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Sample records for rheumatoid synovial fluid

  1. Plasma and synovial fluid kinetics of flurbiprofen in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed Central

    Aarons, L; Salisbury, R; Alam-Siddiqi, M; Taylor, L; Grennan, D M

    1986-01-01

    Clinical assessment, plasma and synovial fluid kinetics were studied in 29 rheumatoid patients receiving 100 mg flurbiprofen twice daily. Clinical assessment and pharmacokinetic measurements varied widely within the group of patients. The average values for plasma clearance, volume of distribution and elimination halflife of flurbiprofen were 0.65 +/- 0.24 ml min-1 kg-1, 0.160 +/- 0.093 l kg-1 and 3.1 +/- 1.7 h, respectively. Synovial fluid drug concentrations peaked later and were lower than corresponding plasma concentrations: 5.2 h and 4.4 mg l-1 as against 1.49 h and 12.5 mg l-1, respectively. At 48 h after an oral dose of flurbiprofen, all the drug had been cleared from the synovial fluid. Synovial fluid drug concentrations were not related to synovial fluid albumin concentration or pH. There was a weak relationship between synovial fluid drug concentration and the thermographic measurements of disease activity. The fractions of flurbiprofen not bound to protein in synovial fluid and plasma were not significantly different. A simple model is proposed to account for the plasma and synovial fluid pharmacokinetics. PMID:3954931

  2. Plasma and synovial fluid meclofenamic acid concentrations in patients with rheumatoid arthritis of the knee.

    PubMed

    Koup, J R; Thomas, D; Tucker, E; Black, A; Ruderman, M; Dixon, J A; Kinkel, A

    1988-01-01

    We have measured plasma and synovial fluid concentrations of meclofenamic acid at 2, 4, 8, and 12 h during steady-state administration (100 mg three times daily for 4-7 days). Paired plasma and synovial samples were obtained pre-treatment and at one of the above times in twelve patients with a diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis. In addition, the extent of protein binding of meclofenamic acid was assessed in vitro in the pre-treatment plasma and synovial fluid specimens. Peak total concentrations of 1.73 and 0.86 micrograms.ml-1 were observed in plasma (at 2 h) and synovial fluid (at 4 h) respectively. The extent of protein binding was 99.7 and 99.6% (not significantly different) in plasma and synovial fluid respectively. The results of this study are compared to those from similar reported studies of other nonsteroidal anti-inflamatory compounds.

  3. An altered repertoire of T cell receptor V gene expression by rheumatoid synovial fluid T lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Lunardi, C; Marguerie, C; So, A K

    1992-12-01

    The pattern of T cell receptor V gene expression by lymphocytes from rheumatoid synovial fluid and paired peripheral blood samples was compared using a polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based assay. Eight rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients who had varying durations of disease (from 2 to 20 years) were studied. In all patients there was evidence of a different pattern of V gene expression between the two compartments. Significantly increased expression of at least one V alpha or V beta gene family by synovial fluid T cells was observed in all the patients studied. Three different V alpha (V alpha 10, 15 and 18) and three V beta (V beta 4, 5 and 13) families were commonly elevated. Sequencing of synovial V beta transcripts demonstrated that the basis of increased expression of selected V gene families in the synovial fluid was due to the presence of dominant clonotypes within those families, which constituted up to 53% of the sequences isolated from one particular synovial V gene family. There were considerable differences in the NDJ sequences found in synovial and peripheral blood T cell receptor (TCR) transcripts of the same V beta gene family. These data suggest that the TCR repertoire in the two compartments differs, and that antigen-driven expansion of particular synovial T cell populations is a component of rheumatoid synovitis, and is present in all stages of the disease. PMID:1458680

  4. Staphylococcal Enterotoxin C in Synovial Fluid of Patients With Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Ataee, Ramezan Ali; Ataee, Mohammad Hosein; Alishiri, Gholam Hosein; Esmaeili, Davoud

    2014-01-01

    Background: In the previous studies using the commercial ELISA kit, the existence of staphylococcal superantigens has been reported in synovial fluid of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Objectives: This study aimed to design molecular methods to detect staphylococcal enterotoxin C in synovial fluid of patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, Staphylococcus aureus strain producing enterotoxin C was used as the reference strain. The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was set up by design a specific pair of primers. Besides bacterial culture, 50 synovial fluid samples of patients with rheumatoid arthritis were subjected to DNA extraction, and then PCR amplification was carried out according to the protocol. All samples were examined by ELISA method for enterotoxin C. The data were descriptively analyzed. Results: The results of bacterial culture were negative for all samples. The results showed that 66% (33 cases) of samples contained entC gene and only 46% (23 cases) have also enterotoxin C. The interesting finding was that the results of ELISA and PCR were the same and have shown only 22 positive cases (44%samples) for staphylococcal enterotoxin C. Conclusions: Based on the findings of this study, S. aureus enterotoxin C (SEC) has been detected in synovial fluid of patients with rheumatoid arthritis by PCR and ELISA methods. These valuable findings may describe the exact etiology of the RA and as well as change the methods of its diagnosis and treatment. This is the first research, which has shown the staphylococcal entC gene in synovial fluid of RA patients. However, S. aureus strains can produce more than 20 types of enterotoxins. Therefore, its involvement on rheumatoid arthritis pathogenesis makes an important challenge in the future. In this regard, further investigation on the other enterotoxins is necessary. PMID:25558381

  5. Clonal heterogeneity of synovial fluid T lymphocytes from patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    SciTech Connect

    Duby, A.D.; Sinclair, A.K.; Osborne-Lawrence, S.L. ); Zeldes, W.; Kan, Li; Fox, D.A. )

    1989-08-01

    Although substantial evidence suggests that synovial T lymphocytes are critical in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), little is known regarding their antigenic specificities, antigen receptor gene rearrangements, and mechanisms of activation. To assess the extend of expansion of specific clones among RA synovial fluid T cells, Southern blot analyses of T-cell receptor (TCR) gene rearrangements were performed on 40 RA synovial fluid T-cell clones, as well as on fresh and polyclonally activated T cells from RA synovial fluid, RA peripheral blood, and normal peripheral blood. Two of the clones had identical TCR rearrangement patterns, but the remainder were unique. The nonclonal RA T-cell samples showed the same pattern of TCR {beta}-chain rearrangement that was observed among normal peripheral blood T cells, indicating no dominant clonal T-cell population in these samples. It was noted that with sufficient exposure of autoradiograms of the Southern blots, discrete TCR gene rearrangements, representing in some cases common D{sub {beta}}J{sub {beta}} (D, diversity; J, joining) rearrangements, were evident in T cells from peripheral blood of normal individuals and patients with RA, as well as T cells from RA synovial fluid. Taken together, the findings indicate that only a minor degree of oligoclonality can be demonstrated among T lymphocytes from RA synovial fluid.

  6. Functional capacities of T lymphocyte subsets from synovial fluid and blood in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, J

    1986-01-01

    A reverse haemolytic plaque forming cell (PFC) assay was employed to analyse the impact of T suppressor/cytotoxic and T helper cells on B cell function in 10 patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). In all cases T8-enriched cells from synovial fluid and blood suppressed the pokeweed mitogen (PWM) induced IgM, IgG, and IgA secretion by autologous lymphocytes to the same degree. The suppression was partly abolished by irradiation of T8-enriched cells. T4-enriched cells from blood increased the PWM induced Ig secretion by autologous blood B cells. In six of 10 patients responses 1.2 to four times higher were obtained with T4-enriched cells from synovial fluid, but in four of 10 patients synovial fluid T4-enriched cells did not increase the PWM responses of blood B cells. T4- and T8-enriched T cells from synovial fluid comprised more Ia+ cells than did T cells from blood (36% v 3% and 43% v 6%). Ia+ T helper and suppressor/cytotoxic cells may modulate in vivo activation of synovial B cells in RA. PMID:2943237

  7. Interleukin 35 Synovial Fluid Levels Are Associated with Disease Activity of Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Šenolt, Ladislav; Šumová, Barbora; Jandová, Romana; Hulejová, Hana; Mann, Heřman; Pavelka, Karel; Vencovský, Jiří; Filková, Mária

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To study the association of systemic and local interleukin-35 (IL-35) levels in rheumatoid arthritis. Methods 37 patients with treatment naïve early RA, 49 with established RA and 29 control patients with osteoarthritis (OA) were studied. Serum and paired synovial fluid samples were analysed for IL-35. Disease activity of RA patients was assessed according to the 28-Joint Count Disease Activity Score (DAS28). Results The levels of serum IL-35 were significantly higher in patients with treatment naïve early RA compared to those with established disease and control OA subjects. In addition, serum levels of IL-35 significantly decreased 12 weeks after initiation of glucocorticoids and conventional synthetic disease modifying antirheumatic drugs in patients with treatment naïve early RA. Synovial fluid IL-35 levels were significantly higher in RA compared to OA patients, were significantly elevated compared to serum counterparts and correlated with synovial fluid leukocyte count (r=0.412; p<0.01), serum CRP levels (r=0.362; p<0.05) and DAS28 (r=0.430, p<0.01). Conclusion This is the first study showing elevated circulating levels of IL-35 in treatment naïve early RA, its significant decrease after treatment initiation and positive association between increased synovial fluid IL-35 and disease activity in patients with long-lasting RA. PMID:26204444

  8. Markers of activated T cells on synovial fluid lymphocytes in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Mathieu, A

    1979-01-31

    Membrane markers of activated T lymphocytes of synovial fluid of two groups of patients with various forms of arthritis were studied. The first group (group A) concerns patients affected by rheumatoid arthritis (RA), and the other (group B) includes those affected by not immunologically-mediated arthropathies as osteoarthrosis, crystal synovitis, post-traumatic arthritis. Some other arthropathies included in a third group (group C) have been considered separately. Both the receptor for human group O Rh negative erythrocytes (H rosettes forming cells) and the receptor able to bind at 37 degrees C sheep red blood cells (stable-E-rosette forming cells) respectively were used as markers for the identification of activated T lymphocytes. The results show a marked increase of activated T cells in group A in comparison to group B. So the possible causes of this lymphocyte activation in rheumatoid patients are suggested.

  9. Juvenile idiopathic arthritis and rheumatoid arthritis: bacterial diversity in temporomandibular joint synovial fluid in comparison with immunological and clinical findings.

    PubMed

    Olsen-Bergem, H; Kristoffersen, A K; Bjørnland, T; Reseland, J E; Aas, J A

    2016-03-01

    Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) involvement in juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) occurs in up to 80% of affected children. The purpose of this study was to investigate the presence of bacterial DNA in synovial fluid, and to compare this with clinical and immunological findings in children with JIA, adults with persistent JIA, and adults with rheumatoid arthritis, in order to detect whether bacteria contribute to inflammation in TMJ arthritis. Synovial fluid and skin swab samples were collected from 30 patients (54 TMJs). Bacterial detection was performed using 16S rRNA pyrosequencing. Bacterial DNA was detected in 31 TMJs (57%) in 19 patients (63%). A positive statistically significant correlation was registered between bacterial DNA detected in TMJ synovial fluid and the following factors: total protein concentration in synovial fluid, interleukin 1β, tumour necrosis factor alpha, adrenocorticotropic hormone, and adiponectin, as well as the duration of the general medical disease. Fourteen different bacterial species were detected in synovial fluid. Bacterial DNA in TMJ synovial fluid without contamination was detected in more than 50% of the patients. Studies are needed to evaluate the consequences of this bacterial DNA in synovial fluid with regard to TMJ arthritis. PMID:26554824

  10. Occasional presence of herpes viruses in synovial fluid and blood from patients with rheumatoid arthritis and axial spondyloarthritis.

    PubMed

    Burgos, Rubén; Ordoñez, Graciela; Vázquez-Mellado, Janitzia; Pineda, Benjamín; Sotelo, Julio

    2015-10-01

    Viral agents have been suspected as participants of immune-mediated disorders. In the case of rheumatic diseases, the synovial joint cavity represents a secluded area of inflammation which could harbor etiological agents. We analyzed by polymerase chain reaction the possible presence of DNA from various herpes viruses in blood and synovial fluid from patients with either rheumatoid arthritis (n = 18), axial spondyloarthritis (n = 11), or osteoarthritis (n = 8). Relevant findings were as follows: DNA from varicella zoster virus was found in synovial fluid but not in blood mononuclear cells from 33 % of patients with rheumatoid arthritis and in 45 % of patients with axial spondyloarthritis but not in patients with osteoarthritis. Also, DNA from herpes simplex viruses 1 and 2 was found both in the blood and in the synovial fluid from 33 % of patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Our results indicate the occasional presence of DNA from herpes viruses in patients with rheumatoid arthritis or with axial spondyloarthritis. However, these findings might represent a parallel epiphenomenon of viral activation associated either with immunosuppressive therapy or with primary immune disturbances, rather than the etiological participation of herpes viruses in these disorders.

  11. Synovial fluid analysis

    MedlinePlus

    Joint fluid analysis; Joint fluid aspiration ... El-Gabalawy HS. Synovial fluid analysis, synovial biopsy, and synovial pathology. In: Firestein GS, Budd RC, Gabriel SE, McInnes IB, O'Dell JR, eds. Kelly's Textbook of ...

  12. Interleukin 2 (IL 2) inhibitor in rheumatoid synovial fluid: Correlation with prognosis and soluble IL 2 receptor levels

    SciTech Connect

    Miossec, P.; Elhamiani, M.; Chichehian, B.; D'Angeac, A.D.; Sany, J.; Hirn, M. )

    1990-03-01

    A soluble activity inhibiting over 50% of the CTLL-2 cell line response to recombinant human interleukin 2 (IL 2) was found in 17 of 29 (59%) rheumatoid synovial fluids. To study the prognosis value of this activity, 16 rheumatoid synovial fluids were collected before a radiation synovectomy of the knee with 7 mCi of 90Y. Patients with a good clinical result after the synovectomy had a lower IL 2 inhibitory activity than those with a bad or incomplete result (P less than 0.01). Levels of inhibitory activity and of soluble IL 2 receptors were correlated with each other and with the response of the synovitis to the radiation synovectomy. These results extend the clinical usefulness of soluble IL 2 receptor measurements and indicate a correlation between the immune activation of the rheumatoid synovitis and its clinical activity.

  13. Cytidine deaminase activity in synovial fluid of patients with rheumatoid arthritis: relation to lactoferrin, acidosis, and cartilage proteoglycan release.

    PubMed Central

    Månsson, B; Geborek, P; Saxne, T; Björnsson, S

    1990-01-01

    It is claimed that cytidine deaminase activity reflects local granulocyte turnover or activity in the synovial fluid of patients with rheumatoid arthritis, but cytidine deaminase is not a granulocyte specific enzyme. Lactoferrin is a granulocyte specific protein that is released from the secondary granulae during activation. We measured cytidine deaminase activity and lactoferrin concentrations in 33 rheumatic synovial fluid samples. Cytidine deaminase activity and lactoferrin concentrations correlated closely, indicating that both analyses reflect similar events in the joint-that is, result in their release from granulocytes. Cytidine deaminase activity and granulocyte concentrations correlated less closely, suggesting that there are additional factors besides the cell number which contribute to this release. Joint acidosis may be one such factor, as pH and cytidine deaminase activity correlated inversely. There was no association with synovial fluid proteoglycan concentrations, a marker of cartilage degradation. PMID:2396864

  14. IL-17 in synovial fluids from patients with rheumatoid arthritis is a potent stimulator of osteoclastogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Kotake, Shigeru; Udagawa, Nobuyuki; Takahashi, Naoyuki; Matsuzaki, Kenichiro; Itoh, Kanami; Ishiyama, Shigeru; Saito, Seiji; Inoue, Kazuhiko; Kamatani, Naoyuki; Gillespie, Matthew T.; Martin, T. John; Suda, Tatsuo

    1999-01-01

    IL-17 is a newly discovered T cell–derived cytokine whose role in osteoclast development has not been fully elucidated. Treatment of cocultures of mouse hemopoietic cells and primary osteoblasts with recombinant human IL-17 induced the formation of multinucleated cells, which satisfied major criteria of osteoclasts, including tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase activity, calcitonin receptors, and pit formation on dentine slices. Direct interaction between osteoclast progenitors and osteoblasts was required for IL-17–induced osteoclastogenesis, which was completely inhibited by adding indomethacin or NS398, a selective inhibitor of cyclooxgenase-2 (COX-2). Adding IL-17 increased prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) synthesis in cocultures of bone marrow cells and osteoblasts and in single cultures of osteoblasts, but not in single cultures of bone marrow cells. In addition, IL-17 dose-dependently induced expression of osteoclast differentiation factor (ODF) mRNA in osteoblasts. ODF is a membrane-associated protein that transduces an essential signal(s) to osteoclast progenitors for differentiation into osteoclasts. Osteoclastogenesis inhibitory factor (OCIF), a decoy receptor of ODF, completely inhibited IL-17–induced osteoclast differentiation in the cocultures. Levels of IL-17 in synovial fluids were significantly higher in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients than osteoarthritis (OA) patients. Anti–IL-17 antibody significantly inhibited osteoclast formation induced by culture media of RA synovial tissues. These findings suggest that IL-17 first acts on osteoblasts, which stimulates both COX-2–dependent PGE2 synthesis and ODF gene expression, which in turn induce differentiation of osteoclast progenitors into mature osteoclasts, and that IL-17 is a crucial cytokine for osteoclastic bone resorption in RA patients. PMID:10225978

  15. Presence of Cyclophilin A in Synovial Fluids of Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Billich, Andreas; Winkler, Gottfried; Aschauer, Heinrich; Rot, Antal; Peichl, Peter

    1997-01-01

    Cyclophilins have been suggested to act as leukocyte chemotactic factors produced in the course of inflammation. Therefore we looked for the presence of cyclophilins in the synovial fluids (SF) from patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Peptidyl prolyl cis–trans isomerase activity (PPIase) was measured in SF from knee punctures of 26 patients with RA and five patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA). PPIase was detected in SF from RA patients, but not in samples from OA patients. Enzyme activity was sensitive to inhibition by cyclosporin A (IC50 = 28–50 nM). Estimated concentrations of the SF-derived cyclophilin based on the enzyme activity were in the range of 11 to 705 nM. The presence of cyclophilin in the SF showed disease correlation; its concentration correlated with the number of cells in the SF (r   = 0.91, P <0.0001) and with the percentage of neutrophils in the cellular infiltrate and was higher in more acute cases of joint swelling. In immunoblots of partially purified preparations of SF from RA patients, an ∼18-kD protein band reacted with polyclonal antibodies that recognize cyclophilin A and B, but not with antibodies specific for cyclophilin B. Sequencing of this protein revealed identity of the NH2-terminal amino acids with those of human cyclophilin A. The finding is unexpected since cyclophilin B rather than A is generally regarded as the secreted isoform, the presence of cyclophilin A being confined to the cytoplasm. Our data support the hypothesis that cyclophilins may contribute to the pathogenesis of inflammatory diseases, possibly by acting as cytokines. This may offer a possible explanation of the effectiveness of cyclosporin A in RA, in addition to the known immunosuppressive effects of the drug. PMID:9120404

  16. Levels of immunoglobulin E (IgE) in paired examinations of serum and synovial fluid in rheumatoid arthritis and reactive synovitis of local origin.

    PubMed

    Hrncír, Z; Tichý, M; Sims, J; Salavec, M; Vavrina, J

    1977-12-15

    Levels of IgE were examined in pairs of serum and synovial fluid of the knee joint in a series of 78 patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), reactive synovitis during osteoarthrosis, and after injury. The IgE levels in synovial fluid were significantly lower (p less than 0.05) in all groups; in RA, they were in significant correlation (r=0.6208, p less than 0.0001) and in direct linear regression to the levels in serum. In 5 patients of the whole series, however, the IgE levels in serum were lower by one order of magnitude as compared with synovial fluid. Serum levels of IgE in RA were in significant correlation and in direct linear regression to the titres of rheumatoid factors according to the latex-fixation test (r=0.3688, p=0.0249) and the haemagglutination test with sheep red cells (r=0.3721, p=0.0235).

  17. Subclasses IgA1 and IgA2 in serum and synovial fluid in rheumatoid arthritis and reactive synovitis of local origin.

    PubMed Central

    Hrncír, Z; Tichý, M

    1978-01-01

    Subclasses IgA1 and IgA2 in serum were examined in 40 patients (28 cases of rheumatoid arthritis and 12 cases of reactive synovitis of local origin) and also in synovial fluid of the knee joint in 17 of these patients. The levels of IgA1 and IgA2 in serum were statistically significantly higher than in synovial fluid in both groups of patients (P = 0.0237--0.0018), but significant correlations between serum and synovial fluid for IgA1 (R = 0.8855, P = 0.0010) and for IgA2 (r = 0.7630, P = 0.0124) were found only in cases of rheumatoid arthritis. A percentage evaluation revealed a significant disproportion (P = 0.0028) in favour of IgA1 in synovial fluid during rheumatoid arthritis. The analysis of proportions of IgA subclasses and rheumatoid factor has shown no significant relationships. PMID:749696

  18. Procalcitonin levels in fresh serum and fresh synovial fluid for the differential diagnosis of knee septic arthritis from rheumatoid arthritis, osteoarthritis and gouty arthritis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chenggong; Zhong, DA; Liao, Qiande; Kong, Lingyu; Liu, Ansong; Xiao, Han

    2014-10-01

    Whether the levels of procalcitonin (PCT) in the serum and synovial fluid are effective indicators for distinguishing septic arthritis (SA) from non-infectious arthritis remains controversial. The present study aimed to evaluate whether PCT levels in fresh serum or fresh joint fluid may be used in the differential diagnosis of SA from rheumatoid arthritis (RA), osteoarthritis (OA) and gouty arthritis (GA). From January 2012 to June 2013, 23 patients with knee SA, 21 patients with RA, 40 patients with OA and 11 patients with GA were enrolled in the current study. The levels of PCT were measured within 24 h after specimen collection at room temperature. An enzyme-linked fluorescence assay (ELFA) was used to detect the levels of PCT in the serum and synovial fluid. The correlations between the levels of PCT in the serum and synovial fluid and the arthritic patient groups were determined by the Nemenyi test. Areas under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve were calculated to evaluate the accuracy of the correlations. The levels of PCT in the serum and joint fluid of the patients in the SA group were higher compared with those of the other groups (P<0.01) and there were no significant differences among the RA, OA and GA groups in these levels. A PCT level of <0.5 μg/l in the serum and synovial fluid had high specificity in the differential diagnosis of SA from RA, OA and GA. Synovial fluid PCT revealed significantly greater sensitivity than serum PCT. The accuracy of the differential diagnosis of SA by the serum levels of PCT was significantly lower than that by the synovial fluid levels of PCT. The levels of PCT in the serum and synovial fluid may be used as alternative laboratory indicators to distinguish between SA and the non-infectious types of arthritis; however, the PCT levels in fresh synovial fluid are more sensitive and accurate indicators than PCT levels in fresh serum.

  19. Isolation and analysis of complement activating aggregates from synovial fluid of patients with rheumatoid arthritis using monoclonal anti-C3d antibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Bedwell, A E; Elson, C J; Carter, S D; Dieppe, P A; Hutton, C W; Czudek, R

    1987-01-01

    The complement activating aggregates in synovial fluids of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) have been isolated using monoclonal IgM anti-C3d antibodies attached to solid phases, and the content of the material bound has been analysed. High levels of aggregated IgG bearing C3d were found in RA synovial fluids, and IgG was the major immunoglobulin bound from such synovial fluids by anti-C3d Sepharose. A strong correlation was shown between levels of aggregated IgG bearing C3d and complement activation, as judged by C3d levels. Significant (but less strong) relationships were also observed between C3d levels and both complement consuming and C1q binding activity. C3d levels and levels of aggregated IgG bearing C3d were both significantly associated with the numbers of polymorphonuclear leucocytes (PMNs) found in RA synovial fluids. From these results it is concluded that the aggregated immunoglobulins bearing C3d (particularly IgG) isolated from RA synovial fluids are responsible for activating complement and attracting PMNs into the joint space. Radioimmunoassay showed no correlation, however, between levels of aggregated IgG (or IgM) bearing C3d and rheumatoid factor (RF) activity bound by anti-C3d. In addition, the material bound by anti-C3d Sepharose from most synovial fluid polyethylene glycol precipitates did not contain either IgM or IgG RF. Thus both techniques show that the majority of complexes bearing C3d do not contain RF. As the complement fixing aggregates apparently contain only immunoglobulin and complement components the results raise the problem of how the aggregates are formed. It is suggested that RA IgG may remain aggregated after either antigen or antibody (RF) has dissociated from the complex. Images PMID:3492971

  20. [Diagnosis: synovial fluid analysis].

    PubMed

    Gallo Vallejo, Francisco Javier; Giner Ruiz, Vicente

    2014-01-01

    Synovial fluid analysis in rheumatological diseases allows a more accurate diagnosis in some entities, mainly infectious and microcrystalline arthritis. Examination of synovial fluid in patients with osteoarthritis is useful if a differential diagnosis will be performed with other processes and to distinguish between inflammatory and non-inflammatory forms. Joint aspiration is a diagnostic and sometimes therapeutic procedure that is available to primary care physicians.

  1. Plasma and Synovial Fluid TrxR Levels are Correlated With Disease Risk and Severity in Patients With Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Zhijun; Sun, Jing; Li, Haichang; Shao, Tiejuan; Wang, Dawei; Zheng, Qi; Wen, Chengping

    2016-01-01

    Abstract This study was designed and performed to establish the relationship between plasma and synovial fluid (SF) levels of thioredoxin reductase (TrxR) and disease activity in Chinese patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). This study consisted of a total of 224 patients diagnosed with RA, 224 age and sex-matched healthy controls, and 156 patient controls. The disease activity of RA patients was calculated as diseases activity score that include 28-joint counts (DAS 28), which was divided into low-diseases activity (LDA) and high-diseases activity (HDA) groups. Increased plasma TrxR was detected in patients with RA than healthy controls (P < 0.0001). With an area under the curve (AUC) of 0.874, plasma TrxR showed a evidently greater discriminatory ability than C-reactive protein (CRP; AUC, 0.815), antistreptolysin-O (ASO; AUC, 0.631), rheumatoid factor (RF, AUC, 0.793), and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR, AUC, 0.789) in diagnosing RA. RA patients with HDA had significantly elevated TrxR levels in plasma and SF than did those with LDA (P < 0.0001). With an AUC of 0.874, plasma TrxR levels as an indicator for screening of HDA showed a significantly greater discriminatory ability than CRP (AUC, 0.690), ASO (AUC, 0.597), RF (AUC, 0.657), and ESR (AUC, 0.603). Similarly, SF TrxR levels as an indicator for screening of HDA also showed a significantly greater discriminatory ability as compared with above biomarkers. TrxR levels in plasma and SF were positively correlated with the severity of RA. TrxR levels may therefore serve as a new biomarker in addition of the traditional biomarkers for assessing the risk and severity of RA. Further analysis of TrxR release machinery may give us a new understanding of pathogenesis of RA. PMID:26871773

  2. An investigation of the optical properties of cholesterol crystals in human synovial fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakharova, M. M.; Nasonova, V. A.; Konstantinova, A. F.; Chudakov, V. S.; Gaĭnutdinov, R. V.

    2009-05-01

    The synovial fluid of patients with rheumatoid diseases has been investigated. The presence of cholesterol crystals in the synovial fluid is revealed by polarization microscopy. A comparative analysis of the composition and properties of synovial fluid and the optical properties of cholesterol crystals is performed. It is established that the size, number, and growth of cholesterol crystals are interrelated to the synovial fluid composition. It is shown that rheumatoid diseases can be accompanied by the formation of cholesterol crystals in the synovial fluid from different joints and in rheumatic nodules. It is shown that all investigated crystals have a significant birefringence.

  3. CD4+ CD25+ T cells with the phenotypic and functional characteristics of regulatory T cells are enriched in the synovial fluid of patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Möttönen, M; Heikkinen, J; Mustonen, L; Isomäki, P; Luukkainen, R; Lassila, O

    2005-05-01

    CD4(+) CD25(+) regulatory T (T(reg)) cells play a critical role in the maintenance of peripheral tolerance and the prevention of autoimmunity. In the present study, we have explored the characteristics of CD4(+) CD25(+) T(reg) cells in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The frequency and phenotype of CD4(+) CD25(+) T cells in paired samples of synovial fluid (SF) and peripheral blood (PB) from patients with RA and PB from normal controls were analysed. An increased frequency of CD4+ cells T cells expressing CD25 was detected in SF compared to PB from patients with RA. No significant difference was observed in the numbers of CD4(+) CD25(+) T cells in PB from patients and controls. SF CD4(+) CD25(+) T cells expressed high levels of CTLA-4 (both surface and intracellular), GITR and OX40, as well as Foxp3 transcripts. Functionally, SF CD4(+) CD25(+) T cells were impaired in their proliferative responses and could suppress the proliferation of their CD4(+) CD25(-) counterparts. In conclusion, these data demonstrate that CD4(+) CD25(+) T(reg) cells, with the potential to regulate the function of effector T cells and antigen-presenting cells, accumulate in the synovium of patients with RA.

  4. Assay of Blood and Synovial Fluid of Patients With Rheumatoid Arthritis for Staphylococcus aureus Enterotoxin D: Absence of Bacteria But Presence of Its Toxin

    PubMed Central

    Ataee, Ramezan Ali; Kashefi, Reyhane; Alishiri, Gholam Hossein; Esmaieli, Davoud

    2015-01-01

    Background: Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is the most common chronic inflammatory disease. The staphylococcal superantigens are considered as the causative agent of RA disease. Objectives: This study aimed to assess the presence of staphylococcal enterotoxin D in synovial fluid and blood of patients with RA. Patients and Methods: A total of 120 blood and SF samples of patients with RA were studied. Bacterial culture, primer pairs design, polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) methods have been used to assess of the staphylococcal enterotoxin D. The data were analyzed through descriptive statistics. Results: During this study and after sequential subcultures, only 5 bacterial strains were isolated. The results of PCR showed the presence of staphylococcal enterotoxin D gene in almost 50% of SF and also in 48.4% of blood samples of patients with RA. Similarly, the ELISA method detected staphylococcal enterotoxin D in 36.16% of SF and in 33.33% of blood of patients with RA. Conclusions: The result of this study showed that a high percentage of patients with RA have shown staphylococcal enterotoxin D (superantigen D) or entD gene in SF and in blood. However, the origin of this superantigen was not clarified and no Staphylococcus aureus enterotoxin D producer was isolated. This finding indicates other role of this superantigen besides its intoxication. Therefore, staphylococcal enterotoxin D as a biomarker may provide a good model for the diagnosis and treatment of patients with RA. PMID:26870313

  5. Expression and functional role of 1F7 (CD26) antigen on peripheral blood and synovial fluid T cells in rheumatoid arthritis patients.

    PubMed

    Muscat, C; Bertotto, A; Agea, E; Bistoni, O; Ercolani, R; Tognellini, R; Spinozzi, F; Cesarotti, M; Gerli, R

    1994-11-01

    The expression and the functional role of the CD26 (1F7) T cell surface molecule, an ectoenzyme which seems to represent a functional collagen receptor of T lymphocytes and to have a role in T cell activation, were analysed in both peripheral blood (PB) and synovial fluid (SF) T cell samples from patients with active and inactive rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Although patients with active disease displayed higher percentages of PB CD26+ CD4+ T cells than inactive RA and control subjects, CD26 antigen expression on RA SF T lymphocytes was low. The anti-1F7 binding to the T cell surface, that led to CD26 antigen modulation and enhancement of both IL-2 synthesis by, and 3H-TdR incorporation of, anti-CD3- or anti-CD2-triggered PB T cells in RA and control subjects, was unable to affect significantly both expression and functional activity of RA SF T lymphocytes. Since the 1F7 antigen spontaneously reappeared on the surface of unstimulated SF T cells after 2-5 days of culturing, the low 1F7 antigen expression of anti-1F7 in the SF T cell compartment may be the result of in vivo molecule modulation exerted by the natural ligand in the joint, with important implications for T cell activation and lymphokine synthesis. PMID:7955530

  6. Optimized “In Vitro” Culture Conditions for Human Rheumatoid Arthritis Synovial Fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Lattuada, Donatella; Crotta, Katia; Truzzi, Marcello Claudio; Corradini, Costantino; Marelli, Ornella

    2014-01-01

    The composition of synovial fluid in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is complex and strongly influences the microenvironment of joints and it is an inseparable element of the disease. Currently, “in vitro” studies are performed on RA cells cultured in the presence of either recombinant proinflammatory cytokines-conditioned medium or medium alone. In this study, we evaluated the use of synovial fluid, derived from RA patients, as optimal culture condition to perform “in vitro” studies on RA synovial fibroblasts. We observed that synovial fluid is more effective in inducing cell proliferation with respect to TNF-alpha or culture medium alone. Spontaneous apoptosis in fibroblasts was also decreased in response to synovial fluid. The expression of proinflammatory cytokines in the presence of synovial fluid was significantly elevated with respect to cells cultured with TNF-alpha or medium, and the overall morphology of cells was also modified. In addition, modulation of intracellular calcium dynamics elicited in response to synovial fluid or TNF-alpha exposure is different and suggests a role for the purinergic signalling in the modulation of the effects. These results emphasize the importance of using RA synovial fluid in “in vitro” studies involving RA cells, in order to reproduce faithfully the physiopathological environmental characteristic of RA joints. PMID:25548436

  7. Rheumatoid synovial cells from intact joints. Morphology, growth, and polykaryocytosis.

    PubMed

    Clarris, B J; Fraser, J R; Moran, C J; Muirden, K D

    1977-08-01

    Synovial cell lines were isolated by instillation of trypsin or chymotrypsin into intact knee joints of patients with persistent rheumatoid effusions resistant to conventional therapy. Morphology and growth in the primary phase were compared with rheumatoid cells isolated from excised synovium and nonrheumatoid synovial cells obtained from intact joints of cadavers or amputated limbs. Cell populations from all sources included varying proportions of macrophage-like and fibroblast-like cells, with only 1-3% multinucleated cells. In medium supplemented with calf serum alone, rheumatoid cells from intact joints showed negligible changes in morphology. However, in the presence of nonrheumatoid, autologous rheumatoid or homologous rheumatoid serum a rapid increase occurred in size of the macrophage-like cells and numbers of polykaryocytes, including some giant syncytial cells. These effects were directly proportional to serum concentration and were identical in fresh or heat-inactivated serum. In most of these rheumatoid cell lines no multiplication occurred, regardless of serum type or concentration. In rheumatoid synovial cells from excised synovium, human serum induced both polykaryocytosis and rapid growth of fibroblasts. Nonrheumatoid synovial cells grew rapidly but few polykaryocytes developed, mostly with less than 6 nuclei. Evidence of viral infection in rheumatoid synovial cells was sought by electron microscopy after stimulation of polykaryocytosis by human serum. In one of the cultures many cells were found with intranuclear particles possessing characteristics of the adenovirus group. PMID:901027

  8. The levels of soluble granzyme A and B are elevated in plasma and synovial fluid of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA).

    PubMed

    Tak, P P; Spaeny-Dekking, L; Kraan, M C; Breedveld, F C; Froelich, C J; Hack, C E

    1999-05-01

    Cytotoxic cells possess specialized granules which contain perforin and a group of serine proteinases termed granzymes. Granzyme-positive cells have been identified in synovial fluid and tissue of patients with RA, where they may play an important role as mediators of granule-mediated apoptosis, extracellular proteolysis, and cytokine induction. The aim here was to define further the involvement of cytotoxic cells in RA. Plasma and synovial fluid samples from the knee joint were obtained from 31 RA patients. The disease controls included 20 osteoarthritis (OA) patients and 10 reactive arthritis (ReA) patients. A recently developed capture ELISA was used to detect soluble granzymes A and B in all patients. Compared with OA and ReA disease controls, markedly increased levels of soluble granzymes A and B were detected in both plasma and synovial fluid of RA patients (P < 0.00001). When values for soluble granzymes A and B in plasma and synovial fluid were used simultaneously as independent variables, logistic regression analysis indicated that a diagnosis of RA could be predicted correctly in 84% of the RA patients and a diagnosis of non-RA in 90% of the controls. The markedly elevated levels of soluble granzymes A and B in plasma and synovial fluid of RA patients strongly suggest that cytotoxic cells are active participants in the pathogenesis of RA. Moreover, the results suggest that measurement of granzymes may assist the laboratory evaluation of patients with arthritis. Larger studies in patients with early disease may clarify the role of this test system in differential diagnosis.

  9. Characterization of the porcine synovial fluid proteome and a comparison to the plasma proteome

    PubMed Central

    Bennike, Tue Bjerg; Barnaby, Omar; Steen, Hanno; Stensballe, Allan

    2015-01-01

    Synovial fluid is present in all joint cavities, and protects the articular cartilage surfaces in large by lubricating the joint, thus reducing friction. Several studies have described changes in the protein composition of synovial fluid in patients with joint disease. However, the protein concentration, content, and synovial fluid volume change dramatically during active joint diseases and inflammation, and the proteome composition of healthy synovial fluid is incompletely characterized. We performed a normative proteomics analysis of porcine synovial fluid, and report data from optimizing proteomic methods to investigate the proteome of healthy porcine synovial fluid (Bennike et al., 2014 [1]). We included an evaluation of different proteolytic sample preparation techniques, and an analysis of posttranslational modifications with a focus on glycosylation. We used pig (Sus Scrofa) as a model organism, as the porcine immune system is highly similar to human and the pig genome is sequenced. Furthermore, porcine model systems are commonly used large animal models to study several human diseases. In addition, we analyzed the proteome of human plasma, and compared the proteomes to the obtained porcine synovial fluid proteome. The proteome of the two body fluids were found highly similar, underlining the detected plasma derived nature of many synovial fluid components. The healthy porcine synovial fluid proteomics data, human rheumatoid arthritis synovial fluid proteomics data used in the method optimization, human plasma proteomics data, and search results, have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange Consortium via the PRIDE partner repository with the dataset identifier PXD000935. PMID:26543887

  10. Influence of exogenous leptin on redox homeostasis in neutrophils and lymphocytes cultured in synovial fluid isolated from patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Gajewska, Joanna; Rzodkiewicz, Przemysław; Wojtecka-Łukasik, Elżbieta

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Leptin is an adipose cells derived hormone that regulates energy homeostasis within the body. Energy metabolism of immune cells influences their activity within numerous pathological states, but the effect of leptin on these cells in unclear. On the one hand, it was observed that leptin induces neutrophils chemotaxis and modulates phagocytosis. On the other hand, neutrophils exposed to leptin did not display detectable Ca2+ ions mobilization or β2-integrin upregulation. In this study, we investigated the effect of leptin on the redox homeostasis in lymphocytes and neutrophils. Material and methods Neutrophils and lymphocytes were isolated by density-gradient centrifugation of blood from healthy volunteers. Cells were cultured with or without leptin (100 ng/ml for lymphocytes and 500 ng/ml for neutrophils) or with or without synovial fluid (85%) for 0–72 h. Culture media were not changed during incubation. Cells were homogenized and homogenate was frozen until laboratory measurements. Redox homeostasis was assessed by the reduced glutathione (GSH) vs. oxidized glutathione (GSSG) ratio and membrane lipid peroxidation evaluation. Results Lymphocytes cultured with leptin and synovial fluid showed a significant increase of the GSSG level. The GSSG/GSH ratio increased by 184 ±37%. In neutrophils incubated in a similar environment, the GSSG/GSH ratio increased by just 21 ±7%, and the effect was observed irrespectively of whether they were exposed to leptin or synovial fluid or both together. Neither leptin nor synovial fluid influenced lipid peroxidation in neutrophils, but in lymphocytes leptin intensified lipid peroxidation. Conclusions Leptin altered the lymphocytes, but not neutrophils redox state. Because firstly neutrophils are anaerobic cells and have just a few mitochondria and secondly lymphocytes have typical aerobic metabolism, the divergence of our data supports the hypothesis that leptin induces oxidative stress by modulation of mitochondria

  11. Adiponectin stimulates IL-8 production by rheumatoid synovial fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Kitahara, Kanako; Kusunoki, Natsuko; Kakiuchi, Terutaka; Suguro, Toru; Kawai, Shinichi

    2009-01-09

    The adipokines are linked not only to metabolic regulation, but also to immune responses. Adiponectin, but not leptin or resistin induced interleukin-8 production from rheumatoid synovial fibroblasts (RSF). The culture supernatant of RSF treated with adiponectin induced chemotaxis, although adiponectin itself had no such effect. Addition of antibody against adiponectin, and inhibition of adiponectin receptor gene decreased adiponectin-induced IL-8 production. Nuclear translocation of nuclear factor-kappa B was increased by adiponectin. The induction of interleukin-8 was inhibited by mitogen-activated protein kinase inhibitors. These findings suggest that adiponectin contributes to the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis.

  12. Synovial fluid of patients with rheumatoid arthritis induces α-smooth muscle actin in human adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells through a TGF-β1-dependent mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Song, Hae Young; Kim, Min Young; Kim, Kyung Hye; Lee, Il Hwan; Shin, Sang Hun; Lee, Jung Sub

    2010-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic, inflammatory autoimmune disorder that causes the immune system to attack the joints. Transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) is a secreted protein that promotes differentiation of synovial fibroblasts to α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA)-positive myofibroblasts to repair the damaged joints. Synovial fluid from patients with RA (RA-SF) induced expression of α-SMA in human adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hASCs). RA-SF-induced α-SMA expression was abrogated by immunodepletion of TGF-β1 from RA-SF with anti-TGF-β1 antibody. Furthermore, pretreatment of hASCs with the TGF-β type I receptor inhibitor SB431542 or lentiviral small hairpin RNA-mediated silencing of TGF-β type I receptor expression in hASCs blocked RA-SF-induced α-SMA expression. Small interfering RNA-mediated silencing of Smad2 or adenoviral overexpression of Smad7 (an inhibitory Smad isoform) completely inhibited RA-SF-stimulated α-SMA expression. These results suggest that TGF-β1 plays a pivotal role in RA-SF-induced differentiation of hASCs to α-SMA-positive cells. PMID:20628268

  13. Hypoxia, mitochondrial dysfunction and synovial invasiveness in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Fearon, Ursula; Canavan, Mary; Biniecka, Monika; Veale, Douglas J

    2016-07-01

    Synovial proliferation, neovascularization and leukocyte extravasation transform the normally acellular synovium into an invasive tumour-like 'pannus'. The highly dysregulated architecture of the microvasculature creates a poor oxygen supply to the synovium, which, along with the increased metabolic turnover of the expanding synovial pannus, creates a hypoxic microenvironment. Abnormal cellular metabolism and mitochondrial dysfunction thus ensue and, in turn, through the increased production of reactive oxygen species, actively induce inflammation. When exposed to hypoxia in the inflamed joint, immune-inflammatory cells show adaptive survival reactions by activating key proinflammatory signalling pathways, including those mediated by hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α), nuclear factor κB (NF-κB), Janus kinase-signal transducer and activator of transcription (JAK-STAT) and Notch, which contribute to synovial invasiveness. The reprogramming of hypoxia-mediated pathways in synovial cells, such as fibroblasts, dendritic cells, macrophages and T cells, is implicated in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis and other inflammatory conditions, and might therefore provide an opportunity for therapeutic intervention. PMID:27225300

  14. Identification of hydroxyapatite crystals in synovial fluid.

    PubMed

    Halverson, P B; McCarty, D J

    1979-04-01

    A semiquantitative technique employing (14C) ethane-1-hydroxy 1, -1-diphosphonate (EHDP) binding has been used to detect crystals, presumably hydroxyapatite, in human synovial fluid samples which were handled to prevent the formation of artifactual mineral phase. Binding material was found in 29% of non-inflammatory and in none of inflammatory joint fluids. Nuclide binding material was strongly correlated with the presence of CPPD crystals and with radiographic evidence of cartilaginous degeneration. PMID:106859

  15. Aztreonam penetration into synovial fluid and bone.

    PubMed Central

    MacLeod, C M; Bartley, E A; Galante, J O; Friedhoff, L T; Dhruv, R

    1986-01-01

    Eighteen patients with uncomplicated degenerative joint disease requiring joint replacement (hip or knee) were given a single 2-g intravenous dose of aztreonam over a 5-min period preoperatively. The mean concentration in synovial fluid of 83.0 +/- 9.2 micrograms/ml averaged 0.99 times the concomitant levels in serum. The mean concentration in cancellous bone of 16.0 +/- 4.3 micrograms/g averaged 0.20 times the concomitant levels in serum. PMID:3707115

  16. Studies of the third component of complement in synovial fluid from arthritic patients. II. Conversion and its relation to total complement

    PubMed Central

    Hedberg, H.; Lundh, B.; Laurell, Anna-Brita

    1970-01-01

    Plasma and synovial fluid from arthritic patients were studied with antigen–antibody crossed electrophoresis for the conversion of C3. When present, C3 conversion was estimated planimetrically. The material included patients with rheumatoid arthritis and systemic lupus erythematosus as well as patients with non-rheumatoid arthritis. C3 conversion was not found in plasma from any of the patients studied. In non-rheumatoid synovial fluids there was no conversion in five and less than 10% in four of the samples. In rheumatoid synovial fluids C3 conversion proved significantly (P<0·01) more pronounced, the degree of conversion exceeding 10% in fourteen out of twenty-three cases. An inverse relationship was found in synovial fluid between the degree of C3 conversion on the one hand, and the total complement activity or the C3 concentration on the other. ImagesFig. 1 PMID:5477926

  17. Free radical oxidation products in plasma and synovial fluid of horses with synovial inflammation.

    PubMed

    Auer, D E; Ng, J C; Seawright, A A

    1993-02-01

    Free radical oxidation products, namely conjugated dienes, ultraviolet fluorescence (excitation 325 nm, emission 395 nm) and visible fluorescence (excitation 360 nm, emission 460 nm) were measured in equine synovial fluid exposed to free radicals in vitro and in the plasma and synovial fluids of horses with synovial effusions. The synovial effusions were induced by intra-articularly administered carrageenin (0.3 ml, 1%), which rarely resulted in clinical lameness. The free radicals were generated in vitro by mixtures of iron and ethylene diamine tetra acetate (Fe/EDTA) or mixtures of hypoxanthine and xanthine oxidase (HX/XO). The conjugated diene concentrations and intensity of ultraviolet fluorescence were negligible in plasma and synovial fluid specimens. No increase resulted from incubation of synovial fluids with either a free radical generating system or as a result of the induced inflammation. The intensity of visible fluorescence did not increase in specimens incubated with Fe/EDTA. However, the intensity of visible fluorescence increased in specimens incubated with HX/XO, in synovial effusions induced by carrageenin, in plasma and in synovial fluids aspirated from saline injected controls. The results indicate that the intensity of visible fluorescence of equine synovial fluid increases after exposure to free radicals and during synovitis in the horse, suggesting a possible role for free radicals in the pathogenesis of equine inflammatory joint disease.

  18. Identification of the advanced glycation end products N -carboxymethyllysine in the synovial tissue of patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Drinda, S; Franke, S; Canet, C; Petrow, P; Brauer, R; Huttich, C; Stein, G; Hein, G

    2002-01-01

    Background: Generation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) is an inevitable process in vivo and can be accelerated under pathological conditions such as oxidative stress. In serum and synovial fluid of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) raised AGE levels have been found. Objective: To determine the presence of N -carboxymethyllysine (CML; marker of oxidative stress) in RA synovial tissue by immunohistology. Methods: Frozen synovial tissue samples from 10 patients with RA and eight controls (four patients without joint disease and four patients with osteoarthritis (OA)) were treated with rabbit-anti-CML-IgG and goat-antirabbit-IgG. Immunostaining was visualised by streptavidine-alkaline phosphatase (chromogen fuchsin). Cell differentiation was performed with antibodies against CD68, CD45RO, and CD20. Results: CML was detected in the synovial lining, sublining, and endothelium in 10/10 RA and 4/4 OA synovial specimens. In RA some macrophages (CD68+) and T cells (CD45RO+) showed positive immunostaining for CML, whereas B cells were negative. Staining in OA synovial sublining was weak compared with RA. Conclusions: CML was detected for the first time in RA and OA synovial tissue. Different patterns of immunostaining in RA and OA and the presence of CML on macrophages and T cells, suggest a role for CML in the pathogenesis of RA. This might be due to presentation of new epitopes which can maintain or even trigger an autoimmune response. PMID:12006318

  19. [LE cells in synovial fluid: prevalence and diagnostic usefulness in rheumatic diseases].

    PubMed

    Puszczewicz, Mariusz; Białkowska-Puszczewicz, Grazyna

    2010-01-01

    This study was undertaken to determine the prevalence of LE cells in synovial fluid and their importance for the diagnosis of rheumatic disease. Synovial fluid was obtained from 631 patients: 31 with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), 337 with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), 4 with Still's disease, 9 with systemic scleroderma (SS), 27 with the overlap syndrome (RA/SLE), 132 with ankylosing spondylitis (AS), 57 with Reiter's syndrome, and 34 with psoriatic arthritis (PA). The fluid was centrifuged, precipitate smears were done and were May-Grünwald-Giemsa stained for cytologic assessment. The supernatant was collected for antinuclear antibody (ANA) testing. Physicochemical and serologic properties of the synovial fluid were routinely determined. All synovial fluids demonstrated signs of inflammation. The presence of LE cells was ascertained in five patients with SLE and nine patients with the overlap syndrome. In these cases, LE cells were accompanied by ANA. In addition, hematoxylin bodies were revealed in SLE patients. LE cells were observed in 2.6% of patients with RA but were not accompanied by ANA. Patients with SS, Still's disease, AS, Reiter's syndrome, and PA tested negative for LE cells. It appears from these results that LE cells are rarely present in the synovial fluid of patients with rheumatic diseases. In contrast, they occur in more than 40% of patients with the overlap syndrome and may thus be regarded as important for the diagnosis of this condition. PMID:21365954

  20. The Rheological Properties of the Biopolymers in Synovial Fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krause, Wendy E.; Klossner, Rebecca R.; Wetsch, Julie; Oates, Katherine M. N.; Colby, Ralph H.

    2005-03-01

    The polyelectrolyte hyaluronic acid (HA, hyaluronan), its interactions with anti-inflammatory drugs and other biopolymers, and its role in synovial fluid are being studied. We are investigating the rheological properties of sodium hyaluronate (NaHA) solutions and an experimental model of synovial fluid (comprised of NaHA, and the plasma proteins albumin and γ-globulins). Steady shear measurements on bovine synovial fluid and the synovial fluid model indicate that the fluids are highly viscoeleastic and rheopectic (stress increases with time under steady shear). In addition, the influence of anti-inflammatory agents on these solutions is being explored. Initial results indicate that D-penicillamine and hydroxychloroquine affect the rheology of the synovial fluid model and its components. The potential implications of these results will be discussed.

  1. Human epidermal growth factor for the stratification of synovial lining layer and neovascularisation in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed Central

    Shiozawa, S; Shiozawa, K; Tanaka, Y; Morimoto, I; Uchihashi, M; Fujita, T; Hirohata, K; Hirata, Y; Imura, S

    1989-01-01

    Immunohistochemical study showed selective localisation of human epidermal growth factor (hEGF) to the synovial lining layer. Although the synovial lining layer of the rheumatoid, osteoarthritic, and traumatic joints was hEGF positive, hEGF staining was especially dense at the rheumatoid synovial lining layer; the staining increasing linearly according to the degree of stratification of the lining layer (r = 1). Human epidermal growth factor was ultrastructurally localised to cytoplasm, especially to rough endoplasmic reticulum, of the synovial lining fibroblast-like (type B) cell. Only the cell surface of macrophage-like (type A) cells was hEGF positive. When different histological variables were compared with each other a positive correlation was found between hEGF staining of the synovial lining layer and the degree of neovascularisation of rheumatoid synovium (r = 0.72). Although some lymphocytes were weakly hEGF positive, neovascularisation did not correlate with the extent of lymphocyte infiltration or of hEGF staining of lymphocytes. Lymphocyte infiltration or hEGF staining of lymphocytes did not correlate with hEGF staining of the synovial lining layer, whereas the lymphocyte infiltration correlated positively with the extent of perivascular accumulation of lymphocytes (r = 0.89). These findings suggest that (a) hEGF is synthesised by and secreted through endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi apparatus from the synovial lining type B cell; (b) hEGF is at least partially responsible for the pathogenesis of stratification of the rheumatoid synovial lining layer, and perhaps of neovascularisation of the rheumatoid synovium, whereas it is not responsible for lymphocyte accumulation to the rheumatoid synovium. Images PMID:2479344

  2. [Cyclic nucleotides and enzymes of the synovial fluid in various rheumatic diseases].

    PubMed

    Buneaux, J J; Djiane, F; Gounelle, J C; Galmiche, P

    1980-01-01

    The authors measured the activities of four enzymes (L.D.H., acid phosphatase, B glucuronidase, and lysozyme) and the contents of AMPc and GMPc in the synovial fluid in 35 patients with rheumatic disease. In those with various forms of inflammatory rheumatism, they found negative correlation between AMPc and the enzymes, whereas in rheumatoid arthritis they observed a positive correlation between GMPc and these enzymes. PMID:6968447

  3. Imatinib mesylate inhibits platelet derived growth factor stimulated proliferation of rheumatoid synovial fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Sandler, Charlotta; Joutsiniemi, Saima; Lindstedt, Ken A.; Juutilainen, Timo; Kovanen, Petri T.; Eklund, Kari K. . E-mail: kari.eklund@hus.fi

    2006-08-18

    Synovial fibroblast is the key cell type in the growth of the pathological synovial tissue in arthritis. Here, we show that platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) is a potent mitogen for synovial fibroblasts isolated from patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Inhibition of PDGF-receptor signalling by imatinib mesylate (1 {mu}M) completely abrogated the PDGF-stimulated proliferation and inhibited approximately 70% of serum-stimulated proliferation of synovial fibroblasts. Similar extent of inhibition was observed when PDGF was neutralized with anti-PDGF antibodies, suggesting that imatinib mesylate does not inhibit pathways other than those mediated by PDGF-receptors. No signs of apoptosis were detected in synovial fibroblasts cultured in the presence of imatinib. These results suggest that imatinib mesylate specifically inhibits PDGF-stimulated proliferation of synovial fibroblasts, and that inhibition of PDGF-receptors could represent a feasible target for novel antirheumatic therapies.

  4. Successful induction of severe destructive arthritis by the transfer of in vitro-activated synovial fluid T cells from patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mice.

    PubMed

    Sakata, A; Sakata, K; Ping, H; Ohmura, T; Tsukano, M; Kakimoto, K

    1996-05-01

    In order to investigate the role of pathogenic T cells in RA, the establishment of an RA model using patients' T cells is thought to be essential. In this study, multiple and severe destructive arthritis was established by transferring in vitro-stimulated synovial fluid T (SFT) cells from patients with RA through simultaneous injection into knee joint and peritoneal cavity of SCID mice without causing xenogeneic graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). Neither the transfer of unstimulated SFT cells nor sole i.p. injection was sufficient to induce severe arthritis. Interestingly, in contrast with SFT cells, in vitro-activated peripheral blood lymphocytes from RA patients failed to trigger such arthritis, suggesting that pathogenic T cells might be concentrated in synovial fluid of RA patients. This, the first severe arthritis model mimicking RA induced by RA patients' T cells, is expected to provide important information about RA pathogenesis and a possible therapeutic approach.

  5. [Azlocillin--synovial fluid levels after intravenous doses].

    PubMed

    Härle, A; Ritzerfeld, W; Wiynck, G; Knoche, U

    1983-01-01

    The corresponding levels of azlocillin in serum and in synovial fluid in the knee-joint were investigated in patients who had undergone aseptic surgery of the lower limbs. The mean synovial fluid concentrations for azlocillin were determined on the basis of 30 samples. Clinically relevant azlocillin levels of approximately 40 mu g/ml were recorded in synovial fluid 10 minutes after start of a short infusion of 5 gm. These increased until about 90 minutes after commencement of antibiotic administration when the maximum level was attained. Subsequently synovial fluid levels decreased slowly and approximately 170 minutes after commencement of the short infusion the mean for serum and synovial concentrations corresponded. The results confirm that with an i.v. infusion of 5 g azlocillin levels can be attained for 3 hours in the synovial fluid that are above the break-point for this antibiotic of 64 mu g/ml. However, despite these good pharmacokinetic data it should be remembered that experience has shown that surgical reintervention is often necessary in addition in joint infections to achieve ultimate cure. PMID:6405553

  6. Growth factors with heparin binding affinity in human synovial fluid

    SciTech Connect

    Hamerman, D.; Taylor, S.; Kirschenbaum, I.; Klagsbrun, M.; Raines, E.W.; Ross, R.; Thomas, K.A.

    1987-12-01

    Synovial effusions were obtained from the knees of 15 subjects with joint trauma, menisceal or ligamentous injury, or osteoarthritis. Heparin-Sepharose affinity chromatography of these synovial fluids revealed, in general, three major peaks of mitogenic activity as measured by incorporation of /sup 3/H-thymidine into 3T3 cells. Gradient elution patterns showed activities at 0.5M NaCl, which is characteristic of platelet derived growth factor, and at 1.1 M NaCl and 1.6M NaCl, indicative of acidic and basic fibroblast growth factors, respectively. The identities of these mitogenic fractions were confirmed by specific immunologic and receptor-binding assays. The presence of platelet derived, acidic and basic fibroblast growth factors in the synovial fluid may contribute to wound healing in the arthritic joint.

  7. Reduced expression of the complement receptor type 2 (CR2, CD21) by synovial fluid B and T lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Illges, H; Braun, M; Peter, H H; Melchers, I

    2000-01-01

    The expression of CR2 (CD21) by synovial B and T lymphocytes of patients suffering from various forms of arthritis was analysed with cytofluorometry and with reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. CR2 (CD21) cell surface protein was detected in normal quantities on peripheral B cells, but was almost absent on synovial B lymphocytes of the same patients. This reduction was most severe in patients with rheumatoid arthritis, but also observed in all other cases. CR2 (CD21) did not reappear after in vitro culture. CR2 (CD21) mRNA was also strongly reduced in synovial B and T lymphocytes. Synovial fluid B lymphocytes were larger than peripheral blood B lymphocytes, while T cells from the same patients showed no size differences. We conclude that synovial fluid B lymphocytes have undergone an irreversible step towards terminal differentiation. The presence or absence of CR2 (CD21) mRNA in peripheral versus synovial T cells indicates that CR2 (CD21) is also differentially expressed by T lymphocytes. PMID:11091285

  8. A Normative Study of the Synovial Fluid Proteome from Healthy Porcine Knee Joints

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Synovial fluid in an articulating joint contains proteins derived from the blood plasma and proteins that are produced by cells within the joint tissues, such as synovium, cartilage, ligament, and meniscus. The proteome composition of healthy synovial fluid and the cellular origins of many synovial fluid components are not fully understood. Here, we present a normative proteomics study using porcine synovial fluid. Using our optimized method, we identified 267 proteins with high confidence in healthy synovial fluid. We also evaluated mRNA expression data from tissues that can contribute to the synovial fluid proteome, including synovium, cartilage, blood, and liver, to better estimate the relative contributions from these sources to specific synovial fluid components. We identified 113 proteins in healthy synovial fluid that appear to be primarily derived from plasma transudates, 37 proteins primarily derived from synovium, and 11 proteins primarily derived from cartilage. Finally, we compared the identified synovial fluid proteome to the proteome of human plasma, and we found that the two body fluids share many similarities, underlining the detected plasma derived nature of many synovial fluid components. Knowing the synovial fluid proteome of a healthy joint will help to identify mechanisms that cause joint disease and pathways involved in disease progression. PMID:25160569

  9. Osteoarthritis screening using Raman spectroscopy of dried human synovial fluid drops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esmonde-White, Karen A.; Mandair, Gurjit S.; Esmonde-White, Francis W. L.; Raaii, Farhang; Roessler, Blake J.; Morris, Michael D.

    2009-02-01

    We describe the use of Raman spectroscopy to investigate synovial fluid drops deposited onto fused silica microscope slides. This spectral information can be used to identify chemical changes in synovial fluid associated with osteoarthritis (OA) damage to knee joints. The chemical composition of synovial fluid is predominately proteins (enzymes, cytokines, or collagen fragments), glycosaminoglycans, and a mixture of minor components such as inorganic phosphate crystals. During osteoarthritis, the chemical, viscoelastic and biological properties of synovial fluid are altered. A pilot study was conducted to determine if Raman spectra of synovial fluid correlated with radiological scoring of knee joint damage. After informed consent, synovial fluid was drawn and x-rays were collected from the knee joints of 40 patients. Raman spectra and microscope images were obtained from the dried synovial fluid drops using a Raman microprobe and indicate a coarse separation of synovial fluid components. Individual protein signatures could not be identified; Raman spectra were useful as a general marker of overall protein content and secondary structure. Band intensity ratios used to describe protein and glycosaminoglycan structure were used in synovial fluid spectra. Band intensity ratios of Raman spectra indicate that there is less ordered protein secondary structure in synovial fluid from the damage group. Combination of drop deposition with Raman spectroscopy is a powerful approach to examining synovial fluid for the purposes of assessing osteoarthritis damage.

  10. Boundary lubricating ability of synovial fluid in degenerative joint disease.

    PubMed

    Davis, W H; Lee, S L; Sokoloff, L

    1978-01-01

    The boundary lubricating ability of eleven synovial fluids was measured in a miniaturized latex--glass test system. The specimens were obtained at necropsy from knees in which the degree of degenerative joint disease varied from none to very severe. The lubricating ability of the fluid was independent of the viscosity over a wide range of shear rates. It was not diminished even in advanced lesions. In two additional fluids, the mucin clot was poor; the lubricating ability of one of these was compromised. Thus, although degenerative joint disease, during its quiescent stages, is not associated with defective synovial lubrication, the possibility that transient defects might lead to cartilage wear during life has not been excluded. The measurements are believed to be valid indicators of boundary lubricating ability under physiological conditions despite the fact that the test surfaces were not cartilaginous and the loading was relatively low (up to 47 pounds per square inch).

  11. Pim-2/mTORC1 Pathway Shapes Inflammatory Capacity in Rheumatoid Arthritis Synovial Cells Exposed to Lipid Peroxidations.

    PubMed

    Yin, Geng; Li, Yan; Yang, Min; Cen, Xiao-min; Xie, Qi-bing

    2015-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is a systemic autoimmune disease characterized by chronic inflammation of multiple joints, with disruption of joint cartilage. The proliferation of synovial fibroblasts in response to multiple inflammation factors is central to the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis. Our previous studies showed that 4-HNE may induce synovial intrinsic inflammations by activating NF-κB pathways and lead to cell apoptosis. However, the molecular mechanisms of how synovial NF-κB activation is modulated are not fully understood. Here, the present findings demonstrated that 4-HNE may induce synovial intrinsic inflammations by mTORC1 inactivation. While ectopic activation of mTORC1 pathway by the overexpression of Pim-2 may disrupt the initiation of inflammatory reactions and maintain synovial homeostasis, our findings will help to uncover novel signaling pathways between inflammations and oxidative stress in rheumatoid arthritis development and imply that Pim-2/mTORC1 pathway may be critical for the initiation of inflammatory reactions in human rheumatoid arthritis synovial cells. PMID:26064888

  12. Tribological and Rheological Properties of a Synovial Fluid Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klossner, Rebecca; Liang, Jing; Krause, Wendy

    2010-03-01

    Hyaluronic acid (HA) and the plasma proteins, albumin and globulins, are the most abundant macromolecules in synovial fluid, the fluid that lubricates freely moving joints. In previous studies, bovine synovial fluid, a synovial fluid model (SFM) and albumin in phosphate buffered saline (PBS) were observed to be rheopectic---viscosity increases over time under constant shear. Additionally, steady shear experiments have a strong shear history dependence in protein-containing solutions, whereas samples of HA in PBS behaved as a ``typical'' polyelectrolyte. The observed rheopexy and shear history dependence are indicative of structure building in solution, which is most likely caused by protein aggregation. The tribology of the SFM was also investigated using nanoindenter-based scratch tests. The coefficient of frictions (μ) between the diamond nanoindenter tip and a polyethylene surface was measured in the presence of the SFM and solutions with varied protein and HA concentrations. The lowest μ is observed in the SFM, which most closely mimics a healthy joint. Finally, an anti-inflammatory drug, hydroxychloroquine, was shown to inhibit protein interactions in the SFM in rheological studies, and thus the tribological response was examined. We hypothesize that the rheopectic behavior is important in lubrication regimes and therefore, the rheological and tribological properties of these solutions will be correlated.

  13. A rapid screen for four corticosteroids in equine synovial fluid.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Karan; Ebel, Joseph G; Bischoff, Karyn

    2014-06-01

    Most antidoping method development in the equine industry has been for plasma and urine, though there has been recent interest in the analysis of synovial fluid for evidence of doping by intra-articular corticosteroid injection. Published methods for corticosteroid analysis in synovial fluid are primarily singleplex methods, do not screen for all corticosteroids of interest and are not adequately sensitive. The purpose of this study is to develop a rapid and sensitive liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS-MS) screening method for the detection of four of the most common intra-articularly administered corticosteroids--betamethasone, methylprednisolone, methylprednisolone acetate and triamcinolone acetonide. Sample preparation consisted of protein precipitation followed by a basified liquid-liquid extraction. LC-MS-MS experiments consisted of a six-min isocratic separation using a Phenomenex Polar-RP stationary phase and a mobile phase consisting of 35% acetonitrile, 5 mM ammonium acetate and 0.1% formic acid in nanopure water. The detection system used was a triple quadrupole mass analyzer with thermospray ionization, and compounds were identified using selective reaction monitoring. The method was validated to the ISO/IEC 17025 standard, and real synovial fluid samples were analyzed to demonstrate the application of the method in an antidoping context. The method was highly selective for the four corticosteroids with limits of detection of 1-3 ng/mL. The extraction efficiency was 50-101%, and the matrix effects were 14-31%. These results indicate that the method is a rapid and sensitive screen for the four corticosteroids in equine synovial fluid, fit for purpose for equine antidoping assays. PMID:24713534

  14. Identification of candidate synovial membrane biomarkers after Achyranthes aspera treatment for rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Wen; Lu, Xianghong; Fu, Zhirong; Zhang, Lin; Li, Ximin; Xu, Xiaobao; Ren, Yina; Lu, Yongzhuang; Fu, Hongwei; Tian, Jingkui

    2016-03-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a systemic autoimmune disease whose main symptom is a heightened inflammatory response in synovial tissues. To verify the anti-arthritic activities of Achyranthes aspera and its possible therapy-related factors on the pathogenesis of RA, the saponins in A. aspera root were isolated and identified to treat the collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) rats. Phytochemical analysis isolated and identified methyl caffeate, 25-S-inokosterone, 25-S-inokosterone β-D-glucopyranosyl 3-(O-β-D-glucopyranosyloxy)-oleanolate, and β-D-glucopyranosyl 3-(O-β-D-galactopyranosyl (1→2)(O-β-D-glucopyranosyloxy)-oleanolate as main compounds in the root of A. aspera. Proteomics was performed to determine the differentially expressed proteins in either inflamed or drug-treated synovium of CIA rats. Treatment resulted in dramatically decreased paw swelling, proliferation of inflammatory cells, and bone degradation. Fibrinogen, procollagen, protein disulfide-isomerase A3, and apolipoprotein A-I were all increased in inflamed synovial tissues and were found to decrease when administered drug therapy. Furthermore, Alpha-1-antiproteinase and manganese superoxide dismutase were both increased in drug-treated synovial tissues. The inhibition of RA progression shows that A. aspera is a promising candidate for future treatment of human arthritis. Importantly, the total saponins found within A. aspera are the active component. Finally, autoantigens such as fibrinogen and collagen could act as inducers of RA due to their aggravation of inflammation. Given this, it is possible that the vimentin and PDIA3 could be the candidate biomarkers specific to Achyranthes saponin therapy for rheumatoid arthritis in synovial membrane.

  15. Relations among synovial membrane histopathologic findings, synovial fluid cytologic findings, and bacterial culture results in horses with suspected infectious arthritis: 64 cases (1979-1987).

    PubMed

    Madison, J B; Sommer, M; Spencer, P A

    1991-05-01

    A retrospective evaluation of 64 cases of suspected infectious arthritis in horses was undertaken to determine the relations among histopathologic findings in synovial membrane specimens, cytologic findings in synovial fluid samples, and bacterial culture results. Positive cultures were obtained from 55% of the joints, and 18 different bacterial organisms were cultured. Culturing of synovial fluid yielded bacterial growth more often than did culturing of synovial membrane. Histologic evaluation (H&E and Gram stain) of synovial membrane specimens provided little information to help distinguish infected from culture-negative joints. We do not advocate the routine use of closed synovial biopsy in suspected cases of equine septic arthritis.

  16. The significance of interleukin-6 and lactate in the synovial fluid for diagnosing native septic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Lenski, Markus; Scherer, Michael A

    2014-03-01

    Aim of this study was to evaluate the role of synovial interleukin-6 and synovial lactate for predicting native septic arthritis. We analyzed retrospectively synovial fluid parameters (interleukin-6, total-protein, glucose, lactate, synovial-fluid-white-blood-cell-count) of 62 patients with culture-verified native septic arthritis and compared them to 57 patients with acute aseptic arthritis. Receiver-Operating-Characteristic-curves were calculated to determine the 'Area-under-the-curves' (AUC), the best thresholds and the corresponding likelihood-ratios. The best parameter for diagnosing septic arthritis was synovial lactate (AUC = 0.864, sensitivity = 74.5%, specificity = 87.2%), followed by synovial interleukin-6 (AUC = 0.803, sensitivity = 92.5%, specificity = 64.1%) and the synovial-fluid-white-blood-cell-count (AUC = 0.782, sensitivity = 71.2%, specificity = 84.9%). Synovial lactate levels above 10 mmol/l almost proofed septic arthritis (interval-Likelihood-Ratio = 20.4), synovial interleukin-6 levels lower than 7000 pg/ml almost ruled out infection (interval-Likelihood-Ratio = 0.12). If none of these thresholds are met, physicians should estimate disease probability by the simultaneous use of the interval-Likelihood-Ratios of synovial lactate, synovial interleukin-6 and synovial-fluid-white-blood-cell-count.

  17. The role of lubricin in the mechanical behavior of synovial fluid

    PubMed Central

    Jay, G. D.; Torres, J. R.; Warman, M. L.; Laderer, M. C.; Breuer, K. S.

    2007-01-01

    Synovial fluid is a semidilute hyaluronate (HA) polymer solution, the rheology of which depends on HA–protein interactions, and lubricin is a HA-binding protein found in synovial fluid and at cartilage surfaces, where it contributes to boundary lubrication under load. Individuals with genetic deficiency of lubricin develop precocious joint failure. The role of lubricin in synovial fluid rheology is not known. We used a multiple-particle-tracking microrheology technique to study the molecular interactions between lubricin and HA in synovial fluid. Particles (200 nm mean diameter) embedded in normal and lubricin-deficient synovial fluid samples were tracked separately by using multiple-particle-tracking microrheology. The time-dependent ensemble-averaged mean-squared displacements of all of the particles were measured over a range of physiologically relevant frequencies. The mean-squared displacement correlation with time lag had slopes with values of unity for simple HA solutions and for synovial fluid from an individual who genetically lacked lubricin, in contrast to slopes with values less than unity (α ≈ 0.6) for normal synovial fluid. These data correlated with bulk rheology studies of the same samples. We found that the subdiffusive and elastic behavior of synovial fluid, at physiological shear rates, was absent in fluid from a patient who lacks lubricin. We conclude that lubricin provides synovial fluid with an ability to dissipate strain energy induced by mammalian locomotion, which is a chondroprotective feature that is distinct from boundary lubrication. PMID:17404241

  18. Synovial fluid matrix metalloproteinase-2 and -9 activities in dogs suffering from joint disorders

    PubMed Central

    MURAKAMI, Kohei; MAEDA, Shingo; YONEZAWA, Tomohiro; MATSUKI, Naoaki

    2016-01-01

    The activity of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 and MMP-9 in synovial fluids (SF) sampled from dogs with joint disorders was investigated by gelatin zymography and densitometry. Pro-MMP-2 showed similar activity levels in dogs with idiopathic polyarthritis (IPA; n=17) or canine rheumatoid arthritis (cRA; n=4), and healthy controls (n=10). However, dogs with cranial cruciate ligament rupture (CCLR; n=5) presented significantly higher pro-MMP-2 activity than IPA and healthy dogs. Meanwhile, dogs with IPA exhibited significantly higher activity of pro- and active MMP-9 than other groups. Activity levels in pro- and active MMP-9 in cRA and CCLR dogs were not significantly different from those in healthy controls. Different patterns of MMP-2 and MMP-9 activity may reflect the differences in the underlying pathological processes. PMID:26902805

  19. Evaluation of apoptosis induction in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells and synovial cells in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Demian, Soheir R; Abo-Shousha, Seham A; Sultan, Hussein E; Zarka, Wael El

    2005-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic inflammatory destructive disease involving the joint and characterized by T-lymphocyte accumulation within the synovial compartment. It is dominated by the presence of macrophages, plasma cells and synovial fibroblasts which are the main pathogenic factors leading to the destruction of bone and cartilage. The survival of these cells may be promoted by inadequate apoptosis leading to synovial hyperplasia. So, the aim of the present study was to evaluate the apoptosis levels before and after induction of apoptosis using anti-Fas mAb, both in peripheral blood (PB) and synovial fluid (SF) infiltrating mononuclear cells (MCs) of patients with RA. CD4+ T cell subsets and cell survival assays were also done to investigate correlations between these parameters. The study was conducted on 15 patients with RA, 10 individual volunteers as a control group and 10 patients with osteoarthritis (OA) as a control group for SF evaluations (have defective Fas expression on their cells). Results of this work revealed that in vitro induction of apoptosis by anti-Fas mAb resulted in increase of: percent (%) reduction of cell viability in PBMCs and SFMCs, % reduction of CD4+ T cell subsets and apoptotic cell % in all studied groups than before induction. The increase in the three parameters is only significant in SF of RA group compared to PB while it is non significant in OA group due to the defective Fas expression on OA cells. Our results also showed a significant positive correlation between CD4+ T cell and viability percentages before induction of apoptosis in SF of RA and between apoptosis levels and CD4+ T cell percentage after induction of apoptosis in the SF of RA group. In conclusion, activated T cells infiltrating SF of RA patients have functional Fas antigen which enable them to undergo in vitro apoptosis using anti-Fas mAb. The cytotoxicity of which is more specific to local lesion such as SF of RA patients suggesting that local

  20. Evaluation of apoptosis induction in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells and synovial cells in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Demian, Soheir R; Abo-Shousha, Seham A; Sultan, Hussein E; Zarka, Wael El

    2005-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic inflammatory destructive disease involving the joint and characterized by T-lymphocyte accumulation within the synovial compartment. It is dominated by the presence of macrophages, plasma cells and synovial fibroblasts which are the main pathogenic factors leading to the destruction of bone and cartilage. The survival of these cells may be promoted by inadequate apoptosis leading to synovial hyperplasia. So, the aim of the present study was to evaluate the apoptosis levels before and after induction of apoptosis using anti-Fas mAb, both in peripheral blood (PB) and synovial fluid (SF) infiltrating mononuclear cells (MCs) of patients with RA. CD4+ T cell subsets and cell survival assays were also done to investigate correlations between these parameters. The study was conducted on 15 patients with RA, 10 individual volunteers as a control group and 10 patients with osteoarthritis (OA) as a control group for SF evaluations (have defective Fas expression on their cells). Results of this work revealed that in vitro induction of apoptosis by anti-Fas mAb resulted in increase of: percent (%) reduction of cell viability in PBMCs and SFMCs, % reduction of CD4+ T cell subsets and apoptotic cell % in all studied groups than before induction. The increase in the three parameters is only significant in SF of RA group compared to PB while it is non significant in OA group due to the defective Fas expression on OA cells. Our results also showed a significant positive correlation between CD4+ T cell and viability percentages before induction of apoptosis in SF of RA and between apoptosis levels and CD4+ T cell percentage after induction of apoptosis in the SF of RA group. In conclusion, activated T cells infiltrating SF of RA patients have functional Fas antigen which enable them to undergo in vitro apoptosis using anti-Fas mAb. The cytotoxicity of which is more specific to local lesion such as SF of RA patients suggesting that local

  1. Pharmacokinetics and penetration into synovial fluid of systemical and electroporation administered sinomenine to rabbits.

    PubMed

    Yan, Huan; Yan, Miao; Li, Huan-De; Jiang, Pei; Deng, Yang; Cai, Hua-Lin

    2015-06-01

    Sinomenine is an anti-rheumatoid arthritis (RA) drug derived from the Sinomenium acutum. The major site of RA treatment is within the synovial compartment. However, the pharmacokinetic and penetration into synovial fluid (SF) of sinomenine have not been reported. In our study, the pharmacokinetics and penetration into SF of systemic and electroporation administered sinomenine were investigated by microdialysis incorporated with HPLC-MS/MS. Sinomenine went into plasma and SF more rapidly with higher peak concentration (Cmax ) by intramuscular injection compared with oral administration. The area under the concentration-time graph (AUC0-∞ ) of intramuscularly injected sinomenine was 1,403,294.75 ± 125,534.567 ng min/mL in plasma and 456,116.37 ± 62,648.36 ng min/mL in SF, which were equivalent with those for an oral dose. These results indicated that equal amounts of sinomenine could penetrate into SF by the two administration routes, and the permeation ratios were approximately 1:3. The AUC0-∞ and Cmax were lower with electroporation compared with systemic administration, but the CSF /CPlasma (concentration of sinomenine in SF vs that of plasma) at 90, 120, 150, 180, 240 and 480 min by electroporation was 3- to 10-fold higher relative to systemic administration. This illustrated that sinomenine can be targeted into joints by electroporation, and electroporation is a potential technique for sinomenine's transdermal delivery.

  2. Hyaluronan Inhibits Tlr-4-Dependent RANKL Expression in Human Rheumatoid Arthritis Synovial Fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Hirabara, Shinya; Ishiguro, Naoki; Kojima, Toshihisa

    2016-01-01

    The Toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling pathway is activated in synovial fibroblast cells in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB (RANK) and its ligand, RANKL, are key molecules involved in the differentiation of osteoclasts and joint destruction in RA. Hyaluronan (HA) is a major extracellular component and an important immune regulator. In this study, we show that lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulation significantly increases RANKL expression via a TLR-4 signaling pathway. We also demonstrate that HA suppresses LPS-induced RANKL expression, which is dependent on CD44, but not intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1). Our study provides evidence for HA-mediated suppression of TLR-4-dependent RANKL expression. This could present an alternative target for the treatment of destructed joint bones and cartilages in RA. PMID:27054952

  3. Expression of granzymes A and B in synovial tissue from patients with rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Kummer, J A; Tak, P P; Brinkman, B M; van Tilborg, A A; Kamp, A M; Verweij, C L; Daha, M R; Meinders, A E; Hack, C E; Breedveld, F C

    1994-10-01

    Granzymes A and B are serine proteinases which are stored in the granules of activated cytotoxic T cells and NK cells. Expression of these granzymes by cytotoxic cells in tissues can be used as an activation marker for these cells. To investigate a possible role of cytotoxic lymphocytes in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and osteoarthritis (OA), we assessed the expression of granzymes A and B by cytotoxic lymphocytes in synovial biopsies from five RA and five OA patients using mAb specific for these serine proteinases. In three of the five RA patients but also in two of the five OA patients granzyme A- and B-expressing lymphocytes were observed in the synovium. Double-labeling immunohistochemical techniques revealed that up to 75% of the granzyme-positive synovial lymphocytes had the CD16+ or CD56+ natural killer cell phenotype. Less than 5% were CD3+, CD8+ cytotoxic T cells, whereas in some patients the phenotype of up to 50% of these cells could not be identified. The presence of granzymes A and B in the synovium of both RA as well as OA patients was confirmed on the molecular level in a second group of 11 RA and 5 OA patients using the polymerase chain reaction. Thus, expression of granzymes A and B occurs in the synovium in patients with RA as well as those with OA. These proteins are mainly expressed by NK cells that may therefore play a role in the pathogenesis of these diseases.

