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Sample records for rhamnogalacturonan acetyl esterase

  1. Novel Family of Carbohydrate Esterases, Based on Identification of the Hypocrea jecorina Acetyl Esterase Gene

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Plant cell walls have been shown to contain acetyl groups in hemicelluloses and pectin. The gene, ae1, encoding the acetyl esterase (Ae1) of Hypocrea jecorina was identified by amino terminal sequencing, peptide mass spectrometry, and genomic sequence analyses. The coded polypeptide had 348 amino ...

  2. Purification, characterization, and mode of action of a rhamnogalacturonan hydrolase from Irpex lacteus, tolerant to an acetylated substrate.

    PubMed

    Normand, Jessica; Ralet, Marie-Christine; Thibault, Jean-François; Rogniaux, Hélène; Delavault, Philippe; Bonnin, Estelle

    2010-03-01

    A novel rhamnogalacturonase (RGase) acting on an acetylated substrate was detected in the commercial preparation Driselase, an enzymatic mixture derived from the basidiomycete Irpex lacteus. The activity was isolated by hydrophobic interaction chromatography, gel filtration, and preparative isoelectric focusing, resulting in the isolation of five different rhamnogalacturonan hydrolases exhibiting various isoelectric points from 6.2 to 7.7. Sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry analyses after trypsin cleavage of the five fractions revealed that the five rhamnogalacturonases have a molar mass of 55 kDa without any divergences in the identified peptides. The RGase with a pI of 7.2 exhibited a pH optimum between 4.5 and 5 and a temperature optimum between 40 degrees C and 50 degrees C. Its mode of action was analyzed by mass spectrometry of the oligosaccharides produced after hydrolysis of acetylated and nonacetylated rhamnogalacturonan. Oligomers esterified by an acetyl group on the reducing galacturonic acid residue or fully acetylated were detected in the hydrolysate showing that the novel enzyme is able to bind acetylated galacturonic acid in its active site.

  3. A colorimetric assay for the determination of acetyl xylan esterase or cephalosporin C acetyl esterase activities using 7-amino cephalosporanic acid, cephalosporin C, or acetylated xylan as substrate.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Martínez, Irene; Montoro-García, Silvia; Lozada-Ramírez, José Daniel; Sánchez-Ferrer, Alvaro; García-Carmona, Francisco

    2007-10-15

    A bromothymol blue-based colorimetric assay has been devised to screen for acetyl xylan esterase or cephalosporin C (CPC) deacetylase activities using 7-amino cephalosporanic acid (7-ACA), CPC, or acetylated xylan as substrate. These enzymes are not screened with their natural substrates because of the tedious procedures available previously. Acetyl xylan esterase from Bacillus pumilus CECT 5072 was cloned, expressed in Escherichia coli Rosetta (DE3), and characterized using this assay. Similar K(M) values for 7-ACA and CPC were obtained when compared with those described using HPLC methods. The assay is easy to perform and can be carried out in robotic high-throughput colorimetric devices normally used in directed evolution experiments. The assay allowed us to detect improvements in activity at a minimum of twofold with a very low coefficient of variance in 96-well plates. This method is significantly faster and more convenient to use than are known HPLC and pH-stat procedures.

  4. Identification of a bacterial pectin acetyl esterase in Erwinia chrysanthemi 3937.

    PubMed

    Shevchik, V E; Hugouvieux-Cotte-Pattat, N

    1997-06-01

    Erwinia chrysanthemi causes soft-rot diseases of various plants by enzymatic degradation of the pectin in plant cell walls. The structural complexity of pectin requires the combined action of several pectinases for its efficient breakdown. Three types of pectinases have so far been identified in E. chrysanthemi: two pectin methyl esterases (PemA, PemB), a polygalacturonase (PehX), and eight pectate lyases (PelA, PelB, PelC, PelD, PelE, PelL, PelZ, PelX). We report in this paper the analysis of a novel enzyme, the pectin acetyl esterase encoded by the paeY gene. No bacterial form of pectin acetyl esterases has been described previously, while plant tissues and some pectinolytic fungi were found to produce similar enzymes. The paeY gene is present in a cluster of five pectinase-encoding genes, pelA-pelE-pelD-paeY-pemA. The paeY open reading frame is 1650 bases long and encodes a 551-residue precursor protein of 60704Da, including a 25-amino-acid signal peptide. PaeY shares one region of homology with a rhamnogalacturonan acetyl esterase of Aspergillus aculeatus. To characterize the enzyme, the paeY gene was overexpressed and its protein product was purified. PaeY releases acetate from sugar-beet pectin and from various synthetic substrates. Moreover, the enzyme was shown to act in synergy with other pectinases. The de-esterification rate by PaeY increased after previous demethylation of the pectins by PemA and after depolymerization of the pectin by pectate lyases. In addition, the degradation of sugar-beet pectin by pectate lyases is favoured after the removal of methyl and acetyl groups by PemA and PaeY, respectively. The paeY gene was first identified on the basis of its regulation, which shares several characteristics with that of other pectinases. Analysis of the paeY transcription, using gene fusions, revealed that it is induced by pectic catabolic products and is affected by growth phase, oxygen limitation and catabolite repression. Regulation of pae

  5. Phylogeny, classification and metagenomic bioprospecting of microbial acetyl xylan esterases.

    PubMed

    Adesioye, Fiyinfoluwa A; Makhalanyane, Thulani P; Biely, Peter; Cowan, Don A

    2016-11-01

    Acetyl xylan esterases (AcXEs), also termed xylan deacetylases, are broad specificity Carbohydrate-Active Enzymes (CAZymes) that hydrolyse ester bonds to liberate acetic acid from acetylated hemicellulose (typically polymeric xylan and xylooligosaccharides). They belong to eight families within the Carbohydrate Esterase (CE) class of the CAZy database. AcXE classification is largely based on sequence-dependent phylogenetic relationships, supported in some instances with substrate specificity data. However, some sequence-based predictions of AcXE-encoding gene identity have proved to be functionally incorrect. Such ambiguities can lead to mis-assignment of genes and enzymes during sequence data-mining, reinforcing the necessity for the experimental confirmation of the functional properties of putative AcXE-encoding gene products. Although one-third of all characterized CEs within CAZy families 1-7 and 16 are AcXEs, there is a need to expand the sequence database in order to strengthen the link between AcXE gene sequence and specificity. Currently, most AcXEs are derived from a limited range of (mostly microbial) sources and have been identified via culture-based bioprospecting methods, restricting current knowledge of AcXEs to data from relatively few microbial species. More recently, the successful identification of AcXEs via genome and metagenome mining has emphasised the huge potential of culture-independent bioprospecting strategies. We note, however, that the functional metagenomics approach is still hampered by screening bottlenecks. The most relevant recent reviews of AcXEs have focused primarily on the biochemical and functional properties of these enzymes. In this review, we focus on AcXE phylogeny, classification and the future of metagenomic bioprospecting for novel AcXEs.

  6. A novel protein from mung bean hypocotyl cell walls with acetyl esterase activity.

    PubMed

    Bordenave, M; Goldberg, R; Huet, J C; Pernollet, J C

    1995-01-01

    An acetyl esterase was purified from cell walls isolated from mung bean hypocotyls. The purified enzyme had an apparent Mr of 43,300 and an apparent pI > 9. It rapidly deesterified triacetin and p-nitrophenylacetate and slowly released acetate from beet and flax pectins, the deesterification rate being increased by previous demethylation of the pectins. No significant peptide sequence identity between the acetyl esterase and any known protein could be found in protein data bases.

  7. Hydrolysis of wheat arabinoxylan by two acetyl xylan esterases from Chaetomium thermophilum.

    PubMed

    Tong, Xiaoxue; Lange, Lene; Grell, Morten Nedergaard; Busk, Peter Kamp

    2015-01-01

    The thermophilic filamentous ascomycete Chaetomium thermophilum produces functionally diverse hemicellulases when grown on hemicellulose as carbon source. Acetyl xylan esterase (EC 3.1.1.72) is an important accessory enzyme in hemicellulose biodegradation. Although the genome of C. thermophilum has been sequenced, its carbohydrate esterases are not annotated yet. We applied peptide pattern recognition (PPR) tool for sequence analysis of the C. thermophilum genome, and 11 carbohydrate esterase genes were discovered. Furthermore, we cloned and heterologously expressed two putative acetyl xylan esterase genes, CtAxeA and CtAxeB, in Pichia pastoris. The recombinant proteins, rCtAxeA and rCtAxeB, released acetic acids from p-nitrophenyl acetate and water-insoluble wheat arabinoxylan. These results indicate that CtAxeA and CtAxeB are true acetyl xylan esterases. For both recombinant esterases, over 93 % of the initial activity was retained after 24 h of incubation at temperatures up to 60 °C, and over 90 % of the initial activity was retained after 24 h of incubation in different buffers from pH 4.0 to 9.0 at 4 and 50 °C. The overall xylose yield from wheat arabinoxylan hydrolysis was 8 % with xylanase treatment and increased to 34 % when xylanase was combined with rCtAxeA and rCtAxeB. In sum, the present study first report the biochemical characterization of two acetyl xylan esterases from C. thermophilum, which are efficient in hydrolyzing hemicellulose with potential application in biomass bioconversion to high value chemicals or biofuels.

  8. Characterization of an Acetyl Xylan Esterase from the Anaerobic Fungus Orpinomyces sp. Strain PC-2

    PubMed Central

    Blum, David L.; Li, Xin-Liang; Chen, Huizhong; Ljungdahl, Lars G.

    1999-01-01

    A 1,067-bp cDNA, designated axeA, coding for an acetyl xylan esterase (AxeA) was cloned from the anaerobic rumen fungus Orpinomyces sp. strain PC-2. The gene had an open reading frame of 939 bp encoding a polypeptide of 313 amino acid residues with a calculated mass of 34,845 Da. An active esterase using the original start codon of the cDNA was synthesized in Escherichia coli. Two active forms of the esterase were purified from recombinant E. coli cultures. The size difference of 8 amino acids was a result of cleavages at two different sites within the signal peptide. The enzyme released acetate from several acetylated substrates, including acetylated xylan. The activity toward acetylated xylan was tripled in the presence of recombinant xylanase A from the same fungus. Using p-nitrophenyl acetate as a substrate, the enzyme had a Km of 0.9 mM and a Vmax of 785 μmol min−1 mg−1. It had temperature and pH optima of 30°C and 9.0, respectively. AxeA had 56% amino acid identity with BnaA, an acetyl xylan esterase of Neocallimastix patriciarum, but the Orpinomyces AxeA was devoid of a noncatalytic repeated peptide domain (NCRPD) found at the carboxy terminus of the Neocallimastix BnaA. The NCRPD found in many glycosyl hydrolases and esterases of anaerobic fungi has been postulated to function as a docking domain for cellulase-hemicellulase complexes, similar to the dockerin of the cellulosome of Clostridium thermocellum. The difference in domain structures indicated that the two highly similar esterases of Orpinomyces and Neocallimastix may be differently located, the former being a free enzyme and the latter being a component of a cellulase-hemicellulase complex. Sequence data indicate that AxeA and BnaA might represent a new family of hydrolases. PMID:10473406

  9. Unexpected Diversity of Escherichia coli Sialate O-Acetyl Esterase NanS.

    PubMed

    Rangel, Ariel; Steenbergen, Susan M; Vimr, Eric R

    2016-10-15

    The sialic acids (N-acylneuraminates) are a group of nine-carbon keto-sugars existing mainly as terminal residues on animal glycoprotein and glycolipid carbohydrate chains. Bacterial commensals and pathogens exploit host sialic acids for nutrition, adhesion, or antirecognition, where N-acetyl- or N-glycolylneuraminic acids are the two predominant chemical forms of sialic acids. Each form may be modified by acetyl esters at carbon position 4, 7, 8, or 9 and by a variety of less-common modifications. Modified sialic acids produce challenges for colonizing bacteria, because the chemical alterations to N-acetylneuraminic acid (Neu5Ac) confer increased resistance to sialidase and aldolase activities essential for the catabolism of host sialic acids. Bacteria with O-acetyl sialate esterase(s) utilize acetylated sialic acids for growth, thereby gaining a presumed metabolic advantage over competitors lacking this activity. Here, we demonstrate the esterase activity of Escherichia coli NanS after purifying it as a C-terminal HaloTag fusion. Using a similar approach, we show that E. coli strain O157:H7 Stx prophage or prophage remnants invariably include paralogs of nanS often located downstream of the Shiga-like toxin genes. These paralogs may include sequences encoding N- or C-terminal domains of unknown function where the NanS domains can act as sialate O-acetyl esterases, as shown by complementation of an E. coli strain K-12 nanS mutant and the unimpaired growth of an E. coli O157 nanS mutant on O-acetylated sialic acid. We further demonstrate that nanS homologs in Streptococcus spp. also encode active esterase, demonstrating an unexpected diversity of bacterial sialate O-acetyl esterase. The sialic acids are a family of over 40 naturally occurring 9-carbon keto-sugars that function in a variety of host-bacterium interactions. These sugars occur primarily as terminal carbohydrate residues on host glycoproteins and glycolipids. Available evidence indicates that diverse

  10. Trichoderma longibrachiatum acetyl xylan esterase 1 enhances hemicellulolytic preparations to degrade corn silage polysaccharides.

    PubMed

    Neumüller, K G; Streekstra, H; Gruppen, H; Schols, H A

    2014-07-01

    Supplementation of a Trichoderma longibrachiatum preparation to an industrial Aspergillus niger/Talaromyces emersonii enzyme mixture demonstrated synergy for the saccharification of corn silage water-unextractable solids (WUS). Sub-fractions of the crude T. longibrachiatum preparation obtained after chromatography were analyzed regarding their hydrolytic activity. An acetyl xylan esterase 1 [Axe1, carbohydrate esterase (CE) family 5]-enriched sub-fraction closely mimicked the hydrolytic gain as obtained by supplementation of the complete, crude enzyme mixture (increase of 50%, 62% and 29% for Xyl, Ara and Glc, respectively). The acetic acid released from model polysaccharides (WUS) and oligosaccharides [neutral (AcXOS) and acidic (AcUXOS) xylo-oligosaccharides] by Axe1 was two and up to six times higher compared to the acetic acid released by acetyl xylan esterase A (AxeA, CE 1). Characterization of Axe1 treated AcXOS and AcUXOS revealed deacetylation of oligosaccharides that were not deacetylated by AxeA or the A. niger/T. emersonii preparation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Expression of mung bean pectin acetyl esterase in potato tubers: effect on acetylation of cell wall polymers and tuber mechanical properties.

    PubMed

    Orfila, Caroline; Dal Degan, Florence; Jørgensen, Bodil; Scheller, Henrik Vibe; Ray, Peter M; Ulvskov, Peter

    2012-07-01

    A mung bean (Vigna radiata) pectin acetyl esterase (CAA67728) was heterologously expressed in tubers of potato (Solanum tuberosum) under the control of the granule-bound starch synthase promoter or the patatin promoter in order to probe the significance of O-acetylation on cell wall and tissue properties. The recombinant tubers showed no apparent macroscopic phenotype. The enzyme was recovered from transgenic tubers using a high ionic strength buffer and the extract was active against a range of pectic substrates. Partial in vivo de-acetylation of cell wall polysaccharides occurred in the transformants, as shown by a 39% decrease in the degree of acetylation (DA) of tuber cell wall material (CWM). Treatment of CWM using a combination of endo-polygalacturonase and pectin methyl esterase extracted more pectin polymers from the transformed tissue compared to wild type. The largest effect of the pectin acetyl esterase (68% decrease in DA) was seen in the residue from this extraction, suggesting that the enzyme is preferentially active on acetylated pectin that is tightly bound to the cell wall. The effects of acetylation on tuber mechanical properties were investigated by tests of failure under compression and by determination of viscoelastic relaxation spectra. These tests suggested that de-acetylation resulted in a stiffer tuber tissue and a stronger cell wall matrix, as a result of changes to a rapidly relaxing viscoelastic component. These results are discussed in relation to the role of pectin acetylation in primary cell walls and its implications for industrial uses of potato fibres.

  12. Acetylated Rhamnogalacturonans from Immature Fruits of Abelmoschus esculentus Inhibit the Adhesion of Helicobacter pylori to Human Gastric Cells by Interaction with Outer Membrane Proteins.

    PubMed

    Thöle, Christian; Brandt, Simone; Ahmed, Niyaz; Hensel, Andreas

    2015-09-15

    Polysaccharide containing extracts from immature fruits of okra (Abelmoschus esculentus) are known to exhibit antiadhesive effects against bacterial adhesion of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) to stomach tissue. The present study investigates structural and functional features of polymers responsible for this inhibition of bacterial attachment to host cells. Ammonium sulfate precipitation of an aqueous extract yielded two fractions at 60% and 90% saturation with significant antiadhesive effects against H. pylori, strain J99, (FE60% 68% ± 15%; FE90% 75% ± 11% inhibition rates) after preincubation of the bacteria at 1 mg/mL. Sequential extraction of okra fruits yielded hot buffer soluble solids (HBSS) with dose dependent antiadhesive effects against strain J99 and three clinical isolates. Preincubation of H. pylori with HBSS (1 mg/mL) led to reduced binding to 3'-sialyl lactose, sialylated Le(a) and Le(x). A reduction of bacterial binding to ligands complementary to BabA and SabA was observed when bacteria were pretreated with FE90%. Structural analysis of the antiadhesive polysaccharides (molecular weight, monomer composition, linkage analysis, stereochemistry, and acetylation) indicated the presence of acetylated rhamnogalacturonan-I polymers, decorated with short galactose side chains. Deacetylation of HBSS and FE90% resulted in loss of the antiadhesive activity, indicating esterification being a prerequisite for antiadhesive activity.

  13. A novel bifunctional acetyl xylan esterase/arabinofuranosidase from Penicillium chrysogenum P33 enhances enzymatic hydrolysis of lignocellulose.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yi; Zhu, Ning; Yang, Jinshui; Lin, Yujian; Liu, Jiawen; Wang, Ruonan; Wang, Fengqin; Yuan, Hongli

    2017-09-26

    Xylan, the major constituent of hemicellulose, is composed of β-(1,4)-linked xylopyranosyl units that for the backbone, with side chains formed by other chemical moieties such as arabinose, galactose, mannose, ferulic acid and acetyl groups. Acetyl xylan esterases and α-L-arabinofuranosidases are two important accessory enzymes that remove side chain residues from xylan backbones and may act in synergy with other xylanolytic enzymes. Compared with enzymes possessing a single catalytic activity, multifunctional enzymes can achieve lignocellulosic biomass hydrolysis using a less complex mixture of enzymes. Here, we cloned an acetyl xylan esterase (PcAxe) from Penicillium chrysogenum P33 and expressed it in Pichia pastoris GS115. The optimal pH and temperature of the recombinant PcAxe (rPcAxe) for 4-nitrophenyl acetate were 7.0 and 40 °C, respectively. rPcAxe is stable across a broad pH range, retaining 100% enzyme activity om pH 6-9 after a 1 h incubation. The enzyme tolerates the presence of a wide range of metal ions. Sequence alignment revealed a GH62 domain exhibiting α-L-arabinofuranosidase activity with pH and temperature optima of pH 7.0 and 50 °C, in addition to the expected esterase domain. rPcAxe displayed significant synergy with a recombinant xylanase, with a degree of synergy of 1.35 for the hydrolysis of delignified corn stover. Release of glucose was increased by 51% from delignified corn stover when 2 mg of a commercial cellulase was replaced by an equivalent amount of rPcAxe, indicating superior hydrolytic efficiency. The novel bifunctional enzyme PcAxe was identified in P. chrysogenum P33. rPcAxe includes a carbohydrate esterase domain and a glycosyl hydrolase family 62 domain. This is the first detailed report on a novel bifunctional enzyme possessing acetyl xylan esterase and α-L-arabinofuranosidase activities. These findings expand our current knowledge of glycoside hydrolases and pave the way for the discovery of similar novel enzymes.

  14. Detection of a Cephalosporin C Acetyl Esterase in the Carbamate Cephalosporin Antibiotic-Producing Culture, Streptomyces clavuligerus

    PubMed Central

    Brannon, D. R.; Fukuda, D. S.; Mabe, J. A.; Huber, F. M.; Whitney, J. G.

    1972-01-01

    The possible role of a cephalosporin C acetyl esterase in the formation of the β-lactam antibiotic A16886A, 7-(5-amino-5-carboxyvaleramido)-3-carbamoyloxy-methyl-3-cephem-4-carboxylic acid, by Streptomyces clavuligerus was studied. Addition of dl-valine-14C-1 to a fermentation of Cephalosporium acremonium gave cephalosporin C-14C-9 (I). The formation of deacetylcephalosporin C-14C-9 from I occurred at a greater rate in broths of S. clavuligerus than in the broths of C. acremonium, or in the autoclaved broths of S. clavuligerus. Diisopropylfluorophosphate partially inhibited the deacetylation of I in S. clavuligerus broth. An intracellular cephalosporin C esterase in S. clavuligerus could not be demonstrated. Although A16886A has been chemically synthesized from deacetylcephalosporin C, this reaction could not be demonstrated with S. clavuligerus. PMID:5045469

  15. Structural role of a conserved active site cis proline in the Thermotoga maritima acetyl esterase from the carbohydrate esterase family 7.

    PubMed

    Singh, Mrityunjay K; Manoj, Narayanan

    2017-04-01

    A conserved cis proline residue located in the active site of Thermotoga maritima acetyl esterase (TmAcE) from the carbohydrate esterase family 7 (CE7) has been substituted by alanine. The residue was known to play a crucial role in determining the catalytic properties of the enzyme. To elucidate the structural role of the residue, the crystal structure of the Pro228Ala variant (TmAcEP228A ) was determined at 2.1 Å resolution. The replacement does not affect the overall secondary, tertiary, and quaternary structures and moderately decreases the thermal stability. However, the wild type cis conformation of the 227-228 peptide bond adopts a trans conformation in the variant. Other conformational changes in the tertiary structure are restricted to residues 222-226, preceding this peptide bond and are located away from the active site. Overall, the results suggest that the conserved proline residue is responsible for the cis conformation of the peptide and shapes the geometry of the active site. Elimination of the pyrrolidine ring results in the loss of van der Waals and hydrophobic interactions with both the alcohol and acyl moeities of the ester substrate, leading to significant impairment of the activity and perturbation of substrate specificity. Furthermore, a cis-to-trans conformational change arising out of residue changes at this position may be associated with the evolution of divergent activity, specificity, and stability properties of members constituting the CE7 family. Proteins 2017; 85:694-708. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Enhancement of acetyl xylan esterase activity on cellulose acetate through fusion to a family 3 cellulose binding module.

    PubMed

    Mai-Gisondi, Galina; Turunen, Ossi; Pastinen, Ossi; Pahimanolis, Nikolaos; Master, Emma R

    2015-11-01

    The current study investigates the potential to increase the activity of a family 1 carbohydrate esterase on cellulose acetate through fusion to a family 3 carbohydrate binding module (CBM). Specifically, CtCBM3 from Clostridium thermocellum was fused to the carboxyl terminus of the acetyl xylan esterase (AnAXE) from Aspergillus nidulans, and active forms of both AnAXE and AnAXE-CtCBM3 were produced in Pichia pastoris. CtCBM3 fusion had negligible impact on the thermostability or regioselectivity of AnAXE; activities towards acetylated corncob xylan, 4-methylumbelliferyl acetate, p-nitrophenyl acetate, and cellobiose octaacetate were also unchanged. By contrast, the activity of AnAXE-CtCBM3 on cellulose acetate increased by two to four times over 24 h, with greater differences observed at earlier time points. Binding studies using microcrystalline cellulose (Avicel) and a commercial source of cellulose acetate confirmed functional production of the CtCBM3 domain; affinity gel electrophoresis using acetylated xylan also verified the selectivity of CtCBM3 binding to cellulose. Notably, gains in enzyme activity on cellulose acetate appeared to exceed gains in substrate binding, suggesting that fusion to CtCBM3 increases functional associations between the enzyme and insoluble, high molecular weight cellulosic substrates.

  17. Preliminary crystallographic analysis of a double mutant of the acetyl xylo-oligosaccharide esterase Axe2 in its dimeric form.

    PubMed

    Lansky, Shifra; Alalouf, Onit; Salama, Rachel; Dvir, Hay; Shoham, Yuval; Shoham, Gil

    2014-04-01

    Xylans are polymeric sugars constituting a significant part of the plant cell wall. They are usually substituted with acetyl side groups attached at positions 2 or 3 of the xylose backbone units. Acetylxylan esterases are part of the hemicellulolytic system of many microorganisms which utilize plant biomass for growth. These enzymes hydrolyze the ester linkages of the xylan acetyl groups and thus improve the accessibility of main-chain-hydrolyzing enzymes and their ability to break down the sugar backbone units. The acetylxylan esterases are therefore critically important for those microorganisms and as such could be used for a wide range of biotechnological applications. The structure of an acetylxylan esterase (Axe2) isolated from the thermophilic bacterium Geobacillus stearothermophilus T6 has been determined, and it has been demonstrated that the wild-type enzyme is present as a unique torus-shaped octamer in the crystal and in solution. In order to understand the functional origin of this unique oligomeric structure, a series of rational noncatalytic, site-specific mutations have been made on Axe2. Some of these mutations led to a different dimeric form of the protein, which showed a significant reduction in catalytic activity. One of these double mutants, Axe2-Y184F-W190P, has recently been overexpressed, purified and crystallized. The best crystals obtained belonged to the orthorhombic space group P212121, with unit-cell parameters a = 71.1, b = 106.0, c = 378.6 Å. A full diffraction data set to 2.3 Å resolution has been collected from a flash-cooled crystal of this type at 100 K using synchrotron radiation. This data set is currently being used for the three-dimensional structure analysis of the Axe2-Y184F-W190P mutant in its dimeric form.

  18. An eleven amino acid residue deletion expands the substrate specificity of acetyl xylan esterase II (AXE II) from Penicillium purpurogenum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colombres, Marcela; Garate, José A.; Lagos, Carlos F.; Araya-Secchi, Raúl; Norambuena, Patricia; Quiroz, Soledad; Larrondo, Luis; Pérez-Acle, Tomas; Eyzaguirre, Jaime

    2008-01-01

    The soft-rot fungus Penicillium purpurogenum secretes to the culture medium a variety of enzymes related to xylan biodegradation, among them three acetyl xylan esterases (AXE I, II and III). AXE II has 207 amino acids; it belongs to family 5 of the carbohydrate esterases and its structure has been determined by X-ray crystallography at 0.9 Å resolution (PDB 1G66). The enzyme possesses the α/β hydrolase fold and the catalytic triad typical of serine esterases (Ser90, His187 and Asp175). AXE II can hydrolyze esters of a large variety of alcohols, but it is restricted to short chain fatty acids. An analysis of its three-dimensional structure shows that a loop that covers the active site may be responsible for this strict specificity. Cutinase, an enzyme that hydrolyzes esters of long chain fatty acids and shows a structure similar to AXE II, lacks this loop. In order to generate an AXE II with this broader specificity, the preparation of a mutant lacking residues involving this loop (Gly104 to Ala114) was proposed. A set of molecular simulation experiments based on a comparative model of the mutant enzyme predicted a stable structure. Using site-directed mutagenesis, the loop's residues have been eliminated from the AXE II cDNA. The mutant protein has been expressed in Aspergillus nidulans A722 and Pichia pastoris, and it is active towards a range of fatty acid esters of up to at least 14 carbons. The availability of an esterase with broader specificity may have biotechnological applications for the synthesis of sugar esters.

  19. Characterization of Heterologously Expressed Acetyl Xylan Esterase1 Isolated from the Anaerobic Rumen Fungus Neocallimastix frontalis PMA02

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Mi; Song, Jaeyong; Park, Hong-Seog; Park, Hyunjin; Chang, Jongsoo

    2016-01-01

    Acetyl xylan esterase (AXE), which hydrolyzes the ester linkages of the naturally acetylated xylan and thus known to have an important role for hemicellulose degradation, was isolated from the anaerobic rumen fungus Neocallimastix frontatlis PMA02, heterologously expressed in Escherichi coli (E.coli) and characterized. The full-length cDNA encoding NfAXE1 was 1,494 bp, of which 978 bp constituted an open reading frame. The estimated molecular weight of NfAXE1 was 36.5 kDa with 326 amino acid residues, and the calculated isoelectric point was 4.54. The secondary protein structure was predicted to consist of nine α-helixes and 12 β-strands. The enzyme expressed in E.coli had the highest activity at 40°C and pH 8. The purified recombinant NfAXE1 had a specific activity of 100.1 U/mg when p-nitrophenyl acetate (p-NA) was used as a substrate at 40°C, optimum temperature. The amount of liberated acetic acids were the highest and the lowest when p-NA and acetylated birchwood xylan were used as substrates, respectively. The amount of xylose released from acetylated birchwod xylan was increased by 1.4 fold when NfAXE1 was mixed with xylanase in a reaction cocktail, implying a synergistic effect of NfAXE1 with xylanase on hemicellulose degradation. PMID:27383808

  20. The role of acetyl xylan esterase in the solubilization of xylan and enzymatic hydrolysis of wheat straw and giant reed

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Due to the complexity of lignocellulosic materials, a complete enzymatic hydrolysis into fermentable sugars requires a variety of cellulolytic and xylanolytic enzymes. Addition of xylanases has been shown to significantly improve the performance of cellulases and to increase cellulose hydrolysis by solubilizing xylans in lignocellulosic materials. The goal of this work was to investigate the effect of acetyl xylan esterase (AXE) originating from Trichoderma reesei on xylan solubilization and enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose. Results The solubilization of xylan in pretreated wheat straw and giant reed (Arundo donax) by xylanolytic enzymes and the impact of the sequential or simultaneous solubilization of xylan on the hydrolysis of cellulose by purified enzymes were investigated. The results showed that the removal of acetyl groups in xylan by AXE increased the accessibility of xylan to xylanase and improved the hydrolysis of xylan in pretreated wheat straw and giant reed. Solubilization of xylan led to an increased accessibility of cellulose to cellulases and thereby increased the hydrolysis extent of cellulose. A clear synergistic effect between cellulases and xylanolytic enzymes was observed. The highest hydrolysis yield of cellulose was obtained with a simultaneous use of cellulases, xylanase and AXE, indicating the presence of acetylated xylan within the cellulose matrix. Acetylated xylobiose and acetylated xylotriose were produced from xylan without AXE, as confirmed by atmospheric pressure matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization ion trap mass spectrometry. Conclusions The results in this paper demonstrate that supplementation of xylanase with AXE enhances the solubilization of xylan to some extent and, consequently, increases the subsequent hydrolysis of cellulose. The highest hydrolysis yield was, however, obtained by simultaneous hydrolysis of xylan and cellulose, indicating a layered structure of cellulose and xylan chains in the cell wall

  1. A novel esterase subfamily with α/β-hydrolase fold suggested by structures of two bacterial enzymes homologous to L-homoserine O-acetyl transferases.

    PubMed

    Tölzer, Christine; Pal, Sonia; Watzlawick, Hildegard; Altenbuchner, Josef; Niefind, Karsten

    2016-01-01

    MekB from Pseudomonas veronii and CgHle from Corynebacteriumglutamicum belong to the superfamily of α/β-hydrolase fold proteins. Based on sequence comparisons, they are annotated as homoserine transacetylases in popular databases like UNIPROT, PFAM or ESTHER. However, experimentally, MekB and CgHle were shown to be esterases that hydrolyse preferentially acetic acid esters. We describe the x-ray structures of these enzymes solved to high resolution. The overall structures confirm the close relatedness to experimentally validated homoserine acetyl transferases, but simultaneously the structures exclude the ability of MekB and CgHle to bind homoserine and acetyl-CoA. Insofar the MekB and CgHle structures suggest dividing the homoserine transacetylase family into subfamilies, namely genuine acetyl transferases and acetyl esterases with MekB and CgHle as constituting members of the latter. © 2015 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  2. Structure and function of an acetyl xylan esterase (Est2A) from the rumen bacterium Butyrivibrio proteoclasticus.

    PubMed

    Till, Marisa; Goldstone, David C; Attwood, Graeme T; Moon, Christina D; Kelly, Willam J; Arcus, Vickery L

    2013-05-01

    Butyrivibrio proteoclasticus is a significant component of the microbial population of the rumen of dairy cattle. It is a xylan-degrading organism whose genome encodes a large number of open reading frames annotated as fiber-degrading enzymes. We have determined the three-dimensional structure of Est2A, an acetyl xylan esterase from B. proteoclasticus, at 2.1 Å resolution, along with the structure of an inactive mutant (H351A) at 2.0 Å resolution. The structure reveals two domains-a C-terminal SGNH domain and an N-terminal jelly-roll domain typical of CE2 family structures. The structures are accompanied by experimentally determined enzymatic parameters against two model substrates, para-nitrophenyl acetate and para-nitrophenyl butyrate. The suite of fiber-degrading enzymes produced by B. proteoclasticus provides a rich source of new enzymes of potential use in industrial settings.

  3. Biochemical and Domain Analyses of FSUAxe6B, a Modular Acetyl Xylan Esterase, Identify a Unique Carbohydrate Binding Module in Fibrobacter succinogenes S85▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida, Shosuke; Mackie, Roderick I.; Cann, Isaac K. O.

    2010-01-01

    Acetyl xylan esterase (EC 3.1.1.72) is a member of a set of enzymes required to depolymerize hemicellulose, especially xylan that is composed of a main chain of β-1,4-linked xylopyranoside residues decorated with acetyl side groups. Fibrobacter succinogenes S85 Axe6B (FSUAxe6B) is an acetyl xylan esterase encoded in the genome of this rumen bacterium. The enzyme is a modular protein comprised of an esterase domain, a carbohydrate-binding module, and a region of unknown function. Sequences that are homologous to the region of unknown function are paralogously distributed, thus far, only in F. succinogenes. Therefore, the sequences were designated Fibrobacter succinogenes-specific paralogous module 1 (FPm-1). The FPm-1s are associated with at least 24 polypeptides in the genome of F. succinogenes S85. A bioinformatics search showed that most of the FPm-1-appended polypeptides are putative carbohydrate-active enzymes, suggesting a potential role in carbohydrate metabolism. Truncational analysis of FSUAxe6B, together with catalytic and substrate binding studies, has allowed us to delineate the functional modules in the polypeptide. The N-terminal half of FSUAxe6B harbors the activity that cleaves side chain acetyl groups from xylan-like substrates, and the binding of insoluble xylan was determined to originate from FPm-1. Site-directed mutagenesis studies of highly conserved active-site residues in the esterase domain suggested that the esterase activity is derived from a tetrad composed of Ser44, His273, Glu194, and Asp270, with both Glu194 and Asp270 functioning as helper acids, instead of a single carboxylate residue proposed to initiate catalysis. PMID:19897648

  4. Penicillium purpurogenum produces a family 1 acetyl xylan esterase containing a carbohydrate-binding module: characterization of the protein and its gene.

    PubMed

    Gordillo, Felipe; Caputo, Valentina; Peirano, Alessandra; Chavez, Renato; Van Beeumen, Jozef; Vandenberghe, Isabel; Claeyssens, Marc; Bull, Paulina; Ravanal, María Cristina; Eyzaguirre, Jaime

    2006-10-01

    At least three acetyl xylan esterases (AXE I, II and III) are secreted by Penicillium purpurogenum. This publication describes more detailed work on AXE I and its gene. AXE I binds cellulose but not xylan; it is glycosylated and inactivated by phenylmethylsulphonyl fluoride, showing that it is a serine esterase. The axe1 gene presents an open reading frame of 1278 bp, including two introns of 68 and 61 bp; it codes for a signal peptide of 31 residues and a mature protein of 351 amino acids (molecular weight 36,693). AXE I has a modular structure: a catalytic module at the amino terminus belonging to family 1 of the carbohydrate esterases, a linker rich in serines and threonines, and a family 1 carboxy terminal carbohydrate binding module (CBM). The CBM is similar to that of AXE from Trichoderma reesei, (with a family 5 catalytic module) indicating that the genes for catalytic modules and CBMs have evolved separately, and that they have been linked by gene fusion. The promoter sequence of axe1 contains several putative sequences for binding of gene expression regulators also found in other family 1 esterase gene promoters. It is proposed that AXE I and II act in succession in xylan degradation; first, xylan is attacked by AXE I and other xylanases possessing CBMs (which facilitate binding to lignocellulose), followed by other enzymes acting mainly on soluble substrates.

  5. Enhancement of the enzymatic activity of Escherichia coli acetyl esterase by a double mutation obtained by random mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Ryuichi; Hirano, Nobutaka; Kanaya, Shigenori; Haruki, Mitsuru

    2012-01-01

    A double mutant of Escherichia coli acetyl esterase (EcAE) with enhanced enzymatic activity was obtained by random mutagenesis using error-prone PCR and screening for enzymatic activity by observing halo formation on a tributyrin plate. The mutant contained Leu97Phe (L97F) and Leu209Phe (L209F) mutations. Single mutants L97F and L209F were also constructed and analyzed for kinetic parameters, as well as double mutant L97F/L209F. Kinetic analysis using p-nitrophenyl butyrate as substrate indicated that the k(cat) values of L97F and L97F/L209F were larger than that of the wild-type enzyme, by 8.3-fold and 12-fold respectively, whereas no significant change was observed in the k(cat) value of L209F. The K(m) values of L209F and L97F/L209F were smaller than that of the wild-type enzyme, by 2.9-fold and 2.4-fold respectively, whereas no significant change was observed in the K(m) value of L97F. These results indicate that a combination of an increase in k(cat) values due to the L97F mutation and a decrease in K(m) value due to the L209F mutation renders the k(cat)/K(m) value of the double mutant enzyme 29-fold higher than that of the wild-type enzyme.

  6. Cloning, Purification and Characterization of Acetyl Xylane Esterase from Anoxybacillus flavithermus DSM 2641(T) with Activity on Low Molecular-Weight Acetates.

    PubMed

    Eminoğlu, Ayşenur; Ülker, Serdar; Sandallı, Cemal

    2015-08-01

    Family 4 carbohydrate esterases (CE-4) have deacetylate different forms of acetylated poly/oligosaccharides in nature. This family is recognized with a specific polysaccharide deacetylase domain assigned as NodB homology domain in their secondary structure. Most family 4 carbohydrate esterases have been structurally and biochemically characterized. However, this is the first study about the enzymological function of pdaB-like CE4s from thermophilic bacterium Anoxybacillus flavithermus DSM 2641(T). A. flavithermus WK1 genome harbors five putative CE4 family genes. One of them is 762 bp long and encodes a protein of 253 amino acids in length and it was used as reference sequence in this study. It was described as acetyl xylane esterase (AXE) in genome project and this AfAXE gene was amplified without signal sequence and cloned. The recombinant protein was expressed in E. coli BL21 (DE3), purified by nickel affinity chromatography and its purity was visualized on SDS-PAGE. The activity of the recombinant enzyme was shown by zymogram analysis with α-naphtyl acetate as a substrate. The enzyme was characterized spectrophotometrically using chromogenic p-nitrophenyl acetate. Optimum temperature and pH were determined as 50 °C and 7.5, respectively. Km and Vmax were determined as 0.43 mM and 3333.33 U/mg, respectively under optimum conditions. To our knowledge this is the first enzymological characterization of a pdaB-like family 4 carbohydrate esterase from the members of Anoxybacillus genus.

  7. Double knockout of β-lactamase and cephalosporin acetyl esterase genes from Escherichia coli reduces cephalosporin C decomposition.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying; Yu, Huimin; Zhang, Jing; Luo, Hui; Shen, Zhongyao

    2012-06-01

    The phenomenon of CPC decomposition occurs in Escherichia coli JM105/pMKC-sCPCacy during the one-step enzymatic conversion of cephalosporin C (CPC) into 7-aminocephalosporanic acid (7-ACA) by CPC acylase (sCPCAcy) for synthesis of cephalosporin antibiotics. E. coli JM105/pMKC-sCPCacy can constitutively produce sCPCacy as a fusion protein with maltose binding protein (MBP). Control experiments verified that the cell lysis solution from the host E. coli JM105 resulted in CPC decomposition by approximately 15%. Two miscellaneous enzymes, β-lactamase (AmpC) and cephalosporin acetyl esterase (Aes), are believed to play a major role in the degradation of CPC. Using the Red recombination system, the genes ampC, aes or both ampC and aes were knocked out from the chromosome of E. coli JM105 to generate the engineers: E. coli JM105(ΔampC), E. coli JM105(Δaes) and E. coli JM105(ΔampC, Δaes). The CPC decomposition was reduced to 12.2% in E. coli JM105(Δaes), 1.3% in E. coli JM105(ΔampC), and even undetectable in ampC-aes double knockout cells of E. coli JM105(ΔampC, Δaes). When catalyzed by crude MBP-sCPCAcy isolated from E. coli JM105(ΔampC, Δaes)/pMKC-sCPCacy (3377U·l(-1)), the CPC utilization efficiency increased to 98.4% from the original 88.7%. Similar results were obtained for the ampC-aes double knockout host derived from E. coli JM109(DE3) and the CPC utilization efficiency enhanced to 99.3% in the catalysis of crude sCPCAcy harvested from E. coli JM109(DE3, ΔampC, Δaes)/pET28-sCPCacy. Copyright © 2012 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Patterns of methyl and O-acetyl esterification in spinach pectins: new complexity.

    PubMed

    Perrone, Paola; Hewage, Chandralal M; Thomson, Adam R; Bailey, Kevin; Sadler, Ian H; Fry, Stephen C

    2002-05-01

    Driselase-digestion of cell walls from suspension-cultures of spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.), followed by anion-exchange chromatography, gel-permeation chromatography, preparative paper chromatography and preparative paper electrophoresis, yielded ten uronic acid-containing products in addition to free galacturonic acid (GalA). These included 4-O-methylglucuronic acid, alpha-L-rhamnopyranosyl-(1-->4)-D-glucuronic acid and several oligosaccharides containing GalA residues. The structures were unambiguously determined by a combination of 1- and 2-dimensional NMR spectroscopic techniques. Five of the six homogalacturonan-derived oligosaccharides purified contained 3-O-acetyl-GalA residues; however, methyl-esterified GalA residues occurred adjacent to both 2-O-acetyl-GalA and 3-O-acetyl-GalA residues. An acetylated, rhamnogalacturonan-I-derived oligosaccharide that was purified also contained 3-O-acetyl-GalA residues. Taken together with published data, our findings indicate considerable diversity in the patterns of pectin esterification. The implications for the action of pectin esterases are discussed.

  9. Structural and Enzymatic Characterization of NanS (YjhS) a 9-O-Acetyl N-acetylneuraminic Acid Esterase from Escherichia coli O157:H7

    SciTech Connect

    E Rangarajan; K Ruane; A Proteau; J Schrag; R Valladares; C Gonzalez; M Gilbert; A Yakunin; M Cygler

    2011-12-31

    There is a high prevalence of sialic acid in a number of different organisms, resulting in there being a myriad of different enzymes that can exploit it as a fermentable carbon source. One such enzyme is NanS, a carbohydrate esterase that we show here deacetylates the 9 position of 9-O-sialic acid so that it can be readily transported into the cell for catabolism. Through structural studies, we show that NanS adopts a SGNH hydrolase fold. Although the backbone of the structure is similar to previously characterized family members, sequence comparisons indicate that this family can be further subdivided into two subfamilies with somewhat different fingerprints. NanS is the founding member of group II. Its catalytic center contains Ser19 and His301 but no Asp/Glu is present to form the classical catalytic triad. The contribution of Ser19 and His301 to catalysis was confirmed by mutagenesis. In addition to structural characterization, we have mapped the specificity of NanS using a battery of substrates.

  10. Pseudo-esterase Activity of Human Albumin

    PubMed Central

    Lockridge, Oksana; Xue, Weihua; Gaydess, Andrea; Grigoryan, Hasmik; Ding, Shi-Jian; Schopfer, Lawrence M.; Hinrichs, Steven H.; Masson, Patrick

    2008-01-01

    Human albumin is thought to hydrolyze esters because multiple equivalents of product are formed for each equivalent of albumin. Esterase activity with p-nitrophenyl acetate has been attributed to turnover at tyrosine 411. However, p-nitrophenyl acetate creates multiple, stable, acetylated adducts, a property contrary to turnover. Our goal was to identify residues that become acetylated by p-nitrophenyl acetate and determine the relationship between stable adduct formation and turnover. Fatty acid-free human albumin was treated with 0.5 mm p-nitrophenyl acetate for 5 min to 2 weeks, or with 10 mm p-nitrophenyl acetate for 48 h to 2 weeks. Aliquots were digested with pepsin, trypsin, or GluC and analyzed by mass spectrometry to identify labeled residues. Only Tyr-411 was acetylated within the first 5 min of reaction with 0.5 mm p-nitrophenyl acetate. After 0.5–6 h there was partial acetylation of 16–17 residues including Asp-1, Lys-4, Lys-12, Tyr-411, Lys-413, and Lys-414. Treatment with 10 mm p-nitrophenyl acetate resulted in acetylation of 59 lysines, 10 serines, 8 threonines, 4 tyrosines, and Asp-1. When Tyr-411 was blocked with diisopropylfluorophosphate or chlorpyrifos oxon, albumin had normal esterase activity with β-naphthyl acetate as visualized on a nondenaturing gel. However, after 82 residues had been acetylated, esterase activity was almost completely inhibited. The half-life for deacetylation of Tyr-411 at pH 8.0, 22 °C was 61 ± 4 h. Acetylated lysines formed adducts that were even more stable. In conclusion, the pseudo-esterase activity of albumin is the result of irreversible acetylation of 82 residues and is not the result of turnover. PMID:18577514

  11. Partial characterization of rhamnogalacturonan I from suspension-cultured cotton cell walls

    SciTech Connect

    An, Jinhua; Mort, A.J. )

    1990-05-01

    It is most likely that the backbone of rhamnogalacturonan I (RGI) in cotton is a repeating disaccharide of rhamnose and galacturonic acid, frequently 3-O-acetylated. After endopolygalacturonase treatment of cotton walls, polymeric RGI can be solubilized by strong alkali extraction or cellulase digestion. All of the RGI along with xyloglucan is solubilized by the alkali, whereas only {approximately}50% is solubilized by the cellulase which digests the xyloglucan. The polymeric material solubilized by cellulase was shown by {sup 13}C and {sup 1}H NMR spectroscopy to be quite highly acetylated and to have some of its galacturonic acid residues methylesterified. From compositional analysis, and assuming a repeating (galA-rha) n backbone for RGI proper, it appears that a considerable amount of homogalacturonan containing {approximately}20% methylesterified galA co-solubilized with the RGI and is possibly covalently attached to it. Progress towards the structural characterization of the RGI and its associated polymers will be presented.

  12. Diversity of plant cell wall esterases in thermophilic and thermotolerant fungi.

    PubMed

    Ghatora, Sonia K; Chadha, Bhupinder S; Saini, Harvinder S; Bhat, Mahalingeshwara K; Faulds, Craig B

    2006-09-18

    Fourteen thermophilic and thermotolerant fungal strains isolated from composting soils produced plant cell wall-acting esterases in a medium containing corn cobs and oat spelt xylan. The concentrated and dialyzed protein extracts of these fungi were fractionated using isoelectric-focusing, gels sliced and eluted protein in each slice was assayed for esterase activity against p-nitrophenyl acetate. A total of 84 esterases detected on the basis of pI were found to show distinct preferential substrate specificities towards p-nitrophenyl acetate, p-nitrophenyl ferulate and p-nitrophenyl butyrate, and were putatively classified as acetyl esterases and esterases types I and II. None of the esterases were active against p-nitrophenyl myristate. In addition, these esterases were characterized as acid, neutral or alkaline active.

  13. SOME PROPERTIES OF AN ESTERASE DERIVED FROM PREPARATIONS OF THE FIRST COMPONENT OF COMPLEMENT

    PubMed Central

    Ratnoff, Oscar D.; Lepow, Irwin H.

    1957-01-01

    Studies on an esterase derived from partially purified preparations of the first component of complement are described. The esterase hydrolyzed certain synthetic amino acid esters, among which N-acetyl-L-tyrosine ethyl ester was most susceptible. This was hydrolyzed maximally between pH 7.5 and 8.2, and at 41°C. The esterase could not be identified with other previously described hydrolytic enzymes. An esterase with similar properties could also be eluted from antigen-antibody aggregates which had been treated with serum. Human serum contained a heat-labile inhibitor of the esterase which could not be identified with any of the known components of complement. The esterase was also inhibited by certain reducing agents. The experiments described support the early hypothesis that complement exerts its action enzymatically, but the physiological role of the esterase derived from preparations of complement is not yet clear. PMID:13449241

  14. Leukocyte esterase urine test

    MedlinePlus

    ... the urine. This may mean you have a urinary tract infection . If this test is positive, the urine should ... Results Mean An abnormal result indicates a possible urinary tract infection. Alternative Names WBC esterase Images Male urinary system ...

  15. Tissue-specific rhamnogalacturonan I forms the gel with hyperelastic properties.

    PubMed

    Mikshina, P V; Petrova, A A; Faizullin, D A; Zuev, Yu F; Gorshkova, T A

    2015-07-01

    Rhamnogalacturonans I are complex pectin polysaccharides extremely variable in structure and properties and widely represented in various sources. The complexity and diversity of the structure of rhamnogalacturonans I are the reasons for the limited information about the properties and supramolecular organization of these polysaccharides, including the relationship between these parameters and the functions of rhamnogalacturonans I in plant cells. In the present work, on the example of rhamnogalacturonan I from flax gelatinous fibers, the ability of this type of pectic polysaccharides to form at physiological concentrations hydrogels with hyperelastic properties was revealed for the first time. According to IR spectroscopy, water molecules are more tightly retained in the gelling rhamnogalacturonan I from flax fiber cell wall in comparison with the non-gelling rhamnogalacturonan I from primary cell wall of potato. With increase in strength of water binding by rhamnogalacturonan I, there is an increase in elastic modulus and decrease in Poisson's ratio of gel formed by this polysaccharide. The model of hyperelastic rhamnogalacturonan I capture by laterally interacting cellulose microfibrils, constructed using the finite element method, confirmed the suitability of rhamnogalacturonan I gel with the established properties for the function in the gelatinous cell wall, allowing consideration of this tissue- and stage-specific pectic polysaccharide as an important factor in creation of gelatinous fiber contractility.

  16. Synthesis of acylated methyl beta-D-xylopyranosides and their enzymic deacylations by rabbit serum esterases.

    PubMed

    Petrović, V; Tomić, S; Ljevaković, D; Tomasić, J

    1997-07-11

    Selective pivaloylations of methyl beta-D-xylopyranoside have been studied under various reaction conditions. Partially pivaloylated products were submitted to additional acetylations. The structures were established by 1H NMR spectroscopy. Representatives of acylated methyl beta-D-xylopyranosides (acyl being pivaloyl, acetyl, or a combination of both) were submitted to hydrolysis catalyzed by rabbit serum and esterases isolated from rabbit serum.

  17. Infectious Salmon Anemia Virus Specifically Binds to and Hydrolyzes 4-O-Acetylated Sialic Acids

    PubMed Central

    Hellebø, Audny; Vilas, Ulrike; Falk, Knut; Vlasak, Reinhard

    2004-01-01

    Infectious salmon anemia virus (ISAV) is the causative agent of infections in farmed Atlantic salmon. ISAV presumably represents a new genus within the Orthomyxoviridae. ISAV has been shown earlier to exhibit a receptor-destroying activity, which was defined as an acetylesterase with unknown specificity. We have analyzed the substrate specificity of the ISAV esterase in detail. Purified ISAV hydrolyzed free 5-N-acetyl-4-O-acetyl neuraminic acid. In addition, the purified 9-O-acetylated sialic acid derivative was also hydrolyzed, but at lower rates. When we used a glycosidically bound substrate, ISAV was unable to hydrolyze 9-O-acetylated sialic acid, which represents the major substrate for the influenza C virus esterase. ISAV completely de-O-acetylated glycoprotein-bound 5-N-acetyl-4-O-acetyl neuraminic acid. Thus, the enzymatic activity of the hemagglutinin-esterase of ISAV is comparable to that of the sialate-4-O-esterases of murine coronaviruses and related group 2 coronaviruses. In addition, we found that ISAV specifically binds to glycoproteins containing 4-O-acetylated sialic acids. Both the ISAV esterase and recombinant rat coronavirus esterase specific for 4-O-acetylated sialic acids hydrolyzed ISAV receptors on horse and rabbit erythrocytes, indicating that this sialic acid represents a receptor determinant for ISAV. PMID:14990724

  18. Characterization of rhamnogalacturonan I from cotton suspension culture cell walls

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    Progress has been made on the project of determining the structure of pectins. From recent progress, a covalent crosslink between rhamnogalacturonan I (RGI) and xyloglucan was hypothesized and a structure for RGI was proposed. The development of a method to determine the distribution of methyl esterification with pectins also progressed. The degree of methyl esterification of cotton cotyledon cell walls was compared to that of cotton suspension cultures. Cotyledon wall were found to have {approximately}55% of the galacturonic acid esterified whereas suspension culture wall were only about 14% methyl esterified. 10 refs. (SM)

  19. A New Family of Carbohydrate Esterases Is Represented by a GDSL Hydrolase/Acetylxylan Esterase from Geobacillus stearothermophilus*

    PubMed Central

    Alalouf, Onit; Balazs, Yael; Volkinshtein, Margarita; Grimpel, Yael; Shoham, Gil; Shoham, Yuval

    2011-01-01

    Acetylxylan esterases hydrolyze the ester linkages of acetyl groups at positions 2 and/or 3 of the xylose moieties in xylan and play an important role in enhancing the accessibility of xylanases to the xylan backbone. The hemicellulolytic system of the thermophilic bacterium Geobacillus stearothermophilus T-6 comprises a putative acetylxylan esterase gene, axe2. The gene product belongs to the GDSL hydrolase family and does not share sequence homology with any of the carbohydrate esterases in the CAZy Database. The axe2 gene is induced by xylose, and the purified gene product completely deacetylates xylobiose peracetate (fully acetylated) and hydrolyzes the synthetic substrates 2-naphthyl acetate, 4-nitrophenyl acetate, 4-methylumbelliferyl acetate, and phenyl acetate. The pH profiles for kcat and kcat/Km suggest the existence of two ionizable groups affecting the binding of the substrate to the enzyme. Using NMR spectroscopy, the regioselectivity of Axe2 was directly determined with the aid of one-dimensional selective total correlation spectroscopy. Methyl 2,3,4-tri-O-acetyl-β-d-xylopyranoside was rapidly deacetylated at position 2 or at positions 3 and 4 to give either diacetyl or monoacetyl intermediates, respectively; methyl 2,3,4,6-tetra-O-acetyl-β-d-glucopyranoside was initially deacetylated at position 6. In both cases, the complete hydrolysis of the intermediates occurred at a much slower rate, suggesting that the preferred substrate is the peracetate sugar form. Site-directed mutagenesis of Ser-15, His-194, and Asp-191 resulted in complete inactivation of the enzyme, consistent with their role as the catalytic triad. Overall, our results show that Axe2 is a serine acetylxylan esterase representing a new carbohydrate esterase family. PMID:21994937

  20. Novel rhamnogalacturonan I and arabinoxylan polysaccharides of flax seed mucilage.

    PubMed

    Naran, Radnaa; Chen, Guibing; Carpita, Nicholas C

    2008-09-01

    The viscous seed mucilage of flax (Linum usitatissimum) is a mixture of rhamnogalacturonan I and arabinoxylan with novel side group substitutions. The rhamnogalacturonan I has numerous single nonreducing terminal residues of the rare sugar l-galactose attached at the O-3 position of the rhamnosyl residues instead of the typical O-4 position. The arabinoxylan is highly branched, primarily with double branches of nonreducing terminal l-arabinosyl units at the O-2 and O-3 positions along the xylan backbone. While a portion of each polysaccharide can be purified by anion-exchange chromatography, the side group structures of both polysaccharides are modified further in about one-third of the mucilage to form composites with enhanced viscosity. Our finding of the unusual side group structures for two well-known cell wall polysaccharides supports a hypothesis that plants make a selected few ubiquitous backbone polymers onto which a broad spectrum of side group substitutions are added to engender many possible functions. To this end, modification of one polymer may be accompanied by complementary modifications of others to impart functions to heterocomposites not present in either polymer alone.

  1. Organophosphates and monocyte esterase deficiency.

    PubMed Central

    McClean, E; Mackey, H; Markey, G M; Morris, T C

    1995-01-01

    AIMS--To examine the possibility that monocyte esterase deficiency (MED) could be caused by exposure to organophosphates. METHODS--Pseudocholinesterase, paraoxonase and arylesterase activities were measured in the serum and acetylcholinesterase activity was measured in the red cells of a group of monocyte esterase deficient subjects and compared with the enzyme activities of a control group of monocyte esterase positive subjects. RESULTS--No significant difference was found between the enzyme activities of the monocyte esterase deficient group and the control group for any of the esterases investigated. CONCLUSION--Current or recent exposure to organophosphorus is not the cause of MED. PMID:7560207

  2. Gastroprotective effect and structure of a rhamnogalacturonan from Acmella oleracea.

    PubMed

    Nascimento, Adamara M; de Souza, Lauro M; Baggio, Cristiane H; Werner, Maria Fernanda de P; Maria-Ferreira, Daniele; da Silva, Luisa M; Sassaki, Guilherme L; Gorin, Philip A J; Iacomini, Marcello; Cipriani, Thales R

    2013-01-01

    The plant Acmella oleracea (L.) R.K.Jansen (Asteraceae), locally known as jambu, is widely used in Legal Amazon in local dishes and in folk medicine. A polysaccharide (SC) was isolated from this plant, following aqueous extraction, which contained uronic acid, galactose, arabinose, rhamnose, and glucose in a 15:2:1:1:0.5 molar ratio and had a M(w) 226,000 g/mol. Methylation analysis and NMR spectroscopy indicated that SC is a rhamnogalacturonan composed of a long chain of →4)-6-OMe-α-D-GalpA-(1→, interspersed with some α-L-Rhap residues, partly substituted by side-chains of type II arabinogalactans. SC significantly inhibited ethanol-induced gastric ulcers in rats with an ED₅₀ of 1.5 mg/kg, indicating that SC acts as gastroprotective agent.

  3. Plant rhamnogalacturonan II complexation of heavy metal cations

    DOEpatents

    O'Neill, Malcolm A.; Pellerin, Patrice J. M.; Warrenfeltz, Dennis; Vidal, Stephane; Darvill, Alan G.; Albersheim, Peter

    1999-01-01

    The present invention provides rhamnogalacturonan-II (RG-II) and relates to its ability to complex specific multivalent heavy metal cations. In the presence of boric acid, RG-II monomers form dimers that are cross-linked by a borate ester. The yield of such borate ester cross-linked dimers of RG-II is enhanced in the presence of specific heavy metal cations. The present invention further relates to the utility of RG-II in assays for the detection of specific heavy metal contamination; as a reagent useful in the removal of specific heavy metal cations contaminating foods and liquids, for example, fish, wines, etc.; as a pharmaceutical composition useful as an antidote in specific heavy metal cation poisoning; as a treatment for the detoxification of specific heavy metal cations from blood and/or tissues; and in a method of remediation of waters and soils contaminated with specific heavy metal cations.

  4. Plant rhamnogalacturonan II complexation of heavy metal cations

    DOEpatents

    O`Neill, M.A.; Pellerin, P.J.M.; Warrenfeltz, D.; Vidal, S.; Darvill, A.G.; Albersheim, P.

    1999-03-02

    The present invention provides rhamnogalacturonan-II (RG-II) and relates to its ability to complex specific multivalent heavy metal cations. In the presence of boric acid, RG-II monomers form dimers that are cross-linked by a borate ester. The yield of such borate ester cross-linked dimers of RG-II is enhanced in the presence of specific heavy metal cations. The present invention further relates to the utility of RG-II in assays for the detection of specific heavy metal contamination; as a reagent useful in the removal of specific heavy metal cations contaminating foods and liquids, for example, fish, wines, etc.; as a pharmaceutical composition useful as an antidote in specific heavy metal cation poisoning; as a treatment for the detoxification of specific heavy metal cations from blood and/or tissues; and in a method of remediation of waters and soils contaminated with specific heavy metal cations. 15 figs.

  5. Structure of a Rhamnogalacturonan Fragment from Apple Pectin: Implications for Pectin Architecture

    DOE PAGES

    Wu, Xiangmei; Mort, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    A comore » mmercial apple pectin was sequentially digested with the cloned enzymes endopolygalacturonase, galactanase, arabinofuranosidase, xylogalacturonase, and rhamnogalacturonan hydrolase. The rhamnogalacturonan hydrolase-generated oligosaccharides were separated by ultrafiltration, anion exchange, and size-exclusion chromatography. Fractions from the ion exchange chromatography were pooled, lyophilized, and screened by MALDI-TOF MS. An oligosaccharide (RGP14P3) was identified and its structure, α -D-Gal p A- ( 1 → 2 ) - α -L-Rha p - ( 1 → 4 ) - α -D-Gal p A- ( 1 → 2 ) - α -L-Rha p - ( 1 → 4 ) - α -D-Gal p A, determined by 1D and 2D NMR spectrometry. This oligosaccharide probably represents a direct connection between homogalacturonan and rhamnogalacturonan in pectin. Alternatively, it could indicate that the nonreducing end of rhamnogalacturonan starts with a galacturonic acid residue.« less

  6. Chemical divisions in the medial geniculate body and surrounding paralaminar nuclei of the rat: quantitative comparison of cell density, NADPH diaphorase, acetyl cholin esterase and basal expression of c-fos.

    PubMed

    Olucha-Bordonau, Francisco E; Pérez-Villalba, Ana; Teruel-Martí, Vicent; Ruiz-Torner, Amparo

    2004-11-01

    Quantitative methods of cell density, the intensities of both acetyl cholinesterase (AChE) and NADPH diaphorase (NADPHd), as well as the basal expression of c-fos, have been carried out in order to study the anatomical divisions of the medial geniculate body (MGB) and the group of nuclei located ventromedially to the MGB called the paralaminar complex (PL). The MGB was composed of the dorsal (MGd), and the ventral (MGv) divisions. We included the medial, or the magnocellular division (MGm), in the PL complex. MGd was composed of a dorsolateral (DL) core and a belt. The belt was composed of the suprageniculate (SG), the deep dorsal (DD), the caudo-medial (CM) and the caudo-dorsal (CD) nuclei. In the MGv, the basal expression of c-fos was the only way to trace a clear boundary between the ovoid (Ov) and the ventrolateral (VL) divisions. However, the marginal zone (MZ) was clearly and contrastingly different. The PL was considered to be composed of: the MGm, the posterior intralaminar nucleus (PIN), the peripeduncular nucleus (PP) and the nucleus subparafascicularis lateralis (SPFL). The MGm and the PIN share most of the chemical features, meanwhile both SPFL and PP displayed different patterns of NADPHd reactivity. The study of cell density on Giemsa stained sections confirmed main divisions of the area. AChE and NADPHd methods allowed the main MGB divisions to be discriminated. The differences between subdivisions were emphasized when cell density and c-fos activity were quantified in each nucleus. Each MGB division displayed a different pattern of c-fos activity under basal conditions. Thus, c-fos basal expression was a particular feature in each MGB or PL nucleus.

  7. Deacetylation of sialic acid by esterases potentiates pneumococcal neuraminidase activity for mucin utilization, colonization and virulence

    PubMed Central

    Kahya, Hasan F.; Andrew, Peter W.

    2017-01-01

    Pneumococcal neuraminidase is a key enzyme for sequential deglycosylation of host glycans, and plays an important role in host survival, colonization, and pathogenesis of infections caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae. One of the factors that can affect the activity of neuraminidase is the amount and position of acetylation present in its substrate sialic acid. We hypothesised that pneumococcal esterases potentiate neuraminidase activity by removing acetylation from sialic acid, and that will have a major effect on pneumococcal survival on mucin, colonization, and virulence. These hypotheses were tested using isogenic mutants and recombinant esterases in microbiological, biochemical and in vivo assays. We found that pneumococcal esterase activity is encoded by at least four genes, SPD_0534 (EstA) was found to be responsible for the main esterase activity, and the pneumococcal esterases are specific for short acyl chains. Assay of esterase activity by using natural substrates showed that both the Axe and EstA esterases could use acetylated xylan and Bovine Sub-maxillary Mucin (BSM), a highly acetylated substrate, but only EstA was active against tributyrin (triglyceride). Incubation of BSM with either Axe or EstA led to the acetate release in a time and concentration dependent manner, and pre-treatment of BSM with either enzyme increased sialic acid release on subsequent exposure to neuraminidase A. qRT-PCR results showed that the expression level of estA and axe increased when exposed to BSM and in respiratory tissues. Mutation of estA alone or in combination with nanA (codes for neuraminidase A), or the replacement of its putative serine active site to alanine, reduced the pneumococcal ability to utilise BSM as a sole carbon source, sialic acid release, colonization, and virulence in a mouse model of pneumococcal pneumonia. PMID:28257499

  8. O-acetylated oligosaccharides from pectins of potato tuber cell walls.

    PubMed

    Ishii, T

    1997-04-01

    Acetylated trigalacturonides and rhamnogalacturonan I (RG-I)-derived oligosaccharides were isolated from a Driselase digest of potato tuber cell walls by ion-exchange and size-exclusion chromatography. The oligosaccharides were structurally characterized by fast atom bombardment-mass spectroscopy, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and glycosyl-linkage composition analysis. One trigalacturonide contained a single acetyl group at O-3 of the reducing galacturonic acid residue. A second trigalacturonide contained two acetyl substituents, which were located on O-3 or O-4 of the nonreducing galacturonic acid residue and O-3 of the reducing galacturonic acid residue. RG-I backbone-derived oligomers had acetyl groups at O-2 of the galacturonic acid residues. Some of these galacturonic acid residues were O-acetylated at both O-2 and O-3 positions. Rhamnosyl residues of RG-I oligomers were not acetylated.

  9. O-acetylated oligosaccharides from pectins of potato tuber cell walls.

    PubMed Central

    Ishii, T

    1997-01-01

    Acetylated trigalacturonides and rhamnogalacturonan I (RG-I)-derived oligosaccharides were isolated from a Driselase digest of potato tuber cell walls by ion-exchange and size-exclusion chromatography. The oligosaccharides were structurally characterized by fast atom bombardment-mass spectroscopy, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and glycosyl-linkage composition analysis. One trigalacturonide contained a single acetyl group at O-3 of the reducing galacturonic acid residue. A second trigalacturonide contained two acetyl substituents, which were located on O-3 or O-4 of the nonreducing galacturonic acid residue and O-3 of the reducing galacturonic acid residue. RG-I backbone-derived oligomers had acetyl groups at O-2 of the galacturonic acid residues. Some of these galacturonic acid residues were O-acetylated at both O-2 and O-3 positions. Rhamnosyl residues of RG-I oligomers were not acetylated. PMID:9112775

  10. Acetylation of woody lignocellulose: significance and regulation

    PubMed Central

    Pawar, Prashant Mohan-Anupama; Koutaniemi, Sanna; Tenkanen, Maija; Mellerowicz, Ewa J.

    2013-01-01

    Non-cellulosic cell wall polysaccharides constitute approximately one quarter of usable biomass for human exploitation. In contrast to cellulose, these components are usually substituted by O-acetyl groups, which affect their properties and interactions with other polymers, thus affecting their solubility and extractability. However, details of these interactions are still largely obscure. Moreover, polysaccharide hydrolysis to constituent monosaccharides is hampered by the presence of O-acetyl groups, necessitating either enzymatic (esterase) or chemical de-acetylation, increasing the costs and chemical consumption. Reduction of polysaccharide acetyl content in planta is a way to modify lignocellulose toward improved saccharification. In this review we: (1) summarize literature on lignocellulose acetylation in different tree species, (2) present data and current hypotheses concerning the role of O-acetylation in determining woody lignocellulose properties, (3) describe plant proteins involved in lignocellulose O-acetylation, (4) give examples of microbial enzymes capable to de-acetylate lignocellulose, and (5) discuss prospects for exploiting these enzymes in planta to modify xylan acetylation. PMID:23734153

  11. Rhamnogalacturonan-I Based Microcapsules for Targeted Drug Release

    PubMed Central

    Kusic, Anja; De Gobba, Cristian; Larsen, Flemming H.; Sassene, Philip; Zhou, Qi; van de Weert, Marco; Mullertz, Anette; Jørgensen, Bodil; Ulvskov, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Drug targeting to the colon via the oral administration route for local treatment of e.g. inflammatory bowel disease and colonic cancer has several advantages such as needle-free administration and low infection risk. A new source for delivery is plant-polysaccharide based delivery platforms such as Rhamnogalacturonan-I (RG-I). In the gastro-intestinal tract the RG-I is only degraded by the action of the colonic microflora. For assessment of potential drug delivery properties, RG-I based microcapsules (~1 μm in diameter) were prepared by an interfacial poly-addition reaction. The cross-linked capsules were loaded with a fluorescent dye (model drug). The capsules showed negligible and very little in vitro release when subjected to media simulating gastric and intestinal fluids, respectively. However, upon exposure to a cocktail of commercial RG-I cleaving enzymes, ~ 9 times higher release was observed, demonstrating that the capsules can be opened by enzymatic degradation. The combined results suggest a potential platform for targeted drug delivery in the terminal gastro-intestinal tract. PMID:27992455

  12. Rhamnogalacturonan-I Based Microcapsules for Targeted Drug Release.

    PubMed

    Svagan, Anna J; Kusic, Anja; De Gobba, Cristian; Larsen, Flemming H; Sassene, Philip; Zhou, Qi; van de Weert, Marco; Mullertz, Anette; Jørgensen, Bodil; Ulvskov, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Drug targeting to the colon via the oral administration route for local treatment of e.g. inflammatory bowel disease and colonic cancer has several advantages such as needle-free administration and low infection risk. A new source for delivery is plant-polysaccharide based delivery platforms such as Rhamnogalacturonan-I (RG-I). In the gastro-intestinal tract the RG-I is only degraded by the action of the colonic microflora. For assessment of potential drug delivery properties, RG-I based microcapsules (~1 μm in diameter) were prepared by an interfacial poly-addition reaction. The cross-linked capsules were loaded with a fluorescent dye (model drug). The capsules showed negligible and very little in vitro release when subjected to media simulating gastric and intestinal fluids, respectively. However, upon exposure to a cocktail of commercial RG-I cleaving enzymes, ~ 9 times higher release was observed, demonstrating that the capsules can be opened by enzymatic degradation. The combined results suggest a potential platform for targeted drug delivery in the terminal gastro-intestinal tract.

  13. Characterization of Nasutitermes globiceps (Isoptera: Termitidae) esterases.

    PubMed

    Ruvolo-Takasusuki, M C; Collet, T

    2000-12-01

    Esterases of Nasutitermes globiceps termites which occur on the Upper Paraná River floodplain (Brazil) were characterized. The electrophoretic pattern of the termite esterases Nasutitermes globiceps was obtained by starch gel electrophoresis. Six esterase activity zones were obtained and numbered, with esterase-1 being the most anodall one and esterase-6 the most cathodal one. Esterase-2 was detected only with substrates derived from the 4-methylumbelliferyl radical. The esterases of N. globiceps present wide substrate specificity, having been observed with substrates derived from alpha-naphthyl (acetate, propionate, and butyrate) and beta-naphthyl (acetate, butyrate) and from 4-methylumbelliferyl (acetate, propionate and butyrate). Esterase-6 is a caste-specific enzyme detected in soldiers. Only esterases 1, 3 and 5 were detected in nymphs. No genetic polymorphism has been detected thus far in the esterases of Nasutitermes globiceps. This study suggests that allozyme variation can be explored to understand Nasutitermes social structure.

  14. Three multidomain esterases from the cellulolytic rumen anaerobe Ruminococcus flavefaciens 17 that carry divergent dockerin sequences.

    PubMed

    Aurilia, V; Martin, J C; McCrae, S I; Scott, K P; Rincon, M T; Flint, H J

    2000-06-01

    Three enzymes carrying esterase domains have been identified in the rumen cellulolytic anaerobe Ruminococcus flavefaciens 17. The newly characterized CesA gene product (768 amino acids) includes an N-terminal acetylesterase domain and an unidentified C-terminal domain, while the previously characterized XynB enzyme (781 amino acids) includes an internal acetylesterase domain in addition to its N-terminal xylanase catalytic domain. A third gene, xynE, is predicted to encode a multidomain enzyme of 792 amino acids including a family 11 xylanase domain and a C-terminal esterase domain. The esterase domains from CesA and XynB share significant sequence identity (44%) and belong to carbohydrate esterase family 3; both domains are shown here to be capable of deacetylating acetylated xylans, but no evidence was found for ferulic acid esterase activity. The esterase domain of XynE, however, shares 42% amino acid identity with a family 1 phenolic acid esterase domain identified from Clostridum thermocellum XynZ. XynB, XynE and CesA all contain dockerin-like regions in addition to their catalytic domains, suggesting that these enzymes form part of a cellulosome-like multienzyme complex. The dockerin sequences of CesA and XynE differ significantly from those previously described in R. flavefaciens polysaccharidases, including XynB, suggesting that they might represent distinct dockerin specificities.

  15. Characterization of Recombinant Rhamnogalacturonan α-l-Rhamnopyranosyl-(1,4)-α-d-Galactopyranosyluronide Lyase from Aspergillus aculeatus1

    PubMed Central

    Mutter, Margien; Colquhoun, Ian J.; Beldman, Gerrit; Schols, Henk A.; Bakx, Edwin J.; Voragen, Alphons G.J.

    1998-01-01

    The four major oligomeric reaction products from saponified modified hairy regions (MHR-S) from apple, produced by recombinant rhamnogalacturonan (RG) α-l-rhamnopyranosyl-(1,4)-α-d-galactopyranosyluronide lyase (rRG-lyase) from Aspergillus aculeatus, were isolated and characterized by 1H-nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. They contain an alternating RG backbone with a degree of polymerization of 4, 6, 8, and 10 and with an α-Δ-(4,5)-unsaturated d-galactopyranosyluronic acid at the nonreducing end and an l-rhamnopyranose at the reducing end. l-Rhamnopyranose units are substituted at C-4 with β-galactose. The maximum reaction rate of rRG-lyase toward MHR-S at pH 6.0 and 31°C was 28 units mg−1. rRG-lyase and RG-hydrolase cleave the same alternating RG I subunit in MHR. Both of these enzymes fragment MHR by a multiple attack mechanism. The catalytic efficiency of rRG-lyase for MHR increases with decreasing degree of acetylation. Removal of arabinose side chains improves the action of rRG-lyase toward MHR-S. In contrast, removal of galactose side chains decreased the catalytic efficiency of rRG-lyase. Native RG-lyase was purified from A. aculeatus, characterized, and found to be similar to the rRG-lyase expressed in Aspergillus oryzae. PMID:9576783

  16. Polypeptide having acetyl xylan esterase activity and uses thereof

    DOEpatents

    Schoonneveld-Bergmans, Margot Elisabeth Francoise; Heijne, Wilbert Herman Marie; Los, Alrik Pieter

    2015-10-20

    The invention relates to a polypeptide comprising the amino acid sequence set out in SEQ ID NO: 2 or an amino acid sequence encoded by the nucleotide sequence of SEQ ID NO: 1, or a variant polypeptide or variant polynucleotide thereof, wherein the variant polypeptide has at least 82% sequence identity with the sequence set out in SEQ ID NO: 2 or the variant polynucleotide encodes a polypeptide that has at least 82% sequence identity with the sequence set out in SEQ ID NO: 2. The invention features the full length coding sequence of the novel gene as well as the amino acid sequence of the full-length functional polypeptide and functional equivalents of the gene or the amino acid sequence. The invention also relates to methods for using the polypeptide in industrial processes. Also included in the invention are cells transformed with a polynucleotide according to the invention suitable for producing these proteins.

  17. Identification of a novel Penicillium chrysogenum rhamnogalacturonan rhamnohydrolase and the first report of a rhamnogalacturonan rhamnohydrolase gene.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Shotaro; Yamada, Hiroyuki; Kunishige, Yuika; Takenaka, Shigeo; Nakazawa, Masami; Ueda, Mitsuhiro; Sakamoto, Tatsuji

    2017-03-01

    Rhamnogalacturonan (RG) I is one of the main components of pectins in the plant cell wall. We recently reported two RG I-degrading enzymes, endo-RG and exo-RG lyases, secreted by Penicillium chrysogenum 31B. Here, our aims were to purify a RG rhamnohydrolase (PcRGRH78A) from the culture filtrate of this strain and to characterize this enzyme. On the basis of the internal amino acid sequences, the encoding gene, Pcrgrh78A, was cloned and overexpressed in Aspergillus oryzae. The deduced amino acid sequence of PcRGRH78A is highly similar to an uncharacterized protein belonging to glycoside hydrolase family 78. Pfam analysis revealed that PcRGRH78A contains a bacterial α-l-rhamnosidase (PF05592) domain. PcRGRH78A shows optimal activity at 45°C and pH 5. The specificity of PcRGRH78A toward rhamnose (Rha)-containing substrates was compared with that of a P. chrysogenum α-l-rhamnosidase (PcRHA78B) belonging to glycoside hydrolase family 78. PcRGRH78A specifically hydrolyzes RG oligosaccharides that contain Rha at their nonreducing ends, releasing the Rha, but has no activity toward naringin, hesperidin, or rutin. In contrast, PcRHA78B effectively degrades p-nitrophenyl α-l-rhamnopyranoside and the three flavonoids, but not RG oligosaccharides. When galactosyl RG oligosaccharides were used as the substrate, PcRGRH78A released Rha in 3.5-fold greater amounts in the presence of β-galactosidase than in its absence, indicating that PcRGRH78A preferentially acts on Rha residues without the galactose moiety at nonreducing ends. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a gene encoding a RG rhamnohydrolase.

  18. Acetyl chloride

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Acetyl chloride ; CASRN 75 - 36 - 5 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Ef

  19. Three Neocallimastix patriciarum esterases associated with the degradation of complex polysaccharides are members of a new family of hydrolases.

