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Sample records for rf photo cathode

  1. RF Conditioning of the Photo-Cathode RF Gun at the Advanced Photon Source - NWA RF Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, T. L.; DiMonte, N.; Nassiri, A.; Sun, Y.; Zholents, A.

    2015-01-01

    A new S-band Photo-cathode (PC) gun was recently installed and RF conditioned at the Advanced Photon Source (APS) Injector Test-stand (ITS) at Argonne National Lab (ANL). The APS PC gun is a LCLS type gun fabricated at SLAC [1]. The PC gun was delivered to the APS in October 2013 and installed in the APS ITS in December 2013. At ANL, we developed a new method of fast detection and mitigation of the guns internal arcs during the RF conditioning process to protect the gun from arc damage and to RF condition more efficiently. Here, we report the results of RF measurements for the PC gun and an Auto-Restart method for high power RF conditioning.

  2. Time dependant quantum efficiency and dark current measurements in an RF photocathode injector with a high quantum efficiency cathode

    SciTech Connect

    Fliller, R.P., III; Edwards, H.; Hartung, W.; /Michigan State U., NSCL

    2005-05-01

    Studies of photo-emission and field emission behavior in an RF gun have been carried out. Unexpected phenomena were observed. In situ changes in the cathode's quantum efficiency and dark current with time were seen during operation of the photo-injector. These changes were correlated with the magnetostatic field at the cathode. In addition, multipacting has been observed under certain conditions. Recent measurements indicate a correlation between multipacting and anomalous photo- and field emission behavior.

  3. Progress on diamond amplified photo-cathode

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, E.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Burrill, A.; Kewisch, J.; Chang, X.; Rao, T.; Smedley, J.; Wu, Q.; Muller, E.; Xin, T.

    2011-03-28

    Two years ago, we obtained an emission gain of 40 from the Diamond Amplifier Cathode (DAC) in our test system. In our current systematic study of hydrogenation, the highest gain we registered in emission scanning was 178. We proved that our treatments for improving the diamond amplifiers are reproducible. Upcoming tests planned include testing DAC in a RF cavity. Already, we have designed a system for these tests using our 112 MHz superconducting cavity, wherein we will measure DAC parameters, such as the limit, if any, on emission current density, the bunch charge, and the bunch length. The diamond-amplified photocathode, that promises to support a high average current, low emittance, and a highly stable electron beam with a long lifetime, is under development for an electron source. The diamond, functioning as a secondary emitter amplifies the primary current, with a few KeV energy, that comes from the traditional cathode. Earlier, our group recorded a maximum gain of 40 in the secondary electron emission from a diamond amplifier. In this article, we detail our optimization of the hydrogenation process for a diamond amplifier that resulted in a stable emission gain of 140. We proved that these characteristics are reproducible. We now are designing a system to test the diamond amplifier cathode using an 112MHz SRF gun to measure the limits of the emission current's density, and on the bunch charge and bunch length.

  4. Rf Gun with High-Current Density Field Emission Cathode

    SciTech Connect

    Jay L. Hirshfield

    2005-12-19

    High current-density field emission from an array of carbon nanotubes, with field-emission-transistor control, and with secondary electron channel multiplication in a ceramic facing structure, have been combined in a cold cathode for rf guns and diode guns. Electrodynamic and space-charge flow simulations were conducted to specify the cathode configuration and range of emission current density from the field emission cold cathode. Design of this cathode has been made for installation and testing in an existing S-band 2-1/2 cell rf gun. With emission control and modulation, and with current density in the range of 0.1-1 kA/cm2, this cathode could provide performance and long-life not enjoyed by other currently-available cathodes

  5. Surface Characterization of the LCLS RF Gun Cathode

    SciTech Connect

    Brachmann, Axel; Decker, Franz-Josef; Ding, Yuantao; Dowell, David; Emma, Paul; Frisch, Josef; Gilevich, Sasha; Hays, Gregory; Hering, Philippe; Huang, Zhirong; Iverson, Richard; Loos, Henrik; Miahnahri, Alan; Nordlund, Dennis; Nuhn, Heinz-Dieter; Pianetta, Piero; Turner, James; Welch, James; White, William; Wu, Juhao; Xiang, Dao; /SLAC

    2012-06-25

    The first copper cathode installed in the LCLS RF gun was used during LCLS commissioning for more than a year. However, after high charge operation (> 500 pC), the cathode showed a decline of quantum efficiency within the area of drive laser illumination. They report results of SEM, XPS and XAS studies that were carried out on this cathode after it was removed from the gun. X-ray absorption and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy reveal surface contamination by various hydrocarbon compounds. In addition they report on the performance of the second installed cathode with emphasis on the spatial distribution of electron emission.

  6. L-band RF gun with a thermionic cathode

    SciTech Connect

    Nagaitsev, S.; Andrews, R.; Church, M.; Lunin, A.; Nezhevenko, O.; Solyak, N.; Sun, D.; Yakovlev, V.; /Fermilab

    2008-06-01

    We present a conceptual design for an L-band (1.3 GHz) rf gun with a two-grid thermionic cathode assembly. The rf gun is designed to provide a 9 mA average beam current for 1 ms pulses at a 5 Hz rate. These parameters match the beam requirements for both the ILC and the Fermilab Project X test facilities. In our simulations we are able to attain a full bunch length of 20-30 degrees, while the output energy can vary from 2 to 4 MeV. Simulations as well as a preliminary design will be presented.

  7. A High-Gradient CW R Photo-Cathode Electron Gun for High Current Injectors

    SciTech Connect

    Robert Rimmer

    2005-05-01

    The paper describes the analysis and preliminary design of a high-gradient photo-cathode RF gun optimized for high current CW operation. The gun cell shape is optimized to provide maximum acceleration for the newly emitted beam while minimizing wall losses in the structure. The design is intended for use in future high-current high-power CW FELs but the shape optimization for low wall losses may be advantageous for other applications such as XFELs or Linear Colliders using high peak power low duty factor guns where pulse heating is a limitation. The concept allows for DC bias on the photocathode in order to repel ions and improve cathode lifetime.

  8. RECENT PROGRESS ON THE DIAMOND AMPLIFIED PHOTO-CATHODE EXPERIMENT.

    SciTech Connect

    CHANG,X.; BEN-ZVI, I.; BURRILL, A.; GRIMES, J.; RAO, T.; SEGALOV, Z.; SMEDLEY, J.; WU, Q.

    2007-06-25

    We report recent progress on the Diamond Amplified Photo-cathode (DAP). The use of a pulsed electron gun provides detailed information about the DAP physics. The secondary electron gain has been measured under various electric fields. We have achieved gains of a few hundred in the transmission mode and observed evidence of emission of electrons from the surface. A model based on recombination of electrons and holes during generation well describes the field dependence of the gain. The emittance measurement system for the DAP has been designed, constructed and is ready for use. The capsule design of the DAP is also being studied in parallel.

  9. RF Simulation of the 187 MHz CW Photo-RF Gun Cavity at LBNL

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Tong-Ming

    2008-12-01

    A 187 MHz normal conducting Photo-RF gun cavity is designed for the next generation light sources. The cavity is capable of operating in CW mode. As high as 750 kV gap voltage can be achieved with a 20 MV/m acceleration gradient. The original cavity optimization is conducted using Superfish code (2D) by Staples. 104 vacuum pumping slots are added and evenly spaced over the cavity equator in order to achieve better than 10-10-Tor of vacuum. Two loop couplers will be used to feed RF power into the cavity. 3D simulations are necessary to study effects from the vacuum pumping slots, couplers and possible multipactoring. The cavity geometry is optimized to minimize the power density and avoid multipactoring at operating field level. The vacuum slot dimensions are carefully chosen in consideration of both the vacuum conduction, local power density enhancement and the power attenuation at the getter pumps. This technical note gives a summary of 3D RF simulation results, multipactoring simulations (2D) and preliminary electromagnetic-thermal analysis using ANSYS code.

  10. OBSERVATION OF REPETITION-RATE DEPENDANT EMISSION FROM AN UN-GATED THERMIONIC CATHODE RF GUN

    SciTech Connect

    Edelen, J. P.; Sun, Y.; Harris, J. R.; Lewellen, J. W.

    2016-09-28

    Recent work at Fermilab in collaboration with the Advanced Photon Source and members of other national labs, designed an experiment to study the relationship between the RF repetition rate and the average current per RF pulse. While existing models anticipate a direct relationship between these two parameters we observed an inverse relationship. We believe this is a result of damage to the barium coating on the cathode surface caused by a change in back-bombardment power that is unaccounted for in the existing theories. These observations shed new light on the challenges and fundamental limitations associated with scaling an ungated thermionic cathode RF gun to high average current machines.

  11. Simulations of Field-Emission Electron Beams from CNT Cathodes in RF Photoinjectors

    SciTech Connect

    Mihalcea, Daniel; Faillace, Luigi; Panuganti, Harsha; Thangaraj, Jayakar C.T.; Piot, Philippe

    2015-06-01

    Average field emission currents of up to 700 mA were produced by Carbon Nano Tube (CNT) cathodes in a 1.3 GHz RF gun at Fermilab High Brightness Electron Source Lab. (HBESL). The CNT cathodes were manufactured at Xintek and tested under DC conditions at RadiaBeam. The electron beam intensity as well as the other beam properties are directly related to the time-dependent electric field at the cathode and the geometry of the RF gun. This report focuses on simulations of the electron beam generated through field-emission and the results are compared with experimental measurements. These simulations were performed with the time-dependent Particle In Cell (PIC) code WARP.

  12. Final Technical Report- Back-gate Field Emission-based Cathode RF Electron Gun

    SciTech Connect

    McGuire, Gary; Martin, Allen; Noonan, John

    2010-10-30

    The objective was to complete the design of an electron gun which utilizes a radio frequency (RF) power source to apply a voltage to a field emission (FE) cathode, a so called cold cathode, in order to produce an electron beam. The concept of the RF electron gun was originally conceived at Argonne National Laboratory but never reduced to practice. The research allowed the completion of the design based upon the integration of the FE electron source. Compared to other electron guns, the RF gun is very compact, less than one third the size of other comparable guns, and produces a high energy (to several MeV), high quality, high power electron beam with a long focal length with high repetition rates. The resultant electron gun may be used in welding, materials processing, analytical equipment and waste treatment.

  13. Preliminary calculations of ballistic bunch compression with thermionic cathode rf guns

    SciTech Connect

    Lewellen, J.W.; Milton, S.

    1997-09-01

    Preliminary calculations using the computer code PARMELA indicate that it is possible to achieve peak currents on the order of 1 kA using a thermionic-cathode rf gun and ballistic bunch compression. In contrast to traditional magnetic bunching schemes, ballistic bunch compression uses a series of rf cavities to modify the energy profile of the beam and properly chosen drifts to allow the bunching to occur naturally. The method, suitably modified, should also be directly applicable to photoinjector rf guns. Present work is focusing on simultaneously compressing the bunch while reducing the emittance of the electron beam. At present, the calculated normalized rms emittance is in the neighborhood of 6.8 {pi} mm mrad with a peak current of 0.88 kA, and a peak bunch charge of 0.28 nC from a thermionic-cathode gun.

  14. Femtosecond timing-jitter between photo-cathode laser and ultra-short electron bunches by means of hybrid compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pompili, R.; Anania, M. P.; Bellaveglia, M.; Biagioni, A.; Castorina, G.; Chiadroni, E.; Cianchi, A.; Croia, M.; Di Giovenale, D.; Ferrario, M.; Filippi, F.; Gallo, A.; Gatti, G.; Giorgianni, F.; Giribono, A.; Li, W.; Lupi, S.; Mostacci, A.; Petrarca, M.; Piersanti, L.; Di Pirro, G.; Romeo, S.; Scifo, J.; Shpakov, V.; Vaccarezza, C.; Villa, F.

    2016-08-01

    The generation of ultra-short electron bunches with ultra-low timing-jitter relative to the photo-cathode (PC) laser has been experimentally proved for the first time at the SPARC_LAB test-facility (INFN-LNF, Frascati) exploiting a two-stage hybrid compression scheme. The first stage employs RF-based compression (velocity-bunching), which shortens the bunch and imprints an energy chirp on it. The second stage is performed in a non-isochronous dogleg line, where the compression is completed resulting in a final bunch duration below 90 fs (rms). At the same time, the beam arrival timing-jitter with respect to the PC laser has been measured to be lower than 20 fs (rms). The reported results have been validated with numerical simulations.

  15. Performance of magnesium cathode in the S-band RF gun

    SciTech Connect

    Srinivasan-Rao, T.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Smedley, J.; Wang, X.J.; Woodle, M.; Palmer, D.T.; Miller, R.H.

    1997-05-01

    In this paper, the authors present the preliminary results of the performance of magnesium cathode in a high frequency RF gun. The quantum efficiency of Mg showed a dramatic improvement upon laser cleaning, increasing from 10{sup {minus}5} to 4 {times} 10{sup {minus}4} after two hours of cleaning, and to 2 {times} 10{sup {minus}3} after systematic cleaning. The cleaning procedure for this increase is described in detail. Charge measured as a function of the laser injection phase relative to the RF phase indicates that the temporal variation of the field on the cathode both due to the RF and the shielding effect of the emitted electrons play a critical role in the emission and extraction of electrons. A model that includes this variation is numerically fitted to the measured charge and the results are presented. The unexpected outcome of the fit was the low field enhancement factor (0.1) predicted by the model for the photoemission. The physical origin of this is still under investigation.

  16. Upgrade of X-band thermionic cathode RF gun for Compton scattering X-ray source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taniguchi, Yoshihiro; Sakamoto, Fumito; Natsui, Takuya; Yamamoto, Tomohiko; Hashimoto, Eiko; Lee, KiWoo; Uesaka, Mitsuru; Yoshida, Mitsuhiro; Higo, Toshiyasu; Fukuda, Shigeki; Akemoto, Mitsuo

    2009-09-01

    A Compton scattering X-ray source consisting of an X-band (11.424 GHz) electron linear accelerator (linac) and Q-switched Nd: YAG laser is currently under development at the University of Tokyo. Monochromatic X-rays are required for a variety of medical and biological applications. The X-ray source produces monochromatic X-rays via collision between a 35-MeV multi-bunch (104 bunches in a 1 μs RF pulse) electron beam and 1.4 J/10 ns (532 nm) Nd: YAG laser pulse. The linac uses an X-band 3.5-cell thermionic cathode RF gun and an alpha magnet as an injector. Until now, electron beam generation (2 MeV, 1 pC/bunch at the exit of the injector), beam acceleration, and X-ray generation have been verified. In order to increase X-ray energy and intensity, we have completed the design and construction of a new RF gun with relevant modifications in some structures. In this paper, we describe the details of the concepts of designing a new RF gun and discuss future works.

  17. High Power Experiment of X-Band Thermionic Cathode RF Gun for Compton Scattering X-ray Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakamoto, Fumito; Uesaka, Mitsuru; Dobashi, Katsuhiro; Yamamoto, Tomohiko; Meng, De; Urakawa, Junji; Higo, Toshiyasu; Akemoto, Mitsuo; Matsuo, Kenichi; Sakae, Hisaharu; Yamamoto, Masashi

    2006-11-01

    We are currently developing a compact monochromatic X-ray source based on laser-electron collision. To realize remarkably compact-, high-intensity- and highly-stable-system, we adopt an X-band multi-bunch liner accelerator (linac) and reliable Q-switch laser. The X-ray yields by the multi-bunch electron beam and Q-switch Nd: YAG laser of 1.4 J/10 ns (FWHM) (532 nm, second harmonic) is 107 photons/RF-pulse (108 photons/sec for 10 Hz operation). The injector of the system consists of a 3.5-cell X-band thermionic cathode RF gun and an alpha magnet. So far we have achieved beam generation from the X-band thermionic cathode RF gun. The peak beam energy is 2 MeV. This experimental high energy (˜2 MeV) beam generation from the X-band thermionic cathode RF gun is the first in the world. In this paper, we describe the system of the Compton scattering X-ray source based on the X-band linac, experimental results of X-band thermionic cathode RF gun and the details of the experimental setup for Compton scattering X-ray generation that are under construction.

  18. RF sputtered CuO thin films: Structural, optical and photo-catalytic behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Ghamdi, Attieh A.; Khedr, M. H.; Shahnawaze Ansari, M.; Hasan, P. M. Z.; Abdel-wahab, M. Sh.; Farghali, A. A.

    2016-07-01

    Nanocrystalline CuO thin films were deposited for 600, 1200 and 1800 s on glass substrate using RF magnetron sputtering technique. The films deposited at room temperature were crystalline and showed Tenorite phase of CuO. The increase in average particle size from 6.67 nm to 9.09 nm and the thickness from 160 nm to 490 nm was observed with the increase in deposition time. The optical band gap was decreased from 2.2 eV to 1.73 eV as the film thickness was increased. The intensity of PL peak showed its maximum for the film deposited for 600 s and minimum for 1800 s. Some unusual emission peaks were observed due to the quantization effect and lattice/surface defects. The CuO films with different thicknesses could be used as photo-catalysts for the degradation of Methylene blue (MB) from the wastewater. Under the exposure of 200 W energy of tungsten lamp, CuO thin films showed excellent photo-catalytic activities. CuO thin film of minimum thickness of around 160 nm responded as a best catalyst for MB degradation. The films were very stable and have a speciality to be recycled without much loss of their photo-catalytic activity. These characteristics have proved the high possibility of commercial applications of CuO thin films in environmental remediation.

  19. ANALYTICAL MODELING OF ELECTRON BACK-BOMBARDMENT INDUCED CURRENT INCREASE IN UN-GATED THERMIONIC CATHODE RF GUNS

    SciTech Connect

    Edelen, J. P.; Sun, Y.; Harris, J. R.; Lewellen, J. W.

    2016-09-28

    In this paper we derive analytical expressions for the output current of an un-gated thermionic cathode RF gun in the presence of back-bombardment heating. We provide a brief overview of back-bombardment theory and discuss comparisons between the analytical back-bombardment predictions and simulation models. We then derive an expression for the output current as a function of the RF repetition rate and discuss relationships between back-bombardment, fieldenhancement, and output current. We discuss in detail the relevant approximations and then provide predictions about how the output current should vary as a function of repetition rate for some given system configurations.

  20. Studies of LiCoO x thin film cathodes produced by r.f. sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polo da Fonseca, C. N.; Davalos, J.; Kleinke, M.; Fantini, M. C. A.; Gorenstein, A.

    Thin films of LiCoO x were deposited by r.f. sputtering, from a LiCoO 2 target and in an O 2/Ar atmosphere. The structural properties were studied by XRD and IR, the morphology by AFM and the electrochemical properties by cyclic voltammetry and galvanostatic charge/discharge techniques in 1 M LiClO 4/PC+EC electrolyte. As-grown films were amorphous and presented compact grain morphology. Annealing promotes a melt of the film at 300°C, followed by crystallisation at higher temperatures. The IR and XRD spectrum of films annealed in air showed the same structural reordering above 300°C. The crystalline film has been identified as a mixed LiCoO 2+Li 1.47Co 3O 4 phase. The open circuit potential for both films is 3.45 V. The films can be cycled till ˜4.2 V, but the crystalline structure presents irreversible phase changes, which limits the cyclability of the material. The films are interesting potential materials to be used at cathodes in lithium batteries.

  1. Hydrothermal synthesis and photoelectrochemical performance enhancement of TiO2/graphene composite in photo-generated cathodic protection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Weiwei; Guo, Hanlin; Sun, Haiqing; Zeng, Rong-Chang

    2016-09-01

    TiO2/graphene composites were synthesized through one-step hydrothermal method. The composites show an enhancement in photo-generated cathodic protection as the time-dependent profiles of photocurrent responses has confirmed. XRD data show that a bicrystalline framework of anatase and brookite formed as graphene provided donor groups in the hydrothermal process. The transfer of photoinduced electrons in the biphasic TiO2 results in effective electron-hole separation. Moreover, graphene lead to a negative shift of the Fermi level as evidenced by Mott-Schottky analysis, which decreases the Schottky barrier formed in the TiO2 and 304 stainless steel interface and results in the enhancement of photo-generated cathodic protection.

  2. High Current Density, Long Life Cathodes for High Power RF Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Ives, Robert Lawrence; Collins, George; Falce, Lou; Schwartzkopf, Steve; Busbaher, Daniel

    2014-01-22

    This program was tasked with improving the quality and expanding applications for Controlled Porosity Reservoir (CPR) cathodes. Calabazas Creek Research, Inc. (CCR) initially developed CPR cathodes on a DOE-funded SBIR program to improve cathodes for magnetron injection guns. Subsequent funding was received from the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency. The program developed design requirements for implementation of the technology into high current density cathodes for high frequency applications. During Phase I of this program, CCR was awarded the prestigious 2011 R&D100 award for this technology. Subsequently, the technology was presented at numerous technical conferences. A patent was issued for the technology in 2009. These cathodes are now marketed by Semicon Associates, Inc. in Lexington, KY. They are the world’s largest producer of cathodes for vacuum electron devices. During this program, CCR teamed with Semicon Associates, Inc. and Ron Witherspoon, Inc. to improve the fabrication processes and expand applications for the cathodes. Specific fabrications issues included the quality of the wire winding that provides the basic structure and the sintering to bond the wires into a robust, cohesive structure. The program also developed improved techniques for integrating the resulting material into cathodes for electron guns.

  3. Facile electrochemical polymerization of polypyrrole film applied as cathode material in dual rotating disk photo fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Kan; Zhang, Hongbo; Tang, Tiantian; Tang, Yanping; Wang, Yalin; Jia, Jinping

    2016-08-01

    Polypyrrole (PPy) film is synthesized on Ti substrate through electrochemical polymerization method and is applied as cathode material in a TiO2 NTs-PPy dual rotating disk photo fuel cell (PFC). The optimized PPy electrochemical polymerization is carried out using linear sweep voltammetry from 0 V to 1.2 V (vs. SCE) with scan rate of 0.1 V s-1, 100 circles. Sixty milliliter real textile wastewater with the initial COD and conductivity of 408 ± 6 mgO2 L-1 and 20180 μS cm-1 is treated in this PFC under UV irradiation. About 0.46 V open-circuit voltage (VOC) and 1.8-2.2 mA short-circuit current (JSC) are obtained. Due to the effective electron-hole separation effect, the COD removal rate is as high as 0.0055 min-1. Stable current and COD removal can be obtained at different output voltage. Two influence factors including rotating speed and pH are investigated. Better electricity generation performance and COD removal activity are achieved at high rotating speed and in acidic condition. In comparison with platinized cathode, though VOC is lower, similar JSC is measured. Considering the high cost of Pt, PPy is a promising alternative cathode material in PFC that can also generate electricity efficiently and stably.

  4. Particle-In-Cell/Monte Carlo Simulation of Ion Back BomBardment in a High Average Current RF Photo-Gun

    SciTech Connect

    Qiang, J.

    2009-10-17

    In this paper, we report on study of ion back bombardment in a high average current radio-frequency (RF) photo-gun using a particle-in-cell/Monte Carlo simulation method. Using this method, we systematically studied effects of gas pressure, RF frequency, RF initial phase, electric field profile, magnetic field, laser repetition rate, different ion species on ion particle line density distribution, kinetic energy spectrum, and ion power line density distribution back bombardment onto the photocathode. Those simulation results suggested that effects of ion back bombardment could increase linearly with the background gas pressure and laser repetition rate. The RF frequency has significantly affected the ion motion inside the gun so that the ion power deposition on the photocathode in an RF gun can be several orders of magnitude lower than that in a DC gun. The ion back bombardment can be minimized by appropriately choosing the electric field profile and the initial phase.

  5. Intrinsic emittance reduction of copper cathodes by laser wavelength tuning in an rf photoinjector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Divall, Marta Csatari; Prat, Eduard; Bettoni, Simona; Vicario, Carlo; Trisorio, Alexandre; Schietinger, Thomas; Hauri, Christoph P.

    2015-03-01

    With the improvement of acceleration techniques, the intrinsic emittance of the cathode has a strong impact on the final brightness of a free electron laser. The systematic studies presented in this paper demonstrate for the first time in a radiofrequency photocathode gun a reduction of the intrinsic emittance when tuning the laser photon energies close to the effective work function of copper. The intrinsic emittance was determined by measuring the core slice emittance as a function of the laser beam size at laser wavelengths between 260 and 275 nm. The results are consistent with the measured effective work function of the cathode. Slice emittance values normalized to the laser beam size reached values down to 500 nm /mm , close to that expected from theory. A 20% reduction of the intrinsic emittance was observed over the spectral range of the laser.

  6. Performance analysis of RF-sputtered ZnO/Si heterojunction UV photodetectors with high photo-responsivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Satyendra Kumar; Hazra, Purnima; Tripathi, Shweta; Chakrabarti, P.

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, structural, electrical and ultraviolet photodetection parameters of RF sputtered-ZnO/Si heterojunction diodes are analyzed. In this work, ZnO thin film was deposited on bare Si substrate as well as Si substrate coated with ultrathin ZnO seed layer to exhibit the effect of seed layer on device performance. AFM image of as-grown ZnO films have exhibited the uniform growth ZnO film over the whole Si substrate with average roughness of 3.2 nm and 2.83 nm for ZnO with and without seed layer respectively. Stronger peak intensity along (002) direction, as shown in XRD spectra confirm that ZnO film grown on ZnO seed layer is having more stable wurtzite structure. Ti/Al point contacts were deposited on top of the ZnO film and a layer of Al was deposited on bottom of Si substrate for using as ohmic contacts for further device characterization at dark and under UV light of 365 nm wavelength. This process is repeated for both the films sequentially. The photo-responsivity of our proposed devices is calculated as 0.34 A/W for seed layer-mediated devices and 0.26 A/W for devices without seed layer. These values are very high as compare to the reported value of photo-responsivity for same kind of ZnO/Si heterojunction device prototypes prepared by other techniques.

  7. RF Processing Experience with the GTF Prototype RF Gun

    SciTech Connect

    Schmerge, J.F.

    2010-11-24

    The SSRL Gun Test Facility (GTF) was built to develop a high brightness electron injector for the LCLS and has been operational since 1996. A total of five different metal cathodes (4 Cu and 1 Mg) have been installed on the GTF gun. The rf processing history with the different cathodes will be presented including peak field achieved at the cathode. The LCLS gun is intended to operate at 120 MV/m and fields up to 140 MV/m have been achieved in the GTF gun. After installing a new cathode the number of rf pulses required to reach 120 MV/m is approximately 5-10 million. Total emitted dark current and Fowler Nordheim plots are also shown over the life of the cathode. The GTF photo-injector gun is an S-band standing-wave structure, with two resonant cavities and an intervening thick washer (Figure 1). The flat, back wall of the first cavity is a copper plate that serves as photocathode when illuminated with ultraviolet light from a pulsed, high-power laser. RF power enters the gun through an iris on the outer wall of the second cavity, and is coupled to the first through the axial opening of the washer. The first cavity is often referred to as a half cell, because its full-cell length has been truncated by the cathode plate and the second cavity is called the full cell. The gun is designed to operate in a {pi} mode, with the peak field on axis in each cell approximately equal. The maximum in the half cell occurs at the cathode, and in the full cell near the center of the cavity. The field profile and tuning procedures are discussed in a separate tech note [1].

  8. Characterization and performance of a high-power solid-state laser for a high-current photo-cathode injector

    SciTech Connect

    Shukui Zhang; David Hardy; George Neil; Michelle D. Shinn

    2005-08-21

    We report the characterization and performance of a diode-pumped, high-power, picosecond laser system designed for high-current photo-cathode accelerator injector at repetition rates of both 75MHz and 750MHz. The characterization includes measurement of the amplification gain, thermally induced beam mode variation, harmonic conversion efficiency, system's amplitude stability, beam pointing stability, beam profile, and pulse width for both frequencies.

  9. Sensitive fast electron spectrometer in adjustable triode configuration with pulsed tunable laser for research on photo-induced field emission cathodes

    SciTech Connect

    Mingels, S. Porshyn, V.; Bornmann, B.; Lützenkirchen-Hecht, D.; Müller, G.

    2015-04-15

    We have completed an ultra-high vacuum system for sensitive fast electron spectroscopy from cold cathodes in triode configuration under high electric fields E (<100 MV/m) and pulsed tunable laser illumination (3.5 ns, 10 Hz, hν = 0.5-5.9 eV, and 0.3-17 mJ). The cathodes are prepared and inserted under clean room conditions and can be precisely 3D-positioned, cooled or heated (77-400 K). Commissioning results with the upgraded system are presented. Field emission measurements with a W tip yielded an energy resolution of 14 meV at 4 eV pass energy and a precise determination of the emitter work function, size, and temperature. Photoemission spectroscopy of short electron bunches from a virgin and laser-ablated S-GaP crystal and quantum efficiency measurements revealed surface states, energy relaxation, and band structure effects. In conclusion, this novel system is ready now for the development and characterization of photo-induced field emission cathodes.

  10. Sensitive fast electron spectrometer in adjustable triode configuration with pulsed tunable laser for research on photo-induced field emission cathodes.

    PubMed

    Mingels, S; Porshyn, V; Bornmann, B; Lützenkirchen-Hecht, D; Müller, G

    2015-04-01

    We have completed an ultra-high vacuum system for sensitive fast electron spectroscopy from cold cathodes in triode configuration under high electric fields E (<100 MV/m) and pulsed tunable laser illumination (3.5 ns, 10 Hz, hν = 0.5-5.9 eV, and 0.3-17 mJ). The cathodes are prepared and inserted under clean room conditions and can be precisely 3D-positioned, cooled or heated (77-400 K). Commissioning results with the upgraded system are presented. Field emission measurements with a W tip yielded an energy resolution of 14 meV at 4 eV pass energy and a precise determination of the emitter work function, size, and temperature. Photoemission spectroscopy of short electron bunches from a virgin and laser-ablated S-GaP crystal and quantum efficiency measurements revealed surface states, energy relaxation, and band structure effects. In conclusion, this novel system is ready now for the development and characterization of photo-induced field emission cathodes.

  11. Persistent Hydrogen Production by the Photo-Assisted Microbial Electrolysis Cell Using a p-Type Polyaniline Nanofiber Cathode.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Yongwon; Kim, Sunghyun

    2016-12-08

    A microbial electrolysis cell, though considered as a promising, environmentally friendly technology for hydrogen production, suffers from concomitant production of methane. The high hydrogen/methane ratio at the initial operation stage decreases with time. Here we report for the first time the photoassisted microbial electrolysis cell (MEC) for persistent hydrogen production using polyaniline nanofibers as a cathode. Under 0.8 V external bias and laboratory fluorescent light illumination in a single-chamber MEC, continuous hydrogen production from acetate at a rate of 1.78 mH2 (3)  m(-3)  d(-1) with 79.2 % overall hydrogen recovery was achieved with negligible methane formation for six months. Energy efficiencies based on input electricity as well as input electricity plus substrate were 182 and 66.2 %, respectively. This was attributed to the p-type-semiconductor characteristics of polyaniline nanofibers in which photoexcited electrons are used to reduce protons at the surface and holes are reduced with electrons originating from acetate oxidation at the anode. This method can be extended to microbial wastewater treatment for hydrogen production.

  12. Rf and space-charge induced emittances in laser-driven rf guns

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Kwang-Je; Chen, Yu-Jiuan

    1988-10-01

    Laser-driven rf electron guns are potential sources of high-current, low-emittance, short bunch-length electron beams, which are required for many advanced accelerator applications, such as free-electron lasers and injectors for high-energy machines. In such guns the design of which was pioneered at Los Alamos National Laboratory and which is currently being developed at several other laboratories, a high-power laser beam illuminates a photo-cathode surface placed on an end wall of an rf cavity. The main advantages of this type of gun are that the time structure of the electron beam is controlled by the laser, eliminating the need for bunchers, and that the electric field in rf cavities can be made very strong, so that the effects due to space-charge repulsion can be minimized. In this paper, we present an approximate but simple analysis for the transverse and longitudinal emittances in rf guns that takes into account both the time variation of the rf field and the space-charge effect. The results are compared and found to agree well with those from simulation. 7 refs., 6 figs.

  13. The Superconducting RF Photoinjector at ELBE--First Operational Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Teichert, J.; Arnold, A.; Buettig, H.; Janssen, D.; Justus, M.; Lehnert, U.; Michel, P.; Murcek, P.; Schamlott, A.; Schneider, C.; Schurig, R.; Staufenbiel, F.; Xiang, R.; Kamps, T.; Rudolph, J.; Schenk, M.; Klemz, G.; Will, I.

    2009-08-04

    An RF photoinjector with a superconducting cavity (SRF gun) for installation at the Radiation Source ELBE was developed within a collaboration of BESSY, DESY, FZD, and MBI. This new and promising injector type allows CW operation and has the potential for the production of high-brightness electron beams. The gun cryostat, the electron diagnostic beamline, and the driver laser with optical beamline were installed. In November 2007 the first beam was produced. Results of the beam parameter measurements with Cs{sub 2}Te photo cathodes are presented.

  14. Physical design of FEL injector based on the performance-enhanced EC-ITC RF gun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Tong-Ning; Chen, Qu-Shan; Pei, Yuan-Ji; Li, Ji; Qin, Bin

    2014-01-01

    To meet the requirements of high performance THz-FEL (Free Electron Laser), a compact scheme of FEL injector was proposed. A thermionic cathode was chosen to emit electrons instead of a photo-cathode with its complex structure and high cost. The effective bunch charge was improved to ~200 pC by adopting an enhanced EC-ITC (External Cathode Independently Tunable Cells) RF gun to extract micro-bunches; back bombardment effects were almost eliminated as well. Constant gradient accelerator structures were designed to improve energy to ~14 MeV, while the focusing system was applied for emittance suppressing and bunch state maintenance. The physical design and beam dynamics of the key components for the FEL injector were analyzed. Furthermore, start-to-end simulations with multi-pulses were performed using homemade MATLAB and Parmela. The results show that continual high brightness electron bunches with a low energy spread and emittance could be obtained stably.

  15. Porous NASICON-Type Li3Fe2(PO4)3 Thin Film Deposited by RF Sputtering as Cathode Material for Li-Ion Microbatteries.

    PubMed

    Sugiawati, Vinsensia Ade; Vacandio, Florence; Eyraud, Marielle; Knauth, Philippe; Djenizian, Thierry

    2016-12-01

    We report the electrochemical performance of porous NASICON-type Li3Fe2(PO4)3 thin films to be used as a cathode for Li-ion microbatteries. Crystalline porous NASICON-type Li3Fe2(PO4)3 layers were obtained by radio frequency sputtering with an annealing treatment. The thin films were characterized by XRD, SEM, and electrochemical techniques. The chronoamperometry experiments showed that a discharge capacity of 88 mAhg(-1) (23 μAhcm(-2)) is attained for the first cycle at C/10 to reach 65 mAhg(-1) (17 μAhcm(-2)) after 10 cycles with a good stability over 40 cycles.

  16. Electron Source based on Superconducting RF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xin, Tianmu

    High-bunch-charge photoemission electron-sources operating in a Continuous Wave (CW) mode can provide high peak current as well as the high average current which are required for many advanced applications of accelerators facilities, for example, electron coolers for hadron beams, electron-ion colliders, and Free-Electron Lasers (FELs). Superconducting Radio Frequency (SRF) has many advantages over other electron-injector technologies, especially when it is working in CW mode as it offers higher repetition rate. An 112 MHz SRF electron photo-injector (gun) was developed at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) to produce high-brightness and high-bunch-charge bunches for electron cooling experiments. The gun utilizes a Quarter-Wave Resonator (QWR) geometry for a compact structure and improved electron beam dynamics. The detailed RF design of the cavity, fundamental coupler and cathode stalk are presented in this work. A GPU accelerated code was written to improve the speed of simulation of multipacting, an important hurdle the SRF structure has to overcome in various locations. The injector utilizes high Quantum Efficiency (QE) multi-alkali photocathodes (K2CsSb) for generating electrons. The cathode fabrication system and procedure are also included in the thesis. Beam dynamic simulation of the injector was done with the code ASTRA. To find the optimized parameters of the cavities and beam optics, the author wrote a genetic algorithm Python script to search for the best solution in this high-dimensional parameter space. The gun was successfully commissioned and produced world record bunch charge and average current in an SRF photo-injector.

  17. RF Gun Optimization Study

    SciTech Connect

    Alicia Hofler; Pavel Evtushenko

    2007-07-03

    Injector gun design is an iterative process where the designer optimizes a few nonlinearly interdependent beam parameters to achieve the required beam quality for a particle accelerator. Few tools exist to automate the optimization process and thoroughly explore the parameter space. The challenging beam requirements of new accelerator applications such as light sources and electron cooling devices drive the development of RF and SRF photo injectors. A genetic algorithm (GA) has been successfully used to optimize DC photo injector designs at Cornell University [1] and Jefferson Lab [2]. We propose to apply GA techniques to the design of RF and SRF gun injectors. In this paper, we report on the initial phase of the study where we model and optimize a system that has been benchmarked with beam measurements and simulation.

  18. Diphtheria Photos

    MedlinePlus

    ... Whooping cough Influenza (flu) Rabies Yellow fever Diphtheria Photos Photographs accompanied by text that reads "Courtesy of . . . " ... source (not IAC) for permission to reprint copyrighted photos. Warning : Some of these photos are quite graphic. ...

  19. Meningococcal Photos

    MedlinePlus

    ... Podcast: Meningitis Immunization for Adolescents Meningitis Sepsis Meningococcal Photos Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir WARNING : Some of these photos might be unsuitable for children. Viewing discretion is ...

  20. Ion bombardment in RF photoguns

    SciTech Connect

    Pozdeyev,E.; Kayran, D.; Litvinenko, V. N.

    2009-05-04

    A linac-ring eRHIC design requires a high-intensity CW source of polarized electrons. An SRF gun is viable option that can deliver the required beam. Numerical simulations presented elsewhere have shown that ion bombardment can occur in an RF gun, possibly limiting lifetime of a NEA GaAs cathode. In this paper, we analytically solve the equations of motion of ions in an RF gun using the ponderomotive potential of the Rf field. We apply the method to the BNL 1/2-cell SRF photogun and demonstrate that a significant portion of ions produced in the gun can reach the cathode if no special precautions are taken. Also, the paper discusses possible mitigation techniques that can reduce the rate of ion bombardment.

  1. The RF Design of an HOM Polarized RF Gun for the ILC

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, J.W.; Clendenin, J.E.; Colby, E.R.; Miller, R.A.; Lewellen, J.W.; /Argonne

    2006-11-15

    The ILC requires a polarized electron beam. While a highly polarized beam can be produced by a GaAs-type cathode in a DC gun of the type currently in use at SLAC, JLAB and elsewhere, the ILC injector system can be simplified and made more efficient if a GaAs-type cathode can be combined with a low emittance RF gun. Since this type of cathode is known to be extremely sensitive to vacuum contamination including back bombardment by electrons and ions, any successful polarized RF gun must have a significantly improved operating vacuum compared to existing RF guns. We present a new RF design for an L-Band normal conducting (NC) RF gun for the ILC polarized electron source. This design incorporates a higher order mode (HOM) structure, whose chief virtue in this application is an improved conductance for vacuum pumping on the cathode. Computer simulation models have been used to optimize the RF parameters with two principal goals: first to minimize the required RF power; second to reduce the peak surface field relative to the field at the cathode in order to suppress field emitted electron bombardment. The beam properties have been simulated initially using PARMELA. Vacuum and other practical issues for implementing this design are discussed.

  2. Mumps Photos

    MedlinePlus

    ... Links World Health Organization Medline Plus Photos of Mumps Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Photos of Mumps Virus and People Affected by Mumps Español: ...

  3. Study of electron current extraction from a radio frequency plasma cathode designed as a neutralizer for ion source applications.

    PubMed

    Jahanbakhsh, Sina; Satir, Mert; Celik, Murat

    2016-02-01

    Plasma cathodes are insert free devices that are developed to be employed as electron sources in electric propulsion and ion source applications as practical alternatives to more commonly used hollow cathodes. Inductively coupled plasma cathodes, or Radio Frequency (RF) plasma cathodes, are introduced in recent years. Because of its compact geometry, and simple and efficient plasma generation, RF plasma source is considered to be suitable for plasma cathode applications. In this study, numerous RF plasma cathodes have been designed and manufactured. Experimental measurements have been conducted to study the effects of geometric and operational parameters. Experimental results of this study show that the plasma generation and electron extraction characteristics of the RF plasma cathode device strongly depend on the geometric parameters such as chamber diameter, chamber length, orifice diameter, orifice length, as well as the operational parameters such as RF power and gas mass flow rate.

  4. Study of electron current extraction from a radio frequency plasma cathode designed as a neutralizer for ion source applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jahanbakhsh, Sina; Satir, Mert; Celik, Murat

    2016-02-01

    Plasma cathodes are insert free devices that are developed to be employed as electron sources in electric propulsion and ion source applications as practical alternatives to more commonly used hollow cathodes. Inductively coupled plasma cathodes, or Radio Frequency (RF) plasma cathodes, are introduced in recent years. Because of its compact geometry, and simple and efficient plasma generation, RF plasma source is considered to be suitable for plasma cathode applications. In this study, numerous RF plasma cathodes have been designed and manufactured. Experimental measurements have been conducted to study the effects of geometric and operational parameters. Experimental results of this study show that the plasma generation and electron extraction characteristics of the RF plasma cathode device strongly depend on the geometric parameters such as chamber diameter, chamber length, orifice diameter, orifice length, as well as the operational parameters such as RF power and gas mass flow rate.

  5. Study of electron current extraction from a radio frequency plasma cathode designed as a neutralizer for ion source applications

    SciTech Connect

    Jahanbakhsh, Sina Satir, Mert; Celik, Murat

    2016-02-15

    Plasma cathodes are insert free devices that are developed to be employed as electron sources in electric propulsion and ion source applications as practical alternatives to more commonly used hollow cathodes. Inductively coupled plasma cathodes, or Radio Frequency (RF) plasma cathodes, are introduced in recent years. Because of its compact geometry, and simple and efficient plasma generation, RF plasma source is considered to be suitable for plasma cathode applications. In this study, numerous RF plasma cathodes have been designed and manufactured. Experimental measurements have been conducted to study the effects of geometric and operational parameters. Experimental results of this study show that the plasma generation and electron extraction characteristics of the RF plasma cathode device strongly depend on the geometric parameters such as chamber diameter, chamber length, orifice diameter, orifice length, as well as the operational parameters such as RF power and gas mass flow rate.

  6. Cathodic arcs

    SciTech Connect

    Anders, Andre

    2003-10-29

    Cathodic arc plasma deposition has become the technology of choice for hard, wear and corrosion resistant coatings for a variety of applications. The history, basic physics of cathodic arc operation, the infamous macroparticle problem and common filter solutions, and emerging high-tech applications are briefly reviewed. Cathodic arc plasmas standout due to their high degree of ionization, with important consequences for film nucleation, growth, and efficient utilization of substrate bias. Industrial processes often use cathodic arc plasma in reactive mode. In contrast, the science of arcs has focused on the case of vacuum arcs. Future research directions include closing the knowledge gap for reactive mode, large area coating, linear sources and filters, metal plasma immersion process, with application in high-tech and biomedical fields.

  7. Performance of Synchronization and Emittance of the Mg cathode photoinjector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iijima, H.; Uesaka, M.; Ueda, T.; Sakumi, A.; Muroya, Y.

    2004-12-01

    Mg cathode photoinjector has been stably operating for three years mainly for radiation chemistry analysis. Generally a combination of the photocathode RF injector as a source of pump-beam and the femtosecond laser as one of probe-laser realizes this technique. Especially, the chemical reactions of hot, room temperature and critical water in a time-range of picosecond and sub-picosecond are very interesting phenomena. The important factor for such as the fast radiation chemistry is not only the pulse duration of beam and laser but also the synchronization between the pump-beam and probe-laser. For the experiments of radiation chemistry, the photoinjector, in which the driven laser synchronized with the probe-laser illuminates the photo-cathode, is normally utilized with a accelerating structure and a magnetic bunch compressor such as chicane-type magnets. Although this short bunch and 100 fs laser light are enough to perform the experiment of radiation chemistry in the time-range of sub-picosecond, the instability of synchronization reduced the total time-resolution. The main source was not the synchronization of the driven- and probe-laser but that of laser and radio frequency. The stability of laser depends on environmental factors: The fluctuation of room temperature causes the instability. Now we have recognized that 0.5 degree (peak-to-peak) fluctuation of the laser-room temperature had approximately corresponded to the instability of 10 ps. This timing-drift is a period of 1 hour roughly. In addition, the cathode damage and emittance evaluation are represented.

  8. Hib Photos

    MedlinePlus

    ... Children’s Immunization Project, St. Paul, Minnesota Cerebrospinal fluid culture positive for Haemophilus influenzae , type b (Gram stain) ... b. Cellulitis of the arm proven by blood culture www.vaccineinformation.org/photos/hib_aap002.jpg Copyright ...

  9. X-Band RF Gun Development

    SciTech Connect

    Vlieks, Arnold; Dolgashev, Valery; Tantawi, Sami; Anderson, Scott; Hartemann, Fred; Marsh, Roark; /LLNL, Livermore

    2012-06-22

    In support of the MEGa-ray program at LLNL and the High Gradient research program at SLAC, a new X-band multi-cell RF gun is being developed. This gun, similar to earlier guns developed at SLAC for Compton X-ray source program, will be a standing wave structure made of 5.5 cells operating in the pi mode with copper cathode. This gun was designed following criteria used to build SLAC X-band high gradient accelerating structures. It is anticipated that this gun will operate with surface electric fields on the cathode of 200 MeV/m with low breakdown rate. RF will be coupled into the structure through a final cell with symmetric duel feeds and with a shape optimized to minimize quadrupole field components. In addition, geometry changes to the original gun, operated with Compton X-ray source, will include a wider RF mode separation, reduced surface electric and magnetic fields.

  10. RF transformer

    DOEpatents

    Smith, James L.; Helenberg, Harold W.; Kilsdonk, Dennis J.

    1979-01-01

    There is provided an improved RF transformer having a single-turn secondary of cylindrical shape and a coiled encapsulated primary contained within the secondary. The coil is tapered so that the narrowest separation between the primary and the secondary is at one end of the coil. The encapsulated primary is removable from the secondary so that a variety of different capacity primaries can be utilized with one secondary.

  11. Fabrication, Tuning, Treatment and Testing of Two 3.5 Cell Photo-Injector Cavities for the ELBE Linac

    SciTech Connect

    Arnold, A.; Murcek, P.; Teichert, J.; Xiang, R.; Eremeev, G. V.; Kneisel, P.; Stirbet, M.; Turlington, L.

    2011-07-01

    As part of a CRADA (Cooperative Research and Development Agreement) between Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR) and Thomas Jefferson Lab National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF) we have fabricated and tested two 1.3 GHz 3.5 cell photo-injector cavities from polycrystalline RRR niobium and large grain RRR niobium, respectively. The cavity with the better performance will replace the presently used injector cavity in the ELBE linac. The cavities have been fabricated and pre-tuned at TJNAF, while the more sophisticated final field tuning, the adjustment of the external couplings and the field profile measurement of transverse electric modes for RF focusing was done at HZDR. The following standard surface treatment and the vertical test was carried out at TJNAF's production facilities. A major challenge turned out to be the rinsing of the cathode cell, which has small opening (O-slash10mm) to receive the cathode stalk. Another unexpected problem encountered after etching, since large visible defects appeared in the least accessible cathode cell. This contribution reports about our experiences, initial results and the on-going diagnostic work to understand and fix the problems.

  12. Investigation of the Stability of the RF Gun of the SSRL Injector System

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, J

    2004-02-05

    In the previous three years, Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (SSRL) has experienced electron beam instabilities in the injector system of the Stanford Positron Electron Asymmetric Ring (SPEAR). Currently, for approximately the past four months the radio frequency (RF) gun of the linear accelerator injector system of the SPEAR at SSRL has become increasingly unstable. The current of the RF gun has become progressively sluggish and the lifetime of the cathode within the RF gun has been much shorter than expected. The cathode also sustains many unexplained damages. The instability of the RF gun affects the entire operation of SPEAR, creating substantial inconvenience. Through mechanical, design, and procedural analysis of the RF gun and the cathode that emits the electron beam of the linear accelerator, a solution to prolong the life of the cathode and secure the stability of the gun can be found. The thorough analysis of the gun and cathode involves investigation into the history of cathode installation and removal through the years of SPEAR operation as well as interviews with SSRL personnel involved with the upkeep of the gun and cathode. From speaking with SSRL employees and reviewing several articles many possible causes for beam instability were presented. The most likely cause of the SSRL gun instability is excessive back bombardment that can be attributed to running the cathode at too high a temperature.

  13. Initial measurements of the UCLA rf photoinjector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartman, S. C.; Barov, N.; Pellegrini, C.; Park, S.; Rosenzweig, J.; Travish, G.; Zhang, R.; Clayton, C.; Davis, P.; Everett, M.; Joshi, C.; Hairapetian, G.

    1994-02-01

    The 1.5 cell standing wave rf photoinjector has been operated for the past several months using a copper cathode. The photoinjector drive laser produces sub 2 ps pulses of UV (λ = 266 nm) light with up to 200 μJ/pulse which generates up to 3 nC of charge. The emittance of the photoinjector was measured as a function of charge, rf launching phase, and peak accelerating field. Also, the quantum efficiency and pulse lengths of the laser beam and the electron beam were measured.

  14. Photo, thermal and chemical degradation of riboflavin

    PubMed Central

    Kazi, Sadia Hafeez; Ahmed, Sofia; Anwar, Zubair; Ahmad, Iqbal

    2014-01-01

    Summary Riboflavin (RF), also known as vitamin B2, belongs to the class of water-soluble vitamins and is widely present in a variety of food products. It is sensitive to light and high temperature, and therefore, needs a consideration of these factors for its stability in food products and pharmaceutical preparations. A number of other factors have also been identified that affect the stability of RF. These factors include radiation source, its intensity and wavelength, pH, presence of oxygen, buffer concentration and ionic strength, solvent polarity and viscosity, and use of stabilizers and complexing agents. A detailed review of the literature in this field has been made and all those factors that affect the photo, thermal and chemical degradation of RF have been discussed. RF undergoes degradation through several mechanisms and an understanding of the mode of photo- and thermal degradation of RF may help in the stabilization of the vitamin. A general scheme for the photodegradation of RF is presented. PMID:25246959

  15. A demonstration of ultra-high time resolution with a pulse-dilation photo-multiplier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hares, J. D.; Dymoke-Bradshaw, A. K. L.; Hilsabeck, T. J.; Kilkenny, J. D.; Morris, D.; Horsfield, C. J.; Gales, S. G.; Milnes, J.; Herrmann, H. W.; McFee, C.

    2016-05-01

    A novel microchannel plate (MCP) intensified high-speed photo-multiplier tube making use of pulse-dilation[1] has been tested. A ramped photo-cathode voltage followed by a relatively long drift region results in a transit time which is dependent on the photo-electron birth time. This leads to temporal magnification or dilation, so providing an enhancement in time resolution of the optical signal with respect to the electrical signal at the output anode. By this means a time resolution on the order of picoseconds may be realized with a substantially slower oscilloscope. The photo-electron signal is guided from a photo-cathode to an MCP by an axial magnetic field and a short input record length is stretched by a factor up to 40X to yield significantly improved time resolution at the photo-cathode. Results of the first measurements are presented.

  16. High pulse power rf sources for linear colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, P.B.

    1983-09-01

    RF sources with high peak power output and relatively short pulse lengths will be required for future high gradient e/sup +/e/sup -/ linear colliders. The required peak power and pulse length depend on the operating frequency, energy gradient and geometry of the collider linac structure. The frequency and gradient are in turn constrained by various parameters which depend on the beam-beam collision dynamics, and on the total ac wall-plug power that has been committed to the linac rf system. Various rf sources which might meet these requirements are reviewed. Existing source types (e.g., klystrons, gyrotrons) and sources which show future promise based on experimental prototypes are first considered. Finally, several proposals for high peak power rf sources based on unconventional concepts are discussed. These are an FEL source (two beam accelerator), rf energy storage cavities with switching, and a photocathode device which produces an rf current by direct emission modulation of the cathode.

  17. Numerical simulation of the sustaining discharge in radio frequency hollow cathode discharge in argon

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Xin-Xian; He, Feng Ouyang, Ji-Ting; Chen, Qiang Ge, Teng

    2014-03-15

    In this paper, a two-dimensional fluid model was developed to study the radio frequency (RF) hollow cathode discharge (HCD) in argon at 1 Torr. The evolutions of the particle density distribution and the ionization rate distribution in RF HCD at 13.56 MHz indicate that the discharge mainly occurs inside the hollow cathode. The spatio-temporal distributions of the ionization rate and the power deposition within the hollow cathode imply that sheath oscillation heating is the primary mechanism to sustain the RF HCD, whereas secondary electron emission plays a negligible role. However, as driving frequency decreases, secondary electron heating becomes a dominant mechanism to sustain the discharge in RF hollow cathode.