  4. Local fibroblast proliferation but not influx is responsible for synovial hyperplasia in a murine model of rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Matsuo, Yusuke; Mizoguchi, Fumitaka; Saito, Tetsuya; Kawahata, Kimito; Ueha, Satoshi; Matsushima, Kouji; Inagaki, Yutaka; Miyasaka, Nobuyuki; Kohsaka, Hitoshi

    2016-02-12

    Synovial fibroblasts play crucial roles in inflammation and joint destruction in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). How they accumulate in the RA joints remains unclear. This study was conducted to discern whether cellular influx from the outside of the joints and local proliferation are responsible for synovial fibroblast accumulation in an animal model of RA. We found that synovial fibroblasts were identified as GFP+ cells using collagen type I alpha 2 (Col1a2)-GFP transgenic reporter mice. Then, bone marrow transplantation and parabiosis techniques were utilized to study the cellular influx. Irradiated wild-type mice were transplanted with bone marrow from Col1a2-GFP mice. Col1a2-GFP and wild-type mice were conjoined for parabiosis. The transplanted mice and the parabionts were subjected to collagen antibody-induced arthritis (CAIA). We found no GFP+ cells in the hyperplastic synovial tissues from the transplanted mice with CAIA and from the wild-type parabionts with CAIA. Furthermore, normal and CAIA synovial tissues from Col1a2-GFP mice and from fluorescent ubiquitination-based cell cycle indicator (Fucci) transgenic mice, in which cells in S/G2/M phases of the cell cycle express Azami-Green, were studied for Ki67, a cellular proliferation marker, and vimentin, a fibroblast marker, expression. The percentages of Ki67+/GFP+ and Azami-Green+/vimentin+ cells in the CAIA synovial tissues were higher than those in the untreated synovial tissues (34% vs. 0.40% and 19% vs. 0.26%, respectively). These findings indicate that local fibroblast proliferation but not cellular influx is responsible for the synovial hyperplasia in CAIA. Suppression of proliferation of the local synovial fibroblasts should be a promising treatment for RA. PMID:26806309

  5. Synovial fluid dynamics with small disc perforation in temporomandibular joint.

    PubMed

    Xu, Y; Zhan, J; Zheng, Y; Han, Y; Zhang, Z; Xi, Y; Zhu, P

    2012-10-01

    The articular disc plays an important role as a stress absorber in joint movement, resulting in stress reduction and redistribution in the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). The flow of synovial fluid in the TMJ may follow a regular pattern during movement of the jaw. We hypothesised that the regular pattern is disrupted when the TMJ disc is perforated. By computed tomography arthrography, we studied the upper TMJ compartment in patients with small disc perforation during jaw opening-closing at positions from 0 to 3 cm. Finite element fluid dynamic modelling was accomplished to analyse the pattern of fluid flow and pressure distribution during the movements. The results showed that the fluid flow in the upper compartment generally formed an anticlockwise circulation but with local vortexes with the jaw opening up to 2 cm. However, when the jaw opening-closing reached 3 cm, an abnormal flow field and the fluid pressure change associated with the perforation may increase the risk of perforation expansion or rupture and is unfavourable for self-repair of the perforated disc. PMID:22582815

  6. Heparin modulates intracellular cyclic AMP in human trabecular bone cells and adherent rheumatoid synovial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Crisp, A J; Roelke, M S; Goldring, S R; Krane, S M

    1984-01-01

    Cells were cultured from explants of human trabecular bone excised from eight patients and incubated usually for 20 minutes with bovine parathyroid hormone, salmon calcitonin, prostaglandin E2, or heparin. The intracellular content of cyclic AMP was measured by radioimmunoassay and was significantly increased by parathyroid hormone in four, by calcitonin in two, by prostaglandin E2 in eight, and by heparin in seven out of eight cultures. In the two cultures containing calcitonin-responsive cells heparin inhibited the cyclic AMP response induced by calcitonin. Heparin did not affect the cyclic AMP response to parathyroid hormone or prostaglandin E2. Heparin also increased the cyclic AMP content of cultured adherent rheumatoid synovial cells. It is proposed that, in certain situations of focal pathological bone resorption, although concentrations of circulating hormones may be normal, the local release of products such as heparin may modify the effect of hormones which regulate connective tissue homoeostasis. local changes in hormone responses could contribute to the enhanced bone resorption associated with inflammatory processes such as rheumatoid arthritis. Images PMID:6089675

  7. Distinctive gene expression signatures in rheumatoid arthritis synovial tissue fibroblast cells: correlates with disease activity.

    PubMed

    Galligan, C L; Baig, E; Bykerk, V; Keystone, E C; Fish, E N

    2007-09-01

    Gene expression profiling of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and osteoarthritis (OA) joint tissue samples provides a unique insight into the gene signatures involved in disease development and progression. Fibroblast-like synovial (FLS) cells were obtained from RA, OA and control trauma joint tissues (non-RA, non-OA) and RNA was analyzed by Affymetrix microarray. Thirty-four genes specific to RA and OA FLS cells were identified (P<0.05). HOXD10, HOXD11, HOXD13, CCL8 and LIM homeobox 2 were highly and exclusively expressed in RA and CLU, sarcoglycan-gamma, GPR64, POU3F3, peroxisome proliferative activated receptor-gamma and tripartite motif-containing 2 were expressed only in OA. The data also revealed expression heterogeneity for patients with the same disease. To address disease heterogeneity in RA FLS cells, we examined the effects of clinical disease parameters (Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ) score, C-reactive protein (CRP), erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), rheumatoid factor (RF)) and drug therapies (methotrexate/prednisone) on RA FLS cell gene expression. Eight specific and unique correlations were identified: human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-DQA2 with HAQ score; Clec12A with RF; MAB21L2, SIAT7E, HAPLN1 and BAIAP2L1 with CRP level; RGMB and OSAP with ESR. Signature RA FLS cell gene expression profiles may provide insights into disease pathogenesis and have utility in diagnosis, prognosis and drug responsiveness. PMID:17568789

  8. Comparing the mechanical properties of the porcine knee meniscus when hydrated in saline versus synovial fluid.

    PubMed

    Lakes, Emily H; Kline, Courtney L; McFetridge, Peter S; Allen, Kyle D

    2015-12-16

    As research progresses to find a suitable knee meniscus replacement, accurate in vitro testing becomes critical for feasibility and comparison studies of mechanical integrity. Within the knee, the meniscus is bathed in synovial fluid, yet the most common hydration fluid in laboratory testing is phosphate buffered saline (PBS). PBS is a relatively simple salt solution, while synovial fluid is a complex non-Newtonian fluid with multiple lubricating factors. As such, PBS may interact with meniscal tissue differently than synovial fluid, and thus, the hydration fluid may be an important factor in obtaining accurate results during in vitro testing. To evaluate these effects, medial porcine menisci were used to evaluate tissue mechanics in tension (n=11) and compression (n=15). In all tests, two samples from the same meniscus were taken, where one sample was hydrated in PBS and the other was hydrated in synovial fluid. Statistical analysis revealed no significant differences between the mean mechanical properties of samples tested in PBS compared to synovial fluid; however, compressive testing revealed the variability between samples was significantly reduced if samples were tested in synovial fluid. For example, the compressive Young׳s Modulus was 12.69±7.49MPa in PBS versus 12.34±4.27MPa in synovial fluid. These results indicate testing meniscal tissue in PBS will largely not affect the mean value of the mechanical properties, but performing compression testing in synovial fluid may provide more consistent results between samples and assist in reducing sample numbers in some experiments.

  9. Comparing the mechanical properties of the porcine knee meniscus when hydrated in saline versus synovial fluid.

    PubMed

    Lakes, Emily H; Kline, Courtney L; McFetridge, Peter S; Allen, Kyle D

    2015-12-16

    As research progresses to find a suitable knee meniscus replacement, accurate in vitro testing becomes critical for feasibility and comparison studies of mechanical integrity. Within the knee, the meniscus is bathed in synovial fluid, yet the most common hydration fluid in laboratory testing is phosphate buffered saline (PBS). PBS is a relatively simple salt solution, while synovial fluid is a complex non-Newtonian fluid with multiple lubricating factors. As such, PBS may interact with meniscal tissue differently than synovial fluid, and thus, the hydration fluid may be an important factor in obtaining accurate results during in vitro testing. To evaluate these effects, medial porcine menisci were used to evaluate tissue mechanics in tension (n=11) and compression (n=15). In all tests, two samples from the same meniscus were taken, where one sample was hydrated in PBS and the other was hydrated in synovial fluid. Statistical analysis revealed no significant differences between the mean mechanical properties of samples tested in PBS compared to synovial fluid; however, compressive testing revealed the variability between samples was significantly reduced if samples were tested in synovial fluid. For example, the compressive Young׳s Modulus was 12.69±7.49MPa in PBS versus 12.34±4.27MPa in synovial fluid. These results indicate testing meniscal tissue in PBS will largely not affect the mean value of the mechanical properties, but performing compression testing in synovial fluid may provide more consistent results between samples and assist in reducing sample numbers in some experiments. PMID:26592438

  10. Inhibitory effect of sodium houttuyfonate on synovial proliferation in vitro in cells from a patient with rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    LI, JUN; ZHOU, TING; ZHAO, FUTAO

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the inhibitory effect of sodium houttuyfonate (SH) on synovial cell proliferation in vitro. Primary cells were obtained from the synovial tissue of a patient with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The cells were divided into five treatment groups as follows: the control group (group 1), 25 μg/ml SH-treated group (group 2), 50 μg/ml SH-treated group (group 3), 100 μg/ml SH-treated group (group 4) and the 200 μg/ml SH-treated group (group 5). Following seven days of treatment, the proliferation rate of the synovial cells was then detected using an MTT assay. The expression level of proliferative synovial cells markedly decreased in the SH-treated groups in a dose-dependent manner compared with the control group. In conclusion, the present study demonstrated that SH was able to inhibit the proliferation of synovial cells obtained from a patient with RA. These results provide a potential theoretical basis for the development of a safe and effective treatment against RA in the future. PMID:24926358

  11. Staphylococcal persistence due to biofilm formation in synovial fluid containing prophylactic cefazolin.

    PubMed

    Dastgheyb, Sana S; Hammoud, Sommer; Ketonis, Constantinos; Liu, Andrew Yongkun; Fitzgerald, Keith; Parvizi, Javad; Purtill, James; Ciccotti, Michael; Shapiro, Irving M; Otto, Michael; Hickok, Noreen J

    2015-04-01

    Antibiotic prophylaxis is standard for patients undergoing surgical procedures, yet despite the wide use of antibiotics, breakthrough infections still occur. In the setting of total joint arthroplasty, such infections can be devastating. Recent findings have shown that synovial fluid causes marked staphylococcal aggregation, which can confer antibiotic insensitivity. We therefore asked in this study whether clinical samples of synovial fluid that contain preoperative prophylactic antibiotics can successfully eradicate a bacterial challenge by pertinent bacterial species. This study demonstrates that preoperative prophylaxis with cefazolin results in high antibiotic levels. Furthermore, we show that even with antibiotic concentrations that far exceed the expected bactericidal levels, Staphylococcus aureus bacteria added to the synovial fluid samples are not eradicated and are able to colonize model implant surfaces, i.e., titanium pins. Based on these studies, we suggest that current prophylactic antibiotic choices, despite high penetration into the synovial fluid, may need to be reexamined. PMID:25624333

  12. Staphylococcal Persistence Due to Biofilm Formation in Synovial Fluid Containing Prophylactic Cefazolin

    PubMed Central

    Dastgheyb, Sana S.; Hammoud, Sommer; Ketonis, Constantinos; Liu, Andrew Yongkun; Fitzgerald, Keith; Parvizi, Javad; Purtill, James; Ciccotti, Michael; Shapiro, Irving M.; Otto, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Antibiotic prophylaxis is standard for patients undergoing surgical procedures, yet despite the wide use of antibiotics, breakthrough infections still occur. In the setting of total joint arthroplasty, such infections can be devastating. Recent findings have shown that synovial fluid causes marked staphylococcal aggregation, which can confer antibiotic insensitivity. We therefore asked in this study whether clinical samples of synovial fluid that contain preoperative prophylactic antibiotics can successfully eradicate a bacterial challenge by pertinent bacterial species. This study demonstrates that preoperative prophylaxis with cefazolin results in high antibiotic levels. Furthermore, we show that even with antibiotic concentrations that far exceed the expected bactericidal levels, Staphylococcus aureus bacteria added to the synovial fluid samples are not eradicated and are able to colonize model implant surfaces, i.e., titanium pins. Based on these studies, we suggest that current prophylactic antibiotic choices, despite high penetration into the synovial fluid, may need to be reexamined. PMID:25624333

  13. Influence of Anti-inflammatory Drugs on the Rheological Properties of Synovial Fluid and Its Components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krause, Wendy E.; Klossner, Rebecca R.; Liang, Jing; Colby, Ralph H.

    2006-03-01

    The polyelectrolyte hyaluronic acid (HA, hyaluronan), its interactions with anti-inflammatory drugs and other biopolymers, and its role in synovial fluid are being studied. We are investigating the rheological properties of sodium hyaluronate (NaHA) solutions and an experimental model of synovial fluid (comprised of NaHA, and the plasma proteins albumin and γ-globulins). Steady shear measurements on bovine synovial fluid, the synovial fluid model, and plasma protein solutions indicate that the fluids are rheopectic (stress increases with time under steady shear). In addition, the influence of anti-inflammatory agents on these solutions is being explored. Initial results indicate that D-penicillamine and hydroxychloroquine (HCQ) affect the rheology of the synovial fluid model and its components. While HCQ has no effect on the viscosity of NaHA solutions, it inhibits/suppresses the observed rheopexy of the synovial fluid model and plasma protein solutions. In contrast, D-penicillamine has a complex, time dependent effect on the viscosity of NaHA solutions,---reducing the zero shear rate viscosity of a 3 mg/mL NaHA (in phosphate buffered saline) by ca. 40% after 44 days. The potential implications of these results will be discussed.

  14. Synovial fluid lubrication of artificial joints: protein film formation and composition.

    PubMed

    Fan, Jingyun; Myant, Connor; Underwood, Richard; Cann, Philippa

    2012-01-01

    Despite design improvements, wear of artificial implants remains a serious health issue particularly for Metal-on-Metal (MoM) hips where the formation of metallic wear debris has been linked to adverse tissue response. Clearly it is important to understand the fundamental lubrication mechanisms which control the wear process. It is usually assumed that MoM hips operate in the ElastoHydrodynamic Lubrication (EHL) regime where film formation is governed by the bulk fluid viscosity; however there is little experimental evidence of this. The current paper critically examines synovial fluid lubrication mechanisms and the effect of synovial fluid chemistry. Two composition parameters were chosen; protein content and pH, both of which are known to change in diseased or post-operative synovial fluid. Film thickness and wear tests were carried out for a series of model synovial fluid solutions. Two distinct film formation mechanisms were identified; an adsorbed surface film and a high-viscosity gel. The entrainment of this gel controls film formation particularly at low speeds. However wear of the femoral head still occurs and this is thought to be due primarily to a tribo-corrosion mechanisms. The implications of this new lubrication mechanism and the effect of different synovial fluid chemistries are examined. One important conclusion is that patient synovial fluid chemistry plays an important role in determining implant wear and the likelihood of failure.

  15. Protein oxidation markers in the serum and synovial fluid of psoriatic arthritis patients.

    PubMed

    Firuzi, Omidreza; Spadaro, Antonio; Spadaro, Chiara; Riccieri, Valeria; Petrucci, Rita; Marrosu, Giancarlo; Saso, Luciano

    2008-01-01

    The role of oxidative stress has been studied in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and other inflammatory joint diseases to some extent, but its importance in psoriatic arthritis (PsA) has rarely been investigated. The aim of this study was to analyze the levels of protein oxidation markers, sulfhydryl (SH) and carbonyl (CO) groups, in the synovial fluid (SF) and serum of PsA patients and compare them with the findings in RA and osteoarthritis (OA) patients. A total of 49 subjects with a knee-joint effusion including 16 PsA, 18 RA, and 15 OA patients were studied. In all patients, the levels of SH groups measured in the serum and SF inversely correlated with the number of white blood cells (WBC) (P<0.05) and the percentage of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) (P<0.01) in SF. Serum SH levels inversely correlated with serum erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) (P<0.02) and C-reactive protein (CRP) (P<0.05) values. The SH levels in SF were significantly lower in patients affected by PsA and RA compared to OA cases (P<0.02). The serum SH levels in PsA were lower than OA (P<0.001) and higher than RA patients (P<0.05). The serum and synovial levels of CO groups in PsA, RA, and OA patients were similar. Our study provides novel evidence on the involvement of protein oxidation in PsA and confirms the important role of oxidative stress in the pathogenesis of RA. These data suggest that antioxidant agents can potentially be a useful addition to the conventional therapy in the management of these diseases.

  16. The pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis in radiological studies. Part I: Formation of inflammatory infiltrates within the synovial membrane

    PubMed Central

    Kontny, Ewa; Maśliński, Włodzimierz; Prochorec-Sobieszek, Monika; Kwiatkowska, Brygida; Zaniewicz-Kaniewska, Katarzyna; Warczyńska, Agnieszka

    2012-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic inflammatory disease with a multifactorial etiology and varied course, which in the majority of patients leads to partial disability or to permanent handicap. Its characteristic trait is a persistent inflammation of the synovial membrane and the formation of an invasive synovial tissue, called the pannus, which in time leads to destruction of the cartilage, subchondral bone tissue, and the soft tissue of the affected joint(s). The pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis is complex and involves cells of both innate and adaptive immunity, a network of various cytokines and an immunoregulatory dysfunction. An important role in the discovery of rheumatoid arthritis pathogenesis was played by magnetic resonance imaging, which showed the disease process to extend beyond the synovium into the bone marrow. Many studies have shown a strict correlation between the vascularity of the synovium (assessed through the power Doppler ultrasound and magnetic resonance examinations), bone marrow edema and the clinical, laboratory and histopathological parameters of rheumatoid arthritis. From the current understanding of rheumatoid arthritis, bone erosions could occur from two directions: from the joint cavity and from the bone marrow. With power Doppler ultrasound, as well as in magnetic resonance imaging, it is possible to visualize the well-vascularized pannus and its destructive effects on joint structures and ligaments. In addition, the magnetic resonance study shows inflammatory and destructive changes within the bone marrow (bone marrow edema, inflammatory cysts, and erosions). Bone marrow edema occurs in 68–75% of patients with early rheumatoid arthritis and is considered to be a predictor of rapid disease progression. PMID:26673660

  17. Aberrant histone acetylation contributes to elevated interleukin-6 production in rheumatoid arthritis synovial fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Wada, Takuma Tsuzuki; Araki, Yasuto; Sato, Kojiro; Aizaki, Yoshimi; Yokota, Kazuhiro; Kim, Yoon Taek; Oda, Hiromi; Kurokawa, Riki; Mimura, Toshihide

    2014-02-21

    Accumulating evidence indicates that epigenetic aberrations have a role in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). However, reports on histone modifications are as yet quite limited in RA. Interleukin (IL)-6 is an inflammatory cytokine which is known to be involved in the pathogenesis of RA. Here we report the role of histone modifications in elevated IL-6 production in RA synovial fibroblasts (SFs). The level of histone H3 acetylation (H3ac) in the IL-6 promoter was significantly higher in RASFs than osteoarthritis (OA) SFs. This suggests that chromatin structure is in an open or loose state in the IL-6 promoter in RASFs. Furthermore, curcumin, a histone acetyltransferase (HAT) inhibitor, significantly reduced the level of H3ac in the IL-6 promoter, as well as IL-6 mRNA expression and IL-6 protein secretion by RASFs. Taken together, it is suggested that hyperacetylation of histone H3 in the IL-6 promoter induces the increase in IL-6 production by RASFs and thereby participates in the pathogenesis of RA. PMID:24513290

  18. DNA methylation regulates the expression of CXCL12 in rheumatoid arthritis synovial fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Karouzakis, E; Rengel, Y; Jüngel, A; Kolling, C; Gay, R E; Michel, B A; Tak, P P; Gay, S; Neidhart, M; Ospelt, C

    2011-12-01

    In the search for specific genes regulated by DNA methylation in rheumatoid arthritis (RA), we investigated the expression of CXCL12 in synovial fibroblasts (SFs) and the methylation status of its promoter and determined its contribution to the expression of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). DNA was isolated from SFs and methylation was analyzed by bisulfite sequencing and McrBC assay. CXCL12 protein was quantified by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay before and after treatment with 5-azacytidine. RASFs were transfected with CXCR7-siRNA and stimulated with CXCL12. Expression of MMPs was analyzed by real-time PCR. Basal expression of CXCL12 was higher in RASFs than osteoarthritis (OA) SFs. 5-azacytidine demethylation increased the expression of CXCL12 and reduced the methylation of CpG nucleotides. A lower percentage of CpG methylation was found in the CXCL12 promoter of RASFs compared with OASFs. Overall, we observed a significant correlation in the mRNA expression and the CXCL12 promoter DNA methylation. Stimulation of RASFs with CXCL12 increased the expression of MMPs. CXCR7 but not CXCR4 was expressed and functional in SFs. We show here that RASFs produce more CXCL12 than OASFs due to promoter methylation changes and that stimulation with CXCL12 activates MMPs via CXCR7 in SFs. Thereby we describe an endogenously activated pathway in RASFs, which promotes joint destruction. PMID:21753787

  19. An analysis of the levels of complement components in the synovial fluid in rheumatic diseases.

    PubMed

    Swaak, A J; Van Rooyen, A; Planten, O; Han, H; Hattink, O; Hack, E

    1987-09-01

    A linear relationship between the synovial fluid to serum concentration ratios and log molecular weight was found for six plasma proteins, which are largely synthesized by the liver. Production or utilization of a given protein in the joint can, therefore, be determined by its deviation from the calculated diffusion line. Based on this diffusion model the role of the complement system was investigated in the joint effusions of 48 patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), 6 patients with osteoarthritis (OA) and 7 patients with meniscus lesions (ML). Among these three groups quantitative differences were found in the metabolism or utilization of several complement components, based on the fact that the ratios were lower than expected for diffusion of proteins of similar molecular weight. The ratios for the RA group were the lowest. In the three patient groups, results showed increased consumption mainly of C3 and C4 locally in the joint. The existence of a real complement activation in the joints of the three different patient groups was further proved by the elevated levels of C3 breakdown products (C3d). Overall this kind of calculation provides us with a method for studying the role of other proteins which may be important in the inflammatory process of the joint.

  20. Spontaneous generation of functional osteoclasts from synovial fluid mononuclear cells as a model of inflammatory osteoclastogenesis.

    PubMed

    Greisen, Stinne R; Einarsson, Halldór Bjarki; Hvid, Malene; Hauge, Ellen-Margrethe; Deleuran, Bent; Kragstrup, Tue Wenzel

    2015-09-01

    In osteoimmunology, osteoclastogenesis is understood in the context of the immune system. Today, the in vitro model for osteoclastogenesis necessitates the addition of recombinant human receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RANKL) and macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF). The peripheral joints of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and spondyloarthritis (SpA) are characterized by an immune-mediated inflammation that can lead to bone destruction. Here, we evaluate spontaneous in vitro osteoclastogenesis in cultures of synovial fluid mononuclear cells (SFMCs) activated only in vivo. SFMCs were isolated and cultured for 21 days at 0.5-1.0 × 10(6) cells/mL in culture medium. SFMCs and healthy control peripheral blood monocytes were cultured with RANKL and M-CSF as controls. Tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) positive multinucleated cells were found in the SFMC cultures after 21 days. These cells expressed the osteoclast genes calcitonin receptor, cathepsin K, and integrin β3, formed lacunae on dentin plates and secreted matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP9) and TRAP. Adding RANKL and M-CSF potentiated this secretion. In conclusion, we show that SFMCs from inflamed peripheral joints can spontaneously develop into functionally active osteoclasts ex vivo. Our study provides a simple in vitro model for studying inflammatory osteoclastogenesis.

  1. CXCL16-Mediated Cell Recruitment to Rheumatoid Arthritis Synovial Tissue and Murine Lymph Nodes Is Dependent Upon the MAPK Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Ruth, Jeffrey H.; Haas, Christian S.; Park, Christy C.; Amin, M. Asif; Martinez, Rita J.; Haines, G. Kenneth; Shahrara, Shiva; Campbell, Phillip L.; Koch, Alisa E.

    2006-01-01

    Objective Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is characterized by profound mononuclear cell (MNC) recruitment into synovial tissue (ST), thought to be due in part to tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα), a therapeutic target for RA. Although chemokines may also be involved, the mechanisms remain unclear. We undertook this study to examine the participation of CXCL16, a novel chemokine, in recruitment of MNCs to RA ST in vivo and to determine the signal transduction pathways mediating this process. Methods Using a human RA ST–SCID mouse chimera, immunohistochemistry, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, real-time reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction, flow cytometry, and in vitro chemotaxis assays, we defined the expression and function of CXCL16 and its receptor, CXCR6, as well as the signal transduction pathways utilized by them for MNC homing in vitro and in vivo. Results CXCL16 was markedly elevated in RA synovial fluid (SF) samples, being as high as 145 ng/ml. Intense macrophage and lining cell staining for CXCL16 in RA ST correlated with increased CXCL16 messenger RNA levels in RA ST compared with those in osteoarthritis and normal ST. By fluorescence-activated cell sorting analysis, one-half of RA SF monocytes and one-third of memory lymphocytes expressed CXCR6. In vivo recruitment of human MNCs to RA ST implanted in SCID mice occurred in response to intragraft injection of human CXCL16, a response similar to that induced by TNFα. Lipofection of MNCs with antisense oligodeoxynucleotides for ERK-1/2 resulted in a 50% decline in recruitment to engrafted RA ST and a 5-fold decline in recruitment to regional lymph nodes. Interestingly, RA ST fibroblasts did not produce CXCL16 in response to TNFα in vitro, suggesting that CXCL16 protein may function in large part independently of TNFα. Conclusion Taken together, these results point to a unique role for CXCL16 as a premier MNC recruiter in RA and suggest additional therapeutic possibilities, targeting CXCL16, its

  2. Descriptions of therapeutic arthrocenthesis and of synovial fluid in a Nahuatl text from prehispanic Mexico.

    PubMed Central

    Alarcon-Segovia, D

    1980-01-01

    Paracelsus is considered to have been the first to record the viscid quality of the synovial fluid. However, his contemporary Bernardino de Sahagún, a Franciscan friar who came to Mexico shortly after the Spanish conquest, obtained from elderly Aztec Indians who spoke only Nahuatl the descriptions of therapeutic arthrocentesis and of the viscid nature of the synovial fluid. They compared the fluid from the knee joint to the viscid fluid from the leaves of the nopal cactus (Opuntia sp.). We here record their description and confirm the accuracy of their comparison. Images PMID:7416821

  3. Descriptions of therapeutic arthrocenthesis and of synovial fluid in a Nahuatl text from prehispanic Mexico.

    PubMed

    Alarcon-Segovia, D

    1980-06-01

    Paracelsus is considered to have been the first to record the viscid quality of the synovial fluid. However, his contemporary Bernardino de Sahagún, a Franciscan friar who came to Mexico shortly after the Spanish conquest, obtained from elderly Aztec Indians who spoke only Nahuatl the descriptions of therapeutic arthrocentesis and of the viscid nature of the synovial fluid. They compared the fluid from the knee joint to the viscid fluid from the leaves of the nopal cactus (Opuntia sp.). We here record their description and confirm the accuracy of their comparison.

  4. Descriptions of therapeutic arthrocenthesis and of synovial fluid in a Nahuatl text from prehispanic Mexico.

    PubMed

    Alarcon-Segovia, D

    1980-06-01

    Paracelsus is considered to have been the first to record the viscid quality of the synovial fluid. However, his contemporary Bernardino de Sahagún, a Franciscan friar who came to Mexico shortly after the Spanish conquest, obtained from elderly Aztec Indians who spoke only Nahuatl the descriptions of therapeutic arthrocentesis and of the viscid nature of the synovial fluid. They compared the fluid from the knee joint to the viscid fluid from the leaves of the nopal cactus (Opuntia sp.). We here record their description and confirm the accuracy of their comparison. PMID:7416821

  5. Ultrastructural demonstration of spirochetal antigens in synovial fluid and synovial membrane in chronic Lyme disease: possible factors contributing to persistence of organisms.

    PubMed

    Nanagara, R; Duray, P H; Schumacher, H R

    1996-10-01

    To perform the first systematic electronmicroscopic (EM) and immunoelectron microscopy (IEM) study of the pathological changes and the evidence of spirochete presence in synovial membranes and synovial fluid (SF) cells of patients with chronic Lyme arthritis. EM examination was performed on four synovial membrane and eight SF cell samples from eight patients with chronic Lyme disease. Spirochetal antigens in the samples were sought by IEM using monoclonal antibody to Borrelia burgdorferi outer surface protein A (OspA) as the immunoprobe. Prominent ultrastructural findings were surface fibrin-like material, thickened synovial lining cell layer and signs of vascular injury. Borrelia-like structures were identified in all four synovial membranes and in two of eight SF cell samples. The presence of spirochetal antigens was confirmed by IEM in all four samples studied (one synovial membrane and three SF cell samples). OspA labelling was in perivascular areas, deep synovial stroma among collagen bundles, and in vacuoles of fibroblasts in synovial membranes; and in cytophagosomes of mononuclear cells in SF cell samples. Electron microscopy adds further evidence for persistence of spirochetal antigens in the joint in chronic Lyme disease. Locations of spirochetes or spirochetal antigens both intracellulary and extracellulary in deep synovial connective tissue as reported here suggest sites at which spirochaetes may elude host immune response and antibiotic treatment.

  6. Joint aspiration and injection and synovial fluid analysis.

    PubMed

    Courtney, Philip; Doherty, Michael

    2009-04-01

    Joint aspiration/injection and synovial fluid (SF) analysis are both invaluable procedures for the diagnosis and treatment of joint disease. This chapter addresses: (1) the indications, the technical principles and the expected benefits and risks of aspiration and injection of intra-articular corticosteroid; and (2) practical aspects relating to SF analysis, especially in relation to crystal identification. Intra-articular injection of long-acting insoluble corticosteroids is a well-established procedure that produces rapid pain relief and resolution of inflammation in most injected joints. The knee is the most common site to require aspiration, although any non-axial joint is accessible for obtaining SF. The technique requires a knowledge of basic anatomy and should not be unduly painful for the patient. Provided sterile equipment and a sensible, aseptic approach are used, it is very safe. Analysis of aspirated SF is helpful in the differential diagnosis of arthritis and is the definitive method for diagnosis of septic arthritis and crystal arthritis. The gross appearance of SF can provide useful diagnostic information in terms of the degree of joint inflammation and presence of haemarthrosis. Microbiological studies of SF are the key to the confirmation of infectious conditions. Increasing joint inflammation is associated with increased SF volume, reduced viscosity, increasing turbidity and cell count, and increasing ratio of polymorphonuclear: mononuclear cells, but such changes are non-specific and must be interpreted in the clinical setting. However, detection of SF monosodium urate and calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate crystals, even from un-inflamed joints during intercritical periods, allow a precise diagnosis of gout and of calcium pyrophosphate crystal-related arthritis. PMID:19393565

  7. Cell-mediated immune responses of synovial mononuclear cells to sexually transmitted, enteric and mumps antigens in patients with Reiter's syndrome, rheumatoid arthritis and ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Ford, D K; da Roza, D M; Shah, P

    1981-01-01

    3H-thymidine uptake responses by synovial mononuclear cells to stimulation with sexually transmitted, enteric and mumps antigens were studied in 12 patients with "sexually transmitted Reiter's syndrome", 5 with "enteric Reiter's syndrome", 5 with rheumatoid arthritis, 4 with ankylosing spondylitis and 10 with "indolent arthritis of one knee." The "sexually transmitted" and salmonella cases were distinguishable by the responses. Synovial responses were sometimes marked when peripheral blood responses were negligible.

  8. Increased concentrations of proteoglycan components in the synovial fluids of patients with acute but not chronic joint disease.

    PubMed Central

    Ratcliffe, A; Doherty, M; Maini, R N; Hardingham, T E

    1988-01-01

    Synovial fluid samples (139) from 121 patients with rheumatoid arthritis, osteoarthritis, pseudogout, chronic pyrophosphate arthritis, gout, and reactive arthritis were analysed for cartilage proteoglycan components. Keratan sulphate (KS) epitope was determined by a competitive radioimmunoassay, and total sulphated glycosaminoglycans (S-GAG) were determined after papain digestion by a specific dye binding assay. Increased concentration of both KS epitope and S-GAG were found in synovial fluid from joints with acute inflammatory arthropathy (gout, pseudogout, and reactive arthritis). Analysis of consecutive samples from the same joint at different stages showed that the concentration of KS epitope or total S-GAG varied with acute inflammatory activity. In samples from patients with chronic conditions during active and inactive inflammatory phases concentrations were much lower and not distinguishable among these disease groups. The detection of raised concentration of proteoglycan components may reflect the rapid depletion or greatly increased turnover of proteoglycan in the articular cartilage during acute inflammation in the joint. This did not appear to be sustained in most patients with chronic joint diseases. PMID:2461686

  9. Determination of lead in paired samples of human blood and synovial fluid

    SciTech Connect

    Villegas-Navarro, A.; Rosales, D.; Bustos, E.; Reyes, R.; Reyes, J.L.; Dieck, T.A.; Heredia, A. )

    1992-09-01

    In spite of the numerous papers published on the toxicity of lead in mammals, little is known about its effects in synovial fluid and bone joints. Our literature search showed a lack of quantitative studies regarding the concentration of lead in human synovial fluid; in addition, normal values regarding the threshold for poisoning by lead in that fluid are unknown. The available literature published corresponds to samples of human wounds by lead bullets localized close to or in a joint. Some of those papers dealing with lead-induced arthritis include symptoms of plumbism. They clearly demonstrate the ability of synovial fluid to dissolve lead and thereby make it available for systemic absorption. The molecular mechanism whereby this process is performed is still unknown, although it would be of interest because of its possible relationship with joint pain, a common problem in patients with lead poisoning that so far has not been fully explained. In a series of experiments with cattle, we found an average ratio of lead between synovial fluid and blood for paired observations of 4.2, although we have not found similar reports, and there is not sufficient information to make a total interpretation of these data. The purpose of this study was to determine the concentration of lead in synovial fluid and blood of corpses and to establish a possible numerical relationship between those two variables. 19 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  10. Synovial fluid replication in knee wear testing: an investigation of the fluid volume.

    PubMed

    Reinders, Jörn; Sonntag, Robert; Kretzer, Jan Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Wear testing cannot replicate the variations in wear rates and wear mechanisms seen in vivo, which may be related to differences between in vivo and in vitro conditions. A considerable difference exists between the in vivo synovial fluid volume (few milliliter) and the in vitro substituted bovine serum volume (several hundred milliliter). The aim of this study was to analyze the effects of a reduced fluid volume on the wear behavior in a knee wear simulator study. Four wear tests with decreasing fluid volumes (250, 150, 75, and 45 ml) were carried out. Using a large fluid volume of 250 ml for wear testing resulted in a wear rate of 9.7±1.2 mm3/10(6)  cycles. Decreasing the fluid volume consecutively reduced the wear rate to down to 8.8±1.4 mm3/10(6) for 150 ml (p=1.00), 5.6±1.2 mm3/10(6) for 75 ml (p=0.01), and 1.0±0.2 mm3/10(6) cycles for 45 ml fluid volume (p≤0.01). Additionally, higher serum degradation and larger wear particles were observed with smaller fluid volumes used for testing. This study demonstrates the high relevance of the protein-based lubricant on the wear behavior and the technical limitation to replicate the synovial fluid in simulator tests. Wear testing should be carried out using larger fluid volumes (e.g., 250 ml) to generate physiological relevant wear masses.

  11. Chemical Hypoxia Brings to Light Altered Autocrine Sphingosine-1-Phosphate Signalling in Rheumatoid Arthritis Synovial Fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Chenqi; Moreno-Nieves, Uriel; Di Battista, John A.; Fernandes, Maria J.; Touaibia, Mohamed; Bourgoin, Sylvain G.

    2015-01-01

    Emerging evidence suggests a role for sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) in various aspects of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) pathogenesis. In this study we compared the effect of chemical hypoxia induced by cobalt chloride (CoCl2) on the expression of S1P metabolic enzymes and cytokine/chemokine secretion in normal fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLS) and RAFLS. RAFLS incubated with CoCl2, but not S1P, produced less IL-8 and MCP-1 than normal FLS. Furthermore, incubation with the S1P2 and S1P3 receptor antagonists, JTE-013 and CAY10444, reduced CoCl2-mediated chemokine production in normal FLS but not in RAFLS. RAFLS showed lower levels of intracellular S1P and enhanced mRNA expression of S1P phosphatase 1 (SGPP1) and S1P lyase (SPL), the enzymes that are involved in intracellular S1P degradation, when compared to normal FLS. Incubation with CoCl2 decreased SGPP1 mRNA and protein and SPL mRNA as well. Inhibition of SPL enhanced CoCl2-mediated cytokine/chemokine release and restored autocrine activation of S1P2 and S1P3 receptors in RAFLS. The results suggest that the sphingolipid pathway regulating the intracellular levels of S1P is dysregulated in RAFLS and has a significant impact on cell autocrine activation by S1P. Altered sphingolipid metabolism in FLS from patients with advanced RA raises the issue of synovial cell burnout due to chronic inflammation. PMID:26556954

  12. EGFP gene transfection into the synovial joint tissues of rats with rheumatoid arthritis by ultrasound-mediated microbubble destruction

    PubMed Central

    JING, XIANG-XIANG; LIU, JIE; YANG, BING-ANG; FU, SHAO-QING; WU, TANG-NA; WANG, DONG-LIN

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to explore the feasibility of enhancing green fluorescent protein (EGFP) gene transfection into the synovial joint tissues of rats with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) by ultrasound-mediated microbubble destruction. An optimal SonoVue dose was determined using 40 normal rats categorized into five groups according to the various doses of microbubbles used. At 1 week after ultrasound irradiation, the rats were sacrificed. Damage to the joint synovial tissues was observed with hematoxylin and eosin histopathological staining under a microscope. A further 44 normal rats were used to establish a rat model of RA, and were then categorized into four groups: EGFP, ultrasound + EGFP, microbubbles + EGFP and ultrasound + microbubbles + EGFP. The last group was irradiated with ultrasound for 10 min following the injection of 300 μl SonoVue and 10 μg EGFP into the joint cavity. Rats were sacrificed after 3 days and synovial tissue was collected from the knee joints for observation of EGFP with fluorescence microscopy and analysis by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. EGFP expression was observed in the synovial tissues of all groups. However, high EGFP expression levels were observed in the ultrasound + microbubbles + EGFP group. No statistically significant differences (P>0.05) were observed in the EGFP expression levels between the EGFP, ultrasound + EGFP and microbubbles + EGFP groups. However, EGFP expression levels in the EGFP, ultrasound + EGFP and microbubbles + EGFP groups significantly differed (P<0.05) from that in the ultrasound + microbubbles + EGFP group. Therefore, ultrasound-mediated microbubble destruction improved EGFP transfection efficiency into the joint synovial tissues of rats with RA. PMID:24940446

  13. VEGF Gene Polymorphisms Affect Serum Protein Levels and Alter Disease Activity and Synovial Lesions in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Jin-Ping; Wu, Yu-Zhang; Yu, Nan; Yu, Zhi-Wu; Xie, Fu-Yuan; Yuan, Quan

    2016-01-01

    Background Our study investigated 2 common single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) for their influences on serum VEGF levels, disease activity, and synovial lesions in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Material/Methods Clinical information and venous blood samples were collected from 98 RA patients and 100 healthy controls. Genotyping on samples from the subjects was performed using matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS). Serum VEGF levels were determined using the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The synovial thickness and joint effusion of 28 joints were measured in RA patients, and total sharp score (TSS) and disease activity score (DAS) of 28 joints were recorded. Results The genotype and allele frequencies of VEGF rs833070 (G>A) and rs3025030 (G>C) were significantly different between RA group and control group (all P<0.05). VEGF rs833070 and rs3025030 polymorphisms were associated with increasing VEGF serum levels in the RA group (all P<0.01). Statistically significant difference was observed in DAS28 between the different genotypes of VEGF rs833070 in RA patients (P<0.05). Importantly, significant differences in synovial thickening, joint effusion and synovial angiogenesis were observed between the different genotypes of VEGF rs833070 and rs3025030 polymorphisms (all P<0.05). Conclusions Our study provides evidence that VEGF polymorphisms might be important indicators of disease activity and synovial lesions, and prognostic factors in evaluating the treatment effectiveness in RA. PMID:26825024

  14. Diagnosing joint infections: synovial fluid differential is more sensitive than white blood cell count.

    PubMed

    Baran, Sean; Price, Connie; Hak, David J

    2014-12-01

    In order to identify the predictive value of synovial fluid white blood cell (WBC) count and differential white blood cell count in identifying nonprosthetic joint infection in immunocompetent and immunosuppressed populations, we retrospectively reviewed 96 adult patients who underwent hip or knee aspiration because of symptoms suggesting a possible nonprosthetic joint infection. Medical history, including immunosuppressive disease or drugs, was recorded, and synovial fluid cell count, differential, and culture results were compared. There were 44 patients with positive synovial cultures. Of 36 patients who had a synovial WBC ≥50,000/mm³, 89% had positive cultures. The sensitivity to synovial WBC ≥50,000/mm³ was 0.727 (95% CI 0.570-0.845), and specificity was 0.923 (95% CI 0.806-0.975). There were 12 patients with a synovial WBC <50,000/mm³ that had positive cultures. The sensitivity of percentage polymorphonuclear cells (%PMNs) to predict positive cultures when the %PMNs were at least 80, 85, and 90% was 0.932, 0.886, and 0.818, respectively. The specificity when the %PMNs was at least 80, 85, and 90% was 0.598, 0.577, and 0.673, respectively. Among the 29% of immunocompromised patients, the sensitivity to synovial WBC ≥50,000/mm³ was 0.714 (95% CI 0.420-0.904), and specificity was 1.000 (95% CI 0.732-1.000). Twenty-nine percent of patients with a synovial WBC <50,000/mm³ had positive cultures. The sensitivity of %PMNs to predict positive cultures when the %PMNs was at least 80, 85, and 90% was 1.000, 0.929, and 0.786, respectively. The specificity when the %PMNs were at least 80, 85, and 90% was 0.500, 0.643, and 0.714, respectively. We found that the synovial WBC differential (percentage synovial fluid PMNs) is a more sensitive predictor for nonprosthetic adult joint infection than the synovial absolute WBC count. This was true in both the general population and the immunosuppressed population.

  15. Effect of repeated through-and-through joint lavage on serum amyloid A in synovial fluid from healthy horses.

    PubMed

    Sanchez-Teran, A F; Bracamonte, J L; Hendrick, S; Riddell, L; Musil, K; Hoff, B; Rubio-Martínez, L M

    2016-04-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of through-and-through joint lavage on systemic and synovial serum amyloid A (SAA), total protein, nucleated cell count and percentage of neutrophils in the synovial fluid of six healthy horses. A prospective experimental study was performed where one healthy tarsocrural joint of each horse was randomly assigned to receive repeated through-and-through joint lavage at 0, 48 and 96 h. Synovial fluid and blood samples were collected at 0 (baseline), 24, 48, 72, 96 and 120 h. Systemic and synovial SAA, total protein, nucleated cell count and percentage of neutrophils were measured and compared to baseline. Concentrations of systemic and synovial SAA percentage of neutrophils were not increased from baseline in contrast to total protein and nucleated cell counts (except for nucleated cell count at 96 h). In conclusion, repeated through-and-through joint lavage did not affect synovial SAA concentrations in horses; however, synovial total protein and nucleated cell count values increased. Some of the total protein and nucleated cell count values observed in this study were within the range reported for septic arthritis 24 h after joint lavage. Hence, synovial SAA may be a valuable marker to evaluate the clinical progression of septic joints after through-and-through joint lavage. Clinical studies evaluating synovial fluid SAA concentrations while treating synovial sepsis with through-and-through joint lavage are warranted.

  16. HMGB1–LPS complex promotes transformation of osteoarthritis synovial fibroblasts to a rheumatoid arthritis synovial fibroblast-like phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Y; Chen, Y; Wang, W; Wang, Z; Tang, G; Zhang, P; He, Z; Liu, Y; Dai, S-M; Shen, Q

    2014-01-01

    It is generally believed that some inflammatory antigens can recognize Toll-like receptors on synovial fibroblasts (SFs) and then activate downstream signals, leading to the formation of RASFs and inducing rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The objective of the current work was to study on the hypothesis that outer PAMP (LPS) binds to the inner DAMP (HMGB1) and becomes a complex that recognizes TLRs/RAGE on SFs, thus initiating a signaling cascade that leads to the secretion of inflammatory cytokines and chemokines, production of tissue-destructive enzymes, and formation of RASFs, finally resulting in RA. Osteoarthritis synovial fibroblasts (OASFs) were co-cultured with HMGB1–LPS complex in vitro for five generations to induce the transformation of human SFs to RA-like SFs (tOASFs). Then, changes of tOASFs in cell cycle and apoptosis–autophagy balance were investigated in vitro, and the pathogenicity of tOASFs was evaluated in a SCID mouse model in vivo. In vitro cell cycle analysis showed more tOASFs passing through the G1/S checkpoint and moving to S or G2 phase. Flow cytometry and confocal microscopy showed that apoptosis was reduced and autophagy was enhanced significantly in tOASFs as compared with those in OASFs. The expression of certain receptors and adhesion molecules in tOASFs was upregulated. In vivo experiments showed that tOASFs attached to, invaded, and degraded the co-implanted cartilage. In addition, histochemistry showed excessive proliferation of tOASFs and the expression of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). Based on the above findings, we conclude that HMGB1–LPS complex could promote the formation of RASFs. PMID:24556692

  17. Magnetic Capture of a Molecular Biomarker from Synovial Fluid in a Rat Model of Knee Osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Yarmola, Elena G; Shah, Yash; Arnold, David P; Dobson, Jon; Allen, Kyle D

    2016-04-01

    Biomarker development for osteoarthritis (OA) often begins in rodent models, but can be limited by an inability to aspirate synovial fluid from a rodent stifle (similar to the human knee). To address this limitation, we have developed a magnetic nanoparticle-based technology to collect biomarkers from a rodent stifle, termed magnetic capture. Using a common OA biomarker--the c-terminus telopeptide of type II collagen (CTXII)--magnetic capture was optimized in vitro using bovine synovial fluid and then tested in a rat model of knee OA. Anti-CTXII antibodies were conjugated to the surface of superparamagnetic iron oxide-containing polymeric particles. Using these anti-CTXII particles, magnetic capture was able to estimate the level of CTXII in 25 μL aliquots of bovine synovial fluid; and under controlled conditions, this estimate was unaffected by synovial fluid viscosity. Following in vitro testing, anti-CTXII particles were tested in a rat monoiodoacetate model of knee OA. CTXII could be magnetically captured from a rodent stifle without the need to aspirate fluid and showed tenfold changes in CTXII levels from OA-affected joints relative to contralateral control joints. Combined, these data demonstrate the ability and sensitivity of magnetic capture for post-mortem analysis of OA biomarkers in the rat. PMID:26136062

  18. Synovial CD4+ T-cell-derived GM-CSF supports the differentiation of an inflammatory dendritic cell population in rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, G; Gibbon, J R; Pratt, A G; Wood, M J; Coady, D; Raftery, G; Lorenzi, A R; Gray, A; Filer, A; Buckley, C D; Haniffa, M A; Isaacs, J D; Hilkens, C M U

    2016-01-01

    Objective A population of synovial inflammatory dendritic cells (infDCs) has recently been identified in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and is thought to be monocyte-derived. Here, we investigated the role and source of granulocyte macrophage-colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) in the differentiation of synovial infDC in RA. Methods Production of GM-CSF by peripheral blood (PB) and synovial fluid (SF) CD4+ T cells was assessed by ELISA and flow cytometry. In vitro CD4+ T-cell polarisation experiments were performed with T-cell activating CD2/CD3/CD28-coated beads in the absence or presence of pro-Th1 or pro-Th17 cytokines. CD1c+ DC and CD16+ macrophage subsets were flow-sorted and analysed morphologically and functionally (T-cell stimulatory/polarising capacity). Results RA-SF CD4+ T cells produced abundant GM-CSF upon stimulation and significantly more than RA-SF mononuclear cells depleted of CD4+ T cells. GM-CSF-producing T cells were significantly increased in RA-SF compared with non-RA inflammatory arthritis SF, active RA PB and healthy donor PB. GM-CSF-producing CD4+ T cells were expanded by Th1-promoting but not Th17-promoting conditions. Following coculture with RA-SF CD4+ T cells, but not healthy donor PB CD4+ T cells, a subpopulation of monocytes differentiated into CD1c+ infDC; a process dependent on GM-CSF. These infDC displayed potent alloproliferative capacity and enhanced GM-CSF, interleukin-17 and interferon-γ production by CD4+ T cells. InfDC with an identical phenotype to in vitro generated cells were significantly enriched in RA-SF compared with non-RA-SF/tissue/PB. Conclusions We demonstrate a therapeutically tractable feedback loop of GM-CSF secreted by RA synovial CD4+ T cells promoting the differentiation of infDC with potent capacity to induce GM-CSF-producing CD4+ T cells. PMID:25923217

  19. Synovial Fluid Response to Extensional Flow: Effects of Dilution and Intermolecular Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Haward, Simon J.

    2014-01-01

    In this study, a microfluidic cross-slot device is used to examine the extensional flow response of diluted porcine synovial fluid (PSF) samples using flow-induced birefringence (FIB) measurements. The PSF sample is diluted to 10× 20× and 30× its original mass in a phosphate-buffered saline and its FIB response measured as a function of the strain rate at the stagnation point of the cross-slots. Equivalent experiments are also carried out using trypsin-treated PSF (t-PSF) in which the protein content is digested away using an enzyme. The results show that, at the synovial fluid concentrations tested, the protein content plays a negligible role in either the fluid's bulk shear or extensional flow behaviour. This helps support the validity of the analysis of synovial fluid HA content, either by microfluidic or by other techniques where the synovial fluid is first diluted, and suggests that the HA and protein content in synovial fluid must be higher than a certain minimum threshold concentration before HA-protein or protein-protein interactions become significant. However a systematic shift in the FIB response as the PSF and t-PSF samples are progressively diluted indicates that HA-HA interactions remain significant at the concentrations tested. These interactions influence FIB-derived macromolecular parameters such as the relaxation time and the molecular weight distribution and therefore must be minimized for the best validity of this method as an analytical technique, in which non-interaction between molecules is assumed. PMID:24651529

  20. Synovial fluid response to extensional flow: effects of dilution and intermolecular interactions.

    PubMed

    Haward, Simon J

    2014-01-01

    In this study, a microfluidic cross-slot device is used to examine the extensional flow response of diluted porcine synovial fluid (PSF) samples using flow-induced birefringence (FIB) measurements. The PSF sample is diluted to 10× 20× and 30× its original mass in a phosphate-buffered saline and its FIB response measured as a function of the strain rate at the stagnation point of the cross-slots. Equivalent experiments are also carried out using trypsin-treated PSF (t-PSF) in which the protein content is digested away using an enzyme. The results show that, at the synovial fluid concentrations tested, the protein content plays a negligible role in either the fluid's bulk shear or extensional flow behaviour. This helps support the validity of the analysis of synovial fluid HA content, either by microfluidic or by other techniques where the synovial fluid is first diluted, and suggests that the HA and protein content in synovial fluid must be higher than a certain minimum threshold concentration before HA-protein or protein-protein interactions become significant. However a systematic shift in the FIB response as the PSF and t-PSF samples are progressively diluted indicates that HA-HA interactions remain significant at the concentrations tested. These interactions influence FIB-derived macromolecular parameters such as the relaxation time and the molecular weight distribution and therefore must be minimized for the best validity of this method as an analytical technique, in which non-interaction between molecules is assumed.

  1. Orally incoculated Salmonella typhimurium is detected in the lymph nodes and synovial fluid of swine

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Salmonella is a foodborne pathogen that has been associated with illnesses from the consumption of meat products. Traditional carcass sampling techniques fail to account for contamination via atypical carcass reservoirs such as lymph nodes and synovial fluid that may harbor Salmonella. In this two-p...

  2. Raman spectroscopy of dried synovial fluid droplets as a rapid diagnostic for knee joint damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esmonde-White, Karen A.; Mandair, Gurjit S.; Raaii, Farhang; Roessler, Blake J.; Morris, Michael D.

    2008-02-01

    Human synovial fluid droplets were investigated using drop deposition in combination with Raman spectroscopy. Following informed consent, synovial fluid was obtained from forty human patients with various severities of knee pain and/or osteoarthritis at the time of knee arthroscopy or total joint replacement. Synovial fluid was aspirated from the knee joint of each patient and stored at -80°C until examination by near-infrared Raman spectroscopy. Synovial fluid aspirates from the knee joint of each patient were deposited onto a clean fused silica microscope slide and the droplet dried under ambient laboratory conditions. Each droplet was illuminated by a line-focused or a ring-focused 785 nm laser. As the droplet dries, biofluid components segregated based on solubility differences and a deposit that is spatially heterogeneous was made. Spectra taken from the droplet edges and center were dominated by protein bands and showed the presence of at least two protein moieties in the droplet. Band area and band height ratios (1410 cm -1/1450 cm -1) showed the greatest change between specimens from patients with mild/early osteoarthritis compared to those with severe/late stage osteoarthritis. The greatest differences were found in the center of the droplet, which contains more soluble protein components than the edges.

  3. Correlation of some cytomorphological and ultrastructural modifications of synovial fluid in juvenile chronic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Ciobanu, A; Ciobanu, I R; Stroescu, I; Stoicescu, M; Gorinoiu, G; Stroe, S; Marian, M

    1995-01-01

    Experiments have been performed on 25 synovial fluid samples from patients with juvenile chronic arthritis (mono- and polyarticular forms) and with hydroarthrosis, the latter considered as controls. By cytomorphologic studies, we determined the cellularity, ragocytosis and synoviocytogram of the synovial fluid cellular pellet and found out that the synovial fluid from cases of juvenile chronic arthritis is characterised by cytosis (11.270/mm3; 15.275/mm3), polynucleosis (67.3%, 72.2%) and ragocytosis (12.8%, 17.5%) whereas hydroarthrosis synovial fluid is characterised by lymphocytosis (47.8%). Ultrastructurally, ragocyte-like polymorphonuclear cells are characterised by: a) segmentation of the nucleus and preferential concentration of chromatime on the periphery of the nuclear membrane: b) frequent intracytoplasmic inclusions and phagolysosomes. Phagocyte-like mononuclear cells present numerous inclusions and phagolysosomes, certainly indicating an endocytic activity. Lymphocytes are characterised by a narrow cytoplasmic rim, presenting relatively few cellular organelles. They coexist with immunely activated lymphocytes rich in cytoplasm, mitochondria and endoplasmic reticle. Corroboration of cytomorphological and ultrastructural date enables us to explain the morphological modifications and emphasize their importance in juvenile chronic arthritis pathogenesis and diagnosis. PMID:8772365

  4. Localization of /sup 99m/Tc methylene disphosphonate within synovial fluid in osteosarcoma

    SciTech Connect

    Sandler, M.S.; Heyman, S.; Watts, H.

    1984-08-01

    Extraosseous uptake of /sup 99m/Tc phosphate bone scanning agents has been reported in a wide variety of lesions, including malignant effusions. A case of uptake of bone scanning agent within synovial fluid in a joint involved with osteosarcoma is reported.

  5. Temporomandibular joint synovial fluid sampling: estimation of dilution factor using calcium ion concentration.

    PubMed

    Aghabeigi, B; Cintra, N; Meghji, S; Evans, A; Crean, S J

    2002-12-01

    Saline aspirates have been commonly used in the biochemical investigations of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) pathology. However, due to presence of adhesions in the diseased temporomandibular joint, full equilibration between the injected saline and the synovial fluid may not be achieved in all cases. We measured calcium ion concentration in the saline aspirates and the plasma to assess the degree of dilution of the synovial fluid by the injected media. Saline aspirates obtained prior to the arthroscopic examination of 17 patients with painful TMJs not responding to 3 months of conservative treatment were analysed for their calcium content by a highly sensitive spectrophotometric autoanalyser. In 10 patients with unilateral symptoms, the contralateral asymptomatic side was used as a control. Using a concentration volume equation the amount of the synovial fluid in the saline aspirates was calculated. The yield of the saline aspirates was variable ranging from 330 to 1000 microl. The mean calcium level was 0.787 mg/dl in the symptomatic group (C.I. 95% 0.337-1.237 mg/dl) and 0.512 mg/dl (C.I. 95% 0.235-0.797) in the asymptomatic group. Using a Student t-test there was no significant difference between the two groups. Furthermore, there was no demonstrable correlation between the volume of the aspirate and its synovial fluid content. This study confirms that the saline aspirate may not be a representative sample of the TMJ synovial fluid, and that expression of the results of the biochemical assays per volume of the aspirate may be misleading.

  6. Ceramide, a mediator of interleukin 1, tumour necrosis factor α, as well as Fas receptor signalling, induces apoptosis of rheumatoid arthritis synovial cells

    PubMed Central

    Mizushima, N.; Kohsaka, H.; Miyasaka, N.

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—To examine the effects of ceramide, which is a lipid second messenger of cell surface receptors, including tumour necrosis factor α (TNFα), interleukin 1 (IL1), and Fas receptors, on rheumatoid arthritis (RA) synovial cells.
METHODS—Synovial cells from RA patients and normal skin fibroblasts were cultured with cell permeable ceramide (C2-ceramide). Apoptosis was assessed by microscopic observation of morphological changes, nuclear staining, and DNA electrophoresis. DNA synthesis was examined by thymidine incorporation.
RESULTS—C2-ceramide induced reversible morphological changes of synovial cells such as cell rounding within four hours. Subsequently, irreversible nuclear changes characteristic to apoptosis were observed at 48 hours. DNA synthesis was not promoted. The addition of ceramide exerted similar effects on cultured dermal fibroblasts.
CONCLUSION—Ceramide induced apoptosis in RA synovial cells. Ceramide could be a second messenger specific for apoptosis of RA synovial cells.

 Keywords: ceramide; apoptosis; rheumatoid arthritis PMID:9797556

  7. Ultrasound Assessment of Synovial Thickness of Some of the Metacarpophalangeal Joints of Hand in Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients and the Normal Population

    PubMed Central

    Hussain Manik, Zuhudha; George, John; Sockalingam, Sargunan

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To compare ultrasound synovial thickness of the 2nd, 3rd and 4th metacarpophalangeal joints (MCPJ) in a group of patients with proven rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and a control group of normal individuals. Materials and Methods. This is a cross-sectional study comprising 30 rheumatoid arthritis patients and 30 healthy individuals. Ultrasound scans were performed at the dorsal side of 2nd, 3rd, and 4th MCPJ of both hands in RA patients and the healthy individuals. Synovial thickness was measured according to quantitative method. The synovial thickness of RA patients and healthy individuals was compared and statistical cut-off was identified. Results. Maximum synovial thickness was most often detected at the radial side of the 2nd MCPJ and 3rd MCPJ and ulnar side of the 4th MCPJ of both hands which is significantly higher (p < 0.05) in RA patients compared to healthy individuals. With high specificity (96%) and sensitivity (90%) the optimum cut-off value to distinguish RA patients and healthy individuals' synovial thickness differs for the radial side of the 2nd and 3rd MCPJ and ulnar side of the 4th MCPJ. Conclusion. Patients with early RA appear to exhibit a characteristic pattern of synovitis which shows radial side predominance in the 2nd and 3rd MCPJ and ulnar side in the 4th MCPJ. PMID:27190682

  8. KPNA2 Contributes to the Inflammatory Processes in Synovial Tissue of Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis and SW982 Cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhongbing; Zhang, Dongmei; Sun, Chi; Tao, Ran; Xu, Xinbao; Xu, Libin; Cheng, Hongbing; Xiao, Min; Wang, Youhua

    2015-12-01

    Karyopherin-α2 (KPNA2) functions as an adaptor that transports several proteins to the nucleus. We investigated the function and possible mechanisms of KPNA2 involved in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Western blotting and immunohistochemistry showed the protein expression of KPNA2 increased in synovial tissue of RA patients compared with the healthy controls. Double immunofluorescent staining indicated that KPNA2 co-localized with T cells, macrophage-like synoviocytes, fibroblast-like synoviocytes, and neutrophils in synovial tissue of RA patients. Moreover, the expression of KPNA2 in SW982 cells was increased in a time-dependent manner in response to TNFα stimulation. Both Western blotting and immunofluorescent staining assay revealed the co-localization of KPNA2 and P65 and their translocation from cytoplasma in TNFα-treated SW982 cells. Furthermore, knocking down the expression of KPNA2 by siRNA inhibited TNFα-induced expression of IL-6, MMP-1, and MMP-13 and, more importantly, decreased the P65 phosphorylation in SW982 cells. We therefore suggested that KPNA2 may play a key role in the inflammation process of RA via NF-κB P65 signal transduction pathway.

  9. The molecular structure and lubricating activity of lubricin isolated from bovine and human synovial fluids.

    PubMed Central

    Swann, D A; Silver, F H; Slayter, H S; Stafford, W; Shore, E

    1985-01-01

    Lubricin was isolated from bovine ankle, metacarpophalangeal and knee and human knee synovial fluids. The lubricins isolated from the bovine joint fluids had the same amino acid and carbohydrate compositions, but differences were observed in the relative molecular masses. The Mr values of bovine metacarpophalangeal and ankle lubricin determined by light-scattering measurements were about 200 000, whereas values of 132 000 and 143 000 were obtained for the bovine knee lubricin. The human knee lubricin had a similar carbohydrate composition to bovine knee lubricin except for the higher glucosamine content, and the amino acid composition differed slightly. The human sample had a lower glutamic acid content and a leucine/isoleucine ratio of 2:1 compared with 1:1 in the bovine. The Mr value of the human knee lubricin (166 000) was also lower than that of the bovine metacarpophalangeal and ankle samples. The Mr value of the bovine knee lubricin determined by sedimentation-equilibrium measurements was 171 000. The length measurements determined by electron microscopy and also the sedimentation measurements showed considerable polydispersity and indicate that the degree of extension of lubricin molecules can vary. Friction measurements showed that the human knee synovial-fluid lubricin had equivalent lubricating ability in a test system in vitro to that observed for lubricin isolated from normal bovine synovial fluids. The lubricating ability of lubricin was concentration-dependent, and each lubricin sample was able to act as a lubricant in vitro in an equivalent manner to whole synovial fluid at concentrations that are thought to occur in vivo. PMID:3977823

  10. Tribological performance of the biological components of synovial fluid in artificial joint implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Subir; Choudhury, Dipankar; Roy, Taposh; Moradi, Ali; Masjuki, H. H.; Pingguan-Murphy, Belinda

    2015-08-01

    The concentration of biological components of synovial fluid (such as albumin, globulin, hyaluronic acid, and lubricin) varies between healthy persons and osteoarthritis (OA) patients. The aim of the present study is to compare the effects of such variation on tribological performance in a simulated hip joint model. The study was carried out experimentally by utilizing a pin-on-disk simulator on ceramic-on-ceramic (CoC) and ceramic-on-polyethylene (CoP) hip joint implants. The experimental results show that both friction and wear of artificial joints fluctuate with the concentration level of biological components. Moreover, the performance also varies between material combinations. Wear debris sizes and shapes produced by ceramic and polyethylene were diverse. We conclude that the biological components of synovial fluid and their concentrations should be considered in order to select an artificial hip joint to best suit that patient.

  11. Concentrations of some antibiotics in synovial fluid after oral administration, with special reference to antistaphylococcal activity.

    PubMed

    Sattar, M A; Barrett, S P; Cawley, M I

    1983-02-01

    One of 4 antibiotics with antistaphylococcal activity was given in a conventional oral dose for one day to each of 20 hospitalised patients with synovial effusion of a knee joint requiring aspiration. Serial synchronous samples of serum and synovial fluid (SF) were taken over 36 hours through indwelling cannulae. No morbidity was experienced either during or after this procedure. Satisfactory antistaphylococcal concentrations in SF were achieved with sodium fusidate (500 mg 8 hourly) and amoxycillin (250 mg 8 hourly). Cephradine (500 mg 6 hourly) frequently failed to reach the minimum inhibitory concentration for Staphylococcus aureus in the SF, and flucloxacillin (250 mg 6 hourly) was unpredictable in its penetration of the synovial space. Wide interpatient variation of both serum and SF concentrations was found. Our results indicate that sodium fusidate is an appropriate early treatment for a nonresistant staphylococcal joint infection. Amoxycillin is a suitable alternative or second antistaphylococcal drug and would also be appropriate initial therapy when the infecting organism is unknown. We strongly recommend that SF antibiotic concentrations be measured, to ensure adequate penetration of the synovial cavity, in the treatment of septic arthritis.

  12. Penetration of daptomycin into bone and synovial fluid in joint replacement.

    PubMed

    Montange, D; Berthier, F; Leclerc, G; Serre, A; Jeunet, L; Berard, M; Muret, P; Vettoretti, L; Leroy, J; Hoen, B; Chirouze, C

    2014-07-01

    Daptomycin exhibits clinical activity in the treatment of infections with Gram-positive organisms, including infections due to methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. However, little is known about its penetration into bone and synovial fluid. The aim of our study was to assess the penetration of daptomycin into bone and synovial fluid after a single intravenous administration. This study was conducted in 16 patients who underwent knee or hip replacement and received a single intravenous dose of 8 mg of daptomycin per kg of body weight prior to surgery. Plasma daptomycin concentrations were measured 1 h after the end of daptomycin infusion and when bone fragments were removed. Daptomycin concentrations were also measured on bone fragments and synovial fluid collected at the same time during surgery. All samples were analyzed with a diode array-high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method. After a single-dose intravenous infusion, bone daptomycin concentrations were above the MIC of daptomycin for Staphylococcus aureus in all subjects, and the median bone penetration percentage was 9.0% (interquartile range [IQR], 4.4 to 11.4). These results support the use of daptomycin in the treatment of Staphylococcus aureus bone and joint infections.

  13. Penetration of Daptomycin into Bone and Synovial Fluid in Joint Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Montange, D.; Berthier, F.; Leclerc, G.; Serre, A.; Jeunet, L.; Berard, M.; Muret, P.; Vettoretti, L.; Leroy, J.; Hoen, B.

    2014-01-01

    Daptomycin exhibits clinical activity in the treatment of infections with Gram-positive organisms, including infections due to methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. However, little is known about its penetration into bone and synovial fluid. The aim of our study was to assess the penetration of daptomycin into bone and synovial fluid after a single intravenous administration. This study was conducted in 16 patients who underwent knee or hip replacement and received a single intravenous dose of 8 mg of daptomycin per kg of body weight prior to surgery. Plasma daptomycin concentrations were measured 1 h after the end of daptomycin infusion and when bone fragments were removed. Daptomycin concentrations were also measured on bone fragments and synovial fluid collected at the same time during surgery. All samples were analyzed with a diode array–high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method. After a single-dose intravenous infusion, bone daptomycin concentrations were above the MIC of daptomycin for Staphylococcus aureus in all subjects, and the median bone penetration percentage was 9.0% (interquartile range [IQR], 4.4 to 11.4). These results support the use of daptomycin in the treatment of Staphylococcus aureus bone and joint infections. PMID:24798278

  14. Plasma and synovial fluid concentrations of calcium pentosan polysulphate achieved in the horse following intramuscular injection.

    PubMed

    Fuller, C J; Ghosh, P; Barr, A R S

    2002-01-01

    Results from in vitro studies have indicated that calcium pentosan polysulphate (CaPPS) may be of therapeutic value in osteoarthritis (OA) in the horse. However, no controlled clinical trials using this drug in equine OA have yet been reported. If CaPPS is to be developed for such use, the relationship between the proposed i.m. dose of CaPPS to be used and the concentrations of drug attained in plasma and synovial fluid of the target joint should first be established. An investigation was undertaken to determine these concentrations after a single 2 mg/kg i.m. injection of CaPPS. Blood and synovial fluid samples were taken from 6 healthy, sound horses following i.m. CaPPS administration. Concentrations of CaPPS measured in the synovial fluid were, on the basis of published studies, sufficient to elicit a potential therapeutic effect on synoviocyte metabolism, and possibly also to stimulate proteoglycan synthesis and reduce matrix metalloproteinase activities in articular cartilage. It would therefore seem justified to investigate further the therapeutic effect of CaPPS in OA in the horse.

  15. Temporomandibular joint osteoarthritis and crystal deposition diseases: a study of crystals in synovial fluid lavages in osteoarthritic temporomandibular joints.

    PubMed

    Dijkgraaf, L C; Liem, R S; de Bont, L G

    1998-08-01

    To study the presence of crystals in synovial fluid lavages of osteoarthritic temporomandibular joints (TMJs), in order to evaluate the possible role of these crystals in the osteoarthritic (OA) process, synovial fluid lavage samples of the upper joint compartment from 44 TMJs were obtained prior to arthroscopy. The OA group consisted of 32 TMJs. The control group consisted of 12 TMJs that had been diagnosed with other nonosteoarthritic conditions. The lavage samples were analysed as wet preparations, unstained and stained, with ordinary light, polarized light and compensated polarized light for the presence of crystals and white blood cells. One sample was prepared for subsequent electron microscopic (EM) examination. Synovial fluid lavage analysis of osteoarthritic TMJs did not show any monosodium urate monohydrate or calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate crystals. However, in three lavages, particles which possibly contained calcium were identified with alizarin red S staining. White blood cells were occasionally seen. Synovial fluid analysis of the lavages of the control TMJs did not reveal any crystals. EM examination of synovial fluid lavage from an osteoarthritic TMJ failed to clearly show crystal formation. Concurrence of TMJ crystal deposition and OA appears less prominent than in other synovial joints. We conclude that crystals probably do not play an important role in TMJ OA. PMID:9698172

  16. Multicomponent T2 Analysis of Articular Cartilage With Synovial Fluid Partial Volume Correction

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Fang; Chaudhary, Rajeev; Block, Walter F.; Samsonov, Alexey; Kijowski, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the use of a three-pool model to account for the confounding effects of synovial fluid on multicomponent T2 analysis of articular cartilage using Multicomponent Driven Equilibrium Single Shot Observation of T1 and T2 (mcDESPOT). Materials and Methods mcDESPOT was performed on the knee of eight asymptomatic volunteers and eight patients with osteoarthritis at 3.0T with multicomponent T2 maps created using the two-pool model and a three-pool model containing a nonexchanging synovial fluid water pool. The fraction of the fast-relaxing water component (FF) and the T2 relaxation times for the fast-relaxing (T2F) and slow-relaxing (T2S) water components were measured in the superficial and deep layers of patellar cartilage using the two-pool and three-pool models in asymptomatic volunteers and patients with osteoarthritis and were compared using Wilcoxon signed rank tests. Results Within the superficial layer of patellar cartilage, FF was 22.5% and 25.6% for asymptomatic volunteers and 21.3% and 22.8% for patients with osteoarthritis when using the two-pool and three-pool models, respectively, while T2S was 73.9 msec and 62.0 msec for asymptomatic volunteers and 72.0 msec and 63.1 msec for patients with osteoarthritis when using the two-pool and three-pool models, respectively. For both asymptomatic volunteers and patients with osteoarthritis, the two-pool model provided significantly (P < 0.05) lower FF and higher T2S than the three-pool model, likely due to the effects of synovial fluid partial volume averaging. Conclusion The effects of partial volume averaging between superficial cartilage and synovial fluid may result in biased multicomponent T2 measurements that can be corrected using an mcDESPOT three-pool model containing a nonexchanging synovial fluid water pool. PMID:26435385

  17. The prevalence of monosodium urate and calcium pyrophosphate crystals in synovial fluid from wrist and finger joints.

    PubMed

    Galozzi, Paola; Oliviero, Francesca; Frallonardo, Paola; Favero, Marta; Hoxha, Ariela; Scanu, Anna; Lorenzin, Mariagrazia; Ortolan, Augusta; Punzi, Leonardo; Ramonda, Roberta

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the frequency of monosodium urate (MSU) and calcium pyrophosphate (CPP) crystals in synovial fluids (SFs) aspirated from wrist and finger joints of patients with previously diagnosed joint diseases. We reviewed the results of SF analysis of 1593 samples and identified 126 patients with effusions in the small joints of the hands and wrists. We reported from patients' medical files data about sex, age, diagnosis, disease duration and the microscopic SF results. The prevalence of CPP crystals in SF was 85.71% in CPP-crystals arthritis (CPP-CA), 19.35% in rheumatoid arthritis (RA), 13.89% in osteoarthritis (OA) and 0% in psoriatic arthritis (PsA), spondyloarthritis (SpA), gout and miscellanea. The prevalence of MSU crystals in SF was 83.3% in gout, 10% in PsA, 2.8% in OA and 0% in RA, SpA, miscellanea and CPP-CA. Consistent with previously reported data concerning the big joints, microcrystals can be frequently found also in the small joints of patients with previous diagnosis. The finding underlines the importance of analyzing SF from the hand and wrist joints in the attempt to identify comorbidities associated with the presence of crystals and to develop targeted treatment strategies.

  18. Expression and function of microRNA-188-5p in activated rheumatoid arthritis synovial fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Ruedel, Anke; Dietrich, Peter; Schubert, Thomas; Hofmeister, Simone; Hellerbrand, Claus; Bosserhoff, Anja-Katrin

    2015-01-01

    Activated synovial fibroblasts in rheumatoid arthritis (RASF) play a critical role in the pathology of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Recent studies suggested that deregulation of microRNAs (miRs) affects the development and progression of RA. Therefore, we aimed to identify de-regulated miRs in RASF and to identify target genes that may contribute to the aggressive phenotype of RASF. Quantitative real-time PCR revealed a marked downregulation of miR-188-5p in synovial tissue samples of RA patients as well as in RASF. Exposure to the cytokine interleukine-1β lead to a further downregulation of miR-188-5p expression levels compared to control cells. Re-expression of miR-188-5p in RASF by transient transfection significantly inhibited cell migration. However, miR-188-5p re-expression had no effects on glycosaminoglycan degradation or expression of repellent factors, which have been previously shown to affect the invasive behavior of RASF. In search for target genes of miR-188-5p in RASF we performed gene expression profiling in RASF and found a strong regulatory effect of miR-188-5p on the hyaluronan binding protein KIAA1199 as well as collagens COL1A1 and COL12A1, which was confirmed by qRT-PCR. In silico analysis revealed that KIAA1199 carries a 3’UTR binding site for miR-188-5p. COL1A1and COL12A1 showed no binding site in the mRNA region, suggesting an indirect regulation of these two genes by miR-188-5p. In summary, our study showed that miR-188-5p is down-regulated in RA in vitro and in vivo, most likely triggered by an inflammatory environment. MiR-188-5p expression is correlated to the activation state of RASF and inhibits migration of these cells. Furthermore, miR-188-5p is directly and indirectly regulating the expression of genes, which may play a role in extracellular matrix formation and destruction in RA. Herewith, this study identified potential novel therapeutic targets to inhibit the development and progression of RA. PMID:26191188

  19. Limited T-cell receptor beta-chain heterogeneity among interleukin 2 receptor-positive synovial T cells suggests a role for superantigen in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed Central

    Howell, M D; Diveley, J P; Lundeen, K A; Esty, A; Winters, S T; Carlo, D J; Brostoff, S W

    1991-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a disease affecting the synovial membranes of articulating joints that is thought to result from T-cell-mediated autoimmune phenomena. T cells responsible for the pathogenesis of RA are likely present in that fraction of synovial T cells that expresses the interleukin 2 receptor (IL-2R), one marker of T-cell activation. We report herein an analysis of T-cell receptor (TCR) beta-chain gene expression by IL-2R-positive synovial T cells. These T cells were isolated from uncultured synovial tissue specimens by using IL-2R-specific monoclonal antibodies and magnetic beads, and TCR beta-chain transcription was analyzed by PCR-catalyzed amplification using a panel of primers specific for the human TCR beta-chain variable region (V beta). Multiple V beta gene families were found to be transcribed in these patients samples; however, three gene families, V beta 3, V beta 14, and V beta 17, were found in a majority of the five synovial samples analyzed, suggesting that T cells bearing these V beta s had been selectively retained in the synovial microenvironment. In many instances, the V beta 3, V beta 14, or V beta 17 repertoires amplified from an individual patient were dominated by a single rearrangement, indicative of clonal expansion in the synovium and supportive of a role for these T cells in RA. Of note is a high sequence similarity between V beta 3, V beta 14, and V beta 17 polypeptides, particularly in the fourth complementarity-determining region (CDR). Given that binding sites for superantigens have been mapped to the CDR4s of TCR beta chains, the synovial localization of T cells bearing V beta s with significant CDR4 homology indicates that V beta-specific T-cell activation by superantigen may play a role in RA. PMID:1660155

  20. Persistence of collagen type II-specific T-cell clones in the synovial membrane of a patient with rheumatoid arthritis

    SciTech Connect

    Londei, M.; Savill, C.M.; Verhoef, A.; Brennan, F.; Leech, Z.A.; Feldmann, M. ); Duance, V. ); Maini, R.N. )

    1989-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is an autoimmune disease characterized by T-cell infiltration of the synovium of joints. Analysis of the phenotype and antigen specificity of the infiltrating cells may thus provide insight into the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis. T cells were cloned with interleukin 2, a procedure that selects for in vivo-activated cells. All clones had the CD4 CDW29 phenotype. Their antigen specificity was tested by using a panel of candidate joint autoantigens. Four of 17 reacted against autologous blood mononuclear cells. Two clones proliferated in response to collagen type II. After 21 months, another set of clones was derived from synovial tissue of the same joint. One of eight clones tested showed a strong proliferative response against collagen type II. The uncloned synovial T cells of a third operation from another joint also responded to collagen type II. The persistence of collagen type II-specific T cells in active rheumatoid joints over a period of 3 years suggests that collagen type II could be one of the autoantigens involved in perpetuating the inflammatory process in rheumatoid arthritis.

  1. Functional role of the KCa3.1 potassium channel in synovial fibroblasts from rheumatoid arthritis patients.

    PubMed

    Friebel, Kristin; Schönherr, Roland; Kinne, Raimund W; Kunisch, Elke

    2015-07-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis synovial fibroblasts (RA-SFs) show an aggressive phenotype and support joint inflammation and tissue destruction. New druggable targets in RA-SFs would therefore be of high therapeutic interest. The present study shows that the intermediate-conductance, calcium-activated potassium channel KCa3.1 (KCNN4) is expressed at the mRNA and protein level in RA-SFs, is functionally active, and has a regulatory impact on cell proliferation and secretion of pro-inflammatory and pro-destructive mediators. Whole-cell patch-clamp recordings identified KCa3.1 as the dominant potassium channel in the physiologically relevant membrane voltage range below 0 mV. Stimulation with transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1) significantly increased transcription, translation, and channel function of KCa3.1. Inhibition of KCa3.1 by the selective, pore-blocking inhibitor TRAM-34, (and, in part, by siRNA) significantly reduced cell proliferation, as well as expression and secretion of pro-inflammatory factors (IL-6, IL-8, and MCP1) and the tissue-destructive protease MMP3. These effects were observed in non-stimulated and/or TGF-β1-stimulated RA-SFs. Since small molecule-based interference with KCa3.1 is principally well tolerated in clinical settings, further evaluation of channel blockers in models of rheumatoid arthritis may be a promising approach to identify new pharmacological targets and develop new therapeutic strategies for this debilitating disease.

