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Sample records for rhabdovirus dna-vaccine depends

  1. The antiviral defense mechanisms in mandarin fish induced by DNA vaccination against a rhabdovirus.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhong-Yuan; Lei, Xiao-Ying; Zhang, Qi-Ya

    2012-06-15

    Plasmid DNAs containing Siniperca chuatsi rhabdovirus (SCRV) glycoprotein gene (pcDNA-G) and nucleoprotein gene (pcDNA-N) were constructed, and used to determine the antiviral immune response elicited by DNA vaccination in mandarin fish. In vitro and in vivo expression of the plasmid constructs was confirmed in transfected cells and muscle tissues of vaccinated fish by Western blot, indirect immunofluorescence or RT-PCR analysis. Fish injected with pcDNA-G exhibited protective effect against SCRV challenge with a relative percent survival (RPS) of 77.5%, but no significant protection (RPS of 2.5%) was observed in fish vaccinated with pcDNA-N. Immunohistochemical analysis showed that vaccination with pcDNA-G decreased histological lesions and suppressed the virus replication in fish target organs, e.g. kidney, liver, spleen, gill and heart. Transcriptional analysis further revealed that the expression levels of type I IFN system genes including interferon regulation factor-7 (IRF-7) gene, myxovirus resistance (Mx) gene and virus inhibitory protein (Viperin) gene were strongly up-regulated after injection with pcDNA-G, whereas the level of transcription of immunoglobulin M (IgM) gene did not show a statistically significant change. These results reveal that type I IFN antiviral immune response is rapidly triggered by the plasmid DNA containing rhabdovirus glycoprotein gene in fish, which offers an explanation of molecular mechanisms for DNA vaccination inducing mandarin fish resist to SCRV disease.

  2. An active DNA vaccine against infectious pancreatic necrosis virus (IPNV) with a different mode of action than fish rhabdovirus DNA vaccines.

    PubMed

    Cuesta, A; Chaves-Pozo, E; de Las Heras, A I; Saint-Jean, S Rodríguez; Pérez-Prieto, S; Tafalla, C

    2010-04-26

    Although there are some commercial vaccines available against infectious pancreatic necrosis virus (IPNV), the disease still continues to be a major problem for aquaculture development worldwide. In the current work, we constructed a DNA vaccine against IPNV (pIPNV-PP) by cloning the long open reading frame of the polyprotein encoded by the viral RNA segment A. In vitro, the vaccine is properly translated giving the functional IPNV polyprotein since preVP2, VP2 and VP3 proteins were detected because of the VP4-protease cleavage. EPC cells transfected with the vaccine plasmid expressed the viral proteins and induced the expression of type I interferon (IFN)-induced Mx genes. Furthermore, IPNV synthesized proteins seemed to assemble in virus-like particles as evidenced by electron microscopy. In vivo, rainbow trout specimens were intramuscularly injected with the vaccine and expression of immune-relevant genes, the presence of neutralizing antibodies and effect on viral load was determined. The pIPNV-PP vaccine was expressed at the injection site and up-regulated MHC Ialpha, MHC IIalpha, type-I interferon (IFN), Mx, CD4 and CD8alpha gene expression in the muscle, head kidney or spleen, although to a much lower extent than the up-regulations observed in response to an effective DNA vaccine against viral hemorrhagic septicaemia virus (VHSV). However, the IPNV vaccine was also very effective in terms of acquired immunity since it elicited neutralizing antibodies (in 6 out of 8 trout fingerlings) and decreased 665-fold the viral load after IPNV infection. The effectiveness of this new IPNV DNA vaccine and its possible mechanism of action are discussed and compared to other viral vaccines.

  3. Biotechnology and DNA vaccines for aquatic animals

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kurath, G.

    2008-01-01

    Biotechnology has been used extensively in the development of vaccines for aquaculture. Modern molecular methods such as polymerase chain reaction (PCR), cloning and microarray analysis have facilitated antigen discovery, construction of novel candidate vaccines, and assessments of vaccine efficacy, mode of action, and host response. This review focuses on DNA vaccines for finfish to illustrate biotechnology applications in this field. Although DNA vaccines for fish rhabdoviruses continue to show the highest efficacy, DNA vaccines for several other viral and bacterial fish pathogens have now been proven to provide significant protection against pathogen challenge. Studies of the fish rhabdovirus DNA vaccines have elucidated factors that affect DNA vaccine efficacy as well as the nature of the fish innate and adaptive immune responses to DNA vaccines. As tools for managing aquatic animal disease emergencies, DNA vaccines have advantages in speed, flexibility, and safety, and one fish DNA vaccine has been licensed.

  4. Protection of rainbow trout against infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus four days after specific or semi-specific DNA vaccination

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    LaPatra, S.E.; Corbeil, S.; Jones, G.R.; Shewmaker, W.D.; Lorenzen, N.; Anderson, E.D.; Kurath, G.

    2001-01-01

    A DNA vaccine against a fish rhabdovirus, infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV), was shown to provide significant protection as soon as 4 d after intramuscular vaccination in 2 g rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) held at 15??C. Nearly complete protection was also observed at later time points (7, 14, and 28 d) using a standardized waterborne challenge model. In a test of the specificity of this early protection, immunization of rainbow trout with a DNA vaccine against another fish rhabdovirus, viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus, provided a significant level of cross-protection against IHNV challenge for a transient period of time, whereas a rabies virus DNA vaccine was not protective. This indication of distinct early and late protective mechanisms was not dependent on DNA vaccine doses from 0.1 to 2.5 ??g. ?? 2001 Elsevier Science Ltd.

  5. Growth and performance of Atlantic salmon, Salmo salar L., following administration of a rhabdovirus DNA vaccine alone or concurrently with an oil-adjuvanted, polyvalent vaccine.

    PubMed

    Skinner, L A; Schulte, P M; LaPatra, S E; Balfry, S K; McKinley, R S

    2008-09-01

    This research demonstrates for the first time an absence of growth-related side effects in Atlantic salmon, Salmo salar L., following the injection of a DNA vaccine alone or concurrently with a commercially available, polyvalent, oil-adjuvanted vaccine. Using weight and specific growth rate measurements, individually tagged Atlantic salmon were monitored for 2028 degree days (dd) post-vaccination. During this time, DNA-vaccinated fish did not differ in weight, length, condition factor or specific growth rate compared to unvaccinated control fish. While differences in weight were observed between unvaccinated control and concurrently vaccinated fish, there were no significant differences in weight, length, condition factor or specific growth rate between concurrently vaccinated fish and adjuvant-vaccinated fish, suggesting that only adjuvant vaccination affected growth. To further determine if concurrent injection of a DNA vaccine and a polyvalent, oil-adjuvanted vaccine had a physiological impact on the Atlantic salmon, swimming performance tests were performed at 106 dd post-vaccination with U(crit,1), U(crit,2), the U(crit) recovery ratio (RR) and the normalized RR being similar to values obtained from unvaccinated control fish. In summary, this study shows that concurrent injection of a DNA vaccine and a polyvalent, oil-adjuvanted vaccine does not negatively influence the growth or swimming performance of Atlantic salmon compared to adjuvant vaccination alone.

  6. DNA vaccines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregersen, Jens-Peter

    2001-12-01

    Immunization by genes encoding immunogens, rather than with the immunogen itself, has opened up new possibilities for vaccine research and development and offers chances for new applications and indications for future vaccines. The underlying mechanisms of antigen processing, immune presentation and regulation of immune responses raise high expectations for new and more effective prophylactic or therapeutic vaccines, particularly for vaccines against chronic or persistent infectious diseases and tumors. Our current knowledge and experience of DNA vaccination is summarized and critically reviewed with particular attention to basic immunological mechanisms, the construction of plasmids, screening for protective immunogens to be encoded by these plasmids, modes of application, pharmacokinetics, safety and immunotoxicological aspects. DNA vaccines have the potential to accelerate the research phase of new vaccines and to improve the chances of success, since finding new immunogens with the desired properties is at least technically less demanding than for conventional vaccines. However, on the way to innovative vaccine products, several hurdles have to be overcome. The efficacy of DNA vaccines in humans appears to be much less than indicated by early studies in mice. Open questions remain concerning the persistence and distribution of inoculated plasmid DNA in vivo, its potential to express antigens inappropriately, or the potentially deleterious ability to insert genes into the host cell's genome. Furthermore, the possibility of inducing immunotolerance or autoimmune diseases also needs to be investigated more thoroughly, in order to arrive at a well-founded consensus, which justifies the widespread application of DNA vaccines in a healthy population.

  7. DNA vaccines for aquacultured fish.

    PubMed

    Lorenzen, N; LaPatra, S E

    2005-04-01

    Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) vaccination is based on the administration of the gene encoding the vaccine antigen, rather than the antigen itself. Subsequent expression of the antigen by cells in the vaccinated hosts triggers the host immune system. Among the many experimental DNA vaccines tested in various animal species as well as in humans, the vaccines against rhabdovirus diseases in fish have given some of the most promising results. A single intramuscular (IM) injection of microgram amounts of DNA induces rapid and long-lasting protection in farmed salmonids against economically important viruses such as infectious haematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) and viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus (VHSV). DNA vaccines against other types of fish pathogens, however, have so far had limited success. The most efficient delivery route at present is IM injection, and suitable delivery strategies for mass vaccination of small fish have yet to be developed. In terms of safety, no adverse effects in the vaccinated fish have been observed to date. As DNA vaccination is a relatively new technology, various theoretical and long-term safety issues related to the environment and the consumer remain to be fully addressed, although inherently the risks should not be any greater than with the commercial fish vaccines that are currently used. Present classification systems lack clarity in distinguishing DNA-vaccinated animals from genetically modified organisms (GMOs), which could raise issues in terms of licensing and public acceptance of the technology. The potential benefits of DNA vaccines for farmed fish include improved animal welfare, reduced environmental impacts of aquaculture activities, increased food quality and quantity, and more sustainable production. Testing under commercial production conditions has recently been initiated in Canada and Denmark.

  8. Induction of CD4(+) T cell-dependent CD8(+) type 1 responses in humans by a malaria DNA vaccine.

    PubMed

    Wang, R; Epstein, J; Baraceros, F M; Gorak, E J; Charoenvit, Y; Carucci, D J; Hedstrom, R C; Rahardjo, N; Gay, T; Hobart, P; Stout, R; Jones, T R; Richie, T L; Parker, S E; Doolan, D L; Norman, J; Hoffman, S L

    2001-09-11

    We assessed immunogenicity of a malaria DNA vaccine administered by needle i.m. or needleless jet injection [i.m. or i.m./intradermally (i.d.)] in 14 volunteers. Antigen-specific IFN-gamma responses were detected by enzyme-linked immunospot (ELISPOT) assays in all subjects to multiple 9- to 23-aa peptides containing class I and/or class II restricted epitopes, and were dependent on both CD8(+) and CD4(+) T cells. Overall, frequency of response was significantly greater after i.m. jet injection. CD8(+)-dependent cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) were detected in 8/14 volunteers. Demonstration in humans of elicitation of the class I restricted IFN-gamma responses we believe necessary for protection against the liver stage of malaria parasites brings us closer to an effective malaria vaccine.

  9. Immunity to Fish Rhabdoviruses

    PubMed Central

    Purcell, Maureen K.; Laing, Kerry J.; Winton, James R.

    2012-01-01

    Members of the family Rhabdoviridae are single-stranded RNA viruses and globally important pathogens of wild and cultured fish and thus relatively well studied in their respective hosts or other model systems. Here, we review the protective immune mechanisms that fish mount in response to rhabdovirus infections. Teleost fish possess the principal components of innate and adaptive immunity found in other vertebrates. Neutralizing antibodies are critical for long-term protection from fish rhabdoviruses, but several studies also indicate a role for cell-mediated immunity. Survival of acute rhabdoviral infection is also dependent on innate immunity, particularly the interferon (IFN) system that is rapidly induced in response to infection. Paradoxically, rhabdoviruses are sensitive to the effects of IFN but virulent rhabdoviruses can continue to replicate owing to the abilities of the matrix (M) protein to mediate host-cell shutoff and the non‑virion (NV) protein to subvert programmed cell death and suppress functional IFN. While many basic features of the fish immune response to rhabdovirus infections are becoming better understood, much less is known about how factors in the environment affect the ecology of rhabdovirus infections in natural populations of aquatic animals. PMID:22355456

  10. Immunity to fish rhabdoviruses.

    PubMed

    Purcell, Maureen K; Laing, Kerry J; Winton, James R

    2012-01-01

    Members of the family Rhabdoviridae are single-stranded RNA viruses and globally important pathogens of wild and cultured fish and thus relatively well studied in their respective hosts or other model systems. Here, we review the protective immune mechanisms that fish mount in response to rhabdovirus infections. Teleost fish possess the principal components of innate and adaptive immunity found in other vertebrates. Neutralizing antibodies are critical for long-term protection from fish rhabdoviruses, but several studies also indicate a role for cell-mediated immunity. Survival of acute rhabdoviral infection is also dependent on innate immunity, particularly the interferon (IFN) system that is rapidly induced in response to infection. Paradoxically, rhabdoviruses are sensitive to the effects of IFN but virulent rhabdoviruses can continue to replicate owing to the abilities of the matrix (M) protein to mediate host-cell shutoff and the non‑virion (NV) protein to subvert programmed cell death and suppress functional IFN. While many basic features of the fish immune response to rhabdovirus infections are becoming better understood, much less is known about how factors in the environment affect the ecology of rhabdovirus infections in natural populations of aquatic animals.

  11. Immunity to fish rhabdoviruses

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Purcell, Maureen K.; Laing, Kerry J.; Winton, James R.

    2012-01-01

    Members of the family Rhabdoviridae are single-stranded RNA viruses and globally important pathogens of wild and cultured fish and thus relatively well studied in their respective hosts or other model systems. Here, we review the protective immune mechanisms that fish mount in response to rhabdovirus infections. Teleost fish possess the principal components of innate and adaptive immunity found in other vertebrates. Neutralizing antibodies are critical for long-term protection from fish rhabdoviruses, but several studies also indicate a role for cell-mediated immunity. Survival of acute rhabdoviral infection is also dependent on innate immunity, particularly the interferon (IFN) system that is rapidly induced in response to infection. Paradoxically, rhabdoviruses are sensitive to the effects of IFN but virulent rhabdoviruses can continue to replicate owing to the abilities of the matrix (M) protein to mediate host-cell shutoff and the non-virion (NV) protein to subvert programmed cell death and suppress functional IFN. While many basic features of the fish immune response to rhabdovirus infections are becoming better understood, much less is known about how factors in the environment affect the ecology of rhabdovirus infections in natural populations of aquatic animals.

  12. The dose-dependent effect on protection and humoral response to a DNA vaccine against Infectious Hematopoietic Necrosis (IHN) virus in subyearling rainbow trout

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    LaPatra, Scott E.; Corbeil, Serge; Jones, Gerald R.; Shewmaker, William D.; Kurath, Gael

    2000-01-01

    A dose–response study that used the DNA vaccine pIHNw-G against infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) showed that complete and highly significant (P < 0.001) protection against a virus injection challenge can be attained in subyearling rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss (145–160 g, 8- to 10-months-old) 6 weeks after a single intramuscular injection with doses as low as 1 μg. Complete protection was also reproducibly demonstrated at higher vaccine doses; however, no protection was observed with a 0.1-μg dose. Virus-neutralizing antibody titers were detected in fish that had been vaccinated with different doses of the DNA vaccine and then sham-infected; there appeared to be a dose-dependent effect, with higher titers obtained with higher doses of vaccine. The DNA-vaccinated animals that survived virus challenge had significantly (P < 0.05) higher neutralizing antibody titers than sham-infected, DNA-vaccinated control fish. Additionally, the titers detected in the IHN survivors exhibited a significant (P < 0.05) dose-dependent effect, with the highest titers being present in fish that received the highest vaccine doses.

  13. Fish Rhabdoviruses

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kurath, G.; Winton, J.

    2008-01-01

    Many important viral pathogens of fish are members of the family Rhabdoviridae. The viruses in this large group cause significant losses in populations of wild fish as well as among fish reared in aquaculture. Fish rhabdoviruses often have a wide host and geographic range, and infect aquatic animals in both freshwater and seawater. The fish rhabdoviruses comprise a diverse collection of isolates that can be placed in one of two quite different groups: isolates that are members of the established genusNovirhabdovirus, and those that are most similar to members of the genus Vesiculovirus. Because the diseases caused by fish rhabdoviruses are important to aquaculture, diagnostic methods for their detection and identification are well established. In addition to regulations designed to reduce the spread of fish viruses, a significant body of research has addressed methods for the control or prevention of diseases caused by fish rhabdoviruses, including vaccination. The number of reported fish rhabdoviruses continues to grow as a result of the expansion of aquaculture, the increase in global trade, the development of improved diagnostic methods, and heightened surveillance activities. Fish rhabdoviruses serve as useful components of model systems to study vertebrate virus disease, epidemiology, and immunology.

  14. Overview of recent DNA vaccine development for fish

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kurath, G.; ,

    2005-01-01

    Since the first description of DNA vaccines for fish in 1996, numerous studies of genetic immunisation against the rhabdovirus pathogens infectious haematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) and viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus (VHSV) have established their potential as both highly efficacious biologicals and useful basic research tools. Single small doses of rhabdovirus DNA constructs provide extremely strong protection against severe viral challenge under a variety of conditions. DNA vaccines for several other important fish viruses, bacteria, and parasites are under investigation, but they have not yet shown high efficacy. Therefore, current research is focussed on mechanistic studies to understand the basis of protection, and on improvement of the nucleic acid vaccine applications against a wider range of fish pathogens.

  15. Concurrent injection of a rhabdovirus-specific DNA vaccine with a polyvalent, oil-adjuvanted vaccine delays the specific anti-viral immune response in Atlantic salmon, Salmo salar L.

    PubMed

    Skinner, Lisa A; LaPatra, S E; Adams, A; Thompson, K D; Balfry, S K; McKinley, R S; Schulte, P M

    2010-04-01

    Vaccines are commonly used in salmonid aquaculture as a method of disease prevention. Although there is a substantial amount of published research regarding the immunological and physiological effects following the injection of different polyvalent vaccines and DNA vaccines, there are no published reports examining the physiological and immunological effects of concurrent vaccine injection, which is the situation encountered in aquaculture. Using key immunological parameters such as lysozyme activity and specific antibody titres we examined the short-term activation of the immune response of cultured Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L.) following concurrent injection with a traditional, polyvalent, oil-adjuvanted vaccine (AV) and an IHNV-specific DNA vaccine (DV). Our results indicate that different aspects of the innate and adaptive immune responses are influenced in either a positive or negative manner. While concurrent vaccine injection elicited an increase in lysozyme activity, changes in antibody titre (Ab) were antigen specific. The production of anti-Aeromonas salmonicida Abs was significantly greater in the combined vaccine group at 296 degree days post-vaccine injection (dd pvi), while the production of anti-Listonella anguillarum Abs was significantly greater at 106 dd pvi in the combined vaccine group. Of even greater interest was the apparent delay in production of IHNV-specific neutralizing antibodies (NAb) when the DV was injected concurrently with the polyvalent AV. The results indicated that concurrent injection of a polyvalent oil-AV and a DV can be beneficial to the production of antibodies; however, the specific anti-viral response may be delayed.

  16. The protective efficacy of MSP4/5 against lethal Plasmodium chabaudi adami challenge is dependent on the type of DNA vaccine vector and vaccination protocol.

    PubMed

    Rainczuk, A; Smooker, P M; Kedzierski, L; Black, C G; Coppel, R L; Spithill, T W

    2003-06-20

    The enhancement of immunogenicity of malarial DNA vaccines is important if they are to have practical application in protecting against blood-stage malaria. Here we describe three different DNA vaccine vector types used in conjunction with the blood-stage merozoite surface protein 4/5 (MSP4/5), the murine homologue of Plasmodium falciparum MSP4 and MSP5, in an attempt to enhance survival against lethal Plasmodium chabaudi adami DS blood-stage challenge. MSP4/5 was inserted into VR1020 (secretory), monocyte-chemotactic protein-3 (MCP-3) (chemoattractant), and cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen 4 (CTLA4) (lymph node targeting) vectors. Mice were immunized intradermally via gene-gun, IM injection, or boosting with recombinant MSP4/5 protein. Antibody responses after boosting were predominantly of the IgG1 and IgE isotypes, with low avidity antibodies produced in DNA primed groups. Despite antibody responses comparable to recombinant protein immunization, boosting mice primed with antigens encoded by MCP-3 and CTLA4 vectors did not enhance survival compared to vector control groups. Gene-gun vaccination using VR1020/MSP4/5 followed by recombinant MSP4/5 boosting, or gene-gun DNA vaccination alone using MCP-3/MSP4/5, resulted in enhanced survival compared to empty vector control mice. The results suggest that the enhancement of survival against lethal blood-stage malaria challenge after utilizing MSP4/5 DNA vaccination is therefore highly dependent on the route and type of vaccine vector employed.

  17. DNA vaccines against influenza.

    PubMed

    Stachyra, Anna; Góra-Sochacka, Anna; Sirko, Agnieszka

    2014-01-01

    Genetic vaccine technology has been considerably developed within the last two decades. This cost effective and promising strategy can be applied for therapy of cancers and for curing allergy, chronic and infectious diseases, such as a seasonal and pandemic influenza. Despite numerous advantages, several limitations of this technology reduce its performance and can retard its commercial exploitation in humans and its veterinary applications. Inefficient delivery of the DNA vaccine into cells of immunized individuals results in low intracellular supply of suitable expression cassettes encoding an antigen, in its low expression level and, in turn, in reduced immune responses against the antigen. Improvement of DNA delivery into the host cells might significantly increase effectiveness of the DNA vaccine. A vast array of innovative methods and various experimental strategies have been applied in order to enhance the effectiveness of DNA vaccines. They include various strategies improving DNA delivery as well as expression and immunogenic potential of the proteins encoded by the DNA vaccines. Researchers focusing on DNA vaccines against influenza have applied many of these strategies. Recent examples of the most successful modern approaches are discussed in this review.

  18. DNA vaccines: a review.

    PubMed

    Liu, M A

    2003-04-01

    The DNA vaccines are simple rings of DNA containing a gene encoding an antigen, and a promoter/terminator to make the gene express in mammalian cells. They are a promising new approach for generating all types of desired immunity: cytolytic T lymphocytes (CTL), T helper cells and antibodies, whilst being a technology that has the potential for global usage in terms of manufacturing ease, broad population administration and safety. This review gives an overview of the mechanisms, preclinical and clinical efficacy of DNA vaccines, and point out the limitations of the first generation of such vaccines, and some of the promising second-generation developments. This technology is also being utilized in the field of proteomics as a tool to elucidate the function of genes. The breadth of applications for DNA vaccines thus ranges from prophylactic vaccines to immunotherapy for infectious diseases, cancer, and autoimmune and allergic diseases. PMID:12653868

  19. Virus-Like Particle Secretion and Genotype-Dependent Immunogenicity of Dengue Virus Serotype 2 DNA Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Galula, Jedhan U.; Shen, Wen-Fan; Chuang, Shih-Te

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Dengue virus (DENV), composed of four distinct serotypes, is the most important and rapidly emerging arthropod-borne pathogen and imposes substantial economic and public health burdens. We constructed candidate vaccines containing the DNA of five of the genotypes of dengue virus serotype 2 (DENV-2) and evaluated the immunogenicity, the neutralizing (Nt) activity of the elicited antibodies, and the protective efficacy elicited in mice immunized with the vaccine candidates. We observed a significant correlation between the level of in vitro virus-like particle secretion, the elicited antibody response, and the protective efficacy of the vaccines containing the DNA of the different DENV genotypes in immunized mice. However, higher total IgG antibody levels did not always translate into higher Nt antibodies against homologous and heterologous viruses. We also found that, in contrast to previous reports, more than 50% of total IgG targeted ectodomain III (EDIII) of the E protein, and a substantial fraction of this population was interdomain highly neutralizing flavivirus subgroup-cross-reactive antibodies, such as monoclonal antibody 1B7-5. In addition, the lack of a critical epitope(s) in the Sylvatic genotype virus recognized by interdomain antibodies could be the major cause of the poor protection of mice vaccinated with the Asian 1 genotype vaccine (pVD2-Asian 1) from lethal challenge with virus of the Sylvatic genotype. In conclusion, although the pVD2-Asian 1 vaccine was immunogenic, elicited sufficient titers of Nt antibodies against all DENV-2 genotypes, and provided 100% protection against challenge with virus of the homologous Asian 1 genotype and virus of the heterologous Cosmopolitan genotype, it is critical to monitor the potential emergence of Sylvatic genotype viruses, since vaccine candidates under development may not protect vaccinated humans from these viruses. IMPORTANCE Five genotype-specific dengue virus serotype 2 (DENV-2) DNA vaccine

  20. An oral DNA vaccine against infectious haematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) encapsulated in alginate microspheres induces dose-dependent immune responses and significant protection in rainbow trout (Oncorrhynchus mykiss).

    PubMed

    Ballesteros, Natalia A; Alonso, Marta; Saint-Jean, Sylvia Rodríguez; Perez-Prieto, Sara I

    2015-08-01

    Administered by intramuscular injection, a DNA vaccine (pIRF1A-G) containing the promoter regions upstream of the rainbow trout interferon regulatory factor 1A gene (IRF1A) driven the expression of the infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) glycoprotein (G) elicited protective immune responses in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). However, less laborious and cost-effective routes of DNA vaccine delivery are required to vaccinate large numbers of susceptible farmed fish. In this study, the pIRF1A-G vaccine was encapsulated into alginate microspheres and orally administered to rainbow trout. At 1, 3, 5, and 7 d post-vaccination, IHNV G transcripts were detected by quantitative real-time PCR in gills, spleen, kidney and intestinal tissues of vaccinated fish. This result suggested that the encapsulation of pIRF1A-G in alginate microparticles protected the DNA vaccine from degradation in the fish stomach and ensured vaccine early delivery to the hindgut, vaccine passage through the intestinal mucosa and its distribution thought internal and external organs of vaccinated fish. We also observed that the oral route required approximately 20-fold more plasmid DNA than the injection route to induce the expression of significant levels of IHNV G transcripts in kidney and spleen of vaccinated fish. Despite this limitation, increased IFN-1, TLR-7 and IgM gene expression was detected by qRT-PCR in kidney of vaccinated fish when a 10 μg dose of the oral pIRF1A-G vaccine was administered. In contrast, significant Mx-1, Vig-1, Vig-2, TLR-3 and TLR-8 gene expression was only detected when higher doses of pIRF1A-G (50 and 100 μg) were orally administered. The pIRF1A-G vaccine also induced the expression of several markers of the adaptive immune response (CD4, CD8, IgM and IgT) in kidney and spleen of immunized fish in a dose-dependent manner. When vaccinated fish were challenged by immersion with live IHNV, evidence of a dose-response effect of the oral vaccine could also

  1. Initial sequence characterization of the rhabdoviruses of squamate reptiles, including a novel rhabdovirus from a caiman lizard (Dracaena guianensis)

    PubMed Central

    Wellehan, James F.X.; Pessier, Allan P.; Archer, Linda L.; Childress, April L.; Jacobson, Elliott R.; Tesh, Robert B.

    2012-01-01

    Rhabdoviruses infect a variety of hosts, including non-avian reptiles. Consensus PCR techniques were used to obtain partial RNA-dependent RNA polymerase gene sequence from five rhabdoviruses of South American lizards; Marco, Chaco, Timbo, Sena Madureira, and a rhabdovirus from a caiman lizard (Dracaena guianensis). The caiman lizard rhabdovirus formed inclusions in erythrocytes, which may be a route for infecting hematophagous insects. This is the first information on behavior of a rhabdovirus in squamates. We also obtained sequence from two rhabdoviruses of Australian lizards, confirming previous Charleville virus sequence and finding that, unlike a previous sequence report but in agreement with serologic reports, Almpiwar virus is clearly distinct from Charleville virus. Bayesian and maximum likelihood phylogenetic analysis revealed that most known rhabdoviruses of squamates cluster in the Almpiwar subgroup. The exception is Marco virus, which is found in the Hart Park group. PMID:22397930

  2. Initial sequence characterization of the rhabdoviruses of squamate reptiles, including a novel rhabdovirus from a caiman lizard (Dracaena guianensis).

    PubMed

    Wellehan, James F X; Pessier, Allan P; Archer, Linda L; Childress, April L; Jacobson, Elliott R; Tesh, Robert B

    2012-08-17

    Rhabdoviruses infect a variety of hosts, including non-avian reptiles. Consensus PCR techniques were used to obtain partial RNA-dependent RNA polymerase gene sequence from five rhabdoviruses of South American lizards; Marco, Chaco, Timbo, Sena Madureira, and a rhabdovirus from a caiman lizard (Dracaena guianensis). The caiman lizard rhabdovirus formed inclusions in erythrocytes, which may be a route for infecting hematophagous insects. This is the first information on behavior of a rhabdovirus in squamates. We also obtained sequence from two rhabdoviruses of Australian lizards, confirming previous Charleville virus sequence and finding that, unlike a previous sequence report but in agreement with serologic reports, Almpiwar virus is clearly distinct from Charleville virus. Bayesian and maximum likelihood phylogenetic analysis revealed that most known rhabdoviruses of squamates cluster in the Almpiwar subgroup. The exception is Marco virus, which is found in the Hart Park group.

  3. DNA vaccines in veterinary use

    PubMed Central

    Redding, Laurel; Werner, David B

    2015-01-01

    DNA vaccines represent a new frontier in vaccine technology. One important application of this technology is in the veterinary arena. DNA vaccines have already gained a foothold in certain fields of veterinary medicine. However, several important questions must be addressed when developing DNA vaccines for animals, including whether or not the vaccine is efficacious and cost effective compared with currently available options. Another important question to consider is how to apply this developing technology in a wide range of different situations, from the domestic pet to individual fish in fisheries with several thousand animals, to wildlife programs for disease control. In some cases, DNA vaccines represent an interesting option for vaccination, while in others, currently available options are sufficient. This review will examine a number of diseases of veterinary importance and the progress being made in DNA vaccine technology relevant to these diseases, and we compare these with the conventional treatment options available. PMID:19722897

  4. Intralymphatic immunization enhances DNA vaccination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maloy, Kevin J.; Erdmann, Iris; Basch, Veronique; Sierro, Sophie; Kramps, Thomas A.; Zinkernagel, Rolf M.; Oehen, Stefan; Kündig, Thomas M.

    2001-03-01

    Although DNA vaccines have been shown to elicit potent immune responses in animal models, initial clinical trials in humans have been disappointing, highlighting a need to optimize their immunogenicity. Naked DNA vaccines are usually administered either i.m. or intradermally. The current study shows that immunization with naked DNA by direct injection into a peripheral lymph node enhances immunogenicity by 100- to 1,000-fold, inducing strong and biologically relevant CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocyte responses. Because injection directly into a lymph node is a rapid and easy procedure in humans, these results have important clinical implications for DNA vaccination.

  5. Introduction of translation stop codons into the viral glycoprotein gene in a fish DNA vaccine eliminates induction of protective immunity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Garver, K.A.; Conway, C.M.; Kurath, G.

    2006-01-01

    A highly efficacious DNA vaccine against a fish rhabdovirus, infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV), was mutated to introduce two stop codons to prevent glycoprotein translation while maintaining the plasmid DNA integrity and RNA transcription ability. The mutated plasmid vaccine, denoted pIHNw-G2stop, when injected intramuscularly into fish at high doses, lacked detectable glycoprotein expression in the injection site muscle, and did not provide protection against lethal virus challenge 7 days post-vaccination. These results suggest that the G-protein itself is required to stimulate the early protective antiviral response observed after vaccination with the nonmutated parental DNA vaccine. ?? Springer Science+Business Media, Inc. 2006.

  6. Evolution of electroporated DNA vaccines.

    PubMed

    Keane-Myers, Andrea M; Bell, Matt

    2014-01-01

    Vaccines have evolved for hundreds of years, but all utilize the premise that safely pre-exposing the host to some component of a pathogen allows for enhanced immune recognition, and potential protection from disease, upon encountering the pathogen at a later date. Early vaccination strategies used inactivated or attenuated vaccines, many of which contained toxins and other components that resulted in reactogenicity or risk of reversion to virulence. DNA vaccines supplant many of the issues associated with inactivated or attenuated vaccines, but these vaccines tend to provide weak immunological responses, particularly in primates. DNA Electroporation may prove to be the "missing link" in the evolution of DNA vaccines allowing for enhanced immune responses from DNA vaccination in humans thereby resulting in protection from disease post-pathogen exposure.

  7. Secretion of dengue virus envelope protein ectodomain from mammalian cells is dependent on domain II serotype and affects the immune response upon DNA vaccination.

    PubMed

    Slon Campos, J L; Poggianella, M; Marchese, S; Bestagno, M; Burrone, O R

    2015-11-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) is currently among the most important human pathogens and affects millions of people throughout the tropical and subtropical regions of the world. Although it has been a World Health Organization priority for several years, there is still no efficient vaccine available to prevent infection. The envelope glycoprotein (E), exposed on the surface on infective viral particles, is the main target of neutralizing antibodies. For this reason it has been used as the antigen of choice for vaccine development efforts. Here we show a detailed analysis of factors involved in the expression, secretion and folding of E ectodomain from all four DENV serotypes in mammalian cells, and how this affects their ability to induce neutralizing antibody responses in DNA-vaccinated mice. Proper folding of E domain II (DII) is essential for efficient E ectodomain secretion, with DIII playing a significant role in stabilizing soluble dimers. We also show that the level of protein secreted from transfected cells determines the strength and efficiency of antibody responses in the context of DNA vaccination and should be considered a pivotal feature for the development of E-based DNA vaccines against DENV. PMID:26358704

  8. Characterisation of the genomes of four putative vesiculoviruses: tench rhabdovirus, grass carp rhabdovirus, perch rhabdovirus and eel rhabdovirus European X.

    PubMed

    Stone, David M; Kerr, Rose C; Hughes, Margaret; Radford, Alan D; Darby, Alistair C

    2013-11-01

    The complete coding sequences were determined for four putative vesiculoviruses isolated from fish. Sequence alignment and phylogenetic analysis based on the predicted amino acid sequences of the five main proteins assigned tench rhabdovirus and grass carp rhabdovirus together with spring viraemia of carp and pike fry rhabdovirus to a lineage that was distinct from the mammalian vesiculoviruses. Perch rhabdovirus, eel virus European X, lake trout rhabdovirus 903/87 and sea trout virus were placed in a second lineage that was also distinct from the recognised genera in the family Rhabdoviridae. Establishment of two new rhabdovirus genera, "Perhabdovirus" and "Sprivivirus", is discussed.

  9. The future of human DNA vaccines.

    PubMed

    Li, Lei; Saade, Fadi; Petrovsky, Nikolai

    2012-12-31

    DNA vaccines have evolved greatly over the last 20 years since their invention, but have yet to become a competitive alternative to conventional protein or carbohydrate based human vaccines. Whilst safety concerns were an initial barrier, the Achilles heel of DNA vaccines remains their poor immunogenicity when compared to protein vaccines. A wide variety of strategies have been developed to optimize DNA vaccine immunogenicity, including codon optimization, genetic adjuvants, electroporation and sophisticated prime-boost regimens, with each of these methods having its advantages and limitations. Whilst each of these methods has contributed to incremental improvements in DNA vaccine efficacy, more is still needed if human DNA vaccines are to succeed commercially. This review foresees a final breakthrough in human DNA vaccines will come from application of the latest cutting-edge technologies, including "epigenetics" and "omics" approaches, alongside traditional techniques to improve immunogenicity such as adjuvants and electroporation, thereby overcoming the current limitations of DNA vaccines in humans.

  10. Can VHS Virus Bypass the Protective Immunity Induced by DNA Vaccination in Rainbow Trout?

    PubMed Central

    Sepúlveda, Dagoberto; Lorenzen, Niels

    2016-01-01

    DNA vaccines encoding viral glycoproteins have been very successful for induction of protective immunity against diseases caused by rhabdoviruses in cultured fish species. However, the vaccine concept is based on a single viral gene and since RNA viruses are known to possess high variability and adaptation capacity, this work aimed at evaluating whether viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus (VHSV), an RNA virus and member of Rhabdoviridae family, was able to evade the protective immune response induced by the DNA vaccination of rainbow trout. The experiments comprised repeated passages of a highly pathogenic VHSV isolate in a fish cell line in the presence of neutralizing fish serum (in vitro approach), and in rainbow trout immunized with the VHS DNA vaccine (in vivo approach). For the in vitro approach, the virus collected from the last passage (passaged virus) was as sensitive as the parental virus to serum neutralization, suggesting that the passaging did not promote the selection of virus populations able to bypass the neutralization by serum antibodies. Also, in the in vivo approach, where virus was passaged several times in vaccinated fish, no increased virulence nor increased persistence in vaccinated fish was observed in comparison with the parental virus. However, some of the vaccinated fish did get infected and could transmit the infection to naïve cohabitant fish. The results demonstrated that the DNA vaccine induced a robust protection, but also that the immunity was non-sterile. It is consequently important not to consider vaccinated fish as virus free in veterinary terms. PMID:27054895

  11. Can VHS Virus Bypass the Protective Immunity Induced by DNA Vaccination in Rainbow Trout?

    PubMed

    Sepúlveda, Dagoberto; Lorenzen, Niels

    2016-01-01

    DNA vaccines encoding viral glycoproteins have been very successful for induction of protective immunity against diseases caused by rhabdoviruses in cultured fish species. However, the vaccine concept is based on a single viral gene and since RNA viruses are known to possess high variability and adaptation capacity, this work aimed at evaluating whether viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus (VHSV), an RNA virus and member of Rhabdoviridae family, was able to evade the protective immune response induced by the DNA vaccination of rainbow trout. The experiments comprised repeated passages of a highly pathogenic VHSV isolate in a fish cell line in the presence of neutralizing fish serum (in vitro approach), and in rainbow trout immunized with the VHS DNA vaccine (in vivo approach). For the in vitro approach, the virus collected from the last passage (passaged virus) was as sensitive as the parental virus to serum neutralization, suggesting that the passaging did not promote the selection of virus populations able to bypass the neutralization by serum antibodies. Also, in the in vivo approach, where virus was passaged several times in vaccinated fish, no increased virulence nor increased persistence in vaccinated fish was observed in comparison with the parental virus. However, some of the vaccinated fish did get infected and could transmit the infection to naïve cohabitant fish. The results demonstrated that the DNA vaccine induced a robust protection, but also that the immunity was non-sterile. It is consequently important not to consider vaccinated fish as virus free in veterinary terms.

  12. Improving the safety of viral DNA vaccines: development of vectors containing both 5' and 3' homologous regulatory sequences from non-viral origin.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Lopez, A; Encinas, P; García-Valtanen, P; Gomez-Casado, E; Coll, J M; Estepa, A

    2013-04-01

    Although some DNA vaccines have proved to be very efficient in field trials, their authorisation still remains limited to a few countries. This is in part due to safety issues because most of them contain viral regulatory sequences to driving the expression of the encoded antigen. This is the case of the only DNA vaccine against a fish rhabdovirus (a negative ssRNA virus), authorised in Canada, despite the important economic losses that these viruses cause to aquaculture all over the world. In an attempt to solve this problem and using as a model a non-authorised, but efficient DNA vaccine against the fish rhabdovirus, viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus (VHSV), we developed a plasmid construction containing regulatory sequences exclusively from fish origin. The result was an "all-fish vector", named pJAC-G, containing 5' and 3' regulatory sequences of β-acting genes from carp and zebrafish, respectively. In vitro and in vivo, pJAC-G drove a successful expression of the VHSV glycoprotein G (G), the only antigen of the virus conferring in vivo protection. Furthermore, and by means of in vitro fusion assays, it was confirmed that G protein expressed from pJAC-G was fully functional. Altogether, these results suggest that DNA vaccines containing host-homologous gene regulatory sequences might be useful for developing safer DNA vaccines, while they also might be useful for basic studies.

  13. Technologies for enhanced efficacy of DNA vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Saade, Fadi; Petrovsky, Nikolai

    2012-01-01

    Despite many years of research, human DNA vaccines have yet to fulfill their early promise. Over the past 15 years, multiple generations of DNA vaccines have been developed and tested in preclinical models for prophylactic and therapeutic applications in the areas of infectious disease and cancer, but have failed in the clinic. Thus, while DNA vaccines have achieved successful licensure for veterinary applications, their poor immunogenicity in humans when compared with traditional protein-based vaccines has hindered their progress. Many strategies have been attempted to improve DNA vaccine potency including use of more efficient promoters and codon optimization, addition of traditional or genetic adjuvants, electroporation, intradermal delivery and various prime–boost strategies. This review summarizes these advances in DNA vaccine technologies and attempts to answer the question of when DNA vaccines might eventually be licensed for human use. PMID:22309668

  14. DNA vaccines: recent developments and future possibilities.

    PubMed

    Liu, Margaret A; Wahren, Britta; Karlsson Hedestam, Gunilla B

    2006-11-01

    The field of DNA vaccines continues to advance and several new strategies to augment the immunogenicity of DNA vaccines are under evaluation. The majority of these studies are in the early preclinical stage, but some DNA vaccines have moved into clinical trials. In this review, we describe some of the more recent efforts aimed at increasing the immunogenicity of DNA vaccines, including the use of genetic adjuvants and plasmid-based expression of viral replicons. In addition, we discuss the possibility of using DNA vaccines to address emerging infectious agents where they may provide an advantage over other vaccine strategies and we review some areas where DNA vaccines have been used to target self-antigens. PMID:17032152

  15. DNA Vaccines: Experiences in the Swine Model.

    PubMed

    Accensi, Francesc; Rodríguez, Fernando; Monteagudo, Paula L

    2016-01-01

    DNA vaccination is one of the most fascinating vaccine-strategies currently in development. Two of the main advantages of DNA immunization rely on its simplicity and flexibility, being ideal to dissect both the immune mechanisms and the antigens involved in protection against a given pathogen. Here, we describe several strategies used to enhance the immune responses induced and the protection afforded by experimental DNA vaccines tested in swine and provide with very basic protocol describing the generation and in vivo application of a prototypic DNA vaccine. Only time will tell the last word regarding the definitive implementation of DNA vaccination in the field.

  16. Rhabdovirus accessory genes.

    PubMed

    Walker, Peter J; Dietzgen, Ralf G; Joubert, D Albert; Blasdell, Kim R

    2011-12-01

    The Rhabdoviridae is one of the most ecologically diverse families of RNA viruses with members infecting a wide range of organisms including placental mammals, marsupials, birds, reptiles, fish, insects and plants. The availability of complete nucleotide sequences for an increasing number of rhabdoviruses has revealed that their ecological diversity is reflected in the diversity and complexity of their genomes. The five canonical rhabdovirus structural protein genes (N, P, M, G and L) that are shared by all rhabdoviruses are overprinted, overlapped and interspersed with a multitude of novel and diverse accessory genes. Although not essential for replication in cell culture, several of these genes have been shown to have roles associated with pathogenesis and apoptosis in animals, and cell-to-cell movement in plants. Others appear to be secreted or have the characteristics of membrane-anchored glycoproteins or viroporins. However, most encode proteins of unknown function that are unrelated to any other known proteins. Understanding the roles of these accessory genes and the strategies by which rhabdoviruses use them to engage, divert and re-direct cellular processes will not only present opportunities to develop new anti-viral therapies but may also reveal aspects of cellar function that have broader significance in biology, agriculture and medicine.

  17. Transcriptional IL-15-Directed in vivo DC Targeting DNA Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Tian, S; Liu, Z; Donahue, C; Noh, HS; Falo, LD; You, Z

    2009-01-01

    DC engineered in vitro by DNA encoding OVAhsp70 and IL-15 up-regulated their expressions of CD80, CD86, CCR7 and IL-15Rα and promoted their productions of IL-6, IL-12 and TNF-α. Transcriptional IL-15-directed in vivo DC targeting DNA vaccine encoding OVAhsp70 elicited long-lasting Th1 and CTL responses and anti-B16OVA activity. CD8 T cell-mediated primary tumor protection was abrogated by DC or CD4 T cell depletion during the induction phase of immune responses. However, CD4 T cell depletion during immunization did not impair CD8 T cell-dependent long-lasting tumor protection. Furthermore, in vivo DC-derived IL-15 exerted the enhancements of cellular and humoral immune responses and antitumor immunity elicited by OVAhsp70 DNA vaccine. Importantly, the potency of this novel DNA vaccine strategy was proven using a self/tumor Ag (TRP2) in a clinically relevant B16 melanoma model. These findings have implications for developing next generation DNA vaccines against cancers and infectious diseases in both healthy and CD4 deficient individuals. PMID:19727134

  18. Maize rhabdovirus-vector transmission

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    oth of the plant-infecting rhabdovirus genera, Nucleorhabdovirus and Cytorhabdovirus, contain viruses that infect maize (Zea mays L.). The maize infecting rhabdoviruses are transmitted by hemipteran insects in the families Cicadellidae and Delphacidae in a persistent propagative manner. This chapt...

  19. Bringing DNA vaccines closer to commercial use.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Joana A; Prazeres, Duarte M F; Monteiro, Gabriel A

    2009-10-01

    Progress in the application of DNA vaccines as an immunization protocol is evident from the increasing number of such vaccines under evaluation in clinical trials and by the recent approval of several DNA vaccine products for veterinary applications. DNA vaccine technology offers important therapeutic and commercial advantages compared with conventional approaches, including the opportunity to target pathogens characterized by significant genetic diversity using a safe immunization platform, and the ability to use a simple, rapid and well-characterized production method. However, further optimization of DNA vaccine technology through the use of improved constructs, delivery systems and immunization protocols is necessary to clinically achieve the promising results that have been demonstrated in preclinical models.

  20. Efficacy of an infectious hematopoietic necrosis (IHN) virus DNA vaccine in Chinook Oncorhynchus tshawytscha and sockeye O. nerka salmon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Garver, K.A.; LaPatra, S.E.; Kurath, G.

    2005-01-01

    The level of protective immunity was determined for Chinook Oncorhynchus tshawytscha and sockeye/kokanee salmon (anadromous and landlocked) O. nerka following intramuscular vaccination with a DNA vaccine against the aquatic rhabdovirus, infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV). A DNA vaccine containing the glycoprotein gene of IHNV protected Chinook and sockeye/kokanee salmon against waterborne or injection challenge with IHNV, and relative percent survival (RPS) values of 23 to 86% were obtained under a variety of lethal challenge conditions. Although this is significant protection, it is less than RPS values obtained in previous studies with rainbow trout (O. mykiss). In addition to the variability in the severity of the challenge and inherent host susceptibility differences, it appears that use of a cross-genogroup challenge virus strain may lead to reduced efficacy of the DNA vaccine. Neutralizing antibody titers were detected in both Chinook and sockeye that had been vaccinated with 1.0 and 0.1 ??g doses of the DNA vaccine, and vaccinated fish responded to viral challenges with higher antibody titers than mock-vaccinated control fish. ?? Inter-Research 2005.

  1. Nanogram quantities of a DNA vaccine protect rainbow trout fry against heterologous strains of infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Corbeil, S.; LaPatra, S.E.; Anderson, E.D.; Kurath, G.

    2000-01-01

    The efficacy of a DNA vaccine containing the glycoprotein gene of infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV), a rhabdovirus affecting trout and salmon, was investigated. The minimal dose of vaccine required, the protection against heterologous strains, and the titers of neutralizing antibodies produced were used to evaluate the potential of the vaccine as a control pharmaceutical. Results indicated that a single dose of as little as 1–10 ng of vaccine protected rainbow trout fry against waterborne challenge by IHNV. An optimal dose of 100 ng per fish was selected to assure strong protection under various conditions. Neutralizing antibody titers were detected in fish vaccinated with concentrations of DNA ranging from 5 to 0.01 μg. Furthermore, the DNA vaccine protected fish against a broad range of viral strains from different geographic locations, including isolates from France and Japan, suggesting that the vaccine could be used worldwide. A single dose of this DNA vaccine induced protection in fish at a lower dose than is usually reported in mammalian DNA vaccine studies.

  2. c-DNA vaccination against parasitic infections: advantages and disadvantages.

    PubMed

    Kofta, W; Wedrychowicz, H

    2001-09-12

    Recently developed technology for DNA vaccination appears to offer the good prospect for the development of a multivalent vaccines that will effectively activate both the humoral and cell mediated mechanisms of the immune system. Currently, DNA vaccination against such important parasitic diseases like malaria, leishmaniosis, toxoplasmosis, cryptosporidiosis, schistosomosis, fasciolosis offers several new opportunities. However, the outcome of vaccination depends very much on vaccine formulations, dose and route of vaccine delivery, and the species and even strain of the vaccinated host. To overcome these problems much research is still needed, specifically focused on cloning and testing of new c-DNA sequences in the following: genome projects: different ways of delivery: design of vectors containing appropriate immunostimulatory sequences and very detailed studies on safety. PMID:11522401

  3. Molecular and cellular aspects of rhabdovirus entry.

    PubMed

    Albertini, Aurélie A V; Baquero, Eduard; Ferlin, Anna; Gaudin, Yves

    2012-01-01

    Rhabdoviruses enter the cell via the endocytic pathway and subsequently fuse with a cellular membrane within the acidic environment of the endosome. Both receptor recognition and membrane fusion are mediated by a single transmembrane viral glycoprotein (G). Fusion is triggered via a low-pH induced structural rearrangement. G is an atypical fusion protein as there is a pH-dependent equilibrium between its pre- and post-fusion conformations. The elucidation of the atomic structures of these two conformations for the vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) G has revealed that it is different from the previously characterized class I and class II fusion proteins. In this review, the pre- and post-fusion VSV G structures are presented in detail demonstrating that G combines the features of the class I and class II fusion proteins. In addition to these similarities, these G structures also reveal some particularities that expand our understanding of the working of fusion machineries. Combined with data from recent studies that revealed the cellular aspects of the initial stages of rhabdovirus infection, all these data give an integrated view of the entry pathway of rhabdoviruses into their host cell.

  4. Molecular and Cellular Aspects of Rhabdovirus Entry

    PubMed Central

    Albertini, Aurélie A. V.; Baquero, Eduard; Ferlin, Anna; Gaudin, Yves

    2012-01-01

    Rhabdoviruses enter the cell via the endocytic pathway and subsequently fuse with a cellular membrane within the acidic environment of the endosome. Both receptor recognition and membrane fusion are mediated by a single transmembrane viral glycoprotein (G). Fusion is triggered via a low-pH induced structural rearrangement. G is an atypical fusion protein as there is a pH-dependent equilibrium between its pre- and post-fusion conformations. The elucidation of the atomic structures of these two conformations for the vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) G has revealed that it is different from the previously characterized class I and class II fusion proteins. In this review, the pre- and post-fusion VSV G structures are presented in detail demonstrating that G combines the features of the class I and class II fusion proteins. In addition to these similarities, these G structures also reveal some particularities that expand our understanding of the working of fusion machineries. Combined with data from recent studies that revealed the cellular aspects of the initial stages of rhabdovirus infection, all these data give an integrated view of the entry pathway of rhabdoviruses into their host cell. PMID:22355455

  5. Recent advances towards the clinical application of DNA vaccines.

    PubMed

    Bins, A D; van den Berg, J H; Oosterhuis, K; Haanen, J B A G

    2013-04-01

    DNA vaccination is an attractive method for therapeutic vaccination against intracellular pathogens and cancer. This review provides an introduction into the DNA vaccination field and discusses the pre-clinical successes and most interesting clinical achievements thus far. Furthermore, general attributes, mechanism of action and safety of DNA vaccination will be discussed. Since clinical results with DNA vaccination so far show room for improvement, possibilities to improve the delivery and immunogenicity of DNA vaccines are reviewed. In the coming years, these new developments should show whether DNA vaccination is able to induce clinically relevant responses in patients.

  6. DNA vaccines: a simple DNA sensing matter?

    PubMed

    Coban, Cevayir; Kobiyama, Kouji; Jounai, Nao; Tozuka, Miyuki; Ishii, Ken J

    2013-10-01

    Since the introduction of DNA vaccines two decades ago, this attractive strategy has been hampered by its low immunogenicity in humans. Studies conducted to improve the immunogenicity of DNA vaccines have shown that understanding the mechanism of action of DNA vaccines might be the key to successfully improving their immunogenicity. Our current understanding is that DNA vaccines induce innate and adaptive immune responses in two ways: (1) encoded protein (or polypeptide) antigen(s) by the DNA plasmid can be expressed in stromal cells (i.e., muscle cells) as well as DCs, where these antigens are processed and presented to naïve CD4 or CD8 T cells either by direct or cross presentation, respectively; and (2) the transfected DNA plasmid itself may bind to an un-identified cytosolic DNA sensor and activate the TBK1-STING pathway and the production of type I interferons (IFNs) which function as an adjuvant. Recent studies investigating double-stranded cytosolic DNA sensor(s) have highlighted new mechanisms in which cytosolic DNA may release secondary metabolites, which are in turn recognized by a novel DNA sensing machinery. Here, we discuss these new metabolites and the possibilities of translating this knowledge into improved immunogenicity for DNA vaccines.

  7. DNA vaccines for targeting bacterial infections

    PubMed Central

    Ingolotti, Mariana; Kawalekar, Omkar; Shedlock, Devon J; Muthumani, Karuppiah; Weiner, David B

    2010-01-01

    DNA vaccination has been of great interest since its discovery in the 1990s due to its ability to elicit both humoral and cellular immune responses. DNA vaccines consist of a DNA plasmid containing a transgene that encodes the sequence of a target protein from a pathogen under the control of a eukaryotic promoter. This revolutionary technology has proven to be effective in animal models and four DNA vaccine products have recently been approved for veterinary use. Although few DNA vaccines against bacterial infections have been tested, the results are encouraging. Because of their versatility, safety and simplicity a wider range of organisms can be targeted by these vaccines, which shows their potential advantages to public health. This article describes the mechanism of action of DNA vaccines and their potential use for targeting bacterial infections. In addition, it provides an updated summary of the methods used to enhance immunogenicity from codon optimization and adjuvants to delivery techniques including electroporation and use of nanoparticles. PMID:20624048

  8. Antiparasitic DNA vaccines in 21st century.

    PubMed

    Wedrychowicz, Halina

    2015-06-01

    Demands for effective vaccines to control parasitic diseases of humans and livestock have been recently exacerbated by the development of resistance of most pathogenic parasites to anti-parasitic drugs. Novel genomic and proteomic technologies have provided opportunities for the discovery and improvement of DNA vaccines which are relatively easy as well as cheap to fabricate and stable at room temperatures. However, their main limitation is rather poor immunogenicity, which makes it necessary to couple the antigens with adjuvant molecules. This paper review recent advances in the development of DNA vaccines to some pathogenic protozoa and helminths. Numerous studies were conducted over the past 14 years of 21st century, employing various administration techniques, adjuvants and new immunogenic antigens to increase efficacy of DNA vaccines. Unfortunately, the results have not been rewarding. Further research is necessary using more extensive combinations of antigens; alternate delivery systems and more efficient adjuvants based on knowledge of the immunomodulatory capacities of parasitic protozoa and helminths.

  9. Improving DNA vaccine performance through vector design.

    PubMed

    Williams, James A

    2014-01-01

    DNA vaccines are a rapidly deployed next generation vaccination platform for treatment of human and animal disease. DNA delivery devices, such as electroporation and needle free jet injectors, are used to increase gene transfer. This results in higher antigen expression which correlates with improved humoral and cellular immunity in humans and animals. This review highlights recent vector and transgene design innovations that improve DNA vaccine performance. These new vectors improve antigen expression, increase plasmid manufacturing yield and quality in bioreactors, and eliminate antibiotic selection and other potential safety issues. A flowchart for designing synthetic antigen transgenes, combining antigen targeting, codon-optimization and bioinformatics, is presented. Application of improved vectors, of antibiotic free plasmid production, and cost effective manufacturing technologies will be critical to ensure safety, efficacy, and economically viable manufacturing of DNA vaccines currently under development for infectious disease, cancer, autoimmunity, immunotolerance and allergy indications.

  10. Human clinical trials of plasmid DNA vaccines.

    PubMed

    Liu, Margaret A; Ulmer, Jeffrey B

    2005-01-01

    This article gives an overview of DNA vaccines with specific emphasis on the development of DNA vaccines for clinical trials and an overview of those trials. It describes the preclinical research that demonstrated the efficacy of DNA vaccines as well as an explication of the immunologic mechanisms of action. These include the induction of cognate immune responses, such as the generation of cytolytic T lymphocytes (CTL) as well as the effect of the plasmid DNA upon the innate immune system. Specific issues related to the development of DNA as a product candidate are then discussed, including the manufacture of plasmid, the qualification of the plasmid DNA product, and the safety testing necessary for initiating clinical trials. Various human clinical trials for infectious diseases and cancer have been initiated or completed, and an overview of these trials is given. Finally, because the early clinical trials have shown less than optimal immunogenicity, methods to increase the potency of the vaccines are described. PMID:16291211

  11. Novel approaches to tuberculosis prevention: DNA vaccines.

    PubMed

    Rivas-Santiago, Bruno; Cervantes-Villagrana, Alberto R

    2014-03-01

    It is estimated that there are approximately eight million new cases of active tuberculosis (TB) worldwide annually. There is only 1 vaccine available for prevention: bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG). This has variable efficacy and is only protective for certain extrapulmonary TB cases in children, therefore new strategies for the creation of novel vaccines have emerged. One of the promising approaches is the DNA vaccine, used as a direct vaccination or as a prime-boost vaccine. This review describes the experimental data obtained during the design of DNA vaccines for TB.

  12. DNA vaccines and intradermal vaccination by DNA tattooing.

    PubMed

    Oosterhuis, K; van den Berg, J H; Schumacher, T N; Haanen, J B A G

    2012-01-01

    Over the past two decades, DNA vaccination has been developed as a method for the induction of immune responses. However, in spite of high expectations based on their efficacy in preclinical models, immunogenicity of first generation DNA vaccines in clinical trials was shown to be poor, and no DNA vaccines have yet been licensed for human use. In recent years significant progress has been made in the development of second generation DNA vaccines and DNA vaccine delivery methods. Here we review the key characteristics of DNA vaccines as compared to other vaccine platforms, and recent insights into the prerequisites for induction of immune responses by DNA vaccines will be discussed. We illustrate the development of second generation DNA vaccines with the description of DNA tattooing as a novel DNA delivery method. This technique has shown great promise both in a small animal model and in non-human primates and is currently under clinical evaluation.

  13. Fish DNA vaccine against infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus: efficacy of various routes of immunization

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Corbeil, Serge; Kurath, Gael; LaPatra, Scott E.

    2000-01-01

    The DNA vaccine, pIHNVw-G, contains the gene for the glycoprotein (G) of the rhabdovirus infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV), a major pathogen of salmon and trout. The relative efficacy of various routes of immunisation with pIHNVw-G was evaluated using 1.8 g rainbow trout fry vaccinated via intramuscular injection, scarification of the skin, intraperitoneal injection, intrabuccal administration, cutaneous particle bombardment using a gene gun, or immersion in water containing DNA vaccine-coated beads. Twenty-seven days after vaccination neutralising antibody titres were determined, and 2 days later groups of vaccinated and control unvaccinated fish were subjected to an IHNV immersion challenge. Results of the virus challenge showed that the intramuscular injection and the gene gun immunisation induced protective immunity in fry, while intraperitoneal injection provided partial protection. Neutralising antibodies were not detected in sera of vaccinated fish regardless of the route of immunisation used, suggesting that cell mediated immunity may be at least partially responsible for the observed protection.

  14. Polymer multilayer tattooing for enhanced DNA vaccination

    PubMed Central

    DeMuth, Peter C.; Min, Younjin; Huang, Bonnie; Kramer, Joshua A.; Miller, Andrew D.; Barouch, Dan H.; Hammond, Paula T.; Irvine, Darrell J.

    2014-01-01

    DNA vaccines have many potential benefits but have failed to generate robust immune responses in humans. Recently, methods such as in vivo electroporation have demonstrated improved performance, but an optimal strategy for safe, reproducible, and pain-free DNA vaccination remains elusive. Here we report an approach for rapid implantation of vaccine-loaded polymer films carrying DNA, immune-stimulatory RNA, and biodegradable polycations into the immune-cell-rich epidermis, using microneedles coated with releasable polyelectrolyte multilayers. Films transferred into the skin following brief microneedle application promoted local transfection and controlled the persistence of DNA and adjuvants in the skin from days to weeks, with kinetics determined by the film composition. These “multilayer tattoo” DNA vaccines induced immune responses against a model HIV antigen comparable to electroporation in mice, enhanced memory T-cell generation, and elicited 140-fold higher gene expression in non-human primate skin than intradermal DNA injection, indicating the potential of this strategy for enhancing DNA vaccination. PMID:23353628

  15. Polymer multilayer tattooing for enhanced DNA vaccination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demuth, Peter C.; Min, Younjin; Huang, Bonnie; Kramer, Joshua A.; Miller, Andrew D.; Barouch, Dan H.; Hammond, Paula T.; Irvine, Darrell J.

    2013-04-01

    DNA vaccines have many potential benefits but have failed to generate robust immune responses in humans. Recently, methods such as in vivo electroporation have demonstrated improved performance, but an optimal strategy for safe, reproducible, and pain-free DNA vaccination remains elusive. Here we report an approach for rapid implantation of vaccine-loaded polymer films carrying DNA, immune-stimulatory RNA, and biodegradable polycations into the immune-cell-rich epidermis, using microneedles coated with releasable polyelectrolyte multilayers. Films transferred into the skin following brief microneedle application promoted local transfection and controlled the persistence of DNA and adjuvants in the skin from days to weeks, with kinetics determined by the film composition. These ‘multilayer tattoo’ DNA vaccines induced immune responses against a model HIV antigen comparable to electroporation in mice, enhanced memory T-cell generation, and elicited 140-fold higher gene expression in non-human primate skin than intradermal DNA injection, indicating the potential of this strategy for enhancing DNA vaccination.

  16. Protective immunity and lack of histopathological damage two years after DNA vaccination against infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus in trout

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kurath, Gael; Garver, Kyle A.; Corbeil, Serge; Elliott, Diane G.; Anderson, Eric D.; LaPatra, Scott E.

    2006-01-01

    The DNA vaccine pIHNw-G encodes the glycoprotein of the fish rhabdovirus infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV). Vaccine performance in rainbow trout was measured 3, 6, 13, 24, and 25 months after vaccination. At three months all fish vaccinated with 0.1 μg pIHNw-G had detectable neutralizing antibody (NAb) and they were completely protected from lethal IHNV challenge with a relative percent survival (RPS) of 100% compared to control fish. Viral challenges at 6, 13, 24, and 25 months post-vaccination showed protection with RPS values of 47–69%, while NAb seroprevalence declined to undetectable levels. Passive transfer experiments with sera from fish after two years post-vaccination were inconsistent but significant protection was observed in some cases. The long-term duration of protection observed here defined a third temporal phase in the immune response to IHNV DNA vaccination, characterized by reduced but significant levels of protection, and decline or absence of detectable NAb titers. Examination of multiple tissues showed an absence of detectable long-term histopathological damage due to DNA vaccination.

  17. Micro- and nanoparticulates for DNA vaccine delivery.

    PubMed

    Farris, Eric; Brown, Deborah M; Ramer-Tait, Amanda E; Pannier, Angela K

    2016-05-01

    DNA vaccination has emerged as a promising alternative to traditional protein-based vaccines for the induction of protective immune responses. DNA vaccines offer several advantages over traditional vaccines, including increased stability, rapid and inexpensive production, and flexibility to produce vaccines for a wide variety of infectious diseases. However, the immunogenicity of DNA vaccines delivered as naked plasmid DNA is often weak due to degradation of the DNA by nucleases and inefficient delivery to immune cells. Therefore, biomaterial-based delivery systems based on micro- and nanoparticles that encapsulate plasmid DNA represent the most promising strategy for DNA vaccine delivery. Microparticulate delivery systems allow for passive targeting to antigen presenting cells through size exclusion and can allow for sustained presentation of DNA to cells through degradation and release of encapsulated vaccines. In contrast, nanoparticle encapsulation leads to increased internalization, overall greater transfection efficiency, and the ability to increase uptake across mucosal surfaces. Moreover, selection of the appropriate biomaterial can lead to increased immune stimulation and activation through triggering innate immune response receptors and target DNA to professional antigen presenting cells. Finally, the selection of materials with the appropriate properties to achieve efficient delivery through administration routes conducive to high patient compliance and capable of generating systemic and local (i.e. mucosal) immunity can lead to more effective humoral and cellular protective immune responses. In this review, we discuss the development of novel biomaterial-based delivery systems to enhance the delivery of DNA vaccines through various routes of administration and their implications for generating immune responses.

  18. M cell-targeted DNA vaccination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yunpeng; Wang, Xinhai; Csencsits, Keri L.; Haddad, Asmahan; Walters, Nancy; Pascual, David W.

    2001-07-01

    DNA immunization, although attractive, is poor for inducing mucosal immunity, thus limiting its protective value against most infectious agents. To surmount this shortcoming, we devised a method for mucosal transgene vaccination by using an M cell ligand to direct the DNA vaccine to mucosal inductive tissues and the respiratory epithelium. This ligand, reovirus protein 1, when conjugated to polylysine (PL), can bind the apical surface of M cells from nasal-associated lymphoid tissues. Intranasal immunizations with protein 1-PL-DNA complexes produced antigen-specific serum IgG and prolonged mucosal IgA, as well as enhanced cell-mediated immunity, made evident by elevated pulmonary cytotoxic T lymphocyte responses. Therefore, targeted transgene vaccination represents an approach for enabling DNA vaccination of the mucosa.

  19. DNA vaccination in skin enhanced by electroporation.

    PubMed

    Broderick, Kate E; Khan, Amir S; Sardesai, Niranjan Y

    2014-01-01

    DNA vaccines are a next generation branch of vaccines which offer major benefits over their conventional counterparts. However, to be effective in large mammals and humans, an enhancing delivery technology is required. Electroporation is a physical technique which results in improved delivery of large molecules through the cell membrane. In the case of plasmid DNA, electroporation enhances both the uptake and expression of the delivered DNA. The skin is an attractive tissue for DNA vaccination in a clinical setting due to the accessibility of the target, the ease of monitoring, and most importantly the immunocompetent nature of the dermis. Electroporation in the skin has the benefit of being minimally invasive and generally well tolerated. Previous studies have determined that optimized electroporation parameters (such as electrical field intensity, pulse length, pulse width, and plasmid formulation) majorly impact the efficiency of DNA delivery to the skin. We provide an overview of DNA vaccination in skin and muscle. In addition, we detail a protocol for the successful intradermal electroporation of plasmid DNA to guinea pig skin, an excellent dermatological animal model. The work detailed here suggests that the technique is safe and effective and could be highly applicable to a clinical setting.

  20. Innate Immune Signaling by, and Genetic Adjuvants for DNA Vaccination.

    PubMed

    Kobiyama, Kouji; Jounai, Nao; Aoshi, Taiki; Tozuka, Miyuki; Takeshita, Fumihiko; Coban, Cevayir; Ishii, Ken J

    2013-01-01

    DNA vaccines can induce both humoral and cellular immune responses. Although some DNA vaccines are already licensed for infectious diseases in animals, they are not licensed for human use because the risk and benefit of DNA vaccines is still controversial. Indeed, in humans, the immunogenicity of DNA vaccines is lower than that of other traditional vaccines. To develop the use of DNA vaccines in the clinic, various approaches are in progress to enhance or improve the immunogenicity of DNA vaccines. Recent studies have shown that immunogenicity of DNA vaccines are regulated by innate immune responses via plasmid DNA recognition through the STING-TBK1 signaling cascade. Similarly, molecules that act as dsDNA sensors that activate innate immune responses through STING-TBK1 have been identified and used as genetic adjuvants to enhance DNA vaccine immunogenicity in mouse models. However, the mechanisms that induce innate immune responses by DNA vaccines are still unclear. In this review, we will discuss innate immune signaling upon DNA vaccination and genetic adjuvants of innate immune signaling molecules.

  1. The Web-Based DNA Vaccine Database DNAVaxDB and Its Usage for Rational DNA Vaccine Design.

    PubMed

    Racz, Rebecca; He, Yongqun

    2016-01-01

    A DNA vaccine is a vaccine that uses a mammalian expression vector to express one or more protein antigens and is administered in vivo to induce an adaptive immune response. Since the 1990s, a significant amount of research has been performed on DNA vaccines and the mechanisms behind them. To meet the needs of the DNA vaccine research community, we created DNAVaxDB ( http://www.violinet.org/dnavaxdb ), the first Web-based database and analysis resource of experimentally verified DNA vaccines. All the data in DNAVaxDB, which includes plasmids, antigens, vaccines, and sources, is manually curated and experimentally verified. This chapter goes over the detail of DNAVaxDB system and shows how the DNA vaccine database, combined with the Vaxign vaccine design tool, can be used for rational design of a DNA vaccine against a pathogen, such as Mycobacterium bovis.

  2. Trial watch: DNA vaccines for cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Senovilla, Laura; Vacchelli, Erika; Garcia, Pauline; Eggermont, Alexander; Fridman, Wolf Hervé; Galon, Jérôme; Zitvogel, Laurence; Kroemer, Guido; Galluzzi, Lorenzo

    2013-04-01

    The foundation of modern vaccinology dates back to the 1790s, when the English physician Edward Jenner uncovered the tremendous medical potential of prophylactic vaccination. Jenner's work ignited a wave of nationwide vaccination campaigns abating the incidence of multiple life-threatening infectious diseases and culminating with the eradication of natural smallpox virus, which was definitively certified by the WHO in 1980. The possibility of using vaccines against cancer was first proposed at the end of the 19th century by Paul Ehrlich and William Coley. However, it was not until the 1990s that such a hypothesis began to be intensively investigated, following the realization that the immune system is not completely unresponsive to tumors and that neoplastic cells express immunogenic tumor-associated antigens (TAAs). Nowadays, anticancer vaccines are rapidly moving from the bench to the bedside, and a few prophylactic and therapeutic preparations have already been approved by FDA for use in humans. In this setting, one interesting approach is constituted by DNA vaccines, i.e., TAA-encoding circularized DNA constructs, often of bacterial origin, that are delivered to patients as such or by means of specific vectors, including (but not limited to) liposomal preparations, nanoparticles, bacteria and viruses. The administration of DNA vaccines is most often performed via the intramuscular or subcutaneous route and is expected to cause (1) the endogenous synthesis of the TAA by myocytes and/or resident antigen-presenting cells; (2) the presentation of TAA-derived peptides on the cell surface, in association with MHC class I molecules; and (3) the activation of potentially therapeutic tumor-specific immune responses. In this Trial Watch, we will summarize the results of recent clinical trials that have evaluated/are evaluating DNA vaccines as therapeutic interventions against cancer. PMID:23734328

  3. Recent Developments in Preclinical DNA Vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Okuda, Kenji; Wada, Yoshiyuki; Shimada, Masaru

    2014-01-01

    The advantages of genetic immunization of the new vaccine using plasmid DNAs are multifold. For example, it is easy to generate plasmid DNAs, increase their dose during the manufacturing process, and sterilize them. Furthermore, they can be stored for a long period of time upon stabilization, and their protein encoding sequences can be easily modified by employing various DNA-manipulation techniques. Although DNA vaccinations strongly increase Th1-mediated immune responses in animals, several problems persist. One is about their weak immunogenicity in humans. To overcome this problem, various genetic adjuvants, electroporation, and prime-boost methods have been developed preclinically, which are reviewed here. PMID:26344468

  4. Influenza Plasmid DNA Vaccines: Progress and Prospects.

    PubMed

    Bicho, Diana; Queiroz, João António; Tomaz, Cândida Teixeira

    2015-01-01

    Current influenza vaccines have long been used to fight flu infectious; however, recent advances highlight the importance of produce new alternatives. Even though traditional influenza vaccines are safe and usually effective, they need to be uploaded every year to anticipate circulating flu viruses. This limitation together with the use of embryonated chicken eggs as the substrate for vaccine production, is time-consuming and could involve potential biohazards in growth of new virus strains. Plasmid DNA produced by prokaryote microorganisms and encoding foreign proteins had emerged as a promising therapeutic tool. This technology allows the expression of a gene of interest by eukaryotic cells in order to induce protective immune responses against the pathogen of interest. In this review, we discuss the strategies to choose the best DNA vaccine to be applied in the treatment and prevention of influenza. Specifically, we give an update of influenza DNA vaccines developments, all involved techniques, their main characteristics, applicability and technical features to obtain the best option against influenza infections.

  5. Licensed DNA Vaccines against Infectious Hematopoietic Necrosis Virus (IHNV).

    PubMed

    Alonso, Marta; Leong, Jo-Ann C

    2013-04-01

    This article reviews some of the recent patents on DNA vaccines against fish viruses, in particular against the novirhabdovirus infectious hematopoitic necrosis virus (IHNV). Although very effective in protecting fish against IHNV, only one DNA vaccine has been approved to date for use in Canada. In Europe and in US, its commercialization is restricted due to safety concerns.

  6. Current status of DNA vaccines in veterinary medicine.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, B R

    2000-09-15

    DNA vaccination entails administration of the DNA itself encoding antigen to direct synthesis of the antigen directly in the target organism. The target organism's immune system recognizes the antigen, and generates humoral (antibody)- and/or cell-mediated immune response. DNA vaccines afford numerous advantages over conventional vaccines, including ease of production, stability and transport. They overcome the need to cultivate dangerous infectious agents, and provide a possibility to vaccinate against multiple pathogens in a single shot. DNA vaccination is beginning to be explored for many pathogens of veterinary interest. The status of DNA vaccines in poultry, livestock and companion animals is reviewed here. While examples of DNA vaccines being tested in the veterinary field are not numerous, the early studies highlight the potential DNA vaccinology offers in veterinary medicine.

  7. A fusion DNA vaccine that targets antigen-presenting cells increases protection from viral challenge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deliyannis, Georgia; Boyle, Jefferey S.; Brady, Jamie L.; Brown, Lorena E.; Lew, Andrew M.

    2000-06-01

    Improving the immunological potency, particularly the Ab response, is a serious hurdle for the protective efficacy and hence broad application of DNA vaccines. We examined the immunogenicity and protective efficacy of a hemagglutinin-based influenza DNA vaccine that was targeted to antigen-presenting cells (APCs) by fusion to CTLA4. The targeted vaccine was shown to induce an accelerated and increased Ab response (as compared with those receiving the nontargeted control) that was predominated by IgG1 and recognized conformationally dependent viral epitopes. Moreover, mice receiving the APC-targeted DNA vaccine had significantly reduced viral titers (100-fold) after a nonlethal virus challenge. The increased protective efficacy was most likely because of increased Ab responses, as cytotoxic T lymphocyte responses were not enhanced. Targeting was demonstrated by direct binding studies of CTLA4 fusion proteins to the cognate ligand (B7; expressed on APCs in vivo). In addition, a targeted protein was detected at 4-fold higher levels in draining lymph nodes within 2-24 h of administration. Therefore, this study demonstrates that targeting DNA-encoded antigen to APCs results in enhanced immunity and strongly suggests that this approach may be useful in improving the protective efficacy of DNA vaccines.

  8. Evaluation of the protective immunogencity of the N, P, M, NV and G proteins of infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus in rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss using DNA vaccines

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Corbeil, S.; LaPatra, S.E.; Anderson, E.D.; Jones, J.; Vincent, B.; Hsu, Y.-L; Kurath, G.

    1999-01-01

    The protective immunogenicity of the nucleoprotein (N), phosphoprotein (P), matrix protein (M), non-virion protein (NV) and glycoprotein (G) of the rhabdovirus infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) was assessed in rainbow trout using DNA vaccine technology. DNA vaccines were produced by amplifying and cloning the viral genes in the plasmid pCDNA 3.1. The protective immunity elicited by each vaccine was evaluated through survival of immunized fry after challenge with live virus. Neutralizing antibody titers were also determined in vaccinated rainbow troutOncorhynchus mykiss fry (mean weight 2 g) and 150 g sockeye salmon Oncorhynchus nerka. The serum from the 150 g fish was also used in passive immunization studies with naïve fry. Our results showed that neither the internal structural proteins (N, P and M) nor the NV protein of IHNV induced protective immunity in fry or neutralizing antibodies in fry and 150 g fish when expressed by a DNA vaccine construct. The G protein, however, did confer significant protection in fry up to 80 d post-immunization and induced protective neutralizing antibodies. We are currently investigating the role of different arms of the fish immune system that contribute to the high level of protection against IHNV seen in vaccinated fish.

  9. Strategies and hurdles using DNA vaccines to fish.

    PubMed

    Hølvold, Linn B; Myhr, Anne I; Dalmo, Roy A

    2014-01-01

    DNA vaccinations against fish viral diseases as IHNV at commercial level in Canada against VHSV at experimental level are both success stories. DNA vaccination strategies against many other viral diseases have, however, not yet yielded sufficient results in terms of protection. There is an obvious need to combat many other viral diseases within aquaculture where inactivated vaccines fail. There are many explanations to why DNA vaccine strategies against other viral diseases fail to induce protective immune responses in fish. These obstacles include: 1) too low immunogenicity of the transgene, 2) too low expression of the transgene that is supposed to induce protection, 3) suboptimal immune responses, and 4) too high degradation rate of the delivered plasmid DNA. There are also uncertainties with regard distribution and degradation of DNA vaccines that may have implications for safety and regulatory requirements that need to be clarified. By combining plasmid DNA with different kind of adjuvants one can increase the immunogenicity of the transgene antigen - and perhaps increase the vaccine efficacy. By using molecular adjuvants with or without in combination with targeting assemblies one may expect different responses compared with naked DNA. This includes targeting of DNA vaccines to antigen presenting cells as a central factor in improving their potencies and efficacies by means of encapsulating the DNA vaccine in certain carriers systems that may increase transgene and MHC expression. This review will focus on DNA vaccine delivery, by the use of biodegradable PLGA particles as vehicles for plasmid DNA mainly in fish.

  10. DNA vaccination of poultry: The current status in 2015.

    PubMed

    Meunier, Marine; Chemaly, Marianne; Dory, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    DNA vaccination is a promising alternative strategy for developing new human and animal vaccines. The massive efforts made these past 25 years to increase the immunizing potential of this kind of vaccine are still ongoing. A relatively small number of studies concerning poultry have been published. Even though there is a need for new poultry vaccines, five parameters must nevertheless be taken into account for their development: the vaccine has to be very effective, safe, inexpensive, suitable for mass vaccination and able to induce immune responses in the presence of maternal antibodies (when appropriate). DNA vaccination should meet these requirements. This review describes studies in this field performed exclusively on birds (chickens, ducks and turkeys). No evaluations of avian DNA vaccine efficacy performed on mice as preliminary tests have been taken into consideration. The review first describes the state of the art for DNA vaccination in poultry: pathogens targeted, plasmids used and different routes of vaccine administration. Second, it presents strategies designed to improve DNA vaccine efficacy: influence of the route of administration, plasmid dose and age of birds on their first inoculation; increasing plasmid uptake by host cells; addition of immunomodulators; optimization of plasmid backbones and codon usage; association of vaccine antigens and finally, heterologous prime-boost regimens. The final part will indicate additional properties of DNA vaccines in poultry: fate of the plasmids upon inoculation, immunological considerations and the use of DNA vaccines for purposes other than preventing infectious diseases.

  11. Strategies and hurdles using DNA vaccines to fish

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    DNA vaccinations against fish viral diseases as IHNV at commercial level in Canada against VHSV at experimental level are both success stories. DNA vaccination strategies against many other viral diseases have, however, not yet yielded sufficient results in terms of protection. There is an obvious need to combat many other viral diseases within aquaculture where inactivated vaccines fail. There are many explanations to why DNA vaccine strategies against other viral diseases fail to induce protective immune responses in fish. These obstacles include: 1) too low immunogenicity of the transgene, 2) too low expression of the transgene that is supposed to induce protection, 3) suboptimal immune responses, and 4) too high degradation rate of the delivered plasmid DNA. There are also uncertainties with regard distribution and degradation of DNA vaccines that may have implications for safety and regulatory requirements that need to be clarified. By combining plasmid DNA with different kind of adjuvants one can increase the immunogenicity of the transgene antigen – and perhaps increase the vaccine efficacy. By using molecular adjuvants with or without in combination with targeting assemblies one may expect different responses compared with naked DNA. This includes targeting of DNA vaccines to antigen presenting cells as a central factor in improving their potencies and efficacies by means of encapsulating the DNA vaccine in certain carriers systems that may increase transgene and MHC expression. This review will focus on DNA vaccine delivery, by the use of biodegradable PLGA particles as vehicles for plasmid DNA mainly in fish. PMID:24552235

  12. Isolation and characterization of Scophthalmus maximus rhabdovirus.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qi-Ya; Tao, Jian-Jun; Gui, Lang; Zhou, Guang-Zhou; Ruan, Hong-Mei; Li, Zhen-Qiu; Gui, Jian-Fang

    2007-02-28

    A rhabdovirus associated with a lethal hemorrhagic disease in cultured turbot Scophthalmus maximus Linnaeus was isolated. The virus induced typical cytopathogenic effects (CPE) in 9 of 15 fish cell lines examined and was then propagated and isolated from infected carp leucocyte cells (CLC). Electron microscopy observations revealed that the negatively stained virions had a typical bullet-shaped morphology with one rounded end and one flat base end. The bullet-shaped morphology was more obvious and clear in ultrathin sections of infected cells. Experimental infections also indicated that the S. maximus rhabdovirus (SMRV) was not only a viral pathogen for cultured turbot, but also had the ability to infect other fish species, such as freshwater grass carp. A partial nucleotide sequence of the SMRV polymerase gene was determined by RT-PCR using 2 pairs of degenerate primers designed according to the conserved sequences of rhabdovirus polymerase genes. Homology analysis, amino acid sequence alignment, and phylogenetic relationship analysis of the partial SMRV polymerase sequence indicated that SMRV was genetically distinct from other rhabdoviruses. Sodium dodecyl sulphate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) analysis of the purified SMRV revealed 5 major structural proteins, and their molecular masses were estimated to be about 250, 58, 47, 42, and 28 kDa. Significant serological reactivity differences were also observed between SMRV and its nearest neighbor, spring viremia of carp virus (SVCV). The data suggest that SMRV is likely a novel fish rhabdovirus, although it is closely related to rhabdoviruses in the genus Vesiculovirus.

  13. HIV DNA Vaccine: Stepwise Improvements Make a Difference

    PubMed Central

    Felber, Barbara K.; Valentin, Antonio; Rosati, Margherita; Bergamaschi, Cristina; Pavlakis, George N.

