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Sample records for rhamnosus gg reveals

  1. Genomic Characterization of Non-Mucus-Adherent Derivatives of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG Reveals Genes Affecting Pilus Biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Rasinkangas, Pia; Reunanen, Justus; Douillard, François P.; Ritari, Jarmo; Uotinen, Virva; Palva, Airi

    2014-01-01

    Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG is one of the best-characterized lactic acid bacteria and can be considered a probiotic paradigm. Comparative and functional genome analysis showed that L. rhamnosus GG harbors a genomic island including the spaCBA-srtC1 gene cluster, encoding the cell surface-decorating host-interacting pili. Here, induced mutagenesis was used to study pilus biogenesis in L. rhamnosus GG. A combination of two powerful approaches, mutation selection and next-generation sequencing, was applied to L. rhamnosus GG for the selection of pilus-deficient mutants from an enriched population. The isolated mutants were first screened by immuno-dot blot analysis using antiserum against pilin proteins. Relevant mutants were selected, and the lack of pili was confirmed by immunoelectron microscopy. The pilosotype of 10 mutant strains was further characterized by analyzing pilin expression using Western blot, dot blot, and immunofluorescence methods. A mucus binding assay showed that the mutants did not adhere to porcine intestinal mucus. Comparative genome sequence analysis using the Illumina MiSeq platform allowed us to determine the nature of the mutations in the obtained pilus-deficient derivatives. Three major classes of mutants with unique genotypes were observed: class I, with mutations in the srtC1 gene; class II, with a deletion containing the spaCBA-srtC1 gene cluster; and class III, with mutations in the spaA gene. Only a limited number of collateral mutations were observed, and one of the pilus-deficient derivatives with a deficient srtC1 gene contained 24 other mutations. This strain, PB12, can be considered a candidate for human trials addressing the impact of the absence of pili. PMID:25192985

  2. Stability of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG in prebiotic edible films.

    PubMed

    Soukoulis, Christos; Behboudi-Jobbehdar, Solmaz; Yonekura, Lina; Parmenter, Christopher; Fisk, Ian D

    2014-09-15

    The concept of prebiotic edible films as effective vehicles for encapsulating probiotic living cells is presented. Four soluble fibres (inulin, polydextrose, glucose-oligosaccharides and wheat dextrin) were selected as prebiotic co-components of gelatine based matrices plasticised with glycerol and used for the immobilisation of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG. The addition of prebiotics was associated with a more compact and uniform film structure, with no detectable interspaces or micropores; probiotic inclusion did not significantly change the structure of the films. Glucose-oligosaccharides and polydextrose significantly enhanced L. rhamnosus GG viability during air drying (by 300% and 75%, respectively), whilst a 33% and 80% reduction in viable counts was observed for inulin and wheat dextrin. Contrarily, inulin was the most effective at controlling the sub-lethal effects on L. rhamnosus GG during storage. However, in all cases the supplementation of edible films with prebiotics ameliorated the storage stability of L. rhamnosus GG.

  3. Stability of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG in prebiotic edible films

    PubMed Central

    Soukoulis, Christos; Behboudi-Jobbehdar, Solmaz; Yonekura, Lina; Parmenter, Christopher; Fisk, Ian D.

    2014-01-01

    The concept of prebiotic edible films as effective vehicles for encapsulating probiotic living cells is presented. Four soluble fibres (inulin, polydextrose, glucose-oligosaccharides and wheat dextrin) were selected as prebiotic co-components of gelatine based matrices plasticised with glycerol and used for the immobilisation of Lactobacillusrhamnosus GG. The addition of prebiotics was associated with a more compact and uniform film structure, with no detectable interspaces or micropores; probiotic inclusion did not significantly change the structure of the films. Glucose-oligosaccharides and polydextrose significantly enhanced L. rhamnosus GG viability during air drying (by 300% and 75%, respectively), whilst a 33% and 80% reduction in viable counts was observed for inulin and wheat dextrin. Contrarily, inulin was the most effective at controlling the sub-lethal effects on L. rhamnosus GG during storage. However, in all cases the supplementation of edible films with prebiotics ameliorated the storage stability of L. rhamnosus GG. PMID:24767059

  4. Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG Lysate Increases Re-Epithelialization of Keratinocyte Scratch Assays by Promoting Migration.

    PubMed

    Mohammedsaeed, Walaa; Cruickshank, Sheena; McBain, Andrew J; O'Neill, Catherine A

    2015-11-05

    A limited number of studies have investigated the potential of probiotics to promote wound healing in the digestive tract. The aim of the current investigation was to determine whether probiotic bacteria or their extracts could be beneficial in cutaneous wound healing. A keratinocyte monolayer scratch assay was used to assess re-epithelialization; which comprises keratinocyte proliferation and migration. Primary human keratinocyte monolayers were scratched then exposed to lysates of Lactobacillus (L) rhamnosus GG, L. reuteri, L. plantarum or L. fermentum. Re-epithelialization of treated monolayers was compared to that of untreated controls. Lysates of L. rhamnosus GG and L. reuteri significantly increased the rate of re-epithelialization, with L. rhamnosus GG being the most efficacious. L. reuteri increased keratinocyte proliferation while L. rhamnosus GG lysate significantly increased proliferation and migration. Microarray analysis of L. rhamnosus GG treated scratches showed increased expression of multiple genes including the chemokine CXCL2 and its receptor CXCR2. These are involved in normal wound healing where they stimulate keratinocyte proliferation and/or migration. Increased protein expression of both CXCL2 and CXCR2 were confirmed by ELISA and immunoblotting. These data demonstrate that L. rhamnosus GG lysate accelerates re-epithelialization of keratinocyte scratch assays, potentially via chemokine receptor pairs that induce keratinocyte migration.

  5. Towards a better understanding of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG - host interactions

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG) is one of the most widely used probiotic strains. Various health effects are well documented including the prevention and treatment of gastro-intestinal infections and diarrhea, and stimulation of immune responses that promote vaccination or even prevent certain allergic symptoms. However, not all intervention studies could show a clinical benefit and even for the same conditions, the results are not univocal. Clearly, the host phenotype governed by age, genetics and environmental factors such as the endogenous microbiota, plays a role in whether individuals are responders or non-responders. However, we believe that a detailed knowledge of the bacterial physiology and the LGG molecules that play a key role in its host-interaction capacity is crucial for a better understanding of its potential health benefits. Molecules that were yet identified as important factors governing host interactions include its adhesive pili or fimbriae, its lipoteichoic acid molecules, its major secreted proteins and its galactose-rich exopolysaccharides, as well as specific DNA motifs. Nevertheless, future studies are needed to correlate specific health effects to these molecular effectors in LGG, and also in other probiotic strains. PMID:25186587

  6. Adhesive properties, extracellular protein production, and metabolism in the Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG strain when grown in the presence of mucin.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, Borja; Saad, Naima; Schmitter, Jean-Marie; Bressollier, Philippe; Urdaci, Maria C

    2010-06-01

    This paper examines the probiotic bacterium Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG, and how it reacts to the presence of mucin in its extracellular milieu. Parameters studied included cell clustering, adhesion to mucin, extracellular protein production, and formation of final metabolites. L. rhamnosus GG was found to grow efficiently in the presence of glucose, N-acetylglucosamine, or mucin (partially purified or purified) as sole carbon sources. However, it was unable to grow using other mucin constituents, such as fucose or glucuronic acid. Mucin induced noticeable changes in all the parameters studied when compared with growth using glucose, including in the formation of cell clusters, which were easily disorganized with trypsin. Mucin increased adhesion of the bacterium, and modulated the production of extracellular proteins. SDS-PAGE revealed that mucin was not degraded during L. rhamnosus GG growth, suggesting that this bacterium is able to partially use the glucidic moiety of glycoprotein. This study goes some way towards developing an understanding of the metabolic and physiological changes that L. rhamnosus GG undergoes within the human gastrointestinal tract.

  7. Polymorphisms, Chromosomal Rearrangements, and Mutator Phenotype Development during Experimental Evolution of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG

    PubMed Central

    Douillard, François P.; Ribbera, Angela; Xiao, Kun; Ritari, Jarmo; Rasinkangas, Pia; Paulin, Lars; Palva, Airi; Hao, Yanling

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG is a lactic acid bacterium widely marketed by the food industry. Its genomic analysis led to the identification of a gene cluster encoding mucus-binding SpaCBA pili, which is located in a genomic island enriched in insertion sequence (IS) elements. In the present study, we analyzed by genome-wide resequencing the genomic integrity of L. rhamnosus GG in four distinct evolutionary experiments conducted for approximately 1,000 generations under conditions of no stress or salt, bile, and repetitive-shearing stress. Under both stress-free and salt-induced stress conditions, the GG population (excluding the mutator lineage in the stress-free series [see below]) accumulated only a few single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and no frequent chromosomal rearrangements. In contrast, in the presence of bile salts or repetitive shearing stress, some IS elements were found to be activated, resulting in the deletion of large chromosomal segments that include the spaCBA-srtC1 pilus gene cluster. Remarkably, a high number of SNPs were found in three strains obtained after 900 generations of stress-free growth. Detailed analysis showed that these three strains derived from a founder mutant with an altered DNA polymerase subunit that resulted in a mutator phenotype. The present work confirms the stability of the pilus production phenotype in L. rhamnosus GG under stress-free conditions, highlights the possible evolutionary scenarios that may occur when this probiotic strain is extensively cultured, and identifies external factors that affect the chromosomal integrity of GG. The results provide mechanistic insights into the stability of GG in regard to its extensive use in probiotic and other functional food products. IMPORTANCE Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG is a widely marketed probiotic strain that has been used in numerous clinical studies to assess its health-promoting properties. Hence, the stability of the probiotic functions of L. rhamnosus GG

  8. Preserving viability of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG in vitro and in vivo by a new encapsulation system

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Probiotics have shown beneficial effects on human health. To increase the efficacy of probiotic applications, we used Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG) as a probiotic model to investigate approaches to enhance the bioavailability of probiotics. LGG was encapsulated in hydrogel beads containing pectin...

  9. Colon-specific delivery of lactobacillus rhamnosus GG using pectin hydrogel beads

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The probiotic bacteria, Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG), has shown beneficial effects on human health, and is accepted by increasing populations for the prevention and treatment of irritable bowel diseases. To increase the bioavailability and efficacy of LGG, the probiotic was encapsulated in hydro...

  10. Genetic expression profile analysis of the temporal inhibition of quercetin and naringenin on Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The plant polyphenols, quercetin and naringenin, are considered healthy dietary compounds; however, little is known of their effects on the probiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG). In this study, it was discovered that both quercetin and naringenin produced temporary inhibition of LGG growth, par...

  11. Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG suspected infection in a newborn with intrauterine growth restriction.

    PubMed

    Sadowska-Krawczenko, I; Paprzycka, M; Korbal, P; Wiatrzyk, A; Krysztopa-Grzybowska, K; Polak, M; Czajka, U; Lutyńska, A

    2014-12-01

    A disseminated Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG ATCC 53103 infection was suspected in a 6 day-old newborn with intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) symptoms, treated empirically with antibiotics and given L. rhamnosus GG with the aim of preventing antibiotic-associated gastrointestinal complications. The level of C-reactive protein on day 5 compared with day 2 was increased in spite of negative urine and cerebrospinal fluid cultures. The blood sampled on day 6 was found to be positive for lactobacilli, and the isolate was pre-identified as L. rhamnosus or Lactobacillus casei on day 11. The strain identity was then verified as L. rhamnosus GG through PCR and 16S rRNA sequencing. Genotyping with the rep-PCR and AFLP methods confirmed the 100% genetic similarity for both the strain isolated from patient blood and the probiotic product. The newborn became touch-sensitive, cried a lot, had worsening laboratory test results, and increased inflammation parameters, but no fever was observed. After a further 9 days of antibiotic therapy, blood cultures became negative, and laboratory tests improved on day 25. The patient was discharged from the hospital after 27 days. IUGR with a possible link to L. rhamnosus GG bacteraemia might be a new potential risk group, beside patients with organ failure, immunocompromised status and dysfunctional gut barrier mechanisms, for which safe use of probiotics needs careful attention. Universally accepted or improved guidelines for the safer administration of probiotics in risk groups are urgently needed. This report should not discourage the use of probiotics, but should highlight the need for their careful use in IUGR patients.

  12. Comparative proteome cataloging of Lactobacillus rhamnosus strains GG and Lc705.

    PubMed

    Savijoki, Kirsi; Lietzén, Niina; Kankainen, Matti; Alatossava, Tapani; Koskenniemi, Kerttu; Varmanen, Pekka; Nyman, Tuula A

    2011-08-05

    The present study reports an in-depth proteome analysis of two Lactobacillus rhamnosus strains, the well-known probiotic strain GG and the dairy strain Lc705. We used GeLC-MS/MS, in which proteins are separated using 1-DE and identified using nanoLC-MS/MS, to generate high-quality protein catalogs. To maximize the number of identifications, all data sets were searched against the target databases using two search engines, Mascot and Paragon. As a result, over 1600 high-confidence protein identifications, covering nearly 60% of the predicted proteomes, were obtained from each strain. This approach enabled identification of more than 40% of all predicted surfome proteins, including a high number of lipoproteins, integral membrane proteins, peptidoglycan associated proteins, and proteins predicted to be released into the extracellular environment. A comparison of both data sets revealed the expression of more than 90 proteins in GG and 150 in Lc705, which lack evolutionary counterparts in the other strain. Differences were noted in proteins with a likely role in biofilm formation, phage-related functions, reshaping the bacterial cell wall, and immunomodulation. The present study provides the most comprehensive catalog of the Lactobacillus proteins to date and holds great promise for the discovery of novel probiotic effector molecules.

  13. Lectin-Like Molecules of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG Inhibit Pathogenic Escherichia coli and Salmonella Biofilm Formation

    PubMed Central

    Petrova, Mariya I.; Imholz, Nicole C. E.; Verhoeven, Tine L. A.; Balzarini, Jan; Van Damme, Els J. M.; Schols, Dominique; Vanderleyden, Jos; Lebeer, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Increased antibiotic resistance has catalyzed the research on new antibacterial molecules and alternative strategies, such as the application of beneficial bacteria. Since lectin molecules have unique sugar-recognizing capacities, and pathogens are often decorated with sugars that affect their survival and infectivity, we explored whether lectins from the probiotic strain Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG have antipathogenic properties. Methods The genome sequence of L. rhamnosus GG was screened for the presence of lectin-like proteins. Two genes, LGG_RS02780 and LGG_RS02750, encoding for polypeptides with an N-terminal conserved L-type lectin domain were detected and designated Llp1 (lectin-like protein 1) and Llp2. The capacity of Llp1 and Llp2 to inhibit biofilm formation of various pathogens was investigated. Sugar specificity was determined by Sepharose beads assays and glycan array screening. Results The isolated lectin domains of Llp1 and Llp2 possess pronounced inhibitory activity against biofilm formation by various pathogens, including clinical Salmonella species and uropathogenic E. coli, with Llp2 being more active than Llp1. In addition, sugar binding assays with Llp1 and Llp2 indicate specificity for complex glycans. Both proteins are also involved in the adhesion capacity of L. rhamnosus GG to gastrointestinal and vaginal epithelial cells. Conclusions Lectins isolated from or expressed by beneficial lactobacilli could be considered promising bio-active ingredients for improved prophylaxis of urogenital and gastrointestinal infections. PMID:27537843

  14. Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG antagonizes Giardia intestinalis induced oxidative stress and intestinal disaccharidases: an experimental study.

    PubMed

    Goyal, Nisha; Rishi, Praveen; Shukla, Geeta

    2013-06-01

    The present study describes the in vivo modulatory potential of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG), an effective probiotic, in Giardia intestinalis-infected BALB/c mice. Experimentally, it was observed that oral administration of lactobacilli prior or simultaneous with Giardia trophozoites to mice, efficiently (p < 0.05) reduced both the severity and duration of giardiasis. More specifically, probiotics fed, Giardia-infected mice, showed a significant increase in the levels of antioxidants [reduced glutathione (GSH) and superoxide dismutase (SOD)] and intestinal disaccharidases [sucrase and lactase] and decreased levels of oxidants in the small intestine, in comparison with Giardia-infected mice. Histopathological findings also revealed almost normal cellular morphology of the small intestine in probiotic-fed Giardia-infected mice compared with fused enterocytes, villous atrophy and increased infiltration of lymphocytes in Giardia-infected mice. The results of the present study has shed new light on the anti-oxidative properties of LGG in Giardia mediated tissue injury, thereby suggesting that the effects of probiotic LGG are biologically plausible and could be used as an alternative microbial interference therapy.

  15. Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG-supplemented formula expands butyrate-producing bacterial strains in food allergic infants

    PubMed Central

    Berni Canani, Roberto; Sangwan, Naseer; Stefka, Andrew T; Nocerino, Rita; Paparo, Lorella; Aitoro, Rosita; Calignano, Antonio; Khan, Aly A; Gilbert, Jack A; Nagler, Cathryn R

    2016-01-01

    Dietary intervention with extensively hydrolyzed casein formula supplemented with Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (EHCF+LGG) accelerates tolerance acquisition in infants with cow's milk allergy (CMA). We examined whether this effect is attributable, at least in part, to an influence on the gut microbiota. Fecal samples from healthy controls (n=20) and from CMA infants (n=19) before and after treatment with EHCF with (n=12) and without (n=7) supplementation with LGG were compared by 16S rRNA-based operational taxonomic unit clustering and oligotyping. Differential feature selection and generalized linear model fitting revealed that the CMA infants have a diverse gut microbial community structure dominated by Lachnospiraceae (20.5±9.7%) and Ruminococcaceae (16.2±9.1%). Blautia, Roseburia and Coprococcus were significantly enriched following treatment with EHCF and LGG, but only one genus, Oscillospira, was significantly different between infants that became tolerant and those that remained allergic. However, most tolerant infants showed a significant increase in fecal butyrate levels, and those taxa that were significantly enriched in these samples, Blautia and Roseburia, exhibited specific strain-level demarcations between tolerant and allergic infants. Our data suggest that EHCF+LGG promotes tolerance in infants with CMA, in part, by influencing the strain-level bacterial community structure of the infant gut. PMID:26394008

  16. Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG-supplemented formula expands butyrate-producing bacterial strains in food allergic infants

    DOE PAGES

    Berni Canani, Roberto; Sangwan, Naseer; Stefka, Andrew T.; ...

    2015-09-22

    Dietary intervention with extensively hydrolyzed casein formula supplemented with Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (EHCF+LGG) accelerates tolerance acquisition in infants with cow’s milk allergy (CMA). We examined whether this effect is attributable, at least in part, to an influence on the gut microbiota. Fecal samples from healthy controls (n=20) and from CMA infants (n=19) before and after treatment with EHCF with (n=12) and without (n=7) supplementation with LGG were compared by 16S rRNA-based operational taxonomic unit clustering and oligotyping. Differential feature selection and generalized linear model fitting revealed that the CMA infants have a diverse gut microbial community structure dominated by Lachnospiraceaemore » (20.5±9.7%) and Ruminococcaceae (16.2±9.1%). Blautia, Roseburia and Coprococcus were significantly enriched following treatment with EHCF and LGG, but only one genus, Oscillospira, was significantly different between infants that became tolerant and those that remained allergic. However, most tolerant infants showed a significant increase in fecal butyrate levels, and those taxa that were significantly enriched in these samples, Blautia and Roseburia, exhibited specific strain-level demarcations between tolerant and allergic infants. As a result, our data suggest that EHCF+LGG promotes tolerance in infants with CMA, in part, by influencing the strain-level bacterial community structure of the infant gut.« less

  17. Synbiotic impact of tagatose on viability of Lactobacillus rhamnosus strain GG mediated by the phosphotransferase system (PTS).

    PubMed

    Koh, Ji Hoon; Choi, Seung Hye; Park, Seung Won; Choi, Nag-Jin; Kim, Younghoon; Kim, Sae Hun

    2013-10-01

    Synbiotics, the combination of prebiotics and probiotics, has been shown to produce synergistic effects that promote gastrointestinal well-being of host. Tagatose is a low calorie food ingredient with putative health-promoting benefits. Herein, we investigated its synbiotic impact on the viability of Lactobacillus casei 01 and Lactobacillus rhamnosus strain GG and the potential mechanism involved. Tagatose, as a synbiotic substrate, enhanced the growth of L. casei 01 and L. rhamnosus strain GG compared to other prebiotics. Other gut-indigenous such as Clostridium spp. readily utilized fructooligosaccharide (FOS), the most widely used functional prebiotics, but not tagatose. Additionally, tagatose enhanced probiotic functions of L. casei 01 and L. rhamnosus strain GG by reinforcing their attachment on HT-29 intestine epithelial cells and enhancing their cholesterol-lowering activities. Whole transcriptome study and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) test showed that the presence of tagatose in L. rhamnosus strain GG caused induction of a large number of genes associated with carbohydrate metabolism including the phosphotransferase system (PTS). Collectively, these results indicate the tagatose enhanced the growth of L. casei 01 and L. rhamnosus strain GG and their probiotic activities by activating tagatose-associated PTS networks. Importantly, this study highlights the potential application of tagatose and L. casei 01 and/or L. rhamnosus strain GG as a synbiotic partner in functional dairy foods (i.e. yogurt and cheese) and therapeutic dietary supplements.

  18. Compositional and physicochemical factors governing the viability of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG embedded in starch-protein based edible films

    PubMed Central

    Soukoulis, Christos; Singh, Poonam; Macnaughtan, William; Parmenter, Christopher; Fisk, Ian D.

    2016-01-01

    Probiotic incorporation in edible films and coatings has been shown recently to be an efficient strategy for the delivery of probiotics in foods. In the present work, the impact of the compositional, physicochemical and structural properties of binary starch-protein edible films on Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG viability and stability was evaluated. Native rice and corn starch, as well as bovine skin gelatine, sodium caseinate and soy protein concentrate were used for the fabrication of the probiotic edible films. Starch and protein type both impacted the structural, mechanical, optical and thermal properties of the films, and the process loss of L. rhamnosus GG during evaporation-dehydration was significantly lower in the presence of proteins (0.91–1.07 log CFU/g) compared to solely starch based systems (1.71 log CFU/g). A synergistic action between rice starch and proteins was detected when monitoring the viability of L. rhamnosus GG over four weeks at fridge and room temperature conditions. In particular, a 3- to 7-fold increase in the viability of L. rhamnosus GG was observed in the presence of proteins, with sodium caseinate – rice starch based films offering the most enhanced stability. The film's shelf-life (as calculated using the FAO/WHO (2011) basis of 6 log viable CFU/g) ranged between 27-96 and 15–24 days for systems stored at fridge or room temperature conditions respectively. PMID:26726280

  19. Evaluation of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG and Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM encapsulated using a novel impinging aerosol method in fruit food products.

    PubMed

    Sohail, Asma; Turner, Mark S; Prabawati, Elisabeth Kartika; Coombes, Allan G A; Bhandari, Bhesh

    2012-07-02

    This study investigated the effect of microencapsulation on the survival of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG and Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM and their acidification in orange juice at 25°C for nine days and at 4°C over thirty five days of storage. Alginate micro beads (10-40 μm) containing the probiotics were produced by a novel dual aerosol method of alginate and CaCl(2) cross linking solution. Unencapsulated L. rhamnosus GG was found to have excellent survivability in orange juice at both temperatures. However unencapsulated L. acidophilus NCFM showed significant reduction in viability. Encapsulation of these two bacteria did not significantly enhance survivability but did reduce acidification at 25°C and 4°C. In agreement with this, encapsulation of L. rhamnosus GG also reduced acidification in pear and peach fruit-based foods at 25°C, however at 4°C difference in pH was insignificant between free and encapsulated cells. In conclusion, L. rhamnosus GG showed excellent survival in orange juice and microencapsulation has potential in reducing acidification and possible negative sensory effects of probiotics in orange juice and other fruit-based products.

  20. Effects of fermentation with Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG on product quality and fatty acids of goat milk yogurt.

    PubMed

    Jia, Ru; Chen, Han; Chen, Hui; Ding, Wu

    2016-01-01

    The effect of fermentation with Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG on the product quality of goat milk yogurt using traditional yogurt starter was studied through single-factor experiments and orthogonal experiments. The optimum fermentation condition was evaluated by the titratable acidity of goat milk yogurt, water-retaining capability, sensory score, and texture properties; the fatty acids of the fermented goat milk were determined by a gas chromatograph. Results indicate that high product quality of goat milk yogurt can be obtained and the content of short-chain and medium-chain fatty acids can be decreased significantly when amount of sugar added was 7%, inoculation amount was 3%, the ratio of 3 lactic acid bacteria--Lactobacillus delbrueckii ssp. bulgaricus, Streptococcus thermophilus, and L. rhamnosus GG--was 1:1:3, and fermentation temperature was 42°C.

  1. Isolated exopolysaccharides from Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG alleviated adipogenesis mediated by TLR2 in mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhen; Zhou, Zhigang; Li, Yu; Zhou, Linkang; Ding, Qianwen; Xu, Li

    2016-01-01

    The fibroblast cell line of 3T3-L1 was used as a cell model for screening and evaluating the feasibility of probiotic components in improving animal lipid metabolisms. The extracts from 12 Lactobacillus strains caused significantly reduced triacylglycerol (TAG) accumulation but with severe inflammation induction in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. Interestingly, exopolysaccharides (EPS) from LGG (Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG) significantly decreased the TAG accumulation without any inflammation. The anti-obesity effect of EPS was confirmed in high-fat-diets feeding mice. Fat pads of mice injected with EPS (50 mg/kg) every two days for two weeks were significantly reduced with much smaller adipocytes, compared with the counterparts. The levels of TAG and cholesterol ester in liver, as well as serum TAG, were decreased in EPS injected mice. In addition, down-regulated inflammation was observed in adipose tissue and liver. Interestingly, the expression of TLR2 in adipose tissue and 3T3-L1 cells was significantly increased by EPS addition. Moreover, the reverse of TAG accumulation in TLR2 knockdown 3T3-L1 in the presence of EPS confirmed that the inhibition effect of EPS on adipogenesis was mediated by TLR2. EPS from LGG has the potential for therapeutic development to intervene lipid metabolic disorders in mammals. PMID:27786292

  2. Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG Effect on Behavior of Zebrafish During Chronic Ethanol Exposure.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Ana Claudia Reis; Rico, Eduardo Pacheco; de Oliveira, Diogo Losch; Rosemberg, Denis Broock; Guizzo, Ranieli; Meurer, Fábio; da Silveira, Themis Reverbel

    2016-01-01

    Ethanol is a widely consumed drug, which acts on the central nervous system to induce behavioral alterations ranging from disinhibition to sedation. Recent studies have produced accumulating evidence for the therapeutic role of probiotic bacteria in behavior. We aimed to investigate the effect of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG) on the behavior of adult zebrafish chronically exposed to ethanol. Adult wild-type zebrafish were randomly divided into four groups, each containing 15 fish. The following groups were formed: Control (C), received unsupplemented feed during the trial period; Probiotic (P), fed with feed supplemented with LGG; Ethanol (E), received unsupplemented feed and 0.5% of ethanol directly added to the tank water; and Probiotic+Ethanol (P+E), group under ethanol exposure (0.5%) and fed with LGG supplemented feed. After 2 weeks of exposure, the novel tank test was used to evaluate fish behavior, which was analyzed using computer-aided video tracking. LGG alone did not alter swimming behavior of the fish. Ethanol exposure led to robust behavioral effects in the form of reduced anxiety levels, as indicated by increased vertical exploration and more time spent in the upper region of the novel tank. The group exposed to ethanol and treated with LGG behaved similarly to animals exposed to ethanol alone. Taken together, these results show that zebrafish behavior was not altered by LGG per se, as seen in murine models. This was the first study to investigate the effects of a probiotic diet on behavior after a chronic ethanol exposure.

  3. Microencapsulated Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG powders: relationship of powder physical properties to probiotic survival during storage.

    PubMed

    Ying, Dan Yang; Phoon, Mei Chi; Sanguansri, Luz; Weerakkody, Rangika; Burgar, Iko; Augustin, Mary Ann

    2010-01-01

    Freeze-dried commercial Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG) were encapsulated in an emulsion-based formulation stabilized by whey protein and resistant starch and either spray-dried or freeze-dried to produce probiotic microcapsules. There was no difference in loss of probiotics viability after spray drying or freeze drying. Particle size, morphology, moisture sorption, and water mobility of the powder microcapsules were examined. Particle size analysis and scanning electron microscopy showed that spray-dried LGG microcapsules (SDMC) were small spherical particles, whereas freeze-dried LGG microcapsules (FDMC) were larger nonspherical particles. Moisture sorption isotherms obtained using dynamic vapor sorption showed a slightly higher water uptake in spray-dried microcapsules. The effect of water mobility, as measured by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, at various water activities (a(w) 0.32, 0.57, and 0.70) and probiotic viability during storage at 25 °C was also examined. Increasing the relative humidity of the environment at which the samples were stored caused an increase in water mobility and the rate of loss in viability. The viability data during storage indicated that SDMC had better storage stability compared to FDMC. Although more water was adsorbed for spray-dried than freeze-dried microcapsules, water mobility was similar for corresponding storage conditions because there was a stronger water-binding energy for spray-dried microcapsule. This possibly accounted for the improved survival of probiotics in spray-dried microcapsules.

  4. Effective prophylaxis against rotavirus diarrhea using a combination of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG and antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Pant, Neha; Marcotte, Harold; Brüssow, Harald; Svensson, Lennart; Hammarström, Lennart

    2007-01-01

    Background Rotavirus is a worldwide cause of infectious infantile diarrhea that claims over 600,000 lives annually. Recently, two new vaccine candidates have been developed but their efficacy in developing countries, still remains to be proven. Oral delivery of specific immunoglobulins provides passive immunity and is a fast acting treatment for rotavirus diarrhea. Probiotic bacteria have also gained considerable attention lately as treatment for rotavirus diarrhea. Here we report an evaluation of the therapeutic potential of different probiotics and their combination with anti – rotavirus antibodies in a mouse model of rotavirus diarrhea. Results Of the six probiotic bacteria tested, Lactobacillus rhamnosus strain GG had the strongest influence in reducing prevalence, duration and severity of diarrhea and was therefore chosen for combination treatment with immunoglobulins. The combination treatment reduced the diarrhea outcome measures significantly, prevented histopathological changes and reduced the virus load in the intestines. Conclusion The advantages associated with immunoglobulins and probiotics based therapy is that the treatment provides a rapid therapeutic effect and is cost efficient. These components do not require special storage conditions and could potentially complement the rehydration therapy that is currently used. PMID:17900343

  5. Inactivation of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG by fixation modifies its probiotic properties.

    PubMed

    Markowicz, C; Kubiak, P; Grajek, W; Schmidt, M T

    2016-01-01

    Probiotics are microorganisms that have beneficial effects on the host and are safe for oral intake in a suitable dose. However, there are situations in which the administration of living microorganisms poses a risk for immunocompromised host. The objective of this study was to evaluate the influence of several fixation methods on selected biological properties of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG that are relevant to its probiotic action. Fixation of the bacterial cells with ethanol, 2-propanol, glutaraldehyde, paraformaldehyde, and heat treatment resulted in a significant decrease of alkaline phosphatase, peroxidase, and β-galactosidase activities. Most of the fixation procedures reduced bacterial cell hydrophobicity and increased adhesion capacity. The fixation procedures resulted in a different perception of the bacterial cells by enterocytes, which was shown as changes in gene expression in enterocytes. The results show that some procedures of inactivation allow a fraction of the enzymatic activity to be maintained. The adhesion properties of the bacterial cells were enhanced, but the response of enterocytes to fixed cells was different than to live bacteria. Inactivation allows maintenance and modification of some of the properties of the bacterial cells.

  6. Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG supernatant enhance neonatal resistance to systemic Escherichia coli K1 infection by accelerating development of intestinal defense

    PubMed Central

    He, Xiaolong; Zeng, Qing; Puthiyakunnon, Santhosh; Zeng, Zhijie; Yang, Weijun; Qiu, Jiawen; Du, Lei; Boddu, Swapna; Wu, Tongwei; Cai, Danxian; Huang, Sheng-He; Cao, Hong

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine whether Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG culture supernatant (LCS) has a preventive effect against gut-derived systemic neonatal Escherichia coli (E. coli) K1 infection. The preventive effects were evaluated in human colonic carcinoma cell line Caco-2 and neonatal rat models. Our in vitro results showed that LCS could block adhesion, invasion and translocation of E. coli K1 to Caco-2 monolayer via up-regulating mucin production and maintaining intestinal integrity. In vivo experiments revealed that pre-treatment with LCS significantly decrease susceptibility of neonatal rats to oral E. coli K1 infection as reflected by reduced bacterial intestinal colonization, translocation, dissemination and systemic infections. Further, we found that LCS treated neonatal rats have higher intestinal expressions of Ki67, MUC2, ZO-1, IgA, mucin and lower barrier permeability than those in untreated rats. These results indicated that LCS could enhance neonatal resistance to systemic E. coli K1 infection via promoting maturation of neonatal intestinal defense. In conclusions, our findings suggested that LCS has a prophylactic effect against systemic E. coli K1 infection in neonates. Future studies aimed at identifying the specific active ingredients in LCS will be helpful in developing effective pharmacological strategies for preventing neonatal E. coli K1 infection. PMID:28262688

  7. Efficacy of whey protein gel networks as potential viability-enhancing scaffolds for cell immobilization of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG.

    PubMed

    Doherty, S B; Gee, V L; Ross, R P; Stanton, C; Fitzgerald, G F; Brodkorb, A

    2010-03-01

    This study investigated cell immobilization of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG in three separate protein products: native, denatured and hydrolysed whey protein isolate (WPI). Treatments were assessed for their ability to enhance probiotic survival during storage, heat stress and ex vivo gastric incubation. Spatial distribution of probiotic cells within immobilized treatments was evaluated by atomic force and confocal scanning laser microscopy, while cell viability was enumerated by plate count and flow cytometry (FACS). Microscopic analysis of denatured treatments revealed an oasis of immobilized cells, phase-separated from the surrounding protein matrix; an environmental characteristic analogous to hydrolysed networks. Cell immobilization in hydrolysed and denatured WPI enhanced survival by 6.1+/-0.1 and 5.8+/-0.1 log10 cycles, respectively, following 14 day storage at 37 degrees C and both treatments generated thermal protection at 57 degrees C (7.3+/-0.1 and 6.5+/-0.1 log(10) cfu/ml). Furthermore, denatured WPI enhanced probiotic protection (8.9+/-0.2 log(10) cfu/ml) following 3h gastric incubation at 37 degrees C. In conclusion, hydrolysed or denatured WPI were the most suitable matrices for cell immobilization, while native protein provided the weakest safeguard against thermal and acid stress, thus making it possible to envision whey protein gel networks as protective substrates for cell immobilization applications.

  8. Effect of Drying Methods on Protein and DNA Conformation Changes in Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG Cells by Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Hlaing, Mya M; Wood, Bayden R; McNaughton, Don; Ying, DanYang; Dumsday, Geoff; Augustin, Mary Ann

    2017-03-01

    Microencapsulation protects cells against environmental stress encountered during the production of probiotics, which are used as live microbial food ingredients. Freeze-drying and spray-drying are used in the preparation of powdered microencapsulated probiotics. This study examines the ability of Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy to detect differences in cells exposed to freeze-drying and spray-drying of encapsulated Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG cells. The FTIR analysis clearly demonstrated there were more significant molecular changes in lipid, fatty acid content, protein, and DNA conformation of nonencapsulated compared to encapsulated bacterial cells. The technique was also able to differentiate between spray-dried and freeze-dried cells. The results also revealed the extent of protection from a protein-carbohydrate-based encapsulant matrix on the cells depending on the type drying process. The extent of this protection to the dehydration stress was shown to be less in spray-dried cells than in freeze-dried cells. This suggests that FTIR could be used as a rapid, noninvasive, and real-time measurement technique to detect detrimental drying effects on cells.

  9. Effect of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG Administration on Vancomycin-Resistant Enterococcus Colonization in Adults with Comorbidities

    PubMed Central

    Hibberd, Patricia L.; Goldin, Barry; Thorpe, Cheleste; McDermott, Laura; Snydman, David R.

    2015-01-01

    Vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) are endemic in health care settings. These organisms colonize the gastrointestinal tract and can lead to infection which is associated with increased mortality. There is no treatment for VRE colonization. We conducted a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial to examine the safety and efficacy of administration of the probiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG) for the reduction or elimination of intestinal colonization by VRE. Colonized adults were randomized to receive LGG or placebo for 14 days. Quantitative stool cultures for LGG and VRE were collected at baseline and days 7, 14, 21, 28, and 56. Day 14 stool samples from some subjects were analyzed by quantitative PCR (qPCR) for LGG. Patients were closely monitored for adverse events. Eleven subjects, of whom 5 received LGG and 6 received placebo, were analyzed. No differences in VRE colony counts were seen at any time points between groups. No decline in colony counts was seen over time in subjects who received LGG. LGG was detected by PCR in all samples tested from subjects who received LGG but was only isolated in culture from 2 of 5 subjects in the LGG group. No treatment-related adverse events were seen. We demonstrated that LGG could be administered safely to patients with comorbidities and is recoverable in some patients' stool cultures. Concomitant administration of antibiotics may have resulted in an inability to recover viable organisms from stool samples, but LGG DNA could still be detected by qPCR. LGG administration did not affect VRE colonization in this study. (This study was registered at Clinicaltrials.gov under registration no. NCT00756262.) PMID:26014940

  10. Effects of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG on hepatic and serum lipid profiles in zebrafish exposed to ethanol.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Ana Claudia Reis; Machado, Alice Beatriz Mombach Pinheiro; de Assis, Adriano Martimbianco; Hermes, Djuli Milene; Schaefer, Pedro Guilherme; Guizzo, Ranieli; Fracasso, Laísa Beduschi; de-Paris, Fernanda; Meurer, Fábio; Barth, Afonso Luis; da Silveira, Themis Reverbel

    2014-08-01

    Zebrafish is a powerful tool in pharmacological research and useful to identify new therapies. Probiotics can offer therapeutic options in alcoholic liver disease. This study was done in two independent experiments: first, we confirmed the intestinal colonization of probiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG) after ethanol exposure. Second, four groups were performed: control (C), probiotic (P), ethanol (E), and probiotic+ethanol (P+E). Liver histology, hepatocytes morphometry, hepatic and serum lipid quantifications were conducted in second experiment. During 4 weeks, P and P+E groups were fed with LGG supplemented feed; E and C unsupplemented. E and P+E groups received 0.5% of ethanol added into tank water. Zebrafish exposed to ethanol (E group) presented intense liver steatosis after 28 days in contrast to the almost normalized liver histology of P+E group at the same period. Liver morphometry showed a significant enlargement of hepatocytes of E group after 4 weeks (p<0.0001). Serum triglycerides decreased in P+E group compared with C, P (p<0.001), and E (p=0.004), after 14 and 28 days similarly. Serum cholesterol was also decreased by LGG; P group decreased compared with C and E after 14 days (p=0.002 and p=0.007, respectively) and P+E group decreased significantly compared with E and C groups (p<0.0001) after 28 days. Hepatic triglycerides were reduced in P+E group after 28 days compared to E (p=0.006). The persistence of LGG in zebrafish intestines was demonstrated. LGG decreased serum levels of triglycerides and cholesterol and improved hepatic steatosis.

  11. Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG Effect on Behavior of Zebrafish During Chronic Ethanol Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, Ana Claudia Reis; Rico, Eduardo Pacheco; de Oliveira, Diogo Losch; Rosemberg, Denis Broock; Guizzo, Ranieli; Meurer, Fábio; da Silveira, Themis Reverbel

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Ethanol is a widely consumed drug, which acts on the central nervous system to induce behavioral alterations ranging from disinhibition to sedation. Recent studies have produced accumulating evidence for the therapeutic role of probiotic bacteria in behavior. We aimed to investigate the effect of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG) on the behavior of adult zebrafish chronically exposed to ethanol. Adult wild-type zebrafish were randomly divided into four groups, each containing 15 fish. The following groups were formed: Control (C), received unsupplemented feed during the trial period; Probiotic (P), fed with feed supplemented with LGG; Ethanol (E), received unsupplemented feed and 0.5% of ethanol directly added to the tank water; and Probiotic+Ethanol (P+E), group under ethanol exposure (0.5%) and fed with LGG supplemented feed. After 2 weeks of exposure, the novel tank test was used to evaluate fish behavior, which was analyzed using computer-aided video tracking. LGG alone did not alter swimming behavior of the fish. Ethanol exposure led to robust behavioral effects in the form of reduced anxiety levels, as indicated by increased vertical exploration and more time spent in the upper region of the novel tank. The group exposed to ethanol and treated with LGG behaved similarly to animals exposed to ethanol alone. Taken together, these results show that zebrafish behavior was not altered by LGG per se, as seen in murine models. This was the first study to investigate the effects of a probiotic diet on behavior after a chronic ethanol exposure. PMID:26862467

  12. Preserving viability of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG in vitro and in vivo by a new encapsulation system.

    PubMed

    Li, Ran; Zhang, Yufeng; Polk, D Brent; Tomasula, Peggy M; Yan, Fang; Liu, LinShu

    2016-05-28

    Probiotics have shown beneficial effects on health and prevention of diseases in humans. However, a concern for application of probiotics is the loss of viability during storage and gastrointestinal transit. The aim of this study was to develop an encapsulation system to preserve viability of probiotics when they are administrated orally and apply Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG) as a probiotic model to evaluate the effectiveness of this approach using in vitro and in vivo experiments. LGG was encapsulated in hydrogel beads prepared using pectin, a food grade polysaccharide, glucose, and calcium chloride, and lyophilized by freeze-drying. Encapsulated LGG was cultured in vitro under the condition that mimicked the physiological environment of the human gastrointestinal tract. Compared to non-encapsulated LGG, encapsulation increased tolerance of LGG in the acid condition, protected LGG from protease digestion, and improved shelf time when stored at the ambient condition, in regard of survivability and production of p40, a known LGG-derived protein involved in LGG's beneficial effects on intestinal homeostasis. To evaluate the effects of encapsulation on p40 production in vivo and prevention of intestinal inflammation by LGG, mice were gavaged with LGG containing beads and treated with dextran sulphate sodium (DSS) to induce intestinal injury and colitis. Compared to non-encapsulated LGG, encapsulated LGG enhanced more p40 production in mice, and exerted higher levels of effects on prevention of DSS-induced colonic injury and colitis and suppression of pro-inflammatory cytokine production. These data indicated that the encapsulation system developed in this study preserves viability of LGG in vitro and in vivo, leading to longer shelf time and enhancing the functions of LGG in the gastrointestinal tract. Thus, this encapsulation approach may have the potential application for improving efficacy of probiotics.

  13. Preserving viability of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG in vitro and in vivo by a new encapsulation system

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ran; Zhang, Yufeng; Polk, D. Brent; Tomasula, Peggy M.; Yan, Fang; Liu, LinShu

    2016-01-01

    Probiotics have shown beneficial effects on health and prevention of diseases in humans. However, a concern for application of probiotics is the loss of viability during storage and gastrointestinal transit. The aim of this study was to develop an encapsulation system to preserve viability of probiotics when they are administrated orally and apply Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG) as a probiotic model to evaluate the effectiveness of this approach using in vitro and in vivo experiments. LGG was encapsulated in hydrogel beads prepared using pectin, a food grade polysaccharide, glucose, and calcium chloride, and lyophilized by freeze-drying. Encapsulated LGG was cultured in vitro under the condition that mimicked the physiological environment of the human gastrointestinal tract. Compared to non-encapsulated LGG, encapsulation increased tolerance of LGG in the acid condition, protected LGG from protease digestion, and improved shelf time when stored at the ambient condition, in regard of survivability and production of p40, a known LGG-derived protein involved in LGG’s beneficial effects on intestinal homeostasis. To evaluate the effects of encapsulation on p40 production in vivo and prevention of intestinal inflammation by LGG, mice were gavaged with LGG containing beads and treated with dextran sulphate sodium (DSS) to induce intestinal injury and colitis. Compared to non-encapsulated LGG, encapsulated LGG enhanced more p40 production in mice, and exerted higher levels of effects on prevention of DSS-induced colonic injury and colitis and suppression of pro-inflammatory cytokine production. These data indicated that the encapsulation system developed in this study preserves viability of LGG in vitro and in vivo, leading to longer shelf time and enhancing the functions of LGG in the gastrointestinal tract. Thus, this encapsulation approach may have the potential application for improving efficacy of probiotics. PMID:27063422

  14. Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG Intake Modifies Preschool Children’s Intestinal Microbiota, Alleviates Penicillin-Associated Changes, and Reduces Antibiotic Use

    PubMed Central

    Korpela, Katri; Salonen, Anne; Virta, Lauri J.; Kumpu, Minna; Kekkonen, Riina A.; de Vos, Willem M.

    2016-01-01

    Antibiotic use is considered among the most severe causes of disturbance to children’s developing intestinal microbiota, and frequently causes adverse gastrointestinal effects ranging from mild and transient diarrhoea to life-threatening infections. Probiotics are commonly advocated to help in preventing antibiotic-associated gastrointestinal symptoms. However, it is currently unknown whether probiotics alleviate the antibiotic-associated changes in children’s microbiota. Furthermore, it is not known how long-term probiotic consumption influences the developing microbiota of children. We analysed the influence of long-term Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG intake on preschool children’s antibiotic use, and antibiotic-associated gastrointestinal complaints in a double blind, randomized placebo-controlled trial with 231 children aged 2–7. In addition, we analysed the effect of L. rhanmosus GG on the intestinal microbiota in a subset of 88 children. The results show that long-term L. rhamnosus GG supplementation has an influence on the composition of the intestinal microbiota in children, causing an increase in the abundance of Prevotella, Lactococcus, and Ruminococcus, and a decrease in Escherichia. The treatment appeared to prevent some of the changes in the microbiota associated with penicillin use, but not those associated with macrolide use. The treatment, however, did reduce the frequency of gastrointestinal complaints after a macrolide course. Finally, the treatment appeared to prevent certain bacterial infections for up to 3 years after the trial, as indicated by reduced antibiotic use. Trial Registration: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01014676 PMID:27111772

  15. Synbiotic Amazonian palm berry (açai, Euterpe oleracea Mart.) ice cream improved Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG survival to simulated gastrointestinal stress.

    PubMed

    Costa, Mayra Garcia Maia; Ooki, Gabriela Namur; Vieira, Antônio Diogo Silva; Bedani, Raquel; Saad, Susana Marta Isay

    2017-02-22

    The effect of açai pulp ice cream and of its supplementation with inulin (I), whey protein concentrate (WC), and/or whey protein isolate (WI) on the viability and resistance to simulated gastrointestinal stress of the probiotic Lactobacillus (Lb.) rhamnosus GG strain throughout storage at -18 °C for up to 112 days was evaluated and morphological changes during stress were monitored. Lb. rhamnosus GG viability was stable in all formulations for up to 112 days of storage, preserving populations around 9 log CFU g(-1). Compared to the fresh culture, Lb. rhamnosus GG showed higher survival under simulated gastrointestinal conditions when incorporated into açai ice cream, indicating that the presence of the food matrix contributed to the microorganism survival. A reduction of at least 5 log cycles of Lb. rhamnosus GG was observed in all formulations after the gastrointestinal simulation in all storage periods assessed. The addition of I, WC, and/or WI did not show any significant effect on the probiotic survival under simulated gastrointestinal stress (p < 0.05). Compared to the fresh culture, fewer morphological changes were observed when the probiotic was added to ice cream. Thus, the açai pulp ice cream was shown to be a suitable matrix for Lb. rhamnosus GG, improving its survival under in vitro simulated gastrointestinal conditions.

  16. Dietary addition of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG impairs the health of Escherichia coli F4-challenged piglets.

    PubMed

    Trevisi, P; Casini, L; Coloretti, F; Mazzoni, M; Merialdi, G; Bosi, P

    2011-08-01

    Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG) is a probiotic for humans and is normally not found in pigs; however, it has been shown to protect the human-derived intestinal Caco-2 cells against the damage induced by an important intestinal pathogen, enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli F4 (ETEC). An experiment was conducted to test whether the dietary addition of LGG improves the growth and health of weaned pigs when orally challenged by E. coli F4. Thirty-six pigs were weaned at 21 days and assigned to a standard weaning diet with or without 1010 CFU LGG (ATCC 53103) per day. The pigs, individually penned, were orally challenged with 1.5 ml of a 1010 CFU E. coli F4 suspension on day 7 and slaughtered on day 12 or 14. With the addition of LGG, the average daily gain and the average daily feed intake were reduced after the challenge with ETEC and for the entire trial (P < 0.05). The average faecal score tended to worsen from day 11 to the end of the trial and the concentration of ETEC in the faeces tended to increase (P = 0.07) with the LGG supplementation. The counts of lactic acid bacteria, enterobacteria and yeasts in the colonic digesta were not affected. The pH values in ileal, colonic and caecal digesta, and the small intestine size were also unchanged. Regardless of the site of measurement (duodenum, jejunum or ileum), a trend of decreased villus height was seen with LGG (P = 0.10). Crypt depth and villus to crypt ratio were unchanged by the diet. A gradual increase of total seric IgA was seen after 1 week and after the challenge, in the control (P < 0.05), but not in the treated group. After the challenge, the LGG reduced the total IgA in the blood serum (P < 0.05), v. the control. The total IgA in the saliva and in the jejunum secretion were not affected by the diet. The F4-specific IgA activity was not affected by the diet at all the samplings. Our result shows that, the administration of LGG do not prevent or reduce the detrimental effect of the E. coli F4 infection on

  17. The N-Terminal GYPSY Motif Is Required for Pilin-Specific Sortase SrtC1 Functionality in Lactobacillus rhamnosus Strain GG

    PubMed Central

    Douillard, François P.; Rasinkangas, Pia; Bhattacharjee, Arnab; Palva, Airi; de Vos, Willem M.

    2016-01-01

    Predominantly identified in pathogenic Gram-positive bacteria, sortase-dependent pili are also found in commensal species, such as the probiotic-marketed strain Lactobacillus rhamnosus strain GG. Pili are typically associated with host colonization, immune signalling and biofilm formation. Comparative analysis of the N-terminal domains of pilin-specific sortases from various piliated Gram-positive bacteria identified a conserved motif, called GYPSY, within the signal sequence. We investigated the function and role of the GYPSY residues by directed mutagenesis in homologous (rod-shaped) and heterologous (coccoid-shaped) expression systems for pilus formation. Substitutions of some of the GYPSY residues, and more specifically the proline residue, were found to have a direct impact on the degree of piliation of Lb. rhamnosus GG. The present findings uncover a new signalling element involved in the functionality of pilin-specific sortases controlling the pilus biogenesis of Lb. rhamnosus GG and related piliated Gram-positive species. PMID:27070897

  18. An Exopolysaccharide-Deficient Mutant of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG Efficiently Displays a Protective Llama Antibody Fragment against Rotavirus on Its Surface

    PubMed Central

    Krogh-Andersen, Kasper; Tellgren-Roth, Christian; Martínez, Noelia; Günaydın, Gökçe; Lin, Yin; Martín, M. Cruz; Álvarez, Miguel A.; Hammarström, Lennart

    2015-01-01

    Rotavirus is the leading cause of infantile diarrhea in developing countries, where it causes a high number of deaths among infants. Two vaccines are available, being highly effective in developed countries although markedly less efficient in developing countries. As a complementary treatment to the vaccines, a Lactobacillus strain producing an anti-rotavirus antibody fragment in the gastrointestinal tract could potentially be used. In order to develop such an alternative therapy, the effectiveness of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG to produce and display a VHH antibody fragment (referred to as anti-rotavirus protein 1 [ARP1]) on the surface was investigated. L. rhamnosus GG is one of the best-characterized probiotic bacteria and has intrinsic antirotavirus activity. Among four L. rhamnosus GG strains [GG (CMC), GG (ATCC 53103), GG (NCC 3003), and GG (UT)] originating from different sources, only GG (UT) was able to display ARP1 on the bacterial surface. The genomic analysis of strain GG (UT) showed that the genes welE and welF of the EPS cluster are inactivated, which causes a defect in exopolysaccharide (EPS) production, allowing efficient display of ARP1 on its surface. Finally, GG (UT) seemed to confer a level of protection against rotavirus-induced diarrhea similar to that of wild-type GG (NCC 3003) in a mouse pup model, indicating that the EPS may not be involved in the intrinsic antirotavirus activity. Most important, GG (EM233), a derivative of GG (UT) producing ARP1, was significantly more protective than the control strain L. casei BL23. PMID:26092449

  19. An l-Fucose Operon in the Probiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG Is Involved in Adaptation to Gastrointestinal Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Becerra, Jimmy E.; Yebra, María J.

    2015-01-01

    l-Fucose is a sugar present in human secretions as part of human milk oligosaccharides, mucins, and other glycoconjugates in the intestinal epithelium. The genome of the probiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG) carries a gene cluster encoding a putative l-fucose permease (fucP), l-fucose catabolic pathway (fucI, fucK, fucU, and fucA), and a transcriptional regulator (fucR). The metabolism of l-fucose in LGG results in 1,2-propanediol production, and their fucI and fucP mutants displayed a severe and mild growth defect on l-fucose, respectively. Transcriptional analysis revealed that the fuc genes are induced by l-fucose and subject to a strong carbon catabolite repression effect. This induction was triggered by FucR, which acted as a transcriptional activator necessary for growth on l-fucose. LGG utilized fucosyl-α1,3-N-acetylglucosamine and contrarily to other lactobacilli, the presence of fuc genes allowed this strain to use the l-fucose moiety. In fucI and fucR mutants, but not in fucP mutant, l-fucose was not metabolized and it was excreted to the medium during growth on fucosyl-α1,3-N-acetylglucosamine. The fuc genes were induced by this fucosyl-disaccharide in the wild type and the fucP mutant but not in a fucI mutant, showing that FucP does not participate in the regulation of fuc genes and that l-fucose metabolism is needed for FucR activation. The l-fucose operon characterized here constitutes a new example of the many factors found in LGG that allow this strain to adapt to the gastrointestinal conditions. PMID:25819967

  20. Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG-supplemented formula expands butyrate-producing bacterial strains in food allergic infants

    SciTech Connect

    Berni Canani, Roberto; Sangwan, Naseer; Stefka, Andrew T.; Nocerino, Rita; Paparo, Lorella; Aitoro, Rosita; Calignano, Antonio; Khan, Aly A.; Gilbert, Jack A.; Nagler, Cathryn R.

    2015-09-22

    Dietary intervention with extensively hydrolyzed casein formula supplemented with Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (EHCF+LGG) accelerates tolerance acquisition in infants with cow’s milk allergy (CMA). We examined whether this effect is attributable, at least in part, to an influence on the gut microbiota. Fecal samples from healthy controls (n=20) and from CMA infants (n=19) before and after treatment with EHCF with (n=12) and without (n=7) supplementation with LGG were compared by 16S rRNA-based operational taxonomic unit clustering and oligotyping. Differential feature selection and generalized linear model fitting revealed that the CMA infants have a diverse gut microbial community structure dominated by Lachnospiraceae (20.5±9.7%) and Ruminococcaceae (16.2±9.1%). Blautia, Roseburia and Coprococcus were significantly enriched following treatment with EHCF and LGG, but only one genus, Oscillospira, was significantly different between infants that became tolerant and those that remained allergic. However, most tolerant infants showed a significant increase in fecal butyrate levels, and those taxa that were significantly enriched in these samples, Blautia and Roseburia, exhibited specific strain-level demarcations between tolerant and allergic infants. As a result, our data suggest that EHCF+LGG promotes tolerance in infants with CMA, in part, by influencing the strain-level bacterial community structure of the infant gut.

  1. An L-Fucose Operon in the Probiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG Is Involved in Adaptation to Gastrointestinal Conditions.

    PubMed

    Becerra, Jimmy E; Yebra, María J; Monedero, Vicente

    2015-06-01

    L-Fucose is a sugar present in human secretions as part of human milk oligosaccharides, mucins, and other glycoconjugates in the intestinal epithelium. The genome of the probiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG) carries a gene cluster encoding a putative L-fucose permease (fucP), L-fucose catabolic pathway (fucI, fucK, fucU, and fucA), and a transcriptional regulator (fucR). The metabolism of L-fucose in LGG results in 1,2-propanediol production, and their fucI and fucP mutants displayed a severe and mild growth defect on L-fucose, respectively. Transcriptional analysis revealed that the fuc genes are induced by L-fucose and subject to a strong carbon catabolite repression effect. This induction was triggered by FucR, which acted as a transcriptional activator necessary for growth on L-fucose. LGG utilized fucosyl-α1,3-N-acetylglucosamine and contrarily to other lactobacilli, the presence of fuc genes allowed this strain to use the L-fucose moiety. In fucI and fucR mutants, but not in fucP mutant, L-fucose was not metabolized and it was excreted to the medium during growth on fucosyl-α1,3-N-acetylglucosamine. The fuc genes were induced by this fucosyl-disaccharide in the wild type and the fucP mutant but not in a fucI mutant, showing that FucP does not participate in the regulation of fuc genes and that L-fucose metabolism is needed for FucR activation. The l-fucose operon characterized here constitutes a new example of the many factors found in LGG that allow this strain to adapt to the gastrointestinal conditions.

  2. Antiproliferative effects on colon adenocarcinoma cells induced by co-administration of vitamin K1 and Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG.

    PubMed

    Orlando, Antonella; Linsalata, Michele; Russo, Francesco

    2016-06-01

    Vitamin K (VK), an essential nutrient associated with the clotting cascade, has also been demonstrated to have anticancer properties in various cancer cells including colon cancer cells. Also probiotics have gained interest as potential anticancer agents. Among them, Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (L.GG) has been shown to inhibit cell proliferation and polyamine biosynthesis as well as to induce apoptosis in different human gastrointestinal cancer cells. Nevertheless, the exact mechanisms involved in these actions are not completely elucidated. Therefore, the aims of the present study were to evaluate in three differently graded human colon cancer cells (namely Caco-2, HT-29 and SW480) the effects of increasing VK1 concentrations, administered alone or in combination with viable L.GG, on the cell proliferation evaluated by MTT test, apoptosis investigated by Bax/Bcl-2 ratio and the percentage of the apoptotic cells, and the cell cycle evaluated by MUSE cell analyzer. Both VK1 and L.GG administered alone up to 72 h, caused inhibition of proliferation, induction of apoptosis and the cell cycle arrest in all the tested colon cancer cells. When VK1 and L.GG were co-administered, the addition of increasing VK1 concentrations potentiated the probiotic antiproliferative effect in a dose-dependent manner, being also related to the individual features of each cell line. The effect was more evident in Caco-2 and HT-29 cells compared to the less differentiated SW480. The enhanced antiproliferative efficacy due to co-administration of L.GG and VK1 could represent a suitable option in a functional food strategy for cancer growth inhibition and chemoprevention.

  3. Using Recombinant Lactococci as an Approach to Dissect the Immunomodulating Capacity of Surface Piliation in Probiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG

    PubMed Central

    Nummenmaa, Elina; Mäkinen, Veli-Matti; Reunanen, Justus; Satokari, Reetta; de Vos, Willem M.; Palva, Ilkka; Palva, Airi

    2013-01-01

    Primarily arising from their well understood beneficial health effects, many lactobacilli strains are considered good candidates for use as probiotics in humans and animals. Lactobacillar probiosis can itself be best typified by the Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG strain, which, with its well-documented clinical benefits, has emerged as one of the most widely used probiotics in the food and health-supplement industries. Even so, many facets of its molecular mechanisms and limitations as a beneficial commensal bacterium still remain to be thoroughly explored and dissected. Because L. rhamnosus GG is one of only a few such strains exhibiting surface piliation (called SpaCBA), we sought to examine whether this particular type of cell-surface appendage has a discernible immunomodulating capacity and is able to trigger targeted responses in human immune-related cells. Thus, presented herein for this study, we recombinantly engineered Lactococcus lactis to produce native (and pilin-deleted) SpaCBA pili that were assembled in a structurally authentic form and anchored to the cell surface, and which had retained mucus-binding functionality. By using these recombinant lactococcal constructs, we were able to demonstrate that the SpaCBA pilus can be a contributory factor in the activation of Toll-like receptor 2-dependent signaling in HEK cells as well as in the modulation of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokine (TNF-α, IL-6, IL-10, and IL-12) production in human monocyte-derived dendritic cells. From these data, we suggest that the recombinant-expressed and surface-anchored SpaCBA pilus, given its projected functioning in the gut environment, might be viewed as a new microbe-associated molecular pattern (MAMP)-like modulator of innate immunity. Accordingly, our study has brought some new insight to the molecular immunogenicity of the SpaCBA pilus, thus opening the way to a better understanding of its possible role in the multifaceted nature of L. rhamnosus GG probiosis within the

  4. No evidence of harms of probiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG ATCC 53103 in healthy elderly-a Phase I Open Label Study to assess safety, tolerability and cytokine responses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Although Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG ATCC 53103 (LGG) has been consumed since the mid 1990s by between 2 and 5 million people daily, the scientific literature lacks rigorous clinical trials that describe the potential harms of LGG, particularly in the elderly. The primary objective of this open label...

  5. A lactobacillus rhamnosus GG-derived soluble protein, p40, stimulates ligand release from intestinal epithelial cells to transactivate epidermal growth factor receptor

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Protein p40, a Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG)-derived soluble protein, ameliorates intestinal injury and colitis, reduces apoptosis and preserves barrier function by activation of EGF receptor (EGFR) in intestinal epithelial cells. The aim of this study was to determine the mechanisms by which p40...

  6. The use of the probiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG and viral findings in the nasopharynx of children attending day care.

    PubMed

    Kumpu, Minna; Lehtoranta, Liisa; Roivainen, Merja; Rönkkö, Esa; Ziegler, Thedi; Söderlund-Venermo, Maria; Kautiainen, Hannu; Järvenpää, Salme; Kekkonen, Riina; Hatakka, Katja; Korpela, Riitta; Pitkäranta, Anne

    2013-09-01

    Limited data are available on the effects of probiotics on the nasopharyngeal presence of respiratory viruses in children attending day care. In this substudy of a randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled 28-week intervention study, nasopharyngeal swab samples were collected, on visits to a physician due to symptoms of infection, from children receiving control milk (N = 97) and children receiving the same milk supplemented with probiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (N = 97). The presence of 14 respiratory viruses was assessed by PCR methods, and viral findings were compared with symptom prevalences in the intervention groups. Rhinovirus was identified in 28.6% of 315 swab samples, followed by respiratory syncytial virus (12.4%), parainfluenza virus 1 (12.1%), enterovirus (8.9%), influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 (7.9%), human bocavirus 1 (3.8%), parainfluenza virus 2 (3.2%), adenovirus (2.9%), and influenza A(H3N2) (0.6%). The children in the probiotic group had less days with respiratory symptoms per month than the children in the control group (6.48 [95% CI 6.28-6.68] vs. 7.19 [95% CI 6.98-7.41], P < 0.001). Probiotic intervention did not reduce significantly the occurrence of the examined respiratory viruses, or have an effect on the number of respiratory symptoms observed at the time of a viral finding. Rhinovirus, respiratory syncytial virus, and parainfluenza virus 1 were the most common respiratory viruses in symptomatic children. Children receiving Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG had fewer days with respiratory symptoms than children in the control group, although probiotic intervention was not effective in reducing the amount of viral findings or the respiratory symptoms associated with viral findings.

  7. Effect of live and inactivated Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG on experimentally induced rhinovirus colds: randomised, double blind, placebo-controlled pilot trial.

    PubMed

    Kumpu, M; Kekkonen, R A; Korpela, R; Tynkkynen, S; Järvenpää, S; Kautiainen, H; Allen, E K; Hendley, J O; Pitkäranta, A; Winther, B

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this work was to investigate the usability of an experimental rhinovirus model in probiotic trials aiming to assess effectiveness in viral infections, and to provide preliminary data of live and inactivated probiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG for larger-scale trials utilising the model. 59 subjects were randomised to receive 100 ml of fruit juice supplemented with 10(9) cfu of live or heat-inactivated (by spray-drying) L. rhamnosus GG or control juice daily for six weeks. After three weeks subjects were intranasally inoculated with experimental rhinovirus. Infection rate (at least one positive culture for challenge virus on five days following inoculation or at least four-fold rise in antibody response to challenge virus) was 14/19 in the group receiving live probiotic strain and 18/20 both in the group receiving heat-inactivated probiotic strain and in the control group (P=0.36). The occurrence and severity of cold symptoms on the five days following the inoculation was lowest in the group receiving live probiotic strain (P=0.45). This trial was the first one dedicated to the investigation of the effect of probiotics using the experimental rhinovirus model. The model showed potential for demonstration of efficacy of probiotics in controlled respiratory viral infections. Occurrence and severity of cold symptoms and number of subjects with rhinovirus infection was lowest in the group receiving live L. rhamnosus GG, but differences were not statistically significant. Further large-scale studies are needed to demonstrate the efficacy of L. rhamnosus GG in respiratory infections.

  8. Impact of lipoteichoic acid modification on the performance of the probiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG in experimental colitis.

    PubMed

    Claes, I J J; Lebeer, Sarah; Shen, C; Verhoeven, T L A; Dilissen, E; De Hertogh, G; Bullens, D M A; Ceuppens, J L; Van Assche, G; Vermeire, S; Rutgeerts, P; Vanderleyden, J; De Keersmaecker, S C J

    2010-11-01

    While some probiotic strains might have adjuvant effects in the therapy for inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), these effects remain controversial and cannot be generalized. In this study, a dltD mutant of the model probiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG), having a drastic modification in its lipoteichoic acid (LTA) molecules, was analysed for its effects in an experimental colitis model. Dextran sulphate sodium (DSS) was used to induce either moderate to severe or mild chronic colitis in mice. Mice received either phosphate-buffered saline (PBS), LGG wild-type or the dltD mutant via the drinking water. Macroscopic parameters, histological abnormalities, cytokine and Toll-like receptor (TLR) expression were analysed to assess disease activity. LGG wild-type did not show efficacy in the different experimental colitis set-ups. This wild-type strain even seemed to exacerbate the severity of colitic parameters in the moderate to severe colitis model compared to untreated mice. In contrast, mice treated with the dltD mutant showed an improvement of some colitic parameters compared to LGG wild-type-treated mice in both experimental models. In addition, treatment with the dltD mutant correlated with a significant down-regulation of Toll-like receptor-2 expression and of downstream proinflammatory cytokine expression in the colitic mice. These results show that molecular cell surface characteristics of probiotics are crucial when probiotics are considered for use as supporting therapy in IBD.

  9. Inhibition of Streptococcus pneumoniae adherence to human epithelial cells in vitro by the probiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Colonization of the nasopharynx by Streptococcus pneumoniae is considered a prerequisite for pneumococcal infections such as pneumonia and otitis media. Probiotic bacteria can influence disease outcomes through various mechanisms, including inhibition of pathogen colonization. Here, we examine the effect of the probiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG) on S. pneumoniae colonization of human epithelial cells using an in vitro model. We investigated the effects of LGG administered before, at the same time as, or after the addition of S. pneumoniae on the adherence of four pneumococcal isolates. Results LGG significantly inhibited the adherence of all the pneumococcal isolates tested. The magnitude of inhibition varied with LGG dose, time of administration, and the pneumococcal isolate used. Inhibition was most effective when a higher dose of LGG was administered prior to establishment of pneumococcal colonization. Mechanistic studies showed that LGG binds to epithelial cells but does not affect pneumococcal growth or viability. Administration of LGG did not lead to any significant changes in host cytokine responses. Conclusions These findings demonstrate that LGG can inhibit pneumococcal colonization of human epithelial cells in vitro and suggest that probiotics could be used clinically to prevent the establishment of pneumococcal carriage. PMID:23561014

  10. In vivo gut transcriptome responses to Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG and Lactobacillus acidophilus in neonatal gnotobiotic piglets

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Anand; Vlasova, Anastasia N; Liu, Zhe; Chattha, Kuldeep S; Kandasamy, Sukumar; Esseili, Malak; Zhang, Xiaoli; Rajashekara, Gireesh; Saif, Linda J

    2014-01-01

    Probiotics facilitate mucosal repair and maintain gut homeostasis. They are often used in adjunct with rehydration or antibiotic therapy in enteric infections. Lactobacillus spp have been tested in infants for the prevention or treatment of various enteric conditions. However, to aid in rational strain selection for specific treatments, comprehensive studies are required to delineate and compare the specific molecules and pathways involved in a less complex but biologically relevant model (gnotobiotic pigs). Here we elucidated Lactobacillus rhamnosus (LGG) and L. acidophilus (LA) specific effects on gut transcriptome responses in a neonatal gnotobiotic (Gn) pig model to simulate responses in newly colonized infants. Whole genome microarray, followed by biological pathway reconstruction, was used to investigate the host-microbe interactions in duodenum and ileum at early (day 1) and later stages (day 7) of colonization. Both LA and LGG modulated common responses related to host metabolism, gut integrity, and immunity, as well as responses unique to each strain in Gn pigs. Our data indicated that probiotic establishment and beneficial effects in the host are guided by: (1) down-regulation or upregulation of immune function-related genes in the early and later stages of colonization, respectively, and (2) alternations in metabolism of small molecules (vitamins and/or minerals) and macromolecules (carbohydrates, proteins, and lipids). Pathways related to immune modulation and carbohydrate metabolism were more affected by LGG, whereas energy and lipid metabolism-related transcriptome responses were prominently modulated by LA. These findings imply that identification of probiotic strain-specific gut responses could facilitate the rational design of probiotic-based interventions to moderate specific enteric conditions. PMID:24637605

  11. Use of viability staining in combination with flow cytometry for rapid viability assessment of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG in complex protein matrices.

    PubMed

    Doherty, S B; Wang, L; Ross, R P; Stanton, C; Fitzgerald, G F; Brodkorb, A

    2010-09-01

    The aim of this study was to demonstrate that flow cytometry (FACS) could potentially be employed for rapid viability assessment of probiotic bacteria immobilized or encapsulated in complex matrices. Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG was immobilized within six different protein environments using whey protein isolate (WPI) and yoghurt matrices and encapsulated within protein micro-beads, all of which ranged in structural complexity. Following a series of environmental-stress trials, survival of the strain was examined using FACS compared to traditional plate count techniques. Cell extraction and digestive pre-treatments were designed to release cells and reduce the protein background, respectively, which represent compositional obstacles for efficient FACS analysis. Physico-chemical properties of protein-probiotic components revealed the mechanism necessary for efficient cell delivery during FACS analysis. This assay required 40 min sample preparation and distinct functional populations were discriminated based on fluorescent properties of thiazole orange (TO) and propidium iodide (PI). This assay yielded 45-50 samples/h, a detection range of 10(2)-10(10)cfu/ml of homogenate and generated correlation coefficients (r) of 0.95, 0.92 and 0.93 in relation to standard plate counts during heat, acid and storage trials, respectively. In conclusion, this methodology provides impetus for dynamic progression of FACS for rapid viability assessment of live bacteria immobilized/encapsulated within complex protein systems.

  12. Activation of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Mediates Mucin Production Stimulated by p40, a Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG-derived Protein*

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lihong; Cao, Hailong; Liu, Liping; Wang, Bangmao; Walker, W. Allan; Acra, Sari A.; Yan, Fang

    2014-01-01

    The mucus layer coating the gastrointestinal tract serves as the first line of intestinal defense against infection and injury. Probiotics promote mucin production by goblet cells in the intestine. p40, a Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG-derived soluble protein, has been shown to transactivate the EGF receptor (EGFR) in intestinal epithelial cells, which is required for inhibition of apoptosis and preservation of barrier function in the colon, thereby ameliorating intestinal injury and colitis. Because activation of EGFR has been shown to up-regulate mucin production in goblet cells, the purpose of this study was to investigate the effects and mechanisms of p40 regulation of mucin production. p40 activated EGFR and its downstream target, Akt, in a concentration-dependent manner in LS174T cells. p40 stimulated Muc2 gene expression and mucin production in LS174T cells, which were abolished by inhibition of EGFR kinase activity, down-regulation of EGFR expression by EGFR siRNA transfection, or suppression of Akt activation. Treatment with p40 increased mucin production in the colonic epithelium, thus thickening the mucus layer in the colon of wild type, but not of Egfrwa5 mice, which have a dominant negative mutation in the EGFR kinase domain. Furthermore, inhibition of mucin-type O-linked glycosylation suppressed the effect of p40 on increasing mucin production and protecting intestinal epithelial cells from TNF-induced apoptosis in colon organ culture. Thus, these results suggest that p40-stimulated activation of EGFR mediates up-regulation of mucin production, which may contribute to the mechanisms by which p40 protects the intestinal epithelium from injury. PMID:24895124

  13. Differential effects of Escherichia coli Nissle and Lactobacillus rhamnosus strain GG on human rotavirus binding, infection, and B cell immunity

    PubMed Central

    Kandasamy, Sukumar; Vlasova, Anastasia N; Fischer, David; Kumar, Anand; Chattha, Kuldeep S; Rauf, Abdul; Shao, Lulu; Langel, Stephanie N; Rajashekara, Gireesh; Saif, Linda J

    2015-01-01

    Rotavirus (RV) causes significant morbidity and mortality in children worldwide. The intestinal microbiota plays an important role in modulating host-pathogen interactions, but little is known about the impact of commonly used probiotics on human RV (HRV) infection. In this study, we compared the immunomodulatory effects of Gram-positive [Lactobacillus rhamnosus strain GG (LGG)] and Gram-negative [Escherichia coli Nissle (EcN)] probiotic bacteria on virulent human rotavirus (VirHRV) infection and immunity using neonatal gnotobiotic (Gn) piglets. Gn piglets were colonized with EcN, LGG, EcN+LGG or uncolonized and challenged with VirHRV. Mean peak virus shedding titers and mean cumulative fecal scores were significantly lower in EcN-colonized compared to LGG-colonized or uncolonized piglets. Reduced viral shedding titers were correlated with significantly reduced small intestinal HRV IgA antibody responses in EcN-colonized compared to uncolonized piglets post-VirHRV challenge. However the total IgA levels post-VirHRV challenge in the intestine and pre-VirHRV challenge in serum were significantly higher in EcN-colonized than in LGG-colonized piglets. In vitro treatment of mononuclear cells (MNCs) with these probiotics demonstrated that EcN, but not LGG, induced IL-6, IL-10, and IgA, with the latter partially dependent on IL-10. However, addition of exogenous recombinant porcine IL-10 + IL-6 to MNCs co-cultured with LGG significantly enhanced IgA responses. The greater effectiveness of EcN in moderating HRV infection, may also be explained by the binding of EcN, but not LGG to Wa HRV particles or HRV 2/4/6 virus-like particles (VLP) but not 2/6 VLP. Results suggest that EcN and LGG differentially modulate RV infection and B cell responses. PMID:26800875

  14. Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG Activation of Dendritic Cells and Neutrophils Depends on the Dose and Time of Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Bay, Boon Huat

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluates the ability of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG) to activate DC and neutrophils and modulate T cell activation and the impact of bacterial dose on these responses. Murine bone marrow derived DC or neutrophils were stimulated with LGG at ratios of 5 : 1, 10 : 1, and 100 : 1 (LGG : cells) and DC maturation (CD40, CD80, CD86, CD83, and MHC class II) and cytokine production (IL-10, TNF-α, and IL-12p70) were examined after 2 h and 18 h coculture and compared to the ability of BCG (the present immunotherapeutic agent for bladder cancer) to stimulate these cells. A 2 h exposure to 100 : 1 (high dose) or an 18 h exposure to 5 : 1 or 10 : 1 (low dose), LGG : cells, induced the highest production of IL-12 and upregulation of CD40, CD80, CD86, and MHC II on DC. In DCs stimulated with LGG activated neutrophils IL-12 production decreased with increasing dose. LGG induced 10-fold greater IL-12 production than BCG. T cell IFNγ and IL-2 production was significantly greater when stimulated with DC activated with low dose LGG. In conclusion, DC or DC activated with neutrophils exposed to low dose LGG induced greater Th1 polarization in T cells and this could potentially exert stronger antitumor effects. Thus the dose of LGG used for immunotherapy could determine treatment efficacy. PMID:27525288

  15. Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG increases Toll-like receptor 3 gene expression in murine small intestine ex vivo and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Aoki-Yoshida, A; Saito, S; Fukiya, S; Aoki, R; Takayama, Y; Suzuki, C; Sonoyama, K

    2016-06-01

    Administration of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG) has been reported to be therapeutically effective against acute secretory diarrhoea resulting from the structural and functional intestinal mucosal lesions induced by rotavirus infection; however, the underlying mechanisms remain to be completely elucidated. Because Toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3) plays a key role in the innate immune responses following the recognition of rotavirus, the present study examined whether LGG influences TLR3 gene expression in murine small intestine ex vivo and in vivo. We employed cultured intestinal organoids derived from small intestinal crypts as an ex vivo tissue model. LGG supplementation increased TLR3 mRNA levels in the intestinal organoids, as estimated by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. Likewise, single and 7-day consecutive daily administrations of LGG increased TLR3 mRNA levels in the small intestine of C57BL/6N mice. The mRNA levels of other TLRs were not substantially altered both ex vivo and in vivo. In addition, LGG supplementation increased the mRNA levels of an antiviral type 1 interferon, interferon-α (IFN-α), and a neutrophil chemokine, CXCL1, upon stimulation with a synthetic TLR3 ligand, poly(I:C) in the intestinal organoids. LGG administration did not alter IFN-α and CXCL1 mRNA levels in the small intestine in vivo. Supplementation of other bacterial strains, Bifidobacterium bifidum and Lactobacillus paracasei, failed to increase TLR3 and poly(I:C)-stimulated CXCL1 mRNA levels ex vivo. We propose that upregulation of TLR3 gene expression may play a pivotal role in the therapeutic efficacy of LGG against rotavirus-associated diarrhoea. In addition, we demonstrated that intestinal organoids may be a promising ex vivo tissue model for investigating host-pathogen interactions and the antiviral action of probiotics in the intestinal epithelium.

