Science.gov

Sample records for rhic insulating vacuum

  1. Modeling of RHIC insulating vacuum for system pumpdown characteristics

    SciTech Connect

    Todd, R.J.; Pate, D.J.; Welch, K.M.

    1993-06-01

    This paper presents a model for predicting the pumpdown characteristics of a 480 m RHIC (Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider) vacuum cryostat. The longitudinal and transverse conductances of a typical cryostat were calculated. A voltage analogue of these conductances was constructed for room temperature conditions. The total longitudinal conductance of a room temperature cryostat was thereby achieved. This conductance was then used to calculate the diameter of an equivalent long outgassing tube, having more convenient analytical expressions for pressure profiles when pumped. The equivalent of a unit outgassing rate for this tube was obtained using previously published MLI (multi-layer insulation) outgassing data. With this model one is then able to predict a cryostat pumpdown rate as a function of the location and size of roughing pumps.

  2. Modeling of RHIC insulating vacuum for system pumpdown characteristics

    SciTech Connect

    Todd, R.J.; Pate, D.J.; Welch, K.M.

    1993-06-01

    This paper presents a model for predicting the pumpdown characteristics of a 480 m RHIC (Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider) vacuum cryostat. The longitudinal and transverse conductances of a typical cryostat were calculated. A voltage analogue of these conductances was constructed for room temperature conditions. The total longitudinal conductance of a room temperature cryostat was thereby achieved. This conductance was then used to calculate the diameter of an equivalent long outgassing tube, having more convenient analytical expressions for pressure profiles when pumped. The equivalent of a unit outgassing rate for this tube was obtained using previously published MLI (multi-layer insulation) outgassing data. With this model one is then able to predict a cryostat pumpdown rate as a function of the location and size of roughing pumps.

  3. Compact vacuum insulation

    DOEpatents

    Benson, D.K.; Potter, T.F.

    1993-01-05

    An ultra-thin compact vacuum insulation panel is comprised of two hard, but bendable metal wall sheets closely spaced apart from each other and welded around the edges to enclose a vacuum chamber. Glass or ceramic spacers hold the wall sheets apart. The spacers can be discrete spherical beads or monolithic sheets of glass or ceramic webs with nodules protruding therefrom to form essentially point'' or line'' contacts with the metal wall sheets. In the case of monolithic spacers that form line'' contacts, two such spacers with the line contacts running perpendicular to each other form effectively point'' contacts at the intersections. Corrugations accommodate bending and expansion, tubular insulated pipes and conduits, and preferred applications are also included.

  4. Compact vacuum insulation embodiments

    DOEpatents

    Benson, David K.; Potter, Thomas F.

    1992-01-01

    An ultra-thin compact vacuum insulation panel is comprised of two hard, but bendable metal wall sheets closely spaced apart from each other and welded around the edges to enclose a vacuum chamber. Glass or ceramic spacers hold the wall sheets apart. The spacers can be discrete spherical beads or monolithic sheets of glass or ceramic webs with nodules protruding therefrom to form essentially "point" or "line" contacts with the metal wall sheets. In the case of monolithic spacers that form "line" contacts, two such spacers with the line contacts running perpendicular to each other form effectively "point" contacts at the intersections. Corrugations accommodate bending and expansion, tubular insulated pipes and conduits, and preferred applications are also included.

  5. Compact vacuum insulation

    DOEpatents

    Benson, David K.; Potter, Thomas F.

    1993-01-01

    An ultra-thin compact vacuum insulation panel is comprised of two hard, but bendable metal wall sheets closely spaced apart from each other and welded around the edges to enclose a vacuum chamber. Glass or ceramic spacers hold the wall sheets apart. The spacers can be discrete spherical beads or monolithic sheets of glass or ceramic webs with nodules protruding therefrom to form essentially "point" or "line" contacts with the metal wall sheets. In the case of monolithic spacers that form "line" contacts, two such spacers with the line contacts running perpendicular to each other form effectively "point" contacts at the intersections. Corrugations accommodate bending and expansion, tubular insulated pipes and conduits, and preferred applications are also included.

  6. Compact vacuum insulation embodiments

    DOEpatents

    Benson, D.K.; Potter, T.F.

    1992-04-28

    An ultra-thin compact vacuum insulation panel is comprised of two hard, but bendable metal wall sheets closely spaced apart from each other and welded around the edges to enclose a vacuum chamber. Glass or ceramic spacers hold the wall sheets apart. The spacers can be discrete spherical beads or monolithic sheets of glass or ceramic webs with nodules protruding therefrom to form essentially point' or line' contacts with the metal wall sheets. In the case of monolithic spacers that form line' contacts, two such spacers with the line contacts running perpendicular to each other form effectively point' contacts at the intersections. Corrugations accommodate bending and expansion, tubular insulated pipes and conduits, and preferred applications are also included. 26 figs.

  7. Small gap magnets and vacuum chambers for eRHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Meng,W.; Bengtsson, J.; Hao, Y.; Mahler, G.; Tuozzolo, J.; Litvinenko, V. N.

    2009-05-04

    eRHIC[1][2][3], a future high luminosity electron-ion collider at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), will add polarized electrons to the list of colliding species in RHIC. A 10-30 GeV electron energy recovery linac (ERL) will require up to six passes around the RHIC 3.8 km circumference. We are developing and testing small (5 mm) gap dipole and quadrupole magnets and vacuum chambers for cost-effective eRHIC passes [4]. We are also studying the sensitivity of eRHIC pass optics to magnet and alignment errors in such a small magnet structure. We present the magnetic and mechanical designs of the small gap eRHIC components and prototyping test progress.

  8. Compact vacuum insulation

    DOEpatents

    Benson, D.K.; Potter, T.F.

    1992-10-27

    Improved compact insulation panel is provided which is comprised of two adjacent metal sheets spaced close together with a plurality of spherical, or other discretely shaped, glass or ceramic beads optimally positioned between the sheets to provide support and maintain the spacing between the metal sheets when the gases there between are evacuated to form a vacuum. These spherical glass beads provide the maximum support while minimizing thermal conductance. In its preferred embodiment; these two metal sheets are textured with ribs or concave protrusions in conjunction with the glass beads to maximize the structural integrity of the panels while increasing the spacing between beads, thereby reducing the number of beads and the number of thermal conduction paths. Glass or porcelain-enameled liners in combination with the glass spacers and metal sidewalls effectively decrease thermal conductivity, and various laminates, including wood, porcelain-enameled metal, and others effectively increase the strength and insulation capabilities of the panels. Also, a metal web is provided to hold the spacers in place, and strategic grooves are shown to accommodate expansion and contraction or shaping of the panels. 35 figs.

  9. Compact vacuum insulation

    DOEpatents

    Benson, David K.; Potter, Thomas F.

    1992-01-01

    Improved compact insulation panel is provided which is comprised of two adjacent metal sheets spaced close together with a plurality of spherical, or other discretely shaped, glass or ceramic beads optimally positioned between the sheets to provide support and maintain the spacing between the metal sheets when the gases therebetween are evacuated to form a vacuum. These spherical glass beads provide the maximum support while minimizing thermal conductance. In its preferred embodiment; these two metal sheets are textured with ribs or concave protrusions in conjunction with the glass beads to maximize the structural integrity of the panels while increasing the spacing between beads, thereby reducing the number of beads and the number of thermal conduction paths. Glass or porcelain-enameled liners in combination with the glass spacers and metal sidewalls effectively decrease thermal conductivity, and variious laminates, including wood, porcelain-enameled metal, and others effectively increase the strength and insulation capabilities of the panels. Also, a metal web is provided to hold the spacers in place, and strategic grooves are shown to accommodate expansion and contraction or shaping of the panels.

  10. Repetitively pulsed vacuum insulator flashover

    SciTech Connect

    Ginn, J.W.; Buttram, M.T.

    1987-01-01

    Experiments were performed to determine the flashover strength of various vacuum insulators under conditions of repetitive pulsing. The pulse duration was 30 ns, and the thickness of a typical insulator sample was 1.8 cm. Data were taken for 45 insulators from five different materials. An insulator was subjected to an extended series of pulses at a given repetition rate and field. If flashover was not detected, the field level was increased and the sequence repeated. At rates up to 50 pulses per second, there was no apparent dependence of flashover field on rate. In addition, some ''single shot'' data were taken, including various modifications of the geometries and surface textures of the insulators. Only two to the modifications increased the flashover strength significantly over that of a 45 sample: (1) annealing some plastics (roughly a 35% increase), and (2) extending the insulator to cover the surfaces of both electrodes (an increase of nearly a factor of two).

  11. Vacuum foil insulation system

    DOEpatents

    Hanson, John P.; Sabolcik, Rudolph E.; Svedberg, Robert C.

    1976-11-16

    In a multifoil thermal insulation package having a plurality of concentric cylindrical cups, means are provided for reducing heat loss from the penetration region which extends through the cups. At least one cup includes an integral skirt extending from one end of the cup to intersection with the penetration means. Assembly of the insulation package with the skirted cup is facilitated by splitting the cup to allow it to be opened up and fitted around the other cups during assembly.

  12. Vacuum-insulated catalytic converter

    DOEpatents

    Benson, David K.

    2001-01-01

    A catalytic converter has an inner canister that contains catalyst-coated substrates and an outer canister that encloses an annular, variable vacuum insulation chamber surrounding the inner canister. An annular tank containing phase-change material for heat storage and release is positioned in the variable vacuum insulation chamber a distance spaced part from the inner canister. A reversible hydrogen getter in the variable vacuum insulation chamber, preferably on a surface of the heat storage tank, releases hydrogen into the variable vacuum insulation chamber to conduct heat when the phase-change material is hot and absorbs the hydrogen to limit heat transfer to radiation when the phase-change material is cool. A porous zeolite trap in the inner canister absorbs and retains hydrocarbons from the exhaust gases when the catalyst-coated substrates and zeolite trap are cold and releases the hydrocarbons for reaction on the catalyst-coated substrate when the zeolite trap and catalyst-coated substrate get hot.

  13. Improved Aerogel Vacuum Thermal Insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruemmele, Warren P.; Bue, Grant C.

    2009-01-01

    An improved design concept for aerogel vacuum thermal-insulation panels calls for multiple layers of aerogel sandwiched between layers of aluminized Mylar (or equivalent) poly(ethylene terephthalate), as depicted in the figure. This concept is applicable to both the rigid (brick) form and the flexible (blanket) form of aerogel vacuum thermal-insulation panels. Heretofore, the fabrication of a typical aerogel vacuum insulating panel has involved encapsulation of a single layer of aerogel in poly(ethylene terephthalate) and pumping of gases out of the aerogel-filled volume. A multilayer panel according to the improved design concept is fabricated in basically the same way: Multiple alternating layers of aerogel and aluminized poly(ethylene terephthalate) are assembled, then encapsulated in an outer layer of poly(ethylene terephthalate), and then the volume containing the multilayer structure is evacuated as in the single-layer case. The multilayer concept makes it possible to reduce effective thermal conductivity of a panel below that of a comparable single-layer panel, without adding weight or incurring other performance penalties. Implementation of the multilayer concept is simple and relatively inexpensive, involving only a few additional fabrication steps to assemble the multiple layers prior to evacuation. For a panel of the blanket type, the multilayer concept, affords the additional advantage of reduced stiffness.

  14. UPGRADE OF RHIC VACUUM SYSTEMS FOR HIGH LUMINOSITY OPERATION.

    SciTech Connect

    HSEUH, H.C.; MAPES, M.; SMART, L.A.; TODD, R.; WEISS, D.

    2005-05-16

    With increasing ion beam intensity during recent RHIC operations, rapid pressure rises of several decades were observed at most warm sections and at a few cold sections. The pressure rises are associated with electron multi-pacting, electron stimulated desorption and beam ion induced desorption and have been one of the major intensity and luminosity limiting factors for RHIC. Improvement of the warm sections has been carried out in the last few years. Extensive in-situ bakes, additional UHV pumping and anti-grazing ridges have been implemented. Several hundred meters of NEG coated beam pipes have been installed and activated. Vacuum monitoring and logging were enhanced. Preventive measures, such as pumping before cool down to reduce monolayer condensates, were also taken to suppress the pressure rises in the cold sections. The effectiveness of these measures in reducing the pressure rises during machine studies and during physics runs are discussed and summarized.

  15. Helium pressures in RHIC vacuum cryostats and relief valve requirements from magnet cooling line failure

    SciTech Connect

    Liaw, C.J.; Than, Y.; Tuozzolo, J.

    2011-03-28

    A catastrophic failure of the RHIC magnet cooling lines, similar to the LHC superconducting bus failure incident, would pressurize the insulating vacuum in the magnet and transfer line cryostats. Insufficient relief valves on the cryostats could cause a structural failure. A SINDA/FLUINT{reg_sign} model, which simulated the 4.5K/4 atm helium flowing through the magnet cooling system distribution lines, then through a line break into the vacuum cryostat and discharging via the reliefs into the RHIC tunnel, had been developed to calculate the helium pressure inside the cryostat. Arc flash energy deposition and heat load from the ambient temperature cryostat surfaces were included in the simulations. Three typical areas: the sextant arc, the Triplet/DX/D0 magnets, and the injection area, had been analyzed. Existing relief valve sizes were reviewed to make sure that the maximum stresses, caused by the calculated maximum pressures inside the cryostats, did not exceed the allowable stresses, based on the ASME Code B31.3 and ANSYS results. The conclusions are as follows: (1) The S/F simulation results show that the highest internal pressure in the cryostats, due to the magnet line failure, is {approx}37 psig (255115 Pa); (2) Based on the simulation, the temperature on the cryostat chamber, INJ Q8-Q9, could drop to 228 K, which is lower than the material minimum design temperature allowed by the Code; (3) Based on the ASME Code and ANSYS results, the reliefs on all the cryostats inside the RHIC tunnel are adequate to protect the vacuum chambers when the magnet cooling lines fail; and (4) In addition to the pressure loading, the thermal deformations, due to the temperature decrease on the cryostat chambers, could also cause a high stress on the chamber, if not properly supported.

  16. Electrical Strength of Multilayer Vacuum Insulators

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, J R; Kendig, M; Poole, B; Sanders, D M; Caporaso, G J

    2008-07-01

    The electrical strength of vacuum insulators is a key constraint in the design of particle accelerators and pulsed power systems. Vacuum insulating structures assembled from alternating layers of metal and dielectric can result in improved performance compared to conventional insulators, but previous attempts to optimize their design have yielded seemingly inconsistent results. Here, we present two models for the electrical strength of these structures, one assuming failure by vacuum arcing between adjacent metal layers and the other assuming failure by vacuum surface flashover. These models predict scaling laws which are in agreement with the experimental data currently available.

  17. Cryogenic Insulation System for Soft Vacuum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Augustynowicz, S. D.; Fesmire, J. E.

    1999-01-01

    The development of a cryogenic insulation system for operation under soft vacuum is presented in this paper. Conventional insulation materials for cryogenic applications can be divided into three levels of thermal performance, in terms of apparent thermal conductivity [k-value in milliwatt per meter-kelvin (mW/m-K)]. System k-values below 0.1 can be achieved for multilayer insulation operating at a vacuum level below 1 x 10(exp -4) torr. For fiberglass or powder operating below 1 x 10(exp -3) torr, k-values of about 2 are obtained. For foam and other materials at ambient pressure, k-values around 30 are typical. New industry and aerospace applications require a versatile, robust, low-cost thermal insulation with performance in the intermediate range. The target for the new composite insulation system is a k-value below 4.8 mW/m-K (R-30) at a soft vacuum level (from 1 to 10 torr) and boundary temperatures of approximately 77 and 293 kelvin (K). Many combinations of radiation shields, spacers, and composite materials were tested from high vacuum to ambient pressure using cryostat boiloff methods. Significant improvement over conventional systems in the soft vacuum range was demonstrated. The new layered composite insulation system was also shown to provide key benefits for high vacuum applications as well.

  18. A Review of Maintenance of Vacuum inside Vacuum Insulation Panels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Chun Guang; Xu, Lie

    The growing concerns over global energy crisis and the phasing out of polyurethane foams blown with CFC-11, which has high Ozone Depletion Potential(ODP), have pushed thermal insulation technology to improve its efficiency. Vacuum Insulation Panel(VIP) has been regarded as a super thermal insulation material with a thermal resistance of about 5-10 times higher than conventional thermal insulation. Appropriate vacuum in VIP is one of the most important factors contributing to the long term heat insulation performance of VIP. In this paper, the researches on three factors, which influence internal pressure inside VIP, including gas and water vapor permeation through the barrier, gas absorption by getters and desiccants and outgassing of the kernel, were reviewed respectively. Following this, the research emphasis and suggestions, which should be paid attention to, were summarized.

  19. Nearly Seamless Vacuum-Insulated Boxes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stepanian, Christopher J.; Ou, Danny; Hu, Xiangjun

    2010-01-01

    A design concept, and a fabrication process that would implement the design concept, have been proposed for nearly seamless vacuum-insulated boxes that could be the main structural components of a variety of controlled-temperature containers, including common household refrigerators and insulating containers for shipping foods. In a typical case, a vacuum-insulated box would be shaped like a rectangular parallelepiped conventional refrigerator box having five fully closed sides and a hinged door on the sixth side. Although it is possible to construct the five-closed-side portion of the box as an assembly of five unitary vacuum-insulated panels, it is not desirable to do so because the relatively high thermal conductances of the seams between the panels would contribute significant amounts of heat leakage, relative to the leakage through the panels themselves. In contrast, the proposal would make it possible to reduce heat leakage by constructing the five-closed-side portion of the box plus the stationary portion (if any) of the sixth side as a single, seamless unit; the only remaining seam would be the edge seal around the door. The basic cross-sectional configuration of each side of a vacuum-insulated box according to the proposal would be that of a conventional vacuum-insulated panel: a low-density, porous core material filling a partially evacuated space between face sheets. However, neither the face sheets nor the core would be conventional. The face sheets would be opposite sides of a vacuum bag. The core material would be a flexible polymer-modified silica aerogel of the type described in Silica/Polymer and Silica/Polymer/Fiber Composite Aero - gels (MSC-23736) in this issue of NASA Tech Briefs. As noted in that article, the stiffness of this core material against compression is greater than that of prior aerogels. This is an important advantage because it translates to greater retention of thickness and, hence, of insulation performance when pressure is

  20. Laser sealed vacuum insulation window

    DOEpatents

    Benson, David K.; Tracy, C. Edwin

    1987-01-01

    A laser sealed evacuated window panel is comprised of two glass panes held spaced apart in relation to each other by a plurality of spherical glass beads and glass welded around the edges to provide an evacuated space between the glass panes that is completely glass sealed from the exterior. The glass welded edge seal is obtained by welding the edges of the glass panes together with a laser beam while the glass panes and bead spacers are positioned in a vacuum furnace and heated to the annealing point of the glass to avoid stress fracture in the area of the glass weld. The laser welding in the furnace can be directed around the perimeter of the glass panel by a combination of rotating the glass panel and linearly translating or aiming the laser with a relay mirror.

  1. Laser sealed vacuum insulating window

    DOEpatents

    Benson, D.K.; Tracy, C.E.

    1985-08-19

    A laser sealed evacuated window panel is comprised of two glass panes held spaced apart in relation to each other by a plurality of spherical glass beads and glass welded around the edges to provide an evacuated space between the glass panes that is completely glass sealed from the exterior. The glass welded edge seal is obtained by welding the edges of the glass panes together with a laser beam while the glass panes and bead spacers are positioned in a vacuum furnace and heated to the annealing point of the glass to avoid stress fracture in the area of the glass weld. The laser welding in the furnace can be directed around the perimeter of the galss panel by a combination of rotating the glass panel and linearly translating or aiming the laser with a relay mirror.

  2. Cryogenic Vacuum Insulation for Vessels and Piping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kogan, A.; Fesmire, J.; Johnson, W.; Minnick, J.

    2010-01-01

    Cryogenic vacuum insulation systems, with proper materials selection and execution, can offer the highest levels of thermal performance. Three areas of consideration are vital to achieve the optimum result: materials, representative test conditions, and engineering approach for the particular application. Deficiency in one of these three areas can prevent optimum performance and lead to severe inefficiency. Materials of interest include micro-fiberglass, multilayer insulation, and composite arrangements. Cylindrical liquid nitrogen boil-off calorimetry methods were used. The need for standard thermal conductivity data is addressed through baseline testing. Engineering analysis and design factors such as layer thickness, density, and practicality are also considered.

  3. Vacuum Insulator Studies for the Dielectric Wall Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, J R; Chen, Y J; Blackfield, D; Sanders, D M; Caporaso, G J; Krogh, M

    2007-06-11

    As part of our ongoing development of the Dielectric Wall Accelerator, we are studying the performance of multilayer high-gradient insulators. These vacuum insulating structures are composed of thin, alternating layers of metal and dielectric, and have been shown to withstand higher gradients than conventional vacuum insulator materials. This paper describes these structures and presents some of our recent results.

  4. Electrostatic Modeling of Vacuum Insulator Triple Junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Tully, L K; Goerz, D A; Houck, T L; Javedani, J B

    2006-10-25

    Triple junctions are often initiation points for insulator flashover in pulsed power devices. The two-dimensional finite-element TriComp [1] modeling software suite was utilized for its electrostatic field modeling package to investigate electric field behavior in the anode and cathode triple junctions of a high voltage vacuum-insulator interface. TriComp enables simple extraction of values from a macroscopic solution for use as boundary conditions in a subset solution. Electric fields computed with this zoom capability correlate with theoretical analysis of the anode and cathode triple junctions within submicron distances for nominal electrode spacing of 1.0 cm. This paper will discuss the iterative zoom process with TriComp finite-element software and the corresponding theoretical verification of the results.

  5. Radiation-controlled dynamic vacuum insulation

    DOEpatents

    Benson, David K.; Potter, Thomas F.

    1995-01-01

    A compact vacuum insulation panel comprising a chamber enclosed by two sheets of metal, glass-like spaces disposed in the chamber between the sidewalls, and a high-grade vacuum in the chamber that includes apparatus and methods for enabling and disabling, or turning "on" and "off" the thermal insulating capability of the panel. One type of enabling and disabling apparatus and method includes a metal hydride for releasing hydrogen gas into the chamber in response to heat, and a hydrogen grate between the metal hydride and the chamber for selectively preventing and allowing return of the hydrogen gas to the metal hydride. Another type of enabling and disabling apparatus and method includes a variable emissivity coating on the sheets of metal in which the emissivity is controllably variable by heat or electricity. Still another type of enabling and disabling apparatus and method includes metal-to-metal contact devices that can be actuated to establish or break metal-to-metal heat paths or thermal short circuits between the metal sidewalls.

  6. Radiation-controlled dynamic vacuum insulation

    DOEpatents

    Benson, D.K.; Potter, T.F.

    1995-07-18

    A compact vacuum insulation panel is described comprising a chamber enclosed by two sheets of metal, glass-like spaces disposed in the chamber between the sidewalls, and a high-grade vacuum in the chamber that includes apparatus and methods for enabling and disabling, or turning ``on`` and ``off`` the thermal insulating capability of the panel. One type of enabling and disabling apparatus and method includes a metal hydride for releasing hydrogen gas into the chamber in response to heat, and a hydrogen grate between the metal hydride and the chamber for selectively preventing and allowing return of the hydrogen gas to the metal hydride. Another type of enabling and disabling apparatus and method includes a variable emissivity coating on the sheets of metal in which the emissivity is controllably variable by heat or electricity. Still another type of enabling and disabling apparatus and method includes metal-to-metal contact devices that can be actuated to establish or break metal-to-metal heat paths or thermal short circuits between the metal sidewalls. 25 figs.

  7. Material-controlled dynamic vacuum insulation

    DOEpatents

    Benson, D.K.; Potter, T.F.

    1996-10-08

    A compact vacuum insulation panel is described comprising a chamber enclosed by two sheets of metal, glass-like spaces disposed in the chamber between the sidewalls, and a high-grade vacuum in the chamber includes apparatus and methods for enabling and disabling, or turning ``on`` and ``off`` the thermal insulating capability of the panel. One type of enabling and disabling apparatus and method includes a metal hydride for releasing hydrogen gas into the chamber in response to heat, and a hydrogen grate between the metal hydride and the chamber for selectively preventing and allowing return of the hydrogen gas to the metal hydride. Another type of enabling and disabling apparatus and method includes a variable emissivity coating on the sheets of metal in which the emissivity is controllably variable by heat or electricity. Still another type of enabling and disabling apparatus and method includes metal-to-metal contact devices that can be actuated to establish or break metal-to-metal heat paths or thermal short circuits between the metal sidewalls. 25 figs.

  8. Material-controlled dynamic vacuum insulation

    DOEpatents

    Benson, David K.; Potter, Thomas F.

    1996-10-08

    A compact vacuum insulation panel comprising a chamber enclosed by two sheets of metal, glass-like spaces disposed in the chamber between the sidewalls, and a high-grade vacuum in the chamber includes apparatus and methods for enabling and disabling, or turning "on" and "off" the thermal insulating capability of the panel. One type of enabling and disabling apparatus and method includes a metal hydride for releasing hydrogen gas into the chamber in response to heat, and a hydrogen grate between the metal hydride and the chamber for selectively preventing and allowing return of the hydrogen gas to the metal hydride. Another type of enabling and disabling apparatus and method includes a variable emissivity coating on the sheets of metal in which the emissivity is controllably variable by heat or electricity. Still another type of enabling and disabling apparatus and method includes metal-to-metal contact devices that can be actuated to establish or break metal-to-metal heat paths or thermal short circuits between the metal sidewalls.

  9. Outgassing of solid material into vacuum thermal insulation spaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Pao-Lien

    1994-01-01

    Many cryogenic storage tanks use vacuum between inner and outer tank for thermal insulation. These cryogenic tanks also use a radiation shield barrier in the vacuum space to prevent radiation heat transfer. This shield is usually constructed by using multiple wraps of aluminized mylar and glass paper as inserts. For obtaining maximum thermal performance, a good vacuum level must be maintained with the insulation system. It has been found that over a period of time solid insulation materials will vaporize into the vacuum space and the vacuum will degrade. In order to determine the degradation of vacuum, the rate of outgassing of the insulation materials must be determined. Outgassing rate of several insulation materials obtained from literature search were listed in tabular form.

  10. Study on a fast loading high vacuum multilayer insulation (MLI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Xian; Zhang, Sheng; Wang, Bo; Gan, Zhihu; Ying, Jianming; Zhang, Chunlin

    2014-01-01

    With the continuous development of vacuum technology, the proportion of high vacuum multilayer insulation method in all kinds of insulation methods is growing [1]. For large cryogenic tanks, the multilayer insulation traditional layer by layer winding way is very inconvenient and takes a lot of time. Different layer density of the multilayer insulation material leads to different thermal insulation performance [2]. Because of the influence of man-made factors, the traditional way of winding is difficult to achieve a consistent density. This paper compared the fast loading type insulation and traditional insulation in a different degree of vacuum, it can be seen that the apparent thermal conductivity of these two types is similar. But fast loading multilayer insulation material is more convenient on the installation and it can eliminate the man-made factors. So it has practical value in engineering applications.

  11. Design Criteria for the Z Vacuum Insulator Stack

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-06-01

    spacings predicted to be safe against breakdown or loss. This paper deals with the design of the insulator stack against vacuum surface flashover and...peak stress, and A (cm2) is the surface area, is widely used to predict the flashover of 45- deg. vacuum insulator surfaces . As is discussed in Ref. 6...signals is also possible by electron emission from the 45- degree surface of the insulator or from any gradient ring. Complete flashover of a stack

  12. Vacuum Insulator Development for the Dielectric Wall Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, J R; Blackfield, D; Caporaso, G J; Chen, Y; Hawkins, S; Kendig, M; Poole, B; Sanders, D M; Krogh, M; Managan, J E

    2008-03-17

    At Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, we are developing a new type of accelerator, known as a Dielectric Wall Accelerator, in which compact pulse forming lines directly apply an accelerating field to the beam through an insulating vacuum boundary. The electrical strength of this insulator may define the maximum gradient achievable in these machines. To increase the system gradient, we are using 'High Gradient Insulators' composed of alternating layers of dielectric and metal for the vacuum insulator. In this paper, we present our recent results from experiment and simulation, including the first test of a High Gradient Insulator in a functioning Dielectric Wall Accelerator cell.

  13. Economical evaluation of damaged vacuum insulation panels in buildings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Y. M.; Lee, H. Y.; Choi, G. S.; Kang, J. S.

    2015-12-01

    In Korea, thermal insulation standard of buildings have been tightened annually to satisfy the passive house standard from the year 2009. The current domestic policies about disseminating green buildings are progressively conducted. All buildings should be the zero energy building in the year 2025, obligatorily. The method is applied to one of the key technologies for high-performance insulation for zero energy building. The vacuum insulation panel is an excellent high performance insulation. But thermal performance of damaged vacuum insulation panels is reduced significantly. In this paper, the thermal performance of damaged vacuum insulation panels was compared and analyzed. The measurement result of thermal performance depends on the core material type. The insulation of building envelope is usually selected by economic feasibility. To evaluate the economic feasibility of VIPs, the operation cost was analyzed by simulation according to the types and damaged ratio of VIPs

  14. Investigation of Vacuum Insulator Surface Dielectric Strength with Nanosecond Pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Nunnally, W C; Krogh, M; Williams, C; Trimble, D; Sampayan, S; Caporaso, G

    2003-06-03

    The maximum vacuum insulator surface dielectric strength determines the acceleration electric field gradient possible in a short pulse accelerator. Previous work has indicated that higher electric field strengths along the insulator-vacuum interface might be obtained as the pulse duration is decreased. In this work, a 250 kV, single ns wide impulse source was applied to small diameter, segmented insulators samples in a vacuum to evaluate the multi-layer surface dielectric strength of the sample construction. Resonances in the low inductance test geometry were used to obtain unipolar, pulsed electric fields in excess of 100 MV/m on the insulator surface. The sample construction, experimental arrangement and experimental results are presented for the initial data in this work. Modeling of the multi-layer structure is discussed and methods of improving insulator surface dielectric strength in a vacuum are proposed.

  15. Profile optimization for an HV insulator in vacuum

    SciTech Connect

    Egiziano, L.; Spagnuolo, G.; Tucci, V.; Lupo, G.; Petrarca, C.

    1996-12-31

    The exposition of HV solid insulators in vacuum to relevant voltage differences could determine the surface flashover along the solid dielectric-vacuum interface. Insulator holdoff capabilities can be significantly improved by limiting the field intensity in proximity of the electrodes by means of a Geometrical Field Control, namely designing the insulator profile so that the region subjected to high field is shifted away from the regions where the electrodes join the solid dielectric-vacuum interface. In this paper a new profile for an HV insulator in vacuum is presented. An axially symmetrical configuration constituted by a couple of coaxial cylindrical electrodes is considered, with the insulator shape designed to guarantee similar performances for both field polarities. The effectiveness of the design is validated by means of numerical simulations and by experimental results involving D.C. and impulse flashover performances.

  16. Experimental study on the storage performance of high-vacuum-multilayer-insulation tank after sudden, catastrophic loss of insulating vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, G. F.; Li, X. D.; Wang, R. S.

    2012-05-01

    High-vacuum-multilayer-insulation (HVMLI) cryogenic tank is one kind of dangerous pressure vessels. One of the worst accidents that may occur in a high-vacuum-multilayer-insulation (HVMLI) cryogenic tank is a sudden, catastrophic loss of insulating vacuum (SCLIV). The influence of SCLIV on storage performance for a HVMLI cryogenic tank is experimentally studied in this paper. A test rig was built up and experiments were conducted using LN2 as the test medium. The cryogenic tank was tested in the conditions of various combinations with different initial liquid level and number of insulation layers. Some important conclusions for storage performance with a vacuum-lost HVMLI cryogenic tank have been obtained. The experimental results show that the numbers of insulation layers and the initial liquid level have obvious effect on the storage performance after SCLIV for cryogenic tanks.

  17. Lightweight Vacuum Jacket for Cryogenic Insulation. Volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barclay, D. L.; Bell, J. E.; Brogren, E. W.; Straayer, J. W.

    1975-01-01

    The feasibility of producing a lightweight vacuum jacket using state-of-the-art technology and materials was examined. Design and analytical studies were made on a full-scale, orbital maneuvering system fuel tank. Preliminary design details were made for the tank assembly, including an optimized vacuum jacket and multilayer insulation system. A half-scale LH2 test model was designed and fabricated, and a force/stiffness proof test was conducted on the vacuum jacket. A vacuum leak rate of .000001 atmosphere ml of helium per second was measured, approximately 1500 hours of vacuum pressure were sustained, and 29 vacuum-pressure cycles were experienced prior to failure.

  18. Design of a variable-conductance vacuum insulation

    SciTech Connect

    Benson, D K; Potter, T F; Tracy, C E

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes one approach to the design of a variable-conductance vacuum insulation. In this design, the vacuum insulation consists of a permanently sealed, thin sheet steel, evacuated envelope of whatever geometry is required for the application. The steel envelope is supported internally against the atmospheric pressure loads by an array of discrete, low-conductance, ceramic supports, and radiative heat transfer is blocked by layers of thin metal radiation shields. Thermal conductance through this insulation is controlled electronically by changing the temperature of a small metal hydride connected to the vacuum envelope. The hydride reversibly absorbs/desorbs hydrogen to produce a hydrogen pressure typically within the range from less than 10{sup {minus}6} to as much as 1 torr. Design calculations are compared with results from laboratory tests of bench scale samples, and some possible automotive applications for this variable-conductance vacuum insulation are suggested.

  19. Progress on Simulating the Initiation of Vacuum Insulator Flashover

    SciTech Connect

    Perkins, M P; Houck, T L; Javedani, J B; Vogtlin, G E; Goerz, D A

    2009-06-26

    Vacuum insulators are critical components in many pulsed power systems. The insulators separate the vacuum and non-vacuum regions, often under great stress due to high electric fields. The insulators will often flashover at the dielectric vacuum interface for electric field values much lower than for the bulk breakdown through the material. Better predictive models and computational tools are needed to enable insulator designs in a timely and inexpensive manner for advanced pulsed power systems. In this article we will discuss physics models that have been implemented in a PIC code to better understand the initiation of flashover. The PIC code VORPAL has been ran on the Linux cluster Hera at LLNL. Some of the important physics modules that have been implemented to this point will be discussed for simple angled insulators. These physics modules include field distortion due to the dielectric, field emission, secondary electron emission, insulator charging, and the effects of magnitude fields. In the future we will incorporate physics modules to investigate the effects of photoemission, electron stimulated desorption, and gas ionization. This work will lead to an improved understanding of flashover initiation and better computational tools for advanced insulator design.

  20. Surface discharge through an insulator in a vacuum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boersch, H.; Hamisch, H.; Ehrlich, W.

    1985-01-01

    A model for the mechanism of stationary discharges over insulators in a vacuum was developed. Upon introduction of this discharge, the insulator charges as a result of secondary emissions, in such a way that electrons coming from the cathode strike with an average secondary electron yield of 1, and so that the secondary electrons return again to the insulator through the electric field near the insulator. When the secondary electrons strike, electrons with an average yield of 1 are released again. The electrons move in short faults toward the anode, which they strike with lesser energy.

  1. Understanding High Voltage Vacuum Insulators for Microsecond Pulses

    SciTech Connect

    J.B., J; D.A., G; T.L., H; E.J., L; R.D., S; L.K., T; G.E., V

    2007-08-15

    High voltage insulation is one of the main areas of pulsed power research and development since the surface of an insulator exposed to vacuum can fail electrically at an applied field more than an order or magnitude below the bulk dielectric strength of the insulator. This is troublesome for applications where high voltage conditioning of the insulator and electrodes is not practical and where relatively long pulses, on the order of several microseconds, are required. Here we give a summary of our approach to modeling and simulation efforts and experimental investigations for understanding flashover mechanism. The computational work is comprised of both filed and particle-in-cell modeling with state-of-the-art commercial codes. Experiments were performed in using an available 100-kV, 10-{micro}s pulse generator and vacuum chamber. The initial experiments were done with polyethylene insulator material in the shape of a truncated cone cut at +45{sup o} angle between flat electrodes with a gap of 1.0 cm. The insulator was sized so there were no flashovers or breakdowns under nominal operating conditions. Insulator flashover or gap closure was induced by introducing a plasma source, a tuft of velvet, in proximity to the insulator or electrode.

  2. Progress on Simulating the Initiation of Vacuum Insulator Flashover

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-06-01

    of a +45° angled insulator as well as pictures demonstrating anode and cathode initiated flashover events [2]. In order to focus our attention on...Progress on Simulating the Initiation of Vacuum Insulator Flashover M.P. Perkins, T.L. Houck, J.B. Javedani, G.E. Vogtlin, D.A. Goerz Lawrence...In this article we will discuss physics models that have been implemented in a PIC code to better understand the initiation of flashover . The PIC

  3. Understanding and Improving High Voltage Vacuum Insulators for Microsecond Pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Javedani, J B; Goerz, D A; Houck, T L; Lauer, E J; Speer, R D; Tully, L K; Vogtlin, G E; White, A D

    2007-03-05

    High voltage insulation is one of the main areas of pulsed power research and development, and dielectric breakdown is usually the limiting factor in attaining the highest possible performance in pulsed power devices. For many applications the delivery of pulsed power into a vacuum region is the most critical aspect of operation. The surface of an insulator exposed to vacuum can fail electrically at an applied field more than an order or magnitude below the bulk dielectric strength of the insulator. This mode of breakdown, called surface flashover, imposes serious limitations on the power flow into a vacuum region. This is especially troublesome for applications where high voltage conditioning of the insulator and electrodes is not practical and for applications where relatively long pulses, on the order of several microseconds, are required. The goal of this project is to establish a sound fundamental understanding of the mechanisms that lead to surface flashover, and then evaluate the most promising techniques to improve vacuum insulators and enable high voltage operation at stress levels near the intrinsic bulk breakdown limits of the material. The approach we proposed and followed was to develop this understanding through a combination of theoretical and computation methods coupled with experiments to validate and quantify expected behaviors. In this report we summarize our modeling and simulation efforts, theoretical studies, and experimental investigations. The computational work began by exploring the limits of commercially available codes and demonstrating methods to examine field enhancements and defect mechanisms at microscopic levels. Plasma simulations with particle codes used in conjunction with circuit models of the experimental apparatus enabled comparisons with experimental measurements. The large scale plasma (LSP) particle-in-cell (PIC) code was run on multiprocessor platforms and used to simulate expanding plasma conditions in vacuum gap regions

  4. Vacuum insulator failure measurements and improvement

    SciTech Connect

    Vogtlin, G.E.; Vernazza, J.E.

    1989-06-01

    Cones, cylinders, and insulators have been tested with a 3 nanosecond full width halfmax pulse. These insulators were made of epoxy, acrylic, lexan, and nylon. The tests were conducted with cone insulators at +45 degrees, /minus/45 degrees, and 0 degree. Additionally, tests were conducted with a plug in the anode that reduces the anode stress, and anodized cathodes. Best results were obtained with both an anodized cathode and an anode plug where failure was through the solid dielectric at 600 kV/cm. Results of this testing will be presented. Explosive emission was also evaluated with the same apparatus. All tests were conducted without conditioning. Currents could be detected down to 10 milliamps. Data for brass, copper, stainless, aluminium will be presented. The onset of explosive emission could be detected. The lowest onset was for brass at less than 200 kV/cm. The best was a carbon loaded epoxy emission. Currents have been detected that follow a Fowler-Nordheim like function of voltage. 6 refs., 3 figs.

  5. Development of High Performance Composite Foam Insulation with Vacuum Insulation Cores

    SciTech Connect

    Biswas, Kaushik; Desjarlais, Andre Omer; SmithPhD, Douglas; LettsPhD, John; YaoPhD, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    Development of a high performance thermal insulation (thermal resistance or R-value per inch of R-12 hr-ft2- F/Btu-in or greater), with twice the thermal resistance of state-of-the-art commercial insulation materials ( R6/inch for foam insulation), promises a transformational impact in the area of building insulation. In 2010, in the US, the building envelope-related primary energy consumption was 15.6 quads, of which 5.75 quads were due to opaque wall and roof sections; the total US consumption (building, industrial and transportation) was 98 quads. In other words, the wall and roof contribution was almost 6% of the entire US primary energy consumption. Building energy modeling analyses have shown that adding insulation to increase the R-value of the external walls of residential buildings by R10-20 (hr-ft2- F/Btu) can yield savings of 38-50% in wall-generated heating and cooling loads. Adding R20 will require substantial thicknesses of current commercial insulation materials, often requiring significant (and sometimes cost-prohibitive) alterations to existing buildings. This article describes the development of a next-generation composite insulation with a target thermal resistance of R25 for a 2 inch thick board (R12/inch or higher). The composite insulation will contain vacuum insulation cores, which are nominally R35-40/inch, encapsulated in polyisocyanurate foam. A recently-developed variant of vacuum insulation, called modified atmosphere insulation (MAI), was used in this research. Some background information on the thermal performance and distinguishing features of MAI has been provided. Technical details of the composite insulation development and manufacturing as well as laboratory evaluation of prototype insulation boards are presented.

  6. Design validation of the PBFA-Z vacuum insulator stack

    SciTech Connect

    Shoup, R.W.; Long, F.; Martin, T.H.

    1997-07-01

    Sandia has developed PBFA-Z, a 20-MA driver for z-pinch experiments by replacing the water lines, insulator stack. and MITLs on PBFA II with hardware of a new design. The PBFA-Z accelerator was designed to deliver 20 MA to a 15-mg z-pinch load in 100 ns. The accelerator was modeled using circuit codes to determine the time-dependent voltage and current waveforms at the input and output of the water lines, the insulator stack, and the MITLs. The design of the vacuum insulator stack was dictated by the drive voltage, the electric field stress and grading requirements, the water line and MITL interface requirements, and the machine operations and maintenance requirements. The insulator stack consists of four separate modules, each of a different design because of different voltage drive and hardware interface requirements. The shape of the components in each module, i.e., grading rings, insulator rings, flux excluders, anode and cathode conductors, and the design of the water line and MITL interfaces, were optimized by using the electrostatic analysis codes, ELECTRO and JASON. The time-dependent performance of the insulator stacks was evaluated using IVORY, a 2-D PIC code. This paper will describe the insulator stack design, present the results of the ELECTRO and IVORY analyses, and show the results of the stack measurements.

  7. Venting and High Vacuum Performance of Low Density Multilayer Insulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riesco, M. E.; McLean, C. H.; Mills, G. L.; Buerger, S.; Meyer, M. L.