  18. Elastomeric Cathode Binder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yen, S. P. S.; Shen, D. S.; Somoano, R. B.

    1985-01-01

    Soluble copolymer binder mixed with cathode material and solvent forms flexible porous cathode used in lithium and Ni/Cd batteries. Cathodes prepared by this process have lower density due to expanding rubbery binder and greater flexibility than conventional cathodes. Fabrication procedure readily adaptable to scaled-up processes.

  19. Creating Photo Illustrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Bradley

    2003-01-01

    Explains the uses of photo illustrations. Notes that the key to developing a successful photo illustration is collaborative planning. Outlines the following guidelines for photo illustrations: never set up a photograph to mimic reality; create only abstractions with photo illustrations; clearly label photo illustrations; and never play photo…

  20. Sources of Emittance in RF Photocathode Injectors

    SciTech Connect

    Dowell, David

    2016-12-11

    Advances in electron beam technology have been central to creating the current generation of x-ray free electron lasers and ultra-fast electron microscopes. These once exotic devices have become essential tools for basic research and applied science. One important beam technology for both is the electron source which, for many of these instruments, is the photocathode RF gun. The invention of the photocathode gun and the concepts of emittance compensation and beam matching in the presence of space charge and RF forces have made these high-quality beams possible. Achieving even brighter beams requires a taking a finer resolution view of the electron dynamics near the cathode during photoemission and the initial acceleration of the beam. In addition, the high brightness beam is more sensitive to degradation by the optical aberrations of the gun’s RF and magnetic lenses. This paper discusses these topics including the beam properties due to fundamental photoemission physics, space charge effects close to the cathode, and optical distortions introduced by the RF and solenoid fields. Analytic relations for these phenomena are derived and compared with numerical simulations.

  1. ILC @ SLAC R&D Program for a Polarized RF Gun

    SciTech Connect

    Clendenin, J.E.; Brachman, A.; Dowell, D.H.; Garwin, E.L.; Ioakemidi, K.; Kirby, R.E.; Maruyama, T.; Miller, R.A.; Prescott, C.Y.; Wang, J.W.; Lewellen, J.W.; Prepost, R.; /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2006-01-25

    Photocathode rf guns produce high-energy low-emittance electron beams. DC guns utilizing GaAs photocathodes have proven successful for generating polarized electron beams for accelerators, but they require rf bunching systems that significantly increase the transverse emittance of the beam. With higher extraction field and beam energy, rf guns can support higher current densities at the cathode. The source laser system can then be used to generate the high peak current, relatively low duty-factor micropulses required by the ILC without the need for post-extraction rf bunching. The net result is that the injection system for a polarized rf gun can be identical to that for an unpolarized rf gun. However, there is some uncertainty as to the survivability of an activated GaAs cathode in the environment of an operating rf gun. Consequently, before attempting to design a polarized rf gun for the ILC, SLAC plans to develop an rf test gun to demonstrate the rf operating conditions suitable for an activated GaAs cathode.

  2. RF micro-discharge thruster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunaevsky, Alexander; Fisch, Nathaniel

    2004-11-01

    Propulsion devices for spacecrafts with masses of several tens to one hundred kilograms are in an increasing demand. These devices should provide thrust of a few mN and specific impulse of about 1000 s at the total power consumption of several tens of W. In search of an alternative solution for lower power range, we investigated an rf discharge initiated in a sub-millimeter capillary fed by a gaseous propellant. In such a discharge, it is possible to heat plasma electrons up to temperatures of ˜ 20-30 eV. Steep density drop at the open end of the capillary should be a reason of the formation of a double layer, were the discharge ions are accelerated to energies of ˜5Te. A laboratory prototype demonstrated stable operation at the argon flow rate of 4-10 sccm. The discharge was powered by a 2 MHz rf generator. Power consumption of the discharge was about 16 W. Ionization rate was moderate due to nonoptimal electrode configuration, which resulted in the propellant utilization of 6-11%. Relatively wide plume angle of ˜130 degrees indicates that the acceleration region is placed outside the capillary and has a convex shape. Stability and parameters of the discharge depends on the material of the capillary channel. Among advantages of the rf micro-discharge thruster are simplicity, small size, and absence of cathode-neutralizer. Being optimized, the rf micro-discharge thruster seems very promising propulsion device for sub-mN thrust range.

  3. Cathodic protection

    SciTech Connect

    Pfalser, I.L.; Brannan, M.S.

    1991-08-20

    This patent describes a cathodic protection system for protecting a metallic structure in contact with the earth from corrosion. It comprises at least one electrically conductive member positioned in a borehole in the earth which is defined by an earthen sidewall: a quantity of a particulate mixture of a clay and a carbonaceous solid which at least partially fills the borehole around the at least one conductive member such that the mixture contacts the earthen sidewall and the at least one conductive member, wherein the mixture has a clay to carbonaceous solid weight ratio of at least about 0.1:1; means for applying a DC electrical voltage to the metallic structure and the at least one conductive member such that the metallic structure is at a negative polarity and the at least one conductive member is at a positive polarity, whereby a current is established between the metallic structure and the at least one conductive member through the earth and the mixture.

  4. Nanotube cathodes.

    SciTech Connect

    Overmyer, Donald L.; Lockner, Thomas Ramsbeck; Siegal, Michael P.; Miller, Paul Albert

    2006-11-01

    Carbon nanotubes have shown promise for applications in many diverse areas of technology. In this report we describe our efforts to develop high-current cathodes from a variety of nanotubes deposited under a variety of conditions. Our goal was to develop a one-inch-diameter cathode capable of emitting 10 amperes of electron current for one second with an applied potential of 50 kV. This combination of current and pulse duration significantly exceeds previously reported nanotube-cathode performance. This project was planned for two years duration. In the first year, we tested the electron-emission characteristics of nanotube arrays fabricated under a variety of conditions. In the second year, we planned to select the best processing conditions, to fabricate larger cathode samples, and to test them on a high-power relativistic electron beam generator. In the first year, much effort was made to control nanotube arrays in terms of nanotube diameter and average spacing apart. When the project began, we believed that nanotubes approximately 10 nm in diameter would yield sufficient electron emission properties, based on the work of others in the field. Therefore, much of our focus was placed on measured field emission from such nanotubes grown on a variety of metallized surfaces and with varying average spacing between individual nanotubes. We easily reproduced the field emission properties typically measured by others from multi-wall carbon nanotube arrays. Interestingly, we did this without having the helpful vertical alignment to enhance emission; our nanotubes were randomly oriented. The good emission was most likely possible due to the improved crystallinity, and therefore, electrical conductivity, of our nanotubes compared to those in the literature. However, toward the end of the project, we learned that while these 10-nm-diameter CNTs had superior crystalline structure to the work of others studying field emission from multi-wall CNT arrays, these nanotubes still

  5. Recycler barrier RF buckets

    SciTech Connect

    Bhat, C.M.; /Fermilab

    2011-03-01

    The Recycler Ring at Fermilab uses a barrier rf systems for all of its rf manipulations. In this paper, I will give an overview of historical perspective on barrier rf system, the longitudinal beam dynamics issues, aspects of rf linearization to produce long flat bunches and methods used for emittance measurements of the beam in the RR barrier rf buckets. Current rf manipulation schemes used for antiproton beam stacking and longitudinal momentum mining of the RR beam for the Tevatron collider operation are explained along with their importance in spectacular success of the Tevatron luminosity performance.

  6. High-Current Cold Cathode Employing Diamond and Related Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Hirshfield, Jay L.

    2014-10-22

    The essence of this project was for diamond films to be deposited on cold cathodes to improve their emission properties. Films with varying morphology, composition, and size of the crystals were deposited and the emission properties of the cathodes that utilize such films were studied. The prototype cathodes fabricated by the methods developed during Phase I were tested and evaluated in an actual high-power RF device during Phase II. These high-power tests used the novel active RF pulse compression system and the X-band magnicon test facility at US Naval Research Laboratory. In earlier tests, plasma switches were employed, while tests under this project utilized electron-beam switching. The intense electron beams required in the switches were supplied from cold cathodes embodying diamond films with varying morphology, including uncoated molybdenum cathodes in the preliminary tests. Tests with uncoated molybdenum cathodes produced compressed X-band RF pulses with a peak power of 91 MW, and a maximum power gain of 16.5:1. Tests were also carried out with switches employing diamond coated cathodes. The pulse compressor was based on use of switches employing electron beam triggering to effect mode conversion. In experimental tests, the compressor produced 165 MW in a ~ 20 ns pulse at ~18× power gain and ~ 140 MW at ~ 16× power gain in a 16 ns pulse with a ~ 7 ns flat-top. In these tests, molybdenum blade cathodes with thin diamond coatings demonstrated good reproducible emission uniformity with a 100 kV, 100 ns high voltage pulse. The new compressor does not have the limitations of earlier types of active pulse compressors and can operate at significantly higher electric fields without breakdown.

  7. Sintered wire cathode

    DOEpatents

    Falce, Louis R.; Ives, R. Lawrence

    2009-06-09

    A porous cathode structure is fabricated from a plurality of wires which are placed in proximity to each other in elevated temperature and pressure for a sintering time. The sintering process produces the porous cathode structure which may be divided into a plurality of individual porous cathodes, one of which may be placed into a dispenser cathode support which includes a cavity for containing a work function reduction material such as BaO, CaO, and Al.sub.2O.sub.3. The work function reduction material migrates through the pores of the porous cathode from a work replenishment surface adjacent to the cavity of the dispenser cathode support to an emitting cathode surface, thereby providing a dispenser cathode which has a uniform work function and therefore a uniform electron emission.

  8. Pressed boride cathodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolski, W.

    1985-01-01

    Results of experimental studies of emission cathodes made from lanthanum, yttrium, and gadolinium hexaborides are presented. Maximum thermal emission was obtained from lanthanum hexaboride electrodes. The hexaboride cathodes operated stably under conditions of large current density power draw, at high voltages and poor vacuum. A microtron electron gun with a lanthanum hexaboride cathode is described.

  9. Criteria of radio-frequency ring-shaped hollow cathode discharge using H{sub 2} and Ar gases for plasma processing

    SciTech Connect

    Ohtsu, Yasunori; Kawasaki, Yujiro

    2013-01-21

    In order to achieve high-density capacitively coupled plasma, a radio-frequency (RF) ring-shaped hollow cathode discharge has been developed as a candidate for processing plasma sources. The plasma density in the hollow cathode discharge reaches a high magnitude of 10{sup 10}-10{sup 11} cm{sup -3}. The RF ring-shaped hollow cathode discharge depends on the pressure and mass of the working gas. Criteria required for producing a RF ring-shaped hollow cathode discharge have been investigated for various gas pressures using H{sub 2} and Ar gases for high-density plasma production. The results reveal that the criteria for the occurrence of the hollow cathode effect are that the trench width should be approximately equal to the sum of the electron-neutral mean free paths and twice the sheath thickness of the RF powered electrode.

  10. Rf feedback free electron laser

    DOEpatents

    Brau, C.A.; Swenson, D.A.; Boyd, T.J. Jr.

    1979-11-02

    A free electron laser system and electron beam system for a free electron laser are provided which use rf feedback to enhance efficiency. Rf energy is extracted from an electron beam by decelerating cavities and returned to accelerating cavities using rf returns such as rf waveguides, rf feedthroughs, etc. This rf energy is added to rf klystron energy to lower the required input energy and thereby enhance energy efficiency of the system.

  11. Rf Feedback free electron laser

    DOEpatents

    Brau, Charles A.; Swenson, Donald A.; Boyd, Jr., Thomas J.

    1981-01-01

    A free electron laser system and electron beam system for a free electron laser which use rf feedback to enhance efficiency. Rf energy is extracted from an electron beam by decelerating cavities and returned to accelerating cavities using rf returns such as rf waveguides, rf feedthroughs, etc. This rf energy is added to rf klystron energy to lower the required input energy and thereby enhance energy efficiency of the system.

  12. Meningococcus Disease Photos

    MedlinePlus

    ... of hands and lower extremities due to meningococcemia http://www.vaccineinformation.org/photos/menicdc001.jpg Courtesy Centers ... female with gangrene of feet due to meningococcemia http://www.vaccineinformation.org/photos/menicdc002.jpg Courtesy Centers ...

  13. Tetanus (Lockjaw) Photos

    MedlinePlus

    ... Vaccination Maternal and Neonatal Tetanus Elimination Tetanus (Lockjaw) Photos Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir WARNING: Some ... be unsuitable for children. Viewing discretion is advised. Photos of the Disease and Images of People Affected ...

  14. Photos of Shingles

    MedlinePlus

    ... on Shingles Immunization Action Coalition Chickenpox Q&As Photos of Shingles Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir ... be unsuitable for children. Viewing discretion is advised. Photos of People with Shingles Shingles rash on the ...

  15. DESIGN OF A DC/RF PHOTOELECTRON GUN.

    SciTech Connect

    YU,D.NEWSHAM,Y.SMIRONOV,A.YU,J.SMEDLEY,J.SRINIVASAN RAU,T.LEWELLEN,J.ZHOLENTS,A.

    2003-05-12

    An integrated dc/rf photoelectron gun produces a low-emittance beam by first rapidly accelerating electrons at a high gradient during a short ({approx}1 ns), high-voltage pulse, and then injecting the electrons into an rf cavity for subsequent acceleration. Simulations show that significant improvement of the emittance appears when a high field ({approx} 0.5-1 GV/m) is applied to the cathode surface. An adjustable dc gap ({le} 1 mm) which can be integrated with an rf cavity is designed for initial testing at the Injector Test Stand at Argonne National Laboratory using an existing 70-kV pulse generator. Plans for additional experiments of an integrated dc/rf gun with a 250-kV pulse generator are being made.

  16. RF Design of the LCLS Gun

    SciTech Connect

    Limborg-Deprey, C

    2010-12-13

    Final dimensions for the LCLS RF gun are described. This gun, referred to as the LCLS gun, is a modified version of the UCLA/BNL/SLAC 1.6 cell S-Band RF gun [1], referred to as the prototype gun. The changes include a larger mode separation (15 MHz for the LCLS gun vs. 3.5 MHz for the prototype gun), a larger radius at the iris between the 2 cells, a reduced surface field on the curvature of the iris between the two cells, Z power coupling, increased cooling channels for operation at 120 Hz, dual rf feed, deformation tuning of the full cell, and field probes in both cells. Temporal shaping of the klystron pulse, to reduce the average power dissipated in the gun, has also been adopted. By increasing the mode separation, the amplitude of the 0-mode electric field on the cathode decreases from 10% of the peak on axis field for the prototype gun to less than 3% for the LCLS gun for the steady state fields. Beam performance is improved as shown by the PARMELA simulations. The gun should be designed to accept a future load lock system. Modifications follow the recommendations of our RF review committee [2]. Files and reference documents are compiled in Section IV.

  17. Photo-oxidation catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Pitts, J. Roland; Liu, Ping; Smith, R. Davis

    2009-07-14

    Photo-oxidation catalysts and methods for cleaning a metal-based catalyst are disclosed. An exemplary catalyst system implementing a photo-oxidation catalyst may comprise a metal-based catalyst, and a photo-oxidation catalyst for cleaning the metal-based catalyst in the presence of light. The exposure to light enables the photo-oxidation catalyst to substantially oxidize absorbed contaminants and reduce accumulation of the contaminants on the metal-based catalyst. Applications are also disclosed.

  18. Determination of photo conversion efficiency of nanotubular titanium oxide photo-electrochemical cell for solar hydrogen generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raja, K. S.; Mahajan, V. K.; Misra, M.

    Anodized and annealed titanium oxide nanotubes show enhanced photo activity and can be used as photo anodes for water electrolysis in hydrogen generation. Application of an external potential to the photo anode is required for enhancement of the photocurrent. This additional electrical energy input complicates the photo conversion efficiency calculation. In this investigation, the photo-electrochemical behavior of anodized titanium oxide nanotubular arrays have been characterized in various electrolytes. Increase in the applied potential increased the photocurrent under illumination with visible light. A simple experimental method for calculating the photo conversion efficiency has been proposed. According to this method, the potential difference between the photo anode and cathode is measured with and without light illumination. The product of the photocurrent and the increase in potential due to light irradiation is considered as the net power output. The photocurrent and the conversion efficiency increased with increase in the pH of the electrolyte. TiO 2 nanotubular arrays annealed at 350 °C for 6 h in nitrogen atmosphere showed a maximum photo conversion efficiency of ∼4% in 1 M KOH electrolyte and ∼3% in 3.5 wt.% sodium chloride solution. The results indicate that nanotubular TiO 2 can be potentially used for the photo electrolysis of seawater to generate hydrogen.

  19. High-quality beam generation using an RF gun and a 150 MeV microtron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuroda, R.; Washio, M.; Kashiwagi, S.; Kobuki, T.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Wang, X. J.; Hori, T.; Sakai, F.; Tsunemi, A.; Urakawa, J.; Hirose, T.

    2000-11-01

    Low-emittance sub-picosecond electron pulses are expected to be used in a wide field, such as free electron laser, laser acceleration, femtosecond X-ray generation by Inverse Compton scattering, pulse radiolysis, etc. In order to produce the low-emittance sub-picosecond electron pulse, we are developing a compact Racetrack Microtron (RTM) with a new 5 MeV injection system adopting a laser photo cathode RF gun (Washio et al., Seventh China-Japan Bilateral Symposium on Radiation Chemistry, October 28, Cengdu, China, 1996). The operation of RTM has been kept under a steady state of beam loading for long pulse mode so far (Washio et al., J. Surf. Sci. Soc. Jpn. 19 (2) (1998) 23). In earlier work (Washio et al., PAC99, March 31, New York, USA, 1999), we have succeeded in the numerical simulation for the case of single short pulse acceleration. Finally, the modified RTM was demonstrated as a useful accelerator for a picosecond electron pulse generation under a transient state of beam loading. In the simulation, a picosecond electron pulse was accelerated to 149.6 MeV in RTM for the injection of 5 MeV electron bunch with a pulse length of 10 ps (FWHM), a charge of 1 nC per pulse, and an emittance of 3 πmm mrad.

  20. Personal Photo Enhancement Using Internet Photo Collections.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chenxi; Gao, Jizhou; Wang, Oliver; Georgel, Pierre; Yang, Ruigang; Davis, James; Frahm, Jan-Michael; Pollefeys, Marc

    2013-04-26

    Given the growth of Internet photo collections we now have a visual index of all major cities and tourist sites in the world. However, it is still a difficult task to capture that perfect shot with your own camera when visiting these places, especially when your camera itself has limitations, such as a limited field of view. In this paper, we propose a framework to overcome the imperfections of personal photos of tourist sites using the rich information provided by large scale Internet photo collections. Our method deploys state-of-the-art techniques for constructing initial 3D models from photo collections. The same techniques are then used to register personal photos to these models, allowing us to augment personal 2D images with 3D information. This strong available scene prior allows us to address a number of traditionally challenging image enhancement techniques, and achieve high quality results using simple and robust algorithms. Specifically, we demonstrate automatic foreground segmentation, mono-to-stereo conversion, the field of view expansion, photometric enhancement, and additionally automatic annotation with geo-location and tags. Our method clearly demonstrates some possible benefits of employing the rich information contained in on-line photo databases to efficiently enhance and augment one’s own personal photos.

  1. Virtual Cathode Oscillator Study.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-11-01

    emission region then con- sists of an array of fibers perpendicular to a conducting cathode surface . A surface flashover along the individual fibers...acts like the Corona electron source developed by Helionetics13 for laser pre-ioniza- tion. The axial surface flashover mechanism is more desirable than...the conventional cold cathode emission process, because production of plasma in this manner inhibits the formation of surface cathode spots. 7 75

  2. Potential Fluctuations and Energetic Ion Production in Hollow Cathode Discharges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goebel, Dan M.; Jameson, Kristina K.; Katz, Ira; Mikellides, Ioannis G.

    2007-01-01

    Ions with energies significantly in excess of the applied discharge voltage have been reported for many years in hollow cathode discharges. Models of dc potential hills downstream of the cathode and instabilities in postulated double layers in the cathode orifice have been proposed to explain this, but have not been substantiated. Measurements of the dc and rf plasma density and potential profiles near the exit of hollow cathodes by miniature fast-scanning probes suggests that turbulent ion acoustic fluctuations and ionization instabilities in the cathode plume significantly increase the energy of the ions that flow from this region. Increases in the discharge current and/or decreases in the cathode gas flow enhance the amplitude of the fluctuations and increase the number and energy of the energetic ions, which increases the erosion rate of the cathode electrodes. The transition from the quiescent 'spot mode' to the noisy 'plume mode' characteristic of these discharges is found to be a gradual transition of increasing fluctuation amplitudes.

  3. PROCEEDING OF WORKSHOP ON PHOTO-INJECTOR FOR ENERGY RECOVERY LINAC.

    SciTech Connect

    WANG,X.J.

    2001-01-22

    Workshop on Photo-injectors for Energy Recovery Linac was held at National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) of Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) on January 22 and 23, 2001. Fifty people attended the workshop; they came from three countries, representing universities, industries and national laboratories. This is the first workshop ever held on photo-injectors for CW operation, and for the first time, both DC and RF photo-injectors were discussed at the workshop. Workshop covered almost all major issues of photo-injectors, photocathode, laser system, vacuum, DC, 433 MHz/B-factory cavities based RF gun, 1.3 GHz RF gun and beam instrumentation. High quantum efficiency and long live time photocathode is the issue discussed during the workshop. Four working group leaders have done great jobs summarizing the workshop discussion, and identifying the major issues for future R and D.

  4. RF radiation from lightning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, D. M.

    1978-01-01

    Radiation from lightning in the RF band from 3-300 MHz were monitored. Radiation in this frequency range is of interest as a potential vehicle for monitoring severe storms and for studying the lightning itself. Simultaneous measurements were made of RF radiation and fast and slow field changes. Continuous analogue recordings with a system having 300 kHz of bandwidth were made together with digital records of selected events (principally return strokes) at greater temporal resolution. The data reveal patterns in the RF radiation for the entire flash which are characteristic of flash type and independent of the frequency of observation. Individual events within the flash also have characteristic RF patterns. Strong radiation occurs during the first return strokes, but delayed about 20 micron sec with respect to the begining of the return stroke; whereas, RF radiation from subsequent return strokes tends to be associated with cloud processes preceding the flash with comparatively little radiation occurring during the return stroke itself.

  5. Simulations of Ion Migration in the LCLS RF Gun and Injector

    SciTech Connect

    Brachmann, Axel; Dowell, David; /SLAC

    2012-06-25

    The motivation for this work was the observed surface contamination of the first LCLS RF gun copper cathode. We will present the results of simulations in regards to ion migration in the LCLS gun. Ions of residual gases will be created by interaction of molecular gas species with the UV drive laser beam and by the electron beam itself. The larger part of those ionized molecules remain in the vicinity of creation, are transported towards beam line walls or away from the cathode. However a small fraction gains enough kinetic energy, focused by RF and magnetic fields and propagates to the cathode, producing an undesirable increase of the cathode's surface work function. Although this fraction is small, during long term operation, this effect may become a significant factor limiting the source performance.

  6. Perceptually Guided Photo Retargeting.

    PubMed

    Xia, Yingjie; Zhang, Luming; Hong, Richang; Nie, Liqiang; Yan, Yan; Shao, Ling

    2016-04-22

    We propose perceptually guided photo retargeting, which shrinks a photo by simulating a human's process of sequentially perceiving visually/semantically important regions in a photo. In particular, we first project the local features (graphlets in this paper) onto a semantic space, wherein visual cues such as global spatial layout and rough geometric context are exploited. Thereafter, a sparsity-constrained learning algorithm is derived to select semantically representative graphlets of a photo, and the selecting process can be interpreted by a path which simulates how a human actively perceives semantics in a photo. Furthermore, we learn the prior distribution of such active graphlet paths (AGPs) from training photos that are marked as esthetically pleasing by multiple users. The learned priors enforce the corresponding AGP of a retargeted photo to be maximally similar to those from the training photos. On top of the retargeting model, we further design an online learning scheme to incrementally update the model with new photos that are esthetically pleasing. The online update module makes the algorithm less dependent on the number and contents of the initial training data. Experimental results show that: 1) the proposed AGP is over 90% consistent with human gaze shifting path, as verified by the eye-tracking data, and 2) the retargeting algorithm outperforms its competitors significantly, as AGP is more indicative of photo esthetics than conventional saliency maps.

  7. Commissioning Experience with the PEP-II Low Level RF System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corredoura, P.; Allison, S.; Claus, R.; Ross, W.; Sapozhnikov, L.; Schwarz, H.; Tighe, R.; Yee, C.; Ziomek, C.

    1997-05-01

    The low-level RF system for PEP-II is a modular design housed in a VXI environment. Remotely configurable feedback loops are used to control coupled-bunch instabilities driven by the accelerating mode of the RF cavities. A programmable DSP based feedback loop is implemented to control phase variations across the klystron due to required adjustment of the cathode voltage to limit cathode power dissipation. The DSP loop also adaptively cancels modulations caused by klystron power supply ripple at selected power line harmonics between 60 Hz and 10 kHz. An adaptive technique is used to generate the station RF reference which tracks the ion clearing gap induced cavity transients. All RF signal processing and measurements are done using inphase and quadrature (IQ) techniques. This paper presents observations and measured data from the system.

  8. Microfluidic stretchable RF electronics.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Shi; Wu, Zhigang

    2010-12-07

    Stretchable electronics is a revolutionary technology that will potentially create a world of radically different electronic devices and systems that open up an entirely new spectrum of possibilities. This article proposes a microfluidic based solution for stretchable radio frequency (RF) electronics, using hybrid integration of active circuits assembled on flex foils and liquid alloy passive structures embedded in elastic substrates, e.g. polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS). This concept was employed to implement a 900 MHz stretchable RF radiation sensor, consisting of a large area elastic antenna and a cluster of conventional rigid components for RF power detection. The integrated radiation sensor except the power supply was fully embedded in a thin elastomeric substrate. Good electrical performance of the standalone stretchable antenna as well as the RF power detection sub-module was verified by experiments. The sensor successfully detected the RF radiation over 5 m distance in the system demonstration. Experiments on two-dimensional (2D) stretching up to 15%, folding and twisting of the demonstrated sensor were also carried out. Despite the integrated device was severely deformed, no failure in RF radiation sensing was observed in the tests. This technique illuminates a promising route of realizing stretchable and foldable large area integrated RF electronics that are of great interest to a variety of applications like wearable computing, health monitoring, medical diagnostics, and curvilinear electronics.

  9. Phase stable RF transport system

    DOEpatents

    Curtin, Michael T.; Natter, Eckard F.; Denney, Peter M.

    1992-01-01

    An RF transport system delivers a phase-stable RF signal to a load, such as an RF cavity of a charged particle accelerator. A circuit generates a calibration signal at an odd multiple frequency of the RF signal where the calibration signal is superimposed with the RF signal on a common cable that connects the RF signal with the load. Signal isolating diplexers are located at both the RF signal source end and load end of the common cable to enable the calibration to be inserted and extracted from the cable signals without any affect on the RF signal. Any phase shift in the calibration signal during traverse of the common cable is then functionally related to the phase shift in the RF signal. The calibration phase shift is used to control a phase shifter for the RF signal to maintain a stable RF signal at the load.

  10. Rf power sources

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, M.A.

    1988-05-01

    This paper covers RF power sources for accelerator applications. The approach has been with particular customers in mind. These customers are high energy physicists who use accelerators as experimental tools in the study of the nucleus of the atom, and synchrotron light sources derived from electron or positron storage rings. This paper is confined to electron-positron linear accelerators since the RF sources have always defined what is possible to achieve with these accelerators. 11 refs., 13 figs.

  11. Microbunching and RF Compression

    SciTech Connect

    Venturini, M.; Migliorati, M.; Ronsivalle, C.; Ferrario, M.; Vaccarezza, C.

    2010-05-23

    Velocity bunching (or RF compression) represents a promising technique complementary to magnetic compression to achieve the high peak current required in the linac drivers for FELs. Here we report on recent progress aimed at characterizing the RF compression from the point of view of the microbunching instability. We emphasize the development of a linear theory for the gain function of the instability and its validation against macroparticle simulations that represents a useful tool in the evaluation of the compression schemes for FEL sources.

  12. Riboflavin-induced photo-crosslinking of collagen hydrogel and its application in meniscus tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Heo, Jiseung; Koh, Rachel H; Shim, Whuisu; Kim, Hwan D; Yim, Hyun-Gu; Hwang, Nathaniel S

    2016-04-01

    A meniscus tear is a common knee injury, but its regeneration remains a clinical challenge. Recently, collagen-based scaffolds have been applied in meniscus tissue engineering. Despite its prevalence, application of natural collagen scaffold in clinical setting is limited due to its extremely low stiffness and rapid degradation. The purpose of the present study was to increase the mechanical properties and delay degradation rate of a collagen-based scaffold by photo-crosslinking using riboflavin (RF) and UV exposure. RF is a biocompatible vitamin B2 that showed minimal cytotoxicity compared to conventionally utilized photo-initiator. Furthermore, collagen photo-crosslinking with RF improved mechanical properties and delayed enzyme-triggered degradation of collagen scaffolds. RF-induced photo-crosslinked collagen scaffolds encapsulated with fibrochondrocytes resulted in reduced scaffold contraction and enhanced gene expression levels for the collagen II and aggrecan. Additionally, hyaluronic acid (HA) incorporation into photo-crosslinked collagen scaffold showed an increase in its retention. Based on these results, we demonstrate that photo-crosslinked collagen-HA hydrogels can be potentially applied in the scaffold-based meniscus tissue engineering.

  13. Cathodes - Technological review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherkouk, Charaf; Nestler, Tina

    2014-06-01

    Lithium cobalt oxide (LiCoO2) was already used in the first commercialized Li-ion battery by SONY in 1990. Still, it is the most frequently used cathode material nowadays. However, LiCoO2 is intrinsically unstable in the charged state, especially at elevated temperatures and in the overcharged state causing volume changes and transport limitation for high power batteries. In this paper, some technological aspects with large impact on cell performance from the cathode material point of view will be reviewed. At first it will be focused on the degradation processes and life-time mechanisms of the cathode material LiCoO2. Electrochemical and structural results on commercial Li-ion batteries recorded during the cycling will be discussed. Thereafter, advanced nanomaterials for new cathode materials will be presented.

  14. Arcjet Cathode Phenomena

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curran, Francis M.; Haag, Thomas W.; Raquet, John F.

    1989-01-01

    Cathode tips made from a number of different materials were tested in a modular arcjet thruster in order to examine cathode phenomena. Periodic disassembly and examination, along with the data collected during testing, indicated that all of the tungsten-based materials behaved similarly despite the fact that in one of these samples the percentage of thorium oxide was doubled and another was 25 percent rhenium. The mass loss rate from a 2 percent thoriated rhenium cathode was found to be an order of magnitude greater than that observed using 2 percent thoriated tungsten. Detailed analysis of one of these cathode tips showed that the molten crater contained pure tungsten to a depth of about 150 microns. Problems with thermal stress cracking were encountered in the testing of a hafnium carbide tip. Post test analysis showed that the active area of the tip had chemically reacted with the propellant. A 100 hour continuous test was run at about 1 kW. Post test analysis revealed no dendrite formation, such as observed in a 30 kW arcjet lifetest, near the cathode crater. The cathodes from both this test and a previously run 1000 hour cycled test displayed nearly identical arc craters. Data and calculations indicate that the mass losses observed in testing can be explained by evaporation.

  15. Arcjet cathode phenomena

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curran, Francis M.; Haag, Thomas W.; Raquet, John F.

    1989-01-01

    Cathode tips made from a number of different materials were tested in a modular arcjet thruster in order to examine cathode phenomena. Periodic disassembly and examination, along with the data collected during testing, indicated that all of the tungsten-based materials behaved similarly despite the fact that in one of these samples the percentage of thorium oxide was doubled and another was 25 percent rhenium. The mass loss rate from a 2 percent thoriated rhenium cathode was found to be an order of magnitude greater than that observed using 2 percent thoriated tungsten. Detailed analysis of one of these cathode tips showed that the molten crater contained pure tungsten to a depth of about 150 microns. Problems with thermal stress cracking were encountered in the testing of a hafnium carbide tip. Post test analysis showed that the active area of the tip had chemically reacted with the propellant. A 100 hour continuous test was run at about 1 kW. Post test analysis revealed no dendrite formation, such as observed in a 30 kW arcjet lifetest, near the cathode crater. The cathodes from both this test and a previously run 1000 hour cycled test displayed nearly identical arc craters. Data and calculations indicate that the mass losses observed in testing can be explained by evaporation.

  16. Ferroelectric Emission Cathodes for Low-Power Electric Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kovaleski, Scott D.; Burke, Tom (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Low- or no-flow electron emitters are required for low-power electric thrusters, spacecraft plasma contactors, and electrodynamic tether systems to reduce or eliminate the need for propellant/expellant. Expellant-less neutralizers can improve the viability of very low-power colloid thrusters, field emission electric propulsion devices, ion engines, Hall thrusters, and gridded vacuum arc thrusters. The NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) is evaluating ferroelectric emission (FEE) cathodes as zero expellant flow rate cathode sources for the applications listed above. At GRC, low voltage (100s to approx. 1500 V) operation of FEE cathodes is examined. Initial experiments, with unipolar, bipolar, and RF burst applied voltage, have produced current pulses 250 to 1000 ns in duration with peak currents of up to 2 A at voltages at or below 1500 V. In particular, FEE cathodes driven by RF burst voltages from 1400 to 2000 V peak to peak, at burst frequencies from 70 to 400 kHz, emitted average current densities from 0.1 to 0.7 A/sq cm. Pulse repeatability as a function of input voltage has been initially established. Reliable emission has been achieved in air background at pressures as high as 10(exp -6) Torr.

  17. Photocatalysis for renewable energy production using PhotoFuelCells.

    PubMed

    Michal, Robert; Sfaelou, Stavroula; Lianos, Panagiotis

    2014-11-27

    The present work is a short review of our recent studies on PhotoFuelCells, that is, photoelectrochemical cells which consume a fuel to produce electricity or hydrogen, and presents some unpublished data concerning both electricity and hydrogen production. PhotoFuelCells have been constructed using nanoparticulate titania photoanodes and various cathode electrodes bearing a few different types of electrocatalyst. In the case where the cell functioned with an aerated cathode, the cathode electrode was made of carbon cloth carrying a carbon paste made of carbon black and dispersed Pt nanoparticles. When the cell was operated in the absence of oxygen, the electrocatalyst was deposited on an FTO slide using a special commercial carbon paste, which was again enriched with Pt nanoparticles. Mixing of Pt with carbon paste decreased the quantity of Pt necessary to act as electrocatalyst. PhotoFuelCells can produce electricity without bias and with relatively high open-circuit voltage when they function in the presence of fuel and with an aerated cathode. In that case, titania can be sensitized in the visible region by CdS quantum dots. In the present work, CdS was deposited by the SILAR method. Other metal chalcogenides are not functional as sensitizers because the combined photoanode in their presence does not have enough oxidative power to oxidize the fuel. Concerning hydrogen production, it was found that it is difficult to produce hydrogen in an alkaline environment even under bias, however, this is still possible if losses are minimized. One way to limit losses is to short-circuit anode and cathode electrode and put them close together. This is achieved in the "photoelectrocatalytic leaf", which was presently demonstrated capable of producing hydrogen even in a strongly alkaline environment.

  18. Defocus in cathode lens instruments.

    PubMed

    Tromp, R M; Altman, M S

    2017-02-24

    Accurately measuring defocus in cathode lens instruments (Low Energy Electron Microscopy - LEEM, and Photo Electron Emission Microscopy - PEEM) is a pre-requisite for quantitative image analysis using Fourier Optics (FO) or Contrast Transfer Function (CTF) image simulations. In particular, one must establish a quantitative relation between lens excitation and image defocus. One way to accomplish this is the Real-Space Microspot LEED method, making use of the accurately known angles of diffracted electron beams, and the defocus-dependent shifts of their corresponding real-space images. However, this only works if a sufficiently large number of diffracted beams is available for the sample under investigation. An alternative is to shift the sample along the optical axis by a known distance, and measure the change in objective lens excitation required to re-focus the image. We analytically derive the relation between sample shift and defocus, and apply our results to the measurement and analysis of achromats in an aberration-corrected LEEM instrument.

  19. Photo-voltaic power generating means and methods

    DOEpatents

    Kroger, Ferdinand A.; Rod, Robert L.; Panicker, Ramachandra M. P.; Knaster, Mark B.

    1984-01-10

    A photo-voltaic power cell based on a photoelectric semiconductor compound and the method of using and making the same. The semiconductor compound in the photo-voltaic power cell of the present invention can be electrolytically formed at a cathode in an electrolytic solution by causing discharge or decomposition of ions or molecules of a non-metallic component with deposition of the non-metallic component on the cathode and simultaneously providing ions of a metal component which discharge and combine with the non-metallic component at the cathode thereby forming the semiconductor compound film material thereon. By stoichiometrically adjusting the amounts of the components, or otherwise by introducing dopants into the desired amounts, an N-type layer can be formed and thereafter a P-type layer can be formed with a junction therebetween. The invention is effective in producing homojunction semiconductor materials and heterojunction semiconductor materials. The present invention also provides a method of using three electrodes in order to form the semiconductor compound material on one of these electrodes. Various examples are given for manufacturing different photo-voltaic cells in accordance with the present invention.

  20. Photo-voltaic power generating means and methods

    DOEpatents

    Kroger, Ferdinand A.; Rod, Robert L.; Panicker, M. P. Ramachandra

    1983-08-23

    A photo-voltaic power cell based on a photoelectric semiconductor compound and the method of using and making the same. The semiconductor compound in the photo-voltaic power cell of the present invention can be electrolytically formed at a cathode in an electrolytic solution by causing discharge or decomposition of ions or molecules of a non-metallic component with deposition of the non-metallic component on the cathode and simultaneously providing ions of a metal component which discharge and combine with the non-metallic component at the cathode thereby forming the semiconductor compound film material thereon. By stoichiometrically adjusting the amounts of the components, or otherwise by introducing dopants into the desired amounts, an N-type layer can be formed and thereafter a P-type layer can be formed with a junction therebetween. The invention is effective in producing homojunction semiconductor materials and heterojunction semiconductor materials. The present invention also provides a method of using three electrodes in order to form the semiconductor compound material on one of these electrodes. Various examples are given for manufacturing different photo-voltaic cells in accordance with the present invention.

  1. Theory and mitigation of electron back-bombardment in thermionic cathode radio frequency guns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edelen, Jonathan Paul

    Photocathode RF guns are currently the standard for high- power, low-emittance beam generation in free-electron lasers. These devices require the use of high-power lasers (which are bulky and expensive to operate) and high-quantum-efficiency cathodes (which have limited lifetimes requiring frequent replacement). The use of RF-gated thermionic cathodes enables operation without a large drive laser and with long lifetimes. One major limitation of RF-gated thermionic cathodes is that electrons emitted late in the RF period will not gain enough energy to exit the gun before being accelerated back towards the cathode by the change in sign of the RF field. These electrons deposit their kinetic energy on the cathode surface in the form of heat, limiting the ability to control the output current from the cathode. This dissertation is aimed at understanding the fundamental design factors that drive the back-bombardment process and at exploring novel techniques to reduce its impact on a high-current system. This begins with the development of analytic models that predict the back-bombardment process in single-cell guns. These models are compared with simulation and with a measurement taken at a specific facility. This is followed by the development of analytic models that predict the effects of space-charge on back-bombardment. These models are compared with simulations. This is followed by an analysis of how the addition of multiple cells will impact the back-bombardment process. Finally, a two-frequency gun is studied for its ability to mitigate the back-bombardment process. This dissertation provides new insight on how the back-bombardment process scales as a function of the beam parameters and how space-charge affects this process. Additionally this dissertation shows how a second frequency can be used to mitigate the back-bombardment effect.

  2. RF Input Power Couplers for High Current SRF Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Khan, V. F.; Anders, W.; Burrill, Andrew; Knobloch, Jens; Kugeler, Oliver; Neumann, Axel; Wang, Haipeng

    2014-12-01

    High current SRF technology is being explored in present day accelerator science. The bERLinPro project is presently being built at HZB to address the challenges involved in high current SRF machines with the goal of generating and accelerating a 100 mA electron beam to 50 MeV in continuous wave (cw) mode at 1.3 GHz. One of the main challenges in this project is that of handling the high input RF power required for the photo-injector as well as booster cavities where there is no energy recovery process. A high power co-axial input power coupler is being developed to be used for the photo-injector and booster cavities at the nominal beam current. The coupler is based on the KEK–cERL design and has been modified to minimise the penetration of the coupler tip in the beam pipe without compromising on beam-power coupling (Qext ~105). Herein we report on the RF design of the high power (115 kW per coupler, dual couplers per cavity) bERLinPro (BP) coupler along with initial results on thermal calculations. We summarise the RF conditioning of the TTF-III couplers (modified for cw operation) performed in the past at BESSY/HZB. A similar conditioning is envisaged in the near future for the low current SRF photo-injector and the bERLinPro main linac cryomodule.

  3. Cathode materials review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daniel, Claus; Mohanty, Debasish; Li, Jianlin; Wood, David L.

    2014-06-01

    The electrochemical potential of cathode materials defines the positive side of the terminal voltage of a battery. Traditionally, cathode materials are the energy-limiting or voltage-limiting electrode. One of the first electrochemical batteries, the voltaic pile invented by Alessandro Volta in 1800 (Phil. Trans. Roy. Soc. 90, 403-431) had a copper-zinc galvanic element with a terminal voltage of 0.76 V. Since then, the research community has increased capacity and voltage for primary (nonrechargeable) batteries and round-trip efficiency for secondary (rechargeable) batteries. Successful secondary batteries have been the lead-acid with a lead oxide cathode and a terminal voltage of 2.1 V and later the NiCd with a nickel(III) oxide-hydroxide cathode and a 1.2 V terminal voltage. The relatively low voltage of those aqueous systems and the low round-trip efficiency due to activation energies in the conversion reactions limited their use. In 1976, Wittingham (J. Electrochem. Soc., 123, 315) and Besenhard (J. Power Sources 1(3), 267) finally enabled highly reversible redox reactions by intercalation of lithium ions instead of by chemical conversion. In 1980, Goodenough and Mizushima (Mater. Res. Bull. 15, 783-789) demonstrated a high-energy and high-power LiCoO2 cathode, allowing for an increase of terminal voltage far beyond 3 V. Over the past four decades, the international research community has further developed cathode materials of many varieties. Current state-of-the-art cathodes demonstrate voltages beyond any known electrolyte stability window, bringing electrolyte research once again to the forefront of battery research.

  4. Cathode materials review

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel, Claus Mohanty, Debasish Li, Jianlin Wood, David L.

    2014-06-16

    The electrochemical potential of cathode materials defines the positive side of the terminal voltage of a battery. Traditionally, cathode materials are the energy-limiting or voltage-limiting electrode. One of the first electrochemical batteries, the voltaic pile invented by Alessandro Volta in 1800 (Phil. Trans. Roy. Soc. 90, 403-431) had a copper-zinc galvanic element with a terminal voltage of 0.76 V. Since then, the research community has increased capacity and voltage for primary (nonrechargeable) batteries and round-trip efficiency for secondary (rechargeable) batteries. Successful secondary batteries have been the lead-acid with a lead oxide cathode and a terminal voltage of 2.1 V and later the NiCd with a nickel(III) oxide-hydroxide cathode and a 1.2 V terminal voltage. The relatively low voltage of those aqueous systems and the low round-trip efficiency due to activation energies in the conversion reactions limited their use. In 1976, Wittingham (J. Electrochem. Soc., 123, 315) and Besenhard (J. Power Sources 1(3), 267) finally enabled highly reversible redox reactions by intercalation of lithium ions instead of by chemical conversion. In 1980, Goodenough and Mizushima (Mater. Res. Bull. 15, 783-789) demonstrated a high-energy and high-power LiCoO{sub 2} cathode, allowing for an increase of terminal voltage far beyond 3 V. Over the past four decades, the international research community has further developed cathode materials of many varieties. Current state-of-the-art cathodes demonstrate voltages beyond any known electrolyte stability window, bringing electrolyte research once again to the forefront of battery research.

  5. Testing a GaAs cathode in SRF gun

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, E.; Kewisch, J.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Burrill, A.; Rao, T.; Wu, Q.; Holmes, D.

    2011-03-28

    RF electron guns with a strained superlattice GaAs cathode are expected to generate polarized electron beams of higher brightness and lower emittance than do DC guns, due to their higher field gradient at the cathode's surface and lower cathode temperature. We plan to install a bulk GaAs:Cs in a SRF gun to evaluate the performance of both the gun and the cathode in this environment. The status of this project is: In our 1.3 GHz 1/2 cell SRF gun, the vacuum can be maintained at nearly 10{sup -12} Torr because of cryo-pumping at 2K. With conventional activation of bulk GaAs, we obtained a QE of 10% at 532 nm, with lifetime of more than 3 days in the preparation chamber and have shown that it can survive in transport from the preparation chamber to the gun. The beam line has been assembled and we are exploring the best conditions for baking the cathode under vacuum. We report here the progress of our test of the GaAs cathode in the SRF gun. Future particle accelerators, such as eRHIC and the ILC require high-brightness, high-current polarized electrons. Strained superlattice GaAs:Cs has been shown to be an efficient cathode for producing polarized electrons. Activation of GaAs with Cs,O(F) lowers the electron affinity and makes it energetically possible for all the electrons, excited into the conduction band that drift or diffuse to the emission surface, to escape into the vacuum. Presently, all operating polarized electron sources, such as the CEBAF, are DC guns. In these devices, the excellent ultra-high vacuum extends the lifetime of the cathode. However, the low field gradient on the photocathode's emission surface of the DC guns limits the beam quality. The higher accelerating gradients, possible in the RF guns, generate a far better beam. Until recently, most RF guns operated at room temperature, limiting the vacuum to {approx}10{sup -9} Torr. This destroys the GaAs's NEA surface. The SRF guns combine the excellent vacuum conditions of DC guns and the high

  6. Off-axis beam dynamics in rf-gun-based electron photoinjectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, R.; Mitchell, C.; Papadopoulos, C.; Qian, H.; Venturini, M.; Qiang, J.; Filippetto, D.; Staples, J.; Jia, Q.; Sannibale, F.

    2016-11-01

    The need to operate an rf-gun-based electron photoinjector with a beam emitted away from the cathode center can occur under various circumstances. First, in some cases the cathode can be affected by ion back-bombardment that progressively reduces the quantum efficiency (QE) in its center, making off-axis operation mandatory; second, in some cases the drive laser intensity can be sufficiently high to generate QE depletion in the cathode area illuminated by the laser, forcing off-axis operation; last, in cathodes with nonuniform QE distribution it could be convenient to operate off axis to exploit a better QE. However, operation in this mode may lead to growth of the projected transverse beam emittances due to correlations between the transverse and longitudinal degrees of freedom that are introduced within the gun and downstream rf cavities. A strategy is described to mitigate this emittance growth by allowing the beam to propagate along a carefully tuned off-axis trajectory in downstream rf cavities to remove the time-dependent rf kicks introduced in the gun. Along this trajectory, short range wakefields do not degrade the emittance, and long range wakefields degrade the emittance for very high repetition rate only.

  7. Rf2a and rf2b transcription factors

    DOEpatents

    Beachy, Roger N.; Petruccelli, Silvana; Dai, Shunhong

    2007-10-02

    A method of activating the rice tungro bacilliform virus (RTBV) promoter in vivo is disclosed. The RTBV promoter is activated by exposure to at least one protein selected from the group consisting of Rf2a and Rf2b.

  8. Proposed RF Breakdown Studies at the AWA

    SciTech Connect

    Antipov, S.; Conde, M.; Gai, W.; Power, J.G.; Spentzouris, L.; Yusof, Z.; Dolgashev, V.; /SLAC

    2007-03-21

    A study of breakdown mechanism has been initiated at the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator (AWA). Breakdown may include several factors such as local field enhancement, explosive electron emission, Ohmic heating, tensile stress produced by electric field, and others. The AWA is building a dedicated facility to test various models for breakdown mechanisms and to determine the roles of different factors in the breakdown. We plan to trigger breakdown events with a high-powered laser at various wavelengths (IR to UV) to determine the role of explosive electron emission in the breakdown process. Another experimental idea follows from the recent work on a Schottky-enabled photoemission in an RF photoinjector [1] that allows us to determine in situ the field enhancement factor on a cathode surface. Monitoring the field enhancement factor before and after the breakdown can shed some light on a number of observations such as the crater formation process.

  9. Photos of Pertussis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Treatment Prevention Adults Parents-to-be Babies & Children Preteens & Teens Travelers Healthcare Personnel Frequently Asked Questions Photos ... Pregnant Women For Parents of Young Children For Preteens & Teens For Adults For Spanish Speakers Publications Related ...

  10. Filtered cathodic arc source

    DOEpatents

    Falabella, S.; Sanders, D.M.

    1994-01-18

    A continuous, cathodic arc ion source coupled to a macro-particle filter capable of separation or elimination of macro-particles from the ion flux produced by cathodic arc discharge is described. The ion source employs an axial magnetic field on a cathode (target) having tapered sides to confine the arc, thereby providing high target material utilization. A bent magnetic field is used to guide the metal ions from the target to the part to be coated. The macro-particle filter consists of two straight solenoids, end to end, but placed at 45[degree] to one another, which prevents line-of-sight from the arc spot on the target to the parts to be coated, yet provides a path for ions and electrons to flow, and includes a series of baffles for trapping the macro-particles. 3 figures.

  11. Filtered cathodic arc source

    DOEpatents

    Falabella, Steven; Sanders, David M.

    1994-01-01

    A continuous, cathodic arc ion source coupled to a macro-particle filter capable of separation or elimination of macro-particles from the ion flux produced by cathodic arc discharge. The ion source employs an axial magnetic field on a cathode (target) having tapered sides to confine the arc, thereby providing high target material utilization. A bent magnetic field is used to guide the metal ions from the target to the part to be coated. The macro-particle filter consists of two straight solenoids, end to end, but placed at 45.degree. to one another, which prevents line-of-sight from the arc spot on the target to the parts to be coated, yet provides a path for ions and electrons to flow, and includes a series of baffles for trapping the macro-particles.

  12. AC/RF Superconductivity

    SciTech Connect

    Ciovati, Gianluigi

    2015-02-01

    This contribution provides a brief introduction to AC/RF superconductivity, with an emphasis on application to accelerators. The topics covered include the surface impedance of normal conductors and superconductors, the residual resistance, the field dependence of the surface resistance, and the superheating field.

  13. Miniaturized cathodic arc plasma source

    DOEpatents

    Anders, Andre; MacGill, Robert A.

    2003-04-15

    A cathodic arc plasma source has an anode formed of a plurality of spaced baffles which extend beyond the active cathode surface of the cathode. With the open baffle structure of the anode, most macroparticles pass through the gaps between the baffles and reflect off the baffles out of the plasma stream that enters a filter. Thus the anode not only has an electrical function but serves as a prefilter. The cathode has a small diameter, e.g. a rod of about 1/4 inch (6.25 mm) diameter. Thus the plasma source output is well localized, even with cathode spot movement which is limited in area, so that it effectively couples into a miniaturized filter. With a small area cathode, the material eroded from the cathode needs to be replaced to maintain plasma production. Therefore, the source includes a cathode advancement or feed mechanism coupled to cathode rod. The cathode also requires a cooling mechanism. The movable cathode rod is housed in a cooled metal shield or tube which serves as both a current conductor, thus reducing ohmic heat produced in the cathode, and as the heat sink for heat generated at or near the cathode. Cooling of the cathode housing tube is done by contact with coolant at a place remote from the active cathode surface. The source is operated in pulsed mode at relatively high currents, about 1 kA. The high arc current can also be used to operate the magnetic filter. A cathodic arc plasma deposition system using this source can be used for the deposition of ultrathin amorphous hard carbon (a-C) films for the magnetic storage industry.

  14. Cathode material for lithium batteries

    DOEpatents

    Park, Sang-Ho; Amine, Khalil

    2013-07-23

    A method of manufacture an article of a cathode (positive electrode) material for lithium batteries. The cathode material is a lithium molybdenum composite transition metal oxide material and is prepared by mixing in a solid state an intermediate molybdenum composite transition metal oxide and a lithium source. The mixture is thermally treated to obtain the lithium molybdenum composite transition metal oxide cathode material.