  16. Survival of Lactobacillus reuteri DSM 17938 and Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG in the Human Gastrointestinal Tract with Daily Consumption of a Low-Fat Probiotic Spread▿

    PubMed Central

    Dommels, Yvonne E. M.; Kemperman, Robèr A.; Zebregs, Yvonne E. M. P.; Draaisma, René B.; Jol, Arne; Wolvers, Danielle A. W.; Vaughan, Elaine E.; Albers, Ruud

    2009-01-01

    Probiotics are live microorganisms which, when administered in adequate amounts, confer a health benefit on the host. Therefore, probiotic strains should be able to survive passage through the human gastrointestinal tract. Human gastrointestinal tract survival of probiotics in a low-fat spread matrix has, however, never been tested. The objective of this randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled human intervention study was to test the human gastrointestinal tract survival of Lactobacillus reuteri DSM 17938 and Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG after daily consumption of a low-fat probiotic spread by using traditional culturing, as well as molecular methods. Forty-two healthy human volunteers were randomly assigned to one of three treatment groups provided with 20 g of placebo spread (n = 13), 20 g of spread with a target dose of 1 × 109 CFU of L. reuteri DSM 17938 (n = 13), or 20 g of spread with a target dose of 5 × 109 CFU of L. rhamnosus GG (n = 16) daily for 3 weeks. Fecal samples were obtained before and after the intervention period. A significant increase, compared to the baseline, in the recovery of viable probiotic lactobacilli in fecal samples was demonstrated after 3 weeks of daily consumption of the spread containing either L. reuteri DSM 17938 or L. rhamnosus GG by selective enumeration. In the placebo group, no increase was detected. The results of selective enumeration were supported by quantitative PCR, detecting a significant increase in DNA resulting from the probiotics after intervention. Overall, our results indicate for the first time that low-fat spread is a suitable carrier for these probiotic strains. PMID:19684171

  17. Dietary Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG Supplementation Improves the Mucosal Barrier Function in the Intestine of Weaned Piglets Challenged by Porcine Rotavirus.

    PubMed

    Mao, Xiangbing; Gu, Changsong; Hu, Haiyan; Tang, Jun; Chen, Daiwen; Yu, Bing; He, Jun; Yu, Jie; Luo, Junqiu; Tian, Gang

    2016-01-01

    Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG) has been regarded as a safe probiotic strain. The aim of this study was to investigate whether dietary LGG supplementation could alleviate diarrhea via improving jejunal mucosal barrier function in the weaned piglets challenged by RV, and further analyze the potential roles for apoptosis of jejunal mucosal cells and intestinal microbiota. A total of 24 crossbred barrows weaned at 21 d of age were assigned randomly to 1 of 2 diets: the basal diet and LGG supplementing diet. On day 11, all pigs were orally infused RV or the sterile essential medium. RV infusion increased the diarrhea rate, increased the RV-Ab, NSP4 and IL-2 concentrations and the Bax mRNA levels of jejunal mucosa (P<0.05), decreased the villus height, villus height: crypt depth, the sIgA, IL-4 and mucin 1 concentrations and the ZO-1, occludin and Bcl-2 mRNA levels of jejunal mucosa (P<0.05), and affected the microbiota of ileum and cecum (P<0.05) in the weaned pigs. Dietary LGG supplementation increased the villus height and villus height: crypt depth, the sIgA, IL-4, mucin 1 and mucin 2 concentrations, and the ZO-1, occludin and Bcl-2 mRNA levels of the jejunal mucosa (P<0.05) reduced the Bax mRNA levels of the jejunal mucosa (P<0.05) in weaned pigs. Furthermore, dietary LGG supplementation alleviated the increase of diarrhea rate in the weaned pigs challenged by RV (P<0.05), and relieve the effect of RV infection on the villus height, crypt depth and the villus height: crypt depth of the jejunal mucosa (P<0.05), the NSP4, sIgA, IL-2, IL-4, mucin 1 and mucin 2 concentrations of jejunal mucosa (P<0.05), the ZO-1, occludin, Bax and Bcl-2 mRNA levels of the jejunal mucosa (P<0.05), and the microbiota of ileum and cecum (P<0.05) in the weaned pigs challenged by RV. These results suggest that supplementing LGG in diets alleviated the diarrhea of weaned piglets challenged by RV via inhibiting the virus multiplication and improving the jejunal mucosal barrier function

  18. Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG supplementation during critical windows of gestation influences immune phenotype in Swiss albino mice offspring.

    PubMed

    Himaja, N; Hemalatha, R; Narendra Babu, K; Shujauddin, M

    2016-01-01

    Probiotic supplementation during critical windows of gestation might have a significant influence on the infant's immune phenotype. Swiss albino mice (F0 generation) aged 31 days were supplemented orally with probiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG); and the supplementation was continued throughout mating, gestation and lactation. The pups (F1 generation) born to them were separated post weaning and received either the same probiotic supplementation as their mothers or were denied supplementation postnatally. Neutrophil phagocytic ability, splenocyte proliferation, immunoglobulins and cytokines were determined in both F0 and F1 pups. In addition, antibody response against hepatitis-B surface antigen (HBsAg) was determined in F1 pups. Probiotic supplementation had no effect on the neutrophil phagocytic ability and splenocyte proliferation index. The serum immunoglobulin G (IgG) and secretory IgA (s-IgA) among the probiotic supplemented group of F0 generation were significantly (P<0.05) higher compared to the controls. Similarly, the mean concentration of interleukin (IL)-10, IL-17 and interferon gamma (IFN-γ) among F0 probiotic group were significantly higher (P<0.05) compared to the control. Prenatal and postnatal probiotic supplementation in F1 pups led to similar results as F0 dams. Prenatal probiotic supplementation in F1 pups led to significantly (P<0.05) higher serum IgG (55.15 ± 1.35 ng/ml) and intestinal s-IgA (77.9 ± 2.86 ng/mg protein) concentration when compared to the control. Similarly, IFN-γ concentration increased (P<0.05) with prenatal probiotic supplementation compared to the control. However, IL-10 and IL-17 concentrations of prenatal probiotic supplemented F1 pups were comparable to the control. As for the antibody response to HBsAg, prenatal probiotic supplementation led to enhanced HBsAg antibody response (471.4 ± 3.97 U/ml) compared to the control. LGG affected the immune regulation and immune responses favourably in mothers and

  19. Dietary Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG Supplementation Improves the Mucosal Barrier Function in the Intestine of Weaned Piglets Challenged by Porcine Rotavirus

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Xiangbing; Gu, Changsong; Hu, Haiyan; Tang, Jun; Chen, Daiwen; Yu, Bing; He, Jun; Yu, Jie; Luo, Junqiu; Tian, Gang

    2016-01-01

    Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG) has been regarded as a safe probiotic strain. The aim of this study was to investigate whether dietary LGG supplementation could alleviate diarrhea via improving jejunal mucosal barrier function in the weaned piglets challenged by RV, and further analyze the potential roles for apoptosis of jejunal mucosal cells and intestinal microbiota. A total of 24 crossbred barrows weaned at 21 d of age were assigned randomly to 1 of 2 diets: the basal diet and LGG supplementing diet. On day 11, all pigs were orally infused RV or the sterile essential medium. RV infusion increased the diarrhea rate, increased the RV-Ab, NSP4 and IL-2 concentrations and the Bax mRNA levels of jejunal mucosa (P<0.05), decreased the villus height, villus height: crypt depth, the sIgA, IL-4 and mucin 1 concentrations and the ZO-1, occludin and Bcl-2 mRNA levels of jejunal mucosa (P<0.05), and affected the microbiota of ileum and cecum (P<0.05) in the weaned pigs. Dietary LGG supplementation increased the villus height and villus height: crypt depth, the sIgA, IL-4, mucin 1 and mucin 2 concentrations, and the ZO-1, occludin and Bcl-2 mRNA levels of the jejunal mucosa (P<0.05) reduced the Bax mRNA levels of the jejunal mucosa (P<0.05) in weaned pigs. Furthermore, dietary LGG supplementation alleviated the increase of diarrhea rate in the weaned pigs challenged by RV (P<0.05), and relieve the effect of RV infection on the villus height, crypt depth and the villus height: crypt depth of the jejunal mucosa (P<0.05), the NSP4, sIgA, IL-2, IL-4, mucin 1 and mucin 2 concentrations of jejunal mucosa (P<0.05), the ZO-1, occludin, Bax and Bcl-2 mRNA levels of the jejunal mucosa (P<0.05), and the microbiota of ileum and cecum (P<0.05) in the weaned pigs challenged by RV. These results suggest that supplementing LGG in diets alleviated the diarrhea of weaned piglets challenged by RV via inhibiting the virus multiplication and improving the jejunal mucosal barrier function

  20. Carboxylic acids in the hindgut of rats fed highly soluble inulin and Bifidobacterium lactis (Bb-12), Lactobacillus salivarius (UCC500) or Lactobacillus rhamnosus (GG)

    PubMed Central

    Nilsson, Ulf; Nyman, Margareta

    2007-01-01

    Background Propionic and butyric acids are important nutrients for the mucosal cells and may therefore increase the nutritional status and reduce the permeability of the colonic mucosa. These acids have also been suggested to counteract diseases in the colon, e.g. ulcerative colitis and colon cancer. Different substrates lead to different amounts and patterns of carboxylic acids (CAs). Objective To study the effect of probiotics on CA formation in the hindgut of rats given inulin. Design The rats were given inulin, marketed as highly soluble by the producer, together with the probiotic bacteria Bifidobacterium lactis (Bb-12), Lactobacillus salivarius (UCC500) or Lactobacillus rhamnosus (GG), or a mixture of all three. Results Rats fed inulin only had comparatively high proportions of propionic and butyric acids throughout the hindgut. When diets were supplemented with Bb-12 and UCC500, the caecal pool of CAs increased compared with inulin only. In the caecum the proportion of butyric acid generally decreased when the rats were fed probiotics. In the distal colon the proportion of propionic and butyric acid was lower, while that of lactic acid was generally higher. The caecal pH in rats fed GG and Bb-12 was lower than expected from the concentration of CAs. Further, rats fed GG had the lowest weight gain and highest caecal tissue weight. Conclusions It is possible to modify the formation of CAs by combining inulin with probiotics. Different probiotics had different effects.

  1. Administration of probiotics Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG and Lactobacillus gasseri K7 during pregnancy and lactation changes mouse mesenteric lymph nodes and mammary gland microbiota.

    PubMed

    Treven, P; Mrak, V; Bogovič Matijašić, B; Horvat, S; Rogelj, I

    2015-04-01

    The milk and mammary gland (MG) microbiome can be influenced by several factors, such as mode of delivery, breastfeeding, maternal lifestyle, health status, and diet. An increasing number of studies show a variety of positive effects of consumption of probiotics during pregnancy and breastfeeding on the mother and the newborn. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of oral administration of probiotics Lactobacillus gasseri K7 (LK7) and Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG) during pregnancy and lactation on microbiota of the mouse mesenteric lymph nodes (MLN), MG, and milk. Pregnant FVB/N mice were fed skim milk or probiotics LGG or LK7 resuspended in skim milk during gestation and lactation. On d 3 and 8 postpartum, blood, feces, MLN, MG, and milk were analyzed for the presence of LGG or LK7. The effects of probiotics on MLN, MG, and milk microbiota was evaluated by real-time PCR and by 16S ribosomal DNA 454-pyrosequencing. In 5 of 8 fecal samples from the LGG group and in 5 of 8 fecal samples from the LK7 group, more than 1 × 10(3) of live LGG or LK7 bacterial cells were detected, respectively, whereas no viable LGG or LK7 cells were detected in the control group. Live lactic acid bacteria but no LGG or LK7 were detected in blood, MLN, and MG. Both probiotics significantly increased the total bacterial load as assessed by copies of 16S ribosomal DNA in MLN, and a similar trend was observed in MG. Metagenomic sequencing revealed that both probiotics increased the abundance of Firmicutes in MG, especially the abundance of lactic acid bacteria. The Lactobacillus genus appeared exclusively in MG from probiotic groups. Both probiotics influenced MLN microbiota by decreasing diversity (Chao1) and increasing the distribution of species (Shannon index). The LGG probiotic also affected the MG microbiota as it increased diversity and distribution of species and proportions of the genera Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium. These results provide evidence that

  2. Transcriptomic Profile of Whole Blood Cells from Elderly Subjects Fed Probiotic Bacteria Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG ATCC 53103 (LGG) in a Phase I Open Label Study

    PubMed Central

    Solano-Aguilar, Gloria; Molokin, Aleksey; Botelho, Christine; Fiorino, Anne-Maria; Vinyard, Bryan; Li, Robert; Chen, Celine; Urban, Joseph; Dawson, Harry; Andreyeva, Irina; Haverkamp, Miriam; Hibberd, Patricia L.

    2016-01-01

    We examined gene expression of whole blood cells (WBC) from 11 healthy elderly volunteers participating on a Phase I open label study before and after oral treatment with Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG-ATCC 53103 (LGG)) using RNA-sequencing (RNA-Seq). Elderly patients (65–80 yrs) completed a clinical assessment for health status and had blood drawn for cellular RNA extraction at study admission (Baseline), after 28 days of daily LGG treatment (Day 28) and at the end of the study (Day 56) after LGG treatment had been suspended for 28 days. Treatment compliance was verified by measuring LGG-DNA copy levels detected in host fecal samples. Normalized gene expression levels in WBC RNA were analyzed using a paired design built within three analysis platforms (edgeR, DESeq2 and TSPM) commonly used for gene count data analysis. From the 25,990 transcripts detected, 95 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were detected in common by all analysis platforms with a nominal significant difference in gene expression at Day 28 following LGG treatment (FDR<0.1; 77 decreased and 18 increased). With a more stringent significance threshold (FDR<0.05), only two genes (FCER2 and LY86), were down-regulated more than 1.5 fold and met the criteria for differential expression across two analysis platforms. The remaining 93 genes were only detected at this threshold level with DESeq2 platform. Data analysis for biological interpretation of DEGs with an absolute fold change of 1.5 revealed down-regulation of overlapping genes involved with Cellular movement, Cell to cell signaling interactions, Immune cell trafficking and Inflammatory response. These data provide evidence for LGG-induced transcriptional modulation in healthy elderly volunteers because pre-treatment transcription levels were restored at 28 days after LGG treatment was stopped. To gain insight into the signaling pathways affected in response to LGG treatment, DEG were mapped using biological pathways and genomic data mining

  3. Phenotypical analysis of the Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG fimbrial spaFED operon: surface expression and functional characterization of recombinant SpaFED pili in Lactococcus lactis.

    PubMed

    Rintahaka, Johanna; Yu, Xia; Kant, Ravi; Palva, Airi; von Ossowski, Ingemar

    2014-01-01

    A noticeable genomic feature of many piliated Gram-positive bacterial species is the presence of more than one pilus-encoding operon. Paradigmatically, the gut-adapted Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG strain contains two different fimbrial operons in its genome. However, whereas one of these operons (called spaCBA) is encoding for the functionally mucus-/collagen-binding SpaCBA pilus, for the other operon (called spaFED) any native expression of the SpaFED-called pili is still the subject of some uncertainty. Irrespective of such considerations, we decided it would be of relevance or interest to decipher the gross structure of this pilus type, and as well assess its functional capabilities for cellular adhesion and immunostimulation. For this, and by following the approach we had used previously to explicate the immuno-properties of SpaCBA pili, we constructed nisin-inducible expression clones producing either wild-type or SpaF pilin-deleted surface-assembled L. rhamnosus GG SpaFED pili on Lactococcus lactis cells. Using these piliated lactococcal constructs, we found that the pilin-polymerized architecture of a recombinant-produced SpaFED pilus coincides with sequence-based functional predictions of the related pilins, and in fact is prototypical of those other sortase-dependent pilus-like structures thus far characterized for piliated Gram-positive bacteria. Moreover, we confirmed that among the different pilin subunits encompassing spaFED operon-encoded pili, the SpaF pilin is a main adhesion determinant, and when present in the assembled structure can mediate pilus binding to mucus, certain extracellular matrix proteins, and different gut epithelial cell lines. However, somewhat unexpectedly, when recombinant SpaFED pili are surface-attached, we found that they could not potentiate the existing lactococcal cell-induced immune responses so elicited from intestinal- and immune-related cells, but rather instead, they could dampen them. Accordingly, we have now provided

  4. Phenotypical Analysis of the Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG Fimbrial spaFED Operon: Surface Expression and Functional Characterization of Recombinant SpaFED Pili in Lactococcus lactis

    PubMed Central

    Kant, Ravi; Palva, Airi; von Ossowski, Ingemar

    2014-01-01

    A noticeable genomic feature of many piliated Gram-positive bacterial species is the presence of more than one pilus-encoding operon. Paradigmatically, the gut-adapted Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG strain contains two different fimbrial operons in its genome. However, whereas one of these operons (called spaCBA) is encoding for the functionally mucus-/collagen-binding SpaCBA pilus, for the other operon (called spaFED) any native expression of the SpaFED-called pili is still the subject of some uncertainty. Irrespective of such considerations, we decided it would be of relevance or interest to decipher the gross structure of this pilus type, and as well assess its functional capabilities for cellular adhesion and immunostimulation. For this, and by following the approach we had used previously to explicate the immuno-properties of SpaCBA pili, we constructed nisin-inducible expression clones producing either wild-type or SpaF pilin-deleted surface-assembled L. rhamnosus GG SpaFED pili on Lactococcus lactis cells. Using these piliated lactococcal constructs, we found that the pilin-polymerized architecture of a recombinant-produced SpaFED pilus coincides with sequence-based functional predictions of the related pilins, and in fact is prototypical of those other sortase-dependent pilus-like structures thus far characterized for piliated Gram-positive bacteria. Moreover, we confirmed that among the different pilin subunits encompassing spaFED operon-encoded pili, the SpaF pilin is a main adhesion determinant, and when present in the assembled structure can mediate pilus binding to mucus, certain extracellular matrix proteins, and different gut epithelial cell lines. However, somewhat unexpectedly, when recombinant SpaFED pili are surface-attached, we found that they could not potentiate the existing lactococcal cell-induced immune responses so elicited from intestinal- and immune-related cells, but rather instead, they could dampen them. Accordingly, we have now provided

  5. Evidence on the role of protein biosynthesis in the induction of heat tolerance of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG by pressure pre-treatment.

    PubMed

    Ananta, E; Knorr, D

    2004-11-15

    It was the aim of this work to evaluate, whether and to which extent heat resistance of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG is affected by mild pressure treatments prior to exposure to lethal temperatures, such as during spray-drying. It was observed that cells pressure pre-treated at 100 MPa at 37 degrees C for 10 min showed higher survival than untreated cells when exposed to heat challenge at 60 degrees C. To gain more insights on the cellular mode of action of pressure induced heat tolerance, flow cytometric analysis was applied in combination with functional dye LIVE/DEAD BacLight bacterial viability kit. Dot plot analysis showed that a lower degree of membrane damage was observed at pressure pre-treated cells upon heat treatment at 60 degrees C for 3 min. Evaluation of heat inactivation kinetics of cells pressure treated in the presence of chloramphenicol, a protein synthesis inhibitor, pointed out the potential contribution of pressure-induced protein biosynthesis in the enhancement of bacterial heat tolerance.

  6. Water activity in dry foods containing live probiotic bacteria should be carefully considered: a case study with Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG in flaxseed.

    PubMed

    Vesterlund, Satu; Salminen, Kari; Salminen, Seppo

    2012-07-02

    This study evaluated the effect of water activity on the long-term storage stability of the probiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG) in a dry food matrix. Viability of LGG was further studied in a crushed flaxseed matrix - a new possible product matrix to deliver probiotics - as well as in reference matrices as maltodextrin. Three different water activities (a(w)=0.11, 0.22 and 0.43) were used, and preparations were stored at room temperature for up to 14months. The viability of LGG was less dependent on the matrix used, but strongly dependent on the water activity. Viability in flaxseed was lost rapidly with a(w) 0.43: with a(w) 0.22 the reduction was 2.4 log(10) units and with a(w) 0.11 the reduction of viability was only 0.29 log(10) units during the entire storage time. Taken together, regulating water activity to a low value may offer possibilities for extending the shelf life of dry probiotic products.

  7. New insights about pilus formation in gut-adapted Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG from the crystal structure of the SpaA backbone-pilin subunit

    PubMed Central

    Chaurasia, Priyanka; Pratap, Shivendra; von Ossowski, Ingemar; Palva, Airi; Krishnan, Vengadesan

    2016-01-01

    Thus far, all solved structures of pilin-proteins comprising sortase-assembled pili are from pathogenic genera and species. Here, we present the first crystal structure of a pilin subunit (SpaA) from a non-pathogen host (Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG). SpaA consists of two tandem CnaB-type domains, each with an isopeptide bond and E-box motif. Intriguingly, while the isopeptide bond in the N-terminal domain forms between lysine and asparagine, the one in the C-terminal domain atypically involves aspartate. We also solved crystal structures of mutant proteins where residues implicated in forming isopeptide bonds were replaced. Expectedly, the E-box-substituted E139A mutant lacks an isopeptide bond in the N-terminal domain. However, the C-terminal E269A substitution gave two structures; one of both domains with their isopeptide bonds present, and another of only the N-terminal domain, but with an unformed isopeptide bond and significant conformational changes. This latter crystal structure has never been observed for any other Gram-positive pilin. Notably, the C-terminal isopeptide bond still forms in D295N-substituted SpaA, irrespective of E269 being present or absent. Although E-box mutations affect SpaA proteolytic and thermal stability, a cumulative effect perturbing normal pilus polymerization was unobserved. A model showing the polymerized arrangement of SpaA within the SpaCBA pilus is proposed. PMID:27349405

  8. Crystallization and X-ray Crystallographic Analysis of the Adhesive SpaC Pilin Subunit in the SpaCBA Pilus of Gut-adapted Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG.

    PubMed

    Kant, Abhiruchi; von Ossowski, Ingemar; Palva, Airi; Krishnan, Vengadesan

    2016-01-01

    Gram-positive Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG, a gut-adapted commensalic (and probiotic) strain, is known to express sortase-assembled pili on its cell surface. These SpaCBA-called pili consist of three different types of building blocks; the SpaA backbone-pilin subunit and the SpaB and SpaC ancillary pilins. SpaC is a relatively large (~90kDa) multi-domain fimbrial adhesin, and while it is located primarily at the SpaCBA pilus tip, occasionally, it can also be detected throughout the length of pilus backbone. Functionally, SpaC mainly accounts for SpaCBA pilus-mediated interactions with intestinal mucus, collagen, and human gut epithelial cells. Moreover, SpaC adhesiveness is also perceived to have a causal relationship with SpaCBA pilus-induced host-cell immune responses. In order to improve the mechanistic understanding of SpaC and its adhesive properties by structural investigation, we purified and successfully crystallized a recombinant construct of the near full-length SpaC protein (residues 36-856) in the presence of magnesium ions. X-ray diffraction data were collected to 2.6 Å resolution. The SpaC crystal belongs to the space group P21212 with unit cell parameters a = 116.5, b = 128.3, c = 136.5 Å and contains two molecules in the asymmetric unit. Presence of conserved metal ion-dependent adhesion site containing von Willebrand factor type A domain suggests its likely role in the function of SpaC.

  9. Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG supernatant promotes intestinal barrier function, balances Treg and TH17 cells and ameliorates hepatic injury in a mouse model of chronic-binge alcohol feeding.

    PubMed

    Chen, Rui-Cong; Xu, Lan-Man; Du, Shan-Jie; Huang, Si-Si; Wu, He; Dong, Jia-Jia; Huang, Jian-Rong; Wang, Xiao-Dong; Feng, Wen-Ke; Chen, Yong-Ping

    2016-01-22

    Impaired intestinal barrier function plays a critical role in alcohol-induced hepatic injury, and the subsequent excessive absorbed endotoxin and bacterial translocation activate the immune response that aggravates the liver injury. Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG supernatant (LGG-s) has been suggested to improve intestinal barrier function and alleviate the liver injury induced by chronic and binge alcohol consumption, but the underlying mechanisms are still not clear. In this study, chronic-binge alcohol fed model was used to determine the effects of LGG-s on the prevention of alcoholic liver disease in C57BL/6 mice and investigate underlying mechanisms. Mice were fed Lieber-DeCarli diet containing 5% alcohol for 10 days, and one dose of alcohol was gavaged on Day 11. In one group, LGG-s was supplemented along with alcohol. Control mice were fed isocaloric diet. Nine hours later the mice were sacrificed for analysis. Chronic-binge alcohol exposure induced an elevation in liver enzymes, steatosis and morphology changes, while LGG-s supplementation attenuated these changes. Treatment with LGG-s significantly improved intestinal barrier function reflected by increased mRNA expression of tight junction (TJ) proteins and villus-crypt histology in ileum, and decreased Escherichia coli (E. coli) protein level in liver. Importantly, flow cytometry analysis showed that alcohol reduced Treg cell population while increased TH17 cell population as well as IL-17 secretion, which was reversed by LGG-s administration. In conclusion, our findings indicate that LGG-s is effective in preventing chronic-binge alcohol exposure-induced liver injury and shed a light on the importance of the balance of Treg and TH17 cells in the role of LGG-s application.

  10. Evaluation of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG using an Escherichia coli K88 model of piglet diarrhoea: Effects on diarrhoea incidence, faecal microflora and immune responses.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lu; Xu, Yong-Qian; Liu, Hao-Yu; Lai, Ting; Ma, Jin-Lei; Wang, Jiu-Feng; Zhu, Yao-Hong

    2010-02-24

    Probiotic bacterium Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG) has been demonstrated to adhere to pig intestinal mucus, and is able to displace and inhibit pathogens, including Escherichia coli (E. coli), in vitro. However, currently there are few data concerning the effects of LGG on piglet health. The objectives of this study were to assess the effectiveness of LGG in reducing the incidence and severity of post-weaning diarrhoea in piglets, and to investigate its mechanisms of action. Eighteen weaned barrows were allocated to nonchallenged control (NCN), challenged control (CCN) and LGG treatment (LGG) groups. Diarrhoea incidence was significantly lower in group LGG than group CCN after E. coli challenge. Faecal coliform bacteria counts were significantly increased, while lactobacilli and bifidobacteria counts were decreased, in group CCN compared with the other groups after challenge. In the jejunum and ileum, secretory immunoglobin A (SIgA) concentrations were significantly higher in group LGG than in group CCN. In group LGG, administration of short-term LGG before E. coli infection attenuated the elevation of serum IL-6 induced by E. coli. Significantly higher concentrations of TNF-alpha were observed in group LGG than NCN and CCN at 6h. IL-1beta concentrations in group NCN were significantly higher than LGG at 6h and higher than CCN at 24h. In conclusion, LGG was effective in ameliorating diarrhoea in post-weaning piglets induced by E. coli K88, possibly via modulation of intestinal microflora, enhancement of intestinal antibody defence, and regulation of production of systemic inflammatory cytokines.

  11. Relative cost-effectiveness of using an extensively hydrolyzed casein formula containing the probiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG in managing infants with cow’s milk allergy in Spain

    PubMed Central

    Guest, Julian F; Weidlich, Diana; Mascuñan Díaz, J Ignacio; Díaz, Juan J; Ojeda, Pedro Manuel; Ferrer-González, J Pablo; Gil, David; Onrubia, Isabel; Rincón Victor, Pedro

    2015-01-01

    Objective To estimate the cost-effectiveness of using an extensively hydrolyzed casein formula containing the probiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (eHCF + LGG; Nutramigen LGG) as a first-line management for cow’s milk allergy compared with eHCF alone, and amino acid formulae in Spain, from the perspective of the Spanish National Health Service (SNS). Methods Decision modeling was used to estimate the probability of immunoglobulin E (IgE)-mediated and non–IgE-mediated allergic infants developing tolerance to cow’s milk by 18 months. The models also estimated the SNS cost (at 2012/2013 prices) of managing infants over 18 months after starting a formula as well as the relative cost-effectiveness of each of the formulae. Results The probability of developing tolerance to cow’s milk by 18 months was higher among infants with either IgE-mediated or non–IgE-mediated allergy who were fed eHCF + LGG compared with those fed one of the other formulae. The total health care cost of initially feeding infants with eHCF + LGG was less than that of feeding infants with one of the other formulae. Hence, eHCF + LGG affords the greatest value for money to the SNS for managing both IgE-mediated and non–IgE-mediated cow’s milk allergy. Conclusion Using eHCF + LGG instead of eHCF alone or amino acid formulae for first-line management of newly-diagnosed infants with cow’s milk allergy affords a cost-effective use of publicly funded resources because it improves outcome for less cost. A randomized controlled study showing faster tolerance development in children receiving a probiotic-containing formula is required before this conclusion can be confirmed. PMID:26648744

  12. Effects of probiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG and Propionibacterium freudenreichii ssp. shermanii JS supplementation on intestinal and systemic markers of inflammation in ApoE*3Leiden mice consuming a high-fat diet.

    PubMed

    Oksaharju, Anna; Kooistra, Teake; Kleemann, Robert; van Duyvenvoorde, Wim; Miettinen, Minja; Lappalainen, Jani; Lindstedt, Ken A; Kovanen, Petri T; Korpela, Riitta; Kekkonen, Riina A

    2013-07-14

    A high-fat diet disturbs the composition and function of the gut microbiota and generates local gut-associated and also systemic responses. Intestinal mast cells, for their part, secrete mediators which play a role in the orchestration of physiological and immunological functions of the intestine. Probiotic bacteria, again, help to maintain the homeostasis of the gut microbiota by protecting the gut epithelium and regulating the local immune system. In the present study, we explored the effects of two probiotic bacteria, Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (GG) and Propionibacterium freudenreichii spp. shermanii JS (PJS), on high fat-fed ApoE*3Leiden mice by estimating the mast cell numbers and the immunoreactivity of TNF-α and IL-10 in the intestine, as well as plasma levels of several markers of inflammation and parameters of lipid metabolism. We found that mice that received GG and PJS exhibited significantly lower numbers of intestinal mast cells compared with control mice. PJS lowered intestinal immunoreactivity of TNF-α, while GG increased intestinal IL-10. PJS was also observed to lower the plasma levels of markers of inflammation including vascular cell adhesion molecule 1, and also the amount of gonadal adipose tissue. GG lowered alanine aminotransferase, a marker of hepatocellular activation. Collectively, these data demonstrate that probiotic GG and PJS tend to down-regulate both intestinal and systemic pro-inflammatory changes induced by a high-fat diet in this humanised mouse model.

  13. Relative cost-effectiveness of using an extensively hydrolyzed casein formula containing the probiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG in managing infants with cow’s milk allergy in Poland

    PubMed Central

    Guest, Julian F; Weidlich, Diana; Kaczmarski, Maciej; Jarocka-Cyrta, Elzbieta; Kobelska-Dubiel, Natalia; Krauze, Agnieszka; Sakowska-Maliszewska, Iwona; Zawadzka-Krajewska, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Objective To estimate the cost-effectiveness of using an extensively hydrolyzed casein formula (eHCF) containing the probiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (eHCF + LGG; Nutramigen LGG) as an initial treatment for cow’s milk allergy compared with eHCF alone and amino acid formulas (AAF) in Poland from the perspective of the Polish National Health Fund (Narodowy Fundusz Zdrowia [NFZ]) and parents. Methods Decision modeling was used to estimate the probability of cow’s milk allergic infants developing tolerance to cow’s milk by 18 months. The model also estimated the cost to the NFZ and parents (Polish Zloty [PLN] at 2013–2014 prices) for managing infants over 18 months after starting one of the formulas as well as the relative cost-effectiveness of each of the formulas. Results The probability of developing tolerance to cow’s milk by 18 months was higher among infants who were fed eHCF + LGG (0.82) compared with those fed eHCF alone (0.53) or an AAF (0.22). An infant who is initially managed with eHCF + LGG is expected to consume fewer health care resources than infants managed with the other formulas. Hence, the estimated total health care cost incurred by the NFZ for initially feeding infants with eHCF + LGG (PLN 5,693) was less than that of feeding infants with eHCF alone (PLN 7,749) or an AAF (PLN 24,333). However, the total cost incurred by parents for initially feeding infants with an AAF (PLN 815) was marginally less than that of feeding with eHCF + LGG (PLN 993), which was less than that of feeding with eHCF alone (PLN 1,226). Conclusion Using eHCF + LGG instead of eHCF alone or an AAF for first-line management of newly diagnosed infants with cow’s milk allergy affords a cost-effective use of NFZ-funded resources, since it improves outcome for less cost. Whether eHCF + LGG would be viewed as being cost-effective by parents is dependent on their willingness to pay an additional cost for additional tolerance acquisition to cow’s milk. PMID:27418845

  14. Probiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG enhanced Th1 cellular immunity but did not affect antibody responses in a human gut microbiota transplanted neonatal gnotobiotic pig model.

    PubMed

    Wen, Ke; Tin, Christine; Wang, Haifeng; Yang, Xingdong; Li, Guohua; Giri-Rachman, Ernawati; Kocher, Jacob; Bui, Tammy; Clark-Deener, Sherrie; Yuan, Lijuan

    2014-01-01

    This study aims to establish a human gut microbiota (HGM) transplanted gnotobiotic (Gn) pig model of human rotavirus (HRV) infection and diarrhea, and to verify the dose-effects of probiotics on HRV vaccine-induced immune responses. Our previous studies using the Gn pig model found that probiotics dose-dependently regulated both T cell and B cell immune responses induced by rotavirus vaccines. We generated the HGM transplanted neonatal Gn pigs through daily feeding of neonatal human fecal suspension to germ-free pigs for 3 days starting at 12 hours after birth. We found that attenuated HRV (AttHRV) vaccination conferred similar overall protection against rotavirus diarrhea and virus shedding in Gn pigs and HGM transplanted Gn pigs. HGM promoted the development of the neonatal immune system, as evidenced by the significantly enhanced IFN-γ producing T cell responses and reduction of regulatory T cells and their cytokine production in the AttHRV-vaccinated pigs. The higher dose Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG) feeding (14 doses, up to 109 colony-forming-unit [CFU]/dose) effectively increased the LGG counts in the HGM Gn pig intestinal contents and significantly enhanced HRV-specific IFN-γ producing T cell responses to the AttHRV vaccine. Lower dose LGG (9 doses, up to 106 CFU/dose) was ineffective. Neither doses of LGG significantly improved the protection rate, HRV-specific IgA and IgG antibody titers in serum, or IgA antibody titers in intestinal contents compared to the AttHRV vaccine alone, suggesting that an even higher dose of LGG is needed to overcome the influence of the microbiota to achieve the immunostimulatory effect in the HGM pigs. This study demonstrated that HGM Gn pig is an applicable animal model for studying immune responses to rotavirus vaccines and can be used for studying interventions (i.e., probiotics and prebiotics) that may enhance the immunogenicity and protective efficacy of vaccines through improving the gut microbiota.

  15. Probiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG Enhanced Th1 Cellular Immunity but Did Not Affect Antibody Responses in a Human Gut Microbiota Transplanted Neonatal Gnotobiotic Pig Model

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Ke; Tin, Christine; Wang, Haifeng; Yang, Xingdong; Li, Guohua; Giri-Rachman, Ernawati; Kocher, Jacob; Bui, Tammy; Clark-Deener, Sherrie; Yuan, Lijuan

    2014-01-01

    This study aims to establish a human gut microbiota (HGM) transplanted gnotobiotic (Gn) pig model of human rotavirus (HRV) infection and diarrhea, and to verify the dose-effects of probiotics on HRV vaccine-induced immune responses. Our previous studies using the Gn pig model found that probiotics dose-dependently regulated both T cell and B cell immune responses induced by rotavirus vaccines. We generated the HGM transplanted neonatal Gn pigs through daily feeding of neonatal human fecal suspension to germ-free pigs for 3 days starting at 12 hours after birth. We found that attenuated HRV (AttHRV) vaccination conferred similar overall protection against rotavirus diarrhea and virus shedding in Gn pigs and HGM transplanted Gn pigs. HGM promoted the development of the neonatal immune system, as evidenced by the significantly enhanced IFN-γ producing T cell responses and reduction of regulatory T cells and their cytokine production in the AttHRV-vaccinated pigs. The higher dose Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG) feeding (14 doses, up to 109 colony-forming-unit [CFU]/dose) effectively increased the LGG counts in the HGM Gn pig intestinal contents and significantly enhanced HRV-specific IFN-γ producing T cell responses to the AttHRV vaccine. Lower dose LGG (9 doses, up to 106 CFU/dose) was ineffective. Neither doses of LGG significantly improved the protection rate, HRV-specific IgA and IgG antibody titers in serum, or IgA antibody titers in intestinal contents compared to the AttHRV vaccine alone, suggesting that an even higher dose of LGG is needed to overcome the influence of the microbiota to achieve the immunostimulatory effect in the HGM pigs. This study demonstrated that HGM Gn pig is an applicable animal model for studying immune responses to rotavirus vaccines and can be used for studying interventions (i.e., probiotics and prebiotics) that may enhance the immunogenicity and protective efficacy of vaccines through improving the gut microbiota. PMID:24722168

  16. Draft Genome Sequence of Lactobacillus rhamnosus 2166

    PubMed Central

    Melnikov, Vyacheslav G.; Kosarev, Igor V.; Abramov, Vyacheslav M.

    2014-01-01

    In this report, we present a draft sequence of the genome of Lactobacillus rhamnosus strain 2166, a potential novel probiotic. Genome annotation and read mapping onto a reference genome of L. rhamnosus strain GG allowed for the identification of the differences and similarities in the genomic contents and gene arrangements of these strains. PMID:24558254

  17. Probiotics Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG, Lactobacillus acidophilus suppresses DMH-induced procarcinogenic fecal enzymes and preneoplastic aberrant crypt foci in early colon carcinogenesis in Sprague Dawley rats.

    PubMed

    Verma, Angela; Shukla, Geeta

    2013-01-01

    Diet makes an important contribution to colorectal cancer (CRC) risk implying risks for CRC are potentially reducible. Therefore, the probiotics have been suggested as the prophylactic measure in colon cancer. In this study, different probiotics were used to compare their protective potential against 1,2 dimethylhydrazine dihydrochloride (DMH)-induced chemical colon carcinogenesis in Sprague Dawley rats. Animals belonging to different probiotic groups were fed orally with 1 × 10(9) lactobacilli daily for 1 week, and then a weekly injection of DMH was given intraperitoneally for 6 wks with daily administration of probiotic. Lactobacillus GG and L.acidophilus + DMH-treated animals had maximum percent reduction in ACF counts. A significant decrease (P < 0.05) in fecal nitroreductase activity was observed in L.casei + DMH and L.plantarum + DMH-treated rats whereas β-glucuronidase activity decreased in L.GG + DMH and L.acidophilus + DMH-treated rats. Animals treated with Bifidobacterium bifidum + DMH had significant decreased β-glucosidase activity. However, not much difference was observed in the colon morphology of animals belonging to various probiotic + DMH-treated rats compared with DMH-treated alone. The results indicated that probiotics, L.GG, and L.acidophilus can be used as the better prophylactic agents for experimental colon carcinogenesis.

  18. The Variable Regions of Lactobacillus rhamnosus Genomes Reveal the Dynamic Evolution of Metabolic and Host-Adaptation Repertoires

    PubMed Central

    Ceapa, Corina; Davids, Mark; Ritari, Jarmo; Lambert, Jolanda; Wels, Michiel; Douillard, François P.; Smokvina, Tamara; de Vos, Willem M.; Knol, Jan; Kleerebezem, Michiel

    2016-01-01

    Lactobacillus rhamnosus is a diverse Gram-positive species with strains isolated from different ecological niches. Here, we report the genome sequence analysis of 40 diverse strains of L. rhamnosus and their genomic comparison, with a focus on the variable genome. Genomic comparison of 40 L. rhamnosus strains discriminated the conserved genes (core genome) and regions of plasticity involving frequent rearrangements and horizontal transfer (variome). The L. rhamnosus core genome encompasses 2,164 genes, out of 4,711 genes in total (the pan-genome). The accessory genome is dominated by genes encoding carbohydrate transport and metabolism, extracellular polysaccharides (EPS) biosynthesis, bacteriocin production, pili production, the cas system, and the associated clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR) loci, and more than 100 transporter functions and mobile genetic elements like phages, plasmid genes, and transposons. A clade distribution based on amino acid differences between core (shared) proteins matched with the clade distribution obtained from the presence–absence of variable genes. The phylogenetic and variome tree overlap indicated that frequent events of gene acquisition and loss dominated the evolutionary segregation of the strains within this species, which is paralleled by evolutionary diversification of core gene functions. The CRISPR-Cas system could have contributed to this evolutionary segregation. Lactobacillus rhamnosus strains contain the genetic and metabolic machinery with strain-specific gene functions required to adapt to a large range of environments. A remarkable congruency of the evolutionary relatedness of the strains’ core and variome functions, possibly favoring interspecies genetic exchanges, underlines the importance of gene-acquisition and loss within the L. rhamnosus strain diversification. PMID:27358423

  19. The Variable Regions of Lactobacillus rhamnosus Genomes Reveal the Dynamic Evolution of Metabolic and Host-Adaptation Repertoires.

    PubMed

    Ceapa, Corina; Davids, Mark; Ritari, Jarmo; Lambert, Jolanda; Wels, Michiel; Douillard, François P; Smokvina, Tamara; de Vos, Willem M; Knol, Jan; Kleerebezem, Michiel

    2016-07-02

    Lactobacillus rhamnosus is a diverse Gram-positive species with strains isolated from different ecological niches. Here, we report the genome sequence analysis of 40 diverse strains of L. rhamnosus and their genomic comparison, with a focus on the variable genome. Genomic comparison of 40 L. rhamnosus strains discriminated the conserved genes (core genome) and regions of plasticity involving frequent rearrangements and horizontal transfer (variome). The L. rhamnosus core genome encompasses 2,164 genes, out of 4,711 genes in total (the pan-genome). The accessory genome is dominated by genes encoding carbohydrate transport and metabolism, extracellular polysaccharides (EPS) biosynthesis, bacteriocin production, pili production, the cas system, and the associated clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR) loci, and more than 100 transporter functions and mobile genetic elements like phages, plasmid genes, and transposons. A clade distribution based on amino acid differences between core (shared) proteins matched with the clade distribution obtained from the presence-absence of variable genes. The phylogenetic and variome tree overlap indicated that frequent events of gene acquisition and loss dominated the evolutionary segregation of the strains within this species, which is paralleled by evolutionary diversification of core gene functions. The CRISPR-Cas system could have contributed to this evolutionary segregation. Lactobacillus rhamnosus strains contain the genetic and metabolic machinery with strain-specific gene functions required to adapt to a large range of environments. A remarkable congruency of the evolutionary relatedness of the strains' core and variome functions, possibly favoring interspecies genetic exchanges, underlines the importance of gene-acquisition and loss within the L. rhamnosus strain diversification.

  20. Probiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus Reduces Organophosphate Pesticide Absorption and Toxicity to Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Trinder, Mark; McDowell, Tim W; Daisley, Brendan A; Ali, Sohrab N; Leong, Hon S; Sumarah, Mark W; Reid, Gregor

    2016-10-15

    Organophosphate pesticides used in agriculture can pose health risks to humans and wildlife. We hypothesized that dietary supplementation with Lactobacillus, a genus of commensal bacteria, would reduce absorption and toxicity of consumed organophosphate pesticides (parathion and chlorpyrifos [CP]). Several Lactobacillus species were screened for toleration of 100 ppm of CP or parathion in MRS broth based on 24-h growth curves. Certain Lactobacillus strains were unable to reach stationary-phase culture maxima and displayed an abnormal culture morphology in response to pesticide. Further characterization of commonly used, pesticide-tolerant and pesticide-susceptible, probiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus strain GG (LGG) and L. rhamnosus strain GR-1 (LGR-1), respectively, revealed that both strains could significantly sequester organophosphate pesticides from solution after 24-h coincubations. This effect was independent of metabolic activity, as L. rhamnosus GG did not hydrolyze CP and no difference in organophosphate sequestration was observed between live and heat-killed strains. Furthermore, LGR-1 and LGG reduced the absorption of 100 μM parathion or CP in a Caco-2 Transwell model of the small intestine epithelium. To determine the effect of sequestration on acute toxicity, newly eclosed Drosophila melanogaster flies were exposed to food containing 10 μM CP with or without supplementation with live LGG. Supplementation with LGG simultaneously, but not with administration of CP 3 days prior (prophylactically), mitigated CP-induced mortality. In summary, the results suggest that L. rhamnosus may be useful for reducing toxic organophosphate pesticide exposure via passive binding. These findings could be transferable to clinical and livestock applications due to affordability and practical ability to supplement products with food-grade bacteria.

  1. Crystallographic Analysis of Rotavirus NSP2-RNA Complex Reveals Specific Recognition of 5′ GG Sequence for RTPase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Liya; Chow, Dar-Chone; Patton, John T.; Palzkill, Timothy; Estes, Mary K.

    2012-01-01

    Rotavirus nonstructural protein NSP2, a functional octamer, is critical for the formation of viroplasms, which are exclusive sites for replication and packaging of the segmented double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) rotavirus genome. As a component of replication intermediates, NSP2 is also implicated in various replication-related activities. In addition to sequence-independent single-stranded RNA-binding and helix-destabilizing activities, NSP2 exhibits monomer-associated nucleoside and 5′ RNA triphosphatase (NTPase/RTPase) activities that are mediated by a conserved H225 residue within a narrow enzymatic cleft. Lack of a 5′ γ-phosphate is a common feature of the negative-strand RNA [(−)RNA] of the packaged dsRNA segments in rotavirus. Strikingly, all (−)RNAs (of group A rotaviruses) have a 5′ GG dinucleotide sequence. As the only rotavirus protein with 5′ RTPase activity, NSP2 is implicated in the removal of the γ-phosphate from the rotavirus (−)RNA. To understand how NSP2, despite its sequence-independent RNA-binding property, recognizes (−)RNA to hydrolyze the γ-phosphate within the catalytic cleft, we determined a crystal structure of NSP2 in complex with the 5′ consensus sequence of minus-strand rotavirus RNA. Our studies show that the 5′ GG of the bound oligoribonucleotide interacts extensively with highly conserved residues in the NSP2 enzymatic cleft. Although these residues provide GG-specific interactions, surface plasmon resonance studies suggest that the C-terminal helix and other basic residues outside the enzymatic cleft account for sequence-independent RNA binding of NSP2. A novel observation from our studies, which may have implications in viroplasm formation, is that the C-terminal helix of NSP2 exhibits two distinct conformations and engages in domain-swapping interactions, which result in the formation of NSP2 octamer chains. PMID:22811529

  2. Probiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus Reduces Organophosphate Pesticide Absorption and Toxicity to Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Trinder, Mark; McDowell, Tim W.; Daisley, Brendan A.; Ali, Sohrab N.; Leong, Hon S.; Sumarah, Mark W.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Organophosphate pesticides used in agriculture can pose health risks to humans and wildlife. We hypothesized that dietary supplementation with Lactobacillus, a genus of commensal bacteria, would reduce absorption and toxicity of consumed organophosphate pesticides (parathion and chlorpyrifos [CP]). Several Lactobacillus species were screened for toleration of 100 ppm of CP or parathion in MRS broth based on 24-h growth curves. Certain Lactobacillus strains were unable to reach stationary-phase culture maxima and displayed an abnormal culture morphology in response to pesticide. Further characterization of commonly used, pesticide-tolerant and pesticide-susceptible, probiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus strain GG (LGG) and L. rhamnosus strain GR-1 (LGR-1), respectively, revealed that both strains could significantly sequester organophosphate pesticides from solution after 24-h coincubations. This effect was independent of metabolic activity, as L. rhamnosus GG did not hydrolyze CP and no difference in organophosphate sequestration was observed between live and heat-killed strains. Furthermore, LGR-1 and LGG reduced the absorption of 100 μM parathion or CP in a Caco-2 Transwell model of the small intestine epithelium. To determine the effect of sequestration on acute toxicity, newly eclosed Drosophila melanogaster flies were exposed to food containing 10 μM CP with or without supplementation with live LGG. Supplementation with LGG simultaneously, but not with administration of CP 3 days prior (prophylactically), mitigated CP-induced mortality. In summary, the results suggest that L. rhamnosus may be useful for reducing toxic organophosphate pesticide exposure via passive binding. These findings could be transferable to clinical and livestock applications due to affordability and practical ability to supplement products with food-grade bacteria. IMPORTANCE The consequences of environmental pesticide pollution due to widespread usage in agriculture and soil

  3. Comparative Genome Analysis of Lactobacillus rhamnosus Clinical Isolates from Initial Stages of Dental Pulp Infection: Identification of a New Exopolysaccharide Cluster

    PubMed Central

    Nadkarni, Mangala A.; Chen, Zhiliang; Wilkins, Marc R.; Hunter, Neil

    2014-01-01

    The human oral microbiome has a major role in oral diseases including dental caries. Our studies on progression of caries infection through dentin and more recently, the invasion of vital dental pulp, detected Lactobacillus rhamnosus in the initial stages of infection of vital pulp tissue. In this study employing current high-throughput next generation sequencing technology we sought to obtain insight into genomic traits of tissue invasive L. rhamnosus, to recognise biomarkers that could provide an understanding of pathogenic potential of lactobacilli, generally regarded as safe. Roche GS FLX+ technology was used to generate whole genome sequences of two clinical isolates of L. rhamnosus infecting vital pulp. Detailed genome-wide comparison of the genetic profiles of tissue invasive L. rhamnosus with probiotic L. rhamnosus was performed to test the hypothesis that specific strains of L. rhamnosus possessing a unique gene complement are selected for the capacity to invade vital pulp tissue. Analysis identified 264 and 258 genes respectively, from dental pulp-invasive L. rhamnosus strains LRHMDP2 and LRHMDP3 isolated from two different subjects that were not present in the reference probiotic L. rhamnosus strain ATCC 53103 (GG). Distinct genome signatures identified included the presence of a modified exopolysaccharide cluster, a characteristic confirmed in a further six clinical isolates. Additional features of LRHMDP2 and LRHMDP3 were altered transcriptional regulators from RpoN, NtrC, MutR, ArsR and zinc-binding Cro/CI families, as well as changes in the two-component sensor kinase response regulator and ABC transporters for ferric iron. Both clinical isolates of L. rhamnosus contained a single SpaFED cluster, as in L. rhamnosus Lc705, instead of the two Spa clusters (SpaCBA and SpaFED) identified in L. rhamnosus ATCC 53103 (GG). Genomic distance analysis and SNP divergence confirmed a close relationship of the clinical isolates but segregation from the reference

  4. Genome Sequence of Lactobacillus rhamnosus ATCC 8530

    PubMed Central

    Pittet, Vanessa; Ewen, Emily; Bushell, Barry R.

    2012-01-01

    Lactobacillus rhamnosus is found in the human gastrointestinal tract and is important for probiotics. We became interested in L. rhamnosus isolate ATCC 8530 in relation to beer spoilage and hops resistance. We report here the genome sequence of this isolate, along with a brief comparison to other available L. rhamnosus genome sequences. PMID:22247527

  5. Correlation of Lactobacillus rhamnosus Genotypes and Carbohydrate Utilization Signatures Determined by Phenotype Profiling

    PubMed Central

    Lambert, Jolanda; van Limpt, Kees; Wels, Michiel; Smokvina, Tamara; Knol, Jan; Kleerebezem, Michiel

    2015-01-01

    Lactobacillus rhamnosus is a bacterial species commonly colonizing the gastrointestinal (GI) tract of humans and also frequently used in food products. While some strains have been studied extensively, physiological variability among isolates of the species found in healthy humans or their diet is largely unexplored. The aim of this study was to characterize the diversity of carbohydrate utilization capabilities of human isolates and food-derived strains of L. rhamnosus in relation to their niche of isolation and genotype. We investigated the genotypic and phenotypic diversity of 25 out of 65 L. rhamnosus strains from various niches, mainly human feces and fermented dairy products. Genetic fingerprinting of the strains by amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) identified 11 distinct subgroups at 70% similarity and suggested niche enrichment within particular genetic clades. High-resolution carbohydrate utilization profiling (OmniLog) identified 14 carbon sources that could be used by all of the strains tested for growth, while the utilization of 58 carbon sources differed significantly between strains, enabling the stratification of L. rhamnosus strains into three metabolic clusters that partially correlate with the genotypic clades but appear uncorrelated with the strain's origin of isolation. Draft genome sequences of 8 strains were generated and employed in a gene-trait matching (GTM) analysis together with the publicly available genomes of L. rhamnosus GG (ATCC 53103) and HN001 for several carbohydrates that were distinct for the different metabolic clusters: l-rhamnose, cellobiose, l-sorbose, and α-methyl-d-glucoside. From the analysis, candidate genes were identified that correlate with l-sorbose and α-methyl-d-glucoside utilization, and the proposed function of these genes could be confirmed by heterologous expression in a strain lacking the genes. This study expands our insight into the phenotypic and genotypic diversity of the species L. rhamnosus

  6. 40 CFR Table 1 to Subpart Gg of... - General Provisions Applicability to Subpart GG

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Subpart GG 1 Table 1 to Subpart GG of Part 63 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY..., Subpt. GG, Table 1 Table 1 to Subpart GG of Part 63—General Provisions Applicability to Subpart GG Reference Applies to affected sources in subpart GG Comment 63.1(a)(1) Yes 63.1(a)(2) Yes 63.1(a)(3) Yes...

  7. 40 CFR Table 1 to Subpart Gg of... - General Provisions Applicability to Subpart GG

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Subpart GG 1 Table 1 to Subpart GG of Part 63 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY..., Subpt. GG, Table 1 Table 1 to Subpart GG of Part 63—General Provisions Applicability to Subpart GG Reference Applies to affected sources in subpart GG Comment 63.1(a)(1) Yes 63.1(a)(2) Yes 63.1(a)(3) Yes...

  8. 40 CFR Table 1 to Subpart Gg of... - General Provisions Applicability to Subpart GG

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Subpart GG 1 Table 1 to Subpart GG of Part 63 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY..., Subpt. GG, Table 1 Table 1 to Subpart GG of Part 63—General Provisions Applicability to Subpart GG Reference Applies to affected sources in subpart GG Comment 63.1(a)(1) Yes 63.1(a)(2) Yes 63.1(a)(3) Yes...

  9. 40 CFR Table 1 to Subpart Gg of... - General Provisions Applicability to Subpart GG

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Subpart GG 1 Table 1 to Subpart GG of Part 63 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY..., Subpt. GG, Table 1 Table 1 to Subpart GG of Part 63—General Provisions Applicability to Subpart GG Reference Applies to affected sources in subpart GG Comment 63.1(a)(1) Yes 63.1(a)(2) Yes 63.1(a)(3) Yes...

  10. Molecular Cloning, Expression of minD Gene from Lactobacillus acidophilus VTCC-B-871 and Analyses to Identify Lactobacillus rhamnosus PN04 from Vietnam Hottuynia cordata Thunb.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Tu Hoang Khue; Doan, Vinh Thi Thanh; Ha, Ly Dieu; Nguyen, Huu Ngoc

    2013-12-01

    The minD gene encoding an inhibitor cell division MinD homolog from Lactobacillus acidophilus VTCC-B-871 was cloned. We showed that there were 97 % homology between minD genes of L. acidophilus VTCC-B-871 and Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG and Lactobacillus rhamnosus Lc705. Based on the analysis of the DNA sequence data from the L. rhamnosus genome project and sequenced minD gene of L. acidophilus VTCC-B-871, a pair of primers was designed to identified the different minD genes from L. acidophilus ATCC 4356, L. rhamnosus ATCC 11443. Besides, the polymerase chain reaction product of minD gene was also obtained in L. rhamnosus PN04, a strain was isolated from Vietnamese Hottuynia cordata Thunb. In addition, we performed a phylogenetic analysis of the deduced amino acid sequence of MinD homologs from L. acidophilus VTCC-B-871 with the other strains and compared the predicted three-dimension structure of L. acidophilus VTCC-B-871 MinD with Escherichia coli MinD, there are similarity that showed evolution of these strains. The overexpression of L. acidophilus VTCC-B-871 MinD in E. coli led to cell filamentation in IPTG and morphology changes in different sugar stresses, interestingly. The present study is the first report characterizing the Lactobacilus MinD homolog that will be useful in probiotic field.

  11. A placebo-controlled trial of Lactobacillus GG to prevent diarrhea in undernourished Peruvian children.

    PubMed

    Oberhelman, R A; Gilman, R H; Sheen, P; Taylor, D N; Black, R E; Cabrera, L; Lescano, A G; Meza, R; Madico, G

    1999-01-01

    This article features a placebo-controlled trial of Lactobacillus GG (L-GG) for diarrhea prevention in undernourished children in Peru. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the use of L-GG as prophylactic treatment for diarrhea. The study population included 204 undernourished children aged 6-24 months, 99 of which were on L-GG and 105 on placebo. Subjects were followed by daily home visits to document diarrhea episodes and diagnostic studies were conducted. Results revealed that children receiving L-GG experienced fewer episodes of diarrhea, which were more pronounced among 18-29 month old children and largely limited to non-breast-fed children. Moreover, the duration of diarrhea episodes and its causes were similar in both groups, except that adenovirus was detected more frequently in the placebo group. In conclusion, L-GG supplementation would decrease diarrhea incidence in high-risk children.

  12. Cloning, expression, purification, and activity assay of proteins related to D-lactic acid formation in Lactobacillus rhamnosus.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiuwen; Zheng, Zhaojuan; Dou, Peipei; Qin, Jiayang; Wang, Xiaochen; Ma, Cuiqing; Tang, Hongzhi; Xu, Ping

    2010-08-01

    Two proteins that might be responsible for D-lactic acid (D-LA) formation were screened from the genome database of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG. The coding genes of the two proteins in L. rhamnosus CASL, ldhD1 and ldhD2, were cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli Rosetta with an inducible expression vector pETDuet-1 (Novagen, Darmstadt, Germany), respectively. The two purified proteins, LdhD-1 and LdhD-2, migrated as a single protein band separately, both corresponding to an apparent molecular mass between 35 kDa and 45 kDa on sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The specific activities of LdhD-1 and LdhD-2 catalyzing pyruvate to LA were 0.02 U/mg and 0.21 U/mg, respectively. The configuration of LA converted from pyruvate was determined using high-performance liquid chromatography equipped with a chiral column. Only D-LA was detected when LdhD-1 and LdhD-2 were tested. In summary, the two proteins cloned and expressed in this study were most probably responsible for D-LA formation during fermentation of L. rhamnosus CASL.

  13. Lactobacillus rhamnosus GR-1 Ameliorates Escherichia coli-Induced Inflammation and Cell Damage via Attenuation of ASC-Independent NLRP3 Inflammasome Activation.

    PubMed

    Wu, Qiong; Liu, Ming-Chao; Yang, Jun; Wang, Jiu-Feng; Zhu, Yao-Hong

    2015-12-11

    Escherichia coli is a major environmental pathogen causing bovine mastitis, which leads to mammary tissue damage and cell death. We explored the effects of the probiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus GR-1 on ameliorating E. coli-induced inflammation and cell damage in primary bovine mammary epithelial cells (BMECs). Increased Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), NOD1, and NOD2 mRNA expression was observed following E. coli challenge, but this increase was attenuated by L. rhamnosus GR-1 pretreatment. Immunofluorescence and Western blot analyses revealed that L. rhamnosus GR-1 pretreatment decreased the E. coli-induced increases in the expression of the NOD-like receptor family member pyrin domain-containing protein 3 (NLRP3) and the serine protease caspase 1. However, expression of the adaptor protein apoptosis-associated speck-like protein (ASC, encoded by the Pycard gene) was decreased during E. coli infection, even with L. rhamnosus GR-1 pretreatment. Pretreatment with L. rhamnosus GR-1 counteracted the E. coli-induced increases in interleukin-1β (IL-1β), -6, -8, and -18 and tumor necrosis factor alpha mRNA expression but upregulated IL-10 mRNA expression. Our data indicate that L. rhamnosus GR-1 reduces the adhesion of E. coli to BMECs, subsequently ameliorating E. coli-induced disruption of cellular morphology and ultrastructure and limiting detrimental inflammatory responses, partly via promoting TLR2 and NOD1 synergism and attenuating ASC-independent NLRP3 inflammasome activation. Although the residual pathogenic activity of L. rhamnosus, the dosage regimen, and the means of probiotic supplementation in cattle remain undefined, our data enhance our understanding of the mechanism of action of this candidate probiotic, allowing for development of specific probiotic-based therapies and strategies for preventing pathogenic infection of the bovine mammary gland.

  14. Biofilms of vaginal Lactobacillus reuteri CRL 1324 and Lactobacillus rhamnosus CRL 1332: kinetics of formation and matrix characterization.

    PubMed

    Leccese Terraf, María Cecilia; Juárez Tomás, María Silvina; Rault, Lucie; Le Loir, Yves; Even, Sergine; Nader-Macías, María Elena Fátima

    2016-09-01

    Adhesion and biofilm formation are strain properties that reportedly contribute to the permanence of lactobacilli in the human vagina. The kinetics of biofilm formation and the chemical nature of the biofilm matrix formed by Lactobacillus reuteri CRL (Centro de Referencia para Lactobacilos Culture Collection) 1324 and Lactobacillus rhamnosus CRL 1332, vaginal beneficial strains, were evaluated in this work. Crystal violet-stained microplate assay and techniques of epifluorescence, electron and confocal microscopy were applied. The highest density and complexity of biofilms of both vaginal lactobacilli were observed at 72 h of incubation. Protease, proteinase K, α-chymotrypsin and trypsin treatments efficiently detached L. reuteri CRL 1324 biofilm that was also partially affected by α-amylase. However, L. rhamnosus CRL 1332 biofilm was slightly affected by protease, proteinase K and α-amylase. Confocal microscopy revealed greater amount of polysaccharides in L. rhamnosus CRL 1332 biofilm matrix than in L. reuteri CRL 1324 biofilm matrix. The results indicate that proteins are one of the main components of the L. reuteri CRL 1324 biofilm, while the biofilm matrix of L. rhamnosus CRL 1332 is composed of carbohydrates and proteins. The results obtained support the knowledge, understanding and characterization of two biofilm-forming vaginal Lactobacillus strains.

  15. The use of date waste for lactic acid production by a fed-batch culture using Lactobacillus casei subsp. rhamnosus

    PubMed Central

    Nancib, Aicha; Nancib, Nabil; Boubendir, Abdelhafid; Boudrant, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    The production of lactic acid from date juice by Lactobacillus caseisubsp. rhamnosus in batch and fed-batch cultures has been investigated. The fed-batch culture system gave better results for lactic acid production and volumetric productivity. The aim of this work is to determine the effects of the feeding rate and the concentration of the feeding medium containing date juice glucose on the cell growth, the consumption of glucose and the lactic acid production by Lactobacillus casei subsp. rhamnosus in fed-batch cultures. For this study, two concentrations of the feeding medium (62 and 100 g/L of date juice glucose) were tested at different feeding rates (18, 22, 33, 75 and 150 mL/h). The highest volumetric productivity (1.3 g/L.h) and lactic acid yield (1.7 g/g) were obtained at a feeding rate of 33 mL/h and a date juice glucose concentration of 62 g/L in the feeding medium. As a result, most of the date juice glucose was completely utilised (residual glucose 1 g/L), and a maximum lactic acid production level (89.2 g/L) was obtained. PMID:26413076

  16. The use of date waste for lactic acid production by a fed-batch culture using Lactobacillus casei subsp. rhamnosus.

    PubMed

    Nancib, Aicha; Nancib, Nabil; Boubendir, Abdelhafid; Boudrant, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    The production of lactic acid from date juice by Lactobacillus caseisubsp. rhamnosus in batch and fed-batch cultures has been investigated. The fed-batch culture system gave better results for lactic acid production and volumetric productivity. The aim of this work is to determine the effects of the feeding rate and the concentration of the feeding medium containing date juice glucose on the cell growth, the consumption of glucose and the lactic acid production by Lactobacillus casei subsp. rhamnosus in fed-batch cultures. For this study, two concentrations of the feeding medium (62 and 100 g/L of date juice glucose) were tested at different feeding rates (18, 22, 33, 75 and 150 mL/h). The highest volumetric productivity (1.3 g/L.h) and lactic acid yield (1.7 g/g) were obtained at a feeding rate of 33 mL/h and a date juice glucose concentration of 62 g/L in the feeding medium. As a result, most of the date juice glucose was completely utilised (residual glucose 1 g/L), and a maximum lactic acid production level (89.2 g/L) was obtained.

  17. Resolved multifrequency radio observations of GG Tau

    SciTech Connect

    Andrews, Sean M.; Birnstiel, T.; Rosenfeld, K. A.; Wilner, D. J.; Chandler, Claire J.; Pérez, L. M.; Isella, Andrea; Ricci, L.; Carpenter, J. M.; Calvet, N.; Corder, S. A.; Deller, A. T.; Dullemond, C. P.; Greaves, J. S.; Harris, R. J.; Henning, Th.; Linz, H.; Kwon, W.; Lazio, J.; Mundy, L. G.; and others

    2014-06-01

    We present subarcsecond resolution observations of continuum emission associated with the GG Tau quadruple star system at wavelengths of 1.3, 2.8, 7.3, and 50 mm. These data confirm that the GG Tau A binary is encircled by a circumbinary ring at a radius of 235 AU with a FWHM width of ∼60 AU. We find no clear evidence for a radial gradient in the spectral shape of the ring, suggesting that the particle size distribution is spatially homogeneous on angular scales ≳0.''1. A central point source, likely associated with the primary component (GG Tau Aa), exhibits a composite spectrum from dust and free-free emission. Faint emission at 7.3 mm is observed toward the low-mass star GG Tau Ba, although its origin remains uncertain. Using these measurements of the resolved, multifrequency emission structure of the GG Tau A system, models of the far-infrared to radio spectrum are developed to place constraints on the grain size distribution and dust mass in the circumbinary ring. The non-negligible curvature present in the ring spectrum implies a maximum particle size of 1-10 mm, although we are unable to place strong constraints on the distribution shape. The corresponding dust mass is 30-300 M {sub ⊕}, at a temperature of 20-30 K. We discuss how this significant concentration of relatively large particles in a narrow ring at a large radius might be produced in a local region of higher gas pressures (i.e., a particle 'trap') located near the inner edge of the circumbinary disk.

  18. Lactobacillus rhamnosus could inhibit Porphyromonas gingivalis derived CXCL8 attenuation

    PubMed Central

    Mendi, Ayşegül; Köse, Sevil; Uçkan, Duygu; Akca, Gülçin; Yilmaz, Derviş; Aral, Levent; Gültekin, Sibel Elif; Eroğlu, Tamer; Kiliç, Emine; Uçkan, Sina

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT An increasing body of evidence suggests that the use of probiotic bacteria is a promising intervention approach for the treatment of inflammatory diseases with a polymicrobial etiology. P. gingivalis has been noted to have a different way of interacting with the innate immune response of the host compared to other pathogenic bacteria, which is a recognized feature that inhibits CXCL8 expression. Objective The aim of the study was to determine if P. gingivalis infection modulates the inflammatory response of gingival stromal stem cells (G-MSSCs), including the release of CXCL8, and the expression of TLRs and if immunomodulatory L. rhamnosus ATCC9595 could prevent CXCL8 inhibition in experimental inflammation. Material and Methods G-MSSCs were pretreated with L. rhamnosus ATCC9595 and then stimulated with P. gingivalis ATCC33277. CXCL8 and IL-10 levels were investigated with ELISA and the TLR-4 and 2 were determined through flow cytometer analysis. Results CXCL8 was suppressed by P. gingivalis and L. rhamnosus ATCC9595, whereas incubation with both strains did not abolish CXCL8. L. rhamnosus ATCC9595 scaled down the expression of TLR4 and induced TLR2 expression when exposed to P. gingivalis stimulation (p<0.01). Conclusions These findings provide evidence that L. rhamnosus ATCC9595 can modulate the inflammatory signals and could introduce P. gingivalis to immune systems by inducing CXCL8 secretion. PMID:27008259

  19. Near-infrared Imaging Polarimetry of Inner Region of GG Tau A Disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yi; Hashimoto, Jun; Hayashi, Saeko S.; Tamura, Motohide; Mayama, Satoshi; Rafikov, Roman; Akiyama, Eiji; Carson, Joseph C.; Janson, Markus; Kwon, Jungmi; de Leon, Jerome; Oh, Daehyeon; Takami, Michihiro; Tang, Ya-wen; Kudo, Tomoyuki; Kusakabe, Nobuhiko; Abe, Lyu; Brandner, Wolfgang; Brandt, Timothy D.; Egner, Sebastian; Feldt, Markus; Goto, Miwa; Grady, Carol A.; Guyon, Olivier; Hayano, Yutaka; Hayashi, Masahiko; Henning, Thomas; Hodapp, Klaus W.; Ishii, Miki; Iye, Masanori; Kandori, Ryo; Knapp, Gillian R.; Kuzuhara, Masayuki; Matsuo, Taro; Mcelwain, Michael W.; Miyama, Shoken; Morino, Jun-Ichi; Moro-martin, Amaya; Nishimura, Tetsuo; Pyo, Tae-Soo; Serabyn, Eugene; Suenaga, Takuya; Suto, Hiroshi; Suzuki, Ryuji; Takahashi, Yasuhiro H.; Takato, Naruhisa; Terada, Hiroshi; Thalmann, Christian; Turner, Edwin L.; Watanabe, Makoto; Wisniewski, John; Yamada, Toru; Takami, Hideki; Usuda, Tomonori

    2017-01-01

    By performing non-masked polarization imaging with Subaru/HiCIAO, polarized scattered light from the inner region of the disk around the GG Tau A system was successfully detected in the H band, with a spatial resolution of approximately 0.″07, revealing the complicated inner disk structures around this young binary. This paper reports the observation of an arc-like structure to the north of GG Tau Ab, and part of a circumstellar structure that is noticeable around GG Tau Aa, extending to a distance of approximately 28 au from the primary star. The speckle noise around GG Tau Ab constrains its disk radius to < 13 au. Based on the size of the circumbinary ring and the circumstellar disk around GG Tau Aa, the semimajor axis of the binary’s orbit is likely to be 62 au. A comparison of the present observations with previous Atacama Large Millimeter Array and near-infrared H2 emission observations suggests that the north arc could be part of a large streamer flowing from the circumbinary ring to sustain the circumstellar disks. According to the previous studies, the circumstellar disk around GG Tau Aa has enough mass and can sustain itself for a duration sufficient for planet formation; thus, our study indicates that planets can form within close (separation ≲ 100 au) young binary systems.

  20. Enhancement of Seed Dehiscence by Seed Treatment with Talaromyces flavus GG01 and GG04 in Ginseng (Panax ginseng)

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Min-Jeong; Shim, Chang-Ki; Kim, Yong-Ki; Hong, Sung-Jun; Park, Jong-Ho; Han, Eun-Jung; Kim, Seok-Cheol

    2017-01-01

    Seed dehiscence of ginseng (Panax ginseng C. A. Mayer) is affected by moisture, temperature, storage conditions and microbes. Several microbes were isolated from completely dehisced seed coat of ginseng cultivars, Chunpoong and Younpoong at Gumsan, Korea. We investigated the potential of five Talaromyces flavus isolates from the dehiscence of ginseng seed in four traditional stratification facilities. The isolates showed antagonistic activities against fungal plant pathogens, such as Cylindrocarpon destructans, Fusarium oxysporum, Rhizoctonia solani, Sclerotinia nivalis, Botrytis cinerea, and Phytophthora capsici. The dehiscence ratios of ginseng seed increased more than 33% by treatment of T. flavus GG01, GG02, GG04, GG12, and GG23 in comparison to control (28%). Among the treatments, the reformulating treatment of T. flavus isolates GG01 and GG04 showed the highest of stratification ratio of ginseng seed. After 16 weeks, the reformulating treatment of T. flavus isolates GG01 and GG04 significantly enhanced dehiscence of ginseng seed by about 81% compared to the untreated control. The candidate’s treatment of T. flavus GG01 and GG04 showed the highest decreasing rate of 93% in seed coat hardness for 112 days in dehiscence period. The results suggested that the pre-inoculation of T. flavus GG01 and GG04 found to be very effective applications in improving dehiscence and germination of ginseng seed. PMID:28167883

  1. Systemic Effects of Ingested Lactobacillus Rhamnosus: Inhibition of Mast Cell Membrane Potassium (IKCa) Current and Degranulation

    PubMed Central

    Forsythe, Paul; Wang, Binxiang; Khambati, Ibrahim; Kunze, Wolfgang A.

    2012-01-01

    Exposure of the intestine to certain strains lactobacillus can have systemic immune effects that include the attenuation of allergic responses. Despite the central role of mast cells in allergic disease little is known about the effect of lactobacilli on the function of these cells. To address this we assessed changes in rat mast cell activation following oral treatment with a strain of Lactobacillus known to attenuate allergic responses in animal models. Sprague Dawley rats were fed with L.rhamnosus JB-1 (1×109) or vehicle control for 9 days. Mediator release from peritoneal mast cells (RPMC) was determined in response to a range of stimuli. Passive cutaneous anaphylaxis (PCA) was used to assess mast cell responses in vivo. The Ca2+ activated K+ channel (KCa3.1) current, identified as critical to mast cell degranulation, was monitored by whole cell patch-clamp. L.rhamnosus JB-1 treatment lead to significant inhibition of mast cell mediator release in response to a range of stimuli including IgE mediated activation. Furthermore, the PCA response was significantly reduced in treated rats. Patch-clamp studies revealed that RPMC from treated animals were much less responsive to the KCa3.1 opener, DCEBIO. These studies demonstrate that Ingestion of L.rhamnosus JB-1 leads to mast cell stabilization in rats and identify KCa3.1 as an immunomodulatory target for certain lactobacilli. Thus the systemic effects of certain candidate probiotics may include mast cell stabilization and such actions could contribute to the beneficial effect of these organisms in allergic and other inflammatory disorders. PMID:22815978

  2. Apsidal motion in eclipsing binary GG Orionis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yilan, E.; Bulut, I.

    2016-03-01

    The study of apsidal motion in binary stars with eccentric orbit is well known as an important source of information for the stellar internal structure as well as the possibility of verification of general relativity. In this study, the apsidal motion of the eccentric eclipsing binary GG Ori (P = 6.631 days, e = 0.22) has been analyzed using the times of minimum light taken from the literature and databases and the elements of apsidal motion have been computed. The method described by Giménez and García-Pelayo (1983) has been used for the apsidal motion analysis.

  3. Probiotic-Associated Aspiration Pneumonia Due to Lactobacillus rhamnosus

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Sean T.; Afolabi, Folashade; Burnham, Carey-Ann D.

    2014-01-01

    Lactobacilli are low-virulence, commensal organisms of the gastrointestinal and genitourinary tracts and are commonly used as “probiotic supplements.” Herein, we describe an episode of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) bronchiolitis with bacterial superinfection secondary to administration of Lactobacillus rhamnosus in an 11-month-old female with trisomy 21. PMID:24899028

  4. The lectin-like protein 1 in Lactobacillus rhamnosus GR-1 mediates tissue-specific adherence to vaginal epithelium and inhibits urogenital pathogens.

    PubMed

    Petrova, Mariya I; Lievens, Elke; Verhoeven, Tine L A; Macklaim, Jean M; Gloor, Gregory; Schols, Dominique; Vanderleyden, Jos; Reid, Gregor; Lebeer, Sarah

    2016-11-21

    The probiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus GR-1 has been documented to survive implantation onto the vaginal epithelium and interfere with urogenital pathogens. However, the molecular mechanisms involved are largely unknown. Here, we report for the first time the construction of dedicated knock-out mutants in L. rhamnosus GR-1 to enable the study of gene functions. In a search for genes responsible for the adherence capacity of L. rhamnosus GR-1, a genomic region encoding a protein with homology to lectin-like proteins was identified. Phenotypic analyses of the knock-out mutant of L. rhamnosus GR-1 revealed a two-fold decreased adhesion to the vaginal and ectocervical epithelial cell lines compared to wild-type. In contrast, the adhesion to gastro-intestinal epithelial (Caco2) and endocervical cell lines (Hela and End1/E6E7) was not drastically affected by the mutation, suggesting that the LGR-1_Llp1 lectins mediates tissue tropism. The purified LGR-1_Llp1 protein also inhibited biofilm formation and adhesion of uropathogenic Escherichia coli. For the first time, an important role for a novel lectin-like protein in the adhesion capacity and host cell-specific interaction of a vaginal probiotic Lactobacillus strain has been discovered, with an additional role in pathogen inhibition.

  5. The lectin-like protein 1 in Lactobacillus rhamnosus GR-1 mediates tissue-specific adherence to vaginal epithelium and inhibits urogenital pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Petrova, Mariya I.; Lievens, Elke; Verhoeven, Tine L. A.; Macklaim, Jean M.; Gloor, Gregory; Schols, Dominique; Vanderleyden, Jos; Reid, Gregor; Lebeer, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    The probiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus GR-1 has been documented to survive implantation onto the vaginal epithelium and interfere with urogenital pathogens. However, the molecular mechanisms involved are largely unknown. Here, we report for the first time the construction of dedicated knock-out mutants in L. rhamnosus GR-1 to enable the study of gene functions. In a search for genes responsible for the adherence capacity of L. rhamnosus GR-1, a genomic region encoding a protein with homology to lectin-like proteins was identified. Phenotypic analyses of the knock-out mutant of L. rhamnosus GR-1 revealed a two-fold decreased adhesion to the vaginal and ectocervical epithelial cell lines compared to wild-type. In contrast, the adhesion to gastro-intestinal epithelial (Caco2) and endocervical cell lines (Hela and End1/E6E7) was not drastically affected by the mutation, suggesting that the LGR-1_Llp1 lectins mediates tissue tropism. The purified LGR-1_Llp1 protein also inhibited biofilm formation and adhesion of uropathogenic Escherichia coli. For the first time, an important role for a novel lectin-like protein in the adhesion capacity and host cell-specific interaction of a vaginal probiotic Lactobacillus strain has been discovered, with an additional role in pathogen inhibition. PMID:27869151

  6. 10. DD and GG breaker building and associated conveyors. DD ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. DD and GG breaker building and associated conveyors. DD is coke transfer hous ein foreground; GG is breaker building in center. Coal bunker is tall building to left; 2-story coke conveyor on left brought coal to powerhouse pulverizer. Looking south/southeast - Rouge Steel Company, 3001 Miller Road, Dearborn, MI

  7. [Lactobacillus Rhamnosus sepsis in a preterm infant associated with probiotic integrator use: a case report.

    PubMed

    Molinaro, Manuela; Aiazzi, Massimo; La Torre, Antonio; Cini, Elisabetta; Banfi, Roberto

    2016-09-01

    Preterm infants are at high risk of neonatal sepsis. We report a case of a preterm infant under prophylaxis with Lactobacillus Rhamnosus for necrotizing enterocolitis; the child develops neonatal sepsis by Lactobacillus Rhamnosus. The infection is improved after probiotic withdrawal and had complete remission after 20 days of specific antibiotic therapy.