    2010-04-01

    The NASA Exploration Program is currently studying the use liquid oxygen, liquid methane and liquid hydrogen for propulsion in future spacecraft for Exploration of the Moon and Mars. This will require the efficient long term, on-orbit storage of these cryogenic propellants. Multilayer Insulation (MLI) will be critical to achieving the required thermal performance since it has much lower heat transfer than any other insulation when used in a vacuum. MLI with a low density (⩽10 layers/cm) has been shown in previous work to be the most mass efficient. The size and mass constraints of these propulsion systems will not allow a structural shell to be used to provide vacuum for the MLI during ground hold and launch. The baseline approach is to purge the MLI during ground hold with an inert gas which is then vented during launch ascent and on-orbit. This paper presents the results on experimental tests and modeling performed by Ball Aerospace on low density, non-perforated MLI used to insulate a cryogenic tank simulating an Exploration cryogenic propellant storage vessel. These include measurements of the rate of venting and of the heat transfer of gas filled insulation, fully evacuated insulation and during the transition in between. Results of transient computer modeling of the MLI venting and heat transfer process are also presented. Previous work by some of the authors performed vent testing using MLI with perforations and slits and a slow pump down rate.

  8. Workshop on Transient Induced Insulator Flashover in Vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    A workshop to discuss the state-of-the-art in transient induced insulator flashover in vacuum was convened at the Pleasanton Hilton at the Club Hotel on August 24-25, 1988. The workshop was attended by 39 participants. Flashover of vacuum-insulator surfaces is the limiting factor in virtually all well designed high voltage, pulsed systems where such interfaces are needed. They are critical to many LLNL present and future applications. The workshop participants attempted via presentations and lively discussions to summarize the state-of-the-art in the field and to outline the critical research topics which could lead to advances in understanding and applications. Several new results were presented at the workshop and an intense discussion session resulted in the formulation of a set of research recommendations and priorities.

  9. Workshop on transient induced insulator flashover in vacuum

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-01-01

    A workshop to discuss the state-of-the-art in transient induced insulator flashover in vacuum was convened at the Pleasanton Hilton at the Club Hotel on August 24-25, 1988. The workshop was attended by 39 participants. Flashover of vacuum-insulator surfaces is the limiting factor in virtually all well designed high voltage, pulsed systems where such interfaces are needed. They are critical to many LLNL present and future applications. The workshop participants attempted via presentations and lively discussions to summarize the state-of-the-art in the field and to outline the critical research topics which could lead to advances in understanding and applications. Several new results were presented at the workshop and an intense discussion session resulted in the formulation of a set of research recommendations and priorities.

  10. Study on the heat transfer of high-vacuum-multilayer-insulation tank after sudden, catastrophic loss of insulating vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, G. F.; Li, X. D.; Wang, R. S.

    2010-10-01

    One of the worst accidents that may occur in a high-vacuum-multilayer-insulation (HVMLI) cryogenic tank is a sudden, catastrophic loss of insulating vacuum (SCLIV). There is no doubt that the gases leaking into the insulation jacket have some influence on the heat transfer process of it. However, this issue has not been thoroughly studied so far. In this paper, a test rig was built up and experiments were conducted using a SCLIV cryogenic tank and with nitrogen, helium and air as the working medium, respectively. The venting rates of the tank and temperature in the insulation jacket were measured respectively after the three different gases leaking into the jacket. A heat transfer model describing the heat transfer process of a SCLIV tank was also presented. The calculated results using this model were compared against the experimental data. It is found that the heat transfer performance of the HVMLI cryogenic tank after SCLIV is strong relevant to the type of gas leaking into the insulation jacket.

  11. XVIIth international symposium on discharges and electrical insulation in vacuum. Volume 1 and 2

    SciTech Connect

    1996-12-31

    This is the proceedings of the XVIIth International Symposium on Discharges and Electrical Insulation in Vacuum, held in Berkeley, CA, July 21-26, 1996. Papers were presented in the following areas: vacuum breakdown and prebreakdown phenomena; vacuum arcs; switching in vacuum; surface flashover; vacuum insulation including magnetic insulation, accelerators, and others; high current diodes, intense particle beams, and vacuum arc ion sources; discharges in the space environment; arcing in controlled fusion devices; emission processes and electrode phenomena; cathodic arc deposition; pseudospark discharges; industrial applications. Separate abstracts have been indexed into the database for some articles from this proceedings.

  12. Parametric scaling study of a magnetically insulated thermionic vacuum switch

    SciTech Connect

    Vanderberg, B.H.; Eninger, J.E.

    1996-02-01

    A parametric scaling study is performed on MINOS (Magnetically INsulated Opening Switch), a novel fast ({approximately}100 ns) high-power opening switch concept based on a magnetically insulated thermionic vacuum diode. Principal scaling parameters are the switch dimensions, voltage, current, applied magnetic field, and switching time. The scaling range of interest covers voltages up to 100 kV and currents of several kA. Fundamental scaling properties are derived from models of space-charge flow and magnetic cutoff. The scaling is completed with empirical results from the experimental MX-1 switch operated in an inductive storage pulsed power generator. Results are presented in diagrams showing voltage, current, power, and efficiency relationships and their limitations. The scaling is illustrated by the design of a megawatt average power opening switch for pulsed power applications. Trade-offs in the engineering of this type of switch are discussed.

  13. Flexible edge seal for vacuum insulating glazing units

    DOEpatents

    Bettger, Kenneth J.; Stark, David H.

    2012-12-11

    A flexible edge seal is provided for a vacuum insulating glazing unit having a first glass pane and a second glass pane spaced-apart from the first. The edge seal comprises a seal member formed of a hermetically bondable material and having a first end, a second end and a center section disposed therebetween. The first end is hermetically bondable to a first glass pane. The second end is hermetically bondable to a second glass pane. The center section comprises a plurality of convolutes.

  14. Ultraviolet-Induced Flashover of Highly-Angled Polymeric Insulators in Vacuum

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-01-01

    holdoff performance of alumina insulators in vacuum ," J. Appi. Phys. 49 (11), 5416 (1978). Mil80 H. C. Miller, " Improving the Voltage Holdoff Performance ...on the Voltage Holdoff T erformance of Alumina Insulators in Vacuum ," IEEE Trans. Electi. Ir:’.L. EI-20 (3), 505 (1985). Nas79 V. Nassisi and A...of Alumina Insulators in Vacuum Through Quasimetallizing ," IEEE Trans.

  15. Coating Properties which Increase the Vacuum Flashover Strength of Insulators.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leiker, Gary Robert

    The surface flashover strengths in vacuum for several common insulators, including Lexan, Lucite, polyethylene, Macor, quartz, alumina, and an alumina-filled epoxy, have been increased using a vacuum spark discharge treatment. Analysis of the treated surfaces using Electron Spectroscopy for Chemical Analysis (ESCA) show them to be coated with a thin hydrocarbon/metal oxide layer. The formation of this high-flashover coating is strongly dependent on the amount of water vapor in the chamber during treatment. Measurements of the secondary electron emission coefficient (SEEC) show that the treated surfaces produce many more secondary electrons at energies of a few keV than do untreated samples. In current theories of electrical breakdown, an avalanche of monoenergetic secondary electrons along the dielectric surface from the cathode to the anode is believed to cause gas desorption and initiate a surface flashover. A new theory is proposed in which the monoenergetic nature of this secondary electron avalanche is destroyed due to electron -gas molecule collisions before the onset of breakdown. This phenomenon, coupled with the larger number of secondaries produced at high energies, could lead to a modified charge distribution on the surface of the treated insulators, which delays the breakdown process.

  16. Coating properties which increase the vacuum flashover strength of insulators

    SciTech Connect

    Leiker, G.R.

    1988-01-01

    The surface flashover strengths in vacuum for several common insulators, including Lexan, Lucite, polyethylene, Macor, quartz, alumina, and an alumina-filled epoxy, have been increased using a vacuum spark discharge treatment. Analysis of the treated surfaces using Electron Spectroscopy for Chemical Analysis (ESCA) show them to be coated with a thin hydrocarbon/metal oxide layer. The formation of this high-flashover coating is strongly dependent on the amount of water vapor in the chamber during treatment. Measurements of the secondary electron emission coefficient (SEEC) show that the treated surfaces produced many more secondary electrons at energies of a few keV than do untreated samples. In current theories of electrical breakdown, an avalanche of monoenergetic secondary electrons along the dielectric surface from the cathode to the anode is believed to cause gas desorption and initiate a surface flashover. A new theory is proposed in which the monoenergetic nature of this secondary electron avalanche is destroyed due to electron-gas molecule collisions before the onset of breakdown. This phenomenon, coupled with the larger number of secondaries produced at high energies, could lead to a modified charge distribution on the surface of the treated insulators, which delays the breakdown process.

  17. VecLoader HEPA Vacuum Insulation Removal System

    SciTech Connect

    None, None

    1999-09-01

    The United States Department of Energy (DOE) continually seeks safer and more cost-effective remediation technologies for use in the deactivation and decommissioning (D&D) of nuclear facilities. To this end, the Deactivation and Decommissioning Focus Area (DDFA) of the DOE’s Office of Science and Technology sponsors Large-Scale Demonstration Projects (LSDPs) at which developers and vendors of improved or innovative technologies showcase products that are potentially beneficial to DOE’s projects and to others in the D&D community. Benefits sought include decreased health and safety risks to personnel and the environment, increased productivity, decreased costs and shortened schedules. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Fernald Environmental Management Project’s (FEMP’s) Decontamination and Decommissioning (D&D) Plan requires that interior and exterior walls of buildings that are being demolished be disassembled and all insulating materials removed prior to demolition. This report provides a comparative analysis of the baseline manual insulation removal technique currently employed at the FEMP, with an innovative vacuum insulation removal system.

  18. Gas-controlled dynamic vacuum insulation with gas gate

    DOEpatents

    Benson, David K.; Potter, Thomas F.

    1994-06-07

    Disclosed is a dynamic vacuum insulation comprising sidewalls enclosing an evacuated chamber and gas control means for releasing hydrogen gas into a chamber to increase gas molecule conduction of heat across the chamber and retrieving hydrogen gas from the chamber. The gas control means includes a metal hydride that absorbs and retains hydrogen gas at cooler temperatures and releases hydrogen gas at hotter temperatures; a hydride heating means for selectively heating the metal hydride to temperatures high enough to release hydrogen gas from the metal hydride; and gate means positioned between the metal hydride and the chamber for selectively allowing hydrogen to flow or not to flow between said metal hydride and said chamber.

  19. Gas-controlled dynamic vacuum insulation with gas gate

    DOEpatents

    Benson, D.K.; Potter, T.F.

    1994-06-07

    Disclosed is a dynamic vacuum insulation comprising sidewalls enclosing an evacuated chamber and gas control means for releasing hydrogen gas into a chamber to increase gas molecule conduction of heat across the chamber and retrieving hydrogen gas from the chamber. The gas control means includes a metal hydride that absorbs and retains hydrogen gas at cooler temperatures and releases hydrogen gas at hotter temperatures; a hydride heating means for selectively heating the metal hydride to temperatures high enough to release hydrogen gas from the metal hydride; and gate means positioned between the metal hydride and the chamber for selectively allowing hydrogen to flow or not to flow between said metal hydride and said chamber. 25 figs.

  20. Laser Glass Frit Sealing for Encapsulation of Vacuum Insulation Glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kind, H.; Gehlen, E.; Aden, M.; Olowinsky, A.; Gillner, A.

    Laser glass frit sealing is a joining method predestined in electronics for the sealing of engineered materials housings in dimensions of some 1 mm2 to several 10 mm2. The application field ranges from encapsulation of display panels to sensor housings. Laser glass frit sealing enables a hermetical closure excluding humidity and gas penetration. But the seam quality is also interesting for other applications requiring a hermetical sealing. One application is the encapsulation of vacuum insulation glass. The gap between two panes must be evacuated for reducing the thermal conductivity. Only an efficient encapsulating technique ensures durable tight joints of two panes for years. Laser glass frit sealing is an alternative joining method even though the material properties of soda lime glass like sensitivity to thermal stresses are much higher as known from engineered materials. An adapted thermal management of the process is necessary to prevent the thermal stresses within the pane to achieve crack free and tight glass frit seams.

  1. High Reliability R-10 Windows Using Vacuum Insulating Glass Units

    SciTech Connect

    Stark, David

    2012-08-16

    The objective of this effort was for EverSealed Windows (“EverSealed” or “ESW”) to design, assemble, thermally and environmentally test and demonstrate a Vacuum Insulating Glass Unit (“VIGU” or “VIG”) that would enable a whole window to meet or exceed the an R-10 insulating value (U-factor ≤ 0.1). To produce a VIGU that could withstand any North American environment, ESW believed it needed to design, produce and use a flexible edge seal system. This is because a rigid edge seal, used by all other know VIG producers and developers, limits the size and/or thermal environment of the VIG to where the unit is not practical for typical IG sizes and cannot withstand severe outdoor environments. The rigid-sealed VIG’s use would be limited to mild climates where it would not have a reasonable economic payback when compared to traditional double-pane or triple-pane IGs. ESW’s goals, in addition to achieving a sufficiently high R-value to enable a whole window to achieve R-10, included creating a VIG design that could be produced for a cost equal to or lower than a traditional triple-pane IG (low-e, argon filled). ESW achieved these goals. EverSealed produced, tested and demonstrated a flexible edge-seal VIG that had an R-13 insulating value and the edge-seal system durability to operate reliably for at least 40 years in the harshest climates of North America.

  2. Application of porcelain enamel as an ultra-high-vacuum-compatible electrical insulator

    SciTech Connect

    Biscardi, C.; Hseuh, H.; Mapes, M.

    2000-07-01

    Many accelerator vacuum system components require electrical insulation internal to the vacuum system. Some accelerator components at Brookhaven National Laboratory are installed in ultra-high-vacuum systems which require the insulation to have excellent vacuum characteristics, be radiation resistant, and be able to withstand high temperatures when used on baked systems. Porcelain enamel satisfies all these requirements. This article describes the process and application of coating metal parts with porcelain enamel to provide electrical insulation. The mechanical and vacuum testing of Marman flanges coated with porcelain and using metal Helicoflex seals to form a zero-length electrical break are detailed. The use of porcelain enameled parts is attractive since it can be done quickly, is inexpensive and environmentally safe, and most of all satisfies stringent vacuum system requirements. (c) 2000 American Vacuum Society.

  3. Insulation Technology in Dry Air and Vacuum for a 72kV Low Pressured Dry Air Insulated Switchgear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Tadahiro; Koga, Hiromi; Harada, Takakazu; Miki, Shinichi; Arioka, Masahiro; Sato, Shinji; Yoshida, Satoru; Inoue, Naoaki; Maruyama, Akihiko; Takeuchi, Toshie

    A new 72kV rated low pressured dry air insulated switchgear applying electromagnetic actuation and function that supports CBM has been developed. First, dielectric characteristics in dry air under lightning impulse application has been investigated at bare and insulator covered electrodes. Dependence of the breakdown electric field strength on the effective area has been clarified to apply the configuration design of the insulation mold for the vacuum interrupter. In addition, moisture volume dependence on surface resistance has been clarified to decide moisture volume in gas pressure tank. Next, a new vacuum circuit breaker (VCB) has been designed. To keep dimensions from former 72kV SF6 gas insulated switchgear, distance between contacts in vacuum interrupter is needed to be shorter than that of former switchgear. Voltage withstand capability between electrodes practically designed for vacuum interrupter has been investigated under dc voltage application simulated the small capacitive current breaking test. Gap configuration including contacts and slits has been optimized and distance has been shortened 11% from former switchgear. As a result, the new low pressured dry air insulated switchgear has been designed comparably in outer size to former SF6 gas insulated switchgear. Using dry air as an insulation medium with low pressure has been able to reduce the environmental burden.

  4. Scaling experiments on a magnetically insulated thermionic vacuum switch

    SciTech Connect

    Eninger, J.E.; Vanderberg, B.H.

    1994-12-31

    Magnetic insulation of the electron flow in a cylindrical thermionic vacuum diode has been proposed as a way to achieve a fast high-voltage high-power opening switch. The expected performance of this type of device can be derived from a set of basic scaling laws combined with empirical relationships obtained from experimental studies. Switch losses are mainly due to anode dissipation W{sub a}, which can be normalized to the transferred pulse energy. Leakage current and switch hold-off voltage depend on device geometry, materials, vacuum conditions etc and must be determined experimentally. For this purpose, the MX-1 experiment has been designed and operated. This device is basically a smooth-bore cylindrical magnetron with a 5 cm radius, 400 cm{sup 2} area thermionic dispenser cathode separated from the coaxial water-cooled anode by a few mm wide gap. This design allows pulsed operation at up to {approximately}100 kV, {approximately}4 kA and average power levels of {approximately}1 MW. The MX-1 switch is used as an opening switch to produce 1--2 {mu}s long square pulses from an inductive storage PFN. The current-voltage characteristics of the switch are determined as a function of the applied magnetic field and load condition. Plasma wave measurements are performed to investigate the stability of the electron flow. Results are summarized in the form of scaling diagrams for the important switch parameters, showing possible performance levels and physical and technical limitations identified as far in this work.

  5. Lightweight Vacuum Jacket for Cryogenic Insulation - Appendices to Final Report. Volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barclay, D. L.; Bell, J. E.; Brogren, E. W.; Straayer, J. W.

    1975-01-01

    The feasibility is demonstrated of producing a lightweight vacuum jacket using state-of-the-art technology and materials. Design and analytical studies were made on an orbital maneuvering system fuel tank. Preliminary design details were completed for the tank assembly which included an optimized vacuum jacket and multilayered insulation system. A half-scale LH2 test model was designed and fabricated and a force/stiffness proof test was conducted on the vacuum jacket. A vacuum leak rate of 0.00001 was measured, approximately 1500 hours of vacuum pressure was sustained, and 29 vacuum pressure cycles were experienced prior to failure. For vol. 1, see N75-26192.

  6. Flammability, odor, offgassing, thermal vacuum stability, and compatibility with aerospace fluids of wire insulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hirsch, David; Johnson, Harry

    1994-01-01

    The NASA Lewis Research Center requested NASA Johnson Space Center White Sands Test Facility to conduct flammability, odor, offgassing, thermal vacuum stability, and compatibility tests with aerospace fluids of several wire insulations.

  7. Thermal Performance of Exterior Insulation and Finish Systems Containing Vacuum Insulation Panels

    SciTech Connect

    Childs, Kenneth W; Stovall, Therese K; Biswas, Kaushik; Carbary, Lawrence D

    2013-01-01

    A high-performance wall system is under development to improve wall thermal performance to a level of U-factor of 0.19 W/(m2 K) (R-30 [h ft2 F]/Btu) in a standard wall thickness by incorporating vacuum insulation panels (VIPs) into an exterior insulation finish system (EIFS). Such a system would be applicable to new construction and will offer a solution to more challenging retrofit situations as well. Multiple design options were considered to balance the need to protect theVIPs during construction and building operation, while minimizing heat transfer through the wall system. The results reported here encompass an indepth assessment of potential system performances including thermal modeling, detailed laboratory measurements under controlled conditions on the component, and system levels according to ASTM C518 (ASTM 2010). The results demonstrate the importance of maximizing the VIP coverage over the wall face. The results also reveal the impact of both the design and execution of system details, such as the joints between adjacent VIPs. The test results include an explicit modeled evaluation of the system performance in a clear wall.

  8. SECONDARY ELECTRON TRAJECTORIES IN HIGH-GRADIENT VACUUM INSULATORS WITH FAST HIGH-VOLTAGE PULSES

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Y; Blackfield, D; Nelson, S D; Poole, B

    2010-04-21

    Vacuum insulators composed of alternating layers of metal and dielectric, known as high-gradient insulators (HGIs), have been shown to withstand higher electric fields than conventional insulators. Primary or secondary electrons (emitted from the insulator surface) can be deflected by magnetic fields from external sources, the high-current electron beam, the conduction current in the transmission line, or the displacement current in the insulator. These electrons are deflected either toward or away from the insulator surface and this affects the performance of the vacuum insulator. This paper shows the effects of displacement current from short voltage pulses on the performance of high gradient insulators. Generally, vacuum insulator failure is due to surface flashover, initiated by electrons emitted from a triple junction. These electrons strike the insulator surface thus producing secondary electrons, and can lead to a subsequent electron cascade along the surface. The displacement current in the insulator can deflect electrons either toward or away from the insulator surface, and affects the performance of the vacuum insulator when the insulator is subjected to a fast high-voltage pulse. Vacuum insulators composed of alternating layers of metal and dielectric, known as high-gradient insulators (HGIs), have been shown to withstand higher electric fields than conventional insulators. HGIs, being tolerant of the direct view of high-current electron and ion beams, and having desirable RF properties for accelerators, are a key enabling technology for the dielectric-wall accelerators (DWA) being developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). Characteristically, insulator surface breakdown thresholds go up as the applied voltage pulse width decreases. To attain the highest accelerating gradient in the DWA, short accelerating voltage pulses are only applied locally, along the HGI accelerator tube, in sync with the charged particle bunch, and the effects of

  9. Understanding High Voltage Vacuum Insulators for Microsecond Pulses

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-06-01

    the insulator flashes over as soon as the expanding plasma touches the surface . Thus, we are looking at the physics that are not included in the...relatively low field stress levels with +45 degree HD Polyethylene as the insulator. Our measurements and observations indicated that surface flashover ...under nominal operating conditions. Insulator flashover or gap closure was induced by introducing a plasma source, a tuft of velvet, in proximity to

  10. An experimental investigation of electric flashover across solid insulators in vacuum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vonbaeyer, H. C.

    1984-01-01

    The insulation of high voltage conductors often employs solid insulators for many applications. In such applications, an unexpected electric flashover may occur along the insulator surface. Under conditions of high vacuum, the flashover voltage across the insulator is observed to be lower compared with that of the same electrode separation without an insulator. The reason for such an extreme reduction of flashover voltage is not well understood. Several models based on the secondary electron emission, were proposed to explain the onset of the surface flashover. The starting point and the developing velocity of the surface flashover were determined. An intensified image converter camera was used to observe the initial stage of electrical flashover along the insulator surface parallel to the electric field. Several different insulator materials were used as test pieces to determine the effect of the dielectric constant on the flashover voltage characteristics.

  11. Improving the voltage holdoff performance of alumina insulators in vacuum by quasimetallizing or doping

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, H.C.

    1980-01-01

    The high voltage holdoff capability of insulators may be improved by changing the material of the insulator or by a proper choice of geometry for the device using the insulator. Results applicable to insulators in various ultrahigh vacuum devices were desired, so work on modifying an alumina ceramic insulator material was selected. It was found that treatment of the surface of an alumina insulator with coatings incorporating varying amounts of Cr, Mn, and Ti can significantly increase the vacuum voltage holdoff capability of the insulator (up to 25%). During processing (quasimetallizing) the coating penetrates into the alumina, so it is insensitive to mechanical damage. This quasimetallize treatment is also compatible with subsequent metallizing and brazing of the alumina insulator. A 7 Mn:1 Ti coating mix performed very well, being found to be as effective on a 94% Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ alumina as on the previously investigated 95% Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/, 1% Cr/sub 2/O/sub 3/ alumina. Mixes of 6 Mn:1 Ti:1 Cr and 6 Mn:3 Cr performed about as well as the 7 Mn:1 Ti mix, but no better.

  12. Development of 72kV High Pressure Air-insulated GIS with Vacuum Circuit Breaker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rokunohe, Toshiaki; Yagihashi, Yoshitaka; Endo, Fumihiro; Aoyagi, Kenji; Saitoh, Hitoshi; Oomori, Takashi

    SF6 gas has excellent dielectric strength and interruption performance. For these reasons, it has been widely used for gas insulated switchgear (GIS). However, use of SF6 gas has become regulated under agreements set at the 1997 COP3. So investigation and development for GIS with a lower amount of SF6 gas are being carried out worldwide. Presently, SF6 gas-free GIS has been commercialized for the 24kV class. Air or N2 gas is used as insulation gas for this GIS. On the other hand, SF6 gas-free GIS has not been commercialized for 72kV class GIS. Dielectric strengths of air and N2 gas are approximately 1/3 that of SF6 gas. So to enhance insulation performance of air and N2, we have investigated a hybrid gas insulation system which has the combined features of providing an insulation coating and suitable insulation gas. We have developed the world's first 72kV SF6 gas-free GIS. This paper deals with key technologies for SF6 gas-free GIS such as the hybrid insulation structure, bellows for the high pressure vacuum circuit breaker, a newly designed disconnector and spacer and prevention of particle levitation. Test results of 72kV high pressure air-insulated GIS with the vacuum circuit breaker are described.

  13. Optimization of the vacuum insulator stack of the MIG pulsed power generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khamzakhan, G.; Chaikovsky, S. A.

    2014-11-01

    The MIG multi-purpose pulsed power machine is intended to generate voltage pulses of amplitude up to 6 MV with electron-beam loads and current pulses of amplitude up to 2.5 MA and rise time '00 ns with inductive loads like Z pinches. The MIG generator is capable of producing a peak power of 2.5 TW. Its water transmission line is separated from the vacuum line by an insulator stack. In the existing design of the insulator, some malfunctions have been detected. The most serious problems revealed are the vacuum surface flashover occurring before the current peaks and the deep discharge traces on the water-polyethylene interface of the two rings placed closer to the ground. A comprehensive numerical simulation of the electric field distribution in the insulator of the MIG generator has been performed. It has been found that the chief drawbacks are nonuniform voltage grading across the insulator rings and significant enhancement of the electric field at anode triple junctions. An improved design of the insulator stack has been developed. It is expected that the proposed modification that requires no rearrangement of either the water line or the load-containing vacuum chamber will provide higher electric strength of the insulator.

  14. Insulator breakdown measurements in a poor vacuum and their interpretation

    SciTech Connect

    Vogtlin, G.E.

    1990-06-01

    Breakdown measurements have been made on insulators with 0 and 45 degree angle surfaces. A technique of observing the electrons produced from the process has given some insight into the mechanisms involved. A three nanosecond pulse was used to induce breakdown. The electrons striking the anode were observed with a plastic fluor and open shutter camera. Two breakdown patterns were interpreted as cathode initiated and anode initiated breakdown. The breakdown process normally encountered was anode initiated with a positive 45 degree insulator. If the anode side was relieved with an internal electrode, the breakdown changed to cathode initiated at a higher level. If the cathode surface was then anodized, the breakdown switched back to the anode at an even higher level. Individual explosive emission sites on the cathode surface could be observed. Insulator breakdown was usually not associated with these sites. Multiple pulses allowed measurement of plasma expansion of the explosive emission sites. It is believed that breakdown with longer pulses is due to the expansion of the explosive emission site plasma to the insulator surface. Measurements were conducted with and without voltage conditioning. It appears that conditioning is achieved without explosive emission. It is believed that this is due to organic fibers that are removed by the conditioning. Organic fibers were used to induce both anode and cathode breakdown. Measurements of fiberous material have shown explosive emission a low as 100 kV on a three nanosecond time scale and below 20 kv/cm on a longer time scale. 8 refs., 5 figs.

  15. Study of Vacuum Insulator Flashover for Pulse Lengths of Multi-Microseconds

    SciTech Connect

    Houck, T; Goerz, D; Javedani, J; Lauer, E; Tully, L; Vogtlin, G

    2006-07-31

    We are studying the flashover of vacuum insulators for applications where high voltage conditioning of the insulator and electrodes is not practical and for pulse lengths on the order of several microseconds. The study is centered about experiments performed with a 100-kV, 10-ms pulsed power system and supported by a combination of theoretical and computational modeling. The base line geometry is a cylindrically symmetric, +45{sup o} insulator between flat electrodes. In the experiments, flashovers or breakdowns are localized by operating at field stresses slightly below the level needed for explosive emissions with the base line geometry. The electrodes and/or insulator are then seeded with an emission source, e.g. a tuft of velvet, or a known mechanical defect. Various standard techniques are employed to suppress cathode-originating flashovers/breakdowns. We present the results of our experiments and discuss the capabilities of modeling insulator flashover.

  16. The Bushing Test Facility: A new megavolt-class, meter-scale vacuum insulation test facility

    SciTech Connect

    Butner, J.M.; Smith, J.D.; Honig, E.M.; Ingwersen, P.M.; Umphres, J.D.; Anderson, R.G.

    1990-01-01

    Construction of the Bushing Test Facility (BTF) was completed at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) in the fall of 1989. The BTF is a new megavolt-class, meter-scale vacuum insulation test facility built to meet two primary objectives: (1) to qualify high-voltage vacuum feedthrough bushings before their installation in the electron-beam diodes of the Aurora KrF laser amplifiers and (2) to investigate fundamental issues related to surface flashover and electrical breakdown in vacuum, thereby enabling us to improve the performance and reliability of high-voltage components for future laser systems. The BTF voltage source is a low-energy (<4.4-kJ), 1-MV Marx generator whose output pulse width is variable from 100 ns to a few microseconds. The large BTF test chamber (2.1 m in diameter and 1.5 m long) allows full-sized Aurora bushings or other large-scale vacuum insulators to be tested at background pressures down to about 10{sup {minus}7} torr. This paper will further describe the facility, its experimental checkout and first bushing tests, and the plans for future vacuum insulation research. 11 refs., 5 figs.

  17. Initiation of vacuum insulator surface high-voltage flashover with electrons produced by laser illumination

    SciTech Connect

    Krasik, Ya. E.; Leopold, J. G.

    2015-08-15

    In this paper, experiments are described in which cylindrical vacuum insulator samples and samples inclined at 45° relative to the cathode were stressed by microsecond timescale high-voltage pulses and illuminated by focused UV laser beam pulses. In these experiments, we were able to distinguish between flashover initiated by the laser producing only photo-electrons and when plasma is formed. It was shown that flashover is predominantly initiated near the cathode triple junction. Even dense plasma formed near the anode triple junction does not necessarily lead to vacuum surface flashover. The experimental results directly confirm our conjecture that insulator surface breakdown can be avoided by preventing its initiation [J. G. Leopold et al., Phys. Rev. ST Accel. Beams 10, 060401 (2007)] and complement our previous experimental results [J. Z. Gleizer et al., IEEE Trans. Dielectr. Electr. Insul. 21, 2394 (2014) and J. Z. Gleizer et al., J. Appl. Phys. 117, 073301 (2015)].

  18. Initiation of vacuum insulator surface high-voltage flashover with electrons produced by laser illumination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krasik, Ya. E.; Leopold, J. G.

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, experiments are described in which cylindrical vacuum insulator samples and samples inclined at 45° relative to the cathode were stressed by microsecond timescale high-voltage pulses and illuminated by focused UV laser beam pulses. In these experiments, we were able to distinguish between flashover initiated by the laser producing only photo-electrons and when plasma is formed. It was shown that flashover is predominantly initiated near the cathode triple junction. Even dense plasma formed near the anode triple junction does not necessarily lead to vacuum surface flashover. The experimental results directly confirm our conjecture that insulator surface breakdown can be avoided by preventing its initiation [J. G. Leopold et al., Phys. Rev. ST Accel. Beams 10, 060401 (2007)] and complement our previous experimental results [J. Z. Gleizer et al., IEEE Trans. Dielectr. Electr. Insul. 21, 2394 (2014) and J. Z. Gleizer et al., J. Appl. Phys. 117, 073301 (2015)].

  19. Vacuum-Insulated Flexible Cryostats for Long Hts Cables: Requirements, Status and Prospects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gouge, M. J.; Demko, J. A.; Roden, M. L.; Maguire, J. F.; Weber, C. S.

    2008-03-01

    Several high temperature superconducting (HTS) cable demonstration projects have begun operation on the electric grid in the last few years with the liquid nitrogen-cooled, three-phase cable contained in one or more vacuum-insulated, flexible cryostats with lengths up to ˜600 meters. These grid demonstration projects are realistic prototypes of the anticipated commercial market which will require superconducting cable lengths in the multiple kilometer range with the vacuum-jacketed cryostats in underground ducts providing acceptable thermal insulation for up to decades. The current state-of-the art for flexible cryostats (installation constraints, heat loads with a good and degraded vacuum, impact of cable bends, getter performance and lifetime, weld and accessory reliability) is discussed. Further development needed to meet the challenging commercial HTS cable application is outlined.

  20. Helium release rates and ODH calculations from RHIC magnet cooling line failure

    SciTech Connect

    Liaw, C.J.; Than, Y.; Tuozzolo, J.

    2011-03-28

    A catastrophic failure of the magnet cooling lines, similar to the LHC superconducting bus failure incident, could discharge cold helium into the RHIC tunnel and cause an Oxygen Deficiency Hazard (ODH) problem. A SINDA/FLUINT{reg_sign} model, which simulated the 4.5K/4 atm helium flowing through the magnet cooling system distribution lines, then through a line break into the insulating vacuum volumes and discharging via the reliefs into the RHIC tunnel, had been developed. Arc flash energy deposition and heat load from the ambient temperature cryostat surfaces are included in the simulations. Three typical areas: the sextant arc, the Triplet/DX/D0 magnets, and the injection area, had been analyzed. Results, including helium discharge rates, helium inventory loss, and the resulting oxygen concentration in the RHIC tunnel area, are reported. Good agreement had been achieved when comparing the simulation results, a RHIC sector depressurization test measurement, and some simple analytical calculations.

  1. Experimental study of the influences of degraded vacuum on multilayer insulation blankets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, P. J.; Wu, J. Y.; Zhang, P.; Xu, L.; Jiang, M. L.

    2009-12-01

    The paper presented experimental investigation on the heat transfer of MLI with different rarefied gases at different pressures. The investigations were carried out using an innovative static liquid nitrogen boil-off rate measurement system in the case of the small temperature perturbations of cold and warm boundaries. The heat fluxes for a number of inert and some polyatomic gases have been analyzed at different heat transfer conditions ranging from molecular to continuum regime, apparent thermal conductivities of the multilayer insulation were measured over a wide range of temperature (77 K-300 K) and pressure (10 -3-10 5 Pa) using the apparatus. The experimental results indicated that under degraded vacuum condition, the influences of rarefied gas on the MLI thermal performance very depend on the gas rarefaction degree which impacted by the MLI vacuum degree. Under the condition of molecular regime heat transfer, the MLI thermal performance was greatly influenced by gas energy accommodation coefficients (EAC), when under the continuum regime, the performances depend on the thermal conductivity of rarefied gas itself. Compared to the results of N 2, Ar, CO 2, Air and He as interstitial gases in the MLI, Ar was the better selection as space gas because of its low EAC and thermal conductivity characteristics on the different vacuum condition ranging from high pressure to vacuum. So different residual gases can be utilized according to the vacuum level and gas energy accommodation coefficient, in order to improve the insulation performance of low vacuum MLI.

  2. Thermal Insulation System for Non-Vacuum Applications Including a Multilayer Composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fesmire, James E. (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    The thermal insulation system of the present invention is for non-vacuum applications and is specifically tailored to the ambient pressure environment with any level of humidity or moisture. The thermal insulation system includes a multilayered composite including i) at least one thermal insulation layer and at least one compressible barrier layer provided as alternating, successive layers, and ii) at least one reflective film provided on at least one surface of the thermal insulation layer and/or said compressible barrier layer. The different layers and materials and their combinations are designed to provide low effective thermal conductivity for the system by managing all modes of heat transfer. The thermal insulation system includes an optional outer casing surrounding the multilayered composite. The thermal insulation system is particularly suited for use in any sub-ambient temperature environment where moisture or its adverse effects are a concern. The thermal insulation system provides physical resilience against damaging mechanical effects including compression, flexure, impact, vibration, and thermal expansion/contraction.

  3. Investigations of the electrical breakdown properties of insulator materials used in high voltage vacuum diodes

    SciTech Connect

    Shurter, R.P.; Carlson, R.L.; Melton, J.G.

    1993-08-01

    The Injector for the proposed Dual-Axis Radiographic Hydrodynamic Testing (DARHT) Facility at Los Alamos utilizes a monolithic insulator deployed in a radial configuration. The 1.83-m-diam {times} 25.4-cm-thick insulator with embedded grading rings separates the output oil transmission line from the vacuum vessel that contains the re-entrant anode and cathode assemblies. Although much work has been done by the pulse power community in studying surface flash-over of insulating materials used in both axial and radial configurations, dendrite growth at the roots of grading rings embedded in materials suitable for very large insulators is less well characterized. Degradation of several acrylic insulators has been observed in the form of dendrites growing at the roots of the grading rings for large numbers (100`s) of pulses on the prototype DARHT Injector and other machines using similar radial geometries. In a few cases, these dendrites have led to catastrophic bulk breakdown of the acrylic between two grading rings making the insulator a costly loss. Insulating materials under investigation are acrylic (Lucite), epoxy (Furane), and cross-linked polystyrene (Rexolite); each of these materials has its own particular mechanical and electrical merits. All of these materials have been cast and machined into the required large size for the Injector. Test methods and the results of investigations into the breakdown strength of various interface geometries and the susceptibility of these materials to dendrite growth are reported.

  4. A generalized analytical model for radiative transfer in vacuum thermal insulation of space vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krainova, Irina V.; Dombrovsky, Leonid A.; Nenarokomov, Aleksey V.; Budnik, Sergey A.; Titov, Dmitry M.; Alifanov, Oleg M.

    2017-08-01

    The previously developed spectral model for radiative transfer in vacuum thermal insulation of space vehicles is generalized to take into account possible thermal contact between a fibrous spacer and one of the neighboring aluminum foil layers. An approximate analytical solution based on slightly modified two-flux approximation for radiative transfer in a semi-transparent fibrous spacer is derived. It was shown that thermal contact between the spacer and adjacent foil may decrease significantly the quality of thermal insulation because of an increase in radiative flux to/from the opposite aluminum foil. Theoretical predictions are confirmed by comparison with new results of laboratory experiments.

  5. Electron flow stability in magnetically insulated vacuum transmission lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rose, D. V.; Genoni, T. C.; Clark, R. E.; Welch, D. R.; Stygar, W. A.

    2011-03-01

    We evaluate the stability of electron current flow in high-power magnetically insulated transmission lines (MITLs). A detailed model of electron flow in cross-field gaps yields a dispersion relation for electromagnetic (EM) transverse magnetic waves [R. C. Davidson et al., Phys. Fluids 27, 2332 (1984)] which is solved numerically to obtain growth rates for unstable modes in various sheath profiles. These results are compared with two-dimensional (2D) EM particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations of electron flow in high-power MITLs. We find that the macroscopic properties (charge and current densities and self-fields) of the equilibrium profiles observed in the simulations are well represented by the laminar-flow model of Davidson et al. Idealized simulations of sheared flow in electron sheaths yield growth rates for both long (diocotron) and short (magnetron) wavelength instabilities that are in good agreement with the dispersion analysis. We conclude that electron sheaths that evolve self-consistently from space-charged-limited emission of electrons from the cathode in well-resolved 2D EM PIC simulations form stable profiles.

  6. Electron Flow Stability in Magnetically Insulated Vacuum Transmission Lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rose, D. V.; Genoni, T. C.; Clark, R. E.; Welch, D. R.; Stygar, W. A.

    2010-11-01

    We evaluate the stability of electron current flow in high power magnetically insulated transmission lines (MITLs). A detailed model of electron flow in cross-field gaps yields a dispersion relation for electromagnetic TM waves [1] which is solved numerically to obtain growth rates for unstable modes in various density profiles. These results are compared with 2D particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations of electron flow in high power MITLs. We find that the macroscopic properties (charge and current density, self-fields) of the equilibrium profiles observed in the simulations are well represented by the laminar flow model of [1]. Idealized simulations of sheared flow in electron sheaths show that unstable, sharp-cutoff radial density profiles rapidly evolve into stable flows with a more gradual density gradient. Growth rates for both long (diocotron) and short (magnetron) wavelength instabilities observed in the simulations agree well with the dispersion analysis. We conclude that electron sheaths in high power 2D MITL flows form stable profiles and that sheath expansion is not caused by flow instability. Subsequently, we investigate the impact of electrode plasma formation and evolution on sheath stability and gap closure using PIC simulations. We compare MITL simulations with experimental measurements. [1] R. C. Davidson, et al., Phys. Fluids 27, 2332 (1984).

  7. Electron flow stability in magnetically insulated vacuum transmission lines

    SciTech Connect

    Rose, D. V.; Genoni, T. C.; Clark, R. E.; Welch, D. R.; Stygar, W. A.

    2011-03-15

    We evaluate the stability of electron current flow in high-power magnetically insulated transmission lines (MITLs). A detailed model of electron flow in cross-field gaps yields a dispersion relation for electromagnetic (EM) transverse magnetic waves [R. C. Davidson et al., Phys. Fluids 27, 2332 (1984)] which is solved numerically to obtain growth rates for unstable modes in various sheath profiles. These results are compared with two-dimensional (2D) EM particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations of electron flow in high-power MITLs. We find that the macroscopic properties (charge and current densities and self-fields) of the equilibrium profiles observed in the simulations are well represented by the laminar-flow model of Davidson et al. Idealized simulations of sheared flow in electron sheaths yield growth rates for both long (diocotron) and short (magnetron) wavelength instabilities that are in good agreement with the dispersion analysis. We conclude that electron sheaths that evolve self-consistently from space-charged-limited emission of electrons from the cathode in well-resolved 2D EM PIC simulations form stable profiles.

  8. Electron flow stability in magnetically insulated vacuum transmission lines.

    SciTech Connect

    Genoni, Thomas C.; Stygar, William A.; Welch, Dale Robert; Clark, R. E.; Rose, David V.

    2010-11-01

    We evaluate the stability of electron current flow in high-power magnetically insulated transmission lines (MITLs). A detailed model of electron flow in cross-field gaps yields a dispersion relation for electromagnetic (EM) transverse magnetic waves [R. C. Davidson et al., Phys. Fluids 27, 2332 (1984)] which is solved numerically to obtain growth rates for unstable modes in various sheath profiles. These results are compared with two-dimensional (2D) EM particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations of electron flow in high-power MITLs. We find that the macroscopic properties (charge and current densities and self-fields) of the equilibrium profiles observed in the simulations are well represented by the laminar-flow model of Davidson et al. Idealized simulations of sheared flow in electron sheaths yield growth rates for both long (diocotron) and short (magnetron) wavelength instabilities that are in good agreement with the dispersion analysis. We conclude that electron sheaths that evolve self-consistently from space-charged-limited emission of electrons from the cathode in well-resolved 2D EM PIC simulations form stable profiles.