    2014-01-01

    Inefficient DNA delivery methods and low expression of plasmid DNA have been major obstacles for the use of plasmid DNA as vaccine for HIV/AIDS. This review describes successful efforts to improve DNA vaccine methodology over the past ~30 years. DNA vaccination, either alone or in combination with other methods, has the potential to be a rapid, safe, and effective vaccine platform against AIDS. Recent clinical trials suggest the feasibility of its translation to the clinic. PMID:26344623

  14. Poly-L-lysine-coated nanoparticles: a potent delivery system to enhance DNA vaccine efficacy.

    PubMed

    Minigo, Gabriela; Scholzen, Anja; Tang, Choon K; Hanley, Jennifer C; Kalkanidis, Martha; Pietersz, Geoffrey A; Apostolopoulos, Vasso; Plebanski, Magdalena

    2007-01-26

    DNA formulations provide the basis for safe and cost efficient vaccines. However, naked plasmid DNA is only poorly immunogenic and new effective delivery strategies are needed to enhance the potency of DNA vaccines. In this study, we present a novel approach for the delivery of DNA vaccines using inert poly-L-lysine (PLL) coated polystyrene particles, which greatly enhance DNA immunogenicity. Intradermal injection of plasmid DNA encoding for chicken egg ovalbumin (OVA) complexed with PLL-coated polystyrene nanoparticles induced high levels of CD8 T cells as well as OVA-specific antibodies in C57BL/6 mice and furthermore inhibited tumour growth after challenge with the OVA expressing EG7 tumour cell line. Importantly, vaccine efficacy depended critically on the size of the particles used as well as on the presence of the PLL linker. Our data show that PLL-coated polystyrene nanoparticles of 0.05 microm but not 0.02 microm or 1.0 microm in diameter are highly effective for the delivery of DNA vaccines. PMID:17052812

  15. DNA vaccines against viral diseases of farmed fish.

    PubMed

    Evensen, Øystein; Leong, Jo-Ann C

    2013-12-01

    Immunization by an antigen-encoding DNA was approved for commercial sale in Canada against a Novirhabdovirus infection in fish. DNA vaccines have been particularly successful against the Novirhabdoviruses while there are reports on the efficacy against viral pathogens like infectious pancreatic necrosis virus, infectious salmon anemia virus, and lymphocystis disease virus and these are inferior to what has been attained for the novirhabdoviruses. Most recently, DNA vaccination of Penaeus monodon against white spot syndrome virus was reported. Research efforts are now focused on the development of more effective vectors for DNA vaccines, improvement of vaccine efficacy against various viral diseases of fish for which there is currently no vaccines available and provision of co-expression of viral antigen and immunomodulatory compounds. Scientists are also in the process of developing new delivery methods. While a DNA vaccine has been approved for commercial use in farmed salmon in Canada, it is foreseen that it is still a long way to go before a DNA vaccine is approved for use in farmed fish in Europe.

  16. DNA vaccines for poultry: the jump from theory to practice.

    PubMed

    Haygreen, Liz; Davison, Fred; Kaiser, Pete

    2005-02-01

    DNA vaccines could offer a solution to a number of problems faced by the poultry industry; they are relatively easy to manufacture, stable, potentially easy to administer, can overcome neonatal tolerance and the deleterious effects of maternal antibody, and do not cause disease pathology. Combined with this, in ovo vaccination offers the advantage of reduced labor costs, mass administration and the induction of an earlier immune response. Together, this list of advantages is impressive. However, this combined technology is still in its infancy and requires many improvements. The potential of CpG motifs, DNA vaccines and in ovo vaccination, however, can be observed by the increasing number of recent reports investigating their application in challenge experiments. CpG motifs have been demonstrated to be stimulatory both in vitro and in vivo. In addition, DNA vaccines have been successfully delivered via the in ovo route, albeit not yet through the amniotic fluid. Lastly, a recent report has demonstrated that a DNA vaccine against infectious bronchitis virus administered via in ovo vaccination, followed by live virus boost, can slightly improve on the protective effect induced by the live virus alone. Therefore, DNA vaccination via the in ovo route is promising and offers potential as a poultry vaccine, however, efficacy needs to be improved and the costs of production reduced before it is likely to be beneficial to the poultry industry in the long term.

  17. Targeting DNA vaccines to myeloid cells using a small peptide.

    PubMed

    Ye, Chunting; Choi, Jang Gi; Abraham, Sojan; Shankar, Premlata; Manjunath, N

    2015-01-01

    Targeting DNA vaccines to dendritic cells (DCs) greatly enhances immunity. Although several approaches have been used to target protein Ags to DCs, currently there is no method that targets DNA vaccines directly to DCs. Here, we show that a small peptide derived from the rabies virus glycoprotein fused to protamine residues (RVG-P) can target DNA to myeloid cells, including DCs, which results in enhanced humoral and T-cell responses. DCs targeted with a DNA vaccine encoding the immunodominant vaccinia B8R gene via RVG-P were able to restimulate vaccinia-specific memory T cells in vitro. Importantly, a single i.v. injection of B8R gene bound to RVG-P was able to prime a vaccinia-specific T-cell response that was able to rapidly clear a subsequent vaccinia challenge in mice. Moreover, delivery of DNA in DCs was enough to induce DC maturation and efficient Ag presentation without the need for adjuvants. Finally, immunization of mice with a DNA-vaccine encoding West Nile virus (WNV) prM and E proteins via RVG-P elicited high titers of WNV-neutralizing Abs that protected mice from lethal WNV challenge. Thus, RVG-P provides a reagent to target DNA vaccines to myeloid cells and elicit robust T-cell and humoral immune responses.

  18. DNAVaxDB: the first web-based DNA vaccine database and its data analysis.

    PubMed

    Racz, Rebecca; Li, Xinna; Patel, Mukti; Xiang, Zuoshuang; He, Yongqun

    2014-01-01

    Since the first DNA vaccine studies were done in the 1990s, thousands more studies have followed. Here we report the development and analysis of DNAVaxDB (http://www.violinet.org/dnavaxdb), the first publically available web-based DNA vaccine database that curates, stores, and analyzes experimentally verified DNA vaccines, DNA vaccine plasmid vectors, and protective antigens used in DNA vaccines. All data in DNAVaxDB are annotated from reliable resources, particularly peer-reviewed articles. Among over 140 DNA vaccine plasmids, some plasmids were more frequently used in one type of pathogen than others; for example, pCMVi-UB for G- bacterial DNA vaccines, and pCAGGS for viral DNA vaccines. Presently, over 400 DNA vaccines containing over 370 protective antigens from over 90 infectious and non-infectious diseases have been curated in DNAVaxDB. While extracellular and bacterial cell surface proteins and adhesin proteins were frequently used for DNA vaccine development, the majority of protective antigens used in Chlamydophila DNA vaccines are localized to the inner portion of the cell. The DNA vaccine priming, other vaccine boosting vaccination regimen has been widely used to induce protection against infection of different pathogens such as HIV. Parasitic and cancer DNA vaccines were also systematically analyzed. User-friendly web query and visualization interfaces are available in DNAVaxDB for interactive data search. To support data exchange, the information of DNA vaccines, plasmids, and protective antigens is stored in the Vaccine Ontology (VO). DNAVaxDB is targeted to become a timely and vital source of DNA vaccines and related data and facilitate advanced DNA vaccine research and development.

  19. Hepatitis E virus DNA vaccine elicits immunologic memory in mice.

    PubMed

    He, J; Hayes, C G; Binn, L N; Seriwatana, J; Vaughn, D W; Kuschner, R A; Innis, B L

    2001-01-01

    Injection of an expression vector pJHEV containing hepatitis E virus (HEV) structural protein open reading frame 2 gene generates a strong antibody response in BALB/c mice that can bind to and agglutinate HEV. In this study, we tested for immunologic memory in immunized mice whose current levels of IgG to HEV were low or undetectable despite 3 doses of HEV DNA vaccine 18 months earlier. Mice previously vaccinated with vector alone were controls. All mice were administered a dose of HEV DNA vaccine to simulate an infectious challenge with HEV. The endpoint was IgG to HEV determined by ELISA. Ten days after the vaccine dose, 5 of 9 mice previously immunized with HEV DNA vaccine had a slight increase in IgG to HEV. By 40 days after the vaccine dose, the level of IgG to HEV had increased dramatically in all 9 mice (108-fold increase in geometric mean titer). In contrast, no control mice became seropositive. These results indicate that mice vaccinated with 3 doses of HEV DNA vaccine retain immunologic memory. In response to a small antigenic challenge delivered as DNA, possibly less than delivered by a human infective dose of virus, mice with memory were able to generate high levels of antibody in less time than the usual incubation period of hepatitis E. We speculate that this type of response could protect a human from overt disease.

  20. Preclinical and clinical development of DNA vaccines for prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Colluru, V T; Johnson, Laura E; Olson, Brian M; McNeel, Douglas G

    2016-04-01

    Prostate cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer in the United States. It is also the second leading cause of cancer-related death in men, making it one of the largest public health concerns today. Prostate cancer is an ideal disease for immunotherapies because of the generally slow progression, the dispensability of the target organ in the patient population, and the availability of several tissue-specific antigens. As such, several therapeutic vaccines have entered clinical trials, with one autologous cellular vaccine (sipuleucel-T) recently gaining Food and Drug Administration approval after demonstrating overall survival benefit in randomized phase III clinical trials. DNA-based vaccines are safe, economical, alternative "off-the-shelf" approaches that have undergone extensive evaluation in preclinical models. In fact, the first vaccine approved in the United States for the treatment of cancer was a DNA vaccine for canine melanoma. Several prostate cancer-specific DNA vaccines have been developed in the last decade and have shown promising results in early phase clinical trials. This review summarizes anticancer human DNA vaccine trials, with a focus on those conducted for prostate cancer. We conclude with an outline of special considerations important for the development and successful translation of DNA vaccines from the laboratory to the clinic.

  1. Using Plasmids as DNA Vaccines for Infectious Diseases.

    PubMed

    Tregoning, John S; Kinnear, Ekaterina

    2014-12-01

    DNA plasmids can be used to induce a protective (or therapeutic) immune response by delivering genes encoding vaccine antigens. That naked DNA (without the refinement of coat proteins or host evasion systems) can cross from outside the cell into the nucleus and be expressed is particularly remarkable given the sophistication of the immune system in preventing infection by pathogens. As a result of the ease, low cost, and speed of custom gene synthesis, DNA vaccines dangle a tantalizing prospect of the next wave of vaccine technology, promising individual designer vaccines for cancer or mass vaccines with a rapid response time to emerging pandemics. There is considerable enthusiasm for the use of DNA vaccination as an approach, but this enthusiasm should be tempered by the successive failures in clinical trials to induce a potent immune response. The technology is evolving with the development of improved delivery systems that increase expression levels, particularly electroporation and the incorporation of genetically encoded adjuvants. This review will introduce some key concepts in the use of DNA plasmids as vaccines, including how the DNA enters the cell and is expressed, how it induces an immune response, and a summary of clinical trials with DNA vaccines. The review also explores the advances being made in vector design, delivery, formulation, and adjuvants to try to realize the promise of this technology for new vaccines. If the immunogenicity and expression barriers can be cracked, then DNA vaccines may offer a step change in mass vaccination.

  2. DNA vaccines, electroporation and their applications in cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Lee, Si-Hyeong; Danishmalik, Sayyed Nilofar; Sin, Jeong-Im

    2015-01-01

    Numerous animal studies and recent clinical studies have shown that electroporation-delivered DNA vaccines can elicit robust Ag-specific CTL responses and reduce disease severity. However, cancer antigens are generally poorly immunogenic, requiring special conditions for immune response induction. To date, many different approaches have been used to elicit Ag-specific CTL and anti-neoplastic responses to DNA vaccines against cancer. In vivo electroporation is one example, whereas others include DNA manipulation, xenogeneic antigen use, immune stimulatory molecule and immune response regulator application, DNA prime-boost immunization strategy use and different DNA delivery methods. These strategies likely increase the immunogenicity of cancer DNA vaccines, thereby contributing to cancer eradication. However, cancer cells are heterogeneous and might become CTL-resistant. Thus, understanding the CTL resistance mechanism(s) employed by cancer cells is critical to develop counter-measures for this immune escape. In this review, the use of electroporation as a DNA delivery method, the strategies used to enhance the immune responses, the cancer antigens that have been tested, and the escape mechanism(s) used by tumor cells are discussed, with a focus on the progress of clinical trials using cancer DNA vaccines.

  3. Bacillus subtilis spores as adjuvants for DNA vaccines.

    PubMed

    Aps, Luana R M M; Diniz, Mariana O; Porchia, Bruna F M M; Sales, Natiely S; Moreno, Ana Carolina R; Ferreira, Luís C S

    2015-05-11

    Recently, Bacillus subtilis spores were shown to be endowed with strong adjuvant capacity when co-administered with purified antigenic proteins. In the present study we assessed whether spores possess adjuvant properties when combined with DNA vaccines. We showed that B. subtilis spores promoted the activation of dendritic cells in vitro and induced migration of pro-inflammatory cells after parenteral administration to mice. Likewise, co-administration of spores with a DNA vaccine encoding the human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV-16) E7 protein enhanced the activation of antigen-specific CD8(+) T cell responses in vivo. Mice immunized with the DNA vaccine admixed with spores presented a protective immunity increase to previously implanted tumor cells, capable of expressing HPV-16 oncoproteins. Finally, we observed that the adjuvant effect can vary accordingly to the number of co-administered spores which may be ascribed with the ability to induce. Collectively, the present results demonstrate for the first time that B. subtilis spores can also confer adjuvant effects to DNA vaccines.

  4. Distribution and variation of NV genes in fish rhabdoviruses

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kurath, G.; Higman, K.H.; Bjorklund, H.V.

    1997-01-01

    The fish rhabdovirus infectious haematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) contains a non-virion (NV) gene between the glycoprotein (G) and polymerase (L) genes on its RNA genome. The present study investigated three other fish rhabdovirus genomes and found that the NV gene of hirame rhabdovirus is closely related to the NV of IHNV, whereas the viral haemorrhagic septicemia NV gene showed evidence of significant divergence. Most importantly, spring viraemia of carp virus, the only vesiculovirus-like fish rhabdovirus examined, did not have an NV gene at its genomic RNA G-L junction. These results suggest that the presence of an NV gene is characteristic of the unassigned fish rhabdovirus subgroup previously classified as lyssaviruses, and that the NV gene is not essential for replication in fish cells per se, since it is absent in a vesiculovirus-like fish rhabdovirus.

  5. Analysis of DNA-vaccinated fish reveals viral antigen in muscle, kidney and thymus, and transient histopathologic changes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Garver, K.A.; Conway, C.M.; Elliott, D.G.; Kurath, G.

    2005-01-01

    A highly efficacious DNA vaccine against a fish rhabdovirus, infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV), was used in a systematic study to analyze vaccine tissue distribution, persistence, expression patterns, and histopathologic effects. Vaccine plasmid pIHNw-G, containing the gene for the viral glycoprotein, was detected immediately after intramuscular injection in all tissues analyzed, including blood, but at later time points was found primarily in muscle tissue, where it persisted to 90 days. Glycoprotein expression was detected in muscle, kidney, and thymus tissues, with levels peaking at 14 days and becoming undetectable by 28 days. Histologic examination revealed no vaccine-specific pathologic changes at the standard effective dose of 0.1 ??g DNA per fish, but at a high dose of 50 ??g an increased inflammatory response was evident. Transient damage associated with needle injection was localized in muscle tissue, but by 90 days after vaccination no damage was detected in any tissue, indicating the vaccine to be safe and well tolerated. ?? Springer Science+Business Media, Inc. 2005.

  6. Identification of genetically modified Maraba virus as an oncolytic rhabdovirus.

    PubMed

    Brun, Jan; McManus, Dan; Lefebvre, Charles; Hu, Kang; Falls, Theresa; Atkins, Harold; Bell, John C; McCart, J Andrea; Mahoney, Douglas; Stojdl, David F

    2010-08-01

    To expand our current array of safe and potent oncolytic viruses, we screened a variety of wild-type (WT) rhabdoviruses against a panel of tumor cell lines. Our screen identified a number of viruses with varying degrees of killing activity. Maraba virus was the most potent of these strains. We built a recombinant system for the Maraba virus platform, engineered a series of attenuating mutations to expand its therapeutic index, and tested their potency in vitro and in vivo. A double mutant (MG1) strain containing both G protein (Q242R) and M protein (L123W) mutations attenuated Maraba virus in normal diploid cell lines, yet appeared to be hypervirulent in cancer cells. This selective attenuation was mediated through interferon (IFN)-dependent and -independent mechanisms. Finally, the Maraba MG1 strain had a 100-fold greater maximum tolerable dose (MTD) than WT Maraba in vivo and resulted in durable cures when systemically administered in syngeneic and xenograft models. In summary, we report a potent new oncolytic rhabdovirus platform with unique tumor-selective attenuating mutations.

  7. Immunotherapy with a posttranscriptionally modified DNA vaccine induces complete protection against metastatic neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Pertl, Ursula; Wodrich, Harald; Ruehlmann, J Michael; Gillies, Stephen D; Lode, Holger N; Reisfeld, Ralph A

    2003-01-15

    The successful induction of a T-cell-mediated tumor-protective immunity against poorly immunogenic malignancies remains a major challenge for cancer immunotherapy. We achieved this by immunization with a tyrosine hydroxylase (mTH)-based DNA vaccine, enhanced with the posttranscriptional regulatory acting RNA element (WPRE), derived from woodchuck hepatitis virus in combination with an antibody-cytokine fusion protein (ch14.18-IL-2) that targets interleukin-2 (IL-2) to the tumor microenvironment. This DNA vaccine mTH-WPRE was carried by attenuated Salmonella typhimurium and applied by oral gavage in a mouse model of neuroblastoma. Mice immunized with the mTH-WPRE vaccine, and which additionally received a boost with suboptimal doses of ch14.18-IL-2, were completely protected against hepatic neuroblastoma metastases. In contrast, all controls presented with disseminated metastases. Both T-cell and natural killer (NK) cell-dependent mechanisms were involved in the induction of a systemic tumor-protective immunity. Thus, up-regulation of interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) expression in CD8(+) T cells occurred only in those animals that received the mTH-WPRE vaccine plus the ch14.18-IL-2 boost. Up-regulation of this proinflammatory cytokine was not observed in mice immunized with mTH-WPRE vaccine alone. A role for NK cells was indicated by the complete abrogation of systemic tumor-protective immunity in all animals that were depleted of NK cells in vivo. Taken together, these data demonstrate that immunization with a posttranscriptionally enhanced DNA vaccine encoding the WPRE sequence, combined with a boost of the ch14.18-IL-2 fusion protein, completely protects against hepatic metastases in a murine model of neuroblastoma and therefore may lead to a new strategy for immunotherapy and prevention of metastatic neuroblastoma.

  8. Sublingual Immunization of Trivalent Human Papillomavirus DNA Vaccine in Baculovirus Nanovector for Protection against Vaginal Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hee-Jung; Cho, Hansam; Kim, Mi-Gyeong; Heo, Yoon-Ki; Cho, Yeondong; Gwon, Yong-Dae; Park, Ki Hoon; Jin, Hyerim; Kim, Jinyoung; Oh, Yu-Kyoung; Kim, Young Bong

    2015-01-01

    Here, we report the immunogenicity of a sublingually delivered, trivalent human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA vaccine encapsidated in a human endogenous retrovirus (HERV) envelope-coated, nonreplicable, baculovirus nanovector. The HERV envelope-coated, nonreplicable, baculovirus-based DNA vaccine, encoding HPV16L1, -18L1 and -58L1 (AcHERV-triHPV), was constructed and sublingually administered to mice without adjuvant. Following sublingual (SL) administration, AcHERV-triHPV was absorbed and distributed throughout the body. At 15 minutes and 1 day post-dose, the distribution of AcHERV-triHPV to the lung was higher than that to other tissues. At 30 days post-dose, the levels of AcHERV-triHPV had diminished throughout the body. Six weeks after the first of three doses, 1×108 copies of SL AcHERV-triHPV induced HPV type-specific serum IgG and neutralizing antibodies to a degree comparable to that of IM immunization with 1×109 copies. AcHERV-triHPV induced HPV type-specific vaginal IgA titers in a dose-dependent manner. SL immunization with 1×1010 copies of AcHERV-triHPV induced Th1 and Th2 cellular responses comparable to IM immunization with 1×109 copies. Molecular imaging revealed that SL AcHERV-triHPV in mice provided complete protection against vaginal challenge with HPV16, HPV18, and HPV58 pseudoviruses. These results support the potential of SL immunization using multivalent DNA vaccine in baculovirus nanovector for induction of mucosal, systemic, and cellular immune responses. PMID:25789464

  9. A novel fish rhabdovirus from sweden is closely related to the Finnish rhabdovirus 903/87.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Tove; Ostman-Myllyoja, Lillemor; Hellström, Anders; Martelius, Suzanne; Olesen, Niels Jørgen; Björklund, Harry

    2002-10-01

    A novel rhabdovirus, preliminary designated as the Sea trout rhabdovirus 28/97 (STRV 28/97), was isolated from sea trout (Salmo trutta trutta) in Sweden in 1996. The fish showed central nervous symptoms, and at the autopsy petechial bleedings in the mesenteric fat were visible. STRV 28/97 was shown to be serologically related to the vesiculotype rhabdovirus 903/87 isolated from brown trout (Salmo trutta lacustris) in Finland [1,3]. The sequences for the nucleocapsid protein, phosphoprotein, matrix protein, glycoprotein and beginning of the polymerase protein of STRV 28/97 were determined. At the amino acid level the genes were over 97% similar to virus 903/87. The nucleocapsid proteins, glycoproteins and beginning of the polymerase protein of STRV 28/97 and virus 903/87 were clustered with the vesiculoviruses and the phosphoproteins close to the vesiculoviruses in protein parsimony analysis. The matrix proteins formed a distinct clade in protein parsimony analysis.

  10. Current trends in separation of plasmid DNA vaccines: a review.

    PubMed

    Ghanem, Ashraf; Healey, Robert; Adly, Frady G

    2013-01-14

    Plasmid DNA (pDNA)-based vaccines offer more rapid avenues for development and production if compared to those of conventional virus-based vaccines. They do not rely on time- or labour-intensive cell culture processes and allow greater flexibility in shipping and storage. Stimulating antibodies and cell-mediated components of the immune system are considered as some of the major advantages associated with the use of pDNA vaccines. This review summarizes the current trends in the purification of pDNA vaccines for practical and analytical applications. Special attention is paid to chromatographic techniques aimed at reducing the steps of final purification, post primary isolation and intermediate recovery, in order to reduce the number of steps necessary to reach a purified end product from the crude plasmid.

  11. Control of HPV-associated tumors by innovative therapeutic HPV DNA vaccine in the absence of CD4+ T cells

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) infections are particularly problematic for HIV + and solid organ transplant patients with compromised CD4+ T cell-dependent immunity as they produce more severe and progressive disease compared to healthy individuals. There are no specific treatments for chronic HPV infection, resulting in an urgent unmet need for a modality that is safe and effective for both immunocompromised and otherwise normal patients with recalcitrant disease. DNA vaccination is attractive because it avoids the risks of administration of live vectors to immunocompromised patients, and can induce potent HPV-specific cytotoxic T cell responses. We have developed a DNA vaccine (pNGVL4a-hCRTE6E7L2) encoding calreticulin (CRT) fused to E6, E7 and L2 proteins of HPV-16, the genotype associated with approximately 90% vaginal, vulvar, anal, penile and oropharyngeal HPV-associated cancers and the majority of cervical cancers. Administration of the DNA vaccine by intramuscular (IM) injection followed by electroporation induced significantly greater HPV-specific immune responses compared to IM injection alone or mixed with alum. Furthermore, pNGVL4a-hCRTE6E7L2 DNA vaccination via electroporation of mice carrying an intravaginal HPV-16 E6/E7-expressing syngeneic tumor demonstrated more potent therapeutic effects than IM vaccination alone. Of note, administration of the DNA vaccine by IM injection followed by electroporation elicited potent E6 and E7-specific CD8+ T cell responses and antitumor effects despite CD4+ T cell-depletion, although no antibody response was detected. While CD4+ T cell-depletion did reduce the E6 and E7-specific CD8+ T cell response, it remained sufficient to prevent subcutaneous tumor growth and to eliminate circulating tumor cells in a model of metastatic HPV-16+ cancer. Thus, the antibody response was CD4-dependent, whereas CD4+ T cell help enhanced the E6/E7-specific CD8+ T cell immunity, but was not required. Taken together, our data suggest that

  12. Prophylactic and therapeutic DNA vaccines against Chagas disease.

    PubMed

    Arce-Fonseca, Minerva; Rios-Castro, Martha; Carrillo-Sánchez, Silvia del Carmen; Martínez-Cruz, Mariana; Rodríguez-Morales, Olivia

    2015-01-01

    Chagas disease is a zoonosis caused by Trypanosoma cruzi in which the most affected organ is the heart. Conventional chemotherapy has a very low effectiveness; despite recent efforts, there is currently no better or more effective treatment available. DNA vaccines provide a new alternative for both prevention and treatment of a variety of infectious disorders, including Chagas disease. Recombinant DNA technology has allowed some vaccines to be developed using recombinant proteins or virus-like particles capable of inducing both a humoral and cellular specific immune response. This type of immunization has been successfully used in preclinical studies and there are diverse models for viral, bacterial and/or parasitic diseases, allergies, tumors and other diseases. Therefore, several research groups have been given the task of designing a DNA vaccine against experimental infection with T. cruzi. In this review we explain what DNA vaccines are and the most recent studies that have been done to develop them with prophylactic or therapeutic purposes against Chagas disease.

  13. Enhancement of DNA vaccine efficacy by intracellular targeting strategies.

    PubMed

    Freitas, Elisabete Borges; Henriques, Ana Margarida; Fevereiro, Miguel; Prazeres, Duarte Miguel; Monteiro, Gabriel Amaro

    2014-01-01

    Immune response against an encoded antigenic protein can be elicited by including targeting sequences to DNA vaccines that promote protein sorting to processing pathways, related with antigen presentation by major histocompatibility complexes (MHC). Candidate DNA vaccines coding for neuraminidase 3 of the avian influenza virus were designed to encode different sequences that direct the protein to specific cellular compartments such as endoplasmic reticulum (i.e., adenovirus E1A), lysosomes (i.e., LAMP), and the combination of protein targeting to the endoplasmic reticulum and lysosome (i.e., E1A-LAMP). The DNA vaccine prototypes were engineered by biomolecular techniques and subsequently produced in E. coli cells. The biological activity of the vaccines was tested firstly in vitro, in Chinese hamster ovary cells, through flow cytometry and real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis. Then, an essential in vivo study was performed in chickens, in order to evaluate the efficacy of DNA prototype vaccines, by measuring the antibody production by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay.

  14. Daedalic DNA vaccination against self antigens as a treatment for chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yuan Min; Zhou, Jimmy Jianheng; Wang, Ya; Watson, Debbie; Zhang, Geoff Yu; Hu, Min; Wu, Huiling; Zheng, Guoping; Wang, Yiping; Durkan, Anne M; Harris, David CH; Alexander, Stephen I

    2013-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a major cause of death and morbidity in Australia and worldwide. DNA vaccination has been used for targeting foreign antigens to induce immune responses and prevent autoimmune disease, viral infection and cancer. However, the use of DNA vaccination has been restricted by a limited ability to induce strong immune responses, especially against self-antigens which are limited by mechanisms of self-tolerance. Furthermore, there have been few studies on the potential of DNA vaccination in chronic inflammatory diseases, including CKD. We have established strategies of DNA vaccination targeting specific self-antigens in the immune system including co-stimulatory pathways, T cell receptors and chemokine molecules, which have been effective in protecting against the development of CKD in a variety of animal models. In particular, we find that the efficacy of DNA vaccination is improved by dendritic cell (DC) targeting and can protect against animal models of autoimmune nephritis mimicking human membranous nephropathy. In this review, we summarize several approaches that have been tested to improve the efficacy of DNA vaccination in CKD models, including enhanced DNA vaccine delivery methods, DNA vaccine modifications and new molecular targets for DNA vaccination. Finally, we discuss the specific application of DNA vaccination for preventing and treating CKD. PMID:23412421

  15. Structural insights into the rhabdovirus transcription/replication complex.

    PubMed

    Ivanov, Ivan; Yabukarski, Filip; Ruigrok, Rob W H; Jamin, Marc

    2011-12-01

    The rhabdoviruses have a non-segmented single stranded negative-sense RNA genome. Their multiplication in a host cell requires three viral proteins in addition to the viral RNA genome. The nucleoprotein (N) tightly encapsidates the viral RNA, and the N-RNA complex serves as the template for both transcription and replication. The viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase is a two subunit complex that consists of a large subunit, L, and a non-catalytic cofactor, the phosphoprotein, P. P also acts as a chaperone of nascent RNA-free N by forming a N(0)-P complex that prevents N from binding to cellular RNAs and from polymerizing in the absence of RNA. Here, we discuss the recent molecular and structural studies of individual components and multi-molecular complexes that are involved in the transcription/replication complex of these viruses with regard to their implication in viral transcription and replication.

  16. Poly(2-aminoethyl methacrylate) with well-defined chain-length for DNA vaccine delivery to dendritic cells

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Weihang; Panus, David; Palumbo, R. Noelle; Tang, Rupei; Wang, Chun

    2011-01-01

    Poly(2-aminoethyl methacrylate) (PAEM) homopolymers with defined chain-length and narrow molecular weight distribution were synthesized using atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP), and a comprehensive study was conducted to evaluate the colloidal properties of PAEM/plasmid DNA polyplexes, the uptake and subcellular trafficking of polyplexes in antigen-presenting dendritic cells (DCs), and the biological performance of PAEM as a potential DNA vaccine carrier. PAEM of different chain-length (45, 75 and 150 repeating units) showed varying strength in condensing plasmid DNA into narrowly dispersed nanoparticles with very low cytotoxicity. Longer polymer chain-length resulted in higher levels of overall cellular uptake and nuclear uptake of plasmid DNA, but shorter polymer chains favored intracellular and intra-nuclear release of free plasmid from the polyplexes. Despite its simple chemical structure, PAEM transfected DCs very efficiently in vitro in media with or without serum and led to phenotypic maturation of DCs. When a model antigen-encoding ovalbumin plasmid was used, transfected DCs stimulated the activation of naïve CD8+ T cells to produce high levels of interferon-γ. The efficiency of transfection, DC maturation, and CD8+ T cell activation showed varying degrees of polymer chain-length dependence. These structurally defined cationic polymers may have much potential as efficient DNA vaccine carriers and immunostimulatory adjuvants. They may also serve as a model material system for elucidating structural and intracellular mechanisms of polymer-mediated DNA vaccine delivery. PMID:22082257

  17. Survivin minigene DNA vaccination is effective against neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Fest, Stefan; Huebener, Nicole; Bleeke, Matthias; Durmus, Tahir; Stermann, Alexander; Woehler, Anja; Baykan, Bianca; Zenclussen, Ana C; Michalsky, Elke; Jaeger, Ines S; Preissner, Robert; Hohn, Oliver; Weixler, Silke; Gaedicke, Gerhard; Lode, Holger N

    2009-07-01

    The inhibitor of apoptosis protein survivin is highly expressed in neuroblastoma (NB) and survivin-specific T cells were identified in Stage 4 patients. Therefore, we generated a novel survivin minigene DNA vaccine (pUS-high) encoding exclusively for survivin-derived peptides with superior MHC class I (H2-K(k)) binding affinities and tested its efficacy to suppress tumor growth and metastases in a syngeneic NB mouse model. Vaccination was performed by oral gavage of attenuated Salmonella typhimurium SL7207 carrying pUS-high. Mice receiving the pUS-high in the prophylactic setting presented a 48-52% reduction in s.c. tumor volume, weight and liver metastasis level in contrast to empty vector controls. This response was as effective as a survivin full-length vaccine and was associated with an increased target cell lysis, increased presence of CD8(+) T-cells at the primary tumor site and enhanced production of proinflammatory cytokines by systemic CD8(+) T cells. Furthermore, depletion of CD8(+) but not CD4(+) T-cells completely abrogated the pUS-high mediated primary tumor growth suppression, demonstrating a CD8(+) T-cell mediated effect. Therapeutic vaccination with pUS-high led to complete NB eradication in over 50% of immunized mice and surviving mice showed an over 80% reduction in primary tumor growth upon rechallenge in contrast to controls. In summary, survivin-based DNA vaccination is effective against NB and the rational minigene design provides a promising approach to circumvent potentially hazardous effects of using full length antiapoptotic genes as DNA vaccines.

  18. Immunogenicity of candidate chimeric DNA vaccine against tuberculosis and leishmaniasis.

    PubMed

    Dey, Ayan; Kumar, Umesh; Sharma, Pawan; Singh, Sarman

    2009-08-13

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Leishmania donovani are important intracellular pathogens, especially in Indian context. In India and other South East Asian countries, both these infections are highly endemic and in about 20% cases co-infection of these pathogens is reported. For both these pathogens cell mediated immunity plays most important role. The available treatment of these infections is either prolonged or cumbersome or it is ineffective in controlling the outbreaks and spread. Therefore, potentiation of a common host defense mechanism can be used to prevent both the infections simultaneously. In this study we have developed a novel chimeric DNA vaccine candidate comprising the esat-6 gene of M. tuberculosis and kinesin motor domain gene of L. donovani. After developing this novel chimera, its immunogenicity was studied in mouse model. The immune response was compared with individual constructs of esat-6 and kinesin motor domain. The results showed that immunization with chimeric DNA vaccine construct resulted in stronger IFN-gamma and IL-2 response against kinesin (3012+/-102 and 367.5+/-8.92pg/ml) and ESAT-6 (1334+/-46.5 and 245.1+/-7.72pg/ml) in comparison to the individual vaccine constructs. The reciprocal immune response (IFN-gamma and IL-2) against individual construct was lower (kinesin motor domain: 1788+/-36.48 and 341.8+/-9.801pg/ml and ESAT-6: 867.0+/-47.23 and 170.8+/-4.578pg/ml, respectively). The results also suggest that using the chimeric construct both proteins yielded a reciprocal adjuvant affect over each other as the IFN-gamma production against chimera vaccination is statistically significant (p<0.0001) than individual construct vaccination. From this pilot study we could envisage that the chimeric DNA vaccine construct may offer an attractive strategy in controlling co-infection of leishmaniasis and tuberculosis and have important implication in future vaccine design. PMID:19559111

  19. Immunogenicity of candidate chimeric DNA vaccine against tuberculosis and leishmaniasis.

    PubMed

    Dey, Ayan; Kumar, Umesh; Sharma, Pawan; Singh, Sarman

    2009-08-13

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Leishmania donovani are important intracellular pathogens, especially in Indian context. In India and other South East Asian countries, both these infections are highly endemic and in about 20% cases co-infection of these pathogens is reported. For both these pathogens cell mediated immunity plays most important role. The available treatment of these infections is either prolonged or cumbersome or it is ineffective in controlling the outbreaks and spread. Therefore, potentiation of a common host defense mechanism can be used to prevent both the infections simultaneously. In this study we have developed a novel chimeric DNA vaccine candidate comprising the esat-6 gene of M. tuberculosis and kinesin motor domain gene of L. donovani. After developing this novel chimera, its immunogenicity was studied in mouse model. The immune response was compared with individual constructs of esat-6 and kinesin motor domain. The results showed that immunization with chimeric DNA vaccine construct resulted in stronger IFN-gamma and IL-2 response against kinesin (3012+/-102 and 367.5+/-8.92pg/ml) and ESAT-6 (1334+/-46.5 and 245.1+/-7.72pg/ml) in comparison to the individual vaccine constructs. The reciprocal immune response (IFN-gamma and IL-2) against individual construct was lower (kinesin motor domain: 1788+/-36.48 and 341.8+/-9.801pg/ml and ESAT-6: 867.0+/-47.23 and 170.8+/-4.578pg/ml, respectively). The results also suggest that using the chimeric construct both proteins yielded a reciprocal adjuvant affect over each other as the IFN-gamma production against chimera vaccination is statistically significant (p<0.0001) than individual construct vaccination. From this pilot study we could envisage that the chimeric DNA vaccine construct may offer an attractive strategy in controlling co-infection of leishmaniasis and tuberculosis and have important implication in future vaccine design.

  20. Intramuscular DNA vaccination protocols mediated by electric fields.

    PubMed

    Chiarella, Pieranna; Signori, Emanuela

    2014-01-01

    Vaccination is historically one of the most important methods for preventing infectious diseases in humans and animals. New insights in the biology of the immune system allow a more rational design of vaccines, and new vaccination strategies are emerging. DNA vaccines have been proposed as a promising approach for introducing foreign antigens into the host for inducing protective immunity against infectious and cancer diseases. Nevertheless, because of their poor immunogenicity, plasmid DNA vaccination strategies need further implementations. Recent data suggest electrotransfer as a useful tool to improve DNA-based vaccination protocols, being able to stimulate both the humoral and cellular immune responses. In preclinical trials, gene electrotransfer is successfully used in prime-boost combination protocols and its tolerability and safety has been demonstrated also in Phase I clinical trials. In this chapter, we report a short comment supporting electrotransfer as an effective strategy to improve DNA-based vaccination protocols and describe the vaccination procedures by plasmid DNA in combination with electrotransfer and hyaluronidase pretreatment in use in our laboratory.

  1. Transposon leads to contamination of clinical pDNA vaccine.

    PubMed

    van der Heijden, I; Gomez-Eerland, R; van den Berg, J H; Oosterhuis, K; Schumacher, T N; Haanen, J B A G; Beijnen, J H; Nuijen, B

    2013-07-11

    We report an unexpected contamination during clinical manufacture of a Human Papilomavirus (HPV) 16 E6 encoding plasmid DNA (pDNA) vaccine, with a transposon originating from the Escherichia coli DH5 host cell genome. During processing, presence of this transposable element, insertion sequence 2 (IS2) in the plasmid vector was not noticed until quality control of the bulk pDNA vaccine when results of restriction digestion, sequencing, and CGE analysis were clearly indicative for the presence of a contaminant. Due to the very low level of contamination, only an insert-specific PCR method was capable of tracing back the presence of the transposon in the source pDNA and master cell bank (MCB). Based on the presence of an uncontrolled contamination with unknown clinical relevance, the product was rejected for clinical use. In order to prevent costly rejection of clinical material, both in-process controls and quality control methods must be sensitive enough to detect such a contamination as early as possible, i.e. preferably during plasmid DNA source generation, MCB production and ultimately during upstream processing. However, as we have shown that contamination early in the process development pipeline (source pDNA, MCB) can be present below limits of detection of generally applied analytical methods, the introduction of "engineered" or transposon-free host cells seems the only 100% effective solution to avoid contamination with movable elements and should be considered when searching for a suitable host cell-vector combination. PMID:23707695

  2. Genomic sequence of mandarin fish rhabdovirus with an unusual small non-transcriptional ORF.

    PubMed

    Tao, Jian-Jun; Zhou, Guang-Zhou; Gui, Jian-Fang; Zhang, Qi-Ya

    2008-03-01

    The complete genome of mandarin fish Siniperca chuatsi rhabdovirus (SCRV) was cloned and sequenced. It comprises 11,545 nucleotides and contains five genes encoding the nucleoprotein N, the phosphoprotein P, the matrix protein M, the glycoprotein G, and the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase protein L. At the 3' and 5' termini of SCRV genome, leader and trailer sequences show inverse complementarity. The N, P, M and G proteins share the highest sequence identities (ranging from 14.8 to 41.5%) with the respective proteins of rhabdovirus 903/87, the L protein has the highest identity with those of vesiculoviruses, especially with Chandipura virus (44.7%). Phylogenetic analysis of L proteins showed that SCRV clustered with spring vireamia of carp virus (SVCV) and was most closely related to viruses in the genus Vesiculovirus. In addition, an overlapping open reading frame (ORF) predicted to encode a protein similar to vesicular stomatitis virus C protein is present within the P gene of SCRV. Furthermore, an unoverlapping small ORF downstream of M ORF within M gene is predicted (tentatively called orf4). Therefore, the genomic organization of SCRV can be proposed as 3' leader-N-P/C-M-(orf4)-G-L-trailer 5'. Orf4 transcription or translation products could not be detected by northern or Western blot, respectively, though one similar mRNA band to M mRNA was found. This is the first report on one small unoverlapping ORF in M gene of a fish rhabdovirus.

  3. The glycoprotein genes and gene junctions of the fish rhabdoviruses spring viremia of carp virus and hirame rhabdovirus: Analysis of relationships with other rhabdoviruses

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bjorklund, H.V.; Higman, K.H.; Kurath, G.

    1996-01-01

    The nucleotide sequences of the glycoprotein genes and all of the internal gene junctions of the fish pathogenic rhabdoviruses spring viremia of carp virus (SVCV) and hirame rhabdovirus (HIRRV) have been determined from cDNA clones generated from viral genomic RNA. The SVCV glycoprotein gene sequence is 1588 nucleotides (nt) long and encodes a 509 amino acid (aa) protein. The HIRRV glycoprotein gene sequence comprises 1612 nt, coding for a 508 aa protein. In sequence comparisons of 15 rhabdovirus glycoproteins, the SVCV glycoprotein gene showed the highest amino acid sequence identity (31.2-33.2%) with vesicular stomatitis New Jersey virus (VSNJV), Chandipura virus (CHPV) and vesicular stomatitis Indiana virus (VSIV). The HIRRV glycoprotein gene showed a very high amino acid sequence identity (74.3%) with the glycoprotein gene of another fish pathogenic rhabdovirus, infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV), but no significant similarity with glycoproteins of VSIV or rabies virus (RABV). In phylogenetic analyses SVCV was grouped consistently with VSIV, VSNJV and CHPV in the Vesiculovirus genus of Rhabdoviridae. The fish rhabdoviruses HIRRV, IHNV and viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV) showed close relationships with each other, but only very distant relationships with mammalian rhabdoviruses. The gene junctions are highly conserved between SVCV and VSIV, well conserved between IHNV and HIRRV, but not conserved between HIRRV/IHNV and RABV. Based on the combined results we suggest that the fish lyssa-type rhabdoviruses HIRRV, IHNV and VHSV may be grouped in their own genus within the family Rhabdoviridae. Aquarhabdovirus has been proposed for the name of this new genus.

  4. [Recent advances in DNA vaccines against allergic airway disease: a review].

    PubMed

    Ou, Jin; Xu, Yu; Shi, Wendan

    2013-12-01

    DNA vaccine is used in infectious diseases initially, and later is applied in neoplastic diseases, allergic diseases and other fields with the further understanding of DNA vaccine and the development of genetic engineering. DNA vaccine transfers the genes encoding exogenous antigens to plasmid vector and then is introduced into organism. It controls the antigen proteins synthesis, thus induces specific humoral and cellular immune responses. So it has a broad application prospect in allergic diseases. Compared with the traditional protein vaccines used in specific immunotherapy, DNA vaccine has many advantages, including high purity and specificity, and improvement of patients' compliance etc. However, there are still two unsolved problems. First, the transfection rate of unmodified naked DNA plasmid is not high, Second, it's difficult to induce ideal immune response. In this study, we will review the progress of DNA vaccine applications in respiratory allergic diseases and its various optimization strategies.

  5. Efficient vaccine against pandemic influenza: combining DNA vaccination and targeted delivery to MHC class II molecules.

    PubMed

    Grødeland, Gunnveig; Bogen, Bjarne

    2015-06-01

    There are two major limitations to vaccine preparedness in the event of devastating influenza pandemics: the time needed to generate a vaccine and rapid generation of sufficient amounts. DNA vaccination could represent a solution to these problems, but efficacy needs to be enhanced. In a separate line of research, it has been established that targeting of vaccine molecules to antigen-presenting cells enhances immune responses. We have combined the two principles by constructing DNA vaccines that encode bivalent fusion proteins; these target hemagglutinin to MHC class II molecules on antigen-presenting cells. Such DNA vaccines rapidly induce hemagglutinin-specific antibodies and T cell responses in immunized mice. Responses are long-lasting and protect mice against challenge with influenza virus. In a pandemic situation, targeted DNA vaccines could be produced and tested within a month. The novel DNA vaccines could represent a solution to pandemic preparedness in the advent of novel influenza pandemics.

  6. Superparamagnetic nanoparticles for effective delivery of malaria DNA vaccine.

    PubMed

    Al-Deen, Fatin Nawwab; Ho, Jenny; Selomulya, Cordelia; Ma, Charles; Coppel, Ross

    2011-04-01

    Low efficiency is often observed in the delivery of DNA vaccines. The use of superparamagnetic nanoparticles (SPIONs) to deliver genes via magnetofection could improve transfection efficiency and target the vector to its desired locality. Here, magnetofection was used to enhance the delivery of a malaria DNA vaccine encoding Plasmodium yoelii merozoite surface protein MSP1(19) (VR1020-PyMSP1(19)) that plays a critical role in Plasmodium immunity. The plasmid DNA (pDNA) containing membrane associated 19-kDa carboxyl-terminal fragment of merozoite surface protein 1 (PyMSP1(19)) was conjugated with superparamagnetic nanoparticles coated with polyethyleneimine (PEI) polymer, with different molar ratio of PEI nitrogen to DNA phosphate. We reported the effects of SPIONs-PEI complexation pH values on the properties of the resulting particles, including their ability to condense DNA and the gene expression in vitro. By initially lowering the pH value of SPIONs-PEI complexes to 2.0, the size of the complexes decreased since PEI contained a large number of amino groups that became increasingly protonated under acidic condition, with the electrostatic repulsion inducing less aggregation. Further reaggregation was prevented when the pHs of the complexes were increased to 4.0 and 7.0, respectively, before DNA addition. SPIONs/PEI complexes at pH 4.0 showed better binding capability with PyMSP1(19) gene-containing pDNA than those at neutral pH, despite the negligible differences in the size and surface charge of the complexes. This study indicated that the ability to protect DNA molecules due to the structure of the polymer at acidic pH could help improve the transfection efficiency. The transfection efficiency of magnetic nanoparticle as carrier for malaria DNA vaccine in vitro into eukaryotic cells, as indicated via PyMSP1(19) expression, was significantly enhanced under the application of external magnetic field, while the cytotoxicity was comparable to the benchmark nonviral

  7. Intranasal DNA Vaccine for Protection against Respiratory Infectious Diseases: The Delivery Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yingying; Yuen, Pak-Wai; Lam, Jenny Ka-Wing

    2014-01-01

    Intranasal delivery of DNA vaccines has become a popular research area recently. It offers some distinguished advantages over parenteral and other routes of vaccine administration. Nasal mucosa as site of vaccine administration can stimulate respiratory mucosal immunity by interacting with the nasopharyngeal-associated lymphoid tissues (NALT). Different kinds of DNA vaccines are investigated to provide protection against respiratory infectious diseases including tuberculosis, coronavirus, influenza and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) etc. DNA vaccines have several attractive development potential, such as producing cross-protection towards different virus subtypes, enabling the possibility of mass manufacture in a relatively short time and a better safety profile. The biggest obstacle to DNA vaccines is low immunogenicity. One of the approaches to enhance the efficacy of DNA vaccine is to improve DNA delivery efficiency. This review provides insight on the development of intranasal DNA vaccine for respiratory infections, with special attention paid to the strategies to improve the delivery of DNA vaccines using non-viral delivery agents. PMID:25014738

  8. Immunogenicity of a DNA-launched replicon-based canine parvovirus DNA vaccine expressing VP2 antigen in dogs.

    PubMed

    Dahiya, Shyam S; Saini, Mohini; Kumar, Pankaj; Gupta, Praveen K

    2012-10-01

    A replicon-based DNA vaccine encoding VP2 gene of canine parvovirus (CPV) was developed by cloning CPV-VP2 gene into a replicon-based DNA vaccine vector (pAlpha). The characteristics of a replicon-based DNA vaccine like, self-amplification of transcripts and induction of apoptosis were analyzed in transfected mammalian cells. When the pAlpha-CPV-VP2 was injected intradermal as DNA-launched replicon-based DNA vaccine in dogs, it induced CPV-specific humoral and cell mediated immune responses. The virus neutralization antibody and lymphocyte proliferative responses were higher than conventional CPV DNA vaccine and commercial CPV vaccine. These results indicated that DNA-launched replicon-based CPV DNA vaccine was effective in inducing both CPV-specific humoral and cellular immune responses and can be considered as effective alternative to conventional CPV DNA vaccine and commercial CPV vaccine.

  9. Cimetidine synergizes with Praziquantel to enhance the immune response of HBV DNA vaccine via activating cytotoxic CD8(+) T cell.

    PubMed

    Xie, Xiaoping; Geng, Shuang; Liu, Hu; Li, Chaofan; Yang, Yuqin; Wang, Bin

    2014-01-01

    Previously, we have reported that either CIM or PZQ, 2 clinical drugs, could be used to develop as adjuvants on HBV DNA vaccine to elicit both humoral and cellular immune responses. Here, we demonstrate that combinations of CIM and PZQ as adjuvants for a HBV DNA vaccine, could induce much stronger antigen specific CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cell responses compared either with CIM or PZQ alone. The synergistic effects of CIM plus PZQ to HBV DNA vaccine were observed on a higher IgG2a/IgG1 ratio, an increase of HBsAg-specific CD4(+) T cells capable of producing IFN-γ or IL-17A and a robust IFN-γ-, IL-17A-, or TNF-α-producing CD8(+) T cells to HBsAg. Most importantly, the antigen-specific CTL response was also elevated significantly, which is critical for the eradication of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infected cells. Using an HBsAg transgenic mouse model, the expression of HBsAg in the hepatic cells was also significantly reduced after immunized with pCD-S 2 in the presence of 0.5% CIM and 0.25% PZQ. Further investigations demonstrated that the synergistic effects of combination of CIM and PZQ were dependent on enhanced cytotoxic CD8(+) T cells, which was correlated with impaired activities of regulatory T cells. Therefore, combinations of CIM and PZQ have great potential to be used as effective adjuvants on DNA-based vaccinations for the treatment of chronic hepatitis B. PMID:24643207

  10. DNA vaccine against visceral leishmaniasis: a promising approach for prevention and control.

    PubMed

    Kumar, A; Samant, M

    2016-05-01

    The visceral leishmaniasis (VL) caused by Leishmania donovani parasite severely affects large populations in tropical and subtropical regions of the world. The arsenal of drugs available is limited, and resistance is common in clinical field isolates. Therefore, vaccines could be an important alternative for prevention against VL. Recently, some investigators advocated the protective efficacy of DNA vaccines, which induces the T cell-based immunity against VL. The vaccine antigens are selected as conserved in various Leishmania species and provide a viable strategy for DNA vaccine development. Our understanding for DNA vaccine development against VL is not enough and much technological advancement is required. Improved formulations and methods of delivery are required, which increase the uptake of DNA vaccine by cells; optimization of vaccine vectors/encoded antigens to augment and direct the host immune response in VL. Despite the many genes identified as vaccine candidates, the disappointing potency of the DNA vaccines in VL underscores the challenges encountered in the efforts to translate efficacy in preclinical models into clinical realities. This review will provide a brief background of DNA vaccines including the insights gained about the design, strategy, safety issues, varied candidates, progress and challenges that play a role in their ability against VL.

  11. Immunogenicity of varicella zoster virus glycoprotein E DNA vaccine

    PubMed Central

    BAO, LIDAO; WEI, GUOMIN; GAN, HONGMEI; REN, XIANHUA; MA, RUILIAN; WANG, YI; LV, HAIJUN

    2016-01-01

    In the present study a eukaryotic expression vector of varicella zoster virus (VZV) glycoprotein E (gE) was constructed and enabled to express in COS7 cells. Furthermore, a specific immune response against the VZV gE eukaryotic expression plasmid was induced in BALB/c mice. The VZV gE gene was amplified using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and cloned into a eukaryotic expression vector, pcDNA3.1. The recombinant vector was subsequently transfected into COS7 cells using a liposome transfection reagent. The recombinant protein was instantaneously expressed by the transfected cells, as detected by immunohistochemistry, and the recombinant pcDNA-VZV gE plasmid was subsequently used to immunize mice. Tissue expression levels were analyzed by reverse transcription-PCR. In addition, the levels of serum antibodies and spleen lymphocyte proliferation activity were investigated. The amplified target gene included the full-length gE gene (~2.7 kb), and the recombinant expression vector induced gE expression in COS7 cells. In addition, the expression plasmid induced sustained expression in vivo following immunization of mice. Furthermore, the plasmid was capable of inducing specific antibody production and effectively stimulating T cell proliferation. Effective humoral and cellular immunity was triggered in the mice immunized with the VZV gE eukaryotic expression vector. The results of the present study laid the foundation for future research into a VZV DNA vaccine. PMID:27168804

  12. DNA Vaccination: Using the Patient's Immune System to Overcome Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Eschenburg, Georg; Stermann, Alexander; Preissner, Robert; Meyer, Hellmuth-Alexander; Lode, Holger N.

    2010-01-01

    Cancer is one of the most challenging diseases of today. Optimization of standard treatment protocols consisting of the main columns of chemo- and radiotherapy followed or preceded by surgical intervention is often limited by toxic side effects and induction of concomitant malignancies and/or development of resistant mechanisms. This requires the development of therapeutic strategies which are as effective as standard therapies but permit the patients a life without severe negative side effects. Along this line, the development of immunotherapy in general and the innovative concept of DNA vaccination in particular may provide a venue to achieve this goal. Using the patient's own immune system by activation of humoral and cellular immune responses to target the cancer cells has shown first promising results in clinical trials and may allow reduced toxicity standard therapy regimen in the future. The main challenge of this concept is to transfer the plethora of convincing preclinical and early clinical results to an effective treatment of patients. PMID:21197271

  13. Rhabdovirus evasion of the interferon system.

    PubMed

    Rieder, Martina; Conzelmann, Karl-Klaus

    2009-09-01

    The family Rhabdoviridae contains important pathogens of humans, livestock, and crops, including the insect-transmitted vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) and the neurotropic rabies virus (RV), which is directly transmitted between mammals. In spite of a highly similar organization of RNA genomes, proteins, and virus particles, cell biology of VSV and RV is divergent in several aspects, particularly with respect to their interplay with the cellular host defense. While infection with both rhabdoviruses is recognized via viral triphosphate RNAs by the cytoplasmic RNA helicase/translocase RIG-I, the viral counteractions to limit the response are contrasting. VSV infection is characterized by a rapid general shutdown of host gene expression and severe cytopathic effects, due to multiple activities of the matrix (M) protein affecting host polymerase functions and mRNA nuclear export, and by rapid and high-level virus replication. In contrast, RV spread and transmission relies on preserving the integrity of host cells, particularly of neurons. While a general cell shutdown by RV M is not observed, RV phosphoprotein (P) has developed independent functions to interfere with activation of IRFs and with STAT signaling. The molecular mechanisms employed are different from those of the paramyxovirus P gene products serving similar functions, and illustrate evolution of IFN antagonists to specifically support virus survival in the natural niches.

  14. A DN-mda5 transgenic zebrafish model demonstrates that Mda5 plays an important role in snakehead rhabdovirus resistance.

    PubMed

    Gabor, K A; Charette, J R; Pietraszewski, M J; Wingfield, D J; Shim, J S; Millard, P J; Kim, C H

    2015-08-01

    Melanoma Differentiation-Associated protein 5 (MDA5) is a member of the retinoic acid-inducible gene I (RIG-I)-like receptor (RLR) family, which is a cytosolic pattern recognition receptor that detects viral nucleic acids. Here we show an Mda5-dependent response to rhabdovirus infection in vivo using a dominant-negative mda5 transgenic zebrafish. Dominant-negative mda5 zebrafish embryos displayed an impaired antiviral immune response compared to wild-type counterparts that can be rescued by recombinant full-length Mda5. To our knowledge, we have generated the first dominant-negative mda5 transgenic zebrafish and demonstrated a critical role for Mda5 in the antiviral response to rhabdovirus.

  15. Efficacy of a glycoprotein DNA vaccine against viral haemorrhagic septicaemia (VHS) in Pacific herring, Clupea pallasii Valenciennes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hart, L.M.; Lorenzen, Niels; LaPatra, S.E.; Grady, C.A.; Roon, S.E.; O’Reilly, J.; Gregg, J.L.; Hershberger, P.K.

    2012-01-01

    Viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus (VHSV) and its associated disease state, viral haemorrhagic septicaemia (VHS), is hypothesized to be a proximate factor accounting for the decline and failed recovery of Pacific herring populations in Prince William Sound, AK (Marty et al. 1998, 2003, 2010). Survivors of laboratory-induced VHSV epizootics develop resistance to subsequent viral exposure (Kocan et al. 2001; Hershberger et al. 2007, 2010), which is likely the result of immune system recognition of the viral glycoprotein (G) (Lecocq-Xhonneux et al. 1994), a surface antigen that contains neutralizing epitopes (Lorenzen, Olesen & Jorgensen 1990; Jørgensen et al. 1995) and cell attachment domains (Lecocq-Xhonneux et al. 1994; Estepa & Coll 1996). These properties have proven useful in the development of G-gene-based DNA vaccines for VHSV and a related rhabdovirus, infectious haematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) (Anderson et al. 1996; Heppell et al. 1998; Corbeil et al. 1999; Einer-Jensen et al. 2009). Rainbow trout fingerlings, Oncorhynchus mykiss (Walbaum), vaccinated with 1 µg of either the VHS or IHN vaccine are protected from VHS when exposed to virus as early as 4 days (44 degree days) post-vaccination (p.v.) (Lorenzen et al. 2002). At later time points (80 days p.v.; 880 degree days), the level of cross-protection against VHS by IHN vaccination is either completely lost (60 days p.v.; 660 degree days) (3 g rainbow trout; 1 µg vaccine dose) (Lorenzen et al. 2002) or present at intermediate levels (6.5 g rainbow trout; 1 µg vaccine dose) (Einer-Jensen et al. 2009). Comparatively, VHS vaccination remains effective as long as 9 months (2520 degree days) p.v. (100 g rainbow trout; 0.5 µg vaccine dose) (McLauchlan et al. 2003). These results suggest that IHN and VHS vaccination activate a rapid transitory innate immune response against VHSV that is followed by long-term adaptive immunity in VHS-vaccinated trout (Lorenzen et al. 2002).

  16. RNA splicing in a new rhabdovirus from Culex mosquitoes.

    PubMed

    Kuwata, Ryusei; Isawa, Haruhiko; Hoshino, Keita; Tsuda, Yoshio; Yanase, Tohru; Sasaki, Toshinori; Kobayashi, Mutsuo; Sawabe, Kyoko

    2011-07-01

    Among members of the order Mononegavirales, RNA splicing events have been found only in the family Bornaviridae. Here, we report that a new rhabdovirus isolated from the mosquito Culex tritaeniorhynchus replicates in the nuclei of infected cells and requires RNA splicing for viral mRNA maturation. The virus, designated Culex tritaeniorhynchus rhabdovirus (CTRV), shares a similar genome organization with other rhabdoviruses, except for the presence of a putative intron in the coding region for the L protein. Molecular phylogenetic studies indicated that CTRV belongs to the family Rhabdoviridae, but it is yet to be assigned a genus. Electron microscopic analysis revealed that the CTRV virion is extremely elongated, unlike virions of rhabdoviruses, which are generally bullet shaped. Northern hybridization confirmed that a large transcript (approximately 6,500 nucleotides [nt]) from the CTRV L gene was present in the infected cells. Strand-specific reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) analyses identified the intron-exon boundaries and the 76-nt intron sequence, which contains the typical motif for eukaryotic spliceosomal intron-splice donor/acceptor sites (GU-AG), a predicted branch point, and a polypyrimidine tract. In situ hybridization exhibited that viral RNAs are primarily localized in the nucleus of infected cells, indicating that CTRV replicates in the nucleus and is allowed to utilize the host's nuclear splicing machinery. This is the first report of RNA splicing among the members of the family Rhabdoviridae.

  17. MyD88/CD40 Genetic Adjuvant Function in Cutaneous Atypical Antigen-Presenting Cells Contributes to DNA Vaccine Immunogenicity

    PubMed Central

    Slawin, Kevin M.; Levitt, Jonathan M.; Spencer, David M.

    2016-01-01

    Therapeutic DNA-based vaccines aim to prime an adaptive host immune response against tumor-associated antigens, eliminating cancer cells primarily through CD8+ cytotoxic T cell-mediated destruction. To be optimally effective, immunological adjuvants are required for the activation of tumor-specific CD8+ T cells responses by DNA vaccination. Here, we describe enhanced anti-tumor efficacy of an in vivo electroporation-delivered DNA vaccine by inclusion of a genetically encoded chimeric MyD88/CD40 (MC) adjuvant, which integrates both innate and adaptive immune signaling pathways. When incorporated into a DNA vaccine, signaling by the MC adjuvant increased antigen-specific CD8+ T cells and promoted elimination of pre-established tumors. Interestingly, MC-enhanced vaccine efficacy did not require direct-expression of either antigen or adjuvant by local antigen-presenting cells, but rather our data supports a key role for MC function in “atypical” antigen-presenting cells of skin. In particular, MC adjuvant-modified keratinocytes increased inflammatory cytokine secretion, upregulated surface MHC class I, and were able to increase in vitro and in vivo priming of antigen-specific CD8+ T cells. Furthermore, in the absence of critical CD8α+/CD103+ cross-priming dendritic cells, MC was still able to promote immune priming in vivo, albeit at a reduced level. Altogether, our data support a mechanism by which MC signaling activates an inflammatory phenotype in atypical antigen-presenting cells within the cutaneous vaccination site, leading to an enhanced CD8+ T cell response against DNA vaccine-encoded antigens, through both CD8α+/CD103+ dendritic cell-dependent and independent pathways. PMID:27741278

  18. Enhancement of HCV polytope DNA vaccine efficacy by fusion to an N-terminal fragment of heat shock protein gp96.

    PubMed

    Pishraft-Sabet, Leila; Kosinska, Anna D; Rafati, Sima; Bolhassani, Azam; Taheri, Tahereh; Memarnejadian, Arash; Alavian, Seyed-Moayed; Roggendorf, Michael; Samimi-Rad, Katayoun

    2015-01-01

    Induction of a strong hepatitis C virus (HCV)-specific immune response plays a key role in control and clearance of the virus. A polytope (PT) DNA vaccine containing B- and T-cell epitopes could be a promising vaccination strategy against HCV, but its efficacy needs to be improved. The N-terminal domain of heat shock protein gp96 (NT(gp96)) has been shown to be a potent adjuvant for enhancing immunity. We constructed a PT DNA vaccine encoding four HCV immunodominant cytotoxic T lymphocyte epitopes (two HLA-A2- and two H2-D(d)-specific motifs) from the Core, E2, NS3 and NS5B antigens in addition to a T-helper CD4+ epitope from NS3 and a B-cell epitope from E2. The NT(gp96) was fused to the C- or N-terminal end of the PT DNA (PT-NT(gp96) or NT(gp96)-PT), and their potency was compared. Cellular and humoral immune responses against the expressed peptides were evaluated in CB6F1 mice. Our results showed that immunization of mice with PT DNA vaccine fused to NT(gp96) induced significantly stronger T-cell and antibody responses than PT DNA alone. Furthermore, the adjuvant activity of NT(gp96) was more efficient in the induction of immune responses when fused to the C-terminal end of the HCV DNA polytope. In conclusion, the NT(gp96) improved the efficacy of the DNA vaccine, and this immunomodulatory effect was dependent on the position of the fusion.

  19. Enhanced nasal mucosal delivery and immunogenicity of anti-caries DNA vaccine through incorporation of anionic liposomes in chitosan/DNA complexes.

    PubMed

    Chen, Liulin; Zhu, Junming; Li, Yuhong; Lu, Jie; Gao, Li; Xu, Huibi; Fan, Mingwen; Yang, Xiangliang

    2013-01-01

    The design of optimized nanoparticles offers a promising strategy to enable DNA vaccines to cross various physiological barriers for eliciting a specific and protective mucosal immunity via intranasal administration. Here, we reported a new designed nanoparticle system through incorporating anionic liposomes (AL) into chitosan/DNA (CS/DNA) complexes. With enhanced cellular uptake, the constructed AL/CS/DNA nanoparticles can deliver the anti-caries DNA vaccine pGJA-P/VAX into nasal mucosa. TEM results showed the AL/CS/DNA had a spherical structure. High DNA loading ability and effective DNA protection against nuclease were proved by gel electrophoresis. The surface charge of the AL/CS/DNA depended strongly on pH environment, enabling the intracellular release of loaded DNA via a pH-mediated manner. In comparison to the traditional CS/DNA system, our new design rendered a higher transfection efficiency and longer residence time of the AL/CS/DNA at nasal mucosal surface. These outstanding features enable the AL/CS/DNA to induce a significantly (p<0.01) higher level of secretory IgA (SIgA) than the CS/DNA in animal study, and a longer-term mucosal immunity. On the other hand, the AL/CS/DNA exhibited minimal cytotoxicity. These results suggest that the developed nanoparticles offer a potential platform for DNA vaccine packaging and delivery for more efficient elicitation of mucosal immunity. PMID:23977186

  20. Specificity of DNA vaccines against the U and M genogroups of infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Penaranda, M.M.D.; LaPatra, S.E.; Kurath, G.

    2011-01-01

    Infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) is a fish rhabdovirus that causes significant mortality in salmonid species. In North America IHNV has three major genogroups designated U, M, and L. Host-specificity of the M and U genogroups of IHNV has been established both in the field and in experimental challenges, with M isolates being more prevalent and more virulent in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss), and U isolates being more prevalent and highly virulent in sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka). In this study, efficacy of DNA vaccines containing either M (pM) or U (pU) virus glycoprotein genes was investigated during intra- and cross-genogroup challenges in rainbow trout. In virus challenges at 7 days post-vaccination (early antiviral response), both pM and pU were highly protective against either M or U IHNV. In challenges at 28 days post-vaccination (specific antiviral response), both pM and pU were protective against M IHNV but the homologous pM vaccine was significantly more protective than pU in one of two experiments. At this stage both pM and pU induced comparably high protection against U IHNV challenge. Correlates of protection were also investigated by assessing the expression of the interferon-stimulated gene Mx-1 and the production of neutralizing antibodies (NAbs) following pM or pU DNA vaccination. Mx-1 gene expression, measured at 4 and 7 days post-vaccination as an indicator of the host innate immune response, was found to be significantly higher after pM than pU vaccination in some cases. Neutralizing antibody was produced in response to the two vaccines, but antibody titers did not show consistent correlation with protection. The results show that the rainbow trout innate and adaptive immune responses have some ability to distinguish between the U and M genogroup IHNV, but overall the pM and pU vaccines were protective against both homologous and cross-genogroup challenges.

  1. Merida virus, a putative novel rhabdovirus discovered in Culex and Ochlerotatus spp. mosquitoes in the Yucatan Peninsula of Mexico.

    PubMed

    Charles, Jermilia; Firth, Andrew E; Loroño-Pino, Maria A; Garcia-Rejon, Julian E; Farfan-Ale, Jose A; Lipkin, W Ian; Blitvich, Bradley J; Briese, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    Sequences corresponding to a putative, novel rhabdovirus [designated Merida virus (MERDV)] were initially detected in a pool of Culex quinquefasciatus collected in the Yucatan Peninsula of Mexico. The entire genome was sequenced, revealing 11 798 nt and five major ORFs, which encode the nucleoprotein (N), phosphoprotein (P), matrix protein (M), glycoprotein (G) and RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (L). The deduced amino acid sequences of the N, G and L proteins have no more than 24, 38 and 43 % identity, respectively, to the corresponding sequences of all other known rhabdoviruses, whereas those of the P and M proteins have no significant identity with any sequences in GenBank and their identity is only suggested based on their genome position. Using specific reverse transcription-PCR assays established from the genome sequence, 27 571 C. quinquefasciatus which had been sorted in 728 pools were screened to assess the prevalence of MERDV in nature and 25 pools were found positive. The minimal infection rate (calculated as the number of positive mosquito pools per 1000 mosquitoes tested) was 0.9, and similar for both females and males. Screening another 140 pools of 5484 mosquitoes belonging to four other genera identified positive pools of Ochlerotatus spp. mosquitoes, indicating that the host range is not restricted to C. quinquefasciatus. Attempts to isolate MERDV in C6/36 and Vero cells were unsuccessful. In summary, we provide evidence that a previously undescribed rhabdovirus occurs in mosquitoes in Mexico.

  2. Needle-free injection of DNA vaccines: a brief overview and methodology.

    PubMed

    Raviprakash, Kanakatte; Porter, Kevin R

    2006-01-01

    The development of needle-free injection originally stemmed from a general apprehension of needle injections, disease transmission by accidental needle-sticks, and the need for effective mass immunization. Naked DNA vaccines, as attractive and universal as they appear, have not produced robust immune responses in test systems. However, proof of principle for DNA vaccines has been validated with a number of vaccine candidates in a variety of test systems, and the concept of DNA vaccines as a generic platform for vaccines still remains viable and attractive. Many avenues are being explored to enhance the immunogenicity of DNA vaccines. The easiest and most straightforward approach that can be quickly transitioned to a clinical trial setting is vaccine delivery by a needle-free jet injector. This approach has shown much potential in a number of cases and should become the lead method for enhancing DNA vaccines. This approach requires no additional development, and with an expanding market and willingness from jet injector manufacturers to produce prefilled syringes, the technique should become feasible for larger phase II/phase III trials.

  3. Comprehensive gene expression profiling following DNA vaccination of rainbow trout against infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Purcell, Maureen K.; Nichols, Krista M.; Winton, James R.; Kurath, Gael; Thorgaard, Gary H.; Wheeler, Paul; Hansen, John D.; Herwig, Russell P.; Park, Linda K.

    2006-01-01

    The DNA vaccine based on the glycoprotein gene of Infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus induces a non-specific anti-viral immune response and long-term specific immunity against IHNV. This study characterized gene expression responses associated with the early anti-viral response. Homozygous rainbow trout were injected intra-muscularly (I.M.) with vector DNA or the IHNV DNA vaccine. Gene expression in muscle tissue (I.M. site) was evaluated using a 16,008 feature salmon cDNA microarray. Eighty different genes were significantly modulated in the vector DNA group while 910 genes were modulated in the IHNV DNA vaccinate group relative to control group. Quantitative reverse-transcriptase PCR was used to examine expression of selected immune genes at the I.M. site and in other secondary tissues. In the localized response (I.M. site), the magnitudes of gene expression changes were much greater in the vaccinate group relative to the vector DNA group for the majority of genes analyzed. At secondary systemic sites (e.g. gill, kidney and spleen), type I IFN-related genes were up-regulated in only the IHNV DNA vaccinated group. The results presented here suggest that the IHNV DNA vaccine induces up-regulation of the type I IFN system across multiple tissues, which is the functional basis of early anti-viral immunity.

  4. Polyplex-releasing microneedles for enhanced cutaneous delivery of DNA vaccine.

    PubMed

    Kim, Nak Won; Lee, Min Sang; Kim, Kyu Ri; Lee, Jung Eun; Lee, Kyuri; Park, Jong Sung; Matsumoto, Yoh; Jo, Dong-Gyu; Lee, Haeshin; Lee, Doo Sung; Jeong, Ji Hoon

    2014-04-10

    Microneedle (MN)-based DNA vaccines have many advantages over conventional vaccines administered by hypodermic needles. However, an efficient strategy for delivering DNA vaccines to intradermal cells has not yet been established. Here, we report a new approach for delivering polyplex-based DNA vaccines using MN arrays coated with a pH-responsive polyelectrolyte multilayer assembly (PMA). This approach enabled rapid release of polyplex upon application to the skin. In addition to the polyplex-releasing MNs, we attempted to further maximize the vaccination by developing a polymeric carrier that targeted resident antigen presenting cells (APCs) rich in the intradermal area, as well as a DNA vaccine encoding a secretable fusion protein containing amyloid beta monomer (Aβ1-42), an antigenic determinant. The resulting vaccination system was able to successfully induce a robust humoral immune response compared to conventional subcutaneous injection with hypodermal needles. In addition, antigen challenge after immunization elicited an immediate and strong recall immune response due to immunogenic memory. These results suggest the potential utility of MN-based polyplex delivery systems for enhanced DNA vaccination.

  5. The evolution, diversity, and host associations of rhabdoviruses

    PubMed Central

    Longdon, Ben; Murray, Gemma G. R.; Palmer, William J.; Day, Jonathan P.; Parker, Darren J; Welch, John J.; Obbard, Darren J.; Jiggins, Francis M.

    2015-01-01

    Metagenomic studies are leading to the discovery of a hidden diversity of RNA viruses. These new viruses are poorly characterized and new approaches are needed predict the host species these viruses pose a risk to. The rhabdoviruses are a diverse family of RNA viruses that includes important pathogens of humans, animals, and plants. We have discovered thirty-two new rhabdoviruses through a combination of our own RNA sequencing of insects and searching public sequence databases. Combining these with previously known sequences we reconstructed the phylogeny of 195 rhabdovirus sequences, and produced the most in depth analysis of the family to date. In most cases we know nothing about the biology of the viruses beyond the host they were identified from, but our dataset provides a powerful phylogenetic approach to predict which are vector-borne viruses and which are specific to vertebrates or arthropods. By reconstructing ancestral and present host states we found that switches between major groups of hosts have occurred rarely during rhabdovirus evolution. This allowed us to propose seventy-six new likely vector-borne vertebrate viruses among viruses identified from vertebrates or biting insects. Based on currently available data, our analysis suggests it is likely there was a single origin of the known plant viruses and arthropod-borne vertebrate viruses, while vertebrate- and arthropod-specific viruses arose at least twice. There are also few transitions between aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems. Viruses also cluster together at a finer scale, with closely related viruses tending to be found in closely related hosts. Our data therefore suggest that throughout their evolution, rhabdoviruses have occasionally jumped between distantly related host species before spreading through related hosts in the same environment. This approach offers a way to predict the most probable biology and key traits of newly discovered viruses. PMID:27774286

  6. Ag85A DNA Vaccine Delivery by Nanoparticles: Influence of the Formulation Characteristics on Immune Responses.

    PubMed

    Poecheim, Johanna; Barnier-Quer, Christophe; Collin, Nicolas; Borchard, Gerrit

    2016-01-01

    The influence of DNA vaccine formulations on immune responses in combination with adjuvants was investigated with the aim to increase cell-mediated immunity against plasmid DNA (pDNA) encoding Mycobacterium tuberculosis antigen 85A. Different ratios of pDNA with cationic trimethyl chitosan (TMC) nanoparticles were characterized for their morphology and physicochemical characteristics (size, zeta potential, loading efficiency and pDNA release profile) applied in vitro for cellular uptake studies and in vivo, to determine the dose-dependent effects of pDNA on immune responses. A selected pDNA/TMC nanoparticle formulation was optimized by the incorporation of muramyl dipeptide (MDP) as an immunostimulatory agent. Cellular uptake investigations in vitro showed saturation to a maximum level upon the increase in the pDNA/TMC nanoparticle ratio, correlating with increasing Th1-related antibody responses up to a definite pDNA dose applied. Moreover, TMC nanoparticles induced clear polarization towards a Th1 response, indicated by IgG2c/IgG1 ratios above unity and enhanced numbers of antigen-specific IFN-γ producing T-cells in the spleen. Remarkably, the incorporation of MDP in TMC nanoparticles provoked a significant additional increase in T-cell-mediated responses induced by pDNA. In conclusion, pDNA-loaded TMC nanoparticles are capable of provoking strong Th1-type cellular and humoral immune responses, with the potential to be further optimized by the incorporation of MDP. PMID:27626449

  7. Ag85A DNA Vaccine Delivery by Nanoparticles: Influence of the Formulation Characteristics on Immune Responses

    PubMed Central

    Poecheim, Johanna; Barnier-Quer, Christophe; Collin, Nicolas; Borchard, Gerrit

    2016-01-01

    The influence of DNA vaccine formulations on immune responses in combination with adjuvants was investigated with the aim to increase cell-mediated immunity against plasmid DNA (pDNA) encoding Mycobacterium tuberculosis antigen 85A. Different ratios of pDNA with cationic trimethyl chitosan (TMC) nanoparticles were characterized for their morphology and physicochemical characteristics (size, zeta potential, loading efficiency and pDNA release profile) applied in vitro for cellular uptake studies and in vivo, to determine the dose-dependent effects of pDNA on immune responses. A selected pDNA/TMC nanoparticle formulation was optimized by the incorporation of muramyl dipeptide (MDP) as an immunostimulatory agent. Cellular uptake investigations in vitro showed saturation to a maximum level upon the increase in the pDNA/TMC nanoparticle ratio, correlating with increasing Th1-related antibody responses up to a definite pDNA dose applied. Moreover, TMC nanoparticles induced clear polarization towards a Th1 response, indicated by IgG2c/IgG1 ratios above unity and enhanced numbers of antigen-specific IFN-γ producing T-cells in the spleen. Remarkably, the incorporation of MDP in TMC nanoparticles provoked a significant additional increase in T-cell-mediated responses induced by pDNA. In conclusion, pDNA-loaded TMC nanoparticles are capable of provoking strong Th1-type cellular and humoral immune responses, with the potential to be further optimized by the incorporation of MDP. PMID:27626449

  8. Genomic characterization and taxonomic position of a rhabdovirus from a hybrid snakehead.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Weiwei; Wang, Qing; Wang, Yingying; Liu, Cun; Liang, Hongru; Fang, Xiang; Wu, Shuqin

    2014-09-01

    A new rhabdovirus, tentatively designated as hybrid snakehead rhabdovirus C1207 (HSHRV-C1207), was first isolated from a moribund hybrid snakehead (Channa maculata×Channa argus) in China. We present the complete genome sequence of HSHRV-C1207 and a comprehensive sequence comparison between HSHRV-C1207 and other rhabdoviruses. Sequence alignment and phylogenetic analysis revealed that HSHRV-C1207 shared the highest degree of homology with Monopterus albus rhabdovirus and Siniperca chuatsi rhabdovirus. All three viruses clustered into a single group that was distinct from the recognized genera in the family Rhabdoviridae. Our analysis suggests that HSHRV-C1207, as well as MARV and SCRV, should be assigned to a new rhabdovirus genus.

  9. Detection of rhabdovirus viral RNA in oropharyngeal swabs and ectoparasites of Spanish bats.

    PubMed

    Aznar-Lopez, Carolina; Vazquez-Moron, Sonia; Marston, Denise A; Juste, Javier; Ibáñez, Carlos; Berciano, Jose Miguel; Salsamendi, Egoitz; Aihartza, Joxerra; Banyard, Ashley C; McElhinney, Lorraine; Fooks, Anthony R; Echevarria, Juan

    2013-01-01

    Rhabdoviruses infect a variety of hosts, including mammals, birds, reptiles, fish, insects and plants. As bats are the natural host for most members of the genus Lyssavirus, the specificity of the amplification methods used for active surveillance is usually restricted to lyssaviruses. However, the presence of other rhabdoviruses in bats has also been reported. In order to broaden the scope of such methods, a new RT-PCR, able to detect a diverse range of rhabdoviruses, was designed. The method detected 81 of 86 different rhabdoviruses. In total, 1488 oropharyngeal bat swabs and 38 nycteribiid samples were analysed, and 17 unique rhabdovirus-related sequences were detected. Phylogenetic analysis suggested that those sequences detected in bats did not constitute a monophyletic group, even when originating from the same bat species. However, all of the sequences detected in nycteribiids and one sequence obtained from a bat did constitute a monophyletic group with Drosophila melanogaster sigma rhabdovirus.

  10. Molecularly engineered poly(ortho ester) microspheres for enhanced delivery of DNA vaccines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chun; Ge, Qing; Ting, David; Nguyen, David; Shen, Hui-Rong; Chen, Jianzhu; Eisen, Herman N.; Heller, Jorge; Langer, Robert; Putnam, David

    2004-03-01

    Genetic vaccination using plasmid DNA presents a unique opportunity for achieving potent immune responses without the potential limitations of many conventional vaccines. Here we report the design of synthetic biodegradable polymers specifically for enhancing DNA vaccine efficacy in vivo. We molecularly engineered poly(ortho ester) microspheres that are non-toxic to cells, protect DNA from degradation, enable uptake by antigen-presenting cells, and release DNA rapidly in response to phagosomal pH. One type of microsphere of poly(ortho esters) that releases DNA vaccines in synchrony with the natural development of adaptive immunity, elicited distinct primary and secondary humoral and cellular immune responses in mice, and suppressed the growth of tumour cells bearing a model antigen. This polymer microparticulate system could, with further study, have implications for advancing the clinical utility of DNA vaccines as well as other nucleic-acid-based therapeutics against viral infections and cancer.

  11. Characterization of GD2 peptide mimotope DNA vaccines effective against spontaneous neuroblastoma metastases.

    PubMed

    Fest, Stefan; Huebener, Nicole; Weixler, Silke; Bleeke, Matthias; Zeng, Yan; Strandsby, Anne; Volkmer-Engert, Rudolf; Landgraf, Christiane; Gaedicke, Gerhard; Riemer, Angelika B; Michalsky, Elke; Jaeger, Ines S; Preissner, Robert; Förster-Wald, Elisabeth; Jensen-Jarolim, Erika; Lode, Holger N

    2006-11-01

    Disialoganglioside GD2 is an established target for immunotherapy in neuroblastoma. We tested the hypothesis that active immunization against the glycolipid GD2 using DNA vaccines encoding for cyclic GD2-mimicking decapeptides (i.e., GD2 mimotopes) is effective against neuroblastoma. For this purpose, two GD2 peptide mimotopes (MA and MD) were selected based on docking experiments to anti-GD2 antibody ch14.18 (binding free energy: -41.23 kJ/mol for MA and -48.06 kJ/mol for MD) and Biacore analysis (K(d) = 12.3 x 10(-5) mol/L for MA and 5.3 x 10(-5) mol/L for MD), showing a higher affinity of MD over MA. These sequences were selected for DNA vaccine design based on pSecTag2-A (pSA) also including a T-cell helper epitope. GD2 mimicry was shown following transfection of CHO-1 cells with pSA-MA and pSA-MD DNA vaccines, with twice-higher signal intensity for cells expressing MD over MA. Finally, these DNA vaccines were tested for induction of tumor protective immunity in a syngeneic neuroblastoma model following oral DNA vaccine delivery with attenuated Salmonella typhimurium (SL 7207). Only mice receiving the DNA vaccines revealed a reduction of spontaneous liver metastases. The highest anti-GD2 humoral immune response and natural killer cell activation was observed in mice immunized with the pSA-MD, a finding consistent with superior calculated binding free energy, dissociation constant, and GD2 mimicry potential for GD2 mimotope MD over MA. In summary, we show that DNA immunization with pSA-MD may provide a useful strategy for active immunization against neuroblastoma.

  12. Clinical development of intramuscular electroporation: providing a "boost" for DNA vaccines.

    PubMed

    Khan, Amir S; Broderick, Kate E; Sardesai, Niranjan Y

    2014-01-01

    The development of effective vaccines has helped to eradicate or control the spread of numerous infectious diseases. However, there are many more diseases that have proved more difficult to eliminate using conventional vaccines. The recent innovation of DNA vaccines may provide a "boost" to the development efforts. While the early efforts of DNA vaccines in the clinic were disappointing, the use of in vivo electroporation has helped to provide some basis for optimism. Now, there are several ongoing clinical studies of vaccines against such diseases as malaria, HIV, hepatitis C, and even various types of cancer. This review will highlight three recently published clinical studies using intramuscular DNA administration with electroporation.

  13. The Murine Intravaginal HSV-2 Challenge Model for Investigation of DNA Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Marshak, Joshua O.; Dong, Lichun; Koelle, David M.