  8. Decays Z{yields}gg{gamma} and Z{sup '}{yields}gg{gamma} in the minimal 331 model

    SciTech Connect

    Flores-Tlalpa, A.; Montano, J.; Ramirez-Zavaleta, F.; Toscano, J. J.

    2009-10-01

    The one-loop induced Z{yields}gg{gamma} and Z{sup '}{yields}gg{gamma} decays are studied within the context of the minimal 331 model, which predicts the existence of new gauge bosons and three exotic quarks. It is found that the Z{yields}gg{gamma} decay is insensitive to the presence of the exotic quarks, as it is essentially governed by the first two families of known quarks. As to the Z{sup '}{yields}gg{gamma} decay, it is found that the exotic quark contribution dominates and that for a heavy Z{sup '} boson it leads to a {gamma}(Z{sup '}{yields}gg{gamma}) that is more than 1 order of magnitude larger than that associated with {gamma}(Z{sup '}{yields}ggg). This result may be used to distinguish a new neutral Z{sup '} boson from those models that do not introduce exotic quarks.

  9. 40 CFR Table 1 to Subpart Gg of... - General Provisions Applicability to Subpart GG

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Reference Applies to affected sources in subpart GG Comment 63.1(a)(1) Yes 63.1(a)(2) Yes 63.1(a)(3) Yes 63.1(a)(4) Yes 63.1(a)(5) No Reserved. 63.1(a)(6) Yes 63.1(a)(7) Yes 63.1(a)(8) Yes 63.1(a)(9) No Reserved. 63.1(a)(10) Yes 63.1(a)(11) Yes 63.1(a)(12) Yes 63.1(a)(13) Yes 63.1(a)(14) Yes 63.1(b)(1)......

  10. Protective effects and mechanisms of a probiotic bacterium Lactobacillus rhamnosus against experimental Edwardsiella tarda infection in tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus).

    PubMed

    Pirarat, Nopadon; Kobayashi, Takeshi; Katagiri, Takayuki; Maita, Masashi; Endo, Makoto

    2006-10-15

    In recent years, probiotics, especially lactic acid bacteria, have been used as dietary supplements to protect fish from various infections. Here, we examined the protective effects of Lactobacillus rhamnosus against experimental Edwardsiella tarda infection in tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus). Cumulative mortality was significantly lower in probiotic-supplemented fish than in control fish. In a histopathological survey, pyogranulomatous responses were observed at an earlier stage and to a greater extent in the probiotic-supplemented fish than in the control fish. Immunohistochemistry using an anti-E. tarda antibody revealed a larger number of positive signals in pyogranuloma-participating cells, indicating an enhanced phagocytic ability. Alternative complement activity was significantly higher in the probiotic groups than in the control. These results suggest that L. rhamnosus enhanced the alternative complement system of the fish, enabling phagocytic cell aggregation, increasing phagocytic activity and subsequently protecting the fish from acute septicemic death by E. tarda infection. Prevention of thymic necrosis by the probiotic supplement seems to minimize immunosuppression and to initiate an immune response against edwardsiellosis.

  11. Development of cost-effective media to increase the economic potential for larger-scale bioproduction of natural food additives by Lactobacillus rhamnosus , Debaryomyces hansenii , and Aspergillus niger.

    PubMed

    Salgado, José Manuel; Rodríguez, Noelia; Cortés, Sandra; Domínguez, José Manuel

    2009-11-11

    Yeast extract (YE) is the most common nitrogen source in a variety of bioprocesses in spite of the high cost. Therefore, the use of YE in culture media is one of the major technical hurdles to be overcome for the development of low-cost fermentation routes, making the search for alternative-cheaper nitrogen sources particularly desired. The aim of the current study is to develop cost-effective media based on corn steep liquor (CSL) and locally available vinasses in order to increase the economic potential for larger-scale bioproduction. Three microorganisms were evaluated: Lactobacillus rhamnosus , Debaryomyces hansenii , and Aspergillus niger . The amino acid profile and protein concentration was relevant for the xylitol and citric acid production by D. hansenii and A. niger , respectively. Metals also played an important role for citric acid production, meanwhile, D. hansenii showed a strong dependence with the initial amount of Mg(2+). Under the best conditions, 28.8 g lactic acid/L (Q(LA) = 0.800 g/L.h, Y(LA/S) = 0.95 g/g), 35.3 g xylitol/L (Q(xylitol) = 0.380 g/L.h, Y(xylitol/S) = 0.69 g/g), and 13.9 g citric acid/L (Q(CA) = 0.146 g/L.h, Y(CA/S) = 0.63 g/g) were obtained. The economic efficiency (E(p/euro)) parameter identify vinasses as a lower cost and more effective nutrient source in comparison to CSL.

  12. CIRCUMBINARY GAS ACCRETION ONTO A CENTRAL BINARY: INFRARED MOLECULAR HYDROGEN EMISSION FROM GG Tau A

    SciTech Connect

    Beck, Tracy L.; Lubow, S. H.; Bary, Jeffrey S.; Dutrey, Anne; Guilloteau, Stephane; Pietu, Vincent; Simon, M. E-mail: lubow@stsci.edu E-mail: Anne.Dutrey@obs.u-bordeaux1.fr E-mail: pietu@iram.fr

    2012-07-20

    We present high spatial resolution maps of ro-vibrational molecular hydrogen emission from the environment of the GG Tau A binary component in the GG Tau quadruple system. The H{sub 2} v = 1-0 S(1) emission is spatially resolved and encompasses the inner binary, with emission detected at locations that should be dynamically cleared on several hundred year timescales. Extensions of H{sub 2} gas emission are seen to {approx}100 AU distances from the central stars. The v = 2-1 S(1) emission at 2.24 {mu}m is also detected at {approx}30 AU from the central stars, with a line ratio of 0.05 {+-} 0.01 with respect to the v = 1-0 S(1) emission. Assuming gas in LTE, this ratio corresponds to an emission environment at {approx}1700 K. We estimate that this temperature is too high for quiescent gas heated by X-ray or UV emission from the central stars. Surprisingly, we find that the brightest region of H{sub 2} emission arises from a spatial location that is exactly coincident with a recently revealed dust 'streamer' which seems to be transferring material from the outer circumbinary ring around GG Tau A into the inner region. As a result, we identify a new excitation mechanism for ro-vibrational H{sub 2} stimulation in the environment of young stars. The H{sub 2} in the GG Tau A system appears to be stimulated by mass accretion infall as material in the circumbinary ring accretes onto the system to replenish the inner circumstellar disks. We postulate that H{sub 2} stimulated by accretion infall could be present in other systems, particularly binaries and 'transition disk' systems which have dust-cleared gaps in their circumstellar environments.

  13. Galileo Galilei (GG): the space mission and the prototype

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nobili, A.

    "GALILEO GALILEI (GG)" is a proposal to fly a small satellite in low Earth orbit aiming to test the Equivalence Principle of Galileo, Newton and Einstein to 1 part in 1017 at room temperature. Ground tests carried out with artificial test bodies on rotating torsion balances, and tests with celestial bodies based on Lunar Laser Ranging data, have found no violation to about 1 part in 1013 . Competing space pro jects are SCOPE (also at room temperature) aiming to 1 part in 1015 , and STEP (at very low temperature) aiming to 1 part in 1018 . GG is characterized by fast rotation and by the possibility to perform a full scale test on the ground. This talk will present the main features of the GG design, as compared to STEP and SCOPE, and report the experimental results obtained with the first and the second generation laboratory prototypes (natural frequencies, quality factor, stability, sensitivity). Interested scientists are welcome to visit the GG webpage at http://eotvos.dm.unipi.it/nobili.

  14. 6. FF coal pulverizer (ball mill inside). GG building in ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. FF coal pulverizer (ball mill inside). GG building in background did preliminary crushing; pulverizer to left, coal conveyor and air cleaning towers to right; conveyor on left brought crushed coal to FF. Looking north/northeast - Rouge Steel Company, 3001 Miller Road, Dearborn, MI

  15. Evaluation of the response of Lactobacillus rhamnosus VTT E-97800 to sucrose-induced osmotic stress.

    PubMed

    Sunny-Roberts, E O; Knorr, D

    2008-02-01

    Environmental osmotic changes are one of the stresses live probiotics may encounter either in their natural habitats or as a result of usage in food formulations and processing. Response to osmotic stress, induced by sucrose, of the probiotic strain Lactobacillus rhamnosus VTT E-97800 (E800) was investigated. The fluorescence-based approach used, by combined staining with caboxyfluorescein (cFDA) and propidium iodide (PI) could give insights on the osmotic-induced changes of microbial esterase activity and membrane integrity; also the extrusion of intracellular accumulated carboxyfluorescein (cF) upon energizing with glucose. Comparison of the flowcytometric viability assessment with the conventional culture techniques revealed that sucrose-stressed cells had a slight loss of culturability (logN/N(0) approximately -0.3) at 1.2 and 1.5M sucrose concentration though they could perform an enzymatic conversion of cFDA into cF. The presence of such metabolically active bacteria in food might be critical as they may excrete toxic or food spoilage metabolites. Moreover, the perturbation of cF extrusion activities became a limiting factor for reproductive capacities. There was no change in the cell morphology. These results proved the ability of the strain of study to tolerate sucrose, even at extreme concentrations and these must be taken into consideration for its usage in the formulation/processing of sugar-based foods, e.g. jams, candies, etc.

  16. Genome Sequence of Lactobacillus rhamnosus Strain CASL, an Efficient l-Lactic Acid Producer from Cheap Substrate Cassava

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Bo; Su, Fei; Wang, Limin; Zhao, Bo; Qin, Jiayang; Ma, Cuiqing; Xu, Ping; Ma, Yanhe

    2011-01-01

    Lactobacillus rhamnosus is a type of probiotic bacteria with industrial potential for l-lactic acid production. We announce the draft genome sequence of L. rhamnosus CASL (2,855,156 bp with a G+C content of 46.6%), which is an efficient producer of l-lactic acid from cheap, nonfood substrate cassava with a high production titer. PMID:22123765

  17. Stability of DNA duplexes containing GG, CC, AA, and TT mismatches.

    PubMed

    Tikhomirova, Anna; Beletskaya, Irina V; Chalikian, Tigran V

    2006-09-05

    We employed salt-dependent differential scanning calorimetric measurements to characterize the stability of six oligomeric DNA duplexes (5'-GCCGGAXTGCCGG-3'/5'-CCGGCAYTCCGGC-3') that contain in the central XY position the GC, AT, GG, CC, AA, or TT base pair. The heat-induced helix-to-coil transitions of all the duplexes are associated with positive changes in heat capacity, DeltaC(p), ranging from 0.43 to 0.53 kcal/mol. Positive values of DeltaC(p) result in strong temperature dependences of changes in enthalpy, DeltaH degrees, and entropy, DeltaS degrees , accompanying duplex melting and cause melting free energies, DeltaG degrees, to exhibit characteristically curved shapes. These observations suggest that DeltaC(p) needs to be carefully taken into account when the parameters of duplex stability are extrapolated to temperatures distant from the transition temperature, T(M). Comparison of the calorimetric and van't Hoff enthalpies revealed that none of the duplexes studied in this work exhibits two-state melting. Within the context of the central AXT/TYA triplet, the thermal and thermodynamic stabilities of the duplexes in question change in the following order: GC > AT > GG > AA approximately TT > CC. Our estimates revealed that the thermodynamic impact of the GG, AA, and TT mismatches is confined within the central triplet. In contrast, the thermodynamic impact of the CC mismatch propagates into the adjacent helix domains and may involve 7-9 bp. We discuss implications of our results for understanding the origins of initial recognition of mismatched DNA sites by enzymes of the DNA repair machinery.

  18. L-Lactic Acid Production by Lactobacillus rhamnosus ATCC 10863

    PubMed Central

    Senedese, Ana Lívia Chemeli; Maciel Filho, Rubens; Maciel, Maria Regina Wolf

    2015-01-01

    Lactic acid has been shown to have the most promising application in biomaterials as poly(lactic acid). L. rhamnosus ATCC 10863 that produces L-lactic acid was used to perform the fermentation and molasses was used as substrate. A solution containing 27.6 g/L of sucrose (main composition of molasses) and 3.0 g/L of yeast extract was prepared, considering the final volume of 3,571 mL (14.0% (v/v) inoculum). Batch and fed batch fermentations were performed with temperature of 43.4°C and pH of 5.0. At the fed batch, three molasses feed were applied at 12, 24, and 36 hours. Samples were taken every two hours and the amounts of lactic acid, sucrose, glucose, and fructose were determined by HPLC. The sucrose was barely consumed at both processes; otherwise the glucose and fructose were almost entirely consumed. 16.5 g/L of lactic acid was produced at batch and 22.0 g/L at fed batch. Considering that lactic acid was produced due to the low concentration of the well consumed sugars, the final amount was considerable. The cell growth was checked and no substrate inhibition was observed. A sucrose molasses hydrolysis is suggested to better avail the molasses fermentation with this strain, surely increasing the L-lactic acid. PMID:25922852

  19. Differential fate of metabolism of a disperse dye by microorganisms Galactomyces geotrichum and Brevibacillus laterosporus and their consortium GG-BL.

    PubMed

    Waghmode, Tatoba R; Kurade, Mayur B; Kagalkar, Anuradha N; Govindwar, Sanjay P

    2012-01-01

    The present work aims to evaluate Brown 3 REL degrading potential of developed microbial consortium GG-BL using two microbial cultures, Galactomyces geotrichum MTCC 1360 (GG) and Brevibacillus laterosporus MTCC 2298 (BL). Microbial consortium GG-BL showed 100% decolorization of a dye Brown 3 REL, while individually G. geotrichum MTCC 1360 and B. laterosporus MTCC 2298 showed 26% and 86% decolorization under aerobic condition (shaking) respectively. Measurements of biochemical oxygen demand (BOD) (76%) and chemical oxygen demand (COD) (68%) were done after decolorization by consortium GG-BL. No induction in activities of oxidoreductive enzymes found in G. geotrichum while B. laterosporus showed induction of veratryl alcohol oxidase, Nicotineamide adenine dinucleotide-dichlorophenol indophenol (NADH-DCIP) reductase and riboflavin reductase indicating their role in dye metabolism. Consortium GG-BL showed induction in the activities of laccase, veratryl alcohol oxidase, tyrosinase, NADH-DCIP reductase and riboflavin reductase. Two different sets of induced enzymes from G. geotrichum and B. laterosporus work together in consortium GG-BL resulting in faster degradation of dye. The degradation of Brown 3 REL was analyzed using high performance thin layer chromatography (HPTLC), high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and gas chromatography mass spectroscopy (GC-MS). Phytotoxicity study revealed that metabolites formed after degradation was significantly less toxic in nature.

  20. Preparation and characterization of a coacervate extended-release microparticulate delivery system for Lactobacillus rhamnosus

    PubMed Central

    Alli, Sk Md Athar

    2011-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this study was to develop a mucoadhesive coacervate microparticulate system to deliver viable Lactobacillus rhamnosus cells into the gut for an extended period of time while maintaining high numbers of viable cells within the formulation throughout its shelf-life and during gastrointestinal transit. Methods: Core coacervate mucoadhesive microparticles of L. rhamnosus were developed using several grades of hypromellose and were subsequently enteric-coated with hypromellose phthalate. Microparticles were evaluated for percent yield, entrapment efficiency, surface morphology, particle size, size distribution, zeta potential, flow properties, in vitro swelling, mucoadhesion properties, in vitro release profile and release kinetics, in vivo probiotic activity, and stability. The values for the kinetic constant and release exponent of model-dependent approaches, the difference factor, similarity factor, and Rescigno indices of model-independent approaches were determined for analyzing in vitro dissolution profiles. Results: Experimental microparticles of formulation batches were of spherical shape with percent yields of 41.24%–58.18%, entrapment efficiency 45.18%–64.16%, mean particle size 33.10–49.62 μm, and zeta potential around −11.5 mV, confirming adequate stability of L. rhamnosus at room temperature. The in vitro L. rhamnosus release profile follows zero-order kinetics and depends on the grade of hypromellose and the L. rhamnosus to hypromellose ratio. Conclusion: Microparticles delivered L. rhamnosus in simulated intestinal conditions for an extended period, following zero-order kinetics, and exhibited appreciable mucoadhesion in simulated intestinal conditions. PMID:21984867

  1. Transcriptomic clues to understand the growth of Lactobacillus rhamnosus in cheese

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Lactobacillus rhamnosus is a non-starter lactic acid bacterium that plays a significant role during cheese ripening, leading to the formation of flavor. In long-ripened cheeses it persists throughout the whole time of ripening due to its capacity to adapt to changing environmental conditions. The versatile adaptability of L. rhamnosus to different ecosystems has been associated with the capacity to use non-conventional energy sources, regulating different metabolic pathways. However, the molecular mechanisms allowing the growth of L. rhamnosus in the cheese dairy environment are still poorly understood. The aim of the present study was to identify genes potentially contributing to the growth ability of L. rhamnosus PR1019 in cheese-like medium (CB) using a transcriptomic approach, based on cDNA-amplified fragment length polymorphism (cDNA-AFLP) and quantitative real-time reverse transcription-PCR (qPCR). Results Using three primer combinations, a total of 89 and 98 transcript-derived fragments were obtained for L. rhamnosus PR1019 grown in commercial MRS medium and CB, respectively. The cDNA-AFLP results were validated on selected regulated genes by qPCR. In order to investigate the main adaptations to growth in a cheese-mimicking system, we focused on 20 transcripts over-expressed in CB with respect to MRS. It is worth noting the presence of transcripts involved in the degradation of pyruvate and ribose. Pyruvate is a intracellular metabolite that can be produced through different metabolic routes starting from the carbon sources present in cheese, and can be released in the cheese matrix with the starter lysis. Similarly the ribonucleosides released with starter lysis could deliver ribose that represents a fermentable carbohydrate in environments, such as cheese, where free carbohydrates are lacking. Both pyruvate degradation and ribose catabolism induce a metabolite flux toward acetate, coupled with ATP production via acetate kinase. Taking into

  2. Lactobacillus rhamnosus JCM 2771: impact on metabolism of isoflavonoids in the fecal flora from a male equol producer.

    PubMed

    Tamura, Motoi; Hori, Sachiko; Nakagawa, Hiroyuki

    2011-05-01

    Many beneficial effects of probiotics have been reported; however, few have focussed on the effects of Lactobacillus, a probiotic, on the bioconversion of isoflavonoids. We hypothesized that Lactobacillus rhamnosus will modify the metabolism of isoflavone. In an in vitro incubation, L. rhamnosus JCM 2771 produced daidzein from daidzin along with genistein. However, daidzin and genistein were not detected in the incubation solution of daidzein with L. rhamnosus. In the fecal suspension from a male equol producer with daidzein, equol was detected in the presence of a low or high concentration of L. rhamnosus. In the fecal incubation with daidzin, the equol concentration increased with an increasing concentration of L. rhamnosus JCM 2771. L. rhamnosus affected the equol production in the in vitro incubation of daidzein with fecal flora from a male equol producer. We demonstrated for the first time that L. rhamnosus JCM 2771 could produce genistein from daidzin and affect the equol production of fecal flora from a male equol producer in vitro.

  3. Detection of circumstellar gas associated with GG Tauri

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skrutskie, M. F.; Snell, R. L.; Strom, K. M.; Strom, S. E.; Edwards, S.; Fukui, Y.; Mizuno, A.; Hayashi, M.; Ohashi, N.

    1993-01-01

    Double-peaked (C-12)O (1-0) emission centered on the young T Tauri star GG Tau possesses a line profile which may be modeled on the assumption that CO emission arises in an extended circumstellar disk. While bounds on the observed gas mass can be estimated on this basis, it is suggested that a large amount of mass could lie within a small and optically thick region, escaping detection due to beam-dilution effects. In addition, CO may no longer accurately trace the gas mass due to its dissociation, or freezing into grains, or due to the locking-up of carbon into more complex molecules.

  4. Genome Sequences of Potential Probiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus Isolates from Human Infants

    PubMed Central

    Arnold, Jason W.; Monteagudo-Mera, Andrea; Altermann, Eric; Cadenas, Maria Belen; Thompson, Amanda L.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Probiotics provide health benefits to their hosts, including modulation of host immune response, inhibition of colonization by pathogens, modulation of the gut microbiota, and epithelial barrier enhancement. Here, we present the draft genome sequences of two newly isolated Lactobacillus rhamnosus strains of probiotic potential from healthy human infants. PMID:28385840

  5. Lactobacillus casei CRL 431 and Lactobacillus rhamnosus CRL 1224 as biological controls for Aspergillus flavus strains.

    PubMed

    Bueno, Dante J; Silva, Julio O; Oliver, Guillermo; González, Silvia N

    2006-10-01

    The effect of two species of lactobacilli, Lactobacillus casei CRL 431 and Lactobacillus rhamnosus CRL 1224, on growth of different Aspergillus flavus strains was determined. A. flavus strains (Ap, TR2, or CF80) were grown in LAPTg broth at 37 degrees C for 7 days as a single culture and in association with L. casei CRL 431 or L. rhamnosus CRL 1224 at initial inoculum ratios of 1:1, 1:10, and 1:100. In most cases, the mixed cultures had a lower fungal growth and a lower pH than the control cultures. Mycelial dry weight was reduced to 73 and 85% using L. casei CRL 431 and L. rhamnosus CRL 1224, respectively. The pH decrease in mixed cultures when the fungal mycelial dry weight is reduced may play an important role in inhibition. The number of viable bacteria was variably affected by fungal growth. These results indicate that L. casei CRL 431 and L. rhamnosus CRL 1224 may be useful as potential biocontrol agent against A. flavus.

  6. Assessing the Effectiveness of Two Theoretically Motivated Computer-Assisted Reading Interventions in the United Kingdom: GG Rime and GG Phoneme

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kyle, Fiona; Kujala, Janne; Richardson, Ulla; Lyytinen, Heikki; Goswami, Usha

    2013-01-01

    We report an empirical comparison of the effectiveness of two theoretically motivated computer-assisted reading interventions (CARI) based on the Finnish GraphoGame CARI: English GraphoGame Rime (GG Rime) and English GraphoGame Phoneme (GG Phoneme). Participants were 6-7-year-old students who had been identified by their teachers as being…

  7. The spectroscopic orbits and physical parameters of GG Carinae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchiano, P.; Brandi, E.; Muratore, M. F.; Quiroga, C.; Ferrer, O. E.; García, L. G.

    2012-04-01

    Aims: GG Car is an eclipsing binary classified as a B[e] supergiant star. The aims of our study are to improve the orbital elements of the binary system in order to obtain the actual orbital period of this system. We also compare the spectral energy distribution of the observed fluxes over a wide wavelength range with a model of a circumstellar envelope composed of gas and dust. This fitting allows us to derive the physical parameters of the system and its environment, as well as to obtain an estimation of the distance to GG Car. Methods: We analyzed about 55 optical and near infrared spectrograms taken during 1996-2010. The spectroscopic orbits were obtained by measuring the radial velocities of the blueshifted absorptions of the He I P-Cygni profiles, which are very representative of the orbital motion of both stars. On the other hand, we modeled the spectral energy distribution of GG Car, proposing a simple model of a spherical envelope consisting of a layer close to the central star composed of ionized gas and other outermost layers composed of dust. Its effect on the spectral energy distribution considering a central B-type star is presented. Comparing the model with the observed continuum energy distribution of GG Car, we can derive fundamental parameters of the system, as well as global physical properties of the gas and dust envelope. It is also possible to estimate the distance taking the spectral regions into account where the theoretical data fit the observational data very well and using the set of parameters obtained and the value of the observed flux for different wavelengths. Results: For the first time, we have determined the orbits for both components of the binary through a detailed study of the He I lines, at λλ4471, 5875, 6678, and 7065 Å, thereby obtaining an orbital period of 31.033 days. An eccentric orbit with e = 0.28 and a mass ratio q = 2.2 ± 0.9 were calculated. Comparing the model with the observed continuum energy distribution of

  8. 30 CFR 251.4 - Types of G&G activities that require permits or Notices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... separate permit for each. (b) Scientific research. You may only conduct G&G scientific research related to... proprietary use or sale. (2) Notice. Any other G&G scientific research that you conduct related to oil, gas.... You must obtain a permit if the research activities you propose to conduct involve: (i) Using solid...

  9. 30 CFR 251.4 - Types of G&G activities that require permits or Notices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) Scientific research. You may only conduct G&G scientific research related to oil, gas, and sulphur in the OCS...) Notice. Any other G&G scientific research that you conduct related to oil, gas, and sulphur in the OCS... research activities you propose to conduct involve: (i) Using solid or liquid explosives; (ii) Drilling...

  10. Inhibitory effect of essential oils against Lactobacillus rhamnosus and starter culture in fermented milk during its shelf-life period

    PubMed Central

    Moritz, Cristiane Mengue Feniman; Rall, Vera Lúcia Mores; Saeki, Margarida Júri; Júnior, Ary Fernandes

    2012-01-01

    The use of essential oils in foods has attracted great interest, due to their antagonistic action against pathogenic microorganisms. However, this action is undesirable for probiotic foods, as products containing Lactobacillus rhamnosus. The aim of the present study was to measure the sensitivity profile of L. rhamnosus and a yogurt starter culture in fermented milk, upon addition of increasing concentrations of cinnamon, clove and mint essential oils. Essential oils were prepared by steam distillation, and chemically characterised by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and determination of density. Survival curves were obtained from counts of L. rhamnosus and the starter culture (alone and in combination), upon addition of 0.04% essential oils. In parallel, titratable acidity was monitored over 28 experimental days. Minimum inhibitory concentration values, obtained using the microdilution method in Brain Heart Infusion medium, were 0.025, 0.2 and 0.4% for cinnamon, clove and mint essential oils, respectively. Cinnamon essential oil had the highest antimicrobial activity, especially against the starter culture, interfering with lactic acid production. Although viable cell counts of L. rhamnosus were lower following treatment with all 3 essential oils, relative to controls, these results were not statistically significant; in addition, cell counts remained greater than the minimum count of 108CFU/mL required for a product to be considered a probiotic. Thus, although use of cinnamon essential oil in yogurt makes starter culture fermentation unfeasible, it does not prevent the application of L. rhamnosus to probiotic fermented milk. Furthermore, clove and mint essential oil caused sublethal stress to L. rhamnosus. PMID:24031939

  11. Enhancement of natural and acquired immunity by Lactobacillus rhamnosus (HN001), Lactobacillus acidophilus (HN017) and Bifidobacterium lactis (HN019).

    PubMed

    Gill, H S; Rutherfurd, K J; Prasad, J; Gopal, P K

    2000-02-01

    Consumption of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) has been suggested to confer a range of health benefits including stimulation of the immune system and increased resistance to malignancy and infectious illness. In the present study, the effects of feeding Lactobacillus rhamnosus (HN001, DR20), Lactobacillus acidophilus (HN017) and Bifidobacterium lactis (HN019, DR10) on in vivo and in vitro indices of natural and acquired immunity in healthy mice were examined. Mice were fed daily with L. rhamnosus, L. acidophilus or B. lactis (10(9) colony forming units) and their immune function was assessed on day 10 or day 28. Supplementation with L. rhamnosus, L. acidophilus or B. lactis resulted in a significant increase in the phagocytic activity of peripheral blood leucocytes and peritoneal macrophages compared with the control mice. The proliferative responses of spleen cells to concanavalin A (a T-cell mitogen) and lipopolysaccharide (a B-cell mitogen) were also significantly enhanced in mice given different LAB. Spleen cells from mice given L. rhamnosus, L. acidophilus or B. lactis also produced significantly higher amounts of interferon-gamma in response to stimulation with concanavalin A than cells from the control mice. LAB feeding had no significant effect on interleukin-4 production by spleen cells or on the percentages of CD4+, CD8+ and CD40+ cells in the blood. The serum antibody responses to orally and systemically administered antigens were also significantly enhanced by supplementation with L. rhamnosus, L. acidophilus or B. lactis. Together, these results suggest that supplementation of the diet with L. rhamnosus (HN001), L. acidophilus (HN017) or B. lactis (HN019) is able to enhance several indices of natural and acquired immunity in healthy mice.

  12. Pyrosequencing Analysis Reveals Changes in Intestinal Microbiota of Healthy Adults Who Received a Daily Dose of Immunomodulatory Probiotic Strains

    PubMed Central

    Plaza-Díaz, Julio; Fernández-Caballero, Jose Ángel; Chueca, Natalia; García, Federico; Gómez-Llorente, Carolina; Sáez-Lara, María José; Fontana, Luis; Gil, Ángel

    2015-01-01

    The colon microbiota plays a crucial role in human gastrointestinal health. Current attempts to manipulate the colon microbiota composition are aimed at finding remedies for various diseases. We have recently described the immunomodulatory effects of three probiotic strains (Lactobacillus rhamnosus CNCM I-4036, Lactobacillus paracasei CNCM I-4034, and Bifidobacterium breve CNCM I-4035). The goal of the present study was to analyze the compositions of the fecal microbiota of healthy adults who received one of these strains using high-throughput 16S ribosomal RNA gene sequencing. Bacteroides was the most abundant genus in the groups that received L. rhamnosus CNCM I-4036 or L. paracasei CNCM I-4034. The Shannon indices were significantly increased in these two groups. Our results also revealed a significant increase in the Lactobacillus genus after the intervention with L. rhamnosus CNCM I-4036. The initially different colon microbiota became homogeneous in the subjects who received L. rhamnosus CNCM I-4036. While some orders that were initially present disappeared after the administration of L. rhamnosus CNCM I-4036, other orders, such as Sphingobacteriales, Nitrospirales, Desulfobacterales, Thiotrichales, and Synergistetes, were detected after the intervention. In summary, our results show that the intake of these three bacterial strains induced changes in the colon microbiota. PMID:26016655

  13. Pyrosequencing analysis reveals changes in intestinal microbiota of healthy adults who received a daily dose of immunomodulatory probiotic strains.

    PubMed

    Plaza-Díaz, Julio; Fernández-Caballero, Jose Ángel; Chueca, Natalia; García, Federico; Gómez-Llorente, Carolina; Sáez-Lara, María José; Fontana, Luis; Gil, Ángel

    2015-05-26

    The colon microbiota plays a crucial role in human gastrointestinal health. Current attempts to manipulate the colon microbiota composition are aimed at finding remedies for various diseases. We have recently described the immunomodulatory effects of three probiotic strains (Lactobacillus rhamnosus CNCM I-4036, Lactobacillus paracasei CNCM I-4034, and Bifidobacterium breve CNCM I-4035). The goal of the present study was to analyze the compositions of the fecal microbiota of healthy adults who received one of these strains using high-throughput 16S ribosomal RNA gene sequencing. Bacteroides was the most abundant genus in the groups that received L. rhamnosus CNCM I-4036 or L. paracasei CNCM I-4034. The Shannon indices were significantly increased in these two groups. Our results also revealed a significant increase in the Lactobacillus genus after the intervention with L. rhamnosus CNCM I-4036. The initially different colon microbiota became homogeneous in the subjects who received L. rhamnosus CNCM I-4036. While some orders that were initially present disappeared after the administration of L. rhamnosus CNCM I-4036, other orders, such as Sphingobacteriales, Nitrospirales, Desulfobacterales, Thiotrichales, and Synergistetes, were detected after the intervention. In summary, our results show that the intake of these three bacterial strains induced changes in the colon microbiota.

  14. Yeast Golden Gate (yGG) for the Efficient Assembly of S. cerevisiae Transcription Units.

    PubMed

    Agmon, Neta; Mitchell, Leslie A; Cai, Yizhi; Ikushima, Shigehito; Chuang, James; Zheng, Allen; Choi, Woo-Jin; Martin, J Andrew; Caravelli, Katrina; Stracquadanio, Giovanni; Boeke, Jef D

    2015-07-17

    We have adapted the Golden Gate DNA assembly method to the assembly of transcription units (TUs) for the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, in a method we call yeast Golden Gate (yGG). yGG allows for the easy assembly of TUs consisting of promoters (PRO), coding sequences (CDS), and terminators (TER). Carefully designed overhangs exposed by digestion with a type IIS restriction enzyme enable virtually seamless assembly of TUs that, in principle, contain all of the information necessary to express a gene of interest in yeast. We also describe a versatile set of yGG acceptor vectors to be used for TU assembly. These vectors can be used for low or high copy expression of assembled TUs or integration into carefully selected innocuous genomic loci. yGG provides synthetic biologists and yeast geneticists with an efficient new means by which to engineer S. cerevisiae.

  15. Reverse Watson-Crick G-G base pair in G-quadruplex formation.

    PubMed

    Mondal, Soma; Bhat, Jyotsna; Jana, Jagannath; Mukherjee, Meghomukta; Chatterjee, Subhrangsu

    2016-01-01

    A stable intermediate dimeric G-rich form as a precursor of tetrameric G-quadruplex structures has been detected via MALDI-TOF spectrometry. Molecular dynamics simulation offered detailed insights at the atomic level, assigning reverse Watson-Crick G-G base pairing (not Hoogsteen) in the G-rich dimer. In support of this, cisplatin formed a stable adduct by binding to the dimeric G-rich structure, eliminating the possibility of G-G Hoogsteen hydrogen bond formation.

  16. Two-quartet G-quadruplexes formed by DNA sequences containing four contiguous GG runs.

    PubMed

    Qin, Mingyan; Chen, Zhuxi; Luo, Qichao; Wen, Yi; Zhang, Naixia; Jiang, Hualiang; Yang, Huaiyu

    2015-03-05

    The DNA sequence containing four contiguous GG runs (G2NxG2NyG2NzG2, G2 sequence) has the potential to form a two-quartet G-quadruplex. However, the prevalence, structure, and function of G2 sequences have not been well-studied. Here, bioinformatics analysis reveals the abundance of G2 sequences in the human genome and their enrichment in promoter regions. The density of G2 sequences in the genome and promoters is much higher than that of the G3 sequence (G3NxG3NyG3NzG3). Experiments show that the conformations and thermal stabilities of the two-quartet G-quadruplexes of G2 sequences are highly sensitive to the length and composition of the loops. Among the two-quartet G-quadruplexes, the parallel G-quadruplex with a loop length of 1 and the antiparallel G-quadruplex with a loop length of 3 show high thermal stabilities. Additionally, the stable parallel G-quadruplexes are stacked into intermolecular higher-order structures. This work determines the prevalence of G2 sequences in the human genome and demonstrates that the G-quadruplex structures for certain loop lengths and compositions may be stable in vivo. Thus, more attention should be paid to the structure and function of the two-quartet G-quadruplex.

  17. BiGG Models: A platform for integrating, standardizing and sharing genome-scale models

    DOE PAGES

    King, Zachary A.; Lu, Justin; Drager, Andreas; ...

    2015-10-17

    In this study, genome-scale metabolic models are mathematically structured knowledge bases that can be used to predict metabolic pathway usage and growth phenotypes. Furthermore, they can generate and test hypotheses when integrated with experimental data. To maximize the value of these models, centralized repositories of high-quality models must be established, models must adhere to established standards and model components must be linked to relevant databases. Tools for model visualization further enhance their utility. To meet these needs, we present BiGG Models (http://bigg.ucsd.edu), a completely redesigned Biochemical, Genetic and Genomic knowledge base. BiGG Models contains more than 75 high-quality, manually-curated genome-scalemore » metabolic models. On the website, users can browse, search and visualize models. BiGG Models connects genome-scale models to genome annotations and external databases. Reaction and metabolite identifiers have been standardized across models to conform to community standards and enable rapid comparison across models. Furthermore, BiGG Models provides a comprehensive application programming interface for accessing BiGG Models with modeling and analysis tools. As a resource for highly curated, standardized and accessible models of metabolism, BiGG Models will facilitate diverse systems biology studies and support knowledge-based analysis of diverse experimental data.« less

  18. BiGG Models: A platform for integrating, standardizing and sharing genome-scale models

    PubMed Central

    King, Zachary A.; Lu, Justin; Dräger, Andreas; Miller, Philip; Federowicz, Stephen; Lerman, Joshua A.; Ebrahim, Ali; Palsson, Bernhard O.; Lewis, Nathan E.

    2016-01-01

    Genome-scale metabolic models are mathematically-structured knowledge bases that can be used to predict metabolic pathway usage and growth phenotypes. Furthermore, they can generate and test hypotheses when integrated with experimental data. To maximize the value of these models, centralized repositories of high-quality models must be established, models must adhere to established standards and model components must be linked to relevant databases. Tools for model visualization further enhance their utility. To meet these needs, we present BiGG Models (http://bigg.ucsd.edu), a completely redesigned Biochemical, Genetic and Genomic knowledge base. BiGG Models contains more than 75 high-quality, manually-curated genome-scale metabolic models. On the website, users can browse, search and visualize models. BiGG Models connects genome-scale models to genome annotations and external databases. Reaction and metabolite identifiers have been standardized across models to conform to community standards and enable rapid comparison across models. Furthermore, BiGG Models provides a comprehensive application programming interface for accessing BiGG Models with modeling and analysis tools. As a resource for highly curated, standardized and accessible models of metabolism, BiGG Models will facilitate diverse systems biology studies and support knowledge-based analysis of diverse experimental data. PMID:26476456

  19. BiGG Models: A platform for integrating, standardizing and sharing genome-scale models

    SciTech Connect

    King, Zachary A.; Lu, Justin; Drager, Andreas; Miller, Philip; Federowicz, Stephen; Lerman, Joshua A.; Ebrahim, Ali; Palsson, Bernhard O.; Lewis, Nathan E.

    2015-10-17

    In this study, genome-scale metabolic models are mathematically structured knowledge bases that can be used to predict metabolic pathway usage and growth phenotypes. Furthermore, they can generate and test hypotheses when integrated with experimental data. To maximize the value of these models, centralized repositories of high-quality models must be established, models must adhere to established standards and model components must be linked to relevant databases. Tools for model visualization further enhance their utility. To meet these needs, we present BiGG Models (http://bigg.ucsd.edu), a completely redesigned Biochemical, Genetic and Genomic knowledge base. BiGG Models contains more than 75 high-quality, manually-curated genome-scale metabolic models. On the website, users can browse, search and visualize models. BiGG Models connects genome-scale models to genome annotations and external databases. Reaction and metabolite identifiers have been standardized across models to conform to community standards and enable rapid comparison across models. Furthermore, BiGG Models provides a comprehensive application programming interface for accessing BiGG Models with modeling and analysis tools. As a resource for highly curated, standardized and accessible models of metabolism, BiGG Models will facilitate diverse systems biology studies and support knowledge-based analysis of diverse experimental data.

  20. Probiotics in digestive diseases: focus on Lactobacillus GG.

    PubMed

    Pace, F; Pace, M; Quartarone, G

    2015-12-01

    Probiotics are becoming increasingly important in basic and clinical research, but they are also a subject of considerable economic interest due to their expanding popularity. They are live micro-organisms which, when administered in adequate amounts, confer a health benefit to the host. From this very well-known definition, it is clear that, unlike drugs, probiotics might be useful in healthy subjects to reduce the risk of developing certain diseases or to optimise some physiological functions. They also may offer some advantages in already ill persons in relieving symptoms and signs, e.g. people with acute diarrhea. According to current definitions, probiotics should survive both gastric acid and bile to reach the small intestine and colon, where they exert their effects. Many of these are available in a lyophilized (freeze-dried) pill form, though some are available in yogurt or as packets (sachets), which can be mixed into non-carbonated drinks. The present review focuses on three main issues: 1) understanding why, at present, probiotics are so interesting for doctors and consumers; 2) reviewing the available data on probiotic use in digestive diseases, in particular irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), (prevention of) infectious diarrhea, inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), and colorectal cancer (CRC); 3) highlighting the individual profile of Lactobacillus GG (LGG) in the above contexts, providing an assessment as well as recommendations on its use in gastro-intestinal tract (GIT) disorders. Research studies conducted in animals and humans with the main probiotics strains for GIT diseases, and published from the early 1990s to 2014 have been considered. PubMed, Medline and Ovid were the main sources adopted for data retrieving. The increasing attention on probiotics is a direct consequence of the improvement in the techniques for studying microbiota. Until recently, its composition has been analysed by culture-based methods

  1. Orthogonal array deciphering MRS medium requirements for isolated Lactobacillus rhamnosus ZY with cell properties characterization.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu; Ng, I-Son; Yao, Chuanyi; Lu, Yinghua

    2014-09-01

    Lactobacillus rhamnosus is a well-known lactic acid bacterium (LAB), but a new ZY strain was isolated for the first time from commercial probiotic powder recently. Although many studies have focused on developing cost-effective media for the production of LAB, the de Man, Rogosa and Sharpe (MRS) medium is still the most common medium for bioprocesses. The aim of the current study is to decipher the composition of MRS based on a statistical approach, which will allow a higher biomass of Lactobacillus to be obtained. In Taguchi's approach, an L27 orthogonal array was adopted to evaluate the significance of 10 ingredients in MRS, in which the effects of the components were ranked according to their effect on biomass at OD600 as dextrose > MnSO4·H2O > beef extract > CH3COONa > MgSO4 > yeast extract > proteose peptone > K2HPO4 > ammonium citrate > Tween 80. Although the individual trace elements of ammonium citrate, K2HPO4, CH3COONa and MgSO4 in MRS had an insignificant influence on the biomass after statistical analysis, the total elimination of trace elements would predominantly affect the cell growth of Lactobacillus. Further characterization of the cell properties through attenuated total reflectance of Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy and protein identification via SDS-PAGE coupled with tandem mass spectrometry implied that dextrose as major carbon source in MRS played the most crucial role for L. rhamnosus production.

  2. Lactobacillus rhamnosus accelerates zebrafish backbone calcification and gonadal differentiation through effects on the GnRH and IGF systems.

    PubMed

    Avella, Matteo A; Place, Allen; Du, Shao-Jun; Williams, Ernest; Silvi, Stefania; Zohar, Yonathan; Carnevali, Oliana

    2012-01-01

    Endogenous microbiota play essential roles in the host's immune system, physiology, reproduction and nutrient metabolism. We hypothesized that a continuous administration of an exogenous probiotic might also influence the host's development. Thus, we treated zebrafish from birth to sexual maturation (2-months treatment) with Lactobacillus rhamnosus, a probiotic species intended for human use. We monitored for the presence of L. rhamnosus during the entire treatment. Zebrafish at 6 days post fertilization (dpf) exhibited elevated gene expression levels for Insulin-like growth factors -I and -II, Peroxisome proliferator activated receptors -α and -β, VDR-α and RAR-γ when compared to untreated-10 days old zebrafish. Using a gonadotropin-releasing hormone 3 GFP transgenic zebrafish (GnRH3-GFP), higher GnRH3 expression was found at 6, 8 and 10 dpf upon L. rhamnosus treatment. The same larvae exhibited earlier backbone calcification and gonad maturation. Noteworthy in the gonad development was the presence of first testes differentiation at 3 weeks post fertilization in the treated zebrafish population -which normally occurs at 8 weeks- and a dramatic sex ratio modulation (93% females, 7% males in control vs. 55% females, 45% males in the treated group). We infer that administration of L. rhamnosus stimulated the IGF system, leading to a faster backbone calcification. Moreover we hypothesize a role for administration of L. rhamnosus on GnRH3 modulation during early larval development, which in turn affects gonadal development and sex differentiation. These findings suggest a significant role of the microbiota composition on the host organism development profile and open new perspectives in the study of probiotics usage and application.

  3. Lactobacillus rhamnosus Accelerates Zebrafish Backbone Calcification and Gonadal Differentiation through Effects on the GnRH and IGF Systems

    PubMed Central

    Avella, Matteo A.; Place, Allen; Du, Shao-Jun; Williams, Ernest; Silvi, Stefania; Zohar, Yonathan; Carnevali, Oliana

    2012-01-01

    Endogenous microbiota play essential roles in the host’s immune system, physiology, reproduction and nutrient metabolism. We hypothesized that a continuous administration of an exogenous probiotic might also influence the host’s development. Thus, we treated zebrafish from birth to sexual maturation (2-months treatment) with Lactobacillus rhamnosus, a probiotic species intended for human use. We monitored for the presence of L. rhamnosus during the entire treatment. Zebrafish at 6 days post fertilization (dpf) exhibited elevated gene expression levels for Insulin-like growth factors -I and -II, Peroxisome proliferator activated receptors -α and -β, VDR-α and RAR-γ when compared to untreated-10 days old zebrafish. Using a gonadotropin-releasing hormone 3 GFP transgenic zebrafish (GnRH3-GFP), higher GnRH3 expression was found at 6, 8 and 10 dpf upon L. rhamnosus treatment. The same larvae exhibited earlier backbone calcification and gonad maturation. Noteworthy in the gonad development was the presence of first testes differentiation at 3 weeks post fertilization in the treated zebrafish population -which normally occurs at 8 weeks- and a dramatic sex ratio modulation (93% females, 7% males in control vs. 55% females, 45% males in the treated group). We infer that administration of L. rhamnosus stimulated the IGF system, leading to a faster backbone calcification. Moreover we hypothesize a role for administration of L. rhamnosus on GnRH3 modulation during early larval development, which in turn affects gonadal development and sex differentiation. These findings suggest a significant role of the microbiota composition on the host organism development profile and open new perspectives in the study of probiotics usage and application. PMID:23029107

  4. Immunobiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus strains differentially modulate antiviral immune response in porcine intestinal epithelial and antigen presenting cells

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Previous findings suggested that Lactobacillus rhamnosus CRL1505 is able to increase resistance of children to intestinal viral infections. However, the intestinal cells, cytokines and receptors involved in the immunoregulatory effect of this probiotic strain have not been fully characterized. Results We aimed to gain insight into the mechanisms involved in the immunomodulatory effect of the CRL1505 strain and therefore evaluated in vitro the crosstalk between L. rhamnosus CRL1505, porcine intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) and antigen presenting cells (APCs) from swine Peyer’s patches in order to deepen our knowledge about the mechanisms, through which this strain may help preventing viral diarrhoea episodes. L. rhamnosus CRL1505 was able to induce IFN–α and –β in IECs and improve the production of type I IFNs in response to poly(I:C) challenge independently of Toll-like receptor (TLR)-2 or TLR9 signalling. In addition, the CRL1505 strain induced mRNA expression of IL-6 and TNF-α via TLR2 in IECs. Furthermore, the strain significantly increased surface molecules expression and cytokine production in intestinal APCs. The improved Th1 response induced by L. rhamnosus CRL1505 was triggered by TLR2 signalling and included augmented expression of MHC-II and co-stimulatory molecules and expression of IL-1β, IL-6, and IFN-γ in APCs. IL-10 was also significantly up-regulated by CRL1505 in APCs. Conclusions It was recently reviewed the emergence of TLR agonists as new ways to transform antiviral treatments by introducing panviral therapeutics with less adverse effects than IFN therapies. The use of L. rhamnosus CRL1505 as modulator of innate immunity and inductor of antiviral type I IFNs, IFN-γ, and regulatory IL-10 clearly offers the potential to overcome this challenge. PMID:24886142

  5. The ``Galileo Galilei'' (GG) Project: Testing the Equivalence Principle in Space and on Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nobili, A. M.; Bramanti, D.; Polacco, E.; Catastini, G.; Anselmi, A.; Portigliotti, S.; Lenti, A.; Severi, A.

    ``GALILEO GALILEI'' (GG) is a proposal for a small, low orbit satellite devoted to testing the Equivalence Principle (EP) of Galileo, Newton and Einstein to 1 part in 1017. At the end of 1997 GG has been selected and funded by ASI (Agenzia Spaziale Italiana) for a 1-year Phase A study. The main novelty of GG is that the concentric hollow test cylinders whose relative motion (in the plane perpendicular to the spin axis) would be affected by an EP violation, spin together with the read-out capacitance sensors placed in between them. The nominal spin rate is 2 Hz, and this is the frequency at which the putative EP violation signal is modulated by the sensors. As compared to other experiments the modulation frequency is increased by more than a factor 104, thus reducing 1/f (low frequency) electronic and mechanical noise. GG will have FEEP ion thrusters for drag compensation. The required amount of propellant is of a few grams only. The experiment works at room temperature. To demonstrate the feasibility of the space experiment a payload prototype for EP testing on the ground (GGG - GG on the Ground) is under development in the laboratories of Laben. The challenge in this field is to fly an experiment able to improve by many orders of magnitude the current best ground sensitivity (≅10-12). This requires spurious relative motions of the test bodies to be greatly reduced, leaving them essentially motionless. Doing that with more than one pair of bodies appears to be an unnecessary complication. This is why GG is now proposed with a single pair of test masses. Information, research papers and photographs of the ground apparatus are available on the Web (http://tycho.dm.unipi.it/nobili)

  6. Unravelling the genome of long chain N-acylhomoserine lactone-producing Acinetobacter sp. strain GG2 and identification of its quorum sensing synthase gene

    PubMed Central

    How, Kah Yan; Hong, Kar-Wai; Sam, Choon-Kook; Koh, Chong-Lek; Yin, Wai-Fong; Chan, Kok-Gan

    2015-01-01

    Myriad proteobacteria use N-acyl homoserine lactone (AHL) molecules as quorum sensing (QS) signals to regulate different physiological functions, including virulence, antibiotic production, and biofilm formation. Many of these proteobacteria possess LuxI/LuxR system as the QS mechanism. Recently, we reported the 3.89 Mb genome of Acinetobacter sp. strain GG2. In this work, the genome of this long chain AHL-producing bacterium was unravelled which led to the molecular characterization of luxI homologue, designated as aciI. This 552 bp gene was cloned and overexpressed in Escherichia coli BL21(DE3). The purified protein was ∼20.5 kDa and is highly similar to several autoinducer proteins of LuxI family among Acinetobacter species. To verify the AHL synthesis activity of this protein, high-resolution liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry analysis revealed the production of 3-oxo-dodecanoyl-homoserine lactone and 3-hydroxy-dodecanoyl-homoserine lactone from induced E. coli harboring the recombinant AciI. Our data show for the first time, the cloning and characterization of the luxI homologue from Acinetobacter sp. strain GG2, and confirmation of its AHLs production. These data are of great significance as the annotated genome of strain GG2 has provided a valuable insight in the study of autoinducer molecules and its roles in QS mechanism of the bacterium. PMID:25926817

  7. Evaluation of genetic polymorphism among Lactobacillus rhamnosus non-starter Parmigiano Reggiano cheese strains.

    PubMed

    Bove, Claudio Giorgio; De Dea Lindner, Juliano; Lazzi, Camilla; Gatti, Monica; Neviani, Erasmo

    2011-01-05

    Parmigiano Reggiano (PR) is an Italian cooked, long-ripened cheese made with unheated cow's milk and natural whey starter. The microflora is involved in the manufacturing of this cheese, arising from the natural whey starter, the raw milk and the environment. Molecular studies have shown that mesophilic non-starter lactic acid bacteria (NSLAB) are the dominant microflora present during the ripening of PR. In this study, a characterisation of Lactobacillus rhamnosus isolated from a single PR manufacturing and ripening process is reported, using a combination of genotypic fingerprinting techniques (RAPD-PCR and REP-PCR). The intraspecies heterogeneity evidenced for 66 strains is correlated to their abilities to adapt to specific environmental and technological conditions. The detection of biotypes that correlate with specific moments in cheese ripening or differential development throughout this process suggests that these strains may have specific roles closely linked to their peculiar technological properties.

  8. Characterization of nitrite degradation by Lactobacillus casei subsp. rhamnosus LCR 6013.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dong-mei; Wang, Pan; Zhang, Xin-yue; Xu, Xi-lin; Wu, Hui; Li, Li

    2014-01-01

    Nitrites are potential carcinogens. Therefore, limiting nitrites in food is critically important for food safety. The nitrite degradation capacity of Lactobacillus casei subsp. rhamnosus LCR 6013 was investigated in pickle fermentation. After LCR 6013 fermentation for 120 h at 37°C, the nitrite concentration in the fermentation system was significantly lower than that in the control sample without the LCR 6013 strain. The effects of NaCl and Vc on nitrite degradation by LCR 6013 in the De Man, Rogosa and Sharpe (MRS) medium were also investigated. The highest nitrite degradations, 9.29 mg/L and 9.89 mg/L, were observed when NaCl and Vc concentrations were 0.75% and 0.02%, respectively in the MRS medium, which was significantly higher than the control group (p ≤ 0.01). Electron capture/gas chromatography and indophenol blue staining were used to study the nitrite degradation pathway of LCR 6013. The nitrite degradation products contained N2O, but no NH4(+). The LCR 6013 strain completely degraded all NaNO2 (50.00 mg/L) after 16 h of fermentation. The enzyme activity of NiR in the periplasmic space was 2.5 times of that in the cytoplasm. Our results demonstrated that L. casei subsp. rhamnosus LCR 6013 can effectively degrade nitrites in both the pickle fermentation system and in MRS medium by NiR. Nitrites are degraded by the LCR 6013 strain, likely via the nitrate respiration pathway (NO2(-)>NO->N2O->N2), rather than the aammonium formation pathway (dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium, DNRA), because the degradation products contain N2O, but not NH4(+).

  9. 30 CFR 551.4 - Types of G&G activities that require permits or Notices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Notices. 551.4 Section 551.4 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF OCEAN ENERGY MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFFSHORE GEOLOGICAL AND GEOPHYSICAL (G&G) EXPLORATIONS OF THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF § 551.4...; (ii) Drilling a deep stratigraphic test; or (iii) Developing data and information for proprietary...

  10. 30 CFR 551.4 - Types of G&G activities that require permits or Notices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Notices. 551.4 Section 551.4 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF OCEAN ENERGY MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFFSHORE GEOLOGICAL AND GEOPHYSCIAL (G&G) EXPLORATIONS OF THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF § 551.4...; (ii) Drilling a deep stratigraphic test; or (iii) Developing data and information for proprietary...

  11. 30 CFR 551.4 - Types of G&G activities that require permits or Notices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Notices. 551.4 Section 551.4 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF OCEAN ENERGY MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFFSHORE GEOLOGICAL AND GEOPHYSICAL (G&G) EXPLORATIONS OF THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF § 551.4...; (ii) Drilling a deep stratigraphic test; or (iii) Developing data and information for proprietary...

  12. Lactobacillus GG for treatment of acute childhood diarrhoea: An open labelled, randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Aggarwal, Sunny; Upadhyay, Amit; Shah, Dheeraj; Teotia, Neeraj; Agarwal, Astha; Jaiswal, Vijay

    2014-01-01

    Background & objectives: Randomized controlled trials in developed countries have reported benefits of Lactobacillus GG (LGG) in the treatment of acute watery diarrhoea, but there is paucity of such data from India. The study was aimed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of Lactobacillus GG in the treatment of acute diarrhoea in children from a semi-urban city in north India. Methods: In this open labelled, randomized controlled trial 200 children with acute watery diarrhoea, aged between 6 months to 5 years visiting outpatient department and emergency room of a teaching hospital in north India were enrolled. The children were randomized into receiving either Lactobacillus GG in dose of 10 billion cfu/day for five days or no probiotic medication in addition to standard WHO management of diarrhoea. Primary outcomes were duration of diarrhoea and time to change in consistency of stools. Results: Median (inter quartile range) duration of diarrhoea was significantly shorter in children in LGG group [60 (54-72) h vs. 78 (72-90) h; P<0.001]. Also, there was faster improvement in stool consistency in children receiving Lactobacillus GG than control group [36 (30-36) h vs. 42 (36-48) h; P<0.001]. There was significant reduction in average number of stools per day in LGG group (P<0.001) compared to the control group. These benefits were seen irrespective of rotavirus positivity in stool tests. Interpretation & conclusions: Our results showed that the use of Lactobacillus GG in children with acute diarrhoea resulted in shorter duration and faster improvement in stool consistency as compared to the control group. PMID:24820831

  13. Influence of the Probiotic Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM
and Lactobacillus rhamnosus HN001 on Proteolysis Patterns
of Edam Cheese

    PubMed Central

    Cichosz, Grażyna; Nalepa, Beata; Kowalska, Marika

    2014-01-01

    Summary The objective of this study is to determine the viability of Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM and Lactobacillus rhamnosus HN001 in Edam cheese as well as the effect of probiotic bacteria on paracasein proteolysis and changes in the water activity during ripening. The use of probiotics L. rhamnosus HN001 and L. acidophilus NCFM in Edam cheese slightly changed its chemical composition, but the change was not significant. The pH values were significantly correlated with the changes in Lactobacillus count (R=–0.807) and the level of phosphotungstic acid-soluble nitrogen compounds in total nitrogen (PTA-SN/TN) (R=0.775). After 10 weeks of ripening, the highest level of trichloroacetic acid-soluble nitrogen compounds in total nitrogen (TCA-SN/TN) was observed in the cheese containing L. rhamnosus HN001 (11.87%) and slightly lower level in the cheese containing L. acidophilus NCFM (7.60%) and control cheese (6.24%). The highest level of PTA-SN/TN fraction was noted in cheese containing L. acidophilus NCFM (3.48%) but the lowest level was observed in control cheese (2.24%) after ten weeks of ripening. The changes in the levels of PTA-SN/TN (R=–0.813) and TCA-SN/TN (R=–0.717) fractions were significantly (p<0.05) correlated with the viability of probiotic counts. Water activity (aw) strongly correlated with the PTA-SN/TN level (R=–0.824) and bacteria viability (R=–0.728). All of the analyzed cheeses were characterized by high counts of L. rhamnosus HN001 and L. acidophilus NCFM during ten weeks of ripening. PMID:27904317

  14. 30 CFR 580.21 - What must I do in conducting G&G prospecting or scientific research?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... scientific research? 580.21 Section 580.21 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF OCEAN ENERGY MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF... conducting G&G prospecting or scientific research? While conducting G&G prospecting or scientific research..., or other uses of the area where you are prospecting or conducting scientific research activities....

  15. 30 CFR 580.21 - What must I do in conducting G&G prospecting or scientific research?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... scientific research? 580.21 Section 580.21 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF OCEAN ENERGY MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF... conducting G&G prospecting or scientific research? While conducting G&G prospecting or scientific research..., or other uses of the area where you are prospecting or conducting scientific research activities....

  16. 30 CFR 580.21 - What must I do in conducting G&G prospecting or scientific research?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... scientific research? 580.21 Section 580.21 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF OCEAN ENERGY MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF... conducting G&G prospecting or scientific research? While conducting G&G prospecting or scientific research..., or other uses of the area where you are prospecting or conducting scientific research activities....

  17. Effect of the probiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus on the expression of genes involved in European eel spermatogenesis.

    PubMed

    Vílchez, M Carmen; Santangeli, Stefania; Maradonna, Francesca; Gioacchini, Giorgia; Verdenelli, Cristina; Gallego, Victor; Peñaranda, David S; Tveiten, Helge; Pérez, Luz; Carnevali, Oliana; Asturiano, Juan F

    2015-11-01

    Positive effects of probiotics on fish reproduction have been reported in several species. In the present study, 40 male European eels were weekly treated with recombinant hCG for 9 weeks and with three different concentrations (10(3), 10(5), and 10(6) CFU/mL) of probiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus IMC 501 (Sinbyotec, Italy). The probiotics were daily added to the water from the sixth week of the hCG treatment. Males from the treated and control groups were sacrificed after 1, 2, and 3 weeks of probiotic treatment (seventh-ninth weeks of hCG treatment); at this point, sperm and testis samples were also collected. Sperm volume was estimated, and motility was analyzed by computer-assisted sperm analysis software. Alternations in transcription of specific genes involved in reproductive process such as activin, androgen receptors α and β (arα and arβ), progesterone receptor 1 (pr1), bone morphogenetic protein 15 (bmp15), and FSH receptor (fshr) were analyzed in the testis. After 2 weeks of probiotic treatment, sperm production and sperm motility parameters (percentage of motile cells and percentage of straight-swimming spermatozoa) were increased in the European eel treated with 10(5) CFU/mL compared to controls or to the other probiotic doses. These changes were associated with increases in messenger RNA expression of activin, arα, arβ, pr1, and fshr. Conversely, after 3 weeks, activin and pr1 expression decreased. No significant changes were observed on bmp15 expression throughout the duration of the treatment with 10(5) CFU/mL dose. The lowest and highest probiotic dose (10(3) and 10(6) CFU/mL, respectively) inhibited the transcription of all genes along all the experiment, except for arα and arβ after 1 week of probiotic treatment when compared to controls. The changes observed by transcriptomic analysis and the sperm parameters suggest that a treatment with L rhamnosus at 10(5) CFU/mL for 2 weeks could improve spermatogenesis process in Anguilla

  18. Fibres as carriers for Lactobacillus rhamnosus during freeze-drying and storage in apple juice and chocolate-coated breakfast cereals.

    PubMed

    Saarela, Maria; Virkajärvi, Ilkka; Nohynek, Liisa; Vaari, Anu; Mättö, Jaana

    2006-11-01

    The capability of different fibre preparations to protect the viability and stability of Lactobacillus rhamnosus during freeze-drying, storage in freeze-dried form and after formulation into apple juice and chocolate-coated breakfast cereals was studied. In freeze-drying trials wheat dextrin and polydextrose proved to be promising carriers for the L. rhamnosus strains: both freeze-drying survival and storage stability at 37 degrees C were comparable to the control carrier (sucrose). Using apple fibre and inulin carriers resulted in powders with fairly good initial freeze-drying survival but with poor storage stability at 37 degrees C. When fresh L. rhamnosus cells were added into apple juice (pH 3.5) together with oat flour with 20% beta-glucan the survival of the cells was much better at 4 degrees C and at 20 degrees C than with sucrose, wheat dextrin and polydextrose, whereas with freeze-dried cells no protective effect of oat flour could be seen. The stability of freeze-dried L. rhamnosus cells at 20 degrees C was higher in chocolate-coated breakfast cereals compared to low pH apple juice. Similar to freeze-drying stability, wheat dextrin and polydextrose proved to be better carriers than oat flour in chocolate-coated breakfast cereals. Regardless of their differing capability to adhere to fibre preparations the two L. rhamnosus strains studied gave parallel results in the stability studies with different carriers.

  19. ``Galileo Galilei'' (GG) a small satellite to test the equivalence principle of Galileo, Newton and Einstein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nobili, Anna M.; Comandi, Gian Luca; Doravari, Suresh; Bramanti, Donato; Kumar, Rajeev; Maccarrone, Francesco; Polacco, Erseo; Turyshev, Slava G.; Shao, Michael; Lipa, John; Dittus, Hansjoerg; Laemmerzhal, Claus; Peters, Achim; Mueller, Jurgen; Unnikrishnan, C. S.; Roxburgh, Ian W.; Brillet, Alain; Marchal, Christian; Luo, Jun; van der Ha, Jozef; Milyukov, Vadim; Iafolla, Valerio; Lucchesi, David; Tortora, Paolo; de Bernardis, Paolo; Palmonari, Federico; Focardi, Sergio; Zanello, Dino; Monaco, Salvatore; Mengali, Giovanni; Anselmo, Luciano; Iorio, Lorenzo; Knezevic, Zoran

    2009-03-01

    “Galileo Galilei” (GG) is a small satellite designed to fly in low Earth orbit with the goal of testing the Equivalence Principle—which is at the basis of the General Theory of Relativity—to 1 part in 1017. If successful, it would improve current laboratory results by 4 orders of magnitude. A confirmation would strongly constrain theories; proof of violation is believed to lead to a scientific revolution. The experiment design allows it to be carried out at ambient temperature inside a small 1-axis stabilized satellite (250 kg total mass). GG is under investigation at Phase A-2 level by ASI (Agenzia Spaziale Italiana) at Thales Alenia Space in Torino, while a laboratory prototype (known as GGG) is operational at INFN laboratories in Pisa, supported by INFN (Istituto Nazionale di fisica Nucleare) and ASI. A final study report will be published in 2009.

  20. The GALILEO GALILEI small-satellite mission with FEEP thrusters (GG).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nobili, A. M.; Bramanti, D.; Catastini, G.

    1997-10-01

    The Equivalence Principle, formulated by Einstein generalizing Galileo's and Newton's work, is a fundamental principle of modern physics. As such it should be tested as accurately as possible. Its most direct consequence, namely the universality of free fall, can be tested in space in a low Earth orbit, the crucial advantage being that the driving signal is about three orders of magnitude stronger than on Earth. GALILEO GALILEI (GG) is a small space mission designed for such a high-accuracy test. GG has been selected by ASI (Agenzia Spaziale Italiana) as a candidate for the next small Italian mission. Ground tests of the proposed apparatus now indicate that an accuracy of 1 part in 1017 is within the reach of this small mission.

  1. Possible planet formation in the young, low-mass, multiple stellar system GG Tau A.

    PubMed

    Dutrey, Anne; Di Folco, Emmanuel; Guilloteau, Stéphane; Boehler, Yann; Bary, Jeff; Beck, Tracy; Beust, Hervé; Chapillon, Edwige; Gueth, Fredéric; Huré, Jean-Marc; Pierens, Arnaud; Piétu, Vincent; Simon, Michal; Tang, Ya-Wen

    2014-10-30

    The formation of planets around binary stars may be more difficult than around single stars. In a close binary star (with a separation of less than a hundred astronomical units), theory predicts the presence of circumstellar disks around each star, and an outer circumbinary disk surrounding a gravitationally cleared inner cavity around the stars. Given that the inner disks are depleted by accretion onto the stars on timescales of a few thousand years, any replenishing material must be transferred from the outer reservoir to fuel planet formation (which occurs on timescales of about one million years). Gas flowing through disk cavities has been detected in single star systems. A circumbinary disk was discovered around the young low-mass binary system GG Tau A (ref. 7), which has recently been shown to be a hierarchical triple system. It has one large inner disk around the single star, GG Tau Aa, and shows small amounts of shocked hydrogen gas residing within the central cavity, but other than a single weak detection, the distribution of cold gas in this cavity or in any other binary or multiple star system has not hitherto been determined. Here we report imaging of gas fragments emitting radiation characteristic of carbon monoxide within the GG Tau A cavity. From the kinematics we conclude that the flow appears capable of sustaining the inner disk (around GG Tau Aa) beyond the accretion lifetime, leaving time for planet formation to occur there. These results show the complexity of planet formation around multiple stars and confirm the general picture predicted by numerical simulations.

  2. Phase III Archaeological Test Excavations Hagerman National Fish Hatchery Site 10GG176 Gooding County, Idaho.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-01-01

    of projectile points from 10GG176. Ignimbrite is a term often used interchangeably with vitrophyre, but the former is more descriptive of the...greater number of these artifacts found at the Birch Creek locality by Swanson (1972), however, were made of chalcedony, ignimbrite , and chert. None of the...granite ( ignimbrite ?). Unlike the utilized cobbles and hammer- stones, these grinding stones have been purposefully shaped into the disk and cylindrical

  3. On top quark mass effects to gg → ZH at NLO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasselhuhn, Alexander; Luthe, Thomas; Steinhauser, Matthias

    2017-01-01

    We compute next-to-leading order QCD corrections to the process gg → ZH. In the effective-theory approach we confirm the results in the literature. We consider top quark mass corrections via an asymptotic expansion and show that there is a good convergence below the top quark threshold which describes approximately a quarter of the total cross section. Our corrections are implemented in the publicly available C++ program ggzh.

  4. Cyclic mismatch binding ligand CMBL4 binds to the 5′-T-3′/5′-GG-3′ site by inducing the flipping out of thymine base

    PubMed Central

    Mukherjee, Sanjukta; Dohno, Chikara; Asano, Kaori; Nakatani, Kazuhiko

    2016-01-01

    A newly designed cyclic bis-naphthyridine carbamate dimer CMBL4 with a limited conformational flexibility was synthesized and characterized. Absorption spectra revealed that two naphthyridines in CMBL4 were stacked on each other in aqueous solutions. The most efficient binding of CMBL4 to DNA was observed for the sequence 5′-T-3′/5′-GG-3′ (T/GG) with the formation of a 1:1 complex, which is one of possible structural elements involved in the higher order structures of (TGG)n repeat DNA triggering the genome microdeletion. Surface plasmon resonance assay also showed the binding of CMBL4 with TGG repeat DNA. Potassium permanganate oxidation studies of CMBL4-bound duplex containing the T/GG site showed that the CMBL4-binding accelerated the oxidation of thymine at that site, which suggests the flipping out of the thymine base from a π-stack. Preferential binding was observed for CMBL4 compared with its acyclic variants, which suggests the marked significance of the macrocyclic structure for the recognition of the T/GG site. PMID:27466390

  5. Controlled release of Lactobacillus rhamnosus biofilm probiotics from alginate-locust bean gum microcapsules.

    PubMed

    Cheow, Wean Sin; Kiew, Tie Yi; Hadinoto, Kunn

    2014-03-15

    Chitosan-coated alginate microcapsules containing high-density biofilm Lactobacillus rhamnosus have been previously shown to exhibit higher freeze drying- and thermal-tolerance than their planktonic counterparts. However, their cell release profile remains poor due to the capsules' susceptibility to the gastric environment. Herein the effects of adding locust bean (LB) and xanthan (XT) gums to alginate (AGN) capsules on the stress tolerance and cell release profiles in simulated gastrointestinal fluids are investigated. Compared to the AGN-only capsules, the AGN-LB capsules exhibit improved stress tolerance (i.e. ≈ 6x for freeze drying, 100x for thermotolerance, 10x for acid), whereas the AGN-XT capsules only improve the acid tolerance. Importantly, the AGN-LB capsules possess the optimal cell release profile with a majority of cells released in the simulated intestinal juice than in the gastric juice. The AGN-LB capsules' superiority is attributed to their stronger interaction with the chitosan coating and high swelling capacity, thus delaying their bulk dissolution.

  6. Protection of L. rhamnosus by spray-drying using two prebiotics colloids to enhance the viability.

    PubMed

    Avila-Reyes, Sandra V; Garcia-Suarez, Francisco J; Jiménez, María Teresa; San Martín-Gonzalez, María F; Bello-Perez, Luis A

    2014-02-15

    Protection of probiotics by substances considered as prebiotics can be an alternative to increase their viability in the large intestine. The objective of this study was to use two wall materials (native rice starch and inulin) without bonding agent to protect Lactobacillus rhamnosus during spray-drying and determine the viability of the microorganism under two storage conditions. For spray-drying conditions tested in this work the product yield with native rice starch (NRS) ranged between 65% and 74% whereas for inulin (IN) it ranged between 43% and 54%. In general, IN solutions exhibited higher outlet temperature than NRS dispersions. Capsules of IN had smaller particle size than those of NRS. Due to the higher hydrophilic nature of IN capsules as compared to NRS, IN capsules exhibited higher water activity than NRS capsules. Confocal microscopy showed marked differences between both wall materials, which could in turn cause differences in the release profile of encapsulated microorganisms. Agglomerates of NRS provided better protection to the microorganisms as evidenced by the lower reduction in viability when compared to IN, and this effect was corroborated by the stability study. It is possible to protect probiotics using both colloids, but differences in the viability and stability during storage were determined. The use of IN could prove beneficial in the encapsulation of probiotic strains since this carbohydrate is not hydrolyzed by human digestive enzymes and may act as prebiotic.

  7. Efficient production of L-lactic acid from cassava powder by Lactobacillus rhamnosus.

    PubMed

    Wang, Limin; Zhao, Bo; Liu, Bo; Yang, Chunyu; Yu, Bo; Li, Qinggang; Ma, Cuiqing; Xu, Ping; Ma, Yanhe

    2010-10-01

    Cassava is one of the most efficient and rich crops in terms of carbohydrate production, which is a tropical perennial plant that grows on poor or depleted soils. Microbial conversion of such a renewable raw material to useful products is an important objective in industrial biotechnology. L-Lactic acid was efficiently produced from cassava powder by a Lactobacillus rhamnosus strain CASL. The fermentation properties of cassava powder were compared with those of glucose and corn powder. The efficiencies of various fermentation strategies for L-lactic acid production from cassava powder, including simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF), two-step fermentation (TSF) and simultaneous liquefaction, saccharification and fermentation (SLSF), were investigated. The high L-lactic acid concentration (175.4 g/l) was obtained using 275 g/l of cassava powder concentration (total sugar of 222.5 g/l) in SSF batch fermentation. This is the highest L-lactic acid concentration reported, from cassava source, and it provides an efficient L-lactic acid production process with cheap raw bioresources, such as cassava powder.

  8. Survival in food systems of Lactobacillus rhamnosus R011 microentrapped in whey protein gel particles.

    PubMed

    Reid, A Ainsley; Champagne, C P; Gardner, N; Fustier, P; Vuillemard, J C

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of whey protein isolate (WPI) gel microentrapment on the viability of Lactobacillus rhamnosus R011 during the production and storage of biscuits, frozen cranberry juice, and vegetable juice. Viability of microentrapped (ME) cells was compared to free cells freeze-dried in a milk-based protective solution as well as in a WPI-based solution (ungelled). During the production of biscuits and their storage for 2 wk at 23 degrees C, the highest stability was obtained with the cells ME in WPI gel particles. However, free cells prepared in the milk-based matrix were those that maintained the highest viability during storage of vegetable juice as well as during freezing and storage of cranberry juice. The culture prepared in a WPI-based solution had the highest drops in viable counts following the heating process of biscuits as well as during storage of vegetable juice and freezing and storage of cranberry juice. Although the WPI-based solution was not efficient in protecting free cells, it is concluded that the process of microentrapment in WPI can help in protecting the freeze-dried cells against subsequent acidic and alkaline pH conditions as well as heating and freezing of food products.

  9. Immobilization of Lactobacillus rhamnosus in mesoporous silica-based material: An efficiency continuous cell-recycle fermentation system for lactic acid production.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zijian; Xie, Xiaona; Wang, Zhi; Tao, Yanchun; Niu, Xuedun; Huang, Xuri; Liu, Li; Li, Zhengqiang

    2016-06-01

    Lactic acid bacteria immobilization methods have been widely used for lactic acid production. Until now, the most common immobilization matrix used is calcium alginate. However, Ca-alginate gel disintegrated during lactic acid fermentation. To overcome this deficiency, we developed an immobilization method in which Lactobacillus rhamnosus cells were successfully encapsulated into an ordered mesoporous silica-based material under mild conditions with a high immobilization efficiency of 78.77% by using elemental analysis. We also optimized the cultivation conditions of the immobilized L. rhamnosus and obtained a high glucose conversion yield of 92.4%. Furthermore, L. rhamnosus encapsulated in mesoporous silica-based material exhibited operational stability during repeated fermentation processes and no decrease in lactic acid production up to 8 repeated batches.

  10. Whole genome sequencing enables the characterization of BurI, a LuxI homologue of Burkholderia cepacia strain GG4

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Kar Wai; Chan, Kok-Gan

    2015-01-01

    Quorum sensing is a mechanism for regulating proteobacterial gene expression in response to changes in cell population. In proteobacteria, N-acyl homoserine lactone (AHL) appears to be the most widely used signalling molecules in mediating, among others, the production of extracellular virulence factors for survival. In this work, the genome of B. cepacia strain GG4, a plasmid-free strain capable of AHL synthesis was explored. In silico analysis of the 6.6 Mb complete genome revealed the presence of a LuxI homologue which correspond to Type I quorum sensing. Here, we report the molecular cloning and characterization of this LuxI homologue, designated as BurI. This 609 bp gene was cloned and overexpressed in Escherichia coli BL21(DE3). The purified protein was approximately 25 kDa and is highly similar to several autoinducer proteins of the LuxI family among Burkholderia species. To verify the AHL synthesis activity of this protein, high resolution liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis revealed the production of 3-oxo-hexanoylhomoserine lactone, N-octanoylhomoserine lactone and 3-hydroxy-octanoylhomoserine lactone from induced E. coli BL21 harboring the recombinant BurI. Our data show, for the first time, the cloning and characterization of the LuxI homologue from B. cepacia strain GG4 and confirmation of its AHL synthesis activity. PMID:26290785

  11. Whole genome sequencing enables the characterization of BurI, a LuxI homologue of Burkholderia cepacia strain GG4.

    PubMed

    How, Kah Yan; Hong, Kar Wai; Chan, Kok-Gan

    2015-01-01

    Quorum sensing is a mechanism for regulating proteobacterial gene expression in response to changes in cell population. In proteobacteria, N-acyl homoserine lactone (AHL) appears to be the most widely used signalling molecules in mediating, among others, the production of extracellular virulence factors for survival. In this work, the genome of B. cepacia strain GG4, a plasmid-free strain capable of AHL synthesis was explored. In silico analysis of the 6.6 Mb complete genome revealed the presence of a LuxI homologue which correspond to Type I quorum sensing. Here, we report the molecular cloning and characterization of this LuxI homologue, designated as BurI. This 609 bp gene was cloned and overexpressed in Escherichia coli BL21(DE3). The purified protein was approximately 25 kDa and is highly similar to several autoinducer proteins of the LuxI family among Burkholderia species. To verify the AHL synthesis activity of this protein, high resolution liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis revealed the production of 3-oxo-hexanoylhomoserine lactone, N-octanoylhomoserine lactone and 3-hydroxy-octanoylhomoserine lactone from induced E. coli BL21 harboring the recombinant BurI. Our data show, for the first time, the cloning and characterization of the LuxI homologue from B. cepacia strain GG4 and confirmation of its AHL synthesis activity.

  12. Lactobacillus rhamnosus HN001 decreases the severity of necrotizing enterocolitis in neonatal mice and preterm piglets: evidence in mice for a role of TLR9

    PubMed Central

    Good, Misty; Sodhi, Chhinder P.; Ozolek, John A.; Buck, Rachael H.; Goehring, Karen C.; Thomas, Debra L.; Vikram, Amit; Bibby, Kyle; Morowitz, Michael J.; Firek, Brian; Lu, Peng

    2014-01-01

    Necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) is the leading cause of death from gastrointestinal disease in premature infants and develops partly from an exaggerated intestinal epithelial immune response to indigenous microbes. There has been interest in administering probiotic bacteria to reduce NEC severity, yet concerns exist regarding infection risk. Mechanisms of probiotic activity in NEC are unknown although activation of the microbial DNA receptor Toll-like receptor-9 (TLR9) has been postulated. We now hypothesize that the Gram-positive bacterium Lactobacillus rhamnosus HN001 can attenuate NEC in small and large animal models, that its microbial DNA is sufficient for its protective effects, and that protection requires activation of the Toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9). We now show that oral administration of live or UV-inactivated Lactobacillus rhamnosus HN001 attenuates NEC severity in newborn mice and premature piglets, as manifest by reduced histology score, attenuation of mucosal cytokine response, and improved gross morphology. TLR9 was required for Lactobacillus rhamnosus-mediated protection against NEC in mice, as the selective decrease of TLR9 from the intestinal epithelium reversed its protective effects. Strikingly, DNA of Lactobacillus rhamnosus HN001 reduced the extent of proinflammatory signaling in cultured enterocytes and in samples of resected human ileum ex vivo, suggesting the therapeutic potential of this probiotic in clinical NEC. Taken together, these findings illustrate that Lactobacillus rhamnosus HN001 is an effective probiotic for NEC via activation of the innate immune receptor TLR9 and that Lactobacillus rhamnosus DNA is sufficient for its protective effects, potentially reducing concerns regarding the infectious risk of this novel therapeutic approach. PMID:24742987

  13. Lactobacillus rhamnosus HN001 decreases the severity of necrotizing enterocolitis in neonatal mice and preterm piglets: evidence in mice for a role of TLR9.