  15. Cathode material for lithium batteries

    DOEpatents

    Park, Sang-Ho; Amine, Khalil

    2015-01-13

    A method of manufacture an article of a cathode (positive electrode) material for lithium batteries. The cathode material is a lithium molybdenum composite transition metal oxide material and is prepared by mixing in a solid state an intermediate molybdenum composite transition metal oxide and a lithium source. The mixture is thermally treated to obtain the lithium molybdenum composite transition metal oxide cathode material.

  16. Photo-responsive polymeric micelles.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yu; Dong, Ruijiao; Zhu, Xinyuan; Yan, Deyue

    2014-09-07

    Photo-responsive polymeric micelles have received increasing attention in both academic and industrial fields due to their efficient photo-sensitive nature and unique nanostructure. In view of the photo-reaction mechanism, photo-responsive polymeric micelles can be divided into five major types: (1) photoisomerization polymeric micelles, (2) photo-induced rearrangement polymeric micelles, (3) photocleavage polymeric micelles, (4) photo-induced crosslinkable polymeric micelles, and (5) photo-induced energy conversion polymeric micelles. This review highlights the recent advances of photo-responsive polymeric micelles, including the design, synthesis and applications in various biomedical fields. Especially, the influence of different photo-reaction mechanisms on the morphology, structure and properties of the polymeric micelles is emphasized. Finally, the possible future directions and perspectives in this emerging area are briefly discussed.

  17. Rf systems for RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Rose, J.; Brodowski, J.; Connolly, R.; Deng, D.P.; Kwiatkowski, S.; Pirkl, W.; Ratti, A.

    1995-05-01

    The RHIC rf systems must capture the injected beam, accelerate it through transition to top energy, shorten the bunches prior to rebucketing, and store the beam for 10 hours in the presence of strong intra-beam scattering. These different functions are met by three independent systems. An accelerating system at 26.7 Mhz (h = 342), a storage system at 196.1 MHz (h = 2508), and a wideband system for the damping of injection efforts.

  18. Hydrogen hollow cathode ion source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mirtich, M. J., Jr.; Sovey, J. S.; Roman, R. F. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    A source of hydrogen ions is disclosed and includes a chamber having at one end a cathode which provides electrons and through which hydrogen gas flows into the chamber. Screen and accelerator grids are provided at the other end of the chamber. A baffle plate is disposed between the cathode and the grids and a cylindrical baffle is disposed coaxially with the cathode at the one end of the chamber. The cylindrical baffle is of greater diameter than the baffle plate to provide discharge impedance and also to protect the cathode from ion flux. An anode electrode draws the electrons away from the cathode. The hollow cathode includes a tubular insert of tungsten impregnated with a low work function material to provide ample electrons. A heater is provided around the hollow cathode to initiate electron emission from the low work function material.

  19. Synopsis of Cathode #4 Activation

    SciTech Connect

    Kwan, Joe; Ekdahl, C.; Harrison, J.; Kwan, J.; Leitner, M.; McCruistian, T.; Mitchell, R.; Prichard, B.; Roy, P.

    2006-05-26

    The purpose of this report is to describe the activation of the fourth cathode installed in the DARHT-II Injector. Appendices have been used so that an extensive amount of data could be included without danger of obscuring important information contained in the body of the report. The cathode was a 612 M type cathode purchased from Spectra-Mat. Section II describes the handling and installation of the cathode. Section III is a narrative of the activation based on information located in the Control Room Log Book supplemented with time plots of pertinent operating parameters. Activation of the cathode was performed in accordance with the procedure listed in Appendix A. The following sections provide more details on the total pressure and constituent partial pressures in the vacuum vessel, cathode heater power/filament current, and cathode temperature.

  20. 53. Historic American Buildings Survey Photo by Slevin Photo Taken: ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    53. Historic American Buildings Survey Photo by Slevin Photo Taken: April 1908 RUINS OF MISSION QUANDRANGLE - Mission San Carlos Borromeo, Rio Road & Lausen Drive, Carmel-by-the-Sea, Monterey County, CA

  1. Tore Supra LH transmitter upgrade, a new RF driver for the power spectrum

    SciTech Connect

    Berger-By, G.; Achard, J.; Armitano, A.; Bouquey, F.; Corbel, E.; Delpech, L.; Ekedahl, A.; Lombard, G.; Magne, R.; Mollard, P.; Pagano, M.; Prou, M.; Samaille, F.; Volpe, D.; Volpe, R.

    2011-12-23

    New real time tools have been developed for testing new 700kW/3.7GHz/CW klystrons and for the operations on very long plasma shots. After the commissioning of the 18 series tubes on the high power test bed facility, the installation of the first 8 klystrons in the Tore Supra transmitter and the adjustment tests on load, this upgrade work has been materialized during the last 2010 campaign by a successful operation on the Full Active Multijunction (FAM) C3 antenna, with new performances: 3.5MW/40s on plasma. The RF output power control in amplitude and phase has been improved for a better control of the wave spectrum launched into the plasma. The new klystrons have no modulating anode and the high cathode voltage must be adjusted with the RF input power in order to optimize the RF output power with a minimization of the thermal power losses in the collector. A new phase correction, depending on the 3 RF output power ranges used, has been introduced. The improvements made in 2009 and 2010 on the generic phase loop and the procedures used during the real time tests of the RF transfer functions in amplitude and phase are detailed below. All RF measurements systems, RF safety systems and the RF calibration procedures have been revised in order to have the best consistency, reproducibility and with a measurement error against the calorimetry measurement lower than 10%.

  2. Light-assisted delithiation of lithium iron phosphate nanocrystals towards photo-rechargeable lithium ion batteries.

    PubMed

    Paolella, Andrea; Faure, Cyril; Bertoni, Giovanni; Marras, Sergio; Guerfi, Abdelbast; Darwiche, Ali; Hovington, Pierre; Commarieu, Basile; Wang, Zhuoran; Prato, Mirko; Colombo, Massimo; Monaco, Simone; Zhu, Wen; Feng, Zimin; Vijh, Ashok; George, Chandramohan; Demopoulos, George P; Armand, Michel; Zaghib, Karim

    2017-04-10

    Recently, intensive efforts are dedicated to convert and store the solar energy in a single device. Herein, dye-synthesized solar cell technology is combined with lithium-ion materials to investigate light-assisted battery charging. In particular we report the direct photo-oxidation of lithium iron phosphate nanocrystals in the presence of a dye as a hybrid photo-cathode in a two-electrode system, with lithium metal as anode and lithium hexafluorophosphate in carbonate-based electrolyte; a configuration corresponding to lithium ion battery charging. Dye-sensitization generates electron-hole pairs with the holes aiding the delithiation of lithium iron phosphate at the cathode and electrons utilized in the formation of a solid electrolyte interface at the anode via oxygen reduction. Lithium iron phosphate acts effectively as a reversible redox agent for the regeneration of the dye. Our findings provide possibilities in advancing the design principles for photo-rechargeable lithium ion batteries.

  3. Programmable RF System for RF System-on-Chip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryu, Jee-Youl; Kim, Sung-Woo; Lee, Dong-Hyun; Park, Seung-Hun; Lee, Jung-Hoon; Ha, Deock-Ho; Kim, Seung-Un

    This paper proposes a new automatic programmable radio frequency (RF) system for a System-on-Chip (SoC) transceiver. We built a 5-GHz low noise amplifier (LNA) with an on-chip programmable RF system using 0.18-(m SiGe technology. This system is extremely useful for today's RF IC devices in a complete RF transceiver environment. The programmable RF system helps it to provide DC output voltages, hence, making the compensation network automatic. The programmable RF system automatically adjusts performance of 5-GHz low noise amplifier with the processor in the SoC transceiver when the LNA goes out of the normal range of operation. The ACN compensates abnormal operation due to the unusual thermal variation or unusual process variation.

  4. Quantum efficiency temporal response and lifetime of a GaAs cathode in SRF electron gun

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, E.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Kewisch, J.; Burrill, A.; Rao, T.; Wu, Q.; Holmes, D.

    2010-05-23

    RF electron guns with a strained super lattice GaAs cathode can generate polarized electron beam of higher brightness and lower emittance than do DC guns, due to their higher field gradient at the cathode's surface. In a normal conducting RF gun, the extremely high vaccum required by these cathodes can not be met. We report on an experiment with a superconducting SRF gun, which can maintain a vacuum of nearly 10-12 torr because of cryo-pumping at the temperature of 4.2K. With conventional activation, we obtained a QE of 3% at 532 nm, with lifetime of nearly 3 days in the preparation chamber. We plan to use this cathode in a 1.3 GHz 1/2 cell SRF gun to study its performance. In addition, we studied the multipacting at the location of cathode. A new model based on the Forkker-Planck equation which can estimate the bunch length of the electron beam is discussed in this paper. Future particle accelerators such as eRHIC and ILC require high brightness, high current polarized electrons Recently, using a superlattice crystal, the maximum polarization of 95% was reached. Activation with Cs,O lowers the electron affinity and makes it energetically possible for all the electrons excited in to the conduction band and reach the surface to escape into the vacuum. Presently the polarized electron sources are based on DC gun, such as that at the CEBAF at Jlab. In these devices, the life time of the cathode is extended due to the reduced back bombardment in their UHV conditions. However, the low accelerating gradient of the DC guns lead to poor longitudinal emittance. The higher accelerating gradient of the RF gun generates low emittance beams. Superconducting RF guns combine the excellent vacuum conditions of the DC guns with the higher accelerating gradients of the RF guns and provide potentially a long lived cathode with very low transverse and longitudinal emittance. In our work at BNL, we successfully activated the GaAs. The quantum efficient is 3% at 532 nm and is expected

  5. Old Sepia Photos

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cunningham, Kathy

    2010-01-01

    The author has always been fascinated by old photographs. As she looks at them, she wonders about the people. Who were they? What were their lives like? Where was this photo taken? A moment in time is frozen forever, for all to see. Inspired by old photographs, the author describes how her fifth-grade classes made their own "photographs" by…

  6. Making "Photo" Graphs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doto, Julianne; Golbeck, Susan

    2007-01-01

    Collecting data and analyzing the results of experiments is difficult for children. The authors found a surprising way to help their third graders make graphs and draw conclusions from their data: digital photographs. The pictures bridged the gap between an abstract graph and the plants it represented. With the support of the photos, students…

  7. Air cathode structure manufacture

    DOEpatents

    Momyer, William R.; Littauer, Ernest L.

    1985-01-01

    An improved air cathode structure for use in primary batteries and the like. The cathode structure includes a matrix active layer, a current collector grid on one face of the matrix active layer, and a porous, nonelectrically conductive separator on the opposite face of the matrix active layer, the collector grid and separator being permanently bonded to the matrix active layer. The separator has a preselected porosity providing low IR losses and high resistance to air flow through the matrix active layer to maintain high bubble pressure during operation of the battery. In the illustrated embodiment, the separator was formed of porous polypropylene. A thin hydrophobic film is provided, in the preferred embodiment, on the current collecting metal grid.

  8. Tomcat-Projects_RF

    SciTech Connect

    Warrant, Marilyn M.; Garcia, Rudy J.; Zhang, Pengchu; Arms, Robert M.; Herzer, John A.; Conrad, Gregory N.; Brabson, John M.

    2004-09-15

    Tomcat-Projects_RF is a software package for analyzing sensor data obtained from a database and displaying the results with Java Servlet Pages (JSP). SQL Views into the dataset are tailored for personnel having different roles in monitoring the items in a storage facility. For example, an inspector, a host treaty compliance officer, a system engineer and software developers were the users identified that would need to access data at different levels of detail, The analysis provides a high level status of the storage facility and allows the user to go deeper into the data details if the user desires.

  9. RF current sensor

    DOEpatents

    Moore, James A.; Sparks, Dennis O.

    1998-11-10

    An RF sensor having a novel current sensing probe and a voltage sensing probe to measure voltage and current. The current sensor is disposed in a transmission line to link all of the flux generated by the flowing current in order to obtain an accurate measurement. The voltage sensor is a flat plate which operates as a capacitive plate to sense voltage on a center conductor of the transmission line, in which the measured voltage is obtained across a resistance leg of a R-C differentiator circuit formed by the characteristic impedance of a connecting transmission line and a capacitance of the plate, which is positioned proximal to the center conductor.

  10. RF Communications Laboratory Renewal

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-04-08

    January, 1967, required placing steel beams in the lab building roof to withstand the 10,000 ft. -lb. torque rating of the positioner. All proposed...intBilUjr.™w«l«niw»r^MWMMUlPIWMMUIl»UfMM TWTWfTWTWI! SOUTH DAKOTA STATE UNIVERSITY Box 2220 Brooklngs, SO 57007-0194 Department of Electrical ...sampling and vector voltmeters, slotted lines, an rf bridge, a Q meter, octave directional couplers, f>tc. The EE Dept. also has a Hybrid

  11. RF Modal Quantity Gaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanleuven, K.

    1989-01-01

    The primary objective is to provide a concept of a radio frequency (RF) modal resonance technique which is being investigated as a method for gaging the quantities of subcritical cryogenic propellants in metallic tanks. Of special interest are the potential applications of the technique to microgravity propellant gaging situations. The results of concept testing using cryogenic oxygen, hydrogen, and nitrogen, as well as paraffin simulations of microgravity fluid orientations, are reported. These test results were positive and showed that the gaging concept was viable.

  12. The cathode plasma simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suksila, Thada

    Since its invention at the University of Stuttgart, Germany in the mid-1960, scientists have been trying to understand and explain the mechanism of the plasma interaction inside the magnetoplasmadynamics (MPD) thruster. Because this thruster creates a larger level of efficiency than combustion thrusters, this MPD thruster is the primary cadidate thruster for a long duration (planetary) spacecraft. However, the complexity of this thruster make it difficult to fully understand the plasma interaction in an MPD thruster while operating the device. That is, there is a great deal of physics involved: the fluid dynamics, the electromagnetics, the plasma dynamics, and the thermodynamics. All of these physics must be included when an MPD thruster operates. In recent years, a computer simulation helped scientists to simulate the experiments by programing the physics theories and comparing the simulation results with the experimental data. Many MPD thruster simulations have been conducted: E. Niewood et al.[5], C. K. J. Hulston et al.[6], K. D. Goodfellow[3], J Rossignol et al.[7]. All of these MPD computer simulations helped the scientists to see how quickly the system responds to the new design parameters. For this work, a 1D MPD thruster simulation was developed to find the voltage drop between the cathode and the plasma regions. Also, the properties such as thermal conductivity, electrical conductivity and heat capacity are temperature and pressure dependent. These two conductivity and heat capacity are usually definded as constant values in many other models. However, this 1D and 2D cylindrical symmetry MPD thruster simulations include both temperature and pressure effects to the electrical, thermal conductivities and heat capacity values interpolated from W. F. Ahtye [4]. Eventhough, the pressure effect is also significant; however, in this study the pressure at 66 Pa was set as a baseline. The 1D MPD thruster simulation includes the sheath region, which is the

  13. Polymer Device of Poly(3-hexylthiophene) with a Cathode Fabricated from Silver Nanoparticles by Wet Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kajii, Hirotake; Maki, Hideki; Kin, Zenken; Morimune, Taichiro; Ohmori, Yutaka

    2005-06-01

    The fabrication and characteristics of a polymer device of poly(3-hexylthiophene) (PAT6) with a cathode fabricated from silver (Ag) nanoparticles were investigated. As the formation temperature is 210°C, the cathode electrode can be formed by wet processing on the organic layer with an amorphous carbon nitride buffer layer and a bank to prevent Ag nanoparticles from penetrating into the organic layer. The PAT6 device with a cathode fabricated from Ag nanoparticles shows a photo-response and a red emission in the reverse and forward bias regions, respectively. We demonstrated the possibility of a polymer photodiode and an organic light-emitting diode with a cathode utilizing Ag nanoparticles.

  14. Ion source with external RF antenna

    DOEpatents

    Leung, Ka-Ngo; Ji, Qing; Wilde, Stephen

    2005-12-13

    A radio frequency (RF) driven plasma ion source has an external RF antenna, i.e. the RF antenna is positioned outside the plasma generating chamber rather than inside. The RF antenna is typically formed of a small diameter metal tube coated with an insulator. An external RF antenna assembly is used to mount the external RF antenna to the ion source. The RF antenna tubing is wound around the external RF antenna assembly to form a coil. The external RF antenna assembly is formed of a material, e.g. quartz, which is essentially transparent to the RF waves. The external RF antenna assembly is attached to and forms a part of the plasma source chamber so that the RF waves emitted by the RF antenna enter into the inside of the plasma chamber and ionize a gas contained therein. The plasma ion source is typically a multi-cusp ion source.

  15. Design aspects of 13.56MHz, 1kW, CW-RF oscillator for plasma production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Sunil; Kadia, Bhavesh; Singh, Raj; Varia, Atul; Srinivas, Y. S. S.; Kulkarni, S. V.; ICRH-RF Group

    2010-02-01

    RF produced plasma has many applications in plasma processing and also it is useful in studying the fundamental characteristics of the plasma. A 1KW RF Hartley oscillator is designed and tested at 13.56 MHz. This has been built at RF section of Institute for Plasma Research by using EIMAC (3CX1200A7) triode tube. The RF source is operated in the grounded cathode mode. Triode 3CX1200A7 is operated in class AB and the feedback is Cathode grounded. The tube has sufficient margin in terms of plate dissipation and Grid dissipation that makes it suitable to withstand momentarily load mismatch. To optimize the RF source along with HVDC power supply many mechanical and electrical aspects have been thought of to enhance the overall quality of the system. This source mainly has three sections (The RF section, HVDC Power supply and soft start Filament Power supply). The system is compact and is housed in a 80 cm × 60 cm × 1800 cm aluminum panel. This paper describes the specifications, design criteria, circuit used, operating parameters of 1KW Oscillator along with HVDC power supply with necessary interlocks, tests conducted and results obtained of this 1 KW grounded grid Hartley Oscillator on 50 ohm dummy load. This system has been tested for 8 hours of continuous operation without any appreciable deterioration of the RF output power.

  16. The MUCOOL RF Program

    SciTech Connect

    Norem, J.; Bross, A.; Moretti, A.; Norris, B.; Qian, Z.; Torun, Y.; Rimmer, R.; Li, D.; Virostek, S.; Zisman, M.; Sandstrom, R.; /Geneva U.

    2006-06-26

    Efficient muon cooling requires high RF gradients in the presence of high (3T) solenoidal fields. The Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) also requires that the x-ray production from these cavities is low, in order to minimize backgrounds in the particle detectors that must be located near the cavities. These cavities require thin Be windows to ensure the highest fields on the beam axis. In order to develop these cavities, the MUCOOL RF Program was started about 6 years ago. Initial measurements were made on a six-cell cavity and a single-cell pillbox, both operating at 805 MHz. We have now begun measurements of a 201 MHz pillbox cavity. This program has led to new techniques to look at dark currents, a new model for breakdown and a general model of cavity performance based on surface damage. The experimental program includes studies of thin Be windows, conditioning, dark current production from different materials, magnetic-field effects and breakdown.

  17. Titanium diaphragm makes excellent amplitron cathode support

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Teich, W. W.

    1965-01-01

    Cathode support structure designed around a titanium diaphragm prevents radial misalignment between the cathode and anode in amplitrons. The titanium exhibits low thermal conductivity, tolerates lateral thermal expansion of the cathode, and is a poor primary and secondary emission medium.

  18. RF MEMS Based Reconfigurable Antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simons, Rainee N.

    2004-01-01

    The presentation will first of all address the advantages of RF MEMS circuit in antenna applications and also the need for electronically reconfigurable antennas. Next, discuss some of the recent examples of RF MEMS based reconfigurable microstrip antennas. Finally, conclude the talk with a summary of MEMS antenna performance.

  19. NSLS-II RF SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Rose, J.; Gash, W.; Holub, B.; Kawashima, Y.; Ma, H.; Towne, N.; Yeddulla, M.

    2011-03-28

    The NSLS-II is a new third generation light source being constructed at Brookhaven Lab. The storage ring is optimized for low emittance by use of damping wigglers to reduce the emittance to below 1 nm-rad. The RF systems are designed to provide stable beam through tight RF phase and amplitude stability requirements.

  20. Photo annealing effect on p-doped inverted organic solar cell

    SciTech Connect

    Lafalce, Evan; Toglia, Patrick; Lewis, Jason E.; Jiang, Xiaomei

    2014-06-28

    We report the transient positive photo annealing effect in which over 600% boost of power conversion efficiency was observed in inverted organic photovoltaic devices (OPV) made from P3HT/PCBM by spray method, after 2 hrs of constant solar AM 1.5 irradiation at low temperature. This is opposite to usual photodegradation of OPV, and cannot be explained by thermal activation alone since the mere temperature effect could only account for 30% of the enhancement. We have investigated the temperature dependence, cell geometry, oxygen influence, and conclude that, for p-doped active layer at room temperature, the predominant mechanism is photo-desorption of O{sub 2}, which eliminates electron traps and reduces space charge screening. As temperature decreases, thermal activation and deep trap-state filling start to show noticeable effect on the enhancement of photocurrent at intermediate low temperature (T = 125 K). At very low temperature, the dominant mechanism for photo annealing is trap-filling, which significantly reduces recombination between free and trapped carriers. At all temperature, photo annealing effect depends on illumination direction from cathode or anode. We also explained the large fluctuation of photocurrent by the capture/reemit of trapped electrons from shallow electron traps of O{sub 2}{sup -} generated by photo-doping. Our study has demonstrated the dynamic process of photo-doping and photo-desorption, and shown that photo annealing in vacuum can be an efficient method to improve OPV device efficiency.

  1. Photo annealing effect on p-doped inverted organic solar cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lafalce, Evan; Toglia, Patrick; Lewis, Jason E.; Jiang, Xiaomei

    2014-06-01

    We report the transient positive photo annealing effect in which over 600% boost of power conversion efficiency was observed in inverted organic photovoltaic devices (OPV) made from P3HT/PCBM by spray method, after 2 hrs of constant solar AM 1.5 irradiation at low temperature. This is opposite to usual photodegradation of OPV, and cannot be explained by thermal activation alone since the mere temperature effect could only account for 30% of the enhancement. We have investigated the temperature dependence, cell geometry, oxygen influence, and conclude that, for p-doped active layer at room temperature, the predominant mechanism is photo-desorption of O2, which eliminates electron traps and reduces space charge screening. As temperature decreases, thermal activation and deep trap-state filling start to show noticeable effect on the enhancement of photocurrent at intermediate low temperature (T = 125 K). At very low temperature, the dominant mechanism for photo annealing is trap-filling, which significantly reduces recombination between free and trapped carriers. At all temperature, photo annealing effect depends on illumination direction from cathode or anode. We also explained the large fluctuation of photocurrent by the capture/reemit of trapped electrons from shallow electron traps of O2- generated by photo-doping. Our study has demonstrated the dynamic process of photo-doping and photo-desorption, and shown that photo annealing in vacuum can be an efficient method to improve OPV device efficiency.

  2. Characteristics of Hydrogen Negative Ion Source with FET based RF System

    SciTech Connect

    Ando, A.; Matsuno, T.; Funaoi, T.; Tanaka, N.; Tsumori, K.; Takeiri, Y.

    2011-09-26

    Characteristics of radio frequency (RF) plasma production were investigated using a FET inverter power supply as a RF generator. High density hydrogen plasma was obtained using an external coil wound a cylindrical ceramic tube (driver region) with RF frequency of lower than 0.5 MHz. When an axial magnetic field around 10 mT was applied to the driver region, an electron density increased drastically and attained to over 10{sup 19} m{sup -3} in the driver region. Effect of the axial magnetic field in driver and expansion region was examined. Lower gas pressure operation below 0.5 Pa was possible with higher RF frequency. H{sup -} density in the expansion region was measured by using laser photo-detachment system. It decreased as the axial magnetic field applied, which was caused by the increase of energetic electron from the driver.

  3. Enhanced responsivity resonant RF photodetectors.

    PubMed

    Liu, R; Dev, S; Zhong, Y; Lu, R; Streyer, W; Allen, J W; Allen, M S; Wenner, B R; Gong, S; Wasserman, D

    2016-11-14

    The responsivity of room-temperature, semiconductor-based photodetectors consisting of resonant RF circuits coupled to microstrip buslines is investigated. The dependence of the photodetector response on the semiconductor material and RF circuit geometry is presented, as is the detector response as a function of the spatial position of the incident light. We demonstrate significant improvement in detector response by choice of photoconductive material, and for a given material, by positioning our optical signal to overlap with positions of RF field enhancement. Design of RF circuits with strong field enhancement are demonstrated to further improve detector response. The improved detector response demonstrated offers opportunities for applications in RF photonics, materials metrology, or single read-out multiplexed detector arrays.

  4. Triservice/NASA cathode life test facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Windes, D.; Dutkowski, J.; Kaiser, R.; Justice, R.

    1999-05-01

    Since December 1992, Naval Surface Warfare Center-Crane Division (NSWCCD) has logged over 1,318,000 h of cathode life testing on 6 different cathode systems in the Triservice/NASA Cathode Life Test Facility. These include two types of reservoir cathodes designated as MK (Siemens), and RV (CPI, formerly Varian), and impregnated matrix cathodes designated M type (manufactured by Semicon and Hughes), TM (Transition Metal cathodes-CPI) and MMM (Mixed Metal Matrix cathodes-CPI). This paper will present results of the cathode life testing at this facility.

  5. Cheaper Hydride-Forming Cathodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Jack A.; Blue, Gary

    1990-01-01

    Hydride-forming cathodes for electrochemical experiments made of materials or combinations of materials cheaper and more abundant than pure palladium, according to proposal. Concept prompted by needs of experimenters in now-discredited concept of electrochemical nuclear fusion, cathodes useful in other electrochemical applications involving generation or storage of hydrogen, deuterium, or tritium.

  6. Hot hollow cathode gun assembly

    DOEpatents

    Zeren, J.D.

    1983-11-22

    A hot hollow cathode deposition gun assembly includes a hollow body having a cylindrical outer surface and an end plate for holding an adjustable heat sink, the hot hollow cathode gun, two magnets for steering the plasma from the gun into a crucible on the heat sink, and a shutter for selectively covering and uncovering the crucible.

  7. Virtual cathode microwave devices -- Basics

    SciTech Connect

    Thode, L.E.; Snell, C.M.

    1991-01-01

    Unlike a conventional microwave tube, a virtual-cathode device operates above the space-charge limit where the depth of the space-charge potential can cause electron reflection. The region associated with this electron reflection is referred to as a virtual cathode. Microwaves can be generated through oscillations in the position of the virtual cathode and through the bunching of electrons trapped in a potential well between the real and virtual cathodes. These two mechanisms are competitive. There are three basic classes of virtual cathode devices: (1) reflex triode; (2) reditron and side-shoot vircator; and (3) reflex diode or vircator. The reflex diode is the highest power virtual-cathode device. For the reflex diode the energy exchange between the beam and electromagnetic wave occurs in both the axial and radial directions. In some designs the oscillating-virtual-cathode frequency exceeds the reflexing-electron frequency exceeds the oscillating-virtual-cathode frequency. For the flex diode a periodic disruption in magnetic insulation can modulate the high- frequency microwave power. Overall, particle-in-cell simulation predictions and axial reflex diode experiments are in good agreement. Although frequency stability and phase locking of the reflex diode have been demonstrated, little progress has been made in efficiency enhancement. 58 refs., 11 figs.

  8. Cathodic hydrodimerization of nitroolefins

    PubMed Central

    Weßling, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Summary Nitroalkenes are easily accessible in high variety by condensation of aldehydes with aliphatic nitroalkanes. They belong to the group of activated alkenes that can be hydrodimerized by cathodic reduction. There are many olefins with different electron withdrawing groups used for cathodic hydrodimerization, but not much is known about the behaviour of the nitro group. Synthetic applications of this group could profit from the easy access to nitroolefins in large variety, the C–C bond formation with the introduction of two nitro groups in a 1,4-distance and the conversions of the nitro group by reduction to oximes and amines, the conversion into aldehydes and ketones via the Nef reaction and base catalyzed condensations at the acidic CH bond. Eight 1-aryl-2-nitro-1-propenes have been electrolyzed in an undivided electrolysis cell to afford 2,5-dinitro-3,4-diaryl hexanes in high yield. The 4-methoxy-, 4-trifluoromethyl-, 2-chloro- and 2,6-difluorophenyl group and furthermore the 2-furyl and 2-pyrrolyl group have been applied. The reaction is chemoselective as only the double bond but not the nitro group undergoes reaction, is regioselective as a ß,ß-coupling with regard to the nitro group and forms preferentially two out of six possible diastereomers as major products. PMID:26199673

  9. Cathodic hydrodimerization of nitroolefins.

    PubMed

    Weßling, Michael; Schäfer, Hans J

    2015-01-01

    Nitroalkenes are easily accessible in high variety by condensation of aldehydes with aliphatic nitroalkanes. They belong to the group of activated alkenes that can be hydrodimerized by cathodic reduction. There are many olefins with different electron withdrawing groups used for cathodic hydrodimerization, but not much is known about the behaviour of the nitro group. Synthetic applications of this group could profit from the easy access to nitroolefins in large variety, the C-C bond formation with the introduction of two nitro groups in a 1,4-distance and the conversions of the nitro group by reduction to oximes and amines, the conversion into aldehydes and ketones via the Nef reaction and base catalyzed condensations at the acidic CH bond. Eight 1-aryl-2-nitro-1-propenes have been electrolyzed in an undivided electrolysis cell to afford 2,5-dinitro-3,4-diaryl hexanes in high yield. The 4-methoxy-, 4-trifluoromethyl-, 2-chloro- and 2,6-difluorophenyl group and furthermore the 2-furyl and 2-pyrrolyl group have been applied. The reaction is chemoselective as only the double bond but not the nitro group undergoes reaction, is regioselective as a ß,ß-coupling with regard to the nitro group and forms preferentially two out of six possible diastereomers as major products.

  10. Measured performance of the GTA rf systems

    SciTech Connect

    Denney, P.M.; Jachim, S.P.

    1993-06-01

    This paper describes the performance of the RF systems on the Ground Test Accelerator (GTA). The RF system architecture is briefly described. Among the RF performance results presented are RF field flatness and stability, amplitude and phase control resolution, and control system bandwidth and stability. The rejection by the RF systems of beam-induced disturbances, such as transients and noise, are analyzed. The observed responses are also compared to computer-based simulations of the RF systems for validation.

  11. Measured performance of the GTA rf systems

    SciTech Connect

    Denney, P.M.; Jachim, S.P.

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes the performance of the RF systems on the Ground Test Accelerator (GTA). The RF system architecture is briefly described. Among the RF performance results presented are RF field flatness and stability, amplitude and phase control resolution, and control system bandwidth and stability. The rejection by the RF systems of beam-induced disturbances, such as transients and noise, are analyzed. The observed responses are also compared to computer-based simulations of the RF systems for validation.

  12. In Situ observation of dark current emission in a high gradient rf photocathode gun

    DOE PAGES

    Shao, Jiahang; Shi, Jiaru; Antipov, Sergey P.; ...

    2016-08-15

    Undesirable electron field emission (also known as dark current) in high gradient rf photocathode guns deteriorates the quality of the photoemission current and limits the operational gradient. To improve the understanding of dark current emission, a high-resolution (~100 μm) dark current imaging experiment has been performed in an L-band photocathode gun operating at ~100 MV/m of surface gradient. Scattered strong emission areas with high current have been observed on the cathode. The field enhancement factor β of selected regions on the cathode has been measured. Finally, the postexaminations with scanning electron microscopy and white light interferometry reveal the origins ofmore » ~75% strong emission areas overlap with the spots where rf breakdown has occurred.« less

  13. A Micromechanical RF Channelizer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akgul, Mehmet

    The power consumption of a radio generally goes as the number and strength of the RF signals it must process. In particular, a radio receiver would consume much less power if the signal presented to its electronics contained only the desired signal in a tiny percent bandwidth frequency channel, rather than the typical mix of signals containing unwanted energy outside the desired channel. Unfortunately, a lack of filters capable of selecting single channel bandwidths at RF forces the front-ends of contemporary receivers to accept unwanted signals, and thus, to operate with sub-optimal efficiency. This dissertation focuses on the degree to which capacitive-gap transduced micromechanical resonators can achieve the aforementioned RF channel-selecting filters. It aims to first show theoretically that with appropriate scaling capacitive-gap transducers are strong enough to meet the needed coupling requirements; and second, to fully detail an architecture and design procedure needed to realize said filters. Finally, this dissertation provides an actual experimentally demonstrated RF channel-select filter designed using the developed procedures and confirming theoretical predictions. Specifically, this dissertation introduces four methods that make possible the design and fabrication of RF channel-select filters. The first of these introduces a small-signal equivalent circuit for parallel-plate capacitive-gap transduced micromechanical resonators that employs negative capacitance to model the dependence of resonance frequency on electrical stiffness in a way that facilitates the analysis of micromechanical circuits loaded with arbitrary electrical impedances. The new circuit model not only correctly predicts the dependence of electrical stiffness on the impedances loading the input and output electrodes of parallel-plate capacitive-gap transduced micromechanical device, but does so in a visually intuitive way that identifies current drive as most appropriate for

  14. An experiment to test the viability of a gallium-arsenide cathode in a SRF electron gun

    SciTech Connect

    Kewisch,J.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Rao, T.; Burrill, A.; Pate, D.; Wu, Q.; Todd, R.; Wang, E.; Bluem, H.; Holmes, D.; Schultheiss, T.

    2009-05-04

    Strained gallium arsenide cathodes are used in electron guns for the production of polarized electrons. In order to have a sufficient quantum efficiency lifetime of the cathode the vacuum in the gun must be 10{sup -11} Torr or better, so that the cathode is not destroyed by ion back bombardment or through contamination with residual gases. All successful polarized guns are DC guns, because such vacuum levels can not be obtained in normal conducting RF guns. A superconductive RF gun may provide a sufficient vacuum level due to cryo-pumping of the cavity walls. We report on the progress of our experiment to test such a gun with normal GaAs-Cs crystals.

  15. Spectroscopy of {sup 257}Rf

    SciTech Connect

    Qian, J.; Heinz, A.; Winkler, R.; Khoo, T. L.; Janssens, R. V. F.; Peterson, D.; Seweryniak, D.; Ahmad, I.; Back, B. B.; Carpenter, M. P.; Greene, J. P.; Jiang, C. L.; Kondev, F. G.; Lauritsen, T.; Lister, C. J.; Robinson, A.; Savard, G.; Scott, R.; Vondrasek, R.; Wang, X.

    2009-06-15

    The isotope {sup 257}Rf was produced in the fusion-evaporation reaction {sup 208}Pb({sup 50}Ti,n){sup 257}Rf. Reaction products were separated and identified by mass. Delayed spectroscopy of {sup 257}Rf and its decay products was performed. A partial decay scheme with configuration assignments is proposed based on {alpha} hindrance factors. The excitation energy of the 1/2{sup +}[620] configuration in {sup 253}No is proposed. The energy of this 1/2{sup +} state in a series of N=151 isotones increases with nuclear charge, reflecting an increase in the N=152 gap. This gap is deduced to grow substantially from 850 to 1400 keV between Z=94 and 102. An isomeric state in {sup 257}Rf, with a half-life of 160{sub -31}{sup +42} {mu}s, was discovered by detecting internal conversion electrons followed by {alpha} decay. It is interpreted as a three-quasiparticle high-K isomer. A second group of internal conversion electrons, with a half-life of 4.1{sub -1.3}{sup +2.4} s, followed by {alpha} decay, was also observed. These events might originate from the decay of excited states in {sup 257}Lr, populated by electron-capture decay of {sup 257}Rf. Fission of {sup 257}Rf was unambiguously detected, with a branching ratio of b{sub Rf}{sup SF}=0.02{+-}0.01.

  16. Multiple Hollow Cathode Wear Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soulas, George C.

    1994-01-01

    A hollow cathode-based plasma contactor has been baselined for use on the Space Station to reduce station charging. The plasma contactor provides a low impedance connection to space plasma via a plasma produced by an arc discharge. The hollow cathode of the plasma contactor is a refractory metal tube, through which xenon gas flows, which has a disk-shaped plate with a centered orifice at the downstream end of the tube. Within the cathode, arc attachment occurs primarily on a Type S low work function insert that is next to the orifice plate. This low work function insert is used to reduce cathode operating temperatures and energy requirements and, therefore, achieve increased efficiency and longevity. The operating characteristics and lifetime capabilities of this hollow cathode, however, are greatly reduced by oxygen bearing contaminants in the xenon gas. Furthermore, an optimized activation process, where the cathode is heated prior to ignition by an external heater to drive contaminants such as oxygen and moisture from the insert absorbed during exposure to ambient air, is necessary both for cathode longevity and a simplified power processor. In order to achieve the two year (approximately 17,500 hours) continuous operating lifetime requirement for the plasma contactor, a test program was initiated at NASA Lewis Research Center to demonstrate the extended lifetime capabilities of the hollow cathode. To date, xenon hollow cathodes have demonstrated extended lifetimes with one test having operated in excess of 8000 hours in an ongoing test utilizing contamination control protocols developed by Sarver-Verhey. The objectives of this study were to verify the transportability of the contamination control protocols developed by Sarver-Verhey and to evaluate cathode contamination control procedures, activation processes, and cathode-to-cathode dispersions in operating characteristics with time. These were accomplished by conducting a 2000 hour wear test of four hollow

  17. Electron beam characterization of a combined diode rf electron gun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganter, R.; Beutner, B.; Binder, S.; Braun, H. H.; Garvey, T.; Gough, C.; Hauri, C.; Ischebeck, R.; Ivkovic, S.; Le Pimpec, F.; Li, K.; Paraliev, M. L.; Pedrozzi, M.; Schietinger, T.; Steffen, B.; Trisorio, A.; Wrulich, A.

    2010-09-01

    Experimental and simulation results of an electron gun test facility, based on pulsed diode acceleration followed by a two-cell rf cavity at 1.5 GHz, are presented here. The main features of this diode-rf combination are: a high peak gradient in the diode (up to 100MV/m) obtained without breakdown conditioning, a cathode shape providing an electrostatic focusing, and an in-vacuum pulsed solenoid to focus the electron beam between the diode and the rf cavity. Although the test stand was initially developed for testing field emitter arrays cathodes, it became also interesting to explore the limits of this electron gun with metallic photocathodes illuminated by laser pulses. The ultimate goal of this test facility is to fulfill the requirements of the SwissFEL project of Paul Scherrer Institute [B. D. Patterson , New J. Phys. 12, 035012 (2010)NJOPFM1367-263010.1088/1367-2630/12/3/035012]; a projected normalized emittance below 0.4μm for a charge of 200 pC and a bunch length of less than 10 ps (rms). A normalized projected emittance of 0.23μm with 13 pC has been measured at 5 MeV using a Gaussian laser longitudinal intensity distribution on the photocathode. Good agreements with simulations have been obtained for different electron bunch charge and diode geometries. Emittance measurements at a bunch charge below 1 pC were performed for different laser spot sizes in agreement with intrinsic emittance theory [e.g. 0.54μm/mm of laser spot size (rms) for Cu at 274 nm]. Finally, a projected emittance of 1.25+/-0.2μm was measured with 200 pC and 100MV/m diode gradient.

  18. Investigations and Applications of Field- and Photo-emitted Electron Beams from a Radio Frequency Gun

    SciTech Connect

    Panuganti, SriHarsha

    2015-08-01

    Production of quality electron bunches using e cient ways of generation is a crucial aspect of accelerator technology. Radio frequency electron guns are widely used to generate and rapidly accelerate electron beams to relativistic energies. In the current work, we primarily study the charge generation processes of photoemission and eld emission inside an RF gun installed at Fermilab's High Brightness Electron Source Laboratory (HBESL). Speci cally, we study and characterize second-order nonlinear photoemission from a Cesium Telluride (Cs2Te) semiconductor photocathode, and eld emission from carbon based cathodes including diamond eld emission array (DFEA) and carbon nanotube (CNT) cathodes located in the RF gun's cavity. Finally, we discuss the application experiments conducted at the facility to produce soft x-rays via inverse Compton scattering (ICS), and to generate uniformly lled ellipsoidal bunches and temporally shaped electron beams from the Cs2Te photocathode.

  19. rf traveling-wave electron gun for photoinjectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaer, Mattia; Citterio, Alessandro; Craievich, Paolo; Reiche, Sven; Stingelin, Lukas; Zennaro, Riccardo

    2016-07-01

    The design of a photoinjector, in particular that of the electron source, is of central importance for free electron laser (FEL) machines where a high beam brightness is required. In comparison to standard designs, an rf traveling-wave photocathode gun can provide a more rigid beam with a higher brightness and a shorter pulse. This is illustrated by applying a specific optimization procedure to the SwissFEL photoinjector, for which a brightness improvement up to a factor 3 could be achieved together with a double gun output energy compared to the reference setup foreseeing a state-of-the-art S-band rf standing-wave gun. The higher brightness is mainly given by a (at least) double peak current at the exit of the gun which brings benefits for both the beam dynamics in the linac and the efficiency of the FEL process. The gun design foresees an innovative coaxial rf coupling at both ends of the structure which allows a solenoid with integrated bucking coil to be placed around the cathode in order to provide the necessary focusing right after emission.

  20. RF tuning element

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McGrath, William R. (Inventor); Lubecke, Victor M. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A device for tuning a circuit includes a substrate, a transmission line on the substrate that includes first and second conductors coupled to a circuit to be tuned, and a movable short-circuit for varying the impedance the transmission line presents to the circuit to be tuned. The movable short-circuit includes a dielectric layer disposed atop the transmission line and a distributed shorting element in the form of a conductive member that is configured to be slid along at least a portion of the transmission line atop the dielectric layer. The conductive member is configured to span the first and second conductors of the transmission line and to define at least a first opening that spans the two conductors so that the conductive member includes first and second sections separated by the first opening. The first and second sections of the conductive member combine with the first and second conductors of the transmission line to form first and second low impedance sections of transmission line, and the opening combines with the first and second conductors of the transmission line and the dielectric layer to form a first high impedance section of transmission line intermediate the first and second low impedance sections. Each of the first low impedance section and the first high impedance section have a length along the transmission line of approximately one-quarter wavelength, thus providing a periodic variation of transmission line impedance. That enhances reflection of rf power.

  1. Observation of Quartz Cathode-Luminescence in a Low Pressure Plasma Discharge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, John E.

    2004-01-01

    Intense, steady-state cathode-luminescence has been observed from exposure of quartz powder to a low pressure rf-excited argon plasma discharge. The emission spectra (400 to 850 nm) associated with the powder luminescence were documented as a function of bias voltage using a spectrometer. The emission was broad-band, essentially washing out the line spectra features of the argon plasma discharge.

  2. Unbalanced field RF electron gun

    DOEpatents

    Hofler, Alicia

    2013-11-12

    A design for an RF electron gun having a gun cavity utilizing an unbalanced electric field arrangement. Essentially, the electric field in the first (partial) cell has higher field strength than the electric field in the second (full) cell of the electron gun. The accompanying method discloses the use of the unbalanced field arrangement in the operation of an RF electron gun in order to accelerate an electron beam.

  3. Concepts for a short wavelength rf gun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuzikov, S. V.; Shchelkunov, S.; Vikharev, A. A.

    2017-03-01

    Three concepts of an rf gun to be operated at 0.1-10 mm wavelengths are considered. In all the concepts, the rf system exploits an accelerating traveling wave. In comparison with a classical decimeter standing-wave rf gun, we analyze the advantages of new concepts, available rf sources, and achievable beam parameters.

  4. FPGA-based RF interference reduction techniques for simultaneous PET–MRI

    PubMed Central

    Gebhardt, P; Wehner, J; Weissler, B; Botnar, R; Marsden, PK; Schulz, V

    2017-01-01

    The combination of positron emission tomography (PET) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as a multi-modal imaging technique is considered very promising and powerful with regard to in vivo disease progression examination, therapy response monitoring and drug development. However, PET–MRI system design enabling simultaneous operation with unaffected intrinsic performance of both modalities is challenging. As one of the major issues, both the PET detectors and the MRI radio-frequency (RF) subsystem are exposed to electromagnetic (EM) interference, which may lead to PET and MRI signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) deteriorations. Early digitization of electronic PET signals within the MRI bore helps to preserve PET SNR, but occurs at the expense of increased amount of PET electronics inside the MRI and associated RF field emissions. This raises the likelihood of PET-related MRI interference by coupling into the MRI RF coil unwanted spurious signals considered as RF noise, as it degrades MRI SNR and results in MR image artefacts. RF shielding of PET detectors is a commonly used technique to reduce PET-related RF interferences, but can introduce eddy current-related MRI disturbances and hinder the highest system integration. In this paper, we present RF interference reduction methods which rely on EM field coupling–decoupling principles of RF receive coils rather than suppressing emitted fields. By modifying clock frequencies and changing clock phase relations of digital circuits, the resulting RF field emission is optimised with regard to a lower field coupling into the MRI RF coil, thereby increasing the RF silence of PET detectors. Our methods are demonstrated by performing FPGA-based clock frequency and phase shifting of digital silicon photo-multipliers (dSiPMs) used in the PET modules of our MR-compatible Hyperion IID PET insert. We present simulations and magnetic-field map scans visualising the impact of altered clock phase pattern on the spatial RF field

  5. FPGA-based RF interference reduction techniques for simultaneous PET-MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gebhardt, P.; Wehner, J.; Weissler, B.; Botnar, R.; Marsden, P. K.; Schulz, V.

    2016-05-01

    The combination of positron emission tomography (PET) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as a multi-modal imaging technique is considered very promising and powerful with regard to in vivo disease progression examination, therapy response monitoring and drug development. However, PET-MRI system design enabling simultaneous operation with unaffected intrinsic performance of both modalities is challenging. As one of the major issues, both the PET detectors and the MRI radio-frequency (RF) subsystem are exposed to electromagnetic (EM) interference, which may lead to PET and MRI signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) deteriorations. Early digitization of electronic PET signals within the MRI bore helps to preserve PET SNR, but occurs at the expense of increased amount of PET electronics inside the MRI and associated RF field emissions. This raises the likelihood of PET-related MRI interference by coupling into the MRI RF coil unwanted spurious signals considered as RF noise, as it degrades MRI SNR and results in MR image artefacts. RF shielding of PET detectors is a commonly used technique to reduce PET-related RF interferences, but can introduce eddy-current-related MRI disturbances and hinder the highest system integration. In this paper, we present RF interference reduction methods which rely on EM field coupling-decoupling principles of RF receive coils rather than suppressing emitted fields. By modifying clock frequencies and changing clock phase relations of digital circuits, the resulting RF field emission is optimised with regard to a lower field coupling into the MRI RF coil, thereby increasing the RF silence of PET detectors. Our methods are demonstrated by performing FPGA-based clock frequency and phase shifting of digital silicon photo-multipliers (dSiPMs) used in the PET modules of our MR-compatible Hyperion II D PET insert. We present simulations and magnetic-field map scans visualising the impact of altered clock phase pattern on the spatial RF field distribution

  6. FPGA-based RF interference reduction techniques for simultaneous PET-MRI.

    PubMed

    Gebhardt, P; Wehner, J; Weissler, B; Botnar, R; Marsden, P K; Schulz, V

    2016-05-07

    The combination of positron emission tomography (PET) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as a multi-modal imaging technique is considered very promising and powerful with regard to in vivo disease progression examination, therapy response monitoring and drug development. However, PET-MRI system design enabling simultaneous operation with unaffected intrinsic performance of both modalities is challenging. As one of the major issues, both the PET detectors and the MRI radio-frequency (RF) subsystem are exposed to electromagnetic (EM) interference, which may lead to PET and MRI signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) deteriorations. Early digitization of electronic PET signals within the MRI bore helps to preserve PET SNR, but occurs at the expense of increased amount of PET electronics inside the MRI and associated RF field emissions. This raises the likelihood of PET-related MRI interference by coupling into the MRI RF coil unwanted spurious signals considered as RF noise, as it degrades MRI SNR and results in MR image artefacts. RF shielding of PET detectors is a commonly used technique to reduce PET-related RF interferences, but can introduce eddy-current-related MRI disturbances and hinder the highest system integration. In this paper, we present RF interference reduction methods which rely on EM field coupling-decoupling principles of RF receive coils rather than suppressing emitted fields. By modifying clock frequencies and changing clock phase relations of digital circuits, the resulting RF field emission is optimised with regard to a lower field coupling into the MRI RF coil, thereby increasing the RF silence of PET detectors. Our methods are demonstrated by performing FPGA-based clock frequency and phase shifting of digital silicon photo-multipliers (dSiPMs) used in the PET modules of our MR-compatible Hyperion II (D) PET insert. We present simulations and magnetic-field map scans visualising the impact of altered clock phase pattern on the spatial RF field

  7. Observation of radio frequency ring-shaped hollow cathode discharge plasma with MgO and Al electrodes for plasma processing

    SciTech Connect

    Ohtsu, Yasunori Matsumoto, Naoki

    2014-05-15

    Various high-density plasma sources have been proposed for plasma processing. Especially, the hollow cathode discharge is one of the powerful ones. In this work, radio-frequency (RF) driven ring-shaped hollow cathode discharges with high secondary-electron emission have been investigated, using an aluminum (Al) cathode, coated or not with magnesium oxide (MgO). The thickness of MgO thin film is approximately 200 nm. The RF discharge voltage for the coated cathode is almost the same as that for the uncoated one, in a wide range of Ar gas pressure, from 5.3 to 53.2 Pa. The results reveal that the plasma density has a peak at an Ar gas pressure of 10.6 Pa for both cathodes. The plasma density for the coated cathode is about 1.5–3 times higher than that for the uncoated one, at various gas pressures. To the contrary, the electron temperature for the coated cathode is lower than temperature obtained with the uncoated cathode, at various gas pressures. Radial profiles of electron saturation current, which is proportional to plasma flux, are also examined for a wide range of gas pressure. Radial profiles of electron temperature at various axial positions are almost uniform for both cathodes so that the diffusion process due to density gradient is dominant for plasma transport. The secondary electrons emitted from the coated cathode contribute to the improvement of the plasma flux radial profile obtained using the uncoated cathode.

  8. Magnetic-cusp, cathodic-arc source

    DOEpatents

    Falabella, Steven

    1995-01-01

    A magnetic-cusp for a cathodic-arc source wherein the arc is confined to the desired cathode surface, provides a current path for electrons from the cathode to the anode, and utilizes electric and magnetic fields to guide ions from the cathode to a point of use, such as substrates to be coated. The magnetic-cusp insures arc stability by an easy magnetic path from anode to cathode, while the straight-through arrangement leads to high ion transmission.

  9. Towards a 100mA Superconducting RF Photoinjector for BERLinPro

    SciTech Connect

    Neumann, Axel; Anders, W; Burrill, Andrew; Jankowiak, Andreas; Kamps, T; Knobloch, Jens; Kugeler, Oliver; Lauinger, P; Matveenko, A N; Schmeisser, M; Volker, J; Ciovati, Gianluigi; Kneisel, Peter; Nietubyc, R; Schubert, S G; Smedley, John; Sekutowicz, Jacek; Volkov, V; Will, I; Zaplatin, Evgeny

    2013-09-01

    For BERLinPro, a 100 mA CW-driven SRF energy recovery linac demonstrator facility, HZB needs to develop a photo-injector superconducting cavity which delivers a at least 1mm*mr emittance beam at high average current. To address these challenges of producing a high peak brightness beam at high repetition rate, at first HZB tested a fully superconducting injector with a lead cathode*,followed now by the design of a SC cavity allowing operation up to 4 mA using CW-modified TTF-III couplers and inserting a normal conducting high quantum efficiency cathode using the HZDR-style insert scheme. This talk will present the latest results and an overview of the measurements with the lead cathode cavity and will describe the design and optimization process, the first production results of the current design and an outlook to the further development steps towards the full power version.

  10. Single bunch injection system for storage ring FEL using an rf photoinjector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Shea, P. G.; Lancaster, J. A.; Madey, J. M. J.; Sachtschale, R.; Jones, R.