    2014-01-01

    DNA vaccines have been licensed in veterinary medicine and have promise for humans. This format is relatively immunogenic in mice and guinea pigs, the two principle HSV-2 animal models, permitting rapid assessment of vectors, antigens, adjuvants, and delivery systems. Limitations include the relatively poor immunogenicity of naked DNA in humans and the profound differences in HSV-2 pathogenesis between host species. Herein, we detail lessons learned over the last few years investigating candidate DNA vaccines in the progesterone-primed female mouse vaginal model of HSV-2 infection as a guide to investigators in the field. PMID:24671693

  14. Mushroom lectin enhanced immunogenicity of HBV DNA vaccine in C57BL/6 and HBsAg-transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Gao, Wenjuan; Sun, Yuhan; Chen, Shiwen; Zhang, Jingyao; Kang, Jingjing; Wang, Yongqiang; Wang, Hexiang; Xia, Guoliang; Liu, Qinghong; Kang, Youmin

    2013-04-26

    DNA vaccination is a promising strategy for activating immune responses against hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection. However, the accumulated data have shown that DNA vaccination alone generates weak immune responses. To enhance the immunogenicity of HBV DNA vaccine, lectin purified from pleurotus ostreatus (POL) was used as adjuvant of HBV DNA vaccine for C57BL/6 and HBV surface antigen transgenic (HBVsAg-Tg) mice. Our data demonstrate that low dose of POL (1 μg/mouse) in conjunction with HBV DNA vaccine stimulated stronger HBV-specific delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) responses and higher HBV-specific IgG level than that in high dose of POL groups (5 μg/mouse and 10 μg/mouse). POL activated strong Th2 and Tc1 cell responses in immunized C57BL/6 and HBVsAg-Tg mice. POL as adjuvant of HBV DNA vaccine effectively enhanced HBV surface protein antibody (HBVsAb) and decreased HBVsAg level for HBV Tg mice treatment. Furthermore, POL infiltrated more lymphocytes excluding Th1, Th2 and Tc1 cell subtypes to liver of HBVsAg-Tg mice. Together, these results suggest that POL as adjuvant enhanced immunogenicity of HBV DNA vaccination and effectively stimulated immune reaponse for HBsAg-Tg mice treatment. Our findings implicate the potential of mushroom lectin as adjuvant of HBV DNA vaccine.

  15. The comparative efficacy of CTLA-4 and L-selectin targeted DNA vaccines in mice and sheep.

    PubMed

    Drew, D R; Boyle, J S; Lew, A M; Lightowlers, M W; Chaplin, P J; Strugnell, R A

    2001-08-14

    The access of antigens to antigen presenting cells (APCs) appears to be a rate-limiting step in the generation of immune responses to DNA vaccines. The cytotoxic T lymphocyte antigen 4 (CTLA-4) and L-selectin represent attractive ligands for use in the targeting of antigen to APCs and lymph nodes. CTLA-4 binds with high affinity to the B7 membrane antigen on APCs, while L-selectin functions as a lymphocyte homing marker and binds to CD34 on the surface of high endothelial venule cells. DNA vaccines encoding human immunoglobulin (HIg), fused to either CTLA-4 or L-selectin, have been shown to generate up to 10,000-fold higher anti-HIg antibody responses than DNA vaccines encoding HIg alone. In this study, the ability of CTLA-4 or L-selectin mediated targeting to enhance the humoral immune response to an alternate vaccine antigen was investigated. DNA vaccines encoding CTLA-4-HIg and L-selectin-HIg fused to the host-protective 45W antigen from Taenia ovis were constructed. In BALB/c mice, the L-selectin targeted vaccine did not improve either the magnitude or speed of antibody responses of vaccinated mice. In contrast, the CTLA-4 targeted DNA vaccine generated 45W-specific antibody responses which were up to 30-fold higher than those achieved with non-targeted DNA vaccination. The kinetic of the antibody response generated following CTLA-4 targeted DNA vaccination was also significantly faster than that achieved with non-targeted DNA vaccination, or with adjuvanted protein vaccination. Vaccination of outbred sheep with DNA vaccines expressing either murine or ovine CTLA-4 targeted antigen failed to enhance immune responses. These findings indicate that CTLA-4 targeting may find application in the improvement of DNA vaccines, but requires further development for applications in large animal species.

  16. Immune-Enhancing Effects of Taishan Pinus massoniana Pollen Polysaccharides on DNA Vaccine Expressing Bordetella avium ompA

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Fujie; Liu, Xiao; Sun, Zhenhong; Yu, Cuilian; Liu, Liping; Yang, Shifa; Li, Bing; Wei, Kai; Zhu, Ruiliang

    2016-01-01

    Bordetella avium is the causative agent of bordetellosis, which remains to be the cause of severe losses in the turkey industry. Given the lack of vaccines that can provide good protection, developing a novel vaccine against B. avium infection is crucial. In this study, we constructed a eukaryotic expression plasmid, which expressed the outer membrane protein A (ompA) of B. avium, to prepare a B. avium recombinant ompA-DNA vaccine. Three concentrations (low, middle, and high) of Taishan Pinus massoniana pollen polysaccharides (TPPPS), a known immunomodulator, were used as adjuvants, and their immune conditioning effects on the developed DNA vaccine were examined. The pure ompA-DNA vaccine, Freund’s incomplete adjuvant ompA-DNA vaccine, and the empty plasmid served as the controls. The chickens in each group were separately inoculated with these vaccines three times at 1, 7, and 14 days old. Dynamic changes in antibody production, cytokine secretion, and lymphocyte count were then determined from 7 to 49 days after the first inoculation. Protective rates of the vaccines were also determined after the third inoculation. Results showed that the pure DNA vaccine obviously induced the production of antibodies, the secretion of cytokines, and the increase in CD4+ and CD8+ T lymphocyte counts in peripheral blood, as well as provided a protective rate of 50% to the B. avium-challenged chickens. The chickens inoculated with the TPPPS adjuvant ompA-DNA vaccine and Freund’s adjuvant ompA-DNA vaccine demonstrated higher levels of immune responses than those inoculated with pure ompA-DNA vaccine, whereas only the ompA-DNA vaccine with 200 mg/mL TPPPS completely protected the chickens against B. avium infection. These findings indicate that the B. avium ompA-DNA vaccine combined with TPPPS is a potentially effective B. avium vaccine. PMID:26870023

  17. Electroporation-mediated administration of candidate DNA vaccines against HIV-1.

    PubMed

    Vasan, Sandhya

    2014-01-01

    Vaccines to prevent HIV remain desperately needed, but a number of challenges, including retroviral integration, establishment of anatomic reservoir sites, high sequence diversity, and heavy envelope glycosylation. have precluded development of a highly effective vaccine. DNA vaccines have been utilized as candidate HIV vaccines because of their ability to generate cellular and humoral immune responses, the lack of anti-vector response allowing for repeat administration, and their ability to prime the response to viral-vectored vaccines. Because the HIV epidemic has disproportionately affected the developing world, the favorable thermostability profile and relative ease and low cost of manufacture of DNA vaccines offer additional advantages. In vivo electroporation (EP) has been utilized to improve immune responses to DNA vaccines as candidate HIV-1 vaccines in standalone or prime-boost regimens with both proteins and viral-vectored vaccines in several animal models and, more recently, in human clinical trials. This chapter describes the preclinical and clinical development of candidate DNA vaccines for HIV-1 delivered by EP, including challenges to bringing this technology to the developing world.

  18. Recent advances in design of immunogenic and effective naked DNA vaccines against cancer.

    PubMed

    Fioretti, Daniela; Iurescia, Sandra; Rinaldi, Monica

    2014-01-01

    A variety of clinical trials for vaccines against cancer have provided evidence that DNA vaccines are well tolerated and have an excellent safety profile. DNA vaccines require much improvement to make them sufficiently effective against cancer in the clinic. Nowadays, it is clear that an increased antigen expression correlates with improved immunogenicity and it is critical to vaccine performance in large animals and humans. Similarly, additional strategies are required to activate effective immunity against poorly immunogenic tumour antigens. This review discusses very recent scientific references focused on the development of sophisticated DNA vaccines against cancer. We report a selection of novel and relevant patents employed to improve their immunogenicity through several strategies such as the use of tissue-specific transcriptional elements, nuclear localisation signalling, codon-optimisation and by targeting antigenic proteins to secretory pathway. Recent patents validating portions or splice variants of tumour antigens as candidates for cancer DNA vaccines with improved specificity, such as mesothelin and hTERT, are also discussed. Lastly, we review novel patents on the use of genetic immunomodulators, such as "universal" T helper epitopes derived from tetanus toxin, E. coli heat labile enterotoxin and vegetable proteins, as well as cytokines, chemokines or costimulatory molecules such as IL-6, IL-15, IL- 21 to amplify immunity against cancer.

  19. DNA vaccine encoding Haemonchus contortus actin induces partial protection in goats.

    PubMed

    Yan, Ruofeng; Wang, Jingjing; Xu, Lixin; Song, Xiaokai; Li, Xiangrui

    2014-10-01

    Actin is a globular multi-functional protein that forms microfilaments, and participates in many important cellular processes. Previous study found that Haemonchus contortus actin could be recognized by the serum of goats infected with the homology parasite. This indicated that H. contortus actin could be a potential candidate for vaccine. In this study, DNA vaccine encoding H. contortus actin was tested for protection against experimental H. contortus infections in goats. Fifteen goats were allocated into three trial groups. The animals of Actin group were vaccinated with the DNA vaccine on day 0 and 14, and challenged with 5000 infective H. contortus third stage larval (L3) on day 28. An unvaccinated positive control group was challenged with L3 at the same time. An unvaccinated negative control group was not challenged with L3. The results showed that DNA vaccine were transcribed at local injection sites and expressed in vivo post immunizations respectively. For goats in Actin vaccinated group, higher levels of serum IgG, serum IgA and mucosal IgA were produced, the percentages of CD4(+) T lymphocytes, CD8(+) T lymphocytes and B lymphocytes and the concentrations of TGF-β were increased significantly (P<0.05). Following L3 challenge, the mean eggs per gram feces (EPG) and worm burdens of Actin group were reduced by 34.4% and 33.1%, respectively. This study suggest that recombinant H. contortus Actin DNA vaccine induced partial immune response and has protective potential against goat haemonchosis.

  20. Engineering nanoparticle-coated bacteria as oral DNA vaccines for cancer immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Hu, Qinglian; Wu, Min; Fang, Chun; Cheng, Changyong; Zhao, Mengmeng; Fang, Weihuan; Chu, Paul K; Ping, Yuan; Tang, Guping

    2015-04-01

    Live attenuated bacteria are of increasing importance in biotechnology and medicine in the emerging field of cancer immunotherapy. Oral DNA vaccination mediated by live attenuated bacteria often suffers from low infection efficiency due to various biological barriers during the infection process. To this end, we herein report, for the first time, a new strategy to engineer cationic nanoparticle-coated bacterial vectors that can efficiently deliver oral DNA vaccine for efficacious cancer immunotherapy. By coating live attenuated bacteria with synthetic nanoparticles self-assembled from cationic polymers and plasmid DNA, the protective nanoparticle coating layer is able to facilitate bacteria to effectively escape phagosomes, significantly enhance the acid tolerance of bacteria in stomach and intestines, and greatly promote dissemination of bacteria into blood circulation after oral administration. Most importantly, oral delivery of DNA vaccines encoding autologous vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR2) by this hybrid vector showed remarkable T cell activation and cytokine production. Successful inhibition of tumor growth was also achieved by efficient oral delivery of VEGFR2 with nanoparticle-coated bacterial vectors due to angiogenesis suppression in the tumor vasculature and tumor necrosis. This proof-of-concept work demonstrates that coating live bacterial cells with synthetic nanoparticles represents a promising strategy to engineer efficient and versatile DNA vaccines for the era of immunotherapy.

  1. Antigen Targeting to Human HLA Class II Molecules Increases Efficacy of DNA Vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Fredriksen, Agnete Brunsvik; Løset, Geir Åge; Vikse, Elisabeth; Fugger, Lars

    2016-01-01

    It has been difficult to translate promising results from DNA vaccination in mice to larger animals and humans. Previously, DNA vaccines encoding proteins that target Ag to MHC class II (MHC-II) molecules on APCs have been shown to induce rapid, enhanced, and long-lasting Ag-specific Ab titers in mice. In this study, we describe two novel DNA vaccines that as proteins target HLA class II (HLA-II) molecules. These vaccine proteins cross-react with MHC-II molecules in several species of larger mammals. When tested in ferrets and pigs, a single DNA delivery with low doses of the HLA-II–targeted vaccines resulted in rapid and increased Ab responses. Importantly, painless intradermal jet delivery of DNA was as effective as delivery by needle injection followed by electroporation. As an indication that the vaccines could also be useful for human application, HLA-II–targeted vaccine proteins were found to increase human CD4+ T cell responses by a factor of ×103 in vitro. Thus, targeting of Ag to MHC-II molecules may represent an attractive strategy for increasing efficacy of DNA vaccines in larger animals and humans. PMID:27671110

  2. Synergistic antitumor efficacy of combined DNA vaccines targeting tumor cells and angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Yin, Xiaotao; Wang, Wei; Zhu, Xiaoming; Wang, Yu; Wu, Shuai; Wang, Zicheng; Wang, Lin; Du, Zhiyan; Gao, Jiangping; Yu, Jiyun

    2015-09-18

    To further enhance the antitumor efficacy of DNA vaccine, we proposed a synergistic strategy that targeted tumor cells and angiogenesis simultaneously. In this study, a Semliki Forest Virus (SFV) replicon DNA vaccine expressing 1-4 domains of murine VEGFR2 and IL12 was constructed, and was named pSVK-VEGFR2-GFc-IL12 (CAVE). The expression of VEGFR2 antigen and IL12 adjuvant molecule in 293T cells in vitro were verified by western blot and enzyme-linked immune sorbent assay (ELISA). Then CAVE was co-immunized with CAVA, a SFV replicon DNA vaccine targeting survivin and β-hCG antigens constructed previously. The antitumor efficacy of our combined replicon vaccines was evaluated in mice model and the possible mechanism was further investigated. The combined vaccines could elicit efficient humoral and cellular immune responses against survivin, β-hCG and VEGFR2 simultaneously. Compared with CAVE or CAVA vaccine alone, the combined vaccines inhibited the tumor growth and improved the survival rate in B16 melanoma mice model more effectively. Furthermore, the intratumoral microvessel density was lowest in combined vaccines group than CAVE or CAVA alone group. Therefore, this synergistic strategy of DNA vaccines for tumor treatment results in an increased antitumor efficacy, and may be more suitable for translation to future research and clinic. PMID:26253468

  3. First isolation of hirame rhabdovirus from freshwater fish in Europe.

    PubMed

    Borzym, E; Matras, M; Maj-Paluch, J; Baud, M; De Boisséson, C; Talbi, C; Olesen, N J; Bigarré, L

    2014-05-01

    A rhabdovirus was isolated in cell culture inoculated with tissue material from diseased grayling, Thymallus thymallus (L.), originating from a fish farm affected by a mortality episode in Poland. Diagnostics tests showed that the virus was not related to novirhabdoviruses known in Europe, nor to vesiculovirus-like species, except perch rhabdovirus (PRhV) with which it shared moderate serological relations. However, RT-PCR with PRhV probes gave negative results. To identify the virus, a random-priming sequence-independent single primer amplification was adopted. Surprisingly, two of the obtained sequences exhibited a high identity (>99%) with hirame rhabdovirus (HIRRV), a novirhabdovirus usually found in fish in marine Asiatic countries, for instance Japan, China and Korea. The full-length sequence of the phosphoprotein gene (P) demonstrated a higher identity of the present isolate with HIRRV from China compared with the Korean isolate. An identical viral sequence was also found in brown trout, Salmo trutta trutta L., affected by mortalities in a second farm in the same region, after a likely contamination from the grayling farm. To our knowledge, this is the first report of HIRRV in Europe, and in two hosts from fresh water that have not been described before as susceptible species.

  4. Epitope-driven DNA vaccine design employing immunoinformatics against B-cell lymphoma: a biotech's challenge.

    PubMed

    Iurescia, Sandra; Fioretti, Daniela; Fazio, Vito Michele; Rinaldi, Monica

    2012-01-01

    DNA vaccination has been widely explored to develop new, alternative and efficient vaccines for cancer immunotherapy. DNA vaccines offer several benefits such as specific targeting, use of multiple genes to enhance immunity and reduced risk compared to conventional vaccines. Rapid developments in molecular biology and immunoinformatics enable rational design approaches. These technologies allow construction of DNA vaccines encoding selected tumor antigens together with molecules to direct and amplify the desired effector pathways, as well as highly targeted vaccines aimed at specific epitopes. Reliable predictions of immunogenic T cell epitope peptides are crucial for rational vaccine design and represent a key problem in immunoinformatics. Computational approaches have been developed to facilitate the process of epitope detection and show potential applications to the immunotherapeutic treatment of cancer. In this review a number of different epitope prediction methods are briefly illustrated and effective use of these resources to support experimental studies is described. Epitope-driven vaccine design employs these bioinformatics algorithms to identify potential targets of vaccines against cancer. In this paper the selection of T cell epitopes to develop epitope-based vaccines, the need for CD4(+) T cell help for improved vaccines and the assessment of vaccine performance against tumor are reviewed. We focused on two applications, namely prediction of novel T cell epitopes and epitope enhancement by sequence modification, and combined rationale design with bioinformatics for creation of new synthetic mini-genes. This review describes the development of epitope-based DNA vaccines and their antitumor effects in preclinical research against B-cell lymphoma, corroborating the usefulness of this platform as a potential tool for cancer therapy. Achievements in the field of DNA vaccines allow to overcome hurdles to clinical translation. In a scenario where the vaccine

  5. Studies on the development of DNA vaccine against Cysticercus cellulosae infection and its efficacy.

    PubMed

    Cai, X; Chai, Z; Jing, Z; Wang, P; Luo, X; Chen, J; Dou, Y; Feng, S; Su, C; Jin, J

    2001-01-01

    DNA vaccine against Cysticercus cellulosae infection was developed and its efficacy was tested. A pair of primers specific to antigen B gene of C. cellulosae was designed which amplified the gene successfully with RT-PCR. The gene was ligated to PV93 vector, and the recombinant of antigen B gene and PV93 was transformed to JM83 cells. The transformed JM83 cells were cultured in a large scale and the plasmid purified. Based on the recombinant plasmid. a DNA vaccine was developed and used to vaccinate two groups of experimental pigs. In each group, there was a routine vaccine, an enhanced vaccine and a control group. Groups 1 and 2 were challenged at 4 months and at 14 days post vaccination respectively with eggs of Taenia solium. The antibody response was also tested with ELISA. The results suggested that all animals vaccinated AgB gene DNA vaccine, no matter by routine or enhanced vaccine, their antibodies reached maximum peak 23 days post vaccination and decreased gradually. When the animals were challenged 4 months after vaccination, they had strong immunity and the parasites decrease rates were 91.2% and 93.1% respectively. When pigs vaccinated with AgB gene DNA vaccine were challenged 14 days post vaccination with 18,000 eggs/pig. The animals showed strong immunity and the parasite decrease rates were 99.5% and 84.9% respectively. However at that time, the antibodies did not reach the peak. While in the control group, the number of C. cellulosae was as many as 2,500. It was concluded that the pigs vaccinated with DNA vaccine had strong immunity against infection of eggs of T. solium.

  6. DNA vaccination of bison to brucellar antigens elicits elevated antibody and IFN-γ responses.

    PubMed

    Clapp, Beata; Walters, Nancy; Thornburg, Theresa; Hoyt, Teri; Yang, Xinghong; Pascual, David W

    2011-07-01

    Brucella abortus remains a threat to the health and well-being of livestock in states bordering the Greater Yellowstone Area. During the past several years, cohabitation of infected wildlife with cattle has jeopardized the brucellosis-free status of Idaho, USA; Wyoming, USA; and Montana, USA. Current livestock B. abortus vaccines have not proven to be efficacious in bison (Bison bison) or elk (Cervus elaphus nelsoni). One problem with the lack of vaccine efficacy may stem from the failure to understand wildlife immune responses to vaccines. In an attempt to understand their immune responses, bison were vaccinated with eukaryotic DNA expression vectors encoding the Brucella periplasmic protein, bp26, and the chaperone protein, trigger factor (TF). These DNA vaccines have previously been shown to be protective against Brucella infection in mice. Bison were immunized intramuscularly at weeks 0, 2, and 4 with bp26 and TF DNA vaccines plus CpG adjuvant or empty vector (control) plus CpG. Blood samples were collected before vaccination and at 8, 10, and 12 wk after primary vaccination. The results showed that bison immunized with bp26 and TF DNA vaccines developed enhanced antibody, proliferative T cell, and interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) responses upon in vitro restimulation with purified recombinant bp26 or TF antigens, unlike bison immunized with empty vector. Flow cytometric analysis revealed that the percentages of CD4(+) and CD8(+) T lymphocytes from the DNA-vaccinated groups were significantly greater than they were for those bison given empty vector. These data suggest that DNA vaccination of bison may elicit strong cellular immune responses and serve as an alternative for vaccination of bison for brucellosis.

  7. Unique immunogenicity of hepatitis B virus DNA vaccine presented by live-attenuated Salmonella typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Woo, P C; Wong, L P; Zheng, B J; Yuen, K Y

    2001-04-01

    A novel vaccine for hepatitis B virus (HBV) was designed by putting a naked DNA vaccine carrying hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) into live-attenuated Salmonella typhimurium. Mucosal immunization by the oral route in mice showed significantly stronger cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) response than recombinant HBsAg vaccination (P < 0.01 at an effector:target ratio of 100:1), while comparable to intramuscular naked DNA immunization at all effector:target ratios. Contrary to previous reports on naked DNA vaccines given intramuscularly, the IgG antibody response induced by the mucosal DNA vaccine is relatively weak when compared to recombinant HBsAg vaccine (P < 0.001 at day 21). These findings are supported by a high interferon-gamma but a low interleukin-4 level detected in the supernatant of splenic cell cultures obtained from mucosally immunized mice. As distinct to recombinant HBsAg vaccine which is effective for protection, oral mucosal DNA vaccine should be considered as a candidate for therapeutic immunization in chronic HBV infection, donor immunization before adoptive transfer of HBV-specific CTL to HBsAg positive bone marrow transplant recipients, and immunization of non-responders to recombinant HBsAg vaccine. This strongly cellular and relatively absent humoral response may make this vaccine a better candidate as a therapeutic vaccine for chronic HBV carriers than naked DNA vaccines, as the humoral response is relatively less important for the clearance of HBV from hepatocytes, but its presence may lead to side effects such as serum sickness and immune complex deposition in chronic HBV carriers.

  8. Electroporation mediated DNA vaccination directly to a mucosal surface results in improved immune responses.

    PubMed

    Kichaev, Gleb; Mendoza, Janess M; Amante, Dinah; Smith, Trevor R F; McCoy, Jay R; Sardesai, Niranjan Y; Broderick, Kate E

    2013-10-01

    In vivo electroporation (EP) has been shown to be a highly efficient non-viral method for enhancing DNA vaccine delivery and immunogenicity, when the site of immunization is the skin or muscle of animals and humans. However, the route of entry for many microbial pathogens is via the mucosal surfaces of the human body. We have previously reported on minimally invasive, surface and contactless EP devices for enhanced DNA delivery to dermal tissue. Robust antibody responses were induced following vaccine delivery in several tested animal models using these devices. Here, we investigated extending the modality of the surface device to efficiently deliver DNA vaccines to mucosal tissue. Initially, we demonstrated reporter gene expression in the epithelial layer of buccal mucosa in a guinea pig model. There was minimal tissue damage in guinea pig mucosal tissue resulting from EP. Delivery of a DNA vaccine encoding influenza virus nucleoprotein (NP) of influenza H1N1 elicited robust and sustained systemic IgG antibody responses following EP-enhanced delivery in the mucosa. Upon further analysis, IgA antibody responses were detected in vaginal washes and sustained cellular immune responses were detected in animals immunized at the oral mucosa with the surface EP device. This data confirms that DNA delivery and EP targeting mucosal tissue directly results in both robust and sustainable humoral as well as cellular immune responses without tissue damage. These responses are seen both in the mucosa and systemically in the blood. Direct DNA vaccine delivery enhanced by EP in mucosa may have important clinical applications for delivery of prophylactic and therapeutic DNA vaccines against diseases such as HIV, HPV and pneumonia that enter at mucosal sites and require both cellular and humoral immune responses for protection. PMID:23954979

  9. Cellular and Molecular Interactions of Rhabdoviruses with their Insect and Plant Hosts

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The rhabdoviruses form a large family (Rhabdoviridae) whose host ranges include humans, other vertebrates, invertebrates, and plants. There are about 75 plant-infecting rhabdoviruses described, several of which are economically important pathogens that are persistently transmitted to their plant ho...

  10. Cellular and molecular aspects of rhabdovirus interactions with insect and plant hosts.

    PubMed

    Ammar, El-Desouky; Tsai, Chi-Wei; Whitfield, Anna E; Redinbaugh, Margaret G; Hogenhout, Saskia A

    2009-01-01

    The rhabdoviruses form a large family (Rhabdoviridae) whose host ranges include humans, other vertebrates, invertebrates, and plants. There are at least 90 plant-infecting rhabdoviruses, several of which are economically important pathogens of various crops. All definitive plant-infecting and many vertebrate-infecting rhabdoviruses are persistently transmitted by insect vectors, and a few putative plant rhabdoviruses are transmitted by mites. Plant rhabdoviruses replicate in their plant and arthropod hosts, and transmission by vectors is highly specific, with each virus species transmitted by one or a few related insect species, mainly aphids, leafhoppers, or planthoppers. Here, we provide an overview of plant rhabdovirus interactions with their insect hosts and of how these interactions compare with those of vertebrate-infecting viruses and with the Sigma rhabdovirus that infects Drosophila flies. We focus on cellular and molecular aspects of vector/host specificity, transmission barriers, and virus receptors in the vectors. In addition, we briefly discuss recent advances in understanding rhabdovirus-plant interactions.

  11. An Epitope-Substituted DNA Vaccine Improves Safety and Immunogenicity against Dengue Virus Type 2.

    PubMed

    Tang, Chung-Tao; Li, Pi-Chun; Liu, I-Ju; Liao, Mei-Ying; Chiu, Chiung-Yi; Chao, Day-Yu; Wu, Han-Chung

    2015-01-01

    Dengue virus (DENV), a global disease, is divided into four serotypes (DENV1-4). Cross-reactive and non-neutralizing antibodies against envelope (E) protein of DENV bind to the Fcγ receptors (FcγR) of cells, and thereby exacerbate viral infection by heterologous serotypes via antibody-dependent enhancement (ADE). Identification and modification of enhancing epitopes may mitigate enhancement of DENV infection. In this study, we characterized the cross-reactive DB21-6 and DB39-2 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against domain I-II of DENV; these antibodies poorly neutralized and potently enhanced DENV infection both in vitro and in vivo. In addition, two enhancing mAbs, DB21-6 and DB39-2, were observed to compete with sera antibodies from patients infected with dengue. The epitopes of these enhancing mAbs were identified using phage display, structural prediction, and mapping of virus-like particle (VLP) mutants. N8, R9, V12, and E13 are the reactive residues of DB21-6, while N8, R9, and E13 are the reactive residues of DB39-2. N8 substitution tends to maintain VLP secretion, and decreases the binding activity of DB21-6 and DB39-2. The immunized sera from N8 substitution (N8R) DNA vaccine exerted greater neutralizing and protective activity than wild-type (WT)-immunized sera, both in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, treatment with N8R-immunized sera reduced the enhancement of mortality in AG129 mice. These results support identification and substitution of enhancing epitope as a novel strategy for developing safe dengue vaccines. PMID:26135599

  12. DNA vaccines encoding altered peptide ligands for SSX2 enhance epitope-specific CD8+ T-cell immune responses☆

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Heath A.; Rekoske, Brian T.; McNeel, Douglas G.

    2014-01-01

    Plasmid DNA serves as a simple and easily modifiable form of antigen delivery for vaccines. The USDA approval of DNA vaccines for several non-human diseases underscores the potential of this type of antigen delivery method as a cost-effective approach for the treatment or prevention of human diseases, including cancer. However, while DNA vaccines have demonstrated safety and immunological effect in early phase clinical trials, they have not consistently elicited robust anti-tumor responses. Hence many recent efforts have sought to increase the immunological efficacy of DNA vaccines, and we have specifically evaluated several target antigens encoded by DNA vaccine as treatments for human prostate cancer. In particular, we have focused on SSX2 as one potential target antigen, given its frequent expression in metastatic prostate cancer. We have previously identified two peptides, p41–49 and p103–111, as HLA-A2-restricted SSX2-specific epitopes. In the present study we sought to determine whether the efficacy of a DNA vaccine could be enhanced by an altered peptide ligand (APL) strategy wherein modifications were made to anchor residues of these epitopes to enhance or ablate their binding to HLA-A2. A DNA vaccine encoding APL modified to increase epitope binding elicited robust peptide-specific CD8+ T cells producing Th1 cytokines specific for each epitope. Ablation of one epitope in a DNA vaccine did not enhance immune responses to the other epitope. These results demonstrate that APL encoded by a DNA vaccine can be used to elicit increased numbers of antigen-specific T cells specific for multiple epitopes simultaneously, and suggest this could be a general approach to improve the immunogenicity of DNA vaccines encoding tumor antigens. PMID:24492013

  13. Genetic diversity of perch rhabdoviruses isolates based on the nucleoprotein and glycoprotein genes.

    PubMed

    Talbi, Chiraz; Cabon, Joelle; Baud, Marine; Bourjaily, Maya; de Boisséson, Claire; Castric, Jeannette; Bigarré, Laurent

    2011-12-01

    Despite the increasing impact of rhabdoviruses in European percid farming, the diversity of the viral populations is still poorly investigated. To address this issue, we sequenced the partial nucleoprotein (N) and complete glycoprotein (G) genes of nine rhabdoviruses isolated from perch (Perca fluviatilis) between 1999 and 2010, mostly from France, and analyzed six of them by immunofluorescence antibody test (IFAT). Using two rabbit antisera raised against either the reference perch rhabdovirus (PRhV) isolated in 1980 or the perch isolate R6146, two serogroups were distinguished. Meanwhile, based on partial N and complete G gene analysis, perch rhabdoviruses were divided into four genogroups, A-B-D and E, with a maximum of 32.9% divergence (G gene) between isolates. A comparison of the G amino acid sequences of isolates from the two identified serogroups revealed several variable regions that might account for antigenic differences. Comparative analysis of perch isolates with other rhabdoviruses isolated from black bass, pike-perch and pike showed some strong phylogenetic relationships, suggesting cross-host transmission. Similarly, striking genetic similarities were shown between perch rhabdoviruses and isolates from other European countries and various ecological niches, most likely reflecting the circulation of viruses through fish trade as well as putative transfers from marine to freshwater fish. Phylogenetic relationships of the newly characterized viruses were also determined within the family Rhabdoviridae. The analysis revealed a genetic cluster containing only fish viruses, including all rhabdoviruses from perch, as well as siniperca chuatsi rhabdovirus (SCRV) and eel virus X (EVEX). This cluster was distinct from the one represented by spring viraemia of carp vesiculovirus (SVCV), pike fry rhabdovirus (PFRV) and mammalian vesiculoviruses. The new genetic data provided in the present study shed light on the diversity of rhabdoviruses infecting perch in

  14. A cytomegalovirus DNA vaccine induces antibodies that block viral entry into fibroblasts and epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    McVoy, Michael A; Lee, Ronzo; Saccoccio, Frances M; Hartikka, Jukka; Smith, Larry R; Mahajan, Rohit; Wang, Jian Ben; Cui, Xiaohong; Adler, Stuart P

    2015-12-16

    A vaccine to prevent congenital cytomegalovirus (CMV) infections is a national priority. Investigational vaccines have targeted the viral glycoprotein B (gB) as an inducer of neutralizing antibodies and phosphoprotein 65 (pp65) as an inducer of cytotoxic T cells. Antibodies to gB neutralize CMV entry into all cell types but their potency is low compared to antibodies that block epithelial cell entry through targeting the pentameric complex (gH/gL/UL128/UL130/UL131). Hence, more potent overall neutralizing responses may result from a vaccine that combines gB with pentameric complex-derived antigens. To assess the ability of pentameric complex subunits to generate epithelial entry neutralizing antibodies, DNA vaccines encoding UL128, UL130, and/or UL131 were formulated with Vaxfectin(®), an adjuvant that enhances antibody responses to DNA vaccines. Mice were immunized with individual DNA vaccines or with pair-wise or trivalent combinations. Only the UL130 vaccine induced epithelial entry neutralizing antibodies and no synergy was observed from bi- or trivalent combinations. In rabbits the UL130 vaccine again induced epithelial entry neutralizing antibodies while UL128 or UL131 vaccines did not. To evaluate compatibility of the UL130 vaccine with DNA vaccines encoding gB or pp65, mono-, bi-, or trivalent combinations were evaluated. Fibroblast and epithelial entry neutralizing titers did not differ between rabbits immunized with gB alone vs. gB/UL130, gB/pp65, or gB/UL130/pp65 combinations, indicating a lack of antagonism from coadministration of DNA vaccines. Importantly, gB-induced epithelial entry neutralizing titers were substantially higher than activities induced by UL130, and both fibroblast and epithelial entry neutralizing titers induced by gB alone as well as gB/pp65 or gB/UL130/pp65 combinations were comparable to those observed in sera from humans with naturally-acquired CMV infections. These findings support further development of Vaxfectin

  15. DNA Vaccines Encoding Antigen Targeted to MHC Class II Induce Influenza-Specific CD8+ T Cell Responses, Enabling Faster Resolution of Influenza Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lambert, Laura; Kinnear, Ekaterina; McDonald, Jacqueline U.; Grodeland, Gunnveig; Bogen, Bjarne; Stubsrud, Elisabeth; Lindeberg, Mona M.; Fredriksen, Agnete Brunsvik; Tregoning, John S.

    2016-01-01

    Current influenza vaccines are effective but imperfect, failing to cover against emerging strains of virus and requiring seasonal administration to protect against new strains. A key step to improving influenza vaccines is to improve our understanding of vaccine-induced protection. While it is clear that antibodies play a protective role, vaccine-induced CD8+ T cells can improve protection. To further explore the role of CD8+ T cells, we used a DNA vaccine that encodes antigen dimerized to an immune cell targeting module. Immunizing CB6F1 mice with the DNA vaccine in a heterologous prime-boost regime with the seasonal protein vaccine improved the resolution of influenza disease compared with protein alone. This improved disease resolution was dependent on CD8+ T cells. However, DNA vaccine regimes that induced CD8+ T cells alone were not protective and did not boost the protection provided by protein. The MHC-targeting module used was an anti-I-Ed single chain antibody specific to the BALB/c strain of mice. To test the role of MHC targeting, we compared the response between BALB/c, C57BL/6 mice, and an F1 cross of the two strains (CB6F1). BALB/c mice were protected, C57BL/6 were not, and the F1 had an intermediate phenotype; showing that the targeting of antigen is important in the response. Based on these findings, and in agreement with other studies using different vaccines, we conclude that, in addition to antibody, inducing a protective CD8 response is important in future influenza vaccines.

  16. DNA Vaccines Encoding Antigen Targeted to MHC Class II Induce Influenza-Specific CD8(+) T Cell Responses, Enabling Faster Resolution of Influenza Disease.

    PubMed

    Lambert, Laura; Kinnear, Ekaterina; McDonald, Jacqueline U; Grodeland, Gunnveig; Bogen, Bjarne; Stubsrud, Elisabeth; Lindeberg, Mona M; Fredriksen, Agnete Brunsvik; Tregoning, John S

    2016-01-01

    Current influenza vaccines are effective but imperfect, failing to cover against emerging strains of virus and requiring seasonal administration to protect against new strains. A key step to improving influenza vaccines is to improve our understanding of vaccine-induced protection. While it is clear that antibodies play a protective role, vaccine-induced CD8(+) T cells can improve protection. To further explore the role of CD8(+) T cells, we used a DNA vaccine that encodes antigen dimerized to an immune cell targeting module. Immunizing CB6F1 mice with the DNA vaccine in a heterologous prime-boost regime with the seasonal protein vaccine improved the resolution of influenza disease compared with protein alone. This improved disease resolution was dependent on CD8(+) T cells. However, DNA vaccine regimes that induced CD8(+) T cells alone were not protective and did not boost the protection provided by protein. The MHC-targeting module used was an anti-I-E(d) single chain antibody specific to the BALB/c strain of mice. To test the role of MHC targeting, we compared the response between BALB/c, C57BL/6 mice, and an F1 cross of the two strains (CB6F1). BALB/c mice were protected, C57BL/6 were not, and the F1 had an intermediate phenotype; showing that the targeting of antigen is important in the response. Based on these findings, and in agreement with other studies using different vaccines, we conclude that, in addition to antibody, inducing a protective CD8 response is important in future influenza vaccines. PMID:27602032

  17. DNA Vaccines Encoding Antigen Targeted to MHC Class II Induce Influenza-Specific CD8+ T Cell Responses, Enabling Faster Resolution of Influenza Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lambert, Laura; Kinnear, Ekaterina; McDonald, Jacqueline U.; Grodeland, Gunnveig; Bogen, Bjarne; Stubsrud, Elisabeth; Lindeberg, Mona M.; Fredriksen, Agnete Brunsvik; Tregoning, John S.

    2016-01-01

    Current influenza vaccines are effective but imperfect, failing to cover against emerging strains of virus and requiring seasonal administration to protect against new strains. A key step to improving influenza vaccines is to improve our understanding of vaccine-induced protection. While it is clear that antibodies play a protective role, vaccine-induced CD8+ T cells can improve protection. To further explore the role of CD8+ T cells, we used a DNA vaccine that encodes antigen dimerized to an immune cell targeting module. Immunizing CB6F1 mice with the DNA vaccine in a heterologous prime-boost regime with the seasonal protein vaccine improved the resolution of influenza disease compared with protein alone. This improved disease resolution was dependent on CD8+ T cells. However, DNA vaccine regimes that induced CD8+ T cells alone were not protective and did not boost the protection provided by protein. The MHC-targeting module used was an anti-I-Ed single chain antibody specific to the BALB/c strain of mice. To test the role of MHC targeting, we compared the response between BALB/c, C57BL/6 mice, and an F1 cross of the two strains (CB6F1). BALB/c mice were protected, C57BL/6 were not, and the F1 had an intermediate phenotype; showing that the targeting of antigen is important in the response. Based on these findings, and in agreement with other studies using different vaccines, we conclude that, in addition to antibody, inducing a protective CD8 response is important in future influenza vaccines. PMID:27602032

  18. Extract from Agaricus blazei Murill can enhance immune responses elicited by DNA vaccine against foot-and-mouth disease.

    PubMed

    Chen, Liang; Shao, Hanjuan

    2006-01-15

    The fungus Agaricus blazei Murill (ABM) is particularly rich in polysaccharides, which have shown particularly strong results in treating and preventing cancers. The goal of this study was to investigate whether co-administration of the ABM extract with foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) DNA vaccine could increase the immune responses. Compared with the control mice, which received FMDV DNA vaccine alone, significant increase in not only the FMDV-specific antibody response but also T cell proliferation was observed in mice which received FMDV DNA vaccine plus the ABM extract. Taken together, these results demonstrated that application of the ABM extract might provide a strategy to improve the efficacy of DNA vaccines.

  19. Protection against Vibrio alginolyticus in crimson snapper Lutjanus erythropterus immunized with a DNA vaccine containing the ompW gene.

    PubMed

    Cai, Shuang-Hu; Lu, Yi-Shan; Jian, Ji-Chang; Wang, Bei; Huang, Yu-Cong; Tang, Ju-Fen; Ding, Yu; Wu, Zao-He

    2013-09-24

    The outer membrane proteins of Vibrio alginolyticus play an important role in the virulence of the bacterium and are potential candidates for vaccine development. In the present study, the ompW gene was cloned, expressed and purified. A DNA vaccine was constructed by inserting the ompW gene into a pcDNA plasmid. Crimson snapper Lutjanus erythropterus (Bloch) were injected intramuscularly with the recombinant plasmid pcDNA-ompW. The expression of the DNA vaccine was detected in gill, head kidney, heart, liver, spleen and injection site muscle of crimson snapper by RT-PCR 7 and 28 d post-vaccination. The ELISA results demonstrated that the DNA vaccine produced an observable antibody response in all sera of the vaccinated fish. In addition, crimson snapper immunized with the DNA vaccine showed a relative percentage survival (RPS) of 92.53%, indicating effective protection against V. alginolyticus infection.

  20. DNA Vaccine that Targets Hemagglutinin to MHC Class II Molecules Rapidly Induces Antibody-Mediated Protection against Influenza

    PubMed Central

    Mjaaland, Siri; Roux, Kenneth H.; Fredriksen, Agnete Brunsvik

    2013-01-01

    New influenza A viruses with pandemic potential periodically emerge due to viral genomic reassortment. In the face of pandemic threats, production of conventional egg-based vaccines is time consuming and of limited capacity. We have developed in this study a novel DNA vaccine in which viral hemagglutinin (HA) is bivalently targeted to MHC class II (MHC II) molecules on APCs. Following DNA vaccination, transfected cells secreted vaccine proteins that bound MHC II on APCs and initiated adaptive immune responses. A single DNA immunization induced within 8 d protective levels of strain-specific Abs and also cross-reactive T cells. During the Mexican flu pandemic, a targeted DNA vaccine (HA from A/California/07/2009) was generated within 3 wk after the HA sequences were published online. These results suggest that MHC II–targeted DNA vaccines could play a role in situations of pandemic threats. The vaccine principle should be extendable to other infectious diseases. PMID:23956431

  1. A DN-mda5 Transgenic Zebrafish 1 Model Demonstrates that Mda5 Plays an Important Role in Snakehead Rhabdovirus Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Gabor, KA; Charette, JR; Pietraszewski, MJ; Wingfield, DJ; Shim, JS; Millard, PJ; Kim, CH

    2015-01-01

    Melanoma Differentiation-Associated protein 5 (MDA5) is a member of the retinoic acid-inducible gene I (RIG-I)-like receptor (RLR) family, which is a cytosolic pattern recognition receptor that detects viral nucleic acids. Here we show an Mda5-dependent response to rhabdovirus infection in vivo using a dominant-negative mda5 transgenic zebrafish. Dominant-negative mda5 zebrafish embryos displayed an impaired antiviral immune response compared to wild-type counterparts that can be rescued by recombinant full-length Mda5. To our knowledge, we have generated the first dominant-negative mda5 transgenic zebrafish and demonstrated a critical role for Mda5 in the antiviral response to rhabdovirus. PMID:25634485

  2. Field testing of Schistosoma japonicum DNA vaccines in cattle in China.

    PubMed

    Shi, Fuhui; Zhang, Yaobi; Lin, Jiaojiao; Zuo, Xin; Shen, Wei; Cai, Yiumin; Ye, Ping; Bickle, Quentin D; Taylor, Martin G

    2002-11-01

    Vaccines are needed to reduce the zoonotic reservoir of Schistosoma japonicum infection in bovines in China. We have developed two experimental DNA vaccines and have already shown these to be capable of inducing partial protection in water buffalo naturally exposed to the risk of S. japonicum infection in the field. We now report a similar field trial in cattle, the other major bovine reservoir host species in China. Groups of cattle were vaccinated with the VRSj28 vaccine or the VRSj23 vaccine, or, to test whether protection could be enhanced by combination vaccination, with both these DNA vaccines together. After vaccination, the cattle were exposed to natural infection in the field for a period of 54 days. Worm and egg counts carried out at the end of the experiment showed that each of the vaccine groups showed partial resistance, and that combined vaccination was not more effective than vaccination with the individual plasmids.

  3. Laboratory and field evaluation of Schistosoma japonicum DNA vaccines in sheep and water buffalo in China.

    PubMed

    Shi, F; Zhang, Y; Ye, P; Lin, J; Cai, Y; Shen, W; Bickle, Q D; Taylor, M G

    2001-11-12

    Vaccines are needed to control zoonotic Schistosoma japonicum infection and several vaccine candidates have now been identified. Two of these (Sj28GST and Sj23) have shown particular promise in sheep when injected with Freund's adjuvants. The objective of the present work was to find a vaccine formulation which may have potential for widespread use in the field. DNA vaccine formulations of these antigens were produced and tested first in sheep under laboratory conditions and then in both the laboratory and the field in water buffalo. In both host species partial protection as evidenced by a reduction in parasite counts in vaccinated compared with control animals was induced by both vaccines, and in water buffalo the vaccines were shown to be partially protective in the field as well as in the laboratory. These results suggest that the two DNA vaccines tested here may have potential for large-scale field use.

  4. Characterization of Durham virus, a novel rhabdovirus that encodes both a C and SH protein

    PubMed Central

    Allison, A. B.; Palacios, G.; Rosa, A. Travassos da; Popov, V. L.; Lu, L.; Xiao, S. Y.; DeToy, K.; Briese, T.; Lipkin, W. Ian; Keel, M. K.; Stallknecht, D. E.; Bishop, G. R.; Tesh, R. B.

    2010-01-01

    The family Rhabdoviridae is a diverse group of non-segmented, negative-sense RNA viruses that are distributed worldwide and infect a wide range of hosts including vertebrates, invertebrates, and plants. Of the 114 currently recognized vertebrate rhabdoviruses, relatively few have been well characterized at both the antigenic and genetic level; hence, the phylogenetic relationships between many of the vertebrate rhabdoviruses remain unknown. The present report describes a novel rhabdovirus isolated from the brain of a moribund American coot (Fulica americana) that exhibited neurological signs when found in Durham County, North Carolina, in 2005. Antigenic characterization of the virus revealed that it was serologically unrelated to 68 other known vertebrate rhabdoviruses. Genomic sequencing of the virus indicated that it shared the highest identity to Tupaia rhabdovirus (TUPV), and as only previously observed in TUPV, the genome encoded a putative C protein in an overlapping open reading frame (ORF) of the phosphoprotein gene and a small hydrophobic protein located in a novel ORF between the matrix and glycoprotein genes. Phylogenetic analysis of partial amino acid sequences of the nucleoprotein and polymerase proteins indicated that, in addition to TUPV, the virus was most closely related to avian and small mammal rhabdoviruses from Africa and North America. In this report, we present the morphological, pathological, antigenic, and genetic characterization of the new virus, tentatively named Durham virus (DURV), and discuss its potential evolutionary relationship to other vertebrate rhabdoviruses. PMID:20863863

  5. Characterization of Durham virus, a novel rhabdovirus that encodes both a C and SH protein.

    PubMed

    Allison, A B; Palacios, G; Travassos da Rosa, A; Popov, V L; Lu, L; Xiao, S Y; DeToy, K; Briese, T; Lipkin, W I; Keel, M K; Stallknecht, D E; Bishop, G R; Tesh, R B

    2011-01-01

    The family Rhabdoviridae is a diverse group of non-segmented, negative-sense RNA viruses that are distributed worldwide and infect a wide range of hosts including vertebrates, invertebrates, and plants. Of the 114 currently recognized vertebrate rhabdoviruses, relatively few have been well characterized at both the antigenic and genetic level; hence, the phylogenetic relationships between many of the vertebrate rhabdoviruses remain unknown. The present report describes a novel rhabdovirus isolated from the brain of a moribund American coot (Fulica americana) that exhibited neurological signs when found in Durham County, North Carolina, in 2005. Antigenic characterization of the virus revealed that it was serologically unrelated to 68 other known vertebrate rhabdoviruses. Genomic sequencing of the virus indicated that it shared the highest identity to Tupaia rhabdovirus (TUPV), and as only previously observed in TUPV, the genome encoded a putative C protein in an overlapping open reading frame (ORF) of the phosphoprotein gene and a small hydrophobic (SH) protein located in a novel ORF between the matrix and glycoprotein genes. Phylogenetic analysis of partial amino acid sequences of the nucleoprotein and polymerase protein indicated that, in addition to TUPV, the virus was most closely related to avian and small mammal rhabdoviruses from Africa and North America. In this report, we present the morphological, pathological, antigenic, and genetic characterization of the new virus, tentatively named Durham virus (DURV), and discuss its potential evolutionary relationship to other vertebrate rhabdoviruses.

  6. Xenogeneic immunization with human tyrosine hydroxylase DNA vaccines suppresses growth of established neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Huebener, Nicole; Fest, Stefan; Hilt, Kerstin; Schramm, Alexander; Eggert, Angelika; Durmus, Tahir; Woehler, Anja; Stermann, Alexander; Bleeke, Matthias; Baykan, Bianca; Weixler, Silke; Gaedicke, Gerhard; Lode, Holger N

    2009-08-01

    Neuroblastoma (NB) is a challenging malignancy of the sympathetic nervous tissue characterized by a very poor prognosis. One important marker for NB is the expression of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), the first-step enzyme of catecholamine biosynthesis. We could show stable and high TH gene expression in 67 NB samples independent of the clinical stage. Based on this observation, we addressed the question of whether xenogeneic TH DNA vaccination is effective in inducing an anti-NB immune response. For this purpose, we generated three DNA vaccines based on pCMV-F3Ub and pBUD-CE4.1 plasmids encoding for human (h)THcDNA (A), hTH minigene (B), and hTHcDNA in combination with the proinflammatory cytokine interleukin 12 (C), and tested prophylactic and therapeutic efficacy to suppress primary tumor growth and spontaneous metastasis. Here we report that xenogeneic TH DNA vaccination was effective in eradicating established primary tumors and inhibiting metastasis. Interestingly, this effect could not be enhanced by adding the Th1 cytokine interleukin 12. However, increased IFN-gamma production and NB cytotoxicity of effector cells harvested from vaccinated mice suggested the participation of tumor-specific CTLs in the immune response. The depletion of CD8(+)T cells completely abrogated the hTH vaccine-mediated anti-NB immune response. Furthermore, rechallenging of surviving mice resulted in reduced primary tumor growth, indicating the induction of a memory immune response. In conclusion, xenogeneic immunization with TH-derived DNA vaccines is effective against NB, and may open a new venue for a novel and effective immunotherapeutic strategy against this challenging childhood tumor.

  7. Targeting of MYCN by means of DNA vaccination is effective against neuroblastoma in mice.

    PubMed

    Stermann, Alexander; Huebener, Nicole; Seidel, Diana; Fest, Stefan; Eschenburg, Georg; Stauder, Michael; Schramm, Alexander; Eggert, Angelika; Lode, Holger N

    2015-10-01

    The MYCN oncogene is a strong genetic marker associated with poor prognosis in neuroblastoma (NB). Therefore, MYCN gene amplification and subsequent overexpression provide a possible target for new treatment approaches in NB. We first identified an inverse correlation of MYCN expression with CD45 mRNA in 101 NB tumor samples. KEGG mapping further revealed that MYCN expression was associated with immune-suppressive pathways characterized by a down-regulation of T cell activation and up-regulation of T cell inhibitory gene transcripts. We then aimed to investigate whether DNA vaccination against MYCN is effective to induce an antigen-specific and T cell-mediated immune response. For this purpose, we generated a MYCN-expressing syngeneic mouse model by MYCN gene transfer to NXS2 cells. MYCN-DNA vaccines were engineered based on the pCMV-F3Ub plasmid backbone to drive ubiquitinated full-length MYCN-cDNA and minigene expression. Vaccines were delivered orally with attenuated S. typhimurium strain SL7207 as a carrier. Immunization with both MYCN-DNA vaccines significantly reduced primary tumor growth of MYCN-expressing NB cells in contrast to negative controls. The immune response was mediated by tumor-infiltrating T cells in vivo, which revealed MYCN-specific and MHC class I-restricted lysis of inducible MYCN-expressing NB target cells in vitro. Finally, these antigen-specific T cells also killed MYCN-negative mammary carcinoma cells pulsed with MYCN peptides in contrast to controls. In summary, we demonstrate proof of concept that MYCN can be targeted by DNA vaccination, which may provide an approach to overcoming MYCN immune-suppressive activities in patients with MYCN-amplified disease.

  8. Effect of vesicle size on tissue localization and immunogenicity of liposomal DNA vaccines.

    PubMed

    Carstens, Myrra G; Camps, Marcel G M; Henriksen-Lacey, Malou; Franken, Kees; Ottenhoff, Tom H M; Perrie, Yvonne; Bouwstra, Joke A; Ossendorp, Ferry; Jiskoot, Wim

    2011-06-24

    The formulation of plasmid DNA (pDNA) in cationic liposomes is a promising strategy to improve the potency of DNA vaccines. In this respect, physicochemical parameters such as liposome size may be important for their efficacy. The aim of the current study was to investigate the effect of vesicle size on the in vivo performance of liposomal pDNA vaccines after subcutaneous vaccination in mice. The tissue distribution of cationic liposomes of two sizes, 500 nm (PDI 0.6) and 140 nm (PDI 0.15), composed of egg PC, DOPE and DOTAP, with encapsulated OVA-encoding pDNA, was studied by using dual radiolabeled pDNA-liposomes. Their potency to elicit cellular and humoral immune responses was investigated upon application in a homologous and heterologous vaccination schedule with 3 week intervals. It was shown that encapsulation of pDNA into cationic lipsomes resulted in deposition at the site of injection, and strongest retention was observed at large vesicle size. The vaccination studies demonstrated a more robust induction of OVA-specific, functional CD8+ T-cells and higher antibody levels upon vaccination with small monodisperse pDNA-liposomes, as compared to large heterodisperse liposomes or naked pDNA. The introduction of a PEG-coating on the small cationic liposomes resulted in enhanced lymphatic drainage, but immune responses were not improved when compared to non-PEGylated liposomes. In conclusion, it was shown that the physicochemical properties of the liposomes are of crucial importance for their performance as pDNA vaccine carrier, and cationic charge and small size are favorable properties for subcutaneous DNA vaccination. PMID:21565240

  9. Selection and identification of Singapore grouper iridovirus vaccine candidate antigens using bioinformatics and DNA vaccination.

    PubMed

    Ou-yang, Zhengliang; Wang, Peiran; Huang, Youhua; Huang, Xiaohong; Wan, Qingjiao; Zhou, Sheng; Wei, Jingguang; Zhou, Yongcan; Qin, Qiwei

    2012-09-15

    In this study, we described a rapid and efficient method which integrated the bioinformatic prediction and DNA vaccine technology to identify vaccine candidates against Singapore grouper iridovirus (SGIV). The 162 previously defined open reading frames (ORFs) of SGIV were subjected to extensive sequence similarity searches, as well as motif, cellular location, and domain prediction. Based on our analysis, 13 genes were chosen and cloned into the eukaryotic expression vector pcDNA 3.1. In vitro and in vivo expression of these DNA vaccine constructs was examined in Epinephelus akaara spleen cells (EAGS) and immunized fish by Western blot and RT-PCR analysis, respectively. Three weeks after the second booster, immunized fish were challenged with SGIV and the level of protection and survival was assessed. Fish vaccinated with plasmid DNA encoding viral ORF072, ORF039 and ORF036 (designated as pcDNA-72, pcDNA-39 and pcDNA-36, respectively) exhibited 66.7%, 66.7% and 58.3% relative percent survival rates, respectively, in comparison with the control fish. These three DNA vaccines induced innate immune responses, raising significantly high level of Mx expression relative to the fish vaccinated with the empty plasmid at 3 days post-vaccination. Furthermore, recombinant protein from ORF072 was also used to immunize another set of fish and similar protective effect was obtained. Taken together, our results validated the applicability of bioinformatics in genome mining, resulting in the identification of three protective antigens. The promising results obtained in the present study have prompted further testing to improve the immunogenicity of these potential DNA vaccines.

  10. Using HLA-A2.1 Transgenic Rabbit Model to Screen and Characterize New HLA-A2.1 Restricted Epitope DNA Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Jiafen; Schell, Todd D.; Peng, Xuwen; Cladel, Nancy M.; Balogh, Karla K.; Christensen, Neil D.

    2011-01-01

    We have established an HLA-A2.1 transgenic rabbit /cottontail rabbit papillomavirus (CRPV) infection model. Using this novel transgenic animal model, we reported earlier that a multivalent epitope DNA vaccine (CRPVE1ep1-5) containing five HLA-A2.1 restricted epitopes from CRPVE1 (42-50, 149-157, 161-169, 245-253 and 303-311) was successful in providing strong and specific protective and therapeutic immunity. Among these five epitopes, two (161-169 and 303-311) have been proven to stimulate strong immunity in both HLA-A2.1 transgenic mouse and rabbit models. In the current study, we further identified the remaining three epitopes (CRPVE1/42-50,149-157, 245-253) in both animal models. CRPVE1/149-157 was able to induce specific CTL responses in HLA-A2.1 transgenic mice by DNA immunization but undetectable by peptide immunization. CRPVE1/42-50 and 245-253 failed to respond in HLA-A2.1 transgenic mice either by peptide or DNA immunization. All the three epitopes when administrated as DNA vaccines, however, were able to stimulate strong protective immunity in HLA-A2.1 transgenic rabbits in a dose dependent manner. Among the five epitopes, two (CRPVE1/ 303-311and CRPVE1/149-157) DNA vaccines also showed specific therapeutic effects in CRPV-infected HLA-A2.1 transgenic rabbits. Taken together, the HLA-A2.1 transgenic rabbit model recognized more epitopes than did the HLA-A2.1 transgenic mouse model. Our data demonstrate that the HLA-A2.1 transgenic rabbit model can complement the HLA-A2.1 transgenic mouse model for the development and testing of new HLA-A2.1 restricted prophylactic and therapeutic T cell based DNA vaccines. PMID:21572916

  11. Chicken IL-7 as a potent adjuvant enhances IBDV VP2 DNA vaccine immunogenicity and protective efficacy.

    PubMed

    Huo, Shanshan; Zuo, Yuzhu; Li, Nan; Li, Xiujin; Zhang, Yonghong; Wang, Liyue; Liu, Hao; Zhang, Jianlou; Cui, Dan; He, Pingyou; Xu, Jian; Li, Yan; Zhu, Xiutong; Zhong, Fei

    2016-09-25

    Our previous work has demonstrated that the mammalian interleukin-7 (IL-7) gene can enhance the immunogenicity of DNA vaccine. Whether chicken IL-7 (chIL-7) possesses the ability to enhance the immunogenicity of VP2 DNA vaccine of infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) remained unknown. To investigate this, we constructed a VP2 antigenic region (VP2366) gene and chIL-7 gene vectors, co-immunized chicken with these vectors and analyzed the effects of the chIL-7 gene on VP2366 gene immunogenicity. Results showed that co-administrated chIL-7 gene with VP2 DNA vaccine significantly increased specific serum antibody titers against IBDV, and enhanced lymphocyte proliferation and IFN-γ and IL-4 productions. More importantly, chIL-7 gene significantly increased VP2366 gene-induced protection against virulent IBDV infection, indicating that the chIL-7 gene possessed the capacity to enhance VP2366 DNA vaccine immunogenicity, and therefore might function as a novel adjuvant for IBDV VP2 DNA vaccine. Mechanically, chIL-7 could stimulate the common cytokine receptor γ chain (γc) expressions in vitro and in vivo, which might be involved in chIL-7 enhancement of the immunogenicity of VP2 DNA vaccine. PMID:27599941

  12. Nano-Delivery Vehicles/Adjuvants for DNA Vaccination Against HIV.

    PubMed

    Dong, Yaqiong; Yang, Jun; Zhang, Jinchao; Zhang, Xin

    2016-03-01

    More than 75 million people has been infected HIV and it is responsible for nearly 36 million deaths on a global scale. As one of the deadliest infectious diseases, HIV is becoming the urgent issue of the global epidemic to tackle. In order to settle this problem from the source, some effective prevention strategies should be developed to control the pandemic of HIV. Vaccines, especially DNA vaccines, could be the optimal way to control the spread of HIV due to the unparalleled superiority that DNA vaccines could generate long-term humoral and cellular immune responses which could provide protective immunity for HIV. But the naked DNA could hardly enter into cells and is easily degraded by DNases and lysosomes, so designing effective delivery system is a promising strategy. Since delivery system could be constructed to promote efficient delivery of DNA into mammalian cells, protect them from degradation, and also could be established to be a target system to arrive at certain position of expectation. The current review discusses the potential of various nano-delivery vehicles/adjuvants such as polymer, lipid, liposome, peptide and inorganic material in improving efficiency of diverse modalities available for HIV DNA vaccines.

  13. Nano-Delivery Vehicles/Adjuvants for DNA Vaccination Against HIV.

    PubMed

    Dong, Yaqiong; Yang, Jun; Zhang, Jinchao; Zhang, Xin

    2016-03-01

    More than 75 million people has been infected HIV and it is responsible for nearly 36 million deaths on a global scale. As one of the deadliest infectious diseases, HIV is becoming the urgent issue of the global epidemic to tackle. In order to settle this problem from the source, some effective prevention strategies should be developed to control the pandemic of HIV. Vaccines, especially DNA vaccines, could be the optimal way to control the spread of HIV due to the unparalleled superiority that DNA vaccines could generate long-term humoral and cellular immune responses which could provide protective immunity for HIV. But the naked DNA could hardly enter into cells and is easily degraded by DNases and lysosomes, so designing effective delivery system is a promising strategy. Since delivery system could be constructed to promote efficient delivery of DNA into mammalian cells, protect them from degradation, and also could be established to be a target system to arrive at certain position of expectation. The current review discusses the potential of various nano-delivery vehicles/adjuvants such as polymer, lipid, liposome, peptide and inorganic material in improving efficiency of diverse modalities available for HIV DNA vaccines. PMID:27455611

  14. Evaluation of Different DNA Vaccines against Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome (PRRS) in Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Petrini, Stefano; Ramadori, Giorgio; Villa, Riccardo; Borghetti, Paolo; de Angelis, Elena; Cantoni, Anna Maria; Corradi, Attilio; Amici, Augusto; Ferrari, Maura

    2013-01-01

    In veterinary medicine, there have been different experiences with the plasmid DNA vaccination. In this area and with the hypothesis to demonstrate the effectiveness of different plasmids encoding porcine respiratory and reproductive syndrome (PRRS), five DNA vaccines against PRRS were evaluated for their innocuity and efficacy in pigs. Eighteen animals were divided into five groups which were injected with five (A, B, C, D, E) different DNA vaccines. Albeit, none of the proposed vaccines were able to protect the animals against PRRS virus. Only vaccines A and B were able to reduce the clinical signs of the infection. ELISA IgM were detected 30 days after the first vaccination in the pigs injected by Vaccine A or B. ELISA IgG were detected 90 days after the first vaccination in the pigs injected by Vaccine B or C. Neutralizing antibody were detected Post Challenge Days 61 (PCD) in all groups. In the pigs inoculated with Vaccine C, IFN-γ were detected 90 days after first vaccination, and after challenge exposure they increased. In the other groups, the IFN-γ were detected after challenge infection. Pigs injected with each of the vaccines A, B, C, D and E showed a significantly higher level of CD4−CD8+ lymphocytes (p < 0.001) after infection in comparison with their controls. PMID:26344342

  15. Immunogenicity of RSV F DNA Vaccine in BALB/c Mice

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) causes severe acute lower respiratory tract disease leading to numerous hospitalizations and deaths among the infant and elderly populations worldwide. There is no vaccine or a less effective drug available against RSV infections. Natural RSV infection stimulates the Th1 immune response and activates the production of neutralizing antibodies, while earlier vaccine trials that used UV-inactivated RSV exacerbated the disease due to the activation of the allergic Th2 response. With a focus on Th1 immunity, we developed a DNA vaccine containing the native RSV fusion (RSV F) protein and studied its immune response in BALB/c mice. High levels of RSV specific antibodies were induced during subsequent immunizations. The serum antibodies were able to neutralize RSV in vitro. The RSV inhibition by sera was also shown by immunofluorescence analyses. Antibody response of the RSV F DNA vaccine showed a strong Th1 response. Also, sera from RSV F immunized and RSV infected mice reduced the RSV infection by 50% and 80%, respectively. Our data evidently showed that the RSV F DNA vaccine activated the Th1 biased immune response and led to the production of neutralizing antibodies, which is the desired immune response required for protection from RSV infections. PMID:27688769

  16. Advances and challenges in the development of therapeutic DNA vaccines against hepatitis B virus infection.

    PubMed

    Cova, Lucyna

    2014-01-01

    Despite the existence of an effective prophylactic vaccine, chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection remains a major public health problem. Because very weak and functionally impaired virus-specific immune responses play a key role in the persistence of HBV infection, the stimulation of these responses appears to be of particular importance for virus clearance. In this regard DNA-based vaccination has emerged as novel, promising therapeutic approach for chronic hepatitis B. This review provides an update of preclinical studies in animal models (mouse, chimpanzee, duck, woodchuck), which evaluated the ability of DNA vaccines targeting hepadnaviral proteins to induce potent and sustained immune responses in naïve animals and to enhance virus clearance and break immune tolerance in chronic virus-carriers. Different strategies have been developed and evaluated in these models to optimize DNA vaccine including genetic adjuvants, combination with antiviral drugs, prime-boost regimens and plasmid delivery. The delivery of DNA by in vivo electroporation appears to be of particular interest for increase of vaccine potency in both small and large animal models. Based on the promising results generated in preclinical studies, first clinical trials of DNA vaccines have been initiated, although effective therapy of chronic hepatitis B awaits further improvements in vaccine efficacy.

  17. DNA vaccine protects ornamental koi (Cyprinus carpio koi) against North American spring viremia of carp virus

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Emmenegger, E.J.; Kurath, G.

    2008-01-01

    The emergence of spring viremia of carp virus (SVCV) in the United States constitutes a potentially serious alien pathogen threat to susceptible fish stocks in North America. A DNA vaccine with an SVCV glycoprotein (G) gene from a North American isolate was constructed. In order to test the vaccine a challenge model utilizing a specific pathogen-free domestic koi stock and a cold water stress treatment was also developed. We have conducted four trial studies demonstrating that the pSGnc DNA vaccine provided protection in vaccinated fish against challenge at low, moderate, and high virus doses of the homologous virus. The protection was significant (p < 0.05) as compared to fish receiving a mock vaccine construct containing a luciferase reporter gene and to non-vaccinated controls in fish ranging in age from 3 to 14 months. In all trials, the SVCV-G DNA immunized fish were challenged 28-days post-vaccination (546 degree-days) and experienced low mortalities varying from 10 to 50% with relative percent survivals ranging from 50 to 88%. The non-vaccinated controls and mock construct vaccinated fish encountered high cumulative percent mortalities ranging from 70 to 100%. This is the first report of a SVCV DNA vaccine being tested successfully in koi. These experiments prove that the SVCV DNA (pSGnc) vaccine can elicit specific reproducible protection and validates its potential use as a prophylactic vaccine in koi and other vulnerable North American fish stocks.

  18. Designing and Development of a DNA Vaccine Based On Structural Proteins of Hepatitis C Virus

    PubMed Central

    Teimourpour, Roghayeh; Tajani, Amineh Sadat; Askari, Vahid Reza; Rostami, Sina; Meshkat, Zahra

    2016-01-01

    Background: Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is one of the most prevalent infectious diseases responsible for high morbidity and mortality worldwide. Therefore, designing new and effective therapeutics is of great importance. The aim of the current study was to construct a DNA vaccine containing structural proteins of HCV and evaluation of its expression in a eukaryotic system. Methods: Structural proteins of HCV (core, E1, and E2) were isolated and amplified from JFH strain of HCV genotype 2a using PCR method. The PCR product was cloned into pCDNA3.1 (+) vector and finally were confirmed by restriction enzyme analysis and sequencing methods. The eukaryotic expression of the vector was confirmed by RT-PCR. Results: A recombinant vector containing 2241bp fragment of HCV structural genes was constructed. The desired plasmid was sequenced and corresponded to 100% identity with the submitted sequences in GenBank. RT-PCR results indicated that the recombinant plasmid could be expressed efficiently in the eukaryotic expression system. Conclusion: Successful cloning of structural viral genes in pCDNA3.1 (+) vector and their expression in the eukaryotic expression system facilitates the development of new DNA vaccines against HCV. A DNA vaccine encoding core-E1-E2 antigens was designed. The desired expression vector can be used for further attempts in the development of vaccines. PMID:27799971

  19. Immunogenicity of DNA Vaccines Encoding Simian Immunodeficiency Virus Antigen Targeted to Dendritic Cells in Rhesus Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Nchinda, Godwin; Trumpfheller, Christine; Salazar, Andres M.; Töpfer, Katharina; Sauermann, Ulrike; Wagner, Ralf; Hannaman, Drew; Tenner-Racz, Klara; Racz, Paul; Stahl-Hennig, Christiane; Überla, Klaus

    2012-01-01

    Background Targeting antigens encoded by DNA vaccines to dendritic cells (DCs) in the presence of adjuvants enhances their immunogenicity and efficacy in mice. Methodology/Principal Findings To explore the immunogenicity of this approach in non-human primates, we generated a single chain antibody to the antigen uptake receptor DEC-205 expressed on rhesus macaque DCs. DNA vaccines encoding this single chain antibody fused to the SIV capsid protein were delivered to six monkeys each by either intramuscular electroporation or conventional intramuscular injection co-injected or not with poly ICLC, a stabilized poly I: C analogue, as adjuvant. Antibodies to capsid were induced by the DC-targeting and non-targeting control DNA delivered by electroporation while conventional DNA immunization at a 10-fold higher dose of DNA failed to induce detectable humoral immune responses. Substantial cellular immune responses were also observed after DNA electroporation of both DNAs, but stronger responses were induced by the non-targeting vaccine. Conventional immunization with the DC-targeting DNA at a 10-fold higher dose did not give rise to substantial cellular immune responses, neither when co-injected with poly ICLC. Conclusions/Significance The study confirms the potent immunogenicity of DNA vaccines delivered by electroporation. Targeting the DNA via a single chain antibody to DEC-205 expressed by DCs, however, does not improve the immunogenicity of the antigens in non-human primates. PMID:22720025

  20. Immunogenicity of RSV F DNA Vaccine in BALB/c Mice

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) causes severe acute lower respiratory tract disease leading to numerous hospitalizations and deaths among the infant and elderly populations worldwide. There is no vaccine or a less effective drug available against RSV infections. Natural RSV infection stimulates the Th1 immune response and activates the production of neutralizing antibodies, while earlier vaccine trials that used UV-inactivated RSV exacerbated the disease due to the activation of the allergic Th2 response. With a focus on Th1 immunity, we developed a DNA vaccine containing the native RSV fusion (RSV F) protein and studied its immune response in BALB/c mice. High levels of RSV specific antibodies were induced during subsequent immunizations. The serum antibodies were able to neutralize RSV in vitro. The RSV inhibition by sera was also shown by immunofluorescence analyses. Antibody response of the RSV F DNA vaccine showed a strong Th1 response. Also, sera from RSV F immunized and RSV infected mice reduced the RSV infection by 50% and 80%, respectively. Our data evidently showed that the RSV F DNA vaccine activated the Th1 biased immune response and led to the production of neutralizing antibodies, which is the desired immune response required for protection from RSV infections.

  1. Immunogenicity of RSV F DNA Vaccine in BALB/c Mice.

    PubMed

    Eroglu, Erdal; Singh, Ankur; Bawage, Swapnil; Tiwari, Pooja M; Vig, Komal; Pillai, Shreekumar R; Dennis, Vida A; Singh, Shree R

    2016-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) causes severe acute lower respiratory tract disease leading to numerous hospitalizations and deaths among the infant and elderly populations worldwide. There is no vaccine or a less effective drug available against RSV infections. Natural RSV infection stimulates the Th1 immune response and activates the production of neutralizing antibodies, while earlier vaccine trials that used UV-inactivated RSV exacerbated the disease due to the activation of the allergic Th2 response. With a focus on Th1 immunity, we developed a DNA vaccine containing the native RSV fusion (RSV F) protein and studied its immune response in BALB/c mice. High levels of RSV specific antibodies were induced during subsequent immunizations. The serum antibodies were able to neutralize RSV in vitro. The RSV inhibition by sera was also shown by immunofluorescence analyses. Antibody response of the RSV F DNA vaccine showed a strong Th1 response. Also, sera from RSV F immunized and RSV infected mice reduced the RSV infection by 50% and 80%, respectively. Our data evidently showed that the RSV F DNA vaccine activated the Th1 biased immune response and led to the production of neutralizing antibodies, which is the desired immune response required for protection from RSV infections. PMID:27688769

  2. CD4+ T cell–independent DNA vaccination against opportunistic infections

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Mingquan; Ramsay, Alistair J.; Robichaux, Myles B.; Norris, Karen A.; Kliment, Corrine; Crowe, Christopher; Rapaka, Rekha R.; Steele, Chad; McAllister, Florencia; Shellito, Judd E.; Marrero, Luis; Schwarzenberger, Paul; Zhong, Qiu; Kolls, Jay K.

    2005-01-01

    Depletion or dysfunction of CD4+ T lymphocytes profoundly perturbs host defenses and impairs immunogenicity of vaccines. Here, we show that plasmid DNA vaccination with a cassette encoding antigen (OVA) and a second cassette encoding full-length CD40 ligand (CD40L), a molecule expressed on activated CD4+ T lymphocytes and critical for T cell helper function, can elicit significant titers of antigen-specific immunoglobulins in serum and Tc1 CD8+ T cell responses in CD4-deficient mice. To investigate whether this approach leads to CD4+ T cell–independent vaccine protection against a prototypic AIDS-defining infection, Pneumocystis (PC) pneumonia, we used serum from mice vaccinated with PC-pulsed, CD40L-modifed DCs to immunoprecipitate PC antigens. Kexin, a PC antigen identified by this approach, was used in a similar DNA vaccine strategy with or without CD40L. CD4-deficient mice receiving DNA vaccines encoding Kexin and CD40L showed significantly higher anti-PC IgG titers as well as opsonic killing of PC compared with those vaccinated with Kexin alone. Moreover, CD4-depleted, Kexin-vaccinated mice showed a 3-log greater protection in a PC challenge model. Adoptive transfer of CD19+ cells or IgG to SCID mice conferred protection against PC challenge, indicating a role of humoral immunity in the protection. The results of these studies show promise for CD4-independent vaccination against HIV-related or other opportunistic pathogens. PMID:16308571

  3. Effects of DDA, CpG-ODN, and plasmid-encoded chicken IFN-gamma on protective immunity by a DNA vaccine against IBDV in chickens.

    PubMed

    Roh, Ha Jung; Sung, Haan Woo; Kwon, Hyuk Moo

    2006-12-01

    This study examined the adjuvant effects of dimethyl dioctadecyl ammonium bromide (DDA), CpG oligodeoxynucleotides (CpG-ODN), and chicken interferon-gamma (ChIFN-gamma) on a DNA vaccine (pcDNA-VP243) against the infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV). A plasmid encoding chicken IFN-ã was constructed. Twice at 2-week intervals, two-week-old chickens were injected intramuscularly and intraperitoneally with either a DNA vaccine alone or a DNA vaccine together with the respective adjuvants. On week 2 after the second immunization, the chickens were orally challenged with the highly virulent IBDV. The groups that received the DNA vaccines plus either DDA or CpG-ODN showed significantly lower survival rates than the group that received the DNA vaccine alone. However, the survival rates for the DNA vaccine alone and for the DNA vaccine plus ChIFN-gamma were similar. The chickens had no detectable antibodies to the IBDV before the challenge but all the surviving chickens in all groups except for the normal control group showed the induction of antibodies to the IBDV at day 10 after the challenge. As judged by the lymphocyte proliferation assays using the a WST-8 solution performed on the peripheral blood and splenic lymphocytes, the stimulation indices (SI) of the peripheral blood lymphocytes in all groups except for the normal control group were similar immediately before the challenge. At 10 days post-challenge, the SI for DNA vaccine plus either CpG-ODN or ChIFN-gamma was similar to that of the DNA vaccine control group. For splenic lymphocytes, the SI in the DNA vaccine plus CpG-ODN and DNA vaccine plus ChIFN-gamma groups were higher than for the DNA vaccine control. These results suggest that DDA actually compromises the protection against the IBDV by DNA vaccine, and CpG-ODN and IFN-gamma had no significant effect. PMID:17106228

  4. RSV fusion (F) protein DNA vaccine provides partial protection against viral infection.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hongzhuan; Dennis, Vida A; Pillai, Shreekumar R; Singh, Shree R

    2009-10-01

    The present study was conducted to investigate the feasibility and efficacy of a RSV F DNA vaccine incorporated with a mucosal adjuvant. Two DNA vaccine vectors (DRF-412 and DRF-412-P) were developed containing residues 412-524 of the RSV F gene. These antigenic regions were cloned into the phCMV1 DNA vaccine vector. One of the DNA vaccine vectors, DRF-412, contained the ctxA(2)B region of the cholera toxin gene as a mucosal adjuvant. The in vitro expressions of these DNA vectors were confirmed in Cos-7 cells by indirect immunofluorescence and Western blot analyses. In vivo expression of the cloned gene was further confirmed in mouse muscle tissue by immunohistological analysis. The active transcription of the RSV F gene in mouse muscle cells was confirmed by RT-PCR. The purified DRF-412 and DRF-412-P DNA vectors were used to immunize mice by intramuscular injections. Our results indicated that DRF-412 and DRF-412-P vaccine vectors were as effective as live RSV in inducing neutralization antibody, systemic Ab (IgG, IgG1, IgG2a, and IgG2b) responses, and mucosal antibody responses (Ig A). The Th1 (TNF-alpha, IL-12p70, IFN-gamma, IL-2) and Th2 (IL-10, IL-6) cytokine profiles were analyzed after stimulation of spleen cells from mice immunized with purified RF-412 protein. We observed that mice inoculated with vector DRF-412 induced a higher mixed Th1/Th2 cytokine immune response than DRF-412-P. Reverse transcriptase and quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) revealed that mice immunized with the DRF-412 vector contained less viral RNA in lung tissue and the lung immunohistology study confirmed that mice immunized with DRF-412 had better protection than those immunized with the DRF-412-P vector. These results indicate that the RSV DRF-412 vaccine vector, which contains the cholera toxin subunit ctxA2B as a mucosal adjuvant may provide a better DNA vaccination strategy against RSV. PMID:19540885

  5. Characterization of perch rhabdovirus (PRV) in farmed grayling Thymallus thymallus.

    PubMed

    Gadd, Tuija; Viljamaa-Dirks, Satu; Holopainen, Riikka; Koski, Perttu; Jakava-Viljanen, Miia

    2013-10-11

    Two Finnish fish farms experienced elevated mortality rates in farmed grayling Thymallus thymallus fry during the summer months, most typically in July. The mortalities occurred during several years and were connected with a few neurological disorders and peritonitis. Virological investigation detected an infection with an unknown rhabdovirus. Based on the entire glycoprotein (G) and partial RNA polymerase (L) gene sequences, the virus was classified as a perch rhabdovirus (PRV). Pairwise comparisons of the G and L gene regions of grayling isolates revealed that all isolates were very closely related, with 99 to 100% nucleotide identity, which suggests the same origin of infection. Phylogenetic analysis demonstrated that they were closely related to the strain isolated from perch Perca fluviatilis and sea trout Salmo trutta trutta caught from the Baltic Sea. The entire G gene sequences revealed that all Finnish grayling isolates, and both the perch and sea trout isolates, were most closely related to a PRV isolated in France in 2004. According to the partial L gene sequences, all of the Finnish grayling isolates were most closely related to the Danish isolate DK5533 from pike. The genetic analysis of entire G gene and partial L gene sequences showed that the Finnish brown trout isolate ka907_87 shared only approximately 67 and 78% identity, respectively, with our grayling isolates. The grayling isolates were also analysed by an immunofluorescence antibody test. This is the first report of a PRV causing disease in grayling in Finland.

  6. IgA response and protection following nasal vaccination of chickens with Newcastle disease virus DNA vaccine nanoencapsulated with Ag@SiO2 hollow nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Kai; Rong, Guangyu; Hao, Yan; Yu, Lu; Kang, Hong; Wang, Xin; Wang, Xiaohua; Jin, Zheng; Ren, Zhiyu; Li, Zejun

    2016-05-01

    Newcastle disease caused by ND virus (NDV) is a highly contagious disease of birds. Vaccine for effective protection of poultry animals from NDV infection is urgently needed. Mucosal immunity plays a very important role in the antiviral immune response. In this study, a NDV F gene-containing DNA vaccine encapsulated in Ag@SiO2 hollow nanoparticles (pFDNA-Ag@SiO2-NPs) with an average diameter of 500 nm were prepared to assess the mucosal immune response. These nanoparticles exhibited low cytotoxicity and did not destroy the bioactivity of plasmid DNA, which could be expressed in vitro. The plasmid DNA was sustainably released after an initial burst release. In vivo immunization showed that the intranasal immunization of chickens with pFDNA-Ag@SiO2-NPs induced high titers of serum antibody, significantly promoted lymphocyte proliferation and induced higher expression levels of IL-2 and IFN-γ in a dose-dependent manner. These results indicated that the Ag@SiO2 hollow nanoparticles could serve as an efficient and safe delivery carrier for NDV DNA vaccine to induce mucosal immunity. This study has provided promising results for the further development of mucosal vaccines encapsulated in inorganic nanoparticles.

  7. IgA response and protection following nasal vaccination of chickens with Newcastle disease virus DNA vaccine nanoencapsulated with Ag@SiO2 hollow nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Kai; Rong, Guangyu; Hao, Yan; Yu, Lu; Kang, Hong; Wang, Xin; Wang, Xiaohua; Jin, Zheng; Ren, Zhiyu; Li, Zejun

    2016-01-01

    Newcastle disease caused by ND virus (NDV) is a highly contagious disease of birds. Vaccine for effective protection of poultry animals from NDV infection is urgently needed. Mucosal immunity plays a very important role in the antiviral immune response. In this study, a NDV F gene-containing DNA vaccine encapsulated in Ag@SiO2 hollow nanoparticles (pFDNA-Ag@SiO2-NPs) with an average diameter of 500 nm were prepared to assess the mucosal immune response. These nanoparticles exhibited low cytotoxicity and did not destroy the bioactivity of plasmid DNA, which could be expressed in vitro. The plasmid DNA was sustainably released after an initial burst release. In vivo immunization showed that the intranasal immunization of chickens with pFDNA-Ag@SiO2-NPs induced high titers of serum antibody, significantly promoted lymphocyte proliferation and induced higher expression levels of IL-2 and IFN-γ in a dose-dependent manner. These results indicated that the Ag@SiO2 hollow nanoparticles could serve as an efficient and safe delivery carrier for NDV DNA vaccine to induce mucosal immunity. This study has provided promising results for the further development of mucosal vaccines encapsulated in inorganic nanoparticles. PMID:27170532

  8. IgA response and protection following nasal vaccination of chickens with Newcastle disease virus DNA vaccine nanoencapsulated with Ag@SiO2 hollow nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Kai; Rong, Guangyu; Hao, Yan; Yu, Lu; Kang, Hong; Wang, Xin; Wang, Xiaohua; Jin, Zheng; Ren, Zhiyu; Li, Zejun

    2016-01-01

    Newcastle disease caused by ND virus (NDV) is a highly contagious disease of birds. Vaccine for effective protection of poultry animals from NDV infection is urgently needed. Mucosal immunity plays a very important role in the antiviral immune response. In this study, a NDV F gene-containing DNA vaccine encapsulated in Ag@SiO2 hollow nanoparticles (pFDNA-Ag@SiO2-NPs) with an average diameter of 500 nm were prepared to assess the mucosal immune response. These nanoparticles exhibited low cytotoxicity and did not destroy the bioactivity of plasmid DNA, which could be expressed in vitro. The plasmid DNA was sustainably released after an initial burst release. In vivo immunization showed that the intranasal immunization of chickens with pFDNA-Ag@SiO2-NPs induced high titers of serum antibody, significantly promoted lymphocyte proliferation and induced higher expression levels of IL-2 and IFN-γ in a dose-dependent manner. These results indicated that the Ag@SiO2 hollow nanoparticles could serve as an efficient and safe delivery carrier for NDV DNA vaccine to induce mucosal immunity. This study has provided promising results for the further development of mucosal vaccines encapsulated in inorganic nanoparticles. PMID:27170532

  9. Kolente virus, a rhabdovirus species isolated from ticks and bats in the Republic of Guinea

    PubMed Central

    Ghedin, Elodie; Rogers, Matthew B.; Widen, Steven G.; Guzman, Hilda; Travassos da Rosa, Amelia P. A.; Wood, Thomas G.; Fitch, Adam; Popov, Vsevolod; Holmes, Edward C.; Walker, Peter J.; Tesh, Robert B.