    PubMed

    Good, Misty; Sodhi, Chhinder P; Ozolek, John A; Buck, Rachael H; Goehring, Karen C; Thomas, Debra L; Vikram, Amit; Bibby, Kyle; Morowitz, Michael J; Firek, Brian; Lu, Peng; Hackam, David J

    2014-06-01

    Necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) is the leading cause of death from gastrointestinal disease in premature infants and develops partly from an exaggerated intestinal epithelial immune response to indigenous microbes. There has been interest in administering probiotic bacteria to reduce NEC severity, yet concerns exist regarding infection risk. Mechanisms of probiotic activity in NEC are unknown although activation of the microbial DNA receptor Toll-like receptor-9 (TLR9) has been postulated. We now hypothesize that the Gram-positive bacterium Lactobacillus rhamnosus HN001 can attenuate NEC in small and large animal models, that its microbial DNA is sufficient for its protective effects, and that protection requires activation of the Toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9). We now show that oral administration of live or UV-inactivated Lactobacillus rhamnosus HN001 attenuates NEC severity in newborn mice and premature piglets, as manifest by reduced histology score, attenuation of mucosal cytokine response, and improved gross morphology. TLR9 was required for Lactobacillus rhamnosus-mediated protection against NEC in mice, as the selective decrease of TLR9 from the intestinal epithelium reversed its protective effects. Strikingly, DNA of Lactobacillus rhamnosus HN001 reduced the extent of proinflammatory signaling in cultured enterocytes and in samples of resected human ileum ex vivo, suggesting the therapeutic potential of this probiotic in clinical NEC. Taken together, these findings illustrate that Lactobacillus rhamnosus HN001 is an effective probiotic for NEC via activation of the innate immune receptor TLR9 and that Lactobacillus rhamnosus DNA is sufficient for its protective effects, potentially reducing concerns regarding the infectious risk of this novel therapeutic approach.

  14. Decolorization and biodegradation of Rubine GFL by microbial consortium GG-BL in sequential aerobic/microaerophilic process.

    PubMed

    Waghmode, Tatoba R; Kurade, Mayur B; Lade, Harshad S; Govindwar, Sanjay P

    2012-07-01

    This study represents the development of a new batch method by consortium GG-BL using two microbial cultures viz., Galactomyces geotrichum MTCC 1360 and Brevibacillus laterosporus MTCC 2298, by varying environmental conditions for the decolorization and biodegradation of Rubine GFL. Consortium was found to give better decolorization and degradation of Rubine GFL as compared to the individual microorganism at aerobic/microaerophilic process. The consortial metabolic activity of these strains lead to 100% decolorization of Rubine GFL (50 mg/L) within 30 h with significant reduction in chemical oxygen demand (79%) and total organic carbon (68%). Induction in the activities of laccase, veratryl alcohol oxidase, tyrosinase, azo reductase, and riboflavin reductase suggested their role in the decolorization process. Nondenaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analysis showed differential induction pattern of oxidoreductive enzymes during decolorization of the dye at different incubation temperatures. The degradation of Rubine GFL into different metabolites by individual organism and in consortium was confirmed using high performance thin layer chromatography, high performance liquid chromatography, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy analysis. Phytotoxicity studies revealed nontoxic nature of the metabolites of Rubine GFL.

  15. Optimization and shelf life of a low-lactose yogurt with Lactobacillus rhamnosus HN001.

    PubMed

    Ibarra, A; Acha, R; Calleja, M-T; Chiralt-Boix, A; Wittig, E

    2012-07-01

    Lactose intolerance results in gastrointestinal discomfort and the malabsorption of certain nutrients, such as calcium. The replacement of milk with low-lactose and probiotic-enriched dairy products is an effective strategy of mitigating the symptoms of lactose intolerance. Lactobacillus rhamnosus HN001 (HN001) is a safe, immunity-stimulating probiotic. We have developed a process to increase the hydrolysis of lactose and HN001 growth in yogurt versus β-galactosidase (βG) concentration and enzymatic hydrolysis time (EHT) before bacterial fermentation. The objective of this study was to optimize the conditions by which yogurt is processed as a function of βG and EHT using a multifactorial design, with lactose content, HN001 growth, process time, and sensory quality as dependent variables. Further, the shelf life of the optimized yogurt was evaluated. In the optimization study, polynomials explained the dependent variables. Based on Pearson correlation coefficients, HN001 growth correlated positively with the hydrolysis of lactose. However, low lactose content and high HN001 count increased the fermentation time and lowered the sensory quality. The optimized conditions-using polynomials to obtain yogurt with >1 × 10(7) cfu of HN001/mL, <10 g of lactose/L, and a minimum overall sensory quality of 7 on the Karlsruhe scale-yielded a theoretical value of 910 neutral lactose units/kg for βG and 2.3h for EHT, which were validated in an industrial-scale assay. Based on a shelf-life study at 3 temperatures, the hydrolysis of lactose and the growth of HN001 continue during storage. Arrhenius equations were developed for the variables in the shelf-life study. Our results demonstrate that it is feasible to develop a low-lactose yogurt to which HN001 has been added for lactose-intolerant persons who wish to strengthen their immune system.

  16. Structure determination of the exopolysaccharide produced by Lactobacillus rhamnosus strains RW-9595M and R.

    PubMed Central

    Van Calsteren, Marie-Rose; Pau-Roblot, Corinne; Bégin, André; Roy, Denis

    2002-01-01

    Exopolysaccharides (EPSs) were isolated and purified from Lactobacillus rhamnosus strains RW-9595M, which has been shown to possess cytokine-stimulating activity, and R grown under various fermentation conditions (carbon source, incubation temperature and duration). Identical (1)H NMR spectra were obtained in all cases. Molecular masses were determined by gel permeation chromatography. The primary structure was elucidated using chemical and spectroscopic techniques. Organic acid, monosaccharide and absolute configuration analyses gave the following composition: pyruvate, 1; D-glucose, 2; D-galactose, 1; and l-rhamnose, 4. Methylation analysis indicated the presence of three residues of 3-linked rhamnose, and one residue each of 2,3-linked rhamnose, 2-linked glucose, 3-linked glucose and 4,6-linked galactose. The EPS was submitted to periodate oxidation followed by borohydride reduction. Monosaccharide analysis of the resulting polysaccharide gave the new composition: rhamnose, 4; and glucose, 1. Methylation analysis confirmed the loss of the 2-linked glucose and 4,6-linked galactose residues. On the basis of one- and two-dimensional (1)H and (13)C NMR data, the structure of the native EPS was consistent with the following heptasaccharide repeating unit: [3Rha alpha-3Glc beta-3[Gal4,6(R)Py alpha-2]Rha alpha-3Rha alpha-3Rha alpha-2Glc alpha-](n) where Rha corresponds to rhamnose (6-deoxymannose) and Py corresponds to pyruvate acetal. Complete (1)H and (13)C assignments are reported for the native and the corresponding pyruvate-hydrolysed polysaccharide. Electrospray MS and MS/MS data are given for the oligosaccharide produced by Smith degradation. PMID:11903041

  17. Absolute Dimensions of the Unevolved B-Type Eclipsing Binary GG Orionis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres, Guillermo; Lacy, Claud H. Sandberg; Claret, Antonio; Sabby, Jeffrey A.

    2000-12-01

    We present photometric observations in B and V, as well as spectroscopic observations of the detached, eccentric 6.6 day double-lined eclipsing binary GG Ori, a member of the Orion OB1 association. Absolute dimensions of the components, which are virtually identical, are determined to high accuracy (better than 1% in the masses and better than 2% in the radii) for the purpose of testing various aspects of theoretical modeling. We obtain MA=2.342+/-0.016 Msolar and RA=1.852+/-0.025 Rsolar for the primary, and MB=2.338+/-0.017 Msolar and RB=1.830+/-0.025 Rsolar for the secondary. The effective temperature of both stars is 9950+/-200 K, corresponding to a spectral type of B9.5. GG Ori is very close to the zero-age main sequence, and comparison with current stellar evolution models gives ages of 65-82 Myr or 7.7 Myr, depending on whether the system is considered to be burning hydrogen on the main sequence or still in the final stages of pre-main-sequence contraction. Good agreement is found in both scenarios for a composition close to solar. We have detected apsidal motion in the binary at a rate of ω=0.00061d+/-0.00025d cycle-1, corresponding to an apsidal period of U=10,700+/-4500 yr. A substantial fraction of this (~70%) is due to the contribution from general relativity, and our measurement is entirely consistent with theory. The eccentric orbit of GG Ori is well explained by tidal evolution models, but both theory and our measurements of the rotational velocity of the components are as yet inconclusive as to whether the stars are synchronized with the orbital motion. Some of the observations reported here were obtained with the Multiple Mirror Telescope, a joint facility of the Smithsonian Institution and the University of Arizona.

  18. Testing dust trapping in the circumbinary disk around GG Tauri A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cazzoletti, P.; Ricci, L.; Birnstiel, T.; Lodato, G.

    2017-03-01

    Context. The protoplanetary disk around the GG Tau A binary system is one of the most studied young circumbinary disk, and it has been observed at many different wavelengths. Observations of the dust continuum emission at sub-mm/mm wavelengths have detected a dust ring located between 200 AU and 300 AU from the center of mass of the system. According to the classical theory of tidal interaction between a binary system and its circumbinary disk, the measured inner radius of the mm-sized dust ring is significantly larger than the predicted truncation radius, given the observed projected separation of the stars in the binary system (0.25'', corresponding to 34 AU). A possible explanation for this apparent tension between observations and theory is that a local maximum in the gas radial pressure is created at the location of the center of the dust ring in the disk as a result of the tidal interaction with the binary. An alternative scenario invokes the presence of a misalignment between the disk and the stellar orbital planes. Aims: We investigate the origin of this dust ring structure in the GG Tau A circumbinary disk, test whether the interaction between the binary and the disk can produce a gas pressure radial bump at the location of the observed ring, and discuss whether the alternative hypothesis of a misaligned disk offers a more viable solution. Methods: We run a set of 3D hydrodynamical simulations for an orbit consistent with the astrometric solutions for the GG Tau A stellar proper motions, different disk temperature profiles, and for different levels of viscosity. Using the obtained gas surface density and radial velocity profiles, we then apply a dust evolution model in post-processing in order to to retrieve the expected distribution of mm-sized grains. Results: We compare the results of our models with the observational results and show that, if the binary orbit and the disk were coplanar, not only would the tidal truncation of the circumbinary disk occur

  19. Lactobacillus rhamnosus GR-1 Attenuates Induction of Hypertrophy in Cardiomyocytes but Not through Secreted Protein MSP-1 (p75)

    PubMed Central

    Ettinger, Grace; Burton, Jeremy P.; Gloor, Gregory B.; Reid, Gregor

    2017-01-01

    Previous animal studies have shown that the administration of probiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus can provide a protective effect against ischemia/reperfusion and necrotic injury to the intestine, liver, and heart, as well as a therapeutic effect to the outcome of ischemic injury to the heart, including cardiac hypertrophy and heart failure. We hypothesized that L. rhamnosus GR-1 major secreted protein 1 (MSP-1), also known as p75, plays a major role in this phenomenon. Experiments using neonatal rat ventricular cardiomyocytes showed that live and dead GR-1 bacteria, probiotic-conditioned media, and other probiotic species and strains inhibited the α1-adrenergic receptor agonist phenylephrine-induced hypertrophy as assessed by markers atrial natriuretic peptide and α-skeletal actin. However, using a mutant strain, we showed that this MSP-1 was not required for the inhibition. The ability of factors produced by lactobacilli to improve cardiac function warrants further study for the management of cardiac hypertrophy and heart failure. PMID:28085895

  20. Cell enumeration and visualisation by transmission electron microscopy of Lactobacillus rhamnosus treated with cinnamon (Cinnamomum zeylanicum B.) essential oil.

    PubMed

    Feniman, C M; Rall, V L M; Doyama, J T; Júnior, A Fernandes

    2012-01-01

    The use of essential oils (EOs) in functional foods containing probiotic microorganisms must consider the antimicrobial activity of these oils against beneficial bacteria such as Lactobacillus rhamnosus. This study aimed to evaluate the sensitivity of L. rhamnosus cultures treated with cinnamon EO through viable cell counts and visualisation by transmission electron microscopy. Cinnamon EO at a concentration of 0.04% had a bacteriostatic activity after 2 h of incubation. Although slight alterations were detected in the cell structure, this concentration was considered to be bactericidal, since it led to a significant reduction in cell numbers after 24 h. On the other hand, cinnamon EO at a 1.00% concentration decreased cell counts by 3 log units after 2 h incubation and no viable cell count was detected after 24 h. Transmission electron microscopy indicated that cells treated with 1.00% cinnamon EO were severely damaged and presented cell membrane disruption and cytoplasmic leakage.

  1. Cloning and Expression of an Oligopeptidase, PepO, with Novel Specificity from Lactobacillus rhamnosus HN001 (DR20)

    PubMed Central

    Christensson, Camilla; Bratt, Henrik; Collins, Lesley J.; Coolbear, Tim; Holland, Ross; Lubbers, Mark W.; O’Toole, Paul W.; Reid, Julian R.

    2002-01-01

    Oligopeptidases of starter and nonstarter lactic acid bacteria contribute to the proteolytic events important in maturation and flavor development processes in cheese. This paper describes the molecular cloning, expression, and specificity of the oligopeptidase PepO from the probiotic nonstarter strain Lactobacillus rhamnosus HN001 (DR20). The pepO gene encodes a protein of 70.9 kDa, whose primary sequence includes the HEXXH motif present in certain classes of metallo-oligopeptidases. The pepO gene was cloned in L. rhamnosus HN001 and overexpressed in pTRKH2 from its own promoter, which was mapped by primer extension. It was further cloned in both pNZ8020 and pNZ8037 and overexpressed in Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris NZ9000 from the nisA promoter. The purified PepO enzyme demonstrated unique cleavage specificity for αs1-casein fragment 1–23, hydrolyzing the bonds Pro-5-Ile-6, Lys-7-His-8, His-8-Gln-9, and Gln-9-Gly-10. The impact of this enzyme in cheese can now be assessed. PMID:11772634

  2. Immune protection mediated by the probiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus HN001 (DR20) against Escherichia coli O157:H7 infection in mice.

    PubMed

    Shu, Quan; Gill, Harsharnjit S

    2002-09-06

    This study investigated the protective effects of feeding the immunoenhancing probiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus HN001 against Escherichia coli O157:H7 infection in murine (BALB/c and C57BL/6 mice) challenge infection models. Mice were fed milk-based diets supplemented with L. rhamnosus HN001 (3 x 10(8) cfu g(-1)) for 7 days prior to and following oral challenge with E. coli O157:H7. Morbidity and feed intake were measured for 1 week following challenge; pathogen translocation to spleen, liver and blood, and humoral and cellular immunological responses (specific antibody and phagocytosis) were measured in a sub-sample of ostensibly healthy animals 1 week post-challenge. Results showed that, after challenge, L. rhamnosus HN001-fed mice exhibited lower cumulative morbidity and bacterial translocation rates, compared to non-probiotic-fed control mice. Significantly higher intestinal anti-E. coli IgA responses and blood leucocyte phagocytic activity were recorded among probiotic-fed mice compared to controls. These results demonstrate that feeding the probiotic L. rhamnosus HN001 to mice can reduce the severity of E. coli O157:H7 infection, and suggest that this reduction may be associated with enhanced humoral and cellular immune responses.

  3. MAPPING CO GAS IN THE GG TAURI A TRIPLE SYSTEM WITH 50 au SPATIAL RESOLUTION

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Ya-Wen; Dutrey, Anne; Guilloteau, Stéphane; Di Folco, Emmanuel; Huré, Jean-Marc; Pierens, Arnaud; Chapillon, Edwige; Pietu, Vincent; Gueth, Fréderic; Bary, Jeff; Beck, Tracy; Beust, Hervé; Boehler, Yann; Simon, Michal

    2016-03-20

    We aim to unveil the observational imprint of physical mechanisms that govern planetary formation in the young, multiple system GG Tau A. We present ALMA observations of {sup 12}CO and {sup 13}CO 3–2 and 0.9 mm continuum emission with 0.″35 resolution. The {sup 12}CO 3–2 emission, found within the cavity of the circumternary dust ring (at radius <180 au) where no {sup 13}CO emission is detected, confirms the presence of CO gas near the circumstellar disk of GG Tau Aa. The outer disk and the recently detected hot spot lying at the outer edge of the dust ring are mapped both in {sup 12}CO and {sup 13}CO. The gas emission in the outer disk can be radially decomposed as a series of slightly overlapping Gaussian rings, suggesting the presence of unresolved gaps or dips. The dip closest to the disk center lies at a radius very close to the hot spot location at ∼250–260 au. The CO excitation conditions indicate that the outer disk remains in the shadow of the ring. The hot spot probably results from local heating processes. The two latter points reinforce the hypothesis that the hot spot is created by an embedded proto-planet shepherding the outer disk.

  4. New class of supersymmetric signatures in the processes gg{yields}HH', VH

    SciTech Connect

    Gounaris, G. J.; Layssac, J.; Renard, F. M.

    2009-07-01

    Within the minimal supersymmetric model (MSSM) and standard model (SM) frameworks, we analyze the 1loop electroweak predictions for the helicity amplitudes describing the 17 processes gg{yields}HH', and the 9 processes gg{yields}VH; where H, H{sup '} denote Higgs or Goldstone bosons, while V=Z, W{sup {+-}}. Concentrating on MSSM, we then investigate how the asymptotic helicity conservation (HCns) property of supersymmetry (SUSY) affects the amplitudes at the LHC energy range and what is the corresponding situation in the SM, where no HCns theorem exists. HCns is subsequently used to construct many relations among the cross sections of the above MSSM processes, depending only on the standard MSSM angles {alpha} and {beta} characterizing the two Higgs doublets. These relations should be asymptotically exact but as the energy decreases toward the LHC range, mass-depending deviations should start appearing. Provided the SUSY scale is not too high, these relations may remain roughly correct, even at the LHC energy range.

  5. Development of an injectable PHBV microparticles-GG hydrogel hybrid system for regenerative medicine.

    PubMed

    Pacheco, Daniela P; Amaral, Maria H; Reis, Rui L; Marques, Alexandra P; Correlo, Vítor M

    2015-01-15

    Uncontrollable displacements that greatly affect the concentration of active agents at the target tissues are among a major limitation of the use of microparticulate drug delivery systems (DDS). Under this context a biphasic injectable DDS combining poly(hydroxybutyrate-co-hydroxyvalerate) (PHBV) microparticles (MPs) and a gellan gum (GG) injectable hydrogel is herein proposed for the localized delivery and long-term retention of MPs carrying hydrophilic and hydrophobic model active agents. A double emulsion-solvent evaporation method was adopted to develop the PHBV MPs, carrying bovine serum albumin (BSA) or dexamethasone (Dex) as hydrophilic and hydrophobic active agents' models, respectively. Moreover, this method was modified, together with the properties of the hydrogel to tailor the delivery profile of the active agents. Variations of the composition of the organic phase during the process allowed tuning surface topography, particle size distribution and core porosity of the PHBV MPs and, thus, the in vitro release profile of Dex but not of BSA. Besides, after embedding hydrogels of higher GG concentration led to a slower and more sustained release of both active agents, independently of the processing conditions of the microparticulate system.

  6. Dose-dependent effects of Lactobacillus rhamnosus on serum interleukin-17 production and intestinal T-cell responses in pigs challenged with Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yao-Hong; Li, Xiao-Qiong; Zhang, Wei; Zhou, Dong; Liu, Hao-Yu; Wang, Jiu-Feng

    2014-03-01

    The mechanism underlying the dose effect of probiotics on ameliorating diarrhea has not been fully elucidated. Here, low (1 × 10(9) CFU/ml) or high (1 × 10(11) CFU/ml) doses of Lactobacillus rhamnosus ATCC 7469 were administered orally to piglets for 1 week before F4 (K88)-positive enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (F4(+) ETEC) challenge. Administration of a low, but not a high, dose of L. rhamnosus decreased the percentage of CD3(+) CD4(+) CD8(-) T cells in the peripheral blood. Notably, transiently increased serum concentrations of interleukin-17A (IL-17A) were observed after F4(+) ETEC challenge in pigs pretreated with a high dose of L. rhamnosus. Administration of L. rhamnosus increased the percentage of the small intestinal lamina propria CD3(+) CD4(+) CD8(-) cells and Peyer's patch CD3(+) CD4(-) CD8(-) and CD3(-) CD4(-) CD8(+) cells. The percentage of ileal intraepithelial CD3(+) CD4(-) CD8(+) cells increased only in the high-dose piglets. Administration of L. rhamnosus downregulated expression of ileal IL-17A after F4(+) ETEC challenge but had no effect on expression of gamma interferon (IFN-γ), IL-12, IL-4, and FOXP3 mRNA in the small intestine. Expression of jejunal IL-2, ileal transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1), and ileal IL-10 was upregulated in the low-dose piglets after F4(+) ETEC challenge. Our findings suggest that amelioration of infectious diarrhea in piglets by L. rhamnosus is associated with the generation of lamina propria CD3(+) CD4(+) CD8(-) T cells, the expansion of Peyer's patch CD3(+) CD4(-) CD8(-) and CD3(-) CD4(-) CD8(+) cells, and the attenuation of F4(+) ETEC-induced increase in CD3(+) CD4(+) CD8(+) T cells in the small intestine. However, consumption of high doses of L. rhamnosus may increase levels of serum IL-17A after F4(+) ETEC challenge, thus eliciting a strong proinflammatory response.

  7. The potential probiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus CTC1679 survives the passage through the gastrointestinal tract and its use as starter culture results in safe nutritionally enhanced fermented sausages.

    PubMed

    Rubio, Raquel; Martín, Belén; Aymerich, Teresa; Garriga, Margarita

    2014-09-01

    The human-derived potential probiotic strain Lactobacillus rhamnosus CTC1679 was used as a starter culture in reduced fat and sodium low-acid fermented sausages (fuets) to assess its ability to survive through the gastrointestinal tract (GIT) in a human intervention study consisting of 5 healthy volunteers who consumed 25 g fuet a day for 21 days. Faecal samples were analysed during and after consumption. L. rhamnosus CTC1679 produced a transient colonisation of the human GIT and persisted during the ingestion period of fuet containing L. rhamnosus CTC1679 at levels ca. 8log CFU/g. After 3 days of non-consumption, the strain was still recovered in the faeces of all the volunteers. To evaluate the safety of the nutritionally enhanced manufactured fuets, a challenge test was designed in a separately manufactured batch. L. rhamnosus CTC1679 was able to grow, survive and dominate (levels ca. 10(8) CFU/g) the endogenous lactic acid bacteria (LAB), prevented the growth of Listeria monocytogenes throughout the whole ripening process of the fuets and eliminated Salmonella. After 35 days of storage at 4 °C, L. monocytogenes was not detected, achieving absence in 25 g of the product. The application of high hydrostatic pressure (HHP) treatment (600 MPa for 5 min) at the end of ripening (day 14) produced an immediate reduction of L. monocytogenes to levels <1log CFU/g. After 35 days of storage at 4 °C the pathogen was not detected. Thus, the strain L. rhamnosus CTC1679 is a suitable starter culture for producing safe potentially probiotic fermented sausages.

  8. Lactobacillus rhamnosus and its cell-free culture supernatant differentially modulate inflammatory biomarkers in Escherichia coli-challenged human dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Bermudez-Brito, Miriam; Muñoz-Quezada, Sergio; Gomez-Llorente, Carolina; Romero, Fernando; Gil, Angel

    2014-05-28

    The intestinal immune system maintains a delicate balance between immunogenicity against invading pathogens and tolerance to the commensal microbiota and food antigens. Different strains of probiotics possess the ability to finely regulate the activation of dendritic cells (DC), polarising the subsequent activity of T-cells. Nevertheless, information about their underlying mechanisms of action is scarce. In the present study, we investigated the immunomodulatory effects of a potentially probiotic strain, Lactobacillus rhamnosus CNCM I-4036, and its cell-free culture supernatant (CFS) on human DC challenged with Escherichia coli. The results showed that the levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8 and IL-12p70 were higher in the cells treated with live L. rhamnosus than in the cells treated with the CFS. In the presence of E. coli, the supernatant was more effective than the probiotic bacteria in reducing the secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines. In addition, live L. rhamnosus potently induced the production of transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 and TGF-β2, whereas the CFS increased the secretion of TGF-β1. However, in the presence of E. coli, both treatments restored the levels of TGF-β. The probiotic strain L. rhamnosus CNCM I-4036 and its CFS were able to activate the Toll-like receptor signalling pathway, enhancing innate immunity. The two treatments induced gene transcription of TLR-9. Live L. rhamnosus activated the expression of TLR-2 and TLR-4 genes, whereas the CFS increased the expression of TLR-1 and TLR-5 genes. In response to the stimulation with probiotic/CFS and E. coli, the expression of each gene tested was notably increased, with the exception of TNF-α and NFKBIA. In conclusion, the CFS exhibited an extraordinary ability to suppress the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines by DC, and may be used as an effective and safer alternative to live bacteria.

  9. Genetic variations in the osteopontin promoters T-443C and G-156GG increase carotid intima–media thickness

    PubMed Central

    Yueniwati, Yuyun; Yurina, Valentina; Sobah, Nurus; Rahayu, Endang

    2016-01-01

    Carotid intima–media thickness (CIMT) is a clear predictor of atherosclerosis. The increase of CIMT is affected by mutations in the osteopontin (OPN) promoters. The purpose of this study was to examine genetic variations in OPN promoters T-443C and G-156GG, identified in Javanese children with ischemic stroke parents, and to investigate their relationship with the increase of CIMT. A case–control analytic study was performed on 20 case and 12 control samples. Case samples were Javanese children aged between 10 to 21 years with ischemic stroke parents. Control samples were children with healthy parents. Mutations of T-443C and G-156GG were determined by employing polymerase chain reaction. Results of sequencing were analyzed using CLC Main Workbench 6.0. CIMT was defined using ultrasound. Genetic variations of T-443C were identified in six samples. Likewise, genetic variations of G-156GG were identified in six samples. Genetic variations in the OPN promoters T-443C and G-156GG were not potential risk factors in an increase of CIMT (P=0.654 and P=0.654). This study proves that genetic variations could be identified at the points of T-443C and G-156GG in children with ischemic stroke parents. Although statistically insignificant, the tendency to increase CIMT occurs in children with genetic variations. Children with ischemic stroke parents have thicker CIMT than children of healthy parents. PMID:27274305

  10. Inactivation of bacterial pathogens in yoba mutandabota, a dairy product fermented with the probiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus yoba.

    PubMed

    Mpofu, Augustine; Linnemann, Anita R; Nout, Martinus J R; Zwietering, Marcel H; Smid, Eddy J; den Besten, Heidy M W

    2016-01-18

    Mutandabota is a dairy product consumed as a major source of proteins and micronutrients in Southern Africa. In this study the microbial safety of traditional and a variant of mutandabota fermented with the probiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus yoba (yoba mutandabota) was investigated by challenging the products with five important food pathogens: Listeria monocytogenes, Salmonella spp., Campylobacter jejuni, Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Bacillus cereus. Pasteurized full-fat cow's milk was used for producing traditional and yoba mutandabota, and was inoculated with a cocktail of strains of the pathogens at an inoculum level of 5.5 log cfu/mL. Survival of the pathogens was monitored over a potential consumption time of 24h for traditional mutandabota, and over 24h of fermentation followed by 24h of potential consumption time for yoba mutandabota. In traditional mutandabota (pH3.4 ± 0.1) no viable cells of B. cereus and C. jejuni were detected 3h after inoculation, while L. monocytogenes, E. coli O157:H7 and Salmonella spp. significantly declined (P<0.05), but could still be detected (<3.5 log inactivation) at the end of the potential consumption time. This indicated that consumption of traditional mutandabota exposes consumers to the risk of food-borne microbial infections. In yoba mutandabota, L. rhamnosus yoba grew from 5.5 ± 0.1 log cfu/mL to 9.1 ± 0.4 log cfu/mL in the presence of pathogens. The pH of yoba mutandabota dropped from 4.2 ± 0.1 to 3.3 ± 0.1 after 24h of fermentation, mainly due to organic acids produced during fermentation. Only Salmonella spp. was able to grow in yoba mutandabota during the first 9h of fermentation, but then decreased in viable plate count. None of the tested pathogens were detected (>3.5 log inactivation) after 3h into potential consumption time of yoba mutandabota. Inactivation of pathogens in mutandabota is of public health significance because food-borne pathogens endanger public health upon consumption of contaminated food

  11. Dynamics of circumstellar disks. III. The case of GG Tau A

    DOE PAGES

    Nelson, Andrew F.; Marzari, Francesco

    2016-08-11

    Here, we present two-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations using the Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamic code, VINE, to model a self-gravitating binary system. We model configurations in which a circumbinary torus+disk surrounds a pair of stars in orbit around each other and a circumstellar disk surrounds each star, similar to that observed for the GG Tau A system. We assume that the disks cool as blackbodies, using rates determined independently at each location in the disk by the time dependent temperature of the photosphere there. We assume heating due to hydrodynamical processes and to radiation from the two stars, using rates approximated from amore » measure of the radiation intercepted by the disk at its photosphere.« less

  12. Dynamics of circumstellar disks. III. The case of GG Tau A

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, Andrew F.; Marzari, Francesco

    2016-08-11

    Here, we present two-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations using the Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamic code, VINE, to model a self-gravitating binary system. We model configurations in which a circumbinary torus+disk surrounds a pair of stars in orbit around each other and a circumstellar disk surrounds each star, similar to that observed for the GG Tau A system. We assume that the disks cool as blackbodies, using rates determined independently at each location in the disk by the time dependent temperature of the photosphere there. We assume heating due to hydrodynamical processes and to radiation from the two stars, using rates approximated from a measure of the radiation intercepted by the disk at its photosphere.

  13. Identification of high-efficiency 3′GG gRNA motifs in indexed FASTA files with ngg2

    PubMed Central

    Roberson, Elisha D.O.

    2016-01-01

    CRISPR/Cas9 is emerging as one of the most-used methods of genome modification in organisms ranging from bacteria to human cells. However, the efficiency of editing varies tremendously site-to-site. A recent report identified a novel motif, called the 3′GG motif, which substantially increases the efficiency of editing at all sites tested in C. elegans. Furthermore, they highlighted that previously published gRNAs with high editing efficiency also had this motif. I designed a python command-line tool, ngg2, to identify 3′GG gRNA sites from indexed FASTA files. As a proof-of-concept, I screened for these motifs in six model genomes: Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Caenorhabditis elegans, Drosophila melanogaster, Danio rerio, Mus musculus, and Homo sapiens. I also scanned the genomes of pig (Sus scrofa) and African elephant (Loxodonta africana) to demonstrate the utility in non-model organisms. I identified more than 60 million single match 3′GG motifs in these genomes. Greater than 61% of all protein coding genes in the reference genomes had at least one unique 3′GG gRNA site overlapping an exon. In particular, more than 96% of mouse and 93% of human protein coding genes have at least one unique, overlapping 3′GG gRNA. These identified sites can be used as a starting point in gRNA selection, and the ngg2 tool provides an important ability to identify 3′GG editing sites in any species with an available genome sequence. PMID:26878062

  14. Dynamics of Circumstellar Disks. III. The Case of GG Tau A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, Andrew F.; Marzari, F.

    2016-08-01

    We present two-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations using the Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamic code, VINE, to model a self-gravitating binary system. We model configurations in which a circumbinary torus+disk surrounds a pair of stars in orbit around each other and a circumstellar disk surrounds each star, similar to that observed for the GG Tau A system. We assume that the disks cool as blackbodies, using rates determined independently at each location in the disk by the time dependent temperature of the photosphere there. We assume heating due to hydrodynamical processes and to radiation from the two stars, using rates approximated from a measure of the radiation intercepted by the disk at its photosphere. We simulate a suite of systems configured with semimajor axes of either a = 62 AU (“wide”) or a = 32 AU (“close”), and with assumed orbital eccentricity of either e = 0 or e = 0.3. Each simulation follows the evolution for ˜6500-7500 yr, corresponding to about three orbits of the torus around the center of mass. Our simulations show that strong, sharply defined spiral structures are generated from the stirring action of the binary and that, in some cases, these structures fragment into 1-2 massive clumps. The torus quickly fragments into several dozen such fragments in configurations in which either the binary is replaced by a single star of equal mass, or radiative heating is neglected. The spiral structures extend inwards to the circumstellar environment as large scale material streams for which most material is found on trajectories that return it to the torus on a timescale of 1-200 yr, with only a small fraction accreting into the circumstellar environment. The spiral structures also propagate outwards through the torus, generating net outwards mass flow, and eventually losing coherence at large distances from the stars. The torus becomes significantly eccentric in shape over most of its evolution. In all configurations, accretion onto the stars

  15. GG high accuracy test of the equivalence principle: state of the art, laboratory prototype and new insights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nobili, Anna M.; Pegna, Raffaello; Comandi, Gian Luca; Bramanti, Donato; Anselmi, Alberto; Catastini, Giuseppe

    The GG ("Galileo Galilei") satellite experiment aims to test the Equivalence Principle (EP) to 10-17 , an extremely ambitious goal (due to improve current best results by 4 orders of magnitude) that should tell us in a clear cut way whether we are in the presence of a new long-range physical interaction (violation) or not (confirmation). Either way, it would be a major result. An end-to-end space experiment simulator was constructed at TAS-I based on GOCE simulator and ASI (Agenzia Spaziale Italiana) funding. The resulting error budget is consistent with the mission goal, which can be realized in 4 years from the start of Phase B. In the lab, a full scale prototype has provided a 25 days continuous run with a sensitivity -in the field of the Sun, hence at diurnal frequency- of a few nanometers in the relative displacement of the proof masses, to be compared with the picometer level required in space for GG to achieve its goal. A passive suspended prototype is under completion in order to reduce ground platform noise by means of an appropriate cardanic suspension which has now been proved to be able to reduce diurnal terrain noise by a factor 104 . The crucial issue of thermal noise has been recently revisited and a major new insight has come thanks to M. Shao (JPL): in GG, by up-converting the frequency of an EP violation signal in the field of the Earth from its (low) orbital frequency of 1.7 · 10-4 Hz to the (high) rotation/modulation frequency of 1Hz -the highest ever in EP experiments- proof mass thermal noise is reduced by orders of magnitude, as the ratio of these frequencies squared. Instead, cooling the experiment to superfluid He temperature would only reduce thermal noise by a factor 10. This is a feature unique to GG. It now appears that, if equipped with an intrinsic differential transducer such as a SIM like laser gauge, GG may indeed aim to an EP test to 10-18 . The end-to-end GG simulator built at TAS-I in 2009 during GG Phase A-2 study is the

  16. Formulation of low-cost fermentative media for lactic acid production with Lactobacillus rhamnosus using vinification lees as nutrients.

    PubMed

    Bustos, Guadalupe; Moldes, Ana Belén; Cruz, José Manuel; Domínguez, José Manuel

    2004-02-25

    Lees coming from different steps in white wine and red wine vinification were characterized under physicochemical analyses to determine the content in carbon, nitrogen, ashes, solids in suspension, organic compounds, and minerals. Due to the hydrolytic activity of Lactobacillus strains, lees without autolysis treatments were used directly as the unique nutrient or in combination with corn steep liquor to carry out the glucose to lactic acid fermentation with Lactobacillus rhamnosus CECT-288. Time courses of glucose and lactic acid were modeled according to reported models. Using 20 g/L of lees coming from the white wine technology and re-collected after the second decanting step before distillation, as the only nutrient, the values achieved (P = 105.5 g/L, Q(P) = 2.470 g/L.h) were even higher than those obtained with the costly MRS broth (P = 104.3 g/L, Q(P) = 2.251 g/L.h).

  17. Sublingual administration of Lactobacillus rhamnosus affects respiratory immune responses and facilitates protection against influenza virus infection in mice.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yu-Na; Youn, Ha-Na; Kwon, Jung-Hoon; Lee, Dong-Hun; Park, Jae-Keun; Yuk, Seong-Su; Erdene-Ochir, Tseren-Ochir; Kim, Ki-Taek; Lee, Joong-Bok; Park, Seung-Yong; Choi, In-Soo; Song, Chang-Seon

    2013-05-01

    The extensive morbidity and mortality caused by influenza A viruses worldwide prompts the need for a deeper understanding of the host immune response and novel therapeutic and/or prophylactic interventions. In this study, we assessed the sublingual route as an effective means of delivering probiotics against influenza virus in mice. In addition, IgA levels, NK cell activity, T cell activation, and cytokine profiles in the lungs were examined to understand the mechanism underlying this protective effect. Sublingual administration of Lactobacillus rhamnosus provided enhanced protection against influenza virus infection by enhancing mucosal secretory IgA production, and T and NK cell activity. Moreover, interleukin (IL)-12 levels in the lungs increased significantly. Conversely, IL-6 and tumor necrosis factor alpha levels in the lungs decreased significantly. On the basis of these promising findings, we propose that the sublingual mucosal route is an attractive alternative to mucosal routes for administering probiotics against influenza virus.

  18. Risks associated with high-dose Lactobacillus rhamnosus in an Escherichia coli model of piglet diarrhoea: intestinal microbiota and immune imbalances.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiao-Qiong; Zhu, Yao-Hong; Zhang, Hong-Fu; Yue, Yuan; Cai, Zheng-Xing; Lu, Qing-Ping; Zhang, Lu; Weng, Xiao-Gang; Zhang, Fan-Jian; Zhou, Dong; Yang, Jin-Cai; Wang, Jiu-Feng

    2012-01-01

    Probiotic could be a promising alternative to antibiotics for the prevention of enteric infections; however, further information on the dose effects is required. In this study, weanling piglets were orally administered low- or high-dose Lactobacillus rhamnosus ACTT 7469 (10(10) CFU/d or 10(12) CFU/d) for 1 week before F4 (K88)-positive Escherichia coli challenge. The compositions of faecal and gastrointestinal microbiota were recorded; gene expression in the intestines was assessed by real-time PCR; serum tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) concentrations and intestinal Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) were detected by ELISA and immunohistochemistry, respectively. Unexpectedly, high-dose administration increased the incidence of diarrhoea before F4(+)ETEC challenge, despite the fact that both doses ameliorated F4(+)ETEC-induced diarrhoea with increased Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium counts accompanied by reduced coliform shedding in faeces. Interestingly, L. rhamnosus administration reduced Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium counts in the colonic contents, and the high-dose piglets also had lower Lactobacillius and Bacteroides counts in the ileal contents. An increase in the concentration of serum TNF-α induced by F4(+)ETEC was observed, but the increase was delayed by L. rhamnosus. In piglets exposed to F4(+)ETEC, jejunal TLR4 expression increased at the mRNA and protein levels, while jejunal interleukin (IL)-8 and ileal porcine β-defensins 2 (pBD2) mRNA expression increased; however, these increases were attenuated by administration of L. rhamnosus. Notably, expression of jejunal TLR2, ileal TLR9, Nod-like receptor NOD1 and TNF-α mRNA was upregulated in the low-dose piglets after F4(+)ETEC challenge, but not in the high-dose piglets. These findings indicate that pretreatment with a low dose of L. rhamnosus might be more effective than a high dose at ameliorating diarrhoea. There is a risk that high-dose L. rhamnosus pretreatment may negate the preventative effects

  19. Nasally administered Lactobacillus rhamnosus accelerate the recovery of humoral immunity in B lymphocyte-deficient malnourished mice.

    PubMed

    Barbieri, Natalia; Villena, Julio; Herrera, Matias; Salva, Susana; Alvarez, Susana

    2013-02-01

    The ability of nasally administered Lactobacillus rhamnosus CRL1505 to accelerate the recovery of respiratory B cell-mediated immunity against pneumococcal infection in replete malnourished mice was evaluated. Weaned mice were malnourished after consumption of a protein-free diet for 21 d. Malnourished mice were fed a balanced conventional diet (BCD) for 7 d (BCD group) or a BCD for 7 d with supplemental L. rhamnosus CRL1505 by the nasal route during the last 2 d (BCD+Lr group). Nonreplete malnourished and normal mice were used as the malnourished (MNC) and the well-nourished (WNC) control groups, respectively. Mice were challenged with Streptococcus pneumoniae at the end of each dietary treatment. The immune response was studied before the challenge and at different times postinfection. The MNC mice had less resistance to pneumococcal infection, fewer mature and immature B cells in lung and spleen, and a reduced production of specific antibodies compared with WNC mice. The BCD treatment did not induce a complete normalization of the number B cell populations and antibody amounts. However, the BCD+Lr group had normal numbers of spleen and lung B cells. Moreover, the BCD+Lr mice had a significantly lower susceptibility to S. pneumoniae infection and higher amounts of anti-pneumococcal antibodies. Although further studies are necessary to clarify the effect of malnutrition and nasally administered lactobacilli in other immune cell populations involved in the protection against respiratory pathogens, this work gives evidence of the importance of using nasal priming with probiotics to accelerate the recovery of respiratory immunity in immunocompromised malnourished hosts.

  20. Protection against translocating Salmonella typhimurium infection in mice by feeding the immuno-enhancing probiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus strain HN001.

    PubMed

    Gill, H S; Shu, Q; Lin, H; Rutherfurd, K J; Cross, M L

    2001-12-01

    The probiotic lactic acid bacterium Lactobacillus rhamnosus (strain HN001) is known to stimulate enhanced innate and acquired immune responses in mice. following oral delivery. Here, the ability of HN001 to confer immune enhancement and protection against an oral challenge of Salmonella tYphimurium was investigated. HN001-fed and non-probiotic-fed control BALB/c mice were challenged with either a single dose of S. typhimurium (ATCC strain 1772), or with five repeated daily doses of the pathogen; post-challenge clinical, behavioural, bacteriological and immunological parameters were assessed. Mice began to show ostensible signs of infection 3-4 days following the initiation of Salmonella challenge, and the first mortalities were observed after 6 days. Following single-dose Salmonella challenge, HN001-fed mice maintained a higher mean pre-mortality general health score than control mice; retained significantly greater food and water intake and weight gain, produced higher titres of serum and intestinal tract anti-Salmonella antibodies, and showed greater overall survival of infection (27/30 mice surviving at 21 days post-challenge, compared to 2/29 in the control group). Following repeated-dose Salmonella challenge, HN001-fed mice had significantly lower mean pathogen burdens in visceral organs (spleen, liver) compared to controls, and additionally, blood and peritoneal leucocytes obtained from HN001-fed mice exhibited significantly higher ex vivo phagocytic capacity compared to control-mice. This study affirms that Lb. rhamnosus strain HN001 displays immuno-enhancing properties in S. typhimurium-infected mice, and demonstrates that oral delivery of this probiotic can promote increased protection against a highly virulent enteric bacterial pathogen.

  1. Degradation of a monoazo dye Alizarin Yellow GG in aqueous solutions by gamma irradiation: Decolorization and biodegradability enhancement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Weihua; Chen, Lujun; Tian, Jinping; Wang, Jianlong; He, Shijun

    2013-02-01

    The irradiation-induced degradation of an azo dye, Alizarin Yellow GG (AY-GG), was investigated in aqueous solution under gamma irradiation using a 60Cobalt source at a dose rate of 113 Gy/min. The decolorization percentage of AY-GG reached 65% when its initial concentration was 100 mg/l and the absorbed dose was 9 kGy. The decolorization process could be described by first-order kinetic equation. In addition, specific oxygen uptake rate (SOUR, mg O2 (g MLVSS)-1 h-1) of activated sludge using the irradiated azo dye solutions was 8.1 mg O2 (g MLVSS)-1 h-1 after 9 kGy irradiation, indicating that the biodegradability of AY-GG could be enhanced by 30%. However, toxic intermediates including heterocyclic aromatic amines and cyanides were detected during the irradiation process, which inhibited the complete biological degradation of azo dye. Fortunately, the inhibition could be eliminated by further irradiation. The azo dye solution became amenable to biodegradation and can be further treated by biological treatment process.

  2. Explicit CP violation in the MSSM through gg{yields}H{sub 1{yields}{gamma}{gamma}}

    SciTech Connect

    Hesselbach, S.; Moretti, S.; Munir, S.; Poulose, P.

    2010-10-01

    We prove the strong sensitivity of the gg{yields}H{sub 1{yields}{gamma}{gamma}} cross section at the Large Hadron Collider on the explicitly CP-violating phases of the minimal supersymmetric standard model, where H{sub 1} is the lightest supersymmetric Higgs boson.

  3. 75 FR 16830 - Geological and Geophysical Exploration (G&G) on the Mid- and South Atlantic Outer Continental...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-02

    ... Minerals Management Service Geological and Geophysical Exploration (G&G) on the Mid- and South Atlantic... siting for renewable energy projects, oil and gas exploration, and marine minerals extraction; these..., aircraft, shore); and The degree to which those activities can overlap in space and time....

  4. 30 CFR 280.21 - What must I do in conducting G&G prospecting or scientific research?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... scientific research? 280.21 Section 280.21 Mineral Resources MINERALS MANAGEMENT SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE... prospecting or scientific research? While conducting G&G prospecting or scientific research activities under a... you are prospecting or conducting scientific research activities. (b) Consult and coordinate your...

  5. 30 CFR 280.21 - What must I do in conducting G&G prospecting or scientific research?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false What must I do in conducting G&G prospecting or scientific research? 280.21 Section 280.21 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF OCEAN ENERGY MANAGEMENT, REGULATION, AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFFSHORE PROSPECTING FOR MINERALS OTHER THAN OIL, GAS,...

  6. Absolute parameters of young stars: GG Lup and μ1 Sco

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budding, E.; Butland, R.; Blackford, M.

    2015-04-01

    New high-resolution spectroscopy and BVR photometry, together with literature data, on the Gould's Belt close binary systems GG Lup and μ1 Sco are presented and analysed. In the case of GG Lup, light and radial velocity curve fittings confirm a near-main-sequence picture of a pair of close stars. Absolute parameters are found, to within a few per cent, thus: M1 = 4.16 ± 0.12, M2 = 2.64 ± 0.12 (M⊙); R1 = 2.42 ± 0.05, R2 = 1.79 ± 0.04 (R⊙); T1 ˜ 13 000, T2 ˜ 10 600 (K); photometric distance ˜160 (pc). The high eccentricity and relatively short period (105 yr) of apsidal revolution may be related to an apparent `slow B-type pulsator' oscillation. Disturbances of the outer envelope of at least one of the components then compromise comparisons to standard evolutionary models, at least regarding the age of the system. A rate of apsidal advance is derived, which allows a check on the mean internal structure constant overline{k_2} = 0.0058 ± 0.0004. This is in agreement with values recently derived for young stars of solar composition and mass ˜3 M⊙. For μ1 Sco, we agree with previous authors that the secondary component is considerably oversized for its mass, implying binary (interactive) stellar evolution, probably of the `Case A' type. The primary appears relatively little affected by this evolution, however. Its parameters show consistency with a star of its derived mass at age about 13 Myr, consistent with the star's membership of the Sco-Cen OB2 Association. The absolute parameters are as follows: M1 = 8.3 ± 1.0, M2 = 4.6 ± 1.0 (M⊙); R1 = 3.9 ± 0.3, R2 = 4.6 ± 0.4 (R⊙); T1 ˜ 24 000, T2 ˜ 17 000 (K); photometric distance ˜135 (pc).

  7. Eruca sativa Might Influence the Growth, Survival under Simulated Gastrointestinal Conditions and Some Biological Features of Lactobacillus acidophilus, Lactobacillus plantarum and Lactobacillus rhamnosus Strains

    PubMed Central

    Fratianni, Florinda; Pepe, Selenia; Cardinale, Federica; Granese, Tiziana; Cozzolino, Autilia; Coppola, Raffaele; Nazzaro, Filomena

    2014-01-01

    The growth and viability of three Lactobacillus strains, Lactobacillus acidophilus, Lactobacillus plantarum and Lactobacillus rhamnosus, after their passage through simulated gastric and pancreatic juices were studied as a function of their presence in the growth medium of rocket salad (Eruca sativa). The presence of E. sativa affected some of the biological properties of the strains. For example, L. acidophilus and L. plantarum worked more efficiently in the presence of E. sativa, increasing not only the antioxidant activity of the medium, but also their own antioxidant power and antimicrobial activity; L. rhamnosus was not affected in the same manner. Overall, the presence of vegetables might help to boost, in specific cases, some of the characteristics of lactobacilli, including antioxidant and antimicrobial power. PMID:25275269

  8. Eruca sativa might influence the growth, survival under simulated gastrointestinal conditions and some biological features of Lactobacillus acidophilus, Lactobacillus plantarum and Lactobacillus rhamnosus strains.

    PubMed

    Fratianni, Florinda; Pepe, Selenia; Cardinale, Federica; Granese, Tiziana; Cozzolino, Autilia; Coppola, Raffaele; Nazzaro, Filomena

    2014-10-01

    The growth and viability of three Lactobacillus strains, Lactobacillus acidophilus, Lactobacillus plantarum and Lactobacillus rhamnosus, after their passage through simulated gastric and pancreatic juices were studied as a function of their presence in the growth medium of rocket salad (Eruca sativa). The presence of E. sativa affected some of the biological properties of the strains. For example, L. acidophilus and L. plantarum worked more efficiently in the presence of E. sativa, increasing not only the antioxidant activity of the medium, but also their own antioxidant power and antimicrobial activity; L. rhamnosus was not affected in the same manner. Overall, the presence of vegetables might help to boost, in specific cases, some of the characteristics of lactobacilli, including antioxidant and antimicrobial power.

  9. Lactobacillus rhamnosus CNCM I-3690 and the commensal bacterium Faecalibacterium prausnitzii A2-165 exhibit similar protective effects to induced barrier hyper-permeability in mice

    PubMed Central

    Laval, L; Martin, R; Natividad, JN; Chain, F; Miquel, S; de Maredsous, C Desclée; Capronnier, S; Sokol, H; Verdu, EF; van Hylckama Vlieg, JET; Bermúdez-Humarán, LG; Smokvina, T; Langella, P

    2015-01-01

    Impaired gut barrier function has been reported in a wide range of diseases and syndromes and in some functional gastrointestinal disorders. In addition, there is increasing evidence that suggests the gut microbiota tightly regulates gut barrier function and recent studies demonstrate that probiotic bacteria can enhance barrier integrity. Here, we aimed to investigate the effects of Lactobacillus rhamnosus CNCM I-3690 on intestinal barrier function. In vitro results using a Caco-2 monolayer cells stimulated with TNF-α confirmed the anti-inflammatory nature of the strain CNCM I-3690 and pointed out a putative role for the protection of the epithelial function. Next, we tested the protective effects of L. rhamnosus CNCM I-3690 in a mouse model of increased colonic permeability. Most importantly, we compared its performance to that of the well-known beneficial human commensal bacterium Faecalibacterium prauznitzii A2-165. Increased colonic permeability was normalized by both strains to a similar degree. Modulation of apical tight junction proteins expression was then analyzed to decipher the mechanism underlying this effect. We showed that CNCM I-3690 partially restored the function of the intestinal barrier and increased the levels of tight junction proteins Occludin and E-cadherin. The results indicate L. rhamnosus CNCM I-3690 is as effective as the commensal anti-inflammatory bacterium F. prausnitzii to treat functional barrier abnormalities. PMID:25517879

  10. Lactobacillus rhamnosus CNCM I-3690 and the commensal bacterium Faecalibacterium prausnitzii A2-165 exhibit similar protective effects to induced barrier hyper-permeability in mice.

    PubMed

    Laval, L; Martin, R; Natividad, J N; Chain, F; Miquel, S; Desclée de Maredsous, C; Capronnier, S; Sokol, H; Verdu, E F; van Hylckama Vlieg, J E T; Bermúdez-Humarán, L G; Smokvina, T; Langella, P

    2015-01-01

    Impaired gut barrier function has been reported in a wide range of diseases and syndromes and in some functional gastrointestinal disorders. In addition, there is increasing evidence that suggests the gut microbiota tightly regulates gut barrier function and recent studies demonstrate that probiotic bacteria can enhance barrier integrity. Here, we aimed to investigate the effects of Lactobacillus rhamnosus CNCM I-3690 on intestinal barrier function. In vitro results using a Caco-2 monolayer cells stimulated with TNF-α confirmed the anti-inflammatory nature of the strain CNCM I-3690 and pointed out a putative role for the protection of the epithelial function. Next, we tested the protective effects of L. rhamnosus CNCM I-3690 in a mouse model of increased colonic permeability. Most importantly, we compared its performance to that of the well-known beneficial human commensal bacterium Faecalibacterium prauznitzii A2-165. Increased colonic permeability was normalized by both strains to a similar degree. Modulation of apical tight junction proteins expression was then analyzed to decipher the mechanism underlying this effect. We showed that CNCM I-3690 partially restored the function of the intestinal barrier and increased the levels of tight junction proteins Occludin and E-cadherin. The results indicate L. rhamnosus CNCM I-3690 is as effective as the commensal anti-inflammatory bacterium F. prausnitzii to treat functional barrier abnormalities.

  11. “Galileo Galilei (GG) on the Ground-GGG”: experimental results and perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Comandi, G. L.; Nobili, A. M.; Bramanti, D.; Toncelli, R.; Polacco, E.; Chiofalo, M. L.

    2003-11-01

    The GGG differential accelerometer is made of concentric coaxial test cylinders weakly coupled in the horizontal plane and spinning in supercritical regime around their symmetry axis. GGG is built as a full scale ground based prototype for the proposed “Galileo Galilei-GG” space experiment aiming to test the equivalence principle (EP) to 10 -17 at room temperature. We report measured Q values of 95000 at 1.4 Hz, and expect even better ones at typical spin frequencies of a few Hz. An EP violation signal in the field of the Sun would appear as a low frequency displacement in the horizontal plane of the laboratory, and it can be separated out from a much larger whirl motion of the test masses at their natural differential frequency. So far we have managed to reduce the amplitude of this whirl to about 0.1 μm. We discuss how to improve these results in view of the very high accuracy GG experiment in space, and/or to reach a 10 -13 sensitivity in the lab which would allow us to either confirm or rule out recent predictions of violation to this level.

  12. Near-Infrared Polarimetry of the GG Tauri A Binary System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Itoh, Yoichi; Oasa, Yumiko; Kudo, Tomoyuki; Kusakabe, Nobuhiko; Hashimoto, Jun; Abe, Lyu; Brandner, Wolfgang; Brandt, Timothy D.; Carson, Joseph C.; Egner, Sebastian; Feldt, Markus; Grady, Carol A.; Guyon, Olivier; Hayano, Yutaka; Hayashi, Masahiko; Hayashi, Saeko S.; Henning, Thomas; Hodapp, Klaus W.; Ishii, Miki; Iye, Masanori; Janson, Markus; Kandori, Ryo; Knapp, Gillian R.; Kuzuhara, Masayuki; Kwon, Jungmi; Matsuo, Taro; McElwain, Michael W.; Miyama, Shoken; Morino, Jun-Ichi; Moro-Martin, Amaya; Nishimura, Tetsuo; Pyo, Tae-Soo; Serabyn, Eugene; Suenaga, Takuya; Suto, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    A high angular resolution near-infrared image that shows the intensity of polarization for the GG Tau A binary system was obtained with the Subaru Telescope. The image shows a circumbinary disk scattering the light from the central binary. The azimuthal profile of the intensity of polarization for the circumbinary disk is roughly reproduced by a simple disk model with the Henyey-Greenstein phase function and the Rayleigh function, indicating there are small dust grains at the surface of the disk. Combined with a previous observation of the circumbinary disk, our image indicates that the gap structure in the circumbinary disk orbits counterclockwise, but material in the disk orbits clockwise. We propose that there is a shadow caused by material located between the central binary and the circumbinary disk. The separations and position angles of the stellar components of the binary in the past 20 yr are consistent with the binary orbit with a = 33.4 AU and e = 0.34.

  13. Lactobacillus GG and Tributyrin Supplementation Reduce Antibiotic-Induced Intestinal Injury

    PubMed Central

    Cresci, Gail; Nagy, Laura E.; Ganapathy, Vadivel

    2013-01-01

    Background Antibiotic therapy negatively alters the gut microbiota. Lactobacillus GG (LGG) decreases antibiotic-associated diarrhea (AAD) symptoms, but the mechanisms are unknown. Butyrate has beneficial effects on gut health. Altered intestinal gene expression occurs in the absence of gut microbiota. We hypothesized that antibiotic-induced changes in gut microbiota reduce butyrate production, varying genes involved with gut barrier integrity and water and electrolyte absorption, lending to AAD, and that simultaneous supplementation with LGG and/or tributyrin would prevent these changes. Methods C57BL/6 mice aged 6–8 weeks received a chow diet while divided into 8 treatment groups (± saline, ± LGG, ± tributyrin, or both). Mice received treatments orally for 7 days with ± broad-spectrum antibiotics. Water intake was recorded daily and body weight was measured. Intestine tissue samples were obtained and analyzed for expression of genes and proteins involved with water and electrolyte absorption, butyrate transport, and gut integrity via polymerase chain reaction and immunohistochemistry. Results Antibiotics decreased messenger RNA (mRNA) expression (butyrate transporter and receptor, Na+/H+ exchanger, Cl−/HCO3−, and a water channel) and protein expression (butyrate transporter, Na+/H+ exchanger, and tight junction proteins) in the intestinal tract. LGG and/or tributyrin supplementation maintained intestinal mRNA expression to that of the control animals, and tributyrin maintained intestinal protein intensity expression to that of control animals. Conclusion Broad-spectrum antibiotics decrease expression of anion exchangers, butyrate transporter and receptor, and tight junction proteins in mouse intestine. Simultaneous oral supplementation with LGG and/or tributyrin minimizes these losses. Optimizing intestinal health with LGG and/or tributyrin may offer a preventative therapy for AAD. PMID:23630018

  14. Study of the CP-violating effects with gg → Η → τ{sup +}τ{sup –} process

    SciTech Connect

    Belyaev, N. L. Konoplich, R. V.

    2015-12-15

    Study of the gg → Η → τ{sup +}τ{sup –} process was performed at Monte Carlo level within the framework of searching for CP-violating effects. The sensitivity of chosen observables to CP-parity of the Higgs boson was demonstrated for hadronic 1-prong τ decays (τ{sup ±} → π{sup ±}, ρ{sup ±}). Monte Carlo samples for the gg → Η → τ{sup +}τ{sup -} process were generated including the parton hadronisation to final state particles. This generation was performed for the Standard Model Higgs boson, the pseudoscalar Higgs boson, the Z → τ{sup +}τ{sup –} background, and mixed CP-states of the Higgs boson.

  15. Process gg{yields}h{sub 0}{yields}{gamma}{gamma} in the Lee-Wick standard model

    SciTech Connect

    Krauss, F.; Underwood, T. E. J.; Zwicky, R.

    2008-01-01

    The process gg{yields}h{sub 0}{yields}{gamma}{gamma} is studied in the Lee-Wick extension of the standard model (LWSM) proposed by Grinstein, O'Connell, and Wise. In this model, negative norm partners for each SM field are introduced with the aim to cancel quadratic divergences in the Higgs mass. All sectors of the model relevant to gg{yields}h{sub 0}{yields}{gamma}{gamma} are diagonalized and results are commented on from the perspective of both the Lee-Wick and higher-derivative formalisms. Deviations from the SM rate for gg{yields}h{sub 0} are found to be of the order of 15%-5% for Lee-Wick masses in the range 500-1000 GeV. Effects on the rate for h{sub 0}{yields}{gamma}{gamma} are smaller, of the order of 5%-1% for Lee-Wick masses in the same range. These comparatively small changes may well provide a means of distinguishing the LWSM from other models such as universal extra dimensions where same-spin partners to standard model fields also appear. Corrections to determinations of Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa (CKM) elements |V{sub t(b,s,d)}| are also considered and are shown to be positive, allowing the possibility of measuring a CKM element larger than unity, a characteristic signature of the ghostlike nature of the Lee-Wick fields.

  16. Is the CCR5-59029-G/G genotype a protective factor for cardiomyopathy in Chagas disease?

    PubMed

    Fernández-Mestre, M T; Montagnani, S; Layrisse, Z

    2004-07-01

    Investigated were two CCR5 gene polymorphisms, the CCR5 Delta 32 deletion and the pCCR5 59029 A-->G promoter point mutation, in 107 ethnically mixed Venezuelan patients serologically positive for Trypanosoma cruzi (34 asymptomatic, 38 arrhythmic, 35 cardiomyopathic). No difference in the distribution of CCR5 Delta 32 among asymptomatic and symptomatic patients was found. We have observed an increase of the 59029-G phenotype among asymptomatic compared with symptomatic chagasic patients (68% vs. 58%), in agreement with previously reported data (57% vs. 31%). This frequency difference, although not statistically significant, is more marked when the 59029-G allele is present in homozygous form. However, a similar distribution of the G/G genotype is present among asymptomatic patients and patients with heart failure. Because it has been reported that the 59029G/G genotype associates with lower CCR5 expression, 37% of our T. cruzi-infected patients with heart failure are genetically predisposed to express low levels of CCR5 on the surface of CD8(+) T cells, contrary to what would be expected if an inflammatory response is required for severe cardiac damage. If confirmed, the possible protection that might be conferred by the G/G genotype may be due to the existence of other genes in linkage disequilibria.

  17. Effects of probiotic drop containing Lactobacillus rhamnosus, Bifidobacterium infantis, and Lactobacillus reuteri on salivary Streptococcus mutans and Lactobacillus levels

    PubMed Central

    Tehrani, Maryam Hajnorouzali; Akhlaghi, Najmeh; Talebian, Leila; Emami, Jaber; Keyhani, Siamak Etzad

    2016-01-01

    Aims: The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of a probiotic drop containing Lactobacillus rhamnosus, Bifidobacterium infantis, and Lactobacillus reuteri on salivary counts of Streptococcus mutans (SM) and Lactobacillus (LB) in children 3–6 years of age. Settings and Design: Sixty-one healthy children were randomly allocated into two parallel blocks in this double-blind, randomized controlled trial (IRCT2014120320202N1) from May to June 2015. Subjects and Methods: Finally 53 participants consumed five drops of placebo (n = 23) or probiotic (n = 30) every night for 2 weeks. Before intervention and 1 day after completion of the intervention, unstimulated salivary samples were collected, and microbiologic evaluations were carried out. Statistical Analysis: Data were analyzed with descriptive statistical methods Wilcoxon signed ranks, Mann–Whitney, and logistic regression. Results: SM level decreased significantly in probiotic group after intervention (P = 0.045), and there were significant differences in salivary SM counts after intervention between two groups (P = 0.04). In probiotic group, LB counts decreased significantly after intervention (P = 0.048); however, there were no significant differences between two groups (P = 0.216). Conclusions: Use of this probiotic drop decreased salivary counts of SM; however, LB counts did not change. In addition, use of the drop in children with higher salivary counts appeared to be more effective. PMID:27994413

  18. The use of flow cytometry to accurately ascertain total and viable counts of Lactobacillus rhamnosus in chocolate.

    PubMed

    Raymond, Yves; Champagne, Claude P

    2015-04-01

    The goals of this study were to evaluate the precision and accuracy of flow cytometry (FC) methodologies in the evaluation of populations of probiotic bacteria (Lactobacillus rhamnosus R0011) in two commercial dried forms, and ascertain the challenges in enumerating them in a chocolate matrix. FC analyses of total (FC(T)) and viable (FC(V)) counts in liquid or dried cultures were almost two times more precise (reproducible) than traditional direct microscopic counts (DCM) or colony forming units (CFU). With FC, it was possible to ascertain low levels of dead cells (FC(D)) in fresh cultures, which is not possible with traditional CFU and DMC methodologies. There was no interference of chocolate solids on FC counts of probiotics when inoculation was above 10(7) bacteria per g. Addition of probiotics in chocolate at 40 °C resulted in a 37% loss in viable cells. Blending of the probiotic powder into chocolate was not uniform which raised a concern that the precision of viable counts could suffer. FCT data can serve to identify the correct inoculation level of a sample, and viable counts (FCV or CFU) can subsequently be better interpreted.

  19. Probiotic cheese containing Lactobacillus rhamnosus HN001 and Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM® modifies subpopulations of fecal lactobacilli and Clostridium difficile in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Lahtinen, Sampo J; Forssten, Sofia; Aakko, Juhani; Granlund, Linda; Rautonen, Nina; Salminen, Seppo; Viitanen, Matti; Ouwehand, Arthur C

    2012-02-01

    Aging is associated with alterations in the intestinal microbiota and with immunosenescence. Probiotics have the potential to modify a selected part of the intestinal microbiota as well as improve immune functions and may, therefore, be particularly beneficial to elderly consumers. In this randomized, controlled cross-over clinical trial, we assessed the effects of a probiotic cheese containing Lactobacillus rhamnosus HN001 and Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM on the intestinal microbiota and fecal immune markers of 31 elderly volunteers and compared these effects with the administration of the same cheese without probiotics. The probiotic cheese was found to increase the number of L. rhamnosus and L. acidophilus NCFM in the feces, suggesting the survival of the strains during the gastrointestinal transit. Importantly, probiotic cheese administration was associated with a trend towards lower counts of Clostridium difficile in the elderly, as compared with the run-in period with the plain cheese. The effect was statistically significant in the subpopulation of the elderly who harbored C. difficile at the start of the study. The probiotic cheese was not found to significantly alter the levels of the major microbial groups, suggesting that the microbial changes conferred by the probiotic cheese were limited to specific bacterial groups. Despite that the administration of the probiotic cheese to the study population has earlier been shown to significantly improve the innate immunity of the elders, we did not observe measurable changes in the fecal immune IgA concentrations. No increase in fecal calprotectin and β-defensin concentrations suggests that the probiotic treatment did not affect intestinal inflammatory markers. In conclusion, the administration of probiotic cheese containing L. rhamnosus HN001 and L. acidophilus NCFM, was associated with specific changes in the intestinal microbiota, mainly affecting specific subpopulations of intestinal lactobacilli and C

  20. Effects of Lactobacillus paracasei CNCM I-4034, Bifidobacterium breve CNCM I-4035 and Lactobacillus rhamnosus CNCM I-4036 on Hepatic Steatosis in Zucker Rats

    PubMed Central

    Plaza-Diaz, Julio; Gomez-Llorente, Carolina; Abadia-Molina, Francisco; Saez-Lara, Maria Jose; Campaña-Martin, Laura; Muñoz-Quezada, Sergio; Romero, Fernando; Gil, Angel; Fontana, Luis

    2014-01-01

    We have previously described the safety and immunomodulatory effects of Lactobacillus paracasei CNCM I-4034, Bifidobacterium breve CNCM I-4035 and Lactobacillus rhamnosus CNCM I-4036 in healthy volunteers. The scope of this work was to evaluate the effects of these probiotic strains on the hepatic steatosis of obese rats. We used the Zucker rat as a genetic model of obesity. Zucker-Leprfa/fa rats received one of three probiotic strains, a mixture of L. paracasei CNCM I-4034 and B. breve CNCM I-4035, or a placebo for 30 days. An additional group of Zucker-lean+/fa rats received a placebo for 30 days. No alterations in intestinal histology, in the epithelial, lamina propria, muscular layers of the ileal or colonic mucosa, or the submucosae, were observed in any of the experimental groups. Triacylglycerol content decreased in the liver of Zucker-Leprfa/fa rats that were fed L. rhamnosus, B. breve, or the mixture of B. breve and L. paracasei. Likewise, the area corresponding to neutral lipids was significantly smaller in the liver of all four groups of Zucker-Leprfa/fa rats that received probiotics than in rats fed the placebo. Zucker-Leprfa/fa rats exhibited significantly greater serum LPS levels than Zucker-lean+/fa rats upon administration of placebo for 30 days. In contrast, all four groups of obese Zucker-Leprfa/fa rats that received LAB strains exhibited serum LPS concentrations similar to those of Zucker-lean+/fa rats. Serum TNF-α levels decreased in the Zucker-Leprfa/fa rats that received B. breve, L. rhamnosus, or the mixture, whereas L. paracasei feeding decreased IL-6 levels in the serum of Zucker-Leprfa/fa rats. In conclusion, the probiotic strains reduced hepatic steatosis in part by lowering serum LPS, and had an anti-inflammatory effect in obese Zucker rats. PMID:24852284

  1. An epichlorohydrin-crosslinked semi-interpenetrating GG-PEO network as a xerogel matrix for sustained release of sulpiride.

    PubMed

    Hoosain, Famida G; Choonara, Yahya E; Kumar, Pradeep; Tomar, Lomas K; Tyagi, Charu; du Toit, Lisa C; Pillay, Viness

    2014-10-01

    The current study involved the development of a novel sustained release crosslinked semi-IPN xerogel matrix tablet prepared by chemical crosslinking of poly(ethylene) oxide (PEO) and gellan gum (GG) employing epichlorohydrin (EPI) as crosslinker. A Box-Behnken design was employed for the statistical optimization of the matrix system to ascertain the ideal combination of native polymeric and crosslinking agents. Characterization studies were performed by employing standard polymer characterization techniques such as Fourier transform infrared spectrometry, differential scanning calorimetry, and scanning electron microscopy. Formulated matrix tablets displayed zero-order release kinetics, extending over 24 h. The mechanism of drug release was primarily by swelling and surface erosion. Crosslinked semi-IPN xerogel matrix tablets were compared to non-crosslinked polymer blends; results from the study conducted showed that the physiochemical properties of the PEO and GG were sufficiently modified to allow for sustained release of sulpiride with a 100% drug release at 24 h in a controlled manner as compared to non-crosslinked formulations which displayed further release beyond the test period. Crosslinked formulations displayed water uptake between 450 and 500% indicating a controlled rate of swelling and erosion allowing for sustained release. Surface morphology of the crosslinked system depicted a porous structure formed by interpenetrating networks of polymers, allowing for a greater degree of controlled penetration into the system affording it the ability to sustain drug release. Therefore, conclusively, based on the study performed, crosslinked PEO-GG allows for the sustained release of sulpiride from a hydrophilic semi-IPN xerogel matrix system.

  2. Variable-coefficient discrete (GG)-expansion method for nonlinear differential-difference equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Bo; He, Yinnian; Wei, Leilei; Wang, Shaoli

    2011-09-01

    In this Letter, a variable-coefficient discrete (GG)-expansion method is proposed to seek new and more general exact solutions of nonlinear differential-difference equations. Being concise and straightforward, this method is applied to the (2+1)-dimension Toda equation. As a result, many new and more general exact solutions are obtained including hyperbolic function solutions, trigonometric function solutions and rational solutions. It is shown that the proposed method provides a very effective and powerful mathematical tool for solving a great many nonlinear differential-difference equations in mathematical physics.

  3. Altered Transcription of Murine Genes Induced in the Small Bowel by Administration of Probiotic Strain Lactobacillus rhamnosus HN001

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Corinda; Lawley, Blair; Loach, Diane; Gould, Maree; Dunn, Amy C.; McLellan, Alexander D.; Black, Michael A.; McNoe, Les; Dekker, James; Gopal, Pramod; Collett, Michael A.

    2014-01-01

    Lactobacillus rhamnosus HN001 is a probiotic strain reported to increase resistance to epithelium-adherent and -invasive intestinal pathogens in experimental animals. To increase understanding of the relationship between strain HN001 and the bowel, transcription of selected genes in the mucosa of the murine small bowel was measured. Mice previously naive to lactobacilli (Lactobacillus-free mice) were examined after daily exposure to HN001 in drinking water. Comparisons were made to results from matched Lactobacillus-free mice. Infant and adult mice were investigated to provide a temporal view of gene expression in response to exposure to HN001. Genes sgk1, angptl4, and hspa1b, associated with the apoptosis pathway, were selected for investigation by reverse transcription-quantitative PCR on the basis of a preliminary duodenal DNA microarray screen. Normalized to gapdh gene transcription, these three genes were upregulated after 6 to 10 days exposure of adult mice to HN001. Angptl4 was shown by immunofluorescence to be upregulated in duodenal epithelial cells of mucosal samples. Epithelial cell migration was faster in HN001-exposed mice than in the Lactobacillus-free controls. Transcriptional responses in infant mice differed according to bowel region and age. For example, sgk1 was upregulated in duodenal, jejunal, and ileal mucosa of mice less than 25 days old, whereas angptl4 and hspa1b were upregulated at 10 days in the duodenum but downregulated in the jejunal mucosa until mice were 25 days old. Overall, the results provide links between a probiotic strain, mucosal gene expression, and host phenotype, which may be useful in delineating mechanisms of probiotic action. PMID:24584241

  4. Association of TNF-α-(308(GG)), IL-10(-819(TT)), IL-10(-1082(GG)) and IL-1R1(+1970(CC)) genotypes with the susceptibility and progression of leprosy in North Indian population.

    PubMed

    Tarique, Mohd; Naqvi, Raza Ali; Santosh, K V; Kamal, Vineet Kumar; Khanna, Neena; Rao, D N

    2015-05-01

    Leprosy is an infectious disease caused by M. leprae. We analyzed 48 cytokine polymorphisms in 13 (pro as well as anti-inflammatory) cytokine genes using PCR-SSP assay in 102 leprosy patients and 120 healthy controls with intent to find out a link between cytokine polymorphisms and disease susceptibility. TNF-α (-308) GG, IL-10 (-819) TT, IL-10 (-1082) GG and IL1R (+1970) CC genotypes are found to be predominant (p=0.01, p=0.02, p=0.0001 and p=0.001, respectively) in both tuberculoid as well as lepromatous leprosy patients. This observation suggests these genotypes as play the central role(s) in the progression of disease. CBA assay demonstrates the varied serum concentration of these cytokines with respect to their genotypes. The above genotypes appeared as high producer genotypes in our study. Even in presence of high produce genotypes, TNF-α level are found to be affected/masked by the presence of IL-10 in leprosy patients. Expressional masking of TNF-α is associated with the expression of IL-10 in these patients. This is one the negative impact of SNP-SNP interaction in leprosy patients. Therefore, we can conclude that cytokine gene polymorphisms determine the predisposition to the leprosy progression.

  5. Synaptic protein ubiquitination in rat brain revealed by antibody-based ubiquitome analysis.

    PubMed

    Na, Chan Hyun; Jones, Drew R; Yang, Yanling; Wang, Xusheng; Xu, Yanji; Peng, Junmin

    2012-09-07

    Protein ubiquitination is an essential post-translational modification regulating neurodevelopment, synaptic plasticity, learning, and memory, and its dysregulation contributes to the pathogenesis of neurological diseases. Here we report a systematic analysis of ubiquitinated proteome (ubiquitome) in rat brain using a newly developed monoclonal antibody that recognizes the diglycine tag on lysine residues in trypsinized peptides (K-GG peptides). Initial antibody specificity analysis showed that the antibody can distinguish K-GG peptides from linear GG peptides or pseudo K-GG peptides derived from iodoacetamide. To evaluate the false discovery rate of K-GG peptide matches during database search, we introduced a null experiment using bacterial lysate that contains no such peptides. The brain ubiquitome was then analyzed by this antibody enrichment with or without strong cation exchange (SCX) prefractionation. During SCX chromatography, although the vast majority of K-GG peptides were detected in the fractions containing at least three positive charged peptides, specific K-GG peptides with two positive charges (e.g., protein N-terminal acetylated and C-terminal non-K/R peptides) were also identified in early fractions. The reliability of C-terminal K-GG peptides was also extensively investigated. Finally, we collected a data set of 1786 K-GG sites on 2064 peptides in 921 proteins and estimated their abundance by spectral counting. The study reveals a wide range of ubiquitination events on key components in presynaptic region (e.g., Bassoon, NSF, SNAP25, synapsin, synaptotagmin, and syntaxin) and postsynaptic density (e.g., PSD-95, GKAP, CaMKII, as well as receptors for NMDA, AMPA, GABA, serotonin, and acetylcholine). We also determined ubiquitination sites on amyloid precursor protein and alpha synuclein that are thought to be causative agents in Alzhermer's and Parkinson's disorders, respectively. As K-GG peptides can also be produced from Nedd8 or ISG15 modified

  6. QCD Corrections to e{sup +}e{sup -}{yields}J/{psi}+gg at B Factories

    SciTech Connect

    Ma Yanqing; Zhang Yujie; Chao Kuangta

    2009-04-24

    In heavy quarkonium production, the measured ratio R{sub cc}={sigma}[J/{psi}+cc+X]/{sigma}[J/{psi}+X] at B factories is much larger than existing theoretical predictions. To clarify this discrepancy, in nonrelativistic QCD we find the next-to-leading-order (NLO) QCD correction to e{sup +}e{sup -}{yields}J/{psi}+gg can enhance the cross section by about 20%. Together with the calculated NLO result for e{sup +}e{sup -}{yields}J/{psi}+cc, we show that the NLO corrections can significantly improve the fit to the ratio R{sub cc}. The effects of leading logarithm resummation near the end point on the J/{psi} momentum distribution and total cross section are also considered. Comparison of the calculated cross section for e{sup +}e{sup -}{yields}J/{psi}+gg with the observed cross section for e{sup +}e{sup -}{yields}J/{psi}+non-(cc) is expected to provide unique information on the issue of color-octet contributions.

  7. Galileo Galilei (gg) Space Test of the Weak Equivalence Principle to 10-17: the Key Features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nobili, A. M.

