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Sample records for rf photo cathode

  1. In-Situ Cleaning of Metal Photo-Cathodes in rf Guns

    SciTech Connect

    Schmerge, J.F.; Castro, J.M.; Clendenin, J.E.; Colby, E.R.; Dowel, D.H.; Gierman, S.M.; Loos, H.; Nalls, M.; White, W.E.; /SLAC

    2007-01-03

    Metal cathodes installed in rf guns typically exhibit much lower quantum efficiency than the theoretical limit. Experimenters often use some sort of in situ technique to ''clean'' the cathode to improve the QE. The most common technique is laser cleaning where the laser is focused to a small spot and scanned across the cathode surface. However, since the laser is operated near the damage threshold, it can also damage the cathode and increase the dark current. The QE also degrades over days and must be cleaned regularly. We are searching for a more robust cleaning technique that cleans the entire cathode surface simultaneously. In this paper we describe initial results using multiple techniques such as several keV ion beams, glow discharge cleaning and back bombarding electrons. Results are quantified in terms of the change in QE and dark current.

  2. Photo-cathode preparation system of the A0 photo-injector

    SciTech Connect

    Moyses Kuchnir et al.

    2002-08-23

    The A0 Photo-Injector is an electron accelerator located in the AZero high bay area of Fermilab. A pulsed laser system generates electron bunches by the photo-electric effect when hitting a photo-cathode in a 1.5-cell, 1.3 GHz RF gun. A 9-cell, 1.3 GHz superconducting resonant cavity then accelerates the electrons to 15 MeV. The 10 ps time resolved waveform of the laser pulses is transferred to the electron bunches. This report is focused on the first hardware component of this accelerator, the Photo-cathode Preparation System. The reason for its existence is in the nature of the photo-electric material film used: Cs{sub 2}Te (Cesium Telluride), a very reactive compound that once coated on the cathode requires that it be transported and used in ultra high vacuum (UHV), i.e. < 10{sup -9} Torr.

  3. Cathode Ion Bombardment in RF Photoguns

    SciTech Connect

    Pozdeyev,E.; Kayran, D.; Litvinenko, V.

    2008-09-01

    In this paper, we use the method of rapid oscillating field to solve the equation of ion motion in an RF gun. We apply the method to the BNL 1/2-cell SRF photogun and demonstrate that a significant portion of ions produced in the gun can reach the cathode if no special precautions are taken. Also, the paper proposes a simple mitigation recipe that can reduce the rate of ion bombardment.

  4. Progress on diamond amplified photo-cathode

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, E.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Burrill, A.; Kewisch, J.; Chang, X.; Rao, T.; Smedley, J.; Wu, Q.; Muller, E.; Xin, T.

    2011-03-28

    Two years ago, we obtained an emission gain of 40 from the Diamond Amplifier Cathode (DAC) in our test system. In our current systematic study of hydrogenation, the highest gain we registered in emission scanning was 178. We proved that our treatments for improving the diamond amplifiers are reproducible. Upcoming tests planned include testing DAC in a RF cavity. Already, we have designed a system for these tests using our 112 MHz superconducting cavity, wherein we will measure DAC parameters, such as the limit, if any, on emission current density, the bunch charge, and the bunch length. The diamond-amplified photocathode, that promises to support a high average current, low emittance, and a highly stable electron beam with a long lifetime, is under development for an electron source. The diamond, functioning as a secondary emitter amplifies the primary current, with a few KeV energy, that comes from the traditional cathode. Earlier, our group recorded a maximum gain of 40 in the secondary electron emission from a diamond amplifier. In this article, we detail our optimization of the hydrogenation process for a diamond amplifier that resulted in a stable emission gain of 140. We proved that these characteristics are reproducible. We now are designing a system to test the diamond amplifier cathode using an 112MHz SRF gun to measure the limits of the emission current's density, and on the bunch charge and bunch length.

  5. Rf Gun with High-Current Density Field Emission Cathode

    SciTech Connect

    Jay L. Hirshfield

    2005-12-19

    High current-density field emission from an array of carbon nanotubes, with field-emission-transistor control, and with secondary electron channel multiplication in a ceramic facing structure, have been combined in a cold cathode for rf guns and diode guns. Electrodynamic and space-charge flow simulations were conducted to specify the cathode configuration and range of emission current density from the field emission cold cathode. Design of this cathode has been made for installation and testing in an existing S-band 2-1/2 cell rf gun. With emission control and modulation, and with current density in the range of 0.1-1 kA/cm2, this cathode could provide performance and long-life not enjoyed by other currently-available cathodes

  6. Improvement of beam macropulse properties using slim thermionic cathode in IAE RF gun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kii, Toshiteru; Miyasako, Atsushi; Hayashi, Syusuke; Masuda, Kai; Ohgaki, Hideaki; Yoshikawa, Kiyoshi; Yamazaki, Tetsuo

    2004-08-01

    A long beam macropulse is strongly required for free-electron lasers. RF guns can potentially produce high brightness electron beam using a simple and compact system. However, due to a back-bombardment, a cathode surface is overheated. Thus, it is difficult to maintain a constant beam current and beam energy during a macropulse. The use of a photo cathode with a short-pulsed laser is one of the solutions, but it affects the simplicity and the compactness of the RF guns. We studied a mechanism of back-bombardment and experimentally and numerically found that a low energy component of the back-streaming electrons plays an important role in cathode surface heating.

  7. Surface Characterization of the LCLS RF Gun Cathode

    SciTech Connect

    Brachmann, Axel; Decker, Franz-Josef; Ding, Yuantao; Dowell, David; Emma, Paul; Frisch, Josef; Gilevich, Sasha; Hays, Gregory; Hering, Philippe; Huang, Zhirong; Iverson, Richard; Loos, Henrik; Miahnahri, Alan; Nordlund, Dennis; Nuhn, Heinz-Dieter; Pianetta, Piero; Turner, James; Welch, James; White, William; Wu, Juhao; Xiang, Dao; /SLAC

    2012-06-25

    The first copper cathode installed in the LCLS RF gun was used during LCLS commissioning for more than a year. However, after high charge operation (> 500 pC), the cathode showed a decline of quantum efficiency within the area of drive laser illumination. They report results of SEM, XPS and XAS studies that were carried out on this cathode after it was removed from the gun. X-ray absorption and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy reveal surface contamination by various hydrocarbon compounds. In addition they report on the performance of the second installed cathode with emphasis on the spatial distribution of electron emission.

  8. Cathodic arc grown niobium films for RF superconducting cavity applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catani, L.; Cianchi, A.; Lorkiewicz, J.; Tazzari, S.; Langner, J.; Strzyzewski, P.; Sadowski, M.; Andreone, A.; Cifariello, G.; Di Gennaro, E.; Lamura, G.; Russo, R.

    2006-07-01

    Experimental results on the characterization of the linear and non-linear microwave properties of niobium film produced by UHV cathodic arc deposition are presented. Surface impedance Zs as a function of RF field and intermodulation distortion (IMD) measurement have been carried out by using a dielectrically loaded resonant cavity operating at 7 GHz. The experimental data show that these samples have a lower level of intrinsic non-linearities at low temperature and low circulating power in comparison with Nb samples grown by sputtering. These results make UHV cathodic arc deposition a promising technique for the improvement of RF superconducting cavities for particle accelerators.

  9. Progress on using NEA cathodes in an RF gun

    SciTech Connect

    Fliller, R.P., III; Anderson, T.; Edwards, H.; Bluem, H.; Schultheiss, T.; Sinclair, C.; Huening, M.; /DESY

    2005-05-01

    RF guns have proven useful in multiple accelerator applications, and are an attractive electron source for the ILC. Using a NEA GaAs photocathode in such a gun allows for the production of polarized electron beams. However the lifetime of a NEA cathode in this environment is reduced by ion and electron bombardment and residual gas oxidation. We report progress made with studies to produce a RF gun using a NEA GaAs photocathode to produce polarized electron beams. We discuss simulations of ion back bombardment and attempts to reduce the residual gas pressure in the gun are discussed. Future directions are also discussed.

  10. L-band RF gun with a thermionic cathode

    SciTech Connect

    Nagaitsev, S.; Andrews, R.; Church, M.; Lunin, A.; Nezhevenko, O.; Solyak, N.; Sun, D.; Yakovlev, V.; /Fermilab

    2008-06-01

    We present a conceptual design for an L-band (1.3 GHz) rf gun with a two-grid thermionic cathode assembly. The rf gun is designed to provide a 9 mA average beam current for 1 ms pulses at a 5 Hz rate. These parameters match the beam requirements for both the ILC and the Fermilab Project X test facilities. In our simulations we are able to attain a full bunch length of 20-30 degrees, while the output energy can vary from 2 to 4 MeV. Simulations as well as a preliminary design will be presented.

  11. Performance of Magnesium Cathode in the S Band RF Gun

    SciTech Connect

    Srinivasan-Rao, T.; Palmer, D.T.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Miller, R.H.; Wang, X.J.; Woodle, M.; /Brookhaven

    2011-09-01

    In this paper, we present the preliminary results of the performance of magnesium cathode in a high frequency RF gun. The quantum efficiency of magnesium showed a dramatic improvement upon laser cleaning, increasing from 10{sup -5} to 4x10{sup -4} after two hours of cleaning. The spatial uniformity of emission also improved from a spot to spot variation of 10 to a variation of 2. Measurements with charges >1 nC indicate that the transient variation of the field due to the shielding effect of the electron in the vicinity of the cathode may play a critical role in the efficient extraction of electrons. Comprehensive theory that includes the electron emission in the presence of a time dependent Schottky effect and RF effects will be discussed.

  12. Study of RF-asymmetry in photo-injector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guan, Xin; Tang, Chuanxiang; Chen, Huaibi; Huang, Wenhui; He, Xiaozhong; Xu, Peng; Li, Renkai

    2007-04-01

    In this paper, the RF-asymmetry existing in the full cell of the BNL/SLAC/UCLA 1.6 cell type photo-injector has been investigated. The fields of the multi-pole modes have been analyzed respectively, and lastly, a simple and reliable technique is presented to eliminate the dipole mode with the RF-asymmetry induced by dipole mode. In the process of simulation, the time domain module of CST Microwave Studio is mainly used as the tool to calculate the electro-magnetic fields. The FFT technique is employed to conduct frequency domain analysis for the fields. The results of FFT are utilized to estimate emittance growth induced by higher multi-pole modes, according to the framework of Panofsky-Wenzal theorem. Based on the above analysis, efforts have been made to eliminate dipole fields by modifying the length of vacuum port on the opposite side of RF-coupling port.

  13. State-Of High Brightness RF Photo-Injector Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrario, Massimo; Clendenin, Jym; Palmer, Dennis; Rosenzweig, James; Serafini, Luca

    2000-04-01

    The art of designing optimized high brightness electron RF Photo-Injectors has moved in the last decade from a cut and try procedure, guided by experimental experience and time consuming particle tracking simulations, up to a fast parameter space scanning, guided by recent analytical results and a fast running semi-analytical code, so to reach the optimum operating point which corresponds to maximum beam brightness. Scaling laws and the theory of invariant envelope provide to the designers excellent tools for a first parameters choice and the code HOMDYN, based on a multi-slice envelope description of the beam dynamics, is tailored to describe the space charge dominated dynamics of laminar beams in presence of time dependent space charge forces, giving rise to a very fast modeling capability for photo-injectors design. We report in this talk the results of a recent beam dynamics study, motivated by the need to redesign the LCLS photoinjector. During this work a new effective working point for a split RF photoinjector has been discovered by means of the previous mentioned approach. By a proper choice of rf gun and solenoid parameters, the emittance evolution shows a double minimum behavior in the drifting region. If the booster is located where the relative emittance maximum and the envelope waist occur, the second emittance minimum can be shifted at the booster exit and frozen at a very low level (0.3 mm-mrad for a 1 nC flat top bunch), to the extent that the invariant envelope matching conditions are satisfied.

  14. RF Simulation of the 187 MHz CW Photo-RF Gun Cavity at LBNL

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Tong-Ming

    2008-12-01

    A 187 MHz normal conducting Photo-RF gun cavity is designed for the next generation light sources. The cavity is capable of operating in CW mode. As high as 750 kV gap voltage can be achieved with a 20 MV/m acceleration gradient. The original cavity optimization is conducted using Superfish code (2D) by Staples. 104 vacuum pumping slots are added and evenly spaced over the cavity equator in order to achieve better than 10-10-Tor of vacuum. Two loop couplers will be used to feed RF power into the cavity. 3D simulations are necessary to study effects from the vacuum pumping slots, couplers and possible multipactoring. The cavity geometry is optimized to minimize the power density and avoid multipactoring at operating field level. The vacuum slot dimensions are carefully chosen in consideration of both the vacuum conduction, local power density enhancement and the power attenuation at the getter pumps. This technical note gives a summary of 3D RF simulation results, multipactoring simulations (2D) and preliminary electromagnetic-thermal analysis using ANSYS code.

  15. Field and photo-emission in a short-pulse, high-charge Cesium telluride RF photoinjector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wisniewski, Eric E.

    A new high-charge RF gun is now operating at the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator (AWA) facility at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). The 1.5 cell 1.3 GHz gun uses a Cesium telluride photocathode driven with a 248 nm laser to provide short-pulse, high charge electron beams for the new 75 MeV drive beamline. The high-gradient RF gun (peak field on the cathode > 80MV/m) is a key piece of the facility upgrade. The large Cs2Te photocathode (diameter > 30 mm) was fabricated in-house. The photo-injector will be used to generate high-charge, short pulse, single bunches (Q > 100 nC) and bunch-trains (Q > 1000 nC) for wakefield experiments, typically involving dielectric-loaded accelerating structures. Details of the photocathode fabrication process and the results of associated diagnostic measurements are presented, including QE measurements and work function measurements performed with a Kelvin probe. Fieldemitted dark current from the Cs2Te cathode was measured during RF conditioning and characterized. Fowler-Nordheim plots of the data are presented and compared to similar measurements made using a copper cathode in the initial phase of conditioning. The results for cesium telluride exhibited non-linear regions within the Fowler-Nordheim plots similar to previous experimental results for other p-type semiconductors. Results of quantum efficiency (QE) studies are presented with the cathode operating in both single and bunch-train modes. QE uniformity and lifetime studies are presented. During commissioning, the cesium telluride photocathode produced bunch-charge of 100 nC, breaking the previous record. No evidence of bunch-train position-dependence of QE was found when generating four-bunch trains with total charge up to 200 nC.

  16. RF hollow cathode discharge with mini-slot at high gas pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Zengqi; Hoshimiya, Katsumi; Collins, George

    2002-10-01

    The hollow cathode discharge (HCD) has been widely used for spectra light sources, low-vacuum electron beam sources and gas lasers due to its ability provide a low voltage plasma discharge. Traditional HCD operates with a DC power supply to drive the discharge. The HCD, however, has a tendency to arc, which limits its maximum operating power without arc control provisions in the power supply. K. Schoenbachs group reported the most detailed progress to achieve pulsed micro hollow cathode discharge at Hundreds Torr of noble gases for VUV source. CSU has explored a rectangular shape HCD, which also demonstrates its stable operation at RF discharge mode. The rf HCD devices consist of a water-cold cathode with a proximity anode, controllable spacer, and rf matching elements. As with other HCD the cathode cooling mechanism is important to assure long device life time due to the high-density plasma achieved and associated heat build-up, especially at the narrow (100 micron) slot several centimeter length. Tailored dielectric coatings, with controlled thickness, on top of the metallic cathode surface play an important role in creating the characteristics of the discharge plasma. Alternatively, the cold cathode can be made from metal-ceramic composite for the additional capability of high secondary electron emission. Cathode slot size of 0.1 0.5 mm has been tested at slot length of 3 cm, and it operates at the gas pressure up to atmospheric pressure.

  17. Computational study of RF micro-hollow cathode discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berkane, A.; Rebiai, S.; Bouanaka, F.; Bahouh, H.

    2015-06-01

    Radiofrequency discharges can generate non-equilibrium and stable micro-plasmas without a streamer in micro-hollow cathode reactors. In this work, we present the results of a fluid model describing the mechanisms occurring in a micro-reactor in argon plasma, generated by an excitation of 13.56 MHz at high pressures (100 Torr) with and without a secondary emission of electrons. The results of the simulation improve the understanding of the effect of micro-hollow cathodes and of the influence of excited atoms in ionization and sustainment of argon discharge at low voltage (150 V). Simulation results showed that the maximum of penning ionization and stepwise ionization rates are respectively about 25% and 11% of the maximum of direct ionization rate. The metastable atom density reaches a maximum value of 1020/m3 inside the hole and have also two humps near to oppsite cathodes. Accordingly the excitation rate is significant in all the space.

  18. Simulations of Field-Emission Electron Beams from CNT Cathodes in RF Photoinjectors

    SciTech Connect

    Mihalcea, Daniel; Faillace, Luigi; Panuganti, Harsha; Thangaraj, Jayakar C.T.; Piot, Philippe

    2015-06-01

    Average field emission currents of up to 700 mA were produced by Carbon Nano Tube (CNT) cathodes in a 1.3 GHz RF gun at Fermilab High Brightness Electron Source Lab. (HBESL). The CNT cathodes were manufactured at Xintek and tested under DC conditions at RadiaBeam. The electron beam intensity as well as the other beam properties are directly related to the time-dependent electric field at the cathode and the geometry of the RF gun. This report focuses on simulations of the electron beam generated through field-emission and the results are compared with experimental measurements. These simulations were performed with the time-dependent Particle In Cell (PIC) code WARP.

  19. Final Technical Report- Back-gate Field Emission-based Cathode RF Electron Gun

    SciTech Connect

    McGuire, Gary; Martin, Allen; Noonan, John

    2010-10-30

    The objective was to complete the design of an electron gun which utilizes a radio frequency (RF) power source to apply a voltage to a field emission (FE) cathode, a so called cold cathode, in order to produce an electron beam. The concept of the RF electron gun was originally conceived at Argonne National Laboratory but never reduced to practice. The research allowed the completion of the design based upon the integration of the FE electron source. Compared to other electron guns, the RF gun is very compact, less than one third the size of other comparable guns, and produces a high energy (to several MeV), high quality, high power electron beam with a long focal length with high repetition rates. The resultant electron gun may be used in welding, materials processing, analytical equipment and waste treatment.

  20. Preliminary calculations of ballistic bunch compression with thermionic cathode rf guns

    SciTech Connect

    Lewellen, J.W.; Milton, S.

    1997-09-01

    Preliminary calculations using the computer code PARMELA indicate that it is possible to achieve peak currents on the order of 1 kA using a thermionic-cathode rf gun and ballistic bunch compression. In contrast to traditional magnetic bunching schemes, ballistic bunch compression uses a series of rf cavities to modify the energy profile of the beam and properly chosen drifts to allow the bunching to occur naturally. The method, suitably modified, should also be directly applicable to photoinjector rf guns. Present work is focusing on simultaneously compressing the bunch while reducing the emittance of the electron beam. At present, the calculated normalized rms emittance is in the neighborhood of 6.8 {pi} mm mrad with a peak current of 0.88 kA, and a peak bunch charge of 0.28 nC from a thermionic-cathode gun.

  1. Femtosecond timing-jitter between photo-cathode laser and ultra-short electron bunches by means of hybrid compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pompili, R.; Anania, M. P.; Bellaveglia, M.; Biagioni, A.; Castorina, G.; Chiadroni, E.; Cianchi, A.; Croia, M.; Di Giovenale, D.; Ferrario, M.; Filippi, F.; Gallo, A.; Gatti, G.; Giorgianni, F.; Giribono, A.; Li, W.; Lupi, S.; Mostacci, A.; Petrarca, M.; Piersanti, L.; Di Pirro, G.; Romeo, S.; Scifo, J.; Shpakov, V.; Vaccarezza, C.; Villa, F.

    2016-08-01

    The generation of ultra-short electron bunches with ultra-low timing-jitter relative to the photo-cathode (PC) laser has been experimentally proved for the first time at the SPARC_LAB test-facility (INFN-LNF, Frascati) exploiting a two-stage hybrid compression scheme. The first stage employs RF-based compression (velocity-bunching), which shortens the bunch and imprints an energy chirp on it. The second stage is performed in a non-isochronous dogleg line, where the compression is completed resulting in a final bunch duration below 90 fs (rms). At the same time, the beam arrival timing-jitter with respect to the PC laser has been measured to be lower than 20 fs (rms). The reported results have been validated with numerical simulations.

  2. Reduction in plasma potential by applying negative DC cathode bias in RF magnetron sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isomura, Masao; Yamada, Toshinori; Osuga, Kosuke; Shindo, Haruo

    2016-11-01

    We applied a negative DC bias voltage to the cathode of an RF magnetron sputtering system and successfully reduced the plasma potential in both argon plasma and hydrogen-diluted argon plasma. The crystallinity of the deposited Ge films is improved by increasing the negative DC bias voltage. It is indicated that the reduction in plasma potential is effective for reducing the plasma damage on deposited materials, caused by the electric potential between the plasma and substrates. In addition, the deposition rate is increased by the increased electric potential between the plasma and the cathode owing to the negative DC bias voltage. The present method successfully gives us higher speed and lower damage sputtering deposition. The increased electric potential between the plasma and the cathode suppresses the evacuation of electrons from the plasma and also enhances the generation of secondary electrons on the cathode. These probably suppress the electron loss from the plasma and result in the reduction in plasma potential.

  3. InGaN: characterization and first photo-cathode results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulmer, M. P.; Han, B.; Wessels, Bruce W.; Siegmund, O. H. W.; Tremsin, A. S.

    2005-08-01

    We have made InGaN:Mg epitaxial layers and report for the first time the QE versus wavelength for a photo-cathode. The motivation for InGaN is to lower the band gap just enough to enable detection of nitrogen fluorescence 337 nm, 357 nm and 391nm for both Earth observing and for energetic cosmic ray studies. Homogeneous InGaN alloys are difficult to prepare as the indium rich alloy tends to coalesce into quantum dots. The transmission, X-ray, and photo-luminescence measurements of the films indicated a significant concentration of Mg acceptors was incorporated into the film and as such could be converted into a viable photo-cathode upon cessiation. We present our photo-luminescence, X-ray, and near-field scanning microscope (NSOM) and QE measurements of films and compare these with measurements of GaN:Mg. The spectral properties of the photo-cathodes will also be presented.

  4. Establishing reliable good initial quantum efficiency and in-situ laser cleaning for the copper cathodes in the RF gun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, F.; Sheppard, J. C.; Vecchione, T.; Jongewaard, E.; Brachmann, A.; Corbett, J.; Gilevich, S.; Weathersby, S.

    2015-05-01

    Establishing good initial quantum efficiency (QE) and reliable in-situ cleaning for copper cathode in the RF gun is of critical importance for the RF gun operations. Recent studies on the SLAC RF gun test bed indicated that the pre-cleaning (plasma cleaning) in the test chamber followed by copper cathode exposure to air for cathode change leads to a very low initial QE in the RF gun, and also demonstrated that without the pre-cleaning good initial QE >4×10-5 can be routinely achieved in the RF gun with the cathodes of QE <1×10-7 measured in the test chamber. QE can decay over the time in the RF gun. The in-situ laser cleaning technique for copper cathodes in the RF gun is established and refined in comparison to previous cleaning at the linac coherent light source, resulting in an improved QE and emittance evolutions. The physics of the laser cleaning process is discussed. It is believed that the reflectivity change is one of the major factors for the QE boost with the laser cleaning.

  5. Development of far-infrared FEL with needle photo-RF-gun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, T.; Miyamoto, S.; Amano, S.; Mochizuki, T.

    2004-08-01

    Far-infrared free electron lasers (FELs) with central wavelengths of 11.6 and ˜70 μm were obtained by using an S-band RF linac (LEENA) at electron energies of 14.4 and ˜5.5 MeV, respectively. Small-signal gain and cavity loss were measured to be 8.2% and 3.3%, respectively, at a peak current of 4.4 A, an electron energy of 15 MeV, and a central wavelength of 10 μm. The pulsewidth of the FEL signal could be lengthened by tailoring the waveform of klystron drive voltage, since uniformity of electron energy in a macropulse was improved. A tungsten needle photo-RF gun was investigated using the field-dependence of QE for a third-harmonics Nd:YAG laser (wavelength of 355 nm). Numerical calculations of electron beam performances in a needle photo-RF-gun were made. A tungsten needle photocathode, with a tip radius of 10 μm, was introduced into the RF-gun cavity of LEENA.

  6. High Power Experiment of X-Band Thermionic Cathode RF Gun for Compton Scattering X-ray Source

    SciTech Connect

    Sakamoto, Fumito; Uesaka, Mitsuru; Dobashi, Katsuhiro; Yamamoto, Tomohiko; Meng, De; Urakawa, Junji; Higo, Toshiyasu; Akemoto, Mitsuo; Matsuo, Kenichi; Sakae, Hisaharu; Yamamoto, Masashi

    2006-11-27

    We are currently developing a compact monochromatic X-ray source based on laser-electron collision. To realize remarkably compact-, high-intensity- and highly-stable-system, we adopt an X-band multi-bunch liner accelerator (linac) and reliable Q-switch laser. The X-ray yields by the multi-bunch electron beam and Q-switch Nd: YAG laser of 1.4 J/10 ns (FWHM) (532 nm, second harmonic) is 107 photons/RF-pulse (108 photons/sec for 10 Hz operation). The injector of the system consists of a 3.5-cell X-band thermionic cathode RF gun and an alpha magnet. So far we have achieved beam generation from the X-band thermionic cathode RF gun. The peak beam energy is 2 MeV. This experimental high energy ({approx}2 MeV) beam generation from the X-band thermionic cathode RF gun is the first in the world. In this paper, we describe the system of the Compton scattering X-ray source based on the X-band linac, experimental results of X-band thermionic cathode RF gun and the details of the experimental setup for Compton scattering X-ray generation that are under construction.

  7. RF sputtered CuO thin films: Structural, optical and photo-catalytic behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Ghamdi, Attieh A.; Khedr, M. H.; Shahnawaze Ansari, M.; Hasan, P. M. Z.; Abdel-wahab, M. Sh.; Farghali, A. A.

    2016-07-01

    Nanocrystalline CuO thin films were deposited for 600, 1200 and 1800 s on glass substrate using RF magnetron sputtering technique. The films deposited at room temperature were crystalline and showed Tenorite phase of CuO. The increase in average particle size from 6.67 nm to 9.09 nm and the thickness from 160 nm to 490 nm was observed with the increase in deposition time. The optical band gap was decreased from 2.2 eV to 1.73 eV as the film thickness was increased. The intensity of PL peak showed its maximum for the film deposited for 600 s and minimum for 1800 s. Some unusual emission peaks were observed due to the quantization effect and lattice/surface defects. The CuO films with different thicknesses could be used as photo-catalysts for the degradation of Methylene blue (MB) from the wastewater. Under the exposure of 200 W energy of tungsten lamp, CuO thin films showed excellent photo-catalytic activities. CuO thin film of minimum thickness of around 160 nm responded as a best catalyst for MB degradation. The films were very stable and have a speciality to be recycled without much loss of their photo-catalytic activity. These characteristics have proved the high possibility of commercial applications of CuO thin films in environmental remediation.

  8. Observation and Measurement of Temperature Rise and Distribution on GaAs Photo-cathode Wafer with a 532nm Drive Laser and a Thermal Imaging Camera

    SciTech Connect

    Shukui Zhang, Stephen Benson, Carlos Hernandez-Garcia

    2011-03-01

    Significant temperature rise and gradient are observed from a GaAs photo-cathode wafer irradiated at various power levels with over 20W laser power at 532nm wavelength. The laser power absorption and dissipated thermal distribution are measured. The result shows a clear indication that proper removal of laser induced heat from the cathode needs to be considered seriously when designing a high average current or low quantum efficiency photo-cathode electron gun. The measurement method presented here provides a useful way to obtain information about both temperature and thermal profiles, it also applies to cathode heating study with other heating devices such as electrical heaters.

  9. Hydrothermal synthesis and photoelectrochemical performance enhancement of TiO2/graphene composite in photo-generated cathodic protection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Weiwei; Guo, Hanlin; Sun, Haiqing; Zeng, Rong-Chang

    2016-09-01

    TiO2/graphene composites were synthesized through one-step hydrothermal method. The composites show an enhancement in photo-generated cathodic protection as the time-dependent profiles of photocurrent responses has confirmed. XRD data show that a bicrystalline framework of anatase and brookite formed as graphene provided donor groups in the hydrothermal process. The transfer of photoinduced electrons in the biphasic TiO2 results in effective electron-hole separation. Moreover, graphene lead to a negative shift of the Fermi level as evidenced by Mott-Schottky analysis, which decreases the Schottky barrier formed in the TiO2 and 304 stainless steel interface and results in the enhancement of photo-generated cathodic protection.

  10. High Current Density, Long Life Cathodes for High Power RF Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Ives, Robert Lawrence; Collins, George; Falce, Lou; Schwartzkopf, Steve; Busbaher, Daniel

    2014-01-22

    This program was tasked with improving the quality and expanding applications for Controlled Porosity Reservoir (CPR) cathodes. Calabazas Creek Research, Inc. (CCR) initially developed CPR cathodes on a DOE-funded SBIR program to improve cathodes for magnetron injection guns. Subsequent funding was received from the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency. The program developed design requirements for implementation of the technology into high current density cathodes for high frequency applications. During Phase I of this program, CCR was awarded the prestigious 2011 R&D100 award for this technology. Subsequently, the technology was presented at numerous technical conferences. A patent was issued for the technology in 2009. These cathodes are now marketed by Semicon Associates, Inc. in Lexington, KY. They are the world’s largest producer of cathodes for vacuum electron devices. During this program, CCR teamed with Semicon Associates, Inc. and Ron Witherspoon, Inc. to improve the fabrication processes and expand applications for the cathodes. Specific fabrications issues included the quality of the wire winding that provides the basic structure and the sintering to bond the wires into a robust, cohesive structure. The program also developed improved techniques for integrating the resulting material into cathodes for electron guns.

  11. Facile electrochemical polymerization of polypyrrole film applied as cathode material in dual rotating disk photo fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Kan; Zhang, Hongbo; Tang, Tiantian; Tang, Yanping; Wang, Yalin; Jia, Jinping

    2016-08-01

    Polypyrrole (PPy) film is synthesized on Ti substrate through electrochemical polymerization method and is applied as cathode material in a TiO2 NTs-PPy dual rotating disk photo fuel cell (PFC). The optimized PPy electrochemical polymerization is carried out using linear sweep voltammetry from 0 V to 1.2 V (vs. SCE) with scan rate of 0.1 V s-1, 100 circles. Sixty milliliter real textile wastewater with the initial COD and conductivity of 408 ± 6 mgO2 L-1 and 20180 μS cm-1 is treated in this PFC under UV irradiation. About 0.46 V open-circuit voltage (VOC) and 1.8-2.2 mA short-circuit current (JSC) are obtained. Due to the effective electron-hole separation effect, the COD removal rate is as high as 0.0055 min-1. Stable current and COD removal can be obtained at different output voltage. Two influence factors including rotating speed and pH are investigated. Better electricity generation performance and COD removal activity are achieved at high rotating speed and in acidic condition. In comparison with platinized cathode, though VOC is lower, similar JSC is measured. Considering the high cost of Pt, PPy is a promising alternative cathode material in PFC that can also generate electricity efficiently and stably.

  12. Facile electrochemical polymerization of polypyrrole film applied as cathode material in dual rotating disk photo fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Kan; Zhang, Hongbo; Tang, Tiantian; Tang, Yanping; Wang, Yalin; Jia, Jinping

    2016-08-01

    Polypyrrole (PPy) film is synthesized on Ti substrate through electrochemical polymerization method and is applied as cathode material in a TiO2 NTs-PPy dual rotating disk photo fuel cell (PFC). The optimized PPy electrochemical polymerization is carried out using linear sweep voltammetry from 0 V to 1.2 V (vs. SCE) with scan rate of 0.1 V s-1, 100 circles. Sixty milliliter real textile wastewater with the initial COD and conductivity of 408 ± 6 mgO2 L-1 and 20180 μS cm-1 is treated in this PFC under UV irradiation. About 0.46 V open-circuit voltage (VOC) and 1.8-2.2 mA short-circuit current (JSC) are obtained. Due to the effective electron-hole separation effect, the COD removal rate is as high as 0.0055 min-1. Stable current and COD removal can be obtained at different output voltage. Two influence factors including rotating speed and pH are investigated. Better electricity generation performance and COD removal activity are achieved at high rotating speed and in acidic condition. In comparison with platinized cathode, though VOC is lower, similar JSC is measured. Considering the high cost of Pt, PPy is a promising alternative cathode material in PFC that can also generate electricity efficiently and stably.

  13. Characterisation of a rf micro hollow cathode discharge and its interactions with nearest neighbours

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dixon, Sam; Boswell, Rod; Charles, Christine; Holland, John; Cox, Wes

    2012-10-01

    A novel microplasma hollow cathode plasma source of 4 mm diameter and driven by 13.56 MHz is investigated using 3D sweeps of Langmuir probes in the downstream plasma expansion region. Initial results suggest that the plasma expansion is a simple diffusion from the exit orifice of the 30 mm long cylindrical source region. By making comprehensive measurements of the plasma plumes produced by two micro hollow cathode sources separated by differing distances, the mutual interaction between these components of the system have been determined with the aim of determining whether a much larger array of sources could be envisioned. The effectiveness of the plasma in dissociating reactive species was tested using SF6 and measuring etch patterns on unbiased silicon wafers. The results have been modeled and show that it is indeed possible to produce a uniform spread of active species over large areas.

  14. Particle-In-Cell/Monte Carlo Simulation of Ion Back BomBardment in a High Average Current RF Photo-Gun

    SciTech Connect

    Qiang, J.

    2009-10-17

    In this paper, we report on study of ion back bombardment in a high average current radio-frequency (RF) photo-gun using a particle-in-cell/Monte Carlo simulation method. Using this method, we systematically studied effects of gas pressure, RF frequency, RF initial phase, electric field profile, magnetic field, laser repetition rate, different ion species on ion particle line density distribution, kinetic energy spectrum, and ion power line density distribution back bombardment onto the photocathode. Those simulation results suggested that effects of ion back bombardment could increase linearly with the background gas pressure and laser repetition rate. The RF frequency has significantly affected the ion motion inside the gun so that the ion power deposition on the photocathode in an RF gun can be several orders of magnitude lower than that in a DC gun. The ion back bombardment can be minimized by appropriately choosing the electric field profile and the initial phase.

  15. Performance analysis of RF-sputtered ZnO/Si heterojunction UV photodetectors with high photo-responsivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Satyendra Kumar; Hazra, Purnima; Tripathi, Shweta; Chakrabarti, P.

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, structural, electrical and ultraviolet photodetection parameters of RF sputtered-ZnO/Si heterojunction diodes are analyzed. In this work, ZnO thin film was deposited on bare Si substrate as well as Si substrate coated with ultrathin ZnO seed layer to exhibit the effect of seed layer on device performance. AFM image of as-grown ZnO films have exhibited the uniform growth ZnO film over the whole Si substrate with average roughness of 3.2 nm and 2.83 nm for ZnO with and without seed layer respectively. Stronger peak intensity along (002) direction, as shown in XRD spectra confirm that ZnO film grown on ZnO seed layer is having more stable wurtzite structure. Ti/Al point contacts were deposited on top of the ZnO film and a layer of Al was deposited on bottom of Si substrate for using as ohmic contacts for further device characterization at dark and under UV light of 365 nm wavelength. This process is repeated for both the films sequentially. The photo-responsivity of our proposed devices is calculated as 0.34 A/W for seed layer-mediated devices and 0.26 A/W for devices without seed layer. These values are very high as compare to the reported value of photo-responsivity for same kind of ZnO/Si heterojunction device prototypes prepared by other techniques.

  16. Effect of Particle Contamination of Objective Lens in a DVD-ROM Drive on Laser Diode Power and Photo Diode RF Signal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Dae-Young; Pae, Yang-Il; Lee, Jaeho; Hwang, Jungho

    2005-05-01

    Air flow produced by disk rotation in an optical disk drive introduces air borne contaminant particles into the drive, which adhere to the objective lens and generates read/write errors. These particles are a serious problem for high-density storage devices and therefore, the effect of particle contamination in a digital versatile disk-read only memory (DVD-ROM) drive on laser diode power and photo diode RF signal was experimentally investigated. The laser power and amplitude of the photo diode RF were reduced, and the RF jitter was exponentially increased with increasing level of contamination of the lens. In addition, data could not be accessed when the contaminated surface area was greater than 20% of the lens surface area.

  17. RF Processing Experience with the GTF Prototype RF Gun

    SciTech Connect

    Schmerge, J.F.

    2010-11-24

    The SSRL Gun Test Facility (GTF) was built to develop a high brightness electron injector for the LCLS and has been operational since 1996. A total of five different metal cathodes (4 Cu and 1 Mg) have been installed on the GTF gun. The rf processing history with the different cathodes will be presented including peak field achieved at the cathode. The LCLS gun is intended to operate at 120 MV/m and fields up to 140 MV/m have been achieved in the GTF gun. After installing a new cathode the number of rf pulses required to reach 120 MV/m is approximately 5-10 million. Total emitted dark current and Fowler Nordheim plots are also shown over the life of the cathode. The GTF photo-injector gun is an S-band standing-wave structure, with two resonant cavities and an intervening thick washer (Figure 1). The flat, back wall of the first cavity is a copper plate that serves as photocathode when illuminated with ultraviolet light from a pulsed, high-power laser. RF power enters the gun through an iris on the outer wall of the second cavity, and is coupled to the first through the axial opening of the washer. The first cavity is often referred to as a half cell, because its full-cell length has been truncated by the cathode plate and the second cavity is called the full cell. The gun is designed to operate in a {pi} mode, with the peak field on axis in each cell approximately equal. The maximum in the half cell occurs at the cathode, and in the full cell near the center of the cavity. The field profile and tuning procedures are discussed in a separate tech note [1].

  18. Sensitive fast electron spectrometer in adjustable triode configuration with pulsed tunable laser for research on photo-induced field emission cathodes

    SciTech Connect

    Mingels, S. Porshyn, V.; Bornmann, B.; Lützenkirchen-Hecht, D.; Müller, G.

    2015-04-15

    We have completed an ultra-high vacuum system for sensitive fast electron spectroscopy from cold cathodes in triode configuration under high electric fields E (<100 MV/m) and pulsed tunable laser illumination (3.5 ns, 10 Hz, hν = 0.5-5.9 eV, and 0.3-17 mJ). The cathodes are prepared and inserted under clean room conditions and can be precisely 3D-positioned, cooled or heated (77-400 K). Commissioning results with the upgraded system are presented. Field emission measurements with a W tip yielded an energy resolution of 14 meV at 4 eV pass energy and a precise determination of the emitter work function, size, and temperature. Photoemission spectroscopy of short electron bunches from a virgin and laser-ablated S-GaP crystal and quantum efficiency measurements revealed surface states, energy relaxation, and band structure effects. In conclusion, this novel system is ready now for the development and characterization of photo-induced field emission cathodes.

  19. Degrading a mixture of three textile dyes using photo-assisted electrochemical process with BDD anode and O₂-diffusion cathode.

    PubMed

    Khataee, Alireza; Safarpour, Mahdie; Vahid, Behrouz; Akbarpour, Amaneh

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, degradation of a mixture of three azo dyes was studied by the photo-assisted electrochemical process using an O₂-diffusion cathode containing carbon nanotubes and boron-doped diamond (BDD) anode. The concentration of three textile dyes (C.I. Acid Orange 8 (AO8), C.I. Acid Orange 10 (AO10), and C.I. Acid Orange 12 (AO12)) was determined simultaneously despite the severe overlap of their spectra. For this purpose, partial least square (PLS), as a multivariate calibration method, was utilized based on recording UV-Vis spectra during the decolorization process. Moreover, the central composite design was used for the modeling of photo-assisted electrochemical decolorization of the aqueous solutions containing three dyes. The investigated parameters were the initial concentration of three dyes, applied current and reaction time. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) revealed that the obtained regression models match the experimental results well with R (Khataee et al. 2010, Clean-Soil Air Water 38 (1):96-103, 2010) of 0.972, 0.971, and 0.957 for AO8, AO10, and AO12, respectively. Three-dimensional surface and contour plots were applied to describe the relation between experimental conditions and the observed response. The results of TOC analysis confirmed good ability of proposed photo-assisted electrochemical process for degradation and mineralization of textile industry wastewater.

  20. Degrading a mixture of three textile dyes using photo-assisted electrochemical process with BDD anode and O₂-diffusion cathode.

    PubMed

    Khataee, Alireza; Safarpour, Mahdie; Vahid, Behrouz; Akbarpour, Amaneh

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, degradation of a mixture of three azo dyes was studied by the photo-assisted electrochemical process using an O₂-diffusion cathode containing carbon nanotubes and boron-doped diamond (BDD) anode. The concentration of three textile dyes (C.I. Acid Orange 8 (AO8), C.I. Acid Orange 10 (AO10), and C.I. Acid Orange 12 (AO12)) was determined simultaneously despite the severe overlap of their spectra. For this purpose, partial least square (PLS), as a multivariate calibration method, was utilized based on recording UV-Vis spectra during the decolorization process. Moreover, the central composite design was used for the modeling of photo-assisted electrochemical decolorization of the aqueous solutions containing three dyes. The investigated parameters were the initial concentration of three dyes, applied current and reaction time. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) revealed that the obtained regression models match the experimental results well with R (Khataee et al. 2010, Clean-Soil Air Water 38 (1):96-103, 2010) of 0.972, 0.971, and 0.957 for AO8, AO10, and AO12, respectively. Three-dimensional surface and contour plots were applied to describe the relation between experimental conditions and the observed response. The results of TOC analysis confirmed good ability of proposed photo-assisted electrochemical process for degradation and mineralization of textile industry wastewater. PMID:24723345

  1. Revealing the properties of the radical-pair magnetoreceptor using pulsed photo-excitation timed with pulsed rf.

    PubMed

    Mouloudakis, K; Kominis, I K

    2016-09-01

    The radical-pair mechanism is understood to underlie the magnetic navigation capability of birds and possibly other species. Experiments with birds have provided indirect and in cases conflicting evidence on the actual existence of this mechanism. We here propose a new experiment that can unambiguously identify the presence of the radical-pair magnetoreceptor in birds and unravel some of its basic properties. The proposed experiment is based on modulated light excitation with a pulsed laser, combined with delayed radio-frequency magnetic field pulses. We predict a resonance effect in the birds' magnetic orientation versus the rf-pulse delay time. The resonance's position reflects the singlet-triplet mixing time of the magnetoreceptor. PMID:27450635

  2. The Superconducting RF Photoinjector at ELBE--First Operational Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Teichert, J.; Arnold, A.; Buettig, H.; Janssen, D.; Justus, M.; Lehnert, U.; Michel, P.; Murcek, P.; Schamlott, A.; Schneider, C.; Schurig, R.; Staufenbiel, F.; Xiang, R.; Kamps, T.; Rudolph, J.; Schenk, M.; Klemz, G.; Will, I.

    2009-08-04

    An RF photoinjector with a superconducting cavity (SRF gun) for installation at the Radiation Source ELBE was developed within a collaboration of BESSY, DESY, FZD, and MBI. This new and promising injector type allows CW operation and has the potential for the production of high-brightness electron beams. The gun cryostat, the electron diagnostic beamline, and the driver laser with optical beamline were installed. In November 2007 the first beam was produced. Results of the beam parameter measurements with Cs{sub 2}Te photo cathodes are presented.

  3. RF Gun Optimization Study

    SciTech Connect

    A. S. Hofler; P. Evtushenko; M. Krasilnikov

    2007-08-01

    Injector gun design is an iterative process where the designer optimizes a few nonlinearly interdependent beam parameters to achieve the required beam quality for a particle accelerator. Few tools exist to automate the optimization process and thoroughly explore the parameter space. The challenging beam requirements of new accelerator applications such as light sources and electron cooling devices drive the development of RF and SRF photo injectors. RF and SRF gun design is further complicated because the bunches are space charge dominated and require additional emittance compensation. A genetic algorithm has been successfully used to optimize DC photo injector designs for Cornell* and Jefferson Lab**, and we propose studying how the genetic algorithm techniques can be applied to the design of RF and SRF gun injectors. In this paper, we report on the initial phase of the study where we model and optimize gun designs that have been benchmarked with beam measurements and simulation.

  4. Porous NASICON-Type Li3Fe2(PO4)3 Thin Film Deposited by RF Sputtering as Cathode Material for Li-Ion Microbatteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugiawati, Vinsensia Ade; Vacandio, Florence; Eyraud, Marielle; Knauth, Philippe; Djenizian, Thierry

    2016-08-01

    We report the electrochemical performance of porous NASICON-type Li3Fe2(PO4)3 thin films to be used as a cathode for Li-ion microbatteries. Crystalline porous NASICON-type Li3Fe2(PO4)3 layers were obtained by radio frequency sputtering with an annealing treatment. The thin films were characterized by XRD, SEM, and electrochemical techniques. The chronoamperometry experiments showed that a discharge capacity of 88 mAhg-1 (23 μAhcm-2) is attained for the first cycle at C/10 to reach 65 mAhg-1 (17 μAhcm-2) after 10 cycles with a good stability over 40 cycles.

  5. Porous NASICON-Type Li3Fe2(PO4)3 Thin Film Deposited by RF Sputtering as Cathode Material for Li-Ion Microbatteries.

    PubMed

    Sugiawati, Vinsensia Ade; Vacandio, Florence; Eyraud, Marielle; Knauth, Philippe; Djenizian, Thierry

    2016-12-01

    We report the electrochemical performance of porous NASICON-type Li3Fe2(PO4)3 thin films to be used as a cathode for Li-ion microbatteries. Crystalline porous NASICON-type Li3Fe2(PO4)3 layers were obtained by radio frequency sputtering with an annealing treatment. The thin films were characterized by XRD, SEM, and electrochemical techniques. The chronoamperometry experiments showed that a discharge capacity of 88 mAhg(-1) (23 μAhcm(-2)) is attained for the first cycle at C/10 to reach 65 mAhg(-1) (17 μAhcm(-2)) after 10 cycles with a good stability over 40 cycles. PMID:27535695

  6. Porous NASICON-Type Li3Fe2(PO4)3 Thin Film Deposited by RF Sputtering as Cathode Material for Li-Ion Microbatteries.

    PubMed

    Sugiawati, Vinsensia Ade; Vacandio, Florence; Eyraud, Marielle; Knauth, Philippe; Djenizian, Thierry

    2016-12-01

    We report the electrochemical performance of porous NASICON-type Li3Fe2(PO4)3 thin films to be used as a cathode for Li-ion microbatteries. Crystalline porous NASICON-type Li3Fe2(PO4)3 layers were obtained by radio frequency sputtering with an annealing treatment. The thin films were characterized by XRD, SEM, and electrochemical techniques. The chronoamperometry experiments showed that a discharge capacity of 88 mAhg(-1) (23 μAhcm(-2)) is attained for the first cycle at C/10 to reach 65 mAhg(-1) (17 μAhcm(-2)) after 10 cycles with a good stability over 40 cycles.

  7. Electron Source based on Superconducting RF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xin, Tianmu

    High-bunch-charge photoemission electron-sources operating in a Continuous Wave (CW) mode can provide high peak current as well as the high average current which are required for many advanced applications of accelerators facilities, for example, electron coolers for hadron beams, electron-ion colliders, and Free-Electron Lasers (FELs). Superconducting Radio Frequency (SRF) has many advantages over other electron-injector technologies, especially when it is working in CW mode as it offers higher repetition rate. An 112 MHz SRF electron photo-injector (gun) was developed at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) to produce high-brightness and high-bunch-charge bunches for electron cooling experiments. The gun utilizes a Quarter-Wave Resonator (QWR) geometry for a compact structure and improved electron beam dynamics. The detailed RF design of the cavity, fundamental coupler and cathode stalk are presented in this work. A GPU accelerated code was written to improve the speed of simulation of multipacting, an important hurdle the SRF structure has to overcome in various locations. The injector utilizes high Quantum Efficiency (QE) multi-alkali photocathodes (K2CsSb) for generating electrons. The cathode fabrication system and procedure are also included in the thesis. Beam dynamic simulation of the injector was done with the code ASTRA. To find the optimized parameters of the cavities and beam optics, the author wrote a genetic algorithm Python script to search for the best solution in this high-dimensional parameter space. The gun was successfully commissioned and produced world record bunch charge and average current in an SRF photo-injector.

  8. The hollow cathode effect in a radio-frequency driven microhollow cathode discharge in nitrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lianzhu; Zhao, Guoming; Wang, Jing; Han, Qing

    2016-02-01

    A two-dimensional particle-in-cell Monte-Carlo code has been developed to study the physical mechanism of the hollow cathode effect (HCE) in an rf microhollow cathode discharge (rf-MHCD). Under the simulated conditions, the HCE in the rf-MHCD is the result of sheath-superposition, and both α ionization and γ ionization play a role. However, α ionization mode is predominant. Electrons undergo a pendular motion during the negative portion of the rf cycle. When the rf hollow electrode has a positive voltage, the majority of the electrons move toward the rf electrode, and the mean electron energy near the rf electrode is higher than that in a dc hollow cathode discharge, resulting in a large number of energetic electrons bombarding the hollow cathode wall, an important characteristic of the rf-MHCD. When the hollow cathode aperture is sufficiently small, many electrons strike the hollow electrode and are removed from the discharge space, so that the plasma density decreases. The average energy of the ions in the quasi-neutral plasma region near the axis is greater than the thermal energy in a molecular gas. Therefore, high density, high energy, and high chemical activity are characteristic advantages of rf-MHCD plasma sources.

  9. RF Gun Optimization Study

    SciTech Connect

    Alicia Hofler; Pavel Evtushenko

    2007-07-03

    Injector gun design is an iterative process where the designer optimizes a few nonlinearly interdependent beam parameters to achieve the required beam quality for a particle accelerator. Few tools exist to automate the optimization process and thoroughly explore the parameter space. The challenging beam requirements of new accelerator applications such as light sources and electron cooling devices drive the development of RF and SRF photo injectors. A genetic algorithm (GA) has been successfully used to optimize DC photo injector designs at Cornell University [1] and Jefferson Lab [2]. We propose to apply GA techniques to the design of RF and SRF gun injectors. In this paper, we report on the initial phase of the study where we model and optimize a system that has been benchmarked with beam measurements and simulation.

  10. THE PENETRABILITY OF A THIN METALLIC FILM INSIDE THE RF FIELD.

    SciTech Connect

    ZHAO, Y.; BEN-ZVI, I.; CHANG, X.; RAO, T.; CHEN, W.; DINARDO, R.; BEUTENMULLER, R.

    2005-05-16

    Thin metallic film was widely applied in various areas. Especially, recently we are planning to apply it in a ''Secondary emission enhanced photo-injector'', in which a diamond cathode is coated with a metallic film on its back to serve as a current path. The thickness of the film is originally considered to be in the order of 10 nm, which is much less than the skin depth, by a factor of almost 200. One would think intuitively that the RF filed would penetrate such a thin film. However, we found it is not true. The film will block most of the field. This paper addresses theoretical analysis as well as the experimental results, and demonstrates that the penetrability of a thin film is very poor. Consequently, most of the RF current will flow on the thin film causing a serious heating problem.

  11. Asbestos Photos

    MedlinePlus

    ... Denver, Colorado) Tremolite Asbestos. Close Up of Vermiculite Insulation in an Attic (Photo courtesy of EPA) Different ... Vermiculite (Photo courtesy of EPA) Attic Containing Vermiculite Insulation (Photo courtesy of EPA) Top of Page Text ...

  12. Ion bombardment in RF photoguns

    SciTech Connect

    Pozdeyev,E.; Kayran, D.; Litvinenko, V. N.

    2009-05-04

    A linac-ring eRHIC design requires a high-intensity CW source of polarized electrons. An SRF gun is viable option that can deliver the required beam. Numerical simulations presented elsewhere have shown that ion bombardment can occur in an RF gun, possibly limiting lifetime of a NEA GaAs cathode. In this paper, we analytically solve the equations of motion of ions in an RF gun using the ponderomotive potential of the Rf field. We apply the method to the BNL 1/2-cell SRF photogun and demonstrate that a significant portion of ions produced in the gun can reach the cathode if no special precautions are taken. Also, the paper discusses possible mitigation techniques that can reduce the rate of ion bombardment.

  13. Photothermal cathode measurements at the Advanced Photon Source.

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Y.-E.; Lewellen, J. W.; Feldman, D. W.; Univ. of Maryland

    2006-01-01

    The Advanced Photon Source (APS) ballistic bunch compression (BBC) gun in the Injector Test Stand (ITS) presently uses an M-type thermionic dispenser cathode as a photocathode. This photothermal cathode offers substantial advantages over conventional metal photocathodes, including easy replacement and easy cleaning via the cathode's built-in heater. We present the results of photoemission measurements as a function of cathode heater power, laser pulse energy, and applied rf field strength.

  14. Hib Photos

    MedlinePlus

    ... fluid culture positive for Haemophilus influenzae , type b (Gram stain) www.vaccineinformation.org/photos/hib_aap001.jpg ... Pediatrics Inferior view of a brain infected with gram-negative Haemophilus influenzae bacteria www.vaccineinformation.org/photos/ ...

  15. Study of electron current extraction from a radio frequency plasma cathode designed as a neutralizer for ion source applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jahanbakhsh, Sina; Satir, Mert; Celik, Murat

    2016-02-01

    Plasma cathodes are insert free devices that are developed to be employed as electron sources in electric propulsion and ion source applications as practical alternatives to more commonly used hollow cathodes. Inductively coupled plasma cathodes, or Radio Frequency (RF) plasma cathodes, are introduced in recent years. Because of its compact geometry, and simple and efficient plasma generation, RF plasma source is considered to be suitable for plasma cathode applications. In this study, numerous RF plasma cathodes have been designed and manufactured. Experimental measurements have been conducted to study the effects of geometric and operational parameters. Experimental results of this study show that the plasma generation and electron extraction characteristics of the RF plasma cathode device strongly depend on the geometric parameters such as chamber diameter, chamber length, orifice diameter, orifice length, as well as the operational parameters such as RF power and gas mass flow rate.

  16. The design for the LCLS RF photoinjector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alley, R.; Bharadwaj, V.; Clendenin, J.; Emma, P.; Fisher, A.; Frisch, J.; Kotseroglou, T.; Miller, R. H.; Palmer, D. T.; Schmerge, J.; Sheppard, J. C.; Woodley, M.; Yeremian, A. D.; Rosenzweig, J.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Serafini, L.

    1999-06-01

    We report on the design of the RF photoinjector of the Linac Coherent Light Source. The RF photoinjector is required to produce a single 150 MeV bunch of ˜1 nC and ˜100 A peak current at a repetition rate of 120 Hz with a normalized rms transverse emittance of ˜1 π mm-mrad. The design employs a 1.6-cell S-band RF gun with an optical spot size at the cathode of a radius of ˜1 mm and a pulse duration with an rms sigma of ˜3 ps. The peak RF field at the cathode is 150 MV/m with extraction 57° ahead of the RF peak. A solenoidal field near the cathode allows the compensation of the initial emittance growth by the end of the injection linac. Spatial and temporal shaping of the laser pulse striking the cathode will reduce the compensated emittance even further. Also, to minimize the contribution of the thermal emittance from the cathode surface, while at the same time optimizing the quantum efficiency, the laser wavelength for a Cu cathode should be tunable around 260 nm. Following the injection linac the geometric emittance simply damps linearly with energy growth. PARMELA simulations show that this design will produce the desired normalized emittance, which is about a factor of two lower than has been achieved to date in other systems. In addition to low emittance, we also aim for laser amplitude stability of 1% in the UV and a timing jitter in the electron beam of 0.5 ps rms, which will lead to less than 10% beam intensity fluctuation after the electron bunch is compressed in the main linac.

  17. Cathodic arcs

    SciTech Connect

    Anders, Andre

    2003-10-29

    Cathodic arc plasma deposition has become the technology of choice for hard, wear and corrosion resistant coatings for a variety of applications. The history, basic physics of cathodic arc operation, the infamous macroparticle problem and common filter solutions, and emerging high-tech applications are briefly reviewed. Cathodic arc plasmas standout due to their high degree of ionization, with important consequences for film nucleation, growth, and efficient utilization of substrate bias. Industrial processes often use cathodic arc plasma in reactive mode. In contrast, the science of arcs has focused on the case of vacuum arcs. Future research directions include closing the knowledge gap for reactive mode, large area coating, linear sources and filters, metal plasma immersion process, with application in high-tech and biomedical fields.