    2013-01-01

    Kolente virus (KOLEV) is a rhabdovirus originally isolated from ticks and a bat in Guinea, West Africa, in 1985. Although tests at the time of isolation suggested that KOLEV is a novel rhabdovirus, it has remained largely uncharacterized. We assembled the complete genome sequence of the prototype strain DakAr K7292, which was found to encode the five canonical rhabdovirus structural proteins (N, P, M, G and L) with alternative ORFs (>180 nt) in the P and L genes. Serologically, KOLEV exhibited a weak antigenic relationship with Barur and Fukuoka viruses in the Kern Canyon group. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that KOLEV represents a distinct and divergent lineage that shows no clear relationship to any rhabdovirus except Oita virus, although with limited phylogenetic resolution. In summary, KOLEV represents a novel species in the family Rhabdoviridae. PMID:24062532

  10. Kolente virus, a rhabdovirus species isolated from ticks and bats in the Republic of Guinea.

    PubMed

    Ghedin, Elodie; Rogers, Matthew B; Widen, Steven G; Guzman, Hilda; Travassos da Rosa, Amelia P A; Wood, Thomas G; Fitch, Adam; Popov, Vsevolod; Holmes, Edward C; Walker, Peter J; Vasilakis, Nikos; Tesh, Robert B

    2013-12-01

    Kolente virus (KOLEV) is a rhabdovirus originally isolated from ticks and a bat in Guinea, West Africa, in 1985. Although tests at the time of isolation suggested that KOLEV is a novel rhabdovirus, it has remained largely uncharacterized. We assembled the complete genome sequence of the prototype strain DakAr K7292, which was found to encode the five canonical rhabdovirus structural proteins (N, P, M, G and L) with alternative ORFs (>180 nt) in the P and L genes. Serologically, KOLEV exhibited a weak antigenic relationship with Barur and Fukuoka viruses in the Kern Canyon group. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that KOLEV represents a distinct and divergent lineage that shows no clear relationship to any rhabdovirus except Oita virus, although with limited phylogenetic resolution. In summary, KOLEV represents a novel species in the family Rhabdoviridae.

  11. Distribution and expression in vitro and in vivo of DNA vaccine against lymphocystis disease virus in Japanese flounder ( Paralichthys olivaceus)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Fengrong; Sun, Xiuqin; Liu, Hongzhan; Wu, Xingan; Zhong, Nan; Wang, Bo; Zhou, Guodong

    2010-01-01

    Lymphocystis disease, caused by the lymphocystis disease virus (LCDV), is a significant worldwide problem in fish industry causing substantial economic losses. In this study, we aimed to develop the DNA vaccine against LCDV, using DNA vaccination technology. We evaluated plasmid pEGFP-N2-LCDV1.3 kb as a DNA vaccine candidate. The plasmid DNA was transiently expressed after liposome transfection into the eukaryotic COS 7 cell line. The distribution and expression of the DNA vaccine (pEGFP-N2-LCDV1.3kb) were also analyzed in tissues of the vaccinated Japanese flounder by PCR, RT-PCR and fluorescent microscopy. Results from PCR analysis indicated that the vaccine-containing plasmids were distributed in injected muscle, the muscle opposite the injection site, the hind intestine, gill, spleen, head, kidney and liver, 6 and 25 days after vaccination. The vaccine plasmids disappeared 100 d post-vaccination. Fluorescent microscopy revealed green fluorescence in the injected muscle, the muscle opposite the injection site, the hind intestine, gill, spleen, head, kidney and liver of fish 48 h post-vaccination, green fluorescence did not appear in the control treated tissue. Green fluorescence became weak at 60 days post-vaccination. RT-PCR analysis indicated that the mcp gene was expressed in all tested tissues of vaccinated fish 6-50 days post-vaccination. These results demonstrate that the antigen encoded by the DNA vaccine is distributed and expressed in all of the tissues analyzed in the vaccinated fish. The antigen would therefore potentially initiate a specific immune response. the plasmid DNA was injected into Japanese flounder ( Paralichthys olivaceus) intramuscularly and antibodies against LCDV were evaluated. The results indicate that the plasmid encoded DNA vaccine could induce an immune response to LCDV and would therefore offer immune protection against LCD. Further studies are required for the development and application of this promising DNA vaccine.

  12. Tumor endothelial marker 1-specific DNA vaccination targets tumor vasculature.

    PubMed

    Facciponte, John G; Ugel, Stefano; De Sanctis, Francesco; Li, Chunsheng; Wang, Liping; Nair, Gautham; Sehgal, Sandy; Raj, Arjun; Matthaiou, Efthymia; Coukos, George; Facciabene, Andrea

    2014-04-01

    Tumor endothelial marker 1 (TEM1; also known as endosialin or CD248) is a protein found on tumor vasculature and in tumor stroma. Here, we tested whether TEM1 has potential as a therapeutic target for cancer immunotherapy by immunizing immunocompetent mice with Tem1 cDNA fused to the minimal domain of the C fragment of tetanus toxoid (referred to herein as Tem1-TT vaccine). Tem1-TT vaccination elicited CD8+ and/or CD4+ T cell responses against immunodominant TEM1 protein sequences. Prophylactic immunization of animals with Tem1-TT prevented or delayed tumor formation in several murine tumor models. Therapeutic vaccination of tumor-bearing mice reduced tumor vascularity, increased infiltration of CD3+ T cells into the tumor, and controlled progression of established tumors. Tem1-TT vaccination also elicited CD8+ cytotoxic T cell responses against murine tumor-specific antigens. Effective Tem1-TT vaccination did not affect angiogenesis-dependent physiological processes, including wound healing and reproduction. Based on these data and the widespread expression of TEM1 on the vasculature of different tumor types, we conclude that targeting TEM1 has therapeutic potential in cancer immunotherapy.

  13. Transdermal immunization with low-pressure-gene-gun mediated chitosan-based DNA vaccines against Japanese encephalitis virus.

    PubMed

    Huang, Han-Ning; Li, Tsung-Lin; Chan, Yi-Lin; Chen, Chien-Lung; Wu, Chang-Jer

    2009-10-01

    DNA vaccine is a milestone in contemporary vaccine development. It has considerably offset many shortcomings in conventional vaccines. Although DNA vaccines applied through 'traditional' high-pressure gene guns generally elicit high titers of protective immunity, such a practice however requires enormous investment in daunting instruments that often discourage vaccines due to an inevitable pain-eliciting effect. In this study, we exploited a less expensive yet low-pressure-gene-gun that can alleviate such phobia of pain. DNA vaccines were prepared by using the associative feature of cationic chitosan and anionic DNAs. The optimized N/P ratio is 3. The formulized complex sizes to nano-scale. The vaccine complexes were tested in C3H/HeN mice. The expression of GFP reporter gene was observable and traceable in epidermis and spleen over 3 days. The expressions of GFP and the activation of dendritic cells (DCs) were evident and co-localized in hair follicles and epidermis. C3H/HeN mice immunized with the developed chitosan-JEV DNA vaccines can elicit desired JEV specific antibodies, whereby the mice maintained high survival rates against 50xLD(50) JEV challenge. The low-pressure-gene-gun mediated chitosan-based JEV DNA vaccines have proven to be convenient and efficacious, thereby with high capacity in deployment for future prophylaxis against JEV outbreaks.

  14. Use of Adjuvants to Enhance the Immune Response Induced by a DNA Vaccine Against Bovine Herpesvirus-1.

    PubMed

    Di Giacomo, Sebastián; Quattrocchi, Valeria; Zamorano, Patricia

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the induction of humoral and cellular immune response by a DNA vaccine based on the bovine herpesvirus-1 (BoHV-1) glycoprotein D with commercial adjuvants (SEPPIC), in the murine model and in a preliminary assay in cattle, in order to select vaccines candidates that can improve cellular response. A DNA vaccine with most of the adjuvants used in this study was able to elicit a gD and viral-specific humoral immune response in vaccinated mice. Nevertheless, only a DNA vaccine with Montanide GEL 01 PR and Montanide Essai 903110 induced viral-specific proliferation and the highest levels of IFN-γ secretion. Since a cellular response is important to deal with BoHV-1 infection, both adjuvants were tested in a small trial using bovines to corroborate improvement of a cellular response in the natural host. It was observed that a DNA vaccine with Montanide Essai 903110 induced the highest BoHV-1 specific IFN-γ production in cattle. So, this adjuvant is proposed as a suitable candidate to be tested in a BoHV-1 DNA vaccine for protection against viral challenge in bovines.

  15. Arg-Gingipain A DNA Vaccine Induces Protective Immunity against Infection by Porphyromonas gingivalis in a Murine Model

    PubMed Central

    Yonezawa, Hideo; Ishihara, Kazuyuki; Okuda, Katsuji

    2001-01-01

    Arginine-specific cysteine proteinases (RgpA and RgpB) produced by the periodontal pathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis are suspected virulence factors and are involved in interrupting host defense mechanisms as well as in penetrating and destroying periodontal connective tissues. To induce a protective immune response against P. gingivalis, we constructed an rgpA DNA vaccine. BALB/c mice were immunized intradermally by Gene Gun with plasmid DNA carrying rgpA. Antibody responses against P. gingivalis were determined by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The rgpA DNA vaccine induced high levels of serum antibodies against P. gingivalis. Sera from the rgpA DNA vaccine-immunized mice diminished the proteolytic activity of RgpA and RgpB and inhibited the binding of P. gingivalis to a type I collagen sponge. Moreover, the sera effectively reduced the hemagglutination of P. gingivalis, indicating that the hemagglutinin activity of the organism is associated with RgpA. We found with a murine abscess model that mice immunized with the rgpA DNA vaccine were resistant to an invasive P. gingivalis W50 challenge. These results suggest that the rgpA DNA vaccine induced specific antibodies against the enzyme and that this vaccine could confer protective immunity against P. gingivalis infection. PMID:11292699

  16. DNA vaccine prime and recombinant FPV vaccine boost: an important candidate immunization strategy to control bluetongue virus type 1.

    PubMed

    Li, Junping; Yang, Tao; Xu, Qingyuan; Sun, Encheng; Feng, Yufei; Lv, Shuang; Zhang, Qin; Wang, Haixiu; Wu, Donglai

    2015-10-01

    Bluetongue virus (BTV) is the causative agent of bluetongue (BT), an important sheep disease that caused great economic loss to the sheep industry. There are 26 BTV serotypes based on the outer protein VP2. However, the serotypes BTV-1 and BTV-16 are the two most prevalent serotypes in China. Vaccination is the most effective method of preventing viral infections. Therefore, the need for an effective vaccine against BTV is urgent. In this study, DNA vaccines and recombinant fowlpox virus (rFPV) vaccines expressing VP2 alone or VP2 in combination with VP5 or co-expressing the VP2 and VP5 proteins of BTV-1 were evaluated in both mice and sheep. Several strategies were tested in mice, including DNA vaccine prime and boost, rFPV vaccine prime and boost, and DNA vaccine prime and rFPV vaccine boost. We then determined the best vaccine strategy in sheep. Our results indicated that a strategy combining a DNA vaccine prime (co-expressing VP2 and VP5) followed by an rFPV vaccine boost (co-expressing VP2 and VP5) induced a high titer of neutralizing antibodies in sheep. Therefore, our data suggest that a DNA vaccine consisting of a pCAG-(VP2+VP5) prime and an rFPV-(VP2+VP5) boost is an important candidate for the design of a novel vaccine against BTV-1.

  17. Immunogenicity of Virus Like Particle Forming Baculoviral DNA Vaccine against Pandemic Influenza H1N1.

    PubMed

    Gwon, Yong-Dae; Kim, Sehyun; Cho, Yeondong; Heo, Yoonki; Cho, Hansam; Park, Kihoon; Lee, Hee-Jung; Choi, Jiwon; Poo, Haryoung; Kim, Young Bong

    2016-01-01

    An outbreak of influenza H1N1 in 2009, representing the first influenza pandemic of the 21st century, was transmitted to over a million individuals and claimed 18,449 lives. The current status in many countries is to prepare influenza vaccine using cell-based or egg-based killed vaccine. However, traditional influenza vaccine platforms have several limitations. To overcome these limitations, many researchers have tried various approaches to develop alternative production platforms. One of the alternative approach, we reported the efficacy of influenza HA vaccination using a baculoviral DNA vaccine (AcHERV-HA). However, the immune response elicited by the AcHERV-HA vaccine, which only targets the HA antigen, was lower than that of the commercial killed vaccine. To overcome the limitations of this previous vaccine, we constructed a human endogenous retrovirus (HERV) envelope-coated, baculovirus-based, virus-like-particle (VLP)-forming DNA vaccine (termed AcHERV-VLP) against pandemic influenza A/California/04/2009 (pH1N1). BALB/c mice immunized with AcHERV-VLP (1×107 FFU AcHERV-VLP, i.m.) and compared with mice immunized with the killed vaccine or mice immunized with AcHERV-HA. As a result, AcHERV-VLP immunization produced a greater humoral immune response and exhibited neutralizing activity with an intrasubgroup H1 strain (PR8), elicited neutralizing antibody production, a high level of interferon-γ secretion in splenocytes, and diminished virus shedding in the lung after challenge with a lethal dose of influenza virus. In conclusion, VLP-forming baculovirus DNA vaccine could be a potential vaccine candidate capable of efficiently delivering DNA to the vaccinee and VLP forming DNA eliciting stronger immunogenicity than egg-based killed vaccines. PMID:27149064

  18. Immunogenicity of Virus Like Particle Forming Baculoviral DNA Vaccine against Pandemic Influenza H1N1

    PubMed Central

    Gwon, Yong-Dae; Kim, Sehyun; Cho, Yeondong; Heo, Yoonki; Cho, Hansam; Park, Kihoon; Lee, Hee-Jung; Choi, Jiwon; Poo, Haryoung; Kim, Young Bong

    2016-01-01

    An outbreak of influenza H1N1 in 2009, representing the first influenza pandemic of the 21st century, was transmitted to over a million individuals and claimed 18,449 lives. The current status in many countries is to prepare influenza vaccine using cell-based or egg-based killed vaccine. However, traditional influenza vaccine platforms have several limitations. To overcome these limitations, many researchers have tried various approaches to develop alternative production platforms. One of the alternative approach, we reported the efficacy of influenza HA vaccination using a baculoviral DNA vaccine (AcHERV-HA). However, the immune response elicited by the AcHERV-HA vaccine, which only targets the HA antigen, was lower than that of the commercial killed vaccine. To overcome the limitations of this previous vaccine, we constructed a human endogenous retrovirus (HERV) envelope-coated, baculovirus-based, virus-like-particle (VLP)–forming DNA vaccine (termed AcHERV-VLP) against pandemic influenza A/California/04/2009 (pH1N1). BALB/c mice immunized with AcHERV-VLP (1×107 FFU AcHERV-VLP, i.m.) and compared with mice immunized with the killed vaccine or mice immunized with AcHERV-HA. As a result, AcHERV-VLP immunization produced a greater humoral immune response and exhibited neutralizing activity with an intrasubgroup H1 strain (PR8), elicited neutralizing antibody production, a high level of interferon-γ secretion in splenocytes, and diminished virus shedding in the lung after challenge with a lethal dose of influenza virus. In conclusion, VLP-forming baculovirus DNA vaccine could be a potential vaccine candidate capable of efficiently delivering DNA to the vaccinee and VLP forming DNA eliciting stronger immunogenicity than egg-based killed vaccines. PMID:27149064

  19. The immune response induced by DNA vaccine expressing nfa1 gene against Naegleria fowleri.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jong-Hyun; Lee, Sang-Hee; Sohn, Hae-Jin; Lee, Jinyoung; Chwae, Yong-Joon; Park, Sun; Kim, Kyongmin; Shin, Ho-Joon

    2012-12-01

    The pathogenic free-living amoeba, Naegleria fowleri, causes fatal primary amoebic meningoencephalitis in experimental animals and in humans. The nfa1 gene that was cloned from N. fowleri is located on pseudopodia, especially amoebic food cups and plays an important role in the pathogenesis of N. fowleri. In this study, we constructed and characterized retroviral vector and lentiviral vector systems for nfa1 DNA vaccination in mice. We constructed the retroviral vector (pQCXIN) and the lentiviral vector (pCDH) cloned with the egfp-nfa1 gene. The expression of nfa1 gene in Chinese hamster ovary cell and human primary nasal epithelial cell transfected with the pQCXIN/egfp-nfa1 vector or pCDH/egfp-nfa1 vector was observed by fluorescent microscopy and Western blotting analysis. Our viral vector systems effectively delivered the nfa1 gene to the target cells and expressed the Nfa1 protein within the target cells. To evaluate immune responses of nfa1-vaccinated mice, BALB/c mice were intranasally vaccinated with viral particles of each retro- or lentiviral vector expressing nfa1 gene. DNA vaccination using viral vectors expressing nfa1 significantly stimulated the production of Nfa1-specific IgG subclass, as well as IgG levels. In particular, both levels of IgG2a (Th1) and IgG1 (Th2) were significantly increased in mice vaccinated with viral vectors. These results show the nfa1-vaccination induce efficiently Th1 type, as well as Th2 type immune responses. This is the first report to construct viral vector systems and to evaluate immune responses as DNA vaccination in N. fowleri infection. Furthermore, these results suggest that nfal vaccination may be an effective method for treatment of N. fowleri infection.

  20. Evaluation of a Novel Non-Penetrating Electrode for Use in DNA Vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Donate, Amy; Coppola, Domenico; Cruz, Yolmari; Heller, Richard

    2011-01-01

    Current progress in the development of vaccines has decreased the incidence of fatal and non-fatal infections and increased longevity. However, new technologies need to be developed to combat an emerging generation of infectious diseases. DNA vaccination has been demonstrated to have great potential for use with a wide variety of diseases. Alone, this technology does not generate a significant immune response for vaccination, but combined with delivery by electroporation (EP), can enhance plasmid expression and immunity. Most EP systems, while effective, can be invasive and painful making them less desirable for use in vaccination. Our lab recently developed a non-invasive electrode known as the multi-electrode array (MEA), which lies flat on the surface of the skin without penetrating the tissue. In this study we evaluated the MEA for its use in DNA vaccination using Hepatitis B virus as the infectious model. We utilized the guinea pig model because their skin is similar in thickness and morphology to humans. The plasmid encoding Hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) was delivered intradermally with the MEA to guinea pig skin. The results show increased protein expression resulting from plasmid delivery using the MEA as compared to injection alone. Within 48 hours of treatment, there was an influx of cellular infiltrate in experimental groups. Humoral responses were also increased significantly in both duration and intensity as compared to injection only groups. While this electrode requires further study, our results suggest that the MEA has potential for use in electrically mediated intradermal DNA vaccination. PMID:21559474

  1. Efficacy of a DNA Vaccine Carrying Eimeria maxima Gam56 Antigen Gene against Coccidiosis in Chickens

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jinjun; Zhang, Yan

    2013-01-01

    To control coccidiosis without using prophylactic medications, a DNA vaccine targeting the gametophyte antigen Gam56 from Eimeria maxima in chickens was constructed, and the immunogenicity and protective effects were evaluated. The ORF of Gam56 gene was cloned into an eukaryotic expression vector pcDNA3.1(zeo)+. Expression of Gam56 protein in COS-7 cells transfected with recombinant plasmid pcDNA-Gam56 was confirmed by indirect immunofluorescence assay. The DNA vaccine was injected intramuscularly to yellow feathered broilers of 1-week old at 3 dosages (25, 50, and 100 µg/chick). Injection was repeated once 1 week later. One week after the second injection, birds were challenged orally with 5×104 sporulated oocysts of E. maxima, then weighed and killed at day 8 post challenge. Blood samples were collected and examined for specific peripheral blood lymphocyte proliferation activity and serum antibody levels. Compared with control groups, the administration of pcDNA-Gam56 vaccine markedly increased the lymphocyte proliferation activity (P<0.05) at day 7 and 14 after the first immunization. The level of lymphocyte proliferation started to decrease on day 21 after the first immunization. A similar trend was seen in specific antibody levels. Among the 3 pcDNA-Gam56 immunized groups, the median dosage group displayed the highest lymphocyte proliferation and antibody levels (P<0.05). The median dosage group had the greatest relative body weight gain (89.7%), and the greatest oocyst shedding reduction (53.7%). These results indicate that median dosage of DNA vaccine had good immunogenicity and immune protection effects, and may be used in field applications for coccidiosis control. PMID:23710081

  2. Induction of protection against porcine cysticercosis in growing pigs by DNA vaccination.

    PubMed

    Guo, Aijiang; Jin, Zhizhong; Zheng, Yadong; Hai, Gang; Yuan, Gailing; Li, Hailong; Cai, Xuepeng

    2007-01-01

    A DNA vaccine, pcDNA3-B, was developed by using the nucleotide sequence of Taenia solium B antigen and cloning into pcDNA3.1 plasmid. The growing pigs were vaccinated by one intramuscular infection of 200 or 1000 microg pcDNA3-B. The immunization with 1000 microg of pcDNA3-B showed 92.6% protection when the pigs were challenged by T. solium eggs and four of the five pigs vaccinated had no viable cysts. The results provide encouraging information on the use of pcDNA3-B vaccination for the prevention of cysticercosis.

  3. [Problems and prospects of gene therapeutics and DNA vaccines development and application].

    PubMed

    Kibirev, Ia A; Drobkov, B I; Marakulin, I V

    2010-01-01

    The review is summarized foreign publications devoted to different aspects of DNA vaccines and gene therapeutics' biological safety. In spite of incomprehension in their action, numerous prototype DNA-based biopharmaceuticals are in advanced stages of human clinical trials. This review is focused on some safety concerns of gene formulations vaccines relate to toxic effects, vertical transmission possibility, genome integration complications, immunologic and immunopathologic effects and environmental spread. It is noted that necessity of national regulatory documents development related to gene therapy medicinal products is significant condition of their application to medical practice.

  4. Phosphate acceptor amino acid residues in structural proteins of rhabdoviruses.

    PubMed

    Sokol, F; Tan, K B; McFalls, M L; Madore, P

    1974-07-01

    Partial acid hydrolysates of the [(32)P]phosphate- or [(3)H]serine-labeled proteins of purified vesicular stomatitis, rabies, Lagos bat, Mokola, or spring viremia of carp virions and of purified intracellular nucleocapsids of these viruses have been analyzed by paper electrophoresis for the presence of phosphorylated amino acids. Both phosphoserine and phosphothreonine, with the former predominant, were present in virion and nucleocapsid preparations that contained phosphoproteins. An exception was the fish rhabdovirus, which contained only phosphoserine. When vesicular stomatitis or rabies virus proteins were phosphorylated in a cell-free system by the virion-associated protein kinase and analyzed for the presence of phosphorylated amino acid residues, phosphoserine was again found to be more abundant than phosphothreonine. After in vitro protein phosphorylation, another phospho-compound, possibly a third phosphoamino acid, was detected in the partial acid hydrolysates of these viruses. PMID:4365328

  5. Host-switching by a vertically transmitted rhabdovirus in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Longdon, Ben; Wilfert, Lena; Osei-Poku, Jewelna; Cagney, Heather; Obbard, Darren J; Jiggins, Francis M

    2011-10-23

    A diverse range of endosymbionts are found within the cells of animals. As these endosymbionts are normally vertically transmitted, we might expect their evolutionary history to be dominated by host-fidelity and cospeciation with the host. However, studies of bacterial endosymbionts have shown that while this is true for some mutualists, parasites often move horizontally between host lineages over evolutionary timescales. For the first time, to our knowledge, we have investigated whether this is also the case for vertically transmitted viruses. Here, we describe four new sigma viruses, a group of vertically transmitted rhabdoviruses previously known in Drosophila. Using sequence data from these new viruses, and the previously described sigma viruses, we show that they have switched between hosts during their evolutionary history. Our results suggest that sigma virus infections may be short-lived in a given host lineage, so that their long-term persistence relies on rare horizontal transmission events between hosts.

  6. Immunogenicity of Bivalent Human Papillomavirus DNA Vaccine Using Human Endogenous Retrovirus Envelope-Coated Baculoviral Vectors in Mice and Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hee-Jung; Hur, Yoon-Ki; Cho, Youn-Dong; Kim, Mi-Gyeong; Lee, Hoon-Taek; Oh, Yu-Kyoung; Kim, Young Bong

    2012-01-01

    Human papillomavirus is known to be the major pathogen of cervical cancer. Here, we report the efficacy of a bivalent human papillomavirus type 16 and 18 DNA vaccine system following repeated dosing in mice and pigs using a recombinant baculovirus bearing human endogenous retrovirus envelope protein (AcHERV) as a vector. The intramuscular administration of AcHERV-based HPV16L1 and HPV18L1 DNA vaccines induced antigen-specific serum IgG, vaginal IgA, and neutralizing antibodies to levels comparable to those achieved using the commercially marketed vaccine Cervarix. Similar to Cervarix, AcHERV-based bivalent vaccinations completely blocked subsequent vaginal challenge with HPV type-specific pseudovirions. However, AcHERV-based bivalent vaccinations induced significantly higher cell-mediated immune responses than Cervarix, promoting 4.5- (HPV16L1) and 3.9-(HPV18L1) fold higher interferon-γ production in splenocytes upon stimulation with antigen type-specific pseudovirions. Repeated dosing did not affect the immunogenicity of AcHERV DNA vaccines. Three sequential immunizations with AcHERV-HP18L1 DNA vaccine followed by three repeated dosing with AcHERV-HP16L1 over 11 weeks induced an initial production of anti-HPV18L1 antibody followed by subsequent induction of anti-HPV16L1 antibody. Finally, AcHERV-based bivalent DNA vaccination induced antigen-specific serum IgG immune responses in pigs. These results support the further development of AcHERV as a bivalent human papillomavirus DNA vaccine system for use in preventing the viral infection as well as treating the infected women by inducing both humoral and cell-mediated immune responses. Moreover, the possibility of repeated dosing indicates the utility of AcHERV system for reusable vectors of other viral pathogen vaccines. PMID:23209698

  7. Enhanced non-inflammasome mediated immune responses by mannosylated zwitterionic-based cationic liposomes for HIV DNA vaccines.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Chenmeng; Liu, Jiandong; Yang, Jun; Li, Yan; Weng, Jie; Shao, Yiming; Zhang, Xin

    2016-04-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) DNA vaccine can induce cellular and humoral immunity. A safe and effective HIV DNA vaccine is urgent need to prevent the spread of acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS). The major drawback of DNA vaccines is the low immunogenicity, which is caused by the poor delivery to antigen presenting cells and insufficient antigen expression. Sparked by the capability of endosomal/lysosomal escape of the zwitterionic lipid distearoyl phosphoethanol-amine-polycarboxybetaine (DSPE-PCB), we attempted to develop a zwitterionic-based cationic liposome with enhanced immunogenicity of DNA vaccines. The mannosylated zwitterionic-based cationic liposome (man-ZCL) was constructed as a DNA vaccine adjuvant for HIV vaccination. Man-ZCL could complex with DNA antigens to form a tight structure and protect them from nuclei enzyme degradation. Benefited from the capability of the specific mannose receptor mediated antigen processing cells targeting and enhanced endosomal/lysosomal escape, the man-ZCL lipoplexes were supposed to promote antigen presentation and the immunogenicity of DNA vaccines. In vitro and in vivo results revealed that man-ZCL lipoplexes showed enhanced anti-HIV immune responses and lower toxicity compared with CpG/DNA and Lipo2k/DNA, and triggered a Th1/Th2 mixed immunity. An antigen-depot effect was observed in the administration site, and this resulted in enhanced retention of DNA antigens in draining lymph nodes. Most importantly, the man-ZCL could assist to activate T cells through a non-inflammasome pathway. These findings suggested that the man-ZCL could be potentially applied as a safe and efficient DNA adjuvant for HIV vaccines. PMID:26851653

  8. Induction of strain-transcending immunity against Plasmodium chabaudi adami malaria with a multiepitope DNA vaccine.

    PubMed

    Scorza, T; Grubb, K; Smooker, P; Rainczuk, A; Proll, D; Spithill, T W

    2005-05-01

    A major goal of current malaria vaccine programs is to develop multivalent vaccines that will protect humans against the many heterologous malaria strains that circulate in endemic areas. We describe a multiepitope DNA vaccine, derived from a genomic Plasmodium chabaudi adami DS DNA expression library of 30,000 plasmids, which induces strain-transcending immunity in mice against challenge with P. c. adami DK. Segregation of this library and DNA sequence analysis identified vaccine subpools encoding open reading frames (ORFs)/peptides of >9 amino acids [aa] (the V9+ pool, 303 plasmids) and >50 aa (V50+ pool, 56 plasmids), respectively. The V9+ and V50+ plasmid vaccine subpools significantly cross-protected mice against heterologous P. c. adami DK challenge, and protection correlated with the induction of both specific gamma interferon production by splenic cells and opsonizing antibodies. Bioinformatic analysis showed that 22 of the V50+ ORFs were polypeptides conserved among three or more Plasmodium spp., 13 of which are predicted hypothetical proteins. Twenty-nine of these ORFs are orthologues of predicted Plasmodium falciparum sequences known to be expressed in the blood stage, suggesting that this vaccine pool encodes multiple blood-stage antigens. The results have implications for malaria vaccine design by providing proof-of-principle that significant strain-transcending immunity can be induced using multiepitope blood-stage DNA vaccines and suggest that both cellular responses and opsonizing antibodies are necessary for optimal protection against P. c. adami.

  9. Immunogenic and protective effects of an oral DNA vaccine against infectious pancreatic necrosis virus in fish.

    PubMed

    de las Heras, Ana I; Rodríguez Saint-Jean, S; Pérez-Prieto, Sara I

    2010-04-01

    DNA vaccines and oral DNA-based immunotherapy against infectious pancreatic necrosis virus (IPNV) have scarcely been studied in salmonid fish. Here, a vector with the capsid VP2 gene inserted was encapsulated in alginate microspheres to avoid the aggressive gastrointestinal conditions experienced following oral administration. Alginate microspheres were effective to protect the pDNA encoding VP2, which was expressed early in different organs of the vaccinated trout and that persisted for at least 60 days. The vaccine induces innate immune responses, raising the expression of IFN more than 10-fold relative to the fish vaccinated with the empty plasmid, at 7 and 15 days post-vaccination. Likewise, maximal expression of the IFN-induced antiviral Mx protein was recorded 15 days post-vaccination and neutralizing antibodies were also detected after 15 days, although their titre rose further at 21 days post-vaccination. Protection was high in the immunized fish, which showed around an 80% relative survival when challenged 15 and 30 days after vaccine delivery. Very low viral load with respect to the control group was detected in the vaccinated fish that survived 45 days after challenge. Thus, this study demonstrates the potential of the encapsulation technique for IPNV-DNA vaccine delivery and the relevance of the IPNV-VP2 gene for future plasmid constructs.

  10. Secure splenic delivery of plasmid DNA and its application to DNA vaccine.

    PubMed

    Kurosaki, Tomoaki; Kodama, Yukinobu; Muro, Takahiro; Higuchi, Norihide; Nakamura, Tadahiro; Kitahara, Takashi; Miyakoda, Mana; Yui, Katsuyuki; Sasaki, Hitoshi

    2013-01-01

    In this experiment, we developed a novel safe and effective gene delivery vector coated with γ-polyglutamic acid (γ-PGA-coated complexes). The γ-PGA-coated complex was composed of chiseled spherical nano-particles with anionic charges. The plasmid DNA/polyethyleneimine complex (non-coated complex) showed high transgene efficiency in the spleen and lung after intravenous administration in mice, with high liver toxicity and lethality. On the other hand, γ-PGA-coated complex selectively showed high transgene efficiency in the spleen without such toxicity. Furthermore, the γ-PGA-coated complex highly accumulated and showed high gene expression in the marginal zone of the spleen. Those results strongly indicated that γ-PGA-coated complex was suitable as a DNA vaccine vector. We therefore applied γ-PGA-coated complex to melanoma DNA vaccine, pUb-M. The γ-PGA-coated complex containing pUb-M significantly inhibited the growth and metastasis of a melanoma cell line, B16-F10 cells. In conclusion, we developed a splenic gene vector, γ-PGA-coated complex, as a novel technology for clinical vaccination. PMID:24189423

  11. Production and purification of plasmid DNA vaccines: is there scope for further innovation?

    PubMed

    Xenopoulos, Alex; Pattnaik, Priyabrata

    2014-12-01

    The demand for plasmid DNA (pDNA) has vastly increased over the past decade in response to significant advances that have been made in its application for gene therapy and vaccine development. Plasmid DNA-based vaccines are experiencing a resurgence due to success with prime-boost immunization strategies. The challenge has always been poor productivity and delivery of pDNA. Plasmid DNA-based vaccines have traditionally required milligram scale of GMP-grade product for vaccination due to the relatively low efficacy and duration of gene expression. However, efforts to increase pDNA vaccine effectiveness are evolving in genetic manipulations of bacterial host, improvements in product recovery and innovative delivery methods. This review summarizes recent advances in large-scale pDNA vaccine manufacturing, ranging from upstream processing, downstream processing and formulation, as such information is usually not available to the scientific community. The article will highlight technology gaps and offer insight on further scope of innovation.

  12. Antiangiogenic immunotherapy targeting Flk-1, DNA vaccine and adoptive T cell transfer, inhibits ocular neovascularization

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Han; Sonoda, Koh-Hei; Hijioka, Kuniaki; Qiao, Hong; Oshima, Yuji; Ishibashi, Tatsuro

    2009-04-17

    Ocular neovascularization (NV) is the primary cause of blindness in a wide range of ocular diseases. The exact mechanism underlying the pathogenesis of ocular NV is not yet well understood, and so there is no satisfactory therapy for ocular NV. Here, we describe a strategy targeting Flk-1, a self-antigen overexpressed on proliferating endothelial cells in ocular NV, by antiangiogenic immunotherapy-DNA vaccine and adoptive T cell therapy. An oral DNA vaccine encoding Flk-1 carried by attenuated Salmonella typhimurium markedly suppressed development of laser-induced choroidal NV. We further demonstrated that adoptive transfer of vaccine-induced CD8{sup +} T cells reduced pathological preretinal NV, with a concomitant facilitation of physiological revascularization after oxygen-induced retinal vessel obliteration. However, physiological retinal vascular development was unaffected in neonatal mice transferred with vaccine-induced CD8{sup +} T cells. These findings suggested that antiangiogenic immunotherapy targeting Flk-1 such as vaccination and adoptive immunotherapy may contribute to future therapies for ocular NV.

  13. Vaccination of rhesus macaques with a vif-deleted simian immunodeficiency virus proviral DNA vaccine

    SciTech Connect

    Sparger, Ellen E. Dubie, Robert A.; Shacklett, Barbara L.; Cole, Kelly S.; Chang, W.L.; Luciw, Paul A.

    2008-05-10

    Studies in non-human primates, with simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) and simian/human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV) have demonstrated that live-attenuated viral vaccines are highly effective; however these vaccine viruses maintain a low level of pathogenicity. Lentivirus attenuation associated with deletion of the viral vif gene carries a significantly reduced risk for pathogenicity, while retaining the potential for virus replication of low magnitude in the host. This report describes a vif-deleted simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV)mac239 provirus that was tested as an attenuated proviral DNA vaccine by inoculation of female rhesus macaques. SIV-specific interferon-{gamma} enzyme-linked immunospot responses of low magnitude were observed after immunization with plasmid containing the vif-deleted SIV provirus. However, vaccinated animals displayed strong sustained virus-specific T cell proliferative responses and increasing antiviral antibody titers. These immune responses suggested either persistent vaccine plasmid expression or low level replication of vif-deleted SIV in the host. Immunized and unvaccinated macaques received a single high dose vaginal challenge with pathogenic SIVmac251. A transient suppression of challenge virus load and a greater median survival time was observed for vaccinated animals. However, virus loads for vaccinated and unvaccinated macaques were comparable by twenty weeks after challenge and overall survival curves for the two groups were not significantly different. Thus, a vif-deleted SIVmac239 proviral DNA vaccine is immunogenic and capable of inducing a transient suppression of pathogenic challenge virus, despite severe attenuation of the vaccine virus.

  14. On the efficacy of malaria DNA vaccination with magnetic gene vectors.

    PubMed

    Nawwab Al-Deen, Fatin; Ma, Charles; Xiang, Sue D; Selomulya, Cordelia; Plebanski, Magdalena; Coppel, Ross L

    2013-05-28

    We investigated the efficacy and types of immune responses from plasmid malaria DNA vaccine encoding VR1020-PyMSP119 condensed on the surface of polyethyleneimine (PEI)-coated SPIONs. In vivo mouse studies were done firstly to determine the optimum magnetic vector composition, and then to observe immune responses elicited when magnetic vectors were introduced via different administration routes. Higher serum antibody titers against PyMSP119 were observed with intraperitoneal and intramuscular injections than subcutaneous and intradermal injections. Robust IgG2a and IgG1 responses were observed for intraperitoneal administration, which could be due to the physiology of peritoneum as a major reservoir of macrophages and dendritic cells. Heterologous DNA prime followed by single protein boost vaccination regime also enhanced IgG2a, IgG1, and IgG2b responses, indicating the induction of appropriate memory immunity that can be elicited by protein on recall. These outcomes support the possibility to design superparamagnetic nanoparticle-based DNA vaccines to optimally evoke desired antibody responses, useful for a variety of diseases including malaria.

  15. Local gene expression and immune responses of vaginal DNA vaccination using a needle-free injector.

    PubMed

    Kanazawa, Takanori; Takashima, Yuuki; Tamura, Toshiaki; Tsuchiya, Miki; Shibata, Yasunori; Udagawa, Haruhide; Okada, Hiroaki

    2010-08-30

    The vaginal mucosa is the most common site of initiation of virus infections that are transmitted through heterosexual intercourse, including HIV and papillomavirus. Thus, in order to prevent or treat these infections, strong vaginal immunity is required as the first line of defense. In this study, to establish a less invasive, safe, convenient and effective immunization method, we examined the local (skin and vagina) gene transfection efficiency of a non-needle jet injector for daily insulin injection. In the skin experiment, the needle-free injector resulted in a marked increase in marker gene expression, compared to the conventional needle-syringe injection. In addition, intradermal DNA vaccination using the needle-free injector dramatically induced IFN-gamma and antibody systemic responses in mice. Furthermore, we investigated the applicability of the needle-free injector as a vaginal vaccination tool in rabbits. Vaginal gene expression using the needle-free injector was significantly greater than that using needle-syringe injection. Moreover, intravaginal vaccination by the needle-free injector promoted vaginal IgA secretion and IFN-gamma mRNA expression in the blood lymphocytes, to a degree significantly higher than that by needle-syringe injection. In conclusion, local vaginal DNA vaccination using a needle-free jet injector is a promising approach for the prevention and treatment of mucosal infectious diseases.

  16. Construction and Nonclinical Testing of a Puumala Virus Synthetic M Gene-Based DNA Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Brocato, R. L.; Josleyn, M. J.; Wahl-Jensen, V.; Schmaljohn, C. S.

    2013-01-01

    Puumala virus (PUUV) is a causative agent of hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS). Although PUUV-associated HFRS does not result in high case-fatality rates, the social and economic impact is considerable. There is no licensed vaccine or specific therapeutic to prevent or treat HFRS. Here we report the synthesis of a codon-optimized, full-length M segment open reading frame and its cloning into a DNA vaccine vector to produce the plasmid pWRG/PUU-M(s2). pWRG/PUU-M(s2) delivered by gene gun produced high-titer neutralizing antibodies in hamsters and nonhuman primates. Vaccination with pWRG/PUU-M(s2) protected hamsters against infection with PUUV but not against infection by related HFRS-associated hantaviruses. Unexpectedly, vaccination protected hamsters in a lethal disease model of Andes virus (ANDV) in the absence of ANDV cross-neutralizing antibodies. This is the first evidence that an experimental DNA vaccine for HFRS can provide protection in a hantavirus lethal disease model. PMID:23239797

  17. Adverse effects of feline IL-12 during DNA vaccination against feline infectious peritonitis virus.

    PubMed

    Glansbeek, Harrie L; Haagmans, Bart L; te Lintelo, Eddie G; Egberink, Herman F; Duquesne, Véronique; Aubert, André; Horzinek, Marian C; Rottier, Peter J M

    2002-01-01

    Cell-mediated immunity is thought to play a decisive role in protecting cats against feline infectious peritonitis (FIP), a progressive and lethal coronavirus disease. In view of the potential of DNA vaccines to induce cell-mediated responses, their efficacy to induce protective immunity in cats was evaluated. The membrane (M) and nucleocapsid (N) proteins were chosen as antigens, because antibodies to the spike (S) protein of FIP virus (FIPV) are known to precipitate pathogenesis. However, vaccination by repeated injections of plasmids encoding these proteins did not protect kittens against challenge infection with FIPV. Also, a prime-boost protocol failed to afford protection, with priming using plasmid DNA and boosting using recombinant vaccinia viruses expressing the same coronavirus proteins. Because of the role of IL-12 in initiating cell-mediated immunity, the effects of co-delivery of plasmids encoding the feline cytokine were studied. Again, IL-12 did not meet expectations - on the contrary, it enhanced susceptibility to FIPV challenge. This study shows that DNA vaccination failed to protect cats against FIP and that IL-12 may yield adverse effects when used as a cytokine adjuvant.

  18. Immune responses in DNA vaccine formulated with PMMA following immunization and after challenge with Leishmania major.

    PubMed

    Zarrati, Somayeh; Mahdavi, Mehdi; Tabatabaie, Fatemeh

    2016-06-01

    Leishmaniasis is a major infectious disease caused by protozoan parasites of the genus Leishmania. Despite of many efforts toward vaccine against Leishmania no effective vaccine has been approved yet. DNA vaccines can generate more powerful and broad immune responses than conventional vaccines. In order to increase immunity, the DNA vaccine has been supplemented with adjuvant. In this study a new nano-vaccine containing TSA recombinant plasmid and poly(methylmethacrylate) nanoparticles (act as adjuvant) was designed and its immunogenicity tested on BALB/c mouse. After three intramuscular injection of nano-vaccine (100 μg), the recombinant TSA protein (20 μg) was injected subcutaneously. Finally as a challenge animals were infected by Leishmania major. After the last injection of nano-vaccine, after protein booster injection, and also after challenge, cellular immune and antibody responses were evaluated by ELISA method. The findings of this study showed the new nano-vaccine was capable of induction both cytokines secretion and specific antibody responses, but predominant Th1 immune response characterized by IFN-γ production compared to control groups. Moreover, results revealed that nano-vaccine was effective in reducing parasite burden in the spleen of Leishmania major-infected BALB/c mice. Base on results, current candidate vaccine has potency for further studies. PMID:27413316

  19. A DNA vaccine against dolphin morbillivirus is immunogenic in bottlenose dolphins.

    PubMed

    Vaughan, Kerrie; Del Crew, Jason; Hermanson, Gary; Wloch, Mary K; Riffenburgh, Robert H; Smith, Cynthia R; Van Bonn, William G

    2007-12-15

    The immunization of exotic species presents considerable challenges. Nevertheless, for facilities like zoos, animal parks, government facilities and non-profit conservation groups, the protection of valuable and endangered species from infectious disease is a growing concern. The rationale for immunization in these species parallels that for human and companion animals; to decrease the incidence of disease. The U.S. Navy Marine Mammal Program, in collaboration with industry and academic partners, has developed and evaluated a DNA vaccine targeting a marine viral pathogen - dolphin morbillivirus (DMV). The DMV vaccine consists of the fusion (F) and hemagglutinin (H) genes of DMV. Vaccine constructs (pVR-DMV-F and pVR-DMV-H) were evaluated for expression in vitro and then for immunogenicity in mice. Injection protocols were designed for application in Atlantic bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) to balance vaccine effectiveness with clinical utility. Six dolphins were inoculated, four animals received both pDMV-F and pDMV-H and two animals received a mock vaccine (vector alone). All animals received an inoculation week 0, followed by two booster injections weeks 8 and 14. Vaccine-specific immune responses were documented in all four vaccinated animals. To our knowledge, this is the first report of pathogen-specific immunogenicity to a DNA vaccine in an aquatic mammal species.

  20. Ancylostoma ceylanicum metalloprotease 6 DNA vaccination induces partial protection against hookworm challenge infection.

    PubMed

    Wiśniewski, Marcin; Jaros, Sławomir; Bąska, Piotr; Cappello, Michael; Wędrychowicz, Halina

    2013-09-01

    Hookworms are blood feeding intestinal nematodes that infect more than 500 million people and cause iron deficiency anemia. Infected children suffer from physical and cognitive growth retardation. Because of potential anthelminthic drug resistance, the need for vaccine development is urgent. Numerous antigens have been tested in animal models as vaccines against hookworm infection, but there is no effective human vaccine. We cloned a cDNA encoding Ancylostoma ceylanicum metalloprotease 6 (Acemep-6). Ace-MEP-6 is a protein with a predicted molecular mass of 101.87 kDa and based on computational analysis it is very likely to be engaged in food processing via hemoglobin digestion. Groups of hamsters were immunized with an Ace-mep-6 cDNA vaccine, either once or three times. Animals that were administered one dose developed high resistance (80%, p < 0.01) against challenge infection, whereas triple immunization resulted in no worm burden reduction. These results suggest that DNA vaccines can be powerful tools in ancylostomiasis control, although the mechanisms through which protection is conferred remain unclear.

  1. Advances in host and vector development for the production of plasmid DNA vaccines.

    PubMed

    Mairhofer, Juergen; Lara, Alvaro R

    2014-01-01

    Recent developments in DNA vaccine research provide a new momentum for this rather young and potentially disruptive technology. Gene-based vaccines are capable of eliciting protective immunity in humans to persistent intracellular pathogens, such as HIV, malaria, and tuberculosis, for which the conventional vaccine technologies have failed so far. The recent identification and characterization of genes coding for tumor antigens has stimulated the development of DNA-based antigen-specific cancer vaccines. Although most academic researchers consider the production of reasonable amounts of plasmid DNA (pDNA) for immunological studies relatively easy to solve, problems often arise during this first phase of production. In this chapter we review the current state of the art of pDNA production at small (shake flasks) and mid-scales (lab-scale bioreactor fermentations) and address new trends in vector design and strain engineering. We will guide the reader through the different stages of process design starting from choosing the most appropriate plasmid backbone, choosing the right Escherichia coli (E. coli) strain for production, and cultivation media and scale-up issues. In addition, we will address some points concerning the safety and potency of the produced plasmids, with special focus on producing antibiotic resistance-free plasmids. The main goal of this chapter is to make immunologists aware of the fact that production of the pDNA vaccine has to be performed with as much as attention and care as the rest of their research.

  2. Ubiquitin depletion and dominant-negative VPS4 inhibit rhabdovirus budding without affecting alphavirus budding.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Gwen M; Hanson, Phyllis I; Kielian, Margaret

    2007-12-01

    The budding reactions of a number of enveloped viruses use the cellular machinery involved in the formation of the luminal vesicles of endosomal multivesicular bodies (MVB). Budding of these viruses is dependent on the presence of specific late-domain motifs in membrane-associated viral proteins. Such budding reactions usually involve ubiquitin and are blocked by expression of an ATPase-deficient form of VPS4, a cellular AAA+ ATPase believed to be required late in the MVB pathway for the disassembly/release of the MVB machinery. Here we examined the role of the MVB pathway in the budding of the late-domain-containing rhabdovirus vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) and the alphavirus Semliki Forest virus (SFV). We tested early and late steps in the MVB pathway by depleting ubiquitin with the proteasome inhibitor MG-132 and by using cell lines inducibly expressing VPS4A or VPS4B protein. As previously shown, VSV budding was strongly dependent on ubiquitin. In contrast to the findings of previous studies with VPS4A, expression of ATPase-deficient mutants of either VPS4A or VPS4B inhibited VSV budding. Inhibition by VPS4 required the presence of the PPPY late domain on the VSV matrix protein and resulted in the accumulation of nonreleased VSV particles at the plasma membrane. In contrast, SFV budding was independent of both ubiquitin and the activity of VPS4, perhaps reflecting the important role of the highly organized envelope protein lattice during alphavirus budding.

  3. Early Activation of Teleost B Cells in Response to Rhabdovirus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Abós, Beatriz; Castro, Rosario; González Granja, Aitor; Havixbeck, Jeffrey J.; Barreda, Daniel R.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT To date, the response of teleost B cells to specific pathogens has been only scarcely addressed. In this work, we have demonstrated that viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV), a fish rhabdovirus, has the capacity to infect rainbow trout spleen IgM-positive (IgM+) cells, although the infection is not productive. Consequently, we have studied the effects of VHSV on IgM+ cell functionality, comparing these effects to those elicited by a Toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3) ligand, poly(I·C). We found that poly(I·C) and VHSV significantly upregulated TLR3 and type I interferon (IFN) transcription in spleen and blood IgM+ cells. Further effects included the upregulated transcription of the CK5B chemokine. The significant inhibition of some of these effects in the presence of bafilomycin A1 (BAF), an inhibitor of endosomal acidification, suggests the involvement of an intracellular TLR in these responses. In the case of VHSV, these transcriptional effects were dependent on viral entry into B cells and the initiation of viral transcription. VHSV also provoked the activation of NF-κB and the upregulation of major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC-II) cell surface expression on IgM+ cells, which, along with the increased transcription of the costimulatory molecules CD80/86 and CD83, pointed to VHSV-induced IgM+ cell activation toward an antigen-presenting profile. Finally, despite the moderate effects of VHSV on IgM+ cell proliferation, a consistent effect on IgM+ cell survival was detected. IMPORTANCE Innate immune responses to pathogens established through their recognition by pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) have been traditionally ascribed to innate cells. However, recent evidence in mammals has revealed that innate pathogen recognition by B lymphocytes is a crucial factor in shaping the type of immune response that is mounted. In teleosts, these immediate effects of viral encounter on B lymphocytes have not been addressed to date. In our study, we

  4. Sigma viruses from three species of Drosophila form a major new clade in the rhabdovirus phylogeny.

    PubMed

    Longdon, Ben; Obbard, Darren J; Jiggins, Francis M

    2010-01-01

    The sigma virus (DMelSV), which is a natural pathogen of Drosophila melanogaster, is the only Drosophila-specific rhabdovirus that has been described. We have discovered two new rhabdoviruses, D. obscura and D. affinis, which we have named DObsSV and DAffSV, respectively. We sequenced the complete genomes of DObsSV and DMelSV, and the L gene from DAffSV. Combining these data with sequences from a wide range of other rhabdoviruses, we found that the three sigma viruses form a distinct clade which is a sister group to the Dimarhabdovirus supergroup, and the high levels of divergence between these viruses suggest that they deserve to be recognized as a new genus. Furthermore, our analysis produced the most robustly supported phylogeny of the Rhabdoviridae to date, allowing us to reconstruct the major transitions that have occurred during the evolution of the family. Our data suggest that the bias towards research into plants and vertebrates means that much of the diversity of rhabdoviruses has been missed, and rhabdoviruses may be common pathogens of insects.

  5. Long-Term Reduction of High Blood Pressure by Angiotensin II DNA Vaccine in Spontaneously Hypertensive Rats.

    PubMed

    Koriyama, Hiroshi; Nakagami, Hironori; Nakagami, Futoshi; Osako, Mariana Kiomy; Kyutoku, Mariko; Shimamura, Munehisa; Kurinami, Hitomi; Katsuya, Tomohiro; Rakugi, Hiromi; Morishita, Ryuichi

    2015-07-01

    Recent research on vaccination has extended its scope from infectious diseases to chronic diseases, including Alzheimer disease, dyslipidemia, and hypertension. The aim of this study was to design DNA vaccines for high blood pressure and eventually develop human vaccine therapy to treat hypertension. Plasmid vector encoding hepatitis B core-angiotensin II (Ang II) fusion protein was injected into spontaneously hypertensive rats using needleless injection system. Anti-Ang II antibody was successfully produced in hepatitis B core-Ang II group, and antibody response against Ang II was sustained for at least 6 months. Systolic blood pressure was consistently lower in hepatitis B core-Ang II group after immunization, whereas blood pressure reduction was continued for at least 6 months. Perivascular fibrosis in heart tissue was also significantly decreased in hepatitis B core-Ang II group. Survival rate was significantly improved in hepatitis B core-Ang II group. This study demonstrated that Ang II DNA vaccine to spontaneously hypertensive rats significantly lowered high blood pressure for at least 6 months. In addition, Ang II DNA vaccines induced an adequate humoral immune response while avoiding the activation of self-reactive T cells, assessed by ELISPOT assay. Future development of DNA vaccine to treat hypertension may provide a new therapeutic option to treat hypertension. PMID:26015450

  6. Safety and Immunogenicity of DNA Vaccines Encoding Ebolavirus and Marburgvirus Wild-Type Glycoproteins in a Phase I Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Sarwar, Uzma N.; Costner, Pamela; Enama, Mary E.; Berkowitz, Nina; Hu, Zonghui; Hendel, Cynthia S.; Sitar, Sandra; Plummer, Sarah; Mulangu, Sabue; Bailer, Robert T.; Koup, Richard A.; Mascola, John R.; Nabel, Gary J.; Sullivan, Nancy J.; Graham, Barney S.; Ledgerwood, Julie E.

    2015-01-01

    Background Ebolavirus and Marburgvirus cause severe hemorrhagic fever with high mortality and are potential bioterrorism agents. There are no available vaccines or therapeutic agents. Previous clinical trials evaluated transmembrane-deleted and point-mutation Ebolavirus glycoproteins (GPs) in candidate vaccines. Constructs evaluated in this trial encode wild-type (WT) GP from Ebolavirus Zaire and Sudan species and the Marburgvirus Angola strain expressed in a DNA vaccine. Methods The VRC 206 study evaluated the safety and immunogenicity of these DNA vaccines (4 mg administered intramuscularly by Biojector) at weeks 0, 4, and 8, with a homologous boost at or after week 32. Safety evaluations included solicited reactogenicity and coagulation parameters. Primary immune assessment was done by means of GP-specific enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Results The vaccines were well tolerated, with no serious adverse events; 80% of subjects had positive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay results (≥30) at week 12. The fourth DNA vaccination boosted the immune responses. Conclusions The investigational Ebolavirus and Marburgvirus WT GP DNA vaccines were safe, well tolerated, and immunogenic in this phase I study. These results will further inform filovirus vaccine research toward a goal of inducing protective immunity by using WT GP antigens in candidate vaccine regimens. Clinical Trials Registration NCT00605514. PMID:25225676

  7. The site of administration influences both the type and the magnitude of the immune response induced by DNA vaccine electroporation.

    PubMed

    Vandermeulen, Gaëlle; Vanvarenberg, Kevin; De Beuckelaer, Ans; De Koker, Stefaan; Lambricht, Laure; Uyttenhove, Catherine; Reschner, Anca; Vanderplasschen, Alain; Grooten, Johan; Préat, Véronique

    2015-06-22

    We investigated the influence of the site of administration of DNA vaccine on the induced immune response. DNA vaccines were administered by electroporation at three different sites: tibial cranial muscle, abdominal skin and ear pinna. Aiming to draw general conclusions about DNA vaccine delivery, we successively used several plasmids encoding either luciferase and ovalbumin as models or gp160 and P1A as vaccines against HIV and P815 mastocytoma, respectively. Low levels and duration of luciferase transgene expression were observed after electroporation of the abdominal skin, partly explaining its lower immunogenic performance as compared to the other sites of administration. Analyses of OT-I CD8+ and OT-II CD4+ T cell responses highlighted the differential impact of the delivery site on the elicited immune response. Muscle electroporation induced the strongest humoral immune response and both muscle and ear pinna sites induced cellular immunity against gp160. Ear pinna delivery generated the highest level of CTL responses against P1A but electroporation of muscle and ear pinna were equally efficient in delaying P815 growth and improving mice survival. The present study demonstrated that the site of administration is a key factor to be tested in the development of DNA vaccine.

  8. Molecular Detection of Adenoviruses, Rhabdoviruses, and Paramyxoviruses in Bats from Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Conrardy, Christina; Tao, Ying; Kuzmin, Ivan V.; Niezgoda, Michael; Agwanda, Bernard; Breiman, Robert F.; Anderson, Larry J.; Rupprecht, Charles E.; Tong, Suxiang

    2014-01-01

    We screened 217 bats of at least 20 species from 17 locations in Kenya during July and August of 2006 for the presence of adenovirus, rhabdovirus, and paramyxovirus nucleic acids using generic reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and PCR assays. Of 217 bat fecal swabs examined, 4 bats were adenovirus DNA-positive, 11 bats were paramyxovirus RNA-positive, and 2 bats were rhabdovirus RNA-positive. Three bats were coinfected by two different viruses. By sequence comparison and phylogenetic analysis, the Kenya bat paramyxoviruses and rhabdoviruses from this study may represent novel viral lineages within their respective families; the Kenya bat adenoviruses could not be confirmed as novel, because the same region sequences from other known bat adenovirus genomes for comparison were lacking. Our study adds to previous evidence that bats carry diverse, potentially zoonotic viruses and may be coinfected with more than one virus. PMID:24865685

  9. A ribonuclease protection assay can distinguish spring viremia of carp virus from pike fry rhabdovirus

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ahne, W.; Kurath, G.; Winton, J.R.

    1998-01-01

    Thirteen rhabdovirus isolates from 10 teleost fish species as well as reference strains of spring viraemia of carp virus (SVCV) and pike fry rhabdovirus (PFRV) cross-reacted in an indirect immunofluorescence assay and were thus indistinguishable by this method. A ribonuclease protection assay (RPA) using a super(32)P-labeled RNA probe made from a cloned copy of the full length SVCV glycoprotein (G) gene was able to discriminate clearly between the type strains of SVCV and PFRV and among the 13 rhabdovirus isolates. Results for the RPA were generally in agreement with standard serum neutralisation assays; however, the RPA was also able to detect genomic differences between isolates of SVCV. These results have implications for fish disease control programs for SVCV.

  10. Tumor antigens for cancer immunotherapy: therapeutic potential of xenogeneic DNA vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasan, Roopa; Wolchok, Jedd D

    2004-01-01

    Preclinical animal studies have convincingly demonstrated that tumor immunity to self antigens can be actively induced and can translate into an effective anti-tumor response. Several of these observations are being tested in clinical trials. Immunization with xenogeneic DNA is an attractive approach to treat cancer since it generates T cell and antibody responses. When working in concert, these mechanisms may improve the efficacy of vaccines. The use of xenogeneic DNA in overcoming immune tolerance has been promising not only in inbred mice with transplanted tumors but also in outbred canines, which present with spontaneous tumors, as in the case of human. Use of this strategy also overcomes limitations seen in other types of cancer vaccines. Immunization against defined tumor antigens using a xenogeneic DNA vaccine is currently being tested in early phase clinical trials for the treatment of melanoma and prostate cancers, with proposed trials for breast cancer and Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma. PMID:15090064

  11. Construction and immunogenicity of a codon-optimized Entamoeba histolytica Gal-lectin-based DNA vaccine.

    PubMed

    Gaucher, Denis; Chadee, Kris

    2002-09-10

    Invasive amebiasis caused by Entamoeba histolytica is the third leading parasitic cause of mortality, and there are no vaccines available to help control the disease. The galactose-adherence lectin (Gal-lectin) is the parasite's major molecule allowing it to adhere to colonic mucin for colonization and to target cells for tissue destruction. It is immunodominant and is regarded as the most promising candidate molecule to be included in a subunit vaccine against amebiasis. In this study, we are reporting the construction of a codon-optimized DNA vaccine encoding a portion of the Gal-lectin heavy subunit that includes the carbohydrate recognition domain (CRD), and its in vivo testing in mice. The vaccine stimulated a Th1-type Gal-lectin-specific cellular immune response as well as the development of serum antibodies that recognized a recombinant portion of the heavy subunit, and that inhibited the adherence of trophozoites to target cells in vitro.

  12. Ty virus-like particles, DNA vaccines and Modified Vaccinia Virus Ankara; comparisons and combinations.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, S C; Schneider, J; Plebanski, M; Hannan, C M; Blanchard, T J; Smith, G L; Hill, A V

    1999-03-01

    Three types of vaccine, all expressing the same antigen from Plasmodium berghei, or a CD8+ T cell epitope from that antigen, were compared for their ability to induce CD8+ T cell responses in mice. Higher levels of lysis and numbers of IFN-gamma secreting T cells were primed with Ty virus-like particles and Modified Vaccinia Virus Ankara (MVA) than with DNA vaccines, but none of the vaccines were able to protect immunised mice from infectious challenge even after repeated doses. However, when the immune response was primed with one type of vaccine (Ty-VLPs or DNA) and boosted with another (MVA) complete protection against infection was achieved. Protection correlated with very high levels of IFN-gamma secreting T cells and lysis. This method of vaccination uses delivery systems and routes that can be used in humans and could provide a generally applicable regime for the induction of high levels of CD8+ T cells.

  13. NF-κB activation during intradermal DNA vaccination is essential for eliciting tumor protective antigen-specific CTL responses.

    PubMed

    Ligtenberg, Maarten A; Rojas-Colonelli, Nicole; Kiessling, Rolf; Lladser, Alvaro

    2013-10-01

    DNA vaccines have been shown to elicit tumor-protective cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) immunity in preclinical models, but have shown limited efficacy in cancer patients. Plasmids used for DNA vaccines can stimulate several innate immune receptors, triggering the activation of master transcription factors, including interferon regulatory factor 3 (IRF3) and nuclear factor κ B (NF-κB). These transcription factors drive the production of type I interferons (IFNs) and pro-inflammatory cytokines, which promote the induction of CTL responses. Understanding the innate immune signaling pathways triggered by DNA vaccines that control the generation of CTL responses will increase our ability to design more effective vaccines. To gain insight into the contribution of these pathways, we vaccinated mice lacking different signaling components with plasmids encoding tyrosinase-related protein 2 (TRP2) or ovalbumin (OVA) using intradermal electroporation. Antigen-specific CTL responses were detected by intracellular IFN-γ staining and in vivo cytotoxicity. Mice lacking IRF3, IFN-α receptor, IL-1β/IL-18, TLR9 or MyD88 showed similar CTL responses to wild-type mice, arguing that none of these molecules were required for the immunogenicity of DNA vaccines. To elucidate the role of NF-κB activation we co-vaccinated mice with pIκBα-SR, a plasmid encoding a mutant IκBα that blocks NF-κB activity. Mice vaccinated with pIκBα-SR and the TRP2-encoding plasmid (pTRP2) drastically reduced the frequencies of TRP2-specific CTLs and were unable to suppress lung melanoma metastasis in vivo, as compared with mice vaccinated only with pTRP2. Taken together these results indicate that the activation of NF-κB is essential for the immunogenicity of intradermal DNA vaccines. PMID:23884215

  14. Protective Immunity to H7N9 Influenza viruses elicited by synthetic DNA Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Jian; Villarreal, Daniel O.; Racine, Trina; Chu, Jaemi S.; Walters, Jewell N.; Morrow, Matthew P.; Khan, Amir S.; Sardesai, Niranjan Y.; Kim, J. Joseph; Kobinger, Gary P.; Weiner, David B.

    2014-01-01

    Despite an intensive vaccine program influenza infections remain a major health problem, due to the viruses’ ability to change its envelope glycoprotein hemagglutinin (HA), through shift and drift, permitting influenza to escape protection induced by current vaccines or natural immunity. Recently a new variant, H7N9, has emerged in China causing global concern. First, there have been more than 130 laboratory-confirmed human infections resulting in an alarmingly high death rate (32.3%). Second, genetic changes found in H7N9 appear to be associated with enabling avian influenza viruses to spread more effectively in mammals, thus transmitting infections on a larger scale. Currently, no vaccines or drugs are effectively able to target H7N9. Here, we report the rapid development of a synthetic consensus DNA vaccine (pH7HA) to elicit potent protective immunity against the H7N9 viruses. We show that pH7HA induces broad antibody responses that bind to divergent HAs from multiple new members of the H7N9 family. These antibody responses result in high-titer HAI against H7N9. Simultaneously, this vaccine induces potent polyfunctional effector CD4 and CD8 T cell memory responses. Animals vaccinated with pH7HA are completely protected from H7N9 virus infection and any morbidity associated with lethal challenge. This study establishes that this synthetic consensus DNA vaccine represents a new tool for targeting emerging infection, and more importantly, its design, testing and development into seed stock for vaccine production in a few days in the pandemic setting has significant implications for the rapid deployment of vaccines protecting against emerging infectious diseases. PMID:24631084

  15. Recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae serves as novel carrier for oral DNA vaccines in Carassius auratus.

    PubMed

    Yan, Nana; Xu, Kun; Li, Xinyi; Liu, Yuwan; Bai, Yichun; Zhang, Xiaohan; Han, Baoquan; Chen, Zhilong; Zhang, Zhiying

    2015-12-01

    Oral delivery of DNA vaccines represents a promising vaccinating method for fish. Recombinant yeast has been proved to be a safe carrier for delivering antigen proteins and DNAs to some species in vivo. However, whether recombinant yeast can be used to deliver functional DNAs for vaccination to fish is still unknown. In this study, red crucian carp (Carassius auratus) was orally administrated with recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae harboring CMV-EGFP expression cassette. On day 5 post the first vaccination, EGFP expression in the hindgut was detected under fluorescence microscope. To further study whether the delivered gene could induce specific immune responses, the model antigen ovalbumin (OVA) was used as immunogen, and oral administrations were conducted with recombinant S. cerevisiae harboring pCMV-OVA mammalian gene expression cassette as gene delivery or pADH1-OVA yeast gene expression cassette as protein delivery. Each administration was performed with three different doses, and the OVA-specific serum antibody was detected in all the experimental groups by western blotting and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). ELISA assay also revealed that pCMV-OVA group with lower dose (pCMV-OVA-L) and pADH1-OVA group with moderate dose (pADH1-OVA-M) triggered relatively stronger antibody response than the other two doses. Moreover, the antibody level induced by pCMV-OVA-L group was significantly higher than pADH1-OVA-M group at the same serum dilutions. All the results suggested that recombinant yeast can be used as a potential carrier for oral DNA vaccines and would help to develop more practical strategies to control infectious diseases in aquaculture. PMID:26481518

  16. Protective immunity to H7N9 influenza viruses elicited by synthetic DNA vaccine.

    PubMed

    Yan, Jian; Villarreal, Daniel O; Racine, Trina; Chu, Jaemi S; Walters, Jewell N; Morrow, Matthew P; Khan, Amir S; Sardesai, Niranjan Y; Kim, J Joseph; Kobinger, Gary P; Weiner, David B

    2014-05-19

    Despite an intensive vaccine program influenza infections remain a major health problem, due to the viruses' ability to change its envelope glycoprotein hemagglutinin (HA), through shift and drift, permitting influenza to escape protection induced by current vaccines or natural immunity. Recently a new variant, H7N9, has emerged in China causing global concern. First, there have been more than 130 laboratory-confirmed human infections resulting in an alarmingly high death rate (32.3%). Second, genetic changes found in H7N9 appear to be associated with enabling avian influenza viruses to spread more effectively in mammals, thus transmitting infections on a larger scale. Currently, no vaccines or drugs are effectively able to target H7N9. Here, we report the rapid development of a synthetic consensus DNA vaccine (pH7HA) to elicit potent protective immunity against the H7N9 viruses. We show that pH7HA induces broad antibody responses that bind to divergent HAs from multiple new members of the H7N9 family. These antibody responses result in high-titer HAI against H7N9. Simultaneously, this vaccine induces potent polyfunctional effector CD4 and CD8T cell memory responses. Animals vaccinated with pH7HA are completely protected from H7N9 virus infection and any morbidity associated with lethal challenge. This study establishes that this synthetic consensus DNA vaccine represents a new tool for targeting emerging infection, and more importantly, its design, testing and development into seed stock for vaccine production in a few days in the pandemic setting has significant implications for the rapid deployment of vaccines protecting against emerging infectious diseases.

  17. Protection of pigs against Taenia solium cysticercosis using recombinant antigen or in combination with DNA vaccine.

    PubMed

    Guo, Ying-Jun; Sun, Shu-Han; Zhang, Yi; Chen, Zhu-Huan; Wang, Kai-Yu; Huang, Li; Zhang, Shu; Zhang, Hong-Ying; Wang, Qing-Min; Wu, Dan; Zhu, Wei-Jia

    2004-09-28

    In the present study, we investigated the duration of protection afforded to pigs immunized in two different prime-boost regimens: one is homologus priming and boosting with a protein vaccine, and the other is priming with a DNA vaccine and boosting with the protein vaccine. Groups of pigs that received the same vaccination regimen were then challenged with Taenia solium eggs at 6, 12 or 20 weeks post-immunization (wpi), respectively. The results showed that all vaccinated pigs challenged at 6 or 12 wpi showed significant (P < 0.05) reduction in the development of cysts. When challenged at 20 wpi, pigs primed with the DNA vaccine (pcDNA3-cC1) followed by two boosters of the protein vaccine (GST-cC1) showed significant (P < 0.05) protection against the challenge of T. solium eggs, whereas pigs receiving three injections of the protein vaccine showed no significant protection compared to non-vaccinated controls (P > 0.05). Antibody isotype assays showed that DNA prime-protein boost regimen induced a predominantly IgG2 response, compared to an IgG1 biased response for the protein prime-protein boost regimen. In addition, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) obtained from the DNA prime-protein boost group proliferated strongly in response to GST-cC1 protein, and this responsiveness persisted until 20 wpi. Taken together, our data suggest that the use of a prime-boost strategy combining DNA and protein vaccines may be better than protein alone for the longevity of protection against the challenge of T. solium eggs.

  18. Interleukin-15 enhance DNA vaccine elicited mucosal and systemic immunity against foot and mouth disease virus.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao; Zhang, Xinyu; Kang, Youming; Jin, Huali; Du, Xiaogang; Zhao, Gan; Yu, Yang; Li, Jinyao; Su, Baowei; Huang, Chang; Wang, Bin

    2008-09-19

    Aerosol transmission of foot and mouth disease virus (FMDV) is believed to be an important route of infection. Induction of mucosal response is thought to be effective way against such infection. Various approaches have been developed including the use of molecules adjuvant and polymers delivery for the mucosal delivery of DNA vaccine. In this study, using low molecular weight chitosan as a delivery vehicle, we investigated whether co-administration intranasally of the FMDV DNA vaccine, pcD-VP1 and a construct expressing IL-15 as the molecular adjuvant can enhance mucosal and systemic immune responses in animals. Compared to the group intranasally immunized with pcD-VP1 alone, the group immunized with the molecular adjuvant not only was induced higher level of mucosal sIgA but also serum IgG. Interestingly, intranasal delivery of the IL-15 construct with pcD-VP1 significantly enhanced the cell-mediated immunity (CMI) compared to the pcD-VP1 alone, as evidenced by the higher level of antigen-specific T-cell proliferation, cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) response and higher expressions of IFN-gamma in both CD4+ and CD8+ T cells inform the spleen and mucosal sites. Consistently, IL-15 as adjuvant provided higher level of FMDV neutralizing antibody against FMDV and high secretions of IgA producing cells in mucosal tissues. Taken together, the results demonstrated that intranasal delivery of IL-15 as a mucosal adjuvant can enhance the antigen-specific mucosal and systemic immune responses, which may provide a protection against the FMDV initial infection.

  19. Effective pulmonary delivery of an aerosolized plasmid DNA vaccine via surface acoustic wave nebulization

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Pulmonary-delivered gene therapy promises to mitigate vaccine safety issues and reduce the need for needles and skilled personnel to use them. While plasmid DNA (pDNA) offers a rapid route to vaccine production without side effects or reliance on cold chain storage, its delivery to the lung has proved challenging. Conventional methods, including jet and ultrasonic nebulizers, fail to deliver large biomolecules like pDNA intact due to the shear and cavitational stresses present during nebulization. Methods In vitro structural analysis followed by in vivo protein expression studies served in assessing the integrity of the pDNA subjected to surface acoustic wave (SAW) nebulisation. In vivo immunization trials were then carried out in rats using SAW nebulized pDNA (influenza A, human hemagglutinin H1N1) condensate delivered via intratracheal instillation. Finally, in vivo pulmonary vaccinations using pDNA for influenza was nebulized and delivered via a respirator to sheep. Results The SAW nebulizer was effective at generating pDNA aerosols with sizes optimal for deep lung delivery. Successful gene expression was observed in mouse lung epithelial cells, when SAW-nebulized pDNA was delivered to male Swiss mice via intratracheal instillation. Effective systemic and mucosal antibody responses were found in rats via post-nebulized, condensed fluid instillation. Significantly, we demonstrated the suitability of the SAW nebulizer to administer unprotected pDNA encoding an influenza A virus surface glycoprotein to respirated sheep via aerosolized inhalation. Conclusion Given the difficulty of inducing functional antibody responses for DNA vaccination in large animals, we report here the first instance of successful aerosolized inhalation delivery of a pDNA vaccine in a large animal model relevant to human lung development, structure, physiology, and disease, using a novel, low-power (<1 W) surface acoustic wave (SAW) hand-held nebulizer to produce droplets of p

  20. Preclinical safety evaluation of DNA vaccines encoding modified HPV16 E6 and E7.

    PubMed

    Henken, F E; Oosterhuis, K; Öhlschläger, P; Bosch, L; Hooijberg, E; Haanen, J B A G; Steenbergen, R D M

    2012-06-13

    Persistent infection with high-risk human papillomaviruses (hrHPV) can result in the formation of anogenital cancers. As hrHPV proteins E6 and E7 are required for cancer initiation and maintenance, they are ideal targets for immunotherapeutic interventions. Previously, we have described the development of DNA vaccines for the induction of HPV16 E6 and E7 specific T cell immunity. These vaccines consist of 'gene-shuffled' (SH) versions of HPV16 E6 and E7 that were fused to Tetanus Toxin Fragment C domain 1 (TTFC) and were named TTFC-E6SH and TTFC-E7SH. Gene-shuffling was performed to avoid the risk of inducing malignant transformation at the vaccination site. Here, we describe the preclinical safety evaluation of these candidate vaccines by analysis of their transforming capacity in vitro using established murine fibroblasts (NIH 3T3 cells) and primary human foreskin keratinocytes (HFKs). We demonstrate that neither ectopic expression of TTFC-E6SH and TTFC-E7SH alone or in combination enabled NIH 3T3 cells to form colonies in soft agar. In contrast, expression of HPV16 E6WT and E7WT alone or in combination resulted in effective transformation. Similarly, retroviral transduction of HFKs from three independent donors with both TTFC-E6SH and TTFC-E7SH alone or in combination did not show any signs of immortalization. In contrast, the combined expression of E6WT and E7WT induced immortalization in HFKs from all donors. Based on these results we consider it justified to proceed to clinical evaluation of DNA vaccines encoding TTFC-E6SH and TTFC-E7SH in patients with HPV16 associated (pre)malignancies.

  1. Influenza nucleoprotein DNA vaccination by a skin targeted, dry coated, densely packed microprojection array (Nanopatch) induces potent antibody and CD8(+) T cell responses.

    PubMed

    Fernando, Germain J P; Zhang, Jin; Ng, Hwee-Ing; Haigh, Oscar L; Yukiko, Sally R; Kendall, Mark A F

    2016-09-10

    DNA vaccines have many advantages such as thermostability and the ease and rapidity of manufacture; for example, in an influenza pandemic situation where rapid production of vaccine is essential. However, immunogenicity of DNA vaccines was shown to be poor in humans unless large doses of DNA are used. If a highly efficacious DNA vaccine delivery system could be identified, then DNA vaccines have the potential to displace protein vaccines. In this study, we show in a C57BL/6 mouse model, that the Nanopatch, a microprojection array of high density (>21,000 projections/cm(2)), could be used to deliver influenza nucleoprotein DNA vaccine to skin, to generate enhanced antigen specific antibody and CD8(+) T cell responses compared to the conventional intramuscular (IM) delivery by the needle and syringe. Antigen specific antibody was measured using ELISA assays of mice vaccinated with a DNA plasmid containing the nucleoprotein gene of influenza type A/WSN/33 (H1N1). Antigen specific CD8(+) T cell responses were measured ex-vivo in splenocytes of mice using IFN-γ ELISPOT assays. These results and our previous antibody and CD4(+) T cell results using the Nanopatch delivered HSV DNA vaccine indicate that the Nanopatch is an effective delivery system of general utility that could potentially be used in humans to increase the potency of the DNA vaccines. PMID:27381247

  2. Isolation and molecular characterization of Fikirini rhabdovirus, a novel virus from a Kenyan bat.

    PubMed

    Kading, Rebekah C; Gilbert, Amy T; Mossel, Eric C; Crabtree, Mary B; Kuzmin, Ivan V; Niezgoda, Michael; Agwanda, Bernard; Markotter, Wanda; Weil, M Ryan; Montgomery, Joel M; Rupprecht, Charles E; Miller, Barry R

    2013-11-01

    Zoonotic and vector-borne pathogens have comprised a significant component of emerging human infections in recent decades, and bats are increasingly recognized as reservoirs for many of these disease agents. To identify novel pathogens associated with bats, we screened tissues of bats collected in Kenya. Virus isolates were identified by next generation sequencing of viral nucleic acid preparations from the infected cell culture supernatant and characterized. Here we report the identification of Fikirini rhabdovirus, a novel rhabdovirus isolated from a bat, Hipposideros vittatus, captured along the Kenyan coast.

  3. Protective efficacy of a Mycoplasma pneumoniae P1C DNA vaccine fused with the B subunit of Escherichia coli heat-labile enterotoxin.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Cuiming; Wang, Shiping; Hu, Shihai; Yu, Minjun; Zeng, Yanhua; You, Xiaoxing; Xiao, Jinhong; Wu, Yimou

    2012-06-01

    In the present study, we investigated the immunomodulatory responses of a DNA vaccine constructed by fusing Mycoplasma pneumoniae P1 protein carboxy terminal region (P1C) with the Escherichia coli heat-labile toxin B subunit (LTB). BALB/c mice were immunized by intranasal inoculation with control DNAs, the P1C DNA vaccine or the LTB-P1C fusion DNA vaccine. Levels of the anti-M. pneumoniae antibodies and levels of interferon-γ and IL-4 in mice were increased significantly upon inoculation of the LTB-P1C fusion DNA vaccine when compared with the inoculation with P1C DNA vaccine. The LTB-P1C fusion DNA vaccine efficiently enhanced the M. pneumoniae-specific IgA and IgG levels. The IgG2a/IgG1 ratio was significantly higher in bronchoalveolar lavages fluid and sera from mice fusion with LTB and P1C than mice receiving P1C alone. When the mice were challenged intranasally with 10(7) CFU M. pneumoniae strain (M129), the LTB-P1C fusion DNA vaccine conferred significantly better protection than P1C DNA vaccine (P < 0.05), as suggested by the results, such as less inflammation, lower histopathological score values, lower detectable number of M. pneumoniae strain, and lower mortality of challenging from 5 × 10(8) CFU M. pneumoniae. These results indicated that the LTB-P1C fusion DNA vaccine efficiently improved protective efficacy against M. pneumoniae infection and effectively attenuated development of M. pneumoniae in mice.

  4. Genetic diversity and associated pathology of rhabdovirus infections in farmed and wild perch Perca fluviatilis in Ireland.

    PubMed

    Ruane, N M; Rodger, H D; McCarthy, L J; Swords, D; Dodge, M; Kerr, R C; Henshilwood, K; Stone, D M

    2014-12-01

    Rhabdovirus infections are an emerging problem for both wild and farmed freshwater fish in Northern Europe. In October 2005, a clinical outbreak with an approximate mortality rate of 40% occurred in a single batch of juvenile perch on a farm in the Republic of Ireland. Clinical signs developed slowly and were consistent with a perch rhabdovirus infection: signs included haemorrhages at the base of the fins and apparent impairment of the central nervous system (manifested as loss of equilibrium and erratic swimming behaviour). Studies suggest that the infected fish originated from a hatchery within the country which relied on wild fish broodstock to supplement the production of perch juveniles. A related rhabdovirus was subsequently isolated from this hatchery. Virus isolation studies have shown that rhabdoviruses were often isolated from wild fish in the vicinity of the hatchery between 1993 and 2005. All isolates were analysed using a generic primer set specific for the L gene of fish vesiculotype viruses. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that all isolates recovered from perch clustered together with the European lake trout rhabdovirus (903/87) of the genus Perhabdovirus. In addition to this, anguillid rhabdovirus was isolated from eel, and the partial L-gene sequence of a previously reported isolate from tench clustered with the pike fry rhabdoviruses, in the genus Sprivivirus.

  5. Characterization of snakehead rhabdovirus infection in zebrafish (Danio rerio).

    PubMed

    Phelan, Peter E; Pressley, Meagan E; Witten, P Eckhard; Mellon, Mark T; Blake, Sharon; Kim, Carol H

    2005-02-01

    The zebrafish, Danio rerio, has become recognized as a valuable model for the study of development, genetics, and toxicology. Recently, the zebrafish has been recognized as a useful model for infectious disease and immunity. In this study, the pathogenesis and antiviral immune response of zebrafish to experimental snakehead rhabdovirus (SHRV) infection was characterized. Zebrafish 24 h postfertilization to 30 days postfertilization were susceptible to infection by immersion in 10(6) 50% tissue culture infective doses (TCID50) of SHRV/ml, and adult zebrafish were susceptible to infection by intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of 10(5) TCID50 of SHRV/ml. Mortalities exceeded 40% in infected fish, and clinical presentation of infection included petechial hemorrhaging, redness of the abdomen, and erratic swim behavior. Virus reisolation and reverse transcription-PCR analysis of the viral nucleocapsid gene confirmed the presence of SHRV. Histological sections of moribund embryonic and juvenile fish revealed necrosis of the pharyngeal epithelium and liver, in addition to congestion of the swim bladder by cell debris. Histopathology in adult fish injected i.p. was confined to the site of injection. The antiviral response in zebrafish was monitored by quantitative real-time PCR analysis of zebrafish interferon (IFN) and Mx expression. IFN and Mx levels were elevated in zebrafish exposed to SHRV, although expression and intensity differed with age and route of infection. This study is the first to examine the pathogenesis of SHRV infection in zebrafish. Furthermore, this study is the first to describe experimental infection of zebrafish embryos with a viral pathogen, which will be important for future experiments involving targeted gene disruption and forward genetic screens.

  6. Evolutionary dynamics and genetic diversity from three genes of Anguillid rhabdovirus.

    PubMed

    Bellec, Laure; Cabon, Joelle; Bergmann, Sven; de Boisséson, Claire; Engelsma, Marc; Haenen, Olga; Morin, Thierry; Olesen, Niels Jørgen; Schuetze, Heike; Toffan, Anna; Way, Keith; Bigarré, Laurent

    2014-11-01

    Wild freshwater eel populations have dramatically declined in recent past decades in Europe and America, partially through the impact of several factors including the wide spread of infectious diseases. The anguillid rhabdoviruses eel virus European X (EVEX) and eel virus American (EVA) potentially play a role in this decline, even if their real contribution is still unclear. In this study, we investigate the evolutionary dynamics and genetic diversity of anguiillid rhabdoviruses by analysing sequences from the glycoprotein, nucleoprotein and phosphoprotein (P) genes of 57 viral strains collected from seven countries over 40 years using maximum-likelihood and Bayesian approaches. Phylogenetic trees from the three genes are congruent and allow two monophyletic groups, European and American, to be clearly distinguished. Results of nucleotide substitution rates per site per year indicate that the P gene is expected to evolve most rapidly. The nucleotide diversity observed is low (2-3 %) for the three genes, with a significantly higher variability within the P gene, which encodes multiple proteins from a single genomic RNA sequence, particularly a small C protein. This putative C protein is a potential molecular marker suitable for characterization of distinct genotypes within anguillid rhabdoviruses. This study provides, to our knowledge, the first molecular characterization of EVA, brings new insights to the evolutionary dynamics of two genotypes of Anguillid rhabdovirus, and is a baseline for further investigations on the tracking of its spread.