    2014-01-01

    Galileo Galilei (GG) is a small satellite to fly in a low altitude, near circular, Sun-synchronous orbit around the Earth with the goal of testing in its field the weak equivalence principle to 10-17. It would improve the best tests with slowly rotating torsion balances by four orders of magnitude. The sensor is a differential accelerometer with two concentric coaxial test cylinders of different composition rotating together with the whole satellite around the symmetry axis, and weakly coupled in the plane perpendicular to it as a 2D mechanical oscillator. One axis rotation at 1 Hz, to be provided once and for all at launch, stabilizes the satellite and up-converts the signal from the low orbital frequency of ≃1.7 · 10-4 Hz to the much higher 1 Hz rotation frequency, needing neither motor nor bearings (passive rotation). For test masses suspended in orbit the major gain is a signal from Earth almost 500 times stronger than for the same masses suspended on ground. In GG both the sensor and the spacecraft are designed to fully exploit the properties of space in order to push the test four orders of magnitude better than slowly rotating torsion balances on ground.

  8. Metabolic and proteomic adaptation of Lactobacillus rhamnosus strains during growth under cheese-like environmental conditions compared to de Man, Rogosa, and Sharpe medium.

    PubMed

    Bove, Claudio Giorgio; De Angelis, Maria; Gatti, Monica; Calasso, Maria; Neviani, Erasmo; Gobbetti, Marco

    2012-11-01

    The aim of this study was to demonstrate the metabolic and proteomic adaptation of Lactobacillus rhamnosus strains, which were isolated at different stages of Parmigiano Reggiano cheese ripening. Compared to de Man, Rogosa, and Sharpe (MRS) broth, cultivation under cheese-like conditions (cheese broth, CB) increased the number of free amino acids used as carbon sources. Compared with growth on MRS or pasteurized and microfiltrated milk, all strains cultivated in CB showed a low synthesis of d,l-lactic acid and elevated levels of acetic acid. The proteomic maps of the five representative strains, showing different metabolic traits, were comparatively determined after growth on MRS and CB media. The amount of intracellular and cell-associated proteins was affected by culture conditions and diversity between strains, depending on their time of isolation. Protein spots showing decreased (62 spots) or increased (59 spot) amounts during growth on CB were identified using MALDI-TOF-MS/MS or LC-nano-ESI-MS/MS. Compared with cultivation on MRS broth, the L. rhamnosus strains cultivated under cheese-like conditions had modified amounts of some proteins responsible for protein biosynthesis, nucleotide, and carbohydrate metabolisms, the glycolysis pathway, proteolytic activity, cell wall, and exopolysaccharide biosynthesis, cell regulation, amino acid, and citrate metabolism, oxidation/reduction processes, and stress responses.

  9. The optimization of l-lactic acid production from sweet sorghum juice by mixed fermentation of Bacillus coagulans and Lactobacillus rhamnosus under unsterile conditions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yong; Chen, Changjing; Cai, Di; Wang, Zheng; Qin, Peiyong; Tan, Tianwei

    2016-10-01

    The cost reduction of raw material and sterilization could increase the economic feasibility of l-lactic acid fermentation, and the development of an cost-effective and efficient process is highly desired. To improve the efficiency of open fermentation by Lactobacillus rhamnosus based on sweet sorghum juice (SSJ) and to overcome sucrose utilization deficiency of Bacillus coagulans, a mixed fermentation was developed. Besides, the optimization of pH, sugar concentration and fermentation medium were also studied. Under the condition of mixed fermentation and controlled pH, a higher yield of 96.3% was achieved, compared to that (68.8%) in sole Lactobacillus rhamnosus fermentation. With an optimized sugar concentration and a stepwise-controlled pH, the l-lactic acid titer, yield and productivity reached 121gL(-1), 94.6% and 2.18gL(-1)h(-1), respectively. Furthermore, corn steep powder (CSP) as a cheap source of nitrogen and salts was proved to be an efficient supplement to SSJ in this process.

  10. The effect of American cranberry (Vaccinium macrocarpon) constituents on the growth inhibition, membrane integrity, and injury of Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Listeria monocytogenes in comparison to Lactobacillus rhamnosus.

    PubMed

    Lacombe, Alison; McGivney, Christine; Tadepalli, Shravani; Sun, Xiaohong; Wu, Vivian C H

    2013-06-01

    The antimicrobial properties of the American cranberry were studied against Escherichia coli O157:H7, Listeria monocytogenes, and Lactobacillus rhamnosus to determine the effects on growth inhibition, membrane permeability, and injury. Cranberry powder was separated using a C-18 Sep-Pak cartridge into sugars plus organic acids (F1), monomeric phenolics (F2), and anthocyanins plus proanthocyanidins (F3). Fraction 3 was further separated into anthocyanins (F4) and proanthocyanidins (F5) using an LH-20 Sephadex column. Each fraction was diluted in the brain heart infusion (BHI) broth to determine the minimum inhibitory/bactericidal concentrations (MIC/MBC). L. monocytogenes was the most susceptible to cranberry fraction treatment with the lowest MIC/MBC for each treatment, followed by E. coli O157:H7 and L. rhamnosus. Membrane permeability and potential was studied using LIVE/DEAD viability assay and using Bis (1, 3-dibutylbarbituric acid) trimethine oxonol (DiBAC4), respectively. L. rhamnosus demonstrated the highest permeability followed by E. coli O157:H7, and L. monocytogenes. L. rhamnosus demonstrated the highest recovery followed by E. coli O157:H7, and L. monocytogenes. Each cranberry fraction demonstrated membrane hyperpolarization at their native pH, while F2, F3, and F5 demonstrated membrane depolarization at neutral pH. With this knowledge cranberry compounds may be used to prevent maladies and potentially substitute for synthetic preservatives and antibiotics.

  11. The CYP1B1_1358_GG genotype is associated with estrogen receptor-negative breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Justenhoven, Christina; Pierl, Christiane B; Haas, Susanne; Fischer, Hans-Peter; Baisch, Christian; Hamann, Ute; Harth, Volker; Pesch, Beate; Brüning, Thomas; Vollmert, Caren; Illig, Thomas; Dippon, Jürgen; Ko, Yon-Dschun; Brauch, Hiltrud

    2008-09-01

    Cytochrome P450 1B1 (CYP1B1) is a major enzyme in the initial catabolic step of estradiol (E2) metabolism and belongs to the multitude of genes regulated by the estrogen receptor alpha (ERalpha). The common non-synonymous polymorphisms CYP1B1_1358_A>G and CYP1B1_1294_C>G increase CYP1B1 enzymatic activity. Given a relationship between CYP1B1 and breast tumor E2 level as well as E2 level and breast tumor ERalpha expression it is of interest to know whether CYP1B1 polymorphisms have an impact on the ERalpha status of breast cancer. We genotyped the GENICA population-based breast cancer case-control collection (1,021 cases, 1,015 controls) by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) and investigated in cases the association between genotypes and tumor ERalpha status (739 ERalpha positive cases; 212 ERalpha negative cases) by logistic regression. We observed a significant association between the homozygous variant CYP1B1_1358_GG genotype and negative ERalpha status (P = 0.005; OR 2.82, 95% CI: 1.37-5.82) with a highly significant Ptrend for CYP1B1_1358_A>G and negative ERalpha status (P = 0.003). We also observed an association of CYP1B1_1358_GG and negative PR status (P = 0.015; OR 2.36, 95% CI: 1.18-4.70) and a Ptrend of 0.111 for CYP1B1_1358_A>G and negative progesterone receptor (PR) status. We conclude that the CYP1B1_1358_A>G polymorphism has an impact on ERalpha status in breast cancer in that the CYP1B1_1358_GG genotype known to encode higher CYP1B1 activity is associated with ERalpha negativity.

  12. Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Profiles of Cytokine, Chemokine, and Growth Factors Produced by Human Decidual Cells Are Altered by Lactobacillus rhamnosus GR-1 Supernatant

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wei; Yang, Siwen; Kim, Sung O.; Reid, Gregor; Challis, John R. G.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effects of bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and Lactobacillus rhamnosus GR-1 supernatant (GR-1SN) on secretion profiles of cytokines, chemokines, and growth factors from primary cultures of human decidual cells. Lipopolysaccharide significantly increased the output of proinflammatory cytokines (interleukin [IL]-1B, IL-2, IL-6, IL-12p70, IL-15, IL-17A, interferon gamma [IFN-γ], and tumor necrosis factor [TNF]); anti-inflammatory cytokines (IL-1RN, IL-4, IL-9, and IL-10); chemokines (IL-8, eotaxin, IFN-inducible protein 10 [IP-10], monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 [MCP-1], macrophage inflammatory protein-1α [MIP-1α], macrophage inflammatory protein-1β [MIP-1β], and regulated on activation normal T cell expressed and secreted [RANTES]); and growth factors (granulocyte colony-stimulating factor [CSF] 3, CSF-2, and vascular endothelial growth factor A [VEGFA]). Lactobacillus rhamnosus GR-1SN alone significantly increased CSF-3, MIP-1α MIP-1β, and RANTES but decreased IL-15 and IP-10 output. The GR-1SN also significantly or partially reduced LPS-induced proinflammatory cytokines TNF, IFN-γ, IL-1β, IL-2 IL-6, IL-12p70, IL-15, IL-17, and IP-10; partially reduced LPS-induced anti-inflammatory cytokines IL-1RN, IL-4 and IL-10, and LPS-induced VEGFA output but did not affect CSF-3, MIP-1α, MIP-1β, MCP-1, IL-8, and IL-9. Our results demonstrate that GR-1SN attenuates the inflammatory responses to LPS by human decidual cells, suggesting its potential role in ameliorating intrauterine infection. PMID:24429676

  13. Effects of dietary supplementation of Lactobacillus rhamnosus or/and Lactococcus lactis on the growth, gut microbiota and immune responses of red sea bream, Pagrus major.

    PubMed

    Dawood, Mahmoud A O; Koshio, Shunsuke; Ishikawa, Manabu; Yokoyama, Saichiro; El Basuini, Mohammed F; Hossain, Md Sakhawat; Nhu, Truong H; Dossou, Serge; Moss, Amina S

    2016-02-01

    Pagrus major fingerlings (3·29 ± 0·02 g) were fed with basal diet (control) supplemented with Lactobacillus rhamnosus (LR), Lactococcus lactis (LL), and L. rhamnosus + L. lactis (LR + LL) at 10(6) cell g(-1) feed for 56 days. Feeding a mixture of LR and LL significantly increased feed utilization (FER and PER), intestine lactic acid bacteria (LAB) count, plasma total protein, alternative complement pathway (ACP), peroxidase, and mucus secretion compared with the other groups (P < 0.05). Serum lysozyme activity (LZY) significantly increased in LR + LL when compared with the control group. Additionally, fish fed the LR + LL diet showed a higher growth performance (Fn wt, WG, and SGR) and protein digestibility than the groups fed an individual LR or the control diet. Superoxide dismutase (SOD) significantly increased in LR and LR + LL groups when compared with the other groups. Moreover, the fish fed LR or LL had better improvement (P < 0.05) in growth, feed utilization, body protein and lipid contents, digestibility coefficients (dry matter, protein, and lipid), protease activity, total intestine and LAB counts, hematocrit, total plasma protein, biological antioxidant potential, ACP, serum and mucus LZY and bactericidal activities, peroxidase, SOD, and mucus secretion than the control group. Interestingly, fish fed diets with LR + LL showed significantly lower total cholesterol and triglycerides when compared with the other groups (P < 0.05). These data strongly suggest that a mixture of LR and LL probiotics may serve as a healthy immunostimulating feed additive in red sea bream aquaculture.

  14. Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Profiles of Cytokine, Chemokine, and Growth Factors Produced by Human Decidual Cells Are Altered by Lactobacillus rhamnosus GR-1 Supernatant.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Yang, Siwen; Kim, Sung O; Reid, Gregor; Challis, John R G; Bocking, Alan D

    2014-07-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effects of bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and Lactobacillus rhamnosus GR-1 supernatant (GR-1SN) on secretion profiles of cytokines, chemokines, and growth factors from primary cultures of human decidual cells. Lipopolysaccharide significantly increased the output of proinflammatory cytokines (interleukin [IL]-1B, IL-2, IL-6, IL-12p70, IL-15, IL-17A, interferon gamma [IFN-γ], and tumor necrosis factor [TNF]); anti-inflammatory cytokines (IL-1RN, IL-4, IL-9, and IL-10); chemokines (IL-8, eotaxin, IFN-inducible protein 10 [IP-10], monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 [MCP-1], macrophage inflammatory protein-1α [MIP-1α], macrophage inflammatory protein-1β [MIP-1β], and regulated on activation normal T cell expressed and secreted [RANTES]); and growth factors (granulocyte colony-stimulating factor [CSF] 3, CSF-2, and vascular endothelial growth factor A [VEGFA]). Lactobacillus rhamnosus GR-1SN alone significantly increased CSF-3, MIP-1α MIP-1β, and RANTES but decreased IL-15 and IP-10 output. The GR-1SN also significantly or partially reduced LPS-induced proinflammatory cytokines TNF, IFN-γ, IL-1β, IL-2 IL-6, IL-12p70, IL-15, IL-17, and IP-10; partially reduced LPS-induced anti-inflammatory cytokines IL-1RN, IL-4 and IL-10, and LPS-induced VEGFA output but did not affect CSF-3, MIP-1α, MIP-1β, MCP-1, IL-8, and IL-9. Our results demonstrate that GR-1SN attenuates the inflammatory responses to LPS by human decidual cells, suggesting its potential role in ameliorating intrauterine infection.

  15. Adhesion Potential of Intestinal Microbes Predicted by Physico-Chemical Characterization Methods

    PubMed Central

    Niederberger, Tobias; Fischer, Peter; Rühs, Patrick Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial adhesion to epithelial surfaces affects retention time in the human gastro-intestinal tract and therefore significantly contributes to interactions between bacteria and their hosts. Bacterial adhesion among other factors is strongly influenced by physico-chemical factors. The accurate quantification of these physico-chemical factors in adhesion is however limited by the available measuring techniques. We evaluated surface charge, interfacial rheology and tensiometry (interfacial tension) as novel approaches to quantify these interactions and evaluated their biological significance via an adhesion assay using intestinal epithelial surface molecules (IESM) for a set of model organisms present in the human gastrointestinal tract. Strain pairs of Lactobacillus plantarum WCFS1 with its sortase knockout mutant Lb. plantarum NZ7114 and Lb. rhamnosus GG with Lb. rhamnosus DSM 20021T were used with Enterococcus faecalis JH2-2 as control organism. Intra-species comparison revealed significantly higher abilities for Lb. plantarum WCSF1 and Lb. rhamnosus GG vs. Lb. plantarum NZ7114 and Lb. rhamnosus DSM 20021T to dynamically increase interfacial elasticity (10−2 vs. 10−3 Pa*m) and reduce interfacial tension (32 vs. 38 mN/m). This further correlated for Lb. plantarum WCSF1 and Lb. rhamnosus GG vs. Lb. plantarum NZ7114 and Lb. rhamnosus DSM 20021T with the decrease of relative hydrophobicity (80–85% vs. 57–63%), Zeta potential (-2.9 to -4.5 mV vs. -8.0 to -13.8 mV) and higher relative adhesion capacity to IESM (3.0–5.0 vs 1.5–2.2). Highest adhesion to the IESM collagen I and fibronectin was found for Lb. plantarum WCFS1 (5.0) and E. faecalis JH2-2 (4.2) whereas Lb. rhamnosus GG showed highest adhesion to type II mucus (3.8). Significantly reduced adhesion (2 fold) to the tested IESM was observed for Lb. plantarum NZ7114 and Lb. rhamnosus DSM 20021T corresponding with lower relative hydrophobicity, Zeta potential and abilities to modify interfacial

  16. 30 CFR 580.20 - What must I not do in conducting Geological and Geophysical (G&G) prospecting or scientific...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false What must I not do in conducting Geological and Geophysical (G&G) prospecting or scientific research? 580.20 Section 580.20 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF OCEAN... damage to any mineral resources (in areas leased or not leased); (d) Cause pollution; (e)...

  17. 30 CFR 280.20 - What must I not do in conducting Geological and Geophysical (G&G) prospecting or scientific...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false What must I not do in conducting Geological and Geophysical (G&G) prospecting or scientific research? 280.20 Section 280.20 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF OCEAN... pollution; (e) Disturb archaeological resources; (f) Create hazardous or unsafe conditions; (g)...

  18. 30 CFR 580.20 - What must I not do in conducting Geological and Geophysical (G&G) prospecting or scientific...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false What must I not do in conducting Geological and Geophysical (G&G) prospecting or scientific research? 580.20 Section 580.20 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF OCEAN... damage to any mineral resources (in areas leased or not leased); (d) Cause pollution; (e)...

  19. 30 CFR 580.20 - What must I not do in conducting Geological and Geophysical (G&G) prospecting or scientific...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false What must I not do in conducting Geological and Geophysical (G&G) prospecting or scientific research? 580.20 Section 580.20 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF OCEAN... damage to any mineral resources (in areas leased or not leased); (d) Cause pollution; (e)...

  20. Genome Sequence of Bacteriophage GG32, Which Can Infect both Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium and Escherichia coli O157:H7

    PubMed Central

    Chae, Su-Jin; Kwon, Taesoo; Lee, Sunjin; Kang, Yeon Ho; Chung, Gyung Tae

    2016-01-01

    We report here a new virulent Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium) bacteriophage, GG32, which was isolated from the Guem River in the Republic of Korea. The strain can infect both S. Typhimurium and Escherichia coli (E. coli) O157:H7 and may be a good candidate for a bio-control agent. PMID:27932635

  1. First Measurement of σ(gg → t$\\bar{t}$)/σ(p$\\bar{p}$ → t$\\bar{t}$)

    SciTech Connect

    Alamdari, Shabnaz Pashapour

    2008-01-01

    The work presented here is the first measurement of the fraction of top quark pair production through gluon-gluon fusion. We use an integrated luminosity of 0.96 ± 0.06 fb-1 of p{bar p} collisions at √s of 1.96 TeV collected by the CDF II detector. We select t$\\bar{t}$ candidates by identifying a high-pT lepton candidate, a large missing ET as evidence for a neutrino candidate and at least four high ET jets, one of which has to be identified as originating from a b quark. The challenge is to discriminate between the two production processes with the identical final state, gg → t$\\bar{t}$ and q$\\bar{p}$ → t$\\bar{t}$. We take advantage of the fact that compared to a quark, a gluon is more likely to radiate a low momentum gluon and therefore, one expects a larger number of charged particles with low pT in a process involving more gluons. Given the large uncertainties associated with the modeling of the low pT charged particle multiplicity, a data-driven technique was employed. Using calibration data samples, we show there exists a clear correlation between the observed average number of low pT charged particles and the average number of gluons involved in the production process predicted by Monte Carlo calculations. Given the correlation, one can identify low pT charged particle multiplicity distributions associated with specific average number of gluons. The W + 0 jet sample and dijets sample with leading jet ET in the range of 80-100 GeV are used to find no-gluon and gluon-rich low p{sub T} charged particle multiplicity distributions, respectively. Using these no-gluon and gluon-rich distributions in a likelihood fit, we find the fraction of gluon-rich events in t{bar t} candidates. This fraction has contributions from the signal and background events. Taking into account these contributions and the gg → t$\\bar{t}$ and q$\\bar{q}$ → t

  2. Association of genetic variants in INS (rs689), INSR (rs1799816) and PP1G.G (rs1799999) with type 2 diabetes (T2D): a case-control study in three ethnic groups from North-West India.

    PubMed

    Sokhi, Jasmine; Sikka, Ruhi; Raina, Priyanka; Kaur, Ramandeep; Matharoo, Kawaljit; Arora, Punit; Bhanwer, Ajs

    2016-02-01

    Genetic contributions towards Type 2 diabetes (T2D) have been assessed through association studies across different world populations with inconsistencies. The majority of the T2D susceptibility loci are common across different races or populations but show ethnicity-specific differences. The pathogenesis of T2D involves genetic variants in the candidate genes. The interactions between the genes involved in insulin signaling and secretory pathways are believed to play an important role in determining an individual's susceptibility towards T2D. Therefore, the present study was initiated to examine the differences, if any, in the contribution of polymorphisms towards T2D susceptibility in the background of different ethnic specifications. The present case-control study included a total of 1216 T2D cases and healthy controls from three ethnic groups (Jat Sikhs, Banias and Brahmins) of North-West India. Polymorphisms were selected on the basis of information available in the literature for INS (rs689), INSR (rs1799816) and PP1G.G (rs1799999) in context to T2D. The genotyping was done using PCR-RFLP method. Statistical analysis was done using SPSS 16.0. The analyses revealed that INS (rs689) polymorphism conferred risk towards T2D susceptibility in all the three ethnic groups whereas INSR (rs1799816) polymorphism conferred risk towards T2D in Brahmins only and PP1G.G (rs1799999) polymorphism indicated T2D risk in Jat Sikhs only. Furthermore, interaction analyses indicated the cumulative role of three genetic variants in modulating T2D susceptibility in the three ethnic groups. In conclusion, our results substantiated the evidences for the role of ethnicity in differential susceptibility to T2D in the background of same genetic variants.

  3. Lactobacillus rhamnosus GR-1 Limits Escherichia coli-Induced Inflammatory Responses via Attenuating MyD88-Dependent and MyD88-Independent Pathway Activation in Bovine Endometrial Epithelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Mingchao; Wu, Qiong; Wang, Mengling; Fu, Yunhe; Wang, Jiufeng

    2016-08-01

    Intrauterine Escherichia coli infection after calving reduces fertility and causes major economic losses in the dairy industry. We investigated the protective effect of the probiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus GR-1 on E. coli-induced cell damage and inflammation in primary bovine endometrial epithelial cells (BEECs). L. rhamnosus GR-1 reduced ultrastructure alterations and the percentage of BEECs apoptosis after E. coli challenge. Increased messenger RNA (mRNA) expression of immune response indicators, including pattern recognition receptors (toll-like receptor [TLR]2, TLR4, nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain [NOD]1, and NOD2), inflammasome proteins (NOD-like receptor family member pyrin domain-containing protein 3, apoptosis-associated speck-like protein, and caspase-1), TLR4 downstream adaptor molecules (myeloid differentiation antigen 88 [MyD88], toll-like receptor adaptor molecule 2 [TICAM2]), nuclear transcription factor kB (NF-kB), and the inflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, IL-18, and interferon (IFN)-β, was observed following E. coli challenge. However, these increases were attenuated by L. rhamnosus GR-1 pretreatment. Our data indicate that L. rhamnosus GR-1 ameliorates the E. coli-induced disruption of cellular ultrastructure, subsequently reducing the percentage of BEECs apoptosis and limiting inflammatory responses, partly via attenuation of MyD88-dependent and MyD88-independent pathway activation. Certain probiotics could potentially prevent postpartum uterine diseases in dairy cows, ultimately reducing the use of antibiotics.

  4. Protein-protein interaction and molecular dynamics analysis for identification of novel inhibitors in Burkholderia cepacia GG4.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Money; Chauhan, Rashi; Prasad, Yamuna; Wadhwa, Gulshan; Jain, Chakresh Kumar

    2016-12-01

    The lack of complete treatments and appearance of multiple drug-resistance strains of Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc) are causing an increased risk of lung infections in cystic fibrosis patients. Bcc infection is a big risk to human health and demands an urgent need to identify new therapeutics against these bacteria. Network biology has emerged as one of the prospective hope in identifying novel drug targets and hits. We have applied protein-protein interaction methodology to identify new drug-target candidates (orthologs) in Burkhloderia cepacia GG4, which is an important strain for studying the quorum-sensing phenomena. An evolutionary based ortholog mapping approach has been applied for generating the large scale protein-protein interactions in B. Cepacia. As a case study, one of the identified drug targets; GEM_3202, a NH (3)-dependent NAD synthetase protein has been studied and the potential ligand molecules were screened using the ZINC database. The three dimensional structure (NH (3)-dependent NAD synthetase protein) has been predicted from MODELLERv9.11 tool using multiple PDB templates such as 3DPI, 2PZ8 and 1NSY with sequence identity of 76%, 50% and 50% respectively. The structure has been validated with Ramachandaran plot having 100% residues of NadE in allowed region and overall quality factor of 81.75 using ERRAT tool. High throughput screening and Vina resulted in two potential hits against NadE such as ZINC83103551 and ZINC38008121. These molecules showed lowest binding energy of -5.7kcalmol(-1) and high stability in the binding pockets during molecular dynamics simulation analysis. The similar approach for target identification could be applied for clinical strains of other pathogenic microbes.

  5. Characterization of a probiotic-derived soluble protein which reveals a mechanism of preventive and treatment effects of probiotics on intestinal inflammatory diseases.

    PubMed

    Yan, Fang; Polk, D Brent

    2012-01-01

    The beneficial effects of probiotics have been demonstrated in many diseases, such as inflammatory bowel disease. The known mechanisms for probiotic action include blocking pathogenic bacterial effects, enhancing the innate immunity and decreasing pathogen-induced inflammation, and promoting intestinal epithelial cell survival, barrier function, and protective responses. We purified and cloned a Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG)-derived soluble protein, p40. This protein ameliorated cytokine-induced apoptosis in intestinal epithelial cells through activation of the EGF receptor and its down-stream target, Akt. By using special hydrogel beads to protect p40 from degradation, we showed that p40 reduced intestinal epithelial apoptosis and preserved barrier function in the colon epithelium in an EGF receptor-dependent manner, thereby preventing and treating intestinal inflammation in mouse models of colitis. Further works regarding structural analysis of p40, regulation of EGF receptor activation and immunoregulatory effects by p40 are discussed. These results may provide insights into the clinical application of probiotics for intestinal inflammatory disorders.

  6. Impact of different cryoprotectants on the survival of freeze-dried Lactobacillus rhamnosus and Lactobacillus casei/paracasei during long-term storage.

    PubMed

    Jofré, A; Aymerich, T; Garriga, M

    2015-01-01

    The production of long shelf-life highly concentrated dried probiotic/starter cultures is of paramount importance for the food industry. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the protective effect of glucose, lactose, trehalose, and skim milk applied alone or combined upon the survival of potentially probiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus CTC1679, Lactobacillus casei/paracasei CTC1677 and L. casei/paracasei CTC1678 during freeze-drying and after 39 weeks of storage at 4 and 22 °C. Immediately after freeze-drying, the percentage of survivors was very high (≥ 94%) and only slight differences were observed among strains and cryoprotectants. In contrast, during storage, survival in the dried state depended on the cryoprotectant, temperature and strain. For all the protectants assayed, the stability of the cultures was remarkably higher when stored under refrigeration (4 °C). Under these conditions, skim milk alone or supplemented with trehalose or lactose showed the best performance (reductions ≤ 0.9 log units after 39 weeks of storage). The lowest survival was observed during non-refrigerated storage and with glucose and glucose plus milk; no viable cells left at the end of the storage period. Thus, freeze-drying in the presence of appropriate cryoprotectants allows the production of long shelf-life highly concentrated dried cultures ready for incorporation in high numbers into food products as starter/potential probiotic cultures.

  7. Potential Nociceptive Regulatory Effect of Probiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus PB01 (DSM 14870) on Mechanical Sensitivity in Diet-Induced Obesity Model

    PubMed Central

    Brandsborg, Erik

    2016-01-01

    Treatments for obesity have been shown to reduce pain secondary to weight loss. Intestinal microbiota, as an endogenous factor, influences obesity and pain sensitivity but the effect of oral probiotic supplementation on musculoskeletal pain perception has not been studied systematically. The present study examined the effect of a single daily oral dose (1 × 109 CFU) of probiotics (Lactobacillus rhamnosus PB01, DSM14870) supplement on mechanical pain thresholds in behaving diet-induced obese (DIO) mice and their normal weight (NW) controls. The mice (N = 24, 6-week-old male) were randomly divided into four groups on either standard or high fat diet with and without probiotic supplementation. Both DIO and NW groups with probiotic supplementation maintained an insignificant weight gain while the control groups gained significant weight (P < 0.05). Similarly, both DIO and NW probiotics supplemented groups demonstrated a significantly (P < 0.05) lower sensitivity to mechanical stimulation compared to their corresponding control. The results of this study suggest a protective effect of probiotics on nociception circuits, which propose a direct result of the weight reduction or an indirect result of anti-inflammatory properties of the probiotics. Deciphering the exact underlying mechanism of the weight loss and lowering nociception effect of the probiotic applied in this study require further investigation. PMID:27647980

  8. Fermented milk with probiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus S1K3 (MTCC5957) protects mice from salmonella by enhancing immune and nonimmune protection mechanisms at intestinal mucosal level.

    PubMed

    Kemgang, Tanedjeu Sonfack; Kapila, Suman; Shanmugam, Venkatesa Perumal; Reddi, Srinu; Kapila, Rajeev

    2016-04-01

    We investigated the mechanism by which an Indian indigenous probiotic culture, Lactobacillus rhamnosus S1K3, could overcome the pathogenic strain Salmonella enterica with an emphasis on the response at the intestinal mucosal level after long-term (30days) consumption. S1K3 was able to produce antimicrobial compounds against the pathogens. The probiotic adhered strongly to intestinal epithelium and maintained its integrity in presence of Salmonella through stimulation of tight junction and antimicrobial peptide genes in vitro. Mice prefed for 30days with S1K3-fermented milk exhibited low incidence of pathogenic Salmonella at mucosal and systemic levels. The probiotic induced TLRs transcripts at the Peyer's patches, followed by an increase in the Secretory-IgA in intestinal fluid, the IgA-secreting cells in lamina propria of small intestine and the IgA level in serum. Moreover, S1K3 maintained the protein level of IL-12, increased the IL-4 and reduced the TGF-β level in intestinal fluid/serum at the later stage of infection. All these actions concurred to lower the count of Salmonella in feces, its invasion in spleen, liver and intestine tissues and improved the health status of probiotic-fed group. In view of this performance, S1K3 appears to be a suitable candidate for the development of nutraceutical food.

  9. A multi-wavelength scattered light analysis of the dust grain population in the GG Tau circumbinary ring

    SciTech Connect

    Duchene, G; McCabe, C; Ghez, A; Macintosh, B

    2004-02-04

    We present the first 3.8 {micro}m image of the dusty ring surrounding the young binary system GG Tau, obtained with the W. M. Keck II 10m telescope's adaptive optics system. THis is the longest wavelength at which the ring has been detected in scattered light so far, allowing a multi-wavelength analysis of the scattering proiperties of the dust grains present in this protoplanetary disk in combination with previous, shorter wavelengths, HST images. We find that the scattering phase function of the dust grains in the disk is only weakly dependent on the wavelength. This is inconsistent with dust models inferred from observations of the interstellar medium or dense molecular clouds. In particular, the strongly forward-throwing scattering phase function observed at 3.8 {micro}m implies a significant increase in the population of large ({approx}> 1 {micro}m) grains, which provides direct evidence for grain growth in the ring. However, the grain size distribution required to match the 3.8 {micro}m image of the ring is incompatible with its published 1 {micro}m polarization map, implying that the dust population is not uniform throughout the ring. We also show that our 3.8 {micro}m image of the ring is incompatible with its published 1 {micro}m polarization map, implying that the dust population is not uniform throughout the ring. We also show that our 3.8 {micro}m scattered light image probes a deeper layer of the ring than previous shorter wavelength images, as demonstrated by a shift in the location of the inner edge of the disk's scattered light distribution between 1 and 3.8 {micro}m. We therefore propose a stratified structure for the ring in which the surface layers, located {approx} 50 AU above the ring midplane, contain dust grains that are very similar to those found in dense molecular clouds, while the region of the ring located {approx} 25 AU from the midplane contains significantly larger grains. This stratified structure is likely the result of vertical

  10. `Galileo Galilei' (GG) small-satellite project: an alternative to the torsion balance for testing the equivalence principle on Earth and in space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nobili, A. M.; Bramanti, D.; Polacco, E.; Roxburgh, I. W.; Comandi, G.; Catastini, G.

    2000-06-01

    `Galileo Galilei' (GG) is a proposal for a small, low-orbit satellite devoted to testing the equivalence principle (EP) of Galileo, Newton and Einstein. The GG report on the phase A study recently carried out with funding from ASI (Agenzia Spaziale Italiana) concluded that GG can test the equivalence principle to 1 part in 1017 at room temperature. The main novelty is to modulate the expected differential signal of an EP violation at the spin rate of the spacecraft (2 Hz). Compared with other experiments, the modulation frequency is increased by more than a factor of 104, thus reducing 1/f (low-frequency) electronic and mechanical noise. The challenge for an EP test in space is to improve over the sensitivity of ground-based experiments (about 1 part in 1012) by many orders of magnitude, so as to deeply probe a so far totally unexplored field; doing that with more than one pair of bodies is an unnecessary complication. For this reason GG is now proposed with a single pair of test masses. At present the best and most reliable laboratory-controlled tests of the equivalence principle have been achieved by the `Eöt-Wash' group with small test cylinders arranged on a torsion balance placed on a turntable which provides the modulation of the signal (a 1-2 h rotation period). The torsion balance is not a suitable instrument in space. We have designed and built the GGG (`GG on the Ground') prototype. It is made of coaxial test cylinders weakly coupled (via mechanical suspensions) and quickly rotating (6 Hz achieved so far); in addition, it is well suited to be flown in space - where the driving signal is about three orders of magnitude stronger and the absence of weight is very helpful - inside the coaxial, co-rotating GG cylindrical spacecraft. The GGG apparatus is now operational. Preliminary measurement data indicate that weakly coupled, fast-spinning macroscopic rotors can be a suitable instrument to detect small differential effects. Rotation (up to 6 Hz so far) is

  11. Probiotic edible films as a new strategy for developing functional bakery products: The case of pan bread☆

    PubMed Central

    Soukoulis, Christos; Yonekura, Lina; Gan, Heng-Hui; Behboudi-Jobbehdar, Solmaz; Parmenter, Christopher; Fisk, Ian

    2014-01-01

    In the present paper, a novel approach for the development of probiotic baked cereal products is presented. Probiotic pan bread constructed by the application of film forming solutions based either on individual hydrogels e.g. 1% w/w sodium alginate (ALG) or binary blends of 0.5% w/w sodium alginate and 2% whey protein concentrate (ALG/WPC) containing Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG, followed by an air drying step at 60 °C for 10 min or 180 °C for min were produced. No visual differences between the bread crust surface of control and probiotic bread were observed. Microstructural analysis of bread crust revealed the formation of thicker films in the case of ALG/WPC. The presence of WPC improved significantly the viability of L. rhamnosus GG throughout air drying and room temperature storage. During storage there was a significant reduction in L. rhamnosus GG viability during the first 24 h, viable count losses were low during the subsequent 2–3 days of storage and growth was observed upon the last days of storage (day 4–7). The use of film forming solutions based exclusive on sodium alginate improved the viability of L. rhamnosus GG under simulated gastro-intestinal conditions, and there was no impact of the bread crust matrix on inactivation rates. The presence of the probiotic edible films did not modify cause major shifts in the mechanistic pathway of bread staling – as shown by physicochemical, thermal, texture and headspace analysis. Based on our calculations, an individual 30–40 g bread slice can deliver approx. 7.57–8.98 and 6.55–6.91 log cfu/portion before and after in-vitro digestion, meeting the WHO recommended required viable cell counts for probiotic bacteria to be delivered to the human host. PMID:25089068

  12. Probiotic edible films as a new strategy for developing functional bakery products: The case of pan bread.

    PubMed

    Soukoulis, Christos; Yonekura, Lina; Gan, Heng-Hui; Behboudi-Jobbehdar, Solmaz; Parmenter, Christopher; Fisk, Ian

    2014-08-01

    In the present paper, a novel approach for the development of probiotic baked cereal products is presented. Probiotic pan bread constructed by the application of film forming solutions based either on individual hydrogels e.g. 1% w/w sodium alginate (ALG) or binary blends of 0.5% w/w sodium alginate and 2% whey protein concentrate (ALG/WPC) containing Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG, followed by an air drying step at 60 °C for 10 min or 180 °C for min were produced. No visual differences between the bread crust surface of control and probiotic bread were observed. Microstructural analysis of bread crust revealed the formation of thicker films in the case of ALG/WPC. The presence of WPC improved significantly the viability of L. rhamnosus GG throughout air drying and room temperature storage. During storage there was a significant reduction in L. rhamnosus GG viability during the first 24 h, viable count losses were low during the subsequent 2-3 days of storage and growth was observed upon the last days of storage (day 4-7). The use of film forming solutions based exclusive on sodium alginate improved the viability of L. rhamnosus GG under simulated gastro-intestinal conditions, and there was no impact of the bread crust matrix on inactivation rates. The presence of the probiotic edible films did not modify cause major shifts in the mechanistic pathway of bread staling - as shown by physicochemical, thermal, texture and headspace analysis. Based on our calculations, an individual 30-40 g bread slice can deliver approx. 7.57-8.98 and 6.55-6.91 log cfu/portion before and after in-vitro digestion, meeting the WHO recommended required viable cell counts for probiotic bacteria to be delivered to the human host.

  13. Revealing Rembrandt

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Andrew J.

    2014-01-01

    The power and significance of artwork in shaping human cognition is self-evident. The starting point for our empirical investigations is the view that the task of neuroscience is to integrate itself with other forms of knowledge, rather than to seek to supplant them. In our recent work, we examined a particular aspect of the appreciation of artwork using present-day functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Our results emphasized the continuity between viewing artwork and other human cognitive activities. We also showed that appreciation of a particular aspect of artwork, namely authenticity, depends upon the co-ordinated activity between the brain regions involved in multiple decision making and those responsible for processing visual information. The findings about brain function probably have no specific consequences for understanding how people respond to the art of Rembrandt in comparison with their response to other artworks. However, the use of images of Rembrandt's portraits, his most intimate and personal works, clearly had a significant impact upon our viewers, even though they have been spatially confined to the interior of an MRI scanner at the time of viewing. Neuroscientific studies of humans viewing artwork have the capacity to reveal the diversity of human cognitive responses that may be induced by external advice or context as people view artwork in a variety of frameworks and settings. PMID:24795552

  14. Improvement in Th1/Th2 immune homeostasis, antioxidative status and resistance to pathogenic E. coli on consumption of probiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus fermented milk in aging mice.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Rohit; Kapila, Rajeev; Dass, Gulshan; Kapila, Suman

    2014-01-01

    Imbalance in Th1/Th2 immune pathways and cellular antioxidant systems with progressive aging are among the leading causes of increased risk of morbidity and mortality in elderly. Although probiotics have been considered to boost immune system, there is a lack of comprehensive analysis of probiotic effects on aging physiology. The present study aimed at determining anti-immunosenescence potential of milk fermented with probiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus (LR) in 16 months old mice by concurrent analysis of immunosenescence markers associated with Th1/Th2 profile of splenocytes, inflamm-aging in plasma, neutrophil functions and antibody response in intestine along with analysis of antioxidant enzymes in liver and red blood cells (RBCs) after feeding trials of 1 and 2 months, respectively. An enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (ATCC 14948)-based infection model in aging mice was also designed to validate protective attributes of LR. Splenocytes registered increased IFN-γ and decreased IL-4 and IL-10 production in LR-fed animals. Neutrophil respiratory burst enzymes and phagocytosis increased significantly while no aggravation in plasma levels of MCP-1 and TNF-α was observed. Further, owing to increased Th1 response, antibodies registered a decrease in IgG1/IgG2a ratio and IgE levels in LR groups. No significant variations were observed in secretory IgA and IgA + cells in the intestine. Antioxidant enzymes (superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione peroxidase) in LR-fed groups recorded increased activities which were more pronounced in the liver than in RBCs. LR supplementation significantly reduced E. coli translocation to organs (intestine, liver, spleen, peritoneal fluid) by enhancing E. coli-specific antibodies (IgA and IgG1) and inflammatory proteins. In conclusion, LR supplementation alleviated immunosenescence-associated Th1/Th2 imbalance, improved antioxidant capacity, and enhanced resistance of aged mice to E. coli infection thereby signifying its potential

  15. Immunostimulatory probiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus HN001 and Bifidobacterium lactis HN019 do not induce pathological inflammation in mouse model of experimental autoimmune thyroiditis.

    PubMed

    Zhou, J S; Gill, H S

    2005-08-15

    The possibility that intestinal microflora contribute to the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases has raised issues regarding the safety of probiotic organisms, especially those with immunostimulating properties, in individuals with such immune dysfunctions. In this study, the effect of consumption of probiotic lactic acid bacteria (LAB) strains Lactobacillus rhamnosus HN001(HN001) and Bifidobacterium lactis HN019 (HN019) on the induction and progression of experimental autoimmune thyroiditis (EAT) was investigated in CBA/CaH (H-2k) mice. HN001 or HN019 in skim milk were fed to mice daily (1-1.5 x 10(8) cfu/mouse/day) for 5 to 9 weeks. A mild form of EAT was induced by subcutaneous injection of mouse thyroglobulin (MTg) with either Freund's adjuvant (complete and incomplete, CFA and IFA) or lipopolysaccharide (LPS). The proliferative responses of spleen lymphocyte to MTg stimulation in vitro and the presence (and degree) of mononuclear cell infiltration in thyroid gland tissues were examined to assess the development and severity of EAT. The levels of serum anti-MTg antibodies (IgG1 and IgG2a) and spleen weight index were determined to detect the presence of autoimmune responses of mice receiving MTg. Results showed that 8 weeks after immunization, 16.67-50% of the mice developed mild EAT with lymphocyte infiltration in the thyroid glands. Probiotic feeding did not induce full-blown EAT. There were no differences in spleen weight index or the proliferative spleenocytes in response to PMA between mice that received MTg alone and mice that received MTg and probiotic LAB strains.

  16. Potential probiotic lactic acid bacteria Lactobacillus rhamnosus (HN001), Lactobacillus acidophilus (HN017) and Bifidobacterium lactis (HN019) do not degrade gastric mucin in vitro.

    PubMed

    Zhou, J S; Gopal, P K; Gill, H S

    2001-01-22

    The mucus layer (mucin) coating the surface of the gastrointestinal tract (GIT) plays an important role in the mucosal barrier system. Any damage or disturbance of this mucin layer will compromise the host's mucosal defence function. In the present study, the ability of three potential probiotic lactic acid bacteria (LAB) strains (Lactobacillus rhamnosus HN001, Lactobacillus acidophilus HN017, Bifidobacterium lactis HN019) to degrade mucin in vitro was evaluated, in order to assess their potential pathogenicity and local toxicity. The LAB strains were incubated in medium containing hog gastric mucin (HGM, 0.3%) at 37 degrees C for 48 h, following which any decrease in carbohydrate and protein concentration in the ethanol-precipitated portion of the culture medium was determined, using phenol-sulphuric acid and bicinchonic acid (BCA) protein assays, respectively. The change in molecular weight of mucin glycoproteins, following incubation with the test strains, was monitored by SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). In order to expose any ability of the test strains to degrade mucin visually and more directly, the test strains were also cultured on agarose containing 0.3% HGM and incubated anaerobically for 72 h at 37 degrees C. No significant change in the carbohydrate or protein concentration in mucin substrates was found following incubation with the test strains. No mucin fragments were derived from the mucin suspension incubated with test strains, and no mucinolysis zone was identified on agarose. These results demonstrate that the potential probiotic LAB strains tested here were unable to degrade gastrointestinal mucin in vitro, which suggests that these novel probiotic candidates are likely to be non-invasive and non-toxic at the mucosal interface.

  17. Safety assessment of potential probiotic lactic acid bacterial strains Lactobacillus rhamnosus HN001, Lb. acidophilus HN017, and Bifidobacterium lactis HN019 in BALB/c mice.

    PubMed

    Zhou, J S; Shu, Q; Rutherfurd, K J; Prasad, J; Birtles, M J; Gopal, P K; Gill, H S

    2000-05-25

    The general safety of immune-enhancing lactic acid bacteria (LAB) strains Lactobacillus rhamnosus HN001 (DR20), Lb. acidophilus HN017, and Bifidobacterium lactis HN019 (DR10) was investigated in a feeding trial. Groups of BALB/c mice were orally administered test LAB strains or the commercial reference strain Lb. acidophilus LA-1 at 2.5 x 10(9), 5 x 10(10) or 2.5 x 10(12) colony forming units (CFU)/kg body weight/day for 4 weeks. Throughout this time, their feed intake, water intake, and live body weight were monitored. At the end of the 4 week observation period, samples of blood, liver, spleen, kidney, mesenteric lymph nodes, and gut tissues (ileum, caecum, and colon) were collected to determine: haematological parameters (red blood cell and platelet counts, haemoglobin concentration, mean corpuscular volume, mean corpuscular haemoglobin, and mean corpuscular haemoglobin concentration); differential leukocyte counts; blood biochemistry (plasma total protein, albumin, cholesterol, and glucose); mucosal histology (epithelial cell height, mucosal thickness, and villus height); and bacterial translocation to extra-gut tissues (blood, liver, spleen, kidney and mesenteric lymph nodes). DNA finger printing techniques were used to identify any viable bacterial strains recovered from these tissues. The results demonstrated that 4 weeks consumption of these LAB strains had no adverse effects on animals' general health status, haematology, blood biochemistry, gut mucosal histology parameters, or the incidence of bacterial translocation. A few viable LAB cells were recovered from the tissues of animals in both control and test groups, but DNA fingerprinting did not identify any of these as the inoculated strains. The results obtained in this study suggest that the potentially probiotic LAB strains HN001, HN017, and HN019 are non-toxic for mice and are therefore likely to be safe for human use.

  18. Inability of probiotic bacterial strains Lactobacillus rhamnosus HN001 and Bifidobacterium lactis HN019 to induce human platelet aggregation in vitro.

    PubMed

    Zhou, J S; Rutherfurd, K J; Gill, H S

    2005-11-01

    Platelet aggregation contributes to the pathogenesis of infective endocarditis, and aggregation of platelets induced by lactobacilli is thought to be an important contributory factor in the development and progression of Lactobacillus endocarditis. The main purpose of this study was to examine the effect of immunity-enhancing probiotic strains Lactobacillus rhamnosus HN001 and Bifidobacterium lactis HN019 on the activation and aggregation of human blood platelets. Whole blood samples from healthy individuals were incubated in vitro with HN001 or HN019 and subsequently labeled with platelet-specific monoclonal antibodies, fluorescein isothiocyanate-conjugated anti-CD41a (expressed on normal platelets), and phycoerythrin-streptavidin-conjugated anti-CD62p (expressed on activated platelets) before analysis by flow cytometry. Platelet-rich plasma was used to assist the gating of the platelet cluster. ADP and epinephrine were used as the physiological platelet activation agonists. Platelet aggregation-inducing strain Streptococcus sanguis 133-79 was used as a positive control strain. The mean fluorescence intensity of phycoerythrin and the percentage of platelets expressing the CD62p marker were used to assess the degree of platelet activation. The percentage of CD62p-positive platelets and the light scatter profiles of the agonist-activated platelets were used to identify the occurrence and degree of platelet aggregation. HN001 and HN019 had no effect on spontaneous platelet activation and aggregation; they also failed to exacerbate the platelet aggregation activity induced by ADP and epinephrine. Therefore, these test probiotic strains HN001 and HN019 are less likely to participate in the pathogenesis of infective endocarditis or other thrombotic disorders with regard to platelet aggregation factors.

  19. Effect of Lactobacillus rhamnosus LGG® and Bifidobacterium animalis ssp. lactis BB-12® on health-related quality of life in college students affected by upper respiratory infections.

    PubMed

    Smith, Tracey J; Rigassio-Radler, Diane; Denmark, Robert; Haley, Timothy; Touger-Decker, Riva

    2013-06-01

    College students are susceptible to upper respiratory infections (URI) due to inadequate sleep, stress and close living quarters. Certain probiotic strains modulate immune function and may improve health-related quality of life (HRQL) during URI. The present study recruited apparently healthy college students and assessed the effect of probiotics on HRQL outcomes (i.e. self-reported duration, symptom severity and functional impairment of URI) in those who developed URI. Missed school and work days due to URI were also considered. Subjects (n 231) were apparently healthy college students living on campus in residence halls at the Framingham State University (Framingham, MA, USA), and were randomised to receive placebo (n 117) or probiotic-containing powder (daily dose of minimum 1 billion colony-forming units of each Lactobacillus rhamnosus LGG® (LGG®) and Bifidobacterium animalis ssp. lactis BB-12® (BB-12®); n 114) for 12 weeks. Subjects completed The Wisconsin Upper Respiratory Symptom Survey-21 to assess HRQL during URI. The final analyses included 198 subjects (placebo, n 97 and probiotics, n 101). The median duration of URI was significantly shorter by 2 d and median severity score was significantly lower by 34% with probiotics v. placebo (P,0·001), indicating a higher HRQL during URI. Number of missed work days was not different between groups (P=0·429); however, the probiotics group missed significantly fewer school days (mean difference = 0·2 d) compared to the placebo group (P=0·002). LGG® and BB-12® may be beneficial among college students with URI for mitigating decrements in HRQL. More research is warranted regarding mechanisms of action associated with these findings and the cost-benefit of prophylactic supplementation.

  20. Sleep quality in efavirenz-treated Chinese HIV patients - comparing between GT and GG genotype of CYP2B6-516 G/T polymorphisms.

    PubMed

    Lee, Shui Shan; To, Kin Wang; Lee, Man Po; Wong, Ngai Sze; Chan, Denise P C; Li, Patrick C K; Cheung, Siu Wai; Chan, Raphael C Y

    2014-03-01

    Seventy-two adult Chinese HIV-positive treatment-naïve patients were recruited in a study to evaluate prospectively the associations between CYP2B6 516 G/T polymorphisms and sleep quality following treatment with an efavirenz-based regimen. Overall, the patients gave an allelic frequency of 0.3 for CYP2B6 516 T, and a genotype frequency of 9.4% for TT. Compared to GG, GT gave a higher median value of plasma efavirenz level at four weeks (3.77 mg/L vs 2.59 mg/L, p < 0.001) and 12 months (3.57 mg/L vs 2.97 mg/L, p = 0.026). Using generalised estimating equations analysis to track the variance over time, there was poorer Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index in GT compared to GG, while GT was associated with a higher efavirenz level of >4 mg/L. There was however no difference in the component sleep scores nor was there direct association between sleep quality and plasma efavirenz levels. The results suggested that CYP2B6 genotype was associated with different patterns of sleep problems, further investigation of which is warranted with the objective of optimizing therapy with efavirenz-based regimens.

  1. Combined Tevatron upper limit on gg{yields}H{yields}W{sup +}W{sup -} and constraints on the Higgs boson mass in fourth-generation fermion models

    SciTech Connect

    Aaltonen, T.; Mehtala, P.; Orava, R.; Osterberg, K.; Saarikko, H.; Remortel, N. van; Abazov, V. M.; Alexeev, G. D.; Artikov, A.; Budagov, J.; Chokheli, D.; Glagolev, V.; Golovanov, G.; Kharzheev, Y. N.; Malyshev, V. L.; Poukhov, O.; Prokoshin, F.; Semenov, A.; Simonenko, A.; Sisakyan, A.

    2010-07-01

    We combine results from searches by the CDF and D0 collaborations for a standard model Higgs boson (H) in the process gg{yields}H{yields}W{sup +}W{sup -} in pp collisions at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider at {radical}(s)=1.96 TeV. With 4.8 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity analyzed at CDF and 5.4 fb{sup -1} at D0, the 95% confidence level upper limit on {sigma}(gg{yields}H)xB(H{yields}W{sup +}W{sup -}) is 1.75 pb at m{sub H}=120 GeV, 0.38 pb at m{sub H}=165 GeV, and 0.83 pb at m{sub H}=200 GeV. Assuming the presence of a fourth sequential generation of fermions with large masses, we exclude at the 95% confidence level a standard-model-like Higgs boson with a mass between 131 and 204 GeV.

  2. Relativistic correction to e{sup +}e{sup -{yields}}J/{psi}+gg at B factories and constraint on color-octet matrix elements

    SciTech Connect

    He Zhiguo; Fan Ying; Chao Kuangta

    2010-03-01

    We calculate the relativistic correction to J/{psi} production in the color-singlet process e{sup +}e{sup -{yields}}J/{psi}+gg at B factories. We employ the nonrelativistic QCD factorization approach, where the short-distance coefficients are calculated perturbatively and the long-distance matrix elements are extracted from the decays of J/{psi} into e{sup +}e{sup -} and light hadrons. We find that the O(v{sup 2}) relativistic correction can enhance the cross section by a factor of 20-30%, comparable to the enhancement due to the O({alpha}{sub s}) radiative correction obtained earlier. Combining the relativistic correction with the QCD radiative correction, we find that the color-singlet contribution to e{sup +}e{sup -{yields}}J/{psi}+gg can saturate the latest observed cross section {sigma}(e{sup +}e{sup -{yields}}J/{psi}+X{sub non-cc})=0.43{+-}0.09{+-}0.09 pb by Belle, thus leaving little room to the color-octet contributions. This gives a very stringent constraint on the color-octet contribution, and may imply that the values of color-octet matrix elements are much smaller than expected earlier by using the naive velocity scaling rules or extracted from fitting experimental data with the leading-order calculations.

  3. Combined Tevatron upper limit on gg -> H -> W^+W^- and constraints on the Higgs boson mass in fourth-generation fermion models

    SciTech Connect

    Aaltonen, T.; Abazov, V.M.; Abbott, B.; Abolins, M.; Acharya, B.S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Adelman, J.; Aguilo, E.; Alexeev, G.D.; Alkhazov, G.; /Helsinki Inst. of Phys. /Dubna, JINR /Oklahoma U. /Michigan State U. /Tata Inst. /Illinois U., Chicago /Florida State U. /Chicago U., EFI /Simon Fraser U. /York U., Canada /St. Petersburg, INP /Illinois U., Urbana /Sao Paulo, IFT /Munich U. /University Coll. London /Oxford U. /St. Petersburg, INP /Duke U. /Kyungpook Natl. U. /Chonnam Natl. U. /Florida U. /Osaka City U.

    2010-05-01

    We combine results from searches by the CDF and D0 collaborations for a standard model Higgs boson (H) in the process gg {yields} H {yields} W{sup +}W{sup -} in p{bar p} collisions at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider at {radical}s = 1.o6 TeV. With 4.8 fb{sup -1} of itnegrated luminosity analyzed at CDF and 5.4 fb{sup -1} at D0, the 95% Confidence Level upper limit on {sigma}(gg {yields} H) x {Beta}(H {yields} W{sup +}W{sup -}) is 1.75 pb at m{sub H} = 120 GeV, 0.38 pb at m{sub H} = 165 GeV, and 0.83 pb at m{sub H} = 200 GeV. Assuming the presence of a fourth sequential generation of fermions with large masses, they exclude at the 95% Confidence Level a standard-model-like Higgs boson with a mass between 131 and 204 Gev.

  4. Radiation effects on optical and structural properties of GG17 Glasses induced by 170 keV electrons and protons

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Qingyan; Geng, Hongbin; Li, Xingji; Xiao, Jingdong; Sun, Chengyue; Zhao, Haifa; Liu, Weilong; Hu, Zhaochu

    2016-01-14

    The effects of 170 keV electron and proton irradiation are investigated on the optical property and the structure of GG17-type borosilicate glasses for the purpose of assessing the suitability of this material for the rubidium lamp envelope, based on GEANT4 simulating calculation, using electron paramagnetic resonance and Fourier transform infrared spectra and optical-transmittance measurements. The Micro-mechanisms on damage of GG17 Glasses are clarified for electron and proton, respectively. For the electron with the energy of 170 keV, defect creation is due to ionization energy losses and the center is mainly boron oxygen hole center (BOHC) formed by one hole trapped on a bridge oxygen structure with [BO{sub 4}]{sup −}. As a result the number of BOHCs grows as the electron fluence increases. However, for the proton with the energy of 170 keV, the creation of structural defects dominates by means of debonding as a result of an atom having been kicked off the structural chain (displacement effect). This leads to the intensive generation of silicon oxygen hole centers, as well as BOHCs, by the holes trapped on non-bridge oxygen.

  5. Faecal Metaproteomic Analysis Reveals a Personalized and Stable Functional Microbiome and Limited Effects of a Probiotic Intervention in Adults

    PubMed Central

    Kolmeder, Carolin A.; Salojärvi, Jarkko; Ritari, Jarmo; de Been, Mark; Raes, Jeroen; Falony, Gwen; Vieira-Silva, Sara; Kekkonen, Riina A.; Corthals, Garry L.; Palva, Airi; Salonen, Anne; de Vos, Willem M.

    2016-01-01

    Recent metagenomic studies have demonstrated that the overall functional potential of the intestinal microbiome is rather conserved between healthy individuals. Here we assessed the biological processes undertaken in-vivo by microbes and the host in the intestinal tract by conducting a metaproteome analysis from a total of 48 faecal samples of 16 healthy adults participating in a placebo-controlled probiotic intervention trial. Half of the subjects received placebo and the other half consumed Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG for three weeks (1010 cfu per day). Faecal samples were collected just before and at the end of the consumption phase as well as after a three-week follow-up period, and were processed for microbial composition and metaproteome analysis. A common core of shared microbial protein functions could be identified in all subjects. Furthermore, we observed marked differences in expressed proteins between subjects that resulted in the definition of a stable and personalized microbiome both at the mass-spectrometry-based proteome level and the functional level based on the KEGG pathway analysis. No significant changes in the metaproteome were attributable to the probiotic intervention. A detailed taxonomic assignment of peptides and comparison to phylogenetic microarray data made it possible to evaluate the activity of the main phyla as well as key species, including Faecalibacterium prausnitzii. Several correlations were identified between human and bacterial proteins. Proteins of the human host accounted for approximately 14% of the identified metaproteome and displayed variations both between and within individuals. The individually different human intestinal proteomes point to personalized host-microbiota interactions. Our findings indicate that analysis of the intestinal metaproteome can complement gene-based analysis and contributes to a thorough understanding of the activities of the microbiome and the relevant pathways in health and disease. PMID

  6. Early pregnancy probiotic supplementation with Lactobacillus rhamnosus HN001 may reduce the prevalence of gestational diabetes mellitus: a randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Wickens, Kristin L; Barthow, Christine A; Murphy, Rinki; Abels, Peter R; Maude, Robyn M; Stone, Peter R; Mitchell, Edwin A; Stanley, Thorsten V; Purdie, Gordon L; Kang, Janice M; Hood, Fiona E; Rowden, Judy L; Barnes, Phillipa K; Fitzharris, Penny F; Crane, Julian

    2017-04-03

    The study aims to assess whether supplementation with the probiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus HN001 (HN001) can reduce the prevalence of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). A double-blind, randomised, placebo-controlled parallel trial was conducted in New Zealand (NZ) (Wellington and Auckland). Pregnant women with a personal or partner history of atopic disease were randomised at 14-16 weeks' gestation to receive HN001 (6×109 colony-forming units) (n 212) or placebo (n 211) daily. GDM at 24-30 weeks was assessed using the definition of the International Association of Diabetes and Pregnancy Study Groups (IADPSG) (fasting plasma glucose ≥5·1 mmol/l, or 1 h post 75 g glucose level at ≥10 mmol/l or at 2 h ≥8·5 mmol/l) and NZ definition (fasting plasma glucose ≥5·5 mmol/l or 2 h post 75 g glucose at ≥9 mmol/l). All analyses were intention-to-treat. A total of 184 (87 %) women took HN001 and 189 (90 %) women took placebo. There was a trend towards lower relative rates (RR) of GDM (IADPSG definition) in the HN001 group, 0·59 (95 % CI 0·32, 1·08) (P=0·08). HN001 was associated with lower rates of GDM in women aged ≥35 years (RR 0·31; 95 % CI 0·12, 0·81, P=0·009) and women with a history of GDM (RR 0·00; 95 % CI 0·00, 0·66, P=0·004). These rates did not differ significantly from those of women without these characteristics. Using the NZ definition, GDM prevalence was significantly lower in the HN001 group, 2·1 % (95 % CI 0·6, 5·2), v. 6·5 % (95 % CI 3·5, 10·9) in the placebo group (P=0·03). HN001 supplementation from 14 to 16 weeks' gestation may reduce GDM prevalence, particularly among older women and those with previous GDM.

  7. Physiological response, blood chemistry profile and mucus secretion of red sea bream (Pagrus major) fed diets supplemented with Lactobacillus rhamnosus under low salinity stress.

    PubMed

    Dawood, Mahmoud A O; Koshio, Shunsuke; Ishikawa, Manabu; El-Sabagh, Mabrouk; Yokoyama, Saichiro; Wang, Wei-Long; Yukun, Zhang; Olivier, Adissin

    2017-02-01

    Environmental stressors caused by inadequate aquaculture management strategies suppress the immune response of fish and make them more susceptible to diseases. Therefore, efforts have been made to relieve stress in fish by using various functional feed additives in the diet, including probiotics. The present work evaluates the effects of Lactobacillus rhamnosus (LR) on physiological stress response, blood chemistry and mucus secretion of red sea bream (Pagrus major) under low salinity stress. Fish were fed four diets supplemented with LR at [0 (LR0), 1 × 10(2) (LR1), 1 × 10(4) (LR2) and 1 × 10(6) (LR3) cells g(-1)] for 56 days. Before stress, blood cortisol, urea nitrogen (BUN) and total bilirubin (T-BIL) showed no significant difference (P > 0.05), whereas plasma glucose and triglyceride (TG) of fish-fed LR2 and LR3 diets were significantly lower (P < 0.05) than those of the other groups. Plasma total cholesterol (T-CHO) of fish-fed LR3 diet was significantly (P < 0.05) lower than that of the other groups. Furthermore, total plasma protein, mucus myeloperoxidase activity and the amount of mucus secretion were significantly enhanced in LR-supplemented groups when compared with the control group (P < 0.05). After the application of the low salinity stress test, plasma cortisol, glucose, T-CHO and TG contents in all groups showed an increased trend significantly (P < 0.01) compared to the fish before the stress challenge. However, plasma total protein and the amount of secreted mucus showed a decreased trend in all groups. On the other hand, BUN, T-BIL and mucus myeloperoxidase activity showed no significant difference after exposure to the low salinity stress (P > 0.05). In addition, the fish that received LR-supplemented diets showed significantly higher tolerance against low salinity stress than the fish-fed LR-free diet (P < 0.05). The physiological status and the detected immune responses, including total plasma protein and mucus

  8. A case of cerebrotendinous xanthomatosis mimicking the clinical phenotype of mitochondrial disease with a novel frame-shift mutation (c. 43_44 delGG) in CYP27A1 gene exon 1.

    PubMed

    Koge, Junpei; Hayashi, Shintaro; Yamaguchi, Hiroo; Tateishi, Takahisa; Murai, Hiroyuki; Kira, Jun-Ichi

    2016-10-28

    A 37-old-male with a history of early childhood mental retardation was admitted to our hospital. He experienced recurrent syncopes at 23 years old, and at age 35 gait disturbance and hearing impairment developed gradually and worsened over time. His grandparents were in a consanguineous marriage. He was of short stature and absent of tendon xanthomas. Neurological examinations revealed scanning speech, dysphagia, right sensorineural hearing loss, spasticity in both upper and lower extremities, and spastic gait. Tendon reflexes were brisk throughout, and Babinski and Chaddock reflexes were both positive bilaterally. Laboratory tests revealed elevated lactate and pyruvate concentrations in both serum and cerebrospinal fluid. Fluid attenuated inversion recovery magnetic resonance imaging showed high intensity lesions in the bilateral cerebellar hemispheres, pyramidal tracts in the brainstem, and internal capsules symmetrically. Brain magnetic resonance spectroscopy measurements revealed an elevated lactate/creatine plus phosphocreatine ratio and a decreased N-acetyl-aspartate/creatine plus phosphocreatine ratio in the cerebellum. At this point, mitochondrial diseases, particularly myoclonic epilepsy with ragged-red fibers (MERRF), to be the most likely cause. We performed a biopsy of his left biceps brachii muscle, showing variations in fiber size with occasional central nuclei and very few ragged-red fibers. Blood mitochondrial respiratory enzyme assays showed normal values with elevated citrate synthase activity, and mitochondrial DNA analyses for MERRF revealed no pathogenic mutations. We then explored other possibilities and detected an elevated serum cholestanol concentration of 20.4 μg/ml (reference value <4.0) and genetic analysis by direct sequencing method disclosed a novel frame-shift mutation (c. 43_44delGG) in CYP27A1 gene exon1, leading to a diagnosis of cerebrotendinous xanthomatosis (CTX). This case emphasizes importance of awareness of CTX as a

  9. Site-specific oxidation at GG and GGG sequences in double-stranded DNA by benzoyl peroxide as a tumor promoter.

    PubMed

    Kawanishi, S; Oikawa, S; Murata, M; Tsukitome, H; Saito, I

    1999-12-21

    Benzoyl peroxide (BzPO), a free-radical generator, has tumor-promoting activity. As a method for approaching the mechanism of tumor promoter function, the ability of oxidative DNA damage by BzPO was investigated by using (32)P-labeled DNA fragments obtained from the human p53 tumor suppressor gene and c-Ha-ras-1 protooncogene. BzPO induced piperidine-labile sites at the 5'-site guanine of GG and GGG sequences of double-stranded DNA in the presence of Cu(I), whereas the damage occurred at single guanine residues of single-stranded DNA. Both methional and dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) inhibited DNA damage induced by BzPO and Cu(I), but typical hydroxyl radical ((*)OH) scavengers, superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase, did not inhibit it. On the other hand, H(2)O(2) induced piperidine-labile sites at cytosine and thymine residues of double-stranded DNA in the presence of Cu(I). Phenylhydrazine, which is known to produce phenyl radicals, induced Cu(I)-dependent damage at thymine residues but not at guanine residues. These results suggest that the BzPO-derived reactive species causing DNA damage is different from (*)OH and phenyl radicals generated from benzoyloxyl radicals. BzPO/Cu(I) induced 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodG) formation in double-stranded DNA more effectively than that in single-stranded DNA. Furthermore, we observed that BzPO increased the amount of 8-oxodG in human cultured cells. Consequently, it is concluded that benzoyloxyl radicals generated by the reaction of BzPO with Cu(I) may oxidize the 5'-guanine of GG and GGG sequences in double-stranded DNA to lead to 8-oxodG formation and piperidine-labile guanine lesions, and the damage seems to be relevant to the tumor-promoting activity of BzPO.

  10. IL28B Gene Polymorphism SNP rs8099917 Genotype GG Is Associated with HTLV-1-Associated Myelopathy/Tropical Spastic Paraparesis (HAM/TSP) in HTLV-1 Carriers

    PubMed Central

    Luiz, Olinda do Carmo; Malta, Fernanda; Pinho, João Renato Rebello; Gonçalves, Fernanda de Toledo; Duarte, Alberto Jose da Silva; de Oliveira, Augusto Cesar Penalva

    2014-01-01

    Background The polymorphisms of IL28B have been described as important in the pathogenesis of infections caused by some viruses. The aim of this research was to evaluate whether IL28B gene polymorphisms (SNP rs8099917 and SNP rs12979860) are associated with HAM/TSP. Methods The study included 229 subjects, classified according to their neurological status in two groups: Group I (136 asymptomatic HTLV-1 carriers) and Group II (93 HAM/TSP patients). The proviral loads were quantified, and the rs8099917 and rs12979860 SNPs in the region of IL28B-gene were analyzed by StepOnePlus Real-time PCR System. Results A multivariate model analysis, including gender, age, and HTLV-1 DNA proviral load, showed that IL28B polymorphisms were independently associated with HAM/TSP outcome in rs12979860 genotype CT (OR = 2.03; IC95% = 0.96–4.27) and in rs8099917 genotype GG (OR = 7.61; IC95% = 1.82–31.72). Conclusion Subjects with SNP rs8099917 genotype GG and rs12979618 genotype CT may present a distinct immune response against HTLV-1 infection. So, it seems reasonable to suggest that a search for IL28B polymorphisms should be performed for all HTLV-1-infected subjects in order to monitor their risk for disease development; however, since this is the first description of such finding in the literature, we should first replicate this study with more HTLV-1-infected persons to strengthen the evidence already provided by our results. PMID:25233462

  11. Stability and efficacy of the 3'-UTR A4G-G5A variant of viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV) as a live attenuated immersion VHSV vaccine in olive flounder (Paralichthys olivaceus).

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung-Hyun; Kim, Meesun; Choi, Go-Eun; Lee, Jeong Ho; Kang, Jung-Ha; Evensen, Øystein; Lee, Woo-Jai

    2016-02-17

    Viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV) is the causative agent of viral hemorrhagic septicemia in fish, a disease that affects a number of teleost fish species including olive flounder (Paralichthys olivaceus). In this study, we assessed the safety and efficacy of two recombinant attenuated VHSV strains, termed A4G-G5A and ΔNV, with the purpose to select the most suitable vaccine strain. The virus strains were passaged in two commercially available cell lines, EPC and RTG-2, and the strains were also tested for residual virulence in zebrafish (Danio rerio). The A4G-G5A strain showed an attenuated growth profile in both the EPC and RTG-2 cell lines compared to wild-type (WT) VHSV (JF-09, genotype IVa), whereas the growth profile of ΔNV was comparable to the WT strains in RTG-2 cells in contrast to EPC cells. Moreover, ΔNV had higher residual virulence compared to A4G-G5A and was highly pathogenic to zebrafish. The A4G-G5A strain was chosen as vaccine candidate and tested for efficacy in in vivo fish studies in the target species, olive flounder, using an immersion vaccine scheme. Groups of fish were immunized with 10(2.5), 10(3.5), 10(4.5), and 10(5.5) TCID50/ml of A4G-G5A giving 5-13.3 cumulative percent mortality (CPM) post immunization. Immunization was followed by a challenge experiment using VHSV-WT. The relative percent survival (RPS) in immunized groups ranged from 81.6% to 100%, correlating with vaccination dose. This study demonstrates that while strain A4G-G5A has retained some residual virulence it confers high level of protection in immunized olive flounder.

  12. Study of the Lactobacillus rhamnosus Lcr35® properties after compression and proposition of a model to predict tablet stability.

    PubMed

    Muller, Claudia; Mazel, Vincent; Dausset, Caroline; Busignies, Virginie; Bornes, Stéphanie; Nivoliez, Adrien; Tchoreloff, Pierre

    2014-11-01

    The beneficial effects of probiotic bacteria on human health are now widely acknowledged, and this has prompted growing interest in research and development in the pharmaceutical field. However, to be viable when they reach their target, the bacteria must be able to survive during the manufacturing process and the biological pathway. Tablet form best meets the requirements for protecting acid labile drugs, but the tableting process could be an additional stress for the bacteria. This study evaluated the initial effect of compression pressure on the Lcr35® strain in a vaginal (Lcr regenerans®) and an intestinal (Lcr restituo®) formulation. A stability study was also performed on the tablets and revealed a beneficial effect of this form. The obtained destruction rates (k) demonstrated that the bacterial stability was greater in tablets than in powders (kpowders>ktablets). A new mathematical model was developed combining compression and temperature parameters to predict the bacterial viability at any pressure and time. Moreover, the genetic profile of Lcr35® (Rep-PCR, microarrays), its resistance to acidity and its ability to inhibit Candidaalbicans growth, after compression, were determined to evaluate the target product profile (TPP) in a Quality by Design (QbD) approach. The Rep-PCR analysis validated the strain identity and the microarrays demonstrated the genetic stability of Lcr35® strain after compaction. Additionally, ability to inhibit the C. albicans growth was maintained and the resistance to gastric conditions of Lcr35® was even improved by tableting. As a dosage form, tablets containing probiotic can guarantee that an adequate amount of bacteria reaches the therapeutic target (intestinal or vaginal) and that the product remains stable until the time of consumption.

  13. Lactobacillus acidophilus CL1285, Lactobacillus casei LBC80R, and Lactobacillus rhamnosus CLR2 (Bio-K+): Characterization, Manufacture, Mechanisms of Action, and Quality Control of a Specific Probiotic Combination for Primary Prevention of Clostridium difficile Infection.

    PubMed

    Auclair, Julie; Frappier, Martin; Millette, Mathieu

    2015-05-15

    A specific probiotic formulation composed of Lactobacillus acidophilus CL1285, Lactobacillus casei LBC80R, and Lactobacillus rhamnosus CLR2 (Bio-K+) has been marketed in North America since 1996. The strains and the commercial products have been evaluated for safety, identity, gastrointestinal survival, and stability throughout shelf life. The capacity of both the fermented beverages and the capsules to reduce incidences of antibiotic-associated diarrhea and Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) has been demonstrated in human clinical trials. Individual strains and the finished products have shown antimicrobial activity against C. difficile and toxin A/B neutralization capacity in vitro. The use of this specific probiotic formulation as part of a bundle of preventive measures to control CDI in healthcare settings is discussed.

  14. Effect of buckwheat flour and oat bran on growth and cell viability of the probiotic strains Lactobacillus rhamnosus IMC 501®, Lactobacillus paracasei IMC 502® and their combination SYNBIO®, in synbiotic fermented milk.

    PubMed

    Coman, Maria Magdalena; Verdenelli, Maria Cristina; Cecchini, Cinzia; Silvi, Stefania; Vasile, Aida; Bahrim, Gabriela Elena; Orpianesi, Carla; Cresci, Alberto

    2013-10-15

    Fermented foods have a great significance since they provide and preserve large quantities of nutritious foods in a wide diversity of flavors, aromas and texture, which enrich the human diet. Originally fermented milks were developed as a means of preserving nutrients and are the most representatives of the category. The first aim of this study was to screen the effect of buckwheat flour and oat bran as prebiotics on the production of probiotic fiber-enriched fermented milks, by investigating the kinetics of acidification of buckwheat flour- and oat bran-supplemented milk fermented by Lactobacillus rhamnosus IMC 501®, Lactobacillus paracasei IMC 502® and their 1:1 combination named SYNBIO®. The probiotic strains viability, pH and sensory characteristics of the fermented fiber-enriched milk products, stored at 4 °C for 28 days were also monitored. The results showed that supplementation of whole milk with the tested probiotic strains and the two vegetable substrates results in a significant faster lowering of the pH. Also, the stability of L. rhamnosus IMC 501®, L. paracasei IMC 502® and SYNBIO® during storage at 4 °C for 28 days in buckwheat flour- and oat bran-supplemented samples was remarkably enhanced. The second aim of the study was to develop a new synbiotic product using the best combination of probiotics and prebiotics by promoting better growth and survival and be acceptable to the consumers with high concentration of probiotic strain. This new product was used to conduct a human feeding trial to validate the fermented milk as a carrier for transporting bacterial cells into the human gastrointestinal tract. The probiotic strains were recovered from fecal samples in 40 out of 40 volunteers fed for 4 weeks one portion per day of synbiotic fermented milk carrying about 10(9) viable cells.

  15. Next-to-Leading-Order QCD Corrections to e{sup +}e{sup -}{yields}J/{psi}gg at the B Factories

    SciTech Connect

    Gong Bin; Wang Jianxiong

    2009-04-24

    We calculate the next-to-leading-order (NLO) QCD corrections to e{sup +}e{sup -}{yields}J/{psi}gg via color singlet J/{psi}({sup 3}S{sub 1}) at the B factories. The result shows that the cross section is enhanced to 0.373 pb by a K factor (NLO/LO) of about 1.21. By considering its dependence on the charm quark mass and renormalization scale, the NLO cross section can range from 0.294 to 0.409 pb. Further including the {psi}{sup '} feed-down, {sigma}[e{sup +}e{sup -}{yields}J/{psi}X(non-cc)] is enhanced by another factor of about 1.29 and reach 0.482 pb. In addition, the momentum distributions of J/{psi} production and polarization are presented. Recent measurements from Belle agree well with our prediction for the cross section and momentum distribution. It is expected that this process can serve as a very good channel to clarify the J/{psi} polarization puzzle by performing further experimental measurements.

  16. Single oral dose toxicity test of polycalcium, a mixed composition of polycan and calcium lactate-gluconate 1:9 (G/G) in SD rat.

    PubMed

    Kim, Joo-Wan; Choi, Jae-Suk; Ha, Yu-Mi; Choi, In Soon; Kim, Ki-Young; Cho, Hyung-rae; Rha, Chae-hun; Ku, Sae-Kwang

    2013-11-01

    The object of this study was to obtain acute oral toxicity information of Polycalcium, a mixed composition of Polycan and Calcium lactate-gluconate 1:9 (g/g), in Sprague-Dawely (SD) rats. In order to investigate the toxicity and identify target organs, Polycalcium were once orally administered to female and male SD rats at dose levels of 2000, 1000, 500 and 0 (control) mg/kg body weights. The mortality, changes on body weight and clinical signs were monitored during 14 days after treatment with gross observation, changes on the organ weights and histopathology of principle organs and treatment sites based on the recommendation of KFDA Guidelines [2009-116, 2009]. As the results of single oral treatment of Polycalcium, no treatment related mortalities were observed within 14 days after end of treatment up to 2000 mg/kg, the limited dosage of rodents in the both genders. In addition, no Polycalcium treatment related changes on the body and organ weights, clinical signs, necropsy and histopathological findings were detected. The results obtained in this study suggest that the Polycalcium is non-toxic in rats. The LD50 and approximate LD in rats after single oral dose of Polycalcium were considered over 2000 mg/kg in both female and male, respectively.

  17. The endothelial protein C receptor rs867186-GG genotype is associated with increased soluble EPCR and could mediate protection against severe malaria

    PubMed Central

    Shabani, Estela; Opoka, Robert O.; Bangirana, Paul; Park, Gregory S.; Vercellotti, Gregory M.; Guan, Weihua; Hodges, James S.; Lavstsen, Thomas; John, Chandy C.