  18. X-Band RF Gun Development

    SciTech Connect

    Vlieks, Arnold; Dolgashev, Valery; Tantawi, Sami; Anderson, Scott; Hartemann, Fred; Marsh, Roark; /LLNL, Livermore

    2012-06-22

    In support of the MEGa-ray program at LLNL and the High Gradient research program at SLAC, a new X-band multi-cell RF gun is being developed. This gun, similar to earlier guns developed at SLAC for Compton X-ray source program, will be a standing wave structure made of 5.5 cells operating in the pi mode with copper cathode. This gun was designed following criteria used to build SLAC X-band high gradient accelerating structures. It is anticipated that this gun will operate with surface electric fields on the cathode of 200 MeV/m with low breakdown rate. RF will be coupled into the structure through a final cell with symmetric duel feeds and with a shape optimized to minimize quadrupole field components. In addition, geometry changes to the original gun, operated with Compton X-ray source, will include a wider RF mode separation, reduced surface electric and magnetic fields.

  19. Monolithic cathodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, P. R.; Swanson, L. W.

    1985-11-01

    The purpose of this program was to evaluate LaB6 (210) and (310) oriented single crystal material for flat cathode applications and to deliver mounted LaB6 cathodes with (310) orientation for operation in RADC/Varian life test vehicles. To that end, the program was divided into four separate tasks, as shown in the report. This project was extended for 3 months past the initial program period so that unavoidable delays could be overcome and the project completed. The final report covers the entire period of the program, which terminated 29 March 1985.

  20. RF transformer

    DOEpatents

    Smith, James L.; Helenberg, Harold W.; Kilsdonk, Dennis J.

    1979-01-01

    There is provided an improved RF transformer having a single-turn secondary of cylindrical shape and a coiled encapsulated primary contained within the secondary. The coil is tapered so that the narrowest separation between the primary and the secondary is at one end of the coil. The encapsulated primary is removable from the secondary so that a variety of different capacity primaries can be utilized with one secondary.

  1. Progress on a cryogenically cooled RF gun polarized electron source

    SciTech Connect

    Fliller, R.P., III; Edwards, H.; /Fermilab

    2006-08-01

    RF guns have proven useful in multiple accelerator applications. An RF gun capable of producing polarized electrons is an attractive electron source for the ILC or an electron-ion collider. Producing such a gun has proven elusive. The NEA GaAs photocathode needed for polarized electron production is damaged by the vacuum environment in an RF gun. Electron and ion back bombardment can also damage the cathode. These problems must be mitigated before producing an RF gun polarized electron source. In this paper we report continuing efforts to improve the vacuum environment in a normal conducting RF gun by cooling it with liquid nitrogen after a high temperature vacuum bake out. We also report on a design of a cathode preparation chamber to produce bulk GaAs photocathodes for testing in such a gun. Future directions are also discussed.

  2. Evaluation of thermal effects due to back-streaming electrons in the IAE RF gun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kii, Toshiteru; Masuda, Kai; Amazaki, Satoshi; Horii, Tomohiro; Toku, Hisayuki; Yoshikawa, Kiyoshi; Ohgaki, Hideaki; Yamazaki, Tetsuo

    2002-05-01

    Back-streaming electrons in thermionic RF guns give a serious thermal effect to a cathode. In this study, the back-streaming beam power onto a thermionic cathode of the IAE RF gun was evaluated quantitatively by using an infrared radiation thermometer. Time evolutions of cathode surface temperature during RF macro-pulse were also calculated by using a simple 1-dimensional heat conduction model and results of a 2-dimensional particle simulation for several methods expected to reduce back-bombardment effect.

  3. Secondary-electrons-induced cathode plasma in a relativistic magnetron

    SciTech Connect

    Queller, T.; Gleizer, J. Z.; Krasik, Ya. E.

    2012-11-19

    Results of time- and space-resolved spectroscopic studies of cathode plasma during a S-band relativistic magnetron operation and a magnetically insulated diode having an identical interelectrode gap are presented. It was shown that in the case of the magnetron operation, one obtains an earlier, more uniform plasma formation due to energetic electrons' interaction with the cathode surface and ionization of desorbed surface monolayers. No differences were detected in the cathode's plasma temperature between the magnetron and the magnetically insulated diode operation, and no anomalous fast cathode plasma expansion was observed in the magnetron at rf power up to 350 MW.

  4. Investigation of the Stability of the RF Gun of the SSRL Injector System

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, J

    2004-02-05

    In the previous three years, Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (SSRL) has experienced electron beam instabilities in the injector system of the Stanford Positron Electron Asymmetric Ring (SPEAR). Currently, for approximately the past four months the radio frequency (RF) gun of the linear accelerator injector system of the SPEAR at SSRL has become increasingly unstable. The current of the RF gun has become progressively sluggish and the lifetime of the cathode within the RF gun has been much shorter than expected. The cathode also sustains many unexplained damages. The instability of the RF gun affects the entire operation of SPEAR, creating substantial inconvenience. Through mechanical, design, and procedural analysis of the RF gun and the cathode that emits the electron beam of the linear accelerator, a solution to prolong the life of the cathode and secure the stability of the gun can be found. The thorough analysis of the gun and cathode involves investigation into the history of cathode installation and removal through the years of SPEAR operation as well as interviews with SSRL personnel involved with the upkeep of the gun and cathode. From speaking with SSRL employees and reviewing several articles many possible causes for beam instability were presented. The most likely cause of the SSRL gun instability is excessive back bombardment that can be attributed to running the cathode at too high a temperature.

  5. Fabrication, Tuning, Treatment and Testing of Two 3.5 Cell Photo-Injector Cavities for the ELBE Linac

    SciTech Connect

    Arnold, A.; Murcek, P.; Teichert, J.; Xiang, R.; Eremeev, G. V.; Kneisel, P.; Stirbet, M.; Turlington, L.

    2011-07-01

    As part of a CRADA (Cooperative Research and Development Agreement) between Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR) and Thomas Jefferson Lab National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF) we have fabricated and tested two 1.3 GHz 3.5 cell photo-injector cavities from polycrystalline RRR niobium and large grain RRR niobium, respectively. The cavity with the better performance will replace the presently used injector cavity in the ELBE linac. The cavities have been fabricated and pre-tuned at TJNAF, while the more sophisticated final field tuning, the adjustment of the external couplings and the field profile measurement of transverse electric modes for RF focusing was done at HZDR. The following standard surface treatment and the vertical test was carried out at TJNAF's production facilities. A major challenge turned out to be the rinsing of the cathode cell, which has small opening (O-slash10mm) to receive the cathode stalk. Another unexpected problem encountered after etching, since large visible defects appeared in the least accessible cathode cell. This contribution reports about our experiences, initial results and the on-going diagnostic work to understand and fix the problems.

  6. Photo, thermal and chemical degradation of riboflavin

    PubMed Central

    Kazi, Sadia Hafeez; Ahmed, Sofia; Anwar, Zubair; Ahmad, Iqbal

    2014-01-01

    Summary Riboflavin (RF), also known as vitamin B2, belongs to the class of water-soluble vitamins and is widely present in a variety of food products. It is sensitive to light and high temperature, and therefore, needs a consideration of these factors for its stability in food products and pharmaceutical preparations. A number of other factors have also been identified that affect the stability of RF. These factors include radiation source, its intensity and wavelength, pH, presence of oxygen, buffer concentration and ionic strength, solvent polarity and viscosity, and use of stabilizers and complexing agents. A detailed review of the literature in this field has been made and all those factors that affect the photo, thermal and chemical degradation of RF have been discussed. RF undergoes degradation through several mechanisms and an understanding of the mode of photo- and thermal degradation of RF may help in the stabilization of the vitamin. A general scheme for the photodegradation of RF is presented. PMID:25246959

  7. Cathode heating mechanisms in pseudospark plasma switches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sommerer, Timothy J.; Pak, Hoyoung; Kushner, Mark J.

    1992-10-01

    Pseudosparks, and the back-lighted thyratron (BLT) in particular, are finding increasing application as pulse power switches. An attractive feature of BLTs is that high current densities (≥ tens of kA cm-2) can be sustained from metal cathodes without auxiliary heating. The source of this current is believed to be electric-field-enhanced thermionic emission resulting from heating of the cathode by ion bombardment during commutation which ultimately melts the surface of the cathode. It is proposed that a photon-driven ionization mechanism in the interelectrode gap of the BLT is responsible for initiating the observed patterns of cathode surface melting and electron emission. A 21/2-dimensional computer model is presented that incorporates a photo-induced ionization mechanism to spread the plasma into the interelectrode gap. It predicts a melting of the cathode in a pattern similar to that which is experimentally observed, and predicts a rate of field-enhanced thermionic electron emission that is sufficient to explain the high BLT conduction current density. In the absence of these mechanisms, the model does not predict the observed large-area melting of the face of the cathode. The cathode heating rate during the BLT switching phase is maximum for operating parameters that are very close to the limit for which the switch will close (that is, the smallest possible pressure-electrode spacing product and smallest possible electrode holes).

  8. Numerical simulation of the sustaining discharge in radio frequency hollow cathode discharge in argon

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Xin-Xian; He, Feng Ouyang, Ji-Ting; Chen, Qiang Ge, Teng

    2014-03-15

    In this paper, a two-dimensional fluid model was developed to study the radio frequency (RF) hollow cathode discharge (HCD) in argon at 1 Torr. The evolutions of the particle density distribution and the ionization rate distribution in RF HCD at 13.56 MHz indicate that the discharge mainly occurs inside the hollow cathode. The spatio-temporal distributions of the ionization rate and the power deposition within the hollow cathode imply that sheath oscillation heating is the primary mechanism to sustain the RF HCD, whereas secondary electron emission plays a negligible role. However, as driving frequency decreases, secondary electron heating becomes a dominant mechanism to sustain the discharge in RF hollow cathode.

  9. A demonstration of ultra-high time resolution with a pulse-dilation photo-multiplier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hares, J. D.; Dymoke-Bradshaw, A. K. L.; Hilsabeck, T. J.; Kilkenny, J. D.; Morris, D.; Horsfield, C. J.; Gales, S. G.; Milnes, J.; Herrmann, H. W.; McFee, C.

    2016-05-01

    A novel microchannel plate (MCP) intensified high-speed photo-multiplier tube making use of pulse-dilation[1] has been tested. A ramped photo-cathode voltage followed by a relatively long drift region results in a transit time which is dependent on the photo-electron birth time. This leads to temporal magnification or dilation, so providing an enhancement in time resolution of the optical signal with respect to the electrical signal at the output anode. By this means a time resolution on the order of picoseconds may be realized with a substantially slower oscilloscope. The photo-electron signal is guided from a photo-cathode to an MCP by an axial magnetic field and a short input record length is stretched by a factor up to 40X to yield significantly improved time resolution at the photo-cathode. Results of the first measurements are presented.

  10. ILC @ SLAC R&D Program for a Polarized RF Gun

    SciTech Connect

    Clendenin, J.E.; Brachman, A.; Dowell, D.H.; Garwin, E.L.; Ioakemidi, K.; Kirby, R.E.; Maruyama, T.; Miller, R.A.; Prescott, C.Y.; Wang, J.W.; Lewellen, J.W.; Prepost, R.; /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2006-01-25

    Photocathode rf guns produce high-energy low-emittance electron beams. DC guns utilizing GaAs photocathodes have proven successful for generating polarized electron beams for accelerators, but they require rf bunching systems that significantly increase the transverse emittance of the beam. With higher extraction field and beam energy, rf guns can support higher current densities at the cathode. The source laser system can then be used to generate the high peak current, relatively low duty-factor micropulses required by the ILC without the need for post-extraction rf bunching. The net result is that the injection system for a polarized rf gun can be identical to that for an unpolarized rf gun. However, there is some uncertainty as to the survivability of an activated GaAs cathode in the environment of an operating rf gun. Consequently, before attempting to design a polarized rf gun for the ILC, SLAC plans to develop an rf test gun to demonstrate the rf operating conditions suitable for an activated GaAs cathode.

  11. Hollow cathode apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aston, G. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    A hollow cathode apparatus is described, which can be rapidly and reliably started. An ignitor positioned upstream from the hollow cathode, generates a puff of plasma that flows with the primary gas to be ionized through the cathode. The plasma puff creates a high voltage breakdown between the downstream end of the cathode and a keeper electrode, to heat the cathode to an electron-emitting temperature.

  12. Creating Photo Illustrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Bradley

    2003-01-01

    Explains the uses of photo illustrations. Notes that the key to developing a successful photo illustration is collaborative planning. Outlines the following guidelines for photo illustrations: never set up a photograph to mimic reality; create only abstractions with photo illustrations; clearly label photo illustrations; and never play photo…

  13. Characterization of an RF plasma ion source for ion implantation

    SciTech Connect

    Kopalidis, Peter M.; Wan Zhimin

    2012-11-06

    A novel inductively coupled RF plasma ion source has been developed for use in a beamline ion implanter. Ion density data have been taken with an array of four Langmuir probes spaced equally at the source extraction arc slit. These provide ion density uniformity information as a function of source pressure, RF power and gas mixture composition. In addition, total extracted ion beam current data are presented for the same conditions. The comparative advantages of the RF source in terms of higher beam current, reduced maintenance and overall productivity improvement compared to a hot cathode source are discussed.

  14. Nanotube cathodes.

    SciTech Connect

    Overmyer, Donald L.; Lockner, Thomas Ramsbeck; Siegal, Michael P.; Miller, Paul Albert

    2006-11-01

    Carbon nanotubes have shown promise for applications in many diverse areas of technology. In this report we describe our efforts to develop high-current cathodes from a variety of nanotubes deposited under a variety of conditions. Our goal was to develop a one-inch-diameter cathode capable of emitting 10 amperes of electron current for one second with an applied potential of 50 kV. This combination of current and pulse duration significantly exceeds previously reported nanotube-cathode performance. This project was planned for two years duration. In the first year, we tested the electron-emission characteristics of nanotube arrays fabricated under a variety of conditions. In the second year, we planned to select the best processing conditions, to fabricate larger cathode samples, and to test them on a high-power relativistic electron beam generator. In the first year, much effort was made to control nanotube arrays in terms of nanotube diameter and average spacing apart. When the project began, we believed that nanotubes approximately 10 nm in diameter would yield sufficient electron emission properties, based on the work of others in the field. Therefore, much of our focus was placed on measured field emission from such nanotubes grown on a variety of metallized surfaces and with varying average spacing between individual nanotubes. We easily reproduced the field emission properties typically measured by others from multi-wall carbon nanotube arrays. Interestingly, we did this without having the helpful vertical alignment to enhance emission; our nanotubes were randomly oriented. The good emission was most likely possible due to the improved crystallinity, and therefore, electrical conductivity, of our nanotubes compared to those in the literature. However, toward the end of the project, we learned that while these 10-nm-diameter CNTs had superior crystalline structure to the work of others studying field emission from multi-wall CNT arrays, these nanotubes still

  15. Recycler barrier RF buckets

    SciTech Connect

    Bhat, C.M.; /Fermilab

    2011-03-01

    The Recycler Ring at Fermilab uses a barrier rf systems for all of its rf manipulations. In this paper, I will give an overview of historical perspective on barrier rf system, the longitudinal beam dynamics issues, aspects of rf linearization to produce long flat bunches and methods used for emittance measurements of the beam in the RR barrier rf buckets. Current rf manipulation schemes used for antiproton beam stacking and longitudinal momentum mining of the RR beam for the Tevatron collider operation are explained along with their importance in spectacular success of the Tevatron luminosity performance.

  16. Recent Advances in Thermionic Cathodes

    SciTech Connect

    Ives, R. Lawrence; Miram, George; Collins, George; Falce, Louis R.

    2010-11-04

    The latest advances in thermionic cathodes, including scandate and controlled porosity reservoir cathodes, are reviewed. These new cathodes provide improved performance over conventional cathodes for many applications. Advantages and disadvantages are presented.

  17. High-Current Cold Cathode Employing Diamond and Related Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Hirshfield, Jay L.

    2014-10-22

    The essence of this project was for diamond films to be deposited on cold cathodes to improve their emission properties. Films with varying morphology, composition, and size of the crystals were deposited and the emission properties of the cathodes that utilize such films were studied. The prototype cathodes fabricated by the methods developed during Phase I were tested and evaluated in an actual high-power RF device during Phase II. These high-power tests used the novel active RF pulse compression system and the X-band magnicon test facility at US Naval Research Laboratory. In earlier tests, plasma switches were employed, while tests under this project utilized electron-beam switching. The intense electron beams required in the switches were supplied from cold cathodes embodying diamond films with varying morphology, including uncoated molybdenum cathodes in the preliminary tests. Tests with uncoated molybdenum cathodes produced compressed X-band RF pulses with a peak power of 91 MW, and a maximum power gain of 16.5:1. Tests were also carried out with switches employing diamond coated cathodes. The pulse compressor was based on use of switches employing electron beam triggering to effect mode conversion. In experimental tests, the compressor produced 165 MW in a ~ 20 ns pulse at ~18× power gain and ~ 140 MW at ~ 16× power gain in a 16 ns pulse with a ~ 7 ns flat-top. In these tests, molybdenum blade cathodes with thin diamond coatings demonstrated good reproducible emission uniformity with a 100 kV, 100 ns high voltage pulse. The new compressor does not have the limitations of earlier types of active pulse compressors and can operate at significantly higher electric fields without breakdown.

  18. Pulsed mode cathode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myers, Roger M. (Inventor); Rawlin, Vinvent K. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A cathode in an MPD thruster has an internal heater and utilizes low work function material. The cathode is preheated to operating temperature, and then the thruster is fired by discharging a capacitor bank in a pulse forming network.

  19. Sintered wire cathode

    DOEpatents

    Falce, Louis R.; Ives, R. Lawrence

    2009-06-09

    A porous cathode structure is fabricated from a plurality of wires which are placed in proximity to each other in elevated temperature and pressure for a sintering time. The sintering process produces the porous cathode structure which may be divided into a plurality of individual porous cathodes, one of which may be placed into a dispenser cathode support which includes a cavity for containing a work function reduction material such as BaO, CaO, and Al.sub.2O.sub.3. The work function reduction material migrates through the pores of the porous cathode from a work replenishment surface adjacent to the cavity of the dispenser cathode support to an emitting cathode surface, thereby providing a dispenser cathode which has a uniform work function and therefore a uniform electron emission.

  20. Cathodic protection -- Rectifier 47

    SciTech Connect

    Lane, W.M.

    1995-06-14

    This Acceptance Test Procedure (ATP) has been prepared to demonstrate that the cathodic protection system functions as required by project criteria. The cathodic protection system is for the tank farms at the Hanford Reservation. The tank farms store radioactive waste.

  1. Cathodic protection -- Rectifier 46

    SciTech Connect

    Lane, W.M.

    1995-06-14

    This Acceptance Test Procedure (ATP) has been prepared to demonstrate that the cathodic protection system functions as required by project criteria. The cathodic protection system is for the tank farms on the Hanford Reservation. The tank farms store radioactive waste.

  2. Micro hollow cathode discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Schoenbach, K.H.; Peterkin, F.E.; Verhappen, R.

    1995-12-31

    Hollow cathode discharges are glow discharges with the cathode fall and negative glow confined in a cavity in the cathode. For the discharge to develop, the cathode hole dimensions must be on the order of the mean free path. By reducing the cathode hole dimensions it is therefore possible to increase the pressure. Stable hollow cathode discharges in air have been observed at almost one atmosphere when the cathode diameter was reduced to 20 micrometers. In order to study the electrical parameters of a micro hollow cathode discharge, a set of experiments has been performed in argon at pressures in the torr range and a cathode hole diameter of 0.7 mm in molybdenum. The current-voltage characteristics and the appearance of the discharge plasma showed two distinct regions. At lower voltage or pressure the current varies linearly with voltage and the hollow cathode plasma is concentrated around the axis of the cathode hole (low glow mode). At higher values of voltage or pressure the current increases nonlinearly, up to a point where a transition into a low voltage hollow cathode arc was observed, and the plasma column expands and fills almost the entire cathode hole (high glow mode). Spectral measurements showed that the transition from the low glow mode into the high glow mode is related to an increased density of electrode vapor in the hollow cathode discharge. Up to the breakdown into a hollow cathode arc, the current voltage characteristic of the discharge has a positive slope. In this range, hollow cathode discharges can be operated in parallel without a ballast resistor.

  3. Photo-degradation behaviour of roseoflavin in some aqueous solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyagi, A.; Penzkofer, A.; Mathes, T.; Hegemann, P.

    2010-03-01

    An absorption and emission spectroscopic characterization of roseoflavin (8-dimethylamino-8-demethyl-riboflavin, RoF) in aqueous solutions was carried out. The studies were concentrated on roseoflavin in pH 8 phosphate buffer. Absorption cross-section spectra, fluorescence excitation spectra, fluorescence quantum distributions, fluorescence quantum yields and fluorescence lifetimes were determined. The fluorescence of RoF is quenched by photo-induced intra-molecular charge-transfer at room temperature. The photo-degradation of RoF in un-buffered water, in Tris-HCl buffer, and in phosphate buffer was studied. Phosphate buffer and to a smaller extent Tris buffer catalyse the RoF photo-degradation. Photo-excitation of the primary photoproduct, 8-methylamino-riboflavin (8-MNH-RF), enhanced the RoF degradation by triplet 8-MNH-RF - singlet RoF excitation transfer with subsequent triplet-state RoF degradation.

  4. Pressed boride cathodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolski, W.

    1985-01-01

    Results of experimental studies of emission cathodes made from lanthanum, yttrium, and gadolinium hexaborides are presented. Maximum thermal emission was obtained from lanthanum hexaboride electrodes. The hexaboride cathodes operated stably under conditions of large current density power draw, at high voltages and poor vacuum. A microtron electron gun with a lanthanum hexaboride cathode is described.

  5. Back bombardment for dispenser and lanthanum hexaboride cathodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakr, Mahmoud; Kinjo, R.; Choi, Y. W.; Omer, M.; Yoshida, K.; Ueda, S.; Takasaki, M.; Ishida, K.; Kimura, N.; Sonobe, T.; Kii, T.; Masuda, K.; Ohgaki, H.; Zen, H.

    2011-06-01

    The back bombardment (BB) effect limits wide usage of thermionic rf guns. The BB effect induces not only ramping-up of a cathode’s temperature and beam current, but also degradation of cavity voltage and beam energy during a macropulse. This paper presents a comparison of the BB effect for the case of dispenser tungsten-base (DC) and lanthanum hexaboride (LaB6) thermionic rf gun cathodes. For each, particle simulation codes are used to simulate the BB effect and electron beam dynamics in a thermionic rf gun cathode. A semiempirical equation is also used to investigate the stopping range and deposited heat power of BB electrons in the cathode material. A numerical simulation method is used to calculate the change of the cathode temperature and current density during a single macropulse. This is done by solving two differential equations for the rf gun cavity equivalent circuit and one-dimensional thermal diffusion equation. High electron emission and small beam size are required for generation of a high-brightness electron beam, and so in this work the emission properties of the cathode are taken into account. Simulations of the BB effect show that, for a pulse of 6μs duration, the DC cathode experiences a large change in the temperature compared with LaB6, and a change in current density 6 times higher. Validation of the simulation results is performed using experimental data for beam current beyond the gun exit. The experimental data is well reproduced using the simulation method.

  6. Analysis of photo-pattern sensitivity in patients with Pokemon-related symptoms.

    PubMed

    Funatsuka, Makoto; Fujita, Michinari; Shirakawa, Seigo; Oguni, Hirokazu; Osawa, Makiko

    2003-01-01

    This study was designed to analyze photo-pattern sensitivity in patients who developed acute neurologic symptoms associated with watching an animated television program, "Pokemon." The 18 patients (13 females and five males) underwent electroencephalograms and photo-pattern stimulation testing, including special stimulation test batteries (strobe-pattern test and cathode ray tube-pattern test). Photo-pattern sensitivity was confirmed in 16 patients with and without seizure episodes. The strobe-pattern test including a white flickering light test (with eyes open, closed, and open or closed), and the cathode ray tube-pattern test each induced a photo-paroxysmal response in more than 80% of patients. However, with the eyes closed only, as is common in Japan, the photo-paroxysmal response induction rate with a white flickering light stimulus was significantly lower (43%). In the cathode ray tube-pattern test, higher spatial frequencies produced higher rates of photo-paroxysmal response induction. It was demonstrated that underlying photo-pattern sensitivity is more accurately investigated by our method than by standard intermittent photic stimulation alone. By characterizing underlying photo-pattern sensitivity and identifying predisposing factors more precisely, we can develop better guidelines for prevention of a second "Pokemon" incident. According to the results of the present cathode ray tube-pattern test, pattern sensitivity (especially spatial resolution) appears to also be involved in Pokemon-related symptoms, in addition to chromatic sensitivity. PMID:12657417

  7. Analysis of photo-pattern sensitivity in patients with Pokemon-related symptoms.

    PubMed

    Funatsuka, Makoto; Fujita, Michinari; Shirakawa, Seigo; Oguni, Hirokazu; Osawa, Makiko

    2003-01-01

    This study was designed to analyze photo-pattern sensitivity in patients who developed acute neurologic symptoms associated with watching an animated television program, "Pokemon." The 18 patients (13 females and five males) underwent electroencephalograms and photo-pattern stimulation testing, including special stimulation test batteries (strobe-pattern test and cathode ray tube-pattern test). Photo-pattern sensitivity was confirmed in 16 patients with and without seizure episodes. The strobe-pattern test including a white flickering light test (with eyes open, closed, and open or closed), and the cathode ray tube-pattern test each induced a photo-paroxysmal response in more than 80% of patients. However, with the eyes closed only, as is common in Japan, the photo-paroxysmal response induction rate with a white flickering light stimulus was significantly lower (43%). In the cathode ray tube-pattern test, higher spatial frequencies produced higher rates of photo-paroxysmal response induction. It was demonstrated that underlying photo-pattern sensitivity is more accurately investigated by our method than by standard intermittent photic stimulation alone. By characterizing underlying photo-pattern sensitivity and identifying predisposing factors more precisely, we can develop better guidelines for prevention of a second "Pokemon" incident. According to the results of the present cathode ray tube-pattern test, pattern sensitivity (especially spatial resolution) appears to also be involved in Pokemon-related symptoms, in addition to chromatic sensitivity.

  8. Rf feedback free electron laser

    DOEpatents

    Brau, C.A.; Swenson, D.A.; Boyd, T.J. Jr.

    1979-11-02

    A free electron laser system and electron beam system for a free electron laser are provided which use rf feedback to enhance efficiency. Rf energy is extracted from an electron beam by decelerating cavities and returned to accelerating cavities using rf returns such as rf waveguides, rf feedthroughs, etc. This rf energy is added to rf klystron energy to lower the required input energy and thereby enhance energy efficiency of the system.

  9. Rf Feedback free electron laser

    DOEpatents

    Brau, Charles A.; Swenson, Donald A.; Boyd, Jr., Thomas J.

    1981-01-01

    A free electron laser system and electron beam system for a free electron laser which use rf feedback to enhance efficiency. Rf energy is extracted from an electron beam by decelerating cavities and returned to accelerating cavities using rf returns such as rf waveguides, rf feedthroughs, etc. This rf energy is added to rf klystron energy to lower the required input energy and thereby enhance energy efficiency of the system.

  10. Criteria of radio-frequency ring-shaped hollow cathode discharge using H{sub 2} and Ar gases for plasma processing

    SciTech Connect

    Ohtsu, Yasunori; Kawasaki, Yujiro

    2013-01-21

    In order to achieve high-density capacitively coupled plasma, a radio-frequency (RF) ring-shaped hollow cathode discharge has been developed as a candidate for processing plasma sources. The plasma density in the hollow cathode discharge reaches a high magnitude of 10{sup 10}-10{sup 11} cm{sup -3}. The RF ring-shaped hollow cathode discharge depends on the pressure and mass of the working gas. Criteria required for producing a RF ring-shaped hollow cathode discharge have been investigated for various gas pressures using H{sub 2} and Ar gases for high-density plasma production. The results reveal that the criteria for the occurrence of the hollow cathode effect are that the trench width should be approximately equal to the sum of the electron-neutral mean free paths and twice the sheath thickness of the RF powered electrode.

  11. RF Design of the LCLS Gun

    SciTech Connect

    Limborg-Deprey, C

    2010-12-13

    Final dimensions for the LCLS RF gun are described. This gun, referred to as the LCLS gun, is a modified version of the UCLA/BNL/SLAC 1.6 cell S-Band RF gun [1], referred to as the prototype gun. The changes include a larger mode separation (15 MHz for the LCLS gun vs. 3.5 MHz for the prototype gun), a larger radius at the iris between the 2 cells, a reduced surface field on the curvature of the iris between the two cells, Z power coupling, increased cooling channels for operation at 120 Hz, dual rf feed, deformation tuning of the full cell, and field probes in both cells. Temporal shaping of the klystron pulse, to reduce the average power dissipated in the gun, has also been adopted. By increasing the mode separation, the amplitude of the 0-mode electric field on the cathode decreases from 10% of the peak on axis field for the prototype gun to less than 3% for the LCLS gun for the steady state fields. Beam performance is improved as shown by the PARMELA simulations. The gun should be designed to accept a future load lock system. Modifications follow the recommendations of our RF review committee [2]. Files and reference documents are compiled in Section IV.

  12. DESIGN OF A DC/RF PHOTOELECTRON GUN.

    SciTech Connect

    YU,D.NEWSHAM,Y.SMIRONOV,A.YU,J.SMEDLEY,J.SRINIVASAN RAU,T.LEWELLEN,J.ZHOLENTS,A.

    2003-05-12

    An integrated dc/rf photoelectron gun produces a low-emittance beam by first rapidly accelerating electrons at a high gradient during a short ({approx}1 ns), high-voltage pulse, and then injecting the electrons into an rf cavity for subsequent acceleration. Simulations show that significant improvement of the emittance appears when a high field ({approx} 0.5-1 GV/m) is applied to the cathode surface. An adjustable dc gap ({le} 1 mm) which can be integrated with an rf cavity is designed for initial testing at the Injector Test Stand at Argonne National Laboratory using an existing 70-kV pulse generator. Plans for additional experiments of an integrated dc/rf gun with a 250-kV pulse generator are being made.

  13. Photo-oxidation catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Pitts, J. Roland; Liu, Ping; Smith, R. Davis

    2009-07-14

    Photo-oxidation catalysts and methods for cleaning a metal-based catalyst are disclosed. An exemplary catalyst system implementing a photo-oxidation catalyst may comprise a metal-based catalyst, and a photo-oxidation catalyst for cleaning the metal-based catalyst in the presence of light. The exposure to light enables the photo-oxidation catalyst to substantially oxidize absorbed contaminants and reduce accumulation of the contaminants on the metal-based catalyst. Applications are also disclosed.

  14. Personal Photo Enhancement Using Internet Photo Collections.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chenxi; Gao, Jizhou; Wang, Oliver; Georgel, Pierre; Yang, Ruigang; Davis, James; Frahm, Jan-Michael; Pollefeys, Marc

    2013-04-26

    Given the growth of Internet photo collections we now have a visual index of all major cities and tourist sites in the world. However, it is still a difficult task to capture that perfect shot with your own camera when visiting these places, especially when your camera itself has limitations, such as a limited field of view. In this paper, we propose a framework to overcome the imperfections of personal photos of tourist sites using the rich information provided by large scale Internet photo collections. Our method deploys state-of-the-art techniques for constructing initial 3D models from photo collections. The same techniques are then used to register personal photos to these models, allowing us to augment personal 2D images with 3D information. This strong available scene prior allows us to address a number of traditionally challenging image enhancement techniques, and achieve high quality results using simple and robust algorithms. Specifically, we demonstrate automatic foreground segmentation, mono-to-stereo conversion, the field of view expansion, photometric enhancement, and additionally automatic annotation with geo-location and tags. Our method clearly demonstrates some possible benefits of employing the rich information contained in on-line photo databases to efficiently enhance and augment one’s own personal photos. PMID:23628993

  15. Potential Fluctuations and Energetic Ion Production in Hollow Cathode Discharges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goebel, Dan M.; Jameson, Kristina K.; Katz, Ira; Mikellides, Ioannis G.

    2007-01-01

    Ions with energies significantly in excess of the applied discharge voltage have been reported for many years in hollow cathode discharges. Models of dc potential hills downstream of the cathode and instabilities in postulated double layers in the cathode orifice have been proposed to explain this, but have not been substantiated. Measurements of the dc and rf plasma density and potential profiles near the exit of hollow cathodes by miniature fast-scanning probes suggests that turbulent ion acoustic fluctuations and ionization instabilities in the cathode plume significantly increase the energy of the ions that flow from this region. Increases in the discharge current and/or decreases in the cathode gas flow enhance the amplitude of the fluctuations and increase the number and energy of the energetic ions, which increases the erosion rate of the cathode electrodes. The transition from the quiescent 'spot mode' to the noisy 'plume mode' characteristic of these discharges is found to be a gradual transition of increasing fluctuation amplitudes.

  16. Autonomous portable pulsed-periodical generator of high-power radiofrequency-pulses based on gas discharge with hollow cathode.

    PubMed

    Bulychev, Sergey V; Dubinov, Alexander E; L'vov, Igor L; Popolev, Vyacheslav L; Sadovoy, Sergey A; Sadchikov, Eugeny A; Selemir, Victor D; Valiulina, Valeria K; Vyalykh, Dmitry V; Zhdanov, Victor S

    2016-05-01

    Portable autonomous generator of high-power RF-pulses based on the gas discharge with hollow cathode has been designed, fabricated, and tested. Input and output characteristics are the following: discharge current amplitude is 800 A, duration of generated RF-pulses is 350 ns, carrier frequency is ∼90 MHz, power in RF-pulse is 0.5 MW, pulse repetition rate is 0.5 kHz, and device efficiency is ∼25%.

  17. Autonomous portable pulsed-periodical generator of high-power radiofrequency-pulses based on gas discharge with hollow cathode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulychev, Sergey V.; Dubinov, Alexander E.; L'vov, Igor L.; Popolev, Vyacheslav L.; Sadovoy, Sergey A.; Sadchikov, Eugeny A.; Selemir, Victor D.; Valiulina, Valeria K.; Vyalykh, Dmitry V.; Zhdanov, Victor S.

    2016-05-01

    Portable autonomous generator of high-power RF-pulses based on the gas discharge with hollow cathode has been designed, fabricated, and tested. Input and output characteristics are the following: discharge current amplitude is 800 A, duration of generated RF-pulses is 350 ns, carrier frequency is ˜90 MHz, power in RF-pulse is 0.5 MW, pulse repetition rate is 0.5 kHz, and device efficiency is ˜25%.

  18. Zinc/air cell cathode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McEvoy, J. J.

    1986-04-01

    This invention relates to a cathode for an air depolarized cell in which the hydrophobic catalytic cathode contains or in integrally drophobi catalytic cathode contains or is integrally coated with, on the surface adjacent the cell separator, an absorbent material such as the gelling material used in the anode. The absorbent material, integrated with the cathode surface, adheres the separator to the cathode thereby preventing delamination and provides an electrolyte reservoir for the hydrophobic cathode.

  19. Simulations of Ion Migration in the LCLS RF Gun and Injector

    SciTech Connect

    Brachmann, Axel; Dowell, David; /SLAC

    2012-06-25

    The motivation for this work was the observed surface contamination of the first LCLS RF gun copper cathode. We will present the results of simulations in regards to ion migration in the LCLS gun. Ions of residual gases will be created by interaction of molecular gas species with the UV drive laser beam and by the electron beam itself. The larger part of those ionized molecules remain in the vicinity of creation, are transported towards beam line walls or away from the cathode. However a small fraction gains enough kinetic energy, focused by RF and magnetic fields and propagates to the cathode, producing an undesirable increase of the cathode's surface work function. Although this fraction is small, during long term operation, this effect may become a significant factor limiting the source performance.

  20. PROCEEDING OF WORKSHOP ON PHOTO-INJECTOR FOR ENERGY RECOVERY LINAC.

    SciTech Connect

    WANG,X.J.

    2001-01-22

    Workshop on Photo-injectors for Energy Recovery Linac was held at National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) of Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) on January 22 and 23, 2001. Fifty people attended the workshop; they came from three countries, representing universities, industries and national laboratories. This is the first workshop ever held on photo-injectors for CW operation, and for the first time, both DC and RF photo-injectors were discussed at the workshop. Workshop covered almost all major issues of photo-injectors, photocathode, laser system, vacuum, DC, 433 MHz/B-factory cavities based RF gun, 1.3 GHz RF gun and beam instrumentation. High quantum efficiency and long live time photocathode is the issue discussed during the workshop. Four working group leaders have done great jobs summarizing the workshop discussion, and identifying the major issues for future R and D.

  1. Microfluidic stretchable RF electronics.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Shi; Wu, Zhigang

    2010-12-01

    Stretchable electronics is a revolutionary technology that will potentially create a world of radically different electronic devices and systems that open up an entirely new spectrum of possibilities. This article proposes a microfluidic based solution for stretchable radio frequency (RF) electronics, using hybrid integration of active circuits assembled on flex foils and liquid alloy passive structures embedded in elastic substrates, e.g. polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS). This concept was employed to implement a 900 MHz stretchable RF radiation sensor, consisting of a large area elastic antenna and a cluster of conventional rigid components for RF power detection. The integrated radiation sensor except the power supply was fully embedded in a thin elastomeric substrate. Good electrical performance of the standalone stretchable antenna as well as the RF power detection sub-module was verified by experiments. The sensor successfully detected the RF radiation over 5 m distance in the system demonstration. Experiments on two-dimensional (2D) stretching up to 15%, folding and twisting of the demonstrated sensor were also carried out. Despite the integrated device was severely deformed, no failure in RF radiation sensing was observed in the tests. This technique illuminates a promising route of realizing stretchable and foldable large area integrated RF electronics that are of great interest to a variety of applications like wearable computing, health monitoring, medical diagnostics, and curvilinear electronics.

  2. Thermionic Cathode Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Getty, W. D.; Herniter, M. E.

    1986-01-01

    A planar cathode, Pierce type electron gun with a design perveance of .0000032 (amps/volts to the 3/2 power) has been operated with a lanthanum hexaboride (LaB6) cathode. The cathode (useful diameter 1.9 cm) is heated by bombardment by electrons from a small tungsten filament. The bombardment heating system is stabilized by a feedback control circuit. The power required to heat the cathode is 315 W bombardment power and 200 W filament power. Heating power has been reduced by careful heat shielding and reduction of heat conduction losses. Significant additional reductions should be possible. The sintered LaB6 cathode disk is 2.5 cm in diameter, 3.2 mm thick, and has a density of 94%. No problems have been encountered with cracking of the disk. Cathode emission is insensitive to repeated exposure to air after allowing the cathode to fully cool. The measured perveance and anode transmission of the gun are 3.2x10(-6) and 94%, respectively. Current densities up to 6.5 A/sq cm have been reached with 5 micrometer pulses. Measurements were made at cathode temperatures of 1300 to 1600 C.

  3. Phase stable RF transport system

    DOEpatents

    Curtin, Michael T.; Natter, Eckard F.; Denney, Peter M.

    1992-01-01

    An RF transport system delivers a phase-stable RF signal to a load, such as an RF cavity of a charged particle accelerator. A circuit generates a calibration signal at an odd multiple frequency of the RF signal where the calibration signal is superimposed with the RF signal on a common cable that connects the RF signal with the load. Signal isolating diplexers are located at both the RF signal source end and load end of the common cable to enable the calibration to be inserted and extracted from the cable signals without any affect on the RF signal. Any phase shift in the calibration signal during traverse of the common cable is then functionally related to the phase shift in the RF signal. The calibration phase shift is used to control a phase shifter for the RF signal to maintain a stable RF signal at the load.

  4. Rheumatoid factor (RF)

    MedlinePlus

    ... infections Leukemia , multiple myeloma , and other cancers Chronic lung disease Chronic liver disease In some cases, people who are healthy and have no other medical problem will have a higher-than-normal RF level.

  5. Negative ion kinetics in RF glow discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Gottscho, R.A.; Gacbe, C.E.

    1986-04-01

    Using temporally and spatially resolved laser spectroscopy, the authors have determined the identities, approximate concentrations, effects on the local field, and kinetics of formation and loss of negative ions in RF discharges. CI/sup -/ and BCI/sub 3//sup -/ are the dominant negative ions found in low-frequency discharges through CI/sub 2/ and BCI/sub 3/, respectively. The electron affinity for CI is measured to be 3.6118 +- 0.0005 eV. Negative ion kinetics are strongly affected by application of the RF field. Formation of negative ions by attachment of slow electrons in RF discharges is governed by the extent and duration of electron energy relaxation. Similarly, destruction of negative ions by collisional detachment and field extraction is dependent upon ion energy modulation. Thus, at low frequency, the anion density peaks at the beginning of the anodic and cathodic half-cycles after electrons have attached but before detachment and extraction have had time to occur. At higher frequencies, electrons have insufficient time to attach before they are reheated and the instantaneous anion density in the sheath is greatly reduced. When the negative ion density is comparable to the positive ion density, the plasma potential is observed to lie below the anode potential, double layers form between sheath and plasma, and anions and electrons are accelerated by large sheath fields to electrode surfaces.

  6. Rf power sources

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, M.A.

    1988-05-01

    This paper covers RF power sources for accelerator applications. The approach has been with particular customers in mind. These customers are high energy physicists who use accelerators as experimental tools in the study of the nucleus of the atom, and synchrotron light sources derived from electron or positron storage rings. This paper is confined to electron-positron linear accelerators since the RF sources have always defined what is possible to achieve with these accelerators. 11 refs., 13 figs.

  7. Microbunching and RF Compression

    SciTech Connect

    Venturini, M.; Migliorati, M.; Ronsivalle, C.; Ferrario, M.; Vaccarezza, C.

    2010-05-23

    Velocity bunching (or RF compression) represents a promising technique complementary to magnetic compression to achieve the high peak current required in the linac drivers for FELs. Here we report on recent progress aimed at characterizing the RF compression from the point of view of the microbunching instability. We emphasize the development of a linear theory for the gain function of the instability and its validation against macroparticle simulations that represents a useful tool in the evaluation of the compression schemes for FEL sources.

  8. Klystron 'efficiency loop' for the ALS storage ring RF system

    SciTech Connect

    Kwiatkowski, Slawomir; Julian, Jim; Baptiste, Kenneth

    2002-05-20

    The recent energy crisis in California has led us to investigate the high power RF systems at the Advanced Light Source (ALS) in order to decrease the energy consumption and power costs. We found the Storage Ring Klystron Power Amplifier system operating as designed but with significant power waste. A simple proportional-integrator (PI) analog loop, which controls the klystron collector beam current, as a function of the output RF power, has been designed and installed. The design considerations, besides efficiency improvement, were to interface to the existing system without major expense. They were to also avoid the klystron cathode power supply filter's resonance in the loop's dynamics, and prevent a conflict with the existing Cavity RF Amplitude Loop dynamics. This efficiency loop will allow us to save up to 700 MW-hours of electrical energy per year and increase the lifetime of the klystron.

  9. Cathodes - Technological review

    SciTech Connect

    Cherkouk, Charaf; Nestler, Tina

    2014-06-16

    Lithium cobalt oxide (LiCoO{sub 2}) was already used in the first commercialized Li-ion battery by SONY in 1990. Still, it is the most frequently used cathode material nowadays. However, LiCoO{sub 2} is intrinsically unstable in the charged state, especially at elevated temperatures and in the overcharged state causing volume changes and transport limitation for high power batteries. In this paper, some technological aspects with large impact on cell performance from the cathode material point of view will be reviewed. At first it will be focused on the degradation processes and life-time mechanisms of the cathode material LiCoO{sub 2}. Electrochemical and structural results on commercial Li-ion batteries recorded during the cycling will be discussed. Thereafter, advanced nanomaterials for new cathode materials will be presented.

  10. Arcjet Cathode Phenomena

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curran, Francis M.; Haag, Thomas W.; Raquet, John F.

    1989-01-01

    Cathode tips made from a number of different materials were tested in a modular arcjet thruster in order to examine cathode phenomena. Periodic disassembly and examination, along with the data collected during testing, indicated that all of the tungsten-based materials behaved similarly despite the fact that in one of these samples the percentage of thorium oxide was doubled and another was 25 percent rhenium. The mass loss rate from a 2 percent thoriated rhenium cathode was found to be an order of magnitude greater than that observed using 2 percent thoriated tungsten. Detailed analysis of one of these cathode tips showed that the molten crater contained pure tungsten to a depth of about 150 microns. Problems with thermal stress cracking were encountered in the testing of a hafnium carbide tip. Post test analysis showed that the active area of the tip had chemically reacted with the propellant. A 100 hour continuous test was run at about 1 kW. Post test analysis revealed no dendrite formation, such as observed in a 30 kW arcjet lifetest, near the cathode crater. The cathodes from both this test and a previously run 1000 hour cycled test displayed nearly identical arc craters. Data and calculations indicate that the mass losses observed in testing can be explained by evaporation.

  11. Arcjet cathode phenomena

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curran, Francis M.; Haag, Thomas W.; Raquet, John F.

    1989-01-01

    Cathode tips made from a number of different materials were tested in a modular arcjet thruster in order to examine cathode phenomena. Periodic disassembly and examination, along with the data collected during testing, indicated that all of the tungsten-based materials behaved similarly despite the fact that in one of these samples the percentage of thorium oxide was doubled and another was 25 percent rhenium. The mass loss rate from a 2 percent thoriated rhenium cathode was found to be an order of magnitude greater than that observed using 2 percent thoriated tungsten. Detailed analysis of one of these cathode tips showed that the molten crater contained pure tungsten to a depth of about 150 microns. Problems with thermal stress cracking were encountered in the testing of a hafnium carbide tip. Post test analysis showed that the active area of the tip had chemically reacted with the propellant. A 100 hour continuous test was run at about 1 kW. Post test analysis revealed no dendrite formation, such as observed in a 30 kW arcjet lifetest, near the cathode crater. The cathodes from both this test and a previously run 1000 hour cycled test displayed nearly identical arc craters. Data and calculations indicate that the mass losses observed in testing can be explained by evaporation.

  12. Riboflavin-induced photo-crosslinking of collagen hydrogel and its application in meniscus tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Heo, Jiseung; Koh, Rachel H; Shim, Whuisu; Kim, Hwan D; Yim, Hyun-Gu; Hwang, Nathaniel S

    2016-04-01

    A meniscus tear is a common knee injury, but its regeneration remains a clinical challenge. Recently, collagen-based scaffolds have been applied in meniscus tissue engineering. Despite its prevalence, application of natural collagen scaffold in clinical setting is limited due to its extremely low stiffness and rapid degradation. The purpose of the present study was to increase the mechanical properties and delay degradation rate of a collagen-based scaffold by photo-crosslinking using riboflavin (RF) and UV exposure. RF is a biocompatible vitamin B2 that showed minimal cytotoxicity compared to conventionally utilized photo-initiator. Furthermore, collagen photo-crosslinking with RF improved mechanical properties and delayed enzyme-triggered degradation of collagen scaffolds. RF-induced photo-crosslinked collagen scaffolds encapsulated with fibrochondrocytes resulted in reduced scaffold contraction and enhanced gene expression levels for the collagen II and aggrecan. Additionally, hyaluronic acid (HA) incorporation into photo-crosslinked collagen scaffold showed an increase in its retention. Based on these results, we demonstrate that photo-crosslinked collagen-HA hydrogels can be potentially applied in the scaffold-based meniscus tissue engineering.

  13. Ferroelectric Emission Cathodes for Low-Power Electric Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kovaleski, Scott D.; Burke, Tom (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Low- or no-flow electron emitters are required for low-power electric thrusters, spacecraft plasma contactors, and electrodynamic tether systems to reduce or eliminate the need for propellant/expellant. Expellant-less neutralizers can improve the viability of very low-power colloid thrusters, field emission electric propulsion devices, ion engines, Hall thrusters, and gridded vacuum arc thrusters. The NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) is evaluating ferroelectric emission (FEE) cathodes as zero expellant flow rate cathode sources for the applications listed above. At GRC, low voltage (100s to approx. 1500 V) operation of FEE cathodes is examined. Initial experiments, with unipolar, bipolar, and RF burst applied voltage, have produced current pulses 250 to 1000 ns in duration with peak currents of up to 2 A at voltages at or below 1500 V. In particular, FEE cathodes driven by RF burst voltages from 1400 to 2000 V peak to peak, at burst frequencies from 70 to 400 kHz, emitted average current densities from 0.1 to 0.7 A/sq cm. Pulse repeatability as a function of input voltage has been initially established. Reliable emission has been achieved in air background at pressures as high as 10(exp -6) Torr.

  14. New method for generating linear transfer matrices through combined rf and solenoid fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gulliford, Colwyn; Bazarov, Ivan

    2012-02-01

    We present a new method for computing the transverse transfer matrix for superimposed axisymmetric rf and solenoid field maps. The algorithm constructs the transfer matrix directly from one-dimensional rf and solenoid field maps without computing numerical derivatives or eigenfunction expansions of the field map data. In addition, this method accurately describes the dynamics of low energy particles starting from a solenoid-immersed cathode, allowing the method to simulate transport through both rf and electrostatic guns. Comparison of particle tracking with the transfer matrix, and direct integration of the equations of motion through several field setups, shows excellent agreement between the two methods.

  15. Photos of Shingles

    MedlinePlus

    ... Some of these photos might be unsuitable for children. Viewing discretion is advised. Photos of People with Shingles Shingles rash on the neck Shingles on face Shingles on waist Shingles on face Child with shingles who had a history of leukemia ...

  16. Barrier RF stacking

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, W.; Wildman, D.; Zheng, H.; Takagi, A.; /KEK, Tsukuba

    2004-12-01

    A novel wideband RF system, nicknamed the barrier RF, has been designed, fabricated and installed in the Fermilab Main Injector. The cavity is made of seven Finemet cores, and the modulator made of two bipolar high-voltage fast solid-state switches. The system can deliver {+-}7 kV square pulses at 90 kHz. The main application is to stack two proton batches injected from the Booster and squeeze them into the size of one so that the bunch intensity can be doubled. High intensity beams have been successfully stacked and accelerated to 120 GeV with small losses. The problem of large longitudinal emittance growth is the focus of the present study. An upgraded system with two barrier RF cavities for continuous stacking is under construction. This work is part of the US-Japan collaborative agreement.

  17. Barrier RF Stacking

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, W.; Wildman, D.; Zheng, H.; Takagi, A.

    2005-06-08

    A novel wideband RF system, nicknamed the barrier RF, has been designed, fabricated and installed in the Fermilab Main Injector. The cavity is made of seven Finemet cores, and the modulator made of two bipolar high-voltage fast solid-state switches. The system can deliver {+-}7 kV square pulses at 90 kHz. The main application is to stack two proton batches injected from the Booster and squeeze them into the size of one so that the bunch intensity can be doubled. High intensity beams have been successfully stacked and accelerated to 120 GeV with small losses. The problem of large longitudinal emittance growth is the focus of the present study. An upgraded system with two barrier RF cavities for continuous stacking is under construction. This work is part of the US-Japan collaborative agreement.

  18. Barrier RF Stacking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chou, W.; Wildman, D.; Zheng, H.; Takagi, A.

    2005-06-01

    A novel wideband RF system, nicknamed the barrier RF, has been designed, fabricated and installed in the Fermilab Main Injector. The cavity is made of seven Finemet cores, and the modulator made of two bipolar high-voltage fast solid-state switches. The system can deliver ±7 kV square pulses at 90 kHz. The main application is to stack two proton batches injected from the Booster and squeeze them into the size of one so that the bunch intensity can be doubled. High intensity beams have been successfully stacked and accelerated to 120 GeV with small losses. The problem of large longitudinal emittance growth is the focus of the present study. An upgraded system with two barrier RF cavities for continuous stacking is under construction. This work is part of the US-Japan collaborative agreement.

  19. Barrier RF stacking

    SciTech Connect

    Weiren Chou and Akira Takagi

    2003-02-24

    This paper introduces a new method for stacking beams in the longitudinal phase space. It uses RF barriers to confine and compress beams in an accelerator, provided that the machine momentum acceptance is a few times larger than the momentum spread of the injected beam. This is the case for the Fermilab Main Injector. A barrier RF system employing Finemet cores and high-voltage solid-state switches is under construction. The goal is to double the number of protons per cycle on the production target for Run2 and NuMI experiments.

  20. Theory and mitigation of electron back-bombardment in thermionic cathode radio frequency guns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edelen, Jonathan Paul

    Photocathode RF guns are currently the standard for high- power, low-emittance beam generation in free-electron lasers. These devices require the use of high-power lasers (which are bulky and expensive to operate) and high-quantum-efficiency cathodes (which have limited lifetimes requiring frequent replacement). The use of RF-gated thermionic cathodes enables operation without a large drive laser and with long lifetimes. One major limitation of RF-gated thermionic cathodes is that electrons emitted late in the RF period will not gain enough energy to exit the gun before being accelerated back towards the cathode by the change in sign of the RF field. These electrons deposit their kinetic energy on the cathode surface in the form of heat, limiting the ability to control the output current from the cathode. This dissertation is aimed at understanding the fundamental design factors that drive the back-bombardment process and at exploring novel techniques to reduce its impact on a high-current system. This begins with the development of analytic models that predict the back-bombardment process in single-cell guns. These models are compared with simulation and with a measurement taken at a specific facility. This is followed by the development of analytic models that predict the effects of space-charge on back-bombardment. These models are compared with simulations. This is followed by an analysis of how the addition of multiple cells will impact the back-bombardment process. Finally, a two-frequency gun is studied for its ability to mitigate the back-bombardment process. This dissertation provides new insight on how the back-bombardment process scales as a function of the beam parameters and how space-charge affects this process. Additionally this dissertation shows how a second frequency can be used to mitigate the back-bombardment effect.

  1. Rf2a and rf2b transcription factors

    DOEpatents

    Beachy, Roger N.; Petruccelli, Silvana; Dai, Shunhong

    2007-10-02

    A method of activating the rice tungro bacilliform virus (RTBV) promoter in vivo is disclosed. The RTBV promoter is activated by exposure to at least one protein selected from the group consisting of Rf2a and Rf2b.

  2. Cathode materials review

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel, Claus Mohanty, Debasish Li, Jianlin Wood, David L.

    2014-06-16

    The electrochemical potential of cathode materials defines the positive side of the terminal voltage of a battery. Traditionally, cathode materials are the energy-limiting or voltage-limiting electrode. One of the first electrochemical batteries, the voltaic pile invented by Alessandro Volta in 1800 (Phil. Trans. Roy. Soc. 90, 403-431) had a copper-zinc galvanic element with a terminal voltage of 0.76 V. Since then, the research community has increased capacity and voltage for primary (nonrechargeable) batteries and round-trip efficiency for secondary (rechargeable) batteries. Successful secondary batteries have been the lead-acid with a lead oxide cathode and a terminal voltage of 2.1 V and later the NiCd with a nickel(III) oxide-hydroxide cathode and a 1.2 V terminal voltage. The relatively low voltage of those aqueous systems and the low round-trip efficiency due to activation energies in the conversion reactions limited their use. In 1976, Wittingham (J. Electrochem. Soc., 123, 315) and Besenhard (J. Power Sources 1(3), 267) finally enabled highly reversible redox reactions by intercalation of lithium ions instead of by chemical conversion. In 1980, Goodenough and Mizushima (Mater. Res. Bull. 15, 783-789) demonstrated a high-energy and high-power LiCoO{sub 2} cathode, allowing for an increase of terminal voltage far beyond 3 V. Over the past four decades, the international research community has further developed cathode materials of many varieties. Current state-of-the-art cathodes demonstrate voltages beyond any known electrolyte stability window, bringing electrolyte research once again to the forefront of battery research.

  3. Cathode materials review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daniel, Claus; Mohanty, Debasish; Li, Jianlin; Wood, David L.