  7. Isolation and characterization of a novel Rhabdovirus from a wild boar (Sus scrofa) in Japan.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Kouji; Hagiwara, Katsuro; Omatsu, Tsutomu; Hamasaki, Chinami; Kuwata, Ryusei; Shimoda, Hiroshi; Suzuki, Kazuo; Endoh, Daiji; Nagata, Noriyo; Nagai, Makoto; Katayama, Yukie; Oba, Mami; Kurane, Ichiro; Saijo, Masayuki; Morikawa, Shigeru; Mizutani, Tetsuya; Maeda, Ken

    2015-09-30

    A novel rhabdovirus was isolated from the serum of a healthy Japanese wild boar (Sus scrofa leucomystax) and identified using the rapid determination system for viral nucleic acid sequences (RDV), next-generation sequencing, and electron microscopy. The virus was tentatively named wild boar rhabdovirus 1 (WBRV1). Phylogenetic analysis of the entire genome sequence indicated that WBRV1 is closely related to Tupaia rhabdovirus (TRV), which was isolated from cultured cells of hepatocellular carcinoma tissue of tree shrew. TRV has not been assigned to any genus of Rhabdoviridae till date. Analysis of the L gene indicated that WBRV1 belongs to the genus Vesiculovirus. These observations suggest that both TRV and WBRV1 belong to a new genus of Rhabdoviridae. Next-generation genome sequencing of WBRV1 revealed 5 open reading frames of 1329, 765, 627, 1629, and 6336 bases in length. The WBRV1 gene sequences are similar to those of other rhabdoviruses. Epizootiological analysis of a population of wild boars in Wakayama prefecture in Japan indicated that 6.5% were positive for the WBRV1 gene and 52% were positive for WBRV1-neutralizing antibodies. Furthermore, such viral neutralizing antibodies were found in domestic pigs in another prefecture. WBRV1 was inoculated intranasally and intraperitoneally into SCID and BALB/c mice and viral RNA was detected in SCID mice, suggesting that WBRV1 can replicate in immunocompromised mice. These results indicate this novel virus is endemic in wild animals and livestock in Japan.

  8. Comparative analysis of antigen-targeting sequences used in DNA vaccines.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Joana A; Azzoni, Adriano R; Prazeres, Duarte M F; Monteiro, Gabriel A

    2010-03-01

    Plasmid vectors can be optimized by including specific signals that promote antigen targeting to the major antigen presentation and processing pathways, increasing the immunogenicity and potency of DNA vaccines. A pVAX1-based backbone was used to encode the Green Fluorescence Protein (GFP) reporter gene fused either to ISG (Invariant Surface Glycoprotein) or to TSA (trans-sialidase) Trypanosoma brucei genes. The plasmids were further engineered to carry antigen-targeting sequences, which promote protein transport to the extracellular space (secretion signal), lysosomes (LAMP-1) and to the endoplasmic reticulum (adenovirus e1a). Transfection efficiency was not affected by differences in the size between each construct as no differences in the plasmid copy number per cell were found. This finding also suggests that the addition of both ISG gene and targeting sequences did not add sensitive regions prone to nuclease attack to the plasmid. Cells transfected with pVAX1GFP had a significant higher number of transcripts. This could be a result of lower mRNA stability and/or a lower transcription rate associated with the bigger transcripts. On the other hand, no differences were found between transcript levels of each ISG-GFP plasmids. Therefore, the addition of these targeting sequences does not affect the maturation/stability of the transcripts. Microscopy analysis showed differences in protein localization and fluorescent levels of cells transfected with pVAX1GFP and ISG constructs. Moreover, cells transfected with the lamp and secretory sequences presented a distinct distribution pattern when compared with ISG protein. Protein expression was quantified by flow cytometry. Higher cell fluorescence was observed in cells expressing the cytoplasmic fusion protein (ISG-GFP or TSA-GFP) compared with cells where the protein was transported to the lysosomal pathway. Protein transport to the endoplasmic reticulum does not lead to a decrease in the mean fluorescence values. The

  9. Improvement of DNA vaccination by adjuvants and sophisticated delivery devices: vaccine-platforms for the battle against infectious diseases

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Advantages of DNA vaccination against infectious diseases over more classical immunization methods include the possibilities for rapid manufacture, fast adaptation to newly emerging pathogens and high stability at ambient temperatures. In addition, upon DNA immunization the antigen is produced by the cells of the vaccinated individual, which leads to activation of both cellular and humoral immune responses due to antigen presentation via MHC I and MHC II molecules. However, so far DNA vaccines have shown most efficient immunogenicity mainly in small rodent models, whereas in larger animals including humans there is still the need to improve effectiveness. This is mostly due to inefficient delivery of the DNA plasmid into cells and nuclei. Here, we discuss technologies used to overcome this problem, including physical means such as in vivo electroporation and co-administration of adjuvants. Several of these methods have already entered clinical testing in humans. PMID:25648133

  10. Gene Gun Her2/neu DNA Vaccination: Evaluation of Vaccine Efficacy in a Syngeneic Her2/neu Mouse Tumor Model.

    PubMed

    Nguyen-Hoai, Tam; Pezzutto, Antonio; Westermann, Jörg

    2015-01-01

    Genetic vaccination using naked plasmid DNA is an immunization strategy both against infectious diseases and cancer. In order to improve the efficacy of DNA vaccines, particularly in large animals and humans, different strategies have been pursued. These vaccination strategies are based on different application routes, schedules, and coexpression of immunomodulatory molecules as adjuvants. Our mouse tumor model offers the possibility to investigate Her2/neu DNA vaccines in different settings, i.e., intramuscular or intradermal application with or without coexpression of adjuvants. Protection from tumor growth in tumor challenge experiments and both T cell and humoral immune responses against Her2/neu peptides are used as surrogate parameters for vaccine efficacy. PMID:26072399

  11. Altered Response Hierarchy and Increased T-Cell Breadth upon HIV-1 Conserved Element DNA Vaccination in Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Kulkarni, Viraj; Valentin, Antonio; Rosati, Margherita; Alicea, Candido; Singh, Ashish K.; Jalah, Rashmi; Broderick, Kate E.; Sardesai, Niranjan Y.; Le Gall, Sylvie; Mothe, Beatriz; Brander, Christian; Rolland, Morgane; Mullins, James I.; Pavlakis, George N.; Felber, Barbara K.

    2014-01-01

    HIV sequence diversity and potential decoy epitopes are hurdles in the development of an effective AIDS vaccine. A DNA vaccine candidate comprising of highly conserved p24gag elements (CE) induced robust immunity in all 10 vaccinated macaques, whereas full-length gag DNA vaccination elicited responses to these conserved elements in only 5 of 11 animals, targeting fewer CE per animal. Importantly, boosting CE-primed macaques with DNA expressing full-length p55gag increased both magnitude of CE responses and breadth of Gag immunity, demonstrating alteration of the hierarchy of epitope recognition in the presence of pre-existing CE-specific responses. Inclusion of a conserved element immunogen provides a novel and effective strategy to broaden responses against highly diverse pathogens by avoiding decoy epitopes, while focusing responses to critical viral elements for which few escape pathways exist. PMID:24465991

  12. Induction of a Protective Response in Mice by the Dengue Virus NS3 Protein Using DNA Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Simone M.; Yorio, Anna Paula; Gonçalves, Antônio J. S.; Vidale, Mariana M.; Costa, Emmerson C. B.; Mohana-Borges, Ronaldo; Motta, Marcia A.; Freire, Marcos S.; Alves, Ada M. B.

    2011-01-01

    The dengue non-structural 3 (NS3) is a multifunctional protein, containing a serino-protease domain, located at the N-terminal portion, and helicase, NTPase and RTPase domains present in the C-terminal region. This protein is considered the main target for CD4+ and CD8+ T cell responses during dengue infection, which may be involved in protection. However, few studies have been undertaken evaluating the use of this protein as a protective antigen against dengue, as well as other flavivirus. In the present work, we investigate the protective efficacy of DNA vaccines based on the NS3 protein from DENV2. Different recombinant plasmids were constructed, encoding either the full-length NS3 protein or only its functional domains (protease and helicase), fused or not to a signal peptide (t-PA). The recombinant proteins were successfully expressed in transfected BHK-21 cells, and only plasmids encoding the t-PA signal sequence mediated protein secretion. Balb/c mice were immunized with the different DNA vaccines and challenged with a lethal dose of DENV2. Most animals immunized with plasmids encoding the full-length NS3 or the helicase domain survived challenge, regardless of the presence of the t-PA. However, some mice presented clinical signs of infection with high morbidity (hind leg paralysis and hunched posture), mainly in animal groups immunized with the DNA vaccines based on the helicase domain. On the other hand, inoculation with plasmids encoding the protease domain did not induce any protection, since mortality and morbidity rates in these mouse groups were similar to those detected in the control animals. The cellular immune response was analyzed by ELISPOT with a specific-CD8+ T cell NS3 peptide. Results revealed that the DNA vaccines based on the full-length protein induced the production of INF-γ, thus suggesting the involvement of this branch of the immune system in the protection. PMID:22031819

  13. Induction of a protective response in mice by the dengue virus NS3 protein using DNA vaccines.

    PubMed

    Costa, Simone M; Yorio, Anna Paula; Gonçalves, Antônio J S; Vidale, Mariana M; Costa, Emmerson C B; Mohana-Borges, Ronaldo; Motta, Marcia A; Freire, Marcos S; Alves, Ada M B

    2011-01-01

    The dengue non-structural 3 (NS3) is a multifunctional protein, containing a serino-protease domain, located at the N-terminal portion, and helicase, NTPase and RTPase domains present in the C-terminal region. This protein is considered the main target for CD4+ and CD8+ T cell responses during dengue infection, which may be involved in protection. However, few studies have been undertaken evaluating the use of this protein as a protective antigen against dengue, as well as other flavivirus. In the present work, we investigate the protective efficacy of DNA vaccines based on the NS3 protein from DENV2. Different recombinant plasmids were constructed, encoding either the full-length NS3 protein or only its functional domains (protease and helicase), fused or not to a signal peptide (t-PA). The recombinant proteins were successfully expressed in transfected BHK-21 cells, and only plasmids encoding the t-PA signal sequence mediated protein secretion. Balb/c mice were immunized with the different DNA vaccines and challenged with a lethal dose of DENV2. Most animals immunized with plasmids encoding the full-length NS3 or the helicase domain survived challenge, regardless of the presence of the t-PA. However, some mice presented clinical signs of infection with high morbidity (hind leg paralysis and hunched posture), mainly in animal groups immunized with the DNA vaccines based on the helicase domain. On the other hand, inoculation with plasmids encoding the protease domain did not induce any protection, since mortality and morbidity rates in these mouse groups were similar to those detected in the control animals. The cellular immune response was analyzed by ELISPOT with a specific-CD8+ T cell NS3 peptide. Results revealed that the DNA vaccines based on the full-length protein induced the production of INF-γ, thus suggesting the involvement of this branch of the immune system in the protection.

  14. Immunogenicity of a plasmid DNA vaccine encoding 42kDa fragment of Plasmodium vivax merozoite surface protein-1.

    PubMed

    Sheikh, Inayat Hussain; Kaushal, Deep C; Chandra, Deepak; Kaushal, Nuzhat A

    2016-10-01

    Plasmodium vivax is the second major human malaria parasite that inflicts debilitating morbidity and consequent economic impact in South-East Asian countries. The relapsing nature of P. vivax along with the emergence of drug-resistant P. vivax strains has emphasized the urgent need for a vaccine. However, the development of an effective vivax vaccine is seriously hampered due to the diversity and variation in parasite antigens and non-availability of suitable animal models. DNA based vaccines represent an alternative approach in inducing immunity to multiple targets from different stages of malaria parasite. DNA prime-boosting strategies induce both antibody mediated and cell-mediated immune responses that are the major mechanisms of protection against malaria parasites. We have earlier studied the immunogenicity and protective efficacy of the soluble and refolded forms of recombinant 42kDa fragment of Plasmodium vivax merozoite surface protein-1 (PvMSP-142) using P. cynomolgi rhesus monkey model. In the present study, we have constructed a recombinant DNA vaccine encoding 42kDa fragment of P. vivax MSP-1 and studied the immunogenicity of PvMSP-142 DNA vaccine construct in mice. The 42kDa gene fragment of PvMSP-1 was PCR amplified using gene specific primers and subcloned into pcDNA 3.1 (+) eukaryotic expression vector. In vitro expression of PvMSP-142 plasmid construct was checked by transfection in COS-1 cell line. Indirect immunofluorescence of transfected COS-1 cells probed with monoclonal antibodies against PvMSP-142 exhibited positive fluorescence. Immunization of BALB/c mice with PvMSP-142-pcDNA vaccine construct revealed the immunogenicity of recombinant vaccine plasmid that can be enhanced by prime boosting with recombinant protein corresponding to the DNA vaccine as evidenced by significant elevation of antibody and the cytokines responses. PMID:27311385

  15. Quantitative expression profiling of immune response genes in rainbow trout following infectious haematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) infection or DNA vaccination

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Purcell, Maureen K.; Kurath, Gael; Garver, Kyle A.; Herwig, Russell P.; Winton, James R.

    2004-01-01

    Infectious haematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) is a well-studied virus of salmonid fishes. A highly efficacious DNA vaccine has been developed against this virus and studies have demonstrated that this vaccine induces both an early and transient non-specific anti-viral phase as well as long-term specific protection. The mechanisms of the early anti-viral phase are not known, but previous studies noted changes in Mx gene expression, suggesting a role for type I interferon. This study used quantitative real-time reverse transcriptase PCR methodology to compare expression changes over time of a number of cytokine or cytokine-related genes in the spleen of rainbow trout following injection with poly I:C, live IHNV, the IHNV DNA vaccine or a control plasmid encoding the non-antigenic luciferase gene. The target genes included Mx-1, viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus induced gene 8 (Vig-8), TNF-α1, TNF-α2, IL-1β1, IL-8, TGF-β1 and Hsp70. Poly I:C stimulation induced several genes but the strongest and significant response was observed in the Mx-1 and Vig-8 genes. The live IHN virus induced a significant response in all genes examined except TGF-β1. The control plasmid construct and the IHNV DNA vaccine marginally induced a number of genes, but the main difference between these two groups was a statistically significant induction of the Mx-1 and Vig-8 genes by the IHNV vaccine only. The gene expression profiles elicited by the live virus and the IHNV DNA vaccine differed in a number of aspects but this study confirms the clear role for a type I interferon-like response in early anti-viral defence.

  16. PD-1 or PD-L1 Blockade Restores Antitumor Efficacy Following SSX2 Epitope-Modified DNA Vaccine Immunization

    PubMed Central

    Rekoske, Brian T.; Smith, Heath A.; Olson, Brian M.; Maricque, Brett B.; McNeel, Douglas G.

    2015-01-01

    DNA vaccines have demonstrated antitumor efficacy in multiple preclinical models, but low immunogenicity has been observed in several human clinical trials. This has led to many approaches seeking to improve the immunogenicity of DNA vaccines. We previously reported that a DNA vaccine encoding the cancer-testis antigen SSX2, modified to encode altered epitopes with increased MHC class I affinity, elicited a greater frequency of cytolytic, multifunctional CD8+ T cells in non-tumor-bearing mice. In this report we sought to test if this optimized vaccine resulted in increased antitumor activity in mice bearing an HLA-A2-expressing tumor engineered to express SSX2. We found that immunization of tumor-bearing mice with the optimized vaccine elicited a surprisingly inferior antitumor effect relative to the native vaccine. Both native and optimized vaccines led to increased expression of PD-L1 on tumor cells, but antigen-specific CD8+ T cells from mice immunized with the optimized construct expressed higher PD-1. Splenocytes from immunized animals induced PD-L1 expression on tumor cells in vitro. Antitumor activity of the optimized vaccine could be increased when combined with antibodies blocking PD-1 or PD-L1, or by targeting a tumor line not expressing PD-L1. These findings suggest that vaccines aimed at eliciting effector CD8+ T cells, and DNA vaccines in particular, might best be combined with PD-1 pathway inhibitors in clinical trials. This may be particularly advantageous for vaccines targeting prostate cancer, a disease for which antitumor vaccines have demonstrated clinical benefit and yet PD-1 pathway inhibitors alone have shown little efficacy to date. PMID:26041735

  17. Characterization of immune responses induced by immunization with the HA DNA vaccines of two antigenically distinctive H5N1 HPAIV isolates.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yulong; Wen, Zhiyuan; Dong, Ke; Zhong, Gongxun; Wang, Xiaomei; Bu, Zhigao; Chen, Hualan; Ye, Ling; Yang, Chinglai

    2012-01-01

    The evolution of the H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza virus (HPAIV) has resulted in high sequence variations and diverse antigenic properties in circulating viral isolates. We investigated immune responses induced by HA DNA vaccines of two contemporary H5N1 HPAIV isolates, A/bar-headed goose/Qinghai/3/2005 (QH) and A/chicken/Shanxi/2/2006 (SX) respectively, against the homologous as well as the heterologous virus isolate for comparison. Characterization of antibody responses induced by immunization with QH-HA and SX-HA DNA vaccines showed that the two isolates are antigenically distinctive. Interestingly, after immunization with the QH-HA DNA vaccine, subsequent boosting with the SX-HA DNA vaccine significantly augmented antibody responses against the QH isolate but only induced low levels of antibody responses against the SX isolate. Conversely, after immunization with the SX-HA DNA vaccine, subsequent boosting with the QH-HA DNA vaccine significantly augmented antibody responses against the SX isolate but only induced low levels of antibody responses against the QH isolate. In contrast to the antibody responses, cross-reactive T cell responses are readily detected between these two isolates at similar levels. These results indicate the existence of original antigenic sin (OAS) between concurrently circulating H5N1 HPAIV strains, which may need to be taken into consideration in vaccine development against the potential H5N1 HPAIV pandemic.

  18. Fusion of CTLA-4 with HPV16 E7 and E6 Enhanced the Potency of Therapeutic HPV DNA Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Gan, Lili; Jia, Rong; Zhou, Lili; Guo, Jihua; Fan, Mingwen

    2014-01-01

    Preventive anti-HPV vaccines are effective against HPV infection but not against existing HPV-associated diseases, including cervical cancer and other malignant diseases. Therefore, the development of therapeutic vaccines is urgently needed. To improve anti-tumor effects of therapeutic vaccine, we fused cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen 4 (CTLA-4) with HPV16 E7 and E6 as a fusion therapeutic DNA vaccine (pCTLA4-E7E6). pCTLA4-E7E6 induced significantly higher anti-E7E6 specific antibodies and relatively stronger specific CTL responses than the nonfusion DNA vaccine pE7E6 in C57BL/6 mice bearing with TC-1 tumors. pCTLA4-E7E6 showed relatively stronger anti-tumor effects than pE7E6 in therapeutic immunization. These results suggest that fusing CTLA-4 with E7E6 is a useful strategy to develop therapeutic HPV DNA vaccines. In addition, fusing the C-terminal of E7 with the N-terminal of E6 impaired the functions of both E7 and E6. PMID:25265018

  19. Two doses of bovine viral diarrhea virus DNA vaccine delivered by electroporation induce long-term protective immune responses.

    PubMed

    van Drunen Littel-van den Hurk, Sylvia; Lawman, Zoe; Snider, Marlene; Wilson, Don; van den Hurk, Jan V; Ellefsen, Barry; Hannaman, Drew

    2013-02-01

    Bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) is a pathogen of major importance in cattle, so there is a need for new effective vaccines. DNA vaccines induce balanced immune responses and are relatively inexpensive and thus promising for both human and veterinary applications. In this study, newborn calves with maternal antibodies were vaccinated intramuscularly (i.m.) with a BVDV E2 DNA vaccine with the TriGrid Delivery System for i.m. delivery (TDS-IM). Two doses of this vaccine spaced 6 or 12 weeks apart were sufficient to induce significant virus-neutralizing antibody titers, numbers of activated T cells, and reduction in viral shedding and clinical presentations after BVDV-2 challenge. In contrast to the placebo-treated animals, the vaccinated calves did not lose any weight, which is an excellent indicator of the well-being of an animal and has a significant economic impact. Furthermore, the interval between the two vaccinations did not influence the magnitude of the immune responses or degree of clinical protection, and a third immunization was not necessary or beneficial. Since electroporation may enhance not only the magnitude but also the duration of immunity after DNA immunization, the interval between vaccination and challenge was extended in a second trial, which showed that two doses of this E2 DNA vaccine again significantly reduced clinical disease against BVDV for several months. These results are promising and support this technology for use against infectious diseases in cattle and large species, including humans, in general.

  20. Strategies to enhance immunogenicity of cDNA vaccine encoded antigens by modulation of antigen processing.

    PubMed

    Platteel, Anouk C M; Marit de Groot, A; Keller, Christin; Andersen, Peter; Ovaa, Huib; Kloetzel, Peter M; Mishto, Michele; Sijts, Alice J A M

    2016-09-30

    Most vaccines are based on protective humoral responses while for intracellular pathogens CD8(+) T cells are regularly needed to provide protection. However, poor processing efficiency of antigens is often a limiting factor in CD8(+) T cell priming, hampering vaccine efficacy. The multistage cDNA vaccine H56, encoding three secreted Mycobacterium tuberculosis antigens, was used to test a complete strategy to enhance vaccine' immunogenicity. Potential CD8(+) T cell epitopes in H56 were predicted using the NetMHC3.4/ANN program. Mice were immunized with H56 cDNA using dermal DNA tattoo immunization and epitope candidates were tested for recognition by responding CD8(+) T cells in ex vivo assays. Seven novel CD8(+) T cell epitopes were identified. H56 immunogenicity could be substantially enhanced by two strategies: (i) fusion of the H56 sequence to cDNA of proteins that modify intracellular antigen processing or provide CD4(+) T cell help, (ii) by substitution of the epitope's hydrophobic C-terminal flanking residues for polar glutamic acid, which facilitated their proteasome-mediated generation. We conclude that this whole strategy of in silico prediction of potential CD8(+) T cell epitopes in novel antigens, followed by fusion to sequences with immunogenicity-enhancing properties or modification of epitope flanking sequences to improve proteasome-mediated processing, may be exploited to design novel vaccines against emerging or 'hard to treat' intracellular pathogens. PMID:27593157

  1. Preclinical safety and tolerability of a repeatedly administered human leishmaniasis DNA vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Riede, O; Seifert, K; Oswald, D; Endmann, A; Hock, C; Winkler, A; Salguero, F J; Schroff, M; Croft, S L; Juhls, C

    2015-01-01

    The leishmaniases are a complex of vector-borne diseases caused by protozoan parasites of the genus Leishmania. LEISHDNAVAX is a multi-antigen, T-cell epitope-enriched DNA vaccine candidate against human leishmaniasis. The vaccine candidate has been proven immunogenic and showed prophylactic efficacy in preclinical studies. Here, we describe the safety testing of LEISHDNAVAX in naive mice and rats, complemented by the demonstration of tolerability in Leishmania-infected mice. Biodistribution and persistence were examined following single and repeated intradermal (i.d.) administration to rats. DNA vectors were distributed systemically but did not accumulate upon repeated injections. Although vector DNA was cleared from most other tissues within 60 days after the last injection, it persisted in skin at the site of injection and in draining lymph nodes. Evaluation of single-dose and repeated-dose toxicity of the vaccine candidate after i.d. administration to naive, non-infected mice did not reveal any safety concerns. LEISHDNAVAX was also well tolerated in Leishmania-infected mice. Taken together, our results substantiate a favorable safety profile of LEISHDNAVAX in both naive and infected animals and thus, support the initiation of clinical trials for both preventive and therapeutic applications of the vaccine. PMID:25871827

  2. C3d enhanced DNA vaccination induced humoral immune response to glycoprotein C of pseudorabies virus

    SciTech Connect

    Tong Tiezhu; Fan Huiying; Tan Yadi; Xiao Shaobo; Ling Jieyu; Chen Huanchun; Guo Aizhen . E-mail: aizhen@mail.hzau.edu.cn

    2006-09-08

    Murine C3d were utilized to enhance immunogenicity of pseudorabies virus (PrV) gC DNA vaccination. Three copies of C3d and four copies of CR2-binding domain M28{sub 4} were fused, respectively, to truncated gC gene encoding soluble glycoprotein C (sgC) in pcDNA3.1. BALB/c mice were, respectively, immunized with recombinant plasmids, blank vector, and inactivated vaccine. The antibody ELISA titer for sgC-C3d{sub 3} DNA was 49-fold more than that for sgC DNA, and the neutralizing antibody obtained 8-fold rise. Protection of mice from death after lethal PrV (316 LD{sub 5}) challenge was augmented from 25% to 100%. Furthermore, C3d fusion increased Th2-biased immune response by inducing IL-4 production. The IL-4 level for sgC-C3d{sub 3} DNA immunization approached that for the inactivated vaccine. Compared to C3d, M28 enhanced sgC DNA immunogenicity to a lesser extent. In conclusion, we demonstrated that murine C3d fusion significantly enhanced gC DNA immunity by directing Th1-biased to a balanced and more effective Th1/Th2 response.

  3. Induction of Broad Cytotoxic T Cells by Protective DNA Vaccination Against Marburg and Ebola

    PubMed Central

    Shedlock, Devon J; Aviles, Jenna; Talbott, Kendra T; Wong, Gary; Wu, Stephan J; Villarreal, Daniel O; Myles, Devin JF; Croyle, Maria A; Yan, Jian; Kobinger, Gary P; Weiner, David B

    2013-01-01

    Marburg and Ebola hemorrhagic fevers have been described as the most virulent viral diseases known to man due to associative lethality rates of up to 90%. Death can occur within days to weeks of exposure and there is currently no licensed vaccine or therapeutic. Recent evidence suggests an important role for antiviral T cells in conferring protection, but little detailed analysis of this response as driven by a protective vaccine has been reported. We developed a synthetic polyvalent-filovirus DNA vaccine against Marburg marburgvirus (MARV), Zaire ebolavirus (ZEBOV), and Sudan ebolavirus (SUDV). Preclinical efficacy studies were performed in guinea pigs and mice using rodent-adapted viruses, whereas murine T-cell responses were extensively analyzed using a novel modified assay described herein. Vaccination was highly potent, elicited robust neutralizing antibodies, and completely protected against MARV and ZEBOV challenge. Comprehensive T-cell analysis revealed cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) of great magnitude, epitopic breadth, and Th1-type marker expression. This model provides an important preclinical tool for studying protective immune correlates that could be applied to existing platforms. Data herein support further evaluation of this enhanced gene-based approach in nonhuman primate studies for in depth analyses of T-cell epitopes in understanding protective efficacy. PMID:23670573

  4. Clearance of persistent HPV infection and cervical lesion by therapeutic DNA vaccine in CIN3 patients

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Tae Jin; Jin, Hyun-Tak; Hur, Soo-Young; Yang, Hyun Gul; Seo, Yong Bok; Hong, Sung Ran; Lee, Chang-Woo; Kim, Suhyeon; Woo, Jung-Won; Park, Ki Seok; Hwang, Youn-Young; Park, Jaehan; Lee, In-Ho; Lim, Kyung-Taek; Lee, Ki-Heon; Jeong, Mi Seon; Surh, Charles D.; Suh, You Suk; Park, Jong Sup; Sung, Young Chul

    2014-01-01

    Here, we demonstrate that electroporation-enhanced immunization with a rationally designed HPV DNA vaccine (GX-188E), preferentially targeting HPV antigens to dendritic cells, elicits a significant E6/E7-specific IFN-γ-producing T-cell response in all nine cervical intraepithelial neoplasia 3 (CIN3) patients. Importantly, eight out of nine patients exhibit an enhanced polyfunctional HPV-specific CD8 T-cell response as shown by an increase in cytolytic activity, proliferative capacity and secretion of effector molecules. Notably, seven out of nine patients display complete regression of their lesions and viral clearance within 36 weeks of follow up. GX-188E administration does not elicit serious vaccine-associated adverse events at all administered doses. These findings indicate that the magnitude of systemic polyfunctional CD8 T-cell response is the main contributing factor for histological, cytological and virological responses, providing valuable insights into the design of therapeutic vaccines for effectively treating persistent infections and cancers in humans. PMID:25354725

  5. Expanded breadth of the T-cell response to mosaic HIV-1 envelope DNA vaccination

    SciTech Connect

    Korber, Bette; Fischer, William; Wallstrom, Timothy

    2009-01-01

    An effective AIDS vaccine must control highly diverse circulating strains of HIV-1. Among HIV -I gene products, the envelope (Env) protein contains variable as well as conserved regions. In this report, an informatic approach to the design of T-cell vaccines directed to HIV -I Env M group global sequences was tested. Synthetic Env antigens were designed to express mosaics that maximize the inclusion of common potential Tcell epitope (PTE) 9-mers and minimize the inclusion of rare epitopes likely to elicit strain-specific responses. DNA vaccines were evaluated using intracellular cytokine staining (ICS) in inbred mice with a standardized panel of highly conserved 15-mer PTE peptides. I, 2 and 3 mosaic sets were developed that increased theoretical epitope coverage. The breadth and magnitude ofT-cell immunity stimulated by these vaccines were compared to natural strain Env's; additional comparisons were performed on mutant Env's, including gpl60 or gpl45 with or without V regions and gp41 deletions. Among them, the 2 or 3 mosaic Env sets elicited the optimal CD4 and CD8 responses. These responses were most evident in CD8 T cells; the 3 mosaic set elicited responses to an average of 8 peptide pools compared to 2 pools for a set of3 natural Env's. Synthetic mosaic HIV -I antigens can therefore induce T-cell responses with expanded breadth and may facilitate the development of effective T -cell-based HIV -1 vaccines.

  6. Intrahepatic DNA vaccination: unexpected increased resistance against murine cysticercosis induced by non-specific enhanced immunity.

    PubMed

    Cruz-Revilla, C; Sonabend, A M; Rosas, G; Toledo, A; Meneses, G; Lopez-Casillas, F; Hernández, B; Fragoso, G; Sciutto, E

    2006-06-01

    Experimental murine cysticercosis caused by Taenia crassiceps has proved to be a useful model with which to test the efficacy of new vaccine candidates and delivery systems against pig cysticercosis. A high level of protection against murine cysticercosis was previously observed by intramuscular or intradermal DNA immunization with the use of the sequence of the recombinant KETc7 antigen cloned in pcDNA3 (pTc-sp7). To determine the effect of KETc7 differential expression in DNA vaccination, KETc7 was cloned in pGEM 11Zf(+) under the control of the tissue-specific regulatory promoter phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (pPc-sp7). A high level of protection was induced by intrahepatic immunization with pPc-sp7, pTc-sp7 and the empty vector in the absence of any specific immunity. The empty vector pGEM 11Zf(+), the plasmid with the highest content of CpG sequences, provided to the most efficient protection. This protection was related to an increased number of splenocytes, enhanced nonspecific splenocyte proliferation, and intensified intrahepatic INF-gamma production. Overall, intrahepatic plasmid CpG-DNA immunization provokes an exacerbated nonspecific immune response that can effectively control Taenia crassiceps cysticercosis.

  7. Immunogenicity and protective efficacy of DNA vaccine against visceral leishmaniasis in BALB/c mice.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Sukhbir; Kaur, Tejinder; Joshi, Jyoti

    2016-07-01

    The current study was designed to examine the protective efficacy of DNA vaccines based on gp63 and Hsp70 against murine visceral leishmaniasis. Inbred BALB/c mice were immunized subcutaneously twice at an interval of three weeks with pcDNA3.1(+) encoding T cell epitopes of gp63 and Hsp70 individually and in combination. Animals were challenged intracardially with 10(7) promastigotes of Leishmania donovani 10 days post immunization and sacrificed 1, 2 and 3 months post challenge. The immunized animals revealed a significant reduction (P < 0.05) in splenic and hepatic parasite burden as compared to the infected controls. Maximum reduction in parasite load (P < 0.05) was observed in animals treated with a combination of pcDNA/gp63 and pcDNA/Hsp70. These animals also showed heightened DTH response, increased IgG2a, elevated Th1 cytokines (IFN-γ and IL-2) and reduced IgG1 and IL-10 levels. Thus, mice immunized with the cocktail vaccine exhibited significantly greater protection in comparison to those immunized with individual antigens. PMID:27533939

  8. Immunogenicity and protective efficacy of DNA vaccine against visceral leishmaniasis in BALB/c mice

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Sukhbir; Kaur, Tejinder; Joshi, Jyoti

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The current study was designed to examine the protective efficacy of DNA vaccines based on gp63 and Hsp70 against murine visceral leishmaniasis. Inbred BALB/c mice were immunized subcutaneously twice at an interval of three weeks with pcDNA3.1(+) encoding T cell epitopes of gp63 and Hsp70 individually and in combination. Animals were challenged intracardially with 107 promastigotes of Leishmania donovani 10 days post immunization and sacrificed 1, 2 and 3 months post challenge. The immunized animals revealed a significant reduction (P < 0.05) in splenic and hepatic parasite burden as compared to the infected controls. Maximum reduction in parasite load (P < 0.05) was observed in animals treated with a combination of pcDNA/gp63 and pcDNA/Hsp70. These animals also showed heightened DTH response, increased IgG2a, elevated Th1 cytokines (IFN-γ and IL-2) and reduced IgG1 and IL-10 levels. Thus, mice immunized with the cocktail vaccine exhibited significantly greater protection in comparison to those immunized with individual antigens. PMID:27533939

  9. Dengue virus type 1 DNA vaccine induces protective immune responses in rhesus macaques.

    PubMed

    Raviprakash, K; Porter, K R; Kochel, T J; Ewing, D; Simmons, M; Phillips, I; Murphy, G S; Weiss, W R; Hayes, C G

    2000-07-01

    A candidate DNA vaccine expressing dengue virus type 1 pre-membrane and envelope proteins was used to immunize rhesus macaques. Monkeys were immunized intramuscularly (i.m.) or intradermally (i.d.) by three or four 1 mg doses of vaccine, respectively. Monkeys that were inoculated i.m. seroconverted more quickly and had higher antibody levels than those that were inoculated i.d. The sera exhibited virus-neutralizing activity, which declined over time. Four of the eight i.m.-inoculated monkeys were protected completely from developing viraemia when challenged 4 months after the last dose with homologous dengue virus. The other four monkeys had reduced viraemia compared with the control immunized monkeys. The i.d. -inoculated monkeys showed no reduction in viraemia when challenged with the virus. All vaccinated monkeys showed an anamnestic antibody response, indicating that they had established immunological memory. Vaccine-induced antibody had an avidity index similar to that of antibody induced by virus infection; however, no clear correlation was apparent between antibody avidity and virus neutralization titres.

  10. Stable and long-lasting immune response in horses after DNA vaccination against equine arteritis virus.

    PubMed

    Giese, M; Bahr, U; Jakob, N J; Kehm, R; Handermann, M; Müller, H; Vahlenkamp, T H; Spiess, C; Schneider, T H; Schusse, G; Darai, G

    2002-10-01

    Equine arteritis virus (EAV) is the causative agent of the equine viral arteritis. It is a small RNA virus with a linear, non-segmented plus RNA genome. EAV is a member of the Arteriviridae family that includes porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRSSV), simian haemorrhagic fever virus (SHFV) and lactate dehydrogenase virus (LDV). The viral transmission is via respiratory and reproductive routes. Clinical signs in horses vary, and severe infection can lead to abortions in pregnant mares or neonatal foal death. The aim of this study was to investigate the development of the immune response in horses after immunization with a DNA vaccine harbouring and expressing EAV Open Reading Frames (ORF) 2, 5, and 7, in combination with equine interleukin 2 (eqIL2). Three boosters followed the basic immunization in two-week intervals. Each immunization was a combination of gene gun and intramuscular injection. All horses developed a high titer of neutralizing antibodies after basic immunization within 2 weeks. Remarkably, this immune response was found to be independent of the age of animals. The youngest horse was six-years old, and the oldest twenty-two years old. A remarkable difference in the immune response between the young and old were not observed. The duration of immunity was investigated during a period of one year. After 12 months, neutralizing antibodies were still detectable in all the vaccinated horses.

  11. Enhancement of suicidal DNA vaccine potency by delaying suicidal DNA-induced cell death.

    PubMed

    Kim, T W; Hung, C-F; Juang, J; He, L; Hardwick, J M; Wu, T-C

    2004-02-01

    DNA-based alphaviral RNA replicon vectors, also called suicidal DNA vectors, alleviate the concerns of integration or transformation related to conventional DNA vectors since suicidal DNA vectors eventually cause apoptosis of transfected cells. However, the expression of inserted genes in these vectors is transient and the potency of suicidal DNA vaccines may be compromised because of apoptotic cell death. Therefore, to enhance the immune response to the human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV-16) E7 antigen, we generated a DNA-based Semliki Forest virus vector, pSCA1, encoding E7 fused with BCL-xL, an antiapoptotic member of the BCL-2 family. Our results indicated that pSCA1 encoding E7/BCL-xL fusion protein delayed cell death in the pSCA1-transfected dendritic cell line and generated significantly higher E7-specific CD8(+) T-cell-mediated immune responses and better antitumor effects than pSCA1 encoding wild-type E7 gene in vaccinated mice. The antiapoptotic function of BCL-xL is important for the enhancement of antigen-specific CD8(+) T-cell responses in vaccinated mice, because a point mutant of BCL-xL lacking antiapoptotic function was ineffective. These results suggest that strategies to delay suicidal DNA-induced cell death using antiapoptotic proteins may greatly enhance the potency of suicidal DNA.

  12. Attenuated Salmonella typhimurium SV4089 as a potential carrier of oral DNA vaccine in chickens.

    PubMed

    Jazayeri, Seyed Davoud; Ideris, Aini; Zakaria, Zunita; Omar, Abdul Rahman

    2012-01-01

    Attenuated Salmonella has been used as a carrier for DNA vaccine. However, in vitro and in vivo studies on the bacteria following transfection of plasmid DNA were poorly studied. In this paper, eukaryotic expression plasmids encoding avian influenza virus (AIV) subtype H5N1 genes, pcDNA3.1/HA, NA, and NP, were transfected into an attenuated Salmonella enteric typhimurium SV4089. In vitro stability of the transfected plasmids into Salmonella were over 90% after 100 generations. The attenuated Salmonella were able to invade MCF-7 (1.2%) and MCF-10A (0.5%) human breast cancer cells. Newly hatched specific-pathogen-free (SPF) chicks were inoculated once by oral gavage with 10(9) colony-forming unit (CFU) of the attenuated Salmonella. No abnormal clinical signs or deaths were recorded after inoculation. Viable bacteria were detected 3 days after inoculation by plating from spleen, liver, and cecum. Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) were carried out for confirmation. Salmonella was not detected in blood cultures although serum antibody immune responses to Salmonella O antiserum group D1 factor 1, 9, and 12 antigens were observed in all the inoculated chickens after 7 days up to 35 days. Our results showed that live attenuated S. typhimurium SV4089 harboring pcDNA3.1/HA, NA, and NP may provide a unique alternative as a carrier for DNA oral vaccine in chickens.

  13. Chemokine Adjuvanted Electroporated-DNA Vaccine Induces Substantial Protection from Simian Immunodeficiency Virus Vaginal Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Hutnick, N A; Moldoveanu, Z; Hunter, M; Reuter, M; Yuan, S; Yan, J; Ginsberg, A; Sylvester, A; Pahar, B; Carnathan, D; Kathuria, N; Khan, A S; Montefiori, D; Sardesai, N Y; Betts, M R; Mestecky, J; Marx, P; Weiner, D B

    2015-01-01

    There have been encouraging results for the development of an effective HIV vaccine. However, many questions remain regarding the quality of immune responses and the role of mucosal antibodies. We addressed some of these issues by using a simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) DNA vaccine adjuvanted with plasmid-expressed mucosal chemokines combined with an intravaginal SIV challenge in rhesus macaque (RhM) model. We previously reported on the ability of CCR9 and CCR10 ligand (L) adjuvants to enhance mucosal and systemic IgA and IgG in small animals. In this study, RhMs were intramuscularly immunized five times with either DNA or DNA plus chemokine adjuvant delivered by electroporation followed by challenge with SIVsmE660. Sixty-eight percent of all vaccinated animals (P=0.0016) remained either uninfected or had aborted infection compared to only 14% in the vaccine naïve group. The highest protection was observed in the CCR10L chemokines group, where 6 of 9 animals had aborted infection and two remained uninfected, leading to 89% protection (P=0.0003). The induction of mucosal SIV-specific antibodies and neutralization titers correlated with trends in protection. These results indicate the need to further investigate the contribution of chemokine adjuvants to modulate immune responses and the role of mucosal antibodies in SIV/HIV protection. PMID:25943275

  14. A DNA vaccine against tuberculosis based on the 65 kDa heat-shock protein differentially activates human macrophages and dendritic cells

    PubMed Central

    Franco, Luís H; Wowk, Pryscilla F; Silva, Célio L; Trombone, Ana PF; Coelho-Castelo, Arlete AM; Oliver, Constance; Jamur, Maria C; Moretto, Edson L; Bonato, Vânia LD

    2008-01-01

    Background A number of reports have demonstrated that rodents immunized with DNA vaccines can produce antibodies and cellular immune responses presenting a long-lasting protective immunity. These findings have attracted considerable interest in the field of DNA vaccination. We have previously described the prophylactic and therapeutic effects of a DNA vaccine encoding the Mycobacterium leprae 65 kDa heat shock protein (DNA-HSP65) in a murine model of tuberculosis. As DNA vaccines are often less effective in humans, we aimed to find out how the DNA-HSP65 stimulates human immune responses. Methods To address this question, we analysed the activation of both human macrophages and dendritic cells (DCs) cultured with DNA-HSP65. Then, these cells stimulated with the DNA vaccine were evaluated regarding the expression of surface markers, cytokine production and microbicidal activity. Results It was observed that DCs and macrophages presented different ability to uptake DNA vaccine. Under DNA stimulation, macrophages, characterized as CD11b+/CD86+/HLA-DR+, produced high levels of TNF-alpha, IL-6 (pro-inflammatory cytokines), and IL-10 (anti-inflammatory cytokine). Besides, they also presented a microbicidal activity higher than that observed in DCs after infection with M. tuberculosis. On the other hand, DCs, characterized as CD11c+/CD86+/CD123-/BDCA-4+/IFN-alpha-, produced high levels of IL-12 and low levels of TNF-alpha, IL-6 and IL-10. Finally, the DNA-HSP65 vaccine was able to induce proliferation of peripheral blood lymphocytes. Conclusion Our data suggest that the immune response is differently activated by the DNA-HSP65 vaccine in humans. These findings provide important clues to the design of new strategies for using DNA vaccines in human immunotherapy. PMID:18208592

  15. Lactococci and lactobacilli as mucosal delivery vectors for therapeutic proteins and DNA vaccines

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Food-grade Lactic Acid Bacteria (LAB) have been safely consumed for centuries by humans in fermented foods. Thus, they are good candidates to develop novel oral vectors, constituting attractive alternatives to attenuated pathogens, for mucosal delivery strategies. Herein, this review summarizes our research, up until now, on the use of LAB as mucosal delivery vectors for therapeutic proteins and DNA vaccines. Most of our work has been based on the model LAB Lactococcus lactis, for which we have developed efficient genetic tools, including expression signals and host strains, for the heterologous expression of therapeutic proteins such as antigens, cytokines and enzymes. Resulting recombinant lactococci strains have been tested successfully for their prophylactic and therapeutic effects in different animal models: i) against human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV-16)-induced tumors in mice, ii) to partially prevent a bovine β-lactoglobulin (BLG)-allergic reaction in mice and iii) to regulate body weight and food consumption in obese mice. Strikingly, all of these tools have been successfully transposed to the Lactobacillus genus, in recent years, within our laboratory. Notably, anti-oxidative Lactobacillus casei strains were constructed and tested in two chemically-induced colitis models. In parallel, we also developed a strategy based on the use of L. lactis to deliver DNA at the mucosal level, and were able to show that L. lactis is able to modulate the host response through DNA delivery. Today, we consider that all of our consistent data, together with those obtained by other groups, demonstrate and reinforce the interest of using LAB, particularly lactococci and lactobacilli strains, to develop novel therapeutic protein mucosal delivery vectors which should be tested now in human clinical trials. PMID:21995317

  16. CCL17 combined with CCL19 as a nasal adjuvant enhances the immunogenicity of an anti-caries DNA vaccine in rodents

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Yan-hong; Yu, Fei; Zeng, Chang; Cao, Li-hua; Zhang, Zhou; Xu, Qing-an

    2016-01-01

    Aim: CCL19 and its receptor CCR7 are essential molecules for facilitating the trafficking of mature dendritic cells (DCs) and helping to establish a microenvironment in lymphoid tissues to initiate primary immune responses, whereas CCL17 is required in the CCR7-CCL19-dependent migration of DCs. In this study we examined whether co-administration of CCL17 and CCL19 could enhance the immunogenicity of an anti-caries DNA vaccine, pCIA-P, in rodents. Methods: Plasmids encoding CCL17 (pCCL17/VAX) and CCL19 (pCCL19/VAX) were constructed. BALB/c mice were intranasally administered pCCL17/VAX, pCCL19/VAX, or pCCL17/VAX plus pCCL19/VAX, the migration of DCs to the spleen and draining lymph nodes (DLNs) was assessed with flow cytometry. The mice were co-administered pCIA-P; and the anti-PAc antibodies in the serum and saliva were detected with ELISA. Wistar rats were orally challenged with Streptococcus mutans and then administered pCIA-P in combination with pCCL17/VAX, pCCL19/VAX, or pCCL17/VAX plus pCCL19/VAX. The amount of S mutans sustained on rat molar surfaces was assessed using a colony forming assay. Caries activity was scored with the Keyes method. Results: Co-administration of the CCL17 and CCL19 genes in mice caused a greater increase in the number of mature DCs in the spleen and DLNs compared with administration of CCL17 or CCL19 genes alone. CCL17 and CCL19 double-adjuvant plus pCIA-P induced significantly higher levels of anti-PAc salivary IgA and anti-PAc serum IgG antibody in mice, and strengthened the ability of pCIA-P in inhibiting the colonization of S mutans on rat tooth surfaces. The caries activity of the combined adjuvant group was significantly lower than that of the pCCL17/VAX or the pCCL19/VAX group. Conclusion: A nasal adjuvant consisting of a combination of CCL17 and CCL19 attracts more mature DCs to secondary lymphoid tissues, inducing enhanced antibody responses against the anti-caries DNA vaccine pCIA-P and reducing S mutans infection in

  17. Determination and analysis of the complete genome sequence of Paralichthys olivaceus rhabdovirus (PORV).

    PubMed

    Zhu, Ruo-Lin; Zhang, Qi-Ya

    2014-04-01

    Paralichthys olivaceus rhabdovirus (PORV), which is associated with high mortality rates in flounder, was isolated in China in 2005. Here, we provide an annotated sequence record of PORV, the genome of which comprises 11,182 nucleotides and contains six genes in the order 3'-N-P-M-G-NV-L-5'. Phylogenetic analysis based on glycoprotein sequences of PORV and other rhabdoviruses showed that PORV clusters with viral haemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV), genus Novirhabdovirus, family Rhabdoviridae. Further phylogenetic analysis of the combined amino acid sequences of six proteins of PORV and VHSV strains showed that PORV clusters with Korean strains and is closely related to Asian strains, all of which were isolated from flounder. In a comparison in which the sequences of the six proteins were combined, PORV shared the highest identity (98.3 %) with VHSV strain KJ2008 from Korea.

  18. Lack of correlation between the resistances to two rhabdovirus infections in rainbow trout.

    PubMed

    Verrier, Eloi R; Ehanno, Aude; Biacchesi, Stéphane; Le Guillou, Sandrine; Dechamp, Nicolas; Boudinot, Pierre; Bremont, Michel; Quillet, Edwige

    2013-07-01

    The Viral Hemorrhagic Septicemia Virus (VHSV) and the Infectious Hematopoietic Necrosis Virus (IHNV) are two rhabdoviruses responsible for serious outbreaks in salmonid farms. To date, little is known about the variability of host response to these viruses. Using gynogenetic clonal lines of rainbow trout exhibiting a wide range of resistance to viral infections, we showed that there was no correlation between the resistance to VHSV and IHNV. We also confirmed the importance of fish weight for its susceptibility to IHNV infection. Finally, using a chimeric recombinant IHNV expressing the VHSV glycoprotein, we showed that the glycoprotein plays a key role in the virulence and in the level of resistance observed in different genetic backgrounds. Taken together, our results provide new prospects for a better understanding of host responses to rhabdovirus infections in salmonids.

  19. A new bacilliform fathead minnow rhabdovirus that produces syncytia in tissue culture.

    PubMed

    Iwanowicz, L R; Goodwin, A E

    2002-05-01

    A pathogenic bacilliform virus 130-180 nm in length and 31-47 nm in diameter was isolated from moribund fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) exhibiting hemorrhages in their eyes and skin. A cytopathic effect of multifocal syncytia was observed in the epithelioma papulosum cyprini cell line after a 48 h incubation at 20 degrees C. A similar cytopathic effect was also observed in other cell lines tested, but not in bluegill fry, koi fin, or Chinook salmon embryo cells. The filterable agent was inactivated by exposure to 50 degrees C for 10 min, 20% ether, 2 and 50% chloroform, pH 3, and pH 10, was unaffected by 5'-iodo-2 deoxyuridine, and appeared bacilliform and occasionally bullet-shaped by electron microscopy. These results are consistent with those of rhabdoviruses. Immunodot blots performed with antisera against selected fish rhabdoviruses, an aquareovirus, and a birnavirus were all negative. River's postulates were fulfilled in fathead minnows, but the agent did not replicate or cause disease in other cyprinids or salmonids during challenge experiments. Hepatic, splenic, and renal lesions were observed during histological analysis of diseased fish from viral challenges and from the original case. Structural proteins resolved via SDS-PAGE had molecular weights similar to those reported in lyssaviruses of the family Rhabdoviridae; however, syncytia formation is not a typical cytopathic effect of rhabdoviruses. This virus, has tentatively been named the fathead minnow rhabdovirus (FHMRV) and is most similar to the members of the family Rhabdoviridae, but atypical properties like syncytia formation may justify the assignment to a novel taxon.

  20. First isolation of a rhabdovirus from perch Perca fluviatilis in Switzerland.

    PubMed

    Wahli, Thomas; Bellec, Laure; von Siebenthal, Beat; Cabon, Joëlle; Schmidt-Posthaus, Heike; Morin, Thierry

    2015-10-16

    Perca fluviatilis is a fish species of increasing interest to the Swiss fish farming industry. In recent years, recirculation systems have been specifically set up to increase production. In one of these farms, abnormal spiral swimming associated with elevated mortalities occurred in repeated batches of imported perch shortly after stocking on several occasions. No bacterial or parasitic etiology was detected, but a virus grown in bluegill fry (BF-2) cells was identified as perch rhabdovirus. Subsequent investigations of other samples suggested a viral tropism for the central nervous system (CNS). Phylogenetic analysis of the partial N and entire G gene sequences positioned this isolate in genogroup C of the species Perch rhabdovirus, with high nucleotide and amino acid (aa) sequence identities with the DK5533 strain isolated in Denmark in 1989. Comparative studies using other closely related isolates allowed the distinction of 2 serological patterns among perch rhabdoviruses and the identification of a proline substitution by a serine in position 147 of the glycoprotein potentially involved in antigenic differentiation. Even if perch imported onto the farm tested negative by virus isolation prior to transport, they may have been the origin of this outbreak since CNS tissue was not included in the samples that were analyzed. Another possibility might be a sub-clinical infection with a viral load in resident fish too low to be detected. This study reports the first isolation of a perch rhabdovirus in Switzerland, and emphasizes the necessity of optimizing diagnostic tools that facilitate better control of the risks associated with fish translocation.

  1. First isolation of a rhabdovirus from perch Perca fluviatilis in Switzerland.

    PubMed

    Wahli, Thomas; Bellec, Laure; von Siebenthal, Beat; Cabon, Joëlle; Schmidt-Posthaus, Heike; Morin, Thierry

    2015-10-16

    Perca fluviatilis is a fish species of increasing interest to the Swiss fish farming industry. In recent years, recirculation systems have been specifically set up to increase production. In one of these farms, abnormal spiral swimming associated with elevated mortalities occurred in repeated batches of imported perch shortly after stocking on several occasions. No bacterial or parasitic etiology was detected, but a virus grown in bluegill fry (BF-2) cells was identified as perch rhabdovirus. Subsequent investigations of other samples suggested a viral tropism for the central nervous system (CNS). Phylogenetic analysis of the partial N and entire G gene sequences positioned this isolate in genogroup C of the species Perch rhabdovirus, with high nucleotide and amino acid (aa) sequence identities with the DK5533 strain isolated in Denmark in 1989. Comparative studies using other closely related isolates allowed the distinction of 2 serological patterns among perch rhabdoviruses and the identification of a proline substitution by a serine in position 147 of the glycoprotein potentially involved in antigenic differentiation. Even if perch imported onto the farm tested negative by virus isolation prior to transport, they may have been the origin of this outbreak since CNS tissue was not included in the samples that were analyzed. Another possibility might be a sub-clinical infection with a viral load in resident fish too low to be detected. This study reports the first isolation of a perch rhabdovirus in Switzerland, and emphasizes the necessity of optimizing diagnostic tools that facilitate better control of the risks associated with fish translocation. PMID:26480912

  2. Characterization of Immune Responses Induced by Ebola Virus Glycoprotein (GP) and Truncated GP Isoform DNA Vaccines and Protection Against Lethal Ebola Virus Challenge in Mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Wenfang; Ye, Ling; Carrion, Ricardo; Mohan, Gopi S; Nunneley, Jerritt; Staples, Hilary; Ticer, Anysha; Patterson, Jean L; Compans, Richard W; Yang, Chinglai

    2015-10-01

    In addition to its surface glycoprotein (GP), Ebola virus directs the production of large quantities of a truncated glycoprotein isoform (sGP) that is secreted into the extracellular space. We recently reported that sGP actively diverts host antibody responses against the epitopes that it shares with GP and thereby allows itself to absorb anti-GP antibodies, a phenomenon we termed "antigenic subversion." To investigate the effect of antigenic subversion by sGP on protection against virus infection, we compared immune responses induced by different prime-boost immunization regimens with GP and sGP DNA vaccines in mice and their efficacy against lethal Ebola virus challenge. Similar levels of anti-GP antibodies were induced by 2 immunizations with sGP and GP DNA vaccines. However, 2 immunizations with GP but not sGP DNA vaccine fully protected mice from lethal challenge. Boosting with sGP or GP DNA vaccine in mice that had been primed by GP or sGP DNA vaccine augmented the levels of anti-GP antibody responses and further improved protective efficacy against Ebola virus infection. These results show that both the quality and the levels of anti-GP antibody responses affect the efficacy of protection against Ebola virus infection.

  3. Intravaginal HPV DNA vaccination with electroporation induces local CD8+ T-cell immune responses and antitumor effects against cervicovaginal tumors.

    PubMed

    Sun, Y; Peng, S; Qiu, J; Miao, J; Yang, B; Jeang, J; Hung, C-F; Wu, T-C

    2015-07-01

    Therapeutic human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines have the potential to inhibit the progression of an established HPV infection to precancer and cancer lesions by targeting HPV oncoproteins. We have previously developed a therapeutic DNA vaccine encoding calreticulin (CRT) linked to E7, CRT/E7 DNA vaccine, for use in the treatment of HPV-associated lesions. Since the transfection efficiency of DNA vaccines administered in vivo is typically low, we examined the use of electroporation as well as different routes of administration to enhance antigen-specific tumor control. We tested the effects of the CRT/E7 DNA vaccine administered intramuscularly or intravaginally, with or without electroporation, on the generation of CD8+ T-cell immunity and therapeutic antitumor effects in HPV16 E7-expressing cervicovaginal tumor-bearing mice. We found that intravaginal vaccination of CRT/E7 DNA followed by electroporation-induced potent E7-specific CD8(+) T-cell responses in the cervicovaginal tract, compared with intramuscular injection followed by electroporation. Furthermore, tumor-bearing mice vaccinated intravaginally followed by electroporation had an enhanced survival, antitumor effects and local production of IFN-γ+CD8+ T cells compared with those vaccinated intramuscularly with electroporation. Thus, we show that intravaginal CRT/E7 DNA vaccination followed by electroporation generates the most potent therapeutic antitumor effects against an orthotopic E7-expressing tumor model. The current study will have significant clinical implications once a clinically applicable electroporation device for intravaginal use becomes available.

  4. A multi-head intradermal electroporation device allows for tailored and increased dose DNA vaccine delivery to the skin

    PubMed Central

    McCoy, Jay R; Mendoza, Janess M; Spik, Kristin W; Badger, Catherine; Gomez, Alan F; Schmaljohn, Connie S; Sardesai, Niranjan Y; Broderick, Kate E

    2015-01-01

    The identification of an effective and tolerable delivery method is a necessity for the success of DNA vaccines in the clinic. This article describes the development and validation of a multi-headed intradermal electroporation device which would be applicable for delivering multiple DNA vaccine plasmids simultaneously but spatially separated. Reporter gene plasmids expressing green and red fluorescent proteins were used to demonstrate the impact of spatial separation on DNA delivery to increase the number of transfected cells and avoid interference through visible expression patterns. To investigate the impact of plasmid interference on immunogenicity, a disease target was investigated where issues with multi-valent vaccines had been previously described. DNA-based Hantaan and Puumala virus vaccines were delivered separately or as a combination and the effect of multi-valence was determined by appropriate assays. While a negative impact was observed for both antigenic vaccines when delivered together, these effects were mitigated when the vaccine was delivered using the multi-head device. We also demonstrate how the multi-head device facilitates higher dose delivery to the skin resulting in improved immune responses. This new multi-head platform device is an efficient, tolerable and non-invasive method to deliver multiple plasmid DNA constructs simultaneously allowing the tailoring of delivery sites for combination vaccines. Additionally, this device would allow the delivery of multi-plasmid vaccine formulations without risk of impacted immune responses through interference. Such a low-cost, easy to use device platform for the delivery of multi-agent DNA vaccines would have direct applications by the military and healthcare sectors for mass vaccination purposes. PMID:25839221

  5. DNA Vaccination Elicits Protective Immune Responses against Pandemic and Classic Swine Influenza Viruses in Pigs ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Gorres, J. Patrick; Lager, Kelly M.; Kong, Wing-Pui; Royals, Michael; Todd, John-Paul; Vincent, Amy L.; Wei, Chih-Jen; Loving, Crystal L.; Zanella, Eraldo L.; Janke, Bruce; Kehrli, Marcus E.; Nabel, Gary J.; Rao, Srinivas S.

    2011-01-01

    Swine influenza is a highly contagious viral infection in pigs that significantly impacts the pork industry due to weight loss and secondary infections. There is also the potential of a significant threat to public health, as was seen in 2009 when the pandemic H1N1 influenza virus strain emerged from reassortment events among avian, swine, and human influenza viruses within pigs. As classic and pandemic H1N1 strains now circulate in swine, an effective vaccine may be the best strategy to protect the pork industry and public health. Current inactivated-virus vaccines available for swine influenza protect only against viral strains closely related to the vaccine strain, and egg-based production of these vaccines is insufficient to respond to large outbreaks. DNA vaccines are a promising alternative since they can potentially induce broad-based protection with more efficient production methods. In this study we evaluated the potentials of monovalent and trivalent DNA vaccine constructs to (i) elicit both humoral and gamma interferon (IFN-γ) responses and (ii) protect pigs against viral shedding and lung disease after challenge with pandemic H1N1 or classic swine H1N1 influenza virus. We also compared the efficiency of a needle-free vaccine delivery method to that of a conventional needle/syringe injection. We report that DNA vaccination elicits robust serum antibody and cellular responses after three immunizations and confers significant protection against influenza virus challenge. Needle-free delivery elicited improved antibody responses with the same efficiency as conventional injection and should be considered for development as a practical alternative for vaccine administration. PMID:21918118

  6. Cloning, protein expression and immunogenicity of HBs-murine IL-18 fusion DNA vaccine.

    PubMed

    Channarong, Sunee; Mitrevej, Ampol; Sinchaipanid, Nuttanan; Usuwantim, Kanchana; Kulkeaw, Kasem; Chaicumpa, Wanpen

    2007-12-01

    Hepatitis B is a global serious disease caused by hepatitis B virus (HBV). There is no known cure for hepatitis B. The best way to deal with the disease is by preventing with hepatitis B vaccine. However, the current protein-based vaccines made up of recombinant hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) are ineffective in chronic HBV carriers and a significant number of the vaccinees do not mount the protective immune response. Novel DNA-based immunization may overcome the deficits of the protein-based immunization and may provide more effective prophylactic and therapeutic outcomes. In this study, we constructed a recombinant plasmid carrying gene encoding the HBV surface antigen (HBs) linked to DNA segment encoding full-length murine interleukin-18, i.e. pcDNA-HBs-IL-18. Immunogenicity of the DNA construct was carried out in BALB/c mice in comparison with mock, i.e. pcDNA3.1+ and vaccines comprised of pRc/CMV-HBs and pRc/CMV-HBs plus pcDNA-IL-18. All vaccinated mice revealed significant serum anti-HBs IgG response after two intramuscular injections of the vaccines at 28 day interval as compared to the level of mock. Co-administration of pRc/CMV-HBs and pcDNA-IL-18 elicited arbitrarily higher levels of anti-HBs IgG than the levels in mice immunized with pRc/CMV-HBs alone and mice that received pcDNA-HBs-IL-18 although not statistically different. Further experiments are needed to investigate the subisotypes of the IgG antibody, the kinetics of cytokine and the cell-mediated immune response. For this communication, the prototype HBs-IL-18 DNA vaccine was successfully constructed and the gene encoding murine IL-18 was successfully cloned. The latter can be co-injected with the antigen coding DNA or used as a fusion partner to the DNA for priming the immune response. The recombinant HBs and full-length IL-18 proteins have potential for other research purposes. They may be used also as standard proteins in the protein quantification assay. PMID:18402297

  7. Modulation of the immune response to DNA vaccine by co-delivery of costimulatory molecules

    PubMed Central

    Fló, J; Tisminetzky, S; Baralle, F

    2000-01-01

    We have investigated methods for modulating immune responses, against herpes simplex virus (HSV), generated from DNA vaccination by co-delivery of genes encoding costimulatory molecules.A strong delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) reaction was induced in mice co-injected via the intradermal (i.d.) route with a eukaryotic expression plasmid encoding the CD80 molecule (pCD80) and a plasmid encoding the glycoprotein D of the HSV-2 (pgD). Furthermore, when spleen cells from these mice were cultured in the presence of inactivated HSV, a significant increase in the expression of interleukin-2 receptor (IL-2R) was observed in the CD4 subset compared with mice immunized only with pgD. Analysis of cytokine synthesis at the single-cell level indicated that CD80 genes induce a significant increase in the number of interferon-γ (IFN-γ)-, IL-2- and IL-4-secreting cells in the spleen. On the other hand, co-administration of the CD80 gene via the intramuscular (i.m.) route did not induce an increase in the cell-mediated immune response. When a plasmid carrying the CD86 gene (pCD86) was co-injected via the i.m. route with the pgD plasmid, a small decrease in the number of IFN-γ-secreting cells was observed. This down-regulation of the immune response was also observed when eukaryotic expression cassettes for CD80 and for CD86 were coadministered with the pgD plasmid via the i.d. route. However, co-injection of pCD86 via the i.m. route produced a small increase in the number of IL-4-secreting cells. When immunized mice were challenged intravaginally with 100 plaque-forming units of virus, only co-injection of the CD80 gene by the i.d. route provoked an adjuvant effect compared with mice immunized with pgD alone. A reduction in the titres of HSV in vaginal washings was observed together with a decrease in the lesion score PMID:10886404

  8. Development of a robust, versatile, and scalable inoculum train for the production of a DNA vaccine.

    PubMed

    Okonkowski, J; Kizer-Bentley, L; Listner, K; Robinson, D; Chartrain, M

    2005-01-01

    For many microbial fermentation processes, the inoculum train can have a substantial impact on process performance in terms of productivity, profitability, and process control. In general, it is understood that a well-characterized and flexible inoculum train is essential for future scale-up and implementation of the process in a pilot plant or manufacturing setting. A fermentation process utilizing E. coli DH5 for the production of plasmid DNA carrying the HIV gag gene for use as a vaccine is currently under development in our laboratory. As part of the development effort, we evaluated inoculum train schemes that incorporate one, two, or three stages. In addition, we investigated the effect of inoculum viable-cell concentrations, either thawed or actively growing, over a wide range (from 2.5 x 10(4) to 1.0 x 10(8) viable cells/mL or approximately 0.001% to 4% of final working volume). The various inoculum trains were evaluated in terms of final plasmid yield, process time, reproducibility, robustness, and feasibility at large scale. The results of these studies show that final plasmid yield remained in the desired range, despite the number of stages or inoculation viable-cell concentrations comprising the inoculum train. On the basis of these observations and because it established a large database, the first part of these investigations supports an exceptional flexibility in the design of scalable inoculum trains for this DNA vaccine process. This work also highlighted that a slightly higher level of process reproducibility, as measured by the time for the culture to reach mid-exponential growth, was observed when using actively growing versus frozen cells. It also demonstrated the existence of a viable-cell concentration threshold for the one-stage process, since we observed that inoculation of the production stage with very low amounts of viable cells from a frozen source could lead to increased process sensitivity to external factors such as variation in the

  9. [Comparison of protective properties of the smallpox DNA-vaccine based on the variola virus A30L gene and its variant with modified codon usage].

    PubMed

    Maksiutov, R A; Shchelkunov, S N

    2011-01-01

    Efficacy of candidate DNA-vaccines based on the variola virus natural gene A30L and artificial gene A30Lopt with modified codon usage, optimized for expression in mammalian cells, was tested. The groups of mice were intracutaneously immunized three times with three-week intervals with candidate DNA-vaccines: pcDNA_A30L or pcDNA_A30Lopt, and in three weeks after the last immunization all mice in the groups were intraperitoneally infected by the ectromelia virus K1 strain in 10 LD50 dose for the estimation of protection. It was shown that the DNA-vaccines based on natural gene A30L and codon-optimized gene A30Lopt elicited virus, thereby neutralizing the antibody response and protected mice from lethal intraperitoneal challenge with the ectromelia virus with lack of statistically significant difference.

  10. The antiviral potential of interferon-induced cotton rat Mx proteins against orthomyxovirus (influenza), rhabdovirus, and bunyavirus.

    PubMed

    Stertz, Silke; Dittmann, Jan; Blanco, Jorge C G; Pletneva, Lioubov M; Haller, Otto; Kochs, Georg

    2007-10-01

    Influenza A virus (FLUAV) is an important human pathogen able to cause devastating pandemics. Recently, cotton rats have been proposed as an animal model to study the innate immune response against FLUAV and other human pathogens. The interferon (IFN)-induced Mx GTPases are part of the cell-autonomous innate immune response against viruses. We, therefore, tested the antiviral activity of the two cotton rat Mx proteins that were recently identified. The nuclear cotton rat Mx1 protein was found to be a strong inhibitor of FLUAV, whereas the cytoplasmic cotton rat Mx2 protein was inactive. Cotton rat Mx2, but not cotton rat Mx1, was able to inhibit the rhabdovirus vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) and the bunyavirus Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) known to replicate in the cytoplasm of infected cells. Thus, cotton rats possess two Mx proteins that have selective antiviral activity that depends on their intracellular localization. We conclude that the Mx status of cotton rats differs from that of conventional inbred mouse strains, which are known to have defective Mx genes. Therefore, cotton rats are a suitable animal model to study experimental infections with FLUAV and other RNA viruses.

  11. A DNA vaccine encoding VP22 of herpes simplex virus type I (HSV-1) and OprF confers enhanced protection from Pseudomonas aeruginosa in mice.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xian; Wang, Yan; Xia, Yifan; Zhang, Lijuan; Yang, Qin; Lei, Jun

    2016-08-17

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa antimicrobial resistance is a major therapeutic challenge. DNA vaccination is an attractive approach for antigen-specific immunotherapy against P. aeruginosa. We explored the feasibility of employing Herpes simplex virus type 1 tegument protein, VP22, as a molecular tool to enhance the immunogenicity of an OprF DNA vaccine against P. aeruginosa. Recombinant DNA vaccines, pVAX1-OprF, pVAX1-OprF-VP22 (encoding a n-OprF-VP22-c fusion protein) and pVAX1-VP22-OprF (encoding a n-VP22-OprF-c fusion protein) were constructed. The humoral and cellular immune responses and immune protective effects of these DNA vaccines in mice were evaluated. In this report, we showed that vaccination with pVAX1-OprF-VP22 induced higher levels of IgG titer, T cell proliferation rate. It also provided better immune protection against the P. aeruginosa challenge when compared to that induced by pVAX1-OprF or pVAX1-VP22-OprF DNA vaccines. Molecular mechanistic analyses indicated vaccination with pVAX1-OprF-VP22 triggered immune responses characterized by a preferential increase in antigen specific IgG2a and IFN-γ in mice, indicating Th1 polarization. We concluded that VP22 is a potent stimulatory molecular tool for DNA vaccination when fused to the carboxyl end of OprF gene. Our study provides a novel strategy for prevention and treatment of P. aeruginosa infection. PMID:27449680

  12. Development of a New DNA Vaccine for Alzheimer Disease Targeting a Wide Range of Aβ Species and Amyloidogenic Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Matsumoto, Yoh; Niimi, Naoko; Kohyama, Kuniko

    2013-01-01

    It has recently been determined that not only Aβ oligomers, but also other Aβ species and amyloidogenic peptides are neurotoxic in Alzheimer disease (AD) and play a pivotal role in AD pathogenesis. In the present study, we attempted to develop new DNA vaccines targeting a wide range of Aβ species. For this purpose, we first performed in vitro assays with newly developed vaccines to evaluate Aβ production and Aβ secretion abilities and then chose an IgL-Aβx4-Fc-IL-4 vaccine (designated YM3711) for further studies. YM3711 was vaccinated to mice, rabbits and monkeys to evaluate anti-Aβ species antibody-producing ability and Aβ reduction effects. It was found that YM3711 vaccination induced significantly higher levels of antibodies not only to Aβ1-42 but also to AD-related molecules including AβpE3-42, Aβ oligomers and Aβ fibrils. Importantly, YM3711 significantly reduced these Aβ species in the brain of model mice. Binding and competition assays using translated YM3711 protein products clearly demonstrated that a large part of antibodies induced by YM3711 vaccination are directed at conformational epitopes of the Aβ complex and oligomers. Taken together, we demonstrate that YM3711 is a powerful DNA vaccine targeting a wide range of AD-related molecules and is worth examining in preclinical and clinical trials. PMID:24086465

  13. Broadly neutralizing DNA vaccine with specific mutation alters the antigenicity and sugar-binding activities of influenza hemagglutinin

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ming-Wei; Liao, Hsin-Yu; Huang, Yaoxing; Jan, Jia-Tsrong; Huang, Chih-Cheng; Ren, Chien-Tai; Wu, Chung-Yi; Cheng, Ting-Jen Rachel; Ho, David D.; Wong, Chi-Huey

    2011-01-01

    The rapid genetic drift of influenza virus hemagglutinin is an obstacle to vaccine efficacy. Previously, we found that the consensus hemagglutinin DNA vaccine (pCHA5) can only elicit moderate neutralization activities toward the H5N1 clade 2.1 and clade 2.3 viruses. Two approaches were thus taken to improve the protection broadness of CHA5. The first one was to include certain surface amino acids that are characteristic of clade 2.3 viruses to improve the protection profiles. When we immunized mice with CHA5 harboring individual mutations, the antibodies elicited by CHA5 containing P157S elicited higher neutralizing activity against the clade 2.3 viruses. Likewise, the viruses pseudotyped with hemagglutinin containing 157S became more susceptible to neutralization. The second approach was to update the consensus sequence with more recent H5N1 strains, generating a second-generation DNA vaccine pCHA5II. We showed that pCHA5II was able to elicit higher cross-neutralization activities against all H5N1 viruses. Comparison of the neutralization profiles of CHA5 and CHA5II, and the animal challenge studies, revealed that CHA5II induced the broadest protection profile. We concluded that CHA5II combined with electroporation delivery is a promising strategy to induce antibodies with broad cross-reactivities against divergent H5N1 influenza viruses. PMID:21321237

  14. A recombinant DNA vaccine protects mice deficient in the alpha/beta interferon receptor against lethal challenge with Usutu virus.

    PubMed

    Martín-Acebes, Miguel A; Blázquez, Ana-Belén; Cañas-Arranz, Rodrigo; Vázquez-Calvo, Ángela; Merino-Ramos, Teresa; Escribano-Romero, Estela; Sobrino, Francisco; Saiz, Juan-Carlos

    2016-04-19

    Usutu virus (USUV) is a mosquito-borne flavivirus whose circulation had been confined to Africa since it was first detected in 1959. However, in the last decade USUV has emerged in Europe causing episodes of avian mortality and sporadic severe neuroinvasive infections in humans. Remarkably, adult laboratory mice exhibit limited susceptibility to USUV infection, which has impaired the analysis of the immune responses, thus complicating the evaluation of virus-host interactions and of vaccine candidates against this pathogen. In this work, we showed that mice deficient in the alpha/beta interferon receptor (IFNAR (-/-) mice) were highly susceptible to USUV infection and provided a lethal challenge model for vaccine testing. To validate this infection model, a plasmid DNA vaccine candidate encoding the precursor of membrane (prM) and envelope (E) proteins of USUV was engineered. Transfection of cultured cells with this plasmid resulted in expression of USUV antigens and the assembly and secretion of small virus-like particles also known as recombinant subviral particles (RSPs). A single intramuscular immunization with this plasmid was sufficient to elicit a significant level of protection against challenge with USUV in IFNAR (-/-) mice. The characterization of the humoral response induced revealed that DNA vaccination primed anti-USUV antibodies, including neutralizing antibodies. Overall, these results probe the suitability of IFNAR (-/-) mice as an amenable small animal model for the study of USUV host virus interactions and vaccine testing, as well as the feasibility of DNA-based vaccine strategies for the control of this pathogen.

  15. Immunogenicity and protective efficacy of Semliki forest virus replicon-based DNA vaccines encoding goatpox virus structural proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng Min; Jin Ningyi; Liu Qi; Huo Xiaowei; Li Yang; Hu Bo; Ma Haili; Zhu Zhanbo; Cong Yanzhao; Li Xiao; Jin Minglan; Zhu Guangze

    2009-08-15

    Goatpox, caused by goatpox virus (GTPV), is an acute feverish and contagious disease in goats often associated with high morbidity and high mortality. To resolve potential safety risks and vaccination side effects of existing live attenuated goatpox vaccine (AV41), two Semliki forest virus (SFV) replicon-based bicistronic expression DNA vaccines (pCSm-AAL and pCSm-BAA) which encode GTPV structural proteins corresponding to the Vaccinia virus proteins A27, L1, A33, and B5, respectively, were constructed. Then, theirs ability to induce humoral and cellular response in mice and goats, and protect goats against virulent virus challenge were evaluated. The results showed that, vaccination with pCSm-AAL and pCSm-BAA in combination could elicit strong humoral and cellular responses in mice and goats, provide partial protection against viral challenge in goats, and reduce disease symptoms. Additionally, priming vaccination with the above-mentioned DNA vaccines could significantly reduce the goats' side reactions from boosting vaccinations with current live vaccine (AV41), which include skin lesions at the inoculation site and fevers. Data obtained in this study could not only facilitate improvement of the current goatpox vaccination strategy, but also provide valuable guidance to suitable candidates for evaluation and development of orthopoxvirus vaccines.

  16. Designation of a Novel DKK1 Multiepitope DNA Vaccine and Inhibition of Bone Loss in Collagen-Induced Arthritic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaoqing; Liu, Sibo; Li, Shentao; Du, Yuxuan; Dou, Yunpeng; Li, Zhanguo; Yuan, Huihui; Zhao, Wenming

    2015-01-01

    Dickkopf-1 (DKK1), a secretory inhibitor of canonical Wnt signaling, plays a critical role in certain bone loss diseases. Studies have shown that serum levels of DKK1 are significantly higher in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients and are correlated with the severity of the disease, which indicates the possibility that bone erosion in RA may be inhibited by neutralizing the biological activity of DKK1. In this study, we selected a panel of twelve peptides using the software DNASTAR 7.1 and screened high affinity and immunogenicity epitopes in vitro and in vivo assays. Furthermore, we optimized four B cell epitopes to design a novel DKK1 multiepitope DNA vaccine and evaluated its bone protective effects in collagen-induced arthritis (CIA), a mouse model of RA. High level expression of the designed vaccine was measured in supernatant of COS7 cells. In addition, intramuscular immunization of BALB/c mice with this vaccine was also highly expressed and sufficient to induce the production of long-term IgG, which neutralized natural DKK1 in vivo. Importantly, this vaccine significantly attenuated bone erosion in CIA mice compared with positive control mice. These results provide evidence for the development of a DNA vaccine targeted against DKK1 to attenuate bone erosion. PMID:26075259

  17. Dendritic cell targeted liposomes-protamine-DNA complexes mediated by synthetic mannosylated cholestrol as a potential carrier for DNA vaccine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Pan; Chen, Simu; Jiang, Yuhong; Jiang, Jiayu; Zhang, Zhirong; Sun, Xun

    2013-07-01

    To construct mannosylated liposomes/protamine/DNA (LPD) carriers for DNA vaccine targeting to dendritic cells (DCs), a mannosylated cholesterol derivative (Man-C6-Chol) was synthesized via simple ester linkage and amide bonds. Then, the Man-C6-Chol was applied to LPD formulation as a synthetic ligand. The physicochemical properties of mannosylated LPD (Man-LPD) were first evaluated, including the size and zeta potential, morphology and the ability to protect DNA against DNase I degradation. Man-LPD showed a small size with a stable viral-like structure. In comparison to non-mannose liposomes/LPD (Man-free liposomes/LPD), mannosylated liposomes/LPD (Man-liposomes/Man-LPD) exhibited higher efficiency in both intracellular uptake (2.3-fold) and transfection (4.5-fold) in vitro. Subsequent MTT assays indicated that the LPD carriers had low toxicity on the tested cells. Afterwards, the investigation into the maturation activation on primary bone marrow-derived DCs (BMDCs) showed that both Man-LPD and Man-free LPD induced remarkable up-regulation of CD80, CD86 and CD40 on BMDCs. Inspired by these studies, we can conclude that the synthetic mannosylated LPD targeting to DCs was a potential carrier for DNA vaccine.

  18. The effect of conjugation to gold nanoparticles on the ability of low molecular weight chitosan to transfer DNA vaccine.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xianfeng; Zhang, Xizhen; Yu, Xianghui; Zha, Xiao; Fu, Qiuan; Liu, Bin; Wang, Xueyun; Chen, Yan; Chen, Yue; Shan, Yaming; Jin, Yinghua; Wu, Yongge; Liu, Junqiu; Kong, Wei; Shen, Jiacong

    2008-01-01

    Nonviral gene delivery systems based on conventional high molecular weight chitosans are efficient as DNA vaccine delivery system, but have poor physical properties such as aggregated shapes, low solubility at neutral pH, high viscosity at concentrations used for in vivo delivery and a slow onset of action. Furthermore, Chitosan oligomers shorter than 14 monomers units were recently found to form only weak complexes with DNA, resulting in physically unstable polyplexes in vitro and in vivo. Here, low molecular weight chitosans with an average molecular mass of 6kDa (Chito6) have been covalently attached to gold nanoparticles (GNPs), and the potency of the resulting Chito6-GNPs conjugates as vectors for the delivery of plasmid DNA has been investigated in vitro and in vivo. After delivery by intramuscular immunization in BALB/c mice, the Chito6-GNPs conjugates induced an enhanced serum antibody response 10 times more potent than naked DNA vaccine. Additionally, in contrast to naked DNA, the Chito6-GNPs conjugates induced potent cytotoxic T lymphocyte responses at a low dose.

  19. Ag85A/ESAT-6 chimeric DNA vaccine induces an adverse response in tuberculosis-infected mice

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Yan; Bai, Xuejuang; Zhang, Junxian; Song, Jingying; Yang, Yourong; Yu, Qi; Li, Ning; Wu, Xueqiong

    2016-01-01

    The Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tb) antigens encoded by the 6 kDa early secretory antigenic target (esat-6) and antigen 85A (ag85a) genes are known to exert protective effects against tuberculosis in animal models. In addition, these antigens represent vaccine components that were tested in early human clinical trials. In the present study, a chimeric DNA vaccine was constructed that contained two copies of the esat-6 gene inserted into the ag85a gene from M. tb. BALB/c mice were treated with this chimeric vaccine following infection with either M. tb H37Rv or a clinical multi drug resistant tuberculosis isolate. Treatment of both groups of mice with the chimeric vaccine resulted in accelerated mortality. These findings are in contrast with previous results, which indicated that DNA vaccines expressing the individual antigens were either beneficial or at least not harmful. The results of the present study suggested that the ESAT-6 antigen is not suitable for inclusion in therapeutic vaccines. PMID:27279275

  20. A DNA vaccine encoding Cu,Zn superoxide dismutase of Brucella abortus induces protective immunity in BALB/c mice.

    PubMed

    Oñate, Angel A; Céspedes, Sandra; Cabrera, Alex; Rivers, Rodolfo; González, Andrés; Muñoz, Carola; Folch, Hugo; Andrews, Edilia

    2003-09-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the immunogenicity and protective efficacy of a DNA vaccine encoding Brucella abortus Cu,Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD). Intramuscular injection of plasmid DNA carrying the SOD gene (pcDNA-SOD) into BALB/c mice elicited both humoral and cellular immune responses. Animals injected with pcDNA-SOD developed SOD-specific antibodies which exhibited a dominance of immunoglobulin G2a (IgG2a) over IgG1. In addition, the DNA vaccine elicited a T-cell-proliferative response and also induced the production of gamma interferon, but not interleukin-10 (IL-10) or IL-4, upon restimulation with either recombinant SOD or crude Brucella protein, suggesting the induction of a typical T-helper-1-dominated immune response in mice. The pcDNA-SOD (but not the control vector) induced a strong, significant level of protection in BALB/c mice against challenge with B. abortus virulent strain 2308; the level of protection was similar to the one induced by B. abortus vaccine strain RB51. Altogether, these data suggest that pcDNA-SOD is a good candidate for use in future studies of vaccination against brucellosis.

  1. Salmonella SL7207 application is the most effective DNA vaccine delivery method for successful tumor eradication in a murine model for neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Berger, Elisa; Soldati, Rocio; Huebener, Nicole; Hohn, Oliver; Stermann, Alexander; Durmus, Tahir; Lobitz, Stephan; Zenclussen, Ana C; Christiansen, Holger; Lode, Holger N; Fest, Stefan

    2013-05-01

    Attenuated Salmonella is an approved oral life vaccine that is currently entering pre-clinical cancer vaccination studies as a promising DNA carrier. In a syngeneic mouse model for neuroblastoma, oral gavage of Salmonella typhimurium (SL7207) carrying recent generated survivin DNA vaccines induced a stronger cellular anti-NB immune response than gene gun application or injection of lentivirally transduced bone marrow-derived DCs. The level of Salmonella-associated side effects was not significant as indicated by unaffected survivin-mediated hematopoiesis and wound healing. We believe that our findings provide an important baseline to translate Salmonella-based DNA vaccination into a clinical application for neuroblastoma.

  2. Bivens arm virus: a new rhabdovirus isolated from Culicoides insignis in Florida and related to Tibrogargan virus of Australia.