    PubMed

    Dalrymple, B P; Cybinski, D H; Layton, I; McSweeney, C S; Xue, G P; Swadling, Y J; Lowry, J B

    1997-08-01

    Acetylesterase and cinnamoyl ester hydrolase activities were demonstrated in culture supernatant of the anaerobic ruminal fungus Neocallimastix patriciarum. A cDNA expression library from N. patriciarum was screened for esterases using beta-naphthyl acetate and a model cinnamoyl ester compound. cDNA clones representing four different esterase genes (bnaA-D) were isolated. None of the enzymes had cinnamoyl ester hydrolase activity, but two of the enzymes (BnaA and BnaC) had acetylxylan esterase activity, bnaA, bnaB and bnaC encode proteins with several distinct domains. Carboxy-terminal repeats in BnaA and BnaC are homologous to protein-docking domains in other enzymes from Neocallimastix species and another anaerobic fungus, a Piromyces sp. The catalytic domains of BnaB and BnaC are members of a recently described family of Ser/His active site hydrolases [Upton, C. & Buckley, J.T. (1995). Trends Biochem Sci 20, 178-179]. BnaB exhibits 40% amino acid identity to a domain of unknown function in the CelE cellulase from Clostridium thermocellum and BnaC exhibits 52% amino acid identity to a domain of unknown function in the XynB xylanase from Ruminococcus flavefaciens. BnaA, whilst exhibiting less than 10% overall amino acid identity to BnaB or BnaC, or to any other known protein, appears to be a member of the same family of hydrolases, having the three universally conserved amino acid sequence motifs. Several other previously described esterases are also shown to be members of this family, including a rhamnogalacturonan acetylesterase from Aspergillus aculeatus. However, none of the other previously described enzymes with acetylxylan esterase activity are members of this family of hydrolases.

  20. Acetylated pectins in raw and heat processed carrots.

    PubMed

    Broxterman, Suzanne E; Picouet, Pierre; Schols, Henk A

    2017-12-01

    Heat processing results in softening of carrots, changing the pectin structure. The effect of heat processing on pectin was studied, showing that the amount of pectin in water soluble solids (WSS) and chelating agent soluble solids (ChSS) increased substantially upon heat processing of the carrots. Pectin in WSS from both unprocessed and heat processed carrot had a degree of methyl-esterification (DM) of ≈60% and a degree of acetylation (DA) of ≈20%. Enzymatic degradation released methyl-esterified galacturonic acid oligomers of degree of polymerisation ≥6 carrying acetyl groups. Mass spectrometry confirmed acetylation in highly methyl-esterified homogalacturonan (HG) regions, next to known rhamnogalacturonan (RG-I) acetylation. ChSS HGs were un-acetylated. RG-I levels of both heat processed carrot WSS and ChSS increased. Digestion of WSS with RG-I degrading enzymes showed that WSS arabinan became more linear upon heat processing resulting in the release of oligosaccharides, while in ChSS galactan became more linear. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Antitussive activity of Althaea officinalis L. polysaccharide rhamnogalacturonan and its changes in guinea pigs with ovalbumine-induced airways inflammation.

    PubMed

    Sutovska, M; Capek, P; Franova, S; Joskova, M; Sutovsky, J; Marcinek, J; Kalman, M

    2011-01-01

    The presented studies were aimed on experimental confirmation of Althaea officinalis polysaccharide rhamnogalacturonan antitussive effect and its changes in conditions of allergic inflammation. We have tested whether rhamnogalacturonan inhibits cough reflex and modulates airways reactivity of guinea pigs in vivo. The cough in guinea pigs was induced by 0.3 M citric acid (CA) aerosol for 3 min interval, in which total number of cough efforts (sudden enhancement of expiratory flow accompanied by cough movement and sound) was counted. Specific airway resistance and its changes induced by citric acid aerosol were considered as an indicator of the in vivo reactivity changes. 1) Althaea officinalis polysaccharide rhamnogalacturonan dose- dependently inhibits cough reflex in unsensitized guinea pigs. Simultaneously, plant polysaccharide shortened the duration of antitussive effect when it was been tested in inflammatory conditions. 2) Rhamnogalacturonan did not influence airways reactivity in vivo conditions expressed as specific resistance values neither sensitized nor unsensitized groups of animals. 3) The antitussive activity of codeine (dose 10 mg.kg(-1) b.w. orally) tested under the same condition was comparable to higher dose of rhamnogalacturonan in unsensitized animals. 4) The characteristic cellular pattern of allergic airways inflammation was confirmed by histopathological investigations. Rhamnogalacturonan isolated from Althaea officinalis mucilage possesses very high cough suppressive effect in guinea pigs test system, which is shortened in conditions of experimentally induced airways allergic inflammation (Tab. 1, Fig. 4, Ref. 25). Full Text in free PDF www.bmj.sk.

  2. An emerging role of pectic rhamnogalacturonanII for cell wall integrity.

    PubMed

    Reboul, Rebecca; Tenhaken, Raimund

    2012-02-01

    The plant cell wall is a complex network of different polysaccharides and glycoproteins, showing high diversity in nature. The essential components, tethering cell wall are under debate, as novel mutants challenge established models. The mutant ugd2,3 with a reduced supply of the important wall precursor UDP-glucuronic acid reveals the critical role of the pectic compound rhamnogalacturonanII for cell wall stability. This polymer seems to be more important for cell wall integrity than the previously favored xyloglucan.

  3. Detection and identification of rhamnogalacturonan lyase activity in intercellular spaces of expanding cotton cotyledons.

    PubMed

    Naran, Radnaa; Pierce, Margaret L; Mort, Andrew J

    2007-04-01

    Rhamnogalacturonan lyase (RG lyase) activity has been detected and its relative activity measured in vivo during the expansion of cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) cotyledons. Rhamnogalacturonan (RG) oligomers labeled with a fluorescent tag were injected into the intercellular spaces of cotton cotyledons and, after incubation, the digested substrate was rinsed out. Enzyme digestion products were detected and identified by capillary zone electrophoresis. Rhamnogalacturonan lyase products were identified as such by co-migration with the digestion products of linear RG oligomers when the oligomers were treated with fungal RG lyase but not when treated with fungal RG hydrolase. In addition, reaction of plant RG lyase digestion products of RG oligomers with I(2)/KI, which selectively removes unsaturated galactopyranosyluronic acid (GaLap) residues formed at the non-reducing end of the oligomer, converted the plant digestion products into RG oligomers that co-migrated with fungal RG hydrolase products. The activity of the enzyme in the intercellular spaces of cotton cotyledons is very low and could be detected most easily when not >0.03 nmol of substrate was injected in a approximately 0.7-cm(2) area and incubated in vivo for 2-6 h. Rhamnogalacturonan lyase activity was the highest in rapidly expanding 3- to 4-day-old cotyledons and gradually decreased during the slow-down in expansion over the next 2-3 days. The RG lyase activity was also detected when the APTS (8-aminopyrene-1,3,6-trisulfonic acid, trisodium salt)-labeled substrates were introduced into intercellular spaces by infiltration instead of injection, indicating that the activity was not induced by wounding or released into the apoplast by cell damage. An exo-RG galacturonohydrolase activity was also found, but RG hydrolase and exo-RG rhamnohydrolase were not detected.

  4. Effect of halogenated benzenes on acetanilide esterase, acetanilide hydroxylase and procaine esterase in rats.

    PubMed

    Carlson, G P; Dziezak, J D; Johnson, K M

    1979-07-01

    1,2,4-Trichlorobenzene, 1,3,5-trichlorobenzene, hexachlorobenzene, 1,2,4-tribromobenzene, 1,3,5-tribromobenzene and hexabromobenzene were compared for their abilities to induce acetanilide esterase, acentailide hydroxylase and procaine esterase. Except for hexabromobenzene all induced acetanilide esterase whereas the hydroxylation of acetanilide was seen only with the fully halogenated benzenes and with 1,3,5-tribromobenzene. Hepatic procaine esterase activity was increased by the three chlorinated benzenes and 1,2,4-tribromobenzene.

  5. Impact of Cell Wall Acetylation on Corn Stover Hydrolysis by Cellulolytic and Xylanolytic Enzymes

    SciTech Connect

    Selig, M. J.; Adney, W. S.; Himmel, M. E.; Decker, S. R.

    2009-01-01

    Analysis of variously pretreated corn stover samples showed neutral to mildly acidic pretreatments were more effective at removing xylan from corn stover and more likely to maintain the acetyl to xylopyranosyl ratios present in untreated material than were alkaline treatments. Retention of acetyl groups in the residual solids resulted in greater resistance to hydrolysis by endoxylanase alone, although the synergistic combination of endoxylanase and acetyl xylan esterase enzymes permitted higher xylan conversions to be observed. Acetyl xylan esterase alone did little to improve hydrolysis by cellulolytic enzymes, although a direct relationship was observed between the enzymatic removal of acetyl groups and improvements in the enzymatic conversion of xylan present in substrates. In all cases, effective xylan conversions were found to significantly improve glucan conversions achievable by cellulolytic enzymes. Additionally, acetyl and xylan removal not only enhanced the respective initial rates of xylan and glucan conversion, but also the overall extents of conversion. This work emphasizes the necessity for xylanolytic enzymes during saccharification processes and specifically for the optimization of acetyl esterase and xylanase synergies when biomass processes include milder pretreatments, such as hot water or sulfite steam explosion.

  6. Characterization of four esterase genes and esterase activity from the gut of the termite Reticulitermes flavipes

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Four esterase genes and general esterase activity were investigated in the gut of the termite Reticulitermes flavipes. Two genes (RfEst1 and RfEst2) share significant translated identity with a number of insect JH esterases. The two remaining genes (RfEst3 and RfEst4) apparently code for much shorte...

  7. Biochemical Characterization and Relative Expression Levels of Multiple Carbohydrate Esterases of the Xylanolytic Rumen Bacterium Prevotella ruminicola 23 Grown on an Ester-Enriched Substrate ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Kabel, Mirjam A.; Yeoman, Carl J.; Han, Yejun; Dodd, Dylan; Abbas, Charles A.; de Bont, Jan A. M.; Morrison, Mark; Cann, Isaac K. O.; Mackie, Roderick I.

    2011-01-01

    We measured expression and used biochemical characterization of multiple carbohydrate esterases by the xylanolytic rumen bacterium Prevotella ruminicola 23 grown on an ester-enriched substrate to gain insight into the carbohydrate esterase activities of this hemicellulolytic rumen bacterium. The P. ruminicola 23 genome contains 16 genes predicted to encode carbohydrate esterase activity, and based on microarray data, four of these were upregulated >2-fold at the transcriptional level during growth on an ester-enriched oligosaccharide (XOSFA,Ac) from corn relative to a nonesterified fraction of corn oligosaccharides (AXOS). Four of the 16 esterases (Xyn10D-Fae1A, Axe1-6A, AxeA1, and Axe7A), including the two most highly induced esterases (Xyn10D-Fae1A and Axe1-6A), were heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli, purified, and biochemically characterized. All four enzymes showed the highest activity at physiologically relevant pH (6 to 7) and temperature (30 to 40°C) ranges. The P. ruminicola 23 Xyn10D-Fae1A (a carbohydrate esterase [CE] family 1 enzyme) released ferulic acid from methylferulate, wheat bran, corn fiber, and XOSFA,Ac, a corn fiber-derived substrate enriched in O-acetyl and ferulic acid esters, but exhibited negligible activity on sugar acetates. As expected, the P. ruminicola Axe1-6A enzyme, which was predicted to possess two distinct esterase family domains (CE1 and CE6), released ferulic acid from the same substrates as Xyn10D-Fae1 and was also able to cleave O-acetyl ester bonds from various acetylated oligosaccharides (AcXOS). The P. ruminicola 23 AxeA1, which is not assigned to a CE family, and Axe7A (CE7) were found to be acetyl esterases that had activity toward a broad range of mostly nonpolymeric acetylated substrates along with AcXOS. All enzymes were inhibited by the proximal location of other side groups like 4-O-methylglucuronic acid, ferulic acid, or acetyl groups. The unique diversity of carbohydrate esterases in P. ruminicola 23

  8. An emerging role of pectic rhamnogalacturonanII for cell wall integrity

    PubMed Central

    Reboul, Rebecca; Tenhaken, Raimund

    2012-01-01

    The plant cell wall is a complex network of different polysaccharides and glycoproteins, showing high diversity in nature. The essential components, tethering cell wall are under debate, as novel mutants challenge established models. The mutant ugd2,3 with a reduced supply of the important wall precursor UDP-glucuronic acid reveals the critical role of the pectic compound rhamnogalacturonanII for cell wall stability. This polymer seems to be more important for cell wall integrity than the previously favored xyloglucan. PMID:22353862

  9. Characterization of two metagenome-derived esterases that reactivate chloramphenicol by counteracting chloramphenicol acetyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Tao, Weixin; Lee, Myung Hwan; Yoon, Mi-Young; Kim, Jin-Cheol; Malhotra, Shweta; Wu, Jing; Hwang, Eul Chul; Lee, Seon-Woo

    2011-12-01

    Function-driven metagenomic analysis is a powerful approach to screening for novel biocatalysts. In this study, we investigated lipolytic enzymes selected from an alluvial soil metagenomic library, and identified two novel esterases, EstDL26 and EstDL136. EstDL26 and EstDL136 reactivated chloramphenicol from its acetyl derivates by counteracting the chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) activity in Escherichia coli. These two enzymes showed only 27% identity in amino acid sequence to each other; however both preferentially hydrolyzed short-chain p-nitrophenyl esters (< or =C5) and showed mesophilic properties. In vitro, EstDL136 catalyzed the deacetylation of 1- and 3- acetyl and 1,3-diacetyl derivates; in contrast, EstDL26 was not capable of the deacetylation at C1, indicating a potential regioselectivity. EstDL26 and EstDL136 were similar to microbial hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL), and since chloramphenicol acetate esterase (CAE) activity was detected from two other soil esterases in the HSL family, this suggests a distribution of CAE among the soil microorganisms. The isolation and characterization of EstDL26 and EstDL136 in this study may be helpful in understanding the diversity of CAE enzymes and their potential role in releasing active chloramphenicol in the producing bacteria.

  10. Some Properties of Extracellular Acetylxylan Esterase Produced by the Yeast Rhodotorula mucilaginosa†

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hung; To, Rebecca J. B.; Latta, Roger K.; Biely, Peter; Schneider, Henry

    1987-01-01

    The red yeast Rhodotorula mucilaginosa produced an esterase that accumulated in the culture supernatant on induction with triacetin. The enzyme was specific for substrates bearing an O-acetyl group, but was relatively nonspecific for the rest of the molecule, which could consist of a phenol, a monosaccharide, a polysaccharide, or an aliphatic alcohol. The esterase was more active against acetylxylan and glucose β-d-pentaacetate than were a number of esterases from plant and animal sources, when activities on 4-nitrophenyl acetate were compared. The enzyme exhibited Michaelis-Menten kinetics and was active over a broad pH range (5.5 to 9.2), with an optimum between pH 8 and 10. In addition, the enzyme retained its activity for 2 h at 55°C. The yeast that produced the enzyme did not produce xylanase and, hence, is of interest for the production of acetylxylan esterase that is free of xylanolytic activity. PMID:16347498

  11. Balance of activities of alcohol acetyltransferase and esterase in Saccharomyces cerevisiae is important for production of isoamyl acetate.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, K; Yamamoto, N; Kiyokawa, Y; Yanagiuchi, T; Wakai, Y; Kitamoto, K; Inoue, Y; Kimura, A

    1998-10-01

    Isoamyl acetate is synthesized from isoamyl alcohol and acetyl coenzyme A by alcohol acetyltransferase (AATFase) in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and is hydrolyzed by esterases at the same time. We hypothesized that the balance of both enzyme activities was important for optimum production of isoamyl acetate in sake brewing. To test this hypothesis, we constructed yeast strains with different numbers of copies of the AATFase gene (ATF1) and the isoamyl acetate-hydrolyzing esterase gene (IAH1) and used these strains in small-scale sake brewing. Fermentation profiles as well as components of the resulting sake were largely alike; however, the amount of isoamyl acetate in the sake increased with an increasing ratio of AATFase/Iah1p esterase activity. Therefore, we conclude that the balance of these two enzyme activities is important for isoamyl acetate accumulation in sake mash.

  12. Balance of Activities of Alcohol Acetyltransferase and Esterase in Saccharomyces cerevisiae Is Important for Production of Isoamyl Acetate

    PubMed Central

    Fukuda, Kiyoshi; Yamamoto, Nagi; Kiyokawa, Yoshifumi; Yanagiuchi, Toshiyasu; Wakai, Yoshinori; Kitamoto, Katsuhiko; Inoue, Yoshiharu; Kimura, Akira

    1998-01-01

    Isoamyl acetate is synthesized from isoamyl alcohol and acetyl coenzyme A by alcohol acetyltransferase (AATFase) in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and is hydrolyzed by esterases at the same time. We hypothesized that the balance of both enzyme activities was important for optimum production of isoamyl acetate in sake brewing. To test this hypothesis, we constructed yeast strains with different numbers of copies of the AATFase gene (ATF1) and the isoamyl acetate-hydrolyzing esterase gene (IAH1) and used these strains in small-scale sake brewing. Fermentation profiles as well as components of the resulting sake were largely alike; however, the amount of isoamyl acetate in the sake increased with an increasing ratio of AATFase/Iah1p esterase activity. Therefore, we conclude that the balance of these two enzyme activities is important for isoamyl acetate accumulation in sake mash. PMID:9758847

  13. Novel Rhamnogalacturonan I and Arabinoxylan Polysaccharides of Flax Seed Mucilage1[C][OA

    PubMed Central

    Naran, Radnaa; Chen, Guibing; Carpita, Nicholas C.

    2008-01-01

    The viscous seed mucilage of flax (Linum usitatissimum) is a mixture of rhamnogalacturonan I and arabinoxylan with novel side group substitutions. The rhamnogalacturonan I has numerous single nonreducing terminal residues of the rare sugar l-galactose attached at the O-3 position of the rhamnosyl residues instead of the typical O-4 position. The arabinoxylan is highly branched, primarily with double branches of nonreducing terminal l-arabinosyl units at the O-2 and O-3 positions along the xylan backbone. While a portion of each polysaccharide can be purified by anion-exchange chromatography, the side group structures of both polysaccharides are modified further in about one-third of the mucilage to form composites with enhanced viscosity. Our finding of the unusual side group structures for two well-known cell wall polysaccharides supports a hypothesis that plants make a selected few ubiquitous backbone polymers onto which a broad spectrum of side group substitutions are added to engender many possible functions. To this end, modification of one polymer may be accompanied by complementary modifications of others to impart functions to heterocomposites not present in either polymer alone. PMID:18667723

  14. Biochemical Characterization and Overexpression of an Endo-rhamnogalacturonan Lyase from Penicillium chrysogenum.

    PubMed

    Iwai, Marin; Yamada, Hiroyuki; Ikemoto, Takeshi; Matsumoto, Shotaro; Fujiwara, Daisuke; Takenaka, Shigeo; Sakamoto, Tatsuji

    2015-06-01

    Rhamnogalacturonan lyase (PcRGL4A) was purified from the culture supernatant of Penicillium chrysogenum 31B. PcRGL4A optimal activity occurred between pH 7-8 and at 40 °C. Conserved Domain Search analysis identified PcRGL4A as a member of Polysaccharide Lyase family 4. PcRGL4A contains two conserved catalytic and four conserved substrate-binding residues as determined by X-ray crystallography of the Aspergillus aculeatus RG lyase. Recombinant PcRGL4A (rPcRGL4A) expressed in Escherichia coli demonstrated specific activity against rhamnogalacturonan (RG) but not homogalacturonan. Analysis of the RG reaction products by high-performance anion-exchange chromatography revealed that rPcRGL4A cleaved the substrate in an endo-manner and that the major final product was an RG tetrasaccharide with 4-deoxy-4,5-unsaturated galacturonic acid at the nonreducing end. Based on these results, PcRGL4A was classified as an endo-acting RG lyase (EC 4.2.2.23). Divalent cations were not essential for the enzymatic activity of rPcRGL4A, but addition of calcium ions to the reaction mixture increased enzymatic activity. rPcRGL4A demonstrated a preference for RG lacking galactose decoration.

  15. Genetic Characterization of Esterase Activity Variants Associated with an Esterase Gene Amplification in a Strain of Culex pipiens from California.

    PubMed

    Ferrari, James A

    2015-03-01

    In the Culex pipiens complex, a common mechanism of insecticide resistance is amplification of esterase genes leading to overproduction of detoxifying esterase enzymes. A number of electrophoretic esterase alleles have been identified, and in field populations individuals with the same esterase electromorph can exhibit a wide range of esterase enzyme activities. We isolated and characterized esterase activity variants associated with the esterase B1 electromorph from a field strain. A mating scheme was used to isolate chromosomes with esterase genes from the strain into 45 families. Twenty-six of the families received esterase genes from the field strain that conferred elevated esterase activity. Mean esterase activities in these families ranged from 43 to 695 nmoles α-naphthyl acetate hydrolyzed/min/mg protein. Variance components indicated that genetic variance (i.e., genetic differences among families) accounted for 77% of the total variation in esterase activity. A comparison of mean esterase activities indicated that there were at least 11 different esterase activity variants contributing to the observed genetic variation in esterase activity among the 26 families. The relevance of these results to understanding the dynamics of amplified esterase genes in populations is discussed.

  16. Possible mechanisms of dose-dependent cough suppressive effect of Althaea officinalis rhamnogalacturonan in guinea pigs test system.

    PubMed

    Sutovská, M; Nosálová, G; Sutovský, J; Franová, S; Prisenznáková, L; Capek, P

    2009-07-01

    The rhamnogalacturonan, isolated from the roots of medicinal plant Althaea officinalis L., showed various biological effects on the citric acid-induced cough reflex and reactivity of airways smooth muscle in vitro and in vivo conditions. It possessed dose-dependent cough suppression effect comparable with opioid agonist codeine. However, reactivity of the airways smooth muscle, measured in vitro as well as in vivo conditions was not significantly affected by rhamnogalacturonan and thus bronchodilatory activity did not participate in the cough suppression effect of polysaccharide tested. Moreover, the cough suppression effect of the polymer was not significantly modified by pretreatment of K(+)(ATP) ion channels with selective antagonist and therefore activation of this type of ion channels is not involved in the mechanism of rhamnogalacturonan cough suppressive ability. On the contrary, pretreatment of animals with selective 5-HT(2) receptors antagonist significantly decreased rhamnogalacturonan antitussive efficacy. From this point of view it seems that the cough suppression effect of the polymer is associated with the serotonergic 5-HT(2) receptor's function.

  17. Esterase isozymes of the hen's oviduct.

    PubMed

    Grunder, A A; Holland, K G

    1977-11-01

    Esterase isozymes of magnum, isthmus and uterus of three strains of Single Comb White Leghorn hens were examined by zone electrophoresis on starch gels. Although three regions (I, II and III) of esterase activity were observed, the electrophoretic system was optimized to characterize the pattern of up to five zones of esterase activity that were identified in Region I. These esterases were classified as aliesterases based on reactions in the presence of various substrates and inhibitors. No genetic polymorphisms were observed for these isozymes. However, two of these isozymes were perceived to have an electrophoretic mobility slightly faster in patterns of the magnum of layers than in the isthmus, uterus, and magnum of non-layers. It was shown that egg albumen was present in relatively high quantities in the magnum of layers and that egg albumen, when added to supernatant preparations of isthmus, uterus and magnum of non-layers, caused the faster electrophoretic mobility of these two esterase isozymes. No relation between specific gravity of eggs laid by hens and presence of various Region I esterase isozymes could be detected.

  18. Rhamnogalacturonan from Acmella oleracea (L.) R.K. Jansen: Gastroprotective and Ulcer Healing Properties in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Maria-Ferreira, Daniele; da Silva, Luisa Mota; Mendes, Daniel Augusto Gasparin Bueno; Cabrini, Daniela de Almeida; Nascimento, Adamara Machado; Iacomini, Marcello; Cipriani, Thales Ricardo; Santos, Adair Roberto Soares; de Paula Werner, Maria Fernanda; Baggio, Cristiane Hatsuko

    2014-01-01

    A rhamnogalacturonan (RGal) isolated from Acmella oleracea (L.) R.K. Jansen administered by oral route showed gastroprotective activity against acute lesions induced by ethanol. In this study, we investigated the gastric ulcer healing effect of RGal and its mechanisms of action. Intraperitoneal treatment of animals with RGal protected the gastric mucosa against acute lesions induced by ethanol, with participation of gastric mucus. Furthermore, in the chronic ulcer model, oral administration of RGal accelerates the gastric ulcer healing, accompanied by increasing of cellular proliferation and gastric mucus content, reducing inflammatory parameters and oxidative stress. In addition, the repeated 7 days-treatment of animals with RGal did not show alterations of clinical and behavioral symptoms, body and organs weights or plasmatic biochemical parameters. Collectively, these results showed that RGal has an interesting antiulcerogenic activity and could constitute an attractive molecule of interest for the development of new antiulcer agents. PMID:24416280

  19. Rhamnogalacturonan from Acmella oleracea (L.) R.K. Jansen: gastroprotective and ulcer healing properties in rats.

    PubMed

    Maria-Ferreira, Daniele; da Silva, Luisa Mota; Mendes, Daniel Augusto Gasparin Bueno; Cabrini, Daniela de Almeida; Nascimento, Adamara Machado; Iacomini, Marcello; Cipriani, Thales Ricardo; Santos, Adair Roberto Soares; Werner, Maria Fernanda de Paula; Baggio, Cristiane Hatsuko

    2014-01-01

    A rhamnogalacturonan (RGal) isolated from Acmella oleracea (L.) R.K. Jansen administered by oral route showed gastroprotective activity against acute lesions induced by ethanol. In this study, we investigated the gastric ulcer healing effect of RGal and its mechanisms of action. Intraperitoneal treatment of animals with RGal protected the gastric mucosa against acute lesions induced by ethanol, with participation of gastric mucus. Furthermore, in the chronic ulcer model, oral administration of RGal accelerates the gastric ulcer healing, accompanied by increasing of cellular proliferation and gastric mucus content, reducing inflammatory parameters and oxidative stress. In addition, the repeated 7 days-treatment of animals with RGal did not show alterations of clinical and behavioral symptoms, body and organs weights or plasmatic biochemical parameters. Collectively, these results showed that RGal has an interesting antiulcerogenic activity and could constitute an attractive molecule of interest for the development of new antiulcer agents.

  20. Distinction between 'A'-esterases and arylesterases. Implications for esterase classification.

    PubMed Central

    Mackness, M I; Thompson, H M; Hardy, A R; Walker, C H

    1987-01-01

    'A'-esterase activities (substrates paraoxon and pirimiphos-methyloxon) and arylesterase activities (substrate phenyl acetate) were assayed in the sera of 14 species of birds representing seven different orders and 11 species of mammal representing five different orders. Ten species of birds had no detectable 'A'-esterase, and the remaining four species only low activity, yet all birds showed considerable arylesterase activity (16.8-99.3 mumol/min per ml of serum). Ten species of mammal showed both 'A'- and 'aryl'-esterase activities. In humans, gel filtration of serum completely separated peaks representing paraoxonase and arylesterase activities. Thus, in both birds and humans, serum enzymes exist that express arylesterase activity but not 'A'-esterase activity. These findings suggest that a distinction should be made between these two types of esterase in future classifications. PMID:2822017

  1. Monocyte esterase deficiency in gastrointestinal cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Markey, G M; Curry, R C; Swain, D; Morris, T C; McCormick, J A; Alexander, H D; Edgar, S

    1993-01-01

    AIM--To substantiate the high incidence of monocyte esterase deficiency (MED) in gastrointestinal carcinoma already reported in a small group of patients; to compare the clinical findings in esterase deficient and esterase positive patients. METHODS--Peripheral blood smears (n = 22) or cytocentrifuge preparations (n = 52) of mononuclear cells from the peripheral blood of patients with gastrointestinal carcinoma were stained by the non-specific esterase stain (pH 5.8) using a batch technique. Samples containing > or = 85% esterase negative monocytes were identified at light microscopic examination. RESULTS--Seven of 74 patients were identified as having MED. This correlated exactly with the proportion (five of 46) found before, using an automated method, and was significantly higher than the 0.8% incidence in normal blood donors shown in that study. Comparison of the clinical details of the 12 MED patients with those of 105 esterase positive patients showed a significantly longer disease free survival in the MED cohort and increased occurrence of benign neoplasms--largely colorectal polyps--in this group also. Three patients had a borderline degree of deficiency and were excluded from comparisons, although they showed the same clinical tendencies as the MED group. CONCLUSIONS--There is a strong degree of association between monocyte esterase deficiency and gastrointestinal carcinoma. Further evidence must be sought to prove that the deficiency precedes the disease and therefore may predispose to it, or at least may identify subjects with such a predisposition. This could lead to early diagnosis and effective treatment of gastrointestinal carcinoma in a sizeable proportion of patients. PMID:8331174

  2. Phenolic acid esterases, coding sequences and methods

    DOEpatents

    Blum, David L.; Kataeva, Irina; Li, Xin-Liang; Ljungdahl, Lars G.

    2002-01-01

    Described herein are four phenolic acid esterases, three of which correspond to domains of previously unknown function within bacterial xylanases, from XynY and XynZ of Clostridium thermocellum and from a xylanase of Ruminococcus. The fourth specifically exemplified xylanase is a protein encoded within the genome of Orpinomyces PC-2. The amino acids of these polypeptides and nucleotide sequences encoding them are provided. Recombinant host cells, expression vectors and methods for the recombinant production of phenolic acid esterases are also provided.

  3. New extremophilic lipases and esterases from metagenomics.

    PubMed

    López-López, Olalla; Cerdán, Maria E; González Siso, Maria I

    2014-01-01

    Lipolytic enzymes catalyze the hydrolysis of ester bonds in the presence of water. In media with low water content or in organic solvents, they can catalyze synthetic reactions such as esterification and transesterification. Lipases and esterases, in particular those from extremophilic origin, are robust enzymes, functional under the harsh conditions of industrial processes owing to their inherent thermostability and resistance towards organic solvents, which combined with their high chemo-, regio- and enantioselectivity make them very attractive biocatalysts for a variety of industrial applications. Likewise, enzymes from extremophile sources can provide additional features such as activity at extreme temperatures, extreme pH values or high salinity levels, which could be interesting for certain purposes. New lipases and esterases have traditionally been discovered by the isolation of microbial strains producing lipolytic activity. The Genome Projects Era allowed genome mining, exploiting homology with known lipases and esterases, to be used in the search for new enzymes. The Metagenomic Era meant a step forward in this field with the study of the metagenome, the pool of genomes in an environmental microbial community. Current molecular biology techniques make it possible to construct total environmental DNA libraries, including the genomes of unculturable organisms, opening a new window to a vast field of unknown enzymes with new and unique properties. Here, we review the latest advances and findings from research into new extremophilic lipases and esterases, using metagenomic approaches, and their potential industrial and biotechnological applications.

  4. Phenol esterase activity of porcine skin.

    PubMed

    Laszlo, Joseph A; Smith, Leslie J; Evans, Kervin O; Compton, David L

    2015-01-01

    The alkyl esters of plant-derived phenols may serve as slow-release sources for cutaneous delivery of antioxidants. The ability of skin esterases to hydrolyze phenolic esters was examined. Esters of tyrosol and hydroxytyrosol were prepared from decanoic and lipoic acids. Ferulic acid was esterified with octadecanol, glycerol, and dioleoylglycerol. These phenolic derivatives were treated in taurodeoxycholate microemulsion and unilamellar liposomes with ex vivo porcine skin and an aqueous extract of the skin. Extracted esterases hydrolyzed the microemulsions at rates in the order: tyrosyl lipoate > tyrosyl decanoate > hydroxytyrosyl lipoate > hydroxytyrosyl decanoate. The tyrosyl decanoate was subject to comparatively little hydrolysis (10-30% after 24h) when incorporated into liposomes, while hydroxytyrosyl decanoate in liposomes was not hydrolyzed at all by the skin extract. Ferulate esters were not hydrolyzed by the extract in aqueous buffer, microemulsion, nor liposomes. Tyrosyl decanoate applied topically to skin explants in microemulsion were readily hydrolyzed within 4h, while hydrolysis was minimal when applied in liposomes. These findings indicate that porcine skin displays a general esterase activity toward medium-chain esters of tyrosol and hydroxytyrosol, which can be moderated by the physiochemical properties of the lipid vehicle, but no feruloyl esterase activity.

  5. New Extremophilic Lipases and Esterases from Metagenomics

    PubMed Central

    López-López, Olalla; Cerdán, Maria E; González Siso, Maria I

    2014-01-01

    Lipolytic enzymes catalyze the hydrolysis of ester bonds in the presence of water. In media with low water content or in organic solvents, they can catalyze synthetic reactions such as esterification and transesterification. Lipases and esterases, in particular those from extremophilic origin, are robust enzymes, functional under the harsh conditions of industrial processes owing to their inherent thermostability and resistance towards organic solvents, which combined with their high chemo-, regio- and enantioselectivity make them very attractive biocatalysts for a variety of industrial applications. Likewise, enzymes from extremophile sources can provide additional features such as activity at extreme temperatures, extreme pH values or high salinity levels, which could be interesting for certain purposes. New lipases and esterases have traditionally been discovered by the isolation of microbial strains producing lipolytic activity. The Genome Projects Era allowed genome mining, exploiting homology with known lipases and esterases, to be used in the search for new enzymes. The Metagenomic Era meant a step forward in this field with the study of the metagenome, the pool of genomes in an environmental microbial community. Current molecular biology techniques make it possible to construct total environmental DNA libraries, including the genomes of unculturable organisms, opening a new window to a vast field of unknown enzymes with new and unique properties. Here, we review the latest advances and findings from research into new extremophilic lipases and esterases, using metagenomic approaches, and their potential industrial and biotechnological applications. PMID:24588890

  6. Phenol esterase activity of porcine skin

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The alkyl esters of plant-derived phenols may serve as slow-release sources for cutaneous delivery of antioxidants. The ability of skin esterases to hydrolyze phenolic esters was examined. Esters of tyrosol and hydroxytyrosol were prepared from decanoic and lipoic acids. Ferulic acid was esterified ...

  7. Identification of Genes Encoding Microbial Glucuronoyl Esterases

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    One type of covalent linkages connecting lignin and hemicellulose in plant cell walls is the ester linkage between 4-0-methyl-D-glucuronic acid of glucuronoxylan and lignin alcohols. An enzyme that could hydrolyze such linkages, named glucuronoyl esterase, occurs in the cellulolytic system of the w...

  8. Monocyte esterase deficiency in malignant neoplasia.

    PubMed Central

    Markey, G M; McCormick, J A; Morris, T C; Alexander, H D; Nolan, L; Morgan, L M; Reynolds, M E; Edgar, S; Bell, A L; McCaigue, M D

    1990-01-01

    A survey of the incidence of monocyte esterase deficiency in 4000 inpatients (including 808 with malignant neoplastic disease) and 474 normal controls was performed using an automated esterase method. A highly significant excess of patients with malignant disease and the deficiency was evident when compared with normal controls or all other patients. Within the group of patients with malignant disease the demonstrable excess occurred in B chronic lymphocytic leukaemia, non-Hodgkin's and Hodgkin's lymphoma, and carcinoma of the gastrointestinal tract. There was also a significant excess of patients with the deficiency attending the renal unit, both among patients who had had renal transplants and those who had not. A familial incidence of monocyte esterase deficiency was found in 19 (35%) of first degree relatives of those patients in whom family studies were done. It is suggested that the reason for the increased prevalence of the anomaly in these disorders might be that the diminution of esterase activity has a role in their development. PMID:2341564

  9. Crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of Axe2, an acetylxylan esterase from Geobacillus stearothermophilus.

    PubMed

    Lansky, Shifra; Alalouf, Onit; Solomon, Vered; Alhassid, Anat; Govada, Lata; Chayen, Naomi E; Chayan, Naomi E; Belrhali, Hassan; Shoham, Yuval; Shoham, Gil

    2013-04-01

    Acetylxylan esterases are part of the hemi-cellulolytic system of many microorganisms which utilize plant biomass for growth. Xylans, which are polymeric sugars that constitute a significant part of the plant biomass, are usually substituted with acetyl side groups attached at position 2 or 3 of the xylose backbone units. Acetylxylan esterases hydrolyse the ester linkages of the xylan acetyl groups and thus improve the ability of main-chain hydrolysing enzymes to break down the sugar backbone units. As such, these enzymes play an important part in the hemi-cellulolytic utilization system of many microorganisms that use plant biomass for growth. Interest in the biochemical characterization and structural analysis of these enzymes stems from their numerous potential biotechnological applications. An acetylxylan esterase (Axe2) of this type from Geobacillus stearothermophilus T-6 has recently been cloned, overexpressed, purified, biochemically characterized and crystallized. One of the crystal forms obtained (RB1) belonged to the tetragonal space group I422, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 110.2, c = 213.1 Å. A full diffraction data set was collected to 1.85 Å resolution from flash-cooled crystals of the wild-type enzyme at 100 K using synchrotron radiation. A selenomethionine derivative of Axe2 has also been prepared and crystallized for single-wavelength anomalous diffraction experiments. The crystals of the selenomethionine-derivatized Axe2 appeared to be isomorphous to those of the wild-type enzyme and enabled the measurement of a full 1.85 Å resolution diffraction data set at the selenium absorption edge and a full 1.70 Å resolution data set at a remote wavelength. These data are currently being used for three-dimensional structure determination of the Axe2 protein.

  10. [3H]Indole-3-acetyl-myo-inositol hydrolysis by extracts of Zea mays L. vegetative tissue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, P. J.; Bandurski, R. S.

    1986-01-01

    [3H]Indole-3-acetyl-myo-inositol was hydrolyzed by buffered extracts of acetone powders prepared from 4 day shoots of dark grown Zea mays L. seedlings. The hydrolytic activity was proportional to the amount of extract added and was linear for up to 6 hours at 37 degrees C. Boiled or alcohol denatured extracts were inactive. Analysis of reaction mixtures by high performance liquid chromatography demonstrated that not all isomers of indole-3-acetyl-myo-inositol were hydrolyzed at the same rate. Buffered extracts of acetone powders were prepared from coleoptiles and mesocotyls. The rates of hydrolysis observed with coleoptile extracts were greater than those observed with mesocotyl extracts. Active extracts also catalyzed the hydrolysis of esterase substrates such as alpha-naphthyl acetate and the methyl esters of indoleacetic acid and naphthyleneacetic acid. Attempts to purify the indole-3-acetyl-myo-inositol hydrolyzing activity by chromatographic procedures resulted in only slight purification with large losses of activity. Chromatography over hydroxylapatite allowed separation of two enzymically active fractions, one of which catalyzed the hydrolysis of both indole-3-acetyl-myo-inositol and esterase substrates. With the other enzymic hydrolysis of esterase substrates was readily demonstrated, but no hydrolysis of indole-3-acetyl-myo-inositol was ever detected.

  11. [3H]Indole-3-acetyl-myo-inositol hydrolysis by extracts of Zea mays L. vegetative tissue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, P. J.; Bandurski, R. S.

    1986-01-01

    [3H]Indole-3-acetyl-myo-inositol was hydrolyzed by buffered extracts of acetone powders prepared from 4 day shoots of dark grown Zea mays L. seedlings. The hydrolytic activity was proportional to the amount of extract added and was linear for up to 6 hours at 37 degrees C. Boiled or alcohol denatured extracts were inactive. Analysis of reaction mixtures by high performance liquid chromatography demonstrated that not all isomers of indole-3-acetyl-myo-inositol were hydrolyzed at the same rate. Buffered extracts of acetone powders were prepared from coleoptiles and mesocotyls. The rates of hydrolysis observed with coleoptile extracts were greater than those observed with mesocotyl extracts. Active extracts also catalyzed the hydrolysis of esterase substrates such as alpha-naphthyl acetate and the methyl esters of indoleacetic acid and naphthyleneacetic acid. Attempts to purify the indole-3-acetyl-myo-inositol hydrolyzing activity by chromatographic procedures resulted in only slight purification with large losses of activity. Chromatography over hydroxylapatite allowed separation of two enzymically active fractions, one of which catalyzed the hydrolysis of both indole-3-acetyl-myo-inositol and esterase substrates. With the other enzymic hydrolysis of esterase substrates was readily demonstrated, but no hydrolysis of indole-3-acetyl-myo-inositol was ever detected.

  12. Effect of nanocoating with rhamnogalacturonan-I on surface properties and osteoblasts response.

    PubMed

    Gurzawska, Katarzyna; Svava, Rikke; Syberg, Susanne; Yihua, Yu; Haugshøj, Kenneth Brian; Damager, Iben; Ulvskov, Peter; Christensen, Leif Højslet; Gotfredsen, Klaus; Jørgensen, Niklas Rye

    2012-03-01

    Long-term stability of titanium implants are dependent on a variety of factors. Nanocoating with organic molecules is one of the methods used to improve osseointegration. Therefore, the aim of this study is to evaluate the in vitro effect of nanocoating with pectic rhamnogalacturonan-I (RG-I) on surface properties and osteoblasts response. Three different RG-Is from apple and lupin pectins were modified and coated on amino-functionalized tissue culture polystyrene plates (aminated TCPS). Surface properties were evaluated by scanning electron microscopy, contact angle measurement, atomic force microscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The effects of nanocoating on proliferation, matrix formation and mineralization, and expression of genes (real-time PCR) related to osteoblast differentiation and activity were tested using human osteoblast-like SaOS-2 cells. It was shown that RG-I coatings affected the surface properties. All three RG-I induced bone matrix formation and mineralization, which was also supported by the finding that gene expression levels of alkaline phosphatase, osteocalcin, and collagen type-1 were increased in cells cultured on the RG-I coated surface, indicating a more differentiated osteoblastic phenotype. This makes RG-I coating a promising and novel candidate for nanocoatings of implants. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Isolation of a lectin binding rhamnogalacturonan-I containing pectic polysaccharide from pumpkin.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jing; Zhang, Fuming; Liu, Xinyue; St Ange, Kalib; Zhang, Anqiang; Li, Quanhong; Linhardt, Robert J

    2017-05-01

    A rhamnogalacturonan-I (RG-I) containing pectic polysaccharide (PPc) was isolated from pumpkin following a low-temperature alkali treatment and a combination of gradual alcohol precipitation and ion-exchange. Monosaccharide compositional analysis of PPc revealed the presence of rhamnose, galacturonic acid, galactose, and arabinose in a molar ratio of 7.4: 25: 28: 2.6. Structural and linkage analysis by 1D NMR ((1)H NMR and (13)C NMR), and 2D NMR (COSY, TOCSY, HSQC, and elevated temperature HMBC) suggested that PPc was a RG-I-like pectic polysaccharide, branched at the C-4 of some of the (about 29% of) rhamnosyl units, with relatively long β-1,4-d-galactan side chains to which were attached, through the C-3 of β-d-Gal, terminal non reducing α-Araf units. The results of surface plasmon resonance (SPR) show that PPc binds to two types of lectin, Ricinus communis agglutinin 120 (RCA120) and Galectin-3 (Gal-3). These binding studies show quick association and slow dissociation with a moderate binding affinity between PPc and Gal-3 of 1.26μM. The interaction between PPc and Gal-3 suggest the potential use of pumpkin pectic polysaccharide as a Gal-3 inhibitor in functional food or drug development applications.

  14. Structural and immunological feature of rhamnogalacturonan I-rich polysaccharide from Korean persimmon vinegar.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hoon; Hong, Hee-Do; Suh, Hyung-Joo; Shin, Kwang-Soon

    2016-08-01

    The crude polysaccharide (KPV-0) isolated from Korean persimmon vinegar was fractionated using gel filtration chromatography to enhance the immunostimulatory activity and to identify the structural features of active fraction. Among three fractions, KPV-I obtained in a void volume, demonstrated the potent production of macrophage-stimulating mediators, including tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin (IL)-6, IL-12, and nitric oxide. KPV-I showed a combined single peak with high molecular weight of 55,000Da by high performance size exclusion chromatography. Component sugar analysis revealed that KPV-I contained mainly of arabinose, mannose, galactose, rhamnose and galacturonic acid. Single radial gel diffusion assay using β-glucosyl Yariv reagent showed that KPV-I contained arabinogalactan protein with 13.7%. Methylation analysis indicated that KPV-I contained 21 kinds of neutral glycosidic linkages, which seemed to be composed three kinds of polysaccharide; that is a rhamnogalacturonan-I (65-70%) derived from persimmon as a raw material, a mannan (20-25%) derived from fermentation-associated microorganisms, and a linear glucans (less than 10%). In conclusion, polysaccharide isolated from persimmon vinegar could augment the macrophage stimulation, and a large amounts of RG-I polysaccharide derived from persimmon is likely a crucial role in expression of the activity in persimmon vinegar. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Extracellular and intracellular esterase processing of SCFA-hexosamine analogs: implications for metabolic glycoengineering and drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Mathew, Mohit P; Tan, Elaine; Shah, Shivam; Bhattacharya, Rahul; Adam Meledeo, M; Huang, Jun; Espinoza, Freddy A; Yarema, Kevin J

    2012-11-15

    This report provides a synopsis of the esterase processing of short chain fatty acid (SCFA)-derivatized hexosamine analogs used in metabolic glycoengineering by demonstrating that the extracellular hydrolysis of these compounds is comparatively slow (e.g., with a t(1/2) of ∼4 h to several days) in normal cell culture as well as in high serum concentrations intended to mimic in vivo conditions. Structure-activity relationship (SAR) analysis of common sugar analogs revealed that O-acetylated and N-azido ManNAc derivatives were more refractory against extracellular inactivation by FBS than their butanoylated counterparts consistent with in silico docking simulations of Ac(4)ManNAc and Bu(4)ManNAc to human carboxylesterase 1 (hCE1). By contrast, all analogs tested supported increased intracellular sialic acid production within 2h establishing that esterase processing once the analogs are taken up by cells is not rate limiting.

  16. Okra pectin contains an unusual substitution of its rhamnosyl residues with acetyl and alpha-linked galactosyl groups.

    PubMed

    Sengkhamparn, Nipaporn; Bakx, Edwin J; Verhoef, René; Schols, Henk A; Sajjaanantakul, Tanaboon; Voragen, Alphons G J

    2009-09-28

    The okra plant, Abelmoschus esculentus (L.) Moench, a native plant from Africa, is now cultivated in many other areas such as Asia, Africa, Middle East, and the southern states of the USA. Okra pods are used as vegetables and as traditional medicines. Sequential extraction showed that the Hot Buffer Soluble Solids (HBSS) extract of okra consists of highly branched rhamnogalacturonan (RG) I containing high levels of acetyl groups and short galactose side chains. In contrast, the CHelating agent Soluble Solids (CHSS) extract contained pectin with less RG I regions and slightly longer galactose side chains. Both pectic populations were incubated with homogeneous and well characterized rhamnogalacturonan hydrolase (RGH), endo-polygalacturonase (PG), and endo-galactanase (endo-Gal), monitoring both high and low molecular weight fragments. RGH is able to degrade saponified HBSS and, to some extent, also non-saponified HBSS, while PG and endo-Gal are hardly able to degrade either HBSS or saponified HBSS. In contrast, PG is successful in degrading CHSS, while RGH and endo-Gal are hardly able to degrade the CHSS structure. These results point to a much higher homogalacturonan (HG) ratio for CHSS when compared to HBSS. In addition, the CHSS contained slightly longer galactan side chains within its RG I region than HBSS. Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry indicated the presence of acetylated RG oligomers in the HBSS and CHSS enzyme digests and electron spray ionization-ion trap-mass spectrum showed that not only galacturonosyl residues but also rhamnosyl residues in RG I oligomers were O-acetylated. NMR spectroscopy showed that all rhamnose residues in a 20kDa HBSS population were O-acetylated at position O-3. Surprisingly, the NMR data also showed that terminal alpha-linked galactosyl groups were present as neutral side chain substituents. Taken together, these results demonstrate that okra contained RG I structures which have not

  17. THE EXCHANGE REACTION OF ACETYL FLUORIDE AND ACETYL HEXAFLUOROARSENATE,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    From the temperature dependence of the exchange rate of the methyl protons between acetyl fluoride and acetyl hexafluoroarsenate an Arrhenius...the reaction was found to be one-half order in acetyl hexafluoroarsenate and zero order in acetyl fluoride. (Author)

  18. Xylella fastidiosa esterase rather than hydroxynitrile lyase.

    PubMed

    Torrelo, Guzman; Ribeiro de Souza, Fayene Zeferino; Carrilho, Emanuel; Hanefeld, Ulf

    2015-03-02

    In 2009, we reported that the product of the gene SCJ21.16 (XFa0032) from Xylella fastidiosa, a xylem-restricted plant pathogen that causes a range of diseases in several important crops, encodes a protein (XfHNL) with putative hydroxynitrile lyase activity. Sequence analysis and activity tests indicated that XfHNL exhibits an α/β-hydrolase fold and could be classified as a member of the family of FAD-independent HNLs. Here we provide a more detailed sequence analysis and new experimental data. Using pure heterologously expressed XfHNL we show that this enzyme cannot catalyse the cleavage/synthesis of mandelonitrile and that this protein is in fact a non-enantioselective esterase. Homology modelling and ligand docking simulations were used to study the active site and support these results. This finding could help elucidate the common ancestor of esterases and hydroxynitrile lyases with an α/β -hydrolase fold.

  19. Identification of putative rhamnogalacturonan-II specific glycosyltransferases in Arabidopsis using a combination of bioinformatics approaches.

    PubMed

    Voxeur, Aline; André, Aurélie; Breton, Christelle; Lerouge, Patrice

    2012-01-01

    Rhamnogalacturonan-II (RG-II) is a complex plant cell wall polysaccharide that is composed of an α(1,4)-linked homogalacturonan backbone substituted with four side chains. It exists in the cell wall in the form of a dimer that is cross-linked by a borate di-ester. Despite its highly complex structure, RG-II is evolutionarily conserved in the plant kingdom suggesting that this polymer has fundamental functions in the primary wall organisation. In this study, we have set up a bioinformatics strategy aimed at identifying putative glycosyltransferases (GTs) involved in RG-II biosynthesis. This strategy is based on the selection of candidate genes encoding type II membrane proteins that are tightly coexpressed in both rice and Arabidopsis with previously characterised genes encoding enzymes involved in the synthesis of RG-II and exhibiting an up-regulation upon isoxaben treatment. This study results in the final selection of 26 putative Arabidopsis GTs, including 10 sequences already classified in the CAZy database. Among these CAZy sequences, the screening protocol allowed the selection of α-galacturonosyltransferases involved in the synthesis of α4-GalA oligogalacturonides present in both homogalacturonans and RG-II, and two sialyltransferase-like sequences previously proposed to be involved in the transfer of Kdo and/or Dha on the pectic backbone of RG-II. In addition, 16 non-CAZy GT sequences were retrieved in the present study. Four of them exhibited a GT-A fold. The remaining sequences harbored a GT-B like fold and a fucosyltransferase signature. Based on homologies with glycosyltransferases of known functions, putative roles in the RG-II biosynthesis are proposed for some GT candidates.

  20. Identification of Putative Rhamnogalacturonan-II Specific Glycosyltransferases in Arabidopsis Using a Combination of Bioinformatics Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Voxeur, Aline; André, Aurélie

    2012-01-01

    Rhamnogalacturonan-II (RG-II) is a complex plant cell wall polysaccharide that is composed of an α(1,4)-linked homogalacturonan backbone substituted with four side chains. It exists in the cell wall in the form of a dimer that is cross-linked by a borate di-ester. Despite its highly complex structure, RG-II is evolutionarily conserved in the plant kingdom suggesting that this polymer has fundamental functions in the primary wall organisation. In this study, we have set up a bioinformatics strategy aimed at identifying putative glycosyltransferases (GTs) involved in RG-II biosynthesis. This strategy is based on the selection of candidate genes encoding type II membrane proteins that are tightly coexpressed in both rice and Arabidopsis with previously characterised genes encoding enzymes involved in the synthesis of RG-II and exhibiting an up-regulation upon isoxaben treatment. This study results in the final selection of 26 putative Arabidopsis GTs, including 10 sequences already classified in the CAZy database. Among these CAZy sequences, the screening protocol allowed the selection of α-galacturonosyltransferases involved in the synthesis of α4-GalA oligogalacturonides present in both homogalacturonans and RG-II, and two sialyltransferase-like sequences previously proposed to be involved in the transfer of Kdo and/or Dha on the pectic backbone of RG-II. In addition, 16 non-CAZy GT sequences were retrieved in the present study. Four of them exhibited a GT-A fold. The remaining sequences harbored a GT-B like fold and a fucosyltransferase signature. Based on homologies with glycosyltransferases of known functions, putative roles in the RG-II biosynthesis are proposed for some GT candidates. PMID:23272088

  1. Plant cell wall degradation by saprophytic Bacillus subtilis strains: gene clusters responsible for rhamnogalacturonan depolymerization.

    PubMed

    Ochiai, Akihito; Itoh, Takafumi; Kawamata, Akiko; Hashimoto, Wataru; Murata, Kousaku

    2007-06-01

    Plant cell wall degradation is a premier event when Bacillus subtilis, a typical saprophytic bacterium, invades plants. Here we show the degradation system of rhamnogalacturonan type I (RG-I), a component of pectin from the plant cell wall, in B. subtilis strain 168. Strain 168 cells showed a significant growth on plant cell wall polysaccharides such as pectin, polygalacturonan, and RG-I as a carbon source. DNA microarray analysis indicated that three gene clusters (yesOPQRSTUVWXYZ, ytePQRST, and ybcMOPST-ybdABDE) are inducibly expressed in strain 168 cells grown on RG-I. Cells of an industrially important bacterium, B. subtilis strain natto, fermenting soybeans also express the gene cluster including the yes series during the assimilation of soybean used as a carbon source. Among proteins encoded in the yes cluster, YesW and YesX were found to be novel types of RG lyases releasing disaccharide from RG-I. Genetic and enzymatic properties of YesW and YesX suggest that strain 168 cells secrete YesW, which catalyzes the initial cleavage of the RG-I main chain, and the resultant oligosaccharides are converted to disaccharides through the extracellular exotype YesX reaction. The disaccharide is finally degraded into its constituent monosaccharides through the reaction of intracellular unsaturated galacturonyl hydrolases YesR and YteR. This enzymatic route for RG-I degradation in strain 168 differs significantly from that in plant-pathogenic fungus Aspergillus aculeatus. This is, to our knowledge, the first report on the bacterial system for complete RG-I main chain degradation.

  2. Plant Cell Wall Degradation by Saprophytic Bacillus subtilis Strains: Gene Clusters Responsible for Rhamnogalacturonan Depolymerization▿

    PubMed Central

    Ochiai, Akihito; Itoh, Takafumi; Kawamata, Akiko; Hashimoto, Wataru; Murata, Kousaku

    2007-01-01

    Plant cell wall degradation is a premier event when Bacillus subtilis, a typical saprophytic bacterium, invades plants. Here we show the degradation system of rhamnogalacturonan type I (RG-I), a component of pectin from the plant cell wall, in B. subtilis strain 168. Strain 168 cells showed a significant growth on plant cell wall polysaccharides such as pectin, polygalacturonan, and RG-I as a carbon source. DNA microarray analysis indicated that three gene clusters (yesOPQRSTUVWXYZ, ytePQRST, and ybcMOPST-ybdABDE) are inducibly expressed in strain 168 cells grown on RG-I. Cells of an industrially important bacterium, B. subtilis strain natto, fermenting soybeans also express the gene cluster including the yes series during the assimilation of soybean used as a carbon source. Among proteins encoded in the yes cluster, YesW and YesX were found to be novel types of RG lyases releasing disaccharide from RG-I. Genetic and enzymatic properties of YesW and YesX suggest that strain 168 cells secrete YesW, which catalyzes the initial cleavage of the RG-I main chain, and the resultant oligosaccharides are converted to disaccharides through the extracellular exotype YesX reaction. The disaccharide is finally degraded into its constituent monosaccharides through the reaction of intracellular unsaturated galacturonyl hydrolases YesR and YteR. This enzymatic route for RG-I degradation in strain 168 differs significantly from that in plant-pathogenic fungus Aspergillus aculeatus. This is, to our knowledge, the first report on the bacterial system for complete RG-I main chain degradation. PMID:17449691

  3. Esterase detoxification of acetylcholinesterase inhibitors by ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Organophosphate (OP) and N-methylcarbamate pesticides inhibit acetylcholinesterase (AChE), but differences in metabolism and detoxification can influence potency of these pesticides across and within species. Carboxylesterase (CaE) and A-esterase (paraoxonase, PON) are considered factors underlying age-related sensitivity differences. We used an in vitro system to measure detoxification of AChE-inhibiting pesticides mediated via these esterases. Recombinant human AChE was used as a bioassay of inhibitor concentration following incubation with detoxifying tissue: liver plus Ca+2 (to stimulate PONs, measuring activity of both esterases) or EGTA (to inhibit PONs, thereby measuring CaE activity). Inhibitory concentrations of aldicarb, chlorpyrifos oxon, malaoxon, methamidophos, oxamyl, paraoxon, and methyl paraoxon were incubated with liver from adult male rat or one of 20 commercially provided human (11-83 years of age) liver samples. Detoxification was the difference in inhibition produced by the pesticide alone or in combination with liver plus Ca+2 or EGTA. Generally, rat liver produced more detoxification than did the human samples. There were large detoxification differences, which were not correlated with age or sex, across human samples for some pesticides (especially malaoxon, chlorpyrifos oxon) but not for others (e.g., aldicarb, methamidophos). Chlorpyrifos oxon was detoxified only in the presence of Ca+2 in both rat and human livers. Detoxification of pa

  4. Biochemical and Structural Analyses of Two Cryptic Esterases in Bacteroides intestinalis and their Synergistic Activities with Cognate Xylanases.

    PubMed

    Wefers, Daniel; Cavalcante, Janaina J V; Schendel, Rachel R; Deveryshetty, Jaigeeth; Wang, Kui; Wawrzak, Zdzislaw; Mackie, Roderick I; Koropatkin, Nicole M; Cann, Isaac

    2017-08-04

    Arabinoxylans are constituents of the human diet. Although not utilizable by the human host, they can be fermented by colonic bacteria. The arabinoxylan backbone is decorated with arabinose side chains that may be substituted with ferulic acid, thus limiting depolymerization to fermentable sugars. We investigated the polypeptides encoded by two genes upregulated during growth of the colonic bacterium Bacteroides intestinalis on wheat arabinoxylan. The recombinant proteins, designated BiFae1A and BiFae1B, were functionally assigned esterase activities. Both enzymes were active on acetylated substrates, although each showed a higher ferulic acid esterase activity on methyl-ferulate. BiFae1A showed a catalytic efficiency of 12mM s(-1) on para-nitrophenyl-acetate, and on methyl-ferulate, the value was 27 times higher. BiFae1B showed low catalytic efficiencies for both substrates. Furthermore, the two enzymes released ferulic acid from various structural elements, and NMR spectroscopy indicated complete de-esterification of arabinoxylan oligosaccharides from wheat bran. BiFae1A is a tetramer based on the crystal structure, whereas BiFae1B is a dimer in solution based on size exclusion chromatography. The structure of BiFae1A was solved to 1.98Å resolution, and two tetramers were observed in the asymmetric unit. A flexible loop that may act as a hinge over the active site and likely coordinates critical interactions with the substrate was prominent in BiFae1A. Sequence alignments of the esterase domains in BiFae1B with the feruloyl esterase from Clostridium thermocellum suggest that both domains lack the flexible hinge in BiFae1A, an observation that may partly provide a molecular basis for the differences in activities in the two esterases. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. A comparative study on esterases from three species of Raillietina.

    PubMed

    Balasubramanian, M P; Dhandayuthapani, S; Nellaiappan, K; Ramalingam, K

    1984-06-01

    The multiplicity of soluble esterases in Raillietina tetragona, R. echinobothrida and R. cesticillus was studied by use of slab polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Five fractions of esterase activity were observed in R. tetragona, seven in R. echinobothrida and three in R. cesticillus. The various fractions of esterase activity of closely related species of Raillietina showed differential behaviour towards various chemicals. Based on the inhibitory effect of inhibitors p-CMB, EDTA, malathion, silver nitrate and eserine sulphate, the various esterases have been classified into arylesterase, carboxylesterase, acetylesterase and cholinesterase.

  6. A p-coumaroyl esterase from Rhizoctonia solani with a pronounced chlorogenic acid esterase activity.

    PubMed

    Nieter, Annabel; Kelle, Sebastian; Linke, Diana; Berger, Ralf G

    2017-07-25

    Extracellular esterase activity was detected in submerged cultures of Rhizoctonia solani grown in the presence of sugar beet pectin or Tween 80. Putative type B feruloyl esterase (FAE) coding sequences found in the genome data of the basidiomycete were heterologously expressed in Pichia pastoris. Recombinant enzyme production on the 5-L bioreactor scale (Rs pCAE: 3245UL(-1)) exceeded the productivity of the wild type strain by a factor of 800. Based on substrate specificity profiling, the purified recombinant Rs pCAE was classified as a p-coumaroyl esterase (pCAE) with a pronounced chlorogenic acid esterase side activity. The Rs pCAE was also active on methyl cinnamate, caffeate and ferulate and on feruloylated saccharides. The unprecedented substrate profile of Rs pCAE together with the lack of sequence similarity to known FAEs or pCAEs suggested that the Rs pCAE represents a new type of enzyme. Hydroxycinnamic acids were released from agro-industrial side-streams, such as destarched wheat bran (DSWB), sugar beet pectin (SBP) and coffee pulp (CP). Overnight incubation of coffee pulp with the Rs pCAE resulted in the efficient release of p-coumaric (100%), caffeic (100%) and ferulic acid (85%) indicating possible applications for the valorization of food processing wastes and for the enhanced degradation of lignified biomass. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Phenyl valerate esterase activity of human butyrylcholinesterase.

    PubMed

    Mangas, Iris; Vilanova, Eugenio; Estévez, Jorge

    2017-03-15

    Phenyl valerate is used for detecting and measuring neuropathy target esterase (NTE) and has been used for discriminating esterases as potential target in hen model of organophosphorus delayed neuropathy. In previous studies we observed that phenyl valerate esterase (PVase) activity of an enzymatic fraction in chicken brain might be due to a butyrylcholinesterase protein (BuChE), and it was suggested that this enzymatic fraction could be related to the potentiation/promotion phenomenon of the organophosphate-induced delayed neuropathy (OPIDN). In this work, PVase activity of purified human butyrylcholinesterase (hBuChE) is demonstrated and confirms the novel observation that a relationship of BuChE with PVase activities is also relevant for humans, as is, therefore the potential role in toxicity for humans. The KM and catalytic constant (kcat) were estimated as 0.52/0.72 µM and 45,900/49,200 min(-1) respectively. Furthermore, this work studies the inhibition by preincubation of PVase and cholinesterase activities of hBuChE with irreversible inhibitors (mipafox, iso-OMPA or PMSF), showing that these inhibitors interact similarly in both activities with similar second-order inhibition constants. Acethylthiocholine and phenyl valerate partly inhibit PVase and cholinesterase activities, respectively. All these observations suggest that both activities occur in the same active center. The interaction with a reversible inhibitor (ethopropazine) showed that the cholinesterase activity was more sensitive than the PVase activity, showing that the sensitivity for this reversible inhibitor is affected by the nature of the substrate. The present work definitively establishes the capacity of BuChE to hydrolyze the carboxylester phenyl valerate using a purified enzyme (hBuChE). Therefore, BuChE should be considered in the research of organophosphorus targets of toxicity related with PVase proteins.

  8. Purification, biochemical characterization, and biological function of human esterase D.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, W H; Wheatley, W; Benedict, W F; Huang, C M; Lee, E Y

    1986-01-01

    Human esterase D (carboxylesterase; carboxylic-ester hydrolase, EC 3.1.1.1), a genetic marker of retinoblastoma, was purified to biochemical homogeneity from erythrocytes. The purification scheme including carboxymethylcellulose, phenyl-Sepharose, chromatofocusing, and hydroxylapatite chromatographies resulted in a 10,000-fold purification of the enzyme with 15% recovery of total activity. The Km of esterase D was estimated to be 10 X 10(-6) M using 4-methylumbelliferyl acetate as substrate. The enzymatic activity was inhibited by p-chloromercuribenzoate and HgCl2, suggesting an important role of SH group(s) in enzyme function. Specific rabbit polyclonal and mouse monoclonal antibodies against esterase D were prepared and recognized either denatured or native human esterase D protein. Moreover, the polyclonal antibodies immunoprecipitated a polypeptide with a molecular mass of about 33-34 kDa from various cell lines of different mammalian species, indicating that the esterase D protein is highly conserved. The highest levels of this enzyme were found in liver and kidney. Furthermore, the expression of esterase D was enhanced 3-fold in a promonocytic cell line treated with phenobarbital but not with phorbol myristate acetate, suggesting that esterase D may have a role in detoxification. The availability of the homogeneous protein and its specific antibodies allows for cloning of the esterase D gene and facilitates studies of retinoblastomas. Images PMID:3462728

  9. Synergistic Enhancement of Cellobiohydrolase Performance on Pretreated Corn Stover by Addition of Xylanase and Esterase Activities

    SciTech Connect

    Selig, M. J.; Knoshaug E. P.; Adney, W. S.; Himmel, M. E.; Decker, S. R.

    2007-11-01

    Significant increases in the depolymerization of corn stover cellulose by cellobiohydrolase I (Cel7A) from Trichoderma reesei were observed using small quantities of non-cellulolytic cell wall-degrading enzymes. Purified endoxylanase (XynA), ferulic acid esterase (FaeA), and acetyl xylan esterase (Axe1) all enhanced Cel7A performance on corn stover subjected to hot water pretreatment. In all cases, the addition of these activities improved the effectiveness of the enzymatic hydrolysis in terms of the quantity of cellulose converted per milligram of total protein. Improvement in cellobiose release by the addition of the non-cellulolytic enzymes ranged from a 13-84% increase over Cel7A alone. The most effective combinations included the addition of both XynA and Axe1, which synergistically enhance xylan conversions resulting in additional synergistic improvements in glucan conversion. Additionally, we note a direct relationship between enzymatic xylan removal in the presence of XynA and the enhancement of cellulose hydrolysis by Cel7A.

  10. Histone acetylation in neurodevelopment.

    PubMed

    Contestabile, Antonio; Sintoni, Silvia

    2013-01-01

    Post-translational modification of histones is a primary mechanism through which epigenetic regulation of DNA transcription does occur. Among these modifications, regulation of histone acetylation state is an important tool to influence gene expression. Epigenetic regulation of neurodevelopment contributes to the structural and functional shaping of the brain during neurogenesis and continues to impact on neural plasticity lifelong. Alterations of these mechanisms during neurodevelopment may result in later occurrence of neuropsychatric disorders. The present paper reviews and discusses available data on histone modifications, in particular histone acetylation, in neurogenesis considering results obtained in culture systems of neural progenitors as well as in in vivo studies. Possible teratogenic effects of altered histone acetylation state during development are also considered. The use during pregnancy of drugs such as valproic acid, which acts as a histone deacetylase inhibitor, may result during postnatal development in autistic-like symptoms. The effect of gestational administration of the drug has been, therefore, tested on adult hippocampal neurogenesis in animals showing behavioral impairment as a consequence of the drug administration at a specific stage of pregnancy. These experimental results show that adult neurogenesis in the hippocampal dentate gyrus is not quantitatively altered by gestational valproic acid administration. Future steps and goals of research on the role and mechanisms of histone acetylation in neurodevelopment are briefly discussed.

  11. Final report on the safety assessment of acetyl triethyl citrate, acetyl tributyl citrate, acetyl trihexyl citrate, and acetyl trioctyl citrate.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Wilbur

    2002-01-01

    Acetyl Triethyl Citrate, Acetyl Tributyl Citrate, Acetyl Trihexyl Citrate, and Acetyl Trioctyl Citrate all function as plasticizers in cosmetics. Additionally, the Trihexyl and Trioctyl forms are described as skin-conditioning agents-emollients, although there are currently no reported uses of Acetyl Trihexyl Citrate or Acetyl Trioctyl Citrate. Acetyl Triethyl Citrate and Acetyl Tributyl Citrate are used in nail products at concentrations up to 7%. Recognizing that there are no reported uses of Acetyl Trihexyl or Trioctyl Citrate, if they were to be used in the future, their concentration of use is expected to be no higher than that reported for Acetyl Triethyl and Tributyl Citrate. These ingredients were sufficiently similar in structure that safety test data on one were considered applicable to all. Approximately 99% of orally administered Acetyl Tributyl Citrate is excreted-intermediate metabolites include acetyl citrate, monobutyl citrate, acetyl monobutyl citrate, dibutyl citrate, and acetyl dibutyl citrate. In acute, short-term, subchronic, and chronic feeding studies, these ingredients were relatively nontoxic. Differences from controls were either not statistically significant or not related to any organ toxicity. Ocular exposures produced moderate reactions that cleared by 48 hours after instillation. Dermal application was not toxic in rabbits. In a guinea pig maximization test, Acetyl Triethyl Citrate was a sensitizer whereas Acetyl Tributyl Citrate was not. Limited clinical testing of Acetyl Triethyl Citrate and Acetyl Tributyl Citrate was negative for both skin irritation and sensitization. These clinical data were considered more relevant than the guinea pig maximization data, suggesting to the Cosmetic Ingredient Review Expert Panel that none of these ingredients would be a sensitizer. Physiologic effects noted with intravenous delivery of Acetyl Triethyl Citrate or Acetyl Tributyl Citrate include dose-related decreases in blood pressure and

  12. Enlarging the substrate portfolio of the thermophilic esterase EST2 from Alicyclobacillus acidocaldarius.

    PubMed

    Pennacchio, Angela; Mandrich, Luigi; Manco, Giuseppe; Trincone, Antonio

    2015-09-01

    The enzymatic regioselective hydrolysis of (a) acetylated mono- to tetrasaccharides of different nature, (b) of acetylated aryl glycosides and (c) of different acetylated nucleosides was studied enlarging the portfolio of substrates that can be employed by the thermophilic esterase EST2 from Alicyclobacillus acidocaldarius. The reactions were optimised to the extent that the amount of enzyme needed was lowered of two orders of magnitude with respect to the previously reported reactions, namely from 4000 to 40 U of enzyme per reaction. New additional solvents were screened and dramatic changes in regioselectivity were observed depending on the amount and type of solvent used. For example, in the presence of 10 % DMF, only two α-D-glucose products 6-OH and 4,6-OH (in a 76:24 ratio) were detected, whereas with 25 % DMF, at least four products of similar amount were observed. This versatility adds specific value to the biocatalyst making possible the design of biocatalytic reactions with different hydrophobic ester substrates. As an additional remarkable example, EST2 catalysed with a good yield and high regioselectivity the hydrolysis of p-nitrophenyl β-D-xylopyranoside triacetate producing only the monoacetylated derivative with acetyl group in 3-O-position, in 2 min. The results with nucleosides as substrates are particularly interesting. The peracetates of 3',5'-di-O-acetylthymidine are converted almost quantitatively (95 %) to the monoacetylated derivative possessing free secondary OH; this regioselectivity is complementary to hydrolysis/alcoholysis reactions catalysed by CAL-B lipase or to other microbial hydrolytic biocatalysts, generally giving products with free primary OH groups. A docking analysis was undertaken with all analysed substrates suggesting a structural interpretation of the results. In most of cases, the best pose of the selected substrate was in line with the observed regioselectivity.

  13. Isolation and characterization of a ferulic acid esterase (Fae1A) from the rumen fungus Anaeromyces mucronatus.

    PubMed

    Qi, M; Wang, P; Selinger, L B; Yanke, L J; Forster, R J; McAllister, T A

    2011-05-01

    A novel ferulic acid esterase gene from rumen fungus Anaeromyces mucronatus was cloned, heteroexpressed in Escherichia coli and characterized. A total of 30 clones exhibiting activity on α-naphthyl acetate (α-NA) were isolated from an A. mucronatus YE505 cDNA library. Sequence analysis revealed that these clones represented two esterase-coding sequences. The gene, fae1A, showed highest amino acid sequence identity to CE family 1 esterases from anaerobic micro-organisms such as Orpinomyces sp., Ruminococcus albus and Clostridium thermocellum. The gene comprised 828 nucleotides encoding a polypeptide of 275 amino acids. The coding sequence was cloned into the pET30a expression vector and overexpressed in E. coli BL21 (DE3). Gene product Fae1A was found to exhibit activity against a number of substrates including naphthyl fatty acid esters, p-nitrophenyl fatty acid esters and hydroxylcinnamic acid esters. Fae1A exhibited a lower K(m) and higher catalytic efficiency (k(cat) /K(m) ) on ferulic acid esters than on α-NA or p-nitrophenyl acetate, suggesting that it has a higher affinity for ethyl and methyl ferulate than for the acetyl esters. It releases ferulic acid and p-coumaric acid from barley straw. Activity of Fae1A was inhibited by the serine-specific protease inhibitor, phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride, indicating that a serine residue plays a role in its activity. To our knowledge, this is the first report of characterization of carbohydrate esterase gene from the genus of Anaeromyces. © 2011 The Authors. Journal of Applied Microbiology © 2011 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  14. The apeE Gene of Salmonella typhimurium Encodes an Outer Membrane Esterase Not Present in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Carinato, Maria E.; Collin-Osdoby, Patricia; Yang, Xioming; Knox, Tina M.; Conlin, Christopher A.; Miller, Charles G.

    1998-01-01

    Salmonella typhimurium apeR mutations lead to overproduction of an outer membrane-associated N-acetyl phenylalanine β-naphthyl ester-cleaving esterase that is encoded by the apeE gene (P. Collin-Osdoby and C. G. Miller, Mol. Gen. Genet. 243:674–680, 1994). This paper reports the cloning and nucleotide sequencing of the S. typhimurium apeE gene as well as some properties of the esterase that it encodes. The predicted product of apeE is a 69.9-kDa protein which is processed to a 67-kDa species by removal of a signal peptide. The predicted amino acid sequence of ApeE indicates that it is a member of the GDSL family of serine esterases/lipases. It is most similar to a lipase excreted by the entomopathogenic bacterium Photorhabdus luminescens. The Salmonella esterase catalyzes the hydrolysis of a variety of fatty acid naphthyl esters and of C6 to C16 fatty acid p-nitrophenyl esters but will not hydrolyze peptide bonds. A rapid diagnostic test reported to be useful in distinguishing Salmonella spp. from related organisms makes use of the ability of Salmonella to hydrolyze the chromogenic ester substrate methyl umbelliferyl caprylate. We report that the apeE gene product is the enzyme in Salmonella uniquely responsible for the hydrolysis of this substrate. Southern blot analysis indicates that Escherichia coli K-12 does not contain a close analog of apeE, and it appears that the apeE gene is contained in a region of DNA present in Salmonella but not in E. coli. PMID:9657991

  15. Novel organic solvent-tolerant esterase isolated by metagenomics: insights into the lipase/esterase classification.

    PubMed

    Berlemont, Renaud; Spee, Olivier; Delsaute, Maud; Lara, Yannick; Schuldes, Jörg; Simon, Carola; Power, Pablo; Daniel, Rolf; Galleni, Moreno

    2013-01-01

    in order to isolate novel organic solvent-tolerant (OST) lipases, a metagenomic library was built using DNA derived from a temperate forest soil sample. A two-step activity-based screening allowed the isolation of a lipolytic clone active in the presence of organic solvents. Sequencing of the plasmid pRBest recovered from the positive clone revealed the presence of a putative lipase/esterase encoding gene. The deduced amino acid sequence (RBest1) contains the conserved lipolytic enzyme signature and is related to the previously described OST lipase from Lysinibacillus sphaericus 205y, which is the sole studied prokaryotic enzyme belonging to the 4.4 α/β hydrolase subgroup (abH04.04). Both in vivo and in vitro studies of the substrate specificity of RBest1, using triacylglycerols or nitrophenyl-esters, respectively, revealed that the enzyme is highly specific for butyrate (C4) compounds, behaving as an esterase rather than a lipase. The RBest1 esterase was purified and biochemically characterized. The optimal esterase activity was observed at pH 6.5 and at temperatures ranging from 38 to 45 °C. Enzymatic activity, determined by hydrolysis of p-nitrophenyl esters, was found to be affected by the presence of different miscible and non-miscible organic solvents, and salts. Noteworthy, RBest1 remains significantly active at high ionic strength. These findings suggest that RBest1 possesses the ability of OST enzymes to molecular adaptation in the presence of organic compounds and resistance of halophilic proteins.

  16. Properties, structure, and applications of microbial sterol esterases.

    PubMed

    Vaquero, Maria Eugenia; Barriuso, Jorge; Martínez, María Jesús; Prieto, Alicia

    2016-03-01

    According to their substrate preferences, carboxylic ester hydrolases are organized in smaller clusters. Among them, sterol esterases (EC 3.1.1.13), also known as cholesterol esterases, act on fatty acid esters of cholesterol and other sterols in aqueous media, and are also able to catalyze synthesis by esterification or transesterification in the presence of organic solvents. Mammalian cholesterol esterases are intracellular enzymes that have been extensively studied since they are essential in lipid metabolism and cholesterol absorption, and the natural role of some microbial sterol esterases is supposed to be similar. However, besides these intracellular enzymes, a number of microbes produce extracellular sterol esterases, which show broad stability, selectivity, or wide substrate specificity, making them interesting for the industry. In spite of this, there is little information about microbial sterol esterases, and only a small amount of them have been characterized. Some of the most commercially exploited cholesterol esterases are produced by Pseudomonas species and by Candida rugosa, although in the last case they are usually described and named as "high substrate versatility lipases." From a structural point of view, most of them belong to the α/β-hydrolase superfamily and have a conserved "catalytic triad" formed by His, an acidic amino acid and a Ser residue that is located in a highly conserved GXSXG sequence. In this review, the information available on microbial sterol esterases has been gathered, taking into account their origin, production and purification, heterologous expression, structure, stability, or substrate specificity, which are the main properties that make them attractive for different applications. Moreover, a comprehensive phylogenetic analysis on available sequences of cholesterol esterases has been done, including putative sequences deduced from public genomes.

  17. Juvenile hormone esterase: biochemistry and structure

    PubMed Central

    Kamita, Shizuo G.; Hammock, Bruce D.