    2014-06-01

    The electrochemical potential of cathode materials defines the positive side of the terminal voltage of a battery. Traditionally, cathode materials are the energy-limiting or voltage-limiting electrode. One of the first electrochemical batteries, the voltaic pile invented by Alessandro Volta in 1800 (Phil. Trans. Roy. Soc. 90, 403-431) had a copper-zinc galvanic element with a terminal voltage of 0.76 V. Since then, the research community has increased capacity and voltage for primary (nonrechargeable) batteries and round-trip efficiency for secondary (rechargeable) batteries. Successful secondary batteries have been the lead-acid with a lead oxide cathode and a terminal voltage of 2.1 V and later the NiCd with a nickel(III) oxide-hydroxide cathode and a 1.2 V terminal voltage. The relatively low voltage of those aqueous systems and the low round-trip efficiency due to activation energies in the conversion reactions limited their use. In 1976, Wittingham (J. Electrochem. Soc., 123, 315) and Besenhard (J. Power Sources 1(3), 267) finally enabled highly reversible redox reactions by intercalation of lithium ions instead of by chemical conversion. In 1980, Goodenough and Mizushima (Mater. Res. Bull. 15, 783-789) demonstrated a high-energy and high-power LiCoO2 cathode, allowing for an increase of terminal voltage far beyond 3 V. Over the past four decades, the international research community has further developed cathode materials of many varieties. Current state-of-the-art cathodes demonstrate voltages beyond any known electrolyte stability window, bringing electrolyte research once again to the forefront of battery research.

  4. RF Input Power Couplers for High Current SRF Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Khan, V. F.; Anders, W.; Burrill, Andrew; Knobloch, Jens; Kugeler, Oliver; Neumann, Axel; Wang, Haipeng

    2014-12-01

    High current SRF technology is being explored in present day accelerator science. The bERLinPro project is presently being built at HZB to address the challenges involved in high current SRF machines with the goal of generating and accelerating a 100 mA electron beam to 50 MeV in continuous wave (cw) mode at 1.3 GHz. One of the main challenges in this project is that of handling the high input RF power required for the photo-injector as well as booster cavities where there is no energy recovery process. A high power co-axial input power coupler is being developed to be used for the photo-injector and booster cavities at the nominal beam current. The coupler is based on the KEK–cERL design and has been modified to minimise the penetration of the coupler tip in the beam pipe without compromising on beam-power coupling (Qext ~105). Herein we report on the RF design of the high power (115 kW per coupler, dual couplers per cavity) bERLinPro (BP) coupler along with initial results on thermal calculations. We summarise the RF conditioning of the TTF-III couplers (modified for cw operation) performed in the past at BESSY/HZB. A similar conditioning is envisaged in the near future for the low current SRF photo-injector and the bERLinPro main linac cryomodule.

  5. Photocatalysis for renewable energy production using PhotoFuelCells.

    PubMed

    Michal, Robert; Sfaelou, Stavroula; Lianos, Panagiotis

    2014-11-27

    The present work is a short review of our recent studies on PhotoFuelCells, that is, photoelectrochemical cells which consume a fuel to produce electricity or hydrogen, and presents some unpublished data concerning both electricity and hydrogen production. PhotoFuelCells have been constructed using nanoparticulate titania photoanodes and various cathode electrodes bearing a few different types of electrocatalyst. In the case where the cell functioned with an aerated cathode, the cathode electrode was made of carbon cloth carrying a carbon paste made of carbon black and dispersed Pt nanoparticles. When the cell was operated in the absence of oxygen, the electrocatalyst was deposited on an FTO slide using a special commercial carbon paste, which was again enriched with Pt nanoparticles. Mixing of Pt with carbon paste decreased the quantity of Pt necessary to act as electrocatalyst. PhotoFuelCells can produce electricity without bias and with relatively high open-circuit voltage when they function in the presence of fuel and with an aerated cathode. In that case, titania can be sensitized in the visible region by CdS quantum dots. In the present work, CdS was deposited by the SILAR method. Other metal chalcogenides are not functional as sensitizers because the combined photoanode in their presence does not have enough oxidative power to oxidize the fuel. Concerning hydrogen production, it was found that it is difficult to produce hydrogen in an alkaline environment even under bias, however, this is still possible if losses are minimized. One way to limit losses is to short-circuit anode and cathode electrode and put them close together. This is achieved in the "photoelectrocatalytic leaf", which was presently demonstrated capable of producing hydrogen even in a strongly alkaline environment.

  6. Design of a visible light driven photo-electrochemical/electro-Fenton coupling oxidation system for wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Ding, Xing; Ai, Zhihui; Zhang, Lizhi

    2012-11-15

    In this study, we report on a photo-electrochemical/electro-Fenton oxidation (PEC/EF) system by coupling visible light driven photo-electrochemical oxidation (PEC) and electro-Fenton oxidation (EF) in an undivided cell. Bi2WO6 nanoplates deposited on FTO glass (Bi2WO6/FTO) and Fe@Fe2O3 core-shell nanowires supported on activated carbon fiber (Fe@Fe2O3/ACF) were used as the anode and the cathode in the PEC/EF system, respectively. This novel PEC/EF system showed much higher activity than the single PEC and EF systems on degradation of rhodamine B in aqueous solution at natural pH. Moreover, the degradation and the instantaneous current efficiencies of the PEC/EF system were increased by 154% and 26% in comparison with the sum of those of single PEC and EF systems, respectively. These significant enhancements could be attributed to the synergetic effect from better separation of photo-generated carriers in the photo-anode and the transfer of photo-electrons to the oxygen diffusion cathode to generate more electro-generated H2O2 and hydroxyl radicals on the Fenton cathode. The better separation of photo-generated carriers contribute more to the overall degradation enhancement than the photo-electrons generated H2O2 and the subsequent Fenton reaction on the cathode during the PEC/EF process. PMID:23017238

  7. Proposed RF Breakdown Studies at the AWA

    SciTech Connect

    Antipov, S.; Conde, M.; Gai, W.; Power, J.G.; Spentzouris, L.; Yusof, Z.; Dolgashev, V.; /SLAC

    2007-03-21

    A study of breakdown mechanism has been initiated at the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator (AWA). Breakdown may include several factors such as local field enhancement, explosive electron emission, Ohmic heating, tensile stress produced by electric field, and others. The AWA is building a dedicated facility to test various models for breakdown mechanisms and to determine the roles of different factors in the breakdown. We plan to trigger breakdown events with a high-powered laser at various wavelengths (IR to UV) to determine the role of explosive electron emission in the breakdown process. Another experimental idea follows from the recent work on a Schottky-enabled photoemission in an RF photoinjector [1] that allows us to determine in situ the field enhancement factor on a cathode surface. Monitoring the field enhancement factor before and after the breakdown can shed some light on a number of observations such as the crater formation process.

  8. Testing a GaAs cathode in SRF gun

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, E.; Kewisch, J.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Burrill, A.; Rao, T.; Wu, Q.; Holmes, D.

    2011-03-28

    RF electron guns with a strained superlattice GaAs cathode are expected to generate polarized electron beams of higher brightness and lower emittance than do DC guns, due to their higher field gradient at the cathode's surface and lower cathode temperature. We plan to install a bulk GaAs:Cs in a SRF gun to evaluate the performance of both the gun and the cathode in this environment. The status of this project is: In our 1.3 GHz 1/2 cell SRF gun, the vacuum can be maintained at nearly 10{sup -12} Torr because of cryo-pumping at 2K. With conventional activation of bulk GaAs, we obtained a QE of 10% at 532 nm, with lifetime of more than 3 days in the preparation chamber and have shown that it can survive in transport from the preparation chamber to the gun. The beam line has been assembled and we are exploring the best conditions for baking the cathode under vacuum. We report here the progress of our test of the GaAs cathode in the SRF gun. Future particle accelerators, such as eRHIC and the ILC require high-brightness, high-current polarized electrons. Strained superlattice GaAs:Cs has been shown to be an efficient cathode for producing polarized electrons. Activation of GaAs with Cs,O(F) lowers the electron affinity and makes it energetically possible for all the electrons, excited into the conduction band that drift or diffuse to the emission surface, to escape into the vacuum. Presently, all operating polarized electron sources, such as the CEBAF, are DC guns. In these devices, the excellent ultra-high vacuum extends the lifetime of the cathode. However, the low field gradient on the photocathode's emission surface of the DC guns limits the beam quality. The higher accelerating gradients, possible in the RF guns, generate a far better beam. Until recently, most RF guns operated at room temperature, limiting the vacuum to {approx}10{sup -9} Torr. This destroys the GaAs's NEA surface. The SRF guns combine the excellent vacuum conditions of DC guns and the high

  9. Thermionic cathode life test studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forman, R.; Elmer, P.

    1980-01-01

    An update on the life testing of commerical, high current density impregnated tungsten cathodes is presented. The B-type cathodes, operated at a current density of 2 A/cm2 and a cathode temperature of 1100 C have now been run satisfactorily for more than four years. The M-cathode, at the same current density but at an operating temperature of only 1010 C, have been tested for more than three years. The M-cathodes show no degradation in current over their present operating life whereas the current from the B-cathodes degrade about 6 percent after four years of operation.

  10. Photo-voltaic power generating means and methods

    DOEpatents

    Kroger, Ferdinand A.; Rod, Robert L.; Panicker, Ramachandra M. P.; Knaster, Mark B.

    1984-01-10

    A photo-voltaic power cell based on a photoelectric semiconductor compound and the method of using and making the same. The semiconductor compound in the photo-voltaic power cell of the present invention can be electrolytically formed at a cathode in an electrolytic solution by causing discharge or decomposition of ions or molecules of a non-metallic component with deposition of the non-metallic component on the cathode and simultaneously providing ions of a metal component which discharge and combine with the non-metallic component at the cathode thereby forming the semiconductor compound film material thereon. By stoichiometrically adjusting the amounts of the components, or otherwise by introducing dopants into the desired amounts, an N-type layer can be formed and thereafter a P-type layer can be formed with a junction therebetween. The invention is effective in producing homojunction semiconductor materials and heterojunction semiconductor materials. The present invention also provides a method of using three electrodes in order to form the semiconductor compound material on one of these electrodes. Various examples are given for manufacturing different photo-voltaic cells in accordance with the present invention.

  11. Photo-voltaic power generating means and methods

    DOEpatents

    Kroger, Ferdinand A.; Rod, Robert L.; Panicker, M. P. Ramachandra

    1983-08-23

    A photo-voltaic power cell based on a photoelectric semiconductor compound and the method of using and making the same. The semiconductor compound in the photo-voltaic power cell of the present invention can be electrolytically formed at a cathode in an electrolytic solution by causing discharge or decomposition of ions or molecules of a non-metallic component with deposition of the non-metallic component on the cathode and simultaneously providing ions of a metal component which discharge and combine with the non-metallic component at the cathode thereby forming the semiconductor compound film material thereon. By stoichiometrically adjusting the amounts of the components, or otherwise by introducing dopants into the desired amounts, an N-type layer can be formed and thereafter a P-type layer can be formed with a junction therebetween. The invention is effective in producing homojunction semiconductor materials and heterojunction semiconductor materials. The present invention also provides a method of using three electrodes in order to form the semiconductor compound material on one of these electrodes. Various examples are given for manufacturing different photo-voltaic cells in accordance with the present invention.

  12. The TESLA RF System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choroba, S.

    2003-12-01

    The TESLA project proposed by the TESLA collaboration in 2001 is a 500 to 800GeV e+/e- linear collider with integrated free electron laser facility. The accelerator is based on superconducting cavity technology. Approximately 20000 superconducting cavities operated at 1.3GHz with a gradient of 23.4MV/m or 35MV/m will be required to achieve the energy of 500GeV or 800GeV respectively. For 500GeV ˜600 RF stations each generating 10MW of RF power at 1.3GHz at a pulse duration of 1.37ms and a repetition rate of 5 or 10Hz are required. The original TESLA design was modified in 2002 and now includes a dedicated 20GeV electron accelerator in a separate tunnel for free electron laser application. The TESLA XFEL will provide XFEL radiation of unprecedented peak brilliance and full transverse coherence in the wavelength range of 0.1 to 6.4nm at a pulse duration of 100fs. The technology of both accelerators, the TESLA linear collider and the XFEL, will be identical, however the number of superconducting cavities and RF stations for the XFEL will be reduced to 936 and 26 respectively. This paper describes the layout of the entire RF system of the TESLA linear collider and the TESLA XFEL and gives an overview of its various subsystems and components.

  13. Quad RF power meter

    SciTech Connect

    Stone, D.W.

    1987-09-01

    This report shows how to construct a four-channel RF power meter from circuit boards and components found in a Hewlett Packard Model 432A Power Meter. Included are descriptions of necessary modifications, electrical circuit diagrams, and a parts list. Each of the four power meters is compatible with a Hewlett Packard 432A Power Meter.

  14. AC/RF Superconductivity

    SciTech Connect

    Ciovati, Gianluigi

    2015-02-01

    This contribution provides a brief introduction to AC/RF superconductivity, with an emphasis on application to accelerators. The topics covered include the surface impedance of normal conductors and superconductors, the residual resistance, the field dependence of the surface resistance, and the superheating field.

  15. RF Guns for Generation of Polarized Electron Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Clendenin, J.E.; Brachmann, A.; Dowell, D.H.; Garwin, E.L.; Ioakeimidi, K.; Kirby, R.E.; Maruyama, T.; Prescott, C.Y.; Prepost, R.; /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2005-11-09

    Several accelerators, including the SLC, JLAB, Mainz, Bates/MIT, and Bonn have successfully operated for medium and high energy physics experiments using polarized electron beams generated by dc-biased guns employing GaAs photocathodes. Since these guns have all used a bias on the order of 100 kV, the longitudinal emittance of the extracted bunch is rather poor. Downstream rf bunching systems increase the transverse emittance. An rf gun with a GaAs photocathode would eliminate the need for separate rf bunchers, resulting in a simpler injection system. In addition, the thermal emittance of GaAs-type cathodes is significantly lower than for other photocathode materials. The environmental requirements for operating activated GaAs photocathodes cannot be met by rf guns as currently designed and operated. These requirements, including limits on vacuum and electron back bombardment, are discussed in some detail. Modifications to actual and proposed rf gun designs that would allow these requirements to be met are presented.

  16. Studies of Optical Emission and Radical Generation from Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Source Powered by RF in a Hollow Slot Electrode Configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Zengqi; Yalin, Azer; Rahman, Abdur; Surla, Vijaya; Hoshimiya, Katsumi; Ovidu, Stan; Collins, George

    2003-05-01

    A hollow slot has been radio frequency electrically excited to generate a discharge plasma at atmospheric pressure. This newly developed micro-plasma device consists of a rf driven hollow electrode, with a long narrow slot of length 3-35 cm, width 0.2 -1.5 mm, and depth 0.7 mm, and a solid transverse electrode which is electrically grounded and placed parallel to the cathode slot with a spacing of 0.1 mm. This two-electrode configuration receives 30 W/cm of rf power with about 150 V of rf voltage applied between the grounded electrode and the rf driven hollow slot electrode. We stabilized the discharge at varying rf frequencies (13.56 MHz, 4 MHz, etc.) in both the hollow cathode and hollow anode modes. Our device design appears scalable to extended length for large surface area processing, utilizing noble gases and their mixtures with oxygen, nitrogen, and hydrogen. A preliminary experiment that ran the torch on argon gas has shown strong line emission in the vacuum UV range. Radical fluxes generated from the RF atmosphere plasma have been measured. The discharge power going to these channels in compared to the input rf power. The latter is determined by careful examination of the rf waveforms and includes harmonic contributions. We have complemented these power measurements by rf circuit models to more clearly identify the hollow cathode and anode modes.

  17. Filtered cathodic arc source

    DOEpatents

    Falabella, S.; Sanders, D.M.

    1994-01-18

    A continuous, cathodic arc ion source coupled to a macro-particle filter capable of separation or elimination of macro-particles from the ion flux produced by cathodic arc discharge is described. The ion source employs an axial magnetic field on a cathode (target) having tapered sides to confine the arc, thereby providing high target material utilization. A bent magnetic field is used to guide the metal ions from the target to the part to be coated. The macro-particle filter consists of two straight solenoids, end to end, but placed at 45[degree] to one another, which prevents line-of-sight from the arc spot on the target to the parts to be coated, yet provides a path for ions and electrons to flow, and includes a series of baffles for trapping the macro-particles. 3 figures.

  18. Filtered cathodic arc source

    DOEpatents

    Falabella, Steven; Sanders, David M.

    1994-01-01

    A continuous, cathodic arc ion source coupled to a macro-particle filter capable of separation or elimination of macro-particles from the ion flux produced by cathodic arc discharge. The ion source employs an axial magnetic field on a cathode (target) having tapered sides to confine the arc, thereby providing high target material utilization. A bent magnetic field is used to guide the metal ions from the target to the part to be coated. The macro-particle filter consists of two straight solenoids, end to end, but placed at 45.degree. to one another, which prevents line-of-sight from the arc spot on the target to the parts to be coated, yet provides a path for ions and electrons to flow, and includes a series of baffles for trapping the macro-particles.

  19. Cathode material for electrochemical cells

    SciTech Connect

    Ryan, D.M.

    1993-08-24

    A primary cell is described having an anode material, an electrolyte material and a cathode material, wherein said cathode material, in the predischarge condition thereof, is K[sub 3]V[sub 5]O[sub 14].

  20. Analysis of amorphous-nano-crystalline multilayer structures by optical, photo-deflection and photo-current spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Gracin, D; Sancho-Paramon, J; Juraić, K; Gajović, A; Ceh, M

    2009-01-01

    Thin film structures consisting of nano-crystalline and amorphous silicon layers deposited on glass by plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition have been studied by optical spectroscopy methods (transmittance, photo-thermal deflection spectroscopy and photo-current spectroscopy) while structure was examined by Raman spectroscopy. The nano-crystalline layers were grown on the same amorphous layers, using different radio-frequency (RF) discharge powers, leading to different structural and optical properties. The energy dependence of the absorption coefficient above the band gap agrees well to the bimodal size distribution of crystals and crystal fraction estimated by Raman spectroscopy. For energies below the band gap, the comparison of the absorption of the bi-layer systems with respect to single amorphous layer reveals that the samples produced at higher RF discharge present a higher disorder degree (Urbach edge increases) and higher number of structural defects (absorption related to the defects increases).

  1. Miniaturized cathodic arc plasma source

    DOEpatents

    Anders, Andre; MacGill, Robert A.

    2003-04-15

    A cathodic arc plasma source has an anode formed of a plurality of spaced baffles which extend beyond the active cathode surface of the cathode. With the open baffle structure of the anode, most macroparticles pass through the gaps between the baffles and reflect off the baffles out of the plasma stream that enters a filter. Thus the anode not only has an electrical function but serves as a prefilter. The cathode has a small diameter, e.g. a rod of about 1/4 inch (6.25 mm) diameter. Thus the plasma source output is well localized, even with cathode spot movement which is limited in area, so that it effectively couples into a miniaturized filter. With a small area cathode, the material eroded from the cathode needs to be replaced to maintain plasma production. Therefore, the source includes a cathode advancement or feed mechanism coupled to cathode rod. The cathode also requires a cooling mechanism. The movable cathode rod is housed in a cooled metal shield or tube which serves as both a current conductor, thus reducing ohmic heat produced in the cathode, and as the heat sink for heat generated at or near the cathode. Cooling of the cathode housing tube is done by contact with coolant at a place remote from the active cathode surface. The source is operated in pulsed mode at relatively high currents, about 1 kA. The high arc current can also be used to operate the magnetic filter. A cathodic arc plasma deposition system using this source can be used for the deposition of ultrathin amorphous hard carbon (a-C) films for the magnetic storage industry.

  2. Cathode material for lithium batteries

    DOEpatents

    Park, Sang-Ho; Amine, Khalil

    2013-07-23

    A method of manufacture an article of a cathode (positive electrode) material for lithium batteries. The cathode material is a lithium molybdenum composite transition metal oxide material and is prepared by mixing in a solid state an intermediate molybdenum composite transition metal oxide and a lithium source. The mixture is thermally treated to obtain the lithium molybdenum composite transition metal oxide cathode material.

  3. Cathode material for lithium batteries

    DOEpatents

    Park, Sang-Ho; Amine, Khalil

    2015-01-13

    A method of manufacture an article of a cathode (positive electrode) material for lithium batteries. The cathode material is a lithium molybdenum composite transition metal oxide material and is prepared by mixing in a solid state an intermediate molybdenum composite transition metal oxide and a lithium source. The mixture is thermally treated to obtain the lithium molybdenum composite transition metal oxide cathode material.

  4. Barrier rf systems in synchrotrons

    SciTech Connect

    Chandra M. Bhat

    2004-06-28

    Recently, many interesting applications of the barrier RF system in hadron synchrotrons have been realized. A remarkable example of this is the development of longitudinal momentum mining and implementation at the Fermilab Recycler for extraction of low emittance pbars for the Tevatron shots. At Fermilab, we have barrier RF systems in four different rings. In the case of Recycler Ring, all of the rf manipulations are carried out using a barrier RF system. Here, the author reviews various uses of barrier rf systems in particle accelerators including some new schemes for producing intense proton beam and possible new applications.

  5. Racetrack microtron rf system

    SciTech Connect

    Tallerico, P.J.; Keffeler, D.R.

    1985-01-01

    The rf system for the National Bureau of Standards (NBS)/Los Alamos cw racetrack microtron is described. The low-power portion consists of five 75-W amplifers that drive two input ports in each of two chopper deflection cavities and one port in the prebuncher cavity. A single 500-kW klystron drives four separate 2380-MHz cavity sections: the two main accelerator sections, a capture section, and a preaccelerator section. The phases and amplitudes in all cavities are controlled by electronic or electromechanical controls. The 1-MW klystron power supply and crowbar system were purchased as a unit; several modifications are described that improve power-supply performance. The entire rf system has been tested and shipped to the NBS, and the chopper-buncher system has been operated with beam at the NBS. 5 refs., 2 figs.

  6. RF pulse compression development

    SciTech Connect

    Farkas, Z.D.; Weaver, J.N.

    1987-10-01

    The body of this paper discusses the theory and some rules for designing a multistage Binary Energy Compressor (BEC) including its response to nonstandard phase coding, describes some proof-of-principle experiments with a couple of low power BECs, presents the design parameters for some sample linear collider rf systems that could possibly use a BEC to advantage and outlines in the conclusion some planned R and D efforts. 8 refs., 26 figs., 4 tabs.

  7. RF pulsed heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pritzkau, David Peace

    RF pulsed heating is a process by which a metal is heated from magnetic fields on its surface due to high-power pulsed RF. When the thermal stresses induced are larger than the elastic limit, microcracks and surface roughening will occur due to cyclic fatigue. Pulsed heating limits the maximum magnetic field on the surface and through it the maximum achievable accelerating gradient in a normal conducting accelerator structure. An experiment using circularly cylindrical cavities operating in the TE011 mode at a resonant frequency of 11.424 GHz is designed to study pulsed heating on OFE copper, a material commonly used in normal conducting accelerator structures. The high-power pulsed RF is supplied by an X-band klystron capable of outputting 50 MW, 1.5 μs pulses. The test pieces of the cavity are designed to be removable to allow testing of different materials with different surface preparations. A diagnostic tool is developed to measure the temperature rise in the cavity utilizing the dynamic Q change of the resonant mode due to heating. The diagnostic consists of simultaneously exciting a TE012 mode to steady-state in the cavity at 18 GHz and measuring the change in reflected power as the cavity is heated from high-power pulsed RF. Two experimental runs were completed. One run was executed at a calculated temperature rise of 120 K for 56 × 106 pulses. The second run was executed at a calculated temperature rise of 82 K for 86 × 106 pulses. Scanning electron microscope pictures show extensive damage occurring in the region of maximum temperature rise on the surface of the test pieces.

  8. RF Pulsed Heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pritzkau, D. P.

    2002-01-01

    RF pulsed heating is a process by which a metal is heated from magnetic elds on its surface due to high-power pulsed RF. When the thermal stresses induced are larger than the elastic limit, microcracks and surface roughening will occur due to cyclic fatigue. Pulsed heating limits the maximum magnetic eld on the surface and through it the maximum achievable accelerating gradient in a normal conducting accelerator structure. An experiment using circularly cylindrical cavities operating in the TE011 mode at a resonant frequency of 11:424 GHz is designed to study pulsed heating on OFE copper, a material commonly used in normal conducting accelerator structures. The high-power pulsed RF is supplied by an X-band klystron capable of outputting 50 MW, 1:5 s perent surface preparations.he cavity are designed to A diagnostic tool is developed to measure the temperature rise in the cavity utilizing the dynamic Q change of the resonant mode due to heating. The diagnostic consists of simultaneously exciting a TE012 mode to steady-state in the cavity at 18 GHz and measuring the change in re ected power as the cavity is heated from high-power pulsed RF. Two experimental runs were completed. One run was executed at a calculated temperature rise of 120 K for 56 106 pulses. The second run was executed at a calculated temperature rise of 82 K for 86106 pulses. Scanning electron microscope pictures show extensive damage occurring in the region of maximum temperature rise on the surface of the test pieces.

  9. Adaptive sharpening of photos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safonov, Ilia V.; Rychagov, Michael N.; Kang, KiMin; Kim, Sang Ho

    2008-01-01

    Sharpness is an important attribute that contributes to the overall impression of printed photo quality. Often it is impossible to estimate sharpness prior to printing. Sometimes it is a complex task for a consumer to obtain accurate sharpening results by editing a photo on a computer. The novel method of adaptive sharpening aimed for photo printers is proposed. Our approach includes 3 key techniques: sharpness level estimation, local tone mapping and boosting of local contrast. Non-reference automatic sharpness level estimation is based on analysis of variations of edges histograms, where edges are produced by high-pass filters with various kernel sizes, array of integrals of logarithm of edges histograms characterizes photo sharpness, machine learning is applied to choose optimal parameters for given printing size and resolution. Local tone mapping with ordering is applied to decrease edge transition slope length without noticeable artifacts and with some noise suppression. Unsharp mask via bilateral filter is applied for boosting of local contrast. This stage does not produce strong halo artifact which is typical for the traditional unsharp mask filter. The quality of proposed approach is evaluated by surveying observer's opinions. According to obtained replies the proposed method enhances the majority of photos.

  10. Hydrogen hollow cathode ion source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mirtich, M. J., Jr.; Sovey, J. S.; Roman, R. F. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    A source of hydrogen ions is disclosed and includes a chamber having at one end a cathode which provides electrons and through which hydrogen gas flows into the chamber. Screen and accelerator grids are provided at the other end of the chamber. A baffle plate is disposed between the cathode and the grids and a cylindrical baffle is disposed coaxially with the cathode at the one end of the chamber. The cylindrical baffle is of greater diameter than the baffle plate to provide discharge impedance and also to protect the cathode from ion flux. An anode electrode draws the electrons away from the cathode. The hollow cathode includes a tubular insert of tungsten impregnated with a low work function material to provide ample electrons. A heater is provided around the hollow cathode to initiate electron emission from the low work function material.

  11. Synopsis of Cathode #4 Activation

    SciTech Connect

    Kwan, Joe; Ekdahl, C.; Harrison, J.; Kwan, J.; Leitner, M.; McCruistian, T.; Mitchell, R.; Prichard, B.; Roy, P.

    2006-05-26

    The purpose of this report is to describe the activation of the fourth cathode installed in the DARHT-II Injector. Appendices have been used so that an extensive amount of data could be included without danger of obscuring important information contained in the body of the report. The cathode was a 612 M type cathode purchased from Spectra-Mat. Section II describes the handling and installation of the cathode. Section III is a narrative of the activation based on information located in the Control Room Log Book supplemented with time plots of pertinent operating parameters. Activation of the cathode was performed in accordance with the procedure listed in Appendix A. The following sections provide more details on the total pressure and constituent partial pressures in the vacuum vessel, cathode heater power/filament current, and cathode temperature.

  12. Tore Supra LH transmitter upgrade, a new RF driver for the power spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berger-By, G.; Achard, J.; Armitano, A.; Bouquey, F.; Corbel, E.; Delpech, L.; Ekedahl, A.; Lombard, G.; Magne, R.; Mollard, P.; Pagano, M.; Prou, M.; Samaille, F.; Volpe, D.; Volpe, R.

    2011-12-01

    New real time tools have been developed for testing new 700kW/3.7GHz/CW klystrons and for the operations on very long plasma shots. After the commissioning of the 18 series tubes on the high power test bed facility, the installation of the first 8 klystrons in the Tore Supra transmitter and the adjustment tests on load, this upgrade work has been materialized during the last 2010 campaign by a successful operation on the Full Active Multijunction (FAM) C3 antenna, with new performances: 3.5MW/40s on plasma. The RF output power control in amplitude and phase has been improved for a better control of the wave spectrum launched into the plasma. The new klystrons have no modulating anode and the high cathode voltage must be adjusted with the RF input power in order to optimize the RF output power with a minimization of the thermal power losses in the collector. A new phase correction, depending on the 3 RF output power ranges used, has been introduced. The improvements made in 2009 and 2010 on the generic phase loop and the procedures used during the real time tests of the RF transfer functions in amplitude and phase are detailed below. All RF measurements systems, RF safety systems and the RF calibration procedures have been revised in order to have the best consistency, reproducibility and with a measurement error against the calorimetry measurement lower than 10%.

  13. RF system for ''TARN II''

    SciTech Connect

    Sato, K.; Fujita, M.; Itano, A.; Kanazawa, M.; Kodaira, M.; Kurihara, T.; Tojyo, E.; Watanabe, S.; Yamazaki, N.; Yoshizawa, M.

    1985-10-01

    An rf acceleration system for the INS heavy-ion synchrotron proposal is being developed. The rf characteristics of full-size ferrite toroids have been measured in a test cavity to study tunable frequencies of an rf cavity. It is estimated from the measurement on the ferrite material TDK SY-6 that a single-gap rf cavity based upon two ferrite-loaded quarter-wave coaxial resonators with four turns each of main and supplementary bias windings will give frequencies of 0.71-7.02 MHz for adiabatic capture and of 0.86-8.00 MHz for synchronous capture. RF acceleration parameters and design features of the rf cavity are presented.

  14. Air cathode structure manufacture

    DOEpatents

    Momyer, William R.; Littauer, Ernest L.

    1985-01-01

    An improved air cathode structure for use in primary batteries and the like. The cathode structure includes a matrix active layer, a current collector grid on one face of the matrix active layer, and a porous, nonelectrically conductive separator on the opposite face of the matrix active layer, the collector grid and separator being permanently bonded to the matrix active layer. The separator has a preselected porosity providing low IR losses and high resistance to air flow through the matrix active layer to maintain high bubble pressure during operation of the battery. In the illustrated embodiment, the separator was formed of porous polypropylene. A thin hydrophobic film is provided, in the preferred embodiment, on the current collecting metal grid.

  15. Quantum efficiency temporal response and lifetime of a GaAs cathode in SRF electron gun

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, E.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Kewisch, J.; Burrill, A.; Rao, T.; Wu, Q.; Holmes, D.

    2010-05-23

    RF electron guns with a strained super lattice GaAs cathode can generate polarized electron beam of higher brightness and lower emittance than do DC guns, due to their higher field gradient at the cathode's surface. In a normal conducting RF gun, the extremely high vaccum required by these cathodes can not be met. We report on an experiment with a superconducting SRF gun, which can maintain a vacuum of nearly 10-12 torr because of cryo-pumping at the temperature of 4.2K. With conventional activation, we obtained a QE of 3% at 532 nm, with lifetime of nearly 3 days in the preparation chamber. We plan to use this cathode in a 1.3 GHz 1/2 cell SRF gun to study its performance. In addition, we studied the multipacting at the location of cathode. A new model based on the Forkker-Planck equation which can estimate the bunch length of the electron beam is discussed in this paper. Future particle accelerators such as eRHIC and ILC require high brightness, high current polarized electrons Recently, using a superlattice crystal, the maximum polarization of 95% was reached. Activation with Cs,O lowers the electron affinity and makes it energetically possible for all the electrons excited in to the conduction band and reach the surface to escape into the vacuum. Presently the polarized electron sources are based on DC gun, such as that at the CEBAF at Jlab. In these devices, the life time of the cathode is extended due to the reduced back bombardment in their UHV conditions. However, the low accelerating gradient of the DC guns lead to poor longitudinal emittance. The higher accelerating gradient of the RF gun generates low emittance beams. Superconducting RF guns combine the excellent vacuum conditions of the DC guns with the higher accelerating gradients of the RF guns and provide potentially a long lived cathode with very low transverse and longitudinal emittance. In our work at BNL, we successfully activated the GaAs. The quantum efficient is 3% at 532 nm and is expected

  16. Tomcat-Projects_RF

    2004-09-15

    Tomcat-Projects_RF is a software package for analyzing sensor data obtained from a database and displaying the results with Java Servlet Pages (JSP). SQL Views into the dataset are tailored for personnel having different roles in monitoring the items in a storage facility. For example, an inspector, a host treaty compliance officer, a system engineer and software developers were the users identified that would need to access data at different levels of detail, The analysis providesmore » a high level status of the storage facility and allows the user to go deeper into the data details if the user desires.« less

  17. Tomcat-Projects_RF

    SciTech Connect

    Warrant, Marilyn M.; Garcia, Rudy J.; Zhang, Pengchu; Arms, Robert M.; Herzer, John A.; Conrad, Gregory N.; Brabson, John M.

    2004-09-15

    Tomcat-Projects_RF is a software package for analyzing sensor data obtained from a database and displaying the results with Java Servlet Pages (JSP). SQL Views into the dataset are tailored for personnel having different roles in monitoring the items in a storage facility. For example, an inspector, a host treaty compliance officer, a system engineer and software developers were the users identified that would need to access data at different levels of detail, The analysis provides a high level status of the storage facility and allows the user to go deeper into the data details if the user desires.

  18. RF Modal Quantity Gaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanleuven, K.

    1989-01-01

    The primary objective is to provide a concept of a radio frequency (RF) modal resonance technique which is being investigated as a method for gaging the quantities of subcritical cryogenic propellants in metallic tanks. Of special interest are the potential applications of the technique to microgravity propellant gaging situations. The results of concept testing using cryogenic oxygen, hydrogen, and nitrogen, as well as paraffin simulations of microgravity fluid orientations, are reported. These test results were positive and showed that the gaging concept was viable.

  19. RF current sensor

    DOEpatents

    Moore, James A.; Sparks, Dennis O.

    1998-11-10

    An RF sensor having a novel current sensing probe and a voltage sensing probe to measure voltage and current. The current sensor is disposed in a transmission line to link all of the flux generated by the flowing current in order to obtain an accurate measurement. The voltage sensor is a flat plate which operates as a capacitive plate to sense voltage on a center conductor of the transmission line, in which the measured voltage is obtained across a resistance leg of a R-C differentiator circuit formed by the characteristic impedance of a connecting transmission line and a capacitance of the plate, which is positioned proximal to the center conductor.

  20. 2. Photocopy of old photo, after 1893. Photo found in ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Photocopy of old photo, after 1893. Photo found in building. Copied November, 1959 by Jack E. Boucher - C.F. Rumpp & Sons, Incorporated, Factory, 114-130 North Fifth Street at Cherry Street, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  1. 53. Historic American Buildings Survey Photo by Slevin Photo Taken: ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    53. Historic American Buildings Survey Photo by Slevin Photo Taken: April 1908 RUINS OF MISSION QUANDRANGLE - Mission San Carlos Borromeo, Rio Road & Lausen Drive, Carmel-by-the-Sea, Monterey County, CA

  2. Thermionic emission cathodes

    SciTech Connect

    Misumi, A.; Saito, S.

    1981-07-21

    A thermionic emission cathode comprising a base metal made of nickel-tungsten series alloy, for example an alloy comprising 90 to 70% by weight of nickel and 10 to 30% by weight of tungsten, and an emitter layer, which is formed on the base, made from a mixture of tungsten powder or nickel-tungsten alloy powder comprising 90 to 70% by weight of nickel and 10 to 30% by weight of tungsten, Ba/sub 3/Wo/sub 6/ powder and (C) zirconium powder or ZrH/sub 2/ powder, and if necessary interposing a powder layer between the base and the emitter layer, said powder layer having the same composition as the base metal and a particle size of 1 to 10 ..mu..m sealed on the surface of the base with a distribution density of 0.5 to 5.0 mg/cm/sup 2/, can be applied to both directly and indirectly heated type cathodes. Said cathode has such advantages as being able to be miniaturized and to have high current density.

  3. Old Sepia Photos

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cunningham, Kathy

    2010-01-01

    The author has always been fascinated by old photographs. As she looks at them, she wonders about the people. Who were they? What were their lives like? Where was this photo taken? A moment in time is frozen forever, for all to see. Inspired by old photographs, the author describes how her fifth-grade classes made their own "photographs" by…

  4. Making "Photo" Graphs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doto, Julianne; Golbeck, Susan

    2007-01-01

    Collecting data and analyzing the results of experiments is difficult for children. The authors found a surprising way to help their third graders make graphs and draw conclusions from their data: digital photographs. The pictures bridged the gap between an abstract graph and the plants it represented. With the support of the photos, students…

  5. Ion source with external RF antenna

    DOEpatents

    Leung, Ka-Ngo; Ji, Qing; Wilde, Stephen

    2005-12-13

    A radio frequency (RF) driven plasma ion source has an external RF antenna, i.e. the RF antenna is positioned outside the plasma generating chamber rather than inside. The RF antenna is typically formed of a small diameter metal tube coated with an insulator. An external RF antenna assembly is used to mount the external RF antenna to the ion source. The RF antenna tubing is wound around the external RF antenna assembly to form a coil. The external RF antenna assembly is formed of a material, e.g. quartz, which is essentially transparent to the RF waves. The external RF antenna assembly is attached to and forms a part of the plasma source chamber so that the RF waves emitted by the RF antenna enter into the inside of the plasma chamber and ionize a gas contained therein. The plasma ion source is typically a multi-cusp ion source.

  6. Glancing angle RF sheaths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Ippolito, D. A.; Myra, J. R.

    2013-10-01

    RF sheaths occur in tokamaks when ICRF waves encounter conducting boundaries. The sheath plays an important role in determining the efficiency of ICRF heating, the impurity influxes from the edge plasma, and the plasma-facing component damage. An important parameter in sheath theory is the angle θ between the equilibrium B field and the wall. Recent work with 1D and 2D sheath models has shown that the rapid variation of θ around a typical limiter can lead to enhanced sheath potentials and localized power deposition (hot spots) when the B field is near glancing incidence. The physics model used to obtain these results does not include some glancing-angle effects, e.g. possible modification of the angular dependence of the Child-Langmuir law and the role of the magnetic pre-sheath. Here, we report on calculations which explore these effects, with the goal of improving the fidelity of the rf sheath BC used in analytical and numerical calculations. Work supported by US DOE grants DE-FC02-05ER54823 and DE-FG02-97ER54392.

  7. The MUCOOL RF Program

    SciTech Connect

    Norem, J.; Bross, A.; Moretti, A.; Norris, B.; Qian, Z.; Torun, Y.; Rimmer, R.; Li, D.; Virostek, S.; Zisman, M.; Sandstrom, R.; /Geneva U.

    2006-06-26

    Efficient muon cooling requires high RF gradients in the presence of high (3T) solenoidal fields. The Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) also requires that the x-ray production from these cavities is low, in order to minimize backgrounds in the particle detectors that must be located near the cavities. These cavities require thin Be windows to ensure the highest fields on the beam axis. In order to develop these cavities, the MUCOOL RF Program was started about 6 years ago. Initial measurements were made on a six-cell cavity and a single-cell pillbox, both operating at 805 MHz. We have now begun measurements of a 201 MHz pillbox cavity. This program has led to new techniques to look at dark currents, a new model for breakdown and a general model of cavity performance based on surface damage. The experimental program includes studies of thin Be windows, conditioning, dark current production from different materials, magnetic-field effects and breakdown.

  8. The cathode plasma simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suksila, Thada

    Since its invention at the University of Stuttgart, Germany in the mid-1960, scientists have been trying to understand and explain the mechanism of the plasma interaction inside the magnetoplasmadynamics (MPD) thruster. Because this thruster creates a larger level of efficiency than combustion thrusters, this MPD thruster is the primary cadidate thruster for a long duration (planetary) spacecraft. However, the complexity of this thruster make it difficult to fully understand the plasma interaction in an MPD thruster while operating the device. That is, there is a great deal of physics involved: the fluid dynamics, the electromagnetics, the plasma dynamics, and the thermodynamics. All of these physics must be included when an MPD thruster operates. In recent years, a computer simulation helped scientists to simulate the experiments by programing the physics theories and comparing the simulation results with the experimental data. Many MPD thruster simulations have been conducted: E. Niewood et al.[5], C. K. J. Hulston et al.[6], K. D. Goodfellow[3], J Rossignol et al.[7]. All of these MPD computer simulations helped the scientists to see how quickly the system responds to the new design parameters. For this work, a 1D MPD thruster simulation was developed to find the voltage drop between the cathode and the plasma regions. Also, the properties such as thermal conductivity, electrical conductivity and heat capacity are temperature and pressure dependent. These two conductivity and heat capacity are usually definded as constant values in many other models. However, this 1D and 2D cylindrical symmetry MPD thruster simulations include both temperature and pressure effects to the electrical, thermal conductivities and heat capacity values interpolated from W. F. Ahtye [4]. Eventhough, the pressure effect is also significant; however, in this study the pressure at 66 Pa was set as a baseline. The 1D MPD thruster simulation includes the sheath region, which is the

  9. A Micromechanical RF Channelizer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akgul, Mehmet

    The power consumption of a radio generally goes as the number and strength of the RF signals it must process. In particular, a radio receiver would consume much less power if the signal presented to its electronics contained only the desired signal in a tiny percent bandwidth frequency channel, rather than the typical mix of signals containing unwanted energy outside the desired channel. Unfortunately, a lack of filters capable of selecting single channel bandwidths at RF forces the front-ends of contemporary receivers to accept unwanted signals, and thus, to operate with sub-optimal efficiency. This dissertation focuses on the degree to which capacitive-gap transduced micromechanical resonators can achieve the aforementioned RF channel-selecting filters. It aims to first show theoretically that with appropriate scaling capacitive-gap transducers are strong enough to meet the needed coupling requirements; and second, to fully detail an architecture and design procedure needed to realize said filters. Finally, this dissertation provides an actual experimentally demonstrated RF channel-select filter designed using the developed procedures and confirming theoretical predictions. Specifically, this dissertation introduces four methods that make possible the design and fabrication of RF channel-select filters. The first of these introduces a small-signal equivalent circuit for parallel-plate capacitive-gap transduced micromechanical resonators that employs negative capacitance to model the dependence of resonance frequency on electrical stiffness in a way that facilitates the analysis of micromechanical circuits loaded with arbitrary electrical impedances. The new circuit model not only correctly predicts the dependence of electrical stiffness on the impedances loading the input and output electrodes of parallel-plate capacitive-gap transduced micromechanical device, but does so in a visually intuitive way that identifies current drive as most appropriate for

  10. Depression cathode structure for cathode ray tubes having surface smoothness and method for producing same

    SciTech Connect

    Rychlewski, T.V.

    1984-10-23

    Depression cathode structures for cathode ray tubes are produced by dispensing liquid cathode material into the depression of a metallic supporting substrate, removing excess cathode material by passing a doctor blade across the substrate surface and over the depression, and drying the cathode layer to a substantially immobile state. The cathode layer may optionally be further shaped prior to substantially complete drying thereof.

  11. RF MEMS Based Reconfigurable Antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simons, Rainee N.

    2004-01-01

    The presentation will first of all address the advantages of RF MEMS circuit in antenna applications and also the need for electronically reconfigurable antennas. Next, discuss some of the recent examples of RF MEMS based reconfigurable microstrip antennas. Finally, conclude the talk with a summary of MEMS antenna performance.

  12. NSLS-II RF SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Rose, J.; Gash, W.; Holub, B.; Kawashima, Y.; Ma, H.; Towne, N.; Yeddulla, M.

    2011-03-28

    The NSLS-II is a new third generation light source being constructed at Brookhaven Lab. The storage ring is optimized for low emittance by use of damping wigglers to reduce the emittance to below 1 nm-rad. The RF systems are designed to provide stable beam through tight RF phase and amplitude stability requirements.

  13. Titanium diaphragm makes excellent amplitron cathode support

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Teich, W. W.

    1965-01-01

    Cathode support structure designed around a titanium diaphragm prevents radial misalignment between the cathode and anode in amplitrons. The titanium exhibits low thermal conductivity, tolerates lateral thermal expansion of the cathode, and is a poor primary and secondary emission medium.

  14. Observation of the hollow cathode effect from a dielectric cathode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Hyeon Seok; Oh, Jin Young; Kim, Youn Sang; Jong Lee, Se; Song, Kie Moon; Baik, Hong Koo

    2010-12-01

    The hollow cathode effect (HCE) is investigated in the dielectric hollow cathode structure in a Ne-Xe mixture at 4%. The influence of the dielectric is shown experimentally by the relationship between voltage and current peaks. The linearity of reduced current density confirms the existence of the HCE and shows that cathode fall has the same value at every pD condition. Varying the pD, the variation in the discharge mode can be measured with IR intensity emitted from the plasma and photographs of discharge in the visible part of the spectra. Voltages and current in the range of 3 kV at 10 µA were used. We suggest an electrode configuration reinforced in cathode sputtering for the display panel and light source using the dielectric hollow cathode discharge (DHCD), and introducing a mechanism of the DHCD mode.

  15. Shielding for thermoacoustic tomography with RF excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, M.; Becker, G.; Dey, P.; Generotzky, J.; Patch, S. K.

    2008-02-01

    Radiofrequency (RF) pulses used to generate thermoacoustic computerized tomography (TCT) signal couple directly into the pulser-receiver and oscilloscope, swamping true TCT signal. We use a standard RF enclosure housing both RF amplifier and object being imaged. This is similar to RF shielding of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) suites and protects electronics outside from stray RF. Unlike MRI, TCT receivers are ultrasound transducers, which must also be shielded from RF. A transducer housing that simultaneously shields RF and permits acoustic transmission was developed specifically for TCT. We compare TCT signals measured with and without RF shielding.

  16. A Micromechanical RF Channelizer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akgul, Mehmet

    The power consumption of a radio generally goes as the number and strength of the RF signals it must process. In particular, a radio receiver would consume much less power if the signal presented to its electronics contained only the desired signal in a tiny percent bandwidth frequency channel, rather than the typical mix of signals containing unwanted energy outside the desired channel. Unfortunately, a lack of filters capable of selecting single channel bandwidths at RF forces the front-ends of contemporary receivers to accept unwanted signals, and thus, to operate with sub-optimal efficiency. This dissertation focuses on the degree to which capacitive-gap transduced micromechanical resonators can achieve the aforementioned RF channel-selecting filters. It aims to first show theoretically that with appropriate scaling capacitive-gap transducers are strong enough to meet the needed coupling requirements; and second, to fully detail an architecture and design procedure needed to realize said filters. Finally, this dissertation provides an actual experimentally demonstrated RF channel-select filter designed using the developed procedures and confirming theoretical predictions. Specifically, this dissertation introduces four methods that make possible the design and fabrication of RF channel-select filters. The first of these introduces a small-signal equivalent circuit for parallel-plate capacitive-gap transduced micromechanical resonators that employs negative capacitance to model the dependence of resonance frequency on electrical stiffness in a way that facilitates the analysis of micromechanical circuits loaded with arbitrary electrical impedances. The new circuit model not only correctly predicts the dependence of electrical stiffness on the impedances loading the input and output electrodes of parallel-plate capacitive-gap transduced micromechanical device, but does so in a visually intuitive way that identifies current drive as most appropriate for

  17. Emission from ferroelectric cathodes

    SciTech Connect

    Sampayan, S.E.; Caporaso, G.J.; Holmes, C.L.; Lauer, E.J.; Prosnitz, D.; Trimble, D.O.; Westenskow, G.A.

    1993-05-17

    We have recently initiated an investigation of electron emission from ferroelectric cathodes. Our experimental apparatus consisted of an electron diode and a 250 kV, 12 ohm, 70 ns pulsed high voltage power source. A planar triode modulator driven by a synthesized waveform generator initiates the polarization inversion and allows inversion pulse tailoring. The pulsed high voltage power source is capable of delivering two high voltage pulses within 50 ns of each other and is capable of operating at a sustained repetition rate of 5 Hz. Our initial measurements indicate that emission current densities above the Child-Langmuir Space Charge Limit are possible. We explain this effect to be based on a non-zero initial energy of the emitted electrons. We also determined that this effect is strongly coupled to relative timing between the inversion pulse and application of the main anode-cathode pulse. We also have initiated brightness measurements of the emitted beam. As in our previous measurements at this Laboratory, we performed the measurement using a pepper pot technique. Beam-let profiles are recorded with a fast phosphor and gated cameras. We describe our apparatus and preliminary measurements.

  18. Cathodic hydrodimerization of nitroolefins

    PubMed Central

    Weßling, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Summary Nitroalkenes are easily accessible in high variety by condensation of aldehydes with aliphatic nitroalkanes. They belong to the group of activated alkenes that can be hydrodimerized by cathodic reduction. There are many olefins with different electron withdrawing groups used for cathodic hydrodimerization, but not much is known about the behaviour of the nitro group. Synthetic applications of this group could profit from the easy access to nitroolefins in large variety, the C–C bond formation with the introduction of two nitro groups in a 1,4-distance and the conversions of the nitro group by reduction to oximes and amines, the conversion into aldehydes and ketones via the Nef reaction and base catalyzed condensations at the acidic CH bond. Eight 1-aryl-2-nitro-1-propenes have been electrolyzed in an undivided electrolysis cell to afford 2,5-dinitro-3,4-diaryl hexanes in high yield. The 4-methoxy-, 4-trifluoromethyl-, 2-chloro- and 2,6-difluorophenyl group and furthermore the 2-furyl and 2-pyrrolyl group have been applied. The reaction is chemoselective as only the double bond but not the nitro group undergoes reaction, is regioselective as a ß,ß-coupling with regard to the nitro group and forms preferentially two out of six possible diastereomers as major products. PMID:26199673

  19. Virtual cathode microwave devices: Basics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thode, L. E.; Snell, C. M.

    Unlike a conventional microwave tube, a virtual-cathode device operates above the space-charge limit where the depth of the space-charge potential can cause electron reflection. The region associated with this electron reflection is referred to as a virtual cathode. Microwaves can be generated through oscillations in the position of the virtual cathode and through the bunching of electrons trapped in a potential well between the real and virtual cathodes. These two mechanisms are competitive. There are three basic classes of virtual cathode devices: (1) reflex triode; (2) reditron and side-shoot vircator; and (3) reflex diode or vircator. The reflex diode is the highest power virtual-cathode device. For the reflex diode the energy exchange between the beam and electromagnetic wave occurs in both the axial and radial directions. In some designs the oscillating virtual-cathode frequency exceeds the reflexing-electron frequency while in other designs the reflexing-electron frequency exceeds the oscillating virtual-cathode frequency. For the flex diode, a periodic disruption in magnetic insulation can modulate the high-frequency microwave power. Overall, particle-in-cell simulation predictions and axial reflex diode experiments are in good agreement. Although frequency stability and phase locking of the reflex diode have been demonstrated, little progress has been made in efficiency enhancement.

  20. Hot hollow cathode gun assembly

    DOEpatents

    Zeren, J.D.

    1983-11-22

    A hot hollow cathode deposition gun assembly includes a hollow body having a cylindrical outer surface and an end plate for holding an adjustable heat sink, the hot hollow cathode gun, two magnets for steering the plasma from the gun into a crucible on the heat sink, and a shutter for selectively covering and uncovering the crucible.

  1. Virtual cathode microwave devices -- Basics

    SciTech Connect

    Thode, L.E.; Snell, C.M.

    1991-01-01

    Unlike a conventional microwave tube, a virtual-cathode device operates above the space-charge limit where the depth of the space-charge potential can cause electron reflection. The region associated with this electron reflection is referred to as a virtual cathode. Microwaves can be generated through oscillations in the position of the virtual cathode and through the bunching of electrons trapped in a potential well between the real and virtual cathodes. These two mechanisms are competitive. There are three basic classes of virtual cathode devices: (1) reflex triode; (2) reditron and side-shoot vircator; and (3) reflex diode or vircator. The reflex diode is the highest power virtual-cathode device. For the reflex diode the energy exchange between the beam and electromagnetic wave occurs in both the axial and radial directions. In some designs the oscillating-virtual-cathode frequency exceeds the reflexing-electron frequency exceeds the oscillating-virtual-cathode frequency. For the flex diode a periodic disruption in magnetic insulation can modulate the high- frequency microwave power. Overall, particle-in-cell simulation predictions and axial reflex diode experiments are in good agreement. Although frequency stability and phase locking of the reflex diode have been demonstrated, little progress has been made in efficiency enhancement. 58 refs., 11 figs.

  2. High Pressure Hollow Cathode Discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoenbach, Karl H.; Tessnow, Thomas; Elhabachi, Ahmed

    1996-10-01

    The sustaining voltage of hollow cathode discharges is dependent on the product of pressure and cathode hole diameter. By reducing the dimension of the cathode hole to 0.2 mm we were able to operate micro-hollow cathode discharges at pressures up to 750 Torr in argon in a direct current mode. The current-voltage characteristics of the 0.2 mm cathode hole discharges was found to have a positive slope at currents below 0.25 mA. Up to this current level hollow cathode discharges can be operated in parallel without ballast. The negative slope observed above the threshold current seems to be due to the onset of thermionic electron emission caused by Joule heating of the cathode. This assumption is supported by the experimental observation that multi-hole operation without ballast even at currents far above the dc-threshold current was possible when the discharge was operated in a pulsed mode. The possibility of generating large arrays of ballast-free, pulsed micro-hollow cathode discharges suggests their use as flat panel light sources or electron sources.

  3. Composite Cathode-Ray Tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gangal, Mukund D.

    1988-01-01

    Proposed composite cathode-ray tube consists of rectangular array of cathode-ray tubes joined at edges, sharing common vacuum. Each electron gun generates independent image on portion of screen. Composite tube operates most advantageously under digital control to make available several display modes. Brightness and resolution of large images increased. Useful for classroom presentations, conferences, and the like.

  4. In Situ Observation of Dark Current Emission in a High Gradient rf Photocathode Gun.

    PubMed

    Shao, Jiahang; Shi, Jiaru; Antipov, Sergey P; Baryshev, Sergey V; Chen, Huaibi; Conde, Manoel; Gai, Wei; Ha, Gwanghui; Jing, Chunguang; Wang, Faya; Wisniewski, Eric

    2016-08-19

    Undesirable electron field emission (also known as dark current) in high gradient rf photocathode guns deteriorates the quality of the photoemission current and limits the operational gradient. To improve the understanding of dark current emission, a high-resolution (∼100  μm) dark current imaging experiment has been performed in an L-band photocathode gun operating at ∼100  MV/m of surface gradient. Scattered strong emission areas with high current have been observed on the cathode. The field enhancement factor β of selected regions on the cathode has been measured. The postexaminations with scanning electron microscopy and white light interferometry reveal the origins of ∼75% strong emission areas overlap with the spots where rf breakdown has occurred. PMID:27588860

  5. In Situ Observation of Dark Current Emission in a High Gradient rf Photocathode Gun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Jiahang; Shi, Jiaru; Antipov, Sergey P.; Baryshev, Sergey V.; Chen, Huaibi; Conde, Manoel; Gai, Wei; Ha, Gwanghui; Jing, Chunguang; Wang, Faya; Wisniewski, Eric

    2016-08-01

    Undesirable electron field emission (also known as dark current) in high gradient rf photocathode guns deteriorates the quality of the photoemission current and limits the operational gradient. To improve the understanding of dark current emission, a high-resolution (˜100 μ m ) dark current imaging experiment has been performed in an L -band photocathode gun operating at ˜100 MV /m of surface gradient. Scattered strong emission areas with high current have been observed on the cathode. The field enhancement factor β of selected regions on the cathode has been measured. The postexaminations with scanning electron microscopy and white light interferometry reveal the origins of ˜75 % strong emission areas overlap with the spots where rf breakdown has occurred.

  6. Miniature Reservoir Cathode: An Update

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vancil, Bernard K.; Wintucky, Edwin G.