    2016-01-01

    The endothelial protein C receptor (EPCR) appears to play an important role in Plasmodium falciparum endothelial cell binding in severe malaria (SM). Despite consistent findings of elevated soluble EPCR (sEPCR) in other infectious diseases, field studies to date have provided conflicting data about the role of EPCR in SM. To better define this role, we performed genotyping for the rs867186-G variant, associated with increased sEPCR levels, and measured sEPCR levels in two prospective studies of Ugandan children designed to understand immunologic and genetic factors associated with neurocognitive deficits in SM including 551 SM children, 71 uncomplicated malaria (UM) and 172 healthy community children (CC). The rs867186-GG genotype was more frequent in CC (4.1%) than SM (0.6%, P = 0.002). The rs867186-G variant was associated with increased sEPCR levels and sEPCR was lower in children with SM than CC (P < 0.001). Among SM children, those who had a second SM episode showed a trend toward lower plasma sEPCR both at initial admission and at 6-month follow-up compared to those without repeated SM (P = 0.06 for both). The study findings support a role for sEPCR in severe malaria pathogenesis and emphasize a distinct role of sEPCR in malaria as compared to other infectious diseases. PMID:27255786

  18. Disrupted Intestinal Microbiota and Intestinal Inflammation in Children with Cystic Fibrosis and Its Restoration with Lactobacillus GG: A Randomised Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Bruzzese, Eugenia; Callegari, Maria Luisa; Raia, Valeria; Viscovo, Sara; Scotto, Riccardo; Ferrari, Susanna; Morelli, Lorenzo; Buccigrossi, Vittoria; Lo Vecchio, Andrea; Ruberto, Eliana; Guarino, Alfredo

    2014-01-01

    Background & Aims Intestinal inflammation is a hallmark of cystic fibrosis (CF). Administration of probiotics can reduce intestinal inflammation and the incidence of pulmonary exacerbations. We investigated the composition of intestinal microbiota in children with CF and analyzed its relationship with intestinal inflammation. We also investigated the microflora structure before and after Lactobacillus GG (LGG) administration in children with CF with and without antibiotic treatment. Methods The intestinal microbiota were analyzed by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE), real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Intestinal inflammation was assessed by measuring fecal calprotectin (CLP) and rectal nitric oxide (rNO) production in children with CF as compared with healthy controls. We then carried out a small double-blind randomized clinical trial with LGG. Results Twenty-two children with CF children were enrolled in the study (median age, 7 years; range, 2–9 years). Fecal CLP and rNO levels were higher in children with CF than in healthy controls (184±146 µg/g vs. 52±46 µg/g; 18±15 vs. 2.6±1.2 µmol/L NO2−, respectively; P<0.01). Compared with healthy controls, children with CF had significantly different intestinal microbial core structures. The levels of Eubacterium rectale, Bacteroides uniformis, Bacteroides vulgatus, Bifidobacterium adolescentis, Bifidobacterium catenulatum, and Faecalibacterium prausnitzii were reduced in children with CF. A similar but more extreme pattern was observed in children with CF who were taking antibiotics. LGG administration reduced fecal CLP and partially restored intestinal microbiota. There was a significant correlation between reduced microbial richness and intestinal inflammation. Conclusions CF causes qualitative and quantitative changes in intestinal microbiota, which may represent a novel therapeutic target in the treatment of CF. Administration of

  19. Apomixis and ploidy barrier suppress pollen-mediated gene flow in field grown transgenic turf and forage grass (Paspalum notatum Flüggé).

    PubMed

    Sandhu, Sukhpreet; Blount, Ann R; Quesenberry, Kenneth H; Altpeter, Fredy

    2010-09-01

    Bahiagrass (Paspalum notatum Flüggé) is the predominant forage grass in the southeastern US. The commercially important bahiagrass cultivar 'Argentine' is preferred for genetic transformation over sexual diploid cytotypes, since it produces uniform seed progeny through apomixis. Pseudogamous apomictic seed production in Argentine bahiagrass may contribute to transgene confinement. It is characterized by embryo development which is independent of fertilization of the egg cell, but requires fertilization with compatible pollen to produce the endosperm. Pollen-mediated gene transfer from transgenic, glufosinate-resistant apomictic bahiagrass as pollen donor at close proximity (0.5-3.5 m) with non-transgenic sexual or apomictic bahiagrass cultivars as pollen receptors was evaluated under field conditions. Hybridization frequency was evaluated by glufosinate herbicide resistance in >23,300 seedlings derived from open-pollinated (OP) pollen receptor plants. Average gene transfer between transgenic apomictic, tetraploid and sexual diploid bahiagrass was 0.03%. Herbicide-resistant hybrids confirmed by immuno-chromatographic detection of the PAT protein displayed a single copy bar gene identical to the pollen parent. Hybrids resulting from diploid pollen receptors were confirmed as triploids or aneu-triploids with significantly reduced vigor and seed set as compared to the parents. Transmission of transgenes to sexual bahiagrass is severely restricted by the ploidy difference between tetraploid apomicts and diploid sexual bahiagrass. Average gene transfer between transgenic apomictic tetraploid and non-transgenic, apomictic tetraploid bahiagrass was 0.17%, confirming a very low frequency of amphimixis in apomictic bahiagrass cultivars. While not providing complete transgene containment, gene transfer between transgenic apomictic and non-transgenic bahiagrass occurs at a much lower frequency than reported for other cross-pollinating or facultative apomictic grasses.

  20. Expression of clpL1 and clpL2 genes in Lactobacillus rhamnosus VTT E-97800 after exposure to acid and heat stress treatments or to freeze-drying.

    PubMed

    Simões, C; Alakomi, H-L; Maukonen, J; Saarela, M

    2010-09-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the potential of utilising the information on expression levels of selected stress genes in assessing the quality of probiotic products. For this purpose RT-qPCR methods were developed to study the expression of clpL1 and clpL2 stress genes in Lactobacillus rhamnosus VTT E-97800 (E800) cells after exposure to processing-related stress conditions or to freeze-drying. Heat treatments in laboratory scale were performed with E800 cells incubated at 47 °C or 50 °C for 60 min. Acid treatments were performed both at laboratory and fermenter scale. At laboratory scale E800 cells were inoculated into General Edible Medium (GEM) adjusted to pH 4.0 and pH 3.5 and incubated at 37 °C for 180 min, whereas fermenter-grown cells were exposed to pH 4.0 for 60 min at the end of the fermentation. RNA from fresh cells and freeze-dried powders was reverse transcribed after isolation, quantification and standardisation. clpL1 and clpL2 transcripts were analysed by RT-qPCR with SYBR Green I. clpL1 was induced in L. rhamnosus E800 cells exposed to 50 °C and to a much lesser extent to 47 °C. No induction was observed for clpL2 in E800 cells during either acid or heat treatment, in any of the conditions applied. RNA isolation from freeze-dried powders was unsuccessful although several attempts were made with high quality products. In conclusion, our results suggest that developing quality indicators for probiotic products based on differences in the expression of stress genes is a challenging task for several reasons: at least with some genes (like in the present study with clpL) quite harsh conditions are needed to detect differences in the gene expression; mRNA isolation from freeze-dried powders was unsuccessful which hampers the quality analysis of large proportion of probiotic products; and furthermore RT-qPCR proved to be a too laborious procedure for routine use.

  1. Combined CDF and D0 upper limits on $gg\\to H\\to W^+W^-$ and constraints on the Higgs boson mass in fourth-generation fermion models with up to 8.2 fb$^{-1}$ of data

    SciTech Connect

    Benjamin, Doug; /Tufts U.

    2011-08-01

    We combine results from searches by the CDF and D0 Collaborations for a standard model Higgs boson (H) in the processes gg {yields} H {yields} W{sup +}W{sup -} and gg {yields} H {yields} ZZ in p{bar p} collisions at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. With 8.2 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity analyzed at CDF and 8.1 fb{sup -1} at D0, the 95% C.L. upper limit on {sigma}(gg {yields} H) x {Beta}(H {yields} W{sup +}W{sup -}) is 1.01 pb at m{sub H} = 120 GeV, 0.40 pb at m{sub H} = 165 GeV, and 0.47 pb at m{sub H} = 200 GeV. Assuming the presence of a fourth sequential generation of fermions with large masses, we exclude at the 95% Confidence Level a standard-model-like Higgs boson with a mass between 124 and 286 GeV.

  2. Lactobacillus casei strain GG in the treatment of infants with acute watery diarrhea: A randomized, double-blind, placebo controlled clinical trial [ISRCTN67363048

    PubMed Central

    Salazar-Lindo, Eduardo; Miranda-Langschwager, Percy; Campos-Sanchez, Miguel; Chea-Woo, Elsa; Sack, R Bradley

    2004-01-01

    Background Adjuvant therapy to ORT with probiotic bacteria for infants with acute watery diarrhea has been under active investigation. Most studies have been done in the developed world showing benefit only for viral mild gastroenteritis. We evaluated the effect of a milk formula containing one billion (109) cfu/ml of Lactobacillus casei strain GG (LGG) upon duration and severity of diarrhea in infants in an environment with more severe acute diarrhea, where etiologic agents other than rotavirus are involved more frequently, and where mixed infections are more prevalent. Methods Male infants aged 3–36 months brought for treatment of acute watery diarrhea of less than 48 hours were eligible. After rehydration was completed with the WHO's oral rehydration solution, patients were randomly assigned to receive a milk formula either containing LGG or not. Stool volume was periodically measured using a devise suited to collect stools separate from urine. Duration of diarrhea was estimated based on stools physical characteristics. Results Eighty nine patients received the placebo milk formula and ninety received the LGG containing formula. Both groups were comparable in their baseline characteristics. Total stool output was significantly larger (p = 0.047) in the LGG group (247.8 ml/kg) than in the placebo group (195.0 ml/kg). No significant differences were found in duration of diarrhea (58.5 hours with LGG vs. 50.4 hours with placebo), rate of treatment failure (21.1% with LGG vs. 18.0% with placebo), and proportion of patients with unresolved diarrhea after 120 hours (12.2% with LGG vs. 12.5% with placebo). The rate of stools with reducing substances after 24 hours of treatment increased significantly in both groups (from 41.4% to 72.2% with LGG and from 45.9% to 68.0% with placebo). Conclusion This study did not show a positive effect of LGG on the clinical course of acute watery diarrhea. Positive beneficial effects of LGG, as had been reported elsewhere, could have

  3. A Decade of Experience in Primary Prevention of Clostridium difficile Infection at a Community Hospital Using the Probiotic Combination Lactobacillus acidophilus CL1285, Lactobacillus casei LBC80R, and Lactobacillus rhamnosus CLR2 (Bio-K+).

    PubMed

    Maziade, Pierre-Jean; Pereira, Pascale; Goldstein, Ellie J C

    2015-05-15

    In August 2003, the 284-bed community hospital Pierre-Le Gardeur (PLGH) in Quebec experienced a major outbreak associated with the Clostridium difficile NAP1/027/BI strain. Augmented standard preventive measures (SPMs) were not able to control this outbreak. It was decided in February 2004 to give to every adult inpatient on antibiotics, without any exclusion, a probiotic (Bio-K+: Lactobacillus acidophilus CL1285, Lactobacillus casei LBC80R, and Lactobacillus rhamnosus CLR2) within 12 hours of the antibiotic prescription. Augmented SPMs were continued. The use of the probiotic in addition to SPMs was associated with a marked reduction of C. difficile infection (CDI). During the 10 years of observation, 44 835 inpatients received Bio-K+, and the CDI rate at PLGH declined from 18.0 cases per 10,000 patient-days and remained at low mean levels of 2.3 cases per 10,000 patient-days. Additionally, 10-year data collected by the Ministry of Health in Quebec comparing the CDI rate between Quebec hospitals showed that CDI rates at PLGH were consistently and continuously lower compared with those at similar hospitals. Blood cultures were monitored at PLGH for Lactobacillus bacteremia through the 10 years' experience, and no Lactobacillus bacteremias were detected. Despite the limitation of an observational study, we concluded that the probiotic Bio-K+ was safe and effective in decreasing our primary CDI rate.

  4. Comparison of Focus HerpesSelect® and Kalon™ HSV-2 gG2 ELISA serological assays to detect herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) antibodies in a South African population

    PubMed Central

    Delany, Sinéad; Jentsch, Ute; Weiss, Helen; Moyes, Jocelyn; Ashley-Morrow, Rhoda; Stevens, Wendy; Mayaud, Philippe

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Sero-epidemiological studies of herpes simplex virus type-2 (HSV-2) infection in Africa remain difficult to interpret owing to the high rate of false-positive results observed when using the new recombinant gG2 HSV-2 ELISA tests. We compared the performance of two widely used gG2 ELISAs to derive an appropriate testing algorithm for use in South Africa. Methods Sera from 210 women attending family planning clinics in Johannesburg were tested using HerpeSelect® and Kalon™ HSV-2 gG2 assays. Sera from 20 discordant pairs, 44 concordant positive and 33 concordant negative samples were further tested by HSV Western Blot (WB). Sensitivity and specificity of each test and of combination algorithms compared to WB were calculated. Results HerpeSelect® had a sensitivity of 98% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 95–100) and specificity of 61% (95%CI: 48–74). Kalon™ was less sensitive (89%, 95%CI: 83–94) but more specific (85%, 95%CI: 61–100). Seroprevalence may have been overestimated by as much as 14% by HerpeSelect®. Specificity was improved by raising the cut-off index for determination of a positive result for HerpeSelect® (to ≥3.5), but not for Kalon™. HIV-1 infection reduced the specificity of HerpeSelect® to 30%. Improved sensitivity and specificity were obtained by a two-test algorithm using HerpeSelect® (≥3.5) as the first test and Kalon™ to resolve equivocal results (sensitivity 92%, 95%CI: 82–98; specificity 91%, 95%CI: 79–98). Conclusion Newer HSV-2 serological tests have low specificity in this South African population with high HIV-1 prevalence. Two-step testing strategies could provide rational testing alternatives to WB. PMID:19837726

  5. How Are Preferences Revealed?

    PubMed Central

    Beshears, John; Choi, James J.; Laibson, David; Madrian, Brigitte C.

    2009-01-01

    Revealed preferences are tastes that rationalize an economic agent’s observed actions. Normative preferences represent the agent’s actual interests. It sometimes makes sense to assume that revealed preferences are identical to normative preferences. But there are many cases where this assumption is violated. We identify five factors that increase the likelihood of a disparity between revealed preferences and normative preferences: passive choice, complexity, limited personal experience, third-party marketing, and intertemporal choice. We then discuss six approaches that jointly contribute to the identification of normative preferences: structural estimation, active decisions, asymptotic choice, aggregated revealed preferences, reported preferences, and informed preferences. Each of these approaches uses consumer behavior to infer some property of normative preferences without equating revealed and normative preferences. We illustrate these issues with evidence from savings and investment outcomes. PMID:24761048

  6. Characterization of the antifungal activity of Lactobacillus harbinensis K.V9.3.1Np and Lactobacillus rhamnosus K.C8.3.1I in yogurt.

    PubMed

    Delavenne, Emilie; Cliquet, Sophie; Trunet, Clément; Barbier, Georges; Mounier, Jérôme; Le Blay, Gwenaëlle

    2015-02-01

    Few antifungal protective cultures adapted to fermented dairy products are commercially available because of the numerous constraints linked to their market implementation. Consumer's demand for naturally preserved food products is growing and the utilization of lactic acid bacteria is a promising way to achieve this goal. In this study, using a 2(5-1) factorial fractional design, we first evaluated the effects of fermentation time, of initial sucrose concentration and of the initial contamination amount of a spoilage yeast, on antifungal activities of single and mixed cultures of Lactobacillus rhamnosus K.C8.3.1I and Lactobacillus harbinensis K.V9.3.1Np in yogurt. L. harbinensis K.V9.3.1Np, the most relevant strain with regard to antifungal activity was then studied to determine its minimal inhibitory inoculation rate, its antifungal stability during storage and its impact on yogurt organoleptic properties. We showed that L. harbinensis K.V9.3.1Np maintained a stable antifungal activity over time, which was not affected by initial sucrose, nor by a reduction of the fermentation time. This inhibitory activity was an all-or-nothing phenomenon. Once L. harbinensis K.V9.3.1Np reached a population of ∼ 2.5 × 10(6) cfu/g of yogurt at the time of contamination, total inhibition of the yeast was achieved. We also showed that an inoculation rate of 5 × 10(6) cfu/ml in milk had no detrimental effect on yogurt organoleptic properties. In conclusion, L. harbinensis K.V9.3.1Np is a promising antifungal bioprotective strain for yogurt preservation.

  7. Probiotic features of Lactobacillus strains isolated from Ragusano and Pecorino Siciliano cheeses.

    PubMed

    Caggia, C; De Angelis, M; Pitino, I; Pino, A; Randazzo, C L

    2015-09-01

    In the present study 177 Lactobacillus spp. strains, isolated from Ragusano and Pecorino Siciliano cheeses, were in vitro screened for probiotic traits, and their characteristics were compared to those of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG, commercial strain. Based on acidic and bile salt resistance, thirteen Lactobacillus strains were selected. The multiplex-PCR application revealed that nine strains belonged to L. rhamnosus species and four to Lactobacillus paracasei species. All selected strains were further investigated for transit tolerance in simulated upper gastrointestinal tract (GI), for adhesion capacity to human intestinal cell lines, for hydrophobicity, for co-aggregation and auto-aggregation and for antimicrobial activities. Moreover, antibiotic resistance, hemolytic and bile salt hydrolase activities were investigated for safety assessment. Viable counts after simulated gastric and duodenal transit revealed that overall the selected lactobacilli tolerated better pancreatic juice and bile salts than acidic juice. In particular, three L. rhamnosus strains (FS10, FS2, and PS11) and one L. paracasei strain (PM8) increased their cell density after the simulated GI transit. The same strains showed also high percentage of auto-aggregation and co-aggregation with Escherichia coli. All strains were effective against both Staphylococcus aureus and E. coli and variability was achieved versus Listeria monocytogenes and Enterococcus faecalis used as pathogenic indicator strains. Different behavior was revealed by strains for adhesion ability and hydrophobicity, which are not always linked each other and are strongly strain-dependent. From the safety point of view, no isolate showed hemolytic and bile salt hydrolase activities, except one, and most of the strains were sensitive to a broad range of clinical antibiotics. This work showed that the L. rhamnosus FS10 and the L. paracasei PM8 are good promising probiotic candidates for further in vivo investigations.

  8. Oxidation of guanine in G, GG, and GGG sequence contexts by aromatic pyrenyl radical cations and carbonate radical anions: relationship between kinetics and distribution of alkali-labile lesions.

    PubMed

    Lee, Young Ae; Durandin, Alexander; Dedon, Peter C; Geacintov, Nicholas E; Shafirovich, Vladimir

    2008-02-14

    Oxidatively generated DNA damage induced by the aromatic radical cation of the pyrene derivative 7,8,9,10-tetrahydroxytetrahydrobenzo[a]pyrene (BPT), and by carbonate radicals anions, was monitored from the initial one-electron transfer, or hole injection step, to the formation of hot alkali-labile chemical end-products monitored by gel electrophoresis. The fractions of BPT molecules bound to double-stranded 20-35-mer oligonucleotides with noncontiguous guanines G and grouped as contiguous GG and GGG sequences were determined by a fluorescence quenching method. Utilizing intense nanosecond 355 nm Nd:YAG laser pulses, the DNA-bound BPT molecules were photoionized to BPT*+ radicals by a consecutive two-photon ionization mechanism. The BPT*+ radicals thus generated within the duplexes selectively oxidize guanine by intraduplex electron-transfer reactions, and the rate constants of these reactions follow the trend 5'-..GGG.. > 5'-..GG.. > 5'-..G... In the case of CO3*- radicals, the oxidation of guanine occurs by intermolecular collision pathways, and the bimolecular rate constants are independent of base sequence context. However, the distributions of the end-products generated by CO3*- radicals, as well as by BPT*+, are base sequence context-dependent and are greater than those in isolated guanines at the 5'-G in 5'-...GG... sequences, and the first two 5'- guanines in the 5'-..GGG sequences. These results help to clarify the conditions that lead to a similar or different base sequence dependence of the initial hole injection step and the final distribution of oxidized, alkali-labile guanine products. In the case of the intermolecular one-electron oxidant CO3*-, the rate constant of hole injection is similar for contiguous and isolated guanines, but the subsequent equilibration of holes by hopping favors trapping and product formation at contiguous guanines, and the sequence dependence of these two phenomena are not correlated. In contrast, in the case of the DNA

  9. Phylogenetic Analysis of a Spontaneous Cocoa Bean Fermentation Metagenome Reveals New Insights into Its Bacterial and Fungal Community Diversity

    PubMed Central

    Illeghems, Koen; De Vuyst, Luc; Papalexandratou, Zoi; Weckx, Stefan

    2012-01-01

    This is the first report on the phylogenetic analysis of the community diversity of a single spontaneous cocoa bean box fermentation sample through a metagenomic approach involving 454 pyrosequencing. Several sequence-based and composition-based taxonomic profiling tools were used and evaluated to avoid software-dependent results and their outcome was validated by comparison with previously obtained culture-dependent and culture-independent data. Overall, this approach revealed a wider bacterial (mainly γ-Proteobacteria) and fungal diversity than previously found. Further, the use of a combination of different classification methods, in a software-independent way, helped to understand the actual composition of the microbial ecosystem under study. In addition, bacteriophage-related sequences were found. The bacterial diversity depended partially on the methods used, as composition-based methods predicted a wider diversity than sequence-based methods, and as classification methods based solely on phylogenetic marker genes predicted a more restricted diversity compared with methods that took all reads into account. The metagenomic sequencing analysis identified Hanseniaspora uvarum, Hanseniaspora opuntiae, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Lactobacillus fermentum, and Acetobacter pasteurianus as the prevailing species. Also, the presence of occasional members of the cocoa bean fermentation process was revealed (such as Erwinia tasmaniensis, Lactobacillus brevis, Lactobacillus casei, Lactobacillus rhamnosus, Lactococcus lactis, Leuconostoc mesenteroides, and Oenococcus oeni). Furthermore, the sequence reads associated with viral communities were of a restricted diversity, dominated by Myoviridae and Siphoviridae, and reflecting Lactobacillus as the dominant host. To conclude, an accurate overview of all members of a cocoa bean fermentation process sample was revealed, indicating the superiority of metagenomic sequencing over previously used techniques. PMID:22666442

  10. Revealing power in truth

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kelley

    2015-01-01

    Jeremy Shiffman’s editorial appropriately calls on making all forms of power more apparent and accountable, notably productive power derived from expertise and claims to moral authority. This commentary argues that relationships based on productive power can be especially difficult to reveal in global health policy because of embedded notions about the nature of power and politics. Yet, it is essential to recognize that global health is shot through with power relationships, that they can take many forms, and that their explicit acknowledgement should be part of, rather than factored out of, any reform of global health governance. PMID:25844390

  11. The Universe Revealed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spence, Pam

    1998-10-01

    The Universe is a bewildering place to the uninitiated. The concepts and theories that govern space seem complex and often contradictory. The Universe Revealed provides the keys to unlocking the wonders of the cosmos. Elegantly written and lavishly illustrated, it begins with the Sun and stretches through our solar system into deepest space. Lucid prose, written by many of the people who have shaped our current thinking on space, and spectacular photographs make the physics of the Universe accessible and provide a solid background for understanding the most recent astronomical discoveries. Covering the most intriguing features of the cosmos, the topics discussed range from the Earth and global warming to cosmic collisions and the size of the Universe. Major sections examine the Solar System, stars, galaxies, cosmology, and the observational techniques used by astronomers, both amateur and professional. The Universe Revealed represents the collaboration of internationally renowned experts in astronomy and cosmology, with contributions from authors including David Malin, F. Duccio Macchetto, Iain Nicholson, Neil Bone, Ian Ridpath, Seth Shostak, Mike Lancaster, Steve Miller, Ken Croswell, Geoff McNamara, and Steven Young. This extraordinary blend of astronomy, astrophysics, and cosmology, will appeal to amateur and armchair astronomers alike.

  12. Gusev's Rim Revealed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit took this panoramic camera image on sol 91 (April 5, 2004). Spirit is looking to the southeast, and through the martian haze has captured the rim of Gusev Crater approximately 80 kilometers (49.7 miles) away on the horizon.

    The right side of this image reveals the portion of the crater edge that descends into the mouth of Ma'adim Vallis, a channel that opens into Gusev Crater. Spirit is currently traveling toward the informally named 'Columbia Hills,' which lie to the left of the region pictured here.

    This image is similar to a panoramic camera image taken on sol 68, but Gusev's ridge is more visible here because the atmospheric dust caused by winter dust storms has settled. Scientists expect to get even clearer images than this one in upcoming sols.

    This image has been modified to make the crater rim more visible.

  13. Ancient River revealed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Recent flights of the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) mission aboard the space shuttle Endeavour discovered a previously unknown branch of an ancient river. The images, released at AGU's Spring Meeting, show the river channel buried under thousands of years worth of windblown sand in a region of North Africa's Sahara Desert near the Kufra Oasis in southeast Libya, centered at 23.3°N latitude, 22.9°E longitude. The image from the flight last October reveals a system of old, now inactive stream valleys, called “paleodrainage systems,” which carried running water northward across the Sahara during periods of wetter climate.

  14. Probiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus GR-1 and Lactobacillus reuteri RC-14 may help downregulate TNF-Alpha, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10 and IL-12 (p70) in the neurogenic bladder of spinal cord injured patient with urinary tract infections: a two-case study.

    PubMed

    Anukam, Kingsley C; Hayes, Keith; Summers, Kelly; Reid, Gregor

    2009-01-01

    The management of urinary tract infection (UTI) in individuals with spinal cord injury (SCI) continues to be of concern, due to complications that can occur. An emerging concept that is a common underlying pathophysiological process is involved, wherein pathogens causing UTI have a role in inflammatory progression. We hypothesized that members of the commensal flora, such as lactobacilli, may counter this reaction through anti-inflammatory mediation. This was assessed in a pilot two-patient study in which probiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus GR-1 and Lactobacillus reuteri were administered to one patient and placebo to another, both along with antibiotics to treat acute UTI. Urinary TNF-alpha was significantly downregulated (P = .015) in the patient who received the probiotic and who used intermittent catheterization compared with patient on placebo and using an indwelling catheter. The extent to which this alteration resulted in improved well-being in spinal cord injured patients remains to be determined in a larger study.

  15. Probiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus GR-1 and Lactobacillus reuteri RC-14 May Help Downregulate TNF-Alpha, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10 and IL-12 (p70) in the Neurogenic Bladder of Spinal Cord Injured Patient with Urinary Tract Infections: A Two-Case Study

    PubMed Central

    Anukam, Kingsley C.; Hayes, Keith; Summers, Kelly; Reid, Gregor

    2009-01-01

    The management of urinary tract infection (UTI) in individuals with spinal cord injury (SCI) continues to be of concern, due to complications that can occur. An emerging concept that is a common underlying pathophysiological process is involved, wherein pathogens causing UTI have a role in inflammatory progression. We hypothesized that members of the commensal flora, such as lactobacilli, may counter this reaction through anti-inflammatory mediation. This was assessed in a pilot two-patient study in which probiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus GR-1 and Lactobacillus reuteri were administered to one patient and placebo to another, both along with antibiotics to treat acute UTI. Urinary TNF-alpha was significantly downregulated (P = .015) in the patient who received the probiotic and who used intermittent catheterization compared with patient on placebo and using an indwelling catheter. The extent to which this alteration resulted in improved well-being in spinal cord injured patients remains to be determined in a larger study. PMID:19753131

  16. Study on the Influence of Tea Extract on Probiotics in Skim Milk: From Probiotics Propagation to Metabolite.

    PubMed

    Li, Sha; Gong, Guangyu; Ma, Chengjie; Liu, Zhenmin; Cai, Jie

    2016-08-01

    In this study, the influence of tea extract (TE) on the growth of probiotics in skim milk was examined. Lactobacillus plantarum ST-III, Bifidobacterium bifidum Bb02, Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM, and Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG were used in this study. The introduction of TE in milk significantly stimulated the propagation and acidification of L. rhamnosus GG and L. acidophilus NCFM. The antioxidant capacities and the total free amino acid contents of all fermented milk products were enhanced by the addition of TE; however, there were different antioxidant properties and free amino acid contents of fermented milk samples fermented by different bacteria. With a 9% (w/w) level, the fermentation with L. rhamnosus GG and L. acidophilus NCFM showed larger numbers of viable cells and faster acidifying rates, as well as excellent antioxidant capacity and abundant free amino acids.  The stimulative effects of TE on probiotics can be considered for industrial purposes and has practical implications for commercial applications.

  17. Titan Casts Revealing Shadow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2004-05-01

    A rare celestial event was captured by NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory as Titan -- Saturn's largest moon and the only moon in the Solar System with a thick atmosphere -- crossed in front of the X-ray bright Crab Nebula. The X-ray shadow cast by Titan allowed astronomers to make the first X-ray measurement of the extent of its atmosphere. On January 5, 2003, Titan transited the Crab Nebula, the remnant of a supernova explosion that was observed to occur in the year 1054. Although Saturn and Titan pass within a few degrees of the Crab Nebula every 30 years, they rarely pass directly in front of it. "This may have been the first transit of the Crab Nebula by Titan since the birth of the Crab Nebula," said Koji Mori of Pennsylvania State University in University Park, and lead author on an Astrophysical Journal paper describing these results. "The next similar conjunction will take place in the year 2267, so this was truly a once in a lifetime event." Animation of Titan's Shadow on Crab Nebula Animation of Titan's Shadow on Crab Nebula Chandra's observation revealed that the diameter of the X-ray shadow cast by Titan was larger than the diameter of its solid surface. The difference in diameters gives a measurement of about 550 miles (880 kilometers) for the height of the X-ray absorbing region of Titan's atmosphere. The extent of the upper atmosphere is consistent with, or slightly (10-15%) larger, than that implied by Voyager I observations made at radio, infrared, and ultraviolet wavelengths in 1980. "Saturn was about 5% closer to the Sun in 2003, so increased solar heating of Titan may account for some of this atmospheric expansion," said Hiroshi Tsunemi of Osaka University in Japan, one of the coauthors on the paper. The X-ray brightness and extent of the Crab Nebula made it possible to study the tiny X-ray shadow cast by Titan during its transit. By using Chandra to precisely track Titan's position, astronomers were able to measure a shadow one arcsecond in

  18. Revealing the Beast Within

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2003-07-01

    Deeply Embedded Massive Stellar Clusters Discovered in Milky Way Powerhouse Summary Peering into a giant molecular cloud in the Milky Way galaxy - known as W49 - astronomers from the European Southern Observatory (ESO) have discovered a whole new population of very massive newborn stars . This research is being presented today at the International Astronomical Union's 25th General Assembly held in Sydney, Australia, by ESO-scientist João Alves. With the help of infrared images obtained during a period of excellent observing conditions with the ESO 3.5-m New Technology Telescope (NTT) at the La Silla Observatory (Chile), the astronomers looked deep into this molecular cloud and discovered four massive stellar clusters, with hot and energetic stars as massive as 120 solar masses. The exceedingly strong radiation from the stars in the largest of these clusters is "powering" a 20 light-year diameter region of mostly ionized hydrogen gas (a "giant HII region"). W49 is one of the most energetic regions of star formation in the Milky Way. With the present discovery, the true sources of the enormous energy have now been revealed for the first time, finally bringing to an end some decades of astronomical speculations and hypotheses. PR Photo 21a/03 : Colour Composite of W49A (NTT+SOFI). PR Photo 21b/03 : Radio and Near-Infrared Composite of W49A Giant molecular clouds Stars form predominantly inside Giant Molecular Clouds which populate our Galaxy, the Milky Way. One of the most prominent of these is W49 , which has a mass of a million solar masses. It is located some 37,000 light-years away and is the most luminous star-forming region known in our home galaxy: its luminosity is several million times the luminosity of our Sun. A smaller region within this cloud is denoted W49A - this is one of the strongest radio-emitting areas known in the Galaxy . Massive stars are excessive in all ways. Compared to their smaller and ligther brethren, they form at an Olympic speed and

  19. Transcription by eucaryotic and procaryotic RNA polymerases of DNA modified at a d(GG) or a d(AG) site by the antitumor drug cis-diamminedichloroplatinum (II)

    SciTech Connect

    Corda, Y.; Job, C.; Job, D. ); Anin, M-F.; Leng, M. )

    1991-01-01

    The authors have investigated whether DNA modifed at a d(GG) or a d(AG) site by the chemotherapeutic drug cis-diamminedichloroplatinum(II) (cis-DDP) can be used as template by wheat germ RNA polymerase II. The templates used in the present study were obtained by ligation of double-helical oligodeoxyribonucleotides, containing 18 pyrimidine bases and 2 central dG, or dA and dG, bases on one strand and 18 purine bases and 2 central dC, or dT and dC, bases on the complementary strand. Therefore, the cis-DDP adducts are only present on one strand of each of the two templates and are regularly spaced by 18 pyrimidine bases. These constructs allowed the authors to investigate the effect of cis-DDP on transcription of the platinated strand and of the complementary unplatinated sequence. Transcription experiments were carried out in the presence of dinucleotide primers and either a single triphosphate substrate (abortive elongation) or the full set of triphosphate substrates dictated by the template sequence (productive elongation). The results show taht the eucraryotic RNA polymerase can catalyze dinucleotide-primed reactions on platinated DNA. However, the eurcaryotic enzyme behaved very differently depending on which strand was transcribed. Thus, transcription elongation was completely blocked on the strand carrying the metal complex, whereas transcription elongation was not blocked on the complementary template strand. Similar results were obtained in transcription of the platinated templates by Escherichia coli RNA polymerase, suggesting that the cis-DDP-induced effect is associated with modifications of the basic catalytic properties of the transcriptases.

  20. [Nephrocutaneous fistula revealing xanthogranulomatous pyelonephritis].

    PubMed

    Scotté, M; Sibert, L; Soury, P; Lebret, T; Gobet, F; Grise, P; Tenière, P

    1993-01-01

    A patient presented with a reno-cutaneous fistula revealing a xanthogranulomatous pyelonephritis secondary to staghorn calculus. Total nephrectomy was necessary because of renal destruction. This treatment allowed closure of the fistula and a good clinical result.

  1. Two Unique Glioma Subtypes Revealed.

    PubMed

    Poh, Alissa

    2016-04-01

    A comprehensive analysis of 1,122 diffuse glioma samples from The Cancer Genome Atlas has revealed two new subtypes of this common brain cancer, with molecular and clinical features that diverge from the norm. The study findings also support the use of DNA methylation profiles to improve glioma classification and treatment.

  2. Ischemic Colitis Revealing Polyarteritis Nodosa

    PubMed Central

    Hamzaoui, Amira; Litaiem, Noureddine; Smiti Khanfir, M.; Ayadi, Sofiene; Nfoussi, Haifa; Houman, M. H.

    2013-01-01

    Ischemic colitis is one of the most common intestinal ischemic injuries. It results from impaired perfusion of blood to the bowel and is rarely caused by vasculitis. We report a case of ischemic colitis revealing polyarteritis nodosa (PAN) in a 55-year-old man. Histological examination of the resected colon led to the diagnosis of PAN. PMID:24382967

  3. Nutritionally enhanced fermented sausages as a vehicle for potential probiotic lactobacilli delivery.

    PubMed

    Rubio, Raquel; Jofré, Anna; Aymerich, Teresa; Guàrdia, Maria Dolors; Garriga, Margarita

    2014-02-01

    The suitability of three potential probiotic lactobacilli strains (Lactobacillus casei CTC1677, L. casei CTC1678 and Lactobacillus rhamnosus CTC1679), previously isolated from infants' faeces and characterized, and three commercial probiotic strains (Lactobacillus plantarum 299v, L. rhamnosus GG and L. casei Shirota) was assessed during the manufacture of low-acid fermented sausages (fuets) with reduced Na(+) and fat content. The inoculated strains were successfully monitored by RAPD-PCR during the process. L. rhamnosus CTC1679 was the only strain able to grow and dominate (levels ca. 10(8)CFU/g) the endogenous lactic acid bacteria population in two independent trials, throughout the ripening process. Thus, fuet containing L. rhamnosus CTC1679 as a starter culture could be a suitable vehicle for putative probiotic bacteria delivery. All the final products recorded a satisfactory overall sensory quality without any noticeable off-flavour, and with the characteristic sensory properties of low-acid fermented sausages.

  4. Characterization of a Panela cheese with added probiotics and fava bean starch

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Twenty Lactobacillus spp. and eight Bifidobacterium spp. were screened for their ability to ferment fava bean starch. B. breve ATCC 15700 and L. rhamnosus GG ATCC 53103 were selected as probiotics for use in fresh style Panela cheese. Two types of fresh cheese (with and without 3% fava bean starch) ...

  5. [Seizures revealing phosphocalcic metabolism abnormalities].

    PubMed

    Hmami, F; Chaouki, S; Benmiloud, S; Souilmi, F Z; Abourazzak, S; Idrissi, M; Atmani, S; Bouharrou, A; Hida, M

    2014-01-01

    Hypocalcemia due to hypoparathyroidism produces a broad spectrum of clinical manifestations, but overt symptoms may be sparse. One unusual presentation is onset or aggravation of epilepsy in adolescence revealing hypoparathyroidism. This situation can lead to delayed diagnosis, with inefficacity of the antiepileptic drugs. We report five cases of adolescence-onset epilepsy with unsuccessful antiepileptic therapy, even with gradually increasing dose. Physical examination revealed signs of hypocalcemia, confirmed biologically. Full testing disclosed the origin of the seizures: hypoparathyroidism in three patients and pseudohypoparathyroidism in the other two. In four of five patients, computed tomography showed calcification of the basal ganglia, defining Fahr's syndrome. The patients were treated with oral calcium and active vitamin D (1-alphahydroxy vitamin D3). Seizure frequency progressively decreased and serum calcium levels returned to normal. These cases illustrate the importance of the physical examination and of routine serum calcium assay in patients with new-onset epileptic seizures in order to detect hypocalcemia secondary to hypoparathyroidism.

  6. Revealing the microstructure of materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, James A.

    1990-01-01

    The objectives are to demonstrate how the microstructure of materials may be revealed by abrasive polishing and chemical etching, and to illustrate how microstructural information is used to monitor manufacturing processes, provide in-depth inspection, and perform failure analysis. Microstructural analysis is the procedure used to reveal the internal microstructural details of a material or part by sectioning and polishing the cut surface so that it may be examined under a suitable microscope. A printed wiring board was selected as the test material because it contains both metals and nonmetals that have distinctive microstructures, and because this technique is used throughout the electronic industry as a key quality control tool. The three principle component materials in printed circuit boards are glass/epoxy laminates faced with copper foil; copper, deposited by both electroless and electrolytic plating; and tin/lead solder. Sample preparation, mounting, grinding, polishing, and examination and analysis are discussed.

  7. Archimedes: Accelerator Reveals Ancient Text

    SciTech Connect

    Bergmann, Uwe

    2004-02-24

    Archimedes (287-212 BC), who is famous for shouting 'Eureka' (I found it) is considered one of the most brilliant thinkers of all times. The 10th-century parchment document known as the 'Archimedes Palimpsest' is the unique source for two of the great Greek's treatises. Some of the writings, hidden under gold forgeries, have recently been revealed at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory at SLAC. An intense x-ray beam produced in a particle accelerator causes the iron in original ink, which has been partly erased and covered, to send out a fluorescence glow. A detector records the signal and a digital image showing the ancient writings is produced. Please join us in this fascinating journey of a 1,000-year-old parchment from its origin in the Mediterranean city of Constantinople to a particle accelerator in Menlo Park.

  8. Revealing Non-Covalent Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Erin R.; Keinan, Shahar; Mori-Sánchez, Paula; Contreras-García, Julia; Cohen, Aron J.; Yang, Weitao

    2010-01-01

    Molecular structure does not easily identify the intricate non-covalent interactions that govern many areas of biology and chemistry, including design of new materials and drugs. We develop an approach to detect non-covalent interactions in real space, based on the electron density and its derivatives. Our approach reveals underlying chemistry that compliments the covalent structure. It provides a rich representation of van der Waals interactions, hydrogen bonds, and steric repulsion in small molecules, molecular complexes, and solids. Most importantly, the method, requiring only knowledge of the atomic coordinates, is efficient and applicable to large systems, such as proteins or DNA. Across these applications, a view of non-bonded interactions emerges as continuous surfaces rather than close contacts between atom pairs, offering rich insight into the design of new and improved ligands. PMID:20394428

  9. Revealing hidden genuine tripartite nonlocality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, Biswajit; Mukherjee, Kaushiki; Sarkar, Debasis

    2016-11-01

    Nonlocal correlations arising from measurements on tripartite entangled states can be classified into two groups, one genuinely three-way nonlocal and other local with respect to some bipartition. Still, whether a genuinely tripartite entangled quantum state can exhibit genuine three-way nonlocality remains a challenging problem as far as measurement context is concerned. Here we introduce an approach in this regard. We consider three tripartite quantum states, none of which is genuinely three-way nonlocal in a specific Bell scenario (three parties, two measurements per party, two outcomes per measurement), but they can exhibit genuine three-way nonlocality when the initial states are subjected to stochastic local operations and classical communication. So, genuine three-way nonlocality is a resource which can be revealed by using a sequence of measurements.

  10. Revealing ontological commitments by magic.

    PubMed

    Griffiths, Thomas L

    2015-03-01

    Considering the appeal of different magical transformations exposes some systematic asymmetries. For example, it is more interesting to transform a vase into a rose than a rose into a vase. An experiment in which people judged how interesting they found different magic tricks showed that these asymmetries reflect the direction a transformation moves in an ontological hierarchy: transformations in the direction of animacy and intelligence are favored over the opposite. A second and third experiment demonstrated that judgments of the plausibility of machines that perform the same transformations do not show the same asymmetries, but judgments of the interestingness of such machines do. A formal argument relates this sense of interestingness to evidence for an alternative to our current physical theory, with magic tricks being a particularly pure source of such evidence. These results suggest that people's intuitions about magic tricks can reveal the ontological commitments that underlie human cognition.

  11. Plan competitions reveal entrepreneurial talent

    SciTech Connect

    Madison, Alison L.

    2011-05-15

    Monthly economic diversity column for Tri-City Herald business section. Excerpt below: There’s something to be said for gaining valuable real-world experience in a structured, nurturing environment. Take for instance learning to scuba dive in the comfort of my resort pool rather than immediately hanging out with sharks while I figure out little things like oxygen tanks and avoiding underwater panic attacks. Likewise, graduate students are getting some excellent, supportive real-world training through university business plan competitions. These competitions are places where smart minds, new technologies, months of preparation and coaching, and some healthy pre-presentation jitters collide to reveal not only solid new business ideas, but also some promising entrepreneurial talent. In fact, professionals from around our region descend upon college campuses every spring to judge these events, which help to bridge the gap between academics and the real technology and business-driven economy.

  12. Erosion and what it Reveals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Released 20 November 2003

    This image is located near the boundary between Syrtis Major and Isidis Planitia. The top of the image shows rough material that has eroded away from the lower portion of the image, revealing an underlying surface that has many small craters. It also reveals an ancient flow lobe that is barely discernable, crossing the southern part of the image (this flow lobe is much easier to see as a smooth region in the context image).

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 16.4, Longitude 77.9 East (282.1 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  13. APEX reveals glowing stellar nurseries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2008-11-01

    Illustrating the power of submillimetre-wavelength astronomy, an APEX image reveals how an expanding bubble of ionised gas about ten light-years across is causing the surrounding material to collapse into dense clumps that are the birthplaces of new stars. Submillimetre light is the key to revealing some of the coldest material in the Universe, such as these cold, dense clouds. Glowing Stellar Nurseries ESO PR Photo 40/08 Glowing Stellar Nurseries The region, called RCW120, is about 4200 light years from Earth, towards the constellation of Scorpius. A hot, massive star in its centre is emitting huge amounts of ultraviolet radiation, which ionises the surrounding gas, stripping the electrons from hydrogen atoms and producing the characteristic red glow of so-called H-alpha emission. As this ionised region expands into space, the associated shock wave sweeps up a layer of the surrounding cold interstellar gas and cosmic dust. This layer becomes unstable and collapses under its own gravity into dense clumps, forming cold, dense clouds of hydrogen where new stars are born. However, as the clouds are still very cold, with temperatures of around -250˚ Celsius, their faint heat glow can only be seen at submillimetre wavelengths. Submillimetre light is therefore vital in studying the earliest stages of the birth and life of stars. The submillimetre-wavelength data were taken with the LABOCA camera on the 12-m Atacama Pathfinder Experiment (APEX) telescope, located on the 5000 m high plateau of Chajnantor in the Chilean Atacama desert. Thanks to LABOCA's high sensitivity, astronomers were able to detect clumps of cold gas four times fainter than previously possible. Since the brightness of the clumps is a measure of their mass, this also means that astronomers can now study the formation of less massive stars than they could before. The plateau of Chajnantor is also where ESO, together with international partners, is building a next generation submillimetre telescope, ALMA

  14. Hubble Images Reveal Jupiter's Auroras

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    These images, taken by the Hubble Space Telescope, reveal changes in Jupiter's auroral emissions and how small auroral spots just outside the emission rings are linked to the planet's volcanic moon, Io. The images represent the most sensitive and sharply-detailed views ever taken of Jovian auroras.

    The top panel pinpoints the effects of emissions from Io, which is about the size of Earth's moon. The black-and-white image on the left, taken in visible light, shows how Io and Jupiter are linked by an invisible electrical current of charged particles called a 'flux tube.' The particles - ejected from Io (the bright spot on Jupiter's right) by volcanic eruptions - flow along Jupiter's magnetic field lines, which thread through Io, to the planet's north and south magnetic poles. This image also shows the belts of clouds surrounding Jupiter as well as the Great Red Spot.

    The black-and-white image on the right, taken in ultraviolet light about 15 minutes later, shows Jupiter's auroral emissions at the north and south poles. Just outside these emissions are the auroral spots. Called 'footprints,' the spots are created when the particles in Io's 'flux tube' reach Jupiter's upper atmosphere and interact with hydrogen gas, making it fluoresce. In this image, Io is not observable because it is faint in the ultraviolet.

    The two ultraviolet images at the bottom of the picture show how the auroral emissions change in brightness and structure as Jupiter rotates. These false-color images also reveal how the magnetic field is offset from Jupiter's spin axis by 10 to 15 degrees. In the right image, the north auroral emission is rising over the left limb; the south auroral oval is beginning to set. The image on the left, obtained on a different date, shows a full view of the north aurora, with a strong emission inside the main auroral oval.

    The images were taken by the telescope's Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2 between May 1994 and September 1995.

    This image and

  15. Chandra Reveals Rich Oxygen Supply

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    This striking Chandra X-Ray Observatory image of supernova remnant SNR0103-72.6 reveals a nearly perfect ring about 150 light years in diameter surrounding a cloud of gas enriched in oxygen and shock-heated to millions of degrees Celsius. The ring marks the outer limits of a shock wave produced as material ejected in the supernova explosion collides with the interstellar gas. The size of the ring indicates that we see the supernova remnant as it was about 10,000 years after its progenitor star exploded. Located in the Small Magenellanic Cloud (SMC), SNR 0103-72.6 is about 190,000 light years from Earth. The x-rays take about 190,000 years to reach us from the SMC, so the supernova explosion occurred about 200,000 years ago, as measured on Earth. Scientists have know for years that oxygen and many other elements necessary for life are created in massive stars and dispersed in supernova explosions, but few remnants rich in these elements have been observed. This supernova remnant will hence become an important laboratory for studying how stars forge the elements necessary for life.

  16. Dilated Cardiomyopathy Revealing Cushing Disease

    PubMed Central

    Marchand, Lucien; Segrestin, Bérénice; Lapoirie, Marion; Favrel, Véronique; Dementhon, Julie; Jouanneau, Emmanuel; Raverot, Gérald

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Cardiovascular impairments are frequent in Cushing's syndrome and the hypercortisolism can result in cardiac structural and functional changes that lead in rare cases to dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM). Such cardiac impairment may be reversible in response to a eucortisolaemic state. A 43-year-old man with a medical past of hypertension and history of smoking presented to the emergency department with global heart failure. Coronary angiography showed a significant stenosis of a marginal branch and cardiac MRI revealed a nonischemic DCM. The left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) was estimated as 28% to 30%. Clinicobiological features and pituitary imaging pointed toward Cushing's disease and administration of adrenolytic drugs (metyrapone and ketoconazole) was initiated. Despite the normalization of cortisol which had been achieved 2 months later, the patient presented an acute heart failure. A massive mitral regurgitation secondary to posterior papillary muscle rupture was diagnosed as a complication of the occlusion of the marginal branch. After 6 months of optimal pharmacological treatment for systolic heart failure, as well as treatment with inhibitors of steroidogenesis, there was no improvement of LVEF. The percutaneous mitral valve was therefore repaired and a defibrillator implanted. The severity of heart failure contraindicated pituitary surgery and the patient was instead treated by stereotaxic radiotherapy. This is the first case reporting a Cushing's syndrome DCM without improvement of LVEF despite normalization of serum cortisol levels. PMID:26579807

  17. Satellites reveal Antarctic mass imbalance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shepherd, A.

    2004-05-01

    Satellite radar observations have revealed a widespread mass imbalance in western Antarctica and rapid thinning of ice shelves at the Antarctic Peninsula. The former shows grounded ice retreat in a region previously considered unstable to such events, and the latter illuminates an ongoing debate as to the mechanism through which ice shelves have disintegrated over the past decade. Both measurements inform us as to the present state of balance of the cryosphere and its interactions with the southern oceans. Since 1992, the Amundsen Sea sector of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet has lost 39 cubic kilometers of its volume each year due to an imbalance between snow accumulation and ice discharge. A flow disturbance is responsible for removing the majority of that ice from the trunks of the Pine Island, Thwaites and Smith glacier drainage systems, raising global sea level by over 1 mm during the past decade alone. The coincidence of rapid ice thinning at the Amundsen Coast and warm circumpolar deep water intrusion in Pine Island Bay, coupled with a ~ 50 cubic kilometre annual freshening of the Ross Sea Gyre downstream, makes ocean melting an attractive proposition for the origin of the regional disturbance. At the same time, the Larsen Ice Shelf surface has lowered by up to 0.27 m per year, in tandem with a period of atmospheric warming and ice shelf collapse. The lowering cannot be explained by increased summer melt-water production alone, and must reflect a loss of basal ice through melting. Ocean temperature measurements close to the ice shelf barrier support this conclusion, making enhanced basal ice melting a likely factor linking the regional climate warming and the successive disintegration of sections of the Larsen Ice Shelf.

  18. Pharmacogenetics of OATP Transporters Reveals That SLCO1B1 c.388A>G Variant Is Determinant of Increased Atorvastatin Response

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Alice C.; Perin, Paula M. S.; Purim, Sheila G.; Silbiger, Vivian N.; Genvigir, Fabiana D. V.; Willrich, Maria Alice V.; Arazi, Simone S.; Luchessi, Andre D.; Hirata, Mario H.; Bernik, Marcia M. S.; Dorea, Egidio L.; Santos, Carla; Faludi, Andre A.; Bertolami, Marcelo C.; Salas, Antonio; Freire, Ana; Lareu, Maria V.; Phillips, Christopher; Porras-Hurtado, Liliana; Fondevila, Manuel; Carracedo, Angel; Hirata, Rosario D. C.

    2011-01-01

    Aims The relationship between variants in SLCO1B1 and SLCO2B1 genes and lipid-lowering response to atorvastatin was investigated. Material and Methods One-hundred-thirty-six unrelated individuals with hypercholesterolemia were selected and treated with atorvastatin (10 mg/day/4 weeks). They were genotyped with a panel of ancestry informative markers for individual African component of ancestry (ACA) estimation by SNaPshot® and SLCO1B1 (c.388A>G, c.463C>A and c.521T>C) and SLCO2B1 (−71T>C) gene polymorphisms were identified by TaqMan® Real-time PCR. Results Subjects carrying SLCO1B1 c.388GG genotype exhibited significantly high low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol reduction relative to c.388AA+c.388AG carriers (41 vs. 37%, p = 0.034). Haplotype analysis revealed that homozygous of SLCO1B1*15 (c.521C and c.388G) variant had similar response to statin relative to heterozygous and non-carriers. A multivariate logistic regression analysis confirmed that c.388GG genotype was associated with higher LDL cholesterol reduction in the study population (OR: 3.2, CI95%:1.3–8.0, p < 0.05). Conclusion SLCO1B1 c.388A>G polymorphism causes significant increase in atorvastatin response and may be an important marker for predicting efficacy of lipid-lowering therapy. PMID:22016628

  19. Gamma-ray solid laser: variety of work nuclei and host matrixes in Mendeleev Table screened with use of system of criteria based on joint GG&RH theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karyagin, Stanislav V.

    2001-03-01

    The hosts and nuclei-candidates (mass approximately 46 - 243, transition energy approximately 1 - 200 keV, decay's time 10-7 - 10+2 s) for gamma-laser (GL) realization are represented over Mendeleev Table. The choice of active media (nuclei-candidates, hosts) for GL is based on the joint theory of (gamma) -generation and radiation-heat regime which accounts a big complex of hindrances against GL and thus discards many tentative candidates. Nuclei- candidates are screened at the analyzing of data banks for nuclear transitions. Chosen candidates (approximately 20) could be used due to author's method SPTEN (Soft Prompt Transplantation of Excited Nuclei). The discarded tentative nuclei (approximately 80) with the life-times 10-6 - 10+2 are represented too. All analyzed long-lived (approximately 0.5 - 10+2 s) isomers are turned to be not fit for GL without use of very strong multi-wave Borrman effect even at the supposition of natural line's width. The application of the revealed candidates in two different (gamma) -laser's categories (residential and non- residential) is discussed.

  20. [Cholangitis revealing an intrahepatic Osler's disease].

    PubMed

    Asma, Kochlef; Dalila, Gargouri; Olfa, Bousnina; Malika, Romani; Afef, Kilani; Najet, BelHadg; Jamel, Kharrat; Abdeljabbar, Gorbel; Sarra, Shili; Chiraz, Jemli; Mohamed, Habib Daghfous; Slim, Khlifi; Anis, Ben Maamer; Abdelmajid, Letaïef

    2005-08-01

    Osler Weber Rendu Disease is an hereditary haemorrhagic télangectasia habitually revealed by reccurent bleeding (epistaxis). Hepatic involvement in Osler disease is found in 8 to 31%, manifested by cholestasis. We report an original observation of a cholangitis revealing Osler disease.

  1. REVEAL: Software Documentation and Platform Migration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Michael A.; Veibell, Victoir T.; Freudinger, Lawrence C.

    2008-01-01

    The Research Environment for Vehicle Embedded Analysis on Linux (REVEAL) is reconfigurable data acquisition software designed for network-distributed test and measurement applications. In development since 2001, it has been successfully demonstrated in support of a number of actual missions within NASA s Suborbital Science Program. Improvements to software configuration control were needed to properly support both an ongoing transition to operational status and continued evolution of REVEAL capabilities. For this reason the project described in this report targets REVEAL software source documentation and deployment of the software on a small set of hardware platforms different from what is currently used in the baseline system implementation. This report specifically describes the actions taken over a ten week period by two undergraduate student interns and serves as a final report for that internship. The topics discussed include: the documentation of REVEAL source code; the migration of REVEAL to other platforms; and an end-to-end field test that successfully validates the efforts.

  2. Hiding personal information reveals the worst

    PubMed Central

    John, Leslie K.; Barasz, Kate; Norton, Michael I.

    2016-01-01

    Seven experiments explore people’s decisions to share or withhold personal information, and the wisdom of such decisions. When people choose not to reveal information—to be “hiders”—they are judged negatively by others (experiment 1). These negative judgments emerge when hiding is volitional (experiments 2A and 2B) and are driven by decreases in trustworthiness engendered by decisions to hide (experiments 3A and 3B). Moreover, hiders do not intuit these negative consequences: given the choice to withhold or reveal unsavory information, people often choose to withhold, but observers rate those who reveal even questionable behavior more positively (experiments 4A and 4B). The negative impact of hiding holds whether opting not to disclose unflattering (drug use, poor grades, and sexually transmitted diseases) or flattering (blood donations) information, and across decisions ranging from whom to date to whom to hire. When faced with decisions about disclosure, decision-makers should be aware not just of the risk of revealing, but of what hiding reveals. PMID:26755591

  3. Two loop correction to interference in $gg \\to ZZ$

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, John M.; Ellis, R. Keith; Czakon, Michal; Kirchner, Sebastian

    2016-08-01

    We present results for the production of a pair of on-shell Z bosons via gluon-gluon fusion. This process occurs both through the production and decay of the Higgs boson, and through continuum production where the Z boson couples to a loop of massless quarks or to a massive quark. We calculate the interference of the two processes and its contribution to the cross section up to and including order O(α$_{s}^{3}$ ). The two-loop contributions to the amplitude are all known analytically, except for the continuum production through loops of top quarks of mass m. The latter contribution is important for the invariant mass of the two Z bosons, (as measured by the mass of their leptonic decay products, m$_{4l}$), in a regime where m$_{4l}$ ≥ 2m because of the contributions of longitudinal bosons. We examine all the contributions to the virtual amplitude involving top quarks, as expansions about the heavy top quark limit combined with a conformal mapping and Padé approximants. Comparison with the analytic results, where known, allows us to assess the validity of the heavy quark expansion, and it extensions. We give results for the NLO corrections to this interference, including both real and virtual radiation.

  4. Two loop correction to interference in $$gg \\to ZZ$$

    DOE PAGES

    Campbell, John M.; Ellis, R. Keith; Czakon, Michal; ...

    2016-08-01

    We present results for the production of a pair of on-shell Z bosons via gluon-gluon fusion. This process occurs both through the production and decay of the Higgs boson, and through continuum production where the Z boson couples to a loop of massless quarks or to a massive quark. We calculate the interference of the two processes and its contribution to the cross section up to and including order O(αmore » $$_{s}^{3}$$ ). The two-loop contributions to the amplitude are all known analytically, except for the continuum production through loops of top quarks of mass m. The latter contribution is important for the invariant mass of the two Z bosons, (as measured by the mass of their leptonic decay products, m$$_{4l}$$), in a regime where m$$_{4l}$$ ≥ 2m because of the contributions of longitudinal bosons. We examine all the contributions to the virtual amplitude involving top quarks, as expansions about the heavy top quark limit combined with a conformal mapping and Padé approximants. Comparison with the analytic results, where known, allows us to assess the validity of the heavy quark expansion, and it extensions. We give results for the NLO corrections to this interference, including both real and virtual radiation.« less

  5. Functional analysis of the p40 and p75 proteins from Lactobacillus casei BL23.

    PubMed

    Bäuerl, Christine; Pérez-Martínez, Gaspar; Yan, Fang; Polk, D Brent; Monedero, Vicente

    2010-01-01

    The genomes of Lactobacillus casei/paracasei and Lactobacillus rhamnosus strains carry two genes encoding homologues of p40 and p75 from L. rhamnosus GG, two secreted proteins which display anti-apoptotic and cell protective effects on human intestinal epithelial cells. p40 and p75 carry cysteine, histidine-dependent aminohydrolase/peptidase (CHAP) and NLPC/P60 domains, respectively, which are characteristic of proteins with cell-wall hydrolase activity. In L. casei BL23 both proteins were secreted to the growth medium and were also located at the bacterial cell surface. The genes coding for both proteins were inactivated in this strain. Inactivation of LCABL_00230 (encoding p40) did not result in a significant difference in phenotype, whereas a mutation in LCABL_02770 (encoding p75) produced cells that formed very long chains. Purified glutathione-S-transferase (GST)-p40 and -p75 fusion proteins were able to hydrolyze the muropeptides from L. casei cell walls. Both fusions bound to mucin, collagen and to intestinal epithelial cells and, similar to L. rhamnosus GG p40, stimulated epidermal growth factor receptor phosphorylation in mouse intestine ex vivo. These results indicate that extracellular proteins belonging to the machinery of cell-wall metabolism in the closely related L. casei/paracasei-L. rhamnosus group are most likely involved in the probiotic effects described for these bacteria.

  6. Functional Analysis of the p40 and p75 Proteins from Lactobacillus casei BL23

    PubMed Central

    Bäuerl, Christine; Pérez-Martínez, Gaspar; Yan, Fang; Polk, D. Brent; Monedero, Vicente

    2011-01-01

    The genomes of Lactobacillus casei/paracasei and Lactobacillus rhamnosus strains carry two genes encoding homologues of p40 and p75 from L. rhamnosus GG, two secreted proteins which display anti-apoptotic and cell protective effects on human intestinal epithelial cells. p40 and p75 carry cysteine, histidine-dependent aminohydrolase/peptidase (CHAP) and NLPC/P60 domains, respectively, which are characteristic of proteins with cell-wall hydrolase activity. In L. casei BL23 both proteins were secreted to the growth medium and were also located at the bacterial cell surface. The genes coding for both proteins were inactivated in this strain. Inactivation of LCABL_00230 (encoding p40) did not result in a significant difference in phenotype, whereas a mutation in LCABL_02770 (encoding p75) produced cells that formed very long chains. Purified glutathione-S-transferase (GST)-p40 and -p75 fusion proteins were able to hydrolyze the muropeptides from L. casei cell walls. Both fusions bound to mucin, collagen and to intestinal epithelial cells and, similar to L. rhamnosus GG p40, stimulated epidermal growth factor receptor phosphorylation in mouse intestine ex vivo. These results indicate that extracellular proteins belonging to the machinery of cell-wall metabolism in the closely related L. casei/paracasei-L. rhamnosus group are most likely involved in the probiotic effects described for these bacteria PMID:21178363

  7. REVEAL: Software Documentation and Platform Migration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Michael A.; Veibell, Victoir T.

    2011-01-01

    The Research Environment for Vehicle Embedded Analysis on Linux (REVEAL) is reconfigurable data acquisition software designed for network-distributed test and measurement applications. In development since 2001, it has been successfully demonstrated in support of a number of actual missions within NASA's Suborbital Science Program. Improvements to software configuration control were needed to properly support both an ongoing transition to operational status and continued evolution of REVEAL capabilities. For this reason the project described in this report targets REVEAL software source documentation and deployment of the software on a small set of hardware platforms different from what is currently used in the baseline system implementation. This presentation specifically describes the actions taken over a ten week period by two undergraduate student interns and serves as an overview of the content of the final report for that internship.

  8. Comparing SessionStateReveal and EphemeralKeyReveal for Diffie-Hellman Protocols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ustaoglu, Berkant

    Both the "eCK" model, by LaMacchia, Lauter and Mityagin, and the "CK01" model, by Canetti and Krawczyk, address the effect of leaking session specific ephemeral data on the security of key establishment schemes. The CK01-adversary is given a SessionStateReveal query to learn session-specific private data defined by the protocol specification, whereas the eCK-adversary is equipped with an EphemeralKeyReveal query to access all ephemeral private input required to carry session computations. SessionStateReveal cannot be issued against the test session; by contrast EphemeralKeyReveal can be used against the test session under certain conditions. On the other hand, it is not obvious how EphemeralKeyReveal compares to SessionStateReveal. Thus it is natural to ask which model is more useful and practically relevant.

  9. Open chromatin reveals the functional maize genome

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Every cellular process mediated through nuclear DNA must contend with chromatin. As results from ENCODE show, open chromatin assays can efficiently integrate across diverse regulatory elements, revealing functional non-coding genome. In this study, we use a MNase hypersensitivity assay to discover o...

  10. Revealing a Child's Pathology: Physicians' Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scelles, Regine; Aubert-Godard, Anne; Gargiulo, Marcela; Avant, Monique; Gortais, Jean

    2010-01-01

    In this study, 12 physicians and 12 care-givers were interviewed using semi-structured interviews. We explored physicians' experiences when they revealed a diagnosis. We also tried to understand which family members the physician was thinking of, with whom they identified themselves, and their first choice of the person to whom they prefer to…

  11. Revealing Student Teacher's Thinking through Dilemma Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Talanquer, Vicente; Tomanek, Debra; Novodvorsky, Ingrid

    2007-01-01

    We explore the potential of dilemma analysis as an assessment tool to reveal student teachers' thinking and concerns about their practice. For this purpose we analyze the dilemma analyses completed by 22 student teachers enrolled in our science teacher preparation program over a period of four semesters. Student teachers' dilemmas fall into two…

  12. Eye Movements Reveal Dynamics of Task Control

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayr, Ulrich; Kuhns, David; Rieter, Miranda

    2013-01-01

    With the goal to determine the cognitive architecture that underlies flexible changes of control settings, we assessed within-trial and across-trial dynamics of attentional selection by tracking of eye movements in the context of a cued task-switching paradigm. Within-trial dynamics revealed a switch-induced, discrete delay in onset of…

  13. Yeast DNA ligase IV mutations reveal a nonhomologous end joining function of BRCT1 distinct from XRCC4/Lif1 binding.

    PubMed

    Chiruvella, Kishore K; Renard, Brian M; Birkeland, Shanda R; Sunder, Sham; Liang, Zhuobin; Wilson, Thomas E

    2014-12-01

    LIG4/Dnl4 is the DNA ligase that (re)joins DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) via nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ), an activity supported by binding of its tandem BRCT domains to the ligase accessory protein XRCC4/Lif1. We screened a panel of 88 distinct ligase mutants to explore the structure–function relationships of the yeast Dnl4 BRCT domains and inter-BRCT linker in NHEJ. Screen results suggested two distinct classes of BRCT mutations with differential effects on Lif1 interaction as compared to NHEJ completion. Validated constructs confirmed that D800K and GG(868:869)AA mutations, which target the Lif1 binding interface, showed a severely defective Dnl4–Lif1 interaction but a less consistent and often small decrease in NHEJ activity in some assays, as well as nearly normal levels of Dnl4 accumulation at DSBs. In contrast, mutants K742A and KTT(742:744)ATA, which target the β3-α2 region of the first BRCT domain, substantially decreased NHEJ function commensurate with a large defect in Dnl4 recruitment to DSBs, despite a comparatively greater preservation of the Lif1 interaction. Together, these separation-of-function mutants indicate that Dnl4 BRCT1 supports DSB recruitment and NHEJ in a manner distinct from Lif1 binding and reveal a complexity of Dnl4 BRCT domain functions in support of stable DSB association.

  14. Revealing Student Teachers' Thinking through Dilemma Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talanquer, Vicente; Tomanek, Debra; Novodvorsky, Ingrid

    2007-06-01

    We explore the potential of dilemma analysis as an assessment tool to reveal student teachers’ thinking and concerns about their practice. For this purpose we analyze the dilemma analyses completed by 22 student teachers enrolled in our science teacher preparation program over a period of four semesters. Student teachers’ dilemmas fall into two main groups: dilemmas about student performance and dilemmas associated with instructional decisions. These dilemmas reveal a variety of concerns that student teachers have about their work. In particular, concerns about lack of student motivation and its consequences on performance and instruction play a central role in student teachers’ thinking. The recognition of common patterns of thought in our student teacher thinking has made us reflect on and re-evaluate important components of the curriculum in our science teacher preparation program.

  15. Characterization of a Panela cheese with added probiotics and fava bean starch.

    PubMed

    Escobar, M C; Van Tassell, M L; Martínez-Bustos, F; Singh, M; Castaño-Tostado, E; Amaya-Llano, S L; Miller, M J

    2012-06-01

    Of 20 Lactobacillus and 8 Bifidobacterium species examined, only Bifidobacterium breve ATCC 15700 was able to ferment starch from fava beans. Bifidobacterium breve ATCC 15700 and Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG ATCC 53103 were selected as probiotics for use in fresh-style Panela cheese. Two types of fresh cheese (with and without 3% fava bean starch) were manufactured with 3 combinations of probiotics: L. rhamnosus GG only, B. breve only, or both L. rhamnosus GG and B. breve. During 4 wk of storage at 4°C, the addition of fava bean starch to the cheese was not found to cause significant differences in the viability of either probiotic strain. However, the microstructure and texture of Panela cheese were altered, resulting in a much softer product. A sensory panel showed that the presence of added fava bean starch in Panela cheese was less desirable to consumers, whereas probiotic supplementation had no effect on perceived taste or appearance. Panela cheese could be a suitable food for inclusion of probiotic bacteria.

  16. [Pseudotumoral toxoplasmic cystitis revealing acquired immunodeficiency syndrome].

    PubMed

    Ples, Raluca; Méchaï, Frédéric; Champiat, Bernard; Droupy, Stéphane; Huerre, Michel; Guettier, Catherine; Ferlicot, Sophie

    2011-02-01

    A case of bladder toxoplasmosis in a 57-year-old male Caucasian patient was diagnosed with difficulty due to misleading clinical presentation. The patient presented with pollakiuria and urination burning. Imagery showed pseudotumoral thickening of the vesicle wall. Previously unknown status of HIV infection was found positive through the diagnosis of bladder toxoplasmosis. The patient died rapidly from neurological complications. This is the second published case in which bladder toxoplasmosis reveals an HIV infection.

  17. Experts reveal catalyst-selection methodologies

    SciTech Connect

    1996-10-14

    Refining catalyst selection procedure were discussed in detail at Oil and Gas Journal`s International Catalyst Conference, Feb. 1--2, in Houston. Marathon Oil Co.`s James P. Wick revealed details of Marathon`s program for review and optimization of fluid catalytic cracking (FCC) and hydrotreating catalysts. And renowned FCC expert Del Tolen outlined a step-by-step procedure for choosing an FCC catalyst. The paper describes Marathon`s program and Tolen`s selection process.

  18. Satellite altimetry reveals seafloor tectonic fabric

    SciTech Connect

    Mcadoo, D.C.; Marks, K.M. )

    1992-01-01

    Seasat altimeter observations of sea-surface topography have revealed much that was unsuspected about the marine gravity field and seafloor topography, which in conjunction with crustal/upper-mantle density variations generates short wavelength (less than 200-km) marine gravity field fluctuations. Such high-resolution altimeter data is currently available, however, only for 6 percent of the world's ocean surface area; future efforts with Geosat Geodetic Mission and ERS-1 data will expand coverage to the entire world ocean. 4 refs.

  19. Apocalypto: revealing lost text with XMT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mills, David; Davis, Graham R.; Lai, Yu-kun; Rosin, Paul

    2014-09-01

    "Can brute-force high-contrast tomography techniques and image processing techniques retrieve textual content from damaged heritage materials?" The Dental Institute at Queen Mary University of London (QMUL) is the leading centre for very high contrast X-Ray Microtomography imaging. The Apocalypto Project is our collaboration with the heritage community and experts in Computer Vision systems in the Computer Science Department at Cardiff University. This collaboration has developed techniques and a workflow that allows us to reveal textual content from moisture-damaged parchment rolls. This article will also present some initial results from burned and heat shrunken parchment rolls, an insect damaged Mamluk cap and a birch bark roll.

  20. Trench Reveals Two Faces of Soils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This approximate true-color image mosaic from the panoramic camera on the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity shows a trench dug by the rover in the vicinity of the 'Anatolia' region. Two imprints from the rover's Mossbauer spectrometer instrument were left in the exposed soils. Detailed comparisons between soils exposed at the surface and those found at depth reveal that surface soils have higher levels of hematite while subsurface soils show fine particles derived from basalt. The trench is approximately 11 centimeters deep. This image was taken on sol 81 with the panoramic camera's 430-, 530- and 750-nanometer filters.

  1. Infections Revealing Complement Deficiency in Adults

    PubMed Central

    Audemard-Verger, A.; Descloux, E.; Ponard, D.; Deroux, A.; Fantin, B.; Fieschi, C.; John, M.; Bouldouyre, A.; Karkowsi, L.; Moulis, G.; Auvinet, H.; Valla, F.; Lechiche, C.; Davido, B.; Martinot, M.; Biron, C.; Lucht, F.; Asseray, N.; Froissart, A.; Buzelé, R.; Perlat, A.; Boutboul, D.; Fremeaux-Bacchi, V.; Isnard, S.; Bienvenu, B.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Complement system is a part of innate immunity, its main function is to protect human from bacterial infection. As genetic disorders, complement deficiencies are often diagnosed in pediatric population. However, complement deficiencies can also be revealed in adults but have been poorly investigated. Herein, we describe a case series of infections revealing complement deficiency in adults to study clinical spectrum and management of complement deficiencies. A nationwide retrospective study was conducted in French university and general hospitals in departments of internal medicine, infectious diseases enrolling patients older than 15 years old who had presented at least one infection leading to a complement deficiency diagnosis. Forty-one patients included between 2002 and 2015 in 19 different departments were enrolled in this study. The male-to-female ratio was 1.3 and the mean age at diagnosis was 28 ± 14 (15–67) years. The main clinical feature was Neisseria meningitidis meningitis 75% (n = 31/41) often involving rare serotype: Y (n = 9) and W 135 (n = 7). The main complement deficiency observed was the common final pathway deficiency 83% (n = 34/41). Half of the cohort displayed severe sepsis or septic shock at diagnosis (n = 22/41) but no patient died. No patient had family history of complement deficiency. The mean follow-up was 1.15 ± 1.95 (0.1–10) years. Half of the patients had already suffered from at least one infection before diagnosis of complement deficiency: meningitis (n = 13), pneumonia (n = 4), fulminans purpura (n = 1), or recurrent otitis (n = 1). Near one-third (n = 10/39) had received prophylactic antibiotics (cotrimoxazole or penicillin) after diagnosis of complement deficiency. The vaccination coverage rate, at the end of the follow-up, for N meningitidis, Streptococcus pneumonia, and Haemophilius influenzae were, respectively, 90% (n = 33/37), 47% (n = 17/36), and 35

  2. Symbiotic conversations are revealed under genetic interrogation

    PubMed Central

    Ruby, Edward G.

    2013-01-01

    The recent development and application of molecular genetics to the symbionts of invertebrate animal species have advanced our knowledge of the biochemical communication that occurs between the host and its bacterial symbionts. In particular, the ability to manipulate these associations experimentally by introducing genetic variants of the symbionts into naive hosts has allowed the discovery of novel colonization mechanisms and factors. In addition, the role of the symbionts in inducing normal host development has been revealed, and its molecular basis described. In this Review, I discuss many of these developments, focusing on what has been discovered in five well-understood model systems. PMID:18794913

  3. Genetic diversity and structure of farm and genebank accessions of cacao (Theobroma cacao L.) in Cameroon revealed by microsatellite markers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The genetic diversity of 400 accessions collected in cacao farms, 95 genebank and 31 reference accessions was analyzed using 12 microsatelitte markers. The genebank and reference accessions were sub-divided into 12 accession groups (AG) that belong to the traditional cacao genetic groups (GG) Lower ...

  4. Interior Evolution of Ceres Revealed by Dawn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raymond, Carol A.; Park, Ryan S.; Konopliv, Alex S.; Bland, Michael T.; Marchi, Simone; Castillo-Rogez, Julie C.; McCord, Thomas B.; Jaumann, Ralf; Russell, Christopher T.; Prettyman, Thomas H.

    2015-11-01

    Dawn's exploration of Ceres has revealed its geophysical characteristics, informing the processes that have shaped it. Dawn has determined the average diameter of Ceres to be 940 km, smaller than the previously estimated 975 km [1]. This implies a density of 2160 kg/m3, indicating that Ceres is less differentiated than predicted [2]. The low-degree gravity field is consistent with the body being in hydrostatic equilibrium and the magnitude of J2 implies some central condensation. Ceres' entire surface is cratered, implying the lack of a thick (10's of km) water ice layer at the surface. Variability in Ceres' crater morphology indicates that the near-surface layer has variable strength and rheology, likely due to heterogeneity in the near-surface mixture of rock, ice and salt. The lack of a number of expected large impact basins on Ceres can be interpreted to be the result of viscous relaxation, resurfacing or a combination of both. These data provide insights into Ceres' thermal evolution and mechanical properties, which appear to be unique to this warm, icy body.[1] Thomas, P. C., et al., Differentiation of the asteroid Ceres as revealed by its shape, Nature, 437, 224-226, 2005; [2] McCord et al., Ceres: Its Origin, Evolution and Structure and Dawn's Potential Contribution, Space Sci Rev DOI 10.1007/s11214-010-9729-9, 2011.

  5. Revealing Event Saliency in Unconstrained Video Collection.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dingwen; Han, Junwei; Jiang, Lu; Ye, Senmao; Chang, Xiaojun

    2017-04-01

    Recent progresses in multimedia event detection have enabled us to find videos about a predefined event from a large-scale video collection. Research towards more intrinsic unsupervised video understanding is an interesting but understudied field. Specifically, given a collection of videos sharing a common event of interest, the goal is to discover the salient fragments, i.e., the curt video fragments that can concisely portray the underlying event of interest, from each video. To explore this novel direction, this paper proposes an unsupervised event saliency revealing framework. It first extracts features from multiple modalities to represent each shot in the given video collection. Then, these shots are clustered to build the cluster-level event saliency revealing framework, which explores useful information cues (i.e., the intra-cluster prior, inter-cluster discriminability, and inter-cluster smoothness) by a concise optimization model. Compared with the existing methods, our approach could highlight the intrinsic stimulus of the unseen event within a video in an unsupervised fashion. Thus, it could potentially benefit to a wide range of multimedia tasks like video browsing, understanding, and search. To quantitatively verify the proposed method, we systematically compare the method to a number of baseline methods on the TRECVID benchmarks. Experimental results have demonstrated its effectiveness and efficiency.

  6. Metabolomics reveals metabolic biomarkers of Crohn's disease

    SciTech Connect

    Jansson, J.K.; Willing, B.; Lucio, M.; Fekete, A.; Dicksved, J.; Halfvarson, J.; Tysk, C.; Schmitt-Kopplin, P.

    2009-06-01

    The causes and etiology of Crohn's disease (CD) are currently unknown although both host genetics and environmental factors play a role. Here we used non-targeted metabolic profiling to determine the contribution of metabolites produced by the gut microbiota towards disease status of the host. Ion Cyclotron Resonance Fourier Transform Mass Spectrometry (ICR-FT/MS) was used to discern the masses of thousands of metabolites in fecal samples collected from 17 identical twin pairs, including healthy individuals and those with CD. Pathways with differentiating metabolites included those involved in the metabolism and or synthesis of amino acids, fatty acids, bile acids and arachidonic acid. Several metabolites were positively or negatively correlated to the disease phenotype and to specific microbes previously characterized in the same samples. Our data reveal novel differentiating metabolites for CD that may provide diagnostic biomarkers and/or monitoring tools as well as insight into potential targets for disease therapy and prevention.

  7. Sawfishes stealth revealed using computational fluid dynamics.

    PubMed

    Bradney, D R; Davidson, A; Evans, S P; Wueringer, B E; Morgan, D L; Clausen, P D

    2017-02-27

    Detailed computational fluid dynamics simulations for the rostrum of three species of sawfish (Pristidae) revealed that negligible turbulent flow is generated from all rostra during lateral swipe prey manipulation and swimming. These results suggest that sawfishes are effective stealth hunters that may not be detected by their teleost prey's lateral line sensory system during pursuits. Moreover, during lateral swipes, the rostra were found to induce little velocity into the surrounding fluid. Consistent with previous data of sawfish feeding behaviour, these data indicate that the rostrum is therefore unlikely to be used to stir up the bottom to uncover benthic prey. Whilst swimming with the rostrum inclined at a small angle to the horizontal, the coefficient of drag of the rostrum is relatively low and the coefficient of lift is zero.