  9. Vacuum insulation of the high energy negative ion source for fusion application.

    PubMed

    Kojima, A; Hanada, M; Hilmi, A; Inoue, T; Watanabe, K; Taniguchi, M; Kashiwagi, M; Umeda, N; Tobari, H; Kobayashi, S; Yamano, Y; Grisham, L R

    2012-02-01

    Vacuum insulation on a large size negative ion accelerator with multiple extraction apertures and acceleration grids for fusion application was experimentally examined and designed. In the experiment, vacuum insulation characteristics were investigated in the JT-60 negative ion source with >1000 apertures on the grid with the surface area of ∼2 m(2). The sustainable voltages varied with a square root of the gap lengths between the grids, and decreased with number of the apertures and with the surface area of the grids. Based on the obtained results, the JT-60SA (super advanced) negative ion source is designed to produce 22 A, 500 keV D(-) ion beams for 100 s.

  10. Design and analysis of the PBFA-Z vacuum insulator stack

    SciTech Connect

    Shoup, R.W. |; Long, F.; Martin, T.H.

    1996-06-01

    Sandia is developing PBFA-Z, a 20-MA driver for z-pinch experiments by replacing the water lines, insulator stack, and MITLs on PBFA II with new hardware. The design of the vacuum insulator stack was dictated by the drive voltage, the electric field stress and grading requirements, the water line and MITL interface requirements, and the machine operations and maintenance requirements. The insulator stack will consist of four separate modules, each of a different design because of different voltage drive and hardware interface requirements. The shape of the components in each module, i.e., grading rings, insulator rings, flux excluders, anode and cathode conductors, and the design of the water line and MITL interfaces, were optimized by using the electrostatic analysis codes, ELECTRO and JASON. The time dependent performance of the insulator stack was evaluated using IVORY, a 2-D PIC code. This paper will describe the insulator stack design and present the results of the ELECTRO and IVORY analyses.

  11. Modeling the pressure increase in liquid helium cryostats after failure of the insulating vacuum

    SciTech Connect

    Heidt, C.; Grohmann, S.; Süßer, M.

    2014-01-29

    The pressure relief system of liquid helium cryostats requires a careful design, due to helium's low enthalpy of vaporization and due to the low operating temperature. Hazard analyses often involve the failure of the insulating vacuum in the worst-case scenario. The venting of the insulating vacuum and the implications for the pressure increase in the helium vessel, however, have not yet been fully analyzed. Therefore, the dimensioning of safety devices often requires experience and reference to very few experimental data. In order to provide a better foundation for the design of cryogenic pressure relief systems, this paper presents an analytic approach for the strongly dynamic process induced by the loss of insulating vacuum. The model is based on theoretical considerations and on differential equation modeling. It contains only few simplifying assumptions, which will be further investigated in future experiments. The numerical solutions of example calculations are presented with regard to the heat flux into the helium vessel, the helium pressure increase and the helium flow rate through the pressure relief device. Implications concerning two-phase flow and the influence of kinetic energy are discussed.

  12. Two-dimensional simulation research of secondary electron emission avalanche discharge on vacuum insulator surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Libing; Wang, Jianguo; Zhu, Xiangqin; Wang, Yue; Zhang, Dianhui

    2015-01-01

    Based on the secondary electron emission avalanche (SEEA) model, the SEEA discharge on the vacuum insulator surface is simulated by using a 2D PIC-MCC code developed by ourselves. The evolutions of the number of discharge electrons, insulator surface charge, current, and 2D particle distribution are obtained. The effects of the strength of the applied electric field, secondary electron yield coefficient, rise time of the pulse, length of the insulator on the discharge are investigated. The results show that the number of the SEEA electrons presents a quadratic dependence upon the applied field strength. The SEEA current, which is on the order of Ampere, is directly proportional to the field strength and secondary electron yield coefficient. Finally, the electron-stimulated outgassing is included in the simulation code, and a three-phase discharge curve is presented by the simulation, which agrees with the experimental data.

  13. Two-dimensional simulation research of secondary electron emission avalanche discharge on vacuum insulator surface

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, Libing; Wang, Jianguo; Zhu, Xiangqin; Wang, Yue; Zhang, Dianhui

    2015-01-15

    Based on the secondary electron emission avalanche (SEEA) model, the SEEA discharge on the vacuum insulator surface is simulated by using a 2D PIC-MCC code developed by ourselves. The evolutions of the number of discharge electrons, insulator surface charge, current, and 2D particle distribution are obtained. The effects of the strength of the applied electric field, secondary electron yield coefficient, rise time of the pulse, length of the insulator on the discharge are investigated. The results show that the number of the SEEA electrons presents a quadratic dependence upon the applied field strength. The SEEA current, which is on the order of Ampere, is directly proportional to the field strength and secondary electron yield coefficient. Finally, the electron-stimulated outgassing is included in the simulation code, and a three-phase discharge curve is presented by the simulation, which agrees with the experimental data.

  14. Development of High Temperature Type Vacuum Insulation Panel using Soluble Polyimide and Characteristic Evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Araki, Kuninari; Kamoto, Daigorou; Matsuoka, Shin-Ichi

    The utilization is expected from the high-insulated characteristic as a tool for energy saving also in the high temperature insulation fields as in vacuum insulation panels (VIP) in the future. For high temperature, the material composition and process of VIP were reviewed, the SUS foil was adopted as packaging material, and soluble polyimide was developed as the thermo compression bonding material for high temperature VIP at 150°C. To lower the glass-transition temperature (Tg) under 200°C, we elaborated the new soluble polyimide using aliphatic diamine copolymer, and controlled Tg to about 176°C. By making from trial VIP and evaluations, it was possible to be maintain high performance concerning the coefficient of thermal conductivity [λ<0.008 W/(m·K) at 150°C].

  15. A ceramic radial insulation structure for a relativistic electron beam vacuum diode.

    PubMed

    Xun, Tao; Yang, Hanwu; Zhang, Jiande; Liu, Zhenxiang; Wang, Yong; Zhao, Yansong

    2008-06-01

    For one kind of a high current diode composed of a small disk-type alumina ceramic insulator water/vacuum interface, the insulation structure was designed and experimentally investigated. According to the theories of vacuum flashover and the rules for radial insulators, a "cone-column" anode outline and the cathode shielding rings were adopted. The electrostatic field along the insulator surface was obtained by finite element analysis simulating. By adjusting the outline of the anode and reshaping the shielding rings, the electric fields were well distributed and the field around the cathode triple junction was effectively controlled. Area weighted statistical method was applied to estimate the surface breakdown field. In addition, the operating process of an accelerator based on a spiral pulse forming line (PFL) was simulated through the PSPICE software to get the waveform of charging and diode voltage. The high voltage test was carried out on a water dielectric spiral PFL accelerator with long pulse duration, and results show that the diode can work stably in 420 kV, 200 ns conditions. The experimental results agree with the theoretical and simulated results.

  16. Effect of doping on the voltage holdoff performance of alumina insulators in vacuum

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, H.C.

    1984-09-21

    Alumina ceramics doped with various combinations of Cr, Mn, and Ti were fabricated into hollow cylindrical insulators, then assembled into vacuum diodes and tested with 25-..mu..s voltage pulses. Four doped alumina ceramics with total dopant levels of 2.6 to 4.7 wt % and partial Cr plus Ti dopant levels of 1.0 to 2.4% performed very well. They had voltage holdoffs significantly better (25 to 40%) than plain alumina ceramics. Ceramics with total dopant levels of 5.3 to 5.6 percent performed only slightly better than plain alumina. Ceramics with partial Cr plus Ti dopant levels of 3.8 to 4.0% had significantly improved voltage holdoff capabilities, but undesirably high permanent failure rates (19 to 33%). Ceramics with total dopant levels greater than 7% performed very poorly, nearly all suffered permanent damage from breakdowns. These results suggest that desirable upper limits for doping are 5% for total dopants and 3% for Cr and Ti combined. Thus, doping a 94% Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ alumina ceramic with appropriate amounts of Cr, Mn, and Ti can significantly improve the voltage holdoff capability of insulators fabricated from such ceramics. These doped ceramic insulators are suitable for use in ultrahigh vacuum applications.

  17. Improving the voltage holdoff performance of alumina insulators in vacuum by quasimetallizing or doping

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, H.C.

    1980-08-11

    Treatment of the surface of an alumina insulator with coatings incorporating varying amounts of Cr, Mn, and Ti can significantly increase the vacuum voltage holdoff capability of the insulator (up to 25 percent). During processing (quasimetallizing) the coating penetrates into the alumina, so it is insensitive to mechanical damage. This quasimetallize treatment is also compatible with subsequent metallizing and brazing of the alumina insulator. Quasimetallizing with appropriate formulations has been shown to change the surface characteristics of alumina in two ways: it decreases both the surface resistivity of the alumina and the secondary electron emission yield of the alumina. Each change improves the voltage holdoff characteristics of the alumina. Similar improvements in voltage holdoff capability can be obtained by doping the plain alumina to the 5 percent (by weight) level with additives of 4 parts Mn/1 part Ti or 2 Mn/1 Ti/1 Cr. Such doped ceramics have the advantage of requiring fewer processing steps than do the quasimetallized ceramics. Both doped and quasimetallized ceramics are suitable for use in ultrahigh vacuum apparatus.

  18. Improved vacuum surface flashover performance of polymer insulators by the use of unique triple junction designs

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, J.D.; Kahaian, D.J.; Honig, E.M.; Montoya, R.E.; Rosocha, L.A.; Allen, G.R. ); Aaron, W.F. III . Plasma Lab.)

    1991-01-01

    Previous research and theories about surface flashover in vacuum indicate that the triple junction region plays a critical role in the insulator flashover process. To attempt to improve upon the performance of the standard 45-degree frustum insulator, three different insulator geometries with modified triple junction regions were investigated. Two samples of each geometry, each 2 cm thick, were tested to obtain the flashover voltage levels in a low 10{sup {minus}5} Torr vacuum using a 1.2-microsecond risetime voltage pulse. Each sample was tested five times with 20 shots per test for a total of 200 shots per geometry. Test results and comparisons of the flashover voltage levels for the four geometries are presented. One geometry showed an improvement in flashover voltage of about 40% over the standard 45-degree frustum. It also showed significantly less susceptibility to low-voltage flashover due to surface damage, suggesting a correlation between surface damage and the development of conductive paths along the surface.

  19. A review of vacuum insulation research and development in the Building Materials Group of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Kollie, T.G.; McElroy, D.L.; Fine, H.A.; Childs, K.W.; Graves, R.S.; Weaver, F.J.

    1991-09-01

    This report is a summary of the development work on flat-vacuum insulation performed by the Building Materials Group (BMG) in the Metals and Ceramics Division of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) during the last two years. A historical review of the technology of vacuum insulation is presented, and the role that ORNL played in this development is documented. The ORNL work in vacuum insulation has been concentrated in Powder-filled Evacuated Panels (PEPs) that have a thermal resistivity over 2.5 times that of insulating foams and seven times that of many batt-type insulations, such as fiberglass. Experimental results of substituting PEPs for chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) foal insulation in Igloo Corporation ice coolers are summarized. This work demonstrated that one-dimensional (1D) heat flow models overestimated the increase in thermal insulation of a foam/PEP-composite insulation, but three-dimensional (3D) models provided by a finite-difference, heat-transfer code (HEATING-7) accurately predicted the resistance of the composites. Edges and corners of the ice coolers were shown to cause the errors in the 1D models as well as shunting of the heat through the foam and around the PEPs. The area of coverage of a PEP in a foam/PEP composite is established as an important parameter in maximizing the resistance of such composites. 50 refs., 27 figs,. 22 tabs.

  20. Experiments to increase the parameters of the vacuum insulation tandem accelerator for boron neutron capture therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasatov, D. A.; Kolesnikov, J. A.; Koshkarev, A. M.; Kuznetsov, A. S.; Makarov, A. N.; Sokolova, E. O.; Sorokin, I. N.; Sycheva, T. V.; Taskaev, S. Yu.; Shchudlo, I. M.

    2016-12-01

    An epithermal neutron source that is based on a vacuum insulation tandem accelerator (VITA) and lithium target was created in the Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics for the development of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). A stationary proton beam with 2 MeV energy and 1.6 mA current has been obtained. To carry out BNCT, it is necessary to increase the beam parameters up to 2.3 MeV and 3 mA. Ways to increase the parameters of the proton beam have been proposed and discussed in this paper. The results of the experiments are presented.

  1. Suppression of shunting current in a magnetically insulated coaxial vacuum diode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yalandin, M. I.; Mesyats, G. A.; Rostov, V. V.; Sharypov, K. A.; Shpak, V. G.; Shunailov, S. A.; Ulmaskulov, M. R.

    2015-06-01

    Real-time investigations of the dynamics of explosive electron emission from a high-voltage cathode holder made of nonmagnetic stainless steel in a magnetically insulated coaxial vacuum diode have been performed. It has been shown that aging the cathode with several tens of voltage pulses at a field of 1-2 MV/cm provides a stray emission delay ranging from hundreds of picoseconds to a nanosecond or more. In addition, the magnetic field must be configured so that the magnetic lines would not cross the vacuum gap between the diode case and the cathode holder in the region behind the emitting edge of the cathode. These efforts provide conditions for stable emission of the working beam from a graphite cathode with a sharp emitting edge.

  2. Suppression of shunting current in a magnetically insulated coaxial vacuum diode

    SciTech Connect

    Yalandin, M. I.; Sharypov, K. A.; Shpak, V. G.; Shunailov, S. A.; Ulmaskulov, M. R.; Mesyats, G. A.; Rostov, V. V.

    2015-06-08

    Real-time investigations of the dynamics of explosive electron emission from a high-voltage cathode holder made of nonmagnetic stainless steel in a magnetically insulated coaxial vacuum diode have been performed. It has been shown that aging the cathode with several tens of voltage pulses at a field of 1–2 MV/cm provides a stray emission delay ranging from hundreds of picoseconds to a nanosecond or more. In addition, the magnetic field must be configured so that the magnetic lines would not cross the vacuum gap between the diode case and the cathode holder in the region behind the emitting edge of the cathode. These efforts provide conditions for stable emission of the working beam from a graphite cathode with a sharp emitting edge.

  3. Optimization of Multilayer Laminated Film and Absorbent of Vacuum Insulation Panel for Use at High Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Araki, Kuninari; Echigoya, Wataru; Tsuruga, Toshimitsu; Kamoto, Daigorou; Matsuoka, Shin-Ichi

    For the energy saving regulation and larger capacity, Vacuum Insulation Panel (VIP) has been used in refrigerators with urethane foam in recent years. VIP for low temperature is constructed by laminated plastic film, using heat welding of each neighboring part for keeping vacuum, so that the performance decrement is very large under high temperature. But recently high efficiency insulation material is desired for high temperature water holding devices (automatic vending machine, heat pump water heater, electric hot-water pot water, etc.), and we especially focused on cost and ability of the laminated plastic film and absorbent for high temperature VIP. We measured the heatproof temperature of plastic films and checked the amount of water vapor and out coming gas on temperature-programmed adsorption in absorbent. These results suggest the suitable laminated film and absorbent system for VIP use at high temperature, and the long-term reliability was evaluated by measuring thermal conductivity of high temperature. As a result it was found that high-retort pouch of CPP (cast polypropylene film) and adding of aluminum coating are the most suitable materials for use in the welded layers of high-temperature VIPs (105°C).

  4. New High Capacity Getter for Vacuum-Insulated Mobile Liquid Hydrogen Storage Systems

    SciTech Connect

    H. Londer; G. R. Myneni; P. Adderley; G. Bartlok; J. Setina; W. Knapp; D. Schleussner

    2006-05-01

    Current ''Non evaporable getters'' (NEGs), based on the principle of metallic surface sorption of gas molecules, are important tools for the improving the performance of many vacuum systems. High porosity alloys or powder mixtures of Zr, Ti, Al, V, Fe and other metals are the base materials for this type of getters. The continuous development of vacuum technologies has created new challenges for the field of getter materials. The main sorption parameters of the current NEGs, namely, pumping speed and sorption capacity, have reached certain upper limits. Chemically active metals are the basis of a new generation of NEGs. The introduction of these new materials with high sorption capacity at room temperature is a long-awaited development. These new materials enable the new generation of NEGs to reach faster pumping speeds, significantly higher sticking rates and sorption capacities up to 104 times higher during their lifetimes. Our development efforts focus on producing these chemically active metals with controlled insulation or protection. The main structural forms of our new getter materials are spherical powders, granules and porous multi-layers. The full pumping performance can take place at room temperature with activation temperatures ranging from room temperature to 650 C. In one of our first pilot projects, our proprietary getter solution was successfully introduced as a getter pump in a double-wall mobile LH2 tank system. Our getters were shown to have very high sorption capacity of all relevant residual gases, including H2. This new concept opens the opportunity for significant vacuum improvements, especially in the field of H2 pumping which is an important task in many different vacuum applications.

  5. New High Capacity Getter for Vacuum-Insulated Mobile Liquid Hydrogen Storage Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Londer, H.; Myneni, G. R.; Adderley, P.; Bartlok, G.; Setina, J.; Knapp, W.; Schleussner, D.

    2006-05-01

    Current "Non evaporable getters" (NEGs), based on the principle of metallic surface sorption of gas molecules, are important tools for the improving the performance of many vacuum systems. High porosity alloys or powder mixtures of Zr, Ti, Al, V, Fe and other metals are the base materials for this type of getters. The continuous development of vacuum technologies has created new challenges for the field of getter materials. The main sorption parameters of the current NEGs, namely, pumping speed and sorption capacity, have reached certain upper limits. Chemically active metals are the basis of a new generation of NEGs. The introduction of these new materials with high sorption capacity at room temperature is a long-awaited development. These new materials enable the new generation of NEGs to reach faster pumping speeds, significantly higher sticking rates and sorption capacities up to 104 times higher during their lifetimes. Our development efforts focus on producing these chemically active metals with controlled insulation or protection. The main structural forms of our new getter materials are spherical powders, granules and porous multi-layers. The full pumping performance can take place at room temperature with activation temperatures ranging from room temperature to 650 °C. In one of our first pilot projects, our proprietary getter solution was successfully introduced as a getter pump in a double-wall mobile LH2 tank system. Our getters were shown to have very high sorption capacity of all relevant residual gases, including H2. This new concept opens the opportunity for significant vacuum improvements, especially in the field of H2 pumping which is an important task in many different vacuum applications.

  6. Microscopic and macroscopic material property effects on ultraviolet-laser-induced flashover of angled insulators in vacuum

    SciTech Connect

    Enloe, C.L.; Gilgenbach, R.M.

    1988-06-01

    Flashover of electrically stressed polymeric insulators in vacuum has been induced by ultraviolet radiation from an excimer laser (KrF). Flashover behavior is a relatively strong function of integrated fluence up to the time of flashover initiation, and virtually independent of applied power or pulse time. Flashover is induced by moderate fluence (10 - 150 mJ/cm/sup 2/) of intense (0.4 - 6 MW/cm/sup 2/) ultraviolet at 248 nm at electric field stress considerably below the static breakdown stress. The critical fluence required to initiate flashover is a function of the electric field stress, the insulating material, and the geometry of the dielectric/vacuum interface. The unconventional insulator geometry (in which electrons are accelerated toward the insulator surface) is more tolerant than the conventional geometry by nearly a factor of 2 in fluence. Insulator materials tested were polyethylene, polystyrene, acrylic, nylon-6, acetal, PVC, and teflon. The critical fluence is correlated to the microscopic and macroscopic material properties; results show that insulating materials with high dielectric constants and low secondary electron emission coefficients exhibit superior tolerance to ultraviolet radiation. Of the materials tested, nylon exhibited the highest critical fluence in both the conventional and the unconventional geometries. A theory of ultraviolet-induced insulator flashover is developed.

  7. Characterization of vacuum-multifoil insulation for long-life thermal batteries

    SciTech Connect

    GUIDOTTI,RONALD A.; REINHARDT,FREDERICK W.; KAUN,THOMAS

    2000-04-17

    The use of vacuum multifoil (VMF) container for thermal insulation in long-life thermal batteries was investigated in a proof-of-concept demonstration. An InvenTek-designed VMF container 4.9 inches in diameter by 10 inches long was used with an internally heated aluminum block, to simulate a thermal-battery stack. The block was heated to 525 C or 600 C and allowed to cool while monitoring the temperature of the block and the external case at three locations with time. The data indicate that it should be possible to build an equivalent-sized thermal battery that should last up to six hours, which would meet the requirements for a long-life sonobuoy application.

  8. Filament-strung stand-off elements for maintaining pane separation in vacuum insulating glazing units

    DOEpatents

    Bettger, Kenneth J; Stark, David H

    2013-08-20

    A vacuum insulating glazing unit (VIGU) comprises first and second panes of transparent material, first and second anchors, a plurality of filaments, a plurality of stand-off elements, and seals. The first and second panes of transparent material have edges and inner and outer faces, are disposed with their inner faces substantially opposing one another, and are separated by a gap having a predetermined height. The first and second anchors are disposed at opposite edges of one pane of the VIGU. Each filament is attached at one end to the first anchor and at the other end to the second anchor, and the filaments are collectively disposed between the panes substantially parallel to one another. The stand-off elements are affixed to each filament at predetermined positions along the filament, and have a height substantially equal to the predetermined height of the gap such that the each stand-off element touches the inner surfaces of both panes. The seals are disposed about the edges of the panes, enclosing the stand-off elements within a volume between the panes from which the atmosphere may be evacuated to form a partial vacuum.

  9. Non-CFC vacuum alternatives for the energy-efficient insulation of household refrigerators: Design and use

    SciTech Connect

    Potter, T.F.; Benson, D.K.

    1991-01-01

    Energy efficiency, environmental issues, and market incentives all encourage government and industry to continue work on thin-profile vacuum insulations for domestic refrigerators and freezers (R/Fs). Vacuum insulations promise significant improvement in thermal savings over current insulations; the technical objective of one design is an R-value of better than 10 (hr-ft{sup 2}-F/Btu) in 0.1 in. thickness. If performance is improved by a factor of 10 over that of CFC-blown insulating foams, the new insulations (made without CFCs or other potentially troublesome fill gases) will change the design and improve the efficiency of refrigerators. Such changes will meet the conservation, regulatory, and market drivers now strong in developed countries and likely to increase in developing countries. Prototypes of various designs have been tested in the laboratory and in factories, and results to date confirm the good thermal performance of these thin-profile alternatives. The next step is to resolve issues of reliability and cost effectiveness. 34 refs., 4 figs.

  10. Ultra high vacuum fabrication of metallic contacts for molecular devices on an insulating surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fostner, Shawn

    The preparation and characterization of metallic wires on insulating substrates by a variety of mechanisms has been explored. A multi-scale approach utilizing microfabricated silicon stencil masks, feedback controlled electromigration, and field induced metal cluster deposition in a novel geometry has been explored on potassium bromide (KBr), indium phosphide (InP), and silicon oxide substrates in an ultra-high vacuum environment (UHV). The initial deposition of gold, and tantalum wires between one hundred nanometers and micrometers in size was performed using reinforced silicon nanostencils. The stencil fabrication was discussed, and an examination of the deformation of the integrated structures under the deposition of highly stressed tantalum films was shown to be significantly smaller than typical structures. Metallic wires deposited using these stencils as well as electron beam lithography were electrically stressed and the breaking characteristics analyzed. Typical nanometer scale gaps were observed, as well as larger features more commonly found in the breaking of bamboo-like structures in gold wires 100 nm in size or less, particularly with a significant series resistance. These larger gaps are expected to be more applicable for the deposition of subsequent metallic clusters and preparation of molecular devices. As a step towards connecting the initially deposited wires as well as localized molecules in an a fashion allowing atomic scale imaging by AFM, modelling and experiments of field induced deposition of gold clusters on KBr and InP substrates was carried out. Deposition on InP substrates with a backside 2D electron gas as a counter-electrode demonstrated the feability of this deposition technique in UHV. Subsequent depositions on or adjacent to metallic pads on the bulk insulating KBr provided a proof of principle of the technique, though some experimental limitations such as large current pulses with the tip in close proximity to the surface are

  11. RHIC status

    SciTech Connect

    Peggs, S.

    1997-08-01

    The design and construction status of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider, RHIC, which is in the seventh year of a nine year construction cycle, is discussed. Those novel performance features of a heavy ion collider that are distinct from hadron colliders in general are noted. These features are derived from the experimental requirements of operation with a variety of ion species over a wide energy range, including collisions between protons and ions, and between ions of unequal energies. Section 1 gives a brief introduction to the major parameters and overall layout of RHIC. A review of the superconducting magnet program is given in Section 2. Activities during the recent Sextant Test are briefly reviewed in Section 3. Finally, Section 4 presents the plans for RHIC commissioning in 1999.

  12. An Optimum Design Index of the Bottle with the Vacuum Insulation Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horiuchi, Takuya; Tanaka, Tatsuya; Imaida, Yutaka; Nakai, Keiji; Utsumi, Koji

    2011-08-01

    In this paper, we present an optimum design index of the bottle with a vacuum insulation structure. Thinner wall design is required to produce lighter bottles. When the wall thickness is too thin, the bottles crushed external pressure. Therefore it is necessary to provide the optimum design index of the bottle. We showed the factors that may affect on the deformation of bottles. We though the factors are classified into shape and material of the bottle. The factors in shape are length L, diameter D and thickness t of the bottles. And the factors for material are Young's modulus and yield stress. The influence of each factor the critical deformation of bottles was verified by using FEM simulation. The nonlinear structural analysis LS-DYNA of the analytical software was applied. The analytical model simplified the base of the external cylinder is hollow cylinder model with shell element. Material properties for stainless steel (sus304), commercially pure titanium (Ti) and titanium alloy (Ti-6Al-4V). These each analytical model was loaded an external pressure by time steps. The pressure when the analytical model was transformed then was obtained. The result shows that the bottle's strength has the definite relation from its shape and greatly influences the material rigidity.

  13. Proceedings of the twenty sixth international symposium on discharges and electrical insulation in vacuum. V. 1

    SciTech Connect

    2014-07-01

    Vacuum science and technology has made vital contributions in high technology areas like space, high energy particle accelerators, plasma devices, pulse power, electronics, vacuum interrupters, thin films, melting and refining of metals/alloys, extraction and processing of advanced materials. Vacuum discharges, vacuum arc physics and technology and various applications towards vacuum interrupters, pulse power and particle accelerator are the main themes for this symposium. Papers relevant to INIS are indexed separately.

  14. Proceedings of the twenty sixth international symposium on discharges and electrical insulation in vacuum. V. 2

    SciTech Connect

    2014-07-01

    Vacuum science and technology has made vital contributions in high technology areas like space, high energy particle accelerators, plasma devices, pulse power, electronics, vacuum interrupters, thin films, melting and refining of metals/alloys, extraction and processing of advanced materials. Vacuum discharges, vacuum arc physics and technology and various applications towards vacuum interrupters, pulse power and particle accelerator are the main themes for this symposium. Papers relevant to INIS are indexed separately.

  15. Micro-Vibration Measurements on Thermally Loaded Multi-Layer Insulation Samples in Vacuum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deutsch, Georg; Grillenbeck, Anton

    2008-01-01

    Some scientific missions require to an extreme extent the absence of any on-board microvibration. Recent projects dedicated to measuring the Earth's gravity field and modeling the geoid with extremely high accuracy are examples. Their missions demand for extremely low micro-vibration environment on orbit for: (1) Not disturbing the measurement of earth gravity effects with the installed gradiometer or (2) Even not damaging the very high sensitive instruments. Based on evidence from ongoing missions multi-layer insulation (MLI) type thermal control blankets have been identified as a structural element of spacecrafts which might deform under temperature variations being caused by varying solar irradiation in orbit. Any such deformation exerts tiny forces which may cause small reactions resulting in micro-vibrations, in particular by exciting the spacecraft eigenmodes. The principle of the test set-up for the micro-vibration test was as follows. A real side wall panel of the spacecraft (size about 0.25 m2) was low-frequency suspended in a thermal vacuum chamber. On the one side of this panel, the MLI samples were fixed by using the standard methods. In front of the MLI, an IR-rig was installed which provided actively controlled IR-radiation power of about 6 kW/m2 in order to heat the MLI surface. The cooling was passive using the shroud temperature at a chamber pressure <1E-5mbar. The resulting micro-vibrations due to MLI motion in the heating and the cooling phase were measured via seismic accelerometers which were rigidly mounted to the panel. Video recording was used to correlate micro-vibration events to any visual MLI motion. Different MLI sample types were subjected to various thermal cycles in a temperature range between -60 C to +80 C. In this paper, the experience on these micro-vibration measurements will be presented and the conclusions for future applications will be discussed

  16. RHIC status

    SciTech Connect

    Ozaki, S.

    1992-01-01

    The RHIC project is in its second year of construction at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) with funding in place since 1991 and DOE approval for construction in January 1992. Key personnel for all of the collider systems are on board, the project management organization as well as procedures are in place, engineering design and prototype tests are in progress, and procurement of major accelerator components has begun.

  17. RHIC status

    SciTech Connect

    Ozaki, S.

    1992-09-01

    The RHIC project is in its second year of construction at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) with funding in place since 1991 and DOE approval for construction in January 1992. Key personnel for all of the collider systems are on board, the project management organization as well as procedures are in place, engineering design and prototype tests are in progress, and procurement of major accelerator components has begun.

  18. Pressure Relief for RHIC Cryogenic System

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, K. C.

    1993-12-27

    The maximum credible accident for the RHIC magnet cryostats has been identified with a heat load extrapolated from the loss of vacuum experiment for RHIC dipole magnet DRD-009 in MAGCOOL. The venting requirements for each of the cryogenic lines was evaluated and the corresponding pressure drops calculated. The results show the pressure drop in this system is less than the 21% maximum allowable working pressure guideline.

  19. Experimental Evaluation and Comparison of Thermal Conductivity of High-Voltage Insulation Materials for Vacuum Electronic Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suresh, C.; Srikrishna, P.

    2017-03-01

    Vacuum electronic devices operate with very high voltage differences between their sub-assemblies which are separated by very small distances. These devices also emit large amounts of heat that needs to be dissipated. Hence, there exists a requirement for high-voltage insulators with good thermal conductivity for voltage isolation and efficient heat dissipation. However, these voltage insulators are generally poor conductors of heat. In the present work, an effort has been made to obtain good high-voltage insulation materials with substantial improvement in their thermal conductivity. New mixtures of composites were formed by blending varying percentages (by volumes) of aluminum nitride powders with that of neat room-temperature vulcanizing (RTV) silicone elastomer compound. In this work, a thermal conductivity test setup has been devised for the quantification of the thermal conductivity of the insulators. The thermal conductivities and high-voltage isolation capabilities of various blended composites were quantified and were compared with that of neat RTV to evaluate the relative improvement.

  20. Experimental Evaluation and Comparison of Thermal Conductivity of High-Voltage Insulation Materials for Vacuum Electronic Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suresh, C.; Srikrishna, P.

    2017-07-01

    Vacuum electronic devices operate with very high voltage differences between their sub-assemblies which are separated by very small distances. These devices also emit large amounts of heat that needs to be dissipated. Hence, there exists a requirement for high-voltage insulators with good thermal conductivity for voltage isolation and efficient heat dissipation. However, these voltage insulators are generally poor conductors of heat. In the present work, an effort has been made to obtain good high-voltage insulation materials with substantial improvement in their thermal conductivity. New mixtures of composites were formed by blending varying percentages (by volumes) of aluminum nitride powders with that of neat room-temperature vulcanizing (RTV) silicone elastomer compound. In this work, a thermal conductivity test setup has been devised for the quantification of the thermal conductivity of the insulators. The thermal conductivities and high-voltage isolation capabilities of various blended composites were quantified and were compared with that of neat RTV to evaluate the relative improvement.

  1. RHIC instrumentation

    SciTech Connect

    Shea, T.J.; Witkover, R.L.

    1998-12-01

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) consists of two 3.8 km circumference rings utilizing 396 superconducting dipoles and 492 superconducting quadrupoles. Each ring will accelerate approximately 60 bunches of 10{sup 11} protons to 250 GeV, or 10{sup 9} fully stripped gold ions to 100 GeV/nucleon. Commissioning is scheduled for early 1999 with detectors for some of the 6 intersection regions scheduled for initial operation later in the year. The injection line instrumentation includes: 52 beam position monitor (BPM) channels, 56 beam loss monitor (BLM) channels, 5 fast integrating current transformers and 12 video beam profile monitors. The collider ring instrumentation includes: 667 BPM channels, 400 BLM channels, wall current monitors, DC current transformers, ionization profile monitors (IPMs), transverse feedback systems, and resonant Schottky monitors. The use of superconducting magnets affected the beam instrumentation design. The BPM electrodes must function in a cryogenic environment and the BLM system must prevent magnet quenches from either fast or slow losses with widely different rates. RHIC is the first superconducting accelerator to cross transition, requiring close monitoring of beam parameters at this time. High space-charge due to the fully stripped gold ions required the IPM to collect magnetically guided electrons rather than the conventional ions. Since polarized beams will also be accelerated in RHIC, additional constraints were put on the instrumentation. The orbit must be well controlled to minimize depolarizing resonance strengths. Also, the position monitors must accommodate large orbit displacements within the Siberian snakes and spin rotators. The design of the instrumentation will be presented along with results obtained during bench tests, the injection line commissioning, and the first sextant test. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  2. RHIC instrumentation

    SciTech Connect

    Shea, T. J.; Witkover, R. L.

    1998-12-10

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) consists of two 3.8 km circumference rings utilizing 396 superconducting dipoles and 492 superconducting quadrupoles. Each ring will accelerate approximately 60 bunches of 10{sup 11} protons to 250 GeV, or 10{sup 9} fully stripped gold ions to 100 GeV/nucleon. Commissioning is scheduled for early 1999 with detectors for some of the 6 intersection regions scheduled for initial operation later in the year. The injection line instrumentation includes: 52 beam position monitor (BPM) channels, 56 beam loss monitor (BLM) channels, 5 fast integrating current transformers and 12 video beam profile monitors. The collider ring instrumentation includes: 667 BPM channels, 400 BLM channels, wall current monitors, DC current transformers, ionization profile monitors (IPMs), transverse feedback systems, and resonant Schottky monitors. The use of superconducting magnets affected the beam instrumentation design. The BPM electrodes must function in a cryogenic environment and the BLM system must prevent magnet quenches from either fast or slow losses with widely different rates. RHIC is the first superconducting accelerator to cross transition, requiring close monitoring of beam parameters at this time. High space-charge due to the fully stripped gold ions required the IPM to collect magnetically guided electrons rather than the conventional ions. Since polarized beams will also be accelerated in RHIC, additional constraints were put on the instrumentation. The orbit must be well controlled to minimize depolarizing resonance strengths. Also, the position monitors must accommodate large orbit displacements within the Siberian snakes and spin rotators. The design of the instrumentation will be presented along with results obtained during bench tests, the injection line commissioning, and the first sextant test.

  3. RHIC instrumentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shea, T. J.; Witkover, R. L.

    1998-12-01

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) consists of two 3.8 km circumference rings utilizing 396 superconducting dipoles and 492 superconducting quadrupoles. Each ring will accelerate approximately 60 bunches of 1011 protons to 250 GeV, or 109 fully stripped gold ions to 100 GeV/nucleon. Commissioning is scheduled for early 1999 with detectors for some of the 6 intersection regions scheduled for initial operation later in the year. The injection line instrumentation includes: 52 beam position monitor (BPM) channels, 56 beam loss monitor (BLM) channels, 5 fast integrating current transformers and 12 video beam profile monitors. The collider ring instrumentation includes: 667 BPM channels, 400 BLM channels, wall current monitors, DC current transformers, ionization profile monitors (IPMs), transverse feedback systems, and resonant Schottky monitors. The use of superconducting magnets affected the beam instrumentation design. The BPM electrodes must function in a cryogenic environment and the BLM system must prevent magnet quenches from either fast or slow losses with widely different rates. RHIC is the first superconducting accelerator to cross transition, requiring close monitoring of beam parameters at this time. High space-charge due to the fully stripped gold ions required the IPM to collect magnetically guided electrons rather than the conventional ions. Since polarized beams will also be accelerated in RHIC, additional constraints were put on the instrumentation. The orbit must be well controlled to minimize depolarizing resonance strengths. Also, the position monitors must accommodate large orbit displacements within the Siberian snakes and spin rotators. The design of the instrumentation will be presented along with results obtained during bench tests, the injection line commissioning, and the first sextant test.

  4. RHIC Status

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peggs, Steve

    1997-05-01

    The design and construction status of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider, RHIC, is discussed. Those novel performance features of a heavy ion collider that are distinct from hadron colliders in general are noted. These features are derived from the experimental requirements of operation with a variety of ion species over a wide energy range, including collisions between protons and ions, and between ions of unequal energies. The project is in the fifth year of a seven year construction cycle. A brief review of the recent Sextant Test is given, together with progress to date on machine construction.

  5. Self-consistent simulation of the initiation of the flashover discharge on vacuum insulator surface

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, L. B.; Zhang, D. H.; Du, T. J.; Zhu, X. Q.; Wang, Y.; Wang, J. G.

    2012-07-15

    A 2D particle-in-cell code, including the space charge effects of insulator surface charge, is established to simulate the initiation of insulator surface flashover. The simulation is started with a field electron emission, which provides the seed electrons of the surface flashover discharge. Then the secondary electron emission is caused by the seed electrons on the insulator surface, gets into an avalanche, and saturates rapidly in a region between the cathode and anode. And the saturation region spreads to the anode at a speed of {approx}10{sup 7} m/s, which is coincident with the experiment measurement.

  6. HYDROGEN AND ITS DESORPTION IN RHIC.

    SciTech Connect

    HSEUH,H.C.

    2002-11-11

    Hydrogen is the dominating gas specie in room temperature, ultrahigh vacuum systems of particle accelerators and storage rings, such as the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven. Rapid pressure increase of a few decades in hydrogen and other residual gases was observed during RHIC's recent high intensity gold and proton runs. The type and magnitude of the pressure increase were analyzed and compared with vacuum conditioning, beam intensity, number of bunches and bunch spacing. Most of these pressure increases were found to be consistent with those induced by beam loss and/or electron stimulated desorption from electron multipacting.

  7. Insulation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rhea, Dennis

    This instructional unit is one of 10 developed by students on various energy-related areas that deals specifically with insulation. Its objective is for the student to be able to determine insulation needs of new or existing structures, select type to use, use installation techniques, calculate costs, and apply safety factors. Some topics covered…

  8. Insulation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rhea, Dennis

    This instructional unit is one of 10 developed by students on various energy-related areas that deals specifically with insulation. Its objective is for the student to be able to determine insulation needs of new or existing structures, select type to use, use installation techniques, calculate costs, and apply safety factors. Some topics covered…

  9. Maximum Expected Wall Heat Flux and Maximum Pressure After Sudden Loss of Vacuum Insulation on the Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA) Liquid Helium (LHe) Dewars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ungar, Eugene K.

    2014-01-01

    The aircraft-based Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA) is a platform for multiple infrared observation experiments. The experiments carry sensors cooled to liquid helium (LHe) temperatures. A question arose regarding the heat input and peak pressure that would result from a sudden loss of the dewar vacuum insulation. Owing to concerns about the adequacy of dewar pressure relief in the event of a sudden loss of the dewar vacuum insulation, the SOFIA Program engaged the NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC). This report summarizes and assesses the experiments that have been performed to measure the heat flux into LHe dewars following a sudden vacuum insulation failure, describes the physical limits of heat input to the dewar, and provides an NESC recommendation for the wall heat flux that should be used to assess the sudden loss of vacuum insulation case. This report also assesses the methodology used by the SOFIA Program to predict the maximum pressure that would occur following a loss of vacuum event.

  10. Increasing the electric strength of vacuum insulation by treating the electrodes with a low-energy, high-current electron beam

    SciTech Connect

    Batrakov, A.V.; Nazarov, D.S.; Ozur, G.E.

    1996-12-31

    The paper is devoted to the study of how the irradiation of the electrode surface with a low-energy, high-current electron beam affects the prebreakdown current and the electric strength of the vacuum insulation. This study is an extension of the work whose results were presented at the XVI ISDEIV. Experiments have been performed for 0.1-mm vacuum gaps formed by refractory-metal electrodes and for millimeter vacuum gaps with a pulsed voltage of amplitude 250 kV and duration 30-100 ns.

  11. Commercialization Plan Support for Development of Low Cost Vacuum Insulating Glazing: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-11-449

    SciTech Connect

    Dameron, Arrelaine

    2015-07-09

    During the duration of this CRADA, V-Glass and NREL will partner in testing, analysis, performance forecasting, costing, and evaluation of V-Glass’s GRIPWELD™ process technology for creating a low cost hermetic seal for conventional and vacuum glazing. Upon successful evaluation of hermeticity, V-Glass’s GRIPWELD™ will be evaluated for its potential use in highly insulating window glazing.

  12. Effect of thickness of insulation coating on temperature of electrically exploded tungsten wires in vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Huantong; Zou, Xiaobing; Wang, Xinxin

    2017-07-01

    This paper reports an interesting observation of great differences in the temperature of exploded wires with insulation coating of different thicknesses. Two kinds of polyimide-coated tungsten wires were used with the same conductive diameter 12.5 μm but a different thickness of coating, 0.75-2.25 μm and 2.25-4.25 μm, respectively. The specific energy reconstructed from the current and voltage signals was quite close for the tested wires. However, the exploding scenario, obtained from Mach-Zehnder interferograms, showed great differences: a neutral outer-layer was observed around the thick-coated wire, which was absent for the thin-coated wire; and the calculated electron density and local thermal equilibrium temperature were much higher for thick-coated wires. The heat-preserving neutral layer formed by the decomposition of the insulation was supposed to be the cause of this phenomenon.

  13. Optimization of the contents of hollow glass microsphere and sodium hexametaphosphate for glass fiber vacuum insulation panel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, C. D.; Chen, Z. F.; Zhou, J. M.