    2002-01-01

    We report on recent work to produce a small low power, low cost reservoir cathode capable of long life (more than 100,000 hours) at high loading (> 5 A/sq cm). Our objective is a highly manufacturable, commercial device costing less than $30. Small highly loaded cathodes are needed, especially for millimeter wave tubes, where focusing becomes difficult when area convergence ratios are too high. We currently have 3 models ranging from .060-inch diameter to. 125-inch diameter. Reservoir type barium dispenser cathodes have a demonstrated capability for simultaneous high emission density and long life. Seven reservoir cathodes continue to operate on the cathode life test facility at NSWC, Crane, Indiana at 2 and 4 amps/sq cm. They have accumulated nearly 100,000 hours with practically no change in emission levels or knee temperature.

  7. Spectroscopy of {sup 257}Rf

    SciTech Connect

    Qian, J.; Heinz, A.; Winkler, R.; Khoo, T. L.; Janssens, R. V. F.; Peterson, D.; Seweryniak, D.; Ahmad, I.; Back, B. B.; Carpenter, M. P.; Greene, J. P.; Jiang, C. L.; Kondev, F. G.; Lauritsen, T.; Lister, C. J.; Robinson, A.; Savard, G.; Scott, R.; Vondrasek, R.; Wang, X.

    2009-06-15

    The isotope {sup 257}Rf was produced in the fusion-evaporation reaction {sup 208}Pb({sup 50}Ti,n){sup 257}Rf. Reaction products were separated and identified by mass. Delayed spectroscopy of {sup 257}Rf and its decay products was performed. A partial decay scheme with configuration assignments is proposed based on {alpha} hindrance factors. The excitation energy of the 1/2{sup +}[620] configuration in {sup 253}No is proposed. The energy of this 1/2{sup +} state in a series of N=151 isotones increases with nuclear charge, reflecting an increase in the N=152 gap. This gap is deduced to grow substantially from 850 to 1400 keV between Z=94 and 102. An isomeric state in {sup 257}Rf, with a half-life of 160{sub -31}{sup +42} {mu}s, was discovered by detecting internal conversion electrons followed by {alpha} decay. It is interpreted as a three-quasiparticle high-K isomer. A second group of internal conversion electrons, with a half-life of 4.1{sub -1.3}{sup +2.4} s, followed by {alpha} decay, was also observed. These events might originate from the decay of excited states in {sup 257}Lr, populated by electron-capture decay of {sup 257}Rf. Fission of {sup 257}Rf was unambiguously detected, with a branching ratio of b{sub Rf}{sup SF}=0.02{+-}0.01.

  8. RF breakdown experiments at SLAC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laurent, L.; Scheitrum, G.; Vlieks, A.; Pearson, C.; Caryotakis, G.; Luhmann, N. C.

    1999-05-01

    RF breakdown is a critical issue in the conditioning of klystrons, accelerator sections, and rf components for the next linear collider (NLC), as well as other high gradient accelerators and high power microwave sources. SLAC is conducting a series of experiments using an X-band traveling wave ring to characterize the processes and trigger mechanisms associated with rf breakdown. The goal of the research is to identify materials, processes, and manufacturing methods that will increase the breakdown threshold and minimize the time required for conditioning.

  9. Photo annealing effect on p-doped inverted organic solar cell

    SciTech Connect

    Lafalce, Evan; Toglia, Patrick; Lewis, Jason E.; Jiang, Xiaomei

    2014-06-28

    We report the transient positive photo annealing effect in which over 600% boost of power conversion efficiency was observed in inverted organic photovoltaic devices (OPV) made from P3HT/PCBM by spray method, after 2 hrs of constant solar AM 1.5 irradiation at low temperature. This is opposite to usual photodegradation of OPV, and cannot be explained by thermal activation alone since the mere temperature effect could only account for 30% of the enhancement. We have investigated the temperature dependence, cell geometry, oxygen influence, and conclude that, for p-doped active layer at room temperature, the predominant mechanism is photo-desorption of O{sub 2}, which eliminates electron traps and reduces space charge screening. As temperature decreases, thermal activation and deep trap-state filling start to show noticeable effect on the enhancement of photocurrent at intermediate low temperature (T = 125 K). At very low temperature, the dominant mechanism for photo annealing is trap-filling, which significantly reduces recombination between free and trapped carriers. At all temperature, photo annealing effect depends on illumination direction from cathode or anode. We also explained the large fluctuation of photocurrent by the capture/reemit of trapped electrons from shallow electron traps of O{sub 2}{sup -} generated by photo-doping. Our study has demonstrated the dynamic process of photo-doping and photo-desorption, and shown that photo annealing in vacuum can be an efficient method to improve OPV device efficiency.

  10. An experiment to test the viability of a gallium-arsenide cathode in a SRF electron gun

    SciTech Connect

    Kewisch,J.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Rao, T.; Burrill, A.; Pate, D.; Wu, Q.; Todd, R.; Wang, E.; Bluem, H.; Holmes, D.; Schultheiss, T.

    2009-05-04

    Strained gallium arsenide cathodes are used in electron guns for the production of polarized electrons. In order to have a sufficient quantum efficiency lifetime of the cathode the vacuum in the gun must be 10{sup -11} Torr or better, so that the cathode is not destroyed by ion back bombardment or through contamination with residual gases. All successful polarized guns are DC guns, because such vacuum levels can not be obtained in normal conducting RF guns. A superconductive RF gun may provide a sufficient vacuum level due to cryo-pumping of the cavity walls. We report on the progress of our experiment to test such a gun with normal GaAs-Cs crystals.

  11. Multiple Hollow Cathode Wear Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soulas, George C.

    1994-01-01

    A hollow cathode-based plasma contactor has been baselined for use on the Space Station to reduce station charging. The plasma contactor provides a low impedance connection to space plasma via a plasma produced by an arc discharge. The hollow cathode of the plasma contactor is a refractory metal tube, through which xenon gas flows, which has a disk-shaped plate with a centered orifice at the downstream end of the tube. Within the cathode, arc attachment occurs primarily on a Type S low work function insert that is next to the orifice plate. This low work function insert is used to reduce cathode operating temperatures and energy requirements and, therefore, achieve increased efficiency and longevity. The operating characteristics and lifetime capabilities of this hollow cathode, however, are greatly reduced by oxygen bearing contaminants in the xenon gas. Furthermore, an optimized activation process, where the cathode is heated prior to ignition by an external heater to drive contaminants such as oxygen and moisture from the insert absorbed during exposure to ambient air, is necessary both for cathode longevity and a simplified power processor. In order to achieve the two year (approximately 17,500 hours) continuous operating lifetime requirement for the plasma contactor, a test program was initiated at NASA Lewis Research Center to demonstrate the extended lifetime capabilities of the hollow cathode. To date, xenon hollow cathodes have demonstrated extended lifetimes with one test having operated in excess of 8000 hours in an ongoing test utilizing contamination control protocols developed by Sarver-Verhey. The objectives of this study were to verify the transportability of the contamination control protocols developed by Sarver-Verhey and to evaluate cathode contamination control procedures, activation processes, and cathode-to-cathode dispersions in operating characteristics with time. These were accomplished by conducting a 2000 hour wear test of four hollow

  12. Noninvasive sheath diagnostics in an inductively coupled plasma using a remote RF sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Satoru; Rauf, Shahid; Collins, Ken

    2011-10-01

    A commercial RF voltage/current (VI) sensor, mounted in the match circuit of an ICP chamber, is used to diagnose plasma density, sheath voltage and ion-energy distribution. The electrical measurements are related to plasma properties utilizing the algorithm proposed by Sobolewski (2000). This approach was previously confirmed by the authors in a commercial CCP chamber in which the VI probes were mounted on a surface close to the cathode surface, providing precise real-time RF VI signals. The VI sensor in the current work is mounted at the output of the match circuit with a complicated transmission line structure in-between. To transfer the RF voltage and current measurements at the match to the cathode surface, an ABCD matrix is calculated using the FDTD method for the specific cathode and chamber design. The resulting ABCD matrix well reflects the physical structure of the chamber, which allows one to approximate the ABCD matrix using simplified circuit concepts as well. The transformed voltages at 13.56 MHz are often 1.5 times larger than the measurement at the match, even though the total line-length is about 50 cm, which is attributed to the high characteristic impedances of some of the coaxial lines. The computed electron density is compared to measurements using a microwave resonant cavity probe and a Langmuir probe. The modeling shows good agreement with measurements.

  13. rf traveling-wave electron gun for photoinjectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaer, Mattia; Citterio, Alessandro; Craievich, Paolo; Reiche, Sven; Stingelin, Lukas; Zennaro, Riccardo

    2016-07-01

    The design of a photoinjector, in particular that of the electron source, is of central importance for free electron laser (FEL) machines where a high beam brightness is required. In comparison to standard designs, an rf traveling-wave photocathode gun can provide a more rigid beam with a higher brightness and a shorter pulse. This is illustrated by applying a specific optimization procedure to the SwissFEL photoinjector, for which a brightness improvement up to a factor 3 could be achieved together with a double gun output energy compared to the reference setup foreseeing a state-of-the-art S-band rf standing-wave gun. The higher brightness is mainly given by a (at least) double peak current at the exit of the gun which brings benefits for both the beam dynamics in the linac and the efficiency of the FEL process. The gun design foresees an innovative coaxial rf coupling at both ends of the structure which allows a solenoid with integrated bucking coil to be placed around the cathode in order to provide the necessary focusing right after emission.

  14. Modelling RF sources using 2-D PIC codes

    SciTech Connect

    Eppley, K.R.

    1993-03-01

    In recent years, many types of RF sources have been successfully modelled using 2-D PIC codes. Both cross field devices (magnetrons, cross field amplifiers, etc.) and pencil beam devices (klystrons, gyrotrons, TWT`S, lasertrons, etc.) have been simulated. All these devices involve the interaction of an electron beam with an RF circuit. For many applications, the RF structure may be approximated by an equivalent circuit, which appears in the simulation as a boundary condition on the electric field (``port approximation``). The drive term for the circuit is calculated from the energy transfer between beam and field in the drift space. For some applications it may be necessary to model the actual geometry of the structure, although this is more expensive. One problem not entirely solved is how to accurately model in 2-D the coupling to an external waveguide. Frequently this is approximated by a radial transmission line, but this sometimes yields incorrect results. We also discuss issues in modelling the cathode and injecting the beam into the PIC simulation.

  15. Modelling RF sources using 2-D PIC codes

    SciTech Connect

    Eppley, K.R.

    1993-03-01

    In recent years, many types of RF sources have been successfully modelled using 2-D PIC codes. Both cross field devices (magnetrons, cross field amplifiers, etc.) and pencil beam devices (klystrons, gyrotrons, TWT'S, lasertrons, etc.) have been simulated. All these devices involve the interaction of an electron beam with an RF circuit. For many applications, the RF structure may be approximated by an equivalent circuit, which appears in the simulation as a boundary condition on the electric field ( port approximation''). The drive term for the circuit is calculated from the energy transfer between beam and field in the drift space. For some applications it may be necessary to model the actual geometry of the structure, although this is more expensive. One problem not entirely solved is how to accurately model in 2-D the coupling to an external waveguide. Frequently this is approximated by a radial transmission line, but this sometimes yields incorrect results. We also discuss issues in modelling the cathode and injecting the beam into the PIC simulation.

  16. Unbalanced field RF electron gun

    SciTech Connect

    Hofler, Alicia

    2013-11-12

    A design for an RF electron gun having a gun cavity utilizing an unbalanced electric field arrangement. Essentially, the electric field in the first (partial) cell has higher field strength than the electric field in the second (full) cell of the electron gun. The accompanying method discloses the use of the unbalanced field arrangement in the operation of an RF electron gun in order to accelerate an electron beam.

  17. Rf-driver linear colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, P.B.

    1987-05-01

    The next generation of linear collider after the SLC (Stanford Linear Collider) will probably have an energy in the range 300 GeV-1 TeV per linac. A number of exotic accelerating schemes, such as laser and plasma acceleration, have been proposed for linear colliders of the far future. However, the technology which is most mature and which could lead to a collider in the above energy range in the relatively near future is the rf-driven linac, in which externally produced rf is fed into a more or less conventional metallic accelerating structure. Two basic technologies have been proposed for producing the required high peak rf power: discrete microwave power sources, and various two-beam acceleration schemes in which the rf is produced by a high current driving beam running parallel to the main accelerator. The current status of experimental and analytic work on both the discrete source and the two-beam methods for producing rf is discussed. The implications of beam-beam related effects (luminosity, disruption and beamstrahlung) for the design of rf-driven colliders are also considered.

  18. Electrical and Optical Measurements in an RF-Driven Micro-Discharge Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahony, C. M. O.; Gans, T.; Graham, W. G.; Maguire, P. D.; Petrovic, Z. Lj.

    2007-10-01

    Microdischarge properties are distinctly different to those of larger sources, leading to potential applications such as: high density tailored plasmas, local heating, fast material processing and scale up to large area sources. Hollow cathode operation is unlikely in micro-hollow cathode devices of diameter <= 100 μm^[1] because short mean free paths inhibit pendular electron motion. Thus diameters as small as 10 μm may be required for HC operation, a critical stability challenge. We report radio frequency operation in micro-hollow cathode structures for diameters as small as 25μm. The sources are operated in argon and helium at pressures of 20 to 600 Torr and ignite readily at ˜20 W, operating stably at powers <10W. Measurements of breakdown characteristics, rf current and voltage and optical emission were recorded. A number of operating modes have been observed in these sub-100μm dimensions and OES of argon and helium discharges indicates there is less sputtering with helium. Positive dc bias has been observed in the cathode potential under rf operation, similar to that reported by Guo & Hong^[2] at a diameter of 300 μm. [1] Kushner, J. Phys. D: Appl. Phys. 38 (2005) 1633 [2]Guo & Hong, Jpn. J. Appl. Phys. 42 (2003) 6598

  19. Investigations and applications of field- and photo-emitted electron beams from a radio frequency gun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panuganti, Sriharsha

    Production of quality electron bunches using efficient ways of generation is a crucial aspect of accelerator technology. Radio frequency electron guns are widely used to generate and rapidly accelerate electron beams to relativistic energies. In the current work, we primarily study the charge generation processes of photoemission and field emission inside an RF gun installed at Fermilab's High Brightness Electron Source Laboratory (HBESL). Specifically, we study and characterize second-order nonlinear photoemission from a Cesium Telluride (Cs2Te) semiconductor photocathode, and field emission from carbon based cathodes including diamond field emission array (DFEA) and carbon nanotube (CNT) cathodes located in the RF gun's cavity. Finally, we discuss the application experiments conducted at the facility to produce soft x-rays via inverse Compton scattering (ICS), and to generate uniformly filled ellipsoidal bunches and temporally-shaped electron beams from the Cs 2Te photocathode.

  20. Investigations and Applications of Field- and Photo-emitted Electron Beams from a Radio Frequency Gun

    SciTech Connect

    Panuganti, SriHarsha

    2015-08-01

    Production of quality electron bunches using e cient ways of generation is a crucial aspect of accelerator technology. Radio frequency electron guns are widely used to generate and rapidly accelerate electron beams to relativistic energies. In the current work, we primarily study the charge generation processes of photoemission and eld emission inside an RF gun installed at Fermilab's High Brightness Electron Source Laboratory (HBESL). Speci cally, we study and characterize second-order nonlinear photoemission from a Cesium Telluride (Cs2Te) semiconductor photocathode, and eld emission from carbon based cathodes including diamond eld emission array (DFEA) and carbon nanotube (CNT) cathodes located in the RF gun's cavity. Finally, we discuss the application experiments conducted at the facility to produce soft x-rays via inverse Compton scattering (ICS), and to generate uniformly lled ellipsoidal bunches and temporally shaped electron beams from the Cs2Te photocathode.

  1. Semantic photo synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Matthew; Brostow, G. J.; Shotton, J.; Kwatra, V.; Cipolla, R.

    2007-02-01

    Composite images are synthesized from existing photographs by artists who make concept art, e.g. storyboards for movies or architectural planning. Current techniques allow an artist to fabricate such an image by digitally splicing parts of stock photographs. While these images serve mainly to "quickly" convey how a scene should look, their production is laborious. We propose a technique that allows a person to design a new photograph with substantially less effort. This paper presents a method that generates a composite image when a user types in nouns, such as "boat" and "sand." The artist can optionally design an intended image by specifying other constraints. Our algorithm formulates the constraints as queries to search an automatically annotated image database. The desired photograph, not a collage, is then synthesized using graph-cut optimization, optionally allowing for further user interaction to edit or choose among alternative generated photos. Our results demonstrate our contributions of (1) a method of creating specific images with minimal human effort, and (2) a combined algorithm for automatically building an image library with semantic annotations from any photo collection.

  2. Observation of Quartz Cathode-Luminescence in a Low Pressure Plasma Discharge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, John E.

    2004-01-01

    Intense, steady-state cathode-luminescence has been observed from exposure of quartz powder to a low pressure rf-excited argon plasma discharge. The emission spectra (400 to 850 nm) associated with the powder luminescence were documented as a function of bias voltage using a spectrometer. The emission was broad-band, essentially washing out the line spectra features of the argon plasma discharge.

  3. FPGA-based RF interference reduction techniques for simultaneous PET-MRI.

    PubMed

    Gebhardt, P; Wehner, J; Weissler, B; Botnar, R; Marsden, P K; Schulz, V

    2016-05-01

    The combination of positron emission tomography (PET) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as a multi-modal imaging technique is considered very promising and powerful with regard to in vivo disease progression examination, therapy response monitoring and drug development. However, PET-MRI system design enabling simultaneous operation with unaffected intrinsic performance of both modalities is challenging. As one of the major issues, both the PET detectors and the MRI radio-frequency (RF) subsystem are exposed to electromagnetic (EM) interference, which may lead to PET and MRI signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) deteriorations. Early digitization of electronic PET signals within the MRI bore helps to preserve PET SNR, but occurs at the expense of increased amount of PET electronics inside the MRI and associated RF field emissions. This raises the likelihood of PET-related MRI interference by coupling into the MRI RF coil unwanted spurious signals considered as RF noise, as it degrades MRI SNR and results in MR image artefacts. RF shielding of PET detectors is a commonly used technique to reduce PET-related RF interferences, but can introduce eddy-current-related MRI disturbances and hinder the highest system integration. In this paper, we present RF interference reduction methods which rely on EM field coupling-decoupling principles of RF receive coils rather than suppressing emitted fields. By modifying clock frequencies and changing clock phase relations of digital circuits, the resulting RF field emission is optimised with regard to a lower field coupling into the MRI RF coil, thereby increasing the RF silence of PET detectors. Our methods are demonstrated by performing FPGA-based clock frequency and phase shifting of digital silicon photo-multipliers (dSiPMs) used in the PET modules of our MR-compatible Hyperion II (D) PET insert. We present simulations and magnetic-field map scans visualising the impact of altered clock phase pattern on the spatial RF field

  4. FPGA-based RF interference reduction techniques for simultaneous PET-MRI.

    PubMed

    Gebhardt, P; Wehner, J; Weissler, B; Botnar, R; Marsden, P K; Schulz, V

    2016-05-01

    The combination of positron emission tomography (PET) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as a multi-modal imaging technique is considered very promising and powerful with regard to in vivo disease progression examination, therapy response monitoring and drug development. However, PET-MRI system design enabling simultaneous operation with unaffected intrinsic performance of both modalities is challenging. As one of the major issues, both the PET detectors and the MRI radio-frequency (RF) subsystem are exposed to electromagnetic (EM) interference, which may lead to PET and MRI signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) deteriorations. Early digitization of electronic PET signals within the MRI bore helps to preserve PET SNR, but occurs at the expense of increased amount of PET electronics inside the MRI and associated RF field emissions. This raises the likelihood of PET-related MRI interference by coupling into the MRI RF coil unwanted spurious signals considered as RF noise, as it degrades MRI SNR and results in MR image artefacts. RF shielding of PET detectors is a commonly used technique to reduce PET-related RF interferences, but can introduce eddy-current-related MRI disturbances and hinder the highest system integration. In this paper, we present RF interference reduction methods which rely on EM field coupling-decoupling principles of RF receive coils rather than suppressing emitted fields. By modifying clock frequencies and changing clock phase relations of digital circuits, the resulting RF field emission is optimised with regard to a lower field coupling into the MRI RF coil, thereby increasing the RF silence of PET detectors. Our methods are demonstrated by performing FPGA-based clock frequency and phase shifting of digital silicon photo-multipliers (dSiPMs) used in the PET modules of our MR-compatible Hyperion II (D) PET insert. We present simulations and magnetic-field map scans visualising the impact of altered clock phase pattern on the spatial RF field

  5. FPGA-based RF interference reduction techniques for simultaneous PET-MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gebhardt, P.; Wehner, J.; Weissler, B.; Botnar, R.; Marsden, P. K.; Schulz, V.

    2016-05-01

    The combination of positron emission tomography (PET) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as a multi-modal imaging technique is considered very promising and powerful with regard to in vivo disease progression examination, therapy response monitoring and drug development. However, PET-MRI system design enabling simultaneous operation with unaffected intrinsic performance of both modalities is challenging. As one of the major issues, both the PET detectors and the MRI radio-frequency (RF) subsystem are exposed to electromagnetic (EM) interference, which may lead to PET and MRI signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) deteriorations. Early digitization of electronic PET signals within the MRI bore helps to preserve PET SNR, but occurs at the expense of increased amount of PET electronics inside the MRI and associated RF field emissions. This raises the likelihood of PET-related MRI interference by coupling into the MRI RF coil unwanted spurious signals considered as RF noise, as it degrades MRI SNR and results in MR image artefacts. RF shielding of PET detectors is a commonly used technique to reduce PET-related RF interferences, but can introduce eddy-current-related MRI disturbances and hinder the highest system integration. In this paper, we present RF interference reduction methods which rely on EM field coupling-decoupling principles of RF receive coils rather than suppressing emitted fields. By modifying clock frequencies and changing clock phase relations of digital circuits, the resulting RF field emission is optimised with regard to a lower field coupling into the MRI RF coil, thereby increasing the RF silence of PET detectors. Our methods are demonstrated by performing FPGA-based clock frequency and phase shifting of digital silicon photo-multipliers (dSiPMs) used in the PET modules of our MR-compatible Hyperion II D PET insert. We present simulations and magnetic-field map scans visualising the impact of altered clock phase pattern on the spatial RF field distribution

  6. FPGA-based RF interference reduction techniques for simultaneous PET–MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gebhardt, P.; Wehner, J.; Weissler, B.; Botnar, R.; Marsden, P. K.; Schulz, V.

    2016-05-01

    The combination of positron emission tomography (PET) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as a multi-modal imaging technique is considered very promising and powerful with regard to in vivo disease progression examination, therapy response monitoring and drug development. However, PET–MRI system design enabling simultaneous operation with unaffected intrinsic performance of both modalities is challenging. As one of the major issues, both the PET detectors and the MRI radio-frequency (RF) subsystem are exposed to electromagnetic (EM) interference, which may lead to PET and MRI signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) deteriorations. Early digitization of electronic PET signals within the MRI bore helps to preserve PET SNR, but occurs at the expense of increased amount of PET electronics inside the MRI and associated RF field emissions. This raises the likelihood of PET-related MRI interference by coupling into the MRI RF coil unwanted spurious signals considered as RF noise, as it degrades MRI SNR and results in MR image artefacts. RF shielding of PET detectors is a commonly used technique to reduce PET-related RF interferences, but can introduce eddy-current-related MRI disturbances and hinder the highest system integration. In this paper, we present RF interference reduction methods which rely on EM field coupling–decoupling principles of RF receive coils rather than suppressing emitted fields. By modifying clock frequencies and changing clock phase relations of digital circuits, the resulting RF field emission is optimised with regard to a lower field coupling into the MRI RF coil, thereby increasing the RF silence of PET detectors. Our methods are demonstrated by performing FPGA-based clock frequency and phase shifting of digital silicon photo-multipliers (dSiPMs) used in the PET modules of our MR-compatible Hyperion II D PET insert. We present simulations and magnetic-field map scans visualising the impact of altered clock phase pattern on the spatial RF field

  7. Performance of photocathode rf gun electron accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Ben-Zvi, I.

    1993-01-01

    In Photo-Injectors (PI) electron guns, electrons are emitted from a photocathode by a short laser pulse and then accelerated by intense rf fields in a resonant cavity. The best known advantage of this technique is the high peak current with a good emittance (high brightness). This is important for short wavelength Free-Electron Lasers and linear colliders. PIs are in operation in many electron accelerator facilities and a large number of new guns are under construction. Some applications have emerged, providing, for example, very high pulse charges. PIs have been operated over a wide range of frequencies, from 144 to 3000 MHz (a 17 GHz gun is being developed). An exciting new possibility is the development of superconducting PIs. A significant body of experimental and theoretical work exists by now, indicating the criticality of the accelerator elements that follow the gun for the preservation of the PI's performance as well as possible avenues of improvements in brightness. Considerable research is being done on the laser and photocathode material of the PI, and improvement is expected in this area.

  8. Performance of photocathode rf gun electron accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Ben-Zvi, I.

    1993-07-01

    In Photo-Injectors (PI) electron guns, electrons are emitted from a photocathode by a short laser pulse and then accelerated by intense rf fields in a resonant cavity. The best known advantage of this technique is the high peak current with a good emittance (high brightness). This is important for short wavelength Free-Electron Lasers and linear colliders. PIs are in operation in many electron accelerator facilities and a large number of new guns are under construction. Some applications have emerged, providing, for example, very high pulse charges. PIs have been operated over a wide range of frequencies, from 144 to 3000 MHz (a 17 GHz gun is being developed). An exciting new possibility is the development of superconducting PIs. A significant body of experimental and theoretical work exists by now, indicating the criticality of the accelerator elements that follow the gun for the preservation of the PI`s performance as well as possible avenues of improvements in brightness. Considerable research is being done on the laser and photocathode material of the PI, and improvement is expected in this area.

  9. Hollow Cathode With Multiple Radial Orifices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brophy, John R.

    1992-01-01

    Improved hollow cathode serving as source of electrons has multiple radial orifices instead of single axial orifice. Distributes ion current more smoothly, over larger area. Prototype of high-current cathodes for ion engines in spacecraft. On Earth, cathodes used in large-diameter ion sources for industrial processing of materials. Radial orientation of orifices in new design causes current to be dispersed radially in vicinity of cathode. Advantageous where desireable to produce plasma more nearly uniform over wider region around cathode.

  10. Observation of radio frequency ring-shaped hollow cathode discharge plasma with MgO and Al electrodes for plasma processing

    SciTech Connect

    Ohtsu, Yasunori Matsumoto, Naoki

    2014-05-15

    Various high-density plasma sources have been proposed for plasma processing. Especially, the hollow cathode discharge is one of the powerful ones. In this work, radio-frequency (RF) driven ring-shaped hollow cathode discharges with high secondary-electron emission have been investigated, using an aluminum (Al) cathode, coated or not with magnesium oxide (MgO). The thickness of MgO thin film is approximately 200 nm. The RF discharge voltage for the coated cathode is almost the same as that for the uncoated one, in a wide range of Ar gas pressure, from 5.3 to 53.2 Pa. The results reveal that the plasma density has a peak at an Ar gas pressure of 10.6 Pa for both cathodes. The plasma density for the coated cathode is about 1.5–3 times higher than that for the uncoated one, at various gas pressures. To the contrary, the electron temperature for the coated cathode is lower than temperature obtained with the uncoated cathode, at various gas pressures. Radial profiles of electron saturation current, which is proportional to plasma flux, are also examined for a wide range of gas pressure. Radial profiles of electron temperature at various axial positions are almost uniform for both cathodes so that the diffusion process due to density gradient is dominant for plasma transport. The secondary electrons emitted from the coated cathode contribute to the improvement of the plasma flux radial profile obtained using the uncoated cathode.

  11. Cold cathode vacuum discharge tube

    DOEpatents

    Boettcher, Gordon E.

    1998-01-01

    A cold cathode vacuum discharge tube, and method for making same, with an interior surface of the trigger probe coated with carbon deposited by carbon vapor deposition (CVD) or diamond-like carbon (DLC) deposition. Preferably a solid graphite insert is employed in the probe-cathode structure in place of an aluminum bushing employed in the prior art. The CVD or DLC probe face is laser scribed to allow resistance trimming to match available trigger voltage signals and to reduce electrical aging.

  12. Micro-hollow cathode dischargers

    SciTech Connect

    Schoenbach, K.H.; Verhappen, R.; Peterkin, F.E.

    1995-12-31

    In order to develop a hollow cathode discharge (HCD) with its increased current over planar electrode glow discharges, the cathode fall, which is on the order of the mean free path for ionization, must be comparable in length to the hole diameter. This indicates that the discharge parameters vary with pressure, p, times hole diameter, D. The pD product for stable operation of a hollow cathosde discharge was quoted to be on the order of one to ten Torr cm for noble gases, less for molecular gases. White (1959) observed the hollow cathode effect in a neon discharge at a pressure of 100 Torr when the hole dimensions were less than 1 mm. The cathode hole in his experiments changed from a cylindrical into a spherical cavity due to sputtering. The anode consisted in White`s experiment of a pin on the axis of the discharge geometry. We have studied micro-hollow (submillimeter) cathode discharges between two electrodes with aligned cylindrical holes by determining the current-voltage characteristics and the visual appearance of the discharge in argon over a wide range of pressure and voltage. The cross-section of the discharge geometry. The cathode is made of molybdenum or barium oxide inserted into a tungsten matrix (dispenser-cathode), the anode of molybdenum, and the dielectric spacer is mica. The discharge was operated under dc conditions, with half-wave rectified ac voltage applied, and pulsed with a 400 {mu}s rectangular voltage pulse. The lower limit in pressure was determined by the maximum voltage which could be applied to the discharge geometry without breakdown along insulators. The upper limit, in this study, is determined by the transition from cathode electrode emission due to ion-impact to thermal emission of electrons, which causes a dramatic increase in current and a drop in forward voltage to values on the order of 20 V.

  13. Towards a 100mA Superconducting RF Photoinjector for BERLinPro

    SciTech Connect

    Neumann, Axel; Anders, W; Burrill, Andrew; Jankowiak, Andreas; Kamps, T; Knobloch, Jens; Kugeler, Oliver; Lauinger, P; Matveenko, A N; Schmeisser, M; Volker, J; Ciovati, Gianluigi; Kneisel, Peter; Nietubyc, R; Schubert, S G; Smedley, John; Sekutowicz, Jacek; Volkov, V; Will, I; Zaplatin, Evgeny

    2013-09-01

    For BERLinPro, a 100 mA CW-driven SRF energy recovery linac demonstrator facility, HZB needs to develop a photo-injector superconducting cavity which delivers a at least 1mm*mr emittance beam at high average current. To address these challenges of producing a high peak brightness beam at high repetition rate, at first HZB tested a fully superconducting injector with a lead cathode*,followed now by the design of a SC cavity allowing operation up to 4 mA using CW-modified TTF-III couplers and inserting a normal conducting high quantum efficiency cathode using the HZDR-style insert scheme. This talk will present the latest results and an overview of the measurements with the lead cathode cavity and will describe the design and optimization process, the first production results of the current design and an outlook to the further development steps towards the full power version.

  14. Cold cathode vacuum gauging system

    DOEpatents

    Denny, Edward C.

    2004-03-09

    A vacuum gauging system of the cold cathode type is provided for measuring the pressure of a plurality of separate vacuum systems, such as in a gas centrifuge cascade. Each casing is fitted with a gauge tube assembly which communicates with the vacuum system in the centrifuge casing. Each gauge tube contains an anode which may be in the form of a slender rod or wire hoop and a cathode which may be formed by the wall of the gauge tube. The tube is provided with an insulated high voltage connector to the anode which has a terminal for external connection outside the vacuum casing. The tube extends from the casing so that a portable magnet assembly may be inserted about the tube to provide a magnetic field in the area between the anode and cathode necessary for pressure measurements in a cold cathode-type vacuum gauge arrangement. The portable magnetic assembly is provided with a connector which engages the external high voltage terminal for providing power to the anode within in the gauge tube. Measurement is made in the same manner as the prior cold cathode gauges in that the current through the anode to the cathode is measured as an indication of the pressure. By providing the portable magnetic assembly, a considerable savings in cost, installation, and maintenance of vacuum gauges for pressure measurement in a gas centrifuge cascade is realizable.

  15. QE Tests with Nb-Pb SRF Photoinjector and Arc Deposited Cathodes

    SciTech Connect

    J.K. Sekutowicz, P. Kneisel, R. Nietubyc, T. Rao, J. Smedley

    2010-05-01

    In this contribution, we report Quantum Efficiency (QE) test results with a hybrid lead/niobium superconducting RF (SRF) photoinjector at 2K and new Pb arc deposited cathodes at 300K. The ultimate goal of our effort is to build a Nb injector with the superconducting cathode made of lead, which, as reported in the past, demonstrated superior QE compared to other metallic superconducting elements. At first, we present the test results obtained with a 1.6-cell high purity Nb cavity with the emitting lead spot in the center of the back plate. The QE test results at room temperature and the SEM surface analysis of eight Pb cathodes, deposited recently under various conditions, are discussed in the second part of this contribution.

  16. Microhollow cathode discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoenbach, K. H.; Moselhy, M.; Shi, W.; Bentley, R.

    2003-07-01

    By reducing the dimensions of hollow cathodes into the hundred micrometer range, stable, direct current, high (atmospheric) pressure glow discharges in rare gases, rare gas-halide mixtures and in air could be generated. The electron energy distribution in these microdischarges is non-Maxwellian, with a pronounced high-energy tail. The high electron energy together with the high gas density, which favors three-body collisions, is the reason for an efficient excimer generation in these microplasmas. Excimer efficiencies from 1% to 9% have been measured for argon, xenon, argon fluoride, and xenon chloride direct current excimer emitters, with a radiant excimer emittance of up to 2 W/cm2 for xenon. Adding small amounts of oxygen to argon has allowed us to generate vacuum ultraviolet line radiation at 130.5 nm with an efficiency approaching 1%. Pulsing xenon discharges with nanosecond electrical pulses has led to an increase in intensity to 15 W/cm2 and to a simultaneous increase in efficiency to more than 20%. Operating the discharges in an abnormal glow mode has allowed us to generate microdischarge arrays without individual ballast. Applications of these plasma arrays are excimer lamps and plasma reactors.

  17. Phase modulation in RF tag

    DOEpatents

    Carrender, Curtis Lee; Gilbert, Ronald W.

    2007-02-20

    A radio frequency (RF) communication system employs phase-modulated backscatter signals for RF communication from an RF tag to an interrogator. The interrogator transmits a continuous wave interrogation signal to the RF tag, which based on an information code stored in a memory, phase-modulates the interrogation signal to produce a backscatter response signal that is transmitted back to the interrogator. A phase modulator structure in the RF tag may include a switch coupled between an antenna and a quarter-wavelength stub; and a driver coupled between the memory and a control terminal of the switch. The driver is structured to produce a modulating signal corresponding to the information code, the modulating signal alternately opening and closing the switch to respectively decrease and increase the transmission path taken by the interrogation signal and thereby modulate the phase of the response signal. Alternatively, the phase modulator may include a diode coupled between the antenna and driver. The modulating signal from the driver modulates the capacitance of the diode, which modulates the phase of the response signal reflected by the diode and antenna.

  18. Additive manufacturing of RF absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mills, Matthew S.

    The ability of additive manufacturing techniques to fabricate integrated electromagnetic absorbers tuned for specific radio frequency bands within structural composites allows for unique combinations of mechanical and electromagnetic properties. These composites and films can be used for RF shielding of sensitive electromagnetic components through in-plane and out-of-plane RF absorption. Structural composites are a common building block of many commercial platforms. These platforms may be placed in situations in which there is a need for embedded RF absorbing properties along with structural properties. Instead of adding radar absorbing treatments to the external surface of existing structures, which adds increased size, weight and cost; it could prove to be advantageous to integrate the microwave absorbing properties directly into the composite during the fabrication process. In this thesis, a method based on additive manufacturing techniques of composites structures with prescribed electromagnetic loss, within the frequency range 1 to 26GHz, is presented. This method utilizes screen printing and nScrypt micro dispensing to pattern a carbon based ink onto low loss substrates. The materials chosen for this study will be presented, and the fabrication technique that these materials went through to create RF absorbing structures will be described. The calibration methods used, the modeling of the RF structures, and the applications in which this technology can be utilized will also be presented.

  19. RF deflector system for beamlines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heikkinen, J.; Gustafsson, J.; Kivikoski, M.; Liukkonen, E.; Nieminen, V.

    1999-06-01

    In some in-beam experiments, an adjustment of the time structure of the cyclotron ion beam guided to the desired research target by a beamline is sometimes needed. This situation occurs if, for example, the decay times of the reaction products are too short compared to the period corresponding to the beam frequency. In the accelerator laboratory of the University of Jyväskylä the frequency of the ion pulses hitting the research target is 10-21 MHz depending on the frequency of the acceleration voltage. A RF deflector system was constructed to adjust the ion beam pulse frequency according to the respective requirements. A desired portion of the ion pulses are deflected by feeding a high-amplitude RF-signal between deflecting plates located into the beam line. The specified deflecting voltage amplitude of 10-15 kV is achieved with 1 kW of RF power.

  20. Cryogenic vacuumm RF feedthrough device

    DOEpatents

    Wu, Genfa; Phillips, Harry Lawrence

    2008-12-30

    A cryogenic vacuum rf feedthrough device comprising: 1) a probe for insertion into a particle beam; 2) a coaxial cable comprising an inner conductor and an outer conductor, a dielectric/insulating layer surrounding the inner conductor, the latter being connected to the probe for the transmission of higher mode rf energy from the probe; and 3) a high thermal conductivity stub attached to the coaxial dielectric about and in thermal contact with the inner conductor which high thermal conductivity stub transmits heat generated in the vicinity of the probe efficiently and radially from the area of the probe and inner conductor all while maintaining useful rf transmission line characteristics between the inner and outer coaxial conductors.

  1. The integrated optic RF spectrum analyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pedinoff, M. E.; Ranganath, T. R.; Joseph, T. R.; Lee, J. Y.

    1981-01-01

    The results of measurements made on a fully integrated optic RF spectrum analyzer (IOSA) are reported. The performance of the device acousto-optic bandwidth, single-tone RF resolution, two-tone RF resolution, single-tone dynamic range, two-tone dynamic range, and single-tone RF response are presented. The device parameters that control device performance are analyzed. These results demonstrate the viability of the IOSA for real time spectrum analysis of pulsed and CW RF signals. Improvements of RF bandwidth resolution can be obtained by the use of larger collimated optical beams which requires larger optical lens elements, and hence, larger crystals.

  2. Lowering the ignition voltage by the dual microhollow cathode configuration for multichannel flat panel lamp

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Tae Il; Park, Ki Wan; Lee, Sung Won; Baik, Hong Koo

    2006-03-20

    We have developed a dual microhollow cathode configuration, employing one power supply circuit with a resistor that is suitable for lamp starting without additional power supplier. We also investigated their electrical characteristics and photo images, varying the applied voltage. The electrical and optical measurements showed that the discharge passed through four distinct stages: no discharges, the first microhollow cathode discharges, the both of the first and second microhollow cathode discharges, and finally the main discharge. As a result, the V{sub s} and E{sub s}/p of a dual microhollow configuration were lower by a factor of about 2 than those of a diode at 40 Torr. We have also observed that the parallel operation can be possible with a single resistor in nine channels flat panel lamp.

  3. Plasma rotation induced by RF

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, V. S.; Chiu, S. C.; Lin-Liu, Y. R. [General Atomics, P.O. Box 85608, San Diego, California 92186-5698; Omelchenko, Y. A. [General Atomics, P.O. Box 85608, San Diego, California 92186-5698

    1999-09-20

    Plasma rotation has many beneficial effects on tokamak operation including stabilization of MHD and microturbulence to improve the beta limit and confinement. Contrary to present-day tokamaks, neutral beams may not be effective in driving rotation in fusion reactors; hence the investigation of radiofrequency (RF) induced plasma rotation is of great interest and potential importance. This paper reviews the experimental results of RF induced rotation and possible physical mechanisms, suggested by theories, to explain the observations. This subject is only in the infancy of its research and many challenging issues remained to be understood and resolved. (c) 1999 American Institute of Physics.

  4. RF-source resistance meters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oakley, E. C. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    Several embodiments of RF source resistance measuring devices are disclosed. Common to all embodiments in the feature of the inclusion of at least one variable resistor, and a peak readout meter. In one embodiment, two ganged unloaded potentiometers are employed while another embodiment comprises an automaticnulling RF power bridge circuit with a variable rather than a fixed bridge reference resistance. A third embodiment comprises a calorimeter with a varible rather than a fixed resistor, while in another embodiment attenuator pads with variable resistors are employed.

  5. Negative ion source with external RF antenna

    DOEpatents

    Leung, Ka-Ngo; Hahto, Sami K.; Hahto, Sari T.

    2007-02-13

    A radio frequency (RF) driven plasma ion source has an external RF antenna, i.e. the RF antenna is positioned outside the plasma generating chamber rather than inside. The RF antenna is typically formed of a small diameter metal tube coated with an insulator. An external RF antenna assembly is used to mount the external RF antenna to the ion source. The RF antenna tubing is wound around the external RF antenna assembly to form a coil. The external RF antenna assembly is formed of a material, e.g. quartz, which is essentially transparent to the RF waves. The external RF antenna assembly is attached to and forms a part of the plasma source chamber so that the RF waves emitted by the RF antenna enter into the inside of the plasma chamber and ionize a gas contained therein. The plasma ion source is typically a multi-cusp ion source. A converter can be included in the ion source to produce negative ions.

  6. High-Yield Metal Materials for Photocathode RF Gun

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, X.J.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Smedley, J.; Srinivasan-Rao, T.; Woodle, M.; Palmer, D.T.; Miller, R.H.

    1997-11-01

    Significant progress has been made in both improving the quantum efficiency and understanding the physics process of photoemission of metal photocathode materials under high electric field. Metal material, copper and magnesium were installed on the photocathode RF gun, and experimentally investigated using frequency quadrupled Nd:Yag laser (266 nm). A systemic procedure was developed for preparing cathode; this involves diamond polishing, ultrasonic cleaning and high temperature vacuum bake out. Using laser cleaning and explosive electron emission cleaning, the highest quantum efficiency measured for copper and magnesium are 0.02% and 0.3%, respectively. The Schottky effect was experimental investigated, the quantum efficiency of the Cu is dominated by the Schottky effect since the work function of the copper is almost equal to the photon energy used (4.66 eV). The quantum efficiency of the magnesium is significant enhanced by the Schottky effect.

  7. Hollow cathodes for arcjet thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luebben, Craig R.; Wilbur, Paul J.

    1987-01-01

    In an attempt to prevent exterior spot emission, hollow cathode bodies and orifice plates were constructed from boron nitride which is an electrical insulator, but the orifice plates melted and/or eroded at high interelectrode pressures. The most suitable hollow cathodes tested included a refractory metal orifice plate in a boron nitride body, with the insert insulated electrically from the orifice plate. In addition, the hollow cathode interior was evacuated to assure a low pressure at the insert surface, thus promoting diffuse electron emission. At high interelectrode pressures, the electrons tended to flow through the orifice plate rather than through the orifice, which could result in overheating of the orifice plate. Using a carefully aligned centerline anode, electron flow through the orifice could be sustained at interelectrode pressures up to 500 torr - but the current flow path still occasionally jumped from the orifice to the orifice plate. Based on these tests, it appears that a hollow cathode would operate most effectively at pressures in the arcjet regime with a refractory, chemically stable, and electrically insulating cathode body and orifice plate.

  8. Skin autofluorescence photo-bleaching and photo-memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lesins, Janis; Lihachev, Alexey; Rudys, Romualdas; Bagdonas, Saulius; Spigulis, Janis

    2011-07-01

    Photo-bleaching of in-vivo skin autofluorescence intensity under continuous low power laser irradiation has been studied. Temporal behavior of single-spot fluorescence and spectral fluorescent images have been studied at continuous 405 nm, 473 nm and 532 nm laser excitation and/or pre-irradiation, with power densities well below the laser-skin safety limits. Skin autofluorescence photo-memory effects (laser signatures) have been observed and analyzed, as well.

  9. Electrical characterization of rf plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, P.A.

    1991-08-01

    Radio-frequency (rf) electrical sources are commonly used to generate plasmas for processing of industrial materials and for related experimental work. Published descriptions of such plasmas usually include generator-power measurements, and occasionally include plasma dc-bias measurements. One or both of these quantitites are also used in industrial feedback ccontrol systems for setpoint regulation. Recent work at Sandia an elsewhere with an experimental rf discharge device (the GEC RF Reference Cell'') has shown that power and dc-bias levels are often insufficient information for specifying the state of the plasma. The plasma can have nonlinear electrical characteristics that cause harmonic generation, and the harmonic levels can depend sensitively on the impedance of the external circuitry at harmonic frequencies. Even though the harmonics may be low in amplitude, they can be directly related to large changes in plasma power and to changes in optical emission from the plasma. Consequently, in order for a worker to truly master the plasma-generation process, it is necessary to understand, measure, and control electrical characteristics of the plamsa. In this paper we describe technique that have been developed from work with the Reference Cell for making electrical measurements on rf plasmas, and we describe surprising observations of harmonic behavior. 10 refs., 4 figs.

  10. Automatic calorimetry system monitors RF power

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harness, B. W.; Heiberger, E. C.

    1969-01-01

    Calorimetry system monitors the average power dissipated in a high power RF transmitter. Sensors measure the change in temperature and the flow rate of the coolant, while a multiplier computes the power dissipated in the RF load.

  11. Simulation of synchrotron motion with rf noise

    SciTech Connect

    Leemann, B.T.; Forest, E.; Chattopadhyay, S.

    1986-08-01

    The theoretical formulation is described that is behind an algorithm for synchrotron phase-space tracking with rf noise and some preliminary simulation results of bunch diffusion under rf noise obtained by actual tracking.

  12. Official Apollo 11 Crew Photo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    The Official Crew Photo of the Apollo 11 Prime Crew. From left to right are Astronauts Neil A. Armstrong, Commander; Michael Collins, Command Module Pilot; and Edwin E. Aldrin Jr., Lunar Module Pilot.

  13. Cold cathode vacuum discharge tube

    DOEpatents

    Boettcher, G.E.

    1998-03-10

    A cold cathode vacuum discharge tube, and method for making same, are disclosed with an interior surface of the trigger probe coated with carbon deposited by carbon vapor deposition (CVD) or diamond-like carbon (DLC) deposition. Preferably a solid graphite insert is employed in the probe-cathode structure in place of an aluminum bushing employed in the prior art. The CVD or DLC probe face is laser scribed to allow resistance trimming to match available trigger voltage signals and to reduce electrical aging. 15 figs.

  14. Cold cathode vacuum discharge tube

    DOEpatents

    Boettcher, G.E.

    1998-04-14

    A cold cathode vacuum discharge tube, and method for making same, with an interior surface of the trigger probe coated with carbon deposited by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) or diamond-like carbon (DLC) deposition are disclosed. Preferably a solid graphite insert is employed in the probe-cathode structure in place of an aluminum bushing employed in the prior art. The CVD or DLC probe face is laser scribed to allow resistance trimming to match available trigger voltage signals and to reduce electrical aging. 14 figs.

  15. Two-photon photoemission from a copper cathode in an X -band photoinjector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, H.; Limborg-Deprey, C.; Adolphsen, C.; McCormick, D.; Dunning, M.; Jobe, K.; Raubenheimer, T.; Vrielink, A.; Vecchione, T.; Wang, F.; Weathersby, S.

    2016-02-01

    This paper presents two-photon photoemission from a copper cathode in an X -band photoinjector. We experimentally verified that the electron bunch charge from photoemission out of a copper cathode scales with laser intensity (I) square for 400 nm wavelength photons. We compare this two-photon photoemission process with the single photon process at 266 nm. Despite the high reflectivity (R ) of the copper surface for 400 nm photons (R =0.48 ) and higher thermal energy of photoelectrons (two-photon at 200 nm) compared to 266 nm photoelectrons, the quantum efficiency of the two-photon photoemission process (400 nm) exceeds the single-photon process (266 nm) when the incident laser intensity is above 300 GW /cm2 . At the same laser pulse energy (E ) and other experimental conditions, emitted charge scales inversely with the laser pulse duration. A thermal emittance of 2.7 mm-mrad per mm root mean square (rms) was measured on our cathode which exceeds by sixty percent larger compared to the theoretical predictions, but this discrepancy is similar to previous experimental thermal emittance on copper cathodes with 266 nm photons. The damage of the cathode surface of our first-generation X -band gun from both rf breakdowns and laser impacts mostly explains this result. Using a 400 nm laser can substantially simplify the photoinjector system, and make it an alternative solution for compact pulsed electron sources.

  16. RF digital-to-analog converter

    DOEpatents

    Conway, P.H.; Yu, D.U.L.

    1995-02-28

    A digital-to-analog converter is disclosed for producing an RF output signal proportional to a digital input word of N bits from an RF reference input, N being an integer greater or equal to 2. The converter comprises a plurality of power splitters, power combiners and a plurality of mixers or RF switches connected in a predetermined configuration. 18 figs.

  17. RF digital-to-analog converter

    DOEpatents

    Conway, Patrick H.; Yu, David U. L.

    1995-01-01

    A digital-to analogue converter for producing an RF output signal proportional to a digital input word of N bits from an RF reference input, N being an integer greater or equal to 2. The converter comprises a plurality of power splitters, power combiners and a plurality of mixers or RF switches connected in a predetermined configuration.

  18. First Characterization of a Fully Superconducting RF Photoinjector Cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Neumann, A; Barday, R; Jankowiak, A; Kamps, T; Knobloch, J; Kugeler, O; Matveenko, A N; Quast, T; Rudolph, J; Schubert, S G; Volker, J; Kneisel, P; Nietubyc, R; Sekutowicz, J K; Smedley, J; Volkov, V; Weinberg, G; Will, I

    2011-09-01

    As a first step towards a high brightness, high average current electron source for the BERLinPro ERL a fully superconducting photo-injector was developed by HZB in collaboration with JLab, DESY and the A. Soltan Institute. This cavity-injector ensemble is made up of a 1.6-cell superconducting cavity with a superconducting lead cathode deposited on the half-cell backwall. A superconducting solenoid is used for emittance compensation. This system, including a diagnostics beamline, has been installed in the HoBiCaT facility to serve as a testbed for beam dynamics studies and to test the combination SRF cavity and superconducting solenoid. This paper summarizes the characterization of the cavity in this configuration including Q measurements, dark current tests and field-stability analyses.

  19. High-current-density, high brightness cathodes for free electron laser applications

    SciTech Connect

    Green, M.C. . Palo Alto Microwave Tube Div.)

    1987-06-01

    This report discusses the following topics: brightness and emittance of electron beams and cathodes; general requirements for cathodes in high brightness electron guns; candidate cathode types; plasma and field emission cathodes; true field emission cathodes; oxide cathodes; lanthanum hexaborides cathodes; laser driven thermionic cathodes; laser driven photocathodes; impregnated porous tungsten dispenser cathodes; and choice of best performing cathode types.

  20. Wireless InGaN-Si/Pt device for photo-electrochemical water splitting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekimoto, Takeyuki; Hashiba, Hiroshi; Shinagawa, Shuichi; Uetake, Yusuke; Deguchi, Masahiro; Yotsuhashi, Satoshi; Ohkawa, Kazuhiro

    2016-08-01

    We demonstrate a wireless device comprising a gallium nitride (GaN)-silicon-based photo-electrode, and a platinum cathode. Compared with conventional two-electrode photo-electrochemical systems, this wireless monolithic device showed potential for a wider range of applications, and reduced the resistance losses resulting from the wiring and aqueous solution. The efficiency was improved when the electrolyte was changed from KHCO3 to NaOH because water oxidation capability of the surface of the GaN was enhanced. A wider solar spectrum wavelength range was exploited by adopting InGaN as a photo-absorption layer; the improved efficiency for hydrogen generation was 0.90%.

  1. Wireless InGaN–Si/Pt device for photo-electrochemical water splitting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekimoto, Takeyuki; Hashiba, Hiroshi; Shinagawa, Shuichi; Uetake, Yusuke; Deguchi, Masahiro; Yotsuhashi, Satoshi; Ohkawa, Kazuhiro

    2016-08-01

    We demonstrate a wireless device comprising a gallium nitride (GaN)–silicon-based photo-electrode, and a platinum cathode. Compared with conventional two-electrode photo-electrochemical systems, this wireless monolithic device showed potential for a wider range of applications, and reduced the resistance losses resulting from the wiring and aqueous solution. The efficiency was improved when the electrolyte was changed from KHCO3 to NaOH because water oxidation capability of the surface of the GaN was enhanced. A wider solar spectrum wavelength range was exploited by adopting InGaN as a photo-absorption layer; the improved efficiency for hydrogen generation was 0.90%.

  2. Remote control for anode-cathode adjustment

    DOEpatents

    Roose, Lars D.

    1991-01-01

    An apparatus for remotely adjusting the anode-cathode gap in a pulse power machine has an electric motor located within a hollow cathode inside the vacuum chamber of the pulse power machine. Input information for controlling the motor for adjusting the anode-cathode gap is fed into the apparatus using optical waveguides. The motor, controlled by the input information, drives a worm gear that moves a cathode tip. When the motor drives in one rotational direction, the cathode is moved toward the anode and the size of the anode-cathode gap is diminished. When the motor drives in the other direction, the cathode is moved away from the anode and the size of the anode-cathode gap is increased. The motor is powered by batteries housed in the hollow cathode. The batteries may be rechargeable, and they may be recharged by a photovoltaic cell in combination with an optical waveguide that receives recharging energy from outside the hollow cathode. Alternatively, the anode-cathode gap can be remotely adjusted by a manually-turned handle connected to mechanical linkage which is connected to a jack assembly. The jack assembly converts rotational motion of the handle and mechanical linkage to linear motion of the cathode moving toward or away from the anode.

  3. Novel Cathodes Prepared by Impregnation Procedures

    SciTech Connect

    Eduardo Paz

    2006-09-30

    (1) We showed that similar results were obtained when using various LSM precursors to produce LSM-YSZ cathodes. (2) We showed that enhanced performance could be achieved by adding LSCo to LSMYSZ cathodes. (3) We have preliminary results showing that there is a slow deactivation with LSFYSZ cathodes.

  4. Dual-Cathode Electron-Beam Source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bradley, James G.; Conley, Joseph M.; Wittry, David B.

    1988-01-01

    Beam from either cathode electromagnetically aligned with exit port. Electron beam from either of two cathodes deflected by magnetic and electric fields to central axis. Mechanical alignment of beam easy because cathode axes, anode apertures, and electron trajectories coplanar. Applications where uninterrupted service needed: scanning electron microscopes, transmission electron microscopes, electron-beam lithography equipment, Auger instruments, and microfocused x-ray sources.

  5. High gradient RF breakdown studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laurent, Lisa Leanne

    Higher accelerating gradients are required by future demands for TeV electron linear colliders. With higher energy comes the challenge of handling stronger electromagnetic fields in the accelerator structures and in the microwave sources that supply the power. A limit on the maximum field gradient is imposed by rf electrical breakdown. Investigating methods to achieve higher gradients and to better understand the mechanisms involved in the rf breakdown process has been the focal point of this study. A systematic series of rf breakdown experiments have been conducted at Stanford Linear Accelerator Center utilizing a transmission cavity operating in the TM020 mode. A procedure was developed to examine the high gradient section of the cavity in an electron microscope. The results have revealed that breakdown asymmetry exists between opposing high gradient surfaces. During breakdown, a plasma formation is detected localized near the surface with no visible evidence of an arc traversing the gap. These findings support the theory that high frequency rf breakdown is a single surface phenomenon. Other results from this study have shown that breakdown can occur at relatively low voltages when surface irregularities exist and along grain boundaries. A series of steps have been developed through this study that have significantly reduced the number of breakdowns that occur along grain boundaries. Testing under various vacuum conditions (10-11--10 -5 Torr) have revealed that while the breakdown threshold remained the same, the field emitted current density increased by almost two orders of magnitude. This suggests that the total field emitted current density is not the critical parameter in the initiation of high frequency vacuum breakdown. In the course of this study, microparticles were carefully tracked before and after rf processing. The outcome of this research suggests that expensive cleanroom facilities may not offer any advantage over practicing good cleaning and

  6. RF power coupling for the CSNS DTL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hua-Chang; Peng, Jun; Yin, Xue-Jun; Ouyang, Hua-Fu; Fu, Shi-Nian

    2011-01-01

    The China Spallation Neutron Source (CSNS) drift tube linac (DTL) consists of four tanks and each tank is fed by a 2.5 MW klystron. Accurate predication of RF coupling between the RF cavity and ports is very important for DTL RF coupler design. An iris-type coupler is chosen to couple the RF power to the DTL accelerating cavity. The physical design of the DTL coupler and the calculations of RF coupling between the cavity and coupler are carried out. The results from the numerical simulations are in excellent agreement with the analytical results.