    1997-05-01

    RF photoinjectors have gained acceptance as the source of choice for high-brightness electron accelerators, but have been quite expensive to build and difficult to operate. In this paper we describe the successful operation of an inexpensive, simple and reliable rf photoinjector suitable for single bunch injection into storage rings. For optimum storage ring FEL and Compton Backscatter performance, we require that the electrons be injected to specified ring rf buckets and no others. The injector-linac electron gun is a single-cell s-band rf gun with a LaB6 cathode. The gun is followed by an a-magnet momentum filter and buncher. The LaB6 cathode can be operated in a pure thermionic mode, a laser switched photoemission mode, or in a combined mode. The laser is a near-UV TEA nitrogen laser with a 600 ps pulse, and 0-50 Hz repetition rate. We routinely inject 0.1 nC bunches at 270 MeV. The ratio of charge in the primary ring bucket to that in the other buckets is better than 1000.

  11. Cold cathode vacuum discharge tube

    DOEpatents

    Boettcher, Gordon E.

    1998-01-01

    A cold cathode vacuum discharge tube, and method for making same, with an interior surface of the trigger probe coated with carbon deposited by carbon vapor deposition (CVD) or diamond-like carbon (DLC) deposition. Preferably a solid graphite insert is employed in the probe-cathode structure in place of an aluminum bushing employed in the prior art. The CVD or DLC probe face is laser scribed to allow resistance trimming to match available trigger voltage signals and to reduce electrical aging.

  12. Performance of photocathode rf gun electron accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Ben-Zvi, I.

    1993-07-01

    In Photo-Injectors (PI) electron guns, electrons are emitted from a photocathode by a short laser pulse and then accelerated by intense rf fields in a resonant cavity. The best known advantage of this technique is the high peak current with a good emittance (high brightness). This is important for short wavelength Free-Electron Lasers and linear colliders. PIs are in operation in many electron accelerator facilities and a large number of new guns are under construction. Some applications have emerged, providing, for example, very high pulse charges. PIs have been operated over a wide range of frequencies, from 144 to 3000 MHz (a 17 GHz gun is being developed). An exciting new possibility is the development of superconducting PIs. A significant body of experimental and theoretical work exists by now, indicating the criticality of the accelerator elements that follow the gun for the preservation of the PI`s performance as well as possible avenues of improvements in brightness. Considerable research is being done on the laser and photocathode material of the PI, and improvement is expected in this area.

  13. Performance of photocathode rf gun electron accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Ben-Zvi, I.

    1993-01-01

    In Photo-Injectors (PI) electron guns, electrons are emitted from a photocathode by a short laser pulse and then accelerated by intense rf fields in a resonant cavity. The best known advantage of this technique is the high peak current with a good emittance (high brightness). This is important for short wavelength Free-Electron Lasers and linear colliders. PIs are in operation in many electron accelerator facilities and a large number of new guns are under construction. Some applications have emerged, providing, for example, very high pulse charges. PIs have been operated over a wide range of frequencies, from 144 to 3000 MHz (a 17 GHz gun is being developed). An exciting new possibility is the development of superconducting PIs. A significant body of experimental and theoretical work exists by now, indicating the criticality of the accelerator elements that follow the gun for the preservation of the PI's performance as well as possible avenues of improvements in brightness. Considerable research is being done on the laser and photocathode material of the PI, and improvement is expected in this area.

  14. QE Tests with Nb-Pb SRF Photoinjector and Arc Deposited Cathodes

    SciTech Connect

    J.K. Sekutowicz, P. Kneisel, R. Nietubyc, T. Rao, J. Smedley

    2010-05-01

    In this contribution, we report Quantum Efficiency (QE) test results with a hybrid lead/niobium superconducting RF (SRF) photoinjector at 2K and new Pb arc deposited cathodes at 300K. The ultimate goal of our effort is to build a Nb injector with the superconducting cathode made of lead, which, as reported in the past, demonstrated superior QE compared to other metallic superconducting elements. At first, we present the test results obtained with a 1.6-cell high purity Nb cavity with the emitting lead spot in the center of the back plate. The QE test results at room temperature and the SEM surface analysis of eight Pb cathodes, deposited recently under various conditions, are discussed in the second part of this contribution.

  15. Cold cathode vacuum gauging system

    DOEpatents

    Denny, Edward C.

    2004-03-09

    A vacuum gauging system of the cold cathode type is provided for measuring the pressure of a plurality of separate vacuum systems, such as in a gas centrifuge cascade. Each casing is fitted with a gauge tube assembly which communicates with the vacuum system in the centrifuge casing. Each gauge tube contains an anode which may be in the form of a slender rod or wire hoop and a cathode which may be formed by the wall of the gauge tube. The tube is provided with an insulated high voltage connector to the anode which has a terminal for external connection outside the vacuum casing. The tube extends from the casing so that a portable magnet assembly may be inserted about the tube to provide a magnetic field in the area between the anode and cathode necessary for pressure measurements in a cold cathode-type vacuum gauge arrangement. The portable magnetic assembly is provided with a connector which engages the external high voltage terminal for providing power to the anode within in the gauge tube. Measurement is made in the same manner as the prior cold cathode gauges in that the current through the anode to the cathode is measured as an indication of the pressure. By providing the portable magnetic assembly, a considerable savings in cost, installation, and maintenance of vacuum gauges for pressure measurement in a gas centrifuge cascade is realizable.

  16. Photo-induced structural changes in Ge-Sb-Se films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Li; Wang, Guoxiang; Shen, Xiang; Dai, Shixun; Xu, Tiefeng; Nie, Qiuhua

    2017-03-01

    Amorphous Ge-Sb-Se thin films have been prepared by the radio-frequency (RF) magnetron co-sputtering deposition technique, and their intrinsic photosensitivity and photo-induced structural changes have been investigated. The results show a crossover from photodarkening (PD) to photobleaching (PB) in the films when the film compositions change from Se-deficient to rich. Further Raman analysis on these as-prepared thin films irradiated with a laser of wavelength 655 nm in every five minutes provides direct evidence of photo-induced structure rearrangements.

  17. Thin-film rechargeable lithium batteries with amorphous Li{sub x}Mn{sub 2}O{sub 4} cathodes

    SciTech Connect

    Dudney, N.J.; Bates, J.B.; Lubben, D.; Hart, F.X |

    1996-01-01

    Cathode films of amorphous Li{sub x}Mn{sub 2}O{sub 4} have been grown by rf magnetron sputtering on unheated substrates. A low process gas pressure and a positive substrate bias were found to give the most conductive cathodes. The batteries were completed with subsequent deposition of a lithium phosphorous oxynitride electrolyte and Li anode. These cells were cycled at 25-100 C between 4.5 and 1.5 V which corresponds to {approximately}0 to 2 Li per Mn{sub 2}O{sub 4}. The amorphous cathodes have a highs pecific capacity and a low capacity loss per cycle.

  18. Liquid cathode primary batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlaikjer, Carl R.

    1985-03-01

    Lithium/liquid cathode/carbon primary batteries offer from 3 to 6 times the volumetric energy density of zinc/alkaline manganese cells, improved stability during elevated temperature storage, satisfactory operation at temperatures from -40 to +150 °C, and efficient discharge at moderate rates. he lithium/sulfur dioxide cell is the most efficient system at temperatures below 0 °C. Although chemical reactions leading to electrolyte degradation and lithium corrosion are known, the rates of these reactions are slow. While the normal temperature cell reaction produces lithium dithionite, discharge at 60 °C leads to a reduction in capacity due to side reactions involving sulfur dioxide and discharge intermediates. Lithium/thionyl chloride and lithium/sulfuryl chloride cells have the highest practical gravimetric and volumetric energy densities when compared with aqueous and most other nonaqueous systems. For thionyl chloride, discharge proceeds through a series of intermediates to sulfur, sulfur dioxide and lithium chloride. Catalysis, leading to improved rate capability and capacity, has been achieved. The causes of rapid reactions leading to thermal runaway are thought to be chemical in nature. Lithium/sulfuryl chloride cells, which produce sulfur dioxide and lithium chloride on discharge, experience more extensive anode corrosion. An inorganic cosolvent and suitable salt are capable of alleviating this corrosion. Calcium/oxyhalide cells have been studied because of their promise of increased safety without substantial sacrifice of energy density relative to lithium cells. Anode corrosion, particularly during discharge, has delayed practical development.

  19. Additive manufacturing of RF absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mills, Matthew S.

    The ability of additive manufacturing techniques to fabricate integrated electromagnetic absorbers tuned for specific radio frequency bands within structural composites allows for unique combinations of mechanical and electromagnetic properties. These composites and films can be used for RF shielding of sensitive electromagnetic components through in-plane and out-of-plane RF absorption. Structural composites are a common building block of many commercial platforms. These platforms may be placed in situations in which there is a need for embedded RF absorbing properties along with structural properties. Instead of adding radar absorbing treatments to the external surface of existing structures, which adds increased size, weight and cost; it could prove to be advantageous to integrate the microwave absorbing properties directly into the composite during the fabrication process. In this thesis, a method based on additive manufacturing techniques of composites structures with prescribed electromagnetic loss, within the frequency range 1 to 26GHz, is presented. This method utilizes screen printing and nScrypt micro dispensing to pattern a carbon based ink onto low loss substrates. The materials chosen for this study will be presented, and the fabrication technique that these materials went through to create RF absorbing structures will be described. The calibration methods used, the modeling of the RF structures, and the applications in which this technology can be utilized will also be presented.

  20. Phase modulation in RF tag

    DOEpatents

    Carrender, Curtis Lee; Gilbert, Ronald W.

    2007-02-20

    A radio frequency (RF) communication system employs phase-modulated backscatter signals for RF communication from an RF tag to an interrogator. The interrogator transmits a continuous wave interrogation signal to the RF tag, which based on an information code stored in a memory, phase-modulates the interrogation signal to produce a backscatter response signal that is transmitted back to the interrogator. A phase modulator structure in the RF tag may include a switch coupled between an antenna and a quarter-wavelength stub; and a driver coupled between the memory and a control terminal of the switch. The driver is structured to produce a modulating signal corresponding to the information code, the modulating signal alternately opening and closing the switch to respectively decrease and increase the transmission path taken by the interrogation signal and thereby modulate the phase of the response signal. Alternatively, the phase modulator may include a diode coupled between the antenna and driver. The modulating signal from the driver modulates the capacitance of the diode, which modulates the phase of the response signal reflected by the diode and antenna.

  1. Predictors of photo naming: Dutch norms for 327 photos.

    PubMed

    Shao, Zeshu; Stiegert, Julia

    2016-06-01

    In the present study, we report naming latencies and norms for 327 photos of objects in Dutch. We provide norms for eight psycholinguistic variables: age of acquisition, familiarity, imageability, image agreement, objective and subjective visual complexity, word frequency, word length in syllables and letters, and name agreement. Furthermore, multiple regression analyses revealed that the significant predictors of photo-naming latencies were name agreement, word frequency, imageability, and image agreement. The naming latencies, norms, and stimuli are provided as supplemental materials.

  2. Klystron equalization for RF feedback

    SciTech Connect

    Corredoura, P.

    1993-01-01

    The next generation of colliding beam storage rings support higher luminosities by significantly increasing the number of bunches and decreasing the spacing between respective bunches. The heavy beam loading requires large RF cavity detuning which drives several lower coupled bunch modes very strongly. One technique which has proven to be very successful in reducing the coupled bunch mode driving impedance is RF feedback around the klystron-cavity combination. The gain and bandwidth of the feedback loop is limited by the group delay around the feedback loop. Existing klystrons on the world market have not been optimized for this application and contribute a large portion of the total loop group delay. This paper describes a technique to reduce klystron group delay by adding an equalizing filter to the klystron RF drive. Such a filter was built and tested on a 500 kill klystron as part of the on going PEP-II R&D effort here at SLAC.

  3. Klystron equalization for RF feedback

    SciTech Connect

    Corredoura, P.

    1993-01-01

    The next generation of colliding beam storage rings support higher luminosities by significantly increasing the number of bunches and decreasing the spacing between respective bunches. The heavy beam loading requires large RF cavity detuning which drives several lower coupled bunch modes very strongly. One technique which has proven to be very successful in reducing the coupled bunch mode driving impedance is RF feedback around the klystron-cavity combination. The gain and bandwidth of the feedback loop is limited by the group delay around the feedback loop. Existing klystrons on the world market have not been optimized for this application and contribute a large portion of the total loop group delay. This paper describes a technique to reduce klystron group delay by adding an equalizing filter to the klystron RF drive. Such a filter was built and tested on a 500 kill klystron as part of the on going PEP-II R D effort here at SLAC.

  4. Cryogenic vacuumm RF feedthrough device

    DOEpatents

    Wu, Genfa; Phillips, Harry Lawrence

    2008-12-30

    A cryogenic vacuum rf feedthrough device comprising: 1) a probe for insertion into a particle beam; 2) a coaxial cable comprising an inner conductor and an outer conductor, a dielectric/insulating layer surrounding the inner conductor, the latter being connected to the probe for the transmission of higher mode rf energy from the probe; and 3) a high thermal conductivity stub attached to the coaxial dielectric about and in thermal contact with the inner conductor which high thermal conductivity stub transmits heat generated in the vicinity of the probe efficiently and radially from the area of the probe and inner conductor all while maintaining useful rf transmission line characteristics between the inner and outer coaxial conductors.

  5. The integrated optic RF spectrum analyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pedinoff, M. E.; Ranganath, T. R.; Joseph, T. R.; Lee, J. Y.

    1981-01-01

    The results of measurements made on a fully integrated optic RF spectrum analyzer (IOSA) are reported. The performance of the device acousto-optic bandwidth, single-tone RF resolution, two-tone RF resolution, single-tone dynamic range, two-tone dynamic range, and single-tone RF response are presented. The device parameters that control device performance are analyzed. These results demonstrate the viability of the IOSA for real time spectrum analysis of pulsed and CW RF signals. Improvements of RF bandwidth resolution can be obtained by the use of larger collimated optical beams which requires larger optical lens elements, and hence, larger crystals.

  6. Hollow cathodes for arcjet thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luebben, Craig R.; Wilbur, Paul J.

    1987-01-01

    In an attempt to prevent exterior spot emission, hollow cathode bodies and orifice plates were constructed from boron nitride which is an electrical insulator, but the orifice plates melted and/or eroded at high interelectrode pressures. The most suitable hollow cathodes tested included a refractory metal orifice plate in a boron nitride body, with the insert insulated electrically from the orifice plate. In addition, the hollow cathode interior was evacuated to assure a low pressure at the insert surface, thus promoting diffuse electron emission. At high interelectrode pressures, the electrons tended to flow through the orifice plate rather than through the orifice, which could result in overheating of the orifice plate. Using a carefully aligned centerline anode, electron flow through the orifice could be sustained at interelectrode pressures up to 500 torr - but the current flow path still occasionally jumped from the orifice to the orifice plate. Based on these tests, it appears that a hollow cathode would operate most effectively at pressures in the arcjet regime with a refractory, chemically stable, and electrically insulating cathode body and orifice plate.

  7. Plasma rotation induced by RF

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, V. S.; Chiu, S. C.; Lin-Liu, Y. R. [General Atomics, P.O. Box 85608, San Diego, California 92186-5698; Omelchenko, Y. A. [General Atomics, P.O. Box 85608, San Diego, California 92186-5698

    1999-09-20

    Plasma rotation has many beneficial effects on tokamak operation including stabilization of MHD and microturbulence to improve the beta limit and confinement. Contrary to present-day tokamaks, neutral beams may not be effective in driving rotation in fusion reactors; hence the investigation of radiofrequency (RF) induced plasma rotation is of great interest and potential importance. This paper reviews the experimental results of RF induced rotation and possible physical mechanisms, suggested by theories, to explain the observations. This subject is only in the infancy of its research and many challenging issues remained to be understood and resolved. (c) 1999 American Institute of Physics.

  8. Negative ion source with external RF antenna

    DOEpatents

    Leung, Ka-Ngo; Hahto, Sami K.; Hahto, Sari T.

    2007-02-13

    A radio frequency (RF) driven plasma ion source has an external RF antenna, i.e. the RF antenna is positioned outside the plasma generating chamber rather than inside. The RF antenna is typically formed of a small diameter metal tube coated with an insulator. An external RF antenna assembly is used to mount the external RF antenna to the ion source. The RF antenna tubing is wound around the external RF antenna assembly to form a coil. The external RF antenna assembly is formed of a material, e.g. quartz, which is essentially transparent to the RF waves. The external RF antenna assembly is attached to and forms a part of the plasma source chamber so that the RF waves emitted by the RF antenna enter into the inside of the plasma chamber and ionize a gas contained therein. The plasma ion source is typically a multi-cusp ion source. A converter can be included in the ion source to produce negative ions.

  9. In-Situ Cleaning of Metal Cathodes Using a Hydrogen Ion Beam

    SciTech Connect

    Dowell, D.H.; King, F.K.; Kirby, R.E.; Schmerge, J.F.; /SLAC

    2005-09-01

    Improving and maintaining the quantum efficiency (QE) of a metal photocathode in an s-band RF gun requires a process for cleaning the surface. In this type of gun, the cathode is typically installed and the system is vacuum baked to {approx}200 degrees C. If the QE is too low, the cathode is usually cleaned with the UV-drive laser. While laser cleaning does increase the cathode QE, it requires fluences close to the damage threshold and rastering the small diameter beam, both of which can produce nonuniform electron emission and potentially damage the cathode. This paper investigates the efficacy of a low energy hydrogen ion beam to produce high-QE metal cathodes. Measurements of the QE vs. wavelength, surface contaminants using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and surface roughness were performed on a copper sample, and the results showed a significant increase in QE after cleaning with a 1keV hydrogen ion beam. The H-ion beam cleaned an area approximately 1cm in diameter and had no effect on the surface roughness while significantly increasing the QE. These results and a comparison with theory as well as a scheme for installing an H-ion cleaner on an s-band gun are presented.

  10. Cathode-less gridded ion thrusters for small satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aanesland, Ane

    2016-10-01

    Electric space propulsion is now a mature technology for commercial satellites and space missions that requires thrust in the order of hundreds of mN, and with available electric power in the order of kW. Developing electric propulsion for SmallSats (1 to 500 kg satellites) are challenging due to the small space and limited available electric power (in the worst case close to 10 W). One of the challenges in downscaling ion and Hall thrusters is the need to neutralize the positive ion beam to prevent beam stalling. This neutralization is achieved by feeding electrons into the downstream space. In most cases hollow cathodes are used for this purpose, but they are fragile and difficult to implement, and in particular for small systems they are difficult to downscale, both in size and electron current. We describe here a new alternative ion thruster that can provide thrust and specific impulse suitable for mission control of satellites as small as 3 kg. The originality of our thruster lies in the acceleration principles and propellant handling. Continuous ion acceleration is achieved by biasing a set of grids with Radio Frequency voltages (RF) via a blocking capacitor. Due to the different mobility of ions and electrons, the blocking capacitor charges up and rectifies the RF voltage. Thus, the ions are accelerated by the self-bias DC voltage. Moreover, due to the RF oscillations, the electrons escape the thruster across the grids during brief instants in the RF period ensuring a full space charge neutralization of the positive ion beam. Due to the RF nature of this system, the space charge limited current increases by almost a factor of 2 compared to classical DC biased grids, which translates into a specific thrust two times higher than for a similar DC system. This new thruster is called Neptune and operates with only one RF power supply for plasma generation, ion acceleration and electron neutralization. We will present the downscaling of this thruster to a 3cm

  11. High-current-density, high brightness cathodes for free electron laser applications

    SciTech Connect

    Green, M.C. . Palo Alto Microwave Tube Div.)

    1987-06-01

    This report discusses the following topics: brightness and emittance of electron beams and cathodes; general requirements for cathodes in high brightness electron guns; candidate cathode types; plasma and field emission cathodes; true field emission cathodes; oxide cathodes; lanthanum hexaborides cathodes; laser driven thermionic cathodes; laser driven photocathodes; impregnated porous tungsten dispenser cathodes; and choice of best performing cathode types.

  12. Cold cathode vacuum discharge tube

    DOEpatents

    Boettcher, G.E.

    1998-03-10

    A cold cathode vacuum discharge tube, and method for making same, are disclosed with an interior surface of the trigger probe coated with carbon deposited by carbon vapor deposition (CVD) or diamond-like carbon (DLC) deposition. Preferably a solid graphite insert is employed in the probe-cathode structure in place of an aluminum bushing employed in the prior art. The CVD or DLC probe face is laser scribed to allow resistance trimming to match available trigger voltage signals and to reduce electrical aging. 15 figs.

  13. Cold cathode vacuum discharge tube

    DOEpatents

    Boettcher, G.E.

    1998-04-14

    A cold cathode vacuum discharge tube, and method for making same, with an interior surface of the trigger probe coated with carbon deposited by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) or diamond-like carbon (DLC) deposition are disclosed. Preferably a solid graphite insert is employed in the probe-cathode structure in place of an aluminum bushing employed in the prior art. The CVD or DLC probe face is laser scribed to allow resistance trimming to match available trigger voltage signals and to reduce electrical aging. 14 figs.

  14. Automatic calorimetry system monitors RF power

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harness, B. W.; Heiberger, E. C.

    1969-01-01

    Calorimetry system monitors the average power dissipated in a high power RF transmitter. Sensors measure the change in temperature and the flow rate of the coolant, while a multiplier computes the power dissipated in the RF load.

  15. Electrical characterization of rf plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, P.A.

    1991-08-01

    Radio-frequency (rf) electrical sources are commonly used to generate plasmas for processing of industrial materials and for related experimental work. Published descriptions of such plasmas usually include generator-power measurements, and occasionally include plasma dc-bias measurements. One or both of these quantitites are also used in industrial feedback ccontrol systems for setpoint regulation. Recent work at Sandia an elsewhere with an experimental rf discharge device (the GEC RF Reference Cell'') has shown that power and dc-bias levels are often insufficient information for specifying the state of the plasma. The plasma can have nonlinear electrical characteristics that cause harmonic generation, and the harmonic levels can depend sensitively on the impedance of the external circuitry at harmonic frequencies. Even though the harmonics may be low in amplitude, they can be directly related to large changes in plasma power and to changes in optical emission from the plasma. Consequently, in order for a worker to truly master the plasma-generation process, it is necessary to understand, measure, and control electrical characteristics of the plamsa. In this paper we describe technique that have been developed from work with the Reference Cell for making electrical measurements on rf plasmas, and we describe surprising observations of harmonic behavior. 10 refs., 4 figs.

  16. High-Power Rf Load

    DOEpatents

    Tantawi, Sami G.; Vlieks, Arnold E.

    1998-09-01

    A compact high-power RF load comprises a series of very low Q resonators, or chokes [16], in a circular waveguide [10]. The sequence of chokes absorb the RF power gradually in a short distance while keeping the bandwidth relatively wide. A polarizer [12] at the input end of the load is provided to convert incoming TE.sub.10 mode signals to circularly polarized TE.sub.11 mode signals. Because the load operates in the circularly polarized mode, the energy is uniformly and efficiently absorbed and the load is more compact than a rectangular load. Using these techniques, a load having a bandwidth of 500 MHz can be produced with an average power dissipation level of 1.5 kW at X-band, and a peak power dissipation of 100 MW. The load can be made from common lossy materials, such as stainless steel, and is less than 15 cm in length. These techniques can also produce loads for use as an alternative to ordinary waveguide loads in small and medium RF accelerators, in radar systems, and in other microwave applications. The design is easily scalable to other RF frequencies and adaptable to the use of other lossy materials.

  17. Acoustic enhancement for photo detecting devices

    SciTech Connect

    Thundat, Thomas G; Senesac, Lawrence R; Van Neste, Charles W

    2013-02-19

    Provided are improvements to photo detecting devices and methods for enhancing the sensitivity of photo detecting devices. A photo detecting device generates an electronic signal in response to a received light pulse. An electro-mechanical acoustic resonator, electrically coupled to the photo detecting device, damps the electronic signal and increases the signal noise ratio (SNR) of the electronic signal. Increased photo detector standoff distances and sensitivities will result.

  18. Cathodic protection maintenance for aboveground storage tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Koszewski, L.

    1995-12-31

    Cathodic protection systems are utilized to mitigate corrosion on the external bottom surfaces of aboveground storage tanks (ASTs). Cathodic protection systems should be part of a preventative maintenance program to minimize in-service failures. A good maintenance program will permit determination of continuous adequate cathodic protection of ASTs, through sustained operation and also provide the opportunity to detect cathodic protection system malfunctions, through periodic observations and testing.

  19. Cathodic protection installation for underground storage tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Koszewski, L.

    1995-12-31

    The 1998 deadline is fast approaching for upgrading Underground Storage Tanks (USTs) with cathodic protection. With so many tanks requiring upgrades over the next few years, tank owners and operators will likely find a shrinking pool of quality cathodic protection installation contractors to perform the necessary upgrading. The proper installation of cathodic protection components is critical to long term effective operation of the cathodic protection system.

  20. Mechanistic Enhancement of SOFC Cathode Durability

    SciTech Connect

    Wachsman, Eric

    2016-02-01

    Durability of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) under “real world” conditions is an issue for commercial deployment. In particular cathode exposure to moisture, CO2, Cr vapor (from interconnects and BOP), and particulates results in long-term performance degradation issues. Here, we have conducted a multi-faceted fundamental investigation of the effect of these contaminants on cathode performance degradation mechanisms in order to establish cathode composition/structures and operational conditions to enhance cathode durability.

  1. Dual-Cathode Electron-Beam Source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bradley, James G.; Conley, Joseph M.; Wittry, David B.

    1988-01-01

    Beam from either cathode electromagnetically aligned with exit port. Electron beam from either of two cathodes deflected by magnetic and electric fields to central axis. Mechanical alignment of beam easy because cathode axes, anode apertures, and electron trajectories coplanar. Applications where uninterrupted service needed: scanning electron microscopes, transmission electron microscopes, electron-beam lithography equipment, Auger instruments, and microfocused x-ray sources.

  2. Novel Cathodes Prepared by Impregnation Procedures

    SciTech Connect

    Eduardo Paz

    2006-09-30

    (1) We showed that similar results were obtained when using various LSM precursors to produce LSM-YSZ cathodes. (2) We showed that enhanced performance could be achieved by adding LSCo to LSMYSZ cathodes. (3) We have preliminary results showing that there is a slow deactivation with LSFYSZ cathodes.

  3. Remote control for anode-cathode adjustment

    DOEpatents

    Roose, Lars D.

    1991-01-01

    An apparatus for remotely adjusting the anode-cathode gap in a pulse power machine has an electric motor located within a hollow cathode inside the vacuum chamber of the pulse power machine. Input information for controlling the motor for adjusting the anode-cathode gap is fed into the apparatus using optical waveguides. The motor, controlled by the input information, drives a worm gear that moves a cathode tip. When the motor drives in one rotational direction, the cathode is moved toward the anode and the size of the anode-cathode gap is diminished. When the motor drives in the other direction, the cathode is moved away from the anode and the size of the anode-cathode gap is increased. The motor is powered by batteries housed in the hollow cathode. The batteries may be rechargeable, and they may be recharged by a photovoltaic cell in combination with an optical waveguide that receives recharging energy from outside the hollow cathode. Alternatively, the anode-cathode gap can be remotely adjusted by a manually-turned handle connected to mechanical linkage which is connected to a jack assembly. The jack assembly converts rotational motion of the handle and mechanical linkage to linear motion of the cathode moving toward or away from the anode.

  4. In Situ observation of dark current emission in a high gradient rf photocathode gun

    SciTech Connect

    Shao, Jiahang; Shi, Jiaru; Antipov, Sergey P.; Baryshev, Sergey V.; Chen, Huaibi; Conde, Manoel; Gai, Wei; Ha, Gwanghui; Jing, Chunguang; Wang, Faya; Wisniewski, Eric

    2016-08-15

    Undesirable electron field emission (also known as dark current) in high gradient rf photocathode guns deteriorates the quality of the photoemission current and limits the operational gradient. To improve the understanding of dark current emission, a high-resolution (~100 μm) dark current imaging experiment has been performed in an L-band photocathode gun operating at ~100 MV/m of surface gradient. Scattered strong emission areas with high current have been observed on the cathode. The field enhancement factor β of selected regions on the cathode has been measured. Finally, the postexaminations with scanning electron microscopy and white light interferometry reveal the origins of ~75% strong emission areas overlap with the spots where rf breakdown has occurred.

  5. Linac RF control at transient beamloading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernogubovsky, M. A.; Sugimoto, M.

    1999-06-01

    Effective RF control design is carried out under electrodynamic property analysis of the transient beam excitation, which gives the basic principle and support method for RF control. The main parameters of the RF system are defined under the directional selective coupling application; the beam dynamics with control characteristics are optimized for operating mode electrodynamics.

  6. Review of pulsed rf power generation

    SciTech Connect

    Lavine, T.L.

    1992-04-01

    I am going to talk about pulsed high-power rf generation for normal-conducting electron and positron linacs suitable for applications to high-energy physics in the Next Linear Collider, or NLC. The talk will cover some basic rf system design issues, klystrons and other microwave power sources, rf pulse-compression devices, and test facilities for system-integration studies.

  7. RF digital-to-analog converter

    DOEpatents

    Conway, P.H.; Yu, D.U.L.

    1995-02-28

    A digital-to-analog converter is disclosed for producing an RF output signal proportional to a digital input word of N bits from an RF reference input, N being an integer greater or equal to 2. The converter comprises a plurality of power splitters, power combiners and a plurality of mixers or RF switches connected in a predetermined configuration. 18 figs.

  8. RF digital-to-analog converter

    DOEpatents

    Conway, Patrick H.; Yu, David U. L.

    1995-01-01

    A digital-to analogue converter for producing an RF output signal proportional to a digital input word of N bits from an RF reference input, N being an integer greater or equal to 2. The converter comprises a plurality of power splitters, power combiners and a plurality of mixers or RF switches connected in a predetermined configuration.

  9. High-brightness rf linear accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Jameson, R.A.

    1986-01-01

    The issue of high brightness and its ramifications in linacs driven by radio-frequency fields is discussed. A history of the RF linacs is reviewed briefly. Some current applications are then examined that are driving progress in RF linacs. The physics affecting the brightness of RF linacs is then discussed, followed by the economic feasibility of higher brightness machines. (LEW)

  10. Cathode for molten salt batteries

    DOEpatents

    Mamantov, Gleb; Marassi, Roberto

    1977-01-01

    A molten salt electrochemical system for battery applications comprises tetravalent sulfur as the active cathode material with a molten chloroaluminate solvent comprising a mixture of AlCl.sub.3 and MCl having a molar ratio of AlCl.sub.3 /MCl from greater than 50.0/50.0 to 80/20.

  11. Offshore platform cathodic protection retrofits

    SciTech Connect

    Turnipseed, S.P.

    1996-10-01

    Cathodic protection (CP) is the primary technique used for underwater corrosion control on the majority of offshore steel structures. Offshore platforms are often kept in service far beyond their original design life. Refurbishment of the CP system is required when adequate protection can no longer be maintained. Various offshore platform CP retrofit designs are discussed.

  12. Cathodic protection system inspection 5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenkins, Jim; Polly, Dan

    1994-02-01

    The rectifier is the heart of an impressed current cathodic protection system. As it is subject to many adverse conditions including power surges, lightning strikes, vandalism, physical damage, and deterioration from atmospheric exposure, frequent inspections of rectifiers are vital to keeping an impressed current system operating so that it can provide nearly continuous protection of the underground, or submerged structures that are being protected.

  13. High-emission cold cathode

    DOEpatents

    Mancebo, L.

    1974-01-29

    A field-emission cathode having a multitude of field emission points for emitting a copious stream of electrons when subjected to a high field is described. The cathode is constructed by compressing a multitude of tungsten strips alternately arranged with molybdenum strips and copper ribbons or compressing alternately arranged copper plated tungsten and molybdenum strips, heating the arrangement to braze the tungsten and molybdenum strips together with the copper, machining and grinding the exposed strip edges of one side of the brazed arrangement to obtain a precisely planar surface, etching a portion of the molybdenum and copper to leave the edges of the tungsten strips protruding for electron emission, and subjecting the protruding edges of the tungsten strips to a high electric field to degas and roughen the surface to pnovide a large number of emitting points. The resulting structure is particularly useful as a cathode in a transversely excited gaseous laser where the cathode is mounted in a vacuum chamber for emitting electrons under the influence of a high electric field between the cathode and an extractor grid. The electrons pass through the extractor grid, a thin window in the wall of the laser chamber and into the laser chamber which is filled with a gaseous mixture of helium, nitrogen, and carbon dioxide. A second grid is mounted on the gaseous side of the window. The electrons pass into the laser chamber under the influence of a second electric field between the second grid and an anode in the laser chamber to raise selected gas atoms of the gaseous mixture to appropriately excited states so that a subsequent coherent light beam passing through the mixture transversely to the electron stream through windows in opposite ends of the laser chamber stimulates the excited atoms to amplify the beam. (Official Gazette)

  14. Cathode for aluminum producing electrolytic cell

    DOEpatents

    Brown, Craig W.

    2004-04-13

    A method of producing aluminum in an electrolytic cell comprising the steps of providing an anode in a cell, preferably a non-reactive anode, and also providing a cathode in the cell, the cathode comprised of a base material having low electrical conductivity reactive with molten aluminum to provide a highly electrically conductive layer on the base material. Electric current is passed from the anode to the cathode and alumina is reduced and aluminum is deposited at the cathode. The cathode base material is selected from boron carbide, and zirconium oxide.

  15. Cathodes for molten-salt batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Argade, Shyam D.

    1993-01-01

    Viewgraphs of the discussion on cathodes for molten-salt batteries are presented. For the cathode reactions in molten-salt cells, chlorine-based and sulfur-based cathodes reactants have relatively high exchange current densities. Sulfur-based cathodes, metal sulfides, and disulfides have been extensively investigated. Primary thermal batteries of the Li-alloy/FeS2 variety have been available for a number of years. Chlorine based rechargable cathodes were investigated for the pulse power application. A brief introduction is followed by the experimental aspects of research, and the results obtained. Performance projections to the battery system level are discussed and the presentation is summarized with conclusions.

  16. Magnetic-cusp, cathodic-arc source

    DOEpatents

    Falabella, S.

    1995-11-21

    A magnetic-cusp for a cathodic-arc source wherein the arc is confined to the desired cathode surface, provides a current path for electrons from the cathode to the anode, and utilizes electric and magnetic fields to guide ions from the cathode to a point of use, such as substrates to be coated. The magnetic-cusp insures arc stability by an easy magnetic path from anode to cathode, while the straight-through arrangement leads to high ion transmission. 3 figs.

  17. Electron cyclotron resonance plasma photos.

    PubMed

    Rácz, R; Biri, S; Pálinkás, J

    2010-02-01

    In order to observe and study systematically the plasma of electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion sources (ECRIS) we made a high number of high-resolution visible light plasma photos and movies in the ATOMKI ECRIS Laboratory. This required building the ECR ion source into an open ECR plasma device, temporarily. An 8MP digital camera was used to record photos of plasmas made from Ne, Ar, and Kr gases and from their mixtures. We studied and recorded the effect of ion source setting parameters (gas pressure, gas composition, magnetic field, and microwave power) to the shape, color, and structure of the plasma. The analysis of the photo series gave us many qualitative and numerous valuable physical information on the nature of ECR plasmas.

  18. Electron cyclotron resonance plasma photos

    SciTech Connect

    Racz, R.; Palinkas, J.; Biri, S.

    2010-02-15

    In order to observe and study systematically the plasma of electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion sources (ECRIS) we made a high number of high-resolution visible light plasma photos and movies in the ATOMKI ECRIS Laboratory. This required building the ECR ion source into an open ECR plasma device, temporarily. An 8MP digital camera was used to record photos of plasmas made from Ne, Ar, and Kr gases and from their mixtures. We studied and recorded the effect of ion source setting parameters (gas pressure, gas composition, magnetic field, and microwave power) to the shape, color, and structure of the plasma. The analysis of the photo series gave us many qualitative and numerous valuable physical information on the nature of ECR plasmas.

  19. Thermionic cathode life-test studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forman, R.; Smith, D. H.

    1979-01-01

    A NASA-Lewis Research Center program for life testing commercial, high-current-density thermionic cathodes has been in progress since 1971. The purpose of the program is to develop long-life power microwave tubes for space communications. Four commercial-type cathodes are being evaluated in this investigation. They are the 'Tungstate', 'S' type, 'B' type, and 'M' type cathodes, all of which are capable of delivering 1 A/ sq cm or more of emission current at an operating temperature in the range of 1000-1100 C. The life test vehicles used in these studies are similar in construction to that of a high-power microwave tube and employ a high-convergence electron-gun structure; in contrast to earlier studies that used close-space diodes. These guns were designed for operation at 2 A/sq cm of cathode loading. The 'Tungstate' cathodes failed at 700 h or less and the 'S' cathode exhibited a lifetime of about 20,000 h. One 'B' cathode has failed after 27,000 h, the remaining units continuing to operate after up to 30,000 h. Only limited data are now available for the 'M' cathode, because only one has been operated for as long as 19,000 h. However, the preliminary results indicate the emission current from the 'M' cathode is more stable than the 'B' cathode and that it can be operated at a true temperature approximately 100 C lower than for the 'B' cathode.

  20. The INGV photos on Flickr

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anzidei, Marco; Felli, Concetta; D'Addezio, Giuliana

    2015-04-01

    In May 2012, right after the M=5.9 Emilia earthquake, was launched the Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia (INGV) photographic gallery on Flickr (https://www.flickr.com/photos/ingv/), to improve the INGV communication strategy. The main goals of this initiative were to inform society of the main ongoing research activities, new scientific discoveries, seismic, volcanic and environmental monitoring and key events at INGV. Specifically, to communicate through photos new results of scientific research in seismology, volcanology and environment, to enhance awareness of the earth sciences and related natural hazard in society. At this time, after about two and a half years from the beginning, have been published about 550 downloadable original photos on Flickr, collected in 45 albums. These were all shot by INGV researchers, technologists and technicians, during field surveys, seismic or volcanic emergencies or key events. Besides the INGV seismic and volcanic monitoring centers, photos document the effects of (i) main recent earthquakes in Italy; (ii) main volcanic eruptions in Italy and worldwide, (iii) Mediterranean sea and ocean tsunamis; (iv) environmental changes and monitoring activities and finally (vi) main events at INGV. Presently, the total number of views is over 2.277.000 with main peaks often in relationships with relevant Italian or worldwide earthquakes and volcanic eruptions. The most popular Photo (San Carlo, Emilia earthquake) has been viewed more than 56,000 times. Because each photo includes a brief scientific description and often is linked to press communicates launched by the INGV press office and to geophysical and geological publications, we believe that this initiative has increased people's awareness of the INGV activity and its role in society, contributing to the scientific outreach of researcher's work. .

  1. Double rf system for bunch shortening

    SciTech Connect

    Chin, Yong Ho.

    1990-11-01

    It was suggested by Zisman that the combination of the two systems (double rf system) may be more effective to shorten a bunch, compromising between the desirable and the undesirable effects mentioned above. In this paper, we demonstrate that a double rf system is, in fact, quite effective in optimizing the rf performance. The parameters used are explained, and some handy formulae for bunch parameters are derived. We consider an example of bunch shortening by adding a higher-harmonic rf system to the main rf system. The parameters of the main rf system are unchanged. The double rf system, however, can be used for another purpose. Namely, the original bunch length can be obtained with a main rf voltage substantially lower than for a single rf system without necessitating a high-power source for the higher-harmonic cavities. Using a double rf system, the momentum acceptance remains large enough for ample beam lifetime. Moreover, the increase in nonlinearity of the rf waveform increases the synchrotron tune spread, which potentially helps a beam to be stabilized against longitudinal coupled-bunch instabilities. We will show some examples of this application. We discuss the choice of the higher-harmonic frequency.

  2. Superconductors for pulsed rf accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Campisi, I.E.; Farkas, Z.D.

    1985-04-01

    The choice of superconducting materials for accelerator rf cavities has been determined in the past only in part by basic properties of the superconductors, such as the critical field, and to a larger extent by criteria which include fabrication processes, surface conditions, heat transfer capabilities and so on. For cw operated cavities the trend has been toward choosing materials with higher critical temperatures and lower surface resistance, from Lead to Niobium, from Niobium to Nb/sub 3/Sn. This trend has been dictated by the specific needs of storage ring cw system and by the relatively low fields which could be reached without breakdown. The work performed at SLAC on superconducting cavities using microsecond long high power rf pulses has shown that in Pb, Nb, and Nb/sub 3/Sn fields close to the critical magnetic fields can be reached without magnetic breakdown.

  3. Recent Advancements of RF Guns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faillace, Luigi

    High-brightness, high-current electron beams are the main requirement for fourth generation light sources such as free-electron lasers (FELs), energy recovery Linacs (ERLs) and high-energy linear colliders. The most successful device for producing such beams is the Radio-Frequency (RF) photoinjector that has been undergoing a constant evolution over the past nearly 30 years towards the production of ever-lower beam emittances and higher currents. The on-going progress in the technology of higher quality materials as well as the enhanced quality of laser pulse shaping have allowed huge improvements in the generation of higher-quality electron beams. Here, it is presented an overview of recent advancements and future perspectives of RF photoinjectors for a fifth generation light source.

  4. RF Microalgal lipid content characterization

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Mahmoud Al; Al-Zuhair, Sulaiman; Taher, Hanifa; Hilal-Alnaqbi, Ali

    2014-01-01

    Most conventional techniques for the determination of microalgae lipid content are time consuming and in most cases are indirect and require excessive sample preparations. This work presents a new technique that utilizes radio frequency (RF) for rapid lipid quantification, without the need for sample preparation. Tests showed that a shift in the resonance frequency of a RF open-ended coaxial resonator and a gradual increase in its resonance magnitude may occur as the lipids content of microalgae cells increases. These response parameters can be then calibrated against actual cellular lipid contents and used for rapid determination of the cellular lipids. The average duration of lipid quantification using the proposed technique was of about 1 minute, which is significantly less than all other conventional techniques, and was achieved without the need for any time consuming treatment steps. PMID:24870372

  5. Complete Photo-production Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    D'Angelo, A.; Bartalini, O.; Fantini, A.; Schaerf, C.; Vegna, V.; Ardashev, K.; Bade, C.; Hicks, K.; Kizilgul, S.; Lucas, M.; Mahon, J.; Bellini, V.; Blecher, M.; Bocquet, J.-P.; Lleres, A.; Rebreyend, D.; Capogni, M.; Caracappa, A.; Kistner, O. C.; Miceli, L.

    2011-10-24

    The extraction of resonance parameters from meson photo-reaction data is a challenging effort, that would greatly benefit from the availability of several polarization observables, measured for each reaction channel on both proton and neutron targets. In the aim of obtaining such complete experiments, polarized photon beams and targets have been developed at facilities, worldwide. We report on the latest results from the LEGS and GRAAL collaborations, providing single and double polarization measurements on pseudo-scalar meson photo-production from the nucleon.

  6. Low jitter RF distribution system

    DOEpatents

    Wilcox, Russell; Doolittle, Lawrence; Huang, Gang

    2012-09-18

    A timing signal distribution system includes an optical frequency stabilized laser signal amplitude modulated at an rf frequency. A transmitter box transmits a first portion of the laser signal and receive a modified optical signal, and outputs a second portion of the laser signal and a portion of the modified optical signal. A first optical fiber carries the first laser signal portion and the modified optical signal, and a second optical fiber carries the second portion of the laser signal and the returned modified optical signal. A receiver box receives the first laser signal portion, shifts the frequency of the first laser signal portion outputs the modified optical signal, and outputs an electrical signal on the basis of the laser signal. A detector at the end of the second optical fiber outputs a signal based on the modified optical signal. An optical delay sensing circuit outputs a data signal based on the detected modified optical signal. An rf phase detect and correct signal circuit outputs a signal corresponding to a phase stabilized rf signal based on the data signal and the frequency received from the receiver box.

  7. Breakdown phenomena in rf windows

    SciTech Connect

    Saito, Y.

    1995-07-05

    The multipactor and flashover phenomena of alumina rf windows used in high-power klystrons have been investigated. Multipactoring due to the high yield of secondary electron emission takes place during rf operation. A spectrum analysis of the luminescence due to multipactoring shows that multipactor electron bombardment causes an F-center of alumina, thus leading to surface melting. From the results of a high-power examination of rf windows with several kinds of alumina ceramics, it was found that an alumina material with a crystallized grain-boundary and without any voids between the boundaries, thus having a low loss-tangent value, is not liable to F-centers, even under multipactoring. Flashovers in a tree-like pattern of alumina luminescence occasionally take place on a TiN-coated surface. From the results of surface-charging measurements and high-power examinations of annealed alumina disks, the flashover phenomenon is considered to be an avalanche of electrons which have been trapped in mechanically introduced defects. The effectivenesses of multipactor-suppressing coatings and of a field-reduced window structure were also examined. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}.

  8. LOW TEMPERATURE CATHODE SUPPORTED ELECTROLYTES

    SciTech Connect

    Harlan U. Anderson; Fatih Dogan; Vladimir Petrovsky

    2002-03-31

    This project has three main goals: Thin Films Studies, Preparation of Graded Porous Substrates and Basic Electrical Characterization and testing of Planar Single Cells. This period has continued to address the problem of making dense 1/2 to 5 {micro}m thick dense layers on porous substrates (the cathode LSM). Our current status is that we are making structures of 2-5 cm{sup 2} in area, which consist of either dense YSZ or CGO infiltrated into a 2-5 {micro}m thick 50% porous layer made of either nanoncrystalline CGO or YSZ powder. This composite structure coats a macroporous cathode or anode; which serves as the structural element of the bi-layer structure. These structures are being tested as SOFC elements. A number of structures have been evaluated both as symmetrical and as button cell configuration. Results of this testing indicates that the cathodes contribute the most to cell losses for temperatures below 750 C. In this investigation different cathode materials were studied using impedance spectroscopy of symmetric cells and IV characteristics of anode supported fuel cells. Cathode materials studied included La{sub 0.8}Sr{sub 0.2}Co{sub 0.2}Fe{sub 0.8}O{sub 3} (LSCF), La{sub 0.7}Sr{sub 0.2}MnO{sub 3} (LSM), Pr{sub 0.8}Sr{sub 0.2}Fe{sub 0.8}O{sub 3} (PSCF), Sm{sub 0.8}Sr{sub 0.2}Co{sub 0.2}Fe{sub 0.8}O{sub 3} (SSCF), and Yb{sub .8}Sr{sub 0.2}Co{sub 0.2}Fe{sub 0.8}O{sub 3} (SSCF). A new technique for filtering the Fourier transform of impedance data was used to increase the sensitivity of impedance analysis. By creating a filter specifically for impedance spectroscopy the resolution was increased. The filter was tailored to look for specific circuit elements like R//C, Warburg, or constant phase elements. As many as four peaks can be resolved using the filtering technique on symmetric cells. It may be possible to relate the different peaks to material parameters, like the oxygen exchange coefficient. The cathode grouped in order from lowest to highest ASR is

  9. Toward a photoconducting semiconductor RF optical fiber antenna array.

    PubMed

    Davis, R; Rice, R; Ballato, A; Hawkins, T; Foy, P; Ballato, J

    2010-09-20

    Recently, optical fibers comprising a crystalline semiconductor core in a silica cladding have been successfully drawn by a conventional drawing process. These fibers are expected to exhibit a photoconductive response when illuminated by photons more energetic than the band gap of the core. In the photoconducting state, such a fiber can be expected to support driven RF currents so as to function as an antenna element, much as a plasma antenna. In this paper, we report the first device-related results on a crystalline semiconductor core optical fiber potentially useful in a photoconducting optical fiber antenna array; namely, optically induced changes to the electrical conductivity of a glass-clad germanium-core optical fiber. Since DC photoconduction measurements were masked by a photovoltaic effect, RF measurements at 5 MHz were used to determine the magnitude of the induced photoconductive effect. The observed photoconductivity, though not large in the present experiment, was comparable to that measured for the bulk crystals from which the fibers were drawn. The absorbed pumping light generated photo-carriers, thereby transforming the core from a dielectric material to a conductor. This technology could thus enable a class of transient antenna elements useful in low observable and reconfigurable antenna array applications.

  10. [Studies on photo-electron-chemical catalytic degradation of the malachite green].

    PubMed

    Li, Ming-yu; Diao, Zeng-hui; Song, Lin; Wang, Xin-le; Zhang, Yuan-ming

    2010-07-01

    A novel two-compartment photo-electro-chemical catalytic reactor was designed. The TiO2/Ti thin film electrode thermally formed was used as photo-anode, and graphite as cathode and a saturated calomel electrode (SCE) as the reference electrode in the reactor. The anode compartment and cathode compartment were connected with the ionic exchange membrane in this reactor. Effects of initial pH, initial concentration of malachite green and connective modes between the anode compartment and cathode compartment on the decolorization efficiency of malachite green were investigated. The degradation dynamics of malachite green was studied. Based on the change of UV-visible light spectrum, the degradation process of malachite green was discussed. The experimental results showed that, during the time of 120 min, the decolouring ratio of the malachite green was 97.7% when initial concentration of malachite green is 30 mg x L(-1) and initial pH is 3.0. The catalytic degradation of malachite green was a pseudo-first order reaction. In the degradation process of malachite green the azo bond cleavage and the conjugated system of malachite green were attacked by hydroxyl radical. Simultaneity, the aromatic ring was oxidized. Finally, malachite green was degraded into other small molecular compounds.

  11. A Photo Contest: Everybody Wins!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carroll, Cathryn

    1996-01-01

    Profiles the winners of a national photography contest for students who are deaf and includes the prize-winning photographs. Information is provided on how to sponsor a photography contest, including choosing the theme, size range, contestants, and timelines for exhibition. Ways to have the photos judged and exhibited are also addressed. (CR)

  12. Nickel-titanium-phosphate cathodes

    DOEpatents

    Belharouak, Ilias; Amine, Khalil

    2008-12-16

    Cathode materials having an improved electronic conductivity allowing for faster kinetics in the electrochemical reaction, as well as higher conductivity to meet the power requirements for many consumer applications, especially at low temperatures. The cathode material comprises a compound from the family of compounds where the basic unit is generally represented by Li.sub.xNi.sub.0.5TiOPO.sub.4. The structure of Li.sub.xNi.sub.0.5TiOPO.sub.4 includes corner sharing octahedra [TiO.sub.6] running along the C-axis. The structure is such that nearly three Li atoms are being inserted in Li.sub.xNi.sub.0.5TiOPO.sub.4. A cell in accordance with the principles of the present invention is rechargable and demonstrates a high capacity of lithium intercalation and fast kinetics.

  13. Filters for cathodic arc plasmas

    DOEpatents

    Anders, Andre; MacGill, Robert A.; Bilek, Marcela M. M.; Brown, Ian G.

    2002-01-01

    Cathodic arc plasmas are contaminated with macroparticles. A variety of magnetic plasma filters has been used with various success in removing the macroparticles from the plasma. An open-architecture, bent solenoid filter, with additional field coils at the filter entrance and exit, improves macroparticle filtering. In particular, a double-bent filter that is twisted out of plane forms a very compact and efficient filter. The coil turns further have a flat cross-section to promote macroparticle reflection out of the filter volume. An output conditioning system formed of an expander coil, a straightener coil, and a homogenizer, may be used with the magnetic filter for expanding the filtered plasma beam to cover a larger area of the target. A cathodic arc plasma deposition system using this filter can be used for the deposition of ultrathin amorphous hard carbon (a-C) films for the magnetic storage industry.

  14. Low Cost RF Amplifier for Community TV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ch, Syafaruddin; Sasongko, Sudi Mariyanto Al; Made Budi Suksmadana, I.; Mustiko Okta Muvianto, Cahyo; Ariessaputra, Suthami

    2016-01-01

    he capability of television to deliver audio video makes this media become the most effective method to spread information. This paper presents an experiment of RF amplifier design having low-cost design and providing sufficient RF power particularly for community television. The RF amplifier consists of two stages of amplifier. The first stage amplifier was used to leverage output of TV modulator from 11dBm to enable to drive next stage amplifier. CAD simulation and fabrication were run to reach optimum RF amplifier design circuit. The associated circuit was made by determining stability circle, stability gain, and matching impedance. Hence, the average power of first stage RF amplifier was 24.68dBm achieved. The second stage used RF modules which was ready match to 50 ohm for both input and output port. The experiment results show that the RF amplifier may operate at frequency ranging from 174 to 230MHz. The average output power of the 2nd stage amplifier was 33.38 Watt with the overall gain of 20.54dB. The proposed RF amplifier is a cheap way to have a stable RF amplifier for community TV. The total budget for the designed RF amplifier is only a 1/5 compared to local design of final TV amplifier.

  15. Barium-Dispenser Thermionic Cathode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wintucky, Edwin G.; Green, M.; Feinleib, M.