    PubMed

    Gibbs, E P; Calisher, C H; Tesh, R B; Lazuick, J S; Bowen, R; Greiner, E C

    1989-02-01

    During field studies in 1981 on the transmission of bluetongue viruses in ruminants in Florida, a virus was isolated from Culicoides insignis collected near water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) recently imported from Trinidad. Electron microscopy showed that this isolate, for which the name Bivens Arm virus is proposed, has rhabdovirus morphology. Serologic comparisons were made with recognized rhabdoviruses from terrestrial vertebrates and hematophagous arthropods. Indirect fluorescent antibody, complement fixation and neutralization tests indicated antigenic reactivity between Bivens Arm virus and two rhabdoviruses found only in Australia, Tibrogargan and Coastal Plains viruses. The Australian isolates cause subclinical infections in cattle and water buffalo and are believed to be transmitted by Culicoides. Initially, it was thought that Bivens Arm virus may have been introduced to Florida with the water buffalo from Trinidad, but a serologic survey of cattle serum, collected before the importation of the buffalo revealed antibody to the virus in cattle on farms located in diverse areas of Florida.

  3. A strain of Siniperca chuatsi rhabdovirus causes high mortality among cultured Largemouth Bass in South China.

    PubMed

    Ma, Dongmei; Deng, Guocheng; Bai, Junjie; Li, Shengjie; Yu, Lingyun; Quan, Yingchun; Yang, Xiaojing; Jiang, Xiaoyan; Zhu, Zemin; Ye, Xing

    2013-09-01

    In April 2011, 40% mortality of Largemouth Bass Micropterus salmoides juveniles occurred at a farm of Zhongshan City, Guangdong Province, China. Infected fish became lethargic, exhibited corkscrew and irregular swimming, and developed a distended abdomen and crooked body. Fish began to die within 2 d after the appearance of clinical signs. In order to analyze the pathogeny and diagnose the disease earlier, observation of clinical signs, cell infection, titer calculation, electron microscopy, immersion infection assay for fish, and nucleotide sequence analysis were carried out. Fathead minnow (FHM) cell cultures, inoculated with filtrate of liver and spleen homogenates from the diseased fish, developed the obvious cytopathic effect 46 h after inoculation in the primary culture and 24 h at the first passage. Typical rhabdovirus particles, 115-143 nm in length and 62-78 nm in diameter, were observed in infected FHM cells by direct transmission electron microscopy. The isolated virus produced a titer of 10(7.15) TCID50/mL. Immersion-Fish infected with the virus had similar clinical signs and 80% mortality with 10(2.5) LD50/mL. The data indicated that the rhabdovirus was the lethal pathogeny of the current disease. Based on nucleoprotein-gene nucleotide sequence multiple alignment analysis, the newly isolated virus is a strain of Siniperca chuatsi rhabdovirus (SCRV) under family Rhabdoviridae, which was initially isolated from Mandarin Fish Siniperca chuatsi. Up to the present, at least four virus strains have been isolated from diseased Largemouth Bass, which have had different clinical signs. Comparison of the clinical signs can help in an early diagnosis of the disease. PMID:23915177

  4. A strain of Siniperca chuatsi rhabdovirus causes high mortality among cultured Largemouth Bass in South China.

    PubMed

    Ma, Dongmei; Deng, Guocheng; Bai, Junjie; Li, Shengjie; Yu, Lingyun; Quan, Yingchun; Yang, Xiaojing; Jiang, Xiaoyan; Zhu, Zemin; Ye, Xing

    2013-09-01

    In April 2011, 40% mortality of Largemouth Bass Micropterus salmoides juveniles occurred at a farm of Zhongshan City, Guangdong Province, China. Infected fish became lethargic, exhibited corkscrew and irregular swimming, and developed a distended abdomen and crooked body. Fish began to die within 2 d after the appearance of clinical signs. In order to analyze the pathogeny and diagnose the disease earlier, observation of clinical signs, cell infection, titer calculation, electron microscopy, immersion infection assay for fish, and nucleotide sequence analysis were carried out. Fathead minnow (FHM) cell cultures, inoculated with filtrate of liver and spleen homogenates from the diseased fish, developed the obvious cytopathic effect 46 h after inoculation in the primary culture and 24 h at the first passage. Typical rhabdovirus particles, 115-143 nm in length and 62-78 nm in diameter, were observed in infected FHM cells by direct transmission electron microscopy. The isolated virus produced a titer of 10(7.15) TCID50/mL. Immersion-Fish infected with the virus had similar clinical signs and 80% mortality with 10(2.5) LD50/mL. The data indicated that the rhabdovirus was the lethal pathogeny of the current disease. Based on nucleoprotein-gene nucleotide sequence multiple alignment analysis, the newly isolated virus is a strain of Siniperca chuatsi rhabdovirus (SCRV) under family Rhabdoviridae, which was initially isolated from Mandarin Fish Siniperca chuatsi. Up to the present, at least four virus strains have been isolated from diseased Largemouth Bass, which have had different clinical signs. Comparison of the clinical signs can help in an early diagnosis of the disease.

  5. Isolation and identification of a lethal rhabdovirus from farmed rice field eels Monopterus albus.

    PubMed

    Ou, Tong; Zhu, Ruo-Lin; Chen, Zhong-Yuan; Zhang, Qi-Ya

    2013-11-01

    We provide the first description of a virus responsible for a systemic hemorrhagic disease causing high mortality in farmed rice field eels Monopterus albus in China. Typical signs exhibited by the diseased fish were extensive hemorrhages in the skin and viscera and some neurological signs, such as loss of equilibrium and disorganized swimming. Histopathological examination revealed various degrees of necrosis within the spleen and liver. Virus isolation was attempted from visceral tissues of diseased fish by inoculation on 6 fish cell lines. Typical cytopathic effects (CPE) were produced in bluegill fry (BF2) cells, so this cell line was chosen for further isolation and propagation of the virus. Electron microscopy observation showed that the negative stained viral particles had the characteristic bullet shape of rhabdoviruses and an estimated size of 60 × 120 nm. We therefore tentatively refer to this virus as Monopterus albus rhabdovirus (MoARV). Molecular characterization of MoARV, including sequence analysis of the nucleoprotein (N), phosphoprotein (P), and glycoprotein (G) genes, revealed 94.5 to 97.3% amino acid similarity to that of Siniperca chuatsi rhabdovirus. Phylogenetic analysis based on the amino acid sequences of N and G proteins indicated that MoARV should be a member of the genus Vesiculovirus. Koch's postulates were fulfilled by infecting healthy rice field eels with MoARV, which produced an acute infection. RT-PCR analysis demonstrated that MoARV RNA could be detected in both naturally and experimentally infected fish. The data suggest that MoARV was the causative pathogen of the disease.

  6. Antiviral Biologic Produced in DNA Vaccine/Goose Platform Protects Hamsters Against Hantavirus Pulmonary Syndrome When Administered Post-exposure

    PubMed Central

    Henderson, Thomas; Nilles, Matthew L.; Kwilas, Steve A.; Josleyn, Matthew D.; Hammerbeck, Christopher D.; Schiltz, James; Royals, Michael; Ballantyne, John; Hooper, Jay W.; Bradley, David S.

    2015-01-01

    Andes virus (ANDV) and ANDV-like viruses are responsible for most hantavirus pulmonary syndrome (HPS) cases in South America. Recent studies in Chile indicate that passive transfer of convalescent human plasma shows promise as a possible treatment for HPS. Unfortunately, availability of convalescent plasma from survivors of this lethal disease is very limited. We are interested in exploring the concept of using DNA vaccine technology to produce antiviral biologics, including polyclonal neutralizing antibodies for use in humans. Geese produce IgY and an alternatively spliced form, IgYΔFc, that can be purified at high concentrations from egg yolks. IgY lacks the properties of mammalian Fc that make antibodies produced in horses, sheep, and rabbits reactogenic in humans. Geese were vaccinated with an ANDV DNA vaccine encoding the virus envelope glycoproteins. All geese developed high-titer neutralizing antibodies after the second vaccination, and maintained high-levels of neutralizing antibodies as measured by a pseudovirion neutralization assay (PsVNA) for over 1 year. A booster vaccination resulted in extraordinarily high levels of neutralizing antibodies (i.e., PsVNA80 titers >100,000). Analysis of IgY and IgYΔFc by epitope mapping show these antibodies to be highly reactive to specific amino acid sequences of ANDV envelope glycoproteins. We examined the protective efficacy of the goose-derived antibody in the hamster model of lethal HPS. α-ANDV immune sera, or IgY/IgYΔFc purified from eggs, were passively transferred to hamsters subcutaneously starting 5 days after an IM challenge with ANDV (25 LD50). Both immune sera, and egg-derived purified IgY/IgYΔFc, protected 8 of 8 and 7 of 8 hamsters, respectively. In contrast, all hamsters receiving IgY/IgYΔFc purified from normal geese (n=8), or no-treatment (n=8), developed lethal HPS. These findings demonstrate that the DNA vaccine/goose platform can be used to produce a candidate antiviral biological product

  7. Antiviral Biologic Produced in DNA Vaccine/Goose Platform Protects Hamsters Against Hantavirus Pulmonary Syndrome When Administered Post-exposure.

    PubMed

    Haese, Nicole; Brocato, Rebecca L; Henderson, Thomas; Nilles, Matthew L; Kwilas, Steve A; Josleyn, Matthew D; Hammerbeck, Christopher D; Schiltz, James; Royals, Michael; Ballantyne, John; Hooper, Jay W; Bradley, David S

    2015-01-01

    Andes virus (ANDV) and ANDV-like viruses are responsible for most hantavirus pulmonary syndrome (HPS) cases in South America. Recent studies in Chile indicate that passive transfer of convalescent human plasma shows promise as a possible treatment for HPS. Unfortunately, availability of convalescent plasma from survivors of this lethal disease is very limited. We are interested in exploring the concept of using DNA vaccine technology to produce antiviral biologics, including polyclonal neutralizing antibodies for use in humans. Geese produce IgY and an alternatively spliced form, IgYΔFc, that can be purified at high concentrations from egg yolks. IgY lacks the properties of mammalian Fc that make antibodies produced in horses, sheep, and rabbits reactogenic in humans. Geese were vaccinated with an ANDV DNA vaccine encoding the virus envelope glycoproteins. All geese developed high-titer neutralizing antibodies after the second vaccination, and maintained high-levels of neutralizing antibodies as measured by a pseudovirion neutralization assay (PsVNA) for over 1 year. A booster vaccination resulted in extraordinarily high levels of neutralizing antibodies (i.e., PsVNA80 titers >100,000). Analysis of IgY and IgYΔFc by epitope mapping show these antibodies to be highly reactive to specific amino acid sequences of ANDV envelope glycoproteins. We examined the protective efficacy of the goose-derived antibody in the hamster model of lethal HPS. α-ANDV immune sera, or IgY/IgYΔFc purified from eggs, were passively transferred to hamsters subcutaneously starting 5 days after an IM challenge with ANDV (25 LD50). Both immune sera, and egg-derived purified IgY/IgYΔFc, protected 8 of 8 and 7 of 8 hamsters, respectively. In contrast, all hamsters receiving IgY/IgYΔFc purified from normal geese (n=8), or no-treatment (n=8), developed lethal HPS. These findings demonstrate that the DNA vaccine/goose platform can be used to produce a candidate antiviral biological product

  8. Persistent natural infection of a Culex tritaeniorhynchus cell line with a novel Culex tritaeniorhynchus rhabdovirus strain.

    PubMed

    Gillich, Nadine; Kuwata, Ryusei; Isawa, Haruhiko; Horie, Masayuki

    2015-09-01

    Culex tritaeniorhynchus rhabdovirus (CTRV) is a mosquito virus that establishes persistent infection without any obvious cell death. Therefore, occult infection by CTRV can be present in mosquito cell lines. In this study, it is shown that NIID-CTR cells, which were derived from Cx. tritaeniorhynchus, are persistently infected with a novel strain of CTRV. Complete genome sequencing of the infecting strain revealed that it is genetically similar but distinct from the previously isolated CTRV strain, excluding the possibility of contamination. These findings raise the importance of further CTRV studies, such as screening of CTRV in other mosquito cell lines.

  9. Recruitment of Antigen-Presenting Cells to the Site of Inoculation and Augmentation of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 DNA Vaccine Immunogenicity by In Vivo Electroporation▿

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jinyan; Kjeken, Rune; Mathiesen, Iacob; Barouch, Dan H.

    2008-01-01

    In vivo electroporation (EP) has been shown to augment the immunogenicity of plasmid DNA vaccines, but its mechanism of action has not been fully characterized. In this study, we show that in vivo EP augmented cellular and humoral immune responses to a human immunodeficiency virus type 1 Env DNA vaccine in mice and allowed a 10-fold reduction in vaccine dose. This enhancement was durable for over 6 months, and re-exposure to antigen resulted in anamnestic effector and central memory CD8+ T-lymphocyte responses. Interestingly, in vivo EP also recruited large mixed cellular inflammatory infiltrates to the site of inoculation. These infiltrates contained 45-fold-increased numbers of macrophages and 77-fold-increased numbers of dendritic cells as well as 2- to 6-fold-increased numbers of B and T lymphocytes compared to infiltrates following DNA vaccination alone. These data suggest that recruiting inflammatory cells, including antigen-presenting cells (APCs), to the site of antigen production substantially improves the immunogenicity of DNA vaccines. Combining in vivo EP with plasmid chemokine adjuvants that similarly recruited APCs to the injection site, however, did not result in synergy. PMID:18353952

  10. Nanoparticle formulation enhanced protective immunity provoked by PYGPI8p-transamidase related protein (PyTAM) DNA vaccine in Plasmodium yoelii malaria model.

    PubMed

    Cherif, Mahamoud Sama; Shuaibu, Mohammed Nasir; Kodama, Yukinobu; Kurosaki, Tomoaki; Helegbe, Gideon Kofi; Kikuchi, Mihoko; Ichinose, Akitoyo; Yanagi, Tetsuo; Sasaki, Hitoshi; Yui, Katsuyuki; Tien, Nguyen Huy; Karbwang, Juntra; Hirayama, Kenji

    2014-04-01

    We have previously reported the new formulation of polyethylimine (PEI) with gamma polyglutamic acid (γ-PGA) nanoparticle (NP) to have provided Plasmodium yoelii merozoite surface protein-1 (PyMSP-1) plasmid DNA vaccine with enhanced protective cellular and humoral immunity in the lethal mouse malaria model. PyGPI8p-transamidase-related protein (PyTAM) was selected as a possible candidate vaccine antigen by using DNA vaccination screening from 29 GPI anchor and signal sequence motif positive genes picked up using web-based bioinformatics tools; though the observed protection was not complete. Here, we observed augmented protective effect of PyTAM DNA vaccine by using PEI and γ-PGA complex as delivery system. NP-coated PyTAM plasmid DNA immunized mice showed a significant survival rate from lethal P. yoelii challenge infection compared with naked PyTAM plasmid or with NP-coated empty plasmid DNA group. Antigen-specific IgG1 and IgG2b subclass antibody levels, proportion of CD4 and CD8T cells producing IFN-γ in the splenocytes and IL-4, IFN-γ, IL-12 and TNF-α levels in the sera and in the supernatants from ex vivo splenocytes culture were all enhanced by the NP-coated PyTAM DNA vaccine. These data indicates that NP augments PyTAM protective immune response, and this enhancement was associated with increased DC activation and concomitant IL-12 production.

  11. A HIV-Tat/C4-binding protein chimera encoded by a DNA vaccine is highly immunogenic and contains acute EcoHIV infection in mice.

    PubMed

    Tomusange, Khamis; Wijesundara, Danushka; Gummow, Jason; Garrod, Tamsin; Li, Yanrui; Gray, Lachlan; Churchill, Melissa; Grubor-Bauk, Branka; Gowans, Eric J

    2016-01-01

    DNA vaccines are cost-effective to manufacture on a global scale and Tat-based DNA vaccines have yielded protective outcomes in preclinical and clinical models of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), highlighting the potential of such vaccines. However, Tat-based DNA vaccines have been poorly immunogenic, and despite the administration of multiple doses and/or the addition of adjuvants, these vaccines are not in general use. In this study, we improved Tat immunogenicity by fusing it with the oligomerisation domain of a chimeric C4-binding protein (C4b-p), termed IMX313, resulting in Tat heptamerisation and linked Tat to the leader sequence of tissue plasminogen activator (TPA) to ensure that the bulk of heptamerised Tat is secreted. Mice vaccinated with secreted Tat fused to IMX313 (pVAX-sTat-IMX313) developed higher titres of Tat-specific serum IgG, mucosal sIgA and cell-mediated immune (CMI) responses, and showed superior control of EcoHIV infection, a surrogate murine HIV challenge model, compared with animals vaccinated with other test vaccines. Given the crucial contribution of Tat to HIV-1 pathogenesis and the precedent of Tat-based DNA vaccines in conferring some level of protection in animal models, we believe that the virologic control demonstrated with this novel multimerised Tat vaccine highlights the promise of this vaccine candidate for humans.

  12. Enhancing immune responses of EV71 VP1 DNA vaccine by co-inoculating plasmid IL-12 or GM-CSF expressing vector in mice.

    PubMed

    Peng, X; Fang, X; Li, J; Kong, L; Li, B; Ding, X

    2016-01-01

    Enterovirus 71 (EV71) is a major causative viral agent for large outbreaks of hand, foot, and mouth disease in children and infants, yet there is no vaccine or effective antiviral treatment for severe EV71 infection. The immunogenicity of EV71 VP1 DNA vaccine and the immunoregulatory activity of interleukin-12 (IL-12) or granulocyte-monocyte colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) were investigated. DNA vaccine plasmids, pcDNA-VP1, pcDNA-IL-12 and pcDNA-GM-CSF were constructed and inoculated into BALB/c mice with or without pcDNA-IL-12 or pcDNA-GM-CSF by intramuscular injection. Cellular and humoral immune responses were assessed by indirect ELISA, lymphocyte proliferation assays, cytokine release assay and FACS. The VP1 DNA vaccine had good immunogenicity and can induce specific humoral and cellular immunity in BALB/c mice, while IL-2 or GM-CSF plays an immunoadjuvant role and enhances specific immune responses. This study provides a frame of reference for the design of DNA vaccines against EV71. PMID:27188732

  13. A HIV-Tat/C4-binding protein chimera encoded by a DNA vaccine is highly immunogenic and contains acute EcoHIV infection in mice.

    PubMed

    Tomusange, Khamis; Wijesundara, Danushka; Gummow, Jason; Garrod, Tamsin; Li, Yanrui; Gray, Lachlan; Churchill, Melissa; Grubor-Bauk, Branka; Gowans, Eric J

    2016-01-01

    DNA vaccines are cost-effective to manufacture on a global scale and Tat-based DNA vaccines have yielded protective outcomes in preclinical and clinical models of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), highlighting the potential of such vaccines. However, Tat-based DNA vaccines have been poorly immunogenic, and despite the administration of multiple doses and/or the addition of adjuvants, these vaccines are not in general use. In this study, we improved Tat immunogenicity by fusing it with the oligomerisation domain of a chimeric C4-binding protein (C4b-p), termed IMX313, resulting in Tat heptamerisation and linked Tat to the leader sequence of tissue plasminogen activator (TPA) to ensure that the bulk of heptamerised Tat is secreted. Mice vaccinated with secreted Tat fused to IMX313 (pVAX-sTat-IMX313) developed higher titres of Tat-specific serum IgG, mucosal sIgA and cell-mediated immune (CMI) responses, and showed superior control of EcoHIV infection, a surrogate murine HIV challenge model, compared with animals vaccinated with other test vaccines. Given the crucial contribution of Tat to HIV-1 pathogenesis and the precedent of Tat-based DNA vaccines in conferring some level of protection in animal models, we believe that the virologic control demonstrated with this novel multimerised Tat vaccine highlights the promise of this vaccine candidate for humans. PMID:27358023

  14. A novel dendritic-cell-targeting DNA vaccine for hepatitis B induces T cell and humoral immune responses and potentiates the antivirus activity in HBV transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Yu, Debin; Liu, Hong; Shi, Shuai; Dong, Liwei; Wang, Hongge; Wu, Nuoting; Gao, Hui; Cheng, Zhaojun; Zheng, Qun; Cai, Jiaojiao; Zou, Libo; Zou, Zhihua

    2015-12-01

    Strategies for inducing an effective immune response following vaccination have focused on targeting antigens to dendritic cells (DCs) through the DC-specific surface molecule DEC-205. The immunogenicity and efficacy of DNA vaccination can also be enhanced by fusing the encoded antigen to single-chain antibodies directed against DEC-205. Here, we investigated this promising approach for its enhancement of hepatitis B virus (HBV)-specific cellular and humoral immune responses and its antiviral effects in HBV transgenic mice. A plasmid DNA vaccine encoding mouse DEC-205 single-chain fragment variable (mDEC-205-scFv) linked with the hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) was constructed. Vaccination with this fusion DNA vaccine in HBV transgenic mice induced robust antiviral T cell and antibody immunity against HBsAg. The levels of serum-circulating HBsAg and the HBV DNA copy number were downregulated by the induction of a higher HBsAg-specific response. Thus, in this study, we demonstrated the therapeutic efficacy of the novel mDEC-205-scFv-fused DNA vaccine in a mouse model of immune-tolerant, chronic HBV infection.

  15. Enhancing immune responses of EV71 VP1 DNA vaccine by co-inoculating plasmid IL-12 or GM-CSF expressing vector in mice.

    PubMed

    Peng, X; Fang, X; Li, J; Kong, L; Li, B; Ding, X

    2016-01-01

    Enterovirus 71 (EV71) is a major causative viral agent for large outbreaks of hand, foot, and mouth disease in children and infants, yet there is no vaccine or effective antiviral treatment for severe EV71 infection. The immunogenicity of EV71 VP1 DNA vaccine and the immunoregulatory activity of interleukin-12 (IL-12) or granulocyte-monocyte colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) were investigated. DNA vaccine plasmids, pcDNA-VP1, pcDNA-IL-12 and pcDNA-GM-CSF were constructed and inoculated into BALB/c mice with or without pcDNA-IL-12 or pcDNA-GM-CSF by intramuscular injection. Cellular and humoral immune responses were assessed by indirect ELISA, lymphocyte proliferation assays, cytokine release assay and FACS. The VP1 DNA vaccine had good immunogenicity and can induce specific humoral and cellular immunity in BALB/c mice, while IL-2 or GM-CSF plays an immunoadjuvant role and enhances specific immune responses. This study provides a frame of reference for the design of DNA vaccines against EV71.

  16. [DNA vaccination via in vivo electroporation can elicit specific immune response against highly pathogenic H5N1 influenza viral structural antigens in mice].

    PubMed

    Wang, Wen; Chen, Hong; Tan, Wen-jie; Deng, Yao; Wang, Min; Liu, Yuan; Yin, Xiao; Zhang, Ke; Guan, Jie; Zhou, Jian-fang; Shu, Yue-long; Ruan, Li

    2010-05-01

    This study aims to develop inexpensive and effective experimental vaccines against highly pathogenic H5N1 Avian Influenza (HPAI) virus and to optimize their immunization programs. To this end, we first synthesized the codon-optimized hemagglutinin gene (HAop) and neuraminidase gene (NAop), both of which were derived from a H5N1 virus (Anhui strain), and constructed successfully the DNA vaccines containing a single cistronic construct (HAwt, HAop, or NAop) or a bicistronic construct (HAop/M2 or NAop/M1) of H5N1 influenza virus origin. Their expression was confirmed by indirect immunofluorescent assay (IFA) and Western blotting. Then twice vaccination of mice with the DNA vaccines by injection intramuscularly or in vivo electroporation (EP) via two different routes was evaluated and analyzed by hemagglutination inhibition (HI) assay, NA-specific antibody detection, micro-neutralizing antibody test and IFN-gamma ELISpot assay. Our results showed that the DNA vaccines with coden-optimized HAop and NAop constructs could quickly elicit a strong immune response by in vivo EP, especially the cellular immune response against HA and NA; the in vivo EP via intradermal route induced stronger humoral immune responses than those via intramuscular route. Our findings will pave a way for further development of novel DNA-based H5N1 vaccine and for the optimization of the immunization programs of DNA vaccine. PMID:20572336

  17. A HIV-Tat/C4-binding protein chimera encoded by a DNA vaccine is highly immunogenic and contains acute EcoHIV infection in mice

    PubMed Central

    Tomusange, Khamis; Wijesundara, Danushka; Gummow, Jason; Garrod, Tamsin; Li, Yanrui; Gray, Lachlan; Churchill, Melissa; Grubor-Bauk, Branka; Gowans, Eric J.

    2016-01-01

    DNA vaccines are cost-effective to manufacture on a global scale and Tat-based DNA vaccines have yielded protective outcomes in preclinical and clinical models of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), highlighting the potential of such vaccines. However, Tat-based DNA vaccines have been poorly immunogenic, and despite the administration of multiple doses and/or the addition of adjuvants, these vaccines are not in general use. In this study, we improved Tat immunogenicity by fusing it with the oligomerisation domain of a chimeric C4-binding protein (C4b-p), termed IMX313, resulting in Tat heptamerisation and linked Tat to the leader sequence of tissue plasminogen activator (TPA) to ensure that the bulk of heptamerised Tat is secreted. Mice vaccinated with secreted Tat fused to IMX313 (pVAX-sTat-IMX313) developed higher titres of Tat-specific serum IgG, mucosal sIgA and cell-mediated immune (CMI) responses, and showed superior control of EcoHIV infection, a surrogate murine HIV challenge model, compared with animals vaccinated with other test vaccines. Given the crucial contribution of Tat to HIV-1 pathogenesis and the precedent of Tat-based DNA vaccines in conferring some level of protection in animal models, we believe that the virologic control demonstrated with this novel multimerised Tat vaccine highlights the promise of this vaccine candidate for humans. PMID:27358023

  18. A hantavirus pulmonary syndrome (HPS) DNA vaccine delivered using a spring-powered jet injector elicits a potent neutralizing antibody response in rabbits and nonhuman primates.

    PubMed

    Kwilas, Steve; Kishimori, Jennifer M; Josleyn, Matthew; Jerke, Kurt; Ballantyne, John; Royals, Michael; Hooper, Jay W

    2014-01-01

    Sin Nombre virus (SNV) and Andes virus (ANDV) cause most of the hantavirus pulmonary syndrome (HPS) cases in North and South America, respectively. The chances of a patient surviving HPS are only two in three. Previously, we demonstrated that SNV and ANDV DNA vaccines encoding the virus envelope glycoproteins elicit high-titer neutralizing antibodies in laboratory animals, and (for ANDV) in nonhuman primates (NHPs). In those studies, the vaccines were delivered by gene gun or muscle electroporation. Here, we tested whether a combined SNV/ANDV DNA vaccine (HPS DNA vaccine) could be delivered effectively using a disposable syringe jet injection (DSJI) system (PharmaJet, Inc). PharmaJet intramuscular (IM) and intradermal (ID) needle-free devices are FDA 510(k)-cleared, simple to use, and do not require electricity or pressurized gas. First, we tested the SNV DNA vaccine delivered by PharmaJet IM or ID devices in rabbits and NHPs. Both IM and ID devices produced high-titer anti-SNV neutralizing antibody responses in rabbits and NHPs. However, the ID device required at least two vaccinations in NHP to detect neutralizing antibodies in most animals, whereas all animals vaccinated once with the IM device seroconverted. Because the IM device was more effective in NHP, the Stratis(®) (PharmaJet IM device) was selected for follow-up studies. We evaluated the HPS DNA vaccine delivered using Stratis(®) and found that it produced high-titer anti-SNV and anti-ANDV neutralizing antibodies in rabbits (n=8/group) as measured by a classic plaque reduction neutralization test and a new pseudovirion neutralization assay. We were interested in determining if the differences between DSJI delivery (e.g., high-velocity liquid penetration through tissue) and other methods of vaccine injection, such as needle/syringe, might result in a more immunogenic DNA vaccine. To accomplish this, we compared the HPS DNA vaccine delivered by DSJI versus needle/syringe in NHPs (n=8/group). We found

  19. Codon-optimized filovirus DNA vaccines delivered by intramuscular electroporation protect cynomolgus macaques from lethal Ebola and Marburg virus challenges.

    PubMed

    Grant-Klein, Rebecca J; Altamura, Louis A; Badger, Catherine V; Bounds, Callie E; Van Deusen, Nicole M; Kwilas, Steven A; Vu, Hong A; Warfield, Kelly L; Hooper, Jay W; Hannaman, Drew; Dupuy, Lesley C; Schmaljohn, Connie S

    2015-01-01

    Cynomolgus macaques were vaccinated by intramuscular electroporation with DNA plasmids expressing codon-optimized glycoprotein (GP) genes of Ebola virus (EBOV) or Marburg virus (MARV) or a combination of codon-optimized GP DNA vaccines for EBOV, MARV, Sudan virus and Ravn virus. When measured by ELISA, the individual vaccines elicited slightly higher IgG responses to EBOV or MARV than did the combination vaccines. No significant differences in immune responses of macaques given the individual or combination vaccines were measured by pseudovirion neutralization or IFN-γ ELISpot assays. Both the MARV and mixed vaccines were able to protect macaques from lethal MARV challenge (5/6 vs. 6/6). In contrast, a greater proportion of macaques vaccinated with the EBOV vaccine survived lethal EBOV challenge in comparison to those that received the mixed vaccine (5/6 vs. 1/6). EBOV challenge survivors had significantly higher pre-challenge neutralizing antibody titers than those that succumbed. PMID:25996997

  20. Glycoprotein-Specific Antibodies Produced by DNA Vaccination Protect Guinea Pigs from Lethal Argentine and Venezuelan Hemorrhagic Fever

    PubMed Central

    Golden, Joseph W.; Maes, Piet; Kwilas, Steven A.; Ballantyne, John

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Several members of the Arenaviridae can cause acute febrile diseases in humans, often resulting in lethality. The use of convalescent-phase human plasma is an effective treatment in humans infected with arenaviruses, particularly species found in South America. Despite this, little work has focused on developing potent and defined immunotherapeutics against arenaviruses. In the present study, we produced arenavirus neutralizing antibodies by DNA vaccination of rabbits with plasmids encoding the full-length glycoprotein precursors of Junín virus (JUNV), Machupo virus (MACV), and Guanarito virus (GTOV). Geometric mean neutralizing antibody titers, as measured by the 50% plaque reduction neutralization test (PRNT50), exceeded 5,000 against homologous viruses. Antisera against each targeted virus exhibited limited cross-species binding and, to a lesser extent, cross-neutralization. Anti-JUNV glycoprotein rabbit antiserum protected Hartley guinea pigs from lethal intraperitoneal infection with JUNV strain Romero when the antiserum was administered 2 days after challenge and provided some protection (∼30%) when administered 4 days after challenge. Treatment starting on day 6 did not protect animals. We further formulated an IgG antibody cocktail by combining anti-JUNV, -MACV, and -GTOV antibodies produced in DNA-vaccinated rabbits. This cocktail protected 100% of guinea pigs against JUNV and GTOV lethal disease. We then expanded on this cocktail approach by simultaneously vaccinating rabbits with a combination of plasmids encoding glycoproteins from JUNV, MACV, GTOV, and Sabia virus (SABV). Sera collected from rabbits vaccinated with the combination vaccine neutralized all four targets. These findings support the concept of using a DNA vaccine approach to generate a potent pan-arenavirus immunotherapeutic. IMPORTANCE Arenaviruses are an important family of emerging viruses. In infected humans, convalescent-phase plasma containing neutralizing antibodies can

  1. Vector optimization and needle-free intradermal application of a broadly protective polyvalent influenza A DNA vaccine for pigs and humans.

    PubMed

    Borggren, Marie; Nielsen, Jens; Bragstad, Karoline; Karlsson, Ingrid; Krog, Jesper S; Williams, James A; Fomsgaard, Anders

    2015-01-01

    The threat posed by the 2009 pandemic H1N1 virus emphasized the need for new influenza A virus vaccines inducing a broad cross-protective immune response for use in both humans and pigs. An effective and broad influenza vaccine for pigs would greatly benefit the pork industry and contribute to public health by diminishing the risk of emerging highly pathogenic reassortants. Current inactivated protein vaccines against swine influenza produce only short-lived immunity and have no efficacy against heterologous strains. DNA vaccines are a potential alternative with advantages such as the induction of cellular and humoral immunity, inherent safety and rapid production time. We have previously developed a DNA vaccine encoding selected influenza proteins of pandemic origin and demonstrated broad protective immune responses in ferrets and pigs. In this study, we evaluated our DNA vaccine expressed by next-generation vectors. These new vectors can improve gene expression, but they are also efficiently produced on large scales and comply with regulatory guidelines by avoiding antibiotic resistance genes. In addition, a new needle-free delivery of the vaccine, convenient for mass vaccinations, was compared with intradermal needle injection followed by electroporation. We report that when our DNA vaccine is expressed by the new vectors and delivered to the skin with the needle-free device in the rabbit model, it can elicit an antibody response with the same titers as a conventional vector with intradermal electroporation. The needle-free delivery is already in use for traditional protein vaccines in pigs but should be considered as a practical alternative for the mass administration of broadly protective influenza DNA vaccines. PMID:25746201

  2. Enhanced efficacy of DNA vaccination against botulinum neurotoxin serotype A by co-administration of plasmids encoding DC-stimulating Flt3L and MIP-3α cytokines.

    PubMed

    Xu, Qing; Zhu, Yu-Feng; Wang, Hai-Chao; Gong, Zheng-Wei; Yu, Yun-Zhou

    2016-09-01

    Targeting antigens encoded by DNA vaccines to the key antigen-presenting cells by chemotactic or growth factors, is an effective strategy for enhancing the potency of DNA vaccinations. Here, we report the effects of chemotactic or growth factors on a DNA vaccine against botulinum neurotoxin serotype A (BoNT/A) in a mouse model. We demonstrated that mice immunized with DNA constructs encoding the Hc domain of BoNT/A (AHc) fused with DC-stimulating Flt3L or MIP-3α cytokines failed to elicit an enhanced or efficacious AHc-specific humoral or protective response in mice. However, the potency of DNA vaccination was significantly modulated and enhanced by co-administration of AHc-expressing DNA with pFlt3L or pMIP-3α, which generated strong immune and protective responses against BoNT/A. Moreover, the enhanced potency was further boosted by co-administration of AHc-expressing DNA with the combination of pFlt3L and pMIP-3α in mice, but not with the Flt3L-MIP-3α fusion molecule, which indicated that co-immunization with both pFlt3L and pMIP-3α could synergistically enhance AHc-specific immune and protective responses against BoNT/A. In summary, our findings indicate that co-administration of plasmids encoding antigen and cytokine rather than administration of plasmids encoding cytokine-antigen fusion is effective to enhance the potency of AHc-expressing DNA vaccine.

  3. Vector optimization and needle-free intradermal application of a broadly protective polyvalent influenza A DNA vaccine for pigs and humans.

    PubMed

    Borggren, Marie; Nielsen, Jens; Bragstad, Karoline; Karlsson, Ingrid; Krog, Jesper S; Williams, James A; Fomsgaard, Anders

    2015-01-01

    The threat posed by the 2009 pandemic H1N1 virus emphasized the need for new influenza A virus vaccines inducing a broad cross-protective immune response for use in both humans and pigs. An effective and broad influenza vaccine for pigs would greatly benefit the pork industry and contribute to public health by diminishing the risk of emerging highly pathogenic reassortants. Current inactivated protein vaccines against swine influenza produce only short-lived immunity and have no efficacy against heterologous strains. DNA vaccines are a potential alternative with advantages such as the induction of cellular and humoral immunity, inherent safety and rapid production time. We have previously developed a DNA vaccine encoding selected influenza proteins of pandemic origin and demonstrated broad protective immune responses in ferrets and pigs. In this study, we evaluated our DNA vaccine expressed by next-generation vectors. These new vectors can improve gene expression, but they are also efficiently produced on large scales and comply with regulatory guidelines by avoiding antibiotic resistance genes. In addition, a new needle-free delivery of the vaccine, convenient for mass vaccinations, was compared with intradermal needle injection followed by electroporation. We report that when our DNA vaccine is expressed by the new vectors and delivered to the skin with the needle-free device in the rabbit model, it can elicit an antibody response with the same titers as a conventional vector with intradermal electroporation. The needle-free delivery is already in use for traditional protein vaccines in pigs but should be considered as a practical alternative for the mass administration of broadly protective influenza DNA vaccines.

  4. Enhanced Immune Response to DNA Vaccine Encoding Bacillus anthracis PA-D4 Protects Mice against Anthrax Spore Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Na Young; Chang, Dong Suk; Kim, Yeonsu; Kim, Chang Hwan; Hur, Gyeung Haeng; Yang, Jai Myung; Shin, Sungho

    2015-01-01

    Anthrax has long been considered the most probable bioweapon-induced disease. The protective antigen (PA) of Bacillus anthracis plays a crucial role in the pathogenesis of anthrax. In the current study, we evaluated the efficiency of a genetic vaccination with the fourth domain (D4) of PA, which is responsible for initial binding of the anthrax toxin to the cellular receptor. The eukaryotic expression vector was designed with the immunoglobulin M (IgM) signal sequence encoding for PA-D4, which contains codon-optimized genes. The expression and secretion of recombinant protein was confirmed in vitro in 293T cells transfected with plasmid and detected by western blotting, confocal microscopy, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The results revealed that PA-D4 protein can be efficiently expressed and secreted at high levels into the culture medium. When plasmid DNA was given intramuscularly to mice, a significant PA-D4-specific antibody response was induced. Importantly, high titers of antibodies were maintained for nearly 1 year. Furthermore, incorporation of the SV40 enhancer in the plasmid DNA resulted in approximately a 15-fold increase in serum antibody levels in comparison with the plasmid without enhancer. The antibodies produced were predominantly the immunoglobulin G2 (IgG2) type, indicating the predominance of the Th1 response. In addition, splenocytes collected from immunized mice produced PA-D4-specific interferon gamma (IFN-γ). The biodistribution study showed that plasmid DNA was detected in most organs and it rapidly cleared from the injection site. Finally, DNA vaccination with electroporation induced a significant increase in immunogenicity and successfully protected the mice against anthrax spore challenge. Our approach to enhancing the immune response contributes to the development of DNA vaccines against anthrax and other biothreats. PMID:26430894

  5. A DNA vaccine encoding CCL4/MIP-1beta enhances myocarditis in experimental Trypanosoma cruzi infection in rats.

    PubMed

    Roffê, Ester; Souza, Adriano L S; Caetano, Bráulia C; Machado, Patrícia P; Barcelos, Lucíola S; Russo, Remo C; Santiago, Helton C; Souza, Danielle G; Pinho, Vanessa; Tanowitz, Herbert B; Camargos, Elisabeth R S; Bruña-Romero, Oscar; Teixeira, Mauro M

    2006-10-01

    Chagas' disease, caused by Trypanosoma cruzi, is a major cause of cardiovascular disease in Latin America. Exacerbated inflammation disproportional to parasite load characterizes chronic myocardial lesions in chagasic patients. Chemokines and their receptors are expected to account for the renewed inflammatory processes after the inoculation of the parasite, but their potential unique functions are far from being clear. Herein, we evaluated the effect of a DNA vaccine encoding CCL4/MIP-1beta, a CC-chemokine, in T. cruzi-elicited myocarditis in rats. Holtzman rats were given intramuscularly cardiotoxin and the CCL4/MIP-1beta DNA-containing plasmid (100microg) was delivered in this muscular site four times. Fourteen days after last immunization, animals were inoculated with a myotropical CL-Brener T. cruzi clone. Peak of parasitism was observed at day 15 after infection, preceding the peak of myocardial inflammation at day 20. Myocarditis was still intense at day 30, but the inflammatory infiltrates showed a more focal distribution. The expression of CCL2/MCP-1 and CCL4/MIP-1beta correlated closely with the kinetics of myocardial inflammation. The CCL4/MIP-1beta DNA vaccine induced an increase of the levels of the anti-CCL4/MIP-1beta observed in T. cruzi-infected animals. This was associated with an exacerbation of myocardial inflammation and fibrosis, although alterations in parasitemia and myocardial parasitism were not observed. Our data suggest that CCL4/MIP-1beta plays a role in preventing excessive inflammation and pathology rather than in controlling parasite replication.

  6. Evaluation of a chimeric multi-epitope-based DNA vaccine against subgroup J avian leukosis virus in chickens.

    PubMed

    Xu, Qingqing; Cui, Ning; Ma, Xingjiang; Wang, Fangkun; Li, Hongmei; Shen, Zhiqiang; Zhao, Xiaomin

    2016-07-19

    The prokaryotic expressed recombinant chimeric multi-epitope protein X (rCMEPX) had been evaluated with good immunogenicity and protective efficacy against subgroup J avian leukosis virus (ALV-J) in our previous study. In the present research, we cloned the chimeric multi-epitope gene X into the eukaryotic expression vector pVAX1 to evaluate its potency as a DNA vaccine. The purified recombinant gp85 protein and rCMEPX were used as positive controls and a DNA prime-protein boost strategy was also studied. Six experimental groups of 7-day-old chickens (20 per group) were immunized intramuscularly three times at 2weeks interval with PBS, gp85, rCMEPX, pVAX1, pVAX-X and pVAX-X+rCMEPX respectively. The antibody titers and cellular immune responses were assayed after immunization. The efficacy of immunoprotection against the challenge of ALV-J NX0101 strain was also examined. The results showed that the DNA vaccine could elicit both neutralizing antibodies and cellular responses. Immune-challenge experiments showed good protection efficacy against ALV-J infection. Particularly, the regimen involving one priming pVAX-X and twice recombinant rCMEPX boosting, induced the highest antibody titers in all immunized groups. Our results suggest that the constructed chimeric multi-epitope DNA has potential for a candidate vaccine against ALV-J when used in proper prime-boost combinations. The data presented here may provide an alternative strategy for vaccine design in chicken ALV-J prevention.

  7. Optimized codon usage enhances the expression and immunogenicity of DNA vaccine encoding Taenia solium oncosphere TSOL18 gene.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuan-Yuan; Chang, Xue-Lian; Tao, Zhi-Yong; Wang, Xiao-Li; Jiao, Yu-Meng; Chen, Yong; Qi, Wen-Juan; Xia, Hui; Yang, Xiao-Di; Sun, Xin; Shen, Ji-Long; Fang, Qiang

    2015-07-01

    Cysticercosis due to larval cysts of Taenia solium, is a serious public health problem affecting humans in numerous regions worldwide. The oncospheral stage-specific TSOL18 antigen is a promising candidate for an anti-cysticercosis vaccine. It has been reported that the immunogenicity of the DNA vaccine may be enhanced through codon optimization of candidate genes. The aim of the present study was to further increase the efficacy of the cysticercosis DNA vaccine; therefore, a codon optimized recombinant expression plasmid pVAX1/TSOL18 was developed in order to enhance expression and immunogenicity of TSOL18. The gene encoding TSOL18 of Taenia solium was optimized, and the resulting opt-TSOL18 gene was amplified and expressed. The results of the present study showed that the codon-optimized TSOL18 gene was successfully expressed in CHO-K1 cells, and immunized mice vaccinated with opt-TSOL18 recombinant expression plasmids demonstrated opt‑TSOL18 expression in muscle fibers, as determined by immunohistochemistry. In addition, the codon-optimized TSOL18 gene produced a significantly greater effect compared with that of TSOL18 and active spleen cells were markedly stimulated in vaccinated mice. 3H-thymidine incorporation was significantly greater in the opt-TSOL18 group compared with that of the TSOL18, pVAX and blank control groups (P<0.01). In conclusion, the eukaryotic expression vector containing the codon-optimized TSOL18 gene was successfully constructed and was confirmed to be expressed in vivo and in vitro. The expression and immunogenicity of the codon-optimized TSOL18 gene were markedly greater compared with that of the un-optimized gene. Therefore, these results may provide the basis for an optimized TSOL18 gene vaccine against cysticercosis.

  8. CCL21 (SLC) improves tumor protection by a DNA vaccine in a Her2/neu mouse tumor model.

    PubMed

    Nguyen-Hoai, T; Baldenhofer, G; Sayed Ahmed, M S; Pham-Duc, M; Vu, M D; Lipp, M; Dörken, B; Pezzutto, A; Westermann, J

    2012-01-01

    Secondary lymphoid-tissue chemokine (SLC/CCL21) is a CC chemokine that is constitutively expressed in various lymphoid tissues and binds to chemokine receptor CCR7 on mature dendritic cells (DCs) and distinct T-and B-cell sub-populations. In vivo, CCL21 regulates the encounters between DC and T cells and thus is a key regulator of adaptive immune responses. We asked whether CCL21 is able to augment immunogenicity of a DNA-based vaccine against Her2/neu in a Balb/c mouse model with syngeneic Her2/neu+ tumor cells (D2F2/E2). Mice were vaccinated intramuscularly with plasmid DNA (pDNA) on day 1 and boosted on day 15; tumor challenge was performed subcutaneously on day 25. Coexpression of CCL21 and Her-2/neu resulted in induction of a TH1-polarized immune response and substantial improvement of the protective effect of the DNA vaccine. Coexpression of tumor antigen pDNA(Her2/neu) with both pDNA(GM-CSF) and pDNA(CCL21) as adjuvants led to further improvement of protection by the vaccine (70% tumor-free mice on day 35 vs 40% with either adjuvant alone vs 5-10% with tumor antigen alone). Our results show that CCL21 is a potent adjuvant for DNA vaccination, particularly in combination with granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF). Clinical use of a pDNA(Her2/neu/CCL21/GM-CSF) vaccine might be particularly promising in minimal residual Her2/neu+ breast cancer.

  9. Immunogenicity of a Bovine Herpesvirus 1 Glycoprotein D DNA Vaccine Complexed with Bovine Neutrophil Beta-Defensin 3

    PubMed Central

    Mackenzie-Dyck, Sarah; Latimer, Laura; Atanley, Ethel; Kovacs-Nolan, Jennifer; Attah-Poku, Sam; Babiuk, Lorne A.

    2014-01-01

    Protective efficacy against bovine herpesvirus 1 (BoHV-1) has been demonstrated to be induced by a plasmid encoding bovine neutrophil beta-defensin 3 (BNBD3) as a fusion construct with truncated glycoprotein D (tgD). However, in spite of the increased cell-mediated immune responses induced by this DNA vaccine, the clinical responses of BoHV-1-challenged cattle were not reduced over those observed in animals vaccinated with the plasmid encoding tgD alone; this might have been because the vaccine failed to improve humoral responses. We hypothesized that an alternative vaccine design strategy that utilized the DNA vaccine pMASIA-tgD as a complex with BNBD3 might improve humoral responses while maintaining robust Th1-type cell-mediated responses. C57BL/6 mice were vaccinated with pMASIA-tgD complexed with 0, 0.01875, 0.1875, or 1.875 nmol of a stable synthesized analog of BNBD3 (aBNBD3). The best results were seen in mice immunized with the vaccine composed of pMASIA-tgD complexed to 0.1875 nmol aBNBD3. In this group, humoral responses were improved, as evidenced by increased virus neutralization, tgD-specific early IgG1, and later IgG2a titers, while the strong cell-mediated immune responses, measured based on specific gamma interferon (IFN-γ)-secreting cells, were maintained relative to pMASIA-tgD. Modulation of the immune response might have been due in part to the effect of BNBD3 on dendritic cells (DCs). In vitro studies showed that murine bone marrow-derived DCs (BMDCs) pretreated with aBNBD3 were activated, as evidenced by CD11c downregulation, and were functionally mature, as shown by increased allostimulatory ability. Native, synthetic, and analog forms of BNBD3 were equally capable of inducing functional maturation of BMDCs. PMID:25378352

  10. Structure-function relationships and mode of replication of animal rhabdoviruses.

    PubMed

    Sokol, F; Koprowski, H

    1975-03-01

    Recently accumulated knowledge allows more precise comparison of the structural (and possibly evolutionary) relationships of several different animal rhabdoviruses: vesicular stomatitis virus, rabies virus, Kern Canyon virus, and spring viremia of carp virus. Each virus is composed primarily of a glycoprotein, an RNA-associated nucleoprotein, and one or two membrane proteins. Vesicular stomatitis virus group viruses contain lesser amounts of two additional distinct polypeptides, NS and L. The separate viruses undergo structural polypeptide phosphorylation in vivo according to characteristic patterns. In vesicular stomatitis virus the NS protein is selectively phosphorylated. In rabies group viruses and in spring viremia of carp virus, the nucleoprotein is the predominant phosphoprotein; in these viruses only the phosphorylated moiety is selectively cleaved off with trypsin. In Kern Canyon virus, only membrane protein and glycoprotein are weakly phosphorylated. Each virus possesses a virion-bound protein kinase. Vesicular stomatitis virus group viruses, Kern Canyon virus, and spring viremia of carp virus only contain virion-bound transcriptases of respectively decreasing levels of activity demonstrable in vitro. Vesicular stomatitis and Kern Canyon viruses replicate efficiently in enucleated cells; rabies virus does not. Based upon these observations, it is suggested that vesicular stomatitis virus may represent the most highly evolved of these rhabdoviruses, whereas spring viremia of carp and Kern Canyon viruses may represent "evolutionary links" between the vesicular stomatitis and rabies virus groups. PMID:165494

  11. Comparison of two birnavirus-rhabdovirus coinfections in fish cell lines.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, S; Alonso, M; Pérez-Prietol, S I

    2005-11-28

    Aquabirnaviruses, such as the infectious pancreatic necrosis virus (IPNV), Novirhabdoviruses, such as the infectious hematopoiteic necrosis virus (IHNV) and the viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV), cause considerable losses to the salmonid industry worldwide. Coinfections of 2 viruses have been described, but the interactions between rhabdoviruses and birnaviruses have not been examined closely. Using virus titration, flow cytometry and RT-PCR assays, we compared the effect of IPNV on the replication of IHNV and VHSV in tissue culture cells. RT-PCR assays indicated that simultaneous infection of IPNV with VHSV does not affect the replication of the rhabdovirus either in the first or successive passages; the infective titers were similar in single and double infections. In contrast, coinfection of IPNV with IHNV induced a fall in infectivity, with reduced expression of IHNV viral antigens in BF-2 cells from Lepomis macrochirus and a loss of 4.5 log10 units of the infective titer after 3 successive passages. It was possible to stimulate BF-2 cells to produce significant interferon-like activity against IHNV but not against VHSV.

  12. A Novel Rhabdovirus Associated with Acute Hemorrhagic Fever in Central Africa

    PubMed Central

    Slikas, Elizabeth; Steffen, Imke; Muyembe, Jean-Jacques; Sittler, Taylor; Veeraraghavan, Narayanan; Ruby, J. Graham; Wang, Chunlin; Makuwa, Maria; Mulembakani, Prime; Tesh, Robert B.; Mazet, Jonna; Rimoin, Anne W.; Taylor, Travis; Schneider, Bradley S.; Simmons, Graham; Delwart, Eric; Wolfe, Nathan D.; Chiu, Charles Y.; Leroy, Eric M.

    2012-01-01

    Deep sequencing was used to discover a novel rhabdovirus (Bas-Congo virus, or BASV) associated with a 2009 outbreak of 3 human cases of acute hemorrhagic fever in Mangala village, Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), Africa. The cases, presenting over a 3-week period, were characterized by abrupt disease onset, high fever, mucosal hemorrhage, and, in two patients, death within 3 days. BASV was detected in an acute serum sample from the lone survivor at a concentration of 1.09×106 RNA copies/mL, and 98.2% of the genome was subsequently de novo assembled from ∼140 million sequence reads. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that BASV is highly divergent and shares less than 34% amino acid identity with any other rhabdovirus. High convalescent neutralizing antibody titers of >1∶1000 were detected in the survivor and an asymptomatic nurse directly caring for him, both of whom were health care workers, suggesting the potential for human-to-human transmission of BASV. The natural animal reservoir host or arthropod vector and precise mode of transmission for the virus remain unclear. BASV is an emerging human pathogen associated with acute hemorrhagic fever in Africa. PMID:23028323

  13. A novel rhabdovirus associated with acute hemorrhagic fever in central Africa.

    PubMed

    Grard, Gilda; Fair, Joseph N; Lee, Deanna; Slikas, Elizabeth; Steffen, Imke; Muyembe, Jean-Jacques; Sittler, Taylor; Veeraraghavan, Narayanan; Ruby, J Graham; Wang, Chunlin; Makuwa, Maria; Mulembakani, Prime; Tesh, Robert B; Mazet, Jonna; Rimoin, Anne W; Taylor, Travis; Schneider, Bradley S; Simmons, Graham; Delwart, Eric; Wolfe, Nathan D; Chiu, Charles Y; Leroy, Eric M

    2012-09-01

    Deep sequencing was used to discover a novel rhabdovirus (Bas-Congo virus, or BASV) associated with a 2009 outbreak of 3 human cases of acute hemorrhagic fever in Mangala village, Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), Africa. The cases, presenting over a 3-week period, were characterized by abrupt disease onset, high fever, mucosal hemorrhage, and, in two patients, death within 3 days. BASV was detected in an acute serum sample from the lone survivor at a concentration of 1.09 × 10(6) RNA copies/mL, and 98.2% of the genome was subsequently de novo assembled from ≈ 140 million sequence reads. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that BASV is highly divergent and shares less than 34% amino acid identity with any other rhabdovirus. High convalescent neutralizing antibody titers of >1:1000 were detected in the survivor and an asymptomatic nurse directly caring for him, both of whom were health care workers, suggesting the potential for human-to-human transmission of BASV. The natural animal reservoir host or arthropod vector and precise mode of transmission for the virus remain unclear. BASV is an emerging human pathogen associated with acute hemorrhagic fever in Africa.

  14. Orchid fleck virus is a rhabdovirus with an unusual bipartite genome.

    PubMed

    Kondo, Hideki; Maeda, Takanori; Shirako, Yukio; Tamada, Tetsuo

    2006-08-01

    Orchid fleck virus (OFV) has an unusual bipartite negative-sense RNA genome with clear sequence similarities to those of nucleorhabdoviruses. The OFV genome consists of two single-stranded RNA molecules, RNA1 and RNA2 that are 6413 and 6001 nt long, respectively, with open reading frame (ORF) information in the complementary sense. RNA1 encodes 49 (ORF1), 26 (ORF2), 38 (ORF3), 20 (ORF4) and 61 kDa (ORF5) proteins, and RNA2 encodes a single protein of 212 kDa (ORF6). ORF1, ORF5 and ORF6 proteins had significant similarities (21-38 % identity) to the nucleocapsid protein (N), glycoprotein (G) and polymerase (L) gene products, respectively, of other rhabdoviruses, especially nucleorhabdoviruses, whereas ORF2, ORF3 and ORF4 proteins had no significant similarities to other proteins in the international databases. Similarities between OFV and rhabdoviruses were also found in the sequence complementarity at both termini of each RNA segment (the common terminal sequences are 3'-UGUGUC---GACACA-5'), the conserved intergenic sequences and in being negative sense. It was proposed that a new genus Dichorhabdovirus in the family Rhabdoviridae of the order Mononegavirales should be established with OFV as its prototype member and type species.

  15. Drosophila melanogaster mounts a unique immune response to the Rhabdovirus sigma virus.

    PubMed

    Tsai, C W; McGraw, E A; Ammar, E-D; Dietzgen, R G; Hogenhout, S A

    2008-05-01

    Rhabdoviruses are important pathogens of humans, livestock, and plants that are often vectored by insects. Rhabdovirus particles have a characteristic bullet shape with a lipid envelope and surface-exposed transmembrane glycoproteins. Sigma virus (SIGMAV) is a member of the Rhabdoviridae and is a naturally occurring disease agent of Drosophila melanogaster. The infection is maintained in Drosophila populations through vertical transmission via germ cells. We report here the nature of the Drosophila innate immune response to SIGMAV infection as revealed by quantitative reverse transcription-PCR analysis of differentially expressed genes identified by microarray analysis. We have also compared and contrasted the immune response of the host with respect to two nonenveloped viruses, Drosophila C virus (DCV) and Drosophila X virus (DXV). We determined that SIGMAV infection upregulates expression of the peptidoglycan receptor protein genes PGRP-SB1 and PGRP-SD and the antimicrobial peptide (AMP) genes Diptericin-A, Attacin-A, Attacin-B, Cecropin-A1, and Drosocin. SIGMAV infection did not induce PGRP-SA and the AMP genes Drosomycin-B, Metchnikowin, and Defensin that are upregulated in DCV and/or DXV infections. Expression levels of the Toll and Imd signaling cascade genes are not significantly altered by SIGMAV infection. These results highlight shared and unique aspects of the Drosophila immune response to the three viruses and may shed light on the nature of the interaction with the host and the evolution of these associations.

  16. Characterization of a venom gland-associated rhabdovirus in the parasitoid wasp Diachasmimorpha longicaudata.

    PubMed

    Simmonds, Tyler J; Carrillo, Daniel; Burke, Gaelen R

    2016-01-01

    Parasitoid wasps reproduce by laying their eggs on or inside of a host insect, which triggers a defense response in the host insect that kills the developing wasp. To counteract the host's lethal response, some parasitoid wasps are associated with symbiotic viruses that alter host metabolism and development to promote successful development of the wasp embryo. These symbiotic viruses display a number of characteristics that differ from those of pathogenic viruses, but are poorly understood with the exception of one group, the polydnaviruses. Here, we characterize the genome of a non-polydnavirus associated with parasitoid wasps, Diachasmimorpha longicaudata rhabdovirus (DlRhV), and assess its role as a potential mutualistic virus. Our results show that the DlRhV genome contains six open reading frames (ORFs). Three ORFs show sequence homology to known viral genes and one ORF encodes a previously identified protein, called parasitism-specific protein 24 (PSP24), that has been hypothesized to play a role in promoting successful parasitism by D. longicaudata. We constructed a phylogeny that shows that DlRhV is most closely related to other insect-infecting rhabdoviruses. Finally, we report that DlRhV infection does not occur in all populations of D. longicaudata, and is not required for successful parasitism. PMID:27374981

  17. Plant rhabdoviruses: new insights and research needs in the interplay of negative-strand RNA viruses with plant and insect hosts.

    PubMed

    Mann, Krin S; Dietzgen, Ralf G

    2014-08-01

    Rhabdoviruses are taxonomically classified in the family Rhabdoviridae, order Mononegavirales. As a group, rhabdoviruses can infect plants, invertebrates and vertebrates. Plant cyto- and nucleorhabdoviruses infect a wide variety of species across both monocot and dicot families, including agriculturally important crops such as lettuce, wheat, barley, rice, maize, potato and tomato. Plant rhabdoviruses are transmitted by and replicate in hemipteran insects such as aphids (Aphididae), leafhoppers (Cicadellidae), or planthoppers (Delphacidae). These specific interactions between plants, viruses and insects offer new insights into host adaptation and molecular virus evolution. This review explores recent advances as well as knowledge gaps in understanding of replication, RNA silencing suppression and movement of plant rhabdoviruses with respect to both plant and insect hosts.

  18. Plant rhabdoviruses: new insights and research needs in the interplay of negative-strand RNA viruses with plant and insect hosts.

    PubMed

    Mann, Krin S; Dietzgen, Ralf G

    2014-08-01

    Rhabdoviruses are taxonomically classified in the family Rhabdoviridae, order Mononegavirales. As a group, rhabdoviruses can infect plants, invertebrates and vertebrates. Plant cyto- and nucleorhabdoviruses infect a wide variety of species across both monocot and dicot families, including agriculturally important crops such as lettuce, wheat, barley, rice, maize, potato and tomato. Plant rhabdoviruses are transmitted by and replicate in hemipteran insects such as aphids (Aphididae), leafhoppers (Cicadellidae), or planthoppers (Delphacidae). These specific interactions between plants, viruses and insects offer new insights into host adaptation and molecular virus evolution. This review explores recent advances as well as knowledge gaps in understanding of replication, RNA silencing suppression and movement of plant rhabdoviruses with respect to both plant and insect hosts. PMID:24610553

  19. Characterization of the Tupaia Rhabdovirus Genome Reveals a Long Open Reading Frame Overlapping with P and a Novel Gene Encoding a Small Hydrophobic Protein

    PubMed Central

    Springfeld, Christoph; Darai, Gholamreza; Cattaneo, Roberto

    2005-01-01

    Rhabdoviruses are negative-stranded RNA viruses of the order Mononegavirales and have been isolated from vertebrates, insects, and plants. Members of the genus Lyssavirus cause the invariably fatal disease rabies, and a member of the genus Vesiculovirus, Chandipura virus, has recently been associated with acute encephalitis in children. We present here the complete genome sequence and transcription map of a rhabdovirus isolated from cultivated cells of hepatocellular carcinoma tissue from a moribund tree shrew. The negative-strand genome of tupaia rhabdovirus is composed of 11,440 nucleotides and encodes six genes that are separated by one or two intergenic nucleotides. In addition to the typical rhabdovirus genes in the order N-P-M-G-L, a gene encoding a small hydrophobic putative type I transmembrane protein of approximately 11 kDa was identified between the M and G genes, and the corresponding transcript was detected in infected cells. Similar to some Vesiculoviruses and many Paramyxovirinae, the P gene has a second overlapping reading frame that can be accessed by ribosomal choice and encodes a protein of 26 kDa, predicted to be the largest C protein of these virus families. Phylogenetic analyses of the tupaia rhabdovirus N and L genes show that the virus is distantly related to the Vesiculoviruses, Ephemeroviruses, and the recently characterized Flanders virus and Oita virus and further extends the sequence territory occupied by animal rhabdoviruses. PMID:15890917

  20. Rhabdovirus-like endogenous viral elements in the genome of Spodoptera frugiperda insect cells are actively transcribed: Implications for adventitious virus detection.

    PubMed

    Geisler, Christoph; Jarvis, Donald L

    2016-07-01

    Spodoptera frugiperda (Sf) cell lines are used to produce several biologicals for human and veterinary use. Recently, it was discovered that all tested Sf cell lines are persistently infected with Sf-rhabdovirus, a novel rhabdovirus. As part of an effort to search for other adventitious viruses, we searched the Sf cell genome and transcriptome for sequences related to Sf-rhabdovirus. To our surprise, we found intact Sf-rhabdovirus N- and P-like ORFs, and partial Sf-rhabdovirus G- and L-like ORFs. The transcribed and genomic sequences matched, indicating the transcripts were derived from the genomic sequences. These appear to be endogenous viral elements (EVEs), which result from the integration of partial viral genetic material into the host cell genome. It is theoretically impossible for the Sf-rhabdovirus-like EVEs to produce infectious virus particles as 1) they are disseminated across 4 genomic loci, 2) the G and L ORFs are incomplete, and 3) the M ORF is missing. Our finding of transcribed virus-like sequences in Sf cells underscores that MPS-based searches for adventitious viruses in cell substrates used to manufacture biologics should take into account both genomic and transcribed sequences to facilitate the identification of transcribed EVE's, and to avoid false positive detection of replication-competent adventitious viruses.

  1. Characterization of the Tupaia rhabdovirus genome reveals a long open reading frame overlapping with P and a novel gene encoding a small hydrophobic protein.

    PubMed

    Springfeld, Christoph; Darai, Gholamreza; Cattaneo, Roberto

    2005-06-01

    Rhabdoviruses are negative-stranded RNA viruses of the order Mononegavirales and have been isolated from vertebrates, insects, and plants. Members of the genus Lyssavirus cause the invariably fatal disease rabies, and a member of the genus Vesiculovirus, Chandipura virus, has recently been associated with acute encephalitis in children. We present here the complete genome sequence and transcription map of a rhabdovirus isolated from cultivated cells of hepatocellular carcinoma tissue from a moribund tree shrew. The negative-strand genome of tupaia rhabdovirus is composed of 11,440 nucleotides and encodes six genes that are separated by one or two intergenic nucleotides. In addition to the typical rhabdovirus genes in the order N-P-M-G-L, a gene encoding a small hydrophobic putative type I transmembrane protein of approximately 11 kDa was identified between the M and G genes, and the corresponding transcript was detected in infected cells. Similar to some Vesiculoviruses and many Paramyxovirinae, the P gene has a second overlapping reading frame that can be accessed by ribosomal choice and encodes a protein of 26 kDa, predicted to be the largest C protein of these virus families. Phylogenetic analyses of the tupaia rhabdovirus N and L genes show that the virus is distantly related to the Vesiculoviruses, Ephemeroviruses, and the recently characterized Flanders virus and Oita virus and further extends the sequence territory occupied by animal rhabdoviruses.

  2. Dose-dependent inhibition of Gag cellular immunity by Env in SIV/HIV DNA vaccinated macaques

    PubMed Central

    Valentin, Antonio; Li, Jinyao; Rosati, Margherita; Kulkarni, Viraj; Patel, Vainav; Jalah, Rashmi; Alicea, Candido; Reed, Steven; Sardesai, Niranjan; Berkower, Ira; Pavlakis, George N; Felber, Barbara K

    2015-01-01

    The induction of a balanced immune response targeting the major structural proteins, Gag and Env of HIV, is important for the development of an efficacious vaccine. The use of DNA plasmids expressing different antigens offers the opportunity to test in a controlled manner the influence of different vaccine components on the magnitude and distribution of the vaccine-induced cellular and humoral immune responses. Here, we show that increasing amounts of env DNA results in greatly enhanced Env antibody titers without significantly affecting the levels of anti-Env cellular immune responses. Co-immunization with Env protein further increased antibody levels, indicating that vaccination with DNA only is not sufficient for eliciting maximal humoral responses against Env. In contrast, under high env:gag DNA plasmid ratio, the development of Gag cellular responses was significantly reduced by either SIV or HIV Env, whereas Gag humoral responses were not affected. Our data indicate that a balanced ratio of the 2 key HIV/SIV vaccine components, Gag and Env, is important to avoid immunological interference and to achieve both maximal humoral responses against Env to prevent virus acquisition and maximal cytotoxic T cell responses against Gag to prevent virus spread. PMID:26125521

  3. Modification of glucose import capacity in Escherichia coli: physiologic consequences and utility for improving DNA vaccine production

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The bacterium Escherichia coli can be grown employing various carbohydrates as sole carbon and energy source. Among them, glucose affords the highest growth rate. This sugar is nowadays widely employed as raw material in industrial fermentations. When E. coli grows in a medium containing non-limiting concentrations of glucose, a metabolic imbalance occurs whose main consequence is acetate secretion. The production of this toxic organic acid reduces strain productivity and viability. Solutions to this problem include reducing glucose concentration by substrate feeding strategies or the generation of mutant strains with impaired glucose import capacity. In this work, a collection of E. coli strains with inactive genes encoding proteins involved in glucose transport where generated to determine the effects of reduced glucose import capacity on growth rate, biomass yield, acetate and production of an experimental plasmid DNA vaccine (pHN). Results A group of 15 isogenic derivatives of E. coli W3110 were generated with single and multiple deletions of genes encoding glucose, mannose, beta-glucoside, maltose and N-acetylglucosamine components of the phosphoenolpyruvate:sugar phosphotransferase system (PTS), as well as the galactose symporter and the Mgl galactose/glucose ABC transporter. These strains were characterized by growing them in mineral salts medium supplemented with 2.5 g/L glucose. Maximum specific rates of glucose consumption (qs) spanning from 1.33 to 0.32 g/g h were displayed by the group of mutants and W3110, which resulted in specific growth rates ranging from 0.65-0.18 h-1. Acetate accumulation was reduced or abolished in cultures with all mutant strains. W3110 and five selected mutant derivatives were transformed with pHN. A 3.2-fold increase in pHN yield on biomass was observed in cultures of a mutant strain with deletion of genes encoding the glucose and mannose PTS components, as well as Mgl. Conclusions The group of E. coli mutants

  4. Priming with two DNA vaccines expressing hepatitis C virus NS3 protein targeting dendritic cells elicits superior heterologous protective potential in mice.

    PubMed

    Guan, Jie; Deng, Yao; Chen, Hong; Yin, Xiao; Yang, Yang; Tan, Wenjie

    2015-10-01

    Development an effective vaccine may offer an alternative preventive and therapeutic strategy against HCV infection. DNA vaccination has been shown to induce robust humoral and cellular immunity and overcome many problems associated with conventional vaccines. In this study, mice were primed with either conventional pVRC-based or suicidal pSC-based DNA vaccines carrying DEC-205-targeted NS3 antigen (DEC-NS3) and boosted with type 5 adenoviral vectors encoding the partial NS3 and core antigens (C44P). The prime boost regimen induced a marked increase in antigen-specific humoral and T-cell responses in comparison with either rAd5-based vaccines or DEC-205-targeted DNA immunization in isolation. The protective effect against heterogeneous challenge was correlated with high levels of anti-NS3 IgG and T-cell-mediated immunity against NS3 peptides. Moreover, priming with a suicidal DNA vaccine (pSC-DEC-NS3), which elicited increased TNF-α-producing CD4+ and CD8+ T-cells against NS3-2 peptides (aa 1245-1461), after boosting, showed increased heterogeneous protective potential compared with priming with a conventional DNA vaccine (pVRC-DEC-NS3). In conclusion, a suicidal DNA vector (pSC-DEC-NS3) expressing DEC-205-targeted NS3 combined with boosting using an rAd5-based HCV vaccine (rAd5-C44P) is a good candidate for a safe and effective vaccine against HCV infection.

  5. Modulatory effect of CpG oligodeoxynucleotide on a DNA vaccine against nervous necrosis virus in orange-spotted grouper (Epinephelus coioides).

    PubMed

    Chen, Shiang-Peng; Peng, Ran-Hong; Chiou, Pinwen P

    2015-08-01

    We report the development of a DNA vaccine pcMGNNV2 against nervous necrosis virus (NNV), a leading cause of mass mortality in grouper larvae. In addition, the modulatory effect of CpG oligodeoxynucleotide (ODN), a Toll-like receptor 9 agonist, on the DNA vaccine was evaluated. The DNA vaccine alone elicited the production of NNV-specific antibodies, indicating that the vaccine was capable of triggering adaptive humoral response. Furthermore, significant induction of TLR9, Mx and IL-1β was observed in the spleen on day 7 post-vaccination, supporting that the vaccine could trigger TLR9 signaling. The incorporation of CpG ODN at high dose did not significantly affect the level of NNV-specific antibodies, but was able to moderately enhance the expression of Mx and IL-1β on day 7, indicating its ability in modulating innate response. After challenge with NNV, the vaccine alone enhanced the survival rate in infected larvae at both 1 and 2 weeks post-vaccination. The combination of CpG ODN further increased the survival rate at week 1 but not week 2. Interestingly, at week 2 the ODN appeared to induce a Th1-like response, as indicated by upregulation of T-bet (a Th1 marker) and downregulation of GATA-3 (a Th2 marker). Thus, the results suggest that the boosted Th1 response by CpG ODN does not augment the protection efficacy of pcMGNNV2 vaccine. To our best knowledge, this is the first report of a successful DNA vaccine against NNV in grouper.

  6. Characterization of resistance to rhabdovirus and retrovirus infection in a human myeloid cell line.

    PubMed

    Boso, Guney; Somia, Nikunj V

    2015-01-01

    Viruses interact with various permissive and restrictive factors in host cells throughout their replication cycle. Cell lines that are non-permissive to viral infection have been particularly useful in discovering host cell proteins involved in viral life cycles. Here we describe the characterization of a human myeloid leukemia cell line, KG-1, that is resistant to infection by retroviruses and a Rhabdovirus. We show that KG-1 cells are resistant to infection by Vesicular Stomatits Virus as well as VSV Glycoprotein (VSVG) pseudotyped retroviruses due to a defect in binding. Moreover our results indicate that entry by xenotropic retroviral envelope glycoprotein RD114 is impaired in KG-1 cells. Finally we characterize a post- entry block in the early phase of the retroviral life cycle in KG-1 cells that renders the cell line refractory to infection. This cell line will have utility in discovering proteins involved in infection by VSV and HIV-1.

  7. Rhabdovirus matrix protein structures reveal a novel mode of self-association.

    PubMed

    Graham, Stephen C; Assenberg, René; Delmas, Olivier; Verma, Anil; Gholami, Alireza; Talbi, Chiraz; Owens, Raymond J; Stuart, David I; Grimes, Jonathan M; Bourhy, Hervé

    2008-12-01

    The matrix (M) proteins of rhabdoviruses are multifunctional proteins essential for virus maturation and budding that also regulate the expression of viral and host proteins. We have solved the structures of M from the vesicular stomatitis virus serotype New Jersey (genus: Vesiculovirus) and from Lagos bat virus (genus: Lyssavirus), revealing that both share a common fold despite sharing no identifiable sequence homology. Strikingly, in both structures a stretch of residues from the otherwise-disordered N terminus of a crystallographically adjacent molecule is observed binding to a hydrophobic cavity on the surface of the protein, thereby forming non-covalent linear polymers of M in the crystals. While the overall topology of the interaction is conserved between the two structures, the molecular details of the interactions are completely different. The observed interactions provide a compelling model for the flexible self-assembly of the matrix protein during virion morphogenesis and may also modulate interactions with host proteins.

  8. Post-translational intracellular trafficking determines the type of immune response elicited by DNA vaccines expressing Gag antigen of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 (HIV-1)

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, Aaron; West, Kim; Rothman, Alan L; Ennis, Francis A; Lu, Shan; Wang, Shixia

    2013-01-01

    In the current study, immune responses induced by Gag DNA vaccines with different designs were evaluated in Balb/C mice. The results demonstrated that the DNA vaccine with the full length wild type gag gene (Wt-Gag) mainly produced Gag antigens intracellularly and induced a higher level of cell-mediated immune (CMI) responses, as measured by IFN-gamma ELISPOT, intracellular cytokine staining (ICS), and cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) assays against a dominant CD8+ T cell epitope (AMQMLKETI). In contrast, the addition of a tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) leader sequence significantly improved overall Gag protein expression/secretion and Gag-specific antibody responses; however, Gag-specific CMI responses were decreased. The mutation of zinc-finger motif changed Gag protein expression patterns and reduced the ability to generate both CMI and antibody responses against Gag. These findings indicate that the structure and post-translational processing of antigens expressed by DNA vaccines play a critical role in eliciting optimal antibody or CMI responses. PMID:23941868

  9. An oral chitosan DNA vaccine against nodavirus improves transcription of cell-mediated cytotoxicity and interferon genes in the European sea bass juveniles gut and survival upon infection.

    PubMed

    Valero, Yulema; Awad, Elham; Buonocore, Francesco; Arizcun, Marta; Esteban, M Ángeles; Meseguer, José; Chaves-Pozo, Elena; Cuesta, Alberto

    2016-12-01

    Vaccines for fish need to be improved for the aquaculture sector, with DNA vaccines and the oral administration route providing the most promising improvements. In this study, we have created an oral chitosan-encapsulated DNA vaccine (CP-pNNV) for the nodavirus (NNV) in order to protect the very susceptible European sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax). Our data show that the oral CP-pNNV vaccine failed to induce serum circulating or neutralizing specific antibodies (immunoglobulin M) or to up-regulate their gene expression in the posterior gut. However, the vaccine up-regulated the expression of genes related to the cell-mediated cytotoxicity (CMC; tcrb and cd8a) and the interferon pathway (IFN; ifn, mx and ifng). In addition, 3 months after vaccination, challenged fish showed a retarded onset of fish death and lower cumulative mortality with a relative survival of 45%. Thus, we created a chitosan-encapsulated DNA vaccine against NNV that is partly protective to European sea bass juveniles and up-regulates the transcription of genes related to CMC and IFN. However, further studies are needed to improve the anti-NNV vaccine and to understand its mechanisms. PMID:27370973

  10. Evaluation of immunogenicity and protective efficacy of a plasmid DNA vaccine encoding ribosomal protein L9 of Brucella abortus in BALB/c mice.

    PubMed

    Jain, Shikha; Afley, Prachiti; Dohre, Sudhir K; Saxena, Nandita; Kumar, Subodh

    2014-07-31

    Brucellosis is a worldwide zoonotic disease. No Brucella vaccine is available for use in humans and existing animal vaccines have limitations. We have previously described the ribosomal protein L9 to have the vaccine potential. In this study, L9 based DNA vaccine (pVaxL9) was generated and evaluated in mouse model. Intramuscular immunisation of pVaxL9 was able to elicit the anti-L9 IgG antibody response of both IgG1 and IgG2a isotypes when compared with PBS and pVax immunised control animals. Heightened antibody response was observed in mice groups immunised with pVaxL9 priming and recombinant L9 boosting (PB) and where pDNA immunisation was carried out by in vivo electroporation (EP). The vaccine groups proliferated splenocytes and released Th1 type cytokines e.g. IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-2. Further, flow cytometric analysis revealed that IFN-γ was released by both by CD4+ and CD8+ T cells particularly in PB and EP groups when compared with mice immunised with empty control vector. The L9 based pDNA vaccine was able to confer significant protection in mice against challenge with virulent B. abortus with PB and EP groups offering better protection. Taken together, it can be concluded that L9 based DNA vaccine is immunogenic and confer protection in mouse model.

  11. A synthetic consensus anti–spike protein DNA vaccine induces protective immunity against Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus in nonhuman primates

    PubMed Central

    Muthumani, Karuppiah; Falzarano, Darryl; Reuschel, Emma L.; Tingey, Colleen; Flingai, Seleeke; Villarreal, Daniel O.; Wise, Megan; Patel, Ami; Izmirly, Abdullah; Aljuaid, Abdulelah; Seliga, Alecia M.; Soule, Geoff; Morrow, Matthew; Kraynyak, Kimberly A.; Khan, Amir S.; Scott, Dana P.; Feldmann, Friederike; LaCasse, Rachel; Meade-White, Kimberly; Okumura, Atsushi; Ugen, Kenneth E.; Sardesai, Niranjan Y.; Kim, J. Joseph; Kobinger, Gary; Feldmann, Heinz; Weiner, David B.

    2015-01-01

    First identified in 2012, Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS) is caused by an emerging human coronavirus, which is distinct from the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV), and represents a novel member of the lineage C betacoronoviruses. Since its identification, MERS coronavirus (MERS-CoV) has been linked to more than 1372 infections manifesting with severe morbidity and, often, mortality (about 495 deaths) in the Arabian Peninsula, Europe, and, most recently, the United States. Human-to-human transmission has been documented, with nosocomial transmission appearing to be an important route of infection. The recent increase in cases of MERS in the Middle East coupled with the lack of approved antiviral therapies or vaccines to treat or prevent this infection are causes for concern. We report on the development of a synthetic DNA vaccine against MERS-CoV. An optimized DNA vaccine encoding the MERS spike protein induced potent cellular immunity and antigen-specific neutralizing antibodies in mice, macaques, and camels. Vaccinated rhesus macaques seroconverted rapidly and exhibited high levels of virus-neutralizing activity. Upon MERS viral challenge, all of the monkeys in the control-vaccinated group developed characteristic disease, including pneumonia. Vaccinated macaques were protected and failed to demonstrate any clinical or radiographic signs of pneumonia. These studies demonstrate that a consensus MERS spike protein synthetic DNA vaccine can induce protective responses against viral challenge, indicating that this strategy may have value as a possible vaccine modality against this emerging pathogen. PMID:26290414

  12. [Creation of DNA vaccine vector based on codon-optimized gene of rabies virus glycoprotein (G protein) with consensus amino acid sequence].

    PubMed

    Starodubova, E S; Kuzmenko, Y V; Latanova, A A; Preobrazhenskaya, O V; Karpov, V L

    2016-01-01

    An optimized design of the rabies virus glycoprotein (G protein) for use within DNA vaccines has been suggested. The design represents a territorially adapted antigen constructed taking into account glycoprotein amino acid sequences of the rabies viruses registered in the Russian Federation and the vaccine Vnukovo-32 strain. Based on the created consensus amino acid sequence, the nucleotide codon-optimized sequence of this modified glycoprotein was obtained and cloned into the pVAX1 plasmid (a vector of the last generation used in the creation of DNA vaccines). A twofold increase in this gene expression compared to the expression of the Vnukovo-32 strain viral glycoprotein gene in a similar vector was registered in the transfected cell culture. It has been demonstrated that the accumulation of modified G protein exceeds the number of the control protein synthesized using the plasmid with the Vnukovo-32 strain viral glycoprotein gene by 20 times. Thus, the obtained modified rabies virus glycoprotein can be considered to be a promising DNA vaccine antigen.

  13. A suicidal DNA vaccine expressing the fusion protein of peste des petits ruminants virus induces both humoral and cell-mediated immune responses in mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yong; Yue, Xiaolin; Jin, Hongyan; Liu, Guangqing; Pan, Ling; Wang, Guijun; Guo, Hao; Li, Gang; Li, Yongdong

    2015-12-01

    Peste des petits ruminants (PPR), a highly contagious disease induced by PPR virus (PPRV), affects sheep and goats. PPRV fusion (F) protein is important for the induction of immune responses against PPRV. We constructed a Semliki Forest virus (SFV) replicon-vectored DNA vaccine ("suicidal DNA vaccine") and evaluated its immunogenicity in BALB/c mice. The F gene of PPRV was cloned and inserted into the SFV replicon-based vector pSCA1. The antigenicity of the resultant plasmid pSCA1/F was identified by indirect immunofluorescence and western blotting. BALB/c mice were then intramuscularly injected with pSCA1/F three times at 14-d intervals. Specific antibodies and virus-neutralizing antibodies against PPRV were quantified by indirect ELISA and microneutralization tests, respectively. Cell-mediated immune responses were examined by cytokine and lymphocyte proliferation assays. The pSCA1/F expressed F protein in vitro and induced specific and neutralizing antibody production, and lymphocyte proliferation in mice. Mice vaccinated with pSCA1/F had increased IL-2 and IL-10 levels after 24-h post first immunization. IFN-γ and TNF-α levels increased from that time point and gradually decreased thereafter. Thus, the Semliki Forest virus replicon-vectored DNA vaccine expressing the F protein of PPRV induced both humoral and cell-mediated immune responses in mice. This could be considered as a novel strategy for vaccine development against PPR. PMID:26343487

  14. Adjuvanting a DNA vaccine with a TLR9 ligand plus Flt3 ligand results in enhanced cellular immunity against the simian immunodeficiency virus.