    2013-01-01

    Synopsis Normal insect development requires a precisely timed, precipitous drop in hemolymph juvenile hormone (JH) titer. This drop occurs through a coordinated halt in JH biosynthesis and increase in JH metabolism. In many species, JH esterase (JHE) is critical for metabolism of the resonance-stabilized methyl ester of JH. JHE metabolizes JH with a high kcat/KM ratio that results primarily from an exceptionally low KM. Here we review the biochemistry and structure of authentic and recombinant JHEs from six insect orders, and present updated diagnostic criteria that help to distinguish JHEs from other carboxylesterases. The use of a JHE-encoding gene to improve the insecticidal efficacy of biopesticides is also discussed. PMID:23543805

  18. Esterase activity during the life cycle of Blastocladiella emersonii.

    PubMed Central

    Barbieri, C L; Camargo, E P

    1975-01-01

    Total esterase activity was measured in extracts on Blastocladiella throughout its life cycle by the degradation of alpha-naphthyl acetate. A fivefold incease in activity, apparently due to the synthesis of new enzymes, was found during sporulation. PMID:1194246

  19. Characterization of a Feruloyl Esterase from Lactobacillus plantarum

    PubMed Central

    Esteban-Torres, María; Reverón, Inés; Mancheño, José Miguel; de las Rivas, Blanca

    2013-01-01

    Lactobacillus plantarum is frequently found in the fermentation of plant-derived food products, where hydroxycinnamoyl esters are abundant. L. plantarum WCFS1 cultures were unable to hydrolyze hydroxycinnamoyl esters; however, cell extracts from the strain partially hydrolyze methyl ferulate and methyl p-coumarate. In order to discover whether the protein Lp_0796 is the enzyme responsible for this hydrolytic activity, it was recombinantly overproduced and enzymatically characterized. Lp_0796 is an esterase that, among other substrates, is able to efficiently hydrolyze the four model substrates for feruloyl esterases (methyl ferulate, methyl caffeate, methyl p-coumarate, and methyl sinapinate). A screening test for the detection of the gene encoding feruloyl esterase Lp_0796 revealed that it is generally present among L. plantarum strains. The present study constitutes the description of feruloyl esterase activity in L. plantarum and provides new insights into the metabolism of hydroxycinnamic compounds in this bacterial species. PMID:23793626

  20. Evaluating Prodrug Strategies for Esterase-Triggered Release of Alcohols

    PubMed Central

    Perez, Christian; Daniel, Kevin B.

    2013-01-01

    Prodrugs are effective tools in overcoming drawbacks typically associated with drug formulation and delivery. Those employing esterase-triggered functional groups are frequently utilized to mask polar carboxylic acids and phenols, increasing drug-like properties such as lipophilicity. Herein we detail a comprehensive assessment for strategies that effectively release hydroxyl and phenolic moieties in the presence of an esterase. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) serve as our proof-of-concept target. Three distinct ester-responsive protecting groups are incorporated into MMP proinhibitors containing hydroxyl moieties. Analytical evaluation of the proinhibitors demonstrates that the use of a benzyl ether group appended to the esterase trigger leads to considerably faster kinetics of conversion and enhanced aqueous stability when compared to more conventional approaches where the trigger is directly attached to the inhibitor. Biological assays confirm that all protecting groups effectively cleave in the presence of esterase to generate the active inhibitor. PMID:23929690

  1. Esterase mutation is a mechanism of resistance to antimalarial compounds

    PubMed Central

    Istvan, Eva S.; Mallari, Jeremy P.; Corey, Victoria C.; Dharia, Neekesh V.; Marshall, Garland R.; Winzeler, Elizabeth A.; Goldberg, Daniel E.

    2017-01-01

    Pepstatin is a potent peptidyl inhibitor of various malarial aspartic proteases, and also has parasiticidal activity. Activity of pepstatin against cultured Plasmodium falciparum is highly variable depending on the commercial source. Here we identify a minor contaminant (pepstatin butyl ester) as the active anti-parasitic principle. We synthesize a series of derivatives and characterize an analogue (pepstatin hexyl ester) with low nanomolar activity. By selecting resistant parasite mutants, we find that a parasite esterase, PfPARE (P. falciparum Prodrug Activation and Resistance Esterase) is required for activation of esterified pepstatin. Parasites with esterase mutations are resistant to pepstatin esters and to an open source antimalarial compound, MMV011438. Recombinant PfPARE hydrolyses pepstatin esters and de-esterifies MMV011438. We conclude that (1) pepstatin is a potent but poorly bioavailable antimalarial; (2) PfPARE is a functional esterase that is capable of activating prodrugs; (3) Mutations in PfPARE constitute a mechanism of antimalarial resistance. PMID:28106035

  2. Nucleosome acetylation sequencing to study the establishment of chromatin acetylation.

    PubMed

    Mittal, Chitvan; Blacketer, Melissa J; Shogren-Knaak, Michael A

    2014-07-15

    The establishment of posttranslational chromatin modifications is a major mechanism for regulating how genomic DNA is utilized. However, current in vitro chromatin assays do not monitor histone modifications at individual nucleosomes. Here we describe a strategy, nucleosome acetylation sequencing, that allows us to read the amount of modification at each nucleosome. In this approach, a bead-bound trinucleosome substrate is enzymatically acetylated with radiolabeled acetyl CoA by the SAGA complex from Saccharomyces cerevisae. The product is digested by restriction enzymes that cut at unique sites between the nucleosomes and then counted to quantify the extent of acetylation at each nucleosomal site. We find that we can sensitively, specifically, and reproducibly follow enzyme-mediated nucleosome acetylation. Applying this strategy, when acetylation proceeds extensively, its distribution across nucleosomes is relatively uniform. However, when substrates are used that contain nucleosomes mutated at the major sites of SAGA-mediated acetylation, or that are studied under initial rate conditions, changes in the acetylation distribution can be observed. Nucleosome acetylation sequencing should be applicable to analyzing a wide range of modifications. Additionally, because our trinucleosomes synthesis strategy is highly modular and efficient, it can be used to generate nucleosomal systems in which nucleosome composition differs across the array.

  3. Distribution of O-Acetylated Sialic Acids among Target Host Tissues for Influenza Virus

    PubMed Central

    Barnard, Karen N.; Ossiboff, Robert J.; Khedri, Zahra; Feng, Kurtis H.; Yu, Hai; Chen, Xi; Varki, Ajit

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Sialic acids (Sias) are important glycans displayed on the cells and tissues of many different animals and are frequent targets for binding and modification by pathogens, including influenza viruses. Influenza virus hemagglutinins bind Sias during the infection of their normal hosts, while the encoded neuraminidases and/or esterases remove or modify the Sia to allow virion release or to prevent rebinding. Sias naturally occur in a variety of modified forms, and modified Sias can alter influenza virus host tropisms through their altered interactions with the viral glycoproteins. However, the distribution of modified Sia forms and their effects on pathogen-host interactions are still poorly understood. Here we used probes developed from viral Sia-binding proteins to detect O-acetylated (4-O-acetyl, 9-O-acetyl, and 7,9-O-acetyl) Sias displayed on the tissues of some natural or experimental hosts for influenza viruses. These modified Sias showed highly variable displays between the hosts and tissues examined. The 9-O-acetyl (and 7,9-) modified Sia forms were found on cells and tissues of many hosts, including mice, humans, ferrets, guinea pigs, pigs, horses, dogs, as well as in those of ducks and embryonated chicken egg tissues and membranes, although in variable amounts. The 4-O-acetyl Sias were found in the respiratory tissues of fewer animals, being primarily displayed in the horse and guinea pig, but were not detected in humans or pigs. The results suggest that these Sia variants may influence virus tropisms by altering and selecting their cell interactions. IMPORTANCE Sialic acids (Sias) are key glycans that control or modulate many normal cell and tissue functions while also interacting with a variety of pathogens, including many different viruses. Sias are naturally displayed in a variety of different forms, with modifications at several positions that can alter their functional interactions with pathogens. In addition, Sias are often modified or

  4. Distribution of O-Acetylated Sialic Acids among Target Host Tissues for Influenza Virus.

    PubMed

    Wasik, Brian R; Barnard, Karen N; Ossiboff, Robert J; Khedri, Zahra; Feng, Kurtis H; Yu, Hai; Chen, Xi; Perez, Daniel R; Varki, Ajit; Parrish, Colin R

    2017-01-01

    Sialic acids (Sias) are important glycans displayed on the cells and tissues of many different animals and are frequent targets for binding and modification by pathogens, including influenza viruses. Influenza virus hemagglutinins bind Sias during the infection of their normal hosts, while the encoded neuraminidases and/or esterases remove or modify the Sia to allow virion release or to prevent rebinding. Sias naturally occur in a variety of modified forms, and modified Sias can alter influenza virus host tropisms through their altered interactions with the viral glycoproteins. However, the distribution of modified Sia forms and their effects on pathogen-host interactions are still poorly understood. Here we used probes developed from viral Sia-binding proteins to detect O-acetylated (4-O-acetyl, 9-O-acetyl, and 7,9-O-acetyl) Sias displayed on the tissues of some natural or experimental hosts for influenza viruses. These modified Sias showed highly variable displays between the hosts and tissues examined. The 9-O-acetyl (and 7,9-) modified Sia forms were found on cells and tissues of many hosts, including mice, humans, ferrets, guinea pigs, pigs, horses, dogs, as well as in those of ducks and embryonated chicken egg tissues and membranes, although in variable amounts. The 4-O-acetyl Sias were found in the respiratory tissues of fewer animals, being primarily displayed in the horse and guinea pig, but were not detected in humans or pigs. The results suggest that these Sia variants may influence virus tropisms by altering and selecting their cell interactions. IMPORTANCE Sialic acids (Sias) are key glycans that control or modulate many normal cell and tissue functions while also interacting with a variety of pathogens, including many different viruses. Sias are naturally displayed in a variety of different forms, with modifications at several positions that can alter their functional interactions with pathogens. In addition, Sias are often modified or removed by

  5. STAT5 acetylation

    PubMed Central

    Kosan, Christian; Ginter, Torsten; Heinzel, Thorsten; Krämer, Oliver H

    2013-01-01

    The cytokine-inducible transcription factors signal transducer and activator of transcription 5A and 5B (STAT5A and STAT5B) are important for the proper development of multicellular eukaryotes. Disturbed signaling cascades evoking uncontrolled expression of STAT5 target genes are associated with cancer and immunological failure. Here, we summarize how STAT5 acetylation is integrated into posttranslational modification networks within cells. Moreover, we focus on how inhibitors of deacetylases and tyrosine kinases can correct leukemogenic signaling nodes involving STAT5. Such small molecules can be exploited in the fight against neoplastic diseases and immunological disorders. PMID:24416653

  6. Histone acetylation in insect chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Allfrey, V G; Pogo, B G; Littau, V C; Gershey, E L; Mirsky, A E

    1968-01-19

    Acetylation of histones takes place along the salivary gland chromosomes of Chironomus thummi when RNA synthesis is active. It can be observed but not measured quantitatively by autoradiography of chromosome squashes. The "fixatives" commonly used in preparing squashes of insect chromosomes preferentially extract the highly acetylated "arginine-rich" histone fractions; the use of such fixatives may explain the reported absence of histone acetylation in Drosophila melanogaster.

  7. The catalytic triad of the influenza C virus glycoprotein HEF esterase: characterization by site-directed mutagenesis and functional analysis.

    PubMed

    Pleschka, S; Klenk, H D; Herrler, G

    1995-10-01

    Influenza C virus is able to inactivate its own cellular receptors by virtue of a sialate 9-O-acetylesterase that releases the acetyl residue at position C-9 of N-acetyl-9-O-acetylneuraminic acid (Neu5,9Ac2). The receptor-destroying enzyme activity is a function of the surface glycoprotein HEF and this esterase belongs to the class of serine hydrolases. In their active site, these enzymes contain a catalytic triad made up of a serine, a histidine and an aspartic acid residue. Sequence comparison with other serine esterases has indicated that, in addition to serine-71 (S71), the amino acids histidine-368 or -369 (H368/369) and aspartic acid 261 (D261) are the most likely candidates to form the catalytic triad of the influenza C virus glycoprotein. By site-directed mutagenesis, mutants were generated in which alanine substituted for either of these amino acids. Using a phagemid expression vector, pSP1D-HEF the HEF gene was expressed in both COS 7 and MDCK I cells. The glycoprotein was obtained in a functional form only in the latter cells, as indicated by its transport to the cell surface and measurable enzyme activity. The low level of expression could be increased by stimulating the NF-KB-binding activity of the cytomegalovirus immediate-early promoter/enhancer element of the vector. The esterase activity of the mutant proteins was compared with that of the wild-type glycoprotein. With Neu5,9Ac2 as the substrate, the esterase specific activities of the S71/A mutant and the H368,369/A mutant were reduced by more than 90%. In the case of the D261/A mutant the specific activity was reduced by 64%. From this data we conclude that S71, H368/369 and D261 are likely to represent the catalytic triad of the influenza C virus glycoprotein HEF. In addition, N280 is proposed to stabilize the oxyanion of the presumptive transition state intermediate formed by the enzyme-substrate complex.

  8. Loss of Highly Branched Arabinans and Debranching of Rhamnogalacturonan I Accompany Loss of Firm Texture and Cell Separation during Prolonged Storage of Apple1

    PubMed Central

    Peña, María J.; Carpita, Nicholas C.

    2004-01-01

    Growth and maturation of the edible cortical cells of apples (Malus domestica Borkh) are accompanied by a selective loss of pectin-associated (1→4)-β-d-galactan from the cell walls, whereas a selective loss of highly branched (1→5)-α-l-arabinans occurs after ripening and in advance of the loss of firm texture. The selective loss of highly branched arabinans occurs during the overripening of apples of four cultivars (Gala, Red Delicious, Firm Gold, and Gold Rush) that varied markedly in storage life, but, in all instances, the loss prestages the loss of firm texture, measured by both breaking strength and compression resistance. The unbranched (1→5)-linked arabinans remain associated with the major pectic polymer, rhamnogalacturonan I, and their content remains essentially unchanged during overripening. However, the degree of rhamnogalacturonan I branching at the rhamnosyl residues also decreases, but only after extensive loss of the highly branched arabinans. In contrast to the decrease in arabinan content, the loss of the rhamnogalacturonan I branching is tightly correlated with loss of firm texture in all cultivars, regardless of storage time. In vitro cell separation assays show that structural proteins, perhaps via their phenolic residues, and homogalacturonans also contribute to cell adhesion. Implications of these cell wall modifications in the mechanisms of apple cortex textural changes and cell separation are discussed. PMID:15247384

  9. Digestibility and prebiotic properties of potato rhamnogalacturonan I polysaccharide and its galactose-rich oligosaccharides/oligomers.

    PubMed

    Khodaei, Nastaran; Fernandez, Benoit; Fliss, Ismail; Karboune, Salwa

    2016-01-20

    Galactose-rich oligosaccharides/oligomers (oligo-RG I) were produced by the enzymatic treatment of potato galactan-rich rhamnogalacturonan I (RG I) with endo-β-1,4-galactanase and Depol 670L multi-enzymatic preparation. The digestibility study revealed that 81.6 and 79.3% of RG I and its corresponding oligomers remained unhydrolyzed, respectively. The prebiotic properties of RG I and its hydrolysates were investigated using a continuous culture system inoculated with immobilized fecal microbiota. Both RG I and oligo-RG I have stimulated the growth of Bifidobacterium spp. and Lactobacillus spp., with oligo-RG I hydrolysates being more selectively fermented by these beneficial bacteria. Furthermore, none of RG I nor its hydrolysates increased the populations of Bacteroidetes and Clostridium leptum. Total amounts of short chain fatty acids, generated upon the fermentation of oligo-RG I, were higher than those obtained with its parent RG I and the positive control (fructooligosaccharides). The overall study contributes to the understandings of the prebiotic properties of potato RG I and its corresponding oligosaccharides/oligomers.

  10. Gelation of rhamnogalacturonan I is based on galactan side chain interaction and does not involve chemical modifications.

    PubMed

    Mikshina, Polina V; Makshakova, Olga N; Petrova, Anna A; Gaifullina, Ilzira Z; Idiyatullin, Bulat Z; Gorshkova, Tatyana A; Zuev, Yuriy F

    2017-09-01

    The article presents the structural principles of microwave-induced formation of new gel type from pectic rhamnogalacturonan I (RG-I). The backbone of gel-forming RG-I does not contain consecutive galacturonic residues and modifying groups that can be the cause of junction zone formation as it occurs in course of classical ways of pectin gelation. Microwave irradiation does not cause destruction and chemical modifications of RG-I. Removal of half of galactan chains from RG-I leads to loss of gelling capability pointing out on their leading role in this process. Rising of intensity of the bands attributed to galactose and glycosidic linkages in RG-I gel comparing to solution where this polymer exists as molecule associate indicates that the spatial organization of galactans in gel is changed. A model of the RG-I gelation is proposed: being destabilized at volumetric microwave heating RG-I associates are repacked forming network where RG-I molecules are entangled by galactan chains. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. A new structural element containing glycine-rich proteins and rhamnogalacturonan I in the protoxylem of seed plants.

    PubMed

    Ryser, Ulrich; Schorderet, Martine; Guyot, Romain; Keller, Beat

    2004-03-01

    The water pipes of elongating plant organs are the result of programmed cell death and are formed by the walls of dead and empty protoxylem elements. These protoxylem elements are passively elongated many times by the surrounding tissue before they are replaced and collapse. Well-known adaptations for this unique task include the characteristic secondary wall thickenings, forming rings and helices. A new, clearly distinct structural element containing glycine-rich proteins is now visualized for the first time, using confocal laser scanning microscopy in the mature protoxylem of elongating organs of seed plants. This structural element is arranged along the longitudinal axis of the protoxylem elements. It interconnects the secondary wall thickenings within and between protoxylem elements, as well as the protoxylem with other cell types such as xylem parenchyma cells and metaxylem elements. The structural element is stable against detergent extractions, proteinase, pectinase and cellulase hydrolysis, and is closely associated with rhamnogalacturonan-I, a pectic polysaccharide. The results clearly demonstrate that the cell wall of protoxylem cells is a highly dynamic and complex structure. The typical polysaccharide-rich primary wall of living and elongating plant cells is progressively modified and finally replaced by a protein-rich wall in the dead and passively stretched protoxylem elements. These glycine-rich walls originated early in the evolution of the seed plants as confirmed by the analysis of genomic information.

  12. Borate-Rhamnogalacturonan II Bonding Reinforced by Ca2+ Retains Pectic Polysaccharides in Higher-Plant Cell Walls1

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Masaru; Nakagawa, Hironobu; Asaka, Tomoyuki; Matoh, Toru

    1999-01-01

    The extent of in vitro formation of the borate-dimeric-rhamnogalacturonan II (RG-II) complex was stimulated by Ca2+. The complex formed in the presence of Ca2+ was more stable than that without Ca2+. A naturally occurring boron (B)-RG-II complex isolated from radish (Raphanus sativus L. cv Aokubi-daikon) root contained equimolar amounts of Ca2+ and B. Removal of the Ca2+ by trans-1,2-diaminocyclohexane-N,N,N′,N′-tetraacetic acid induced cleavage of the complex into monomeric RG-II. These data suggest that Ca2+ is a normal component of the B-RG-II complex. Washing the crude cell walls of radish roots with a 1.5% (w/v) sodium dodecyl sulfate solution, pH 6.5, released 98% of the tissue Ca2+ but only 13% of the B and 22% of the pectic polysaccharides. The remaining Ca2+ was associated with RG-II. Extraction of the sodium dodecyl sulfate-washed cell walls with 50 mm trans-1,2-diaminocyclohexane-N,N,N′,N′-tetraacetic acid, pH 6.5, removed the remaining Ca2+, 78% of B, and 49% of pectic polysaccharides. These results suggest that not only Ca2+ but also borate and Ca2+ cross-linking in the RG-II region retain so-called chelator-soluble pectic polysaccharides in cell walls. PMID:9880361

  13. Microwave-assisted alkaline extraction of galactan-rich rhamnogalacturonan I from potato cell wall by-product.

    PubMed

    Khodaei, Nastaran; Karboune, Salwa; Orsat, Valérie

    2016-01-01

    Galactan-rich rhamnogalacturonan I (RG I), exhibiting promising health benefits, is the most abundant polysaccharide in potato pulp by-product. In the present study, the microwave-assisted alkaline extraction of galactan-rich RG I was investigated. Solid/liquid ratio was identified as the most significant parameter affecting linearly yield and galactose/rhamnose contents. Microwave power and solid/liquid ratio exhibited a significant adverse interactive effect on the yield. Galactose content of extracted polysaccharides can be modulated by compromising between KOH concentration and extraction time, which exhibited adverse interaction. Optimum conditions were identified using the established predicted models and consisted of treatment of potato cell wall at solid/liquid ratio of 2.9% (w/v) with 1.5M KOH under microwave power of 36.0 W for 2.0 min. Yield of intact galactan-rich RG I of 21.6% and productivity of 192.0 g/Lh were achieved. The functional properties of RG I-rich polysaccharides were comparable or superior to potato galactan and oranges homogalacturonan. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Structural characterization of a rhamnogalacturonan I-arabinan-type I arabinogalactan macromolecule from starfruit (Averrhoa carambola L.).

    PubMed

    Leivas, Carolina Lopes; Iacomini, Marcello; Cordeiro, Lucimara M C

    2015-05-05

    A structural characterization of polysaccharides obtained from edible tropical fruit named starfruit (Averrhoa carambola L.) was carried out. After fractionation by freeze-thaw and Fehling precipitation, a pectic polysaccharide was obtained. It was composed of rhamnose, arabinose, galactose and uronic acid in the 5.0:72.5:12.1:10.4 molar ratios, respectively. A combination of monosaccharide, GPC, methylation and NMR analysis and enzymatic hydrolysis with endo-β-(1→4)-D-galactanase showed the presence of a rhamnogalacturonan I to which a branched arabinan and a type I arabinogalactan are attached. The arabinan moiety was formed by (1→5)-linked α-L-Araf units in the backbone, branched only at O-3 by (1→2)- and (1→3)-linked α-L-Araf units, while the type I arabinogalactan was formed by (1→4)- and (1→4,6)-linked β-D-Galp units in the backbone with (1→5)-, (1→3,5)- and (1→3)-linked α-L-Araf units as side chains.

  15. An esterase gene from Lactobacillus casei cotranscribed with genes encoding a phosphoenolpyruvate:sugar phosphotransferase system and regulated by a LevR-like activator and sigma54 factor.

    PubMed

    Yebra, María J; Viana, Rosa; Monedero, Vicente; Deutscher, Josef; Pérez-Martínez, Gaspar

    2004-01-01

    A new esterase-encoding gene was found in the draft genome sequence of Lactobacillus casei BL23 (CECT5275). It is located in an operon together with genes encoding the EIIA, EIIB, EIIC, and EIID proteins of a mannose class phosphoenolpyruvate:sugar phosphotransferase system. After overproduction in Escherichia coli and purification, the esterase could hydrolyze acetyl sugars, hence the operon was named esu for esterase-sugar uptake genes. Upstream of the genes encoding the EII components (esuABCD) and the esterase (esuE), two genes transcribed in the opposite sense were found which encode a Bacillus subtilis LevR-like transcriptional activator (esuR) and a sigma54-like transcriptional factor (rpoN). As compared with the wild-type strain, elevated fructose phosphorylation was detected in L. casei mutants constitutively expressing the esu operon. However, none of the many sugars tested could induce the esu operon. The fact that EsuE exhibits esterase activity on acetyl sugars suggests that this operon could be involved in the uptake and metabolism of esterified sugars. Expression of the esu operon is similar to that of the B. subtilis lev operon: it contains a -12,-24 consensus promoter typical of sigma54-regulated genes, and EsuR and RpoN are essential for its transcription which is negatively regulated by EIIB(Esu). The esuABCDE transcription unit represents the first sigma54-regulated operon in lactobacilli. Furthermore, replacement of His852 in the phosphoenolpyruvate:sugar phosphotransferase system regulation domain II of EsuR with Ala indicated that the transcription activator function of EsuR is inhibited by EIIB(Esu)-mediated phosphorylation at His852.

  16. Cell-bound lipase and esterase of Brevibacterium linens.

    PubMed

    Sorhaug, T; Ordal, Z J

    1974-03-01

    The activities of glycerol ester hydrolase, lipase (EC 3.1.1.3) and carboxylesterase, and esterase (EC 3.1.1.1) were determined for whole cell preparations of Brevibacterium linens by using the pH-stat assay. The culture growth liquors were inactive against the three substrates, tributyrin emulsion, triacetin, and methyl butyrate. Cells washed in water had less activity than cells washed in 5% NaCl; the ratio of activities was close to 1:2 for all strains using tributyrin emulsion as the substrate. For the esterase substrates, this relationship varied widely and was strain dependent. The ability to hydrolyze the two esterase substrates varied independently of the level of lipase activity.

  17. Histone acetylation in heterochromatin assembly

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jeong-Hoon; Workman, Jerry L.

    2010-01-01

    Histone acetylation is generally considered a mark involved in activating gene expression by making chromatin structures less compact. In the April 1, 2010, issue of Genes & Development, Xhemalce and Kouzarides (pp. 647–652) demonstrate that the acetylation of histone H3 at Lys 4 (H3K4) plays a role in the formation of repressive heterochromatin in Schizosaccharomyces pombe. H3K4 acetylation mediates a switch of chromodomain proteins associated with methylated H3K9 during heterochromatin assembly. PMID:20395362

  18. Acetylation dynamics and stoichiometry in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Weinert, Brian T; Iesmantavicius, Vytautas; Moustafa, Tarek; Schölz, Christian; Wagner, Sebastian A; Magnes, Christoph; Zechner, Rudolf; Choudhary, Chunaram

    2014-01-01

    Lysine acetylation is a frequently occurring posttranslational modification; however, little is known about the origin and regulation of most sites. Here we used quantitative mass spectrometry to analyze acetylation dynamics and stoichiometry in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We found that acetylation accumulated in growth-arrested cells in a manner that depended on acetyl-CoA generation in distinct subcellular compartments. Mitochondrial acetylation levels correlated with acetyl-CoA concentration in vivo and acetyl-CoA acetylated lysine residues nonenzymatically in vitro. We developed a method to estimate acetylation stoichiometry and found that the vast majority of mitochondrial and cytoplasmic acetylation had a very low stoichiometry. However, mitochondrial acetylation occurred at a significantly higher basal level than cytoplasmic acetylation, consistent with the distinct acetylation dynamics and higher acetyl-CoA concentration in mitochondria. High stoichiometry acetylation occurred mostly on histones, proteins present in histone acetyltransferase and deacetylase complexes, and on transcription factors. These data show that a majority of acetylation occurs at very low levels in exponentially growing yeast and is uniformly affected by exposure to acetyl-CoA.

  19. Three-dimensional structure of homodimeric cholesterol esterase-ligand complex at 1.4 Å resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Pletnev, V.; Addlagatta, A.; Wawrzak, Z.; Duax, W.

    2010-03-08

    The three-dimensional structure of a Candida cylindracea cholesterol esterase (ChE) homodimer (534 x 2 amino acids) in complex with a ligand of proposed formula C{sub 23}H{sub 48}O{sub 2} has been determined at 1.4 {angstrom} resolution in space group P1 using synchrotron low-temperature data. The structure refined to R = 0.136 and R{sub free} = 0.169 and has revealed new stereochemical details in addition to those detected for the apo- and holo-forms at 1.9 and 2.0 {angstrom} resolution, respectively [Ghosh et al. (1995), Structure, 3, 279-288]. The cholesterol esterase structure is a dimer with four spatially separated interfacial contact areas and two symmetry-related pairs of openings to an internal intradimer cavity. Hydrophobic active-site gorges in each subunit face each other across a central interfacial cavity. The ChE subunits have carbohydrate chains attached to their Asn314 and Asn351 residues, with two ordered N-acetyl-D-glucosoamine moieties visible at each site. The side chains of 14 residues have two alternative conformations with occupancy values of 0.5 {+-} 0.2. For each subunit the electron density in the enzyme active-site gorge is well modeled by a C{sub 23}-chain fatty acid.

  20. New insights on molecular interactions of organophosphorus pesticides with esterases.

    PubMed

    Mangas, Iris; Estevez, Jorge; Vilanova, Eugenio; França, Tanos Celmar Costa

    2017-02-01

    Organophosphorus compounds (OPs) are a large and diverse class of chemicals mainly used as pesticides and chemical weapons. People may be exposed to OPs in several occasions, which can produce several distinct neurotoxic effects depending on the dose, frequency of exposure, type of OP, and the host factors that influence susceptibility and sensitivity. These neurotoxic effects are mainly due to the interaction with enzyme targets involved in toxicological or detoxication pathways. In this work, the toxicological relevance of known OPs targets is reviewed. The main enzyme targets of OPs have been identified among the serine hydrolase protein family, some of them decades ago (e.g. AChE, BuChE, NTE and carboxylesterases), others more recently (e.g. lysophospholipase, arylformidase and KIA1363) and others which are not molecularly identified yet (e.g. phenylvalerate esterases). Members of this family are characterized by displaying serine hydrolase activity, containing a conserved serine hydrolase motif and having an alpha-beta hydrolase fold. Improvement in Xray-crystallography and in silico methods have generated new data of the interactions between OPs and esterases and have established new methods to study new inhibitors and reactivators of cholinesterases. Mass spectrometry for AChE, BChE and APH have characterized the active site serine adducts with OPs being useful to detect biomarkers of OPs exposure and inhibitory and postinhibitory reactions of esterases and OPs. The purpose of this review is focus specifically on the interaction of OP with esterases, mainly with type B-esterases, which are able to hydrolyze carboxylesters but inhibited by OPs by covalent phosphorylation on the serine or tyrosine residue in the active sites. Other related esterases in some cases with no-irreversible effect are also discussed. The understanding of the multiple molecular interactions is the basis we are proposing for a multi-target approach for understanding the

  1. Glycosylinositol phosphorylceramides from Rosa cell cultures are boron-bridged in the plasma membrane and form complexes with rhamnogalacturonan II.

    PubMed

    Voxeur, Aline; Fry, Stephen C

    2014-07-01

    Boron (B) is essential for plant cell-wall structure and membrane functions. Compared with its role in cross-linking the pectic domain rhamnogalacturonan II (RG-II), little information is known about the biological role of B in membranes. Here, we investigated the involvement of glycosylinositol phosphorylceramides (GIPCs), major components of lipid rafts, in the membrane requirement for B. Using thin-layer chromatography and mass spectrometry, we first characterized GIPCs from Rosa cell culture. The major GIPC has one hexose residue, one hexuronic acid residue, inositol phosphate, and a ceramide moiety with a C18 trihydroxylated mono-unsaturated long-chain base and a C24 monohydroxylated saturated fatty acid. Disrupting B bridging (by B starvation in vivo or by treatment with cold dilute HCl or with excess borate in vitro) enhanced the GIPCs' extractability. As RG-II is the main B-binding site in plants, we investigated whether it could form a B-centred complex with GIPCs. Using high-voltage paper electrophoresis, we showed that addition of GIPCs decreased the electrophoretic mobility of radiolabelled RG-II, suggesting formation of a GIPC-B-RG-II complex. Last, using polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, we showed that added GIPCs facilitate RG-II dimerization in vitro. We conclude that B plays a structural role in the plasma membrane. The disruption of membrane components by high borate may account for the phytotoxicity of excess B. Moreover, the in-vitro formation of a GIPC-B-RG-II complex gives the first molecular explanation of the wall-membrane attachment sites observed in vivo. Finally, our results suggest a role for GIPCs in the RG-II dimerization process. © 2014 The Authors. The Plant Journal published by Society for Experimental Biology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Glycosylinositol phosphorylceramides from Rosa cell cultures are boron-bridged in the plasma membrane and form complexes with rhamnogalacturonan II

    PubMed Central

    Voxeur, Aline; Fry, Stephen C

    2014-01-01

    Boron (B) is essential for plant cell-wall structure and membrane functions. Compared with its role in cross-linking the pectic domain rhamnogalacturonan II (RG-II), little information is known about the biological role of B in membranes. Here, we investigated the involvement of glycosylinositol phosphorylceramides (GIPCs), major components of lipid rafts, in the membrane requirement for B. Using thin-layer chromatography and mass spectrometry, we first characterized GIPCs from Rosa cell culture. The major GIPC has one hexose residue, one hexuronic acid residue, inositol phosphate, and a ceramide moiety with a C18 trihydroxylated mono-unsaturated long-chain base and a C24 monohydroxylated saturated fatty acid. Disrupting B bridging (by B starvation in vivo or by treatment with cold dilute HCl or with excess borate in vitro) enhanced the GIPCs’ extractability. As RG-II is the main B-binding site in plants, we investigated whether it could form a B-centred complex with GIPCs. Using high-voltage paper electrophoresis, we showed that addition of GIPCs decreased the electrophoretic mobility of radiolabelled RG-II, suggesting formation of a GIPC–B–RG-II complex. Last, using polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, we showed that added GIPCs facilitate RG-II dimerization in vitro. We conclude that B plays a structural role in the plasma membrane. The disruption of membrane components by high borate may account for the phytotoxicity of excess B. Moreover, the in-vitro formation of a GIPC–B–RG-II complex gives the first molecular explanation of the wall–membrane attachment sites observed in vivo. Finally, our results suggest a role for GIPCs in the RG-II dimerization process. PMID:24804932

  3. Boron bridging of rhamnogalacturonan-II is promoted in vitro by cationic chaperones, including polyhistidine and wall glycoproteins.

    PubMed

    Chormova, Dimitra; Fry, Stephen C

    2016-01-01

    Dimerization of rhamnogalacturonan-II (RG-II) via boron cross-links contributes to the assembly and biophysical properties of the cell wall. Pure RG-II is efficiently dimerized by boric acid (B(OH)3 ) in vitro only if nonbiological agents for example Pb(2+) are added. By contrast, newly synthesized RG-II domains dimerize very rapidly in vivo. We investigated biological agents that might enable this. We tested for three such agents: novel enzymes, borate-transferring ligands and cationic 'chaperones' that facilitate the close approach of two polyanionic RG-II molecules. Dimerization was monitored electrophoretically. Parsley shoot cell-wall enzymes did not affect RG-II dimerization in vitro. Borate-binding ligands (apiose, dehydroascorbic acid, alditols) and small organic cations (including polyamines) also lacked consistent effects. Polylysine bound permanently to RG-II, precluding electrophoretic analysis. However, another polycation, polyhistidine, strongly promoted RG-II dimerization by B(OH)3 without irreversible polyhistidine-RG-II complexation. Likewise, partially purified spinach extensins (histidine/lysine-rich cationic glycoproteins), strongly promoted RG-II dimerization by B(OH)3 in vitro. Thus certain polycations, including polyhistidine and wall glycoproteins, can chaperone RG-II, manoeuvring this polyanionic polysaccharide domain such that boron-bridging is favoured. These chaperones dissociate from RG-II after facilitating its dimerization, indicating that they act catalytically rather than stoichiometrically. We propose a natural role for extensin-RG-II interaction in steering cell-wall assembly. © 2015 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2015 New Phytologist Trust.

  4. Germanium Does Not Substitute for Boron in Cross-Linking of Rhamnogalacturonan II in Pumpkin Cell Walls1

    PubMed Central

    Ishii, Tadashi; Matsunaga, Toshiro; Iwai, Hiroaki; Satoh, Shinobu; Taoshita, Junji

    2002-01-01

    Boron (B)-deficient pumpkin (Cucurbita moschata Duchesne) plants exhibit reduced growth, and their tissues are brittle. The leaf cell walls of these plants contain less than one-half the amount of borate cross-linked rhamnogalacturonan II (RG-II) dimer than normal plants. Supplying germanium (Ge), which has been reported to substitute for B, to B-deficient plants does not restore growth or reduce tissue brittleness. Nevertheless, the leaf cell walls of the Ge-treated plants accumulated considerable amounts of Ge. Dimeric RG-II (dRG-II) accounted for between 20% and 35% of the total RG-II in the cell walls of the second to fourth leaves from Ge-treated plants, but only 2% to 7% of the RG-II was cross-linked by germanate (dRG-II-Ge). The ability of RG-II to form a dimer is not reduced by Ge treatment because approximately 95% of the monomeric RG-II generated from the walls of Ge-treated plants is converted to dRG-II-Ge in vitro in the presence of germanium oxide and lead acetate. However, dRG-II-Ge is unstable and is converted to monomeric RG-II when the Ge is removed. Therefore, the content of dRG-II-Ge and dRG-II-B described above may not reflect the actual ratio of these in muro. 10B-Enriched boric acid and Ge are incorporated into the cell wall within 10 min after their foliar application to B-deficient plants. Foliar application of 10B but not Ge results in an increase in the proportion of dRG-II in the leaf cell wall. Taken together, our results suggest that Ge does not restore the growth of B-deficient plants. PMID:12481079

  5. Molecular characterization of a Penicillium chrysogenum exo-rhamnogalacturonan lyase that is structurally distinct from other polysaccharide lyase family proteins.

    PubMed

    Iwai, Marin; Kawakami, Takuya; Ikemoto, Takeshi; Fujiwara, Daisuke; Takenaka, Shigeo; Nakazawa, Masami; Ueda, Mitsuhiro; Sakamoto, Tatsuji

    2015-10-01

    We previously described an endo-acting rhamnogalacturonan (RG) lyase, termed PcRGL4A, of Penicillium chrysogenum 31B. Here, we describe a second RG lyase, called PcRGLX. We determined the cDNA sequence of the Pcrglx gene, which encodes PcRGLX. Based on analyses using a BLAST search and a conserved domain search, PcRGLX was found to be structurally distinct from known RG lyases and might belong to a new polysaccharide lyase family together with uncharacterized fungal proteins of Nectria haematococca, Aspergillus oryzae, and Fusarium oxysporum. The Pcrglx cDNA gene product (rPcRGLX) expressed in Escherichia coli demonstrated specific activity against RG but not against homogalacturonan. Divalent cations were not essential for the enzymatic activity of rPcRGLX. rPcRGLX mainly released unsaturated galacturonosyl rhamnose (ΔGR) from RG backbones used as the substrate from the initial stage of the reaction, indicating that the enzyme can be classified as an exo-acting RG lyase (EC 4.2.2.24). This is the first report of an RG lyase with this mode of action in Eukaryota. rPcRGLX acted synergistically with PcRGL4A to degrade soybean RG and released ΔGR. This ΔGR was partially decorated with galactose (Gal) residues, indicating that rPcRGLX preferred oligomeric RGs to polymeric RGs, that the enzyme did not require Gal decoration of RG backbones for degradation, and that the enzyme bypassed the Gal side chains of RG backbones. These characteristics of rPcRGLX might be useful in the determination of complex structures of pectins.

  6. Glucuronoyl esterases are active on polymeric substrate, methyl esterified glucuronoxylan

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Alkali extracted beechwood glucuronoxylan methyl ester prepared by esterification of 4-O-methyl-D-glucuronic acid side residues by methanol was found to serve as substrate of microbial glucuronoyl esterases from Ruminococcus flavefaciens, Schizophyllum commune and Trichoderma reesei. The enzymatic d...

  7. Characterization of a novel enzyme-Starmerella bombicola lactone esterase (SBLE)-responsible for sophorolipid lactonization.

    PubMed

    Ciesielska, Katarzyna; Roelants, Sophie L K W; Van Bogaert, Inge N A; De Waele, Stijn; Vandenberghe, Isabel; Groeneboer, Sara; Soetaert, Wim; Devreese, Bart

    2016-11-01

    We recently discovered a novel enzyme in the exoproteome of Starmerella bombicola, which is structurally related to Candida antarctica lipase A. A knockout strain for this enzyme does no longer produce lactonic sophorolipids, prompting us to believe that this protein is the missing S. bombicola lactone esterase (SBLE). SBLE catalyzes a rather unusual reaction, i.e., an intramolecular esterification (lactonization) of acidic sophorolipids in an aqueous environment, which raised questions about its activity and mode of action. Here, we report the heterologous production of this enzyme in Pichia pastoris and its purification in a two-step strategy. Purified recombinant SBLE (rSBLE) was used to perform HPLC and liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LCMS)-based assays with different sophorolipid mixtures. We experimentally confirmed that SBLE is able to perform ring closure of acetylated acidic sophorolipids. This substrate was selected for rSBLE kinetic studies to estimate the apparent values of K m . We established that rSBLE displays optimal activity in the pH range of 3.5 to 6 and has an optimal temperature in the range of 20 to 50 °C. Additionally, we generated a rSBLE mutant through site-directed mutagenesis of Ser194 in the predicted active site pocket and show that this mutant is lacking the ability to lactonize sophorolipids. We therefore propose that SBLE operates via the common serine hydrolase mechanism in which the catalytic serine residue is assisted by a His/Asp pair.

  8. Betacoronavirus Adaptation to Humans Involved Progressive Loss of Hemagglutinin-Esterase Lectin Activity.

    PubMed

    Bakkers, Mark J G; Lang, Yifei; Feitsma, Louris J; Hulswit, Ruben J G; de Poot, Stefanie A H; van Vliet, Arno L W; Margine, Irina; de Groot-Mijnes, Jolanda D F; van Kuppeveld, Frank J M; Langereis, Martijn A; Huizinga, Eric G; de Groot, Raoul J

    2017-03-08

    Human beta1-coronavirus (β1CoV) OC43 emerged relatively recently through a single zoonotic introduction. Like related animal β1CoVs, OC43 uses 9-O-acetylated sialic acid as receptor determinant. β1CoV receptor binding is typically controlled by attachment/fusion spike protein S and receptor-binding/receptor-destroying hemagglutinin-esterase protein HE. We show that following OC43's introduction into humans, HE-mediated receptor binding was selected against and ultimately lost through progressive accumulation of mutations in the HE lectin domain. Consequently, virion-associated receptor-destroying activity toward multivalent glycoconjugates was reduced and altered such that some clustered receptor populations are no longer cleaved. Loss of HE lectin function was also observed for another respiratory human coronavirus, HKU1. This thus appears to be an adaptation to the sialoglycome of the human respiratory tract and for replication in human airways. The findings suggest that the dynamics of virion-glycan interactions contribute to host tropism. Our observations are relevant also to other human respiratory viruses of zoonotic origin, particularly influenza A virus. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. High-throughput screening method for lipases/esterases.

    PubMed

    Mateos-Díaz, Eduardo; Rodríguez, Jorge Alberto; de Los Ángeles Camacho-Ruiz, María; Mateos-Díaz, Juan Carlos

    2012-01-01

    High-throughput screening (HTS) methods for lipases and esterases are generally performed by using synthetic chromogenic substrates (e.g., p-nitrophenyl, resorufin, and umbelliferyl esters) which may be misleading since they are not their natural substrates (e.g., partially or insoluble triglycerides). In previous works, we have shown that soluble nonchromogenic substrates and p-nitrophenol (as a pH indicator) can be used to quantify the hydrolysis and estimate the substrate selectivity of lipases and esterases from several sources. However, in order to implement a spectrophotometric HTS method using partially or insoluble triglycerides, it is necessary to find particular conditions which allow a quantitative detection of the enzymatic activity. In this work, we used Triton X-100, CHAPS, and N-lauroyl sarcosine as emulsifiers, β-cyclodextrin as a fatty acid captor, and two substrate concentrations, 1 mM of tributyrin (TC4) and 5 mM of trioctanoin (TC8), to improve the test conditions. To demonstrate the utility of this method, we screened 12 enzymes (commercial preparations and culture broth extracts) for the hydrolysis of TC4 and TC8, which are both classical substrates for lipases and esterases (for esterases, only TC4 may be hydrolyzed). Subsequent pH-stat experiments were performed to confirm the preference of substrate hydrolysis with the hydrolases tested. We have shown that this method is very useful for screening a high number of lipases (hydrolysis of TC4 and TC8) or esterases (only hydrolysis of TC4) from wild isolates or variants generated by directed evolution using nonchromogenic triglycerides directly in the test.

  10. Fatal Intoxication with Acetyl Fentanyl.

    PubMed

    Cunningham, Susan M; Haikal, Nabila A; Kraner, James C

    2016-01-01

    Among the new psychoactive substances encountered in forensic investigations is the opioid, acetyl fentanyl. The death of a 28-year-old man from recreational use of this compound is reported. The decedent was found in the bathroom of his residence with a tourniquet secured around his arm and a syringe nearby. Postmortem examination findings included marked pulmonary and cerebral edema and needle track marks. Toxicological analysis revealed acetyl fentanyl in subclavian blood, liver, vitreous fluid, and urine at concentrations of 235 ng/mL, 2400 ng/g, 131 ng/mL, and 234 ng/mL, respectively. Acetyl fentanyl was also detected in the accompanying syringe. Death was attributed to recreational acetyl fentanyl abuse, likely through intravenous administration. The blood acetyl fentanyl concentration is considerably higher than typically found in fatal fentanyl intoxications. Analysis of this case underscores the need for consideration of a wide range of compounds with potential opioid-agonist activity when investigating apparent recreational drug-related deaths. © 2015 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  11. A naturally occurring mutation in an Arabidopsis accession affects a beta-D-galactosidase that increases the hydrophilic potential of rhamnogalacturonan I in seed mucilage.

    PubMed

    Macquet, Audrey; Ralet, Marie-Christine; Loudet, Olivier; Kronenberger, Jocelyne; Mouille, Gregory; Marion-Poll, Annie; North, Helen M

    2007-12-01

    The Arabidopsis thaliana accession Shahdara was identified as a rare naturally occurring mutant that does not liberate seed mucilage on imbibition. The defective locus was found to be allelic to the mum2-1 and mum2-2 mutants. Map-based cloning showed that MUCILAGE-MODIFIED2 (MUM2) encodes the putative beta-D-galactosidase BGAL6. Activity assays demonstrated that one of four major beta-D-galactosidase activities present in developing siliques is absent in mum2 mutants. No difference was observed in seed coat epidermal cell structure between wild-type and mutant seed; however, weakening of the outer tangential cell wall by chemical treatment resulted in the release of mucilage from mum2 seed coat epidermal cells, and the mum2 mucilage only increased slightly in volume, relative to the wild type. Consistent with the absence of beta-D-galactosidase activity in the mutant, the inner layer of mucilage contained more Gal. The allocation of polysaccharides between the inner and outer mucilage layers was also modified in mum2. Mass spectrometry showed that rhamnogalacturonan I in mutant mucilage had more branching between rhamnose and hexose residues relative to the wild type. We conclude that the MUM2/BGAL6 beta-D-galactosidase is required for maturation of rhamnogalacturonan I in seed mucilage by the removal of galactose/galactan branches, resulting in increased swelling and extrusion of the mucilage on seed hydration.

  12. A New Functional Classification of Glucuronoyl Esterases by Peptide Pattern Recognition

    PubMed Central

    Agger, Jane W.; Busk, Peter K.; Pilgaard, Bo; Meyer, Anne S.; Lange, Lene

    2017-01-01

    Glucuronoyl esterases are a novel type of enzymes believed to catalyze the hydrolysis of ester linkages between lignin and glucuronoxylan in lignocellulosic biomass, linkages known as lignin carbohydrate complexes. These complexes contribute to the recalcitrance of lignocellulose. Glucuronoyl esterases are a part of the microbial machinery for lignocellulose degradation and coupling their role to the occurrence of lignin carbohydrate complexes in biomass is a desired research goal. Glucuronoyl esterases have been assigned to CAZymes family 15 of carbohydrate esterases, but only few examples of characterized enzymes exist and the exact activity is still uncertain. Here peptide pattern recognition is used as a bioinformatic tool to identify and group new CE15 proteins that are likely to have glucuronoyl esterase activity. 1024 CE15-like sequences were drawn from GenBank and grouped into 24 groups. Phylogenetic analysis of these groups made it possible to pinpoint groups of putative fungal and bacterial glucuronoyl esterases and their sequence variation. Moreover, a number of groups included previously undescribed CE15-like sequences that are distinct from the glucuronoyl esterases and may possibly have different esterase activity. Hence, the CE15 family is likely to comprise other enzyme functions than glucuronoyl esterase alone. Gene annotation in a variety of fungal and bacterial microorganisms showed that coprophilic fungi are rich and diverse sources of CE15 proteins. Combined with the lifestyle and habitat of coprophilic fungi, they are predicted to be excellent candidates for finding new glucuronoyl esterase genes. PMID:28293230

  13. Molecular modeling of the structures of human and rat pancreatic cholesterol esterases.

    PubMed Central

    Feaster, S. R.; Quinn, D. M.; Barnett, B. L.

    1997-01-01

    Structural models have been generated for rat and human cholesterol esterases by molecular modeling. For rat cholesterol esterase, three separate models were generated according to the following procedure: (1) the cholesterol esterase sequence was aligned with those of three template enzymes: Torpedo californica acetylcholinesterase, Geotrichum candidum lipase and Candida rugosa lipase; (2) the X-ray structure coordinates of the three template enzymes were used to construct cholesterol esterase models by amino acid replacements of matched sequence positions and by making sequence insertions and deletions as required; (3) bad contracts in each of the cholesterol esterase models were relaxed by molecular dynamics and mechanics; (4) the three cholesterol esterase models were merged into one by arithmetic averaging of atomic coordinates; (5) Ramachandran analysis indicated that the model generated from the AChE template possessed the best set of phi/psi angles. Therefore, this model was subjected to molecular dynamics, with harmonic constraints imposed on the C(alpha) coordinates to drive them toward the coordinates of the averaged model. (6) Subsequent relaxation by molecular mechanics produced the final rat cholesterol esterase model. A model for human cholesterol esterase was produced by repeating steps 1-3 above, albeit with the rat cholesterol esterase model as the template. Hydrophobic and electrostatic analyses of the rat and human cholesterol esterase models suggest the structural origins of molecular recognition of hydrophobic substrates and interfaces, of charged interfaces, and of bile salt activators. PMID:9007978

  14. Overexpression of esterase D in kidney from trisomy 13 fetuses.

    PubMed Central

    Loughna, S; Bennett, P; Gau, G; Nicolaides, K; Blunt, S; Moore, G

    1993-01-01

    Human trisomy 13 (Patau syndrome) occurs in approximately 1 in 5,000 live births. It is compatible with life, but prolonged survival is rare. Anomalies often involve the urogenital, cardiac, craniofacial, and central nervous systems. It is possible that these abnormalities may be due to the overexpression of developmentally important genes on chromosome 13. The expression of esterase D (localized to chromosome 13q14.11) has been investigated in both muscle and kidney from trisomy 13 fetuses and has been compared with normal age- and sex-matched fetal tissues, by using northern analysis. More than a twofold increase in expression of esterase D was found in the kidney of two trisomy 13 fetuses, with normal levels in a third. Overexpression was not seen in the muscle tissues from these fetuses. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:8213811

  15. N-ACETYL GROUPS IN VITELLENIN,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The presence of acetyl groups in vitellenin was confirmed by hydrazinolysis according to the DNP method of Phillips. After hydrazinolysis of 10-30...hydrazinolysis at room temperature for 1 hour, vitellenin contains N- acetyl , but no Oacetyl, groups. (Author)

  16. Mechanism and diversity of the erythromycin esterase family of enzymes.

    PubMed

    Morar, Mariya; Pengelly, Kate; Koteva, Kalinka; Wright, Gerard D

    2012-02-28

    Macrolide antibiotics such as azithromycin and erythromycin are mainstays of modern antibacterial chemotherapy, and like all antibiotics, they are vulnerable to resistance. One mechanism of macrolide resistance is via drug inactivation: enzymatic hydrolysis of the macrolactone ring catalyzed by erythromycin esterases, EreA and EreB. A genomic enzymology approach was taken to gain insight into the catalytic mechanisms and origins of Ere enzymes. Our analysis reveals that erythromycin esterases comprise a separate group in the hydrolase superfamily, which includes homologues of uncharacterized function found on the chromosome of Bacillus cereus, Bcr135 and Bcr136, whose three-dimensional structures have been determined. Biochemical characterization of Bcr136 confirms that it is an esterase that is, however, unable to inactivate macrolides. Using steady-state kinetics, homology-based structure modeling, site-directed mutagenesis, solvent isotope effect studies, pH, and inhibitor profiling performed in various combinations for EreA, EreB, and Bcr136 enzymes, we identified the active site and gained insight into some catalytic features of this novel enzyme superfamily. We rule out the possibility of a Ser/Thr nucleophile and show that one histidine, H46 (EreB numbering), is essential for catalytic function. This residue is proposed to serve as a general base in activation of a water molecule as the reaction nucleophile. Furthermore, we show that EreA, EreB, and Bcr136 are distinct, with only EreA inhibited by chelating agents and hypothesized to contain a noncatalytic metal. Detailed characterization of these esterases allows for a direct comparison of the resistance determinants, EreA and EreB, with their prototype, Bcr136, and for the discussion of their potential connections.

  17. Adaptive Linkage Disequilibrium Between Two Esterase Loci of a Salamander

    PubMed Central

    Webster, T. Preston

    1973-01-01

    In some populations of the salamander Plethodon cinereus, two polymorphic esterase loci are in linkage disequilibrium. Short-term stability of the linkage disequilibrium is demonstrated by an age class analysis. Long, perhaps very long, term stability is suggested by its distribution. This stability and concordant geographic variation in allelic frequencies imply selective origin and maintenance. Data on the frequencies of two color morphs suggest that formation of the linkage disequilibrium is dependent on the genetic background. Images PMID:4515614

  18. [Phosphonate esterase activity in human serum (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Labadie, M; Laplaud, P M; Lachatre, G; Breton, J C

    1980-02-01

    A simple methodology for the spectrophotometric assay of phosphonate esterase activity in human serum samples is described, featuring incubation at 30 degrees C in a medium containing p-nitrophenol and phenyl-phosphonic acid ester. Reproducibility of the method as well a mean values in normal patients vs age and sex are reported. Serum activity appears to be increased almost exclusively during pregnancy or administration of estrogenic drugs (as oral contraceptives or in prostate neoplasms).

  19. Toxicological implications of esterases-From molecular structures to functions

    SciTech Connect

    Satoh, Tetsuo . E-mail: satohbri@peach.ifnet.or.jp

    2005-09-01

    This article reports on a keynote lecture at the 10th International Congress of Toxicology sponsored by the International Union of Toxicology and held on July 2004. Current developments in molecular-based studies into the structure and function of cholinesterases, carboxylesterases, and paraoxonases are described. This article covers mechanisms of regulation of gene expression of the various esterases by developmental factors and xenobiotics, as well as the interplay between physiological and chemical regulation of the enzyme activity.

  20. Bacterial protein acetylation: new discoveries unanswered questions.

    PubMed

    Wolfe, Alan J

    2016-05-01

    Nε-acetylation is emerging as an abundant post-translational modification of bacterial proteins. Two mechanisms have been identified: one is enzymatic, dependent on an acetyltransferase and acetyl-coenzyme A; the other is non-enzymatic and depends on the reactivity of acetyl phosphate. Some, but not most, of those acetylations are reversed by deacetylases. This review will briefly describe the current status of the field and raise questions that need answering.

  1. 3 Benzyl-6-chloropyrone: a suicide inhibitor of cholesterol esterase

    SciTech Connect

    Saint, C.; Gallo, I.; Kantorow, M.; Bailey, J.M.

    1986-05-01

    Cholesterol, absorbed from the intestine, appears in lymph as the ester. Cholesterol esterase is essential for this process, since depletion of the enzyme blocks and repletion restores, absorption. Selective inhibitors of cholesterol esterase may thus prove useful in reducing cholesterol uptake. A series of potential suicide substrates were synthesized which, following cleavage by the enzyme, would attack the putative nucleophile in the active site. One of these, 3-benzyl-6-chloropyrone (3BCP), inhibited both synthesis and hydrolysis of /sup 14/C-cholesteryl oleate with an I/sub 50/ of approximately 150 ..mu..M. The inactivation was time-dependent and characteristic of a suicide mechanism. The ..cap alpha.. pyrone structure (lactone analog) is cleaved by a serine-hydroxyl in the active site. This generates an enoyl chloride which inactivates the imidazole believed to play a part in the catalytic function of the enzyme. Inhibition by 3BCP is selective for cholesterol esterase. The activity of pancreatic lipase as not affected by concentrations up to 1 mM.

  2. Protein acetylation in archaea, bacteria, and eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    Soppa, Jörg

    2010-09-16

    Proteins can be acetylated at the alpha-amino group of the N-terminal amino acid (methionine or the penultimate amino acid after methionine removal) or at the epsilon-amino group of internal lysines. In eukaryotes the majority of proteins are N-terminally acetylated, while this is extremely rare in bacteria. A variety of studies about N-terminal acetylation in archaea have been reported recently, and it was revealed that a considerable fraction of proteins is N-terminally acetylated in haloarchaea and Sulfolobus, while this does not seem to apply for methanogenic archaea. Many eukaryotic proteins are modified by differential internal acetylation, which is important for a variety of processes. Until very recently, only two bacterial proteins were known to be acetylation targets, but now 125 acetylation sites are known for E. coli. Knowledge about internal acetylation in archaea is extremely limited; only two target proteins are known, only one of which--Alba--was used to study differential acetylation. However, indications accumulate that the degree of internal acetylation of archaeal proteins might be underestimated, and differential acetylation has been shown to be essential for the viability of haloarchaea. Focused proteomic approaches are needed to get an overview of the extent of internal protein acetylation in archaea.

  3. Structural basis for the De-N-acetylation of Poly-β-1,6-N-acetyl-D-glucosamine in Gram-positive bacteria.

    PubMed

    Little, Dustin J; Bamford, Natalie C; Pokrovskaya, Varvara; Robinson, Howard; Nitz, Mark; Howell, P Lynne

    2014-12-26

    Exopolysaccharides are required for the development and integrity of biofilms produced by a wide variety of bacteria. In staphylococci, partial de-N-acetylation of the exopolysaccharide poly-β-1,6-N-acetyl-d-glucosamine (PNAG) by the extracellular protein IcaB is required for biofilm formation. To understand the molecular basis for PNAG de-N-acetylation, the structure of IcaB from Ammonifex degensii (IcaBAd) has been determined to 1.7 Å resolution. The structure of IcaBAd reveals a (β/α)7 barrel common to the family four carbohydrate esterases (CE4s) with the canonical motifs circularly permuted. The metal dependence of IcaBAd is similar to most CE4s showing the maximum rates of de-N-acetylation with Ni(2+), Co(2+), and Zn(2+). From docking studies with β-1,6-GlcNAc oligomers and structural comparison to PgaB from Escherichia coli, the Gram-negative homologue of IcaB, we identify Arg-45, Tyr-67, and Trp-180 as key residues for PNAG binding during catalysis. The absence of these residues in PgaB provides a rationale for the requirement of a C-terminal domain for efficient deacetylation of PNAG in Gram-negative species. Mutational analysis of conserved active site residues suggests that IcaB uses an altered catalytic mechanism in comparison to other characterized CE4 members. Furthermore, we identified a conserved surface-exposed hydrophobic loop found only in Gram-positive homologues of IcaB. Our data suggest that this loop is required for membrane association and likely anchors IcaB to the membrane during polysaccharide biosynthesis. The work presented herein will help guide the design of IcaB inhibitors to combat biofilm formation by staphylococci.

  4. A new microplate screening method for the simultaneous activity quantification of feruloyl esterases, tannases, and chlorogenate esterases.

    PubMed

    Ramírez, L; Arrizon, J; Sandoval, G; Cardador, A; Bello-Mendoza, R; Lappe, P; Mateos-Díaz, J C

    2008-12-01

    Feruloyl, chlorogenate esterases, and tannases are enzymes useful in phenolic modifications of pharmaceutical relevance as protectors against several degenerative human diseases. Therefore, there is a growing interest in discovering new sources of these enzymes. However, traditional methods for their activity measurements are time-consuming and poorly adapted for high-throughput screening. In this study, a successful new microplate high-throughput screening method for the simultaneous quantification of all mentioned activities is demonstrated. This method allows the detection of activities as low as 1.7 mU ml(-1). Furthermore, reaction rates increased proportionally with the amount of enzyme added, and no interferences with the other commercial hydrolases tested were found. The utility of the method was demonstrated after simultaneously screening feruloyl, chlorogenate esterase, and tannase activities in solid state fermentation extracts obtained during the kinetics of production of 20 fungal strains. Among these, seven strains were positive for at least one of the esterase activities tested. This result shows the potential for the rapid routine screening assays for multiple samples of moderate low to high enzymatic levels.

  5. Isozymic variations in specific and nonspecific esterase and its thermostability in silkworm, Bombyx mori L.

    PubMed

    Patnaik, Bharat Bhusan; Biswas, Tapati Datta; Nayak, Sandeepta Kumar; Saha, A K; Majumdar, M K

    2012-09-01

    Esterase isozymic variations were documented in the haemolymph of developed multivoltine and bivoltine silkworm breeds during unfavorable seed crop seasons of May - September using á- and â- napthylacetate separately to identify specific and nonspecific esterase having thermotolerant potentiality. Variations existed in the isozyme pattern with three bands (Est-2, 3 and 4) in pure Nistari race and other developed multivoltine and bivoltine breeds. Est-2 and Est-3 were non-specific esterases as they were observed when both á- and â-napthylacetate was used as substrates separately. Est-4 band was observed only with á-napthylacetate as substrate and was therefore confirmed to be specific á-esterase band in the haemolymph of silkworm, Bombyx mori L. Zymograms showed that the non-specific esterase band (Est-3) with R1 of 0.43 and specific á-esterase band (Est-4) with R(f) of 0.32 predominately withstood a temperature of 70 +/- 2 degrees C for a duration of 10 min and were confirmed as thermostable esterases in haemolymph of silkworm, Bombyx mori L. This also categorized the presence of thermostable esterases in developed multivoltine and bivoltine breeds of silkworm, even though the qualitative activity was more in the former than the latter. The qualitative presence of thermostable esterases and their activity could be adopted as an indicative biochemical marker in relation to thermotolerance in silkworm.

  6. Characterisation of a New Family of Carboxyl Esterases with an OsmC Domain

    PubMed Central

    Horsfall, Louise E.; Wardrope, Caroline; Togneri, Peter D.; Marles-Wright, Jon; Rosser, Susan J.

    2016-01-01

    Proteins in the serine esterase family are widely distributed in bacterial phyla and display activity against a range of biologically produced and chemically synthesized esters. A serine esterase from the psychrophilic bacterium Pseudoalteromonas arctica with a C-terminal OsmC-like domain was recently characterized; here we report on the identification and characterization of further putative esterases with OsmC-like domains constituting a new esterase family that is found in a variety of bacterial species from different environmental niches. All of these proteins contained the Ser-Asp-His motif common to serine esterases and a highly conserved pentapeptide nucleophilic elbow motif. We produced these proteins heterologously in Escherichia coli and demonstrated their activity against a range of esterase substrates. Two of the esterases characterized have activity of over two orders of magnitude higher than other members of the family, and are active over a wide temperature range. We determined the crystal structure of the esterase domain of the protein from Rhodothermus marinus and show that it conforms to the classical α/β hydrolase fold with an extended ‘lid’ region, which occludes the active site of the protein in the crystal. The expansion of characterized members of the esterase family and demonstration of activity over a wide-range of temperatures could be of use in biotechnological applications such as the pharmaceutical, detergent, bioremediation and dairy industries. PMID:27851780

  7. Rhamnogalacturonan II is a Toll-like receptor 4 agonist that inhibits tumor growth by activating dendritic cell-mediated CD8+ T cells.

    PubMed

    Park, Sung Nam; Noh, Kyung Tae; Jeong, Young-Il; Jung, In Duk; Kang, Hyun Kyu; Cha, Gil Sun; Lee, Su Jung; Seo, Jong Keun; Kang, Dae Hwan; Hwang, Tae-Ho; Lee, Eun Kyung; Kwon, Byungsuk; Park, Yeong-Min

    2013-02-08

    We evaluated the effectiveness of rhamnogalacturonan II (RG-II)-stimulated bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (BMDCs) vaccination on the induction of antitumor immunity in a mouse lymphoma model using EG7-lymphoma cells expressing ovalbumin (OVA). BMDCs treated with RG-II had an activated phenotype. RG-II induced interleukin (IL)-12, IL-1β, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interferon-γ (IFN-γ) production during dendritic cell (DC) maturation. BMDCs stimulated with RG-II facilitate the proliferation of CD8+ T cells. Using BMDCs from the mice deficient in Toll-like receptors (TLRs), we revealed that RG-II activity is dependent on TLR4. RG-II showed a preventive effect of immunization with OVA-pulsed BMDCs against EG7 lymphoma. These results suggested that RG-II expedites the DC-based immune response through the TLR4 signaling pathway.

  8. Towards the industrialization of new biosurfactants: Biotechnological opportunities for the lactone esterase gene from Starmerella bombicola.

    PubMed

    Roelants, Sophie L K W; Ciesielska, Katarzyna; De Maeseneire, Sofie L; Moens, Helena; Everaert, Bernd; Verweire, Stijn; Denon, Quenten; Vanlerberghe, Brecht; Van Bogaert, Inge N A; Van der Meeren, Paul; Devreese, Bart; Soetaert, Wim

    2016-03-01

    Although sophorolipids (SLs) produced by S. bombicola are a real showcase for the industrialization of microbial biosurfactants, some important drawbacks are associated with this efficient biological process, e.g., the simultaneous production of acidic and lactonic SLs. Depending on the application, there is a requirement for the naturally produced mixture to be manipulated to give defined ratios of the components. Recently, the enzyme responsible for the lactonization of SLs was discovered. The discovery of the gene encoding this lactone esterase (sble) enabled the development of promising S. bombicola strains producing either solely lactonic (using a sble overexpression strain described in this paper: oe sble) or solely acidic SLs (using a sble deletion strain, which was recently described, but not characterized yet: Δsble). The new S. bombicola strains were used to investigate the production processes (fermentation and purification) of either lactonic or acidic SLs. The strains maintain the high inherent productivities of the wild-type or even perform slightly better and thus represent a realistic industrial opportunity. 100% acidic SLs with a mixed acetylation pattern were obtained for the Δsble strain, while the inherent capacity to selectively produce lactonic SLs was significantly increased (+42%) for the oe sble strain (99% lactonic SLs). Moreover, the regulatory effect of citrate on lactone SL formation for the wild-type was absent in this new strain, which indicates that it is more robust and better suited for the industrial production of lactonic SLs. Basic parameters were determined for the purified SLs, which confirm that the two new strains produce molecules with distinctive properties of which the application potential can now easily be investigated independently.

  9. Structure of coronavirus hemagglutinin-esterase offers insight into corona and influenza virus evolution.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Qinghong; Langereis, Martijn A; van Vliet, Arno L W; Huizinga, Eric G; de Groot, Raoul J

    2008-07-01

    The hemagglutinin-esterases (HEs) are a family of viral envelope glycoproteins that mediate reversible attachment to O-acetylated sialic acids by acting both as lectins and as receptor-destroying enzymes (RDEs). Related HEs occur in influenza C, toro-, and coronaviruses, apparently as a result of relatively recent lateral gene transfer events. Here, we report the crystal structure of a coronavirus (CoV) HE in complex with its receptor. We show that CoV HE arose from an influenza C-like HE fusion protein (HEF). In the process, HE was transformed from a trimer into a dimer, whereas remnants of the fusion domain were adapted to establish novel monomer-monomer contacts. Whereas the structural design of the RDE-acetylesterase domain remained unaltered, the HE receptor-binding domain underwent remodeling to such extent that the ligand is now bound in opposite orientation. This is surprising, because the architecture of the HEF site was preserved in influenza A HA over a much larger evolutionary distance, a switch in receptor specificity and extensive antigenic variation notwithstanding. Apparently, HA and HEF are under more stringent selective constraints than HE, limiting their exploration of alternative binding-site topologies. We attribute the plasticity of the CoV HE receptor-binding site to evolutionary flexibility conferred by functional redundancy between HE and its companion spike protein S. Our findings offer unique insights into the structural and functional consequences of independent protein evolution after interviral gene exchange and open potential avenues to broad-spectrum antiviral drug design.

  10. Genetic studies of the caddisfly Triaenodes tardus Milne (Trichoptera: Leptoceridae). I. Evidence for a sex-linked esterase.

    PubMed

    Steiner, W W; Brigham, A R; Unzicker, J D

    1983-12-01

    Electrophoretic analysis of esterase in Triaenodes tardus Milne, a widely distributed North American caddisfly, reveals sex linkage at one of several esterase loci. Females are the heterogametic sex, confirming observations made via cytogenetic observation of European species.

  11. Esterase activity of BSA-ZnO nanoparticle complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhogale, A.; Nair, A.; Patel, N.; Miotello, A.; Kothari, D. C.

    2014-04-01

    The effect of Zinc Oxide Nanoparticles (ZnO NPs) on functional properties of Bovine Serum Albumin (BSA) protein was studied. ZnO NPs were synthesized with average size of ˜7.5 nm as obtained from TEM analysis. The catalytic conversion of p-nitrophenylacetate (PNPA) to p-nitrophenol in the presence of BSA attached with ZnO NPs was examined by UV-Vis spectroscopy at room temperature. The result suggests that esterase activity of BSA is significantly enhanced (6 times) due to the ground state BSA-ZnO complex formation.

  12. Para-nitrobenzyl esterases with enhanced activity in aqueous and nonaqueous media

    DOEpatents

    Arnold, F.H.; Moore, J.C.

    1999-05-25

    A method is disclosed for isolating and identifying modified para-nitrobenzyl esterases which exhibit improved stability and/or esterase hydrolysis activity toward selected substrates and under selected reaction conditions relative to the unmodified para-nitrobenzyl esterase. The method involves preparing a library of modified para-nitrobenzyl esterase nucleic acid segments (genes) which have nucleotide sequences that differ from the nucleic acid segment which encodes for unmodified para-nitrobenzyl esterase. The library of modified para-nitrobenzyl nucleic acid segments is expressed to provide a plurality of modified enzymes. The clones expressing modified enzymes are then screened to identify which enzymes have improved esterase activity by measuring the ability of the enzymes to hydrolyze the selected substrate under the selected reaction conditions. Specific modified para-nitrobenzyl esterases are disclosed which have improved stability and/or ester hydrolysis activity in aqueous or aqueous-organic media relative to the stability and/or ester hydrolysis activity of unmodified naturally occurring para-nitrobenzyl esterase. 43 figs.

  13. Effects of Rosiglitazone and High Fat Diet on Lipase/Esterase Expression in Adipose Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Wen‐Jun; Patel, Shailja; Yu, Zaixin; Jue, Dyron; Kraemer, Fredric B.

    2007-01-01

    A number of intracellular lipase/esterase have been reported in adipose tissue either by functional assays of activity or through proteomic analysis. In the current work, we have studied the relative expression level of 12 members of the lipase/esterase family that are found in white adipose tissue. We found that the relative mRNA levels of ATGL and HSL are the most abundant, being 2–3 fold greater than TGH or ADPN; whereas other intracellular neutral lipase/esterases were expressed at substantially lower levels. High fat feeding did not alter the mRNA expression levels of most lipase/esterases, but did reduce CGI‐58 and WBSCR21. Likewise, rosiglitazone treatment did not alter the mRNA expression levels of most lipase/esterases, but did increase ATGL, TGH, CGI‐58 and WBSCR21, while reducing ADPN. WAT from HSL−/− mice showed no compensatory increase in any lipase/esterases, rather mRNA levels of most lipase/esterases were reduced. In contrast, BAT from HSL−/− mice showed an increase in ATGL and CGI‐58 expression, as well as a decrease in ES‐1, APEH and WBSCR21. Analysis of the immunoreactive protein levels of some of the lipases confirmed the results seen with mRNA. In conclusion, these data highlight the complexity of the regulation of the expression of intracellular neutral lipase/esterases involved in lipolysis. PMID:17215164

  14. Effects of rosiglitazone and high fat diet on lipase/esterase expression in adipose tissue.

    PubMed

    Shen, Wen-Jun; Patel, Shailja; Yu, Zaixin; Jue, Dyron; Kraemer, Fredric B

    2007-02-01

    A number of intracellular lipase/esterase have been reported in adipose tissue either by functional assays of activity or through proteomic analysis. In the current work, we have studied the relative expression level of 12 members of the lipase/esterase family that are found in white adipose tissue. We found that the relative mRNA levels of ATGL and HSL are the most abundant, being 2-3 fold greater than TGH or ADPN; whereas other intracellular neutral lipase/esterases were expressed at substantially lower levels. High fat feeding did not alter the mRNA expression levels of most lipase/esterases, but did reduce CGI-58 and WBSCR21. Likewise, rosiglitazone treatment did not alter the mRNA expression levels of most lipase/esterases, but did increase ATGL, TGH, CGI-58 and WBSCR21, while reducing ADPN. WAT from HSL-/- mice showed no compensatory increase in any lipase/esterases, rather mRNA levels of most lipase/esterases were reduced. In contrast, BAT from HSL-/- mice showed an increase in ATGL expression, as well as a decrease in ES-1, APEH and WBSCR21. Analysis of the immunoreactive protein levels of some of the lipases confirmed the results seen with mRNA. In conclusion, these data highlight the complexity of the regulation of the expression of intracellular neutral lipase/esterases involved in lipolysis.

  15. Structure of the catalytic domain of glucuronoyl esterase Cip2 from Hypocrea jecorina

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The structure of the catalytic domain of glucuronoyl esterase Cip2 from the fungus Hypocrea jecorina was determined at a resolution of 1.9 Angstroms. This is the first structure of the newly established carbohydrate esterase family 15. The structure has revealed the residues Ser278–His411–Glu301 pre...

  16. Para-nitrobenzyl esterases with enhanced activity in aqueous and nonaqueous media

    DOEpatents

    Arnold, Frances H.; Moore, Jeffrey C.

    1998-01-01

    A method for isolating and identifying modified para-nitrobenzyl esterases which exhibit improved stability and/or esterase hydrolysis activity toward selected substrates and under selected reaction conditions relative to the unmodified para-nitrobenzyl esterase. The method involves preparing a library of modified para-nitrobenzyl esterase nucleic acid segments (genes) which have nucleotide sequences that differ from the nucleic acid segment which encodes for unmodified para-nitrobenzyl esterase. The library of modified para-nitrobenzyl nucleic acid segments is expressed to provide a plurality of modified enzymes. The clones expressing modified enzymes are then screened to identify which enzymes have improved esterase activity by measuring the ability of the enzymes to hydrolyze the selected substrate under the selected reaction conditions. Specific modified para-nitrobenzyl esterases are disclosed which have improved stability and/or ester hydrolysis activity in aqueous or aqueous-organic media relative to the stability and/or ester hydrolysis activity of unmodified naturally occurring para-nitrobenzyl esterase.

  17. Para-nitrobenzyl esterases with enhanced activity in aqueous and nonaqueous media

    DOEpatents

    Arnold, Frances H.; Moore, Jeffrey C.

    1999-01-01

    A method for isolating and identifying modified para-nitrobenzyl esterases which exhibit improved stability and/or esterase hydrolysis activity toward selected substrates and under selected reaction conditions relative to the unmodified para-nitrobenzyl esterase. The method involves preparing a library of modified para-nitrobenzyl esterase nucleic acid segments (genes) which have nucleotide sequences that differ from the nucleic acid segment which encodes for unmodified para-nitrobenzyl esterase. The library of modified para-nitrobenzyl nucleic acid segments is expressed to provide a plurality of modified enzymes. The clones expressing modified enzymes are then screened to identify which enzymes have improved esterase activity by measuring the ability of the enzymes to hydrolyze the selected substrate under the selected reaction conditions. Specific modified para-nitrobenzyl esterases are disclosed which have improved stability and/or ester hydrolysis activity in aqueous or aqueous-organic media relative to the stability and/or ester hydrolysis activity of unmodified naturally occurring para-nitrobenzyl esterase.

  18. 21 CFR 173.140 - Esterase-lipase derived from Mucor miehei.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... HUMAN CONSUMPTION Enzyme Preparations and Microorganisms § 173.140 Esterase-lipase derived from Mucor miehei. Esterase-lipase enzyme, consisting of enzyme derived from Mucor miehei var. Cooney et Emerson by... Emerson is nonpathogenic and nontoxic in man or other animals. (c) The enzyme is produced by a process...

  19. 21 CFR 173.140 - Esterase-lipase derived from Mucor miehei.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... HUMAN CONSUMPTION Enzyme Preparations and Microorganisms § 173.140 Esterase-lipase derived from Mucor miehei. Esterase-lipase enzyme, consisting of enzyme derived from Mucor miehei var. Cooney et Emerson by... Emerson is nonpathogenic and nontoxic in man or other animals. (c) The enzyme is produced by a process...

  20. 21 CFR 173.140 - Esterase-lipase derived from Mucor miehei.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) SECONDARY DIRECT FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED IN FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Enzyme Preparations and Microorganisms § 173.140 Esterase-lipase derived from Mucor miehei. Esterase-lipase enzyme, consisting of enzyme... animals. (c) The enzyme is produced by a process which completely removes the organism Mucor miehei var...

  1. 21 CFR 173.140 - Esterase-lipase derived from Mucor miehei.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... HUMAN CONSUMPTION Enzyme Preparations and Microorganisms § 173.140 Esterase-lipase derived from Mucor miehei. Esterase-lipase enzyme, consisting of enzyme derived from Mucor miehei var. Cooney et Emerson by... Emerson is nonpathogenic and nontoxic in man or other animals. (c) The enzyme is produced by a process...

  2. 21 CFR 173.140 - Esterase-lipase derived from Mucor miehei.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... HUMAN CONSUMPTION Enzyme Preparations and Microorganisms § 173.140 Esterase-lipase derived from Mucor miehei. Esterase-lipase enzyme, consisting of enzyme derived from Mucor miehei var. Cooney et Emerson by... Emerson is nonpathogenic and nontoxic in man or other animals. (c) The enzyme is produced by a process...

  3. Para-nitrobenzyl esterases with enhanced activity in aqueous and nonaqueous media

    DOEpatents

    Arnold, F.H.; Moore, J.C.

    1998-04-21

    A method is disclosed for isolating and identifying modified para-nitrobenzyl esterases. These enzymes exhibit improved stability and/or esterase hydrolysis activity toward selected substrates and under selected reaction conditions relative to the unmodified para-nitrobenzyl esterase. The method involves preparing a library of modified para-nitrobenzyl esterase nucleic acid segments (genes) which have nucleotide sequences that differ from the nucleic acid segment which encodes for unmodified para-nitrobenzyl esterase. The library of modified para-nitrobenzyl nucleic acid segments is expressed to provide a plurality of modified enzymes. The clones expressing modified enzymes are then screened to identify which enzymes have improved esterase activity by measuring the ability of the enzymes to hydrolyze the selected substrate under the selected reaction conditions. Specific modified para-nitrobenzyl esterases are disclosed which have improved stability and/or ester hydrolysis activity in aqueous or aqueous-organic media relative to the stability and/or ester hydrolysis activity of unmodified naturally occurring para-nitrobenzyl esterase. 43 figs.

  4. An Open Receptor-Binding Cavity of Hemagglutinin-Esterase-Fusion Glycoprotein from Newly-Identified Influenza D Virus: Basis for Its Broad Cell Tropism

    PubMed Central

    Song, Hao; Qi, Jianxun; Khedri, Zahra; Diaz, Sandra; Yu, Hai; Chen, Xi; Varki, Ajit; Shi, Yi; Gao, George F.