  2. Potential protein targets of the peptidylarginine deiminase 2 and peptidylarginine deiminase 4 enzymes in rheumatoid synovial tissue and its possible meaning

    PubMed Central

    Badillo-Soto, Martha Adriana; Rodríguez-Rodríguez, Mayra; Pérez-Pérez, María Elena; Daza-Benitez, Leonel; Bollain-y-Goytia, Juan José; Carrillo-Jiménez, Miguel Angel; Avalos-Díaz, Esperanza; Herrera-Esparza, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    Objective The molecular mechanism of citrullination involves the calcium-dependent peptidylarginine deiminase (PAD) family of enzymes. These enzymes induce a stereochemical modification of normal proteins and transform them into autoantigens, which in rheumatoid arthritis trigger a complex cascade of joint inflammatory events followed by chronic synovitis, pannus formation, and finally, cartilage destruction. By hypothesizing that PAD2 and PAD4 enzymes produce autoantigens, we investigated five possible synovial protein targets of PAD enzymes. Material and Methods We measured PAD2, PAD4, and citrullinated proteins in 10 rheumatoid and 10 osteoarthritis synovial biopsies and then assessed the post-translational modifications of fibrinogen, cytokeratin, tubulin, IgG, and vimentin proteins using a double-fluorescence assay with specific antibodies and an affinity-purified anti-citrullinated peptide (CCP) antibody. The degree of co-localization was analyzed, and statistical significance was determined by ANOVA, Fisher’s exact test, and regression analysis. Results The principal results of this study demonstrated that citrullinated proteins, such as fibrinogen, IgG, and other probed proteins, were targets of PAD2 and PAD4 activity in rheumatoid synovial biopsies, whereas osteoarthritis biopsies were negative for this enzyme (p<0.0001). An analysis of citrullination sites using the UniProtKB/Swiss-Prot data bank predicts that the secondary structure of the analyzed proteins displays most of the sites for citrullination; a discussion regarding its possible meaning in terms of pathogenesis is made. Conclusion Our results support the conclusion that the synovial citrullination of proteins is PAD2 and PAD4 dependent. Furthermore, there is a collection of candidate proteins that can be citrullinated. PMID:27708970

  3. Synovial effusion and synovial fluid biomarkers in psoriatic arthritis to assess intraarticular tumor necrosis factor-α blockade in the knee joint

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction The purpose of this study was theevaluation of synovial effusion (SE), synovial fluid (SF) and synovial tissue (ST) biomarkers in relation to disease activity indexes to assess the response to intraarticular (IA) tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α blockers in psoriatic arthritis (PsA). Methods Systemic and local disease activity indexes (disease activity score (DAS); the Ritchie articular index (mRAI), erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) and C-reactive protein (CRP); Thompson articular (THOMP) and joint articular (KJAI)-Index ) and ST samples were assessed at baseline, throughout treatment, and during the follow-up in 14 patients affected with PsA who underwent IA injections (0.5 ml to 12.5 mg) in the knee joint of etanercept (E) or placebo (P) once every two weeks for a 10-week period. Total SF white blood cell (WBC) counts (WBC/μl) and SF cytokine/chemokine (CK/CCK) levels were measured before IA-E at baseline, after IA-E, and as long as there were adequate amounts of SF for knee aspiration (post). Characterization of synovial mononuclear cell infiltration and synovial vessels was carried out in 8 out of 14 knees by staining serial sections of synovial tissue biopsies for CD45, CD3, CD68, CD31 and CD105. Results At baseline, CRP and/or ESR were significantly correlated with SF-CK (interleukin- (IL-)1β, IL-1Ra, IL-6, IL-8) and CCK (CCL3). Post-IA injections, there was a decrease in SE in the knees in which aspiration following IA-E injection was possible as well as a significant reduction in SF WBC/μl and in SF-CK (IL-1β, IL-1Ra, IL-6 and IL-22). Pre- and post-IA-E injections, there were significant correlations between ST markers and SF-CK (IL-1β with CD45; IL-1β and IL-6 with CD31) and between SF-CCK (CCL4 and CCL3 with CD3). At the end of the study, there was a significant reduction in disease activity indexes (CRP, DAS, RAI, THOMP, KJAI) as well as in the ST markers (CD45; CD3). Conclusions Synovial effusion regression is a reliable indicator

  4. The use of native fluorescence analysis of synovial fluid in the diagnosis of medial compartment disease in medium- and large-breed dogs.

    PubMed

    Bilská, Kamila; Šteffeková, Zuzana; Birková, Anna; Mareková, Mária; Ledecký, Valent; Hluchý, Marián; Kisková, Terézia

    2016-05-01

    We assumed that proteins are most likely responsible for synovial fluid fluorescence and that changes detected in fluorescence intensity are most likely the result of changes in the concentration of fluorescent proteins. Synchronous fluorescent matrices from synovial fluid samples were measured in the excitation wavelength range of 200-350 nm using a luminescence spectrophotometer. The synchronous matrix of synovial fluid consists of 2 dominant fluorescent centers (F1 and F2) in the ultraviolet region. The fluorescence intensities of both centers were significantly higher in pathological samples, with p = 0.001 (a 59% increase of the median value) for the F1 center and p = 0.002 (a 52% increase of the median value) for the F2 center. Receiver operating characteristic analysis confirmed that synovial fluid autofluorescence is a significant predictor of medial compartment disease in dogs, with the area under the curve at 0.776 (F1) and 0.778 (F2). We did not detect any differences in the autofluorescence of synovial fluid between male and female, or any breed-based changes. No position changes of fluorescent centers were recorded in the synovial fluid in diseased dogs compared with healthy dogs. The synovial fluid metabolic fingerprint of canine patients with medial compartment disease differed from that of healthy dogs. Our study demonstrated the feasibility of synovial fluid fingerprinting to identify disease-specific profiles of synovial fluid metabolites. PMID:27016720

  5. Modification of nuclear PML protein by SUMO-1 regulates Fas-induced apoptosis in rheumatoid arthritis synovial fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Meinecke, Ingmar; Cinski, Antje; Baier, Anja; Peters, Marvin A; Dankbar, Berno; Wille, Aline; Drynda, Andreas; Mendoza, Heidi; Gay, Renate E; Hay, Ronald T; Ink, Barbara; Gay, Steffen; Pap, Thomas

    2007-03-20

    The small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO)-1 is an important posttranslational regulator of different signaling pathways and involved in the formation of promyelocytic leukemia (PML) protein nuclear bodies (NBs). Overexpression of SUMO-1 has been associated with alterations in apoptosis, but the underlying mechanisms and their relevance for human diseases are not clear. Here, we show that the increased expression of SUMO-1 in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) synovial fibroblasts (SFs) contributes to the resistance of these cells against Fas-induced apoptosis through increased SUMOylation of nuclear PML protein and increased recruitment of the transcriptional repressor DAXX to PML NBs. We also show that the nuclear SUMO-protease SENP1, which is found at lower levels in RA SFs, can revert the apoptosis-inhibiting effects of SUMO-1 by releasing DAXX from PML NBs. Our findings indicate that in RA SFs overexpression of SENP1 can alter the SUMO-1-mediated recruitment of DAXX to PML NBs, thus influencing the proapoptotic effects of DAXX. Accumulation of DAXX in PML NBs by SUMO-1 may, therefore, contribute to the pathogenesis of inflammatory disorders.

  6. Altered expression of TPP1 in fibroblast-like synovial cells might be involved in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Qing, Yu-Feng; Zhou, Jing-Guo; Zhao, Ming-Cai; Xie, Wen-Guang; Yang, Qi-Bin; Xing, Yan; Zeng, Sheng-Ping; Jiang, Hong

    2012-08-01

    We undertook this study to determine whether the altered expression of telomeric proteins TPP1 and POT1 in fibroblast-like synovial cells (FLS) could provide insights into the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). FLS were isolated from patients with RA, osteoarthritis (OA) and traumatic joint disease, and cultured in vitro. TPP1 and POT1 mRNA level of FLS were measured using real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) in 42 RA, 23 OA and 13 healthy cases. Immunofluorescence staining and Western blot were used to detect the expression of TPP1 and POT1 protein. Expression of TPP1 and POT1 mRNA was significantly reduced in RA cases (P < 0.001, respectively), and no significant difference was observed between OA and healthy cases (P > 0.05, respectively). Confocal microscopy images showed TPP1 and POT1 proteins mainly located in nucleus of FLS. Western blot demonstrated that TPP1 protein level was significantly reduced in RA cases (P < 0.001), and POT1 protein expression was not statistical significance among RA, OA patients and healthy cases (P > 0.05). Significant negative correlation was observed between level of TPP1 mRNA and titers of anti-CCP antibody (P < 0.001), RF (P < 0.01). Altered expression of TPP1 might contribute to persistent proliferation of FLS in RA, further study on functions of telomeric proteins in RA would be needed.

  7. Novel Cartilage Oligomeric Matrix Protein (COMP) Neoepitopes Identified in Synovial Fluids from Patients with Joint Diseases Using Affinity Chromatography and Mass Spectrometry*

    PubMed Central

    Åhrman, Emma; Lorenzo, Pilar; Holmgren, Kristin; Grodzinsky, Alan J.; Dahlberg, Leif E.; Saxne, Tore; Heinegård, Dick; Önnerfjord, Patrik

    2014-01-01

    To identify patients at risk for progressive joint damage, there is a need for early diagnostic tools to detect molecular events leading to cartilage destruction. Isolation and characterization of distinct cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP) fragments derived from cartilage and released into synovial fluid will allow discrimination between different pathological conditions and monitoring of disease progression. Early detection of disease and processes in the tissue as well as an understanding of the pathologic mechanisms will also open the way for novel treatment strategies. Disease-specific COMP fragments were isolated by affinity chromatography of synovial fluids from patients with rheumatoid arthritis, osteoarthritis, or acute trauma. Enriched COMP fragments were separated by SDS-PAGE followed by in-gel digestion and mass spectrometric identification and characterization. Using the enzymes trypsin, chymotrypsin, and Asp-N for the digestions, an extensive analysis of the enriched fragments could be accomplished. Twelve different neoepitopes were identified and characterized within the enriched COMP fragments. For one of the neoepitopes, Ser77, an inhibition ELISA was developed. This ELISA quantifies COMP fragments clearly distinguishable from total COMP. Furthermore, fragments containing the neoepitope Ser77 were released into the culture medium of cytokine (TNF-α and IL-6/soluble IL-6 receptor)-stimulated human cartilage explants. The identified neoepitopes provide a complement to the currently available commercial assays for cartilage markers. Through neoepitope assays, tools to pinpoint disease progression, evaluation methods for therapy, and means to elucidate disease mechanisms will be provided. PMID:24917676

  8. Misdiagnosis of Late-Onset Lyme Arthritis by Inappropriate Use of Borrelia burgdorferi Immunoblot Testing with Synovial Fluid

    PubMed Central

    Barclay, Sam S.; Melia, Michael T.

    2012-01-01

    The primary objective of this study was to determine whether patients with putative late-onset Lyme arthritis based upon synovial fluid Borrelia burgdorferi IgM and IgG immunoblot testing offered by commercial laboratories satisfied conventional criteria for the diagnosis of Lyme arthritis. Secondary objectives included assessing the prior duration and responsiveness of associated antibiotic therapy. We conducted a retrospective analysis of 11 patients referred to an academic medical center infectious disease clinic during the years 2007 to 2009 with a diagnosis of Lyme disease based upon previously obtained synovial fluid B. burgdorferi immunoblot testing. Ten of the 11 (91%) patients with a diagnosis of late-onset Lyme arthritis based upon interpretation of synovial fluid B. burgdorferi immunoblot testing were seronegative and did not satisfy published criteria for the diagnosis of late-onset Lyme arthritis. None of the 10 patients had a clinical response to previously received antibiotics despite an average course of 72 days. Diagnosis of Lyme arthritis should not be based on synovial fluid B. burgdorferi immunoblot testing. This unvalidated test does not appear useful for the diagnosis of Lyme disease, and this study reinforces the longstanding recommendation to use B. burgdorferi immunoblot testing only on serum samples and not other body fluids. Erroneous interpretations of “positive” synovial fluid immunoblots may lead to inappropriate antibiotic courses and delays in diagnosis of other joint diseases. PMID:22971779

  9. In vivo electrochemical corrosion study of a CoCrMo biomedical alloy in human synovial fluids.

    PubMed

    Igual Munoz, A; Schwiesau, J; Jolles, B M; Mischler, S

    2015-07-01

    The present study was initiated with the aim to assess the in vivo electrochemical corrosion behaviour of CoCrMo biomedical alloys in human synovial fluids in an attempt to identify possible patient or pathology specific effects. For this, electrochemical measurements (open circuit potential OCP, polarization resistance Rp, potentiodynamic polarization curves, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy EIS) were carried out on fluids extracted from patients with different articular pathologies and prosthesis revisions. Those electrochemical measurements could be carried out with outstanding precision and signal stability. The results show that the corrosion behaviour of CoCrMo alloy in synovial fluids not only depends on material reactivity but also on the specific reactions of synovial fluid components, most likely involving reactive oxygen species. In some patients the latter were found to determine the whole cathodic and anodic electrochemical response. Depending on patients, corrosion rates varied significantly between 50 and 750 mg dm(-2)year(-1).

  10. Comparative study of normal and osteoarthritic canine synovial fluid using 500 MHz 1H magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Damyanovich, A Z; Staples, J R; Chan, A D; Marshall, K W

    1999-03-01

    High resolution 1H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy has been used to investigate and compare the metabolic profiles of normal and osteoarthritic synovial fluids in a canine model of osteoarthritis. The spectra of osteoarthritic synovial fluid showed (a) increased concentrations of lactate, pyruvate, lipoprotein-associated fatty acids, and glycerol as well as the ketones hydroxybutyrate and hydroxyisobutyrate, (b) reduced levels of glucose, and (c) elevated levels of N-acetylglycoproteins, acetate, and acetamide compared with healthy normal canine synovial fluid. An increase was also observed in the concentrations of the amino acids alanine and isoleucine. These results suggest that (a) the intraarticular environment in canine osteoarthritis is more hypoxic and acidotic than in a normal joint, (b) lipolysis may play an increasingly important role as a source of energy in osteoarthritis, and (c) the N-acetylglycoprotein polymer component of synovial fluid (mostly hyaluronan) seems to be increasingly fragmented and degraded into acetate by way of an acetamide intermediate with progressive osteoarthritis. The observed changes in the biochemical profile of canine osteoarthritic synovial fluid may be useful in understanding alterations in joint metabolism consequent to arthritic diseases and helpful in identifying potential markers of osteoarthritis. PMID:10221839

  11. Effects of Viscoseal, a synovial fluid substitute, on recovery after arthroscopic partial meniscectomy and joint lavage.

    PubMed

    Mathies, B

    2006-01-01

    This was a pilot, single blind, randomised, controlled study in patients requiring partial meniscectomy. The aim was to assess whether replacing the synovial fluid lost during arthroscopy with a hyaluronic acid-containing synovial fluid substitute (Viscoseal) would reduce the severity and duration of post-operative symptoms during the 4 weeks post-surgery, in comparison to the standard arthroscopy procedure alone. Fifty patients were randomly assigned to either undergo arthroscopic partial meniscectomy alone (control group: n=25) or to receive 10 ml Viscoseal into the joint at the end of the procedure (Viscoseal group: n=25). Forty patients (20 per group) completed the study. Despite the small patient population in this pilot study, some interesting results were obtained. On Day 1 after surgery, the mean values for pain at rest (VAS) increased in both groups but this increase was lower in the Viscoseal group (8.9+/-23.1 mm) than in the standard therapy group (20.0+/-25.9 mm) (Mann-Whitney statistic MW-S: P=0.0525) and remained in favour of Viscoseal for the first 3 days after surgery. Joint swelling decreased to a greater extent in the Viscoseal group with an observed superiority at Day 7 (MW-S: P=0.1187) and a proven superiority at Days 12 (MW-S: P=0.015) and 28 (MW-S: P=0.0072). Diclofenac intake was lower in the Viscoseal group from Day 3 to Day 28 with a proven superiority (LB-CI > 0.5) in favour of Viscoseal on Days 3 (MW-S: P = 0.0093), 4 (MW-S: P= 0.0075), and 7 (MW-S: P = 0.0195) indicating that the product had an NSAID-sparing effect. Viscoseal was safe and well-tolerated and no adverse reactions occurred during the study. These findings indicate that Viscoseal may be useful as a synovial fluid substitute after arthroscopy.

  12. Detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Group Organisms in Human and Mouse Joint Tissue by Reverse Transcriptase PCR: Prevalence in Diseased Synovial Tissue Suggests Lack of Specific Association with Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Kempsell, Karen E.; Cox, Charles J.; McColm, Andrew A.; Bagshaw, Julie A.; Reece, Richard; Veale, Douglas J.; Emery, Paul; Isaacs, John D.; Gaston, J. S. Hill; Crowe, J. Scott

    2001-01-01

    Infection with mycobacterial species, including Mycobacterium tuberculosis, has long been implicated in the etiopathology of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) on the basis of clinical and pathological similarities between tuberculosis and RA. Despite evidence of immune responses to mycobacterial antigens in RA patient synovial fluid, cross-reactivity between these and host joint antigens, and the presence of M. tuberculosis protein antigen in RA synovial fluid, a definite causal association with RA has not been shown. Previous studies from our laboratory using reverse transcriptase PCR (RT-PCR) of bacterial rRNAs have shown RA synovium to be colonized by a diverse range of bacteria, most of commensal origin. However, M. tuberculosis group organism (MTG) RNA sequences were found in one RA patient tissue. Since this was considered of sufficient interest to warrant further investigation, we devised a M. tuberculosis-specific nested RT-PCR test which could be used for detection of MTG in a mixed pool of bacterial crDNAs. This test was used to investigate the distribution of MTG in RA synovial tissue and also non-RA arthritis and healthy control tissues and was also used to examine the tissue distribution of MTG in an acute and chronic model of M. tuberculosis infection in the BALB/c mouse. MTG sequences were found in a high proportion of RA patient synovial tissues but also in non-RA arthritis control tissues at lower frequency. This likely reflects trafficking of persistent M. bovis BCG to inflamed joint tissue, irrespective of cause. MTG were not found in healthy synovial tissue or the tissue of patients with undifferentiated arthritis. In both the acute and chronic models of infection in BALB/c mice, M. tuberculosis was also found to have trafficked to joint tissues, however, no signs of inflammation, arthritis, or pathology associated with M. tuberculosis infection was seen. These combined results would argue against a specific causal role of MTG in RA-like arthritis

  13. Hyaluronan production in human rheumatoid fibroblastic synovial lining cells is increased by interleukin 1β but inhibited by transforming growth factor β1

    PubMed Central

    Kawakami, M.; Suzuki, K.; Matsuki, Y.; Ishizuka, T.; Hidaka, T.; Konishi, T.; Matsumoto, M.; Kataharada, K.; Nakamura, H.

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—To investigate the regulatory roles of interleukin 1β (IL1β), tumour necrosis factor α (TNFα), interferon γ (IFNγ) or transforming growth factor β1 (TGFβ1) on hyaluronan (HA) synthesis by human fibroblastic synovial lining cells.
METHODS—Concentrations of HA in culture supernatants of fibroblastic synovial lining cell line (RAMAK-1 cell line) with or without stimulation by IL1β, TNFα, IFNγ or TGFβ1 were measured by sandwich binding protein assay. Levels of HA synthase mRNA of the cells with or without stimulation were detected by reverse transcribed polymerase chain reaction. Molecular weights of HA in the culture supernatants of the cells with or without stimulation were measured using high performance gel permeation liquid chromatography.
RESULTS—HA synthesis by the cells was not significantly augmented by TNFα or by IFNγ. It was significantly stimulated by IL1β but inhibited by TGFβ1. Molecular weights of HA in the culture supernatants of the cells were unchanged by stimulation with TNFα. They were remarkably increased by stimulation with IL1β and IFNγ, but reduced with TGFβ1.
CONCLUSION—IL1β is an up regulator of HA synthesis, while TGFβ1 is a down regulator. HA production in the synovial lining cells of inflamed joints (for example, rheumatoid arthritis) might be regulated by the balance of these cytokines.

 Keywords: synovial lining cells; hyaluronan, interleukin 1β; transforming growth factor β1 PMID:9893571

  14. Inhibitory effects of anti-rheumatic drugs containing magnosalin, a compound from 'Shin-i' (Flos magnoliae), on the proliferation of synovial cells in rheumatoid arthritis models.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, S; Kobayashi, H; Matsuno, H; Kimura, I; Kimura, M

    1998-05-01

    This study was undertaken to examine the effects of magnosalin, a compound isolated from 'Shin-i' (Flos magnoliae) on proliferation of synovial cells isolated from MRL/1pr and collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) mice, and rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients. Magnosalin (2.39-23.9 microM) inhibited 5% fetal bovine serum (FBS)-stimulated [3H]-thymidine incorporation into the synovial cells in the MRL/1pr mice. The effect of magnosalin was greater than that of hydrocortisone, bucillamine and magnoshinin (another compound from 'Shin-i'), but weaker than that of corticosterone. The effects of magnosalin for FBS-induced thymidine incorporation into the cells of the CIA mice and the RA patients were significantly greater than those in the corresponding control mice and osteoarthritis patients. Interleukin (IL)-1alpha increased the incorporation of thymidine into the synovial cells in the C57BL/6J mice to a greater degree than did basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) or platelet-derived growth factor BB-homodimer (PDGF-BB). The inhibitory effect of magnosalin on the submaximal action of IL-1alpha was significantly greater than that of bFGF, PDGF-BB or FBS. These results offer evidence that magnosalin suppresses the proliferation of synovial cells in RA models by inhibiting IL-1alpha-stimulated action.

  15. Synovial fluid bupivacaine concentrations following single intra-articular injection in normal and osteoarthritic canine stifles.

    PubMed

    Barry, S L; Martinez, S A; Davies, N M; Remsberg, C M; Sayre, C L; Bachelez, A

    2015-02-01

    Intra-articular bupivacaine helps alleviate pain in animals receiving joint surgery, but its use has become controversial as ex vivo studies have illuminated the potential for chondrotoxicity. Such studies typically involve cell cultures incubated in solutions containing high bupivacaine concentrations for long durations. The aim of this study was to measure the actual synovial fluid bupivacaine concentrations after intra-articular injection. Eight healthy beagles with normal stifles and 22 large and giant-breed dogs with stifle osteoarthritis (OA) were treated with a single intra-articular injection of bupivacaine (1 mg/kg) into a stifle. Joint fluid samples were taken from the treated stifle immediately after injection and 30 min after injection and analyzed for bupivacaine concentrations. Immediately after injection, the median bupivacaine concentrations in normal and OA stifles were 3.6 and 2.5 mg/mL, respectively. Thirty minutes after injection, bupivacaine concentrations in normal and OA stifles were 0.4 and 0.6 mg/mL, respectively. These results provide insight into the pharmacokinetics of bupivacaine after injection into a joint. Given its immediate dilution and rapid drop in synovial fluid concentration, bupivacaine is unlikely to damage chondrocytes when administered as a single intra-articular injection.

  16. Microscopical analysis of synovial fluid wear debris from failing CoCr hip prostheses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, M. B.; Brown, A. P.; Cox, A.; Curry, A.; Denton, J.

    2010-07-01

    Metal on metal hip joint prostheses are now commonly implanted in patients with hip problems. Although hip replacements largely go ahead problem free, some complications can arise such as infection immediately after surgery and aseptic necrosis caused by vascular complications due to surgery. A recent observation that has been made at Manchester is that some Cobalt Chromium (CoCr) implants are causing chronic pain, with the source being as yet unidentified. This form of replacement failure is independent of surgeon or hospital and so some underlying body/implant interface process is thought to be the problem. When the synovial fluid from a failed joint is examined particles of metal (wear debris) can be found. Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) has been used to look at fixed and sectioned samples of the synovial fluid and this has identified fine (< 100 nm) metal and metal oxide particles within the fluid. TEM EDX and Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy (EELS) have been employed to examine the composition of the particles, showing them to be chromium rich. This gives rise to concern that the failure mechanism may be associated with the debris.

  17. Dynamic automated synovial imaging (DASI) for differential diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grisan, E.; Raffeiner, B.; Coran, A.; Rizzo, G.; Ciprian, L.; Stramare, R.

    2014-03-01

    Inflammatory rheumatic diseases are leading causes of disability and constitute a frequent medical disorder, leading to inability to work, high comorbidity and increased mortality. The gold-standard for diagnosing and differentiating arthritis is based on patient conditions and radiographic findings, as joint erosions or decalcification. However, early signs of arthritis are joint effusion, hypervascularization and synovial hypertrophy. In particular, vascularization has been shown to correlate with arthritis' destructive behavior, more than clinical assessment. Contrast Enhanced Ultrasound (CEUS) examination of the small joints is emerging as a sensitive tool for assessing vascularization and disease activity. The evaluation of perfusion pattern rely on subjective semiquantitative scales, that are able to capture the macroscopic degree of vascularization, but are unable to detect the subtler differences in kinetics perfusion parameters that might lead to a deeper understanding of disease progression and a better management of patients. We show that after a kinetic analysis of contrast agent appearance, providing the quantitative features characterizing the perfusion pattern of the joint, it is possible to accurately discriminate RA from PSA by building a random forest classifier on the computed features. We compare its accuracy with the assessment performed by expert radiologist blinded of the diagnosis.

  18. Fluorescent sensing of pyrophosphate anion in synovial fluid based on DNA-attached magnetic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Tong, Li-Li; Chen, Zhen-zhen; Jiang, Zhong-yao; Sun, Miao-miao; Li, Lu; Liu, Ju; Tang, Bo

    2015-10-15

    In this work, a new fluorescent method for sensitive detection of pyrophosphate anion (P2O7(4-), PPi) in the synovial fluid was developed using fluorophore labeled single-stranded DNA-attached Fe3O4 NPs. The sensing approach is based on the strong affinity of PPi to Fe3O4 NPs and highly efficient fluorescent quenching ability of Fe3O4 NPs for fluorophore labeled single-stranded DNA. In the presence of PPi, the fluorescence would enhance dramatically due to desorption of fluorophore labeled single-stranded DNA from the surface of Fe3O4 NPs, which allowed the analysis of PPi in a very simple manner. The proposed sensing system allows for the sensitive determination of PPi in the range of 2.0 × 10(-7)-4 × 10(-6)M with a detection limit of 76 nM. Importantly, the protocol exhibits excellent selectivity for the determination of PPi over other phosphate-containing compounds. The method was successfully applied to the determination of PPi in the synovial fluid, which suggests our proposed method has great potential for diagnostic purposes. PMID:25957830

  19. Changes in lipoxygenase products from synovial fluid in carrageenan induced arthritis in dogs.

    PubMed

    Herlin, T; Fogh, K; Ewald, H; Hansen, E S; Knudsen, V E; Holm, I; Kragballe, K; Bunger, C

    1988-07-01

    A non-suppurative chronic arthritis was induced in the juvenile dog knee by intra-articular instillations with Carrageenan. Lipoxygenase products of arachidonic acid were separated from synovial fluid by reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC). After ten weeks we observed an accumulation of leukotriene B4 (LTB4) in synovial fluid in five out of six experimental knees (0.94 to 5.5 ng/ml), as judged by integrated optical density. Biological activity of LTB4 was confirmed by chemokinesis. LTB4 was not detected in control knees. The 15-lipoxygenase products, 15-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (15-HETE) and 13-hydroxy-9,11-octadecadienoic acid (13-HODD), being inhibitors of 5-lipoxygenase, were found in relatively high levels in the control knees compared to the arthritic knees. The results denote LTB4 as a pro-inflammatory local mediator during carrageenan-induced arthritis; possibly, the decreased levels of 15-HETE and 13-HODD in the arthritic knees may have a regulatory function, thus facilitating LTB4 generation. PMID:2841956

  20. Effects of ACL Reconstructive Surgery on Temporal Variations of Cytokine Levels in Synovial Fluid.

    PubMed

    Bigoni, Marco; Turati, Marco; Gandolla, Marta; Sacerdote, Paola; Piatti, Massimiliano; Castelnuovo, Alberto; Franchi, Silvia; Gorla, Massimo; Munegato, Daniele; Gaddi, Diego; Pedrocchi, Alessandra; Omeljaniuk, Robert J; Locatelli, Vittorio; Torsello, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction restores knee stability but does not reduce the incidence of posttraumatic osteoarthritis induced by inflammatory cytokines. The aim of this research was to longitudinally measure IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, and TNF-α levels in patients subjected to ACL reconstruction using bone-patellar tendon-bone graft. Synovial fluid was collected within 24-72 hours of ACL rupture (acute), 1 month after injury immediately prior to surgery (presurgery), and 1 month thereafter (postsurgery). For comparison, a "control" group consisted of individuals presenting chronic ACL tears. Our results indicate that levels of IL-6, IL-8, and IL-10 vary significantly over time in reconstruction patients. In the acute phase, the levels of these cytokines in reconstruction patients were significantly greater than those in controls. In the presurgery phase, cytokine levels in reconstruction patients were reduced and comparable with those in controls. Finally, cytokine levels increased again with respect to control group in the postsurgery phase. The levels of IL-1β and TNF-α showed no temporal variation. Our data show that the history of an ACL injury, including trauma and reconstruction, has a significant impact on levels of IL-6, IL-8, and IL-10 in synovial fluid but does not affect levels of TNF-α and IL-1β. PMID:27313403

  1. Effects of ACL Reconstructive Surgery on Temporal Variations of Cytokine Levels in Synovial Fluid

    PubMed Central

    Bigoni, Marco; Gandolla, Marta; Sacerdote, Paola; Piatti, Massimiliano; Castelnuovo, Alberto; Franchi, Silvia; Gorla, Massimo; Munegato, Daniele; Gaddi, Diego; Pedrocchi, Alessandra; Omeljaniuk, Robert J.; Locatelli, Vittorio; Torsello, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction restores knee stability but does not reduce the incidence of posttraumatic osteoarthritis induced by inflammatory cytokines. The aim of this research was to longitudinally measure IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, and TNF-α levels in patients subjected to ACL reconstruction using bone-patellar tendon-bone graft. Synovial fluid was collected within 24–72 hours of ACL rupture (acute), 1 month after injury immediately prior to surgery (presurgery), and 1 month thereafter (postsurgery). For comparison, a “control” group consisted of individuals presenting chronic ACL tears. Our results indicate that levels of IL-6, IL-8, and IL-10 vary significantly over time in reconstruction patients. In the acute phase, the levels of these cytokines in reconstruction patients were significantly greater than those in controls. In the presurgery phase, cytokine levels in reconstruction patients were reduced and comparable with those in controls. Finally, cytokine levels increased again with respect to control group in the postsurgery phase. The levels of IL-1β and TNF-α showed no temporal variation. Our data show that the history of an ACL injury, including trauma and reconstruction, has a significant impact on levels of IL-6, IL-8, and IL-10 in synovial fluid but does not affect levels of TNF-α and IL-1β. PMID:27313403

  2. Effect of Fibroblast Growth Factor 2 on Equine Synovial Fluid Chondroprogenitor Expansion and Chondrogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Bianchessi, Marta; Chen, Yuwen; Durgam, Sushmitha; Pondenis, Holly; Stewart, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells have been identified in the synovial fluid of several species. This study was conducted to characterize chondroprogenitor (CP) cells in equine synovial fluid (SF) and to determine the effect of fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF-2) on SF-CP monolayer proliferation and subsequent chondrogenesis. We hypothesized that FGF-2 would stimulate SF-CP proliferation and postexpansion chondrogenesis. SF aspirates were collected from adult equine joints. Colony-forming unit (CFU) assays were performed during primary cultures. At first passage, SF-cells were seeded at low density, with or without FGF-2. Following monolayer expansion and serial immunophenotyping, cells were transferred to chondrogenic pellet cultures. Pellets were analyzed for chondrogenic mRNA expression and cartilage matrix secretion. There was a mean of 59.2 CFU/mL of SF. FGF-2 increased the number of population doublings during two monolayer passages and halved the population doubling times. FGF-2 did not alter the immunophenotype of SF-CPs during monolayer expansion, nor did FGF-2 compromise chondrogenesis. Hypertrophic phenotypic markers were not expressed in control or FGF-2 groups. FGF-2 did prevent the development of a “fibroblastic” cell layer around pellet periphery. FGF-2 significantly accelerates in vitro SF-CP expansion, the major hurdle to clinical application of this cell population, without detrimentally affecting subsequent chondrogenic capacity. PMID:26839571

  3. Biodynamic Performance of Hyaluronic Acid versus Synovial fluid of the Knee for Osteoarthritic Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Corvelli, Michael; Che, Bernadette; Saeui, Christopher; Singh, Anirudha; Elisseeff, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    Hyaluronic acid (HA), a natural biomaterial present in healthy joints but depleted in osteoarthritis (OA), has been employed clinically to provide symptomatic relief of joint pain. Joint movement combined with a reduced joint lubrication in osteoarthritic knees can result in increased wear and tear, chondrocyte apoptosis, and inflammation, leading to cascading cartilage deterioration. Therefore, development of an appropriate cartilage model and evaluation for its friction properties with potential lubricants in different conditions is necessary, which can closely resemble a mechanically induced OA cartilage. Additionally, the comparison of different models with and without endogenous lubricating surface zone proteins, such as PRG4 promotes a well-rounded understanding of cartilage lubrication. In this study, we present our findings on the lubricating effects of HA on different articular cartilage model surfaces in comparison to synovial fluid, a physiological lubricating biomaterial. The mechanical testings data demonstrated that HA reduced average static and kinetic friction coefficient values of the cartilage samples by 75% and 70%, respectively. Furthermore, HA mimicked the friction characteristics of freshly harvested natural synovial fluid throughout all tested and modeled OA conditions with no statistically significant difference. These characteristics led us to exclusively identify HA as an effective boundary layer lubricant in the technology that we develop to treat OA [Singh et al. 2104]. PMID:25858258

  4. Determination of marbofloxacin in plasma and synovial fluid by ultrafiltration followed by HPLC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Montesano, Camilla; Curini, Roberta; Sergi, Manuel; Compagnone, Dario; Celani, Gianluca; Varasano, Vincenzo; Petrizzi, Lucio; Amorena, Michele

    2016-05-10

    A rapid LC-MS/MS method for the determination of marbofloxacin in plasma and synovial fluid is presented in this study. The method uses a rapid sample preparation which only requires an ultrafiltration step with centrifugal filter devices. The optimized procedure allows a minimal need of sample (175 μL), particularly useful for synovial fluid samples which amount is rather limited; it is simple, rapid and easily applicable providing anyhow a satisfactory clean up, demonstrated by post-infusion experiments. On the other hand to maximize the speed of the analysis an ultrafast chromatographic separation has been obtained by selecting a column of 20 mm; the reduced run-time is suitable for processing numerous samples on a daily basis. Linearity was assessed in the range 5-2500 ng mL(-1); ofloxacin was used as internal standard. LOD and LOQ were respectively 1 and 5 ng/mL. The method was successfully applied to a set of samples generated during an experimental veterinary study.

  5. Inhibition of HMGB1-induced angiogenesis by cilostazol via SIRT1 activation in synovial fibroblasts from rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hye Young; Park, So Youn; Lee, Sung Won; Lee, Hye Rin; Lee, Won Suk; Rhim, Byung Yong; Hong, Ki Whan; Kim, Chi Dae

    2014-01-01

    High mobility group box chromosomal protein 1 (HMGB-1) released from injured cells plays an important role in the development of arthritis. This study investigated the anti-angiogenic effects of cilostazol in collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) of mice, and the underlying mechanisms involved. The expressions of HIF-1α, VEGF, NF-κB p65 and SIRT1 in synovial fibroblasts obtained from rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients were assessed by Western blotting, and in vitro and in vivo angiogenesis were analyzed. Tube formations by human microvascular endothelial cells (HMVECs) were significantly increased by direct exposure to HMGB1 or to conditioned medium derived from HMGB1-stimulated RA fibroblasts, and these increases were attenuated by cilostazol, the latter of which was blocked by sirtinol. HMGB1 increased the expression of HIF-1α and VEGF and concomitantly increased nuclear NF-κB p65 and DNA binding activity, but these effects of HMGB1 were inhibited by cilostazol. SIRT1 protein expression was time-dependently decreased (3-24 hr) by HMGB1, which was recovered by pretreatment with cilostazol (1-30 µM) or resveratrol, accompanying with increased SIRT1 deacetylase activity. In the tibiotarsal joint tissues of CIA mice treated with vehicle, HIF-1α- and VEGF-positive spots and CD31 staining were markedly exaggerated, whereas SIRT1 immunofluorescence was diminished. These variables were wholly reversed in cilostazol (30 mg/kg/day)-treated mice. Furthermore, number of blood vessels stained by von Willebrand factor antibody was significantly lower in cilostazol-treated CIA mice. Summarizing, cilostazol activated SIRT1 and inhibited NF-κB-mediated transcription, thereby suppressing the expression of HIF-1α and VEGF. In addition, cilostazol caused HIF-1α deacetylation by enhancing SIRT1 activity and reduced VEGF production, thereby had an anti-angiogenic effect in vitro studies and in CIA murine model.

  6. Thymoquinone inhibits TNF-α-induced inflammation and cell adhesion in rheumatoid arthritis synovial fibroblasts by ASK1 regulation.

    PubMed

    Umar, Sadiq; Hedaya, Omar; Singh, Anil K; Ahmed, Salahuddin

    2015-09-15

    Tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) is a pro-inflammatory cytokine produced by monocytes/macrophage that plays a pathological role in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). In this study, we investigate the effect of thymoquinone (TQ), a phytochemical found in Nigella sativa, in regulating TNF-α-induced RA synovial fibroblast (RA-FLS) activation. Treatment with TQ (1-5μM) had no marked effect on the viability of human RA-FLS. Pre-treatment of TQ inhibited TNF-α-induced interleukin-6 (IL-6) and IL-8 production and ICAM-1, VCAM-1, and cadherin-11 (Cad-11) expression in RA-FLS (p<0.01). Evaluation of the signaling events showed that TQ inhibited TNF-α-induced phospho-p38 and phospho-JNK expression, but had no inhibitory effect on NF-κB pathway, in RA-FLS (p<0.05; n=4). Interestingly, we observed that selective down-regulation of TNF-α-induced phospho-p38 and phospho-JNK activation by TQ is elicited through inhibition of apoptosis-regulated signaling kinase 1 (ASK1). Furthermore, TNF-α selectively induced phosphorylation of ASK1 at Thr845 residue in RA-FLS, which was inhibited by TQ pretreatment in a dose dependent manner (p<0.01). Pre-treatment of RA-FLS with ASK1 inhibitor (TC ASK10), blocked TNF-α induced expression of ICAM-1, VCAM-1, and Cad-11. Our results suggest that TNF-α-induced ASK1-p38/JNK pathway is an important mediator of cytokine synthesis and enhanced expression of adhesion molecule in RA-FLS and TQ, by selectively inhibiting this pathway, may have a potential therapeutic value in regulating tissue destruction observed in RA. PMID:26134265

  7. Inhibition of HMGB1-Induced Angiogenesis by Cilostazol via SIRT1 Activation in Synovial Fibroblasts from Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sung Won; Lee, Hye Rin; Lee, Won Suk; Rhim, Byung Yong; Hong, Ki Whan; Kim, Chi Dae

    2014-01-01

    High mobility group box chromosomal protein 1 (HMGB-1) released from injured cells plays an important role in the development of arthritis. This study investigated the anti-angiogenic effects of cilostazol in collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) of mice, and the underlying mechanisms involved. The expressions of HIF-1α, VEGF, NF-κB p65 and SIRT1 in synovial fibroblasts obtained from rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients were assessed by Western blotting, and in vitro and in vivo angiogenesis were analyzed. Tube formations by human microvascular endothelial cells (HMVECs) were significantly increased by direct exposure to HMGB1 or to conditioned medium derived from HMGB1-stimulated RA fibroblasts, and these increases were attenuated by cilostazol, the latter of which was blocked by sirtinol. HMGB1 increased the expression of HIF-1α and VEGF and concomitantly increased nuclear NF-κB p65 and DNA binding activity, but these effects of HMGB1 were inhibited by cilostazol. SIRT1 protein expression was time-dependently decreased (3–24 hr) by HMGB1, which was recovered by pretreatment with cilostazol (1–30 µM) or resveratrol, accompanying with increased SIRT1 deacetylase activity. In the tibiotarsal joint tissues of CIA mice treated with vehicle, HIF-1α- and VEGF-positive spots and CD31 staining were markedly exaggerated, whereas SIRT1 immunofluorescence was diminished. These variables were wholly reversed in cilostazol (30 mg/kg/day)-treated mice. Furthermore, number of blood vessels stained by von Willebrand factor antibody was significantly lower in cilostazol-treated CIA mice. Summarizing, cilostazol activated SIRT1 and inhibited NF-κB-mediated transcription, thereby suppressing the expression of HIF-1α and VEGF. In addition, cilostazol caused HIF-1α deacetylation by enhancing SIRT1 activity and reduced VEGF production, thereby had an anti-angiogenic effect in vitro studies and in CIA murine model. PMID:25126750

  8. Synovial membrane immunohistology in early-untreated rheumatoid arthritis reveals high expression of catabolic bone markers that is modulated by methotrexate

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction We aimed to investigate the expression and therapeutic modulation of the receptor activator of the NF-κB ligand (RANKL) system in early-untreated rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Methods In this study, 15 patients with newly diagnosed RA (median symptom duration 7 months) were started on methotrexate (MTX) 20 mg weekly. Synovial biopsies were obtained by needle arthroscopy at baseline and 8 weeks after initiation of therapy. X-rays of the hands and feet were obtained at baseline and 1 year after diagnosis. Immunohistochemistry was performed to detect RANKL, receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB (RANK) and osteoprotegerin (OPG) in the synovial biopsies. The in vitro effect of MTX was tested on RA-derived primary fibroblasts and the osteoblasts-like osteosarcoma cell line (rtPCR, Western blot and ELISA) and in osteoclasts (tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase staining and dentine pit formation assay). Results MTX decreased synovial cellularity as well as RANK expression and the RANKL/OPG ratio. We confirmed this effect by a decrease of the mRNA and protein RANKL/OPG ratio in synovial-derived fibroblasts and osteoblasts-like tumoral cells exposed in vitro to methotrexate. Supernatants from MTX treated osteoblasts-like tumoral cells prevented pre-osteoclast formation in the absence of exogenous RANKL. Furthermore, MTX blocked osteoclastogenesis from peripheral blood mononuclear cells despite the presence of macrophage colony stimulating factor and RANKL, which indicates that MTX directly inhibits osteoclastogenesis. Conclusions The synovial membrane of early-untreated RA is characterized by a high RANKL/OPG ratio that can be reversed by methotrexate. PMID:24295447

  9. Evaluation of a Genus- and Group-Specific Rapid PCR Assay Panel on Synovial Fluid for Diagnosis of Prosthetic Knee Infection

    PubMed Central

    Melendez, Dante P.; Greenwood-Quaintance, Kerryl E.; Berbari, Elie F.; Osmon, Douglas R.; Mandrekar, Jayawant N.; Hanssen, Arlen D.

    2015-01-01

    We evaluated a genus- and group-specific PCR assay panel using 284 prosthetic knee synovial fluid samples collected from patients presenting to our institution with implant failure. Using the Musculoskeletal Infection Society diagnostic criteria, 88 and 196 samples were classified as showing prosthetic joint infection (PJI) and aseptic failure (AF), respectively. Sensitivities of the synovial fluid PCR panel and culture were 55.6% and 76.1% (P ≤ 0.001), respectively, and specificities were 91.8% and 97.4% (P = 0.016), respectively. Among the 70 subjects who had received antibiotics within the month preceding synovial fluid aspiration (48 of whom had PJI), PCR panel and synovial fluid culture sensitivities were 64.5% and 85.4%, respectively (P < 0.0001). In this group, the PCR panel detected Staphylococcus aureus in two culture-negative PJI cases. Overall, the evaluated molecular diagnostic tool had low sensitivity when applied to synovial fluid. PMID:26537446

  10. Tiludronate concentrations and cytologic findings in synovial fluid after intravenous regional limb perfusion with tiludronate in horses

    PubMed Central

    Hunter, Barbara G.; Larson, Maureen K.

    2015-01-01

    Anecdotal accounts of tiludronate administration via intravenous regional limb perfusion (IVRLP) exist despite a lack of information regarding safety for synovial structures in the perfused area. The objective of this study was to determine whether tiludronate concentrations in synovial structures after IVRLP with low dose (0.5 mg, LDT) or high dose (50 mg, HDT) tiludronate remain below a value demonstrated in vitro to be safe for articular cartilage (<19,000 ng/ml), and to determine effects of tiludronate on synovial fluid cytology variables compared to saline perfused control limbs. Using a randomized controlled experimental study design, horses received IVRLP with LDT (n = 6) or HDT (n = 6) in one forelimb and IVRLP with saline in the contralateral limb. Synovial fluid cytology variables and tiludronate concentrations were evaluated in navicular bursae (NB), and distal interphalangeal (DIP) and metacarpophalangeal (MCP) joints one week before and 30–45 min after IVRLP, and in DIP and MCP joints 24 h after IVRLP. Data were analyzed with 2-way rmANOVA (p < 0.05). Highest measured synovial fluid tiludronate concentrations occurred 30–45 min post-perfusion. Mean tiludronate concentrations were lower in LDT limbs (MCP = 39.6 ± 14.3 ng/ml, DIP = 118.1 ± 66.6 ng/ml, NB = 82.1 ± 30.2 ng/ml) than in HDT limbs (MCP = 3,745.1 ± 1,536.6 ng/ml, DIP = 16,274.0 ± 5,460.2 ng/ml, NB = 6,049.3 ± 1,931.7 ng/ml). Tiludronate concentration was >19,000 ng/ml in DIP joints of two HDT limbs. Tiludronate was measurable only in synovial fluid from HDT limbs 24 h post-perfusion. There were no differences in synovial fluid cytology variables between control and treated limbs. Conclusions. In some horses, IVRLP with HDT may result in synovial fluid concentrations of tiludronate that may have adverse effects on articular cartilage, based on in vitro data. IVRLP with LDT is unlikely to promote articular cartilage degradation. Further studies to determine a safe and effective dose

  11. Surfactants identified in synovial fluid and their ability to act as boundary lubricants.

    PubMed Central

    Hills, B A; Butler, B D

    1984-01-01

    Thin-layer chromatography has been used to identify phospholipids extracted from canine synovial fluid, the major component (45%) being phosphatidyl choline (PC). The extracts and their components have been shown to be surface active in reducing the surface tension of water and to be readily adsorbed to hydrophilic solids, whose surfaces then become hydrophobic. These adsorbed monolayers of synovial surfactant were then found to be excellent boundary lubricants in vitro, reducing the coefficient of kinetic friction (mu) in the dry state and under physiological loading by up to 97% for extracts and 99% for PC alone, reaching mu = 0.01. Surface-active phospholipid is put forward as the possible active ingredient in joint lubrication and shown to be consistent with previous biochemical studies to elucidate its identity. The model essentially follows the classical Hardy model for boundary lubrication imparted by surfactants. It is discussed in relation to a new approach in providing artificial lubrication and facilitating tissue release in patients with arthritis. PMID:6476922

  12. Hyaluronan Oligosaccharides Induce MMP-1 and -3 via Transcriptional Activation of NF-κB and p38 MAPK in Rheumatoid Synovial Fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Hanabayashi, Masahiro; Takahashi, Nobunori; Sobue, Yasumori; Hirabara, Shinya; Ishiguro, Naoki; Kojima, Toshihisa

    2016-01-01

    Objective To explore the effect of hyaluronan oligosaccharides (HAoligos) on interactions between HA and its principal receptor, CD44, in rheumatoid synovial fibroblasts (RSFs) and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) production. Methods RSFs were isolated from rheumatoid synovial tissue. HA distribution was visualized by immunocytochemistry. MMP-1 and MMP-3 induction was analyzed by real-time RT-PCR and immunoblotting. The interaction between HAoligos and their MMP-producing receptors was tested by blocking with anti-CD44 and anti-Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR-4). Phosphorylation of nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) was analyzed by immunoblotting. Results Endogenous HA decreased after treatment with HAoligos, while MMP-1 and MMP-3 expression increased in a dose-dependent manner. Pretreatment with anti-CD44 or anti-TLR-4 antibody significantly reduced the effect of HAoligos on MMP-1 and MMP-3 mRNA expression. NF-κB and p38 MAPK phosphorylation was enhanced by HAoligos pretreated with anti-TLR-4, and HAoligo-induced MMP production was blocked with an inhibitor of NF-κB and p38 MAPK pathways. Conclusions Disruptive changes in CD44-HA interactions by HAoligos enhanced MMP-1 and MMP-3 production via activation of NF-κB and p38 MAPK signaling pathways in RSFs. PMID:27564851

  13. Single Molecule Microscopy Reveals an Increased Hyaluronan Diffusion Rate in Synovial Fluid from Knees Affected by Osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Kohlhof, Hendrik; Gravius, Sascha; Kohl, Sandro; Ahmad, Sufian S; Randau, Thomas; Schmolders, Jan; Rommelspacher, Yorck; Friedrich, Max; Kaminski, Tim P

    2016-02-12

    Osteoarthritis is a common and progressive joint disorder. Despite its widespread, in clinical practice only late phases of osteoarthritis that are characterized by severe joint damage are routinely detected. Since osteoarthritis cannot be cured but relatively well managed, an early diagnosis and thereby early onset of disease management would lower the burden of osteoarthritis. Here we evaluated if biophysical parameters of small synovial fluid samples extracted by single molecule microscopy can be linked to joint damage. In healthy synovial fluid (ICRS-score < 1) hyaluronan showed a slower diffusion (2.2 μm(2)/s, N = 5) than in samples from patients with joint damage (ICRS-score > 2) (4.5 μm(2)/s, N = 16). More strikingly, the diffusion coefficient of hyaluronan in healthy synovial fluid was on average 30% slower than expected by sample viscosity. This effect was diminished or missing in samples from patients with joint damage. Since single molecule microscopy needs only microliters of synovial fluid to extract the viscosity and the specific diffusion coefficient of hyaluronan this method could be of use as diagnostic tool for osteoarthritis.

  14. Single Molecule Microscopy Reveals an Increased Hyaluronan Diffusion Rate in Synovial Fluid from Knees Affected by Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Kohlhof, Hendrik; Gravius, Sascha; Kohl, Sandro; Ahmad, Sufian S.; Randau, Thomas; Schmolders, Jan; Rommelspacher, Yorck; Friedrich, Max; Kaminski, Tim P.

    2016-01-01

    Osteoarthritis is a common and progressive joint disorder. Despite its widespread, in clinical practice only late phases of osteoarthritis that are characterized by severe joint damage are routinely detected. Since osteoarthritis cannot be cured but relatively well managed, an early diagnosis and thereby early onset of disease management would lower the burden of osteoarthritis. Here we evaluated if biophysical parameters of small synovial fluid samples extracted by single molecule microscopy can be linked to joint damage. In healthy synovial fluid (ICRS-score < 1) hyaluronan showed a slower diffusion (2.2 μm2/s, N = 5) than in samples from patients with joint damage (ICRS-score > 2) (4.5 μm2/s, N = 16). More strikingly, the diffusion coefficient of hyaluronan in healthy synovial fluid was on average 30% slower than expected by sample viscosity. This effect was diminished or missing in samples from patients with joint damage. Since single molecule microscopy needs only microliters of synovial fluid to extract the viscosity and the specific diffusion coefficient of hyaluronan this method could be of use as diagnostic tool for osteoarthritis. PMID:26868769

  15. Intraarticular volume and clearance in human synovial effusions

    SciTech Connect

    Wallis, W.J.; Simkin, P.A.; Nelp, W.B.; Foster, D.M.

    1985-04-01

    Intraarticular volumes were measured by radiolabeled albumin (RISA) distribution in chronic knee effusions from 11 rheumatoid arthritis patients and 9 osteoarthritis patients. Volumes of synovial fluid obtained at joint aspiration were substantially less than those found by RISA dilution. Up to 24 hours was needed for full distribution of RISA throughout the intraarticular compartment. Measured 123I and RISA radioactivity over the knee described monoexponential rate constants, lambda (minute-1). The clearance of 123I and RISA from synovial effusions was derived by the formulation volume (ml) X lambda (minute-1) = clearance (ml/minute). RISA clearance in rheumatoid effusions was significantly greater than that found in osteoarthritis effusions. Intraarticular volume and isotope clearance were easily quantified and provide measures for further evaluating the microvascular physiology of synovial effusions.

  16. Serum and Synovial Fluid Levels of CCL18 are Correlated with Radiographic Grading of Knee Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yun; Chen, Juwu; Yang, Guohui

    2015-01-01

    Background Chemokines are involved in the pathogenesis of osteoarthritis (OA). CCL18, a member of the chemokines family, is observed in synovial fluid (SF) of OA patients. The aim of this study was to determine the association between CCL18 levels in serum and SF with radiographic knee OA. Material/Methods This study was conducted in a population of 308 patients with knee OA. The radiological knee OA was graded by the Kellgren-Lawrence grading system. Results Serum levels of CCL18 in knee OA patients were markedly higher than those in healthy controls. Serum and SF levels of CCL18 increased with the severity of KL grades and were correlated with disease severity. Conclusions The CCL18 levels in serum and SF are correlated with the severity of OA. PMID:25794928

  17. Thymoquinone inhibits TNF-α-induced inflammation and cell adhesion in rheumatoid arthritis synovial fibroblasts by ASK1 regulation

    SciTech Connect

    Umar, Sadiq; Hedaya, Omar; Singh, Anil K.; Ahmed, Salahuddin

    2015-09-15

    Tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) is a pro-inflammatory cytokine produced by monocytes/macrophage that plays a pathological role in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). In this study, we investigate the effect of thymoquinone (TQ), a phytochemical found in Nigella sativa, in regulating TNF-α-induced RA synovial fibroblast (RA-FLS) activation. Treatment with TQ (1–5 μM) had no marked effect on the viability of human RA-FLS. Pre-treatment of TQ inhibited TNF-α-induced interleukin-6 (IL-6) and IL-8 production and ICAM-1, VCAM-1, and cadherin-11 (Cad-11) expression in RA-FLS (p < 0.01). Evaluation of the signaling events showed that TQ inhibited TNF-α-induced phospho-p38 and phospho-JNK expression, but had no inhibitory effect on NF-κB pathway, in RA-FLS (p < 0.05; n = 4). Interestingly, we observed that selective down-regulation of TNF-α-induced phospho-p38 and phospho-JNK activation by TQ is elicited through inhibition of apoptosis-regulated signaling kinase 1 (ASK1). Furthermore, TNF-α selectively induced phosphorylation of ASK1 at Thr845 residue in RA-FLS, which was inhibited by TQ pretreatment in a dose dependent manner (p < 0.01). Pre-treatment of RA-FLS with ASK1 inhibitor (TC ASK10), blocked TNF-α induced expression of ICAM-1, VCAM-1, and Cad-11. Our results suggest that TNF-α-induced ASK1-p38/JNK pathway is an important mediator of cytokine synthesis and enhanced expression of adhesion molecule in RA-FLS and TQ, by selectively inhibiting this pathway, may have a potential therapeutic value in regulating tissue destruction observed in RA. - Highlights: • Evolving evidence suggests that ASK1 plays a central role in rheumatic arthritis (RA). • TNF-α activates ASK1, which regulate downstream signaling through JNK/p38 activation in RA-FLS. • ASK1 may be used as a potential therapeutic target in RA. • Thymoquinone was able to selectively inhibit TNF-α-induced phosphorylation of ASK1 in RA-FLS. • Thymoquinone might serve as a potential small

  18. The value of synovial fluid assays in the diagnosis of joint disease: a literature survey

    PubMed Central

    Swan, A; Amer, H; Dieppe, P

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To carry out a critical appraisal of the literature in an attempt to assess the current value of synovial fluid (SF) analysis in the diagnosis of joint disease. Methods: A literature search was undertaken using the Medline, Biomed, Bids, Pubmed, and Embase electronic databases using the keywords: synovial fluid (SF) analysis, SF crystals, joint sepsis, acute arthritis, and SF cell counts, cytology, biomarkers, and microbiology. Results: Publications fell into three main categories. Firstly, reports assessing the value of the three traditional assays (microbiology, white blood cell counts, and microscopy for pathogenic crystals). For these quality control evidence was found to be sparse, and tests for sensitivity, specificity, and reliability showed worrying variations. These poor standards in SF analysis may be due to lack of inclusion of some tests within routine pathology services. Secondly, claims for the usefulness of "new" assays (cytology and biochemical markers). For cytology, the supporting evidence was mainly anecdotal and there were no reports on specificity, sensitivity, and reliability. Interpretation difficulties are a major hindrance to the clinical use of biochemical assays, which remain primarily research tools. Finally, work on the diagnostic value of SF analysis in general. The appraisal confirmed that SF analysis remains of major diagnostic value in acute arthritis, where septic arthritis or crystal arthropathy is suspected, and in intercritical gout. Conclusions: Given the importance of SF tests, rationalisation of their use, together with improved quality control, should be immediate priorities. Further investigation is recommended into the contribution of SF inspection and white cell counts to diagnosis, as well as of the specificity and sensitivity of SF microbiological assays, crystal identification, and cytology. PMID:12006320

  19. Use of soluble peptide–DR4 tetramers to detect synovial T cells specific for cartilage antigens in patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Kotzin, Brian L.; Falta, Michael T.; Crawford, Frances; Rosloniec, Edward F.; Bill, Jerry; Marrack, Philippa; Kappler, John

    2000-01-01

    Considerable evidence indicates that CD4+ T cells are important in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), but the antigens recognized by these T cells in the joints of patients remain unclear. Previous studies have suggested that type II collagen (CII) and human cartilage gp39 (HCgp39) are among the most likely synovial antigens to be involved in T cell stimulation in RA. Furthermore, experiments have defined dominant peptide determinants of these antigens when presented by HLA-DR4, the most important RA-associated HLA type. We used fluorescent, soluble peptide–DR4 complexes (tetramers) to detect synovial CD4+ T cells reactive with CII and HCgp39 in DR4+ patients. The CII-DR4 complex bound in a specific manner to CII peptide-reactive T cell hybridomas, but did not stain a detectable fraction of synovial CD4+ cells. A background percentage of positive cells (<0.2%) was not greater in DR4 (DRB1*0401) patients compared with those without this disease-associated allele. Similar results were obtained with the gp39-DR4 complex for nearly all RA patients. In a small subset of DR4+ patients, however, the percentage of synovial CD4+ cells binding this complex was above background and could not be attributed to nonspecific binding. These studies demonstrate the potential for peptide–MHC class II tetramers to be used to track antigen-specific T cells in human autoimmune diseases. Together, the results also suggest that the major oligoclonal CD4+ T cell expansions present in RA joints are not specific for the dominant CII and HCgp39 determinants. PMID:10618411

  20. Measurements of C-reactive protein in serum and lactate dehydrogenase in serum and synovial fluid of patients with osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Hurter, K; Spreng, D; Rytz, U; Schawalder, P; Ott-Knüsel, F; Schmökel, H

    2005-03-01

    Diagnosis of osteoarthritis (OA) is based upon the clinical orthopaedic examination and the radiographic assessment, both of which can be non-specific and insensitive in early joint disease. The aim of our study was to investigate if there is an increase in serum levels of C-reactive protein (CRP) in degenerative joint disease (DJD) and if CRP could be used to help diagnose OA. We also wished to investigate whether it was possible to distinguish a joint with clinically and radiographically confirmed OA from a healthy joint by comparing lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) levels within the synovial fluid and the serum. We have shown a difference in synovial LDH levels between diseased and healthy joints (P<0.0001). There was also a significant difference between LDH in arthritic synovial fluid and serum, with no correlation between the values. Despite the fact that the values of our clinical patients tended to be higher than the values of our control group (P=0.05) all measured values were within the normal limits of previous publications. From these data, we conclude that single measurements of serum CRP do not permit detection of OA in clinical patients and that serum LDH is not a reliable marker for osteoarthritis. LDH levels in the synovial fluid could be of diagnostic value for identifying osteoarthritis. PMID:15727922

  1. Synovial fluid hyaluronan mediates MSC attachment to cartilage, a potential novel mechanism contributing to cartilage repair in osteoarthritis using knee joint distraction

    PubMed Central

    Mastbergen, Simon C; Jones, Elena; Calder, Stuart J; Lafeber, Floris P J G; McGonagle, Dennis

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Knee joint distraction (KJD) is a novel, but poorly understood, treatment for osteoarthritis (OA) associated with remarkable ‘spontaneous’ cartilage repair in which resident synovial fluid (SF) multipotential mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) may play a role. We hypothesised that SF hyaluronic acid (HA) inhibited the initial interaction between MSCs and cartilage, a key first step to integration, and postulate that KJD environment favoured MSC/cartilage interactions. Methods Attachment of dual-labelled SF-MSCs were assessed in a novel in vitro human cartilage model using OA and rheumatoid arthritic (RA) SF. SF was digested with hyaluronidase (hyase) and its effect on adhesion was observed using confocal microscopy. MRI and microscopy were used to image autologous dual-labelled MSCs in an in vivo canine model of KJD. SF-HA was investigated using gel electrophoresis and densitometry. Results Osteoarthritic-synovial fluid (OA-SF) and purified high molecular weight (MW) HA inhibited SF-MSC adhesion to plastic, while hyase treatment of OA-SF but not RA-SF significantly increased MSC adhesion to cartilage (3.7-fold, p<0.05) These differences were linked to the SF mediated HA-coat which was larger in OA-SF than in RA-SF. OA-SF contained >9 MDa HA and this correlated with increases in adhesion (r=0.880). In the canine KJD model, MSC adhesion to cartilage was evident and also dependent on HA MW. Conclusions These findings highlight an unappreciated role of SF-HA on MSC interactions and provide proof of concept that endogenous SF-MSCs are capable of adhering to cartilage in a favourable biochemical and biomechanical environment in OA distracted joints, offering novel one-stage strategies towards joint repair. PMID:25948596

  2. Legg-Calvé-Perthes disease produces chronic hip synovitis and elevation of interleukin-6 in the synovial fluid.

    PubMed

    Kamiya, Nobuhiro; Yamaguchi, Ryosuke; Adapala, Naga Suresh; Chen, Elena; Neal, David; Jack, Obrien; Thoveson, Alec; Gudmundsson, Paul; Brabham, Case; Aruwajoye, Olumide; Drissi, Hicham; Kim, Harry K W

    2015-06-01

    Legg-Calvé-Perthes disease (LCPD) is a childhood hip disorder of ischemic osteonecrosis of the femoral head. Hip joint synovitis is a common feature of LCPD, but the nature and pathophysiology of the synovitis remain unknown. The purpose of this study was to determine the chronicity of the synovitis and the inflammatory cytokines present in the synovial fluid at an active stage of LCPD. Serial MRI was performed on 28 patients. T2-weighted and gadolinium-enhanced MR images were used to assess synovial effusion and synovial enhancement (hyperemia) over time. A multiple-cytokine assay was used to determine the levels of 27 inflammatory cytokines and related factors present in the synovial fluid from 13 patients. MRI analysis showed fold increases of 5.0 ± 3.3 and 3.1 ± 2.1 in the synovial fluid volume in the affected hip compared to the unaffected hip at the initial and the last follow-up MRI, respectively. The mean duration between the initial and the last MRI was 17.7 ± 8.3 months. The volume of enhanced synovium on the contrast MRI was increased 16.5 ± 8.5 fold and 6.3 ± 5.6 fold in the affected hip compared to the unaffected hip at the initial MRI and the last follow-up MRI, respectively. In the synovial fluid of the affected hips, IL-6 protein levels were significantly increased (LCPD: 509 ± 519 pg/mL, non-LCPD: 19 ± 22 pg/mL; p = 0.0005) on the multi-cytokine assay. Interestingly, IL-1β and TNF-α levels were not elevated. In the active stage of LCPD, chronic hip synovitis and significant elevation of IL-6 are produced in the synovial fluid. Further studies are warranted to investigate the role of IL-6 on the pathophysiology of synovitis in LCPD and how it affects bone healing. PMID:25556551

  3. Expression of miR-146a, miR-155, and miR-223 in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded synovial tissues of patients with rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Kriegsmann, Mark; Randau, Thomas M; Gravius, Sascha; Lisenko, Katharina; Altmann, Carolin; Arens, Norbert; Kriegsmann, Jörg

    2016-07-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic autoimmune disease with a heterogeneous clinical presentation affecting about 1 % of adults in developed countries. Currently, the diagnosis is based on the revised criteria of the American College of Rheumatology (ACR) and the European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) from 2010. These criteria include clinical and laboratory parameters. Because of the variability of the clinical picture, delayed diagnosis of RA occurs in a significant subset of patients. Therefore, the discovery of novel biomarkers that improve the diagnosis of RA is of particular interest. Recently, it became evident that miRNAs have regulatory activities in physiologic processes and human diseases. Upregulation of miR-146a, miR-155, and miR-223 has been shown in various compartments such as serum, blood, synovial fluid, and tissues in patients with RA. A total of 87 samples were analyzed (RA 50, osteoarthritis (OA) 37). RNA was isolated from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded synovial tissue (FFPE). The relative expression of miR-146a, miR-155, and miR-223 was determined by comparison to a housekeeping RNA molecule (snRNA U6) and an RNA pool from histologically and clinically verified OA samples. miR-146a, miR-155, and miR-223 were significantly elevated in RA compared to OA synovial tissues (p < 0.001). A strong correlation between the miRNAs could be observed. The sensitivity and specificity for the detection of RA were 0.76/0.80 (miR-146a), 0.80/0.95 (miR-155), and 0.86/0.81 (miR-223). The combination of miR-155 and miR-223 resulted in the highest area under the curve (AUC 0.92) with a sensitivity and specificity of 0.84/0.91, respectively. Significantly higher expression levels of miR-146a, miR-155, and miR-223 in FFPE synovial tissue samples of patients with established RA compared to patients with OA were shown. The usefulness of these miRs for the differential diagnosis of early phases of RA against OA remains to be investigated. PMID:27079198

  4. Recovery of microorganisms from synovial and pleural fluids of animals using hyperosmolar media.

    PubMed

    Buchanan, A M; Davis, D C; Pedersen, N C; Beaman, B L

    1982-03-01

    L-phase (CWD) broth and plate media were used in parallel with conventional microbiological media during a 3-year period for culturing synovial and pleural fluids of animals. Two kinds of recoveries were obtained where parallel conventional methods were negative: (1) parent or normal bacteria, in very low numbers; and (2) Type B CWD variants in equally low numbers. Organisms in group 1 were: Streptococcus zooepidemicus from horses (2x); beta-hemolytic streptococci, Lancefield Gp. G (2x); Staphylococcus aureus; Actinobacillus, and Actinomyces viscosus. Group 2 consisted of Bacteroides sp., Propionibacterium acnes, and three "Nocardia-like" sp. Catalase + Actinomyces was not recovered equally well on CWD plates as on conventional media with fluids obtained during ampicillin treatment. This occurred in spite of the fact that the CWD media was shown to support growth and reversion of laboratory induced L-phase variants of Nocardia caviae and N. asteroides, and had facilitated recovery of a Bacteroides L-phase variant from a pleural fluid. The nature of this fault in the media is under investigation in this laboratory. PMID:7101719

  5. Hairy polyelectrolyte brushes-grafted thermosensitive microgels as artificial synovial fluid for simultaneous biomimetic lubrication and arthritis treatment.

    PubMed

    Liu, Guoqiang; Liu, Zhilu; Li, Na; Wang, Xiaolong; Zhou, Feng; Liu, Weimin

    2014-11-26

    We report the fabrication of poly(3-sulfopropyl methacrylate potassium salt) (PSPMK) brushes grafted poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAAm) microgels and their potential as artificial synovial fluid for biomimetic aqueous lubrication and arthritis treatment. The negatively charged PSPMK brushes and thermosensitive PNIPAAm microgels play water-based hydration lubrication and temperature-triggered drug release, respectively. Under soft friction pairs, an ultralow coefficient of friction was achieved, while the hairy thermosensitive microgels showed a desirable temperature-triggered drugs release performance. Such a soft charged hairy microgel offers great possibility for designing intelligent synovial fluid. What is more, the combination of lubrication and drug loading capabilities enables the large clinical potential of novel soft hairy nanoparticles as synthetic joint lubricant fluid in arthritis treatment.

  6. Comprehensive protein profiling of synovial fluid in osteoarthritis following protein equalization

    PubMed Central

    Peffers, M.J.; McDermott, B.; Clegg, P.D.; Riggs, C.M.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Objective The aim of the study was to characterise the protein complement of synovial fluid (SF) in health and osteoarthritis (OA) using liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) following peptide-based depletion of high abundance proteins. Design SF was used from nine normal and nine OA Thoroughbred horses. Samples were analysed with LC-MS/MS using a NanoAcquity™ LC coupled to an LTQ Orbitrap Velos. In order to enrich the lower-abundance protein fractions protein equalisation was first undertaken using ProteoMiner™. Progenesis-QI™ LC-MS software was used for label-free quantification. In addition immunohistochemistry, western blotting and mRNA expression analysis was undertaken on selected joint tissues. Results The number of protein identifications was increased by 33% in the ProteoMiner™ treated SF compared to undepleted SF. A total of 764 proteins (462 with≥2 significant peptides) were identified in SF. A subset of 10 proteins were identified which were differentially expressed in OA SF. S100-A10, a calcium binding protein was upregulated in OA and validated with western blotting and immunohistochemistry. Several new OA specific peptide fragments (neopeptides) were identified. Conclusion The protein equalisation method compressed the dynamic range of the synovial proteins identifying the most comprehensive SF proteome to date. A number of proteins were identified for the first time in SF which may be involved in the pathogenesis of OA. We identified a distinct set of proteins and neopeptides that may act as potential biomarkers to distinguish between normal and OA joints. PMID:25819577

  7. Receptor activator NF-κB ligand (RANKL) expression in synovial tissue from patients with rheumatoid arthritis, spondyloarthropathy, osteoarthritis, and from normal patients: semiquantitative and quantitative analysis

    PubMed Central

    Crotti, T; Smith, M; Weedon, H; Ahern, M; Findlay, D; Kraan, M; Tak, P; Haynes, D

    2002-01-01

    Objectives: To compare receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL) production in the synovial tissue from patients with active rheumatoid arthritis (RA), inactive RA, spondyloarthropathies (SpA), osteoarthritis, and from normal subjects. In addition, to establish the cell lineages expressing RANKL in these tissues. Methods: Immunohistological analysis of frozen synovial tissue biopsy specimens was performed using a monoclonal antibody (mAb) to detect RANKL. Sections were evaluated by computer assisted image analysis and semiquantitative analysis to compare RANKL expression between groups. Dual and sequential labelling with mAb RANKL and cell lineage specific monoclonal antibodies were used to determine the types of cells expressing RANKL. Results: Higher levels of RANKL were expressed in tissues from patients with active RA and SpA than in tissues from patients with inactive RA, osteoarthritis, and from normal subjects. RANKL protein was associated with CD3 antigen-positive lymphocytes and some macrophages. RANKL was predominantly associated with activated, memory T cells (CD45Ro positive cells) in patients with active RA and spondyloarthropathy (SpA). Conclusions: The highest levels of RANKL were detected in patients with RA with active synovitis and in some patients with SpA. An increase in RANKL in the inflamed joint of patients with RA, produced by infiltrating activated T cells and macrophages, is likely to be an important cause of joint erosions in RA. PMID:12429533

  8. Identification of prostaglandin E2 and leukotriene B4 in the synovial fluid of painful, dysfunctional temporomandibular joints.

    PubMed

    Quinn, J H; Bazan, N G

    1990-09-01

    It has been hypothesized that prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and leukotriene B4 (LTB4) should be present in the synovial fluid of inflamed, dysfunctional temporomandibular joints. An assay to identify PGE2 and LTB4 and platelet-activating factor (PAF) was used, and a strong correlation between the levels of these lipid mediators of pain and inflammation and an index of clinical joint pathology was found. PMID:2168477

  9. Synovial fluid pretreatment with hyaluronidase facilitates isolation of CD44+ extracellular vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Boere, Janneke; van de Lest, Chris H. A.; Libregts, Sten F. W. M.; Arkesteijn, Ger J. A.; Geerts, Willie J. C.; Nolte-'t Hoen, Esther N. M.; Malda, Jos; van Weeren, P. René; Wauben, Marca H. M.

    2016-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) in synovial fluid (SF) are gaining increased recognition as important factors in joint homeostasis, joint regeneration, and as biomarkers of joint disease. A limited number of studies have investigated EVs in SF samples of patients with joint disease, but knowledge on the role of EVs in healthy joints is lacking. In addition, no standardized protocol is available for isolation of EVs from SF. Based on the high viscosity of SF caused by high concentrations of hyaluronic acid (HA) – a prominent extracellular matrix component – it was hypothesized that EV recovery could be optimized by pretreatment with hyaluronidase (HYase). Therefore, the efficiency of EV isolation from healthy equine SF samples was tested by performing sequential ultracentrifugation steps (10,000g, 100,000g and 200,000g) in the presence or absence of HYase. Quantitative EV analysis using high-resolution flow cytometry showed an efficient recovery of EVs after 100,000g ultracentrifugation, with an increased yield of CD44+ EVs when SF samples were pretreated with HYase. Morphological analysis of SF-derived EVs with cryo-transmission-electron microscopy did not indicate damage by high-speed ultracentrifugation and revealed that most EVs are spherical with a diameter of 20–200 nm. Further protein characterization by Western blotting revealed that healthy SF-derived EVs contain CD9, Annexin-1, and CD90/Thy1.1. Taken together, these data suggest that EV isolation protocols for body fluids that contain relatively high amounts of HA, such as SF, could benefit from treatment of the fluid with HYase prior to ultracentrifugation. This method facilitates recovery and detection of CD44+ EVs within the HA-rich extracellular matrix. Furthermore, based on the findings presented here, it is recommended to sediment SF-derived EVs with at least 100,000g for optimal EV recovery. PMID:27511891

  10. Synovial fluid pretreatment with hyaluronidase facilitates isolation of CD44+ extracellular vesicles.

    PubMed

    Boere, Janneke; van de Lest, Chris H A; Libregts, Sten F W M; Arkesteijn, Ger J A; Geerts, Willie J C; Nolte-'t Hoen, Esther N M; Malda, Jos; van Weeren, P René; Wauben, Marca H M

    2016-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) in synovial fluid (SF) are gaining increased recognition as important factors in joint homeostasis, joint regeneration, and as biomarkers of joint disease. A limited number of studies have investigated EVs in SF samples of patients with joint disease, but knowledge on the role of EVs in healthy joints is lacking. In addition, no standardized protocol is available for isolation of EVs from SF. Based on the high viscosity of SF caused by high concentrations of hyaluronic acid (HA) - a prominent extracellular matrix component - it was hypothesized that EV recovery could be optimized by pretreatment with hyaluronidase (HYase). Therefore, the efficiency of EV isolation from healthy equine SF samples was tested by performing sequential ultracentrifugation steps (10,000g, 100,000g and 200,000g) in the presence or absence of HYase. Quantitative EV analysis using high-resolution flow cytometry showed an efficient recovery of EVs after 100,000g ultracentrifugation, with an increased yield of CD44+ EVs when SF samples were pretreated with HYase. Morphological analysis of SF-derived EVs with cryo-transmission-electron microscopy did not indicate damage by high-speed ultracentrifugation and revealed that most EVs are spherical with a diameter of 20-200 nm. Further protein characterization by Western blotting revealed that healthy SF-derived EVs contain CD9, Annexin-1, and CD90/Thy1.1. Taken together, these data suggest that EV isolation protocols for body fluids that contain relatively high amounts of HA, such as SF, could benefit from treatment of the fluid with HYase prior to ultracentrifugation. This method facilitates recovery and detection of CD44+ EVs within the HA-rich extracellular matrix. Furthermore, based on the findings presented here, it is recommended to sediment SF-derived EVs with at least 100,000g for optimal EV recovery. PMID:27511891

  11. Inhibitor-free DNA for real-time PCR analysis of synovial fluid from horses, cattle and pigs.

    PubMed

    Schneeweiss, Wilfried; Stanek, Christian; Wagner, Martin; Hein, Ingeborg

    2007-03-31

    The potential of five different commercial DNA isolation methods to remove real-time PCR inhibitors from the synovial fluid of horses, cattle and pigs was investigated. All kits with the exception of one included a silica column-based purification of the DNA. With the fifth kit, DNA purification is achieved by removing contaminating macromolecules by a desalting process. We used a recently developed method based on comparison of the real-time PCR signal of an artificial target incorporated into each PCR reaction in the presence of the isolated DNA from the sample, and in control samples containing water instead of isolated DNA. This was followed by statistical analysis of the data. Inhibition and subsequent reduction of the endpoint fluorescence in the real-time PCR reaction was encountered in many cases. Less frequently, the target copy number in the samples was underestimated. However, we found no experimental evidence of a negative influence of the reduced endpoint fluorescence signal on the detection limit of the real-time PCR assay. All kits tested were useful for analyzing pelleted synovial fluid from horses, cattle and pigs. When analyzing non-pelleted synovial fluid, three kits - two based on silica columns and one employing a desalting process - yielded inhibitor-free DNA for real-time PCR analysis. PMID:17222992

  12. Soluble CD14 levels in the serum, synovial fluid, and cerebrospinal fluid of patients with various stages of Lyme disease.

    PubMed

    Lin, B; Noring, R; Steere, A C; Klempner, M S; Hu, L T

    2000-03-01

    Levels of circulating soluble CD14 (sCD14) in patients with various stages of Lyme disease (LD) were examined. Patients with early or untreated late LD had significantly higher levels of sCD14 than did healthy controls (P=.0001 and .0007, respectively); levels returned to normal within 3 months after antibiotic therapy. Patients with persistent posttreatment symptoms of LD had sCD14 levels equivalent to those of healthy controls. Differences in the serum sCD14 levels in patients with various stages of LD are likely to be directly correlated with differences in bacterial burden, suggesting that posttreatment symptoms may not require continued presence of the organism. sCD14 levels in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of patients with any stage of LD were no different from those of control subjects. Levels of synovial fluid sCD14 from patients with Borrelia burgdorferi in their joints were elevated, compared with levels in normal serum, and may play a role in the pathogenesis of arthritis.

  13. Chemical nature of implant-derived titanium(IV) ions in synovial fluid

    SciTech Connect

    Silwood, Christopher J.L.; Grootveld, Martin . E-mail: grootvm@lsbu.ac.uk

    2005-05-13

    Previous investigations have indicated a deleterious leakage of Ti(III) and/or Ti(IV) species from Ti-Al-V alloy joint prostheses into adjacent tissue, synovium or synovial fluid (SF) in vivo. In view of the importance of the particular chemical nature of such complexes in determining their biological activity, we have employed high field proton ({sup 1}H) NMR spectroscopy to 'speciate' Ti(IV) in inflammatory SF. Treatment of osteoarthritic SF samples with increasing concentrations of Ti(IV) (0.10-1.03 mM [TiO(C{sub 2}O{sub 4}){sub 2}]{sup 2-}) gave rise to a specific broadening of the citrate proton resonances, indicating that this bioavailable oxygen-donor ligand plays an important role in complexing implant-derived Ti(IV). {sup 1}H NMR analysis of Ti(IV)-loaded SF samples subsequently treated with a large excess of ascorbate (0.05 M) showed that this added Ti(IV) chelator was only poorly effective in removing this metal ion from Ti(IV)-citrate/Ti(IV)-oxycitrate complexes. The results obtained here provide evidence for complexation of the low-molecular-mass (non-protein-bound) fraction of implant-derived Ti(IV) by citrate in vivo.

  14. Lubricin expression in human osteoarthritic knee meniscus and synovial fluid: a morphological, immunohistochemical and biochemical study.