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, various additive amounts of hollow glass microspheres (HGMs) and sodium hexametaphosphate (SHMP) powders were blended with flame attenuated glass wool (FAGW) to form hybrid core materials (HCMs) through the wet method. Among them, the SHMP was dissolved in the glass fiber suspension and coated on the surface of glass fibers while the HGMs were insoluble in the glass fiber suspension and filled in the fiber-fiber pores. The average pore diameter of the FAGW/HGM HCMs was 8-11 μm which was near the same as that of flame attenuated glass fiber mats (FAGMs, i.e., 10.5 µm). The tensile strength of the SHMP coated FAGMs was enhanced from 160 N/m to 370 N/m when SHMP content increased from 0 wt.% to 0.2 wt.%. By contrast, the tensile strength of the FAGW/HGM HCMs decreased from 160 N/m to 40 N/m when HGM content increased from 0 wt.% to 50 wt.%. Both the FAGW/HGM HCMs and SHMP coated FAGMs were vacuumed completely to form vacuum insulation panels (VIPs). The results showed that both the addition of SHMP and HGM led a slight increase in the thermal conductivity of the corresponding VIPs. To obtain a high-quality VIP, the optimal SHMP content and HGM content in glass fiber suspension was 0.12-0.2 wt.% and 0 wt.%.

  14. Dynamic superlubricity on insulating and conductive surfaces in ultra-high vacuum and ambient environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gnecco, E.; Socoliuc, A.; Maier, S.; Gessler, J.; Glatzel, T.; Baratoff, A.; Meyer, E.

    2009-01-01

    Atomic-scale friction between a sharp tip at the end of a micro-fabricated silicon cantilever and atomically flat surfaces (NaCl, KBr, HOPG and mica) can be significantly reduced by piezo-induced perpendicular mechanical oscillations at specific resonance frequencies of the cantilever in gentle contact with the sample. The reported measurements confirm and extend the applicability of the effect recently demonstrated using electro-capacitive actuation on alkali halide surfaces in ultra-high vacuum (Socoliuc et al 2006 Science 313 208). A controlled reduction of friction is now observed even on a conductive surface and under ambient conditions, which is quite promising for applications to micro-electromechanical devices. The theory previously used to interpret 'dynamic superlubricity' is supported by new measurements showing that the contact can be maintained in that regime and that the initial reduction of friction is linear versus oscillation amplitude. The calibration of the oscillating component of the normal force is also discussed.

  15. Dynamic superlubricity on insulating and conductive surfaces in ultra-high vacuum and ambient environment.

    PubMed

    Gnecco, E; Socoliuc, A; Maier, S; Gessler, J; Glatzel, T; Baratoff, A; Meyer, E

    2009-01-14

    Atomic-scale friction between a sharp tip at the end of a micro-fabricated silicon cantilever and atomically flat surfaces (NaCl, KBr, HOPG and mica) can be significantly reduced by piezo-induced perpendicular mechanical oscillations at specific resonance frequencies of the cantilever in gentle contact with the sample. The reported measurements confirm and extend the applicability of the effect recently demonstrated using electro-capacitive actuation on alkali halide surfaces in ultra-high vacuum (Socoliuc et al 2006 Science 313 208). A controlled reduction of friction is now observed even on a conductive surface and under ambient conditions, which is quite promising for applications to micro-electromechanical devices. The theory previously used to interpret 'dynamic superlubricity' is supported by new measurements showing that the contact can be maintained in that regime and that the initial reduction of friction is linear versus oscillation amplitude. The calibration of the oscillating component of the normal force is also discussed.

  16. Numerical simulation of cathode plasma dynamics in magnetically insulated vacuum transmission lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thoma, C.; Genoni, T. C.; Welch, D. R.; Rose, D. V.; Clark, R. E.; Miller, C. L.; Stygar, W. A.; Kiefer, M. L.

    2015-03-01

    A novel algorithm for the simulation of cathode plasmas in particle-in-cell codes is described and applied to investigate cathode plasma evolution in magnetically insulated transmission lines (MITLs). The MITL electron sheath is modeled by a fully kinetic electron species. Electron and ion macroparticles, both modeled as fluid species, form a dense plasma which is initially localized at the cathode surface. Energetic plasma electron particles can be converted to kinetic electrons to resupply the electron flux at the plasma edge (the "effective" cathode). Using this model, we compare results for the time evolution of the cathode plasma and MITL electron flow with a simplified (isothermal) diffusion model. Simulations in 1D show a slow diffusive expansion of the plasma from the cathode surface. But in multiple dimensions, the plasma can expand much more rapidly due to anomalous diffusion caused by an instability due to the strong coupling of a transverse magnetic mode in the electron sheath with the expanding resistive plasma layer.

  17. Numerical simulation of cathode plasma dynamics in magnetically insulated vacuum transmission lines

    SciTech Connect

    Thoma, C.; Genoni, T. C.; Welch, D. R.; Rose, D. V.; Clark, R. E.; Miller, C. L.; Stygar, W. A.; Kiefer, M. L.

    2015-03-15

    A novel algorithm for the simulation of cathode plasmas in particle-in-cell codes is described and applied to investigate cathode plasma evolution in magnetically insulated transmission lines (MITLs). The MITL electron sheath is modeled by a fully kinetic electron species. Electron and ion macroparticles, both modeled as fluid species, form a dense plasma which is initially localized at the cathode surface. Energetic plasma electron particles can be converted to kinetic electrons to resupply the electron flux at the plasma edge (the “effective” cathode). Using this model, we compare results for the time evolution of the cathode plasma and MITL electron flow with a simplified (isothermal) diffusion model. Simulations in 1D show a slow diffusive expansion of the plasma from the cathode surface. But in multiple dimensions, the plasma can expand much more rapidly due to anomalous diffusion caused by an instability due to the strong coupling of a transverse magnetic mode in the electron sheath with the expanding resistive plasma layer.

  18. Experiments with RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Westfall, Gary D.

    2000-12-31

    Experiments with the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) will begin in December 1999. RHIC consists of two superconducting rings capable of accelerating and storing Au beams of 100 GeV/nucleon and proton beams of 250 GeV. Four experiments are being prepared for RHIC: STAR, PHENIX, PHOBOS, and BRAHMS. These detector systems are designed to search for signals of the quark gluon plasma in Au-Au collisions. A spin physics program using polarized protons will also be carried out at RHIC.

  19. THE RHIC INJECTION SYSTEM.

    SciTech Connect

    FISCHER,W.; GLENN,J.W.; MACKAY,W.W.; PTITSIN,V.; ROBINSON,T.G.; TSOUPAS,N.

    1999-03-29

    The RHIC injection system has to transport beam from the AGS-to-RHIC transfer line onto the closed orbits of the RHIC Blue and Yellow rings. This task can be divided into three problems. First, the beam has to be injected into either ring. Second, once injected the beam needs to be transported around the ring for one turn. Third, the orbit must be closed and coherent beam oscillations around the closed orbit should be minimized. We describe our solutions for these problems and report on system tests conducted during the RHIC Sextant test performed in 1997. The system will be fully commissioned in 1999.

  20. Development of design technique for vacuum insulation in large size multi-aperture multi-grid accelerator for nuclear fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Kojima, A. Hanada, M.; Tobari, H.; Nishikiori, R.; Hiratsuka, J.; Kashiwagi, M.; Umeda, N.; Yoshida, M.; Ichikawa, M.; Watanabe, K.; Yamano, Y.; Grisham, L. R.

    2016-02-15

    Design techniques for the vacuum insulation have been developed in order to realize a reliable voltage holding capability of multi-aperture multi-grid (MAMuG) accelerators for fusion application. In this method, the nested multi-stage configuration of the MAMuG accelerator can be uniquely designed to satisfy the target voltage within given boundary conditions. The evaluation of the voltage holding capabilities of each acceleration stages was based on the previous experimental results about the area effect and the multi-aperture effect. Since the multi-grid effect was found to be the extension of the area effect by the total facing area this time, the total voltage holding capability of the multi-stage can be estimated from that per single stage by assuming the stage with the highest electric field, the total facing area, and the total apertures. By applying these consideration, the analysis on the 3-stage MAMuG accelerator for JT-60SA agreed well with the past gap-scan experiments with an accuracy of less than 10% variation, which demonstrated the high reliability to design MAMuG accelerators and also multi-stage high voltage bushings.

  1. Development of design technique for vacuum insulation in large size multi-aperture multi-grid accelerator for nuclear fusion.

    PubMed

    Kojima, A; Hanada, M; Tobari, H; Nishikiori, R; Hiratsuka, J; Kashiwagi, M; Umeda, N; Yoshida, M; Ichikawa, M; Watanabe, K; Yamano, Y; Grisham, L R

    2016-02-01

    Design techniques for the vacuum insulation have been developed in order to realize a reliable voltage holding capability of multi-aperture multi-grid (MAMuG) accelerators for fusion application. In this method, the nested multi-stage configuration of the MAMuG accelerator can be uniquely designed to satisfy the target voltage within given boundary conditions. The evaluation of the voltage holding capabilities of each acceleration stages was based on the previous experimental results about the area effect and the multi-aperture effect. Since the multi-grid effect was found to be the extension of the area effect by the total facing area this time, the total voltage holding capability of the multi-stage can be estimated from that per single stage by assuming the stage with the highest electric field, the total facing area, and the total apertures. By applying these consideration, the analysis on the 3-stage MAMuG accelerator for JT-60SA agreed well with the past gap-scan experiments with an accuracy of less than 10% variation, which demonstrated the high reliability to design MAMuG accelerators and also multi-stage high voltage bushings.

  2. Thermal insulator

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamoto, R.; Asada, Y.; Matsuo, Y.; Mikoda, M.

    1985-07-16

    A thermal insulator comprises an expanded resin body having embedded therein an evacuated powder insulation portion which consists of fine powder and a container of film-like plastics or a film-like composite of plastics and metal for enclosing the powder. The resin body has been expanded by a Freon gas as a blowing agent. Since a Freon gas has a larger molecular diameter than the constituent gases of air, it is less likely to permeate through the container than air. Thus present invention provides a novel composite insulator which fully utilizes the benefits of vacuum insulation without necessitating a strong and costly material for a vacuum container.

  3. A new test method for the assessment of the arc tracking properties of wire insulation in air, oxygen enriched atmospheres and vacuum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koenig, Dieter

    1994-01-01

    Development of a new test method suitable for the assessment of the resistance of aerospace cables to arc tracking for different specific environmental and network conditions of spacecraft is given in view-graph format. The equipment can be easily adapted for tests at different realistic electrical network conditions incorporating circuit protection and the test system works equally well whatever the test atmosphere. Test results confirm that pure Kapton insulated wire has bad arcing characteristics and ETFE insulated wire is considerably better in air. For certain wires, arc tracking effects are increased at higher oxygen concentrations and significantly increased under vacuum. All tests on different cable insulation materials and in different environments, including enriched oxygen atmospheres, resulted in a more or less rapid extinguishing of all high temperature effects at the beginning of the post-test phase. In no case was a self-maintained fire initiated by the arc.

  4. Stochastic cooling in RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Brennan,J.M.; Blaskiewicz, M. M.; Severino, F.

    2009-05-04

    After the success of longitudinal stochastic cooling of bunched heavy ion beam in RHIC, transverse stochastic cooling in the vertical plane of Yellow ring was installed and is being commissioned with proton beam. This report presents the status of the effort and gives an estimate, based on simulation, of the RHIC luminosity with stochastic cooling in all planes.

  5. Longitudinal impedance of RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Blaskiewicz, M.; Brennan, J. M.; Mernick, K.

    2015-05-03

    The longitudinal impedance of the two RHIC rings has been measured using the effect of potential well distortion on longitudinal Schottky measurements. For the blue RHIC ring Im(Z/n) = 1.5±0.2Ω. For the yellow ring Im(Z/n) = 5.4±1Ω.

  6. THE RHIC ACCELERATOR.

    SciTech Connect

    HARRISON,M.; PEGGS,S.; ROSER,T.

    2002-01-01

    This review discusses the design and initial operation of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), noting the novel features of a heavy ion collider that are distinct from conventional hadron colliders. These features reflect the experimental requirements of operation with a variety of ion species over a wide energy range, including collisions between ions of unequal energies and polarized protons. Other unique aspects of RHIC include intrabeam scattering, interaction-region error compensation, and transition crossing with a slow ramp rate. The RHIC facility has just completed the second physics run after beam commissioning in 2000.

  7. RHIC Renaissance Celebration

    SciTech Connect

    Brookhaven Lab

    2009-07-31

    A celebration of the contribution that Renaissance Technologies, Inc., made to the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider, during which the entire Lab community participated in a series of RHIC Renaissance events, beginning with the Roads to Discovery ceremony,

  8. RHIC progress and future

    SciTech Connect

    Montag,C.

    2009-05-04

    The talk reviews RHIC performance, including unprecedented manipulations of polarized beams and recent low energy operations. Achievements and limiting factors of RHIC operation are discussed, such as intrabeam scattering, electron cloud, beam-beam effects, magnet vibrations, and the efficiency of novel countermeasures such as bunched beam stochastic cooling, beam scrubbing and chamber coatings. Future upgrade plans and the pertinent R&D program will also be presented.

  9. ELECTRON COOLING FOR RHIC.

    SciTech Connect

    BEN-ZVI,I.

    2001-05-13

    The Accelerator Collider Department (CAD) at Brookhaven National Laboratory is operating the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), which includes the dual-ring, 3.834 km circumference superconducting collider and the venerable AGS as the last part of the RHIC injection chain. CAD is planning on a luminosity upgrade of the machine under the designation RHIC II. One important component of the RHIC II upgrade is electron cooling of RHIC gold ion beams. For this purpose, BNL and the Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics in Novosibirsk entered into a collaboration aimed initially at the development of the electron cooling conceptual design, resolution of technical issues, and finally extend the collaboration towards the construction and commissioning of the cooler. Many of the results presented in this paper are derived from the Electron Cooling for RHIC Design Report [1], produced by the, BINP team within the framework of this collaboration. BNL is also collaborating with Fermi National Laboratory, Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility and the University of Indiana on various aspects of electron cooling.

  10. Coordinating the 2009 RHIC Run

    ScienceCinema

    Brookhaven Lab - Mei Bai

    2016-07-12

    Physicists working at the Brookhaven National Lab's Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) are exploring the puzzle of proton spin as they begin taking data during the 2009 RHIC run. For the first time, RHIC is running at a record energy of 500 giga-elect

  11. Coordinating the 2009 RHIC Run

    SciTech Connect

    Brookhaven Lab - Mei Bai

    2009-04-13

    Physicists working at the Brookhaven National Lab's Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) are exploring the puzzle of proton spin as they begin taking data during the 2009 RHIC run. For the first time, RHIC is running at a record energy of 500 giga-elect

  12. RHIC FY15 pp Run RHIC and AGS polarization analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, H.; Adams, P.

    2016-02-20

    The polarization information is important for the spin physics program in Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). There are discrepancies between AGS and RHIC polarization measurements. First, the face value of AGS polarization is higher than RHIC ones in general. Second, the measured polarization profile (described by the profile ratio R) is stronger in AGS than in RHIC. This note analyzes the polarization data from FY15 pp run period. The results show that the differences between AGS and RHIC polarization measurements are reasonable, but the R value difference is puzzling. The difference between blue and yellow ring is worth of spin simulation to explain.

  13. Sunspot: A program to model the behavior of hypervelocity impact damaged multilayer insulation in the Sunspot thermal vacuum chamber of Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rule, W. K.; Hayashida, K. B.

    1992-01-01

    The development of a computer program to predict the degradation of the insulating capabilities of the multilayer insulation (MLI) blanket of Space Station Freedom due to a hypervelocity impact with a space debris particle is described. A finite difference scheme is used for the calculations. The computer program was written in Microsoft BASIC. Also described is a test program that was undertaken to validate the numerical model. Twelve MLI specimens were impacted at hypervelocities with simulated debris particles using a light gas gun at Marshall Space Flight Center. The impact-damaged MLI specimens were then tested for insulating capability in the space environment of the Sunspot thermal vacuum chamber at MSFC. Two undamaged MLI specimens were also tested for comparison with the test results of the damaged specimens. The numerical model was found to adequately predict behavior of the MLI specimens in the Sunspot chamber. A parameter, called diameter ratio, was developed to relate the nominal MLI impact damage to the apparent (for thermal analysis purposes) impact damage based on the hypervelocity impact conditions of a specimen.

  14. STOCHASTIC COOLING FOR RHIC.

    SciTech Connect

    BLASKIEWICZ,M.BRENNAN,J.M.CAMERON,P.WEI,J.

    2003-05-12

    Emittance growth due to Intra-Beam Scattering significantly reduces the heavy ion luminosity lifetime in RHIC. Stochastic cooling of the stored beam could improve things considerably by counteracting IBS and preventing particles from escaping the rf bucket [1]. High frequency bunched-beam stochastic cooling is especially challenging but observations of Schottky signals in the 4-8 GHz band indicate that conditions are favorable in RHIC [2]. We report here on measurements of the longitudinal beam transfer function carried out with a pickup kicker pair on loan from FNAL TEVATRON. Results imply that for ions a coasting beam description is applicable and we outline some general features of a viable momentum cooling system for RHIC.

  15. RHIC progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Peggs, S.

    1998-08-01

    The design and construction status of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider, RHIC, which is in the eighth year of a nine year construction cycle, is discussed. Those performance features of a heavy ion collider that are distinct from hadron colliders in general are noted. These features are derived from the experimental requirements of operation with a variety of ion species over a wide energy range, including collisions between ions of unequal energies, between protons and ions, and between polarized protons. Section 1 gives a brief introduction to the major parameters and overall layout of RHIC. A review of the superconducting magnet program is given in Section 2. Machine performance is reviewed in Section 3, and the plans for RHIC commissioning in 1999 are presented in Section 4.

  16. RHIC PROGRESS REPORT

    SciTech Connect

    PEGGS, S.

    1998-06-26

    The design and construction status of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider, RHIC, which is in the eighth year of a nine year construction cycle, is discussed [1]. Those performance features of a heavy ion collider that are distinct from hadron colliders in general are noted. These features are derived from the experimental requirements of operation with a variety of ion species over a wide energy range, including collisions between ions of unequal energies, between protons and ions, and between polarized protons. Section 1 gives a brief introduction to the major parameters and overall layout of RHIC. A review of the superconducting magnet program is given in Section 2. Machine performance is reviewed in Section 3, and the plans for RHIC commissioning in 1999 are presented in Section 4.

  17. RHIC STATUS AND PLANS.

    SciTech Connect

    PILAT,R.

    2002-06-02

    RHIC ended successfully its second year of operation in January 2002 after a six month run with gold ions and two months of polarized proton collisions. I will review the machine performance and accomplishments, that include reaching design energy (100 GeV/u) and design luminosity during the gold run, and the first high energy (100 GeV) polarized proton collisions. I will also discuss the machine development strategy and the main performance milestones. The goals and plans for the shutdown and the nest run, scheduled to start in November 2002 have been the focus of a RHIC Retreat in March 2002. I will summarize findings and plans for the upcoming run and outline a vision for the nest few years of RHIC operation and upgrades.

  18. A Survey of Thermal Decomposition of Solid Insulations and Its Relevance to Breakdown Mechanisms in Partial Vacuum

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1995-07-01

    or adverse media contained in the natural vacuum (space) environment. This paper addresses the thermal degradation of some polymer materials...chain. Within this context the major degradation mechanisms include thermal , radiative (photonic/UV), mechanical (stress), and chemical [1 ]. Whether or...enclosed materials and/or adverse media contained in the natural vacuum (space) environment. This paper addresses the thermal degradation of some

  19. RHIC survey and alignment

    SciTech Connect

    Karl, F.X.; Anderson, R.R.; Goldman, M.A.; Hemmer, F.M.; Kazmark, D. Jr.; Mroczkowski, T.T.; Roecklien, J.C.

    1993-07-01

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider consists of two interlaced plane rings, a pair of mirror-symmetric beam injection arcs, a spatially curved beam transfer line from the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron, and a collection of precisely positioned and aligned magnets, on appropriately positioned support stands, threaded on those arcs. RHIC geometry is defined by six beam crossing points exactly in a plane, lying precising at the vertices of a regular hexagon of specified size position and orientation of this hexagon are defined geodetically. Survey control and alignment procedures, currently in use to construct RHIC, are described.

  20. SPIN FLIPPING IN RHIC.

    SciTech Connect

    BAI,M.; LEHRACH,A.; LUCCIO,A.; MACKAY,W.W.; ROSER,T.; TSOUPAS,N.

    2001-06-18

    At the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), polarized protons will be accelerated and stored for spin physics experiments. Two full helical snakes will be used to eliminate the depolarization due to imperfection and intrinsic spin resonances. Since no resonances are crossed in RHIC, the beam polarization remains fixed through acceleration. However, in order to reduce systematic errors, the experiment often requires the polarization direction reversed. This paper presents a method of using an ac dipole to obtain a full spin flip in the presence of two full snakes [1]. A similar method of using an rf solenoid for spin flip was tested at IUCF [2,3].

  1. RHIC SPIN FLIPPER

    SciTech Connect

    BAI,M.; ROSER, T.

    2007-06-25

    This paper proposes a new design of spin flipper for RHIC to obtain full spin flip with the spin tune staying at half integer. The traditional technique of using an rf dipole or solenoid as spin flipper to achieve full spin flip in the presence of full Siberian snake requires one to change the snake configuration to move the spin tune away from half integer. This is not practical for an operational high energy polarized proton collider like RHIC where beam lifetime is sensitive to small betatron tune change. The design of the new spin flipper as well as numerical simulations are presented.

  2. Loss maps of RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Robert-Demolaize,G.

    2007-10-01

    State-of-the-art tracking tools were recently developed at CERN to study the cleaning efficiency of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) collimation system [1]. These tools are fully transportable, meaning that any accelerator lattice that includes a collimation system can be simulated. Each of the two Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) [2] beam lines features a multi-stage collimation system, therefore dedicated datasets from RHIC operations with proton beams can be used to benchmark the tracking codes and assess the accuracy of the predicted hot spots along the LHC.

  3. Foam Insulation for Cryogenic Flowlines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sonju, T. R.; Carbone, R. L.; Oves, R. E.

    1985-01-01

    Welded stainless-steel vacuum jackets on cryogenic ducts replaced by plastic foam-insulation jackets that weigh 12 percent less. Foam insulation has 85 percent of insulating ability of stainless-steel jacketing enclosing vacuum of 10 microns of mercury. Foam insulation easier to install than vacuum jacket. Moreover, foam less sensitive to damage and requires minimal maintenance. Resists vibration and expected to have service life of at least 10 years.

  4. Study of orbit correction for eRHIC FFAG design

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, C.; Hao, Y.; Litvinenko, V.; Meot, F.; Minty, M.; Ptitsyn, V.; Trbojevic, D.

    2015-05-03

    The unique feature of the orbits in the eRHIC Fixed Field Alternating Gradient (FFAG) design is that multiple accelerating and decelerating bunches pass through the same magnets with different horizontal offsets. Therefore, it is critical for the eRHIC FFAG to correct multiple orbits in the same vacuum pipe for better spin transmission and alignment of colliding beams. In this report, the effects on orbits from multiple error sources will be studied. The orbit correction method will be described and results will be presented.

  5. Virtual Tour of RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Brookhaven Lab

    2009-06-11

    An animation that follows polarized protons as they travel through the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) accelerator complex to the experiments. The arrows indicate the direction of each proton's spin. The animation concludes with a fly-by of the RHI

  6. Virtual Tour of RHIC

    ScienceCinema

    Brookhaven Lab

    2016-07-12

    An animation that follows polarized protons as they travel through the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) accelerator complex to the experiments. The arrows indicate the direction of each proton's spin. The animation concludes with a fly-by of the RHI

  7. Beam injection into RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, W.; Hahn, H.; MacKay, W.W.; Satogata, T.; Tsoupas, N.; Zhang, W.

    1997-07-01

    During the RHIC sextant test in January 1997 beam was injected into a sixth of one of the rings for the first time. The authors describe the injection zone and its bottlenecks. They report on the commissioning of the injection system, on beam based measurements of the kickers and the application program to steer the beam.

  8. Beam Injection into RHIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, W.; Hahn, H.; Mackay, W. W.; Tsoupas, N.

    1997-05-01

    During the RHIC sextant test in January 1997 beam was injected into a sixth of one of the rings for the first time. We describe the injection zone and its bottlenecks, the application program to steer the beam and the injection kickers. We report on the commissioning of the injection systems and on measurements of the kickers.

  9. Chromaticity Feedback at RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Marusic, A.; Minty, M.; Tepikian, S.

    2010-05-23

    Chromaticity feedback during the ramp to high beam energies has been demonstrated in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). In this report we review the feedback design and measurement technique. Commissioning experiences including interaction with existing tune and coupling feedback are presented together with supporting experimental data.

  10. Multilayer High-Gradient Insulators

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, J R; Anaya, R M; Blackfield, D; Chen, Y -; Falabella, S; Hawkins, S; Holmes, C; Paul, A C; Sampayan, S; Sanders, D M; Watson, J A; Caporaso, G J; Krogh, M

    2006-11-15

    High voltage systems operated in vacuum require insulating materials to maintain spacing between conductors held at different potentials, and may be used to maintain a nonconductive vacuum boundary. Traditional vacuum insulators generally consist of a single material, but insulating structures composed of alternating layers of dielectric and metal can also be built. These ''High-Gradient Insulators'' have been experimentally shown to withstand higher voltage gradients than comparable conventional insulators. As a result, they have application to a wide range of high-voltage vacuum systems where compact size is important. This paper describes ongoing research on these structures, as well as the current theoretical understanding driving this work.

  11. RHIC beam permit and quench detection communications system

    SciTech Connect

    Conkling, C.R. Jr.

    1997-07-01

    A beam permit module has been developed to concentrate RHIC, subsystem sensor outputs, permit beam, and initiate emergency shutdowns. The modules accept inputs from the vacuum, cryogenic, power supply, beam loss, and superconducting magnet quench detection systems. Modules are located at equipment locations around the RHIC ring. The modules are connected by three fiberoptic communications links; a beam permit link, and two magnet power supply interlock links. During operation, carrier presence allows beam. If a RHIC subsystem detects a fault, the beam permit carrier terminates - initiating a beam dump. If the fault was a superconducting magnet quench, a power supply interlock carrier terminates - initiating an emergency magnet power dump. In addition, the master module triggers an event to cause remote sensors to log and hold data at the time-of-failure.

  12. Status of the RHIC project

    SciTech Connect

    Ludlam, T.W.

    1986-01-01

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) facility will provide collision energies of 100 GeV/nucleon per beam for heavy ions as massive as gold. RHIC will use the existing Brookhaven AGS and Tandem Van de Graaff as injector. The new accelerator facility, which is a nuclear physics initiative, will utilize the existing facilities of the partially completed CBA project. This report discusses the status of the machine design, R and D work and preparations for experiments at RHIC.

  13. The RHIC cryogenic control system

    SciTech Connect

    Farah, Y.; Sondericker, J.

    1993-08-01

    A cryogenic process control system for the RHIC Project is discussed. It is independent of the main RHIC Control System, consisting of an upgrade of the existing 24.8 Kw helium refrigerator control section with the addition of a ring control section that regulates and monitors all cryogenic signals in the RHIC tunnel. The system is fully automated, which can run without the continuous presence of operators.

  14. RHIC PLANS TOWARDS HIGHER LUMINOSITY

    SciTech Connect

    FEDOTOV,A.

    2007-06-25

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) is designed to provide luminosity over a wide range of beam energies and species, including heavy ions, polarized protons, and tric beam collisions. In the first seven years of operation there has been a rapid increase in the achieved peak and average luminosity, substantially exceeding design values. Work is presently underway to achieve the Enhanced Design parameters. Planned major upgrades include the Electron Beam Ion Source (EBIS), RHIC-11, and construction of an electron-ion collider (eRHIC). We review the expected RHIC upgrade performance. Electron cooling and its impact on the luminosity both for heavy ions and protons are discussed in detail.

  15. RHIC - Exploring the Universe Within

    ScienceCinema

    BNL

    2016-07-12

    A guided tour of Brookhaven's Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) conducted by past Laboratory Director John Marburger. RHIC is a world-class scientific research facility that began operation in 2000, following 10 years of development and construction. Hundreds of physicists from around the world use RHIC to study what the universe may have looked like in the first few moments after its creation. RHIC drives two intersecting beams of gold ions head-on, in a subatomic collision. What physicists learn from these collisions may help us understand more about why the physical world works the way it does, from the smallest subatomic particles, to the largest stars.

  16. RHIC - Exploring the Universe Within

    SciTech Connect

    BNL

    2008-08-12

    A guided tour of Brookhaven's Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) conducted by past Laboratory Director John Marburger. RHIC is a world-class scientific research facility that began operation in 2000, following 10 years of development and construction. Hundreds of physicists from around the world use RHIC to study what the universe may have looked like in the first few moments after its creation. RHIC drives two intersecting beams of gold ions head-on, in a subatomic collision. What physicists learn from these collisions may help us understand more about why the physical world works the way it does, from the smallest subatomic particles, to the largest stars.

  17. RHIC LUMINOSITY UPGRADE PROGRAM

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, W.

    2010-05-23

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) operates with either ions or polarized protons. After increasing the heavy ion luminosity by two orders of magnitude since its commissioning in 2000, the current luminosity upgrade program aims for an increase by another factor of 4 by means of 3D stochastic cooling and a new 56 MHz SRF system. An Electron Beam Ion Source is being commissioned that will allow the use of uranium beams. Electron cooling is considered for collider operation below the current injection energy. For the polarized proton operation both luminosity and polarization are important. In addition to ongoing improvements in the AGS injector, the construction of a new high-intensity polarized source has started. In RHIC a number of upgrades are under way to increase the intensity and polarization transmission to 250 GeV beam energy. Electron lenses will be installed to partially compensate the head-on beam-beam effect.

  18. Source options for RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Prelec, K.

    1988-01-01

    Conceptual designs of the RHIC facility are matched to the parameters of existing tandem Van de Graaff accelerators at Brookhaven National Laboratory. It has been shown that tandems could produce many ion species up to gold with sufficient intensities for injection into the BNL booster and further acceleration and storage in AGS and RHIC synchrotrons. There have been, however, questions about the long-term performance of tandem accelerators, in view of their reliability, cost of maintenance, and expected requests for higher intensities than they could provide. A study was done in 1986 to investigate the possibility of replacing the tandems with a more compact preinjector situated close to the booster. This report will review the options for such a preinjector. 5 refs., 4 tabs.

  19. RHIC Prefire Protection Masks

    SciTech Connect

    Drees, A.; Biscardi, C.; Curcio, T.; Gassner, D.; DeMonte, V.; DeSanto, L.; Fu, W.; Liaw, C. J.; Montag, C.; Thieberger, P.; Yip, K.

    2015-01-07

    The protection of the RHIC experimental detectors from damage due to beam hitting close upstream elements in cases of abort kicker prefires requires some dedicated precautionary measures with two general options: to bring the beam close to a limiting aperture (i.e. the beam pipe wall), as far upstream of the detector components as possible or, alternatively, to bring a limiting aperture close to the circulating beam. During the FY 2014 RHIC Heavy Ion run the first option was chosen because of the limited time available for preparation before the start of the run. For future runs the second option, in this case the installation of dual-sided movable masks, is preferred. The installation of the masks, one per ring, is planned before the start of the FY 2015 run.

  20. RHIC The Perfect Liquid

    ScienceCinema

    BNL

    2016-07-12

    Evidence to date suggests that gold-gold collisions the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider at Brookhaven are indeed creating a new state of hot, dense matter, but one quite different and even more remarkable than had been predicted. Instead of behaving like a gas of free quarks and gluons, as was expected, the matter created in RHIC's heavy ion collisions appears to be more like a "perfect" liquid.

  1. RHIC The Perfect Liquid

    SciTech Connect

    BNL

    2008-08-12

    Evidence to date suggests that gold-gold collisions the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider at Brookhaven are indeed creating a new state of hot, dense matter, but one quite different and even more remarkable than had been predicted. Instead of behaving like a gas of free quarks and gluons, as was expected, the matter created in RHIC's heavy ion collisions appears to be more like a "perfect" liquid.

  2. Rf systems for RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Rose, J.; Brodowski, J.; Connolly, R.; Deng, D.P.; Kwiatkowski, S.; Pirkl, W.; Ratti, A.

    1995-05-01

    The RHIC rf systems must capture the injected beam, accelerate it through transition to top energy, shorten the bunches prior to rebucketing, and store the beam for 10 hours in the presence of strong intra-beam scattering. These different functions are met by three independent systems. An accelerating system at 26.7 Mhz (h = 342), a storage system at 196.1 MHz (h = 2508), and a wideband system for the damping of injection efforts.

  3. RHIC spin program

    SciTech Connect

    Bunce, G.

    1995-12-31

    Colliding beams of high energy polarized protons at RHIC is an excellent way to probe the polarization of gluons, u and d quarks in a polarized proton. RHIC is the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider being built now at Brookhaven in the ISABELLE tunnel. It is designed to collide gold ions on gold ions at 100 GeV/nucleon. Its goal is to discover the quark-gluon plasma, and the first collisions are expected in March, 1999. RHIC will also make an ideal polarized proton collider with high luminosity and 250 GeV x 250 GeV collisions. The RHIC spin physics program is: (1) Use well-understood perturbative QCD probes to study non-perturbative confining dynamics in QCD. We will measure - gluon and sea quark polarization in a polarized proton, polarization of quarks in a transversely polarized proton. (2) Look for additional surprises using the first high energy polarized proton collider. We will - look for the expected maximal parity violation in W and Z boson production, - search for parity violation in other processes, - test parton models with spin. This lecture is organized around a few of the key ideas: Siberian Snakes--What are they? High energy proton-proton collisions are scatters of quarks and leptons, at high x, a polarized proton beam is a beam of polarized u quarks, quark and gluon collisions are very sensitive to spin. We will discuss two reactions: how direct photon production measures gluon polarization, and how W{sup +} boson production measures u and d quark polarization.

  4. Polarized protons at RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Makdisi, Y.

    1992-01-01

    The approval for construction of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) provides a potential opportunity to collide polarized proton beams at energies up to 500 GeV in the center of mass and high luminosities approaching 2 {times} 10{sup 32}/cm{sup 2}/sec. This capability is enhanced by the fact that the AGS has already accelerated polarized protons and relies on the newly completed Accumulator/Booster for providing the required polarized proton intensity and a system of spin rotators (Siberian snakes) to retain the polarization. The RHIC Spin Collaboration was formed and submitted a Letter of Intent to construct this polarized collider capability and utilize its physics opportunities. In this presentation, I will discuss the plans to upgrade the AGS, the proposed layout of the RHIC siberian snakes, and timetables. The physics focus is the measurement of the spin dependent parton distributions with such accessible probes including high p(t) jets, direct photons, and Drell Yan. The attainable sensitivities and the progress that has been reached in defining the detector requirements will be outlined.

  5. Polarized protons at RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Makdisi, Y.

    1992-10-01

    The approval for construction of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) provides a potential opportunity to collide polarized proton beams at energies up to 500 GeV in the center of mass and high luminosities approaching 2 {times} 10{sup 32}/cm{sup 2}/sec. This capability is enhanced by the fact that the AGS has already accelerated polarized protons and relies on the newly completed Accumulator/Booster for providing the required polarized proton intensity and a system of spin rotators (Siberian snakes) to retain the polarization. The RHIC Spin Collaboration was formed and submitted a Letter of Intent to construct this polarized collider capability and utilize its physics opportunities. In this presentation, I will discuss the plans to upgrade the AGS, the proposed layout of the RHIC siberian snakes, and timetables. The physics focus is the measurement of the spin dependent parton distributions with such accessible probes including high p(t) jets, direct photons, and Drell Yan. The attainable sensitivities and the progress that has been reached in defining the detector requirements will be outlined.

  6. RHIC spin physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bunce, G.

    The physics potential of colliding beams of protons, polarized either longitudinally or transversely, at RHIC is remarkable. A luminosity of L = 2 x 10(exp 32) cm(exp -2) sec(exp -1) with 70 percent polarized beams will be available with up to 250 GeV energy in each beam. The proposal to collide polarized protons in RHIC was submitted in August 1992 and approved in October 1993, just after this workshop. The collaboration has been encouraged to complete research and development on Siberian Snakes, so that RHIC will be able to accelerate polarized protons early in its program. The expected date of the first heavy ion collisions is 1999. The spin physics program includes measurement of gluon and sea quark polarization in the longitudinally polarized proton, measurement and then application of parity violation in W and Z production, measurement of hard scattering parton-parton asymmetries, and quark polarization or transversity in transversely polarized protons. Single spin asymmetries allow sensitive searches for parity violation (longitudinal polarization) and correlations between quark spin and gluons (transverse). Probes include direct photons (to p(sub T) = 20 GeV/c), jets (to p(sub T) greater than 50 GeV/c), Drell-Yan pairs (to m(sub ll) = 9 GeV), W(sup +/-), and Z. Here, the collaboration emphasizes the new information included in the update, given to the Brookhaven PAC this September.

  7. The RHIC status update

    SciTech Connect

    Ozaki, S.

    1995-07-15

    The construction of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) began in 1991, with the completion date originally scheduled for 1997. Significant reduction of the funding levels in FY 1993 and 1994, and the funding level cap for FY 1995 and later years caused a 19-month stretchout of the construction period to the second quarter of FY 1999, and an increase of the total estimated cost (TEC) to $475 M. The Project, therefore, is now at the halfway mark of the construction period with actual cost and schedule performance tracking close to the DOE-approved baseline. Construction funding through FY 1994 reached close to 60% of the TEC. Incidentally, if one adds the current value of preexisting facilities which will be incorporated into RHIC, such as the injection system (Tandem Van de Graaff - the Booster - the AGS), the esixting 3.8 km tunnel, the 24 kW helium refrigerator, etc., the total value of the RHIC facility, when completed, will reach one billion dollars, if not more. The accelerator lattice design was finalized in 1992 after an intensive study was made to optimize the collider design for performance, operational flexibility, and value engineering. The civil construciton, including the collider enclosure, magnet access ports to the ring tunnel, and six service buildings for accelerator power supplies and cryogenic control boxes was completed.

  8. Magnetically insulated coaxial vacuum diode with partial space-charge-limited explosive emission from edge-type cathode

    SciTech Connect

    Belomyttsev, S. Ya.; Rostov, V. V.; Romanchenko, I. V.; Kolomiets, M. D.; Mesyats, G. A.; Yalandin, M. I.

    2016-01-14

    The vacuum current associated with any type of electron emission for arbitrary configuration of the diode depends on the combination of the applied electric field and vacuum space charge (VSC) field created by the current. Such fundamental statement should give very close links between the diode current and the normalized cathode field θ which has been introduced by Forbes in 2008 for planar diodes as a reduction in the cathode surface field: θ = field-with/field-without VSC. This article reports the universal approximation of the type of cos(πθ/2) that is the ratio of the actual current and the fully space-charge-limited current. Also, the theoretical treatment and the experimental method of determination of the dynamic emissive characteristics of the macroscopic explosive emission from edge-type cathodes in the coaxial diode are developed. The experimental results obtained with a picosecond time reference between the cathode voltage and the onset of the high-current electron beam exhibit a good coincidence with the theoretical predictions. The presented methods enable the analysis of a real-time-resolved dynamics associated with the dense, magnetized electron beam formation, acceleration and drift motion, including kinematic effects and the phase-stable excitation of high-power microwave oscillators.

  9. Magnetically insulated coaxial vacuum diode with partial space-charge-limited explosive emission from edge-type cathode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belomyttsev, S. Ya.; Rostov, V. V.; Romanchenko, I. V.; Shunailov, S. A.; Kolomiets, M. D.; Mesyats, G. A.; Sharypov, K. A.; Shpak, V. G.; Ulmaskulov, M. R.; Yalandin, M. I.

    2016-01-01

    The vacuum current associated with any type of electron emission for arbitrary configuration of the diode depends on the combination of the applied electric field and vacuum space charge (VSC) field created by the current. Such fundamental statement should give very close links between the diode current and the normalized cathode field θ which has been introduced by Forbes in 2008 for planar diodes as a reduction in the cathode surface field: θ = field-with/field-without VSC. This article reports the universal approximation of the type of cos(πθ/2) that is the ratio of the actual current and the fully space-charge-limited current. Also, the theoretical treatment and the experimental method of determination of the dynamic emissive characteristics of the macroscopic explosive emission from edge-type cathodes in the coaxial diode are developed. The experimental results obtained with a picosecond time reference between the cathode voltage and the onset of the high-current electron beam exhibit a good coincidence with the theoretical predictions. The presented methods enable the analysis of a real-time-resolved dynamics associated with the dense, magnetized electron beam formation, acceleration and drift motion, including kinematic effects and the phase-stable excitation of high-power microwave oscillators.

  10. Polarized proton collider at RHIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alekseev, I.; Allgower, C.; Bai, M.; Batygin, Y.; Bozano, L.; Brown, K.; Bunce, G.; Cameron, P.; Courant, E.; Erin, S.; Escallier, J.; Fischer, W.; Gupta, R.; Hatanaka, K.; Huang, H.; Imai, K.; Ishihara, M.; Jain, A.; Lehrach, A.; Kanavets, V.; Katayama, T.; Kawaguchi, T.; Kelly, E.; Kurita, K.; Lee, S. Y.; Luccio, A.; MacKay, W. W.; Mahler, G.; Makdisi, Y.; Mariam, F.; McGahern, W.; Morgan, G.; Muratore, J.; Okamura, M.; Peggs, S.; Pilat, F.; Ptitsin, V.; Ratner, L.; Roser, T.; Saito, N.; Satoh, H.; Shatunov, Y.; Spinka, H.; Syphers, M.; Tepikian, S.; Tominaka, T.; Tsoupas, N.; Underwood, D.; Vasiliev, A.; Wanderer, P.; Willen, E.; Wu, H.; Yokosawa, A.; Zelenski, A. N.

    2003-03-01

    In addition to heavy ion collisions (RHIC Design Manual, Brookhaven National Laboratory), RHIC will also collide intense beams of polarized protons (I. Alekseev, et al., Design Manual Polarized Proton Collider at RHIC, Brookhaven National Laboratory, 1998 [2]), reaching transverse energies where the protons scatter as beams of polarized quarks and gluons. The study of high energy polarized protons beams has been a long term part of the program at BNL with the development of polarized beams in the Booster and AGS rings for fixed target experiments. We have extended this capability to the RHIC machine. In this paper we describe the design and methods for achieving collisions of both longitudinal and transverse polarized protons in RHIC at energies up to s=500 GeV.