  7. Cathode for molten salt batteries

    DOEpatents

    Mamantov, Gleb; Marassi, Roberto

    1977-01-01

    A molten salt electrochemical system for battery applications comprises tetravalent sulfur as the active cathode material with a molten chloroaluminate solvent comprising a mixture of AlCl.sub.3 and MCl having a molar ratio of AlCl.sub.3 /MCl from greater than 50.0/50.0 to 80/20.

  8. Modeling cathode boundary layer discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munoz-Serrano, E.; Boeuf, J. P.; Pitchford, L. C.

    2009-10-01

    A Cathode Boundary Layer Discharge or CBL (Schoenbach, et al Plasma Sources Sci. Technol. 13, 177,2004) is an electrode/dielectric/electrode sandwich with a central hole pierced through the dielectric and one of the electrodes (the anode). Thus, the cathode surface area available to the discharge is limited by the annular dielectric, and the discharge operates in an abnormal glow mode with a positive V-I characteristic at higher current. Using a two-dimensional fluid model, we have studied the electrical properties of CBLs in argon at 100 and 400 torr pressure. The spatial profiles of charged particle and metastable densities, potential, and gas temperature, as well as calculated V-I characteristics will be shown for a range of conditions for a 800 micron hole diameter. One interesting result (anticipated in the work of Belostotskiy, et al, Plasma Sources Sci. Technol 17, 045018, 2008) is that there is a sharp increase in the slope of the V-I characteristic when gas heating is taken into account. This current limiting effect is not observed when the discharge is able to expand on the outer surface of the cathode as in the case of the MicroHollow Cathode Discharge (MHCD) configuration, for example.

  9. PIC/MCC Simulation of Radio Frequency Hollow Cathode Discharge in Nitrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Qing; Wang, Jing; Zhang, Lianzhu

    2016-01-01

    A two-dimensional PIC/MCC model is developed to simulate the nitrogen radio frequency hollow cathode discharge (rf-HCD). It is found that both the sheath oscillation heating and the secondary electron heating together play a role to maintain the rf-HCD under the simulated conditions. The mean energy of ions (N2+, N+) in the negative glow region is greater than the thermal kinetic energy of the molecular gas (N2), which is an important characteristic of rf-HCD. During the negative portion of the hollow electrode voltage cycle, electrons mainly follow pendulum movement and produce a large number of ionization collisions in the plasma region. During the positive voltage of the rf cycle, the axial electric field becomes stronger and its direction is pointing to the anode (substrate), therefore the ions move toward the anode (substrate) via the axial electric field acceleration. Compared with dc-HCD, rf-HCD is more suitable for serving as a plasma jet nozzle at low pressure. supported by Natural Science Foundation of Hebei Province, China (No. A2012205072)

  10. Acoustic enhancement for photo detecting devices

    DOEpatents

    Thundat, Thomas G; Senesac, Lawrence R; Van Neste, Charles W

    2013-02-19

    Provided are improvements to photo detecting devices and methods for enhancing the sensitivity of photo detecting devices. A photo detecting device generates an electronic signal in response to a received light pulse. An electro-mechanical acoustic resonator, electrically coupled to the photo detecting device, damps the electronic signal and increases the signal noise ratio (SNR) of the electronic signal. Increased photo detector standoff distances and sensitivities will result.

  11. Microhollow Cathode Discharge Excimer Lamps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoenbach, K. H.

    1999-11-01

    character. Reducing the diameter of the cathode hole in a hollow cathode discharge geometry to values on the order of 100 μm has allowed us to extend the pressure range of stable, direct current hollow cathode gas discharges up to atmospheric pressure. The large concentration of high-energy electrons generated in the cathode fall, in combination with the high neutral gas density favors three-body processes such as excimer formation. Excimer emission in xenon discharges peaking at 172 nm, was observed with efficiencies between 6% and 9% at pressures of several hundred Torr. Typical forward voltages are 200 V at dc currents up to 8 mA. Pulsed operation allowed us to extend the current range to 80 mA with corresponding linear increase in optical power. Spatially resolved measurements showed that the source of the excimer radiation at atmospheric pressure and currents of less than 8 mA is confined to the cathode opening. The radiative emittance at 8 mA and atmospheric pressure is approximately 20 W/cm^2. With reduced pressure and increased current, respectively, the excimer source extends into the area outside the cathode hole. Besides in xenon, excimer emission in argon at a peak wavelength of 128 nm has been recorded. In addition to operating the discharge in rare gases, we have also explored its use as rare gas-halide excimer source. In a gas mixture containing 1% ArF we were able to generate stable dc discharges in flowing gas at pressures ranging from 100 Torr to atmospheric pressure. The spectra of the high-pressure ArF discharges are dominated by excimer radiation peaking at 193 nm. The excimer emission of a single ArF discharge at 700 Torr was measured as 150 mW at an efficiency of 3%. Parallel operation of these discharges by means of a resistive anode, which has recently been demonstrated for argon discharges, offers the possibility to use microhollow cathode discharge arrays as dc-excimer lamps, with estimated power densities exceeding 10 W/cm^2. abstract

  12. Double rf system for bunch shortening

    SciTech Connect

    Chin, Yong Ho.

    1990-11-01

    It was suggested by Zisman that the combination of the two systems (double rf system) may be more effective to shorten a bunch, compromising between the desirable and the undesirable effects mentioned above. In this paper, we demonstrate that a double rf system is, in fact, quite effective in optimizing the rf performance. The parameters used are explained, and some handy formulae for bunch parameters are derived. We consider an example of bunch shortening by adding a higher-harmonic rf system to the main rf system. The parameters of the main rf system are unchanged. The double rf system, however, can be used for another purpose. Namely, the original bunch length can be obtained with a main rf voltage substantially lower than for a single rf system without necessitating a high-power source for the higher-harmonic cavities. Using a double rf system, the momentum acceptance remains large enough for ample beam lifetime. Moreover, the increase in nonlinearity of the rf waveform increases the synchrotron tune spread, which potentially helps a beam to be stabilized against longitudinal coupled-bunch instabilities. We will show some examples of this application. We discuss the choice of the higher-harmonic frequency.

  13. Recent Advancements of RF Guns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faillace, Luigi

    High-brightness, high-current electron beams are the main requirement for fourth generation light sources such as free-electron lasers (FELs), energy recovery Linacs (ERLs) and high-energy linear colliders. The most successful device for producing such beams is the Radio-Frequency (RF) photoinjector that has been undergoing a constant evolution over the past nearly 30 years towards the production of ever-lower beam emittances and higher currents. The on-going progress in the technology of higher quality materials as well as the enhanced quality of laser pulse shaping have allowed huge improvements in the generation of higher-quality electron beams. Here, it is presented an overview of recent advancements and future perspectives of RF photoinjectors for a fifth generation light source.

  14. High-emission cold cathode

    DOEpatents

    Mancebo, L.

    1974-01-29

    A field-emission cathode having a multitude of field emission points for emitting a copious stream of electrons when subjected to a high field is described. The cathode is constructed by compressing a multitude of tungsten strips alternately arranged with molybdenum strips and copper ribbons or compressing alternately arranged copper plated tungsten and molybdenum strips, heating the arrangement to braze the tungsten and molybdenum strips together with the copper, machining and grinding the exposed strip edges of one side of the brazed arrangement to obtain a precisely planar surface, etching a portion of the molybdenum and copper to leave the edges of the tungsten strips protruding for electron emission, and subjecting the protruding edges of the tungsten strips to a high electric field to degas and roughen the surface to pnovide a large number of emitting points. The resulting structure is particularly useful as a cathode in a transversely excited gaseous laser where the cathode is mounted in a vacuum chamber for emitting electrons under the influence of a high electric field between the cathode and an extractor grid. The electrons pass through the extractor grid, a thin window in the wall of the laser chamber and into the laser chamber which is filled with a gaseous mixture of helium, nitrogen, and carbon dioxide. A second grid is mounted on the gaseous side of the window. The electrons pass into the laser chamber under the influence of a second electric field between the second grid and an anode in the laser chamber to raise selected gas atoms of the gaseous mixture to appropriately excited states so that a subsequent coherent light beam passing through the mixture transversely to the electron stream through windows in opposite ends of the laser chamber stimulates the excited atoms to amplify the beam. (Official Gazette)

  15. Cathode for aluminum producing electrolytic cell

    DOEpatents

    Brown, Craig W.

    2004-04-13

    A method of producing aluminum in an electrolytic cell comprising the steps of providing an anode in a cell, preferably a non-reactive anode, and also providing a cathode in the cell, the cathode comprised of a base material having low electrical conductivity reactive with molten aluminum to provide a highly electrically conductive layer on the base material. Electric current is passed from the anode to the cathode and alumina is reduced and aluminum is deposited at the cathode. The cathode base material is selected from boron carbide, and zirconium oxide.

  16. Nonaqueous battery with organic compound cathode

    SciTech Connect

    Yamaji, A.; Yamaki, J.

    1981-02-17

    A battery embodying this invention comprises: an anode including an anode-active material formed of one metal selected from the Group IA metals or preferably lithium metal; a cathode including a cathode-active material formed of metal or metal-free organic compounds having a phthalocyanine function or organic compounds having a porphin function; and an electrolyte prepared from a material which is chemically stable to the cathode and anode materials and permits the migration of the ion of the anode metal to the cathode for electrochemical reaction with the cathode-active material.

  17. Cathodes for molten-salt batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Argade, Shyam D.

    1993-01-01

    Viewgraphs of the discussion on cathodes for molten-salt batteries are presented. For the cathode reactions in molten-salt cells, chlorine-based and sulfur-based cathodes reactants have relatively high exchange current densities. Sulfur-based cathodes, metal sulfides, and disulfides have been extensively investigated. Primary thermal batteries of the Li-alloy/FeS2 variety have been available for a number of years. Chlorine based rechargable cathodes were investigated for the pulse power application. A brief introduction is followed by the experimental aspects of research, and the results obtained. Performance projections to the battery system level are discussed and the presentation is summarized with conclusions.

  18. Cathodes for molten-salt batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Argade, Shyam D.

    1993-02-01

    Viewgraphs of the discussion on cathodes for molten-salt batteries are presented. For the cathode reactions in molten-salt cells, chlorine-based and sulfur-based cathodes reactants have relatively high exchange current densities. Sulfur-based cathodes, metal sulfides, and disulfides have been extensively investigated. Primary thermal batteries of the Li-alloy/FeS2 variety have been available for a number of years. Chlorine based rechargable cathodes were investigated for the pulse power application. A brief introduction is followed by the experimental aspects of research, and the results obtained. Performance projections to the battery system level are discussed and the presentation is summarized with conclusions.

  19. Low jitter RF distribution system

    DOEpatents

    Wilcox, Russell; Doolittle, Lawrence; Huang, Gang

    2012-09-18

    A timing signal distribution system includes an optical frequency stabilized laser signal amplitude modulated at an rf frequency. A transmitter box transmits a first portion of the laser signal and receive a modified optical signal, and outputs a second portion of the laser signal and a portion of the modified optical signal. A first optical fiber carries the first laser signal portion and the modified optical signal, and a second optical fiber carries the second portion of the laser signal and the returned modified optical signal. A receiver box receives the first laser signal portion, shifts the frequency of the first laser signal portion outputs the modified optical signal, and outputs an electrical signal on the basis of the laser signal. A detector at the end of the second optical fiber outputs a signal based on the modified optical signal. An optical delay sensing circuit outputs a data signal based on the detected modified optical signal. An rf phase detect and correct signal circuit outputs a signal corresponding to a phase stabilized rf signal based on the data signal and the frequency received from the receiver box.

  20. Rf System for the NLCTA

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, J.W.; Adolphsen, C.; Eichner, J.; Fuller, R.W.; Gold, S.L.; Hanna, S.M.; Hoag, H.A.; Holmes, S.G.; Koontz, R.F.; Lavine, Theodore L.; Loewen, R.J.; Miller, R.H.; Nantista, C.D.; Pope, R.; Rifkin, J.; Ruth, R.D.; Tantawi, S.G.; Vlieks, A.E.; Wilson, Z.; Yeremian, A.; /SLAC

    2011-08-26

    This paper describes an X-Band RF system for the Next Linear Collider Test Accelerator. The RF system consists of a 90 MeV injector and a 540 MeV linac. The main components of the injector are two low-Q single-cavity prebunchers and two 0.9-m-long detuned accelerator sections. The linac system consists of six 1.8-m-long detuned and damped detuned accelerator sections powered in pairs. The rf power generation, compression, delivery, distribution and measurement systems consist of klystrons, SLEDII energy compression systems, rectangular waveguides, magic-T's, and directional couplers. The phase and amplitude for each prebuncher is adjusted via a magic-T type phase shifter/attenuator. Correct phasing between the two 0.9 m accelerator sections is obtained by properly aligning the sections and adjusting two squeeze type phase shifters. Bunch phase and bunch length can be monitored with special microwave cavities and measurement systems. The design, fabrication, microwave measurement, calibration, and operation of the sub-systems and their components are briefly presented.

  1. Rf System for the NLCTA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, J. W.; Adolphsen, C.; Eichner, J.; Fuller, R. W.; Gold, S. L.; Hanna, S. M.; Hoag, H. A.; Holmes, S. G.; Koontz, R. F.; Lavine, T. L.; Loewen, R. J.; Miller, R. H.; Nantista, C. D.; Pope, R.; Rifkin, J.; Ruth, R. D.; Tantawi, S. G.; Vlieks, A. E.; Wilson, Z.; Yeremian, A.

    1997-05-01

    This paper describes an X-Band rf system for the Next Linear Accelerator Test Accelerator. The rf system consists of a 90 MeV injector and a 540 MeV linac. The main components of the injector are two low-Q single-cavity prebunchers and two 0.9-m-long detuned accelerator sections. The linac system consists of six 1.8-m-long detuned, or damped and detuned, accelerator sections powered in pairs. The rf power generation, compression, delivery, distribution and measurement systems consist of klystrons, SLED-II energy compression systems, rectangular waveguides, magic-T's, and directional couplers. The phase and amplitude for each prebuncher is adjusted via a magic-T type phase shifter/attenuator. The correct phasing between two 0.9 m accelerator sections is obtained by properly setting the sections and adjusting two squeeze type phase shifters. Also, bunch phase and bunch length can be monitored by special microwave cavities and measurement systems. The design, fabrication, microwave measurement, calibration, and operation for above sub-systems and their components will be presented.

  2. Temperature Distributions in Hollow Cathode Emitters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polk, Jay; Marrese, Colleen; Thornber, Ben; Dang, Lisa; Johnson, Lee

    2004-01-01

    Life-limiting processes in hollow cathodes are determined largely by the temperature of the emitter. To support development of cathode life models we have developed a noncontact temperature measurement technique which employs a stepper motor-driven fiber optic probe. The probe is driven inside the hollow cathode and collects light radiated by the hot interior surface of the emitter. Ratio pyrometry is used determine the axial temperature profile. Thermocouples on the orifice plate provide measurements ofthe external temperature during cathode operation and are used to calibrate the pyrometer system in situ with a small oven enclosing the externally heated cathode. Initial measurements of the temperature distribution in a hollow cathode with the same geometry as a cathode that failed after operating at 12 A emission current for 27800 hours are discussed.

  3. Aberrations of the cathode objective lens up to fifth order.

    PubMed

    Tromp, R M; Wan, W; Schramm, S M

    2012-08-01

    In this paper we discuss a topic that was close to Prof. Gertrude Rempfer s interests for many years. On this occasion of her 100th birthday, we remember and honor Gertrude for her many outstanding contributions, and for the inspiring example that she set. We derive theoretical expressions for the aberration coefficients of the uniform electrostatic field up to 5th order and compare these with raytracing calculations for the cathode lens used in Low Energy Electron Microscopy and Photo Electron Emission Microscopy experiments. These higher order aberration coefficients are of interest for aberration corrected experiments in which chromatic (C(c)) and spherical (C₃) aberrations of the microscope are set to zero. The theoretical predictions are in good agreement with the results of raytracing. Calculations of image resolution using the Contrast Transfer Function method show that sub-nanometer resolution is achievable in an aberration corrected LEEM system. PMID:22188906

  4. Electron cyclotron resonance plasma photos

    SciTech Connect

    Racz, R.; Palinkas, J.; Biri, S.

    2010-02-15

    In order to observe and study systematically the plasma of electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion sources (ECRIS) we made a high number of high-resolution visible light plasma photos and movies in the ATOMKI ECRIS Laboratory. This required building the ECR ion source into an open ECR plasma device, temporarily. An 8MP digital camera was used to record photos of plasmas made from Ne, Ar, and Kr gases and from their mixtures. We studied and recorded the effect of ion source setting parameters (gas pressure, gas composition, magnetic field, and microwave power) to the shape, color, and structure of the plasma. The analysis of the photo series gave us many qualitative and numerous valuable physical information on the nature of ECR plasmas.

  5. LOW TEMPERATURE CATHODE SUPPORTED ELECTROLYTES

    SciTech Connect

    Harlan U. Anderson; Fatih Dogan; Vladimir Petrovsky

    2002-03-31

    This project has three main goals: Thin Films Studies, Preparation of Graded Porous Substrates and Basic Electrical Characterization and testing of Planar Single Cells. This period has continued to address the problem of making dense 1/2 to 5 {micro}m thick dense layers on porous substrates (the cathode LSM). Our current status is that we are making structures of 2-5 cm{sup 2} in area, which consist of either dense YSZ or CGO infiltrated into a 2-5 {micro}m thick 50% porous layer made of either nanoncrystalline CGO or YSZ powder. This composite structure coats a macroporous cathode or anode; which serves as the structural element of the bi-layer structure. These structures are being tested as SOFC elements. A number of structures have been evaluated both as symmetrical and as button cell configuration. Results of this testing indicates that the cathodes contribute the most to cell losses for temperatures below 750 C. In this investigation different cathode materials were studied using impedance spectroscopy of symmetric cells and IV characteristics of anode supported fuel cells. Cathode materials studied included La{sub 0.8}Sr{sub 0.2}Co{sub 0.2}Fe{sub 0.8}O{sub 3} (LSCF), La{sub 0.7}Sr{sub 0.2}MnO{sub 3} (LSM), Pr{sub 0.8}Sr{sub 0.2}Fe{sub 0.8}O{sub 3} (PSCF), Sm{sub 0.8}Sr{sub 0.2}Co{sub 0.2}Fe{sub 0.8}O{sub 3} (SSCF), and Yb{sub .8}Sr{sub 0.2}Co{sub 0.2}Fe{sub 0.8}O{sub 3} (SSCF). A new technique for filtering the Fourier transform of impedance data was used to increase the sensitivity of impedance analysis. By creating a filter specifically for impedance spectroscopy the resolution was increased. The filter was tailored to look for specific circuit elements like R//C, Warburg, or constant phase elements. As many as four peaks can be resolved using the filtering technique on symmetric cells. It may be possible to relate the different peaks to material parameters, like the oxygen exchange coefficient. The cathode grouped in order from lowest to highest ASR is

  6. Microhollow Cathode Discharge Excimer Lamps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoenbach, Karl H.

    1999-10-01

    Reducing the diameter of the cathode hole in hollow cathode discharge geometry to values on the order of 100 μm has allowed us to extend the pressure range of stable, direct current hollow cathode discharges up to atmospheric pressure. The large concentration of high-energy electrons in the nonthermal discharge, in combination with the high neutral gas density favors three-body processes such as rare gas excimer formation. Excimer emission in argon and xenon discharges peaking at 130 nm and 172 nm, respectively, was observed with an efficiency for xenon excimer emission between 6% and 9% in a pressure range from 250 Torr and 450 Torr. Typical forward voltages are 200 V at dc currents of up to 8 mA. Pulsed operation allowed us to extend the current range in xenon discharges to 80 mA. At pressures in the hundreds of Torr range the source of the excimer radiation extends over an area of several times the cathode opening. With increasing pressure the source is reduced in size and eventually, at pressures exceeding atmospheric becomes confined to the cathode opening. For a specific pressure the radiative power increases linearly with current at constant radiant emittance. For atmospheric pressure discharges in xenon the radiative emittance is approximately 20 W/cm^2. In addition to operating the discharge in rare gases, we have also explored its use as rare gas-halide excimer source. In a gas mixture containing 1 % ArF we were able to generate stable dc discharges in flowing gas at pressures ranging from 100 Torr to atmospheric pressure. The spectra of the high-pressure ArF discharges are dominated by excimer radiation peaking at 193 nm. The excimer emission of an ArF discharge at 700 Torr was measured as 150 mW. With a discharge voltage of 500 V, and a current of 10 mA the efficiency is 3 %. Parallel operation of the micro-discharges by means of a resistive anode offers the possibility to use microhollow cathode discharge arrays as dc-excimer lamps, with estimated

  7. Toward a photoconducting semiconductor RF optical fiber antenna array.

    PubMed

    Davis, R; Rice, R; Ballato, A; Hawkins, T; Foy, P; Ballato, J

    2010-09-20

    Recently, optical fibers comprising a crystalline semiconductor core in a silica cladding have been successfully drawn by a conventional drawing process. These fibers are expected to exhibit a photoconductive response when illuminated by photons more energetic than the band gap of the core. In the photoconducting state, such a fiber can be expected to support driven RF currents so as to function as an antenna element, much as a plasma antenna. In this paper, we report the first device-related results on a crystalline semiconductor core optical fiber potentially useful in a photoconducting optical fiber antenna array; namely, optically induced changes to the electrical conductivity of a glass-clad germanium-core optical fiber. Since DC photoconduction measurements were masked by a photovoltaic effect, RF measurements at 5 MHz were used to determine the magnitude of the induced photoconductive effect. The observed photoconductivity, though not large in the present experiment, was comparable to that measured for the bulk crystals from which the fibers were drawn. The absorbed pumping light generated photo-carriers, thereby transforming the core from a dielectric material to a conductor. This technology could thus enable a class of transient antenna elements useful in low observable and reconfigurable antenna array applications.

  8. Low Cost RF Amplifier for Community TV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ch, Syafaruddin; Sasongko, Sudi Mariyanto Al; Made Budi Suksmadana, I.; Mustiko Okta Muvianto, Cahyo; Ariessaputra, Suthami

    2016-01-01

    he capability of television to deliver audio video makes this media become the most effective method to spread information. This paper presents an experiment of RF amplifier design having low-cost design and providing sufficient RF power particularly for community television. The RF amplifier consists of two stages of amplifier. The first stage amplifier was used to leverage output of TV modulator from 11dBm to enable to drive next stage amplifier. CAD simulation and fabrication were run to reach optimum RF amplifier design circuit. The associated circuit was made by determining stability circle, stability gain, and matching impedance. Hence, the average power of first stage RF amplifier was 24.68dBm achieved. The second stage used RF modules which was ready match to 50 ohm for both input and output port. The experiment results show that the RF amplifier may operate at frequency ranging from 174 to 230MHz. The average output power of the 2nd stage amplifier was 33.38 Watt with the overall gain of 20.54dB. The proposed RF amplifier is a cheap way to have a stable RF amplifier for community TV. The total budget for the designed RF amplifier is only a 1/5 compared to local design of final TV amplifier.

  9. The INGV photos on Flickr

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anzidei, Marco; Felli, Concetta; D'Addezio, Giuliana

    2015-04-01

    In May 2012, right after the M=5.9 Emilia earthquake, was launched the Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia (INGV) photographic gallery on Flickr (https://www.flickr.com/photos/ingv/), to improve the INGV communication strategy. The main goals of this initiative were to inform society of the main ongoing research activities, new scientific discoveries, seismic, volcanic and environmental monitoring and key events at INGV. Specifically, to communicate through photos new results of scientific research in seismology, volcanology and environment, to enhance awareness of the earth sciences and related natural hazard in society. At this time, after about two and a half years from the beginning, have been published about 550 downloadable original photos on Flickr, collected in 45 albums. These were all shot by INGV researchers, technologists and technicians, during field surveys, seismic or volcanic emergencies or key events. Besides the INGV seismic and volcanic monitoring centers, photos document the effects of (i) main recent earthquakes in Italy; (ii) main volcanic eruptions in Italy and worldwide, (iii) Mediterranean sea and ocean tsunamis; (iv) environmental changes and monitoring activities and finally (vi) main events at INGV. Presently, the total number of views is over 2.277.000 with main peaks often in relationships with relevant Italian or worldwide earthquakes and volcanic eruptions. The most popular Photo (San Carlo, Emilia earthquake) has been viewed more than 56,000 times. Because each photo includes a brief scientific description and often is linked to press communicates launched by the INGV press office and to geophysical and geological publications, we believe that this initiative has increased people's awareness of the INGV activity and its role in society, contributing to the scientific outreach of researcher's work. .

  10. Emittance Studies of the BNL/SLAC/UCLA 1.6 Cell Photocathode RF Gun

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, D.T.; Wang, X.J.; Miller, R.H.; Babzien, M.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Pellegrini, C.; Sheehan, J.; Skaritka, J.; Winick, H.; Woodle, M.; Yakimenko, V.; /Brookhaven

    2011-09-09

    The symmetrized 1.6 cell S-band photocathode gun developed by the BNL/SLAC/UCLA collaboration is in operation at the Brookhaven Accelerator Test Facility (ATF). A novel emittance compensation solenoid magnet has also been designed, built and is in operation at the ATF. These two subsystems form an emittance compensated photoinjector used for beam dynamics, advanced acceleration and free electron laser experiments at the ATF. The highest acceleration field achieved on the copper cathode is 150 MV/m, and the guns normal operating field is 130 MV/m. The maximum rf pulse length is 3 {mu}s. The transverse emittance of the photoelectron beam were measured for various injection parameters. The 1 nC emittance results are presented along with electron bunch length measurements that indicated that at above the 400 pC, space charge bunch lengthening is occurring. The thermal emittance, {epsilon}{sub o}, of the copper cathode has been measured.

  11. Complete Photo-production Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    D'Angelo, A.; Bartalini, O.; Fantini, A.; Schaerf, C.; Vegna, V.; Ardashev, K.; Bade, C.; Hicks, K.; Kizilgul, S.; Lucas, M.; Mahon, J.; Bellini, V.; Blecher, M.; Bocquet, J.-P.; Lleres, A.; Rebreyend, D.; Capogni, M.; Caracappa, A.; Kistner, O. C.; Miceli, L.

    2011-10-24

    The extraction of resonance parameters from meson photo-reaction data is a challenging effort, that would greatly benefit from the availability of several polarization observables, measured for each reaction channel on both proton and neutron targets. In the aim of obtaining such complete experiments, polarized photon beams and targets have been developed at facilities, worldwide. We report on the latest results from the LEGS and GRAAL collaborations, providing single and double polarization measurements on pseudo-scalar meson photo-production from the nucleon.

  12. A low-frequency high-voltage rf-barrier-bunching system for high-intensity neutron source compressor rings

    SciTech Connect

    Hardek, T.W.; Ziomek, C.; Rees, D.

    1995-05-01

    A Los Alamos design for a 1-MW pulsed neutron source incorporates a ring utilizing an rf-barrier bunching system. This bunching concept allows uniform longitudinal beam distributions with low momentum spread. Bunching cavities are operated at the revolution frequency (1.5 MHz in this case) and each of the 2nd, 3rd, 4th, and 5th revolution frequency harmonics. Their effects combine to maintain a beam free gap in the longitudinal distribution of the accumulated beam. The cavities are driven by low-plate-resistance common-cathode configured retrode amplifiers incorporating local rf feedback. Additional adaptive feed-forward hardware is included to reduce the beam-induced bunching-gap voltages well below that achievable solely with rf feedback. Details of this system are presented along with a discussion of the various feed-back and feed-forward techniques incorporated.

  13. Filters for cathodic arc plasmas

    DOEpatents

    Anders, Andre; MacGill, Robert A.; Bilek, Marcela M. M.; Brown, Ian G.

    2002-01-01

    Cathodic arc plasmas are contaminated with macroparticles. A variety of magnetic plasma filters has been used with various success in removing the macroparticles from the plasma. An open-architecture, bent solenoid filter, with additional field coils at the filter entrance and exit, improves macroparticle filtering. In particular, a double-bent filter that is twisted out of plane forms a very compact and efficient filter. The coil turns further have a flat cross-section to promote macroparticle reflection out of the filter volume. An output conditioning system formed of an expander coil, a straightener coil, and a homogenizer, may be used with the magnetic filter for expanding the filtered plasma beam to cover a larger area of the target. A cathodic arc plasma deposition system using this filter can be used for the deposition of ultrathin amorphous hard carbon (a-C) films for the magnetic storage industry.

  14. Microhollow cathode discharge excimer lamps

    SciTech Connect

    Schoenbach, Karl H.; El-Habachi, Ahmed; Moselhy, Mohamed M.; Shi, Wenhui; Stark, Robert H.

    2000-05-01

    Microhollow cathode discharges are high-pressure, nonequilibrium gas discharges between a hollow cathode and a planar or hollow anode with electrode dimensions in the 100 {mu}m range. The large concentration of high-energy electrons, in combination with the high-gas density favors excimer formation. Excimer emission was observed in xenon and argon, at wavelengths of 128 and 172 nm, respectively, and in argon fluoride and xenon chloride, at 193 and 308 nm. The radiant emittance of the excimer radiation was found to increase monotonically with pressure. However, due to the decrease in source size with pressure, the efficiency (ratio of excimer radiant power to input electrical power), has for xenon and argon fluoride a maximum at {approx}400 Torr. The maximum efficiency is between 6% and 9% for xenon, and {approx}2% for argon fluoride. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics.

  15. Microhollow cathode discharge excimer lamps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoenbach, Karl H.; El-Habachi, Ahmed; Moselhy, Mohamed M.; Shi, Wenhui; Stark, Robert H.

    2000-05-01

    Microhollow cathode discharges are high-pressure, nonequilibrium gas discharges between a hollow cathode and a planar or hollow anode with electrode dimensions in the 100 μm range. The large concentration of high-energy electrons, in combination with the high-gas density favors excimer formation. Excimer emission was observed in xenon and argon, at wavelengths of 128 and 172 nm, respectively, and in argon fluoride and xenon chloride, at 193 and 308 nm. The radiant emittance of the excimer radiation was found to increase monotonically with pressure. However, due to the decrease in source size with pressure, the efficiency (ratio of excimer radiant power to input electrical power), has for xenon and argon fluoride a maximum at ˜400 Torr. The maximum efficiency is between 6% and 9% for xenon, and ˜2% for argon fluoride.

  16. Nickel-titanium-phosphate cathodes

    DOEpatents

    Belharouak, Ilias; Amine, Khalil

    2008-12-16

    Cathode materials having an improved electronic conductivity allowing for faster kinetics in the electrochemical reaction, as well as higher conductivity to meet the power requirements for many consumer applications, especially at low temperatures. The cathode material comprises a compound from the family of compounds where the basic unit is generally represented by Li.sub.xNi.sub.0.5TiOPO.sub.4. The structure of Li.sub.xNi.sub.0.5TiOPO.sub.4 includes corner sharing octahedra [TiO.sub.6] running along the C-axis. The structure is such that nearly three Li atoms are being inserted in Li.sub.xNi.sub.0.5TiOPO.sub.4. A cell in accordance with the principles of the present invention is rechargable and demonstrates a high capacity of lithium intercalation and fast kinetics.

  17. Diagnostics of RF magnetron sputtering plasma for synthesizing transparent conductive Indium-Zinc-Oxide film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohta, Takayuki; Inoue, Mari; Takota, Naoki; Ito, Masafumi; Higashijima, Yasuhiro; Kano, Hiroyuki; den, Shoji; Yamakawa, Koji; Hori, Masaru

    2009-10-01

    Transparent conductive Oxide film has been used as transparent conducting electrodes of optoelectronic devices such as flat panel display, solar cells, and so on. Indium-Zinc-Oxide (IZO) has been investigated as one of promising alternatives Indium Tin Oxide film, due to amorphous, no nodule and so on. In order to control a sputtering process with highly precise, RF magnetron sputtering plasma using IZO composite target was diagnosed by absorption and emission spectroscopy. We have developed a multi-micro hollow cathode lamp which can emit simultaneous multi-atomic lines for monitoring Zn and In densities simultaneously. Zn and In densities were measured to be 10^9 from 10^10 cm-3 at RF power from 40 to 100 W, pressure of 5Pa, and Ar flow rate of 300 sccm. The emission intensities of Zn, In, InO, and Ar were also observed.

  18. Single electron beam rf feedback free electron laser

    DOEpatents

    Brau, C.A.; Stein, W.E.; Rockwood, S.D.

    1981-02-11

    A free electron laser system and electron beam system for a free electron laser which uses rf feedback to enhance efficiency are described. Rf energy is extracted from a single electron beam by decelerating cavities and energy is returned to accelerating cavities using rf returns, such as rf waveguides, rf feedthroughs, resonant feedthroughs, etc. This rf energy is added to rf klystron energy to reduce the required input energy and thereby enhance energy efficiency of the system.

  19. Cathodic phenomena in aluminum electrowinning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouteillon, J.; Poignet, J. C.; Rameau, J. J.

    1993-02-01

    Although aluminum is one of the world's highest production-volume primary metals, it is particularly costly to produce for a variety of factors, not the least of which are the expenses associated with electrolytic reduction. Based on the scale of global aluminum processing, even minor improvements in the electrowinning technology can result in significant savings of resources. Thus, from this perspective, the following reviews recent studies of cathodic phenomena in aluminum electrowinning.

  20. Barium-Dispenser Thermionic Cathode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wintucky, Edwin G.; Green, M.; Feinleib, M.

    1989-01-01

    Improved reservoir cathode serves as intense source of electrons required for high-frequency and often high-output-power, linear-beam tubes, for which long operating lifetime important consideration. High emission-current densities obtained through use of emitting surface of relatively-low effective work function and narrow work-function distribution, consisting of coat of W/Os deposited by sputtering. Lower operating temperatures and enhanced electron emission consequently possible.

  1. High contrast cathode ray tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lisovicz, E. J.; Catlaw, T. G. (Inventor)

    1971-01-01

    A layer of material is described, which contains fine grains of phosphor material stimulated by electrons to produce visible radiation. The layer, which also contains fine grains of cobalt oxide, is deposited on the glass screen of a cathode ray tube to provide high contrast, by absorbing most of the visible radiation which is directed to the layer through the screen, while not materially affecting the visible light which the phosphor material produces in response to the electron stimulation.

  2. Overview of the RF Systems for LCLS

    SciTech Connect

    McIntosh, P.; Akre, R.; Boyce, R.; Emma, P.; Hill, A.; Rago, C.; /SLAC

    2005-06-15

    The Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) at SLAC, when it becomes operational in 2009, will provide its user community with an X-ray source many orders of magnitude brighter than anything available in the world at that time [1]. The electron beam acceleration will be provided by existing and new RF systems capable of maintaining the amplitude and phase stability of each bunch to extremely tight tolerances. RF feedback control of the various RF systems will be fundamental in ensuring the beam arrives at the LCLS undulator at precisely the required energy and peak current phase. This paper details the requirements for RF stability for the various LCLS RF systems and also highlights proposals for how these injector and Linac RF systems can meet these tight constraints.

  3. High voltage RF feedthrough bushing

    DOEpatents

    Grotz, Glenn F.

    1984-01-01

    Described is a multi-element, high voltage radio frequency bushing for trmitting RF energy to an antenna located in a vacuum container. The bushing includes a center conductor of complex geometrical shape, an outer coaxial shield conductor, and a thin-walled hollow truncated cone insulator disposed between central and outer conductors. The shape of the center conductor, which includes a reverse curvature portion formed of a radially inwardly directed shoulder and a convex portion, controls the uniformity of the axial surface gradient on the insulator cone. The outer shield has a first substantially cylindrical portion and a second radially inwardly extending truncated cone portion.

  4. Dust Growth by RF Sputtering

    SciTech Connect

    Churton, B.; Samarian, A. A.; Coueedel, L.

    2008-09-07

    The effect of the dust particle growth by RF sputtering on glow discharge has been investigated. It has been found that the growth of dust particles modifies the electrical characteristics of the discharge. In particularly, the absolute value of the self-bias voltage decreases during the particle growth due to the electron losses on the dust particles. To find the correlation between the dust growth and the self bias evolution, dust particles have been collected at different times. The dust particle growth rate is found to be linear.

  5. Robust multiplatform RF emitter localization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al Issa, Huthaifa; Ordóñez, Raúl

    2012-06-01

    In recent years, position based services has increase. Thus, recent developments in communications and RF technology have enabled system concept formulations and designs for low-cost radar systems using state-of-the-art software radio modules. This research is done to investigate a novel multi-platform RF emitter localization technique denoted as Position-Adaptive RF Direction Finding (PADF). The formulation is based on the investigation of iterative path-loss (i.e., Path Loss Exponent, or PLE) metrics estimates that are measured across multiple platforms in order to autonomously adapt (i.e. self-adjust) of the location of each distributed/cooperative platform. Experiments conducted at the Air-Force Research laboratory (AFRL) indicate that this position-adaptive approach exhibits potential for accurate emitter localization in challenging embedded multipath environments such as in urban environments. The focus of this paper is on the robustness of the distributed approach to RF-based location tracking. In order to localize the transmitter, we use the Received Signal Strength Indicator (RSSI) data to approximate distance from the transmitter to the revolving receivers. We provide an algorithm for on-line estimation of the Path Loss Exponent (PLE) that is used in modeling the distance based on Received Signal Strength (RSS) measurements. The emitter position estimation is calculated based on surrounding sensors RSS values using Least-Square Estimation (LSE). The PADF has been tested on a number of different configurations in the laboratory via the design and implementation of four IRIS wireless sensor nodes as receivers and one hidden sensor as a transmitter during the localization phase. The robustness of detecting the transmitters position is initiated by getting the RSSI data through experiments and then data manipulation in MATLAB will determine the robustness of each node and ultimately that of each configuration. The parameters that are used in the functions are

  6. MEMS technologies for rf communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Qun; Kim, B. K.

    2001-04-01

    Microelectromechanical system (MEMS) represents an exciting new technology derived from the same fabricating processes used to make integrated circuits. The trends of growing importance of the wireless communications market is toward the system with minimal size, cost and power consumption. For the purpose of MEMS R&D used for wireless communications, a history and present situation of MEMS device development are reviewed in this paper, and an overview of MEMS research topics on RF communication applications and the state of the art technologies are also presented here.

  7. OPERATION OF THE RHIC RF SYSTEMS.

    SciTech Connect

    BRENNAN,J.M.; BLASKIEWICZ,M.; DELONG,J.; FISCHER,W.; HAYES,T.; SMITH,K.S.; ZALTSMAN,A.

    2003-05-12

    Operational aspects of the RHIC rf system are described. To date three different beam combinations have been collided for physics production: gold-gold, deuteron-gold, and proton-proton(polarized). To facilitate this flexibility the rf systems of the two rings are independent and self-sufficient. Techniques to cope with problems such as, injection/capture, beam loading, bunch shortening, and rf noise have evolved and are explained.

  8. Photo CD: A Macintosh Primer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, Hugh

    1993-01-01

    Describes Photo CD, a procedure developed by Eastman Kodak for storing high-resolution 35mm film images on compact discs, and explains Macintosh microcomputer-based hardware and software that can be used with it. Software for viewing as well as editing and altering images is described, and future products are discussed. (four references) (LRW)

  9. Reconfigurable RF CMOS Circuit for Cognitive Radio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masu, Kazuya; Okada, Kenichi

    Cognitive radio and/or SDR (Software Defined Radio) inherently requires multi-band and multi standard wireless circuit. The circuit is implemented based on Si CMOS technology. In this article, the recent progress of Si RF CMOS is described and the reconfigurable RF CMOS circuit which was proposed by the authors is introduced. At the present and in the future, several kind of Si CMOS technology can be used for RF CMOS circuit implementation. The realistic RF CMOS circuit implementation toward cognitive and/or SDR is discussed.

  10. A pulsed cathodic arc spacecraft propulsion system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neumann, P. R. C.; Bilek, M. M. M.; Tarrant, R. N.; McKenzie, D. R.

    2009-11-01

    We investigate the use of a centre-triggered cathodic arc as a spacecraft propulsion system that uses an inert solid as a source of plasma. The cathodic vacuum arc produces almost fully ionized plasma with a high exhaust velocity (>104 m s-1), giving a specific impulse competitive with other plasma or ion thrusters. A centre trigger design is employed that enables efficient use of cathode material and a high pulse-to-pulse repeatability. We compare three anode geometries, two pulse current profiles and two pulse durations for their effects on impulse generation, energy and cathode material usage efficiency. Impulse measurement is achieved through the use of a free-swinging pendulum target constructed from a polymer material. Measurements show that impulse is accurately controlled by varying cathode current. The cylindrical anode gave the highest energy efficiency. Cathode usage is optimized by choosing a sawtooth current profile. There is no requirement for an exhaust charge neutralization system.

  11. Airborne RF Measurement System and Analysis of Representative Flight RF Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koppen, Sandra V.; Ely, Jay J.; Smith, Laura J.; Jones, Richard A.; Fleck, Vincent J.; Salud, Maria Theresa; Mielnik, John

    2007-01-01

    Environmental radio frequency (RF) data over a broad band of frequencies were needed to evaluate the airspace around several airports. An RF signal measurement system was designed using a spectrum analyzer connected to an aircraft VHF/UHF navigation antenna installed on a small aircraft. This paper presents an overview of the RF measurement system and provides analysis of a sample of RF signal measurement data over a frequency range of 30 MHz to 1000 MHz.

  12. RF/optical shared aperture for high availability wideband communication RF/FSO links

    SciTech Connect

    Ruggiero, Anthony J; Pao, Hsueh-yuan; Sargis, Paul

    2014-04-29

    An RF/Optical shared aperture is capable of transmitting and receiving optical signals and RF signals simultaneously. This technology enables compact wide bandwidth communications systems with 100% availability in clear air turbulence, rain and fog. The functions of an optical telescope and an RF reflector antenna are combined into a single compact package by installing an RF feed at either of the focal points of a modified Gregorian telescope.

  13. RF/optical shared aperture for high availability wideband communication RF/FSO links

    SciTech Connect

    Ruggiero, Anthony J; Pao, Hsueh-yuan; Sargis, Paul

    2015-03-24

    An RF/Optical shared aperture is capable of transmitting and receiving optical signals and RF signals simultaneously. This technology enables compact wide bandwidth communications systems with 100% availability in clear air turbulence, rain and fog. The functions of an optical telescope and an RF reflector antenna are combined into a single compact package by installing an RF feed at either of the focal points of a modified Gregorian telescope.

  14. Development program on a cold cathode electron gun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spindt, C. A.; Holland, C. E.

    1985-01-01

    During this phase of the cathode development program, SRI improved the multiple electron beam exposure system used to print hole patterns for the cathode arrays, studied anisotropic etch processes, conducted cathode investigations using an emission microscope, reviewed possible alternate materials for cathode fabrication, studied cathode storage techniques, conducted high power operation experiments, and demonstrated high-current-density operation with small arrays of tips.

  15. RF power recovery feedback circulator

    DOEpatents

    Sharamentov, Sergey I.

    2011-03-29

    A device and method for improving the efficiency of RF systems having a Reflective Load. In the preferred embodiment, Reflected Energy from a superconducting resonator of a particle accelerator is reintroduced to the resonator after the phase of the Reflected Energy is aligned with the phase of the Supply Energy from a RF Energy Source. In one embodiment, a Circulator is used to transfer Reflected Energy from the Reflective Load into a Phase Adjuster which aligns the phase of the Reflected Energy with that of the Supply Energy. The phase-aligned energy is then combined with the Supply Energy, and reintroduced into the Reflective Load. In systems having a constant phase shift, the Phase Adjuster may be designed to shift the phase of the Reflected Energy by a constant amount using a Phase Shifter. In systems having a variety (variable) phase shifts, a Phase Shifter controlled by a phase feedback loop comprising a Phase Detector and a Feedback Controller to account for the various phase shifts is preferable.

  16. Barrier RF stacking at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Weiren Chou et al.

    2003-06-04

    A key issue to upgrade the luminosity of the Tevatron Run2 program and to meet the neutrino requirement of the NuMI experiment at Fermilab is to increase the proton intensity on the target. This paper introduces a new scheme to double the number of protons from the Main Injector (MI) to the pbar production target (Run2) and to the pion production target (NuMI). It is based on the fact that the MI momentum acceptance is about a factor of four larger than the momentum spread of the Booster beam. Two RF barriers--one fixed, another moving--are employed to confine the proton beam. The Booster beams are injected off-momentum into the MI and are continuously reflected and compressed by the two barriers. Calculations and simulations show that this scheme could work provided that the Booster beam momentum spread can be kept under control. Compared with slip stacking, a main advantage of this new method is small beam loading effect thanks to the low peak beam current. The RF barriers can be generated by an inductive device, which uses nanocrystal magnet alloy (Finemet) cores and fast high voltage MOSFET switches. This device has been designed and fabricated by a Fermilab-KEK-Caltech team. The first bench test was successful. Beam experiments are being planned.

  17. RF sources for future colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, Robert M.

    1997-02-01

    As we push particle colliders to 1-TeV center-of-mass collision energy and beyond, we require much more from our RF energy sources, both in terms of the RF performance and the number required for a given machine. In order to conserve real estate, the operating frequency of future colliders is apt to be higher than the S-band used for the SLAC SLC. It is this inevitable trend toward higher frequencies which presents the source designer with the greatest challenge. This paper is about that challenge. For reasons which will become clear, as we go to frequencies substantially above X-band, we will require sources other than klystrons, probably of the type referred to as "fast-wave devices," such as FEL or gyro-based amplifiers, or two-beam accelerators. Because these are discussed elsewhere in this conference, I will stick to the klystron as my model in describing the challenges to be overcome, as well as the criteria which must be met by alternative sources for new accelerators.

  18. Interrelationship between marine biofouling and cathodic protection

    SciTech Connect

    Little, B.J.; Wagner, P.A. )

    1993-09-01

    Microorganisms colonize and form a gelatinous biofilm on all engineering materials exposed in natural marine environments, including cathodically protected surfaces. The impact of cathodic protection (CP) potentials on the chemical/biological composition of the biofilm and the impact of the biofilms on potentials required for CP have been the subject of many recent investigations. Literature on these subjects will be reviewed with emphasis on clarifying interactions between living and nonliving deposits on cathodically protected metal surfaces.

  19. Pyrite cathode material for a thermal battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pemsler, J. P.; Litchfield, J. K.

    1991-02-01

    The present invention relates in general to a synthetic cathode material for a molten salt battery and, more particularly, to a process of providing and using synthetic pyrite for use as a cathode in a thermal battery. These batteries, which have been successfully used in a number of military applications, include iron disulfide cathode material obtained as benefacted or from natural occurring pyrite deposits, or as a byproduct of flotation concentrate from the processing of base or noble metal ores.

  20. Theory and simulation of backbombardment in single-cell thermionic-cathode electron guns

    DOE PAGES

    Edelen, J.  P.; Biedron, S.  G.; Harris, J.  R.; Milton, S.  V.; Lewellen, J.  W.

    2015-04-01

    This paper presents a comparison between simulation results and a first principles analytical model of electron back-bombardment developed at Colorado State University for single-cell, thermionic-cathode rf guns. While most previous work on back-bombardment has been specific to particular accelerator systems, this work is generalized to a wide variety of guns within the applicable parameter space. The merits and limits of the analytic model will be discussed. This paper identifies the three fundamental parameters that drive the back-bombardment process, and demonstrates relative accuracy in calculating the predicted back-bombardment power of a single-cell thermionic gun.

  1. RF Reactive Magnetron Sputter Deposition of Silicon Sub-Oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Hattum, E. D.

    2007-01-01

    RF reactive magnetron plasma sputter deposition of silicon sub oxide E.D. van Hattum Department of Physics and Astronomy, Faculty of Sciences, Utrecht University The work described in the thesis has been inspired and stimulated by the use of SiOx layers in the direct inductive printing technology, where the SiOx layer is used as the charge retention layer on the drums for copying and printing devices. The thesis describes investigations of the plasma and of processes taking place on the sputter target and on the SiOx growth surface in the room temperature, RF reactive magnetron plasma sputter deposition technology. The sputtering target consists of silicon and the reactive atmosphere consists of an Ar/O2 mixture. The composition of the grown SiOx layers has been varied between x=0 and x=2 by variation of the O2 partial pressure. The characteristics of the growth process have been related to the nanostructural properties of the grown films. The deposition system enables the characterisation of the plasma (Langmuir probe, energy resolved mass spectrometer) and of the growing film (Elastic Recoil Detection (ERD), Fourier transform infrared absorption spectroscopy) and is connected to a beamline of a 6MV tandem van de Graaff accelerator. Also Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy have been applied. It is shown how ERD can be used as a real-time in-situ technique. The thesis presents spatially resolved values of the ion density, electron temperature and the quasi-electrostatic potential, determined using a Langmuir probe. The plasma potential has a maximum about 2 cm from the cathode erosion area, and decreases (more than 200 V typically) towards the floating sputter cathode. The potential decreases slightly in the direction towards the grounded growth surface and the positive, mainly Ar+, ions created in the large volume of the plasma closest to the substrate are accelerated towards the growth surface. These ions obtain a few eV of

  2. Arc initiation in cathodic arc plasma sources

    DOEpatents

    Anders, Andre

    2002-01-01

    A "triggerless" arc initiation method and apparatus is based on simply switching the arc supply voltage to the electrodes (anode and cathode). Neither a mechanical trigger electrode nor a high voltage flashover from a trigger electrode is required. A conducting path between the anode and cathode is provided, which allows a hot spot to form at a location where the path connects to the cathode. While the conductive path is eroded by the cathode spot action, plasma deposition ensures the ongoing repair of the conducting path. Arc initiation is achieved by simply applying the relatively low voltage of the arc power supply, e.g. 500 V-1 kV, with the insulator between the anode and cathode coated with a conducting layer and the current at the layer-cathode interface concentrated at one or a few contact points. The local power density at these contact points is sufficient for plasma production and thus arc initiation. A conductive surface layer, such as graphite or the material being deposited, is formed on the surface of the insulator which separates the cathode from the anode. The mechanism of plasma production (and arc initiation) is based on explosive destruction of the layer-cathode interface caused by joule heating. The current flow between the thin insulator coating and cathode occurs at only a few contact points so the current density is high.

  3. Phthalocyanine cathode materials for secondary lithium cells

    SciTech Connect

    Tamaki, J.; Yamaji, A.

    1982-01-01

    Discharge and charge characteristics of various phthalocyanine cathodes coupled with lithium metal are studied. The best capacity based only on cathode active material weight is 1440 A-hr/kg in the lithium/iron phthalocyanine system, and the cycle life of the lithium/Cu phthalocyanine system is more than 100 times at the discharge depth of 157 A-hr/kg. The cathode reaction mechanism is supposed to be lithium intercalation between phthalocyanine molecules. The results indicate that these phthalocyanines are promising cathode active materials for lithium secondary batteries.

  4. Development of High Energy Cathode (PNNL)

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Jiguang; Liu, Jun

    2011-01-01

    Lithium ion batteries with high energy densities are required to reach DOE’s goal on early commercialization of electrical vehicles, including HEV, PHEV and EV. To increase the energy of cathode, voltage or/and capacity of cathode need to be increased. During FY10, we have investigated cathode materials with high operation voltages, for example LiMnPO4, and renewable organic cathode with high capacities. Environmentally friendly materials and low cost synthesis approaches have been intentionally explored during our efforts.

  5. Emission properties of explosive field emission cathodes

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, Amitava; Patel, Ankur; Menon, Rakhee; Sharma, Archana; Chakravarthy, D. P.; Patil, D. S.

    2011-10-15

    The research results of the explosive field emission cathode plasma expansion velocity and the initial emission area in the planar diode configuration with cathodes made of graphite, stainless steel, polymer velvet, carbon coated, and carbon fiber (needle type) cathodes are presented. The experiments have been performed at the electron accelerator LIA-200 (200 kV, 100 ns, and 4 kA). The diode voltage has been varied from 28-225 kV, whereas the current density has been varied from 86-928 A/cm{sup 2} with 100 ns pulse duration. The experimentally obtained electron beam diode perveance has been compared with the 1 dimensional Child-Langmuir- law. It was found that initially only a part of the cathode take part in the emission process. The plasma expands at 1.7-5.2 cm/{mu}s for 4 mm anode-cathode gap for various cathode materials. It was found that the plasma expansion velocity increases with the decrease in the cathode diameter. At the beginning of the accelerating pulse, the entire cathode area participates in the electron emission process only for the multiple needle type carbon fiber cathode.

  6. Photo-assisted etching of silicon in chlorine- and bromine-containing plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Weiye; Sridhar, Shyam; Liu, Lei; Hernandez, Eduardo; Donnelly, Vincent M.; Economou, Demetre J.

    2014-05-01

    Cl2, Br2, HBr, Br2/Cl2, and HBr/Cl2 feed gases diluted in Ar (50%-50% by volume) were used to study etching of p-type Si(100) in a rf inductively coupled, Faraday-shielded plasma, with a focus on the photo-assisted etching component. Etching rates were measured as a function of ion energy. Etching at ion energies below the threshold for ion-assisted etching was observed in all cases, with Br2/Ar and HBr/Cl2/Ar plasmas having the lowest and highest sub-threshold etching rates, respectively. Sub-threshold etching rates scaled with the product of surface halogen coverage (measured by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy) and Ar emission intensity (7504 Å). Etching rates measured under MgF2, quartz, and opaque windows showed that sub-threshold etching is due to photon-stimulated processes on the surface, with vacuum ultraviolet photons being much more effective than longer wavelengths. Scanning electron and atomic force microscopy revealed that photo-etched surfaces were very rough, quite likely due to the inability of the photo-assisted process to remove contaminants from the surface. Photo-assisted etching in Cl2/Ar plasmas resulted in the formation of 4-sided pyramidal features with bases that formed an angle of 45° with respect to ⟨110⟩ cleavage planes, suggesting that photo-assisted etching can be sensitive to crystal orientation.

  7. Battery-Powered RF Pre-Ionization System for the Caltech Magnetohydrodynamically-Driven Jet Experiment: RF Discharge Properties and MHD-Driven Jet Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaplin, Vernon H.

    This thesis describes investigations of two classes of laboratory plasmas with rather different properties: partially ionized low pressure radiofrequency (RF) discharges, and fully ionized high density magnetohydrodynamically (MHD)-driven jets. An RF pre-ionization system was developed to enable neutral gas breakdown at lower pressures and create hotter, faster jets in the Caltech MHD-Driven Jet Experiment. The RF plasma source used a custom pulsed 3 kW 13.56 MHz RF power amplifier that was powered by AA batteries, allowing it to safely float at 4-6 kV with the cathode of the jet experiment. The argon RF discharge equilibrium and transport properties were analyzed, and novel jet dynamics were observed. Although the RF plasma source was conceived as a wave-heated helicon source, scaling measurements and numerical modeling showed that inductive coupling was the dominant energy input mechanism. A one-dimensional time-dependent fluid model was developed to quantitatively explain the expansion of the pre-ionized plasma into the jet experiment chamber. The plasma transitioned from an ionizing phase with depressed neutral emission to a recombining phase with enhanced emission during the course of the experiment, causing fast camera images to be a poor indicator of the density distribution. Under certain conditions, the total visible and infrared brightness and the downstream ion density both increased after the RF power was turned off. The time-dependent emission patterns were used for an indirect measurement of the neutral gas pressure. The low-mass jets formed with the aid of the pre-ionization system were extremely narrow and collimated near the electrodes, with peak density exceeding that of jets created without pre-ionization. The initial neutral gas distribution prior to plasma breakdown was found to be critical in determining the ultimate jet structure. The visible radius of the dense central jet column was several times narrower than the axial current channel

  8. 47 CFR 101.1525 - RF safety.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false RF safety. 101.1525 Section 101.1525 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES FIXED MICROWAVE SERVICES Service and Technical Rules for the 70/80/90 GHz Bands § 101.1525 RF safety. Licensees in the...