  8. Neutron Imaging Reveals Internal Plant Hydraulic Dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Warren, Jeffrey; Bilheux, Hassina Z; Kang, Misun; Voisin, Sophie; Cheng, Chu-Lin; Horita, Jusuke; Perfect, Edmund

    2013-01-01

    Many terrestrial ecosystem processes are constrained by water availability and transport within the soil. Knowledge of plant water fluxes is thus critical for assessing mechanistic processes linked to biogeochemical cycles, yet resolution of root structure and xylem water transport dynamics has been a particularly daunting task for the ecologist. Through neutron imaging, we demonstrate the ability to non-invasively monitor individual root functionality and water fluxes within Zea mays L. (maize) and Panicum virgatum L. (switchgrass) seedlings growing in a sandy medium. Root structure and growth were readily imaged by neutron radiography and neutron computed tomography. Seedlings were irrigated with water or deuterium oxide and imaged through time as a growth lamp was cycled on to alter leaf demand for water. Sub-millimeter scale resolution reveals timing and magnitudes of root water uptake, redistribution within the roots, and root-shoot hydraulic linkages, relationships not well characterized by other techniques.

  9. Paraventricular meningioma revealed by mental disorder

    PubMed Central

    Hilmani, Said; Houass, Yassine; El Azhari, Abdessamad

    2016-01-01

    Background: Ventricular meningioma constitutes 2% of intracranial meningioma, representing a challenging disease for neurosurgeons. Although cognitive impairment is one of the major symptoms of ventricular tumors, few studies have reported the details of cognitive impairment before and after their surgical removal. The expected effects on cognitive function should also be considered when choosing a surgical approach. Case Descriptions: We report the case of a large lateral ventricle meningioma revealed by cognitive dysfunction and moderate intellectual disability. The patient underwent subtotal resection of the tumor which had partial improvement in cognitive disorders. It is important to precisely assess neuropsychological function in patients with large brain tumors, and judicious preoperative plan, adequate knowledge of anatomy, and use of correct microsurgical techniques are fundamental in achieving complete resection of paraventricular meningioma with low morbidity. Conclusion: Pre and postoperative precise neuropsychological examinations may identify the potential cognitive impairment and beneficial effects of surgery in patients with large lateral ventricle meningiomas. PMID:28144473

  10. Memory strength and specificity revealed by pupillometry.

    PubMed

    Papesh, Megan H; Goldinger, Stephen D; Hout, Michael C

    2012-01-01

    Voice-specificity effects in recognition memory were investigated using both behavioral data and pupillometry. Volunteers initially heard spoken words and nonwords in two voices; they later provided confidence-based old/new classifications to items presented in their original voices, changed (but familiar) voices, or entirely new voices. Recognition was more accurate for old-voice items, replicating prior research. Pupillometry was used to gauge cognitive demand during both encoding and testing: enlarged pupils revealed that participants devoted greater effort to encoding items that were subsequently recognized. Further, pupil responses were sensitive to the cue match between encoding and retrieval voices, as well as memory strength. Strong memories, and those with the closest encoding-retrieval voice matches, resulted in the highest peak pupil diameters. The results are discussed with respect to episodic memory models and Whittlesea's (1997) SCAPE framework for recognition memory.

  11. Fracture reveals clustering in cohesive granular matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tapia, Franco; Santucci, Stéphane; Géminard, Jean-Christophe

    2016-09-01

    We report an experimental study of the morphology of fractures in cohesive granular materials. Cohesion is introduced by equilibrating the grains with a humid atmosphere. The setup allows to produce a controlled crack in a thin layer of a glass beads assembly, and observe with an extremely high resolution the edge of the fracture at the free surface of the layer. The detailed multi-scale analysis of the fracture profile reveals the presence, in the bulk of the material, of clusters of grains whose size increases monotonically with the relative humidity. These results are important because the formation of clusters, resulting in a heterogeneity of the cohesion force, governs the mechanical properties of cohesive granular matter in contact with a humid atmosphere.

  12. Social patterns revealed through random matrix theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkar, Camellia; Jalan, Sarika

    2014-11-01

    Despite the tremendous advancements in the field of network theory, very few studies have taken weights in the interactions into consideration that emerge naturally in all real-world systems. Using random matrix analysis of a weighted social network, we demonstrate the profound impact of weights in interactions on emerging structural properties. The analysis reveals that randomness existing in particular time frame affects the decisions of individuals rendering them more freedom of choice in situations of financial security. While the structural organization of networks remains the same throughout all datasets, random matrix theory provides insight into the interaction pattern of individuals of the society in situations of crisis. It has also been contemplated that individual accountability in terms of weighted interactions remains as a key to success unless segregation of tasks comes into play.

  13. Revealing effective classifiers through network comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallos, Lazaros K.; Fefferman, Nina H.

    2014-11-01

    The ability to compare complex systems can provide new insight into the fundamental nature of the processes captured, in ways that are otherwise inaccessible to observation. Here, we introduce the n-tangle method to directly compare two networks for structural similarity, based on the distribution of edge density in network subgraphs. We demonstrate that this method can efficiently introduce comparative analysis into network science and opens the road for many new applications. For example, we show how the construction of a “phylogenetic tree” across animal taxa according to their social structure can reveal commonalities in the behavioral ecology of the populations, or how students create similar networks according to the University size. Our method can be expanded to study many additional properties, such as network classification, changes during time evolution, convergence of growth models, and detection of structural changes during damage.

  14. Open chromatin reveals the functional maize genome

    PubMed Central

    Rodgers-Melnick, Eli; Vera, Daniel L.; Bass, Hank W.

    2016-01-01

    Cellular processes mediated through nuclear DNA must contend with chromatin. Chromatin structural assays can efficiently integrate information across diverse regulatory elements, revealing the functional noncoding genome. In this study, we use a differential nuclease sensitivity assay based on micrococcal nuclease (MNase) digestion to discover open chromatin regions in the maize genome. We find that maize MNase-hypersensitive (MNase HS) regions localize around active genes and within recombination hotspots, focusing biased gene conversion at their flanks. Although MNase HS regions map to less than 1% of the genome, they consistently explain a remarkably large amount (∼40%) of heritable phenotypic variance in diverse complex traits. MNase HS regions are therefore on par with coding sequences as annotations that demarcate the functional parts of the maize genome. These results imply that less than 3% of the maize genome (coding and MNase HS regions) may give rise to the overwhelming majority of phenotypic variation, greatly narrowing the scope of the functional genome. PMID:27185945

  15. Ceres Revealed in a Grain of Salt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zolensky, M. E.; Bodnar, R. J.; Fries, M.; Chan, Q. H.-S.; Kebukawa, Y.; Mikouchi, T.; Hagiya, K.; Komatsu, M.; Ohsumi, K.; Steele, A.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Zag and Monahans (1998) are H chondrite regolith breccias containing 4.5 giga-year-old halite crystals which contain abundant inclusions of aqueous fluids, solids and organics. These all originated on a cryo-volcanically-active C class asteroid, probably 1 Ceres; the halite was transported to the regolith of the H chondrite parent asteroid, potentially 6 Hebe. Detailed analysis of these solids will thus potentially reveal the mineralogy of Ceres. Mineralogy of solids in the Monahans Halite Solid grains are present in the halites, which were entrained within the mother brines during eruption, including material from the interior and surface of the erupting body. The solids include abundant, widely variable organics that could not have been significantly heated (which would have resulted in the loss of fluids from the halite). Our analyses by Raman microprobe, SEM/EDX, synchrotron X-ray diffraction, UPLC-FD/QToF-MS, C-XANES and TEM reveal that these trapped grains include macromolecular carbon (MMC) similar in structure to CV3 chondrite matrix carbon, aliphatic carbon compounds, olivine (Fo99-59), high- and low-Ca pyroxene, feldspars, phyllosilicates, magnetite, sulfides, metal, lepidocrocite, carbonates, diamond, apatite and zeolites. Conclusions: The halite in Monahans and Zag derive from a water and carbon-rich object that was cryo-volcanically active in the early solar system, probably Ceres. The Dawn spacecraft found that Ceres includes C chondrite materials. Our samples include both protolith and aqueously-altered samples of the body, permitting understanding of alteration conditions. Whatever the halite parent body, it was rich in a wide variety of organics and warm, liquid water at the solar system's dawn.

  16. Multilocus Sequence Typing of Lactobacillus casei Reveals a Clonal Population Structure with Low Levels of Homologous Recombination▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Diancourt, Laure; Passet, Virginie; Chervaux, Christian; Garault, Peggy; Smokvina, Tamara; Brisse, Sylvain

    2007-01-01

    Robust genotyping methods for Lactobacillus casei are needed for strain tracking and collection management, as well as for population biology research. A collection of 52 strains initially labeled L. casei or Lactobacillus paracasei was first subjected to rplB gene sequencing together with reference strains of Lactobacillus zeae, Lactobacillus rhamnosus, and other species. Phylogenetic analysis showed that all 52 strains belonged to a single compact L. casei-L. paracasei sequence cluster, together with strain CIP107868 (= ATCC 334) but clearly distinct from L. rhamnosus and from a cluster with L. zeae and CIP103137T (= ATCC 393T). The strains were genotyped using amplified fragment length polymorphism, multilocus sequence typing based on internal portions of the seven housekeeping genes fusA, ileS, lepA, leuS, pyrG, recA, and recG, and tandem repeat variation (multilocus variable-number tandem repeats analysis [MLVA] using nine loci). Very high concordance was found between the three methods. Although amounts of nucleotide variation were low for the seven genes (π ranging from 0.0038 to 0.0109), 3 to 12 alleles were distinguished, resulting in 31 sequence types. One sequence type (ST1) was frequent (17 strains), but most others were represented by a single strain. Attempts to subtype ST1 strains by MLVA, ribotyping, clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat characterization, and single nucleotide repeat variation were unsuccessful. We found clear evidence for homologous recombination during the diversification of L. casei clones, including a putative intragenic import of DNA into one strain. Nucleotides were estimated to change four times more frequently by recombination than by mutation. However, statistical congruence between individual gene trees was retained, indicating that recombination is not frequent enough to disrupt the phylogenetic signal. The developed multilocus sequence typing scheme should be useful for future studies of L. casei

  17. Neutron Imaging Reveals Internal Plant Hydraulic Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warren, J.; Bilheux, H.; Kang, M.; Voisin, S.; Cheng, C.; Horita, J.; Perfect, E.

    2011-12-01

    In situ quantification of soil-plant water fluxes have not been fully successful due to a lack of non-destructive techniques capable of revealing roots or water fluxes at relevant spatial scales. Neutron imaging is a unique non-invasive tool that can assess sub-millimeter scale material properties and transport in situ, and which has been successfully applied to characterize soil and plant water status. Here, we have applied neutron radiography and tomography to quantify water transport through individual maize roots in response to internal plant demand. Zea mays seedlings were grown for 10 days in Flint silica sand within 2.6 cm diameter Al chambers. Using a reactor-based neutron source at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (HFIR), water fluxes were tracked through the maize soil-root systems by collecting consecutive neutron radiographs over a 12 h period following irrigation with D2O. D has a much lower neutron attenuation than H, thus D2O displacement of existing H2O within the plant vascular system, or influx of D2O into previously dry tissue or soil is readily tracked by changes in image intensity through time. Plant water release and uptake was regulated by periodically cycling on a high-intensity grow light. From each maize replicate, selected regions of interest (ROI) were delineated around individual roots, root free soil, stem and leaf segments. Changes in ROI were tracked through time to reveal patterns of water flux. The hydration of root and stem tissue cycled in response to illumination; root water content often increased during darkness, then decreased with illumination as water was transported from the root into the stem. Relative root-shoot hydration through time illustrates the balance between demand, storage capacity and uptake, which varies depending on root characteristics and its localized soil environment. The dynamic transport of water between soil, individual roots, stems and leaves was readily visualized and quantified illustrating the value

  18. VISTA Reveals the Secret of the Unicorn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2010-10-01

    A new infrared image from ESO's VISTA survey telescope reveals an extraordinary landscape of glowing tendrils of gas, dark clouds and young stars within the constellation of Monoceros (the Unicorn). This star-forming region, known as Monoceros R2, is embedded within a huge dark cloud. The region is almost completely obscured by interstellar dust when viewed in visible light, but is spectacular in the infrared. An active stellar nursery lies hidden inside a massive dark cloud rich in molecules and dust in the constellation of Monoceros. Although it appears close in the sky to the more familiar Orion Nebula it is actually almost twice as far from Earth, at a distance of about 2700 light-years. In visible light a grouping of massive hot stars creates a beautiful collection of reflection nebulae where the bluish starlight is scattered from parts of the dark, foggy outer layers of the molecular cloud. However, most of the new-born massive stars remain hidden as the thick interstellar dust strongly absorbs their ultraviolet and visible light. In this gorgeous infrared image taken from ESO's Paranal Observatory in northern Chile, the Visible and Infrared Survey Telescope for Astronomy (VISTA [1], eso0949) penetrates the dark curtain of cosmic dust and reveals in astonishing detail the folds, loops and filaments sculpted from the dusty interstellar matter by intense particle winds and the radiation emitted by hot young stars. "When I first saw this image I just said 'Wow!' I was amazed to see all the dust streamers so clearly around the Monoceros R2 cluster, as well as the jets from highly embedded young stellar objects. There is such a great wealth of exciting detail revealed in these VISTA images," says Jim Emerson, of Queen Mary, University of London and leader of the VISTA consortium. With its huge field of view, large mirror and sensitive camera, VISTA is ideal for obtaining deep, high quality infrared images of large areas of the sky, such as the Monoceros R2 region

  19. Revealing Invisible Photonic Inscriptions: Images from Strain

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Photonic structural materials have received intensive interest and have been strongly developed over the past few years for image displays, sensing, and anticounterfeit materials. Their “smartness” arises from their color responsivity to changes of environment, strain, or external fields. Here, we introduce a novel invisible photonic system that reveals encrypted images or characters by simply stretching, or immersing in solvents. This type of intriguing photonic material is composed of regularly arranged core–shell particles that are selectively cross-linked by UV irradiation, giving different strain response compared to un-cross-linked regions. The images reversibly appear and disappear when cycling the strain and releasing it. The unique advantages of this soft polymer opal system compared with other types of photonic gels are that it can be produced in roll to roll quantities, can be vigorously deformed to achieve strong color changes, and has no solvent evaporation issues because it is a photonic rubber system. We demonstrate potential applications together with a fabrication procedure which is straightforward and scalable, vital for user take-up. Our work deepens understanding of this rubbery photonic system based on core–shell nanospheres. PMID:26039279

  20. Overnight lexical consolidation revealed by speech segmentation.

    PubMed

    Dumay, Nicolas; Gareth Gaskell, M

    2012-04-01

    Two experiments explored the consolidation of spoken words, and assessed whether post-sleep novel competitor effects truly reflect engagement of these novel words in competition for lexical segmentation. Two types of competitor relationships were contrasted: the onset-aligned case (such as "frenzylk"), where the novel word is a close variant of the existing word: they start at the same time point and overlap on most of their segments; and the fully embedding case (such as "lirmucktoze"), where the existing word corresponds to a smaller embedded portion of its novel competitor and is thus less noticeable. Experiment 1 (pause detection) revealed a similar performance for both cases, with no competitor effect immediately after exposure, but significant inhibition after 24 h and seven days. Experiment 2 (word spotting) produced exactly the same pattern; however, as is the case with existing word carriers (cf. McQueen, Norris, & Cutler, 1994), the inhibition was much stronger for fully embedded than for onset-aligned targets (e.g., "lirmuckt" vs. "frenzyl"). Meanwhile, explicit measures of learning, i.e., free recall and recognition, improved over time. These results cannot be explained by either consolidation of episodic traces or acquisition of new phonological/dialectal variants. We argue instead that they reflect a general trait of vocabulary learning and consolidation.

  1. Revealing Open Quantum Systems with Subsystem DFT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishtal, Alisa; Pavanello, Michele

    The traditional quantum chemical methods, wave function or density based, are designed to solve for a closed system, where the Hamiltonian contains all relevant interactions. The closed system is, however, not realistic, as in real life the system is embedded in an environment with which it interacts to some degree. Including the description of the environment at the full quantum mechanical level leads to the Open Quantum Systems (OQS) theory: the only theory which can describe non-Markovian dynamics between the system and the environment. By allowing the flow of information in both directions phenomena such as quantum entanglement, relevant for the design of quantum computers, become available. While most OQS theories rely on the density matrix to describe the system-bath interaction, time-dependent subsystem DFT allows to approach the problem using the electron density. Through Dyson-like equations connecting the density-density response kernels of the OQS and its environment, the extent to which non-Markovian dynamics is present can be revealed. We illustrate this for the process of excitation energy transfer in coupled chromophores embedded in explicit solvent.

  2. Sequence tagging reveals unexpected modifications in toxicoproteomics.

    PubMed

    Dasari, Surendra; Chambers, Matthew C; Codreanu, Simona G; Liebler, Daniel C; Collins, Ben C; Pennington, Stephen R; Gallagher, William M; Tabb, David L

    2011-02-18

    Toxicoproteomic samples are rich in posttranslational modifications (PTMs) of proteins. Identifying these modifications via standard database searching can incur significant performance penalties. Here, we describe the latest developments in TagRecon, an algorithm that leverages inferred sequence tags to identify modified peptides in toxicoproteomic data sets. TagRecon identifies known modifications more effectively than the MyriMatch database search engine. TagRecon outperformed state of the art software in recognizing unanticipated modifications from LTQ, Orbitrap, and QTOF data sets. We developed user-friendly software for detecting persistent mass shifts from samples. We follow a three-step strategy for detecting unanticipated PTMs in samples. First, we identify the proteins present in the sample with a standard database search. Next, identified proteins are interrogated for unexpected PTMs with a sequence tag-based search. Finally, additional evidence is gathered for the detected mass shifts with a refinement search. Application of this technology on toxicoproteomic data sets revealed unintended cross-reactions between proteins and sample processing reagents. Twenty-five proteins in rat liver showed signs of oxidative stress when exposed to potentially toxic drugs. These results demonstrate the value of mining toxicoproteomic data sets for modifications.

  3. Phylogenetic proximity revealed by neurodevelopmental event timings.

    PubMed

    Nagarajan, Radhakrishnan; Clancy, Barbara

    2008-01-01

    Statistical properties such as distribution and correlation signatures were investigated using a temporal database of common neurodevelopmental events in the three species most frequently used in experimental studies, rat, mouse, and macaque. There was a fine nexus between phylogenetic proximity and empirically derived dates of the occurrences of 40 common events including the neurogenesis of cortical layers and outgrowth milestones of developing axonal projections. Exponential and power-law approximations to the distribution of the events reveal strikingly similar decay patterns in rats and mice when compared to macaques. Subsequent hierarchical clustering of the common event timings also captures phylogenetic proximity, an association further supported by multivariate linear regression data. These preliminary results suggest that statistical analyses of the timing of developmental milestones may offer a novel measure of phylogenetic classifications. This may have added pragmatic value in the specific support it offers for the reliability of rat/mouse comparative modeling, as well as in the broader implications for the potential of meta-analyses using databases assembled from the extensive empirical literature.

  4. Revealing global regulatory perturbations across human cancers

    PubMed Central

    Goodarzi, Hani; Elemento, Olivier; Tavazoie, Saeed

    2010-01-01

    Summary The discovery of pathways and regulatory networks whose perturbation contributes to neoplastic transformation remains a fundamental challenge for cancer biology. We show that such pathway perturbations, and the cis-regulatory elements through which they operate, can be efficiently extracted from global gene-expression profiles. Our approach utilizes information-theoretic analysis of expression levels, pathways, and genomic sequences. Analysis across a diverse set of human cancers reveals the majority of previously known cancer pathways. Through de novo motif discovery we associate these pathways with transcription-factor binding sites and miRNA targets, including those of E2F, NF-Y, p53, and let-7. Follow-up experiments confirmed that these predictions correspond to functional in vivo regulatory interactions. Strikingly, the majority of the perturbations, associated with putative cis-regulatory elements, fall outside of known cancer pathways. Our study provides a systems-level dissection of regulatory perturbations in cancer—an essential component of a rational strategy for therapeutic intervention and drug-target discovery. PMID:20005852

  5. Revealing the dual streams of speech processing

    PubMed Central

    Fridriksson, Julius; Yourganov, Grigori; Bonilha, Leonardo; Basilakos, Alexandra; Rorden, Christopher

    2016-01-01

    Several dual route models of human speech processing have been proposed suggesting a large-scale anatomical division between cortical regions that support motor–phonological aspects vs. lexical–semantic aspects of speech processing. However, to date, there is no complete agreement on what areas subserve each route or the nature of interactions across these routes that enables human speech processing. Relying on an extensive behavioral and neuroimaging assessment of a large sample of stroke survivors, we used a data-driven approach using principal components analysis of lesion-symptom mapping to identify brain regions crucial for performance on clusters of behavioral tasks without a priori separation into task types. Distinct anatomical boundaries were revealed between a dorsal frontoparietal stream and a ventral temporal–frontal stream associated with separate components. Collapsing over the tasks primarily supported by these streams, we characterize the dorsal stream as a form-to-articulation pathway and the ventral stream as a form-to-meaning pathway. This characterization of the division in the data reflects both the overlap between tasks supported by the two streams as well as the observation that there is a bias for phonological production tasks supported by the dorsal stream and lexical–semantic comprehension tasks supported by the ventral stream. As such, our findings show a division between two processing routes that underlie human speech processing and provide an empirical foundation for studying potential computational differences that distinguish between the two routes. PMID:27956600

  6. Niche engineering reveals complementary resource use.

    PubMed

    Gable, Jacob T; Crowder, David W; Northfield, Tobin D; Steffan, Shawn A; Snyder, William E

    2012-09-01

    Greater resource use by diverse communities might result from species occupying complementary niches. Demonstrating niche complementarity among species is challenging, however, due to the difficulty in relating differences between species in particular traits to their use of complementary resources. Here, we overcame this obstacle by exploiting plastic foraging behavior in a community of predatory insects common on Brassica oleracea plants in Washington, USA. These predators complemented one another by partitioning foraging space, with some species foraging primarily along leaf edges and others at leaf centers. We hypothesized that emergent biodiversity effects would occur when predators partitioned foraging space on leaves, but not when spatial complementarity was dampened. Indeed, on intact leaves, edge- and center-foraging predators combined to kill more prey than any single predator species could by itself. These emergent diversity effects, however, disappeared on plants damaged by the caterpillar Plutella xylostella. Caterpillar chew-holes brought edge habitats to the center of leaves, so that all predator species could attack aphids anywhere on plants. With spatial niche differences diminished, there were no benefits of predator diversity; the most voracious single predator species killed the most aphids. Thus, caterpillar herbivory determined whether multi-predator-species effects reflected complementarity or species' individual impacts. Our study provides direct evidence for a causative relationship between niche differentiation and increased resource consumption by diverse communities, as revealed by ecological engineers that homogenize the foraging environment.

  7. Revealing the values behind convenience food consumption.

    PubMed

    Botonaki, Anna; Mattas, Konstadinos

    2010-12-01

    The increasing importance of convenience in consumer food choices has attracted researchers' interest. In the effort to understand how convenience affects consumers' food preferences, values are believed to play an important role. The present study attempts to examine the way personal values suggested by Schwartz (1992) are associated with behaviour and attitudes regarding convenience food. A number of constructs describing food related attitudes and behaviours were developed and their relationship with personal values was analyzed following the methodology proposed by Brunsø, Scholderer, and Grunert (2004). Data were collected through a questionnaire survey from a random sample of consumers in Thessaloniki city, Greece. The results reveal that convenience food consumption and convenience orientation in the food domain are mainly connected with values that motivate people to seek new experiences, act independently and enhance their own personal interests, while are in conflict with values of conservation and self-transcendence. The opposite holds for other food related attitudes and behaviours like involvement with cooking and variety in diet. The findings seem to be of particular interest not only for marketers of food products, but also for food policy makers.

  8. The IC 342-Maffei 1 Group Revealed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCall, M. L.; Buta, R.

    1996-12-01

    Deep wide-field CCD images of thirteen members of the IC 342-Maffei 1 Group in the Northern Milky Way have been acquired in the Johnson V and Cousins I photometric systems. The observations were obtained with the Kitt Peak Burrell-Schmidt telescope in Arizona during six nights in November 1995. Almost none of these galaxies was effectively studied in the past because of the heavy foreground extinction and significant foreground star contamination in the direction of the group. The tens of thousands of foreground stars included on the Schmidt images have been successfully subtracted using DAOPHOT, revealing the true extent and total brightness of most of the galaxies for the first time. In the absence of galactic extinction, Maffei 1, Maffei 2, and IC 342 would be among the five brightest galaxies in the northern sky, and both Maffei 1 and IC 342 would subtend angles as large as the full Moon. The results are critical for assessing the degree to which the group influenced the dynamical evolution of the Local Group. In this poster, we will present deep photographs, total magnitudes and color indices, luminosity profiles, and distance estimates for the member galaxies.

  9. Community structure revealed by phase locking.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Ming-Yang; Zhuo, Zhao; Cai, Shi-min; Fu, Zhongqian

    2014-09-01

    Community structure can naturally emerge in paths to synchronization, and scratching it from the paths is a tough issue that accounts for the diverse dynamics of synchronization. In this paper, with assumption that the synchronization on complex networks is made up of local and collective processes, we proposed a scheme to lock the local synchronization (phase locking) at a stable state, meanwhile, suppress the collective synchronization based on Kuramoto model. Through this scheme, the network dynamics only contains the local synchronization, which suggests that the nodes in the same community synchronize together and these synchronization clusters well reveal the community structure of network. Furthermore, by analyzing the paths to synchronization, the relations or overlaps among different communities are also obtained. Thus, the community detection based on the scheme is performed on five real networks and the observed community structures are much more apparent than modularity-based fast algorithm. Our results not only provide a deep insight to understand the synchronization dynamics on complex network but also enlarge the research scope of community detection.

  10. Caged Naloxone Reveals Opioid Signaling Deactivation Kinetics

    PubMed Central

    Banghart, Matthew R.; Shah, Ruchir C.; Lavis, Luke D.

    2013-01-01

    The spatiotemporal dynamics of opioid signaling in the brain remain poorly defined. Photoactivatable opioid ligands provide a means to quantitatively measure these dynamics and their underlying mechanisms in brain tissue. Although activation kinetics can be assessed using caged agonists, deactivation kinetics are obscured by slow clearance of agonist in tissue. To reveal deactivation kinetics of opioid signaling we developed a caged competitive antagonist that can be quickly photoreleased in sufficient concentrations to render agonist dissociation effectively irreversible. Carboxynitroveratryl-naloxone (CNV-NLX), a caged analog of the competitive opioid antagonist NLX, was readily synthesized from commercially available NLX in good yield and found to be devoid of antagonist activity at heterologously expressed opioid receptors. Photolysis in slices of rat locus coeruleus produced a rapid inhibition of the ionic currents evoked by multiple agonists of the μ-opioid receptor (MOR), but not of α-adrenergic receptors, which activate the same pool of ion channels. Using the high-affinity peptide agonist dermorphin, we established conditions under which light-driven deactivation rates are independent of agonist concentration and thus intrinsic to the agonist-receptor complex. Under these conditions, some MOR agonists yielded deactivation rates that are limited by G protein signaling, whereas others appeared limited by agonist dissociation. Therefore, the choice of agonist determines which feature of receptor signaling is unmasked by CNV-NLX photolysis. PMID:23960100

  11. Biosignatures as revealed by spectropolarimetry of Earthshine.

    PubMed

    Sterzik, Michael F; Bagnulo, Stefano; Palle, Enric

    2012-02-29

    Low-resolution intensity spectra of Earth's atmosphere obtained from space reveal strong signatures of life ('biosignatures'), such as molecular oxygen and methane with abundances far from chemical equilibrium, as well as the presence of a 'red edge' (a sharp increase of albedo for wavelengths longer than 700 nm) caused by surface vegetation. Light passing through the atmosphere is strongly linearly polarized by scattering (from air molecules, aerosols and cloud particles) and by reflection (from oceans and land). Spectropolarimetric observations of local patches of Earth's sky light from the ground contain signatures of oxygen, ozone and water, and are used to characterize the properties of clouds and aerosols. When applied to exoplanets, ground-based spectropolarimetry can better constrain properties of atmospheres and surfaces than can standard intensity spectroscopy. Here we report disk-integrated linear polarization spectra of Earthshine, which is sunlight that has been first reflected by Earth and then reflected back to Earth by the Moon. The observations allow us to determine the fractional contribution of clouds and ocean surface, and are sensitive to visible areas of vegetation as small as 10 per cent. They represent a benchmark for the diagnostics of the atmospheric composition, mean cloud height and surfaces of exoplanets.

  12. Balance Trees Reveal Microbial Niche Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Morton, James T; Sanders, Jon; Quinn, Robert A; McDonald, Daniel; Gonzalez, Antonio; Vázquez-Baeza, Yoshiki; Navas-Molina, Jose A; Song, Se Jin; Metcalf, Jessica L; Hyde, Embriette R; Lladser, Manuel; Dorrestein, Pieter C; Knight, Rob

    2017-01-01

    Advances in sequencing technologies have enabled novel insights into microbial niche differentiation, from analyzing environmental samples to understanding human diseases and informing dietary studies. However, identifying the microbial taxa that differentiate these samples can be challenging. These issues stem from the compositional nature of 16S rRNA gene data (or, more generally, taxon or functional gene data); the changes in the relative abundance of one taxon influence the apparent abundances of the others. Here we acknowledge that inferring properties of individual bacteria is a difficult problem and instead introduce the concept of balances to infer meaningful properties of subcommunities, rather than properties of individual species. We show that balances can yield insights about niche differentiation across multiple microbial environments, including soil environments and lung sputum. These techniques have the potential to reshape how we carry out future ecological analyses aimed at revealing differences in relative taxonomic abundances across different samples. IMPORTANCE By explicitly accounting for the compositional nature of 16S rRNA gene data through the concept of balances, balance trees yield novel biological insights into niche differentiation. The software to perform this analysis is available under an open-source license and can be obtained at https://github.com/biocore/gneiss. Author Video: An author video summary of this article is available.

  13. Balance Trees Reveal Microbial Niche Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Morton, James T.; Sanders, Jon; Quinn, Robert A.; McDonald, Daniel; Gonzalez, Antonio; Vázquez-Baeza, Yoshiki; Navas-Molina, Jose A.; Metcalf, Jessica L.; Hyde, Embriette R.; Lladser, Manuel; Dorrestein, Pieter C.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Advances in sequencing technologies have enabled novel insights into microbial niche differentiation, from analyzing environmental samples to understanding human diseases and informing dietary studies. However, identifying the microbial taxa that differentiate these samples can be challenging. These issues stem from the compositional nature of 16S rRNA gene data (or, more generally, taxon or functional gene data); the changes in the relative abundance of one taxon influence the apparent abundances of the others. Here we acknowledge that inferring properties of individual bacteria is a difficult problem and instead introduce the concept of balances to infer meaningful properties of subcommunities, rather than properties of individual species. We show that balances can yield insights about niche differentiation across multiple microbial environments, including soil environments and lung sputum. These techniques have the potential to reshape how we carry out future ecological analyses aimed at revealing differences in relative taxonomic abundances across different samples. IMPORTANCE By explicitly accounting for the compositional nature of 16S rRNA gene data through the concept of balances, balance trees yield novel biological insights into niche differentiation. The software to perform this analysis is available under an open-source license and can be obtained at https://github.com/biocore/gneiss. Author Video: An author video summary of this article is available. PMID:28144630

  14. Feather corticosterone reveals developmental stress in seabirds.

    PubMed

    Will, Alexis P; Suzuki, Yuya; Elliott, Kyle H; Hatch, Scott A; Watanuki, Yutaka; Kitaysky, Alexander S

    2014-07-01

    In nest-bound avian offspring, food shortages typically trigger a release of the stress hormone corticosterone (CORT). Recent studies indicate that CORT is passively deposited in the tissue of growing feathers and thus may provide an integrated measure of stress incurred during development in the nest. The current hypothesis predicts that, assuming a constant rate of feather growth, elevated CORT circulating in the blood corresponds to higher levels of CORT in feather tissue, but experimental evidence for nutritionally stressed chicks is lacking. Here, we examined how food limitation affects feather CORT content in the rhinoceros auklet (Cerorhinca moncerata). We (i) used captive chicks reared on control versus restricted diets, and (ii) applied this technique to free-living chicks with unknown nutritional histories that fledged at three separate colonies. We found that (i) feather growth was not affected by experimentally induced nutritional stress; (ii) captive chicks raised on a restricted diet had higher levels of CORT in their primary feathers; (iii) feather CORT deposition is a sensitive method of detecting nutritional stress; and (iv) free-living fledglings from the colony with poor reproductive performance had higher CORT in their primary feathers. We conclude that feather CORT is a sensitive integrated measure revealing the temporal dynamics of food limitations experienced by rhinoceros auklet nestlings. The use of feather CORT may be a powerful endocrine tool in ecological and evolutionary studies of bird species with similar preferential allocation of limited resources to feather development.

  15. Radio Telescopes Reveal Unseen Galactic Cannibalism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2008-06-01

    Radio-telescope images have revealed previously-unseen galactic cannibalism -- a triggering event that leads to feeding frenzies by gigantic black holes at the cores of galaxies. Astronomers have long suspected that the extra-bright cores of spiral galaxies called Seyfert galaxies are powered by supermassive black holes consuming material. However, they could not see how the material is started on its journey toward the black hole. Optical/Radio Comparison Visible-light (left) and radio (right) image of galaxy pair: Radio image shows gas streaming between galaxies. CREDIT: Kuo et al., NRAO/AUI/NSF Click on image for more graphics. One leading theory said that Seyfert galaxies have been disturbed by close encounters with neighboring galaxies, thus stirring up their gas and bringing more of it within the gravitational reach of the black hole. However, when astronomers looked at Seyferts with visible-light telescopes, only a small fraction showed any evidence of such an encounter. Now, new images of hydrogen gas in Seyferts made using the National Science Foundation's Very Large Array (VLA) radio telescope show the majority of them are, in fact, disturbed by ongoing encounters with neighbor galaxies. "The VLA lifted the veil on what's really happening with these galaxies," said Cheng-Yu Kuo, a graduate student at the University of Virginia. "Looking at the gas in these galaxies clearly showed that they are snacking on their neighbors. This is a dramatic contrast with their appearance in visible starlight," he added. The effect of the galactic encounters is to send gas and dust toward the black hole and produce energy as the material ultimately is consumed. Black holes, concentrations of matter so dense that not even light can escape their gravitational pull, reside at the cores of many galaxies. Depending on how rapidly the black hole is eating, the galaxy can show a wide range of energetic activity. Seyfert galaxies have the mildest version of this activity, while

  16. Revealing atropisomer axial chirality in drug discovery.

    PubMed

    LaPlante, Steven R; Edwards, Paul J; Fader, Lee D; Jakalian, Araz; Hucke, Oliver

    2011-03-07

    An often overlooked source of chirality is atropisomerism, which results from slow rotation along a bond axis due to steric hindrance and/or electronic factors. If undetected or not managed properly, this time-dependent chirality has the potential to lead to serious consequences, because atropisomers can be present as distinct enantiomers or diastereoisomers with their attendant different properties. Herein we introduce a strategy to reveal and classify compounds that have atropisomeric chirality. Energy barriers to axial rotation were calculated using quantum mechanics, from which predicted high barriers could be experimentally validated. A calculated rotational energy barrier of 20 kcal mol(-1) was established as a suitable threshold to distinguish between atropisomers and non-atropisomers with a prediction accuracy of 86%. This methodology was applied to subsets of drug databases in the course of which atropisomeric drugs were identified. In addition, some drugs were exposed that were not yet known to have this chiral attribute. The most valuable utility of this tool will be to predict atropisomerism along the drug discovery pathway. When used in concert with our compound classification scheme, decisions can be made during early discovery stages such as "hit-to-lead" and "lead optimization," to foresee and validate the presence of atropisomers and to exercise options of removing, further stabilizing, or rendering the chiral axis of interest more freely rotatable via SAR design, thereby decreasing this potential liability within a compound series. The strategy can also improve drug development plans, such as determining whether a drug or series should be developed as a racemic mixture or as an isolated single compound. Moreover, the work described herein can be extended to other chemical fields that require the assessment of potential chiral axes.

  17. Saturn Probe: Revealing Solar System Origins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spilker, T. R.

    2015-12-01

    Comparative studies of the gas giant and ice giant planets are needed to reliably discriminate among competing theories of the origin and evolution of giant planets and the solar system, but we lack critical measurements. A Saturn atmospheric entry probe mission would fill a vital part of that gap, allowing comparative studies of Jupiter and Saturn, providing the basis for later comparisons with the ice giants Uranus and Neptune, and informing studies of extrasolar planetary systems now being characterized. The Galileo Probe mission provided the first in situ studies of Jupiter's atmosphere. Similar measurements at Saturn, Uranus and Neptune would provide an important comparative planetology context for the Galileo results. Cassini's "Proximal Orbits" in 2017 will reveal Saturn's internal structure to complement the Juno mission's similar measurements at Jupiter. A Saturn entry probe, complementing the Galileo Probe investigations at Jupiter, would complete a solid basis for improved understanding of both Jupiter and Saturn, an important stepping stone to understanding Uranus and Neptune and solar system formation and evolution. The 2012 Decadal Survey ("DS") added Saturn Probe science objectives to NASA's New Frontiers Program: highest-priority Tier 1 objectives any New Frontiers implementation must achieve, and Tier 2, high priority but lower than Tier 1. A DS mission concept study using extremely conservative assumptions concluded that a Saturn Probe project could fit within New Frontiers resource constraints, giving a PI confidence that they could pursue some Tier 2 objectives, customizing for the proper balance of science return, science team composition, procured or contributed instruments, etc. Contributed instruments could significantly enhance the payload and the science team for greater science return. They also provide international collaboration opportunities, with science benefits well demonstrated by missions such as Cassini-Huygens and Rosetta.

  18. Quadrupole transitions revealed by Borrmann spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Pettifer, Robert F; Collins, Stephen P; Laundy, David

    2008-07-10

    The Borrmann effect-a dramatic increase in transparency to X-ray beams-is observed when X-rays satisfying Bragg's law diffract through a perfect crystal. The minimization of absorption seen in the Borrmann effect has been explained by noting that the electric field of the X-ray beam approaches zero amplitude at the crystal planes, thus avoiding the atoms. Here we show experimentally that under conditions of absorption suppression, the weaker electric quadrupole absorption transitions are effectively enhanced to such a degree that they can dominate the absorption spectrum. This effect can be exploited as an atomic spectroscopy technique; we show that quadrupole transitions give rise to additional structure at the L(1), L(2) and L(3) absorption edges of gadolinium in gadolinium gallium garnet, which mark the onset of excitations from 2s, 2p(1/2) and 2p(3/2) atomic core levels, respectively. Although the Borrmann effect served to underpin the development of the theory of X-ray diffraction, this is potentially the most important experimental application of the phenomenon since its first observation seven decades ago. Identifying quadrupole features in X-ray absorption spectroscopy is central to the interpretation of 'pre-edge' spectra, which are often taken to be indicators of local symmetry, valence and atomic environment. Quadrupolar absorption isolates states of different symmetries to that of the dominant dipole spectrum, and typically reveals orbitals that dominate the electronic ground-state properties of lanthanides and 3d transition metals, including magnetism. Results from our Borrmann spectroscopy technique feed into contemporary discussions regarding resonant X-ray diffraction and the nature of pre-edge lines identified by inelastic X-ray scattering. Furthermore, because the Borrmann effect has been observed in photonic materials, it seems likely that the quadrupole enhancement reported here will play an important role in modern optics.

  19. NASA's Hyperwall Revealing the Big Picture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sellers, Piers

    2011-01-01

    NASA:s hyperwall is a sophisticated visualization tool used to display large datasets. The hyperwall, or video wall, is capable of displaying multiple high-definition data visualizations and/or images simultaneously across an arrangement of screens. Functioning as a key component at many NASA exhibits, the hyperwall is used to help explain phenomena, ideas, or examples of world change. The traveling version of the hyperwall is typically comprised of nine 42-50" flat-screen monitors arranged in a 3x3 array (as depicted below). However, it is not limited to monitor size or number; screen sizes can be as large as 52" and the arrangement of screens can include more than nine monitors. Generally, NASA satellite and model data are used to highlight particular themes in atmospheric, land, and ocean science. Many of the existing hyperwall stories reveal change across space and time, while others display large-scale still-images accompanied by descriptive, story-telling captions. Hyperwall content on a variety of Earth Science topics already exists and is made available to the public at: eospso.gsfc.nasa.gov/hyperwall. Keynote and PowerPoint presentations as well as Summary of Story files are available for download on each existing topic. New hyperwall content and accompanying files will continue being developed to promote scientific literacy across a diverse group of audience members. NASA invites the use of content accessible through this website but requests the user to acknowledge any and all data sources referenced in the content being used.

  20. Chemical provinces reveal Elysium Volcano's compositional evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Susko, D. A.; Karunatillake, S.; Wray, J. J.; Skok, J. R.; Hurowitz, J.; Ojha, L.; Judice, T.; Bently, R. O. J.

    2014-12-01

    Chemical provinces of Mars became definable[1-3] with the maps of elemental mass fractions generated with Mars Odyssey Gamma Ray Spectrometer (GRS) data[4,5]. Previous work highlighted the Elysium lava flow province as anomalous, with a depletion in K and Th relative to the average crust in the rest of Mars (ROM).[3] We characterize the elemental composition, geology, and geomorphology of the region to constrain the processes that have contributed to its evolution. We compare SE Elysium with its North West lava fields, advancing prior work on thermal evolution of the martian mantle.[6] Lava fields at both sites probably source from Elysium eruptions. Both show similar Si content, as well as a Ca-enrichment compared to ROM, consistent with prior models.[6,7] Nevertheless, the two fields are compositionally distinct from each other, with NW Elysium decisively depleted in Ca and Fe, but enriched in K and Th. Such distinctness, in elements that reflect magmatic fractionation, reveals the possibility that a single volcanic complex on Mars may evolve rapidly during the Amazonian era, causing variable flow compositions. Interestingly, a chemical province containing volcanics that is contemporaneous with Elysium, overlaps the Tharsis region.[3] Unlike Elysium, the K and Th distributions within Tharsis are indistinguishable from ROM. Meanwhile, the mass fraction signature in Tharsis is enriched in Cl and depleted in Si. Such contrast, in chemical anomalies between volcanic constructs of similar age, may indicate that the depletion of K and Th in SE Elysium did not arise from temporal evolution of the mantle. [1] Taylor, G. et al. Geology 38, 183-186, 2010 [2] Gasnault, O. et al. 207, 226-247, 2010 [3] Karunatillake, S. et al. J. Geophys. Res. 114, E12001, 2009 [4] Boynton, W. V. et al. J. Geophys. Res. 112, E12S99, 2007 [5] Feldman, W. C. et al. J. Geophys. Res. 109, E09006, 2004 [6] Baratoux, D. et al. Nature 472, 338-41, 2011 [7] Balta, J. et al. Geology 41, 1115

  1. Planetary Interior Structure Revealed by Spin Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Margot, J.; Peale, S. J.; Jurgens, R. F.; Slade, M. A.; Holin, I. V.

    2002-12-01

    The spin state of a planet depends on the distribution of mass within the interior, gradual and discrete changes in its moments of inertia, dissipation mechanisms at the surface and below, and external torques. Detailed measurements of the spin dynamics can therefore reveal much about planetary interior structure, interactions at the core-mantle and atmosphere-surface boundaries, and mass redistribution events. Studies of the spin precession, polar wobble, and length of day variations have been used to determine Earth's moments of inertia and rigidity and to study the effects of atmospheric angular momentum changes, post-glacial rebound, and large earthquakes. In planetary investigations the spin measurements are particularly important because other means of constraining interior properties require in-situ or orbiting sensors (e.g. seismometers, magnetometers, and Doppler tracking of spacecraft). Here we describe the successful implementation of a new Earth-based radar technique (Holin, 1992) that provides spin state measurements with unprecedented accuracy. Our first observations were designed to characterize Mercury's core. Peale (1976) showed that the measurement of four quantities (the obliquity of the planet, the amplitude of its longitude librations, and the second-degree gravitational harmonics) are sufficient to determine the size and state of Mercury's core. The existence of a molten core would place strong constraints on the thermal and rotational histories of the planet, with profound implications for the composition and rotation state of the planet at the time of formation. A solid core would have a fundamental impact on theories of planetary magnetic field generation. We observed Mercury with the Goldstone radar and the Green Bank Telescope in May-June 2002. We illuminated the planet with a monochromatic signal, recorded the scattered power at the two antennas, and cross-correlated the echoes in the time domain. We obtained strong correlations which

  2. Microradiometers Reveal Ocean Health, Climate Change

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2013-01-01

    When NASA researcher Stanford Hooker is in the field, he pays close attention to color. For Hooker, being in the field means being at sea. On one such research trip to the frigid waters of the Arctic, with a Coast Guard icebreaker looming nearby and the snow-crusted ice shelf a few feet away, Hooker leaned over the edge of his small boat and lowered a tethered device into the bright turquoise water, a new product devised by a NASA partner and enabled by a promising technology for oceanographers and atmospheric scientists alike. Color is a function of light. Pure water is clear, but the variation in color observed during a visit to the beach or a flight along a coastline depends on the water s depth and the constituents in it, how far down the light penetrates and how it is absorbed and scattered by dissolved and suspended material. Hooker cares about ocean color because of what it can reveal about the health of the ocean, and in turn, the health of our planet. "The main thing we are interested in is the productivity of the water," Hooker says. The seawater contains phytoplankton, microscopic plants, which are the food base for the ocean s ecosystems. Changes in the water s properties, whether due to natural seasonal effects or human influence, can lead to problems for delicate ecosystems such as coral reefs. Ocean color can inform researchers about the quantities and distribution of phytoplankton and other materials, providing clues as to how the world ocean is changing. NASA s Coastal Zone Color Scanner, launched in 1978, was the first ocean color instrument flown on a spacecraft. Since then, the Agency s ocean color research capabilities have become increasingly sophisticated with the launch of the SeaWiFS instrument in 1997 and the twin MODIS instruments carried into orbit on NASA s Terra (1999) and Aqua (2002) satellites. The technology provides sweeping, global information on ocean color on a scale unattainable by any other means. One issue that arises from

  3. Functional Analysis of the Fructooligosaccharide Utilization Operon in Lactobacillus paracasei 1195▿

    PubMed Central

    Goh, Yong Jun; Lee, Jong-Hwa; Hutkins, Robert W.

    2007-01-01

    The fosABCDXE operon encodes components of a putative fructose/mannose phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent phosphotransferase system and a β-fructosidase precursor (FosE) that are involved in the fructooligosaccharide (FOS) utilization pathway of Lactobacillus paracasei 1195. The presence of an N-terminal signal peptide sequence and an LPQAG cell wall anchor motif in the C-terminal region of the deduced FosE precursor amino acid sequence predicted that the enzyme is cell wall associated, indicating that FOS may be hydrolyzed extracellularly. In this study, cell fractionation experiments demonstrated that the FOS hydrolysis activity was present exclusively in the cell wall extract of L. paracasei previously grown on FOS. In contrast, no measurable FOS hydrolysis activity was detected in the cell wall extract from the isogenic fosE mutant. Induction of β-fructosidase activity was observed when cells were grown on FOS, inulin, sucrose, or fructose but not when cells were grown on glucose. A diauxic growth pattern was observed when cells were grown on FOS in the presence of limiting glucose (0.1%). Analysis of the culture supernatant revealed that glucose was consumed first, followed by the longer-chain FOS species. Transcription analysis further showed that the fos operon was expressed only after glucose was depleted in the medium. Expression of fosE in a non-FOS-fermenting strain, Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG, enabled the recombinant strain to metabolize FOS, inulin, sucrose, and levan. PMID:17644636

  4. Evaluation of the probiotic potential of Bacillus polyfermenticus CJ6 isolated from Meju, a Korean soybean fermentation starter.

    PubMed

    Jung, Ji Hye; Lee, Myung Yul; Chang, Hae Choon

    2012-11-01

    To evaluate the probiotic potential of Bacillus polyfermenticus CJ6 isolated from meju, a Korean traditional soybean fermentation starter, its functionality and safety were investigated. B. polyfermenticus CJ6 was sensitive to all antibiotics listed by the European Food Safety Authority. The strain was also non-hemolytic, carried no emetic toxin or enterotoxin genes, and produced no enterotoxins. The resistance of B. polyfermenticus CJ6 vegetative cells and spores to simulated gastrointestinal conditions was high (60-100% survival rate). B. polyfermenticus CJ6 produced high amounts (0.36 g as a purified lyophilized form) of gamma-polyglutamic acid (PGA). We speculate that the improved cell viability and the production of gamma-PGA have a significant correlation. Adhesion of the strain to Caco-2 and HT-29 cells was weaker than that of the reference strain (Lb. rhamnosus GG), but it was comparable to or stronger than those of reported Bacillus spp. When B. polyfermenticus CJ6 spores were given orally to mice, the number of cells excreted in the feces was 4-fold higher than the original inocula. This suggests the inoculated spores propagated within the intestinal tract of the mice. This idea was confirmed by field emission scanning electron microscopy, which revealed directly that B. polyfermenticus CJ6 cells germinated and adhered within the gastrointestinal tract of mice. Taken together, these findings suggest that B. polyfermenticus CJ6 has probiotic potential for both human consumption and use in animal feeds.

  5. Effect of sublethal preculturing on the survival of probiotics and metabolite formation in set-yoghurt.

    PubMed

    Settachaimongkon, Sarn; van Valenberg, Hein J F; Winata, Vera; Wang, Xiaoxi; Nout, M J Robert; van Hooijdonk, Toon C M; Zwietering, Marcel H; Smid, Eddy J

    2015-08-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of preculturing of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG and Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis BB12 under sublethal stress conditions on their survival and metabolite formation in set-yoghurt. Prior to co-cultivation with yoghurt starters in milk, the two probiotic strains were precultured under sublethal stress conditions (combinations of elevated NaCl and low pH) in a batch fermentor. The activity of sublethally precultured probiotics was evaluated during fermentation and refrigerated storage by monitoring bacterial population dynamics, milk acidification and changes in volatile and non-volatile metabolite profiles of set-yoghurt. The results demonstrated adaptive stress responses of the two probiotic strains resulting in their viability improvement without adverse influence on milk acidification. A complementary metabolomic approach using SPME-GC/MS and (1)H-NMR resulted in the identification of 35 volatiles and 43 non-volatile polar metabolites, respectively. Principal component analysis revealed substantial impact of the activity of sublethally precultured probiotics on metabolite formation demonstrated by distinctive volatile and non-volatile metabolite profiles of set-yoghurt. Changes in relative abundance of various aroma compounds suggest that incorporation of stress-adapted probiotics considerably influences the organoleptic quality of product. This study provides new information on the application of stress-adapted probiotics in an actual food-carrier environment.

  6. Role of DNA Repair Factor Xeroderma Pigmentosum Protein Group C in Response to Replication Stress As Revealed by DNA Fragile Site Affinity Chromatography and Quantitative Proteomics.

    PubMed

    Beresova, Lucie; Vesela, Eva; Chamrad, Ivo; Voller, Jiri; Yamada, Masayuki; Furst, Tomas; Lenobel, Rene; Chroma, Katarina; Gursky, Jan; Krizova, Katerina; Mistrik, Martin; Bartek, Jiri

    2016-12-02

    Replication stress (RS) fuels genomic instability and cancer development and may contribute to aging, raising the need to identify factors involved in cellular responses to such stress. Here, we present a strategy for identification of factors affecting the maintenance of common fragile sites (CFSs), which are genomic loci that are particularly sensitive to RS and suffer from increased breakage and rearrangements in tumors. A DNA probe designed to match the high flexibility island sequence typical for the commonly expressed CFS (FRA16D) was used as specific DNA affinity bait. Proteins significantly enriched at the FRA16D fragment under normal and replication stress conditions were identified using stable isotope labeling of amino acids in cell culture-based quantitative mass spectrometry. The identified proteins interacting with the FRA16D fragment included some known CFS stabilizers, thereby validating this screening approach. Among the hits from our screen so far not implicated in CFS maintenance, we chose Xeroderma pigmentosum protein group C (XPC) for further characterization. XPC is a key factor in the DNA repair pathway known as global genomic nucleotide excision repair (GG-NER), a mechanism whose several components were enriched at the FRA16D fragment in our screen. Functional experiments revealed defective checkpoint signaling and escape of DNA replication intermediates into mitosis and the next generation of XPC-depleted cells exposed to RS. Overall, our results provide insights into an unexpected biological role of XPC in response to replication stress and document the power of proteomics-based screening strategies to elucidate mechanisms of pathophysiological significance.

  7. The lower atmosphere of Pluto revealed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2009-03-01

    ), attached to ESO's Very Large Telescope, have now revealed that the atmosphere as a whole, not just the upper atmosphere, has a mean temperature of minus 180 degrees Celsius, and so it is indeed "much hotter" than the surface. In contrast to the Earth's atmosphere [2], most, if not all, of Pluto's atmosphere is thus undergoing a temperature inversion: the temperature is higher, the higher in the atmosphere you look. The change is about 3 to 15 degrees per kilometre. On Earth, under normal circumstances, the temperature decreases through the atmosphere by about 6 degrees per kilometre. "It is fascinating to think that with CRIRES we are able to precisely measure traces of a gas in an atmosphere 100 000 times more tenuous than the Earth's, on an object five times smaller than our planet and located at the edge of the Solar System," says co-author Hans-Ulrich Käufl. "The combination of CRIRES and the VLT is almost like having an advanced atmospheric research satellite orbiting Pluto." The reason why Pluto's surface is so cold is linked to the existence of Pluto's atmosphere, and is due to the sublimation of the surface ice; much like sweat cools the body as it evaporates from the surface of the skin, this sublimation has a cooling effect on the surface of Pluto. In this respect, Pluto shares some properties with comets, whose coma and tails arise from sublimating ice as they approach the Sun. The CRIRES observations also indicate that methane is the second most common gas in Pluto's atmosphere, representing half a percent of the molecules. "We were able to show that these quantities of methane play a crucial role in the heating processes in the atmosphere and can explain the elevated atmospheric temperature," says Lellouch. Two different models can explain the properties of Pluto's atmosphere. In the first, the astronomers assume that Pluto's surface is covered with a thin layer of methane, which will inhibit the sublimation of the nitrogen frost. The second scenario invokes

  8. Dramatic Outburst Reveals Nearest Black Hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2000-01-01

    Sgr. The radio observations revealed the presence of a jet escaping from the system at mind-boggling speeds. Only three other galactic X-ray stellar systems have been found to eject material at such speeds. They have been dubbed "microquasars" because, on a smaller scale, they resemble quasars, which lie at the hearts of distant galaxies and also spew out high-velocity jets of particles. In galaxy-core quasars, the black holes are millions of times more massive than the Sun; in the more nearby microquasars the black holes are roughly three to twenty times more massive than the Sun. The extremely high velocity of the jets suggests that their origin lies close to the event horizon of a black hole. Microquasar activity is thought to arise when the black hole in the binary system draws material away from its companion star. The material surrounding the black hole forms a rapidly spinning disk called an accretion disk. This disk is heated by friction to millions of degrees, causing it to emit X-rays. As spiralling gas moves into the gravity well of the black hole, it moves faster and faster. Magnetic fields in the disk are believed to expel the charged subatomic particles at speeds close to that of light. As the charged particles interact with the magnetic fields, they emit radio waves. If some of the material escapes by being magnetically expelled into space, the matter may continue moving at the tremendous speed it had attained near the black hole. After their ejection, the jets of particles expand and cool, fading from astronomers' view. V4641 Sgr excites astronomers because it is close and because it acted so differently from other microquasars. In other microquasars, outbursts have dimmed more slowly over weeks or months rather than hours. "There's something fundamentally different about this one; it's more extreme than any other example," Hjellming said. "And because this system happens to be so close to us, `it is very likely that there are more objects like V4641

  9. 21 CFR 1.21 - Failure to reveal material facts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Failure to reveal material facts. 1.21 Section 1... GENERAL ENFORCEMENT REGULATIONS General Labeling Requirements § 1.21 Failure to reveal material facts. (a) Labeling of a food, drug, device, or cosmetic shall be deemed to be misleading if it fails to reveal...

  10. 21 CFR 1.21 - Failure to reveal material facts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Failure to reveal material facts. 1.21 Section 1... GENERAL ENFORCEMENT REGULATIONS General Labeling Requirements § 1.21 Failure to reveal material facts. (a) Labeling of a food, drug, device, or cosmetic shall be deemed to be misleading if it fails to reveal...

  11. What Facial Appearance Reveals Over Time: When Perceived Expressions in Neutral Faces Reveal Stable Emotion Dispositions

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Reginald B.; Garrido, Carlos O.; Albohn, Daniel N.; Hess, Ursula; Kleck, Robert E.

    2016-01-01

    It might seem a reasonable assumption that when we are not actively using our faces to express ourselves (i.e., when we display nonexpressive, or neutral faces), those around us will not be able to read our emotions. Herein, using a variety of expression-related ratings, we examined whether age-related changes in the face can accurately reveal one’s innermost affective dispositions. In each study, we found that expressive ratings of neutral facial displays predicted self-reported positive/negative dispositional affect, but only for elderly women, and only for positive affect. These findings meaningfully replicate and extend earlier work examining age-related emotion cues in the face of elderly women (Malatesta et al., 1987a). We discuss these findings in light of evidence that women are expected to, and do, smile more than men, and that the quality of their smiles predicts their life satisfaction. Although ratings of old male faces did not significantly predict self-reported affective dispositions, the trend was similar to that found for old female faces. A plausible explanation for this gender difference is that in the process of attenuating emotional expressions over their lifetimes, old men reveal less evidence of their total emotional experiences in their faces than do old women. PMID:27445944

  12. Antibiotic susceptibility profiles of new probiotic Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium strains.

    PubMed

    Zhou, J S; Pillidge, C J; Gopal, P K; Gill, H S

    2005-02-01

    The antimicrobial susceptibilities and presence of plasmids in four new probiotic lactic acid bacteria (LAB) strains, Lactobacillus rhamnosus HN001 (DR20) HN067, Lactobacillus acidophilus HN017 and Bifidobacterium lactis HN019 (DR10), were determined. Resistance to 18 commonly used antibiotics was assessed by disk diffusion. The three Lactobacillus strains had similar antibiotic susceptibility profiles to those of Lactobacillus plantarum strain HN045 and two commercial probiotic Lactobacillus strains, GG and LA-1. The B. lactis strain HN019 had a similar profile to three commercial probiotic B. lactis strains (Bb12, HN049 and HN098). All 10 strains were sensitive to the Gram-positive spectrum antibiotics erythromycin and novobiocin, the broad-spectrum antibiotics rifampicin, spectinomycin, tetracycline and chloramphenicol and the beta-lactam antibiotics penicillin, ampicillin and cephalothin. By contrast, most strains were resistant to the Gram-negative spectrum antibiotics fusidic acid, nalidixic acid and polymyxin B and the aminoglycosides neomycin, gentamicin, kanamycin and streptomycin. All three L. rhamnosus strains (HN001, HN067 and GG) were resistant to vancomycin and several strains were also resistant to cloxacillin. Of the four new probiotic strains, only L. rhamnosus HN001 contained plasmids; however, a plasmid-free derivative of HN001 had the same antibiotic susceptibility profile as the parent strain.

  13. Facial cellulitis revealing choreo-acanthocytosis: a case report.

    PubMed

    Samia, Younes; Yosra, Cherif; Foued, Bellazreg; Mouna, Aissi; Olfa, Berriche; Jihed, Souissi; Hammadi, Braham; Mahbouba, Frih-Ayed; Amel, Letaief; Habib, Sfar Mohamed

    2014-01-01

    We report a 62 year-old-man with facial cellulitis revealing choreo-acanthocytosis (ChAc). He showed chorea that started 20 years ago. The orofacial dyskinisia with tongue and cheek biting resulted in facial cellulitis. The peripheral blood smear revealed acanthocytosis of 25%. The overall of chorea, orofacial dyskinetic disorder, peripheral neuropathy, disturbed behavior, acanthocytosis and the atrophy of caudate nuclei was suggestive of a diagnosis of ChAc. To our knowledge no similar cases of facial cellulitis revealing choreo-acanthocytosis (ChAc) were found in a review of the literature.

  14. Field-portable-XRF reveals the ubiquity of antimony in plastic consumer products.

    PubMed

    Turner, Andrew; Filella, Montserrat

    2017-02-09

    Very little systematic information exists on the occurrence and concentrations of antimony (Sb) in consumer products. In this study, a Niton XL3t field-portable-X-ray fluorescence (FP-XRF) spectrometer was deployed in situ and in the laboratory to provide quantitative information on Sb dissipated in plastic items and fixtures (including rubber, textile and foamed materials) from the domestic, school, vehicular and office settings. The metalloid was detected in 18% of over 800 measurements performed, with concentrations ranging from about 60 to 60,000μgg(-1). The highest concentrations were encountered in white, electronic casings and in association with similar concentrations of Br, consistent with the use of antimony oxides (e.g. Sb2O3) as synergistic flame retardants. Concentrations above 1000μgg(-1), and with or without Br, were also encountered in paints, piping and hosing, adhesives, whiteboards, Christmas decorations, Lego blocks, document carriers, garden furniture, upholstered products and interior panels of private motor vehicles. Lower concentrations of Sb were encountered in a wide variety of items but its presence (without Br) in food tray packaging, single-use drinks bottles, straws and small toys were of greatest concern from a human health perspective. While the latter observations are consistent with the use of antimony compounds as catalysts in the production of polyethylene terephthalate, co-association of Sb and Br in many products not requiring flame retardancy suggests that electronic casings are widely recycled. Further research is required into the mobility of Sb when dissipated in new, recycled and aged polymeric materials.

  15. Satellite telemetry and prey sampling reveal contaminant sources to pacific northwest ospreys

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Elliott, J.E.; Morrissey, C.A.; Henny, C.J.; Inzunza, E.R.; Shaw, P.

    2007-01-01

    Migratory behavior can be an important factor in determining contaminant exposure in avian populations. Accumulation of organochlorine (OC) pesticides while birds are wintering in tropical regions has been cited often as the reason for high concentrations in migrant populations. To explore this issue, we satellite tracked 16 Ospreys (Pandion haliaetus) over the period 1996-2003 from breeding sites in British Columbia, Canada, and integrated the results into a database on 15 Ospreys that were satellite tracked over the period 1995-1999, from breeding locations in Washington and Oregon, USA. Data on wintering sites of 31 Ospreys in Mexico and Central America were used for spatially targeted sampling of prey fish. Concentrations of the main organochlorine contaminant, p,p???-dichloro-diphenyl-dichloroethylene (DDE), in fish composites from Mexico ranged from 0.005 to 0.115 ??g/g wet mass. Significant differences existed among fish families in p,p???-DDE, total dichloro- diphenyltrichloroethane (??DDT), ??chlordanes, and total polychlorinated biphenyls (??PCBs). Catfish (family Ariidae) generally had significantly higher levels of DDT metabolites and other organochlorine contaminants compared to other fish families collected. Differences in prey contaminant levels were detected among the collection sites around coastal Mexico, with fish from Veracruz State generally having higher levels of DDT metabolites, ??chlordanes, ??PCBs, and hexachlorobenzene. Eggs collected from 16 nests throughout the Pacific Northwest (nine from British Columbia, seven from Oregon and Washington) where Ospreys had been satellite tagged, showed marked variation in levels of DDT metabolites (p,p???-DDE; range 0.02-10.14 ??g/g). Wintering site had no significant effect on contaminant concentrations in sample eggs from those specific Ospreys; rather concentrations of p,p???-DDE, were predicted by breeding sites with highest levels in eggs of Ospreys breeding in the lower Columbia River

  16. Everett Weinreb, Photographer, April 1989 FOUNDATION DETAIL REVEALED AS RESULT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Everett Weinreb, Photographer, April 1989 FOUNDATION DETAIL REVEALED AS RESULT OF HOUSE DEMOLITION - Irvine Ranch Agricultural Headquarters, Boyd Tenant House, Southeast of Intersection of San Diego & Santa Ana Freeways, Irvine, Orange County, CA

  17. General view of the archaeological site showing excavation and revealing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    General view of the archaeological site showing excavation and revealing the steps leading down into the eighteenth-century burial vault - Harry Buck House, North of Main Street (14800 Governor Oden Bowie Drive), Upper Marlboro, Prince George's County, MD

  18. Many Ignore Fire Safety at Home, Survey Reveals

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_162699.html Many Ignore Fire Safety at Home, Survey Reveals Holiday activities can ... dangerous time of year, but many families ignore fire and burn safety tips, a new survey finds. ...

  19. Genome-Wide Scan Reveals Mutation Associated with Melanoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... historical) Genome-Wide Scan Reveals Mutation Associated with Melanoma A team of international researchers supported by the ... when they divide and grow uncontrollably, develop into melanoma. Also, MITF activity is known to be amplified ...

  20. [Deep vein thrombosis revealing myeloproliferative syndrome in two adolescents].

    PubMed

    Bertrand, A; Heissat, S; Caron, N; Viremouneix, L; Pracros, J-P; Javouhey, E; Lachaux, A; Mialou, V

    2014-05-01

    Deep vein thrombosis occurs in 30% of patients with essential thrombocythemia, but rarely at initial diagnosis. We report two pediatric patients with essential thrombocythemia revealed by atypical deep vein thrombosis. First, a 16-year-old girl presented Budd-Chiari syndrome revealed by a hemorrhagic shock. Clinical exam revealed isolated splenomegaly. A search for thrombophilia found a factor V Leiden homozygous mutation and a Jak2 mutation. Bone marrow biopsy confirmed the diagnosis of a myeloproliferative disorder. The second case, a 17-year-old girl, had a routine examination by her physician that revealed splenomegaly. Ultrasonography displayed thrombus in the splenic and portal vein. An isolated Jak2 mutation was found and a myeloproliferative disorder was confirmed by bone marrow biopsy. The diagnosis of myeloproliferative disorder was made in both patients presenting atypical venous thrombosis with a Jak2 mutation and confirmed by bone marrow biopsy. These initial presentations of myeloproliferative disorders are rare in childhood and possibly underdiagnosed.

  1. Direct sequencing of the human microbiome readily reveals community differences

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Culture-independent studies of human microbiota by direct genomic sequencing reveal quite distinct differences among communities, indicating that improved sequencing capacity can be most wisely utilized to study more samples, rather than more sequences per sample. PMID:20441597

  2. Revealing the molecular signatures of host-pathogen interactions

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Advances in sequencing technology and genome-wide association studies are now revealing the complex interactions between hosts and pathogen through genomic variation signatures, which arise from evolutionary co-existence. PMID:22011345

  3. 14. DETAIL VIEW, FLUTED PILASTER AND PANELLED REVEAL IN DOORWAY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. DETAIL VIEW, FLUTED PILASTER AND PANELLED REVEAL IN DOORWAY BETWEEN VESTIBULE AND STAIRHALL (NOTE WOOD GRAINING), WITH SCALE - Bowieville, 522 Church Road South, Leeland, Prince George's County, MD

  4. Revealing of HII-regions in Galaxies with Panoramic Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hakopian, S. A.; Balayan, S. K.

    2016-06-01

    Observations intended to investigation and revealing of nodes of processes of nuclear and starforming activity in galaxies were performed via panoramic spectroscopy. Data obtained on Mrk 1050 revealed evidence of starforming activity also outside the central engine of high surface brightness. Two small HII-regions, being likely a part of the chain, are located in the part of the spiral branch coming from the nucleus part.

  5. Revealing physical interaction networks from statistics of collective dynamics.

    PubMed

    Nitzan, Mor; Casadiego, Jose; Timme, Marc

    2017-02-01

    Revealing physical interactions in complex systems from observed collective dynamics constitutes a fundamental inverse problem in science. Current reconstruction methods require access to a system's model or dynamical data at a level of detail often not available. We exploit changes in invariant measures, in particular distributions of sampled states of the system in response to driving signals, and use compressed sensing to reveal physical interaction networks. Dynamical observations following driving suffice to infer physical connectivity even if they are temporally disordered, are acquired at large sampling intervals, and stem from different experiments. Testing various nonlinear dynamic processes emerging on artificial and real network topologies indicates high reconstruction quality for existence as well as type of interactions. These results advance our ability to reveal physical interaction networks in complex synthetic and natural systems.

  6. Camelid genomes reveal evolution and adaptation to desert environments.

    PubMed

    Wu, Huiguang; Guang, Xuanmin; Al-Fageeh, Mohamed B; Cao, Junwei; Pan, Shengkai; Zhou, Huanmin; Zhang, Li; Abutarboush, Mohammed H; Xing, Yanping; Xie, Zhiyuan; Alshanqeeti, Ali S; Zhang, Yanru; Yao, Qiulin; Al-Shomrani, Badr M; Zhang, Dong; Li, Jiang; Manee, Manee M; Yang, Zili; Yang, Linfeng; Liu, Yiyi; Zhang, Jilin; Altammami, Musaad A; Wang, Shenyuan; Yu, Lili; Zhang, Wenbin; Liu, Sanyang; Ba, La; Liu, Chunxia; Yang, Xukui; Meng, Fanhua; Wang, Shaowei; Li, Lu; Li, Erli; Li, Xueqiong; Wu, Kaifeng; Zhang, Shu; Wang, Junyi; Yin, Ye; Yang, Huanming; Al-Swailem, Abdulaziz M; Wang, Jun

    2014-10-21

    Bactrian camel (Camelus bactrianus), dromedary (Camelus dromedarius) and alpaca (Vicugna pacos) are economically important livestock. Although the Bactrian camel and dromedary are large, typically arid-desert-adapted mammals, alpacas are adapted to plateaus. Here we present high-quality genome sequences of these three species. Our analysis reveals the demographic history of these species since the Tortonian Stage of the Miocene and uncovers a striking correlation between large fluctuations in population size and geological time boundaries. Comparative genomic analysis reveals complex features related to desert adaptations, including fat and water metabolism, stress responses to heat, aridity, intense ultraviolet radiation and choking dust. Transcriptomic analysis of Bactrian camels further reveals unique osmoregulation, osmoprotection and compensatory mechanisms for water reservation underpinned by high blood glucose levels. We hypothesize that these physiological mechanisms represent kidney evolutionary adaptations to the desert environment. This study advances our understanding of camelid evolution and the adaptation of camels to arid-desert environments.

  7. Activity screening of environmental metagenomic libraries reveals novel carboxylesterase families

    PubMed Central

    Popovic, Ana; Hai, Tran; Tchigvintsev, Anatoly; Hajighasemi, Mahbod; Nocek, Boguslaw; Khusnutdinova, Anna N.; Brown, Greg; Glinos, Julia; Flick, Robert; Skarina, Tatiana; Chernikova, Tatyana N.; Yim, Veronica; Brüls, Thomas; Paslier, Denis Le; Yakimov, Michail M.; Joachimiak, Andrzej; Ferrer, Manuel; Golyshina, Olga V.; Savchenko, Alexei; Golyshin, Peter N.; Yakunin, Alexander F.

    2017-01-01

    Metagenomics has made accessible an enormous reserve of global biochemical diversity. To tap into this vast resource of novel enzymes, we have screened over one million clones from metagenome DNA libraries derived from sixteen different environments for carboxylesterase activity and identified 714 positive hits. We have validated the esterase activity of 80 selected genes, which belong to 17 different protein families including unknown and cyclase-like proteins. Three metagenomic enzymes exhibited lipase activity, and seven proteins showed polyester depolymerization activity against polylactic acid and polycaprolactone. Detailed biochemical characterization of four new enzymes revealed their substrate preference, whereas their catalytic residues were identified using site-directed mutagenesis. The crystal structure of the metal-ion dependent esterase MGS0169 from the amidohydrolase superfamily revealed a novel active site with a bound unknown ligand. Thus, activity-centered metagenomics has revealed diverse enzymes and novel families of microbial carboxylesterases, whose activity could not have been predicted using bioinformatics tools. PMID:28272521

  8. Revealing physical interaction networks from statistics of collective dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Nitzan, Mor; Casadiego, Jose; Timme, Marc

    2017-01-01

    Revealing physical interactions in complex systems from observed collective dynamics constitutes a fundamental inverse problem in science. Current reconstruction methods require access to a system’s model or dynamical data at a level of detail often not available. We exploit changes in invariant measures, in particular distributions of sampled states of the system in response to driving signals, and use compressed sensing to reveal physical interaction networks. Dynamical observations following driving suffice to infer physical connectivity even if they are temporally disordered, are acquired at large sampling intervals, and stem from different experiments. Testing various nonlinear dynamic processes emerging on artificial and real network topologies indicates high reconstruction quality for existence as well as type of interactions. These results advance our ability to reveal physical interaction networks in complex synthetic and natural systems. PMID:28246630

  9. Primary Splenic Angiosarcoma Revealed by Bone Marrow Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Anoun, Soumaya; Marouane, Sofia; Quessar, Asmae; Benchekroun, Said

    2014-01-01

    Primary splenic angiosarcomas are the most common malignant non-hematopoietic tumors of the spleen. Metastatic diseases were found in 69% of patients in a reported series but the incidence of bone marrow involvement is unclear. We report a rare case of a 25-years-old Moroccan woman with unsuspected primary splenic angiosarcoma revealed by bone marrow metastasis. She presented with serious anemia and splenomegaly. Bone marrow biopsy revealed proliferating spindle cells. Computed tomography scanning showed an enlarged spleen with heterogeneous lesions. Splenectomy was performed and retrospective histological study of the spleen confirmed the diagnosis. She died 1 year after splenectomy. PMID:25541659

  10. Primary splenic angiosarcoma revealed by bone marrow metastasis.

    PubMed

    Anoun, Soumaya; Marouane, Sofia; Quessar, Asmae; Benchekroun, Said

    2014-12-05

    Primary splenic angiosarcomas are the most common malignant non-hematopoietic tumors of the spleen. Metastatic diseases were found in 69% of patients in a reported series but the incidence of bone marrow involvement is unclear. We report a rare case of a 25-years-old Moroccan woman with unsuspected primary splenic angiosarcoma revealed by bone marrow metastasis. She presented with serious anemia and splenomegaly. Bone marrow biopsy revealed proliferating spindle cells. Computed tomography scanning showed an enlarged spleen with heterogeneous lesions. Splenectomy was performed and retrospective histological study of the spleen confirmed the diagnosis. She died 1 year after splenectomy.

  11. Wigner flow reveals topological order in quantum phase space dynamics.

    PubMed

    Steuernagel, Ole; Kakofengitis, Dimitris; Ritter, Georg

    2013-01-18

    The behavior of classical mechanical systems is characterized by their phase portraits, the collections of their trajectories. Heisenberg's uncertainty principle precludes the existence of sharply defined trajectories, which is why traditionally only the time evolution of wave functions is studied in quantum dynamics. These studies are quite insensitive to the underlying structure of quantum phase space dynamics. We identify the flow that is the quantum analog of classical particle flow along phase portrait lines. It reveals hidden features of quantum dynamics and extra complexity. Being constrained by conserved flow winding numbers, it also reveals fundamental topological order in quantum dynamics that has so far gone unnoticed.

  12. Puzzles in modern biology. I. Male sterility, failure reveals design.

    PubMed

    Frank, Steven A

    2016-01-01

    Many human males produce dysfunctional sperm. Various plants frequently abort pollen. Hybrid matings often produce sterile males. Widespread male sterility is puzzling. Natural selection prunes reproductive failure. Puzzling failure implies something that we do not understand about how organisms are designed. Solving the puzzle reveals the hidden processes of design.

  13. Adaptation to High Ethanol Reveals Complex Evolutionary Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Das, Anupam; Espinosa-Cantú, Adriana; De Maeyer, Dries; Arslan, Ahmed; Van Pee, Michiel; van der Zande, Elisa; Meert, Wim; Yang, Yudi; Zhu, Bo; Marchal, Kathleen; DeLuna, Alexander; Van Noort, Vera; Jelier, Rob; Verstrepen, Kevin J.

    2015-01-01

    Tolerance to high levels of ethanol is an ecologically and industrially relevant phenotype of microbes, but the molecular mechanisms underlying this complex trait remain largely unknown. Here, we use long-term experimental evolution of isogenic yeast populations of different initial ploidy to study adaptation to increasing levels of ethanol. Whole-genome sequencing of more than 30 evolved populations and over 100 adapted clones isolated throughout this two-year evolution experiment revealed how a complex interplay of de novo single nucleotide mutations, copy number variation, ploidy changes, mutator phenotypes, and clonal interference led to a significant increase in ethanol tolerance. Although the specific mutations differ between different evolved lineages, application of a novel computational pipeline, PheNetic, revealed that many mutations target functional modules involved in stress response, cell cycle regulation, DNA repair and respiration. Measuring the fitness effects of selected mutations introduced in non-evolved ethanol-sensitive cells revealed several adaptive mutations that had previously not been implicated in ethanol tolerance, including mutations in PRT1, VPS70 and MEX67. Interestingly, variation in VPS70 was recently identified as a QTL for ethanol tolerance in an industrial bio-ethanol strain. Taken together, our results show how, in contrast to adaptation to some other stresses, adaptation to a continuous complex and severe stress involves interplay of different evolutionary mechanisms. In addition, our study reveals functional modules involved in ethanol resistance and identifies several mutations that could help to improve the ethanol tolerance of industrial yeasts. PMID:26545090

  14. 24. Demolitin of Pier G reveals the center bays at ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    24. Demolitin of Pier G reveals the center bays at the track well in transverse section. Note structural system of first, second, and third floors, as well as the monitor roof. - Lehigh Valley Railroad, Pier G, Jersey City, Hudson County, NJ

  15. Chemical milling solution reveals stress corrosion cracks in titanium alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Braski, D. N.

    1967-01-01

    Solution of hydrogen flouride, hydrogen peroxide, and water reveals hot salt stress corrosion cracks in various titanium alloys. After the surface is rinsed in water, dried, and swabbed with the solution, it can be observed by the naked eye or at low magnification.

  16. Revealing the Effects of Cognitive Education Programmes through Dynamic Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tzuriel, David

    2011-01-01

    The major objective of this paper is to demonstrate the effectiveness of dynamic assessment (DA) in revealing outcomes of cognitive education programmes. Three programmes based on "mediated learning experience" theory are reviewed: "Feuerstein's Instrumental Enrichment", "Bright Start", and "Peer Mediation with…

  17. Puzzles in modern biology. I. Male sterility, failure reveals design

    PubMed Central

    Frank, Steven A.