    2016-01-01

    Influenza viruses cause seasonal flu each year and pandemics or epidemic sporadically, posing a major threat to public health. Recently, a new influenza D virus (IDV) was isolated from pigs and cattle. Here, we reveal that the IDV utilizes 9-O-acetylated sialic acids as its receptor for virus entry. Then, we determined the crystal structures of hemagglutinin-esterase-fusion glycoprotein (HEF) of IDV both in its free form and in complex with the receptor and enzymatic substrate analogs. The IDV HEF shows an extremely similar structural fold as the human-infecting influenza C virus (ICV) HEF. However, IDV HEF has an open receptor-binding cavity to accommodate diverse extended glycan moieties. This structural difference provides an explanation for the phenomenon that the IDV has a broad cell tropism. As IDV HEF is structurally and functionally similar to ICV HEF, our findings highlight the potential threat of the virus to public health. PMID:26816272

  5. An Open Receptor-Binding Cavity of Hemagglutinin-Esterase-Fusion Glycoprotein from Newly-Identified Influenza D Virus: Basis for Its Broad Cell Tropism.

    PubMed

    Song, Hao; Qi, Jianxun; Khedri, Zahra; Diaz, Sandra; Yu, Hai; Chen, Xi; Varki, Ajit; Shi, Yi; Gao, George F

    2016-01-01

    Influenza viruses cause seasonal flu each year and pandemics or epidemic sporadically, posing a major threat to public health. Recently, a new influenza D virus (IDV) was isolated from pigs and cattle. Here, we reveal that the IDV utilizes 9-O-acetylated sialic acids as its receptor for virus entry. Then, we determined the crystal structures of hemagglutinin-esterase-fusion glycoprotein (HEF) of IDV both in its free form and in complex with the receptor and enzymatic substrate analogs. The IDV HEF shows an extremely similar structural fold as the human-infecting influenza C virus (ICV) HEF. However, IDV HEF has an open receptor-binding cavity to accommodate diverse extended glycan moieties. This structural difference provides an explanation for the phenomenon that the IDV has a broad cell tropism. As IDV HEF is structurally and functionally similar to ICV HEF, our findings highlight the potential threat of the virus to public health.

  6. Accumulation of Peptidoglycan O-Acetylation Leads to Altered Cell Wall Biochemistry and Negatively Impacts Pathogenesis Factors of Campylobacter jejuni*

    PubMed Central

    Ha, Reuben; Frirdich, Emilisa; Sychantha, David; Biboy, Jacob; Taveirne, Michael E.; Johnson, Jeremiah G.; DiRita, Victor J.; Vollmer, Waldemar; Clarke, Anthony J.; Gaynor, Erin C.

    2016-01-01

    Campylobacter jejuni is a leading cause of bacterial gastroenteritis in the developed world. Despite its prevalence, its mechanisms of pathogenesis are poorly understood. Peptidoglycan (PG) is important for helical shape, colonization, and host-pathogen interactions in C. jejuni. Therefore, changes in PG greatly impact the physiology of this organism. O-acetylation of peptidoglycan (OAP) is a bacterial phenomenon proposed to be important for proper cell growth, characterized by acetylation of the C6 hydroxyl group of N-acetylmuramic acid in the PG glycan backbone. The OAP gene cluster consists of a PG O-acetyltransferase A (patA) for translocation of acetate into the periplasm, a PG O-acetyltransferase B (patB) for O-acetylation, and an O-acetylpeptidoglycan esterase (ape1) for de-O-acetylation. In this study, reduced OAP in ΔpatA and ΔpatB had minimal impact on C. jejuni growth and fitness under the conditions tested. However, accumulation of OAP in Δape1 resulted in marked differences in PG biochemistry, including O-acetylation, anhydromuropeptide levels, and changes not expected to result directly from Ape1 activity. This suggests that OAP may be a form of substrate level regulation in PG biosynthesis. Ape1 acetylesterase activity was confirmed in vitro using p-nitrophenyl acetate and O-acetylated PG as substrates. In addition, Δape1 exhibited defects in pathogenesis-associated phenotypes, including cell shape, motility, biofilm formation, cell surface hydrophobicity, and sodium deoxycholate sensitivity. Δape1 was also impaired for chick colonization and adhesion, invasion, intracellular survival, and induction of IL-8 production in INT407 cells in vitro. The importance of Ape1 in C. jejuni biology makes it a good candidate as an antimicrobial target. PMID:27474744

  7. Accumulation of Peptidoglycan O-Acetylation Leads to Altered Cell Wall Biochemistry and Negatively Impacts Pathogenesis Factors of Campylobacter jejuni.

    PubMed

    Ha, Reuben; Frirdich, Emilisa; Sychantha, David; Biboy, Jacob; Taveirne, Michael E; Johnson, Jeremiah G; DiRita, Victor J; Vollmer, Waldemar; Clarke, Anthony J; Gaynor, Erin C

    2016-10-21

    Campylobacter jejuni is a leading cause of bacterial gastroenteritis in the developed world. Despite its prevalence, its mechanisms of pathogenesis are poorly understood. Peptidoglycan (PG) is important for helical shape, colonization, and host-pathogen interactions in C. jejuni Therefore, changes in PG greatly impact the physiology of this organism. O-acetylation of peptidoglycan (OAP) is a bacterial phenomenon proposed to be important for proper cell growth, characterized by acetylation of the C6 hydroxyl group of N-acetylmuramic acid in the PG glycan backbone. The OAP gene cluster consists of a PG O-acetyltransferase A (patA) for translocation of acetate into the periplasm, a PG O-acetyltransferase B (patB) for O-acetylation, and an O-acetylpeptidoglycan esterase (ape1) for de-O-acetylation. In this study, reduced OAP in ΔpatA and ΔpatB had minimal impact on C. jejuni growth and fitness under the conditions tested. However, accumulation of OAP in Δape1 resulted in marked differences in PG biochemistry, including O-acetylation, anhydromuropeptide levels, and changes not expected to result directly from Ape1 activity. This suggests that OAP may be a form of substrate level regulation in PG biosynthesis. Ape1 acetylesterase activity was confirmed in vitro using p-nitrophenyl acetate and O-acetylated PG as substrates. In addition, Δape1 exhibited defects in pathogenesis-associated phenotypes, including cell shape, motility, biofilm formation, cell surface hydrophobicity, and sodium deoxycholate sensitivity. Δape1 was also impaired for chick colonization and adhesion, invasion, intracellular survival, and induction of IL-8 production in INT407 cells in vitro The importance of Ape1 in C. jejuni biology makes it a good candidate as an antimicrobial target. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  8. Analysis of acetylation stoichiometry suggests that SIRT3 repairs nonenzymatic acetylation lesions.

    PubMed

    Weinert, Brian T; Moustafa, Tarek; Iesmantavicius, Vytautas; Zechner, Rudolf; Choudhary, Chunaram

    2015-11-03

    Acetylation is frequently detected on mitochondrial enzymes, and the sirtuin deacetylase SIRT3 is thought to regulate metabolism by deacetylating mitochondrial proteins. However, the stoichiometry of acetylation has not been studied and is important for understanding whether SIRT3 regulates or suppresses acetylation. Using quantitative mass spectrometry, we measured acetylation stoichiometry in mouse liver tissue and found that SIRT3 suppressed acetylation to a very low stoichiometry at its target sites. By examining acetylation changes in the liver, heart, brain, and brown adipose tissue of fasted mice, we found that SIRT3-targeted sites were mostly unaffected by fasting, a dietary manipulation that is thought to regulate metabolism through SIRT3-dependent deacetylation. Globally increased mitochondrial acetylation in fasted liver tissue, higher stoichiometry at mitochondrial acetylation sites, and greater sensitivity of SIRT3-targeted sites to chemical acetylation in vitro and fasting-induced acetylation in vivo, suggest a nonenzymatic mechanism of acetylation. Our data indicate that most mitochondrial acetylation occurs as a low-level nonenzymatic protein lesion and that SIRT3 functions as a protein repair factor that removes acetylation lesions from lysine residues.

  9. A Comparison of Multiple Esterases as Biomarkers of Organophosphate Exposure and Effect in Two Earthworm Species

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, Ashley; Stoskopf, Michael K.

    2011-01-01

    Two different earthworm species, Eisenia fetida and Lumbricus terrestris, were exposed to 5 μg/cm2 of malathion to evaluate their usefulness as sentinels of organophosphate exposure and to assess three different esterases, as biomarkers of malathion exposure and effect. Tissue xenobiotic burdens and esterase activity were determined for each species and each esterase in order to assess variability. E. fetida exhibited 4-fold less variability in tissue burdens than did L. terrestris and had less variable basal esterase activities. An attempt was made to correlate malathion and malaoxon tissue burdens with esterase activity post-exposure. There was no malaoxon present in the earthworm tissues. No significant correlations were determined by comparing acetylcholinesterase, butyrylcholinesterase, nor carboxylesterase activities with malathion burdens. PMID:21404045

  10. Organophosphate acetylcholine esterase inhibitor poisoning from a home-made shampoo.

    PubMed

    Sadaka, Yair; Broides, Arnon; Tzion, Raffi Lev; Lifshitz, Matitiahu

    2011-07-01

    Organophosphate acetylcholine esterase inhibitor poisoning is a major health problem in children. We report an unusual cause of organophosphate acetylcholine esterase inhibitor poisoning. Two children were admitted to the pediatric intensive care unit due to organophosphate acetylcholine esterase inhibitor poisoning after exposure from a home-made shampoo that was used for the treatment of head lice. Owing to no obvious source of poisoning, the diagnosis of organophosphate acetylcholine esterase inhibitor poisoning in one of these patients was delayed. Both patients had an uneventful recovery. Organophosphate acetylcholine esterase inhibitor poisoning from home-made shampoo is possible. In cases where the mode of poisoning is unclear, direct questioning about the use of home-made shampoo is warranted, in these cases the skin and particularly the scalp should be rinsed thoroughly as soon as possible.

  11. Esterase Activity and Intracellular Localization in Reconstructed Human Epidermal Cultured Skin Models

    PubMed Central

    Katayanagi, Mishina; Hashimoto, Fumie

    2015-01-01

    Background Reconstructed human epidermal culture skin models have been developed for cosmetic and pharmaceutical research. Objective This study evaluated the total and carboxyl esterase activities (i.e., Km and Vmax, respectively) and localization in two reconstructed human epidermal culture skin models (LabCyte EPI-MODEL [Japan Tissue Engineering] and EpiDerm [MatTek/Kurabo]). The usefulness of the reconstruction cultured epidermis was also verified by comparison with human and rat epidermis. Methods Homogenized epidermal samples were fractioned by centrifugation. p-nitrophenyl acetate and 4-methylumbelliferyl acetate were used as substrates of total esterase and carboxyl esterase, respectively. Results Total and carboxyl esterase activities were present in the reconstructed human epidermal culture skin models and were localized in the cytosol. Moreover, the activities and localization were the same as those in human and rat epidermis. Conclusion LabCyte EPI-MODEL and EpiDerm are potentially useful for esterase activity prediction in human epidermis. PMID:26082583

  12. Acetylation

    Treesearch

    Roger M. Rowell

    2006-01-01

    Wood was designed after millions of years of evolution, to perform in a wet environment, and nature is programmed to recycle it, in a timely way, back to the basic building blocks of carbon dioxide and water through biological, thermal, aqueous, photochemical, chemical, and mechanical degredations. We learned to use wood, accepting that it changes dimensions with...

  13. A Method to determine lysine acetylation stoichiometries

    SciTech Connect

    Nakayasu, Ernesto S.; Wu, Si; Sydor, Michael A.; Shukla, Anil K.; Weitz, Karl K.; Moore, Ronald J.; Hixson, Kim K.; Kim, Jong Seo; Petyuk, Vladislav A.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana; Qian, Weijun; Smith, Richard D.; Adkins, Joshua N.; Ansong, Charles

    2014-07-21

    A major bottleneck to fully understanding the functional aspects of lysine acetylation is the lack of stoichiometry information. Here we describe a mass spectrometry method using a combination of isotope labeling and detection of a diagnostic fragment ion to determine the stoichiometry of lysine acetylation on proteins globally. Using this technique, we determined the modification occupancy on hundreds of acetylated peptides from cell lysates and cross-validated the measurements via immunoblotting.

  14. Profiling and functional classification of esterases in olive (Olea europaea) pollen during germination.

    PubMed

    Rejón, Juan D; Zienkiewicz, Agnieszka; Rodríguez-García, María Isabel; Castro, Antonio J

    2012-10-01

    A pollen grain contains a number of esterases, many of which are released upon contact with the stigma surface. However, the identity and function of most of these esterases remain unknown. In this work, esterases from olive pollen during its germination were identifided and functionally characterized. The esterolytic capacity of olive (Olea europaea) pollen was examined using in vitro and in-gel enzymatic assays with different enzyme substrates. The functional analysis of pollen esterases was achieved by inhibition assays by using specific inhibitors. The cellular localization of esterase activities was performed using histochemical methods. Olive pollen showed high levels of non-specific esterase activity, which remained steady after hydration and germination. Up to 20 esterolytic bands were identified on polyacrylamide gels. All the inhibitors decreased pollen germinability, but only diisopropyl fluorophosphate (DIFP) hampered pollen tube growth. Non-specific esterase activity is localized on the surface of oil bodies (OBs) and small vesicles, in the pollen intine and in the callose layer of the pollen tube wall. Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity was mostly observed in the apertures, exine and pollen coat, and attached to the pollen tube wall surface and to small cytoplasmic vesicles. In this work, for the first time a systematic functional characterization of esterase enzymes in pollen from a plant species with wet stigma has been carried out. Olive pollen esterases belong to four different functional groups: carboxylesterases, acetylesterases, AChEs and lipases. The cellular localization of esterase activity indicates that the intine is a putative storage site for esterolytic enzymes in olive pollen. Based on inhibition assays and cellular localization of enzymatic activities, it can be concluded that these enzymes are likely to be involved in pollen germination, and pollen tube growth and penetration of the stigma.

  15. Profiling and functional classification of esterases in olive (Olea europaea) pollen during germination

    PubMed Central

    Rejón, Juan D.; Zienkiewicz, Agnieszka; Rodríguez-García, María Isabel; Castro, Antonio J.

    2012-01-01

    Background and Aims A pollen grain contains a number of esterases, many of which are released upon contact with the stigma surface. However, the identity and function of most of these esterases remain unknown. In this work, esterases from olive pollen during its germination were identifided and functionally characterized. Methods The esterolytic capacity of olive (Olea europaea) pollen was examined using in vitro and in-gel enzymatic assays with different enzyme substrates. The functional analysis of pollen esterases was achieved by inhibition assays by using specific inhibitors. The cellular localization of esterase activities was performed using histochemical methods. Key Results Olive pollen showed high levels of non-specific esterase activity, which remained steady after hydration and germination. Up to 20 esterolytic bands were identified on polyacrylamide gels. All the inhibitors decreased pollen germinability, but only diisopropyl fluorophosphate (DIFP) hampered pollen tube growth. Non-specific esterase activity is localized on the surface of oil bodies (OBs) and small vesicles, in the pollen intine and in the callose layer of the pollen tube wall. Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity was mostly observed in the apertures, exine and pollen coat, and attached to the pollen tube wall surface and to small cytoplasmic vesicles. Conclusions In this work, for the first time a systematic functional characterization of esterase enzymes in pollen from a plant species with wet stigma has been carried out. Olive pollen esterases belong to four different functional groups: carboxylesterases, acetylesterases, AChEs and lipases. The cellular localization of esterase activity indicates that the intine is a putative storage site for esterolytic enzymes in olive pollen. Based on inhibition assays and cellular localization of enzymatic activities, it can be concluded that these enzymes are likely to be involved in pollen germination, and pollen tube growth and penetration of

  16. [Partial characterization of esterase activity in a temephos-resistant Aedes aegypti strain].

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, C María Magdalena; Bisset, C Juan A; Hernández, C Hilda; Ricardo, Yanelys; French, Leidys; Pérez, Omayda; Fuentes, Ilario

    2012-01-01

    the esterase enzymes have been defined as the mechanism of resistance to temephos in Aeges aegypti in Cuba, which is the most used larvacide worldwide. to partially characterize the activity of esterases in exposed and nonexposed larvae at sublethal doses of temephos in an Aedes aegypti strain that is resistant to this product. a susceptible reference Aedes aegypti strain (Rockefeller) and another temephos-resistant strain (SANtemFII) were used. The larvae from SANtemF11 strain were exposed to lethal concentration 90 (LC90) of temephos (1 ppm); 10 % of the surviving larvae after 24 hours (SANtem[24 h] was moved to clean water, with no exposure to insecticide for 24 hours (SANtem [48 h]). The activity of esterases was partially characterized in these larvae through biochemical assays and gel-polyacrylamide electrophoresis. The molecular weight of esterase A 4 (ESt. A4) was estimated with the support of sodium duodecyl sulophate (SDS-PAGE). the activity of esterases in SANtemF11 was significantly higher than in Rockefeller strain. Significant reduction of the activity of esterases in surviving larvae was observed (SANtemF11 [24 h], but it increased 24 h later without exposure to temephos. The zymogram showed that 10% of larvae that survived from temephos action, just the esterase A4 band increased if compared with those of SAntemF11. The estimated molecular weight of esterase A4 was 58 kDa. the presence of a specific band of esterase (58 kDa) in surviving larvae confirmed the role of these enzymes in insecticidal resistance. The diagnosis of the function of the esterases in resistance to temephos through biochemical tests should not be made in larvae exposed to sublethal doses of this insecticide, in order to avoid false negatives.

  17. Branched nanotrees with immobilized acetylcholine esterase for nanobiosensor applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Risveden, Klas; Dick, Kimberly A.; Bhand, Sunil; Rydberg, Patrik; Samuelson, Lars; Danielsson, Bengt

    2010-02-01

    A novel lab-on-a-chip nanotree enzyme reactor is demonstrated for the detection of acetylcholine. The reactors are intended for use in the RISFET (regional ion sensitive field effect transistor) nanosensor, and are constructed from gold-tipped branched nanorod structures grown on SiNx-covered wafers. Two different reactors are shown: one with simple, one-dimensional nanorods and one with branched nanorod structures (nanotrees). Significantly higher enzymatic activity is found for the nanotree reactors than for the nanorod reactors, most likely due to the increased gold surface area and thereby higher enzyme binding capacity. A theoretical calculation is included to show how the enzyme kinetics and hence the sensitivity can be influenced and increased by the control of electrical fields in relation to the active sites of enzymes in an electronic biosensor. The possible effects of electrical fields employed in the RISFET on the function of acetylcholine esterase is investigated using quantum chemical methods, which show that the small electric field strengths used are unlikely to affect enzyme kinetics. Acetylcholine esterase activity is determined using choline oxidase and peroxidase by measuring the amount of choline formed using the chemiluminescent luminol reaction.

  18. Hemagglutinin-esterase-fusion (HEF) protein of influenza C virus.

    PubMed

    Wang, Mingyang; Veit, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Influenza C virus, a member of the Orthomyxoviridae family, causes flu-like disease but typically only with mild symptoms. Humans are the main reservoir of the virus, but it also infects pigs and dogs. Very recently, influenza C-like viruses were isolated from pigs and cattle that differ from classical influenza C virus and might constitute a new influenza virus genus. Influenza C virus is unique since it contains only one spike protein, the hemagglutinin-esterase-fusion glycoprotein HEF that possesses receptor binding, receptor destroying and membrane fusion activities, thus combining the functions of Hemagglutinin (HA) and Neuraminidase (NA) of influenza A and B viruses. Here we briefly review the epidemiology and pathology of the virus and the morphology of virus particles and their genome. The main focus is on the structure of the HEF protein as well as on its co- and post-translational modification, such as N-glycosylation, disulfide bond formation, S-acylation and proteolytic cleavage into HEF1 and HEF2 subunits. Finally, we describe the functions of HEF: receptor binding, esterase activity and membrane fusion.

  19. A halotolerant type A feruloyl esterase from Pleurotus eryngii.

    PubMed

    Nieter, Annabel; Haase-Aschoff, Paul; Linke, Diana; Nimtz, Manfred; Berger, Ralf G

    2014-03-01

    An extracellular feruloyl esterase (PeFaeA) from the culture supernatant of Pleurotus eryngii was purified to homogeneity using cation exchange, hydrophobic interaction, and size exclusion chromatography. The length of the complete coding sequence of PeFaeA was determined to 1668 bp corresponding to a protein of 555 amino acids. The catalytic triad of Ser-Glu-His demonstrated the uniqueness of the enzyme compared to previously published FAEs. The purified PeFaeA was a monomer with an estimated molecular mass of 67 kDa. Maximum feruloyl esterase (FAE) activity was observed at pH 5.0 and 50 °C, respectively. Metal ions (5 mM), except Hg(2+), had no significant influence on the enzyme activity. Substrate specificity profiling characterized the enzyme as a type A FAE preferring bulky natural substrates, such as feruloylated saccharides, rather than small synthetic ones. Km and kcat of the purified enzyme for methyl ferulate were 0.15 mM and 0.85 s(-1). In the presence of 3 M NaCl activity of the enzyme increased by 28 %. PeFaeA alone released only little ferulic acid from destarched wheat bran (DSWB), whereas after addition of Trichoderma viride xylanase the concentration increased more than 20 fold. Copyright © 2014 The British Mycological Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Food induced esterase phenocopies in the snail Cepaea nemoralis.

    PubMed

    Oxford, G S

    1975-12-01

    Hepatopancreatic extracts from the snail Cepaea nemoralis, assayed straight from the field, often contain three or four heavily staining esterase zones which migrate to the cathodal end of polyacrylamide disc gels during electrophoresis. Previous breeding results showed that the heavily straining zones appeared allelic but to incorporate these multibanded phenotypes, a super gene of five closely linked loci was tentatively proposed. Further breeding work again failed to demonstrate multiple zones in parents or offspring and so experiments were conducted to see whether the multi-zoned phenotypes in the wild were produced by secondary modification of single primary products. Wild snails yielding extracts containing more than two heavily staining zones were shown to possess only two such zones after three months under laboratory conditions. Also, the ingestion of nettle (Urtica dioica L.) has been demonstrated to induce extra esterase zones in laboratory-reared animals. Some of the secondarily induced zones appear identical in physical, biochemical and electrophoretic properties to the primary products of other alleles, and thus appear to be electrophoretic phenocopies. A model is suggested which could account for this phenomenon.

  1. Characterization of Cinnamoyl Esterases from Different Lactobacilli and Bifidobacteria.

    PubMed

    Fritsch, Caroline; Jänsch, André; Ehrmann, Matthias A; Toelstede, Simone; Vogel, Rudi F

    2017-02-01

    A high variety of plants that are used for food production contain esterified hydroxycinnamic acids. As their free forms display several benefits, like an enhanced absorption in human intestinal tract, anti-oxidative and anti-carcinogenic effects, an improved protein solubility and reduced discoloration, the microbial ability to cleave the ester bond is highly desired. In order to examine potential fermentation strains for this purpose, six different lactic acid bacteria and one bifidobacterial strain were screened for their ability to degrade esterified hydroxycinnamic acids because these strains are commonly used for fermentation of plant-based foods. Moreover, their cinnamoyl esterase activity was examined by molecular biological analyses. The enzymes were heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli, purified and biochemically characterized. The purified esterases with a molecular mass around 27-29 kDa had their optimum predominantly between pH 7 and 8 at 20-30 °C. Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis, Lactobacillus gasseri, Lactobacillus acidophilus, Lactobacillus plantarum and Lactobacillus fermentum displayed activities against a broad substrate range (methyl caffeate, methyl trans-p-coumarate, chlorogenic acid as well as partially ethyl ferulate). Concerning substrate affinity, reaction velocity, thermal and pH stability, Lactobacillus gasseri showed the overall best performance. The herein studied lactic acid- and bifidobacteria are promising for the production of fermented plant-based foods with an increased quality and nutritional value.

  2. Purification and biochemical characterization of a turkey preduodenal esterase.

    PubMed

    Cherif, Slim; Miled, Nabil; Kammoun, Maher; Mejdoub, Hafedh; Gargouri, Youssef

    2006-01-01

    A preduodenal esterase was purified to homogeneity from turkey (Meleagris gallopavo) pharyngial tissue. Pure turkey pregastric esterase (TPrE) was obtained after anion exchange chromatography (DEAE-cellulose), Sephacryl S-200 gel filtration, anion exchange chromatography (Mono-Q sepharose) and affinity chromatography (Blue-Gel Affi Gel). The pure enzyme has an apparent molecular mass of 50 kDa, as determined by SDS/PAGE analysis. The optimum pH and temperature for enzyme activity using tributyrin as substrate were 8.5 and 48 degrees C, respectively. Under these conditions, the specific activity measured was 650 U/mg. No significant lipolytic activity was found when was tested on triolein or liprocil as substrates or with monolayer dicaprin with TPrE. In contrast, TPrE displayed a maximal activities of 800, 680 and 520 U/mg with vinyl acetate, vinyl propionate and vinyl butyrate, respectively. This enzyme retained 75% of its maximal activity when incubated for 30 min at pH 4 and 50 degrees C, but it was completely inactivated after an incubation for 10 min at 60 degrees C. The TPrE N-terminal amino acid sequence showed similarities to the N-terminal sequence of a thioesterase from mallard duck, but no similarity with known preduodenal lipases was found.

  3. Vine Trimming Shoots as Substrate for Ferulic Acid Esterases Production.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Rodríguez, N; Outeiriño, D; Torrado Agrasar, A; Domínguez, J M

    2017-02-01

    Ferulic acid esterases (FAE) possess a large variety of biotechnological applications mainly based on their ability to release ferulic acid from lignocellulosic matrixes. The use of vine trimming shoots (VTS), an agricultural waste, as substrate for the generation of this kind of esterases represents an attractive alternative to change the consideration of VTS from residue to resource. Furthermore, xylanase, cellobiase, and cellulase activities were quantified. Six microorganisms were screened for FAE production by solid-state fermentation, and the effects of the additional supplementation and substrate size were also tested. Finally, the process was scaled-up to a horizontal bioreactor where the influence of aeration in enzymatic activities was evaluated. Thus, the optimal FAE activity (0.44 U/g dry VTS) was attained by Aspergillus terreus CECT 2808, in non-additional supplementation media, using the larger particles size of substrate (≤ 5 mm) and at a flow rate of 0.7 L/min.

  4. Acetylation of prostaglandin synthase by aspirin.

    PubMed Central

    Roth, G J; Stanford, N; Majerus, P W

    1975-01-01

    When microsomes of sheep or bovine seminal vesicles are incubated with [acetyl-3H]aspirin (acetyl salicylic acid), 200 Ci/mol, we observe acetylation of a single protein, as measured by sodium dodecyl sulfate/polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The protein has a molecular weight of 85,000 and corresponds to a similar acetylated protein found in the particulate fraction of aspirin-treated human platelets. The aspirin-mediated acetylation reaction proceeds with the same time course and at the same concentration as does the inhibition of prostaglandin synthase (cyclo-oxygenase) (EC 1.14.99.1; 8,11,14-eicosatrienoate, hydrogen-donor:oxygen oxidoreductase) by the drug. At 100 muM aspirin, 50% inhibition of prostaglandin synthase and 50% of maximal acetylation are observed after 15 min at 37 degrees. Furthermore, the substrate for cyclo-oxygenase, arachidonic acid, inhibits protein acetylation by aspirin at concentrations (50% inhibition at 10-30 muM) which correlate with the Michaelis constant of arachidonic acid as a substrate for cyclooxygenase. Arachidonic acid analogues and indomethacin inhibit the acetylation reaction in proportion to their effectiveness as cyclo-oxygenase inhibitors. The results suggest that aspirin acts as an active-site acetylating agent for the enzyme cyclo-oxygenase. This action of aspirin may account for its anti-inflammatory and anti-platelet action. PMID:810797

  5. Characterization and Prediction of Lysine (K)-Acetyl-Transferase Specific Acetylation Sites*

    PubMed Central

    Li, Tingting; Du, Yipeng; Wang, Likun; Huang, Lei; Li, Wenlin; Lu, Ming; Zhang, Xuegong; Zhu, Wei-Guo

    2012-01-01

    Lysine acetylation is a well-studied post-translational modification on both histone and nonhistone proteins. More than 2000 acetylated proteins and 4000 lysine acetylation sites have been identified by large scale mass spectrometry or traditional experimental methods. Although over 20 lysine (K)-acetyl-transferases (KATs) have been characterized, which KAT is responsible for a given protein or lysine site acetylation is mostly unknown. In this work, we collected KAT-specific acetylation sites manually and analyzed sequence features surrounding the acetylated lysine of substrates from three main KAT families (CBP/p300, GCN5/PCAF, and the MYST family). We found that each of the three KAT families acetylates lysines with different sequence features. Based on these differences, we developed a computer program, Acetylation Set Enrichment Based method to predict which KAT-families are responsible for acetylation of a given protein or lysine site. Finally, we evaluated the efficiency of our method, and experimentally detected four proteins that were predicted to be acetylated by two KAT families when one representative member of the KAT family is over expressed. We conclude that our approach, combined with more traditional experimental methods, may be useful for identifying KAT families responsible for acetylated substrates proteome-wide. PMID:21964354

  6. Effect of human serum albumin on drug metabolism: structural evidence of esterase activity of human serum albumin.

    PubMed

    Yang, Feng; Bian, Chuanbing; Zhu, Lili; Zhao, Gengxiang; Huang, Zixiang; Huang, Mingdong

    2007-02-01

    Human serum albumin (HSA) is the most abundant plasma protein in the human body with a plasma concentration of 0.6mM. HSA plays an important role in drug transport and metabolism. Enzymatic activity of HSA on different substrates or drugs has been studied and documented. The structural mechanism of this activity, however, is unknown. In this study, we have determined the crystal structures of HSA-myristate in a complex of aspirin and of salicylic acid, respectively. The crystal structure of HSA-myristate-aspirin illustrates that aspirin transfers acetyl group to Lys199 and is hydrolyzed into salicylic acid by HSA. The hydrolysis product, salicylic acid, remains bound to HSA at a similar location, but it shows a very different orientation when compared with the salicylic acid in the HSA-myristate-salicylic acid ternary complex. These results not only provide the structural evidence of esterase activity of HSA, and demonstrate the conformational plasticity of HSA on drug binding, but also may provide structural information for the modulation of HSA-drug interaction by computational approach based on HSA-drug structure.

  7. A continuous spectrophotometric assay for the determination of diamondback moth esterase activity.

    PubMed

    He, Xiaodun

    2003-10-01

    Conventional methods to determine esterase activity from insects are composed of a three-step process where the enzyme is allowed to hydrolyze a 1-naphthyl acetate substrate, that reaction is quenched by a SDS detergent, and then a Fast Blue B dye complex is formed with 1-naphthol, the product of 1-naphthyl acetate hydrolysis. These methods measure dye-product complex rather than the product, 1-naphthol. A new assay is presented that continuously monitors the formation of 1-naphthol with the hydrolysis of an esterase substrate. The esterase activity was determined as the slope of the linear regression change in absorbance over time at 320 nm. The continuous assay provides a simple, rapid, and sensitive method for measuring esterases extracted from a single diamondback moth in 1-10 min. The detection limit of the assay is approximately 0.6 microM 1-naphthol. The 1-naphthol product from the esterase reaction was confirmed by HPLC analysis. According to the assay, the K(m) and V(max) values of the esterase were 28 +/- 2 microM and 6.0 +/- 0.1 microM/min, respectively, at 37 degrees C for 1-naphthyl acetate. The K(i) value was 9 +/- 2 microM using azadirachtin, an insecticide from neem tree, Azadirachta indica (A.Juss). Azadirachtin was a reversible competitive inhibitor of the esterase activity.

  8. An organic-solvent-tolerant esterase from thermophilic Bacillus licheniformis S-86.

    PubMed

    Torres, Sebastián; Martínez, M Alejandra; Pandey, Ashok; Castro, Guillermo R

    2009-01-01

    A thermophile, halotolerant and organic-solvent-tolerant esterase producer Bacillus sp. S-86 strain previously isolated was found to belong to Bacillus licheniformis species through morphological, biochemical, 16S rRNA gene sequence analyses and rDNA intergenic spacers amplification (ITS-PCR). The strain can grow at 55 degrees C in presence of C2-C7 alkanols (log P=-0.86 to 2.39), and NaCl concentrations up to 15% (w/v). This bacterium showed optimal growth and esterase production at 50 degrees C. Two different molecular weight esterase activities were detected in zymographic assays. PMSF inhibited type I esterase activity, showing no inhibitory effect on type II esterase activity. B. licheniformis S-86 was able to grow in presence of hydroxylic organic-solvents like propan-2-ol, butan-1-ol and 3-methylbutan-1-ol. At a sub-lethal concentration of these solvents (392 mmoll(-1) propan-2-ol; 99 mmol l(-1) butan-1-ol, 37 mmol l(-1) 3-methylbutan-1-ol), adequate to produce 50% cell growth inhibition at 50 degrees C, an increment between 1.9 and 2.3 times was observed in type I esterase production, and between 2.2 and 3.1 times in type II esterase production.

  9. Comparative Autosomal Linkage in Mammals: Genetics of Esterases in MUS MUSCULUS and RATTUS NORVEGICUS

    PubMed Central

    Womack, James E.; Sharp, Mark

    1976-01-01

    Recombination between Esterase-4 and Esterase-2 in the rat was not observed in 278 backcross offspring. Es-4 is thus included within the "esterase cluster" in Linkage group V. A new map of this region was constructed and the relationship of the four esterase loci was found to be: Es-4–(9.6 ± 1.6 cM)–Es-2, Es-4–(1.5 ± 0.7 cM)–Es-3 . Homology of this region with a region of Linkage Group XVIII (Chromosome 8) of the mouse was proposed on the basis of tissue distribution, subcellular localization and response of enzymes to inhibitors. Specifically, rat Es-1 was suggested as the homolog of mouse Es-2, rat Es-2 as the homolog of mouse Es-1, and rat Es-4 as the homolog of mouse Es-6. An autosomal segment comprising at least 15 cM of the rat and mouse genomes appears to have remained relatively intact with respect to genetic content during rodent speciation. In addition, a new polymorphism for mouse esterase was described. The locus was designated Esterase-10 (Es-10) and proposed as the mouse homolog of human Esterase D. Linkage of Es-10 with nucleoside phosphorylase-1 (Np-1) on Chromosome 14 was established. PMID:57899

  10. A Bacterial Cocaine Esterase Protects Against Cocaine-Induced Epileptogenic Activity and Lethality

    PubMed Central

    Jutkiewicz, Emily M.; Baladi, Michelle G.; Cooper, Ziva D.; Narasimhan, Diwahar; Sunahara, Roger K.; Woods, James H.

    2012-01-01

    Study objective Cocaine toxicity results in cardiovascular complications, seizures, and death and accounts for approximately 20% of drug-related emergency department visits every year. Presently, there are no treatments to eliminate the toxic effects of cocaine. The present study hypothesizes that a bacterial cocaine esterase with high catalytic efficiency would provide rapid and robust protection from cocaine-induced convulsions, epileptogenic activity, and lethality. Methods Cocaine-induced paroxysmal activity and convulsions were evaluated in rats surgically implanted with radiotelemetry devices (N=6 per treatment group). Cocaine esterase was administered 1 minute after a lethal dose of cocaine or after cocaine-induced convulsions to determine the ability of the enzyme to prevent or reverse, respectively, the effects of cocaine. Results The cocaine esterase prevented all cocaine-induced electroencephalographic changes and lethality. This effect was specific for cocaine because the esterase did not prevent convulsions and death induced by a cocaine analog, (−)-2β-carbomethoxy-3β-phenyltropane. The esterase prevented lethality even after cocaine-induced convulsions occurred. In contrast, the short-acting benzodiazepine, midazolam, prevented cocaine-induced convulsions but not the lethal effects of cocaine. Conclusion The data showed that cocaine esterase successfully degraded circulating cocaine to prevent lethality and that cocaine-induced convulsions alone are not responsible for the lethal effects of cocaine in this model. Therefore, further investigation into the use of cocaine esterase for treating cocaine overdose and its toxic effects is warranted. PMID:19013687

  11. A Method to Determine Lysine Acetylation Stoichiometries

    DOE PAGES

    Nakayasu, Ernesto S.; Wu, Si; Sydor, Michael A.; ...

    2014-01-01

    Lysine acetylation is a common protein posttranslational modification that regulates a variety of biological processes. A major bottleneck to fully understanding the functional aspects of lysine acetylation is the difficulty in measuring the proportion of lysine residues that are acetylated. Here we describe a mass spectrometry method using a combination of isotope labeling and detection of a diagnostic fragment ion to determine the stoichiometry of protein lysine acetylation. Using this technique, we determined the modification occupancy for ~750 acetylated peptides from mammalian cell lysates. Furthermore, the acetylation on N-terminal tail of histone H4 was cross-validated by treating cells with sodiummore » butyrate, a potent deacetylase inhibitor, and comparing changes in stoichiometry levels measured by our method with immunoblotting measurements. Of note we observe that acetylation stoichiometry is high in nuclear proteins, but very low in mitochondrial and cytosolic proteins. In summary, our method opens new opportunities to study in detail the relationship of lysine acetylation levels of proteins with their biological functions.« less

  12. Lysine acetylation and cancer: A proteomics perspective.

    PubMed

    Gil, Jeovanis; Ramírez-Torres, Alberto; Encarnación-Guevara, Sergio

    2017-01-06

    Lysine acetylation is a reversible modification controlled by two groups of enzymes: lysine acetyltransferases (KATs) and lysine deacetylases (KDACs). Acetylated lysine residues are recognized by bromodomains, a family of evolutionarily conserved domains. The use of high-resolution mass spectrometry-based proteomics, in combination with the enrichment of acetylated peptides through immunoprecipitation with anti-acetyl-lysine antibodies, has expanded the number of acetylated proteins from histones and a few nuclear proteins to more than 2000 human proteins. Because acetylation targets almost all cellular processes, this modification has been associated with cancer. Several KATs, KDACs and bromodomain-containing proteins have been linked to cancer development. Many small molecules targeting some of these proteins have been or are being tested as potential cancer therapies. The stoichiometry of lysine acetylation has not been explored in cancer, representing a promising field in which to increase our knowledge of how this modification is affected in cancer. In this review, we will focus on the strategies that can be used to go deeper in the characterization of the protein lysine acetylation emphasizing in cancer research.

  13. Rational approaches, design strategies, structure activity relationship and mechanistic insights for esterase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Singh, Harbinder; Singh, Jatinder Vir; Kaur, Navdeep; Sanduja, Mohit; Singh, Gurpreet; Bedi, Preet Mohinder Singh; Sharma, Sahil

    2017-08-07

    Esterase is an enzyme that splits esters into an acid and alcohol. Varieties of esterases are present in human body to control diverse set of cellular processes and execute their specific functions. It can be seen that any increase in metabolites produced by these enzymes lead to severe pathological conditions like Alzheimer disease, hypercholesterolemia etc. Numerous esterase inhibitors have been developed and reported by the researchers around the globe, but not systematically summarized yet. Therefore, this assemblage focuses on various reported esterase inhibitors during recent past with detailed account of the design strategies employed for the synthesis of novel drug entities. The article also highlights the structure activity relationship along with mechanistic insights revealed during the biological evaluation of inhibitors as esterase inhibition. The interactions with the amino acid residues responsible for esterase inhibitory potential of molecules have also been discussed. This compilation will be of great interest for the researchers working in the area of esterase inhibitors. Rivastigmine derivatives (44-53), tacrine-piperazine hybrid (136), coumarin-benzofuran derivative (169), coumarin-benzylpiperidine hybrid (181) and phenylcinnamide derivative (220) found to be exerting cholinesterase inhibition with IC50 below the range of 1 nM. Whereas, flavone (258) has displayed anticholesterol esterase potential below 1 nM. Benzil like derivative, (273) has also been designed and reported to possess remarkable inhibitory potential (IC50 < 1 nM) against carboxylesterase. These representative results place them in forefront as potential future drug candidates to further develop potent and specific esterase inhibitors. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  14. Metabolic control of methylation and acetylation.

    PubMed

    Su, Xiaoyang; Wellen, Kathryn E; Rabinowitz, Joshua D

    2016-02-01

    Methylation and acetylation of DNA and histone proteins are the chemical basis for epigenetics. From bacteria to humans, methylation and acetylation are sensitive to cellular metabolic status. Modification rates depend on the availability of one-carbon and two-carbon substrates (S-adenosylmethionine, acetyl-CoA, and in bacteria also acetyl-phosphate). In addition, they are sensitive to demodification enzyme cofactors (α-ketoglutarate, NAD(+)) and structural analog metabolites that function as epigenetic enzyme inhibitors (e.g., S-adenosylhomocysteine, 2-hydroxyglutarate). Methylation and acetylation likely initially evolved to tailor protein activities in microbes to their metabolic milieu. While the extracellular environment of mammals is more tightly controlled, the combined impact of nutrient abundance and metabolic enzyme expression impacts epigenetics in mammals sufficiently to drive important biological outcomes such as stem cell fate and cancer.

  15. SPOTing Acetyl-Lysine Dependent Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Picaud, Sarah; Filippakopoulos, Panagis

    2015-01-01

    Post translational modifications have been recognized as chemical signals that create docking sites for evolutionary conserved effector modules, allowing for signal integration within large networks of interactions. Lysine acetylation in particular has attracted attention as a regulatory modification, affecting chromatin structure and linking to transcriptional activation. Advances in peptide array technologies have facilitated the study of acetyl-lysine-containing linear motifs interacting with the evolutionary conserved bromodomain module, which specifically recognizes and binds to acetylated sequences in histones and other proteins. Here we summarize recent work employing SPOT peptide technology to identify acetyl-lysine dependent interactions and document the protocols adapted in our lab, as well as our efforts to characterize such bromodomain-histone interactions. Our results highlight the versatility of SPOT methods and establish an affordable tool for rapid access to potential protein/modified-peptide interactions involving lysine acetylation. PMID:27600229

  16. Metabolic control of methylation and acetylation

    PubMed Central

    Su, Xiaoyang; Wellen, Kathryn E.; Rabinowitz, Joshua D

    2015-01-01

    Methylation and acetylation of DNA and histone proteins are the chemical basis for epigenetics. From bacteria to humans, methylation and acetylation are sensitive to cellular metabolic status. Modification rates depend on the availability of one-carbon and two-carbon substrates (S-adenosylmethionine, acetyl-CoA, and in bacteria also acetyl-phosphate). In addition, they are sensitive to demodification enzyme cofactors (α-ketoglutarate, NAD+) and structural analog metabolites that function as epigenetic enzyme inhibitors (e.g., S-adenosylhomocysteine, 2-hydroxyglutarate). Methylation and acetylation likely initially evolved to tailor protein activities in microbes to their metabolic milieu. While the extracellular environment of mammals is more tightly controlled, the combined impact of nutrient abundance and metabolic enzyme expression impacts epigenetics in mammals sufficiently to drive important biological outcomes such as stem cell fate and cancer. PMID:26629854

  17. Heterologous Expression of Two Ferulic Acid Esterases from Penicillium funiculosum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knoshaug, Eric P.; Selig, Michael J.; Baker, John O.; Decker, Stephen R.; Himmel, Michael E.; Adney, William S.

    Two recombinant ferulic acid esterases from Penicillium funiculosum produced in Aspergillus awamori were evaluated for their ability to improve the digestibility of pretreated corn stover. The genes, faeA and faeB, were cloned from P. funiculosum and expressed in A. awamori using their native signal sequences. Both enzymes contain a catalytic domain connected to a family 1 carbohydrate-binding module by a threonine-rich linker peptide. Interestingly, the carbohydrate binding-module is N-terminal in FaeA and C-terminal in FaeB. The enzymes were purified to homogeneity using column chromatography, and their thermal stability was characterized by differential scanning microcalorimetry. We evaluated both enzymes for their potential to enhance the cellulolytic activity of purified Trichoderma reesei Cel7A on pretreated corn stover.

  18. Heterologous Expression of Two Ferulic Acid Esterases from Penicillium Funiculosum

    SciTech Connect

    Knoshaug, E. P.; Selig, M. J.; Baker, J. O.; Decker, S. R.; Himmel, M. E.; Adney, W. S.

    2008-01-01

    Two recombinant ferulic acid esterases from Penicillium funiculosum produced in Aspergillus awamori were evaluated for their ability to improve the digestibility of pretreated corn stover. The genes, faeA and faeB, were cloned from P. funiculosum and expressed in A. awamori using their native signal sequences. Both enzymes contain a catalytic domain connected to a family 1 carbohydrate-binding module by a threonine-rich linker peptide. Interestingly, the carbohydrate binding-module is N-terminal in FaeA and C-terminal in FaeB. The enzymes were purified to homogeneity using column chromatography, and their thermal stability was characterized by differential scanning microcalorimetry. We evaluated both enzymes for their potential to enhance the cellulolytic activity of purified Trichoderma reesei Cel7A on pretreated corn stover.

  19. β-Glucuronidase-coupled assays of glucuronoyl esterases.

    PubMed

    Fraňová, Lucia; Puchart, Vladimír; Biely, Peter

    2016-10-01

    Glucuronoyl esterases (GEs) are microbial enzymes with potential to cleave the ester bonds between lignin alcohols and xylan-bound 4-O-methyl-d-glucuronic acid in plant cell walls. This activity renders GEs attractive research targets for biotechnological applications. One of the factors impeding the progress in GE research is the lack of suitable substrates. In this work, we report a facile preparation of methyl esters of chromogenic 4-nitrophenyl and 5-bromo-4-chloro-3-indolyl β-D-glucuronides for qualitative and quantitative GE assay coupled with β-glucuronidase as the auxiliary enzyme. The indolyl derivative affording a blue indigo-type product is suitable for rapid and sensitive assay of GE in commercial preparations as well as for high throughput screening of microorganisms and genomic and metagenomic libraries. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Plasma B-esterase activities in European raptors.

    PubMed

    Roy, Claudie; Grolleau, Gérard; Chamoulaud, Serge; Rivière, Jean-Louis

    2005-01-01

    B-esterases are serine hydrolases composed of cholinesterases, including acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and butyrylcholinesterase (BChE), and carboxylesterase (CbE). These esterases, found in blood plasma, are inhibited by organophosphorus (OP) and carbamate (CB) insecticides and can be used as nondestructive biomarkers of exposure to anticholinesterase insecticides. Furthermore, B-esterases are involved in detoxification of these insecticides. In order to establish the level of these enzymes and to have reference values for their normal activities, total plasma cholinesterase (ChE), AChE and BChE activities, and plasma CbE activity were determined in 729 European raptors representing 20 species, four families, and two orders. The diurnal families of the Falconiforme order were represented by Accipitridae and Falconidae and the nocturnal families of the Strigiforme order by Tytonidae and Strigidae. Intraspecies differences in cholinesterase activities according to sex and/or age were investigated in buzzards (Buteo buteo), sparrowhawks (Accipiter nisus), kestrels (Falco tinnunculus), barn owls (Tyto alba), and tawny owls (Strix aluco). Sex-related differences affecting ChE and AChE activities were observed in young kestrels (2-3-mo-old) and age-related differences in kestrels (ChE and AChE), sparrowhawks (AChE), and tawny owls (ChE, AChE, and BChE). The interspecies analysis yielded a negative correlation between ChE activity and body mass taking into account the relative contribution of AChE and BChE to ChE activity, with the exception of the honey buzzard (Pernis apivorus). The lowest ChE activities were found in the two largest species, Bonelli's eagle (Hieraaetus fasciatus) and Egyptian vulture (Neophron percnopterus) belonging to the Accipitridae family. The highest ChE activities were found in the relatively small species belonging to the Tytonidae and Strigidae families and in honey buzzard of the Accipitridae family. Species of the Accipitridae, Tytonidae, and

  1. Identification of two feruloyl esterases in Dickeya dadantii 3937 and induction of the major feruloyl esterase and of pectate lyases by ferulic acid.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Susan; Hugouvieux-Cotte-Pattat, Nicole

    2011-02-01

    The plant-pathogenic bacterium Dickeya dadantii (formerly Erwinia chrysanthemi) produces a large array of plant cell wall-degrading enzymes. Using an in situ detection test, we showed that it produces two feruloyl esterases, FaeD and FaeT. These enzymes cleave the ester link between ferulate and the pectic or xylan chains. FaeD and FaeT belong to the carbohydrate esterase family CE10, and they are the first two feruloyl esterases to be identified in this family. Cleavage of synthetic substrates revealed strong activation of FaeD and FaeT by ferulic acid. The gene faeT appeared to be weakly expressed, and its product, FaeT, is a cytoplasmic protein. In contrast, the gene faeD is strongly induced in the presence of ferulic acid, and FaeD is an extracellular protein secreted by the Out system, responsible for pectinase secretion. The product of the adjacent gene faeR is involved in the positive control of faeD in response to ferulic acid. Moreover, ferulic acid acts in synergy with polygalacturonate to induce pectate lyases, the main virulence determinant of soft rot disease. Feruloyl esterases dissociate internal cross-links in the polysaccharide network of the plant cell wall, suppress the polysaccharide esterifications, and liberate ferulic acid, which contributes to the induction of pectate lyases. Together, these effects of feruloyl esterases could facilitate soft rot disease caused by pectinolytic bacteria.

  2. The structure- and metal-dependent activity of Escherichia coli PgaB provides insight into the partial de-N-acetylation of poly-β-1,6-N-acetyl-D-glucosamine.

    PubMed

    Little, Dustin J; Poloczek, Joanna; Whitney, John C; Robinson, Howard; Nitz, Mark; Howell, P Lynne

    2012-09-07

    Exopolysaccharides are required for the development and integrity of biofilms produced by a wide variety of bacteria. In Escherichia coli, partial de-N-acetylation of the exopolysaccharide poly-β-1,6-N-acetyl-D-glucosamine (PNAG) by the periplasmic protein PgaB is required for polysaccharide intercellular adhesin-dependent biofilm formation. To understand the molecular basis for PNAG de-N-acetylation, the structure of PgaB in complex with Ni(2+) and Fe(3+) have been determined to 1.9 and 2.1 Å resolution, respectively, and its activity on β-1,6-GlcNAc oligomers has been characterized. The structure of PgaB reveals two (β/α)(x) barrel domains: a metal-binding de-N-acetylase that is a member of the family 4 carbohydrate esterases (CE4s) and a domain structurally similar to glycoside hydrolases. PgaB displays de-N-acetylase activity on β-1,6-GlcNAc oligomers but not on the β-1,4-(GlcNAc)(4) oligomer chitotetraose and is the first CE4 member to exhibit this substrate specificity. De-N-acetylation occurs in a length-dependent manor, and specificity is observed for the position of de-N-acetylation. A key aspartic acid involved in de-N-acetylation, normally seen in other CE4s, is missing in PgaB, suggesting that the activity of PgaB is attenuated to maintain the low levels of de-N-acetylation of PNAG observed in vivo. The metal dependence of PgaB is different from most CE4s, because PgaB shows increased rates of de-N-acetylation with Co(2+) and Ni(2+) under aerobic conditions, and Co(2+), Ni(2+) and Fe(2+) under anaerobic conditions, but decreased activity with Zn(2+). The work presented herein will guide inhibitor design to combat biofilm formation by E. coli and potentially a wide range of medically relevant bacteria producing polysaccharide intercellular adhesin-dependent biofilms.

  3. The Structure- and Metal-dependent Activity of Escherichia coli PgaB Provides Insight into the Partial De-N-acetylation of Poly-β-1,6-N-acetyl-d-glucosamine*

    PubMed Central

    Little, Dustin J.; Poloczek, Joanna; Whitney, John C.; Robinson, Howard; Nitz, Mark; Howell, P. Lynne

    2012-01-01

    Exopolysaccharides are required for the development and integrity of biofilms produced by a wide variety of bacteria. In Escherichia coli, partial de-N-acetylation of the exopolysaccharide poly-β-1,6-N-acetyl-d-glucosamine (PNAG) by the periplasmic protein PgaB is required for polysaccharide intercellular adhesin-dependent biofilm formation. To understand the molecular basis for PNAG de-N-acetylation, the structure of PgaB in complex with Ni2+ and Fe3+ have been determined to 1.9 and 2.1 Å resolution, respectively, and its activity on β-1,6-GlcNAc oligomers has been characterized. The structure of PgaB reveals two (β/α)x barrel domains: a metal-binding de-N-acetylase that is a member of the family 4 carbohydrate esterases (CE4s) and a domain structurally similar to glycoside hydrolases. PgaB displays de-N-acetylase activity on β-1,6-GlcNAc oligomers but not on the β-1,4-(GlcNAc)4 oligomer chitotetraose and is the first CE4 member to exhibit this substrate specificity. De-N-acetylation occurs in a length-dependent manor, and specificity is observed for the position of de-N-acetylation. A key aspartic acid involved in de-N-acetylation, normally seen in other CE4s, is missing in PgaB, suggesting that the activity of PgaB is attenuated to maintain the low levels of de-N-acetylation of PNAG observed in vivo. The metal dependence of PgaB is different from most CE4s, because PgaB shows increased rates of de-N-acetylation with Co2+ and Ni2+ under aerobic conditions, and Co2+, Ni2+ and Fe2+ under anaerobic conditions, but decreased activity with Zn2+. The work presented herein will guide inhibitor design to combat biofilm formation by E. coli and potentially a wide range of medically relevant bacteria producing polysaccharide intercellular adhesin-dependent biofilms. PMID:22810235

  4. Antitumor and antimetastatic activities of rhamnogalacturonan-II-type polysaccharide isolated from mature leaves of green tea via activation of macrophages and natural killer cells.

    PubMed

    Park, Hye-Ryung; Hwang, Dahyun; Suh, Hyung-Joo; Yu, Kwang-Won; Kim, Tae Young; Shin, Kwang-Soon

    2017-06-01

    To investigate the antitumor and antimetastatic polysaccharide from the mature leaves of green tea, GTE-II was purified using size exclusion chromatography. GTE-II consisted of 15 different sugars including rarely observed sugars such as 2-O-methyl-fucose, 2-O-methyl-xylose, apiose, aceric acid, 3-deoxy-d-manno-2-octulosonic acid, and 3-deoxy-d-lyxo-2-heptulosaric acid, which were characteristics of pectic polysaccharide rhamnogalacturonan-II. Treatment of peritoneal macrophages with GTE-II not only increased interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-12 production, but also had significantly increased tumoricidal activity against Yac-1 tumor cells than those obtained from untreated mice. In an assay of natural killer (NK) cell activity, intravenous administration of GTE-II significantly stimulated NK cytotoxicity against Yac-1 tumor cells. Furthermore, the depletion of NK cells by injection of rabbit anti-asialo GM1 serum eliminated the inhibitory effect of GTE-II on B16BL6 melanoma cells. These data suggest that GTE-II inhibits tumor metastasis, and its antitumor effect is associated with activation of macrophages and NK cells. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. The structurally effect of surface coated rhamnogalacturonan I on response of the osteoblast-like cell line SaOS-2.

    PubMed

    Svava, Rikke; Gurzawska, Katarzyna; Yihau, Yu; Haugshøj, Kenneth Brian; Dirscherl, Kai; Levery, Steven B; Jørgensen, Niklas Rye; Gotfredsen, Klaus; Damager, Iben; Ulvskov, Peter; Jørgensen, Bodil

    2014-06-01

    Osseointegration is important when implants are inserted into the bone and can be improved by biochemical surface coating of the implant. In this paper enzymatically modified rhamnogalacturonan I (RG-I) from apple and lupin was used for biochemical coating of aminated surfaces and the importance of the quality of RG-I, the nature of the binding, the fine structure of RG-I, and its effect on SaOS-2 cell line cultured on coated surfaces was investigated. SaOS-2 cells are osteoblast-like cells and a well-established in vitro model of bone-matrix forming osteoblasts. Purification by gel filtration could remove small fragments of galacturonic acid (GalA) and binding studies showed that the purity of the RG-I molecules was important for the quality of the coating. The structure of RG-I and osteoblast-like cells' viability were positively correlated so that high content of 1,4-linked galactose (Gal) and a low content of arabinose in the RG-I molecules favored cell viability. These results indicate that coating of implants with RG-I affect osseointegration positively. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Nonhistone protein acetylation as cancer therapy targets

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Brahma N; Zhang, Guanghua; Hwa, Yi L; Li, Jinping; Dowdy, Sean C; Jiang, Shi-Wen

    2012-01-01

    Acetylation and deacetylation are counteracting, post-translational modifications that affect a large number of histone and nonhistone proteins. The significance of histone acetylation in the modification of chromatin structure and dynamics, and thereby gene transcription regulation, has been well recognized. A steadily growing number of nonhistone proteins have been identified as acetylation targets and reversible lysine acetylation in these proteins plays an important role(s) in the regulation of mRNA stability, protein localization and degradation, and protein–protein and protein–DNA interactions. The recruitment of histone acetyltransferases (HATs) and histone deacetylases (HDACs) to the transcriptional machinery is a key element in the dynamic regulation of genes controlling cellular proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis. Many nonhistone proteins targeted by acetylation are the products of oncogenes or tumor-suppressor genes and are directly involved in tumorigenesis, tumor progression and metastasis. Aberrant activity of HDACs has been documented in several types of cancers and HDAC inhibitors (HDACi) have been employed for therapeutic purposes. Here we review the published literature in this field and provide updated information on the regulation and function of nonhistone protein acetylation. While concentrating on the molecular mechanism and pathways involved in the addition and removal of the acetyl moiety, therapeutic modalities of HDACi are also discussed. PMID:20553216

  7. Acetylation of rice straw for thermoplastic applications.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guangzhi; Huang, Kai; Jiang, Xue; Huang, Dan; Yang, Yiqi

    2013-07-01

    An inexpensive and biodegradable thermoplastic was developed through acetylation of rice straw (RS) with acetic anhydride. Acetylation conditions were optimized. The structure and properties of acetylated RS were characterized by fourier transform infrared (FTIR), solid-state (13)C NMR spectroscopy, X-ray diffractometer (XRD), scanning electron microscope (SEM), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The results showed that acetylation of RS has successfully taken place, and comparing with raw RS, the degree of crystallinity decreased and the decomposition rate was slow. The acetylated RS has got thermoplasticity when weight ratio of RS and acetic anhydride was 1:3, using sulphuric acid (9% to RS) as catalyst in glacial acetic acid 35°C for 12h, and the dosage of solvent was 9 times RS, in which weight percent gain (WPG) of the modified RS powder was 35.5% and its percent acetyl content was 36.1%. The acetylated RS could be formed into transparent thin films with different amount of plasticizer diethyl phthalate (DEP) using tape casting technology.

  8. Acetylation modulates the STAT signaling code.

    PubMed

    Wieczorek, Martin; Ginter, Torsten; Brand, Peter; Heinzel, Thorsten; Krämer, Oliver H

    2012-12-01

    A fascinating question of modern biology is how a limited number of signaling pathways generate biological diversity and crosstalk phenomena in vivo. Well-defined posttranslational modification patterns dictate the functions and interactions of proteins. The signal transducers and activators of transcription (STATs) are physiologically important cytokine-induced transcription factors. They are targeted by a multitude of posttranslational modifications that control and modulate signaling responses and gene expression. Beyond phosphorylation of serine and tyrosine residues, lysine acetylation has recently emerged as a critical modification regulating STAT functions. Interestingly, acetylation can determine STAT signaling codes by various molecular mechanisms, including the modulation of other posttranslational modifications. Here, we provide an overview on the acetylation of STATs and how this protein modification shapes cellular cytokine responses. We summarize recent advances in understanding the impact of STAT acetylation on cell growth, apoptosis, innate immunity, inflammation, and tumorigenesis. Furthermore, we discuss how STAT acetylation can be targeted by small molecules and we consider the possibility that additional molecules controlling STAT signaling are regulated by acetylation. Our review also summarizes evolutionary aspects and we show similarities between the acetylation-dependent control of STATs and other important molecules. We propose the concept that, similar to the 'histone code', distinct posttranslational modifications and their crosstalk orchestrate the functions and interactions of STAT proteins.

  9. Site-Specific Acetyl Lysine Antibodies Reveal Differential Regulation of Histone Acetylation upon Kinase Inhibition.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shi; Chen, Suping; Duan, Qianqian; Xu, Guoqiang

    2017-03-01

    Lysine acetylation regulates diverse biological functions for the modified proteins. Mass spectrometry-based proteomic approaches have identified thousands of lysine acetylation sites in cells and tissues. However, functional studies of these acetylation sites were limited by the lack of antibodies recognizing the specific modification sites. Here, we generated 55 site-specific acetyl lysine antibodies for the detection of this modification in cell lysates and evaluated the quality of these antibodies. Based on the immunoblotting analyses, we found that the nature of amino acid sequences adjacent to the modification sites affected the specificity of the site-specific acetyl lysine antibodies. Amino acids with charged, hydrophilic, small, or flexible side chains adjacent to the modification sites increase the likelihood of obtaining high quality site-specific acetyl lysine antibodies. This result may provide valuable insights in fine-tuning the amino acid sequences of the epitopes for the generation of site-specific acetyl lysine antibodies. Using the site-specific acetyl lysine antibodies, we further discovered that acetylation of histone 3 at four lysine residues was differentially regulated by kinase inhibitors. This result demonstrates the potential application of these antibodies in the study of new signaling pathways that lysine acetylation may participate in.

  10. Acetyl-phosphate is a critical determinant of lysine acetylation in E. coli.

    PubMed

    Weinert, Brian T; Iesmantavicius, Vytautas; Wagner, Sebastian A; Schölz, Christian; Gummesson, Bertil; Beli, Petra; Nyström, Thomas; Choudhary, Chunaram

    2013-07-25

    Lysine acetylation is a frequently occurring posttranslational modification in bacteria; however, little is known about its origin and regulation. Using the model bacterium Escherichia coli (E. coli), we found that most acetylation occurred at a low level and accumulated in growth-arrested cells in a manner that depended on the formation of acetyl-phosphate (AcP) through glycolysis. Mutant cells unable to produce AcP had significantly reduced acetylation levels, while mutant cells unable to convert AcP to acetate had significantly elevated acetylation levels. We showed that AcP can chemically acetylate lysine residues in vitro and that AcP levels are correlated with acetylation levels in vivo, suggesting that AcP may acetylate proteins nonenzymatically in cells. These results uncover a critical role for AcP in bacterial acetylation and indicate that most acetylation in E. coli occurs at a low level and is dynamically affected by metabolism and cell proliferation in a global, uniform manner.

  11. Production of feruloyl/rho-coumaroyl esterase activity by Penicillium expansum, Penicillium brevicompactum and Aspergillus niger.

    PubMed

    Donaghy, J A; McKay, A M

    1995-12-01

    Extracellular esterase production by Penicillium expansum, Penicillium brevicompactum and Aspergillus niger was determined in both liquid and solid-state culture. Methyl ferulate was used as the main carbon source in liquid culture whereas wheat bran and sugar beet pulp were used in solid-state culture. Extracted enzyme for each fungus showed activity in the presence of ONP butyrate, methyl ferulate, methyl coumarate and two 'natural' feruloylated carbohydrate esters. Higher enzyme recoveries were obtained using wheat bran in solid-state culture. Higher levels of feruloyl esterase activity were recovered from P. expansum on all feruloylated substrates than from P. brevicompactum or A. niger. Using ONP butyrate as substrate the pH and temperature optima for the esterases of both Penicillium spp. were 6.0 and 25-30 degrees C. Aspergillus niger esterase activity showed a broader temperature range with an optimum at 40 degrees C.

  12. Evaluation of leukocyte esterase and nitrite strip tests to detect spontaneous bacterial peritonitis in cirrhotic patients

    PubMed Central

    Torun, Serkan; Dolar, Enver; Yilmaz, Yusuf; Keskin, Murat; Kiyici, Murat; Sinirtas, Melda; Sarandol, Emre; Gurel, Selim; Nak, Selim Giray; Gulten, Macit

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the diagnostic efficacy of leukocyte esterase and nitrite reagent strips for bedside diagnosis of spontaneous bacterial peritonitis (SBP). METHODS: A total of 63 consecutive patients with cirrhotic ascites (38 male, 25 female) tested between April 2005 and July 2006 were included in the study. Bedside reagent strip testing was performed on ascitic fluid and the results compared to manual cell counting and ascitic fluid culture. SBP was defined as having a polymorphonuclear ascites count of ≥ 250/mm3. RESULTS: Fifteen samples showed SBP. The sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values of the leukocyte esterase reagent strips were; 93%, 100%, 100%, and 98%, respectively. The sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive value of the nitrite reagent strips were 13%, 93%, 40%, and 77%, respectively. The combination of leukocyte esterase and nitrite reagents strips did not yield statistically significant effects on diagnostic accuracy. CONCLUSION: Leukocyte esterase reagent strips may provide a rapid, bedside diagnostic test for SBP. PMID:18023094

  13. Evaluation of leukocyte esterase and nitrite strip tests to detect spontaneous bacterial peritonitis in cirrhotic patients.

    PubMed

    Torun, Serkan; Dolar, Enver; Yilmaz, Yusuf; Keskin, Murat; Kiyici, Murat; Sinirtas, Melda; Sarandol, Emre; Gurel, Selim; Nak, Selim-Giray; Gulten, Macit

    2007-12-07

    To investigate the diagnostic efficacy of leukocyte esterase and nitrite reagent strips for bedside diagnosis of spontaneous bacterial peritonitis (SBP). A total of 63 consecutive patients with cirrhotic ascites (38 male, 25 female) tested between April 2005 and July 2006 were included in the study. Bedside reagent strip testing was performed on ascitic fluid and the results compared to manual cell counting and ascitic fluid culture. SBP was defined as having a polymorphonuclear ascites count of >or= 250/mm(3). Fifteen samples showed SBP. The sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values of the leukocyte esterase reagent strips were; 93%, 100%, 100%, and 98%, respectively. The sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive value of the nitrite reagent strips were 13%, 93%, 40%, and 77%, respectively. The combination of leukocyte esterase and nitrite reagents strips did not yield statistically significant effects on diagnostic accuracy. Leukocyte esterase reagent strips may provide a rapid, bedside diagnostic test for SBP.

  14. Esterase detoxification of acetylcholinesterase inhibitors by human or rat liver in vitro

    EPA Science Inventory

    Organophosphate (OP) and N-methylcarbamate pesticides inhibit acetylcholinesterase (AChE), but differences in metabolism and detoxification can influence potency of these pesticides across and within species. Carboxylesterase (CaE) and A-esterase (paraoxonase, PON) are considered...

  15. MECHANISMS OF ACTIVATION OF C'1 ESTERASE IN HEREDITARY ANGIONEUROTIC EDEMA PLASMA IN VITRO

    PubMed Central

    Donaldson, Virginia H.

    1968-01-01

    The generation of C'1 esterase activity in siliconed plasma obtained from individuals with hereditary angioneurotic edema in remission tends to occur spontaneously, but can be hastened during its incubation with preparations of activated Hageman factor. This effect of activated Hageman factor could not be shown during its incubation with normal siliconed plasma, nor could consumption of normal serum inhibition of C'1 esterase be clearly shown. Soy bean trypsin inhibitor and heparin could impair this enhanced generation of C'1 esterase but neither inhibits the esterolytic function of C'1 esterase once formed. Trasylol was less effective in blocking this effect of activated Hageman factor. While the mechanism of the effect of activated Hageman factor upon C'1 activation remains obscure, it is apparent that some intermediate steps, possibly involving a kinin-forming system of plasma, may play a role. PMID:5299945

  16. Esterase detoxification of acetylcholinesterase inhibitors by human or rat liver in vitro

    EPA Science Inventory

    Organophosphate (OP) and N-methylcarbamate pesticides inhibit acetylcholinesterase (AChE), but differences in metabolism and detoxification can influence potency of these pesticides across and within species. Carboxylesterase (CaE) and A-esterase (paraoxonase, PON) are considered...

  17. Toxicity testing using esterase inhibition as a biomarker in three species of the genus Lecane (Rotifera).

    PubMed

    Pérez-Legaspi, Ignacio Alejandro; Rico-Martínez, Roberto; Pineda-Rosas, Arikitza

    2002-04-01

    We have developed an esterase inhibition test to investigate the effects of 10 toxicants, including six metals (cadmium, chromium, copper, lead, mercuric chloride, and titanium) and four organics (benzene, ethyl acetate, toluene, and vinyl acetate) in three species of the benthic rotifer genus Lecane (L. hamata, L. luna, and L. quadridentata). Metals affect esterase inhibition by an average value of 4,957-fold greater than the four organics tested for the three rotifer species. Most of the EC50 (effect concentration where a 50% reduction in esterase activity is observed) values correspond to environmentally realistic concentrations. Comparisons of acute-to-chronic ratios among these three species showed that in two species, L. luna and L. quadridentata, esterase inhibition is an outstanding biomarker for most of the toxicants tested.

  18. Influenza C virus esterase: analysis of catalytic site, inhibition, and possible function

    SciTech Connect

    Vlasak, R.; Muster, T.; Lauro, A.M.; Powers, J.C.; Palese, P.

    1989-05-01

    The active site serine of the acetylesterase of influenza C virus was localized to amino acid 71 of the hemagglutinin-esterase protein by affinity labeling with /sup 3/H-labeled diisopropylfluorophosphate. This serine and the adjacent amino acids (Phe-Gly-Asp-Ser) are part of a consensus sequence motif found in serine hydrolases. Since comparative analysis failed to reveal esterase sequence similarities with other serine hydrolases, the authors suggest that this viral enzyme is a serine hydrolase constituting a new family of serine esterases. Furthermore, they found that the influenza C virus esterase was inhibited by isocoumarin derivatives, with 3,4-dichloroisocoumarin being the most potent inhibitor. Addition of this compound prevented elution of influenza C virus from erythrocytes and inhibited virus infectivity, possibly through inhibition of virus entry into cells.

  19. Production of cellulolytic enzymes containing cinnamic acid esterase from Schizophyllum commune.

    PubMed

    Tsujiyama, Sho-ichi; Ueno, Hitomi

    2011-01-01

    To develop enzyme preparations capable of digesting plant biomass, we examined the production of cinnamic acid esterase as well as cellulolytic and xylanolytic enzymes in cultures of Schizophyllum commune. The cinnamic acid esterase was produced in the cultures containing solid cellulosic substrates, with production being enhanced by delignifying the wood powder. This indicates that these esterases are produced by cellulose, despite their substrates being phenolic compounds. Cellulolytic and xylanolytic enzymes, with the exception of α-arabinofuranosidase, were also produced in cultures containing cellulosic substances. These results show that enzyme preparation can have high activity of cinnamic acid esterase and cellulolytic and xylanolytic enzymes when S. commune is incubated in the presence of cellulose. These enzyme preparations will be useful for digesting plant biomass and for releasing cinnamic acid derivatives from plant cell walls.

  20. Esterase-sensitive sulfur dioxide prodrugs inspired by modified Julia olefination.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wenyi; Wang, Binghe

    2017-09-12

    Sulfur dioxide (SO2) is an endogenously produced gaseous molecule, and is emerging as a potential gasotransmitter. Herein, we describe the first series of esterase-sensitive prodrugs inspired by modified Julia olefination as SO2 donors.

  1. Acetyl Fentanyl Toxicity: Two Case Reports.

    PubMed

    Fort, Chelsea; Curtis, Byron; Nichols, Clay; Niblo, Cheryl

    2016-11-01

    Acetyl fentanyl is an illicit fentanyl analog recently appearing in forensic casework. A quantitative method was created for measuring acetyl fentanyl in various biological matrices acquired post-mortem due to recent positive screening results in casework. Initial detection by immunoassay and standard gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC/MS) methods have been previously reported for acetyl fentanyl and are examined further here. A Selective Ion Monitoring (SIM) method was created using a GC/MS for quantitation. In two separate cases, acetyl fentanyl was found to be in similar concentrations to those previously reported and ruled to be the cause of death. Acetyl fentanyl concentrations were determined in blood samples, liver, brain, vitreous humor, and urine. Individual 1 had acetyl fentanyl concentrations as follows: heart blood-285 ng/mL, femoral blood-192 ng/mL, liver-1,100 ng/g, brain-620 ng/g, and urine-3,420 ng/mL. Individual 2 had acetyl fentanyl concentrations as follows: heart blood-210 ng/mL, femoral blood-255 ng/mL, urine-2,720 ng/mL and vitreous humor-140 ng/mL. Experimental conditions for screening and quantitation are provided, using immunoassay and GC/MS methods. Due to the recent emergence of acetyl fentanyl, more data will need to be generated to fully differentiate recreational and fatal concentrations of acetyl fentanyl to assist toxicologists accurately understanding its physiological impact. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Chemical biology of peptidoglycan acetylation and deacetylation.

    PubMed

    Moynihan, Patrick J; Sychantha, David; Clarke, Anthony J

    2014-06-01

    Post-synthetic modification of the bacterial cell wall represents an important strategy for pathogenic bacteria to evade innate immunity and control autolysins. Modifications to the glycan backbone of peptidoglycan are generally restricted to the C-6 hydroxyl and C-3 amino moieties, with the most common being acetylation and deacetylation. In this review we discuss the pathways for O-acetylation, de-O-acetylation and N-deacetylation with an emphasis on the chemical-biological approaches used in their investigation. The current challenges in the field and the prospects of targeting these systems with novel therapeutics are also explored.

  3. The search of the target of promotion: Phenylbenzoate esterase activities in hen peripheral nerve

    SciTech Connect

    Moretto, A. . E-mail: angelo.moretto@icps.it; Nicolli, A.; Lotti, M.

    2007-03-15

    Certain esterase inhibitors, such as carbamates, phosphinates and sulfonyl halides, do not cause neuropathy as some organophosphates, but they may exacerbate chemical or traumatic insults to axons. This phenomenon is called promotion of axonopathies. Given the biochemical and toxicological characteristics of these compounds, the hypothesis was made that the target of promotion is a phenyl valerate (PV) esterase similar to neuropathy target esterase (NTE), the target of organophosphate induced delayed polyneuropathy. However, attempts to identify a PV esterase in hen peripheral nerve have been, so far, unsuccessful. We tested several esters, other than PV, as substrates of esterases from crude homogenate of the hen peripheral nerve. The ideal substrate should be poorly hydrolysed by NTE but extensively by enzyme(s) that are insensitive to non-promoters, such as mipafox, and sensitive to promoters, such as phenyl methane sulfonyl fluoride (PMSF). When phenyl benzoate (PB) was used as substrate, about 65% of total activity was resistant to the non-promoter mipafox (up to 0.5 mM, 20 min, pH 8.0), that inhibits NTE and other esterases. More than 90% of this resistant activity was sensitive to the classical promoter PMSF (1 mM, 20 min, pH 8.0) with an IC{sub 50} of about 0.08 mM (20 min, pH 8.0). On the contrary, the non-promoter p-toluene sulfonyl fluoride caused only about 10% inhibition at 0.5 mM. Several esterase inhibitors including, paraoxon, phenyl benzyl carbamate, di-n-butyl dichlorovinyl phosphate and di-isopropyl fluorophosphate, were tested both in vitro and in vivo for inhibition of this PB activity. Mipafox-resistant PMSF-sensitive PB esterase activity(ies) was inhibited by promoters but not by non promoters and neuropathic compounds.

  4. Esterase as an enzymatic signature of Geodermatophilaceae adaptability to Sahara desert stones and monuments.

    PubMed

    Essoussi, I; Ghodhbane-Gtari, F; Amairi, H; Sghaier, H; Jaouani, A; Brusetti, L; Daffonchio, D; Boudabous, A; Gtari, M

    2010-05-01

    To assess esterase profiling of members of Geodermatophilaceae isolated from desert stones and monuments in Tunisia and Egypt. Members of Geodermatophilaceae family isolated from desert stones and monuments in Tunisia and Egypt were characterized by partial 16S rRNA sequences. Twenty-five strains were clustered in three dissimilar groups of the genera Geodermatophilus (12 strains), Blastococcus (5 strains) and Modestobacter (3 strains). Isolates were also screened and typed based on major groups of esterase hydrolytic activity. Their esterase patterns were determined and compared to those of ten reference strains belonging to Geodermatophilaceae family. Strains exhibited a diverse and complex pattern of electrophoretic esterase bands, and 31 haplotypes were obtained for the 35 investigated strains. Esterases produced by members of Geodermatophilaceae family have an optimal activity around 40 degrees C and at pH 8. Esterases from Geodermatophilus strains display a high resistance to thermal inactivation and alkaline pH and retaining 30 and 20% of activity after heating for 20 min at 120 degrees C and at pH 12, respectively, and were completely inactivated after 30 min at 120 degrees C. Enzyme activity has been strongly activated in the presence of Ca(2+)and Mg(2+) ions and moderately by Zn(2+) and was markedly inhibited by Cu(2+) and Co(2+) ions. Geodermatophilaceae isolates share a rich and particular pool of esterase activities that could be directly linked to harsh conditions characterizing their ecological habitat including high level of aridity, temperature, ionic strength and low nutrient availability. Esterase could be considered as enzymatic signature that outlines adaptability of Geodermatophilaceae in arid area.

  5. Qualitative alterations in plasma esterases in BALB/c mice following the administration of diethylnitrosamine.

    PubMed

    Davidson, K A; Tyndall, R L; Clapp, N K

    1978-04-01

    Selected non-specific plasma esterases in female BALB/c mice, separated by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, were qualitatively altered following treatment of the mice with diethylnitrosamine (DEN). These alterations include a decreased preference for naphthyl butyrate as a substrate relative to naphthyl acetate; decreased sensitivity to enhancement by divalent cations such as Ca2+, Mg2+, and Mn2; and an increased sensitivity to inhibition by eserine. All esterase species affected were also quantitatively altered and some were testosterone-dependent.

  6. Esterase in Imported Fire Ants, Solenopsis invicta and S. richteri (Hymenoptera: Formicidae): Activity, Kinetics and Variation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, J.; Rashid, T.; Feng, G.

    2014-01-01

    Solenopsis invicta and Solenopsis richteri are two closely related invasive ants native to South America. Despite their similarity in biology and behavior, S. invicta is a more successful invasive species. Toxic tolerance has been found to be important to the success of some invasive species. Esterases play a crucial role in toxic tolerance of insects. Hence, we hypothesized that the more invasive S. invicta would have a higher esterase activity than S. richteri. Esterase activities were measured for workers and male and female alates of both ant species using α-naphthyl acetate and β-naphthyl acetate as substrates. Esterase activities in S. invicta were always significantly higher than those in S. richteri supporting our hypothesis. In S. invicta, male alates had the highest esterase activities followed by workers then female alates for both substrates. In S. richetri, for α-naphthyl acetate, male alates had the highest activity followed by female alates then workers, while for β-naphthyl acetate, female alates had the highest activity followed by male alates then workers. For workers, S. richteri showed significantly higher levels of variation about the mean esterase activity than S. invicta. However, S. invicta showed significantly higher levels of variation in both female and male alates. PMID:25408118

  7. Molecular basis for the behavioral effects of the odorant degrading enzyme Esterase 6 in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Younus, Faisal; Fraser, Nicholas J.; Coppin, Chris W.; Liu, Jian-Wei; Correy, Galen J.; Chertemps, Thomas; Pandey, Gunjan; Maïbèche, Martine; Jackson, Colin J.; Oakeshott, John G.