  9. 47 CFR 95.1125 - RF safety.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false RF safety. 95.1125 Section 95.1125 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES PERSONAL RADIO SERVICES Wireless Medical Telemetry Service (WMTS) General Provisions § 95.1125 RF safety. Portable...

  10. 47 CFR 95.1125 - RF safety.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false RF safety. 95.1125 Section 95.1125 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES PERSONAL RADIO SERVICES Wireless Medical Telemetry Service (WMTS) General Provisions § 95.1125 RF safety. Portable...

  11. 47 CFR 90.1335 - RF safety.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false RF safety. 90.1335 Section 90.1335 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES PRIVATE LAND MOBILE RADIO SERVICES Wireless Broadband Services in the 3650-3700 MHz Band § 90.1335 RF...

  12. 47 CFR 90.1335 - RF safety.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false RF safety. 90.1335 Section 90.1335 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES PRIVATE LAND MOBILE RADIO SERVICES Wireless Broadband Services in the 3650-3700 MHz Band § 90.1335 RF...

  13. 47 CFR 90.1335 - RF safety.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false RF safety. 90.1335 Section 90.1335 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES PRIVATE LAND MOBILE RADIO SERVICES Wireless Broadband Services in the 3650-3700 MHz Band § 90.1335 RF...

  14. 47 CFR 101.1525 - RF safety.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false RF safety. 101.1525 Section 101.1525 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES FIXED MICROWAVE SERVICES Service and Technical Rules for the 70/80/90 GHz Bands § 101.1525 RF safety. Licensees in the...

  15. 47 CFR 101.1525 - RF safety.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false RF safety. 101.1525 Section 101.1525 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES FIXED MICROWAVE SERVICES Service and Technical Rules for the 70/80/90 GHz Bands § 101.1525 RF safety. Licensees in the...

  16. 47 CFR 95.1125 - RF safety.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false RF safety. 95.1125 Section 95.1125 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES PERSONAL RADIO SERVICES Wireless Medical Telemetry Service (WMTS) General Provisions § 95.1125 RF safety. Portable...

  17. 47 CFR 101.1525 - RF safety.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false RF safety. 101.1525 Section 101.1525 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES FIXED MICROWAVE SERVICES Service and Technical Rules for the 70/80/90 GHz Bands § 101.1525 RF safety. Licensees in the...

  18. 47 CFR 95.1125 - RF safety.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false RF safety. 95.1125 Section 95.1125 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES PERSONAL RADIO SERVICES Wireless Medical Telemetry Service (WMTS) General Provisions § 95.1125 RF safety. Portable...

  19. 47 CFR 101.1525 - RF safety.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false RF safety. 101.1525 Section 101.1525 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES FIXED MICROWAVE SERVICES Service and Technical Rules for the 70/80/90 GHz Bands § 101.1525 RF safety. Licensees in the...

  20. 47 CFR 90.1335 - RF safety.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false RF safety. 90.1335 Section 90.1335 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES PRIVATE LAND MOBILE RADIO SERVICES Wireless Broadband Services in the 3650-3700 MHz Band § 90.1335 RF...

  1. RF-controlled implantable solid state switch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fryer, T. B.

    1971-01-01

    Miniature, totally implantable, solid state RF-controlled switching circuit for biotelemetry systems consumes zero power in off condition and turns on or off by pulse of RF energy. Switch, the size of small coin, is reducible by integrated circuit techniques.

  2. 47 CFR 27.52 - RF safety.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false RF safety. 27.52 Section 27.52 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES MISCELLANEOUS WIRELESS COMMUNICATIONS SERVICES Technical Standards § 27.52 RF safety. Licensees and manufacturers are subject to...

  3. 47 CFR 95.1125 - RF safety.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false RF safety. 95.1125 Section 95.1125 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES PERSONAL RADIO SERVICES Wireless Medical Telemetry Service (WMTS) General Provisions § 95.1125 RF safety. Portable...

  4. 47 CFR 27.52 - RF safety.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false RF safety. 27.52 Section 27.52 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES MISCELLANEOUS WIRELESS COMMUNICATIONS SERVICES Technical Standards § 27.52 RF safety. Licensees and manufacturers are subject to...

  5. 47 CFR 27.52 - RF safety.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false RF safety. 27.52 Section 27.52 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES MISCELLANEOUS WIRELESS COMMUNICATIONS SERVICES Technical Standards § 27.52 RF safety. Licensees and manufacturers are subject to...

  6. 47 CFR 27.52 - RF safety.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false RF safety. 27.52 Section 27.52 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES MISCELLANEOUS WIRELESS COMMUNICATIONS SERVICES Technical Standards § 27.52 RF safety. Licensees and manufacturers are subject to...

  7. 47 CFR 90.1335 - RF safety.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false RF safety. 90.1335 Section 90.1335 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES PRIVATE LAND MOBILE RADIO SERVICES Wireless Broadband Services in the 3650-3700 MHz Band § 90.1335 RF...

  8. 47 CFR 27.52 - RF safety.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false RF safety. 27.52 Section 27.52 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES MISCELLANEOUS WIRELESS COMMUNICATIONS SERVICES Technical Standards § 27.52 RF safety. Licensees and manufacturers are subject to...

  9. RF switch positioner for communications satellite network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Storaasli, A. G.; Griesser, H. P.; Grant, R. W.

    1986-01-01

    The RF switch positioner is a simple, lightweight, redundant positioning mechanism used to reconfigure the antenna beam on the INTELSAT VI satellite. It simultaneously rotates approximately 100 squareax waveguide switches through a full 360 deg. The RF switch positioner has been space qualified and has performed to expectations in conjunction with the feed networks in range testing.

  10. RF SYSTEM FOR THE SNS ACCUMULATOR RING.

    SciTech Connect

    BLASKIEWICZ, M.; BRENNAN, J.M.; BRODOWSKI, J.; DELONG, J.; METH, M.; SMITH, K.; ZALTSMAN, A.

    2001-06-18

    During accumulation the RF beam current in the spallation neutron source ring rises from 0 to 50 amperes. A clean, 250 nanosecond gap is needed for the extraction kicker risetime. Large momentum spread and small peak current are needed to prevent instabilities and stopband related losses. A robust RF system meeting these requirements has been designed.

  11. Airborne RF Measurement System (ARMS) and Analysis of Representative Flight RF Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koppen, Sandra V.; Ely, Jay J.; Smith, Laura J.; Jones, Richard A.; Fleck, Vincent J.; Salud, Maria Theresa; Mielnik, John J.

    2007-01-01

    Environmental radio frequency (RF) data over a broad band of frequencies (30 MHz to 1000 MHz) were obtained to evaluate the electromagnetic environment in airspace around several airports. An RF signal measurement system was designed utilizing a spectrum analyzer connected to the NASA Lancair Columbia 300 aircraft's VHF/UHF navigation antenna. This paper presents an overview of the RF measurement system and provides analysis of sample RF signal measurement data. This aircraft installation package and measurement system can be quickly returned to service if needed by future projects requiring measurement of an RF signal environment or exploration of suspected interference situations.

  12. Photo-generated THz antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgiou, G.; Tyagi, H. K.; Mulder, P.; Bauhuis, G. J.; Schermer, J. J.; Rivas, J. Gómez

    2014-01-01

    Electromagnetic resonances in conducting structures give rise to the enhancement of local fields and extinction efficiencies. Conducting structures are conventionally fabricated with a fixed geometry that determines their resonant response. Here, we challenge this conventional approach by demonstrating the photo-generation of THz linear antennas on a flat semiconductor layer by the structured optical illumination through a spatial light modulator. Free charge carriers are photo-excited only on selected areas, which enables the realization of different conducting antennas on the same sample by simply changing the illumination pattern, thus without the need of physically structuring the sample. These results open a wide range of possibilities for the all-optical spatial control of resonances on surfaces and the concomitant control of THz extinction and local fields.

  13. Photo-spin-voltaic effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellsworth, David; Lu, Lei; Lan, Jin; Chang, Houchen; Li, Peng; Wang, Zhe; Hu, Jun; Johnson, Bryan; Bian, Yuqi; Xiao, Jiang; Wu, Ruqian; Wu, Mingzhong

    2016-09-01

    The photo-voltaic effect typically occurs in semiconductors and involves photon-driven excitation of electrons from a valence band to a conduction band. In a region such as a p-n junction that has a built-in electric field, the excited electrons and holes diffuse in opposite directions, resulting in an electric voltage. This letter reports that a spin voltage can be created by photons in a non-magnetic metal that is in close proximity to a magnetic insulator: a photo-spin-voltaic effect. The experiments use platinum/magnetic insulator bilayer structures. On exposure to light, there occurs photon-driven, spin-dependent excitation of electrons in several platinum atomic layers near the platinum/magnetic insulator interface. The excited electrons and holes diffuse in different manners, and this gives rise to an effective spin voltage at the interface and a corresponding pure spin current that flows across the platinum.

  14. Use of Near-Infrared Detector to Sense RF Antenna Heating

    SciTech Connect

    Legg, R.A.; Lee, R.L.; Baity, W.F.

    1999-11-01

    The three antennas used for ion cyclotron heating (ICH) experiments on DIII-D have experienced localized heating of the Faraday shield rods during plasma operations which has resulted in some melting. This melting is of great concern not only because of the damage it does to the rf system's ability to deliver rf to the plasma, but because of its potential to contaminate the plasma during a shot and cast the experimental results from the shot into question. A real-time sensor to detect the temperature of the antennae during plasma operations is described. The sensor uses an avalanche photo diode (APD) with sensitivity from 0.4 to 1.0 {micro}m to monitor the temperature of the antennae. Calculations for the detector sensitivity based on Planck's law are compared with experimental results and detector data taken during plasma operations are presented.

  15. Magnetoplasmonic RF mixing and nonlinear frequency generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Firby, C. J.; Elezzabi, A. Y.

    2016-07-01

    We present the design of a magnetoplasmonic Mach-Zehnder interferometer (MZI) modulator facilitating radio-frequency (RF) mixing and nonlinear frequency generation. This is achieved by forming the MZI arms from long-range dielectric-loaded plasmonic waveguides containing bismuth-substituted yttrium iron garnet (Bi:YIG). The magnetization of the Bi:YIG can be driven in the nonlinear regime by RF magnetic fields produced around adjacent transmission lines. Correspondingly, the nonlinear temporal dynamics of the transverse magnetization component are mapped onto the nonreciprocal phase shift in the MZI arms, and onto the output optical intensity signal. We show that this tunable mechanism can generate harmonics, frequency splitting, and frequency down-conversion with a single RF excitation, as well as RF mixing when driven by two RF signals. This magnetoplasmonic component can reduce the number of electrical sources required to generate distinct optical modulation frequencies and is anticipated to satisfy important applications in integrated optics.

  16. R&D ERL: Low level RF

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, K.

    2010-01-15

    A superconducting RF (SRF) Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) is currently under development at the Collider-Accelerator Department (C-AD) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). The major components from an RF perspective are (a) a 5-cell SRF ERL cavity, (b) an SRF photocathode electron gun, and (c) a drive laser for the photocathode gun. Each of these RF subsystems has its own set of RF performance requirements, as well as common requirements for ensuring correct synchronism between them. A low level RF (LLRF) control system is currently under development, which seeks to leverage both technology and experience gained from the recently commissioned RHIC LLRF system upgrade. This note will review the LLRF system requirements and describe the system to be installed at the ERL.

  17. High Power Beam Test and Measurement of Emittance Evolution of a 1.6-Cell Photocathode RF Gun at Pohang Accelerator Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jang-Ho; Park, Sung-Ju; Kim, Changbum; Parc, Yong-Woon; Hong, Ju-Ho; Huang, Jung-Yun; Xiang, Dao; Wang, Xijie; Ko, In Soo

    2007-04-01

    A Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) GUN-IV type photocathode rf gun has been fabricated to use in femtosecond electron diffraction (FED), femtosecond far infrared radiation (fs-FIR) facility, and X-ray free electron laser (XFEL) facilities at the Pohang Accelerator Laboratory (PAL). The gun consists of a 1.6-cell cavity with a copper cathode, a solenoid magnet, beam diagnostic components and auxiliary systems. We report here the measurement of the basic beam parameters which confirm a successful fabrication of the photocathode RF gun system. The emittance evolution is measured by an emittance meter and compared with the PARMELA simulation, which shows a good agreement.

  18. RF FEL for power beaming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burke, Robert

    The laser device components associated with operating a radio frequency-free electron laser (RF-FEL) for beaming power from Earth were designed and tested. Analysis of the power beaming system requirements reveals that the FEL, identified by NASA as the laser of choice, is the major subsystem requiring demonstration before proceeding further in proving the efficacy of laser power beaming. Rocketdyne has identified a series of low cost, low risk demonstrations which proceed sequentially, as follows: (1) a 1 kW proof-of-principle demonstration; (2) a 150 kW demonstration of beaming power to a satellite; and (3) a MW class demonstration of Earth to lunar surface power transmission. This sequence of events can be completed in 5.5 years at a cost of $188M, with key milestones each year.

  19. RF Cavity Characterization with VORPAL

    SciTech Connect

    C. Nieter, C. Roark, P. Stoltz, C.D. Zhou, F. Marhauser

    2011-03-01

    When designing a radio frequency (RF) accelerating cavity structure various figures of merit are considered before coming to a final cavity design. These figures of merit include specific field and geometry based quantities such as the ratio of the shunt impedance to the quality factor (R/Q) or the normalized peak fields in the cavity. Other important measures of cavity performance include the peak surface fields as well as possible multipacting resonances in the cavity. High fidelity simulations of these structures can provide a good estimate of these important quantities before any cavity prototypes are built. We will present VORPAL simulations of a simple pillbox structure where these quantities can be calculated analytically and compare them to the results from the VORPAL simulations. We will then use VORPAL to calculate these figures of merit and potential multipacting resonances for two cavity designs under development at Jefferson National Lab for Project X.

  20. Design of rf conditioner cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Govil, R.; Rimmer, R.A.; Sessler, A.; Kirk, H.G.

    1992-06-01

    Theoretical studies are made of radio frequency structures which can be used to condition electron beams so as to greatly reduce the stringent emittance requirements for successful lasing in a free-electron laser. The basic strategy of conditioning calls for modulating an electron beam in the transverse dimension, by a periodic focusing channel, while it traverses a series of rf cavities, each operating in a TM{sub 210} mode. In this paper, we analyze the cavities both analytically and numerically (using MAFIA simulations). We find that when cylindrical symmetry is broken the coupling impedance can be greatly enhanced. We present results showing various performance characteristics as a function of cavity parameters, as well as possible designs for conditioning cavities.

  1. Superconducting cavities and modulated RF

    SciTech Connect

    Farkas, Z.D.

    1981-02-01

    If a cavity has an infinite Q/sub o/, 81.5% of the energy contained in a pulse incident upon the cavity is transferred into the cavity by the end of the pulse if the cavity Q/sub e/ is chosen so that the cavity time constant is 0.796 pulse width (T/sub a/). As Q/sug o/ decreases, the energy in the cavity at the end of the pulse decreases very slowly as long as T/sub a/ is much less than the unloaded cavity time constant, T/sub co/. SC cavities with very high Q/sub o/ enable one to obtain very high gradients with a low power cw source. At high gradients, however, one often does not attain the high Q/sub o/ predicted by theory. Therefore, if one is inteerested in attaining maximum energy in the cavity, as is the case for RF processing and diagnostics, for a given available source energy there is no point in keeping the power on for longer than 0.1 T/sub co/ because the energy expended after 0.1 T/sub co/ is wasted. Therefore, to attain high fields at moderate Q/sub o/, pulsed operation is indicated. This note derives the fields and energy stored and dissipated in the cavity when Q/sub e/ is optimized for a given T/sub a/. It shows how to use this data to measure Q/sub o/ of an SC cavity as a function of field level, how to process the cavity with high RF fields, how to operate SC cavities in the pulsed mode to obtain higher efficiencies and gradients. Experimental results are also reported.

  2. Processes For Cleaning a Cathode Tube and Assemblies In A Hollow Cathode Assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, Michael J. (Inventor); Verhey, Timothy R. R. (Inventor); Soulas, George C. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    The present invention is a process for cleaning a cathode tube and other subassemblies in a hollow cathode assembly. In the disclosed process, hand covering elastomer gloves are used for handling all cathode assembly parts. The cathode tube and other subassemblies are cleaned with a lint-free cloth damped with acetone, then wiped with alcohol, immersed in ethyl alcohol or acetone, and ultrasonic agitation is applied, heating to 60 C. for ethyl alcohol or 56 C. for acetone. The cathode tube and other subassemblies are dried by blowing with nitrogen gas.

  3. Preliminary Results of Field Emission Cathode Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sovey, James S.; Kovaleski, Scott D.

    2001-01-01

    Preliminary screening tests of field emission cathodes such as chemical vapor deposited (CVD) diamond, textured pyrolytic graphite, and textured copper were conducted at background pressures typical of electric thruster test facilities to assess cathode performance and stability. Very low power electric thrusters which provide tens to hundreds micronewtons of thrust may need field emission neutralizers that have a capability of tens to hundreds of microamperes. From current voltage characteristics, it was found that the CVD diamond and textured metals cathodes clearly satisfied the Fowler-Nordheim emission relation. The CVD diamond and a textured copper cathode had average current densities of 270 and 380 mA/sq cm, respectively, at the beginning-of-life. After a few hours of operation the cathode emission currents degraded by 40 to 75% at background pressures in the 10(exp -5) Pa to 10(exp -4) Pa range. The textured pyrolytic graphite had a modest current density at beginning-of-life of 84 mA/sq cm, but this cathode was the most stable of all. Extended testing of the most promising cathodes is warranted to determine if current degradation is a burn-in effect or whether it is a long-term degradation process. Preliminary experiments with ferroelectric emission cathodes, which are ceramics with spontaneous electric polarization, were conducted. Peak current densities of 30 to 120 mA/sq cm were obtained for pulse durations of about 500 ns in the 10(exp -4) Pa pressure range.

  4. Energy-efficient operation of a booster RF system for Taiwan light source operated in top-up mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeh, Meng-Shu; Wang, Chaoen; Chang, Lung-Hai; Chung, Fu-Tsai; Yu, Tsung-Chi; Lin, Ming-Chyuan; Chen, Ling-Jhen; Yang, Tz-Te; Chang, Mei-Hsia; Lin, Yu-Han; Tsai, Ming-Hsun; Lo, Chih-Hung; Liu, Zong-Kai

    2015-03-01

    Contemporary light sources operate in a top-up mode to maintain their photon intensity quasi-constant so as to improve significantly the thermal stability of the photon beam and to maximize ultimately the average photon flux at a designed maximum operational beam current. Operating in a top-up mode requires frequent beam injection from the synchrotron booster to the storage ring of the light source, but the injection intervals occupy only a tiny portion of the operational time of the integrated machine. To maintain a high operational reliability, the booster RF system practically operates necessarily under injection conditions around the clock and consumes full electric power whether during top-up injection or not. How to decrease the power consumption of the booster RF system during its stand-by time but not to sacrifice the reliability and availability of the RF system is obviously of fundamental interest for routine operation of the light source in a top-up mode. Here, an energy-efficient operation of a booster RF system adaptive to top-up operation of a light source is proposed that has been developed, realized and integrated into the booster RF system of the Taiwan Light Source (TLS), and routinely operated since the end of year 2008. The klystron cathode current and RF gap voltage of the booster's accelerating RF cavity are both periodically modulated to adapt the injection rhythm during top-up operation, which results in decreased consumption of electric power of the booster RF system by more than 78%. The impact on the reliability and availability of the booster RF system has been carefully monitored during the past five operational years, delivering more than 5000 h scheduled user beam time per year. The booster RF system retains its excellent reliability and availability as previously. Neither a decrease of the service time nor an induced reliability issue from the klystron or any high-power high-voltage component of the transmitter has been experienced

  5. RF System High Power Amplifier Software Conversion at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    G. Lahti; H. Dong; T. Seegerger

    2006-10-31

    Jefferson Lab is in the process of converting the RF system from analog RF modules and non-smart high power amplifiers (HPAs) to digital RF modules and smart HPAs. The present analog RF module controls both the RF signal and the non-smart HPA hardware. The new digital RF module will only control the RF signal, so the new HPA must include embedded software. This paper will describe the conversion from a software perspective, including the initial testing, the intermediate mixed system of old and new units, and finally the totally new RF system.

  6. Study of asymmetries of Cd(Zn)Te devices investigated using photo-induced current transient spectroscopy, Rutherford backscattering, surface photo-voltage spectroscopy, and gamma ray spectroscopies

    SciTech Connect

    Crocco, J.; Bensalah, H.; Zheng, Q.; Dieguez, E.; Corregidor, V.; Avles, E.; Castaldini, A.; Fraboni, B.; Cavalcoli, D.; Cavallini, A.; Vela, O.

    2012-10-01

    Despite these recent advancements in preparing the surface of Cd(Zn)Te devices for detector applications, large asymmetries in the electronic properties of planar Cd(Zn)Te detectors are common. Furthermore, for the development of patterned electrode geometries, selection of each electrode surface is crucial for minimizing dark current in the device. This investigation presented here has been carried out with three objectives. Each objective is oriented towards establishing reliable methods for the selection of the anode and cathode surfaces independent of the crystallographic orientation. The objectives of this study are (i) investigate how the asymmetry in I-V characteristics of Cd(Zn)Te devices may be associated with the TeO2 interfacial layer using Rutherford backscattering to study the structure at the Au-Cd(Zn)Te interface, (ii) develop an understanding of how the concentration of the active traps in Cd(Zn)Te varies with the external bias, and (iii) propose non-destructive methods for selection of the anode and cathode which are independent of crystallographic orientation. The spectroscopic methods employed in this investigation include Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy, photo-induced current transient spectroscopy, and surface photo-voltage spectroscopy, as well as gamma ray spectroscopy to demonstrate the influence on detector properties.

  7. Cathode Effects in Cylindrical Hall Thrusters

    SciTech Connect

    Granstedt, E.M.; Raitses, Y.; Fisch, N. J.

    2008-09-12

    Stable operation of a cylindrical Hall thruster (CHT) has been achieved using a hot wire cathode, which functions as a controllable electron emission source. It is shown that as the electron emission from the cathode increases with wire heating, the discharge current increases, the plasma plume angle reduces, and the ion energy distribution function shifts toward higher energies. The observed effect of cathode electron emission on thruster parameters extends and clarifies performance improvements previously obtained for the overrun discharge current regime of the same type of thruster, but using a hollow cathode-neutralizer. Once thruster discharge current saturates with wire heating, further filament heating does not affect other discharge parameters. The saturated values of thruster discharge parameters can be further enhanced by optimal placement of the cathode wire with respect to the magnetic field.

  8. Photo-stimulated low electron temperature high current diamond film field emission cathode

    DOEpatents

    Shurter; Roger Philips , Devlin; David James , Moody; Nathan Andrew , Taccetti; Jose Martin , Russell; Steven John

    2012-07-24

    An electron source includes a back contact surface having a means for attaching a power source to the back contact surface. The electron source also includes a layer comprising platinum in direct contact with the back contact surface, a composite layer of single-walled carbon nanotubes embedded in platinum in direct contact with the layer comprising platinum. The electron source also includes a nanocrystalline diamond layer in direct contact with the composite layer. The nanocrystalline diamond layer is doped with boron. A portion of the back contact surface is removed to reveal the underlying platinum. The electron source is contained in an evacuable container.

  9. High pressure microhollow cathode discharges in air

    SciTech Connect

    Khedr, M.A.; Stark, R.H.; Watson, B.; Schoenbach, K.H.

    1998-12-31

    Research on high pressure, large volume glow discharges in air is motivated by applications such as reflectors and absorbers for electromagnetic radiation, plasma processing, and the remediation of gaseous pollution. In order to prevent glow-to-arc transitions, which in high-pressure glow discharges start in the cathode region, it is proposed to use a plasma cathode consisting of an array of microhollow cathode discharges. To explore the conditions for stable operation of single 100 {micro}m microhollow cathode discharges in flowing air, the current-voltage characteristics, and the visual appearance of a 100 {micro}m microhollow cathode discharge were studied. The results show that the threshold current for the transition from a glow into a filamentary discharge varies inversely with pressure. At pressures of 400 Torr the current in the 100 {micro}m hollow cathode discharge must not exceed 0.5 mA in order for the discharge to be stable. The type of instability, which causes the transition from dc to fluctuating currents, is not known at this time, but the observed dependence of the threshold current from the gas pressure points to a thermal instability. Assuming that the White-Allis scaling law still holds for air discharges at pressures close to atmospheric, it is expected that reducing the cathode hole diameter to 50 {micro}m will allow us to operate microhollow cathode discharges at atmospheric air with currents of up to 0.25 mA. Experimental studies on the effect of the cathode dimensions and cathode material are underway and results will be discussed at the conference.

  10. DEVELOPMENT OF A COMPACT PHOTO-INJECTOR WITH RFFOCUSING LENS FOR SHORT PULSE ELECTRON SOURCE APPLICATION

    SciTech Connect

    Grabenhofer, Alexander; Eaton, Douglas W.

    2013-09-01

    For development of compact ultrafast electron source system, we are currently designing a short-pulse RF-gun with RF focusing structure by means of a series of comprehensive modeling analysis processes. EM design of a 2.5 cell resonant cavity with input coupler, acceleration dynamics of photo-emitted electron bunch, EM design of RF-lens with input coupler, and phasespace analysis of focused electron bunch are systematically examined with multi-physics simulators. All the features of the 2.856 GHz cavity geometry were precisely engineered for acceleration energies ranging from 100 keV to 500 keV (safety limited) to be powered by our 5 MW S-band klystron. The klystron (Thales TH2163) and modulator system (ScandiNova K1 turnkey system) were successfully installed and tested. Performance tests of the klystron system show peak output power > 5 MW, as per operation specifications. At the quasi-relativistic energies, the electron source is capable of generating 100fC – 1 pC electron bunch with pulse duration close to 30 fs – 1 ps and transverse size of a few hundred microns. PIC simulations have shown that the electron bunch undergoes fast RF acceleration, rapidly reaching the desired energies, which can be controlled by tuning RF injection phase and input driving power. It has been shown that it is possible to also focus/compress the bunch longitudinally using a RF-lens, which would allow us to control the temporal resolution of the system as well. While our primary analysis has been performed on a 2.5 cell design, we are also looking into half-cell (single cavity) design that is expected to provide the same range of beam energy with a simple configuration.

  11. RF Power and HOM Coupler Tutorial

    SciTech Connect

    Rusnak, B

    2003-10-28

    Radio frequency (RF) couplers are used on superconducting cavities to deliver RF power for creating accelerating fields and to remove unwanted higher-order mode power for reducing emittance growth and cryogenic load. RF couplers in superconducting applications present a number of interdisciplinary design challenges that need to be addressed, since poor performance in these devices can profoundly impact accelerator operations and the overall success of a major facility. This paper will focus on critical design issues for fundamental and higher order mode (HOM) power couplers, highlight a sampling of reliability-related problems observed in couplers, and discuss some design strategies for improving performance.

  12. Multi-level RF identification system

    DOEpatents

    Steele, Kerry D.; Anderson, Gordon A.; Gilbert, Ronald W.

    2004-07-20

    A radio frequency identification system having a radio frequency transceiver for generating a continuous wave RF interrogation signal that impinges upon an RF identification tag. An oscillation circuit in the RF identification tag modulates the interrogation signal with a subcarrier of a predetermined frequency and modulates the frequency-modulated signal back to the transmitting interrogator. The interrogator recovers and analyzes the subcarrier signal and determines its frequency. The interrogator generates an output indicative of the frequency of the subcarrier frequency, thereby identifying the responding RFID tag as one of a "class" of RFID tags configured to respond with a subcarrier signal of a predetermined frequency.

  13. Nb-Pb Superconducting RF Gun

    SciTech Connect

    Sekutowicz, J.; Iversen, J.; Kreps, G.; Moller, W.D.; Singer, W.; Singer, X.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Burrill, A.; Smedley, J.; Rao, T.; Ferrario, M.; Kneisel, P.; Langner, J.; Strzyzewski, P.; Lefferts, R.; Lipski, A.; Szalowski, K.; Ko, K.; Xiao, L.; /SLAC

    2006-03-29

    We report on the status of an electron RF-gun made of two superconductors: niobium and lead. The presented design combines the advantages of the RF performance of bulk niobium superconducting cavities and the reasonably high quantum efficiency of lead, as compared to other superconducting metals. The concept, mentioned in a previous paper, follows the attractive approach of all niobium superconducting RF-gun as it has been proposed by the BNL group. Measured values of quantum efficiency for lead at various photon energies, analysis of recombination time of photon-broken Cooper pairs for lead and niobium, and preliminary cold test results are discussed in this paper.

  14. Nb-Pb superconducting RF gun

    SciTech Connect

    J. Sekutowicz; J. Iversen; G. Kreps; W.D. Moller; W. Singer; X. Singer; I. Ben-Zvi; A. Burrill; J. Smedley; T. Rao; M. Ferrario; P. Kneisel; J. Langner; P. Strzyzewski; R. Lefferts; A. Lipski; K. Szalowski; K. Ko; L. Xiao

    2006-04-14

    We report on the status of an electron RF-gun made of two superconductors: niobium and lead. The presented design combines the advantages of the RF performance of bulk niobium superconducting cavities and the reasonably high quantum efficiency of lead, as compared to other superconducting metals. The concept, mentioned in a previous paper, follows the attractive approach of all niobium superconducting RF-gun as it has been proposed by the BNL group. Measured values of quantum efficiency for lead at various photon energies, analysis of recombination time of photon-broken Cooper pairs for lead and niobium, and preliminary cold test results are discussed in this paper.

  15. Matching network for RF plasma source

    SciTech Connect

    Pickard, Daniel S.; Leung, Ka-Ngo

    2007-11-20

    A compact matching network couples an RF power supply to an RF antenna in a plasma generator. The simple and compact impedance matching network matches the plasma load to the impedance of a coaxial transmission line and the output impedance of an RF amplifier at radio frequencies. The matching network is formed of a resonantly tuned circuit formed of a variable capacitor and an inductor in a series resonance configuration, and a ferrite core transformer coupled to the resonantly tuned circuit. This matching network is compact enough to fit in existing compact focused ion beam systems.

  16. Self-assembly of photo-reduced graphene-titania films.

    SciTech Connect

    Lambert, Timothy N.; Chavez, Carlos A.; Bell, Nelson Simmons; Washburn, Cody M.; Brumbach, Michael Todd; Wheeler, David Roger; McKenzie, Bonnie Beth

    2010-07-01

    In an aim to develop photo-responsive composites, the UV photo-reduction of aqueous titanium oxide nanoparticle-graphene oxide (TiO{sub 2}-GO) dispersions (Lambert et al. J Phys. Chem. 2010 113 (46), 19812-19823) was undertaken. Photo-reduction led to the formation of a black precipitate as well as a soluble portion, comprised of titanium oxide nanoparticle-reduced graphene oxide (TiO{sub 2}-RGO). When allowed to slowly evaporate, self assembled titanium oxide nanoparticle-graphene oxide (SA-TiO{sub 2}-RGO) films formed at the air-liquid interface of the solution. The thickness of SARGO-TiO{sub 2} films range from {approx}30-100 nm when deposited on substrates, and appear to be comprised of a mosaic assembly of graphene nanosheets and TiO{sub 2}, as observed by scanning electron microscopy. Raman spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy indicate that the graphene oxide is only partially reduced in the SA-TiO{sub 2}-RGO material. These films were also deposited onto inter-digitated electrodes and their photo-responsive behavior was examined. UV-exposure lead to a {approx} 200 kOhm decrease in resistance across the device, resulting in a cathodically biased film. The cathodic bias of the films was utilized for the subsequent reduction of Ag(NO{sub 3}) into silver (Ag) nanoparticles, forming a ternary Ag-(SA-RGO-TiO{sub 2}) composite. Various aspects of the self assembled films, their photoconductive properties as well as potential applications will be presented.

  17. Investigating the effect of electron emission pattern on RF gun beam quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajabi, A.; Shokri, B.

    2016-05-01

    Thermionic radio frequency gun is one of the most promising choices to gain a high quality electron beam, used in the infrared free electron lasers and synchrotron radiation injectors. To study the quality of the beam in a compact electron source, the emission pattern effect on the beam dynamics should be investigated. In the presented work, we developed a 3D simulation code to model the real process of thermionic emission and to investigate the effect of emission pattern, by considering geometrical constraints, on the beam dynamics. According to the results, the electron bunch emittance varies considerably with the emission pattern. Simulation results have been validated via comparison with the well-known simulation codes such as ASTRA simulation code and CST microwave studio, as well as other simulation results in the literature. It was also demonstrated that by using a continuous wave laser beam for heating the cathode, the emission pattern full width at half maximum (FWHM) of the transverse emission distribution is proportional to FWHM of the Gaussian profile for the laser beam. Additionally, by using the developed code, the effect of wall structure around the cathode on the back bombardment effect has been studied. According to the results, for a stable operation of the RF gun, one should consider the nose cone in vicinity of the cathode surface to reduce the back-bombardment effect.

  18. RF capacitively coupled plasma with multi-hole multi electrode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hun Su; Lee, Yun Seong; Seo, Sang Hun; Chang, Hong Young

    2011-10-01

    In the photovoltaic industry, it is desired to make plasma discharge of high electron density for the deposition of microcrystalline silicon layer, which is a bottle-neck process in the fabrication of thin film solar cell. So multi-hole electrode instead of plane electrode is used to make capacitively coupled discharge and the deposition rate could be increased because of the plasma density increases by the increased ionization by the energetic secondary electron surrounded by sheath region. To further increase the productivity of the process, high frequency and large electrode area is demanded, however the uniformity of the process is degraded by the change. To solve the matter, the concept of dividing a multi-hole electrode into multiple multi-hole electrode is introduced in the presentation. By dividing electrode into several region and differentiating the hole configuration of each region, local hollow cathode effect can be controlled to make more uniform discharge. To verify the feasibility of the concept, an electrode of RF capacitively coupled plasma is divided and the hole configuration of each electrode. And with 13.56MHz power applied to the electrode, the spatial plasma distribution of the discharge is measured.

  19. Analysis of cathode geometry to minimize cathode erosion in direct current microplasma jet

    SciTech Connect

    Causa, Federica; Ghezzi, Francesco; Caniello, Roberto; Grosso, Giovanni; Dellasega, David

    2012-12-15

    Microplasma jets are now widely used for deposition, etching, and materials processing. The present study focuses on the investigation of the influence of cathode geometry on deposition quality, for microplasma jet deposition systems in low vacuum. The interest here is understanding the influence of hydrogen on sputtering and/or evaporation of the electrodes. Samples obtained with two cathode geometries with tapered and rectangular cross-sections have been investigated experimentally by scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersion X-ray spectroscopy. Samples obtained with a tapered-geometry cathode present heavy contamination, demonstrating cathode erosion, while samples obtained with a rectangular-cross-section cathode are free from contamination. These experimental characteristics were explained by modelling results showing a larger radial component of the electric field at the cathode inner wall of the tapered cathode. As a result, ion acceleration is larger, explaining the observed cathode erosion in this case. Results from the present investigation also show that the ratio of radial to axial field components is larger for the rectangular geometry case, thus, qualitatively explaining the presence of micro-hollow cathode discharge over a wide range of currents observed in this case. In the light of the above findings, the rectangular cathode geometry is considered to be more effective to achieve cleaner deposition.

  20. Analysis of cathode geometry to minimize cathode erosion in direct current microplasma jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Causa, Federica; Ghezzi, Francesco; Dellasega, David; Caniello, Roberto; Grosso, Giovanni

    2012-12-01

    Microplasma jets are now widely used for deposition, etching, and materials processing. The present study focuses on the investigation of the influence of cathode geometry on deposition quality, for microplasma jet deposition systems in low vacuum. The interest here is understanding the influence of hydrogen on sputtering and/or evaporation of the electrodes. Samples obtained with two cathode geometries with tapered and rectangular cross-sections have been investigated experimentally by scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersion X-ray spectroscopy. Samples obtained with a tapered-geometry cathode present heavy contamination, demonstrating cathode erosion, while samples obtained with a rectangular-cross-section cathode are free from contamination. These experimental characteristics were explained by modelling results showing a larger radial component of the electric field at the cathode inner wall of the tapered cathode. As a result, ion acceleration is larger, explaining the observed cathode erosion in this case. Results from the present investigation also show that the ratio of radial to axial field components is larger for the rectangular geometry case, thus, qualitatively explaining the presence of micro-hollow cathode discharge over a wide range of currents observed in this case. In the light of the above findings, the rectangular cathode geometry is considered to be more effective to achieve cleaner deposition.

  1. Efficiently photo-charging lithium-ion battery by perovskite solar cell.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jiantie; Chen, Yonghua; Dai, Liming

    2015-08-27

    Electric vehicles using lithium-ion battery pack(s) for propulsion have recently attracted a great deal of interest. The large-scale practical application of battery electric vehicles may not be realized unless lithium-ion batteries with self-charging suppliers will be developed. Solar cells offer an attractive option for directly photo-charging lithium-ion batteries. Here we demonstrate the use of perovskite solar cell packs with four single CH3NH3PbI3 based solar cells connected in series for directly photo-charging lithium-ion batteries assembled with a LiFePO4 cathode and a Li4Ti5O12 anode. Our device shows a high overall photo-electric conversion and storage efficiency of 7.80% and excellent cycling stability, which outperforms other reported lithium-ion batteries, lithium-air batteries, flow batteries and super-capacitors integrated with a photo-charging component. The newly developed self-chargeable units based on integrated perovskite solar cells and lithium-ion batteries hold promise for various potential applications.

  2. Efficiently photo-charging lithium-ion battery by perovskite solar cell

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jiantie; Chen, Yonghua; Dai, Liming

    2015-01-01

    Electric vehicles using lithium-ion battery pack(s) for propulsion have recently attracted a great deal of interest. The large-scale practical application of battery electric vehicles may not be realized unless lithium-ion batteries with self-charging suppliers will be developed. Solar cells offer an attractive option for directly photo-charging lithium-ion batteries. Here we demonstrate the use of perovskite solar cell packs with four single CH3NH3PbI3 based solar cells connected in series for directly photo-charging lithium-ion batteries assembled with a LiFePO4 cathode and a Li4Ti5O12 anode. Our device shows a high overall photo-electric conversion and storage efficiency of 7.80% and excellent cycling stability, which outperforms other reported lithium-ion batteries, lithium–air batteries, flow batteries and super-capacitors integrated with a photo-charging component. The newly developed self-chargeable units based on integrated perovskite solar cells and lithium-ion batteries hold promise for various potential applications. PMID:26311589

  3. Efficiently photo-charging lithium-ion battery by perovskite solar cell.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jiantie; Chen, Yonghua; Dai, Liming

    2015-01-01

    Electric vehicles using lithium-ion battery pack(s) for propulsion have recently attracted a great deal of interest. The large-scale practical application of battery electric vehicles may not be realized unless lithium-ion batteries with self-charging suppliers will be developed. Solar cells offer an attractive option for directly photo-charging lithium-ion batteries. Here we demonstrate the use of perovskite solar cell packs with four single CH3NH3PbI3 based solar cells connected in series for directly photo-charging lithium-ion batteries assembled with a LiFePO4 cathode and a Li4Ti5O12 anode. Our device shows a high overall photo-electric conversion and storage efficiency of 7.80% and excellent cycling stability, which outperforms other reported lithium-ion batteries, lithium-air batteries, flow batteries and super-capacitors integrated with a photo-charging component. The newly developed self-chargeable units based on integrated perovskite solar cells and lithium-ion batteries hold promise for various potential applications. PMID:26311589

  4. Efficiently photo-charging lithium-ion battery by perovskite solar cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jiantie; Chen, Yonghua; Dai, Liming

    2015-08-01

    Electric vehicles using lithium-ion battery pack(s) for propulsion have recently attracted a great deal of interest. The large-scale practical application of battery electric vehicles may not be realized unless lithium-ion batteries with self-charging suppliers will be developed. Solar cells offer an attractive option for directly photo-charging lithium-ion batteries. Here we demonstrate the use of perovskite solar cell packs with four single CH3NH3PbI3 based solar cells connected in series for directly photo-charging lithium-ion batteries assembled with a LiFePO4 cathode and a Li4Ti5O12 anode. Our device shows a high overall photo-electric conversion and storage efficiency of 7.80% and excellent cycling stability, which outperforms other reported lithium-ion batteries, lithium-air batteries, flow batteries and super-capacitors integrated with a photo-charging component. The newly developed self-chargeable units based on integrated perovskite solar cells and lithium-ion batteries hold promise for various potential applications.

  5. Cathode for an electrochemical cell

    DOEpatents

    Bates, John B.; Dudney, Nancy J.; Gruzalski, Greg R.; Luck, Christopher F.

    2001-01-01

    Described is a thin-film battery, especially a thin-film microbattery, and a method for making same having application as a backup or primary integrated power source for electronic devices. The battery includes a novel electrolyte which is electrochemically stable and does not react with the lithium anode and a novel vanadium oxide cathode. Configured as a microbattery, the battery can be fabricated directly onto a semiconductor chip, onto the semiconductor die or onto any portion of the chip carrier. The battery can be fabricated to any specified size or shape to meet the requirements of a particular application. The battery is fabricated of solid state materials and is capable of operation between -15.degree. C. and 150.degree. C.

  6. Hall-effect thruster--Cathode coupling: The effect of cathode position and magnetic field topology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sommerville, Jason D.

    2009-12-01

    Hall-effect thruster (HET) cathodes are responsible for the generation of the free electrons necessary to initiate and sustain the main plasma discharge and to neutralize the ion beam. The position of the cathode relative to the thruster strongly affects the efficiency of thrust generation. However, the mechanisms by which the position affects the efficiency are not well understood. This dissertation explores the effect of cathode position on HET efficiency. Magnetic field topology is shown to play an important role in the coupling between the cathode plasma and the main discharge plasma. The position of the cathode within the magnetic field affects the ion beam and the plasma properties of the near-field plume, which explains the changes in efficiency of the thruster. Several experiments were conducted which explored the changes of efficiency arising from changes in cathode coupling. In each experiment, the thrust, discharge current, and cathode coupling voltage were monitored while changes in the independent variables of cathode position, cathode mass flow and magnetic field topology were made. From the telemetry data, the efficiency of the HET thrust generation was calculated. Furthermore, several ion beam and plasma properties were measured including ion energy distribution, beam current density profile, near-field plasma potential, electron temperature, and electron density. The ion beam data show how the independent variables affected the quality of ion beam and therefore the efficiency of thrust generation. The measurements of near-field plasma properties partially explain how the changes in ion beam quality arise. The results of the experiments show that cathode position, mass flow, and field topology affect several aspects of the HET operation, especially beam divergence and voltage utilization efficiencies. Furthermore, the experiments show that magnetic field topology is important in the cathode coupling process. In particular, the magnetic field

  7. Onboard Photo of Mt. Everest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Astronaut Daniel W. Bursch, Expedition Four flight engineer, was delighted in capturing this image of Mt. Everest in the Himalayan Range from aboard the International Space Station (ISS). The mountain is near frame center. Because the photo was taken close to orbital sunrise, the low sun angle gave tremendous relief to the mountains. Named for Sir George Everest, the British surveyor-general of India, Mount Everest is the tallest point on earth. Standing 29,028 feet tall, it is 5 1/2 miles above sea level. Mount Everest is located half in Nepal and half in Tibet.

  8. Photo-switchable membrane and method

    SciTech Connect

    Marshall, Kenneth L; Glowacki, Eric

    2013-05-07

    Switchable gas permeation membranes in which a photo-switchable low-molecular-weight liquid crystalline (LC) material acts as the active element, and a method of making such membranes. Different LC eutectic mixtures were doped with mesogenic azo dyes and infused into track-etched porous membranes with regular cylindrical pores. Photo-induced isothermal phase changes in the imbibed mesogenic material afforded large, reversible changes in the permeability of the photo-switchable membrane to nitrogen. For example, membranes imbibed with a photo-switchable cyanobiphenyl LC material demonstrated low permeability in the nematic state, while the photo-generated isotropic state demonstrated a 16.times.-greater sorption coefficient. Both states obey a high linear sorption behavior in accordance with Henry's Law. In contrast, membranes imbibed with a photo-switchable phenyl benzoate LC material showed the opposite permeability behavior to the biphenyl-imbibed membrane, along with nonlinear sorption behavior.

  9. Capacitor analysis for rf antennas

    SciTech Connect

    Power, W.H.; Baity, F.W.; Hoffman, D.J.

    1987-01-01

    Commercially available vacuum capacitors have been used in radio frequency (rf) antenna designs. The dimensional envelope of the capacitors has adapted favorably to antenna concepts. However, capacitors that are commercially available have not demonstrated acceptable performance characteristics for maximum design currents of 800 A rms at 80 MHz and 1300 A rms at 30 MHz or for voltages of 50 kV peak. The reason for capacitor failure was investigated. The investigation consisted of establishing existing mechanical design features, defining desired operating criteria of key capacitor components, determining component design limitations, and developing a modified concept for testing. The design criteria included a variable capacitance range of 50 to 450 pF at the maximum current conditions. Effects of capacitor cooling by means of radiative transfer and forced convective transfer were considered. The resulting modified capacitor design concept uses as many components of the commercially available capacitors as possible. An apparatus for testing and evaluation was designed for the proposed capacitor concepts. Tests have demonstrated reliable operations at 750 A and 80 MHz cw on a similar design. 2 refs., 5 figs.

  10. Micropower RF material proximity sensor

    DOEpatents

    McEwan, Thomas E.

    1998-01-01

    A level detector or proximity detector for materials capable of sensing through plastic container walls or encapsulating materials is of the sensor. Thus, it can be used in corrosive environments, as well as in a wide variety of applications. An antenna has a characteristic impedance which depends on the materials in proximity to the antenna. An RF oscillator, which includes the antenna and is based on a single transistor in a Colpitt's configuration, produces an oscillating signal. A detector is coupled to the oscillator which signals changes in the oscillating signal caused by changes in the materials in proximity to the antenna. The oscillator is turned on and off at a pulse repetition frequency with a low duty cycle to conserve power. The antenna consists of a straight monopole about one-quarter wavelength long at the nominal frequency of the oscillator. The antenna may be horizontally disposed on a container and very accurately detects the fill level within the container as the material inside the container reaches the level of the antenna.

  11. Micropower RF material proximity sensor

    DOEpatents

    McEwan, T.E.

    1998-11-10

    A level detector or proximity detector for materials capable of sensing through plastic container walls or encapsulating materials is disclosed. Thus, it can be used in corrosive environments, as well as in a wide variety of applications. An antenna has a characteristic impedance which depends on the materials in proximity to the antenna. An RF oscillator, which includes the antenna and is based on a single transistor in a Colpitt`s configuration, produces an oscillating signal. A detector is coupled to the oscillator which signals changes in the oscillating signal caused by changes in the materials in proximity to the antenna. The oscillator is turned on and off at a pulse repetition frequency with a low duty cycle to conserve power. The antenna consists of a straight monopole about one-quarter wavelength long at the nominal frequency of the oscillator. The antenna may be horizontally disposed on a container and very accurately detects the fill level within the container as the material inside the container reaches the level of the antenna. 5 figs.

  12. Glow discharges in high pressure microhollow cathodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boeuf, J.-P.; Pitchford, L. C.; Schoenbach, K. H.

    2004-09-01

    We have developed a model of high-pressure, microhollow cathode discharges (MHCDs) which has been used to predict the electrical characteristics and other properties of these discharges for comparison with experiment. The configuration studied here is an anode/dielectric/cathode sandwich in which a cylindrical hole with a diameter of some 100's of microns is pierced in the dielectric and in the cathode. Results from the model calculations in xenon at 100 torr and higher pressures show that the positive V-I (voltage-current) characteristic observed experimentally at low current corresponds to an abnormal glow discharge inside the cathode hole. At higher current, the V-I characteristic is that of a normal to slightly abnormal glow discharge between the anode and the outer face of the cathode. The change in slope of the V-I characteristic is consistent with experiment (provided metastables are taken into account). This shape was previously attribed to the onset of the classical hollow cathode effect, but we find no hollow cathode effect for pressures above about 30 torr and for 200 micron hole diameters.

  13. Parallel operation of miniature hollow cathode discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Schoenbach, K.H.; Peterkin, F.E.; Verhappen, R.

    1994-12-31

    The pressure where hollow cathode discharges operate scales inversely with the cathode hole diameter. By reducing the size of the cathode hole to less than one millimeter, the authors were able to obtain stable operation of the hollow cathode glow discharge in air, up to ten`s of torr. The current-voltage characteristic was found to have a positive slope below approximately 5 torr. This allows the authors to operate hollow cathode discharges in parallel at these pressures without using ballast resistors for the individual discharges. In an experiment with four 0.75 mm diameter cathode holes drilled in a 0.75 mm copper plate, the authors obtained stable operation of the discharges at a threshold voltage of 380 V and a total current of 0.16 mA. The intensity of the glow from each hole tended to equalize after several hours of operation. The system was run for approximately 40 hours without evident change in performance. The stability with respect to parallel operation offers the possibility to use miniature hollow cathode discharge arrays as flat panel electron and ion sources.

  14. Batteries: Overview of Battery Cathodes

    SciTech Connect

    Doeff, Marca M

    2010-07-12

    The very high theoretical capacity of lithium (3829 mAh/g) provided a compelling rationale from the 1970's onward for development of rechargeable batteries employing the elemental metal as an anode. The realization that some transition metal compounds undergo reductive lithium intercalation reactions reversibly allowed use of these materials as cathodes in these devices, most notably, TiS{sub 2}. Another intercalation compound, LiCoO{sub 2}, was described shortly thereafter but, because it was produced in the discharged state, was not considered to be of interest by battery companies at the time. Due to difficulties with the rechargeability of lithium and related safety concerns, however, alternative anodes were sought. The graphite intercalation compound (GIC) LiC{sub 6} was considered an attractive candidate but the high reactivity with commonly used electrolytic solutions containing organic solvents was recognized as a significant impediment to its use. The development of electrolytes that allowed the formation of a solid electrolyte interface (SEI) on surfaces of the carbon particles was a breakthrough that enabled commercialization of Li-ion batteries. In 1990, Sony announced the first commercial batteries based on a dual Li ion intercalation system. These devices are assembled in the discharged state, so that it is convenient to employ a prelithiated cathode such as LiCoO{sub 2} with the commonly used graphite anode. After charging, the batteries are ready to power devices. The practical realization of high energy density Li-ion batteries revolutionized the portable electronics industry, as evidenced by the widespread market penetration of mobile phones, laptop computers, digital music players, and other lightweight devices since the early 1990s. In 2009, worldwide sales of Li-ion batteries for these applications alone were US$ 7 billion. Furthermore, their performance characteristics (Figure 1) make them attractive for traction applications such as hybrid

  15. Modular open RF architecture: extending VICTORY to RF systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melber, Adam; Dirner, Jason; Johnson, Michael

    2015-05-01

    Radio frequency products spanning multiple functions have become increasingly critical to the warfighter. Military use of the electromagnetic spectrum now includes communications, electronic warfare (EW), intelligence, and mission command systems. Due to the urgent needs of counterinsurgency operations, various quick reaction capabilities (QRCs) have been fielded to enhance warfighter capability. Although these QRCs were highly successfully in their respective missions, they were designed independently resulting in significant challenges when integrated on a common platform. This paper discusses how the Modular Open RF Architecture (MORA) addresses these challenges by defining an open architecture for multifunction missions that decomposes monolithic radio systems into high-level components with welldefined functions and interfaces. The functional decomposition maximizes hardware sharing while minimizing added complexity and cost due to modularization. MORA achieves significant size, weight and power (SWaP) savings by allowing hardware such as power amplifiers and antennas to be shared across systems. By separating signal conditioning from the processing that implements the actual radio application, MORA exposes previously inaccessible architecture points, providing system integrators with the flexibility to insert third-party capabilities to address technical challenges and emerging requirements. MORA leverages the Vehicular Integration for Command, Control, Communication, Computers, Intelligence, Surveillance, and Reconnaissance (C4ISR)/EW Interoperability (VICTORY) framework. This paper concludes by discussing how MORA, VICTORY and other standards such as OpenVPX are being leveraged by the U.S. Army Research, Development, and Engineering Command (RDECOM) Communications Electronics Research, Development, and Engineering Center (CERDEC) to define a converged architecture enabling rapid technology insertion, interoperability and reduced SWaP.

  16. Design of RF Power System for CPHS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Cheng; Du, Taibin; Guan, Xialing

    The Compact Pulsed Hadron Source (CPHS) system has been proposed and designed by the Department of Engineering Physics of Tsinghua University in Beijing, China. It consists of an accelerator front-end-a highintensity ion source, a 3 MeV radiofrequency quadrupole linac (RFQ), and a 13 MeV drift-tube linac (DTL), a neutron target station, and some experimental stations. In design of our RF power supply, both RFQ and DTL share a single klystron which is capable of 2.5 MW peak RF power and a 3.33% duty factor. The 325 MHz klystron contains a modulating anode and has a 100 kW average output power. Portions of the RF power system, such as pulsed high voltage power supply, modulator, crowbar protection and RF power transmission are all presented in details in this paper.

  17. CEBAF'S New RF Separator Structure Test Results

    SciTech Connect

    Reza Kazimi; Jock Fugitt; A. Krycuk; Charles Sinclair; Larry Turlington

    1993-05-01

    Prototypes of the rf separator for CEBAF have been made and successfully beam tested. The structure is a new design which has a high transverse shunt impedance together with a small transverse dimension compared to more conventional rf deflecting structures. Five rf separators will be used at CEBAF to allow beam from any one of the five recirculation passes to be delivered to any of the three experimental halls. The authors have already described the basic design of the structure and theoretical calculations. They have also reported some results from rf measurements and beam tests. In this paper they present more beam test results, their final design parameters, and test results of coupling two 1/2 wavelength cavities together.

  18. Degreasing and cleaning superconducting RF Niobium cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Rauchmiller, Michael; Kellett, Ron; /Fermilab

    2011-09-01

    The purpose and scope of this report is to detail the steps necessary for degreasing and cleaning of superconducting RF Niobium cavities in the A0 clean room. It lists the required equipment and the cleaning procedure.

  19. Single frequency RF powered ECG telemetry system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ko, W. H.; Hynecek, J.; Homa, J.

    1979-01-01

    It has been demonstrated that a radio frequency magnetic field can be used to power implanted electronic circuitry for short range telemetry to replace batteries. A substantial reduction in implanted volume can be achieved by using only one RF tank circuit for receiving the RF power and transmitting the telemetered information. A single channel telemetry system of this type, using time sharing techniques, was developed and employed to transmit the ECG signal from Rhesus monkeys in primate chairs. The signal from the implant is received during the period when the RF powering radiation is interrupted. The ECG signal is carried by 20-microsec pulse position modulated pulses, referred to the trailing edge of the RF powering pulse. Satisfactory results have been obtained with this single frequency system. The concept and the design presented may be useful for short-range long-term implant telemetry systems.

  20. Si-based RF MEMS components.

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, James E.; Nordquist, Christopher Daniel; Baker, Michael Sean; Fleming, James Grant; Stewart, Harold D.; Dyck, Christopher William

    2005-01-01

    Radio frequency microelectromechanical systems (RF MEMS) are an enabling technology for next-generation communications and radar systems in both military and commercial sectors. RF MEMS-based reconfigurable circuits outperform solid-state circuits in terms of insertion loss, linearity, and static power consumption and are advantageous in applications where high signal power and nanosecond switching speeds are not required. We have demonstrated a number of RF MEMS switches on high-resistivity silicon (high-R Si) that were fabricated by leveraging the volume manufacturing processes available in the Microelectronics Development Laboratory (MDL), a Class-1, radiation-hardened CMOS manufacturing facility. We describe novel tungsten and aluminum-based processes, and present results of switches developed in each of these processes. Series and shunt ohmic switches and shunt capacitive switches were successfully demonstrated. The implications of fabricating on high-R Si and suggested future directions for developing low-loss RF MEMS-based circuits are also discussed.