    2016-01-01

    Many human males produce dysfunctional sperm. Various plants frequently abort pollen. Hybrid matings often produce sterile males. Widespread male sterility is puzzling. Natural selection prunes reproductive failure. Puzzling failure implies something that we do not understand about how organisms are designed. Solving the puzzle reveals the hidden processes of design. PMID:28004842

  18. When Values and Behaviors Conflict: Immigrant BSW Students' Experiences Revealed

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Calderwood, Kimberly; Harper, Kim; Ball, Kellie; Liang, David

    2009-01-01

    This qualitative study reveals the discomfort seven immigrant bachelor of social work students reported experiencing when the behaviors expected of them as Canadian social workers conflicted with their fundamental family values. Behaviorally, participants had assimilated to Canadian and to social work cultures; however, the values they held from…

  19. Integrated genomics of Mucorales reveals novel therapeutic targets

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mucormycosis is a life-threatening infection caused by Mucorales fungi. We sequenced 30 fungal genomes and performed transcriptomics with three representative Rhizopus and Mucor strains with human airway epithelial cells during fungal invasion to reveal key host and fungal determinants contributing ...

  20. Fundamental Patterns Underlying Neurotoxicity Revealed by DNA Microarray Expression Profiling

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-09-01

    microarray analysis of the dopaminergic cell line, SN4741 , revealed induction of stress indices following MPP* treatment (Chun et al., 2001). To...response to a wide range of cellular stresses including oxidative insult of the nigral dopaminergic cell line SN4741 with hydrogen peroxide or MPP* (Salinas

  1. Detail of south granite pier revealing riveted truss ends and ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail of south granite pier revealing riveted truss ends and iron footing plates on top of granite cap stones. View north - New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad, Fort Point Channel Rolling Lift Bridge, Spanning Fort Point Channel, Boston, Suffolk County, MA

  2. Experimentally implementable criteria revealing substructures of genuine multipartite entanglement

    SciTech Connect

    Huber, Marcus; Schimpf, Hans; Gabriel, Andreas; Spengler, Christoph; Bruss, Dagmar; Hiesmayr, Beatrix C.

    2011-02-15

    We present a general framework that reveals substructures of genuine multipartite entanglement. Via simple inequalities it is possible to discriminate different sets of multipartite qubit states. These inequalities are beneficial regarding experimental examinations as only local measurements are required. Furthermore, the number of observables scales favorably with system size. In exemplary cases we demonstrate the noise resistance and discuss implementations.

  3. Paraneoplastic opsoclonus-myoclonus-ataxia syndrome revealing dual malignancy.

    PubMed

    Nasri, A; Kacem, I; Jerdak, F; Djebara, M Ben; Mejri, N; Sidhom, Y; Gargouri, A; Gouider, Riadh

    2016-10-01

    Dual malignancy has been rarely associated to paraneoplastic syndromes. We describe an unusual case of metachronous small cell lung carcinoma revealed by opsoclonus-myoclonus ataxia syndrome in a 69-year-old patient with known prostate adenocarcinoma, with positive anti-Hu and anti-Yo antibodies and good responsiveness to corticosteroids and chemotherapy.

  4. The Basics of How to Reveal Epilepsy--Part Two

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mittan, Robert J.

    2009-01-01

    In the April 2009 edition of "Exceptional Parent," Part One of this series explored why, for their own emotional well-being, it is so important for parents to tell others about their or their child's epilepsy. This month's installment will discuss the basics of how to reveal epilepsy to others, including some additional advantages one receives in…

  5. Natural Disasters that Reveal Cracks in Our Social Foundation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Langer, Nieli

    2004-01-01

    The recent deaths of more than 13,000 French elderly in the European heat wave of 2003 revealed cracks in the social foundation of urban communities, here and abroad. The breakdown occurred in community services, neighborhood networks, and governmental agencies that were responsible for warning of impending dangers to at-risk elderly. This paper…

  6. Thrombotic Microangiopathy Revealing Bone Metastases from an Ethmoid Sinus Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Morisse, Mony Chenda; Kontar, Loay; Bihan, Céline; Boone, Mathieu; Lachaier, Emma; Titeca-Beauport, Dimitri; Maizel, Julien; Chauffert, Bruno

    2016-01-01

    Cancer-related thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA) is a rare entity whose clinical and biological characteristics have been described in various tumors. Here we describe the first case of cancer-related TMA revealing diffuse bone metastases from an ethmoid sinus carcinoma. PMID:27721770

  7. Cassini Flybys Reveal Details About Titan Seas and Lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    2013-12-01

    The Cassini spacecraft's flybys of Saturn's moon Titan reveal new details about the sizes, depths, and locations of the seas and lakes, whose liquid is mostly methane, that dot the moon's northern hemisphere, according to findings presented by scientists at a 12 December news briefing at the AGU Fall Meeting in San Francisco, Calif.

  8. Perspective view. Fivestory reinforced concrete factory building reveals the structural ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Perspective view. Five-story reinforced concrete factory building reveals the structural frame on the exterior of the facade. Twelve bay facade facing onto Clay Avenue (north facade) has first floor openings bricked up. Mix of typical factory windows and glass block windows fill the majority of the openings on the rest of building - Russell Industrial Center, 1600 Clay Avenue, Detroit, MI

  9. Benign Cystic Peritoneal Mesothelioma Revealed by Small Bowel Obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Bray Madoué, Kaimba; Boniface, Moifo; Annick Laure, Edzimbi; Pierre, Herve

    2016-01-01

    Benign cystic peritoneal mesothelioma is a rare tumor which frequently occurs in women of reproductive age. Abdominal pain associated with pelvic or abdominal mass is the common clinical presentation. We report the case of a 22-year-old woman with a pathological proved benign cystic mesothelioma of the peritoneum revealed by a small bowel obstruction and a painful left-sided pelvic mass with signs of psoitis. Contrast enhanced abdominal CT-scan demonstrated a large pelvic cystic mass with mass effect on rectosigmoid and pelvic organs. The patient underwent surgical removal of the tumor. Pathological examination revealed the diagnosis of benign cystic mesothelioma of the peritoneum. The outcome was excellent with a 12-month recoil. PMID:27066288

  10. Acting without seeing: eye movements reveal visual processing without awareness.

    PubMed

    Spering, Miriam; Carrasco, Marisa

    2015-04-01

    Visual perception and eye movements are considered to be tightly linked. Diverse fields, ranging from developmental psychology to computer science, utilize eye tracking to measure visual perception. However, this prevailing view has been challenged by recent behavioral studies. Here, we review converging evidence revealing dissociations between the contents of perceptual awareness and different types of eye movement. Such dissociations reveal situations in which eye movements are sensitive to particular visual features that fail to modulate perceptual reports. We also discuss neurophysiological, neuroimaging, and clinical studies supporting the role of subcortical pathways for visual processing without awareness. Our review links awareness to perceptual-eye movement dissociations and furthers our understanding of the brain pathways underlying vision and movement with and without awareness.

  11. Sequencing of Seven Haloarchaeal Genomes Reveals Patterns of Genomic Flux

    PubMed Central

    Lynch, Erin A.; Langille, Morgan G. I.; Darling, Aaron; Wilbanks, Elizabeth G.; Haltiner, Caitlin; Shao, Katie S. Y.; Starr, Michael O.; Teiling, Clotilde; Harkins, Timothy T.; Edwards, Robert A.; Eisen, Jonathan A.; Facciotti, Marc T.

    2012-01-01

    We report the sequencing of seven genomes from two haloarchaeal genera, Haloferax and Haloarcula. Ease of cultivation and the existence of well-developed genetic and biochemical tools for several diverse haloarchaeal species make haloarchaea a model group for the study of archaeal biology. The unique physiological properties of these organisms also make them good candidates for novel enzyme discovery for biotechnological applications. Seven genomes were sequenced to ∼20×coverage and assembled to an average of 50 contigs (range 5 scaffolds - 168 contigs). Comparisons of protein-coding gene compliments revealed large-scale differences in COG functional group enrichment between these genera. Analysis of genes encoding machinery for DNA metabolism reveals genera-specific expansions of the general transcription factor TATA binding protein as well as a history of extensive duplication and horizontal transfer of the proliferating cell nuclear antigen. Insights gained from this study emphasize the importance of haloarchaea for investigation of archaeal biology. PMID:22848480

  12. Mitogenome revealed multiple postdomestication genetic mixtures of West African sheep.

    PubMed

    Brahi, O H D; Xiang, H; Chen, X; Farougou, S; Zhao, X

    2015-10-01

    Notable diversity observed within African ovine breeds makes them of great interests, but limited studies on genetic origins and domestications remain poorly understood. Here, we investigate the evolutionary status of West African native breeds, Djallonke and Sahelian sheep using mitogenome sequencing. Compared with other ovine mitogenome sequences, West African sheep were revealed a Eurasian origin, and the initially tamed sheep breeds in West Africa have been genetically mixed with each other and mixed with European breeds. Worldwide domestic sheep is deemed the Eurasian origin and migrated west to Europe and Africa and east to the Far East, in which dispersed and received selection for acclimation to autochthonic environment independently and ultimately evolved into different native breeds, respectively. Our results contribute to the comprehensive understanding of the domestic sheep origin and reveal multiple postdomestication genetic amelioration processes.

  13. Maps of random walks on complex networks reveal community structure.

    PubMed

    Rosvall, Martin; Bergstrom, Carl T

    2008-01-29

    To comprehend the multipartite organization of large-scale biological and social systems, we introduce an information theoretic approach that reveals community structure in weighted and directed networks. We use the probability flow of random walks on a network as a proxy for information flows in the real system and decompose the network into modules by compressing a description of the probability flow. The result is a map that both simplifies and highlights the regularities in the structure and their relationships. We illustrate the method by making a map of scientific communication as captured in the citation patterns of >6,000 journals. We discover a multicentric organization with fields that vary dramatically in size and degree of integration into the network of science. Along the backbone of the network-including physics, chemistry, molecular biology, and medicine-information flows bidirectionally, but the map reveals a directional pattern of citation from the applied fields to the basic sciences.

  14. Drosophila models reveal novel insights into mechanisms underlying neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Mohan, Ryan D; Workman, Jerry L; Abmayr, Susan M

    2014-01-01

    The SAGA chromatin modifying complex functions as a transcriptional coactivator for a large number of genes, and SAGA dysfunction has been linked to carcinogenesis and neurodegenerative disease. The protein complex is comprised of approximately 20 subunits, arranged in a modular fashion, and includes 2 enzymatic subunits: the Gcn5 acetyltransferase and the Non-stop deubiquitinase. As we learn more about SAGA, it becomes evident that this complex functions through sophisticated mechanisms that support very precise regulation of gene expression. Here we describe recent findings in which a Drosophila loss-of-function model revealed novel mechanisms for regulation of SAGA-mediated histone H2B deubiquitination. This model also yielded novel and surprising insights into mechanisms that underlie progressive neurodegenerative disease. Lastly, we comment on the utility of Drosophila as a model for neurodegenerative disease through which crucial and conserved mechanisms may be revealed. PMID:25483136

  15. Direct visualization reveals kinetics of meiotic chromosome synapsis

    SciTech Connect

    Rog, Ofer; Dernburg, Abby  F.

    2015-03-17

    The synaptonemal complex (SC) is a conserved protein complex that stabilizes interactions along homologous chromosomes (homologs) during meiosis. The SC regulates genetic exchanges between homologs, thereby enabling reductional division and the production of haploid gametes. Here, we directly observe SC assembly (synapsis) by optimizing methods for long-term fluorescence recording in C. elegans. We report that synapsis initiates independently on each chromosome pair at or near pairing centers—specialized regions required for homolog associations. Once initiated, the SC extends rapidly and mostly irreversibly to chromosome ends. Quantitation of SC initiation frequencies and extension rates reveals that initiation is a rate-limiting step in homolog interactions. Eliminating the dynein-driven chromosome movements that accompany synapsis severely retards SC extension, revealing a new role for these conserved motions. This work provides the first opportunity to directly observe and quantify key aspects of meiotic chromosome interactions and will enable future in vivo analysis of germline processes.

  16. Revealing bismuth oxide hollow nanoparticle formation by the Kirkendall effect.

    PubMed

    Niu, Kai-Yang; Park, Jungwon; Zheng, Haimei; Alivisatos, A Paul

    2013-01-01

    We study the formation of bismuth oxide hollow nanoparticles by the Kirkendall effect using liquid cell transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Rich dynamics of bismuth diffusion through the bismuth oxide shell have been captured in situ. The diffusion coefficient of bismuth through bismuth oxide shell is 3-4 orders of magnitude higher than that of bulk. Observation reveals that defects, temperature, sizes of the particles, and so forth can affect the diffusion of reactive species and modify the kinetics of the hollowing process.

  17. Parascapular mass revealing primary tuberculosis of the posterior arch

    PubMed Central

    Arbault, Anais; Ornetti, Paul; Chevallier, Olivier; Avril, Julien; Pottecher, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    We report the case of a parascapular abscess revealing primary tuberculosis of the posterior arch in a 31-year-old man. Sectional imaging is essential in order to detect the different lesions of this atypical spinal tuberculosis as osteolysis of the posterior arch extendible to vertebral body, osteocondensation, epidural extension which is common in this location, and high specificity of a zygapophysial, costo-vertebral or transverse arthritis. PMID:27709081

  18. Placental Abruption Revealed by Hemoperitoneum: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Bertholdt, C.; Vincent-Rohfritsch, A.; Tsatsaris, V.; Goffinet, F.

    2016-01-01

    Background Hemoperitoneum is a life-threatening surgical emergency. Diagnosis of the cause is often difficult, in particular, during pregnancy when it may be either obstetric or nonobstetric. Case We report the case of a hemoperitoneum caused by the backflow of blood through a uterine tube, due to placental abruption. Conclusion Hemoperitoneum in pregnant women with no other signs can reveal placental abruption. The difficulty in identifying the cause may delay appropriate management. PMID:27994944

  19. Dermatomyositis revealing breast cancer: report of a case.

    PubMed

    Lamquami, Safae; Errarhay, Sanae; Mamouni, Nisrine; Bouchikhi, Chahrazad; Banani, Abdelaziz

    2015-01-01

    Dermatomyositis (DM) is a rare connective corresponding to an inflammatory disease of skeletal muscles. Paraneoplastic origin must always be sought, primarily gynecological tumor in women, but the investigations are often made difficult by the fact that a primary tumor is often not detectable at the time of the cutaneous manifestations. This approach includes in addition to the monitoring report at regular intervals of 6 to 12 months for two years after diagnosis. We report a case of Dermatomyositis revealing breast cancer.

  20. Spectral Imaging for Revealing and Preserving World Cultural Heritage

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-01

    of appearance of the original woodcut features Other signal processing included a PCA spectral separation of an iron gall ink inscription most...likely added by Schöner, 1451 as shown in Figure 3. The image processing clearly illus- trates the iron gall ink writing on top of the printing ink ...Figure 3 – PCA of printing and iron gall ink inscription (sheet 10) Other obscured historical information included revealing the text of a

  1. Revealing Companions to Nearby Stars with Astrometric Acceleration

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-07-01

    of 57 stars, we compare the statistics of resolved astrometric companions with those of a simulated binary population. The fraction of resolved...frequency of supernovae, blue stragglers, X-ray binaries, etc. The statistical properties of binaries strongly depend on stellar mass. Only for nearby solar ...a large fraction of these stars by the Geneva-Copenhagen Sur- vey of the Solar neighborhood, GCS (Nordströem et al. 2004), revealing short-period

  2. [Neonatal adrenal hemorrhage revealed by jaundice: a case report].

    PubMed

    Oulmaati, A; Hays, S; Mory-Thomas, N; Bretones, P; Bensaid, M; Jordan, I; Bonfils, M; Godbert, I; Picaud, J-C

    2012-04-01

    The clinical presentation of adrenal hemorrhage varies, depending on the extent of hemorrhage as well as the amount of adrenal cortex involved by the hemorrhage. We report here a case of neonatal adrenal hemorrhage revealed by late onset of neonatal jaundice. This adrenal hemorrhage most probably resulted from shoulder dystocia. The aim of this work was to focus on the fact that jaundice can be caused by adrenal hemorrhage and to emphasize the crucial importance of abdominal ultrasound in cases of persistent jaundice.

  3. Revealing topological superconductivity in extended quantum spin Hall Josephson junctions.

    PubMed

    Lee, Shu-Ping; Michaeli, Karen; Alicea, Jason; Yacoby, Amir

    2014-11-07

    Quantum spin Hall-superconductor hybrids are promising sources of topological superconductivity and Majorana modes, particularly given recent progress on HgTe and InAs/GaSb. We propose a new method of revealing topological superconductivity in extended quantum spin Hall Josephson junctions supporting "fractional Josephson currents." Specifically, we show that as one threads magnetic flux between the superconductors, the critical current traces an interference pattern featuring sharp fingerprints of topological superconductivity-even when noise spoils parity conservation.

  4. [Chicken pox recurrence revealing a renal adenocarcinoma in an adult].

    PubMed

    Thieulent, N; Grezard, P; Wolf, F; Barrut, D; Perrot, H

    2000-09-01

    A new episode of chicken pox in adults who had a well documented infection previously is usually observed in immunocompromised individuals. The principal immunodeficiency factors are hematology diseases, acquired immunodeficiency disease and old age. We report here the case of a young woman who after a contaminating contact presented a recurrence of typical chicken pox. Morphological investigations evidenced a right kidney tumor which pathology revealed to be a renal adenocarcinoma. We discuss this pathological association and review cases reported in the literature.

  5. Using metabarcoding to reveal and quantify plant-pollinator interactions

    PubMed Central

    Pornon, André; Escaravage, Nathalie; Burrus, Monique; Holota, Hélène; Khimoun, Aurélie; Mariette, Jérome; Pellizzari, Charlène; Iribar, Amaia; Etienne, Roselyne; Taberlet, Pierre; Vidal, Marie; Winterton, Peter; Zinger, Lucie; Andalo, Christophe

    2016-01-01

    Given the ongoing decline of both pollinators and plants, it is crucial to implement effective methods to describe complex pollination networks across time and space in a comprehensive and high-throughput way. Here we tested if metabarcoding may circumvent the limits of conventional methodologies in detecting and quantifying plant-pollinator interactions. Metabarcoding experiments on pollen DNA mixtures described a positive relationship between the amounts of DNA from focal species and the number of trnL and ITS1 sequences yielded. The study of pollen loads of insects captured in plant communities revealed that as compared to the observation of visits, metabarcoding revealed 2.5 times more plant species involved in plant-pollinator interactions. We further observed a tight positive relationship between the pollen-carrying capacities of insect taxa and the number of trnL and ITS1 sequences. The number of visits received per plant species also positively correlated to the number of their ITS1 and trnL sequences in insect pollen loads. By revealing interactions hard to observe otherwise, metabarcoding significantly enlarges the spatiotemporal observation window of pollination interactions. By providing new qualitative and quantitative information, metabarcoding holds great promise for investigating diverse facets of interactions and will provide a new perception of pollination networks as a whole. PMID:27255732

  6. Tal1 transgenic expression reveals absence of B lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Palamarchuk, Alexey; Zanesi, Nicola; Aqeilan, Rami I; Efanov, Alexey; Maximov, Vadim; Santanam, Urmila; Hagan, John P; Croce, Carlo M; Pekarsky, Yuri

    2006-06-15

    TAL1 oncogene encodes a helix-loop-helix transcription factor, Tal1, which is required for blood cell development, and its activation is a frequent event in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Tal1 interacts and inhibits other helix-loop-helix factors such as E47 and HEB. To investigate the function of Tal1 in B cells, we generated Emu-TAL1 transgenic mouse line, expressing Tal1 in mouse B-cell lineage. Fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) analysis of lymphocytes isolated from spleens of five out of five founders reveals complete absence of IgM- or CD19-expressing cells. Only 2% to 3% of these cells were B220+ and 100% of B220+ cells were CD43+, indicating that these mice were able to make pro-B cells. Similarly, FACS analysis of bone marrow cells in Emu-TAL1 mice revealed complete absence of B220+IgM+ and B220+CD19+ cells. Analysis of the recombination status of IgH genes revealed the presence of D-J but absence or drastic reduction of V-D-J rearrangements. Our results suggest that Tal1 overexpression in B cells results in a phenotype similar to that of B cells of E47/E2A knockout animals. This represents first in vivo evidence that Tal1 can completely inhibit E47/E2A function.

  7. Transient light-induced intracellular oxidation revealed by redox biosensor

    SciTech Connect

    Kolossov, Vladimir L.; Beaudoin, Jessica N.; Hanafin, William P.; DiLiberto, Stephen J.; Kenis, Paul J.A.; Rex Gaskins, H.

    2013-10-04

    Highlights: •Time-resolved live cell imaging revealed light-induced oxidation. •Only the roGFP probe fused with glutaredoxin reveals photooxidation. •The transient oxidation is rapidly reduced by the cytosolic antioxidant system. •Intracellular photooxidation is media-dependent. •Oxidation is triggered exclusively by exposure to short wavelength excitation. -- Abstract: We have implemented a ratiometric, genetically encoded redox-sensitive green fluorescent protein fused to human glutaredoxin (Grx1-roGFP2) to monitor real time intracellular glutathione redox potentials of mammalian cells. This probe enabled detection of media-dependent oxidation of the cytosol triggered by short wavelength excitation. The transient nature of light-induced oxidation was revealed by time-lapse live cell imaging when time intervals of less than 30 s were implemented. In contrast, transient ROS generation was not observed with the parental roGFP2 probe without Grx1, which exhibits slower thiol-disulfide exchange. These data demonstrate that the enhanced sensitivity of the Grx1-roGFP2 fusion protein enables the detection of short-lived ROS in living cells. The superior sensitivity of Grx1-roGFP2, however, also enhances responsiveness to environmental cues introducing a greater likelihood of false positive results during image acquisition.

  8. Traumatic extradural haematoma revealed after contralateral decompressive craniectomy.

    PubMed

    Nadig, Adarsh S; King, Andrew T

    2012-12-01

    Traumatic extradural haematoma following a severe head injury is well documented in neurosurgical literature. We report a case of traumatic extradural haematoma which initially was concealed by the high intracranial pressure (ICP) and revealed after the contralateral decompressive craniectomy. A 21-year-old roofer sustained severe head injury from a fall. The CT brain showed right sided fronto-temporal contusions with small acute subdural haematoma and left orbital roof fracture extending into the temporal bone. ICP was above 45 mmHg even after maximal medical therapy. Decompressive craniectomy was performed on the right side along with contusionectomy. Within an hour, ICP spiked and the CT brain showed left side extradural haematoma. The second surgery demonstrated a bleeding middle meningeal artery associated with the left temporal bone fracture. The clinical sequence of events, radiological and operative findings revealed this to be a traumatic extradural haematoma sustained at the initial trauma. This was revealed after the tamponade effect was released from the initial decompressive craniectomy on the contralateral side.

  9. Active medulloblastoma enhancers reveal subgroup-specific cellular origins.

    PubMed

    Lin, Charles Y; Erkek, Serap; Tong, Yiai; Yin, Linlin; Federation, Alexander J; Zapatka, Marc; Haldipur, Parthiv; Kawauchi, Daisuke; Risch, Thomas; Warnatz, Hans-Jörg; Worst, Barbara C; Ju, Bensheng; Orr, Brent A; Zeid, Rhamy; Polaski, Donald R; Segura-Wang, Maia; Waszak, Sebastian M; Jones, David T W; Kool, Marcel; Hovestadt, Volker; Buchhalter, Ivo; Sieber, Laura; Johann, Pascal; Chavez, Lukas; Gröschel, Stefan; Ryzhova, Marina; Korshunov, Andrey; Chen, Wenbiao; Chizhikov, Victor V; Millen, Kathleen J; Amstislavskiy, Vyacheslav; Lehrach, Hans; Yaspo, Marie-Laure; Eils, Roland; Lichter, Peter; Korbel, Jan O; Pfister, Stefan M; Bradner, James E; Northcott, Paul A

    2016-02-04

    Medulloblastoma is a highly malignant paediatric brain tumour, often inflicting devastating consequences on the developing child. Genomic studies have revealed four distinct molecular subgroups with divergent biology and clinical behaviour. An understanding of the regulatory circuitry governing the transcriptional landscapes of medulloblastoma subgroups, and how this relates to their respective developmental origins, is lacking. Here, using H3K27ac and BRD4 chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by sequencing (ChIP-seq) coupled with tissue-matched DNA methylation and transcriptome data, we describe the active cis-regulatory landscape across 28 primary medulloblastoma specimens. Analysis of differentially regulated enhancers and super-enhancers reinforced inter-subgroup heterogeneity and revealed novel, clinically relevant insights into medulloblastoma biology. Computational reconstruction of core regulatory circuitry identified a master set of transcription factors, validated by ChIP-seq, that is responsible for subgroup divergence, and implicates candidate cells of origin for Group 4. Our integrated analysis of enhancer elements in a large series of primary tumour samples reveals insights into cis-regulatory architecture, unrecognized dependencies, and cellular origins.

  10. Active medulloblastoma enhancers reveal subgroup-specific cellular origins

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Charles Y.; Erkek, Serap; Tong, Yiai; Yin, Linlin; Federation, Alexander J.; Zapatka, Marc; Haldipur, Parthiv; Kawauchi, Daisuke; Risch, Thomas; Warnatz, Hans-Jörg; Worst, Barbara C.; Ju, Bensheng; Orr, Brent A.; Zeid, Rhamy; Polaski, Donald R.; Segura-Wang, Maia; Waszak, Sebastian M.; Jones, David T.W.; Kool, Marcel; Hovestadt, Volker; Buchhalter, Ivo; Sieber, Laura; Johann, Pascal; Chavez, Lukas; Gröschel, Stefan; Ryzhova, Marina; Korshunov, Andrey; Chen, Wenbiao; Chizhikov, Victor V.; Millen, Kathleen J.; Amstislavskiy, Vyacheslav; Lehrach, Hans; Yaspo, Marie-Laure; Eils, Roland; Lichter, Peter; Korbel, Jan O.; Pfister, Stefan M.; Bradner, James E.; Northcott, Paul A.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Medulloblastoma is a highly malignant paediatric brain tumour, often inflicting devastating consequences on the developing child. Genomic studies have revealed four distinct molecular subgroups with divergent biology and clinical behaviour. An understanding of the regulatory circuitry governing the transcriptional landscapes of medulloblastoma subgroups, and how this relates to their respective developmental origins, is lacking. Using H3K27ac and BRD4 ChIP-Seq, coupled with tissue-matched DNA methylation and transcriptome data, we describe the active cis-regulatory landscape across 28 primary medulloblastoma specimens. Analysis of differentially regulated enhancers and super-enhancers reinforced inter-subgroup heterogeneity and revealed novel, clinically relevant insights into medulloblastoma biology. Computational reconstruction of core regulatory circuitry identified a master set of transcription factors, validated by ChIP-Seq, that are responsible for subgroup divergence and implicate candidate cells-of-origin for Group 4. Our integrated analysis of enhancer elements in a large series of primary tumour samples reveals insights into cis-regulatory architecture, unrecognized dependencies, and cellular origins. PMID:26814967

  11. Using metabarcoding to reveal and quantify plant-pollinator interactions.

    PubMed

    Pornon, André; Escaravage, Nathalie; Burrus, Monique; Holota, Hélène; Khimoun, Aurélie; Mariette, Jérome; Pellizzari, Charlène; Iribar, Amaia; Etienne, Roselyne; Taberlet, Pierre; Vidal, Marie; Winterton, Peter; Zinger, Lucie; Andalo, Christophe

    2016-06-03

    Given the ongoing decline of both pollinators and plants, it is crucial to implement effective methods to describe complex pollination networks across time and space in a comprehensive and high-throughput way. Here we tested if metabarcoding may circumvent the limits of conventional methodologies in detecting and quantifying plant-pollinator interactions. Metabarcoding experiments on pollen DNA mixtures described a positive relationship between the amounts of DNA from focal species and the number of trnL and ITS1 sequences yielded. The study of pollen loads of insects captured in plant communities revealed that as compared to the observation of visits, metabarcoding revealed 2.5 times more plant species involved in plant-pollinator interactions. We further observed a tight positive relationship between the pollen-carrying capacities of insect taxa and the number of trnL and ITS1 sequences. The number of visits received per plant species also positively correlated to the number of their ITS1 and trnL sequences in insect pollen loads. By revealing interactions hard to observe otherwise, metabarcoding significantly enlarges the spatiotemporal observation window of pollination interactions. By providing new qualitative and quantitative information, metabarcoding holds great promise for investigating diverse facets of interactions and will provide a new perception of pollination networks as a whole.

  12. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy reveals oral Lactobacillus promotion of increases in brain GABA, N-acetyl aspartate and glutamate.

    PubMed

    Janik, Rafal; Thomason, Lynsie A M; Stanisz, Andrew M; Forsythe, Paul; Bienenstock, John; Stanisz, Greg J

    2016-01-15

    The gut microbiome has been shown to regulate the development and functions of the enteric and central nervous systems. Its involvement in the regulation of behavior has attracted particular attention because of its potential translational importance in clinical disorders, however little is known about the pathways involved. We previously have demonstrated that administration of Lactobacillus rhamnosus (JB-1) to healthy male BALB/c mice, promotes consistent changes in GABA-A and -B receptor sub-types in specific brain regions, accompanied by reductions in anxiety and depression-related behaviors. In the present study, using magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS), we quantitatively assessed two clinically validated biomarkers of brain activity and function, glutamate+glutamine (Glx) and total N-acetyl aspartate+N-acetyl aspartyl glutamic acid (tNAA), as well as GABA, the chief brain inhibitory neurotransmitter. Mice received 1×10(9) cfu of JB-1 per day for 4weeks and were subjected to MRS weekly and again 4weeks after cessation of treatment to ascertain temporal changes in these neurometabolites. Baseline concentrations for Glx, tNAA and GABA were equal to 10.4±0.3mM, 8.7±0.1mM, and 1.2±0.1mM, respectively. Delayed increases were first seen for Glx (~10%) and NAA (~37%) at 2weeks which persisted only to the end of treatment. However, Glx was still elevated 4weeks after treatment had ceased. Significantly elevated GABA (~25%) was only seen at 4weeks. These results suggest specific metabolic pathways in our pursuit of mechanisms of action of psychoactive bacteria. They also offer through application of standard clinical neurodiagnostic techniques, translational opportunities to assess biomarkers accompanying behavioral changes induced by alterations in the gut microbiome.

  13. Interior Evolution of Ceres and Vesta Revealed by Dawn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raymond, C. A.; Russell, C. T.; Bland, M. T.; Castillo, J. C.; De Sanctis, M. C.; Ermakov, A.; Jaumann, R.; Konopliv, A. S.; Marchi, S.; McCord, T. B.; McSween, H. Y., Jr.; Nathues, A.; Park, R. S.; Prettyman, T. H.; Toplis, M. J.; Zuber, M. T.

    2015-12-01

    Dawn's exploration of Vesta and Ceres has revealed their geophysical characteristics, informing the processes that shaped the bodies. Dawn has determined the average diameter of Ceres to be 940 km, smaller than the previously estimated 975 km [1]. This implies a density of 2160 kg/m3, indicating that Ceres is less differentiated than predicted [2]. Ceres' entire surface is cratered, implying the lack of a thick (10's of km) water ice layer at the surface. Variability in Ceres' crater morphology indicates that the near-surface layer has variable strength and rheology, likely due to heterogeneity in the near-surface mixture of rock, ice and salt. These observations may indicate that Ceres lost a significant amount of an original surface ice layer due to impact erosion. The lack of large impact basins on Ceres can be interpreted to be the result of viscous relaxation. These data provide insights into Ceres' thermal evolution and mechanical properties, which appear to be unique to this warm, icy body. In contrast to Ceres, Vesta formed very early and hot, resulting in a fully differentiated body. Dawn's exploration revealed geophysical and geochemical evidence for an iron-rich core and basaltic crust. However, unlike the pre-Dawn paradigm of Vesta's evolution, Dawn found that the crust and mantle of Vesta are less distinct than predicted by classical differentiation models. [1] Thomas, P. C., et al., Differentiation of the asteroid Ceres as revealed by its shape, Nature, 437, 224-226, 2005; [2] McCord et al., Ceres: Its Origin, Evolution and Structure and Dawn's Potential Contribution, Space Sci Rev
DOI 10.1007/s11214-010-9729-9, 2011.

  14. Genes but Not Genomes Reveal Bacterial Domestication of Lactococcus Lactis

    PubMed Central

    Passerini, Delphine; Beltramo, Charlotte; Coddeville, Michele; Quentin, Yves; Ritzenthaler, Paul

    2010-01-01

    Background The population structure and diversity of Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis, a major industrial bacterium involved in milk fermentation, was determined at both gene and genome level. Seventy-six lactococcal isolates of various origins were studied by different genotyping methods and thirty-six strains displaying unique macrorestriction fingerprints were analyzed by a new multilocus sequence typing (MLST) scheme. This gene-based analysis was compared to genomic characteristics determined by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). Methodology/Principal Findings The MLST analysis revealed that L. lactis subsp. lactis is essentially clonal with infrequent intra- and intergenic recombination; also, despite its taxonomical classification as a subspecies, it displays a genetic diversity as substantial as that within several other bacterial species. Genome-based analysis revealed a genome size variability of 20%, a value typical of bacteria inhabiting different ecological niches, and that suggests a large pan-genome for this subspecies. However, the genomic characteristics (macrorestriction pattern, genome or chromosome size, plasmid content) did not correlate to the MLST-based phylogeny, with strains from the same sequence type (ST) differing by up to 230 kb in genome size. Conclusion/Significance The gene-based phylogeny was not fully consistent with the traditional classification into dairy and non-dairy strains but supported a new classification based on ecological separation between “environmental” strains, the main contributors to the genetic diversity within the subspecies, and “domesticated” strains, subject to recent genetic bottlenecks. Comparison between gene- and genome-based analyses revealed little relationship between core and dispensable genome phylogenies, indicating that clonal diversification and phenotypic variability of the “domesticated” strains essentially arose through substantial genomic flux within the dispensable genome

  15. l-(+)-Lactic acid production by Lactobacillus rhamnosus B103 from dairy industry waste.

    PubMed

    Bernardo, Marcela Piassi; Coelho, Luciana Fontes; Sass, Daiane Cristina; Contiero, Jonas

    2016-01-01

    Lactic acid, which can be obtained through fermentation, is an interesting compound because it can be utilized in different fields, such as in the food, pharmaceutical and chemical industries as a bio-based molecule for bio-refinery. In addition, lactic acid has recently gained more interest due to the possibility of manufacturing poly(lactic acid), a green polymer that can replace petroleum-derived plastics and be applied in medicine for the regeneration of tissues and in sutures, repairs and implants. One of the great advantages of fermentation is the possibility of using agribusiness wastes to obtain optically pure lactic acid. The conventional batch process of fermentation has some disadvantages such as inhibition by the substrate or the final product. To avoid these problems, this study was focused on improving the production of lactic acid through different feeding strategies using whey, a residue of agribusiness. The downstream process is a significant bottleneck because cost-effective methods of producing high-purity lactic acid are lacking. Thus, the investigation of different methods for the purification of lactic acid was one of the aims of this work. The pH-stat strategy showed the maximum production of lactic acid of 143.7g/L. Following purification of the lactic acid sample, recovery of reducing sugars and protein and color removal were 0.28%, 100% and 100%, respectively.

  16. Estimating the probability of failure when testing reveals no failures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Keith W.; Morell, Larry J.; Noonan, Robert E.; Park, Stephen K.; Nicol, David M.; Murrill, Branson W.; Voas, Jeffrey M.

    1992-01-01

    Formulas for estimating the probability of failure when testing reveals no errors are introduced. These formulas incorporate random testing results, information about the input distribution, and prior assumptions about the probability of failure of the software. The formulas are not restricted to equally likely input distributions, and the probability of failure estimate can be adjusted when assumptions about the input distribution change. The formulas are based on a discrete sample space statistical model of software and include Bayesian prior assumptions. Reusable software and software in life-critical applications are particularly appropriate candidates for this type of analysis.

  17. Cutaneous metastasis revealing a relapse of gastric linitis: Another case

    PubMed Central

    Kairouani, Mouna; Perrin, Julie; Dietemann-Barabinot, Anne; Diab, Rafiq; Ruck, Stephane

    2012-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Cutaneous metastasis from gastric cancer is a rare occurrence. The linitis gastric carcinoma accounts only 8.7% of all gastric cancers. PRESENTATION OF CASE We report a case of female patient who was followed for linits cancer with peritoneal metastasis treated by six cycles of chemotherapy. After seventeen months of control, the relapse of the disease revealed by occurrence of cutaneous metastatsis. DISCUSSION Cutaneous metastasis from linit gastric is rare and the prognostic remains poor. The treatment is palliative. CONCLUSION This rare presentation should encourage the practitioners to biopsy any suspicion skin lesion. PMID:23276763

  18. Mediated amperometry reveals different modes of yeast responses to sugars.

    PubMed

    Garjonyte, Rasa; Melvydas, Vytautas; Malinauskas, Albertas

    2016-02-01

    Menadione-mediated amperometry at carbon paste electrodes modified with various yeasts (Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Candida pulcherrima, Pichia guilliermondii and Debaryomyces hansenii) was employed to monitor redox activity inside the yeast cells induced by glucose, fructose, sucrose, maltose or galactose. Continuous measurements revealed distinct modes (transient or gradually increasing) of the current development during the first 2 to 3 min after subjection to glucose, fructose and sucrose at electrodes containing S. cerevisiae and non-Saccharomyces strains. Different modes (increasing or decreasing) of the current development after yeast subjection to galactose at electrodes with S. cerevisiae or D. hansenii and at electrodes with C. pulcherrima and P. guilliermondii suggested different mechanisms of galactose assimilation.

  19. How the ``Blues'' reveals the intimacy of music and physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibson, J. Murray

    2013-03-01

    Little do most people know when they hear blues piano - and you'll hear some live in this talk - that physics permeates the style, as it does all of music. Why should you care? By deconstructing blues piano the intimacy of physics, mathematics and music will be revealed in its glory.[1] The exercise says something about how the brains of the music composer and of the listener must be intimately linked to the physical principles of acoustics. And it provides a great vehicle to explain physical phenomena to non-scientists - everything from quantum mechanics to protein structure.

  20. Protein tagging reveals new insights into signaling in flagella.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Takashi

    2014-03-03

    In this issue, Oda et al. (2014. J. Cell Biol. http://dx.doi.org/10.1083/jcb.201312014) use mutant analysis, protein tagging, and cryoelectron tomography to determine the detailed location of components in flagellar radial spokes-a complex of proteins that connect the peripheral microtubule doublets to the central pair. Remarkably, this approach revealed an interaction between radial spokes and the central pair based on geometry rather than a specific signaling mechanism, highlighting the importance of studying a system in three dimensions.

  1. Tributaries of West Antarctic Ice Streams Revealed by RADARSAT Interferometry.

    PubMed

    Joughin; Gray; Bindschadler; Price; Morse; Hulbe; Mattar; Werner

    1999-10-08

    Interferometric RADARSAT data are used to map ice motion in the source areas of four West Antarctic ice streams. The data reveal that tributaries, coincident with subglacial valleys, provide a spatially extensive transition between slow inland flow and rapid ice stream flow and that adjacent ice streams draw from shared source regions. Two tributaries flow into the stagnant ice stream C, creating an extensive region that is thickening at an average rate of 0.49 meters per year. This is one of the largest rates of thickening ever reported in Antarctica.

  2. Survivability of probiotics encapsulated in alginate gel microbeads using a novel impinging aerosols method.

    PubMed

    Sohail, Asma; Turner, Mark S; Coombes, Allan; Bostrom, Thor; Bhandari, Bhesh

    2011-01-31

    Encapsulation of probiotic bacteria in cross-linked alginate beads is of major interest for improving the survivability in harsh acid and bile environment and also in food matrices. Alginate micro beads (10-40 μm) containing the probiotics Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG and Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM were produced by a novel technique based on dual aerosols of alginate solution and CaCl(2) cross linking solution. Extruded macro beads (approximately 2mm diameter) produced by the conventional method and micro beads produced by novel aerosols technique offered comparable protection to L. rhamnosus in high acid and bile environment. Chitosan coating of micro beads resulted in a significant increase in survival time of L. rhamnosus from 40 to 120 min in acid condition and the reduction in cell numbers was confined to 0.94 log over this time. Alginate macro beads are more effective than micro beads in protecting L. acidophilus against high acid and bile. Chitosan coating of micro beads resulted in similar protection to L. acidophilus in macro beads in acid and extended the survival time from 90 to at least 120 min. Viability of this organism in micro beads was 3.5 log after 120 min. The continuous processing capability and scale-up potential of the dual aerosol technique offers potential for an efficient encapsulation of probiotics in very small alginate micro beads below sensorial detection limits while still being able to confer effective protection in acid and bile environment.

  3. Active microrheology reveals molecular-level variations in the viscoelastic properties of Chaetopterus mucus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weigand, William; Messmore, Ashley; Anderson, Rae

    The sea annelid, Chaetopterus Variopedatus, secretes a bioluminescent mucus that also exhibits complex viscoelastic properties. The constituents of the mucus are relatively unknown but it does play an important role in the development of the worms' parchment-like housing tubes. In order to determine how and why this mucus can exhibit material properties ranging from fluidity to rigidity we perform microrheology experiments. We determine the microscale viscoelastic properties by using optical tweezers to produce small oscillations in the mucus which allow us to determine both the linear storage and loss moduli (G',G'') along with the viscosity of the fluid. By varying the size of the microspheres (2-10 µm) and oscillation amplitude (.5-10 µm) we are able to determine the dominant intrinsic length scales of the molecular mesh comprising the mucus. By varying the oscillation frequency (1-15Hz) we determine the crossover frequency at which G' surpasses G'', to quantify the longest relaxation time of the mesh network. Initial results show a strong dependence on bead size which indicate that the dominant entanglement lengthscale of the mucus mesh is ~5 um. Microspheres of this size exhibit a wide variety of stress responses in different regions of the mucus demonstrating the substantial microscale heterogeneity of the mucus. We carry out measurements on a population of worms of varying size and age to determine mucus variability between worms.

  4. Invoking Thomas Kuhn: What Citation Analysis Reveals about Science Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loving, Cathleen C.; Cobern, William W.

    This paper analyzes how Thomas Kuhn's writings are used by others, especially science education researchers. Previous research in citation analysis is used to frame questions related to who cites Kuhn, in what manner and why. Research questions first focus on the variety of disciplines invoking Kuhn and to what extent Structure of Scientific Revolutions (SSR) is cited. The Web of Science database provides material from 1982 for this analysis. The science education literature is analyzed using back issues from 1985 of the Journal of Research in Science Teaching and Science Education. An article analysis reveals trends in terms of what Kuhnian ideas are most frequently invoked. Results indicate a wide array of disciplines from beekeeping to law cite Kuhn - especially generic citations to SSR. The science education journal analysis reveals pervasive use of the term paradigm, although use is quite varied. The two areas of research in science education most impacted by Kuhn appear to be conceptual change theory and constructivist epistemologies. Additional uses of Kuhn are discussed. The degree to which Kuhn is invoked in ways supporting the theoretical framework of citation analysis, whether his work is misappropriated, and the impact of Kuhn are discussed.

  5. The Microbiome of Brazilian Mangrove Sediments as Revealed by Metagenomics

    PubMed Central

    Andreote, Fernando Dini; Jiménez, Diego Javier; Chaves, Diego; Dias, Armando Cavalcante Franco; Luvizotto, Danice Mazzer; Dini-Andreote, Francisco; Fasanella, Cristiane Cipola; Lopez, Maryeimy Varon; Baena, Sandra; Taketani, Rodrigo Gouvêa; de Melo, Itamar Soares

    2012-01-01

    Here we embark in a deep metagenomic survey that revealed the taxonomic and potential metabolic pathways aspects of mangrove sediment microbiology. The extraction of DNA from sediment samples and the direct application of pyrosequencing resulted in approximately 215 Mb of data from four distinct mangrove areas (BrMgv01 to 04) in Brazil. The taxonomic approaches applied revealed the dominance of Deltaproteobacteria and Gammaproteobacteria in the samples. Paired statistical analysis showed higher proportions of specific taxonomic groups in each dataset. The metabolic reconstruction indicated the possible occurrence of processes modulated by the prevailing conditions found in mangrove sediments. In terms of carbon cycling, the sequences indicated the prevalence of genes involved in the metabolism of methane, formaldehyde, and carbon dioxide. With respect to the nitrogen cycle, evidence for sequences associated with dissimilatory reduction of nitrate, nitrogen immobilization, and denitrification was detected. Sequences related to the production of adenylsulfate, sulfite, and H2S were relevant to the sulphur cycle. These data indicate that the microbial core involved in methane, nitrogen, and sulphur metabolism consists mainly of Burkholderiaceae, Planctomycetaceae, Rhodobacteraceae, and Desulfobacteraceae. Comparison of our data to datasets from soil and sea samples resulted in the allotment of the mangrove sediments between those samples. The results of this study add valuable data about the composition of microbial communities in mangroves and also shed light on possible transformations promoted by microbial organisms in mangrove sediments. PMID:22737213

  6. Computational modeling reveals molecular details of epidermal growth factor binding

    PubMed Central

    Mayawala, Kapil; Vlachos, Dionisios G; Edwards, Jeremy S

    2005-01-01

    Background The ErbB family of receptors are dysregulated in a number of cancers, and the signaling pathway of this receptor family is a critical target for several anti-cancer drugs. Therefore a detailed understanding of the mechanisms of receptor activation is critical. However, despite a plethora of biochemical studies and recent single particle tracking experiments, the early molecular mechanisms involving epidermal growth factor (EGF) binding and EGF receptor (EGFR) dimerization are not as well understood. Herein, we describe a spatially distributed Monte Carlo based simulation framework to enable the simulation of in vivo receptor diffusion and dimerization. Results Our simulation results are in agreement with the data from single particle tracking and biochemical experiments on EGFR. Furthermore, the simulations reveal that the sequence of receptor-receptor and ligand-receptor reaction events depends on the ligand concentration, receptor density and receptor mobility. Conclusion Our computer simulations reveal the mechanism of EGF binding on EGFR. Overall, we show that spatial simulation of receptor dynamics can be used to gain a mechanistic understanding of receptor activation which may in turn enable improved cancer treatments in the future. PMID:16318625

  7. Microsatellite genotyping reveals a signature in breast cancer exomes.

    PubMed

    McIver, L J; Fonville, N C; Karunasena, E; Garner, H R

    2014-06-01

    Genomic instability at microsatellite loci is a hallmark of many cancers, including breast cancer. However, much of the genomic variation and many of the hereditary components responsible for breast cancer remain undetected. We hypothesized that variation at microsatellites could provide additional genomic markers for breast cancer risk assessment. A total of 1,345 germline and tumor DNA samples from individuals diagnosed with breast cancer, exome sequenced as part of The Cancer Genome Atlas, were analyzed for microsatellite variation. The comparison group for our analysis, representing healthy individuals, consisted of 249 females which were exome sequenced as part of the 1,000 Genomes Project. We applied our microsatellite-based genotyping pipeline to identify 55 microsatellite loci that can distinguish between the germline of individuals diagnosed with breast cancer and healthy individuals with a sensitivity of 88.4 % and a specificity of 77.1 %. Further, we identified additional microsatellite loci that are potentially useful for distinguishing between breast cancer subtypes, revealing a possible fifth subtype. These findings are of clinical interest as possible risk diagnostics and reveal genes that may be of potential therapeutic value, including genes previously not associated with breast cancer.

  8. Piriform spider silk sequences reveal unique repetitive elements.

    PubMed

    Perry, David J; Bittencourt, Daniela; Siltberg-Liberles, Jessica; Rech, Elibio L; Lewis, Randolph V

    2010-11-08

    Orb-weaving spider silk fibers are assembled from very large, highly repetitive proteins. The repeated segments contain, in turn, short, simple, and repetitive amino acid motifs that account for the physical and mechanical properties of the assembled fiber. Of the six orb-weaver silk fibroins, the piriform silk that makes the attachment discs, which lashes the joints of the web and attaches dragline silk to surfaces, has not been previously characterized. Piriform silk protein cDNAs were isolated from phage libraries of three species: A. trifasciata , N. clavipes , and N. cruentata . The deduced amino acid sequences from these genes revealed two new repetitive motifs: an alternating proline motif, where every other amino acid is proline, and a glutamine-rich motif of 6-8 amino acids. Similar to other spider silk proteins, the repeated segments are large (>200 amino acids) and highly homogenized within a species. There is also substantial sequence similarity across the genes from the three species, with particular conservation of the repetitive motifs. Northern blot analysis revealed that the mRNA is larger than 11 kb and is expressed exclusively in the piriform glands of the spider. Phylogenetic analysis of the C-terminal regions of the new proteins with published spidroins robustly shows that the piriform sequences form an ortholog group.

  9. Blue whale earplug reveals lifetime contaminant exposure and hormone profiles.

    PubMed

    Trumble, Stephen J; Robinson, Eleanor M; Berman-Kowalewski, Michelle; Potter, Charles W; Usenko, Sascha

    2013-10-15

    Lifetime contaminant and hormonal profiles have been reconstructed for an individual male blue whale (Balaenoptera musculus, Linnaeus 1758) using the earplug as a natural aging matrix that is also capable of archiving and preserving lipophilic compounds. These unprecedented lifetime profiles (i.e., birth to death) were reconstructed with a 6-mo resolution for a wide range of analytes including cortisol (stress hormone), testosterone (developmental hormone), organic contaminants (e.g., pesticides and flame retardants), and mercury. Cortisol lifetime profiles revealed a doubling of cortisol levels over baseline. Testosterone profiles suggest this male blue whale reached sexual maturity at approximately 10 y of age, which corresponds well with and improves on previous estimates. Early periods of the reconstructed contaminant profiles for pesticides (such as dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethanes and chlordanes), polychlorinated biphenyls, and polybrominated diphenyl ethers demonstrate significant maternal transfer occurred at 0-12 mo. The total lifetime organic contaminant burden measured between the earplug (sum of contaminants in laminae layers) and blubber samples from the same organism were similar. Total mercury profiles revealed reduced maternal transfer and two distinct pulse events compared with organic contaminants. The use of a whale earplug to reconstruct lifetime chemical profiles will allow for a more comprehensive examination of stress, development, and contaminant exposure, as well as improve the assessment of contaminant use/emission, environmental noise, ship traffic, and climate change on these important marine sentinels.

  10. Membrane protein properties revealed through data-rich electrostatics calculations

    PubMed Central

    Guerriero, Christopher J.; Brodsky, Jeffrey L.; Grabe, Michael

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY The electrostatic properties of membrane proteins often reveal many of their key biophysical characteristics, such as ion channel selectivity and the stability of charged membrane-spanning segments. The Poisson-Boltzmann (PB) equation is the gold standard for calculating protein electrostatics, and the software APBSmem enables the solution of the PB equation in the presence of a membrane. Here, we describe significant advances to APBSmem including: full automation of system setup, per-residue energy decomposition, incorporation of PDB2PQR, calculation of membrane induced pKa shifts, calculation of non-polar energies, and command-line scripting for large scale calculations. We highlight these new features with calculations carried out on a number of membrane proteins, including the recently solved structure of the ion channel TRPV1 and a large survey of 1,614 membrane proteins of known structure. This survey provides a comprehensive list of residues with large electrostatic penalties for being embedded in the membrane potentially revealing interesting functional information. PMID:26118532

  11. Reticulated lipid probe fluorescence reveals MDCK cell apical membrane topography.

    PubMed

    Colarusso, Pina; Spring, Kenneth R

    2002-02-01

    High spatial resolution confocal microscopy of young MDCK cells stained with the lipophilic probe 1,1'-dihexadecyl-3,3,3',3'- tetramethylindocarbocyanine perchlorate (DiIC(16)) revealed a reticulated fluorescence pattern on the apical membrane. DiIC(16) was delivered as crystals to live cells to minimize possible solvent perturbations of the membrane lipids. The ratio of the integrated fluorescence intensities in the bright versus dim regions was 1.6 +/- 0.1 (n = 13). Deconvolved images of the cells were consistent with exclusive plasma membrane staining. Multi-spectral and fluorescence anisotropy microscopy did not reveal differences between bright and dim regions. Bright regions coincided with microvilli and microridges observed by differential interference contrast microscopy and were stable for several minutes. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching yielded similar diffusion coefficients (pooled D = 1.5 +/- 0.6 x 10(-9) cm(2)/s, n = 40) for both bright and dim regions. Line fluorescence recovery after photobleaching showed that the reticulated pattern was maintained as the fluorescence recovered in the bleached areas. Cytochalasin D did not affect the staining pattern, but the pattern was eliminated by cholesterol depletion with methyl-beta-cyclodextrin. We conclude that the reticulated fluorescence pattern was caused by increased optical path lengths through the microvilli and microridges compared with the flat areas on the apical membrane.

  12. Reticulated lipid probe fluorescence reveals MDCK cell apical membrane topography.

    PubMed Central

    Colarusso, Pina; Spring, Kenneth R

    2002-01-01

    High spatial resolution confocal microscopy of young MDCK cells stained with the lipophilic probe 1,1'-dihexadecyl-3,3,3',3'- tetramethylindocarbocyanine perchlorate (DiIC(16)) revealed a reticulated fluorescence pattern on the apical membrane. DiIC(16) was delivered as crystals to live cells to minimize possible solvent perturbations of the membrane lipids. The ratio of the integrated fluorescence intensities in the bright versus dim regions was 1.6 +/- 0.1 (n = 13). Deconvolved images of the cells were consistent with exclusive plasma membrane staining. Multi-spectral and fluorescence anisotropy microscopy did not reveal differences between bright and dim regions. Bright regions coincided with microvilli and microridges observed by differential interference contrast microscopy and were stable for several minutes. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching yielded similar diffusion coefficients (pooled D = 1.5 +/- 0.6 x 10(-9) cm(2)/s, n = 40) for both bright and dim regions. Line fluorescence recovery after photobleaching showed that the reticulated pattern was maintained as the fluorescence recovered in the bleached areas. Cytochalasin D did not affect the staining pattern, but the pattern was eliminated by cholesterol depletion with methyl-beta-cyclodextrin. We conclude that the reticulated fluorescence pattern was caused by increased optical path lengths through the microvilli and microridges compared with the flat areas on the apical membrane. PMID:11806917

  13. Blue whale earplug reveals lifetime contaminant exposure and hormone profiles

    PubMed Central

    Trumble, Stephen J.; Robinson, Eleanor M.; Berman-Kowalewski, Michelle; Potter, Charles W.; Usenko, Sascha

    2013-01-01

    Lifetime contaminant and hormonal profiles have been reconstructed for an individual male blue whale (Balaenoptera musculus, Linnaeus 1758) using the earplug as a natural aging matrix that is also capable of archiving and preserving lipophilic compounds. These unprecedented lifetime profiles (i.e., birth to death) were reconstructed with a 6-mo resolution for a wide range of analytes including cortisol (stress hormone), testosterone (developmental hormone), organic contaminants (e.g., pesticides and flame retardants), and mercury. Cortisol lifetime profiles revealed a doubling of cortisol levels over baseline. Testosterone profiles suggest this male blue whale reached sexual maturity at approximately 10 y of age, which corresponds well with and improves on previous estimates. Early periods of the reconstructed contaminant profiles for pesticides (such as dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethanes and chlordanes), polychlorinated biphenyls, and polybrominated diphenyl ethers demonstrate significant maternal transfer occurred at 0–12 mo. The total lifetime organic contaminant burden measured between the earplug (sum of contaminants in laminae layers) and blubber samples from the same organism were similar. Total mercury profiles revealed reduced maternal transfer and two distinct pulse events compared with organic contaminants. The use of a whale earplug to reconstruct lifetime chemical profiles will allow for a more comprehensive examination of stress, development, and contaminant exposure, as well as improve the assessment of contaminant use/emission, environmental noise, ship traffic, and climate change on these important marine sentinels. PMID:24043814

  14. Genome Sequencing Reveals a Phage in Helicobacter pylori

    PubMed Central

    Lehours, Philippe; Vale, Filipa F.; Bjursell, Magnus K.; Melefors, Ojar; Advani, Reza; Glavas, Steve; Guegueniat, Julia; Gontier, Etienne; Lacomme, Sabrina; Alves Matos, António; Menard, Armelle; Mégraud, Francis; Engstrand, Lars; Andersson, Anders F.

    2011-01-01

    ABSTRACT Helicobacter pylori chronically infects the gastric mucosa in more than half of the human population; in a subset of this population, its presence is associated with development of severe disease, such as gastric cancer. Genomic analysis of several strains has revealed an extensive H. pylori pan-genome, likely to grow as more genomes are sampled. Here we describe the draft genome sequence (63 contigs; 26× mean coverage) of H. pylori strain B45, isolated from a patient with gastric mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma. The major finding was a 24.6-kb prophage integrated in the bacterial genome. The prophage shares most of its genes (22/27) with prophage region II of Helicobacter acinonychis strain Sheeba. After UV treatment of liquid cultures, circular DNA carrying the prophage integrase gene could be detected, and intracellular tailed phage-like particles were observed in H. pylori cells by transmission electron microscopy, indicating that phage production can be induced from the prophage. PCR amplification and sequencing of the integrase gene from 341 H. pylori strains from different geographic regions revealed a high prevalence of the prophage (21.4%). Phylogenetic reconstruction showed four distinct clusters in the integrase gene, three of which tended to be specific for geographic regions. Our study implies that phages may play important roles in the ecology and evolution of H. pylori. PMID:22086490

  15. Previously Unrecognized Large Lunar Impact Basins Revealed by Topographic Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frey, Herbert V.

    2008-01-01

    The discovery of a large population of apparently buried impact craters on Mars, revealed as Quasi- Circular Depressions (QCDs) in Mars Orbiting Laser Altimeter (MOLA) data [1,2,3] and as Circular Thin Areas (CTAs) [4] in crustal thickness model data [5] leads to the obvious question: are there unrecognized impact features on the Moon and other bodies in the solar system? Early analysis of Clementine topography revealed several large impact basins not previously known [6,7], so the answer certainly is "Yes." How large a population of previously undetected impact basins, their size frequency distribution, and how much these added craters and basins will change ideas about the early cratering history and Late Heavy Bombardment on the Moon remains to be determined. Lunar Orbiter Laser Altimeter (LOLA) data [8] will be able to address these issues. As a prelude, we searched the state-of-the-art global topographic grid for the Moon, the Unified Lunar Control Net (ULCN) [9] for evidence of large impact features not previously recognized by photogeologic mapping, as summarized by Wilhelms [lo].

  16. Proteomics Reveals Novel Drosophila Seminal Fluid Proteins Transferred at Mating

    PubMed Central

    Findlay, Geoffrey D; Yi, Xianhua; MacCoss, Michael J; Swanson, Willie J

    2008-01-01

    Across diverse taxa, seminal fluid proteins (Sfps) transferred at mating affect the reproductive success of both sexes. Such reproductive proteins often evolve under positive selection between species; because of this rapid divergence, Sfps are hypothesized to play a role in speciation by contributing to reproductive isolation between populations. In Drosophila, individual Sfps have been characterized and are known to alter male sperm competitive ability and female post-mating behavior, but a proteomic-scale view of the transferred Sfps has been missing. Here we describe a novel proteomic method that uses whole-organism isotopic labeling to detect transferred Sfps in mated female D. melanogaster. We identified 63 proteins, which were previously unknown to function in reproduction, and confirmed the transfer of dozens of predicted Sfps. Relative quantification of protein abundance revealed that several of these novel Sfps are abundant in seminal fluid. Positive selection and tandem gene duplication are the prevailing forces of Sfp evolution, and comparative proteomics with additional species revealed lineage-specific changes in seminal fluid content. We also report a proteomic-based gene discovery method that uncovered 19 previously unannotated genes in D. melanogaster. Our results demonstrate an experimental method to identify transferred proteins in any system that is amenable to isotopic labeling, and they underscore the power of combining proteomic and evolutionary analyses to shed light on the complex process of Drosophila reproduction. PMID:18666829

  17. Memory in motion: movement dynamics reveal memory strength.

    PubMed

    Papesh, Megan H; Goldinger, Stephen D

    2012-10-01

    Recognition memory is typically examined as a discrete end-state, describable by static variables, such as accuracy, response time, and confidence. In the present study, we combined real-time mouse-tracking with subsequent, overt confidence estimates to examine the dynamic nature of memory decisions. By examining participants' streaming x-, y- mouse coordinates during recognition decisions, we observed that movement trajectories revealed underlying response confidence. More confident decisions were associated with shorter decision times and more linear response trajectories. Less confident decisions were made slowly, with increased trajectory curvature. Statistical indices of curvature and decision times, including area-under-the-curve and time to maximum deviation, suggested that memory strength relates to response dynamics. Whether participants were correct or incorrect, old responses showed a stronger correspondence between mouse trajectories and confidence, relative to new responses. We suggest that people subjectively experience a correspondence between feelings of memory and feelings of confidence; that subjective experience reveals itself in real-time decision processes, as suggested by sequential sampling models of recognition decisions.

  18. Economic choices reveal probability distortion in macaque monkeys.

    PubMed

    Stauffer, William R; Lak, Armin; Bossaerts, Peter; Schultz, Wolfram

    2015-02-18

    Economic choices are largely determined by two principal elements, reward value (utility) and probability. Although nonlinear utility functions have been acknowledged for centuries, nonlinear probability weighting (probability distortion) was only recently recognized as a ubiquitous aspect of real-world choice behavior. Even when outcome probabilities are known and acknowledged, human decision makers often overweight low probability outcomes and underweight high probability outcomes. Whereas recent studies measured utility functions and their corresponding neural correlates in monkeys, it is not known whether monkeys distort probability in a manner similar to humans. Therefore, we investigated economic choices in macaque monkeys for evidence of probability distortion. We trained two monkeys to predict reward from probabilistic gambles with constant outcome values (0.5 ml or nothing). The probability of winning was conveyed using explicit visual cues (sector stimuli). Choices between the gambles revealed that the monkeys used the explicit probability information to make meaningful decisions. Using these cues, we measured probability distortion from choices between the gambles and safe rewards. Parametric modeling of the choices revealed classic probability weighting functions with inverted-S shape. Therefore, the animals overweighted low probability rewards and underweighted high probability rewards. Empirical investigation of the behavior verified that the choices were best explained by a combination of nonlinear value and nonlinear probability distortion. Together, these results suggest that probability distortion may reflect evolutionarily preserved neuronal processing.

  19. Direct visualization reveals kinetics of meiotic chromosome synapsis

    DOE PAGES

    Rog, Ofer; Dernburg, Abby  F.

    2015-03-17

    The synaptonemal complex (SC) is a conserved protein complex that stabilizes interactions along homologous chromosomes (homologs) during meiosis. The SC regulates genetic exchanges between homologs, thereby enabling reductional division and the production of haploid gametes. Here, we directly observe SC assembly (synapsis) by optimizing methods for long-term fluorescence recording in C. elegans. We report that synapsis initiates independently on each chromosome pair at or near pairing centers—specialized regions required for homolog associations. Once initiated, the SC extends rapidly and mostly irreversibly to chromosome ends. Quantitation of SC initiation frequencies and extension rates reveals that initiation is a rate-limiting step inmore » homolog interactions. Eliminating the dynein-driven chromosome movements that accompany synapsis severely retards SC extension, revealing a new role for these conserved motions. This work provides the first opportunity to directly observe and quantify key aspects of meiotic chromosome interactions and will enable future in vivo analysis of germline processes.« less

  20. Circadian acetylome reveals regulation of mitochondrial metabolic pathways.

    PubMed

    Masri, Selma; Patel, Vishal R; Eckel-Mahan, Kristin L; Peleg, Shahaf; Forne, Ignasi; Ladurner, Andreas G; Baldi, Pierre; Imhof, Axel; Sassone-Corsi, Paolo

    2013-02-26

    The circadian clock is constituted by a complex molecular network that integrates a number of regulatory cues needed to maintain organismal homeostasis. To this effect, posttranslational modifications of clock proteins modulate circadian rhythms and are thought to convert physiological signals into changes in protein regulatory function. To explore reversible lysine acetylation that is dependent on the clock, we have characterized the circadian acetylome in WT and Clock-deficient (Clock(-/-)) mouse liver by quantitative mass spectrometry. Our analysis revealed that a number of mitochondrial proteins involved in metabolic pathways are heavily influenced by clock-driven acetylation. Pathways such as glycolysis/gluconeogenesis, citric acid cycle, amino acid metabolism, and fatty acid metabolism were found to be highly enriched hits. The significant number of metabolic pathways whose protein acetylation profile is altered in Clock(-/-) mice prompted us to link the acetylome to the circadian metabolome previously characterized in our laboratory. Changes in enzyme acetylation over the circadian cycle and the link to metabolite levels are discussed, revealing biological implications connecting the circadian clock to cellular metabolic state.

  1. Revealing quantum correlation by negativity of the Wigner function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taghiabadi, Razieh; Akhtarshenas, Seyed Javad; Sarbishaei, Mohsen

    2016-05-01

    We analyze two two-mode continuous variable separable states with the same marginal states. We adopt the definition of classicality in the form of well-defined positive Wigner function describing the state and find that although the states possess positive local Wigner functions, they exhibit negative Wigner functions for the global states. Using the negativity of Wigner function as an indicator of nonclassicality, we show that despite these states possess different negativities of the Wigner function, they do not reveal this difference as phase space nonclassicalities such as negativity of the Mandel Q parameter or quadrature squeezing. We then concentrate on quantum correlation of these states and show that quantum discord and local quantum uncertainty, as two well-defined measures of quantum correlation, manifest the difference between negativity of the Wigner functions. The non-Gaussianity of these states is also examined and show that the difference in behavior of their non-Gaussianity is the same as the difference between negativity of their Wigner functions. We also investigate the influence of correlation rank criterion and find that when the states can be produced locally from classical states, the Wigner functions cannot reveal their quantum correlations.

  2. Anticipatory eye fixations reveal tool knowledge for tool interaction.

    PubMed

    Belardinelli, Anna; Barabas, Marissa; Himmelbach, Marc; Butz, Martin V

    2016-08-01

    Action-oriented eye-tracking studies have shown that eye fixations reveal much about current behavioral intentions. The eyes typically fixate those positions of a tool or an object where the fingers will be placed next, or those positions in a scene, where obstacles need to be avoided to successfully reach or transport a tool or object. Here, we asked to what extent eye fixations can also reveal active cognitive inference processes, which are expected to integrate bottom-up visual information with internal knowledge for planning suitable object interactions task-dependently. In accordance to the available literature, we expected that task-relevant knowledge will include sensorimotor, semantic, and mechanical aspects. To investigate if and in which way this internal knowledge influences eye fixation behavior while planning an object interaction, we presented pictures of familiar and unfamiliar tools and instructed participants to either pantomime 'lifting' or 'using' the respective tool. When confronted with unfamiliar tools, participants fixated the tool's effector part closer and longer in comparison with familiar tools. This difference was particularly prominent during 'using' trials when compared with 'lifting' trials. We suggest that this difference indicates that the brain actively extracts mechanical information about the unknown tool in order to infer its appropriate usage. Moreover, the successive fixations over a trial indicate that a dynamic, task-oriented, active cognitive process unfolds, which integrates available tool knowledge with visually gathered information to plan and determine the currently intended tool interaction.

  3. Ancient DNA sequence revealed by error-correcting codes

    PubMed Central

    Brandão, Marcelo M.; Spoladore, Larissa; Faria, Luzinete C. B.; Rocha, Andréa S. L.; Silva-Filho, Marcio C.; Palazzo, Reginaldo

    2015-01-01

    A previously described DNA sequence generator algorithm (DNA-SGA) using error-correcting codes has been employed as a computational tool to address the evolutionary pathway of the genetic code. The code-generated sequence alignment demonstrated that a residue mutation revealed by the code can be found in the same position in sequences of distantly related taxa. Furthermore, the code-generated sequences do not promote amino acid changes in the deviant genomes through codon reassignment. A Bayesian evolutionary analysis of both code-generated and homologous sequences of the Arabidopsis thaliana malate dehydrogenase gene indicates an approximately 1 MYA divergence time from the MDH code-generated sequence node to its paralogous sequences. The DNA-SGA helps to determine the plesiomorphic state of DNA sequences because a single nucleotide alteration often occurs in distantly related taxa and can be found in the alternative codon patterns of noncanonical genetic codes. As a consequence, the algorithm may reveal an earlier stage of the evolution of the standard code. PMID:26159228

  4. Effects of Lactobacillus johnsonii and Lactobacillus reuteri on gut barrier function and heat shock proteins in intestinal porcine epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hao-Yu; Roos, Stefan; Jonsson, Hans; Ahl, David; Dicksved, Johan; Lindberg, Jan Erik; Lundh, Torbjörn

    2015-01-01

    Heat shock proteins (HSPs) are a set of highly conserved proteins that can serve as intestinal gate keepers in gut homeostasis. Here, effects of a probiotic, Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG), and two novel porcine isolates, Lactobacillus johnsonii strain P47-HY and Lactobacillus reuteri strain P43-HUV, on cytoprotective HSP expression and gut barrier function, were investigated in a porcine IPEC-J2 intestinal epithelial cell line model. The IPEC-J2 cells polarized on a permeable filter exhibited villus-like cell phenotype with development of apical microvilli. Western blot analysis detected HSP expression in IPEC-J2 and revealed that L. johnsonii and L. reuteri strains were able to significantly induce HSP27, despite high basal expression in IPEC-J2, whereas LGG did not. For HSP72, only the supernatant of L. reuteri induced the expression, which was comparable to the heat shock treatment, which indicated that HSP72 expression was more stimulus specific. The protective effect of lactobacilli was further studied in IPEC-J2 under an enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) challenge. ETEC caused intestinal barrier destruction, as reflected by loss of cell–cell contact, reduced IPEC-J2 cell viability and transepithelial electrical resistance, and disruption of tight junction protein zonula occludens-1. In contrast, the L. reuteri treatment substantially counteracted these detrimental effects and preserved the barrier function. L. johnsonii and LGG also achieved barrier protection, partly by directly inhibiting ETEC attachment. Together, the results indicate that specific strains of Lactobacillus can enhance gut barrier function through cytoprotective HSP induction and fortify the cell protection against ETEC challenge through tight junction protein modulation and direct interaction with pathogens. PMID:25847917

  5. Lactobacillus plantarum LB95 impairs the virulence potential of Gram-positive and Gram-negative food-borne pathogens in HT-29 and Vero cell cultures.

    PubMed

    Dutra, Virna; Silva, Ana Carla; Cabrita, Paula; Peres, Cidália; Malcata, Xavier; Brito, Luisa

    2016-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes, Salmonella enterica and verocytotoxigenic Escherichia coli (VTEC) are amongst the most important agents responsible for food outbreaks occurring worldwide. In this work, two Lactobacillus spp. strains (LABs), Lactobacillus plantarum (LB95) and Lactobacillus paraplantarum (LB13), previously isolated from spontaneously fermenting olive brines, and two reference probiotic strains, Lactobacillus casei Shirota and Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG, were investigated for their ability to attenuate the virulence of the aforementioned pathogens using animal cell culture assays. In competitive exclusion assays, the relative percentages of adhesion and invasion of S. enterica subsp. enterica serovar Enteritidis were significantly reduced when the human HT-29 cell line was previously exposed to LB95. The relative percentage of invasion by Listeria monocytogenes was significantly reduced when HT-29 cells were previously exposed to LB95. In the cytotoxicity assays, the cell-free supernatant of the co-culture (CFSC)of VTEC with LB95 accounted for the lowest value obtained amongst the co-cultures of VTEC with LABs, and was significantly lower than the value obtained with the co-culture of VTEC with the two probiotic reference strains. The cytotoxicity of CFSC of VTEC with both LB95 and LB13 exhibited values not significantly different from the cell-free supernatant of the nonpathogenic E. coli B strain. Our results suggested that LB95 may be able to attenuate the virulence of Gram-positive and Gram-negative food-borne pathogens; together with other reported features of these strains, our data reveal their possible use in probiotic foods due to their interesting potential in preventing enteric infections in humans.

  6. Probiotic pre-administration reduces mortality in a mouse model of cecal ligation and puncture-induced sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Lufang; Xu, Keying; Gui, Qifeng; Chen, Yue; Chen, Deying; Yang, Yunmei

    2016-01-01

    A number of clinical trials have demonstrated that the use of probiotics has the potential to prevent nosocomial infections. However, the mechanism underlying probiotic-induced anti-infection and sepsis remains to be investigated. In the present study, 200 µl/day of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG) or normal saline (control) was orally administrated to 4-week-old C57BL6 mice 4 weeks prior to cecal ligation and puncture (CLP). A number of mice were sacrificed 24 h after CLP, and the remaining mice were used for survival studies. Ileum tissues were collected to evaluate the injury on the intestine. Blood samples were also obtained to investigate the changed metabolic pattern in mice that underwent different treatments using ultra-performance liquid chromatography coupled with quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UPLC-QTOF-MS). In the survival studies, the mortality of CLP-induced septic mice pretreated with LGG was significantly lower compared with untreated mice (P=0.029). Ileum mucosal damage was evident in the control septic mice. Based on the data of UPLC-QTOF-MS, phosphatidylcholines were increased and lysophosphatidylcholines (LPCs) that contained polyunsaturated fatty acids were decreased in septic mice, whereas saturated fatty acid LPCs reveal no significant difference between septic and sham mice. In addition, the metabolic profile in the septic mice pretreated with LGG was much closer to that of sham mice compared with control septic mice. The results of the present study suggest that probiotic pre-administration reduces the mortality in septic mice by decreasing ileum mucosal damage, increasing the gut barrier integrity and altering global serum metabolic profiles. PMID:27588102

  7. Offenders' crime narratives as revealed by the Narrative Roles Questionnaire.

    PubMed

    Youngs, Donna; Canter, David V

    2013-03-01

    The study of narrative processes as part of the immediate factors that shape criminal action is limited by the lack of a methodology for differentiating the narrative themes that characterise specific crime events. The current study explores how the roles offenders see themselves as playing during an offence encapsulate their underlying crime narratives and thus provide the basis for a quantitative methodology. To test this possibility, a 33-item Narrative Roles Questionnaire (NRQ) was developed from intensive interviews with offenders about their experience of committing a recent offence. A multidimensional analysis of the NRQ completed by 71 convicted offenders revealed life narrative themes similar to those identified in fiction by Frye and with noncriminals by McAdams, labelled The Professional, Victim, Hero, and Revenger offence roles. The NRQ thus is a first step in opening up the possibility of empirical studies of the narrative aetiological perspective in criminology.

  8. [Elderly women: revealing their experiences and care needs].

    PubMed

    Merighi, Miriam Aparecida Barbosa; de Oliveira, Deíse Moura; de Jesus, Maria Cristina Pinto; Souto, Rafaella Queiroga; Thamada, Andressa Akina

    2013-04-01

    This qualitative study used a social phenomenology approach to elucidate the experiences, care needs and expectations of the elderly women. Nine elderly women were interviewed between February and May 2011 using a semi-structured questionnaire. The elderly women referred to their physical, mental, and social limitations. They valued ​​the preservation of their autonomy in daily activities and in self-care and considered their families to be a fundamental support. They had expectations of remaining healthy, pursuing leisure activities, and having improved access to healthcare information and treatment. The absence of prospects at this stage of life was related to the loss of significant people and the loss of health. The results of this study reveal important aspects of the experiences of elderly women and encourage further research and improvement in teaching, clinical practice and management policies in relation to the needs of these women.

  9. Stochastic heart-rate model can reveal pathologic cardiac dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuusela, Tom

    2004-03-01

    A simple one-dimensional Langevin-type stochastic difference equation can simulate the heart-rate fluctuations in a time scale from minutes to hours. The model consists of a deterministic nonlinear part and a stochastic part typical of Gaussian noise, and both parts can be directly determined from measured heart-rate data. Data from healthy subjects typically exhibit the deterministic part with two or more stable fixed points. Studies of 15 congestive heart-failure subjects reveal that the deterministic part of pathologic heart dynamics has no clear stable fixed points. Direct simulations of the stochastic model for normal and pathologic cases can produce statistical parameters similar to those of real subjects. Results directly indicate that pathologic situations simplify the heart-rate control system.

  10. Mathematical Analysis of Biomolecular Network Reveals Connections Between Diseases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Guanyu

    2012-02-01

    Connections between cancer and metabolic diseases may consist in the complex network of interactions among a common set of biomolecules. By applying singularity and bifurcation analysis, the phenotypes constrained by the AKT signaling pathway are identified and mapped onto the parameter space, which include cancer and certain metabolic diseases. By considering physiologic properties (sensitivity, robustness and adaptivity) the AKT pathway must possess in order to efficiently sense growth factors and nutrients, the region of normal responses is located. The analysis illuminates the parameter space and reveals system-level mechanisms in regulating biological functions (cell growth, survival, proliferation and metabolism) and how their deregulation may lead to the development of diseases. The analytical expressions summarize the synergistic interactions among many molecules, which provides valuable insights into therapeutic interventions.

  11. Heat islands over Mumbai as revealed by autorecorded thermograph data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, A. K.; Voogt, James; Kshirsagar, S. R.; Srivastava, Kavita

    2016-02-01

    This study examined hourly temperature data of two locations of Mumbai metropolitan city. One data point (Coloba, Mumbai) is in centre of the city and the other one (Santacruz, Mumbai) is at the airport. The study finds that there were many occasions when night-time hourly temperatures over the city centre were considerably higher than that of the airport, even though temperature at the time of sunset at both the places was nearly same. In this study, the occasions, when hourly night-time temperature over city was more than that of the airport by objectively defined threshold value (3.0 ∘C in this study) for most of the hours in the night, were termed as heat island events. Analysis of the study reveals that these events are mostly confined to November-February months. The study also found that frequency of such events has doubled in recent two decades in comparison to the earlier two decades.

  12. Marine and terrestrial ecology: unifying concepts, revealing differences.

    PubMed

    Webb, Thomas J

    2012-10-01

    The extent to which similar ecological processes operate on land and in the sea has been much debated, with apparently 'fu