    PubMed

    Kwissa, Marcin; Amara, Rama R; Robinson, Harriet L; Moss, Bernard; Alkan, Sefik; Jabbar, Abdul; Villinger, Francois; Pulendran, Bali

    2007-10-29

    DNA vaccines offer promising strategies for immunization against infections. However, their clinical use requires improvements in immunogenicity. We explored the efficacy of Toll-like receptor (TLR) ligands (TLR-Ls) on augmenting the immunogenicity of a DNA prime-modified vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA) boost vaccine against SIV. Rhesus macaques were injected with Fms-like tyrosine kinase 3 (Flt3)-ligand (FL) to expand dendritic cells (DCs) and were primed with a DNA vaccine encoding immunodeficiency virus antigens mixed with ligands for TLR9 or TLR7/8. Subsequently, the animals were boosted with DNA and twice with recombinant MVA expressing the same antigens. TLR9-L (CpG DNA) mediated activation of DCs in vivo and enhanced the magnitude of antigen-specific CD8(+) interferon (IFN) gamma(+) T cells and polyfunctional CD8(+) T cells producing IFN-gamma, tumor necrosis factor alpha, and interleukin 2. Although this trial was designed primarily as an immunogenicity study, we challenged the animals with pathogenic SIVmac(251) and observed a reduction in peak viremia and cumulative viral loads in the TLR9-L plus FL-adjuvanted group relative to the unvaccinated group; however, the study design precluded comparisons between the adjuvanted groups and the group vaccinated with DNA/MVA alone. Viral loads were inversely correlated with the magnitude and quality of the immune response. Thus, the immunogenicity of DNA vaccines can be augmented with TLR9-L plus FL. PMID:17954572

  15. Passive protection of shrimp against white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) using specific antibody from egg yolk of chickens immunized with inactivated virus or a WSSV-DNA vaccine.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yanan; Liu, Junjun; Jin, Liji; Li, Xiaoyu; Zhen, Yuhong; Xue, Hongyu; You, Jiansong; Xu, Yongping

    2008-11-01

    White spot syndrome virus (WSSV) causes high mortality and large economic losses in cultured shrimp. The VP28, VP19 and VP15 genes encode viral structural proteins of WSSV. In this study, hens were immunized with recombinant plasmid (pCI-VP28/VP19/VP15) with linkers or with inactivated WSSV, which used CpG oligodeoxynucleotides (CpG ODNs) and Freund's adjuvant as adjuvant, respectively. Egg yolk immunoglobulin (IgY) from hens immunized with inactivated vaccine and DNA vaccine was obtained, purified and used for protection of Metapenaeus ensis shrimp against WSSV. The data showed that the antibody response of the hens immunized with the DNA vaccine was improved by CpG ODNs as adjuvant, but was still inferior to inactivated WSSV in both sera and egg yolks. Using specific IgY from hens immunized with inactivated WSSV and DNA vaccine to neutralize WSSV, the challenged shrimp showed 73.3% and 33.3% survival, respectively. Thus, the results suggest that passive immunization strategy with IgY will be a valuable method against WSSV infection in shrimp. PMID:18805492

  16. [Creation of DNA vaccine vector based on codon-optimized gene of rabies virus glycoprotein (G protein) with consensus amino acid sequence].

    PubMed

    Starodubova, E S; Kuzmenko, Y V; Latanova, A A; Preobrazhenskaya, O V; Karpov, V L

    2016-01-01

    An optimized design of the rabies virus glycoprotein (G protein) for use within DNA vaccines has been suggested. The design represents a territorially adapted antigen constructed taking into account glycoprotein amino acid sequences of the rabies viruses registered in the Russian Federation and the vaccine Vnukovo-32 strain. Based on the created consensus amino acid sequence, the nucleotide codon-optimized sequence of this modified glycoprotein was obtained and cloned into the pVAX1 plasmid (a vector of the last generation used in the creation of DNA vaccines). A twofold increase in this gene expression compared to the expression of the Vnukovo-32 strain viral glycoprotein gene in a similar vector was registered in the transfected cell culture. It has been demonstrated that the accumulation of modified G protein exceeds the number of the control protein synthesized using the plasmid with the Vnukovo-32 strain viral glycoprotein gene by 20 times. Thus, the obtained modified rabies virus glycoprotein can be considered to be a promising DNA vaccine antigen. PMID:27239860

  17. A suicidal DNA vaccine expressing the fusion protein of peste des petits ruminants virus induces both humoral and cell-mediated immune responses in mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yong; Yue, Xiaolin; Jin, Hongyan; Liu, Guangqing; Pan, Ling; Wang, Guijun; Guo, Hao; Li, Gang; Li, Yongdong

    2015-12-01

    Peste des petits ruminants (PPR), a highly contagious disease induced by PPR virus (PPRV), affects sheep and goats. PPRV fusion (F) protein is important for the induction of immune responses against PPRV. We constructed a Semliki Forest virus (SFV) replicon-vectored DNA vaccine ("suicidal DNA vaccine") and evaluated its immunogenicity in BALB/c mice. The F gene of PPRV was cloned and inserted into the SFV replicon-based vector pSCA1. The antigenicity of the resultant plasmid pSCA1/F was identified by indirect immunofluorescence and western blotting. BALB/c mice were then intramuscularly injected with pSCA1/F three times at 14-d intervals. Specific antibodies and virus-neutralizing antibodies against PPRV were quantified by indirect ELISA and microneutralization tests, respectively. Cell-mediated immune responses were examined by cytokine and lymphocyte proliferation assays. The pSCA1/F expressed F protein in vitro and induced specific and neutralizing antibody production, and lymphocyte proliferation in mice. Mice vaccinated with pSCA1/F had increased IL-2 and IL-10 levels after 24-h post first immunization. IFN-γ and TNF-α levels increased from that time point and gradually decreased thereafter. Thus, the Semliki Forest virus replicon-vectored DNA vaccine expressing the F protein of PPRV induced both humoral and cell-mediated immune responses in mice. This could be considered as a novel strategy for vaccine development against PPR.

  18. An oral chitosan DNA vaccine against nodavirus improves transcription of cell-mediated cytotoxicity and interferon genes in the European sea bass juveniles gut and survival upon infection.

    PubMed

    Valero, Yulema; Awad, Elham; Buonocore, Francesco; Arizcun, Marta; Esteban, M Ángeles; Meseguer, José; Chaves-Pozo, Elena; Cuesta, Alberto

    2016-12-01

    Vaccines for fish need to be improved for the aquaculture sector, with DNA vaccines and the oral administration route providing the most promising improvements. In this study, we have created an oral chitosan-encapsulated DNA vaccine (CP-pNNV) for the nodavirus (NNV) in order to protect the very susceptible European sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax). Our data show that the oral CP-pNNV vaccine failed to induce serum circulating or neutralizing specific antibodies (immunoglobulin M) or to up-regulate their gene expression in the posterior gut. However, the vaccine up-regulated the expression of genes related to the cell-mediated cytotoxicity (CMC; tcrb and cd8a) and the interferon pathway (IFN; ifn, mx and ifng). In addition, 3 months after vaccination, challenged fish showed a retarded onset of fish death and lower cumulative mortality with a relative survival of 45%. Thus, we created a chitosan-encapsulated DNA vaccine against NNV that is partly protective to European sea bass juveniles and up-regulates the transcription of genes related to CMC and IFN. However, further studies are needed to improve the anti-NNV vaccine and to understand its mechanisms.

  19. Mapping the neutralizing epitopes on the glycoprotein of infectious haematopoietic necrosis virus, a fish rhabdovirus

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Huang, C.; Chien, M.S.; Landolt, M.L.; Batts, W.; Winton, J.

    1996-01-01

    Twelve neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against the fish rhabdovirus, infectious haematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV), were used to select 20 MAb escape mutants. The nucleotide sequence of the entire glycoprotein (G) gene was determined for six mutants representing differing cross-neutralization patterns and each had a single nucleotide change leading to a single amino acid substitution within one of three regions of the protein. These data were used to design nested PCR primers to amplify portions of the G gene of the 14 remaining mutants. When the PCR products from these mutants were sequenced, they also had single nucleotide substitutions coding for amino acid substitutions at the same, or nearby, locations. Of the 20 mutants for which all or part of the glycoprotein gene was sequenced, two MAbs selected mutants with substitutions at amino acids 230-231 (antigenic site I) and the remaining MAbs selected mutants with substitutions at amino acids 272-276 (antigenic site II). Two MAbs that selected mutants mapping to amino acids 272-276, selected other mutants that mapped to amino acids 78-81, raising the possibility that this portion of the N terminus of the protein was part of a discontinuous epitope defining antigenic site II. CLUSTAL alignment of the glycoproteins of rabies virus, vesicular stomatitis virus and IHNV revealed similarities in the location of the neutralizing epitopes and a high degree of conservation among cysteine residues, indicating that the glycoproteins of three different genera of animal rhabdoviruses may share a similar three-dimensional structure in spite of extensive sequence divergence.

  20. Characterization of the components and activity of Sonchus yellow net rhabdovirus polymerase.

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, J D; Jackson, A O

    1997-01-01

    Sonchus yellow net virus (SYNV) is the best-characterized member of a group of plant rhabdoviruses that replicate in the host cell nucleus. Using a recently developed method for partial purification of active SYNV polymerase by salt extraction of nuclei from infected plant tissue (J. D. O. Wagner et al, J. Virol. 70:468-477, 1996), we have identified the nucleocapsid (N), M2, and L proteins as polymerase complex components (based on copurification with the polymerase activity and by coimmunoprecipitation assays). Furthermore, the L protein was shown by antibody inhibition analysis to be a functional component of the polymerase. A second complex of M2 and L proteins, thought to be a precursor to the polymerase complex, was also identified. In addition, we conducted a detailed characterization of SYNV RNA synthesis in vitro. The results demonstrate that the RNAs are transcribed sequentially, beginning with the N mRNA and followed successively by the remaining five mRNAs in the order of their genome organization. Gene expression conforms to a cascade pattern, with synthesis of the 3'-proximal N mRNA occurring at the highest level, followed by consecutively lower levels of transcription from each subsequent gene. The reaction conditions favor transcription over minus-sense RNA replication, which, we posit, is inhibited near specific signal sequences located on the antigenomic template. The results support the concept that the mechanism of transcription is highly conserved among diverse rhabdoviruses and are compatible with a unified model for the regulation of genomic and antigenomic RNA synthesis. PMID:9032374

  1. Trout oral VP2 DNA vaccination mimics transcriptional responses occurring after infection with infectious pancreatic necrosis virus (IPNV).

    PubMed

    Ballesteros, Natalia A; Saint-Jean, Sylvia S Rodríguez; Perez-Prieto, Sara I; Coll, Julio M

    2012-12-01

    Time-course and organ transcriptional response profiles in rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss were studied after oral DNA-vaccination with the VP2 gene of the infectious pancreatic necrosis virus (IPNV) encapsulated in alginates. The profiles were also compared with those obtained after infection with IPNV. A group of immune-related genes (stat1, ifn1, ifng, mx1, mx3, il8, il10, il11, il12b, tnf2, mhc1uda, igm and igt) previously selected from microarray analysis of successful oral vaccination of rainbow trout, were used for the RTqPCR analysis. The results showed that oral VP2-vaccination qualitatively mimicked both the time-course and organ (head kidney, spleen, intestine, pyloric ceca, and thymus) transcriptional profiles obtained after IPNV-infection. Highest transcriptional differential expression levels after oral vaccination were obtained in thymus, suggesting those might be important for subsequent protection against IPNV challenges. However, transcriptional differential expression levels of most of the genes mentioned above were lower in VP2-vaccinated than in IPNV-infected trout, except for ifn1 which were similar. Together all the results suggest that the oral-alginate VP2-vaccination procedure immunizes trout against IPNV in a similar way as IPNV-infection does while there is still room for additional improvements in the oral vaccination procedure. Some of the genes described here could be used as markers to further optimize the oral immunization method.

  2. Systemically administered gp100 encoding DNA vaccine for melanoma using water-in-oil-in-water multiple emulsion delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Kalariya, Mayurkumar; Amiji, Mansoor M

    2013-09-10

    The purpose of this study was to develop a water-in-oil-in-water (W/O/W) multiple emulsions-based vaccine delivery system for plasmid DNA encoding the gp100 peptide antigen for melanoma immunotherapy. The gp100 encoding plasmid DNA was encapsulated in the inner-most aqueous phase of squalane oil containing W/O/W multiple emulsions using a two-step emulsification method. In vitro transfection ability of the encapsulated plasmid DNA was investigated in murine dendritic cells by transgene expression analysis using fluorescence microscopy and ELISA methods. Prophylactic immunization using the W/O/W multiple emulsions encapsulated the gp100 encoding plasmid DNA vaccine significantly reduced tumor volume in C57BL/6 mice during subsequent B16-F10 tumor challenge. In addition, serum Th1 cytokine levels and immuno-histochemistry of excised tumor tissues indicated activation of cytotoxic T-lymphocytes mediated anti-tumor immunity causing tumor growth suppression. The W/O/W multiple emulsions-based vaccine delivery system efficiently delivers the gp100 plasmid DNA to induce cell-mediated anti-tumor immunity.

  3. Immunogenicity and safety of xenogeneic vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 DNA vaccination in mice and dogs

    PubMed Central

    Denies, Sofie; Cicchelero, Laetitia; Polis, Ingeborgh; Sanders, Niek N.

    2016-01-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 (VEGFR-2) is an attractive target in oncology due to its crucial role in angiogenesis. In this study a DNA vaccine coding for human VEGFR-2 was evaluated in healthy mice and dogs, administered by intradermal injection and electroporation. In mice, three doses and vaccination schedules were evaluated. Cellular immune responses were measured by intracellular IFN-gamma staining and a cytotoxicity assay and antibodies by ELISA. Safety was assessed by measuring regulatory T cells and myeloid derived suppressor cells and a wound healing assay. The vaccine was subsequently evaluated in dogs, which were vaccinated three times with 100μg. Cellular immune responses were measured by intracellular IFN-gamma staining and antibodies by a flow cytometric assay. In mice, maximal cellular responses were observed after two vaccinations with 5μg. Humoral responses continued to increase with higher dose and number of vaccinations. No abnormalities in the measured safety parameters were observed. The vaccine was also capable of eliciting a cellular and humoral immune response in dogs. No adverse effects were observed, but tolerability of the electroporation was poor. This study will facilitate the evaluation of the vaccine in tumor bearing animals, ranging from rodent models to dogs with spontaneous tumors. PMID:26871296

  4. In silico analyses of Wilms׳ tumor protein to designing a novel multi-epitope DNA vaccine against cancer.

    PubMed

    Khalili, Saeed; Rahbar, Mohammad Reza; Dezfulian, Mohammad Haj; Jahangiri, Abolfazl

    2015-08-21

    Predefined and pre-weighted objective criteria and essential role of Wilms׳ tumor wild type gene (WT1) for maintaining transformed features of cancer cells confirm the high potency of WT1 as a valuable cancer antigen. The antigen was at the top of the ranking among 75 representative cancer antigens. In the present study, an in silico approach was launched to characterized novel CTL epitopes and design a novel multi-epitope DNA vaccine to elicit a desirable immune response against cancers over expressing WT1. Forty-four novel epitopes were described. A multi-epitope construct was designed based on predicted epitopes which is 310 residues in length. The vaccine candidate designed here displays acceptable population coverage (>65%) in different ethnicities as well as high probability of eliciting WT1 antibodies which both are pertinent goals in the context of appropriate multi-epitope vaccines. Various in silico analyses indicate that final vaccine is a qualified immunotherapy candidate capable of eliciting both CD4+ and CD8+ T cell responses.

  5. DNA vaccination strategy targets epidermal dendritic cells, initiating their migration and induction of a host immune response

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Trevor RF; Schultheis, Katherine; Kiosses, William B; Amante, Dinah H; Mendoza, Janess M; Stone, John C; McCoy, Jay R; Sardesai, Niranjan Y; Broderick, Kate E

    2014-01-01

    The immunocompetence and clinical accessibility of dermal tissue offers an appropriate and attractive target for vaccination. We previously demonstrated that pDNA injection into the skin in combination with surface electroporation (SEP), results in rapid and robust expression of the encoded antigen in the epidermis. Here, we demonstrate that intradermally EP-enhanced pDNA vaccination results in the rapid induction of a host humoral immune response. In the dermally relevant guinea pig model, we used high-resolution laser scanning confocal microscopy to observe direct dendritic cell (DC) transfections in the epidermis, to determine the migration kinetics of these cells from the epidermal layer into the dermis, and to follow them sequentially to the immediate draining lymph nodes. Furthermore, we delineate the relationship between the migration of directly transfected epidermal DCs and the generation of the host immune response. In summary, these data indicate that direct presentation of antigen to the immune system by DCs through SEP-based in vivo transfection in the epidermis, is related to the generation of a humoral immune response. PMID:26052522

  6. Recombinant DNA vaccine against neurite outgrowth inhibitors attenuates behavioral deficits and decreases Abeta in an Alzheimer's disease mouse model.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lingling; Ma, Quanhong; Yang, Wulin; Qi, Xiangrong; Yao, Zhigang; Liu, Ying; Liang, Liang; Wang, Xiang; Ma, Chunmei; Huang, Lan; Xu, Yanfeng; Zhu, Hua; Deng, Wei; Gao, Yingying; Ruan, Li; Xiao, Zhicheng; Qin, Chuan

    2013-07-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a chronic neurodegenerative disease that causes a progressive loss in learning and memory capabilities and eventually results in dementia. The non-renewable nature of neurons in the central nervous system leads to the basic pathological changes that are related to the various behavioral and psychological symptoms of AD. Oligodendrocyte- and myelin-related neurite outgrowth inhibitors (NOIs) tend to hinder the regeneration of neurons. We designed a recombinant DNA vaccine composed of multiple specific inhibitory domains of NOIs. Vaccination induced effective antibodies against the specific domains in the sera of mice treated with a DNA primed-vaccinia virus boost regimen. The vaccine attenuated neuronal degeneration in the mouse brain and protected the model mice from behavioral deficits. Vaccination also decreased the formation of soluble Aβ oligomer and amyloid plaques in the co-transgenic mice brain. What's more, astrocytosis in brains of APP/PS1 co-transgenic mice was also relieved. The results suggested that immunotherapy with multiple specific domains of myelin- and oligodendrocyte-related NOIs may be a promising approach for Alzheimer's disease and other degenerative central nervous system diseases.

  7. Clustered epitopes within a new poly-epitopic HIV-1 DNA vaccine shows immunogenicity in BALB/c mice.

    PubMed

    Jafarpour, Nazli; Memarnejadian, Arash; Aghasadeghi, Mohammad Reza; Kohram, Fatemeh; Aghababa, Haniyeh; Khoramabadi, Nima; Mahdavi, Mehdi

    2014-08-01

    Despite a huge number of studies towards vaccine development against human immunodeficiency virus-1, no effective vaccine has been approved yet. Thus, new vaccines should be provided with new formulations. Herein, a new DNA vaccine candidate encoding conserved and immunogenic epitopes from HIV-1 antigens of tat, pol, gag and env is designed and constructed. After bioinformatics analyses to find the best epitopes and their tandem, nucleotide sequence corresponding to the designed multiepitope was synthesized and cloned into pcDNA3.1+ vector. Expression of pcDNA3.1-tat/pol/gag/env plasmid was evaluated in HEK293T cells by RT-PCR and western-blotting. Seven groups of BALB/c mice were intramuscularly immunized three times either with 50, 100, 200 µg of plasmid in 2-week intervals or with similar doses of insert-free plasmid. Two weeks after the last injection, proliferation of T cells and secretion of IL4 and IFN-γ cytokines were evaluated using Brdu and ELISA methods, respectively. Results showed the proper expression of the plasmid in protein and mRNA levels. Moreover, the designed multiepitope plasmid was capable of induction of both proliferation responses as well as IFN-γ and IL-4 cytokine production in a considerable level compared to the control groups. Overall, our primary data warranted further detailed studies on the potency of this vaccine. PMID:24842263

  8. Immunogenicity and safety of xenogeneic vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 DNA vaccination in mice and dogs.

    PubMed

    Denies, Sofie; Cicchelero, Laetitia; Polis, Ingeborgh; Sanders, Niek N

    2016-03-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 (VEGFR-2) is an attractive target in oncology due to its crucial role in angiogenesis. In this study a DNA vaccine coding for human VEGFR-2 was evaluated in healthy mice and dogs, administered by intradermal injection and electroporation. In mice, three doses and vaccination schedules were evaluated. Cellular immune responses were measured by intracellular IFN-gamma staining and a cytotoxicity assay and antibodies by ELISA. Safety was assessed by measuring regulatory T cells and myeloid derived suppressor cells and a wound healing assay. The vaccine was subsequently evaluated in dogs, which were vaccinated three times with 100µg. Cellular immune responses were measured by intracellular IFN-gamma staining and antibodies by a flow cytometric assay. In mice, maximal cellular responses were observed after two vaccinations with 5µg. Humoral responses continued to increase with higher dose and number of vaccinations. No abnormalities in the measured safety parameters were observed. The vaccine was also capable of eliciting a cellular and humoral immune response in dogs. No adverse effects were observed, but tolerability of the electroporation was poor. This study will facilitate the evaluation of the vaccine in tumor bearing animals, ranging from rodent models to dogs with spontaneous tumors. PMID:26871296

  9. Protective Efficacy and Immunogenicity of a Combinatory DNA Vaccine against Influenza A Virus and the Respiratory Syncytial Virus

    PubMed Central

    Stab, Viktoria; Nitsche, Sandra; Niezold, Thomas; Storcksdieck genannt Bonsmann, Michael; Wiechers, Andrea; Tippler, Bettina; Hannaman, Drew; Ehrhardt, Christina; Überla, Klaus

    2013-01-01

    The Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV) and Influenza A Virus (IAV) are both two major causative agents of severe respiratory tract infections in humans leading to hospitalization and thousands of deaths each year. In this study, we evaluated the immunogenicity and efficacy of a combinatory DNA vaccine in comparison to the single component vaccines against both diseases in a mouse model. Intramuscular electroporation with plasmids expressing the hemagglutinin (HA) of IAV and the F protein of RSV induced strong humoral immune responses regardless if they were delivered in combination or alone. In consequence, high neutralizing antibody titers were detected, which conferred protection against a lethal challenge with IAV. Furthermore, the viral load in the lungs after a RSV infection could be dramatically reduced in vaccinated mice. Concurrently, substantial amounts of antigen-specific, polyfunctional CD8+ T-cells were measured after vaccination. Interestingly, the cellular response to the hemagglutinin was significantly reduced in the presence of the RSV-F encoding plasmid, but not vice versa. Although these results indicate a suppressive effect of the RSV-F protein, the protective efficacy of the combinatory vaccine was comparable to the efficacy of both single-component vaccines. In conclusion, the novel combinatory vaccine against RSV and IAV may have great potential to reduce the rate of severe respiratory tract infections in humans without increasing the number of necessary vaccinations. PMID:23967287

  10. Intranasal DNA vaccination induces potent mucosal and systemic immune responses and cross-protective immunity against influenza viruses.

    PubMed

    Torrieri-Dramard, Lea; Lambrecht, Bénédicte; Ferreira, Helena Lage; Van den Berg, Thierry; Klatzmann, David; Bellier, Bertrand

    2011-03-01

    The induction of potent virus-specific immune responses at mucosal surfaces where virus transmission occurs is a major challenge for vaccination strategies. In the case of influenza vaccination, this has been achieved only by intranasal delivery of live-attenuated vaccines that otherwise pose safety problems. Here, we demonstrate that potent mucosal and systemic immune responses, both cellular and humoral, are induced by intranasal immunization using formulated DNA. We show that formulation with the DNA carrier polyethylenimine (PEI) improved by a 1,000-fold the efficiency of gene transfer in the respiratory track following intranasal administration of luciferase-coding DNA. Using PEI formulation, intranasal vaccination with DNA-encoding hemagglutinin (HA) from influenza A H5N1 or (H1N1)2009 viruses induced high levels of HA-specific immunoglobulin A (IgA) antibodies that were detected in bronchoalveolar lavages (BALs) and the serum. No mucosal responses could be detected after parenteral or intranasal immunization with naked-DNA. Furthermore, intranasal DNA vaccination with HA from a given H5N1 virus elicited full protection against the parental strain and partial cross-protection against a distinct highly pathogenic H5N1 strain that could be improved by adding neuraminidase (NA) DNA plasmids. Our observations warrant further investigation of intranasal DNA as an effective vaccination route.

  11. Codon-optimized filovirus DNA vaccines delivered by intramuscular electroporation protect cynomolgus macaques from lethal Ebola and Marburg virus challenges

    PubMed Central

    Grant-Klein, Rebecca J; Altamura, Louis A; Badger, Catherine V; Bounds, Callie E; Van Deusen, Nicole M; Kwilas, Steven A; Vu, Hong A; Warfield, Kelly L; Hooper, Jay W; Hannaman, Drew; Dupuy, Lesley C; Schmaljohn, Connie S

    2015-01-01

    Cynomolgus macaques were vaccinated by intramuscular electroporation with DNA plasmids expressing codon-optimized glycoprotein (GP) genes of Ebola virus (EBOV) or Marburg virus (MARV) or a combination of codon-optimized GP DNA vaccines for EBOV, MARV, Sudan virus and Ravn virus. When measured by ELISA, the individual vaccines elicited slightly higher IgG responses to EBOV or MARV than did the combination vaccines. No significant differences in immune responses of macaques given the individual or combination vaccines were measured by pseudovirion neutralization or IFN-γ ELISpot assays. Both the MARV and mixed vaccines were able to protect macaques from lethal MARV challenge (5/6 vs. 6/6). In contrast, a greater proportion of macaques vaccinated with the EBOV vaccine survived lethal EBOV challenge in comparison to those that received the mixed vaccine (5/6 vs. 1/6). EBOV challenge survivors had significantly higher pre-challenge neutralizing antibody titers than those that succumbed. PMID:25996997

  12. Cationic solid-lipid nanoparticles are as efficient as electroporation in DNA vaccination against visceral leishmaniasis in mice.

    PubMed

    Saljoughian, N; Zahedifard, F; Doroud, D; Doustdari, F; Vasei, M; Papadopoulou, B; Rafati, S

    2013-12-01

    The use of an appropriate delivery system has recently emerged as a promising approach for the development of effective vaccination against visceral leishmaniasis (VL). Here, we compare two vaccine delivery systems, namely electroporation and cationic solid-lipid nanoparticle (cSLN) formulation, to administer a DNA vaccine harbouring the L. donovani A2 antigen along with L. infantum cysteine proteinases [CPA and CPB without its unusual C-terminal extension (CPB(-CTE) )] and evaluate their potential against L. infantum challenge. Prime-boost administration of the pcDNA-A2-CPA-CPB(-CTE) delivered by either electroporation or cSLN formulation protects BALB/c mice against L. infantum challenge and that protective immunity is associated with high levels of IFN-γ and lower levels of IL-10 production, leading to a strong Th1 immune response. At all time points, the ratio of IFN-γ: IL-10 induced upon restimulation with rA2-rCPA-rCPB and F/T antigens was significantly higher in vaccinated animals. Moreover, Th2-efficient protection was elicited through a high humoral immune response. Nitric oxide production, parasite burden and histopathological analysis were also in concordance with other findings. Overall, these data indicate that similar to the electroporation delivery system, cSLNs as a nanoscale vehicle of Leishmania antigens could improve immune response, hence indicating the promise of these strategies against visceral leishmaniasis.

  13. Complete genomic sequence and taxonomic position of eel virus European X (EVEX), a rhabdovirus of European eel.

    PubMed

    Galinier, Richard; van Beurden, Steven; Amilhat, Elsa; Castric, Jeannette; Schoehn, Guy; Verneau, Olivier; Fazio, Géraldine; Allienne, Jean-François; Engelsma, Marc; Sasal, Pierre; Faliex, Elisabeth

    2012-06-01

    Eel virus European X (EVEX) was first isolated from diseased European eel Anguilla anguilla in Japan at the end of seventies. The virus was tentatively classified into the Rhabdoviridae family on the basis of morphology and serological cross reactivity. This family of viruses is organized into six genera and currently comprises approximately 200 members, many of which are still unassigned because of the lack of molecular data. This work presents the morphological, biochemical and genetic characterizations of EVEX, and proposes a taxonomic classification for this virus. We provide its complete genome sequence, plus a comprehensive sequence comparison between isolates from different geographical origins. The genome encodes the five classical structural proteins plus an overlapping open reading frame in the phosphoprotein gene, coding for a putative C protein. Phylogenic relationship with other rhabdoviruses indicates that EVEX is most closely related to the Vesiculovirus genus and shares the highest identity with trout rhabdovirus 903/87.

  14. Human Polyclonal Antibodies Produced through DNA Vaccination of Transchromosomal Cattle Provide Mice with Post-Exposure Protection against Lethal Zaire and Sudan Ebolaviruses

    PubMed Central

    Bounds, Callie E.; Kwilas, Steven A.; Kuehne, Ana I.; Brannan, Jennifer M.; Bakken, Russell R.; Dye, John M.; Hooper, Jay W.; Dupuy, Lesley C.; Ellefsen, Barry; Hannaman, Drew; Wu, Hua; Jiao, Jin-an; Sullivan, Eddie J.; Schmaljohn, Connie S.

    2015-01-01

    DNA vaccination of transchromosomal bovines (TcBs) with DNA vaccines expressing the codon-optimized (co) glycoprotein (GP) genes of Ebola virus (EBOV) and Sudan virus (SUDV) produce fully human polyclonal antibodies (pAbs) that recognize both viruses and demonstrate robust neutralizing activity. Each TcB was vaccinated by intramuscular electroporation (IM-EP) a total of four times and at each administration received 10 mg of the EBOV-GPco DNA vaccine and 10 mg of the SUDV-GPco DNA vaccine at two sites on the left and right sides, respectively. After two vaccinations, robust antibody responses (titers > 1000) were detected by ELISA against whole irradiated EBOV or SUDV and recombinant EBOV-GP or SUDV-GP (rGP) antigens, with higher titers observed for the rGP antigens. Strong, virus neutralizing antibody responses (titers >1000) were detected after three vaccinations when measured by vesicular stomatitis virus-based pseudovirion neutralization assay (PsVNA). Maximal neutralizing antibody responses were identified by traditional plaque reduction neutralization tests (PRNT) after four vaccinations. Neutralizing activity of human immunoglobulins (IgG) purified from TcB plasma collected after three vaccinations and injected intraperitoneally (IP) into mice at a 100 mg/kg dose was detected in the serum by PsVNA up to 14 days after administration. Passive transfer by IP injection of the purified IgG (100 mg/kg) to groups of BALB/c mice one day after IP challenge with mouse adapted (ma) EBOV resulted in 80% protection while all mice treated with non-specific pAbs succumbed. Similarly, interferon receptor 1 knockout (IFNAR -/-) mice receiving the purified IgG (100 mg/kg) by IP injection one day after IP challenge with wild type SUDV resulted in 89% survival. These results are the first to demonstrate that filovirus GP DNA vaccines administered to TcBs by IM-EP can elicit neutralizing antibodies that provide post-exposure protection. Additionally, these data describe

  15. Enhancement of the priming efficacy of DNA vaccines encoding dendritic cell-targeted antigens by synergistic toll-like receptor ligands

    PubMed Central

    Grossmann, Claudius; Tenbusch, Matthias; Nchinda, Godwin; Temchura, Vladimir; Nabi, Ghulam; Stone, Geoffrey W; Kornbluth, Richard S; Überla, Klaus

    2009-01-01

    Background Targeting of protein antigens to dendritic cells (DC) via the DEC205 receptor enhances presentation of antigen-derived peptides on MHC-I and MHC-II molecules and, in the presence of costimulatory signals, antigen-specific immune responses. The immunogenicity and efficacy of DNA vaccination can also be enhanced by fusing the encoded antigen to single chain antibodies directed against DEC205. To further improve this strategy, we evaluated different toll-like receptor ligands (TLR) and CD40 ligands (CD40L) as adjuvants for DNA vaccines encoding a DEC205-single-chain antibody fused to the ovalbumin model antigen or HIV-1 Gag and assessed the priming efficacy of DNA in a DNA prime adenoviral vector boost immunization regimen. Results Mice were primed with the adjuvanted DEC-205 targeted DNA vaccines and boosted with adenoviral vectors encoding the same antigens. CD8+ T cell responses were determined after the adenoviral booster immunization, to determine how well the different DNA immunization regimens prime for the adenoviral boost. In the absence of adjuvants, targeting of DNA-encoded ovalbumin to DCs suppressed CD8+ T-cell responses after the adenoviral booster immunization. CD8+ T-cell responses to the DEC205 targeted DNA vaccines increased only slightly by adding either the TLR-9 ligand CpG, the TLR-3 ligand Poly I:C, or CD40 ligand expression plasmids. However, the combination of both TLR-ligands led to a strong enhancement of CD8+ T-cell responses compared to a non-targeted DNA vaccine. This finding was confirmed using HIV Gag as antigen. Conclusion Although DNA prime adenoviral vector boost immunizations belong to the strongest inducers of cytotoxic T cell responses in different animal models and humans, the CD8+ T cell responses can be further improved by targeting the DNA encoded antigen to DEC205 in the presence of synergistic TLR ligands CpG and Poly I:C. PMID:19650904

  16. Isolation of a rhabdovirus during outbreaks of disease in cyprinid fish species at fishery sites in England.

    PubMed

    Way, K; Bark, S J; Longshaw, C B; Denham, K L; Dixon, P F; Feist, S W; Gardiner, R; Gubbins, M J; Le Deuff, R M; Martin, P D; Stone, D M; Taylor, G R

    2003-12-01

    A virus was isolated during disease outbreaks in bream Abramis brama, tench Tinca tinca, roach Rutilis rutilis and crucian carp Carassius carassius populations at 6 fishery sites in England in 1999. Mortalities at the sites were primarily among recently introduced fish and the predominant fish species affected was bream. The bream stocked at 5 of the 6 English fishery sites were found to have originated from the River Bann, Northern Ireland. Most fish presented few consistent external signs of disease but some exhibited clinical signs similar to those of spring viraemia of carp (SVC), with extensive skin haemorrhages, ulceration on the flanks and internal signs including ascites and petechial haemorrhages. The most prominent histopathological changes were hepatocellular necrosis, interstitial nephritis and splenitis. The virus induced a cytopathic effect in tissue cultures (Epithelioma papulosum cyprini [EPC] cells) at 20 degrees C and produced moderate signals in an enzyme immunoassay (EIA) for the detection of SVC virus. The virus showed a close serological relationship to pike fry rhabdovirus in both EIA and serum neutralisation assays and to a rhabdovirus isolated during a disease outbreak in a bream population in the River Bann in 1998. A high degree of sequence similarity (> or = 99.5% nucleotide identity) was observed between the English isolates and those from the River Bann. Experimental infection of juvenile bream, tench and carp with EPC cell-grown rhabdovirus by bath and intraperitoneal injection resulted in a 40% mortality of bream in the injection group only. The virus was re-isolated from pooled kidney, liver and spleen tissue samples from moribund bream. The field observations together with the experimental results indicate that this rhabdovirus is of low virulence but may have the potential to cause significant mortality in fishes under stress.

  17. Rhabdovirus-induced apoptosis in a fish cell line is inhibited by a human endogenous acid cysteine proteinase inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Björklund, H V; Johansson, T R; Rinne, A

    1997-07-01

    To determine the mechanisms of cell death in rhabdovirus-infected cells, we studied the infection of the epithelial papilloma of carp cell line with spring viremia of carp virus. Studies using electron microscopy, confocal microscopy, and agarose gel electrophoresis revealed changes in cell morphology and DNA fragmentation indicative of apoptosis. The virus-induced apoptosis was inhibited in cells treated with a human endogenous acid cysteine proteinase inhibitor. PMID:9188644

  18. Detection and genome analysis of a novel (dima)rhabdovirus (Riverside virus) from Ochlerotatus sp. mosquitoes in Central Europe.

    PubMed

    Reuter, Gábor; Boros, Ákos; Pál, József; Kapusinszky, Beatrix; Delwart, Eric; Pankovics, Péter

    2016-04-01

    During an investigation for potential arboviruses present in mosquitoes in Hungary (Central Europe) three highly similar virus strains of a novel rhabdovirus (family Rhabdoviridae) called Riverside virus (RISV, KU248085-KU248087) were detected and genetically characterized from Ochlerotatus sp. mosquito pools collected from 3 geographical locations using viral metagenomic and RT-PCR methods. The ssRNA(-) genome of RISVs follows the general genome layout of rhabdoviruses (3'-N-P-M-G-L-5') with two alternatives, small ORFs in the P and G genes (Px and Gx). The genome of RISVs contains some unusual features such as the large P proteins, the short M proteins with the absence of N-terminal region together with the undetectable "Late budding" motif and the overlap of P and M genes. The unusually long 3' UTRs of the M genes of RISVs probably contain a remnant transcription termination signal which is suggesting the presence of an ancestral gene. The phylogenetic analysis and sequence comparisons show that the closest known relative of RISVs is the recently identified partially sequenced mosquito-borne rhabdovirus, North Creek virus (NOCRV), from Australia. The RISVs and NOCRV form a distinct, basally rooted lineage in the dimarhabdovirus supergroup. The host species range of RISVs is currently unknown, although the presence of these viruses especially in Ochlerotatus sp. mosquitoes which are known to be fierce biting pests of humans and warm-blooded animals and abundant and widespread in Hungary could hold some potential medical and/or veterinary risks.

  19. A novel strategy for the determination of a rhabdovirus genome and its application to sequencing of Eggplant mottled dwarf virus.

    PubMed

    Pappi, Polyxeni G; Dovas, Chrysostomos I; Efthimiou, Konstantinos E; Maliogka, Varvara I; Katis, Nikolaos I

    2013-08-01

    A novel strategy employing the rhabdovirus untranslated conserved intergenic regions was developed and applied successfully for the determination of the complete nucleotide sequence of Eggplant mottled dwarf virus (EMDV). The EMDV genome contains seven open reading frames with the same organization as Potato yellow dwarf virus (PYDV), the type species of the genus Nucleorhabdovirus. These two species encode five core genes [nucleocapsid (N), phosphoprotein (P), matrix (M), glycoprotein (G), and the polymerase (L)] like other viruses of the genus and an additional one (X), located between N and P, giving rise to a protein with currently unknown function. Furthermore, both EMDV and PYDV contain a gene (Y), inserted between P and M, which probably encodes the virus movement protein, in concordance with the rest of the plant-infecting rhabdoviruses. Phylogenetic analysis of the polymerase gene confirmed the classification of EMDV within the genus Nucleorhabdovirus and showed a close evolutionary relationship to PYDV. The novel sequencing strategy developed is a useful tool for the genome determination of yet uncharacterized rhabdoviruses.

  20. Treatment with MOG-DNA vaccines induces CD4+CD25+FoxP3+ regulatory T cells and up-regulates genes with neuroprotective functions in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background DNA vaccines represent promising therapeutic strategies in autoimmune disorders such as multiple sclerosis (MS). However, the precise mechanisms by which DNA vaccines induce immune regulation remain largely unknown. Here, we aimed to expand previous knowledge existing on the mechanisms of action of DNA vaccines in the animal model of MS, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), by treating EAE mice with a DNA vaccine encoding the myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG), and exploring the therapeutic effects on the disease-induced inflammatory and neurodegenerative changes. Methods EAE was induced in C57BL6/J mice by immunization with MOG35-55 peptide. Mice were intramuscularly treated with a MOG-DNA vaccine or vehicle in prophylactic and therapeutic approaches. Histological studies were performed in central nervous system (CNS) tissue. Cytokine production and regulatory T cell (Treg) quantification were achieved by flow cytometry. Gene expression patterns were determined using microarrays, and the main findings were validated by real-time PCR. Results MOG-DNA treatment reduced the clinical and histopathological signs of EAE when administered in both prophylactic and therapeutic settings. Suppression of clinical EAE was associated with dampening of antigen (Ag)-specific proinflammatory Th1 and Th17 immune responses and, interestingly, expansion of Treg in the periphery and upregulation in the CNS of genes encoding neurotrophic factors and proteins involved in remyelination. Conclusions These results suggest for the first time that the beneficial effects of DNA vaccines in EAE are not limited to anti-inflammatory mechanisms, and DNA vaccines may also exert positive effects through hitherto unknown neuroprotective mechanisms. PMID:22727044

  1. Bovine ephemeral fever rhabdovirus α1 protein has viroporin-like properties and binds importin β1 and importin 7.

    PubMed

    Joubert, D Albert; Blasdell, Kim R; Audsley, Michelle D; Trinidad, Lee; Monaghan, Paul; Dave, Keyur A; Lieu, Kim G; Amos-Ritchie, Rachel; Jans, David A; Moseley, Gregory W; Gorman, Jeffrey J; Walker, Peter J

    2014-02-01

    Bovine ephemeral fever virus (BEFV) is an arthropod-borne rhabdovirus that is classified as the type species of the genus Ephemerovirus. In addition to the five canonical rhabdovirus structural proteins (N, P, M, G, and L), the large and complex BEFV genome contains several open reading frames (ORFs) between the G and L genes (α1, α2/α3, β, and γ) encoding proteins of unknown function. We show that the 10.5-kDa BEFV α1 protein is expressed in infected cells and, consistent with previous predictions based on its structure, has the properties of a viroporin. Expression of a BEFV α1-maltose binding protein (MBP) fusion protein in Escherichia coli was observed to inhibit cell growth and increase membrane permeability to hygromycin B. Increased membrane permeability was also observed in BEFV-infected mammalian cells (but not cells infected with an α1-deficient BEFV strain) and in cells expressing a BEFV α1-green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusion protein, which was shown by confocal microscopy to localize to the Golgi complex. Furthermore, the predicted C-terminal cytoplasmic domain of α1, which contains a strong nuclear localization signal (NLS), was translocated to the nucleus when expressed independently, and in an affinity chromatography assay employing a GFP trap, the full-length α1 was observed to interact specifically with importin β1 and importin 7 but not with importin α3. These data suggest that, in addition to its function as a viroporin, BEFV α1 may modulate components of nuclear trafficking pathways, but the specific role thereof remains unclear. Although rhabdovirus accessory genes occur commonly among arthropod-borne rhabdoviruses, little is known of their functions. Here, we demonstrate that the BEFV α1 ORF encodes a protein which has the structural and functional characteristics of a viroporin. We show that α1 localizes in the Golgi complex and increases cellular permeability. We also show that BEFV α1 binds importin β1 and importin 7

  2. Duck enteritis virus glycoprotein D and B DNA vaccines induce immune responses and immunoprotection in Pekin ducks.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yan; Cao, Yongsheng; Cui, Lihong; Ma, Bo; Mu, Xiaoyu; Li, Yanwei; Zhang, Zhihui; Li, Dan; Wei, Wei; Gao, Mingchun; Wang, Junwei

    2014-01-01

    DNA vaccine is a promising strategy for protection against virus infection. However, little is known on the efficacy of vaccination with two plasmids for expressing the glycoprotein D (gD) and glycoprotein B (gB) of duck enteritis virus (DEV) in inducing immune response and immunoprotection against virulent virus infection in Pekin ducks. In this study, two eukaryotic expressing plasmids of pcDNA3.1-gB and pcDNA3.1-gD were constructed. Following transfection, the gB and gD expressions in DF1 cells were detected. Groups of ducks were vaccinated with pcDNA3.1-gB and/or pcDNA3.1-gD, and boosted with the same vaccine on day 14 post primary vaccination. We found that intramuscular vaccinations with pcDNA3.1-gB and/or pcDNA3.1-gD, but not control plasmid, stimulated a high frequency of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells in Pekin ducks, particularly with both plasmids. Similarly, vaccination with these plasmids, particularly with both plasmids, promoted higher levels of neutralization antibodies against DEV in Pekin ducks. More importantly, vaccination with both plasmids significantly reduced the virulent DEV-induced mortality in Pekin ducks. Our data indicated that vaccination with plasmids for expressing both gB and gD induced potent cellular and humoral immunity against DEV in Pekin ducks. Therefore, this vaccination strategy may be used for the prevention of DEV infection in Pekin ducks.

  3. Protective immunity against Taenia crassiceps murine cysticercosis induced by DNA vaccination with a Taenia saginata tegument antigen.

    PubMed

    Rosas, Gabriela; Fragoso, Gladis; Garate, Teresa; Hernández, Beatriz; Ferrero, Patricia; Foster-Cuevas, Mildred; Parkhouse, R Michael E; Harrison, Leslie J S; Briones, Sergio López; González, Luis Miguel; Sciutto, Edda

    2002-11-01

    This study investigated the protective capacity of the recombinant Taenia saginata Tso18 antigen administered as a DNA vaccine in the Taenia crassiceps murine model of cysticercosis. This Tso18 DNA sequence, isolated from a T. saginata oncosphere cDNA library, has homologies with Taenia solium and Echinococcus sp. It was cloned in the pcDNA3.1 plasmid and injected once intramuscularly into mice. Compared to saline-vaccinated control mice, immunization reduced the parasite burden by 57.3-81.4%, while lower levels of non-specific protection were induced in control mice injected with the plasmid pcDNA3.1 (18.8-33.1%) or a plasmid with irrelevant construct, pcDNA3.1/3D15 (33.4-38.8%). Importantly, significant levels of protection were observed between the pcDNA3.1/Tso18 plasmid and pcDNA3.1/3D15 plasmid immunized mice. Mice immunized with pTso18 synthesized low levels of, primarily IgG1 sub-class, antibodies. These antibodies were shown to recognize a 66 kDa antigen fraction of T. crassiceps and T. solium. Splenocytes enriched in both CD4+CD8- and CD4-CD8+ T cells from these vaccinated mice proliferated in vitro when exposed to antigens from both T. solium and T. crassiceps cestodes. Immunolocalization studies revealed the Tso18 antigen in oncospheres of T. saginata and T. solium, in the adult tapeworm and in the tegument of T. solium cysticerci. The protective capacity of this antigen and its extensive distribution in different stages, species and genera of cestodes points to the potential of Tso18 antigen for the possible design of a vaccine against cestodes.

  4. Characterization of an Sf-rhabdovirus-negative Spodoptera frugiperda cell line as an alternative host for recombinant protein production in the baculovirus-insect cell system.

    PubMed

    Maghodia, Ajay B; Geisler, Christoph; Jarvis, Donald L

    2016-06-01

    Cell lines derived from the fall armyworm, Spodoptera frugiperda (Sf), are widely used as hosts for recombinant protein production in the baculovirus-insect cell system (BICS). However, it was recently discovered that these cell lines are contaminated with a virus, now known as Sf-rhabdovirus [1]. The detection of this adventitious agent raised a potential safety issue that could adversely impact the BICS as a commercial recombinant protein production platform. Thus, we examined the properties of Sf-RVN, an Sf-rhabdovirus-negative Sf cell line, as a potential alternative host. Nested RT-PCR assays showed Sf-RVN cells had no detectable Sf-rhabdovirus over the course of 60 passages in continuous culture. The general properties of Sf-RVN cells, including their average growth rates, diameters, morphologies, and viabilities after baculovirus infection, were virtually identical to those of Sf9 cells. Baculovirus-infected Sf-RVN and Sf9 cells produced equivalent levels of three recombinant proteins, including an intracellular prokaryotic protein and two secreted eukaryotic glycoproteins, and provided similar N-glycosylation patterns. In fact, except for the absence of Sf-rhabdovirus, the only difference between Sf-RVN and Sf9 cells was SF-RVN produced higher levels of infectious baculovirus progeny. These results show Sf-RVN cells can be used as improved, alternative hosts to circumvent the potential safety hazard associated with the use of Sf-rhabdovirus-contaminated Sf cells for recombinant protein manufacturing with the BICS.

  5. Evolution of MS lesions to black holes under DNA vaccine treatment.

    PubMed

    Papadopoulou, Athina; von Felten, Stefanie; Traud, Stefan; Rahman, Amena; Quan, Joanne; King, Robert; Garren, Hideki; Steinman, Lawrence; Cutter, Gary; Kappos, Ludwig; Radue, Ernst Wilhelm

    2012-07-01

    Persistent black holes (PBH) are associated with axonal loss and disability progression in multiple sclerosis (MS). The objective of this work was to determine if BHT-3009, a DNA plasmid-encoding myelin basic protein (MBP), reduces the risk of new lesions becoming PBH, compared to placebo, and to test if pre-treatment serum anti-MBP antibody levels impact on the effect of BHT-3009 treatment. In this retrospective, blinded MRI study, we reviewed MRI scans of 155 MS patients from a double-blind, randomized, phase II trial with three treatment arms (placebo, 0.5 and 1.5 mg BHT-3009). New lesions at weeks 8 and 16 were tracked at week 48 and those appearing as T1-hypointense were classified as PBH. A subset of 46 patients with available pre-treatment serum anti-MBP IgM levels were analyzed separately. Overall, there was no impact of treatment on the risk for PBH. However, there was a significant interaction between anti-MBP antibodies and treatment effect: patients receiving 0.5 mg BHT-3009 showed a reduced risk of PBH with higher antibody levels compared to placebo (p < 0.01). Although we found no overall reduction of the risk for PBH in treated patients, there may be an effect of low-dose BHT-3009, depending on the patients' pre-treatment immune responses.

  6. CTL responses to Leishmania mexicana gp63-cDNA vaccine in a murine model.

    PubMed

    Ali, S A; Rezvan, H; McArdle, S E; Khodadadi, A; Asteal, F A; Rees, R C

    2009-07-01

    Immunity to Leishmania is believed to be strongly dependent upon the activation of Th1 immune responses, although the exact role of cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) has not yet been determined. The aims of this study were to establish a suitable cytotoxicity assay to measure CTL activity and to compare immunity induced by Leishmania mexicana gp63 cDNA via i.m. injection and gene gun immunization in the BALB/c mouse model. The CTL activity was evaluated by short-term (51)Cr-release cytotoxicity assays against CT26 tumour cells transfected with L. mexicana gp63 cDNA and dendritic cells (DCs) loaded with soluble Leishmania antigen (SLA) as targets. The results clearly demonstrated that higher protection to L. mexicana infection was induced by gene gun DNA-immunization vs. i.m. injection. Cytotoxic T lymphocyte activity of splenocytes was observed in mice immunized either with L. mexicana gp63 cDNA or SLA and long-lived CTL activity was observed in immunized and/or re-challenged mice but not naïve mice infected with the parasite.

  7. A rationally designed tyrosine hydroxylase DNA vaccine induces specific antineuroblastoma immunity.

    PubMed

    Huebener, Nicole; Fest, Stefan; Strandsby, Anne; Michalsky, Elke; Preissner, Robert; Zeng, Yan; Gaedicke, Gerhard; Lode, Holger N

    2008-07-01

    Therapeutic vaccination against tumor antigens without induction of autoimmunity remains a major challenge in cancer immunotherapy. Here, we show for the first time effective therapeutic vaccination followed by suppression of established spontaneous neuroblastoma metastases using a tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) DNA minigene vaccine. We identified three novel mouse TH (mTH3) derived peptides with high predicted binding affinity to MHC class I antigen H2-K(k) according to the prediction program SYFPEITHI and computer modeling of epitopes into the MHC class I antigen binding groove. Subsequently, a DNA minigene vaccine was generated based on the expression vector pCMV-F3Ub encoding mutated ubiquitin (Gly(76) to Ala(76)) and mTH3. Prophylactic and therapeutic efficacies of this vaccine were established following oral delivery with attenuated Salmonella typhimurium SL7207. Only mice immunized with mTH3 were free of spontaneous liver metastases. This effect was clearly dependent on ubiquitin and high affinity of the mTH epitopes to MHC class I antigens. Specifically, we showed a crucial role for minigene expression as a stable ubiquitin-Ala(76) fusion peptide for vaccine efficacy. The immune response following the mTH3 DNA minigene vaccination was mediated by CD8(+) T cells as indicated by infiltration of primary tumors and TH-specific cytolytic activity in vitro. Importantly, no cell infiltration was detectable in TH-expressing adrenal medulla, indicating the absence of autoimmunity. In summary, we show effective therapeutic vaccination against neuroblastoma with a novel rationally designed TH minigene vaccine without induction of autoimmunity providing an important baseline for future clinical application of this strategy.

  8. Chemo-immunotherapy using saffron and its ingredients followed by E7-NT (gp96) DNA vaccine generates different anti-tumor effects against tumors expressing the E7 protein of human papillomavirus.

    PubMed

    Khavari, Afshin; Bolhassani, Azam; Alizadeh, Fatemeh; Bathaie, S Zahra; Balaram, Prabha; Agi, Elnaz; Vahabpour, Rouhollah

    2015-02-01

    Saffron and its components have been suggested as promising candidates for cancer prevention. Carotenoids and monoterpene aldehydes are two potent ingredients of saffron. The goal of the current study was to investigate the anti-tumor effect of chemo-immunotherapy using saffron and its ingredients followed by E7-NT (gp96) DNA vaccine against tumors expressing the E7 protein of human papillomavirus. The in vitro cytotoxic and apoptotic effects of aqueous saffron extract and its components were evaluated in malignant TC-1 and non-malignant COS-7 cell lines. Then, multimodality treatments using E7-NT (gp96) DNA vaccine combined with saffron extract and its ingredients as well as single-modality treatments were tested for their efficacy in inhibiting large and bulky tumor growth. Saffron and its components exerted a considerable anti-tumor effect through prevention of cell growth and stimulation of programmed cell death. Furthermore, 100 % of mice treated with crocin were tumor-free, in contrast to DNA vaccine alone (~66.7 %) and DNA + crocin (~33.3 %) indicating the high potency of crocin as a chemotherapeutic agent. Interestingly, the multimodality treatment using DNA vaccine along with picrocrocin augmented the anti-tumor effects of picrocrocin. Thus, the combination of DNA vaccine with saffron extract and crocin at certain concentrations did not potentiate protective and therapeutic effects compared to mono-therapies for the control of TC-1 tumors. PMID:25395243

  9. Chemo-immunotherapy using saffron and its ingredients followed by E7-NT (gp96) DNA vaccine generates different anti-tumor effects against tumors expressing the E7 protein of human papillomavirus.

    PubMed

    Khavari, Afshin; Bolhassani, Azam; Alizadeh, Fatemeh; Bathaie, S Zahra; Balaram, Prabha; Agi, Elnaz; Vahabpour, Rouhollah

    2015-02-01

    Saffron and its components have been suggested as promising candidates for cancer prevention. Carotenoids and monoterpene aldehydes are two potent ingredients of saffron. The goal of the current study was to investigate the anti-tumor effect of chemo-immunotherapy using saffron and its ingredients followed by E7-NT (gp96) DNA vaccine against tumors expressing the E7 protein of human papillomavirus. The in vitro cytotoxic and apoptotic effects of aqueous saffron extract and its components were evaluated in malignant TC-1 and non-malignant COS-7 cell lines. Then, multimodality treatments using E7-NT (gp96) DNA vaccine combined with saffron extract and its ingredients as well as single-modality treatments were tested for their efficacy in inhibiting large and bulky tumor growth. Saffron and its components exerted a considerable anti-tumor effect through prevention of cell growth and stimulation of programmed cell death. Furthermore, 100 % of mice treated with crocin were tumor-free, in contrast to DNA vaccine alone (~66.7 %) and DNA + crocin (~33.3 %) indicating the high potency of crocin as a chemotherapeutic agent. Interestingly, the multimodality treatment using DNA vaccine along with picrocrocin augmented the anti-tumor effects of picrocrocin. Thus, the combination of DNA vaccine with saffron extract and crocin at certain concentrations did not potentiate protective and therapeutic effects compared to mono-therapies for the control of TC-1 tumors.

  10. Toxoplasma gondii: Vaccination with a DNA vaccine encoding T- and B-cell epitopes of SAG1, GRA2, GRA7 and ROP16 elicits protection against acute toxoplasmosis in mice.

    PubMed

    Cao, Aiping; Liu, Yuan; Wang, Jingjing; Li, Xun; Wang, Shuai; Zhao, Qunli; Cong, Hua; He, Shenyi; Zhou, Huaiyu

    2015-11-27

    Toxoplasma gondii (T. gondii) is an obligate, intracellular, protozoan parasite that infects large variety of warm-blooded animals including humans, livestock, and marine mammals, and causes the disease toxoplasmosis. Although T. gondii infection rates differ significantly from country to country, it still has a high morbidity and mortality. In these circumstances, developing an effective vaccine against T. gondii is urgently needed for preventing and treating toxoplasmosis. The aim of this study was to construct a multi-epitopes DNA vaccine and evaluate the immune protective efficacy against acute toxoplasmosis in mice. Therefore, twelve T- and B-cell epitopes from SAG1, GRA2, GRA7 and ROP16 of T. gondii were predicted by bioinformatics analysis, and then a multi-epitopes DNA vaccine was constructed. Mice immunized with the multi-epitopes DNA vaccine gained higher levels of IgG titers and IgG2a subclass titers, significant production of gamma interferon (IFN-γ), percentage of T lymphocyte subsets, and longer survival times against the acute infection of T. gondii compared with those of mice administered with empty plasmid and those in control groups. Furthermore, a genetic adjuvant pEGFP-RANTES (pRANTES) could enhance the efficacy of the multi-epitopes DNA vaccine associating with humoral and cellular (Th1, CD8(+) T cell) immune responses. Above all, the DNA vaccine and the genetic adjuvant revealed in this study might be new candidates for further vaccine development against T. gondii infection.

  11. Cellular immunity survey against urinary tract infection using pVAX/fimH cassette with mammalian and wild type codon usage as a DNA vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Bagherpour, Ghasem; Khoramabadi, Nima; Fallah Mehrabadi, Jalil; Mahdavi, Mehdi; Halabian, Raheleh; Amin, Mohsen; Izadi Mobarakeh, Jalal; Einollahi, Behzad

    2014-01-01

    Purpose FimH (the adhesion fragment of type 1 fimbriae) is implicated in uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) attachment to epithelial cells through interaction with mannose. Recently, some studies have found that UPEC can thrive intracellularly causing recurrent urinary tract infection (UTI). Almost all vaccines have been designed to induce antibodies against UPEC. Yet, the humoral immune response is not potent enough to overcome neither the primary UTI nor recurrent infections. However, DNA vaccines offer the possibility of inducing cell mediated immune responses and may be a promising preventive tool. Materials and Methods In this study, we employed two different open reading frames within mammalian (mam) and wild type (wt) codons of fimH gene. Optimized fragments were cloned in pVAX-1. Expression of the protein in COS-7 was confirmed by western blot analysis after assessing pVAX/fimH(mam) and pVAX/fimH(wt). The constructs were injected to BALB/c mice at plantar surface of feet followed by electroporation. Results The mice immunized with both constructs following booster injection with recombinant FimH showed increased interferon-γ and interleukin-12 responses significantly higher than non-immunized ones (p<0.05). The immunized mice were challenged with UPEC and then the number of bacteria recovered from the immunized mice was compared with the non-immunized ones. Decreased colony count in immunized mice along with cytokine responses confirmed the promising immune response by the DNA vaccines developed in this study. Conclusion In conclusion, DNA vaccines of UPEC proteins may confer some levels of protection which can be improved by multiple constructs or boosters. PMID:25003092

  12. Protective and Anti-Pathology Effects of Sm Fructose-1,6-Bisphosphate Aldolase-Based DNA Vaccine against Schistosoma mansoni by Changing Route of Injection

    PubMed Central

    Saber, Mohamed; Hammam, Olft; Karim, Amr; Medhat, Amina; Khela, Mamdouh; El-Dabaa, Ehab

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the efficacy of fructose-1,6-bis phosphate aldolase (SMALDO) DNA vaccination against Schistosoma mansoni infection using different routes of injection. The SMALDO has been cloned into the eukaryotic expression vector pcDNA3.1/V5-His TOPO-TA and was used in injecting Swiss albino mice intramuscularly (IM), subcutaneously (SC), or intraperitoneally (IP) (50 µg/mouse). Mice vaccinated with non-recombinant pcDNA3.1 served as controls. Each group was immunized 4 times at weeks 0, 2, 4, and 6. Two weeks after the last booster dose, all mice groups were infected with 80 S. mansoni cercariae via tail immersion. At week 8 post-infection, animals were sacrificed for assessment of parasitological and histopathological parameters. High anti-SMALDO IgG antibody titers were detected in sera of all vaccinated groups (P<0.01) compared to the control group. Both the IP and SC vaccination routes resulted in a significant reduction in worm burden (46.2% and 28.9%, respectively, P<0.01). This was accompanied by a significant reduction in hepatic and intestinal egg counts (41.7% and 40.2%, respectively, P<0.01) in the IP group only. The number of dead eggs was significantly increased in both IP and IM groups (P<0.01). IP vaccination recorded the highest significant reduction in granuloma number and diameter (54.7% and 29.2%, respectively, P<0.01) and significant increase in dead miracidia (P<0.01). In conclusion, changing the injection route of SMALDO DNA vaccination significantly influenced the efficacy of vaccination. SMALDO DNA vaccination via IP route could be a promising protective and anti-pathology vaccine candidate against S. mansoni infection. PMID:23710082

  13. Preparation, characterization, and in ovo vaccination of dextran-spermine nanoparticle DNA vaccine coexpressing the fusion and hemagglutinin genes against Newcastle disease.

    PubMed

    Firouzamandi, Masoumeh; Moeini, Hassan; Hosseini, Seyed Davood; Bejo, Mohd Hair; Omar, Abdul Rahman; Mehrbod, Parvaneh; El Zowalaty, Mohamed E; Webster, Thomas J; Ideris, Aini

    2016-01-01

    Plasmid DNA (pDNA)-based vaccines have emerged as effective subunit vaccines against viral and bacterial pathogens. In this study, a DNA vaccine, namely plasmid internal ribosome entry site-HN/F, was applied in ovo against Newcastle disease (ND). Vaccination was carried out using the DNA vaccine alone or as a mixture of the pDNA and dextran-spermine (D-SPM), a nanoparticle used for pDNA delivery. The results showed that in ovo vaccination with 40 μg pDNA/egg alone induced high levels of antibody titer (P<0.05) in specific pathogen-free (SPF) chickens at 3 and 4 weeks postvaccination compared to 2 weeks postvaccination. Hemagglutination inhibition (HI) titer was not significantly different between groups injected with 40 μg pDNA + 64 μg D-SPM and 40 μg pDNA at 4 weeks postvaccination (P>0.05). Higher antibody titer was observed in the group immunized with 40 μg pDNA/egg at 4 weeks postvaccination. The findings also showed that vaccination with 40 μg pDNA/egg alone was able to confer protection against Newcastle disease virus strain NDIBS002 in two out of seven SPF chickens. Although the chickens produced antibody titers 3 weeks after in ovo vaccination, it was not sufficient to provide complete protection to the chickens from lethal viral challenge. In addition, vaccination with pDNA/D-SPM complex did not induce high antibody titer when compared with naked pDNA. Therefore, it was concluded that DNA vaccination with plasmid internal ribosome entry site-HN/F can be suitable for in ovo application against ND, whereas D-SPM is not recommended for in ovo gene delivery. PMID:26834470

  14. Oral Vaccination with Attenuated Salmonella typhimurium-Delivered TsPmy DNA Vaccine Elicits Protective Immunity against Trichinella spiralis in BALB/c Mice

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lei; Wang, Xiaohuan; Bi, Kuo; Sun, Ximeng; Yang, Jing; Gu, Yuan; Huang, Jingjing; Zhan, Bin; Zhu, Xinping

    2016-01-01

    Background Our previous studies showed that Trichinella spiralis paramyosin (TsPmy) is an immunomodulatory protein that inhibits complement C1q and C8/C9 to evade host complement attack. Vaccination with recombinant TsPmy protein induced protective immunity against T. spiralis larval challenge. Due to the difficulty in producing TsPmy as a soluble recombinant protein, we prepared a DNA vaccine as an alternative approach in order to elicit a robust immunity against Trichinella infection. Methods and Findings The full-length TsPmy coding DNA was cloned into the eukaryotic expression plasmid pVAX1, and the recombinant pVAX1/TsPmy was transformed into attenuated Salmonella typhimurium strain SL7207. Oral vaccination of mice with this attenuated Salmonella-delivered TsPmy DNA vaccine elicited a significant mucosal sIgA response in the intestine and a systemic IgG antibody response with IgG2a as the predominant subclass. Cytokine analysis also showed a significant increase in the Th1 (IFN-γ, IL-2) and Th2 (IL-4, 5, 6, 10) responses in lymphocytes from the spleen and MLNs of immunized mice upon stimulation with TsPmy protein. The expression of the homing receptors CCR9/CCR10 on antibody secreting B cells may be related to the translocation of IgA-secreted B cells to local intestinal mucosa. The mice immunized with Salmonella-delivered TsPmy DNA vaccine produced a significant 44.8% reduction in adult worm and a 46.6% reduction in muscle larvae after challenge with T. spiralis larvae. Conclusion Our results demonstrated that oral vaccination with TsPmy DNA delivered by live attenuated S. typhimurium elicited a significant local IgA response and a mixed Th1/Th2 immune response that elicited a significant protection against T. spiralis infection in mice. PMID:27589591

  15. Real-Time Immune Monitoring to Guide Plasmid DNA Vaccination Schedule Targeting Prostatic Acid Phosphatase (PAP) in Patients with Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    McNeel, Douglas G.; Becker, Jordan T.; Eickhoff, Jens C.; Johnson, Laura E.; Bradley, Eric; Pohlkamp, Isabel; Staab, Mary Jane; Liu, Glenn; Wilding, George; Olson, Brian M.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND We have previously reported that a DNA vaccine encoding prostatic acid phosphatase (PAP) could elicit PAP-specific T cells in patients with early recurrent prostate cancer. In the current pilot trial we sought to evaluate whether prolonged immunization with regular booster immunizations, or “personalized” schedules of immunization determined using real-time immune monitoring, could elicit persistent, antigen-specific T cells, and whether treatment was associated with changes in PSA doubling time (PSA DT). METHODS 16 patients with castration-resistant, non-metastatic prostate cancer received six immunizations at two-week intervals, and then either quarterly (Arm 1) or as determined by multi-parameter immune monitoring (Arm 2). RESULTS Patients were on study a median of 16 months; four received 24 vaccinations. Only one event associated with treatment > grade 2 was observed. 6/16 (38%) remained metastasis-free at 2 years. PAP-specific T cells were elicited in 12/16 (75%), predominantly of a Th1 phenotype, which persisted in frequency and phenotype for at least one year. IFNγ-secreting T-cell responses measured by ELISPOT were detectable in 5/13 individuals at one year, and this was not statistically different between study arms. The overall median fold change in PSA DT from pre-treatment to post-treatment was 1.6 (range 0.6–7.0, p=0.036). CONCLUSIONS Repetitive immunization with a plasmid DNA vaccine was safe and elicited Th1-biased antigen-specific T cells that persisted over time. Modifications in the immunization schedule based on real-time immune monitoring did not increase the frequency of patients developing effector and memory T-cell responses with this DNA vaccine. PMID:24850844

  16. DNA vaccines expressing soluble CD4-envelope proteins fused to C3d elicit cross-reactive neutralizing antibodies to HIV-1

    SciTech Connect

    Bower, Joseph F.; Green, Thomas D.; Ross, Ted M. . E-mail: tmr15@pitt.edu

    2004-10-25

    DNA vaccines expressing the envelope (Env) of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) have been relatively ineffective at generating high-titer, long-lasting, neutralizing antibodies in a variety of animal models. In this study, DNA vaccines were constructed to express a fusion protein of the soluble human CD4 (sCD4) and the gp120 subunit of the HIV-1 envelope. To enhance the immunogenicity of the expressed fusion protein, three copies of the murine C3d (mC3d{sub 3}) were added to the carboxyl terminus of the complex. Monoclonal antibodies that recognize CD4-induced epitopes on gp120 efficiently bound to sCD4-gp120 or sCD4-gp120-mC3d{sub 3}. In addition, both sCD4-gp120 and sCD4-gp120-mC3d{sub 3} bound to cells expressing appropriate coreceptors in the absence of cell surface hCD4. Mice (BALB/c) vaccinated with DNA vaccines expressing either gp120-mC3d{sub 3} or sCD4-gp120-mC3d{sub 3} elicited antibodies that neutralized homologous virus infection. However, the use of sCD4-gp120-mC3d{sub 3}-DNA elicited the highest titers of neutralizing antibodies that persisted after depletion of anti-hCD4 antibodies. Interestingly, only mice vaccinated with DNA expressing sCD4-gp120-mC3d{sub 3} had antibodies that elicited cross-protective neutralizing antibodies. The fusion of sCD4 to the HIV-1 envelope exposes neutralizing epitopes that elicit broad protective immunity when the fusion complex is coupled with the molecular adjuvant, C3d.

  17. Preparation, characterization, and in ovo vaccination of dextran-spermine nanoparticle DNA vaccine coexpressing the fusion and hemagglutinin genes against Newcastle disease.

    PubMed

    Firouzamandi, Masoumeh; Moeini, Hassan; Hosseini, Seyed Davood; Bejo, Mohd Hair; Omar, Abdul Rahman; Mehrbod, Parvaneh; El Zowalaty, Mohamed E; Webster, Thomas J; Ideris, Aini

    2016-01-01

    Plasmid DNA (pDNA)-based vaccines have emerged as effective subunit vaccines against viral and bacterial pathogens. In this study, a DNA vaccine, namely plasmid internal ribosome entry site-HN/F, was applied in ovo against Newcastle disease (ND). Vaccination was carried out using the DNA vaccine alone or as a mixture of the pDNA and dextran-spermine (D-SPM), a nanoparticle used for pDNA delivery. The results showed that in ovo vaccination with 40 μg pDNA/egg alone induced high levels of antibody titer (P<0.05) in specific pathogen-free (SPF) chickens at 3 and 4 weeks postvaccination compared to 2 weeks postvaccination. Hemagglutination inhibition (HI) titer was not significantly different between groups injected with 40 μg pDNA + 64 μg D-SPM and 40 μg pDNA at 4 weeks postvaccination (P>0.05). Higher antibody titer was observed in the group immunized with 40 μg pDNA/egg at 4 weeks postvaccination. The findings also showed that vaccination with 40 μg pDNA/egg alone was able to confer protection against Newcastle disease virus strain NDIBS002 in two out of seven SPF chickens. Although the chickens produced antibody titers 3 weeks after in ovo vaccination, it was not sufficient to provide complete protection to the chickens from lethal viral challenge. In addition, vaccination with pDNA/D-SPM complex did not induce high antibody titer when compared with naked pDNA. Therefore, it was concluded that DNA vaccination with plasmid internal ribosome entry site-HN/F can be suitable for in ovo application against ND, whereas D-SPM is not recommended for in ovo gene delivery.

  18. Induction of human immunodeficiency virus type-1-specific immunity with a novel gene transport unit (GTU)-MultiHIV DNA vaccine.

    PubMed

    Blazevic, Vesna; Männik, Andres; Malm, Maria; Sikut, Rein; Valtavaara, Minna; Toots, Urve; Ustav, Mart; Krohn, Kai

    2006-07-01

    A multiHIV fusion gene expressing an antigenic fusion protein composed of regulatory HIV-1 proteins Rev, Nef, and Tat, as well as Gag p17/p24 and a stretch of 11 cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) epitope clusters from Pol and Env, was cloned into a novel DNA vector named the Gene Transport Unit (GTU). A mouse H-2(d)-restricted HIV-1 gp120 epitope (RGPGRAFVTI) was cloned into the fusion gene as well. In addition to the HIV- 1 genes the GTU codes for a nuclear anchoring protein (bovine papilloma virus E2), ensuring the long maintenance of the vector and a high expression level of the selected immunogens. BALB/c mice were immunized with the GTU-MultiHIV DNA construct by different routes and regimens of immunization to assess the immunogenicity of the DNA vaccine in vivo. Mice developed strong CD8(+) CTL responses to HIV-1 Env and Gag measured by an ELISPOT-IFN-gamma assay and chromium release assay. In addition, T cell responses to regulatory proteins Rev, Nef, and Tat were induced. Antibody responses were detected to each of the HIV antigens encoded by the DNA construct. Minimal doses of the GTU-MultiHIV DNA delivered by gene gun were potent in inducing significant HIV-specific CTL responses. The equivalent doses of the conventional plasmid expressing MultiHIV DNA delivered by gene gun failed to do so. An ideal DNA vaccine should yield high expression of the viral antigens for a prolonged period of time, and expression of the multiple viral antigens is probably required for the induction of a broad and protective immune response. The GTU-MultiHIV DNA vaccine described is a good vaccine candidate that meets the above criteria. PMID:16831091

  19. Protective efficacy of a broadly cross-reactive swine influenza DNA vaccine encoding M2e, cytotoxic T lymphocyte epitope and consensus H3 hemagglutinin

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Pigs have been implicated as mixing reservoir for the generation of new pandemic influenza strains, control of swine influenza has both veterinary and public health significance. Unlike human influenza vaccines, strains used for commercially available swine influenza vaccines are not regularly replaced, making the vaccines provide limited protection against antigenically diverse viruses. It is therefore necessary to develop broadly protective swine influenza vaccines that are efficacious to both homologous and heterologous virus infections. In this study, two forms of DNA vaccines were constructed, one was made by fusing M2e to consensus H3HA (MHa), which represents the majority of the HA sequences of H3N2 swine influenza viruses. Another was made by fusing M2e and a conserved CTL epitope (NP147-155) to consensus H3HA (MNHa). Their protective efficacies against homologous and heterologous challenges were tested. Results BALB/c mice were immunized twice by particle-mediated epidermal delivery (gene gun) with the two DNA vaccines. It was shown that the two vaccines elicited substantial antibody responses, and MNHa induced more significant T cell-mediated immune response than MHa did. Then two H3N2 strains representative of different evolutional and antigenic clusters were used to challenge the vaccine-immunized mice (homosubtypic challenge). Results indicated that both of the DNA vaccines prevented homosubtypic virus infections completely. The vaccines’ heterologous protective efficacies were further tested by challenging with a H1N1 swine influenza virus and a reassortant 2009 pandemic strain. It was found that MNHa reduced the lung viral titers significantly in both challenge groups, histopathological observation showed obvious reduction of lung pathogenesis as compared to MHa and control groups. Conclusions The combined utility of the consensus HA and the conserved M2e and CTL epitope can confer complete and partial protection against homologous and

  20. DNA Vaccine Encoding the Chimeric Form of Schistosoma mansoni Sm-TSP2 and Sm29 Confers Partial Protection against Challenge Infection

    PubMed Central

    Gonçalves de Assis, Natan Raimundo; Batistoni de Morais, Suellen; Figueiredo, Bárbara Castro Pimentel; Ricci, Natasha Delaqua; de Almeida, Leonardo Augusto; da Silva Pinheiro, Carina; Martins, Vicente de Paulo; Oliveira, Sergio Costa

    2015-01-01

    Schistosomiasis is an important parasitic disease worldwide that affects more than 207 million people in 76 countries and causes approximately 250,000 deaths per year. The best long-term strategy to control schistosomiasis is through immunization combined with drug treatment. Due to the ability of DNA vaccines to generate humoral and cellular immune responses, such vaccines are considered a promising approach against schistosomiasis. Sm29 and tetraspanin-2 (Sm-TSP2) are two proteins that are located in the S. mansoni tegument of adult worms and schistosomula and induce high levels of protection through recombinant protein immunization. In this study, we transfected BHK-21 cells with plasmids encoding Sm29, Sm-TSP2 or a chimera containing both genes. Using RT-PCR analysis and western blot, we confirmed that the DNA vaccine constructs were transcribed and translated, respectively, in BHK-21 cells. After immunization of mice, we evaluated the reduction in worm burden. We observed worm burden reductions of 17-22%, 22%, 31-32% and 24-32% in animals immunized with the pUMVC3/Sm29, pUMVC3/SmTSP-2, pUMVC3/Chimera and pUMVC3/Sm29 + pUMVC3/SmTSP-2 plasmids, respectively. We evaluated the humoral response elicited by DNA vaccines, and animals immunized with pUMVC3/Sm29 and pUMVC3/Sm29 + pUMVC3/SmTSP-2 showed higher titers of anti-Sm29 antibodies. The cytokine profile produced by the spleen cells of immunized mice was then evaluated. We observed higher production of Th1 cytokines, such as TNF-α and IFN-γ, in vaccinated mice and no significant production of IL-4 and IL-5. The DNA vaccines tested in this study showed the ability to generate a protective immune response against schistosomiasis, probably through the production of Th1 cytokines. However, future strategies aiming to optimize the protective response induced by a chimeric DNA construct need to be developed. PMID:25942636

  1. DNA Vaccine Encoding the Chimeric Form of Schistosoma mansoni Sm-TSP2 and Sm29 Confers Partial Protection against Challenge Infection.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves de Assis, Natan Raimundo; Batistoni de Morais, Suellen; Figueiredo, Bárbara Castro Pimentel; Ricci, Natasha Delaqua; de Almeida, Leonardo Augusto; da Silva Pinheiro, Carina; Martins, Vicente de Paulo; Oliveira, Sergio Costa

    2015-01-01

    Schistosomiasis is an important parasitic disease worldwide that affects more than 207 million people in 76 countries and causes approximately 250,000 deaths per year. The best long-term strategy to control schistosomiasis is through immunization combined with drug treatment. Due to the ability of DNA vaccines to generate humoral and cellular immune responses, such vaccines are considered a promising approach against schistosomiasis. Sm29 and tetraspanin-2 (Sm-TSP2) are two proteins that are located in the S. mansoni tegument of adult worms and schistosomula and induce high levels of protection through recombinant protein immunization. In this study, we transfected BHK-21 cells with plasmids encoding Sm29, Sm-TSP2 or a chimera containing both genes. Using RT-PCR analysis and western blot, we confirmed that the DNA vaccine constructs were transcribed and translated, respectively, in BHK-21 cells. After immunization of mice, we evaluated the reduction in worm burden. We observed worm burden reductions of 17-22%, 22%, 31-32% and 24-32% in animals immunized with the pUMVC3/Sm29, pUMVC3/SmTSP-2, pUMVC3/Chimera and pUMVC3/Sm29 + pUMVC3/SmTSP-2 plasmids, respectively. We evaluated the humoral response elicited by DNA vaccines, and animals immunized with pUMVC3/Sm29 and pUMVC3/Sm29 + pUMVC3/SmTSP-2 showed higher titers of anti-Sm29 antibodies. The cytokine profile produced by the spleen cells of immunized mice was then evaluated. We observed higher production of Th1 cytokines, such as TNF-α and IFN-γ, in vaccinated mice and no significant production of IL-4 and IL-5. The DNA vaccines tested in this study showed the ability to generate a protective immune response against schistosomiasis, probably through the production of Th1 cytokines. However, future strategies aiming to optimize the protective response induced by a chimeric DNA construct need to be developed.

  2. Efficacy of chimeric DNA vaccines encoding Eimeria tenella 5401 and chicken IFN-γ or IL-2 against coccidiosis in chickens.

    PubMed

    Song, Xiaokai; Huang, Xinmei; Yan, Ruofeng; Xu, Lixin; Li, Xiangrui

    2015-09-01

    Chimeric DNA vaccines encoding Eimeria tenella (E. tenella) surface antigen 5401 were constructed and their efficacies against E. tenella challenge were studied. The open reading frame (ORF) of 5401 was cloned into the prokaryotic expression vector pGEX-4T2 to express the recombinant protein and the expressed recombinant protein was identified by Western blot. The ORF of 5401 and chicken cytokine gene IFN-γ or IL-2 were cloned into the eukaryotic expression vector pVAX1 consecutively to construct DNA vaccines pVAX-5401-IFN-γ, pVAX-5401-IL-2 and pVAX-5401. The expression of aim genes in vivo was detected by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and Western blot. Fourteen-day-old chickens were inoculated twice at an interval of 7 days with 100 µg of plasmids pVAX-5401, pVAX-5401-IFN-γ and pVAX-5401-IL-2 or 200 µg of recombinant 5401 protein by leg intramuscular injection, respectively. Seven days after the second inoculation, all chickens except the unchallenged control group were challenged orally with 5 × 10(4) sporulated oocysts of E. tenella. Seven days after challenge, all chickens were weighted and slaughtered to determine the effects of immunization. The results showed the recombinant protein was about 90 kDa and reacted with antiserum against soluble sporozoites. The animal experiment showed that all the DNA vaccines pVAX-5401, pVAX-5401-IFN-γ or pVAX-5401-IL-2 and the recombinant 5401 protein could obviously alleviate body weight loss and cecal lesions as compared with non-vaccinated challenged control and empty vector pVAX1control. Furthermore, pVAX-5401-IFN-γ or pVAX-5401-IL-2 induced anti-coccidial index (ACI) of 180.01 or 177.24 which were significantly higher than that of pVAX-5401. The results suggested that 5401 was an effective candidate antigen for vaccine. This finding also suggested that chicken IFN-γ or IL-2 could effectively improve the efficacies of DNA vaccines against avian coccidiosis.

  3. Characterization of Viral Communities of Biting Midges and Identification of Novel Thogotovirus Species and Rhabdovirus Genus.

    PubMed

    Temmam, Sarah; Monteil-Bouchard, Sonia; Robert, Catherine; Baudoin, Jean-Pierre; Sambou, Masse; Aubadie-Ladrix, Maxence; Labas, Noémie; Raoult, Didier; Mediannikov, Oleg; Desnues, Christelle

    2016-03-11

    More than two thirds of emerging viruses are of zoonotic origin, and among them RNA viruses represent the majority. Ceratopogonidae (genus Culicoides) are well-known vectors of several viruses responsible for epizooties (bluetongue, epizootic haemorrhagic disease, etc.). They are also vectors of the only known virus infecting humans: the Oropouche virus. Female midges usually feed on a variety of hosts, leading to possible transmission of emerging viruses from animals to humans. In this context, we report here the analysis of RNA viral communities of Senegalese biting midges using next-generation sequencing techniques as a preliminary step toward the identification of potential viral biohazards. Sequencing of the RNA virome of three pools of Culicoides revealed the presence of a significant diversity of viruses infecting plants, insects and mammals. Several novel viruses were detected, including a novel Thogotovirus species, related but genetically distant from previously described tick-borne thogotoviruses. Novel rhabdoviruses were also detected, possibly constituting a novel Rhabdoviridae genus, and putatively restricted to insects. Sequences related to the major viruses transmitted by Culicoides, i.e., African horse sickness, bluetongue and epizootic haemorrhagic disease viruses were also detected. This study highlights the interest in monitoring the emergence and circulation of zoonoses and epizooties using their arthropod vectors.

  4. Differential effects of alloherpesvirus CyHV-3 and rhabdovirus SVCV on apoptosis in fish cells.

    PubMed

    Miest, Joanna J; Adamek, Mikolaj; Pionnier, Nicolas; Harris, Sarah; Matras, Marek; Rakus, Krzysztof Ł; Irnazarow, Ilgiz; Steinhagen, Dieter; Hoole, Dave

    2015-03-23

    Whilst Herpesviridae, which infect higher vertebrates, actively influence host immune responses to ensure viral replication, it is mostly unknown if Alloherpesviridae, which infect lower vertebrates, possess similar abilities. An important antiviral response is clearance of infected cells via apoptosis, which in mammals influences the outcome of infection. Here, we utilise common carp infected with CyHV-3 to determine the effect on the expression of genes encoding apoptosis-related proteins (p53, Caspase 9, Apaf-1, IAP, iNOS) in the pronephros, spleen and gills. The influence of CyHV-3 on CCB cells was also studied and compared to SVCV (a rhabdovirus) which induces apoptosis in carp cell lines. Although CyHV-3 induced iNOS expression in vivo, significant induction of the genetic apoptosis pathway was only seen in the pronephros. In vitro CyHV-3 did not induce apoptosis or apoptosis-related expression whilst SVCV did stimulate apoptosis. This suggests that CyHV-3 possesses mechanisms similar to herpesviruses of higher vertebrates to inhibit the antiviral apoptotic process.

  5. Characterization and application of monoclonal antibodies against turbot (Scophthalmus maximus) Rhabdovirus.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Guang-Zhou; Li, Zheng-Qiu; Zhang, Qi-Ya

    2006-01-01

    Five monoclonal antibodies (mAbs), 1G8, 1H9, 2D2, 2D3, and 2F5, against Scophthalmus maximus rhabdovirus (SMRV) were prepared. Characterization of the mAbs included indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, isotyping, viral inhibition assay, immunofluorescence staining of virus-infected cell cultures, and Western blot analysis. Isotyping revealed that 1G8 and 1H9 were of the IgG2b subclass and that the other three were IgM. 2D2, 2D3, and 2F5 partially inhibited SMRV infection in epithelioma papulosum cyprinid (EPC) cell culture. Western blotting showed that all five mAbs could react with two SMRV proteins with molecular masses of approximately 30 kDa (P) and 26 kDa (M). These two proteins were localized within the cytoplasm of SMRV-infected EPC cells by immunofluorescence assay. Also, progressive foci of viral replication in cell cultures were monitored from 6 to 24 h, using mAb 2D3 as the primary antibody. A flow cytometry procedure was used to detect and quantify SMRV-infected (0.01 PFU/cell) EPC cells with mAb 2D3, and 10.8% of cells could be distinguished as infected 36 h postinfection. Moreover, mAb 2D3 was successfully applied for the detection of viral antigen in cryosections from flounder tissues by immunohistochemistry tests.