    PubMed

    Musumeci, Giuseppe; Trovato, Francesca Maria; Loreto, Carla; Leonardi, Rosalia; Szychlinska, Marta Anna; Castorina, Sergio; Mobasheri, Ali

    2014-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the expression of lubricin, the product of the human PRG4 (proteoglycan 4) gene, in menisci and synovial fluid from normal donors and patients with osteoarthritis (OA), using a combination of histology, immunohistochemistry, ELISA and Western blotting analysis, to provide further insight on the role of this protein in the progression of OA and pathological processes in the meniscus. Lubricin expression was studied in samples from 40 patients and in 9 normal donors after arthroscopic partial meniscectomy. Histological analysis confirmed normal microanatomy and the absence of structural changes in control samples. Menisci derived from OA patients showed evidence of structural alterations, fibrillations and clefts. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed very strong lubricin immunostaining in normal menisci in contrast to weak/moderate staining seen in osteoarthritic menisci. Quantitative ELISA and Western blot analysis confirmed the above results. The findings of this study support the notion that changes in lubricin expression and boundary-lubricating ability of cartilage is followed by the development of OA. This study could provide the biological foundation for the development of novel therapeutic treatments, to be applied before the surgery, for the prevention of post-traumatic cartilage damage.

  15. Histamine and substance P in synovial fluid of patients with temporomandibular disorders.

    PubMed

    Li, W; Long, X; Jiang, S; Li, Y; Fang, W

    2015-05-01

    Although psychosocial factors and malocclusion are regarded as potential causes of temporomandibular disorders (TMD), the underlying pathogenesis is poorly understood. Recent studies suggest that substance P (SP), which has been associated with both psychosocial factors and malocclusion, and histamine, whose release can be induced by SP, may be implicated in the pathogenetic process. This study was designed to measure the concentration of histamine and SP in synovial fluid (SF) of both 38 patients with TMD and 11 healthy controls, and analyse the correlation between histamine and SP. Patients with TMD were divided into three subgroups: displaced disc with reduction (DDR), displaced disc without reduction (DDNR) and osteoarthritis (OA), with 10, 13, 15 subjects in every subgroup, respectively. After collecting SF samples, histamine and SP levels were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay analysis (ELISA) and calibrated by bicinchoninic acid (BCA)-quantified protein level in the samples. The results suggest that OA group presented a significantly higher level of both histamine and SP than DDNR, DDR and healthy control groups. Histamine or SP in DDR and DDNR groups tend to be higher than control group, but no significance was found. Painful TMJs show higher histamine and SP than painless TMJs. Correlation analysis reveals a significant correlation between histamine and SP concentrations. Collectively, this study showed the changes of histamine and SP in the SF from different stages of TMD and found a significant correlation between the two substances, suggesting their potential implication in the pathogenesis of TMD.

  16. ICPMS analysis of proteins separated by Native-PAGE: Evaluation of metaloprotein profiles in human synovial fluid with acute and chronic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Moyano, Mario F; Mariño-Repizo, Leonardo; Tamashiro, Héctor; Villegas, Liliana; Acosta, Mariano; Gil, Raúl A

    2016-07-01

    The role of trace elements bound to proteins in the etiology and pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) remains unclear. In this sense, the identification and detection of metalloproteins has a strong and growing interest. Metalloprotein studies are currently carried out by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) associated to inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS), and despite that complete information can be obtained for metals such as Fe, Cu and Zn, difficulties due to poor sensitivity for other trace elements such as Sn, As, etc, are currently faced. In the present work, a simple and fast method for the determination of trace metals bound to synovial fluid (SF) proteins was optimized. Proteins from SF (long and short-term RA) were separated in ten fractions by native PAGE, then dissolved in nitric acid and peroxide hydrogen, and analyzed by ICPMS. Fifteen metals were determined in each separated protein fraction (band). Adequate calibration of proteins molecular weight allowed stablishing which protein type were bound to different metals.

  17. Synovial fluid pH, cytologic characteristics, and gentamicin concentration after intra-articular administration of the drug in an experimental model of infectious arthritis in horses.

    PubMed

    Lloyd, K C; Stover, S M; Pascoe, J R; Adams, P

    1990-09-01

    Chemical and cytologic effects and bactericidal activity of gentamicin in septic synovial fluid were evaluated in an experimental model of infectious arthritis in horses. Septic arthritis was induced by inoculation of approximately 7.5 X 10(6) colony-forming units of Escherichia coli into 1 antebrachiocarpal joint in each of 16 clinically normal adult horses. Clinical signs of septic arthritis were evident 24 hours after inoculation. Horses were allotted to 3 groups: group-1 horses (n = 5) each were given 150 mg of gentamicin (50 mg/ml; 3 ml) intra-articularly (IA); group-2 horses (n = 5) each were given 2.2 mg of gentamicin/kg of body weight, IV, every 6 hours; and group-3 horses (n = 6) each were given buffered gentamicin, consisting of 3 mEq of sodium bicarbonate (1 mEq/ml; 3 ml) and 150 mg of gentamicin (50 mg/ml; 3 ml), IA. Synovial fluid specimens were obtained at posttreatment hour (PTH) 0, 0.25, 1, 4, 8, 12, and 24 via an indwelling intra-articular catheter. Synovial fluid pH was evaluated at PTH 0, 0.25, and 24. Microbiologic culture and cytologic examination were performed on synovial fluid specimens obtained at PTH 0 and 24, and gentamicin concentration was measured in all synovial fluid specimens. At PTH 0, E coli was isolated from synovial fluid specimens obtained from all horses. Synovial fluid pH was lower (range, 7.08 to 7.16) and WBC count was higher (range, 88,000 to 227,200 cells/microliters) and predominantly neutrophilic (95 to 99%) at PTH 0 than before inoculation.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  18. Synovial fluid and plasma n3 long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids in patients with inflammatory arthritis.

    PubMed

    Moghaddami, Mahin; James, Michael; Proudman, Susanna; Cleland, Leslie G

    2015-06-01

    Relationships between n-3 long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LC-PUFA) in plasma and synovial fluid (SF) were examined in 36 patients with knee effusion within the context of a variety of rheumatic diagnoses and various stated fish oil (FO) intakes (from 0 to 30mL of standard FO daily) of variable duration. In a sub-group of patients, correlations between PUFA in SF mononuclear cells (MNC) and cell-free supernatants of SF and between SF MNC and peripheral blood (PB) MNC were examined. Correlations were also sought between clinical data (stated FO intake, pain score) and n-3 LC-PUFA. Correlations between plasma n-3 LC-PUFA and SF n-3 LC-PUFA were very strong (r(2)>0.9, p<0.001). The LC-PUFA profiles of SF supernatants differed from those of MNC. PUFA profiles in PB MNC and SF MNC were similar, except for a higher proportion of DHA in the latter. Positive correlations were observed between stated intakes of FO and EPA in plasma and SF (for both r=0.37, p=0.02) and DHA in plasma (r=0.37, p=0.02) and SF (r=0.36, p=0.03). n-3 LC-PUFA in plasma and SF correlated inversely with pain score (plasma r(2)=0.16, p<0.02; SF r(2) 0.32, p=0.001). In conclusion, plasma n-3 LC-PUFA is a strong indicator of SF n-3 LC-PUFA status across a broad range of rheumatic diagnoses and FO intakes. Higher n-3 LC-PUFA in plasma and SF were associated with lesser pain experience. PMID:25817850

  19. Acute Molecular Changes in Synovial Fluid Following Human Knee Injury: Association With Early Clinical Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Paterson, Erin; Freidin, Andrew; Kenny, Mark; Judge, Andrew; Saklatvala, Jeremy; Williams, Andy; Vincent, Tonia L.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate whether molecules found to be up‐regulated within hours of surgical joint destabilization in the mouse are also elevated in the analogous human setting of acute knee injury, how this molecular response varies between individuals, and whether it is related to patient‐reported outcomes in the 3 months after injury. Methods Seven candidate molecules were analyzed in blood and synovial fluid (SF) from 150 participants with recent structural knee injury at baseline (<8 weeks from injury) and in blood at 14 days and 3 months following baseline. Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score 4 (KOOS4) was obtained at baseline and 3 months. Patient and control samples were compared using Meso Scale Discovery platform assays or enzyme‐linked immunosorbent assay. Results Six of the 7 molecules were significantly elevated in human SF immediately after injury: interleukin‐6 (IL‐6), monocyte chemotactic protein 1, matrix metalloproteinase 3 (MMP‐3), tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases 1 (TIMP‐1), activin A, and tumor necrosis factor–stimulated gene 6 (TSG‐6). There was low‐to‐moderate correlation with blood measurements. Three of the 6 molecules were significantly associated with baseline KOOS4 (those with higher SF IL‐6, TIMP‐1, or TSG‐6 had lower KOOS4). These 3 molecules, MMP‐3, and activin A were all significantly associated with greater improvement in KOOS4 over 3 months, after adjustment for other relevant factors. Of these, IL‐6 alone significantly accounted for the molecular contribution to baseline KOOS4 and change in KOOS4 over 3 months. Conclusion Our findings validate relevant human biomarkers of tissue injury identified in a mouse model. Analysis of SF rather than blood more accurately reflects this response. The response is associated with patient‐reported outcomes over this early period, with SF IL‐6 acting as a single representative marker. Longitudinal outcomes will determine if these molecules are

  20. Effect of synovial fluid, phosphate-buffered saline solution, and water on the dissolution and corrosion properties of CoCrMo alloys as used in orthopedic implants.

    PubMed

    Lewis, A C; Kilburn, M R; Papageorgiou, I; Allen, G C; Case, C P

    2005-06-15

    The corrosion and dissolution of high- and low-carbon CoCrMo alloys, as used in orthopedic joint replacements, were studied by immersing samples in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS), water, and synovial fluid at 37 degrees C for up to 35 days. Bulk properties were analyzed with a fine ion beam microscope. Surface analyses by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Auger electron spectroscopy showed surprisingly that synovial fluid produced a thin oxide/hydroxide layer. Release of ions into solution from the alloy also followed an unexpected pattern where synovial fluid, of all the samples, had the highest Cr concentration but the lowest Co concentration. The presence of carbide inclusions in the alloy did not affect the corrosion or the dissolution mechanisms, although the carbides were a significant feature on the metal surface. Only one mechanism was recognized as controlling the thickness of the oxide/hydroxide interface. The analysis of the dissolved metal showed two mechanisms at work: (1) a protein film caused ligand-induced dissolution, increasing the Cr concentration in synovial fluid, and was explained by the equilibrium constants; (2) corrosion at the interface increased the Co in PBS. The effect of prepassivating the samples (ASTM F-86-01) did not always have the desired effect of reducing dissolution. The release of Cr into PBS increased after prepassivation. The metal-synovial fluid interface did not contain calcium phosphate as a deposit, typically found where samples are exposed to calcium rich bodily fluids.

  1. The adsorption and lubrication behavior of synovial fluid proteins and glycoproteins on the bearing-surface materials of hip replacements.

    PubMed

    Roba, Marcella; Naka, Marco; Gautier, Emanuel; Spencer, Nicholas D; Crockett, Rowena

    2009-04-01

    The selectivity of synovial fluid protein adsorption onto ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) and alumina (Al(2)O(3)), and in particular the ability of glycoproteins to adsorb in the presence of all the other synovial fluid proteins, was investigated by means of fluorescence microscopy and gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). The non-specific nature of protein adsorption from synovial fluid indicated that the lubrication of artificial hip-joint materials may not be attributable to a single protein as has been frequently suggested. The friction behavior of polyethylene (PE) sliding against Al(2)O(3) in solutions of bovine serum albumin (BSA), alpha-1-acid glycoprotein (AGP) and alpha-1-antitrypsin (A1AT) was investigated by means of colloidal probe atomic force microscopy. BSA was shown to be a poorer boundary lubricant than the phosphate buffered saline used as a control. This was attributed to denaturation of the BSA upon adsorption, which provided a high-shear-strength layer at the interface, impairing the lubrication. Interestingly, both the glycoproteins AGP and A1AT, despite their low concentrations, improved lubrication. The lubricating properties of AGP and A1AT were attributed to adsorption via the hydrophobic backbone, allowing the hydrophilic carbohydrate moieties to be exposed to the aqueous solution, thus providing a low-shear-strength fluid film that lubricated the system. The amount of glycoprotein adsorbed on hydrophobic surfaces was determined by means of optical waveguide lightmode spectroscopy (OWLS), allowing conclusions to be drawn about the conformation of the glycan residues following adsorption.

  2. Differentially Expressed in Chondrocytes 2 (DEC2) Increases the Expression of IL-1β and Is Abundantly Present in Synovial Membrane in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Olkkonen, Juri; Kouri, Vesa-Petteri; Hynninen, Joel; Mandelin, Jami

    2015-01-01

    Objective Patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) have altered circadian rhythm of circulating serum cortisol, melatonin and IL-6, as well as disturbance in the expression of clock genes ARNTL2 and NPAS2. In humans, TNFα increases the expression ARNTL2 and NPAS2 but paradoxically suppresses clock output genes DPB and PER3. Our objective was to investigate the expression of direct clock suppressors DEC1 and DEC2 (BHLHE 40 and 41 proteins) in response to TNFα and investigate their role during inflammation. Methods Cultured primary fibroblasts were stimulated with TNFα. Effects on DEC2 were studied using RT-qPCR and immunofluorescence staining. The role of NF-κB in DEC2 increase was analyzed using IKK-2 specific inhibitor IMD-0354. Cloned DEC2 was transfected into HEK293 cells to study its effects on gene expression. Transfections into primary human fibroblasts were used to confirm the results. The presence of DEC2 was analyzed in (RA) and osteoarthritis (OA) synovial membranes by immunohistochemistry. Results TNFα increased DEC2 mRNA and DEC2 was mainly detected at nuclei after the stimulus. The effects of TNFα on DEC2 expression were mediated via NF-κB. Overexpression, siRNA and promoter activity studies disclosed that DEC2 directly regulates IL-1β, in both HEK293 cells and primary human fibroblasts. DEC2 was increased in synovial membrane in RA compared to OA. Conclusion Not only ARNTL2 and NPAS2 but also DEC2 is regulated by TNFα in human fibroblasts. NF-κB mediates the effect on DEC2, which upregulates IL-1β. Circadian clock has a direct effect on inflammation in human fibroblasts. PMID:26710124

  3. Exploring time of death from potassium, sodium, chloride, glucose & calcium analysis of postmortem synovial fluid in semi arid climate.

    PubMed

    Siddhamsetty, Arun K; Verma, Satish K; Kohli, Anil; Verma, Aditi; Puri, Dinesh; Singh, Archana

    2014-11-01

    Estimation of time of death (TOD) with fair accuracy from postmortem changes still remains an important but difficult task to be performed by every autopsy surgeon under different climatic conditions. The environment plays an important role in the process of decomposition and thereby affecting the levels of electrolytes and other biochemical parameters in the postmortem samples. Since, there is limited information available on the levels of these biochemical parameters from semi arid environment, the present study was aimed to explore time of death by analyzing electrolyte, glucose and calcium levels of postmortem synovial fluid collected from samples under such climatic conditions. The synovial fluid samples from two hundred and ten bodies brought to University College of Medical Sciences and associated Guru Teg Bahadur Hospital Delhi for medico-legal postmortem examination, during the period of November 2010 to April 2012, were analyzed for potassium, sodium, chloride, glucose and calcium. Univariate regression analysis of electrolyte concentrations of synovial fluid showed significant positive relationship between time of death and potassium (r = 0.840, p = 0.000). However, there was negative relationship between time of death and sodium (r = -0.175, p = 0.011) & glucose (r = -0.427, p = 0.000) and no significant relationship was found between time of death and calcium (r = 0.099, p = 0.152) & chloride (r = 0.082, p = 0.24) among the samples analyzed.

  4. Disposition of isoflupredone acetate in plasma, urine and synovial fluid following intra-articular administration to exercised Thoroughbred horses.

    PubMed

    Knych, Heather K; Harrison, Linda M; White, Alexandria; McKemie, Daniel S

    2016-01-01

    The use of isoflupredone acetate in performance horses and the scarcity of published pharmacokinetic data necessitate further study. The objective of the current study was to describe the plasma pharmacokinetics of isoflupredone acetate as well as time-related urine and synovial fluid concentrations following intra-articular administration to horses. Twelve racing-fit adult Thoroughbred horses received a single intra-articular administration (8 mg) of isoflupredone acetate into the right antebrachiocarpal joint. Blood, urine and synovial fluid samples were collected prior to and at various times up to 28 days post drug administration. All samples were analyzed using liquid chromatography-Mass Spectrometry. Plasma data were analyzed using a population pharmacokinetic compartmental model. Maximum measured plasma isoflupredone concentrations were 1.76 ± 0.526 ng/mL at 4.0 ± 1.31 h and 1.63 ± 0.243 ng/mL at 4.75 ± 0.5 h, respectively, for horses that had synovial fluid collected and for those that did not. The plasma beta half-life was 24.2 h. Isoflupredone concentrations were below the limit of detection in all horses by 48 h and 7 days in plasma and urine, respectively. Isoflupredone was detected in the right antebrachiocarpal and middle carpal joints for 8.38 ± 5.21 and 2.38 ± 0.52 days, respectively. Results of this study provide information that can be used to regulate the use of intra-articular isoflupredone in the horse.

  5. Influence of C3 level on the determination of C3d in plasma and synovial fluid by radial immunodiffusion.

    PubMed

    Hack, C E; Paardekooper, J; Hannema, A J

    1986-02-12

    The influence of C3 levels on the determination of C3d in plasma and synovial fluid by radial immunodiffusion was investigated. In the method used, C3 is precipitated by 11% polyethylene glycol (PEG), and C3d is measured in the supernatant. In 51 healthy donors, a weak though significant correlation between C3 and C3d levels was found. The mean concentration of C3d was 1.6% of that in aged serum from healthy donors. So, small amounts of C3 (i.e., 1-2% of the normal plasma level) in the 11% PEG supernatants may contribute significantly to the C3d levels measured. A radioimmunoassay that detects C3, C3b, iC3b and C3c was used to measure C3 levels in the PEG supernatants. In PEG supernatants of 4 plasma samples, 0.3-0.6% of the C3 level in normal plasma was found, whereas in those of 2 synovial fluids much higher levels were found (4-10% of the normal plasma level). When purified 125I-labeled antibodies against C3c were added to the gel of the radial immunodiffusion, C3c antigen was detected in the precipitation rings obtained with all PEG supernatants of plasma samples from patients. Therefore, the quantitative contribution of C3 to the precipitation rings in the C3d radial immunodiffusion was analyzed after the addition of an excess of anti-C3c antibodies to the gel. No effect on the size of the C3d-precipitation rings obtained with plasma samples from patients was observed. However, the C3d precipitation rings obtained with synovial fluids were significantly smaller when the gel used in the radial immunodiffusion contained an excess of anti-C3c antibodies together with the anti-C3d serum. We conclude that it is necessary to add an excess of anti-C3c antibodies to the gel used for the radial immunodiffusion, for the determination of C3d levels in synovial fluid. An antiserum against human C3b, which contains both anti-C3c and anti-C3d antibodies, can be used for this purpose.

  6. Hyaluronidase treatment of synovial fluid to improve assay precision for biomarker research using multiplex immunoassay platforms.

    PubMed

    Jayadev, Chethan; Rout, Raj; Price, Andrew; Hulley, Philippa; Mahoney, David

    2012-12-14

    Synovial fluid (SF) is a difficult biological matrix to analyse due to its complex non-Newtonian nature. This can result in poor assay repeatability and potentially inefficient use of precious samples. This study assessed the impact of SF treatment by hyaluronidase and/or dilution on intra-assay precision using the Luminex and Meso Scale Discovery (MSD) multiplex platforms. SF was obtained from patients with knee osteoarthritis at the time of joint replacement surgery. Aliquots derived from the same sample were left untreated (neat), 2-fold diluted, 4-fold diluted or treated with 2mg/ml testicular hyaluronidase (with 2-fold dilution). Preparation methods were compared in a polysterene-bead Luminex 10-plex (N=16), magnetic-bead Luminex singleplex (N=7) and MSD 4-plex (N=7). Each method was assessed for coefficient of variation (CV) of replicate measurements, number of bead events (for Luminex assays) and dilution-adjusted analyte concentration. Percentage recovery was calculated for dilutions and HAse treatment. Hyaluronidase treatment significantly increased the number of wells with satisfactory bead events/region (95%) compared to neat (48%, p<0.001) in the polystyrene-bead Luminex assay, but the magnetic-bead Luminex assay achieved ≥50 bead events irrespective of treatment method. Hyaluronidase treatment resulted in lower intra-assay CVs for detectable ligands (group average CV<10%) than neat, 2-fold and 4-fold dilution (CV~25% for all, p<0.05) in both polystyrene- and magnetic-bead Luminex assays. In addition, measured sample concentrations were higher and recovery was poor (elevated) after hyaluronidase treatment. In the MSD 4-plex, within-group comparison of the intra-assay CV or concentration was not conclusively influenced by SF preparation. However, only hyaluronidase treatment resulted in CV<25% for all samples for TNF-α. There was no effect on analyte concentrations or recovery. Hyaluronidase treatment can improve intra-assay precision and assay signal

  7. Agreement of manual cell counts and automated counts of the scil Vet abc Plus(+) hematology analyzer for analysis of equine synovial fluid.

    PubMed

    Van de Water, Eline; Oosterlinck, Maarten; Duchateau, Luc; Pille, Frederik

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether the scil Vet abc Plus(+) (SCIL Animal Care Company, Altorf, France), an impedance hematology analyzer, can accurately quantify and differentiate nucleated blood cells (NBCs) in equine synovial fluid. Synovial fluid samples (n=242) in different stages of experimentally induced inflammation were analyzed with and without hyaluronidase pretreatment and compared to manual hemocytometer counts and smear reviews. No significant effect of hyaluronidase pretreatment was observed. Total nucleated cell counts of the scil Vet abc Plus(+) were significantly higher compared to the manual method (P=0.02), yet the difference was small and clinically irrelevant (ratio manual/automated count equal to 0.97 with 95% CI [0.95, 1.00]). Differential cell counts of the scil Vet abc Plus(+) were not accurate. In conclusion, the scil Vet abc Plus(+) hematology analyzer is highly accurate for quantification, but not accurate for differentiation of NBCs in equine synovial fluid.

  8. The influence of resveratrol on the synovial expression of matrix metalloproteinases and receptor activator of NF-kappaB ligand in rheumatoid arthritis fibroblast-like synoviocytes.

    PubMed

    Glehr, Mathias; Breisach, Margherita; Walzer, Sonja; Lohberger, Birgit; Fürst, Florentine; Friesenbichler, Joerg; Rinner, Beate; Avian, Alexander; Windhager, Reinhard; Leithner, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    Medication of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) remains challenging and often controversial concerning side effects or long-term complications. We investigated the effect of resveratrol, a phytoalexin discussed for its chondro-protective and anti-inflammatory qualities, on the synovial expression of matrix-degrading enzymes like matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and bone-remodelling proteins in RA fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLS). Interleukin-1beta-stimulated RA-FLS were treated with 100 microM resveratrol for 24 h. To evaluate the effect of resveratrol on the amount of bound/combined MMPs, a Luminex xMAP multiplexing technology was used. The alteration in expression of receptor activator of nuclear factor-kappaB ligand (RANKL) and osteoprotegrin (OPG) was measured by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). Resveratrol reduced the expression of MMP-1 (p = 0.022), MMP-3 (p = 0.021), and MMP-9 (p = 0.047). qRT-PCR showed a significant reduction in the relative abundance of the transcripts of OPG (p = 0.012) and RANKL (p = 0.018). Our in vitro findings indicate that resveratrol could be a new target for further pharmacological studies in the field of RA. In the future it could play a role as a possible substitute or supplement to currently used drugs against RA to prevent cartilage matrix degradation and pathological bone resorption due to inhibition of MMPs and RANKL.

  9. Indian Hedgehog in Synovial Fluid Is a Novel Marker for Early Cartilage Lesions in Human Knee Joint

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Congming; Wei, Xiaochun; Chen, Chongwei; Cao, Kun; Li, Yongping; Jiao, Qiang; Ding, Juan; Zhou, Jingming; Fleming, Braden C.; Chen, Qian; Shang, Xianwen; Wei, Lei

    2014-01-01

    To determine whether there is a correlation between the concentration of Indian hedgehog (Ihh) in synovial fluid (SF) and the severity of cartilage damage in the human knee joints, the knee cartilages from patients were classified using the Outer-bridge scoring system and graded using the Modified Mankin score. Expression of Ihh in cartilage and SF samples were analyzed with immunohistochemistry (IHC), western blot, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Furthermore, we detected and compared Ihh protein levels in rat and mice cartilages between normal control and surgery-induced osteoarthritis (OA) group by IHC and fluorescence molecular tomography in vivo respectively. Ihh expression was increased 5.2-fold in OA cartilage, 3.1-fold in relative normal OA cartilage, and 1.71-fold in OA SF compared to normal control samples. The concentrations of Ihh in cartilage and SF samples was significantly increased in early-stage OA samples when compared to normal samples (r = 0.556; p < 0.001); however, there were no significant differences between normal samples and late-stage OA samples. Up-regulation of Ihh protein was also an early event in the surgery-induced OA models. Increased Ihh is associated with the severity of OA cartilage damage. Elevated Ihh content in human knee joint synovial fluid correlates with early cartilage lesions. PMID:24786088

  10. A Customized Raman System for Point-of-Care Detection of Arthropathic Crystals in the Synovial Fluid

    PubMed Central

    Li, Bolan; Yang, Shan; Akkus, Ozan

    2014-01-01

    Monosodium urate (MSU) and calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate (CPPD) are the most frequently observed crystals in joint space, leading to painful arthropathies. Correct diagnosis of the crystal identity is critical for the appropriate course of treatment. In this work, a custom Raman device in combination with a practical and efficient sample preparation method is used for chemically selective diagnosis of MSU and CPPD crystals in an automated fashion. The samples were prepared by a brief enzymatic digestion treatment of synovial fluid followed by a customized filtration process which was able to congregate crystals over a submillimeter sized spot. The data acquisition and collection was automated to collect multiple spectra distributed over the filtration spot. The performance of the cost-efficient Raman system was compared to a research-grade high fidelity Raman instrument. The custom-designed Raman device could detect MSU crystals at sub-clinical concentration of 0.1 μg/mL, and 1 μg/mL for CPPD crystals. This practical sample preparation approach in tandem with the low-cost customized Raman device has a potential to be a novel tool for point-and-shoot Raman diagnosis of arthritic crystals in synovial fluid at the point of care. PMID:24419093

  11. Human synoviocyte lubricin and bovine synovial fluid lubricin equally improve gliding resistance in a canine model in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Kohn, Mark D.; Sun, Yu-long; Zhao, Chunfeng; Thoreson, Andrew R.; Jay, Gregory D.; An, Kai-Nan; Amadio, Peter C.

    2014-01-01

    The lubricating ability of human synoviocyte lubricin and bovine lubricin purified from synovial fluid was investigated and compared using a canine in vitro tendon model. Our null hypothesis was that these two forms of lubricin would have equal lubricating ability. Forty two canine hind-limbs were used. The peroneus longus (PL) tendons were harvested, along with the proximal phalanx and flexor digitorum profundus of the second or fifth digit with its proximal fibro-osseous pulley. Forty PL tendons were randomly assigned to one of four treatment groups. After gliding resistance testing, two intact PL tendons and two tendons in each group were randomly selected for surface observation with scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The variance of the PL saline group mean gliding resistance was significantly different from other groups. There was a significant treatment-cycle interaction effect on the mean gliding resistance. On SEM, the surface of the saline treated PL tendons appeared rough, whereas the other tendon surfaces appeared smooth. Human synoviocyte lubricin functioned as well as bovine synovial fluid lubricin to reduce friction of canine PL tendons in vitro. This data suggest that treatment using the two forms of lubricin are mechanically similar. PMID:22561248

  12. Human synoviocyte lubricin and bovine synovial fluid lubricin equally improve gliding resistance in a canine model in vitro.

    PubMed

    Kohn, Mark D; Sun, Yu-long; Zhao, Chunfeng; Thoreson, Andrew R; Jay, Gregory D; An, Kai-Nan; Amadio, Peter C

    2011-01-01

    The lubricating ability of human synoviocyte lubricin and bovine lubricin purified from synovial fluid was investigated and compared using a canine in vitro tendon model. Our null hypothesis was that these two forms of lubricin would have equal lubricating ability. Forty two canine hind-limbs were used. The peroneus longus (PL) tendons were harvested, along with the proximal phalanx and flexor digitorum profundus of the second or fifth digit with its proximal fibro-osseous pulley. Forty PL tendons were randomly assigned to one of four treatment groups. After gliding resistance testing, two intact PL tendons and two tendons in each group were randomly selected for surface observation with scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The variance of the PL saline group mean gliding resistance was significantly different from other groups. There was a significant treatment-cycle interaction effect on the mean gliding resistance. On SEM, the surface of the saline treated PL tendons appeared rough, whereas the other tendon surfaces appeared smooth. Human synoviocyte lubricin functioned as well as bovine synovial fluid lubricin to reduce friction of canine PL tendons in vitro. This data suggest that treatment using the two forms of lubricin are mechanically similar.

  13. Diagnostic Value of T-cell Interferon-γ Release Assays on Synovial Fluid for Articular Tuberculosis: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Xin-He; Bian, Sai-Nan; Zhang, Yue-Qiu; Zhang, Li-Fan; Shi, Xiao-Chun; Yang, Bo; Zhang, Feng-Chun; Liu, Xiao-Qing

    2016-01-01

    Background: Tuberculosis (TB) remains a major global public health challenge. Articular TB is an important form of extrapulmonary tuberculosis, and its diagnosis is difficult because of the low sensitivity of traditional methods. The aim of this study was to analyze the diagnostic value of T-SPOT.TB on synovial fluid for the diagnosis of articular TB. Methods: Patients with suspected articular TB were enrolled consecutively between August 2011 and December 2015. T-SPOT.TB was performed on both synovial fluid mononuclear cells (SFMCs) and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). The final diagnosis of articular TB was independent of the T-SPOT.TB result. The diagnostic sensitivity, specificity, predictive value, and likelihood ratio of T-SPOT.TB on SFMCs and PBMCs were analyzed. Results: Twenty patients with suspected articular TB were enrolled. Six were diagnosed with articular TB, and 14 patients were diagnosed with other diseases. Sensitivity and specificity were 83% and 86% for T-SPOT.TB on SFMCs, and 67% and 69% for T-SPOT.TB on PBMCs, respectively. The positive predictive value (PPV) and negative predictive value (NPV) of T-SPOT.TB on SFMCs were 71% and 92%, respectively. The PPV and NPV were 50% and 82% for T-SPOT.TB on PBMCs. Conclusion: Sensitivity, specificity, and NPV of T-SPOT.TB on SFMCs appeared higher than that on PBMCs, indicating that T-SPOT.TB on SFMCs might be a rapid and accurate diagnostic test for articular TB. PMID:27174325

  14. Investigation of the Frictional Response of Osteoarthritic Human Tibiofemoral Joints and the Potential Beneficial Tribological Effect of Healthy Synovial Fluid

    PubMed Central

    Caligaris, Matteo; Canal, Clare E.; Ahmad, Christopher S.; Gardner, Thomas R.; Ateshian, Gerard A.

    2009-01-01

    Objective This study tests the hypothesis that the natural progression of osteoarthritis (OA) in human joints leads to an increase in the friction coefficient. This hypothesis is based on the expectation that the wear observed in OA may be exacerbated by higher friction coefficients. A corollary hypothesis is that healthy synovial fluid (SF) may help mitigate the increase in the friction coefficient in diseased joints. Design The friction coefficient of human tibiofemoral joints with varying degrees of OA was measured in healthy bovine SF and physiological buffered saline (PBS). Two testing configurations were adopted, one that promotes sustained cartilage interstitial fluid pressurization to investigate the effectiveness of this mechanism with advancing OA, and another that allows interstitial fluid pressure to subside to investigate the effectiveness of boundary lubrication. Results Eight specimens were visually staged to be normal or mildly degenerated (stages ≤2 on a scale of 1 to 4) and eight others had progressive degeneration (stages > 2 and ≤ 3). No statistical differences were found in the friction coefficient with increasing OA, whether in migrating or stationary contact area configurations; however, the friction coefficient was significantly lower in SF than PBS in both configurations. Conclusions The friction coefficient of human tibiofemoral cartilage does not necessarily increase with naturally increasing OA, for visual stages ranging from 1 to 3. This outcome may be explained by the fact that interstitial fluid pressurization is not necessarily defeated by advancing degeneration. This study also demonstrates that healthy synovial fluid decreases the friction coefficient of OA joints relative to PBS. PMID:19410031

  15. Cell source-dependent in vivo immunosuppressive properties of mesenchymal stem cells derived from the bone marrow and synovial fluid of minipigs

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Won-Jae; Hah, Young-Sool; Ock, Sun-A.; Lee, Jae-Hoon; Jeon, Ryong-Hoon; Park, Ji-Sung; Lee, Sang-Il; Rho, Na-Young; Rho, Gyu-Jin; Lee, Sung-Lim

    2015-05-01

    The in vitro differentiation and immunosuppressive capacity of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) derived from synovial fluid (SF-MSCs) and bone marrow extract (BM-MSCs) in an isogenic background of minipigs were comparatively analyzed in a collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) mouse model of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The proliferation capacity and expression of pluripotent transcription factors (Oct3/4 and Sox2) were significantly (P<0.05) higher in SF-MSCs than in BM-MSCs. The differentiation capacity of SF-MSCs into adipocytes, osteocytes and neurocytes was significantly (P<0.05) lower than that of BM-MSCs, and the differentiation capacity of SF-MSCs into chondrocytes was significantly (P<0.05) higher than that of BM-MSCs. Systemic injection of BM- and SF-MSCs significantly (P<0.05) ameliorated the clinical symptoms of CIA mice, with SF-MSCs having significantly (P<0.05) higher clinical and histopathological recovery scores than BM-MSCs. Furthermore, the immunosuppressive properties of SF-MSCs in CIA mice were associated with increased levels of the anti-inflammatory cytokine interleukin (IL)-10, and decreased levels of the pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-1β and osteoclast-related sRANKL. In conclusion, SF-MSCs exhibited eminent pluripotency and differentiation capacity into chondrocytes, addition to substantial in vivo immunosuppressive capacity by elevating IL-10 and reducing IL-1β levels in CIA mice. - Highlights: • Immunosuppressive capacity of BM-, SM-, and SF-MSCs was evaluated in an RA model. • Proliferation, pluripotency and chondrogenic differentiation capacity were higher in SF-MSCs. • SF-MSCs exhibited improved therapeutic effects than BM-MSCs. • SF-MSCs may have applications as immunosuppressive therapy in autoimmune diseases.

  16. Matrix metalloproteinases 2 and 9 in canine rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Coughlan, A R; Robertson, D H; Bennett, D; May, C; Beynon, R J; Carter, S D

    1998-08-22

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are considered important mediators of tissue damage in joint diseases. The levels of MMPs 2 and 9 were measured in samples of synovial fluid from 20 joints in seven dogs with rheumatoid arthritis by gelatin zymography. The results were compared with the actual gelatinolytic activity of the fluid measured in a gelatin-degradation ELISA. The gelatinolytic activity in synovial fluid from arthritic joints was markedly greater than that in fluid from disease-free joints. The zymographic activity attributable to MMP-9 (identified by Western blotting) was absent from synovial fluid from control joints but prominent in fluid from arthritic joints, and in these joints the presence of a 75 kDa form of MMP-9 was correlated with the gelatinolytic activity of the fluid measured by the ELISA (r = 0.81, P < 0.05). Synovial fluid from one dog with rheumatoid arthritis was examined before and after treatment with corticosteroids. After treatment its zymographic pattern had returned to normal. PMID:9770764

  17. Transmission electron microscopic identification of silicon-containing particles in synovial fluid: potential confusion with calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate and apatite crystals.

    PubMed Central

    Bardin, T; Schumacher, H R; Lansaman, J; Rothfuss, S; Dryll, A

    1984-01-01

    Silicon-containing particles were identified by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) in thin sections of two synovial fluids, which also contained calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate (CPPD) crystals, aspirated during acute attacks of pseudogout. Such particles, which are interpreted as probably being artefacts from glassware, were electron dense and similar in appearance to some CPPD or hydroxyapatite crystals. Images PMID:6476921

  18. The entrapment of corrosion products from CoCr implant alloys in the deposits of calcium phosphate: a comparison of serum, synovial fluid, albumin, EDTA, and water.

    PubMed

    Lewis, A C; Kilburn, M R; Heard, P J; Scott, T B; Hallam, K R; Allen, G C; Learmonth, I D

    2006-08-01

    Physical wear of orthopedic implants is inevitable. CoCr alloy samples, typically used in joint reconstruction, corrode rapidly after removal of the protective oxide layer. The behavior of CoCr pellets immersed in human serum, foetal bovine serum (FBS), synovial fluid, albumin in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS), EDTA in PBS, and water were studied using X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) and Time-of-Flight Secondary Ion Mass Spectroscopy (ToF-SIMS). The difference in the corrosive nature of human serum, water, albumin in PBS and synovial fluid after 5 days of immersion was highlighted by the oxide layer, which was respectively 15, 3.5, 1.5, and 1.5 nm thick. The thickness of an additional calcium phosphate deposit from human serum and synovial fluid was 40 and 2 nm, respectively. Co and Cr ions migrated from the bulk metal surface and were trapped in this deposit by the phosphate anion. This may account for the composition of wear debris from CoCr orthopedic implants, which is known to consist predominantly of hydroxy-phosphate compounds. Known components of synovial fluid including proteoglycans, pyrophosphates, phospholipids, lubricin, and superficial zone protein (SZP), have been identified as possible causes for the lack of significant calcium phosphate deposition in this environment. Circulation of these compounds around the whole implant may inhibit calcium phosphate deposition.

  19. Dissection of the mechanisms of immune injury in rheumatoid arthritis, using total lymphoid irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Gaston, J.S.; Strober, S.; Solovera, J.J.; Gandour, D.; Lane, N.; Schurman, D.; Hoppe, R.T.; Chin, R.C.; Eugui, E.M.; Vaughan, J.H.

    1988-01-01

    Eleven patients with intractable rheumatoid arthritis were treated with total lymphoid irradiation. After radiotherapy, there was a marked decrease in the number and function of peripheral blood helper/inducer (Leu-3+) T lymphocytes, in the spontaneous secretion of interleukin-1 by synovial biopsy specimens, and in the activity of the joint disease. In contrast, levels of IgM, IgA, and IgG rheumatoid factors and C3 concentrations in blood and synovial fluid samples did not change significantly after therapy with total lymphoid irradiation.

  20. Preventing Friction Induced Chondrocyte Apoptosis: A Comparison of Human Synovial Fluid and Hylan G-F 20

    PubMed Central

    Waller, Kimberly A; Zhang, Ling X; Fleming, Braden C; Jay, Gregory D

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Symptomatic osteoarthritis (OA) is a common painful disease with limited treatment options. A rising number of OA patients have been treated with intraarticular injections of hyaluronic acid, including the high molecular weight hylan G-F 20, which is injected following arthrocentesis. This study investigated the effectiveness of hylan G-F 20 to lower coefficient of friction (COF) and prevent chondrocyte apoptosis in vitro. Methods A disc-on-disc bovine cartilage bearing was used to measure the static and kinetic COF when lubricated with hylan G-F 20, human synovial fluid (HSF) and phosphate buffered saline (PBS). Following friction testing, we stained paraffin embedded sections of these cartilage bearings for activated caspase-3, a marker of apoptosis. Results Bearings lubricated with hylan G-F 20 had kinetic COF values that were similar to bearings lubricated with PBS, but significantly higher than those lubricated with HSF. There were no significant differences in static COF values in bearings lubricated with hylan G-F 20 as compared to PBS or HSF. However, bearings lubricated with HSF had a significantly lower static COF values compared to bearings lubricated with PBS. The mean percentage of caspase-3 positive chondrocytes in the superficial and upper intermediate zones of bearings lubricated with hylan G-F 20 were significantly higher when compared to bearings lubricated with HSF or unloaded controls, but significantly lower than those lubricated with PBS. Conclusion These findings indicate that joint lubrication may prevent chondrocyte apoptosis by lowering the COF. Furthermore, removal of synovial fluid prior to hylan G-F 20 injection may be detrimental to cartilage health. PMID:22660808

  1. Influence of cartilage interstitial fluid on the mRNA levels of matrix proteins, cytokines, metalloproteases and their inhibitors in synovial membrane.

    PubMed

    Hyc, Anna; Moskalewski, Stanislaw; Osiecka-Iwan, Anna

    2016-09-01

    Articular cartilage and the synovial membrane both ensure the smooth action of synovial joints; however, the influence of chondrocytes on synovial metabolism remains unclear. The secretory activity of chondrocytes is usually studied in cell cultures and may differ from that in intact cartilage. According to McCutchen's theory of 'weeping' joint lubrication, loading of the articular cartilage during motion squeezes the fluid with lubricating properties from the cartilage. The purpose of the study was to obtain cartilage interstitial fluid (CIF) from intact cartilage and to evaluate its influence on gene expression in the synovial membrane cells. CIF was rinsed out from the cartilage of newborn rats at a pressure of three bar. The chondrocytes survived rinsing and grew in culture. Cytokines in CIF were detected using the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The influence of CIF and CIF-like cocktail (all cytokines found in CIF) on gene expression in the synovial membrane cells was studied after a 4 h-incubation, by real-time PCR. Data were analyzed using the Wilcoxon matched-pair test or by the Mann‑Whitney U test. CIF contained basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), insulin-like growth factor (IGF)‑1, transforming growth factor β1 (TGFβ1), bone morphogenetic protein 7 (BMP7), macrophage (M)-colony-stimulating factor (CSF), granulocyte (G)-CSF and leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF). CIF stimulated the expression of hyaluronan synthase (HAS)1 and 2, lubricin, collagen I, versican, aggrecan, matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs)2 and 3, tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMPs) 1-3, interleukin (IL)-6 and TGFβ1, and decreased the expression of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and IL-1β. Incubation of the synovial membrane with CIF-like cocktail partially imitated the effects of CIF. Analysis of CIF composition may help to characterize the secretory activity of chondrocytes in their natural environment under various physiological and

  2. Synovial Fluid Concentrations and Relative Potency of Interleukin-1 alpha and beta in Cartilage and Meniscus Degradation

    PubMed Central

    McNulty, Amy L.; Rothfusz, Nicole E.; Leddy, Holly A.; Guilak, Farshid

    2014-01-01

    Cartilage degeneration with osteoarthritis (OA) is believed to involve the activities of interleukin-1 (IL-1), which exists as alpha and beta isoforms. The goal of this study was to measure the concentrations of both isoforms of IL-1 in the synovial fluid of normal and spontaneously osteoarthritic porcine knees, and to test the hypothesis that physiologic concentrations of IL-1α and IL-1β exhibit different potencies in activating calcium signaling, the production of matrix metalloproteinases and nitric oxide, and the loss of proteoglycans and tissue mechanical properties in cartilage and meniscus. Median concentrations of IL-1α were 0.043 ng/mL with mild OA and 0.288 ng/mL with moderate OA, whereas IL-1β concentrations were 0.109 ng/mL with mild OA and 0.122ng/mL with moderate OA. Both isoforms induced calcium signaling in chondrocytes and meniscal cells at all concentrations. Overall, cartilage and meniscus catabolism was significantly more sensitive to IL-1α than IL-1β at concentrations of 1 ng/mL or less, while few differences were observed between the two forms at 10 ng/mL. These data provide a range of physiologic IL-1 concentrations that can serve as a framework for the comparison of various in vitro studies, as well as providing further insight for the development of anti-cytokine therapies for OA. PMID:23483596

  3. Synovial fluid concentrations and relative potency of interleukin-1 alpha and beta in cartilage and meniscus degradation.

    PubMed

    McNulty, Amy L; Rothfusz, Nicole E; Leddy, Holly A; Guilak, Farshid

    2013-07-01

    Cartilage degeneration with osteoarthritis (OA) is believed to involve the activities of interleukin-1 (IL-1), which exists as alpha and beta isoforms. The goal of this study was to measure the concentrations of both isoforms of IL-1 in the synovial fluid of normal and spontaneously osteoarthritic porcine knees, and to test the hypothesis that physiologic concentrations of IL-1α and IL-1β exhibit different potencies in activating calcium signaling, the production of matrix metalloproteinases and nitric oxide, and the loss of proteoglycans and tissue mechanical properties in cartilage and meniscus. Median concentrations of IL-1α were 0.043 ng/ml with mild OA and 0.288 ng/ml with moderate OA, whereas IL-1β concentrations were 0.109 ng/ml with mild OA and 0.122 ng/ml with moderate OA. Both isoforms induced calcium signaling in chondrocytes and meniscal cells at all concentrations. Overall, cartilage and meniscus catabolism was significantly more sensitive to IL-1α than IL-1β at concentrations of 1 ng/ml or less, while few differences were observed between the two forms at 10 ng/ml. These data provide a range of physiologic IL-1 concentrations that can serve as a framework for the comparison of various in vitro studies, as well as providing further insight for the development of anti-cytokine therapies for OA.

  4. Wide-field imaging of birefringent synovial fluid crystals using lens-free polarized microscopy for gout diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yibo; Lee, Seung Yoon Celine; Zhang, Yun; Furst, Daniel; Fitzgerald, John; Ozcan, Aydogan

    2016-01-01

    Gout is a form of crystal arthropathy where monosodium urate (MSU) crystals deposit and elicit inflammation in a joint. Diagnosis of gout relies on identification of MSU crystals under a compensated polarized light microscope (CPLM) in synovial fluid aspirated from the patient’s joint. The detection of MSU crystals by optical microscopy is enhanced by their birefringent properties. However, CPLM partially suffers from the high-cost and bulkiness of conventional lens-based microscopy, and its relatively small field-of-view (FOV) limits the efficiency and accuracy of gout diagnosis. Here we present a lens-free polarized microscope which adopts a novel differential and angle-mismatched polarizing optical design achieving wide-field and high-resolution holographic imaging of birefringent objects with a color contrast similar to that of a standard CPLM. The performance of this computational polarization microscope is validated by imaging MSU crystals made from a gout patient’s tophus and steroid crystals used as negative control. This lens-free polarized microscope, with its wide FOV (>20 mm2), cost-effectiveness and field-portability, can significantly improve the efficiency and accuracy of gout diagnosis, reduce costs, and can be deployed even at the point-of-care and in resource-limited clinical settings. PMID:27356625

  5. Tribological investigation of diamond-like carbon coated micro-dimpled surface under bovine serum and osteoarthritis oriented synovial fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Subir; Choudhury, Dipankar; Roy, Taposh; Mamat, Azuddin Bin; Masjuki, H. H.; Pingguan-Murphy, Belinda

    2015-06-01

    Osteoarthritis-oriented synovial fluid (OASF), i.e., that typical of a patient with osteoarthritis, has different physical and biological characteristics than bovine serum (BS), a lubricant widely used in biotribological investigations. Micro-dimpled and diamond-like carbon- (DLC) coated surfaces are key emerging interfaces for orthopedic implants. In this study, tribological performances of dimpled surfaces, with and without DLC coating, have been investigated under both BS and OASF. The friction tests were performed utilizing a pin on a disk tribometer, whereas contact pressure, speed, and temperature were simulated to a ‘medium walking gait’ of hip joint conditions. The mechanical properties of the specimen and the physical properties of the lubricant were characterized before the friction test. Raman analysis was conducted to identify the coating condition both before and after the test. The DLC-coated dimpled surface showed maximum hardness and residual stress. A DLC-coated dimpled surface under an OASF lubricated condition yielded a lower friction coefficient and wear compared to those of plain and dimpled specimens. The higher graphitization of coated materials with increasing load was confirmed by Raman spectroscopy.

  6. Wide-field imaging of birefringent synovial fluid crystals using lens-free polarized microscopy for gout diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yibo; Lee, Seung Yoon Celine; Zhang, Yun; Furst, Daniel; Fitzgerald, John; Ozcan, Aydogan

    2016-06-01

    Gout is a form of crystal arthropathy where monosodium urate (MSU) crystals deposit and elicit inflammation in a joint. Diagnosis of gout relies on identification of MSU crystals under a compensated polarized light microscope (CPLM) in synovial fluid aspirated from the patient’s joint. The detection of MSU crystals by optical microscopy is enhanced by their birefringent properties. However, CPLM partially suffers from the high-cost and bulkiness of conventional lens-based microscopy, and its relatively small field-of-view (FOV) limits the efficiency and accuracy of gout diagnosis. Here we present a lens-free polarized microscope which adopts a novel differential and angle-mismatched polarizing optical design achieving wide-field and high-resolution holographic imaging of birefringent objects with a color contrast similar to that of a standard CPLM. The performance of this computational polarization microscope is validated by imaging MSU crystals made from a gout patient’s tophus and steroid crystals used as negative control. This lens-free polarized microscope, with its wide FOV (>20 mm2), cost-effectiveness and field-portability, can significantly improve the efficiency and accuracy of gout diagnosis, reduce costs, and can be deployed even at the point-of-care and in resource-limited clinical settings.

  7. A Comparative Metabolomic Evaluation of Behcet’s Disease with Arthritis and Seronegative Arthritis Using Synovial Fluid

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jungyeon; Hwang, Jiwon; Kim, Kyoung Heon; Cha, Hoon-Suk

    2015-01-01

    Behcet’s disease (BD) with arthritis is often confused with seronegative arthritis (SNA) because of shared clinical symptoms and the lack of definitive biomarkers for BD. To investigate possible metabolic patterns and potential biomarkers of BD with arthritis, metabolomic profiling of synovial fluid (SF) from 6 patients with BD with arthritis and 18 patients with SNA was performed using gas chromatography/time-of-flight mass spectrometry in conjunction with univariate and multivariate statistical analyses. A total of 123 metabolites were identified from samples. Orthogonal partial least square-discriminant analysis showed clear discrimination between BD with arthritis and SNA. A set of 11 metabolites were identified as potential biomarkers for BD using variable importance for projection values and the Wilcoxon-Mann-Whitney test. Compared with SNA, BD with arthritis exhibited relatively high levels of glutamate, valine, citramalate, leucine, methionine sulfoxide, glycerate, phosphate, lysine, isoleucine, urea, and citrulline. There were two markers identified, elevated methionine sulfoxide and citrulline, that were associated with increased oxidative stress, providing a potential link to BD-associated neutrophil hyperactivity. Glutamate, citramalate, and valine were selected and validated as putative biomarkers for BD with arthritis (sensitivity, 100%; specificity, 61.1%). This is the first report to present potential biomarkers from SF for discriminating BD with arthritis from SNA. The metabolomics of SF may be helpful in searching for potential biomarkers and elucidating the clinicopathogenesis of BD with arthritis. PMID:26270538

  8. Correlation of Bone Morphogenetic Protein-2 Levels in Serum and Synovial Fluid with Disease Severity of Knee Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yan; Hou, Ruizhi; Yin, Ruofeng; Yin, Weitian

    2015-01-01

    Background This study aimed to investigate the bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2) levels in serum and synovial fluid (SF) of patients with primary knee osteoarthritis (OA) and to exam its correlation with radiographic and symptomatic severity of the disease. Material/Methods A total of 37 knee OA patients and 20 healthy controls were enrolled in this study. Knee OA radiographic grading was performed according to the Kellgren-Lawrence (KL) grading system by evaluating X-ray changes observed in anteroposterior knee radiography. Symptomatic severity of the disease was evaluated according to the Western Ontario McMaster University Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) scores. BMP-2 levels in serum and SF were determined using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Results Serum BMP-2 level in patients with knee OA was higher than that in healthy controls. Knee OA patients with KL grade 4 showed significantly elevated BMP-2 levels in the serum and SF compared with those with KL grade 2 and 3. Knee OA patients with KL grade 3 had significant higher SF levels of BMP-2 than those with KL grade 2. BMP-2 levels in the serum and SF of knee OA patients were both positively correlated with KL grades and WOMAC scores. Conclusions BMP2 levels in serum and SF were closely related to the radiographic and symptomatic severity of knee OA and may serve as an alternative biochemical parameter to determine disease severity of primary knee OA. PMID:25644704

  9. Fibroblast growth factor-21 concentration in serum and synovial fluid is associated with radiographic bone loss of knee osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhan-Chun; Xiao, Jie; Wang, Gang; Li, Mao-Qiang; Hu, Kong-Zu; Ma, Tao; Wang, Wei-Li; Liu, Zu-De; Zhang, Ji-Dong

    2015-04-01

    We aimed to evaluate whether FGF-21 concentration in serum and synovial fluid (SF) is associated with radiographic bone loss of knee osteoarthritis (OA). A total of 186 OA patients and 108 controls were recruited. The radiographic bone loss of knee OA was assessed by the Ahlbäck grading scale. FGF-21 concentration in serum and SF was measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). We demonstrated that OA patients had significantly higher serum FGF-21 concentration compared with controls (204.30 [range 158.25-279.16] ng/L vs. 130.72 [range 94.93-218.03] ng/L, p < 0.01). FGF-21 concentration in serum was well correlated with that in paired SF samples (r = 0.668, p < 0.001). In OA patients, those with a higher Ahlbäck grade had significantly higher serum and SF FGF-21 concentration (p < 0.001 for both). FGF-21 concentration in serum and SF was significantly and independently associated with the Ahlbäck grade (r = 0.403, p < 0.001 and r = 0.410, p < 0.001; respectively). These findings indicated that FGF-21 might be a potential biomarker for predicting bone loss of OA. Therapeutic interventions by blocking FGF-21 signaling pathways to delay the degenerative process of OA warrants further investigations. PMID:25549692

  10. Wide-field imaging of birefringent synovial fluid crystals using lens-free polarized microscopy for gout diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yibo; Lee, Seung Yoon Celine; Zhang, Yun; Furst, Daniel; Fitzgerald, John; Ozcan, Aydogan

    2016-01-01

    Gout is a form of crystal arthropathy where monosodium urate (MSU) crystals deposit and elicit inflammation in a joint. Diagnosis of gout relies on identification of MSU crystals under a compensated polarized light microscope (CPLM) in synovial fluid aspirated from the patient's joint. The detection of MSU crystals by optical microscopy is enhanced by their birefringent properties. However, CPLM partially suffers from the high-cost and bulkiness of conventional lens-based microscopy, and its relatively small field-of-view (FOV) limits the efficiency and accuracy of gout diagnosis. Here we present a lens-free polarized microscope which adopts a novel differential and angle-mismatched polarizing optical design achieving wide-field and high-resolution holographic imaging of birefringent objects with a color contrast similar to that of a standard CPLM. The performance of this computational polarization microscope is validated by imaging MSU crystals made from a gout patient's tophus and steroid crystals used as negative control. This lens-free polarized microscope, with its wide FOV (>20 mm(2)), cost-effectiveness and field-portability, can significantly improve the efficiency and accuracy of gout diagnosis, reduce costs, and can be deployed even at the point-of-care and in resource-limited clinical settings. PMID:27356625

  11. Characterisation of synovial fluid and infrapatellar fat pad derived mesenchymal stromal cells: The influence of tissue source and inflammatory stimulus

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, John; Wright, Karina; Roberts, Sally; Kuiper, Jan Herman; Mangham, Chas; Richardson, James; Mennan, Claire

    2016-01-01

    The infrapatellar fat pad (FP) and synovial fluid (SF) in the knee serve as reservoirs of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) with potential therapeutic benefit. We determined the influence of the donor on the phenotype of donor matched FP and SF derived MSCs and examined their immunogenic and immunomodulatory properties before and after stimulation with the pro-inflammatory cytokine interferon-gamma (IFN-γ). Both cell populations were positive for MSC markers CD73, CD90 and CD105, and displayed multipotency. FP-MSCs had a significantly faster proliferation rate than SF-MSCs. CD14 positivity was seen in both FP-MSCs and SF-MSCs, and was positively correlated to donor age but only for SF-MSCs. Neither cell population was positive for the co-stimulatory markers CD40, CD80 and CD86, but both demonstrated increased levels of human leukocyte antigen-DR (HLA-DR) following IFN-γ stimulation. HLA-DR production was positively correlated with donor age for FP-MSCs but not SF-MSCs. The immunomodulatory molecule, HLA-G, was constitutively produced by both cell populations, unlike indoleamine 2, 3-dioxygenase which was only produced following IFN-γ stimulation. FP and SF are accessible cell sources which could be utilised in the treatment of cartilage injuries, either by transplantation following ex-vivo expansion or endogenous targeting and mobilisation of cells close to the site of injury. PMID:27073003

  12. Modulation of Synovial Fluid-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells by Intra-Articular and Intraosseous Platelet Rich Plasma Administration

    PubMed Central

    Muiños-López, Emma; Sánchez, Pello; Anitua, Eduardo; Fiz, Nicolás; Aizpurua, Beatriz; Guadilla, Jorge; Padilla, Sabino; Prósper, Felipe

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of intra-articular (IA) or a combination of intra-articular and intraosseous (IO) infiltration of Platelet Rich Plasma (PRP) on the cellular content of synovial fluid (SF) of osteoarthritic patients. Thirty-one patients received a single infiltration of PRP either in the IA space (n = 14) or in the IA space together with two IO infiltrations, one in the medial femoral condyle and one in the tibial plateau (n = 17). SF was collected before and after one week of the infiltration. The presence in the SF of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), monocytes, and lymphocytes was determined and quantified by flow cytometry. The number and identity of the MSCs were further confirmed by colony-forming and differentiation assays. PRP infiltration into the subchondral bone (SB) and the IA space induced a reduction in the population of MSCs in the SF. This reduction in MSCs was further confirmed by colony-forming (CFU-F) assay. On the contrary, IA infiltration alone did not cause variations in any of the cellular populations by flow cytometry or CFU-F assay. The SF of osteoarthritic patients contains a population of MSCs that can be modulated by PRP infiltration of the SB compartment.

  13. Evaluation of the speciation status of aluminium(III) ions in isolated osteoarthritic knee-joint synovial fluid.

    PubMed

    Silwood, Christopher J L; Grootveld, Martin

    2005-10-10

    High field 1H NMR spectroscopy demonstrated that the equilibration of added Al(III) ions in osteoarthritic (OA) knee-joint synovial fluid (SF) resulted in its complexation by citrate and, to a much lesser extent, tyrosine and histidine. The ability of these ligands, together with inorganic phosphate, to compete for the available Al(III) in terms of (1) thermodynamic equilibrium constants for the formation of their complexes and (2) their SF concentrations was probed through the use of computer speciation calculations, which considered low-molecular-mass binary and ternary Al(III) species, the predominant Al(III) plasma transport protein transferrin, and also relevant hydrolysis and precipitation processes. It was found that, at relatively low added Al(III) concentrations, citrate species were more favoured, whilst phosphate species became dominant at higher levels. The significance of these findings with regard to the in vivo corrosion of aluminium-containing metal alloy joint prostheses (e.g., TiAlV alloys) is discussed. PMID:15978730

  14. Largazole, a class I histone deacetylase inhibitor, enhances TNF-α-induced ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 expression in rheumatoid arthritis synovial fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Salahuddin; Riegsecker, Sharayah; Beamer, Maria; Rahman, Ayesha; Bellini, Joseph V; Bhansali, Pravin; Tillekeratne, L M Viranga

    2013-07-15

    In the present study, we evaluated the effect of largazole (LAR), a marine-derived class I HDAC inhibitor, on tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α)-induced expression of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1), and matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) activity. LAR (1-5 μM) had no adverse effect on the viability of RA synovial fibroblasts. Among the different class I HDACs screened, LAR (0.5-5 μM) inhibited the constitutive expression of HDAC1 (0-30%). Surprisingly, LAR increased class II HDAC [HDAC6] by ~220% with a concomitant decrease in HDAC5 [30-58%] expression in RA synovial fibroblasts. SAHA (5 μM), a pan-HDAC inhibitor, also induced HDAC6 expression in RA synovial fibroblasts. Pretreatment of RA synovial fibroblasts with LAR further enhanced TNF-α-induced ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 expression. However, LAR inhibited TNF-α-induced MMP-2 activity in RA synovial fibroblasts by 35% when compared to the TNF-α-treated group. Further, the addition of HDAC6 specific inhibitor Tubastatin A with LAR suppressed TNF-α+LAR-induced ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 expression and completely blocked MMP-2 activity, suggesting a role of HDAC6 in LAR-induced ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 expression. LAR also enhanced TNF-α-induced phospho-p38 and phospho-AKT expression, but inhibited the expression of phospho-JNK and nuclear translocation of NF-κBp65 in RA synovial fibroblasts. These results suggest that LAR activates p38 and Akt pathways and influences class II HDACs, in particular HDAC6, to enhance some of the detrimental effects of TNF-α in RA synovial fibroblasts. Understanding the exact role of different HDAC isoenzymes in RA pathogenesis is extremely important in order to develop highly effective HDAC inhibitors for the treatment of RA.

  15. Effects of glucosamine-chondroitin combination on synovial fluid IL-1β, IL-6, TNF-α and PGE2 levels in internal derangements of temporomandibular joint

    PubMed Central

    Esen, Emin; Tatli, Ufuk

    2015-01-01

    Background The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of glucosamine-chondroitin sulphate combination on internal derangements of temporomandibular joint in clinical and biochemical manners. Material and Methods This randomized clinical study included 31 cases reporting joint tenderness, in which disc displacement was detected on MR imaging. In all patients, synovial fluid sampling was performed under local anesthesia. In the study group, the patients were prescribed a combination of 1500 mg glucosamine and 1200 mg chondroitin sulphate, while patients in the control group were only prescribed 50 mg tramadol HCl (twice daily) for pain control. After 8 weeks, synovial fluid sampling was repeated in the same manner. The levels of pain, maximum mouth opening (MMO), synovial fluid IL-1ß, IL-6, TNF-α and PGE2 measured before and after pharmacological intervention were compared. Results The reduction in pain levels was significant in both groups. There was no significant difference between two groups in terms of pain reduction. The improvement in MMO was significant in the study group but it was not in the control group. The MMO improvement was significantly higher in the study group compared to the control group. In the study group, significant decrease was observed in PGE2 level, while the decreases in IL-1β, IL-6 and TNF-α levels were not significant. In the control group, no significant decrease was observed in any of the inflammatory cytokines after 8 weeks, moreover IL-1ß and IL-6 levels were increased. Alterations of IL-1ß and IL-6 levels were significant in study group while TNF-α and PGE2 levels were not, compared to control group. Conclusions In conclusion, these results might suggest that glucosamine-chondroitin combination significantly increases the MMO and decreases the synovial fluid IL1β and IL6 levels in internal derangements of TMJ compared to tramadol. The modifications of synovial fluid TNF-α and PGE2 levels do not reach

  16. Largazole, a class I histone deacetylase inhibitor, enhances TNF-α-induced ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 expression in rheumatoid arthritis synovial fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmed, Salahuddin; Riegsecker, Sharayah; Beamer, Maria; Rahman, Ayesha; Bellini, Joseph V.; Bhansali, Pravin; Tillekeratne, L.M. Viranga

    2013-07-15

    In the present study, we evaluated the effect of largazole (LAR), a marine-derived class I HDAC inhibitor, on tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α)-induced expression of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1), and matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) activity. LAR (1–5 μM) had no adverse effect on the viability of RA synovial fibroblasts. Among the different class I HDACs screened, LAR (0.5–5 μM) inhibited the constitutive expression of HDAC1 (0–30%). Surprisingly, LAR increased class II HDAC [HDAC6] by ∼ 220% with a concomitant decrease in HDAC5 [30–58%] expression in RA synovial fibroblasts. SAHA (5 μM), a pan-HDAC inhibitor, also induced HDAC6 expression in RA synovial fibroblasts. Pretreatment of RA synovial fibroblasts with LAR further enhanced TNF-α-induced ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 expression. However, LAR inhibited TNF-α-induced MMP-2 activity in RA synovial fibroblasts by 35% when compared to the TNF-α-treated group. Further, the addition of HDAC6 specific inhibitor Tubastatin A with LAR suppressed TNF-α + LAR-induced ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 expression and completely blocked MMP-2 activity, suggesting a role of HDAC6 in LAR-induced ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 expression. LAR also enhanced TNF-α-induced phospho-p38 and phospho-AKT expression, but inhibited the expression of phospho-JNK and nuclear translocation of NF-κBp65 in RA synovial fibroblasts. These results suggest that LAR activates p38 and Akt pathways and influences class II HDACs, in particular HDAC6, to enhance some of the detrimental effects of TNF-α in RA synovial fibroblasts. Understanding the exact role of different HDAC isoenzymes in RA pathogenesis is extremely important in order to develop highly effective HDAC inhibitors for the treatment of RA. - Highlights: • Largazole enhances TNF-α-induced ICAM-1 and VCAM-1. • Largazole upregulates class II HDAC (HDAC6) in RA synovial fibroblasts. • Largazole also induces the expression of phospho-p38

  17. Identification of T-cell stimulatory antigens of Chlamydia trachomatis using synovial fluid-derived T-cell clones.

    PubMed Central

    Hassell, A B; Reynolds, D J; Deacon, M; Gaston, J S; Pearce, J H

    1993-01-01

    Chlamydia trachomatis is a major cause of sexually transmitted disease, infertility and reactive arthritis in the Western world, and of trachoma in the developing world. There is evidence that the chronic inflammatory reaction seen in diseases associated with chlamydiae represents a delayed-type hypersensitivity response to chlamydial antigens. Little is known about which chlamydial antigens elicit T-cell responses yet such information could have important implications in terms of both immunopathological understanding of these diseases and immunoprophylaxis design. In this study, 61 chlamydia-specific T-cell clones have been produced from the synovial fluid of an individual with sexually acquired reactive arthritis (SARA). Ten clones have been characterized in detail and used to identify T-cell stimulatory antigens of chlamydiae by means of T-cell immunoblotting. Two distinct antigenic fractions have been identified, one recognized by three of the clones (molecular weight 18,000), the other recognized by six of the clones (molecular weight 30,000). The fractions are distinct from the major outer membrane protein, the 57,000 MW stress protein and the 60,000 MW cysteine-rich membrane protein of chlamydiae. The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) restriction of the response to these antigens differed: clones recognizing the 18,000 MW antigen required antigen-presenting cells expressing DR1 subtype DRB1*0101 or DRB1*0102 which only differ at amino acids 85 and 86 on the DR beta-chain; by contrast clones recognizing the 30,000 MW antigen were presented to only by antigen-presenting cells from DRB1*0101 individuals, reflecting extreme sensitivity of these clones to the polymorphism at positions 85 and 86 on the DR beta-chain. Images Figure 4 PMID:7691730

  18. Decreased Lubricin Concentrations and Markers of Joint Inflammation in Synovial Fluids from Patients with Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury

    PubMed Central

    Elsaid, KA; Fleming, BC; Oksendahl, HL; Machan, JT; Fadale, PD; Hulstyn, MJ; Shalvoy, R; Jay, GD

    2009-01-01

    Objective To study the effect of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury on lubricin concentration in synovial fluid (SF) and its correlation with time post-injury, inflammatory cytokines, lubricin degrading enzymes, and SF proteoglycan content. Methods SF samples were obtained from both knees of 30 patients with a unilateral ACL insufficiency 32–364 days post-injury. Lubricin, inflammatory cytokines [interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and interleukin-6 (IL-6)] and catabolic enzymes [procathepsin-B and neutrophil elastase (NE)] were quantified in the SF of injured and contralateral (uninjured) joints using ELISAs. Sulfated glycosaminoglycans (sGAG) levels in SF were measured by Alcian blue binding assay. Results SF lubricin concentrations were significantly (p<0.001) reduced following ACL injury when compared to the contralateral joint. Within 12-months, the lubricin concentration of the injured knee (slope=0..006, SE=0.00010, p<0.001) approached that of the contralateral knee, which did not change with time (slope=−0.0002, SE=0.00050, p=0.71). TNF-α levels showed a significant negative relationship with log2 lubricin levels. IL-1β, TNF-α, IL-6, procathepsin-B and NE concentrations in injured SF were greater in samples whose injuries were recent compared to those that were chronic. There were no detectable cytokines or enzymes in SF of contralateral joints. sGAG concentrations were significantly (p<0.01) higher in injured SF compared to contralateral joints. Conclusions The decrease in SF lubricin concentrations following ACL injury may place the joint at an increased risk of wear-induced damage, as a consequence of lack of boundary lubrication, potentially leading to secondary osteoarthritis. The decrease in SF lubricin was associated with elevation of inflammatory cytokines. PMID:18512776

  19. Identification of nanobacteria in human arthritic synovial fluid by method validated in human blood and urine using 200 nm model nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Tsurumoto, Toshiyuki; Zhu, Dan; Sommer, Andrei P

    2008-05-01

    Earlier we introduced a biosensor for the identification of nanobacteria in water drops. Here, we generalize its principle and apply it to identify nanobacteria in synovial fluid from a patient with osteoarthritis. Results indicate the prevalence of nanobacteria in the synovial fluid. The identification method is applicable to body fluids such as unfiltered human blood and urine, is independent of culturing procedures, and permits for a rapid detection of nanoparticles in liquid drops. In view of increasing clinical evidence on a contribution of nanobacteria in disease, their reported detection in HIV-infected people in South Africa, laboratory experiments indicating the excretion of viable (i.e., propagating) nanobacteria from humans via urine, the use of human excreta in agricultural irrigation, models predicting an injection of nanoaerosols contained in irrigation water enriched with human excreta into the atmosphere, and the identification of nanobacteria in the terrestrial atmosphere, promote the identification method described in this work to an important tool to monitor nanobacteria in body fluids and environmental samples. PMID:18522113

  20. Femoral neck erosions: sign of hip joint synovial disease

    SciTech Connect

    Goldberg, R.P.; Weissman, B.N.; Naimark, A.

    1983-07-01

    Pathologic synovial processes in the hip joint can cause characteristic extrinsic erosions of the femoral neck, which in extreme cases produce an ''apple core'' appearance. Nine such cases of synovial diseases, including synovial osteochondromatosis, pigmented villonodular synovitis, rheumatoid arthritis, and amyloidosis, that demonstrate this radiographic finding are presented. The anatomic relations of the hip joint that result in theis appearance, differential diagnosis, and radiographic techniques useful in diagnosis are discussed.

  1. Oral rosmarinic acid-enhanced Mentha spicata modulates synovial fluid biomarkers of inflammation in horses challenged with intra-articular LPS.

    PubMed

    Pearson, W; Fletcher, R S; Kott, L S

    2012-10-01

    A biological extract of high-rosmarinic acid mint (HRAM) has previously demonstrated inhibitory effects on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)), nitric oxide (NO) and glycosaminoglycan (GAG) release in vitro. This study was undertaken to determine whether HRAM added to feed produces similar effects in horses challenged with intra-articular LPS. Eight horses received HRAM (0 or 28.1 ± 1.3 g/day; n = 4 per group) in their feed for 24 days in a blinded manner. On day 21, all horses received an intra-articular injection of LPS (0.3 ng) into their left or right intercarpal joint. Synovial fluid (SF) samples were taken on postinjection day (PID)-21 (i.e. prior to commencement of supplementation), PID0, PID0.25, PID0.5, PID1 and PID3 and analysed for PGE(2), GAG, NO, protein and total nucleated cells counts. Blood biochemistry and haematology screens were conducted at PID-21, PID0, PID1 and PID3. There was a significant reduction in LPS-induced PGE(2) and GAG in SF in horses supplemented with HRAM compared with controls and a tendency to increase complement recognition protein accumulation in synovial fluid of HRAM horses. Plasma from HRAM horses had reduced total white blood cells, segmented neutrophils (compared with baseline concentrations) and lymphocytes (compared with controls), and increased SF nucleated cell count (compared with baseline concentrations and controls). It is concluded that HRAM offered as part of the feed alter biomarkers of inflammation in SF of LPS-challenged horses. Larger studies that seek to clarify effects of HRAM on synovial fluid cell counts and possible role of HRAM-induced interference with complement signalling are warranted.

  2. Primary pleuropulmonary synovial sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Mirzoyan, Michael; Muslimani, Ala'a; Setrakian, Sebouh; Swedeh, Mohamed; Daw, Hamed A

    2008-09-01

    Pleuropulmonary synovial sarcoma (PPSS) is increasingly recognized as a subtype of sarcoma because of the recent identification of a distinctive chromosomal translocation specific to synovial sarcoma. Soft-tissue synovial sarcoma is far more common than PPSS and typically develops in para-articular locations of the extremities, affects young and middle-aged adults, with no difference in distribution between the sexes, and has well-documented radiologic manifestations. Pleuropulmonary synovial sarcoma can arise in the chest wall, heart, mediastinum, pleura, or lung, and it shares patient demographics and several imaging features with its soft-tissue counterpart. Patients present with a cough, chest pain, or dyspnea. On chest radiographs, PPSS typically appears as a sharply marginated mass with uniform opacity, based in the pleura or in the lung, and often accompanied by an ipsilateral pleural effusion. Computed tomographic images show a well-circumscribed, heterogeneously enhanced lesion without associated involvement of bone and without calcifications (except in the case of a chest wall primary tumor). Magnetic resonance imaging provides superior demonstration of nodular soft tissue and multilocular fluid-filled internal components of PPSS, in addition to peripheral rim enhancement after the intravenous administration of a gadoliniumbased contrast material such as gadopentetate dimeglumine. Current treatment consists of surgical resection followed by chemotherapy, radiation therapy, or both. PMID:18824448

  3. Development of a synovial fluid analogue with bio-relevant rheology for wear testing of orthopaedic implants.

    PubMed

    Smith, Alan M; Fleming, Leigh; Wudebwe, Uchena; Bowen, James; Grover, Liam M

    2014-04-01

    The rheological properties of synovial fluid (SF) are crucial to the performance of joint prostheses. During the development of joint prostheses, wear tests are performed, which simulate joint movements in diluted solutions (usually between 25 and 33% v/v) of bovine serum which has very different rheological properties compared with native SF, where rheology is maintained by hyaluronan. Consequently, there is a need to develop a more suitable artificial SF. In this study, we used rheological techniques to understand SF flow properties which provided an insight into the mechanical behaviour required of a practical SF analogue. Steady-shear viscosity measurements were performed to reveal changes as a function of shear rate. To analyse the viscoelastic properties small deformation oscillatory measurements of storage modulus (G') loss modulus (G″) and complex viscosity (η(⁎)) were made. The rheological properties of the SF where compared with those of the polysaccharides sodium alginate, gellan gum and mixtures of both polymers. Initial results revealed classic shear thinning behaviour for the SF with a small Newtonian plateau at low shear rates with a gradual reduction in viscosity with increasing shear rate. Viscoelasticity measurements also showed that at low frequencies of oscillation there was a viscous response with G″ greater than G' and at higher frequencies there was an elastic response. Rheological properties were found to be similar to that of a 50:50 mix of 2% w/v high molecular weight alginate and 0.75% w/v gellan gum. Importantly, the lubricating behaviour of the serum differed significantly from the biopolymer blend over a full range of sliding velocities. The biopolymer blend was shown to lubricate the opposing surfaces more effectively. This difference was attributed to the more rapid alignment of the polysaccharide during shear when compared with the bovine albumin (the most abundant protein in serum), which typically exhibits a globular

  4. Synovial Fluid C-reactive Protein as a Diagnostic Marker for Periprosthetic Joint Infection: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chi; Wang, Qi; Li, Rui; Duan, Jin-Yan; Wang, Cheng-Bin

    2016-01-01

    Background: Periprosthetic joint infection (PJI) is the main cause of failure following total joint arthroplasty. Until now, the diagnosis of PJI is still confronted with technical limitations, and the question of whether synovial fluid biomarker, C-reactive protein (CRP), can provide high value in the diagnosis of PJI remains unanswered and, therefore, was the aim of the study. Methods: First, we conducted a systematic review on CRP in the diagnosis of PJI by searching online databases using keywords such as “periprosthetic joint infection”, “synovial fluid”, and “C-reactive protein”. Eligible studies providing sufficient data to construct 2 × 2 contingency tables were then selected based on the list of criteria and the quality of included studies was assessed subsequently. Finally, the reported sensitivity, specificity, diagnostic odds ratio (DOR), summary receiver operating characteristic (SROC) curve, and the area under the SROC (AUSROC) were pooled together and used to evaluate overall diagnostic performance. Results: Seven studies were included in our review, six of which comprising a total of 456 participants were further investigated in our meta-analysis. The pooled sensitivity, specificity, and DOR were 0.92 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.86–0.96), 0.90 (95% CI: 0.87–0.93), and 101.40 (95% CI: 48.07–213.93), respectively. The AUSROC was 0.9663 (standard error, 0.0113). Conclusions: Synovial fluid CRP is a good biomarker for the diagnosis of PJI with high sensitivity and specificity. PMID:27503025

  5. Synovial Fluid Analysis

    MedlinePlus

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  6. MHC restriction of synovial fluid lymphocyte responses to the triggering organism in reactive arthritis. Absence of a class I-restricted response.

    PubMed Central

    Hassell, A B; Pilling, D; Reynolds, D; Life, P F; Bacon, P A; Gaston, J S

    1992-01-01

    Synovial fluid mononuclear cells (SFMC) from patients with reactive arthritis (ReA) show marked proliferative responses to preparations of the organism triggering the arthritis. Initial studies with MHC-specific MoAbs have indicated that a significant element of these proliferative responses is mediated by class II MHC-restricted CD4+ T cells. It is imperative to establish the presence or absence of a class I-restricted response, for two reasons. Firstly, the association of ReA with the MHC class I molecule, HLA B27, raises the possibility of there being a B27-restricted response to the triggering organism. Secondly, a number of the organisms associated with ReA are intracellular pathogens, whose antigens might be expected to be presented by class I MHC molecules. In an effort to identify a class I MHC-restricted pathogen-specific response in the SFMC of ReA patients, we have assessed the proliferative responses of SFMC depleted of CD4+ T cells. Responses were grossly diminished by CD4+ T cell depletion. We also investigated Chlamydia-specific cytotoxicity in the SFMC of patients with sexually acquired ReA in a system using productive chlamydial infection to produce both targets and effectors. Significant antigen specific cytotoxicity was not seen. These experiments do not provide evidence to support the existence of pathogen-specific responses by CD8+, class I-restricted synovial fluid T cells in ReA. PMID:1606728

  7. Hyaluronan and synovial joint: function, distribution and healing

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Synovial fluid is a viscous solution found in the cavities of synovial joints. The principal role of synovial fluid is to reduce friction between the articular cartilages of synovial joints during movement. The presence of high molar mass hyaluronan (HA) in this fluid gives it the required viscosity for its function as lubricant solution. Inflammation oxidation stress enhances normal degradation of hyaluronan causing several diseases related to joints. This review describes hyaluronan properties and distribution, applications and its function in synovial joints, with short review for using thiol compounds as antioxidants preventing HA degradations under inflammation conditions. PMID:24678248

  8. Recombinant Salmonella typhimurium outer membrane protein A is recognized by synovial fluid CD8 cells and stimulates synovial fluid mononuclear cells to produce interleukin (IL)-17/IL-23 in patients with reactive arthritis and undifferentiated spondyloarthropathy.