    1989-01-01

    Improved reservoir cathode serves as intense source of electrons required for high-frequency and often high-output-power, linear-beam tubes, for which long operating lifetime important consideration. High emission-current densities obtained through use of emitting surface of relatively-low effective work function and narrow work-function distribution, consisting of coat of W/Os deposited by sputtering. Lower operating temperatures and enhanced electron emission consequently possible.

  16. Electron beam gun with kinematic coupling for high power RF vacuum devices

    SciTech Connect

    Borchard, Philipp

    2016-11-22

    An electron beam gun for a high power RF vacuum device has components joined by a fixed kinematic coupling to provide both precise alignment and high voltage electrical insulation of the components. The kinematic coupling has high strength ceramic elements directly bonded to one or more non-ductile rigid metal components using a high temperature active metal brazing alloy. The ceramic elements have a convex surface that mates with concave grooves in another one of the components. The kinematic coupling, for example, may join a cathode assembly and/or a beam shaping focus electrode to a gun stem, which is preferably composed of ceramic. The electron beam gun may be part of a high power RF vacuum device such as, for example, a gyrotron, klystron, or magnetron.

  17. Increase in transmittance of unbacked aluminum filters exposed to RF or dc discharges in oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, W. R.; Steele, G. N.; Gillette, R. B.

    1973-01-01

    Results of an experimental study of the effect of discharges in oxygen on the oxide thickness and transmittance of aluminum filters. The studies were performed by exposing the filters to RF discharges and dc glow discharges in oxygen. In all experiments except one in which an aluminum ring was used as the cathode an increase in the transmittance of the filters is noted. It is thus demonstrated that the transmittance of aluminum filters increases on exposure to electrical discharges in oxygen, although it is not certain whether this phenomenon is caused by atomic oxygen.

  18. Electrochemical performance and thermal stability of LiCoO 2 cathodes surface-modified with a sputtered thin film of lithium phosphorus oxynitride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Kwan-Ho; Jeon, Jun-Hong; Park, Hong-Kyu; Lee, Sung-Man

    A lithium phosphorus oxynitride (LiPON) glass-electrolyte thin film is coated on a lithium cobalt oxide (LiCoO 2) composite cathode by means of a radio frequency (RF) magnetron sputtering method. The effect of the LiPON coating layer on the electrochemical performance and thermal stability of the LiCoO 2 cathode is investigated. The thermal stability of the delithiated LiCoO 2 cathode in the presence of liquid electrolyte is examined by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). It is found that the LiPON coating, improves the rate capability and the thermal stability of the charged LiCoO 2 cathode. The LiPON film appears to suppress impedance growth during cycling and inhibits side-reactions between delithiated LiCoO 2 and the electrolyte.

  19. Single electron beam rf feedback free electron laser

    DOEpatents

    Brau, C.A.; Stein, W.E.; Rockwood, S.D.

    1981-02-11

    A free electron laser system and electron beam system for a free electron laser which uses rf feedback to enhance efficiency are described. Rf energy is extracted from a single electron beam by decelerating cavities and energy is returned to accelerating cavities using rf returns, such as rf waveguides, rf feedthroughs, resonant feedthroughs, etc. This rf energy is added to rf klystron energy to reduce the required input energy and thereby enhance energy efficiency of the system.

  20. High Current Cathode Thermal Behavior, Part II: Theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodfellow, K. D.; Polk, J. E.

    1993-01-01

    Cathode erosion is one of the life limiting mechanisms for several classes of electric thrusters. Since cathode erosion is strongly dependent on the cathode temperature, a quantitative understanding of the effects of cathode operation on the cathode temperature is required. The development of a cathode/plasma interaction model for determining the heat loads to the cathode as function of the various free stream plasma parameters is presented. This model is combined with a cathode thermal model in order to provide a complete and integrated picture of high current cathode operation.

  1. Face photo-sketch synthesis and recognition.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaogang; Tang, Xiaoou

    2009-11-01

    In this paper, we propose a novel face photo-sketch synthesis and recognition method using a multiscale Markov Random Fields (MRF) model. Our system has three components: 1) given a face photo, synthesizing a sketch drawing; 2) given a face sketch drawing, synthesizing a photo; and 3) searching for face photos in the database based on a query sketch drawn by an artist. It has useful applications for both digital entertainment and law enforcement. We assume that faces to be studied are in a frontal pose, with normal lighting and neutral expression, and have no occlusions. To synthesize sketch/photo images, the face region is divided into overlapping patches for learning. The size of the patches decides the scale of local face structures to be learned. From a training set which contains photo-sketch pairs, the joint photo-sketch model is learned at multiple scales using a multiscale MRF model. By transforming a face photo to a sketch (or transforming a sketch to a photo), the difference between photos and sketches is significantly reduced, thus allowing effective matching between the two in face sketch recognition. After the photo-sketch transformation, in principle, most of the proposed face photo recognition approaches can be applied to face sketch recognition in a straightforward way. Extensive experiments are conducted on a face sketch database including 606 faces, which can be downloaded from our Web site (http://mmlab.ie.cuhk.edu.hk/facesketch.html).

  2. Photo-assisted etching of silicon in chlorine- and bromine-containing plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Weiye; Sridhar, Shyam; Liu, Lei; Hernandez, Eduardo; Donnelly, Vincent M.; Economou, Demetre J.

    2014-05-01

    Cl2, Br2, HBr, Br2/Cl2, and HBr/Cl2 feed gases diluted in Ar (50%-50% by volume) were used to study etching of p-type Si(100) in a rf inductively coupled, Faraday-shielded plasma, with a focus on the photo-assisted etching component. Etching rates were measured as a function of ion energy. Etching at ion energies below the threshold for ion-assisted etching was observed in all cases, with Br2/Ar and HBr/Cl2/Ar plasmas having the lowest and highest sub-threshold etching rates, respectively. Sub-threshold etching rates scaled with the product of surface halogen coverage (measured by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy) and Ar emission intensity (7504 Å). Etching rates measured under MgF2, quartz, and opaque windows showed that sub-threshold etching is due to photon-stimulated processes on the surface, with vacuum ultraviolet photons being much more effective than longer wavelengths. Scanning electron and atomic force microscopy revealed that photo-etched surfaces were very rough, quite likely due to the inability of the photo-assisted process to remove contaminants from the surface. Photo-assisted etching in Cl2/Ar plasmas resulted in the formation of 4-sided pyramidal features with bases that formed an angle of 45° with respect to ⟨110⟩ cleavage planes, suggesting that photo-assisted etching can be sensitive to crystal orientation.

  3. Beam tail effect of a performance-enhanced EC-ITC RF gun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Tong-Ning; Pei, Yuan-Ji; Qin, Bin; Chen, Qu-Shan

    2013-12-01

    The beam tail effect of multi-bunches will influence the electron beam performance in a high intensity thermionic RF gun. Beam dynamic calculations that illustrate the working states of single beam tail and multi-pulse feed-in of a performance-enhanced EC-ITC (external cathode independent tunable cavity) RF gun for an FEL (free electron laser) injector are performed to estimate the extracted bunch properties. By using both Parmela and homemade MATLAB codes, the effects of a single beam tail as well as interactions of multi-pulses are analyzed, where a ring-based electron algorithm is adopted to calculated RF fields and the space-charge field. Furthermore, the procedure of unexpected deviated-energy particles mixed with an effective bunch head is described by the MATLAB code as well. As a result, the performance-enhanced EC-ITC RF gun is proved to have the capability to extract continual stable bunches suitable for a high requirement THz-FEL.

  4. Emittance measurement & optimization for the photocathode RF gun with laser profile shaping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Sheng-Guang; Masafumi, Fukuda; Sakae, Araki; Nobuhiro, Terunuma; Junji, Urakawa

    2010-05-01

    The Laser Undulator Compact X-ray source (LUCX) is a test bench for a compact high brightness X-ray generator, based on inverse Compton Scattering at KEK, which requires high intensity multi-bunch trains with low transverse emittance. A photocathode RF gun with emittance compensation solenoid is used as an electron source. Much endeavor has been made to increase the beam intensity in the multi-bunch trains. The cavity of the RF gun is tuned into an unbalanced field in order to reduce space charge effects, so that the field gradient on the cathode surface is relatively higher when the forward RF power into gun cavity is not high enough. A laser profile shaper is employed to convert the driving laser profile from Gaussian into uniform. In this research we seek to find the optimized operational conditions for the decrease of the transverse emittance. With the uniform driving laser and the unbalanced RF gun, the RMS transverse emittance of a 1 nC bunch has been improved effectively from 5.46 μmm · mrad to 3.66 μmm · mrad.

  5. Development program on a cold cathode electron gun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spindt, C. A.; Holland, C. E.

    1985-01-01

    During this phase of the cathode development program, SRI improved the multiple electron beam exposure system used to print hole patterns for the cathode arrays, studied anisotropic etch processes, conducted cathode investigations using an emission microscope, reviewed possible alternate materials for cathode fabrication, studied cathode storage techniques, conducted high power operation experiments, and demonstrated high-current-density operation with small arrays of tips.

  6. Extreme regimes of femtosecond photoemission from a copper cathode in a dc electron gun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasmans, P. L. E. M.; van Vugt, D. C.; van Lieshout, J. P.; Brussaard, G. J. H.; Luiten, O. J.

    2016-10-01

    The femtosecond photoemission yield from a copper cathode and the emittance of the created electron beams has been studied in a 12 MeV /m , 100 keV dc electron gun over a wide range of laser fluence, from the linear photoemission regime until the onset of image charge limitations and cathode damaging. The measured photoemission curves can be described well with available theory which includes the Schottky effect, second-order photoemission, and image charge limitation. The second-order photoemission can be explained by thermally assisted one-photon photoemission (1PPE) and by above-threshold two-photon photoemission (2PPE). Measurements with a fresh cathode suggest that the 2PPE process is dominant. The beam emittance has been measured for the entire range of initial surface charge densities as well. The emittance measurements of space-charge dominated beams can be described well by an envelope equation with generalized perveance. The dc gun produces 0.1 pC bunches with 25 nm rms normalized emittance, corresponding to a normalized brightness usually associated with rf photoguns. In this experimental study the limits of femtosecond photoemission from a copper cathode have been explored and analyzed in great detail, resulting in improved understanding of the underlying mechanisms.

  7. Gyromagnetic RF source for interdisciplinary research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romanchenko, I. V.; Rostov, V. V.; Gunin, A. V.; Konev, V. Yu.

    2017-02-01

    We demonstrate a source of high power nanosecond RF pulses based on gyromagnetic nonlinear transmission line. The source is designed to explore the exposure of different biological objects to strong RF fields in an air filled rectangular waveguide loaded onto ethanol RF load. The RF pulse amplitude can be varied by 52 dB, reaching a maximum value of nearly 40 kV/cm and decreasing to tens of V/cm. The RF pulse amplitude is controlled by decreasing the incident pulse amplitude from the high voltage driver. The duration of RF pulses lies in the range from 4 to 25 ns and the frequency from 0.6 to 1.0 GHz.

  8. Decay Study of {sup 257}Rf

    SciTech Connect

    Qian, J.; Heinz, A.; Winkler, R.; Janssens, R. V. F.; Khoo, T. L.; Seweryniak, D.; Peterson, D.; Back, B. B.; Carpenter, M. P.; Greene, J. P.; Jiang, C. L.; Kondev, F. G.; Lauritsen, T.; Lister, C. J.; Pardo, R. C.; Robinson, A.; Scott, R.; Vondrasek, R.; Wang, X.; Zhu, S.

    2009-03-04

    The isotope {sup 257}Rf was produced in the fusion-evaporation reaction {sup 208}Pb({sup 50}Ti, n){sup 257}Rf. Reaction products were separated by the Argonne Fragment Mass Analyzer. Radioactive decay and spontaneous fission of {sup 257}Rf and its decay products were investigated. An isomeric state in {sup 257}Rf, with a half-life of 160{sub -31}{sup 42} {mu}S, was discovered by detecting internal conversion electrons followed by alpha decays. It is interpreted as a three-quasiparticle high-K isomer. A second group of internal-conversion electrons which were succeeded by alpha decay, with a half-life of 4.1{sub -1.3}{sup +2.4} s, was observed. These events might originate from the decay of excited states in {sup 257}Lr, populated by electron-capture decay of {sup 257}Rf, or from another isomer in {sup 257}Rf.

  9. Gyromagnetic RF source for interdisciplinary research.

    PubMed

    Romanchenko, I V; Rostov, V V; Gunin, A V; Konev, V Yu

    2017-02-01

    We demonstrate a source of high power nanosecond RF pulses based on gyromagnetic nonlinear transmission line. The source is designed to explore the exposure of different biological objects to strong RF fields in an air filled rectangular waveguide loaded onto ethanol RF load. The RF pulse amplitude can be varied by 52 dB, reaching a maximum value of nearly 40 kV/cm and decreasing to tens of V/cm. The RF pulse amplitude is controlled by decreasing the incident pulse amplitude from the high voltage driver. The duration of RF pulses lies in the range from 4 to 25 ns and the frequency from 0.6 to 1.0 GHz.

  10. Hollow cathode, quasi-steady MPD arc

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parmentier, N.; Jahn, R. G.

    1971-01-01

    A quasi-steady MPD accelerator has been operated with four different hollow cathodes over a power range from 5 kilowatts to 5 megawatts. The absolute level of the argon mass flow, as well as the fractional division of the flow between the cathode and the six standard chamber injectors, is varied over a range of 1 to 12 grams per second. For a fixed total current, it is observed that the voltage increases monotonically with mass flow rate, compared to the usual experience with solid cathodes where the voltage decreases with mass flow rate. For a fixed percentage of flow through the cathode, each hollow cathode configuration displays a minimum impedance at a particular value of the total mass flow. It is asserted that in order to keep the discharge inside the hollow cathode the magnetic pressure and gasdynamic pressure have to match inside the cavity.

  11. Dust Growth by RF Sputtering

    SciTech Connect

    Churton, B.; Samarian, A. A.; Coueedel, L.

    2008-09-07

    The effect of the dust particle growth by RF sputtering on glow discharge has been investigated. It has been found that the growth of dust particles modifies the electrical characteristics of the discharge. In particularly, the absolute value of the self-bias voltage decreases during the particle growth due to the electron losses on the dust particles. To find the correlation between the dust growth and the self bias evolution, dust particles have been collected at different times. The dust particle growth rate is found to be linear.

  12. MEMS technologies for rf communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Qun; Kim, B. K.

    2001-04-01

    Microelectromechanical system (MEMS) represents an exciting new technology derived from the same fabricating processes used to make integrated circuits. The trends of growing importance of the wireless communications market is toward the system with minimal size, cost and power consumption. For the purpose of MEMS R&D used for wireless communications, a history and present situation of MEMS device development are reviewed in this paper, and an overview of MEMS research topics on RF communication applications and the state of the art technologies are also presented here.

  13. High voltage RF feedthrough bushing

    DOEpatents

    Grotz, Glenn F.

    1984-01-01

    Described is a multi-element, high voltage radio frequency bushing for trmitting RF energy to an antenna located in a vacuum container. The bushing includes a center conductor of complex geometrical shape, an outer coaxial shield conductor, and a thin-walled hollow truncated cone insulator disposed between central and outer conductors. The shape of the center conductor, which includes a reverse curvature portion formed of a radially inwardly directed shoulder and a convex portion, controls the uniformity of the axial surface gradient on the insulator cone. The outer shield has a first substantially cylindrical portion and a second radially inwardly extending truncated cone portion.

  14. Recent work on an RF ion thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, R. Q.; Nakanishi, S.

    1981-01-01

    An experimental investigation of an rf ion thruster using an immersed coupler in an argon discharge is reported. The conical coil, used to couple rf power into the discharge, is placed inside the discharge vessel. The discharge was self-sustained by 100-150 MHz rf power at low environmental pressures. The ion extraction was accomplished by conventional accelerated grid optics from an unoptimized 8 cm diameter ion thruster.

  15. OPERATION OF THE RHIC RF SYSTEMS.

    SciTech Connect

    BRENNAN,J.M.; BLASKIEWICZ,M.; DELONG,J.; FISCHER,W.; HAYES,T.; SMITH,K.S.; ZALTSMAN,A.

    2003-05-12

    Operational aspects of the RHIC rf system are described. To date three different beam combinations have been collided for physics production: gold-gold, deuteron-gold, and proton-proton(polarized). To facilitate this flexibility the rf systems of the two rings are independent and self-sufficient. Techniques to cope with problems such as, injection/capture, beam loading, bunch shortening, and rf noise have evolved and are explained.

  16. RF Breakdown Prevention, Part 2 Product Overview

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-05-07

    RF Breakdown Prevention, Part 2 Product Overview May 7, 2015 Preston T. Partridge Antenna Systems Department Communication Systems Implementation...REPORT TYPE Final 3. DATES COVERED - 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE RF Breakdown Prevention, Part 2 Product Overview 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER FA8802-14-C...5 - 7, 2015 RF Breakdown Prevention, Part 2 James Farrell, Boeing Satellite Systems Dr. Jeffrey P. Tate, Raytheon Space and Airborne Systems Preston

  17. Study of Direct RF Injection on Microcontroller

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-06-06

    test board and micro -instruction. 2.3 Organization of Report Section 3.0 describes the experiment procedure for direct RF injection. Section 4.0...coaxial cable that connects the RF source to the custom probe. The outer conductor is stripped from the coaxial line and a ground clip (used in...direct current (DC) circuits) is soldered to that stripped outer shield. A DC blocking capacitor is soldered to the RF inner conductor and is used to

  18. Sun powers Libya cathodic-protection system

    SciTech Connect

    Currer, G.W.

    1982-03-22

    Well castings and part of the main 300-mile-long, 32-in diameter pipeline from Sarir to Tobruk are cathodically protected by solar power, which prevents galvanic action by applying an electric direct current of appropriate magnitude and polarity to the steel structures. They then act as cathodes and become the recipients of metallic ions. At each cathodic-protection station, the solar-generaor system consists of solar-panel arrays, electronic controls, and batteries.

  19. Discharge with Hollow Cathode (Selected Chapters),

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-04-12

    view of its mechanism made Rose in [77]. Let us dismantle/select the fundamental conclusions of this work which are based on the study of the...too little in order to support discharge by means of : 7-processes, and therefore the mechanism of secondary processes in the arc with hollow cathode...which leads to the output of electrons from the cathode, thermoemission, then the temperature of cathode surface T3 must be T.=p33OK. Unfortunately, the

  20. Cathodic protection design for aboveground storage tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Koszewski, L.; Quincy, G.L.

    1995-12-31

    The application of cathodic protection for aboveground storage tank (AST) bottoms has been accomplished in a variety of approaches, with varying degrees of success. Recent State regulations, requiring corrosion protection for new tanks and secondary containment for double bottom tanks, have prompted new application techniques to be developed for AST cathodic protection. Improved design applications are now available to todays` tank owners and operators to provide effective long term cathodic protection.

  1. A LOW NOISE RF SOURCE FOR RHIC.

    SciTech Connect

    HAYES,T.

    2004-07-05

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) requires a low noise rf source to ensure that beam lifetime during a store is not limited by the rf system. The beam is particularly sensitive to noise from power line harmonics. Additionally, the rf source must be flexible enough to handle the frequency jump required for rebucketing (transferring bunches from the acceleration to the storage rf systems). This paper will describe the design of a Direct Digital Synthesizer (DDS) based system that provides both the noise performance and the flexibility required.

  2. Theory and simulation of backbombardment in single-cell thermionic-cathode electron guns

    DOE PAGES

    Edelen, J.  P.; Biedron, S.  G.; Harris, J.  R.; ...

    2015-04-01

    This paper presents a comparison between simulation results and a first principles analytical model of electron back-bombardment developed at Colorado State University for single-cell, thermionic-cathode rf guns. While most previous work on back-bombardment has been specific to particular accelerator systems, this work is generalized to a wide variety of guns within the applicable parameter space. The merits and limits of the analytic model will be discussed. This paper identifies the three fundamental parameters that drive the back-bombardment process, and demonstrates relative accuracy in calculating the predicted back-bombardment power of a single-cell thermionic gun.

  3. Arc initiation in cathodic arc plasma sources

    SciTech Connect

    Anders, Andre

    2002-01-01

    A "triggerless" arc initiation method and apparatus is based on simply switching the arc supply voltage to the electrodes (anode and cathode). Neither a mechanical trigger electrode nor a high voltage flashover from a trigger electrode is required. A conducting path between the anode and cathode is provided, which allows a hot spot to form at a location where the path connects to the cathode. While the conductive path is eroded by the cathode spot action, plasma deposition ensures the ongoing repair of the conducting path. Arc initiation is achieved by simply applying the relatively low voltage of the arc power supply, e.g. 500 V-1 kV, with the insulator between the anode and cathode coated with a conducting layer and the current at the layer-cathode interface concentrated at one or a few contact points. The local power density at these contact points is sufficient for plasma production and thus arc initiation. A conductive surface layer, such as graphite or the material being deposited, is formed on the surface of the insulator which separates the cathode from the anode. The mechanism of plasma production (and arc initiation) is based on explosive destruction of the layer-cathode interface caused by joule heating. The current flow between the thin insulator coating and cathode occurs at only a few contact points so the current density is high.

  4. Emission properties of explosive field emission cathodes

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, Amitava; Patel, Ankur; Menon, Rakhee; Sharma, Archana; Chakravarthy, D. P.; Patil, D. S.

    2011-10-15

    The research results of the explosive field emission cathode plasma expansion velocity and the initial emission area in the planar diode configuration with cathodes made of graphite, stainless steel, polymer velvet, carbon coated, and carbon fiber (needle type) cathodes are presented. The experiments have been performed at the electron accelerator LIA-200 (200 kV, 100 ns, and 4 kA). The diode voltage has been varied from 28-225 kV, whereas the current density has been varied from 86-928 A/cm{sup 2} with 100 ns pulse duration. The experimentally obtained electron beam diode perveance has been compared with the 1 dimensional Child-Langmuir- law. It was found that initially only a part of the cathode take part in the emission process. The plasma expands at 1.7-5.2 cm/{mu}s for 4 mm anode-cathode gap for various cathode materials. It was found that the plasma expansion velocity increases with the decrease in the cathode diameter. At the beginning of the accelerating pulse, the entire cathode area participates in the electron emission process only for the multiple needle type carbon fiber cathode.

  5. Airborne RF Measurement System and Analysis of Representative Flight RF Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koppen, Sandra V.; Ely, Jay J.; Smith, Laura J.; Jones, Richard A.; Fleck, Vincent J.; Salud, Maria Theresa; Mielnik, John

    2007-01-01

    Environmental radio frequency (RF) data over a broad band of frequencies were needed to evaluate the airspace around several airports. An RF signal measurement system was designed using a spectrum analyzer connected to an aircraft VHF/UHF navigation antenna installed on a small aircraft. This paper presents an overview of the RF measurement system and provides analysis of a sample of RF signal measurement data over a frequency range of 30 MHz to 1000 MHz.

  6. RF/optical shared aperture for high availability wideband communication RF/FSO links

    DOEpatents

    Ruggiero, Anthony J; Pao, Hsueh-yuan; Sargis, Paul

    2015-03-24

    An RF/Optical shared aperture is capable of transmitting and receiving optical signals and RF signals simultaneously. This technology enables compact wide bandwidth communications systems with 100% availability in clear air turbulence, rain and fog. The functions of an optical telescope and an RF reflector antenna are combined into a single compact package by installing an RF feed at either of the focal points of a modified Gregorian telescope.

  7. RF/optical shared aperture for high availability wideband communication RF/FSO links

    DOEpatents

    Ruggiero, Anthony J; Pao, Hsueh-yuan; Sargis, Paul

    2014-04-29

    An RF/Optical shared aperture is capable of transmitting and receiving optical signals and RF signals simultaneously. This technology enables compact wide bandwidth communications systems with 100% availability in clear air turbulence, rain and fog. The functions of an optical telescope and an RF reflector antenna are combined into a single compact package by installing an RF feed at either of the focal points of a modified Gregorian telescope.

  8. Dielectric barrier hollow cathode discharge and its enhanced performance for light source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Tae Il; Park, Ki Wan; Baik, Hong Koo; Lee, Seong-Min

    2005-12-01

    We invented the dielectric barrier hollow cathode discharge (DBHCD) configuration as a novel light source and studied on the physical properties of discharge and the possibility of the parallel operation of many holes of the DBHCD without additional impedances such as inductance or capacitance. The electrical characteristics and the photo images of discharges sustained in cavity were investigated. The experimental result showed that the surface discharge mode was transformed into a hollow cathode mode according to a decrease of the pD (operating pressure times hole diameter). The parallel operation of the 13 arrays of DBHCD was also possible without additional impedances for limiting current. We measured the relative IR emission efficiency of the coplanar dielectric barrier discharge (CDBD) and DBHCD to evaluate the enhanced performance as light sources. According to the experiment, the 25 arrays of DBHCD result in 30%-enhanced performance in IR emission efficiency compared with CDBD.

  9. Investigation of the operating characteristics of a 12 stepped-cavity relativistic magnetron with axial extraction driven by an "F" transparent cathode using particle-in-cell simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, M.; Schamiloglu, E.; Jiang, W.; Fuks, M.; Liu, C.

    2016-11-01

    We explore the performance of a 12 stepped-cavity relativistic magnetron with axial extraction (12 stepped-cavity RMDO) driven by an "F" transparent cathode (the "F" transparent cathode is a coaxial transparent cathode with two azimuthal periods of increased thickness and which looks like the letter "F," so we call it "F" transparent cathode) through particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations. It is shown that using the "F" transparent cathode, an electronic efficiency of 70% with gigawatt output power is obtained while reducing the axial leakage current by about 50% compared to using the usual transparent cathode. Further PIC simulations demonstrate that frequency bifurcation occurs and mode switching can be achieved using several hundred kilowatts input RF power in the 12 stepped-cavity RMDO driven by an "F" transparent cathode. For example, it was found that using an applied driver power of 180 kW for 10 ns, the operating TE31 mode can be switched to the TE41 mode. It is also found that the secondary electron and backscattered electron emission and axial leakage current were two disturbing factors for the 12 stepped-cavity RMDO when it works at a stable operation mode but when the 12 stepped-cavity RMDO works near the critical magnetic field at the boundary between two modes, these two factors would lead to the operation modes changing.

  10. JLEIC SRF cavity RF Design

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Shaoheng; Guo, Jiquan; Wang, Haipeng; Rimmer, Robert A.

    2016-05-01

    The initial design of a low higher order modes (HOM) impedance superconducting RF (SRF) cavity is presented in this paper. The design of this SRF cavity is for the proposed Jefferson Lab Electron Ion Collider (JLEIC). The electron ring of JLEIC will operate with electrons of 3 to 10 GeV energy. The ion ring of JLEIC will operate with protons of up to 100 GeV energy. The bunch lengths in both rings are ~12 mm (RMS). In order to maintain the short bunch length in the ion ring, SRF cavities are adopted to provide large enough gradient. In the first phase of JLEIC, the PEP II RF cavities will be reused in the electron ring to lower the initial cost. The frequency of the SRF cavities is chosen to be the second harmonic of PEP II cavities, 952.6 MHz. In the second phase of JLEIC, the same frequency SRF cavities may replace the normal conducting PEP II cavities to achieve higher luminosity at high energy. At low energies, the synchro-tron radiation damping effect is quite weak, to avoid the coupled bunch instability caused by the intense closely-spaced electron bunches, low HOM impedance of the SRF cavities combined with longitudinal feedback sys-tem will be necessary.

  11. RF power recovery feedback circulator

    DOEpatents

    Sharamentov, Sergey I [Bolingbrook, IL

    2011-03-29

    A device and method for improving the efficiency of RF systems having a Reflective Load. In the preferred embodiment, Reflected Energy from a superconducting resonator of a particle accelerator is reintroduced to the resonator after the phase of the Reflected Energy is aligned with the phase of the Supply Energy from a RF Energy Source. In one embodiment, a Circulator is used to transfer Reflected Energy from the Reflective Load into a Phase Adjuster which aligns the phase of the Reflected Energy with that of the Supply Energy. The phase-aligned energy is then combined with the Supply Energy, and reintroduced into the Reflective Load. In systems having a constant phase shift, the Phase Adjuster may be designed to shift the phase of the Reflected Energy by a constant amount using a Phase Shifter. In systems having a variety (variable) phase shifts, a Phase Shifter controlled by a phase feedback loop comprising a Phase Detector and a Feedback Controller to account for the various phase shifts is preferable.

  12. Photo-Healable Metallosupramolecular Polymers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-01-09

    access to a wider variety of photo-healable coatings. (a) Papers published in peer-reviewed journals (N/A for none) Enter List of papers submitted or...published that acknowledge ARO support from the start of the project to the date of this printing. List the papers, including journal references, in the...Jeong J. Wie, John P. Swanson, Frederick L. Beyer, Michael E. Mackay, Stuart J. Rowan. Influence of Metal Ion and Polymer Core on the Melt Rheology of

  13. Auxiliary coil controls temperature of RF induction heater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1966-01-01

    Auxiliary coil controls the temperature of an RF induction furnace that is powered by a relatively unstable RF generator. Manual or servoed adjustments of the relative position of the auxiliary coil, which is placed in close proximity to the RF coil, changes the looseness of the RF coil and hence the corresponding heating effect of its RF field.

  14. Study of asymmetries of Cd(Zn)Te devices investigated using photo-induced current transient spectroscopy, Rutherford backscattering, surface photo-voltage spectroscopy, and gamma ray spectroscopies

    SciTech Connect

    Crocco, J.; Bensalah, H.; Zheng, Q.; Dieguez, E.; Corregidor, V.; Avles, E.; Castaldini, A.; Fraboni, B.; Cavalcoli, D.; Cavallini, A.; Vela, O.

    2012-10-01

    Despite these recent advancements in preparing the surface of Cd(Zn)Te devices for detector applications, large asymmetries in the electronic properties of planar Cd(Zn)Te detectors are common. Furthermore, for the development of patterned electrode geometries, selection of each electrode surface is crucial for minimizing dark current in the device. This investigation presented here has been carried out with three objectives. Each objective is oriented towards establishing reliable methods for the selection of the anode and cathode surfaces independent of the crystallographic orientation. The objectives of this study are (i) investigate how the asymmetry in I-V characteristics of Cd(Zn)Te devices may be associated with the TeO2 interfacial layer using Rutherford backscattering to study the structure at the Au-Cd(Zn)Te interface, (ii) develop an understanding of how the concentration of the active traps in Cd(Zn)Te varies with the external bias, and (iii) propose non-destructive methods for selection of the anode and cathode which are independent of crystallographic orientation. The spectroscopic methods employed in this investigation include Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy, photo-induced current transient spectroscopy, and surface photo-voltage spectroscopy, as well as gamma ray spectroscopy to demonstrate the influence on detector properties.

  15. Battery-Powered RF Pre-Ionization System for the Caltech Magnetohydrodynamically-Driven Jet Experiment: RF Discharge Properties and MHD-Driven Jet Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaplin, Vernon H.

    This thesis describes investigations of two classes of laboratory plasmas with rather different properties: partially ionized low pressure radiofrequency (RF) discharges, and fully ionized high density magnetohydrodynamically (MHD)-driven jets. An RF pre-ionization system was developed to enable neutral gas breakdown at lower pressures and create hotter, faster jets in the Caltech MHD-Driven Jet Experiment. The RF plasma source used a custom pulsed 3 kW 13.56 MHz RF power amplifier that was powered by AA batteries, allowing it to safely float at 4-6 kV with the cathode of the jet experiment. The argon RF discharge equilibrium and transport properties were analyzed, and novel jet dynamics were observed. Although the RF plasma source was conceived as a wave-heated helicon source, scaling measurements and numerical modeling showed that inductive coupling was the dominant energy input mechanism. A one-dimensional time-dependent fluid model was developed to quantitatively explain the expansion of the pre-ionized plasma into the jet experiment chamber. The plasma transitioned from an ionizing phase with depressed neutral emission to a recombining phase with enhanced emission during the course of the experiment, causing fast camera images to be a poor indicator of the density distribution. Under certain conditions, the total visible and infrared brightness and the downstream ion density both increased after the RF power was turned off. The time-dependent emission patterns were used for an indirect measurement of the neutral gas pressure. The low-mass jets formed with the aid of the pre-ionization system were extremely narrow and collimated near the electrodes, with peak density exceeding that of jets created without pre-ionization. The initial neutral gas distribution prior to plasma breakdown was found to be critical in determining the ultimate jet structure. The visible radius of the dense central jet column was several times narrower than the axial current channel

  16. Use of Near-Infrared Detector to Sense RF Antenna Heating

    SciTech Connect

    Legg, R.A.; Lee, R.L.; Baity, W.F.

    1999-11-01

    The three antennas used for ion cyclotron heating (ICH) experiments on DIII-D have experienced localized heating of the Faraday shield rods during plasma operations which has resulted in some melting. This melting is of great concern not only because of the damage it does to the rf system's ability to deliver rf to the plasma, but because of its potential to contaminate the plasma during a shot and cast the experimental results from the shot into question. A real-time sensor to detect the temperature of the antennae during plasma operations is described. The sensor uses an avalanche photo diode (APD) with sensitivity from 0.4 to 1.0 {micro}m to monitor the temperature of the antennae. Calculations for the detector sensitivity based on Planck's law are compared with experimental results and detector data taken during plasma operations are presented.

  17. Processes For Cleaning a Cathode Tube and Assemblies In A Hollow Cathode Assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, Michael J. (Inventor); Verhey, Timothy R. R. (Inventor); Soulas, George C. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    The present invention is a process for cleaning a cathode tube and other subassemblies in a hollow cathode assembly. In the disclosed process, hand covering elastomer gloves are used for handling all cathode assembly parts. The cathode tube and other subassemblies are cleaned with a lint-free cloth damped with acetone, then wiped with alcohol, immersed in ethyl alcohol or acetone, and ultrasonic agitation is applied, heating to 60 C. for ethyl alcohol or 56 C. for acetone. The cathode tube and other subassemblies are dried by blowing with nitrogen gas.

  18. RF SYSTEM FOR THE SNS ACCUMULATOR RING.

    SciTech Connect

    BLASKIEWICZ, M.; BRENNAN, J.M.; BRODOWSKI, J.; DELONG, J.; METH, M.; SMITH, K.; ZALTSMAN, A.

    2001-06-18

    During accumulation the RF beam current in the spallation neutron source ring rises from 0 to 50 amperes. A clean, 250 nanosecond gap is needed for the extraction kicker risetime. Large momentum spread and small peak current are needed to prevent instabilities and stopband related losses. A robust RF system meeting these requirements has been designed.

  19. 47 CFR 95.1221 - RF exposure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false RF exposure. 95.1221 Section 95.1221 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES PERSONAL RADIO SERVICES Medical Device Radiocommunication Service (MedRadio) § 95.1221 RF exposure. MedRadio...

  20. 47 CFR 95.1221 - RF exposure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false RF exposure. 95.1221 Section 95.1221 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES PERSONAL RADIO SERVICES Medical Device Radiocommunication Service (MedRadio) § 95.1221 RF exposure. A MedRadio...

  1. 47 CFR 90.1335 - RF safety.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false RF safety. 90.1335 Section 90.1335 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES PRIVATE LAND MOBILE RADIO SERVICES Wireless Broadband Services in the 3650-3700 MHz Band § 90.1335 RF...

  2. 47 CFR 27.52 - RF safety.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false RF safety. 27.52 Section 27.52 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES MISCELLANEOUS WIRELESS COMMUNICATIONS SERVICES Technical Standards § 27.52 RF safety. Licensees and manufacturers are subject to...

  3. 47 CFR 90.1335 - RF safety.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false RF safety. 90.1335 Section 90.1335 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES PRIVATE LAND MOBILE RADIO SERVICES Wireless Broadband Services in the 3650-3700 MHz Band § 90.1335 RF...

  4. 47 CFR 90.1217 - RF Hazards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false RF Hazards. 90.1217 Section 90.1217 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES PRIVATE LAND... § 90.1217 RF Hazards. Licensees and manufacturers are subject to the radiofrequency radiation...

  5. 47 CFR 90.1335 - RF safety.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false RF safety. 90.1335 Section 90.1335 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES PRIVATE LAND MOBILE RADIO SERVICES Wireless Broadband Services in the 3650-3700 MHz Band § 90.1335 RF...

  6. 47 CFR 101.1525 - RF safety.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false RF safety. 101.1525 Section 101.1525 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES FIXED MICROWAVE SERVICES Service and Technical Rules for the 70/80/90 GHz Bands § 101.1525 RF safety. Licensees in the...

  7. 47 CFR 95.1125 - RF safety.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false RF safety. 95.1125 Section 95.1125 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES PERSONAL RADIO SERVICES Wireless Medical Telemetry Service (WMTS) General Provisions § 95.1125 RF safety. Portable...

  8. 47 CFR 24.52 - RF hazards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false RF hazards. 24.52 Section 24.52 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES PERSONAL COMMUNICATIONS SERVICES Technical Standards § 24.52 RF hazards. Licensees and manufacturers are subject to...

  9. 47 CFR 24.52 - RF hazards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false RF hazards. 24.52 Section 24.52 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES PERSONAL COMMUNICATIONS SERVICES Technical Standards § 24.52 RF hazards. Licensees and manufacturers are subject to...

  10. 47 CFR 90.1217 - RF Hazards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false RF Hazards. 90.1217 Section 90.1217 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES PRIVATE LAND... § 90.1217 RF Hazards. Licensees and manufacturers are subject to the radiofrequency radiation...

  11. 47 CFR 101.1525 - RF safety.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false RF safety. 101.1525 Section 101.1525 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES FIXED MICROWAVE SERVICES Service and Technical Rules for the 70/80/90 GHz Bands § 101.1525 RF safety. Licensees in the...

  12. 47 CFR 95.1221 - RF exposure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false RF exposure. 95.1221 Section 95.1221 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES PERSONAL RADIO SERVICES Medical Device Radiocommunication Service (MedRadio) § 95.1221 RF exposure. MedRadio...

  13. 47 CFR 95.1125 - RF safety.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false RF safety. 95.1125 Section 95.1125 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES PERSONAL RADIO SERVICES Wireless Medical Telemetry Service (WMTS) General Provisions § 95.1125 RF safety. Portable...

  14. 47 CFR 90.1217 - RF Hazards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false RF Hazards. 90.1217 Section 90.1217 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES PRIVATE LAND... § 90.1217 RF Hazards. Licensees and manufacturers are subject to the radiofrequency radiation...

  15. 47 CFR 95.1125 - RF safety.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false RF safety. 95.1125 Section 95.1125 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES PERSONAL RADIO SERVICES Wireless Medical Telemetry Service (WMTS) General Provisions § 95.1125 RF safety. Portable...

  16. 47 CFR 101.1525 - RF safety.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false RF safety. 101.1525 Section 101.1525 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES FIXED MICROWAVE SERVICES Service and Technical Rules for the 70/80/90 GHz Bands § 101.1525 RF safety. Licensees in the...

  17. 47 CFR 95.1125 - RF safety.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false RF safety. 95.1125 Section 95.1125 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES PERSONAL RADIO SERVICES Wireless Medical Telemetry Service (WMTS) General Provisions § 95.1125 RF safety. Portable...

  18. 47 CFR 95.1221 - RF exposure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false RF exposure. 95.1221 Section 95.1221 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES PERSONAL RADIO SERVICES Medical Device Radiocommunication Service (MedRadio) § 95.1221 RF exposure. A MedRadio...

  19. 47 CFR 95.1221 - RF exposure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false RF exposure. 95.1221 Section 95.1221 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES PERSONAL RADIO SERVICES Medical Device Radiocommunication Service (MedRadio) § 95.1221 RF exposure. MedRadio...

  20. 47 CFR 95.1125 - RF safety.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false RF safety. 95.1125 Section 95.1125 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES PERSONAL RADIO SERVICES Wireless Medical Telemetry Service (WMTS) General Provisions § 95.1125 RF safety. Portable...

  1. 47 CFR 101.1525 - RF safety.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false RF safety. 101.1525 Section 101.1525 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES FIXED MICROWAVE SERVICES Service and Technical Rules for the 70/80/90 GHz Bands § 101.1525 RF safety. Licensees in the...

  2. 47 CFR 24.52 - RF hazards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false RF hazards. 24.52 Section 24.52 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES PERSONAL COMMUNICATIONS SERVICES Technical Standards § 24.52 RF hazards. Licensees and manufacturers are subject to...

  3. 47 CFR 24.52 - RF hazards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false RF hazards. 24.52 Section 24.52 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES PERSONAL COMMUNICATIONS SERVICES Technical Standards § 24.52 RF hazards. Licensees and manufacturers are subject to...

  4. 47 CFR 90.1217 - RF Hazards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false RF Hazards. 90.1217 Section 90.1217 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES PRIVATE LAND... § 90.1217 RF Hazards. Licensees and manufacturers are subject to the radiofrequency radiation...

  5. 47 CFR 101.1525 - RF safety.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false RF safety. 101.1525 Section 101.1525 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES FIXED MICROWAVE SERVICES Service and Technical Rules for the 70/80/90 GHz Bands § 101.1525 RF safety. Licensees in the...

  6. 47 CFR 90.1335 - RF safety.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false RF safety. 90.1335 Section 90.1335 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES PRIVATE LAND MOBILE RADIO SERVICES Wireless Broadband Services in the 3650-3700 MHz Band § 90.1335 RF...

  7. 47 CFR 27.52 - RF safety.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false RF safety. 27.52 Section 27.52 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES MISCELLANEOUS WIRELESS COMMUNICATIONS SERVICES Technical Standards § 27.52 RF safety. Licensees and manufacturers are subject to...

  8. 47 CFR 27.52 - RF safety.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false RF safety. 27.52 Section 27.52 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES MISCELLANEOUS WIRELESS COMMUNICATIONS SERVICES Technical Standards § 27.52 RF safety. Licensees and manufacturers are subject to...

  9. 47 CFR 90.1335 - RF safety.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false RF safety. 90.1335 Section 90.1335 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES PRIVATE LAND MOBILE RADIO SERVICES Wireless Broadband Services in the 3650-3700 MHz Band § 90.1335 RF...

  10. 47 CFR 27.52 - RF safety.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false RF safety. 27.52 Section 27.52 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES MISCELLANEOUS WIRELESS COMMUNICATIONS SERVICES Technical Standards § 27.52 RF safety. Licensees and manufacturers are subject to...

  11. Airborne RF Measurement System (ARMS) and Analysis of Representative Flight RF Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koppen, Sandra V.; Ely, Jay J.; Smith, Laura J.; Jones, Richard A.; Fleck, Vincent J.; Salud, Maria Theresa; Mielnik, John J.

    2007-01-01

    Environmental radio frequency (RF) data over a broad band of frequencies (30 MHz to 1000 MHz) were obtained to evaluate the electromagnetic environment in airspace around several airports. An RF signal measurement system was designed utilizing a spectrum analyzer connected to the NASA Lancair Columbia 300 aircraft's VHF/UHF navigation antenna. This paper presents an overview of the RF measurement system and provides analysis of sample RF signal measurement data. This aircraft installation package and measurement system can be quickly returned to service if needed by future projects requiring measurement of an RF signal environment or exploration of suspected interference situations.

  12. Preliminary Results of Field Emission Cathode Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sovey, James S.; Kovaleski, Scott D.

    2001-01-01

    Preliminary screening tests of field emission cathodes such as chemical vapor deposited (CVD) diamond, textured pyrolytic graphite, and textured copper were conducted at background pressures typical of electric thruster test facilities to assess cathode performance and stability. Very low power electric thrusters which provide tens to hundreds micronewtons of thrust may need field emission neutralizers that have a capability of tens to hundreds of microamperes. From current voltage characteristics, it was found that the CVD diamond and textured metals cathodes clearly satisfied the Fowler-Nordheim emission relation. The CVD diamond and a textured copper cathode had average current densities of 270 and 380 mA/sq cm, respectively, at the beginning-of-life. After a few hours of operation the cathode emission currents degraded by 40 to 75% at background pressures in the 10(exp -5) Pa to 10(exp -4) Pa range. The textured pyrolytic graphite had a modest current density at beginning-of-life of 84 mA/sq cm, but this cathode was the most stable of all. Extended testing of the most promising cathodes is warranted to determine if current degradation is a burn-in effect or whether it is a long-term degradation process. Preliminary experiments with ferroelectric emission cathodes, which are ceramics with spontaneous electric polarization, were conducted. Peak current densities of 30 to 120 mA/sq cm were obtained for pulse durations of about 500 ns in the 10(exp -4) Pa pressure range.

  13. Multi-cathode unbalanced magnetron sputtering systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sproul, William D.

    1991-01-01

    Ion bombardment of a growing film during deposition is necessary in many instances to ensure a fully dense coating, particularly for hard coatings. Until the recent advent of unbalanced magnetron (UBM) cathodes, reactive sputtering had not been able to achieve the same degree of ion bombardment as other physical vapor deposition processes. The amount of ion bombardment of the substrate depends on the plasma density at the substrate, and in a UBM system the amount of bombardment will depend on the degree of unbalance of the cathode. In multi-cathode systems, the magnetic fields between the cathodes must be linked to confine the fast electrons that collide with the gas atoms. Any break in this linkage results in electrons being lost and a low plasma density. Modeling of the magnetic fields in a UBM cathode using a finite element analysis program has provided great insight into the interaction between the magnetic fields in multi-cathode systems. Large multi-cathode systems will require very strong magnets or many cathodes in order to maintain the magnetic field strength needed to achieve a high plasma density. Electromagnets offer the possibility of independent control of the plasma density. Such a system would be a large-scale version of an ion beam enhanced deposition (IBED) system, but, for the UBM system where the plasma would completely surround the substrate, the acronym IBED might now stand for Ion Blanket Enhanced Deposition.

  14. Model for designing planar magnetron cathodes

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, M.

    1997-09-30

    This report outlines an analytical model of the distribution of plasma in the cathode fall of a planar magnetron cathode. Here I continue commentary on previous work, and introduce an ion sheath model to describe the discharge dark space below the magnetron halo.

  15. R&D ERL: Low level RF

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, K.

    2010-01-15

    A superconducting RF (SRF) Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) is currently under development at the Collider-Accelerator Department (C-AD) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). The major components from an RF perspective are (a) a 5-cell SRF ERL cavity, (b) an SRF photocathode electron gun, and (c) a drive laser for the photocathode gun. Each of these RF subsystems has its own set of RF performance requirements, as well as common requirements for ensuring correct synchronism between them. A low level RF (LLRF) control system is currently under development, which seeks to leverage both technology and experience gained from the recently commissioned RHIC LLRF system upgrade. This note will review the LLRF system requirements and describe the system to be installed at the ERL.

  16. Self-assembly of photo-reduced graphene-titania films.

    SciTech Connect

    Lambert, Timothy N.; Chavez, Carlos A.; Bell, Nelson Simmons; Washburn, Cody M.; Brumbach, Michael Todd; Wheeler, David Roger; McKenzie, Bonnie Beth

    2010-07-01

    In an aim to develop photo-responsive composites, the UV photo-reduction of aqueous titanium oxide nanoparticle-graphene oxide (TiO{sub 2}-GO) dispersions (Lambert et al. J Phys. Chem. 2010 113 (46), 19812-19823) was undertaken. Photo-reduction led to the formation of a black precipitate as well as a soluble portion, comprised of titanium oxide nanoparticle-reduced graphene oxide (TiO{sub 2}-RGO). When allowed to slowly evaporate, self assembled titanium oxide nanoparticle-graphene oxide (SA-TiO{sub 2}-RGO) films formed at the air-liquid interface of the solution. The thickness of SARGO-TiO{sub 2} films range from {approx}30-100 nm when deposited on substrates, and appear to be comprised of a mosaic assembly of graphene nanosheets and TiO{sub 2}, as observed by scanning electron microscopy. Raman spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy indicate that the graphene oxide is only partially reduced in the SA-TiO{sub 2}-RGO material. These films were also deposited onto inter-digitated electrodes and their photo-responsive behavior was examined. UV-exposure lead to a {approx} 200 kOhm decrease in resistance across the device, resulting in a cathodically biased film. The cathodic bias of the films was utilized for the subsequent reduction of Ag(NO{sub 3}) into silver (Ag) nanoparticles, forming a ternary Ag-(SA-RGO-TiO{sub 2}) composite. Various aspects of the self assembled films, their photoconductive properties as well as potential applications will be presented.

  17. RF Cavity Characterization with VORPAL

    SciTech Connect

    C. Nieter, C. Roark, P. Stoltz, C.D. Zhou, F. Marhauser

    2011-03-01

    When designing a radio frequency (RF) accelerating cavity structure various figures of merit are considered before coming to a final cavity design. These figures of merit include specific field and geometry based quantities such as the ratio of the shunt impedance to the quality factor (R/Q) or the normalized peak fields in the cavity. Other important measures of cavity performance include the peak surface fields as well as possible multipacting resonances in the cavity. High fidelity simulations of these structures can provide a good estimate of these important quantities before any cavity prototypes are built. We will present VORPAL simulations of a simple pillbox structure where these quantities can be calculated analytically and compare them to the results from the VORPAL simulations. We will then use VORPAL to calculate these figures of merit and potential multipacting resonances for two cavity designs under development at Jefferson National Lab for Project X.

  18. RF FEL for power beaming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burke, Robert

    The laser device components associated with operating a radio frequency-free electron laser (RF-FEL) for beaming power from Earth were designed and tested. Analysis of the power beaming system requirements reveals that the FEL, identified by NASA as the laser of choice, is the major subsystem requiring demonstration before proceeding further in proving the efficacy of laser power beaming. Rocketdyne has identified a series of low cost, low risk demonstrations which proceed sequentially, as follows: (1) a 1 kW proof-of-principle demonstration; (2) a 150 kW demonstration of beaming power to a satellite; and (3) a MW class demonstration of Earth to lunar surface power transmission. This sequence of events can be completed in 5.5 years at a cost of $188M, with key milestones each year.

  19. RF Jitter Modulation Alignment Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortega, L. F.; Fulda, P.; Diaz-Ortiz, M.; Perez Sanchez, G.; Ciani, G.; Voss, D.; Mueller, G.; Tanner, D. B.

    2017-01-01

    We will present the numerical and experimental results of a new alignment sensing scheme which can reduce the complexity of alignment sensing systems currently used, while maintaining the same shot noise limited sensitivity. This scheme relies on the ability of electro-optic beam deflectors to create angular modulation sidebands in radio frequency, and needs only a single-element photodiode and IQ demodulation to generate error signals for tilt and translation degrees of freedom in one dimension. It distances itself from current techniques by eliminating the need for beam centering servo systems, quadrant photodetectors and Gouy phase telescopes. RF Jitter alignment sensing can be used to reduce the complexity in the alignment systems of many laser optical experiments, including LIGO and the ALPS experiment.

  20. VERSE-Guided Numerical RF Pulse Design: A Fast Method for Peak RF Power Control

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Daeho; Grissom, William A.; Lustig, Michael; Kerr, Adam B.; Stang, Pascal P.; Pauly, John M.

    2013-01-01

    In parallel excitation, the computational speed of numerical radiofrequency (RF) pulse design methods is critical when subject dependencies and system nonidealities need to be incorporated on-the-fly. One important concern with optimization-based methods is high peak RF power exceeding hardware or safety limits. Hence, online controllability of the peak RF power is essential. Variable-rate selective excitation pulse reshaping is ideally suited to this problem due to its simplicity and low computational cost. In this work, we first improve the fidelity of variable-rate selective excitation implementation for discrete-time waveforms through waveform oversampling such that variable-rate selective excitation can be robustly applied to numerically designed RF pulses. Then, a variable-rate selective excitation-guided numerical RF pulse design is suggested as an online RF pulse design framework, aiming to simultaneously control peak RF power and compensate for off-resonance. PMID:22135085

  1. Femtosecond precision measurement of laser-rf phase jitter in a photocathode rf gun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Libing; Zhao, Lingrong; Lu, Chao; Jiang, Tao; Liu, Shengguang; Wang, Rui; Zhu, Pengfei; Xiang, Dao

    2017-03-01

    We report on the measurement of the laser-rf phase jitter in a photocathode rf gun with femtosecond precision. In this experiment four laser pulses with equal separation are used to produce electron bunch trains; then the laser-rf phase jitter is obtained by measuring the variations of the electron bunch spacing with an rf deflector. Furthermore, we show that when the gun and the deflector are powered by the same rf source, it is possible to obtain the laser-rf phase jitter in the gun through measurement of the beam-rf phase jitter in the deflector. Based on these measurements, we propose an effective time-stamping method that may be applied in MeV ultrafast electron diffraction facilities to enhance the temporal resolution.