  6. Generation and characterization of monoclonal antibodies against the flounder Paralichthys olivaceus rhabdovirus.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Guang-Zhou; Gui, Lang; Li, Zheng-Qiu; Yuan, Xiu-Ping; Zhang, Qi-Ya

    2008-03-01

    Two MAbs (3C7 and 3C9) against flounder Paralichthys olivaceus rhabdovirus (PORV) were generated with hybridoma cell fusion technology and characterized by an indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, isotype test, Western blot and immunodot analysis and immunofluorescence assay. Isotyping tests demonstrated that both of the two MAbs belonged to IgM subclass. Western blot analysis showed the MAbs reacted with 42, 30, and 22 kDa viral proteins, which were localized within the cytoplasm of PORV-infected grass carp ovary (GCO) cells analyzed by indirect immunofluorescences tests. The MAb 3C7 was also selected at random for detecting virus antigens in the inoculated grass carp tissues by immunohistochemistry assay. Flow cytometry tests showed that at the 36 h postinfection (0.25 PFU/cell), the 23% PORV-infected GCO cells could be distinguished from the uninfected cells with the MAb 3C7. Such MAbs could be useful for diagnosis and potential treatment of viral infection.

  7. Subcellular trafficking in rhabdovirus infection and immune evasion: a novel target for therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Oksayan, Sibil; Ito, Naoto; Moseley, Greg; Blondel, Danielle

    2012-02-01

    Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) and Rabies Virus (RABV) are the prototypic members of the rhabdovirus family. These viruses have a particularly broad host range, and despite the availability of vaccines, RABV still causes more than 50,000 human deaths a year. Trafficking of the virion or viral particles is important at several stages of the replicative life cycle, including cellular entry, localization into the cytoplasmic inclusion bodies which primarily house the transcription and replication of the viral genome, and migration to the plasma membrane from whence the virus is released by budding. Intriguingly, specific viral proteins, VSV M and RABV P have also been shown to undergo intracellular trafficking independent of the other viral apparatus. These proteins are multifunctional, and play roles in antagonism of host processes, namely the IFN system, and as such enable viral evasion of the innate cellular antiviral response. A body of recent research has been aimed at characterizing the mechanisms by which these proteins are able to shuttle between and localize to various subcellular sites, including the nucleus, which is not required during the cytoplasmic replicative life cycle of the virus. This work has indicated that trafficking of these proteins plays a significant role in determining the ability of the viruses to replicate and cause infection, and as such, represents a viable target for development of a new generation of vaccines and prophylactic therapeutics which are required to battle these pathogens of human and agricultural significance.

  8. Characterization of Viral Communities of Biting Midges and Identification of Novel Thogotovirus Species and Rhabdovirus Genus

    PubMed Central

    Temmam, Sarah; Monteil-Bouchard, Sonia; Robert, Catherine; Baudoin, Jean-Pierre; Sambou, Masse; Aubadie-Ladrix, Maxence; Labas, Noémie; Raoult, Didier; Mediannikov, Oleg; Desnues, Christelle

    2016-01-01

    More than two thirds of emerging viruses are of zoonotic origin, and among them RNA viruses represent the majority. Ceratopogonidae (genus Culicoides) are well-known vectors of several viruses responsible for epizooties (bluetongue, epizootic haemorrhagic disease, etc.). They are also vectors of the only known virus infecting humans: the Oropouche virus. Female midges usually feed on a variety of hosts, leading to possible transmission of emerging viruses from animals to humans. In this context, we report here the analysis of RNA viral communities of Senegalese biting midges using next-generation sequencing techniques as a preliminary step toward the identification of potential viral biohazards. Sequencing of the RNA virome of three pools of Culicoides revealed the presence of a significant diversity of viruses infecting plants, insects and mammals. Several novel viruses were detected, including a novel Thogotovirus species, related but genetically distant from previously described tick-borne thogotoviruses. Novel rhabdoviruses were also detected, possibly constituting a novel Rhabdoviridae genus, and putatively restricted to insects. Sequences related to the major viruses transmitted by Culicoides, i.e., African horse sickness, bluetongue and epizootic haemorrhagic disease viruses were also detected. This study highlights the interest in monitoring the emergence and circulation of zoonoses and epizooties using their arthropod vectors. PMID:26978389

  9. Production of recombinant snakehead rhabdovirus: the NV protein is not required for viral replication.

    PubMed

    Johnson, M C; Simon, B E; Kim, C H; Leong, J A

    2000-03-01

    Snakehead rhabdovirus (SHRV) affects warm water fish in Southeast Asia and belongs to the genus Novirhabdovirus by virtue of its nonvirion gene (NV). Because SHRV grows best at temperatures between 28 and 31 degrees C, we were able to use the T7 expression system to produce viable recombinant SHRV from a cloned cDNA copy of the viral genome. Expression of a positive-strand RNA copy of the 11, 550-nucleotide SHRV genome along with the viral nucleocapsid (N), phosphoprotein (P), and polymerase (L) proteins resulted in the generation of infectious SHRV in cells preinfected with a vaccinia virus vector for T7 polymerase expression. Recombinant virus production was verified by detection of a unique restriction site engineered into the SHRV genome between the NV and L genes. Since we were now able to begin examining the function of the NV gene, we constructed a recombinant virus containing a nonsense mutation located 22 codons into the coding sequence of the NV protein. The NV knockout virus was produced at a concentration as high as that of wild-type virus in cultured fish cells, and the resulting virions appeared to be identical to the wild-type virions in electron micrographs. These initial studies suggest that NV has no critical function in SHRV replication in cultured fish cells.

  10. Characterization of Viral Communities of Biting Midges and Identification of Novel Thogotovirus Species and Rhabdovirus Genus.

    PubMed

    Temmam, Sarah; Monteil-Bouchard, Sonia; Robert, Catherine; Baudoin, Jean-Pierre; Sambou, Masse; Aubadie-Ladrix, Maxence; Labas, Noémie; Raoult, Didier; Mediannikov, Oleg; Desnues, Christelle

    2016-03-01

    More than two thirds of emerging viruses are of zoonotic origin, and among them RNA viruses represent the majority. Ceratopogonidae (genus Culicoides) are well-known vectors of several viruses responsible for epizooties (bluetongue, epizootic haemorrhagic disease, etc.). They are also vectors of the only known virus infecting humans: the Oropouche virus. Female midges usually feed on a variety of hosts, leading to possible transmission of emerging viruses from animals to humans. In this context, we report here the analysis of RNA viral communities of Senegalese biting midges using next-generation sequencing techniques as a preliminary step toward the identification of potential viral biohazards. Sequencing of the RNA virome of three pools of Culicoides revealed the presence of a significant diversity of viruses infecting plants, insects and mammals. Several novel viruses were detected, including a novel Thogotovirus species, related but genetically distant from previously described tick-borne thogotoviruses. Novel rhabdoviruses were also detected, possibly constituting a novel Rhabdoviridae genus, and putatively restricted to insects. Sequences related to the major viruses transmitted by Culicoides, i.e., African horse sickness, bluetongue and epizootic haemorrhagic disease viruses were also detected. This study highlights the interest in monitoring the emergence and circulation of zoonoses and epizooties using their arthropod vectors. PMID:26978389

  11. Immune Response Elicited by DNA Vaccination Using Lactococcus lactis Is Modified by the Production of Surface Exposed Pathogenic Protein

    PubMed Central

    Pontes, Daniela; Azevedo, Marcela; Innocentin, Silvia; Blugeon, Sébastien; Lefévre, François; Azevedo, Vasco; Miyoshi, Anderson; Courtin, Pascal; Chapot-Chartier, Marie-Pierre; Langella, Philippe; Chatel, Jean-Marc

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we compared immune responses elicited by DNA immunization using Lactococcus lactis or L. lactis expressing the Staphylococcus aureus invasin Fibronectin Binding Protein A (FnBPA) at its surface. Both strains carried pValac:BLG, a plasmid containing the cDNA of Beta-Lactoglobulin (BLG), and were designated LL-BLG and LL-FnBPA+ BLG respectively. A TH2 immune response characterized by the secretion of IL-4 and IL-5 in medium of BLG reactivated splenocytes was detected after either oral or intranasal administration of LL-FnBPA+ BLG. In contrast, intranasal administration of LL-BLG elicited a TH1 immune response. After BLG sensitization, mice previously intranasally administered with LL-BLG showed a significantly lower concentration of BLG-specific IgE than the mice non-administered. Altenatively administration of LL-FnBPA+ BLG didn't modify the BLG-specific IgE concentration obtained after sensitization, thus confirming the TH2 orientation of the immune response. To determine if the TH2-skewed immune response obtained with LL-FnBpA+ BLG was FnBPA-specific or not, mice received another L. lactis strain producing a mutated form of the Listeria monocytogenes invasin Internalin A intranasally, allowing thus the binding to murine E-cadherin, and containing pValac:BLG (LL-mInlA+ BLG). As with LL-FnBPA+ BLG, LL-mInlA+ BLG was not able to elicit a TH1 immune response. Furthermore, we observed that these difference were not due to the peptidoglycan composition of the cell wall as LL-FnBPA+ BLG, LL-mInlA+ BLG and LL-BLG strains shared a similar composition. DNA vaccination using LL-BLG elicited a pro-inflammatory TH1 immune response while using LL-FnBPA+ BLG or LL-mInlA+ BLG elicited an anti-inflammatory TH2 immune response. PMID:24465412

  12. Evaluation of protective efficacy using a nonstructural protein NS1 in DNA vaccine-loaded microspheres against dengue 2 virus.

    PubMed

    Huang, Shih-shiung; Li, I-Hsun; Hong, Po-da; Yeh, Ming-kung

    2013-01-01

    Dengue virus results in dengue fever or severe dengue hemorrhagic fever/dengue shock syndrome in humans. The purpose of this work was to develop an effective antidengue virus delivery system, by designing poly (dl-lactic-co-glycolic) acid/polyethylene glycol (PLGA/PEG) microspheres using a double-emulsion solvent extraction method, for vaccination therapy based on locally and continuously sustained biological activity. Nonstructural protein 1 (NS1) in deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) vaccine-loaded PLGA/PEG microspheres exhibited a high loading capacity (4.5% w/w), yield (85.2%), and entrapment efficiency (39%), the mean particle size 4.8 μm, and a controlled in vitro release profile with a low initial burst (18.5%), lag time (4 days), and continued released protein over 70 days. The distribution of protein on the microspheres surface, outer layer, and core were 3.0%, 28.5%, and 60.7%, respectively. A release rate was noticed to be 1.07 μg protein/mg microspheres/day of protein release, maintained for 42 days. The cumulative release amount at Days 1, 28, and 42 was 18.5, 53.7, and 62.66 μg protein/mg microspheres, respectively. The dengue virus challenge in mice test, in which mice received one dose of 20 μg NS1 protein content of microspheres, in comparison with NS1 protein in Al(OH)3 or PBS solution, was evaluated after intramuscular immunization of BALB/c mice. The study results show that the greatest survival was observed in the group of mice immunized with NS1 protein-loaded PLGA/PEG microspheres (100%). In vivo vaccination studies also demonstrated that NS1 protein-loaded PLGA/PEG microspheres had a protective ability; its steady-state immune protection in rat plasma changed from 4,443 ± 1,384 pg/mL to 10,697 ± 3,197 pg/mL, which was 2.5-fold higher than that observed for dengue virus in Al(OH)3 at 21 days. These findings strongly suggest that NS1 protein-loaded PLGA/PEG microspheres offer a new therapeutic strategy in optimizing the vaccine incorporation

  13. Synergistic antitumor effect of a human papillomavirus DNA vaccine harboring E6E7 fusion gene and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 gene.

    PubMed

    Gao, Jie; Fan, Lei; Ma, Wei; Xiao, Huan

    2016-09-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) has been identified as the primary etiological factor in cervical cancer as well as in subsets of anogenital and oropharyngeal cancers. The two HPV viral oncoproteins, E6 and E7, are uniquely and consistently expressed in all HPV-infected cells and are therefore promising targets for therapeutic vaccination. In order to achieve a synergistic antitumor and anti-angiogenesis effect, we designed and constructed a novel DNA vaccine that can express the HPV 16 E6E7 fusion protein and VEGFR2 in the same reading frame. A series of DNA plasmids encoding E6E7, VEGFR2 and their conjugates were constructed and injected into mice. The resultant humoral and cellular immune responses were detected by ELISA and enzyme-linked immunospot (ELISPOT), respectively. To evaluate the antitumor efficacy of these plasmids, tumor-bearing mice expressing the E6E7 fusion protein were constructed. After injection into the tumor-bearing mouse model, the plasmid harboring the E6E7 fusion gene and VEGFR2 showed stronger inhibition of tumor growth than the plasmid expressing E6E7 or VEGFR2 alone, which indicated that the combination of E6E7 and VEGFR2 could exert a synergistic antitumor effect. These observations emphasize the potential of a synergistic antitumor and anti-angiogenesis strategy using a DNA vaccine, which could be a promising approach for tumor immunotherapy. PMID:27515281

  14. Co-expression of HIV-1 virus-like particles and granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor by GEO-D03 DNA vaccine.

    PubMed

    Hellerstein, Michael; Xu, Yongxian; Marino, Tracie; Lu, Shan; Yi, Hong; Wright, Elizabeth R; Robinson, Harriet L

    2012-11-01

    Here, we report on GEO-D03, a DNA vaccine that co-expresses non-infectious HIV-1 virus-like particles (VLPs) and the human cytokine, granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF). The virus-like particles display the native gp160 form of the HIV-1 Envelope glycoprotein (Env) and are designed to elicit antibody against the natural form of Env on virus and virus-infected cells. The DNA-expressed HIV Gag, Pol and Env proteins also have the potential to elicit virus-specific CD4 and CD8 T cells. The purpose of the co-expressed GM-CSF is to target a cytokine that recruits, expands and differentiates macrophages and dendritic cells to the site of VLP expression. The GEO-D03 DNA vaccine is currently entered into human trials as a prime for a recombinant modified vaccinia Ankara (MVA) boost. In preclinical studies in macaques using an SIV prototype vaccine, this vaccination regimen elicited both anti-viral T cells and antibody, and provided 70% protection against acquisition during 12 weekly rectal exposures with a heterologous SIV. Higher avidity of the Env-specific Ab for the native form of the Env in the challenge virus correlated with lower likelihood of SIV infection.

  15. Immune and histopathologic responses of DNA-vaccinated hybrid striped bass Morone saxatilis x M. chrysops after acute Mycobacterium marinum infection.

    PubMed

    Pasnik, David J; Smith, Stephen A

    2006-11-21

    The post-challenge immune and histopathologic responses of hybrid striped bass vaccinated with a DNA vaccine encoding the Mycobacterium marinum Ag85A gene and subsequently challenged with M. marinum were investigated. Juvenile hybrid striped bass Morone saxatilis x M. chrysops were injected intramuscularly with 25 or 50 microg DNA plasmid and developed significant specific protective responses to live bacterial challenge 120 d post-vaccination. Both vaccine groups demonstrated increased survival, reduced splenic bacterial counts, and reduced granuloma formation compared to the control groups 14 d after challenge with approximately 8 x 10(5) cfu M. marinum g(-1) fish body wt. The vaccine groups also developed more rapidly and significantly increased antibody and lymphoproliferative responses post-challenge compared to control groups, and these post-challenge immune responses appear to be vital against M. marinum infection in vaccinated hybrid striped bass. No significant differences in immune responses were recognized between the 25 and 50 microg vaccination groups, and these groups eventually experienced mortalities, splenic bacterial counts, and granuloma formation 28 d post-challenge comparable to those of the control groups at 14 d post-challenge. Therefore, vaccination of hybrid striped bass with a DNA vaccine encoding the M. marinum Ag85A gene provided significant but limited duration of protection against an acute high-dose M. marinum challenge.

  16. Development of a new DNA vaccine based on mycobacterial ESAT-6 antigen delivered by recombinant invasive Lactococcus lactis FnBPA+.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Vanessa Bastos; Saraiva, Tessália Diniz Luerce; Souza, Bianca Mendes; Zurita-Turk, Meritxell; Azevedo, Marcela Santiago Pacheco; De Castro, Camila Prósperi; Mancha-Agresti, Pamela; Dos Santos, Janete Soares Coelho; Santos, Ana Cristina Gomes; Faria, Ana Maria Caetano; Leclercq, Sophie; Azevedo, Vasco; Miyoshi, Anderson

    2015-02-01

    The use of the food-grade bacterium Lactococcus lactis as a vehicle for the oral delivery of DNA vaccine plasmids constitutes a promising strategy for vaccination. The delivery of DNA plasmids into eukaryotic cells is of critical importance for subsequent DNA expression and effectiveness of the vaccine. In this context, the use of the recombinant invasive L. lactis FnBPA+ (fibronectin-binding protein A) strain for the oral delivery of the eukaryotic expression vector vaccination using lactic acid bacteria (pValac), coding for the 6-kDa early secreted antigenic target (ESAT-6) gene of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, could represent a new DNA vaccine strategy against tuberculosis. To this end, the ESAT-6 sequence was cloned into the pValac vector; the L. lactis fibronectin-binding protein A (FnBPA)+ (pValac:ESAT-6) strain was obtained, and its immunological profile was checked in BALB/c mice. This strain was able to significantly increase interferon gamma (IFN-γ) production in spleen cells, showing a systemic T helper 1 (Th1) cell response. The mice also showed a significant increase in specific secretory immunoglobulin A (sIgA) production in colon tissue and fecal extracts. Thus, this is the first time that L. lactis has been used to deliver a plasmid DNA harboring a gene that encodes an antigen against tuberculosis through mucous membranes. PMID:25503506

  17. Combination of treatment with death receptor 5-specific antibody with therapeutic HPV DNA vaccination generates enhanced therapeutic anti-tumor effects.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Chih Wen; Monie, Archana; Trimble, Cornelia; Alvarez, Ronald D; Huh, Warner K; Buchsbaum, Donald J; Straughn, J Michael; Wang, Mei-Cheng; Yagita, Hideo; Hung, Chien-Fu; Wu, T-C

    2008-08-12

    There is currently a vital need for the development of novel therapeutic strategies for the control of advanced stage cancers. Antigen-specific immunotherapy and the employment of antibodies against the death receptor 5 (DR5) have emerged as two potentially promising strategies for cancer treatment. In the current study, we hypothesize that the combination of treatment with the anti-DR5 monoclonal antibody, MD5-1 with a DNA vaccine encoding calreticulin (CRT) linked to human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV-16) E7 antigen (CRT/E7(detox)) administered via gene gun would lead to further enhancement of E7-specific immune responses as well as anti-tumor effects. Our results indicated that mice bearing the E7-expressing tumor, TC-1 treated with MD5-1 monoclonal antibody followed by CRT/E7(detox) DNA vaccination generated the most potent therapeutic anti-tumor effects as well as highest levels of E7-specific CD8+ T cells among all the groups tested. In addition, treatment with MD5-1 monoclonal antibody was capable of rendering the TC-1 tumor cells more susceptible to lysis by E7-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes. Our findings serve as an important foundation for future clinical translation.

  18. Chitosan-coated poly(lactic-co-glycolic) acid nanoparticles as an efficient delivery system for Newcastle disease virus DNA vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Kai; Zhang, Yang; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Shi, Ci; Wang, Xin; Wang, Xiaohua; Jin, Zheng; Cui, Shangjin

    2014-01-01

    We determined the efficacy and safety of chitosan (CS)-coated poly(lactic-co-glycolic) acid (PLGA) nanoparticles (NPs) as a delivery system for a vaccine to protect chickens against Newcastle disease virus (NDV). The newly constructed vaccine contained DNA (the F gene) of NDV. The Newcastle disease virus (NDV) F gene deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) plasmid (pFDNA)-CS/PLGA-NPs were spherical (diameter =699.1±5.21 nm [mean ± standard deviation]) and smooth, with an encapsulation efficiency of 98.1% and a Zeta potential of +6.35 mV. An in vitro release assay indicated that CS controlled the burst release of plasmid DNA, such that up to 67.4% of the entire quantity of plasmid DNA was steadily released from the pFDNA-CS/PLGA-NPs. An in vitro expression assay indicated that the expression of nanoparticles (NPs) was maintained in the NPs. In an immunization test with specific pathogen-free chickens, the pFDNA-CS/PLGA-NPs induced stronger cellular, humoral, and mucosal immune responses than the plasmid DNA vaccine alone. The pFDNA-CS/PLGA-NPs did not harm 293T cells in an in vitro assay and did not harm chickens in an in vivo assay. Overall, the results indicated that CS-coated PLGA NPs can serve as an efficient and safe mucosal immune delivery system for NDV DNA vaccine. PMID:25356070

  19. Induction of CML28-specific cytotoxic T cell responses using co-transfected dendritic cells with CML28 DNA vaccine and SOCS1 small interfering RNA expression vector

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou Hongsheng; Zhang Donghua . E-mail: hanson2008@gmail.com; Wang Yaya; Dai Ming; Zhang Lu; Liu Wenli; Liu Dan; Tan Huo; Huang Zhenqian

    2006-08-18

    CML28 is an attractive target for antigen-specific immunotherapy. SOCS1 represents an inhibitory control mechanism for DC antigen presentation and the magnitude of adaptive immunity. In this study, we evaluated the potential for inducing CML28-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) responses by dendritic cells (DCs)-based vaccination. We constructed a CML28 DNA vaccine and a SOCS1 siRNA vector and then cotransfect monocyte-derived DCs. Flow cytometry analysis showed gene silencing of SOCS1 resulted in higher expressions of costimulative moleculars in DCs. Mixed lymphocyte reaction (MLR) indicated downregulation of SOCS1 stronger capability to stimulate proliferation of responder cell in DCs. The CTL assay revealed transfected DCs effectively induced autologous CML28-specific CTL responses and the lytic activities induced by SOCS1-silenced DCs were significantly higher compared with those induced by SOCS1-expressing DCs. These results in our study indicates gene silencing of SOCS1 remarkably enhanced the cytotoxicity efficiency of CML28 DNA vaccine in DCs.

  20. A retrospective review of outcome and survival following surgery and adjuvant xenogeneic DNA vaccination in 32 dogs with oral malignant melanoma

    PubMed Central

    TREGGIARI, Elisabetta; GRANT, Jessica Pauline; NORTH, Susan Margaret

    2016-01-01

    A xenogeneic DNA vaccination has been licensed for use in dogs with locally controlled stage II and III oral malignant melanoma (OMM). At present, there are limited outcome data for dogs with OMM treated with surgery and immunotherapy. The aim of this study is to retrospectively review the outcome and survival of 32 dogs affected by OMM that were treated with a combination of surgery and the xenogeneic DNA vaccination (with the addition of radiotherapy in some cases) and to determine the influence of surgical margins and delay in receiving vaccination. The overall median survival time (MST) was 335 days (95% CI: 301–540 days), and the overall median progression-free survival (PFS) was 160 days (mean 182 days, 95% CI: 132–232 days). Stage, completeness of surgical margins and delay in administration of the vaccine did not appear to statistically influence survival or PFS, although these results may reflect the low statistical power of the study due to small numbers. Further studies are required to assess whether the addition of any adjuvant treatment to surgery, including immunotherapy, is able to significantly prolong survival in cases of canine oral melanoma. PMID:26781703

  1. Genotyping of the fish rhabdovirus, viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus, by restriction fragment length polymorphisms

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Einer-Jensen, Katja; Winton, James R.; Lorenzen, Niels

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a standardized molecular assay that used limited resources and equipment for routine genotyping of isolates of the fish rhabdovirus, viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus (VHSV). Computer generated restriction maps, based on 62 unique full-length (1524 nt) sequences of the VHSV glycoprotein (G) gene, were used to predict restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) patterns that were subsequently grouped and compared with a phylogenetic analysis of the G-gene sequences of the same set of isolates. Digestion of PCR amplicons from the full-lengthG-gene by a set of three restriction enzymes was predicted to accurately enable the assignment of the VHSV isolates into the four major genotypes discovered to date. Further sub-typing of the isolates into the recently described sub-lineages of genotype I was possible by applying three additional enzymes. Experimental evaluation of the method consisted of three steps: (i) RT-PCR amplification of the G-gene of VHSV isolates using purified viral RNA as template, (ii) digestion of the PCR products with a panel of restriction endonucleases and (iii) interpretation of the resulting RFLP profiles. The RFLP analysis was shown to approximate the level of genetic discrimination obtained by other, more labour-intensive, molecular techniques such as the ribonuclease protection assay or sequence analysis. In addition, 37 previously uncharacterised isolates from diverse sources were assigned to specific genotypes. While the assay was able to distinguish between marine and continental isolates of VHSV, the differences did not correlate with the pathogenicity of the isolates.

  2. Characterization of Snakehead Rhabdovirus Infection in Zebrafish (Danio rerio)†

    PubMed Central

    Phelan, Peter E.; Pressley, Meagan E.; Witten, P. Eckhard; Mellon, Mark T.; Blake, Sharon; Kim, Carol H.

    2005-01-01

    The zebrafish, Danio rerio, has become recognized as a valuable model for the study of development, genetics, and toxicology. Recently, the zebrafish has been recognized as a useful model for infectious disease and immunity. In this study, the pathogenesis and antiviral immune response of zebrafish to experimental snakehead rhabdovirus (SHRV) infection was characterized. Zebrafish 24 h postfertilization to 30 days postfertilization were susceptible to infection by immersion in 106 50% tissue culture infective doses (TCID50) of SHRV/ml, and adult zebrafish were susceptible to infection by intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of 105 TCID50 of SHRV/ml. Mortalities exceeded 40% in infected fish, and clinical presentation of infection included petechial hemorrhaging, redness of the abdomen, and erratic swim behavior. Virus reisolation and reverse transcription-PCR analysis of the viral nucleocapsid gene confirmed the presence of SHRV. Histological sections of moribund embryonic and juvenile fish revealed necrosis of the pharyngeal epithelium and liver, in addition to congestion of the swim bladder by cell debris. Histopathology in adult fish injected i.p. was confined to the site of injection. The antiviral response in zebrafish was monitored by quantitative real-time PCR analysis of zebrafish interferon (IFN) and Mx expression. IFN and Mx levels were elevated in zebrafish exposed to SHRV, although expression and intensity differed with age and route of infection. This study is the first to examine the pathogenesis of SHRV infection in zebrafish. Furthermore, this study is the first to describe experimental infection of zebrafish embryos with a viral pathogen, which will be important for future experiments involving targeted gene disruption and forward genetic screens. PMID:15650208

  3. Increasing virulence, but not infectivity, associated with serially emergent virus strains of a fish rhabdovirus

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Breyta, Rachel; McKenney, Douglas; Tesfaye, Tarin; Ono, Kotaro; Kurath, Gael

    2016-01-01

    Surveillance and genetic typing of field isolates of a fish rhabdovirus, infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV), has identified four dominant viral genotypes that were involved in serial viral emergence and displacement events in steelhead trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) in western North America. To investigate drivers of these landscape-scale events, IHNV isolates designated 007, 111, 110, and 139, representing the four relevant genotypes, were compared for virulence and infectivity in controlled laboratory challenge studies in five relevant steelhead trout populations. Viral virulence was assessed as mortality using lethal dose estimates (LD50), survival kinetics, and proportional hazards analysis. A pattern of increasing virulence for isolates 007, 111, and 110 was consistent in all five host populations tested, and correlated with serial emergence and displacements in the virus-endemic lower Columbia River source region during 1980–2013. The fourth isolate, 139, did not have higher virulence than the previous isolate 110. However, the mG139M genotype displayed a conditional displacement phenotype in that it displaced type mG110M in coastal Washington, but not in the lower Columbia River region, indicating that factors other than evolution of higher viral virulence were involved in some displacement events. Viral infectivity, measured as infectious dose (ID50), did not correlate consistently with virulence or with viral emergence, and showed a narrow range of variation relative to the variation observed in virulence. Comparison among the five steelhead trout populations confirmed variation in resistance to IHNV, but correlations with previous history of virus exposure or with sites of viral emergence varied between IHNV source and sink regions. Overall, this study indicated increasing viral virulence over time as a potential driver for emergence and displacement events in the endemic Lower Columbia River source region where these IHNV genotypes originated

  4. Route and method of delivery of DNA vaccine influence immune responses in mice and non-human primates.

    PubMed Central

    McCluskie, M. J.; Brazolot Millan, C. L.; Gramzinski, R. A.; Robinson, H. L.; Santoro, J. C.; Fuller, J. T.; Widera, G.; Haynes, J. R.; Purcell, R. H.; Davis, H. L.

    1999-01-01

    antibodies (Th2-like) at 4 weeks and only very low IgG2a levels at later times; ID-immunized mice had predominantly IgG1 at 4 weeks and this changed to mixed IgG1/IgG2a over time. Responses with IM injection (in the leg or tongue) were predominantly IgG2a (Th1-like) at all times. IV injection gave mixed IgG1/IgG2a responses. In monkeys, in the first experiment, 1 mg DNA IM or ID at 0, 4, and 8 weeks gave equivalent anti-HB titers and 0.4 microg at the same times by GG induced lower titers. In the second experiment, 1 mg DNA IM or ID, or 3.2 microg by GG, at 0, 12, and 24 weeks, gave anti-HB values in the hierarchy of GG > IM > ID. Furthermore, high titers were retained after a single immunization in mice but fell off over time in the monkeys, even after boost. CONCLUSIONS: Route of administration of plasmid DNA vaccines influences the strength and nature of immune responses in mice and non-human primates. However, the results in mice were not always predictive of those in monkeys and this is likely true for humans as well. Optimal dose and immunization schedule will most likely vary between species. It is not clear whether results in non-human primates will be predictive of results in humans, thus additional studies are required. http://link.springer-ny.com/link/service/journals/00020/bibs /5n5p287. html Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:10390545

  5. Complete genome sequence and integrated protein localization and interaction map for alfalfa dwarf virus, which combines properties of both cytoplasmic and nuclear plant rhabdoviruses

    SciTech Connect

    Bejerman, Nicolás; Giolitti, Fabián; Breuil, Soledad de; Trucco, Verónica; Nome, Claudia; Lenardon, Sergio; Dietzgen, Ralf G.

    2015-09-15

    Summary: We have determined the full-length 14,491-nucleotide genome sequence of a new plant rhabdovirus, alfalfa dwarf virus (ADV). Seven open reading frames (ORFs) were identified in the antigenomic orientation of the negative-sense, single-stranded viral RNA, in the order 3′-N-P-P3-M-G-P6-L-5′. The ORFs are separated by conserved intergenic regions and the genome coding region is flanked by complementary 3′ leader and 5′ trailer sequences. Phylogenetic analysis of the nucleoprotein amino acid sequence indicated that this alfalfa-infecting rhabdovirus is related to viruses in the genus Cytorhabdovirus. When transiently expressed as GFP fusions in Nicotiana benthamiana leaves, most ADV proteins accumulated in the cell periphery, but unexpectedly P protein was localized exclusively in the nucleus. ADV P protein was shown to have a homotypic, and heterotypic nuclear interactions with N, P3 and M proteins by bimolecular fluorescence complementation. ADV appears unique in that it combines properties of both cytoplasmic and nuclear plant rhabdoviruses. - Highlights: • The complete genome of alfalfa dwarf virus is obtained. • An integrated localization and interaction map for ADV is determined. • ADV has a genome sequence similarity and evolutionary links with cytorhabdoviruses. • ADV protein localization and interaction data show an association with the nucleus. • ADV combines properties of both cytoplasmic and nuclear plant rhabdoviruses.

  6. Isolation and characterization of a rhabdovirus from starry flounder (Platichthys stellatus) collected from the northern portion of Puget Sound, Washington, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mork, Christina; Hershberger, Paul K.; Kocan, Richard; Batts, William N.; Winton, James R.

    2004-01-01

    The initial characterization of a rhabdovirus isolated from a single, asymptomatic starry flounder (Platichthys stellatus) collected during a viral survey of marine fishes from the northern portion of Puget Sound, Washington, USA, is reported. Virions were bullet-shaped and approximately 100 nm long and 50 nm wide, contained a lipid envelope, remained stable for at least 14 days at temperatures ranging from -80 to 5 degrees C and grew optimally at 15 degrees C in cultures of epithelioma papulosum cyprini (EPC) cells. The cytopathic effect on EPC cell monolayers was characterized by raised foci containing rounded masses of cells. Pyknotic and dark-staining nuclei that also showed signs of karyorrhexis were observed following haematoxylin and eosin, May-Grunwald Giemsa and acridine orange staining. PAGE of the structural proteins and PCR assays using primers specific for other known fish rhabdoviruses, including Infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus, Viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus, Spring viremia of carp virus, and Hirame rhabdovirus, indicated that the new virus, tentatively termed starry flounder rhabdovirus (SFRV), was previously undescribed in marine fishes from this region. In addition, sequence analysis of 2678 nt of the amino portion of the viral polymerase gene indicated that SFRV was genetically distinct from other members of the family Rhabdoviridae for which sequence data are available. Detection of this virus during a limited viral survey of wild fishes emphasizes the void of knowledge regarding the diversity of viruses that naturally infect marine fish species in the North Pacific Ocean.

  7. Genome of turbot rhabdovirus exhibits unusual non-coding regions and an additional ORF that could be expressed in fish cell.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Ruo-Lin; Lei, Xiao-Ying; Ke, Fei; Yuan, Xiu-Ping; Zhang, Qi-Ya

    2011-02-01

    Genomic sequence of Scophthalmus maximus rhabdovirus (SMRV) isolated from diseased turbot has been characterized. The complete genome of SMRV comprises 11,492 nucleotides and encodes five typical rhabdovirus genes N, P, M, G and L. In addition, two open reading frames (ORF) are predicted overlapping with P gene, one upstream of P and smaller than P (temporarily called Ps), and another in P gene which may encodes a protein similar to the vesicular stomatitis virus C protein. The C ORF is contained within the P ORF. The five typical proteins share the highest sequence identities (48.9%) with the corresponding proteins of rhabdoviruses in genus Vesiculovirus. Phylogenetic analysis of partial L protein sequence indicates that SMRV is close to genus Vesiculovirus. The first 13 nucleotides at the ends of the SMRV genome are absolutely inverse complementarity. The gene junctions between the five genes show conserved polyadenylation signal (CATGA(7)) and intergenic dinucleotide (CT) followed by putative transcription initiation sequence A(A/G)(C/G)A(A/G/T), which are different from known rhabdoviruses. The entire Ps ORF was cloned and expressed, and used to generate polyclonal antibody in mice. One obvious band could be detected in SMRV-infected carp leucocyte cells (CLCs) by anti-Ps/C serum via Western blot, and the subcellular localization of Ps-GFP fusion protein exhibited cytoplasm distribution as multiple punctuate or doughnut shaped foci of uneven size.

  8. Isolation and characterization of a rhabdovirus from starry flounder (Platichthys stellatus) collected from the northern portion of Puget Sound, Washington, USA.

    PubMed

    Mork, Christina; Hershberger, Paul; Kocan, Richard; Batts, William; Winton, James

    2004-02-01

    The initial characterization of a rhabdovirus isolated from a single, asymptomatic starry flounder (Platichthys stellatus) collected during a viral survey of marine fishes from the northern portion of Puget Sound, Washington, USA, is reported. Virions were bullet-shaped and approximately 100 nm long and 50 nm wide, contained a lipid envelope, remained stable for at least 14 days at temperatures ranging from -80 to 5 degrees C and grew optimally at 15 degrees C in cultures of epithelioma papulosum cyprini (EPC) cells. The cytopathic effect on EPC cell monolayers was characterized by raised foci containing rounded masses of cells. Pyknotic and dark-staining nuclei that also showed signs of karyorrhexis were observed following haematoxylin and eosin, May-Grunwald Giemsa and acridine orange staining. PAGE of the structural proteins and PCR assays using primers specific for other known fish rhabdoviruses, including Infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus, Viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus, Spring viremia of carp virus, and Hirame rhabdovirus, indicated that the new virus, tentatively termed starry flounder rhabdovirus (SFRV), was previously undescribed in marine fishes from this region. In addition, sequence analysis of 2678 nt of the amino portion of the viral polymerase gene indicated that SFRV was genetically distinct from other members of the family Rhabdoviridae for which sequence data are available. Detection of this virus during a limited viral survey of wild fishes emphasizes the void of knowledge regarding the diversity of viruses that naturally infect marine fish species in the North Pacific Ocean.

  9. Thermal inactivation of rabies and other rhabdoviruses: stabilization by the chelating agent ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid at physiological temperatures.

    PubMed

    Michalski, F; Parks, N F; Sokol, F; Clark, H F

    1976-07-01

    Thermal inactivation of rabies and several other rhabdoviruses was studied using virus suspended in several different diluents. Rabies serogroup viruses were more stable than Kern Canyon or vesicular stomatitis viruses. Limited studies of two fish rhabdoviruses requiring low temperatures (less than 33 C) for replication indicated that they were not markedly more thermolabile than rabies virus. Bovine serum protein components in complex cell culture media stabilized virus at 56 C, but at temperatures of less than or equal to 37 C, sodium tris (hydroxymethyl)-aminomethane (NT) buffer containing ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) (NTE) was a much more efficient stabilizer of virus infectivity. Chelating agents EDTA and ethyleneglycol-bis-(beta-aminoethyl ether)tetraacetic acid were equally efficient in protection of rabies virus infectivity; the effect of each was lost when excess Ca2+ was added. Bovine serum in NT or NTE buffers produced a thermostabilizing effect at 37 C not provided by the same serum concentration in complex cell culture media. Bovine serum was more efficient than EDTA in stabilizing virus infectivity during repeated cycles of freezing and thawing. PMID:181323

  10. The protective effect of a Schistosoma japonicum Chinese strain 23 kDa plasmid DNA vaccine in pigs is enhanced with IL-12.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yinchang; Ren, Jiangong; Da'dara, Akram; Harn, Donald; Xu, Ming; Si, Jin; Yu, Chuanxin; Liang, Yousheng; Ye, Ping; Yin, Xuren; He, Wei; Xu, Yongliang; Cao, Guoqun; Hua, Wanquan

    2004-11-15

    The schistosome integral membrane protein Sm/Sj23 was initially shown to induce protection in mice as a synthetic peptide vaccine and further, as a plasmid DNA vaccine to induce protection in mice, sheep and water buffalo. In this study we asked if we could induce protection against challenge infection in pigs against Schistosoma japonicum by vaccinating them with a plasmid DNA vaccine encoding the S. japonicum Chinese strain 23 kDa membrane protein. Further, we asked if we could enhance protective efficacy of this vaccine by the addition of IL-12. We compared vaccination with SjC23 plasmid DNA alone or with IL-12 plasmid DNA in pigs. Pigs were immunized three times at three weekly intervals. Thirty Chinese Songjang native pigs were divided into three groups. In group A, each pig was immunized with 500 microg of SjC23 plasmid DNA by intramuscular (i.m.) injection in both buttocks. In group B each pig was immunized with 500 microg of SjC23 plasmid DNA, and 500 microg of each of pcDNA3.1-p35 and 500 microg of pcDNA3.1-p40 DNA by i.m. injection. In group C each pig was immunized with 500 microg of pcDNA3.1 as the control. Thirty days post-vaccination, pigs were challenged with S. japonicum cercariae and adult and egg burdens and granuloma size determined 45 days post-challenge. The results showed that worm reduction rates in SjC23 group compared with control group were 29.2% and in the SjC23 + IL-12 group reduced 58.6%. Similarly the female worm reduction rates were 50.8 and 58.8%, the hepatic egg reduction rates were 48.2 and 56.4%, and the mean square measure reduction rates of hepatic egg granulomas were 48.6 and 44.4%, the mean diameter reduction rates of granulomas were 27.6 and 22.8% in pigs vaccinated with SjC23 or SjC23 + IL-12 compared to plasmid vaccinated pigs, respectively. Analysis of sera from pigs vaccinated with SjC23 showed that 4 of 10 pigs had anti-Sj23 antibody responses; with 5 of 10 pigs positive for anti-Sj23 in the SjC23+IL-12 group. These

  11. A DNA Vaccine for Venezuelan Equine Encephalitis Virus Delivered by Intramuscular Electroporation Elicits High Levels of Neutralizing Antibodies in Multiple Animal Models and Provides Protective Immunity to Mice and Nonhuman Primates ▿

    PubMed Central

    Dupuy, Lesley C.; Richards, Michelle J.; Ellefsen, Barry; Chau, Lillian; Luxembourg, Alain; Hannaman, Drew; Livingston, Brian D.; Schmaljohn, Connie S.

    2011-01-01

    We evaluated the immunogenicity and protective efficacy of a DNA vaccine expressing codon-optimized envelope glycoprotein genes of Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEEV) when delivered by intramuscular electroporation. Mice vaccinated with the DNA vaccine developed robust VEEV-neutralizing antibody responses that were comparable to those observed after administration of the live-attenuated VEEV vaccine TC-83 and were completely protected from a lethal aerosol VEEV challenge. The DNA vaccine also elicited strong neutralizing antibody responses in rabbits that persisted at high levels for at least 6 months and could be boosted by a single additional electroporation administration of the DNA performed approximately 6 months after the initial vaccinations. Cynomolgus macaques that received the vaccine by intramuscular electroporation developed substantial neutralizing antibody responses and after an aerosol challenge had no detectable serum viremia and had reduced febrile reactions, lymphopenia, and clinical signs of disease compared to those of negative-control macaques. Taken together, our results demonstrate that this DNA vaccine provides a potent means of protecting against VEEV infections and represents an attractive candidate for further development. PMID:21450977

  12. Immunization with DNA vaccines encoding glycoprotein D or glycoprotein B, alone or in combination, induces protective immunity in animal models of herpes simplex virus-2 disease.

    PubMed

    McClements, W L; Armstrong, M E; Keys, R D; Liu, M A

    1996-10-15

    DNA vaccines expressing herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) full-length glycoprotein D (gD), or a truncated form of HSV-2 glycoprotein B (gB) were evaluated for protective efficacy in two experimental models of HSV-2 infection. Intramuscular (i.m.) injection of mice showed that each construction induced neutralizing serum antibodies and protected the mice from lethal HSV-2 infection. Dose-titration studies showed that low doses (< or = 1 microgram) of either DNA construction induced protective immunity, and that a single immunization with the gD construction was effective. The two DNAs were then tested in a low-dosage combination in guinea pigs. Immune sera from DNA-injected animals had antibodies to both gD and gB, and virus neutralizing activity. When challenged by vaginal infection with HSV-2, the DNA-immunized animals were significantly protected from primary genital disease.

  13. DNA vaccine encoding HPV-16 E7 with mutation in L-Y-C-Y-E pRb-binding motif induces potent anti-tumor responses in mice.

    PubMed

    Bahrami, Armina Alagheband; Ghaemi, Amir; Tabarraei, Alijan; Sajadian, Azadeh; Gorji, Ali; Soleimanjahi, Hoorieh

    2014-09-01

    Cervical cancer is the second most common cancer among women worldwide and remains a clinical problem despite improvements in early detection and therapy. The human papillomavirus (HPV) type 16 (HPV16) E7 oncoprotein expressed in cervical carcinoma cells are considered as attractive tumor-specific antigen targets for immunotherapy. Since the transformation potential of the oncogenes, vaccination based of these oncogenes is not safe. In present study, DNA vaccine expressing the modified variant with mutation in pRb-binding motif of the HPV-16 E7 oncoprotein was generated. A novel modified E7 gene with mutation in LYCYE motif was designed and constructed and the immunogenicity and antitumor effect of therapeutic DNA vaccines encoding the mutant and wild type of E7 gene were investigated. The L-Y-C-Y-E pRb-binding motif of E7 proteins has been involved in the immortalization and transformation of the host cell. The results showed that the mutant and wild type HPV-16 E7 vectors expressed the desired protein. Furthermore, the immunological mechanism behind mutant E7 DNA vaccine can be attributed at least partially to increased cytotoxic T lymphocyte, accompanied by the up-regulation of Th1-cytokine IFN-γ and TNF-β and down-regulation of Th3-cytokine TGF-β. Immunized mice with mutant plasmid demonstrated significantly stronger cell immune responses and higher levels of tumor protection than wild-type E7 DNA vaccine. The results exhibit that modified E7 DNA vaccine may be a promising candidate for development of therapeutic vaccine against HPV-16 cancers.

  14. DNA vaccine encoding the moonlighting protein Onchocerca volvulus glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (Ov-GAPDH) leads to partial protection in a mouse model of human filariasis.

    PubMed

    Steisslinger, Vera; Korten, Simone; Brattig, Norbert W; Erttmann, Klaus D

    2015-10-26

    River blindness, caused by the filarial parasite Onchocerca volvulus, is a major socio-economic and public health problem in Sub-Saharan Africa. In January 2015, The Onchocerciasis Vaccine for Africa (TOVA) Initiative has been launched with the aim of providing new tools to complement mass drug administration (MDA) of ivermectin, thereby promoting elimination of onchocerciasis in Africa. In this context we here present Onchocerca volvulus glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (Ov-GAPDH) as a possible DNA vaccine candidate. We report that in a laboratory model for filariasis, immunization with Ov-GAPDH led to a significant reduction of adult worm load and microfilaraemia in BALB/c mice after challenge infection with the filarial parasite Litomosoides sigmodontis. Mice were either vaccinated with Ov-GAPDH.DNA plasmid (Ov-pGAPDH.DNA) alone or in combination with recombinantly expressed Ov-GAPDH protein (Ov-rGAPDH). During the following challenge infection of immunized and control mice with L. sigmodontis, those formulations which included the DNA plasmid, led to a significant reduction of adult worm loads (up to 57% median reduction) and microfilaraemia (up to 94% reduction) in immunized animals. In a further experiment, immunization with a mixture of four overlapping, synthetic Ov-GAPDH peptides (Ov-GAPDHpept), with alum as adjuvant, did not significantly reduce worm loads. Our results indicate that DNA vaccination with Ov-GAPDH has protective potential against filarial challenge infection in the mouse model. This suggests a transfer of the approach into the cattle Onchocerca ochengi model, where it is possible to investigate the effects of this vaccination in the context of a natural host-parasite relationship. PMID:26320419

  15. Immunization of DNA vaccine encoding C3d-VP1 fusion enhanced protective immune response against foot-and-mouth disease virus.

    PubMed

    Fan, Huiying; Tong, Tiezhu; Chen, Huanchun; Guo, Aizhen

    2007-10-01

    Because foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) remains a great problem to many livestock of agricultural importance, safe, effective vaccines are in great need. DNA vaccine would be a promising candidate but the design remains to be optimized. VP1 gene of FMDV strain O/ES/2001 was linked to three copies of either porcine or murine C3d or four copies of a 28-aa fragment of murine C3d containing the CR2 receptor binding domain (M28). The resultant plasmids encoding C3d/M28-VP1 fusion or only VP1 as control were immunized guinea pigs. Both cellular and humoral immune responses were evaluated and protection was observed after virus challenge. As a result, although the plasmid encoding only VP1 could elicit virus-binding antibody detected by ELISA, splenocyte proliferation, IL-4 and IFN-gamma production, the levels were significantly less than C3d/M28-VP1 fusion. Furthermore, VP1 failed to induce neutralization antibody and protect animals against virus challenge, while murine C3d-VP1 fusion efficiently induced neutralization antibody response and provided 87.50% of the animals with complete protection and 12.50% with partial protection. Among murine C3d, M28, and porcine C3d, the adjuvant effect of murine C3d is strongest, followed by porcine C3d, and last murine M28. In conclusion, the fact that C3d genes, when coupled to VP1 gene, are able to greatly enhance the protective immune response of VP1 DNA in guinea pigs suggests that C3d-VP1 DNA chimera has a significant potential for use as a novel DNA vaccine against FMDV. PMID:17497212

  16. HER2/neu DNA vaccination by intradermal gene delivery in a mouse tumor model: Gene gun is superior to jet injector in inducing CTL responses and protective immunity.

    PubMed

    Nguyen-Hoai, Tam; Kobelt, Dennis; Hohn, Oliver; Vu, Minh D; Schlag, Peter M; Dörken, Bernd; Norley, Steven; Lipp, Martin; Walther, Wolfgang; Pezzutto, Antonio; Westermann, Jörg

    2012-12-01

    DNA vaccines are potential tools for the induction of immune responses against both infectious disease and cancer. The dermal application of DNA vaccines is of particular interest since the epidermal and dermal layers of the skin are characterized by an abundance of antigen-presenting cells (APCs). The aim of our study was to compare tumor protection as obtained by two different methods of intradermal DNA delivery (gene gun and jet injector) in a well-established HER2/neu mouse tumor model. BALB/c mice were immunized twice with a HER2/neu-coding plasmid by gene gun or jet injector. Mice were then subcutaneously challenged with HER2/neu(+) syngeneic D2F2/E2 tumor cells. Protection against subsequent challenges with tumor cells as well as humoral and T-cell immune responses induced by the vaccine were monitored. Gene gun immunization was far superior to jet injector both in terms of tumor protection and induction of HER2/neu-specific immune responses. After gene gun immunization, 60% of the mice remained tumor-free until day 140 as compared with 25% after jet injector immunization. Furthermore, gene gun vaccination was able to induce both a strong T(H)1-polarized T-cell response with detectable cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) activity and a humoral immune response against HER2/neu, whereas the jet injector was not. Although the disadvantages that were associated with the use of the jet injector in our model may be overcome with methodological modifications and/or in larger animals, which exhibit a thicker skin and/or subcutaneous muscle tissue, we conclude that gene gun delivery constitutes the method of choice for intradermal DNA delivery in preclinical mouse models and possibly also for the clinical development of DNA-based vaccines.

  17. Aspects of T Cell-Mediated Immunity Induced in Mice by a DNA Vaccine Based on the Dengue-NS1 Antigen after Challenge by the Intracerebral Route

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Edson R. A.; Gonçalves, Antônio J. S.; Costa, Simone M.; Azevedo, Adriana S.; Mantuano-Barradas, Marcio; Nogueira, Ana Cristina M. A.

    2016-01-01

    Dengue disease has emerged as a major public health issue across tropical and subtropical countries. Infections caused by dengue virus (DENV) can evolve to life-threatening forms, resulting in about 20,000 deaths every year worldwide. Several animal models have been described concerning pre-clinical stages in vaccine development against dengue, each of them presenting limitations and advantages. Among these models, a traditional approach is the inoculation of a mouse-brain adapted DENV variant in immunocompetent animals by the intracerebral (i.c.) route. Despite the historical usage and relevance of this model for vaccine testing, little is known about the mechanisms by which the protection is developed upon vaccination. To cover this topic, a DNA vaccine based on the DENV non-structural protein 1 (pcTPANS1) was considered and investigations were focused on the induced T cell-mediated immunity against i.c.-DENV infection. Immunophenotyping assays by flow cytometry revealed that immunization with pcTPANS1 promotes a sustained T cell activation in spleen of i.c.-infected mice. Moreover, we found that the downregulation of CD45RB on T cells, as an indicator of cell activation, correlated with absence of morbidity upon virus challenge. Adoptive transfer procedures supported by CFSE-labeled cell tracking showed that NS1-specific T cells induced by vaccination, proliferate and migrate to peripheral organs of infected mice, such as the liver. Additionally, in late stages of infection (from the 7th day onwards), vaccinated mice also presented reduced levels of circulating IFN-γ and IL-12p70 in comparison to non-vaccinated animals. In conclusion, this work presented new aspects about the T cell-mediated immunity concerning DNA vaccination with pcTPANS1 and the i.c. infection model. These insights can be explored in further studies of anti-dengue vaccine efficacy. PMID:27631083

  18. Evaluation of Immunogenicity of Cocktail DNA Vaccine Containing Plasmids Encoding Complete GRA5, SAG1, and ROP2 Antigens of Toxoplasma gondii in BALB/C Mice

    PubMed Central

    NASERIFAR, Razi; GHAFFARIFAR, Fatemeh; DALIMI, Abdolhosein; SHARIFI, Zohreh; SOLHJOO, Kavous; HOSSEINIAN KHOSROSHAHI, Kami

    2015-01-01

    Background: Severe and fatal complications of toxoplasmosis urge development of effective vaccines against the disease. The current study was performed to evaluate cocktail DNA vaccine containing plasmids encoding GRA5, SAG1, and ROP2 genes of Toxoplasma gondii in BALB/c mice in Tarbiat Modares University in 2012. Methods: The plasmids containing complete GRA5, SAG1, and ROP2 genes were mass extracted and then the recombinant plasmids were administered via intramuscular injections according to immunized mice three times with three-week intervals. Then splenocytes were cultured, and proliferation as well as cytokine assays were carried out. The other mice in each group were inoculated by the parasite and mortality of the mice was evaluated on a daily basis. Results: The results of cytokine assay for INF-γ were higher in the mice that received the cocktail DNA containing recombinant plasmids. Evaluation of proliferation of splenocytes using the MTT (3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5 diphenyl tetrazolium bromide) assay indicated induction of cellular response. Measurement of total IgG and the isotypes of IgG1 and IgG2a showed that the cocktail DNA stimulated IgG and IgG2a production in comparison with the control groups (P<0.05). Furthermore, the survival rate of mice in the groups that received the cocktail DNA was significantly higher than that in the control groups (P<0.05). Conclusion: Administration of the cocktail DNA vaccine led to production of higher levels of IFN-γ, confirmed by secretion of IgG2a, and the immune response was shifted toward Th1. Thus, the cocktail DNA containing the recombinant plasmids can be an appropriate candidate for immunization against toxoplasmosis. PMID:26811726

  19. Coadministration of the Three Antigenic Leishmania infantum Poly (A) Binding Proteins as a DNA Vaccine Induces Protection against Leishmania major Infection in BALB/c Mice

    PubMed Central

    Corvo, Laura; Garde, Esther; Ramírez, Laura; Iniesta, Virginia; Bonay, Pedro; Gómez-Nieto, Carlos; González, Víctor M.; Martín, M. Elena; Alonso, Carlos; Coelho, Eduardo A. F.; Barral, Aldina; Barral-Netto, Manoel

    2015-01-01

    Background Highly conserved intracellular proteins from Leishmania have been described as antigens in natural and experimental infected mammals. The present study aimed to evaluate the antigenicity and prophylactic properties of the Leishmania infantum Poly (A) binding proteins (LiPABPs). Methodology/Principal Findings Three different members of the LiPABP family have been described. Recombinant tools based on these proteins were constructed: recombinant proteins and DNA vaccines. The three recombinant proteins were employed for coating ELISA plates. Sera from human and canine patients of visceral leishmaniasis and human patients of mucosal leishmaniasis recognized the three LiPABPs. In addition, the protective efficacy of a DNA vaccine based on the combination of the three Leishmania PABPs has been tested in a model of progressive murine leishmaniasis: BALB/c mice infected with Leishmania major. The induction of a Th1-like response against the LiPABP family by genetic vaccination was able to down-regulate the IL-10 predominant responses elicited by parasite LiPABPs after infection in this murine model. This modulation resulted in a partial protection against L. major infection. LiPABP vaccinated mice showed a reduction on the pathology that was accompanied by a decrease in parasite burdens, in antibody titers against Leishmania antigens and in the IL-4 and IL-10 parasite-specific mediated responses in comparison to control mice groups immunized with saline or with the non-recombinant plasmid. Conclusion/Significance The results presented here demonstrate for the first time the prophylactic properties of a new family of Leishmania antigenic intracellular proteins, the LiPABPs. The redirection of the immune response elicited against the LiPABP family (from IL-10 towards IFN-γ mediated responses) by genetic vaccination was able to induce a partial protection against the development of the disease in a highly susceptible murine model of leishmaniasis. PMID:25955652

  20. Aspects of T Cell-Mediated Immunity Induced in Mice by a DNA Vaccine Based on the Dengue-NS1 Antigen after Challenge by the Intracerebral Route.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Edson R A; Gonçalves, Antônio J S; Costa, Simone M; Azevedo, Adriana S; Mantuano-Barradas, Marcio; Nogueira, Ana Cristina M A; Alves, Ada M B

    2016-01-01

    Dengue disease has emerged as a major public health issue across tropical and subtropical countries. Infections caused by dengue virus (DENV) can evolve to life-threatening forms, resulting in about 20,000 deaths every year worldwide. Several animal models have been described concerning pre-clinical stages in vaccine development against dengue, each of them presenting limitations and advantages. Among these models, a traditional approach is the inoculation of a mouse-brain adapted DENV variant in immunocompetent animals by the intracerebral (i.c.) route. Despite the historical usage and relevance of this model for vaccine testing, little is known about the mechanisms by which the protection is developed upon vaccination. To cover this topic, a DNA vaccine based on the DENV non-structural protein 1 (pcTPANS1) was considered and investigations were focused on the induced T cell-mediated immunity against i.c.-DENV infection. Immunophenotyping assays by flow cytometry revealed that immunization with pcTPANS1 promotes a sustained T cell activation in spleen of i.c.-infected mice. Moreover, we found that the downregulation of CD45RB on T cells, as an indicator of cell activation, correlated with absence of morbidity upon virus challenge. Adoptive transfer procedures supported by CFSE-labeled cell tracking showed that NS1-specific T cells induced by vaccination, proliferate and migrate to peripheral organs of infected mice, such as the liver. Additionally, in late stages of infection (from the 7th day onwards), vaccinated mice also presented reduced levels of circulating IFN-γ and IL-12p70 in comparison to non-vaccinated animals. In conclusion, this work presented new aspects about the T cell-mediated immunity concerning DNA vaccination with pcTPANS1 and the i.c. infection model. These insights can be explored in further studies of anti-dengue vaccine efficacy. PMID:27631083

  1. An improved rearranged Human Papillomavirus Type 16 E7 DNA vaccine candidate (HPV-16 E7SH) induces an E7 wildtype-specific T cell response.

    PubMed

    Ohlschläger, Peter; Pes, Michaela; Osen, Wolfram; Dürst, Matthias; Schneider, Achim; Gissmann, Lutz; Kaufmann, Andreas M

    2006-04-01

    A new and very promising approach in vaccine development is the application of naked DNA. In comparison to conventional vaccines it offers several advantages, especially if there is a need for the development of low cost vaccines. Infection with high-risk human papillomaviruses (hr-HPVs) is the major risk factor for the development of cervical cancer (cc), the third most common cancer in women worldwide. The HPV E7 oncogene is constitutively expressed in HPV-infected cells and represents an excellent target for immune therapy of HPV-related disease. Therefore, we chose the HPV-16 E7 as model antigen in the development of a therapeutic DNA vaccine candidate. For safety reasons the use of a transforming gene like the HPV-16 E7 for DNA vaccination is not feasible in humans. In consequence we have generated an artificial ("shuffled") HPV-16 E7-gene (HPV-16 E7SH), containing all putative cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTLs) epitopes and exhibiting high safety features. Here, we show the induction of a strong E7-wildtype (E7WT) directed cellular and humoral immune response including tumor protection and regression after in vivo immunization in the murine system. Moreover, the vaccine candidate demonstrated immunogenicity in humans, demonstrated by priming of antigen-specific T cells in vitro. Importantly, the artificial HPV-gene has completely lost its transforming properties as measured in soft agar transformation assays. These results may be of importance for the development of vaccines based on oncogenes or oncoproteins. PMID:16472545

  2. Construction of DNA vaccines encoding Eimeria acervulina cSZ-2 with chicken IL-2 and IFN-γ and their efficacy against poultry coccidiosis.

    PubMed

    Shah, Muhammad Ali A; Song, Xiaokai; Xu, Lixin; Yan, Ruofeng; Li, Xiangrui

    2011-02-01

    The study describes vaccination experiments with highly immunogenic sporozoite E. acervulina cSZ-2 co-administered with chicken IL-2 (chIL-2) and interferon-γ (chIFN-γ) to determine their efficacies against homologue challenge. The entire coding sequence of cSZ2, chIL-2 and chIFN-γ were cloned into eukaryotic expression vector pVAX1, constructing DNA vaccines pVAX1-cSZ2, pVAX1-chIL-2, pVAX1-chIFN-γ, pVAX1-cSZ2-chIL-2 and pVAX1-cSZ2-chIFN-γ. The expression of target genes in vivo was detected by RT-PCR and Western blot. Chicken experiments were carried out by vaccinating chickens two times at dose rate of 100 μg intramuscularly. At 28 days of age, all chickens were inoculated orally with 1×10(5) sporulated oocysts of E. acervulina except the unchallenged control group. Seven days after challenge, all chickens were weighted and slaughtered for duodenum collection. The results indicated that these DNA vaccines were successfully constructed and the antigen genes could be expressed effectively in vivo. The findings also demonstrated best synergistic effect of IL-2 with this protein which suggested that co-administration of cytokines with this antigen was a powerful method to enhance immunity by alleviating intestinal lesions, body weight loss and oocyst count imparting partial protection against homologous challenge.

  3. DNA vaccine encoding the moonlighting protein Onchocerca volvulus glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (Ov-GAPDH) leads to partial protection in a mouse model of human filariasis.

    PubMed

    Steisslinger, Vera; Korten, Simone; Brattig, Norbert W; Erttmann, Klaus D

    2015-10-26

    River blindness, caused by the filarial parasite Onchocerca volvulus, is a major socio-economic and public health problem in Sub-Saharan Africa. In January 2015, The Onchocerciasis Vaccine for Africa (TOVA) Initiative has been launched with the aim of providing new tools to complement mass drug administration (MDA) of ivermectin, thereby promoting elimination of onchocerciasis in Africa. In this context we here present Onchocerca volvulus glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (Ov-GAPDH) as a possible DNA vaccine candidate. We report that in a laboratory model for filariasis, immunization with Ov-GAPDH led to a significant reduction of adult worm load and microfilaraemia in BALB/c mice after challenge infection with the filarial parasite Litomosoides sigmodontis. Mice were either vaccinated with Ov-GAPDH.DNA plasmid (Ov-pGAPDH.DNA) alone or in combination with recombinantly expressed Ov-GAPDH protein (Ov-rGAPDH). During the following challenge infection of immunized and control mice with L. sigmodontis, those formulations which included the DNA plasmid, led to a significant reduction of adult worm loads (up to 57% median reduction) and microfilaraemia (up to 94% reduction) in immunized animals. In a further experiment, immunization with a mixture of four overlapping, synthetic Ov-GAPDH peptides (Ov-GAPDHpept), with alum as adjuvant, did not significantly reduce worm loads. Our results indicate that DNA vaccination with Ov-GAPDH has protective potential against filarial challenge infection in the mouse model. This suggests a transfer of the approach into the cattle Onchocerca ochengi model, where it is possible to investigate the effects of this vaccination in the context of a natural host-parasite relationship.

  4. CryJ-LAMP DNA Vaccines for Japanese Red Cedar Allergy Induce Robust Th1-Type Immune Responses in Murine Model.

    PubMed

    Su, Yan; Connolly, Michael; Marketon, Anthony; Heiland, Teri

    2016-01-01

    Allergies caused by Japanese Red Cedar (JRC) pollen affect up to a third of Japanese people, necessitating development of an effective therapeutic. We utilized the lysosomal targeting property of lysosomal-associated membrane protein-1 (LAMP-1) to make DNA vaccines that encode LAMP-1 and the sequences of immunodominant allergen CryJ1 or CryJ2 from the JRC pollen. This novel strategy is designed to skew the CD4 T cell responses to the target allergens towards a nonallergenic Th1 response. CryJ1-LAMP and CryJ2-LAMP were administrated to BALB/c mice and antigen-specific Th1-type IgG2a and Th2-type IgG1 antibodies, as well as IgE antibodies, were assayed longitudinally. We also isolated different T cell populations from immunized mice and adoptively transferred them into naïve mice followed by CryJ1/CryJ2 protein boosts. We demonstrated that CryJ-LAMP immunized mice produce high levels of IFN-γ and anti-CryJ1 or anti-CryJ2 IgG2a antibodies and low levels of IgE antibodies, suggesting that a Th1 response was induced. In addition, we found that CD4(+) T cells are the immunological effectors of DNA vaccination in this allergy model. Together, our results suggest the CryJ-LAMP Vaccine has a potential as an effective therapeutic for JRC induced allergy by skewing Th1/Th2 responses. PMID:27239481

  5. Ngaingan virus, a macropod-associated rhabdovirus, contains a second glycoprotein gene and seven novel open reading frames.

    PubMed

    Gubala, Aneta; Davis, Steven; Weir, Richard; Melville, Lorna; Cowled, Chris; Walker, Peter; Boyle, David

    2010-03-30

    Ngaingan virus (NGAV) was isolated from a pool of biting midges that were collected in the tropics of northern Australia. Reported here is the full-length sequence of the NGAV genome, which, at over 15.7 kb, is the largest in any rhabdovirus described to date and contains 13 genes, the highest number of genes observed in any (-) ssRNA virus. Seven of these putative genes show no significant homology to known proteins. Like viruses in the genus Ephemerovirus, NGAV possesses a second glycoprotein gene (G(NS)). Phylogenetic analyses, however, place NGAV within the yet to be classified "Hart Park" group containing Wongabel and Flanders viruses, which do not contain a second glycoprotein gene. Screening of various animal sera from northern Australia has indicated that NGAV is currently circulating in macropods (wallabies, wallaroos and kangaroos), highlighting the need for further studies to determine its potential to cause disease in these species.

  6. Detection of cutaneous antibodies in excised skin explants from grass carp, Ctenopharyngodon idella (Valenciennes), immune to Scophthalmus maximus rhabdovirus.

    PubMed

    Lü, A-J; Li, Z-Q; Zhang, Q-Y

    2008-08-01

    This study determined whether cutaneous antibodies were present in excised skin explants of grass carp, Ctenopharyngodon idella, immune to Scophthalmus maximus rhabdovirus (SMRV). Culture fluid from immune skin explants were assayed by indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (iELISA), Western blot, indirect immunofluorescent assay (IFA) and flow cytometry (FCM). iELISA showed that cutaneous antibody titres were much lower (1:12) than antiserum titres (1:1458) from intraperitoneally immunized grass carp. The phosphoprotein and matrix protein antigens of purified SMRV proteins were recognized by cutaneous antibodies from skin culture fluid using Western blot. The skin culture fluid produced staining signals in viral assembly sites and cytoplasm of SMRV-infected epithelioma papulosum cyprini (EPC) cells by IFA. FCM showed that 4.39% SMRV-infected EPC cells were detected, while non-specific reaction was seen in 2% of control cells. This is the first description of cutaneous antibodies against SMRV in grass carp.

  7. Evolution of infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV), a fish rhabdovirus, in Europe over 20 years: implications for control.

    PubMed

    Enzmann, Peter-Joachim; Castric, Jeannette; Bovo, Giuseppe; Thiery, Richard; Fichtner, Dieter; Schütze, Heike; Wahli, Thomas

    2010-02-24

    The fish pathogenic rhabdovirus infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) causes substantial losses in European aquaculture. IHNV was first detected in Europe in 1987 and has since undergone considerable spread. Phylogenetic analyses of the full G-gene sequences of 73 isolates obtained from 4 countries in Europe (France, n = 18; Italy, 9; Switzerland, 4; Germany, 42) enable determination of the evolution of the virus in Europe since the first detection, and identification of characteristic changes within the G-genes of European strains. Further, the database allows us to analyse the pathways of distribution in Europe over time. The results suggest that in most of the recent cases, spread of IHNV was related to trade of infected fish. The data further demonstrate that knowledge of the sequence is required to determine the source of infections in farms.

  8. Sequence analysis and expression of the M1 and M2 matrix protein genes of hirame rhabdovirus (HIRRV)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nishizawa, T.; Kurath, G.; Winton, J.R.

    1997-01-01

    We have cloned and sequenced a 2318 nucleotide region of the genomic RNA of hirame rhabdovirus (HIRRV), an important viral pathogen of Japanese flounder Paralichthys olivaceus. This region comprises approximately two-thirds of the 3' end of the nucleocapsid protein (N) gene and the complete matrix protein (M1 and M2) genes with the associated intergenic regions. The partial N gene sequence was 812 nucleotides in length with an open reading frame (ORF) that encoded the carboxyl-terminal 250 amino acids of the N protein. The M1 and M2 genes were 771 and 700 nucleotides in length, respectively, with ORFs encoding proteins of 227 and 193 amino acids. The M1 gene sequence contained an additional small ORF that could encode a highly basic, arginine-rich protein of 25 amino acids. Comparisons of the N, M1, and M2 gene sequences of HIRRV with the corresponding sequences of the fish rhabdoviruses, infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) or viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV) indicated that HIRRV was more closely related to IHNV than to VHSV, but was clearly distinct from either. The putative consensus gene termination sequence for IHNV and VHSV, AGAYAG(A)(7), was present in the N-M1, M1-M2, and M2-G intergenic regions of HIRRV as were the putative transcription initiation sequences YGGCAC and AACA. An Escherichia coli expression system was used to produce recombinant proteins from the M1 and M2 genes of HIRRV. These were the same size as the authentic M1 and M2 proteins and reacted with anti-HIRRV rabbit serum in western blots. These reagents can be used for further study of the fish immune response and to test novel control methods.

  9. Intranasal delivery of cationic PLGA nano/microparticles-loaded FMDV DNA vaccine encoding IL-6 elicited protective immunity against FMDV challenge.

    PubMed

    Wang, Gang; Pan, Li; Zhang, Yongguang; Wang, Yonglu; Zhang, Zhongwang; Lü, Jianliang; Zhou, Peng; Fang, Yuzhen; Jiang, Shoutian

    2011-01-01

    Mucosal vaccination has been demonstrated to be an effective means of eliciting protective immunity against aerosol infections of foot and mouth disease virus (FMDV) and various approaches have been used to improve mucosal response to this pathogen. In this study, cationic PLGA (poly(lactide-co-glycolide)) nano/microparticles were used as an intranasal delivery vehicle as a means administering FMDV DNA vaccine encoding the FMDV capsid protein and the bovine IL-6 gene as a means of enhancing mucosal and systemic immune responses in animals. Three eukaryotic expression plasmids with or without bovine IL-6 gene (pc-P12A3C, pc-IL2AP12A3C and pc-P12AIL3C) were generated. The two latter plasmids were designed with the IL-6 gene located either before or between the P12A and 3C genes, respectively, as a means of determining if the location of the IL-6 gene affected capsid assembly and the subsequent immune response. Guinea pigs and rats were intranasally vaccinated with the respective chitosan-coated PLGA nano/microparticles-loaded FMDV DNA vaccine formulations. Animals immunized with pc-P12AIL3C (followed by animals vaccinated with pc-P12A3C and pc-IL2AP12A3C) developed the highest levels of antigen-specific serum IgG and IgA antibody responses and the highest levels of sIgA (secretory IgA) present in mucosal tissues. However, the highest levels of neutralizing antibodies were generated in pc-IL2AP12A3C-immunized animals (followed by pc-P12AIL3C- and then in pc-P12A3C-immunized animals). pc-IL2AP12A3C-immunized animals also developed stronger cell mediated immune responses (followed by pc-P12AIL3C- and pc-P12A3C-immunized animals) as evidenced by antigen-specific T-cell proliferation and expression levels of IFN-γ by both CD4+ and CD8+ splenic T cells. The percentage of animals protected against FMDV challenge following immunizations with pc-IL2AP12A3C, pc-P12AIL3C or pc-P12A3C were 3/5, 1/5 and 0/5, respectively. These data suggested that intranasal delivery of cationic

  10. First detection of pike fry-like rhabdovirus in barbel and spring viraemia of carp virus in sturgeon and pike in aquaculture in the Czech Republic.

    PubMed

    Vicenova, Monika; Reschova, Stanislava; Pokorova, Dagmar; Hulova, Jana; Vesely, Tomas

    2011-06-16

    Rapid antigen detection enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) testing of cell cultures with organ homogenate from fish, collected from farms with a predominance of common carp or in natural aquaculture in the Czech Republic between 1995 and 2008, identified piscine vesiculovirus in 27 of 178 samples. Using reverse transcription semi-nested PCR, targeting a 550 nucleotide region of the glycoprotein (G) gene, piscine vesiculovirus was confirmed in 23 of the 27 organ samples diagnosed by ELISA as infected. PCR products were amplified and sequenced from 18 isolates from common carp Cyprinus carpio (family Cyprinidae), 2 isolates from northern pike Esox lucius (family Esocidae), and 1 isolate each from Siberian sturgeon Acipenser baerii (family Acipenseridae), common barbel Barbus barbus (family Cyprinidae), and koi carp Cyprinus carpio koi (family Cyprinidae). The sequences (based on 401 nucleotides) clustered into 2 genogroups. The majority of isolates (n = 22), including those from sturgeon and pike, grouped with the spring viraemia of carp virus (SVCV) Genogroup I and Subgroup Id. The 22 isolates could be further subdivided into 2 groups: Id1 (n = 20) and Id2 (n = 2). A marker (a non-conservative nucleotide substitution) for the Id1 SVCV group was identified. It was specifically found in all sequences of Id1 isolates when testing SVCV originating from different countries. The remaining isolate from barbel, was classified in the pike fry-like rhabdovirus Genogroup IV. This is the first confirmation of natural SVCV infection in sturgeon and pike, and pike fry-like rhabdovirus infection in barbel. In the case of the pike fry-like rhabdovirus, this is also its first identification in the Czech Republic. According to the presence/absence of evident clinical signs of rhabdoviral disease in the 3 infected hosts, only the sturgeon seemed to be susceptible to the monitored rhabdovirus.

  11. Analysis of expressed sequence tags from Maize mosaic rhabdovirus-infected gut tissues of Peregrinus maidis reveals the presence of key components of insect innate immunity.

    PubMed

    Whitfield, A E; Rotenberg, D; Aritua, V; Hogenhout, S A

    2011-04-01

    The corn planthopper, Peregrinus maidis, causes direct feeding damage to plants and transmits Maize mosaic rhabdovirus (MMV) in a persistent-propagative manner. MMV must cross several insect tissue layers for successful transmission to occur, and the gut serves as an important barrier for rhabdovirus transmission. In order to facilitate the identification of proteins that may interact with MMV either by facilitating acquisition or responding to virus infection, we generated and analysed the gut transcriptome of P. maidis. From two normalized cDNA libraries, we generated a P. maidis gut transcriptome composed of 20,771 expressed sequence tags (ESTs). Assembly of the sequences yielded 1860 contigs and 14,032 singletons, and biological roles were assigned to 5793 (36%). Comparison of P. maidis ESTs with other insect amino acid sequences revealed that P. maidis shares greatest sequence similarity with another hemipteran, the brown planthopper Nilaparvata lugens. We identified 202 P. maidis transcripts with putative homology to proteins associated with insect innate immunity, including those implicated in the Toll, Imd, JAK/STAT, Jnk and the small-interfering RNA-mediated pathways. Sequence comparisons between our P. maidis gut EST collection and the currently available National Center for Biotechnology Information EST database collection for Ni. lugens revealed that a pathogen recognition receptor in the Imd pathway, peptidoglycan recognition protein-long class (PGRP-LC), is present in these two members of the family Delphacidae; however, these recognition receptors are lacking in the model hemipteran Acyrthosiphon pisum. In addition, we identified sequences in the P. maidis gut transcriptome that share significant amino acid sequence similarities with the rhabdovirus receptor molecule, acetylcholine receptor (AChR), found in other hosts. This EST analysis sheds new light on immune response pathways in hemipteran guts that will be useful for further dissecting innate

  12. Safety and Immunogenicity Study of Multiclade HIV-1 Adenoviral Vector Vaccine Alone or as Boost following a Multiclade HIV-1 DNA Vaccine in Africa

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Susan; Than, Soe; Adams, Elizabeth M.; Graham, Barney S.; Koup, Richard A.; Bailer, Robert T.; Smith, Carol; Dally, Len; Tarragona-Fiol, Tony; Bergin, Philip J.; Hayes, Peter; Ho, Martin; Loughran, Kelley; Komaroff, Wendy; Stevens, Gwynneth; Thomson, Helen; Boaz, Mark J.; Cox, Josephine H.; Schmidt, Claudia; Gilmour, Jill; Nabel, Gary J.; Fast, Patricia

    2010-01-01

    Background We conducted a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled Phase I study of a recombinant replication-defective adenovirus type 5 (rAd5) vector expressing HIV-1 Gag and Pol from subtype B and Env from subtypes A, B and C, given alone or as boost following a DNA plasmid vaccine expressing the same HIV-1 proteins plus Nef, in 114 healthy HIV-uninfected African adults. Methodology/Principal Findings Volunteers were randomized to 4 groups receiving the rAd5 vaccine intramuscularly at dosage levels of 1×1010 or 1×1011 particle units (PU) either alone or as boost following 3 injections of the DNA vaccine given at 4 mg/dose intramuscularly by needle-free injection using Biojector® 2000. Safety and immunogenicity were evaluated for 12 months. Both vaccines were well-tolerated. Overall, 62% and 86% of vaccine recipients in the rAd5 alone and DNA prime - rAd5 boost groups, respectively, responded to the HIV-1 proteins by an interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) ELISPOT. The frequency of immune responses was independent of rAd5 dosage levels. The highest frequency of responses after rAd5 alone was detected at 6 weeks; after DNA prime - rAd5 boost, at 6 months (end of study). At baseline, neutralizing antibodies against Ad5 were present in 81% of volunteers; the distribution was similar across the 4 groups. Pre-existing immunity to Ad5 did not appear to have a significant impact on reactogenicity or immune response rates to HIV antigens by IFN-γ ELISPOT. Binding antibodies against Env were detected in up to 100% recipients of DNA prime - rAd5 boost. One volunteer acquired HIV infection after the study ended, two years after receipt of rAd5 alone. Conclusions/Significance The HIV-1 rAd5 vaccine, either alone or as a boost following HIV-1 DNA vaccine, was well-tolerated and immunogenic in African adults. DNA priming increased the frequency and magnitude of cellular and humoral immune responses, but there was no effect of rAd5 dosage on immunogenicity endpoints. Trial

  13. Isolation and characterisation of rhabdovirus from wild common bream Abramis brama, roach Rutilus rutilus, farmed brown trout Salmo trutta and rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss in Northern Ireland.

    PubMed

    Rowley, H; Graham, D A; Campbell, S; Way, K; Stone, D M; Curran, W L; Bryson, D G

    2001-12-20

    Rhabdovirus was isolated from wild common bream Abramis brama during a disease outbreak with high mortality in Northern Ireland during May 1998. Rhabdovirus was also isolated at the same time from healthy farmed rainbow Oncorhynchus mykiss and brown trout Salmo trutta on the same stretch of river and 11 mo later from healthy wild bream and roach Rutilus rutilus in the same river system. Experimental intra-peritoneal infection of bream and mirror carp Cyprinus carpio var specularis with 2 of these isolates produced low mortality rates of < or = 12%. Serological testing of these isolates by virus neutralisation indicated that they were antigenically closely related to pike fry rhabdovirus (PFRV) but not to spring viraemia of carp virus (SVCV), while testing by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay indicated them to be antigenically different from both. Comparison of nucleotide sequence data of a 550 base pair segment of the viral glycoprotein generated by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction indicated a high (> or = 96.6%) degree of similarity between these isolates and a previous Northern Ireland isolate made in 1984, a 1997 isolate from bream in the Republic of Ireland and an earlier Dutch isolate from roach. In contrast, similarity between these isolates and PFRV was < 82.4%, indicating that these viruses belong to 2 distinct genogroups, while similarity to SVCV was even lower (< 67.4%).

  14. DNA vaccines targeting heavy chain C-terminal fragments of Clostridium botulinum neurotoxin serotypes A, B, and E induce potent humoral and cellular immunity and provide protection from lethal toxin challenge.

    PubMed

    Scott, Veronica L; Villarreal, Daniel O; Hutnick, Natalie A; Walters, Jewell N; Ragwan, Edwin; Bdeir, Khalil; Yan, Jian; Sardesai, Niranjan Y; Finnefrock, Adam C; Casimiro, Danilo R; Weiner, David B

    2015-01-01

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) are deadly, toxic proteins produced by the bacterium Clostridium botulinum that can cause significant diseases in humans. The use of the toxic substances as potential bioweapons has raised concerns by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the United States Military. Currently, there is no licensed vaccine to prevent botulinum intoxication. Here we present an immunogenicity study to evaluate the efficacy of novel monovalent vaccines and a trivalent cocktail DNA vaccine targeting the heavy chain C-terminal fragments of Clostridium botulinum neurotoxin serotypes A, B, and E. These synthetic DNA vaccines induced robust humoral and polyfunctional CD4(+) T-cell responses which fully protected animals against lethal challenge after just 2 immunizations. In addition, naïve animals administered immunized sera mixed with the lethal neurotoxin were 100% protected against intoxication. The data demonstrate the protective efficacy induced by a combinative synthetic DNA vaccine approach. This study has importance for the development of vaccines that provide protective immunity against C. botulinum neurotoxins and other toxins.

  15. DNA vaccines targeting heavy chain C-terminal fragments of Clostridium botulinum neurotoxin serotypes A, B, and E induce potent humoral and cellular immunity and provide protection from lethal toxin challenge

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Veronica L; Villarreal, Daniel O; Hutnick, Natalie A; Walters, Jewell N; Ragwan, Edwin; Bdeir, Khalil; Yan, Jian; Sardesai, Niranjan Y; Finnefrock, Adam C; Casimiro, Danilo R; Weiner, David B

    2015-01-01

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) are deadly, toxic proteins produced by the bacterium Clostridium botulinum that can cause significant diseases in humans. The use of the toxic substances as potential bioweapons has raised concerns by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the United States Military. Currently, there is no licensed vaccine to prevent botulinum intoxication. Here we present an immunogenicity study to evaluate the efficacy of novel monovalent vaccines and a trivalent cocktail DNA vaccine targeting the heavy chain C-terminal fragments of Clostridium botulinum neurotoxin serotypes A, B, and E. These synthetic DNA vaccines induced robust humoral and polyfunctional CD4+ T-cell responses which fully protected animals against lethal challenge after just 2 immunizations. In addition, naïve animals administered immunized sera mixed with the lethal neurotoxin were 100% protected against intoxication. The data demonstrate the protective efficacy induced by a combinative synthetic DNA vaccine approach. This study has importance for the development of vaccines that provide protective immunity against C. botulinum neurotoxins and other toxins. PMID:26158319

  16. Protective effect of a DNA vaccine containing an open reading frame with homology to an ABC-type transporter present in the genomic island 3 of Brucella abortus in BALB/c mice.

    PubMed

    Riquelme-Neira, Roberto; Retamal-Díaz, Angello; Acuña, Francisca; Riquelme, Pablo; Rivera, Alejandra; Sáez, Darwin; Oñate, Angel

    2013-08-12

    The immunogenicity of a DNA vaccine containing an open reading frame (ORF) of genomic island 3 (GI-3), specific for Brucella abortus and Brucella melitensis, has been examined. Intramuscular injection of plasmid DNA carrying the open reading frame with homology to an ABC-type transporter (pV278a) into BALB/c mice elicited both humoral and cellular immune responses. Mice injected with pV278a had a dominant immunoglobulin G2a (IgG2a) response. This DNA vaccine elicited a T-cell-proliferative response and induced significant levels of interferon gamma (INF-γ) upon restimulation with recombinant 278a protein. Upon stimulation with an appropriate recombinant protein or crude Brucella protein, the vaccine did not induce IL-4, suggesting a typical T-helper (TH1) response. Furthermore, the vaccine induced protection in BALB/c mice when challenged with the virulent strain Brucella abortus 2308. Taken together, these data suggest that DNA vaccination offers an improved delivery of the homologous of an ABC-type transporter antigen, and provides the first evidence of a protective effect of this antigen in the construction of vaccines against B. abortus.