  1. New developments in RF power sources

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, R.H.

    1994-06-01

    The most challenging rf source requirements for high-energy accelerators presently being studied or designed come from the various electron-positron linear collider studies. All of these studies except TESLA (the superconducting entry in the field) have specified rf sources with much higher peak powers than any existing tubes at comparable high frequencies. While circular machines do not, in general, require high peak power, the very high luminosity electron-positron rings presently being designed as B factories require prodigious total average rf power. In this age of energy conservation, this puts a high priority on high efficiency for the rf sources. Both modulating anodes and depressed collectors are being investigated in the quest for high efficiency at varying output powers.

  2. Prototype rf cavity for the HISTRAP accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Mosko, S.W.; Dowling, D.T.; Olsen, D.K.

    1989-01-01

    HISTRAP, a proposed synchrotron-cooling-storage ring designed to both accelerate and decelerate very highly charged very heavy ions for atomic physics research, requires an rf accelerating system to provide /+-/2.5 kV of peak accelerating voltage per turn while tuning through a 13.5:1 frequency range in a fraction of a second. A prototype half-wave, single gap rf cavity with biased ferrite tuning was built and tested over a continuous tuning range of 200 kHz through 2.7 MHz. Initial test results establish the feasibility of using ferrite tuning at the required rf power levels. The resonant system is located entirely outside of the accelerator's 15cm ID beam line vacuum enclosure except for a single rf window which serves as an accelerating gap. Physical separation of the cavity and the beam line permits in situ vacuum baking of the beam line at 300/degree/C.

  3. Performance of a first generation X-band photoelectron rf gun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Limborg-Deprey, C.; Adolphsen, C.; McCormick, D.; Dunning, M.; Jobe, K.; Li, H.; Raubenheimer, T.; Vrielink, A.; Vecchione, T.; Wang, F.; Weathersby, S.

    2016-05-01

    Building more compact accelerators to deliver high brightness electron beams for the generation of high flux, highly coherent radiation is a priority for the photon science community. A relatively straightforward reduction in footprint can be achieved by using high-gradient X-band (11.4 GHz) rf technology. To this end, an X-band injector consisting of a 5.5 cell rf gun and a 1-m long linac has been commissioned at SLAC. It delivers an 85 MeV electron beam with peak brightness somewhat better than that achieved in S-band photoinjectors, such as the one developed for the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS). The X-band rf gun operates with up to a 200 MV /m peak field on the cathode, and has been used to produce bunches of a few pC to 1.2 nC in charge. Notably, bunch lengths as short as 120 fs rms have been measured for charges of 5 pC (˜3 ×107 electrons), and normalized transverse emittances as small as 0.22 mm-mrad have been measured for this same charge level. Bunch lengths as short as 400 (250) fs rms have been achieved for electron bunches of 100 (20) pC with transverse normalized emittances of 0.7 (0.35) mm-mrad. We report on the performance and the lessons learned from the operation and optimization of this first generation X-band gun.

  4. Results of the SLAC LCLS Gun High-Power RF Tests

    SciTech Connect

    Dowell, D.H.; Jongewaard, E.; Limborg-Deprey, C.; Schmerge, J.F.; Li, Z.; Xiao, L.; Wang, J.; Lewandowski, J.; Vlieks, A.; /SLAC

    2007-11-02

    The beam quality and operational requirements for the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) currently being constructed at SLAC are exceptional, requiring the design of a new RF photocathode gun for the electron source. Based on operational experience at SLAC's GTF and SDL and ATF at BNL as well as other laboratories, the 1.6cell s-band (2856MHz) gun was chosen to be the best electron source for the LCLS, however a significant redesign was necessary to achieve the challenging parameters. Detailed 3-D analysis and design was used to produce near-perfect rotationally symmetric rf fields to achieve the emittance requirement. In addition, the thermo-mechanical design allows the gun to operate at 120Hz and a 140MV/m cathode field, or to an average power dissipation of 4kW. Both average and pulsed heating issues are addressed in the LCLS gun design. The first LCLS gun is now fabricated and has been operated with high-power RF. The results of these high-power tests are presented and discussed.

  5. Obtaining the Linear Electron Beams by Using the Magnetron Injection Guns with Cold Secondary Emission Metallic Cathodes (Experiment).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tur, Yu. D.; Dovbnya, A. N.; Mitrochenko, V. V.; Reshetnyak, N. G.; Romas'ko, V. P.; Zakutin, V. V.

    1997-05-01

    The problem of extending the life-time, of increasing the pulse and average power of many RF-sources is closely related to the design of their electron guns. As it is known, the magnetron injection guns with secondary emission metallic cathodes (SEMC-MIG) are specified by the high current emission density and long life-time. The main goal of these investigations is to determine the possibility of using SEMC-MIGs as the electron source in high-power RF devices and accelerator injector systems. The experiments have been performed by using the experimental setup to investigate SEMC-MIG linear electron beam parameters from single and multiple beams gun assemblies with the anode voltage up to 100 kV, pulse duration up to 10 μs, repetition rate 25 Hz and 0.1-0.2 T magnetic field strength. Pulse-to-pulse long-term stability of the annular electron beams (internal diameter nearly equal to the cathode diameter, wide of ring 1-2 mm ) with beam density up to 70 A/cm^2 have been achieved. It is shown, that the cathode diameter extension provides a proportionate increasing of the beam current. In the case of multiple beam gun assemblies we have separated identical electron beams.

  6. Numerical study on rectangular microhollow cathode discharge

    SciTech Connect

    He Shoujie; Ouyang Jiting; He Feng; Li Shang

    2011-03-15

    Rectangular microhollow cathode discharge in argon is investigated by using two-dimensional time-dependent self-consistent fluid model. The electric potential, electric field, particle density, and mean electron energy are calculated. The results show that hollow cathode effect can be onset in the present configuration, with strong electric field and high mean electron energy in the cathode fall while high density and quasineutral plasma in the negative glow. The potential well and electric filed reversal are formed in the negative glow region. It is suggested that the presence of large electron diffusion flux necessitates the field reversal and potential well.

  7. Cathode for molten carbonate fuel cell

    DOEpatents

    Kaun, Thomas D.; Mrazek, Franklin C.

    1990-01-01

    A porous sintered cathode for a molten carbonate fuel cell and method of making same, the cathode including a skeletal structure of a first electronically conductive material slightly soluble in the electrolyte present in the molten carbonate fuel cell covered by fine particles of a second material of possibly lesser electronic conductivity insoluble in the electrolyte present in the molten carbonate fuel cell, the cathode having a porosity in the range of from about 60% to about 70% at steady-state cell operating conditions consisting of both macro-pores and micro-pores.

  8. Plasma distribution of cathodic ARC deposition system

    SciTech Connect

    Anders, S.; Raoux, S.; Krishnan, K.; MacGill, R.A.; Brown, I.G.

    1996-08-01

    The plasma distribution using a cathodic arc plasma source with and without magnetic macroparticle filter has been determined by depositing on a transparent plastic substrate and measuring the film absorption. It was found that the width of the distribution depends on the arc current, and it also depends on the cathode material which leads to a spatial separation of the elements when an alloy cathode is used. By applying a magnetic multicusp field near the exit of the magnetic filter, it was possible to modify the plasma distribution and obtain a flat plasma profile with a constant and homogeneous elemental distribution.

  9. Pulsed hollow cathode discharge with nanosecond risetime

    SciTech Connect

    Schaefer, G.; Husoy, P.O.; Schoenbach, K.H.

    1984-12-01

    This paper reports the operation of a cylindrical hollow cathode discharge with current risetimes of a few nanoseconds at current densities at the entrance of the cathode in the range of 50-560A x cm/sup -2/ and at voltages of 280-850 V. Time-dependent measurements of the impedance of the discharge are presented. They allow for the evaluation of discharge quantities such as risetime, delay time, discharge voltage, and current, depending on the operation parameters as applied voltage, pressure, and preionization. The power density in the active region of the hollow cathode exceeded 200 kW x cm/sup -3/.

  10. 95 GHz Gyrotron with Ferroelectric Cathode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Einat, M.; Pilossof, M.; Ben-Moshe, R.; Hirshbein, H.; Borodin, D.

    2012-11-01

    Ferroelectric cathodes were reported as a feasible electron source for microwave tubes. However, due to the surface plasma emission characterizing this cathode, operation of millimeter wave tubes based on it remains questionable. Nevertheless, the interest in compact high power sources of millimeter waves and specifically 95 GHz is continually growing. In this experiment, a ferroelectric cathode is used as an electron source for a gyrotron with the output frequency extended up to 95 GHz. Power above a 5 kW peak and ˜0.5μs pulses are reported; a duty cycle of 10% is estimated to be achievable.

  11. Cells having cathodes containing polycarbon disulfide materials

    DOEpatents

    Okamoto, Yoshi; Skotheim, Terje A.; Lee, Hung S.

    1995-08-15

    The present invention relates to an electric current producing cell which contains an anode, a cathode having as a cathode-active material one or more carbon-sulfur compounds of the formula (CS.sub.x).sub.n, in which x takes values from 1.2 to 2.3 and n is greater or equal to 2, and where the redox process does not involve polymerization and de-polymerization by forming and breaking S--S bonds in the polymer backbone. The cell also contains an electrolyte which is chemically inert with respect to the anode and the cathode.

  12. Cells having cathodes containing polycarbon disulfide materials

    DOEpatents

    Okamoto, Y.; Skotheim, T.A.; Lee, H.S.

    1995-08-15

    The present invention relates to an electric current producing cell which contains an anode, a cathode having as a cathode-active material one or more carbon-sulfur compounds of the formula (CS{sub x}){sub n}, in which x takes values from 1.2 to 2.3 and n is greater or equal to 2, and where the redox process does not involve polymerization and de-polymerization by forming and breaking S--S bonds in the polymer backbone. The cell also contains an electrolyte which is chemically inert with respect to the anode and the cathode. 5 figs.

  13. BVA members wow judges in photo competition.

    PubMed

    2016-09-01

    Earlier this year, BVA ran its inaugural photo competition, giving members the opportunity to showcase the work of the veterinary profession and the animals and wildlife they encounter. Standing out from over 400 high-quality entries, judges picked the images reproduced in this month's BVA News as the winning and highly commended photos. To see all the entries and hear from the winners, visit www.bva.co.uk/vet-photos-2016/. There will be another photo competition in 2017 with more categories to be announced. PMID:27585899

  14. Overview of the 100 mA average-current RF photoinjector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, D. C.; Colestock, P. L.; Kurennoy, S. S.; Rees, D. E.; Regan, A. H.; Russell, S.; Schrage, D. L.; Wood, R. L.; Young, L. M.; Schultheiss, T.; Christina, V.; Cole, M.; Rathke, J.; Shaw, J.; Eddy, C.; Holm, R.; Henry, R.; Yater, J.

    2004-08-01

    High-average-power FELs require high-current, low-emittance and low-energy-spread electron beams. These qualities have been achieved with RF photoinjectors operating at low-duty factors. To date, a high-average-current RF photoinjector operating continuously at 100% duty factor is yet to be demonstrated. The principal challenges of a high-duty-factor normal-conducting RF photoinjector are related to applying a high accelerating gradient continuously, thus generating large ohmic losses in the cavity walls, cooling the injector cavity walls and the high-power RF couplers, and finding a photocathode with reasonable Q.E. that can survive the poor vacuum of the RF photoinjector. We present the preliminary design of a normal-conducting 700 MHz photoinjector with solenoid magnetic fields for emittance compensation. The photoinjector is designed to produce 2.7 MeV electron beams at 3 nC bunch charge and 35 MHz repetition rate (100 mA average current). The photoinjector consists of a 2 {1}/{2}-cell, π-mode, RF cavity with on-axis electric coupling, and a non-resonant vacuum plenum. Heat removal in the resonant cells is achieved via dense arrays of internal cooling passages capable of handling high-velocity water flows. Megawatt RF power is coupled into the injector through two tapered ridge-loaded waveguides. PARMELA simulations show that the 2 {1}/{2}-cell injector can produce a 7 μm emittance directly. Transverse plasma oscillations necessitate additional acceleration and a second solenoid to realign the phase space envelopes of different axial slices at higher energy, resulting in a normalized rms emittance of 6.5 μm and 34 keV rms energy spread. We are developing a novel cesiated p-type GaN photocathode with 7% quantum efficiency at 350 nm and a cesium dispenser to replenish the cathode with cesium through a porous silicon carbide substrate. These performance parameters will be necessary for the design of the 100 kW FEL.

  15. Normal Conducting RF Cavity for MICE

    SciTech Connect

    Li, D.; DeMello, A.; Virostek, S.; Zisman, M.; Summers, D.

    2010-05-23

    Normal conducting RF cavities must be used for the cooling section of the international Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE), currently under construction at Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (RAL) in the UK. Eight 201-MHz cavities are needed for the MICE cooling section; fabrication of the first five cavities is complete. We report the cavity fabrication status including cavity design, fabrication techniques and preliminary low power RF measurements.

  16. Fast beam stacking using rf barriers

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, W.; Capista, D.; Griffin, J.; Ng, K.-Y.; Wildman, D.; /Fermilab

    2007-06-01

    Two barrier RF systems were fabricated, tested and installed in the Fermilab Main Injector. Each can provide 8 kV rectangular pulses (the RF barriers) at 90 kHz. When a stationary barrier is combined with a moving barrier, injected beams from the Booster can be continuously deflected, folded and stacked in the Main Injector, which leads to doubling of the beam intensity. This paper gives a report on the beam experiment using this novel technology.

  17. RF MEMS reconfigurable triangular patch antenna.

    SciTech Connect

    Nordquist, Christopher Daniel; Christodoulou, Christos George; Feldner, Lucas Matthew

    2005-01-01

    A Ka-band RF MEMS enabled frequency reconfigurable triangular microstrip patch antenna has been designed for monolithic integration with RF MEMS phase shifters to demonstrate a low-cost monolithic passive electronically scanned array (PESA). This paper introduces our first prototype reconfigurable triangular patch antenna currently in fabrication. The aperture coupled patch antenna is fabricated on a dual-layer quartz/alumina substrate using surface micromachining techniques.

  18. RF MEMS reconfigurable triangular patch antenna.

    SciTech Connect

    Christodoulou, Christos George; Nordquist, Christopher Daniel; Feldner, Lucas Matthew

    2005-07-01

    A Ka-band RF MEMS enabled frequency reconfigurable triangular microstrip patch antenna has been designed for monolithic integration with RF MEMS phase shifters to demonstrate a low-cost monolithic passive electronically scanned array (PESA). This paper introduces our first prototype reconfigurable triangular patch antenna currently in fabrication. The aperture coupled patch antenna is fabricated on a dual-layer quartz/alumina substrate using surface micromachining techniques.

  19. Spontaneous fission of 256Rf, new data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svirikhin, A. I.; Yeremin, A. V.; Izosimov, I. N.; Isaev, A. V.; Kuznetsov, A. N.; Malyshev, O. N.; Popeko, A. G.; Popov, Yu. A.; Sokol, E. A.; Chelnokov, M. L.; Chepigin, V. I.; Andel, B.; Asfari, M. Z.; Gall, B.; Yoshihiro, N.; Kalaninova, Z.; Mullins, S.; Piot, J.; Stefanova, E.; Tonev, D.

    2016-07-01

    Spontaneous fission properties of the short-lived neutron-deficient 256Rf nucleus produced in the complete fusion reaction with a beam of multiply charged heavy 50Ti ions from the U-400 cyclotron (FLNR, JINR) are experimentally investigated. Its half-life and decay branching ratio are measured. The average number of neutrons per spontaneous fission of 256Rf (bar v = 4.47 ± 0.09) is determined for the first time.

  20. A no-load RF calorimeter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chernoff, R. C.

    1975-01-01

    The described device can be used to measure the output of any dc powered RF source. No dummy load is required for the measurements. The device is, therefore, called the 'no-load calorimeter' (NLC). The NLC measures the power actually fed to the antenna or another useful load. It is believed that the NLC can compete successfully with directional coupler type systems in measuring the output of high-power RF sources.

  1. CONSTRUCTION PROGRESS PHOTO OF REMOTE ANALYTICAL FACILITY (CPP627). INL PHOTO ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    CONSTRUCTION PROGRESS PHOTO OF REMOTE ANALYTICAL FACILITY (CPP-627). INL PHOTO NUMBER NRTS-54-12573. R.G. Larsen, Photographer, 10/20/1954 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho Chemical Processing Plant, Fuel Reprocessing Complex, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  2. CONSTRUCTION PROGRESS PHOTO OF REMOTE ANALYTICAL FACILITY (CPP627). INL PHOTO ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    CONSTRUCTION PROGRESS PHOTO OF REMOTE ANALYTICAL FACILITY (CPP-627). INL PHOTO NUMBER NRTS-54-12124. Unknown Photographer, 9/21/1954 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho Chemical Processing Plant, Fuel Reprocessing Complex, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  3. RF study and 3-D simulations of a side-coupling thermionic RF-gun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rimjaem, S.; Kusoljariyakul, K.; Thongbai, C.

    2014-02-01

    A thermionic RF-gun for generating ultra-short electron bunches was optimized, developed and used as a source at a linac-based THz radiation research laboratory of the Plasma and Beam Physics Research Facility, Chiang Mai University, Thailand. The RF-gun is a π/2-mode standing wave structure, which consists of two S-band accelerating cells and a side-coupling cavity. The 2856 MHz RF wave is supplied from an S-band klystron to the gun through the waveguide input-port at the cylindrical wall of the second cell. A fraction of the RF power is coupled from the second cell to the first one via a side-coupling cavity. Both the waveguide input-port and the side-coupling cavity lead to an asymmetric geometry of the gun. RF properties and electromagnetic field distributions inside the RF-gun were studied and numerically simulated by using computer codes SUPERFISH 7.19 and CST Microwave Studio 2012©. RF characterizations and tunings of the RF-gun were performed to ensure the reliability of the gun operation. The results from 3D simulations and measurements are compared and discussed in this paper. The influence of asymmetric field distributions inside the RF-gun on the electron beam properties was investigated via 3D beam dynamics simulations. A change in the coupling-plane of the side-coupling cavity is suggested to improve the gun performance.

  4. Movable RF probe eliminates need for calibration in plasma accelerators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, D. B.

    1967-01-01

    Movable RF antenna probe in plasma accelerators continuously maps the RF field both within and beyond the accelerator. It eliminates the need for installing probes in the accelerator walls. The moving RF probe can be used to map the RF electrical field under various accelerator conditions.

  5. Overview of High Power Vacuum Dry RF Load Designs

    SciTech Connect

    Krasnykh, Anatoly

    2015-08-27

    A specific feature of RF linacs based on the pulsed traveling wave (TW) mode of operation is that only a portion of the RF energy is used for the beam acceleration. The residual RF energy has to be terminated into an RF load. Higher accelerating gradients require higher RF sources and RF loads, which can stably terminate the residual RF power. RF feeders (from the RF source though the accelerating section to the load) are vacuumed to transmit multi-megawatt high power RF. This overview will outline vacuumed RF loads only. A common method to terminate multi-MW RF power is to use circulated water (or other liquid) as an absorbing medium. A solid dielectric interface (a high quality ceramic) is required to separate vacuum and liquid RF absorber mediums. Using such RF load approaches in TW linacs is troubling because there is a fragile ceramic window barrier and a failure could become catastrophic for linac vacuum and RF systems. Traditional loads comprising of a ceramic disk have limited peak and average power handling capability and are therefore not suitable for high gradient TW linacs. This overview will focus on ''vacuum dry'' or ''all-metal'' loads that do not employ any dielectric interface between vacuum and absorber. The first prototype is an original design of RF loads for the Stanford Two-Mile Accelerator.

  6. The CEBAF RF Separator System Upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    J. Hovater; Mark Augustine; Al Guerra; Richard Nelson; Robert Terrell; Mark Wissmann

    2004-08-01

    The CEBAF accelerator uses RF deflecting cavities operating at the third sub-harmonic (499 MHz) of the accelerating frequency (1497 MHz) to ''kick'' the electron beam to the experimental halls. The cavities operate in a TEM dipole mode incorporating mode enhancing rods to increase the cavity's transverse shunt impedance [1]. As the accelerators energy has increased from 4 GeV to 6 GeV the RF system, specifically the 1 kW solid-state amplifiers, have become problematic, operating in saturation because of the increased beam energy demands. Two years ago we began a study to look into replacement for the RF amplifiers and decided to use a commercial broadcast Inductive Output Tube (IOT) capable of 30 kW. The new RF system uses one IOT amplifier on multiple cavities as opposed to one amplifier per cavity as was originally used. In addition, the new RF system supports a proposed 12 GeV energy upgrade to CEBAF. We are currently halfway through the upgrade with three IOTs in operation and the remaining one nearly installed. This paper reports on the new RF system and the IOT performance.

  7. RF heating of nanoclusters for cancer therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Letfullin, Renat R.; Letfullin, Alla R.; George, Thomas F.

    2015-03-01

    Nanodrugs selectively delivered to a tumor site can be activated by radiation for drug release, or nanoparticles (NPs) can be used as a drug themselves by producing biological damage in cancer cells through thermal, mechanical ablations or charged particle emission. Radio-frequency (RF) waves have an excellent ability to penetrate into the human body without causing healthy tissue damage, which provides a great opportunity to activate/heat NPs delivered inside the body as a contrast agent for diagnosis and treatment purposes. However the heating of NPs in the RF range of the spectrum is controversial in the research community because of the low power load of RF waves and low absorption of NPs in the RF range. To resolve these weaknesses in the RF activation of NPs and dramatically increase absorption of contrast agents in tumor, we suggest aggregating the nanoclusters inside or on the surface of the cancer cells. We simulate space distribution of temperature changes inside and outside metal and dielectric nanopraticles/nanoclusters, determine the number of nanoparticles needed to form a cluster, and estimate the thermal damage area produced in surrounding medium by nanopraticles/nanoclusters heated in the RF field.

  8. Thermoregulatory responses to RF energy absorption.

    PubMed

    Adair, Eleanor R; Black, David R

    2003-01-01

    This white paper combines a tutorial on the fundamentals of thermoregulation with a review of the current literature concerned with physiological thermoregulatory responses of humans and laboratory animals in the presence of radio frequency (RF) and microwave fields. The ultimate goal of research involving whole body RF exposure of intact organisms is the prediction of effects of such exposure on human beings. Most of the published research on physiological thermoregulation has been conducted on laboratory animals, with a heavy emphasis on laboratory rodents. Because their physiological heat loss mechanisms are limited, these small animals are very poor models for human beings. Basic information about the thermoregulatory capabilities of animal models relative to human capability is essential for the appropriate evaluation and extrapolation of animal data to humans. In general, reliance on data collected on humans and nonhuman primates, however fragmentary, yields a more accurate understanding of how RF fields interact with humans. Such data are featured in this review, including data from both clinic and laboratory. Featured topics include thermal sensation, human RF overexposures, exposures attending magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), predictions based on simulation models, and laboratory studies of human volunteers. Supporting data from animal studies include the thermoregulatory profile, response thresholds, physiological responses of heat production and heat loss, intense or prolonged exposure, RF effects on early development, circadian variation, and additive drug-microwave interactions. The conclusion is inescapable that humans demonstrate far superior thermoregulatory ability over other tested organisms during RF exposure at, or even above current human exposure guidelines. PMID:14628305

  9. Low temperature aluminum reduction cell using hollow cathode

    DOEpatents

    Brown, Craig W.; Frizzle, Patrick B.

    2002-08-20

    A method of producing aluminum in an electrolytic cell containing alumina dissolved in an electrolyte. A plurality of non-consumable anodes are disposed substantially vertically in the electrolyte along with a plurality of monolithic hollow cathodes. Each cathode has a top and bottom and the cathodes are disposed vertically in the electrolyte and the anodes and the cathodes are arranged in alternating relationship. Each of the cathodes is comprised of a first side facing a first opposing anode and a second side facing a second opposing anode. The first and second sides are joined by ends to form a reservoir in the hollow cathode for collecting aluminum therein deposited at the cathode.

  10. Aerial photo SBVC1962". Photo no. 360. Low oblique aerial view ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Aerial photo -SBVC-1962". Photo no. 360. Low oblique aerial view of the campus, looking southeast. Stamped on the rear: "Ron Wilhite, Sun-Telegram photo, file, 10/22/62/ - San Bernardino Valley College, 701 South Mount Vernon Avenue, San Bernardino, San Bernardino County, CA

  11. Design of a Sputtering Cathode for Binary Alloys Deposition in Plasma Source Ion Implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malik, Shamim; Breun, Robert; Fetherston, Paul; Sridharan, Kumar; Conrad, John

    1996-10-01

    In Plasma Source Ion Implantation (PSII)1,2 a target is immersed in a plasma and pulse biased to a high negative voltage ( 50kV). Ions are injected into the near surface of target material under the influence of the electric field. In order to produce Ion Assisted Deposition (IAD) films in PSII, materials of interest are sputtered using DC or RF bias and up to 20 kV negative bias pulses are applied while depositing films. We have performed deposition of titanium aluminum nitride (TiAlN) films using a perforated aluminum cathode stacked on a planar titanium cathode. Design characteristics of the sputtering cathodes as a function of the ratio of material area, plasma parameters, and stoichiometric deposition rates have been evaluated. Analysis of these results will be presented. * This work was supported by NSF. No DMI-9528746, US-Army No. DAALH 03-94-G-0283 1 J. R. Conrad, et al. J. Appl. Phys.62, 4951 (1987). 2 M.M. Shamim et al., J. Vac. Sci. Technol. 12, 843 (1994).

  12. The role of anode and cathode plasmas in high power ion diode performance

    SciTech Connect

    Mehlhorn, T.A.; Bailey, J.E.; Bernard, M.A.

    1996-06-01

    We describe measurements, modeling, and mitigation experiments on the effects of anode and cathode plasmas in applied-B ion diodes. We have performed experiments with electrode conditioning and cleaning techniques including RF discharges, anode heating, cryogenic cathode cooling and anode surface coatings that have been successful in mitigating some of the effects of electrode contamination on ion diode performance on both the SABRE and PBFA accelerators. We are developing sophisticated spectroscopic diagnostic techniques that allow us to measure the electric and magnetic fields in the A-K gap, we compare these measured fields with those predicted by our 3-D particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations of ion diodes, and we measure anode and cathode plasma densities and expansion velocities. We are continuing to develop E-M simulation codes with fluid-PIC hybrid models for dense plasmas, in order to understand the role of electrode plasmas in ion diode performance. Our strategy for improving high power ion diode performance is to employ and expand our capabilities in measuring and modeling A-K gap plasmas and leverage our increased knowledge into an increase in total ion beam brightness to High Yield Facility (HYF) levels.

  13. Magnetic dipole discharges. II. Cathode and anode spot discharges and probe diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Stenzel, R. L.; Urrutia, J. M.; Ionita, C.; Schrittwieser, R.

    2013-08-15

    The high current regime of a magnetron-type discharge has been investigated. The discharge uses a permanent magnet as a cold cathode which emits secondary electrons while the chamber wall or a grounded electrode serves as the anode. As the discharge voltage is increased, the magnet develops cathode spots, which are short duration arcs that provide copious electrons to increase the discharge current dramatically. Short (1 μs), high current (200 A) and high voltage (750 V) discharge pulses are produced in a relaxation instability between the plasma and a charging capacitor. Spots are also observed on a negatively biased plane Langmuir probe. The probe current pulses are as large as those on the magnet, implying that the high discharge current does not depend on the cathode surface area but on the properties of the spots. The fast current pulses produce large inductive voltages, which can reverse the electrical polarity of the magnet and temporarily operate it as an anode. The discharge current may also oscillate at the frequency determined by the charging capacitor and the discharge circuit inductance. Each half cycle of high-current current pulses exhibits a fast (≃10 ns) current rise when a spot is formed. It induces high frequency (10–100 MHz) transients and ringing oscillations in probes and current circuits. Most probes behave like unmatched antennas for the electromagnetic pulses of spot discharges. Examples are shown to distinguish the source of oscillations and some rf characteristics of Langmuir probes.

  14. Ion energy measurements near a dormant cathode in a multiple-cathode gridded ion thruster

    SciTech Connect

    Rovey, Joshua L.; Gallimore, Alec D.

    2007-03-15

    A rectangular ion thruster discharge chamber was investigated for operation with multiple discharge cathode assemblies (DCAs). The multiple cathode approach attempts to increase thruster throughput and lifetime by operating three DCAs sequentially, possibly providing a threefold increase in discharge life. Previous multiple-cathode electric propulsion devices, such as the SPT-100, have shown dormant cathode erosion to be a life-limiting phenomenon. Similar results in a multiple-cathode discharge chamber may decrease the anticipated gain in discharge lifetime. In order to assess possible dormant cathode sputtering erosion, a diagnostic canister (DC) was designed and utilized to measure bombarding ion energy at the dormant cathode locations. The DC appeared similar to the active DCA, but was outfitted with a retarding potential analyzer. Most probable ion energy measurements show ions with energy of 27-35 eV ({+-}10%) with respect to cathode common and ion energy increases with increasing magnetic field strength. These results are consistent with an ion falling from the plasma potential to cathode common. A simple sputtering erosion model shows that, if doubly charged ions are present, these energies are enough to cause sputtering erosion of the dormant units.

  15. Effect of Cathode Length on Electrical Characteristics of a Microhollow Cathode Discharge in Helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamasaki, Tsutomu; Namba, Shinichi; Takiyama, Ken; Nojima, Hideo

    2012-06-01

    The electrical characteristics of a microhollow cathode discharge (MHCD) have been measured over a wide range of helium gas pressures from 10 to 900 Torr, by using cathodes of 0.5 mm diameter and 0.5-3.0 mm length. A relatively high voltage of the Paschen minimum at high pressure for the shortest cathode and a conventional hollow cathode mode for longer ones were observed. These are explained by a change of the plasma loss owing to the difference in cathode length. The radial extent of the negative glow inside the cathode hole increased with discharge current, and eventually spread along the outer surface. The threshold current for the extension of the plasma outside the cathode hole increased in proportion to the cathode length and to the square of the gas pressure. Thus, the longer cathode provides a favorable condition for the generation of reactive MHCD plasma at high-pressure and high-current operation. On the basis of these results and spectroscopic observation, the sustaining mechanism of an MHCD is briefly discussed.

  16. Cryo-EM visualization of the ribosome in termination complex with apo-RF3 and RF1

    PubMed Central

    Pallesen, Jesper; Hashem, Yaser; Korkmaz, Gürkan; Koripella, Ravi Kiran; Huang, Chenhui; Ehrenberg, Måns; Sanyal, Suparna; Frank, Joachim

    2013-01-01

    Termination of messenger RNA translation in Bacteria and Archaea is initiated by release factors (RFs) 1 or 2 recognizing a stop codon in the ribosomal A site and releasing the peptide from the P-site transfer RNA. After release, RF-dissociation is facilitated by the G-protein RF3. Structures of ribosomal complexes with RF1 or RF2 alone or with RF3 alone—RF3 bound to a non-hydrolyzable GTP-analog—have been reported. Here, we present the cryo-EM structure of a post-termination ribosome containing both apo-RF3 and RF1. The conformation of RF3 is distinct from those of free RF3•GDP and ribosome-bound RF3•GDP(C/N)P. Furthermore, the conformation of RF1 differs from those observed in RF3-lacking ribosomal complexes. Our study provides structural keys to the mechanism of guanine nucleotide exchange on RF3 and to an L12-mediated ribosomal recruitment of RF3. In conjunction with previous observations, our data provide the foundation to structurally characterize the complete action cycle of the G-protein RF3. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.00411.001 PMID:23755360

  17. Quantum Yield of Gold-Cathode Photomultipliers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Childs, Charles B.

    1961-01-01

    Two gold-cathode EMI 6255G tubes have been investigated for their quantum yield between 3100 and 1900 A. The tubes had cathodes of different appearances. One of these, numbered 3012, had a slight bluish tinge and was very transparent to visible light; the other, numbered 3021, had a definite gold coloration. The relative quantum yield of each tube was determined with the aid of a Cary model 14 recording spectrophotometer used as a monochromator. The monochromator relative-energy output was determined from the current output of a sodium-salicylate-coated RCA 1P21 photomultiplier. Each gold-cathode tube was then operated at 3000 v, and the central 1.8 cm cube of the cathode was exposed to the monochromator output.

  18. Time-shared Cathode Ray Tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herndon, E. S.

    1969-01-01

    Time-shared cathode tube provides high quality display at low cost display stations which utilize television moniters. It updates a cluster of graphic displays from a computer and is useful in systems not equipped for graphics time-sharing.

  19. The temporal development of hollow cathode discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Ngo, M.T. ); Schoenbach, K.H.; Gerdin, G.A. . Dept. of Electrical Engineering); Lee, J.H. )

    1990-06-01

    This paper reports the temporal development of hollow cathode discharges studied by means of electrical and optical diagnostic techniques. The results indicate that the discharge develops in two stages. The initial breakdown occurs along the longest straight path of the system; i.e., from the anode to the bottom of the cathode hole. This predischarge is confined to a narrow filament along the axis and carries a current of up to hundreds of mA. The resulting distortion of the electric field in the cathode hole is assumed to cause a radial breakdown from the filamentary plasma on the axis to the edge of the cathode hole. After this second breakdown, an increase in current by more than three orders of magnitude is observed. Measurements with axial magnetic fields support the two-stage model.

  20. High current density cathode for electrorefining in molten electrolyte

    DOEpatents

    Li, Shelly X.

    2010-06-29

    A high current density cathode for electrorefining in a molten electrolyte for the continuous production and collection of loose dendritic or powdery deposits. The high current density cathode eliminates the requirement for mechanical scraping and electrochemical stripping of the deposits from the cathode in an anode/cathode module. The high current density cathode comprises a perforated electrical insulated material coating such that the current density is up to 3 A/cm.sup.2.

  1. Co-Flow Hollow Cathode Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hofer, Richard R.; Goebel, Dan M.

    2011-01-01

    Hall thrusters utilize identical hollow cathode technology as ion thrusters, yet must operate at much higher mass flow rates in order to efficiently couple to the bulk plasma discharge. Higher flow rates are necessary in order to provide enough neutral collisions to transport electrons across magnetic fields so that they can reach the discharge. This higher flow rate, however, has potential life-limiting implications for the operation of the cathode. A solution to the problem involves splitting the mass flow into the hollow cathode into two streams, the internal and external flows. The internal flow is fixed and set such that the neutral pressure in the cathode allows for a high utilization of the emitter surface area. The external flow is variable depending on the flow rate through the anode of the Hall thruster, but also has a minimum in order to suppress high-energy ion generation. In the co-flow hollow cathode, the cathode assembly is mounted on thruster centerline, inside the inner magnetic core of the thruster. An annular gas plenum is placed at the base of the cathode and propellant is fed throughout to produce an azimuthally symmetric flow of gas that evenly expands around the cathode keeper. This configuration maximizes propellant utilization and is not subject to erosion processes. External gas feeds have been considered in the past for ion thruster applications, but usually in the context of eliminating high energy ion production. This approach is adapted specifically for the Hall thruster and exploits the geometry of a Hall thruster to feed and focus the external flow without introducing significant new complexity to the thruster design.

  2. CO2 laser cold cathode research results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hochuli, U.

    1973-01-01

    The construction and processing of four test lasers are discussed, and the test results are assessed. Tests show that the best performance was obtained from cathodes made from internally oxidized Ag-Cu alloys or pure Cu. Due to the cold cathode technology developments, sealed-off 1 w CO2 lasers with gas volumes of only 50 cu cm were duplicated, and have performed satisfactorily for more than 6000 hours.

  3. Parallel operation of microhollow cathode discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, W.; Stark, R.H.; Schoenbach, K.H.

    1999-02-01

    Parallel operation of dc microhollow cathode discharges in argon at pressures up to several hundred torr was obtained without individual ballast at low currents, where the slope of the current-voltage characteristic is positive. By using semi-insulating silicon as anode material, the authors were able to extend the range of stable operation over the entire current range, including that with negative differential resistance. This opens the possibility to utilize microhollow cathode discharge arrays in flat panel lamps.

  4. Parametric Modeling of Transverse Phase Space of an RF Photoinjector

    SciTech Connect

    Hartman, E.; Sayyar-Rodsari, B.; Schweiger, C.A.; Lee, M.J.; Lui, P.; Paterson, Ewan; Schmerge, J.F.; /SLAC

    2008-01-24

    High brightness electron beam sources such as rf photo-injectors as proposed for SASE FELs must consistently produce the desired beam quality. We report the results of a study in which a combined neural network (NN) and first-principles (FP) model is used to model the transverse phase space of the beam as a function of quadrupole strength, while beam charge, solenoid field, accelerator gradient, and linac voltage and phase are kept constant. The parametric transport matrix between the exit of the linac section and the spectrometer screen constitutes the FP component of the combined model. The NN block provides the parameters of the transport matrix as functions of quad current. Using real data from SLAC Gun Test Facility, we will highlight the significance of the constrained training of the NN block and show that the phase space of the beam is accurately modeled by the combined NN and FP model, while variations of beam matrix parameters with the quad current are correctly captured. We plan to extend the combined model in the future to capture the effects of variations in beam charge, solenoid field, and accelerator voltage and phase.

  5. Development of plasma cathode electron guns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oks, Efim M.; Schanin, Peter M.

    1999-05-01

    The status of experimental research and ongoing development of plasma cathode electron guns in recent years is reviewed, including some novel upgrades and applications to various technological fields. The attractiveness of this kind of e-gun is due to its capability of creating high current, broad or focused beams, both in pulsed and steady-state modes of operation. An important characteristic of the plasma cathode electron gun is the absence of a thermionic cathode, a feature which leads to long lifetime and reliable operation even in the presence of aggressive background gas media and at fore-vacuum gas pressure ranges such as achieved by mechanical pumps. Depending on the required beam parameters, different kinds of plasma discharge systems can be used in plasma cathode electron guns, such as vacuum arcs, constricted gaseous arcs, hollow cathode glows, and two kinds of discharges in crossed E×B fields: Penning and magnetron. At the present time, plasma cathode electron guns provide beams with transverse dimension from fractional millimeter up to about one meter, beam current from microamperes to kiloamperes, beam current density up to about 100 A/cm2, pulse duration from nanoseconds to dc, and electron energy from several keV to hundreds of keV. Applications include electron beam melting and welding, surface treatment, plasma chemistry, radiation technologies, laser pumping, microwave generation, and more.

  6. Alternative cathodes for molten carbonate fuel cells

    SciTech Connect

    Bloom, I.; Lanagan, M.; Roche, M.F.; Krumpelt, M.

    1996-02-01

    Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) is developing advanced cathodes for pressurized operation of the molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC). The present cathode, lithiated nickel oxide, tends to transport to the anode of the MCFC, where it is deposited as metallic nickel. The rate of transport increases with increasing CO{sub 2} pressure. This increase is due to an increased solubility of nickel oxide (NiO) in the molten carbonate electrolyte. An alternative cathode is lithium cobaltate (LiCoO{sub 2})-Solid solutions of LiCoO{sub 2} in LiFeO{sub 2} show promise for long-lived cathode materials. We have found that small additions of LiCoO{sub 2} to LiFeO{sub 2} markedly decrease the resistivity of the cathode material. Cells containing the LiCoO{sub 2}-LiFeO{sub 2} cathodes have stable performance for more than 2100 h of operation and display lower cobalt migration.

  7. Photo sensor array technology development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rossman, M. W.; Young, V. F.; Beall, J. R.

    1977-01-01

    The development of an improved capability photo sensor array imager for use in a Viking '75 type facsimile camera is presented. This imager consists of silicon photodiodes and lead sulfide detectors to cover a spectral range from 0.4 to 2.7 microns. An optical design specifying filter configurations and convergence angles is described. Three electronics design approaches: AC-chopped light, DC-dual detector, and DC-single detector, are investigated. Experimental and calculated results are compared whenever possible using breadboard testing and tolerance analysis techniques. Results show that any design used must be forgiving of the relative instability of lead sulfide detectors. A final design using lead sulfide detectors and associated electronics is implemented by fabrication of a hybrid prototype device. Test results of this device show a good agreement with calculated values.

  8. Photos of Slapped-Cheek Rash

    MedlinePlus

    ... Facebook Tweet Share Compartir WARNING: Some of these photos might be unsuitable for children. Viewing discretion is advised. In people with slapped-cheek rash from fifth disease, the degree of redness can vary and can often be ... it. PHIL Photo ID# 4508 Left side of this boy’s face ...

  9. A Snapshot of Photo Editing Options

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bolkan, J.V.

    2004-01-01

    Plenty of digital imaging professionals claim that Adobe's Photoshop CS is the best photo editing application money can buy. This document reviews Adobe's Photoshop CS and its worthy competitors. In addition to Adobe, the following programs are reviewed in this document: (1) Adobe Photoshop Elements 2.0; (2) Arcsoft PhotoImpression; (3) Jasc Paint…

  10. Using Participatory Photo Novels to Teach Marketing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Das, Kallol

    2012-01-01

    Teaching the restless young generation business students of today is not easy. Furthermore, the traditional lecture method has failed miserably to engage the business students and deliver significant learning. The author presents a discussion on the photo novel as an attractive communication medium and the participatory photo novel as an…

  11. Partnering with Families through Photo Collages

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bacigalupa, Chiara

    2016-01-01

    This article describes the implementation and benefits of a photo-based family communication method called Daily Explorations. Daily Explorations are one- to two-page photo collages that are annotated with meaningful explanations of children's play and e-mailed to parents every day. The process, described in more detail in this article, is a…

  12. RF Performance of Membrane Aperture Shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flint, Eirc M.; Lindler, Jason E.; Thomas, David L.; Romanofsky, Robert

    2007-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of recent results establishing the suitability of Membrane Aperture Shell Technology (MAST) for Radio Frequency (RF) applications. These single surface shells are capable of maintaining their figure with no preload or pressurization and minimal boundary support, yet can be compactly roll stowed and passively self deploy. As such, they are a promising technology for enabling a future generation of RF apertures. In this paper, we review recent experimental and numerical results quantifying suitable RF performance. It is shown that candidate materials possess metallic coatings with sufficiently low surface roughness and that these materials can be efficiently fabricated into RF relevant doubly curved shapes. A numerical justification for using a reflectivity metric, as opposed to the more standard RF designer metric of skin depth, is presented and the resulting ability to use relatively thin coating thickness is experimentally validated with material sample tests. The validity of these independent film sample measurements are then confirmed through experimental results measuring RF performance for reasonable sized doubly curved apertures. Currently available best results are 22 dBi gain at 3 GHz (S-Band) for a 0.5m aperture tested in prime focus mode, 28dBi gain for the same antenna in the C-Band (4 to 6 GHz), and 36.8dBi for a smaller 0.25m antenna tested at 32 GHz in the Ka-Band. RF range test results for a segmented aperture (one possible scaling approach) are shown as well. Measured antenna system actual efficiencies (relative to the unachievable) ideal for these on axis tests are generally quite good, typically ranging from 50 to 90%.

  13. RF pulse compression for future linear colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, P.B.

    1995-05-01

    Future (nonsuperconducting) linear colliders will require very high values of peak rf power per meter of accelerating structure. The role of rf pulse compression in producing this power is examined within the context of overall rf system design for three future colliders at energies of 1.0--1.5 TeV, 5 TeV and 25 TeV. In order keep the average AC input power and the length of the accelerator within reasonable limits, a collider in the 1.0--1.5 TeV energy range will probably be built at an x-band rf frequency, and will require a peak power on the order of 150--200 MW per meter of accelerating structure. A 5 TeV collider at 34 GHz with a reasonable length (35 km) and AC input power (225 MW) would require about 550 MW per meter of structure. Two-beam accelerators can achieve peak powers of this order by applying dc pulse compression techniques (induction linac modules) to produce the drive beam. Klystron-driven colliders achieve high peak power by a combination of dc pulse compression (modulators) and rf pulse compression, with about the same overall rf system efficiency (30--40%) as a two-beam collider. A high gain (6.8) three-stage binary pulse compression system with high efficiency (80%) is described, which (compared to a SLED-11 system) can be used to reduce the klystron peak power by about a factor of two, or alternately, to cut the number of klystrons in half for a 1.0--1.5 TeV x-band collider. For a 5 TeV klystron-driven collider, a high gain, high efficiency rf pulse compression system is essential.

  14. RF pulse compression for future linear colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Perry B.

    1995-07-01

    Future (nonsuperconducting) linear colliders will require very high values of peak rf power per meter of accelerating structure. The role of rf pulse compression in producing this power is examined within the context of overall rf system design for three future colliders at energies of 1.0-1.5 TeV, 5 TeV, and 25 TeV. In order to keep the average AC input power and the length of the accelerator within reasonable limits, a collider in the 1.0-1.5 TeV energy range will probably be built at an x-band rf frequency, and will require a peak power on the order of 150-200 MW per meter of accelerating structure. A 5 TeV collider at 34 GHz with a reasonable length (35 km) and AC input power (225 MW) would require about 550 MW per meter of structure. Two-beam accelerators can achieve peak powers of this order by applying dc pulse compression techniques (induction linac modules) to produce the drive beam. Klystron-driven colliders achieve high peak power by a combination of dc pulse compression (modulators) and rf pulse compression, with about the same overall rf system efficiency (30-40%) as a two-beam collider. A high gain (6.8) three-stage binary pulse compression system with high efficiency (80%) is described, which (compared to a SLED-II system) can be used to reduce the klystron peak power by about a factor of two, or alternatively, to cut the number of klystrons in half for a 1.0-1.5 TeV x-band collider. For a 5 TeV klystron-driven collider, a high gain, high efficiency rf pulse compression system is essential.

  15. LOW TEMPERATURE CATHODE SUPPORTED ELECTROLYTES

    SciTech Connect

    Harlan U. Anderson; Fatih Dogan; Vladimir Petrovsky

    2003-03-31

    This report represents a summary of the work carried out on this project which started October 1999 and ended March 2003. A list of the publications resulting from the work are contained in Appendix A. The most significant achievements are: (1) Dense nanocrystalline zirconia and ceria films were obtained at temperatures < 400 C. (2) Nanocrystalline films of both ceria and zirconia were characterized. (3) We showed that under anodic conditions 0.5 to 1 micron thick nanocrystalline films of Sc doped zirconia have sufficient electronic conductivity to prevent them from being useful as an electrolyte. (4) We have developed a process by which dense 0.5 to 5 micron thick dense films of either YSZ or ceria can be deposited on sintered porous substrates which serve as either the cathode or anode at temperatures as low as 400 C. (5) The program has provided the research to produce two PhD thesis for students, one is now working in the solid oxide fuel cell field. (6) The results of the research have resulted in 69 papers published, 3 papers submitted or being prepared for publication, 50 oral presentations and 3 patent disclosures.

  16. High voltage photo switch package module

    DOEpatents

    Sullivan, James S; Sanders, David M; Hawkins, Steven A; Sampayan, Stephen E

    2014-02-18

    A photo-conductive switch package module having a photo-conductive substrate or wafer with opposing electrode-interface surfaces, and at least one light-input surface. First metallic layers are formed on the electrode-interface surfaces, and one or more optical waveguides having input and output ends are bonded to the substrate so that the output end of each waveguide is bonded to a corresponding one of the light-input surfaces of the photo-conductive substrate. This forms a waveguide-substrate interface for coupling light into the photo-conductive wafer. A dielectric material such as epoxy is then used to encapsulate the photo-conductive substrate and optical waveguide so that only the metallic layers and the input end of the optical waveguide are exposed. Second metallic layers are then formed on the first metallic layers so that the waveguide-substrate interface is positioned under the second metallic layers.

  17. A perceptual metric for photo retouching.

    PubMed

    Kee, Eric; Farid, Hany

    2011-12-13

    In recent years, advertisers and magazine editors have been widely criticized for taking digital photo retouching to an extreme. Impossibly thin, tall, and wrinkle- and blemish-free models are routinely splashed onto billboards, advertisements, and magazine covers. The ubiquity of these unrealistic and highly idealized images has been linked to eating disorders and body image dissatisfaction in men, women, and children. In response, several countries have considered legislating the labeling of retouched photos. We describe a quantitative and perceptually meaningful metric of photo retouching. Photographs are rated on the degree to which they have been digitally altered by explicitly modeling and estimating geometric and photometric changes. This metric correlates well with perceptual judgments of photo retouching and can be used to objectively judge by how much a retouched photo has strayed from reality. PMID:22123980

  18. A perceptual metric for photo retouching

    PubMed Central

    Kee, Eric; Farid, Hany

    2011-01-01

    In recent years, advertisers and magazine editors have been widely criticized for taking digital photo retouching to an extreme. Impossibly thin, tall, and wrinkle- and blemish-free models are routinely splashed onto billboards, advertisements, and magazine covers. The ubiquity of these unrealistic and highly idealized images has been linked to eating disorders and body image dissatisfaction in men, women, and children. In response, several countries have considered legislating the labeling of retouched photos. We describe a quantitative and perceptually meaningful metric of photo retouching. Photographs are rated on the degree to which they have been digitally altered by explicitly modeling and estimating geometric and photometric changes. This metric correlates well with perceptual judgments of photo retouching and can be used to objectively judge by how much a retouched photo has strayed from reality. PMID:22123980

  19. A perceptual metric for photo retouching.

    PubMed

    Kee, Eric; Farid, Hany

    2011-12-13

    In recent years, advertisers and magazine editors have been widely criticized for taking digital photo retouching to an extreme. Impossibly thin, tall, and wrinkle- and blemish-free models are routinely splashed onto billboards, advertisements, and magazine covers. The ubiquity of these unrealistic and highly idealized images has been linked to eating disorders and body image dissatisfaction in men, women, and children. In response, several countries have considered legislating the labeling of retouched photos. We describe a quantitative and perceptually meaningful metric of photo retouching. Photographs are rated on the degree to which they have been digitally altered by explicitly modeling and estimating geometric and photometric changes. This metric correlates well with perceptual judgments of photo retouching and can be used to objectively judge by how much a retouched photo has strayed from reality.

  20. Polymer light-emitting devices with novel cathode structures and full-color patterning processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Xianyu

    2006-12-01

    In the past decades, polymeric light-emitting diode (PLED) have been a focus of research interest to scientists all over the world due to its potential application in flat panel displays. In previous studies, tremendous progresses in material developments, device engineering and theoretical modeling for PLEDs have been achieved. However, there are still a number of crucial problems to be solved in order for PLEDs to be widely employed in commercial flat panel displays. In this thesis, we present studies of PLEDs that used a high work-function metal aluminum as the cathode. The device exhibits a highly enhanced efficiency by modifying the cathode using certain non-ionic surfactant polymers. Based on this finding, we further demonstrated top-emitting PLEDs with environmentally stable cathodes. In another development, we show that a three-coloremitting device with a bilayer emitting polymer structure can be achieved by a dry photo-patterning process. Each of the red, green and blue emission in the device has a comparable emitting efficiency to the traditional standard red, green or blue device with single color emission. These results are believed to be important and beneficial for obtaining low-cost, large-scale and long life-time flat panel displays based on PLEDs.

  1. RF characterization and testing of ridge waveguide transitions for RF power couplers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Rajesh; Jose, Mentes; Singh, G. N.; Kumar, Girish; Bhagwat, P. V.

    2016-12-01

    RF characterization of rectangular to ridge waveguide transitions for RF power couplers has been carried out by connecting them back to back. Rectangular waveguide to N type adapters are first calibrated by TRL method and then used for RF measurements. Detailed information is obtained about their RF behavior by measurements and full wave simulations. It is shown that the two transitions can be characterized and tuned for required return loss at design frequency of 352.2 MHz. This opens the possibility of testing and conditioning two transitions together on a test bench. Finally, a RF coupler based on these transitions is coupled to an accelerator cavity. The power coupler is successfully tested up to 200 kW, 352.2 MHz with 0.2% duty cycle.

  2. Photo-degradation in air of the active layer components in a thiophene-quinoxaline copolymer:fullerene solar cell.

    PubMed

    Hansson, Rickard; Lindqvist, Camilla; Ericsson, Leif K E; Opitz, Andreas; Wang, Ergang; Moons, Ellen

    2016-04-28

    We have studied the photo-degradation in air of a blend of [6,6]-phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) and poly[2,3-bis-(3-octyloxyphenyl)quinoxaline-5,8-diyl-alt-thiophene-2,5-diyl] (TQ1), and how the photo-degradation affects the solar cell performance. Using near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy, changes to the electronic structure of TQ1 and PCBM caused by illumination in ambient air are investigated and compared between the pristine materials and the blend. The NEXAFS spectra show that the unoccupied molecular orbitals of TQ1 are not significantly changed by the exposure of pristine TQ1 to light in air, whereas those of PCBM are severely affected as a result of photo-induced degradation of PCBM. Furthermore, the photo-degradation of PCBM is accelerated by blending it with TQ1. While the NEXAFS spectrum of TQ1 remains unchanged upon illumination in air, its valence band spectrum shows that the occupied molecular orbitals are weakly affected. Yet, UV-Vis absorption spectra demonstrate photo-bleaching of TQ1, which is attenuated in the presence of PCBM in blend films. Illumination of the active layer of TQ1:PCBM solar cells prior to cathode deposition causes severe losses in electrical performance. PMID:27051887

  3. Photo-degradation in air of the active layer components in a thiophene-quinoxaline copolymer:fullerene solar cell.

    PubMed

    Hansson, Rickard; Lindqvist, Camilla; Ericsson, Leif K E; Opitz, Andreas; Wang, Ergang; Moons, Ellen

    2016-04-28

    We have studied the photo-degradation in air of a blend of [6,6]-phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) and poly[2,3-bis-(3-octyloxyphenyl)quinoxaline-5,8-diyl-alt-thiophene-2,5-diyl] (TQ1), and how the photo-degradation affects the solar cell performance. Using near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy, changes to the electronic structure of TQ1 and PCBM caused by illumination in ambient air are investigated and compared between the pristine materials and the blend. The NEXAFS spectra show that the unoccupied molecular orbitals of TQ1 are not significantly changed by the exposure of pristine TQ1 to light in air, whereas those of PCBM are severely affected as a result of photo-induced degradation of PCBM. Furthermore, the photo-degradation of PCBM is accelerated by blending it with TQ1. While the NEXAFS spectrum of TQ1 remains unchanged upon illumination in air, its valence band spectrum shows that the occupied molecular orbitals are weakly affected. Yet, UV-Vis absorption spectra demonstrate photo-bleaching of TQ1, which is attenuated in the presence of PCBM in blend films. Illumination of the active layer of TQ1:PCBM solar cells prior to cathode deposition causes severe losses in electrical performance.