  2. Cathode Effects in Cylindrical Hall Thrusters

    SciTech Connect

    Granstedt, E.M.; Raitses, Y.; Fisch, N. J.

    2008-09-12

    Stable operation of a cylindrical Hall thruster (CHT) has been achieved using a hot wire cathode, which functions as a controllable electron emission source. It is shown that as the electron emission from the cathode increases with wire heating, the discharge current increases, the plasma plume angle reduces, and the ion energy distribution function shifts toward higher energies. The observed effect of cathode electron emission on thruster parameters extends and clarifies performance improvements previously obtained for the overrun discharge current regime of the same type of thruster, but using a hollow cathode-neutralizer. Once thruster discharge current saturates with wire heating, further filament heating does not affect other discharge parameters. The saturated values of thruster discharge parameters can be further enhanced by optimal placement of the cathode wire with respect to the magnetic field.

  3. Dual cathode system for electron beam instruments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bradley, James G. (Inventor); Conley, Joseph M. (Inventor); Wittry, David B. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    An electron beam source having a single electron optical axis is provided with two coplanar cathodes equally spaced on opposite sides from the electron optical axis. A switch permits selecting either cathode, and a deflection system comprised of electromagnets, each with separate pole pieces equally spaced from the plane of the cathodes and electron optical axis, first deflects the electron beam from a selected cathode toward the electron optical axis, and then in an opposite direction into convergence with the electron optical axis. The result is that the electron beam from one selected cathode undergoes a sigmoid deflection in two opposite directions, like the letter S, with the sigmoid deflection of each being a mirror image of the other.

  4. Aboveground storage tank double bottom cathodic protection

    SciTech Connect

    Surkein, M.B.

    1995-12-31

    Cathodic protection is typically used to achieve corrosion control between bottoms of aboveground storage tanks with double bottoms. To determine the proper design of such systems, an investigation was conducted on the performance of two different cathodic protection system designs utilizing zinc ribbon anodes. A full scale field test on a 35 meter (115 feet) diameter tank was conducted to determine cathodic protection system performance. The test included periodic measurement of tank bottom steel potentials including on, instant off and polarization decay, anode current output and tank product level measurements.Results showed that zinc ribbon anode spacing in a chord fashion of 1.2 meter (4 feet) or less can be effective to achieve cathodic protection according to industry accepted standards. Utilizing the design information gained by the study, a standard sacrificial anode and impressed current anode cathodic protection system has been developed.

  5. Photo-stimulated low electron temperature high current diamond film field emission cathode

    DOEpatents

    Shurter,; Roger Philips, Devlin [Los Alamos, NM; David James, Moody [Santa Fe, NM; Nathan Andrew, Taccetti [Los Alamos, NM; Jose Martin, Russell [Santa Fe, NM; John, Steven [Los Alamos, NM

    2012-07-24

    An electron source includes a back contact surface having a means for attaching a power source to the back contact surface. The electron source also includes a layer comprising platinum in direct contact with the back contact surface, a composite layer of single-walled carbon nanotubes embedded in platinum in direct contact with the layer comprising platinum. The electron source also includes a nanocrystalline diamond layer in direct contact with the composite layer. The nanocrystalline diamond layer is doped with boron. A portion of the back contact surface is removed to reveal the underlying platinum. The electron source is contained in an evacuable container.

  6. Efficiently photo-charging lithium-ion battery by perovskite solar cell.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jiantie; Chen, Yonghua; Dai, Liming

    2015-08-27

    Electric vehicles using lithium-ion battery pack(s) for propulsion have recently attracted a great deal of interest. The large-scale practical application of battery electric vehicles may not be realized unless lithium-ion batteries with self-charging suppliers will be developed. Solar cells offer an attractive option for directly photo-charging lithium-ion batteries. Here we demonstrate the use of perovskite solar cell packs with four single CH3NH3PbI3 based solar cells connected in series for directly photo-charging lithium-ion batteries assembled with a LiFePO4 cathode and a Li4Ti5O12 anode. Our device shows a high overall photo-electric conversion and storage efficiency of 7.80% and excellent cycling stability, which outperforms other reported lithium-ion batteries, lithium-air batteries, flow batteries and super-capacitors integrated with a photo-charging component. The newly developed self-chargeable units based on integrated perovskite solar cells and lithium-ion batteries hold promise for various potential applications.

  7. Efficiently photo-charging lithium-ion battery by perovskite solar cell

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jiantie; Chen, Yonghua; Dai, Liming

    2015-01-01

    Electric vehicles using lithium-ion battery pack(s) for propulsion have recently attracted a great deal of interest. The large-scale practical application of battery electric vehicles may not be realized unless lithium-ion batteries with self-charging suppliers will be developed. Solar cells offer an attractive option for directly photo-charging lithium-ion batteries. Here we demonstrate the use of perovskite solar cell packs with four single CH3NH3PbI3 based solar cells connected in series for directly photo-charging lithium-ion batteries assembled with a LiFePO4 cathode and a Li4Ti5O12 anode. Our device shows a high overall photo-electric conversion and storage efficiency of 7.80% and excellent cycling stability, which outperforms other reported lithium-ion batteries, lithium–air batteries, flow batteries and super-capacitors integrated with a photo-charging component. The newly developed self-chargeable units based on integrated perovskite solar cells and lithium-ion batteries hold promise for various potential applications. PMID:26311589

  8. Efficiently photo-charging lithium-ion battery by perovskite solar cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jiantie; Chen, Yonghua; Dai, Liming

    2015-08-01

    Electric vehicles using lithium-ion battery pack(s) for propulsion have recently attracted a great deal of interest. The large-scale practical application of battery electric vehicles may not be realized unless lithium-ion batteries with self-charging suppliers will be developed. Solar cells offer an attractive option for directly photo-charging lithium-ion batteries. Here we demonstrate the use of perovskite solar cell packs with four single CH3NH3PbI3 based solar cells connected in series for directly photo-charging lithium-ion batteries assembled with a LiFePO4 cathode and a Li4Ti5O12 anode. Our device shows a high overall photo-electric conversion and storage efficiency of 7.80% and excellent cycling stability, which outperforms other reported lithium-ion batteries, lithium-air batteries, flow batteries and super-capacitors integrated with a photo-charging component. The newly developed self-chargeable units based on integrated perovskite solar cells and lithium-ion batteries hold promise for various potential applications.

  9. DEVELOPMENT OF A COMPACT PHOTO-INJECTOR WITH RFFOCUSING LENS FOR SHORT PULSE ELECTRON SOURCE APPLICATION

    SciTech Connect

    Grabenhofer, Alexander; Eaton, Douglas W.

    2013-09-01

    For development of compact ultrafast electron source system, we are currently designing a short-pulse RF-gun with RF focusing structure by means of a series of comprehensive modeling analysis processes. EM design of a 2.5 cell resonant cavity with input coupler, acceleration dynamics of photo-emitted electron bunch, EM design of RF-lens with input coupler, and phasespace analysis of focused electron bunch are systematically examined with multi-physics simulators. All the features of the 2.856 GHz cavity geometry were precisely engineered for acceleration energies ranging from 100 keV to 500 keV (safety limited) to be powered by our 5 MW S-band klystron. The klystron (Thales TH2163) and modulator system (ScandiNova K1 turnkey system) were successfully installed and tested. Performance tests of the klystron system show peak output power > 5 MW, as per operation specifications. At the quasi-relativistic energies, the electron source is capable of generating 100fC – 1 pC electron bunch with pulse duration close to 30 fs – 1 ps and transverse size of a few hundred microns. PIC simulations have shown that the electron bunch undergoes fast RF acceleration, rapidly reaching the desired energies, which can be controlled by tuning RF injection phase and input driving power. It has been shown that it is possible to also focus/compress the bunch longitudinally using a RF-lens, which would allow us to control the temporal resolution of the system as well. While our primary analysis has been performed on a 2.5 cell design, we are also looking into half-cell (single cavity) design that is expected to provide the same range of beam energy with a simple configuration.

  10. Energy-efficient operation of a booster RF system for Taiwan light source operated in top-up mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeh, Meng-Shu; Wang, Chaoen; Chang, Lung-Hai; Chung, Fu-Tsai; Yu, Tsung-Chi; Lin, Ming-Chyuan; Chen, Ling-Jhen; Yang, Tz-Te; Chang, Mei-Hsia; Lin, Yu-Han; Tsai, Ming-Hsun; Lo, Chih-Hung; Liu, Zong-Kai

    2015-03-01

    Contemporary light sources operate in a top-up mode to maintain their photon intensity quasi-constant so as to improve significantly the thermal stability of the photon beam and to maximize ultimately the average photon flux at a designed maximum operational beam current. Operating in a top-up mode requires frequent beam injection from the synchrotron booster to the storage ring of the light source, but the injection intervals occupy only a tiny portion of the operational time of the integrated machine. To maintain a high operational reliability, the booster RF system practically operates necessarily under injection conditions around the clock and consumes full electric power whether during top-up injection or not. How to decrease the power consumption of the booster RF system during its stand-by time but not to sacrifice the reliability and availability of the RF system is obviously of fundamental interest for routine operation of the light source in a top-up mode. Here, an energy-efficient operation of a booster RF system adaptive to top-up operation of a light source is proposed that has been developed, realized and integrated into the booster RF system of the Taiwan Light Source (TLS), and routinely operated since the end of year 2008. The klystron cathode current and RF gap voltage of the booster's accelerating RF cavity are both periodically modulated to adapt the injection rhythm during top-up operation, which results in decreased consumption of electric power of the booster RF system by more than 78%. The impact on the reliability and availability of the booster RF system has been carefully monitored during the past five operational years, delivering more than 5000 h scheduled user beam time per year. The booster RF system retains its excellent reliability and availability as previously. Neither a decrease of the service time nor an induced reliability issue from the klystron or any high-power high-voltage component of the transmitter has been experienced

  11. RF System High Power Amplifier Software Conversion at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    G. Lahti; H. Dong; T. Seegerger

    2006-10-31

    Jefferson Lab is in the process of converting the RF system from analog RF modules and non-smart high power amplifiers (HPAs) to digital RF modules and smart HPAs. The present analog RF module controls both the RF signal and the non-smart HPA hardware. The new digital RF module will only control the RF signal, so the new HPA must include embedded software. This paper will describe the conversion from a software perspective, including the initial testing, the intermediate mixed system of old and new units, and finally the totally new RF system.

  12. Photo-switchable membrane and method

    DOEpatents

    Marshall, Kenneth L; Glowacki, Eric

    2013-05-07

    Switchable gas permeation membranes in which a photo-switchable low-molecular-weight liquid crystalline (LC) material acts as the active element, and a method of making such membranes. Different LC eutectic mixtures were doped with mesogenic azo dyes and infused into track-etched porous membranes with regular cylindrical pores. Photo-induced isothermal phase changes in the imbibed mesogenic material afforded large, reversible changes in the permeability of the photo-switchable membrane to nitrogen. For example, membranes imbibed with a photo-switchable cyanobiphenyl LC material demonstrated low permeability in the nematic state, while the photo-generated isotropic state demonstrated a 16.times.-greater sorption coefficient. Both states obey a high linear sorption behavior in accordance with Henry's Law. In contrast, membranes imbibed with a photo-switchable phenyl benzoate LC material showed the opposite permeability behavior to the biphenyl-imbibed membrane, along with nonlinear sorption behavior.

  13. Astronauts Capture Moon Illusion Photo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    Many odd looking moon photos have been captured over the years by astronauts aboard the International Space Station. Even so, this photograph, taken by the crew over Russia on May 11, 2003, must have come as a surprise. The moon which is really a quarter of a million miles away, appears to be floating inside the Earth's atmosphere. The picture is tricky because of its uneven lighting. With the sun's elevation angle at only 6 degrees, night is falling on the left side of the image while it is still broad daylight on the right side. This gradient of sunlight is the key to the illusion.

  14. CONSTRUCTION PROGRESS PHOTO OF REMOTE ANALYTICAL FACILITY (CPP627). INL PHOTO ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    CONSTRUCTION PROGRESS PHOTO OF REMOTE ANALYTICAL FACILITY (CPP-627). INL PHOTO NUMBER NRTS-54-12573. R.G. Larsen, Photographer, 10/20/1954 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho Chemical Processing Plant, Fuel Reprocessing Complex, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  15. CONSTRUCTION PROGRESS PHOTO OF REMOTE ANALYTICAL FACILITY (CPP627). INL PHOTO ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    CONSTRUCTION PROGRESS PHOTO OF REMOTE ANALYTICAL FACILITY (CPP-627). INL PHOTO NUMBER NRTS-54-12124. Unknown Photographer, 9/21/1954 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho Chemical Processing Plant, Fuel Reprocessing Complex, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  16. Bibliographic description of photo database : The case study of "EXPO '90", The Photo Museum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamio, Tatsuo

    Advanced electronic technology enables to convert image information such as photos into the digital form and store the resulting data on to computers. Thus we have seen the movement toward constructing photo databases. One of the examples is the photo database exhibited at the Photo Museum of "EXPO '90" which will be held at Osaka in this coming April. Even image information database such as photos we have to still rely on languages when retrieving them. However, there exist different aspects from document information database so that we need to have much discussion on how to prepare guidelines or standards for bibliographic description of photo databases. Taking the Photo Museum as the case study this paper considers the photo databases. The bibliographic elements are categorized into four items; photographing behavior, photographing technique, title and subject. Particularly, subject category which can be searching keys, consists of sense information, subject class and keywords.

  17. Analysis of cathode geometry to minimize cathode erosion in direct current microplasma jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Causa, Federica; Ghezzi, Francesco; Dellasega, David; Caniello, Roberto; Grosso, Giovanni

    2012-12-01

    Microplasma jets are now widely used for deposition, etching, and materials processing. The present study focuses on the investigation of the influence of cathode geometry on deposition quality, for microplasma jet deposition systems in low vacuum. The interest here is understanding the influence of hydrogen on sputtering and/or evaporation of the electrodes. Samples obtained with two cathode geometries with tapered and rectangular cross-sections have been investigated experimentally by scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersion X-ray spectroscopy. Samples obtained with a tapered-geometry cathode present heavy contamination, demonstrating cathode erosion, while samples obtained with a rectangular-cross-section cathode are free from contamination. These experimental characteristics were explained by modelling results showing a larger radial component of the electric field at the cathode inner wall of the tapered cathode. As a result, ion acceleration is larger, explaining the observed cathode erosion in this case. Results from the present investigation also show that the ratio of radial to axial field components is larger for the rectangular geometry case, thus, qualitatively explaining the presence of micro-hollow cathode discharge over a wide range of currents observed in this case. In the light of the above findings, the rectangular cathode geometry is considered to be more effective to achieve cleaner deposition.

  18. BVA members wow judges in photo competition.

    PubMed

    2016-09-03

    Earlier this year, BVA ran its inaugural photo competition, giving members the opportunity to showcase the work of the veterinary profession and the animals and wildlife they encounter. Standing out from over 400 high-quality entries, judges picked the images reproduced in this month's BVA News as the winning and highly commended photos. To see all the entries and hear from the winners, visit www.bva.co.uk/vet-photos-2016/. There will be another photo competition in 2017 with more categories to be announced.

  19. Progress on Quantitative Modeling of rf Sheaths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Ippolito, D. A.; Myra, J. R.; Kohno, H.; Wright, J. C.

    2011-12-01

    A new quantitative approach for computing the rf sheath potential is described, which incorporates plasma dielectric effects and the relative geometry of the magnetic field and the material boundaries. The new approach uses a modified boundary condition ("rf sheath BC") that couples the rf waves and the sheaths at the boundary. It treats the sheath as a thin vacuum region and matches the fields across the plasma-vacuum boundary. When combined with the Child-Langmuir Law (relating the sheath width and sheath potential), the model permits a self-consistent determination of the sheath parameters and the rf electric field at the sheath-plasma boundary. Semi-analytic models using this BC predict a number of general features, including a sheath voltage threshold, a dimensionless parameter characterizing rf sheath effects, and the existence of sheath plasma waves with an associated resonance. Since the sheath BC is nonlinear and dependent on geometry, computing the sheath potential numerically is a challenging computational problem. Numerical results will be presented from a new parallel-processing finite-element rf wave code for the tokamak scrape-off layer (called "rfSOL"). The code has verified the physics predicted by analytic theory in 1D, and extended the solutions into model 2D geometries. The numerical calculations confirm the existence of multiple roots and hysteresis effects, and parameter studies have been carried out. Areas for future work will be discussed.

  20. Investigating the effect of electron emission pattern on RF gun beam quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajabi, A.; Shokri, B.

    2016-05-01

    Thermionic radio frequency gun is one of the most promising choices to gain a high quality electron beam, used in the infrared free electron lasers and synchrotron radiation injectors. To study the quality of the beam in a compact electron source, the emission pattern effect on the beam dynamics should be investigated. In the presented work, we developed a 3D simulation code to model the real process of thermionic emission and to investigate the effect of emission pattern, by considering geometrical constraints, on the beam dynamics. According to the results, the electron bunch emittance varies considerably with the emission pattern. Simulation results have been validated via comparison with the well-known simulation codes such as ASTRA simulation code and CST microwave studio, as well as other simulation results in the literature. It was also demonstrated that by using a continuous wave laser beam for heating the cathode, the emission pattern full width at half maximum (FWHM) of the transverse emission distribution is proportional to FWHM of the Gaussian profile for the laser beam. Additionally, by using the developed code, the effect of wall structure around the cathode on the back bombardment effect has been studied. According to the results, for a stable operation of the RF gun, one should consider the nose cone in vicinity of the cathode surface to reduce the back-bombardment effect.

  1. Cathode for an electrochemical cell

    DOEpatents

    Bates, John B.; Dudney, Nancy J.; Gruzalski, Greg R.; Luck, Christopher F.

    2001-01-01

    Described is a thin-film battery, especially a thin-film microbattery, and a method for making same having application as a backup or primary integrated power source for electronic devices. The battery includes a novel electrolyte which is electrochemically stable and does not react with the lithium anode and a novel vanadium oxide cathode. Configured as a microbattery, the battery can be fabricated directly onto a semiconductor chip, onto the semiconductor die or onto any portion of the chip carrier. The battery can be fabricated to any specified size or shape to meet the requirements of a particular application. The battery is fabricated of solid state materials and is capable of operation between -15.degree. C. and 150.degree. C.

  2. Polarization switching in ferroelectric cathodes

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenman, G.; Shur, D.; Garb, K.; Cohen, R.; Krasik, Y.E.

    1997-07-01

    A new mechanism of polarization switching and electron emission in ferroelectric cathodes is proposed. Surface flashover plasma of a ferroelectric origin was observed on a polar ferroelectric surface [D. Shur, G. Rosenman, and Ya. E. Krasik, Appl. Phys. Lett. {bold 70}, 574 (1997)]. Simultaneous measurements of switched charge and plasma density show that expanding surface plasma represents a dynamic switching electrode. Direct measurements of ion/electron emission currents and surface analysis implemented by different analytic tools indicate that electrons and ions from the surface plasma contribute to spontaneous polarization screening. The high energy of charged particles emitted from the surface plasma is ascribed to a high surface potential during polarization switching. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  3. Matching network for RF plasma source

    DOEpatents

    Pickard, Daniel S.; Leung, Ka-Ngo

    2007-11-20

    A compact matching network couples an RF power supply to an RF antenna in a plasma generator. The simple and compact impedance matching network matches the plasma load to the impedance of a coaxial transmission line and the output impedance of an RF amplifier at radio frequencies. The matching network is formed of a resonantly tuned circuit formed of a variable capacitor and an inductor in a series resonance configuration, and a ferrite core transformer coupled to the resonantly tuned circuit. This matching network is compact enough to fit in existing compact focused ion beam systems.

  4. Multi-level RF identification system

    DOEpatents

    Steele, Kerry D.; Anderson, Gordon A.; Gilbert, Ronald W.

    2004-07-20

    A radio frequency identification system having a radio frequency transceiver for generating a continuous wave RF interrogation signal that impinges upon an RF identification tag. An oscillation circuit in the RF identification tag modulates the interrogation signal with a subcarrier of a predetermined frequency and modulates the frequency-modulated signal back to the transmitting interrogator. The interrogator recovers and analyzes the subcarrier signal and determines its frequency. The interrogator generates an output indicative of the frequency of the subcarrier frequency, thereby identifying the responding RFID tag as one of a "class" of RFID tags configured to respond with a subcarrier signal of a predetermined frequency.

  5. RF Power and HOM Coupler Tutorial

    SciTech Connect

    Rusnak, B

    2003-10-28

    Radio frequency (RF) couplers are used on superconducting cavities to deliver RF power for creating accelerating fields and to remove unwanted higher-order mode power for reducing emittance growth and cryogenic load. RF couplers in superconducting applications present a number of interdisciplinary design challenges that need to be addressed, since poor performance in these devices can profoundly impact accelerator operations and the overall success of a major facility. This paper will focus on critical design issues for fundamental and higher order mode (HOM) power couplers, highlight a sampling of reliability-related problems observed in couplers, and discuss some design strategies for improving performance.

  6. Nb-Pb Superconducting RF Gun

    SciTech Connect

    Sekutowicz, J.; Iversen, J.; Kreps, G.; Moller, W.D.; Singer, W.; Singer, X.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Burrill, A.; Smedley, J.; Rao, T.; Ferrario, M.; Kneisel, P.; Langner, J.; Strzyzewski, P.; Lefferts, R.; Lipski, A.; Szalowski, K.; Ko, K.; Xiao, L.; /SLAC

    2006-03-29

    We report on the status of an electron RF-gun made of two superconductors: niobium and lead. The presented design combines the advantages of the RF performance of bulk niobium superconducting cavities and the reasonably high quantum efficiency of lead, as compared to other superconducting metals. The concept, mentioned in a previous paper, follows the attractive approach of all niobium superconducting RF-gun as it has been proposed by the BNL group. Measured values of quantum efficiency for lead at various photon energies, analysis of recombination time of photon-broken Cooper pairs for lead and niobium, and preliminary cold test results are discussed in this paper.

  7. Nb-Pb superconducting RF gun

    SciTech Connect

    J. Sekutowicz; J. Iversen; G. Kreps; W.D. Moller; W. Singer; X. Singer; I. Ben-Zvi; A. Burrill; J. Smedley; T. Rao; M. Ferrario; P. Kneisel; J. Langner; P. Strzyzewski; R. Lefferts; A. Lipski; K. Szalowski; K. Ko; L. Xiao

    2006-04-14

    We report on the status of an electron RF-gun made of two superconductors: niobium and lead. The presented design combines the advantages of the RF performance of bulk niobium superconducting cavities and the reasonably high quantum efficiency of lead, as compared to other superconducting metals. The concept, mentioned in a previous paper, follows the attractive approach of all niobium superconducting RF-gun as it has been proposed by the BNL group. Measured values of quantum efficiency for lead at various photon energies, analysis of recombination time of photon-broken Cooper pairs for lead and niobium, and preliminary cold test results are discussed in this paper.

  8. Batteries: Overview of Battery Cathodes

    SciTech Connect

    Doeff, Marca M

    2010-07-12

    The very high theoretical capacity of lithium (3829 mAh/g) provided a compelling rationale from the 1970's onward for development of rechargeable batteries employing the elemental metal as an anode. The realization that some transition metal compounds undergo reductive lithium intercalation reactions reversibly allowed use of these materials as cathodes in these devices, most notably, TiS{sub 2}. Another intercalation compound, LiCoO{sub 2}, was described shortly thereafter but, because it was produced in the discharged state, was not considered to be of interest by battery companies at the time. Due to difficulties with the rechargeability of lithium and related safety concerns, however, alternative anodes were sought. The graphite intercalation compound (GIC) LiC{sub 6} was considered an attractive candidate but the high reactivity with commonly used electrolytic solutions containing organic solvents was recognized as a significant impediment to its use. The development of electrolytes that allowed the formation of a solid electrolyte interface (SEI) on surfaces of the carbon particles was a breakthrough that enabled commercialization of Li-ion batteries. In 1990, Sony announced the first commercial batteries based on a dual Li ion intercalation system. These devices are assembled in the discharged state, so that it is convenient to employ a prelithiated cathode such as LiCoO{sub 2} with the commonly used graphite anode. After charging, the batteries are ready to power devices. The practical realization of high energy density Li-ion batteries revolutionized the portable electronics industry, as evidenced by the widespread market penetration of mobile phones, laptop computers, digital music players, and other lightweight devices since the early 1990s. In 2009, worldwide sales of Li-ion batteries for these applications alone were US$ 7 billion. Furthermore, their performance characteristics (Figure 1) make them attractive for traction applications such as hybrid

  9. Aerial photo SBVC1962". Photo no. 360. Low oblique aerial view ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Aerial photo -SBVC-1962". Photo no. 360. Low oblique aerial view of the campus, looking southeast. Stamped on the rear: "Ron Wilhite, Sun-Telegram photo, file, 10/22/62/ - San Bernardino Valley College, 701 South Mount Vernon Avenue, San Bernardino, San Bernardino County, CA

  10. Cells having cathodes containing polycarbon disulfide materials

    DOEpatents

    Okamoto, Yoshi; Skotheim, Terje A.; Lee, Hung S.

    1995-08-15

    The present invention relates to an electric current producing cell which contains an anode, a cathode having as a cathode-active material one or more carbon-sulfur compounds of the formula (CS.sub.x).sub.n, in which x takes values from 1.2 to 2.3 and n is greater or equal to 2, and where the redox process does not involve polymerization and de-polymerization by forming and breaking S--S bonds in the polymer backbone. The cell also contains an electrolyte which is chemically inert with respect to the anode and the cathode.

  11. Cells having cathodes containing polycarbon disulfide materials

    DOEpatents

    Okamoto, Y.; Skotheim, T.A.; Lee, H.S.

    1995-08-15

    The present invention relates to an electric current producing cell which contains an anode, a cathode having as a cathode-active material one or more carbon-sulfur compounds of the formula (CS{sub x}){sub n}, in which x takes values from 1.2 to 2.3 and n is greater or equal to 2, and where the redox process does not involve polymerization and de-polymerization by forming and breaking S--S bonds in the polymer backbone. The cell also contains an electrolyte which is chemically inert with respect to the anode and the cathode. 5 figs.

  12. Development of Lanthanum Ferrite SOFC Cathodes

    SciTech Connect

    Simner, Steve P.; Bonnett, Jeff F.; Canfield, Nathan L.; Meinhardt, Kerry D.; Shelton, Jayne P.; Sprenkle, Vince L.; Stevenson, Jeffry W.

    2003-01-01

    A number of studies have been conducted concerning compositional/microstructural modifications of a Sr-doped lanthanum ferrite (LSF) cathode and protective Sm-doped ceria (SDC) layer in an anode supported solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC). Emphasis was placed on achieving enhanced low temperature (700-800 degrees C) performance, and long-term cell stability. Investigations involved manipulation of the lanthanum ferrite chemistry, addition of noble metal oxygen reduction catalysts, incorporation of active cathode layer compositions containing Co, Fe and higher Sr contents, and attempts to optimize the ceria barrier layer between the LSF cathode and YSZ electrolyte.

  13. K2CsSb Cathode Development

    SciTech Connect

    Smedley,J.; Rao, T.; Wang, E.

    2008-10-01

    K{sub 2}CsSb is an attractive photocathode for high current applications. With a quantum efficiency of >4% at 532nm and >10% at 355nm, it is the only cathode to have demonstrated an average current of 35mA in an accelerator environment We describe ongoing cathode development work. for the energy recovery linac being constructed at BNL Several cathodes have been created on both copper and stainless steel substrates, and their spatial uniformity and spectral response have been characterized. Preliminary lifetime measurements have been performed at high average current densities (>1 mA/mm{sup 2}).

  14. Cathode for molten carbonate fuel cell

    DOEpatents

    Kaun, Thomas D.; Mrazek, Franklin C.

    1990-01-01

    A porous sintered cathode for a molten carbonate fuel cell and method of making same, the cathode including a skeletal structure of a first electronically conductive material slightly soluble in the electrolyte present in the molten carbonate fuel cell covered by fine particles of a second material of possibly lesser electronic conductivity insoluble in the electrolyte present in the molten carbonate fuel cell, the cathode having a porosity in the range of from about 60% to about 70% at steady-state cell operating conditions consisting of both macro-pores and micro-pores.

  15. 95 GHz gyrotron with ferroelectric cathode.

    PubMed

    Einat, M; Pilossof, M; Ben-Moshe, R; Hirshbein, H; Borodin, D

    2012-11-02

    Ferroelectric cathodes were reported as a feasible electron source for microwave tubes. However, due to the surface plasma emission characterizing this cathode, operation of millimeter wave tubes based on it remains questionable. Nevertheless, the interest in compact high power sources of millimeter waves and specifically 95 GHz is continually growing. In this experiment, a ferroelectric cathode is used as an electron source for a gyrotron with the output frequency extended up to 95 GHz. Power above a 5 kW peak and ~0.5 μs pulses are reported; a duty cycle of 10% is estimated to be achievable.

  16. Plasma distribution of cathodic ARC deposition system

    SciTech Connect

    Anders, S.; Raoux, S.; Krishnan, K.; MacGill, R.A.; Brown, I.G.

    1996-08-01

    The plasma distribution using a cathodic arc plasma source with and without magnetic macroparticle filter has been determined by depositing on a transparent plastic substrate and measuring the film absorption. It was found that the width of the distribution depends on the arc current, and it also depends on the cathode material which leads to a spatial separation of the elements when an alloy cathode is used. By applying a magnetic multicusp field near the exit of the magnetic filter, it was possible to modify the plasma distribution and obtain a flat plasma profile with a constant and homogeneous elemental distribution.

  17. High power microwave generation from coaxial virtual cathode oscillator using graphite and velvet cathodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menon, Rakhee; Roy, Amitava; Singh, S. K.; Mitra, S.; Sharma, Vishnu; Kumar, Senthil; Sharma, Archana; Nagesh, K. V.; Mittal, K. C.; Chakravarthy, D. P.

    2010-05-01

    High power microwave (HPM) generation studies were carried out in KALI-5000 pulse power system. The intense relativistic electron beam was utilized to generate HPMs using a coaxial virtual cathode oscillator. The typical electron beam parameters were 350 kV, 25 kA, and 100 ns, with a few hundreds of ampere per centimeter square current density. Microwaves were generated with graphite and polymer velvet cathode at various diode voltage, current, and accelerating gaps. A horn antenna setup with diode detector and attenuators was used to measure the microwave power. It was observed that the microwave power increases with the diode voltage and current and reduces with the accelerating gap. It was found that both the peak power and width of the microwave pulse is larger for the velvet cathode compared to the graphite cathode. In a coaxial vircator, velvet cathode is superior to the graphite cathode due to its shorter turn on time and better electron beam uniformity.

  18. Design and Development of a Series Switch for High Voltage in RF Heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, Himanshu K.; Shah, Deep; Thacker, Mauli; Shah, Atman

    2013-02-01

    Plasma is the fourth state of matter. To sustain plasma in its ionic form very high temperature is essential. RF heating systems are used to provide the required temperature. Arching phenomenon in these systems can cause enormous damage to the RF tube. Heavy current flows across the anode-cathode junction, which need to be suppressed in minimal time for its protection. Fast-switching circuit breakers are used to cut-off the load from the supply in cases of arching. The crowbar interrupts the connection between the high voltage power supply (HVPS) and the RF tube for a temporary period between which the series switch has to open. The crowbar shunts the current across the load but in the process leads to short circuiting the HVPS. Thus, to protect the load as well as the HVPS a series switch is necessary. This paper presents the design and development of high voltage Series Switch for the high power switching applications. Fiber optic based Optimum triggering scheme is designed and tested to restrict the time delay well within the stipulated limits. The design is well supported with the experimental results for the whole set-up along with the series switch at various voltage level before its approval for operation at 5.2 kV.

  19. Simulation study on the emittance compensation of off-axis emitted beam in RF photoinjector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Rui-Xuan; Mitchell, Chad; Jia, Qi-Ka; Papadopoulos, Christos; Sannibale, Fernando

    2016-11-01

    To make full use of the photocathode material and improve its quantum efficiency lifetime, it can be necessary to operate the laser away from the cathode center in photoinjectors. In RF guns, the off-axis emitted beam will see a time-dependent RF effect, which would generate a significant growth in transverse emittance. It has been demonstrated that such an emittance growth can be almost completely compensated by orienting the beam on a proper orbit in the downstream RF cavities along the injector [1]. In this paper we analyze in detail the simulation techniques used in reference [1] and the issues associated with them. The optimization of photoinjector systems involving off-axis beams is a challenging problem. To solve this problem, one needs advanced simulation tools including both genetic algorithms and an efficient algorithm for 3D space charge. In this paper, we report on simulation studies where the two codes ASTRA and IMPACT-T are used jointly to overcome these challenges, in order to optimize a system designed to compensate for the emittance growth in a beam emitted off axis. Supported by National Nature Science Foundation of China (11375199), and Chinese Scholarship Council

  20. Results of the SLAC LCLS Gun High-Power RF Tests

    SciTech Connect

    Dowell, D.H.; Jongewaard, E.; Limborg-Deprey, C.; Schmerge, J.F.; Li, Z.; Xiao, L.; Wang, J.; Lewandowski, J.; Vlieks, A.; /SLAC

    2007-11-02

    The beam quality and operational requirements for the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) currently being constructed at SLAC are exceptional, requiring the design of a new RF photocathode gun for the electron source. Based on operational experience at SLAC's GTF and SDL and ATF at BNL as well as other laboratories, the 1.6cell s-band (2856MHz) gun was chosen to be the best electron source for the LCLS, however a significant redesign was necessary to achieve the challenging parameters. Detailed 3-D analysis and design was used to produce near-perfect rotationally symmetric rf fields to achieve the emittance requirement. In addition, the thermo-mechanical design allows the gun to operate at 120Hz and a 140MV/m cathode field, or to an average power dissipation of 4kW. Both average and pulsed heating issues are addressed in the LCLS gun design. The first LCLS gun is now fabricated and has been operated with high-power RF. The results of these high-power tests are presented and discussed.

  1. Micropower RF material proximity sensor

    DOEpatents

    McEwan, T.E.

    1998-11-10

    A level detector or proximity detector for materials capable of sensing through plastic container walls or encapsulating materials is disclosed. Thus, it can be used in corrosive environments, as well as in a wide variety of applications. An antenna has a characteristic impedance which depends on the materials in proximity to the antenna. An RF oscillator, which includes the antenna and is based on a single transistor in a Colpitt`s configuration, produces an oscillating signal. A detector is coupled to the oscillator which signals changes in the oscillating signal caused by changes in the materials in proximity to the antenna. The oscillator is turned on and off at a pulse repetition frequency with a low duty cycle to conserve power. The antenna consists of a straight monopole about one-quarter wavelength long at the nominal frequency of the oscillator. The antenna may be horizontally disposed on a container and very accurately detects the fill level within the container as the material inside the container reaches the level of the antenna. 5 figs.

  2. RF/Optical Hybrid Antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torrez, T. M.

    2015-05-01

    This article details analyses performed on several variations of a proposed radio frequency (RF)/optical hybrid antenna. The goal was to determine the structural impact of adding an assembly of optical mirrors to the antenna; stresses in the structural members and reflector surface deformation were used to assess this impact. The results showed that the structure could handle the added assembly, and the surface RMS increased, as expected, with larger increases seen as the antenna translates in elevation from the rigging angle of 45 deg (a predetermined location chosen to optimize panel settings during installation). In addition, actuators are located behind each optical mirror to reoptimize the mirror positions after they deflect due to the antenna being tipped in elevation. The necessary actuator motion was calculated for each mirror for a range of elevation angles, and it was found that the required motions are achievable by commonly used actuators. Resonant frequency analysis was also performed on the quadripod and tripod (for DSS-13 at Goldstone) to determine the effect that adding optical components on the apex has on the structure and its first mode; it was found that the impact is minimal to both the stresses seen in the structure and its first mode.

  3. Micropower RF material proximity sensor

    DOEpatents

    McEwan, Thomas E.

    1998-01-01

    A level detector or proximity detector for materials capable of sensing through plastic container walls or encapsulating materials is of the sensor. Thus, it can be used in corrosive environments, as well as in a wide variety of applications. An antenna has a characteristic impedance which depends on the materials in proximity to the antenna. An RF oscillator, which includes the antenna and is based on a single transistor in a Colpitt's configuration, produces an oscillating signal. A detector is coupled to the oscillator which signals changes in the oscillating signal caused by changes in the materials in proximity to the antenna. The oscillator is turned on and off at a pulse repetition frequency with a low duty cycle to conserve power. The antenna consists of a straight monopole about one-quarter wavelength long at the nominal frequency of the oscillator. The antenna may be horizontally disposed on a container and very accurately detects the fill level within the container as the material inside the container reaches the level of the antenna.

  4. Low temperature aluminum reduction cell using hollow cathode

    DOEpatents

    Brown, Craig W.; Frizzle, Patrick B.

    2002-08-20

    A method of producing aluminum in an electrolytic cell containing alumina dissolved in an electrolyte. A plurality of non-consumable anodes are disposed substantially vertically in the electrolyte along with a plurality of monolithic hollow cathodes. Each cathode has a top and bottom and the cathodes are disposed vertically in the electrolyte and the anodes and the cathodes are arranged in alternating relationship. Each of the cathodes is comprised of a first side facing a first opposing anode and a second side facing a second opposing anode. The first and second sides are joined by ends to form a reservoir in the hollow cathode for collecting aluminum therein deposited at the cathode.

  5. Modular open RF architecture: extending VICTORY to RF systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melber, Adam; Dirner, Jason; Johnson, Michael

    2015-05-01

    Radio frequency products spanning multiple functions have become increasingly critical to the warfighter. Military use of the electromagnetic spectrum now includes communications, electronic warfare (EW), intelligence, and mission command systems. Due to the urgent needs of counterinsurgency operations, various quick reaction capabilities (QRCs) have been fielded to enhance warfighter capability. Although these QRCs were highly successfully in their respective missions, they were designed independently resulting in significant challenges when integrated on a common platform. This paper discusses how the Modular Open RF Architecture (MORA) addresses these challenges by defining an open architecture for multifunction missions that decomposes monolithic radio systems into high-level components with welldefined functions and interfaces. The functional decomposition maximizes hardware sharing while minimizing added complexity and cost due to modularization. MORA achieves significant size, weight and power (SWaP) savings by allowing hardware such as power amplifiers and antennas to be shared across systems. By separating signal conditioning from the processing that implements the actual radio application, MORA exposes previously inaccessible architecture points, providing system integrators with the flexibility to insert third-party capabilities to address technical challenges and emerging requirements. MORA leverages the Vehicular Integration for Command, Control, Communication, Computers, Intelligence, Surveillance, and Reconnaissance (C4ISR)/EW Interoperability (VICTORY) framework. This paper concludes by discussing how MORA, VICTORY and other standards such as OpenVPX are being leveraged by the U.S. Army Research, Development, and Engineering Command (RDECOM) Communications Electronics Research, Development, and Engineering Center (CERDEC) to define a converged architecture enabling rapid technology insertion, interoperability and reduced SWaP.

  6. 47 CFR 27.52 - RF safety.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... this chapter, as appropriate. Applications for equipment authorization of mobile or portable devices... Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES MISCELLANEOUS WIRELESS COMMUNICATIONS SERVICES Technical Standards § 27.52 RF safety. Licensees and manufacturers are subject to...

  7. New developments in RF power sources

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, R.H.

    1994-06-01

    The most challenging rf source requirements for high-energy accelerators presently being studied or designed come from the various electron-positron linear collider studies. All of these studies except TESLA (the superconducting entry in the field) have specified rf sources with much higher peak powers than any existing tubes at comparable high frequencies. While circular machines do not, in general, require high peak power, the very high luminosity electron-positron rings presently being designed as B factories require prodigious total average rf power. In this age of energy conservation, this puts a high priority on high efficiency for the rf sources. Both modulating anodes and depressed collectors are being investigated in the quest for high efficiency at varying output powers.

  8. Single frequency RF powered ECG telemetry system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ko, W. H.; Hynecek, J.; Homa, J.

    1979-01-01

    It has been demonstrated that a radio frequency magnetic field can be used to power implanted electronic circuitry for short range telemetry to replace batteries. A substantial reduction in implanted volume can be achieved by using only one RF tank circuit for receiving the RF power and transmitting the telemetered information. A single channel telemetry system of this type, using time sharing techniques, was developed and employed to transmit the ECG signal from Rhesus monkeys in primate chairs. The signal from the implant is received during the period when the RF powering radiation is interrupted. The ECG signal is carried by 20-microsec pulse position modulated pulses, referred to the trailing edge of the RF powering pulse. Satisfactory results have been obtained with this single frequency system. The concept and the design presented may be useful for short-range long-term implant telemetry systems.

  9. CEBAF'S New RF Separator Structure Test Results

    SciTech Connect

    Reza Kazimi; Jock Fugitt; A. Krycuk; Charles Sinclair; Larry Turlington

    1993-05-01

    Prototypes of the rf separator for CEBAF have been made and successfully beam tested. The structure is a new design which has a high transverse shunt impedance together with a small transverse dimension compared to more conventional rf deflecting structures. Five rf separators will be used at CEBAF to allow beam from any one of the five recirculation passes to be delivered to any of the three experimental halls. The authors have already described the basic design of the structure and theoretical calculations. They have also reported some results from rf measurements and beam tests. In this paper they present more beam test results, their final design parameters, and test results of coupling two 1/2 wavelength cavities together.

  10. Digital-Centric RF CMOS Technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuzawa, Akira

    Analog-centric RFCMOS technology has played an important role in motivating the change of technology from conventional discrete device technology or bipolar IC technology to CMOS technology. However it introduces many problems such as poor performance, susceptibility to PVT fluctuation, and cost increase with technology scaling. The most important advantage of CMOS technology compared with legacy RF technology is that CMOS can use more high performance digital circuits for very low cost. In fact, analog-centric RF-CMOS technology has failed the FM/AM tuner business and the digital-centric CMOS technology is becoming attractive for many users. It has many advantages; such as high performance, no external calibration points, high yield, and low cost. From the above facts, digital-centric CMOS technology which utilizes the advantages of digital technology must be the right path for future RF technology. Further investment in this technology is necessary for the advancement of RF technology.

  11. Degreasing and cleaning superconducting RF Niobium cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Rauchmiller, Michael; Kellett, Ron; /Fermilab

    2011-09-01

    The purpose and scope of this report is to detail the steps necessary for degreasing and cleaning of superconducting RF Niobium cavities in the A0 clean room. It lists the required equipment and the cleaning procedure.

  12. FERMILAB CRYOMODULE TEST STAND RF INTERLOCK SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Petersen, Troy; Diamond, J. S.; McDowell, D.; Nicklaus, D.; Prieto, P. S.; Semenov, A.

    2016-10-12

    An interlock system has been designed for the Fermilab Cryo-module Test Stand (CMTS), a test bed for the cryo- modules to be used in the upcoming Linac Coherent Light Source 2 (LCLS-II) project at SLAC. The interlock system features 8 independent subsystems, one per superconducting RF cavity and solid state amplifier (SSA) pair. Each system monitors several devices to detect fault conditions such as arcing in the waveguides or quenching of the SRF system. Additionally each system can detect fault conditions by monitoring the RF power seen at the cavity coupler through a directional coupler. In the event of a fault condition, each system is capable of removing RF signal to the amplifier (via a fast RF switch) as well as turning off the SSA. Additionally, each input signal is available for re- mote viewing and recording via a Fermilab designed digitizer board and MVME 5500 processor.

  13. Si-based RF MEMS components.

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, James E.; Nordquist, Christopher Daniel; Baker, Michael Sean; Fleming, James Grant; Stewart, Harold D.; Dyck, Christopher William

    2005-01-01

    Radio frequency microelectromechanical systems (RF MEMS) are an enabling technology for next-generation communications and radar systems in both military and commercial sectors. RF MEMS-based reconfigurable circuits outperform solid-state circuits in terms of insertion loss, linearity, and static power consumption and are advantageous in applications where high signal power and nanosecond switching speeds are not required. We have demonstrated a number of RF MEMS switches on high-resistivity silicon (high-R Si) that were fabricated by leveraging the volume manufacturing processes available in the Microelectronics Development Laboratory (MDL), a Class-1, radiation-hardened CMOS manufacturing facility. We describe novel tungsten and aluminum-based processes, and present results of switches developed in each of these processes. Series and shunt ohmic switches and shunt capacitive switches were successfully demonstrated. The implications of fabricating on high-R Si and suggested future directions for developing low-loss RF MEMS-based circuits are also discussed.

  14. RF synchronized short pulse laser ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Fuwa, Yasuhiro Iwashita, Yoshihisa; Tongu, Hiromu; Inoue, Shunsuke; Hashida, Masaki; Sakabe, Shuji; Okamura, Masahiro; Yamazaki, Atsushi

    2016-02-15

    A laser ion source that produces shortly bunched ion beam is proposed. In this ion source, ions are extracted immediately after the generation of laser plasma by an ultra-short pulse laser before its diffusion. The ions can be injected into radio frequency (RF) accelerating bucket of a subsequent accelerator. As a proof-of-principle experiment of the ion source, a RF resonator is prepared and H{sub 2} gas was ionized by a short pulse laser in the RF electric field in the resonator. As a result, bunched ions with 1.2 mA peak current and 5 ns pulse length were observed at the exit of RF resonator by a probe.

  15. The role of anode and cathode plasmas in high power ion diode performance

    SciTech Connect

    Mehlhorn, T.A.; Bailey, J.E.; Bernard, M.A.

    1996-06-01

    We describe measurements, modeling, and mitigation experiments on the effects of anode and cathode plasmas in applied-B ion diodes. We have performed experiments with electrode conditioning and cleaning techniques including RF discharges, anode heating, cryogenic cathode cooling and anode surface coatings that have been successful in mitigating some of the effects of electrode contamination on ion diode performance on both the SABRE and PBFA accelerators. We are developing sophisticated spectroscopic diagnostic techniques that allow us to measure the electric and magnetic fields in the A-K gap, we compare these measured fields with those predicted by our 3-D particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations of ion diodes, and we measure anode and cathode plasma densities and expansion velocities. We are continuing to develop E-M simulation codes with fluid-PIC hybrid models for dense plasmas, in order to understand the role of electrode plasmas in ion diode performance. Our strategy for improving high power ion diode performance is to employ and expand our capabilities in measuring and modeling A-K gap plasmas and leverage our increased knowledge into an increase in total ion beam brightness to High Yield Facility (HYF) levels.

  16. Partnering with Families through Photo Collages

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bacigalupa, Chiara

    2016-01-01

    This article describes the implementation and benefits of a photo-based family communication method called Daily Explorations. Daily Explorations are one- to two-page photo collages that are annotated with meaningful explanations of children's play and e-mailed to parents every day. The process, described in more detail in this article, is a…

  17. Using Participatory Photo Novels to Teach Marketing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Das, Kallol

    2012-01-01

    Teaching the restless young generation business students of today is not easy. Furthermore, the traditional lecture method has failed miserably to engage the business students and deliver significant learning. The author presents a discussion on the photo novel as an attractive communication medium and the participatory photo novel as an…

  18. Photo-induced Defects in Semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redfield, David; Bube, Richard H.

    2006-03-01

    1. Introduction: metastable defects; 2. III-V compounds: DX2 and EL2 centers; 3. Other crystalline materials; 4. Hydrogenated amorphous silicon: properties of defects; 5. Hydrogenated amorphous silicon: photo-induced defect kinetics and processes; 6. Other amorphous semiconductors; 7. Photo-induced defect effects in devices; References; Index.

  19. A Snapshot of Photo Editing Options

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bolkan, J.V.

    2004-01-01

    Plenty of digital imaging professionals claim that Adobe's Photoshop CS is the best photo editing application money can buy. This document reviews Adobe's Photoshop CS and its worthy competitors. In addition to Adobe, the following programs are reviewed in this document: (1) Adobe Photoshop Elements 2.0; (2) Arcsoft PhotoImpression; (3) Jasc Paint…

  20. RF/Optical Demonstration: Focal Plane Assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoppe, D. J.; Chung, S.; Kovalik, J.; Gama, E.; Fernandez, M. M.

    2016-11-01

    In this article, we describe the second-generation focal plane optical assembly employed in the RF/optical demonstration at DSS-13. This assembly receives reflected light from the two mirror segments mounted on the RF primary. The focal plane assembly contains a fast steering mirror (FSM) to stabilize the focal plane spot, a pupil camera to aid in aligning the two segments, and several additional cameras for receiving the optical signal prior to as well as after the FSM loop.

  1. Vortex formation during rf heating of plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Motley, R.W.

    1980-05-01

    Experiments on a test plasma show that the linear theory of waveguide coupling to slow plasma waves begins to break down if the rf power flux exceeds approx. 30 W/cm/sup 2/. Probe measurements reveal that within 30 ..mu..s an undulation appears in the surface plasma near the mouth of the twin waveguide. This surface readjustment is part of a vortex, or off-center convective cell, driven by asymmetric rf heating of the plasma column.

  2. A no-load RF calorimeter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chernoff, R. C.

    1975-01-01

    The described device can be used to measure the output of any dc powered RF source. No dummy load is required for the measurements. The device is, therefore, called the 'no-load calorimeter' (NLC). The NLC measures the power actually fed to the antenna or another useful load. It is believed that the NLC can compete successfully with directional coupler type systems in measuring the output of high-power RF sources.

  3. RF MEMS reconfigurable triangular patch antenna.

    SciTech Connect

    Nordquist, Christopher Daniel; Christodoulou, Christos George; Feldner, Lucas Matthew

    2005-01-01

    A Ka-band RF MEMS enabled frequency reconfigurable triangular microstrip patch antenna has been designed for monolithic integration with RF MEMS phase shifters to demonstrate a low-cost monolithic passive electronically scanned array (PESA). This paper introduces our first prototype reconfigurable triangular patch antenna currently in fabrication. The aperture coupled patch antenna is fabricated on a dual-layer quartz/alumina substrate using surface micromachining techniques.

  4. RF MEMS reconfigurable triangular patch antenna.

    SciTech Connect

    Christodoulou, Christos George; Nordquist, Christopher Daniel; Feldner, Lucas Matthew

    2005-07-01

    A Ka-band RF MEMS enabled frequency reconfigurable triangular microstrip patch antenna has been designed for monolithic integration with RF MEMS phase shifters to demonstrate a low-cost monolithic passive electronically scanned array (PESA). This paper introduces our first prototype reconfigurable triangular patch antenna currently in fabrication. The aperture coupled patch antenna is fabricated on a dual-layer quartz/alumina substrate using surface micromachining techniques.

  5. Normal Conducting RF Cavity for MICE

    SciTech Connect

    Li, D.; DeMello, A.; Virostek, S.; Zisman, M.; Summers, D.

    2010-05-23

    Normal conducting RF cavities must be used for the cooling section of the international Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE), currently under construction at Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (RAL) in the UK. Eight 201-MHz cavities are needed for the MICE cooling section; fabrication of the first five cavities is complete. We report the cavity fabrication status including cavity design, fabrication techniques and preliminary low power RF measurements.

  6. RF study and 3-D simulations of a side-coupling thermionic RF-gun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rimjaem, S.; Kusoljariyakul, K.; Thongbai, C.

    2014-02-01

    A thermionic RF-gun for generating ultra-short electron bunches was optimized, developed and used as a source at a linac-based THz radiation research laboratory of the Plasma and Beam Physics Research Facility, Chiang Mai University, Thailand. The RF-gun is a π/2-mode standing wave structure, which consists of two S-band accelerating cells and a side-coupling cavity. The 2856 MHz RF wave is supplied from an S-band klystron to the gun through the waveguide input-port at the cylindrical wall of the second cell. A fraction of the RF power is coupled from the second cell to the first one via a side-coupling cavity. Both the waveguide input-port and the side-coupling cavity lead to an asymmetric geometry of the gun. RF properties and electromagnetic field distributions inside the RF-gun were studied and numerically simulated by using computer codes SUPERFISH 7.19 and CST Microwave Studio 2012©. RF characterizations and tunings of the RF-gun were performed to ensure the reliability of the gun operation. The results from 3D simulations and measurements are compared and discussed in this paper. The influence of asymmetric field distributions inside the RF-gun on the electron beam properties was investigated via 3D beam dynamics simulations. A change in the coupling-plane of the side-coupling cavity is suggested to improve the gun performance.

  7. Reduction of RF sheaths potentials by compensation or suppression of parallel RF currents on ICRF antennae

    SciTech Connect

    Mendes, A.; Colas, L.; Vulliez, K.; Argouarch, A.; Milanesio, D.