    2017-01-01

    Previous electrophysiological and behavioural studies implicate esterase 6 in the processing of the pheromone cis-vaccenyl acetate and various food odorants that affect aggregation and reproductive behaviours. Here we show esterase 6 has relatively high activity against many of the short-mid chain food esters, but negligible activity against cis-vaccenyl acetate. The crystal structure of esterase 6 confirms its substrate-binding site can accommodate many short-mid chain food esters but not cis-vaccenyl acetate. Immunohistochemical assays show esterase 6 is expressed in non-neuronal cells in the third antennal segment that could be accessory or epidermal cells surrounding numerous olfactory sensilla, including basiconics involved in food odorant detection. Esterase 6 is also produced in trichoid sensilla, but not in the same cell types as the cis-vaccenyl acetate binding protein LUSH. Our data support a model in which esterase 6 acts as a direct odorant degrading enzyme for many bioactive food esters, but not cis-vaccenyl acetate. PMID:28393888

  8. Production and purification of a solvent-resistant esterase from Bacillus licheniformis S-86.

    PubMed

    Torres, Sebastián; Baigorí, Mario D; Pandey, Ashok; Castro, Guillermo R

    2008-12-01

    New thermophilic and organic-solvent-tolerant Bacillus licheniformis S-86 strain is able to produce two active and solvent-stable esterases. Production of type I and II esterases was substantially enhanced when oils and surfactants were supplied as carbon sources. Grape oil (0.1% v/v) and Tween 20 to 60 (0.1% v/v) had enhanced enzyme production between 1.6- and 2.2-folds. Type II esterase was purified to homogeneity in a five-step procedure. This esterase was purified 76.7-fold with a specific activity of 135 U mg(-1). Molecular mass of the enzyme was estimated to be 38.4 kDa by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Type II esterase was active mostly on esters with short acyl chains, which allowed to classify the enzyme as a carboxylesterase with a K (m) of 80.2 mmol l(-1) and a V (max) of 256.4 micromol min(-1) mg(-1) for p-nitrophenyl acetate. Also, B. licheniformis S-86 type II esterase displayed activity in presence of water-miscible organic solvents at 50% concentration and stability after 1-h incubation.

  9. Esterase in imported fire ants, Solenopsis invicta and S. richteri (Hymenoptera: Formicidae): activity, kinetics and variation.

    PubMed

    Chen, J; Rashid, T; Feng, G

    2014-11-19

    Solenopsis invicta and Solenopsis richteri are two closely related invasive ants native to South America. Despite their similarity in biology and behavior, S. invicta is a more successful invasive species. Toxic tolerance has been found to be important to the success of some invasive species. Esterases play a crucial role in toxic tolerance of insects. Hence, we hypothesized that the more invasive S. invicta would have a higher esterase activity than S. richteri. Esterase activities were measured for workers and male and female alates of both ant species using α-naphthyl acetate and β-naphthyl acetate as substrates. Esterase activities in S. invicta were always significantly higher than those in S. richteri supporting our hypothesis. In S. invicta, male alates had the highest esterase activities followed by workers then female alates for both substrates. In S. richetri, for α-naphthyl acetate, male alates had the highest activity followed by female alates then workers, while for β-naphthyl acetate, female alates had the highest activity followed by male alates then workers. For workers, S. richteri showed significantly higher levels of variation about the mean esterase activity than S. invicta. However, S. invicta showed significantly higher levels of variation in both female and male alates.

  10. A stereoselective esterase from Bacillus megaterium: purification, gene cloning, expression and catalytic properties.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Jian-Yong; Wang, Jian; Zhou, Sha-Sha; Li, Xiao-Jun; Ying, Xiang-Xian; Wang, Zhao

    2015-10-27

    Esterases (EC 3.1.1.X) have been used as biocatalysts due to their good stability, high chemo-, regio- and stereoselectivity. In our previous studies, Bacillus megaterium WZ009 harboring esterase displayed the unique capability to convert (S)-4-Chloro-3-hydroxyethylbutyrate (CHBE) in the racemate to (S)-3-hydroxy-γ-butyrolactone (HL) through stereoselective hydrolysis, dechlorination, and lactonization. The remaining (R)-CHBE and formed (S)-HL could be obtained in a one-pot enzymatic reaction. An esterase from B. megaterium WZ009 was purified and was found to have 466 encoded amino acids and an apparent molecular mass of 55 kDa. The purified esterase exhibited maximal activity at a temperature of 25 °C and at a pH of 11.5 towards 100 mM CHBE. When the stereoselective biocatalysis of rac-CHBE was performed using the recombinant Escherichia coli BL21 (DH3) cells harboring the esterase, the catalytic activity increased by 20-fold compared with the original strain B. megaterium WZ009. With the addition of activated carbon (62 g/L) in the reaction system, the conversion was increased from 39% to 45% at a substrate concentration of 750 mM. Another remarkable advantage is that both of the obtained residual (R)-CHBE and the formed (S)-HL had high optical purities (e.e.s > 99.9%, e.e.p > 99.9%), thereby making this esterase a usable biocatalyst for industrial application.

  11. Identification of lysine-acetylated mitochondrial proteins and their acetylation sites.

    PubMed

    Hartl, Markus; König, Ann-Christine; Finkemeier, Iris

    2015-01-01

    The (ε)N-acetylation of lysine side chains is a highly conserved posttranslational modification of both prokaryotic and eukaryotic proteins. Lysine acetylation not only occurs on histones in the nucleus but also on many mitochondrial proteins in plants and animals. As the transfer of the acetyl group to lysine eliminates its positive charge, lysine acetylation can affect the biological function of proteins. This chapter describes two methods for the identification of lysine-acetylated proteins in plant mitochondria using an anti-acetyllysine antibody. We describe the Western blot analysis of a two-dimensional blue native-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis with an anti-acetyllysine antibody as well as the immuno-enrichment of lysine-acetylated peptides followed by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry data acquisition and analysis.

  12. Switching catalysis from hydrolysis to perhydrolysis in Pseudomonas fluorescens esterase.

    PubMed

    Yin, De Lu Tyler; Bernhardt, Peter; Morley, Krista L; Jiang, Yun; Cheeseman, Jeremy D; Purpero, Vincent; Schrag, Joseph D; Kazlauskas, Romas J

    2010-03-09

    Many serine hydrolases catalyze perhydrolysis, the reversible formation of peracids from carboxylic acids and hydrogen peroxide. Recently, we showed that a single amino acid substitution in the alcohol binding pocket, L29P, in Pseudomonas fluorescens (SIK WI) aryl esterase (PFE) increased the specificity constant of PFE for peracetic acid formation >100-fold [Bernhardt et al. (2005) Angew. Chem., Int. Ed. 44, 2742]. In this paper, we extend this work to address the three following questions. First, what is the molecular basis of the increase in perhydrolysis activity? We previously proposed that the L29P substitution creates a hydrogen bond between the enzyme and hydrogen peroxide in the transition state. Here we report two X-ray structures of L29P PFE that support this proposal. Both structures show a main chain carbonyl oxygen closer to the active site serine as expected. One structure further shows acetate in the active site in an orientation consistent with reaction by an acyl-enzyme mechanism. We also detected an acyl-enzyme intermediate in the hydrolysis of epsilon-caprolactone by mass spectrometry. Second, can we further increase perhydrolysis activity? We discovered that the reverse reaction, hydrolysis of peracetic acid to acetic acid and hydrogen peroxide, occurs at nearly the diffusion limited rate. Since the reverse reaction cannot increase further, neither can the forward reaction. Consistent with this prediction, two variants with additional amino acid substitutions showed 2-fold higher k(cat), but K(m) also increased so the specificity constant, k(cat)/K(m), remained similar. Third, how does the L29P substitution change the esterase activity? Ester hydrolysis decreased for most esters (75-fold for ethyl acetate) but not for methyl esters. In contrast, L29P PFE catalyzed hydrolysis of epsilon-caprolactone five times more efficiently than wild-type PFE. Molecular modeling suggests that moving the carbonyl group closer to the active site blocks access

  13. Switching catalysis from hydrolysis to perhydrolysis in P. fluorescens esterase

    PubMed Central

    Yin, De Lu (Tyler); Bernhardt, Peter; Morley, Krista L.; Jiang, Yun; Cheeseman, Jeremy D.; Purpero, Vincent; Schrag, Joseph D.; Kazlauskas, Romas J.

    2010-01-01

    Many serine hydrolases catalyze perhydrolysis – the reversible formation of per-acids from carboxylic acids and hydrogen peroxide. Recently we showed that a single amino acid substitution in the alcohol binding pocket - L29P - in Pseudomonas fluorescens (SIK WI) aryl esterase (PFE) increased the specificity constant of PFE for peracetic acid formation >100-fold [Bernhardt et al. Angew. Chem. Intl. Ed. 2005, 44, 2742]. In this paper, we extend this work to address the three following questions. First, what is the molecular basis of the increase in perhydrolysis activity? We previously proposed that the L29P substitution creates a hydrogen bond between the enzyme and hydrogen peroxide in the transition state. Here we report two x-ray structures of L29P PFE that support this proposal. Both structures show a main chain carbonyl oxygen closer to the active-site serine as expected. One structure further shows acetate in the active site in an orientation consistent with reaction by an acyl-enzyme mechanism. We also detected an acyl-enzyme intermediate in the hydrolysis of ε-caprolactone by mass spectrometry. Second, can we further increase perhydrolysis activity? We discovered that the reverse reaction – hydrolysis of peracetic acid to acetic acid and hydrogen peroxide – occurs at nearly the diffusion limited rate. Since the reverse reaction cannot increase further, neither can the forward reaction. Consistent with this prediction, two variants with additional amino acid substitutions showed two fold higher kcat, but Km also increased so the specificity constant, kcat/Km, remained similar. Third, how does the L29P substitution change the esterase activity? Ester hydrolysis decreased for most esters (75-fold for ethyl acetate), but not for methyl esters. In contrast, L29P PFE catalyzed hydrolysis of ε-caprolactone five times more efficiently than wild-type PFE. Molecular modeling suggests that moving the carbonyl group closer to the active site blocks access for

  14. Switching Catalysis from Hydrolysis to Perhydrolysis in Pseudomonas fluorescens Esterase

    SciTech Connect

    Yin, D.; Bernhardt, P; Morley, K; Jiang, Y; Cheeseman, J; Purpero, V; Schrag, J; Kazlauskas, R

    2010-01-01

    Many serine hydrolases catalyze perhydrolysis, the reversible formation of peracids from carboxylic acids and hydrogen peroxide. Recently, we showed that a single amino acid substitution in the alcohol binding pocket, L29P, in Pseudomonas fluorescens (SIK WI) aryl esterase (PFE) increased the specificity constant of PFE for peracetic acid formation >100-fold [Bernhardt et al. (2005) Angew. Chem., Int. Ed. 44, 2742]. In this paper, we extend this work to address the three following questions. First, what is the molecular basis of the increase in perhydrolysis activity? We previously proposed that the L29P substitution creates a hydrogen bond between the enzyme and hydrogen peroxide in the transition state. Here we report two X-ray structures of L29P PFE that support this proposal. Both structures show a main chain carbonyl oxygen closer to the active site serine as expected. One structure further shows acetate in the active site in an orientation consistent with reaction by an acyl-enzyme mechanism. We also detected an acyl-enzyme intermediate in the hydrolysis of {var_epsilon}-caprolactone by mass spectrometry. Second, can we further increase perhydrolysis activity? We discovered that the reverse reaction, hydrolysis of peracetic acid to acetic acid and hydrogen peroxide, occurs at nearly the diffusion limited rate. Since the reverse reaction cannot increase further, neither can the forward reaction. Consistent with this prediction, two variants with additional amino acid substitutions showed 2-fold higher k{sub cat}, but K{sub m} also increased so the specificity constant, k{sub cat}/K{sub m}, remained similar. Third, how does the L29P substitution change the esterase activity? Ester hydrolysis decreased for most esters (75-fold for ethyl acetate) but not for methyl esters. In contrast, L29P PFE catalyzed hydrolysis of {var_epsilon}-caprolactone five times more efficiently than wild-type PFE. Molecular modeling suggests that moving the carbonyl group closer to the

  15. Acetylation Reader Proteins: Linking Acetylation Signaling to Genome Maintenance and Cancer.

    PubMed

    Gong, Fade; Chiu, Li-Ya; Miller, Kyle M

    2016-09-01

    Chromatin-based DNA damage response (DDR) pathways are fundamental for preventing genome and epigenome instability, which are prevalent in cancer. Histone acetyltransferases (HATs) and histone deacetylases (HDACs) catalyze the addition and removal of acetyl groups on lysine residues, a post-translational modification important for the DDR. Acetylation can alter chromatin structure as well as function by providing binding signals for reader proteins containing acetyl-lysine recognition domains, including the bromodomain (BRD). Acetylation dynamics occur upon DNA damage in part to regulate chromatin and BRD protein interactions that mediate key DDR activities. In cancer, DDR and acetylation pathways are often mutated or abnormally expressed. DNA damaging agents and drugs targeting epigenetic regulators, including HATs, HDACs, and BRD proteins, are used or are being developed to treat cancer. Here, we discuss how histone acetylation pathways, with a focus on acetylation reader proteins, promote genome stability and the DDR. We analyze how acetylation signaling impacts the DDR in the context of cancer and its treatments. Understanding the relationship between epigenetic regulators, the DDR, and chromatin is integral for obtaining a mechanistic understanding of genome and epigenome maintenance pathways, information that can be leveraged for targeting acetylation signaling, and/or the DDR to treat diseases, including cancer.

  16. Acetylation Reader Proteins: Linking Acetylation Signaling to Genome Maintenance and Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Kyle M.

    2016-01-01

    Chromatin-based DNA damage response (DDR) pathways are fundamental for preventing genome and epigenome instability, which are prevalent in cancer. Histone acetyltransferases (HATs) and histone deacetylases (HDACs) catalyze the addition and removal of acetyl groups on lysine residues, a post-translational modification important for the DDR. Acetylation can alter chromatin structure as well as function by providing binding signals for reader proteins containing acetyl-lysine recognition domains, including the bromodomain (BRD). Acetylation dynamics occur upon DNA damage in part to regulate chromatin and BRD protein interactions that mediate key DDR activities. In cancer, DDR and acetylation pathways are often mutated or abnormally expressed. DNA damaging agents and drugs targeting epigenetic regulators, including HATs, HDACs, and BRD proteins, are used or are being developed to treat cancer. Here, we discuss how histone acetylation pathways, with a focus on acetylation reader proteins, promote genome stability and the DDR. We analyze how acetylation signaling impacts the DDR in the context of cancer and its treatments. Understanding the relationship between epigenetic regulators, the DDR, and chromatin is integral for obtaining a mechanistic understanding of genome and epigenome maintenance pathways, information that can be leveraged for targeting acetylation signaling, and/or the DDR to treat diseases, including cancer. PMID:27631103

  17. p53 Acetylation: Regulation and Consequences

    PubMed Central

    Reed, Sara M.; Quelle, Dawn E.

    2014-01-01

    Post-translational modifications of p53 are critical in modulating its tumor suppressive functions. Ubiquitylation, for example, plays a major role in dictating p53 stability, subcellular localization and transcriptional vs. non-transcriptional activities. Less is known about p53 acetylation. It has been shown to govern p53 transcriptional activity, selection of growth inhibitory vs. apoptotic gene targets, and biological outcomes in response to diverse cellular insults. Yet recent in vivo evidence from mouse models questions the importance of p53 acetylation (at least at certain sites) as well as canonical p53 functions (cell cycle arrest, senescence and apoptosis) to tumor suppression. This review discusses the cumulative findings regarding p53 acetylation, with a focus on the acetyltransferases that modify p53 and the mechanisms regulating their activity. We also evaluate what is known regarding the influence of other post-translational modifications of p53 on its acetylation, and conclude with the current outlook on how p53 acetylation affects tumor suppression. Due to redundancies in p53 control and growing understanding that individual modifications largely fine-tune p53 activity rather than switch it on or off, many questions still remain about the physiological importance of p53 acetylation to its role in preventing cancer. PMID:25545885

  18. Biological activity of acetylated phenolic compounds.

    PubMed

    Fragopoulou, Elizabeth; Nomikos, Tzortzis; Karantonis, Haralabos C; Apostolakis, Constantinos; Pliakis, Emmanuel; Samiotaki, Martina; Panayotou, George; Antonopoulou, Smaragdi

    2007-01-10

    In recent years an effort has been made to isolate and identify biologically active compounds that are included in the Mediterranean diet. The existence of naturally occurring acetylated phenolics, as well as studies with synthetic ones, provide evidence that acetyl groups could be correlated with their biological activity. Platelet activating factor (PAF) is implicated in atherosclerosis, whereas its inhibitors seem to play a protective role against cardiovascular disease. The aim of this study was to examine the biological activity of resveratrol and tyrosol and their acetylated derivatives as inhibitors of PAF-induced washed rabbit platelet aggregation. Acetylation of resveratrol and tyrosol was performed, and separation was achieved by HPLC. Acetylated derivatives were identified by negative mass spectrometry. The data showed that tyrosol and its monoacetylated derivatives act as PAF inhibitors, whereas diacetylated derivatives induce platelet aggregation. Resveratrol and its mono- and triacetylated derivatives exert similar inhibitory activity, whereas the diacetylated ones are more potent inhibitors. In conclusion, acetylated phenolics exert the same or even higher antithrombotic activity compared to the biological activity of the initial one.

  19. Protein Acetylation in Procaryotes Increases Stress Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Qun; Wood, Thomas K.

    2011-01-01

    Acetylation of lysine residues is conserved in all three kingdoms; however, its role in prokaryotes is unknown. Here we demonstrate that acetylation enables the reference bacterium Escherichia coli to withstand environmental stress. Specifically, the bacterium reaches higher cell densities and becomes more resistant to heat and oxidative stress when its proteins are acetylated as shown by deletion of the gene encoding acetyltransferase YfiQ and the gene encoding deacetylase CobB as well as by overproducing YfiQ and CobB. Furthermore, we show that the increase in oxidative stress resistance with acetylation is due to the induction of catalase activity through enhanced katG expression. We also found that two-component system proteins CpxA, PhoP, UvrY, and BasR are associated with cell catalase activity and may be responsible as the connection between bacterial acetylation and the stress response. This is the first demonstration of a specific environmental role of acetylation in prokaryotes. PMID:21703240

  20. Protein acetylation in prokaryotes increases stress resistance.

    PubMed

    Ma, Qun; Wood, Thomas K

    2011-07-15

    Acetylation of lysine residues is conserved in all three kingdoms; however, its role in prokaryotes is unknown. Here we demonstrate that acetylation enables the reference bacterium Escherichia coli to withstand environmental stress. Specifically, the bacterium reaches higher cell densities and becomes more resistant to heat and oxidative stress when its proteins are acetylated as shown by deletion of the gene encoding acetyltransferase YfiQ and the gene encoding deacetylase CobB as well as by overproducing YfiQ and CobB. Furthermore, we show that the increase in oxidative stress resistance with acetylation is due to the induction of catalase activity through enhanced katG expression. We also found that two-component system proteins CpxA, PhoP, UvrY, and BasR are associated with cell catalase activity and may be responsible as the connection between bacterial acetylation and the stress response. This is the first demonstration of a specific environmental role of acetylation in prokaryotes. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Mechanisms and Dynamics of Protein Acetylation in Mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Baeza, Josue; Smallegan, Michael J.; Denu, John M.

    2016-01-01

    Reversible protein acetylation is a major regulatory mechanism for controlling protein function. Through genetic manipulations, dietary perturbations, and new proteomic technologies, the diverse functions of protein acetylation are coming into focus. Protein acetylation in mitochondria has taken center stage, revealing that 63% of mitochondrially localized proteins contain lysine acetylation sites. Here we summarize the field, and discuss salient topics that cover spurious versus targeted acetylation, the role of SIRT3 deacetylation, nonenzymatic acetylation, and molecular models for regulatory acetylations that display high and low stoichiometry. PMID:26822488

  2. Mycobacteriophage Lysin B is a novel mycolylarabinogalactan esterase

    SciTech Connect

    Payne, K.; Sun, Q.; Sacchettini, J.; Hatfull, G.F.

    2010-08-27

    Mycobacteriophages encounter a unique problem among phages of Gram-positive bacteria, in that lysis must not only degrade the peptidoglycan layer but also circumvent a mycolic acid-rich outer membrane covalently attached to the arabinogalactan-peptidoglycan complex. Mycobacteriophages accomplish this by producing two lysis enzymes, Lysin A (LysA) that hydrolyses peptidoglycan, and Lysin B (LysB), a novel mycolylarabinogalactan esterase, that cleaves the mycolylarabinogalactan bond to release free mycolic acids. The D29 LysB structure shows an {alpha}/{beta} hydrolase organization with a catalytic triad common to cutinases, but which contains an additional four-helix domain implicated in the binding of lipid substrates. Whereas LysA is essential for mycobacterial lysis, a Giles {Delta}lysB mutant mycobacteriophage is viable, but defective in the normal timing, progression and completion of host cell lysis. We propose that LysB facilitates lysis by compromising the integrity of the mycobacterial outer membrane linkage to the arabinogalactan-peptidoglycan layer.

  3. Structural analysis of thermostabilizing mutations of cocaine esterase

    SciTech Connect

    Narasimhan, Diwahar; Nance, Mark R.; Gao, Daquan; Ko, Mei-Chuan; Macdonald, Joanne; Tamburi, Patricia; Yoon, Dan; Landry, Donald M.; Woods, James H.; Zhan, Chang-Guo; Tesmer, John J.G.; Sunahara, Roger K.

    2010-09-03

    Cocaine is considered to be the most addictive of all substances of abuse and mediates its effects by inhibiting monoamine transporters, primarily the dopamine transporters. There are currently no small molecules that can be used to combat its toxic and addictive properties, in part because of the difficulty of developing compounds that inhibit cocaine binding without having intrinsic effects on dopamine transport. Most of the effective cocaine inhibitors also display addictive properties. We have recently reported the use of cocaine esterase (CocE) to accelerate the removal of systemic cocaine and to prevent cocaine-induced lethality. However, wild-type CocE is relatively unstable at physiological temperatures ({tau}{sub 1/2} {approx} 13 min at 37 C), presenting challenges for its development as a viable therapeutic agent. We applied computational approaches to predict mutations to stabilize CocE and showed that several of these have increased stability both in vitro and in vivo, with the most efficacious mutant (T172R/G173Q) extending half-life up to 370 min. Here we present novel X-ray crystallographic data on these mutants that provide a plausible model for the observed enhanced stability. We also more extensively characterize the previously reported variants and report on a new stabilizing mutant, L169K. The improved stability of these engineered CocE enzymes will have a profound influence on the use of this protein to combat cocaine-induced toxicity and addiction in humans.

  4. Leukocyte esterase-nitrite and bioluminescence assays as urine screens.

    PubMed Central

    Males, B M; Bartholomew, W R; Amsterdam, D

    1985-01-01

    The 1-min leukocyte esterase (LE)-nitrite test (Chemstrip 9; Biodynamics, Division of Boehringer Mannheim Biochemicals, Indianapolis, Ind.) and a bioluminescence assay (Monolight centrifugation method; Analytical Luminescence Laboratory, Inc., San Diego, Calif.) were tested for their efficacy as urine screens among 453 patients at a tertiary-care teaching hospital. Both methods had the capacity to exclude significant bacteriuria (greater than or equal to 10(5) CFU/ml) when compared with the results of conventional culture methods, with predictive values of 99 and 93%, respectively, for a negative test. Bioluminescence was the more accurate nonculture method used. Sensitivity and specificity values were 97 and 71%, respectively, for bioluminescence, 82 and 60%, respectively, for LE with nitrite, and 72 and 64%, respectively, for LE without nitrite. At reduced levels of bacteriuria less than 10(5) CFU/ml), the sensitivities of LE-nitrite and bioluminescence were decreased but comparable. The addition of protein and blood test results in the Chemstrip 9, along with LE-nitrite as bacteriuria indicators, were unsatisfactory because of the large numbers of false-positive results attributed to protein and blood determinations. LE activity as detected by the LE test was a poor predictor of significant bacteriuria in both male and female patients. The sensitivity (71%) and specificity (57%) of the LE test in male patients were significantly lower than those previously reported and varied with the patient population studied. PMID:3935662

  5. Hydrolysis of synthetic polyesters by Clostridium botulinum esterases.

    PubMed

    Perz, Veronika; Baumschlager, Armin; Bleymaier, Klaus; Zitzenbacher, Sabine; Hromic, Altijana; Steinkellner, Georg; Pairitsch, Andris; Łyskowski, Andrzej; Gruber, Karl; Sinkel, Carsten; Küper, Ulf; Ribitsch, Doris; Guebitz, Georg M

    2016-05-01

    Two novel esterases from the anaerobe Clostridium botulinum ATCC 3502 (Cbotu_EstA and Cbotu_EstB) were expressed in Escherichia coli BL21-Gold(DE3) and were found to hydrolyze the polyester poly(butylene adipate-co-butylene terephthalate) (PBAT). The active site residues (triad Ser, Asp, His) are present in both enzymes at the same location only with some amino acid variations near the active site at the surrounding of aspartate. Yet, Cbotu_EstA showed higher kcat values on para-nitrophenyl butyrate and para-nitrophenyl acetate and was considerably more active (sixfold) on PBAT. The entrance to the active site of the modeled Cbotu_EstB appears more narrowed compared to the crystal structure of Cbotu_EstA and the N-terminus is shorter which could explain its lower activity on PBAT. The Cbotu_EstA crystal structure consists of two regions that may act as movable cap domains and a zinc metal binding site.

  6. Structural analysis of thermostabilizing mutations of cocaine esterase

    PubMed Central

    Narasimhan, Diwahar; Nance, Mark R.; Gao, Daquan; Ko, Mei-Chuan; Macdonald, Joanne; Tamburi, Patricia; Yoon, Dan; Landry, Donald M.; Woods, James H.; Zhan, Chang-Guo; Tesmer, John J.G.; Sunahara, Roger K.

    2010-01-01

    Cocaine is considered to be the most addictive of all substances of abuse and mediates its effects by inhibiting monoamine transporters, primarily the dopamine transporters. There are currently no small molecules that can be used to combat its toxic and addictive properties, in part because of the difficulty of developing compounds that inhibit cocaine binding without having intrinsic effects on dopamine transport. Most of the effective cocaine inhibitors also display addictive properties. We have recently reported the use of cocaine esterase (CocE) to accelerate the removal of systemic cocaine and to prevent cocaine-induced lethality. However, wild-type CocE is relatively unstable at physiological temperatures (τ1/2 ∼13 min at 37°C), presenting challenges for its development as a viable therapeutic agent. We applied computational approaches to predict mutations to stabilize CocE and showed that several of these have increased stability both in vitro and in vivo, with the most efficacious mutant (T172R/G173Q) extending half-life up to 370 min. Here we present novel X-ray crystallographic data on these mutants that provide a plausible model for the observed enhanced stability. We also more extensively characterize the previously reported variants and report on a new stabilizing mutant, L169K. The improved stability of these engineered CocE enzymes will have a profound influence on the use of this protein to combat cocaine-induced toxicity and addiction in humans. PMID:20436035

  7. Kinetic characterization and fed-batch fermentation for maximal simultaneous production of esterase and protease from Lysinibacillus fusiformis AU01.

    PubMed

    Divakar, K; Suryia Prabha, M; Nandhinidevi, G; Gautam, P

    2017-04-21

    The simultaneous production of intracellular esterase and extracellular protease from the strain Lysinibacillus fusiformis AU01 was studied in detail. The production was performed both under batch and fed-batch modes. The maximum yield of intracellular esterase and protease was obtained under full oxygen saturation at the beginning of the fermentation. The data were fitted to the Luedeking-Piret model and it was shown that the enzyme (both esterase and protease) production was growth associated. A decrease in intracellular esterase and increase in the extracellular esterase were observed during late stationary phase. The appearance of intracellular proteins in extracellular media and decrease in viable cell count and biomass during late stationary phase confirmed that the presence of extracellular esterase is due to cell lysis. Even though the fed-batch fermentation with different feeding strategies showed improved productivity, feeding yeast extract under DO-stat fermentation conditions showed highest intracellular esterase and protease production. Under DO-stat fed-batch cultivation, maximum intracellular esterase activity of 820 × 10(3) U/L and extracellular protease activity of 172 × 10(3) U/L were obtained at the 16th hr. Intracellular esterase and extracellular protease production were increased fivefold and fourfold, respectively, when compared to batch fermentation performed under shake flask conditions.

  8. Roles of BOR2, a Boron Exporter, in Cross Linking of Rhamnogalacturonan II and Root Elongation under Boron Limitation in Arabidopsis1[W

    PubMed Central

    Miwa, Kyoko; Wakuta, Shinji; Takada, Shigeki; Ide, Koji; Takano, Junpei; Naito, Satoshi; Omori, Hiroyuki; Matsunaga, Toshiro; Fujiwara, Toru

    2013-01-01

    Boron (B) is required for cross linking of the pectic polysaccharide rhamnogalacturonan II (RG-II) and is consequently essential for the maintenance of cell wall structure. Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) BOR1 is an efflux B transporter for xylem loading of B. Here, we describe the roles of BOR2, the most similar paralog of BOR1. BOR2 encodes an efflux B transporter localized in plasma membrane and is strongly expressed in lateral root caps and epidermis of elongation zones of roots. Transfer DNA insertion of BOR2 reduced root elongation by 68%, whereas the mutation in BOR1 reduced it by 32% under low B availability (0.1 µm), but the reduction in shoot growth was not as obvious as that in the BOR1 mutant. A double mutant of BOR1 and BOR2 exhibited much more severe growth defects in both roots and shoots under B-limited conditions than the corresponding single mutants. All single and double mutants grew normally under B-sufficient conditions. These results suggest that both BOR1 and BOR2 are required under B limitation and that their roles are, at least in part, different. The total B concentrations in roots of BOR2 mutants were not significantly different from those in wild-type plants, but the proportion of cross-linked RG-II was reduced under low B availability. Such a reduction in RG-II cross linking was not evident in roots of the BOR1 mutant. Thus, we propose that under B-limited conditions, transport of boric acid/borate by BOR2 from symplast to apoplast is required for effective cross linking of RG-II in cell wall and root cell elongation. PMID:24114060

  9. Boron bridging of rhamnogalacturonan-II, monitored by gel electrophoresis, occurs during polysaccharide synthesis and secretion but not post-secretion

    PubMed Central

    Chormova, Dimitra; Messenger, David J; Fry, Stephen C

    2014-01-01

    The cell-wall pectic domain rhamnogalacturonan-II (RG-II) is cross-linked via borate diester bridges, which influence the expansion, thickness and porosity of the wall. Previously, little was known about the mechanism or subcellular site of this cross-linking. Using polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) to separate monomeric from dimeric (boron-bridged) RG-II, we confirmed that Pb2+ promotes H3BO3-dependent dimerisation in vitro. H3BO3 concentrations as high as 50 mm did not prevent cross-linking. For in-vivo experiments, we successfully cultured ‘Paul's Scarlet’ rose (Rosa sp.) cells in boron-free medium: their wall-bound pectin contained monomeric RG-II domains but no detectable dimers. Thus pectins containing RG-II domains can be held in the wall other than via boron bridges. Re-addition of H3BO3 to 3.3 μm triggered a gradual appearance of RG-II dimer over 24 h but without detectable loss of existing monomers, suggesting that only newly synthesised RG-II was amenable to boron bridging. In agreement with this, Rosa cultures whose polysaccharide biosynthetic machinery had been compromised (by carbon starvation, respiratory inhibitors, anaerobiosis, freezing or boiling) lost the ability to generate RG-II dimers. We conclude that RG-II normally becomes boron-bridged during synthesis or secretion but not post-secretion. Supporting this conclusion, exogenous [3H]RG-II was neither dimerised in the medium nor cross-linked to existing wall-associated RG-II domains when added to Rosa cultures. In conclusion, in cultured Rosa cells RG-II domains have a brief window of opportunity for boron-bridging intraprotoplasmically or during secretion, but secretion into the apoplast is a point of no return beyond which additional boron-bridging does not readily occur. PMID:24320597

  10. Occurrence of the Primary Cell Wall Polysaccharide Rhamnogalacturonan II in Pteridophytes, Lycophytes, and Bryophytes. Implications for the Evolution of Vascular Plants1

    PubMed Central

    Matsunaga, Toshiro; Ishii, Tadashi; Matsumoto, Sadamu; Higuchi, Masanobu; Darvill, Alan; Albersheim, Peter; O'Neill, Malcolm A.

    2004-01-01

    Borate ester cross-linking of the cell wall pectic polysaccharide rhamnogalacturonan II (RG-II) is required for the growth and development of angiosperms and gymnosperms. Here, we report that the amounts of borate cross-linked RG-II present in the sporophyte primary walls of members of the most primitive extant vascular plant groups (Lycopsida, Filicopsida, Equisetopsida, and Psilopsida) are comparable with the amounts of RG-II in the primary walls of angiosperms. By contrast, the gametophyte generation of members of the avascular bryophytes (Bryopsida, Hepaticopsida, and Anthocerotopsida) have primary walls that contain small amounts (approximately 1% of the amounts of RG-II present in angiosperm walls) of an RG-II-like polysaccharide. The glycosyl sequence of RG-II is conserved in vascular plants, but these RG-IIs are not identical because the non-reducing l-rhamnosyl residue present on the aceric acid-containing side chain of RG-II of all previously studied plants is replaced by a 3-O-methyl rhamnosyl residue in the RG-IIs isolated from Lycopodium tristachyum, Ceratopteris thalictroides, Platycerium bifurcatum, and Psilotum nudum. Our data indicate that the amount of RG-II incorporated into the walls of plants increased during the evolution of vascular plants from their bryophyte-like ancestors. Thus, the acquisition of a boron-dependent growth habit may be correlated with the ability of vascular plants to maintain upright growth and to form lignified secondary walls. The conserved structures of pteridophyte, lycophyte, and angiosperm RG-IIs suggests that the genes and proteins responsible for the biosynthesis of this polysaccharide appeared early in land plant evolution and that RG-II has a fundamental role in wall structure. PMID:14671014

  11. Occurrence of the primary cell wall polysaccharide rhamnogalacturonan II in pteridophytes, lycophytes, and bryophytes. Implications for the evolution of vascular plants.

    PubMed

    Matsunaga, Toshiro; Ishii, Tadashi; Matsumoto, Sadamu; Higuchi, Masanobu; Darvill, Alan; Albersheim, Peter; O'Neill, Malcolm A

    2004-01-01

    Borate ester cross-linking of the cell wall pectic polysaccharide rhamnogalacturonan II (RG-II) is required for the growth and development of angiosperms and gymnosperms. Here, we report that the amounts of borate cross-linked RG-II present in the sporophyte primary walls of members of the most primitive extant vascular plant groups (Lycopsida, Filicopsida, Equisetopsida, and Psilopsida) are comparable with the amounts of RG-II in the primary walls of angiosperms. By contrast, the gametophyte generation of members of the avascular bryophytes (Bryopsida, Hepaticopsida, and Anthocerotopsida) have primary walls that contain small amounts (approximately 1% of the amounts of RG-II present in angiosperm walls) of an RG-II-like polysaccharide. The glycosyl sequence of RG-II is conserved in vascular plants, but these RG-IIs are not identical because the non-reducing L-rhamnosyl residue present on the aceric acid-containing side chain of RG-II of all previously studied plants is replaced by a 3-O-methyl rhamnosyl residue in the RG-IIs isolated from Lycopodium tristachyum, Ceratopteris thalictroides, Platycerium bifurcatum, and Psilotum nudum. Our data indicate that the amount of RG-II incorporated into the walls of plants increased during the evolution of vascular plants from their bryophyte-like ancestors. Thus, the acquisition of a boron-dependent growth habit may be correlated with the ability of vascular plants to maintain upright growth and to form lignified secondary walls. The conserved structures of pteridophyte, lycophyte, and angiosperm RG-IIs suggests that the genes and proteins responsible for the biosynthesis of this polysaccharide appeared early in land plant evolution and that RG-II has a fundamental role in wall structure.

  12. The pore size of non-graminaceous plant cell walls is rapidly decreased by borate ester cross-linking of the pectic polysaccharide rhamnogalacturonan II

    SciTech Connect

    Fleischer, A.; O'Neill, M.A.; Ehwald, R.

    1999-11-01

    The walls of suspension-cultured Chenopodium album L. cells grown continually for more than 1 year on B-deficient medium contained monomeric rhamnogalacturonan (mRG-II) but not the borate ester cross-linked RG II dimer (dRG-II-B). The walls of these cells had an increased size limit for dextran permeation, which is a measure of wall pore size. Adding boric acid to growing B-deficient cells resulted in B binding to the wall, the formation of dRG-II-B from mRG-II, and a reduction in wall pore size within 10 min. The wall pore size of denatured B-grown cells was increased by treatment at pH {le} 2.0 or by treatment with Ca{sup 2+}-chelating agents. The acid-mediated increase in wall pore size was prevented by boric acid alone at pH 2.0 and by boric acid together with Ca{sup 2+}, but not by Na{sup +} or Mg{sup 2+} ions at pH 1.5. The Ca{sup 2+}-chelator-mediated increase in pore size was partially reduced by boric acid. Their results suggest that B-mediated cross-linking of RG-II in the walls of living plant cells generates a pectin network with a decreased size exclusion limit for polymers. The formation, stability, and possible functions of a borate ester cross-linked pectic network in the primary walls of nongraminaceous plant cells are discussed.

  13. Identification and characterization of glycosyltransferases involved in the synthesis of the side chains of the cell wall pectic polysaccharide rhamnogalacturonan II

    SciTech Connect

    O'Neill, Malcolm

    2015-08-31

    Our goal was to gain insight into the genes and proteins involved in the biosynthesis of rhamnogalacturonan II (RG-II), a borate cross-linked and structurally conserved pectic polysaccharide present in the primary cell walls of all vascular plants. The research conducted during the funding period established that (i) Avascular plants have the ability to synthesize UDP-apiose but lack the glycosyltransferase machinery required to synthesize RG-II or other apiose-containing cell wall glycans. (ii) RG-II structure is highly conserved in the Lemnaceae (duckweeds and relatives). However, the structures of other wall pectins and hemicellulose have changed substantial during the diversification of the Lemnaceae. This supports the notion that a precise structure of RG-II must be maintained to allow borate cross-linking to occur in a controlled manner. (iii) Enzymes involved in the conversion of UDP-GlcA to UDP-Api, UDP-Xyl, and UDP-Ara may have an important role in controlling the composition of duckweed cell walls. (iv) RG-II exists as the borate ester cross-linked dimer in the cell walls of soybean root hairs and roots. Thus, RG-II is present in the walls of plants cells that grow by tip or by expansive growth. (v) A reduction in RG-II cross-linking in the maize tls1 mutant, which lacks a borate channel protein, suggests that the growth defects observed in the mutant are, at least in part, due to defects in the cell wall.

  14. The Pore Size of Non-Graminaceous Plant Cell Walls Is Rapidly Decreased by Borate Ester Cross-Linking of the Pectic Polysaccharide Rhamnogalacturonan II1

    PubMed Central

    Fleischer, Axel; O'Neill, Malcolm A.; Ehwald, Rudolf

    1999-01-01

    The walls of suspension-cultured Chenopodium album L. cells grown continually for more than 1 year on B-deficient medium contained monomeric rhamnogalacturonan II (mRG-II) but not the borate ester cross-linked RG II dimer (dRG-II-B). The walls of these cells had an increased size limit for dextran permeation, which is a measure of wall pore size. Adding boric acid to growing B-deficient cells resulted in B binding to the wall, the formation of dRG-II-B from mRG-II, and a reduction in wall pore size within 10 min. The wall pore size of denatured B-grown cells was increased by treatment at pH ≤ 2.0 or by treatment with Ca2+-chelating agents. The acid-mediated increase in wall pore size was prevented by boric acid alone at pH 2.0 and by boric acid together with Ca2+, but not by Na+ or Mg2+ ions at pH 1.5. The Ca2+-chelator-mediated increase in pore size was partially reduced by boric acid. Our results suggest that B-mediated cross-linking of RG-II in the walls of living plant cells generates a pectin network with a decreased size exclusion limit for polymers. The formation, stability, and possible functions of a borate ester cross-linked pectic network in the primary walls of nongraminaceous plant cells are discussed. PMID:10557231

  15. Lipases and esterases from extremophiles: overview and case example of the production and purification of an esterase from Thermus thermophilus HB27.

    PubMed

    Fuciños, Pablo; González, Roberto; Atanes, Estrella; Sestelo, Ana Belén Fernández; Pérez-Guerra, Nelson; Pastrana, Lorenzo; Rúa, María Luisa

    2012-01-01

    Extremophiles are organisms that have evolved to exist in a variety of extreme environments. They fall into a number of different classes that include thermophiles, halophiles, acidophiles, alkalophiles, psychrophiles, and barophiles (piezophiles). Extremophiles have the potential to produce uniquely valuable biocatalysts that function under conditions in which usually the enzymes of their nonextremophilic counterparts could not. Among novel enzymes isolated from extremophilic microorganisms, hydrolases, and particularly lipases and esterases are experiencing a growing demand. Lipases (EC 3.1.1.3) and esterases (EC 3.1.1.1) catalyze the cleavage of ester bounds in aqueous media and the reverse reaction in organic solvents. Both lipolytic enzymes have relevant applications in food, dairy, detergent, biofuel, and pharmaceutical industries. Here, we summarize the properties of lipases and esterases from the main extremophile groups: thermophiles and hyperthermophiles, psychrophiles, halophiles, alkalophiles/acidophiles, and solvent-resistant microorganisms.We report the biomass and lipolytic activity production by Thermus thermophilus HB27 in 5-L stirred-tank bioreactor at 70°C. Suitability of thermal spring water for culture media formulation is shown. In addition, a protocol to isolate and purify a cell-bound esterase from this microorganism is described.

  16. Enhanced biosurfactant production through cloning of three genes and role of esterase in biosurfactant release

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Biosurfactants have been reported to utilize a number of immiscible substrates and thereby facilitate the biodegradation of panoply of polyaromatic hydrocarbons. Olive oil is one such carbon source which has been explored by many researchers. However, studying the concomitant production of biosurfactant and esterase enzyme in the presence of olive oil in the Bacillus species and its recombinants is a relatively novel approach. Results Bacillus species isolated from endosulfan sprayed cashew plantation soil was cultivated on a number of hydrophobic substrates. Olive oil was found to be the best inducer of biosurfactant activity. The protein associated with the release of the biosurfactant was found to be an esterase. There was a twofold increase in the biosurfactant and esterase activities after the successful cloning of the biosurfactant genes from Bacillus subtilis SK320 into E.coli. Multiple sequence alignment showed regions of similarity and conserved sequences between biosurfactant and esterase genes, further confirming the symbiotic correlation between the two. Biosurfactants produced by Bacillus subtilis SK320 and recombinant strains BioS a, BioS b, BioS c were found to be effective emulsifiers, reducing the surface tension of water from 72 dynes/cm to as low as 30.7 dynes/cm. Conclusion The attributes of enhanced biosurfactant and esterase production by hyper-producing recombinant strains have many utilities from industrial viewpoint. This study for the first time has shown a possible association between biosurfactant production and esterase activity in any Bacillus species. Biosurfactant-esterase complex has been found to have powerful emulsification properties, which shows promising bioremediation, hydrocarbon biodegradation and pharmaceutical applications. PMID:21707984

  17. Esterase inhibition attribute of grapefruit juice leading to a new drug interaction.

    PubMed

    Li, Ping; Callery, Patrick S; Gan, Liang-Shang; Balani, Suresh K

    2007-07-01

    This report describes a newly identified potential of grapefruit juice (GFJ) in mediating pharmacokinetic drug interactions due to its capability to inhibit esterase. The study demonstrates that GFJ inhibits purified porcine esterase activity toward p-nitrophenyl acetate and the prodrugs lovastatin and enalapril. In rat and human hepatic or gut S9 fractions and rat gut lumen, GFJ inhibited the hydrolysis of enalapril and lovastatin, which are known to be metabolized principally by esterases, lovastatin being metabolized also by CYP3A. In Caco-2 cells, with minimal CYP3A activity, permeability of these prodrugs was increased in the presence of GFJ. In rats, oral coadministration of GFJ or an esterase inhibitor, bis-(p-nitrophenylphosphate), with the prodrugs led to respective increases in plasma area under the curve by 70% or 57% for enalaprilat and 279% or 141% for lovastatin acid. In addition, portal vein-cannulated rats pretreated with GFJ at -15 and -2 h before lovastatin administration (10 mg/kg p.o.) as a solution, 1) in water and 2) in GFJ, showed, respectively, a 49% increase (CYP3A-inhibited) and a 116% increase (both CYP3A and gut esterase-inhibited) in the portal plasma exposure to the active acid, compared with a non-GFJ pretreatment group. Overall, along with the CYP3A inactivation by GFJ, the decreased esterase activity also played a significant role in increasing the metabolic stability and permeability of esters leading to enhancement of exposure to the active drugs in rats. These new esterase inhibition findings indicate that the potential of drug interaction between ester prodrugs and GFJ should also be considered in the clinic.

  18. Molecular cloning, over expression and characterization of thermoalkalophilic esterases isolated from Geobacillus sp.

    PubMed

    Tekedar, Hasan Cihad; Sanlı-Mohamed, Gülşah

    2011-03-01

    Due to potential use for variety of biotechnological applications, genes encoding thermoalkalophilic esterase from three different Geobacillus strains isolated from thermal environmental samples in Balçova (Agamemnon) geothermal site were cloned and respective proteins were expressed in Escherichia coli (E.coli) and characterized in detail. Three esterases (Est1, Est2, Est3) were cloned directly by PCR amplification using consensus degenerate primers from genomic DNA of the strains Est1, Est2 and Est3 which were from mud, reinjection water and uncontrolled thermal leak, respectively. The genes contained an open reading frame (ORF) consisting of 741 bp for Est1 and Est2, which encoded 246 amino acids and ORF of Est3 was 729 bp encoded 242 amino acids. The esterase genes were expressed in E. coli and purified using His-Select HF nickel affinity gel. The molecular mass of the recombinant enzyme for each esterase was approximately 27.5 kDa. The three esterases showed high specific activity toward short chain p-NP esters. Recombinant Est1, Est2, Est3 have exhibited similar activity and the highest esterase activity of 1,100 U/mg with p-nitrophenyl acetate (pNPC(2)) as substrate was observed with Est1. All three esterase were most active around 65°C and pH 9.5-10.0. The effect of organic solvents, several metal ions, inhibitors and detergents on enzyme activity for purified Est1, Est2, Est3 were determined separately and compared.

  19. The sialate O-acetylesterase EstA from gut Bacteroidetes species enables sialidase-mediated cross-species foraging of 9-O-acetylated sialoglycans.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Lloyd S; Lewis, Warren G; Lewis, Amanda L

    2017-07-14

    The gut harbors many symbiotic, commensal, and pathogenic microbes that break down and metabolize host carbohydrates. Sialic acids are prominent outermost carbohydrates on host glycoproteins called mucins and protect underlying glycan chains from enzymatic degradation. Sialidases produced by some members of the colonic microbiota can promote the expansion of several potential pathogens (e.g. Clostridium difficile, Salmonella, and Escherichia coli) that do not produce sialidases. O-Acetyl ester modifications of sialic acids help resist the action of many sialidases and are present at high levels in the mammalian colon. However, some gut bacteria, in turn, produce sialylate-O-acetylesterases to remove them. Here, we investigated O-acetyl ester removal and sialic acid degradation by Bacteroidetes sialate-O-acetylesterases and sialidases, respectively, and subsequent utilization of host sialic acids by both commensal and pathogenic E. coli strains. In vitro foraging studies demonstrated that sialidase-dependent E. coli growth on mucin is enabled by Bacteroides EstA, a sialate O-acetylesterase acting on glycosidically linked sialylate-O-acetylesterase substrates, particularly at neutral pH. Biochemical studies suggested that spontaneous migration of O-acetyl esters on the sialic acid side chain, which can occur at colonic pH, may serve as a switch controlling EstA-assisted sialic acid liberation. Specifically, EstA did not act on O-acetyl esters in their initial 7-position. However, following migration to the 9-position, glycans with O-acetyl esters became susceptible to the sequential actions of bacterial esterases and sialidases. We conclude that EstA specifically unlocks the nutritive potential of 9-O-acetylated mucus sialic acids for foraging by bacteria that otherwise are prevented from accessing this carbon source. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  20. The sialate O-acetylesterase EstA from gut Bacteroidetes species enables sialidase-mediated cross-species foraging of 9-O-acetylated sialoglycans

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Lloyd S.; Lewis, Warren G.

    2017-01-01

    The gut harbors many symbiotic, commensal, and pathogenic microbes that break down and metabolize host carbohydrates. Sialic acids are prominent outermost carbohydrates on host glycoproteins called mucins and protect underlying glycan chains from enzymatic degradation. Sialidases produced by some members of the colonic microbiota can promote the expansion of several potential pathogens (e.g. Clostridium difficile, Salmonella, and Escherichia coli) that do not produce sialidases. O-Acetyl ester modifications of sialic acids help resist the action of many sialidases and are present at high levels in the mammalian colon. However, some gut bacteria, in turn, produce sialylate-O-acetylesterases to remove them. Here, we investigated O-acetyl ester removal and sialic acid degradation by Bacteroidetes sialate-O-acetylesterases and sialidases, respectively, and subsequent utilization of host sialic acids by both commensal and pathogenic E. coli strains. In vitro foraging studies demonstrated that sialidase-dependent E. coli growth on mucin is enabled by Bacteroides EstA, a sialate O-acetylesterase acting on glycosidically linked sialylate-O-acetylesterase substrates, particularly at neutral pH. Biochemical studies suggested that spontaneous migration of O-acetyl esters on the sialic acid side chain, which can occur at colonic pH, may serve as a switch controlling EstA-assisted sialic acid liberation. Specifically, EstA did not act on O-acetyl esters in their initial 7-position. However, following migration to the 9-position, glycans with O-acetyl esters became susceptible to the sequential actions of bacterial esterases and sialidases. We conclude that EstA specifically unlocks the nutritive potential of 9-O-acetylated mucus sialic acids for foraging by bacteria that otherwise are prevented from accessing this carbon source. PMID:28526748

  1. Distinction between esterases and lipases: a kinetic study with vinyl esters and TAG.

    PubMed

    Chahinian, Henri; Nini, Lylia; Boitard, Elisabeth; Dubès, Jean-Paul; Comeau, Louis-Claude; Sarda, Louis

    2002-07-01

    The better to characterize enzymes hydrolyzing carboxyl ester bonds (carboxyl ester hydrolases), we have compared the kinetic behavior of various lipases and esterases against solutions and emulsions of vinyl esters and TAG. Short-chain vinyl esters are hydrolyzed at comparable rates by esterases and lipases and have higher limits of solubility in water than corresponding TAG. Therefore, they are suited to study the influence of the physical state of the substrate on carboxyl ester hydrolase activity within a large concentration range. Enzymes used in this study are TAG lipases from microorganisms, lipases from human and guinea pig pancreas, pig liver esterase, and acetylcholinesterase. This study also includes cutinase, a fungal enzyme that displays functional properties between esterases and lipases. Esterases display maximal activity against solutions of short-chain vinyl esters (vinyl acetate, vinyl propionate, and vinyl butyrate) and TAG (triacetin, tripropionin, and tributyrin). Half-maximal activity is reached at ester concentrations far below the solubility limit. The transition from solution to emulsion at substrate concentrations exceeding the solubility limit has no effect on esterase activity. Lipases are active on solutions of short-chain vinyl esters and TAG but, in contrast to esterases, they all display maximal activity against emulsified substrates and half-maximal activity is reached at substrate concentrations near the solubility limit of the esters. The kinetics of hydrolysis of soluble substrates by lipases are either hyperbolic or deviate from the Michaelis-Menten model and show no or weak interfacial activation. The presence of molecular aggregates in solutions of short-chain substrates, as evidenced by a spectral dye method, likely accounts for the activity of lipases against soluble esters. Unlike esterases, lipases hydrolyze emulsions of water-insoluble medium- and long-chain vinyl esters and TAG such as vinyl laurate, trioctanoin, and

  2. Structural, Kinetic and Proteomic Characterization of Acetyl Phosphate-Dependent Bacterial Protein Acetylation

    PubMed Central

    Sahu, Alexandria; Sorensen, Dylan; Minasov, George; Lima, Bruno P.; Scholle, Michael; Mrksich, Milan; Anderson, Wayne F.; Gibson, Bradford W.; Schilling, Birgit; Wolfe, Alan J.

    2014-01-01

    The emerging view of Nε-lysine acetylation in eukaryotes is of a relatively abundant post-translational modification (PTM) that has a major impact on the function, structure, stability and/or location of thousands of proteins involved in diverse cellular processes. This PTM is typically considered to arise by the donation of the acetyl group from acetyl-coenzyme A (acCoA) to the ε-amino group of a lysine residue that is reversibly catalyzed by lysine acetyltransferases and deacetylases. Here, we provide genetic, mass spectrometric, biochemical and structural evidence that Nε-lysine acetylation is an equally abundant and important PTM in bacteria. Applying a recently developed, label-free and global mass spectrometric approach to an isogenic set of mutants, we detected acetylation of thousands of lysine residues on hundreds of Escherichia coli proteins that participate in diverse and often essential cellular processes, including translation, transcription and central metabolism. Many of these acetylations were regulated in an acetyl phosphate (acP)-dependent manner, providing compelling evidence for a recently reported mechanism of bacterial Nε-lysine acetylation. These mass spectrometric data, coupled with observations made by crystallography, biochemistry, and additional mass spectrometry showed that this acP-dependent acetylation is both non-enzymatic and specific, with specificity determined by the accessibility, reactivity and three-dimensional microenvironment of the target lysine. Crystallographic evidence shows acP can bind to proteins in active sites and cofactor binding sites, but also potentially anywhere molecules with a phosphate moiety could bind. Finally, we provide evidence that acP-dependent acetylation can impact the function of critical enzymes, including glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, triosephosphate isomerase, and RNA polymerase. PMID:24756028

  3. Acetyl-L-carnitine in hepatic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Malaguarnera, Michele

    2013-06-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy is a common complication of hepatic cirrhosis. The clinical diagnosis is based on two concurrent types of symptoms: impaired mental status and impaired neuromotor function. Impaired mental status is characterized by deterioration in mental status with psychomotor dysfunction, impaired memory, and increased reaction time, sensory abnormalities, poor concentration, disorientation and coma. Impaired neuromotor function include hyperreflexia, rigidity, myoclonus and asterixis. The pathogenesis of hepatic encephalopathy has not been clearly defined. The general consensus is that elevated levels of ammonia and an inflammatory response work in synergy to cause astrocyte to swell and fluid to accumulate in the brain which is thought to explain the symptoms of hepatic encephalopathy. Acetyl-L-carnitine, the short-chain ester of carnitine is endogenously produced within mitochondria and peroxisomes and is involved in the transport of acetyl-moieties across the membranes of these organelles. Acetyl-L-carnitine administration has shown the recovery of neuropsychological activities related to attention/concentration, visual scanning and tracking, psychomotor speed and mental flexibility, language short-term memory, attention, and computing ability. In fact, Acetyl-L-carnitine induces ureagenesis leading to decreased blood and brain ammonia levels. Acetyl-L-carnitine treatment decreases the severity of mental and physical fatigue, depression cognitive impairment and improves health-related quality of life. The aim of this review was to provide an explanation on the possible toxic effects of ammonia in HE and evaluate the potential clinical benefits of ALC.

  4. GLYCOENGINEERING OF ESTERASE ACTIVITY THROUGH METABOLIC FLUX-BASED MODULATION OF SIALIC ACID.

    PubMed

    Mathew, Mohit; Tan, Elaine; Labonte, Jason W; Shah, Shivam; Saeui, Christopher T; Liu, Lingshu; Bhattacharya, Rahul; Bovonratwet, Patawut; Gray, Jeffrey J; Yarema, Kevin

    2017-02-20

    This report describes the metabolic glycoengineering (MGE) of intracellular esterase activity in human colon cancer (LS174T) and Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. In silico analysis of the carboxylesterases CES1 and CES2 suggested that these enzymes are modified with sialylated N-glycans, which are proposed to stabilize the active multimeric forms of these enzymes. This premise was supported by treating cells with butanolylated ManNAc to increase sialylation, which in turn increased esterase activity. By contrast, hexosamine analogs not targeted to sialic acid biosynthesis (e.g., butanoylated GlcNAc or GalNAc) had minimal impact. Measurement of mRNA and protein confirmed that esterase activity was controlled through glycosylation and not through transcription or translation. Azide-modified ManNAc analogs widely used in MGE also enhanced esterase activity and provided a way to enrich targeted "glycoengineered" proteins (such as CES2), thereby providing unambiguous evidence that the compounds were converted to sialosides and installed into the glycan structures of esterases as intended. Overall, this study provides a pioneering example of the modulation of intracellular enzyme activity through MGE, which expands the value of this technology from its current status as a labeling strategy and modulator of cell surface biological events.

  5. Isoenzymes of peroxidase and esterase related to morphogenesis in Mammillaria gracillis Pfeiff. tissue culture.

    PubMed

    Balen, Biljana; Krsnik-Rasol, Marijana; Simeon-Rudolf, Vera

    2003-11-01

    In vitro propagated plants of the cactus Mammillaria gracillis Pfeiff. (Cactaceae) spontaneously produced callus. The habituated callus regenerated normal and hyperhydric shoots without the addition of grown regulators. Tumours were obtained by infecting cactus explants with Agrobacterium tumefaciens; the wild strain B6S3 (tumour TW) or with the rooty mutant GV3101 (tumour TR). Both tumour lines grew vigorously, never expressing any morphogenic potential. In this study, cactus shoots, callus, normal and hyperhydric regenerants and TW and TR tumours were compared with regard to peroxidase (EC 1.11.1.7) and esterase activity, and isoenzyme patterns. Guaiacol peroxidase activity was the lowest in the cactus shoots and in the normal regenerants. Callus, hyperhydric regenerants and tumours had peroxidase activity of 6 to 7 times higher. Esterase activity was measured with 1- and 2-naphthylacetate as broad-spectrum substrates. The highest esterase activity was determined in tumours with both substrates. All tissues, except the TR tumour, had higher esterase activity for 2-compared to 1-naphtylacetate. Peroxidase and esterase isoenzyme patterns were not completely identical among the investigated tissues.

  6. Esterase profiles of organophosphorus compounds in vitro predict their behavior in vivo.

    PubMed

    Makhaeva, Galina F; Rudakova, Elena V; Serebryakova, Olga G; Aksinenko, Alexey Yu; Lushchekina, Sofya V; Bachurin, Sergey O; Richardson, Rudy J

    2016-11-25

    We studied 4 serine esterases (EOHs) that are associated with the following consequences from their inhibition by organophosphorus compounds (OPCs): acetylcholinesterase (AChE: acute neurotoxicity; cognition enhancement), butyrylcholinesterase (BChE: inhibition of drug metabolism and/or stoichiometric scavenging of EOH inhibitors; cognition enhancement), carboxylesterase (CaE; inhibition of drug metabolism and/or stoichiometric scavenging of EOH inhibitors), and neuropathy target esterase (NTE: delayed neurotoxicity, OPIDN). The relative degree of inhibition of these EOHs constitutes the "esterase profile" of an OPC, which we hypothesize can serve as a predictor of its overall physiological effects. To test this hypothesis, we selected 3 OPCs known from previous work on reference enzymes to span a wide range of esterase profiles, neuropathic potential, and acute cholinergic toxicity. For each compound, we determined in vitro IC50 and in vivo ED50 values for inhibition of AChE, BChE, CaE, and NTE in mouse brain and blood. The results showed good correlations between in vitro and in vivo measures of potency and selectivity except for brain CaE, a tissue-specific isoform of the enzyme that was less sensitive to the test compounds than expected. Thus, this synthesis of new and previously published results indicates that the concept of the esterase profile of OPCs is useful for the prediction of therapeutic and toxic effects in vivo. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Solid-state fermentation as a potential technique for esterase/lipase production by halophilic archaea.

    PubMed

    Martin del Campo, Martha; Camacho, Rosa M; Mateos-Díaz, Juan C; Müller-Santos, Marcelo; Córdova, Jesus; Rodríguez, Jorge A

    2015-11-01

    Halophilic archaea are extremophiles, adapted to high-salt environments, showing a big biotechnological potential as enzyme, lipids and pigments producers. Four inert supports (perlite, vermiculite, polyurethane foam and glass fiber) were employed for solid-state fermentation (SSF) of the halophilic archaeon Natronococcus sp. TC6 to investigate biomass and esterase production. A very low esterase activity and high water activity were observed when perlite, vermiculite and polyurethane were used as supports. When glass fiber was employed, an important moisture loss was observed (8.6%). Moreover, moisture retention was improved by mixing polyurethane and glass fiber, resulting in maximal biomass and esterase production. Three halophilic archaea: Natronococcus sp. TC6, Halobacterium sp. NRC-1 and Haloarcula marismortui were cultured by submerged fermentation (SmF) and by SSF; an improvement of 1.3- to 6.2-fold was observed in the biomass and esterase production when SSF was used. Growth was not homogeneous in the mixture, but was predominant in the glass fiber thus was probably because the glass fiber provides a holder to the cells, while the polyurethane acts as an impregnation medium reservoir. To the best of our knowledge, this work is the first report on haloarchaea cultivation by SSF aiming biomass and esterase/lipase activity production.

  8. Organophosphate and Pyrethroid Hydrolase Activities of Mutant Esterases from the Cotton Bollworm Helicoverpa armigera

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yongqiang; Farnsworth, Claire A.; Coppin, Chris W.; Teese, Mark G.; Liu, Jian-Wei; Scott, Colin; Zhang, Xing; Russell, Robyn J.; Oakeshott, John G.

    2013-01-01

    Two mutations have been found in five closely related insect esterases (from four higher Diptera and a hymenopteran) which each confer organophosphate (OP) hydrolase activity on the enzyme and OP resistance on the insect. One mutation converts a Glycine to an Aspartate, and the other converts a Tryptophan to a Leucine in the enzymes’ active site. One of the dipteran enzymes with the Leucine mutation also shows enhanced activity against pyrethroids. Introduction of the two mutations in vitro into eight esterases from six other widely separated insect groups has also been reported to increase substantially the OP hydrolase activity of most of them. These data suggest that the two mutations could contribute to OP, and possibly pyrethroid, resistance in a variety of insects. We therefore introduced them in vitro into eight Helicoverpa armigera esterases from a clade that has already been implicated in OP and pyrethroid resistance. We found that they do not generally enhance either OP or pyrethroid hydrolysis in these esterases but the Aspartate mutation did increase OP hydrolysis in one enzyme by about 14 fold and the Leucine mutation caused a 4–6 fold increase in activity (more in one case) of another three against some of the most insecticidal isomers of fenvalerate and cypermethrin. The Aspartate enzyme and one of the Leucine enzymes occur in regions of the H. armigera esterase isozyme profile that have been previously implicated in OP and pyrethroid resistance, respectively. PMID:24204917

  9. Molecular and kinetic evidence for allelic variants of esterase Estbeta1 in the mosquito Culex quinquefasciatus.

    PubMed

    Small, G J; Karunaratne, S H; Chadee, D D; Hemingway, J

    1999-07-01

    Elevated esterase Estbeta1 was purified from larvae of newly isolated strains of the mosquito Culex quinquefasciatus from Colombia (COL) and Trinidad (TRI) with resistance to organophosphate (OP) insecticides. Insecticide interactions were compared with those of elevated Estbeta1(2) from the OP-resistant Habana strain and the non-elevated Estbeta1(3) from the susceptible PelSS strain. On the basis of insecticide binding efficiency, all elevated Estbeta1 esterases were readily distinguishable. Differences between the EcoRI restriction fragment patterns of the amplified estbeta1 gene in COL and TRI strains compared with each other, and between amplified estbeta1(1), estbeta1(2) and the non-amplified estbeta1(3), suggest differences in their nucleotide sequence. Considering their variable insecticide binding efficiencies, these genetic differences would imply that, in contrast to estalpha2 and estbeta2, amplification of estbeta1 has occurred several times independently. Generally, the elevated Estbeta1s were more reactive with insecticides than the non-elevated Estbeta1(3). This supports the hypothesis that the elevated esterase-based mechanism confers resistance through amplification of alleles coding for esterases which have a greater specificity for the insecticides they sequester than the esterases coded by their non-amplified counterparts.

  10. Serum cholesterol concentration associated with aspirin esterase activity in older people: preliminary data.

    PubMed

    Kotani, Kazuhiko; Caccavello, Russell; Hermo, Ricardo; Yamada, Toshiyuki; Taniguchi, Nobuyuki; Gugliucci, Alejandro

    2010-05-10

    Metabolism of aspirin (acetylsalicylic acid), commonly used in older people for the prevention of cardiovascular disease, is important to the effectiveness of this drug. Whereas part of aspirin hydrolysis occurs in blood, there is a paucity of information in regards to circulating aspirin esterase activity in various physiological and pathological conditions. High aspirin esterase activity, corresponding to faster aspirin hydrolysis (thus aspirin non-responsiveness), may occur in cardiovascular disease-prone states. The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of cardio-metabolic variables such as cholesterol on serum aspirin esterase activity in older people who participated in an intervention study on physical activity. A total of 18 non-medicated subjects (7 men/11 women, mean age 67.8 years, body mass index = 23.4 +/- 3.3 kg/m(2)), who completed a 3-month interventional program for a mild-to-moderate increase in physical activity, were analyzed. The body mass index, plasma glucose, serum total cholesterol and aspirin esterase activity were measured in the pre- and post-interventional phases of the study. During the interventional period, the changes in aspirin esterase activity correlated significantly and positively with those of total cholesterol concentrations (r = 0.542, P = 0.020; beta = 0.609, P = 0.035 in a multiple linear regression analysis after adjusting for all the measured variables). The results suggest that cholesterol metabolism alterations may be associated with aspirin metabolism in older people.

  11. Organophosphate and pyrethroid hydrolase activities of mutant Esterases from the cotton bollworm Helicoverpa armigera.

    PubMed

    Li, Yongqiang; Farnsworth, Claire A; Coppin, Chris W; Teese, Mark G; Liu, Jian-Wei; Scott, Colin; Zhang, Xing; Russell, Robyn J; Oakeshott, John G

    2013-01-01

    Two mutations have been found in five closely related insect esterases (from four higher Diptera and a hymenopteran) which each confer organophosphate (OP) hydrolase activity on the enzyme and OP resistance on the insect. One mutation converts a Glycine to an Aspartate, and the other converts a Tryptophan to a Leucine in the enzymes' active site. One of the dipteran enzymes with the Leucine mutation also shows enhanced activity against pyrethroids. Introduction of the two mutations in vitro into eight esterases from six other widely separated insect groups has also been reported to increase substantially the OP hydrolase activity of most of them. These data suggest that the two mutations could contribute to OP, and possibly pyrethroid, resistance in a variety of insects. We therefore introduced them in vitro into eight Helicoverpa armigera esterases from a clade that has already been implicated in OP and pyrethroid resistance. We found that they do not generally enhance either OP or pyrethroid hydrolysis in these esterases but the Aspartate mutation did increase OP hydrolysis in one enzyme by about 14 fold and the Leucine mutation caused a 4-6 fold increase in activity (more in one case) of another three against some of the most insecticidal isomers of fenvalerate and cypermethrin. The Aspartate enzyme and one of the Leucine enzymes occur in regions of the H. armigera esterase isozyme profile that have been previously implicated in OP and pyrethroid resistance, respectively.

  12. Cellular function of neuropathy target esterase in lysophosphatidylcholine action

    SciTech Connect

    Vose, Sarah C.; Fujioka, Kazutoshi; Gulevich, Alex G.; Lin, Amy Y.; Holland, Nina T.; Casida, John E.

    2008-11-01

    Neuropathy target esterase (NTE) plays critical roles in embryonic development and maintenance of peripheral axons. It is a secondary target of some organophosphorus toxicants including analogs of insecticides and chemical warfare agents. Although the mechanistic role of NTE in vivo is poorly defined, it is known to hydrolyze lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC) in vitro and may protect cell membranes from cytotoxic accumulation of LPC. To determine the cellular function of NTE, Neuro-2a and COS-7 cells were transfected with a full-length human NTE-containing plasmid yielding recombinant NTE (rNTE). We find the same inhibitor sensitivity and specificity profiles for rNTE assayed with LPC or phenyl valerate (a standard NTE substrate) and that this correlation extends to the LPC hydrolases of human brain, lymphocytes and erythrocytes. All of these LPC hydrolases are therefore very similar to each other in respect to a conserved inhibitor binding site conformation. NTE is expressed in brain and lymphocytes and contributes to LPC hydrolase activities in these tissues. The enzyme or enzymes responsible for erythrocyte LPC hydrolase activity remain to be identified. We also show that rNTE protects Neuro-2a and COS-7 cells from exogenous LPC cytotoxicity. Expression of rNTE in Neuro-2a cells alters their phospholipid balance (analyzed by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry with single ion monitoring) by lowering LPC-16:0 and LPC-18:0 and elevating glycerophosphocholine without a change in phosphatidylcholine-16:0/18:1 or 16:0/18:2. NTE therefore serves an important function in LPC homeostasis and action.

  13. Eco-friendly surface modification on polyester fabrics by esterase treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jindan; Cai, Guoqiang; Liu, Jinqiang; Ge, Huayun; Wang, Jiping

    2014-03-01

    Currently, traditional alkali deweighting technology is widely used to improve the hydrophilicity of polyester fabrics. However, the wastewater and heavy chemicals in the effluent cause enormous damage to the environment. Esterase treatment, which is feasible in mild conditions with high selectivity, can provide a clean and efficient way for polyester modification. Under the optimum conditions, the polyester fabric hydrolysis process of esterase had a linear kinetics. X-ray photoelectron spectrometry (XPS) results showed that hydroxyl and carboxyl groups were produced only on the surface of modified fiber without changing the chemical composition of the bulk. These fibers exhibited much improved fabric wicking, as well as greatly improved oily stain removal performance. Compared to the harsh alkali hydrolysis, the enzyme treatment led to smaller weight loss and better fiber integrity. The esterase treatment technology is promising to produce higher-quality polyester textiles with an environmental friendly approach.

  14. Mycobacteriocins produced by rapidly growing mycobacteria are Tween-hydrolyzing esterases.

    PubMed Central

    Saito, H; Tomioka, H; Watanabe, T; Yoneyama, T

    1983-01-01

    Smegmatocin, a protein produced by Mycobacterium smegmatis ATCC 14468, was found to have an esterase activity, hydrolyzing Tween 80, polyoxyethylene sorbitan monooleate, added to the assay medium for various "bacteriocins" from mycobacteria. Because M. diernhoferi ATCC 19340 (indicator strain for smegmatocin) is highly susceptible to oleic acid and smegmatocin requires Tween 80 for manifestation of its anti-M. diernhoferi activity, it is likely that smegmatocin-mediated antimicrobial action is caused by oleic acid generated by hydrolysis of Tween 80 by the inherent esterase action of smegmatocin. Other mycobacteriocins from rapidly growing mycobacteria also have inherent esterase activity against Tween 80 and require Tween 80 for expression of antimycobacterial action. Smegmatocin was found to hydrolyze various polyoxyethylene (sorbitan) fatty acyl esters but not sorbitan monooleate and glyceryl esters. Images PMID:6826523

  15. Role of an esterase in flavor volatile variation within the tomato clade.

    PubMed

    Goulet, Charles; Mageroy, Melissa H; Lam, Nghi B; Floystad, Abbye; Tieman, Denise M; Klee, Harry J

    2012-11-13

    Tomato flavor is dependent upon a complex mixture of volatiles including multiple acetate esters. Red-fruited species of the tomato clade accumulate a relatively low content of acetate esters in comparison with the green-fruited species. We show that the difference in volatile ester content between the red- and green-fruited species is associated with insertion of a retrotransposon adjacent to the most enzymatically active member of a family of esterases. This insertion causes higher expression of the esterase, resulting in the reduced levels of multiple esters that are negatively correlated with human preferences for tomato. The insertion was evolutionarily fixed in the red-fruited species, suggesting that high expression of the esterase and consequent low ester content may provide an adaptive advantage in the ancestor of the red-fruited species. These results illustrate at a molecular level how closely related species exhibit major differences in volatile production by altering a volatile-associated catabolic activity.

  16. Preliminary toxicological study of ferric acetyl acetonate

    SciTech Connect

    London, J.E.; Smith, D.M.

    1983-01-01

    The calculated acute oral LD/sub 50//sup 30/ (lethal does for 50% of the animals occuring with 30 days after compound administration) values for ferric acetyl acetonate were 584 mg/kg in mice and 995 mg/kg in rats. According to classical guidelines, this compound would be considered slightly toxic in both species. Skin application studies in the rabbit demonstrated the compound to be irritating. The eye irritation study disclosed the compound to be a severe irritant causing permanent damage to the cornea (inflammation and scarring resulting in blindness). The sensitization study in the guinea pig did not show ferric acetyl acetonate to be deleterious in this regard.

  17. Properties of phenyl valerate esterase activities from chicken serum are comparable with soluble esterases of peripheral nerves in relation with organophosphorus compounds inhibition.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Pérez, Adolfo G; Barril, José; Estévez, Jorge; Vilanova, Eugenio

    2003-04-30

    Chicken serum, the usual in vivo animal for testing organophosphorus delayed neuropathy, has long been reported not to contain a homologous activity of the neuronal neuropathy target esterase (NTE) activity when it is assayed according to standard methods as the phenyl valerate esterase (PVase) activity, which is resistant to paraoxon and sensitive to mipafox. However, a PVase activity (1000-1500 nmol/min/ml) can be measured in serum that is extremely sensitive to both paraoxon, a non-neuropathic organophosphorus compound and mipafox, a model neuropathy inducer. The inhibition was time progressive in both cases, suggesting a covalent phosphorilating reaction. The fixed time inhibition curves suggest at least two sensitive components. The IC50 for 30 min, at 37 degrees C are 6 and 51 nM for paraoxon and 4 and 110 nM for mipafox, for every sensitive component. When paraoxon was removed from a serum sample pretreated with the inhibitor, the paraoxon sensitive PVase activity was recovered, in spite of showing a time progressive inhibition suggesting that hydrolytic dephosphorylating reaction recovered at a significant rate. The reactivation of the phosphorylated enzyme could explain that the time progressive inhibitions curves for long time with paraoxon tend to reach a plateau depending on the inhibition concentration. However, with mipafox, the curve approached the same maximal inhibitions at all concentrations as expected for a permanent covalent irreversible phosphorylation, which is coherent with the observations that the activity remained inhibited after removing the inhibitor. Data of serum esterases described in this paper showed similar properties to those previously reported for peripheral nerve soluble phenylvalerate esterase: (1) extremely high sensitivity to paraoxon and mipafox; (2) time progressive kinetic with two sensitive components; (3) recovery of activity after removal of paraoxon; and (4) permanent inhibition with mipafox. These properties of

  18. Extraction and purification of wheat-esterase using aqueous two-phase systems of ionic liquid and salt.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Bin; Feng, Zhibiao; Liu, Chunhong; Xu, Yingcao; Li, Dongmei; Ji, Guo

    2015-05-01

    To explore a new and simple rapid extraction and purification technique for wheat-esterase, an ionic liquids (ILs)-based aqueous two-phase system (ATPS) was developed for the purification of wheat-esterase from wheat extracts. Effects of various process parameters such as the concentrations of [Bmim]BF4, the types and concentrations of phase-forming salt, the system pH and the temperature on partitioning of wheat-esterase were evaluated. The obtained data indicated that wheat-esterase was preferentially partitioned into the ILs-rich phase and the ATPS composed of 20 % [Bmim]BF4 (w/w) and 25 % (w/w) NaH2PO4(pH = 4.8) showed good selectivity on wheat-esterase. Under the optimum conditions, wheat-esterase was purified with an acceptable yield (88.93 %), but produced wheat-esterase was 4.23 times as pure. It was obvious that temperature shows little influence on the purification between 10 and 50 °C. Sephadex G-150FF revealed that the band intensity of contaminating proteins in ATPS fraction almost disappeared. Therefore, ILs-based ATPS was an effective method for partitioning and recovery of wheat-esterase from wheat crude extracts.

  19. In muro fragmentation of the rhamnogalacturonan I backbone in potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) results in a reduction and altered location of the galactan and arabinan side-chains and abnormal periderm development.

    PubMed

    Oomen, Ronald J F J; Doeswijk-Voragen, Chantal H L; Bush, Maxwell S; Vincken, Jean-Paul; Borkhardt, Bernhard; van den Broek, Lambertus A M; Corsar, Julia; Ulvskov, Peter; Voragen, Alphons G J; McCann, Maureen C; Visser, Richard G F

    2002-05-01

    Rhamnogalacturonan (RG) I is a branched pectic polysaccharide in plant cell walls. Rhamnogalacturonan lyase (eRGL) from Aspergillus aculeatus is able to cleave the RG I backbone at specific sites. Transgenic potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) plants were made by the introduction of the gene encoding eRGL, under the control of the granule-bound starch synthase promoter. The eRGL protein was successfully expressed and translated into an active form, demonstrated by eRGL activity in the tuber extracts. The transgenic plants produced tubers with clear morphological alterations, including radial swelling of the periderm cells and development of intercellular spaces in the cortex. Sugar compositional analysis of the isolated cell walls showed a large reduction in galactosyl and arabinosyl residues in transgenic tubers. Immunocytochemical studies using the LM5 (galactan) and LM6 (arabinan) antibodies also showed a large reduction in galactan and arabinan side-chains of RG I. Most of the remaining LM5 epitopes were located in the expanded middle lamella at cell corners of eRGL tubers, which is in contrast to their normal location in the primary wall of wild type tubers. These data suggest that RG I has an important role in anchoring galactans and arabinans at particular regions in the wall and in normal development of the periderm.