  4. RF BREAKDOWN STUDIES USING PRESSURIZED CAVITIES

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Rolland

    2014-09-21

    Many present and future particle accelerators are limited by the maximum electric gradient and peak surface fields that can be realized in RF cavities. Despite considerable effort, a comprehensive theory of RF breakdown has not been achieved and mitigation techniques to improve practical maximum accelerating gradients have had only limited success. Part of the problem is that RF breakdown in an evacuated cavity involves a complex mixture of effects, which include the geometry, metallurgy, and surface preparation of the accelerating structures and the make-up and pressure of the residual gas in which plasmas form. Studies showed that high gradients can be achieved quickly in 805 MHz RF cavities pressurized with dense hydrogen gas, as needed for muon cooling channels, without the need for long conditioning times, even in the presence of strong external magnetic fields. This positive result was expected because the dense gas can practically eliminate dark currents and multipacting. In this project we used this high pressure technique to suppress effects of residual vacuum and geometry that are found in evacuated cavities in order to isolate and study the role of the metallic surfaces in RF cavity breakdown as a function of magnetic field, frequency, and surface preparation. One of the interesting and useful outcomes of this project was the unanticipated collaborations with LANL and Fermilab that led to new insights as to the operation of evacuated normal-conducting RF cavities in high external magnetic fields. Other accomplishments included: (1) RF breakdown experiments to test the effects of SF6 dopant in H2 and He gases with Sn, Al, and Cu electrodes were carried out in an 805 MHz cavity and compared to calculations and computer simulations. The heavy corrosion caused by the SF6 components led to the suggestion that a small admixture of oxygen, instead of SF6, to the hydrogen would allow the same advantages without the corrosion in a practical muon beam line. (2) A

  5. Experimental Investigation of Thruster Cathode Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crofton, Mark

    2004-11-01

    Advanced ion propulsion technologies are being developed under the Nuclear Electric Xenon Ion System (NEXIS) program for use in outer planet exploration. A revolutionary approach to thruster cathode design is dictated by the very high lifetime and propellant throughput requirements for nuclear electric applications. In conventional dispenser hollow cathodes used in thrusters, processes leading to depletion, inadequate transport, or insufficient production of barium are among those limiting the lifetime. A reservoir hollow cathode is being developed to address each of these failure mechanisms, exploiting four design variables - matrix material, source material, geometry, and thermal design - to essentially eliminate established failure modes. The very long anticipated lifetime necessitates new life validation methods to augment or replace the conventional lifetest approach. One important tool for quickly evaluating design changes is the ability to measure barium density inside a hollow cathode and/or in the plume. The dependence of barium density on temperature and other factors is an extremely important indicator of cathode health, particularly if the ratio Ba:BaO is also obtained. Comparison of barium production for reservoir and conventional cathodes will enable an assessment of the efficacy of reservoir designs and the goal of reducing barium consumption at a given emission current level. This study describes benchmark measurements made on a conventional cathode previously operated in a 20-kW NEXIS laboratory engine. Data on cathode operation and life-limiting processes were obtained through direct, real-time monitoring of atoms and molecules. A high-resolution, tunable laser system was employed to detect absorption of the low-density barium atoms inside the cathode. The plume was monitored also, using a quadrupole mass spectrometer to monitor multiple species and measure ion charge ratios. Data obtained with retarding potential analyzers or other means are

  6. Observations of a mode transition in a hydrogen hollow cathode discharge using phase resolved optical emission spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Dixon, Sam Charles, Christine; Dedrick, James; Boswell, Rod; Gans, Timo; O'Connell, Deborah

    2014-07-07

    Two distinct operational modes are observed in a radio frequency (rf) low pressure hydrogen hollow cathode discharge. The mode transition is characterised by a change in total light emission and differing expansion structures. An intensified CCD camera is used to make phase resolved images of Balmer α emission from the discharge. The low emission mode is consistent with a typical γ discharge, and appears to be driven by secondary electrons ejected from the cathode surface. The bright mode displays characteristics common to an inductive discharge, including increased optical emission, power factor, and temperature of the H{sub 2} gas. The bright mode precipitates the formation of a stationary shock in the expansion, observed as a dark region adjacent to the source-chamber interface.

  7. MULTIPACTING ANALYSIS OF A QUARTER WAVE CHOKE JOINT USED FOR INSERTION OF A DEMOUNTABLE CATHODE INTO A SRF PHOTOINJECTOR

    SciTech Connect

    BURRILL,A.

    2007-06-25

    The multipacting phenomena in accelerating structures and coaxial lines are well documented and methods of mitigating or suppressing it are understood. The multipacting that occurs in a quarter wave choke joint designed to mount a cathode insertion stalk into a superconducting RF photoinjector has been analyzed via calculations and experimental measurements and the effect of introducing multipacting suppression grooves into the structure is analyzed. Several alternative choke joint designs are analyzed and suggestions made regarding future choke joint development. Furthermore, the problems encountered in cleaning the choke joint surfaces, factors important in changes to the secondary electron yield, are discussed and evaluated. This design is being implemented on the BNL 1.3 GHz photoinjector, previously used for measurement of the quantum efficiency of bare Nb, to allow for the introduction of other cathode materials for study, and to verify the design functions properly prior to constructing our 703 Mflz photoinjector with a similar choke joint design.

  8. Multipacting Analysis of a Quarter Wave Choke Joint used for Insertion of a Demountable Cathode into a SRF Photoinjector

    SciTech Connect

    A. Burrill; I. Ben-Zvi; M. D. Cole; J. Rathke; P. Kneisel; R. Manus; R. A. Rimmer

    2007-08-01

    The multipacting phenomena in accelerating structures and coaxial lines are well documented and methods of mitigating or suppressing it are understood. The multipacting that occurs in a quarter wave choke joint designed to mount a cathode insertion stalk into a superconducting RF photoinjector has been analyzed via calculations and experimental measurements and the effect of introducing multipacting suppression grooves into the structure is analyzed. Several alternative choke joint designs are analyzed and suggestions made regarding future choke joint development. Furthermore, the problems encountered in cleaning the choke joint surfaces, factors important in changes to the secondary electron yield, are discussed and evaluated. This design is being implemented on the BNL 1.3 GHz photoinjector, previously used for measurement of the quantum efficiency of bare Nb, to allow for the introduction of other cathode materials for study, and to verify the design functions properly prior to constructing our 703 MHz photoinjector with a similar choke joint design.

  9. Development of light source using micro hollow cathode plasma for monitoring absolute densities of metal atoms in magnetron sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohta, Takayuki; Tachibana, Yoshihiro; Ito, Masafumi; Takashima, Seigo; Higashijima, Yasuhiro; Kano, Hiroyuki; den, Shoji; Hori, Masaru

    2007-10-01

    The quantitative analysis of metal atoms is important for understanding the chemistry and controlling the conditions in sputtering process. The light source, which emits multi-atomic lines simultaneously, is required for diagnostics of behaviors of many kind of metallic atom at the same time. In this study, a multi-micro hollow cathode lamp for simultaneous monitoring of multi-metal atoms in sputtering process was developed. The emissions of Cu, Zn, Fe, and Mo for analysis were simultaneously obtained from 4 hollows. The Cu and Mo densities in the magnetron sputtering were measured using absorption spectroscopy employing the multi-micro hollow cathode lamp. Those densities were measured to be from 10^9 to 10^10 cm-3 in the RF power range from 0 to 100 W at a pressure of 5 Pa. The simultaneous measurement of the atomic densities in the sputtering plasma has been performed.

  10. Design and Construction of a 500 KW CW, 400 MHZ Klystron To Be Used As RF Power Source For LHC/RF Component Tests

    SciTech Connect

    Pearson, Chris

    2003-05-05

    A 500 kW cw klystron operating at 400 MHz was developed and constructed jointly by CERN and SLAC for use as a high-power source at CERN for testing LHC/RF components such as circulators, RF absorbers and superconducting cavities with their input couplers. The design is a modification of the 353 MHz SLAC PEP-I klystron. More than 80% of the original PEP-I tube parts could thus be incorporated in the LHC test klystron which resulted in lower engineering costs as well as reduced development and construction time. The physical length between cathode plane and upper pole plate was kept unchanged so that a PEP-I tube focusing solenoid, available at CERN, could be re-used. With the aid of the klystron simulation codes JPNDISK and CONDOR, the design of the LHC tube was accomplished, which resulted in a tube with noticeably higher efficiency than its predecessor, the PEP-I klystron. The integrated cavities were redesigned using SUPERFISH and the output coupling circuit, which also required redesigning, was done with the aid of MAFIA. Details of the tube development and test results are presented.

  11. Electron spectrometer in adjustable triode configuration for photo-induced field emission measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Bornmann, B.; Mingels, S.; Luetzenkirchen-Hecht, D.; Mueller, G.; Dams, F.; Prommesberger, C.; Schreiner, R.

    2012-01-15

    We have constructed a new ultrahigh vacuum apparatus with a triode configuration for the systematic investigation of photo-induced field emission (PFE) from metallic or semiconducting cathodes. These are exposed to electric fields up to 400 MV/m and laser irradiation by means of hole or mesh gates. Cathodes and gates are in situ exchangeable and adjustable with high precision to ensure a homogeneous extraction of electrons which are partially transmitted to the fixed electron spectrometer. Its hemispherical sector analyzer provides an energy resolution limit of 8 meV. The commissioning of the measurement system has been performed with a tungsten needle. Its temperature showed up in the high-energy tail of the electron spectrum, while its work function was derived from the spectral low-energy part combined with the integral current-voltage curve. First PFE measurements on B-doped Si-tip arrays yielded a small field emission current increase under green laser illumination. A shift and splitting of the energy spectra was observed which revealed different emission regimes as well as the photosensitivity of the cathode due to carrier excitation into the conduction band. For the full exploitation of the PFE system, a tunable laser over a wide eV-range is required.

  12. Introduction to Latest RF ATE with Low Test Cost Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimishima, Masayuki

    This paper describes latest RF Automated Test Equipment (RF ATE) technologies that include device under test (DUT) connections, a calibration method, and an RF test module mainly focusing on low cost of test (COT). Most important respect for low COT is how achieve a number of simultaneous measurements and short test time as well as a plain calibration. We realized these respects by a newly proposed calibration method and a drastically downsized RF test module with multiple resources and high throughput. The calibration method is very convenient for RF ATE. Major contribution for downsizing of the RF test module is RF circuit technology in form of RF functional system in package (RF-SIPs), resulting in very attractive test solutions.

  13. Compact Rare Earth Emitter Hollow Cathode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watkins, Ronald; Goebel, Dan; Hofer, Richard

    2010-01-01

    A compact, high-current, hollow cathode utilizing a lanthanum hexaboride (LaB6) thermionic electron emitter has been developed for use with high-power Hall thrusters and ion thrusters. LaB6 cathodes are being investigated due to their long life, high current capabilities, and less stringent xenon purity and handling requirements compared to conventional barium oxide (BaO) dispenser cathodes. The new cathode features a much smaller diameter than previously developed versions that permit it to be mounted on axis of a Hall thruster ( internally mounted ), as opposed to the conventional side-mount position external to the outer magnetic circuit ("externally mounted"). The cathode has also been reconfigured to be capable of surviving vibrational loads during launch and is designed to solve the significant heater and materials compatibility problems associated with the use of this emitter material. This has been accomplished in a compact design with the capability of high-emission current (10 to 60 A). The compact, high-current design has a keeper diameter that allows the cathode to be mounted on the centerline of a 6- kW Hall thruster, inside the iron core of the inner electromagnetic coil. Although designed for electric propulsion thrusters in spacecraft station- keeping, orbit transfer, and interplanetary applications, the LaB6 cathodes are applicable to the plasma processing industry in applications such as optical coatings and semiconductor processing where reactive gases are used. Where current electrical propulsion thrusters with BaO emitters have limited life and need extremely clean propellant feed systems at a significant cost, these LaB6 cathodes can run on the crudest-grade xenon propellant available without impact. Moreover, in a laboratory environment, LaB6 cathodes reduce testing costs because they do not require extended conditioning periods under hard vacuum. Alternative rare earth emitters, such as cerium hexaboride (CeB6) can be used in this

  14. Virtual cathode microwave generator having annular anode slit

    SciTech Connect

    Kwan, T.J.T.; Snell, C.M.

    1988-03-08

    A microwave generator using an oscillating virtual cathode is described comprising: a cathode for emitting electrons; an anode for accelerating emitted electrons from the cathode, the anode having an annular slit therethrough effective for forming the virtual cathode and having at least one range thickness relative to electrons reflected from the virtual cathode; and magnet means for producing a magnetic field having a field strength effective to form an annular beam from the emitted electrons in substantial alignment with the annular anode slit and to enable the electrons reflected from the virtual cathode to axially diverge from the annular beam. The reflected electrons return toward the cathode diverge from the annular beam and are absorbed by the anode to substantially eliminate electrons reflexing between the cathode and the virtual cathode.

  15. Determination of trace uranium by resonance fluorescence method coupled with photo-catalytic technology and dual cloud point extraction.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiekang; Li, Guirong; Han, Qian

    2016-12-01

    In this paper, two kinds of salophens (Sal) with different solubilities, Sal1 and Sal2, have been respectively synthesized, and they all can combine with uranyl to form stable complexes: [UO2(2+)-Sal1] and [UO2(2+)-Sal2]. Among them, [UO2(2+)-Sal1] was used as ligand to extract uranium in complex samples by dual cloud point extraction (dCPE), and [UO2(2+)-Sal2] was used as catalyst for the determination of uranium by photocatalytic resonance fluorescence (RF) method. The photocatalytic characteristic of [UO2(2+)-Sal2] on the oxidized pyronine Y (PRY) by potassium bromate which leads to the decrease of RF intensity of PRY were studied. The reduced value of RF intensity of reaction system (ΔF) is in proportional to the concentration of uranium (c), and a novel photo-catalytic RF method was developed for the determination of trace uranium (VI) after dCPE. The combination of photo-catalytic RF techniques and dCPE procedure endows the presented methods with enhanced sensitivity and selectivity. Under optimal conditions, the linear calibration curves range for 0.067 to 6.57ngmL(-1), the linear regression equation was ΔF=438.0 c (ngmL(-1))+175.6 with the correlation coefficient r=0.9981. The limit of detection was 0.066ngmL(-1). The proposed method was successfully applied for the separation and determination of uranium in real samples with the recoveries of 95.0-103.5%. The mechanisms of the indicator reaction and dCPE are discussed.

  16. Improved cathode materials for microbial electrosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, T; Nie, HR; Bain, TS; Lu, HY; Cui, MM; Snoeyenbos-West, OL; Franks, AE; Nevin, KP; Russell, TP; Lovley, DR

    2013-01-01

    Microbial electrosynthesis is a promising strategy for the microbial conversion of carbon dioxide to transportation fuels and other organic commodities, but optimization of this process is required for commercialization. Cathodes which enhance electrode-microbe electron transfer might improve rates of product formation. To evaluate this possibility, biofilms of Sporomusa ovata, which are effective in acetate electrosynthesis, were grown on a range of cathode materials and acetate production was monitored over time. Modifications of carbon cloth that resulted in a positive-charge enhanced microbial electrosynthesis. Functionalization with chitosan or cyanuric chloride increased acetate production rates 6-7 fold and modification with 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane gave rates 3-fold higher than untreated controls. A 3-fold increase in electrosynthesis over untreated carbon cloth cathodes was also achieved with polyaniline cathodes. However, not all strategies to provide positively charged surfaces were successful, as treatment of carbon cloth with melamine or ammonia gas did not stimulate acetate electrosynthesis. Treating carbon cloth with metal, in particular gold, palladium, or nickel nanoparticles, also promoted electrosynthesis, yielding electrosynthesis rates that were 6-,4.7- or 4.5-fold faster than the untreated control, respectively. Cathodes comprised of cotton or polyester fabric treated with carbon nanotubes yielded cathodes that supported acetate electrosynthesis rates that were similar to 3-fold higher than carbon cloth controls. Recovery of electrons consumed in acetate was similar to 80% for all materials. The results demonstrate that one approach to increase rates of carbon dioxide reduction in microbial electrosynthesis is to modify cathode surfaces to improve microbe-electrode interactions.

  17. 2013 Estorm - Invited Paper - Cathode Materials Review

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel, Claus; Mohanty, Debasish; Li, Jianlin; Wood III, David L

    2014-01-01

    The electrochemical potential of cathode materials defines the positive side of the terminal voltage of a battery. Traditionally, cathode materials are the energy-limiting or voltage-limiting electrode. One of the first electrochemical batteries, the voltaic pile invented by Alessandro Volta in 1800 (Phil. Trans. Roy. Soc. 90, 403 431) had a copper-zinc galvanic element with a terminal voltage of 0.76 V. Since then, the research community has increased capacity and voltage for primary (nonrechargeable) batteries and round-trip efficiency for secondary (rechargeable) batteries. Successful secondary batteries have been the lead acid with a lead oxide cathode and a terminal voltage of 2.1 V and later the NiCd with a nickel(III) oxide hydroxide cathode and a 1.2 V terminal voltage. The relatively low voltage of those aqueous systems and the low round-trip efficiency due to activation energies in the conversion reactions limited their use. In 1976, Wittingham (J. Electrochem. Soc., 123, 315) and Besenhard (J Power Sources 1(3), 267) finally enabled highly reversible redox reactions by intercalation of lithium ions instead of by chemical conversion. In 1980, Goodenough and Mizushima (Mater. Res. Bull. 15, 783 789) demonstrated a high-energy and high-power LiCoO2 cathode, allowing for an increase of terminal voltage far beyond 3 V. Over the past four decades, the international research community has further developed cathode materials of many varieties. Current state-of-the-art cathodes demonstrate voltages beyond any known electrolyte stability window, bringing electrolyte research once again to the forefront of battery research.

  18. A rapid fluorescence based method for the quantitative analysis of cell culture media photo-degradation.

    PubMed

    Calvet, Amandine; Li, Boyan; Ryder, Alan G

    2014-01-01

    Cell culture media are very complex chemical mixtures that are one of the most important aspects in biopharmaceutical manufacturing. The complex composition of many media leads to materials that are inherently unstable and of particular concern, is media photo-damage which can adversely affect cell culture performance. This can be significant particularly with small scale transparent bioreactors and media containers are used for process development or research. Chromatographic and/or mass spectrometry based analyses are often time-consuming and expensive for routine high-throughput media analysis particularly during scale up or development processes. Fluorescence excitation-emission matrix (EEM) spectroscopy combined with multi-way chemometrics is a robust methodology applicable for the analysis of raw materials, media, and bioprocess broths. Here we demonstrate how EEM spectroscopy was used for the rapid, quantitative analysis of media degradation caused by ambient visible light exposure. The primary degradation pathways involve riboflavin (leading to the formation of lumichrome, LmC) which also causes photo-sensitised degradation of tryptophan, which was validated using high pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) measurements. The use of PARallel FACtor analysis (PARAFAC), multivariate curve resolution (MCR), and N-way partial least squares (NPLS) enabled the rapid and easy monitoring of the compositional changes in tryptophan (Trp), tyrosine (Tyr), and riboflavin (Rf) concentration caused by ambient light exposure. Excellent agreement between HPLC and EEM methods was found for the change in Trp, Rf, and LmC concentrations. PMID:24356227

  19. A rapid fluorescence based method for the quantitative analysis of cell culture media photo-degradation.

    PubMed

    Calvet, Amandine; Li, Boyan; Ryder, Alan G

    2014-01-01

    Cell culture media are very complex chemical mixtures that are one of the most important aspects in biopharmaceutical manufacturing. The complex composition of many media leads to materials that are inherently unstable and of particular concern, is media photo-damage which can adversely affect cell culture performance. This can be significant particularly with small scale transparent bioreactors and media containers are used for process development or research. Chromatographic and/or mass spectrometry based analyses are often time-consuming and expensive for routine high-throughput media analysis particularly during scale up or development processes. Fluorescence excitation-emission matrix (EEM) spectroscopy combined with multi-way chemometrics is a robust methodology applicable for the analysis of raw materials, media, and bioprocess broths. Here we demonstrate how EEM spectroscopy was used for the rapid, quantitative analysis of media degradation caused by ambient visible light exposure. The primary degradation pathways involve riboflavin (leading to the formation of lumichrome, LmC) which also causes photo-sensitised degradation of tryptophan, which was validated using high pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) measurements. The use of PARallel FACtor analysis (PARAFAC), multivariate curve resolution (MCR), and N-way partial least squares (NPLS) enabled the rapid and easy monitoring of the compositional changes in tryptophan (Trp), tyrosine (Tyr), and riboflavin (Rf) concentration caused by ambient light exposure. Excellent agreement between HPLC and EEM methods was found for the change in Trp, Rf, and LmC concentrations.

  20. Multiple cathodic reaction mechanisms in seawater cathodic biofilms operating in sediment microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Babauta, Jerome T; Hsu, Lewis; Atci, Erhan; Kagan, Jeff; Chadwick, Bart; Beyenal, Haluk

    2014-10-01

    In this study, multiple reaction mechanisms in cathodes of sediment microbial fuel cells (SMFCs) were characterized by using cyclic voltammetry and microelectrode measurements of dissolved oxygen and pH. The cathodes were acclimated in SMFCs with sediment and seawater from San Diego Bay. Two limiting current regions were observed with onset potentials of approximately +400 mVAg/AgCl for limiting current I and -120 mVAg/AgCl for limiting current II. The appearance of two catalytic waves suggests that multiple cathodic reaction mechanisms influence cathodic performance. Microscale oxygen concentration measurements showed a zero surface concentration at the electrode surface for limiting current II but not for limiting current I, which allowed us to distinguish limiting current II as the conventional oxygen reduction reaction and limiting current I as a currently unidentified cathodic reaction mechanism. Microscale pH measurements further confirmed these results.

  1. The lartge-area picosecond photo-detector (LAPPD) project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varner, Gary

    2012-03-01

    The technological revolution that replaced the bulky Cathode Ray Tube with a wide variety of thin, reduced-cost display technologies, has yet to be realized for photosensors. Such a low-cost, robust and flexible photon detector, capable of efficient single photon measurement with good spatial and temporal resolution, would have numerous scientific, medical and industrial applications. To address the significant technological challenges of realizing such a disruptive technology, the Large Area Picosecond Photo-Detector (LAPPD) collaboration was formed, and has been strongly supported by the Department of Energy. This group leverages the inter-disciplinary capabilities and facilities at Argonne National Laboratory, the Berkeley Space Sciences Laboratory (SSL), electronics expertise at the Universities of Chicago and Hawaii, and close work with industrial partners to extend the known technologies. Advances in theory-inspired design and in-situ photocathode characterization during growth, Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD) for revolutionizing micro-channel plate fabrication, and compact, wave-form sampling CMOS ASIC readout of micro striplines are key tools toward realizing a viable LAPPD device. Progress toward a first 8" x 8" demonstrator module will be presented.

  2. Rf capacitively-coupled electrodeless light source

    DOEpatents

    Manos, Dennis M.; Diggs, Jessie; Ametepe, Joseph D.; Fugitt, Jock A.

    2000-01-01

    An rf capacitively-coupled electrodeless light source is provided. The light source comprises a hollow, elongated chamber and at least one center conductor disposed within the hollow, elongated chamber. A portion of each center conductor extends beyond the hollow, elongated chamber. At least one gas capable of forming an electronically excited molecular state is contained within each center conductor. An electrical coupler is positioned concentric to the hollow, elongated chamber and the electrical coupler surrounds the portion of each center conductor that extends beyond the hollow, elongated chamber. A rf-power supply is positioned in an operable relationship to the electrical coupler and an impedance matching network is positioned in an operable relationship to the rf power supply and the electrical coupler.

  3. RF Spectroscopy on a Homogeneous Fermi Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Zhenjie; Mukherjee, Biswaroop; Patel, Parth; Struck, Julian; Zwierlein, Martin

    2016-05-01

    Over the last two decades RF spectroscopy has been established as an indispensable tool to probe a large variety of fundamental properties of strongly interacting Fermi gases. This ranges from measurement of the pairing gap over tan's contact to the quasi-particle weight of Fermi polarons. So far, most RF spectroscopy experiments have been performed in harmonic traps, resulting in an averaged response over different densities. We have realized an optical uniform potential for ultracold Fermi gases of 6 Li atoms, which allows us to avoid the usual problems connected to inhomogeneous systems. Here we present recent results on RF spectroscopy of these homogeneous samples with a high signal to noise ratio. In addition, we report progress on measuring the contact of a unitary Fermi gas across the normal to superfluid transition.

  4. RF-Based Accelerators for HEDP Research

    SciTech Connect

    Staples, John W.; Sessler, Andrew; Keller, Roderich; Ostroumov,Petr; Chou, Weiren

    2005-05-09

    Accelerator-driven High-Energy Density Physics (HEDP) experiments require typically 1 nanosecond, 1 microcoulomb pulses of mass 20 ions accelerated to several MeV to produce eV-level excitations in thin targets, the warm dense matter regime. Traditionally the province of induction linacs, RF-based acceleration may be a viable alternative with recent breakthroughs in accelerating structures and high-field compact superconducting solenoids. A reference design for an RF-based accelerator for HEDP research is presented using 15 T solenoids and multiple-gap RF structures configured with multiple parallel beams combined at the target. The beam is ballistically compressed with an induction linac core providing the necessary energy sweep and injected into a plasma-neutralized drift compression channel resulting in a 1 mm radius beam spot 1 nanosecond long at a thin foil or low-density target.

  5. Prospects for Advanced RF Theory and Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Batchelor, D.B.

    1999-04-12

    This paper represents an attempt to express in print the contents of a rather philosophical review talk. The charge for the talk was not to summarize the present status of the field and what we can do, but to assess what we will need to do in the future and where the gaps are in fulfilling these needs. The objective was to be complete, covering all aspects of theory and modeling in all frequency regimes, although in the end the talk mainly focussed on the ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF). In choosing which areas to develop, it is important to keep in mind who the customers for RF modeling are likely to be and what sorts of tasks they will need for RF to do. This occupies the first part of the paper. Then we examine each of the elements of a complete RF theory and try to identify the kinds of advances needed.

  6. Laser/rf personnel identification system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zari, Michael C.; Ward, Reeder N.; Hess, David A.; Anderson, Christopher S.

    1995-05-01

    This paper documents the design of a Laser/RF Personnel Identification System developed for the US Army Communications and Electronics Command (CECOM) for soldier identification. The system has dual use applications, including law enforcement officer protection, and includes a laser interrogation unit with a programmable activation code. The interrogation unit is very directive for low probability of intercept (LPI), which is of interest during covert operations. A responder unit, worn by the law enforcement personnel or soldier, transmits an LPI radio frequency (RF) response only after receiving the proper interrogation code. The basic subsystems for the identification system are a laser interrogation unit, an RF responder unit, and a programming/synchronization unit. In this paper, the operating principles for the subsystems are reviewed and design issues are discussed. In addition to the design performed for CECOM, a breadboard system was developed to validate the concept. Hardware implementation is reviewed and field testing of the breadboard is presented.

  7. Pulsed rf superconductivity program at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Campisi, I.E.; Farkas, Z.D.

    1984-08-01

    Recent tests performed at SLAC on superconducting TM/sub 010/ caavities using short rf pulses (less than or equal to 2.5 ..mu..s) have established that at the cavity surface magnetic fields can be reached in the vicinity of the theoretical critical fields without an appreciable increase in average losses. Tests on niobium and lead cavities are reported. The pulse method seems to be best suited to study peak field properties of superconductors in the microwave band, without the limitations imposed by defects. The short pulses also seem to be more effective in decreasing the causes of field emission by rf processing. Applications of the pulsed rf superconductivity to high-gradient linear accelerators are also possible.

  8. Microhollow Cathode Discharge Excimer Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moselhy, M.; El-Habachi, A.; Shi, W.; Stark, R. H.; Schoenbach, K. H.

    2000-10-01

    Microhollow cathode discharges (MHCDs) are direct current, high-pressure, non-equilibrium gas discharges. When operated in Ar, Xe, ArF and XeCl, these discharges were found to be intense sources of excimer radiation at 130, 172, 193, 308 nm, respectively. Internal conversion efficiencies (from input electrical power to output optical power) of 1% (Ar), 8% (Xe), 2% (ArF) and 3% (XeCl) were achieved [1,2,3]. The spatial distribution of the xenon excimer source was studied by means of an ICCD-MAX intensified CCD camera. The measurements showed that the source expands with current and becomes reduced in size with pressure. The maximum radiant emittance (radiant power per source area) was measured as 2 W/cm^2 at atmospheric pressure and a discharge current of 3 mA. The peak irradiance (radiant power per target area) for a single discharge was calculated to be 3 mW/cm^2 at a distance of 1 cm from the source. Operating multiple discharges in parallel allows us to generate flat panel excimer lamps with an irradiance approaching the value of the radiant emittance (2 W/cm^2). In order to increase the irradiance further MHCDs could be operated in series. First experiments with two discharges in series have shown that the radiant emittance increases linearly with the number of discharges [3]. Besides using systems of MHCDs as lamps, efforts to utilize “stacked discharges” as excimer laser medium are underway. This work is supported by NSF and DARPA. 1. Ahmed El-Habachi and Karl H. Schoenbach, Appl. Phys. Lett. 73, 885 (1998). 2. Wenhui Shi, Ahmed El-Habachi, and Karl H. Schoenbach, Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 44, 25 (1999). 3. Ahmed El-Habachi et. al., “Series Operation of Direct Current Xenon Chloride Excimer Sources”, to appear in J. Appl. Phys.

  9. Photo-assisted etching of silicon in chlorine- and bromine-containing plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Weiye; Sridhar, Shyam; Liu, Lei; Hernandez, Eduardo; Donnelly, Vincent M. Economou, Demetre J.

    2014-05-28

    Cl{sub 2}, Br{sub 2}, HBr, Br{sub 2}/Cl{sub 2}, and HBr/Cl{sub 2} feed gases diluted in Ar (50%–50% by volume) were used to study etching of p-type Si(100) in a rf inductively coupled, Faraday-shielded plasma, with a focus on the photo-assisted etching component. Etching rates were measured as a function of ion energy. Etching at ion energies below the threshold for ion-assisted etching was observed in all cases, with Br{sub 2}/Ar and HBr/Cl{sub 2}/Ar plasmas having the lowest and highest sub-threshold etching rates, respectively. Sub-threshold etching rates scaled with the product of surface halogen coverage (measured by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy) and Ar emission intensity (7504 Å). Etching rates measured under MgF{sub 2}, quartz, and opaque windows showed that sub-threshold etching is due to photon-stimulated processes on the surface, with vacuum ultraviolet photons being much more effective than longer wavelengths. Scanning electron and atomic force microscopy revealed that photo-etched surfaces were very rough, quite likely due to the inability of the photo-assisted process to remove contaminants from the surface. Photo-assisted etching in Cl{sub 2}/Ar plasmas resulted in the formation of 4-sided pyramidal features with bases that formed an angle of 45° with respect to 〈110〉 cleavage planes, suggesting that photo-assisted etching can be sensitive to crystal orientation.

  10. Studies on an experimental quartz tube hollow cathode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegfried, D. E.; Wilbur, P. J.

    1979-01-01

    An experimental study is described in which a quartz tube, hollow cathode was operated in a test fixture allowing the simultaneous measurement of internal cathode pressure, insert temperature profiles, and the emission currents from various cathode components as a function of discharge current and propellant (mercury) mass flow rate for a number of different cathode orifice diameters. Results show that the insert temperature profile is essentially independent of orifice diameter but depends strongly on internal cathode pressure and emission current. The product of internal cathode pressure and insert diameter is shown to be important in determining the emission location and the minimum keeper voltage.

  11. SSRL photocathode RF gun test stand

    SciTech Connect

    Hernandez, M.; Baltay, M.; Boyce, A.

    1995-12-31

    A photocathode RF gun test stand designed for the production and study of high brightness electron beams will be constructed at SSRL. The beam will be generated from a laser driven third generation photocathode RF gun being developed in collaboration with BNL, LBL, and UCLA. The 3-5 [MeV] beam from the gun will be accelerated using a SLAC three meter S-band accelerator section, in order to achieve the desired low emittance beam, emittance compensation with solenoidal focusing will be employed.

  12. Inductance of rf-wave-heated plasmas.

    PubMed

    Farshi, E; Todo, Y

    2003-03-14

    The inductance of rf-wave-heated plasmas is derived. This inductance represents the inductance of fast electrons located in a plateau during their acceleration due to electric field or deceleration due to collisions and electric field. This inductance has been calculated for small electric fields from the two-dimensional Fokker-Planck equation as the flux crossing the surface of critical energy mv(2)(ph)/2 in the velocity space. The new expression may be important for radio-frequency current drive ramp-up, current drive efficiency, current profile control, and so on in tokamaks. This inductance may be incorporated into transport codes that study plasma heating by rf waves.

  13. Potential-well distortion in barrier Rf

    SciTech Connect

    King Ng

    2004-04-29

    Head-tail asymmetry has been observed in the longitudinal beam profiles in the Fermilab Recycler Ring where protons or antiprotons are stored in rf barrier buckets. The asymmetry is caused by the distortion of the rf potential well in the presence of resistive impedance. Gaussian energy distribution can fit the observed asymmetric beam profile but not without discrepancy. It can also fit the measured energy distribution. On the other hand, generalized elliptic distribution gives a better fit to the beam profile. However, it fails to reproduce the observed energy distribution.

  14. RF Driven Multicusp H- Ion Source

    SciTech Connect

    Leung, K.N.; DeVries, G.J.; DiVergilio, W.F.; Hamm, R.W.; Hauck, C.A.; Kunkel, W.B.; McDonald, D.S.; Williams, M.D.

    1990-06-01

    An rf driven multicusp source capable of generating 1-ms H{sup -} beam pulses with a repetition rate as high as 150 Hz has been developed. This source can be operated with a filament or other types of starter. There is almost no lifetime limitation and a clean plasma can be maintained for a long period of operation. It is demonstrated that rf power as high as 25 kW could be coupled inductively to the plasma via a glass-coated copper-coil antenna. The extracted H{sup -} current density achieved is about 200 mA/cm{sup 2}.

  15. Spindt cold cathode electron gun development program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spindt, C. A.

    1983-01-01

    A thin film field emission cathode array and an electron gun based on this emitter array are summarized. Fabricating state of the art cathodes for testing at NASA and NRL, advancing the fabrication technology, developing wedge shaped emitters, and performing emission tests are covered. An anistropic dry etching process (reactive ion beam etching) developed that leads to increasing the packing density of the emitter tips to about 5 x 10 to the 6th power/square cm. Tests with small arrays of emitter tips having about 10 tips has demonstrated current densities of over 100 A/sq cm. Several times using cathodes having a packing density of 1.25 x 10 to the 6th power tips/sq cm. Indications are that the higher packing density achievable with the dry etch process may extend this capability to the 500 A/sq cm range and beyond. The wedge emitter geometry was developed and shown to produce emission. This geometry can (in principle) extend the current density capability of the cathodes beyond the 500 A/sq cm level. An emission microscope was built and tested for use with the cathodes.

  16. Parallel operation of microhollow cathode discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, W.; Schoenbach, K.H.

    1998-12-31

    The dc current-voltage characteristics of microhollow cathode discharges has, in certain ranges of the discharge current, a positive slope. In these current ranges it should be possible to operate multiple discharges in parallel without individual ballast, and be used as flat panel excimer lamps or large area plasma cathodes. In order to verify this hypothesis they have studied the parallel operation of two microhollow cathode discharges of 100 {micro}m hole diameter in argon at pressures from 100 Torr to 800 Torr. Stable dc operation of the two discharges, without individual ballast, was obtained if the voltage-current characteristics of the individual discharges had a positive slope greater than 10 V/mA over a voltage range of more than 5% of the sustaining voltage. Small variations in the discharge geometry generated during fabrication of cathode holes or caused by thermal effects during discharge operation are detrimental to parallel operation. Varying the distance between the discharges from twice the hole diameter to approximately five times did not affect the parallel operation. The total current was always slightly larger than the sum of the currents measured for the individual discharges, indicating coupling between the two discharges. In order to obtain parallel operation even for microhollow cathode geometries with large variations, they have studied the effect of distributed resistive ballast on the operation of such discharges.

  17. Developing Photo Activated Localization Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hess, Harald

    2015-03-01

    Photo Activated Localization Microscopy, PALM, acquires super-resolution images by activating a subset of activatable fluorescent labels and estimating the center of the each molecular label to sub-diffractive accuracy. When this process is repeated thousands of times for different subsets of molecules, then an image can be rendered from all the center coordinates of the molecules. I will describe the circuitous story of its development that began with another super-resolution technique, NSOM, developed by my colleague Eric Betzig, who imaged single molecules at room temperature, and later we spectrally resolved individual luminescent centers of quantum wells. These two observations inspired a generalized path to localization microscopy, but that path was abandoned because no really useful fluorescent labels were available. After a decade of nonacademic industrial pursuits and the subsequent freedom of unemployment, we came across a class of genetically expressible fluorescent proteins that were switchable or convertible that enabled the concept to be implemented and be biologically promising. The past ten years have been very active with many groups exploring applications and enhancements of this concept. Demonstrating significant biological relevance will be the metric if its success.

  18. Photo induced surface heparin immobilization.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Y; Matsuda, T

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes a novel method providing durable layering of heparin immobilized hydrogels on fabricated devices. The preparation method is based on photochemistry of a dithiocarbamate group that is dissociated into a highly reactive radical pair upon ultraviolet (UV) irradiation. By taking advantage of characteristics of the photo generated radicals, hydrogel formation and its fixation onto a substrate surface were attained. The immobilization of heparin onto poly(ethylene terephtalate) was demonstrated. First, a mixed aqueous solution containing a photoreactive water soluble poly(N,N-dimethylacrylamide-covinylbenzyl N,N-diethyldithiocarbamate) and heparin was coated on the substrate. Subsequent UV irradiation resulted in the simultaneous formation of a heparin immobilized hydrogel and its chemical fixation onto the substrate. No delamination was found after vigorous washing with water. Significant inhibition of platelet adhesion and markedly prolonged blood coagulation times were observed, which are apparently derived from the surface hydrogel, and from released and chemically fixed surface heparin. Thus, it is expected that the photochemical method developed here provides potent antithrombogenicity to artificial organs. PMID:8268639

  19. Er3+-activated photonic structures fabricated by sol-gel and rf-sputtering techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrari, M.; Alombert-Goget, G.; Armellini, C.; Berneschi, S.; Bhaktha, S. N. B.; Boulard, B.; Brenci, M.; Chiappini, A.; Chiasera, A.; Duverger-Arfuso, C.; Féron, P.; Gonçalves, R. R.; Jestin, Y.; Minati, L.; Moser, E.; Nunzi Conti, G.; Pelli, S.; Rao, D. N.; Retoux, R.; Righini, G. C.; Speranza, G.

    2009-05-01

    The realization of photonic structures operating at visible and near infrared frequencies is a highly attractive scientific and technological challenge. Since optical fiber innovation, a huge of activity has been performed leading to interesting results, such as optical waveguides and planar lightwave circuits, microphotonic devices, optical microcavities, nanowires, plasmonic structures, and photonic crystals. These systems have opened new possibilities in the field of both basic and applied physics, in a large area covering Information Communication Technologies, Health and Biology, Structural Engineering, and Environment Monitoring Systems. Several materials and techniques are employed to successfully fabricate photonic structures. Concerning materials, Er3+-activated silica-based glasses still play an important role, although recently interesting results have been published about fluoride glass-ceramic waveguides. As far as regards the fabrication methods sol-gel route and rf sputtering have proved to be versatile and reliable techniques. In this article we will present a review of some Er3+-activated photonic structures fabricated by sol gel route and rf sputtering deposition. In the discussion on the sol-gel approach we focus our attention on the silica-hafnia binary system presenting an overview concerning fabrication protocols and structural, optical and spectroscopic assessment of SiO2-HfO2 waveguides activated by Er3+ ions. In order to put in evidence the reliability and versatility of the sol-gel route for photonics applications four different confined structures are briefly presented: amorphous waveguides, coated microspheres, monolithic waveguide laser, and core-shell nanospheres. As examples of rf sputtering technique, we will discuss Er3+-activated silica-hafnia and silica-germania waveguides, the latter system allowing fabrication of integrated optics structures by UV photo-imprinting. Finally, two examples of photonic crystal structures, one

  20. Development of large area, pico-second resolution photo-detectors and associated readout electronics

    SciTech Connect

    Grabas, H.; Oberla, E.; Attenkoffer, K.; Bogdan, M.; Frisch, H. J.; Genat, J. F.; May, E. N.; Varner, G. S.; Wetstein, M.

    2011-07-01

    The Large Area Pico-second Photo-detectors described in this contribution incorporate a photo-cathode and a borosilicate glass capillary Micro-Channel Plate (MCP) pair functionalized by atomic layer deposition (ALD) of separate resistive and electron secondary emitters materials. They may be used for biomedical imaging purposes, a remarkable opportunity to apply technologies developed in HEP having the potential to make major advances in the medical world, in particular for Positron Emission Tomography (PET). If daisy-chained and coupled to fast transmission lines read at both ends, they could be implemented in very large dimensions. Initial testing with matched pairs of small glass capillary test has demonstrated gains of the order of 105 to 106. Compared to other fast imaging devices, these photo-detectors are expected to provide timing resolutions in the 10-100 ps range, and two-dimension position in the sub-millimeter range. A 6-channel readout ASIC has been designed in 130 nm CMOS technology and tested. As a result, fast analog sampling up to 17 GS/s has been obtained, the intrinsic analog bandwidth being presently under evaluation. The digitization in parallel of several cells in two microseconds allows getting off-chip digital data read at a maximum rate of 40 MHz. Digital Signal Processing of the sampled waveforms is expected achieving the timing and space resolutions obtained with digital oscilloscopes. (authors)

  1. Photo-electrochemical sensor for dissolved oxygen, based on a poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene)/iron oxalate hybrid electrode.

    PubMed

    Bencsik, Gábor; Lukács, Zsófia; Visy, Csaba

    2010-02-01

    In this work a poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT)/iron oxalate composite was synthesized by electrochemical polymerization. The layer was deposited potentiostatically from the monomer-containing solution in the presence of iron(II) oxalate. Similarly to the polypyrrole/iron oxalate electrode--presented in a recent paper--the layer gave a negative photocurrent, which depended on the oxygen concentration of the electrolyte. This cathodic photocurrent--taken as the differences between the values registered under illumination and in the dark at -750 mV potential on the cathodic part of the voltammetric cycles--confirmed the sensitivity of the PEDOT/iron oxalate electrode for dissolved oxygen. Stationary photocurrents were determined also from chronoamperometric measurements, and they exhibited a linear behaviour with the dissolved oxygen concentration to below 1 ppm. The photo-effect of the PEDOT/iron oxalate layer can be attributed to the excitation of the neutral form of the film. PMID:20098773

  2. Filtered cathodic arc deposition apparatus and method

    DOEpatents

    Krauss, Alan R.

    1999-01-01

    A filtered cathodic arc deposition method and apparatus for the production of highly dense, wear resistant coatings which are free from macro particles. The filtered cathodic arc deposition apparatus includes a cross shaped vacuum chamber which houses a cathode target having an evaporable surface comprised of the coating material, means for generating a stream of plasma, means for generating a transverse magnetic field, and a macro particle deflector. The transverse magnetic field bends the generated stream of plasma in the direction of a substrate. Macro particles are effectively filtered from the stream of plasma by traveling, unaffected by the transverse magnetic field, along the initial path of the plasma stream to a macro particle deflector. The macro particle deflector has a preformed surface which deflects macro particles away from the substrate.

  3. Cathodic protection in simulated geothermal environments

    SciTech Connect

    Bandy, R.; van Rooyen, D.

    1983-01-01

    The results of cathodic protection of carbon steel and AISI Type 316 stainless steel in simulated geothermal brines are described. Impressed current tests on carbon steel and stainless steel were conducted under controlled potential, and cathodic protection of carbon steel using zinc sacrificial anodes was studied by monitoring the galvanic current and potential of the couple with a zero-resistance ammeter. Weight-loss measurements and photomicrographs of test coupons were taken whenever necessary to determine the nature of attack and degree of protection. Tests were generally conducted at 90/sup 0/C. However, some tests on carbon steel were conducted up to 150/sup 0/C in a titanium autoclave. Results show that the weight loss of carbon steel can be reduced significantly and the pitting corrosion of the stainless steel can be prevented by shifting the potentials of the metals 60 to 80 mV cathodic to their respective open-circuit potentials.

  4. Advanced rechargeable sodium batteries with novel cathodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Di Stefano, S.; Ratnakumar, B. V.; Bankston, C. P.

    1990-01-01

    Various high energy density rechargeable batteries are being considered for future space applications. Of these, the sodium-sulfur battery is one of the leading candidates. The primary advantage is the high energy density (760 W h/kg theoretical). Energy densities in excess of 180 W h/kg have been realized in practical batteries. More recently, cathodes other than sulfur are being evaluated. Various new cathode materials are presently being evaluated for use in high energy density sodium batteries for advanced space applications. The approach is to carry out basic electrochemical studies of these materials in a sodium cell configuration in order to understand their fundamental behaviors. Thus far, the studies have focussed on alternative metal chlorides such as CuCl2 and organic cathode materials such as TCNE.

  5. Advanced rechargeable sodium batteries with novel cathodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Distefano, S.; Ratnakumar, B. V.; Bankston, C. P.

    1989-01-01

    Various high energy density rechargeable batteries are being considered for future space applications. Of these, the sodium sulfur battery is one of the leading candidates. The primary advantage is the high energy density (760 Wh/kg theoretical). Energy densities in excess of 180 Wh/kg have been realized in practical batteries. More recently, cathodes other than sulfur are being evaluated. Researchers at JPL are evaluating various new cathode materials for use in high energy density sodium batteries for advanced space applications. The approach is to carry out basic electrochemical studies of these materials in a sodium cell configuration in order to understand their fundamental behaviors. Thus far studies have focused on alternate metal chlorides such as CuCl2 and organic cathode materials such as tetracyanoethylene (TCNE).

  6. Effects of cathodic disbonding and blistering on current demand for cathodic protection of coated steel

    SciTech Connect

    Knudsen, O.O.; Steinsmo, U.

    2000-03-01

    Cathodic disbonding, blistering, and current demand for cathodic protection were measured for nine commercial coatings for submerged steel structures. The ASTM-G8 standard test and a long-term test (2 years), simulating North Sea conditions, were used. The relevance of the ASTM-G8 test as a prequalification test was evaluated by comparing cathodic disbonding in the two tests. After 800 days in the long-term test, the correlation to ASTM-G8 was good. The correlation coefficient was 0.98. The current demand for cathodic protection increased when the coatings blistered. Examination of the blisters showed that they had cracked. After 2 years of testing, the current demand only had increased for the thin coatings (< 150 {micro}m). The current demand for the thicker coatings (> 450 {micro}m) had not increased, in spite of significant cathodic disbonding for some coatings. Coating breakdown factors, defined as the ratio between current demand for cathodic protection for the coated samples and samples of bare steel, were calculated. These factors were compared with the design values for cathodic protection in Det Norske Veritas (DNV) RP B401 and NORSOK M-CR-503. For all coatings, the coating breakdown rate was lower than the design values.

  7. KSC Employees Assemble for Historic Photo

    NASA Video Gallery

    Employees at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center, Fla., took a few moments to assemble for a historic aerial photo Friday outside Kennedy’s Vehicle Assembly Building. Thousands of workers stood side-b...

  8. A way to the Photo Master Expert

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inagaki, Toshihiko

    After the author presided over the photographer's group for 15 years or more, the author met with the Photo Master certificate examination. And the author took the certificate examination, and was authorized as a Photo Master Expert in 2005. In this report, the outline how photographic technology has been mastered in order to adapt the photographer's group to the great change of photography from film to digital and how the contents of the activity of a photographer's group have changed is described. And the progress which took the Photo Master certificate examination as a good opportunity to prove the achievement level of those activities is described. And as a photographic activity after Photo Master Expert authorization, the shooting method of mural painting in the royal tomb of Amenophis III is described.

  9. Synchrotron Investigations of SOFC Cathode Degradation

    SciTech Connect

    Idzerda, Yves

    2013-09-30

    The atomic variations occurring in cathode/electrolyte interface regions of La{sub 1-x}Sr{sub x}Co{sub y}Fe{sub 1-y}O{sub 3-δ} (LSCF) cathodes and other SOFC related materials have been investigated and characterized using soft X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS) and diffuse soft X-ray Resonant Scattering (XRS). X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy in the soft X-ray region (soft XAS) is shown to be a sensitive technique to quantify the disruption that occurs and can be used to suggest a concrete mechanism for the degradation. For LSC, LSF, and LSCF films, a significant degradation mechanism is shown to be Sr out-diffusion. By using the XAS spectra of hexavalent Cr in SrCrO4 and trivalent Cr in Cr2O3, the driving factor for Sr segregation was identified to be the oxygen vacancy concentration at the anode and cathode side of of symmetric LSCF/GDC/LSCF heterostructures. This is direct evidence of vacancy induced cation diffusion and is shown to be a significant indicator of cathode/electrolyte interfacial degradation. X-ray absorption spectroscopy is used to identify the occupation of the A-sites and B-sites for LSC, LSF, and LSCF cathodes doped with other transition metals, including doping induced migration of Sr to the anti-site for Sr, a significant cathode degradation indicator. By using spatially resolved valence mapping of Co, a complete picture of the surface electrochemistry can be determined. This is especially important in identifying degradation phenomena where the degradation is spatially localized to the extremities of the electrochemistry and not the average. For samples that have electrochemical parameters that are measured to be spatially uniform, the Co valence modifications were correlated to the effects of current density, overpotential, and humidity.

  10. 47 CFR 101.1425 - RF safety.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false RF safety. 101.1425 Section 101.1425 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES FIXED MICROWAVE... rules for radiation hazards, as set forth in § 1.1307 of this chapter....

  11. 47 CFR 101.1425 - RF safety.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false RF safety. 101.1425 Section 101.1425 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES FIXED MICROWAVE... rules for radiation hazards, as set forth in § 1.1307 of this chapter....

  12. 47 CFR 101.1425 - RF safety.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false RF safety. 101.1425 Section 101.1425 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES FIXED MICROWAVE... rules for radiation hazards, as set forth in § 1.1307 of this chapter....

  13. RF Breakdown of Metallic Surfaces in Hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    BastaniNejad, M.; Elmustafa, A.A.; Yonehara, K.; Chung, M.; Jansson, A.; Hu, M.; Moretti, A.; Popovic, M.; Alsharo'a, M.; Neubauer, M.; Sah, R.; /Muons Inc., Batavia

    2009-05-01

    In earlier reports, microscopic images of the surfaces of metallic electrodes used in high-pressure gas-filled 805 MHz RF cavity experiments were used to investigate the mechanism of RF breakdown of tungsten, molybdenum, and beryllium electrode surfaces. Plots of remnants were consistent with the breakdown events being due to field emission, due to the quantum mechanical tunnelling of electrons through a barrier as described by Fowler and Nordheim. In the work described here, these studies have been extended to include tin, aluminium, and copper. Contamination of the surfaces, discovered after the experiments concluded, have cast some doubt on the proper qualities to assign to the metallic surfaces. However, two significant results are noted. First, the maximum stable RF gradient of contaminated copper electrodes is higher than for a clean surface. Second, the addition of as little as 0.01% of SF6 to the hydrogen gas increased the maximum stable gradient, which implies that models of RF breakdown in hydrogen gas will be important to the study of metallic breakdown.

  14. Experimental Study of RF Pulsed Heating

    SciTech Connect

    Laurent, Lisa; Tantawi, Sami; Dolgashev, Valery; Nantista, Christopher; Higashi, Yasuo; Aicheler, Markus; Heikkinen, Samuli; Wuensch, Walter; /CERN

    2011-11-04

    Cyclic thermal stresses produced by rf pulsed heating can be the limiting factor on the attainable reliable gradients for room temperature linear accelerators. This is especially true for structures that have complicated features for wakefield damping. These limits could be pushed higher by using special types of copper, copper alloys, or other conducting metals in constructing partial or complete accelerator structures. Here we present an experimental study aimed at determining the potential of these materials for tolerating cyclic thermal fatigue due to rf magnetic fields. A special cavity that has no electric field on the surface was employed in these studies. The cavity shape concentrates the magnetic field on one flat surface where the test material is placed. The materials tested in this study have included oxygen free electronic grade copper, copper zirconium, copper chromium, hot isostatically pressed copper, single crystal copper, electroplated copper, Glidcop(reg. sign), copper silver, and silver plated copper. The samples were exposed to different machining and heat treatment processes prior to rf processing. Each sample was tested to a peak pulsed heating temperature of approximately 110 C and remained at this temperature for approximately 10 x 10{sup 6} rf pulses. In general, the results showed the possibility of pushing the gradient limits due to pulsed heating fatigue by the use of copper zirconium and copper chromium alloys.

  15. NSLS-II RF BEAM POSITION MONITOR

    SciTech Connect

    Vetter, K.; Della Penna, A. J.; DeLong, J.; Kosciuk, B.; Mead, J.; Pinayev, I.; Singh, O.; Tian, Y.; Ha, K.; Portmann, G.; Sebek J.

    2011-03-28

    An internal R&D program has been undertaken at BNL to develop a sub-micron RF Beam Position Monitor (BPM) for the NSLS-II 3rd generation light source that is currently under construction. The BPM R&D program started in August 2009. Successful beam tests were conducted 15 months from the start of the program. The NSLS-II RF BPM has been designed to meet all requirements for the NSLS-II Injection system and Storage Ring. Housing of the RF BPM's in +-0.1 C thermally controlled racks provide sub-micron stabilization without active correction. An active pilot-tone has been incorporated to aid long-term (8hr min) stabilization to 200nm RMS. The development of a sub-micron BPM for the NSLS-II has successfully demonstrated performance and stability. Pilot Tone calibration combiner and RF synthesizer has been implemented and algorithm development is underway. The program is currently on schedule to start production development of 60 Injection BPM's starting in the Fall of 2011. The production of {approx}250 Storage Ring BPM's will overlap the Injection schedule.

  16. Image reconstructions with the rotating RF coil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trakic, A.; Wang, H.; Weber, E.; Li, B. K.; Poole, M.; Liu, F.; Crozier, S.

    2009-12-01

    Recent studies have shown that rotating a single RF transceive coil (RRFC) provides a uniform coverage of the object and brings a number of hardware advantages (i.e. requires only one RF channel, averts coil-coil coupling interactions and facilitates large-scale multi-nuclear imaging). Motion of the RF coil sensitivity profile however violates the standard Fourier Transform definition of a time-invariant signal, and the images reconstructed in this conventional manner can be degraded by ghosting artifacts. To overcome this problem, this paper presents Time Division Multiplexed — Sensitivity Encoding (TDM-SENSE), as a new image reconstruction scheme that exploits the rotation of the RF coil sensitivity profile to facilitate ghost-free image reconstructions and reductions in image acquisition time. A transceive RRFC system for head imaging at 2 Tesla was constructed and applied in a number of in vivo experiments. In this initial study, alias-free head images were obtained in half the usual scan time. It is hoped that new sequences and methods will be developed by taking advantage of coil motion.

  17. Advanced RF power sources for linacs

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, P.B.

    1996-10-01

    In order to maintain a reasonable over-all length at high center-of-mass energy, the main linac of an electron-positron linear collider must operate at a high accelerating gradient. For copper (non-superconducting) accelerator structures, this implies a high peak power per unit length and a high peak power per RF source, assuming a limited number of discrete sources are used. To provide this power, a number of devices are currently under active development or conceptual consideration: conventional klystrons with multi-cavity output structures, gyroklystrons, magnicons, sheet-beam klystrons, multiple-beam klystrons and amplifiers based on the FEL principle. To enhance the peak power produced by an rf source, the SLED rf pulse compression scheme is currently in use on existing linacs, and new compression methods that produce a flatter output pulse are being considered for future linear colliders. This paper covers the present status and future outlook for the more important rf power sources and pulse compression systems. It should be noted that high gradient electron linacs have applications in addition to high-energy linear colliders; they can, for example, serve as compact injectors for FEL`s and storage rings.

  18. The IPNS second harmonic RF upgrade.

    SciTech Connect

    Middendorf, M. E.; Brumwell, F. R.; Dooling, J. C.; Horan, D.; Kustom, R. L.; Lien, M. K.; McMichael, G. E.; Moser, M. R.; Nassiri, A.; Wang, S.; Accelerator Systems Division

    2008-01-01

    The intense pulsed neutron source (IPNS) rapid cycling synchrotron (RCS) is used to accelerate protons from 50 MeV to 450 MeV, at a repetition rate of 30 Hz. The original ring design included two identical rf systems, each consisting of an accelerating cavity, cavity bias supply, power amplifiers and low-level analog electronics. The original cavities are located 180 degrees apart in the ring and provide a total peak accelerating voltage of {approx}21 kV over the 2.21-MHz to 5.14-MHz revolution frequency sweep. A third rf system has been constructed and installed in the RCS. The third rf system is capable of operating at the fundamental revolution frequency for the entire acceleration cycle, providing an additional peak accelerating voltage of up to {approx}11 kV, or at the second harmonic of the revolution frequency for the first {approx}4 ms of the acceleration cycle, providing an additional peak voltage of up to {approx}11 kV for bunch shape control. We describe here the hardware implementation and operation to date of the third rf cavity in the second harmonic mode.

  19. 47 CFR 101.1425 - RF safety.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false RF safety. 101.1425 Section 101.1425 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES FIXED MICROWAVE... rules for radiation hazards, as set forth in § 1.1307 of this chapter....

  20. 47 CFR 101.1425 - RF safety.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false RF safety. 101.1425 Section 101.1425 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES FIXED MICROWAVE... rules for radiation hazards, as set forth in § 1.1307 of this chapter....