    PubMed

    Chaurasia, S; Shasany, A K; Aggarwal, A; Misra, R

    2016-08-01

    In developing countries, one-third of patients with reactive arthritis (ReA) and undifferentiated spondyloarthropathy (uSpA) are triggered by Salmonella typhimurium. Synovial fluid mononuclear cells (SFMCs) of patients with ReA and uSpA proliferate to low molecular weight fractions (lmwf) of outer membrane proteins (Omp) of S. typhimurium. To characterize further the immunity of Omp of Salmonella, cellular immune response to two recombinant proteins of lmwf, OmpA and OmpD of S. typhimurium (rOmpA/D-sal) was assessed in 30 patients with ReA/uSpA. Using flow cytometry, 17 of 30 patients' SF CD8(+) T cells showed significant intracellular interferon (IFN)-γ to Omp crude lysate of S. typhimurium. Of these 17, 11 showed significantly more CD8(+) CD69(+) IFN-γ T cells to rOmpA-sal, whereas only four showed reactivity to rOmpD-sal. The mean stimulation index was significantly greater in rOmpA-sal than rOmpD-sal [3·0 (1·5-6·5) versus 1·5 (1·0-2·75), P < 0·005]. Similarly, using enzyme-linked immunospot (ELISPOT) in these 17 patients, the mean spots of IFN-γ-producing SFMCs were significantly greater in rOmpA-sal than rOmpD-sal [44·9 (3·5-130·7) versus 19·25 (6-41), P < 0·05]. SFMCs stimulated by rOmpA-sal produced significantly more proinflammatory cytokines than rOmpD-sal: IFN-γ [1·44 (0·39-20·42) versus 0·72 (0·048-9·15) ng/ml, P < 0·05], interleukin (IL)-17 [28·60 (6·15-510·86) versus 11·84 (6·83-252·62) pg/ml, P < 0·05], IL-23 [70·19 (15-1161·16) versus 28·25 (> 15-241·52) pg/ml, P < 0·05] and IL-6 [59·78 (2·03-273·36) versus 10·17 (0·004-190·19) ng/ml, P < 0·05]. The rOmpA-sal-specific CD8(+) T cell response correlated with duration of current synovitis (r = 0·53, P < 0·05). Thus, OmpA of S. typhimurium is a target of SF CD8(+) T cells and drives SFMC to produce increased cytokines of the IL-17/IL-23 axis which contribute to the pathogenesis of Salmonella-triggered ReA. PMID:27060348

  9. Serum amyloid A-derived peptides, present in human rheumatic synovial fluids, induce the secretion of interferon-gamma by human CD(4)(+) T-lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Yavin, E J; Preciado-Patt, L; Rosen, O; Yaron, M; Suessmuth, R D; Levartowsky, D; Jung, G; Lider, O; Fridkin, M

    2000-04-28

    Serum amyloid A (SAA) is a major acute-phase protein whose biochemical functions remain largely obscure. Human rheumatic synovial fluids were screened by high performance liquid chromatography mass spectrometry for SAA-derived peptides, specifically the sequence AGLPEKY (SAA(98-104)) which was previously shown to modulate various leukocyte functions. Two such fluids were found to contain a truncated version of SAA(98-104). Synthetic SAA(98-104) and several of its analogs were shown capable of binding isolated human CD(4)(+) T-lymphocytes and stimulating them to produce interferon-gamma. Given the high acute-phase serum level of SAA and its massive proteolysis by inflammatory related enzymes, SAA-derived peptides may be involved in host defense mechanisms. PMID:10788622

  10. Wide-field synovial fluid imaging using polarized lens-free on-chip microscopy for point-of-care diagnostics of gout (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yibo; Lee, Seung Yoon; Zhang, Yun; Furst, Daniel; Fitzgerald, John; Ozcan, Aydogan

    2016-03-01

    Gout and pseudogout are forms of crystal arthropathy caused by monosodium urate (MSU) and calcium pyrophosphate dehydrate (CPPD) crystals in the joint, respectively, that can result in painful joints. Detecting the unique-shaped, birefringent MSU/CPPD crystals in a synovial fluid sample using a compensated polarizing microscope has been the gold-standard for diagnosis since the 1960's. However, this can be time-consuming and inaccurate, especially if there are only few crystals in the fluid. The high-cost and bulkiness of conventional microscopes can also be limiting for point-of-care diagnosis. Lens-free on-chip microscopy based on digital holography routinely achieves high-throughput and high-resolution imaging in a cost-effective and field-portable design. Here we demonstrate, for the first time, polarized lens-free on-chip imaging of MSU and CPPD crystals over a wide field-of-view (FOV ~ 20.5 mm2, i.e., <20-fold larger compared a typical 20X objective-lens FOV) for point-of-care diagnostics of gout and pseudogout. Circularly polarizer partially-coherent light is used to illuminate the synovial fluid sample on a glass slide, after which a quarter-wave-plate and an angle-mismatched linear polarizer are used to analyze the transmitted light. Two lens-free holograms of the MSU/CPPD sample are taken, with the sample rotated by 90°, to rule out any non-birefringent objects within the specimen. A phase-recovery algorithm is also used to improve the reconstruction quality, and digital pseudo-coloring is utilized to match the color and contrast of the lens-free image to that of a gold-standard microscope image to ease the examination by a rheumatologist or a laboratory technician, and to facilitate computerized analysis.

  11. Cytokines in juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA).

    PubMed

    Mangge, H; Schauenstein, K

    1998-06-01

    Juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA), unlike rheumatoid arthritis of adulthood (RA), is a heterogenous disease comprising at least five subtypes that differ in clinical course and prognosis, and require different therapeutical approaches. As compared to RA, the production of local and systemic cytokines in JRA have not yet been as extensively investigated. In this article we review the available literature on cytokine expression in serum and synovial fluid in all five different subtypes of JRA. Even though the data are still fragmentary, the evidence so far suggests that the determination of serum cytokines yields relevant information as to clinical subtype and inflammatory activity of the disease. Furthermore, the cytokine data suggest that the pathogenesis of JRA may even by more heterogenous than defined by the clinical subtypes. Finally, future directions of research in this area are proposed, and-based on the latest results-arguments for (anti)cytokine therapies in JRA are critically discussed.

  12. Simvastatin Inhibits Toll-like Receptor 8 (TLR8) Signaling in Primary Human Monocytes and Spontaneous Tumor Necrosis Factor Production from Rheumatoid Synovial Membrane Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Mullen, Lisa; Ferdjani, Jason; Sacre, Sandra

    2015-01-01

    Simvastatin has been shown to have antiinflammatory effects that are independent of its serum cholesterol lowering action, but the mechanisms by which these antiinflammatory effects are mediated have not been elucidated. To explore the mechanism involved, the effect of simvastatin on toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling in primary human monocytes was investigated. A short pretreatment with simvastatin dose-dependently inhibited the production of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α in response to TLR8 activation (but not TLR2, -4 or -5). Statins are known inhibitors of the cholesterol biosynthetic pathway, but, intriguingly, TLR8 inhibition could not be reversed by addition of mevalonate or geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate, downstream products of cholesterol biosynthesis. TLR8 signaling was examined in HEK 293 cells stably expressing TLR8, where simvastatin inhibited I kappa B kinase (IKK)α/β phosphorylation and subsequent nuclear factor (NF)-κB activation without affecting the pathway to activating protein-1 (AP-1). Because simvastatin has been reported to have antiinflammatory effects in RA patients and TLR8 signaling contributes to TNF production in human RA synovial tissue in culture, simvastatin was tested in these cultures. Simvastatin significantly inhibited the spontaneous release of TNF in this model, which was not reversed by mevalonate. Together, these results demonstrate a hitherto unrecognized mechanism of simvastatin inhibition of TLR8 signaling that may in part explain its beneficial antiinflammatory effects. PMID:26322850

  13. Synovial chondrosarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Confalonieri, Norberto

    2016-01-01

    Background Synovial chondrosarcoma (SCH) is a very rare tumor arising in the intra-articular cavity. In the majority of literature reports it is described as a malignant transformation of a pre-existing synovial chondromatosis (SC). We reported a systematic review of primary and secondary SCH described in the literature with the aim to recollect data from different case-reports and case-series, trying to summarize general aspects of this very rare disease. Methods We collected 42 abstracts in the form of case series and case reports, which reported 67 cases of SCH. Studies were taken into account only if they proved a histological diagnosis of SCH, either primary or secondary, with or without evidence of pre-existing SC. Results The average age of SCH was 56.9 years, with prevalence for male sex. The average time of malignant transformation was 11.2 years. The most affected joint was the knee (47.7%), followed by hip (34.3%) and ankle (5.9%). SCH was described as de novo sarcoma only in 13 cases (19%). Surgery ended up with amputation in 59.7% of cases. Local recurrence rate was 28.3%. Conclusions We concluded that prognosis of SCH is worse than conventional one and we speculated this is due to the difficult site of the tumor (intraarticular), diagnostic delay and inappropriate previous treatments. We consider that a rapid deterioration of a SC or rapid recurrence after synoviectomy should be considered suspicious of malignant transformation and should be treated in a reference center. PMID:27570774

  14. Proteomics in Rheumatoid Arthritis Research

    PubMed Central

    Park, Yune-Jung; Chung, Min Kyung; Hwang, Daehee

    2015-01-01

    Although rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is the most common chronic inflammatory autoimmune disease, diagnosis of RA is currently based on clinical manifestations, and there is no simple, practical assessment tool in the clinical field to assess disease activity and severity. Recently, there has been increasing interest in the discovery of new diagnostic RA biomarkers that can assist in evaluating disease activity, severity, and treatment response. Proteomics, the large-scale study of the proteome, has emerged as a powerful technique for protein identification and characterization. For the past 10 years, proteomic techniques have been applied to different biological samples (synovial tissue/fluid, blood, and urine) from RA patients and experimental animal models. In this review, we summarize the current state of the application of proteomics in RA and its importance in identifying biomarkers and treatment targets. PMID:26330803

  15. B Cell Lymphoma mimicking Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Cosatti, M A; Pisoni, C N; Altuve, J L; Lorente, C

    2016-01-01

    Non Hodking´s lymphoma (NHL) may involve bones but synovial involvement is uncommon. We describe a patient who presented with polyarthritis, sicca symptoms and rash suggestive of rheumatoid arthritis. An atypical skin rash prompted skin and synovial biopsies. A diagnosis of synovial and skin malignant large B-cell lymphoma anaplastic subtype was performed. Chemotherapy with dexamethasone, vincristine and rituximab was started. Following treatment the patient had complete resolution of cutaneous and articular lymphoma manifestations. PMID:27419896

  16. Macrophage migration inhibitory factor: a potential therapeutic target for rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kyoung-Woon; Kim, Hae-Rim

    2016-01-01

    Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) is originally identified in the culture medium of activated T lymphocytes as a soluble factor that inhibits the random migration of macrophages. MIF is now recognized as a multipotent cytokine involved in the regulation of immune and inf lammatory responses. In rheumatoid arthritis (RA), MIF promotes inf lammatory responses by inducing proinflammatory cytokines and tissue-degrading molecules, promoting the proliferation and survival of synovial fibroblasts, stimulating neutrophil chemotaxis, and regulating angiogenesis and osteoclast differentiation. Expression of MIF in synovial tissue and synovial fluid levels of MIF are elevated in RA patients. Specifically, MIF levels correlate with RA disease activity and high levels are associated with bone erosion. In animal models of RA, the genetic and therapeutic inhibition of MIF has been shown to control inflammation and bone destruction. Based on the role of MIF in RA pathogenesis, small molecular inhibitors targeting it or its receptor pathways could provide a new therapeutic option for RA patients. PMID:27169879

  17. Macrophage migration inhibitory factor: a potential therapeutic target for rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyoung-Woon; Kim, Hae-Rim

    2016-07-01

    Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) is originally identified in the culture medium of activated T lymphocytes as a soluble factor that inhibits the random migration of macrophages. MIF is now recognized as a multipotent cytokine involved in the regulation of immune and inf lammatory responses. In rheumatoid arthritis (RA), MIF promotes inf lammatory responses by inducing proinflammatory cytokines and tissue-degrading molecules, promoting the proliferation and survival of synovial fibroblasts, stimulating neutrophil chemotaxis, and regulating angiogenesis and osteoclast differentiation. Expression of MIF in synovial tissue and synovial fluid levels of MIF are elevated in RA patients. Specifically, MIF levels correlate with RA disease activity and high levels are associated with bone erosion. In animal models of RA, the genetic and therapeutic inhibition of MIF has been shown to control inflammation and bone destruction. Based on the role of MIF in RA pathogenesis, small molecular inhibitors targeting it or its receptor pathways could provide a new therapeutic option for RA patients. PMID:27169879

  18. Detection of kallikrein-like activity in inflamed synovial tissue.

    PubMed

    Sharma, J N; Zeitlin, I J; Deodhar, S D; Buchanan, W W

    1983-04-01

    The synovial tissue kallikrein of rheumatoid patients, arthritic dogs and normal dogs has been partially characterized and estimated. Both human and dog synovial tissue kinin-forming enzyme appears to be distinct from plasmin, plasma kallikrein and pancreatic kallikrein. In three rheumatoid arthritic patients, the mean synovial tissue kallikrein level was found to be 106 +/- 13.5 ng bradykinin equivalents (BK Equiv) per g per min. In nine arthritic dogs the mean synovial tissue kallikrein level, 60.5 +/- 4.5 ng BK Equiv per g per min, was found to be greater (p less than 0.05) than that of five normal dogs (21.6 +/- 5.3 ng BK Equiv per g per min). The possible significance of this finding is discussed. PMID:6553485

  19. [Immunomorphological characteristics of the synovial membrane in rheumatic diseases].

    PubMed

    Radenska-Lopovok, S G

    2016-01-01

    The synovial membrane is frequently a target in rheumatic diseases. A search for diagnostic criteria and determination of changes in the pathological process necessitate standardized biopsy diagnostic techniques and quantification of morphological changes using digital imaging methods. The paper considers main methods for obtaining synovial membrane samples. It presents major morphological and immunohistochemical variations in synovitis in the presence of rheumatoid arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, and osteoarthrosis. It shows different immunological and autoinflammatory mechanisms of these diseases. Synovial membrane inflammation in rheumatoid arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, and osteoarthrosis is characterized by different components of morphogenesis, which is proven by the expression of different cell markers. Rheumatoid synovitis is an autoinflammatory process; synovitis in ankylosing spondylitis is characterized by autoinflammatory processes; biomechanical factors as joint inflammation triggers are leading in osteoarthrosis. PMID:27600785

  20. Human Synovial Lubricin Expresses Sialyl Lewis x Determinant and Has L-selectin Ligand Activity*

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Chunsheng; Ekwall, Anna-Karin Hultgård; Bylund, Johan; Björkman, Lena; Estrella, Ruby P.; Whitelock, John M.; Eisler, Thomas; Bokarewa, Maria; Karlsson, Niclas G.

    2012-01-01

    Lubricin (or proteoglycan 4 (PRG4)) is an abundant mucin-like glycoprotein in synovial fluid (SF) and a major component responsible for joint lubrication. In this study, it was shown that O-linked core 2 oligosaccharides (Galβ1–3(GlcNAcβ1–6)GalNAcα1-Thr/Ser) on lubricin isolated from rheumatoid arthritis SF contained both sulfate and fucose residues, and SF lubricin was capable of binding to recombinant L-selectin in a glycosylation-dependent manner. Using resting human polymorphonuclear granulocytes (PMN) from peripheral blood, confocal microscopy showed that lubricin coated circulating PMN and that it partly co-localized with L-selectin expressed by these cells. In agreement with this, activation-induced shedding of L-selectin also mediated decreased lubricin binding to PMN. It was also found that PMN recruited to inflamed synovial area and fluid in rheumatoid arthritis patients kept a coat of lubricin. These observations suggest that lubricin is able to bind to PMN via an L-selectin-dependent and -independent manner and may play a role in PMN-mediated inflammation. PMID:22930755

  1. Human synovial lubricin expresses sialyl Lewis x determinant and has L-selectin ligand activity.

    PubMed

    Jin, Chunsheng; Ekwall, Anna-Karin Hultgård; Bylund, Johan; Björkman, Lena; Estrella, Ruby P; Whitelock, John M; Eisler, Thomas; Bokarewa, Maria; Karlsson, Niclas G

    2012-10-19

    Lubricin (or proteoglycan 4 (PRG4)) is an abundant mucin-like glycoprotein in synovial fluid (SF) and a major component responsible for joint lubrication. In this study, it was shown that O-linked core 2 oligosaccharides (Galβ1-3(GlcNAcβ1-6)GalNAcα1-Thr/Ser) on lubricin isolated from rheumatoid arthritis SF contained both sulfate and fucose residues, and SF lubricin was capable of binding to recombinant L-selectin in a glycosylation-dependent manner. Using resting human polymorphonuclear granulocytes (PMN) from peripheral blood, confocal microscopy showed that lubricin coated circulating PMN and that it partly co-localized with L-selectin expressed by these cells. In agreement with this, activation-induced shedding of L-selectin also mediated decreased lubricin binding to PMN. It was also found that PMN recruited to inflamed synovial area and fluid in rheumatoid arthritis patients kept a coat of lubricin. These observations suggest that lubricin is able to bind to PMN via an L-selectin-dependent and -independent manner and may play a role in PMN-mediated inflammation.

  2. The effect of isometric exercise of the hand on the synovial blood flow in patients with rheumatoid arthritis measured by color Doppler ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Ellegaard, Karen; Torp-Pedersen, Søren; Lund, Hans; Pedersen, Kirsten; Henriksen, Marius; Danneskiold-Samsøe, Bente; Bliddal, Henning

    2013-01-01

    In 90% of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), the joints of the hand are affected. Studies of grip strength training have not indicated a negative effect on disease activity after training. Introduction of ultrasound Doppler (USD) to measure increased blood flow induced by inflammation has made it possible to investigate the direct effect on blood supply in the synovium after training. In this case-control study, 24 patients with RA with USD activity in the wrist joint participated. The USD activity was measured by the color fraction (CF) (CF = colored pixels/total number of pixels in ROI). Twenty-four patients were assigned to an 8-week grip strength training program. At baseline and after 8 weeks of training, an USD examination of the wrist joint was performed. In the training group, we measured grip strength and pain in the wrist joint. Six patients withdrew from the training because of pain or change in medication. Eighteen patients served as control group. There was a modest, not significant, decrease in the CF in response to training (1.86%; P = 0.08). Grip strength increased 8.8% after training (P = 0.055). Pain in motion deceased after training (P = 0.04). No difference in the CF was seen between the training and control groups, neither at baseline nor at follow-up (P = 0.82 and P = 0.48). Patients withdrawing from training had a significantly higher CF than the other patients (P > 0.001). The results in this study might indicate that the flow in the synovium assessed by USD is not affected by grip strength training.

  3. The synovial prostaglandin system in chronic inflammatory arthritis: differential effects of steroidal and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs

    PubMed Central

    Bombardieri, S.; Cattani, P.; Ciabattoni, G.; Di Munno, O.; Pasero, G.; Patrono, C.; Pinca, E.; Pugliese, F.

    1981-01-01

    1 The present study was undertaken to characterize the spectrum of arachidonic acid metabolites present in synovial effusions of patients with rheumatoid or psoriatic arthritis, and to compare changes in their concentration following a short-term treatment with 6α-methyl-prednisolone (6-MeP: 4-8 mg/day) or indoprofen (1.2 g/day), a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agent with proven synovial prostaglandin inhibitory effect. 2 Measurements of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), thromboxane (TX) B2, 6-keto-PGF1α and PGF2α were performed by radioimmunoassay techniques in synovial effusions obtained from 23 patients, and validated by thin-layer chromatographic analysis of the extracted immunoreactivity. 3 PGE2 and TXB2 accounted for more than 60% of the total immunoreactivity in untreated patients. The absence of any constant ratio between the different arachidonic acid metabolites detected in synovial fluid is consistent with a heterogeneous cellular origin of these compounds. 4 Indoprofen treatment was associated with a consistent reduction of synovial prostaglandin and thromboxane concentrations, ranging from 36% in the case of 6-keto-PGF1α to 90% in the case of PGE2. 5 In contrast, 6-MeP caused opposite changes on different metabolites originating via the cyclo-oxygenase pathway. Thus, 6-keto-PGF1α concentrations were reduced by 35%, PGF2α concentrations were increased by 30%, while PGE2 and TXB2 were unchanged following 6-MeP. 6 Although the mechanism(s) underlying the failure of 6-MeP to reduce synovial PGE2 and TXB2 levels are uncertain, the results of the present study clearly indicate that therapeutic doses of steroidal and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs cause quite distinct changes in arachidonic acid metabolism, which might be relevant to their specific therapeutic actions and side-effects. PMID:6895043

  4. Evaluation of a real-time PCR assay for simultaneous detection of Kingella kingae and Staphylococcus aureus from synovial fluid in suspected septic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Haldar, Malay; Butler, Meghan; Quinn, Criziel D; Stratton, Charles W; Tang, Yi-Wei; Burnham, Carey-Ann D

    2014-07-01

    Direct plating of synovial fluid (SF) on agar-based media often fails to identify pathogens in septic arthritis (SA). We developed a PCR assay for the simultaneous detection of Kingella kingae and Staphylococcus aureus from SF to evaluate molecular detection in SF and to estimate the incidence of K. kingae in SA in North America. The assay was based on detection of the cpn60 gene of K. kingae and the spa gene of S. aureus in multiplex real-time PCR. K. kingae was identified in 50% of patients between 0 and 5 yr of age (n=6) but not in any patients >18 yr old (n=105). Direct plating of SF on agar-based media failed to detect K. kingae in all samples. The PCR assay was inferior to the culture-based method for S. aureus, detecting only 50% of culture-positive cases. Our findings suggest that K. kingae is a common pathogen in pediatric SA in North America, in agreement with previous reports from Europe. PCR-based assays for the detection of K. kingae may be considered in children with SA, especially in those with a high degree of clinical suspicion.

  5. Investigation of the molecular nature of low-molecular-mass cobalt(II) ions in isolated osteoarthritic knee-joint synovial fluid.

    PubMed

    Silwood, Christopher J L; Chikanza, Ian C; Tanner, K Elizabeth; Shelton, Julia C; Bowsher, John G; Grootveld, Martin

    2004-06-01

    High field 1H NMR spectroscopy demonstrated that addition of Co(II) ions to osteoarthritic knee-joint synovial fluid (SF) resulted in its complexation by a range of biomolecules, the relative efficacies of these complexants/chelators being citrate > histidine - threonine > glycine - glutamate - glutamine - phenylalanine tyrosine > formate > lactate > alanine > valine > acetate > pyruvate > creatinine, this order reflecting the ability of these ligands to compete for the available Co(II) in terms of (1) thermodynamic equilibrium constants for the formation of their complexes and (2) their SF concentrations. Since many of these SF Co(II) complexants (e.g. histidinate) serve as powerful *OH scavengers, the results acquired indicate that any of this radical generated from the Co(II) source in such complexes via Fenton or pseudo-Fenton reaction systems will be "site-specifically" scavenged. The significance of these observations with regard to cobalt toxicity and the in vivo corrosion of cobalt-containing metal alloy joint prostheses (e.g. CoCr alloys) is discussed.

  6. Differentiation Effects of Platelet-Rich Plasma Concentrations on Synovial Fluid Mesenchymal Stem Cells from Pigs Cultivated in Alginate Complex Hydrogel

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Hao-Che; Chen, Wei-Chuan; Chiang, Chih-Wei; Chen, Lei-Yen; Chang, Yu-Ching; Chen, Chih-Hwa

    2015-01-01

    This article studied the effects of platelet-rich plasma (PRP) on the potential of synovial fluid mesenchymal stem cells (SF-MSCs) to differentiate. The PRP and SF-MSCs were obtained from the blood and knees of pigs, respectively. The identification of SF-MSCs and their ability to differentiate were studied by histological and surface epitopes, respectively. The SF-MSCs can undergo trilineage mesenchymal differentiation under osteogenic, chondrogenic, and adipocyte induction. The effects of various PRP concentrations (0%, 20% and 50% PRP) on differentiation were evaluated using the SF-MSCs-alginate system, such as gene expression and DNA proliferation. A 50% PRP concentration yielded better differentiation than the 20% PRP concentration. PRP favored the chondrogenesis of SF-MSCs over their osteogenesis in a manner that depended on the ratios of type II collagen/type I collagen and aggrecan/osteopontin. Eventually, PRP promoted the proliferation of SF-MSCs and induced chondrogenic differentiation of SF-MSCs in vitro. Both PRP and SF-MSCs could be feasibly used in regenerative medicine and orthopedic surgeries. PMID:26262616

  7. High levels of the soluble form of CD30 molecule in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) are expression of CD30+ T cell involvement in the inflamed joints.

    PubMed

    Gerli, R; Muscat, C; Bistoni, O; Falini, B; Tomassini, C; Agea, E; Tognellini, R; Biagini, P; Bertotto, A

    1995-12-01

    The CD30 is a surface molecule expressed by Th2-type lymphokine-producing T cells upon activation. CD30-expressing activated T cells release a soluble form of the molecule, which can be detectable both in vitro and in vivo. In the present study, high levels of soluble CD30 were found in peripheral blood and synovial fluid from patients with RA. However, CD30+ CD3+ cells, either CD4+ or CD8+, were significantly present in synovial fluid, but not in peripheral blood, of RA patients. Serum values of soluble CD30 were higher in active than inactive RA patients and directly correlated with rheumatoid factor serum titres. These data strongly support an involvement of CD30+ T cells in the immune processes of rheumatoid synovitis, and may suggest a relationship between Th2-type cytokine-secreting T cells and the pathological response in RA. PMID:8536371

  8. IL-17 contributes to angiogenesis in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Pickens, Sarah R; Volin, Michael V; Mandelin, Arthur M; Kolls, Jay K; Pope, Richard M; Shahrara, Shiva

    2010-03-15

    Angiogenesis is an early and a critical event in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Neovascularization is dependent on endothelial cell activation, migration and proliferation, and inhibition of angiogenesis may provide a novel therapeutic approach in RA. In this study, we document a novel role of IL-17 in mediating angiogenesis. Local expression of IL-17 in mouse ankles increases vascularity. We further demonstrate that IL-17 is angiogenic by showing its ability to promote blood vessel growth in Matrigel plugs in vivo. Additionally, IL-17, in concentrations present in the RA joint, induces human lung microvascular endothelial cell (HMVEC) migration mediated through the PI3K/AKT1 pathway. Furthermore, suppression of the PI3K pathway markedly reduces IL-17-induced tube formation. We also show that both IL-17-induced HMVEC chemotaxis and tube formation are mediated primarily through IL-17 receptor C. Neutralization of either IL-17 in RA synovial fluids or IL-17 receptor C on HMVECs significantly reduces the induction of HMVEC migration by RA synovial fluid. Finally, RA synovial fluid immunoneutralized with anti-IL-17 and antivascular endothelial growth factor does not reduce HMVEC migration beyond the effect detected by immunodepleting each factor alone. These observations identify a novel function for IL-17 as an angiogenic mediator in RA, supporting IL-17 as a therapeutic target in RA.

  9. Infection of human synovial cells by human T cell lymphotropic virus type I. Proliferation and granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor production by synovial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Sakai, M; Eguchi, K; Terada, K; Nakashima, M; Yamashita, I; Ida, H; Kawabe, Y; Aoyagi, T; Takino, H; Nakamura, T

    1993-01-01

    The present study was performed to clarify the relationship between human T cell lymphotropic virus type I (HTLV-I) infection and chronic inflammatory arthropathy. To determine the ability of HTLV-I to infect synovial cells and the effect on synovial cell proliferation, synovial cells were cocultured with the HTLV-I-producing T cell lines (MT-2 or HCT-1). After coculture with HTLV-I-infected T cells, the synovial cells expressed HTLV-I-specific core antigens, and HTLV-I proviral DNA was detected from the synovial cells by polymerase chain reaction. These cocultured synovial cells with HTLV-I-infected T cells proliferated more actively than the synovial cells cocultured with uninfected T cells. This stimulatory effect of HTLV-I-infected T cells on synovial cell proliferation seems necessary to contact each other. After being cocultured with MT-2 cells, synovial cells proliferated more actively than control cells even after several passages. Furthermore, HTLV-I-infected synovial cells produced significant amounts of granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor. These results suggest that HTLV-I can infect synovial cells, resulting their active proliferation and may be involved in the pathogenesis of proliferative synovitis similar to that found in rheumatoid arthritis. Images PMID:8408648

  10. Ultrasound in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Rizzo, Chiara; Ceccarelli, Fulvia; Gattamelata, Angelica; Vavala, Caterina; Valesini, Guido; Iagnocco, Annamaria

    2013-09-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic inflammatory disease characterized by synovial inflammation that can lead to structural damage of cartilage, bone and tendons. Assessing the inflammatory activity and the severity is essential in RA to help rheumatologists in adopting proper therapeutic strategies and in evaluating disease outcome and response to treatment. In the last years musculoskeletal (MS) ultrasonography (US) underwent tremendous technological development of equipment with increased sensitivity in detecting a wide set of joint and soft tissues abnormalities. In RA MSUS with the use of Doppler modalities is a useful imaging tool to depict inflammatory abnormalities (i.e. synovitis, tenosynovitis and bursitis) and structural changes (i.e. bone erosions, cartilage damage and tendon lesions). In addition, MSUS has been demonstrated to be able to monitor the response to different therapies in RA to guide local diagnostic and therapeutic procedures such as biopsy, fluid aspirations and injections. Future applications based on the development of new tools may improve the role of MSUS in RA.

  11. Dysregulation of CD4+CD25hi+ T cells in the synovial fluid of patients with antibiotic-refractory Lyme arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Vudattu, Nalini K.; Strle, Klemen; Steere, Allen C.; Drouin, Elise E.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To explore the role of immune dysregulation in antibiotic-refractory Lyme arthritis, the phenotype, frequency and function of CD4+ Teff and Treg cells were compared in patients with antibiotic-responsive or antibiotic-refractory arthritis. In the latter condition, infection-induced autoimmunity is thought to have a pathogenic role. Methods Matched peripheral blood (PB) and synovial fluid (SF) samples from 15 patients with antibiotic-responsive arthritis were compared with those from 16 patients with antibiotic-refractory arthritis using flow cytometry, suppression and cytokine assays. Results Critical differences between the 2 patient groups were found in the SF CD4+CD25hi+ populations, a subset of cells usually composed of FOXP3-positive Treg cells. In patients with antibiotic-refractory arthritis, this cell population often had fewer FOXP3-positive cells, and greater frequencies of FOXP3-negative (Teff) compared to patients with antibiotic-responsive arthritis. Moreover, in the refractory group, CD4+CD25hi+ cells had significantly greater expression of GITR and OX-40, two co-receptors that augment T cell function. Suppression assays showed that CD4+CD25hi+ cells in patients with refractory arthritis did not effectively suppress proliferation of CD4+CD25− cells, or secretion of IFN-γ or TNF-α, whereas those from patients with responsive arthritis did. Finally, in the refractory group, higher ratios of CD25hi+FOXP3−/CD25hi+FOXP3+ cells correlated directly with longer post-treatment durations of arthritis. Conclusion Patients with antibiotic-refractory Lyme arthritis often had lower frequencies of Treg, higher expression of activation co-receptors, and less effective inhibition of pro-inflammatory cytokines. This suggests that immune responses in these patients were excessively amplified leading to immune dysregulation and refractory arthritis. PMID:23450683

  12. Progression of Mycoplasma hyosynoviae infection in three pig herds. Development of tonsillar carrier state, arthritis and antibodies in serum and synovial fluid in pigs from birth to slaughter.

    PubMed

    Hagedorn-Olsen, T; Nielsen, N C; Friis, N F; Nielsen, J

    1999-11-01

    In this investigation, natural infection with Mycoplasma hyosynoviae was followed in groups of individual pigs in three different herds with regard to occurrence of tonsillar carrier state, clinical arthritis and development of antibodies in serum and in synovial fluid. Antibodies were detected by a polyclonal enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) developed for experimental use. The infection with M. hyosynoviae progressed very differently in the three herds investigated. In one herd, the infection was apparently limited to adult pigs. In a second herd, all pigs became tonsillar carriers of M. hyosynoviae, but no mycoplasma-related arthritis nor any serological response was demonstrated within the growing-finishing period. In the third herd investigated, tonsillar infection was detected in all pigs, clinical cases of M. hyosynoviae arthritis followed and a moderate serological response was observed in some, but not all, pigs. In all three herds, M. hyosynoviae infection was carried in the tonsils of the adult pigs, but it was only occasionally transmitted from sows to piglets. Maternal antibodies were transferred to the piglets and persisted for approximately 8-12 weeks. After weaning, some pigs became infected before 20 weeks of age, while others did not. In the majority of cases, the tonsillar infection was established from 11 weeks of age or older. A latent tonsillar infection was present for a period of several weeks within the group of investigated pigs before cases of generalized infection and arthritis were seen. In some cases, generalization of M. hyosynoviae infection in the blood and in joints was observed in spite of the detection of an active serological response a few weeks earlier. The present work suggests that generalization of the infection and development of arthritis may depend on age, immunity, virulence factors and/or infection pressure; in some herds maybe combined with certain triggering mechanisms such as stress and lowered general

  13. TWEAK and Fn14 expression in the pathogenesis of joint inflammation and bone erosion in rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction TNF-like weak inducer of apoptosis (TWEAK) has been proposed as a mediator of inflammation and bone erosion in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). This study aimed to investigate TWEAK and TWEAK receptor (Fn14) expression in synovial tissue from patients with active and inactive rheumatoid arthritis (RA), osteoarthritis (OA) and normal controls and assess soluble (s)TWEAK levels in the synovial fluids from patients with active RA and OA. Effects of sTWEAK on osteoclasts and osteoblasts were investigated in vitro. Methods TWEAK and Fn14 expression were detected in synovial tissues by immunohistochemistry (IHC). Selected tissues were dual labelled with antibodies specific for TWEAK and lineage-selective cell surface markers CD68, Tryptase G, CD22 and CD38. TWEAK mRNA expression was examined in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) sorted on the basis of their expression of CD22. sTWEAK was detected in synovial fluid from OA and RA patients by ELISA. The effect of sTWEAK on PBMC and RAW 264.7 osteoclastogenesis was examined. The effect of sTWEAK on cell surface receptor activator of NF Kappa B Ligand (RANKL) expression by human osteoblasts was determined by flow cytometry. Results TWEAK and Fn14 expression were significantly higher in synovial tissue from all patient groups compared to the synovial tissue from control subjects (P < 0.05). TWEAK was significantly higher in active compared with inactive RA tissues (P < 0.05). TWEAK expression co-localised with a subset of CD38+ plasma cells and with CD22+ B-lymphocytes in RA tissues. Abundant TWEAK mRNA expression was detected in normal human CD22+ B cells. Higher levels of sTWEAK were observed in synovial fluids isolated from active RA compared with OA patients. sTWEAK did not stimulate osteoclast formation directly from PBMC, however, sTWEAK induced the surface expression of RANKL by human immature, STRO-1+ osteoblasts. Conclusions The expression of TWEAK by CD22+ B cells and CD38+ plasma cells in RA

  14. Role of inflammatory factors and adipose tissue in pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis. Part I: Rheumatoid adipose tissue.

    PubMed

    Sudoł-Szopińska, Iwona; Kontny, Ewa; Zaniewicz-Kaniewska, Katarzyna; Prohorec-Sobieszek, Monika; Saied, Fadhil; Maśliński, Włodzimierz

    2013-06-01

    For many years, it was thought that synovial cells and chondrocytes are the only sources of proinflammatory cytokines and growth factors found in the synovial fluid in patients suffering from osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis. Currently, it is more and more frequently indicated that adipose tissue plays a significant role in the pathogenesis of these diseases as well as that a range of pathological processes that take place in the adipose tissue, synovial membrane and cartilage are interconnected. The adipose tissue is considered a specialized form of the connective tissue containing various types of cells which produce numerous biologically active factors. The latest studies reveal that, similarly to the synovial membrane, articular adipose tissue may take part in the local inflammatory response and affect the metabolism of the cartilage and subchondral osseous tissue. In in vitro conditions, the explants of this tissue obtained from patients suffering from osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis produce similar pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines to the explants of the synovial membrane. At this stage already, knowledge translates into imaging diagnostics. In radiological images, the shadowing of the periarticular soft tissues may not only reflect synovial membrane pathologies or joint effusion, but may also suggest inflammatory edema of the adipose tissue. On ultrasound examinations, abnormal presentation of the adipose tissue, i.e. increased echogenicity and hyperemia, may indicate its inflammation. Such images have frequently been obtained during ultrasound scanning and have been interpreted as inflammation, edema, hypertrophy or fibrosis of the adipose tissue. At present, when the knowledge concerning pathogenic mechanisms is taken into account, abnormal echogenicity and hyperemia of the adipose tissue may be considered as a proof of its inflammation. In the authors' own practice, the inflammation of the adipose tissue usually accompanies synovitis

  15. Differential expression of the urokinase receptor (CD87) in arthritic and normal synovial tissues.

    PubMed Central

    Szekanecz, Z; Haines, G K; Koch, A E

    1997-01-01

    AIM: To determine whether the urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (u-PAR; CD87) exhibits a possible pathogenic role in rheumatoid and osteoarthritis. METHODS: A semiquantitative, indirect immunoperoxidase histochemical analysis was performed on frozen synovial tissue sections. The recently characterised monoclonal antibody 10G7 recognising transfectants bearing u-PAR was used. Synovial tissue was obtained from 10 patients with rheumatoid arthritis, 10 patients with osteoarthritis, and four normal subjects. RESULTS: u-PAR was expressed on 70-90% of synovial tissue lining cells and subsynovial, interstitial macrophages from the arthritis patients, but only on a few myeloid cells from the normal subjects. It was also present on more endothelial cells from the rheumatoid and osteoarthritis patients, than from normal synovial tissue. CONCLUSIONS: Plasminogen activators are important in joint destruction underlying arthritis. The up-regulated expression of u-PAR in diseased versus normal synovial tissue suggests a role for this antigen in the inflammatory and angiogenic mechanisms underlying rheumatoid and osteoarthritis. Images PMID:9215148

  16. Energy Metabolism Disorder as a Contributing Factor of Rheumatoid Arthritis: A Comparative Proteomic and Metabolomic Study

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Guifeng; Zou, Hai; Wang, Jian Min; Lin, Yao Yao; Chuka, Chifundo Martha; Ge, Ren Shan; Zhai, Weitao; Wang, Jian Guang

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To explore the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), the different metabolites were screened in synovial fluid by metabolomics. Methods Synovial fluid from 25 RA patients and 10 normal subjects were analyzed by GC/TOF MS analysis so as to give a broad overview of synovial fluid metabolites. The metabolic profiles of RA patients and normal subjects were compared using multivariate statistical analysis. Different proteins were verified by qPCR and western blot. Different metabolites were verified by colorimetric assay kit in 25 inactive RA patients, 25 active RA patients and 20 normal subjects. The influence of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1α pathway on catabolism was detected by HIF-1α knockdown. Results A subset of 58 metabolites was identified, in which the concentrations of 7 metabolites related to energy metabolism were significantly different as shown by importance in the projection (VIP) (VIP≥1) and Student’s t-test (p<0.05). In the 7 metabolites, the concentration of glucose was decreased, and the concentration of lactic acid was increased in the synovial fluid of RA patients than normal subjects verified by colorimetric assay Kit. Receiver operator characteristic (ROC) analysis shows that the concentration of glucose and lactic acid in synovial fluid could be used as dependable biomarkers for the diagnosis of active RA, provided an AUC of 0.906 and 0.922. Sensitivity and specificity, which were determined by cut-off points, reached 84% and 96% in sensitivity and 95% and 85% in specificity, respectively. The verification of different proteins identified in our previous proteomic study shows that the enzymes of anaerobic catabolism were up-regulated (PFKP and LDHA), and the enzymes of aerobic oxidation and fatty acid oxidation were down-regulated (CS, DLST, PGD, ACSL4, ACADVL and HADHA) in RA patients. The expression of HIF-1α and the enzymes of aerobic oxidation and fatty acid oxidation were decreased and the enzymes of anaerobic

  17. NETs are a source of citrullinated autoantigens and stimulate inflammatory responses in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Khandpur, Ritika; Carmona-Rivera, Carmelo; Vivekanandan-Giri, Anuradha; Gizinski, Alison; Yalavarthi, Srilakshmi; Knight, Jason S; Friday, Sean; Li, Sam; Patel, Rajiv M; Subramanian, Venkataraman; Thompson, Paul; Chen, Pojen; Fox, David A; Pennathur, Subramaniam; Kaplan, Mariana J

    2013-03-27

    The early events leading to the development of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) remain unclear, but formation of autoantibodies to citrullinated protein antigens (ACPAs) is considered a key pathogenic event. Neutrophils isolated from patients with various autoimmune diseases display enhanced neutrophil extracellular trap (NET) formation, a phenomenon that exposes autoantigens in the context of immunostimulatory molecules. We investigated whether aberrant NETosis occurs in RA, determined its triggers, and examined its deleterious inflammatory consequences. Enhanced NETosis was observed in circulating and RA synovial fluid neutrophils compared to neutrophils from healthy controls and from patients with osteoarthritis (OA). Further, netting neutrophils infiltrated RA synovial tissue, rheumatoid nodules, and skin. NETosis correlated with ACPA presence and levels and with systemic inflammatory markers. RA sera and immunoglobulin fractions from RA patients with high levels of ACPA and/or rheumatoid factor significantly enhanced NETosis, and the NETs induced by these autoantibodies displayed distinct protein content. Indeed, during NETosis, neutrophils externalized the citrullinated autoantigens implicated in RA pathogenesis, and anti-citrullinated vimentin antibodies potently induced NET formation. Moreover, the inflammatory cytokines interleukin-17A (IL-17A) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) induced NETosis in RA neutrophils. In turn, NETs significantly augmented inflammatory responses in RA and OA synovial fibroblasts, including induction of IL-6, IL-8, chemokines, and adhesion molecules. These observations implicate accelerated NETosis in RA pathogenesis, through externalization of citrullinated autoantigens and immunostimulatory molecules that may promote aberrant adaptive and innate immune responses in the joint and in the periphery, and perpetuate pathogenic mechanisms in this disease.

  18. Rheumatoid Vasculitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... RV) is an unusual complication of longstanding, severe rheumatoid arthritis. The active vasculitis associated with rheumatoid disease occurs ... a manifestation of “extra-articular” (beyond the joint)rheumatoid arthritis and involves the small and medium-sized arteries ...

  19. Primary Intracranial Synovial Sarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Li, Luyuan; Sinson, Grant; Mueller, Wade

    2016-01-01

    Background. Synovial sarcoma is an aggressive soft tissue sarcoma with uncertain histological origin. The pathology frequently presents as a localized disease, especially near large joints around the knee and thigh. Intracranial disease, which is rare, has been reported as metastasis from synovial sarcoma. We report a case with no obvious primary extracranial pathology, suggesting primary intracranial disease; this has not been reported in the literature. Case Description. A 21-year-old male, with a prior right skull lesion resection for atypical spindle cell neoplasm, presented with headaches, gait instability, left arm weakness, and left homonymous hemianopsia. CT of head demonstrated a right parietal hemorrhagic lesion with mass effect, requiring surgical decompression. Histopathology revealed synovial sarcoma. FISH analysis noted the existence of the t(X;18)(p11.2;q11.2) chromosomal translocation. PET scan did not show other metastatic disease. He underwent stereotactic radiotherapy and adjuvant chemotherapy. At 2-year follow-up, he remained nonfocal without recurrence. Conclusion. We report the first known case of primary intracranial synovial sarcoma. Moreover, we stress that intracranial lesions may have a tendency for hemorrhage, requiring urgent lifesaving decompression. PMID:27247811

  20. Primary Intracranial Synovial Sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Patel, Mohit; Li, Luyuan; Nguyen, Ha Son; Doan, Ninh; Sinson, Grant; Mueller, Wade

    2016-01-01

    Background. Synovial sarcoma is an aggressive soft tissue sarcoma with uncertain histological origin. The pathology frequently presents as a localized disease, especially near large joints around the knee and thigh. Intracranial disease, which is rare, has been reported as metastasis from synovial sarcoma. We report a case with no obvious primary extracranial pathology, suggesting primary intracranial disease; this has not been reported in the literature. Case Description. A 21-year-old male, with a prior right skull lesion resection for atypical spindle cell neoplasm, presented with headaches, gait instability, left arm weakness, and left homonymous hemianopsia. CT of head demonstrated a right parietal hemorrhagic lesion with mass effect, requiring surgical decompression. Histopathology revealed synovial sarcoma. FISH analysis noted the existence of the t(X;18)(p11.2;q11.2) chromosomal translocation. PET scan did not show other metastatic disease. He underwent stereotactic radiotherapy and adjuvant chemotherapy. At 2-year follow-up, he remained nonfocal without recurrence. Conclusion. We report the first known case of primary intracranial synovial sarcoma. Moreover, we stress that intracranial lesions may have a tendency for hemorrhage, requiring urgent lifesaving decompression. PMID:27247811

  1. Role of the complement system in rheumatoid arthritis and psoriatic arthritis: relationship with anti-TNF inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Ballanti, Eleonora; Perricone, Carlo; di Muzio, Gioia; Kroegler, Barbara; Chimenti, Maria Sole; Graceffa, Dario; Perricone, Roberto

    2011-08-01

    The complement system is an essential component of innate immunity and also plays an important role in modulating adaptive immunity. It comprises more than 30 plasma and membrane-bound proteins and can be activated through three pathways: the classical, the alternative and the lectin pathways. Its activation contributes to the pathogenesis of several autoimmune and inflammatory conditions. The evidence of complement activation in synovial fluid of Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) patients is abundant, while few data exist in Psoriatic Arthritis (PsA) patients. Levels of complement proteins are generally depressed in the synovial fluid of patients with RA, reflecting consumption of complement. On the other hand, elevated levels of several complement cleavage products have been observed in synovial fluid. Involvement of complement in the pathogenesis of RA was also confirmed in animal models of arthritis: mice deficient for complement proteins are protected against the development of collagen-induced arthritis and administration of the anti-C5 monoclonal antibody prevents the onset of this arthritis. In the last decade anti-tumor necrosis factor agents have shown to be effective for the treatment of both RA and PsA and some studies suggest that the interaction between TNFα and complement system may contribute to the pathogenesis of these diseases. Reduction of the complement activation could be one of the mechanism by which TNFα-inhibitors exert their effectiveness in inflammatory arthritides. Because of these findings, complement could be an attractive therapeutic target both in RA and in PsA.

  2. Synovial chondromatosis in raptors.

    PubMed

    Stone, E G; Walser, M M; Redig, P T; Rings, B; Howard, D J

    1999-01-01

    Fourteen raptors, consisting of 13 great horned owls (Bubo virginianus) and one red-tailed hawk (Buteo jamaicensis), from central and north central Minnesota, western Wisconsin, and eastern South Dakota (USA) were admitted to a raptor rehabilitation center between June 1992 and June 1995, with perisynovial and synovial chondromatosis affecting multiple joints. Birds were severely debilitated primarily due to loss of shoulder motion. The etiology of these lesions in raptors is unknown. PMID:10073365

  3. Glenohumeral Synovial Chondromatosis.

    PubMed

    Andrade, Robert

    2016-09-01

    A 20-year-old, right hand-dominant man reported to physical therapy with a history of deep anterior left shoulder pain. Radiographs, which were obtained after physical therapy was initiated, and subsequent magnetic resonance imaging showed the presence of numerous radio-opaque loose bodies that followed bone signal characteristics dispersed throughout the glenohumeral joint, leading to a diagnosis of synovial chondromatosis. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 2016;46(9):809. doi:10.2519/jospt.2016.0414.

  4. Synovial tissue hypoxia and inflammation in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Ng, C T; Biniecka, M; Kennedy, A; McCormick, J; FitzGerald, O; Bresnihan, B; Buggy, D; Taylor, C T; O'Sullivan, J; Fearon, U; Veale, D J

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Hypoxia is a microenvironmental feature in the inflamed joint, which promotes survival advantage for cells. The aim of this study was to examine the relationship of partial oxygen pressure in the synovial tissue (tPO2) in patients with inflammatory arthritis with macroscopic/microscopic inflammation and local levels of proinflammatory mediators. Methods Patients with inflammatory arthritis underwent full clinical assessment and video arthroscopy to quantify macroscopic synovitis and measure synovial tPO2 under direct visualisation. Cell specific markers (CD3 (T cells), CD68 (macrophages), Ki67 (cell proliferation) and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labelling (cell apoptosis)) were quantified by immunohistology. In vitro migration was assessed in primary and normal synoviocytes (synovial fibroblast cells (SFCs)) using a wound repair scratch assay. Levels of tumour necrosis factor α (TNFα), interleukin 1β (IL1β), interferon γ (IFNγ), IL6, macrophage inflammatory protein 3α (MIP3α) and IL8 were quantified, in matched serum and synovial fluid, by multiplex cytokine assay and ELISA. Results The tPO2 was 22.5 (range 3.2–54.1) mm Hg and correlated inversely with macroscopic synovitis (r=−0.421, p=0.02), sublining CD3 cells (−0.611, p<0.01) and sublining CD68 cells (r=−0.615, p<0.001). No relationship with cell proliferation or apoptosis was found. Primary and normal SFCs exposed to 1% and 3% oxygen (reflecting the median tPO2 in vivo) induced cell migration. This was coupled with significantly higher levels of synovial fluid tumour necrosis factor α (TNFα), IL1β, IFNγ and MIP3α in patients with tPO2 <20 mm Hg (all p values <0.05). Conclusions This is the first study to show a direct in vivo correlation between synovial tPO2, inflammation and cell migration, thus it is proposed that hypoxia is a possible primary driver of inflammatory processes in the arthritic joint. PMID:20439288

  5. Incidence and specificity of antibodies to types I, II, III, IV, and V collagen in rheumatoid arthritis and other rheumatic diseases as measured by 125I-radioimmunoassay

    SciTech Connect

    Stuart, J.M.; Huffstutter, E.H.; Townes, A.S.; Kang, A.H.

    1983-07-01

    Antibodies to human native and denatured types I, II, III, IV, and V collagens were measured using 125I-radioimmunoassay. Mean levels of binding by sera from 30 rheumatoid arthritis patients were significantly higher than those from 20 normal subjects against all of the collagens tested. The relative antibody concentration was higher in synovial fluid than in simultaneously obtained serum. Many patients with gout or various other rheumatic diseases also had detectable anticollagen antibodies. With a few notable exceptions, the majority of the reactivity detected in all patient groups was directed against covalent structural determinants present on all of the denatured collagens, suggesting a secondary reaction to tissue injury.

  6. T Cell Migration in Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Mellado, Mario; Martínez-Muñoz, Laura; Cascio, Graciela; Lucas, Pilar; Pablos, José L; Rodríguez-Frade, José Miguel

    2015-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune disease characterized by chronic inflammation in joints, associated with synovial hyperplasia and with bone and cartilage destruction. Although the primacy of T cell-related events early in the disease continues to be debated, there is strong evidence that autoantigen recognition by specific T cells is crucial to the pathophysiology of rheumatoid synovitis. In addition, T cells are key components of the immune cell infiltrate detected in the joints of RA patients. Initial analysis of the cytokines released into the synovial membrane showed an imbalance, with a predominance of proinflammatory mediators, indicating a deleterious effect of Th1 T cells. There is nonetheless evidence that Th17 cells also play an important role in RA. T cells migrate from the bloodstream to the synovial tissue via their interactions with the endothelial cells that line synovial postcapillary venules. At this stage, selectins, integrins, and chemokines have a central role in blood cell invasion of synovial tissue, and therefore in the intensity of the inflammatory response. In this review, we will focus on the mechanisms involved in T cell attraction to the joint, the proteins involved in their extravasation from blood vessels, and the signaling pathways activated. Knowledge of these processes will lead to a better understanding of the mechanism by which the systemic immune response causes local joint disorders and will help to provide a molecular basis for therapeutic strategies.

  7. T Cell Migration in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Mellado, Mario; Martínez-Muñoz, Laura; Cascio, Graciela; Lucas, Pilar; Pablos, José L.; Rodríguez-Frade, José Miguel

    2015-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune disease characterized by chronic inflammation in joints, associated with synovial hyperplasia and with bone and cartilage destruction. Although the primacy of T cell-related events early in the disease continues to be debated, there is strong evidence that autoantigen recognition by specific T cells is crucial to the pathophysiology of rheumatoid synovitis. In addition, T cells are key components of the immune cell infiltrate detected in the joints of RA patients. Initial analysis of the cytokines released into the synovial membrane showed an imbalance, with a predominance of proinflammatory mediators, indicating a deleterious effect of Th1 T cells. There is nonetheless evidence that Th17 cells also play an important role in RA. T cells migrate from the bloodstream to the synovial tissue via their interactions with the endothelial cells that line synovial postcapillary venules. At this stage, selectins, integrins, and chemokines have a central role in blood cell invasion of synovial tissue, and therefore in the intensity of the inflammatory response. In this review, we will focus on the mechanisms involved in T cell attraction to the joint, the proteins involved in their extravasation from blood vessels, and the signaling pathways activated. Knowledge of these processes will lead to a better understanding of the mechanism by which the systemic immune response causes local joint disorders and will help to provide a molecular basis for therapeutic strategies. PMID:26284069

  8. The role and modulation of CCR6+ Th17 cell populations in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Paulissen, Sandra M J; van Hamburg, Jan Piet; Dankers, Wendy; Lubberts, Erik

    2015-07-01

    The IL-17A producing T-helper-17 (Th17) cell population plays a major role in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) pathogenesis and has gained wide interest as treatment target. IL-17A expressing Th cells are characterized by the expression of the chemokine receptor CCR6 and the transcription factor RORC. In RA, CCR6+ Th cells were identified in peripheral blood, synovial fluid and inflamed synovial tissue. CCR6+ Th cells might drive the progression of an early inflammation towards a persistent arthritis. The CCR6+ Th cell population is heterogeneous and several subpopulations can be distinguished, including Th17, Th22, Th17.1 (also called non-classic Th1 cells), and unclassified or intermediate populations. Interestingly, some of these populations produce low levels of IL-17A but are still very pathogenic. Furthermore, the CCR6+ Th cells phenotype is unstable and plasticity exists between CCR6+ Th cells and T-regulatory (Treg) cells and within the CCR6+ Th cell subpopulations. In this review, characteristics of the different CCR6+ Th cell populations, their plasticity, and their potential impact on rheumatoid arthritis are discussed. Moreover, current approaches to target CCR6+ Th cells and future directions of research to find specific CCR6+ Th cell targets in the treatment of patients with RA and other CCR6+ Th cell mediated autoimmune diseases are highlighted.

  9. In situ hybridization of IL-6 in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed Central

    Wood, N C; Symons, J A; Dickens, E; Duff, G W

    1992-01-01

    IL-6, an important mediator of the acute phase response, has been implicated in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Many cell types including macrophages, T cells, B cells, endothelial cells and fibroblasts can produce this cytokine and production is largely regulated at the level of gene transcription or mRNA stabilization. In this paper we have first measured the levels of IL-6 activity in synovial fluid (SF) and serum from patients with RA and then localized IL-6-producing cells in the synovium by in situ hybridization combined with immunophenotyping. Patients with RA had raised levels of IL-6 in both SF and serum compared with patients with osteoarthritis and age-matched healthy controls. In individual RA patients tested serially after admission to hospital, serum IL-6 was initially raised and, unexpectedly, increased with clinical improvement. In situ hybridization of IL-6 mRNA showed positive cells both in the lymphocyte-rich aggregates and adjacent to small blood vessels. With immunophenotyping it was found that cells containing IL-6 mRNA were often in contact with CD14+ tissue macrophages and double immunophenotyping revealed that immunoreactive IL-6 was often associated with synovial T cells. Images Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:1531188

  10. Fucosyltransferase 1 mediates angiogenesis in rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Isozaki, Takeo; Amin, Mohammad A.; Ruth, Jeffrey H.; Campbell, Phillip L.; Tsou, Pei-Suen; Ha, Christine M.; Stinson, W. Alex; Domino, Steven E.; Koch, Alisa E.

    2015-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to determine the role of α(1,2)-linked fucosylation of proteins by fucosyltransferase1 (fut1) in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) angiogenesis. Methods Analysis of α(1,2)-linked fucosylated proteins in synovial tissues (STs) was performed by immunohistological staining. α(1,2)-linked fucosylated angiogenic chemokine expression in synovial fluids (SFs) was determined by immunoprecipitation and lectin blotting. To determine the angiogenic role of α(1,2)-linked fucosylated proteins in RA, we performed human dermal microvascular endothelial cell (HMVEC) chemotaxis and Matrigel assays using nondepleted and α(1,2)-linked fucosylated protein depleted RA SFs. To examine the production of proangiogenic chemokines by fucosyltransferase 1 (fut1) in HMVECs, cells were transfected with fut1 sense or antisense oligonucleotides, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was performed. We then studied mouse lung endothelial cell (MLEC) chemotaxis using wild type and fut1 gene deficient MLECs. Results α(1,2)-linked fucosylated proteins on RA ST endothelial cells (ECs) were highly expressed compared to normal ST. α(1,2)-linked fucosylated monocyte chemoattract protein-1 (MCP-1)/CCL2 was present in RA SFs, and was significantly elevated compared to osteoarthritis SFs. Depletion of α(1,2)-linked fucosylated proteins in RA SFs induced less HMVEC migration and tube formation compared to nondepleted RA SFs. We found that blocking fut1 expression in ECs resulted in decreased MCP-1/CCL2 and regulated upon activation and normal T cell expressed and secreted (RANTES)/CCL5 production. Finally, we showed that fut1 regulates EC migration in response to vascular endothelial cell growth factor. Conclusions α(1,2)-linked fucosylation by fut1 may be an important new target for angiogenic diseases like RA. PMID:24692243

  11. Expression and Function of Aminopeptidase N/CD13 Produced by Fibroblast Like Synoviocytes in Rheumatoid Arthritis: Role of CD13 in Chemotaxis of Cytokine Activated T cells Independent of Enzymatic Activity

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Rachel; Endres, Judith; Behbahani-Nejad, Nilofar; Phillips, Kristine; Ruth, Jeffrey H; Friday, Sean C; Edhayan, Gautam; Lanigan, Thomas; Urquhart, Andrew; Chung, Kevin C; Fox, David A

    2014-01-01

    Objective Aminopeptidase N (CD13, EC 3.4.11.2) is a metalloproteinase expressed by fibroblast like synoviocytes (FLS). It has been suggested that CD13 can act chemotactically for T cells in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The goals of this study were to measure CD13 in vivo and in vitro-in RA samples, and to determine whether CD13 could play a role in homing of T cells to the RA joint. Methods IL-17 treated FLS were used to immunize mice, from which a novel anti-human CD13 monoclonal antibody (591.1D7.34) was developed. 1D7 and a second anti-CD13 monoclonal, WM15, were used to develop a novel ELISA for CD13, and CD13 enzymatic activity was measured in parallel. Chemotaxis of cytokine activated T cells (Tck) was measured by an under-agarose assay. Result We detected substantial amounts of CD13 in synovial fluids, sera, FLS lysates, and culture supernatants by ELISA, with a significant increase in CD13 in RA synovial fluids when compared to osteoarthritis (OA). CD13 accounted for most but not all of the CD13-like enzymatic activity in synovial fluid. Recombinant human CD13 was chemotactic for Tck through a G-protein-coupled-receptor and contributed to the chemotactic properties of synovial fluid independently of enzymatic activity. Conclusion CD13 is released from FLS into culture supernatants and is found in synovial fluid. CD13 induces chemotaxis of Tck, a T cell population similar to that found in RA synovium. This data suggest that CD13 could play an important role as a T cell chemoattractant, in a positive feedback loop that contributes to RA synovitis. PMID:25219368

  12. Functional analysis of an arthritogenic synovial fibroblast

    PubMed Central

    Aidinis, Vassilis; Plows, David; Haralambous, Sylva; Armaka, Maria; Papadopoulos, Petros; Kanaki, Maria Zambia; Koczan, Dirk; Thiesen, Hans Juergen; Kollias, George

    2003-01-01

    Increasing attention has been directed towards identifying non-T-cell mechanisms as potential therapeutic targets in rheumatoid arthritis. Synovial fibroblast (SF) activation, a hallmark of rheumatoid arthritis, results in inappropriate production of chemokines and matrix components, which in turn lead to bone and cartilage destruction. We have demonstrated that SFs have an autonomous pathogenic role in the development of the disease, by showing that they have the capacity to migrate throughout the body and cause pathology specifically to the joints. In order to decipher the pathogenic mechanisms that govern SF activation and pathogenic potential, we used the two most prominent methods of differential gene expression analysis, differential display and DNA microarrays, in a search for deregulated cellular pathways in the arthritogenic SF. Functional clustering of differentially expressed genes, validated by dedicated in vitro functional assays, implicated a number of cellular pathways in SF activation. Among them, diminished adhesion to the extracellullar matrix was shown to correlate with increased proliferation and migration to this matrix. Our findings support an aggressive role for the SF in the development of the disease and reinforce the perspective of a transformed-like character of the SF. PMID:12723986

  13. GPR91 senses extracellular succinate released from inflammatory macrophages and exacerbates rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Littlewood-Evans, Amanda; Sarret, Sophie; Apfel, Verena; Loesle, Perrine; Dawson, Janet; Zhang, Juan; Muller, Alban; Tigani, Bruno; Kneuer, Rainer; Patel, Saijel; Valeaux, Stephanie; Gommermann, Nina; Rubic-Schneider, Tina; Junt, Tobias; Carballido, José M

    2016-08-22

    When SUCNR1/GPR91-expressing macrophages are activated by inflammatory signals, they change their metabolism and accumulate succinate. In this study, we show that during this activation, macrophages release succinate into the extracellular milieu. They simultaneously up-regulate GPR91, which functions as an autocrine and paracrine sensor for extracellular succinate to enhance IL-1β production. GPR91-deficient mice lack this metabolic sensor and show reduced macrophage activation and production of IL-1β during antigen-induced arthritis. Succinate is abundant in synovial fluids from rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients, and these fluids elicit IL-1β release from macrophages in a GPR91-dependent manner. Together, we reveal a GPR91/succinate-dependent feed-forward loop of macrophage activation and propose GPR91 antagonists as novel therapeutic principles to treat RA.

  14. Glenohumeral Synovial Chondromatosis.

    PubMed

    Andrade, Robert

    2016-09-01

    A 20-year-old, right hand-dominant man reported to physical therapy with a history of deep anterior left shoulder pain. Radiographs, which were obtained after physical therapy was initiated, and subsequent magnetic resonance imaging showed the presence of numerous radio-opaque loose bodies that followed bone signal characteristics dispersed throughout the glenohumeral joint, leading to a diagnosis of synovial chondromatosis. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 2016;46(9):809. doi:10.2519/jospt.2016.0414. PMID:27581180

  15. Increased production of the soluble tumor-associated antigens CA19-9, CA125, and CA15-3 in rheumatoid arthritis: potential adhesion molecules in synovial inflammation?

    PubMed

    Szekanecz, Eva; Sándor, Zsuzsa; Antal-Szalmás, Péter; Soós, Lilla; Lakos, Gabriella; Besenyei, Timea; Szentpétery, Agnes; Simkovics, Enikö; Szántó, János; Kiss, Emese; Koch, Alisa E; Szekanecz, Zoltán

    2007-06-01

    Some tumor-associated antigens (TAAs) are expressed on inflammatory cells. We previously detected carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA; CD66) in the rheumatoid (RA) synovium. The production of CEA, CA19-9, CA125, and CA15.3, may be increased in patients with RA, scleroderma, lupus, and Sjögren's syndrome (SS). Some of these TAAs contain sialylated carbohydrate motifs and they are involved in tumor-associated cell adhesion and metastasis. We assessed levels of TAAs in the sera of RA patients and healthy subjects. Serum TAA levels were correlated with disease markers including serum rheumatoid factor (RF), C-reactive protein (CRP), and anti-CCP antibody levels, DAS28, age disease duration. TAAs including CEA, CA15-3, CA72-4, CA125, and CA19-9, and neuron-specific enolase (NSE) were assessed by immunoassay in the sera of 75 patients with RA and 50 age- and sex-matched healthy controls. Normal upper limits for these TAAs were 3.4 microg/L, 25 kU/L, 6.9 kU/L, 35 kU/L, 34 kU/L, and 16.3 microg/L, respectively. There were significantly more RA patients showing abnormally high levels of CA125 (10.8% versus 7.1%), CA19-9 (8.1% versus 0%), and CA15-3 (17.6% versus 14.3%) in comparison to controls (P < 0.05). The mean absolute serum levels of CA125 (23.9 +/- 1.8 versus 16.8 +/- 2.2 kU/L) and CA19-9 (14.2 +/- 1.2 versus 10.5 +/- 1.6 kU/L) were also significantly higher in RA compared to controls (P < 0.05). Among RA patients, serum CEA showed significant correlation with RF (r = 0.270; P < 0.05). None of the assessed TAAs showed any correlation with CRP, anti-CCP, DAS28, age or disease duration. The concentration of some TAAs may be elevated in the sera of patients with established RA in comparison to healthy subjects. CEA, CA19-9, CA125, and CA15-3 contain carbohydrate motifs and thus they may be involved in synovitis-associated adhesive events. Furthermore, some TAAs, such as CEA, may also correlate with prognostic factors, such as serum RF levels.

  16. Rheumatoid Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a form of arthritis that causes pain, swelling, stiffness and loss of function in ... wrist and fingers. More women than men get rheumatoid arthritis. It often starts in middle age and is ...

  17. Lymphoid irradiation in intractable rheumatoid arthritis. A double-blind, randomized study comparing 750-rad treatment with 2,000-rad treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Hanly, J.G.; Hassan, J.; Moriarty, M.; Barry, C.; Molony, J.; Casey, E.; Whelan, A.; Feighery, C.; Bresnihan, B.

    1986-01-01

    Twenty patients with intractable rheumatoid arthritis were treated with 750-rad or 2,000-rad lymphoid irradiation in a randomized double-blind comparative study. Over a 12-month followup period, there was a significant improvement in 4 of 7 and 6 of 7 standard parameters of disease activity following treatment with 750 rads and 2,000 rads, respectively. Transient, short-term toxicity was less frequent with the lower dose. In both groups, there was a sustained peripheral blood lymphopenia, a selective depletion of T helper (Leu-3a+) lymphocytes, and reduced in vitro mitogen responses. These changes did not occur, however, in synovial fluid. These results suggest that 750-rad lymphoid irradiation is as effective as, but less toxic than, that with 2,000 rads in the management of patients with intractable rheumatoid arthritis.

  18. Editorial Commentary: Role of Synovial Biomarkers in Patient Outcomes After Knee Arthroscopy.

    PubMed

    Brand, Jefferson C

    2016-03-01

    Humans are notably poor at predicting event outcomes. In "Correlation of Synovial Fluid Biomarkers With Cartilage Pathology and Associated Outcomes in Knee Arthroscopy," Cuellar, Cuellar, Kirsch, and Strauss show that some synovial fluid biomarkers (20 were sampled for the investigation) may predict operative findings at the time of arthroscopy and patient-reported outcome measures at follow-up. Further research will clarify the role of synovial biomarkers in knee pathology and, hopefully, narrow the choices to one or two pertinent markers that can be used to improve our ability to predict outcomes from arthroscopic knee surgery.

  19. [Rheumatoid arthritis and cytokines].

    PubMed

    Kaneko, Shunta; Kondo, Yuya; Yokosawa, Masahiro; Sumida, Takayuki

    2016-06-01

    The cytokines are an important substance involved in the immune reaction and maintenance of homeostasis. An imbalance in the cytokine network may lead to inflammation and autoimmune diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA). RA is an autoimmune and systemic inflammatory disorder characterized by synovial inflammation, destruction of cartilage and bone and systemic manifestations. The pro-inflammatory cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα), interleukin-1 (IL-1), IL-6 and IL-17 induce the inflammation of the joints and destruction of bone and cartilage via activation of macrophages, fibroblast like synoviocytes (FLS), helper T (Th) cells and osteoclasts. Recently, the available therapeutic agents that target these cytokines have excellent clinical effects in RA patients.

  20. [Basic research overview in rheumatoid arthritis].

    PubMed

    Iwasaki, Yukiko; Yamamoto, Kazuhiko

    2016-06-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a common autoimmune disease with a prevalence of 0.5-1.0% worldwide. Although advances in understanding the pathogenesis of RA have led to new therapeutics with good outcomes, the real cause of the disease is still unknown. RA is characterized by synovial inflammation and hyperplasia, which erodes cartilage and bone, and autoantibody production (rheumatoid factor (RF) and anti-citrullinated protein antibody (ACPA)). There are many critical questions on the mechanism of the disease onset and progression: How genetic and environmental factors interact with each other? Why does the inflammatory response localize in joints? What are the key players to perpetuate synovial inflammation? In this review, we summarize pathogenetic advances in these issues especially from the point of view of basic research.

  1. Upregulation of fibroblast growth factor 1 in the synovial membranes of patients with late stage osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Li, R; Wang, B; He, C Q; Yang, Y Q; Guo, H; Chen, Y; Du, T H

    2015-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a degenerative disease of the systemic joint that involves multiple cytokines and growth factors. Fibroblast growth factor 1 (FGF-1) is increased in patients with rheumatic arthritis. The aim of this study was to determine whether the expression and secretion of FGF-1 differed in synovial tissue from patients with late stage OA from that in normal tissues. We selected eight patients with late stage OA and eight healthy donors for this study. An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was used to determine the amount of FGF-1 in the synovial fluid and in the culture medium of synovial fibroblasts. Real time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) analysis was performed to examine the expression levels of FGF-1 and FGF receptor 2 (FGFR2) in synovial and cartilage tissues. We detected FGF-1 in the synovial fluid from all eight donors, as well as in the culture medium of synovial fibroblasts. Synovial fluid from patients with OA and culture medium of OA synovial fibroblasts contained significantly more FGF-1 than those from controls. FGF-1 expression was also lower in the synovial membranes of normal donors than in those of OA patients. FGFR2 expression was also higher in OA cartilage than in normal cartilage. Overall, these results demonstrated that FGF-1 synthesis and secretion by synovial fibroblasts were significantly increased in OA. FGFR2 expression was also shown to be upregulated in patients with OA. These findings suggest that increased FGF-1 signaling correlates with an OA pathological condition. PMID:26400350

  2. [Aseptic meningitis in a patient with cerebrospinal fluid anti-agalactosyl IgG antibody-positive preclinical rheumatoid arthritis: a case report].

    PubMed

    Kawabata, Yuichi; Miyaji, Yosuke; Nakano, Tatsu; Joki, Hideto; Tanaka, Fumiaki

    2015-01-01

    A 69-year-old woman presented with non-fluent aphasia, ideomotor apraxia, right hemiparesis and convulsion. Her medical history was unremarkable, and she had not suffered from arthritis. DWI and FLAIR image of brain MRI showed hyperintensities in the subarachnoid space along the left frontal and both parietal lobes, and these lesions were associated with gadolinium enhancement. The levels of serum anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide antibody, anti-agalactosyl IgG antibody and matrix metalloproteinase-3 were elevated. The results of blood cultures were negative. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) analysis revealed monocytic pleocytosis and negative findings for infection or malignancy. The level of anti-agalactosyl IgG antibody in CSF was elevated. The antibody index (AI) of anti-agalactosyl IgG antibody (the ratio between the CSF/serum quotient for IgG antibodies, and the CSF/serum quotient for total IgG; normal value of AI < 1.3) showed considerably high value of 8.4, indicating the intrathecal-specific antibody synthesis. As a result, the pathogenesis of her disease was consistent with rheumatoid meningitis despite lack of arthritis. After intravenous administration of methylprednisolone, her symptoms, the level of anti-agalactosyl IgG antibody in CSF, and the MRI findings were ameliorated. Anti-agalactosyl IgG antibody in the CSF was a helpful biomarker in diagnosis and assessment of the severity of rheumatoid meningitis. PMID:26511025

  3. The pharmacokinetics of the enantiomers of flurbiprofen in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed Central

    Young, M A; Aarons, L; Toon, S

    1991-01-01

    Plasma and synovial fluid concentrations of the enantiomers of flurbiprofen were measured in 15 rheumatoid patients receiving 100 mg racemic flurbiprofen twice daily. Pharmacokinetic parameters showed considerable variability within the group of patients, although differences in S(+)/R(-) plasma concentration ratios were small. The average values (+/- s.d.) of oral plasma clearance, volume of distribution and elimination half-life for R(-)-flurbiprofen were 0.075 (+/- 0.066) l min-1, 12.47 (+/- 5.79) l and 138 (+/- 61) min, respectively. The average values (+/- s.d.) of oral plasma clearance, volume of distribution and elimination half-life for S(+)-flurbiprofen were 0.057 (+/- 0.035) l min-1, 12.81 (+/- 4.43) l and 155 (+/- 49) min, respectively. S(+)/R(-) ratios (+/- s.d.) rose from 1.06 (+/- 0.12) to 1.75 (+/- 0.61) at the end of the 12 h interval in plasma and from 1.18 (+/- 0.13) to 1.47 (+/- 0.24) over the measured time course in synovial fluid. Increases in S(+)/R(-) ratios may be clinically important as they demonstrate accumulation of the pharmacologically active species. PMID:2015160

  4. Two- and three-dimensional optical tomography of finger joints for diagnostics of rheumatoid arthritis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klose, Alexander D.; Hielscher, Andreas H.; Hanson, Kenneth M.; Beuthan, Juergen

    1998-12-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is one of the most common diseases of human joints. This progressive disease is characterized by an inflammation process that originates in the inner membrane (synovalis) of the capsule and spreads to other parts of the joint. In early stages the synovalis thickness and the permeability of this membrane changes. This leads to changes in the optical parameters of the synovalis and the synovial fluid (synovia), which occupies the space between the bones. The synovia changes from a clear yellowish fluid to a turbid grayish substance. In this work we present 2 and 3-dimensional reconstruction schemes for optical tomography of the finger joints. Our reconstruction algorithm is based on the diffusion approximation and employs adjoint differentiation techniques for the gradient calculation of the objective function with respect to the spatial distribution of optical properties. In this way, the spatial distribution of optical properties within the joints is reconstructed with high efficiency and precision. Volume information concerning the synovial space and the capsula are provided. Furthermore, it is shown that small changes of the scattering coefficients can be monitored. Therefore, optical tomography has the potential of becoming a useful tool for the early diagnosis and monitoring of disease progression in RA.

  5. The glycosylation of human synovial lubricin: implications for its role in inflammation.

    PubMed

    Estrella, Ruby P; Whitelock, John M; Packer, Nicolle H; Karlsson, Niclas G

    2010-07-15

    Acidic proteins were isolated from synovial fluid from two osteoarthritic and two rheumatoid arthritic patients and identified by MS. It was found that the most abundant protein in all of the samples was the mucin-like protein lubricin. Further characterization of lubricin from the different patients by LC (liquid chromatography)-MS of released oligosaccharides showed that the core 1 O-linked oligosaccharides NeuAc alpha2-3Gal beta1-3GalNAc and NeuAc alpha2-3Gal beta1-3(NeuAc alpha2-6)GalNAc were the dominating structures on lubricin. The latter was found to be more prevalent in the rheumatoid arthritis samples, indicating that sialylation is up-regulated as part of the inflammatory response. In addition to these dominating structures, core 2 structures were also found in low amounts, where the largest was the disialylated hexasaccharide corresponding to the sequence NeuAc alpha2-3Ga lbeta1-3(NeuAc alpha2-3Gal beta1-3/4GlcNAc beta1-6)GalNAc. It was also found that a small proportion of the core 2 oligosaccharides carried sulfate. The ability of lubricin to present complex glycosylation reflecting the state of the joint tissue makes lubricin a candidate as a carrier of inflammatory oligosaccharide epitopes. In particular, it was shown that lubricin from inflamed arthritic tissue was recognized by the antibody MECA-79 and thus carried the sulfated epitope proposed to be part of the L-selectin ligand that is responsible for recruitment of leucocytes to inflammatory sites.

  6. Rheumatoid knee synovitis successfully treated with intra-articular rifamycin SV.

    PubMed Central

    Caruso, I; Montrone, F; Fumagalli, M; Patrono, C; Santandrea, S; Gandini, M C

    1982-01-01

    Thirty rheumatoid patients with persistent knee effusion were treated intra-articularly with rifamycin SV, 500 mg weekly, or with saline solution, 10 ml, in a double-blind study. A complete disappearance of effusion and an impressive clinical improvement was observed in the patients on rifamycin. The synovial fluid and membrane underwent some changes. In 2 patients the rifamycin caused a painful local reaction. After a follow-up of 5 years only one patient has experienced effusion relapse, 5 months after the termination of rifamycin SV treatment. The patients on saline showed no significant change. On the basis of the results obtained from the monoarthritis experimental model and from clinical trials it is tempting to consider that rifamycin has an antimitotic effect, impeding the synthesis of RNA and DNA polymerases in immunocompetent cells. PMID:7046652

  7. A longitudinal study of cartilage matrix metabolism in patients with cruciate ligament rupture--synovial fluid concentrations of aggrecan fragments, stromelysin-1 and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1.

    PubMed

    Dahlberg, L; Fridén, T; Roos, H; Lark, M W; Lohmander, L S

    1994-12-01

    This is the first study which quantifies aggrecan fragments, stromelysin-1 and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-1 (TIMP-1) in SF samples prospectively obtained from the same patient at different time intervals after a cruciate ligament injury of the knee. Aggrecan fragment concentrations were determined by dye precipitation with Alcian Blue. Stromelysin-1 and TIMP-1 were analysed by immunoassay. Ten healthy volunteers formed the reference group. Immediately after knee injury, all marker concentrations were higher as compared to the reference group. The high marker concentrations decreased gradually with time, and in samples obtained between 6 months and 6 years after the injury, median concentrations of some of the markers were not different compared to reference levels. This was in contrast to results from previous cross-sectional studies, where chronic phase median concentrations of all markers were consistently higher than reference levels. In previous cross-sectional studies, however, the samples were obtained at arthroscopy done because of knee complaints at different times after a knee injury. In the present study, the knee injured patients visited the orthopaedic outpatient ward only for SF sampling, and they had no or only minor knee symptoms. We conclude that the temporal changes of marker concentrations in joint fluid after knee injury, suggested from cross-sectional studies, have now been confirmed in a longitudinal, prospective cohort study. We further find that in patients with mild knee symptoms in the chronic phase after cruciate ligament injury, median SF levels of aggrecan fragments, stromelysin-1, and TIMP-1 are lower than in patients with significant knee complaints after the same type of injury.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  8. Semaphorin 4D Contributes to Rheumatoid Arthritis by Inducing Inflammatory Cytokine Production: Pathogenic and Therapeutic Implications

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida, Yuji; Kang, Sujin; Ebina, Kousuke; Shi, Kenrin; Nojima, Satoshi; Kimura, Tetsuya; Ito, Daisuke; Morimoto, Keiko; Nishide, Masayuki; Hosokawa, Takashi; Hirano, Toru; Shima, Yoshihito; Narazaki, Masashi; Tsuboi, Hideki; Saeki, Yukihiko; Tomita, Tetsuya; Tanaka, Toshio; Kumanogoh, Atsushi

    2015-01-01

    Objective Semaphorin 4D (Sema4D)/CD100 has pleiotropic roles in immune activation, angiogenesis, bone metabolism, and neural development. We undertook this study to investigate the role of Sema4D in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Methods Soluble Sema4D (sSema4D) levels in serum and synovial fluid were analyzed by enzyme‐linked immunosorbent assay. Cell surface expression and transcripts of Sema4D were analyzed in peripheral blood cells from RA patients, and immunohistochemical staining of Sema4D was performed in RA synovium. Generation of sSema4D was evaluated in an ADAMTS‐4–treated monocytic cell line (THP‐1 cells). The efficacy of anti‐Sema4D antibody was evaluated in mice with collagen‐induced arthritis (CIA). Results Levels of sSema4D were elevated in both serum and synovial fluid from RA patients, and disease activity markers were correlated with serum sSema4D levels. Sema4D‐expressing cells also accumulated in RA synovium. Cell surface levels of Sema4D on CD3+ and CD14+ cells from RA patients were reduced, although levels of Sema4D transcripts were unchanged. In addition, ADAMTS‐4 cleaved cell surface Sema4D to generate sSema4D in THP‐1 cells. Soluble Sema4D induced tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα) and interleukin‐6 (IL‐6) production from CD14+ monocytes. IL‐6 and TNFα induced ADAMTS‐4 expression in synovial cells. Treatment with an anti‐Sema4D antibody suppressed arthritis and reduced proinflammatory cytokine production in CIA. Conclusion A positive feedback loop involving sSema4D/IL‐6 and TNFα/ADAMTS‐4 may contribute to the pathogenesis of RA. The inhibition of arthritis by anti‐Sema4D antibody suggests that Sema4D represents a potential therapeutic target for RA. PMID:25707877

  9. Synovial Sarcoma With Myoid Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Qassid, Omar; Ali, Ahmed; Thway, Khin

    2016-09-01

    Synovial sarcoma is a malignant mesenchymal tumor with variable epithelial differentiation, which is defined by the presence of a specific t(X;18)(p11.2;q11.2) chromosomal translocation that generates SS18-SSX fusion oncogenes. Synovial sarcoma typically arises within extremity deep soft tissue (particularly around large joints) of young adults, but has been shown to occur at almost any location. When it arises in more unusual sites, such as the abdomen, it can present a significant diagnostic challenge. We describe a case of intraabdominal monophasic synovial sarcoma that immunohistochemically showed strong expression of smooth muscle actin and calponin but only very scanty cytokeratin, and which showed morphologic and immunohistochemical overlap with other spindle cell neoplasms that can arise at this site, such as gastrointestinal stromal tumor and myofibrosarcoma. As correct diagnosis is of clinical and prognostic importance, surgical pathologists should be aware of the potential for synovial sarcoma to occur at a variety of anatomic sites and of its spectrum of immunoreactivity. Synovial sarcoma should be in the differential diagnosis of spindle cell neoplasms with myoid differentiation that do not fall into any definite tumor category, for which there should be a relatively low threshold for performing fluorescence in situ hybridization or reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction to assess for the specific SS18 gene rearrangement or SS18-SSX fusion transcripts, which remain the diagnostic gold standard. PMID:27106779

  10. Persistence of Antigen in Rabbit Synovial Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Webb, F. W. S.; Ford, P. M.; Glynn, L. E.