  11. Thermal Performance of Aged and Weathered Spray-On Foam Insulation (SOFI) Materials Under Cryogenic Vacuum Conditions (Cryostat-4)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    The NASA Cryogenics Test Laboratory at Kennedy Space Center conducted long-term testing of SOFI materials under actual-use cryogenic conditions with Cryostat-4. The materials included in the testing were NCFI 24-124 (acreage foam), BX-265 (close-out foam, including intertank flange and bipod areas), and a potential alternate material, NCFI 27-68, (acreage foam with the flame retardant removed). Specimens of these materials were placed at two locations: a site that simulated aging (the Vehicle Assembly Building [VAB]) and a site that simulated weathering (the Atmospheric Exposure Test Site [beach site]). After aging/weathering intervals of 3, 6, and 12 months, the samples were retrieved and tested for their thermal performance under cryogenic vacuum conditions with test apparatus Cryostat-4.

  12. RHIC Polarized proton operation

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, H.; Ahrens, L.; Alekseev, I.G.; Aschenauer, E.; Atoian, G.; Bai, M.; Bazilevsky, A.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Brennan, J.M.; Brown, K.A.; Bruno, D.; Connolly, R.; Dion, A.; D'Ottavio, T.; Drees, K.A.; Fischer, W.; Gardner, C.; Glenn, J.W.; Gu, X.; Harvey, M.; Hayes, T.; Hoff, L.; Hulsart, R.L.; Laster, J.; Liu, C.; Luo, Y.; MacKay, W.W.; Makdisi, Y.; Marr, G.J.; Marusic, A.; Meot, F.; Mernick, K.; Michnoff, R,; Minty, M.; Montag, C.; Morris, J.; Nemesure, S.; Poblaguev, A.; Ptitsyn, V.; Ranjibar, V.; Robert-Demolaize, G.; Roser, T.; J.; Severino, F.; Schmidke, B.; Schoefer, V.; Severino, F.; Smirnov, D.; Smith, K.; Steski, D.; Svirida, D.; Tepikian, S.; Trbojevic, D.; Tsoupas, N.; Tuozzolo, J. Wang, G.; Wilinski, M.; Yip, K.; Zaltsman, A.; Zelenski, A.; Zeno, K.; Zhang, S.Y.

    2011-03-28

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) operation as the polarized proton collider presents unique challenges since both luminosity(L) and spin polarization(P) are important. With longitudinally polarized beams at the experiments, the figure of merit is LP{sup 4}. A lot of upgrades and modifications have been made since last polarized proton operation. A 9 MHz rf system is installed to improve longitudinal match at injection and to increase luminosity. The beam dump was upgraded to increase bunch intensity. A vertical survey of RHIC was performed before the run to get better magnet alignment. The orbit control is also improved this year. Additional efforts are put in to improve source polarization and AGS polarization transfer efficiency. To preserve polarization on the ramp, a new working point is chosen such that the vertical tune is near a third order resonance. The overview of the changes and the operation results are presented in this paper. Siberian snakes are essential tools to preserve polarization when accelerating polarized beams to higher energy. At the same time, the higher order resonances still can cause polarization loss. As seen in RHIC, the betatron tune has to be carefully set and maintained on the ramp and during the store to avoid polarization loss. In addition, the orbit control is also critical to preserve polarization. The higher polarization during this run comes from several improvements over last run. First we have a much better orbit on the ramp. The orbit feedback brings down the vertical rms orbit error to 0.1mm, much better than the 0.5mm last run. With correct BPM offset and vertical realignment, this rms orbit error is indeed small. Second, the jump quads in the AGS improved input polarization for RHIC. Third, the vertical tune was pushed further away from 7/10 snake resonance. The tune feedback maintained the tune at the desired value through the ramp. To calibrate the analyzing power of RHIC polarimeters at any energy above

  13. RHIC electron lenses upgrades

    SciTech Connect

    Gu, X.; Altinbas, Z.; Bruno, D.; Binello, S.; Costanzo, M.; Drees, A.; Fischer, W.; Gassner, D. M.; Hock, J.; Hock, K.; Harvey, M.; Luo, Y.; Marusic, A.; Mi, C.; Mernick, K.; Minty, M.; Michnoff, R.; Miller, T. A.; Pikin, A. I.; Robert-Demolaize, G.; Samms, T.; Shrey, T. C.; Schoefer, V.; Tan, Y.; Than, R.; Thieberger, P.; White, S. M.

    2015-05-03

    In the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) 100 GeV polarized proton run in 2015, two electron lenses were used to partially compensate for the head-on beam-beam effect for the first time. Here, we describe the design of the current electron lens, detailing the hardware modifications made after the 2014 commissioning run with heavy ions. A new electron gun with 15-mm diameter cathode is characterized. The electron beam transverse profile was measured using a YAG screen and fitted with a Gaussian distribution. During operation, the overlap of the electron and proton beams was achieved using the electron backscattering detector in conjunction with an automated orbit control program.

  14. The RHIC project

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, M.A.

    1996-07-01

    The design and construction status of the Relativistic Heavy Ion collider (RHIC) is discussed. Those novel features of a heavy ion collider that are distinct from hadron colliders in general are noted. These features are derived from the experimental requirements of operation with a variety of ion species over a wide energy range including collisions between ions of unequal energies. The project is in the fourth year of a seven year construction cycle. A review of the superconducting magnet program is given together with progress to date on the machine construction.

  15. RAMP MANAGEMENT IN RHIC.

    SciTech Connect

    KEWISCH,J.; VAN ZEIJTS,J.; PEGGS,S.; SATOGATA,T.

    1999-03-29

    In RHIC, magnets and RF cavities are controlled by Wave Form Generators (WFGs), simple real time computers which generate the set points. The WFGs are programmed to change set points from one state to another in a synchronized way. Such transition is called a ''Ramp'' and consists of a sequence of ''stepping stones'' which contain the set point of every WFG controlled device at a point in time. An appropriate interpolation defines the set points between these stepping stones. This report describes the implementation of the ramp system. The user interface, tools to create and modify ramps, interaction with modeling tools and measurements and correction programs are discussed.

  16. Improving the performance of organic thin film transistors formed on a vacuum flash-evaporated acrylate insulator

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, Z. Abbas, G. A.; Assender, H. E.; Morrison, J. J.; Sanchez-Romaguera, V.; Yeates, S. G.; Taylor, D. M.

    2013-12-02

    A systematic investigation has been undertaken, in which thin polymer buffer layers with different ester content have been spin-coated onto a flash-evaporated, cross-linked diacrylate gate-insulator to form bottom-gate, top-contact organic thin-film transistors. The highest device mobilities, ∼0.65 cm{sup 2}/V s and ∼1.00 cm{sup 2}/V s for pentacene and dinaphtho[2,3-b:2′,3′-f]-thieno[3,2-b]thiophene (DNTT), respectively, were only observed for a combination of large-grain (∼1–2 μm) semiconductor morphology coupled with a non-polar dielectric surface. No correlation was found between semiconductor grain size and dielectric surface chemistry. The threshold voltage of pentacene devices shifted from −10 V to −25 V with decreasing surface ester content, but remained close to 0 V for DNTT.

  17. Direct Photons at RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Gabor,D.

    2008-07-29

    Direct photons are ideal tools to investigate kinematical and thermodynamical conditions of heavy ion collisions since they are emitted from all stages of the collision and once produced they leave the interaction region without further modification by the medium. The PHENIX experiment at RHIC has measured direct photon production in p+p and Au+Au collisions at 200 GeV over a wide transverse momentum (p{sub T}) range. The p+p measurements allow a fundamental test of QCD, and serve as a baseline when we try to disentangle more complex mechanisms producing high p{sub T} direct photons in Au+Au. As for thermal photons in Au+Au we overcome the difficulties due to the large background from hadronic decays by measuring 'almost real' virtual photons which appear as low invariant mass e{sup +}e{sup -} pairs: a significant excess of direct photons is measured above the above next-to-leading order perturbative quantum chromodynamics calculations. Additional insights on the origin of direct photons can be gained with the study of the azimuthal anisotropy which benefits from the increased statistics and reaction plane resolution achieved in RHIC Year-7 data.

  18. PHOBOS experiment at RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Wozniak, K.; PHOBOS Collaboration

    1995-12-01

    The study of relativistic heavy nuclei collisions at RHIC opens a new area of physics--the physics of hadronic matter at very high energy densities. The conditions necessary to create a new state of matter, never before seen in the laboratory, may be reached. It gives a chance to study the quantum chromodynamics predictions of the phase transition from hadronic matter to a quark-gluon plasma. The PHOBOS experiment will investigate almost all predicted signals of the QGP formation. General event properties (angular distribution of charged particles, total multiplicity) will be combined with detailed information on particles emitted in the central rapidity region (particle ratios {pi}/K/p, p{sub t} spectra, correlations, {phi} meson properties). Similar studies will be done also in the other three experiments at RHIC, but there are many important observables for which PHOBOS will provide unique information. The multiplicity detector covers almost a full phase space, recording all charged particles with pseudorapidities {vert_bar}{eta}{vert_bar} {le} 5.4. In the PHOBOS spectrometer particles emitted in the central rapidity region will be measured and identified starting from lowest transverse momenta (20 MeV/c for pions). The high rate unbiased trigger gives a chance to see unpredicted phenomena and enables the study of very rare processes that require large statistics. The measurements of the converting photons planned for some runs will be used to study the {pi}{sup 0}/({pi}{sup +} + {pi}{sup {minus}}) ratio in selected phase space intervals.

  19. Partonic collectivity at RHIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Shusu

    2009-10-01

    The measurement of event anisotropy, often called v2, provides a powerful tool for studying the properties of hot and dense medium created in high-energy nuclear collisions. The important discoveries of partonic collectivity and the brand-new process for hadronization - quark coalescence were obtained through a systematic analysis of the v2 for 200 GeV Au+Au collisions at RHIC [1]. However, early dynamic information might be masked by later hadronic rescatterings. Multistrange hadrons (φ, ξ and φ) with their large mass and presumably small hadronic cross sections should be less sensitive to hadronic rescattering in the later stage of the collisions and therefore a good probe of the early stage of the collision. We will present the measurement of v2 of π, p, KS^0, λ, ξ, φ and φ in heavy ion collisions. In minimum-bias Au+Au collisions at √sNN = 200 GeV, a significant amount of elliptic flow, almost identical to other mesons and baryons, is observed for φ and φ. Experimental observations of pT dependence of v2 of identified particles at RHIC support partonic collectivity. [4pt] [1] B. I. Abelev et al., (STAR Collaboration), Phys. Rev. C 77, 054901 (2008).

  20. RHIC spin flipper commissioning results

    SciTech Connect

    Bai M.; Roser, T.; Dawson, C.; Kewisch, J.; Makdisi, Y.; Oddo, P.; Pai, C.; Pile, P.

    2012-05-20

    The five AC dipole RHIC spin flipper design in the RHIC Blue ring was first tested during the RHIC 2012 polarized proton operation. The advantage of this design is to eliminate the vertical coherent betatron oscillations outside the spin flipper. The closure of each ac dipole vertical bump was measured with orbital response as well as spin. The effect of the rotating field on the spin motion by the spin flipper was also confirmed by measuring the suppressed resonance at Q{sub s} = 1 - Q{sub osc}.

  1. A Prototype Ionization Profile Monitor for RHIC.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connolly, R.; Cameron, P.; Ryan, W.; Shea, T.; Sikora, R.; Tsoupas, N.

    1997-05-01

    Transverse beam profiles in the Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider (RHIC) will be measured with ionization profile monitors (IPMs). Each IPM will measure the integrated distribution of electrons in one plane resulting from residual gas ionization during bunch passage. The high space-charge electric field of the beam makes it necessary to image with electrons which are guided by a magnetic field. A prototype detector was tested in the injection line during the RHIC Sextant Test. It consists of a collector circuit board mounted on one side of the beam and a parallel electrode on the other to provide an electric sweep field. The collector board has 48 electrodes oriented parallel to the beam with a chevron microchannel plate amplifier mounted in front of the collection traces. The detector vacuum chamber is placed in the gap of a magnet. At each bunch passage the charge pulses are integrated, amplified, and digitized for display as a profile histogram. This paper describes the prototype detector and gives results from the beam tests.

  2. POLARIZED PROTON COLLISIONS AT RHIC.

    SciTech Connect

    BAI, M.; AHRENS, L.; ALEKSEEV, I.G.; ALESSI, J.; ET AL.

    2005-05-16

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider provides not only collisions of ions but also collisions of polarized protons. In a circular accelerator, the polarization of polarized proton beam can be partially or fully lost when a spin depolarizing resonance is encountered. To preserve the beam polarization during acceleration, two full Siberian snakes were employed in RHIC. In 2002, polarized proton beams were first accelerated to 100 GeV and collided in RHIC. Beams were brought into collisions with longitudinal polarization at the experiments STAR and PHENIX by using spin rotators. Optimizing polarization transmission efficiency and improving luminosity performance are significant challenges. Currently, the luminosity lifetime in RHIC is limited by the beam-beam effect. The current state of RHIC polarized proton program, including its dedicated physics run in 2005 and efforts to optimize luminosity production in beam-beam limited conditions are reported.

  3. RHIC control system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barton, D. S.; Binello, S.; Buxton, W.; Clifford, T.; D'Ottavio, T.; Hartmann, H.; Hoff, L. T.; Katz, R.; Kennell, S.; Kerner, T.; Laster, J.; Lee, R. C.; Marusic, A.; Michnoff, R.; Morris, J.; Oerter, B. R.; Olsen, R.; Piacentino, J.; Skelly, J. F.

    2003-03-01

    The RHIC control system architecture is hierarchical and consists of two physical layers with a fiber-optic network connection. The Front-End Level systems consist of VME chassis with processors running a real-time operating system and both VME I/O modules and remote bus interfaces. Accelerator device software interfaces are implemented as objects in C++. The network implementation uses high speed, switched Ethernet technology. Specialized hardware modules were built for waveform control of power supplies, multiplexed signal acquisition, and timing services. The Console Level systems are Unix workstations. A strong emphasis has been given to developing highly reusable, standard software tools for use in building physics and diagnostic application software.

  4. CRYSTAL COLLIMATION AT RHIC.

    SciTech Connect

    FLILLER,R.P.,III.DREES,A.GASSNER,D.HAMMONS,L.MCINTYRE,G.PEGGS,S.TRBOJEVIC,D.BIRYUKOV,V.CHESNOKOV,Y.TEREKHOV,V.

    2003-06-19

    Crystal Channeling occurs when an ion enters a crystal with a small angle with respect to the crystal planes. The electrostatic interaction between the incoming ion and the lattice causes the ion to follow the crystal planes. By mechanically bending a crystal, it is possible to use a crystal to deflect ions. One novel use of a bent crystal is to use it to channel beam halo particles into a collimator downstream. By deflecting the halo particles into a collimator with a crystal it may be possible to improve collimation efficiency as compared to a single collimator. A bent crystal is installed in the yellow ring of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). In this paper we discuss our experience with the crystal collimator, and compare our results to previous data, simulation, and theoretical prediction.

  5. Hadron spectroscopy at RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, S.U.; Kern, W.; Willutzki, H.J.

    1990-08-01

    A description is given of the physics opportunities at RHIC regarding quark-gluon spectroscopy. The basic idea is to isolate with appropriate triggers the subprocesses pomeron + pomeron {yields} hadrons and {gamma}* + {gamma}* {yields} hadrons with the net effective mass of hadrons in the range of 1.0 to 3.0 GeV, in order to study the hadronic states composed of u, d, and s and gluons. The double-pomeron interactions are expected to produce glueballs and hybrids preferentially, while the two-offshell-photon initial states should couple predominantly to quarkonia and multiquark states. A plethora of J{sup PC}-exotic mesons can be produced either directly in both types of interactions or in association with a single recoil photon in the final state. 8 refs., 2 figs.

  6. Multilayer High-Gradient Insulators

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, J R

    2006-08-16

    Multilayer High-Gradient Insulators are vacuum insulating structures composed of thin, alternating layers of dielectric and metal. They are currently being developed for application to high-current accelerators and related pulsed power systems. This paper describes some of the High-Gradient Insulator research currently being conducted at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory.

  7. Microsphere Insulation Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mohling, R.; Allen, M.; Baumgartner, R.

    2006-01-01

    Microsphere insulation panels (MIPs) have been developed as lightweight, longlasting replacements for the foam and vacuum-jacketed systems heretofore used for thermally insulating cryogenic vessels and transfer ducts. The microsphere core material of a typical MIP consists of hollow glass bubbles, which have a combination of advantageous mechanical, chemical, and thermal-insulation properties heretofore available only separately in different materials. In particular, a core filling of glass microspheres has high crush strength and low density, is noncombustible, and performs well in soft vacuum.

  8. FAST AUTOMATED DECOUPLING AT RHIC.

    SciTech Connect

    BEEBE-WANG,J.J.

    2005-05-16

    Coupling correction is essential for the operational performance of RHIC. The independence of the transverse degrees of freedom makes diagnostics and tune control easier, and it is advantageous to operate an accelerator close to the coupling resonance to minimize nearby nonlinear sidebands. An automated coupling correction application iDQmini has been developed for RHIC routine operations. The application decouples RHIC globally by minimizing the tune separation through finding the optimal settings of two orthogonal skew quadrupole families. The program iDQmini provides options of automatic, semi-automatic and manual decoupling operations. It accesses tune information from all RHIC tune measurement systems: the PLL (phase lock loop), the high frequency Schottky system and the tune meter. It also supplies tune and skew quadrupole scans, finding the minimum tune separation, display the real time results and interface with the RHIC control system. We summarize the capabilities of the coupling correction application iDQmini, and discuss the operational protections incorporated in the program.

  9. CONFIGURATION MANUAL POLARIZED PROTON COLLIDER AT RHIC.

    SciTech Connect

    ROSER,T.; MACKAY,W.W.; ALEKSEEV,I.; BAI,M.; BROWN,K.; BUNCE,G.; CAMERON,P.; COURANT,E.; ET AL.

    2001-03-01

    In this report, the authors present their design to accelerate and store polarized protons in RHIC, with the level of polarization, luminosity, and control of systematic errors required by the approved RHIC spin physics program. They provide an overview of the physics to be studied using RHIC with polarized proton beams, and a brief description of the accelerator systems required for the project.

  10. RESEARCH PLAN FOR SPIN PHYSICS AT RHIC.

    SciTech Connect

    AIDALA, C.; BUNCE, G.; ET AL.

    2005-02-01

    In this report we present the research plan for the RHIC spin program. The report covers (1) the science of the RHIC spin program in a world-wide context; (2) the collider performance requirements for the RHIC spin program; (3) the detector upgrades required, including timelines; (4) time evolution of the spin program.

  11. Configuration Manual Polarized Proton Collider at RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Alekseev, I.; Allgower, C.; Bai, M.; Batygin, Y.; Bozano, L.; Brown, K.; Bunce, G.; Cameron, P.; Courant, E.; Erin, S.; Escallier, J.; Fischer, W.; Gupta, R.; Hatanka, K.; Huang, H.; Imai, K.; Ishihara, M.; Jain, A.; Kanavets, V.; Katayama, T.; Kawaguchi, T.; Kelly, E.; Kurita, K.; Lee, S. Y.; Luccio, A.; MacKay, W. W.; Mahler, G.; Makdisi, Y.; Mariam, F.; McGahern, W.; Morgan, G.; Muratore, J.; Okamura, M.; Peggs, S.; Pilat, F.; Ptitsin, V.; Ratner, L.; Roser, T.; Saito, N.; Satoh, H.; Shatunov, Y.; Spinka, H.; Svirida, D.; Syphers, M.; Tepikian, S.; Tominaka, T.; Tsoupas, N.; Underwood, D.; Vasiliev, A.; Wanderer, P.; Willen, E.; Wu, H.; Yokosawa, A.; Zelenski, A.

    2006-01-01

    In this report we present our design to accelerate and store polarized protons in RHIC, with the level of polarization, luminosity, and control of systematic errors required by the approved RHIC spin physics program. We provide an overview of the physics to be studied using RHIC with polarized proton beams, and a brief description of the accelerator systems required for the project.

  12. Stochastic cooling in RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Brennan J. M.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Mernick, K.

    2012-05-20

    The full 6-dimensional [x,x'; y,y'; z,z'] stochastic cooling system for RHIC was completed and operational for the FY12 Uranium-Uranium collider run. Cooling enhances the integrated luminosity of the Uranium collisions by a factor of 5, primarily by reducing the transverse emittances but also by cooling in the longitudinal plane to preserve the bunch length. The components have been deployed incrementally over the past several runs, beginning with longitudinal cooling, then cooling in the vertical planes but multiplexed between the Yellow and Blue rings, next cooling both rings simultaneously in vertical (the horizontal plane was cooled by betatron coupling), and now simultaneous horizontal cooling has been commissioned. The system operated between 5 and 9 GHz and with 3 x 10{sup 8} Uranium ions per bunch and produces a cooling half-time of approximately 20 minutes. The ultimate emittance is determined by the balance between cooling and emittance growth from Intra-Beam Scattering. Specific details of the apparatus and mathematical techniques for calculating its performance have been published elsewhere. Here we report on: the method of operation, results with beam, and comparison of results to simulations.

  13. The RHIC Injection Kicker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hahn, H.; Tuozzolo, J. E.; Tsoupas, N.

    1997-05-01

    Beam transfer from the AGS to RHIC is performed in single-bunch mode. Close spacing of the bunches in the collider requires an injection kicker with a rise time of <95 nsec, suggesting adoption of a travelling wave solution. The required vertical kick of 0.186 T.m is provided by 4 units, each 1.12 m long with a 48.4× 48.4 mm aperture and operated at 1.6 kA. The kicker is constructed as a ``C'' cross section magnet, in which ferrite and high-permittivity ( ~ 100) dielectric sections alternate. The dielectric blocks provide the capacity necessary for the nominally 25 Ohm characteristic impedance of the travelling wave structure, but impose the practical limit on the peak voltage, and thus current, achievable. Computer studies to minimize local electric field enhancements resulted in a configuration capable of holding >50 kV, with adequate safety margin over the nominal 40 kV. Tests indicated the possibility of lowering the nominal voltage by operating mismatched into 20 Ohm terminations without degrading the pulse shape. In this paper, the experience gained in the fabrication of the four kicker units for the ``Sextant Test'' and the results from various single-unit tests and operation in beam are reported.

  14. The RHIC injection kicker

    SciTech Connect

    Hahn, H.; Tsoupas, N.; Tuozzolo, J.E.

    1997-07-01

    Beam transfer from the AGS to RHIC is performed in single-bunch mode. Close spacing of the bunches in the collider requires an injection kicker with a rise time of <90 nsec, suggesting adoption of a travelling wave structure. The required vertical kick of 0.186 t{center_dot}m is provided by 4 magnets, each 1.12 m long with a 48.4 x 48.4 mm aperture and operated at 1.6 kA. The kicker is constructed as a {open_quotes}C{close_quotes} cross section magnet, in which ferrite and high-permittivity dielectric sections alternate. The dielectric blocks provide the capacity necessary for the nominally 25 {Omega} characteristic impedance of the travelling wave structure, but impose the practical limit on the peak voltage, and thus current, achievable. Computer studies to minimize local electric field enhancements resulted in a configuration capable of holding {approximately} 50 kV, with adequate safety margin over the nominal 40 kV. Equivalent circuit analysis indicated the possibility of lowering the nominal voltage by operating mismatched into 20 {Omega} terminations without degrading the pulse shape. In this paper, the experience gained in the fabrication of the production units and the results from various single-unit tests and operation of four kickers with beam in the {open_quotes}Sextant Test{close_quotes} are reported.

  15. Polarized neutrons in RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Courant, E.D.

    1998-04-20

    There does not appear to be any obvious way to accelerate neutrons, polarized or otherwise, to high energies by themselves. To investigate the behavior of polarized neutrons the authors therefore have to obtain them by accelerating them as components of heavier nuclei, and then sorting out the contribution of the neutrons in the analysis of the reactions produced by the heavy ion beams. The best neutron carriers for this purpose are probably {sup 3}He nuclei and deuterons. A polarized deuteron is primarily a combination of a proton and a neutron with their spins pointing in the same direction; in the {sup 3}He nucleus the spins of the two protons are opposite and the net spin (and magnetic moment) is almost the same as that of a free neutron. Polarized ions other than protons may be accelerated, stored and collided in a ring such as RHIC provided the techniques proposed for polarized proton operation can be adapted (or replaced by other strategies) for these ions. This paper discusses techniques for accelerating polarized {sup 3}He nuclei and deuterons.

  16. Soft Photon Effects on Vacuum Power Flow.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-12-01

    Voltage as Function of Insulator Angle ............... 14 6. Vacuum Flashover Component Configuration ....................... 20 7. Radiation Temperature ...application. First, when an insulator is used in a vacuum , its ability to stand off voltage is severely limited on and near its surface . Bulk breakdown...investigate the following two problem areas inherent in vacuum nower flow under soft photon fluence: 1. Insulator Flashover : When a voltage is applied

  17. Ion optics of RHIC EBIS

    SciTech Connect

    Pikin, A.; Alessi, J.; Beebe, E.; Kponou, A.; Okamura, M.; Raparia, D.; Ritter, J.; Tan, Y.; Kuznetsov, G.

    2011-09-10

    RHIC EBIS has been commissioned to operate as a versatile ion source on RHIC injection facility supplying ion species from He to Au for Booster. Except for light gaseous elements RHIC EBIS employs ion injection from several external primary ion sources. With electrostatic optics fast switching from one ion species to another can be done on a pulse to pulse mode. The design of an ion optical structure and the results of simulations for different ion species are presented. In the choice of optical elements special attention was paid to spherical aberrations for high-current space charge dominated ion beams. The combination of a gridded lens and a magnet lens in LEBT provides flexibility of optical control for a wide range of ion species to satisfy acceptance parameters of RFQ. The results of ion transmission measurements are presented.

  18. Magnetic correction of RHIC triplets

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, J.; Gupta, R.; Peggs, S.

    1993-01-01

    Triplets of large bore quadrupoles will be antisymmetrically placed on either side of all six intersection points of the Relativistic Heavy Ion collider (RHIC). In RHIC collision optics, the tiplets at the two experimental detectors are intended to enable the collision beta function to be reduced to the design goal of [beta][sup *] = 1.0 meter in both planes, in order to minimize the spot size and maximize the luminosity. This requires running with [beta][sub max] [approx] 1400 meters in the triplet, where the beams will have their largest size, both absolutely and as a fraction of the available aperture. Hence, the ultimate performance of RHIC rests on achieving the highest possible magnetic field quality in the triplets. This paper discusses the correction of magnetic errors expected in the quadrupole bodies and ends, using both these limped correctors and also quadrupole body tuning shims.

  19. Magnetic correction of RHIC triplets

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, J.; Gupta, R.; Peggs, S.

    1993-06-01

    Triplets of large bore quadrupoles will be antisymmetrically placed on either side of all six intersection points of the Relativistic Heavy Ion collider (RHIC). In RHIC collision optics, the tiplets at the two experimental detectors are intended to enable the collision beta function to be reduced to the design goal of {beta}{sup *} = 1.0 meter in both planes, in order to minimize the spot size and maximize the luminosity. This requires running with {beta}{sub max} {approx} 1400 meters in the triplet, where the beams will have their largest size, both absolutely and as a fraction of the available aperture. Hence, the ultimate performance of RHIC rests on achieving the highest possible magnetic field quality in the triplets. This paper discusses the correction of magnetic errors expected in the quadrupole bodies and ends, using both these limped correctors and also quadrupole body tuning shims.

  20. Superconducting Storage Cavity for RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Ben-Zvi,I.

    2009-01-02

    This document provides a top-level description of a superconducting cavity designed to store hadron beams in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory. It refers to more detailed documents covering the various issues in designing, constructing and operating this cavity. The superconducting storage cavity is designed to operate at a harmonic of the bunch frequency of RHIC at a relatively low frequency of 56 MHz. The current storage cavities of RHIC operate at 197 MHz and are normal-conducting. The use of a superconducting cavity allows for a high gap voltage, over 2 MV. The combination of a high voltage and low frequency provides various advantages stemming from the resulting large longitudinal acceptance bucket.

  1. Two photon physics at RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, S.

    1995-05-01

    Because the two photon cross section is proportional to Z{sup 4}, heavy ion colliders offer an unmatched luminosity. However, because nuclei have finite sizes, the photon spectrum is gradually cut off by a nuclear form factor. For RHIC, this cutoff occurs at a few GeV; below this energy, RHIC will have the highest {gamma}{gamma} luminosity in the world when it turns on. In addition to the high rates, because Z{alpha} {approximately} 0.6, the nuclear environment provides a window to strong field QED and new phenomena like multiple pair production. To study {gamma}{gamma} physics, regions where the nuclei interact hadronically must be avoided; this leads to roughly a factor of two loss in usable luminosity. The rates expected by the Solenoidal Tracker at RHIC (STAR) collaboration will be given. Backgrounds will be discussed, along with several rejection techniques.

  2. RHIC VERTICAL AC DIPOLE COMMISSIONING.

    SciTech Connect

    BAI,M.; DELONG,J.; HOFF,L.; PAI,C.; PEGGS,S.; PIACENTINO,J.; OERTER,B.; ODDO,P.; ROSER,T.; SATOGATA,T.; TRBOJEVIC,D.; ZALTSMAN,A.

    2002-06-02

    The RHIC vertical ac dipole was installed in the summer of 2001. The magnet is located in the interaction region between sector 3 and sector 4 common to both beams. The resonant frequency of the ac dipole was first configured to be around half of the beam revolution frequency to act as a spin flipper. At the end of the RHIC 2002 run, the ac dipole frequency was reconfigured for linear optics studies. A 0.35 mm driven betatron oscillation was excited with the vertical ac dipole and the vertical betatron functions and phase advances at each beam position monitor (BPM) around the RHIC yellow ring were measured using the excited coherence. We also recorded horizontal turn-by-turn beam positions at each BPM location to investigate coupling effects. Analysis algorithms and measurement results are presented.

  3. Cryogenic Insulation Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Augustynowicz, S. D.; Fesmire, J. E.; Wikstrom, J. P.

    1999-01-01

    The results of a comparative study of cryogenic insulation systems performed are presented. The key aspects of thermal insulation relative to cryogenic system design, testing, manufacturing, and maintenance are discussed. An overview of insulation development from an energy conservation perspective is given. Conventional insulation materials for cryogenic applications provide three levels of thermal conductivity. Actual thermal performance of standard multilayer insulation (MLI) is several times less than laboratory performance and often 10 times worse than ideal performance. The cost-effectiveness of the insulation system depends on thermal performance; flexibility and durability; ease of use in handling, installation, and maintenance; and overall cost including operations, maintenance, and life cycle. Results of comprehensive testing of both conventional and novel materials such as aerogel composites using cryostat boil-off methods are given. The development of efficient, robust cryogenic insulation systems that operate at a soft vacuum level is the primary focus of this paper.

  4. POLARIZED NEUTRONS IN RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    COURANT,E.D.

    1998-04-27

    There does not appear to be any obvious way to accelerate neutrons, polarized or otherwise, to high energies by themselves. To investigate the behavior of polarized neutrons the authors therefore have to obtain them by accelerating them as components of heavier nuclei, and then sorting out the contribution of the neutrons in the analysis of the reactions produced by the heavy ion beams. The best neutron carriers for this purpose are probably {sup 3}He nuclei and deuterons. A polarized deuteron is primarily a combination of a proton and a neutron with their spins pointing in the same direction; in the {sup 3}He nucleus the spins of the two protons are opposite and the net spin (and magnetic moment) is almost the same as that of a free neutron. Polarized ions other than protons may be accelerated, stored and collided in a ring such as RHIC provided the techniques proposed for polarized proton operation can be adapted (or replaced by other strategies) for these ions. To accelerate polarized particles in a ring, one must make provisions for overcoming the depolarizing resonances that occur at certain energies. These resonances arise when the spin tune (ratio of spin precession frequency to orbit frequency) resonates with a component present in the horizontal field. The horizontal field oscillates with the vertical motion of the particles (due to vertical focusing); its frequency spectrum is dominated by the vertical oscillation frequency and its modulation by the periodic structure of the accelerator ring. In addition, the magnet imperfections that distort the closed orbit vertically contain all integral Fourier harmonics of the orbit frequency.

  5. Materials for ultra-high vacuum

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, G.

    1989-08-15

    This report discusses materials for use in ultrahigh vacuum systems of 1 {times} 10{sup {minus}9} Torr or lower. The author briefly discusses alloys, solders, insulators and joining methods for vacuum systems. (JDL)

  6. Breakdown-Resistant RF Connectors for Vacuum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caro, Edward R.; Bonazza, Walter J.

    1987-01-01

    Resilient inserts compensate for insulation shrinkage. Coaxial-cable connector for radio-frequency (RF) energy resists electrical breakdown in vacuum. Used on RF equipment in vacuum chambers as well as in spaceborne radar and communication gear.

  7. A study of LC-39 cryogenic systems. Part 1: A study of the vacuum insulated transfer lines at Kennedy Space Center. Part 2: Cooldown pressure surges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ludtke, P. R.; Voth, R. O.

    1971-01-01

    The vacuum liquid hydrogen and liquid oxygen transfer lines at Kennedy Space Center were studied to evaluate the feasibility of using a condensing gas such as CO2 inside the vacuum spaces to achieve a condensing-vacuum. The study indicates that at ambient temperature, a maximum vacuum hyphen space pressure of 4000 microns is acceptable for the LH2 transfer lines. In addition, the cooldown procedures for the 14-inch cross-country liquid oxygen line was studied using a simplified mathematical model. Preliminary cooldown times are presented for various heat leak rates to the line and for two vent configurations.

  8. Aluminized fiberglass insulation conforms to curved surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1966-01-01

    Layers of fiber glass with outer reflective films of vacuum-deposited aluminum or other reflective metal, provide thermal insulation which conforms to curved surfaces. This insulation has good potential for cryogenic systems.

  9. Composite Flexible Blanket Insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kourtides, Demetrius A. (Inventor); Pitts, William C. (Inventor); Goldstein, Howard E. (Inventor); Sawko, Paul M. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    Composite flexible multilayer insulation systems (MLI) were evaluated for thermal performance and compared with the currently used fibrous silica (baseline) insulation system. The systems described are multilayer insulations consisting of alternating layers of metal foil and scrim ceramic cloth or vacuum metallized polymeric films quilted together using ceramic thread. A silicon carbide thread for use in the quilting and the method of making it are also described. These systems are useful in providing lightweight insulation for a variety of uses, particularly on the surface of aerospace vehicles subject to very high temperatures during flight.

  10. Vacuum-Gauge Connection For Shipping Container

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henry, Robert H.

    1990-01-01

    External connector enables measurement of vacuum in stored part. Remote-readout connector added to shipping container and connected to thermo-couple vacuum gauge in vacuum-insulated cryogenic line packed in container. Enables monitoring of condition of vacuum without opening container.

  11. Vacuum-Gauge Connection For Shipping Container

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henry, Robert H.

    1990-01-01

    External connector enables measurement of vacuum in stored part. Remote-readout connector added to shipping container and connected to thermo-couple vacuum gauge in vacuum-insulated cryogenic line packed in container. Enables monitoring of condition of vacuum without opening container.

  12. RHIC BBLR measurements in 2009

    SciTech Connect

    Calaga, R.; Robert-Demolaize, G.; Fischer, W.

    2010-05-23

    Long range beam-beam experiments were conducted during the Run 2009 in the Yellow and the Blue beams of the RHIC accelerator with DC wires. The effects of a long-range interaction with a DC wire on colliding and non-colliding bunches with the aid of beam losses, orbits, tunes were studied. Results from distance scans and an attempt to compensate a long-range interaction with a DC wire is presented. Two DC wires in the vertical plane were installed in the RHIC accelerator in 2006 with the aim of investigating long range (LR) beam-beam effects and a potential compensation. Extensive experiments were conducted focusing mainly on the effect of a wire on single ion beams from 2006-2009. A unique opportunity to compare the effect of the wire on colliding beams and compensation of a single LR beam-beam interaction were conducted in Run2009 with protons at 100 GeV. Due to aperture considerations for decreasing {beta}*, the Blue wire was removed during the shutdown after the Run2009 and the Yellow wire is foreseen to be removed in the near future. Therefore, these experiments serve as the final set of measurements for LR beam-beam with RHIC as a test bed. The relevant RHIC beam and lattice parameters are listed in Table 1 for the experiments in Run2009.

  13. RHIC Ring Element Nomenclature System

    SciTech Connect

    Hahn, H.; Rufer, C.; Sondericker, J.

    1990-10-11

    A technical note was published by Hahn, in March 1985, that presented a nomenclature system which identified RHIC main magnets and their position in the ring structure. A revised nomenclature system is described in this technical note which supersedes the earlier version. This present designation completes the 1985 note and has been enlarged to take into account practical considerations like machine installation and operation.

  14. The PHENIX experiment at RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Aronson, S.

    1992-01-01

    We review the current status of the design of a major RHIC detector which focuses primarily on the detection of dilepton pairs, direct photons, and selected hadron signals. The physics motivation and goals, the present conceptual design, and various technical issues are presented and discussed. The plan for continuing the design work over the next year is outlined.

  15. The PHENIX experiment at RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Aronson, S.

    1992-04-01

    We review the current status of the design of a major RHIC detector which focuses primarily on the detection of dilepton pairs, direct photons, and selected hadron signals. The physics motivation and goals, the present conceptual design, and various technical issues are presented and discussed. The plan for continuing the design work over the next year is outlined.

  16. Insulator Surface Flashover Due to UV Illumination

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-06-01

    The surface of an insulator under vacuum and under electrical charge will flashover when illuminated by a critical dose of ultra-violet (UV...fluence (energy per unit area) required to induce surface flashover of vacuum insulators for some candid insulator materials: High Density... Insulator Surface Flashover Due to UV Illumination1 J. B. Javedani, T.L. Houck, D.A. Lahowe, G.E. Vogtlin and D.A. Goerz Lawrence Livermore

  17. Magnetically insulated ion flow theory

    SciTech Connect

    Ottinger, P.F.; Schumer, J.W.

    2006-06-15

    Initiation of an anode plasma and ion emission into a magnetically insulated transmission line can cause serious current losses unless the ions are magnetically insulated as well as the electrons. A model for magnetically insulated ion flow in a vacuum transmission line is developed. Particle-in-cell simulations are presented that show that this model accurately predicts properties of this flow. The model is applied to determine the current required to magnetically insulate ion flow for a given voltage and vacuum line impedance. Relevance of this work to system designs for Z-pinch-driven inertial confinement fusion is discussed.

  18. Physics with tagged forward protons at RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Yip,K.

    2009-08-30

    The physics reach of the STAR detector at RHIC has been extended to include elastic and inelastic diffraction measurements with tagged forward protons. This program has started at RHIC in p+p collisions with a special optics run of {beta}* {approx} 21 m at STAR, at the center-of-mass energy {radical}s = 200 GeV during the last week of the RHIC 2009 run.

  19. RHIC Sextant Test -- Physics and performance

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, J.; Fischer, W.; Ahrens, L.

    1997-07-01

    This paper presents beam physics and machine performance results of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) Sextant and AGS-to-RHIC (AtR) transfer line during the Sextant Test in early 1997. Techniques used to measure both machine properties (difference orbits, dispersion, and beamline optics) and beam parameters (energy, intensity, transverse and longitudinal emittances) are described. Good agreement was achieved between measured and design lattice optics. The gold ion beam quality was shown to approach RHIC design requirements.

  20. Highlights from BNL and RHIC 2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tannenbaum, M. J.

    The following sections are included: * Introduction * News from BNL since ISSP2013 * RHIC Operations and accelerator future plans * Detector issues in A+A compared to p+p collisions * Nch, ET distributions and constituent-quarks as the fundamental elements of particle production * Collective Flow * RHIC Beam Energy Scan (BES)-in search of the critical point * Jet quenching, RHIC's main claim to fame * References

  1. RHIC CHALLENGES FOR LOW ENERGY OPERATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    SATOGATA,T.; BRENNAN, J.M.; DREES, A.; FEDOTOV, A.; ROSER, T.; TSOUPAS, N.

    2007-06-25

    There is significant interest in RHIC heavy ion collisions at {radical}s =5-50 GeV/u, motivated by a search for the QCD phase transition critical point. The lowest energies are well below the nominal RHIC gold injection {radical}s = 19.6 GeV/u. There are several challenges that face RHIC operations in this regime, including longitudinal acceptance, magnet field quality, lattice control, and luminosity monitoring. We report on the status of work to address these challenges, including results from beam tests of low energy RHIC operations with protons and gold.

  2. RHIC PERFORMANCE AND FUTURE PLANS

    SciTech Connect

    FISCHER,W.

    2004-10-10

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory, consisting of two 3.8 km long superconducting rings, was commissioned in 1999. Since then the machine collided fully stripped gold ions at five different energies, up to 100 GeV/u, deuterons with gold ions at 100 GeV/u, and protons at 100 GeV with a beam polarizations of up 45%. Over four operating periods the heavy ion luminosity has increased by two orders of magnitude, and now exceeds the design value by a factor of 2. Another factor of 2 is targeted for the next 4 years, as well as a more than 10-fold increase in the proton luminosity and a 2-fold increase in the polarization. Possible further upgrades include an Electron Beam Ion Source (EBIS), stochastic and electron cooling, and an electron ring to form an electron-ion collider (eRHIC).

  3. Workshop on the RHIC performance

    SciTech Connect

    Khiari, F.; Milutinovic, J.; Ratti, A.; Rhoades-Brown, M.J.

    1988-07-01

    The most recent conceptual design manual for the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven was published in May 1986 (BNL 51932). The purpose of this workshop was to review the design specifications in this RHIC reference manual, and to discuss in detail possible improvements in machine performance by addressing four main areas. These areas are beam-beam interactions, stochastic cooling, rf and bunch instabilities. The contents of this proceedings are as follows. Following an overview of the workshop, in which the motivation and goals are discussed in detail, transcripts of the first day talks are given. Many of these transcripts are copies of the original transparencies presented at the meeting. The following four sections contain contributed papers, that resulted from discussions at the workshop within each of the four working groups. In addition, there is a group summary for each of the four working groups at the beginning of each section. Finally, a list of participants is given.

  4. The PHENIX experiment at RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Morrison, D.P.; Akiba, Y.; Alford, O.; PHENIX Collaboration

    1997-12-01

    The primary goals of the heavy-ion program of the PHENIX collaboration are the detection of the quark-gluon plasma and the subsequent characterization of its physical properties. To address these aims, PHENIX will pursue a wide range of high energy heavy-ion physics topics. The breadth of the physics program represents the expectation that it will require the synthesis of a number of measurements to investigate the physics of the quark-gluon plasma. The broad physics agenda of the collaboration is also reflected in the design of the PHENIX detector itself, which is capable of measuring hadrons, leptons and photons with excellent momentum and energy resolution. PHENIX has chosen to instrument a selective acceptance with multiple detector technologies to provide very discriminating particle identification abilities. Additionally, PHENIX will take advantage of RHIC`s capability to collide beams of polarized protons with a vigorous spin physics program, a subject covered in a separable contribution to these proceedings.