  20. Contribution of soil esterase to biodegradation of aliphatic polyester agricultural mulch film in cultivated soils.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto-Tamura, Kimiko; Hiradate, Syuntaro; Watanabe, Takashi; Koitabashi, Motoo; Sameshima-Yamashita, Yuka; Yarimizu, Tohru; Kitamoto, Hiroko

    2015-01-01

    The relationship between degradation speed of soil-buried biodegradable polyester film in a farmland and the characteristics of the predominant polyester-degrading soil microorganisms and enzymes were investigated to determine the BP-degrading ability of cultivated soils through characterization of the basal microbial activities and their transition in soils during BP film degradation. Degradation of poly(butylene succinate-co-adipate) (PBSA) film was evaluated in soil samples from different cultivated fields in Japan for 4 weeks. Both the degradation speed of the PBSA film and the esterase activity were found to be correlated with the ratio of colonies that produced clear zone on fungal minimum medium-agarose plate with emulsified PBSA to the total number colonies counted. Time-dependent change in viable counts of the PBSA-degrading fungi and esterase activities were monitored in soils where buried films showed the most and the least degree of degradation. During the degradation of PBSA film, the viable counts of the PBSA-degrading fungi and the esterase activities in soils, which adhered to the PBSA film, increased with time. The soil, where the film was degraded the fastest, recorded large PBSA-degrading fungal population and showed high esterase activity compared with the other soil samples throughout the incubation period. Meanwhile, esterase activity and viable counts of PBSA-degrading fungi were found to be stable in soils without PBSA film. These results suggest that the higher the distribution ratio of native PBSA-degrading fungi in the soil, the faster the film degradation is. This could be due to the rapid accumulation of secreted esterases in these soils.

  1. Cloning, Characterization, Controlled Overexpression, and Inactivation of the Major Tributyrin Esterase Gene of Lactococcus lactis

    PubMed Central

    Fernández, Leonides; Beerthuyzen, Marke M.; Brown, Julie; Siezen, Roland J.; Coolbear, Tim; Holland, Ross; Kuipers, Oscar P.

    2000-01-01

    The gene encoding the major intracellular tributyrin esterase of Lactococcus lactis was cloned using degenerate DNA probes based on 19 known N-terminal amino acid residues of the purified enzyme. The gene, named estA, was sequenced and found to encode a protein of 258 amino acid residues. The transcription start site was mapped 233 nucleotides upstream of the start codon, and a canonical promoter sequence was identified. The deduced amino acid sequence of the estA product contained the typical GXSXG motif found in most lipases and esterases. The protein was overproduced up to 170-fold in L. lactis by use of the nisin-controlled expression system recently developed for lactic acid bacteria. The estA gene was inactivated by chromosomal integration of a temperature-sensitive integration vector. This resulted in the complete loss of esterase activity, which could then be recovered after complementation of the constructed esterase-deficient strain with the wild-type estA gene. This confirms that EstA is the main enzyme responsible for esterase activity in L. lactis. Purified recombinant enzyme showed a preference for short-chain acyl esters, surprisingly also including phospholipids. Medium- and long-acyl-chain lipids were also hydrolyzed, albeit less efficiently. Intermediate characteristics between esterases and lipases make intracellular lactococcal EstA difficult to classify in either of these two groups of esterolytic enzymes. We suggest that, in vivo, EstA could be involved in (phospho)lipid metabolism or cellular detoxification or both, as its sequence showed significant similarity to S-formylglutathione hydrolase (FGH) of Paracoccus denitrificans and human EstD (or FGH), which are part of a universal formaldehyde detoxification pathway. PMID:10742212

  2. Characterization of a novel cold active and salt tolerant esterase from Zunongwangia profunda.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Mohammad Asadur; Culsum, Umma; Tang, Wenhao; Zhang, Shao Wei; Wu, Gaobing; Liu, Ziduo

    2016-04-01

    A novel cold active esterase, EstLiu was cloned from the marine bacterium Zunongwangia profunda, overexpressed in E. coli BL21 (DE3) and purified by glutathione-S transferase (GST) affinity chromatography. The mature esterase EstLiu sequence encodes a protein of 273 amino acids residues, with a predicted molecular weight of 30KDa and containing the classical pentapeptidase motif from position 156 to 160 with the catalytic triad Ser158-Asp211-His243. Although, EstLiu showed 64% similarity with the hypothetical esterase from Chryseobacterium sp. StRB126 (WP_045498424), phylogenetic analysis showed it had no similarity with any of the established family of lipases/esterases, suggesting that it could be considered as a new family. The purified enzyme showed broad substrate specificity with the highest hydrolytic activity against p-nitrophenyl butyrate (C4). EstLiu showed remarkable activity (75%) at 0°Cand the optimal activity at pH 8.0 and 30°C with good thermostability and quickened inactivation above 60°C. EstLiu retained 81, 103, 67 and 78% of its original activity at 50% (v/v) in ethanol, isopropanol, DMSO and ethylene glycol, respectively. In the presence of Tween 20, Tween 80 and Triton X-100, EstLiu showed 88, 100 and 117% of relative activity. It is also co-factor independent. The high activity at low temperature and desirable stability in organic solvents and salts of this novel family esterase represents a good evidence of novel biocatalyst. Overall, this novel enzyme showed better activity than previously reported esterases in extreme reaction conditions and could promote the reaction in both aqueous and non-aqueous conditions, indicating its great potential for industrial applications.

  3. The cell wall pectic polymer rhamnogalacturonan-II is required for proper pollen tube elongation: implications of a putative sialyltransferase-like protein

    PubMed Central

    Dumont, Marie; Lehner, Arnaud; Bouton, Sophie; Kiefer-Meyer, Marie Christine; Voxeur, Aline; Pelloux, Jérôme; Lerouge, Patrice; Mollet, Jean-Claude

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aims Rhamnogalacturonan-II (RG-II) is one of the pectin motifs found in the cell wall of all land plants. It contains sugars such as 2-keto-3-deoxy-d-lyxo-heptulosaric acid (Dha) and 2-keto-3-deoxy-d-manno-octulosonic acid (Kdo), and within the wall RG-II is mostly found as a dimer via a borate diester cross-link. To date, little is known regarding the biosynthesis of this motif. Here, after a brief review of our current knowledge on RG-II structure, biosynthesis and function in plants, this study explores the implications of the presence of a Golgi-localized sialyltransferase-like 2 (SIA2) protein that is possibly involved in the transfer of Dha or Kdo in the RG-II of Arabidopsis thaliana pollen tubes, a fast-growing cell type used as a model for the study of cell elongation. Methods Two heterozygous mutant lines of arabidopsis (sia2-1+/– and qrt1 × sia2-2+/–) were investigated. sia2-2+/– was in a quartet1 background and the inserted T-DNA contained the reporter gene β-glucuronidase (GUS) under the pollen-specific promoter LAT52. Pollen germination and pollen tube phenotype and growth were analysed both in vitro and in vivo by microscopy. Key Results Self-pollination of heterozygous lines produced no homozygous plants in the progeny, which may suggest that the mutation could be lethal. Heterozygous mutants displayed a much lower germination rate overall and exhibited a substantial delay in germination (20 h of delay to reach 30 % of pollen grain germination compared with the wild type). In both lines, mutant pollen grains that were able to produce a tube had tubes that were either bursting, abnormal (swollen or dichotomous branching tip) or much shorter compared with wild-type pollen tubes. In vivo, mutant pollen tubes were restricted to the style, whereas the wild-type pollen tubes were detected at the base of the ovary. Conclusions This study highlights that the mutation in arabidopsis SIA2 encoding a sialyltransferase-like protein that

  4. Boron bridging of rhamnogalacturonan-II, monitored by gel electrophoresis, occurs during polysaccharide synthesis and secretion but not post-secretion.

    PubMed

    Chormova, Dimitra; Messenger, David J; Fry, Stephen C

    2014-02-01

    The cell-wall pectic domain rhamnogalacturonan-II (RG-II) is cross-linked via borate diester bridges, which influence the expansion, thickness and porosity of the wall. Previously, little was known about the mechanism or subcellular site of this cross-linking. Using polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) to separate monomeric from dimeric (boron-bridged) RG-II, we confirmed that Pb(2+) promotes H3 BO3 -dependent dimerisation in vitro. H3 BO3 concentrations as high as 50 mm did not prevent cross-linking. For in-vivo experiments, we successfully cultured 'Paul's Scarlet' rose (Rosa sp.) cells in boron-free medium: their wall-bound pectin contained monomeric RG-II domains but no detectable dimers. Thus pectins containing RG-II domains can be held in the wall other than via boron bridges. Re-addition of H3 BO3 to 3.3 μm triggered a gradual appearance of RG-II dimer over 24 h but without detectable loss of existing monomers, suggesting that only newly synthesised RG-II was amenable to boron bridging. In agreement with this, Rosa cultures whose polysaccharide biosynthetic machinery had been compromised (by carbon starvation, respiratory inhibitors, anaerobiosis, freezing or boiling) lost the ability to generate RG-II dimers. We conclude that RG-II normally becomes boron-bridged during synthesis or secretion but not post-secretion. Supporting this conclusion, exogenous [(3) H]RG-II was neither dimerised in the medium nor cross-linked to existing wall-associated RG-II domains when added to Rosa cultures. In conclusion, in cultured Rosa cells RG-II domains have a brief window of opportunity for boron-bridging intraprotoplasmically or during secretion, but secretion into the apoplast is a point of no return beyond which additional boron-bridging does not readily occur. © 2013 The Authors The Plant Journal published by Society for Experimental Biology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Consumption of dairy yogurt with the polysaccharide rhamnogalacturonan from the peel of the Korean citrus hallabong enhances immune function and attenuates the inflammatory response.

    PubMed

    Lee, Mi-Hyang; Kim, Minjoo; Kim, Minkyung; Kwak, Jung Hyun; Chang, Dong Hoon; Yu, Won Kyu; Lee, Sang-Hyun; Lee, Jong Ho

    2016-06-15

    The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of consuming dairy yogurt supplemented with rhamnogalacturonan (RG), a polysaccharide from the peel of the Korean citrus hallabong, on natural killer (NK) cell activity and circulating cytokine levels. A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study was conducted on 120 nondiabetic and nonobese subjects. Over an eight-week period, the test group consumed one pack (150 mL) of dairy yogurt containing 50 mg of probiotics and 100 mg of hallabong peel polysaccharide (60% RG) each day, whereas the placebo group consumed the same product without the hallabong peel supplement. NK cell activity (%) was measured based on the ratios of the effector cells (E; peripheral blood mononuclear cells, PBMCs) from each participant relative to the target cells (T; K562 cells) at E : T ratios of 10 : 1, 5 : 1, 2.5 : 1, or 1.25 : 1. NK cell activities under all assay conditions and interleukin (IL)-12 and interferon (IFN)-γ levels were significantly increased in the test group at eight weeks compared to the baseline values, whereas the placebo group showed a significant increase only in NK cell activity at E : T = 1.25 : 1. The test group had significantly greater increases in the changes in serum NK cell activity at the E : T ratios of 10 : 1, 5 : 1, and 2.5 : 1 and in the increases in IL-12 and IFN-γ levels than were observed in the placebo group, after adjusting for baseline values. After eight weeks of treatment, significant reductions were found in IL-6 and IL-1β levels in both the placebo and test groups. The daily consumption of dairy yogurt supplemented with RG, a polysaccharide from the peel of the Korean citrus hallabong, enhanced NK cell function and attenuated pro-inflammatory cytokine levels (ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT02535663).

  6. Nongradient blue native gel analysis of serum proteins and in-gel detection of serum esterase activities

    PubMed Central

    Thangthaeng, Nopporn; Sumien, Nathalie; Forster, Michael J.; Shah, Ruchir A.; Yan, Liang-Jun

    2011-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to analyze serum protein complexes and detect serum esterase activities using nongradient blue native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (BN-PAGE). For analysis of potential protein complexes, serum from rat was used. Results demonstrate that a total of 8 gel bands could be clearly distinguished after Coomassie blue staining, and serum albumin could be isolated nearly as a pure protein. Moreover, proteins in these bands were identified by electrospray mass spectrometry and low-energy collision induced dissociation (CID)-MS/MS peptide sequencing and the existence of serum dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase (DLDH) was confirmed. For studies of in-gel detection of esterase activities, serum from rat, mouse, and human was used. In-gel staining of esterase activity was achieved by the use of either α-naphthylacetate or β-naphthylacetate in the presence of Fast blue BB salt. There were three bands exhibiting esterase activities in the serum of both rat and mouse. In contrast, there was only one band showing esterase activity staining in the human serum. When serum samples were treated with varying concentrations of urea, esterase activity staining was abolished for all the bands except the one containing esterase 1 (Es1) protein that is known to be a single polypeptide enzyme, indicating that majority of these esterases were protein complexes or multimeric proteins. We also identified the human serum esterase as butyrylcholinesterase following isolation and partial purification using ammonium sulfate fractioning and ion exchange column chromatographies. Where applicable, demonstrations of the gel-based method for measuring serum esterase activities under physiological or pathophysiological conditions were illustrated. Results of the present study demonstrate that nongradient BN-PAGE can serve as a feasible analytical tool for proteomic and enzymatic analysis of serum proteins. PMID:21237726

  7. Nongradient blue native gel analysis of serum proteins and in-gel detection of serum esterase activities.

    PubMed

    Thangthaeng, Nopporn; Sumien, Nathalie; Forster, Michael J; Shah, Ruchir A; Yan, Liang-Jun

    2011-02-15

    The objective of the present study was to analyze serum protein complexes and detect serum esterase activities using nongradient blue native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (BN-PAGE). For analysis of potential protein complexes, serum from rat was used. Results demonstrate that a total of 8 gel bands could be clearly distinguished after Coomassie blue staining, and serum albumin could be isolated nearly as a pure protein. Moreover, proteins in these bands were identified by electrospray mass spectrometry and low-energy collision induced dissociation (CID)-MS/MS peptide sequencing and the existence of serum dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase (DLDH) was confirmed. For studies of in-gel detection of esterase activities, serum from rat, mouse, and human was used. In-gel staining of esterase activity was achieved by the use of either α-naphthylacetate or β-naphthylacetate in the presence of Fast blue BB salt. There were three bands exhibiting esterase activities in the serum of both rat and mouse. In contrast, there was only one band showing esterase activity staining in the human serum. When serum samples were treated with varying concentrations of urea, esterase activity staining was abolished for all the bands except the one containing esterase 1 (Es1) protein that is known to be a single polypeptide enzyme, indicating that majority of these esterases were protein complexes or multimeric proteins. We also identified the human serum esterase as butyrylcholinesterase following isolation and partial purification using ammonium sulfate fractioning and ion exchange column chromatographies. Where applicable, demonstrations of the gel-based method for measuring serum esterase activities under physiological or pathophysiological conditions were illustrated. Results of the present study demonstrate that nongradient BN-PAGE can serve as a feasible analytical tool for proteomic and enzymatic analysis of serum proteins. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Cocaine esterase: interactions with cocaine and immune responses in mice.

    PubMed

    Ko, Mei-Chuan; Bowen, Luvina D; Narasimhan, Diwahar; Berlin, Aaron A; Lukacs, Nicholas W; Sunahara, Roger K; Cooper, Ziva D; Woods, James H

    2007-02-01

    Cocaine esterase (CocE) is the most efficient protein catalyst for the hydrolysis of cocaine characterized to date. The aim of this study was to investigate the in vivo potency of CocE in blocking cocaine-induced toxicity in the mouse and to assess CocE's potential immunogenicity. Cocaine toxicity was quantified by measuring the occurrence of convulsions and lethality. Intravenous administration of CocE (0.1-1 mg) 1 min before cocaine administration produced dose-dependent rightward shifts of the dose-response curve for cocaine toxicity. More important, i.v. CocE (0.1-1 mg), given 1 min after the occurrence of cocaine-induced convulsions, shortened the recovery time after the convulsions and saved the mice from subsequent death. Effects of repeated exposures to CocE were evaluated by measuring anti-CocE antibody titers and the protective effects of i.v. CocE (0.32 mg) against toxicity elicited by i.p. cocaine (320 mg/kg) (i.e., 0-17% occurrence of convulsions and lethality). CocE retained its potency against cocaine toxicity in mice after a single prior CocE exposure (0.1-1 mg), and these mice did not show an immune response. CocE retained similar effectiveness in mice after three prior CocE exposures (0.1-1 mg/week for 3 weeks), although these mice displayed 10-fold higher antibody titers. CocE partially lost effectiveness (i.e., 33-50% occurrence of convulsions and lethality) in mice with four prior exposures to CocE (0.1-1 mg/2 week for four times), and these mice displayed approximately 100-fold higher antibody titers. These results suggest that CocE produces robust protection and reversal of cocaine toxicity, indicating CocE's therapeutic potential for acute cocaine toxicity. Repeated CocE exposures may increase its immunogenicity and partially reduce its protective ability.

  9. Gene encoding acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase

    DOEpatents

    Roessler, Paul G.; Ohlrogge, John B.

    1996-01-01

    A DNA encoding an acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase (ACCase) from a photosynthetic organism and functional derivatives thereof which are resistant to inhibition from certain herbicides. This gene can be placed in organisms to increase their fatty acid content or to render them resistant to certain herbicides.

  10. Gene encoding acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase

    SciTech Connect

    Roessler, P.G.; Ohlrogge, J.B.

    1996-09-24

    A DNA encoding an acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase (ACCase) from a photosynthetic organism and functional derivatives are disclosed which are resistant to inhibition from certain herbicides. This gene can be placed in organisms to increase their fatty acid content or to render them resistant to certain herbicides. 5 figs.

  11. 21 CFR 172.828 - Acetylated monoglycerides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... molecular distillation or by steam stripping; or (2) The direct acetylation of edible monoglycerides with acetic anhydride without the use of catalyst or molecular distillation, and with the removal by vacuum distillation, if necessary, of the acetic acid, acetic anhydride, and triacetin. (b) The food additive has...

  12. 21 CFR 172.828 - Acetylated monoglycerides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... molecular distillation or by steam stripping; or (2) The direct acetylation of edible monoglycerides with acetic anhydride without the use of catalyst or molecular distillation, and with the removal by vacuum distillation, if necessary, of the acetic acid, acetic anhydride, and triacetin. (b) The food additive has...

  13. 21 CFR 172.828 - Acetylated monoglycerides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... molecular distillation or by steam stripping; or (2) The direct acetylation of edible monoglycerides with acetic anhydride without the use of catalyst or molecular distillation, and with the removal by vacuum distillation, if necessary, of the acetic acid, acetic anhydride, and triacetin. (b) The food additive has...

  14. 21 CFR 172.828 - Acetylated monoglycerides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... molecular distillation or by steam stripping; or (2) The direct acetylation of edible monoglycerides with acetic anhydride without the use of catalyst or molecular distillation, and with the removal by vacuum distillation, if necessary, of the acetic acid, acetic anhydride, and triacetin. (b) The food additive has...

  15. Gene encoding acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase

    DOEpatents

    Roessler, P.G.; Ohlrogge, J.B.

    1996-09-24

    A DNA encoding an acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase (ACCase) from a photosynthetic organism and functional derivatives are disclosed which are resistant to inhibition from certain herbicides. This gene can be placed in organisms to increase their fatty acid content or to render them resistant to certain herbicides. 5 figs.

  16. Simultaneous determination of N(1)-acetyl sulfisoxazole and its metabolites, and relative bioavailability compare to sulfisoxazole in rats.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eunyoung; Kang, Wonku

    2016-09-10

    N(1)-acetyl sulfisoxazole (N1AS), a dihydropteroate synthase inhibitor is known to be biotransformed primarily to sulfisoxazole, partly to N(4)-acetyl sulfisoxazole (N4AS), and likely also to diacetyl sulfisoxazole (DAS) and other compounds. Although its clinical use has been limited due to urolithiasis, some countries still use the drug in combination with trimethoprim in cattle. A liquid chromatographic method using ultraviolet detection was developed for the simultaneous determination of four substances for the first time. Four analytes and sulfamethoxazole (IS) were separated on a reversed-phase column with gradient elution of a mobile phase. Because DAS and N1AS in plasma were changed very quickly into N4AS and sulfisoxazole, respectively, and esterase inhibitors (sodium fluoride and eserine) could not prevent the transformation, sulfisoxazole and N4AS were monitored in rat plasma following a single oral administration of N1AS and sulfisoxazole in five rats. The relative bioavailability of N1AS to sulfisoxazole was about two, indicating that a half-dose of N1AS would be equivalent to a dose of sulfisoxazole to achieve the same systemic exposure to sulfisoxazole.

  17. A cluster of at least three esterase genes in Lucilia cuprina includes malathion carboxylesterase and two other esterases implicated in resistance to organophosphates

    SciTech Connect

    Smyth, K.A. |; Russell, R.J.; Oakeshott, J.G.

    1994-12-01

    Three distinct malathion carboxylesterase (MCE) phenotypes have been identified among strains of Lucilia cuprina. The high-activity phenotype shows 1.6- and 3.3-fold more MCE specific activity than the intermediate- and low-activity phenotypes, respectively. Flies with high MCE activity are 1000-fold more resistant to malathion than flies with either low or intermediate MCE phenotypes, which are equally susceptible. High and low MCE specific activity are allelic and encoded by the Rmal gene on chromosome 4. Rmal is clustered within one map unit of two other esterase genes, Rop1 and E9, which are implicated in resistance to other organophosphate insecticides. Intermediate MCE specific activity is also inherited within the cluster, although its allelism to Rmal, Rop1, or E9 is unclear. The cluster does not contain the gene for the hemolymph esterase E4, which maps 6.1 map units from Rop1, on the other side of the bubbled wing marker. The cluster appears to be homologous to part of a tandem array of 11 esterase genes on chromosome 3R of Drosophila melanogaster. 41 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. An improved chemo-enzymatic synthesis of 1-beta-O-acyl glucuronides: highly chemoselective enzymatic removal of protecting groups from corresponding methyl acetyl derivatives.

    PubMed

    Baba, Akiko; Yoshioka, Tadao

    2007-12-07

    An improved and widely applicable chemo-enzymatic method for the synthesis of a series of 1-beta-O-acyl glucuronides 5a-f has been developed from the corresponding methyl acetyl derivatives 3a-f, which were stereospecifically synthesized from cesium salts of carboxylic acids 1a-f and methyl 2,3,4-tri-O-acetyl-1-bromo-1-deoxy-alpha-D-glucopyranuronate (2). Chemoselectivity of lipase AS Amano (LAS) in the hydrolytic removal of O-acetyl groups of 3a-f to provide methyl esters 4a-f was influenced by the nature of their 1-beta-O-acyl groups; high selectivity was evident only for 3b and 3f. Carboxylesterase from Streptomyces rochei (CSR), newly screened as an alternative to LAS, showed much greater chemoselectivity toward the O-acetyl groups than LAS; 3a, 3d, and 3e were chemoselectively hydrolyzed only by CSR. The combination of CSR with LAS yielded better results in the hydrolysis of 3c and 3f than did single usage of CSR. Final deprotection of the methyl ester groups of 4a-f to provide 5a-f was chemoselectively achieved by using lipase from Candida antarctica type B (CAL-B) as well as esterase from porcine liver (PLE), although CAL-B possessed higher chemoselectivity and catalytic efficiency than did PLE. CSR also exhibited high chemoselectivity in the synthesis of (S)-naproxen 1-beta-O-acyl glucopyranoside (7) from its 2,3,4,6-tetra-O-acetyl derivative 6.

  19. Transition-State Analysis of 2-O-Acetyl-ADP-Ribose Hydrolysis by Human Macrodomain 1

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Macrodomains, including the human macrodomain 1 (MacroD1), are erasers of the post-translational modification of monoadenosinediphospho-ribosylation and hydrolytically deacetylate the sirtuin product O-acetyl-ADP-ribose (OAADPr). OAADPr has been reported to play a role in cell signaling based on oocyte microinjection studies, and macrodomains affect an array of cell processes including transcription and response to DNA damage. Here, we investigate human MacroD1 by transition-state (TS) analysis based on kinetic isotope effects (KIEs) from isotopically labeled OAADPr substrates. Competitive radiolabeled-isotope effects and mass spectrometry were used to obtain KIE data to yield intrinsic KIE values. Intrinsic KIEs were matched to a quantum chemical structure of the TS that includes the active site residues Asp184 and Asn174 and a structural water molecule. Transition-state analysis supports a concerted mechanism with an early TS involving simultaneous nucleophilic water attack and leaving group bond cleavage where the breaking C–O ester bond = 1.60 Å and the C–O bond to the attacking water nucleophile = 2.30 Å. The MacroD1 TS provides mechanistic understanding of the OAADPr esterase chemistry. PMID:25051211

  20. Acetyl diacylglycerol produced by modified camelina (Camelina sativa)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Acetyl diacylglyceride (Acetyl-TAG) is a component of a commercial product, ACETEM, manufactured by transesterification reaction of triglycerides, glycerol, and triacetin or by acetylation of mono- and diglycerides with acetic acid anhydride. ACETEM is commonly used as foaming agents and coatings in...

  1. 40 CFR 721.10520 - Acetylated fatty acid glycerides (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Acetylated fatty acid glycerides... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10520 Acetylated fatty acid glycerides (generic). (a) Chemical substance... acetylated fatty acid glycerides (PMN P-11-160) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  2. 40 CFR 721.10520 - Acetylated fatty acid glycerides (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Acetylated fatty acid glycerides... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10520 Acetylated fatty acid glycerides (generic). (a) Chemical substance... acetylated fatty acid glycerides (PMN P-11-160) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  3. Engineering Saccharomyces cerevisiae to produce feruloyl esterase for the release of ferulic acid from switchgrass

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The Aspergillus niger ferulic acid esterase gene (faeA) was cloned into Saccharomyces cerevisiae via a yeast expression vector, resulting in efficient expression and secretion of the enzyme in the medium. The recombinant enzyme was purified to homogeneity by anion-exchange and hydrophobic interactio...

  4. Phylogenetic classification of Aureobasidium pullulans strains for production of feruloyl esterase

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The objective was to phylogenetically classify diverse strains of A. pullulans and determine their production of feruloyl esterase. Seventeen strains from the A. pullulans literature were phylogenetically classified. Phenotypic traits of color variation and endo-ß-1,4-xylanase overproduction were as...

  5. Esterase detoxification of acetylcholinesterase inhibitors using human liver samples in vitro

    EPA Science Inventory

    Organophosphate (OP) and N-methylcarbamate pesticides inhibit acetylcholinesterase (AChE), but differences in metabolism and detoxification can influence potency of these pesticides across and within species. Carboxylesterase (CaE) and A-esterase (paraoxonase, PON1) are consider...

  6. Electrochemical biosensor for carbofuran pesticide based on esterases from Eupenicillium shearii FREI-39 endophytic fungus.

    PubMed

    Grawe, Gregory Ferreira; de Oliveira, Tássia Regina; de Andrade Narciso, Esther; Moccelini, Sally Katiuce; Terezo, Ailton José; Soares, Marcos Antonio; Castilho, Marilza

    2015-01-15

    In this work, a biosensor was constructed by physical adsorption of the isolated endophytic fungus Eupenicillium shearii FREI-39 esterase on halloysite, using graphite powder, multi-walled carbon nanotubes and mineral oil for the determination of carbofuran pesticide by inhibition of the esterase using square-wave voltammetry (SWV). Specific esterase activities were determined each 2 days over a period of 15 days of growth in four different inoculation media. The highest specific activity was found on 6th day, with 33.08 U on PDA broth. The best performance of the proposed biosensor was obtained using 0.5 U esterase activity. The carbofuran concentration response was linear in the range from 5.0 to 100.0 µg L(-1) (r=0.9986) with detection and quantification limits of 1.69 µg L(-1) and 5.13 µg L(-1), respectively. A recovery study of carbofuran in spiked water samples showed values ranging from 103.8±6.7% to 106.7±9.7%. The biosensor showed good repeatability and reproducibility and remained stable for a period of 20 weeks. The determination of carbofuran in spiked water samples using the proposed biosensor was satisfactory when compared to the chromatographic reference method. The results showed no significant difference at the 95% confidence level with t-test statistics. The application of enzymes from endophytic fungi in constructing biosensors broadens the biotechnological importance of these microorganisms.

  7. Isolation and characterization of juvenile hormone esterase from gypsy moth (Lymantria dispar)

    Treesearch

    Algimantas P. Valaitis; Joan Jolliff

    1991-01-01

    Insect metamorphosis is under precise hormonal control. During the last larval stadium, the degradation of juvenile hormone by juvenile hormone esterase (JHE) is essential for the initiation of pupation. Therefore, we have targeted this system for disruption with a strategy to produce a recombinant gypsy moth virus which expresses JHE. In order to clone and insert the...

  8. Esterase detoxification of acetylcholinesterase inhibitors using human liver samples in vitro

    EPA Science Inventory

    Organophosphate (OP) and N-methylcarbamate pesticides inhibit acetylcholinesterase (AChE), but differences in metabolism and detoxification can influence potency of these pesticides across and within species. Carboxylesterase (CaE) and A-esterase (paraoxonase, PON1) are consider...

  9. Evolution and homologous recombination of the hemagglutinin-esterase gene sequences from porcine torovirus

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The objective of the present study was to gain new insights into the evolution, homologous recombination and selection pressures imposed on the porcine torovirus (PToV), by examining changes in the hemagglutinin-esterase (HE) gene. The most recent common ancestor of PToV was estimated to have emerge...

  10. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction studies of the pneumococcal teichoic acid phosphorylcholine esterase Pce

    SciTech Connect

    Lagartera, Laura; González, Ana; Stelter, Meike; García, Pedro; Kahn, Richard; Menéndez, Margarita; Hermoso, Juan A.

    2005-02-01

    The modular choline-binding protein Pce, the phosphorylcholine esterase from S. pneumoniae, has been crystallized by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. A SAD data set from a derivative with a gadolinium complex has been collected to 2.7 Å resolution.

  11. Cholesterol esterase inhibitory activity of bioactives from leaves of Mangifera indica L

    PubMed Central

    Gururaja, G. M.; Mundkinajeddu, Deepak; Dethe, Shekhar M.; Sangli, Gopala K.; Abhilash, K.; Agarwal, Amit

    2015-01-01

    Background: In the earlier studies, methanolic extract of Mangifera indica L leaf was exhibited hypocholesterol activity. However, the bioactive compounds responsible for the same are not reported so far. Objective: To isolate the bioactive compounds with hypocholesterol activity from the leaf extract using cholesterol esterase inhibition assay which can be used for the standardization of extract. Materials and Methods: The leaf methanolic extract of M. indica (Sindoora variety) was partitioned with ethyl acetate and chromatographed on silica gel to yield twelve fractions and the activity was monitored by using cholesterol esterase inhibition assay. Active fractions were re-chromatographed to yield individual compounds. Results and Discussion: A major compound mangiferin present in the extract was screened along with other varieties of mango leaves for cholesterol esterase inhibition assay. However, the result indicates that compounds other than mangiferin may be active in the extract. Invitro pancreatic cholesterol esterase inhibition assay was used for bioactivity guided fractionation (BAGF) to yield bioactive compound for standardization of extract. Bioactivity guided fractionation afford the active fraction containing 3b-taraxerol with an IC50 value of 0.86μg/ml. Conclusion: This study demonstrates that M. indica methanol extract of leaf have significant hypocholesterol activity which is standardized with 3b-taraxerol, a standardized extract for hypocholesterol activity resulted in development of dietary supplement from leaves of Mangifera indica. PMID:26692750

  12. Developmental expression and gene/enzyme identifications in the alpha esterase gene cluster of Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Campbell, P M; de Q Robin, G C; Court, L N; Dorrian, S J; Russell, R J; Oakeshott, J G

    2003-10-01

    Here we show how the 10 genes of the alpha esterase cluster of Drosophila melanogaster have diverged substantially in their expression profiles. Together with previously described sequence divergence this suggests substantial functional diversification. By peptide mass fingerprinting and in vitro gene expression we have also shown that two of the genes encode the isozymes EST9 (formerly ESTC) and EST23. EST9 is the major 'alpha staining' esterase in zymograms of gut tissues in feeding stages while orthologues of EST23 confer resistance to organophosphorus insecticides in other higher Diptera. The results for EST9 and EST23 concur with previous suggestions that the products of the alpha esterase cluster function in digestion and detoxification of xenobiotic esters. However, many of the other genes in the cluster show developmental or tissue-specific expression that seems inconsistent with such roles. Furthermore, there is generally poor correspondence between the mRNA expression patterns of the remaining eight genes and isozymes previously characterized by standard techniques of electrophoresis and staining, suggesting that the alpha cluster might only account for a small minority of the esterase isozyme profile.

  13. Homology modeling and active-site residues probing of the thermophilic Alicyclobacillus acidocaldarius esterase 2.

    PubMed Central

    Manco, G.; Febbraio, F.; Adinolfi, E.; Rossi, M.

    1999-01-01

    The moderate thermophilic eubacterium Alicyclobacillus (formerly Bacillus) acidocaldarius expresses a thermostable carboxylesterase (esterase 2) belonging to the hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL)-like group of the esterase/lipase family. Based on secondary structures predictions and a secondary structure-driven multiple sequence alignment with remote homologous protein of known three-dimensional (3D) structure, we previously hypothesized for this enzyme the alpha/beta-hydrolase fold typical of several lipases and esterases and identified Ser155, Asp252, and His282 as the putative members of the catalytic triad. In this paper we report the construction of a 3D model for this enzyme based on the structure of mouse acetylcholinesterase complexed with fasciculin. The model reveals the topological organization of the fold corroborating our predictions. As regarding the active-site residues, Ser155, Asp252, and His282 are located close to each other at hydrogen bond distances. Their catalytic role was here probed by biochemical and mutagenic studies. Moreover, on the basis of the secondary structure-driven multiple sequence alignment and the 3D structural model, a residue supposed important for catalysis, Gly84, was mutated to Ser. The activity of the mutated enzyme was drastically reduced. We propose that Gly84 is part of a putative "oxyanion hole" involved in the stabilization of the transition state similar to the C group of the esterase/lipase family. PMID:10493580

  14. Bacterial cinnamoyl esterase activity screening for the production of a novel functional food product.

    PubMed

    Guglielmetti, Simone; De Noni, Ivano; Caracciolo, Federica; Molinari, Francesco; Parini, Carlo; Mora, Diego

    2008-02-01

    Lactobacillus helveticus MIMLh5 was selected for its strong cinnamoyl esterase activity on chlorogenic acid and employed for the preparation of a food product containing a high concentration of free caffeic acid. The novel food product was demonstrated to display high total antioxidant power and potential probiotic properties.

  15. Bacterial Cinnamoyl Esterase Activity Screening for the Production of a Novel Functional Food Product▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Guglielmetti, Simone; De Noni, Ivano; Caracciolo, Federica; Molinari, Francesco; Parini, Carlo; Mora, Diego

    2008-01-01

    Lactobacillus helveticus MIMLh5 was selected for its strong cinnamoyl esterase activity on chlorogenic acid and employed for the preparation of a food product containing a high concentration of free caffeic acid. The novel food product was demonstrated to display high total antioxidant power and potential probiotic properties. PMID:18165367

  16. Purification and characterization of novel extracellular cholesterol esterase from Acinetobacter sp.

    PubMed

    Du, Liangjun; Huo, Ying; Ge, Fanglan; Yu, Jiajun; Li, Wei; Cheng, Guiying; Yong, Bin; Zeng, Lihuang; Huang, Min

    2010-12-01

    CHE4-1, a bacterial strain that belongs to the genus Acinetobacter and expresses high level of inducible extracellular cholesterol esterase (CHE), was isolated from feces of carnivore Panthera pardus var. The cholesterol esterase of the strain CHE4-1 was purified by ultrafiltration followed with DEAE-Sepharose FF chromatography and Phenyl-Sepharose CL-4B chromatography, and then by Sephadex G-50 gel filtration. Different from other known microbial cholesterol esterase, the purified CHE from CHE4-1 strain is a monomer with molecular weight of 6.5 kD and has high activity to both long-chain and short-chain cholesterol ester. Enzymatic activity was enhanced in the presence of metal ion Ca(2+), Zn(2+) and boracic acid, and was not significantly affected by several detergents including sodium cholate, Triton X100 and Tween-80. The enzyme was found to be stable during long-term aqueous storage at 4 °C, indicating its potential as a clinical diagnostic reagent. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report regarding purification and characterization of CHE from Acinetobacter sp. The results demonstrated that this particular CHE is a novel cholesterol esterase.

  17. Usefulness of Leukocyte Esterase Test Versus Rapid Strep Test for Diagnosis of Acute Strep Pharyngitis

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Objective: A study to compare the usage of throat swab testing for leukocyte esterase on a test strip(urine dip stick-multi stick) to rapid strep test for rapid diagnosis of Group A Beta hemolytic streptococci in cases of acute pharyngitis in children. Hypothesis: The testing of throat swab for leukocyte esterase on test strip currently used for urine testing may be used to detect throat infection and might be as useful as rapid strep. Methods: All patients who come with a complaint of sore throat and fever were examined clinically for erythema of pharynx, tonsils and also for any exudates. Informed consent was obtained from the parents and assent from the subjects. 3 swabs were taken from pharyngo-tonsillar region, testing for culture, rapid strep & Leukocyte Esterase. Results: Total number is 100. Cultures 9(+); for rapid strep== 84(-) and16 (+); For LE== 80(-) and 20(+) Statistics: From data configuration Rapid Strep versus LE test don’t seem to be a random (independent) assignment but extremely aligned. The Statistical results show rapid and LE show very agreeable results. Calculated Value of Chi Squared Exceeds Tabulated under 1 Degree Of Freedom (P<.0.0001) reject Null Hypothesis and Conclude Alternative Conclusions: Leukocyte esterase on throat swab is as useful as rapid strep test for rapid diagnosis of strep pharyngitis on test strip currently used for urine dip stick causing acute pharyngitis in children. PMID:27335975

  18. Usefulness of Leukocyte Esterase Test Versus Rapid Strep Test for Diagnosis of Acute Strep Pharyngitis.

    PubMed

    Nibhanipudi, Kumara V

    2015-01-01

    A study to compare the usage of throat swab testing for leukocyte esterase on a test strip(urine dip stick-multi stick) to rapid strep test for rapid diagnosis of Group A Beta hemolytic streptococci in cases of acute pharyngitis in children. The testing of throat swab for leukocyte esterase on test strip currently used for urine testing may be used to detect throat infection and might be as useful as rapid strep. All patients who come with a complaint of sore throat and fever were examined clinically for erythema of pharynx, tonsils and also for any exudates. Informed consent was obtained from the parents and assent from the subjects. 3 swabs were taken from pharyngo-tonsillar region, testing for culture, rapid strep & Leukocyte Esterase. Total number is 100. Cultures 9(+); for rapid strep== 84(-) and16 (+); For LE== 80(-) and 20(+) From data configuration Rapid Strep versus LE test don't seem to be a random (independent) assignment but extremely aligned. The Statistical results show rapid and LE show very agreeable results. Calculated Value of Chi Squared Exceeds Tabulated under 1 Degree Of Freedom (P<.0.0001) reject Null HYPOTHESIS and Conclude Alternative Conclusions: Leukocyte esterase on throat swab is as useful as rapid strep test for rapid diagnosis of strep pharyngitis on test strip currently used for urine dip stick causing acute pharyngitis in children.

  19. Chaperone-like activities of {alpha}-synuclein: {alpha}-Synuclein assists enzyme activities of esterases

    SciTech Connect

    Ahn, Misun; Kim, SeungBum; Kang, Mira; Ryu, Yeonwoo . E-mail: ywryu@ajou.ac.kr; Doohun Kim, T. . E-mail: doohunkim@ajou.ac.kr

    2006-08-11

    {alpha}-Synuclein, a major constituent of Lewy bodies (LBs), has been implicated to play a critical role in the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease (PD), although the physiological function of {alpha}-synuclein has not yet been known. Here we have shown that {alpha}-synuclein, which has no well-defined secondary or tertiary structure, can protect the enzyme activity of microbial esterases against stress conditions such as heat, pH, and organic solvents. In particular, the flexibility of {alpha}-synuclein and its C-terminal region seems to be important for complex formation, but the structural integrity of the C-terminal region may not be required for stabilization of enzyme activity. In addition, atomic force microscopy (AFM) and in vivo enzyme assays showed highly specific interactions of esterases with {alpha}-synuclein. Our results indicate that {alpha}-synuclein not only protects the enzyme activity of microbial esterases in vitro, but also can stabilize the active conformation of microbial esterases in vivo.

  20. Detoxication of paraoxon by rat liver homogenate and serum carboxylesterases and A-esterases.

    PubMed

    Tang, J; Chambers, J E

    1999-01-01

    Paraoxon, the active metabolite of parathion, can be detoxified through a noncatalytic pathway by carboxylesterases and a catalytic pathway by calcium-dependent A-esterases, producing p-nitrophenol as a common metabolite. The detoxication patterns of carboxylesterases and A-esterases were investigated in vitro in the present study with a high tissue concentration (75 mg/mL rat liver homogenate or 50% rat serum solution) to more closely reflect enzyme concentrations in intact tissues. A final paraoxon concentration of 3.75 microM was used to incubate with liver homogenates or serum solutions for 5 seconds or 3, 5, 15, or 25 minutes; also 0.625, 1.25, 2.5, 3.125, 3.75, or 5.0 microM paraoxon (final concentration) was incubated with liver homogenates or serum solutions for 15 minutes. Phenyl saligenin cyclic phosphate and EDTA were used to inhibit carboxylesterases and A-esterases, respectively. Significant amounts of p-nitrophenol were generated with or without either inhibitor during a 15 minute incubation with paraoxon from low (0.625 microM) to high (5.0 microM) concentrations. The amount of p-nitrophenol generated via carboxylesterase phosphorylation was greater than via A-esterase-mediated hydrolysis in the initial period of incubation or when incubating with a low concentration of paraoxon. Plateau shape curves of p-nitrophenol concentration versus time or paraoxon concentration indicated that carboxylesterase phosphorylation was saturable. When incubated for long time intervals or with high concentrations of paraoxon, more p-nitrophenol was generated via A-esterase-mediated hydrolysis than from carboxylesterase phosphorylation. The ratio of paraoxon concentration to tissue amount used in in vitro assays of this study was equivalent to dosing a rat with toxicologically relevant dosages. These in vitro data suggest that both carboxylesterases and A-esterases detoxify paraoxon in vivo; carboxylesterases may be an important mode of paraoxon detoxication in initial

  1. Total esterase activity in human saliva: Validation of an automated assay, characterization and behaviour after physical stress.

    PubMed

    Tecles, Fernando; Tvarijonaviciute, Asta; De Torre, Carlos; Carrillo, José M; Rubio, Mónica; García, Montserrat; Cugat, Ramón; Cerón, José J

    2016-07-01

    Although saliva has esterase activity, this activity has not been characterized or studied in individuals subjected to physical stress. The aim of this report was to develop and validate an automated spectrophotometric assay for total esterase activity measurement in human saliva, as well as to study the contribution of different enzymes on this activity and its behaviour under physical stress in healthy subjects. The assay used 4-nitrophenyl acetate as substrate and was precise, accurate and provided low limits of detection and quantification. Inhibition with diisopropylfluorophosphate showed that cholinesterase, carboxylesterase and cholesterol esterase contributions not represented more than 20% of total esterase. Addition of standards of lipase and albumin to saliva samples showed that both proteins significantly contributed to esterase activity only when equal or higher than 11.6 IU/L and 250 μg/mL, respectively. Western blot analyses showed absence of paraoxonase-1 and high amount of carbonic anhydrase-VI. The high affinity of purified carbonic anhydrase-VI for the substrate supported a major contribution of this enzyme. Total esterase activity and alpha-amylase was measured in saliva samples from 12 healthy male students before and after participation in an indoor football match. The activity significantly increased after match and positively correlated with salivary alpha-amylase. This method could be used as a biomarker of physical stress in humans, with carbonic anhydrase-VI being the esterase that contributed more to the activity of the assay.

  2. Comparison of the acetylation of proteins and nucleic acids

    PubMed Central

    Paik, Woon Ki; Kim, Sangduk

    1970-01-01

    The possibility of acetylation of nucleic acids was examined. Although protein is actively acetylated with [1-14C]acetic acid in rat liver systems in vivo and in vitro and in a frog liver system in vivo, nucleic acids are not acetylated under these conditions; nucleic acids purified from these sources are without radioactivity. Requirements for acetylation in vitro of protein in rat liver are different from those in frog liver; GSH has no effect in the rat liver system and is inhibitory in the frog liver system. Among various acetylated proteins, proteins insoluble in 0.1m-sulphuric acid have the highest radioactivity. PMID:5435491

  3. N-acetyl endorphin in rat spermatogonia and primary spermatocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, M C; Clements, J A; Smith, A I; Lolait, S J; Funder, J W

    1985-01-01

    In previous reports modest levels of beta-endorphin have been found by radioimmunoassay in rat testis, and localized by immunofluorescence to the interstitial cells. We have confirmed these previous reports and extended them by showing that the majority of testicular endorphins are acetylated forms, N-acetyl gamma-endorphin, N-acetyl alpha-endorphin, and N-acetyl beta-endorphin1-27. In addition, N-acetylated endorphins are not found in interstitial cells, but are confined to spermatogonia and primary spermatocytes. Images PMID:3156881

  4. Biochemical Diversity of Carboxyl Esterases and Lipases from Lake Arreo (Spain): a Metagenomic Approach

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Martínez, Mónica; Alcaide, María; Tchigvintsev, Anatoli; Reva, Oleg; Polaina, Julio; Bargiela, Rafael; Guazzaroni, María-Eugenia; Chicote, Álvaro; Canet, Albert; Valero, Francisco; Rico Eguizabal, Eugenio; Guerrero, María del Carmen; Yakunin, Alexander F.

    2013-01-01

    The esterases and lipases from the α/β hydrolase superfamily exhibit an enormous sequence diversity, fold plasticity, and activities. Here, we present the comprehensive sequence and biochemical analyses of seven distinct esterases and lipases from the metagenome of Lake Arreo, an evaporite karstic lake in Spain (42°46′N, 2°59′W; altitude, 655 m). Together with oligonucleotide usage patterns and BLASTP analysis, our study of esterases/lipases mined from Lake Arreo suggests that its sediment contains moderately halophilic and cold-adapted proteobacteria containing DNA fragments of distantly related plasmids or chromosomal genomic islands of plasmid and phage origins. This metagenome encodes esterases/lipases with broad substrate profiles (tested over a set of 101 structurally diverse esters) and habitat-specific characteristics, as they exhibit maximal activity at alkaline pH (8.0 to 8.5) and temperature of 16 to 40°C, and they are stimulated (1.5 to 2.2 times) by chloride ions (0.1 to 1.2 M), reflecting an adaptation to environmental conditions. Our work provides further insights into the potential significance of the Lake Arreo esterases/lipases for biotechnology processes (i.e., production of enantiomers and sugar esters), because these enzymes are salt tolerant and are active at low temperatures and against a broad range of substrates. As an example, the ability of a single protein to hydrolyze triacylglycerols, (non)halogenated alkyl and aryl esters, cinnamoyl and carbohydrate esters, lactones, and chiral epoxides to a similar extent was demonstrated. PMID:23542620

  5. Crystal Structure and Functional Characterization of an Esterase (EaEST) from Exiguobacterium antarcticum

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Boo-Young; Yoo, Wanki; Ryu, Bum Han; Kim, Han-Woo; Shin, Seung Chul; Kim, Sunghwan; Park, Hyun; Kim, T. Doohun; Lee, Jun Hyuck

    2017-01-01

    A novel microbial esterase, EaEST, from a psychrophilic bacterium Exiguobacterium antarcticum B7, was identified and characterized. To our knowledge, this is the first report describing structural analysis and biochemical characterization of an esterase isolated from the genus Exiguobacterium. Crystal structure of EaEST, determined at a resolution of 1.9 Å, showed that the enzyme has a canonical α/β hydrolase fold with an α-helical cap domain and a catalytic triad consisting of Ser96, Asp220, and His248. Interestingly, the active site of the structure of EaEST is occupied by a peracetate molecule, which is the product of perhydrolysis of acetate. This result suggests that EaEST may have perhydrolase activity. The activity assay showed that EaEST has significant perhydrolase and esterase activity with respect to short-chain p-nitrophenyl esters (≤C8), naphthyl derivatives, phenyl acetate, and glyceryl tributyrate. However, the S96A single mutant had low esterase and perhydrolase activity. Moreover, the L27A mutant showed low levels of protein expression and solubility as well as preference for different substrates. On conducting an enantioselectivity analysis using R- and S-methyl-3-hydroxy-2-methylpropionate, a preference for R-enantiomers was observed. Surprisingly, immobilized EaEST was found to not only retain 200% of its initial activity after incubation for 1 h at 80°C, but also retained more than 60% of its initial activity after 20 cycles of reutilization. This research will serve as basis for future engineering of this esterase for biotechnological and industrial applications. PMID:28125606

  6. Alicyclobacillus acidocaldarius Thermophilic Esterase EST2's Activity in Milk and Cheese Models

    PubMed Central

    Mandrich, Luigi; Manco, Giuseppe; Rossi, Mosè; Floris, Esther; Jansen-van den Bosch, Tanja; Smit, Gerrit; Wouters, Jeroen A.

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this work was to investigate the behavior of thermophilic esterase EST2 from Alicyclobacillus acidocaldarius in milk and cheese models. The pure enzyme was used to compare the EST2 hydrolytic activity to the activity of endogenous esterase EstA from Lactococcus lactis. The results indicate that EST2 exhibits 30-fold-higher esterase activity than EstA. As EstA has thioesterase activity, EST2 was assayed for this activity under the optimal conditions determined for EstA (namely, 30°C and pH 7.5). Although it is a thermophilic enzyme, EST2 exhibited eightfold-higher thioesterase activity than EstA with S-methyl thiobutanoate. The abilities of EST2 and EstA to synthesize short-chain fatty acid esters were compared. Two methods were developed to do this. In the first method a spectrophotometric assay was used to monitor the synthesis of esters by the pure enzymes using p-nitrophenol as the alcohol substrate. The synthetic activities were also evaluated under conditions that mimicked those present in milk and/or cheese. The second method involved evaluation of the synthetic abilities of the enzymes when they were directly added to a model cheese matrix. Substantial ester synthesis by EST2 was observed under both conditions. Finally, esterase and thioesterase activities were evaluated in milk using the purified EST2 enzyme and in the model cheese matrix using a strain of L. lactis NZ9000 harboring the EST2 gene and thus overproducing EST2. Both the esterase and thioesterase activities measured in milk and in the cheese matrix were much greater than the activities of the controls. PMID:16672457

  7. An Inserted α/β Subdomain Shapes the Catalytic Pocket of Lactobacillus johnsonii Cinnamoyl Esterase

    PubMed Central

    Vu, Clara; Xu, Xiaohui; Cui, Hong; Molloy, Sara; Savchenko, Alexei; Yakunin, Alexander; Gonzalez, Claudio F.

    2011-01-01

    Background Microbial enzymes produced in the gastrointestinal tract are primarily responsible for the release and biochemical transformation of absorbable bioactive monophenols. In the present work we described the crystal structure of LJ0536, a serine cinnamoyl esterase produced by the probiotic bacterium Lactobacillus johnsonii N6.2. Methodology/Principal Findings We crystallized LJ0536 in the apo form and in three substrate-bound complexes. The structure showed a canonical α/β fold characteristic of esterases, and the enzyme is dimeric. Two classical serine esterase motifs (GlyXSerXGly) can be recognized from the amino acid sequence, and the structure revealed that the catalytic triad of the enzyme is formed by Ser106, His225, and Asp197, while the other motif is non-functional. In all substrate-bound complexes, the aromatic acyl group of the ester compound was bound in the deepest part of the catalytic pocket. The binding pocket also contained an unoccupied area that could accommodate larger ligands. The structure revealed a prominent inserted α/β subdomain of 54 amino acids, from which multiple contacts to the aromatic acyl groups of the substrates are made. Inserts of this size are seen in other esterases, but the secondary structure topology of this subdomain of LJ0536 is unique to this enzyme and its closest homolog (Est1E) in the Protein Databank. Conclusions The binding mechanism characterized (involving the inserted α/β subdomain) clearly differentiates LJ0536 from enzymes with similar activity of a fungal origin. The structural features herein described together with the activity profile of LJ0536 suggest that this enzyme should be clustered in a new group of bacterial cinnamoyl esterases. PMID:21876742

  8. Regulation, Function, and Detection of Protein Acetylation in Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Carabetta, Valerie J; Cristea, Ileana M

    2017-08-15

    N(ε)-Lysine acetylation is now recognized as an abundant posttranslational modification (PTM) that influences many essential biological pathways. Advancements in mass spectrometry-based proteomics have led to the discovery that bacteria contain hundreds of acetylated proteins, contrary to the prior notion of acetylation events being rare in bacteria. Although the mechanisms that regulate protein acetylation are still not fully defined, it is understood that this modification is finely tuned via both enzymatic and nonenzymatic mechanisms. The opposing actions of Gcn5-related N-acetyltransferases (GNATs) and deacetylases, including sirtuins, provide the enzymatic control of lysine acetylation. A nonenzymatic mechanism of acetylation has also been demonstrated and proven to be prominent in bacteria, as well as in mitochondria. The functional consequences of the vast majority of the identified acetylation sites remain unknown. From studies in mammalian systems, acetylation of critical lysine residues was shown to impact protein function by altering its structure, subcellular localization, and interactions. It is becoming apparent that the same diversity of functions can be found in bacteria. Here, we review current knowledge of the mechanisms and the functional consequences of acetylation in bacteria. Additionally, we discuss the methods available for detecting acetylation sites, including quantitative mass spectrometry-based methods, which promise to promote this field of research. We conclude with possible future directions and broader implications of the study of protein acetylation in bacteria. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  9. Dynamic Protein Acetylation in Plant–Pathogen Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Song, Gaoyuan; Walley, Justin W.

    2016-01-01

    Pathogen infection triggers complex molecular perturbations within host cells that results in either resistance or susceptibility. Protein acetylation is an emerging biochemical modification that appears to play central roles during host–pathogen interactions. To date, research in this area has focused on two main themes linking protein acetylation to plant immune signaling. Firstly, it has been established that proper gene expression during defense responses requires modulation of histone acetylation within target gene promoter regions. Second, some pathogens can deliver effector molecules that encode acetyltransferases directly within the host cell to modify acetylation of specific host proteins. Collectively these findings suggest that the acetylation level for a range of host proteins may be modulated to alter the outcome of pathogen infection. This review will focus on summarizing our current understanding of the roles of protein acetylation in plant defense and highlight the utility of proteomics approaches to uncover the complete repertoire of acetylation changes triggered by pathogen infection. PMID:27066055

  10. Acetylation and characterization of banana (Musa paradisiaca) starch.

    PubMed

    Bello-Pérez, L A; Contreras-Ramos, S M; Jìmenez-Aparicio, A; Paredes-López, O

    2000-01-01

    Banana native starch was acetylated and some of its functional properties were evaluated and compared to corn starch. In general, acetylated banana starch presented higher values in ash, protein and fat than corn acetylated starch. The modified starches had minor tendency to retrogradation assessed as % transmittance of starch pastes. At high temperature acetylated starches presented a water retention capacity similar to their native counterpart. The acetylation considerably increased the solubility of starches, and a similar behavior was found for swelling power. When freeze-thaw stability was studied, acetyl banana starch drained approximately 60% of water in the first and second cycles, but in the third and fourth cycles the percentage of separated water was low. However, acetyl corn starch showed lower freeze-thaw stability than the untreated sample. The modification increased the viscosity of banana starch pastes.

  11. Acetylation of prostaglandin synthetase by aspirin. Purification and properties of the acetylated protein from sheep vesicular gland.

    PubMed

    Roth, G J; Stanford, N; Jacobs, J W; Majerus, P W

    1977-09-20

    We previously presented evidence that aspirin (acetylsalicylic acid) inhibits prostaglandin synthetase by acetylating and active site of the enzyme. In the current work, we have labeled the enzyme from an aceton-pentane powder of sheep vesicular gland using [acetyl-3H]aspirin and purified the [3H]acetyl-protein to near homogeneity. The final preparation contains protein of a single molecular weight (85 000) and an amino-terminal sequence of Asp-Ala-Gly-Arg-Ala. The [3H]acetyl-protein contained 0.5 mol of acetyl residues per mol of protein based on amino acid composition but only a single sequence was found.

  12. Fragrance material review on acetyl carene.

    PubMed

    Scognamiglio, J; Letizia, C S; Api, A M

    2013-12-01

    A toxicologic and dermatologic review of acetyl carene when used as a fragrance ingredient is presented. Acetyl carene is a member of the fragrance structural group Alkyl Cyclic Ketones. These fragrances can be described as being composed of an alkyl, R1, and various substituted and bicyclic saturated or unsaturated cyclic hydrocarbons, R2, in which one of the rings may include up to 12 carbons. Alternatively, R2 may be a carbon bridge of C2-C4 carbon chain length between the ketone and cyclic hydrocarbon. This review contains a detailed summary of all available toxicology and dermatology papers that are related to this individual fragrance ingredient and is not intended as a stand-alone document. Available data for acetyl carene were evaluated then summarized and includes physical properties, acute toxicity, skin irritation, and skin sensitization data. A safety assessment of the entire Alkyl Cyclic Ketones will be published simultaneously with this document; please refer to Belsito et al. (Belsito, D., Bickers, D., Bruze, M., Calow, P., Dagli, M., Fryer, A.D., Greim, H., Miyachi, Y., Saurat, J.H., Sipes, I.G., 2013A Toxicologic and dermatologic assessment of alkyl cyclic ketones when used as fragrance ingredients. (submitted for publication).) for an overall assessment of the safe use of this material and all Alkyl Cyclic Ketones in fragrances. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  13. The neurobiology of acetyl-L-carnitine.

    PubMed

    Traina, Giovanna

    2016-06-01

    A large body of evidence points to the positive effects of dietary supplementation of acetyl-L-carnitine (ALC). Its use has shown health benefits in neuroinflammation, which is a common denominator in a host of neurodegenerative diseases. ALC is the principal acetyl ester of L-Carnitine (LC), and it plays an essential role in intermediary metabolism, acting as a donor of acetyl groups and facilitating the transfer of fatty acids from cytosol to mitochondria during beta-oxidation. Dietary supplementation of ALC exerts neuroprotective, neurotrophic, antidepressive and analgesic effects in painful neuropathies. ALC also has antioxidant and anti-apoptotic activity. Moreover, ALC exhibits positive effects on mitochondrial metabolism, and shows promise in the treatment of aging and neurodegenerative pathologies by slowing the progression of mental deterioration. In addition, ALC plays neuromodulatory effects on both synaptic morphology and synaptic transmission. These effects are likely due to affects of ALC through modulation of gene expression on several targets in the central nervous system. Here, we review the current state of knowledge on effects of ALC in the nervous system.

  14. Antibodies specific to acetylated histones document the existence of deposition- and transcription-related histone acetylation in Tetrahymena

    PubMed Central

    1989-01-01

    In this study, we have constructed synthetic peptides which are identical to hyperacetylated amino termini of two Tetrahymena core histones (tetra-acetylated H4 and penta-acetylated hv1) and used them to generate polyclonal antibodies specific for acetylated forms (mono-, di-, tri-, etc.) of these histones. Neither of these antisera recognizes histone that is unacetylated. Immunoblotting analyses demonstrate that both transcription-related and deposition-related acetate groups on H4 are recognized by both antisera. In addition, the antiserum raised against penta-acetylated hv1 also recognizes acetylated forms of this variant. Immunofluorescent analyses with both antisera demonstrate that, as expected, histone acetylation is specific to macronuclei (or new macronuclei) at all stages of the life cycle except when micronuclei undergo periods of rapid replication and chromatin assembly. During this time micronuclear staining is also detected. Our results also suggest that transcription-related acetylation begins selectively in new macronuclei immediately after the second postzygotic division. Acetylated histone is not observed in new micronuclei during stages corresponding to anlagen development and, therefore, histone acetylation can be distributed asymmetrically in development. Equally striking is the rapid turnover of acetylated histone in parental macronuclei during the time of their inactivation and elimination from the cell. Taken together, these data lend strong support to the idea that modulation of histone acetylation plays an important role in gene activation and in chromatin assembly. PMID:2654136

  15. Poly-acetylated chromatin signatures are preferred epitopes for site-specific histone H4 acetyl antibodies.

    PubMed

    Rothbart, Scott B; Lin, Shu; Britton, Laura-Mae; Krajewski, Krzysztof; Keogh, Michael-C; Garcia, Benjamin A; Strahl, Brian D

    2012-01-01

    Antibodies specific for histone post-translational modifications (PTMs) have been central to our understanding of chromatin biology. Here, we describe an unexpected and novel property of histone H4 site-specific acetyl antibodies in that they prefer poly-acetylated histone substrates. By all current criteria, these antibodies have passed specificity standards. However, we find these site-specific histone antibodies preferentially recognize chromatin signatures containing two or more adjacent acetylated lysines. Significantly, we find that the poly-acetylated epitopes these antibodies prefer are evolutionarily conserved and are present at levels that compete for these antibodies over the intended individual acetylation sites. This alarming property of acetyl-specific antibodies has far-reaching implications for data interpretation and may present a challenge for the future study of acetylated histone and non-histone proteins.

  16. Biosynthesis and turnover of O-acetyl and N-acetyl groups in the gangliosides of human melanoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Manzi, A.E.; Sjoberg, E.R.; Diaz, S.; Varki, A.

    1990-08-05

    We and others previously described the melanoma-associated oncofetal glycosphingolipid antigen 9-O-acetyl-GD3, a disialoganglioside O-acetylated at the 9-position of the outer sialic acid residue. We have now developed methods to examine the biosynthesis and turnover of disialogangliosides in cultured melanoma cells and in Golgi-enriched vesicles from these cells. O-Acetylation was selectively expressed on di- and trisialogangliosides, but not on monosialogangliosides, nor on glycoprotein-bound sialic acids. Double-labeling of cells with (3H)acetate and (14C)glucosamine introduced easily detectable labels into each of the components of the ganglioside molecules. Pulse-chase studies of such doubly labeled molecules indicated that the O-acetyl groups turn over faster than the parent molecule. When Golgi-enriched vesicles from these cells were incubated with (acetyl-3H)acetyl-coenzyme A, the major labeled products were disialogangliosides. (Acetyl-3H)O-acetyl groups were found at both the 7- and the 9-positions, indicating that both 7-O-acetyl GD3 and 9-O-acetyl GD3 were synthesized by the action of O-acetyltransferase(s) on endogenous GD3. Analysis of the metabolically labeled molecules confirmed the existence of both 7- and 9-O-acetylated GD3 in the intact cells. Surprisingly, the major 3H-labeled product of the in vitro labeling reaction was not O-acetyl-GD3, but GD3, with the label exclusively in the sialic acid residues. Fragmentation of the labeled sialic acids by enzymatic and chemical methods showed that the 3H-label was exclusively in (3H)N-acetyl groups. Analyses of the double-labeled sialic acids from intact cells also showed that the 3H-label from (3H)acetate was exclusively in the form of (3H)N-acetyl groups, whereas the 14C-label was at the 4-position.

  17. Synthesis of acetylated konjac glucomannan and effect of degree of acetylation on water absorbency.

    PubMed

    Koroskenyi, B; McCarthy, S P

    2001-01-01

    Konjac glucomannan was acetylated with acetic anhydride under different conditions to reduce the unusually high water absorbency of native konjac. The dependence of the degree of substitution (DS) on the reaction conditions and the influence of the DS on the water absorbency were investigated. The most efficient method for the acetylation was refluxing konjac in acetic anhydride in the presence of sodium hydroxide catalyst. The water absorbency rapidly decreased with increasing DS. Fully acetylated product was obtained within 12 h, which exhibited 1.0 g/g water absorbency vs the 105.4 g/g absorbency of native konjac. Because of the exponential decrease of water absorbency with increasing DS, a relatively small DS is sufficient to significantly suppress the absorption of water.

  18. Improved enantioselectivity of thermostable esterase from Archaeoglobus fulgidus toward (S)-ketoprofen ethyl ester by directed evolution and characterization of mutant esterases.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jinyeong; Kim, Seungbum; Yoon, Sangyoung; Hong, Eunsoo; Ryu, Yeonwoo

    2015-08-01

    Thermostable esterases have potential applications in various biotechnology industries because of their resistance to high temperature and organic solvents. In a previous study, we isolated an esterase from Archaeoglobus fulgidus DSM 4304 (Est-AF), which showed high thermostability but low enantioselectivity toward (S)-ketoprofen ethyl ester. (R)-ketoprofenor (S)-ketoprofenis produced by esterase hydrolysis of the ester bond of (R,S)-ketoprofen ethyl ester and (S)-ketoprofen has better pharmaceutical activity and lower side effects than (R)-ketoprofen. Therefore, we have generated mutants of Est-AF that retained high thermostability whilst improving enantioselectivity. A library of Est-AF mutants was created by error-prone polymerase chain reaction, and mutants with improved enantioselectivity were isolated by site-saturation mutagenesis. The regions of Est-AF containing amino acid mutations were analyzed by homology modeling of its three-dimensional structure, and structure-based explanations for the changes in enantioselectivity are proposed. Finally, we isolated two mutants showing improved enantioselectivity over Est-AF (ee% = -16.2 ± 0.2 and E = 0.7 ± 0.0): V138G (ee% = 35.9 ± 1.0 and E = 3.0 ± 0.1) and V138G/L200R (ee% = 89.2 ± 0.2 and E = 19.5 ± 0.5). We also investigated various characteristics of these mutants and found that the mutants showed similar thermostability and resistance to additives or organic solvents to Est-AF, without a significant trade-off between activity and stability.

  19. A Dual Pathogenic Mechanism Links Tau Acetylation to Sporadic Tauopathy

    PubMed Central

    Trzeciakiewicz, Hanna; Tseng, Jui-Heng; Wander, Connor M.; Madden, Victoria; Tripathy, Ashutosh; Yuan, Chao-Xing; Cohen, Todd J.

    2017-01-01

    Tau acetylation has recently emerged as a dominant post-translational modification (PTM) in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and related tauopathies. Mass spectrometry studies indicate that tau acetylation sites cluster within the microtubule (MT)-binding region (MTBR), suggesting acetylation could regulate both normal and pathological tau functions. Here, we combined biochemical and cell-based approaches to uncover a dual pathogenic mechanism mediated by tau acetylation. We show that acetylation specifically at residues K280/K281 impairs tau-mediated MT stabilization, and enhances the formation of fibrillar tau aggregates, highlighting both loss and gain of tau function. Full-length acetylation-mimic tau showed increased propensity to undergo seed-dependent aggregation, revealing a potential role for tau acetylation in the propagation of tau pathology. We also demonstrate that methylene blue, a reported tau aggregation inhibitor, modulates tau acetylation, a novel mechanism of action for this class of compounds. Our study identifies a potential “two-hit” mechanism in which tau acetylation disengages tau from MTs and also promotes tau aggregation. Thus, therapeutic approaches to limit tau K280/K281 acetylation could simultaneously restore MT stability and ameliorate tau pathology in AD and related tauopathies. PMID:28287136

  20. SWI/SNF Displaces SAGA-Acetylated Nucleosomes

    PubMed Central

    Chandy, Mark; Gutiérrez, José L.; Prochasson, Philippe; Workman, Jerry L.

    2006-01-01

    SWI/SNF is a well-characterized chromatin remodeling complex that remodels chromatin by sliding nucleosomes in cis and/or displacing nucleosomes in trans. The latter mechanism has the potential to remove promoter nucleosomes, allowing access to transcription factors and RNA polymerase. In vivo, histone acetylation often precedes apparent nucleosome loss; therefore, we sought to determine whether nucleosomes containing acetylated histones could be displaced by the SWI/SNF chromatin remodeling complex. We found that SAGA-acetylated histones were lost from an immobilized nucleosome array when treated with the SWI/SNF complex. When the nucleosome array was acetylated by SAGA in the presence of bound transcription activators, it generated a peak of acetylation surrounding the activator binding sites. Subsequent SWI/SNF treatment suppressed this acetylation peak. Immunoblots indicated that SWI/SNF preferentially displaced acetylated histones from the array relative to total histones. Moreover, the Swi2/Snf2 bromodomain, an acetyl-lysine binding domain, played a role in the displacement of acetylated histones. These data indicate that targeted histone acetylation by the SAGA complex predisposes promoter nucleosomes for displacement by the SWI/SNF complex. PMID:17030999

  1. Importance of acetylator phenotype in the identity of Asian populations.

    PubMed

    Zaid, R B; Nargis, M; Neelotpol, S; Sayeed, M A; Banu, A; Shurovi, S; Hassan, K N; Salimullah, M; Ali, L; Azad Khan, A K

    2007-06-01

    The Marma, Tripura, and Chakma are tribal populations of South Asian countries such as Bangladesh. The populations are thought to be immigrants who started moving from their original home in the Far East toward the west and south. We randomly selected 80 Marma, 53 Tripura, and 43 Chakma to determine acetylation capacity and acetylator phenotype. The mean acetylation capacities were 63% in the Marma, 65% in the Tripura, and 70% in the Chakma. The acetylator phenotype was bimodally distributed as fast and slow acetylator. The frequencies of fast acetylator were 83% in the Marma, 89% in the Tripura, and 88% in the Chakma. According to acetylation capacity, the tribes are different from the founder nontribal populations of Bangladesh. They identify themselves as having a separate single population origin. The frequency of fast acetylator predicted served as the acetylator status of the Far East Asian population. The segregation of populations by acetylator phenotype on geographic longitude might be appropriate for geonational identification of Asian populations.

  2. Biocatalytic Resolution of Rac-α-Ethyl-2-Oxo-Pyrrolidineacetic Acid Methyl Ester by Immobilized Recombinant Bacillus cereus Esterase.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Jian-Yong; Liu, Yin-Yan; Luo, Wei-Feng; Zheng, Ren-Chao; Ying, Xiang-Xian; Wang, Zhao

    2016-04-01

    A new esterase-producing strain (Bacillus cereus WZZ001) which exhibiting high hydrolytic activity and excellent enantioselectivity on rac-α-ethyl-2-oxo-pyrrolidineacetic acid methyl ester (R, S-1) has been isolated from soil sample by our laboratory. In this study, the stereoselective hydrolysis of (R, S-1) was performed using the recombinant Bacillus cereus esterase which expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3). Under the optimized conditions of pH 8.0, 35 °C, and concentration of substrate 400 mM, a successful enzymatic resolution was achieved with an e.e. s of 99.5 % and conversion of 49 %. Immobilization considerably increased the reusability of the recombinant esterase; the immobilized enzyme showed excellent reusability during 6 cycles of repeated 2 h reactions at 35 °C. Thereby, it makes the recombinant B. cereus esterase a usable biocatalyst for industrial application.

  3. Inactive methyl indole-3-acetic acid ester can be hydrolyzed and activated by several esterases belonging to the AtMES esterase family of Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yue; Xu, Richard; Ma, Choong-Je; Vlot, A Corina; Klessig, Daniel F; Pichersky, Eran

    2008-07-01

    The plant hormone auxin (indole-3-acetic acid [IAA]) is found both free and conjugated to a variety of carbohydrates, amino acids, and peptides. We have recently shown that IAA could be converted to its methyl ester (MeIAA) by the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) enzyme IAA carboxyl methyltransferase 1. However, the presence and function of MeIAA in vivo remains unclear. Recently, it has been shown that the tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) protein SABP2 (salicylic acid binding protein 2) hydrolyzes methyl salicylate to salicylic acid. There are 20 homologs of SABP2 in the genome of Arabidopsis, which we have named AtMES (for methyl esterases). We tested 15 of the proteins encoded by these genes in biochemical assays with various substrates and identified several candidate MeIAA esterases that could hydrolyze MeIAA. MeIAA, like IAA, exerts inhibitory activity on the growth of wild-type roots when applied exogenously. However, the roots of Arabidopsis plants carrying T-DNA insertions in the putative MeIAA esterase gene AtMES17 (At3g10870) displayed significantly decreased sensitivity to MeIAA compared with wild-type roots while remaining as sensitive to free IAA as wild-type roots. Incubating seedlings in the presence of [(14)C]MeIAA for 30 min revealed that mes17 mutants hydrolyzed only 40% of the [(14)C]MeIAA taken up by plants, whereas wild-type plants hydrolyzed 100% of absorbed [(14)C]MeIAA. Roots of Arabidopsis plants overexpressing AtMES17 showed increased sensitivity to MeIAA but not to IAA. Additionally, mes17 plants have longer hypocotyls and display increased expression of the auxin-responsive DR5:beta-glucuronidase reporter gene, suggesting a perturbation in IAA homeostasis and/or transport. mes17-1/axr1-3 double mutant plants have the same phenotype as axr1-3, suggesting MES17 acts upstream of AXR1. The protein encoded by AtMES17 had a K(m) value of 13 microm and a K(cat) value of 0.18 s(-1) for MeIAA. AtMES17 was expressed at the highest levels in shoot

  4. Using a simple HPLC approach to identify the enzymatic products of UTL-5g, a small molecule TNF-α inhibitor, from porcine esterase and from rabbit esterase

    PubMed Central

    Swartz, Kenneth; Zhang, Yiguan; Valeriote, Frederick; Chen, Ben; Shaw, Jiajiu

    2013-01-01

    UTL-5g is a novel small-molecule chemoprotector that lowers hepatotoxicity, nephrotoxicity, and myelotoxicity induced by cisplatin through TNF-α inhibition among other factors. As a prelude to investigating the metabolites of UTL-5g, we set out to identify the enzymatic products of UTL-5g under the treatment of both porcine liver esterase (PLE) and rabbit liver esterase (RLE). First, a number of mixtures made by UTL-5g and PLE were incubated at 25 °C. At predetermined time points, individual samples were quenched by acetonitrile, vortexed, and centrifuged. The supernatants were then analyzed by reversed-phase HPLC (using a C18 column). The retention times and UV/Vis spectra of individual peaks were compared to those of UTL-5g and its two postulated enzymatic products; thus the enzymatic products of UTL-5g were tentatively identified. Secondly, a different HPLC method (providing different retentions times) was used to cross-check and to confirm the identities of the two enzymatic products. Based on the observations, it was concluded that under the treatment of PLE, the major enzymatic products of UTL-5g were 5-methyliosxazole-3-carboxylic acid (ISOX) and 2,4-dichloroaniline (DCA). Treatment of UTL-5g by RLE also provided the same enzymatic products of UTL-5g from esterase. These results indicate that the peptide bond in UTL-5g was cleaved by PLE/RLE. Michaelis–Menten kinetics showed that the Km values of UTL-5g were 2.07 mM with PLE and 0.37 mM with RLE indicating that UTL-5g had a higher affinity with RLE. In summary, by a simple HPLC approach, we have concluded that the peptide bond in UTL-5g was cleaved by esterase from either porcine liver or rabbit liver in vitro and afforded DCA (at a mole ratio of 1:1) and ISOX. However, further studies are needed in order to determine whether UTL-5g is metabolized by microsomal enzymes to produce ISOX and DCA. PMID:24126042

  5. Using a simple HPLC approach to identify the enzymatic products of UTL-5g, a small molecule TNF-α inhibitor, from porcine esterase and from rabbit esterase.

    PubMed

    Swartz, Kenneth; Zhang, Yiguan; Valeriote, Frederick; Chen, Ben; Shaw, Jiajiu

    2013-12-01

    UTL-5g is a novel small-molecule chemoprotector that lowers hepatotoxicity, nephrotoxicity, and myelotoxicity induced by cisplatin through TNF-α inhibition among other factors. As a prelude to investigating the metabolites of UTL-5g, we set out to identify the enzymatic products of UTL-5g under the treatment of both porcine liver esterase (PLE) and rabbit liver esterase (RLE). First, a number of mixtures made by UTL-5g and PLE were incubated at 25°C. At predetermined time points, individual samples were quenched by acetonitrile, vortexed, and centrifuged. The supernatants were then analyzed by reversed-phase HPLC (using a C18 column). The retention times and UV/vis spectra of individual peaks were compared to those of UTL-5g and its two postulated enzymatic products; thus the enzymatic products of UTL-5g were tentatively identified. Secondly, a different HPLC method (providing different retentions times) was used to cross-check and to confirm the identities of the two enzymatic products. Based on the observations, it was concluded that under the treatment of PLE, the major enzymatic products of UTL-5g were 5-methyliosxazole-3-carboxylic acid (ISOX) and 2,4-dichloroaniline (DCA). Treatment of UTL-5g by RLE also provided the same enzymatic products of UTL-5g from esterase. These results indicate that the peptide bond in UTL-5g was cleaved by PLE/RLE. Michaelis-Menten kinetics showed that the Km values of UTL-5g were 2.07mM with PLE and 0.37mM with RLE indicating that UTL-5g had a higher affinity with RLE. In summary, by a simple HPLC approach, we have concluded that the peptide bond in UTL-5g was cleaved by esterase from either porcine liver or rabbit liver in vitro and afforded DCA (at a mole ratio of 1:1) and ISOX. However, further studies are needed in order to determine whether UTL-5g is metabolized by microsomal enzymes to produce ISOX and DCA. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Comparative study of human intestinal and hepatic esterases as related to enzymatic properties and hydrolizing activity for ester-type drugs.

    PubMed

    Inoue, M; Morikawa, M; Tsuboi, M; Ito, Y; Sugiura, M

    1980-08-01

    In attempts to determine the exact role of intestinal esterase in the body, we purified esterases from human intestinal mucosa and liver, and compared the enzymatic properties and substrate specificities with those of purified esterases. Esterase from human liver was purified 58-fold, by treatment with butanol, DE-52 and DEAE Sephadex A-50 column chromatographies, Sephadex G-200 gel filtration, and isoelectric focusing. The purified preparation showed a single band by polyacylamide gel electrophoresis. The molecular weights of intestinal and hepatic esterases were determined to be 53,000-55,000 and 180,000, respectively, by gel filtration on Sephadex G-200. The activity of the purified intestinal and hepatic esterases was strongly inhibited by diethyl-p-nitrophenyl phosphate and diisopropyl fluorophosphate, and was not inhibited by eserine sulfate and p-chloromercuribenzoate. Moreover, the purified esterases hydrolyzed ester-type drugs such as aspirin, clofibrate, indanyl carbenicillin and procaine. Hepatic esterase had properties similar to those of intestinal esterase with respect to the sensitivity to organophosphate and the substrate specificity. However, the two purified esterases differed in properties such as molecular weight, isoelectric point, thermostability and optimal pH.