    1971-01-01

    It is already known that rabbits which show delayed-type hypersensitivity to an antigen will, after a single injection of the same antigen into a knee joint develop a chronic proliferative synovitis. It is also known that almost all of a foreign protein injected into a normal knee joint is rapidly cleared in a few days. It has now been shown that if an animal is given foreign protein into a knee joint, and delayed-type hypersensitivity is produced later, that a chronic proliferative synovitis can also develop. This suggests that minute amounts of foreign protein can persist in an antigenic form in normal rabbit synovial membrane. It is possible that the persistence of this small amount of antigen may account in part for the chronicity of this form of experimental synovitis, and the fact that unlike human rheumatoid arthritis this type of experimental synovitis is confined to the joint injected with antigen. ImagesFigs. 3-4Figs. 1-2 PMID:5547654

  11. Heterogeneity of Synovial Molecular Patterns in Patients with Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Lauwerys, Bernard R.; Hernández-Lobato, Daniel; Gramme, Pierre; Ducreux, Julie; Dessy, Adrien; Focant, Isabelle; Ambroise, Jérôme; Bearzatto, Bertrand; Nzeusseu Toukap, Adrien; Van den Eynde, Benoît J.; Elewaut, Dirk; Gala, Jean-Luc; Durez, Patrick; Houssiau, Frédéric A.; Helleputte, Thibault; Dupont, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Early diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an unmet medical need in the field of rheumatology. Previously, we performed high-density transcriptomic studies on synovial biopsies from patients with arthritis, and found that synovial gene expression profiles were significantly different according to the underlying disorder. Here, we wanted to further explore the consistency of the gene expression signals in synovial biopsies of patients with arthritis, using low-density platforms. Methods Low-density assays (cDNA microarray and microfluidics qPCR) were designed, based on the results of the high-density microarray data. Knee synovial biopsies were obtained from patients with RA, spondyloarthropathies (SA) or osteoarthritis (OA) (n = 39), and also from patients with initial undifferentiated arthritis (UA) (n = 49). Results According to high-density microarray data, several molecular pathways are differentially expressed in patients with RA, SA and OA: T and B cell activation, chromatin remodelling, RAS GTPase activation and extracellular matrix regulation. Strikingly, disease activity (DAS28-CRP) has a significant influence on gene expression patterns in RA samples. Using the low-density assays, samples from patients with OA are easily discriminated from RA and SA samples. However, overlapping molecular patterns are found, in particular between RA and SA biopsies. Therefore, prediction of the clinical diagnosis based on gene expression data results in a diagnostic accuracy of 56.8%, which is increased up to 98.6% by the addition of specific clinical symptoms in the prediction algorithm. Similar observations are made in initial UA samples, in which overlapping molecular patterns also impact the accuracy of the diagnostic algorithm. When clinical symptoms are added, the diagnostic accuracy is strongly improved. Conclusions Gene expression signatures are overall different in patients with OA, RA and SA, but overlapping molecular signatures are found in

  12. Lipid bilayer membranes: Missing link in the comprehension of synovial lubrication?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Packard, Ross; Cowley, Leonie; Dubief, Yves

    2010-03-01

    The human body hosts an extremely efficient tribological system in its synovial joints that operate under very low friction and virtually no wear. It has long been assumed that the higher molecular weight molecules present in the synovial fluid (hyaluronic acid, lubricin) are solely responsible for the mechanical properties of joint. Smaller components, unsaturated phospholipids, have a virtually an undefined role, most probably because of the cancellation of their amphiphilic properties ex vivo caused by oxidation. Using experimental observations of multilamellar arrangements in synovial joints, we formulate the assumption that self-assembling structures provide the anisotropy necessary to synovial fluid to resist drainage under normal compression. Our molecular dynamics simulations demonstrate the tremendous mechanical properties of lipid bilayers and also highlight their weakening consistent with modifications resulting from injuries or joint prosthesis.

  13. RhoA/ROCK-dependent pathway is required for TLR2-mediated IL-23 production in human synovial macrophages: suppression by cilostazol.

    PubMed

    Park, So Youn; Lee, Sung Won; Lee, Won Suk; Rhim, Byung Yong; Lee, Seung Jin; Kwon, Sang Mo; Hong, Ki Whan; Kim, Chi Dae

    2013-11-01

    IL-23 is produced by antigen presenting cells and plays critical roles in immune response in rheumatoid arthritis. In this study, we investigated whether the RhoA/Rho-kinase pathway is required to elevate TLR2-mediated IL-23 production in synovial macrophages from patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), and then examined the suppressive effect of cilostazol on these pathways. IL-23 production was elevated by lipoteichoic acid (LTA), a TLR2 ligand, and this elevation was more prominent in RA macrophages than in those from peripheral blood of normal control. LTA increased the activation of RhoA in association with increased the nuclear translocation of NF-κB and its DNA-binding activity. Pretreatment of RA macrophages with the pharmacological inhibitors exoenzyme C3 (RhoA), Y27632 (Rho-kinase) or BAY11-7082 (NF-κB) inhibited IL-23 production by LTA. Inhibition of the RhoA/Rho-kinase pathway by these drugs attenuated NF-κB activation. Cilostazol suppressed the TLR2-mediated activation of RhoA, decreased NF-κB activity with down-regulated IL-23 production, and these effects were reversed by Rp-cAMPS, as an inhibitor of cAMP-dependent protein kinase. The expression of IL-23, which colocalized with CD68⁺ cells in knee joint of CIA mice, was significantly attenuated by cilostazol along with the decreased severity of arthritis. Taken together, the RhoA/Rho-kinase pathway signals TLR2-stimulated IL-23 production in synovial fluid macrophages via activation of NF-κB. Thus it is summarized that cilostazol suppresses TLR2-mediated IL-23 production by suppressing RhoA pathway via cAMP-dependent protein kinase activation. PMID:23973526

  14. RhoA/ROCK-dependent pathway is required for TLR2-mediated IL-23 production in human synovial macrophages: suppression by cilostazol.

    PubMed

    Park, So Youn; Lee, Sung Won; Lee, Won Suk; Rhim, Byung Yong; Lee, Seung Jin; Kwon, Sang Mo; Hong, Ki Whan; Kim, Chi Dae

    2013-11-01

    IL-23 is produced by antigen presenting cells and plays critical roles in immune response in rheumatoid arthritis. In this study, we investigated whether the RhoA/Rho-kinase pathway is required to elevate TLR2-mediated IL-23 production in synovial macrophages from patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), and then examined the suppressive effect of cilostazol on these pathways. IL-23 production was elevated by lipoteichoic acid (LTA), a TLR2 ligand, and this elevation was more prominent in RA macrophages than in those from peripheral blood of normal control. LTA increased the activation of RhoA in association with increased the nuclear translocation of NF-κB and its DNA-binding activity. Pretreatment of RA macrophages with the pharmacological inhibitors exoenzyme C3 (RhoA), Y27632 (Rho-kinase) or BAY11-7082 (NF-κB) inhibited IL-23 production by LTA. Inhibition of the RhoA/Rho-kinase pathway by these drugs attenuated NF-κB activation. Cilostazol suppressed the TLR2-mediated activation of RhoA, decreased NF-κB activity with down-regulated IL-23 production, and these effects were reversed by Rp-cAMPS, as an inhibitor of cAMP-dependent protein kinase. The expression of IL-23, which colocalized with CD68⁺ cells in knee joint of CIA mice, was significantly attenuated by cilostazol along with the decreased severity of arthritis. Taken together, the RhoA/Rho-kinase pathway signals TLR2-stimulated IL-23 production in synovial fluid macrophages via activation of NF-κB. Thus it is summarized that cilostazol suppresses TLR2-mediated IL-23 production by suppressing RhoA pathway via cAMP-dependent protein kinase activation.

  15. Contribution of synovial lining cells to synovial vascularization of the rat temporomandibular joint.

    PubMed

    Nozawa-Inoue, Kayoko; Harada, Fumiko; Magara, Jin; Ohazama, Atsushi; Maeda, Takeyasu

    2016-03-01

    The lining layer of the synovial membrane in the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) contains two types of lining cells: macrophage-like type A and fibroblast-like type B cells. The type B cells are particularly heterogeneous in their morphology and immunoreactivity, so that details of their functions remain unclear. Some of the type B cells exhibit certain resemblances in their ultrastructure to those of an activated capillary pericyte at the initial stage of the angiogenesis. The articular surface, composed of cartilage and the disc in the TMJ, has few vasculatures, whereas the synovial lining layer is richly equipped with blood capillaries to produce the constituent of synovial fluid. The present study investigated at both the light and electron microscopic levels the immunocytochemical characteristics of the synovial lining cells in the adult rat TMJ, focusing on their contribution to the synovial vascularization. It also employed an intravascular perfusion with Lycopersicon esculentum (tomato) lectin to identify functional vessels in vivo. Results showed that several type B cells expressed desmin, a muscle-specific intermediate filament which is known as the earliest protein to appear during myogenesis as well as being a marker for the immature capillary pericyte. These desmin-positive type B cells showed immunoreactions for vimentin and pericyte markers (neuron-glial 2; NG2 and PDGFRβ) but not for the other markers of myogenic cells (MyoD and myogenin) or a contractile apparatus (αSMA and caldesmon). Immunoreactivity for RECA-1, an endothelial marker, was observed in the macrophage-like type A cells. The arterioles and venules inside the synovial folds extended numerous capillaries with RECA-1-positive endothelial cells and desmin-positive pericytes to distribute densely in the lining layer. The distal portion of these capillaries showing RECA-1-immunoreactivity lacked lectin-staining, indicating a loss of blood-circulation due to sprouting or termination in the

  16. SYNOVIAL SARCOMA OF THE LARYNX.

    PubMed

    Javed, Nabila; Iqbal, Javed

    2015-01-01

    Synovial sarcoma is a mesenchymal spindle cell tumour that displays variable epithelial differentiation. It most commonly occurs in lower extremities. Head and neck is a rare site for synovial sarcoma accounting for less than 10%. Larynx is an extremely rare site and only 16 cases with laryngeal location have been reported. Immunohistochemistry is important for correct diagnosis. Surgical excision of the tumour with clear margins and local radiotherapy is effective in local control. Chemotherapy is indicated in the presence of distant metastasis. Case of a 16 years old female is presented with hoarseness of voice and mass in supraglottic region. Lateral pharangotomy and excision of mass revealed synovial sarcoma. She had been treated with adjuvant radiotherapy in September 2012. She was fine and coming for regular follow up.

  17. Postlaminectomy Bilateral Lumbar Intraspinal Synovial Cysts

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Sung Ik; Lee, Jung Hwan

    2016-01-01

    Lumbar intraspinal synovial cysts are included in the difference diagnosis of lumbar radiculopathy. Developing imaging modalities has result in increased reporting about these lesions. However, the case of bilateral new lumbar intraspinal synovial cysts after laminectomy has been rarely reported. We report of a rare case with bilateral lumbar intraspinal synovial cysts after laminectomy, requiring surgical excision. PMID:27799997

  18. Subacromial bursitis with giant rice bodies as initial presentation of rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Subramaniam, Ramesh; Tan, Justina Wei Lyn; Chau, Cora Yuk Ping; Lee, Keng Thiam

    2012-10-01

    Rice body formation is a nonspecific response to chronic synovial inflammation associated with tuberculous arthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, juvenile rheumatoid arthritis, seronegative inflammatory arthritis, and even osteoarthritis. Such bodies were termed rice bodies because of their close resemblance to grains of polished white rice. We present a case report of a middle-aged woman with right shoulder subacromial/subdeltoid bursitis with giant rice body formation as her initial presentation of rheumatoid arthritis. Her right shoulder symptoms resolved after subacromial and subdeltoid bursectomy and removal of the rice bodies. She subsequently developed inflammatory arthritis of other joints, met the criteria for rheumatoid arthritis, and has been treated medically. PMID:23013846

  19. Synovial plicae of the knee

    SciTech Connect

    Apple, J.S.; Martinez, S.; Daffner, R.H.; Gehweiler, J.A.; Hardaker, W.T.

    1982-01-01

    This report describes the anatomy, patho-physiology, clinical, and radiographic findings, and treatment of the synovial plicae of the knee joint. The suprapatellar plica is a synovial fold present in the suprapatellar pouch of the knee joint in approximately 20% of the population. This fold may become symptomatic after injury and cause symptoms similar to other common internal derangements of the knee. Double contrast arthrography of the knee can be used to identify the presence of plicae. Although arthrography can identify the presence of a plica, its clinical significance requires close correlation with symptoms and an accurate clinical examination.

  20. Rheumatoid lung disease

    MedlinePlus

    Lung disease - rheumatoid arthritis; Rheumatoid nodules; Rheumatoid lung ... Elsevier Saunders; 2016:chap 65. Lake F, Proudman S. Rheumatoid arthritis and lung disease: from mechanisms to a practical approach. Semin Respir ...

  1. Knee synovial cyst presenting as iliotibial band friction syndrome.

    PubMed

    Costa, M L; Marshall, T; Donell, S T; Phillips, H

    2004-06-01

    We present the case of a 28-year-old competitive runner with iliotibial band (ITB) friction syndrome associated with a synovial cyst. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) did not demonstrate a fluid collection. However, open exploration revealed a large cyst beneath the ITB arising from the capsule of the knee proximal to the lateral meniscus. The cyst disappeared on extension. The pre-operative MRI scan may have revealed the cyst, if it had been taken with the knee flexed.

  2. Extra and Intra-articular Synovial Chondromatosis.

    PubMed

    Chaudhary, R K; Banskota, B; Rijal, S; Banskota, A K

    2015-01-01

    Synovial chondromatosis is not so rare intra-articular condition secondary to synovial metaplasia, that affects the knee joint. Extra-articular synovial chondromatosis however is an extremely rare condition that usually involves the synovial sheath or bursa of the foot or hand. We present two cases of synovial chondromatosis, one intra and one extra-articular. The first case was a 25 year old lady who presented with pain, swelling and restricted range of motion of left knee and was found to have an intra-articular synovial chondromatosis which was treated successfully by joint debridement. The second case was that of a 22 year old man who presented with right knee pain and was diagnosed to have an extra-articular synovial chondromatosis of his right medial hamstring tendon sheath, excision of which resulted in complete relief of symptoms. PMID:27549506

  3. Tumour necrosis factor in synovial exudates.

    PubMed Central

    Di Giovine, F S; Nuki, G; Duff, G W

    1988-01-01

    The actions of tumour necrosis factor (TNF) include resorption of bone and cartilage, suggesting a potential role in the pathogenesis of arthritis. TNF activity was looked for in synovial fluids from 137 patients with different rheumatic diseases. Unfractionated samples were tested in the L929 bioassay. Significant TNF activity that was neutralised by monoclonal antibody to TNF alpha occurred in 13 (30%) of 44 samples. Raised TNF levels were not associated with any particular disease type or routine laboratory markers of inflammation but were related to disease duration in osteoarthritis. The finding of biologically active TNF in symptomatic joints of arthritic patients supports the idea that it may contribute to the pathogenesis of joint damage in chronic rheumatic diseases. PMID:3263088

  4. Persistent spontaneous synovial drainage from digital flexor sheath in proliferative tenosynovitis: Two case reports and a review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Chin, Brian; Cheung, Kevin; Farhangkhoee, Hana; Thoma, Achilleas

    2015-01-01

    Proliferative flexor tenosynovitis of the hand is an inflammatory process involving the synovial sheaths surrounding the tendons. It is most commonly caused by infection, but may also be caused by overuse, diabetes and rheumatic conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis and crystal arthropathies. The present report describes two patients with severe proliferative tenosynovitis, who developed a fistula between the tendon sheath and skin after instrumentation, resulting in persistent synovial drainage. After failing conservative management, both patients were managed with extensive flexor tenosynovectomy to prevent inoculation of bacteria into the flexor sheath. The presentation, management and outcome of each case is described in addition to a discussion of the literature on tenosynovial fistulas. PMID:26090353

  5. Rheumatoid arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... with rest, strengthening exercise, and anti-inflammatory drugs. Methotrexate is the most commonly used DMARD for rheumatoid ... is a drug that is often combined with methotrexate and hydroxychloroquine (triple therapy). It may be weeks ...

  6. Mesenchymal stem cells, autoimmunity and rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    El-Jawhari, J.J.; El-Sherbiny, Y.M.; Jones, E.A.

    2014-01-01

    The vast majority of literature pertaining to mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) immunomodulation has focussed on bone marrow-derived MSC that are systemically infused to alleviate inflammatory conditions. Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is the commonest autoimmune joint disease that has witnessed significant therapeutic advances in the past decade, but remains stubbornly difficult to treat in a subset of cases. Pre-clinical research has demonstrated that bone marrow, adipose, synovial and umbilical cord-derived MSC all suppress the functions of different immune cells thus raising the possibility of new therapies for autoimmune diseases including RA. Indeed, preliminary evidence for MSC efficacy has been reported in some cases of RA and systemic lupus erythromatosis. The potential use of bone marrow-MSC (BM-MSC) for RA therapy is emerging but the use of synovial MSC (S-MSC) to suppress the exaggerated immune response within the inflamed joints remains rudimentary. Synovial fibroblasts that are likely derived from S-MSCs, also give rise to a cell-cultured progeny termed fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLS), which are key players in the perpetuation of joint inflammation and destruction. A better understanding of the link between these cells and their biology could be a key to developing novel MSC-based strategies for therapy. The review briefly focuses on BM-MSC and gives particular attention to joint niche synovial MSC and FLS with respect to immunoregulatory potential therapy roles. PMID:24518000

  7. Expression of molecules involved in B lymphocyte survival and differentiation by synovial fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Edwards, J C; Leigh, R D; Cambridge, G

    1997-06-01

    The synovitis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is one of few pathological lesions in which B lymphocyte accumulation progresses to the extent of germinal centre formation. The present study was designed to assess the ability of synovial fibroblasts to express molecules implicated in B lymphocyte survival and differentiation, both in vivo, and in response to cytokines in vitro. Normal and diseased synovia were examined by indirect immunofluorescence. In all tissues synovial intimal fibroblasts showed co-expression of vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) and complement decay-accelerating factor (DAF) comparable to that of follicular dendritic cells (FDC), but not complement receptor 2 (CR2). In rheumatoid synovia, subintimal cells showed variable expression of VCAM-1 and DAF, with bright co-expression of VCAM-1, DAF and CR2 in lymphoid follicle centres. B lymphocytes, some of which were proliferating cell nuclear antigen-positive, were present in contact with subintimal cells expressing VCAM-1 with or without DAF or CR2. B lymphocytes were rarely present in the intimal layer, and, where present, showed fragmentation. In vitro, synovial fibroblasts exposed to tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) in combination with interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) showed enhanced expression of VCAM-1, in comparison with fibroblasts from skin and lung and, unlike skin and lung fibroblasts, also expressed DAF and CR2. These findings support the hypothesis that synovial targeting in RA involves an enhanced ability of synovial fibroblasts to support B lymphocyte survival. This appears to be dependent, not on the constitutive expression of VCAM-1 and DAF on intimal cells, but on the increased ability of subintimal cells to respond to proinflammatory cytokines, perhaps critically in the expression of VCAM-1.

  8. Expression of molecules involved in B lymphocyte survival and differentiation by synovial fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Edwards, J C; Leigh, R D; Cambridge, G

    1997-06-01

    The synovitis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is one of few pathological lesions in which B lymphocyte accumulation progresses to the extent of germinal centre formation. The present study was designed to assess the ability of synovial fibroblasts to express molecules implicated in B lymphocyte survival and differentiation, both in vivo, and in response to cytokines in vitro. Normal and diseased synovia were examined by indirect immunofluorescence. In all tissues synovial intimal fibroblasts showed co-expression of vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) and complement decay-accelerating factor (DAF) comparable to that of follicular dendritic cells (FDC), but not complement receptor 2 (CR2). In rheumatoid synovia, subintimal cells showed variable expression of VCAM-1 and DAF, with bright co-expression of VCAM-1, DAF and CR2 in lymphoid follicle centres. B lymphocytes, some of which were proliferating cell nuclear antigen-positive, were present in contact with subintimal cells expressing VCAM-1 with or without DAF or CR2. B lymphocytes were rarely present in the intimal layer, and, where present, showed fragmentation. In vitro, synovial fibroblasts exposed to tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) in combination with interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) showed enhanced expression of VCAM-1, in comparison with fibroblasts from skin and lung and, unlike skin and lung fibroblasts, also expressed DAF and CR2. These findings support the hypothesis that synovial targeting in RA involves an enhanced ability of synovial fibroblasts to support B lymphocyte survival. This appears to be dependent, not on the constitutive expression of VCAM-1 and DAF on intimal cells, but on the increased ability of subintimal cells to respond to proinflammatory cytokines, perhaps critically in the expression of VCAM-1. PMID:9182884

  9. [Pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis].

    PubMed

    Branimir Anić; Miroslav Mayer

    2014-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune systemic disease that primarily affects joints. Etiology and the pathogenesis of RA are complex, involving many types of cells, among others macrophages, T and B cells, fibro- blasts, chondrocytes and dendritic cells. Despite well documented role of many genes and epigenetic modifications in the development and evolution of the disease, in most RA patients there is no clear predisposing factor present. Environmental factors involved in RA pathogenesis are cigarette smoke, industrial pollutants like silica crystals, disturbances of intestinal, lung, and oral microbiota and some specific bacterial and viral infectious agents and their components. In the initial disease stage there are qualitative and quantitative disturbances ofpeptide citrulination as well as other protein modifications, followed by antigen presenting cell (APC) (macrophages and dendritic cells) and fibroblast like synoviocytes (FLS) activation. Some microbes foster this processes by APC and FLS direct and indirect activation. In the second stage APC's elicit specific humoral B cell re- sponse resulting in specific antibodies production and T cell autoreactivity. Inherited and acquired defects in T and B cell responses caused by repeated activation of innate immunity as well as loss of tolerance, elicit chronic autoimmune inflammation, primarily of synovial membranes, and development of cellular panus. Pathologic activation of the osteoclasts and release of the immune system effector molecules and the proteolytic enzymes damage the cartilage, bone and tendons composition and structure. Persistent inflammation through its complex mechanisms results in many systemic and extraarticular RA manifestations of almost all organ systems, resulting in severe complications and comorbidities such as rheumatoid lung, carditis, vasculitis, cahexia, anemia, accelerated atherosclerosis, myocardial and cerebrovascular vascular disease, lymphoma, osteoporosis, depression etc

  10. Hypoxia and its implications in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Quiñonez-Flores, Celia María; González-Chávez, Susana Aideé; Pacheco-Tena, César

    2016-08-22

    Alterations in tissue oxygen pressure contribute to a number of diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Low partial pressure of oxygen, a condition known as hypoxia, is a relevant feature in RA since it is involved in angiogenesis, inflammation, apoptosis, cartilage degradation, energy metabolism, and oxidative damage. Therefore, alterations in hypoxia-related signaling pathways are considered potential mechanisms of disease pathogenesis. The objective of this review is to highlight and update our current knowledge of the role of hypoxia in the pathogenesis of RA. We describe the experimental evidence that RA synovial tissue exists in a hypoxic state, as well as the origin and involvement of synovial hypoxia in different aspects of the pathogenic process.

  11. Hypoxia and its implications in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Quiñonez-Flores, Celia María; González-Chávez, Susana Aideé; Pacheco-Tena, César

    2016-01-01

    Alterations in tissue oxygen pressure contribute to a number of diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Low partial pressure of oxygen, a condition known as hypoxia, is a relevant feature in RA since it is involved in angiogenesis, inflammation, apoptosis, cartilage degradation, energy metabolism, and oxidative damage. Therefore, alterations in hypoxia-related signaling pathways are considered potential mechanisms of disease pathogenesis. The objective of this review is to highlight and update our current knowledge of the role of hypoxia in the pathogenesis of RA. We describe the experimental evidence that RA synovial tissue exists in a hypoxic state, as well as the origin and involvement of synovial hypoxia in different aspects of the pathogenic process. PMID:27549205

  12. Peripheral and site-specific CD4(+) CD28(null) T cells from rheumatoid arthritis patients show distinct characteristics.

    PubMed

    Pieper, J; Johansson, S; Snir, O; Linton, L; Rieck, M; Buckner, J H; Winqvist, O; van Vollenhoven, R; Malmström, V

    2014-02-01

    Proinflammatory CD4(+) CD28(null) T cells are frequently found in the circulation of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), but are less common in the rheumatic joint. In the present study, we sought to identify functional differences between CD4(+) CD28(null) T cells from blood and synovial fluid in comparison with conventional CD28-expressing CD4(+) T cells. Forty-four patients with RA, displaying a distinct CD4(+) CD28(null) T cell population in blood, were recruited for this study; the methylation status of the IFNG locus was examined in isolated T cell subsets, and intracellular cytokine production (IFN-γ, TNF, IL-17) and chemokine receptor expression (CXCR3, CCR6 and CCR7) were assessed by flow cytometry on T cells from the two compartments. Circulating CD4(+) CD28(null) T cells were significantly more hypomethylated in the CNS-1 region of the IFNG locus than conventional CD4(+) CD28(+) T cells and produced higher levels of both IFN-γ and TNF after TCR cross-linking. CD4(+) CD28(null) T cells from the site of inflammation expressed significantly more CXCR3 and CCR6 compared to their counterparts in blood. While IL-17A production could hardly be detected in CD4(+) CD28(null) cells from the blood, a significant production was observed in CD4(+) CD28(null) T cells from synovial fluid. CD4(+) CD28(null) T cells were not only found to differ from conventional CD4(+) CD28(+) T cells in the circulation, but we could also demonstrate that synovial CD4(+) CD28(null) T cells showed additional effector functions (IL-17 coproduction) as compared to the same subset in peripheral blood, suggesting an active role for these cells in the perpetuation of inflammation in the subset of patients having a CD28(null) population.

  13. Rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Scott, David L; Wolfe, Frederick; Huizinga, Tom W J

    2010-09-25

    Rheumatoid arthritis is characterised by persistent synovitis, systemic inflammation, and autoantibodies (particularly to rheumatoid factor and citrullinated peptide). 50% of the risk for development of rheumatoid arthritis is attributable to genetic factors. Smoking is the main environmental risk. In industrialised countries, rheumatoid arthritis affects 0·5-1·0% of adults, with 5-50 per 100 000 new cases annually. The disorder is most typical in women and elderly people. Uncontrolled active rheumatoid arthritis causes joint damage, disability, decreased quality of life, and cardiovascular and other comorbidities. Disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs), the key therapeutic agents, reduce synovitis and systemic inflammation and improve function. The leading DMARD is methotrexate, which can be combined with other drugs of this type. Biological agents are used when arthritis is uncontrolled or toxic effects arise with DMARDs. Tumour necrosis factor inhibitors were the first biological agents, followed by abatacept, rituximab, and tocilizumab. Infections and high costs restrict prescription of biological agents. Long-term remission induced by intensive, short-term treatment selected by biomarker profiles is the ultimate goal.

  14. Functional CD40 ligand is expressed by T cells in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed Central

    MacDonald, K P; Nishioka, Y; Lipsky, P E; Thomas, R

    1997-01-01

    CD40 ligand (CD40-L), a member of the tumor necrosis family of transmembrane glycoproteins, is rapidly and transiently expressed on the surface of recently activated CD4+ T cells. Interactions between CD40-L and CD40 induce B cell immunoglobulin production as well as monocyte activation and dendritic cell differentiation. Since these features characterize rheumatoid arthritis (RA), the expression and function of CD40-L in RA was examined. Freshly isolated RA peripheral blood (PB) and synovial fluid (SF) T cells expressed CD40-L mRNA as well as low level cell surface CD40-L. An additional subset of CD4+ RA SF T cells upregulated cell surface CD40-L expression within 15 min of in vitro activation even in the presence of cycloheximide, but soluble CD40-L was not found in SF. CD40-L expressed by RA T cells was functional, since RA PB and SF T cells but not normal PB T cells stimulated CD40-L-dependent B cell immunoglobulin production and dendritic cell IL-12 expression in the absence of prolonged in vitro T cell activation. In view of the diverse proinflammatory effects of CD40-L, this molecule is likely to play a central role in the perpetuation of rheumatoid synovitis. Of importance, blockade of CD40-L may prove highly effective as a disease modifying therapy for RA. PMID:9410920

  15. Could hormones make a difference in the treatment of juvenile rheumatoid arthritis?

    PubMed

    Khalkhali-Ellis, Z; Moore, T L; Hendrix, M J

    2000-02-01

    Adrenal androgens dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA; prasterone) and its sulphated form (DHEA-S) are among the most abundant hormonal steroids in men and nonpregnant women. Deficiencies of these adrenal androgens are associated with autoimmune disorders such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Recent studies from our laboratory have also identified low levels of adrenal androgens in the serum and synovial fluid of patients with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA). These findings support and complement those already published for RA and other autoimmune diseases. Because of the paucity of data on the hormonal status of patients with JRA, studies on the relationship between hypoandrogenicity and predisposition to develop JRA, and/or disease progression have not been conducted. In addition, despite the rapid expansion of research in the clinical use of these adrenal androgens in hyperlipidaemia, atherosclerosis, obesity, diabetes mellitus, insulin resistance and hypertension, their potential beneficial effects in JRA/RA have not been fully investigated. In fact, clinical trials of adrenal androgens in RA have only been conducted for the treatment of systemic lupus erythematosus. Further studies using prospective approaches are necessary to provide a unified consensus on the hormonal status of patients with JRA (as well as those with RA). This overview of our knowledge of the putative role(s) of hormones in arthritis will hopefully stimulate researchers in basic science and rheumatologists to synergistically collaborate in the effective translation of such knowledge to new clinical approaches. PMID:18034514

  16. Synovial Sarcoma Mimicking Myositis Ossificans

    PubMed Central

    Erkut, Adem; Guvercin, Yılmaz; Bedir, Recep

    2016-01-01

    A calcification mass was incidentally found in the soft tissue of a patient who had a history of trauma to the extremity during examination. The patient had no symptom. The pathological analysis of the mass revealed it was an early-phase synovial sarcoma (SS). The diagnosis was made before the onset of symptoms and proper surgical intervention was performed. Therefore, in case of a <1 cm lesion clinically suspicious of myositis ossificans, SS should be taken into consideration as a possible diagnosis.

  17. Hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical and gonadal functions in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Cutolo, M; Sulli, A; Pizzorni, C; Craviotto, C; Straub, R H

    2003-05-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) as well as most autoimmune disorders results from a combination of several predisposing factors including the relations between epitopes of the trigger agent (i.e., virus, self-antigens) and histocompatibility epitopes (i.e., HLA), the status of the stress response system including the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical axis (HPA) and the sympathetic nervous system (SNS), as well as the gonadal hormones (hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis, HPG), with estrogens implicated as enhancers of the immune response and androgens and progesterone as natural suppressors. The regular observation of reduced cortisol and adrenal androgen secretion during testing in RA patients not treated with glucocorticoids should clearly be regarded as "relative adrenal insufficiency" in the setting of a sustained inflammatory process, as shown by high interleukin (IL)-6 levels. In polymyalgia rheumatica, several pathogenetic and clinical aspects of the disease might well overlap RA, at least with elderly onset RA (EORA). Therefore, reduced production of adrenal hormones (i.e., cortisol, DHEAS) at baseline in active and untreated patients with polymyalgia rheumatica was detected. The defect was mainly related to altered adrenal responsiveness to ACTH stimulation (i.e., increased 17-OHP), at least in untreated patients with polymyalgia rheumatica. Finally, normal serum estrogen and low androgen levels, but high synovial fluid estrogen and much lower androgen levels, have been found in RA patients, supporting the fundamental role of the peripheral sex hormone metabolism in the manifestations of the disease.

  18. Suppression of PU.1-linked TLR4 expression by cilostazol with decrease of cytokine production in macrophages from patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Park, SY; Lee, SW; Baek, SH; Lee, CW; Lee, WS; Rhim, BY; Hong, KW; Kim, CD

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose The present study assessed the effects of cilostazol on LPS-stimulated TLR4 signal pathways in synovial macrophages from patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). These effects were confirmed in collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) in mice. Experimental Approach Expression of TLR4, PU.1, NF-κB p65 and IκBα on synovial fluid macrophages from RA patients was determined by Western blotting, and cytokines were measured by elisa. Anti-arthritic effects were evaluated in CIA mice. Key Results Intracellular cAMP was concentration-dependently raised by cilostazol (1–100 μM). Cilostazol significantly suppressed LPS-stimulated increase of TLR4 expression by blocking PU.1 transcriptional activity in RA macrophages. In addition, cilostazol decreased LPS-induced myeloid differentiation factor 88 (MyD88) expression, but not that of TNF receptor-associated factor 6 (TRAF6). Cilostazol also suppressed IkBα degradation and NF-κB p65 nuclear translocation. Moreover, LPS-induced increase of cytokine production (TNF-α, IL-1β) was inhibited by cilostazol, an effect which was accompanied by suppression of IκBα degradation, and NF-κB p65 nuclear translocation. However, expression of anti-inflammatory IL-10 was elevated by cilostazol and forskolin/IBMX. In mice with CIA, post-treatment with cilostazol (30 mg kg−1 day−1) decreased expression of TLR4 in knee joints in association with decreased recruitment of macrophages. Consequently, synovial inflammation, proteoglycan depletion and bone erosion were significantly inhibited by cilostazol treatment. Conclusions and Implications Cilostazol down-regulated LPS-stimulated PU.1-linked TLR4 expression and TLR4/MyD88/NF-κB signal pathways, and then suppressed inflammatory cytokine production in synovial macrophages from RA patients. Also cilostazol markedly inhibited the severity of CIA in mice. PMID:23072581

  19. Pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis and the immune response

    SciTech Connect

    Scheinberg, M.A.

    1983-08-01

    The interrelationship among lymphocytes, macrophages, and neutrophils appears to be an important aspect of the synovial inflammation that is characteristic of rheumatoid arthritis. In a study comparing gold sodium aurothiomalate (GST) with auranofin (Au), an orally absorbed compound, both appeared to inhibit the disease process and no difference between parenteral and oral administration was observed. Another study involved two groups of nine patients with severe rheumatoid arthritis. One group underwent plasmapheresis. The second group underwent total lymphoid irradiation. Both agents appeared to inhibit the disease process. Plasmapheresis was better tolerated that irradiation.

  20. [New therapies for rheumatoid arthritis].

    PubMed

    Salgado, Eva; Maneiro, José Ramón

    2014-11-18

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic systemic inflammatory disease characterized by inflammation of the synovial membrane and progressive destruction of the articular cartilage and bone. Advances in the knowledge of disease pathogenesis allowed the identification of novel therapeutic targets such as tumor necrosis factor (TNF), interleukin (IL)-1, IL-6 or the system JAK/STAT phosphorylation. At present there are 5 TNF antagonists approved for RA. Tocilizumab blocks the pathway of IL-6 and is the only biological with proven efficacy in monotherapy. Rituximab modulates B cell response in RA. Abatacept provided new data on T cell involvement in the pathogenesis of RA. Tofacitinib is the first kinase inhibitor approved for this disease. Biologic drugs have proven efficacy, almost always in combination with methotrexate, and even halt radiographic progression. Monitoring infection is the main precaution in handling these patients.

  1. Rheumatoid arthritis: MR imaging manifestations.

    PubMed

    Beltran, J; Caudill, J L; Herman, L A; Kantor, S M; Hudson, P N; Noto, A M; Baran, A S

    1987-10-01

    Radiologic assessment of the stage and treatment response of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is based on the presence of bone erosions, joint-space narrowing, and osteoporosis. Most radiologic methods for staging RA lack interobserver correlation and are time consuming. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging provides excellent depiction of soft-tissue abnormalities of the joints affected by RA, which allows detection of early changes. Nineteen joints of 17 patients with RA were studied with surface-coil MR imaging. Measurable abnormalities demonstrated by MR imaging but not clearly seen on plain radiographs included bone erosions, joint effusion, synovial sheath effusion, and cartilage irregularity and thinning. Seven patients of this group underwent MR imaging before and after 6 months of gold therapy. Four patients had significant interval changes on MR images that were not seen on plain radiographs. MR imaging may become a sensitive and objective method for quantitative assessment of the joint changes of RA. PMID:3628762

  2. Application of liposomes in treatment of rheumatoid arthritis: quo vadis.

    PubMed

    Kapoor, Bhupinder; Singh, Sachin Kumar; Gulati, Monica; Gupta, Reena; Vaidya, Yogyata

    2014-01-01

    The most common treatments for rheumatoid arthritis include nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), corticosteroids, disease modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs), and some biological agents. However, none of the treatments available is able to achieve the ultimate goal of treatment, that is, drug-free remission. This limitation has shifted the focus of treatment to delivery strategies with an ability to deliver the drugs into the synovial cavity in the proper dosage while mitigating side effects to other tissues. A number of approaches like microemulsions, microspheres, liposomes, microballoons, cocrystals, nanoemulsions, dendrimers, microsponges, and so forth, have been used for intrasynovial delivery of these drugs. Amongst these, liposomes have proven to be very effective for retaining the drug in the synovial cavity by virtue of their size and chemical composition. The fast clearance of intra-synovially administered drugs can be overcome by use of liposomes leading to increased uptake of drugs by the target synovial cells, which in turn reduces the exposure of nontarget sites and eliminates most of the undesirable effects associated with therapy. This review focuses on the use of liposomes in treatment of rheumatoid arthritis and summarizes data relating to the liposome formulations of various drugs. It also discusses emerging trends of this promising technology. PMID:24688450

  3. Application of Liposomes in Treatment of Rheumatoid Arthritis: Quo Vadis

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Sachin Kumar; Gulati, Monica

    2014-01-01

    The most common treatments for rheumatoid arthritis include nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), corticosteroids, disease modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs), and some biological agents. However, none of the treatments available is able to achieve the ultimate goal of treatment, that is, drug-free remission. This limitation has shifted the focus of treatment to delivery strategies with an ability to deliver the drugs into the synovial cavity in the proper dosage while mitigating side effects to other tissues. A number of approaches like microemulsions, microspheres, liposomes, microballoons, cocrystals, nanoemulsions, dendrimers, microsponges, and so forth, have been used for intrasynovial delivery of these drugs. Amongst these, liposomes have proven to be very effective for retaining the drug in the synovial cavity by virtue of their size and chemical composition. The fast clearance of intra-synovially administered drugs can be overcome by use of liposomes leading to increased uptake of drugs by the target synovial cells, which in turn reduces the exposure of nontarget sites and eliminates most of the undesirable effects associated with therapy. This review focuses on the use of liposomes in treatment of rheumatoid arthritis and summarizes data relating to the liposome formulations of various drugs. It also discusses emerging trends of this promising technology. PMID:24688450

  4. Evidence in support of a self-perpetuating HLA-DR-dependent delayed-type cell reaction in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed Central

    Klareskog, L; Forsum, U; Scheynius, A; Kabelitz, D; Wigzell, H

    1982-01-01

    Originating from observations on similarities between the rheumatoid synovial tissue and skin lesions in delayed-type hypersensitivity reactions--similarities as to massive infiltrates of "helper" T lymphocytes close to HLA-DR-expressing macrophage/dendritic cells--a notion is formed on the importance of local macrophage-dependent helper T-cell activation in the rheumatoid joint similar to that in a delayed-type skin reaction. In vitro studies on suspended synovial cells have been used to test and qualify these ideas. It is shown that (i) HLA-DR-expressing cells in normal synovial intima can, like epidermal Langerhans cells, mediate T-cell activation; (ii) the large numbers of rheumatoid synovial HLA-DR-expressing macrophage-like/dendritic cells are heterogeneous and mediate either efficient activation or suppression of T-lymphocyte proliferation, and (iii) specificity of rheumatoid T cells can be analyzed with the help of autologous synovial antigen-presenting cells; a specific anti-collagen type II response is reported in three patients. Images PMID:6980416

  5. The role of LAIR-1 (CD305) in T cells and monocytes/macrophages in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Y; Lv, K; Zhang, C M; Jin, B Q; Zhuang, R; Ding, Y

    2014-01-01

    The LAIR-1 receptor is expressed on a majority of mononuclear leukocytes. It is used as a biomarker when testing synovial fluid for evidence of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The primary objective of this study was to measure T cell- and monocyte/macrophage-specific LAIR-1 expression in RA patients and compare this to LAIR-1 expression in osteoarthritis (OA) patients and healthy individuals. LAIR-1 expression was significantly decreased in circulating CD4(+) T cells in RA patients compared to both OA patients and healthy individuals. In contrast, LAIR-1 is high in CD14(+) monocytes and local CD68(+) macrophages in synovial tissues from RA patients. Upon stimulation with TNF-α, LAIR-1 expression decreased in T-helper (Th)1 and Th2 CD4(+) T cells from healthy donors. These results indicate that LAIR-1 may exert different functions on T cells and monocytes/macrophages and suggest that LAIR-1 may be a novel therapeutic target for the treatment of RA. PMID:24380839

  6. Synovial Sarcoma Mimicking Myositis Ossificans

    PubMed Central

    Erkut, Adem; Guvercin, Yılmaz; Bedir, Recep

    2016-01-01

    A calcification mass was incidentally found in the soft tissue of a patient who had a history of trauma to the extremity during examination. The patient had no symptom. The pathological analysis of the mass revealed it was an early-phase synovial sarcoma (SS). The diagnosis was made before the onset of symptoms and proper surgical intervention was performed. Therefore, in case of a <1 cm lesion clinically suspicious of myositis ossificans, SS should be taken into consideration as a possible diagnosis. PMID:27595081

  7. Synovial Sarcoma Mimicking Myositis Ossificans.

    PubMed

    Balik, Mehmet Sabri; Erkut, Adem; Guvercin, Yılmaz; Bedir, Recep

    2016-09-01

    A calcification mass was incidentally found in the soft tissue of a patient who had a history of trauma to the extremity during examination. The patient had no symptom. The pathological analysis of the mass revealed it was an early-phase synovial sarcoma (SS). The diagnosis was made before the onset of symptoms and proper surgical intervention was performed. Therefore, in case of a <1 cm lesion clinically suspicious of myositis ossificans, SS should be taken into consideration as a possible diagnosis. PMID:27595081

  8. From the archives of the AFIP: Pleuropulmonary synovial sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Frazier, Aletta Ann; Franks, Teri J; Pugatch, Robert D; Galvin, Jeffrey R

    2006-01-01

    Pleuropulmonary synovial sarcoma (PPSS) is increasingly recognized as a subtype of sarcoma because of the recent identification of a distinctive chromosomal translocation specific to synovial sarcoma. Soft-tissue synovial sarcoma is far more common than PPSS and typically develops in para-articular locations of the extremities; affects young and middle-aged adults, with no difference in distribution between the sexes; and has well-documented radiologic manifestations. PPSS may arise in the chest wall, heart, mediastinum, pleura, or lung, and it shares patient demographics and several imaging features with its soft-tissue counterpart. Patients present with a cough, chest pain, or dyspnea. On chest radiographs, PPSS typically appears as a sharply marginated mass with uniform opacity, based either in the pleura or in the lung, and often accompanied by an ipsilateral pleural effusion. Computed tomographic images show a well-circumscribed heterogeneously enhanced lesion without associated involvement of bone and without calcifications (except in the case of a chest wall primary tumor). Magnetic resonance imaging provides superior demonstration of nodular soft tissue and multilocular fluid-filled internal components of PPSS, in addition to peripheral rim enhancement after the intravenous administration of a gadolinium-based contrast material such as gadopentetate dimeglumine. Current treatment consists of surgical resection followed by chemotherapy, radiation therapy, or both. PMID:16702463

  9. 5-Lipoxygenase Inhibitors Attenuate TNF-α-Induced Inflammation in Human Synovial Fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Han-Ching; Lin, Tzu-Hung; Wu, Ming-Yueh; Chiu, Yung-Cheng; Tang, Chih-Hsin; Hour, Mann-Jen; Liou, Houng-Chi; Tu, Huang-Ju; Yang, Rong-Sen; Fu, Wen-Mei

    2014-01-01

    The lipoxygenase isoform of 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX) is reported to be overexpressed in human rheumatoid arthritis synovial tissue and involved in the progress of inflammatory arthritis. However, the detailed mechanism of how 5-lipoxygenase regulates the inflammatory response in arthritis synovial tissue is still unclear. The aim of this study was to investigate the involvement of lipoxygenase pathways in TNF-α-induced production of cytokines and chemokines. Human synovial fibroblasts from rheumatoid patients were used in this study. 5-LOX inhibitors and shRNA were used to examine the involvement of 5-LOX in TNF-α-induced cytokines and chemokines expression. The signaling pathways were examined by Western Blotting or immunofluorescence staining. The effect of 5-LOX inhibitor on TNF-α-induced chemokine expression and paw edema was also explored in vivo in C57BL/6 mice. Treatment with 5-LOX inhibitors significantly decreased TNF-α-induced pro-inflammatory mediators including interleukin-6 (IL-6) and monocyte chemo-attractant protein-1 (MCP-1) in human synovial fibroblasts. Knockdown of 5-LOX using shRNA exerted similar inhibitory effects. The abrogation of NF-κB activation was involved in the antagonizing effects of these inhibitors. Furthermore, 5-LOX inhibitor decreased TNF-α-induced up-regulation of serum MCP-1 level and paw edema in mouse model. Our results provide the evidence that the administration of 5-LOX inhibitors is able to ameliorate TNF-α-induced cytokine/chemokine release and paw edema, indicating that 5-LOX inhibitors may be developed for therapeutic treatment of inflammatory arthritis. PMID:25229347

  10. Reverse Transcriptase-PCR Analysis of Bacterial rRNA for Detection and Characterization of Bacterial Species in Arthritis Synovial Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Kempsell, Karen E.; Cox, Charles J.; Hurle, Michael; Wong, Anthony; Wilkie, Scott; Zanders, Edward D.; Gaston, J. S. Hill; Crowe, J. Scott

    2000-01-01

    Onset of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is widely believed to be preceded by exposure to some environmental trigger such as bacterial infectious agents. The influence of bacteria on RA disease onset or pathology has to date been controversial, due to inconsistencies between groups in the report of bacterial species isolated from RA disease tissue. Using a modified technique of reverse transcriptase-PCR amplification, we have detected bacterial rRNA in the synovial tissue of late-stage RA and non-RA arthritis controls. This may be suggestive of the presence of live bacteria. Sequencing of cloned complementary rDNA (crDNA) products revealed a number of bacterial sequences in joint tissue from each patient, and from these analyses a comprehensive profile of the organisms present was compiled. This revealed a number of different organisms in each patient, some of which are common to both RA and non-RA controls and are probably opportunistic colonizers of previously diseased tissue and others which are unique species. These latter organisms may be candidates for a specific role in disease pathology and require further investigation to exclude them as causative agents in the complex bacterial millieu. In addition, many of the detected bacterial species have not been identified previously from synovial tissue or fluid from arthritis patients. These may not be easily cultivable, since they were not revealed in previous studies using conventional in vitro bacterial culture methods. In situ hybridization analyses have revealed the joint-associated bacterial rRNA to be both intra- and extracellular. The role of viable bacteria or their nucleic acids as triggers in disease onset or pathology in either RA or non-RA arthritis controls is unclear and requires further investigation. PMID:10992514

  11. Primary pleuropulmonary synovial sarcoma: a case report.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Lianfang; Guan, Zhiyu; Dai, Xuan; Xu, Jie

    2015-01-01

    Pleuropulmonary synovial sarcoma (PPSS) is an extremely rare malignant tumor, which is increasingly recognized as a subtype of sarcoma with a distinctive chromosomal translocation specific to synovial sarcoma. It is often presents like any thoracic tumor with symptoms such as chest pain or cough. Here we report a case of PPSS in a 49-year-old woman presenting with cough, shortness of breath and chest pain. And who were found upon histologic examination of the resection specimen to have cystic primary pleuropulmonary synovial sarcoma. PMID:26823907

  12. Gastrin, gastric acid secretion, and gastric microflora in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed Central

    Henriksson, K; Uvnäs-Moberg, K; Nord, C E; Johansson, C; Gullberg, R

    1986-01-01

    The relation between the basal and stimulated gastric acid secretion, plasma gastrin, and the gastric microflora was examined in 45 patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Sixteen patients (36%) had basal achlorhydria, and of these, 10 (22%) had achlorhydria or hypochlorhydria after stimulation with pentagastrin. The peak acid output and acidity showed inverse correlation with the disease duration but were not associated with age or with the degree of physical disability. Hypergastrinaemia was found in nine patients (20%), of whom 6 (13%) had significant titres of parietal cell antibody. The acidity of the peak acid output showed negative correlation with plasma gastrin. It was confirmed that the gastric secretory state is a determinant of plasma gastrin levels and in addition influences the growth of micro-organisms in the gastric lumen. The type of microflora in the non-acid stomach was similar to that found in the saliva. A subgroup of eight females was identified who showed low gastric acid secretion rates, positive bacterial cultures, and atlantoaxial subluxation. Gastrin- and insulin-like immunoreactivities were found in joint fluid. The concentrations reflected their plasma levels, suggesting that the peptides are not released at the inflammatory site, but rather that they reach synovial fluid from circulating blood. PMID:3524480

  13. Solitary pulmonary nodule: pleuropulmonary synovial sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Ward, Robert C; Birnbaum, Ariel E; Aswad, Bassam I; Healey, Terrance T

    2014-05-01

    Pleuropulmonary synovial sarcoma (PPSS) is an extremely rare primary malignancy of the lung. We present a case of a middle-aged female with PPSS that was initially discovered as an incidental indeterminate nodule on chest radiograph. Following evaluation with computed tomography (CT), the patient went on to positron-emission tomography (PET)/CT for work-up of the solitary pulmonary nodule, which demonstrated mild FDG-avidity and no other evidence of FDG-avid disease. The patient then underwent thoracotomy and right upper lobectomy for definitive treatment. Only after evaluation of the gross pathology, histology, immunohistochemistry and cytogenetics was the diagnosis of synovial sarcoma made. Importantly, the preceding PET/CT, in addition to physical exam of the upper and lower extremities, helped exclude the more common extra-thoracic soft-tissue variety of synovial sarcoma, which frequently metastasizes to lung, carrying a worse prognosis. Discussion of synovial sarcoma and PPSS follows. PMID:24791267

  14. Usefulness of sonography in the diagnosis of rheumatoid hand.

    PubMed

    Zaniewicz-Kaniewska, Katarzyna; Sudoł-Szopińska, Iwona

    2013-09-01

    Ultrasound examination is becoming more and more common in patients with rheumatoid diseases. Above all, it enables the assessment of articular soft tissues and constitutes a non-invasive examination. In a rheumatologist's everyday practice, it is conducted at the stage of initial diagnosis as well as to monitor the treatment and to confirm the remission if the clinical picture is ambiguous. The first sign of arthritis (including rheumatoid arthritis) that is visible on ultrasound examination is the thickening of the synovial membrane of the joint cavities, tendon sheaths or bursae. It is frequently accompanied by the exudate in the joint, sheath or bursa. In a subsequent stage, in Doppler examination, enhanced vascularization of the synovial membrane is observed. Sometimes, the inflammatory process of the tendon sheaths also affects the tendons, which might lead to their damage. Moreover, ultrasound examination also reveals erosions and inflammatory cysts (geodes) which attest to the advancement of the disease. A dynamic ultrasound examination enables to diagnose the capsule-ligamentous contracture of the interphalangeal joints, which occurs due to the lack of rehabilitation that should begin at the moment of the commencement of the inflammation. The ultrasound image does not allow for the differentiation between various rheumatoid entities, including those encompassing the joints in the hand, wrist. The observed changes, i.e. thickening of the synovial membrane, hyperemia, effusions, erosions or tendon damage, may accompany various rheumatoid entities. The purpose of the ultrasound examination is to recognize these irregularities, determine their localization and advancement and, finally, to monitor the course of treatment. Furthermore, ultrasound scan enables to assess the joints and tendons in a dynamic examination in relation to local ailments of the patient as well as to monitor the biopsy, aspiration and medicine administration. Sonography is used for a US

  15. Usefulness of sonography in the diagnosis of rheumatoid hand

    PubMed Central

    Sudoł-Szopińska, Iwona

    2013-01-01

    Ultrasound examination is becoming more and more common in patients with rheumatoid diseases. Above all, it enables the assessment of articular soft tissues and constitutes a non-invasive examination. In a rheumatologist's everyday practice, it is conducted at the stage of initial diagnosis as well as to monitor the treatment and to confirm the remission if the clinical picture is ambiguous. The first sign of arthritis (including rheumatoid arthritis) that is visible on ultrasound examination is the thickening of the synovial membrane of the joint cavities, tendon sheaths or bursae. It is frequently accompanied by the exudate in the joint, sheath or bursa. In a subsequent stage, in Doppler examination, enhanced vascularization of the synovial membrane is observed. Sometimes, the inflammatory process of the tendon sheaths also affects the tendons, which might lead to their damage. Moreover, ultrasound examination also reveals erosions and inflammatory cysts (geodes) which attest to the advancement of the disease. A dynamic ultrasound examination enables to diagnose the capsule-ligamentous contracture of the interphalangeal joints, which occurs due to the lack of rehabilitation that should begin at the moment of the commencement of the inflammation. The ultrasound image does not allow for the differentiation between various rheumatoid entities, including those encompassing the joints in the hand, wrist. The observed changes, i.e. thickening of the synovial membrane, hyperemia, effusions, erosions or tendon damage, may accompany various rheumatoid entities. The purpose of the ultrasound examination is to recognize these irregularities, determine their localization and advancement and, finally, to monitor the course of treatment. Furthermore, ultrasound scan enables to assess the joints and tendons in a dynamic examination in relation to local ailments of the patient as well as to monitor the biopsy, aspiration and medicine administration. Sonography is used for a US

  16. [Rheumatoid arthritis].

    PubMed

    Strunk, J; Lange, U; Müller-Ladner, U

    2005-07-29

    The development of novel anti-rheumatic drugs revolutionizes currently therapeutic strategies and diagnostic management of patients with rheumatoid arthritis, facilitating the goal of true remission instead of only symptomatic treatment as in former years. Since early treatment is known to be crucial for the longterm outcome, imaging modalities such as magnetic resonance imaging and high-frequency ultrasonography including Doppler sonography, which allow direct visualization of very early pathologic alterations of synovitis, or even initial destruction, become increasingly important. Besides the established therapy with methotrexate, new drugs such as leflunomide or the use of various combination therapies have been successfully introduced into the therapeutic armamentarium. Especially the introduction of cytokine-antagonists such as TNF-a inhibitors target the aim of remission. In addition, the upcoming therapeutic agents, which influence very effectively the inflammatory and destructive process need also to be integrated into the concert of different therapeutic strategies in the management of patients with rheumatoid arthritis, which includes the mandatory complementary factors such as physiotherapy, ergotherapy and orthopedic surgery.

  17. Differential Th1/Th2 cytokine patterns in chronic arthritis: interferon γ is highly expressed in synovium of rheumatoid arthritis compared with seronegative spondyloarthropathies

    PubMed Central

    Canete, J.; Martinez, S.; Farres, J.; Sanmarti, R.; Blay, M.; Gomez, A.; Salvador, G.; Munoz-Gomez, J.

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To investigate possible differences in Th1 and Th2 cytokine mRNA expression in the synovial tissue (ST) of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and seronegative spondyloarthropathies (SpA) with diagnostic and/or pathogenic interest.
METHODS—Eleven RA patients and 14 SpA patients (10 with undifferentiated spondyloarthropathy (USpA), two with ankylosing spondylitis (AS) and two with psoriatic arthritis (PsA)) were included. Th1 (interferon γ, interleukin 2) and Th2 (interleukin 4, interleukin 5 and interleukin 10) cytokine mRNA levels from arthritic knee ST were quantified by using an optimised polymerase chain reaction method with a computerised analysis system. Protein levels of proinflammatory cytokines (interleukin 1, tumour necrosis factor α and interleukin 6) in synovial fluid were quantified with a specific ELISA test.
RESULTS—Th1 cytokines were detected in all of RA ST samples in contrast with 58% (interferon γ) and 71% (interleukin 2) of SpA samples. Th2 cytokines were expressed in 90% of RA ST samples, but the findings in SpA were interleukin 10 in 90%, interleukin 4 in 60% and interleukin 5 in 40% of ST samples. However, when the mRNA levels of each cytokine were quantified and corrected for T cell mRNA levels, only interferon γ levels were significantly higher in RA than in SpA (p<0.003). Thus, the Th1/Th2 cytokine ratio in RA was fivefold that of SpA. Synovial fluid interleukin 1β concentrations were higher in RA than in SpA (p<0.05); there were also higher synovial fluid levels of tumour necrosis factor α in RA than in SpA, but without statistical significance.
CONCLUSION—This study has detected both Th1 and Th2 cytokine gene expression in ST from RA and SpA patients. Synovium interferon γ mRNA levels and SF interleukin 1β protein levels were significantly higher in RA than in SpA, so reflecting the known proinflammatory activity of interferon γ through macrophage activation. Thus, the Th1 (interferon

  18. A protocol for the culture and isolation of murine synovial fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jinjun; Ouyang, Qingqing; Hu, Ziyou; Huang, Qin; Wu, Jing; Wang, Ran; Yang, Min

    2016-01-01

    The culture of synovial fibroblasts (SFs) is one of the most effective tools for investigating the pathology and physiology of synovial tissues and should prove useful for identifying the importance of SFs in disease as well as for the development of novel therapeutic approaches for several chronic joint diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis. However, thus far, a detailed protocol for the primary culture and isolation of murine SFs has not been established. Therefore, the present study describes an easy and convenient method for isolating and culturing SFs from C57BL/6 mice. This protocol can be divided into 4 stages: Isolation of synovial tissues, isolation of SFs, seeding of SFs for growth in culture and purity analysis of SFs using the four cell markers, vimentin, cluster of differentiation 90.2 (CD90.2; Thy-1.2), intracellular adhesion molecule 1 (CD54) and vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 (CD106). This method is efficient and a purified population of SFs can be obtained 10 days after the initiation of culture. PMID:27446536

  19. What Is Rheumatoid Arthritis?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Information Arthritis Find a Clinical Trial Journal Articles Rheumatoid Arthritis PDF Version Size: 57 KB Audio Version Time: ... Size: 9.7 MB November 2014 What Is Rheumatoid Arthritis? Fast Facts: An Easy-to-Read Series of ...

  20. Rheumatoid arthritis (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Rheumatoid arthritis is an autoimmune disease in which the body's immune system attacks itself. The pattern of joints ... other joints and is worse in the morning. Rheumatoid arthritis is also a systemic disease, involving other body ...

  1. Nitric Oxide-Driven Hypoxia Initiates Synovial Angiogenesis, Hyperplasia and Inflammatory Lesions in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Fei; Wu, Pei; Xiao, Na; Qiu, Frank; Zeng, Qing-Ping

    2012-01-01

    Background Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an inflammatory articular disease with cartilage and bone damage due to hyperplasic synoviocyte invasion and subsequent matrix protease digestion. Although monoclonal antibodies against tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) have been approved for clinical use in patients with RA, desired therapeutic regimens suitable for non-responders are still unavailable because etiological initiators leading to RA remain enigmatic and unidentified. Methodology/Principal Findings Bacteria-induced arthritis (BIA) that simulates collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) is developed in mice upon daily live bacterial feeding. The morphological lesions of paw erythema and edema together with the histological alterations of synovial hyperplasia and lymphocytic infiltration emerge as the early-phase manifestations of BIA and CIA. Bacteria- or collagen-mediated global upregulation of pro-inflammatory cytokines is accompanied by the burst of nitric oxide (NO). Elevation of the serum NO level is correlated with decline of the blood oxygen saturation percentage (SpO2), reflecting a hypoxic consequence during development towards arthritis. NO-driven hypoxia is further evident from a positive relationship between NO and lactic acid (LA), an end product from glycolysis. Upregulation of hypoxia inducible factor 1 alpha (HIF-1α) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) validates hypoxia-induced angiogenesis in the inflamed synovium of modeling mice. Administration of the NO donor compound sodium nitroprusside (SNP) causes articular inflammation by inducing synovial hypoxia. Anti-bacteria by the antibiotic cefotaxime and/or the immunosuppressant rapamycin or artesunate that also inhibits nitric oxide synthase (NOS) can abrogate NO production, mitigate hypoxia, and considerably ameliorate or even completely abort synovitis, hence highlighting that NO may serve as an initiator of inflammatory arthritis. Conclusions/Significance Like collagen, bacteria also

  2. Class-switched B cells display response to therapeutic B-cell depletion in rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Möller, Burkhard; Aeberli, Daniel; Eggli, Stefan; Fuhrer, Martin; Vajtai, Istvan; Vögelin, Esther; Ziswiler, Hans-Rudolf; Dahinden, Clemens A; Villiger, Peter M

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Reconstitution of peripheral blood (PB) B cells after therapeutic depletion with the chimeric anti-CD20 antibody rituximab (RTX) mimics lymphatic ontogeny. In this situation, the repletion kinetics and migratory properties of distinct developmental B-cell stages and their correlation to disease activity might facilitate our understanding of innate and adaptive B-cell functions in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Methods Thirty-five 'RTX-naïve' RA patients with active arthritis were treated after failure of tumour necrosis factor blockade in an open-label study with two infusions of 1,000 mg RTX. Prednisone dose was tapered according to clinical improvement from a median of 10 mg at baseline to 5 mg at 9 and 12 months. Conventional disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs were kept stable. Subsets of CD19+ B cells were assessed by flow cytometry according to their IgD and CD27 surface expression. Their absolute number and relative frequency in PB were followed every 3 months and were determined in parallel in synovial tissue (n = 3) or synovial fluid (n = 3) in the case of florid arthritis. Results Six of 35 patients fulfilled the European League Against Rheumatism criteria for moderate clinical response, and 19 others for good clinical response. All PB B-cell fractions decreased significantly in number (P < 0.001) after the first infusion. Disease activity developed independently of the total B-cell number. B-cell repopulation was dominated in quantity by CD27-IgD+ 'naïve' B cells. The low number of CD27+IgD- class-switched memory B cells (MemB) in the blood, together with sustained reduction of rheumatoid factor serum concentrations, correlated with good clinical response. Class-switched MemB were found accumulated in flaring joints. Conclusions The present data support the hypothesis that control of adaptive immune processes involving germinal centre-derived, antigen, and T-cell-dependently matured B cells is essential for successful RTX treatment. PMID

  3. Effects of Oral Administration of Type II Collagen on Rheumatoid Arthritis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trentham, David E.; Dynesius-Trentham, Roselynn A.; Orav, E. John; Combitchi, Daniel; Lorenzo, Carlos; Sewell, Kathryn Lea; Hafler, David A.; Weiner, Howard L.

    1993-09-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is an inflammatory synovial disease thought to involve T cells reacting to an antigen within the joint. Type II collagen is the major protein in articular cartilage and is a potential autoantigen in this disease. Oral tolerization to autoantigens suppresses animal models of T cell-mediated autoimmune disease, including two models of rheumatoid arthritis. In this randomized, double-blind trial involving 60 patients with severe, active rheumatoid arthritis, a decrease in the number of swollen joints and tender joints occurred in subjects fed chicken type II collagen for 3 months but not in those that received a placebo. Four patients in the collagen group had complete remission of the disease. No side effects were evident. These data demonstrate clinical efficacy of an oral tolerization approach for rheumatoid arthritis.

  4. The Future of Rheumatoid Arthritis and Hand Surgery - Combining Evolutionary Pharmacology and Surgical Technique

    PubMed Central

    M, Malahias; H, Gardner; S, Hindocha; A, Juma; Khan, W

    2012-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is a systemic autoimmune disease of uncertain aetiology, which is characterized primarily by synovial inflammation with secondary skeletal destructions. Rheumatoid Arthritis is diagnosed by the presence of four of the seven diagnostic criteria, defined by The American College of Rheumatology. Approximately half a million adults in the United Kingdom suffer from rheumatoid arthritis with an age prevalence between the second and fourth decades of life; annually approximately 20,000 new cases are diagnosed. The management of Rheumatoid Arthritis is complex; in the initial phase of the disease it primarily depends on pharmacological management. With disease progression, surgical input to correct deformity comes to play an increasingly important role. The treatment of this condition is also intimately coupled with input from both the occupational therapists and physiotherapy. PMID:22423304

  5. Color Doppler ultrasound of the hand: observations on clinical utility in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Saadeh, Constantine; Gaylor, Patrick; Lee, Doohi; Malacara, Jan; Gaylor, Michael

    2004-02-01

    The use of ultrasound with color Doppler in the evaluation of rheumatoid arthritis was followed in 25 patients with joint complaints. Small joint ultrasound of the metacarpophalangeal joints (MCPs) as well as the wrists was performed with supplementation by color Doppler. In addition, 6 patients were followed for at least 3 months after start of treatment of rheumatoid arthritis using the same technique. In patients with what appeared to be definite rheumatoid arthritis, ultrasound supported this diagnosis as evidenced by the finding of cortical defects, extensor tendon sheath thickening, and synovial proliferation. Increased activity by color Doppler ultrasonography was the most common finding. Significant decrease in color Doppler activity was noted in the 6 patients who were followed up after 3 months of therapy with disease-modifying agents. Therefore, the use of ultrasound with color Doppler could aid in the diagnosis and follow up of patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

  6. [Early diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis].

    PubMed

    Badot, V

    2014-09-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is the most common chronic inflammatory rheumatic disorder, and is characterized by inflammation of the joint, which can lead to irreversible bone damage, joint deformity and disability, if not diagnosed timely or treated adequately. New classification criteria were developed in 2010 in order to identify patients at risk of developing persistent or erosive arthritis, and requiring early therapy. In order to detect early arthritis or bone erosions before their appearance on X-rays, ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging are now routinely used by clinicians, and also seem to deliver prognostic information about the disease. Synovial biopsies are potentially interesting in case of early arthritis to identify markers of diagnosis, prognosis or therapeutic response. Genetic or environmental risk factors were described to play a role in the development or maintenance of the disease; they could also help to screen early RA. A rapid diagnosis is eventually based on the right information and a tight collaboration between the primary care physician and the rheumatology care specialist. PMID:25675622

  7. Synovial Lipomatosis of the Glenohumeral Joint

    PubMed Central

    Safran, Ori

    2016-01-01

    Synovial lipomatosis (also known as lipoma arborescens) is a rare and benign lesion affecting synovium-lined cavities. It is characterized by hyperplasia of mature fat tissue in the subsynovial layer. Although the most commonly affected site is the knee joint, rarely additional locations such as tendon sheath and other joints are involved. We present a case of synovial lipomatosis of the glenohumeral joint in a 44-year-old man. The clinical data radiological studies and histopathologic results are described, as well as a review of the current literature. PMID:27563476

  8. Synovial Lipomatosis of the Glenohumeral Joint.

    PubMed

    Beyth, Shaul; Safran, Ori

    2016-01-01

    Synovial lipomatosis (also known as lipoma arborescens) is a rare and benign lesion affecting synovium-lined cavities. It is characterized by hyperplasia of mature fat tissue in the subsynovial layer. Although the most commonly affected site is the knee joint, rarely additional locations such as tendon sheath and other joints are involved. We present a case of synovial lipomatosis of the glenohumeral joint in a 44-year-old man. The clinical data radiological studies and histopathologic results are described, as well as a review of the current literature.

  9. The hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical and gonadal axis function in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Cutolo, M; Giusti, M; Foppiani, L; Seriolo, B; Briata, M; Bisso, A; Faelli, F; Felli, L; Prete, C; Pizzorni, C; Sulli, A

    2000-01-01

    The altered cortisol and adrenal androgen (i.e., dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate = DHEAS) secretion, observed during testing in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients not treated with corticosteroids, should be clearly regarded as a "relative adrenal insufficiency" in the setting of a sustained inflammatory process, as shown by high serum IL-6 levels. Androgens seem implicated in the pathophysiology of autoimmune disorders, including RA, as natural immunosuppressors. Low plasma and synovial fluid testosterone concentrations are observed in male RA patients; low plasma DHEAS levels are mainly observed in female RA patients. The menopausal peak of RA suggests that estrogens and/or progesterone deficiency also play a role in the disease, and many data indicate that estrogens suppress cellular immunity, but stimulate humoral immunity (i.e., deficiency promotes cellular Th1-type immunity). Gene polymorphisms for enzymes involved in the steroidogenesis seem to further complicate the role of sex hormones in the susceptibility to autoimmunity. Acquired changes of sex steroid metabolism seem to also play a role in the peripheral sex hormone levels. In conclusion, a complex interaction between the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenocortical and gonadal axis functions is evident in RA.

  10. Tissue cytokine patterns distinguish variants of rheumatoid synovitis.

    PubMed Central

    Klimiuk, P. A.; Goronzy, J. J.; Björ nsson, J.; Beckenbaugh, R. D.; Weyand, C. M.

    1997-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic inflammatory disease with primary manifestations in the synovial membrane. Tissue infiltrates are composed of T cells, B cells, and macrophages, but histopathological appearances vary widely and are rarely pathognomonic. Mechanisms underlying the phenotypic heterogeneity of rheumatoid synovitis are not known. To explore whether a correlation exists between the microscopic patterns of rheumatoid synovitis and in situ production of cytokines, tissue samples from 21 consecutive patients with clinically active RA were examined. Based upon the organization of the lymphocyte infiltrate, the synovial biopsies were categorized into three distinct subsets. Ten samples were characterized by diffuse lymphoid infiltrates without further microarrangement. In seven samples, lymphoid follicles with germinal center formation were detected, and in four specimens, granuloma formation was identified. In all specimens, cytokine transcription of interferon (IFN)-gamma, interleukin (IL)-4, IL-1 beta, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha, IL-10, and transforming growth factor-beta 1 was semiquantified with polymerase chain reaction and liquid phase hybridization. Each of the morphologically defined variants of synovitis displayed a unique cytokine profile. Low-level transcription of IFN-gamma, IL-4, IL-1 beta, and TNF-alpha was typical of diffuse synovitis. In follicular synovitis, IFN-gamma was the dominant cytokine, IL-4 was virtually undetectable, and IL-10 was abundant. Granulomatous synovitis demonstrated high transcription of IFN-gamma, IL-4, IL-1 beta, and TNF-alpha and could be clearly distinguished from the other phenotypes. To investigate whether differences in the synovial lesions were related to host factors, patients were compared for clinical parameters. Diffuse synovitis was seen in most of the patients with seronegative RA, the mildest form of the disease. In contrast, extra-articular spreading of RA with nodule formation was typically

  11. Identification and expression of iron regulators in human synovium: evidence for upregulation in haemophilic arthropathy compared to rheumatoid arthritis, osteoarthritis, and healthy controls.

    PubMed

    Nieuwenhuizen, L; Schutgens, R E G; van Asbeck, B S; Wenting, M J; van Veghel, K; Roosendaal, G; Biesma, D H; Lafeber, F P J G

    2013-07-01

    Recurrent joint bleeding is the most common manifestation of severe haemophilia resulting in haemophilic arthropathy (HA). Iron plays a central role in the pathogenesis of the two main features of HA: synovitis and cartilage destruction. The aim of this study was to investigate the synovial presence of the iron regulator proteins ferroportin (FPN), hepcidin, haemoglobin scavenger receptor CD163 (CD163), feline leukaemia virus subgroup C (FLVCR), and heme carrier protein 1 (HCP-1). A comparison of the expression in HA with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), osteoarthritis (OA), and healthy controls (HC) is made. Synovial expression of iron regulators was investigated by immunohistochemistry in human synovial tissue and in a murine haemophilia model. We demonstrate for the first time the synovial presence of the investigated iron regulator proteins. Expression of the iron regulator proteins FPN, CD163, FLVCR, and HCP-1 was enhanced in HA in comparison to RA, OA, and HC synovium. In addition, in a murine haemophilia model of acute joint bleeding, synovial expression of FPN, CD163, and HCP-1 was increased. In both human and murine experiment, synovial expression of hepcidin was not altered. These findings indicate the presence of iron regulator proteins in the synovium, demonstrate an enhanced expression of FPN, CD163, FLVCR, and HCP-1 in HA, and suggest a synovial adaptation mechanism to maintain synovial iron homeostasis in HA.

  12. Necrotising anterior scleritis in a late-onset rheumatoid arthritis (LORA) patient.

    PubMed

    Ooi, Kenneth G-J; Wingate, Richard; Adler, Paul A

    2007-01-01

    Late-onset rheumatoid arthritis (LORA) is a clinically distinct entity from rheumatoid arthritis of younger onset (YORA). We present a case of necrotising anterior scleritis in an elderly lady with new-onset LORA that was initially thought to be infective. Oestrogen receptors have been identified on B cells, T cells, and macrophages with oestrogens demonstrated to increase their activation and enhance RA synovial inflammation. The presence of long-term oestrogen supplementation may have contributed to the development and perpetuation of her RA, thereby necessitating awareness of the possible immunomodulatory role of the sex steroids in immune-mediated diseases which affect the eye.

  13. Impact of rheumatoid arthritis on sexual function

    PubMed Central

    Tristano, Antonio G

    2014-01-01

    Sexuality is a complex aspect of the human being’s life and is more than just the sexual act. Normal sexual functioning consists of sexual activity with transition through the phases from arousal to relaxation with no problems, and with a feeling of pleasure, fulfillment and satisfaction. Rheumatic diseases may affect all aspects of life including sexual functioning. The reasons for disturbing sexual functioning are multifactorial and comprise disease-related factors as well as therapy. Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic inflammatory autoimmune disease characterized by progressive joint destruction resulting from chronic synovial inflammation. It leads to various degrees of disability, and ultimately has a profound impact on the social, economic, psychological, and sexual aspects of the patient’s life. This is a systemic review about the impact of RA on sexual functioning. PMID:24829873

  14. Rheumatoid Factors: Clinical Applications

    PubMed Central

    Castelli, Roberto

    2013-01-01

    Rheumatoid factors are antibodies directed against the Fc region of immunoglobulin G. First detected in patients with rheumatoid arthritis 70 years ago, they can also be found in patients with other autoimmune and nonautoimmune conditions, as well as in healthy subjects. Rheumatoid factors form part of the workup for the differential diagnosis of arthropathies. In clinical practice, it is recommended to measure anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide antibodies and rheumatoid factors together because anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide antibodies alone are only moderately sensitive, and the combination of the two markers improves diagnostic accuracy, especially in the case of early rheumatoid arthritis. Furthermore, different rheumatoid factor isotypes alone or in combination can be helpful when managing rheumatoid arthritis patients, from the time of diagnosis until deciding on the choice of therapeutic strategy. PMID:24324289

  15. A synovial amidase acting on tissue kallikrein-selective substrate in clinical and experimental arthritis.

    PubMed

    Al-Haboubi, H A; Bennett, D; Sharma, J N; Thomas, G R; Zeitlin, I J

    1986-01-01

    Increased levels of amidase acting on a tissue-kallikrein selective substrate, Val.Leu.Arg.pNA, with an activity optimum at pH9, were detected in blood-free inflamed tissues from adjuvant arthritic rats (p less than 0.01). The component of this activity resistant to inhibition by soybean trypsin inhibitor (SBTI) also greatly increased (p less than 0.05). Both the SBTI-sensitive and SBTI-resistant components were inhibited by aprotinin (93% and 72% respectively). Kallikrein-like amidase also increased in inflamed synovia from seropositive rheumatoid, and osteoarthritic dogs when compared with healthy canine synovia. This increase was parallelled by an increase in kinin-forming enzyme which was also measured in rheumatoid and healthy animals and this activity was inhibited 72% by aprotinin. Total kallikrein-like amidase also increased 989% (p less than 0.05) in synovia from seropositive rheumatoid human patients, compared with healthy synovial tissue. Evidence is presented indicating that the origin of this enzymic activity may be plasma kallikrein. PMID:3643734

  16. Exercise induced release of von Willebrand factor: evidence for hypoxic reperfusion microvascular injury in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed Central

    Farrell, A J; Williams, R B; Stevens, C R; Lawrie, A S; Cox, N L; Blake, D R

    1992-01-01

    Experimental evidence suggests that rheumatoid synovitis may be perpetuated by the generation of reactive oxygen species during hypoxic reperfusion injury. The latter occurs because increased intra-articular pressure during exercise exceeds synovial capillary perfusion pressure, impairing blood flow. The object of this study was to establish a marker for and the mechanism of synovial hypoxic reperfusion injury. Von Willebrand factor (vWF) is only released from endothelial cells and platelets and is an in vivo and in vitro marker of endothelial injury. In vivo exercise induced changes in plasma vWF were therefore investigated in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) compared with controls and in vitro vWF release by human umbilical vein endothelial cells subjected to hypoxia reperfusion. Pre-exercise plasma vWF levels were 1001 and 817 IU/l, increasing after exercise to 1658 and 845 IU/l in patients with RA and controls respectively. Von Willebrand factor release from human umbilical vein endothelial cells followed a biphasic pattern, occurring during both hypoxia and reperfusion. Hypoxia reperfusion induced vWF release by human umbilical vein endothelial cells in vitro suggests that exercise induced vWF release in patients with RA is best explained by synovial hypoxic reperfusion injury. This study supports evidence that generation of reactive oxygen species plays a principal part in synovial hypoxic reperfusion injury and suggests vWF as a useful marker of this phenomenon. Images PMID:1444624

  17. Targeting epigenetic misregulation in synovial sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Waterfall, Joshua J; Meltzer, Paul S

    2012-03-20

    Like many sarcomas, synovial sarcoma is driven by a characteristic oncogenic transcription factor fusion, SS18-SSX. In this issue of Cancer Cell, Su et al. elucidate the protein partners necessary for target gene misregulation and demonstrate a direct effect of histone deacetylase inhibitors on the SS18-SSX complex composition, expression misregulation, and apoptosis.

  18. The molecular mechanism of osteoclastogenesis in rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Udagawa, Nobuyuki; Kotake, Shigeru; Kamatani, Naoyuki; Takahashi, Naoyuki; Suda, Tatsuo

    2002-01-01

    Bone-resorbing osteoclasts are formed from hemopoietic cells of the monocyte–macrophage lineage under the control of bone-forming osteoblasts. We have cloned an osteoblast-derived factor essential for osteoclastogenesis, the receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL). Synovial fibroblasts and activated T lymphocytes from patients with rheumatoid arthritis also express RANKL, which appears to trigger bone destruction in rheumatoid arthritis as well. Recent studies have shown that T lymphocytes produce cytokines other than RANKL such as IL-17, granulocyte–macrophage colony-stimulating factor and IFN-γ, which have powerful regulatory effects on osteoclastogenesis. The possible roles of RANKL and other cytokines produced by T lymphocytes in bone destruction are described. PMID:12223101

  19. Evidence of the presence of rheumatoid factor and antibodies reacting with human and rabbit IgA in fluid from non-keratinizing jaw cysts.