    2009-11-26

    Radio Frequency (RF) sheaths are suspected to limit the performance of present-day Ion Cyclotron Range of Frequencies (ICRF) antennae over long pulses and should be minimized in future Fusion devices. Within the simplest models, RF sheath effects are quantified by the integral V{sub RF} {integral}E{sub ||}{center_dot}dl where the parallel RF field E{sub ||} is linked with the slow wave. On 'long open field lines' with large toroidal extension on both sides of the antenna it was shown that V{sub RF} is excited by parallel RF currents j{sub ||} flowing on the antenna structure. We thus propose two ways to reduce |V{sub RF}| by acting on j{sub ||} on the antenna front face. The first method, more adapted for protruding antennae, consists in avoiding the j{sub ||} circulation on the antenna structure, by slotting the antenna frame on its horizontal edges and by cutting partially the Faraday screen rods. The second method, well suited for recessed antennae, consists in compensating j{sub ||} of opposite signs along long flux tubes, with parallelepiped antennae aligned with tilted flux tubes. The different concepts are assessed numerically on a 2-strap Tore Supra antenna phased [0, {pi}] using near RF fields from the antenna code TOPICA. Simulations stress the need to suppress all current paths for j{sub ||} to reduce substantially |V{sub RF}| over the whole antenna height.

  8. High current density cathode for electrorefining in molten electrolyte

    DOEpatents

    Li, Shelly X.

    2010-06-29

    A high current density cathode for electrorefining in a molten electrolyte for the continuous production and collection of loose dendritic or powdery deposits. The high current density cathode eliminates the requirement for mechanical scraping and electrochemical stripping of the deposits from the cathode in an anode/cathode module. The high current density cathode comprises a perforated electrical insulated material coating such that the current density is up to 3 A/cm.sup.2.

  9. Overview of High Power Vacuum Dry RF Load Designs

    SciTech Connect

    Krasnykh, Anatoly

    2015-08-27

    A specific feature of RF linacs based on the pulsed traveling wave (TW) mode of operation is that only a portion of the RF energy is used for the beam acceleration. The residual RF energy has to be terminated into an RF load. Higher accelerating gradients require higher RF sources and RF loads, which can stably terminate the residual RF power. RF feeders (from the RF source though the accelerating section to the load) are vacuumed to transmit multi-megawatt high power RF. This overview will outline vacuumed RF loads only. A common method to terminate multi-MW RF power is to use circulated water (or other liquid) as an absorbing medium. A solid dielectric interface (a high quality ceramic) is required to separate vacuum and liquid RF absorber mediums. Using such RF load approaches in TW linacs is troubling because there is a fragile ceramic window barrier and a failure could become catastrophic for linac vacuum and RF systems. Traditional loads comprising of a ceramic disk have limited peak and average power handling capability and are therefore not suitable for high gradient TW linacs. This overview will focus on ''vacuum dry'' or ''all-metal'' loads that do not employ any dielectric interface between vacuum and absorber. The first prototype is an original design of RF loads for the Stanford Two-Mile Accelerator.

  10. Interactions of release factor RF3 with the translation machinery.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, Michael

    2015-08-01

    The bacterial release factor RF3 is a GTPase that has been implicated in multiple, incompletely understood steps of protein synthesis. This study explores the genetic interaction of RF3 with other components of the translation machinery. RF3 contributes to translation termination by recycling the class I release factors RF1 and RF2 off post-termination ribosomes. RF3 has also been implicated in dissociation of peptidyl-tRNAs from elongating ribosomes and in a post-peptidyltransferase quality control (post-PT QC) mechanism that selectively terminates ribosomes carrying erroneous peptides. A majority of the in vivo studies on RF3 have been carried out in K-12 strains of Escherichia coli which carry a partially defective RF2 protein with an Ala to Thr substitution at position 246. Here, the contribution of the K-12 specific RF2 variant to RF3 activities has been investigated. Strain reconstruction experiments in both E. coli and Salmonella enterica demonstrate that defects in termination and post-PT QC that are associated with RF3 loss, as well as phenotypes uncovered by phenotypic profiling, are all substantially ameliorated when the incompletely active K-12-specific RF2 protein is replaced by a fully active Ala246 RF2. These results indicate that RF3 loss is well tolerated in bacteria with fully active class I release factors, but that many of the previously reported phenotypes for RF3 deletion strains have been compromised by the presence of a partially defective RF2.

  11. Movable RF probe eliminates need for calibration in plasma accelerators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, D. B.

    1967-01-01

    Movable RF antenna probe in plasma accelerators continuously maps the RF field both within and beyond the accelerator. It eliminates the need for installing probes in the accelerator walls. The moving RF probe can be used to map the RF electrical field under various accelerator conditions.

  12. Companies Exporting Cathode Ray Tubes for Reuse

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Companies listed in the table below have submitted written notifications to EPA Headquarters to inform EPA of their intention to export used, intact cathode ray tubes (CRTs) for reuse as required under the CRT rule.

  13. Plasma-cathode-initiated vacuum gap closure

    SciTech Connect

    Sampayan, S.E.; Gurbaxani, S.H. ); Buttram, M.T. )

    1990-09-01

    The properties of vacuum gap closure initiated by a plasma cathode are presented. The plasma cathode consisted of approximately 60 surface flashover sites distributed over a 10-cm{sup 2} area. Vacuum gap dimensions were 1{times}7.5 cm in diameter. Faraday cup measurements indicated an ion density greater than 10{sup 12} cm{sup {minus}3}, which was controllable by the amplitude of the initiating high-voltage pulse. Although the field-free expansion velocity of the plasma was measured to be 7 cm/{mu}s, plasma-cathode-initiated closure of the vacuum gap indicated closure speeds on the order of 0.5 cm/{mu}s. Also, increased injected ion density and increased anode-cathode potential resulted in increased closure velocity.

  14. High voltage photo switch package module

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, James S; Sanders, David M; Hawkins, Steven A; Sampayan, Stephen E

    2014-02-18

    A photo-conductive switch package module having a photo-conductive substrate or wafer with opposing electrode-interface surfaces, and at least one light-input surface. First metallic layers are formed on the electrode-interface surfaces, and one or more optical waveguides having input and output ends are bonded to the substrate so that the output end of each waveguide is bonded to a corresponding one of the light-input surfaces of the photo-conductive substrate. This forms a waveguide-substrate interface for coupling light into the photo-conductive wafer. A dielectric material such as epoxy is then used to encapsulate the photo-conductive substrate and optical waveguide so that only the metallic layers and the input end of the optical waveguide are exposed. Second metallic layers are then formed on the first metallic layers so that the waveguide-substrate interface is positioned under the second metallic layers.

  15. A perceptual metric for photo retouching

    PubMed Central

    Kee, Eric; Farid, Hany

    2011-01-01

    In recent years, advertisers and magazine editors have been widely criticized for taking digital photo retouching to an extreme. Impossibly thin, tall, and wrinkle- and blemish-free models are routinely splashed onto billboards, advertisements, and magazine covers. The ubiquity of these unrealistic and highly idealized images has been linked to eating disorders and body image dissatisfaction in men, women, and children. In response, several countries have considered legislating the labeling of retouched photos. We describe a quantitative and perceptually meaningful metric of photo retouching. Photographs are rated on the degree to which they have been digitally altered by explicitly modeling and estimating geometric and photometric changes. This metric correlates well with perceptual judgments of photo retouching and can be used to objectively judge by how much a retouched photo has strayed from reality. PMID:22123980

  16. Rotating frame RF current density imaging.

    PubMed

    Scott, G C; Joy, M L; Armstrong, R L; Henkelman, R M

    1995-03-01

    RF current density imaging (RF-CDI) is a new MRI technique for imaging the Larmor frequency current density parallel to B0 in electrolytic media. To extend the use of RF-CDI to biological tissue for generating conductivity contrast, the sensitivity must be increased and the data requirements reduced. A rotating frame approach, in which a large B1 field is applied simultaneously as a rotary echo with RF current, is proposed to meet these requirements. Rotating frame magnetic fields are encoded in the phase of an MRI image. Trials have now been performed with this sequence in a three-compartment cylindrical phantom containing doped water or mineral oil for detecting displacement, conduction and fringe field currents. In a postmortem rat study, 85.56 MHz RF currents injected by implanted electrodes created tissue dependent contrast because of the electrical properties of tissue. A sensitivity and artifact analysis was also performed. The sensitivity of this method is determined by the maximum RF pulse duration. SAR limits pose an upper bound on this time and B1, whereas the avoidance of phase artifacts imposes a lower bound on B1.

  17. RF Wave Propagation and Scattering in Tokamaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horton, Wendell; Goniche, Marc; Arefiev, Alex; Peysson, Yves; Ekedahl, Annika; InstituteFusion Studies Collaboration; IRFM CEA Collaboration

    2016-10-01

    The propagation, scattering and absorption of the lower hybrid and electron cyclotron RF waves used to control fusion plasmas is reviewed. Drift wave turbulence driven by the steep ion and electron temperature gradients in H-mode divertor tokamaks produces strong scattering of the RF waves used for heating and plasma currents drive Both the 3-5GHz lower-hybrid (LH) and the 170GHZ electron cyclotron (EC) waves experience scattering and diffraction as propagating through the statistically complex density of the plasma. Ray equations are used to calculate the spread of the rays and the associated change in the parallel phase, polarization and group velocity of the RF waves in the propagation through the fusion plasma. A Fokker Planck equation for the phase space of the RF plasmons is one method to describe the spread of the RF wave power in the complex geometry of a divertor tokamak using the ray tracing codes. The evolution of the electron distribution function from the resonant electron-wave interactions is summarized for several scenarios. The resulting X-ray spectrum is broaden giving better agreement with the measured X-ray spectrum than that calculated in the absence of the turbulent scattering of the RF waves. M. Goniche et al., and Tore Supra Team, Phys. Plasmas 21, 2014.

  18. The CEBAF RF Separator System Upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    J. Hovater; Mark Augustine; Al Guerra; Richard Nelson; Robert Terrell; Mark Wissmann

    2004-08-01

    The CEBAF accelerator uses RF deflecting cavities operating at the third sub-harmonic (499 MHz) of the accelerating frequency (1497 MHz) to ''kick'' the electron beam to the experimental halls. The cavities operate in a TEM dipole mode incorporating mode enhancing rods to increase the cavity's transverse shunt impedance [1]. As the accelerators energy has increased from 4 GeV to 6 GeV the RF system, specifically the 1 kW solid-state amplifiers, have become problematic, operating in saturation because of the increased beam energy demands. Two years ago we began a study to look into replacement for the RF amplifiers and decided to use a commercial broadcast Inductive Output Tube (IOT) capable of 30 kW. The new RF system uses one IOT amplifier on multiple cavities as opposed to one amplifier per cavity as was originally used. In addition, the new RF system supports a proposed 12 GeV energy upgrade to CEBAF. We are currently halfway through the upgrade with three IOTs in operation and the remaining one nearly installed. This paper reports on the new RF system and the IOT performance.

  19. Low reflectance high power RF load

    DOEpatents

    Ives, R. Lawrence; Mizuhara, Yosuke M.

    2016-02-02

    A load for traveling microwave energy has an absorptive volume defined by cylindrical body enclosed by a first end cap and a second end cap. The first end cap has an aperture for the passage of an input waveguide with a rotating part that is coupled to a reflective mirror. The inner surfaces of the absorptive volume consist of a resistive material or are coated with a coating which absorbs a fraction of incident RF energy, and the remainder of the RF energy reflects. The angle of the reflector and end caps is selected such that reflected RF energy dissipates an increasing percentage of the remaining RF energy at each reflection, and the reflected RF energy which returns to the rotating mirror is directed to the back surface of the rotating reflector, and is not coupled to the input waveguide. Additionally, the reflector may have a surface which generates a more uniform power distribution function axially and laterally, to increase the power handling capability of the RF load. The input waveguide may be corrugated for HE11 mode input energy.

  20. Co-Flow Hollow Cathode Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hofer, Richard R.; Goebel, Dan M.

    2011-01-01

    Hall thrusters utilize identical hollow cathode technology as ion thrusters, yet must operate at much higher mass flow rates in order to efficiently couple to the bulk plasma discharge. Higher flow rates are necessary in order to provide enough neutral collisions to transport electrons across magnetic fields so that they can reach the discharge. This higher flow rate, however, has potential life-limiting implications for the operation of the cathode. A solution to the problem involves splitting the mass flow into the hollow cathode into two streams, the internal and external flows. The internal flow is fixed and set such that the neutral pressure in the cathode allows for a high utilization of the emitter surface area. The external flow is variable depending on the flow rate through the anode of the Hall thruster, but also has a minimum in order to suppress high-energy ion generation. In the co-flow hollow cathode, the cathode assembly is mounted on thruster centerline, inside the inner magnetic core of the thruster. An annular gas plenum is placed at the base of the cathode and propellant is fed throughout to produce an azimuthally symmetric flow of gas that evenly expands around the cathode keeper. This configuration maximizes propellant utilization and is not subject to erosion processes. External gas feeds have been considered in the past for ion thruster applications, but usually in the context of eliminating high energy ion production. This approach is adapted specifically for the Hall thruster and exploits the geometry of a Hall thruster to feed and focus the external flow without introducing significant new complexity to the thruster design.

  1. Electron spectrometer in adjustable triode configuration for photo-induced field emission measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bornmann, B.; Mingels, S.; Dams, F.; Prommesberger, C.; Schreiner, R.; Lützenkirchen-Hecht, D.; Müller, G.

    2012-01-01

    We have constructed a new ultrahigh vacuum apparatus with a triode configuration for the systematic investigation of photo-induced field emission (PFE) from metallic or semiconducting cathodes. These are exposed to electric fields up to 400 MV/m and laser irradiation by means of hole or mesh gates. Cathodes and gates are in situ exchangeable and adjustable with high precision to ensure a homogeneous extraction of electrons which are partially transmitted to the fixed electron spectrometer. Its hemispherical sector analyzer provides an energy resolution limit of 8 meV. The commissioning of the measurement system has been performed with a tungsten needle. Its temperature showed up in the high-energy tail of the electron spectrum, while its work function was derived from the spectral low-energy part combined with the integral current-voltage curve. First PFE measurements on B-doped Si-tip arrays yielded a small field emission current increase under green laser illumination. A shift and splitting of the energy spectra was observed which revealed different emission regimes as well as the photosensitivity of the cathode due to carrier excitation into the conduction band. For the full exploitation of the PFE system, a tunable laser over a wide eV-range is required.

  2. Electron spectrometer in adjustable triode configuration for photo-induced field emission measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Bornmann, B.; Mingels, S.; Luetzenkirchen-Hecht, D.; Mueller, G.; Dams, F.; Prommesberger, C.; Schreiner, R.

    2012-01-15

    We have constructed a new ultrahigh vacuum apparatus with a triode configuration for the systematic investigation of photo-induced field emission (PFE) from metallic or semiconducting cathodes. These are exposed to electric fields up to 400 MV/m and laser irradiation by means of hole or mesh gates. Cathodes and gates are in situ exchangeable and adjustable with high precision to ensure a homogeneous extraction of electrons which are partially transmitted to the fixed electron spectrometer. Its hemispherical sector analyzer provides an energy resolution limit of 8 meV. The commissioning of the measurement system has been performed with a tungsten needle. Its temperature showed up in the high-energy tail of the electron spectrum, while its work function was derived from the spectral low-energy part combined with the integral current-voltage curve. First PFE measurements on B-doped Si-tip arrays yielded a small field emission current increase under green laser illumination. A shift and splitting of the energy spectra was observed which revealed different emission regimes as well as the photosensitivity of the cathode due to carrier excitation into the conduction band. For the full exploitation of the PFE system, a tunable laser over a wide eV-range is required.

  3. Electron spectrometer in adjustable triode configuration for photo-induced field emission measurements.

    PubMed

    Bornmann, B; Mingels, S; Dams, F; Prommesberger, C; Schreiner, R; Lützenkirchen-Hecht, D; Müller, G

    2012-01-01

    We have constructed a new ultrahigh vacuum apparatus with a triode configuration for the systematic investigation of photo-induced field emission (PFE) from metallic or semiconducting cathodes. These are exposed to electric fields up to 400 MV∕m and laser irradiation by means of hole or mesh gates. Cathodes and gates are in situ exchangeable and adjustable with high precision to ensure a homogeneous extraction of electrons which are partially transmitted to the fixed electron spectrometer. Its hemispherical sector analyzer provides an energy resolution limit of 8 meV. The commissioning of the measurement system has been performed with a tungsten needle. Its temperature showed up in the high-energy tail of the electron spectrum, while its work function was derived from the spectral low-energy part combined with the integral current-voltage curve. First PFE measurements on B-doped Si-tip arrays yielded a small field emission current increase under green laser illumination. A shift and splitting of the energy spectra was observed which revealed different emission regimes as well as the photosensitivity of the cathode due to carrier excitation into the conduction band. For the full exploitation of the PFE system, a tunable laser over a wide eV-range is required.

  4. Ir-coated dispenser cathode for CRT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, Sakae; Yakabe, Toru; Matsumoto, Sadao; Miyazaki, Daisuke; Yoshii, Tsuyoshi

    1990-12-01

    A compact dispenser cathode has been developed for application to CRTs. A cathode emitter, comprising BaO, CaO, and Al2O3 in a molar ratio of 4:1:1, was impregnated into a porous tungsten pellet. An intermetallic compound of tungsten and iridium was formed on the cathode pellet. Heater ratings were 6.3 V x 0.2 A. Emission characteristics were measured by using color CRTs. As a result, a cathode peak loading of 15 A/sq cm was ensured in the space-charge region. Furthermore, life tests with a peak loading of 7.5 A/sq cm were conducted over 10,000 h. The decrease in emission current after 10 000 h was within only 10 percent of the initial value. Reliability of cathode performance was assured in terms of breakdown potential between the heater and the cathode, emission characteristics, life performance, grid emission, and the drift in cutoff potential. In addition, the effects of the coating thickness on the emission characteristics are discussed.

  5. Development of plasma cathode electron guns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oks, Efim M.; Schanin, Peter M.

    1999-05-01

    The status of experimental research and ongoing development of plasma cathode electron guns in recent years is reviewed, including some novel upgrades and applications to various technological fields. The attractiveness of this kind of e-gun is due to its capability of creating high current, broad or focused beams, both in pulsed and steady-state modes of operation. An important characteristic of the plasma cathode electron gun is the absence of a thermionic cathode, a feature which leads to long lifetime and reliable operation even in the presence of aggressive background gas media and at fore-vacuum gas pressure ranges such as achieved by mechanical pumps. Depending on the required beam parameters, different kinds of plasma discharge systems can be used in plasma cathode electron guns, such as vacuum arcs, constricted gaseous arcs, hollow cathode glows, and two kinds of discharges in crossed E×B fields: Penning and magnetron. At the present time, plasma cathode electron guns provide beams with transverse dimension from fractional millimeter up to about one meter, beam current from microamperes to kiloamperes, beam current density up to about 100 A/cm2, pulse duration from nanoseconds to dc, and electron energy from several keV to hundreds of keV. Applications include electron beam melting and welding, surface treatment, plasma chemistry, radiation technologies, laser pumping, microwave generation, and more.

  6. Model for designing planar magnetron cathodes

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, M.

    1997-05-30

    Planar magnetron cathodes have arching magnetic field lines which concentrate plasma density to enhance ion bombardment and sputtering. Typical parameters are: helium at 1 to 300 milli-torr, 200 to 2000 gauss at the cathode, 200 to 800 volts, and plasma density decreasing by up to ten times within 2 to 10 cm from the cathode. A 2D, quasineutral, fluid model yields formulas for the plasma density: n(x,y), current densities: j(x,y), j{sub e}(x,y), j{sub +}(x,y), the electric field: E{sub y}(y), and the voltage between the cathode surface and a distant plasma. An ion sheath develops between the cathode and the quasineutral flow. The thickness of this sheath depends on processes in the quasineutral flow. Experiments shows that T{sub e} (3 {yields} 8 eV) adjusts to ensure that {alpha}{sub 0}{tau} {approx} 2.5 in helium, for ionization rate {alpha}{sub 0} (10{sup 4} {yields} 10{sup 5} s{sup -1}), and electron transit time to the unmagnetized plasma {tau} (10 {yields} 100 {micro}s). Helium glow discharge cathode fall {alpha}{sub 0}{tau} is about 2.5, though this occurs at much higher voltage.

  7. Cryo-EM visualization of the ribosome in termination complex with apo-RF3 and RF1.

    PubMed

    Pallesen, Jesper; Hashem, Yaser; Korkmaz, Gürkan; Koripella, Ravi Kiran; Huang, Chenhui; Ehrenberg, Måns; Sanyal, Suparna; Frank, Joachim

    2013-06-04

    Termination of messenger RNA translation in Bacteria and Archaea is initiated by release factors (RFs) 1 or 2 recognizing a stop codon in the ribosomal A site and releasing the peptide from the P-site transfer RNA. After release, RF-dissociation is facilitated by the G-protein RF3. Structures of ribosomal complexes with RF1 or RF2 alone or with RF3 alone-RF3 bound to a non-hydrolyzable GTP-analog-have been reported. Here, we present the cryo-EM structure of a post-termination ribosome containing both apo-RF3 and RF1. The conformation of RF3 is distinct from those of free RF3•GDP and ribosome-bound RF3•GDP(C/N)P. Furthermore, the conformation of RF1 differs from those observed in RF3-lacking ribosomal complexes. Our study provides structural keys to the mechanism of guanine nucleotide exchange on RF3 and to an L12-mediated ribosomal recruitment of RF3. In conjunction with previous observations, our data provide the foundation to structurally characterize the complete action cycle of the G-protein RF3. DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.00411.001.

  8. Cryo-EM visualization of the ribosome in termination complex with apo-RF3 and RF1

    PubMed Central

    Pallesen, Jesper; Hashem, Yaser; Korkmaz, Gürkan; Koripella, Ravi Kiran; Huang, Chenhui; Ehrenberg, Måns; Sanyal, Suparna; Frank, Joachim

    2013-01-01

    Termination of messenger RNA translation in Bacteria and Archaea is initiated by release factors (RFs) 1 or 2 recognizing a stop codon in the ribosomal A site and releasing the peptide from the P-site transfer RNA. After release, RF-dissociation is facilitated by the G-protein RF3. Structures of ribosomal complexes with RF1 or RF2 alone or with RF3 alone—RF3 bound to a non-hydrolyzable GTP-analog—have been reported. Here, we present the cryo-EM structure of a post-termination ribosome containing both apo-RF3 and RF1. The conformation of RF3 is distinct from those of free RF3•GDP and ribosome-bound RF3•GDP(C/N)P. Furthermore, the conformation of RF1 differs from those observed in RF3-lacking ribosomal complexes. Our study provides structural keys to the mechanism of guanine nucleotide exchange on RF3 and to an L12-mediated ribosomal recruitment of RF3. In conjunction with previous observations, our data provide the foundation to structurally characterize the complete action cycle of the G-protein RF3. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.00411.001 PMID:23755360

  9. Parametric Modeling of Transverse Phase Space of an RF Photoinjector

    SciTech Connect

    Hartman, E.; Sayyar-Rodsari, B.; Schweiger, C.A.; Lee, M.J.; Lui, P.; Paterson, Ewan; Schmerge, J.F.; /SLAC

    2008-01-24

    High brightness electron beam sources such as rf photo-injectors as proposed for SASE FELs must consistently produce the desired beam quality. We report the results of a study in which a combined neural network (NN) and first-principles (FP) model is used to model the transverse phase space of the beam as a function of quadrupole strength, while beam charge, solenoid field, accelerator gradient, and linac voltage and phase are kept constant. The parametric transport matrix between the exit of the linac section and the spectrometer screen constitutes the FP component of the combined model. The NN block provides the parameters of the transport matrix as functions of quad current. Using real data from SLAC Gun Test Facility, we will highlight the significance of the constrained training of the NN block and show that the phase space of the beam is accurately modeled by the combined NN and FP model, while variations of beam matrix parameters with the quad current are correctly captured. We plan to extend the combined model in the future to capture the effects of variations in beam charge, solenoid field, and accelerator voltage and phase.

  10. LOW TEMPERATURE CATHODE SUPPORTED ELECTROLYTES

    SciTech Connect

    Harlan U. Anderson; Fatih Dogan; Vladimir Petrovsky

    2003-03-31

    This report represents a summary of the work carried out on this project which started October 1999 and ended March 2003. A list of the publications resulting from the work are contained in Appendix A. The most significant achievements are: (1) Dense nanocrystalline zirconia and ceria films were obtained at temperatures < 400 C. (2) Nanocrystalline films of both ceria and zirconia were characterized. (3) We showed that under anodic conditions 0.5 to 1 micron thick nanocrystalline films of Sc doped zirconia have sufficient electronic conductivity to prevent them from being useful as an electrolyte. (4) We have developed a process by which dense 0.5 to 5 micron thick dense films of either YSZ or ceria can be deposited on sintered porous substrates which serve as either the cathode or anode at temperatures as low as 400 C. (5) The program has provided the research to produce two PhD thesis for students, one is now working in the solid oxide fuel cell field. (6) The results of the research have resulted in 69 papers published, 3 papers submitted or being prepared for publication, 50 oral presentations and 3 patent disclosures.

  11. Determination of trace uranium by resonance fluorescence method coupled with photo-catalytic technology and dual cloud point extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jiekang; Li, Guirong; Han, Qian

    2016-12-01

    In this paper, two kinds of salophens (Sal) with different solubilities, Sal1 and Sal2, have been respectively synthesized, and they all can combine with uranyl to form stable complexes: [UO22 +-Sal1] and [UO22 +-Sal2]. Among them, [UO22 +-Sal1] was used as ligand to extract uranium in complex samples by dual cloud point extraction (dCPE), and [UO22 +-Sal2] was used as catalyst for the determination of uranium by photocatalytic resonance fluorescence (RF) method. The photocatalytic characteristic of [UO22 +-Sal2] on the oxidized pyronine Y (PRY) by potassium bromate which leads to the decrease of RF intensity of PRY were studied. The reduced value of RF intensity of reaction system (ΔF) is in proportional to the concentration of uranium (c), and a novel photo-catalytic RF method was developed for the determination of trace uranium (VI) after dCPE. The combination of photo-catalytic RF techniques and dCPE procedure endows the presented methods with enhanced sensitivity and selectivity. Under optimal conditions, the linear calibration curves range for 0.067 to 6.57 ng mL- 1, the linear regression equation was ΔF = 438.0 c (ng mL- 1) + 175.6 with the correlation coefficient r = 0.9981. The limit of detection was 0.066 ng mL- 1. The proposed method was successfully applied for the separation and determination of uranium in real samples with the recoveries of 95.0-103.5%. The mechanisms of the indicator reaction and dCPE are discussed.

  12. Determination of trace uranium by resonance fluorescence method coupled with photo-catalytic technology and dual cloud point extraction.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiekang; Li, Guirong; Han, Qian

    2016-12-05

    In this paper, two kinds of salophens (Sal) with different solubilities, Sal1 and Sal2, have been respectively synthesized, and they all can combine with uranyl to form stable complexes: [UO2(2+)-Sal1] and [UO2(2+)-Sal2]. Among them, [UO2(2+)-Sal1] was used as ligand to extract uranium in complex samples by dual cloud point extraction (dCPE), and [UO2(2+)-Sal2] was used as catalyst for the determination of uranium by photocatalytic resonance fluorescence (RF) method. The photocatalytic characteristic of [UO2(2+)-Sal2] on the oxidized pyronine Y (PRY) by potassium bromate which leads to the decrease of RF intensity of PRY were studied. The reduced value of RF intensity of reaction system (ΔF) is in proportional to the concentration of uranium (c), and a novel photo-catalytic RF method was developed for the determination of trace uranium (VI) after dCPE. The combination of photo-catalytic RF techniques and dCPE procedure endows the presented methods with enhanced sensitivity and selectivity. Under optimal conditions, the linear calibration curves range for 0.067 to 6.57ngmL(-1), the linear regression equation was ΔF=438.0 c (ngmL(-1))+175.6 with the correlation coefficient r=0.9981. The limit of detection was 0.066ngmL(-1). The proposed method was successfully applied for the separation and determination of uranium in real samples with the recoveries of 95.0-103.5%. The mechanisms of the indicator reaction and dCPE are discussed.

  13. Observations of a mode transition in a hydrogen hollow cathode discharge using phase resolved optical emission spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Dixon, Sam Charles, Christine; Dedrick, James; Boswell, Rod; Gans, Timo; O'Connell, Deborah

    2014-07-07

    Two distinct operational modes are observed in a radio frequency (rf) low pressure hydrogen hollow cathode discharge. The mode transition is characterised by a change in total light emission and differing expansion structures. An intensified CCD camera is used to make phase resolved images of Balmer α emission from the discharge. The low emission mode is consistent with a typical γ discharge, and appears to be driven by secondary electrons ejected from the cathode surface. The bright mode displays characteristics common to an inductive discharge, including increased optical emission, power factor, and temperature of the H{sub 2} gas. The bright mode precipitates the formation of a stationary shock in the expansion, observed as a dark region adjacent to the source-chamber interface.

  14. MULTIPACTING ANALYSIS OF A QUARTER WAVE CHOKE JOINT USED FOR INSERTION OF A DEMOUNTABLE CATHODE INTO A SRF PHOTOINJECTOR

    SciTech Connect

    BURRILL,A.

    2007-06-25

    The multipacting phenomena in accelerating structures and coaxial lines are well documented and methods of mitigating or suppressing it are understood. The multipacting that occurs in a quarter wave choke joint designed to mount a cathode insertion stalk into a superconducting RF photoinjector has been analyzed via calculations and experimental measurements and the effect of introducing multipacting suppression grooves into the structure is analyzed. Several alternative choke joint designs are analyzed and suggestions made regarding future choke joint development. Furthermore, the problems encountered in cleaning the choke joint surfaces, factors important in changes to the secondary electron yield, are discussed and evaluated. This design is being implemented on the BNL 1.3 GHz photoinjector, previously used for measurement of the quantum efficiency of bare Nb, to allow for the introduction of other cathode materials for study, and to verify the design functions properly prior to constructing our 703 Mflz photoinjector with a similar choke joint design.

  15. Multipacting Analysis of a Quarter Wave Choke Joint used for Insertion of a Demountable Cathode into a SRF Photoinjector

    SciTech Connect

    A. Burrill; I. Ben-Zvi; M. D. Cole; J. Rathke; P. Kneisel; R. Manus; R. A. Rimmer

    2007-08-01

    The multipacting phenomena in accelerating structures and coaxial lines are well documented and methods of mitigating or suppressing it are understood. The multipacting that occurs in a quarter wave choke joint designed to mount a cathode insertion stalk into a superconducting RF photoinjector has been analyzed via calculations and experimental measurements and the effect of introducing multipacting suppression grooves into the structure is analyzed. Several alternative choke joint designs are analyzed and suggestions made regarding future choke joint development. Furthermore, the problems encountered in cleaning the choke joint surfaces, factors important in changes to the secondary electron yield, are discussed and evaluated. This design is being implemented on the BNL 1.3 GHz photoinjector, previously used for measurement of the quantum efficiency of bare Nb, to allow for the introduction of other cathode materials for study, and to verify the design functions properly prior to constructing our 703 MHz photoinjector with a similar choke joint design.

  16. RF pulse compression for future linear colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, P.B.

    1995-05-01

    Future (nonsuperconducting) linear colliders will require very high values of peak rf power per meter of accelerating structure. The role of rf pulse compression in producing this power is examined within the context of overall rf system design for three future colliders at energies of 1.0--1.5 TeV, 5 TeV and 25 TeV. In order keep the average AC input power and the length of the accelerator within reasonable limits, a collider in the 1.0--1.5 TeV energy range will probably be built at an x-band rf frequency, and will require a peak power on the order of 150--200 MW per meter of accelerating structure. A 5 TeV collider at 34 GHz with a reasonable length (35 km) and AC input power (225 MW) would require about 550 MW per meter of structure. Two-beam accelerators can achieve peak powers of this order by applying dc pulse compression techniques (induction linac modules) to produce the drive beam. Klystron-driven colliders achieve high peak power by a combination of dc pulse compression (modulators) and rf pulse compression, with about the same overall rf system efficiency (30--40%) as a two-beam collider. A high gain (6.8) three-stage binary pulse compression system with high efficiency (80%) is described, which (compared to a SLED-11 system) can be used to reduce the klystron peak power by about a factor of two, or alternately, to cut the number of klystrons in half for a 1.0--1.5 TeV x-band collider. For a 5 TeV klystron-driven collider, a high gain, high efficiency rf pulse compression system is essential.

  17. RF Performance of Membrane Aperture Shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flint, Eirc M.; Lindler, Jason E.; Thomas, David L.; Romanofsky, Robert

    2007-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of recent results establishing the suitability of Membrane Aperture Shell Technology (MAST) for Radio Frequency (RF) applications. These single surface shells are capable of maintaining their figure with no preload or pressurization and minimal boundary support, yet can be compactly roll stowed and passively self deploy. As such, they are a promising technology for enabling a future generation of RF apertures. In this paper, we review recent experimental and numerical results quantifying suitable RF performance. It is shown that candidate materials possess metallic coatings with sufficiently low surface roughness and that these materials can be efficiently fabricated into RF relevant doubly curved shapes. A numerical justification for using a reflectivity metric, as opposed to the more standard RF designer metric of skin depth, is presented and the resulting ability to use relatively thin coating thickness is experimentally validated with material sample tests. The validity of these independent film sample measurements are then confirmed through experimental results measuring RF performance for reasonable sized doubly curved apertures. Currently available best results are 22 dBi gain at 3 GHz (S-Band) for a 0.5m aperture tested in prime focus mode, 28dBi gain for the same antenna in the C-Band (4 to 6 GHz), and 36.8dBi for a smaller 0.25m antenna tested at 32 GHz in the Ka-Band. RF range test results for a segmented aperture (one possible scaling approach) are shown as well. Measured antenna system actual efficiencies (relative to the unachievable) ideal for these on axis tests are generally quite good, typically ranging from 50 to 90%.

  18. Transductive face sketch-photo synthesis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Nannan; Tao, Dacheng; Gao, Xinbo; Li, Xuelong; Li, Jie

    2013-09-01

    Face sketch-photo synthesis plays a critical role in many applications, such as law enforcement and digital entertainment. Recently, many face sketch-photo synthesis methods have been proposed under the framework of inductive learning, and these have obtained promising performance. However, these inductive learning-based face sketch-photo synthesis methods may result in high losses for test samples, because inductive learning minimizes the empirical loss for training samples. This paper presents a novel transductive face sketch-photo synthesis method that incorporates the given test samples into the learning process and optimizes the performance on these test samples. In particular, it defines a probabilistic model to optimize both the reconstruction fidelity of the input photo (sketch) and the synthesis fidelity of the target output sketch (photo), and efficiently optimizes this probabilistic model by alternating optimization. The proposed transductive method significantly reduces the expected high loss and improves the synthesis performance for test samples. Experimental results on the Chinese University of Hong Kong face sketch data set demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method by comparing it with representative inductive learning-based face sketch-photo synthesis methods.

  19. How taking photos increases enjoyment of experiences.

    PubMed

    Diehl, Kristin; Zauberman, Gal; Barasch, Alixandra

    2016-08-01

    Experiences are vital to the lives and well-being of people; hence, understanding the factors that amplify or dampen enjoyment of experiences is important. One such factor is photo-taking, which has gone unexamined by prior research even as it has become ubiquitous. We identify engagement as a relevant process that influences whether photo-taking will increase or decrease enjoyment. Across 3 field and 6 lab experiments, we find that taking photos enhances enjoyment of positive experiences across a range of contexts and methodologies. This occurs when photo-taking increases engagement with the experience, which is less likely when the experience itself is already highly engaging, or when photo-taking interferes with the experience. As further evidence of an engagement-based process, we show that photo-taking directs greater visual attention to aspects of the experience one may want to photograph. Lastly, we also find that this greater engagement due to photo-taking results in worse evaluations of negative experiences. (PsycINFO Database Record

  20. Photo-assisted etching of silicon in chlorine- and bromine-containing plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Weiye; Sridhar, Shyam; Liu, Lei; Hernandez, Eduardo; Donnelly, Vincent M. Economou, Demetre J.

    2014-05-28

    Cl{sub 2}, Br{sub 2}, HBr, Br{sub 2}/Cl{sub 2}, and HBr/Cl{sub 2} feed gases diluted in Ar (50%–50% by volume) were used to study etching of p-type Si(100) in a rf inductively coupled, Faraday-shielded plasma, with a focus on the photo-assisted etching component. Etching rates were measured as a function of ion energy. Etching at ion energies below the threshold for ion-assisted etching was observed in all cases, with Br{sub 2}/Ar and HBr/Cl{sub 2}/Ar plasmas having the lowest and highest sub-threshold etching rates, respectively. Sub-threshold etching rates scaled with the product of surface halogen coverage (measured by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy) and Ar emission intensity (7504 Å). Etching rates measured under MgF{sub 2}, quartz, and opaque windows showed that sub-threshold etching is due to photon-stimulated processes on the surface, with vacuum ultraviolet photons being much more effective than longer wavelengths. Scanning electron and atomic force microscopy revealed that photo-etched surfaces were very rough, quite likely due to the inability of the photo-assisted process to remove contaminants from the surface. Photo-assisted etching in Cl{sub 2}/Ar plasmas resulted in the formation of 4-sided pyramidal features with bases that formed an angle of 45° with respect to 〈110〉 cleavage planes, suggesting that photo-assisted etching can be sensitive to crystal orientation.

  1. Compact Rare Earth Emitter Hollow Cathode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watkins, Ronald; Goebel, Dan; Hofer, Richard

    2010-01-01

    A compact, high-current, hollow cathode utilizing a lanthanum hexaboride (LaB6) thermionic electron emitter has been developed for use with high-power Hall thrusters and ion thrusters. LaB6 cathodes are being investigated due to their long life, high current capabilities, and less stringent xenon purity and handling requirements compared to conventional barium oxide (BaO) dispenser cathodes. The new cathode features a much smaller diameter than previously developed versions that permit it to be mounted on axis of a Hall thruster ( internally mounted ), as opposed to the conventional side-mount position external to the outer magnetic circuit ("externally mounted"). The cathode has also been reconfigured to be capable of surviving vibrational loads during launch and is designed to solve the significant heater and materials compatibility problems associated with the use of this emitter material. This has been accomplished in a compact design with the capability of high-emission current (10 to 60 A). The compact, high-current design has a keeper diameter that allows the cathode to be mounted on the centerline of a 6- kW Hall thruster, inside the iron core of the inner electromagnetic coil. Although designed for electric propulsion thrusters in spacecraft station- keeping, orbit transfer, and interplanetary applications, the LaB6 cathodes are applicable to the plasma processing industry in applications such as optical coatings and semiconductor processing where reactive gases are used. Where current electrical propulsion thrusters with BaO emitters have limited life and need extremely clean propellant feed systems at a significant cost, these LaB6 cathodes can run on the crudest-grade xenon propellant available without impact. Moreover, in a laboratory environment, LaB6 cathodes reduce testing costs because they do not require extended conditioning periods under hard vacuum. Alternative rare earth emitters, such as cerium hexaboride (CeB6) can be used in this

  2. Design and Construction of a 500 KW CW, 400 MHZ Klystron To Be Used As RF Power Source For LHC/RF Component Tests

    SciTech Connect

    Pearson, Chris

    2003-05-05

    A 500 kW cw klystron operating at 400 MHz was developed and constructed jointly by CERN and SLAC for use as a high-power source at CERN for testing LHC/RF components such as circulators, RF absorbers and superconducting cavities with their input couplers. The design is a modification of the 353 MHz SLAC PEP-I klystron. More than 80% of the original PEP-I tube parts could thus be incorporated in the LHC test klystron which resulted in lower engineering costs as well as reduced development and construction time. The physical length between cathode plane and upper pole plate was kept unchanged so that a PEP-I tube focusing solenoid, available at CERN, could be re-used. With the aid of the klystron simulation codes JPNDISK and CONDOR, the design of the LHC tube was accomplished, which resulted in a tube with noticeably higher efficiency than its predecessor, the PEP-I klystron. The integrated cavities were redesigned using SUPERFISH and the output coupling circuit, which also required redesigning, was done with the aid of MAFIA. Details of the tube development and test results are presented.

  3. 2013 Estorm - Invited Paper - Cathode Materials Review

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel, Claus; Mohanty, Debasish; Li, Jianlin; Wood III, David L

    2014-01-01

    The electrochemical potential of cathode materials defines the positive side of the terminal voltage of a battery. Traditionally, cathode materials are the energy-limiting or voltage-limiting electrode. One of the first electrochemical batteries, the voltaic pile invented by Alessandro Volta in 1800 (Phil. Trans. Roy. Soc. 90, 403 431) had a copper-zinc galvanic element with a terminal voltage of 0.76 V. Since then, the research community has increased capacity and voltage for primary (nonrechargeable) batteries and round-trip efficiency for secondary (rechargeable) batteries. Successful secondary batteries have been the lead acid with a lead oxide cathode and a terminal voltage of 2.1 V and later the NiCd with a nickel(III) oxide hydroxide cathode and a 1.2 V terminal voltage. The relatively low voltage of those aqueous systems and the low round-trip efficiency due to activation energies in the conversion reactions limited their use. In 1976, Wittingham (J. Electrochem. Soc., 123, 315) and Besenhard (J Power Sources 1(3), 267) finally enabled highly reversible redox reactions by intercalation of lithium ions instead of by chemical conversion. In 1980, Goodenough and Mizushima (Mater. Res. Bull. 15, 783 789) demonstrated a high-energy and high-power LiCoO2 cathode, allowing for an increase of terminal voltage far beyond 3 V. Over the past four decades, the international research community has further developed cathode materials of many varieties. Current state-of-the-art cathodes demonstrate voltages beyond any known electrolyte stability window, bringing electrolyte research once again to the forefront of battery research.

  4. Improved cathode materials for microbial electrosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, T; Nie, HR; Bain, TS; Lu, HY; Cui, MM; Snoeyenbos-West, OL; Franks, AE; Nevin, KP; Russell, TP; Lovley, DR

    2013-01-01

    Microbial electrosynthesis is a promising strategy for the microbial conversion of carbon dioxide to transportation fuels and other organic commodities, but optimization of this process is required for commercialization. Cathodes which enhance electrode-microbe electron transfer might improve rates of product formation. To evaluate this possibility, biofilms of Sporomusa ovata, which are effective in acetate electrosynthesis, were grown on a range of cathode materials and acetate production was monitored over time. Modifications of carbon cloth that resulted in a positive-charge enhanced microbial electrosynthesis. Functionalization with chitosan or cyanuric chloride increased acetate production rates 6-7 fold and modification with 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane gave rates 3-fold higher than untreated controls. A 3-fold increase in electrosynthesis over untreated carbon cloth cathodes was also achieved with polyaniline cathodes. However, not all strategies to provide positively charged surfaces were successful, as treatment of carbon cloth with melamine or ammonia gas did not stimulate acetate electrosynthesis. Treating carbon cloth with metal, in particular gold, palladium, or nickel nanoparticles, also promoted electrosynthesis, yielding electrosynthesis rates that were 6-,4.7- or 4.5-fold faster than the untreated control, respectively. Cathodes comprised of cotton or polyester fabric treated with carbon nanotubes yielded cathodes that supported acetate electrosynthesis rates that were similar to 3-fold higher than carbon cloth controls. Recovery of electrons consumed in acetate was similar to 80% for all materials. The results demonstrate that one approach to increase rates of carbon dioxide reduction in microbial electrosynthesis is to modify cathode surfaces to improve microbe-electrode interactions.

  5. Multiple cathodic reaction mechanisms in seawater cathodic biofilms operating in sediment microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Babauta, Jerome T; Hsu, Lewis; Atci, Erhan; Kagan, Jeff; Chadwick, Bart; Beyenal, Haluk

    2014-10-01

    In this study, multiple reaction mechanisms in cathodes of sediment microbial fuel cells (SMFCs) were characterized by using cyclic voltammetry and microelectrode measurements of dissolved oxygen and pH. The cathodes were acclimated in SMFCs with sediment and seawater from San Diego Bay. Two limiting current regions were observed with onset potentials of approximately +400 mVAg/AgCl for limiting current I and -120 mVAg/AgCl for limiting current II. The appearance of two catalytic waves suggests that multiple cathodic reaction mechanisms influence cathodic performance. Microscale oxygen concentration measurements showed a zero surface concentration at the electrode surface for limiting current II but not for limiting current I, which allowed us to distinguish limiting current II as the conventional oxygen reduction reaction and limiting current I as a currently unidentified cathodic reaction mechanism. Microscale pH measurements further confirmed these results.

  6. RF BREAKDOWN STUDIES USING PRESSURIZED CAVITIES

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Rolland

    2014-09-21

    Many present and future particle accelerators are limited by the maximum electric gradient and peak surface fields that can be realized in RF cavities. Despite considerable effort, a comprehensive theory of RF breakdown has not been achieved and mitigation techniques to improve practical maximum accelerating gradients have had only limited success. Part of the problem is that RF breakdown in an evacuated cavity involves a complex mixture of effects, which include the geometry, metallurgy, and surface preparation of the accelerating structures and the make-up and pressure of the residual gas in which plasmas form. Studies showed that high gradients can be achieved quickly in 805 MHz RF cavities pressurized with dense hydrogen gas, as needed for muon cooling channels, without the need for long conditioning times, even in the presence of strong external magnetic fields. This positive result was expected because the dense gas can practically eliminate dark currents and multipacting. In this project we used this high pressure technique to suppress effects of residual vacuum and geometry that are found in evacuated cavities in order to isolate and study the role of the metallic surfaces in RF cavity breakdown as a function of magnetic field, frequency, and surface preparation. One of the interesting and useful outcomes of this project was the unanticipated collaborations with LANL and Fermilab that led to new insights as to the operation of evacuated normal-conducting RF cavities in high external magnetic fields. Other accomplishments included: (1) RF breakdown experiments to test the effects of SF6 dopant in H2 and He gases with Sn, Al, and Cu electrodes were carried out in an 805 MHz cavity and compared to calculations and computer simulations. The heavy corrosion caused by the SF6 components led to the suggestion that a small admixture of oxygen, instead of SF6, to the hydrogen would allow the same advantages without the corrosion in a practical muon beam line. (2) A

  7. Development of large area, pico-second resolution photo-detectors and associated readout electronics

    SciTech Connect

    Grabas, H.; Oberla, E.; Attenkoffer, K.; Bogdan, M.; Frisch, H. J.; Genat, J. F.; May, E. N.; Varner, G. S.; Wetstein, M.

    2011-07-01

    The Large Area Pico-second Photo-detectors described in this contribution incorporate a photo-cathode and a borosilicate glass capillary Micro-Channel Plate (MCP) pair functionalized by atomic layer deposition (ALD) of separate resistive and electron secondary emitters materials. They may be used for biomedical imaging purposes, a remarkable opportunity to apply technologies developed in HEP having the potential to make major advances in the medical world, in particular for Positron Emission Tomography (PET). If daisy-chained and coupled to fast transmission lines read at both ends, they could be implemented in very large dimensions. Initial testing with matched pairs of small glass capillary test has demonstrated gains of the order of 105 to 106. Compared to other fast imaging devices, these photo-detectors are expected to provide timing resolutions in the 10-100 ps range, and two-dimension position in the sub-millimeter range. A 6-channel readout ASIC has been designed in 130 nm CMOS technology and tested. As a result, fast analog sampling up to 17 GS/s has been obtained, the intrinsic analog bandwidth being presently under evaluation. The digitization in parallel of several cells in two microseconds allows getting off-chip digital data read at a maximum rate of 40 MHz. Digital Signal Processing of the sampled waveforms is expected achieving the timing and space resolutions obtained with digital oscilloscopes. (authors)

  8. RF and Plasma Modeling for VASIMR.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carter, M. D.; Moore, R. D.; Ilin, A. V.; Chang-Diaz, F. R.; Squire, J. P.

    2004-11-01

    Present experiments for the VASIMR concept rely exclusively on RF power in an electrode-less system. A helicon discharge in the 10-30 MHz range is used for the plasma source while a lower frequency is used to accelerate the ions in the plasma jet using an ion cyclotron interaction. At both frequencies, the wavelength is comparable with the plasma size, requiring full wave methods to accurately calculate the RF-plasma response. In the plasma source, the generation of the plasma is nonlinear in that plasma transport, neutral gas transport, and RF deposition should be self-consistent. The plasma target for the ion acceleration must also be consistent with the source, and nonlinear wave-particle interactions must be considered. Strong inhomogeneities exist in both the radial and axial directions for all of these processes. In this paper, we present results from a model based on the EMIR4 code, (M. D. Carter et al., Phys. Plasmas 9), 5097 (2002). which has been upgraded to iterate a 3D RF solution with a two-dimensional magnetized diffusive transport model based on frictional ions in an ambipolar potential. We also discuss nonlinear ion orbits in the resulting RF fields.

  9. RF generated atmospheric pressure plasmas and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jaeyoung; Herrmann, Hans W.; Henins, Ivars; Gautier, Donald C.

    2001-10-01

    RF generated atmospheric pressure plasma sources have been developed for various materials applications. They operate with rf power and produce a α-mode capacitive discharge that is stable, steady-state, non-thermal, and volumetric. The plasma parameters of this source have been measured: electron densities of 10^11 cm-3 and electron temperatures of 2 eV by using neutral bremsstrahlung emission. Localized electron heating near the sheath boundary has been observed and is related to the discharge stability and α to γ mode (or arcing) transition using 1D fluid model. The discharge stability improves with increase in rf frequency. The electrode surface property such as the secondary electron emission coefficient also plays a significant role in determining α to γ mode transition. For example, a stable α-mode air discharge is produced using 100 MHz rf power with the use of a boron nitride cover on one of the electrodes. In comparison, an air discharge becomes unstable at a lower rf frequency (e.g. 13.56 MHz) or with an alumina cover. Similar results were obtained with various feedgas such as steam, CO_2, and hydrocarbon containing gases. Further characterization of this high frequency source is under progress. For its applications, we have successfully demonstrated the effective neutralization of actual chemical warfare agents such as VX, GD and HD. In addition, significant progresses have been made in the area of etching of organic and metal film etching, and production of novel materials.

  10. Photo induced surface heparin immobilization.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Y; Matsuda, T

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes a novel method providing durable layering of heparin immobilized hydrogels on fabricated devices. The preparation method is based on photochemistry of a dithiocarbamate group that is dissociated into a highly reactive radical pair upon ultraviolet (UV) irradiation. By taking advantage of characteristics of the photo generated radicals, hydrogel formation and its fixation onto a substrate surface were attained. The immobilization of heparin onto poly(ethylene terephtalate) was demonstrated. First, a mixed aqueous solution containing a photoreactive water soluble poly(N,N-dimethylacrylamide-covinylbenzyl N,N-diethyldithiocarbamate) and heparin was coated on the substrate. Subsequent UV irradiation resulted in the simultaneous formation of a heparin immobilized hydrogel and its chemical fixation onto the substrate. No delamination was found after vigorous washing with water. Significant inhibition of platelet adhesion and markedly prolonged blood coagulation times were observed, which are apparently derived from the surface hydrogel, and from released and chemically fixed surface heparin. Thus, it is expected that the photochemical method developed here provides potent antithrombogenicity to artificial organs.

  11. Developing Photo Activated Localization Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hess, Harald

    2015-03-01

    Photo Activated Localization Microscopy, PALM, acquires super-resolution images by activating a subset of activatable fluorescent labels and estimating the center of the each molecular label to sub-diffractive accuracy. When this process is repeated thousands of times for different subsets of molecules, then an image can be rendered from all the center coordinates of the molecules. I will describe the circuitous story of its development that began with another super-resolution technique, NSOM, developed by my colleague Eric Betzig, who imaged single molecules at room temperature, and later we spectrally resolved individual luminescent centers of quantum wells. These two observations inspired a generalized path to localization microscopy, but that path was abandoned because no really useful fluorescent labels were available. After a decade of nonacademic industrial pursuits and the subsequent freedom of unemployment, we came across a class of genetically expressible fluorescent proteins that were switchable or convertible that enabled the concept to be implemented and be biologically promising. The past ten years have been very active with many groups exploring applications and enhancements of this concept. Demonstrating significant biological relevance will be the metric if its success.

  12. Studies on an experimental quartz tube hollow cathode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegfried, D. E.; Wilbur, P. J.