  7. Global Analysis of Lysine Acetylation Suggests the Involvement of Protein Acetylation in Diverse Biological Processes in Rice (Oryza sativa)

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Xiaoxian; Tan, Feng; Mujahid, Hana; Zhang, Jian; Nanduri, Bindu; Peng, Zhaohua

    2014-01-01

    Lysine acetylation is a reversible, dynamic protein modification regulated by lysine acetyltransferases and deacetylases. Recent advances in high-throughput proteomics have greatly contributed to the success of global analysis of lysine acetylation. A large number of proteins of diverse biological functions have been shown to be acetylated in several reports in human cells, E.coli, and dicot plants. However, the extent of lysine acetylation in non-histone proteins remains largely unknown in monocots, particularly in the cereal crops. Here we report the mass spectrometric examination of lysine acetylation in rice (Oryza sativa). We identified 60 lysine acetylated sites on 44 proteins of diverse biological functions. Immunoblot studies further validated the presence of a large number of acetylated non-histone proteins. Examination of the amino acid composition revealed substantial amino acid bias around the acetylation sites and the amino acid preference is conserved among different organisms. Gene ontology analysis demonstrates that lysine acetylation occurs in diverse cytoplasmic, chloroplast and mitochondrial proteins in addition to the histone modifications. Our results suggest that lysine acetylation might constitute a regulatory mechanism for many proteins, including both histones and non-histone proteins of diverse biological functions. PMID:24586658

  8. Global analysis of lysine acetylation suggests the involvement of protein acetylation in diverse biological processes in rice (Oryza sativa).

    PubMed

    Nallamilli, Babi Ramesh Reddy; Edelmann, Mariola J; Zhong, Xiaoxian; Tan, Feng; Mujahid, Hana; Zhang, Jian; Nanduri, Bindu; Peng, Zhaohua

    2014-01-01

    Lysine acetylation is a reversible, dynamic protein modification regulated by lysine acetyltransferases and deacetylases. Recent advances in high-throughput proteomics have greatly contributed to the success of global analysis of lysine acetylation. A large number of proteins of diverse biological functions have been shown to be acetylated in several reports in human cells, E.coli, and dicot plants. However, the extent of lysine acetylation in non-histone proteins remains largely unknown in monocots, particularly in the cereal crops. Here we report the mass spectrometric examination of lysine acetylation in rice (Oryza sativa). We identified 60 lysine acetylated sites on 44 proteins of diverse biological functions. Immunoblot studies further validated the presence of a large number of acetylated non-histone proteins. Examination of the amino acid composition revealed substantial amino acid bias around the acetylation sites and the amino acid preference is conserved among different organisms. Gene ontology analysis demonstrates that lysine acetylation occurs in diverse cytoplasmic, chloroplast and mitochondrial proteins in addition to the histone modifications. Our results suggest that lysine acetylation might constitute a regulatory mechanism for many proteins, including both histones and non-histone proteins of diverse biological functions.

  9. Est10: A Novel Alkaline Esterase Isolated from Bovine Rumen Belonging to the New Family XV of Lipolytic Enzymes.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, María Cecilia; Loaces, Inés; Amarelle, Vanesa; Senatore, Daniella; Iriarte, Andrés; Fabiano, Elena; Noya, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    A metagenomic fosmid library from bovine rumen was used to identify clones with lipolytic activity. One positive clone was isolated. The gene responsible for the observed phenotype was identified by in vitro transposon mutagenesis and sequencing and was named est10. The 367 amino acids sequence harbors a signal peptide, the conserved secondary structure arrangement of alpha/beta hydrolases, and a GHSQG pentapeptide which is characteristic of esterases and lipases. Homology based 3D-modelling confirmed the conserved spatial orientation of the serine in a nucleophilic elbow. By sequence comparison, Est10 is related to hydrolases that are grouped into the non-specific Pfam family DUF3089 and to other characterized esterases that were recently classified into the new family XV of lipolytic enzymes. Est10 was heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli as a His-tagged fusion protein, purified and biochemically characterized. Est10 showed maximum activity towards C4 aliphatic chains and undetectable activity towards C10 and longer chains which prompted its classification as an esterase. However, it was able to efficiently catalyze the hydrolysis of aryl esters such as methyl phenylacetate and phenyl acetate. The optimum pH of this enzyme is 9.0, which is uncommon for esterases, and it exhibits an optimal temperature at 40 °C. The activity of Est10 was inhibited by metal ions, detergents, chelating agents and additives. We have characterized an alkaline esterase produced by a still unidentified bacterium belonging to a recently proposed new family of esterases.

  10. Coordination of a transcriptional switch by HMGI(Y) acetylation.

    PubMed

    Munshi, N; Agalioti, T; Lomvardas, S; Merika, M; Chen, G; Thanos, D

    2001-08-10

    Dynamic control of interferon-beta (IFN-beta) gene expression requires the regulated assembly and disassembly of the enhanceosome, a higher-order nucleoprotein complex formed in response to virus infection. The enhanceosome activates transcription by recruiting the histone acetyltransferase proteins CREB binding protein (CBP) and p300/CBP-associated factors (PCAF)/GCN5, which, in addition to modifying histones, acetylate HMGI(Y), the architectural component required for enhanceosome assembly. We show that the accurate execution of the IFN-beta transcriptional switch depends on the ordered acetylation of the high-mobility group I protein HMGI(Y) by PCAF/GCN5 and CBP, which acetylate HMGI(Y) at distinct lysine residues on endogenous promoters. Whereas acetylation of HMGI(Y) by CBP at lysine-65 destabilizes the enhanceosome, acetylation of HMGI(Y) by PCAF/GCN5 at lysine-71 potentiates transcription by stabilizing the enhanceosome and preventing acetylation by CBP.

  11. Preparation, physicochemical characterization and application of acetylated lotus rhizome starches.

    PubMed

    Sun, Suling; Zhang, Ganwei; Ma, Chaoyang

    2016-01-01

    Acetylated lotus rhizome starches were prepared, physicochemically characterized and used as food additives in puddings. The percentage content of the acetyl groups and degree of substitution increased linearly with the amount of acetic anhydride used. The introduction of acetyl groups was confirmed via Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy. The values of the pasting parameters were lower for acetylated starch than for native starch. Acetylation was found to increase the light transmittance (%), the freeze-thaw stability, the swelling power and the solubility of the starch. Sensorial scores for puddings prepared using native and acetylated lotus rhizome starches as food additives indicated that puddings produced from the modified starches with superior properties over those prepared from native starch. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Escherichia coli O157:H7 Strain EDL933 Harbors Multiple Functional Prophage-Associated Genes Necessary for the Utilization of 5-N-Acetyl-9-O-Acetyl Neuraminic Acid as a Growth Substrate

    PubMed Central

    Saile, Nadja; Voigt, Anja; Kessler, Sarah; Stressler, Timo; Fischer, Lutz

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) O157:H7 strain EDL933 harbors multiple prophage-associated open reading frames (ORFs) in its genome which are highly homologous to the chromosomal nanS gene. The latter is part of the nanCMS operon, which is present in most E. coli strains and encodes an esterase which is responsible for the monodeacetylation of 5-N-acetyl-9-O-acetyl neuraminic acid (Neu5,9Ac2). Whereas one prophage-borne ORF (z1466) has been characterized in previous studies, the functions of the other nanS-homologous ORFs are unknown. In the current study, the nanS-homologous ORFs of EDL933 were initially studied in silico. Due to their homology to the chromosomal nanS gene and their location in prophage genomes, we designated them nanS-p and numbered the different nanS-p alleles consecutively from 1 to 10. The two alleles nanS-p2 and nanS-p4 were selected for production of recombinant proteins, their enzymatic activities were investigated, and differences in their temperature optima were found. Furthermore, a function of these enzymes in substrate utilization could be demonstrated using an E. coli C600ΔnanS mutant in a growth medium with Neu5,9Ac2 as the carbon source and supplementation with the different recombinant NanS-p proteins. Moreover, generation of sequential deletions of all nanS-p alleles in strain EDL933 and subsequent growth experiments demonstrated a gene dose effect on the utilization of Neu5,9Ac2. Since Neu5,9Ac2 is an important component of human and animal gut mucus and since the nutrient availability in the large intestine is limited, we hypothesize that the presence of multiple Neu5,9Ac2 esterases provides them a nutrient supply under certain conditions in the large intestine, even if particular prophages are lost. IMPORTANCE In this study, a group of homologous prophage-borne nanS-p alleles and two of the corresponding enzymes of enterohemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC) O157:H7 strain EDL933 that may be important to provide

  13. Improved biomass degradation using fungal glucuronoyl-esterases-hydrolysis of natural corn fiber substrate.

    PubMed

    d'Errico, Clotilde; Börjesson, Johan; Ding, Hanshu; Krogh, Kristian B R M; Spodsberg, Nikolaj; Madsen, Robert; Monrad, Rune Nygaard

    2016-02-10

    Lignin-carbohydrate complexes (LCCs) are in part responsible for the recalcitrance of lignocellulosics in relation to industrial utilization of biomass for biofuels. Glucuronoyl esterases (GEs) belonging to the carbohydrate esterase family 15 have been proposed to be able to degrade ester LCCs between glucuronic acids in xylans and lignin alcohols. By means of synthesized complex LCC model substrates we provide kinetic data suggesting a preference of fungal GEs for esters of bulky arylalkyl alcohols such as ester LCCs. Furthermore, using natural corn fiber substrate we report the first examples of improved degradation of lignocellulosic biomass by the use of GEs. Improved C5 sugar, glucose and glucuronic acid release was observed when heat pretreated corn fiber was incubated in the presence of GEs from Cerrena unicolor and Trichoderma reesei on top of different commercial cellulase/hemicellulase preparations. These results emphasize the potential of GEs for delignification of biomass thereby improving the overall yield of fermentable sugars for biofuel production.

  14. Acute promyelocytic leukemia, hypogranular variant, with uncharacteristic staining with chloroacetate esterase.

    PubMed

    Dunphy, C H; Polski, J M; Johns, G; Evans, H L; Gardner, L J

    2001-06-01

    A diagnosis of the hypogranular variant of acute promyelocytic leukemia (APLv) may be difficult to establish based on cytomorphology alone. However, the great majority of cases have a classical immunophenotype by flow cytometric immunophenotyping (FCI) (CD13+, CD33+, dim CD64+, HLA-DR-, and CD34-) and a classical enzyme cytochemical (EC) staining pattern. [intensely staining with myeloperoxidase, Sudan Black B, and chloroacetate esterase (CAE) and negative with alpha'-naphthyl acetate and butyrate esterases]. Although the immunophenotype of APLv by FCI has varied in the literature (HLA-DR +/- and CD34 +/-), the EC staining pattern has remained constant. We report a case of APLv with characteristic cytomorphology, compatible FCI data (CD13+, CD33+, dim CD64+, HLA-DR +/-, and CD34-), chromosomal detection of t(15; 17), and molecular detection of the PML/RAR alpha fusion gene; however, staining of the leukemic cells with CAE was quite uncharacteristic. We describe our findings.

  15. Esterase-Sensitive Prodrugs with Tunable Release Rates and Direct Generation of Hydrogen Sulfide.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yueqin; Yu, Bingchen; Ji, Kaili; Pan, Zhixiang; Chittavong, Vayou; Wang, Binghe

    2016-03-24

    Prodrugs that release hydrogen sulfide upon esterase-mediated cleavage of an ester group followed by lactonization are described herein. By modifying the ester group and thus its susceptibility to esterase, and structural features critical to the lactonization rate, H2 S release rates can be tuned. Such prodrugs directly release hydrogen sulfide without the involvement of perthiol species, which are commonly encountered with existing H2 S donors. Additionally, such prodrugs can easily be conjugated to another non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agent, leading to easy synthesis of hybrid prodrugs. As a biological validation of the H2 S prodrugs, the anti-inflammatory effects of one such prodrug were examined by studying its ability to inhibit LPS-induced TNF-α production in RAW 264.7 cells. This type of H2 S prodrugs shows great potential as both research tools and therapeutic agents.

  16. Application of glutaraldehyde for the staining of esterase-active cells with carboxyfluorescein diacetate.

    PubMed

    Morono, Yuki; Takano, Suguru; Miyanaga, Kazuhiko; Tanji, Yasunori; Unno, Hajime; Hori, Katsutoshi

    2004-03-01

    Staining of esterase-active bacteria with carboxyfluorescein diacetate (CFDA) has been used to evaluate the viability of various types of cell. However, the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria prevents CFDA from permeating into the cell. Although EDTA can increase the permeability of the outer membrane allowing CFDA to enter the cells, it was experimentally confirmed that there is still considerable difficulty in visualizing viable cells due to passive diffusion of carboxyfluorescein (CF), a hydrolyzed product of CFDA, out of the cells. We found that glutaraldehyde enhances the discriminative recognition of esterase-active Gram-negative bacteria under microscopic observation by improving the efficacy of staining. We believe the successful staining in the presence of glutaraldehyde is due to two separate effects: an increase in the permeability of CFDA into the cell and prevention of leakage of CF out of the cell.

  17. Esterases immobilized on aminosilane modified magnetic nanoparticles as a catalyst for biotransformation reactions.

    PubMed

    Alex, Deepthy; Mathew, Abraham; Sukumaran, Rajeev K

    2014-09-01

    Magnetite nanoparticles were prepared by reacting ferrous and ferric salts in presence of aqueous ammonia. The magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) were amino functionalized by treating with 3-aminopropyl triethoxy silane (APTES) and was coupled with glutaraldehyde. A novel solvent tolerant esterase from Pseudozyma sp. NII 08165 was immobilized on the MNPs through covalent bonding to the glutaraldehyde. The magnetite nanoparticles had a size range of 10-100 nm, confirmed by DLS. Lipases immobilized on MNPs were evaluated for biotransformation reactions including synthesis of ethyl acetate and transesterification of vegetable oil for producing biodiesel. The MNP immobilized esterase had prolonged shelf life and there was no loss in enzyme activity. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Release of short chain fatty acids from cream lipids by commercial lipases and esterases.

    PubMed

    Saerens, K; Descamps, D; Dewettinck, K

    2008-02-01

    Lipases and esterases are frequently used in dairy production processes to enhance the buttery flavour of the end product. Short chain fatty acids, and especially butanoic acid, play a key role in this and different enzymes with specificity towards short chain fatty acids are commercially available as potent flavouring tools. We have compared six lipases/esterases associated with buttery flavour production. Although specificity to short chain fatty acids was ascribed to each enzyme, clear differences in free fatty acid profiles were found when these enzymes were applied on cream. Candida cylindraceae lipase was the most useful enzyme for buttery flavour production in cream with the highest yield of free fatty acids (57 g oleic acid 100 g(-1) fat), no release of long chain fatty acids and specificity towards butanoic acid.

  19. Is Esterase-P Encoded by a Cryptic Pseudogene in Drosophila Melanogaster?

    PubMed Central

    Balakirev, E. S.; Ayala, F. J.

    1996-01-01

    We have amplified and sequenced the gene encoding Esterase-P (Est-P) in 10 strains of Drosophila melanogaster. Three premature termination codons occur in the coding region of the gene in two strains. This observation, together with other indirect evidence, leads us to propose that Est-P may be a pseudogene in D. melanogaster. Est-P would be a ``cryptic'' pseudogene, in the sense that it retains intact the coding sequence (without stop codons and other alterations usually observed in pseudogenes) in most D. melanogaster strains. We conjecture that the β-esterase cluster may consist in other Drosophila species of functional and nonfunctional genes. We also conjecture that the rarity of detected pseudogenes in Drosophila may be due to the difficulty of discovering them, because most of them are cryptic. PMID:8978040

  20. Heterozygosity of the sheep: Polymorphism of 'malic enzyme', isocitrate dehydrogenase (NADP+), catalase and esterase.

    PubMed

    Baker, C M; Manwell, C

    1977-04-01

    In contrast to other reports, it is found that the sheep has approximately as much enzyme variation as man. Most of the genetically interpretable enzyme variation in heart, liver, kidney and muscle from 52 sheep (Merinos or Merino crosses) is in the NADP-dependent dehydrogenases [two 'malic enzymes' and the supernatant isocitrate dehydrogenase (NADP+)] and in the esterases. Ten different loci for NAD-dependent dehydrogenases are electrophoretically monomorphic, as are five different NADH diaphorases from heart muscle and 15 different major proteins from skeletal muscle. It is highly statistically significant that NADP-dependent dehydrogenases and esterases are polymorphic but representatives of several other major classes of enzymes are not. The physiological significance of this polymorphism may be related to the role of these enzymes in growth and detoxication, sheep having been selected by man for faster growth, of wool or of carcass, and for grazing a wide variety of plants.

  1. Characterization and affinity purification of juvenile hormone esterase from Bombyx mori.

    PubMed

    Shiotsuki, T; Bonning, B C; Hirai, M; Kikuchi, K; Hammock, B D

    2000-08-01

    Juvenile hormone esterase (JHE) from hemolymph of the silkworm moth Bombyx mori was characterized for substrate specificity and inhibitor sensitivity. B. mori JHE hydrolyzed the juvenile hormone surrogate substrate methyl n-heptylthioacetothioate (HEPTAT) more efficiently than p-nitrophenyl acetate and 1-naphthyl acetate substrates widely used to assay total carboxylesterase activity. B. mori JHE was sensitive to 3-octylthio-1,1,1-trifluoro-2-propanone (OTFP), which was developed as a selective inhibitor for lepidopteran JHE, and relatively insensitive to diisopropyl fluorophosphate (DFP), an inhibitor of serine esterases but not of all JHEs. Affinity purification with a trifluoromethyl ketone ligand was more efficient for purification of B. mori JHE than DEAE ion exchange chromatography.

  2. Fragrance material review on acetyl cedrene.

    PubMed

    Scognamiglio, J; Letizia, C S; Politano, V T; Api, A M

    2013-12-01

    A toxicologic and dermatologic review of acetyl cedrene when used as a fragrance ingredient is presented. Acetyl cedrene is a member of the fragrance structural group Alkyl Cyclic Ketones. The generic formula for this group can be represented as (R1)(R2)CO. These fragrances can be described as being composed of an alkyl, R1, and various substituted and bicyclic saturated or unsaturated cyclic hydrocarbons, R2, in which one of the rings may include up to 12 carbons. Alternatively, R2 may be a carbon bridge of C2-C4 carbon chain length between the ketone and cyclic hydrocarbon. This review contains a detailed summary of all available toxicology and dermatology papers that are related to this individual fragrance ingredient and is not intended as a stand-alone document. Available data for acetyl cedrene were evaluated then summarized and includes physical properties, acute toxicity, skin irritation, mucous membrane (eye) irritation, skin sensitization, elicitation, phototoxicity, photoallergy, toxicokinetics, repeated dose, reproductive toxicity, and genotoxicity data. A safety assessment of the entire Alkyl Cyclic Ketones will be published simultaneously with this document; please refer to Belsito et al. (2013) (Belsito, D., Bickers, D., Bruze, M., Calow, P., Dagli, M., Fryer, A.D., Greim, H., Miyachi, Y., Saurat, J.H., Sipes, I.G., 2013. A Toxicologic and Dermatologic Assessment of Alkyl Cyclic Ketones When Used as Fragrance Ingredients. Submitted with this manuscript.) for an overall assessment of the safe use of this material and all Alkyl Cyclic Ketones in fragrances. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  3. Acetylation unleashes protein demons of dementia.

    PubMed

    Mattson, Mark P

    2010-09-23

    Aberrant posttranslational modifications of proteins can impair synaptic plasticity and may render neurons vulnerable to degeneration during aging. In this issue of Neuron, Min et al. show that acetylation of the amino acid lysine in the microtubule-associated protein tau prevents its ubiquitin-mediated degradation, resulting in "tau tangles" similar to those of dementias. Other recent studies suggest that lysine hyperacetylation contributes to the accumulation of amyloid β-peptide in Alzheimer's disease and to impaired cognitive function resulting from a trophic factor deficit. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Characterization of patatin esterase activity in AOT-isooctane reverse micelles.

    PubMed

    Jiménez, M; Escribano, J; Gandía-Herrero, F; Chazarra, S; Cabanes, J; García-Carmona, F; Pérez-Gilabert, M

    2002-01-01

    Patatin is a family of glycoproteins that accounts for 30-40% of the total soluble protein in potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) tubers. This protein has been reported not only to serve as a storage protein but also to exhibit lipid acyl hydrolase (LAH) activity. In this study patatin is characterized in AOT-isooctane reverse micelles. The influence on the enzymatic activity of characteristic parameters of reverse micelles, w(o) (= H(2)O/AOT), and the percentage of H(2)O, theta, were investigated. The results obtained show that patatin esterase activity varies with w(o) but remains constant throughout the range of theta values studied. The variation with w(o) showed that the activity follows an S-shaped behavior pattern, reaching a maximum at about w(o) = 20 for 2% H(2)O. Patatin esterase activity was compared with p-nitrophenyl (PNP) fatty acid esters of different chain lengths. The activity was much higher for PNP-caprylate. The pH optimum was 6.0, different from the value obtained when patatin esterase activity was measured in mixed micelle systems. The optimal temperature was 35 degrees C, above which the activity decreased to almost zero. The kinetic parameters were also evaluated (K(m) = 10 mM, V(m) = 158 microM/min, V(m)/K(m) = 15.8 x 10(-3) min(-1)). This paper shows the suitability of reverse micelles for measuring patatin esterase activity, since it allows the study of the enzyme in similar conditions to that prevailing in vivo.

  5. Environmental Factors Modulating the Stability and Enzymatic Activity of the Petrotoga mobilis Esterase (PmEst).

    PubMed

    Lopes, Jose L S; Yoneda, Juliana S; Martins, Julia M; DeMarco, Ricardo; Jameson, David M; Castro, Aline M; Bossolan, Nelma R S; Wallace, B A; Araujo, Ana P U

    2016-01-01

    Enzymes isolated from thermophilic organisms found in oil reservoirs can find applications in many fields, including the oleochemical, pharmaceutical, bioenergy, and food/dairy industries. In this study, in silico identification and recombinant production of an esterase from the extremophile bacteria Petrotoga mobilis (designated PmEst) were performed. Then biochemical, bioinformatics and structural characterizations were undertaken using a combination of synchrotron radiation circular dichroism (SRCD) and fluorescence spectroscopies to correlate PmEst stability and hydrolytic activity on different substrates. The enzyme presented a high Michaelis-Menten constant (KM 0.16 mM) and optimum activity at ~55°C for p-nitrophenyl butyrate. The secondary structure of PmEst was preserved at acid pH, but not under alkaline conditions. PmEst was unfolded at high concentrations of urea or guanidine through apparently different mechanisms. The esterase activity of PmEst was preserved in the presence of ethanol or propanol and its melting temperature increased ~8°C in the presence of these organic solvents. PmEst is a mesophilic esterase with substrate preference towards short-to medium-length acyl chains. The SRCD data of PmEst is in agreement with the prediction of an α/β protein, which leads us to assume that it displays a typical fold of esterases from this family. The increased enzyme stability in organic solvents may enable novel applications for its use in synthetic biology. Taken together, our results demonstrate features of the PmEst enzyme that indicate it may be suitable for applications in industrial processes, particularly, when the use of polar organic solvents is required.

  6. Environmental Factors Modulating the Stability and Enzymatic Activity of the Petrotoga mobilis Esterase (PmEst)

    PubMed Central

    Martins, Julia M.; DeMarco, Ricardo; Jameson, David M.; Castro, Aline M.; Bossolan, Nelma R. S.; Wallace, B. A.; Araujo, Ana P. U.

    2016-01-01

    Enzymes isolated from thermophilic organisms found in oil reservoirs can find applications in many fields, including the oleochemical, pharmaceutical, bioenergy, and food/dairy industries. In this study, in silico identification and recombinant production of an esterase from the extremophile bacteria Petrotoga mobilis (designated PmEst) were performed. Then biochemical, bioinformatics and structural characterizations were undertaken using a combination of synchrotron radiation circular dichroism (SRCD) and fluorescence spectroscopies to correlate PmEst stability and hydrolytic activity on different substrates. The enzyme presented a high Michaelis-Menten constant (KM 0.16 mM) and optimum activity at ~55°C for p-nitrophenyl butyrate. The secondary structure of PmEst was preserved at acid pH, but not under alkaline conditions. PmEst was unfolded at high concentrations of urea or guanidine through apparently different mechanisms. The esterase activity of PmEst was preserved in the presence of ethanol or propanol and its melting temperature increased ~8°C in the presence of these organic solvents. PmEst is a mesophilic esterase with substrate preference towards short-to medium-length acyl chains. The SRCD data of PmEst is in agreement with the prediction of an α/β protein, which leads us to assume that it displays a typical fold of esterases from this family. The increased enzyme stability in organic solvents may enable novel applications for its use in synthetic biology. Taken together, our results demonstrate features of the PmEst enzyme that indicate it may be suitable for applications in industrial processes, particularly, when the use of polar organic solvents is required. PMID:27351338

  7. Esterase Activated Carbonyl Sulfide/Hydrogen Sulfide (H2S) Donors.

    PubMed

    Chauhan, Preeti; Bora, Prerona; Ravikumar, Govindan; Jos, Swetha; Chakrapani, Harinath

    2017-01-06

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is a mediator of a number of cellular processes, and modulating cellular levels of this gas has emerged as an important therapeutic area. Localized generation of H2S is thus very useful but highly challenging. Here, we report pivaloyloxymethyl-based carbonothioates and carbamothioates that are activated by the enzyme, esterase, to generate carbonyl sulfide (COS), which is hydrolyzed to H2S.

  8. Heterologous Expression and Biochemical Characterisation of Fourteen Esterases from Helicoverpa armigera

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yongqiang; Coppin, Chris W.; Devonshire, Alan L.; Scott, Colin; East, Peter; Russell, Robyn J.; Oakeshott, John G.

    2013-01-01

    Esterases have recurrently been implicated in insecticide resistance in Helicoverpa armigera but little is known about the underlying molecular mechanisms. We used a baculovirus system to express 14 of 30 full-length esterase genes so far identified from midgut cDNA libraries of this species. All 14 produced esterase isozymes after native PAGE and the isozymes for seven of them migrated to two regions of the gel previously associated with both organophosphate and pyrethroid resistance in various strains. Thirteen of the enzymes obtained in sufficient yield for further analysis all showed tight binding to organophosphates and low but measurable organophosphate hydrolase activity. However there was no clear difference in activity between the isozymes from regions associated with resistance and those from elsewhere in the zymogram, or between eight of the isozymes from a phylogenetic clade previously associated with resistance in proteomic and quantitative rtPCR experiments and five others not so associated. By contrast, the enzymes differed markedly in their activities against nine pyrethroid isomers and the enzymes with highest activity for the most insecticidal isomers were from regions of the gel and, in some cases, the phylogeny that had previously been associated with pyrethroid resistance. Phospholipase treatment confirmed predictions from sequence analysis that three of the isozymes were GPI anchored. This unusual feature among carboxylesterases has previously been suggested to underpin an association that some authors have noted between esterases and resistance to the Cry1Ac toxin from Bacillus thuringiensis. However these three isozymes did not migrate to the zymogram region previously associated with Cry1Ac resistance. PMID:23799064

  9. [Methods of increasing the activity of extracellular esterase, beta-fructofuranosidase and proteases of wine yeast].

    PubMed

    Abdurazakova, S Kh; Salomov, Kh T

    1975-01-01

    Upon regular fermentation changes in the activity of the enzymes esterase, beta-fructofuranosidase and protease of the yeast Saccharomyces mini of the Parkent I race were examined. The maximum activity of the enzymes occurred in the stationary phase of the yeast growth. An increase in the activity of the above enzymes was shown possible during a prolonged stabilization of the stationary conditions in the process of a continuous chemostat cultivation of wine yeast.

  10. Intrinsic temperature sensitivity of influenza C virus hemagglutinin-esterase-fusion protein.

    PubMed

    Takashita, Emi; Muraki, Yasushi; Sugawara, Kanetsu; Asao, Hironobu; Nishimura, Hidekazu; Suzuki, Koji; Tsuji, Takashi; Hongo, Seiji; Ohara, Yoshiro; Ohara, Yoshihiro; Kawaoka, Yoshihiro; Ozawa, Makoto; Matsuzaki, Yoko

    2012-12-01

    Influenza C virus replicates more efficiently at 33°C than at 37°C. To determine whether hemagglutinin-esterase-fusion protein (HEF), a surface glycoprotein of influenza C virus, is a restricting factor for this temperature sensitivity, we analyzed the biological and biochemical properties of HEF at 33°C and 37°C. We found that HEF exhibits intrinsic temperature sensitivities for surface expression and fusion activity.

  11. Characterisation of a cold adapted esterase and mutants from a psychotolerant Pseudomonas sp. strain.

    PubMed

    Dong, Juan; Gasmalla, Mohammed A A; Zhao, Wei; Sun, Jingtao; Liu, Wenyu; Wang, Mingming; Han, Liang; Yang, Ruijin

    2016-07-13

    A cold-adapted esterase-producing strain named T1-39 was isolated from Glacier No.1, Tianshan, China, and identified as Pseudomonas sp. from 16S rRNA sequence analysis. The esterase (EstT1-39) secreted by this strain preferentially hydrolyzed esters of glycerol with short- and medium-chain fatty acids. Mutants of T1-39 were generated by the atmospheric and room-temperature plasma (ARTP) method and screened for enhanced esterase activity. Among all the mutants, strain TB11 had 4.45-fold higher esterase productivity than T1-39, with high genetic stability over 10 generations of continuous cultivation. Maximum activity of EstT1-39 and EstTB11 was observed at 30°C, pH 9.0 and 25°C, pH 8.5, respectively. EstTB11 was thermally more stable (50°C for 1 hour) and active over a broader pH range than EstT1-39. EstTB11 also retained 38% of its maximal activity at 0°C and was found to be able to hydrolyze milk fats into short- and medium-chain fatty acids at 4°C. The characteristics of EstT1-39 made it a cold-adapted enzyme and the EstTB11 from the mutant, with its higher activity at lower temperatures, may be suitable for the production of aromas and flavors in the dairy industry. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  12. Total cholesterol, high density lipoprotein cholesterol and choline esterase in overseas and Japanese university students.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, S

    1985-04-01

    Serum lipids were studied in 97 overseas and 282 Japanese university students. As compared with Japanese, serum total cholesterol levels were low and high density lipoprotein/total cholesterol ratio was high in the overseas students, especially in Chinese and Korean students. 30-39-year-old Chinese students, moreover, showed elevated high density lipoprotein levels. Choline esterase levels were significantly lower in 30-39-year-old Chinese and Korean students than in Japanese and Taiwanese.

  13. Interactions between resin monomers and commercial composite resins with human saliva derived esterases.

    PubMed

    Jaffer, F; Finer, Y; Santerre, J P

    2002-04-01

    Cholesterol esterase (CE) and pseudocholinesterase (PCE) have been reported to degrade commercial and model composite resins containing bisphenylglycidyl dimethacrylate (BisGMA), triethylene glycol dimethacrylate (TEGDMA) or the latter in combination with urethane modified BisGMA monomer systems. In addition, human saliva has been shown to contain esterase like activities similar to CE and PCE. Hence, it was the aim of the current study to determine to what extent human saliva could degrade two common commercial composite resins (Z250 from 3M Inc. and Spectrum TPH from L.D. Caulk) which contain the above monomer systems. Saliva samples from different volunteers were collected, processed, pooled, and freeze-dried. TEGDMA and BisGMA monomers were incubated with human saliva derived esterase activity (HSDEA) and their respective hydrolysis was monitored using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Both monomers were completely hydrolyzed within 25 h by HSDEA. Photopolymerized composites were incubated with buffer or human saliva (pH 7.0 and 37 C) for 2, 8 and 16 days. The incubation solutions were analyzed using HPLC and mass spectrometry. Surface morphology characterization was carried out using scanning electron microscopy. Upon biodegradation, the Z250 composite yielded higher amounts of BisGMA and TEGDMA related products relative to the TPH composite. However, there were higher amounts of ethoxylated bis-phenol A released from the TPH material. In terms of total mass of products released, human saliva demonstrated a greater ability to degrade Z250. In summary, HSDEA has been shown to contain esterase activities that can readily catalyze the biodegradation of current commercial composite resins.

  14. Contribution of human esterases to the metabolism of selected drugs of abuse.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Markus R; Schütz, Aline; Maurer, Hans H

    2015-01-05

    Human esterases such as the human carboxylesterases (hCES) are important for the catalytic ester hydrolysis of xenobiotics and they play an important role in the detoxification of drugs (e.g., cocaine) but also in the activation of prodrugs (e.g., ramipril). Therefore, the aim of the presented study was to characterize the enzyme-catalyzed ester hydrolysis of ten drugs (cocaine, dimethocaine, ethylphenidate, 4-fluoro-3α-tropacocaine, 4-fluoro-3β-tropacocaine, heroin, methylphenidate, mitragynine, ramipril, and thebacon) by different esterase-containing systems (recombinant hCES1b, hCES1c, and hCES2, pooled human liver microsomes, pooled human liver S9 fraction, and pooled human plasma). Michaelis-Menten kinetic studies were done using in vitro incubations with the aforementioned enzyme-containing systems and LC coupled to ion trap MS for analysis. Ramipril and heroin were used as known model substrates to ensure reliable incubation conditions. The hydrolysis reactions followed classic Michaelis-Menten kinetics with exception of cocaine and 4-fluoro-3α-tropacocaine, for which hydrolysis rate was too low for reliable modeling. The substrates were mainly metabolized by the following enzymes systems: cocaine, hCES1c; dimethocaine, human plasma esterases; ethylphenidate, hCES1c; 4-fluoro-3β-tropacocaine, human plasma esterases; heroin, hCES2; methylphenidate, hCES1c; mitragynine, hCES1c; ramipril, hCES1b; thebacon, hCES2. Compounds bearing a small alcohol part and a larger acyl part showed higher affinity to hCES1 while those with a large alcohol part showed higher affinity to hCES2. The collected data are important for prediction of drug-drug or drug-food interactions as well as for individual variations in metabolism of drugs of abuse due to enzyme polymorphisms. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. A Chlorogenic Acid Esterase with a Unique Substrate Specificity from Ustilago maydis

    PubMed Central

    Haase-Aschoff, Paul; Kelle, Sebastian; Linke, Diana; Krings, Ulrich; Popper, Lutz; Berger, Ralf G.

    2014-01-01

    An extracellular chlorogenic acid esterase from Ustilago maydis (UmChlE) was purified to homogeneity by using three separation steps, including anion-exchange chromatography on a Q Sepharose FF column, preparative isoelectric focusing (IEF), and, finally, a combination of affinity chromatography and hydrophobic interaction chromatography on polyamide. SDS-PAGE analysis suggested a monomeric protein of ∼71 kDa. The purified enzyme showed maximal activity at pH 7.5 and at 37°C and was active over a wide pH range (3.5 to 9.5). Previously described chlorogenic acid esterases exhibited a comparable affinity for chlorogenic acid, but the enzyme from Ustilago was also active on typical feruloyl esterase substrates. Kinetic constants for chlorogenic acid, methyl p-coumarate, methyl caffeate, and methyl ferulate were as follows: Km values of 19.6 μM, 64.1 μM, 72.5 μM, and 101.8 μM, respectively, and kcat/Km values of 25.83 mM−1 s−1, 7.63 mM−1 s−1, 3.83 mM−1 s−1 and 3.75 mM−1 s−1, respectively. UmChlE released ferulic, p-coumaric, and caffeic acids from natural substrates such as destarched wheat bran (DSWB) and coffee pulp (CP), confirming activity on complex plant biomass. The full-length gene encoding UmChlE consisted of 1,758 bp, corresponding to a protein of 585 amino acids, and was functionally produced in Pichia pastoris GS115. Sequence alignments with annotated chlorogenic acid and feruloyl esterases underlined the uniqueness of this enzyme. PMID:25548041

  16. A chlorogenic acid esterase with a unique substrate specificity from Ustilago maydis.

    PubMed

    Nieter, Annabel; Haase-Aschoff, Paul; Kelle, Sebastian; Linke, Diana; Krings, Ulrich; Popper, Lutz; Berger, Ralf G

    2015-03-01

    An extracellular chlorogenic acid esterase from Ustilago maydis (UmChlE) was purified to homogeneity by using three separation steps, including anion-exchange chromatography on a Q Sepharose FF column, preparative isoelectric focusing (IEF), and, finally, a combination of affinity chromatography and hydrophobic interaction chromatography on polyamide. SDS-PAGE analysis suggested a monomeric protein of ∼71 kDa. The purified enzyme showed maximal activity at pH 7.5 and at 37°C and was active over a wide pH range (3.5 to 9.5). Previously described chlorogenic acid esterases exhibited a comparable affinity for chlorogenic acid, but the enzyme from Ustilago was also active on typical feruloyl esterase substrates. Kinetic constants for chlorogenic acid, methyl p-coumarate, methyl caffeate, and methyl ferulate were as follows: Km values of 19.6 μM, 64.1 μM, 72.5 μM, and 101.8 μM, respectively, and kcat/Km values of 25.83 mM(-1) s(-1), 7.63 mM(-1) s(-1), 3.83 mM(-1) s(-1) and 3.75 mM(-1) s(-1), respectively. UmChlE released ferulic, p-coumaric, and caffeic acids from natural substrates such as destarched wheat bran (DSWB) and coffee pulp (CP), confirming activity on complex plant biomass. The full-length gene encoding UmChlE consisted of 1,758 bp, corresponding to a protein of 585 amino acids, and was functionally produced in Pichia pastoris GS115. Sequence alignments with annotated chlorogenic acid and feruloyl esterases underlined the uniqueness of this enzyme. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  17. Purification of neuropathy target esterase from avian brain after prelabelling with [3H]diisopropyl phosphorofluoridate.

    PubMed

    Rüffer-Turner, M E; Read, D J; Johnson, M K

    1992-01-01

    Neuropathy target esterase from hen brains was radiolabelled at the active site with [3H]diisopropyl phosphorofluoridate. The labelled protein was purified by differential centrifugation and Nonidet P40 solubilization, detergent phase partitioning, anion exchange, and preparative sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). The volatilizable counts assay and analytical SDS-PAGE were used to monitor the protein. The 150-kDa subunit polypeptide appears as a single band on analytical SDS-PAGE.

  18. Biochemical Characterization of a Family 15 Carbohydrate Esterase from a Bacterial Marine Arctic Metagenome

    PubMed Central

    De Santi, Concetta; Willassen, Nils Peder

    2016-01-01

    Background The glucuronoyl esterase enzymes of wood-degrading fungi (Carbohydrate Esterase family 15; CE15) form part of the hemicellulolytic and cellulolytic enzyme systems that break down plant biomass, and have possible applications in biotechnology. Homologous enzymes are predicted in the genomes of several bacteria, however these have been much less studied than their fungal counterparts. Here we describe the recombinant production and biochemical characterization of a bacterial CE15 enzyme denoted MZ0003, which was identified by in silico screening of a prokaryotic metagenome library derived from marine Arctic sediment. MZ0003 has high similarity to several uncharacterized gene products of polysaccharide-degrading bacterial species, and phylogenetic analysis indicates a deep evolutionary split between these CE15s and fungal homologs. Results MZ0003 appears to differ from previously-studied CE15s in some aspects. Some glucuronoyl esterase activity could be measured by qualitative thin-layer chromatography which confirms its assignment as a CE15, however MZ0003 can also hydrolyze a range of other esters, including p-nitrophenyl acetate, which is not acted upon by some fungal homologs. The structure of MZ0003 also appears to differ as it is predicted to have several large loop regions that are absent in previously studied CE15s, and a combination of homology-based modelling and site-directed mutagenesis indicate its catalytic residues deviate from the conserved Ser-His-Glu triad of many fungal CE15s. Taken together, these results indicate that potentially unexplored diversity exists among bacterial CE15s, and this may be accessed by investigation of the microbial metagenome. The combination of low activity on typical glucuronoyl esterase substrates, and the lack of glucuronic acid esters in the marine environment suggest that the physiological substrate of MZ0003 and its homologs is likely to be different from that of related fungal enzymes. PMID:27433797

  19. Survey of the human acetylator polymorphism in spontaneous disorders.

    PubMed Central

    Evans, D A

    1984-01-01

    There is ample evidence that the human acetylator phenotypes are associated with drug induced phenomena. It is principally the slow acetylators who exhibit toxic adverse effects because of their relative inability to detoxify the original drug compounds. In rare instances, however, it is the rapid acetylators who are at a disadvantage. In the matter of association of spontaneous disease with either acetylator phenotype, there are two groups of disorders to consider. First, disorders in which carcinogenic amines are known to be an aetiological factor. This is because these amines are substrates for the polymorphic N-acetyltransferase activity and hence there is a possible rational basis for searching for an association. Secondly, other disorders where searches for associations are based more on hunches. In the first group there is a definite statistical association between cancer of the bladder and the slow acetylator phenotype. In prevalence studies the slow phenotype is 39% more associated with bladder cancer than is the rapid phenotype. On the basis of the evidence now available it is not possible to say whether this association is because slow acetylators develop the disease more frequently or whether they survive longer. In the second group the relevant studies show (1) a greatly increased prevalence of slow acetylators in Gilbert's disease; (2) a confirmed association between the rapid acetylator phenotype and diabetes; (3) a possible association between the rapid acetylator phenotype and breast cancer; (4) a possible association between the slow acetylator phenotype and leprosy in Chinese patients; (5) an earlier age of onset of thyrotoxicosis (Graves' disease) in slow acetylators than in rapid acetylators; (6) no evidence of an association between either phenotype and spontaneous systemic lupus erythematosus. PMID:6387123

  20. Lipase-catalyzed synthesis of acetylated EGCG and antioxidant properties of the acetylated derivatives

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    (-)-Epigallocatechin-3-O-gallate (EGCG) acetylated derivatives were prepared by lipase catalyzed acylation of EGCG with vinyl acetate to improve its lipophilicity and expand its application in lipophilic media. The immobilized lipase, Lipozyme RM IM, was found to be the optimum catalyst. The optimiz...

  1. Structural and functional profile of the carbohydrate esterase gene complement in Phytophthora infestans.

    PubMed

    Ospina-Giraldo, Manuel D; McWalters, Jessica; Seyer, Lauren

    2010-12-01

    The plant cell cuticle is the first obstacle for penetration of the host by plant pathogens. To breach this barrier, most pathogenic fungi employ a complex assortment of cell wall-degrading enzymes including carbohydrate esterases, glycoside hydrolases, and polysaccharide lyases. We characterized the full complement of carbohydrate esterase-coding genes in three Phytophthora species and analyzed the expression of cutinase in vitro and in planta; we also determined the cutinase allele distribution in multiple isolates of P. infestans. Our investigations revealed that there are 49, 21, and 37 esterase homologs in the P. infestans, P. ramorum, and P. sojae genomes, respectively, with a considerable number predicted to be extracellular. Four cutinase gene copies were found in both the P. infestans and P. ramorum genomes, while 16 copies were found in P. sojae. Transcriptional analyses of cutinase in P. infestans revealed that its expression level during infection is significantly upregulated at all time points compared to that of the same gene in mycelium grown in vitro. Expression achieves maximum values at 15 hpi, declining at subsequent time points. These results may suggest, therefore, that cutinase most likely plays a role in P. infestans pathogenicity.

  2. Conversion of a Rhizopus chinensis lipase into an esterase by lid swapping

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xiao-Wei; Zhu, Shan-Shan; Xiao, Rong; Xu, Yan

    2014-01-01

    In an effort to explore the feasibility of converting a lipase into an esterase by modifying the lid region, we designed and characterized two novel Rhizopus chinensis lipase variants by lid swapping. The substrate specificity of an R. chinensis lipase was successfully modified toward water-soluble substrates, that is, turned into an esterase, by replacing the hydrophobic lid with a hydrophilic lid from ferulic acid esterase from Aspergillus niger. Meanwhile, as a comparison, the lid of R. chinensis lipase was replaced by a hydrophobic lid from Rhizomucor miehei lipase, which did not alter its substrate specificity but led to a 5.4-fold higher catalytic efficiency (k*cat/K*m) toward p-nitrophenyl laurate. Based on the analysis of structure-function relationships, it suggests that the amphipathic nature of the lid is very important for the substrate specificity. This study provides new insight into the structural basis of lipase specificities and a way to tune the substrate preference of lipases. PMID:24670990

  3. Production and characterization of a tributyrin esterase from Lactobacillus plantarum suitable for cheese lipolysis.

    PubMed

    Esteban-Torres, M; Mancheño, J M; de las Rivas, B; Muñoz, R

    2014-11-01

    Lactobacillus plantarum is a lactic acid bacterium that can be found during cheese ripening. Lipolysis of milk triacylglycerols to free fatty acids during cheese ripening has fundamental consequences on cheese flavor. In the present study, the gene lp_1760, encoding a putative esterase or lipase, was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3) and the overproduced Lp_1760 protein was biochemically characterized. Lp_1760 hydrolyzed p-nitrophenyl esters of fatty acids from C2 to C16, with a preference for p-nitrophenyl butyrate. On triglycerides, Lp_1760 showed higher activity on tributyrin than on triacetin. Although optimal conditions for activity were 45°C and pH 7, Lp_1760 retains activity under conditions commonly found during cheese making and ripening. The Lp_1760 showed more than 50% activity at 5°C and exhibited thermal stability at high temperatures. Enzymatic activity was strongly inhibited by sodium dodecyl sulfate and phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride. The Lp_1760 tributyrin esterase showed high activity in the presence of NaCl, lactic acid, and calcium chloride. The results suggest that Lp_1760 might be a useful tributyrin esterase to be used in cheese manufacturing.

  4. Thermostable esterase 2 from Alicyclobacillus acidocaldarius as biosensor for the detection of organophosphate pesticides.

    PubMed

    Febbraio, Ferdinando; Merone, Luigia; Cetrangolo, Giovanni Paolo; Rossi, Mosè; Nucci, Roberto; Manco, Giuseppe

    2011-03-01

    Pesticides are the plague of modern times, although much needed in agriculture, causing damage to the entire ecosystem, including humans. The high operative costs and the requirement of specialized personnel for pesticide detection, incentive to develop alternative solutions such as the set up of cheap, rapid, and simple to use biosensors. In this work, we evaluate the possibility to use the esterase 2 from Alicyclobacillus acidocaldarius as a biosensor for the detection of specific organophosphate pesticides. With the recent demonstration of the very high affinity of esterase 2 toward paraoxon, a more complete analysis on the detection methods in water as well as in purposely contaminated fruit juices was carried out. The inhibitory effects of a wide range of other pesticides on esterase 2 were investigated, showing a better selectivity with respect to nonspecific reaction of acethylcholinesterases, the main target of organophosphate pesticides. The applied methodology allowed one to detect 2.75 × 10(-3) ppm of neurotoxic agent, comparable to the efficiency of other acethylcholinesterase-based biosensors. Finally, a raw biosensor, based on EST2 immobilization on a nitrocellulose membrane, was devised and tested for paraoxon detection, showing longtime stability, reproducibility, and sensibility.

  5. Newly Identified Thermostable Esterase from Sulfobacillus acidophilus: Properties and Performance in Phthalate Ester Degradation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiao-Yan; Fan, Xiang; Qiu, Yong-Jun; Li, Cheng-Yuan; Xing, Shuai; Zheng, Yi-Tao

    2014-01-01

    EstS1, a newly identified thermostable esterase from Sulfobacillus acidophilus DSM10332, was heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli and shown to enzymatically degrade phthalate esters (PAEs) to their corresponding monoalkyl PAEs. The optimal pH and temperature of the esterase were found to be 8.0 and 70°C, respectively. The half-life of EstS1 at 60°C was 15 h, indicating that the enzyme had good thermostability. The specificity constant (kcat/Km) of the enzyme for p-nitrophenyl butyrate was as high as 6,770 mM−1 s−1. The potential value of EstS1 was demonstrated by its ability to effectively hydrolyze 35 to 82% of PAEs (10 mM) within 2 min at 37°C, with all substrates being completely degraded within 24 h. At 60°C, the time required for complete hydrolysis of most PAEs was reduced by half. To our knowledge, this enzyme is a new esterase identified from thermophiles that is able to degrade various PAEs at high temperatures. PMID:25149523

  6. Conversion of a Rhizopus chinensis lipase into an esterase by lid swapping.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiao-Wei; Zhu, Shan-Shan; Xiao, Rong; Xu, Yan

    2014-06-01

    In an effort to explore the feasibility of converting a lipase into an esterase by modifying the lid region, we designed and characterized two novel Rhizopus chinensis lipase variants by lid swapping. The substrate specificity of an R. chinensis lipase was successfully modified toward water-soluble substrates, that is, turned into an esterase, by replacing the hydrophobic lid with a hydrophilic lid from ferulic acid esterase from Aspergillus niger Meanwhile, as a comparison, the lid of R. chinensis lipase was replaced by a hydrophobic lid from Rhizomucor miehei lipase, which did not alter its substrate specificity but led to a 5.4-fold higher catalytic efficiency (k*cat/K*m) toward p-nitrophenyl laurate. Based on the analysis of structure-function relationships, it suggests that the amphipathic nature of the lid is very important for the substrate specificity. This study provides new insight into the structural basis of lipase specificities and a way to tune the substrate preference of lipases.

  7. B-esterase determination and organophosphate insecticide inhibitory effects in JEG-3 trophoblasts.

    PubMed

    Espinoza, Marlon; Rivero Osimani, Valeria; Sánchez, Victoria; Rosenbaum, Enrique; Guiñazú, Natalia

    2016-04-01

    The placenta and trophoblasts express several B-esterases. This family includes acethylcholinesterase (AChE), carboxylesterase (CES) and butyrylcholinesterase (BChE), which are important targets of organophosphate insecticide (OP) toxicity. To better understand OP effects on trophoblasts, B-esterase basal activity and kinetic behavior were studied in JEG-3 choriocarcinoma cell cultures. Effects of the OP azinphos-methyl (Am) and chlorpyrifos (Cp) on cellular enzyme activity were also evaluated. JEG-3 cells showed measurable activity levels of AChE and CES, while BChE was undetected. Recorded Km for AChE and CES were 0.33 and 0.26 mM respectively. Native gel electrophoresis and RT-PCR analysis demonstrated CES1 and CES2 isoform expression. Cells exposed for 4 and 24 h to the OP Am or Cp, showed a differential CES and AChE inhibition profiles. Am inhibited CES and AChE at 4 h treatment while Cp showed the highest inhibition profile at 24 h. Interestingly, both insecticides differentially affected CES1 and CES2 activities. Results demonstrated that JEG-3 trophoblasts express AChE, CES1 and CES2. B-esterase enzymes were inhibited by in vitro OP exposure, indicating that JEG-3 cells metabolization capabilities include phase I enzymes, able to bioactivate OP. In addition, since CES enzymes are important for medicinal drug activation/deactivation, OP exposure may interfere with trophoblast CES metabolization, probably being relevant in a co-exposure scenario during pregnancy.

  8. Metagenomic mining for thermostable esterolytic enzymes uncovers a new family of bacterial esterases

    PubMed Central

    Zarafeta, Dimitra; Moschidi, Danai; Ladoukakis, Efthymios; Gavrilov, Sergey; Chrysina, Evangelia D.; Chatziioannou, Aristotelis; Kublanov, Ilya; Skretas, Georgios; Kolisis, Fragiskos N.

    2016-01-01

    Biocatalysts exerting activity against ester bonds have a broad range of applications in modern biotechnology. Here, we have identified a new esterolytic enzyme by screening a metagenomic sample collected from a hot spring in Kamchatka, Russia. Biochemical characterization of the new esterase, termed EstDZ2, revealed that it is highly active against medium chain fatty acid esters at temperatures between 25 and 60 °C and at pH values 7–8. The new enzyme is moderately thermostable with a half-life of more than six hours at 60 °C, but exhibits exquisite stability against high concentrations of organic solvents. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that EstDZ2 is likely an Acetothermia enzyme that belongs to a new family of bacterial esterases, for which we propose the index XV. One distinctive feature of this new family, is the presence of a conserved GHSAG catalytic motif. Multiple sequence alignment, coupled with computational modelling of the three-dimensional structure of EstDZ2, revealed that the enzyme lacks the largest part of the “cap” domain, whose extended structure is characteristic for the closely related Family IV esterases. Thus, EstDZ2 appears to be distinct from known related esterolytic enzymes, both in terms of sequence characteristics, as well as in terms of three-dimensional structure. PMID:27991516

  9. Cloning, expression and characterization of a novel esterase from a South China Sea sediment metagenome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hao; Li, Fuchao; Chen, Huaxin; Zhao, Jin; Yan, Jinfei; Jiang, Peng; Li, Ronggui; Zhu, Baoli

    2015-07-01

    Lipolytic enzymes, including esterases and lipases, represent a group of hydrolases that catalyze the cleavage and formation of ester bonds. A novel esterase gene, scsEst01, was cloned from a South China Sea sediment metagenome. The scsEst01 gene consisted of 921 bp encoding 307 amino acid residues. The predicted amino acid sequence shared less than 90% identity with other lipolytic enzymes in the NCBI nonredundant protein database. ScsEst01 was successfully co-expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3) with chaperones (dnaK-dnaJ-grpE) to prevent the formation of inclusion bodies. The recombinant protein was purified on an immobilized metal ion affinity column containing chelating Sepharose charged with Ni2+. The enzyme was characterized using p -nitrophenol butyrate as a substrate. ScsEst01 had the highest lipolytic activity at 35°C and pH 8.0, indicative of a meso-thermophilic alkaline esterase. ScsEst01 was thermostable at 20°C. The lipolytic activity of scsEst01 was strongly increased by Fe2+, Mn2+ and 1% Tween 80 or Tween 20.

  10. Interindividual and intraindividual variability in acetylation: characterization with caffeine.

    PubMed

    Hardy, B G; Lemieux, C; Walker, S E; Bartle, W R

    1988-08-01

    The degree of interindividual and intraindividual variability in acetylator activity was investigated with caffeine used as a probe of enzyme activity. Acetylator phenotype and relative N-acetyltransferase activity were estimated in 46 subjects by measuring the urinary ratio of two metabolites, AFMU/1-MX, after a single 300 mg oral dose of caffeine on five separate occasions. Thirty homozygous slow (rr) and 15 heterozygous rapid (Rr) acetylators were identified. The degree of interindividual variability in acetylator activity was observed to be a mean of 32% (range 27% to 36%) and 20% (range 11% to 29%) in the rr and Rr groups, respectively. The mean intraindividual variation on repetitive measurement was 19% (range 6% to 49%) in the rr and 14% (range 7% to 24%) in the Rr acetylator group. Four subjects had apparent changes in acetylator activity with time such that they were unable to be assigned to any one acetylator group. Two of these four subjects exhibited apparent homozygous rapid acetylator activity intermittently during the 5-week trial. This variability may explain, in part, some of the high degree of patient variability observed in the toxicity, efficacy, and drug-related disease associated with acetylated drugs and environmental toxins.

  11. Tubulin acetylation protects long-lived microtubules against mechanical ageing.

    PubMed

    Portran, Didier; Schaedel, Laura; Xu, Zhenjie; Théry, Manuel; Nachury, Maxence V

    2017-04-01

    Long-lived microtubules endow the eukaryotic cell with long-range transport abilities. While long-lived microtubules are acetylated on Lys40 of α-tubulin (αK40), acetylation takes place after stabilization and does not protect against depolymerization. Instead, αK40 acetylation has been proposed to mechanically stabilize microtubules. Yet how modification of αK40, a residue exposed to the microtubule lumen and inaccessible to microtubule-associated proteins and motors, could affect microtubule mechanics remains an open question. Here we develop FRET-based assays that report on the lateral interactions between protofilaments and find that αK40 acetylation directly weakens inter-protofilament interactions. Congruently, αK40 acetylation affects two processes largely governed by inter-protofilament interactions, reducing the nucleation frequency and accelerating the shrinkage rate. Most relevant to the biological function of acetylation, microfluidics manipulations demonstrate that αK40 acetylation enhances flexibility and confers resilience against repeated mechanical stresses. Thus, unlike deacetylated microtubules that accumulate damage when subjected to repeated stresses, long-lived microtubules are protected from mechanical ageing through their acquisition of αK40 acetylation. In contrast to other tubulin post-translational modifications that act through microtubule-associated proteins, motors and severing enzymes, intraluminal acetylation directly tunes the compliance and resilience of microtubules.

  12. Acetylation of Stat1 modulates NF-κB activity

    PubMed Central

    Krämer, Oliver H.; Baus, Daniela; Knauer, Shirley K.; Stein, Stefan; Jäger, Elke; Stauber, Roland H.; Grez, Manuel; Pfitzner, Edith; Heinzel, Thorsten

    2006-01-01

    Acetylation of signaling molecules can lead to apoptosis or differentiation of carcinoma cells. The molecular mechanisms underlying these processes and the biological role of enzymes mediating the transfer or removal of an acetyl-group are currently under intense investigation. Our study shows that Stat1 is an acetylated protein. Stat1 acetylation depends on the balance between Stat1-associated histone deacetylases (HDACs) and histone acetyltransferases (HATs) such as CBP. Remarkably both inhibitors of HDACs and the cytokine interferon α alter this equilibrium and induce Stat1 acetylation. The analysis of Stat1 mutants reveals Lys 410 and Lys 413 as acetylation sites. Experiments with Stat1 mutants mimicking either constitutively acetylated or nonacetylated states show that only acetylated Stat1 is able to interact with NF-κB p65. As a consequence, p65 DNA binding, nuclear localization, and expression of anti-apoptotic NF-κB target genes decrease. These findings show how the acetylation of Stat1 regulates NF-κB activity and thus ultimately apoptosis. PMID:16481475

  13. Structure, morphology and functionality of acetylated and oxidised barley starches.

    PubMed

    El Halal, Shanise Lisie Mello; Colussi, Rosana; Pinto, Vânia Zanella; Bartz, Josiane; Radunz, Marjana; Carreño, Neftali Lenin Villarreal; Dias, Alvaro Renato Guerra; Zavareze, Elessandra da Rosa

    2015-02-01

    Acetylation and oxidation are chemical modifications which alter the properties of starch. The degree of modification of acetylated and oxidized starches is dependent on the catalyst and active chlorine concentrations, respectively. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of acetylation and oxidation on the structural, morphological, physical-chemical, thermal and pasting properties of barley starch. Barley starches were acetylated at different catalyst levels (11%, 17%, and 23% of NaOH solution) and oxidized at different sodium hypochlorite concentrations (1.0%, 1.5%, and 2.0% of active chlorine). Fourier-transformed infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray diffractograms, thermal, morphological, and pasting properties, swelling power and solubility of starches were evaluated. The degree of substitution (DS) of the acetylated starches increased with the rise in catalyst concentration. The percentage of carbonyl (CO) and carboxyl (COOH) groups in oxidized starches also increased with the rise of active chlorine level. The presence of hydrophobic acetyl groups, carbonyl and carboxyl groups caused a partial disorganization and depolymerization of starch granules. The structural, morphological and functional changes in acetylated and oxidized starches varied according to reaction conditions. Acetylation makes barley starch more hydrophobic by the insertion of acetyl groups. Also the oxidation promotes low retrogradation and viscosity. All these characteristics are important for biodegradable film production. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. N-ACETYL-β-GLUCOSAMINIDASE ACTIVITY IN SERUM DURING PREGNANCY

    PubMed Central

    Walker, P. G.; Woollen, Mary E.; Pugh, Doreen

    1960-01-01

    A spectrophotometric method for the estimation of N-acetyl-β-glucosaminidase in serum has been devised. Sera from normal adult males and females showed similar levels of activity. The activity in serum rose progressively during pregnancy and fell rapidly after parturition to normal levels. This change resembled closely that which occurs in serum β-glucuronidase. Placenta showed a moderate and chorion a high level of N-acetyl-β-glucosaminidase. High N-acetyl-β-glucosaminidase activity was demonstrated histochemically in decidual cells. The functions of N-acetyl-β-glucosaminidase and β-glucuronidase and factors influencing their activity are discussed. Images PMID:13782743

  15. Esterases of Varroa destructor (Acari: Varroidae), parasitic mite of the honeybee.

    PubMed

    Dmitryjuk, Małgorzata; Żołtowska, Krystyna; Frączek, Regina; Lipiński, Zbigniew

    2014-04-01

    Varroa destructor is an ectoparasite that causes serious damage to the population of the honeybee. Increasing resistance of the parasite to acaricides is related, among others, to metabolic adaptations of its esterases to facilitate decomposition of the chemicals used. Esterases are a large heterogeneous group of enzymes that metabolize a number of endogenous and exogenous substrates with ester binding. The aim of the present study was to determine the activity of esterases in the body extracts (BE) and excretion/secretion products (E/SP) of the mite. The enzymes contained in the E/SP should originate mainly from the salivary glands and the alimentary system and they may play a particularly important role in the first line of defence of the mite against acaricides. Activity of cholinesterases (ChEs) [acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and butyrylcholinesterase], carboxylesterases (CEs) and phosphatases [alkaline phosphatase (AP) and acid phosphatase (AcP)] was investigated. The activity of all the enzymes except AChE was higher in the E/SP than in the BE. ChEs from the BE and from the E/SP reacted differently on eserine, a ChE inhibitor. Eserine inhibited both enzymes from the BE, increased decomposition of acetylcholine, but did not influence hydrolysis of butyrylcholine by the E/SP. Activity of the CEs from the BE in relation to the esters of carboxylic acids can be presented in the following series: C10 > C12 > C14 > C8 > C2 > C4 = C16, while activity of the CEs from the E/SP was: C4 > C8 > C2 > C14 > C10 > C12 > C16. The inhibitor of CEs, triphenyl phosphate, reduced the activity of esterases C2–C8 and C14–C16; however, it acted in the opposite way to CEs C10 and C12. The activity of both phosphatases was higher in the E/SP than in the BE (AcP about twofold and AP about 2.6-fold); the activities of AP and AcP in the same material were similar. Given the role of esterases in resistance to pesticides, further studies are necessary to obtain complete biochemical

  16. The Fasted/Fed Mouse Metabolic Acetylome: N6-Acetylation Differences Suggest Acetylation Coordinates Organ-Specific Fuel Switching

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Li; Vaitheesvaran, Bhavapriya; Hartil, Kirsten; Robinson, Alan J.; Hoopmann, Michael R.; Eng, Jimmy K.; Kurland, Irwin J.; Bruce, James E.

    2011-01-01

    The elucidation of extra-nuclear lysine acetylation has been of growing interest, as the co-substrate for acetylation, acetyl CoA, is at a key metabolic intersection. Our hypothesis was that mitochondrial and cytoplasmic protein acetylation may be part of a fasted/re-fed feedback control system for the regulation of the metabolic network in fuel switching, where acetyl CoA would be provided by fatty acid oxidation, or glycolysis, respectively. To test this we characterized the mitochondrial and cytoplasmic acetylome in various organs that have a high metabolic rate relative to their mass, and/or switch fuels, under fasted and re-fed conditions (brain, kidney, liver, skeletal muscle, heart muscle, white and brown adipose tissues). Using immunoprecipitation, coupled with LC-MSMS label free quantification, we show there is a dramatic variation in global quantitative profiles of acetylated proteins from different organs. In total, 733 acetylated peptides from 337 proteins were identified and quantified, out of which 31 acetylated peptides from the metabolic proteins that may play organ-specific roles were analyzed in detail. Results suggest that fasted/re-fed acetylation changes coordinated by organ-specific (de-)acetylases in insulin-sensitive versus insensitive organs may underlie fuel use and switching. Characterization of the tissue-specific acetylome should increase understanding of metabolic conditions wherein normal fuel switching is disrupted, such as in Type II diabetes. PMID:21728379

  17. Histone H4 lysine 16 acetylation breaks the genome's silence

    PubMed Central

    Shia, Wei-Jong; Pattenden, Samantha G; Workman, Jerry L

    2006-01-01

    Acetylation at histone H4 lysine 16 is involved in many cellular processes in organisms as diverse as yeast and humans. A recent biochemical study pinpoints this particular acetylation mark as a switch for changing chromatin from a repressive to a transcriptionally active state. PMID:16689998

  18. Lysine acetylation in mitochondria: From inventory to function.

    PubMed

    Hosp, Fabian; Lassowskat, Ines; Santoro, Valeria; De Vleesschauwer, David; Fliegner, Daniela; Redestig, Henning; Mann, Matthias; Christian, Sven; Hannah, Matthew A; Finkemeier, Iris

    2017-03-01

    Cellular signaling pathways are regulated in a highly dynamic fashion in order to quickly adapt to distinct environmental conditions. Acetylation of lysine residues represents a central process that orchestrates cellular metabolism and signaling. In mitochondria, acetylation seems to be the most prevalent post-translational modification, presumably linked to the compartmentation and high turnover of acetyl-CoA in this organelle. Similarly, the elevated pH and the higher concentration of metabolites in mitochondria seem to favor non-enzymatic lysine modifications, as well as other acylations. Hence, elucidating the mechanisms for metabolic control of protein acetylation is crucial for our understanding of cellular processes. Recent advances in mass spectrometry-based proteomics have considerably increased our knowledge of the regulatory scope of acetylation. Here, we review the current knowledge and functional impact of mitochondrial protein acetylation across species. We first cover the experimental approaches to identify and analyze lysine acetylation on a global scale, we then explore both commonalities and specific differences of plant and animal acetylomes and the evolutionary conservation of protein acetylation, as well as its particular impact on metabolism and diseases. Important future directions and technical challenges are discussed, and it is pointed out that the transfer of knowledge between species and diseases, both in technology and biology, is of particular importance for further advancements in this field. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. and Mitochondria Research Society. All rights reserved.

  19. Effect of acetaminophen on sulfamethazine acetylation in male volunteers.

    PubMed

    Tahir, I M; Iqbal, T; Saleem, S; Mehboob, H; Akhter, N; Riaz, M

    2016-03-01

    The effect of acetaminophen on sulfamethazine N-acetylation by human N-acetyltrasferase-2 (NAT2) was studied in 19 (n=19) healthy male volunteers in two different phases. In the first phase of the study the volunteers were given an oral dose of sulfamethazine 500 mg alone and blood and urine samples were collected. After the 10-day washout period the same selected volunteers were again administered sulfamethazine 500 mg along with 1000 mg acetaminophen. The acetylation of sulfamethazine by human NAT2 in both phases with and without acetaminophen was determined by HPLC to establish their respective phenotypes. In conclusion obtained statistics of present study revealed that acetaminophen significantly (P<0.0001) decreased sulfamethazine acetylation in plasma of both slow and fast acetylator male volunteers. A highly significant (P<0.0001) decrease in plasma-free and total sulfamethazine concentration was also observed when acetaminophen was co-administered. Urine acetylation status in both phases of the study was found not to be in complete concordance with that of plasma. Acetaminophen significantly (P<0.0001) increased the acetyl, free and total sulfamethazine concentration in urine of both slow and fast acetylators. Urine acetylation analysis has not been found to be a suitable approach for phenotypic studies.

  20. An Alternative Strategy for Pan-acetyl-lysine Antibody Generation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sun-Yee; Sim, Choon Kiat; Zhang, Qiongyi; Tang, Hui; Brunmeir, Reinhard; Pan, Hong; Karnani, Neerja; Han, Weiping; Zhang, Kangling; Xu, Feng

    2016-01-01

    Lysine acetylation is an important post-translational modification in cell signaling. In acetylome studies, a high-quality pan-acetyl-lysine antibody is key to successful enrichment of acetylated peptides for subsequent mass spectrometry analysis. Here we show an alternative method to generate polyclonal pan-acetyl-lysine antibodies using a synthesized random library of acetylated peptides as the antigen. Our antibodies are tested to be specific for acetyl-lysine peptides/proteins via ELISA and dot blot. When pooled, five of our antibodies show broad reactivity to acetyl-lysine peptides, complementing a commercial antibody in terms of peptide coverage. The consensus sequence of peptides bound by our antibody cocktail differs slightly from that of the commercial antibody. Lastly, our antibodies are tested in a proof-of-concept to analyze the acetylome of HEK293 cells. In total we identified 1557 acetylated peptides from 416 proteins. We thus demonstrated that our antibodies are well-qualified for acetylome studies and can complement existing commercial antibodies.

  1. Global analysis of lysine acetylation in strawberry leaves

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Xianping; Chen, Wenyue; Zhao, Yun; Ruan, Songlin; Zhang, Hengmu; Yan, Chengqi; Jin, Liang; Cao, Lingling; Zhu, Jun; Ma, Huasheng; Cheng, Zhongyi

    2015-01-01

    Protein lysine acetylation is a reversible and dynamic post-translational modification. It plays an important role in regulating diverse cellular processes including chromatin dynamic, metabolic pathways, and transcription in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Although studies of lysine acetylome in plants have been reported, the throughput was not high enough, hindering the deep understanding of lysine acetylation in plant physiology and pathology. In this study, taking advantages of anti-acetyllysine-based enrichment and high-sensitive-mass spectrometer, we applied an integrated proteomic approach to comprehensively investigate lysine acetylome in strawberry. In total, we identified 1392 acetylation sites in 684 proteins, representing the largest dataset of acetylome in plants to date. To reveal the functional impacts of lysine acetylation in strawberry, intensive bioinformatic analysis was performed. The results significantly expanded our current understanding of plant acetylome and demonstrated that lysine acetylation is involved in multiple cellular metabolism and cellular processes. More interestingly, nearly 50% of all acetylated proteins identified in this work were localized in chloroplast and the vital role of lysine acetylation in photosynthesis was also revealed. Taken together, this study not only established the most extensive lysine acetylome in plants to date, but also systematically suggests the significant and unique roles of lysine acetylation in plants. PMID:26442052

  2. Antemortem stress regulates protein acetylation and glycolysis in postmortem muscle.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhongwen; Li, Xin; Wang, Zhenyu; Shen, Qingwu W; Zhang, Dequan

    2016-07-01

    Although exhaustive research has established that preslaughter stress is a major factor contributing to pale, soft, exudative (PSE) meat, questions remain regarding the biochemistry of postmortem glycolysis. In this study, the influence of preslaughter stress on protein acetylation in relationship to glycolysis was studied. The data show that antemortem swimming significantly enhanced glycolysis and the total acetylated proteins in postmortem longissimus dorsi (LD) muscle of mice. Inhibition of protein acetylation by histone acetyltransferase (HAT) inhibitors eliminated stress induced increase in glycolysis. Inversely, antemortem injection of histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors, trichostatin A (TSA) and nicotinamide (NAM), further increased protein acetylation early postmortem and the glycolysis. These data provide new insight into the biochemistry of postmortem glycolysis by showing that protein acetylation regulates glycolysis, which may participate in the regulation of preslaughter stress on glycolysis in postmortem muscle. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  3. Acetylated triterpene saponins from the Thai medicinal plant, Sapindus emarginatus.

    PubMed

    Kanchanapoom, T; Kasai, R; Yamasaki, K

    2001-09-01

    From the pericarps of Sapindus emarginatus (Sapindaceae), three new acetylated triterpene saponins were isolated together with hederagenin and five known triterpene saponins, as well as one known sweet acyclic sesquiterpene glycoside, mukurozioside IIb. The structures of new compounds were elucidated as hederagenin 3-O-(2-O-acetyl-beta-D-xylopyranosyl)-(1-->3)-alpha-L-rhamnopyranosyl-(1-->2)-alpha-L-arabinopyranoside, 23-O-acetyl-hederagenin 3-O-(4-O-acetyl-beta-D-xylopyranosyl)-(1-->3)-alpha-L-rhamnopyranosyl-(1-->2)-alpha-L-arabinopyranoside and oleanolic acid 3-O-(4-O-acetyl-beta-D-xylopyranosyl)-(1-->3)-alpha-L-rhamnopyranosyl-(1-->2)-alpha-L-arabinopyranoside by chemical and spectroscopic data.

  4. Acetylated histone H3 increases nucleosome dissociation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, Marek; Manohar, Mridula; Ottesen, Jennifer; Poirier, Michael

    2009-03-01

    Chromatin's basic unit structure is the nucleosome, i.e. genomic DNA wrapped around a particular class of proteins -- histones -- which due to their physical hindrance, block vital biological processes, such as DNA repair, DNA replication, and RNA transcription. Histone post-translational modifications, which are known to exist in vivo, are hypothesized to regulate these biological processes by directly altering DNA-histone interactions and thus nucleosome structure and stability. Using magnetic tweezers technique we studied the acetylation of histone H3 in the dyad region, i.e. at K115 and K122, on reconstituted arrays of nucleosomes under constant external force. Based on the measured increase in the probability of dissociation of modified nucleosomes, we infer that this double modification could facilitate histone chaperone mediated nucleosome disassembly in vivo.

  5. Heterodisaccharide 4-O-(N-acetyl-beta-D-glucosaminyl)-D-glucosamine is a specific inducer of chitinolytic enzyme production in Vibrios harboring chitin oligosaccharide deacetylase genes.

    PubMed

    Hirano, Takako; Kadokura, Kazunari; Ikegami, Takanori; Shigeta, Yuko; Kumaki, Yasuko; Hakamata, Wataru; Oku, Tadatake; Nishio, Toshiyuki

    2009-09-01

    Vibrio parahaemolyticus KN1699 produces 4-O-(N-acetyl-beta-d-glucosaminyl)-d-glucosamine (GlcNAc-GlcN) as a major end product from chitin using two extracellular hydrolases: glycoside hydrolase family 18 chitinase, which produces (GlcNAc)(2) from chitin, and carbohydrate esterase (CE) family 4 chitin oligosaccharide deacetylase (COD), which hydrolyzes the N-acetyl group at the reducing-end GlcNAc residue of (GlcNAc)(2). In this study, we clarified that this heterodisaccharide functions as an inducer of the production of the two above-mentioned chitinolytic enzymes, particularly chitinase. Similar results for chitinase production were obtained with other chitin-decomposing Vibrio strains harboring the CE family 4 COD gene; however, such an increase in chitinase production was not observed in chitinolytic Vibrio strains that did not harbor the COD gene. These results suggest that GlcNAc-GlcN is a unique inducer of chitinase production in Vibrio bacteria that have the COD-producing ability and that the COD involved in the synthesis of this signal compound is one of the key enzymes in the chitin catabolic cascade of these bacteria.

  6. Analysing deltamethrin susceptibility and pyrethroid esterase activity variations in sylvatic and domestic Triatoma infestans at the embryonic stage.

    PubMed

    Santo-Orihuela, Pablo Luis; Carvajal, Guillermo; Picollo, María Inés; Vassena, Claudia Viviana

    2013-12-01

    The aim of the present work was to study the deltamethrin susceptibility of eggs from Triatoma infestans populations and the contribution of pyrethroid esterases to deltamethrin degradation. Insects were collected from sylvatic areas, including Veinte de Octubre and Kirus-Mayu (Bolivia) and from domiciliary areas, including El Palmar (Bolivia) and La Pista (Argentina). Deltamethrin susceptibility was determined by dose-response bioassays. Serial dilutions of deltamethrin (0.0005-1 mg/mL) were topically applied to 12-day-old eggs. Samples from El Palmar had the highest lethal dose ratio (LDR) value (44.90) compared to the susceptible reference strain (NFS), whereas the Veinte de Octubre samples had the lowest value (0.50). Pyrethroid esterases were evaluated using 7-coumaryl permethrate (7-CP) on individually homogenised eggs from each population and from NFS. The El Palmar and La Pista samples contained 40.11 and 36.64 pmol/min/mg protein, respectively, and these values were statistically similar to NFS (34.92 pmol/min/mg protein) and different from Kirus-Mayu and Veinte de Octubre (27.49 and 22.69 pmol/min/mg protein, respectively). The toxicological data indicate that the domestic populations were resistant to deltamethrin, but no statistical contribution of 7-CP esterases was observed. The sylvatic populations had similar LDR values to NFS, but lower 7-CP esterase activities. Moreover, this is the first study of the pyrethroid esterases on T. infestans eggs employing a specific substrate (7-CP).

  7. Genome-wide analysis of esterase-like genes in the striped rice stem borer, Chilo suppressalis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Baoju; Wang, Ying; Zhang, Yang; Han, Ping; Li, Fei; Han, Zhaojun

    2015-06-01

    The striped rice stem borer, Chilo suppressalis, a destructive pest of rice, has developed high levels of resistance to certain insecticides. Esterases are reported to be involved in insecticide resistance in several insects. Therefore, this study systematically analyzed esterase-like genes in C. suppressalis. Fifty-one esterase-like genes were identified in the draft genomic sequences of the species, and 20 cDNA sequences were derived which encoded full- or nearly full-length proteins. The putative esterase proteins derived from these full-length genes are overall highly diversified. However, key residues that are functionally important including the serine residue in the active site are conserved in 18 out of the 20 proteins. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that most of these genes have homologues in other lepidoptera insects. Genes CsuEst6, CsuEst10, CsuEst11, and CsuEst51 were induced by the insecticide triazophos, and genes CsuEst9, CsuEst11, CsuEst14, and CsuEst51 were induced by the insecticide chlorantraniliprole. Our results provide a foundation for future studies of insecticide resistance in C. suppressalis and for comparative research with esterase genes from other insect species.

  8. Conserved tyrosine 182 residue in hyperthermophilic esterase EstE1 plays a critical role in stabilizing the active site.

    PubMed

    Truongvan, Ngoc; Chung, Hye-Shin; Jang, Sei-Heon; Lee, ChangWoo

    2016-03-01

    An aromatic amino acid, Tyr or Trp, located in the esterase active site wall, is highly conserved, with hyperthermophilic esterases showing preference for Tyr and lower temperature esterases showing preference for Trp. In this study, we investigated the role of Tyr(182) in the active site wall of hyperthermophilic esterase EstE1. Mutation of Tyr to Phe or Ala had a moderate effect on EstE1 thermal stability. However, a small-to-large mutation such as Tyr to His or Trp had a devastating effect on thermal stability. All mutant EstE1 enzymes showed reduced catalytic rates and enhanced substrate affinities as compared with wild-type EstE1. Hydrogen bond formation involving Tyr(182) was unimportant for maintaining EstE1 thermal stability, as the EstE1 structure is already adapted to high temperatures via increased intramolecular interactions. However, removal of hydrogen bond from Tyr(182) significantly decreased EstE1 catalytic activity, suggesting its role in stabilization of the active site. These results suggest that Tyr is preferred over a similarly sized Phe residue or bulky His or Trp residue in the active site walls of hyperthermophilic esterases for stabilizing the active site and regulating catalytic activity at high temperatures.