    PubMed

    Skaug, N

    1976-01-01

    Fluid from an apical periodontal and a follicular jaw cyst formed, in double diffusion in agarose gel, a continuous precipitin line against IgA isolated from human and rabbit serum, IgA myeloma protein, and secretory IgA. Results of immunoelectrophoresis and absorption experiments indicated that the IgA precipitating factor was an immunoglobulin belonging to the IgM class. Furthermore, the two cyst fluids contained immune complexes, possibly IgA-anti-IgA, which precipitated in agar gel. The same two cyst fluids showed a positive reaction in the Waaler-Rose test with tires of 40 and 80, respectively. A series of the other cyst fluids examined were negative in the Waaler-Rose test. None of the cyst fluids conatined antinuclear antibodies.

  20. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    MedlinePlus

    ... Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series This series of five videos was designed ... Activity Role of Body Weight in Osteoarthritis Educational Videos for Patients Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series Psoriatic ...

  1. Needle arthroscopy of the knee with synovial biopsy sampling: technical experience in 150 patients.

    PubMed

    Baeten, D; Van den Bosch, F; Elewaut, D; Stuer, A; Veys, E M; De Keyser, F

    1999-01-01

    Needle arthroscopy is an office-based technique allowing direct visualisation of the knee cavity and selective sampling of the synovial membrane. We performed needle arthroscopy in 150 patients with synovitis of the knee (1) to evaluate the diagnostic potential in early arthritis, (2) to perform therapeutic lavage in persistent inflammatory synovitis and (3) to assess the balance between technical feasibility, safety and patient comfort on the one hand, and the relevance of the obtained macro- and microscopic information for diagnosis and research purposes on the other. After disinfection of the leg and local anaesthesia of the skin and joint, a 1.8-2.7 mm needle arthroscope was introduced into the knee. Synovial fluid was aspirated and lavage of the joint cavity was performed to allow macroscopic evaluation of hyperaemia and hypertrophy of the synovial membrane. Biopsies were taken at inflamed sites, followed by another lavage to remove blood and debris. Needle arthroscopy of the knee is a simple and easy to perform technique made particularly attractive by the local anaesthesia and the ambulatory setting. It allows good macroscopic evaluation of synovial inflammation and selective sampling of the synovial membrane. Biopsies are suitable for RNA and DNA extraction, bacterial or lymphocyte culture, and cell isolation. Because samples were sometimes too small for representative histology, we switched from a 1.8 mm to a 2.7 mm biopsy forceps with good results. In nearly all cases the arthroscopy was well tolerated. Moreover, some patients reported relief of symptoms and even improvement of mobility after lavage of the inflamed joint. No major complications were noted. It was concluded that needle arthroscopy of the knee is a simple, safe and well-tolerated technique, with promising perspectives as a diagnostic, scientific and possibly therapeutic tool in rheumatic diseases. PMID:10638766

  2. Synovial chemokine expression and relationship with knee symptoms in patients with meniscal tears

    PubMed Central

    Nair, Anjali; Gan, Justin; Bush-Joseph, Charles; Verma, Nikhil; Tetreault, Matthew W.; Saha, Kanta; Margulis, Arkady; Fogg, Louis; Scanzello, Carla R.

    2015-01-01

    Objective In patients with knee OA, synovitis is associated with knee pain and symptoms. We previously identified synovial mRNA expression of a set of chemokines (CCL19, IL-8, CCL5, XCL-1, CCR7) associated with synovitis in patients with meniscal tears but without radiographic OA. CCL19 and CCR7 were also associated with knee symptoms. This study sought to validate expression of these chemokines and association with knee symptoms in more typical patients presenting for meniscal arthroscopy, many who have pre-existing OA. Design Synovial biopsies and fluid (SF) were collected from patients undergoing meniscal arthroscopy. Synovial mRNA expression was measured using quantitative RT-PCR. The Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS) was administered preoperatively. Regression analyses determined if associations between chemokine mRNA levels and KOOS scores were independent of other factors including radiographic OA. CCL19 in SF was measured by ELISA, and compared to patients with advanced knee OA and asymptomatic organ donors. Results 90% of patients had intra-operative evidence of early cartilage degeneration. CCL19, IL-8, CCL5, XCL1, CCR7 transcripts were detected in all patients. Synovial CCL19 mRNA levels independently correlated with KOOS Activities of Daily Living scores (95% CI [-8.071, -0.331], p= 0.036), indicating higher expression was associated with more knee-related dysfunction. SF CCL19 was detected in 7 of 10 patients, compared to 4 of 10 asymptomatic donors. Conclusion In typical patients presenting for meniscal arthroscopy, synovial CCL19 mRNA expression was associated with knee-related difficulty with activities of daily living, independent of other factors including presence of radiographic knee OA. PMID:25724256

  3. Intra-articular injection of synovial mesenchymal stem cells improves cartilage repair in a mouse injury model.

    PubMed

    Mak, J; Jablonski, C L; Leonard, C A; Dunn, J F; Raharjo, E; Matyas, J R; Biernaskie, J; Krawetz, R J

    2016-01-01

    Controversy remains whether articular cartilage has an endogenous stem/progenitor cell population, since its poor healing capacity after injury can lead to diseases such as osteoarthritis. In the joint environment there are mesenchymal stem/progenitor cells (MSCs) in the synovial membrane and synovial fluid that can differentiate into cartilage, but it is still under debate if these cells contribute to cartilage repair in vivo. In this study, we isolated a Sca-1 positive, chondrogenesis capable population of mouse synovial MSCs from C57BL6 and MRL/MpJ "super-healer" strains. Intra-articular injection of Sca-1 + GFP + synovial cells from C57BL6 or MRL/MpJ into C57BL6 mice following cartilage injury led to increased cartilage repair by 4 weeks after injury. GFP expression was detected in the injury site at 2 weeks, but not 4 weeks after injury. These results suggest that synovial stem/progenitor cells, regardless of strain background, have beneficial effects when injected into an injured joint. MSCs derived from MRL/MpJ mice did not promote an increased repair capacity compared to MSCs derived from non-healing C57BL6 controls; however, MRL/MpJ MSCs were observed within the defect area at the time points examined, while C57BL6 MSCs were not. PMID:26983696

  4. The lubricative function of artificial joint material surfaces by confocal laser scanning microscopy. Comparison with natural synovial joint surface.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Masanori; Oka, Masanori

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to observe and compare the effect of the behavior of different lubricating surfaces, including articular cartilage and several artificial joint materials, under the physiological loading by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) to clarify the mechanism of lubrication in natural joints and subsequently improve the quality of artificial joints. In our experiment, even with considerable loading, natural articular cartilage exhibited a synovial fluid area and an area of direct and solid contact. In the region between these two areas, a liquid crystal layer was observed. On the other hand, the materials used for artificial joints (metal and polyethylene, which are now in use, and polyvinyl alcohol-hydrogel polymer which is being developed), did not exhibit neither a clear fluid pool area nor the intermediary area with liquid crystal formation. These results suggest that natural articular cartilage surface has a particular characteristic which builds up a synovial pooling area and liquid crystal formation in the third area by interaction with macromolecules in synovial fluid under the loading condition. These characteristics give natural articular cartilage its excellent lubricative function. To improve the quality of artificial joints, the characteristics of the implant material surface and the synovial macromolecules must be considered. PMID:14646057

  5. The clinical features of rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Grassi, W; De Angelis, R; Lamanna, G; Cervini, C

    1998-05-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic inflammatory disease characterized by progressive damage of synovial-lined joints and variable extra-articular manifestations. Tendon and bursal involvement are frequent and often clinically dominant in early disease. RA can affect any joint, but it is usually found in metacarpophalangeal, proximal interphalangeal and metatarsophalangeal joints, as well as in the wrists and knee. Articular and periarticular manifestations include joint swelling and tenderness to palpation, with morning stiffness and severe motion impairment in the involved joints. The clinical presentation of RA varies, but an insidious onset of pain with symmetric swelling of small joints is the most frequent finding. RA onset is acute or subacute in about 25% of patients, but its patterns of presentation also include palindromic onset, monoarticular presentation (both slow and acute forms), extra-articular synovitis (tenosynovitis, bursitis), polymyalgic-like onset, and general symptoms (malaise, fatigue, weight loss, fever). The palindromic onset is characterized by recurrent episodes of oligoarthritis with no residual radiologic damage, while the polymyalgic-like onset may be clinically indistinguishable from polymyalgia rheumatica in elderly subjects. RA is characteristically a symmetric erosive disease. Although any joint, including the cricoarytenoid joint, can be affected, the distal interphalangeal, the sacroiliac, and the lumbar spine joints are rarely involved. The clinical features of synovitis are particularly apparent in the morning. Morning stiffness in and around the joints, lasting at least 1 h before maximal improvement is a typical sign of RA. It is a subjective sign and the patient needs to be carefully informed as to the difference between pain and stiffness. Morning stiffness duration is related to disease activity. Hand involvement is the typical early manifestation of rheumatoid arthritis. Synovitis involving the metacarpophalangeal

  6. Primary pulmonary synovial sarcoma: a rare neoplasm

    PubMed Central

    Ramos, Montserrat Blanco; Fontán, Eva María García; Carretero, Miguel Ángel Cańizares; Pińeiro, Ana González

    2016-01-01

    Primary pulmonary synovial sarcoma is an extremely rare tumor with an unknown cause. The diagnosis is established after other primary lung malignancies or metastatic extrathoracic sarcoma have been excluded. We report the case of a 69-year-old man who presented with a well-defined mass in the right upper lobe on a chest X-ray. A video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS) right upper lobectomy was performed. Immunohistochemically, neoplastic cells were positive for vimentin, CD56 and Bcl-2, and focally positive for CD99, epithelial membrane antigen and cytokeratin 7 and 19. The cytogenetic study revealed a SYT genetic reassortment. So, the final pathological diagnosis was primary pulmonary synovial sarcoma. PMID:27516790

  7. JAWS coordinates chondrogenesis and synovial joint positioning.

    PubMed

    Sohaskey, Michael L; Yu, Jane; Diaz, Michael A; Plaas, Anna H; Harland, Richard M

    2008-07-01

    Properly positioned synovial joints are crucial to coordinated skeletal movement. Despite their importance for skeletal development and function, the molecular mechanisms that underlie joint positioning are not well understood. We show that mice carrying an insertional mutation in a previously uncharacterized gene, which we have named Jaws (joints abnormal with splitting), die perinatally with striking skeletal defects, including ectopic interphalangeal joints. These ectopic joints develop along the longitudinal axis and persist at birth, suggesting that JAWS is uniquely required for the orientation and consequent positioning of interphalangeal joints within the endochondral skeleton. Jaws mutant mice also exhibit severe chondrodysplasia characterized by delayed and disorganized maturation of growth plate chondrocytes, together with impaired chondroitin sulfation and abnormal metabolism of the chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan aggrecan. Our findings identify JAWS as a key regulator of chondrogenesis and synovial joint positioning required for the restriction of joint formation to discrete stereotyped locations in the embryonic skeleton.

  8. Primary pulmonary synovial sarcoma: a rare neoplasm.

    PubMed

    García, José Soro; Ramos, Montserrat Blanco; Fontán, Eva María García; Carretero, Miguel Ángel Cańizares; Pińeiro, Ana González

    2016-06-01

    Primary pulmonary synovial sarcoma is an extremely rare tumor with an unknown cause. The diagnosis is established after other primary lung malignancies or metastatic extrathoracic sarcoma have been excluded. We report the case of a 69-year-old man who presented with a well-defined mass in the right upper lobe on a chest X-ray. A video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS) right upper lobectomy was performed. Immunohistochemically, neoplastic cells were positive for vimentin, CD56 and Bcl-2, and focally positive for CD99, epithelial membrane antigen and cytokeratin 7 and 19. The cytogenetic study revealed a SYT genetic reassortment. So, the final pathological diagnosis was primary pulmonary synovial sarcoma. PMID:27516790

  9. Intraspinal synovial cyst in a dog.

    PubMed

    Perez, B; Rollan, E; Ramiro; Pumarola, M

    2000-01-01

    An eight-year-old, male Siberian husky cross was referred with a history of an acute onset of pelvic-limb ataxia and paraparesis. Radiography and subsequent myelography of the spine revealed an extradural compression of the spinal cord at the level of the 13th thoracic (T13) to first lumbar (L1) vertebrae. Hemilaminectomy resulted in the successful removal of an extradural cystic lesion. The morphological diagnosis based on histopathology was a synovial cyst with chondromatosis. There were no postoperative complications, and the dog's condition improved markedly. At two years postoperatively, the animal remains normal on both physical and neurological examination. To the authors' knowledge, this article is the first report of an intraspinal synovial cyst in a dog.

  10. The Pathogenic Role of Angiogenesis in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Elshabrawy, Hatem A.; Chen, Zhenlong; Volin, Michael V.; Ravella, Shalini; Virupannavar, Shanti; Shahrara, Shiva

    2016-01-01

    Angiogenesis is the formation of new capillaries from pre-existing vasculature, which plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of several inflammatory autoimmune diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA), spondyloarthropathies, psoriasis, systemic lupus erythematosus, systemic sclerosis and atherosclerosis. In RA, excessive migration of circulating leukocytes into the inflamed joint necessitates formation of new blood vessels to provide nutrients and oxygen to the hypertrophic joint. The dominance of the pro-angiogenic factors over the endogenous angiostatic mediators triggers angiogenesis. In this review article, we highlight the underlying mechanisms by which cells present in the RA synovial tissue are modulated to secrete pro-angiogenic factors. We focus on the significance of pro-angiogenic factors such as growth factors, hypoxia inducible factors, cytokines, chemokines, matrix metalloproteinase and adhesion molecules on RA pathogenesis. As pro-angiogenic factors are primarily produced from RA synovial tissue macrophages and fibroblasts, we emphasize the key role of RA synovial tissue lining layer in maintaining synovitis through neovascularization. Lastly, we summarize the specific approaches utilized to target angiogenesis. We conclude that the formation of new blood vessels plays an indispensable role in RA progression. However since the function of several pro-angiogenic mediators is cross regulated, discovering novel approaches to target multiple cascades or selecting an upstream cascade that impairs the activity of a number of pro-angiogenic factors may provide a promising strategy for RA therapy. PMID:26198292

  11. Immunomodulatory Effects of Bee Venom in Human Synovial Fibroblast Cell Line

    PubMed Central

    Mohammadi, Ebrahim; Vatanpour, Hossein; H Shirazi, Farshad

    2015-01-01

    As in Iranian traditional medicine, bee venom (BV) is a promising treatment for the rheumatoid arthritis (RA) which is considered as a problematic human chronic inflammatory disease in the present time. Smoking is considered to be a major risk factor in RA onset and severity. The main aim of this study is to investigate the effects of BV on cigarette smoke-induced inflammatory response in fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLS). Cytotoxicity of cigarette smoke condensate (CSC) and bee venom were determined by the tetrazolium (MTT) method in cultured synovial fibroblastes. The expression of interleukin-1β and sirtuin1 mRNA were analyzed by SYBR green real-time quantitative PCR. Differences between the mean values of treated and untreated groups were assessed by student t-test. Based on MTT assay, CSC and BV did not exert any significant cytotoxic effects up to 40 µg/mL and 10 µg/mL, respectively. Our results showed that interleukin-1β mRNA level was significantly up-regulated by CSC treatments in LPS-stimulated synoviocytes in a dose-dependent manner. Conversely, the expressions of IL-1β and Sirt1 were up-regulated even in lower concentrations of BV and attenuated at higher concentrations. Also, BV attenuated the CSC-induced and LPS-induced inflammatory responses in synovial fibroblasts. Our results support the epidemiological studies indicating pro-inflammatory effects of CSC and anti-inflammatory effects of BV on FLS cell line. PMID:25561937

  12. Primary pleuro-pulmonary synovial sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Shah, Unmil B; Joshi, S; Ghorpade, S V; Gaikwad, S N; Sundrani, R M

    2010-01-01

    Primary pleuro-pulmonary synovial sarcoma (PPSS) is a rare tumour and poses adiagnostic challenge particularly when unusual histological features are present. We report a case of a 30-year-old immunocompromised human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) sero-positive male who was referred to us with complaints of cough, breathlessness and left-sided chestpain for the past two months. The PPSS can be confirmed on tru-cut biopsy. PMID:20949738

  13. Methotrexate-loaded lipid-core nanocapsules are highly effective in the control of inflammation in synovial cells and a chronic arthritis model

    PubMed Central

    Boechat, Antônio Luiz; de Oliveira, Catiúscia Padilha; Tarragô, Andrea Monteiro; da Costa, Allyson Guimarães; Malheiro, Adriana; Guterres, Silvia Stanisçuaski; Pohlmann, Adriana Raffin

    2015-01-01

    Background Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is the most common autoimmune disease in the word, affecting 1% of the population. Long-term prognosis in RA was greatly improved following the introduction of highly effective medications such as methotrexate (MTX). Despite the importance of this drug in RA, 8%–16% of patients must discontinue the treatment because of adverse effects. Last decade, we developed a promising new nanocarrier as a drug-delivery system, lipid-core nanocapsules. Objective The aim of the investigation reported here was to evaluate if methotrexate-loaded lipid-core nanocapsules (MTX-LNC) reduce proinflammatory and T-cell-derived cytokines in activated mononuclear cells derived from RA patients and even in functional MTX-resistant conditions. We also aimed to find out if MTX-LNC would reduce inflammation in experimentally inflammatory arthritis at lower doses than MTX solution. Methods Formulations were prepared by self-assembling methodology. The adjuvant arthritis was induced in Lewis rats (AIA) and the effect on edema formation, TNF-α levels, and interleukin-1 beta levels after treatment was evaluated. Mononuclear cells obtained from the synovial fluid of RA patients during articular infiltration procedures were treated with MTX solution and MTX-LNC. For in vitro experiments, the same dose of MTX was used in comparing MTX and MTX-LNC, while the dose of MTX in the MTX-LNC was 75% lower than the drug in solution in in vivo experiments. Results Formulations presented nanometric and unimodal size distribution profiles, with D[4.3] of 175±17 nm and span of 1.6±0.2. Experimental results showed that MTX-LNC had the same effect as MTX on arthritis inhibition on day 28 of the experiment (P<0.0001); however, this effect was achieved earlier, on day 21 (P<0.0001), by MTX-LNC, and this formulation had reduced both TNF-α (P=0.001) and IL-1α (P=0.0002) serum levels by the last day of the experiment. Further, the MTX-LNC were more effective at reducing the

  14. A popliteal giant synovial osteochondroma mimicking a parosteal osteosarcoma

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Both giant synovial osteochondroma and parosteal osteosarcoma are rare musculo-skeletal tumors, often localized in the vicinity of the knee. Misdiagnosis of a malignant bone tumor can entail fatal consequences. Etiology of giant synovial osteochondroma is widely unsolved but is believed to originate from synovial chondromatosis, a mostly benign metaplasia of the synovial membrane. Parosteal osteosarcoma is a low-grade surface osteosarcoma with a propensity of local recurrence and the potential of distant metastasis and therefore requiring a different therapeutical approach. We report the case of a popliteal giant osteochondroma mimicking a parosteal osteosarcoma. Relevant facts of this rare entity regarding pathogenesis, treatment, and differential diagnoses will be discussed. PMID:24066980

  15. Atlantoaxial Joint Synovial Cyst: Diagnosis and Percutaneous Treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Velan, Osvaldo; Rabadan, Alejandra; Paganini, Lisandro; Langhi, Luciano

    2008-11-15

    Synovial cysts at the atlantoaxial level are found uncommonly. Lumbar symptomatic cases are treated by percutaneous cyst aspiration with or without corticoid injection or by surgical resection, but synovial cysts at the C1-C2 level are usually treated by surgery. We report here a 92-year-old woman with a retro-odontoid synovial cyst producing spinal cord compression that was treated by percutaneous aspiration of the cyst under CT guidance. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of an atlantoaxial synovial cyst successfully treated with a minimally invasive procedure.

  16. Synovial sarcoma of kidney in a child: A rare presentation

    PubMed Central

    Radhakrishnan, Venkatraman; Dhanushkodi, Manikandan; Narayanswamy, Kathiresan; Raja, Anand; Sundersingh, Shirley; Sagar, Tenali

    2016-01-01

    There are no reported cases in the literature of primary renal synovial sarcoma in pediatric patients. The management of renal synovial sarcoma has been extrapolated from the management of soft tissue sarcomas at other sites. We present a 4-year-old female who was suspected to have Wilms’ tumor. The patient underwent guided biopsy as she did not respond to neoadjuvant chemotherapy for Wilms’ tumor. The biopsy was consistent with primary renal synovial sarcoma. The child was treated with change in her neoadjuvant chemotherapy regimen and surgery. The diagnosis of synovial sarcoma was confirmed by demonstrating the t (X, 18) translocation using polymerase chain reaction. PMID:27046979

  17. Transferrin receptor bearing cells in the peripheral blood of patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed Central

    Salmon, M; Bacon, P A; Symmons, D P; Blann, A D

    1985-01-01

    Activated, proliferating lymphocytes are a feature of rheumatoid arthritis. They are present both in the synovial membrane and in the peripheral circulation. The expression of transferrin receptors(TFR) is a good marker of cellular proliferation. This study shows increased levels of circulating TFR-bearing lymphocytes in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The TFR+ population contains a disproportionately large number of T4+ cells, leading to a high T4:T8 ratio (5:1 in the TFR+ population, compared to 2:1 in the total circulating pool of lymphocytes). This reflects the pattern found in the rheumatoid synovium and suggests that lymphocyte activation in RA may be an extra-articular phenomenon. The TFR+ population also contains a range of non-T cells, including B cells, and a population bearing phenotypic similarities to natural killer (NK) cells. PMID:3002686

  18. OSCAR-collagen signaling in monocytes plays a proinflammatory role and may contribute to the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Schultz, Heidi S; Guo, Li; Keller, Pernille; Fleetwood, Andrew J; Sun, Mingyi; Guo, Wei; Ma, Chunyan; Hamilton, John A; Bjørkdahl, Olle; Berchtold, Martin W; Panina, Svetlana

    2016-04-01

    Osteoclast-associated receptor (OSCAR) is an activating receptor expressed by human myeloid cells. Collagen type I (ColI) and collagen type II (ColII) serve as ligands for OSCAR. OSCAR-collagen interaction stimulates RANK-dependent osteoclastogenesis. We have recently reported that OSCAR promotes functional maturation of monocyte-derived dendritic cells. OSCAR is upregulated on monocytes from rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients with active disease, and these monocytes show an increased proosteoclastogenic potential. In the current study, we have addressed a functional role for an OSCAR-collagen interaction on monocytes. We show that OSCAR-ColII signaling promoted the survival of monocytes. Moreover, ColII stimulated the release of proinflammatory cytokines by monocytes from healthy donors, which could be completely blocked by an anti-OSCAR monoclonal antibody. Mononuclear cells from the synovial fluid of RA patients plated on ColII secreted TNF-α and IL-8 in an OSCAR-dependent manner. Global RNA profiling showed that components of multiple signaling pathways relevant to RA pathogenesis are regulated at the transcriptional level by OSCAR in monocytes. Thus, OSCAR can play a proinflammatory role in monocyte-derived cells and may contribute crucially on multiple levels to RA pathogenesis. PMID:26786702

  19. Hyaluronan secretion into the synovial cavity of rabbit knees and comparison with albumin turnover.

    PubMed Central

    Coleman, P J; Scott, D; Ray, J; Mason, R M; Levick, J R

    1997-01-01

    1. Hyaluronan is not only a lubricant but also enhances the synovial lining's resistance to fluid outflow. This finding led to the proposal that hyaluronan (> 2 x 10(6) Da, approximately 210 nm radius) may escape across the synovial lining less freely than smaller solutes (e.g. albumin, 6.7 x 10(4) Da, 3.6 nm radius) or water. Here multiple washouts were used to measure intraarticular hyaluronan mass and secretion rate in rabbit knees, leading to an estimate of hyaluronan turnover time. Plasma albumin permeation into the joint cavity was also measured to enable comparison of turnover times between molecules of very disparate size. 2. Endogenous hyaluronan mass in the joint cavity, analysed by high performance liquid chromatography of joint washes, was 182 +/- 9.9 micrograms (mean +/- S.E.M; n = 21). Since hyaluronan concentration in synovial fluid averages 3.62 +/- 0.19 micrograms microliters-1, the endogenous synovial fluid volume was calculated to be 50 microliters (mass/concentration), about double the aspiratable volume. 3. The hyaluronan secretion rate over 4 h was 4.80 +/- 0.77 micrograms h-1 (n = 5). The rate was significantly higher in contralateral joints expanded by 2 ml Ringer solution (5.80 +/- 0.84 micrograms h-1, n = 5, P = 0.01, Student's paired t test), indicating a stretch/hydration sensitive secretory mechanism. The newly secreted chains ((2.05-2.48) x 10(6) Da) were not significantly different in length from the endogenous chains (2.95 x 10(6) Da). 4. Hyaluronan turnover time, calculated as mass/secretion rate, was 31.4-37.9 h. This is more than an order of magnitude longer than turnover time for intra-articular albumin. The latter, determined from the intra-articular albumin mass and plasma-to-cavity permeation rate was 1.8 h (95% confidence intervals 1.2-3.5 h, n = 9). The big difference in turnover times support the view that, relative to albumin and water, hyaluronan is partially sieved out and retained in the joint cavity by the synovial

  20. Quantification of joint inflammation in rheumatoid arthritis by time-resolved diffuse optical spectroscopy and tracer kinetic modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ioussoufovitch, Seva; Morrison, Laura B.; Lee, Ting-Yim; St. Lawrence, Keith; Diop, Mamadou

    2015-03-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is characterized by chronic synovial inflammation, which can cause progressive joint damage and disability. Diffuse optical spectroscopy (DOS) and imaging have the potential to become potent monitoring tools for RA. We devised a method that combined time-resolved DOS and tracer kinetics modeling to rapidly and reliably quantify blood flow in the joint. Preliminary results obtained from two animals show that the technique can detect joint inflammation as early as 5 days after onset.

  1. A case of emphysematous pyelonephritis in a patient with rheumatoid arthritis taking corticosteroid and low-dose methotrexate.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Hiroshi; Suzuki, Ryoma; Asano, Tomoyuki; Shio, Kiori; Iwadate, Haruyo; Kobayashi, Hiroko; Matsuoka, Toshimitsu; Aikawa, Ken; Ohira, Hiromasa

    2010-05-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a systemic autoimmune disease that is characterized by chronic synovial inflammation. Patients with RA have increased risk of infection; this is related to RA itself or the adverse effects of medication. In this report, we describe a case of emphysematous pyelonephritis in a patient with RA associated with AA amyloidosis and steroid-induced diabetes mellitus who was taking corticosteroid and low-dose methotrexate. PMID:20536605

  2. The pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis in radiological studies. Part II: Imaging studies in rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Zaniewicz-Kaniewska, Katarzyna; Warczyńska, Agnieszka; Matuszewska, Genowefa; Saied, Fadhil; Kunisz, Wojciech

    2012-01-01

    Early diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis followed by early initiation of treatment, prevent the destruction of joints and progression to disability in the majority of patients. A traditional X-ray fails to capture early inflammatory changes, while late changes (e.g. erosions) appear after a significant delay, once 20–30% of bone mass has been lost. Sonography and magnetic resonance imaging studies have shown that erosions are seen in the first 3 months from the appearance of symptoms in 10–26% of patients, while in 75% they are seen in the first 2 years of the disease. Power Doppler ultrasound and dynamic magnetic resonance studies allow for qualitative, semiquantitative and quantitative monitoring of the vascularization of the synovium. In addition, magnetic resonance enables assessment of the bone marrow. The ultrasonographic examination using a state-of-the-art apparatus with a high-frequency probe allows for images with great spatial resolution and for the visualization of soft tissues and bone surfaces. However, the changes seen in ultrasonography (synovial pathologies, the presence of exudate, tendons changes, cartilage and bone lesions, pathologies of tendon attachments and ligaments – enthesopathies) are not only specific for rheumatoid arthritis and occur in other rheumatic diseases. Qualitative methods are sufficient for diagnosing the disease through ultrasound or magnetic resonance imaging. Whereas semiquantitative and quantitative scales serve to monitor the disease course – efficacy of conservative treatment and qualification for radioisotope synovectomy or surgical synovectomy – and to assess treatment efficacy. PMID:26673409

  3. Historical observations contributing insights on etiopathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis and role of rheumatoid factor.

    PubMed

    Tan, Eng M; Smolen, Josef S

    2016-09-19

    When studies on rheumatoid arthritis (RA) that were made many decades ago and could be considered "historical" in nature are analyzed in the context of recent observations, important insights on RA and on the function of rheumatoid factor (RF) become apparent. RF in the role of antibody to immune complexes (ICs) appears to be involved in activation of the complement system and in the production of chemotactic and inflammatory mediators, creating a condition that can be sustained and reinitiated. In the synovial cavity, a state of nonresolving inflammation is produced with the formation of citrullinated protein antigen-antibody complexes or other forms of ICs. This is followed by a second wave of IC production in the form of RF acting as antibody reactive with the initial ICs. Both of these processes are associated with complement consumption and production of inflammatory mediators. We present a model of an initiation phase of RA that might represent an example of repetitive formation of ICs and complement-mediated inflammation. Targeting therapy at this phase of RA to break the cycles of recurrent inflammation might be a novel approach to aid in further control of the disease. PMID:27621417

  4. Synovial sarcoma presenting as iliotibial band friction syndrome.

    PubMed

    Mesiha, Mena; Bauer, Thomas; Andrish, Jack

    2009-10-01

    Iliotibial band friction syndrome is a common entity that is often quickly diagnosed in orthopedic clinics. However, synovial sarcoma is an elusive clinical entity that appears around many joints with variable presentations. This case report is an example of a patient with a classic presentation of iliotibial band friction syndrome that was diagnosed as a synovial sarcoma on further investigation.

  5. Synovial chondromatosis in a great horned owl (Bubo virginianus).

    PubMed

    Howard, M O; Nieves, M A; Miles, K G

    1996-04-01

    A case of synovial chondromatosis in a great horned owl (Bubo virginianus) was found in June 1993. In radiographs of bilateral swelling of the scapulohumeral joint we observed numerous mineralized foci in the soft tissue. The foci were identified by light microscopy as cartilaginous metaplasia. This is the first report of synovial chondromatosis in an owl. PMID:8722282

  6. Rheumatoid vasculitis - Case report.

    PubMed

    Pecly, Inah Maria Drummond; Ocampo, Juan Felipe; Ramirez, Guillermo Pandales; de Oliveira, Hedi Marinho de Melo Guedes; Saud, Claudia Guerra Murad; Arantes, Milton Dos Reis

    2015-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic systemic inflammatory autoimmune disease and its main manifestation is persistent synovitis affecting peripheral joints symmetrically, In spite of its destructive potential, the evolution of RA is highly variable. Some patients may have only a short-term process oligoarticular with minimum lesion, while others suffers a polyarthritis evolving with progressive and continuous involvement of other organ systems such as skin, heart, lungs, muscles and blood vessels rarely leading to rheumatoid vasculitis. The aim of this study was to describe a case of rheumatoid vasculitis a rare and severe condition.

  7. Pre-tibial synovial cyst after reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament: case report.

    PubMed

    Bulisani, Luís Eduardo Pedigoni; Bulisani, Erickson

    2014-01-01

    Arthroscopic reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament has been modernized through new surgical techniques and new materials. When tibial fixation is performed using an absorbable screw, complications may occur, such as formation of a pre-tibial cyst. The case described here is about a patient who presented an anteromedial synovial cyst in his right knee, three years after having undergone ACL reconstruction. The patient did not present any pain nor any complaints other than a mass that progressively increased in size, worsened after physical activities. Imaging examinations were requested: simple radiography of the knee and magnetic resonance. Anteromedial imaging of the knee showed a mass with well-delimited borders and internal fluid content, suggestive of a synovial cyst, with communication with the joint cavity through the tibial tunnel, without presenting enlargement or absorption of the bone tunnel. The cyst was surgically resected and the tibial tunnel occlusion was performed using a bone plug. The diagnosis of a synovial cyst was subsequently confirmed through the results from the anatomopathological examination. The patient presented good clinical evolution, with disappearance of the symptoms and a return to physical activities. PMID:26229880

  8. Pre-tibial synovial cyst after reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament: case report.

    PubMed

    Bulisani, Luís Eduardo Pedigoni; Bulisani, Erickson

    2014-01-01

    Arthroscopic reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament has been modernized through new surgical techniques and new materials. When tibial fixation is performed using an absorbable screw, complications may occur, such as formation of a pre-tibial cyst. The case described here is about a patient who presented an anteromedial synovial cyst in his right knee, three years after having undergone ACL reconstruction. The patient did not present any pain nor any complaints other than a mass that progressively increased in size, worsened after physical activities. Imaging examinations were requested: simple radiography of the knee and magnetic resonance. Anteromedial imaging of the knee showed a mass with well-delimited borders and internal fluid content, suggestive of a synovial cyst, with communication with the joint cavity through the tibial tunnel, without presenting enlargement or absorption of the bone tunnel. The cyst was surgically resected and the tibial tunnel occlusion was performed using a bone plug. The diagnosis of a synovial cyst was subsequently confirmed through the results from the anatomopathological examination. The patient presented good clinical evolution, with disappearance of the symptoms and a return to physical activities.

  9. Abundant lubricin expression suggests a link between synoviocytes, synovial tumors, and myxomas.

    PubMed

    Solka, Kathryn A; Schmid, Thomas M; Miller, Ira J

    2016-10-01

    Progenitor cell differentiation into fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLSs) and their ensuing phenotypic changes are incompletely explored. Synovial lining is composed of intimal macrophages and FLSs. FLSs have epithelioid morphology and directionally secrete components of synovial fluid, including lubricin. We stained human tissues and tumors using two anti-lubricin antibodies. Lubricin was found in FLSs in synovium and in tenosynovial giant cell tumors (TSGCTs) and not in the associated monocyte/macrophage cells, which were identified by double immunostaining for CD163. In TSGCTs, giant cells, known to form by fusion of mononuclear cells, were negative for both lubricin and CD163. Occasional mononuclear cells with the same phenotype were also seen, suggesting that the precursors of the giant cells are derived from the minor CD163-negative monocyte subset. Lubricin was also detected in intramuscular myxomas, in early myxoid changes of ganglion cysts, and in one of five low-grade myxofibrosarcomas, but not in other fibroconnective tissues, epithelial tissues, or other tumors tested. This suggests that lubricin expression may typify adaptive and neoplastic changes along a pathway toward FLSs. Further support for this concept comes from ganglion cysts and juxta-articular myxoma tumors, which show a spectrum of myxoid, cystic and synovial differentiation, and in which moderate lubricin staining of myxoid stroma was seen.

  10. Growth-related gene product {alpha}: A chemotactic cytokine for neutrophils in rheumatoid arthritis

    SciTech Connect

    Koch, A.E.; Pope, R.M. |; Shah, M.R.; Hosaka, S.

    1995-10-01

    Leukocyte recruitment is critical in the inflammation seen in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). To determine whether the chemokine growth-related gene product {alpha} (gro{alpha}) plays a role in this process, we examined synovial tissue (ST), synovial fluid (SF), and plasma samples from 102 patients with arthritis. RA SF contained more antigenic gro{alpha} (mean 5.3 {+-} 1.9 ng/ml) than did SFs from either osteoarthritis (OA) or other forms of arthritis (mean 0.1 ng/ml) (p < 0.05). RA plasma contained more gro{alpha} (mean 4.3 {+-} 1.8 ng/ml) than normal plasma (mean 0.1 ng/ml) (p < 0.05). RA ST fibroblasts (1.2 x 10{sup 5}/cells/ml RPMI 1640/24 h) produced antigenic gro{alpha} (mean 0.2 {+-} 0.1 ng/ml), and this production was increased significantly upon incubation with TNF-{alpha} (mean 1.3 {+-} 0.3 ng/ml) or IL-1{beta} (mean 2.3 {+-} 0.6 ng/ml) (p < 0.05). Cells from RA SF also produced gro{alpha}: neutrophils (PMNs) (10{sup 7} cells/ml/24 h) produced 3.7 {+-} 0.7 ng/ml. RA SF mononuclear cells produced gro{alpha}, particularly upon incubation with LPS or PHA. Immunoreactive ST gro{alpha} was found in greater numbers of RA compared with either OA or normal lining cells, as well as in RA compared with OA subsynovial macrophages (p < 0.05). IL-8 accounted for a mean of 36% of the RA SF chemotactic activity for PMNs, while epithelial neutrophil-activating peptide-78 accounted for 34%, and gro{alpha} for 28%, of this activity. Combined neutralization of all three chemokines in RA SFs resulted in a mean decrease of 50% of the chemotactic activity for PMNs present in the RA SFs. These results indicate that gro{alpha} plays an important role in the ingress of PMNs into the RA joint. 54 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Rheumatoid arthritis: identifying and characterising polymorphisms using rat models

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic inflammatory joint disorder characterised by erosive inflammation of the articular cartilage and by destruction of the synovial joints. It is regulated by both genetic and environmental factors, and, currently, there is no preventative treatment or cure for this disease. Genome-wide association studies have identified ∼100 new loci associated with rheumatoid arthritis, in addition to the already known locus within the major histocompatibility complex II region. However, together, these loci account for only a modest fraction of the genetic variance associated with this disease and very little is known about the pathogenic roles of most of the risk loci identified. Here, we discuss how rat models of rheumatoid arthritis are being used to detect quantitative trait loci that regulate different arthritic traits by genetic linkage analysis and to positionally clone the underlying causative genes using congenic strains. By isolating specific loci on a fixed genetic background, congenic strains overcome the challenges of genetic heterogeneity and environmental interactions associated with human studies. Most importantly, congenic strains allow functional experimental studies be performed to investigate the pathological consequences of natural genetic polymorphisms, as illustrated by the discovery of several major disease genes that contribute to arthritis in rats. We discuss how these advances have provided new biological insights into arthritis in humans. PMID:27736747

  12. Synovial chondromatosis of the temporomandibular joint.

    PubMed

    Reyes Macías, Juan Francisco; Sánchez Prieto, Martín

    2007-01-01

    Synovial Chondromatosis (SC) is a disease whose etiology is unknown, can be defined as a benign synovial process characterized by the formation of metaplastic cartilaginous nodes inside connective tissue of articular surfaces, is considered an active metaplastic phenomenon better than a neoplastic process; it presents a greater preference to affect women who constitute almost 70% of reported cases, the age range is wide and oscillates between 18-75 years (average 44.6 years). Between the main clinical findings are: pain, crackle, volume augmentation and a limited buccal opening. SC is an unusual state and the reports in the English literature are no more than 75 cases, only 66 of those where histologically verified, most of those were affecting great joints like hip, knee and shoulder, but if SC is not frequent in this sites, is even more infrequent on temporomandibular joint. The aim of this paper is to report a clinical case and at the same time to realize a brief review of the literature.

  13. Rheumatoid Meningitis: Diagnostic and Therapeutic Observations.

    PubMed

    Stretz, Christoph; Song, Xianyuan; Killory, Brendan D; Ollenschleger, Martin D; Nouh, Amre M

    2016-03-01

    A 75-year-old female with untreated rheumatoid arthritis presented with two weeks of behavioral changes and cognitive decline. A neurologic examination showed severe encephalopathy, brisk reflexes, and bilateral Babinski sign. A contrast-enhanced brain MRI demonstrated right meningeal enhancement and periventricular white matter disease. A computed tomographic angiogram (CTA) of the head and neck was negative for vasculitis. The cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) demonstrated lymphocytic pleocytosis. The patient's serum rheumatoid factor levels were elevated. A biopsy of the leptomeninges and cortex showed lymphocytic vasculitis of the cortical tissue and patchy lymphoplasmacytic infiltrates of dural small vessels consistent with rheumatoid meningitis. The patient received pulse-dose steroids followed by cyclophosphamide infusions. At her three month follow-up appointment, the patient's mental status had improved mildly. A follow-up brain MRI showed resolution of enhancement, but progression of subcortical bihemispheric white matter disease. Subsequently, the patient developed a respiratory infection and passed away. In rheumatoid arthritis, symptoms of encephalopathy, headaches, seizures, or focal neurologic deficits should raise suspicion for CNS involvement. This potentially treatable disease warrants prompt diagnosis.

  14. Sonographic cutoff values for detection of abnormalities in small, medium and large joints: a comparative study between patients with rheumatoid arthritis and healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Machado, Flávia Soares; Furtado, Rita Nely Vilar; Takahashi, Rogerio Diniz; de Buosi, Ana Leticia Pirosi; Natour, Jamil

    2015-04-01

    To determine ultrasound measurements indicative of abnormalities in small, medium and large joints, we conducted a cross-sectional study comparing 60 patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and 78 healthy volunteers. A MyLab 60 ultrasound machine (Esaote) and a linear multifrequency probe were used. Quantitative measurements of synovial recesses and semiquantitative measurements of synovial hyperplasia, power Doppler and bone erosion (scores = 0-3) were performed. The cutoff values for synovial recesses indicating RA (receiver operating characteristic curve, area under the curve >0.800) were found to be (radiocarpal) 3.78 mm and (ulnocarpal) 3.07 mm. Those measurements with the greatest chance of indicating RA (logistic regression analysis expressed as odds ratios [ORs]) were (p < 0.001) measurements of synovial hyperplasia (ulnocarpal, OR = 100, and radiocarpal, OR = 70); synovial power Doppler (radiocarpal, OR = 66); synovial bone erosion (radiocarpal, OR = 324); fifth metatarsophalangeal joint (OR = 100); and second metacarpophalangeal joint (OR = 92). We concluded that for both quantitative and semiquantitative ultrasound measurements, radiocarpal abnormalities increase the chance of detecting RA.

  15. Synovial Sarcoma in Head and Neck: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Fonseca, Adriano Santana; Azevedo, Amanda Canário Andrade; Magalhães, Fabíola Moreira; Andrade, Nilvano Alves de

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Synovial sarcoma is a malignant tumor of mesenchymal pluripotent cells. Objectives We present a case of synovial sarcoma in the posterolateral wall of the oropharynx. Resumed report The patient, a 23-year-old woman, was admitted with a history of dysphagia and difficulty in breathing for 8 months, resulting in progressive deterioration and onset of snoring, muffled voice, and local pain. An oropharyngeal tumor in the left posterolateral wall touched the base of the ipsilateral tongue. The patient underwent endoscopic pharyngectomy to remove the lesion. Pathologic examination revealed synovial sarcoma with positive margins, and Mohs technique was proposed for margin control. The margins were disease-free, without the need for total laryngectomy. The pharynx was reconstructed with a microvascular forearm flap. The patient developed postoperative stability. Conclusion Despite its name, synovial sarcoma is rarely sourced directly from synovial membranes. It is most commonly found in the vicinity of large joints. The location at the head and neck, a location poor in synovial tissue, is unusual. Synovial sarcoma in the head and neck has an aggressive nature and poor prognosis. Resection with negative margins remains the foundation of therapy, which is not so easily achieved in the head and neck. It is important for the otorhinolaryngologist and head and neck surgeon to be familiar with this aggressive tumor, which carries high mortality and morbidity. The appropriate diagnosis and treatment can improve prognosis and patient survival. PMID:25992071

  16. Rheumatoid arthritis and periodontitis – inflammatory and infectious connections. Review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Rutger Persson, G.

    2012-01-01

    An association between oral disease/periodontitis and rheumatoid arthritis (RA) has been considered since the early 1820s. The early treatment was tooth eradication. Epidemiological studies suggest that the prevalence of RA and periodontitis may be similar and about 5% of the population are aged 50 years or older. RA is considered as an autoimmune disease whereas periodontitis has an infectious etiology with a complex inflammatory response. Both diseases are chronic and may present with bursts of disease activity. Association studies have suggested odds ratios of having RA and periodontitis varying from 1.8:1 (95% CI: 1.0–3.2, NS) to 8:1 (95% CI: 2.9–22.1, p<0.001). Genetic factors are driving the host responses in both RA and periodontitis. Tumor necrosis factor-α, a proinflammatory cytokine, regulates a cascade of inflammatory events in both RA and periodontitis. Porphyromonas gingivalis is a common pathogen in periodontal infection. P. gingivalis has also been identified in synovial fluid. The specific abilities of P. gingivalis to citrullinate host peptides by proteolytic cleavage at Arg-X peptide bonds by arginine gingipains can induce autoimmune responses in RA through development of anticyclic citrullinated peptide antibodies. In addition, P. gingivalis carries heat shock proteins (HSPs) that may also trigger autoimmune responses in subjects with RA. Data suggest that periodontal therapies combined with routine RA treatments further improve RA status. Conclusions Periodontal infection (P. gingivalis) carries a unique risk for development of autoimmune antibodies associated with RA. Patients with RA have either lost many teeth or usually have severe periodontitis. Additional research, both in regards to basic mechanisms as well as clinical studies, are necessary before it can be said that there are causative links between RA and periodontitis. Cross-disciplinary research in well-defined populations should be performed to further enhance knowledge and

  17. Crystal Structures of T Cell Receptor (Beta) Chains Related to Rheumatoid Arthritis

    SciTech Connect

    Li,H.; van Vranken, S.; Zhao, Y.; Li, Z.; Guo, Y.; Eisele, L.; Li, Y.

    2005-01-01

    The crystal structures of the V{beta}17+ {beta} chains of two human T cell receptors (TCRs), originally derived from the synovial fluid (SF4) and tissue (C5-1) of a patient with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), have been determined in native (SF4) and mutant (C5-1{sub F104{yields}Y/C187{yields}S}) forms, respectively. These TCR {beta} chains form homo-dimers in solution and in crystals. Structural comparison reveals that the main-chain conformations in the CDR regions of the C5-1 and SF4 V{beta}17 closely resemble those of a V{beta}17 JM22 in a bound form; however, the CDR3 region shows different conformations among these three V{beta}17 structures. At the side-chain level, conformational differences were observed at the CDR2 regions between our two ligand-free forms and the bound JM22 form. Other significant differences were observed at the V{beta} regions 8-12, 40-44, and 82-88 between C5-1/SF4 and JM22 V{beta}17, implying that there is considerable variability in the structures of very similar {beta} chains. Structural alignments also reveal a considerable variation in the V{beta}-C{beta} associations, and this may affect ligand recognition. The crystal structures also provide insights into the structure basis of T cell recognition of Mycoplasma arthritidis mitogen (MAM), a superantigen that may be implicated in the development of human RA. Structural comparisons of the V{beta} domains of known TCR structures indicate that there are significant similarities among V{beta} regions that are MAM-reactive, whereas there appear to be significant structural differences among those V{beta} regions that lack MAM-reactivity. It further reveals that CDR2 and framework region (FR) 3 are likely to account for the binding of TCR to MAM.

  18. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    MedlinePlus

    ... Arthritis Educational Video Series Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series This series of five videos was designed to help you ... Educational Videos for Patients Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series Psoriatic Arthritis 101 2010 E.S.C.A.P. ...

  19. siRNA targeting PLK-1 induces apoptosis of synoviocytes in rheumatoid arthritis

    SciTech Connect

    Wada, Makoto; Kawahito, Yutaka . E-mail: kawahity@koto.kpu-m.ac.jp; Kimura, Shinya; Kohno, Masataka; Ishino, Hidetaka; Kimura, Mizuho; Omoto, Atsushi; Yamamoto, Aihiro; Hamaguchi, Masahide; Tsubouchi, Yasunori; Tokunaga, Daisaku; Hojo, Tatsuya; Ashihara, Eishi; Maekawa, Taira; Yoshikawa, Toshikazu

    2007-06-01

    Polo-like kinase-1 (PLK-1) is a member of the PLK family and participates in the control of cell mitosis. Here, we show that immunoreactive PLK-1 is strongly expressed in synoviocytes and some infiltrative mononuclear cells in synovial tissues from patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), while patients with osteoarthritis and injury show little or no expression of PLK-1 in synovial tissues. Western blot analysis shows that PLK is expressed and its expression is enhanced by IL-1{beta} in RA synoviocytes. IL-1{beta} also enhanced the cell growth of RA synoviocytes. Moreover, siRNA targeted against PLK-1 significantly decreases the expression of PLK-1 of RA synoviocytes stimulated by IL-1{beta} and suppresses the proliferation of these synoviocytes through apoptosis. These findings suggest that PLK-1 plays a critical role in the proliferation of RA synoviocytes leading to bone destruction, and siRNA against PLK-1 is potentially useful for the treatment of RA.

  20. The Interplay Between Monocytes/Macrophages and CD4+ T Cell Subsets in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Ceri A.; Dickinson, Abigail K.; Taams, Leonie S.

    2015-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic inflammatory disease characterized by inflammation of the synovial lining (synovitis). The inflammation in the RA joint is associated with and driven by immune cell infiltration, synovial hyperproliferation, and excessive production of proinflammatory mediators, such as tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα), interferon γ (IFNγ), interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, and IL-17, eventually resulting in damage to the cartilage and underlying bone. The RA joint harbors a wide range of immune cell types, including monocytes, macrophages, and CD4+ T cells (both proinflammatory and regulatory). The interplay between CD14+ myeloid cells and CD4+ T cells can significantly influence CD4+ T cell function, and conversely, effector vs. regulatory CD4+ T cell subsets can exert profound effects on monocyte/macrophage function. In this review, we will discuss how the interplay between CD4+ T cells and monocytes/macrophages may contribute to the immunopathology of RA. PMID:26635790

  1. Giant intraosseous cyst-like lesions in rheumatoid arthritis report of a case.

    PubMed

    Lohse, Anne; Carbillet, Jean-Pierre; Onimus, Michel; Stevenel, Françoise; Toussirot, Eric; Wendling, Daniel

    2003-02-01

    The term "intraosseous synovial cyst" is used to designate both the epiphyseal cyst-like lesions seen in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and mucoid cysts, which occur in a different setting. We report the case of a patient in whom a 4-cm cyst-like lesion developed in the left tibia 18 years after onset of RA and 6 years after osmic acid synovectomy of the left knee. Positive contrast arthrography and magnetic resonance imaging visualized a communication between the lesion and the joint space. Preexisting bone and joint lesions and increased intraarticular pressure play a major role in the genesis of cyst-like lesions in RA. In our patient, the osmic acid synovectomy may have contributed to the development of the lesion. "Synovial cyst" is a misnomer for these giant lesions, which are geodes rather than cysts. Despite their low incidence, these lesions deserve attention because they raise diagnostic and therapeutic problems.

  2. Hypoxia-Inducible Factor (HIF) as a Target for Novel Therapies in Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Hua, Susan; Dias, Thilani H

    2016-01-01

    Hypoxia is an important micro-environmental characteristic of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Hypoxia-inducible factors (HIF) are key transcriptional factors that are highly expressed in RA synovium to regulate the adaptive responses to this hypoxic milieu. Accumulating evidence supports hypoxia and HIFs in regulating a number of important pathophysiological characteristics of RA, including synovial inflammation, angiogenesis, and cartilage destruction. Experimental and clinical data have confirmed the upregulation of both HIF-1α and HIF-2α in RA. This review will focus on the differential expression of HIFs within the synovial joint and its functional behavior in different cell types to regulate RA progression. Potential development of new therapeutic strategies targeting HIF-regulated pathways at sites of disease in RA will also be addressed. PMID:27445820

  3. Hypoxia-Inducible Factor (HIF) as a Target for Novel Therapies in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Hua, Susan; Dias, Thilani H.

    2016-01-01

    Hypoxia is an important micro-environmental characteristic of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Hypoxia-inducible factors (HIF) are key transcriptional factors that are highly expressed in RA synovium to regulate the adaptive responses to this hypoxic milieu. Accumulating evidence supports hypoxia and HIFs in regulating a number of important pathophysiological characteristics of RA, including synovial inflammation, angiogenesis, and cartilage destruction. Experimental and clinical data have confirmed the upregulation of both HIF-1α and HIF-2α in RA. This review will focus on the differential expression of HIFs within the synovial joint and its functional behavior in different cell types to regulate RA progression. Potential development of new therapeutic strategies targeting HIF-regulated pathways at sites of disease in RA will also be addressed. PMID:27445820

  4. Extra-articular Synovial Chondromatosis Eroding and Penetrating the Acromion.

    PubMed

    El Rassi, George; Matta, Jihad; Hijjawi, Ayman; Khair, Ousama Abou; Fahs, Sara

    2015-10-01

    Synovial chondromatosis of the shoulder is an uncommon disorder. It usually affects the glenohumeral joint and is characterized by metaplasia of the synovium leading to the formation of osteochondral loose bodies. Few cases of extra-articular subacromial synovial chondromatosis involving the rotator cuff tendon have been reported in the literature. The treatment of previously reported cases consisted of open bursectomy and removal of loose bodies. We report a case of subacromial synovial chondromatosis without rotator cuff involvement but with severe erosion and fracture of the acromion. Treatment consisted of shoulder arthroscopy to remove all loose bodies, total bursectomy, and debridement of the acromion. Potential benefits of arthroscopy were also evaluated. PMID:26697302

  5. Extra-articular Synovial Chondromatosis Eroding and Penetrating the Acromion

    PubMed Central

    El Rassi, George; Matta, Jihad; Hijjawi, Ayman; Khair, Ousama Abou; Fahs, Sara

    2015-01-01

    Synovial chondromatosis of the shoulder is an uncommon disorder. It usually affects the glenohumeral joint and is characterized by metaplasia of the synovium leading to the formation of osteochondral loose bodies. Few cases of extra-articular subacromial synovial chondromatosis involving the rotator cuff tendon have been reported in the literature. The treatment of previously reported cases consisted of open bursectomy and removal of loose bodies. We report a case of subacromial synovial chondromatosis without rotator cuff involvement but with severe erosion and fracture of the acromion. Treatment consisted of shoulder arthroscopy to remove all loose bodies, total bursectomy, and debridement of the acromion. Potential benefits of arthroscopy were also evaluated. PMID:26697302

  6. Synovial joints: from development to homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Longobardi, Lara; Li, Tieshi; Tagliafierro, Lidia; Temple, Joseph D; Willcockson, Helen H; Ye, Ping; Esposito, Alessandra; Xu, Fuhua; Spagnoli, Anna

    2015-02-01

    Synovial joint morphogenesis occurs through the condensation of mesenchymal cells into a non-cartilaginous region known as the interzone and the specification of progenitor cells that commit to the articular fate. Although several signaling molecules are expressed by the interzone, the mechanism is poorly understood. For treatments of cartilage injuries, it is critical to discover the presence of joint progenitor cells in adult tissues and their expression gene pattern. Potential stem cell niches have been found in different joint regions, such as the surface zone of articular cartilage, synovium, and groove of Ranvier. Inherited joint malformations as well as joint-degenerating conditions are often associated with other skeletal defects and may be seen as the failure of morphogenic factors to establish the correct microenvironment in cartilage and bone. Therefore, exploring how joints form can help us understand how cartilage and bone are damaged and develop drugs to reactivate this developing mechanism.

  7. Synovial Joints: from Development to Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Tieshi; Tagliafierro, Lidia; Temple, Joseph D.; Willcockson, Helen H.; Ye, Ping; Esposito, Alessandra; Xu, Fuhua; Spagnoli, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Synovial joint morphogenesis occurs through the condensation of mesenchymal cells into a non-cartilaginous region known as interzone, and the specification of progenitor cells that commit to the articular fate. Although several signaling molecules are expressed by the interzone, the mechanism is poorly understood. For treatments of cartilage injuries, it is critical to discover the presence of joint progenitor cells in adult tissues and their expression gene pattern. Potential stem cells niches have been found in different joint regions, such as the surface zone of articular cartilage, synovium and groove of Ranvier. Inherited joint malformation as well as joint degenerating conditions are often associated with other skeletal defects, and may be seen as the failure of morphogenic factors to establish the correct microenvironment in cartilage and bone. Therefore, exploring how joints form can help us understand how cartilage and bone are damaged and to develop drugs to reactivate this developing mechanism. PMID:25431159

  8. Lyme arthritis. Spirochetes found in synovial microangiopathic lesions.

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, Y. E.; Duray, P. H.; Steere, A. C.; Kashgarian, M.; Buza, J.; Malawista, S. E.; Askenase, P. W.

    1985-01-01

    In 17 patients with Lyme disease, synovial specimens, obtained by synovectomy or needle biopsy, showed nonspecific villous hypertrophy, synovial cell hyperplasia, prominent microvasculature, lymphoplasmacellular infiltration, and sometimes lymphoid follicles. The larger surgically obtained specimens also showed striking deposition of fibrin in synovial stroma and a form of endarteritis obliterans. In 2 patients, spirochetes were seen in and around blood vessels by the Dieterle silver stain. Compared with 55 cases of other synovial disease, obliterative microvascular lesions were seen only in Lyme synovia, but marked stromal deposition of fibrin seemed nonspecific. These findings imply that the Lyme spirochete may survive for years in affected synovium and may be directly responsible for the microvascular injury. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:3966535

  9. Dermatoglyphics in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Ravindranath, Roopa; Shubha, R; Nagesh, H V; Johnson, Job; Rajangam, Sayee

    2003-10-01

    Patients with rheumatoid arthritis have been referred to Division of Human Genetics for counselling. Qualitative dermatoglyphics comprising of finger print pattern, interdigital pattern, hypothenar pattern and palmar crease were studied on 26 female and 11 male rheumatoid arthritis patients. Comparison between patient male and control male; and patient female and control female has been done. 'Chi' square test was performed. In male patients, with hands together, arches were increased, loops/ whorls were decreased. Partial Simian crease was significantly increased. In the right hand, patterns were increased in the 3rd interdigital area. On the other hand, in female patients there was a significant increase in whorls and decrease in loops on the first finger on both the hands, increase in arches on the 3rd finger; both arches and whorls on the 4th finger of left hand. Present study has emphasized that dermatoglyphics could be applied as a diagnostic tool to patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

  10. [Rheumatoid arthritis: a general disease and local diseases].

    PubMed

    Bouysset, Maurice; Noël, Eric; Tebib, Jacques G

    2005-12-15

    The rheumatoid synovitis affects the joints by destroying the cartilage, the sub-chondral bone and the articular capsule. The tendons and ligaments can be degraded by proximity or by the means of the affected synovial sheaths. This conjunction of effects involves a foreseeable degradation on the complex articulations whose clinician must know the stages to interfere effectively into a preventive way by local interventions when the general treatments of the disease are insufficient and before recourse to the repairing surgery. This management can only be considered with a team where the general practitioner has a central place of alarm. Extraarticular symptoms (Sjogren's syndrome, cardiac, pulmonary or renal involvement) are specific local diseases and should be managed appropriately by the general practitioner and referred specialists.

  11. [Molecular mechanisms of bone destruction in rheumatoid arthritis].

    PubMed

    Nanki, Toshihiro

    2007-04-01

    Osteoclast in the synovium of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) plays an important role for bone destruction of the affected joints. The osteoclast is differentiated from macrophage-like synoviocyte, which is migrated from peripheral blood monocytes. In the RA synovium, receptor activator of NF-kappaB ligand (RANKL) which is expressed by T cells and fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLS) and macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) which is expressed by FLS induce the differentiation into osteoclast from macrophage-like synoviocyte. TNF-alpha, interleukin (IL) -1, IL-6, and IL-17 which are expressed by macrophages, FLS, and/or T cells in the synovium enhance the differentiation and activation of the osteoclast. Thus, such synovial cells contribute osteoclastgenesis and bone destruction.

  12. How does Chinese medicine target cytokine imbalance in rheumatoid arthritis?

    PubMed

    Liu, Jian; Sun, Yue

    2013-11-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) manifests as an imbalance between pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines. Cytokine imbalance is suggested to play critical roles in the development of RA. Currently, various treatments for RA, including biological agents such as antibodies against inflammation mediators, or Chinese herbal medicines, intervene the disease by restoring the balance of cytokines. Chinese medicine (CM) can not only suppress the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines, but also induce the expression of cytokines with anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory effects. Thus, Chinese medicine can effectively reduce inflammatory cell infiltration into synovial tissue, pannus formation, and degradation of the extracellular matrix surrounding cartilage cells, thereby reducing subchondral bone damage. This paper reviews the changes of cytokine profiling during development of RA and discuss the mechanisms by which Chinese medicine restores the cytokine balance.

  13. Glucocorticoids and Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Joana Fonseca; Ahmed Mohamed, Alaa Abdelkhalik; Emery, Paul

    2016-02-01

    Glucocorticoids (GCs) were discovered in the 1940s and were administered for the first time to patients with rheumatoid arthritis in 1948. However, side effects were subsequently reported. In the last 7 decades, the mechanisms of action for both therapeutic properties and side effects have been elucidated. Mechanisms for minimizing side effects were also developed. GCs are the most frequently used class of drugs in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis because of their efficacy in relieving symptoms and their low cost. A review of clinical applications, side effects, and drug interactions is presented. PMID:26611549

  14. One year in review 2016: novelties in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Calabrò, Andrea; Caterino, Anna Laura; Elefante, Elena; Valentini, Valentina; Vitale, Antonio; Talarico, Rosaria; Cantarini, Luca; Frediani, Bruno

    2016-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic disease characterised by inflammation of the synovial tissue in joints, which can lead to joint destruction. The primary goal of the treatment is to control pain and inflammation, reduce joint damage and disability, and maintain or improve physical function and quality of life. The present review is aimed at providing a critical analysis of the recent literature on the novelties in the treatment of RA, with a particular focus on the most relevant studies published over the last year. PMID:27268779

  15. The potential role of Chinese medicine in ameliorating extra-articular manifestations of rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jian; Liu, Rui-lian

    2011-10-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic systemic autoimmune disease chiefly affecting synovial membranes of multiple joints. The clinical manifestations are highly variable. Besides joint affection, extra-articular manifestations always occur in RA patients, such as lung, blood vessel, heart, endocrine glands, hematological system, and nervous system affections. In addition to Western medicine therapy, Chinese medicine also plays a significant role in the treatment of RA with good efficacy and less adverse reactions. This paper summarizes the effects of xinfeng capsule, a Chinese medicine, and the mechanisms of its action in ameliorating the extra-articular manifestations based on a series of clinical and experimental researches.

  16. One year in review 2016: novelties in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Calabrò, Andrea; Caterino, Anna Laura; Elefante, Elena; Valentini, Valentina; Vitale, Antonio; Talarico, Rosaria; Cantarini, Luca; Frediani, Bruno

    2016-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic disease characterised by inflammation of the synovial tissue in joints, which can lead to joint destruction. The primary goal of the treatment is to control pain and inflammation, reduce joint damage and disability, and maintain or improve physical function and quality of life. The present review is aimed at providing a critical analysis of the recent literature on the novelties in the treatment of RA, with a particular focus on the most relevant studies published over the last year.

  17. Macrophage heterogeneity in the context of rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Udalova, Irina A; Mantovani, Alberto; Feldmann, Marc

    2016-08-01

    Macrophages are very important in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The increase in the number of sublining macrophages in the synovium is an early hallmark of active rheumatic disease, and high numbers of macrophages are a prominent feature of inflammatory lesions. The degree of synovial macrophage infiltration correlates with the degree of joint erosion, and depletion of these macrophages from inflamed tissue has a profound therapeutic benefit. Research has now uncovered an unexpectedly high level of heterogeneity in macrophage origin and function, and has emphasized the role of environmental factors in their functional specialization. Although the heterogeneous populations of macrophages in RA have not been fully characterized, preliminary results in mouse models of arthritis have contributed to our understanding of the phenotype and ontogeny of synovial macrophages, and to deciphering the properties of monocyte-derived infiltrating and tissue-resident macrophages. Elucidating the molecular mechanisms that drive polarization of macrophages towards proinflammatory or anti-inflammatory phenotypes could lead to identification of signalling pathways that inform future therapeutic strategies. PMID:27383913

  18. MDM4 overexpression contributes to synoviocyte proliferation in patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Nanwei; Wang, Yuji; Li, Dawei; Chen, Guoqiang; Sun, Rongbin; Zhu, Ruixia; Sun, Sai; Liu, Hongwei; Yang, Guang; Dong, Tianhua

    2010-10-22

    Research highlights: {yields} Elevated MDM4 mRNA and protein levels in FLS from patients with RA and OA. {yields} Strong MDM4 staining in synovial cells of inflammatory synovium. {yields} MDM4 knockdown increased p53 and p21 levels, and inhibited the proliferation of RA FLS. {yields} MDM4 overexpression increased p53 while decreased p21 levels, and promoted the growth of RA FLS. -- Abstract: Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic autoimmune disease with features of inflammatory cell infiltration, synovial cell invasive proliferation, and ultimately, irreversible joint destruction. It has been reported that the p53 pathway is involved in RA pathogenesis. MDM4/MDMX is a major negative regulator of p53. To determine whether MDM4 contributes to RA pathogenesis, MDM4 mRNA and protein expression were assessed in fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLS) by real-time PCR, western blotting, and in synovial tissues by immunohistochemistry. Furthermore, MDM4 was knocked down and overexpressed by lentivirus-mediated expression, and the proliferative capacity of FLS was determined by MTS assay. We found that cultured FLS from RA and osteoarthritis (OA) patients exhibited higher levels of MDM4 mRNA and protein expression than those from trauma controls. MDM4 protein was highly expressed in the synovial lining and sublining cells from both types of arthritis. Finally, MDM4 knockdown inhibited the proliferation of RA FLS by enhancing functional p53 levels while MDM4 overexpression promoted the growth of RA FLS by inhibiting p53 effects. Taken together, our results suggest that the abundant expression of MDM4 in FLS may contribute to the hyperplasia phenotype of RA synovial tissues.

  19. Complement fixation by rheumatoid factor.

    PubMed Central

    Tanimoto, K; Cooper, N R; Johnson, J S; Vaughan, J H

    1975-01-01

    The capacity for fixation and activation of hemolytic complement by polyclonal IgM rheumatoid factors (RF) isolated from sera of patients with rheumatoid arthritis and monoclonal IgM-RF isolated from the cryoprecipitates of patients with IgM-IgG mixed cryoglobulinemia was examined. RF mixed with aggregated, reduced, and alkylated human IgG (Agg-R/A-IgG) in the fluid phase failed to significantly reduce the level of total hemolytic complement, CH50, or of individual complement components, C1, C2, C3, and C5. However, sheep erythrocytes (SRC) coated with Agg-R/A-IgG or with reduced and alkylated rabbit IgG anti-SRC antibody were hemolyzed by complement in the presence of polyclonal IgM-RF. Human and guinea pig complement worked equally well. The degree of hemolysis was in direct proportion to the hemagglutination titer of the RF against the same coated cells. Monoclonal IgM-RF, normal human IgM, and purified Waldenström macroglobulins without antiglobulin activity were all inert. Hemolysis of coated SRC by RF and complement was inhibited by prior treatment of the complement source with chelating agents, hydrazine, cobra venom factor, specific antisera to C1q, CR, C5, C6, or C8, or by heating at 56 degrees C for 30 min. Purified radiolabeled C4, C3, and C8 included in the complement source were bound to hemolysed SRC in direct proportion to the degree of hemolysis. These data indicate that polyclonal IgM-RF fix and activate complement via the classic pathway. The system described for assessing complement fixation by isolated RF is readily adaptable to use with whole human serum. PMID:1078825

  20. Comparison of low-field dedicated extremity magnetic resonance imaging with articular ultrasonography in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Horikoshi, Masanobu; Suzuki, Takeshi; Sugihara, Makoto; Kondo, Yuya; Tsuboi, Hiroto; Uehara, Takeaki; Hama, Maasa; Takase, Kaoru; Ohno, Shigeru; Ishigatsubo, Yoshiaki; Yoshida, Yuri; Sagawa, Akira; Ikeda, Kei; Ota, Toshiyuki; Matsumoto, Isao; Ito, Satoshi; Sumida, Takayuki

    2010-12-01

    To compare magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and ultrasonography (US) in the detection of joint inflammation of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), 6 patients with RA were examined by US and low-field 0.3-T nonenhanced dedicated extremity MRI (compacTscan). All patients were females, with mean age of 50.2 years, mean disease duration of 13.5 years, and mean disease activity score (DAS)28-CRP of 1.78. Each patient was treated with either infliximab, etanercept, adalimumab, or tocilizumab. Intercarpal joints, radioulnar joints, second through fifth proximal interphalangeal (PIP) joints, and first through fifth metacarpophalangeal (MCP) joints (a total of 132 joints, 22 joints in each patient) were assessed by MRI for presence of joint inflammation. A total of 156 joints (24 first interphalangeal and radiocarpal joints plus the above 132 joints), were assessed by grayscale US (GS-US) and power Doppler US (PD-US) for presence of joint inflammation by two trained ultrasonographers. We assessed correlations between joint inflammations on MRI and GS-US/PD-US, and also interobserver correlation between the two ultrasonographers by calculating intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC). Synovial hypertrophy and/or synovial fluid was detected in 74/156 joints on GS-US, and synovitis was detected in 10/156 joints on PD-US and in 38/132 joints on MRI. Using PD-US as a reference, sensitivity of MRI in detection of synovitis was 80%. Using MRI as a reference, sensitivity of PD-US was 21%. Specificity of PD-US was higher than that of MRI. Overall agreement between GS-US and MRI and between PD-US and MRI was 0.56 and 0.76, respectively, suggesting that results of PD-US are close to those of MRI. ICC was 0.545 for GS-US and 0.807 for PD-US, suggesting specificity of PD-US in detecting joint inflammation. Our results show that findings of PD-US correlated with those of MRI. Low-field MRI and PD-US are useful tools for assessment of patients with RA.

  1. Quantitative image analysis of synovial tissue.

    PubMed

    van der Hall, Pascal O; Kraan, Maarten C; Tak, Paul Peter

    2007-01-01

    Quantitative image analysis is a form of imaging that includes microscopic histological quantification, video microscopy, image analysis, and image processing. Hallmarks are the generation of reliable, reproducible, and efficient measurements via strict calibration and step-by-step control of the acquisition, storage and evaluation of images with dedicated hardware and software. Major advantages of quantitative image analysis over traditional techniques include sophisticated calibration systems, interaction, speed, and control of inter- and intraobserver variation. This results in a well controlled environment, which is essential for quality control and reproducibility, and helps to optimize sensitivity and specificity. To achieve this, an optimal quantitative image analysis system combines solid software engineering with easy interactivity with the operator. Moreover, the system also needs to be as transparent as possible in generating the data because a "black box design" will deliver uncontrollable results. In addition to these more general aspects, specifically for the analysis of synovial tissue the necessity of interactivity is highlighted by the added value of identification and quantification of information as present in areas such as the intimal lining layer, blood vessels, and lymphocyte aggregates. Speed is another important aspect of digital cytometry. Currently, rapidly increasing numbers of samples, together with accumulation of a variety of markers and detection techniques has made the use of traditional analysis techniques such as manual quantification and semi-quantitative analysis unpractical. It can be anticipated that the development of even more powerful computer systems with sophisticated software will further facilitate reliable analysis at high speed.

  2. Leptin consumption in the inflamed joints of patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Bokarewa, M; Bokarew, D; Hultgren, O; Tarkowski, A

    2003-01-01

    Background: Leptin has been shown to participate in bone remodelling and leptin substitution reported to have a protective effect in experimental septic arthritis. Objective: To assess leptin levels in inflamed joints and plasma of patients with RA. Material and methods: Leptin concentrations were assessed in matched blood and synovial fluid samples from 76 patients with RA. Blood samples from 34 healthy subjects acted as additional controls. Results were analysed and correlated with duration and activity of RA, x ray changes, and treatment at time of sampling. Results: In patients with RA, leptin levels were significantly higher in plasma than in synovial fluid samples obtained simultaneously and higher than in control samples. Plasma and synovial fluid leptin levels correlated strongly. Locally in the joint, leptin levels were related to WBC count. Such a relation was not seen in the bloodstream. Leptin levels were not related to sex, age, or disease duration. Difference between leptin levels in plasma and synovial fluid was greater in non-erosive arthritis (5.1 (SEM 1.2) v 3.7 (0.9) ng/ml, p=0.006), than in patients with erosive joint disease (6.2 (1.0) v 5.4 (0.8) ng/ml, NS). Methotrexate treatment was associated with relatively high plasma leptin levels, while treatment with other DMARDs was associated with lower leptin levels than in patients receiving no DMARD treatment (p=0.0005). Conclusions: Leptin production was significantly increased in patients with RA compared with healthy controls. Synovial fluid leptin levels were significantly lower than in matched plasma samples, suggesting an in situ consumption of this molecule. PMID:12972473

  3. [Mechanisms of osteoporosis development in patients with rheumatoid arthritis].

    PubMed

    Matuszewska, Agnieszka; Szechiński, Jacek

    2014-02-04

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is progressive, chronic, autoimmune, systemic connective tissue disease. It affects 0,5-1% population. RA manifests as inflammation of symmetrical mainly small and medium joints with synovial hypertrophy, extra-articular lesions and systemic complications. Depending on intensity and duration of RA in imaging studies the patients demonstrate narrowing of articular fissures, presence of geodes, erosions, subluxations and/or synostoses. Progressive bone mass loss in the joint involved by the morbid process and in the entire skeleton was also described. Local (periarticular) osteoporosis is linked to the presence of cytokines and growth factors, which regulate reciprocal interactions between osteoclasts, osteoblasts and immune system cells. In the inflamed joint accumulate synoviocytes of fibroblast phenotype, synoviocytes of macrophage phenotype, antigen presenting cells, lymphocytes T, activated lymphocytes B, plasma cells and neutrophils. Increased expression of receptor activator of nuclear factor κB (RANKL), macrophage-colony stimulating factor (M-CSF), presence of TNFα, IL-1, IL-6, IL-7, IL-17 influences pathological loss of bone mass. Rheumatoid arthritis is an important risk factor of generalised osteoporosis and fractures, involved in FRAX (fracture risk assessment) algorythm. Generalised osteoporosis in patients with RA has a multifactorial aetiology. Its development reflects effects of both: factors linked to the disease (presence of proinflammatory cytokines, disability of the patients, applied therapy) and classical risk factors of osteoporosis (e.g. advanced age, sex, post-menopausal period, genetic predisposition, low peak bone mass, low body weight, deficiency of calcium and vitamin D, tobacco smoking).

  4. Photodynamic damage to cartilage and synovial tissue grafted on a chick's chorioallantoic membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, M.; Nahir, A. M.; Kimel, Sol

    1997-09-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic inflammatory disease of the synovial joints causing pain deformities and disability. The highly vascular inflamed synovium has aggressive and destructive characteristics, it invades, erodes and gradually destroys cartilage and underlying bone. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) was performed using the chick chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) model to investigate the vitality of synovium and cartilage implanted on the CAM. Synovium, obtained from human patients, was grafted onto the CAM; gross microscopy and histology proved its vitality 7 days post grafting. Cartilage obtained from rabbit knee joint was also maintained on the CAM for 7 days. Its vitality was demonstrated by histology and by measuring metabolic and enzymatic activity of cartilage cells (chondrocytes) as well as the collagen and proteoglycans content. Selective PDT was performed using aluminum phthalocyanine tetrasulfonate (AlPcS4), a hydrophilic compound, soluble in biological solutions, as a photosensitizer. After irradiation with a diode laser (lambda equals 670 nm, 10 mW) damage was observed in vascularized synovium grafts, whereas avascular cartilage remained intact.

  5. Efficacy of radiation synovectomy (radiosynovectomy or radiosynoviorthesis) with yttrium-90 in exudative inflammation of synovial membrane of knee joints in patients with rheumatic diseases – preliminary report

    PubMed Central

    Węgierska, Małgorzata; Barczyńska, Tacjana; Waszczak, Marzena; Żuchowski, Paweł; Jeka, Sławomir

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Hypertrophic and exudative synovitis of the knee is one of the earliest symptoms in rheumatic diseases. In the case of pharmacotherapy failure, other methods which directly remove the inflamed synovial membrane are used – synovectomies. Radiosynovectomy (RSV) is the radiopharmaceutical application of colloidal solution to joint cavities. In this study, the authors assessed the efficacy of knee radiosynovectomy with yttrium-90 (Y-90) in several groups of patients divided into certain rheumatic diseases. Material and methods The study group consisted of 70 patients aged from 29 to 65 years with hypertrophic and exudative synovitis of the knee in rheumatic diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, osteoarthrosis and spondyloarthropathies. Radiopharmaceutical colloid of Y-90, with a radiation dose of 185-222 MBq in a volume of 2-3 ml, was administered to joint. Then the knee joint was immobilized for 72 h. During visits V1, V2, V3 and V4, erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) and C-reactive protein (CRP) were measured and ultrasound of the knee was performed. Disease activity was evaluated by the WOMAC scale, HAQ and 100-mm visual analog scale (VAS). Results The most significant difference of synovial hypertrophy, before and after the procedure, was obtained in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Variability of effusion before and after the procedure in all groups was comparable and statistically significant. The greatest improvement in variability of inflammatory parameters, before and 4 weeks after radiosynovectomy, was observed in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Conclusions In the therapeutic algorithm radiosynovectomy should be located between conservative treatment and operative procedures. Radiosynovectomy does not require hospitalization or prolonged rehabilitation. Radiosynoviorthesis affects the patient's general condition, which is associated with eliminating pain and restoring joint function. PMID:27407269

  6. CD26 surface molecule involvement in T cell activation and lymphokine synthesis in rheumatoid and other inflammatory synovitis.