    1979-01-01

    An experimental study is described in which a quartz tube, hollow cathode was operated in a test fixture allowing the simultaneous measurement of internal cathode pressure, insert temperature profiles, and the emission currents from various cathode components as a function of discharge current and propellant (mercury) mass flow rate for a number of different cathode orifice diameters. Results show that the insert temperature profile is essentially independent of orifice diameter but depends strongly on internal cathode pressure and emission current. The product of internal cathode pressure and insert diameter is shown to be important in determining the emission location and the minimum keeper voltage.

  13. Hot-cathode preionization studies in CCT

    SciTech Connect

    Darrow, D.S.; Ono, M. . Plasma Physics Lab.); Pribyl, P.A.; Taylor, R.J. . Tokamak Fusion Lab.)

    1991-07-01

    A hot LaB{sub 6} cathode was used to ionize the gas in the vessel of CCT at the start of tokamak discharges. Substantial plasma densities could be obtained in the preionization phase, resulting in reliable breakdown and initiation of q{sub a} {approx equal} 3 discharges at loop voltages of 4.2 V/turn, considerably lower than the 33 V/turn required with no preionization and the 20 V/turn required when a 15 kHz oscillator was the preionization source. When inductive effects were subtracted, the cathode preionization produced a loop voltage attributable to plasma resistance of 4 V/turn, while the oscillator-produced plasma required 12 V/turn. Repeatable cathode-enhanced breakdowns could be obtained at voltages as low as 3.4 V/turn for discharges with higher q{sub a}. With the cathode-enhanced plasma, the initial value of dI{sub p}/d{Phi}{sub OH} is higher than that with the oscillator-produced plasma. The spectrum of visible light emitted from cathode-initiated discharges shows no additional impurities present beyond those seen in a normal plasma. 10 refs., 4 figs.

  14. Spindt cold cathode electron gun development program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spindt, C. A.

    1983-01-01

    A thin film field emission cathode array and an electron gun based on this emitter array are summarized. Fabricating state of the art cathodes for testing at NASA and NRL, advancing the fabrication technology, developing wedge shaped emitters, and performing emission tests are covered. An anistropic dry etching process (reactive ion beam etching) developed that leads to increasing the packing density of the emitter tips to about 5 x 10 to the 6th power/square cm. Tests with small arrays of emitter tips having about 10 tips has demonstrated current densities of over 100 A/sq cm. Several times using cathodes having a packing density of 1.25 x 10 to the 6th power tips/sq cm. Indications are that the higher packing density achievable with the dry etch process may extend this capability to the 500 A/sq cm range and beyond. The wedge emitter geometry was developed and shown to produce emission. This geometry can (in principle) extend the current density capability of the cathodes beyond the 500 A/sq cm level. An emission microscope was built and tested for use with the cathodes.

  15. A way to the Photo Master Expert

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inagaki, Toshihiko

    After the author presided over the photographer's group for 15 years or more, the author met with the Photo Master certificate examination. And the author took the certificate examination, and was authorized as a Photo Master Expert in 2005. In this report, the outline how photographic technology has been mastered in order to adapt the photographer's group to the great change of photography from film to digital and how the contents of the activity of a photographer's group have changed is described. And the progress which took the Photo Master certificate examination as a good opportunity to prove the achievement level of those activities is described. And as a photographic activity after Photo Master Expert authorization, the shooting method of mural painting in the royal tomb of Amenophis III is described.

  16. KSC Employees Assemble for Historic Photo

    NASA Video Gallery

    Employees at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center, Fla., took a few moments to assemble for a historic aerial photo Friday outside Kennedy’s Vehicle Assembly Building. Thousands of workers stood side-b...

  17. Prospects for Advanced RF Theory and Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Batchelor, D.B.

    1999-04-12

    This paper represents an attempt to express in print the contents of a rather philosophical review talk. The charge for the talk was not to summarize the present status of the field and what we can do, but to assess what we will need to do in the future and where the gaps are in fulfilling these needs. The objective was to be complete, covering all aspects of theory and modeling in all frequency regimes, although in the end the talk mainly focussed on the ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF). In choosing which areas to develop, it is important to keep in mind who the customers for RF modeling are likely to be and what sorts of tasks they will need for RF to do. This occupies the first part of the paper. Then we examine each of the elements of a complete RF theory and try to identify the kinds of advances needed.

  18. Pulsed rf superconductivity program at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Campisi, I.E.; Farkas, Z.D.

    1984-08-01

    Recent tests performed at SLAC on superconducting TM/sub 010/ caavities using short rf pulses (less than or equal to 2.5 ..mu..s) have established that at the cavity surface magnetic fields can be reached in the vicinity of the theoretical critical fields without an appreciable increase in average losses. Tests on niobium and lead cavities are reported. The pulse method seems to be best suited to study peak field properties of superconductors in the microwave band, without the limitations imposed by defects. The short pulses also seem to be more effective in decreasing the causes of field emission by rf processing. Applications of the pulsed rf superconductivity to high-gradient linear accelerators are also possible.

  19. Prospects for advanced RF theory and modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batchelor, D. B.

    1999-09-01

    This paper represents an attempt to express in print the contents of a rather philosophical review talk. The charge for the talk was not to summarize the present status of the field and what we can do, but to assess what we will need to do in the future and where the gaps are in fulfilling these needs. The objective was to be complete, covering all aspects of theory and modeling in all frequency regimes, although in the end the talk mainly focussed on the ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF). In choosing which areas to develop, it is important to keep in mind who the customers for RF modeling are likely to be and what sorts of tasks they will need for RF to do. This occupies the first part of the paper. Then we examine each of the elements of a complete RF theory and try to identify the kinds of advances needed.

  20. Directions for rf-controlled intelligent microvalve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enderling, Stefan; Varadan, Vijay K.; Abbott, Derek

    2001-03-01

    In this paper, we consider the novel concept of a Radio Frequency (RF) controllable microvalve for different medical applications. Wireless communication via a Surface Acoustic Wave Identification-mark (SAW ID-tag) is used to control, drive and locate the microvalve inside the human body. The energy required for these functions is provided by RF pulses, which are transmitted to the valve and back by a reader/transmitter system outside of the body. These RF bursts are converted into Surface Acoustic Waves (SAWs), which propagate along the piezoelectric actuator material of the microvalve. These waves cause deflections, which are employed to open and close the microvalve. We identified five important areas of application of the microvalve in biomedicine: 1) fertility control; 2) artificial venous valves; 3) flow cytometry; 4) drug delivery and 5) DNA mapping.

  1. RF TECHNIQUES FOR IMPROVED LUMINOSITY IN RHIC.

    SciTech Connect

    BRENNAN,J.M.BLASKIEWICZ,J.BUTLER,J.DELONG,J.FISCHER,W.HAYES,T.

    2004-07-05

    The luminosity of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider has improved significantly [1] over the first three physics runs. A number of special rf techniques have been developed to facilitate higher luminosity. The techniques described herein include: an ultra low-noise rf source for the 197 MHz storage rf system, a frequency shift switch-on technique for transferring bunches from the acceleration to the storage system, synchronizing the rings during the energy ramp (including crossing the transition energy) to avoid incidental collisions, installation of dedicated 200 MHZ cavities to provide longitudinal Landau damping on the ramp, and the development of a bunch merging scheme in the Booster to increase the available bunch intensity from the injectors.

  2. VHF Injector Pumping Slot RF Shielding Effectiveness

    SciTech Connect

    Staples, John

    2007-08-08

    The effectiveness of the shielding of the pumping slots is calculated for two radial depths of the slots with Mafia-2 and compared to a simple recipe that calculates the RF attenuation in a slot. CBP Technical Note 378 describes the pumping configuration of the 100 MHz VHF photoinjector. The cavity is surrounded by 36 slots, 4.9 cm wide, separated by bars, also 4.9 cm wide. The radial depth of the bars controls the attenuation of the RF from the cavity proper to the annular plenum outside the bars where the getter pumps are located. This note describes calculations of the level of RF fields in the plenum for two different values of the radial depth of the bars and two different values of the spacing between the outer dimension of the bars and the outer plenum wall.

  3. Rf capacitively-coupled electrodeless light source

    DOEpatents

    Manos, Dennis M.; Diggs, Jessie; Ametepe, Joseph D.; Fugitt, Jock A.

    2000-01-01

    An rf capacitively-coupled electrodeless light source is provided. The light source comprises a hollow, elongated chamber and at least one center conductor disposed within the hollow, elongated chamber. A portion of each center conductor extends beyond the hollow, elongated chamber. At least one gas capable of forming an electronically excited molecular state is contained within each center conductor. An electrical coupler is positioned concentric to the hollow, elongated chamber and the electrical coupler surrounds the portion of each center conductor that extends beyond the hollow, elongated chamber. A rf-power supply is positioned in an operable relationship to the electrical coupler and an impedance matching network is positioned in an operable relationship to the rf power supply and the electrical coupler.

  4. New RF gun for Novosibirsk ERL FEL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volkov, Vladimir N.; Arbusov, Vladimir S.; Kenzhebulatov, Ermek K.; Kolobanov, Evgeniy I.; Kondakov, Aleksey A.; Kozyrev, Evgeniy V.; Krutikhin, Sergey A.; Kurkin, Grigoriy Ya.; Kuptsov, Igor V.; Motygin, Sergey V.; Ovchar, Vladimir K.; Petrov, Victor M.; Pilan, Andrey M.; Rotov, Evgeniy A.; Sedlyarov, Igor K.; Serednykov, Stanislav S.; Shevchenko, Oleg A.; Scheglov, Mikhail A.; Tribendis, Aleksey G.; Vinokurov, Nikolay A.

    The new radiofrequency (RF) gun making an intensive high-quality electron beam for injecting in Novosibirsk microtron recuperator (ERL) and driving Free Electron Laser (FEL) is made in Budker INP SB RAS. Bench tests of RF gun demonstrated good results in strict accordance with the calculations predicting average current of a bunch of 100 iA, energy of particles of 400 keV and normalized emittance less than 15 microns. The RF gun stand testing showed reliable work, unpretentious for vacuum conditions and stable in long-term operation. The additional injection beamline built-in to the existing system of the NovoFEL injector with the static gun is developed and designed.

  5. Rf-inhomogeneity compensation using method of Fourier synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khaneja, Navin

    2017-04-01

    In this paper, we propose a new method for design of composite pulses that are robust to rf-amplitude (rf-inhomogeneity). We call this, the method of Fourier synthesis. The method is general enough to design excitation, inversion, refocusing or arbitary flip angle pulses that are robust to rf-amplitude. The method can be tailored to have amplitude selective excitation. We experimentally show rf-compensation over a order of magnitude (20 db) variation in rf-amplitude. The method is expected to find use in invivo NMR studies using surface coils, where there is large dispersion in rf-amplitude over the sample.

  6. X-BAND TRAVELING WAVE RF DEFLECTOR STRUCTURES

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, J.W.; Tantawi, S.; /SLAC

    2008-12-18

    Design studies on the X-Band transverse RF deflectors operating at HEM{sub ll} mode have been made for two different applications. One is for beam measurement of time-sliced emittance and slice energy spread for the upgraded LCLS project, its optimization in RF efficiency and system design are carefully considered. Another is to design an ultra-fast RF kicker in order to pick up single bunches from the bunch-train of the B-factory storage ring. The challenges are to obtain very short structure filling time with high RF group velocity and good RF efficiency with reasonable transverse shunt impedance. Its RF system will be discussed.

  7. Rf-inhomogeneity compensation using method of Fourier synthesis.

    PubMed

    Khaneja, Navin

    2017-04-01

    In this paper, we propose a new method for design of composite pulses that are robust to rf-amplitude (rf-inhomogeneity). We call this, the method of Fourier synthesis. The method is general enough to design excitation, inversion, refocusing or arbitary flip angle pulses that are robust to rf-amplitude. The method can be tailored to have amplitude selective excitation. We experimentally show rf-compensation over a order of magnitude (20db) variation in rf-amplitude. The method is expected to find use in invivo NMR studies using surface coils, where there is large dispersion in rf-amplitude over the sample.

  8. Control electronics of the PEP RF system

    SciTech Connect

    Pellegrin, J.L.; Schwarz, H.

    1981-01-01

    The operation of the major components used for controlling the phase and field level of the PEP RF cavities is described. The control electronics of one RF station is composed of several control loops: each cavity has a tuners' servo loop which maintains the frequency constant and also keeps the fields of each cavity balanced; the total gap voltage developed by a pair of cavities is regulated by a gap voltage controller; finally, the phase variation along the amplification chain, the klystron and the cavities are compensated by a phase lock loop. The design criteria of each loop are set forth and the circuit implementation and test results are presented.

  9. SSRL photocathode RF gun test stand

    SciTech Connect

    Hernandez, M.; Baltay, M.; Boyce, A.

    1995-12-31

    A photocathode RF gun test stand designed for the production and study of high brightness electron beams will be constructed at SSRL. The beam will be generated from a laser driven third generation photocathode RF gun being developed in collaboration with BNL, LBL, and UCLA. The 3-5 [MeV] beam from the gun will be accelerated using a SLAC three meter S-band accelerator section, in order to achieve the desired low emittance beam, emittance compensation with solenoidal focusing will be employed.

  10. RF Breakdown in High Frequency Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Doebert, S

    2004-05-27

    RF breakdown in high-frequency accelerators appears to limit the maximum achievable gradient as well as the reliability of such devices. Experimental results from high power tests, obtained mostly in the framework of the NLC/GLC project at 11 GHz and from the CLIC study at 30 GHz, will be used to illustrate the important issues. The dependence of the breakdown phenomena on rf pulse length, operating frequency and fabrication material will be described. Since reliability is extremely important for large scale accelerators such as a linear collider, the measurements of breakdown rate as a function of the operating gradient will be highlighted.

  11. Comparison between large area photo-multiplier tubes at cryogenic temperature for neutrino and rare event physics experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falcone, A.; Bertoni, R.; Boffelli, F.; Bonesini, M.; Cervi, T.; Menegolli, A.; Montanari, C.; Prata, M. C.; Rappoldi, A.; Raselli, G. L.; Rossella, M.; Spanu, M.; Torti, M.; Zani, A.

    2015-07-01

    An evaluation of the behavior of three large cathode area photo-multiplier tubes, Hamamatsu R5912 Mod and R5912-02 Mod, and ETL 9357 KFLB, was carried out both at room and cryogenic temperature, using a 405 nm light source. The main electrical and optical features of the devices were studied; the obtained results were compared with the characteristics of the ETL 9357 FLA tubes, used in the ICARUS experiment. Tubes were also studied as a function of the Earth's magnetic field and an evaluation of the quantum efficiency was made in the vacuum ultraviolet light region.

  12. All new custom path photo book creation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wiley; Muzzolini, Russ

    2012-03-01

    In this paper, we present an all new custom path to allow consumers to have full control to their photos and the format of their books, while providing them with guidance to make their creation fast and easy. The users can choose to fully automate the initial creation, and then customize every page. The system manage many design themes along with numerous design elements, such as layouts, backgrounds, embellishments and pattern bands. The users can also utilize photos from multiple sources including their computers, Shutterfly accounts, Shutterfly Share sites and Facebook. The users can also use a photo as background, add, move and resize photos and text - putting what they want where they want instead of being confined to templates. The new path allows users to add embellishments anywhere in the book, and the high-performance platform can support up to 1,000 photos per book and up to 25 pictures per page. The path offers either Smart Autofill or Storyboard features allowing customers to populate their books with photos so they can add captions and customize the pages.

  13. Er3+-activated photonic structures fabricated by sol-gel and rf-sputtering techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrari, M.; Alombert-Goget, G.; Armellini, C.; Berneschi, S.; Bhaktha, S. N. B.; Boulard, B.; Brenci, M.; Chiappini, A.; Chiasera, A.; Duverger-Arfuso, C.; Féron, P.; Gonçalves, R. R.; Jestin, Y.; Minati, L.; Moser, E.; Nunzi Conti, G.; Pelli, S.; Rao, D. N.; Retoux, R.; Righini, G. C.; Speranza, G.

    2009-05-01

    The realization of photonic structures operating at visible and near infrared frequencies is a highly attractive scientific and technological challenge. Since optical fiber innovation, a huge of activity has been performed leading to interesting results, such as optical waveguides and planar lightwave circuits, microphotonic devices, optical microcavities, nanowires, plasmonic structures, and photonic crystals. These systems have opened new possibilities in the field of both basic and applied physics, in a large area covering Information Communication Technologies, Health and Biology, Structural Engineering, and Environment Monitoring Systems. Several materials and techniques are employed to successfully fabricate photonic structures. Concerning materials, Er3+-activated silica-based glasses still play an important role, although recently interesting results have been published about fluoride glass-ceramic waveguides. As far as regards the fabrication methods sol-gel route and rf sputtering have proved to be versatile and reliable techniques. In this article we will present a review of some Er3+-activated photonic structures fabricated by sol gel route and rf sputtering deposition. In the discussion on the sol-gel approach we focus our attention on the silica-hafnia binary system presenting an overview concerning fabrication protocols and structural, optical and spectroscopic assessment of SiO2-HfO2 waveguides activated by Er3+ ions. In order to put in evidence the reliability and versatility of the sol-gel route for photonics applications four different confined structures are briefly presented: amorphous waveguides, coated microspheres, monolithic waveguide laser, and core-shell nanospheres. As examples of rf sputtering technique, we will discuss Er3+-activated silica-hafnia and silica-germania waveguides, the latter system allowing fabrication of integrated optics structures by UV photo-imprinting. Finally, two examples of photonic crystal structures, one

  14. 17. INTERIOR OF BATHROOM SHOWING TOILET AT EXTREME PHOTO LEFT, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    17. INTERIOR OF BATHROOM SHOWING TOILET AT EXTREME PHOTO LEFT, SINK, MIRROR AND ELECTRIC LIGHT AT LEFT PHOTO CENTER, OPEN AND CLOSED BUILT-IN CABINETRY AT PHOTO CENTER AND THE BATHTUB AT EXTREME PHOTO RIGHT. VIEW TO SOUTHWEST. - Bishop Creek Hydroelectric System, Plant 4, Worker Cottage, Bishop Creek, Bishop, Inyo County, CA

  15. Effects of cathodic disbonding and blistering on current demand for cathodic protection of coated steel

    SciTech Connect

    Knudsen, O.O.; Steinsmo, U.

    2000-03-01

    Cathodic disbonding, blistering, and current demand for cathodic protection were measured for nine commercial coatings for submerged steel structures. The ASTM-G8 standard test and a long-term test (2 years), simulating North Sea conditions, were used. The relevance of the ASTM-G8 test as a prequalification test was evaluated by comparing cathodic disbonding in the two tests. After 800 days in the long-term test, the correlation to ASTM-G8 was good. The correlation coefficient was 0.98. The current demand for cathodic protection increased when the coatings blistered. Examination of the blisters showed that they had cracked. After 2 years of testing, the current demand only had increased for the thin coatings (< 150 {micro}m). The current demand for the thicker coatings (> 450 {micro}m) had not increased, in spite of significant cathodic disbonding for some coatings. Coating breakdown factors, defined as the ratio between current demand for cathodic protection for the coated samples and samples of bare steel, were calculated. These factors were compared with the design values for cathodic protection in Det Norske Veritas (DNV) RP B401 and NORSOK M-CR-503. For all coatings, the coating breakdown rate was lower than the design values.

  16. Field free, directly heated lanthanum boride cathode

    DOEpatents

    Leung, Ka-Ngo; Moussa, D.; Wilde, S.B.

    1987-02-02

    A directly heated cylindrical lanthanum boride cathode assembly is disclosed which minimizes generation of magnetic field which would interfere with electron emission from the cathode. The cathode assembly comprises a lanthanum boride cylinder in electrical contact at one end with a central support shaft which functions as one electrode to carry current to the lanthanum boride cylinder and in electrical contact, at its opposite end with a second electrode which is coaxially position around the central support shaft so that magnetic fields generated by heater current flowing in one direction through the central support shaft are cancelled by an opposite magnetic field generated by current flowing through the lanthanum boride cylinder and the coaxial electrode in a direction opposite to the current flow in the central shaft.

  17. Field free, directly heated lanthanum boride cathode

    DOEpatents

    Leung, Ka-Ngo; Moussa, David; Wilde, Stephen B.

    1991-01-01

    A directly heated cylindrical lanthanum boride cathode assembly is disclosed which minimizes generation of magnetic fields which would interfere with electron emission from the cathode. The cathode assembly comprises a lanthanum boride cylinder in electrical contact at one end with a central support shaft which functions as one electrode to carry current to the lanthanum boride cylinder and in electrical contact, at its opposite end with a second electrode which is coaxially position around the central support shaft so that magnetic fields generated by heater current flowing in one direction through the central support shaft are cancelled by an opposite magnetic field generated by current flowing through the lanthanum boride cylinder and the coaxial electrode in a direction opposite to the current flow in the central shaft.

  18. Advanced rechargeable sodium batteries with novel cathodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Di Stefano, S.; Ratnakumar, B. V.; Bankston, C. P.

    1990-01-01

    Various high energy density rechargeable batteries are being considered for future space applications. Of these, the sodium-sulfur battery is one of the leading candidates. The primary advantage is the high energy density (760 W h/kg theoretical). Energy densities in excess of 180 W h/kg have been realized in practical batteries. More recently, cathodes other than sulfur are being evaluated. Various new cathode materials are presently being evaluated for use in high energy density sodium batteries for advanced space applications. The approach is to carry out basic electrochemical studies of these materials in a sodium cell configuration in order to understand their fundamental behaviors. Thus far, the studies have focussed on alternative metal chlorides such as CuCl2 and organic cathode materials such as TCNE.

  19. Advanced rechargeable sodium batteries with novel cathodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Distefano, S.; Ratnakumar, B. V.; Bankston, C. P.

    1989-01-01

    Various high energy density rechargeable batteries are being considered for future space applications. Of these, the sodium sulfur battery is one of the leading candidates. The primary advantage is the high energy density (760 Wh/kg theoretical). Energy densities in excess of 180 Wh/kg have been realized in practical batteries. More recently, cathodes other than sulfur are being evaluated. Researchers at JPL are evaluating various new cathode materials for use in high energy density sodium batteries for advanced space applications. The approach is to carry out basic electrochemical studies of these materials in a sodium cell configuration in order to understand their fundamental behaviors. Thus far studies have focused on alternate metal chlorides such as CuCl2 and organic cathode materials such as tetracyanoethylene (TCNE).

  20. Cathodic protection on concrete offshore platforms

    SciTech Connect

    Heuze, B.

    1980-05-01

    Experience with five cathodically protected North Sea concrete platforms has demonstrated the value of interconnecting the concrete-reinforcement steel with cathodically protected metal items on the structure (rather than insulating the steel from them) as a means of bringing the entire structure under the protection of the corrosion-control system. Lessons learned from this experience point out the importance of the duct material in safeguarding the prestressing tendons, the limitations of cathodic protection in cases of coating cracking and disbondment, and the precautions to be taken against stray welding currents. An improved approach to corrosion prevention focuses on the design philosophy, the current required by the reinforcing bar and well casing, the corrosion protection inside piping shafts and risers, and the required monitoring systems.

  1. Filtered cathodic arc deposition apparatus and method

    DOEpatents

    Krauss, Alan R.

    1999-01-01

    A filtered cathodic arc deposition method and apparatus for the production of highly dense, wear resistant coatings which are free from macro particles. The filtered cathodic arc deposition apparatus includes a cross shaped vacuum chamber which houses a cathode target having an evaporable surface comprised of the coating material, means for generating a stream of plasma, means for generating a transverse magnetic field, and a macro particle deflector. The transverse magnetic field bends the generated stream of plasma in the direction of a substrate. Macro particles are effectively filtered from the stream of plasma by traveling, unaffected by the transverse magnetic field, along the initial path of the plasma stream to a macro particle deflector. The macro particle deflector has a preformed surface which deflects macro particles away from the substrate.

  2. Synchrotron Investigations of SOFC Cathode Degradation

    SciTech Connect

    Idzerda, Yves

    2013-09-30

    The atomic variations occurring in cathode/electrolyte interface regions of La{sub 1-x}Sr{sub x}Co{sub y}Fe{sub 1-y}O{sub 3-δ} (LSCF) cathodes and other SOFC related materials have been investigated and characterized using soft X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS) and diffuse soft X-ray Resonant Scattering (XRS). X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy in the soft X-ray region (soft XAS) is shown to be a sensitive technique to quantify the disruption that occurs and can be used to suggest a concrete mechanism for the degradation. For LSC, LSF, and LSCF films, a significant degradation mechanism is shown to be Sr out-diffusion. By using the XAS spectra of hexavalent Cr in SrCrO4 and trivalent Cr in Cr2O3, the driving factor for Sr segregation was identified to be the oxygen vacancy concentration at the anode and cathode side of of symmetric LSCF/GDC/LSCF heterostructures. This is direct evidence of vacancy induced cation diffusion and is shown to be a significant indicator of cathode/electrolyte interfacial degradation. X-ray absorption spectroscopy is used to identify the occupation of the A-sites and B-sites for LSC, LSF, and LSCF cathodes doped with other transition metals, including doping induced migration of Sr to the anti-site for Sr, a significant cathode degradation indicator. By using spatially resolved valence mapping of Co, a complete picture of the surface electrochemistry can be determined. This is especially important in identifying degradation phenomena where the degradation is spatially localized to the extremities of the electrochemistry and not the average. For samples that have electrochemical parameters that are measured to be spatially uniform, the Co valence modifications were correlated to the effects of current density, overpotential, and humidity.

  3. High pressure working mode of hollow cathode arc discharges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minoo, H.; Popovici, C.

    1985-01-01

    The behavior of high pressure cathotrons is discussed. Methods of preheating either the gas or the cathode itself are detailed together with various geometries for the hollow cathode. Three special configurations were tested, and the results are analyzed.

  4. Review on MIEC Cathode Materials for Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burnwal, Suman Kumar; Bharadwaj, S.; Kistaiah, P.

    2016-11-01

    The cathode is one of the most important components of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs). The reduction of oxygen at the cathode (traditional cathodes like LSM, LSGM, etc.) is the slow step in the cell reaction at intermediate temperature (600-800∘C) which is one of the key obstacles to the development of SOFCs. The mixed ionic and electronic conducting cathode (MIEC) like LSCF, BSCF, etc., has recently been proposed as a promising cathode material for SOFC due to the improvement of the kinetic of the cathode reaction. The MIEC materials provide not only the electrons for the reduction of oxygen, but also the ionic conduction required to ensure the transport of the formed oxygen ions and thereby improves the overall electrochemical performance of SOFC system. The characteristics of MIEC cathode materials and its comparison with other traditional cathode materials is studied and presented in the paper.

  5. Cathodic protection retrofit of an offshore pipeline

    SciTech Connect

    Winters, R.H.; Holk, A.C.

    1997-09-01

    The cathodic protection anodes and corrosion coating on two 8-inch (203.2 mm) outside diameter (O.D.) offshore pipelines were damaged during deep water ({minus}380 feet, {minus}116 m) installation. In-situ methods for deep water inspection and repair of the pipelines` cathodic protection and coating systems were developed and performed. Methods are described in which underwater anode retrofits were performed and friction welding technology was used to re-attach anode leads. Standard procedures for underwater pipeline coating repair and remediation of damaged line pipe are provided.

  6. High reliability cathode heaters for ion thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mueller, L. A.

    1976-01-01

    A number of space missions have been proposed which will utilize 30-cm mercury bombardment ion thrusters and also will require a large number of thruster restarts. A test program was carried out to determine thermal cycle life of several different cathode heater designs. Plasma/flame sprayed heaters and swaged type heaters were tested. Four of the five plasma/flame sprayed heaters tested failed in a comparatively short time. Four tantalum swaged heaters that were brazed to the tantalum cathode tube were successfully tested and met the goals that were set at the start of the test.

  7. Cathode architectures for alkali metal / oxygen batteries

    DOEpatents

    Visco, Steven J; Nimon, Vitaliy; De Jonghe, Lutgard C; Volfkovich, Yury; Bograchev, Daniil

    2015-01-13

    Electrochemical energy storage devices, such as alkali metal-oxygen battery cells (e.g., non-aqueous lithium-air cells), have a cathode architecture with a porous structure and pore composition that is tailored to improve cell performance, especially as it pertains to one or more of the discharge/charge rate, cycle life, and delivered ampere-hour capacity. A porous cathode architecture having a pore volume that is derived from pores of varying radii wherein the pore size distribution is tailored as a function of the architecture thickness is one way to achieve one or more of the aforementioned cell performance improvements.

  8. DARHT 2 kA Cathode Development

    SciTech Connect

    Henestroza, E.; Houck, T.; Kwan, J.W.; Leitner, M.; Miram, G.; Prichard, B.; Roy, P.K.; Waldron, W.; Westenskow, G.; Yu, S.; Bieniosek, F.M.

    2009-03-09

    In the campaign to achieve 2 kA of electron beam current, we have made several changes to the DARHT-II injector during 2006-2007. These changes resulted in a significant increase in the beam current, achieving the 2 kA milestone. Until recently (before 2007), the maximum beam current that was produced from the 6.5-inch diameter (612M) cathode was about 1300 A when the cathode was operating at a maximum temperature of 1140 C. At this temperature level, the heat loss was dominated by radiation which is proportional to temperature to the fourth power. The maximum operating temperature was limited by the damage threshold of the potted filament and the capacity of the filament heater power supply, as well as the shortening of the cathode life time. There were also signs of overheating at other components in the cathode assembly. Thus it was clear that our approach to increase beam current could not be simply trying to run at a higher temperature and the preferred way was to operate with a cathode that has a lower work function. The dispenser cathode initially used was the type 612M made by SpectraMat. According to the manufacturer's bulletin, this cathode should be able to produce more than 10 A/cm{sup 2} of current density (corresponding to 2 kA of total beam current) at our operating conditions. Instead the measured emission (space charge limited) was 6 A/cm{sup 2}. The result was similar even after we had revised the activation and handling procedures to adhere more closely to the recommend steps (taking longer time and nonstop to do the out-gassing). Vacuum was a major concern in considering the cathode's performance. Although the vacuum gauges at the injector vessel indicated 10{sup -8} Torr, the actual vacuum condition near the cathode in the central region of the vessel, where there might be significant out-gassing from the heater region, was never determined. Poor vacuum at the surface of the cathode degraded the emission (by raising the work function value). We

  9. Fabrication Of Metal Chloride Cathodes By Sintering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bugga, Ratnakumar V.; Di Stefano, Salvador; Bankston, C. Perry

    1992-01-01

    Transition-metal chloride cathodes for use in high-temperature rechargeable sodium batteries prepared by sintering transition-metal powders mixed with sodium chloride. Need for difficult and dangerous chlorination process eliminated. Proportions of transition metal and sodium chloride in mixture adjusted to suit specific requirements. Cathodes integral to sodium/metal-chloride batteries, which have advantages over sodium/sulfur batteries including energy densities, increased safety, reduced material and thermal-management problems, and ease of operation and assembly. Being evaluated for supplying electrical power during peak demand and electric vehicles.

  10. High reliability cathode heaters for ion thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mueller, L. A.

    1976-01-01

    A number of space missions were proposed which utilize 30-cm mercury bombardment ion thrusters and also require a large number of thruster restarts. A test program was carried out to determine thermal cycle life of several different cathode heater designs. Plasma/flame sprayed heaters and swaged type heaters were tested. Four of the five plasma/flame sprayed heaters tested failed in a comparatively short time. Four tantalum swaged heaters that were brazed to the tantalum cathode tube were successfully tested and met the goals that were set at the start of the test.

  11. Ferroelectric Cathodes in Transverse Magnetic Fields

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander Dunaevsky; Yevgeny Raitses; Nathaniel J. Fisch

    2002-07-29

    Experimental investigations of a planar ferroelectric cathode in a transverse magnetic field up to 3 kGs are presented. It is shown that the transverse magnetic field affects differently the operation of ferroelectric plasma cathodes in ''bright'' and ''dark'' modes in vacuum. In the ''bright'' mode, when the surface plasma is formed, the application of the transverse magnetic field leads to an increase of the surface plasma density. In the ''dark'' mode, the magnetic field inhibits the development of electron avalanches along the surface, as it does similarly in other kinds of surface discharges in the pre-breakdown mode.

  12. Investigation and improvement of SOFC composite cathodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bidrawn, Fred

    The focus of this dissertation is on the preparation, performance, and long term stability of SOFC composite cathodes prepared by infiltration methods. The majority of the work that follows aims to improve the understanding of the processes contributing to cathode deactivation and to propose strategies to lessen the extent of this deactivation. Through this understanding of the factors governing cathode performance, improvements can be made in overall cathode performance which can in turn lead to lower operating temperatures. The fuel cells used in this work were prepared by tapecasting and infiltration methods. Composite YSZ-perovskite electrodes were prepared by infiltration of stoichiometric ratios of perovskite precursor nitrate salts into a porous YSZ scaffold. First, the influence of ionic conductivity on the performance of solid oxide fuel cell cathodes was studied for electrodes prepared by infiltration of 40-wt% La0.8Ca0.2FeO3 (LCF), La0.8 Sr0.2FeO3 (LSF), and La0.8Ba0.2 FeO3 (LBF) into porous YSZ scaffolds. Although ionic conductivity varied by over an order of magnitude, no significant difference was observed in the performance of each material, suggesting that oxygen ion diffusion through perovskite film is not a rate limiting step for the oxygen reduction process within the cathode. Next, the effect of various infiltrated dopants on the performance of SOFC cathodes was examined. The addition of dopants had little influence on the 1123-K composite electrodes but all dopants tested improved the performance of the 1373-K, suggesting that the improved performance is related to structural changes in the electrode, rather than to improved catalytic properties or ionic conductivity. Based on these results, a model was developed to understand the performance of these electrodes. Two rate-limiting cases are considered for oxygen transfer into the YSZ fins: diffusion through the perovskite film or reactive adsorption of O2 at the perovskite surface. In agreement

  13. A Novel Cathode Material for Cathodic Dehalogenation of 1,1-Dibromo Cyclopropane Derivatives.

    PubMed

    Gütz, Christoph; Selt, Maximilian; Bänziger, Markus; Bucher, Christoph; Römelt, Christina; Hecken, Nadine; Gallou, Fabrice; Galvão, Tomás R; Waldvogel, Siegfried R

    2015-09-28

    Leaded bronze turned out to be an excellent cathode material for the dehalogenation reaction of cyclopropanes without affecting the strained molecular entity. With this particular alloy, beneficial properties of lead cathodes are conserved, whereas the corrosion of cathode is efficiently suppressed. The solvent in the electrolyte determines whether a complete debromination reaction is achieved or if the process can be selectively stopped at the monobromo cyclopropane intermediate. The electroorganic conversion tolerates a variety of functional groups and can be conducted at rather complex substrates like cyclosporine A. This approach allows the sustainable preparation of cyclopropane derivatives.

  14. Automatic digital photo-book making system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wiley; Teo, Patrick; Muzzolini, Russ

    2010-02-01

    The diversity of photo products has grown more than ever before. A group of photos are not only printed individually, but also can be arranged in specific order to tell a story, such as in a photo book, a calendar or a poster collage. Similar to making a traditional scrapbook, digital photo book tools allow the user to choose a book style/theme, layouts of pages, backgrounds and the way the pictures are arranged. This process is often time consuming to users, given the number of images and the choices of layout/background combinations. In this paper, we developed a system to automatically generate photo books with only a few initial selections required. The system utilizes time stamps, color indices, orientations and other image properties to best fit pictures into a final photo book. The common way of telling a story is to lay the pictures out in chronological order. If the pictures are proximate in time, they will coincide with each other and are often logically related. The pictures are naturally clustered along a time line. Breaks between clusters can be used as a guide to separate pages or spreads, thus, pictures that are logically related can stay close on the same page or spread. When people are making a photo book, it is helpful to start with chronologically grouped images, but time alone wont be enough to complete the process. Each page is limited by the number of layouts available. Many aesthetic rules also apply, such as, emphasis of preferred pictures, consistency of local image density throughout the whole book, matching a background to the content of the images, and the variety of adjacent page layouts. We developed an algorithm to group images onto pages under the constraints of aesthetic rules. We also apply content analysis based on the color and blurriness of each picture, to match backgrounds and to adjust page layouts. Some of our aesthetic rules are fixed and given by designers. Other aesthetic rules are statistic models trained by using

  15. Cathode performance improvement in calcium-thionyl chloride cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, C. W., Jr.; Wade, W. L., Jr.; Binder, M.; Gilman, S.

    1986-08-01

    Carbon cathode performance in calcium-thionyl chloride cells was markedly improved with a cathode comprised of a mixture of high and low surface area carbon blacks. Addition of sulfur dioxide gas to the electrolyte further enhanced cathode performance and electrolyte conductivity. Load potentials and cathode life were nearly equal to that of the analogous lithium based system. The advantage of the calcium based system is its potential for greater safety.

  16. Coaxial cable stripping device facilitates RF cabling fabrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, R. S.; Tobias, R. A.

    1967-01-01

    Coaxial cable stripping device assures clean, right angled shoulder for RF cable connector fabrication. This method requires minimal skill and creates a low voltage standing wave ratio and mechanical stability in the interconnecting RF Cables.

  17. Eccentric superconducting RF cavity separator structure

    DOEpatents

    Aggus, John R.; Giordano, Salvatore T.; Halama, Henry J.

    1976-01-01

    Accelerator apparatus having an eccentric-shaped, iris-loaded deflecting cavity for an rf separator for a high energy high momentum, charged particle accelerator beam. In one embodiment, the deflector is superconducting, and the apparatus of this invention provides simplified machining and electron beam welding techniques. Model tests have shown that the electrical characteristics provide the desired mode splitting without adverse effects.

  18. Experimental Study of RF Pulsed Heating

    SciTech Connect

    Laurent, Lisa; Tantawi, Sami; Dolgashev, Valery; Nantista, Christopher; Higashi, Yasuo; Aicheler, Markus; Heikkinen, Samuli; Wuensch, Walter; /CERN

    2011-11-04

    Cyclic thermal stresses produced by rf pulsed heating can be the limiting factor on the attainable reliable gradients for room temperature linear accelerators. This is especially true for structures that have complicated features for wakefield damping. These limits could be pushed higher by using special types of copper, copper alloys, or other conducting metals in constructing partial or complete accelerator structures. Here we present an experimental study aimed at determining the potential of these materials for tolerating cyclic thermal fatigue due to rf magnetic fields. A special cavity that has no electric field on the surface was employed in these studies. The cavity shape concentrates the magnetic field on one flat surface where the test material is placed. The materials tested in this study have included oxygen free electronic grade copper, copper zirconium, copper chromium, hot isostatically pressed copper, single crystal copper, electroplated copper, Glidcop(reg. sign), copper silver, and silver plated copper. The samples were exposed to different machining and heat treatment processes prior to rf processing. Each sample was tested to a peak pulsed heating temperature of approximately 110 C and remained at this temperature for approximately 10 x 10{sup 6} rf pulses. In general, the results showed the possibility of pushing the gradient limits due to pulsed heating fatigue by the use of copper zirconium and copper chromium alloys.

  19. 47 CFR 24.52 - RF hazards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ..., as appropriate. Applications for equipment authorization of mobile or portable devices operating... 47 Telecommunication 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false RF hazards. 24.52 Section 24.52 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES PERSONAL...

  20. Common Sense Copper and RF Guns

    SciTech Connect

    Mulhollan, G.

    2005-01-18

    The purpose of this document is to gather together both fundamental information on copper and on the cleaning and operation of copper in RF gun structures. While incomplete, this is a living document and will be added to and updated as necessary.

  1. RF cavities with transversely biased ferrite tuning

    SciTech Connect

    Smythe, W.R.; Brophy, T.G.; Carlini, R.D.; Friedrichs, C.C.; Grisham, D.L.; Spalek, G.; Wilkerson, L.C.

    1985-10-01

    Earley et al. suggested that ferrite tuned rf cavities have lower ferrite power dissipation if the ferrite bias field is perpendicular rather than parallel to the rf magnetic field. A 50-84 MHz cavity has been constructed in which ferrite can be biased either way. Low power measurements of six microwave ferrites show that the magnetic Q's of these ferrites under perpendicular bias are much higher than under parallel bias, and that the high Q region extends over a much wider range of rf permeability. TDK Y-5 ferrite was found to have a magnetic Q of 10,800, 4,800, 1,200 and 129 at rf permeabilities of 1.2, 2.4, 3.7 and 4.5, respectively. Measurements of perpendicularly biased ferrite at various power levels were made in a coaxial line cavity. The Q of Y-5 ferrite was found to decrease by less than a factor of 2 as the power density in the ferrite was increased to 1.3 W/cmT. A cavity design for a 6 GeV, high current, rapid cycling synchrotron using transversely biased ferrite tuning is described.

  2. RF Sputtering of Gold Contacts On Niobium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barr, D. W.

    1983-01-01

    Reliable gold contacts are deposited on niobium by combination of RF sputtering and photolithography. Process results in structures having gold only where desired for electrical contact. Contacts are stable under repeated cycling from room temperature to 4.2 K and show room-temperature contact resistance as much as 40 percent below indium contacts made by thermalcompression bonding.

  3. Experimental study of rf pulsed heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laurent, Lisa; Tantawi, Sami; Dolgashev, Valery; Nantista, Christopher; Higashi, Yasuo; Aicheler, Markus; Heikkinen, Samuli; Wuensch, Walter

    2011-04-01

    Cyclic thermal stresses produced by rf pulsed heating can be the limiting factor on the attainable reliable gradients for room temperature linear accelerators. This is especially true for structures that have complicated features for wakefield damping. These limits could be pushed higher by using special types of copper, copper alloys, or other conducting metals in constructing partial or complete accelerator structures. Here we present an experimental study aimed at determining the potential of these materials for tolerating cyclic thermal fatigue due to rf magnetic fields. A special cavity that has no electric field on the surface was employed in these studies. The cavity shape concentrates the magnetic field on one flat surface where the test material is placed. The materials tested in this study have included oxygen free electronic grade copper, copper zirconium, copper chromium, hot isostatically pressed copper, single crystal copper, electroplated copper, Glidcop®, copper silver, and silver plated copper. The samples were exposed to different machining and heat treatment processes prior to rf processing. Each sample was tested to a peak pulsed heating temperature of approximately 110°C and remained at this temperature for approximately 10×106 rf pulses. In general, the results showed the possibility of pushing the gradient limits due to pulsed heating fatigue by the use of copper zirconium and copper chromium alloys.

  4. Theory of RF superconductivity for resonant cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurevich, Alex

    2017-03-01

    An overview of a theory of electromagnetic response of superconductors in strong radio-frequency (RF) electromagnetic fields is given with the emphasis on applications to superconducting resonant cavities for particle accelerators. The paper addresses fundamentals of the BCS surface resistance, the effect of subgap states and trapped vortices on the residual surface resistance at low RF fields, and a nonlinear surface resistance at strong fields, particularly the effect of the RF field suppression of the surface resistance. These issues are essential for the understanding of the field dependence of high quality factors Q({B}a)∼ {10}10{--}{10}11 achieved on the Nb cavities at 1.3–2 K in strong RF fields B a close to the depairing limit, and the extended Q({B}a) rise which has been observed on Ti and N-treated Nb cavities. Possible ways of further increase of Q({B}a) and the breakdown field by optimizing impurity concentration at the surface and by multilayer nanostructuring with materials other than Nb are discussed.

  5. RF plasma heating in toroidal fusion devices

    SciTech Connect

    Golant, V.E.; Fedorov, V.I. )

    1989-01-01

    The purpose of the present book is to provide, in seven chapters, a unified overview of the methods for rf heating of plasmas in toroidal fusion experiments. In Chapter 1 the problem of plasma heating in tokamaks and stellarators is formulated and the requirements for auxiliary heating techniques are described. This chapter also contains a brief review of the results of research on tokamaks and stellarators. Chapter 2 is devoted to a theoretical description of the principal physical effects involved in the rf heating of plasmas, especially the characteristics of wave propagation, of the mechanisms by which waves are absorbed and plasma heating takes place, and of the nonlinear effects that accompany heating. The primary emphasis is on a qualitative physical picture of these effects. Chapters 3-6, in turn, deal with the major rf heating techniques currently under investigation, electron cyclotron (ECH), ion cyclotron (ICH), lower hybrid (LHH), and Alfven wave heating. In each of these chapters the main schemes for heating are described, the results of theoretical analyses and numerical simulations are discussed, the technology of the heating systems is briefly described, and experimental work published through the end of 1984 is reviewed. Finally, in Chapter 7 the different rf heating techniques are compared; they are contrasted with neutral beam injection, and the feasibility of adiabatic compression as a means of heating plasmas is examined. Separate abstracts were prepared for each chapter of this book. 246 refs.

  6. Three-dimensional rf structure calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, R.K.; Browman, M.J.; Weiland, T.

    1988-01-01

    The calculation of three-dimensional rf structures is rapidly approaching adolescence, after having been in its infancy for the last four years. This paper will show the kinds of calculations that are currently being performed in the frequency domain and is a companion paper to one in which time-domain calculations are described. 13 refs., 14 figs.

  7. Three-dimensional RF structure calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, R. K.; Browman, M. J.; Weiland, T.

    1989-04-01

    The calculation of three-dimensional rf structures is rapidly approaching adolescence, after having been in its infancy for the last four years. This paper will show the kinds of calculations that are currently being performed in the frequency domain and is a companion paper to one in which time-domain calculations are described.

  8. Advanced RF power sources for linacs

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, P.B.

    1996-10-01

    In order to maintain a reasonable over-all length at high center-of-mass energy, the main linac of an electron-positron linear collider must operate at a high accelerating gradient. For copper (non-superconducting) accelerator structures, this implies a high peak power per unit length and a high peak power per RF source, assuming a limited number of discrete sources are used. To provide this power, a number of devices are currently under active development or conceptual consideration: conventional klystrons with multi-cavity output structures, gyroklystrons, magnicons, sheet-beam klystrons, multiple-beam klystrons and amplifiers based on the FEL principle. To enhance the peak power produced by an rf source, the SLED rf pulse compression scheme is currently in use on existing linacs, and new compression methods that produce a flatter output pulse are being considered for future linear colliders. This paper covers the present status and future outlook for the more important rf power sources and pulse compression systems. It should be noted that high gradient electron linacs have applications in addition to high-energy linear colliders; they can, for example, serve as compact injectors for FEL`s and storage rings.

  9. NSLS-II RF BEAM POSITION MONITOR

    SciTech Connect

    Vetter, K.; Della Penna, A. J.; DeLong, J.; Kosciuk, B.; Mead, J.; Pinayev, I.; Singh, O.; Tian, Y.; Ha, K.; Portmann, G.; Sebek J.

    2011-03-28

    An internal R&D program has been undertaken at BNL to develop a sub-micron RF Beam Position Monitor (BPM) for the NSLS-II 3rd generation light source that is currently under construction. The BPM R&D program started in August 2009. Successful beam tests were conducted 15 months from the start of the program. The NSLS-II RF BPM has been designed to meet all requirements for the NSLS-II Injection system and Storage Ring. Housing of the RF BPM's in +-0.1 C thermally controlled racks provide sub-micron stabilization without active correction. An active pilot-tone has been incorporated to aid long-term (8hr min) stabilization to 200nm RMS. The development of a sub-micron BPM for the NSLS-II has successfully demonstrated performance and stability. Pilot Tone calibration combiner and RF synthesizer has been implemented and algorithm development is underway. The program is currently on schedule to start production development of 60 Injection BPM's starting in the Fall of 2011. The production of {approx}250 Storage Ring BPM's will overlap the Injection schedule.

  10. RF Breakdown of Metallic Surfaces in Hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    BastaniNejad, M.; Elmustafa, A.A.; Yonehara, K.; Chung, M.; Jansson, A.; Hu, M.; Moretti, A.; Popovic, M.; Alsharo'a, M.; Neubauer, M.; Sah, R.; /Muons Inc., Batavia

    2009-05-01

    In earlier reports, microscopic images of the surfaces of metallic electrodes used in high-pressure gas-filled 805 MHz RF cavity experiments were used to investigate the mechanism of RF breakdown of tungsten, molybdenum, and beryllium electrode surfaces. Plots of remnants were consistent with the breakdown events being due to field emission, due to the quantum mechanical tunnelling of electrons through a barrier as described by Fowler and Nordheim. In the work described here, these studies have been extended to include tin, aluminium, and copper. Contamination of the surfaces, discovered after the experiments concluded, have cast some doubt on the proper qualities to assign to the metallic surfaces. However, two significant results are noted. First, the maximum stable RF gradient of contaminated copper electrodes is higher than for a clean surface. Second, the addition of as little as 0.01% of SF6 to the hydrogen gas increased the maximum stable gradient, which implies that models of RF breakdown in hydrogen gas will be important to the study of metallic breakdown.

  11. 47 CFR 101.1425 - RF safety.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false RF safety. 101.1425 Section 101.1425 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES FIXED MICROWAVE SERVICES Multichannel Video Distribution and Data Service Rules for the 12.2-12.7 GHz Band § 101.1425...

  12. 47 CFR 101.1425 - RF safety.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false RF safety. 101.1425 Section 101.1425 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES FIXED MICROWAVE SERVICES Multichannel Video Distribution and Data Service Rules for the 12.2-12.7 GHz Band § 101.1425...

  13. 47 CFR 101.1425 - RF safety.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false RF safety. 101.1425 Section 101.1425 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES FIXED MICROWAVE SERVICES Multichannel Video Distribution and Data Service Rules for the 12.2-12.7 GHz Band § 101.1425...

  14. 47 CFR 101.1425 - RF safety.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false RF safety. 101.1425 Section 101.1425 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES FIXED MICROWAVE SERVICES Multichannel Video Distribution and Data Service Rules for the 12.2-12.7 GHz Band § 101.1425...

  15. 47 CFR 101.1425 - RF safety.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false RF safety. 101.1425 Section 101.1425 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES FIXED MICROWAVE SERVICES Multichannel Video Distribution and Data Service Rules for the 12.2-12.7 GHz Band § 101.1425...

  16. RF Charging of Topside Sounder Spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, H. G.

    1998-11-01

    Evidence concerning RF-induced charging of topside sounder spacecraft is reviewed. The most direct evidence from the orbital sounders ISIS II and Cosmos 1809 is observations of sounder-accelerated ions at energies up to a several tens of electron-volts. These ions are interpreted as the flux to the spacecraft body to discharge the negative electrical potential induced on the body by the action of sounder near fields on ambient electrons. The situation on ISIS II was modeled for frequencies well below the electron plasma and gyrofrequencies, fp and fc , respectively. During the RF pulse, the body was found to go to a negative potential about equal to the peak amplitude of the voltage waveform applied to the sounder dipole. Other observations from the sounders at frequencies around fp and fc, including "floating" resonant signals on ionograms and impedance measurements, attest to RF sheaths and hence to charging. The OEDIPUS-C spacecraft potential measurement has provided proof of RF charging through the whole range of electron characteristic frequencies.

  17. Energetic ion production and electrode erosion in hollow cathode discharges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goebel, Dan M.; Jameson, Kristina; Katz, Ira; Mikellides, Ioannis

    2005-01-01

    Ions with energies significantly in excess of the discharge voltage have been reported in high current hollow cathode discharges. Models of DC potential hills downstream of the cathode and ion acoustic instabilities in a double layer postulated in the cathode orifice have been proposed to explain these energetic ions, but have not been substantiated in experiments.

  18. Combined plasma and thermal hollow cathode insert model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katz, Ira; Polk, James E.; Mikellides, Ionnis G.; Goebel, Dan m.; Hornbeck, Sarah E.

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, we present the first results from a Hollow Cathode Thermal (HCThermal) model that uses the spatially distributed plasma fluxes calculated by the InsertRegion of an Orificed Cathode (IROrCa2D) code as the heat source to predict the hollow cathode and insert temperatures.

  19. Optical properties of lamps with cold emission cathode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalenik, Jerzy; Czerwosz, ElŻbieta; Biernacki, Krzysztof; Rymarczyk, Joanna; Stepińska, Izabela

    2016-12-01

    A luminescent lamp was constructed and tested. Phosphor excited by electrons is the source of light. The source of electrons is field emission cathode. The cathode is covered with nickel-carbon layer containing carbon nanotubes that enhance electron emission from the cathode. Results of luminance measurements are presented. Luminance is high enough for lighting application.

  20. The loss of material from the cathode of metal arcs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seeliger, R.; Wulfhekel, H.

    1985-01-01

    A study was made of the effect of arc length, cathode thickness, current strength, gas pressure and the chemical nature of the cathode material and filling gases upon the material loss from Cu, Fe, and Ag cathodes in arcs. The results show that the analysis of the phenomenon is complex and the energy balance is difficult to formulate.