  5. RHIC Injection Kicker Design Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Hahn, H.; Tsoupas, N.; Tuozzolo, J. E.

    1997-01-02

    Injecting beam from the AGS to RHIC is performed by single-bunch transfer. The RHIC injection kicker system provides a vertical deflection of 1.86 mrad for beams with a B p = 100 Tm. The available free space for the four kickers limits their effective length to 1.12 m each. Neglecting any contribution from the electric field, the deflecting magnetic field is required to be 415 G inside the beam tube. This leads, with the horizontal aperture of 4.84 cm, to the current requirement of 1.6kA. The magnetic field then becomes 2.13 kG in the back ferrite. In this report, computation studies directed at reducing the electric peak fields, without significant reduction of the capacitance and concomitant increase of the characteristic impedance, are presented.

  6. Surface flashover of insulators

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, H.C.

    1988-08-31

    This paper reviews surface flashover (i.e., voltage breakdown along the surfaces of insulators), primarily in vacuum, although some comments are made about surface/flashover in high pressure gases. Theories and models relating to surface flashover are discussed, along with pertinent experimental results. Also, some suggestions are made regarding how to choose the material, geometry, and processing when selecting an insulator for a particular application.

  7. Monolithic readout circuits for RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    O`Connor, P.; Harder, J.

    1991-12-31

    Several CMOS ASICs have been developed for a proposed RHIC experiment. This paper discusses why ASIC implementation was chosen for certain functions, circuit specifications and the design techniques used to meet them, and results of simulations and early prototypes. By working closely together from an early stage in the planning process, in-house ASIC designers and detector and data acquisition experimenters can achieve optimal use of this important technology.

  8. RHIC and its upgrade programmes.

    SciTech Connect

    Roser,T.

    2008-06-23

    As the first hadron accelerator and collider consisting of two independent superconducting rings RHIC has operated with a wide range of beam energies and particle species. After a brief review of the achieved performance the presentation will give an overview of the plans, challenges and status of machine upgrades, that range from a new heavy ion pre-injector and beam cooling at 100 GeV to a high luminosity electron-ion collider.

  9. High intensity protons in RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Montag, C.; Ahrens, L.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Brennan, J. M.; Drees, K. A.; Fischer, W.; Huang, H.; Minty, M.; Robert-Demolaize, G.; Thieberger, P.; Yip, K.

    2012-01-05

    During the 2012 summer shutdown a pair of electron lenses will be installed in RHIC, allowing the beam-beam parameter to be increased by roughly 50 percent. To realize the corresponding luminosity increase bunch intensities have to be increased by 50 percent, to 2.5 {center_dot} 10{sup 11} protons per bunch. We list the various RHIC subsystems that are most affected by this increase, and propose beam studies to ensure their readiness. The proton luminosity in RHIC is presently limited by the beam-beam effect. To overcome this limitation, electron lenses will be installed in IR10. With the help of these devices, the headon beam-beam kick experienced during proton-proton collisions will be partially compensated, allowing for a larger beam-beam tuneshift at these collision points, and therefore increasing the luminosity. This will be accomplished by increasing the proton bunch intensity from the presently achieved 1.65 {center_dot} 10{sup 11} protons per bunch in 109 bunches per beam to 2.5 {center_dot} 10{sup 11}, thus roughly doubling the luminosity. In a further upgrade we aim for bunch intensities up to 3 {center_dot} 10{sup 11} protons per bunch. With RHIC originally being designed for a bunch intensity of 1 {center_dot} 10{sup 11} protons per bunch in 56 bunches, this six-fold increase in the total beam intensity by far exceeds the design parameters of the machine, and therefore potentially of its subsystems. In this note, we present a list of major subsystems that are of potential concern regarding this intensity upgrade, show their demonstrated performance at present intensities, and propose measures and beam experiments to study their readiness for the projected future intensities.

  10. RHIC stochastic cooling motion control

    SciTech Connect

    Gassner, D.; DeSanto, L.; Olsen, R.H.; Fu, W.; Brennan, J.M.; Liaw, CJ; Bellavia, S.; Brodowski, J.

    2011-03-28

    Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) beams are subject to Intra-Beam Scattering (IBS) that causes an emittance growth in all three-phase space planes. The only way to increase integrated luminosity is to counteract IBS with cooling during RHIC stores. A stochastic cooling system for this purpose has been developed, it includes moveable pick-ups and kickers in the collider that require precise motion control mechanics, drives and controllers. Since these moving parts can limit the beam path aperture, accuracy and reliability is important. Servo, stepper, and DC motors are used to provide actuation solutions for position control. The choice of motion stage, drive motor type, and controls are based on needs defined by the variety of mechanical specifications, the unique performance requirements, and the special needs required for remote operations in an accelerator environment. In this report we will describe the remote motion control related beam line hardware, position transducers, rack electronics, and software developed for the RHIC stochastic cooling pick-ups and kickers.

  11. Future Physics Capabilities of RHIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, B. M.

    2007-05-01

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory is a versatile facility for both heavy-ion and polarized-proton collision physics. The initial heavy-ion runs (Au+Au, Cu+Cu, and d+Au) have led to the unexpected discoveries at RHIC that (1) the new state of matter produced is a "nearly-perfect" fluid, (2) fast quarks (jets) lose large amounts of energy, when traversing the medium, (3) the quarks themselves are observed to flow, and (4) forward particle production is lower than expected. The polarized proton (p+p) program has discovered that gluons do not make a maximal contribution to the spin of the proton. Substantial upgrades to the accelerator and experimental detectors are ushering in an exciting transition from discovery to understanding. RHIC is poised to address these fundamental questions of broad significance: (a) What are the phases of QCD matter? (b) What is the wave function of the proton? (c) What is the wave function of a heavy nucleus? (d) What is the nature of non-equilibrium processes in a fundamental theory? After a brief introduction this talk and paper give an abbreviated overview of what has been learned so far, the plan for the mid-term (2006-2011), and the long-range plan (2012 and beyond).

  12. 6 MV Vacuum Voltmeter Development

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-06-01

    reversed). The draw rod compresses o-ring seals between the insulators and rings to allow operation in vacuum. The insulator outer surfaces are coated...small-diameter ends, and have toroidal conductors attached at their large-diameter ends. The field shaper surfaces are treated to increase the...the direction to emit electrons toward the VVM insulator stack. The field magnitude is about 0.5 MV/cm, and would probably emit without the surface

  13. Composite thermal insulator

    SciTech Connect

    Ishihara, Sh.; Yamamoto, R.; Yoneno, H.

    1985-01-08

    The disclosure is directed to a composite thermal insulator including a Freon gas expanded plastic, and an evacuated powder insulation. The present invention provides a composite thermal insulator light in weight and having a superior heat insulating performance over a long period through replacement of a thick metallic container conventionally used for the evacuated powder insulation and considered indispensable for withstanding a load at one atmospheric pressure and for preventing vacuum leakage, by a film-like plastic container, with activated carbon disposed in it. More specifically, the composite thermal insulator of the present invention includes a Freon gas expanded plastic, a film-like plastic container evacuated to form a vacuum in its interior, and directly contacting and/or covered by the expanded plastic, and activated carbon or inorganic powder containing activated carbon tightly enclosed in the plastic container, light in weight, having a heat conductivity lower than 0.01 kcal/mh/sup 0/ C. and a mechanical strength sufficient for actual use, with almost no variations with time in the heat insulating property.

  14. BUNCH PATTERNS AND PRESSURE RISE IN RHIC.

    SciTech Connect

    FISCHER,W.IRISO-ARIZ,U.

    2004-07-05

    The RHIC luminosity is limited by pressure rises with high intensity beams. At injection and store, the dominating cause for the pressure rise was shown to be electron clouds. We discuss bunch distributions along the circumference that minimize the electron cloud effect in RHIC. Simulation results are compared with operational observations.

  15. Notes on the RHIC Injection Kicker

    SciTech Connect

    Forsyth, E. B.

    1995-03-01

    The basic design of the RHIC injection kicker has been completed. However a good deal more must be done before the system is operational in RHIC. The purpose of this note is to discuss the outstanding issues and offer guidance on solutions.

  16. RHIC sextant test: Accelerator systems and performance

    SciTech Connect

    Pilat, F.; Trbojevic, D.; Ahrens, L.

    1997-08-01

    One sextant of the RHIC Collider was commissioned in early 1997 with beam. We describe here the performance of the accelerator systems, instrumentation subsystems and application software. We also describe a ramping test without beam that took place after the commissioning with beam. Finally, we analyze the implications of accelerator systems performance and their impact on the planning for RHIC installation and commissioning.

  17. Elastic proton-proton scattering at RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Yip, K.

    2011-09-03

    Here we describe elastic proton+proton (p+p) scattering measurements at RHIC in p+p collisions with a special optics run of {beta}* {approx} 21 m at STAR, at the center-of-mass energy {radical}s = 200 GeV during the last week of the RHIC 2009 run. We present preliminary results of single and double spin asymmetries.

  18. THE COLOR GLASS CONDENSATE, RHIC AND HERA.

    SciTech Connect

    MCLERRAN,L.

    2002-04-30

    In this talk, I discuss a universal form of matter, the Color Glass Condensate. It is this matter which composes the low x part of all hadronic wavefunctions. The experimental programs at RHIC and HERA, and future programs at LHC and eRHIC may allow us to probe and study the properties of this matter.

  19. Optics measurements and corrections at RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Bai M.; Aronson, J.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Luo, Y.; Robert-Demolaize, G.; White, S.

    2012-05-20

    The further improvement of RHIC luminosity performance requires more precise understanding of the RHIC modeling. Hence, it is necessary to minimize the beta-beat, deviation of measured beta function from the calculated beta functions based on an model. The correction of betabeat also opens up the possibility of exploring operating RHIC polarized protons at a working point near integer, a prefered choice for both luminosity as well as beam polarization. The segment-by-segment technique for reducing beta-beat demonstrated in the LHC operation for reducing the beta-beat was first tested in RHIC during its polarized proton operation in 2011. It was then fully implemented during the RHIC polarized proton operation in 2012. This paper reports the commissioning results. Future plan is also presented.

  20. Method and apparatus for filling thermal insulating systems

    DOEpatents

    Arasteh, Dariush K.

    1992-01-01

    A method for filling insulated glazing units is disclosed. The method utilizes a vacuum chamber in which the insulated glazing units are placed. The insulated glazing units and vacuum chamber are evacuated simultaneously. The units are then refilled with a low conductance gas such as Krypton while the chamber is simultaneously refilled with air.

  1. Method and apparatus for filling thermal insulating systems

    DOEpatents

    Arasteh, D.K.

    1992-01-14

    A method for filling insulated glazing units is disclosed. The method utilizes a vacuum chamber in which the insulated glazing units are placed. The insulated glazing units and vacuum chamber are evacuated simultaneously. The units are then refilled with a low conductance gas such as Krypton while the chamber is simultaneously refilled with air. 3 figs.

  2. critRHIC: the RHIC low energy program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephans, G. S. F.

    2006-12-01

    Recent experimental and theoretical developments have motivated interest in a more detailed exploration of heavy ion collisions in the range \\sqrt{s_{_{NN}}} = 5\\--15\\,GeV . In contrast to interactions at the full RHIC energy of \\sqrt{s_{_{NN}}} = 200\\,GeV , such collisions result in systems characterized by much higher baryon chemical potential, μB. Extensions of lattice QCD calculations to non-zero values of μB suggest that a critical point may exist in this region of the QCD phase diagram. Discovery of the critical point or, equivalently, determining the location where the phase transition from partonic to hadronic matter switches from a smooth crossover to first order would establish a major landmark in the phase diagram. Initial studies of Pb + Pb collisions in this energy range have revealed several unexpected features in the data. In response to these results, it has been suggested that the existing RHIC accelerator and experiments can be used to further the investigation of this important physics topic. This proceeding briefly summarizes the theoretical and experimental situation with particular emphasis on the conclusions from a RIKEN BNL workshop held in March 2006.

  3. TRANSVERSE ECHO MEASUREMENTS IN RHIC.

    SciTech Connect

    FISCHER, W.

    2005-09-18

    Diffusion counteracts cooling and the knowledge of diffusion rates is important for the calculation of cooling times and equilibrium beam sizes. Echo measurements are a potentially sensitive method to determine diffusion rates, and longitudinal measurements were done in a number of machines. We report on transverse echo measurements in RHIC and the observed dependence of echo amplitudes on a number of parameters for beams of gold and copper ions, and protons. In particular they examine the echo amplitudes of gold and copper ion bunches of varying intensity, which exhibit different diffusion rates from intrabeam scattering.

  4. UPGRADING RHIC FOR HIGHER LUMINOSITY.

    SciTech Connect

    MACKAY,W.; BEN-ZVI,I.; BRENNAN,J.M.; HARRISON,M.; KEWISCH,J.; PEGGS,S.; ROSER,T.; TRBOJEVIC,D.; PARKHOMCHUK,V.

    2001-06-18

    While RHIC has only just started running for its heavy ion physics program, in the first run last summer, we achieved 10% of the design luminosity. In this paper we discuss plans for increasing the luminosity by a factor of 35 beyond the nominal design. A factor of 4 should be straightforward by doubling the number of bunches per ring and squeezing the {beta}* from 2 to 1 m at selected interaction points. An additional factor of 8 to 10 could be possible by using electron cooling to counteract intrabeam scattering and reduce emittances of the beams.

  5. COMMISSIONING SPIN ROTATORS IN RHIC.

    SciTech Connect

    Mackay, W W; Bai, M; Courant, E D; Fischer, W; Huang, H; Luccio, A; Montag, C; Pilat, F; Ptitsyn, V; Roser, T; Satogata, T; Trbojevic, D; Vanziejts, J

    2003-05-12

    During the summer of 2002, eight superconducting helical spin rotators were installed into RHIC in order to control the polarization directions independently at the STAR and PHENIX experiments. Without the rotators, the orientation of polarization at the interaction points would only be vertical. With four rotators around each of the two experiments, we can rotate either or both beams from vertical into the horizontal plane through the interaction region and then back to vertical on the other side. This allows independent control for each beam with vertical, longitudinal, or radial polarization at the experiment. In this paper, we present results from the first run using the new spin rotators at PHENIX.

  6. Global Orbit Feedback in RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Minty, M.; Hulsart, R.; Marusic, A.; Michnoff, R.; Ptitsyn, V.; Robert-Demolaize, G.; Satogata, T.

    2010-05-23

    For improved reproducibility of good operating conditions and ramp commissioning efficiency, new dual-plane slow orbit feedback during the energy ramp was implemented during run-10 in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). The orbit feedback is based on steering the measured orbit, after subtraction of the dispersive component, to either a design orbit or to a previously saved reference orbit. Using multiple correctors and beam position monitors, an SVD-based algorithm is used for determination of the applied corrections. The online model is used as a basis for matrix computations. In this report we describe the feedback design, review the changes made to realize its implementation, and assess system performance.

  7. INTENSITY DEPENDENT EFFECTS IN RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    WEI,J.

    1999-09-02

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) is currently under commissioning after a seven-year construction cycle. Unlike conventional hadron colliders, this machine accelerates, stores, and collides heavy ion beams of various combinations of species. The dominant intensity dependent effects are intra-beam scattering at both injection and storage, and complications caused by crossing transition at a slow ramp rate. In this paper, the authors present theoretical formalisms that have been used for the study, and discuss mechanisms, impacts, and compensation methods including beam cooling and transition jump schemes. Effects of space charge, beam-beam, and ring impedances are also summarized.

  8. Advances in Microsphere Insulation Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, M. S.; Baumgartner, R. G.; Fesmire, J. E.; Augustynowicz, S. D.

    2004-06-01

    Microsphere insulation, typically consisting of hollow glass bubbles, combines in a single material the desirable properties that other insulations only have individually. The material has high crush strength, low density, is noncombustible, and performs well in soft vacuum. Microspheres provide robust, low-maintenance insulation systems for cryogenic transfer lines and dewars. They also do not suffer from compaction problems typical of perlite that result in the necessity to reinsulate dewars because of degraded thermal performance and potential damage to its support system. Since microspheres are load bearing, autonomous insulation panels enveloped with lightweight vacuum-barrier materials can be created. Comprehensive testing performed at the Cryogenics Test Laboratory located at the NASA Kennedy Space Center demonstrated competitive thermal performance with other bulk materials. Test conditions were representative of actual-use conditions and included cold vacuum pressure ranging from high vacuum to no vacuum and compression loads from 0 to 20 psi. While microspheres have been recognized as a legitimate insulation material for decades, actual implementation has not been pursued. Innovative microsphere insulation system configurations and applications are evaluated.

  9. HIGH PERFORMANCE EBIS FOR RHIC.

    SciTech Connect

    ALESSI,J.; BEEBE, E.; GOULD, O.; KPONOU, A.; LOCKEY, R.; PIKIN, A.; RAPARIA, D.; RITTER, J.; SNYDSTRUP, L.

    2007-06-25

    An Electron Beam Ion Source (EBIS), capable of producing high charge states and high beam currents of any heavy ion species in short pulses, is ideally suited for injection into a synchrotron. An EBIS-based, high current, heavy ion preinjector is now being built at Brookhaven to provide increased capabilities for the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), and the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL). Benefits of the new preinjector include the ability to produce ions of any species, fast switching between species to serve the simultaneous needs of multiple programs, and lower operating and maintenance costs. A state-of-the-art EBIS, operating with an electron beam current of up to 10 A, and producing multi-milliamperes of high charge state heavy ions, has been developed at Brookhaven, and has been operating very successfully on a test bench for several years. The present performance of this high-current EBIS is presented, along with details of the design of the scaled-up EBIS for RHIC, and the status of its construction. Other aspects of the project, including design and construction of the heavy ion RFQ, Linac, and matching beamlines, are also mentioned.

  10. R&D ERL: Vacuum

    SciTech Connect

    Mapes, M.; Smart, L.; Weiss, D.; Steszyn, A.; Todd, R.

    2010-01-01

    The ERL Vacuum systems are depicted in a figure. ERL has eight vacuum volumes with various sets of requirements. A summary of vacuum related requirements is provided in a table. Five of the eight volumes comprise the electron beamline. They are the 5-cell Superconducting RF Cavity, Superconducting e-gun, injection, loop and beam dump. Two vacuum regions are the individual cryostats insulating the 5-cell Superconducting RF Cavity and the Superconducting e-gun structures. The last ERL vacuum volume not shown in the schematic is the laser transport line. The beamline vacuum regions are separated by electropneumatic gate valves. The beam dump is common with loop beamline but is considered a separate volume due to geometry and requirements. Vacuum in the 5-cell SRF cavity is maintained in the {approx}10{sup -9} torr range at room temperature by two 20 l/s ion pumps and in the e-gun SRF cavity by one 60 l/s ion pump. Vacuum in the SRF cavities operated at 2{sup o}K is reduced to low 10{sup -11} torr via cryopumping of the cavity walls. The cathode of the e-gun must be protected from poisoning, which can occur if vacuum adjacent to the e-gun in the injection line exceeds 10-11 torr range in the injection warm beamline near the e-gun exit. The vacuum requirements for beam operation in the loop and beam dump are 10-9 torr range. The beamlines are evacuated from atmospheric pressure to high vacuum level with a particulate free, oil free turbomolecular pumping cart. 25 l/s shielded ion pumps distributed throughout the beamlines maintain the vacuum requirement. Due to the more demanding vacuum requirement of the injection beamline proximate to the e-gun, a vacuum bakeout of the injection beamline is required. In addition, two 200 l/s diode ion pumps and supplemental pumping provided by titanium sublimation pumps are installed in the injection line just beyond the exit of the e-gun. Due to expected gas load a similar pumping arrangement is planned for the beam dump. The

  11. RHIC GAMMA TRANSITION JUMP POWER SUPPLY PROTOTYPE TEST.

    SciTech Connect

    MI,J.; GANETIS,G.; LOUIE,W.; BRUNO,D.; ZAPASEK,R.; SANDBERG,J.; ZHANG,W.

    2001-06-18

    This paper describes the principle and test results of the prototype RHIC Gamma Transition Jump Power Supply. The jump power supply principle is introduced and illustrated along with diagrams in this paper. The prototype is built with Insulated Gate Bipolar Transistors (IGBT) as current direction switch components. Optically coupled IGBT drivers are used for the jump control switch. The jump time among the power supplies is synchronized from 40 to 60 milliseconds to meet the RHIC beam transition-crossing requirement. The short jump time is needed to avoid particle loss and to preserve the initial bunch area during the transition, thus successfully transferring the ion beams from the acceleration RF system to storage system. There are a total of twenty four jump power supplies that will be used. They synchronously switch the direction of the magnets current while the beam is being accelerated through the transition to reach the top storage energy. Each power supply will energize a group of super conducting magnets, which consists of four magnets that are connected in series. At the end, test results are listed, accompanied with the dummy load current waveform and prototype power supply picture.

  12. SPIN MATCHING FROM AGS TO RHIC.

    SciTech Connect

    MACKAY,W.W.; TSOUPAS,N.

    2002-11-06

    With a partial Siberian snake in the AGS and transport lines with interspersed horizontal and vertical bends, the incoming spin direction at the injection points of both the collider rings is not likely to match the ideal vertical stable spin direction of RHIC which has two full helical Siberian snakes per ring. In this paper we examine the matching of a polarized beam transferred from the AGS into RHIC. The present 5% partial solenoidal snake as well as a proposed 20% superconducting helical are considered for the AGS. Solutions with retuned snakes in RHIC to better match the incoming beam have been found.

  13. RHIC Sextant Test - Accelerator Systems and Performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilat, F.; Ahrens, L.; Brown, K.; Connolly, R.; dell, G. F.; Fischer, W.; Kewisch, J.; Mackay, W.; Mane, V.; Peggs, S.; Satogata, T.; Tepikian, S.; Thompson, P.; Trbojevic, D.; Tsoupas, N.; Wei, J.

    1997-05-01

    One sextant of the RHIC collider and the full AtR (AGS to RHIC) transfer line have been commissioned in early 1997 with beam. We describe here the design and performance of the accelerator systems during the test, such as the magnet and power supply systems, instrumentation subsystems and application software. After reviewing the main milestones of the commissioning we describe a ramping test without beam that took place after the commissioning with beam. Finally, we analyze the implications of accelerator systems preformance and their impact on the plannig for RHIC installation and commissioning.

  14. Hot Quark Soup Produced at RHIC

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC, http://www.bnl.gov/rhic) is a 2.4-mile-circumference particle accelerator/collider that has been operating at Brookhaven Lab since 2000, delivering collisions of heavy ions, protons, and other particles to an international team of physicists investigating the basic structure and fundamental forces of matter. In 2005, RHIC physicists announced that the matter created in RHICs most energetic collisions behaves like a nearly perfect liquid in that it has extraordinarily low viscosity, or resistance to flow. Since then, the scientists have been taking a closer look at this remarkable form of matter, which last existed some 13 billion years ago, a mere fraction of a second after the Big Bang. Scientists have revealed new findings, including the first measurement of temperature very early in the collision events, and their implications for the nature of this early-universe matter.

  15. Summary of the RHIC Retreat 2007

    SciTech Connect

    Pilat,F.; Gardner, C.; Montag, C.; Roser, T.

    2008-08-01

    The RHIC Retreat 2007 took place on July 16-17 2007 at the Foxwoods Resort in CT, about 3 weeks after the end of the RHIC Run-7. The goal of the Retreat is traditionally to plan the upcoming run in the light of the results from the previous one, by providing a snapshot of the present understanding of the machine and a forum for free and frank discussion. A particular attention was paid to the challenge of increasing the time at store, and the related issue of system reliability. An interesting Session covered all new developments aimed to improve the machine performance and luminosity. In Section 2 we summarize the results from Run-7 for RHIC and the injectors and discuss the present objectives of the RHIC program and performance. Sections 3-6 are summaries of the Retreat sessions focused on preparation for deuteron gold and polarized protons, respectively, machine availability and new developments.

  16. RHIC low energy tests and initial operations

    SciTech Connect

    Satogata,T.; Ahrens, L.; Bai, M.; Brennan, J.M.; Bruno, D.; Butler, J.; Drees, A.; Fedotov, A.; Fischer, W.; Harvey, M.; Hayes, T.; Jappe, W.; Lee, R.C.; Mackay, W.W.; Malitsky, N.; Marr, G.; Michnoff, R.; Oerter, B.; Pozdeyev, E.; Roser, T.; Severino, F.; Smith, K.; Tepikian, S.; Tsoupas, N.

    2009-05-04

    Future Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) runs, including a portion of FY10 heavy ion operations, will explore collisions at center of mass energies of 5-50 GeV/n (GeV/nucleon). Operations at these energies is motivated by a search for the QCD phase transition critical point. The lowest end of this energy range is nearly a factor of four below the nominal RHIC injection center of mass energy of {radical} s = 20.8 GeV/n. There are several operational challenges in the RHIC low-energy regime, including harmonic number changes, small longitudinal acceptance, lowered magnet field quality, nonlinear orbit control, and luminosity monitoring. We report on the experience with some of these challenges during beam tests with gold in March 2008, including first RHIC operations at {radical}s = 9.18 GeV/n and first beam experience at {radical}s = 5 GeV/n.

  17. Polarization transmission at RHIC, numerical simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Meot F.; Bai, M.; Liu, C.; Minty, M.; Ranjbar, V.

    2012-05-20

    Typical tracking simulations regarding the transmission of the polarization in the proton-proton collider RHIC are discussed. They participate in general studies aimed at understanding and improving polarization performances during polarized proton-proton runs.

  18. Chromatic Correction for the RHIC Lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S. Y.

    1986-03-31

    We study the chromatic correction for the RHIC lattice. The scheme requires three families of sextupoles in the inner arc and outer arc respectively. It works very well to correct the tune and betatron amplitude modulations.

  19. RHIC Sextant Test --- Physics and Performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, J.; Fischer, W.; Ahrens, L.; Brennan, J. M.; Brown, K.; Connolly, R.; dell, G. F.; Harrison, M.; Kewisch, J.; Mackay, W. W.; Mane, V.; Peggs, S.; Pilat, F.; Satogata, T.; Tepikian, S.; Thompson, P.; Trahern, C. G.; Trbojevic, D.; Tsoupas, N.

    1997-05-01

    This paper presents beam physics and machine performance results of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) Sextant and AGS-to-RHIC (ATR) transfer line during the Sextant test in early 1997. Techniques used to measure both machine properties (difference orbits, dispersion, and beamline optics) and beam parameters (energy, intensity, transverse and longitudinal emittances) are described. The flexibility of the ATR and RHIC Sextant lattices is demonstrated by a widely tunable range of phase advance per cell. Longitudinal tomography is employed to reconstruct beam motion in phase space. Digitized two-dimensional video profile monitors are used to measure transverse beam emittances and beamline optics. The gold ion beam parameters are shown to be comparable to the RHIC design requirements.

  20. GLOBAL DECOUPLING ON THE RHIC RAMP.

    SciTech Connect

    LUO, Y.; CAMERON, P.; DELLA PENNA, A.; FISCHER, W.; ET AL.

    2005-05-16

    The global betatron decoupling on the ramp is an important issue for the operation of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), especially in the RHIC polarized proton (pp) run. To avoid the major betatron and spin resonances on the ramp, the betatron tunes are constrained. And the rms value of the vertical closed orbit should be smaller than 0.5mm. Both require the global coupling on the ramp to be well corrected. Several ramp decoupling schemes were found and tested at RHIC, like N-turn map decoupling, three-ramp correction, coupling amplitude modulation, and coupling phase modulation. In this article, the principles of these methods are shortly reviewed and compared. Among them, coupling angle modulation is a robust and fast one. It has been applied to the global decoupling in the routine RHIC operation.

  1. Central exclusive production at RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Adamczyk, Leszek; Guryn, Włodek; Turnau, Jacek

    2014-11-10

    The present status and future plans of the physics program of Central Exclusive Production (CEP) at RHIC are described. The measurements are based on the detection of the forward protons from the Double Pomeron Exchange (DPE) process in the Roman Pot system and of the recoil system of charged particles from the DPE process measured in the STAR experiment’s Time Projection Chamber (TPC). The data described here were taken using polarized proton-proton collisions at ps = 200 GeV. The preliminary spectra of two pion and four pion invariant mass reconstructed by STAR TPC in central region of pseudo-rapidity | | < 1, are presented. Near future plans to take data with the current system at center-of-mass energy ps = 200 GeV and plans to upgrade the forward proton tagging sys- tem are presented. Also a possible addition of the Roman Pots to the sPHENIX detector is discussed.

  2. The RHIC project -- Physical challenges

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, J.

    1997-11-01

    The design and construction status of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider, RHIC, is discussed. Those novel features of a heavy ion Collider that are distinct from conventional hadron Colliders in general are noted. These features are derived from the experimental requirements of operation with a variety of ion species over a wide energy range including collisions between ions of unequal energies. The project is in the fifth year of a seven-year construction cycle. A review of the superconducting magnet program is given together with progress to date on the machine construction and commissioning. Emphasis is made on challenging issues including intrabeam scattering, interaction-region error compensation, magnet alignments, and matched transition-energy jump.

  3. HIGH PT MEASUREMENT AT RHIC.

    SciTech Connect

    MIODUSZEWSKI,S.

    2003-01-06

    We present recent high transverse momentum measurements in Au+Au and p+p collisions at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). We define and show the nuclear modification factor for neutral pions and charged hadrons and discuss the particle species dependence. By means of the nuclear modification factor, we observe a suppression factor at high p{sub T} of 5-6 for neutral pions and 3-4 for charged hadrons in central Au+Au collisions relative to the binary-scaled yields in p+p (or peripheral) collisions. Finally we present strong evidence for the observation of jets in Au+Au collisions and the disappearance of the away-side jet in central Au+Au collisions.

  4. ABORT GAP CLEANING IN RHIC.

    SciTech Connect

    DREES,A.; AHRENS,L.; III FLILLER,R.; GASSNER,D.; MCINTYRE,G.T.; MICHNOFF,R.; TRBOJEVIC,D.

    2002-06-03

    During the RHIC Au-run in 2001 the 200 MHz storage cavity system was used for the first time. The rebucketing procedure caused significant beam debunching in addition to amplifying debunching due to other mechanisms. At the end of a four hour store, debunched beam could account for approximately 30%-40% of the total beam intensity. Some of it will be in the abort gap. In order to minimize the risk of magnet quenching due to uncontrolled beam losses at the time of a beam dump, a combination of a fast transverse kicker and copper collimators were used to clean the abort gap. This report gives an overview of the gap cleaning procedure and the achieved performance.

  5. Advantages of polarization experiments at RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Underwood, D.G.

    1990-01-01

    We point out various spin experiments that could be done if the polarized beam option is pursued at RHIC. The advantages of RHIC for investigating several current and future physics problems are discussed. In particular, the gluon spin dependent structure function of the nucleon could be measured cleanly and systematically. Relevant experience developed in conjunction with the Fermilab Polarized Beam program is also presented. 8 refs., 2 tabs.

  6. FEL potential of eRHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Litvinenko, V.N.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Hao, Y.; Kao, C-C.; Kayran, D.; Murphy, J.B.; Ptitsyn, V.; Trbojevic, D.; Tsoupas, N.

    2010-08-23

    Brookhaven National Laboratory plans to build a 5-to-30 GeV energy-recovery linac (ERL) for its future electron-ion collider, eRHIC. In past few months, the Laboratory turned its attention to the potential of this unique machine for free electron lasers (FELS), which we initially assessed earlier. In this paper, we present our current vision of a possible FEL farm, and of narrow-band FEL-oscillators driven by this accelerator. eRHIC, the proposed electron-ion collider at BNL, takes advantage of the existing Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) complex. Plans call for adding a six-pass super-conducting (SRF) ERL to this complex to collide polarized- and unpolarized- electron beams with heavy ions (with energies up to 130 GeV per nucleon) and with polarized protons (with energies up to 325 GeV). RHIC, with a circumference of 3.834 km, has three-fold symmetry and six straight sections each {approx} 250 m long. Two of these straight sections will accommodate 703-MHz SRF linacs. The maximum energy of the electron beam in eRHIC will be reached in stages, from 5 GeV to 30 GeV, by increasing the lengths of its SRF linacs. We plan to install at the start the six-pass magnetic system with small gap magnets. The structure of the eRHIC's electron beam will be identical with that of its hadron beam, viz., 166 bunches will be filled, reserving about a one-microsecond gap for the abort kicker. With modest modifications, we can assure that eRHIC's ERL will become an excellent driver for continuous wave (CW) FELs (see Fig.1). The eRHIC's beam structure will support the operation of several such FELs in parasitic mode.

  7. ANALYSIS OF ELECTRON CLOUD AT RHIC.

    SciTech Connect

    IRISO,U.; BLASKIEWICZ,M.; CAMERON,P.; DREES,A.; FISCHER,W.; ET AL.

    2004-07-05

    Pressure rises with high intense beams are among the main luminosity limitations at RHIC. Observations during the latest runs show beam induced electron multipacting as one of the causes for these pressure rises. Experimental studies are carried out at RHIC using devoted instrumentation to understand the mechanism leading to electron clouds. In the following, we report the experimental electron cloud data and the analyzed results using computer simulation codes.

  8. Superconducting RF systems for eRHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Belomestnykh S.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Brutus, J.C.; Hahn, H. et al

    2012-05-20

    The proposed electron-hadron collider eRHIC will consist of a six-pass 30-GeV electron Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) and one of RHIC storage rings operating with energy up to 250 GeV. The collider design extensively utilizes superconducting RF (SRF) technology in both electron and hadron parts. This paper describes various SRF systems, their requirements and parameters.

  9. Polarized Proton Acceleration in AGS and RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Roser, Thomas

    2008-02-06

    As the first hadron accelerator and collider consisting of two independent superconducting rings RHIC has operated with a wide range of beam energies and particle species including polarized proton beams. The acceleration of polarized beams in both the injector and the collider rings is complicated by numerous depolarizing spin resonances. Partial and full Siberian snakes have made it possible to overcome the depolarization and beam polarizations of up to 65% have been reached at 100 GeV in RHIC.

  10. POLARIZED PROTON ACCELERATION IN AGS AND RHIC.

    SciTech Connect

    ROSER,T.

    2007-09-10

    As the first hadron accelerator and collider consisting of two independent superconducting rings RHIC has operated with a wide range of beam energies and particle species including polarized proton beams. The acceleration of polarized beams in both the injector and the collider rings is complicated by numerous depolarizing spin resonances. Partial and full Siberian snakes have made it possible to overcome the depolarization and beam polarizations of up to 65% have been reached at 100 GeV in RHIC.

  11. RHIC Polarized proton performance in run-8

    SciTech Connect

    Montag,C.; Bai, M.; MacKay, W.W.; Roser, T.; Abreu, N.; Ahrens, L.; Barton, D.; Beebe-Wang, J.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Brennan, J.M.; Brown, K.A.; Bruno, D.; Bunce, G.; Calaga, R.; Cameron, P.; Connolly, R.; D'Ottavio, T.; Drees, A.; Fedotov, A.V.; Fischer, W.; Ganetis, G.; Gardner, C.; Glenn, J.; Hayes, T.; Huang, H.; Ingrassia, P.; Kayran, D.A.; Kewisch, J.; Lee, R.C.; Lin, F.; Litvinenko, V.N.; Luccio, A.U.; Luo, Y.; Makdisi, Y.; Malitsky, N.; Marr, G.; Marusic, A.; Michnoff, R.; Morris, J.; Oerter, B.; Pilat, F.; Pile, P.; Robert-Demolaize, G.; Russo, T.; Satogata, T.; Schultheiss, C.; Sivertz, M.; Smith, K.; Tepikian, S.; D. Trbojevic, D.; Tsoupas, N.; Tuozzolo, J.; Zaltsman, A.; Zelenski, A.; Zeno, K.; Zhang, S.Y.

    2008-10-06

    During Run-8, the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) provided collisions of spin-polarized proton beams at two interaction regions. Physics data were taken with vertical orientation of the beam polarization, which in the 'Yellow' RHIC ring was significantly lower than in previous years. We present recent developments and improvements as well as the luminosity and polarization performance achieved during Run-8, and we discuss possible causes of the not as high as previously achieved polarization performance of the 'Yellow' ring.

  12. Load responsive multilayer insulation performance testing

    SciTech Connect

    Dye, S.; Kopelove, A.; Mills, G. L.

    2014-01-29

    Cryogenic insulation designed to operate at various pressures from one atmosphere to vacuum, with high thermal performance and light weight, is needed for cryogenically fueled space launch vehicles and aircraft. Multilayer insulation (MLI) performs well in a high vacuum, but the required vacuum shell for use in the atmosphere is heavy. Spray-on foam insulation (SOFI) is often used in these systems because of its light weight, but can have a higher heat flux than desired. We report on the continued development of Load Responsive Multilayer Insulation (LRMLI), an advanced thermal insulation system that uses dynamic beam discrete spacers that provide high thermal performance both in atmosphere and vacuum. LRMLI consists of layers of thermal radiation barriers separated and supported by micromolded polymer spacers. The spacers have low thermal conductance, and self-support a thin, lightweight vacuum shell that provides internal high vacuum in the insulation. The dynamic load responsive spacers compress to support the external load of a vacuum shell in one atmosphere, and decompress under reduced atmospheric pressure for lower heat leak. Structural load testing was performed on the spacers with various configurations. LRMLI was installed on a 400 liter tank and boil off testing with liquid nitrogen performed at various chamber pressures from one atmosphere to high vacuum. Testing was also performed with an MLI blanket on the outside of the LRMLI.

  13. Load responsive multilayer insulation performance testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dye, S.; Kopelove, A.; Mills, G. L.

    2014-01-01

    Cryogenic insulation designed to operate at various pressures from one atmosphere to vacuum, with high thermal performance and light weight, is needed for cryogenically fueled space launch vehicles and aircraft. Multilayer insulation (MLI) performs well in a high vacuum, but the required vacuum shell for use in the atmosphere is heavy. Spray-on foam insulation (SOFI) is often used in these systems because of its light weight, but can have a higher heat flux than desired. We report on the continued development of Load Responsive Multilayer Insulation (LRMLI), an advanced thermal insulation system that uses dynamic beam discrete spacers that provide high thermal performance both in atmosphere and vacuum. LRMLI consists of layers of thermal radiation barriers separated and supported by micromolded polymer spacers. The spacers have low thermal conductance, and self-support a thin, lightweight vacuum shell that provides internal high vacuum in the insulation. The dynamic load responsive spacers compress to support the external load of a vacuum shell in one atmosphere, and decompress under reduced atmospheric pressure for lower heat leak. Structural load testing was performed on the spacers with various configurations. LRMLI was installed on a 400 liter tank and boil off testing with liquid nitrogen performed at various chamber pressures from one atmosphere to high vacuum. Testing was also performed with an MLI blanket on the outside of the LRMLI.

  14. LHeC and eRHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Litvinenko,V.

    2009-07-16

    This paper is focused on possible designs and predicted performances of two proposed high-energy, high-luminosity electron-hadron colliders: eRHIC at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL, Upton, NY, USA) and LHeC at Organisation Europeenne pour la Recherche Nucleaire (CERN, Geneve, Switzerland). The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC, BNL) and the Large Hadron Collider (LHC, CERN) are designed as versatile colliders. RHIC is colliding various species of hadrons staring from polarized protons to un-polarized heavy ions (such as fully stripped Au (gold) ions) in various combinations: polarized p-p, d-Au, Cu-Cu, Au-Au. Maximum energy in RHIC is 250 GeV (per beam) for polarized protons and 100 GeV/n for heavy ions. There is planed expansion of the variety of species to include polarized He{sup 3} and unpolarized fully stripped U (uranium). LHeC is designed to collide both un-polarized protons with energy up to 7 TeV per beam and fully stripped Pb (lead) ions with energy up to 3 TeV/n. Both eRHIC and LHeC plan to add polarized electrons (or/and positrons) to the list of colliding species in these versatile hadron colliders. In eRHIC 10-20 GeV electrons would collide with hadrons circulating in RHIC. In LHeC 50-150 GeV polarized leptons will collided with LHC's hadron beams. Both colliders plan to operate in electron-proton (in RHIC case protons are polarized as well) and electron-ion collider modes. eRHIC and LHeC colliders are complimentary both in the energy reach and in their physics goals. I will discuss in this paper possible choices of the accelerator technology for the electron part of the collider for both eRHIC and LHeC, and will present predicted performance for the colliders. In addition, possible staging scenarios for these colliders will be discussed.

  15. Contrived Vacuum Impedances in the Triplet Cryostat

    SciTech Connect

    Welch, Kimo M.

    1995-07-05

    The longitudinal vacuum conductance of cryostats housing standard dipoles and CQS magnet assemblies is such that one is able to sue pressure differences between interconnects, created by external pumping, to resolve the location of He leaks into the cryostat to within one magnet interconnect. The large diameter of the RHIC triplet cryostat precludes exploiting its longitudinal conductance for the same purpose. Because of this, a baffle is being designed to partition the cryostat vacuum envelop, and thus add better resolution to the location of possible He leaks. The method is given for calculating the needed impedance of this baffle.

  16. Medium energy heavy ion operations at RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Drees, K.A.; Ahrens, L.; Bai, M.; Beebe-Wang, J.; Blackler, I.M.C.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Brown, K.A.; Brennan, M.; Bruno, D.; Butler, J.; Carlson, C.; Connolly, R.; D'Ottavio, T.; Fischer, W.; Fu, W.; Gassner, D.; Harvey, M.; Hayes, T.; Huang, H.; Hulsart, R.; Ingrassia, P.; Kling, N.; Lafky, M.; Laster, J.; Lee, R.C.; Litvinenko, V.; Luo, Y.; MacKay, W.W.; Marr, G.; Mapes. M.; Marusic, A.; Mernick, K.; Michnoff, R.; Minty, M.; Montag, C.; Morris, J.; Naylor, C.; Nemesure, S.; Pilat, F.; Ptitsyn, V.; Robert-Demolaize, G.; Roser, T.; Sampson, P.; Satogata, T.; Schoefer, V.; Schultheiss, C.; Severino, F.; Shrey, T.; Smith, K.S.; Tepikian, S.; Thieberger, P.; Trbojevic, D.; Tsoupas, N.; Tuozzolo, J.; van Kuik, B.; Wilinski, M.; Zaltsman, A.; Zeno, K.; Zhang, S.Y.