    PubMed

    Gerli, R; Muscat, C; Bertotto, A; Bistoni, O; Agea, E; Tognellini, R; Fiorucci, G; Cesarotti, M; Bombardieri, S

    1996-07-01

    T cell surface expression and the functional role of CD26 antigen (Ag), a surface ectoenzyme involved in T cell activation and migration across the extracellular matrix, were analyzed in the peripheral blood (PB) and synovial fluid (SF) from patients with inflammatory arthritides. CD26 membrane expression on T cells was detected by cytofluorometry using two different monoclonal antibodies, anti-Ta1 and anti-1F7, while cell proliferation and both IL-2 and IFN-gamma production were evaluated in anti-CD3- or anti-CD2-stimulated cell cultures after Ag surface modulation with anti-1F7. The results showed that Ta1 and 1F7 Ag expression were increased on T cells from PB of patients with active, but not inactive, rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Most SF T cells from RA or other inflammatory arthritides displayed the memory marker CD45R0 and the Ta1 Ag, but lacked the 1F7 molecule. In addition, in vitro 1F7 modulation, which enhanced RA PB T cell proliferation and both IL-2 and IFN-gamma synthesis, did not synergize with anti-CD3 or anti-CD2 in inducing IL-2-dependent activation of SF T cells, but reduced IFN-gamma production. A spontaneous reappearance of 1F7 Ag on the SF T cell surface was seen after 2-5 days in culture. Phorbol myristate acetate, able to accelerate its reexpression, also restored a normal response of SF T cells to anti-1F7 comitogenic effects. These data confirm a role of the CD26 surface molecule in regulating T cell activation and lymphokine synthesis. This observation may have important implications in the regulation of T cell activity at the joint level during chronic inflammatory processes. PMID:8674237

  7. Identification of a novel chemokine-dependent molecular mechanism underlying rheumatoid arthritis-associated autoantibody-mediated bone loss

    PubMed Central

    Krishnamurthy, Akilan; Joshua, Vijay; Haj Hensvold, Aase; Jin, Tao; Sun, Meng; Vivar, Nancy; Ytterberg, A Jimmy; Engström, Marianne; Fernandes-Cerqueira, Cátia; Amara, Khaled; Magnusson, Malin; Wigerblad, Gustaf; Kato, Jungo; Jiménez-Andrade, Juan Miguel; Tyson, Kerry; Rapecki, Stephen; Lundberg, Karin; Catrina, Sergiu-Bogdan; Jakobsson, Per-Johan; Svensson, Camilla; Malmström, Vivianne; Klareskog, Lars; Wähämaa, Heidi; Catrina, Anca I

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Rheumatoid arthritis (RA)-specific anti-citrullinated protein/peptide antibodies (ACPAs) appear before disease onset and are associated with bone destruction. We aimed to dissect the role of ACPAs in osteoclast (OC) activation and to identify key cellular mediators in this process. Methods Polyclonal ACPA were isolated from the synovial fluid (SF) and peripheral blood of patients with RA. Monoclonal ACPAs were isolated from single SF B-cells of patients with RA. OCs were developed from blood cell precursors with or without ACPAs. We analysed expression of citrullinated targets and peptidylarginine deiminases (PAD) enzymes by immunohistochemistry and cell supernatants by cytometric bead array. The effect of an anti-interleukin (IL)-8 neutralising antibody and a pan-PAD inhibitor was tested in the OC cultures. Monoclonal ACPAs were injected into mice and bone structure was analysed by micro-CT before and after CXCR1/2 blocking with reparixin. Results Protein citrullination by PADs is essential for OC differentiation. Polyclonal ACPAs enhance OC differentiation through a PAD-dependent IL-8-mediated autocrine loop that is completely abolished by IL-8 neutralisation. Some, but not all, human monoclonal ACPAs derived from single SF B-cells of patients with RA and exhibiting distinct epitope specificities promote OC differentiation in cell cultures. Transfer of the monoclonal ACPAs into mice induced bone loss that was completely reversed by the IL-8 antagonist reparixin. Conclusions We provide novel insights into the key role of citrullination and PAD enzymes during OC differentiation and ACPA-induced OC activation. Our findings suggest that IL8-dependent OC activation may constitute an early event in the initiation of the joint specific inflammation in ACPA-positive RA. PMID:26612338

  8. TIGIT overexpression diminishes the function of CD4 T cells and ameliorates the severity of rheumatoid arthritis in mouse models.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Weigong; Dong, Yanying; Wu, Caijun; Ma, Yunfeng; Jin, Yaofeng; Ji, Yanhong

    2016-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an immune-mediated disease with a pathogenesis that involves CD4 T cell activation. Multiple immune regulatory molecules expressed on CD4(+) T cells were involved in RA pathogenesis. In this study, we investigated the role of T cell immunoglobulin and ITIM (immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibition motif) domain (TIGIT) in RA. The frequency of TIGIT-positive CD4(+) T cells in the synovial fluid (SF) of active RA patients was lower than that of inactive RA patients. And a negative correlation between RA disease activity and TIGIT expression was found. In CD4(+) T cells isolated from SF of active RA patients, TIGIT upregulation significantly decreased cell proliferation, as shown by MTT assay. TIGIT overexpression also significantly decreased the production of IFN-γ and IL-17, and increased that of IL-10, as determined by ELISA and qRT-PCR. In CD4(+) T cells isolated from SF of inactive RA patients, TIGIT was silenced by siRNA transfection. As expected, TIGIT knockdown resulted in an opposite effect on cell proliferation and the production of cytokines, including IFN-γ, IL-17 and IL-10. A RA mouse model was established using type II collagen induction. TIGIT was upregulated in RA mouse by lentivector infection. As expected, TIGIT overexpression in vivo significantly alleviated the disease severity and deceased the levels of anti-collagen II antibodies. TIGIT upregulation in the early stage was more effective to alleviate disease severity. Our data suggested the potential therapeutic role of TIGIT in RA patients.

  9. Synovial Sarcoma of the Tongue: Report of a Case.

    PubMed

    Basile, Lauren E; Hoch, Benjamin; Dillon, Jasjit K

    2016-01-01

    This report outlines the workup and management of a 55-year-old woman with a synovial sarcoma of the lateral border of the tongue that was initially diagnosed as a glomus tumor. A review was performed of the literature on synovial sarcomas of the oral cavity and current National Comprehensive Cancer Network guidelines. Synovial sarcomas of the tongue are rare neoplasms, with variable morphologic microscopic types and immunohistochemical profiles. Fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis of the known gene translocation also can be used in diagnosis. According to the literature, resection of the tumor is the current treatment of choice; however, owing to the rarity of this entity, diagnosis and management prove challenging for the oral and maxillofacial surgeon.

  10. Minimally invasive CT guided treatment of intraspinal synovial cyst

    PubMed Central

    Kozar, Sergeja; Jeromel, Miran

    2014-01-01

    Background Intraspinal synovial cysts of vertebral facet joints are uncommon cause of radicular pain as well as neurological deficits. They can be managed both conservatively and surgically. Case report A 77-year old polymorbid patient presented with bilateral low back pain which worsened during the course of time and did not respond to the conservative treatment. A diagnosis of intraspinal synovial cyst was made using the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Percutaneous computed tomography (CT) guided injection with installation of local anesthetic together with corticosteroid and rupture of the cyst was successfully used. A month after the procedure his pain improved, the usage of analgesics diminished and his over-all quality of life improved. Conclusions Percutaneous CT guided lumbar synovial cyst treatment is safe and reliable alternative to the surgical treatment in polymorbid patients with radiculopathy who are not able to tolerate general anesthesia and operation. PMID:24587777

  11. Synovial sarcoma: a rare presentation of parapharyngeal mass.

    PubMed

    Shaariyah, Mohd Mokhtar; Mazita, Ami; Masaany, Mansor; Razif, Mohd Yunus; Isa, Mohamed Rose; Asma, Abdullah

    2010-06-01

    Synovial sarcoma is a rare soft tissue sarcoma of the head and neck region involving the parapharyngeal space. The diagnosis of synovial sarcoma can be very challenging to the pathologists. We present a rare case of parapharyngeal synovial sarcoma in a young female patient who had a two-month history of left cervical intumescent mass at level II. The fine needle aspiration cytology of the mass was proved inconclusive. Transcervical excision of the mass was performed and the first case of parapharyngeal sarcoma was identified in our center by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) technique. Repeat imaging revealed residual tumor. The patient successfully underwent a second excision of the residual tumor and received adjuvant radiotherapy.

  12. Synovial tumefactive extramedullary hematopoiesis associated to polycythemia vera.

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Argüelles Cabrera, Hugo; Carrasco Juan, José Luis; García Castro, María Candelaria; González Gaitano, Manuel; Bonilla Arjona, Alfonso; Díaz-Flores, Lucio

    2007-01-01

    The case of a 66-year-old male patient with a chronic myeloproliferative type polycythemia vera disorder, who after 2 years of evolution is developing a tumefactive extramedullary hematopoiesis (TEH) located in the synovial of the articulation in the right knee, is described. The tumor histologically consists of a relatively lax and edematous synovial structure diffusely infiltrated by mature and semimature hematopoietic cellular population. The simultaneous study of the bone marrow reveals medullar spaces full of hematopoietic cellularity, with a predominance of megakaryocytic and red series, and with the addition of severe reticulin fibrosis, facts that suggest a progression toward myelofibrosis. The TEH developed in tissues without a reticulum endothelial system is very uncommon. We provide data about the first case located in the synovial membrane and we review the literature regarding this pathologic entity.

  13. Variation at FCGR2A and Functionally Related Genes Is Associated with the Response to Anti-TNF Therapy in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Avila-Pedretti, Gabriela; Tornero, Jesús; Fernández-Nebro, Antonio; Blanco, Francisco; González-Alvaro, Isidoro; Cañete, Juan D.; Maymó, Joan; Alperiz, Mercedes; Fernández-Gutiérrez, Benjamín; Olivé, Alex; Corominas, Héctor; Erra, Alba; Aterido, Adrià; López Lasanta, María; Tortosa, Raül; Julià, Antonio; Marsal, Sara

    2015-01-01

    Objective Anti-TNF therapies have been highly efficacious in the management of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), but 25–30% of patients do not show a significant clinical response. There is increasing evidence that genetic variation at the Fc receptor FCGR2A is associated with the response to anti-TNF therapy. We aimed to validate this genetic association in a patient cohort from the Spanish population, and also to identify new genes functionally related to FCGR2A that are also associated with anti-TNF response. Methods A total of 348 RA patients treated with an anti-TNF therapy were included and genotyped for FCGR2A polymorphism rs1081274. Response to therapy was determined at 12 weeks, and was tested for association globally and independently for each anti-TNF drug (infliximab, etanercept and adalimumab). Using gene expression profiles from macrophages obtained from synovial fluid of RA patients, we searched for genes highly correlated with FCGR2A expression. Tag SNPs were selected from each candidate gene and tested for association with the response to therapy. Results We found a significant association between FCGR2A and the response to adalimumab (P=0.022). Analyzing the subset of anti-CCP positive RA patients (78%), we also found a significant association between FCGR2A and the response to infliximab (P=0.035). DHX32 and RGS12 were the most consistently correlated genes with FCGR2A expression in RA synovial fluid macrophages (P<0.001). We found a significant association between the genetic variation at DHX32 (rs12356233, corrected P=0.019) and a nominally significant association between RGS12 and the response to adalimumab (rs4690093, uncorrected P=0.040). In the anti-CCP positive group of patients, we also found a nominally significant association between RGS12 and the response to infliximab (rs2857859, uncorrected P=0.042). Conclusions In the present study we have validated the FCGR2A association in an independent population, and we have identified new genes

  14. Intra-articular drug delivery from an optimized topical patch containing teriflunomide and lornoxicam for rheumatoid arthritis treatment: does the topical patch really enhance a local treatment?

    PubMed

    Xi, Honglei; Cun, Dongmei; Xiang, Rongwu; Guan, Yanli; Zhang, Yuxiu; Li, Yuanru; Fang, Liang

    2013-07-10

    Patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) often bear joint destruction and symptomatic pain. The aim of this work is to develop a compound transdermal patch containing teriflunomide (TEF) and lornoxicam (LOX) to transport these drugs across the skin with the isochronous permeation rates for RA therapy and investigate intra-articular delivery of TEF and LOX following transdermal patches applied topically. The salts of TEF and LOX with organic amines diethylamine (DEtA), triethylamine (TEtA), diethanolamine (DEA), triethanolamine (TEA) and N-(2'-hydroxy-ethanol)-piperdine (NP) were prepared to improve the skin permeation of the parent drug. The optimized patch formulation is obtained from a 3-factor, 2-level central composite design. After topical application of the optimized compound patch to only one knee joint in rabbit, intra-articular delivery of TEF and LOX on the application site was compared with that on the non-application site. Anti-inflammatory and analgesic effects of the optimized compound patch were evaluated using the adjuvant arthritis model and the pain model induced by acetic acid, respectively. The in vitro experiment results showed that the amine salts of TEF and LOX, especially TEF-TEtA and LOX-TEtA, enhanced the skin permeation of TEF and LOX from the transdermal patch system. The optimal formulation successfully displayed isochronous permeation rates for TEF and LOX across rabbit skin, and was defined with 5% of TEF-TEtA, 10% of LOX-TEtA and 15% of azone. The in vivo study showed that TEF and LOX from transdermal patches were transferred into skin, ligament and fat pad on the application site by direct diffusion and on the non-application site by the redistribution of systemic blood supply, while local absorption of TEF and LOX in synovial fluid originated from the systemic blood supply rather than direct diffusion. In the RA rat model, the results of swelling inhibition on primary arthritis of bilateral hind paws further confirmed the above

  15. Pre-tibial synovial cyst after reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament: case report☆☆☆

    PubMed Central

    Bulisani, Luís Eduardo Pedigoni; Bulisani, Erickson

    2014-01-01

    Arthroscopic reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament has been modernized through new surgical techniques and new materials. When tibial fixation is performed using an absorbable screw, complications may occur, such as formation of a pre-tibial cyst. The case described here is about a patient who presented an anteromedial synovial cyst in his right knee, three years after having undergone ACL reconstruction. The patient did not present any pain nor any complaints other than a mass that progressively increased in size, worsened after physical activities. Imaging examinations were requested: simple radiography of the knee and magnetic resonance. Anteromedial imaging of the knee showed a mass with well-delimited borders and internal fluid content, suggestive of a synovial cyst, with communication with the joint cavity through the tibial tunnel, without presenting enlargement or absorption of the bone tunnel. The cyst was surgically resected and the tibial tunnel occlusion was performed using a bone plug. The diagnosis of a synovial cyst was subsequently confirmed through the results from the anatomopathological examination. The patient presented good clinical evolution, with disappearance of the symptoms and a return to physical activities. PMID:26229880

  16. CTGF increases vascular endothelial growth factor-dependent angiogenesis in human synovial fibroblasts by increasing miR-210 expression

    PubMed Central

    Liu, S-C; Chuang, S-M; Hsu, C-J; Tsai, C-H; Wang, S-W; Tang, C-H

    2014-01-01

    Connective tissue growth factor (CTGF, a.k.a. CCN2) is inflammatory mediator and abundantly expressed in osteoarthritis (OA). Angiogenesis is essential for OA progression. Here, we investigated the role of CTGF in vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) production and angiogenesis in OA synovial fibroblasts (OASFs). We showed that expression of CTGF and VEGF in synovial fluid were higher in OA patients than in controls. Directly applying CTGF to OASFs increased VEGF production then promoted endothelial progenitor cells tube formation and migration. CTGF induced VEGF by raising miR-210 expression via PI3K, AKT, ERK, and nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB)/ELK1 pathways. CTGF-mediating miR-210 upregulation repressed glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase 1-like (GPD1L) expression and PHD activity and subsequently promoted hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1α-dependent VEGF expression. Knockdown of CTGF decreased VEGF expression and abolished OASF-conditional medium-mediated angiogenesis in vitro as well as angiogenesis in chick chorioallantoic membrane and Matrigel-plug nude mice model in vivo. Taken together, our results suggest CTGF activates PI3K, AKT, ERK, and NF-κB/ELK1 pathway, leading to the upregulation of miR-210, contributing to inhibit GPD1L expression and prolyl hydroxylases 2 activity, promoting HIF-1α-dependent VEGF expression and angiogenesis in human synovial fibroblasts. PMID:25341039

  17. MicroRNA-155 influences B-cell function through PU.1 in rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Alivernini, Stefano; Kurowska-Stolarska, Mariola; Tolusso, Barbara; Benvenuto, Roberta; Elmesmari, Aziza; Canestri, Silvia; Petricca, Luca; Mangoni, Antonella; Fedele, Anna Laura; Di Mario, Clara; Gigante, Maria Rita; Gremese, Elisa; McInnes, Iain B.; Ferraccioli, Gianfranco

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNA-155 (miR-155) is an important regulator of B cells in mice. B cells have a critical role in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Here we show that miR-155 is highly expressed in peripheral blood B cells from RA patients compared with healthy individuals, particularly in the IgD-CD27- memory B-cell population in ACPA+ RA. MiR-155 is highly expressed in RA B cells from patients with synovial tissue containing ectopic germinal centres compared with diffuse synovial tissue. MiR-155 expression is associated reciprocally with lower expression of PU.1 at B-cell level in the synovial compartment. Stimulation of healthy donor B cells with CD40L, anti-IgM, IL-21, CpG, IFN-α, IL-6 or BAFF induces miR-155 and decreases PU.1 expression. Finally, inhibition of endogenous miR-155 in B cells of RA patients restores PU.1 and reduces production of antibodies. Our data suggest that miR-155 is an important regulator of B-cell activation in RA. PMID:27671860

  18. Mycoplasma fermentans glycolipid-antigen as a pathogen of rheumatoid arthritis

    SciTech Connect

    Kawahito, Yutaka; Ichinose, Sizuko; Sano, Hajime; Tsubouchi, Yasunori; Kohno, Masataka; Yoshikawa, Toshikazu; Tokunaga, Daisaku; Hojo, Tatsuya; Harasawa, Ryo; Nakano, Teruaki; Matsuda, Kazuhiro

    2008-05-02

    Mycoplasma fermentans has been suspected as one of the causative pathogenic microorganisms of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) however, the pathogenic mechanism is still unclear. We, previously, reported that glycolipid-antigens (GGPL-I and III) are the major antigens of M. fermentans. Monoclonal antibody against the GGPL-III could detect the existence of the GGPL-III antigens in synovial tissues from RA patients. GGPL-III antigens were detected in 38.1% (32/84) of RA patient's tissues, but not in osteoarthritis (OA) and normal synovial tissues. Immunoelectron microscopy revealed that a part of GGPL-III antigens are located at endoplasmic reticulum. GGPL-III significantly induced TNF-{alpha} and IL-6 production from peripheral blood mononulear cells, and also proliferation of synovial fibroblasts. Further study is necessary to prove that M. fermentans is a causative microorganism of RA; however, the new mechanisms of disease pathogenesis provides hope for the development of effective and safe immunotherapeutic strategies based on the lipid-antigen, GGPL-III, in the near future.

  19. Changes in Soluble CD18 in Murine Autoimmune Arthritis and Rheumatoid Arthritis Reflect Disease Establishment and Treatment Response

    PubMed Central

    Kragstrup, Tue Wenzel; Jalilian, Babak; Keller, Kresten Krarup; Zhang, Xianwei; Laustsen, Julie Kristine; Stengaard-Pedersen, Kristian; Hetland, Merete Lund; Hørslev-Petersen, Kim; Junker, Peter; Østergaard, Mikkel; Hauge, Ellen-Margrethe; Hvid, Malene; Vorup-Jensen, Thomas; Deleuran, Bent

    2016-01-01

    Introduction In rheumatoid arthritis (RA) immune activation and presence of autoantibodies may precede clinical onset of disease, and joint destruction can progress despite remission. However, the underlying temporal changes of such immune system abnormalities in the inflammatory response during treat-to-target strategies remain poorly understood. We have previously reported low levels of the soluble form of CD18 (sCD18) in plasma from patients with chronic RA and spondyloarthritis. Here, we study the changes of sCD18 before and during treatment of early RA and following arthritis induction in murine models of rheumatoid arthritis. Methods The level of sCD18 was analyzed with a time-resolved immunoflourometric assay in 1) plasma from early treatment naïve RA patients during a treat-to-target strategy (the OPERA cohort), 2) plasma from chronic RA patients, 3) serum from SKG and CIA mice following arthritis induction, and 4) supernatants from synovial fluid mononuclear cells (SFMCs) and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from 6 RA patients cultured with TNFα or adalimumab. Results Plasma levels of sCD18 were decreased in chronic RA patients compared with early RA patients and in early RA patients compared with healthy controls. After 12 months of treatment the levels in early RA patients were similar to healthy controls. This normalization of plasma sCD18 levels was more pronounced in patients with very early disease who achieved an early ACR response. Plasma sCD18 levels were associated with radiographic progression. Correspondingly, the serum level of sCD18 was decreased in SKG mice 6 weeks after arthritis induction compared with healthy littermates. The sCD18 levels in both SKG and CIA mice exhibited a biphasic course after arthritis induction with an initial increase above baseline followed by a decline. Shedding of CD18 from RA SFMC and RA PBMC cultures was increased by TNFα and decreased by adalimumab. Conclusions The plasma sCD18 levels were altered

  20. [Familial form of rheumatoid nodulosis].

    PubMed

    Bosser, H; Schubert, B; Grosshans, E

    1993-01-01

    We report a familial form of rheumatoid nodulosis where the early lesions appeared in the first years of life in a young man and his son. The numerous papular and nodular skin lesions disclosed an ulcerative evolution leaving atrophic scars mainly near the limbs' joints. In both patients the evolution was characterized by the late onset of polyarthralgias and of a non-destructive seronegative polyarthritis; intra-osseous lesions were present in the metatarsal bones in the father. Rheumatoid nodulosis is a rare disease, sometimes considered as a benign variant of rheumatoid arthritis without destructive joint involvement. A serum rheumatoid factor is inconstantly present and the intra-osseous geodes have been shown to be rheumatoid nodules exhibiting the same histological structures of palisading granulomas as the subcutaneous nodules. The main symptom of the disease is the occurrence of multiple nodules followed by the delayed onset of a polyarthritis with a benign course without systemic involvement.

  1. The discovery of the synovial lymphatic stomata and lymphatic reabsorption in knee effusion.

    PubMed

    Ping, Zepeng; Jiang, Tingting; Wang, Chong; Chen, Zhongyi; Chen, Zhongliang; Wang, Jiaxiong; Wang, Li; Wang, Beibei; Xu, Dandan; Liu, Changming; Li, Zhongjie; Li, Ji-Cheng

    2015-06-01

    To illustrate the mechanism of lymphatic reabsorption in knee joint effusion. The current investigation employed transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) techniques to reveal the ultrastructure of the knee synovial membrane in New Zealand rabbits and human. Ultrastructural changes of the synovial lymphatic stomata were observed by using trypan blue absorption and sodium hydroxide (NaOH) digestion methods, and the animal models of synovitis. New Zealand rabbits and human synovial membranes were composed of two types of synovial cells: type A and type B. No lymphatic stomata were found among type A synovial cells, whereas lymphatic stomata with the diameters ranging 0.74-3.26 µm were found in type B synovial cells, and some stomata were closed. After the NaOH digestion, a number of sieve pores, similar to lymphatic stomata in size and shape, were observed in the dense fibrous connective tissue underneath the type B synovial cells. After injecting trypan blue into the rabbit knee joint cavity, absorption of trypan blue through the lymphatic stomata was observed, suggesting the absorption function of the synovial lymphatic stomata. In the rabbit knee joint synovitis models, the synovial lymphatic stomata diameter enlarged. Some macrophages migrated from the lymphatic stomata, indicating that the synovial lymphatic stomata were involved in the joint effusion absorption and inflammatory response. Our study is the first to report the existence of synovial lymphatic stomata in the New Zealand rabbits and human knee joints. Lymphatic stomata may have an important role in the reabsorption of joint effusion.

  2. Bakers Cyst with Synovial Chondromatosis of Knee - A Rare Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Daivesh P; Diwakar, Manish; Dargar, Nitin

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Synovial chondromatosis is a rare intraarticular benign condition arising from the synovial membrane of the joints, synovial sheaths or bursae around the joints. Primary synovial chondromatosis typically affects the large joints in the third to fifth decade of life, although involvement of smaller joints and presentation in younger age group is also documented. The purpose of this case report is to document this rare extra articular synovial pathology present inside the baker’s cyst which required open synovectomy and debridement to eradicate it. Case Report: A 43 yearold male presented with a two year history of pain, swelling and restriction of right knee joint. After the clinical and radiological assessment, open synovectomy, removal of cyst and thorough joint debridement procedure was performed. Histopathological study confirmed the findings of synovial chondromatosis. Conclusion: Synovial chondromatosis is a rare benign condition. Complete synovectomy offers reliable cure rate. PMID:27299117

  3. Clinical, Laboratory, and Ultrasound Assessment of the Knee in Juvenile Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Algergawy, Shereen; Haliem, Tohamy; Al-Shaer, Osama

    2011-01-01

    Background: The aim of this work was to study the ultrasonographic (USG) features of knee joints in relation to clinical and laboratory measures in patients with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA), and also to evaluate the accuracy of ultrasound in the diagnosis of local joint activity. Methods: This study included 20 with JRA and 20 matched and apparently healthy controls. All patients were subjected to full history taking, careful clinical examination and laboratory investigation. The knee joints of all patients and control were examined with plain radiography and ultrasonography on the same day of clinical examination using ultrasound to detect synovial thickness and effusion at the knee. Results: Mean USG knee synovial thickness was significantly greater in JRA patients versus controls (4.2 ± 2.4 mm versus 1.7 ± 0.3 mm, P < 0.001). Although knee effusion was not detected in any of the controls, it was demonstrated in 90% of JRA patients, with a mean effusion volume of 3.8 ± 3.1 mL. There was a statistically significant difference (P < 0.001) between clinically active and inactive knees with regard to knee synovial thickness. Mean knee effusion volume was significantly (P < 0.05) higher in the clinically active than in the clinically inactive knees. Patients with high disease activity had a significantly (P < 0.05) higher knee synovial thickness and knee effusion volume than patients with low and moderate disease activity. Significantly (P < 0.05) positive correlations were found between knee synovial thickness and articular index (AI) scores, disease activity score, clinical knee scores, erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), and C-reactive protein (CRP) levels. Significant positive correlations (P < 0.05) were found between knee effusion volume and AI scores, visual analog scores, disease activity scores, clinical knee scores, ESR, and CRP levels. Significant negative correlations (P < 0.05) were found between knee effusion volumes and hemoglobin levels

  4. A Novel Mechanism of Neutrophil Recruitment in a Coculture Model of the Rheumatoid Synovium

    PubMed Central

    Lally, Frank; Smith, Emily; Filer, Andrew; Stone, Michael A.; Shaw, John S.; Nash, Gerard B.; Buckley, Christopher D.; Rainger, G. Ed

    2011-01-01

    Objective Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is classically thought of as a Th1, T lymphocyte–driven disease of the adaptive immune system. However, cells of the innate immune system, including neutrophils, are prevalent within the diseased joint, and accumulate in large numbers. This study was undertaken to determine whether cells of the rheumatoid stromal microenvironment could establish an inflammatory environment in which endothelial cells are conditioned in a disease-specific manner to support neutrophil recruitment. Methods Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (ECs) and fibroblasts isolated from the synovium or skin of RA patients were established in coculture on opposite sides of porous transwell filters. After 24 hours of EC conditioning, the membranes were incorporated into a parallel-plate, flow-based adhesion assay and levels of neutrophil adhesion to ECs were measured. Results ECs cocultured with synovial, but not skin, fibroblasts could recruit neutrophils in a manner that was dependent on the number of fibroblasts. Antibody blockade of P-selectin or E-selectin reduced neutrophil adhesion, and an antibody against CD18 (the β2 integrin) abolished adhesion. Blockade of CXCR2, but not CXCR1, also greatly inhibited neutrophil recruitment. Interleukin-6 (IL-6) was detectable in coculture supernatants, and both IL-6 and neutrophil adhesion were reduced in a dose-dependent manner by hydrocortisone added to cocultures. Antibody blockade of IL-6 also effectively abolished neutrophil adhesion. Conclusion Synovial fibroblasts from the rheumatoid joint play an important role in regulating the recruitment of inflammatory leukocytes during active disease. This process may depend on a previously unsuspected route of IL-6–mediated crosstalk between fibroblasts and endothelial cells. PMID:16255036

  5. Single cell cloning and recombinant monoclonal antibodies generation from RA synovial B cells reveal frequent targeting of citrullinated histones of NETs

    PubMed Central

    Corsiero, Elisa; Bombardieri, Michele; Carlotti, Emanuela; Pratesi, Federico; Robinson, William; Migliorini, Paola; Pitzalis, Costantino

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is characterised by breach of self-tolerance towards citrullinated antigens with generation of anti-citrullinated peptide/proteins antibodies (ACPA). Currently, the nature and source of citrullinated antigens driving the humoral autoimmune response within synovial ectopic lymphoid structures (ELS) is a crucial unknown aspect of RA pathogenesis. Here we characterised the autoreactive B-cell response of lesional B cells isolated from ELS+RA synovium. Methods Single synovial tissue CD19+cells were Fluorescence Activated Cell Sorting (FACS)-sorted and VH/VL Ig genes cloned to generate recombinant monoclonal antibodies (rmAbs) from patients with ELS+/ACPA+RA. Results RA-rmAbs immunoreactivity analysis provided the following key findings: (1) in a chIP-based array containing 300 autoantigens and in a ‘citrullinome’ multiplex assay, a strong reactivity against citrullinated histones H2A/H2B (citH2A/H2B) was observed in ∼40% of RA-rmAbs, followed by cit-fibrinogen and cit-vimentin; (2) anti-citH2A/H2B-reactive RA-rmAbs (but not anti-citH2A/H2B negative) selectively recognised neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) from peripheral blood and/or RA joint neutrophils; (3) anti-citH2A/citH2B and anti-NET immunobinding was dependent on affinity maturation and was completely abrogated following reversion of hypermutated IgVH/VL genes to germline sequences; (4) ELS+ (not ELS−) RA synovial tissues engrafted into Severe Combined ImmunoDeficiency (SCID) mice released human anti-citH2A/citH2B and anti-NET antibodies in association with the intra-graft expression of CXCL13 and lymphotoxin (LT)-β, two master regulators of ELS. Conclusion We provided novel evidence that B cells differentiated within synovial ELS in the RA joints frequent target deiminated proteins which could be generated during NETosis of RA synovial neutrophils including histones. Thus, NETs could represent a source of citrullinated antigens fuelling the ACPA autoimmune

  6. Eye disease in a patient with rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Shinzato, M; Yamamoto, J; Hirata, C E; Goldberg, A C; Yoshinari, N H; Bonfá, E

    1999-11-01

    We report the case of a 40-year-old woman with diffuse uveitis, sensorineural hearing loss and cerebrospinal fluid pleocytosis as features of Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada syndrome who developed symmetric polyarthritis and stiffness of small and large joints, in addition to rheumatoid arthritis. Although their target tissues are distinct, both diseases have a possible autoimmune origin strongly associated with HLA-DRB4.

  7. Biologic agents for the treatment of juvenile rheumatoid arthritis: current status.

    PubMed

    Carrasco, Ruy; Smith, Judith A; Lovell, Daniel

    2004-01-01

    Biologic therapies, primarily anticytokine therapies, are being increasingly used in patients with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA). Levels of a variety of proinflammatory cytokines have been shown to be elevated in the peripheral blood and synovial fluid and tissue in children with JRA. In a blinded, randomized, controlled trial in children with severe, long-standing, polyarticular-course JRA not responsive to standard therapies, etanercept showed a statistically significantly greater response rate than placebo. Approximately 75% of these children responded to etanercept. Etanercept has been efficacious in 50-60% of children with active systemic JRA in open clinical trials with acceptable tolerance. Adverse events seen in children treated with etanercept have been similar in type and frequency to those reported in adults. Infliximab has been studied in several open clinical trials in both polyarticular and systemic JRA and found to, overall, have demonstrated efficacy in approximately 60% of patients. Approximately 3-5% of patients have demonstrated infusion reactions or frank allergic reactions and 9% developed new autoantibodies. Anakinra has been studied in children with polyarticular JRA. Approximately 65% of patients developed injection-site reactions and 68% demonstrated a response to the medication. Anakinra may have increased efficacy in systemic JRA. Interleukin (IL)-6 is highly related to the systemic disease manifestations in systemic JRA and two patients treated with a monoclonal antibody to the IL-6 receptor have demonstrated significant improvement with prolonged clinical control with continued treatment. A particular pediatric concern is the effect of immunosuppressive biologics in children who are exposed to or develop varicella. These children should be treated, both in terms of prophylaxis and aggressive antivaricella treatment, as for other immunosuppressed children. Anticytokine biologics have demonstrated great promise in the treatment of

  8. The Proportion of Regulatory T Cells in Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Morita, Takayoshi; Shima, Yoshihito; Wing, James Badger; Sakaguchi, Shimon; Kumanogoh, Atsushi

    2016-01-01

    Background Regulatory T cells (Tregs) have important functions in peripheral immune tolerance. Dysfunction of Tregs is considered to be a pivotal cause of autoimmune diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis (RA). However, previous reports describing the proportion of Tregs among CD4+ T cells in RA patients were controversial because a range of markers are used to identify Tregs with little consensus. To clarify the status of Tregs in RA, we investigated the proportion of Tregs with focusing on the definitions of them. Methods We identified the studies reporting the proportion of Tregs in RA patients using PubMed and Google Scholar. We performed a systematic review of them and a meta-analysis to evaluate the proportion of Tregs (FOXP3-positive and/or CD25-positive) among CD4+ T cells in peripheral blood (PB) and synovial fluid (SF) of RA patients and control subjects. Results A total 31 studies were selected. The proportion of Tregs defined by all definitions among CD4+ T cells in PB was not significantly different between RA patients and control subjects (-0.65, [-1.30, 0.01]). Then we performed sub-analyses based on individual definitions. The proportion of Tregs defined by either CD25 or FOXP3 alone did not differ between RA patients and control subjects. The proportion of Tregs defined by both FOXP3 and CD25 was lower in RA patients than that in control subjects (-2.42 [-3.49, -1.34]). The proportion of Tregs defined by both FOXP3 and CD25 was higher in SF than that in PB among RA patients (3.27 [0.40, 6.14]). Conclusion The status of Tregs varied according to the definition system. The proportion of Tregs defined by stricter and functionally validated methods decreased in PB and increased in SF among RA patients. If the proportion of Tregs differs in RA, accurate and functionally relevant definitions of Tregs are necessary to elucidate their status in RA. PMID:27622457

  9. Rheumatoid arthritis and ocular involvement.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Chittaranjan; Banik, Sujoy; Islam, Md Nazarul; Biswas, Mukul Chandra; Biswas, Gautam; Biswas, Sobhan

    2003-09-01

    To study the occurrence and incidence of different ocular manifestations in rheumatoid arthritis a random cross-sectional study was carried out among 54 patients with active rheumatoid arthritis. The patients were examined thoroughly to detect any ocular disease associated with rheumatoid arthritis. Complete ocular examination with special emphasis on anterior segment evaluation and tearfilm study was done. Two-thirds of the patients examined had some kind of visual problem at presentation. Three patients (5.55%) had marked dry eye with another 20 (37.03%) having borderline tear deficiency. Two cases ( 3.70% ) of episcleritis were also seen. No cases of scleritis or retinopathy were found. The most common ocular association with rheumatoid arthritis was secondary Sjogren's syndrome. Other conditions include episcleritis and marginal keratitis.

  10. Effect of nitric oxide on mitochondrial activity of human synovial cells

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Nitric oxide (NO) is a messenger implicated in the destruction and inflammation of joint tissues. Cartilage and synovial membrane from patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and osteoarthritis (OA) have high levels of NO. NO is known to modulate various cellular pathways and, thus, inhibit the activity of the mitochondrial respiratory chain (MRC) of chondrocytes and induce the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and cell death in multiple cell types. For these reasons, and because of the importance of the synovial membrane in development of OA pathology, we investigated the effects of NO on survival, mitochondrial function, and activity of fibroblastic human OA synovial cells. Methods Human OA synovia were obtained from eight patients undergoing hip joint replacement. Sodium nitroprusside (SNP) was used as a NO donor compound and cell viability was evaluated by MTT assays. Mitochondrial function was evaluated by analyzing the mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψm) with flow cytometry using the fluorofore DePsipher. ATP levels were measured by luminescence assays, and the activities of the respiratory chain complexes (complex I: NADH CoQ1 reductase, complex II: succinate dehydrogenase, complex III: ubiquinol-cytochrome c reductase, complex IV: cytochrome c oxidase) and citrate synthase (CS) were measured by enzymatic assay. Protein expression analyses were performed by western blot. Results SNP at a concentration of 0.5 mM induced cell death, shown by the MTT method at different time points. The percentages of viable cells at 24, 48 and 72 hours were 86.11 ± 4.9%, 74.31 ± 3.35%, and 43.88 ± 1.43%, respectively, compared to the basal level of 100% (*p < 0.05). SNP at 0.5 mM induced depolarization of the mitochondrial membrane at 12 hours with a decrease in the ratio of polarized cells (basal = 2.48 ± 0.28; SNP 0.5 mM = 1.57 ± 0.11; *p < 0.01). The time course analyses of treatment with SNP at 0.5 mM demonstrated that treatment reliably and

  11. Adiponectin Isoforms and Leptin Impact on Rheumatoid Adipose Mesenchymal Stem Cells Function

    PubMed Central

    Skalska, Urszula; Kontny, Ewa

    2016-01-01

    Adiponectin and leptin have recently emerged as potential risk factors in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) pathogenesis. In this study we evaluated the effects of adiponectin and leptin on immunomodulatory function of adipose mesenchymal stem cells (ASCs) derived from infrapatellar fat pad of RA patients. ASCs were stimulated with leptin, low molecular weight (LMW) and high/middle molecular weight (HMW/MMW) adiponectin isoforms. The secretory activity of ASCs and their effect on rheumatoid synovial fibroblasts (RA-FLS) and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from healthy donors have been analysed. RA-ASCs secreted spontaneously TGFβ, IL-6, IL-1Ra, PGE2, IL-8, and VEGF. Secretion of all these factors was considerably upregulated by HMW/MMW adiponectin, but not by LMW adiponectin and leptin. Stimulation with HMW/MMW adiponectin partially abolished proproliferative effect of ASC-derived soluble factors on RA-FLS but did not affect IL-6 secretion in FLS cultures. ASCs pretreated with HMW/MMW adiponectin maintained their anti-inflammatory function towards PBMCs, which was manifested by moderate PBMCs proliferation inhibition and IL-10 secretion induction. We have proved that HMW/MMW adiponectin stimulates secretory potential of rheumatoid ASCs but does not exert strong impact on ASCs function towards RA-FLS and PBMCs. PMID:26681953

  12. Tocilizumab, a humanized anti-interleukin-6 receptor antibody, for treatment of rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Mihara, Masahiko; Ohsugi, Yoshiyuki; Kishimoto, Tadamitsu

    2011-01-01

    Interleukin (IL)-6 has a variety of biological functions. For example, it stimulates the production of acute-phase reactants (C-reactive protein and serum amyloid A) and hepcidin which interferes with iron recycling and absorption, causing iron-deficient anemia, and augments expression of vascular endothelial growth factor and receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand in synovial cells, leading to neovascularization and osteoclast formation. IL-6 also acts on lymphocytes, not only on B cells to stimulate autoantibody production, but also on naïve T helper cells to promote Th17 cell differentiation. Thus, an imbalance between T cell subsets possibly contributes to development of rheumatoid arthritis. Several clinical studies have demonstrated that a humanized anti-IL-6 receptor antibody, tocilizumab, improves clinical symptoms in rheumatoid arthritis. Tocilizumab prevented radiographic progression of joint destruction by inhibiting cartilage/bone resorption. Tocilizumab also improved hematological abnormalities, including hypergammaglobulinemia, high levels of autoantibodies, and elevation of erythrocyte sedimentation rate and acute-phase proteins. Importantly, tocilizumab improved quality of life by reducing systemic symptoms, including fatigue, anemia, anorexia, and fever. These findings have confirmed that hyperproduction of IL-6 is responsible for the above clinical symptoms, including joint destruction. Many patients treated with tocilizumab achieved clinical remission associated with decreased serum IL-6, suggesting that IL-6 enhances autoimmunity. Tocilizumab is a new therapeutic option for rheumatoid arthritis.

  13. Physiotherapy in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Kavuncu, Vural; Evcik, Deniz

    2004-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic and painful clinical condition that leads to progressive joint damage, disability, deterioration in quality of life, and shortened life expectancy. Even mild inflammation may result in irreversible damage and permanent disability. The clinical course according to symptoms may be either intermittent or progressive in patients with RA. In most patients, the clinical course is progressive, and structural damage develops in the first 2 years. The aim of RA management is to achieve pain relief and prevent joint damage and functional loss. Physiotherapy and rehabilitation applications significantly augment medical therapy by improving the management of RA and reducing handicaps in daily living for patients with RA. In this review, the application of physiotherapy modalities is examined, including the use of cold/heat applications, electrical stimulation, and hydrotherapy. Rehabilitation treatment techniques for patients with RA such as joint protection strategies, massage, exercise, and patient education are also presented. PMID:15266230

  14. Physiotherapy in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Kavuncu, Vural; Evcik, Deniz

    2004-05-17

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic and painful clinical condition that leads to progressive joint damage, disability, deterioration in quality of life, and shortened life expectancy. Even mild inflammation may result in irreversible damage and permanent disability. The clinical course according to symptoms may be either intermittent or progressive in patients with RA. In most patients, the clinical course is progressive, and structural damage develops in the first 2 years. The aim of RA management is to achieve pain relief and prevent joint damage and functional loss. Physiotherapy and rehabilitation applications significantly augment medical therapy by improving the management of RA and reducing handicaps in daily living for patients with RA. In this review, the application of physiotherapy modalities is examined, including the use of cold/heat applications, electrical stimulation, and hydrotherapy. Rehabilitation treatment techniques for patients with RA such as joint protection strategies, massage, exercise, and patient education are also presented.

  15. [The rheumatoid hand].

    PubMed

    Henry, Julien; Roulot, Eric; Gaujoux-Viala, Cécile

    2013-12-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis usually affects the hand (90%). Without treatment, joint damages and deformities lead to loss of the ability to grip, grasp, and pinch, often leaving the patient unable to perform the activities of daily living. Early treatment with DMARDs ± physical therapy is the best way to control the disease and prevent deformity, as well as disability, which often occurs when joints get damaged. Two decades later dramatic advances have been made in the medical therapy of RA with the expanded range of effective disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs. When a patient with RA develops joint damages in the hand or wrist that are unresponsive to medical management and injections therapy, surgical intervention may be necessary. Optimal care involves a team approach among the patient involving rheumatologists, physical therapists and hand surgeons. Patients with RA should be closely monitored in order to detect joint damages necessitating physical therapist or hand surgeon consultation.

  16. Rheumatoid arthritis: vocational rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Cochrane, G M

    1982-01-01

    The consequences of inflation and accelerating introduction of automation and microprocessors into industry are a shift from unskilled to skilled work, the lessening of opportunities for the unskilled worker, and growing unemployment. If disabled people are competing for employment they must take every opportunity to extend education and acquire skills. Juvenile chronic arthritis presents one set of problems in vocational rehabilitation at the beginning of a working career and adult rheumatoid arthritis another, commonly in those over 45 years old and previously established in work. The prevalence of severe disability in juvenile chronic arthritis is about 1 in 20 000 of the population, females are affected twice as often as males and 1 in 10 has defective vision or blindness due to chronic iridocyclitis. At school, besides education, there must be emphasis on encouraging independence, self-confidence, mobility and determination. A School Leavers' Conference early in the last year at school gives the adolescent the best chance of choosing a career. Rheumatoid arthritis is three times more common in women and increasingly, over the last 40 years, women are working besides home-making. Morning stiffness, fatigue, immobility and pain are the common symptoms of widespread involvement of joints and systemic disturbance. The principal determinant in the success of vocational rehabilitation is personality, and the social and environmental factors are more significant than the degree of disability. The Disablement Resettlement Officer can assure continuity of rehabilitation between the health and employment services: a favourable outcome is work, self-derived income independence and freedom of movement using whatever technical aids are required to achieve this.

  17. Synovial cytokine expression in psoriatic arthritis and associations with lymphoid neogenesis and clinical features

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Psoriatic arthritis (PsA) is an autoantibody-negative immune-mediated disease in which synovial lymphoid neogenesis (LN) occurs. We determined whether LN is associated with specific patterns of inflammatory cytokine expression in paired synovial tissue (ST) and fluid (SF) samples and their potential correlation with the clinical characteristics of PsA. Methods ST and paired SF samples were obtained from the inflamed knee of PsA patients. ST samples were immunostained with CD3 (T cell), CD20 (B cell), and MECA-79 (high endothelial vessels). Total ST mRNA was extracted, and the gene expression of 21 T-cell-derived and proinflammatory cytokines were measured with quantitative real-time PCR. SF concentrations of Th1, Th2, Th17, and proinflammatory cytokines were determined with the Quantibody Human Th17 Array. Clinical and biologic data were collected at inclusion and after a median of 27 months of follow-up. Results Twenty (43.5%) of 46 patients had LN. Only two genes showed differences (Wilcoxon test, P < 0.06) in ST between LN-positive and LN-negative patients: interleukin-23A (IL-23A) (P = 0.058) and transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β1) (P = 0.050). IL-23A expression was higher, and TGF-β1 expression was lower in LN-positive patients. ST IL-15 mRNA showed a nonsignificant trend toward higher expression in LN-positive patients, and SF IL-15 protein levels were significantly higher in LN-positive patients (P = 0.002). In all PsA patients, IL-23A mRNA expression correlated with C-reactive protein (CRP) (r = 0.471; P = 0.001) and swollen-joint count (SJC) (r = 0.350; P = 0.018), whereas SF levels of IL-6 and CC chemokine-ligand 20 (CCL-20) correlated with CRP levels (r = 0.377; P = 0.014 and r = 0.501; P < 0.0001, respectively). Conclusions These findings suggest differences in the cytokine profile of PsA patients with LN, with a higher expression of IL-23A and IL-15 and a lower expression of TGF-β1. In the entire group of patients, IL-23 ST

  18. Supramolecular synergy in the boundary lubrication of synovial joints

    PubMed Central

    Seror, Jasmine; Zhu, Linyi; Goldberg, Ronit; Day, Anthony J.; Klein, Jacob

    2015-01-01

    Hyaluronan, lubricin and phospholipids, molecules ubiquitous in synovial joints, such as hips and knees, have separately been invoked as the lubricants responsible for the remarkable lubrication of articular cartilage; but alone, these molecules cannot explain the extremely low friction at the high pressures of such joints. We find that surface-anchored hyaluronan molecules complex synergistically with phosphatidylcholine lipids present in joints to form a boundary lubricating layer, which, with coefficient of friction μ≈0.001 at pressures to over 100 atm, has a frictional behaviour resembling that of articular cartilage in the major joints. Our findings point to a scenario where each of the molecules has a different role but must act together with the others: hyaluronan, anchored at the outer surface of articular cartilage by lubricin molecules, complexes with joint phosphatidylcholines to provide the extreme lubrication of synovial joints via the hydration–lubrication mechanism. PMID:25754223

  19. Synovial cutaneous fistula complicating a reverse total shoulder arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Letter, Haley P; Limback, Joseph; Wasyliw, Christopher; Bancroft, Laura; Scherer, Kurt

    2016-06-01

    Reverse total shoulder arthroplasty is becoming a common form of shoulder arthroplasty that is often performed in the setting of rotator cuff pathology. Infection is a rare complication but is more common in reverse total shoulder arthroplasty than in hemiarthroplasty or anatomic total shoulder arthroplasty. We present the case of a 69-year-old patient with a reverse total shoulder arthroplasty who presented with purulent drainage from the skin of his anterior shoulder. Computed tomography arthrogram confirmed the presence of a synovial cutaneous fistula. Synovial cutaneous fistula is a rare variant of periprosthetic infection that, to our knowledge, has not been described previously in the setting of a reverse total shoulder arthroplasty. Computed tomography arthrogram proved to be a reliable method for confirming the diagnosis and was used for operative planning to remove the hardware. PMID:27257460

  20. Endoscopic Resection of Lateral Synovial Cyst of the Knee.

    PubMed

    Lui, Tun Hing

    2015-12-01

    Synovial cysts on the lateral side of the knee can cause pain, limitation of joint mobility, compression of the neighboring neurovascular structures, rupture leading to compartment syndrome, infection, erosion of adjacent bone, and iliotibial band friction syndrome. Open resection is commonly performed for symptomatic cysts. We describe an alternative, endoscopic approach to cyst resection. This has the advantages of minimally invasive surgery of smaller wounds, better cosmesis, and less surgical trauma. PMID:27284517

  1. Sports-related changes of the synovial membrane

    PubMed Central

    MANUNTA, ANDREA F.; ZEDDE, PIETRO; PISANU, FRANCESCO; MARRAS, FRANCESCO

    2014-01-01

    Purpose the aim of this study is to differentiate the behavior of the synovial membrane in the presence of various stimuli in patients who practice sports. Methods fifty one patients (30 males and 21 females, mean age 48 years, range 31–59 years) who actively practiced non-competitive sports underwent a biopsy of the synovial membrane during arthroscopic surgery performed for joint effusion secondary to meniscal lesion (24 cases), anterior cruciate ligament injury (ACL) (17 cases), postoperative knee joint stiffness (2 cases), aseptic loosening or dislocation of the polyethylene component of uni-compartmental knee arthroplasty (5 cases), and anterior fibrous impingement of the ankle (3 cases). Synovial tissue samples were obtained during surgery from all the patients and processed for light microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and scanning electron microscopy observation. Results circulatory phenomena were observed in acute inflammatory processes, characterized by hyperemia and vasodilation. Exudative and infiltrative phenomena were observed in the presence of foreign bodies and were characterized by leukocytic exudation (presence of polynuclear neutrophils), accompanied by lymphomonocytic infiltration. Proliferative phenomena were observed in post-traumatic forms of synovitis (ACL and meniscal injuries), characterized by hypertrophy and proliferation of villous formations. Degenerative and regressive phenomena were observed in cases of fibrous reaction (ankle impingement and joint stiffness) and were characterized by formation of dense fibrous connective tissue with hyaline patches, evolving towards sclerosis. Conclusions the activation of inflammatory processes in patients who expose their joints to excessive stress may lead to the formation of hyperplastic tissue. Ultramicroscopic debris is usually capable of transforming the structural organization of the synovial tissue. Level of evidence Level IV, observational case series. PMID:25750907

  2. Place of radiotherapy in the treatment of synovial sarcoma

    SciTech Connect

    Carson, J.H.; Harwood, A.R.; Cummings, B.J.; Fornasier, V.; Langer, F.; Quirt, I.

    1981-01-01

    This paper reviews 36 patients with synovial sarcoma; 18 were referred within three months of surgery. None had undergone en bloc excision and all were treated with post-operative radiotherapy. Local control and survival were analyzed with respect to Tumor Node Metastasis Classification, histology, site of primary and surgical procedure. Eight patients with T1-2N0M0 tumors were alive and well (minimum two year follow-up) following excision and radiotherapy; 7 had a normally functional extremity. In contrast, only one of 8 patients with T3N0M0 tumors is alive and well. Seven of 8 patients with well or moderately differentiated histology were alive and well whereas no patient with poorly differentiated histologies survived. Six of 7 patients were alive and well if their tumor was distal to the elbow or knee whereas none of those who had a primary thigh synovial sarcoma survived. Eighteen patients were referred with recurrent disease and 2 were salvaged. A management policy is proposed for synovial sarcoma with the integrated use of surgery, radiation and chemotherapy; it emphasizes optimal cure rates and a functional extremity reserving amputation for salvage.

  3. Chenopodium ambrosioides L. Reduces Synovial Inflammation and Pain in Experimental Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Calado, Gustavo P.; Lopes, Alberto Jorge O.; Costa Junior, Livio M.; Lima, Francisco das Chagas A.; Silva, Lucilene A.; Pereira, Wanderson S.; do Amaral, Flávia M. M.; Garcia, João Batista S.; Cartágenes, Maria do Socorro de S.; Nascimento, Flávia R. F.

    2015-01-01

    The chronicity of osteoarthritis (OA), characterized by pain and inflammation in the joints, is linked to a glutamate receptor, N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA). The use of plant species such as Chenopodium ambrosioides L. (Amaranthaceae) as NMDA antagonists offers a promising perspective. This work aims to analyze the antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory responses of the crude hydroalcoholic extract (HCE) of C. ambrosioides leaves in an experimental OA model. Wistar rats were separated into six groups (n = 24): clean (C), negative control (CTL-), positive control (CTL+), HCE0.5, HCE5 and HCE50. The first group received no intervention. The other groups received an intra-articular injection of sodium monoiodoacetate (MIA) (8 mg/kg) on day 0. After six hours, they were orally treated with saline, Maxicam plus (meloxicam + chondroitin sulfate) and HCE at doses of 0.5 mg/kg, 5 mg/kg and 50 mg/kg, respectively. After three, seven and ten days, clinical evaluations were performed (knee diameter, mechanical allodynia, mechanical hyperalgesia and motor activity). On the tenth day, after euthanasia, synovial fluid and draining lymph node were collected for cellular quantification, and cartilage was collected for histopathological analysis. Finally, molecular docking was performed to evaluate the compatibility of ascaridole, a monoterpene found in HCE, with the NMDA receptor. After the third day, HCE reduced knee edema. HCE5 showed less cellular infiltrate in the cartilage and synovium and lower intensities of allodynia from the third day and of hyperalgesia from the seventh day up to the last treatment day. The HCE5 and HCE50 groups improved in forced walking. In relation to molecular docking, ascaridole showed NMDA receptor binding affinity. C. ambrosioides HCE was effective in the treatment of OA because it reduced synovial inflammation and behavioral changes due to pain. This effect may be related to the antagonistic effect of ascaridole on the NMDA receptor. PMID:26524084

  4. Chenopodium ambrosioides L. Reduces Synovial Inflammation and Pain in Experimental Osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Calado, Gustavo P; Lopes, Alberto Jorge O; Costa Junior, Livio M; Lima, Francisco das Chagas A; Silva, Lucilene A; Pereira, Wanderson S; Amaral, Flávia M M do; Garcia, João Batista S; Cartágenes, Maria do Socorro de S; Nascimento, Flávia R F

    2015-01-01

    The chronicity of osteoarthritis (OA), characterized by pain and inflammation in the joints, is linked to a glutamate receptor, N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA). The use of plant species such as Chenopodium ambrosioides L. (Amaranthaceae) as NMDA antagonists offers a promising perspective. This work aims to analyze the antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory responses of the crude hydroalcoholic extract (HCE) of C. ambrosioides leaves in an experimental OA model. Wistar rats were separated into six groups (n = 24): clean (C), negative control (CTL-), positive control (CTL+), HCE0.5, HCE5 and HCE50. The first group received no intervention. The other groups received an intra-articular injection of sodium monoiodoacetate (MIA) (8 mg/kg) on day 0. After six hours, they were orally treated with saline, Maxicam plus (meloxicam + chondroitin sulfate) and HCE at doses of 0.5 mg/kg, 5 mg/kg and 50 mg/kg, respectively. After three, seven and ten days, clinical evaluations were performed (knee diameter, mechanical allodynia, mechanical hyperalgesia and motor activity). On the tenth day, after euthanasia, synovial fluid and draining lymph node were collected for cellular quantification, and cartilage was collected for histopathological analysis. Finally, molecular docking was performed to evaluate the compatibility of ascaridole, a monoterpene found in HCE, with the NMDA receptor. After the third day, HCE reduced knee edema. HCE5 showed less cellular infiltrate in the cartilage and synovium and lower intensities of allodynia from the third day and of hyperalgesia from the seventh day up to the last treatment day. The HCE5 and HCE50 groups improved in forced walking. In relation to molecular docking, ascaridole showed NMDA receptor binding affinity. C. ambrosioides HCE was effective in the treatment of OA because it reduced synovial inflammation and behavioral changes due to pain. This effect may be related to the antagonistic effect of ascaridole on the NMDA receptor.

  5. Sex hormone adjuvant therapy in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Cutolo, M

    2000-11-01

    RA is an autoimmune rheumatic disorder resulting from the combination of several predisposing factors, including the relation between epitopes of possible triggering agents and histocompatibility epitopes, the status of the stress response system, and the sex hormone status. Estrogens are implicated as enhancers of humoral immunity, and androgens and progesterone are natural immune suppressors. Sex hormone concentrations have been evaluated in RA patients before glucocorticoid therapy and have frequently been found to be altered, especially in premenopausal women and male patients. In particular, low levels of gonadal and adrenal androgens (testosterone and DHT, DHEA and DHEAS) and a reduced androgen:estrogen ratio have been detected in body fluids (i.e., blood, synovial fluid, smears, saliva) of male and female RA patients. These observations support a possible pathogenic role for the decreased levels of the immune-suppressive androgens. Exposure to environmental estrogens (estrogenic xenobiotics), genetic polymorphisms of genes coding for hormone metabolic enzymes or receptors, and gonadal disturbances related to stress system activation (hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical axis) and physiologic hormonal perturbations such as during aging, the menstrual cycle, pregnancy, the postpartum period, and menopause may interfere with the androgen:estrogen ratio. Sex hormones might exert their immune-modulating effects, at least in RA synovitis, because synovial macrophages, monocytes, and lymphocytes possess functional androgen and estrogen receptors and may metabolize gonadal hormones. The molecular basis for sex hormone adjuvant therapy in RA is thus experimentally substantiated. By considering the well-demonstrated immune-suppressive activities exerted by androgens, male hormones and their derivatives seem to be the most promising therapeutic approach. Recent studies have shown positive effects of androgen replacement therapy at least in male RA patients

  6. Within-day variation and influence of physical exercise on circulating Galectin-3 in patients with rheumatoid arthritis and healthy individuals.

    PubMed

    Issa, S F; Christensen, A F; Lottenburger, T; Junker, K; Lindegaard, H; Hørslev-Petersen, K; Junker, P

    2015-07-01

    Galectin-3 has been suggested as a pro-inflammatory mediator in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Previous studies have reported overexpression of Galectin-3 in RA synovitis and increased levels in synovial fluid and serum in long-standing RA compared with osteoarthritis and healthy controls. Our objectives were to study whether serum Galectin-3 (1) exhibits circadian variation and/or (2) responds to exercise in RA and controls. The study on circadian patterns (1) comprised eleven patients with newly diagnosed RA, disease duration less than 6 months (ERA), 10 patients with long-standing RA [5-15 years (LRA)] and 16 self-reportedly healthy control subjects. During 24 h, 7 blood samples were drawn at 3-h intervals starting at 10 a.m. through 10 p.m. and at 7 and 10 a.m. on the following day. The study on the effect of physical activity (2) included 10 patients with ERA, 10 with LRA and 14 controls. The participants underwent a standardized exercise programme and four blood samples were drawn before, during and after exercise. Serum Galectin-3 was quantified by ELISA (R&D systems). (1) Galectin-3 was increased at baseline in both RA subsets (P = 0.08). There were no diurnal oscillations (P = 0.85). Day-to-day variation amounted to 3%. (2) Baseline Galectin-3 was increased in LRA versus controls and ERA (P < 0.01 and 0.05). Physical exercise induced 10-15% Galectin-3 increments in RA and controls (P < 0.001) peaking after 1-3 h. To conclude, Galectin-3 did not exhibit circadian variation. Day-to-day variation was 3%. Exercise elicited comparable increments in patients with RA of short and long duration and controls, approaching normal after 1-3 h.

  7. Transdifferentiation of polymorphonuclear neutrophils to dendritic-like cells at the site of inflammation in rheumatoid arthritis: evidence for activation by T cells

    PubMed Central

    Iking-Konert, C; Ostendorf, B; Sander, O; Jost, M; Wagner, C; Joosten, L; Schneider, M; Hansch, G

    2005-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate infiltrated cells in the synovial fluid (SF) of inflamed joints of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), with special reference to polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN) and their interaction with T cells. Methods: Expression on PMN of activation associated receptors CD14, CD64, CD83, and major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II was examined in the SF of 15 patients with RA, as were the infiltrated T cells. SF cytokines were determined by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). To mimic the in vivo situation, co-culture experiments were carried out using PMN and T cells of healthy donors. Results: The SF contained activated T lymphocytes and abundant PMN. SF PMN expression of CD14 and CD64 was enhanced compared with peripheral blood. Of special interest was the observation that only the SF PMN expressed MHC class II antigens and CD83. Exposure to SF, which contained considerable amounts of cytokines (for example, interferon γ (IFNγ), tumour necrosis factor α, and interleukin 2), induced a similar receptor pattern on blood derived PMN of healthy donors. Furthermore, PMN acquired MHC class II and CD83 within 24 to 48 hours, when co-cultured with autologous T cells or T cell lines. This effect was also achieved by T cell supernatants, was dependent on protein synthesis, and could be inhibited by antibodies against IFNγ. Conclusions: SF PMN from patients with RA undergo major alterations, including transdifferentiation to cells with dendritic-like characteristics, probably induced by T cell derived cytokines. Because MHC class II positive PMN are known to activate T cells, the mutual activation of PMN and T cells might contribute to the perpetuation of the local inflammatory process, and eventually to the destructive process in RA. PMID:15778239

  8. Rheumatoid nodule presenting as Morton's neuroma.

    PubMed

    Chaganti, S; Joshy, S; Hariharan, K; Rashid, M

    2013-09-01

    Among 101 feet that presented with symptoms and signs similar to Morton's neuroma, intermetatarsal rheumatoid nodules were found in five feet (three patients). Two patients had bilateral involvement. Histology of the excised tissue showed the presence of a rheumatoid nodule and Morton's neuroma in four feet and a rheumatoid nodule with unremarkable nerve bundles in one. A rheumatoid nodule can coexist with Morton's neuroma, as seen in our patients, and the presentation is often similar to that of a Morton's neuroma. Our patients were rendered asymptomatic with surgical treatment and went on to have appropriate management of rheumatoid arthritis. Rheumatoid nodule should be considered in the differential diagnosis of Morton's neuroma in not only rheumatoid arthritis patients but also asymptomatic patients who have never been tested for rheumatoid antibodies.

  9. Primary Synovial Sarcoma of the Kidney with Inferior Vena Caval Thrombus.

    PubMed

    Chandrasekaran, Deepak; Narayanaswamy, Kathiresan; Sundersingh, Shirley; Senniappan, Karthikeyan; Raja, Anand

    2016-09-01

    Synovial sarcomas occurs primarily in the soft tissues, mostly in para-articular regions of the extremities. These tumors have been described in other unusual locations like the pleura, lungs, mediastinum, and kidneys. Primary synovial sarcoma of the kidney is a recently described entity; to date, a total of approximately 35 cases have been reported. Only three cases of primary synovial sarcoma of kidney with IVC thrombus have been reported so far. Here we present the case of a 44 year old gentleman, with primary synovial sarcoma of the left kidney with caval thrombus. PMID:27651698

  10. Update on the use of rituximab for intractable rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Looney, R John

    2009-01-01

    It has been 3 years since rituximab, a mouse x human chimeric anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody that selectively depleted B cells, was approved by the FDA for the treatment of moderate to severe rheumatoid arthritis (RA) with an inadequate response to anti-TNF therapies. Since approval rituximab has become a part of standard treatment, and additional data have become available on long-term efficacy and safety both from clinical trials and from post-marketing surveillance. In open long-term follow-up from clinical trials, patients treated with multiple courses of rituximab continued to respond in terms of signs and symptoms, and damage assessed radiographically was significantly inhibited. Moreover, the rate of serious infectious events was not increased as the number of courses increased. However, because of case reports of progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy in patients treated with rituximab for non-malignant conditions, a black box warning has been added. Studies on the immunologic correlates of response to rituximab treatment including B cell subsets in peripheral blood and synovial biopsies are providing clues into how rituximab works for autoimmune disease. However, at this time we are not able to explain why some patients do not respond and cannot predict who will respond. Future challenges for the further development of rituximab for intractable RA will be discussed.

  11. Rheumatoid shoulder assessed by ultrasonography: prevalence of abnormalities and associated factors

    PubMed Central

    Elbinoune, Imane; Amine, Bouchra; Wabi, Moudjibou; Rkain, Hanan; Aktaou, Souad; Hajjaj-Hassouni, Najia

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The shoulder involvement in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is common. It can be subclinical and compromise the function of the upper limb. Musculoskeletal ultrasonography can detect subclinical abnormalities in rheumatoid shoulder. Our aim was to assess the prevalence of ultrasound abnormalities in rheumatoid shoulder, and investigate their association with different parameters. Methods Cross-sectional study including 37 patients with RA, meeting the ACR/EULAR 2010 classification criteria, who were enrolled during a month. A questionnaire with sociodemographic, clinical and laboratory data was filled in for all patients. Ultrasound evaluation was performed by a single experienced operator. For each patient, both of shoulders were evaluated. Results Mean age was 50 years with female predominance. Median disease duration of RA was 7.5 years. All patients had a seropositive form of RA. Mean clinical DAS28 was 5.1. Mean HAQ was 1.2. Thirty-one (83.8%) patients had involvement of the shoulder: unilateral in 9(24.3%) cases and bilateral in 22(59.5%) cases. Synovitis was found in 16(43.2%) patients with Doppler in 4 (10.8%) cases. Sub-acromial bursitis was noted in 14 (37.8%) cases and the effusion in 20 (54.1%). Synovitis was noted especially in elderly individuals (p: 0.01). The Doppler was visualized in elderly patients (p: 0.01), with a shorter disease duration (p: 0.02) and with a high SDAI (p: 0.006). US inflammatory findings in anterior recess of glenohumeral joint were linked to a higher synovial index (p: 0.03) and a higher level of rheumatoid factor (p: 0.01). Conclusion 59.5% of our RA patients had bilateral involvement of the shoulder which was related to the disease activity. Ultrasound should be a systematic tool to look for the involvement of this joint in RA patients. PMID:27800090

  12. Production of monoclonal antibodies against inactivated alpha 1-antitrypsin. Cross-reactivity with complexed alpha 1-antitrypsin and application in an assay to determine inactivated and complexed alpha 1-antitrypsin in biological fluids.

    PubMed

    Abbink, J J; Kamp, A M; Swaak, A J; Hack, C E

    1991-10-25

    15 different monoclonal antibodies (mcAbs) have been raised against the cleaved (inactive) form of the serpin alpha 1-antitrypsin (AT). In initial experiments these mcAbs were analysed for their ability to bind the native and the cleaved form of this inhibitor: eight of the 15 mcAbs appeared to react predominantly with cleaved AT. Additional experiments with mixtures of purified native AT, AT complexed to neutrophilic elastase and inactivated AT revealed that all mAbs that preferentially reacted with inactivated AT also bound to complexed AT. Using two of the mcAbs against inactivated AT a quantitative and sensitive sandwich-type radioimmunoassay was developed to determine levels of proteolytically inactivated AT in biological fluids. With this assay increased levels of inactivated AT were found in synovial fluid from patients with rheumatoid arthritis corresponding to about 2.4% (range 0.3-11%) of total AT. Approximately 10% of this inactivated AT appeared to consist of AT complexed to neutrophil elastase. The mcAbs described here further illustrate the structural resemblance between the complexed and cleaved forms of AT. In addition, these mcAbs appear to be useful tools for the study of AT in human disease.

  13. Auriculotemporal neuralgia secondary to TMJ synovial cyst: a rare presentation of a rare entity.

    PubMed

    Ansari, Hossein; Robertson, Carrie E; Lane, John I; Viozzi, Christopher F; Garza, Ivan

    2013-01-01

    Synovial cysts of the temporomandibular joint are rare, and to our knowledge, only 14 cases have been reported. The most common presentation is local pain and swelling. We present a case of a synovial cyst presenting with neuralgia in the distribution of the auriculotemporal nerve, initially misdiagnosed as trigeminal neuralgia.

  14. MR evaluation of synovial injury in shoulder trauma.

    PubMed

    Chalian, Majid; Soldatos, Theodoros; Faridian-Aragh, Neda; Andreisek, Gustav; McFarland, Edward G; Carrino, John A; Chhabra, Avneesh

    2011-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings relevant to synovial injury of the shoulder in patients with and without acute shoulder trauma. Three hundred and nine consecutive shoulder MRI studies (185-male, 124-female, 50 ± 15 years old) were retrospectively evaluated for findings suggestive of synovial injury including rupture and/or diverticulum of the joint capsule, bursa, and biceps tendon sheath (BTS), ganglion/synovial cyst, geyser phenomenon, and sequel of previous shoulder dislocation (Hill-Sachs deformity). Patients with one or more of these findings were included in the MR-positive group, whereas the remaining subjects were used as MR negatives. Based on their medical records, patients were also divided into trauma and non-trauma groups, and statistical analysis was performed to evaluate the association between the aforementioned MRI findings and history of shoulder trauma. Fifty-six patients were included in the MR-positive group and 253 in the MR-negative group. In MR-positive group, the incidence of capsular rupture (CR) and subacromial/subdeltoid (SASD) bursal rupture was higher in trauma patients, whereas the incidence of BTS diverticulum and ganglion cyst was higher in subjects without trauma. Significant association was found between the history of acute trauma and CR, SASD bursal rupture, BTS rupture, and Hill-Sachs deformity. In shoulder MR examination, presence of CR and/or SASD bursal rupture is strongly suggestive of acute shoulder trauma. In addition, BTS rupture and Hill-Sachs deformity are more prevalent in patients with acute shoulder trauma. The presence of these features should alert MRI readers to assess for additional trauma-related internal derangements, if a respective history has not been provided.

  15. MR evaluation of synovial injury in shoulder trauma.

    PubMed

    Chalian, Majid; Soldatos, Theodoros; Faridian-Aragh, Neda; Andreisek, Gustav; McFarland, Edward G; Carrino, John A; Chhabra, Avneesh

    2011-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings relevant to synovial injury of the shoulder in patients with and without acute shoulder trauma. Three hundred and nine consecutive shoulder MRI studies (185-male, 124-female, 50 ± 15 years old) were retrospectively evaluated for findings suggestive of synovial injury including rupture and/or diverticulum of the joint capsule, bursa, and biceps tendon sheath (BTS), ganglion/synovial cyst, geyser phenomenon, and sequel of previous shoulder dislocation (Hill-Sachs deformity). Patients with one or more of these findings were included in the MR-positive group, whereas the remaining subjects were used as MR negatives. Based on their medical records, patients were also divided into trauma and non-trauma groups, and statistical analysis was performed to evaluate the association between the aforementioned MRI findings and history of shoulder trauma. Fifty-six patients were included in the MR-positive group and 253 in the MR-negative group. In MR-positive group, the incidence of capsular rupture (CR) and subacromial/subdeltoid (SASD) bursal rupture was higher in trauma patients, whereas the incidence of BTS diverticulum and ganglion cyst was higher in subjects without trauma. Significant association was found between the history of acute trauma and CR, SASD bursal rupture, BTS rupture, and Hill-Sachs deformity. In shoulder MR examination, presence of CR and/or SASD bursal rupture is strongly suggestive of acute shoulder trauma. In addition, BTS rupture and Hill-Sachs deformity are more prevalent in patients with acute shoulder trauma. The presence of these features should alert MRI readers to assess for additional trauma-related internal derangements, if a respective history has not been provided. PMID:21735271

  16. Screening of gene signatures for rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis based on bioinformatics analysis

    PubMed Central

    He, Peiheng; Zhang, Ziji; Liao, Weiming; Xu, Dongliang; Fu, Ming; Kang, Yan

    2016-01-01

    The current study aimed to identify gene signatures during rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and osteoarthritis (OA), and used these to elucidate the underlying modular mechanisms. Using the Gene Expression Omnibus database, the present study obtained the GSE7669 mRNA expression microarray data from RA and OA synovial fibroblasts (n=6 each). The differentially expressed genes (DEGs) in RA synovial samples compared with OA samples were identified using the Linear Models for Microarray Analysis package. The Gene Ontology and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes pathway enrichment analyses were performed using the Database for Annotation Visualization and Integrated Discovery. A protein-protein interaction network was constructed and the modules were further analyzed using the Molecular Complex Detection plugin of Cytoscape. A total of 181 DEGs were identified by comparing RA and OA synovial samples (96 up- and 85 downregulated genes). The significant DEGs in module 1, including collagen, type I, α 1 (COL1A1), COL3A1, COL4A1 and COL11A1, were predominantly enriched in the extracellular matrix (ECM)-receptor interaction and focal adhesion pathways. Additionally, significant DEGs in module 2, including radical S-adenosyl methionine domain containing 2 (RSAD2), 2′-5′-oligoadenylate synthetase 2 (OAS2), myxovirus (influenza virus) resistance 1 (MX1) and ISG15 ubiquitin-like modifier (ISG15), were predominantly associated with immune function pathways. In conclusion, the present study indicated that RSAD2, OAS2, MX1 and ISG15 may be notable gene signatures in RA development via regulation of the immune response. COL3A1, COL4A1, COL1A1 and COL11A1 may be important gene signatures in OA development via involvement in the pathways of ECM-receptor interactions and focal adhesions. PMID:27356888

  17. Screening of gene signatures for rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis based on bioinformatics analysis.

    PubMed

    He, Peiheng; Zhang, Ziji; Liao, Weiming; Xu, Dongliang; Fu, Ming; Kang, Yan

    2016-08-01

    The current study aimed to identify gene signatures during rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and osteoarthritis (OA), and used these to elucidate the underlying modular mechanisms. Using the Gene Expression Omnibus database, the present study obtained the GSE7669 mRNA expression microarray data from RA and OA synovial fibroblasts (n=6 each). The differentially expressed genes (DEGs) in RA synovial samples compared with OA samples were identified using the Linear Models for Microarray Analysis package. The Gene Ontology and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes pathway enrichment analyses were performed using the Database for Annotation Visualization and Integrated Discovery. A protein‑protein interaction network was constructed and the modules were further analyzed using the Molecular Complex Detection plugin of Cytoscape. A total of 181 DEGs were identified by comparing RA and OA synovial samples (96 up‑ and 85 downregulated genes). The significant DEGs in module 1, including collagen, type I, α 1 (COL1A1), COL3A1, COL4A1 and COL11A1, were predominantly enriched in the extracellular matrix (ECM)‑receptor interaction and focal adhesion pathways. Additionally, significant DEGs in module 2, including radical S‑adenosyl methionine domain containing 2 (RSAD2), 2'‑5'‑oligoadenylate synthetase 2 (OAS2), myxovirus (influenza virus) resistance 1 (MX1) and ISG15 ubiquitin‑like modifier (ISG15), were predominantly associated with immune function pathways. In conclusion, the present study indicated that RSAD2, OAS2, MX1 and ISG15 may be notable gene signatures in RA development via regulation of the immune response. COL3A1, COL4A1, COL1A1 and COL11A1 may be important gene signatures in OA development via involvement in the pathways of ECM-receptor interactions and focal adhesions. PMID:27356888

  18. HMGB1 induces angiogenesis in rheumatoid arthritis via HIF-1α activation.

    PubMed

    Park, So Youn; Lee, Sung Won; Kim, Hye Young; Lee, Won Suk; Hong, Ki Whan; Kim, Chi Dae

    2015-04-01

    High-mobility group box protein 1 (HMGB1), a nonhistone nuclear protein and a cytokine mediator, is implicated in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Extracellular HMGB1 binds to its receptors and triggers downstream signal cascade leading to the perpetuation of synovitis and local tissue invasion. Here, we investigated a novel role of HMGB1 in regulating hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1α to mediate angiogenesis in RA synovium. HIF-1α mRNA levels and activities in synovial fibroblasts from RA patients were enhanced by HMGB1. Pharmacological inhibition of TLR4 and NF-kappaB activation blocked the HMGB1-dependent upregulation of HIF-1α mRNA expression and its activity, suggesting the involvement of transcriptional regulation. HMGB1 stimulated expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and inhibition of HIF-1α attenuated HMGB1-induced VEGF. Conditioned media derived from HMGB1-stimulated synovial fibroblasts enhanced tube formation in human microvascular endothelial cells by upregulating HIF-1α. In the joint tissues of mice with collagen-induced arthritis, treatment with anti-HMGB1 neutralizing antibody prevented blood vessel formation in association with decreased expression of HIF-1α. These observations support the idea that increased HMGB1 induces an extension of inflamed synovium by accelerating angiogenesis in RA through enhancement of HIF-1α activation. Therefore, inhibition of HMGB1 could prove beneficial for the treatment of angiogenesis in RA. PMID:25545169

  19. Subcutaneous Phaeohyphomycosis Due to Pyrenochaeta romeroi Mimicking a Synovial Cyst.

    PubMed

    Dinh, Aurélien; Levy, Bruno; Bouchand, Frédérique; Davido, Benjamin; Duran, Clara; Cristi, Marin; Felter, Adrien; Salomon, Jérôme; Ait Ammar, Nawel

    2016-01-01

    Opportunistic subcutaneous fungal infections are increasing nowadays due to the growing number of medical conditions causing immunosuppression, especially organ transplant. The incidence rate of subcutaneous phaeohyphomycosis is very low. Most studies found are case reports. They showed a wide variation of clinical presentations. Pyrenochaeta romeroi, a fungus from the Dematiaceae group is a saprophyte found in soil and plants and a possible causative agent of phaeohyphomycosis. We present a rare case of subcutaneous phaeohyphomycosis caused by P. romeroi mimicking a synovial cyst in a diabetic patient. PMID:27630637

  20. GUYON'S CANAL SYNDROME DUE TO A SYNOVIAL CYST

    PubMed Central

    Ruas, Evandro Silva; Castilho, Rodrigo Simões; Maia, Philipe Eduardo Carvalho; Melo, Gustavus Lemos Ribeiro

    2015-01-01

    We present a case of Guyon's canal syndrome caused by a synovial cyst within the left wrist of a 48-year-old female patient. The patient presented pain and paresthesia in the region of the ulnar nerve, with loss of muscle strength and left-hand deformity. Electroneuromyography showed a compression of the ulnar nerve at the wrist level. Surgical decompression of the nerve at Guyon's canal with resection of the cyst was performed. After the surgery, the patient presented an improvement in the pain and paresthesia, as well as an increase in muscle trophism and correction of the deformity. PMID:27026975

  1. Subcutaneous Phaeohyphomycosis Due to Pyrenochaeta romeroi Mimicking a Synovial Cyst.

    PubMed

    Dinh, Aurélien; Levy, Bruno; Bouchand, Frédérique; Davido, Benjamin; Duran, Clara; Cristi, Marin; Felter, Adrien; Salomon, Jérôme; Ait Ammar, Nawel

    2016-01-01

    Opportunistic subcutaneous fungal infections are increasing nowadays due to the growing number of medical conditions causing immunosuppression, especially organ transplant. The incidence rate of subcutaneous phaeohyphomycosis is very low. Most studies found are case reports. They showed a wide variation of clinical presentations. Pyrenochaeta romeroi, a fungus from the Dematiaceae group is a saprophyte found in soil and plants and a possible causative agent of phaeohyphomycosis. We present a rare case of subcutaneous phaeohyphomycosis caused by P. romeroi mimicking a synovial cyst in a diabetic patient.

  2. Subcutaneous Phaeohyphomycosis Due to Pyrenochaeta romeroi Mimicking a Synovial Cyst

    PubMed Central

    Dinh, Aurélien; Levy, Bruno; Bouchand, Frédérique; Davido, Benjamin; Duran, Clara; Cristi, Marin; Felter, Adrien; Salomon, Jérôme; Ait Ammar, Nawel

    2016-01-01

    Opportunistic subcutaneous fungal infections are increasing nowadays due to the growing number of medical conditions causing immunosuppression, especially organ transplant. The incidence rate of subcutaneous phaeohyphomycosis is very low. Most studies found are case reports. They showed a wide variation of clinical presentations. Pyrenochaeta romeroi, a fungus from the Dematiaceae group is a saprophyte found in soil and plants and a possible causative agent of phaeohyphomycosis. We present a rare case of subcutaneous phaeohyphomycosis caused by P. romeroi mimicking a synovial cyst in a diabetic patient.

  3. Subcutaneous Phaeohyphomycosis Due to Pyrenochaeta romeroi Mimicking a Synovial Cyst

    PubMed Central

    Dinh, Aurélien; Levy, Bruno; Bouchand, Frédérique; Davido, Benjamin; Duran, Clara; Cristi, Marin; Felter, Adrien; Salomon, Jérôme; Ait Ammar, Nawel

    2016-01-01

    Opportunistic subcutaneous fungal infections are increasing nowadays due to the growing number of medical conditions causing immunosuppression, especially organ transplant. The incidence rate of subcutaneous phaeohyphomycosis is very low. Most studies found are case reports. They showed a wide variation of clinical presentations. Pyrenochaeta romeroi, a fungus from the Dematiaceae group is a saprophyte found in soil and plants and a possible causative agent of phaeohyphomycosis. We present a rare case of subcutaneous phaeohyphomycosis caused by P. romeroi mimicking a synovial cyst in a diabetic patient. PMID:27630637

  4. Annexin A2 is a target of autoimmune T and B cell responses associated with synovial fibroblast proliferation in patients with antibiotic-refractory Lyme arthritis.

    PubMed

    Pianta, Annalisa; Drouin, Elise E; Crowley, Jameson T; Arvikar, Sheila; Strle, Klemen; Costello, Catherine E; Steere, Allen C

    2015-10-01

    In this study, autoantibody responses to annexin A2 were found in 11-15% of 278 patients with Lyme disease, including in those with erythema migrans (EM), an early sign of the illness, and in those with antibiotic-responsive or antibiotic-refractory Lyme arthritis (LA), a late disease manifestation. In contrast, robust T cell reactivity to annexin A2 peptides was found only in patients with responsive or refractory LA. In LA patients, annexin A2 protein levels, which were higher in the refractory group, correlated with annexin A2 antibody levels in sera and synovial fluid