  9. Screening, Nucleotide Sequence, and Biochemical Characterization of an Esterase from Pseudomonas fluorescens with High Activity towards Lactones

    PubMed Central

    Khalameyzer, V.; Fischer, I.; Bornscheuer, U. T.; Altenbuchner, J.

    1999-01-01

    A genomic library of Pseudomonas fluorescens DSM 50106 in a λRESIII phage vector was screened in Escherichia coli K-12 for esterase activity by using α-naphthyl acetate and Fast Blue RR. A 3.2-kb DNA fragment was subcloned from an esterase-positive clone and completely sequenced. Esterase EstF1 was encoded by a 999-bp open reading frame (ORF) and exhibited significant amino acid sequence identity with members of the serine hydrolase family. The deduced amino acid sequences of two other C-terminal truncated ORFs exhibited homology to a cyclohexanone monooxygenase and an alkane hydroxylase. However, esterase activity was not induced by growing of P. fluorescens DSM 50106 in the presence of several cyclic ketones. The esterase gene was fused to a His tag and expressed in E. coli. The gene product was purified by zinc ion affinity chromatography and characterized. Detergents had to be added for purification, indicating that the enzyme was membrane bound or membrane associated. The optimum pH of the purified enzyme was 7.5, and the optimum temperature was 43°C. The showed highest purified enzyme activities towards lactones. The activity increased from γ-butyrolactone (18.1 U/mg) to ɛ-caprolactone (21.8 U/mg) to δ-valerolactone (36.5 U/mg). The activities towards the aliphatic esters were significantly lower; the only exception was the activity toward ethyl caprylate, which was the preferred substrate. PMID:9925571

  10. Comprehensive profiling of lysine acetylation suggests the widespread function is regulated by protein acetylation in the silkworm, Bombyx mori.

    PubMed

    Nie, Zuoming; Zhu, Honglin; Zhou, Yong; Wu, Chengcheng; Liu, Yue; Sheng, Qing; Lv, Zhengbing; Zhang, Wenping; Yu, Wei; Jiang, Caiying; Xie, Longfei; Zhang, Yaozhou; Yao, Juming

    2015-09-01

    Lysine acetylation in proteins is a dynamic and reversible PTM and plays an important role in diverse cellular processes. In this study, using lysine-acetylation (Kac) peptide enrichment coupled with nano HPLC/MS/MS, we initially identified the acetylome in the silkworms. Overall, a total of 342 acetylated proteins with 667 Kac sites were identified in silkworm. Sequence motifs analysis around Kac sites revealed an enrichment of Y, F, and H in the +1 position, and F was also enriched in the +2 and -2 positions, indicating the presences of preferred amino acids around Kac sites in the silkworm. Functional analysis showed the acetylated proteins were primarily involved in some specific biological processes. Furthermore, lots of nutrient-storage proteins, such as apolipophorin, vitellogenin, storage proteins, and 30 K proteins, were highly acetylated, indicating lysine acetylation may represent a common regulatory mechanism of nutrient utilization in the silkworm. Interestingly, Ser2 proteins, the coating proteins of larval silk, were found to contain many Kac sites, suggesting lysine acetylation may be involved in the regulation of larval silk synthesis. This study is the first to identify the acetylome in a lepidoptera insect, and expands greatly the catalog of lysine acetylation substrates and sites in insects.

  11. Replacement of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae acetyl-CoA synthetases by alternative pathways for cytosolic acetyl-CoA synthesis.

    PubMed

    Kozak, Barbara U; van Rossum, Harmen M; Benjamin, Kirsten R; Wu, Liang; Daran, Jean-Marc G; Pronk, Jack T; van Maris, Antonius J A

    2014-01-01

    Cytosolic acetyl-coenzyme A is a precursor for many biotechnologically relevant compounds produced by Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In this yeast, cytosolic acetyl-CoA synthesis and growth strictly depend on expression of either the Acs1 or Acs2 isoenzyme of acetyl-CoA synthetase (ACS). Since hydrolysis of ATP to AMP and pyrophosphate in the ACS reaction constrains maximum yields of acetyl-CoA-derived products, this study explores replacement of ACS by two ATP-independent pathways for acetyl-CoA synthesis. After evaluating expression of different bacterial genes encoding acetylating acetaldehyde dehydrogenase (A-ALD) and pyruvate-formate lyase (PFL), acs1Δ acs2Δ S. cerevisiae strains were constructed in which A-ALD or PFL successfully replaced ACS. In A-ALD-dependent strains, aerobic growth rates of up to 0.27 h(-1) were observed, while anaerobic growth rates of PFL-dependent S. cerevisiae (0.20 h(-1)) were stoichiometrically coupled to formate production. In glucose-limited chemostat cultures, intracellular metabolite analysis did not reveal major differences between A-ALD-dependent and reference strains. However, biomass yields on glucose of A-ALD- and PFL-dependent strains were lower than those of the reference strain. Transcriptome analysis suggested that reduced biomass yields were caused by acetaldehyde and formate in A-ALD- and PFL-dependent strains, respectively. Transcript profiles also indicated that a previously proposed role of Acs2 in histone acetylation is probably linked to cytosolic acetyl-CoA levels rather than to direct involvement of Acs2 in histone acetylation. While demonstrating that yeast ACS can be fully replaced, this study demonstrates that further modifications are needed to achieve optimal in vivo performance of the alternative reactions for supply of cytosolic acetyl-CoA as a product precursor. © 2013 The Authors. Published by International Metabolic Engineering Society on behalf of International Metabolic Engineering Society All rights

  12. Biochemical studies on a versatile esterase that is most catalytically active with polyaromatic esters

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Martínez, Mónica; Lores, Iván; Peña-García, Carlina; Bargiela, Rafael; Reyes-Duarte, Dolores; Guazzaroni, María-Eugenia; Peláez, Ana Isabel; Sánchez, Jesús; Ferrer, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    Herein, we applied a community genomic approach using a naphthalene-enriched community (CN1) to isolate a versatile esterase (CN1E1) from the α/β-hydrolase family. The protein shares low-to-medium identity (≤ 57%) with known esterase/lipase-like proteins. The enzyme is most active at 25–30°C and pH 8.5; it retains approximately 55% of its activity at 4°C and less than 8% at ≥ 55°C, which indicates that it is a cold-adapted enzyme. CN1E1 has a distinct substrate preference compared with other α/β-hydrolases because it is catalytically most active for hydrolysing polyaromatic hydrocarbon (phenanthrene, anthracene, naphthalene, benzoyl, protocatechuate and phthalate) esters (7200–21 000 units g−1 protein at 40°C and pH 8.0). The enzyme also accepts 44 structurally different common esters with different levels of enantio-selectivity (1.0–55 000 units g−1 protein), including (±)-menthyl-acetate, (±)-neomenthyl acetate, (±)-pantolactone, (±)-methyl-mandelate, (±)-methyl-lactate and (±)-glycidyl 4-nitrobenzoate (in that order). The results provide the first biochemical evidence suggesting that such broad-spectrum esterases may be an ecological advantage for bacteria that mineralize recalcitrant pollutants (including oil refinery products, plasticizers and pesticides) as carbon sources under pollution pressure. They also offer a new tool for the stereo-assembly (i.e. through ester bonds) of multi-aromatic molecules with benzene rings that are useful for biology, chemistry and materials sciences for cases in which enzyme methods are not yet available. PMID:24418210

  13. Purification and characterization of a highly thermostable esterase from the actinobacterium Geodermatophilus obscurus strain G20.

    PubMed

    Jaouani, Atef; Neifar, Mohamed; Hamza, Adnen; Chaabouni, Semia; Martinez, Maria Jesus; Gtari, Maher

    2012-12-01

    Intracellular thermostable esterase produced by the extremophilic Geodermatophilus obscurus G20 was purified to homogeneity by a heat treatment, followed by an anion-exchange chromatography, and then characterized. The molecular weight of the purified enzyme determined by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) was shown to be approximatively 55 kDa. The enzyme showed an optimal activity between pH 8.0 and 9.0 and was stable in the pH range 7.0-10.0. Moreover, it is highly thermostable, with a residual activity greater than 90% after incubation at 80 °C for more than 10 h. The enzyme showed preference for esters of p -nitrophenol with short chain fatty acid. When the p -nitrophenyl acetate (C2) was used as substrate, the Michaelis-Menten constant (K(m) ) and maximum velocity for the reaction (V(max) ) of esterase were 400 μM and 2500 U/mg protein, respectively. The effect of phenylmethanesulphonyl fluoride (PMSF), a serine-specific inhibitor, on the enzyme activity suggested that the thermostable esterase belong to the serine hydrolase group. Because of its high thermostability, activity at alkaline pH, tolerance to methanol and various metal ions and specificity for short chain fatty acids, this enzyme showed high potential for use in biocatalysis. (© 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim). Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Characterization of EST3: a metagenome-derived esterase with suitable properties for biotechnological applications.

    PubMed

    Maester, Thaís Carvalho; Pereira, Mariana Rangel; Machado Sierra, E G; Balan, Andrea; de Macedo Lemos, Eliana Gertrudes

    2016-07-01

    Metagenomic libraries from diverse environments have been extensive sources of many lipases and esterases; nevertheless, most of these enzymes remain biochemically uncharacterized. We previously built a metagenomic fosmid library from a microbial consortium specialized for diesel oil degradation and tested it for lipolytic activity. In the present study, we identified the PL14.H10 clone that was subcloned and sequenced, which enabled the identification of the EST3 protein. This enzyme exhibited 74 % amino acid identity with the uncharacterized alpha/beta hydrolase from Parvibaculum lavamentivorans [GenBank: WP012110575.1] and was classified into lipolytic enzyme family IV. Biochemical characterization revealed that EST3 presents high activity in a wide range of temperature with highest activity from 41 to 45 °C. Also, this thermostable esterase acts from mild acidic to alkaline conditions with an optimum pH of 6.0. The enzyme exhibited activity against p-nitrophenyl esters of different chain lengths and highest catalytic efficiency against p-nitrophenyl caprylate. The activity of the protein was increased in the presence of 0.5 mM of Mn(+2), Li(+), EDTA, and 1 % of CTAB and exhibited half of the activity in the presence of 10 % methanol and ethanol. Moreover, the homology model of EST3 was built and compared to other esterases, revealing a substrate channel that should fit a wide range of substrates. Taken together, the data presented in this work reveal the unique and interesting characteristics of EST3 that might be explored for further use in biotechnological applications.

  15. Structural insights into the substrate specificity of two esterases from the thermophilic Rhizomucor miehei

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Shaoqing; Qin, Zhen; Duan, Xiaojie; Yan, Qiaojuan; Jiang, Zhengqiang

    2015-01-01

    Two hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL) family esterases (RmEstA and RmEstB) from the thermophilic fungus Rhizomucor miehei, exhibiting distinct substrate specificity, have been recently reported to show great potential in industrial applications. In this study, the crystal structures of RmEstA and RmEstB were determined at 2.15 Å and 2.43 Å resolutions, respectively. The structures of RmEstA and RmEstB showed two distinctive domains, a catalytic domain and a cap domain, with the classical α/β-hydrolase fold. Catalytic triads consisting of residues Ser161, Asp262, and His292 in RmEstA, and Ser164, Asp261, and His291 in RmEstB were found in the respective canonical positions. Structural comparison of RmEstA and RmEstB revealed that their distinct substrate specificity might be attributed to their different substrate-binding pockets. The aromatic amino acids Phe222 and Trp92, located in the center of the substrate-binding pocket of RmEstB, blocked this pocket, thus narrowing its catalytic range for substrates (C2–C8). Two mutants (F222A and W92F in RmEstB) showing higher catalytic activity toward long-chain substrates further confirmed the hypothesized interference. This is the first report of HSL family esterase structures from filamentous fungi.jlr The information on structure-function relationships could open important avenues of exploration for further industrial applications of esterases. PMID:26108223

  16. Cloning and characterization of a novel thermostable esterase from Bacillus gelatini KACC 12197.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jinyeong; Deng, Lili; Hong, Eunsoo; Ryu, Yeonwoo

    2015-12-01

    A novel gene encoding a thermostable esterase (designated as Est-gela) was isolated from the moderate thermophile Bacillus gelatini KACC 12197. The open reading frame of this gene (1170 bp) encodes 389 amino acid residues, and the molecular weight of Est-gela is approximately 42 kDa. The protein sequence of Est-gela shows similarity with β-lactamases and esterases (⩽ 43%). Est-gela contains the Ser-X-X-Lys conserved sequence (Ser58-Met59-Thr60-Lys61) and belongs to family VIII of esterases. We overexpressed Est-gela in Escherichia coli XL1-blue and purified this protein using a His tag. Est-gela showed a strong enzymatic activity toward p-nitrophenyl esters with short acyl chains (⩽ C4) and the strongest activity toward p-nitrophenyl butyrate. Est-gela showed an enhanced enzymatic activity at 65-75 °C and retained more than 90% of the activity after incubation at 65 °C for 180 min. These results indicated that Est-gela was thermostable. In addition, Est-gela showed the maximal activity at pH 10. We also evaluated the effects of surfactants and organic solvents. Surfactants were more effective at improving the enzymatic activity than were organic solvents. Finally, Est-gela hydrolyzed (R,S)-ketoprofen ethyl ester (Kcat/Km = 5.0 ± 0.2 s(-1) mM(-1), mean ± standard error) with enantioselectivity toward (S)-ketoprofen ethyl ester rather than (R)-ketoprofen ethyl ester.

  17. Feruloyl esterase activity is influenced by bile, probiotic intestinal adhesion and milk fat.

    PubMed

    Mukdsi, M C Abeijón; Argañaraz Martínez, E; Chaia, A Perez; Medina, R B

    2016-09-01

    Cinnamoyl esterases (CE) are microbial and mammalian intestinal enzymes able to release antioxidant hydroxycinnamic acids from their non-digestible ester-linked forms naturally present in vegetable foods. Previous findings showed that oral administration of Lactobacillus fermentum CRL1446 increased intestinal CE activity and improved oxidative status in mice. The aim of this work was to evaluate the in vitro CE activity of L. fermentum CRL1446 and the effect of bile on this activity, as well as strain resistance to simulated gastrointestinal tract (GIT) conditions and its ability to adhere to intestinal epithelium and influence its basal CE activity. L. fermentum CRL1446 and L. fermentum ATCC14932 (positive control for CE activity) were able to hydrolyse different synthetic hydroxycinnamates, with higher specificity toward methyl ferulate (3,853.73 and 899.19 U/g, respectively). Feruloyl esterase (FE) activity was mainly intracellular in L. fermentum CRL1446 and cell-surface associated in L. fermentum ATCC14932. Both strains tolerated simulated GIT conditions and were able to adhere ex vivo to intestinal epithelium. Pre-incubation of L. fermentum strains with bile increased FE activity in both whole cells and supernatants (~2-fold), compared to controls, suggesting that cells were permeabilised by bile, allowing more substrate to enter the cell and/or leakage of FE enzymes. Three-fold higher FE activities were detected in intestinal tissue fragments with adhered L. fermentum CRL1446 cells compared to control fragments (without bacteria), indicating that this strain provides exogenous FE activity and could stimulate esterase activity in the intestinal mucosa. Finally, we found that milk fat had a negative effect on FE activity of intestinal tissue, in absence or presence of adhered L. fermentum. These results help explaining the increase in intestinal FE activity previously observed in mice fed with L. fermentum CRL1446, and support the potential use of this strain

  18. Expression of a fungal ferulic acid esterase in alfalfa modifies cell wall digestibility

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Alfalfa (Medicago sativa) is an important forage crop in North America owing to its high biomass production, perennial nature and ability to fix nitrogen. Feruloyl esterase (EC 3.1.1.73) hydrolyzes ester linkages in plant cell walls and has the potential to further improve alfalfa as biomass for biofuel production. Results In this study, faeB [GenBank:AJ309807] was synthesized at GenScript and sub-cloned into a novel pEACH vector containing different signaling peptides to target type B ferulic acid esterase (FAEB) proteins to the apoplast, chloroplast, endoplasmic reticulum and vacuole. Four constructs harboring faeB were transiently expressed in Nicotiana leaves, with FAEB accumulating at high levels in all target sites, except chloroplast. Stable transformed lines of alfalfa were subsequently obtained using Agrobacterium tumefaciens (LBA4404). Out of 136 transgenic plants regenerated, 18 independent lines exhibited FAEB activity. Subsequent in vitro digestibility and Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) analysis of FAEB-expressing lines showed that they possessed modified cell wall morphology and composition with a reduction in ester linkages and elevated lignin content. Consequently, they were more recalcitrant to digestion by mixed ruminal microorganisms. Interestingly, delignification by alkaline peroxide treatment followed by exposure to a commercial cellulase mixture resulted in higher glucose release from transgenic lines as compared to the control line. Conclusion Modifying cell wall crosslinking has the potential to lower recalcitrance of holocellulose, but also exhibited unintended consequences on alfalfa cell wall digestibility due to elevated lignin content. The combination of efficient delignification treatment (alkaline peroxide) and transgenic esterase activity complement each other towards efficient and effective digestion of transgenic lines. PMID:24650274

  19. A glucuronoyl esterase from Acremonium alcalophilum cleaves native lignin-carbohydrate ester bonds.

    PubMed

    Arnling Bååth, Jenny; Giummarella, Nicola; Klaubauf, Sylvia; Lawoko, Martin; Olsson, Lisbeth

    2016-08-01

    The Glucuronoyl esterases (GE) have been proposed to target lignin-carbohydrate (LC) ester bonds between lignin moieties and glucuronic acid side groups of xylan, but to date, no direct observations of enzymatic cleavage on native LC ester bonds have been demonstrated. In the present investigation, LCC fractions from spruce and birch were treated with a recombinantly produced GE originating from Acremonium alcalophilum (AaGE1). A combination of size exclusion chromatography and (31) P NMR analyses of phosphitylated LCC samples, before and after AaGE1 treatment provided the first evidence for cleavage of the LC ester linkages existing in wood.

  20. A Novel Alkaliphilic Bacillus Esterase Belongs to the 13th Bacterial Lipolytic Enzyme Family

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Lang; Xue, Yanfen; Zheng, Yingying; Lu, Jian R.; Ma, Yanhe

    2013-01-01

    Background Microbial derived lipolytic hydrolysts are an important class of biocatalysts because of their huge abundance and ability to display bioactivities under extreme conditions. In spite of recent advances, our understanding of these enzymes remains rudimentary. The aim of our research is to advance our understanding by seeking for more unusual lipid hydrolysts and revealing their molecular structure and bioactivities. Methodology/Principal Findings Bacillus. pseudofirmus OF4 is an extreme alkaliphile with tolerance of pH up to 11. In this work we successfully undertook a heterologous expression of a gene estof4 from the alkaliphilic B. pseudofirmus sp OF4. The recombinant protein called EstOF4 was purified into a homologous product by Ni-NTA affinity and gel filtration. The purified EstOF4 was active as dimer with the molecular weight of 64 KDa. It hydrolyzed a wide range of substrates including p-nitrophenyl esters (C2–C12) and triglycerides (C2–C6). Its optimal performance occurred at pH 8.5 and 50°C towards p-nitrophenyl caproate and triacetin. Sequence alignment revealed that EstOF4 shared 71% identity to esterase Est30 from Geobacillus stearothermophilus with a typical lipase pentapeptide motif G91LS93LG95. A structural model developed from homology modeling revealed that EstOF4 possessed a typical esterase 6α/7β hydrolase fold and a cap domain. Site-directed mutagenesis and inhibition studies confirmed the putative catalytic triad Ser93, Asp190 and His220. Conclusion EstOF4 is a new bacterial esterase with a preference to short chain ester substrates. With a high sequence identity towards esterase Est30 and several others, EstOF4 was classified into the same bacterial lipolytic family, Family XIII. All the members in this family originate from the same bacterial genus, bacillus and display optimal activities from neutral pH to alkaline conditions with short and middle chain length substrates. However, with roughly 70% sequence identity, these

  1. An integron cassette encoding erythromycin esterase, ere(A), from Providencia stuartii.

    PubMed

    Plante, Isabelle; Centrón, Daniela; Roy, Paul H

    2003-04-01

    We have mapped the variable region of the two class 1 integrons found in the multiresistant strain Providencia stuartii 1723. Integron 1 contains a new arrangement of gene cassettes, aacA4-aadB-aadA1, conferring resistance to all aminoglycosides used for clinical treatment. Integron 2 contains a variant of the gene cassette ere(A), coding for an erythromycin esterase, whose nucleotide sequence shares 93.7% DNA identity with ere(A) from Escherichia coli BM2195 plasmid pIP1100.

  2. Identification of a heroin esterase in Rhodococcus sp. strain H1.

    PubMed Central

    Cameron, G W; Jordan, K N; Holt, P J; Baker, P B; Lowe, C R; Bruce, N C

    1994-01-01

    A strain of a Rhodococcus sp. (termed H1) capable of utilizing heroin as its sole carbon and energy source was isolated by selective enrichment. An inducible heroin esterase was partially purified and shown to catalyze the hydrolysis of both of the acetylester groups of heroin. The enzyme displays optimum activity at pH 8.5 and appears to be a trimer of identical subunits with an M(r) or 39,000 and a native M(r) of 120,000. PMID:7986057

  3. Effects on operant learning and brain acetylcholine esterase activity in rats following chronic inorganic arsenic intake.

    PubMed

    Nagaraja, T N; Desiraju, T

    1994-05-01

    1. Very young and adult Wistar rats were given As5+, 5 mg arsenic kg-1 body weight day-1 (sodium arsenate). 2. Operant learning was tested in a Skinner box at the end of exposure and, in the case of developing animals, also after a recovery period. 3. Acetylcholine esterase (AChE) activity was estimated in discrete brain regions of these animals. 4. The animals exposed to arsenic took longer to acquire the learned behaviour and to extinguish the operant. AChE activity was inhibited in some regions of the brain.

  4. Benzoyl-L-arginine methyl ester (BAME)-esterase activity in human plasma during the gravidic-puerperal cycle.

    PubMed

    Salles Meirelles, R

    1977-01-01

    Benzoyl-L-arginine methyl ester (BAME)-esterase activity of plasma was measured in women going through the gravidic-puerperal cycle and compared with plasma of non-pregnant women. Plasma from women in the 36th to 40th week of pregnancy hydrolyzes BAME two times more rapidly than that from non-pregnant women. During pregnancy, BAME-esterase activity in plasma increases progressively up to the 40th week, decreases during labor, and after delivery reaches the same level as in non-pregnant women. The BAME-esterase activity of plasma was affected by the storage temperature, with differences demonstrable between -20 and -4 C and between pregnant and non-pregnant women.

  5. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of the glucuronoyl esterase catalytic domain from Hypocrea jecorina

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, S. J.; Li, X.-L.; Cotta, M. A.; Biely, P.; Duke, N. E. C.; Schiffer, M.; Pokkuluri, P. R.

    2008-04-01

    The catalytic domain of the glucuronoyl esterase from H. jecorina was overexpresssed, purified and crystallized in space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}. X-ray diffraction data were collected to 1.9 Å resolution. The catalytic domain of the glucuronoyl esterase from Hypocrea jecorina (anamorph Trichoderma reesei) was overexpresssed, purified and crystallized by the sitting-drop vapor-diffusion method using 1.4 M sodium/potassium phosphate pH 6.9. The crystals belonged to space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1} and X-ray diffraction data were collected to 1.9 Å resolution. This is the first enzyme with glucoronoyl esterase activity to be crystallized; its structure will be valuable in lignocellulose-degradation research.

  6. Determination of the distributions of degrees of acetylation of chitosan.

    PubMed

    Thevarajah, Joel Jerushan; Van Leeuwen, Matthew Paul; Cottet, Herve; Castignolles, Patrice; Gaborieau, Marianne

    2017-02-01

    Chitosan is often characterized by its average degree of acetylation. To increase chitosan's use in various industries, a more thorough characterization is necessary as the acetylation of chitosan affects properties such as dissolution and mechanical properties of chitosan films. Despite the poor solubility of chitosan, free solution capillary electrophoresis (CE) allows a robust separation of chitosan by the degree of acetylation. The distribution of degrees of acetylation of various chitosan samples was characterized through their distributions of electrophoretic mobilities. These distributions can be obtained easily and with high precision. The heterogeneity of the chitosan chains in terms of acetylation was characterized through the dispersity of the electrophoretic mobility distributions obtained. The relationship between the number-average degree of acetylation obtained by solid-state NMR spectroscopy and the weight-average electrophoretic mobilities was established. The distribution of degrees of acetylation was determined using capillary electrophoresis in the critical conditions (CE-CC). Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Acetylation of Tau Inhibits Its Degradation and Contributes to Tauopathy

    PubMed Central

    Min, Sang-Won; Cho, Seo-Hyun; Zhou, Yungui; Schroeder, Sebastian; Haroutunian, Vahram; Seeley, William W.; Huang, Eric J.; Shen, Yong; Masliah, Eliezer; Mukherjee, Chandrani; Meyers, David; Cole, Philip A.; Ott, Melanie; Gan, Li

    2011-01-01

    Summary Neurodegenerative tauopathies characterized by hyperphosphorylated tau include frontotemporal dementia and parkinsonism linked to chromosome 17 (FTDP-17) and Alzheimer's disease (AD). Reducing tau levels improves cognitive function in mouse models of AD and FTDP-17, but the mechanisms regulating the turnover of pathogenic tau are unknown. We found that tau is acetylated and that tau acetylation prevents degradation of phosphorylated tau (p-tau). Using two antibodies specific for acetylated tau, we showed that tau acetylation is elevated in patients at early and moderate Braak stages of tauopathy. Histone acetyltransferase p300 was involved in tau acetylation and the class III protein deacetylase SIRT1 in deacetylation. Deleting SIRT1 enhanced levels of acetylated-tau and pathogenic forms of p-tau in vivo, likely by blocking proteasome-mediated degradation. Inhibiting p300 with a small molecule promoted tau deacetylation and eliminated p-tau associated with tauopathy. Modulating tau acetylation could be a new therapeutic strategy to reduce tau-mediated neurodegeneration. PMID:20869593

  8. Chitosan Molecular Structure as a Function of N-Acetylation

    SciTech Connect

    Franca, Eduardo F.; Freitas, Luiz C.; Lins, Roberto D.

    2011-07-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations have been carried out to characterize the structure and solubility of chitosan nanoparticle-like structures as a function of the deacetylation level (0, 40, 60, and 100%) and the spatial distribution of the N-acetyl groups in the particles. The polysaccharide chains of highly N-deacetylated particles where the N-acetyl groups are uniformly distributed present a high flexibility and preference for the relaxed two-fold helix and five-fold helix motifs. When these groups are confined to a given region of the particle, the chains adopt preferentially a two-fold helix with f and w values close to crystalline chitin. Nanoparticles with up to 40% acetylation are moderately soluble, forming stable aggregates when the N-acetyl groups are unevenly distributed. Systems with 60% or higher N-acetylation levels are insoluble and present similar degrees of swelling regardless the distribution of their N-acetyl groups. Overall particle solvation is highly affected by electrostatic forces resulting from the degree of acetylation. The water mobility and orientation around the polysaccharide chains affects the stability of the intramolecular O3- HO3(n) ... O5(n+ 1) hydrogen bond, which in turn controls particle aggregation.

  9. Histone Acetylation Inhibitors Promote Axon Growth in Adult DRG neurons

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Shen; Nazif, Kutaiba; Smith, Alexander; Baas, Peter W; Smith, George M

    2015-01-01

    Intrinsic mechanisms that guide damaged axons to regenerate following spinal cord injury remain poorly understood. Manipulation of posttranslational modifications of key proteins in mature neurons could re-invigorate growth machinery after injury. One such modification is acetylation, a reversible process controlled by two enzyme families acting in opposition, the Histone Deacetylases (HDACs) and the Histone Acetyl Transferases (HATs). While acetylated histones in the nucleus is associated with upregulation of growth promoting genes, de-acetylated tubulin in the axoplasm is associated with more labile microtubules, conducive to axon growth. In this study we investigated the effects of HAT inhibitors and HDAC inhibitors on cultured adult dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons. We found that inhibition of HATs, using Anacardic Acid or CPTH2, improved axon outgrowth, while inhibition of HDACs using TSA or Tubacin, inhibited axon growth. Furthermore, Anacardic Acid increased the number of axons able to cross an inhibitory chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan (CSPG) border. Histone acetylation, but not tubulin acetylation levels, was affected by HAT inhibitors, whereas tubulin acetylation levels were increased in the presence of HDAC inhibitor Tubacin. Although microtubule stabilizing drug taxol did not have an effect on the lengths of DRG axons, nocodazole decreased axon lengths. While the mechanistic basis will require future studies, our data show that inhibitors of HAT can augment axon growth in adult DRG neurons, with the potential of aiding axon growth over inhibitory substrates produced by the glial scar. PMID:25702820

  10. A novel feruloyl esterase from rumen microbial metagenome: Gene cloning and enzyme characterization in the release of mono- and diferulic acids

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A feruloyl esterase (FAE) gene was isolated from a rumen microbial metagenome, cloned into E. coli, and expressed in active form. The enzyme (RuFae4) was classified as a Type D feruloyl esterase based on its action on synthetic substrates and ability to release diferulates. The RuFae4 alone releas...

  11. Overexpression of two α-esterase genes mediates metabolic resistance to malathion in the oriental fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel).

    PubMed

    Wang, L-L; Huang, Y; Lu, X-P; Jiang, X-Z; Smagghe, G; Feng, Z-J; Yuan, G-R; Wei, D; Wang, J-J

    2015-08-01

    Esterase has been reported to be involved in malathion resistance in the oriental fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel). However, the underlying molecular mechanism of the esterase-mediated resistance remains largely unknown in this species. Here, with the use of a strain selected for malathion resistance in the laboratory (MR), we found that two overexpressed α-esterase genes, namely BdCarE4 and BdCarE6, predominant in the adult midgut and fat body, function in conferring malathion resistance in B. dorsalis. Notably, these two genes were found to be mostly close to the esterase E3, which are usually implicated in detoxifying organophosphate insecticides. The transcript levels of BdCarE4 and BdCarE6 were investigated and compared between the MR and a susceptible (MS) strain of B. dorsalis. Both genes were significantly up-regulated in the MR strain, which was consistent with the enhanced esterase activity in the MR strain. However, no changes in either the coding sequence or gene copy number were observed between the two strains. Subsequently, heterologous expression combined with cytotoxicity assay in Sf9 cells demonstrated that BdCarE4 and BdCarE6 can probably detoxify malathion. Furthermore, RNA interference-mediated knockdown of each of these two genes significantly increased malathion susceptibility in the MR strain adults. In conclusion, these results expand our molecular understanding of the important role of α-esterases during the development of resistance to organophosphorous insecticides in B. dorsalis. © 2015 The Royal Entomological Society.

  12. Est10: A Novel Alkaline Esterase Isolated from Bovine Rumen Belonging to the New Family XV of Lipolytic Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez, María Cecilia; Loaces, Inés; Amarelle, Vanesa; Senatore, Daniella; Iriarte, Andrés; Fabiano, Elena; Noya, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    A metagenomic fosmid library from bovine rumen was used to identify clones with lipolytic activity. One positive clone was isolated. The gene responsible for the observed phenotype was identified by in vitro transposon mutagenesis and sequencing and was named est10. The 367 amino acids sequence harbors a signal peptide, the conserved secondary structure arrangement of alpha/beta hydrolases, and a GHSQG pentapeptide which is characteristic of esterases and lipases. Homology based 3D-modelling confirmed the conserved spatial orientation of the serine in a nucleophilic elbow. By sequence comparison, Est10 is related to hydrolases that are grouped into the non-specific Pfam family DUF3089 and to other characterized esterases that were recently classified into the new family XV of lipolytic enzymes. Est10 was heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli as a His-tagged fusion protein, purified and biochemically characterized. Est10 showed maximum activity towards C4 aliphatic chains and undetectable activity towards C10 and longer chains which prompted its classification as an esterase. However, it was able to efficiently catalyze the hydrolysis of aryl esters such as methyl phenylacetate and phenyl acetate. The optimum pH of this enzyme is 9.0, which is uncommon for esterases, and it exhibits an optimal temperature at 40°C. The activity of Est10 was inhibited by metal ions, detergents, chelating agents and additives. We have characterized an alkaline esterase produced by a still unidentified bacterium belonging to a recently proposed new family of esterases. PMID:25973851

  13. Obesity, cancer, and acetyl-CoA metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Joyce V.; Shah, Supriya A.; Wellen, Kathryn E.

    2013-01-01

    As rates of obesity soar in the Unites States and around the world, cancer attributed to obesity has emerged as major threat to public health. The link between obesity and cancer can be attributed in part to the state of chronic inflammation that develops in obesity. Acetyl-CoA production and protein acetylation patterns are highly sensitive to metabolic state and are significantly altered in obesity. In this article, we explore the potential role of nutrient-sensitive lysine acetylation in regulating inflammatory processes in obesity-linked cancer. PMID:23878588

  14. Erasers of Histone Acetylation: The Histone Deacetylase Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Seto, Edward; Yoshida, Minoru

    2014-01-01

    Histone deacetylases (HDACs) are enzymes that catalyze the removal of acetyl functional groups from the lysine residues of both histone and nonhistone proteins. In humans, there are 18 HDAC enzymes that use either zinc- or NAD+-dependent mechanisms to deacetylate acetyl lysine substrates. Although removal of histone acetyl epigenetic modification by HDACs regulates chromatin structure and transcription, deacetylation of nonhistones controls diverse cellular processes. HDAC inhibitors are already known potential anticancer agents and show promise for the treatment of many diseases. PMID:24691964

  15. Acetylation of cellulose nanowhiskers with vinyl acetate under moderate conditions.

    PubMed

    Cetin, Nihat Sami; Tingaut, Philippe; Ozmen, Nilgül; Henry, Nathan; Harper, David; Dadmun, Mark; Sèbe, Gilles

    2009-10-08

    A novel and straightforward method for the surface acetylation of cellulose nanowhiskers by transesterification of vinyl acetate is proposed. The reaction of vinyl acetate with the hydroxyl groups of cellulose nanowhiskers obtained from cotton linters was examined with potassium carbonate as catalyst. Results indicate that during the first stage of the reaction, only the surface of the nanowhiskers was modified, while their dimensions and crystallinity remained unchanged. With increasing reaction time, diffusion mechanisms controlled the rate, leading to nanowhiskers with higher levels of acetylation, smaller dimensions, and lower crystallinity. In THF, a solvent of low polarity, the suspensions from modified nanowhiskers showed improved stability with increased acetylation.

  16. Structural Basis of Eco1-Mediated Cohesin Acetylation

    PubMed Central

    Chao, William C. H.; Wade, Benjamin O.; Bouchoux, Céline; Jones, Andrew W.; Purkiss, Andrew G.; Federico, Stefania; O’Reilly, Nicola; Snijders, Ambrosius P.; Uhlmann, Frank; Singleton, Martin R.

    2017-01-01

    Sister-chromatid cohesion is established by Eco1-mediated acetylation on two conserved tandem lysines in the cohesin Smc3 subunit. However, the molecular basis of Eco1 substrate recognition and acetylation in cohesion is not fully understood. Here, we discover and rationalize the substrate specificity of Eco1 using mass spectrometry coupled with in-vitro acetylation assays and crystallography. Our structures of the X. laevis Eco2 (xEco2) bound to its primary and secondary Smc3 substrates demonstrate the plasticity of the substrate-binding site, which confers substrate specificity by concerted conformational changes of the central β hairpin and the C-terminal extension. PMID:28290497

  17. Functional characterization of a novel microbial esterase identified from the Indian Ocean and its use in the stereoselective preparation of ( R)-methyl mandelate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Jiayuan; Sun, Aijun; Zhang, Yun; Deng, Dun; Wang, Yongfei; Ma, Sanmei; Hu, Yunfeng

    2016-11-01

    Genomic mining has identified a novel microbial alkaline esterase from the Indian Ocean. This esterase was overexpressed in E. coli BL21 (DE3) and further functionally characterized. Under optimal conditions (10 mmol/L substrate, pH 6.0, 2 h at 40 °C), this esterase can hydrolyze racemic methyl mandelate to ( R)-methyl mandelate with very high optical purity ( e.e. >99%) and yield (nearly 90%). Interestingly, the stereoselectivity of this esterase is opposite to that of two previously reported lipases that can generate ( S)-methyl mandelate through the hydrolysis of racemic methyl mandelate. No organic solvents or other additives were required to optimize the optical purity and production of the final chiral product ( R)-methyl mandelate, which can potentially simplify the production procedure of ( R)-methyl mandelate catalyzed by esterase.

  18. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of the glucuronoyl esterase catalytic domain from Hypocrea jecorina.

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, S. J.; Li, X. -L.; Cotta, M. A.; Biely, P.; Duke, N. E. C.; Schiffer, M.; Pokkuluri, P. R.; Biosciences Division; National Center for Agricultural Utilization Research; Slovak Academy of Sciences

    2008-01-01

    The catalytic domain of the glucuronoyl esterase from Hypocrea jecorina (anamorph Trichoderma reesei) was overexpresssed, purified and crystallized by the sitting-drop vapor-diffusion method using 1.4 M sodium/potassium phosphate pH 6.9. The crystals belonged to space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1} and X-ray diffraction data were collected to 1.9 {angstrom} resolution. This is the first enzyme with glucoronoyl esterase activity to be crystallized; its structure will be valuable in lignocellulose-degradation research.

  19. Nε- and O-Acetylation in Mycobacterium tuberculosis Lineage 7 and Lineage 4 strains: Proteins Involved in Bioenergetics, Virulence and Antimicrobial Resistance are Acetylated.

    PubMed

    Birhanu, Alemayehu Godana; Yimer, Solomon Abebe; Holm-Hansen, Carol; Norheim, Gunnstein; Aseffa, Abraham; Abebe, Markos; Tønjum, Tone

    2017-09-18

    Increasing evidence demonstrates that lysine acetylation is involved in Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) virulence and pathogenesis. However, previous investigations in Mtb have only monitored acetylation at lysine residues using selected reference strains. We analyzed the global Nε- and O-acetylation of 3 Mtb isolates; 2 lineage 7 clinical isolates and the lineage 4 H37Rv reference strain. Quantitative acetylome analysis resulted in identification of 2490 class-I acetylation sites, among them 2349 O-acetylation and 141 Nε-acetylation sites, derived from 953 unique proteins. Mtb O-acetylation was thereby significantly more abundant than Nε-acetylation. The acetylated proteins were found to be involved in central metabolism, translation, stress responses and antimicrobial drug resistance. Notably, 261 acetylation sites on 165 proteins were differentially regulated between lineage 7 and lineage 4 strains. A total of 257 acetylation sites on 161 proteins were hypoacetylated in lineage 7 strains. These proteins are involved in Mtb growth, virulence, bioenergetics, host-pathogen interaction and stress responses. This study provides the first global analysis of O-acetylated proteins in Mtb. This quantitative acetylome data expand the current understanding regarding the nature and diversity of acetylated proteins in Mtb, and opens a new avenue of research for exploring the role of protein acetylation in Mtb physiology.

  20. 9-O-Acetylation of sialic acids is catalysed by CASD1 via a covalent acetyl-enzyme intermediate

    PubMed Central

    Baumann, Anna-Maria T.; Bakkers, Mark J. G.; Buettner, Falk F. R.; Hartmann, Maike; Grove, Melanie; Langereis, Martijn A.; de Groot, Raoul J.; Mühlenhoff, Martina

    2015-01-01

    Sialic acids, terminal sugars of glycoproteins and glycolipids, play important roles in development, cellular recognition processes and host–pathogen interactions. A common modification of sialic acids is 9-O-acetylation, which has been implicated in sialoglycan recognition, ganglioside biology, and the survival and drug resistance of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia cells. Despite many functional implications, the molecular basis of 9-O-acetylation has remained elusive thus far. Following cellular approaches, including selective gene knockout by CRISPR/Cas genome editing, we here show that CASD1—a previously identified human candidate gene—is essential for sialic acid 9-O-acetylation. In vitro assays with the purified N-terminal luminal domain of CASD1 demonstrate transfer of acetyl groups from acetyl-coenzyme A to CMP-activated sialic acid and formation of a covalent acetyl-enzyme intermediate. Our study provides direct evidence that CASD1 is a sialate O-acetyltransferase and serves as key enzyme in the biosynthesis of 9-O-acetylated sialoglycans. PMID:26169044

  1. Acetylation of Mammalian ADA3 Is Required for Its Functional Roles in Histone Acetylation and Cell Proliferation.

    PubMed

    Mohibi, Shakur; Srivastava, Shashank; Bele, Aditya; Mirza, Sameer; Band, Hamid; Band, Vimla

    2016-10-01

    Alteration/deficiency in activation 3 (ADA3) is an essential component of specific histone acetyltransferase (HAT) complexes. We have previously shown that ADA3 is required for establishing global histone acetylation patterns and for normal cell cycle progression (S. Mohibi et al., J Biol Chem 287:29442-29456, 2012, http://dx.doi.org/10.1074/jbc.M112.378901). Here, we report that these functional roles of ADA3 require its acetylation. We show that ADA3 acetylation, which is dynamically regulated in a cell cycle-dependent manner, reflects a balance of coordinated actions of its associated HATs, GCN5, PCAF, and p300, and a new partner that we define, the deacetylase SIRT1. We use mass spectrometry and site-directed mutagenesis to identify major sites of ADA3 acetylated by GCN5 and p300. Acetylation-defective mutants are capable of interacting with HATs and other components of HAT complexes but are deficient in their ability to restore ADA3-dependent global or locus-specific histone acetylation marks and cell proliferation in Ada3-deleted murine embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs). Given the key importance of ADA3-containing HAT complexes in the regulation of various biological processes, including the cell cycle, our study presents a novel mechanism to regulate the function of these complexes through dynamic ADA3 acetylation.

  2. Acetylation of Mammalian ADA3 Is Required for Its Functional Roles in Histone Acetylation and Cell Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Mohibi, Shakur; Srivastava, Shashank; Bele, Aditya; Mirza, Sameer; Band, Hamid

    2016-01-01

    Alteration/deficiency in activation 3 (ADA3) is an essential component of specific histone acetyltransferase (HAT) complexes. We have previously shown that ADA3 is required for establishing global histone acetylation patterns and for normal cell cycle progression (S. Mohibi et al., J Biol Chem 287:29442–29456, 2012, http://dx.doi.org/10.1074/jbc.M112.378901). Here, we report that these functional roles of ADA3 require its acetylation. We show that ADA3 acetylation, which is dynamically regulated in a cell cycle-dependent manner, reflects a balance of coordinated actions of its associated HATs, GCN5, PCAF, and p300, and a new partner that we define, the deacetylase SIRT1. We use mass spectrometry and site-directed mutagenesis to identify major sites of ADA3 acetylated by GCN5 and p300. Acetylation-defective mutants are capable of interacting with HATs and other components of HAT complexes but are deficient in their ability to restore ADA3-dependent global or locus-specific histone acetylation marks and cell proliferation in Ada3-deleted murine embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs). Given the key importance of ADA3-containing HAT complexes in the regulation of various biological processes, including the cell cycle, our study presents a novel mechanism to regulate the function of these complexes through dynamic ADA3 acetylation. PMID:27402865

  3. An Esterase from Anaerobic Clostridium hathewayi Can Hydrolyze Aliphatic-Aromatic Polyesters.

    PubMed

    Perz, Veronika; Hromic, Altijana; Baumschlager, Armin; Steinkellner, Georg; Pavkov-Keller, Tea; Gruber, Karl; Bleymaier, Klaus; Zitzenbacher, Sabine; Zankel, Armin; Mayrhofer, Claudia; Sinkel, Carsten; Kueper, Ulf; Schlegel, Katharina; Ribitsch, Doris; Guebitz, Georg M

    2016-03-15

    Recently, a variety of biodegradable polymers have been developed as alternatives to recalcitrant materials. Although many studies on polyester biodegradability have focused on aerobic environments, there is much less known on biodegradation of polyesters in natural and artificial anaerobic habitats. Consequently, the potential of anaerobic biogas sludge to hydrolyze the synthetic compostable polyester PBAT (poly(butylene adipate-co-butylene terephthalate) was evaluated in this study. On the basis of reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC) analysis, accumulation of terephthalic acid (Ta) was observed in all anaerobic batches within the first 14 days. Thereafter, a decline of Ta was observed, which occurred presumably due to consumption by the microbial population. The esterase Chath_Est1 from the anaerobic risk 1 strain Clostridium hathewayi DSM-13479 was found to hydrolyze PBAT. Detailed characterization of this esterase including elucidation of the crystal structure was performed. The crystal structure indicates that Chath_Est1 belongs to the α/β-hydrolases family. This study gives a clear hint that also micro-organisms in anaerobic habitats can degrade manmade PBAT.

  4. Evaluation of fitness components in strains of Drosophila mulleri carrying different genotypes for an esterase.

    PubMed

    Lourenço, M F; Ceron, C R; Carareto, C M

    2001-01-01

    Several fitness components in strains of Drosophila mulleri carrying the slow or the fast alleles for the major beta esterase (esterase-4) found in this species, as well as in heterozygous flies in which the slow or fast alleles came from one of the parents, were evaluated. Twelve components were analysed including longevity of both virgins and mated males and females, productivity, viability, including the egg-larva, egg-pupa, egg-imago and pupa-imago periods. These parameters were used to estimate the total fitness for each genotype. The best score was reached by individuals having the Est-4S/Est-4S genotype (scored at 1.000), followed by a fitness value of 0.892 presented by the Est-4F/Est-4S genotype (with the fast allele from maternal origin), 0.863 for the Est-4F/Est-4F and 0.842 for the Est-4S/Est-4Fgenotypes (with Est-4F of maternal origin). These results suggested a higher relative adaptability of the Est-4S/Est-4S genotype followed by the Est-4F/Est-4S hybrid that possessed the allele Est-4S of maternal origin, which was incompatible with predictions of neutral polymorphism.

  5. Esterase activity of lactic acid bacteria isolated from malolactic fermentation of red wines.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Martín, Fátima; Seseña, Susana; Izquierdo, Pedro Miguel; Palop, María Llanos

    2013-05-15

    The goal of this study was to examine the esterase activity of 243 lactic acid bacteria (LAB) strains from wines of different red grape varieties, belonging to the genera Oenococcus, Lactobacillus, Pediococcus and Enterococcus. p-Nitrophenyl octanoate was used as substrate. All strains presented esterase activity in the first screening, but only those showing higher activity were used in subsequent studies to determine the cellular location of this activity, the influence of pH, temperature and the presence of ethanol and the substrate specificity. For the thirteen selected strains, the highest activity was observed in the intracellular fraction. Responses to pH, temperature and ethanol were strain-dependent, but for all the strains, a marked decrease in activity in presence of ethanol was observed. When the influence of pH and ethanol acting together was studied at 25 °C and 37 °C, temperature-dependent differences were not observed for any of the strains except for Oen6. In the substrate specificity assay, the majority of strains of all genera displayed a trend to more readily hydrolyse ester substrates from C8 and longer.

  6. Diet quality determines lipase gene expression and lipase/esterase activity in Daphnia pulex

    PubMed Central

    Schwarzenberger, Anke; Wacker, Alexander

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT We studied the short- (12 h) and long-term (144 h) response of Daphnia pulex lipases to quality shifts in diets consisting of different mixtures of the green alga Scenedesmus with the cyanobacterium Synechococcus, two species with contrasting lipid compositions. The lipase/esterase activity in both the gut and the body tissues had fast responses to the diet shift and increased with higher dietary contributions of Synechococcus. When screening the Daphnia genome for TAG lipases, we discovered a large gene-family expansion of these enzymes. We used a subset of eight genes for mRNA expression analyses and distinguished between influences of time and diet on the observed gene expression patterns. We identified five diet-responsive lipases of which three showed a sophisticated short- and long-term pattern of expression in response to small changes in food-quality. Furthermore, the gene expression of one of the lipases was strongly correlated to lipase/esterase activity in the gut suggesting its potentially major role in digestion. These findings demonstrate that the lipid-related enzymatic machinery of D. pulex is finely tuned to diet and might constitute an important mechanism of physiological adaptation in nutritionally complex environments. PMID:28069588

  7. New mutations in C1 esterase inhibitor (SERPING1) in a German family with hereditary angioedema.

    PubMed

    El-Meguid, Aly M A; Aslanidis, Charalampos; Schimanski, Seven; Schambeck, Christian; Schmitz, Gerd

    2008-01-01

    Hereditary angioedema (HAE) is a genetically dominant clinical disorder characterized by recurrent, acute oedema of the skin or mucosa, usually involving the extremities, face, larynx and gastrointestinal tract. C1 inhibitor (C1inh) deficiency is linked to the development of HAE, either by decrease of its plasma level or presence of a dysfunctional protein. The purpose of this study was to identify the genetic abnormality of C1inh in three patients with HAE (mother and her two children). Analysis was carried out using PCR, and direct sequencing of genomic DNA obtained from whole peripheral blood. DNA sequencing of the eight exons of the C1 esterase inhibitor gene (SERPING1) revealed one mutation and one polymorphism in the mother and the two children. The polymorphism was a heterozygous GTG 458 ATG (Val 458 Met) in exon 8 and the mutation was a one-nucleotide deletion in codon 456 in Exon 8. This frameshift mutation (CTC456(power)TC) leads to a 45 amino acid larger protein with altered protein sequence and should be regarded as the causative defect in the patients. It is concluded, that heterozygous frameshift mutation at exon 8 alters the protein sequence of the C1 esterase inhibitor, leading to inactive protein in all three patients analyzed.

  8. Degradation of mouse NTE-related esterase by macroautophagy and the proteasome.

    PubMed

    Chang, Ping-An; Chen, Yu-Ying; Long, Ding-Xin; Qin, Wen-Zhen; Mou, Xiao-Ling

    2012-06-01

    NTE-related esterase (NRE) is a novel endoplasmic reticulum-anchored lysophospholipase with high homology to neuropathy target esterase (NTE). However, little is known about the regulation of NRE protein. In the current study, we investigated the degradation pathways of mouse NRE (mNRE) in mammalian cells. Based on experiments with inhibitors and inducer of protein degradation pathways, we provide here the first evidence that mNRE is degraded by macroautophagy as well as by the proteasome. Moreover, the contribution of protein domains to the degradation of mNRE was investigated, which showed that the transmembrane and regulatory domain played a role in the degradation of mNRE by macroautophagy and the proteasome respectively. In contrast the C-terminal catalytic domain was not involved in both degradation pathways of mNRE. These findings showed for the first time that the degradation pathways in controlling mNRE quantity and may provide further insight into structure and regulation of mNRE.

  9. Comparative intestinal esterases amongst passerine species: Assessing vulnerability to toxic chemicals in a phylogenetically explicit context.

    PubMed

    Narvaez, Cristobal; Ramirez-Otarola, Natalia; Bozinovic, Francisco; Sanchez-Hernandez, Juan C; Sabat, Pablo

    2015-09-01

    Inhibition of blood esterase activities by organophosphate (OP) pesticides has been used as a sensitive biomarker in birds. Furthermore, compared to mammalian vertebrates, less is known about the role of these enzyme activities in the digestive tracts of non-mammalian vertebrates, as well as the environmental and biological stressors that contribute to their natural variation. To fill this gap, we examined butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) and carboxylesterases (CbE) in the digestive tracts of sixteen passerine species from central Chile. Whole intestine enzyme activities were positively and significantly correlated with body mass. After correcting for body mass and phylogenetic effect, we found only a marginal effect of dietary category on BChE activity, but a positive and significant association between the percentage of dietary nitrogen and the mass-corrected lipase activity. Our results suggest that observed differences may be due to the dietary composition in the case of lipases and BChE, and also we predict that all model species belonging to the same order will probably respond differently to pesticide exposure, in light of differences in the activity levels of esterase activities. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Crystallization and preliminary crystallographic studies of the metalloglycoprotein esterase A4 using a baculovirus expression system

    SciTech Connect

    Hiraki, Toshiki; Shibayama, Naoya; Yoon, Young-Ho; Yun, Kyung-Mook; Hamamoto, Toshiro; Tame, Jeremy R. H.; Park, Sam-Yong

    2007-09-01

    Esterase A4 (EA4) is a timer protein found in diapause eggs of the silkworm Bombyx mori. The gene for this metalloglycoprotein was cloned from B. mori eggs and expressed using a baculovirus expression system in silkworm pupae. Crystals of the purified protein have been grown that diffract to beyond 2.1 Å resolution at 100 K using synchrotron radiation. Esterase A4 (EA4) is a timer protein found in diapause eggs of the silkworm Bombyx mori. The gene for this metalloglycoprotein was cloned from B. mori eggs and expressed using a baculovirus expression system in silkworm pupae. Crystals of the purified protein have been grown that diffract to beyond 2.1 Å resolution at 100 K using synchrotron radiation. The protein crystals belong to space group P2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 47.1, b = 73.9, c = 47.4 Å, β = 104.1°. With one dimer per asymmetric unit, the crystal volume per unit protein weight (V{sub M}) is 2.3 Å{sup 3} Da{sup −1} and the solvent content is 47%.

  11. Purification and characterization of a pregastric esterase from a hygienized kid rennet paste.

    PubMed

    Calvo, M V; Fontecha, J

    2004-05-01

    Rennet pastes obtained by maceration of gastric tissues from suckling kids are used traditionally to produce some artisanal cheeses in Spain. Besides milk-clotting function, rennet pastes provide proteolytic activity and lipolytic system, essentially pregastric, necessary in the development of piquant flavor typical of these cheeses. A simple and reproducible procedure allows us to obtain a standardized rennet paste that posses the desired activity and is of good microbiological quality. Concomitantly, a kid pregastric esterase (KPGE) was purified to homogeneity. The purification procedure was based on an aqueous extract of hygienized rennet paste (HRP), which was chromatographed on DEAE-Sepharose Fast Flow then adsorbed on phenyl superose followed by a re-chromatography on the same column. The final enzymatic preparation, where the overall activity recovery was 3%, showed a molecular mass of 53 kDa. The highest activity was determined on p-nitrophenyl butyrate, but marked hydrolysis was also detected on beta-naphthyl caprylate. In contrast, low activity on tributyrin (substrate under emulsion form) was detected, thus confirming the esterase character of purified enzyme.

  12. Predictive value of the leukocyte esterase test for the detection of pleocytosis in cerebrospinal fluid.

    PubMed

    Shokouhi, Shervin; Darazam, Ilad Alavi; Karamipour, Mehdi; Ahmadi, HasanAli; Sajadi, Mohammad M

    2017-03-17

    Rapid and accurate diagnostic tests for patients with suspected bacterial meningitis is crucial to prevent subsequent mortality and morbidity. We carried out this study to determine diagnostic value of the rapid leukocyte esterase (LE) strip test to identify PMN pleocytosis in cerebral spinal fluid. A total of 126 patients with suspected meningitis were enrolled in this prospective study. Microscopic examination (cell count and differential) and leukocyte esterase (LE) rapid strip test was performed on cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value of the LE test were determined. The receiver operating characteristic (ROC) was used to calculate the best cut-point values. Fifty and two (41%) of patients had pleocytosis in the CSF, while 48 (38%) patients had a positive result the using rapid strip test. The diagnostic accuracy of this test for pleocytosis translated to a sensitivity of 85% and a specificity of 86%, with an area under the curve of 0.88. The rapid LE strip test could be considered an additional test in the patient bedside for diagnosis of pleocytosis in CSF. It is a feasible test in resource-limited settings. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  13. Functional Analysis of Esterase TCE2 Gene from Tetranychus cinnabarinus (Boisduval) involved in Acaricide Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Li; Wei, Peng; Wang, Xiangzun; Shen, Guangmao; Zhang, Jiao; Xiao, Wei; Xu, Zhifeng; Xu, Qiang; He, Lin

    2016-01-01

    The carmine spider mite, Tetranychus cinnabarinus is an important pest of crops and vegetables worldwide, and it has the ability to develop resistance against acaricides rapidly. Our previous study identified an esterase gene (designated TCE2) over-expressed in resistant mites. To investigate this gene’s function in resistance, the expression levels of TCE2 in susceptible, abamectin-, fenpropathrin-, and cyflumetofen-resistant strains were knocked down (65.02%, 63.14%, 57.82%, and 63.99%, respectively) via RNA interference. The bioassay data showed that the resistant levels to three acaricides were significantly decreased after the down-regulation of TCE2, indicating a correlation between the expression of TCE2 and the acaricide-resistance in T. cinnabarinus. TCE2 gene was then re-engineered for heterologous expression in Escherichia coli. The recombinant TCE2 exhibited α-naphthyl acetate activity (483.3 ± 71.8 nmol/mg pro. min−1), and the activity of this enzyme could be inhibited by abamectin, fenpropathrin, and cyflumetofen, respectively. HPLC and GC results showed that 10 μg of the recombinant TCE2 could effectively decompose 21.23% fenpropathrin and 49.70% cyflumetofen within 2 hours. This is the first report of a successful heterologous expression of an esterase gene from mites. This study provides direct evidence that TCE2 is a functional gene involved in acaricide resistance in T. cinnabarinus. PMID:26725309

  14. Inhibition of Mitochondrial Bioenergetics by Esterase-Triggered COS/H2S Donors.

    PubMed

    Steiger, Andrea K; Marcatti, Michela; Szabo, Csaba; Szczesny, Bartosz; Pluth, Michael D

    2017-08-18

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is an important biological mediator, and synthetic H2S donating molecules provide an important class of investigative tools for H2S research. Here, we report esterase-activated H2S donors that function by first releasing carbonyl sulfide (COS), which is rapidly converted to H2S by the ubiquitous enzyme carbonic anhydrase (CA). We report the synthesis, self-immolative decomposition, and H2S release profiles of the developed scaffolds. In addition, the developed esterase-triggered COS/H2S donors exhibit higher levels of cytotoxicity than equivalent levels of Na2S or the common H2S donors GYY4137 and AP39. Using cellular bioenergetics measurements, we establish that the developed donors reduce cellular respiration and ATP synthesis in BEAS 2B human lung epithelial cells, which is consistent with COS/H2S inhibition of cytochrome c oxidase in the mitochondrial respiratory chain although not observed with common H2S donors at the same concentrations. Taken together, these results may suggest that COS functions differently than H2S in certain biological contexts or that the developed donors are more efficient at delivering H2S than other common H2S-releasing motifs.

  15. Kinetic mechanism of the detoxification of the organophosphate paraoxon by human serum A-esterase.

    PubMed

    Vitarius, J A; Sultatos, L G

    1994-01-01

    The mammalian detoxification of certain organophosphates, such as paraoxon [O,O-diethyl (p-nitrophenyl) phosphate], is catalyzed by the enzyme A-esterase. In this study, incubations of human serum in 50 mM glycine buffer (pH 10.5) with paraoxon resulted in the nonlinear production of p-nitrophenol, characterized by a rapid initial phase for the first several minutes of the incubation, followed by a second, slower phase in which the velocity approached constancy. Production of p-nitrophenol could be accurately fitted to the velocity equation for an Ordered Uni Bi kinetic mechanism with initial-burst activity, yielding estimates of appk2, appk3, and appE, for 10 human subjects. Increasing calcium concentration in the incubation resulted in increases in appk3 and appE, without affecting appk2. Conversely, addition of 1 M sodium chloride decreased the appk3 and appE, but did not alter appk2. And finally, a continuous system computer model was constructed based on the differential equations descriptive of an Ordered Uni Bi kinetic mechanism. This model accurately simulated production of p-nitrophenol from human serum, providing further support that A-esterase hydrolyzes paraoxon by an Ordered Uni Bi kinetic mechanism with initial-burst activity.

  16. An esterase from Escherichia coli with a sequence similarity to hormone-sensitive lipase.

    PubMed Central

    Kanaya, S; Koyanagi, T; Kanaya, E

    1998-01-01

    An esterase from Escherichia coli that is a member of the hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL) family was overproduced, purified and characterized. It is encoded by the ybaC gene and composed of 319 amino acid residues with an Mr of 36038. The enzymic activity was determined by using various p-nitrophenyl esters of fatty acids as a substrate at 25 degreesC and pH 7.1. The enzyme showed hydrolytic activity towards substrates with an acyl chain length of less than 8, whereas it showed little hydrolytic activity towards those with an acyl chain length of more than 10. In addition, it showed little hydrolytic activity towards trioleoylglycerol and cholesterol oleate. Determination of the kinetic parameters for the hydrolyses of the substrates from C2 to C8 indicates that C4 and C5 substrates are the most preferred. Close agreement between the Mr determined by SDS/PAGE (37000) and column chromatography (38000) suggests that the enzyme exists in a monomeric form. It is an acidic protein with a pI value of 4.1. The far-UV CD spectrum suggests that its helical content is 26.1%. Comparison of the amino acid sequence of this enzyme with those involved in the HSL family allows us to propose that Ser165, Asp262 and His292 constitute the catalytic triad of E. coli esterase. PMID:9576853

  17. An esterase from Escherichia coli with a sequence similarity to hormone-sensitive lipase.

    PubMed

    Kanaya, S; Koyanagi, T; Kanaya, E

    1998-05-15

    An esterase from Escherichia coli that is a member of the hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL) family was overproduced, purified and characterized. It is encoded by the ybaC gene and composed of 319 amino acid residues with an Mr of 36038. The enzymic activity was determined by using various p-nitrophenyl esters of fatty acids as a substrate at 25 degreesC and pH 7.1. The enzyme showed hydrolytic activity towards substrates with an acyl chain length of less than 8, whereas it showed little hydrolytic activity towards those with an acyl chain length of more than 10. In addition, it showed little hydrolytic activity towards trioleoylglycerol and cholesterol oleate. Determination of the kinetic parameters for the hydrolyses of the substrates from C2 to C8 indicates that C4 and C5 substrates are the most preferred. Close agreement between the Mr determined by SDS/PAGE (37000) and column chromatography (38000) suggests that the enzyme exists in a monomeric form. It is an acidic protein with a pI value of 4.1. The far-UV CD spectrum suggests that its helical content is 26.1%. Comparison of the amino acid sequence of this enzyme with those involved in the HSL family allows us to propose that Ser165, Asp262 and His292 constitute the catalytic triad of E. coli esterase.

  18. Studies on the role of neurotoxic esterase in organophosphorous compound-induced delayed neurotoxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Carrington, C.D.

    1984-01-01

    Neurotoxic esterase (NTE) is a protein with esterase activity that is proposed to be the site at which organophosphorus compound (OP) induced delayed neurotoxicity (OPIDIN) is initiated. The role of NTE in OPIDIN in unknown. The studies described in this dissertation were designed to further elucidate potential mechanisms underlying the involvement of NTE in OPIDN. The prophylactic effect of phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride (PMSF) was found to be correlated with the time course of inhibition of NTE by PMSF and two neurotoxic OPs, and is therefore most likely to be due to the prevention of the binding of the OP to the initiation site. A membrane bound protein labelled with /sup 3/H-diisopropyl phosphorofluoridate (DiFP) with an apparent molecular weight of 160 K was the major binding site with a specificity similar to that of NTE. Recovery of NTE activity following in vivo inhibition by DiFP was found to be slower in hen brain when compared to chicks or rats. Differences in recovery in peripheral nerve were not found to be correlated with differences in susceptibility between species or between young and adult animals. The anterograde transport rate for NTE was estimated to be about 300 mm/day. Since exchange between mobile and stationary transport pools appeared to be rapid, it is concluded that the proximodistal delay in NTE recovery is due to a dilution of newly synthesized NTE by inhibited NTE as it is transported down the nerve.

  19. Crystal structures of Ophiostoma piceae sterol esterase: structural insights into activation mechanism and product release.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez-Fernández, Javier; Vaquero, María Eugenia; Prieto, Alicia; Barriuso, Jorge; Martínez, María Jesús; Hermoso, Juan A

    2014-09-01

    Sterol esterases are able to efficiently hydrolyze both sterol esters and triglycerides and to carry out synthesis reactions in the presence of organic solvents. Their high versatility makes them excellent candidates for biotechnological purposes. Sterol esterase from fungus Ophiostoma piceae (OPE) belongs to the family abH03.01 of the Candida rugosa lipase-like proteins. Crystal structures of OPE were solved in this study for the closed and open conformations. Enzyme activation involves a large displacement of the conserved lid, structural rearrangements of loop α16-α17, and formation of a dimer with a large opening. Three PEG molecules are placed in the active site, mimicking chains of the triglyceride substrate, demonstrating the position of the oxyanion hole and the three pockets that accommodate the sn-1, sn-2 and sn-3 fatty acids chains. One of them is an internal tunnel, connecting the active center with the outer surface of the enzyme 30 Å far from the catalytic Ser220. Based on our structural and biochemical results we propose a mechanism by which a great variety of different substrates can be hydrolyzed in OPE paving the way for the construction of new variants to improve the catalytic properties of these enzymes and their biotechnological applications.

  20. 3-d structure-based amino acid sequence alignment of esterases, lipases and related proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Gentry, M.K.; Doctor, B.P.; Cygler, M.; Schrag, J.D.; Sussman, J.L.

    1993-05-13

    Acetylcholinesterase and butyrylcholinesterase, enzymes with potential as pretreatment drugs for organophosphate toxicity, are members of a larger family of homologous proteins that includes carboxylesterases, cholesterol esterases, lipases, and several nonhydrolytic proteins. A computer-generated alignment of 18 of the proteins, the acetylcholinesases, butyrylcholinesterases, carboxylesterases, some esterases, and the nonenzymatic proteins has been previously presented. More recently, the three-dimensional structures of two enzymes enzymes in this group, acetylcholinesterase from Torpedo californica and lipase from Geotrichum candidum, have been determined. Based on the x-ray structures and the superposition of these two enzymes, it was possible to obtain an improved amino acid sequence alignment of 32 members of this family of proteins. Examination of this alignment reveals that 24 amino acids are invariant in all of the hydrolytic proteins, and an additional 49 are well conserved. Conserved amino acids include those of the active site, the disulfide bridges, the salt bridges, in the core of the proteins, and at the edges of secondary structural elements. Comparison of the three-dimensional structures makes it possible to find a well-defined structural basis for the conservation of many of these amino acids.

  1. Use of esterase activities for the detection of chemical neurotoxic agents.

    PubMed

    Manco, Giuseppe; Nucci, Roberto; Febbraio, Ferdinando

    2009-01-01

    The quest for a quick and easy detection of the neurotoxin levels in the environment has fostered the search for systems alternative to currently employed analytical methods such as spectrophotometer, gas-liquid chromatography, thin-layer chromatography, and more recently mass spectrometry. These drawbacks lead to intense research efforts to develop biosensor devices for the determination of these compounds. In this review, we present an overview of the actual development of research in neurotoxin detection by using enzymatic biosensors based on esterase activity, in particular cholinesterases, and carboxylesterases. Detection by enzymatic activity could be carried out measuring the hydrolysis products or the residual enzymatic activity after inhibition, using a transducer system that makes possible the correlation between the determined activity and the analyte concentration. Several transducer systems were adopted for the neurotoxins identification using esterases, including electrochemical, optical, conductimetric and piezoelectric procedures. The differences in the used transducer determine the final sensitivity and specificity of the biosensor. Moreover, a brief description of immobilization procedure, that is an important step in the biosensor development and could affect the final characteristic of biosensor (sensibility, stability, response time and reproducibility), was accomplished. Final considerations on advantages and problems, related to actual development of these technologies, and its prospective were discussed.

  2. Association of sick building syndrome with neuropathy target esterase (NTE) activity in Japanese.

    PubMed

    Matsuzaka, Yasunari; Ohkubo, Tomoichi; Kikuti, Yukie Y; Mizutani, Akiko; Tsuda, Michio; Aoyama, Yoshiko; Kakuta, Kazuhiko; Oka, Akira; Inoko, Hidetoshi; Sakabe, Kou; Ishikawa, Satoshi; Kulski, Jerzy K; Kimura, Minoru

    2014-10-01

    Sick building syndrome (SBS) is a set of several clinically recognizable symptoms reported by occupants of a building without a clear cause. Neuropathy target esterase (NTE) is a membrane bound serine esterase and its reaction with organophosphates (OPs) can lead to OP-induced delayed neuropathy (OPIDN) and nerve axon degeneration. The aim of our study was to determine whether there was a difference in NTE activity in the peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of Japanese patients with SBS and healthy controls and whether PNPLA6 (alias NTE) gene polymorphisms were associated with SBS. We found that the enzymatic activity of NTE was significantly higher (P < 0.0005) in SBS patients compared with controls. Moreover, population with an AA genotype of a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP), rs480208, in intron 21 of the PNPLA6 gene strongly reduced the activity of NTE. Fifty-eight SNP markers within the PNPLA6 gene were tested for association in a case-control study of 188 affected individuals and 401 age-matched controls. Only one SNP, rs480208, was statistically different in genotype distribution (P = 0.005) and allele frequency (P = 0.006) between the cases and controls (uncorrected for testing multiple SNP sites), but these were not significant by multiple corrections. The findings of the association between the enzymatic activity of NTE and SBS in Japanese show for the first time that NTE activity might be involved with SBS. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc., a Wiley company.

  3. A self-calibrating PARACEST MRI contrast agent that detects esterase enzyme activity

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yuguo; Sheth, Vipul R.; Liu, Guanshu; Pagel, Mark D.

    2016-01-01

    The CEST effect of many PARACEST MRI contrast agents changes in response to a molecular biomarker. However, other molecular biomarkers or environmental factors can influence CEST, so that a change in CEST is not conclusive proof for detecting the biomarker. To overcome this problem, a second control CEST effect may be included in the same PARACEST agent, which is responsive to all factors that alter the first CEST effect except for the biomarker to be measured. To investigate this approach, a PARACEST MRI contrast agent was developed with one CEST effect that is responsive to esterase enzyme activity and a second control CEST effect. The ratio of the two CEST effects was independent of concentration and T1 relaxation, so that this agent was self-calibrating with respect to these factors. This ratiometric method was dependent on temperature and was influenced by MR coalescence as the chemical exchange rates approached the chemical shifts of the exchangable protons as temperature was increased. The two CEST effects also showed evidence of having different pH dependencies, so that this agent was not self-calibrating with respect to pH. Therefore, a self-calibrating PARACEST MRI contrast agent can more accurately detect a molecular biomarker such as esterase enzyme activity, as long as temperature and pH are within an acceptable physiological range and remain constant. PMID:21861282

  4. Rapid test for acetyl-methyl-carbinol formation by Enterobacteriaceae.

    PubMed Central

    Qadri, S M; Nichols, C W; Qadri, S G; Villarreal, A

    1978-01-01

    A modified Voges-Proskauer test is described which distinguishes within 4 to 8 hours between organisms that can produce acetyl-methyl-carbinol (acetoin) from glucose fermentation and those that cannot. PMID:363745

  5. Data detailing the platelet acetyl-lysine proteome.

    PubMed

    Aslan, Joseph E; David, Larry L; McCarty, Owen J T

    2015-12-01

    Here we detail proteomics data that describe the acetyl-lysine proteome of blood platelets (Aslan et al., 2015 [1]). An affinity purification - mass spectrometry (AP-MS) approach was used to identify proteins modified by Nε-lysine acetylation in quiescent, washed human platelets. The data provide insights into potential regulatory mechanisms of platelet function mediated by protein lysine acetylation. Additionally, as platelets are anucleate and lack histone proteins, they offer a unique and valuable system to study the regulation of cytosolic proteins by lysine acetylation. The mass spectrometry proteomics data have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange Consortium (Vizcaino et al., 2014 [2]) via with PRIDE partner repository with the dataset identifier PXD002332.

  6. Acetylation of C/EBPα inhibits its granulopoietic function

    PubMed Central

    Bararia, Deepak; Kwok, Hui Si; Welner, Robert S.; Numata, Akihiko; Sárosi, Menyhárt B.; Yang, Henry; Wee, Sheena; Tschuri, Sebastian; Ray, Debleena; Weigert, Oliver; Levantini, Elena; Ebralidze, Alexander K.; Gunaratne, Jayantha; Tenen, Daniel G.

    2016-01-01

    CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein alpha (C/EBPα) is an essential transcription factor for myeloid lineage commitment. Here we demonstrate that acetylation of C/EBPα at lysine residues K298 and K302, mediated at least in part by general control non-derepressible 5 (GCN5), impairs C/EBPα DNA-binding ability and modulates C/EBPα transcriptional activity. Acetylated C/EBPα is enriched in human myeloid leukaemia cell lines and acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) samples, and downregulated upon granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF)- mediated granulocytic differentiation of 32Dcl3 cells. C/EBPα mutants that mimic acetylation failed to induce granulocytic differentiation in C/EBPα-dependent assays, in both cell lines and in primary hematopoietic cells. Our data uncover GCN5 as a negative regulator of C/EBPα and demonstrate the importance of C/EBPα acetylation in myeloid differentiation. PMID:27005833

  7. Acetylation of banana fibre to improve oil absorbency.

    PubMed

    Teli, M D; Valia, Sanket P

    2013-01-30

    Oil spill leaves detrimental effects on the environment, living organisms and economy. In the present work, an attempt is made to provide an efficient, easily deployable method of cleaning up oil spills and recovering of the oil. The work reports the use of banana fibres which were acetylated for oil spill recovery. The product so formed was characterized by FT-IR, TG, SEM and its degree of acetylation was also evaluated. The extent of acetylation was measured by weight percent gain. The oil sorption capacity of the acetylated fibre was higher than that of the commercial synthetic oil sorbents such as polypropylene fibres as well as un-modified fibre. Therefore, these oil sorption-active materials which are also biodegradable can be used to substitute non-biodegradable synthetic materials in oil spill cleanup. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Acetylation of Cavin-1 Promotes Lipolysis in White Adipose Tissue.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Shui-Rong; Guo, Liang; Wang, Xu; Liu, Yang; Peng, Wan-Qiu; Liu, Yuan; Wei, Xiang-Bo; Dou, Xin; Ding, Meng; Lei, Qun-Ying; Qian, Shu-Wen; Li, Xi; Tang, Qi-Qun

    2017-08-15

    White adipose tissue (WAT) serves as a reversible energy storage depot in the form of lipids in response to nutritional status. Cavin-1, an essential component in the biogenesis of caveolae, is a positive regulator of lipolysis in adipocytes. However, molecular mechanisms of cavin-1 in the modulation of lipolysis remain poorly understood. Here, we showed that cavin-1 was acetylated at lysines 291, 293, and 298 (3K), which were under nutritional regulation in WAT. We further identified GCN5 as the acetyltransferase and Sirt1 as the deacetylase of cavin-1. Acetylation-mimetic 3Q mutants of cavin-1 augmented fat mobilization in 3T3-L1 adipocytes and zebrafish. Mechanistically, acetylated cavin-1 preferentially interacted with hormone-sensitive lipase and recruited it to the caveolae, thereby promoting lipolysis. Our findings shed light on the essential role of cavin-1 in regulating lipolysis in an acetylation-dependent manner in WAT. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  9. Protein kinase C coordinates histone H3 phosphorylation and acetylation

    PubMed Central

    Darieva, Zoulfia; Webber, Aaron; Warwood, Stacey; Sharrocks, Andrew D

    2015-01-01

    The re-assembly of chromatin following DNA replication is a critical event in the maintenance of genome integrity. Histone H3 acetylation at K56 and phosphorylation at T45 are two important chromatin modifications that accompany chromatin assembly. Here we have identified the protein kinase Pkc1 as a key regulator that coordinates the deposition of these modifications in S. cerevisiae under conditions of replicative stress. Pkc1 phosphorylates the histone acetyl transferase Rtt109 and promotes its ability to acetylate H3K56. Our data also reveal novel cross-talk between two different histone modifications as Pkc1 also enhances H3T45 phosphorylation and this modification is required for H3K56 acetylation. Our data therefore uncover an important role for Pkc1 in coordinating the deposition of two different histone modifications that are important for chromatin assembly. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.09886.001 PMID:26468616

  10. Partially Acetylated Sugarcane Bagasse For Wicking Oil From Contaminated Wetlands

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sugarcane bagasse was partially acetylated to enhance its oil-wicking ability in saturated environments while holding moisture for hydrocarbon biodegradation. The water sorption capacity of raw bagasse was reduced fourfold after treatment, which indicated considerably increased ...

  11. Recognition Imaging of Acetylated Chromatin Using a DNA Aptamer

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Liyun; Fu, Qiang; Williams, Berea A.R.; Azzaz, Abdelhamid M.; Shogren-Knaak, Michael A.; Chaput, John C.; Lindsay, Stuart

    2009-01-01

    Histone acetylation plays an important role in the regulation of gene expression. A DNA aptamer generated by in vitro selection to be highly specific for histone H4 protein acetylated at lysine 16 was used as a recognition element for atomic force microscopy-based recognition imaging of synthetic nucleosomal arrays with precisely controlled acetylation. The aptamer proved to be reasonably specific at recognizing acetylated histones, with recognition efficiencies of 60% on-target and 12% off-target. Though this selectivity is much poorer than the >2000:1 equilibrium specificity of the aptamer, it is a large improvement on the performance of a ChIP-quality antibody, which is not selective at all in this application, and it should permit high-fidelity recognition with repeated imaging. The ability to image the precise location of posttranslational modifications may permit nanometer-scale investigation of their effect on chromatin structure. PMID:19751687

  12. Partially Acetylated Sugarcane Bagasse For Wicking Oil From Contaminated Wetlands

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sugarcane bagasse was partially acetylated to enhance its oil-wicking ability in saturated environments while holding moisture for hydrocarbon biodegradation. The water sorption capacity of raw bagasse was reduced fourfold after treatment, which indicated considerably increased ...

  13. Olig1 Acetylation and Nuclear Export Mediate Oligodendrocyte Development

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Jinxiang; Bercury, Kathryn K.; Jin, Weilin

    2015-01-01

    The oligodendrocyte transcription factor Olig1 is critical for both oligodendrocyte development and remyelination in mice. Nuclear to cytoplasmic translocation of Olig1 protein occurs during brain development and in multiple sclerosis, but the detailed molecular mechanism of this translocation remains elusive. Here, we report that Olig1 acetylation and deacetylation drive its active translocation between the nucleus and the cytoplasm in both mouse and rat oligodendrocytes. We identified three functional nuclear export sequences (NES) localized in the basic helix-loop-helix domain and one specific acetylation site at Lys 150 (human Olig1) in NES1. Olig1 acetylation and deacetylation are regulated by the acetyltransferase CREB-binding protein and the histone deacetylases HDAC1, HDAC3, and HDAC10. Acetylation of Olig1 decreased its chromatin association, increased its interaction with inhibitor of DNA binding 2 and facilitated its retention in the cytoplasm of mature oligodendrocytes. These studies establish that acetylation of Olig1 regulates its chromatin dissociation and subsequent translocation to the cytoplasm and is required for its function in oligodendrocyte maturation. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Th