    2011-03-28

    As part of the search for a phase transition or critical point on the QCD phase diagram, an energy scan including 5 different energy settings was performed during the 2010 RHIC heavy ion run. While the top beam energy for heavy ions is at 100 GeV/n and the lowest achieved energy setpoint was significantly below RHICs injection energy of approximately 10 GeV/n, we also provided beams for data taking in a medium energy range above injection energy and below top beam energy. This paper reviews RHIC experience and challenges for RHIC medium energy operations that produced full experimental data sets at beam energies of 31.2 GeV/n and 19.5 GeV/n. The medium energy AuAu run covered two beam energies, both above the RHIC injection energy of 9.8 GeV but well below the standard store energy of 100 GeV (see table 1). The low energy and full energy runs with heavy ions in FY10 are summarized in [1] and [2]. Stochastic Cooling ([3]) was only used for 100 GeV beams and not used in the medium energy run. The efficiency of the transition from 100 GeV operation to 31.2 GeV and then to 19.5 GeV was remarkable. Setup took 32 h and 19 h respectively for the two energy settings. The time in store, defined to be the percentage of time RHIC provides beams in physics conditions versus calendar time, was approximately 52% for the entire FY10 heavy ion run. In both medium energy runs it was well above this average, 68% for 31.5 GeV and 82% for 19.5 GeV. For both energies RHIC was filled with 111 bunches with 1.2 10{sup 9} and 1.3 10{sup 9} ions per bunch respectively.

  17. Studying the spin structure of the proton using the solenoidal tracker at RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Hallman, T.J.; STAR Collaboration

    1998-05-01

    The primary goal of RHIC is to produce nuclear matter under extremes of temperature and density sufficient to excite the QCD vacuum, resulting in the creation of a deconfined plasma of quarks and gluons. A second goal central to the RHIC scientific program is to advance the study of the spin structure of the proton significantly beyond what has been learned from deep inelastic scattering (DIS) measurements by studying spin asymmetries in strong processes involving the partonic constituents of polarized protons. After decades of being regarded as an inessential complication to the strong interaction at high energy, spin has again become a topic of considerable experimental and theoretical interest. This is largely due to the observation from DIS that the net contribution to the proton spin from the quark constituents ({approximately} 30%) is smaller than expected relative to the momentum carried in this sector. The RHIC accelerator will provide an unprecedented opportunity to fully explore the spin structure of the proton with high precision studies focused on measuring the spin-dependent parton distributions (valence quark, sea quark, gluon) of the proton. It is designed to operate both with high luminosity (10{sup 31}--10{sup 32} cm{sup {minus}2} sec{sup {minus}1}) and high polarization ({approximately} 70%). In addition, the energy range at RHIC ({radical}s = 200--500 GeV) is sufficiently high that spin effects in polarized proton interactions should be calculable once the spin structure of the proton is sufficiently understood. The experimental results will therefore provide a rigorous test of QCD. A further focus of the RHIC spin physics program will be to search for physics beyond the standard model. The increased sensitivity afforded by using polarized protons to study parity violation in inclusive jet production at high p{sub t} makes this exploration competitive with respect to ongoing searches using unpolarized beams.

  18. Magnetic inhibition of insulator flashover

    SciTech Connect

    VanDevender, J.P.; McDaniel, D.H.; Neau, E.L.; Mattis, R.E.; Bergeron, K.D.

    1982-06-01

    Electrical breakdown across a vacuum/plastic interface in the presence of applied or self-generated magnetic fields, B< or =3.5 T, was investigated. The E x B drift of charged particles near the interface in these experiments was away from the insulator surface. The self-magnetic field effects on a plastic vacuum insulator flashover were examined with inductive loads, particle beam loads, and imploding plasma loads. Average breakdown electric fields of up to 38 MV/m were observed. Power densities of 100 TW/m/sup 2/ were passed through acrylic-vacuum interfaces. The flashover electric fields were improved over the B = 0 fields from previous experiments by factors of 7.1, 5.0, and 1.8 for the -45/sup 0/, 0/sup 0/, and +45/sup 0/ insulators, respectively.

  19. The dipole corrector magnets for the RHIC fast global orbit feedback system

    SciTech Connect

    Thieberger, P.; Arnold, L.; Folz, C.; Hulsart, R.; Jain, A.; Karl, R.; Mahler, G.; Meng, W.; Mernick, K.; Michnoff, R.; Minty, M.; Montag, C.; Ptitsyn, V.; Ritter, J.; Smart, L.; Tuozzolo, J.; White, J.

    2011-03-28

    The recently completed RHIC fast global orbit feedback system uses 24 small 'window-frame' horizontal dipole correctors. Space limitations dictated a very compact design. The magnetic design and modelling of these laminated yoke magnets is described as well as the mechanical implementation, coil winding, vacuum impregnation, etc. Test procedures to determine the field quality and frequency response are described. The results of these measurements are presented and discussed. A small fringe field from each magnet, overlapping the opposite RHIC ring, is compensated by a correction winding placed on the opposite ring's magnet and connected in series with the main winding of the first one. Results from measurements of this compensation scheme are shown and discussed.

  20. Calculation of synchrotron radiation from high intensity electron beam at eRHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Jing Y.; Chubar, O.; Litvinenko, V.

    2012-05-20

    The Electron-Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (eRHIC) at Brookhaven National Lab is an upgrade project for the existing RHIC. A 30 GeV energy recovery linac (ERL) will provide a high charge and high quality electron beam to collide with proton and ion beams. This will improve the luminosity by at least 2 orders of magnitude. The synchrotron radiation (SR) from the bending magnets and strong quadrupoles for such an intense beam could be penetrating the vacuum chamber and producing hazards to electronic devices and undesired background for detectors. In this paper, we calculate the SR spectral intensity, power density distributions and heat load on the chamber wall. We suggest the wall thickness required to stop the SR and estimate spectral characteristics of the residual and scattered background radiation outside the chamber.

  1. WHAT ARE WE LEARNING FROM RHIC?

    SciTech Connect

    KHARZEEV,D.

    2002-06-24

    Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory on Long Island, New York, began operation in 2000 culminating over ten years of development and construction, and a much longer period of theoretical speculations about the properties of hot QCD matter produced in nuclear collisions in the collider regime. RHIC's 2.4mile rings contain superconducting magnets, which operate at minus 451.6 degrees Fahrenheit, 4.5 degrees above the absolute zero. RHIC collides two intersecting heavy ion beams at center-of-mass energy of up to 200 GeV/A (at luminosity of up to 10{sup 26}sec{sup -1}cm{sup 2}, which can be further increased in the future), and polarized proton beams at c.m.s. energy of up to 500 GeV. The total energy in the gold-gold collision thus reaches 40 TeV, which is at present the World's record collision energy. In the pp mode, the unique possibility offered by RHIC for the first time is the study of double spin asymmetries and other spin observables. This talk is an attempt to summarize some of the first results obtained at RHIC. The author discusses the significance of these measurements for establishing the properties of hot and dense QCD matter and for understanding the dynamics of the theory at the high parton density, strong color field frontier.

  2. PROCEEDINGS OF RIKEN BNL RESEARCH CENTER WORKSHOP ENTITLED "ODDERON SEARCHES AT RHIC" (VOLUME 76)

    SciTech Connect

    ORGANIZERS: GURYN, W.; KOVCHEGOV, Y.; VOGELSANG, W.; TRUEMAN, L.

    2005-10-25

    The Odderon, a charge-conjugation-odd partner of the Pomeron, has been a puzzle ever since its introduction in 1973. The Pomeron describes a colorless exchange with vacuum quantum numbers in the t-channel of hadronic scattering at high energies. The concept was originally formulated for the non-perturbative regime of Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD). In perturbation theory, the simplest picture of the Poineron is that of a two-gluon exchange process, whereas an Odderon can be thought of as an exchange of three gluons. Both the Pomeron and the Odderon are expected in QCD. However, while there exists plenty of experimental data that could be successfully described by Pomeron exchanges (for example in electron-proton and hadron-hadron scattering at high energies), no experimental sign of the Odderon has been observed. One of the very few hints so far is the difference in the diffractive minima of elastic proton-proton and proton-antiproton scattering measured at the ISR. The Odderon has recently received renewed attention by QCD researchers, mainly for the following two reasons. First of all, RHIC has entered the scene, offering exciting unique new opportunities for Odderon searches. RHIC provides collisions of nuclei at center-of-mass energies far exceeding those at all previous experiments. RHIC also provides collisions of protons of the highest center-of-mass energy, and in the interval, which has not been explored previously in p {bar p} collisions. In addition, it also has the unique feature of polarization for the proton beams, promising to become a crucial tool in Odderon searches. Indeed, theorists have proposed possible signatures of the Odderon in some spin asymmetries measurable at RHIC. Qualitatively unique signals should be seen in these observables if the Odderon coupling is large. Secondly, the Odderon has recently been shown to naturally emerge from the Color Glass Condensate (CGC), a theory for the high-energy asymptotics of QCD. It has been argued that

  3. Central exclusive production at RHIC

    DOE PAGES

    Adamczyk, Leszek; Guryn, Włodek; Turnau, Jacek

    2014-11-10

    The present status and future plans of the physics program of Central Exclusive Production (CEP) at RHIC are described. The measurements are based on the detection of the forward protons from the Double Pomeron Exchange (DPE) process in the Roman Pot system and of the recoil system of charged particles from the DPE process measured in the STAR experiment’s Time Projection Chamber (TPC). The data described here were taken using polarized proton-proton collisions at ps = 200 GeV. The preliminary spectra of two pion and four pion invariant mass reconstructed by STAR TPC in central region of pseudo-rapidity | |more » < 1, are presented. Near future plans to take data with the current system at center-of-mass energy ps = 200 GeV and plans to upgrade the forward proton tagging sys- tem are presented. Also a possible addition of the Roman Pots to the sPHENIX detector is discussed.« less

  4. Robust Multilayer Insulation for Cryogenic Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fesmire, J. E.; Augustynowicz, S. D.; Scholtens, B. E.

    2008-03-01

    New requirements for thermal insulation include robust Multilayer insulation (MLI) systems that work for a range of environments from high vacuum to no vacuum. Improved MLI systems must be simple to install and maintain while meeting the life-cycle cost and thermal performance objectives. Performance of actual MLI systems has been previously shown to be much worse than ideal MLI. Spacecraft that must contain cryogens for both lunar service (high vacuum) and ground launch operations (no vacuum) are planned. Future cryogenic spacecraft for the soft vacuum environment of Mars are also envisioned. Industry products using robust MLI can benefit from improved cost-efficiency and system safety. Novel materials have been developed to operate as excellent thermal insulators at vacuum levels that are much less stringent than the absolute high vacuum requirement of current MLI systems. One such robust system, Layered Composite Insulation (LCI), has been developed by the Cryogenics Test Laboratory at NASA Kennedy Space Center. The experimental testing and development of LCI is the focus of this paper. LCI thermal performance under cryogenic conditions is shown to be six times better than MLI at soft vacuum and similar to MLI at high vacuum. The experimental apparent thermal conductivity (k-value) and heat flux data for LCI systems are compared with other MLI systems.

  5. Robust Multilayer Insulation for Cryogenic Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fesmire, J. E.; Scholtens, B. F.; Augustynowicz, S. D.

    2007-01-01

    New requirements for thermal insulation include robust Multilayer insulation (MU) systems that work for a range of environments from high vacuum to no vacuum. Improved MLI systems must be simple to install and maintain while meeting the life-cycle cost and thermal performance objectives. Performance of actual MLI systems has been previously shown to be much worse than ideal MLI. Spacecraft that must contain cryogens for both lunar service (high vacuum) and ground launch operations (no vacuum) are planned. Future cryogenic spacecraft for the soft vacuum environment of Mars are also envisioned. Industry products using robust MLI can benefit from improved cost-efficiency and system safety. Novel materials have been developed to operate as excellent thermal insulators at vacuum levels that are much less stringent than the absolute high vacuum requirement of current MLI systems. One such robust system, Layered Composite Insulation (LCI), has been developed by the Cryogenics Test Laboratory at NASA Kennedy Space Center. The experimental testing and development of LCI is the focus of this paper. LCI thermal performance under cryogenic conditions is shown to be six times better than MLI at soft vacuum and similar to MLI at high vacuum. The experimental apparent thermal conductivity (k-value) and heat flux data for LCI systems are compared with other MLI systems.

  6. The RHIC polarized H- ion source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zelenski, A.; Atoian, G.; Raparia, D.; Ritter, J.; Steski, D.

    2016-02-01

    A novel polarization technique had been successfully implemented for the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) polarized H- ion source upgrade to higher intensity and polarization. In this technique, a proton beam inside the high magnetic field solenoid is produced by ionization of the atomic hydrogen beam (from external source) in the He-gaseous ionizer cell. Further proton polarization is produced in the process of polarized electron capture from the optically pumped Rb vapor. The use of high-brightness primary beam and large cross sections of charge-exchange cross sections resulted in production of high intensity H- ion beam of 85% polarization. The source very reliably delivered polarized beam in the RHIC Run-2013 and Run-2015. High beam current, brightness, and polarization resulted in 75% polarization at 23 GeV out of Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS) and 60%-65% beam polarization at 100-250 GeV colliding beams in RHIC.

  7. RHIC BPM SYSTEM MODIFICATIONS AND PERFORMANCE.

    SciTech Connect

    SATOGATA, T.; CALAGA, R.; CAMERON, P.; ET AL.

    2005-05-16

    The RHIC beam position monitor (BPM) system provides independent average orbit and turn-by-turn (TBT) position measurements. In each ring, there are 162 measurement locations per plane (horizontal and vertical) for a total of 648 BPM planes in the RHIC machine. During 2003 and 2004 shutdowns, BPM processing electronics were moved from the RHIC tunnel to controls alcoves to reduce radiation impact, and the analog signal paths of several dozen modules were modified to eliminate gain-switching relays and improve signal stability. This paper presents results of improved system performance, including stability for interaction region beam-based alignment efforts. We also summarize performance of recently-added DSP profile scan capability, and improved million-turn TBT acquisition channels for 10 Hz triplet vibration, nonlinear dynamics, and echo studies.

  8. Recent Results from RHIC: The Perfect Liquid

    SciTech Connect

    Westfall, Gary

    2006-07-19

    In the past two years we have witnessed a leap forward in the understanding high temperature, high density, and strongly interacting matter produced in ultra-relativistic heavy ion collisions at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Combining measurements of Au+Au, d+Au, and p+p collisions at energies up to 200 GeV per nucleon pair in the center of mass frame, the four RHIC experimental groups, STAR, PHENIX, PHOBOS, and BRAHMS, have produced impressive experimental evidence for the existence of a new form of matter. In this Colloquium, I will present an overview of recent experimental results from RHIC including evidence for thermalization, hydrodynamic behavior of a perfect fluid, the partonic origin of flow, and jet suppression. These measurements point to the observation of a hot, dense, strongly interacting matter produced in central Au+Au collisions at the highest available energies.

  9. RHIC BEAM LOSS MONITOR SYSTEM INITIAL OPERATION.

    SciTech Connect

    WITKOVER,R.L.; MICHNOFF,R.J.; GELLER,J.M.

    1999-03-29

    The RHIC Beam Loss Monitor (BLM) System is designed to prevent beam loss quenching of the superconducting magnets, and acquire loss data. Four hundred ion chambers are located around the rings to detect losses. The required 8-decade range in signal current is compressed using an RC pre- integrator ahead of a low current amplifier. A beam abort may be triggered if fast or slow losses exceed programmable threshold levels. A micro-controller based VME module sets references and gains and reads trip status for up to 64 channels. Results obtained with the detectors in the RHIC Sextant Test and the prototype electronics in the AGS-to-RHIC (AtR) transfer line are presented along with the present status of the system.

  10. A critical review of RHIC experimental results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trainor, Thomas A.

    2014-07-01

    The relativistic heavy-ion collider (RHIC) was constructed to achieve an asymptotic state of nuclear matter in heavy-ion collisions, a near-ideal gas of deconfined quarks and gluons denoted quark-gluon plasma or QGP. RHIC collisions are indeed very different from the hadronic processes observed at the Bevalac and AGS, but high-energy elementary-collision mechanisms are also non-hadronic. The two-component model (TCM) combines measured properties of elementary collisions with the Glauber eikonal model to provide an alternative asymptotic limit for A-A collisions. RHIC data have been interpreted to indicate formation of a strongly-coupled QGP (sQGP) or "perfect liquid". In this review, I consider the experimental evidence that seems to support such conclusions and alternative evidence that may conflict with those conclusions and suggest different interpretations.

  11. RHIC BPM system average orbit calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Michnoff,R.; Cerniglia, P.; Degen, C.; Hulsart, R.; et al.

    2009-05-04

    RHIC beam position monitor (BPM) system average orbit was originally calculated by averaging positions of 10000 consecutive turns for a single selected bunch. Known perturbations in RHIC particle trajectories, with multiple frequencies around 10 Hz, contribute to observed average orbit fluctuations. In 2006, the number of turns for average orbit calculations was made programmable; this was used to explore averaging over single periods near 10 Hz. Although this has provided an average orbit signal quality improvement, an average over many periods would further improve the accuracy of the measured closed orbit. A new continuous average orbit calculation was developed just prior to the 2009 RHIC run and was made operational in March 2009. This paper discusses the new algorithm and performance with beam.

  12. RHIC INSERTION REGION, SHUNT POWER SUPPLY CURRENT ERRORS.

    SciTech Connect

    BRUNO,D.; GANETIS,G.; LAMBIASE,R.F.; SANDBERG,J.

    2001-06-18

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) was commissioned in 1999 and 2000. RHIC requires power supplies to supply currents to highly inductive superconducting magnets. The RHIC Insertion Region contain's many shunt power supplies to trim the current of different magnet elements in a large superconducting magnet circuit. Power Supply current error measurements were performed during the commissioning of RHIC. Models of these power supply systems were produced to predict and improve these power supply current errors using the circuit analysis program MicroCap V by Spectrum Software (TM). Results of the power supply current errors are presented from the models and from the measurements performed during the commissioning of RHIC.

  13. MULTI - MILLION - TURN BEAM POSITION MONITORS FOR RHIC.

    SciTech Connect

    SATOGATA,T.CAMERON,P.CERNIGLIA,P.CUPOLO,J.DAWSON,CDEGEN,CMEAD,JVETTER,K

    2003-05-12

    During the RHIC 2003 run, two beam position monitors (BPMs) in each transverse plane in the RHIC blue ring were upgraded with high-capacity mezzanine cards. This upgrade provided these planes with the capability to digitize up to 128 million consecutive turns of RHIC beam, or almost 30 minutes of continuous beam centroid phase space evolution for a single RHIC bunch. This paper describes necessary hardware and software changes and initial system performance. We discuss early uses and results for diagnosis of coherent beam oscillations, turn-by-turn (TBT) acquisition through a RHIC acceleration ramp, and ac-dipole nonlinear dynamics studies.

  14. RHIC CRITICAL POINT SEARCH: ASSESSING STARs CAPABILITIES.

    SciTech Connect

    SORENSEN,P.

    2006-07-03

    In this report we discuss the capabilities and limitations of the STAR detector to search for signatures of the QCD critical point in a low energy scan at RHIC. We find that a RHIC low energy scan will cover a broad region of interest in the nuclear matter phase diagram and that the STAR detector--a detector designed to measure the quantities that will be of interest in this search--will provide new observables and improve on previous measurements in this energy range.

  15. Experience with split transition lattices at RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Montag, C.; Tepikian, S.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Brennan, J.M.

    2010-05-23

    During the acceleration process, heavy ion beams in RHIC cross the transition energy. When RHIC was colliding deuterons and gold ions during Run-8, lattices with different integer tunes were used for the two rings. This resulted in the two rings crossing transition at different times, which proved beneficial for the 'Yellow' ring, the RF system of which is slaved to the 'Blue' ring. For the symmetric gold-gold run in FY2010, lattices with different transition energies but equal tunes were implemented. We report the optics design concept as well as operational experience with this configuration.

  16. The RHIC Polarized H{sup -} Source

    SciTech Connect

    Zelenski, A.; Kponou, A.; Ritter, J.; Belov, A.; Zubets, V.

    2009-08-04

    The depolarization factors in the multi-step spin-transfer polarization technique and basic limitations on maximum polarization in the Optically-Pumped Polarized H- Ion Source (OPPIS) are discussed. Results of simulations and experimental studies of the Sona-transition polarization transfer process are presented. The experimentally observed polarization oscillations and polarization maximum peak were reproduced in simulations. Detailed studies of polarization losses in the RHIC OPPIS and the source parameters optimization resulted in the OPPIS polarization increase to 86-90%. This contributed to increasing polarization in the AGS and RHIC to 65approx70%.

  17. QUADRUPOLE BEAM-BASED ALIGNMENT AT RHIC.

    SciTech Connect

    NIEDZIELA, J.; MONTAG, C.; SATOGATA, T.

    2005-05-16

    Successful implementation of a beam-based alignment algorithm, tailored to different types of quadrupoles at RHIC, provides significant benefits to machine operations for heavy ions and polarized protons. This algorithm was used to calibrate beam position monitor centers relative to interaction region quadrupoles to maximize aperture. This approach was also used to determine the optimal orbit through transition jump quadrupoles to minimize orbit changes during the transition jump for heavy ion acceleration. This paper provides background discussion and results from first measurements during the RHIC 2005 run.

  18. The RHIC transfer line cable database

    SciTech Connect

    Scholl, E.H.; Satogata, T.

    1995-05-01

    A cable database was created to facilitate and document installation of cables and wiring in the RHIC project, as well as to provide a data source to track possible wiring and signal problems. The eight tables of this relational database, currently implemented in Sybase, contain information ranging from cable routing to attenuation of individual wires. This database was created in a hierarchical scheme under the assumption that cables contain wires -- each instance of a cable has one to many wires associated with it. This scheme allows entry of information pertinent to individual wires while only requiring single entries for each cable. Relationships to other RHIC databases are also discussed.

  19. RHIC ABORT KICKER WITH REDUCED COUPLING IMPEDANCE.

    SciTech Connect

    HAHN,H.; DAVINO,D.

    2002-06-02

    Kicker magnets typically represent the most important contributors to the transverse impedance budget of accelerators and storage rings. Methods of reducing the impedance value of the SNS extraction kicker presently under construction and, in view of a future performance upgrade, that of the RHIC abort kicker have been thoroughly studied at this laboratory. In this paper, the investigation of a potential improvement from using ferrite different from the BNL standard CMD5005 is reported. Permeability measurements of several ferrite types have been performed. Measurements on two kicker magnets using CMD5005 and C2050 suggest that the impedance of a magnet without external resistive damping, such as the RHIC abort kicker, would benefit.

  20. BUNCHED BEAM STOCHASTIC COOLING PROJECT FOR RHIC.

    SciTech Connect

    BRENNAN, J.M.; BASKIEWICZ, M.M.

    2005-09-18

    The main performance limitation for RHIC is emittance growth caused by IntraBeam Scattering during the store. We have developed a longitudinal bunched-beam stochastic cooling system in the 5-8 GHz band which will be used to counteract IBS longitudinal emittance growth and prevent de-bunching during the store. Solutions to the technical problems of achieving sufficient kicker voltage and overcoming the electronic saturation effects caused by coherent components within the Schottky spectrum are described. Results from tests with copper ions in RHIC during the FY05 physics run, including the observation of signal suppression, are presented.

  1. SIMULATION OF PARTICLE SPECTRA AT RHIC.

    SciTech Connect

    KAHANA,D.E.; KAHANA,S.H.

    2001-09-04

    A purely hadronic simulation is performed of the recently reported data from PHOBOS at energies of {radical}s = 56, 130 GeV using the relativistic heavy ion cascade LUCIFER which had previously given a good description of the NA49 inclusive spectra at {radical}s = 17.2 GeV/A. The results compare well with these early measurements at RHIC and indeed successfully predict the increase in multiplicity now seen by PHOBOS and the other RHIC detectors at the nominal maximum energy of {radical}s = 200 GeV/A, suggesting that evidence for quark-gluon matter remains elusive.

  2. Summary of the RHIC Retreat 2008

    SciTech Connect

    Pilat,F.; Brennan, M.; Brown, K.; Fischer, W.; Montag, C.

    2008-08-01

    The main goal of the RHIC Retreat is to review last run's performance and prepare for the next. As always though we also discussed the longer term goals and plans for the facility to put the work in perspective and in the right priority. A straw-man plan for the facility was prepared for the DOE that assumes 30 cryoweek and running 2 species per year. The plan outlines RHIC operations for 2008-2012 and integrates well accelerator and detector upgrades to optimize the physics output with high luminosities. The plans includes guidance from the PAC and has been reviewed by DOE.

  3. SNAKE DEPLORIZING RESONANCE STUDY IN RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    BAI,M.; CAMERON, P.; LUCCIO, A.; HUANG, H.; PITISYN, V.; ET AL.

    2007-06-25

    Snake depolarizing resonances due to the imperfect cancellation of the accumulated perturbations on the spin precession between snakes were observed at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). During the RHIC 2005 and 2006 polarized proton runs, we mapped out the spectrum of odd order snake resonance at Q{sub y} = 7/10. Here, Q, is the beam vertical betatron tune. We also studied the beam polarization after crossing the 7/10th resonance as a function of resonance crossing rate. This paper reports the measured resonance spectrum as well as the results of resonance crossing.

  4. A prototype ionization profile monitor for RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Connolly, R.; Cameron, P.; Ryan, W.

    1997-07-01

    Transverse beam profiles in the Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider (RHIC) will be measured with ionization profile monitors (IPM`s). Each IPM collects and measures the distribution of electrons in the beamline resulting from residual gas ionization during bunch passage. The electrons are swept transversely from the beamline and collected on strip anodes oriented parallel to the beam axis. At each bunch passage the charge pulses are amplified, integrated, and digitized for display as a profile histogram. A prototype detector was tested in the injection line during the RHIC Sextant Test. This paper describes the detector and gives results from the beam tests.

  5. RHIC BPM SYSTEM PERFORMANCE, UPGRADES, AND TOOLS.

    SciTech Connect

    SATOGATA,T.; CAMERON,P.; CERNIGLIA,P.; CUPOLO,J.; DAWSON,C.; DEGEN,C.; MEAD,J.; PTITSYN,V.; SIKORA,R.

    2002-06-02

    During the RHIC 2001-2 run, the beam position monitor (BPM) system provided independent average orbit and turn-by-turn (TBT) position measurements at 162 locations in each measurement plane and RHIC ring. TBT acquisition was successfully upgraded from 128 turns to 1024 turns per trigger, including injection. Closed orbits were acquired and automatically archived every two seconds through each acceleration ramp for orbit analysis and feed-forward orbit correction. This paper presents the overall system performance during this run, including precision, reproducibility, radiation damage, and analysis tools. We also summarize future plans, including million-turn TBT acquisition for nonlinear dynamics studies.

  6. Superconducting wire and cable for RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Garber, M.; Ghosh, A.K.; Greene, A.; McChesney, D.; Morgillo, A.; Shah, R.; DelRe, S.; Epstein, G.; Hong, S.; Lichtenwalner, J.

    1994-06-01

    The superconducting dipole and quadrupole magnets in the RHIC accelerator ring are to be fabricated from 30-strand superconducting cable. The RHIC wire has a diameter of 0.65 mm, copper-to-superconductor ratio of 2.25, filament diameter of 6 {mu}m and high critical current density. Primary emphasis during manufacturing has been on uniformity of materials, processes and performance. Near final results are presented on a production program which has extended over two years. Measured parameters are described which are important for design of superconducting accelerator magnets.

  7. Heavy Nuclei, From RHIC to The Cosmos

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, Spencer R.

    2002-11-01

    Ultra-relativistic heavy ion collisions produce a high-temperature, thermalized system that may mimic the conditions present shortly after the big bang. This writeup will given an overview of early results from the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), and discuss what we have learned about hot, strongly interacting nuclear systems. The thermal and chemical composition of the system will be discussed, along with observables that are sensitive to the early evolution of the system. I will also discuss the implications of the RHIC results for cosmic ray air showers.

  8. DVCS with an EIC/eRHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Fazio, Salvatore

    2011-07-15

    An overview of the status of the diffractive physics program with the future EIC/eRHIC will be given. eRHIC is a machine designed to collide an electron beam with energies ranging from 5 GeV up to 20(30)GeV with a hadron beam (protons, nuclei) at an energy, which can be varied from 50 GeV up to 325 GeV. The high luminosity of the machine, expected in the order of 10{sup 34} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}, will open the opportunity for very high precision measurements.

  9. A COMPREHENSIVE NEW DETECTOR FOR DETAILED STUDY OF THE QGP, INITIAL CONDITION AND SPIN PHYSICS AT RHIC II.

    SciTech Connect

    HARRIS, J.W.; BELLWIED, R.; SMIRNOV, N.; STEINBERG, P.; SURROW, B.; ULLRICH, T.

    2004-03-15

    A case is presented for compelling physics at a high luminosity RHIC II collider. A comprehensive new detector system is introduced to address this physics. The experimental focus is on detailed jet tomography of the quark gluon plasma (QGP); measuring gluon saturation in the nucleus, investigating the color glass condensate, measuring effects of the QCD vacuum on particle masses, determining the structure and dynamics within the proton and possible new phenomena. The physics and detector capabilities are introduced.

  10. ISABELLE vacuum systems

    SciTech Connect

    Halama, H J

    1980-01-01

    The Intersecting Storage Accelerator (ISABELLE) consists of two rings having a circumference of 3.8 km each. In these rings superconducting magnets, held at 4 K, bend and focus the proton beam which is accelerated up to 400 GeV. Due to very different pressure requirements, ISABELLE has two completely independent vacuum systems. One, which operates at 1 x 10/sup -11/ Torr, provides a very clean environment for the circulating proton beam. Here only ion and titanium sublimation pumps are used to provide the vacuum. The other system maintains superconducting magnet vessels at a pressure below 1 x 10/sup -4/ Torr, since at this pressure the gas conduction becomes negligible. In this so-called insulating vacuum system, turbomolecular pumps pump the inadvertent small helium leaks. Other gases are cryocondensed on the cold surfaces of the cryogenic system. The basic element of ISABELLE known as Full Cell containing 45 meters of beam tube, 8 pumping stations, 8 superconducting magnets and complete instrumentation has been constructed, leak checked and tested. All design parameters have been achieved in both vacuum systems. The two vacuum systems are described with particular emphasis on the influence of superconducting magnets in the selection of materials and UHV components.

  11. Hybrid Multifoil Aerogel Thermal Insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sakamoto, Jeffrey; Paik, Jong-Ah; Jones, Steven; Nesmith, Bill

    2008-01-01

    This innovation blends the merits of multifoil insulation (MFI) with aerogel-based insulation to develop a highly versatile, ultra-low thermally conductive material called hybrid multifoil aerogel thermal insulation (HyMATI). The density of the opacified aerogel is 240 mg/cm3 and has thermal conductivity in the 20 mW/mK range in high vacuum and 25 mW/mK in 1 atmosphere of gas (such as argon) up to 800 C. It is stable up to 1,000 C. This is equal to commercially available high-temperature thermal insulation. The thermal conductivity of the aerogel is 36 percent lower compared to several commercially available insulations when tested in 1 atmosphere of argon gas up to 800 C.

  12. Distributing Radiant Heat in Insulation Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freitag, H. J.; Reyes, A. R.; Ammerman, M. C.

    1986-01-01

    Thermally radiating blanket of stepped thickness distributes heat over insulation sample during thermal vacuum testing. Woven of silicon carbide fibers, blanket spreads heat from quartz lamps evenly over insulation sample. Because of fewer blanket layers toward periphery of sample, more heat initially penetrates there for more uniform heat distribution.

  13. DC CHARACTERIZATION OF HIGH GRADIENT MULTILAYER INSULATORS

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, J A; Caporaso, G J; Sampayan, S E; Sanders, D M; Krogh, M L

    2005-05-26

    We have developed a novel insulator concept that involves the use of alternating layers of conductors and insulators with periods less than 1 mm. We have demonstrated that these structures perform 2 to 5 times better than conventional insulators in long pulse, short pulse, and alternating polarity applications. We present new testing results showing exceptional behavior at DC, with gradients in excess of 110kV/cm in vacuum.

  14. Brahms Experiment at RHIC Day-1 Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Videbaek, Flemming

    1999-03-23

    The BRAHMS experiment is designed to measure semi-inclusive spectra of charged hadron over a wide range of rapidity. It will yield information on particle production, both at central rapidity and in the baryon rich fragmentation region. The physics plans for measurements in the first year of running at RHIC are discussed.

  15. Spin physics at E-704 and RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Underwood, D.G.

    1995-12-31

    Results from the E704 Polarized beam program at Fermilab as well as the future measurements in the RHIC SPIN program are presented. These are in the context of possible spin measurements at HERA. The emphasis is on how to obtain spin dependent gluon and sea quark distributions. There are references for other topics such as twist-3, supersymmetry, and beam polarimeters.

  16. Linear and chromatic optics measurements at RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Aiba, M.; Calaga, R.; Aiba, M.; Tomas, R.; Vanbavinkove, G.

    2010-05-23

    Measurements of chromatic beta-beating were carried out for the first time in the RHIC accelerator during Run 2009. The analysis package developed for the LHC was used to extract the off-momentum optics for injection and top energy. Results from the beam experiments and compassion to the optics model are presented. The primary goal of the RHIC experiments were execute an on-line measurement of the optics using the tools developed for the LHC. Turn-by-turn BPM trajectories (typically 1000 turns) acquired immediately after an external dipole kick are numerically analyzed to determine the optical parameters at the location of the beam position monitors (BPMs). For chromatic optics, a similar analysis, but on a beam with finite momentum offset(s). Each optical measurement typically is calculated from multiple data sets to capture statistical variations and ensure reproducibility. The procedure of measurement and analysis is detailed in ref [1, 2]. Two dedicated experiments were performed at RHIC with protons during Run 2009. The first at injection energy and optics and the other at 250 GeV and squeezed optics. The basic RHIC parameters relevant for the two experiments are listed in Table 1.

  17. Polarized proton beam for eRHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, H.; Meot, F.; Ptitsyn, V.; Roser, T.

    2015-05-03

    RHIC has provided polarized proton collisions from 31 GeV to 255 GeV in the past decade. To preserve polarization through numerous depolarizing resonances through the whole accelerator chain, harmonic orbit correction, partial snakes, horizontal tune jump system and full snakes have been used. In addition, close attentions have been paid to betatron tune control, orbit control and beam line alignment. The polarization of 60% at 255 GeV has been delivered to experiments with 1.8×1011 bunch intensity. For the eRHIC era, the beam brightness has to be maintained to reach the desired luminosity. Since we only have one hadron ring in the eRHIC era, existing spin rotator and snakes can be converted to six snake configuration for one hadron ring. With properly arranged six snakes, the polarization can be maintained at 70% at 250 GeV. This paper summarizes the effort and plan to reach high polarization with small emittance for eRHIC.

  18. Hybrid helical snakes and rotators for RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Courant, E.D.

    1995-06-13

    The spin rotators and Siberian snakes presently envisaged for RHIC utilize helical dipole magnets. The snakes and the rotators each consist of four helices, each with a full twist (360{degrees}) of the field. Here we investigate an alternate layout, namely combinations of helical and pure bending magnet, and show that this may have advantages.

  19. Calculated Volume for the RHIC Magnet Enclosure

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, D. P.

    1994-11-01

    The study of the oxygen deficiency hazard conditions in the RHIC magnet enclosure (RME) or tunnel required that the volume of each sextant of the RME be calculated. The results of a calculation for the total tunnel volume of each sextant are shown here.

  20. MEASUREMENT OF LINEAR COUPLING RESONANCE IN RHIC.

    SciTech Connect

    BAI,M.PILAT,F.SATOGATA,T.TOMAS,R.

    2002-05-12

    Linear coupling is one of the factors that determine beam lifetime in RHIC. The traditional method of measuring the minimum tune separation requires a tune scan and can't be done parasitically or during the acceleration ramp. A new technique of using ac dipoles to measure linear coupling resonance has been developed at RHIC. This method measures the degree of coupling by comparing the amplitude of the horizontal coherent excitation with the amplitude of the vertical coherent excitation if the beam is excited by the vertical AC dipole and vice versa. One advantage of this method is that it can be done without changing tunes from the normal machine working points. In principle, this method can also localize the coupling source by mapping out the coupling driving terms throughout the ring. This is very useful for local decoupling the interaction regions in RHIC. A beam experiment of measuring linear coupling has been performed in RHIC during its 2003 run, and the analysis of the experimental data is discussed in this paper.

  1. First Polarized Proton Collisions at RHIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roser, T.; Ahrens, L.; Alessi, J.; Bai, M.; Beebe-Wang, J.; Brennan, J. M.; Brown, K. A.; Bunce, G.; Cameron, P.; Courant, E. D.; Drees, A.; Fischer, W.; Fliller, R.; Glenn, W.; Huang, H.; Luccio, A. U.; MacKay, W. W.; Makdisi, Y.; Montag, C.; Pilat, F.; Ptitsyn, V.; Satogata, T.; Tepikian, S.; Trbojevic, D.; Tsoupas, N.; van Zeijts, J.; Zelenski, A.; Zeno, K.; Deshpande, A.; Kurita, K.; Krueger, K.; Spinka, H.; Underwood, D.; Syphers, M.; Alekseev, I.; Svirida, D.; Ranjbar, V.; Tojo, J.; Jinnouchi, O.; Okamura, M.; Saito, N.

    2003-05-01

    We successfully injected polarized protons in both RHIC rings and maintained polarization during acceleration up to 100 GeV per ring using two Siberian snakes in each ring. Each snake consists of four helical superconducting dipoles which rotate the polarization by 180° about a horizontal axis. This is the first time that polarized protons have been accelerated to 100 GeV.

  2. RHIC Proton Luminosity and Polarization Improvement

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, S. Y.

    2014-01-17

    The RHIC proton beam polarization can be improved by raising the Booster scraping, which also helps to reduce the RHIC transverse emittance, and therefore to improve the luminosity. By doing this, the beam-beam effect would be enhanced. Currently, the RHIC working point is constrained between 2/3 and 7/10, the 2/3 resonance would affect intensity and luminosity lifetime, and the working point close to 7/10 would enhance polarization decay in store. Run 2013 shows that average polarization decay is merely 1.8% in 8 hours, and most fills have the luminosity lifetime better than 14 hours, which is not a problem. Therefore, even without beam-beam correction, there is room to improve for RHIC polarization and luminosity. The key to push the Booster scraping is to raise the Booster input intensity; for that, two approaches can be used. The first is to extend the LINAC tank 9 pulse width, which has been successfully applied in run 2006. The second is to raise the source temperature, which has been successfully applied in run 2006 and run 2012.

  3. Simulations for preliminary design of a multi-cathode DC electron gun for eRHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Q.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Chang, X.; Skaritka, J.

    2010-05-23

    The proposed electron ion collider, eRHIC, requires a large average polarized electron current of 50 mA, which is more than 20 times higher than the present experimental output of a single, highly polarized electron source, based on cesiated super-lattice GaAs. To meet eRHIC's requirement for current, we designed a multicathode DC electron gun for injection. The twenty-four GaAs cathodes emit electrons in sequence, then are combined on axis by a rotating field (or 'funnelled'). In addition to its ultra-high vacuum requirements, the multicathode DC electron gun will place high demand on the electric field symmetry, the magnetic field shielding, and on preventing arcing. In this paper, we discuss our results from a 3D simulation of the latest model for this gun. The findings will guide the actual design in future. Their preliminary design of a multi-cathode electron source for eRHIC demonstrated tolerable fields and reasonable results in both field and particle simulations.

  4. Better Thermal Insulation in Solar-Array Laminators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burger, D. R.; Knox, J. F.

    1984-01-01

    Glass marbles improve temperature control. Modified vacuum laminator for photovoltaic solar arrays includes thermal insulation made of conventional glass marbles. Marbles serve as insulation for temperature control of lamination process at cure temperatures as high as 350 degrees F. Used to replace original insulation made of asbestos cement.

  5. Feed-through connector couples RF power into vacuum chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grandy, G. L.

    1967-01-01

    Feed-through device connects RF power to an RF coil in a vacuum chamber. The coil and leads are water cooled and vacuum tight seals are provided at the junctions. The device incorporates silver soldered copper tubes, polytetrafluoroethylene electrical insulators, and O-ring vacuum seals.

  6. Supplemental multilayer insulation research facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dempsey, P. J.; Stochl, R. J.

    1995-07-01

    The Supplemental Multilayer Insulation Research Facility (SMIRF) provides a small scale test bed for conducting cryogenic experiments in a vacuum environment. The facility vacuum system is capable of simulating a Space Shuttle launch pressure profile as well as providing a steady space vacuum environment of 1.3 x 10(exp -4) Newton/sq meter (1 x 10(exp -6) torr). Warm side boundary temperatures can be maintained constant between 111 K (200 R) and 361 K (650 R) using a temperature controlled shroud. The shroud can also simulate a typical lunar day-night temperature profile. The test hardware consists of a cryogenic calorimeter supported by the lid of the vacuum chamber. A 0.45 cu meter (120 gallon) vacuum jacketed storage/supply tank is available for conditioning the cryogen prior to use in the calorimeter. The facility was initially designed to evaluate the thermal performance of insulation systems for long-term storage in space. The facility has recently been used to evaluate the performance of various new insulation systems for LH2 and LN2 ground storage dewars.

  7. Supplemental multilayer insulation research facility

    SciTech Connect

    Dempsey, P.J.; Stochl, R.J.

    1996-12-31

    The Supplemental Multilayer Insulation Research Facility (SMIRF) provides a small scale test bed for conducting cryogenic experiments in a vacuum environment. The facility vacuum system is capable of simulating a Space Shuttle launch pressure profile as well as providing a steady space vacuum environment of 1.3{times}10{sup -4} N/m{sup 2}(1 x 10{sup -6} torr). Warm side boundary temperatures can be maintained constant between 111 K(200 R) and 361 K(650 R) using a temperature controlled shroud. The shroud can also simulate a typical lunar day-night temperature profile. The test hardware consists of a cryogenic calorimeter supported by the lid of the vacuum chamber. A 0.45 m{sup 3} (120 gal) vacuum jacketed storage/supply tank is available for conditioning the cryogen prior to use in the calorimeter. The facility was initially designed to evaluate the thermal performance of insulation systems for long-term storage in space. The facility has recently been used to evaluate the performance of various new insulation systems for LH{sub 2} and LN{sub 2} ground storage dewars.

  8. Supplemental multilayer insulation research facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dempsey, P. J.; Stochl, R. J.

    1995-01-01

    The Supplemental Multilayer Insulation Research Facility (SMIRF) provides a small scale test bed for conducting cryogenic experiments in a vacuum environment. The facility vacuum system is capable of simulating a Space Shuttle launch pressure profile as well as providing a steady space vacuum environment of 1.3 x 10(exp -4) Newton/sq meter (1 x 10(exp -6) torr). Warm side boundary temperatures can be maintained constant between 111 K (200 R) and 361 K (650 R) using a temperature controlled shroud. The shroud can also simulate a typical lunar day-night temperature profile. The test hardware consists of a cryogenic calorimeter supported by the lid of the vacuum chamber. A 0.45 cu meter (120 gallon) vacuum jacketed storage/supply tank is available for conditioning the cryogen prior to use in the calorimeter. The facility was initially designed to evaluate the thermal performance of insulation systems for long-term storage in space. The facility has recently been used to evaluate the performance of various new insulation systems for LH2 and LN2 ground storage dewars.

  9. Demonstration of Microsphere Insulation in Cryogenic Vessels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumgartner, R. G.; Myers, E. A.; Fesmire, J. E.; Morris, D. L.; Sokalski, E. R.

    2006-04-01

    While microspheres have been recognized as a legitimate insulation material for decades, actual use in full-scale cryogenic storage tanks has not been demonstrated until now. The performance and life-cycle-cost advantages previously predicted have now been proven. Most bulk cryogenic storage tanks are insulated with either multilayer insulation (MLI) or perlite. Microsphere insulation, consisting of hollow glass bubbles, combines in a single material the desirable properties that other insulations only have individually. The material has high crush strength, low density, is noncombustible, and performs well in soft vacuum. These properties were proven during recent field testing of two 22,700-L (6,000-gallon) liquid nitrogen tanks, one insulated with microsphere insulation and the other with perlite. Normal evaporation rates (NER) for both tanks were monitored with precision test equipment and insulation levels within the tanks were observed through view ports as an indication of insulation compaction. Specific industrial applications were evaluated based on the test results and beneficial properties of microsphere insulation. Over-the-road trailers previously insulated with perlite will benefit not only from the reduced heat leak, but also the reduced mass of microsphere insulation. Economic assessments for microsphere-insulated cryogenic vessels including life-cycle cost are also presented.

  10. VACUUM TRAP

    DOEpatents

    Gordon, H.S.

    1959-09-15

    An improved adsorption vacuum trap for use in vacuum systems was designed. The distinguishing feature is the placement of a plurality of torsionally deformed metallic fins within a vacuum jacket extending from the walls to the central axis so that substantially all gas molecules pass through the jacket will impinge upon the fin surfaces. T fins are heated by direct metallic conduction, thereby ol taining a uniform temperature at the adeorbing surfaces so that essentially all of the condensible impurities from the evacuating gas are removed from the vacuum system.

  11. Electrostatic Modeling of Vacuum Insulator Triple Junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Tully, L K; White, A D; Goerz, D A; Javedani, J B; Houck, T L

    2007-08-13

    A comprehensive matrix of 60 tests was designed to explore the effect of calcium chloride vs. sodium chloride and the ratio R of nitrate concentration over chloride concentration on the repassivation potential of Alloy 22. Tests were conducted using the cyclic potentiodynamic polarization (CPP) technique at 75 C and at 90 C. Results show that at a ratio R of 0.18 and higher nitrate was able to inhibit the crevice corrosion in Alloy 22 induced by chloride. Current results fail to show in a consistent way a different effect on the repassivation potential of Alloy 22 for calcium chloride solutions than for sodium chloride solutions.

  12. Lightweight evacuated multilayer insulation systems for the space shuttle vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barclay, D. L.; Bell, J. E.; Zimmerman, D. K.

    1973-01-01

    The elements in the evacuated multilayer insulation system were investigated, and the major weight contributors for optimization selected. Outgassing tests were conducted on candidate vacuum jacket materials and experiments were conducted to determine the vacuum and structural integrity of selected vacuum jacket configurations. A nondestructive proof test method, applicable to externally pressurized shells, was validated on this program.

  13. Vacuum Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Biltoft, P J

    2004-10-15

    The environmental condition called vacuum is created any time the pressure of a gas is reduced compared to atmospheric pressure. On earth we typically create a vacuum by connecting a pump capable of moving gas to a relatively leak free vessel. Through operation of the gas pump the number of gas molecules per unit volume is decreased within the vessel. As soon as one creates a vacuum natural forces (in this case entropy) work to restore equilibrium pressure; the practical effect of this is that gas molecules attempt to enter the evacuated space by any means possible. It is useful to think of vacuum in terms of a gas at a pressure below atmospheric pressure. In even the best vacuum vessels ever created there are approximately 3,500,000 molecules of gas per cubic meter of volume remaining inside the vessel. The lowest pressure environment known is in interstellar space where there are approximately four molecules of gas per cubic meter. Researchers are currently developing vacuum technology components (pumps, gauges, valves, etc.) using micro electro mechanical systems (MEMS) technology. Miniature vacuum components and systems will open the possibility for significant savings in energy cost and will open the doors to advances in electronics, manufacturing and semiconductor fabrication. In conclusion, an understanding of the basic principles of vacuum technology as presented in this summary is essential for the successful execution of all projects that involve vacuum technology. Using the principles described above, a practitioner of vacuum technology can design a vacuum system that will achieve the project requirements.

  14. Thermophysical investigations of nanotechnological insulation materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lakatos, Ákos

    2017-07-01

    Nowadays, to sufficiently reduce the heat loss through the wall structures with the so-called traditional insulations (polystyrene and fibrous slabs), huge thicknesses (20 - 25 cm) must be applied. In some cases there is no place for their applications e.g.: historical or heritage builfings, since the use of nano-insulation materials (aerogel, vacuum ceramic paints) takes place. They are said to be much more efficient insulations than the above mentioned ones, since they should be used in thinner forms. In this article the thermal insulating capability of solid brick wall covered with a silica-aerogel slab with 1.3 cm, moreover with a vacuum ceramic hollow contained paint with 2 mm thick are investigated. As well as a literature review about the thermal conductivity of nano-technological insulation materials will be given. Comparison of the atomic and thermal diffusion will be also presented.

  15. Development of a Polarized 3He Ion Source for RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Milner, Richard G.

    2013-01-15

    The goal of the project was to design and construct a source of polarized 3He atoms for injection into EBIS. This is the initial step in producing polarized 3He beams in RHIC in collaboration with physicists from Columbia University and Brookhaven National Laboratory. These beams can be used to probe the spin structure of the neutron in the existing RHIC complex as well as to measure precisely the Bjorken Sum Rule at a future eRHIC electron-ion collider.

  16. Heavy Flavor Measurements at RHIC in the Near Future

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Nu

    2006-12-01

    We discuss the recent results on open charm measurements at RHIC. The heavy flavor upgrade program for both PHENIX and STAR experiments are briefly discussed. The completion of the program will yield important information on light flavor thermalization of the partonic matter created in high-energy nuclear collisions at RHIC. A new era of RHIC is ahead of us with the progress of the upgrade program.

  17. Vacuum Virtues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rathey, Allen

    2007-01-01

    Upright vacuums, like cars, vary in quality, features and performance. Like automobiles, some uprights are reliable, others may be problematic, and some become a problem as a result of neglect or improper use. So, how do education institutions make an informed choice and, having done so, ensure that an upright vacuum goes the distance? In this…

  18. Vacuum Virtues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rathey, Allen

    2007-01-01

    Upright vacuums, like cars, vary in quality, features and performance. Like automobiles, some uprights are reliable, others may be problematic, and some become a problem as a result of neglect or improper use. So, how do education institutions make an informed choice and, having done so, ensure that an upright vacuum goes the distance? In this…

  19. Vacuum mechatronics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hackwood, Susan; Belinski, Steven E.; Beni, Gerardo

    1989-01-01

    The discipline of vacuum mechatronics is defined as the design and development of vacuum-compatible computer-controlled mechanisms for manipulating, sensing and testing in a vacuum environment. The importance of vacuum mechatronics is growing with an increased application of vacuum in space studies and in manufacturing for material processing, medicine, microelectronics, emission studies, lyophylisation, freeze drying and packaging. The quickly developing field of vacuum mechatronics will also be the driving force for the realization of an advanced era of totally enclosed clean manufacturing cells. High technology manufacturing has increasingly demanding requirements for precision manipulation, in situ process monitoring and contamination-free environments. To remove the contamination problems associated with human workers, the tendency in many manufacturing processes is to move towards total automation. This will become a requirement in the near future for e.g., microelectronics manufacturing. Automation in ultra-clean manufacturing environments is evolving into the concept of self-contained and fully enclosed manufacturing. A Self Contained Automated Robotic Factory (SCARF) is being developed as a flexible research facility for totally enclosed manufacturing. The construction and successful operation of a SCARF will provide a novel, flexible, self-contained, clean, vacuum manufacturing environment. SCARF also requires very high reliability and intelligent control. The trends in vacuum mechatronics and some of the key research issues are reviewed.

  20. Cellulose Insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    Fire retardant cellulose insulation is produced by shredding old newspapers and treating them with a combination of chemicals. Insulating material is blown into walls and attics to form a fiber layer which blocks the flow of air. All-Weather Insulation's founders asked NASA/UK-TAP to help. They wanted to know what chemicals added to newspaper would produce an insulating material capable of meeting federal specifications. TAP researched the query and furnished extensive information. The information contributed to successful development of the product and helped launch a small business enterprise which is now growing rapidly.

  1. Gravitational vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigoryan, L. S.; Saakyan, G. S.

    1984-09-01

    The existence of a special gravitational vacuum is considered in this paper. A phenomenological method differing from the traditional Einsteinian formalization is utilized. Vacuum, metric and matter form a complex determined by field equations and at great distances from gravitational masses vacuum effects are small but could be large in powerful fields. Singularities and black holes justify the approach as well as the Ambartsmyan theory concerning the existence of supermassive and superdense prestallar bodies that then disintegrate. A theory for these superdense bodies is developed involving gravitational field equations that describe the vacuum by an energy momentum tensor and define the field and mass distribution. Computations based on the theory for gravitational radii with incompressible liquid models adequately reflecting real conditions indicate that a gravitational vacuum could have considerable effects on superdense stars and could have radical effects for very large masses.

  2. Conceptual design of a quadrupole magnet for eRHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Witte, H.; Berg, J. S.

    2015-05-03

    eRHIC is a proposed upgrade to the existing Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) hadron facility at Brookhaven National Laboratory, which would allow collisions of up to 21 GeV polarized electrons with a variety of species from the existing RHIC accelerator. eRHIC employs an Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) and an FFAG lattice for the arcs. The arcs require open-midplane quadrupole magnets of up to 30 T/m gradient of good field quality. In this paper we explore initial quadrupole magnet design concepts based on permanent magnetic material which allow to modify the gradient during operation.

  3. IBS suppression lattice in RHIC: theory and experimental verification

    SciTech Connect

    Fedotov,A.V.; Bai, M.; Bruno, D.; Cameron, P.; Connolly, R.; Cupolo, J.; Della Penna, A.; Drees, A.; Fischer, W.; Ganetis, G.; Hoff, L.; Litvinenko, V.N.; Louie, W.; Luo, Y.; Malitsky, N.; Marr, G.; Marusic, A.; Montag, C.; Ptitsyn, V.; Roser, T.; Satogata, T.; Tepikian, S.; Trbojevic, D.; Tsoupas, N.

    2008-08-25

    Intra-beam scattering (IBS) is the limiting factor of the luminosity lifetime for Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) operation with heavy ions. Over the last few years the process of IBS was carefully studied in RHIC with dedicated IBS measurements and their comparison with the theoretical models. A new lattice was recently designed and implemented in RHIC to suppress transverse IBS growth, which lowered the average arc dispersion by about 20% [1]. This lattice became operational during RHIC Run-8. We review the IBS suppression mechanism, IBS measurements before and after the lattice change, and comparisons with predictions.

  4. ANALYSIS OF AVAILABILITY AND RELIABILITY IN RHIC OPERATIONS.

    SciTech Connect

    PILAT, F.; INGRASSIA, P.; MICHNOFF, R.

    2006-06-26

    RHIC has been successfully operated for 5 years as a collider for different species, ranging from heavy ions including gold and copper, to polarized protons. We present a critical analysis of reliability data for RHIC that not only identifies the principal factors limiting availability but also evaluates critical choices at design times and assess their impact on present machine performance. RHIC availability data are typical when compared to similar high-energy colliders. The critical analysis of operations data is the basis for studies and plans to improve RHIC machine availability beyond the 50-60% typical of high-energy colliders.

  5. Analysis of RHIC beam dump pre-fires

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, W.; Ahrens, L.; Fischer, W.; Hahn, H.; Mi, J.; Sandberg, J.; Tan, Y.

    2011-03-28

    It has been speculated that the beam may cause instability of the RHIC Beam Abort Kickers. In this study, we explore the available data of past beam operations, the device history of key modulator components, and the radiation patterns to examine the correlations. The RHIC beam abort kicker system was designed and built in the 90's. Over last decade, we have made many improvements to bring the RHIC beam abort kicker system to a stable operational state. However, the challenge continues. We present the analysis of the pre-fire, an unrequested discharge of kicker, issues which relates to the RHIC machine safety and operational stability.

  6. SUCCESSFUL BUNCHED BEAM STOCHASTIC COOLING IN RHIC.

    SciTech Connect

    BRENNAN, J.M.; BLASKIEWICZ, M.; SEVERINO, F.

    2006-06-23

    We report on a successful test of bunch-beam stochastic cooling in RHIC at 100 GeV. The cooling system is designed for heavy ions but was tested in the recent RHIC run which operated only with polarized protons. To make an analog of the ion beam a special bunch was prepared with very low intensity. This bunch had {approx}1.5 x 10{sup 9} protons, while the other 100 bunches contained {approx}1.2 x 10{sup 11} protons each. With this bunch a cooling time on the order 1 hour was observed through shortening of the bunch length and increase in the peak bunch current, together with a narrowing of the spectral line width of the Scottky power at 4 GHz. The low level signal processing electronics and the isolated-frequency kicker cavities are described.

  7. Ferrite HOM Absorber for the RHIC ERL

    SciTech Connect

    Hahn,H.; Choi, E.M.; Hammons, L.

    2008-10-01

    A superconducting Energy Recovery Linac is under construction at Brookhaven National Laboratory to serve as test bed for RHIC upgrades. The damping of higher-order modes in the superconducting five-cell cavity for the Energy-Recovery linac at RHIC is performed exclusively by two ferrite absorbers. The ferrite properties have been measured in ferrite-loaded pill box cavities resulting in the permeability values given by a first-order Debye model for the tiled absorber structure and an equivalent permeability value for computer simulations with solid ring dampers. Measured and simulated results for the higher-order modes in the prototype copper cavity are discussed. First room-temperature measurements of the finished niobium cavity are presented which confirm the effective damping of higher-order modes in the ERL. by the ferrite absorbers.

  8. OBSERVATIONS OF SNAKE RESONANCE IN RHIC.

    SciTech Connect

    BAI, M.; HUANG, H.; MACKAY, W.W.; PITISYN, V.; ROSER, T.; TEPIKIAN, S.

    2005-05-16

    Siberian snakes now become essential in the polarized proton acceleration. With proper configuration of Siberian snakes, the spin precession tune of the beam becomes 1/2 which avoids all the spin depolarizing resonance. However, the enhancement of the perturbations on the spin motion can still occur when the spin precession tune is near some low order fractional numbers, called snake resonances, and. the beam can be depolarized when passing through the resonance. The snake resonances have been confirmed in the spin tracking calculations, and observed in RHIC with polarized proton beam. Equipped with two full Siberian snakes in each ring, RHIC provides us a perfect facility for snake resonance studies. This paper presents latest experimental results. New insights are also discussed.

  9. Beam-beam experience in RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Montag, C.; Heimerle, M.

    2010-07-29

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider RHIC consists of two superconducting storage rings that intersect at six locations around the ring circumference. Two of these interaction regions are currently equipped with experiment detectors, namely STAR at the “6 o’clock” interaction point (IP), and PHENIX at “8 o’clock”. The two beams collide only at these two interaction regions, while they are vertically separated by typically 6-10mm at the other IPs. Together with the separator dipoles located at roughly 10m from the IP, and a distance between bunches of 30m, this avoids any parasitic beam-beam collisions. RHIC is capable of colliding any ion species at magnetic rigidities up to B × r = 830T × m , corresponding to 250 GeV for proton beams, or 100 GeV/n for fully stripped gold ions.

  10. Studies of eRHIC coherent instabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Wang G.; Blaskiewicz, M.

    2012-05-20

    In the presence of an effective coherent electron cooling, the rms ion bunch length in eRHIC will be kept at 8.3 cm for 250 GeV protons, which is much shorter than the current RHIC 45 cm rms bunch length. Together with the increased bunch intensity and total bunch number, coherent instabilities could be a potential limitation for achieving desired machine performance. In this study, we use the tracking code TRANFT to find thresholds and growth rates for single bunch and coupled bunch instabilities with linear chromaticity and amplitude dependent tune shift taken into account. Based on the simulation results, requirements of machine parameters such as rf voltage, linear chromaticity, and tune dependence of betatron amplitude are specified to suppress these instabilities.

  11. RHIC Au beam in Run 2014

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, S. Y.

    2014-09-15

    Au beam at the RHIC ramp in run 2014 is reviewed together with the run 2011 and run 2012. Observed bunch length and longitudinal emittance are compared with the IBS simulations. The IBS growth rate of the longitudinal emittance in run 2014 is similar to run 2011, and both are larger than run 2012. This is explained by the large transverse emittance at high intensity observed in run 2012, but not in run 2014. The big improvement of the AGS ramping in run 2014 might be related to this change. The importance of the injector intensity improvement in run 2014 is emphasized, which gives rise to the initial luminosity improvement of 50% in run 2014, compared with the previous Au-Au run 2011. In addition, a modified IBS model, which is calibrated using the RHIC Au runs from 9.8 GeV/n to 100 GeV/n, is presented and used in the study.

  12. STOCHASTIC COOLING STUDIES IN RHIC, II.

    SciTech Connect

    BLASKIEWICZ,M.BRENNAN,J.M.WEI,J.

    2004-07-05

    Intra-beam scattering (IBS) is unavoidable for highly charged heavy ions and causes emittance growth during the store for collision physics. A longitudinal bunched beam stochastic cooling system will confine the bunch within the RF bucket increasing the useful luminosity. We describe a series of measurements in RHIC that have been used to verify our understanding of the relevant physics and the cooling system architecture that is being prototyped.

  13. PRESSURE OSCILLATION IN RHIC CRYOGENIC SYSTEM.

    SciTech Connect

    JIA,L.MONTAG,C.TALLERICO,T.HIRZEL,W.NICOLETTI,A.

    2003-09-22

    HORIZONTAL BEAM VIBRATION AROUND 10HZ IN THE RELATIVISTIC HEAVY ION COLLIDER (RHIC) HAVE BEEN IDENTIFIED AND THE POSSIBLE SOURCES TO CAUSE THIS VIBRATION HAVE BEEN INVESTIGATED. TO DETERMINE THE HETIUM PRESSURE OSCILLATIONS AS A POSSIBLE PRIMARY VIBRATION SOURCE, HELIUM PRESSURE MEASUREMENTS WERE CARRIED OUT IN THE FIVE CRYOGENIC TRANSFER LINES AT 2 VALVE BOXES AND 6 LEAD PORTS AT 2 TRIPLET CRYOSTAT FOR BOTH MAGNET RINGS. ADDITIONALLY, COLD MA...

  14. eRHIC ERL modeling in Zgoubi

    SciTech Connect

    Meot, F.; Brooks, S.; Hao, Y.; Jing, Y.; Ptitsyn, V.; Trbojevic, D.; Tsoupas, N.

    2016-01-01

    This Note discusses on-going work regarding the modeling of eRHIC ERL in the ray-tracing code Zgoubi. The various pieces of the recirculator puzzle, their optical properties and their assemblage into an operational input data file in are addressed. The Note reports in particular on preparatory stages toward extensive end-to-end 6D polarized electron bunch transport simulations, which yield methods, as well a series of preliminary qualitative outcomes, discussed as well.

  15. RHIC spin program. Revision 07/97

    SciTech Connect

    Bunce, G.

    1997-07-01

    Colliding beams of high energy polarized protons at RHIC is an excellent way to probe the polarization of gluons, {anti u} and {anti d} quarks in a polarized proton. RHIC is the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider being built now at Brookhaven in the ISABELLE tunnel. It is designed to collide gold ions on gold ions at 100 GeV/ nucleon. Its goal is to discover the quark-gluon plasma, and the first collisions are expected in March, 1999. RHIC will also make an ideal polarized proton collider with high luminosity and 250 GeV x 250 GeV collisions. The RHIC spin physics program is: (1) Use well-understood perturbative QCD probes to study non-perturbative confining dynamics in QCD. The author will measure gluon and sea quark polarization in a polarized proton, and polarization of quarks in a transversely polarized proton. (2) Look for additional surprises using the first high energy polarized proton colliders. The author will look for the expected maximal parity violation in W and Z boson production, search for parity violation in other processes, and test parton models with spin. This lecture is organized around a few of the key ideas: Siberian Snakes -- What are they? High energy proton-proton collisions are scatters of quarks and leptons. At high x, a polarized proton beam is a beam of polarized u quarks. Quark and gluon collisions are very sensitive to spin. The author discusses two reactions: how direct photon production measures gluon polarization, and how W{sup {minus}} boson production measures u and {anti d} quark polarization.

  16. OPERATION OF THE RHIC RF SYSTEMS.

    SciTech Connect

    BRENNAN,J.M.; BLASKIEWICZ,M.; DELONG,J.; FISCHER,W.; HAYES,T.; SMITH,K.S.; ZALTSMAN,A.

    2003-05-12

    Operational aspects of the RHIC rf system are described. To date three different beam combinations have been collided for physics production: gold-gold, deuteron-gold, and proton-proton(polarized). To facilitate this flexibility the rf systems of the two rings are independent and self-sufficient. Techniques to cope with problems such as, injection/capture, beam loading, bunch shortening, and rf noise have evolved and are explained.

  17. The RHIC project -- Status and plans

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, M.

    1995-05-01

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) Project is in the 4th year of an estimated 8 year construction cycle at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The accelerator complex is designed to collide a variety of ion species at center-of-mass energies up to 100 GeV/nucleon in a two ring superconducting structure. Industrial magnet production is in progress as well as the other accelerator systems. This presentation will outline the status of the construction effort, near and long term goals.

  18. Building the RHIC tracking lattice model

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, Y.; Fischer, W.; Tepikian, S.

    2010-01-27

    In this note we outline the procedure to build a realistic lattice model for the RHIC beam-beam tracking simulation. We will install multipole field errors in the arc main dipoles, arc main quadrupols and interaction region magnets (DX, D0, and triplets) and introduce a residual closed orbit, tune ripples, and physical apertures in the tracking lattice model. Nonlinearities such as local IR multipoles, second order chromaticies and third order resonance driving terms are also corrected before tracking.

  19. INTRA - BEAM SCATTERING MEASUREMENTS IN RHIC.

    SciTech Connect

    FISCHER,W.; CONNOLLY,R.; TEPIKIAN,S.; VAN ZEIJTS,J.; ZENO,K.

    2002-06-02

    RHIC in gold operation shows significant intra-beam scattering due to the high charge state of the stored ions. Intra-beam scattering leads to longitudinal and transverse emittance growth. The longitudinal emittance growth causes debunching in operation; the transverse emittance growth contributes to the reduction of the beam and luminosity lifetimes. The longitudinal and transverse beam growth was measured. Beam growth measurement are compared with computations.

  20. RHIC polarized proton performance in run-8.

    SciTech Connect

    Montag,C.; Abreu, N.; Ahrens, L.; Bai, M.; Barton, D.; et al.

    2008-06-23

    During Run-8, the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) provided collisions of spin-polarized proton beams at two interaction regions. Helical spin rotators at these two interaction regions were used to control the spin orientation of both beams at the collision points. Physics data were taken with different orientations of the beam polarization. We present recent developments and improvements as well as the luminosity and polarization performance achieved during Run-8.

  1. The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider, Rhic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foelsche, H.; Hahn, H.; Harrison, M.; Ozaki, S.; Rhoades-Brown, M. J.

    1993-03-01

    The scope of the first relativistic energy heavy ion collider, RHIC, is discussed. Particular attention is paid to those novel features of a heavy ion collider that are distinct from the more usual proton machines. These features are derived from the experimental requirements of operation with a variety of ion species over a wide energy range as well as the increased demands on available ion sources and injector complexes. Storage of heavy ion beams for many hours is severely impacted by intrabeam scattering.

  2. ELECTRON CLOUD OBSERVATIONS AND CURES IN RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    FISCHER,W.; BLASKIEWICZ, M.; HUANG, H.; HSEUH, H.C.; ET AL.

    2007-06-25

    Since 2001 RHIC has experienced electron cloud effects, which have limited the beam intensity. These include dynamic pressure rises - including pressure instabilities, tune shifts, a reduction of the stability threshold for bunches crossing the transition energy, and possibly incoherent emittance growth. We summarize the main observations in operation and dedicated experiments, as well as countermeasures including baking, NEG coated warm beam pipes, solenoids, bunch patterns, anti-grazing rings, pre-pumped cold beam pipes, scrubbing, and operation with long bunches.

  3. Estimation of collective instabilities in RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    MacKay, W.W.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Deng, D.; Mane, V.; Peggs, S.; Ratti, A.; Rose, J.; Shea, T.J.; Wei, J.

    1995-05-01

    The authors have estimated the broadband impedance in RHIC to be {vert_bar}Z/n{vert_bar} < 1.2 {Omega} for frequencies above 100 MHz. The Z/n threshold is set for Au{sup +79} ions at transition with an estimated 10% growth in emittance for Z/n = 1.5 {Omega}. They summarize the sources of broad and narrow band impedances in RHIC and investigate the multibunch instability limits throughout the machine cycle. The largest contribution to the broadband impedance comes from the abort and injection kickers. Since RHIC is designed to accelerate fully stripped ions from H{sup +} up to Au{sup +79} they give results for both protons and gold ions; other ions should give results somewhere between these two extremes. All ion species are expected to be stable during storage. At lower energies damping systems and chromaticity corrections will limit any growth to acceptable levels during the short time it takes to inject and accelerate the beams.

  4. RHIC low-energy challenges and plans

    SciTech Connect

    Satogata,T.; Ahrens, L.; Bai, M.; Brennan, J.M.; Bruno, D.; Butler, J.; Drees, A.; Fedotov, A.; Fischer, W.; Harvey, M.; Hayes, T.; Jappe, W.; Lee, R.C.; MacKay, W.W.; Malitsky, N.; Marr, G.; Michnoff, R.; Oerter, B.; Pozdeyev, E.; Roser, T.; Schoefer, V.; Severino, F.; Smith, K.; Tepikian, S.; Tsoupas, N.

    2009-06-08

    Future Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) runs, including a portion of FY10 heavy ion operations, will explore collisions at center of mass energies of 5-50 GeV/n (GeV/nucleon). Operations at these energies is motivated by the search for a possible QCD phase transition critical point. The lowest end of this energy range is nearly a factor of four below the nominal RHIC injection center of mass energy {radical}s = 19.6 GeV/n. There are several operational challenges in the RHIC low-energy regime, including harmonic number changes, small longitudinal acceptance, lowered magnet field quality, nonlinear orbit control, and luminosity monitoring. We report on the experience with these challenges during beam tests with gold beams in March 2008. This includes first operations at {radical}s = 9.18 GeV/n, first beam experience at {radical}s = 5 GeV/n, and luminosity projections for near-term operations.

  5. RHIC beam loss monitor system design

    SciTech Connect

    Witkover, R.; Zitvogel, E.; Michnoff, R.

    1997-07-01

    The Beam Loss Monitor (BLM) System is designed to prevent the quenching of RHIC magnets due to beam loss, provide quantitative loss data, and the loss history in the event of a beam abort. The system uses 400 ion chambers of a modified Tevatron design. To satisfy fast (single turn) and slow (100 msec) loss beam criteria and provide sensitivity for studies measurements, a range of over 8 decades is needed. An RC pre-integrator reduces the dynamic range for a low current amplifier. This is digitized for data logging. The output is also applied to an analog multiplier which compensates the energy dependence, extending the range of the abort comparators. High and low pass filters separate the signal to dual comparators with independent programmable trip levels. Up to 64 channels, on 8 VME boards, are controlled by a micro-controller based VME module, decoupling it from the front-end computer (FEC) for real-time operation. Results with the detectors in the RHIC Sextant Test and the electronics in the AGS-to-RHIC (AtR) transfer line will be presented.

  6. RHIC spin flipper AC dipole controller

    SciTech Connect

    Oddo, P.; Bai, M.; Dawson, C.; Gassner, D.; Harvey, M.; Hayes, T.; Mernick, K.; Minty, M.; Roser, T.; Severino, F.; Smith, K.

    2011-03-28

    The RHIC Spin Flipper's five high-Q AC dipoles which are driven by a swept frequency waveform require precise control of phase and amplitude during the sweep. This control is achieved using FPGA based feedback controllers. Multiple feedback loops are used to and dynamically tune the magnets. The current implementation and results will be presented. Work on a new spin flipper for RHIC (Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider) incorporating multiple dynamically tuned high-Q AC-dipoles has been developed for RHIC spin-physics experiments. A spin flipper is needed to cancel systematic errors by reversing the spin direction of the two colliding beams multiple times during a store. The spin flipper system consists of four DC-dipole magnets (spin rotators) and five AC-dipole magnets. Multiple AC-dipoles are needed to localize the driven coherent betatron oscillation inside the spin flipper. Operationally the AC-dipoles form two swept frequency bumps that minimize the effect of the AC-dipole dipoles outside of the spin flipper. Both AC bumps operate at the same frequency, but are phase shifted from each other. The AC-dipoles therefore require precise control over amplitude and phase making the implementation of the AC-dipole controller the central challenge.

  7. Heavy flavor in heavy-ion collisions at RHIC and RHIC II

    SciTech Connect

    Frawley, A D; Ullrich, T; Vogt, R

    2008-03-30

    In the initial years of operation, experiments at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) have identified a new form of matter formed in nuclei-nuclei collisions at energy densities more than 100 times that of a cold atomic nucleus. Measurements and comparison with relativistic hydrodynamic models indicate that the matter thermalizes in an unexpectedly short time, has an energy density at least 15 times larger than needed for color deconfinement, has a temperature about twice the critical temperature predicted by lattice QCD, and appears to exhibit collective motion with ideal hydrodynamic properties--a 'perfect liquid' that appears to flow with a near-zero viscosity to entropy ratio--lower than any previously observed fluid and perhaps close to a universal lower bound. However, a fundamental understanding of the medium seen in heavy-ion collisions at RHIC does not yet exist. The most important scientific challenge for the field in the next decade is the quantitative exploration of the new state of nuclear matter. That will require new data that will, in turn, require enhanced capabilities of the RHIC detectors and accelerator. In this report we discuss the scientific opportunities for an upgraded RHIC facility --RHIC II--in conjunction with improved capabilities of the two large RHIC detectors, PHENIX and STAR. We focus solely on heavy flavor probes. Their production rates are calculable using the well-established techniques of perturbative QCD and their sizable interactions with the hot QCD medium provide unique and sensitive measurements of its crucial properties making them one of the key diagnostic tools available to us.

  8. Silicon crystal growth in vacuum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khattak, C. P.; Schmid, F.

    1982-01-01

    The most developed process for silicon crystal growth is the Czochralski (CZ) method which was in production for over two decades. In an effort to reduce cost of single crystal silicon for photovoltaic applications, a directional solidification technique, Heat Exchanger Method (HEM), was adapted. Materials used in HEM and CZ furnaces are quite similar (heaters, crucibles, insulation, etc.). To eliminate the cost of high purity argon, it was intended to use vacuum operation in HEM. Two of the major problems encountered in vacuum processing of silicon are crucible decomposition and silicon carbide formation in the melt.

  9. THE RHIC INJECTOR ACCELERATORS CONFIGURATIONS, AND PERFORMANCE FOR THE RHIC 2003 AU - D PHYSICS RUN.

    SciTech Connect

    Ahrens, L; Benjamin, J; Blaskiewicz, M; Brennan, J M; Brown, K A; Carlson, K A; Delong, J; D'Ottavio, T; Frak, B; Gardner, C J; Glenn, J W; Harvey, M; Hayes, T; Hseuh, H- C; Ingrassia, P; Lowenstein, D; Mackay, W; Marr, G; Morris, J; Roser, T; Satogata, T; Smith, G; Smith, K S; Steski, D; Tsoupas, N; Thieberger, P; Zeno, K; Zhang, S Y

    2003-05-12

    The RHIC 2003 Physics Run [1] required collisions between gold ions and deuterons. The injector necessarily had to deliver adequate quality (transverse and longitudinal emittance) and quantity of both species. For gold this was a continuing evolution from past work [2]. For deuterons it was new territory. For the filling of the RHIC the injector not only had to deliver quality beams but also had to switch between these species quickly. This paper details the collider requirements and our success in meeting these. Some details of the configurations employed are given.

  10. PROCEEDINGS OF RIKEN BNL RESEARCH CENTER WORKSHOP, VOLUME 57, HIGH PT PHYSICS AT RHIC, DECEMBER 2-6, 2003

    SciTech Connect

    Kretzer, Stefan; Venugopalan, Raju; Vogelsang, Werner

    2004-02-18

    The AuAu, dAu, and pp collision modes of the RHIC collider at BNL have led to the publication of exciting high p{perpendicular} particle production data. There have also been two physics runs with polarized protons, and preliminary results on the double-spin asymmetry for pion production had been presented very recently. The ontological questions behind these measurements are fascinating: Did RHIC collisions create a Quark-Gluon-Plasma phase and did they verify the Color Glass Condensate as the high energy limit of QCD? Will the Spin Crisis finally be resolved in terms of gluon polarization and what new surprises are we yet to meet for Transverse Spin? Phenomena related to sub-microscopic questions as important as these call for interpretations that are footed in solid theory. At large p{perpendicular}, perturbative concepts are legitimately expected to provide useful approaches. The corresponding hard parton dynamics are, in several ways, key to unraveling the initial or final state and collisional phase of hard scattering events in vacuum as well as in hot or cold nuclear matter. Before the advent of RHIC data, a RIKEN-BNL workshop had been held at BNL in March 1999 on ''Hard Parton Physics in High Energy Nuclear Collisions''. The 2003 workshop on ''High p{perpendicular} Physics at RHIC'' was a logical continuation of this previous workshop. It gave the opportunity to revisit the 1999 expectations in the light of what has been found in the meantime and, at the same time, to critically discuss the underlying theoretical concepts. We brought together theorists who have done seminal work on the foundations of parton phenomenology in field theory, with theorists and experimentalists who are presently working on RHIC phenomenology. The participants were both from a high-energy physics and nuclear physics background and it remains only to be said here that this chemistry worked perfectly and the workshop was a great success.

  11. Vacuum System Performance for the First Sextant Test of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, R.; Hseuh, H. C.; Pate, D.; Smart, L.; Todd, R.; Weiss, D.

    1997-10-14

    One of the major milestones during the construction of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) is the completion and successful testing of the first one sixth of the ring. This report summarizes the performance of the vacuum systems as it relates to the First Sextant Test (FST), and the design changes which precipitated.

  12. Design Tool for Cryogenic Thermal Insulation Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Demko, Jonathan A; Fesmire, J. E.; Augustynowicz, S. D.

    2008-01-01

    Thermal isolation of low-temperature systems from ambient environments is a constant issue faced by practitioners of cryogenics. For energy-efficient systems and processes to be realized, thermal insulation must be considered as an integrated system, not merely an add-on element. A design tool to determine the performance of insulation systems for comparative trade-off studies of different available material options was developed. The approach is to apply thermal analysis to standard shapes (plane walls, cylinders, spheres) that are relatively simple to characterize with a one-dimensional analytical or numerical model. The user describes the system hot and cold boundary geometry and the operating environment. Basic outputs such as heat load and temperature profiles are determined. The user can select from a built-in insulation material database or input user defined materials. Existing information has been combined with the new experimental thermal conductivity data produced by the Cryogenics Test Laboratory for cryogenic and vacuum environments, including high vacuum, soft vacuum, and no vacuum. Materials in the design tool include multilayer insulation, aerogel blankets, aerogel bulk-fill, foams, powders, composites, and other insulation system constructions. A comparison of the design tool to a specific composite thermal insulation system is given.

  13. Composite aerogel insulation for cryogenic liquid storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kyeongho, Kim; Hyungmook, Kang; Soojin, Shin; In Hwan, Oh; Changhee, Son; Hyung, Cho Yun; Yongchan, Kim; Sarng Woo, Karng

    2017-02-01

    High porosity materials such as aerogel known as a good insulator in a vacuum range (10-3 ∼ 1 Torr) was widely used to storage and to transport cryogenic fluids. It is necessary to be investigated the performance of aerogel insulations for cryogenic liquid storage in soft vacuum range to atmospheric pressure. A one-dimensional insulating experimental apparatus was designed and fabricated to consist of a cold mass tank, a heat absorber and an annular vacuum space with 5-layer (each 10 mm thickness) of the aerogel insulation materials. Aerogel blanket for cryogenic (used maximum temperature is 400K), aerogel blanket for normal temperature (used maximum temperature is 923K), and combination of the two kinds of aerogel blankets were 5-layer laminated between the cryogenic liquid wall and the ambient wall in vacuum space. Also, 1-D effective thermal conductivities of the insulation materials were evaluated by measuring boil-off rate from liquid nitrogen and liquid argon. In this study, the effective thermal conductivities and the temperature-thickness profiles of the two kinds of insulators and the layered combination of the two different aerogel blankets were presented.

  14. RHIC low energy beam loss projections

    SciTech Connect

    Satogata,T.

    2009-08-01

    For RHIC low-energy operations, we plan to collide Au beams with energies of E = 2:5-10 GeV/u in RHIC. Beams are injected into collision optics, and RHIC runs as a storage ring with no acceleration. At these low energies, observed beam lifetimes are minutes, with measured beam lifetimes of 3.5 min (fast) and 50 min (slow) at E=4.6 GeV/u in the March 2008 test run. With these lifetimes we can operate RHIC as a storage ring to produce reasonable integrated luminosity. This note estimates beam losses and collimator/dump energy deposition in normal injection modes of low energy operation. The main question is whether a normal injection run is feasible for an FY10 10-15 week operations run from a radiation safety perspective. A peripheral question is whether continuous injection operations is feasible from a radiation safety perspective. In continuous injection mode, we fill both rings, then continuously extract and reinject the oldest bunches that have suffered the most beam loss to increase the overall integrated luminosity. We expect to gain a factor of 2-3 in integrated luminosity from continuous injection at lowest energies if implemented[1]. Continuous injection is feasible by FY11 from an engineering perspective given enough effort, but the required extra safety controls and hardware dose risk make it unappealing for the projected luminosity improvement. Low-energy electron cooling will reduce beam losses by at least an order of magnitude vs normal low-energy operations, but low energy cooling is only feasible in the FY13 timescale and therefore beyond the scope of this note. For normal injection low energy estimates we assume the following: (1) RHIC beam total energies are E=2.5-10 GeV/u. (Continuous injection mode is probably unnecessary above total energies of E=7-8 GeV/u.); (2) RHIC operates only as a storage ring, with no acceleration; (3) 110 bunches of about 0.5-1.0 x 10{sup 9} initial bunch intensities (50-100% injection efficiency, likely conservative

  15. Experimental effects of orbit on polarization loss in RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Ranjbar V.; Bai, M.; Huang, H.; Marusic, A.; Ptitsyn, V.; Minty, M.

    2012-05-20

    We are performing several experiments during the RHIC ramp to better understand the impact of orbit errors on the polarization at our current working point. These will be conducted by exciting specified orbit harmonics during the final two large intrinsic resonance crossing in RHIC during the 250 GeV polarized proton ramp. The resultant polarization response will then be measured.

  16. Transfer of a polarized proton beam from AGS to RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Tsoupas, N.; Roser, T.; Syphers, M.; Luccio, A.; Underwood, D.

    1997-07-01

    As part of the RHIC project, the RHIC machine will also be able to accelerate polarized proton beam bunches. The bunches will be extracted from the AGS machine, with kinetic energy T = 25 GeV, and transferred into RHIC via the AtR transfer line. When the RHIC machine accelerates polarized protons, it will operate with two full snakes, which define the stable spin direction of a polarized proton beam circulating in each ring, along the vertical. Therefore a polarized proton beam should be injected into the RHIC machine with the stable spin direction along the vertical in order to match that of the RHIC machine. The layout of the dipole magnets of the AtR line creates a dependence, on the injection energy, of the stable spin direction of a polarized proton beam injected into the RHIC machine. In this paper, the study of the stable spin direction (at the RHIC injection point) of a polarized proton beam as a function of the injection energy is presented. A modification of the AtR transfer line, which eliminates this energy dependence (within the range of proton injection energies) of the stable spin direction is also presented.

  17. An experiment to study strong electromagnetic fields at RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Fatyga, M. ); Norbury, J.W. . Dept. of Physics)

    1990-01-01

    We present a description of an experiment which can be used to search for effects of strong electromagnetic fields on the production of e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} pairs in the elastic scattering of two heavy ions at RHIC. A very brief discussion of other possible studies of electromagnetic phenomena at RHIC is also presented.

  18. Measurements of strangeness production in the STAR experiment at RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, W.K.

    1995-07-15

    Simulations of the ability of the STAR (Solenoidal Tracker at RHIC) detector to measure strangeness production in central Au+Au collisions at RHIC are presented. Emphasis is placed on the reconstruction of short lived particles using a high resolution inner tracker. The prospects for performing neutral kaon interferometry are discussed. Simulation results for measurements of strange and multi-strange baryons are presented.

  19. OVERVIEW AND STATUS OF THE STAR DETECTOR AT RHIC.

    SciTech Connect

    CHRISTIE,W.B. FOR THE STAR COLLABORATION

    1999-01-09

    Presented here is the current status of the STAR Detector. STAR is one of the four detectors being constructed at the RHIC collider facility. The STAR detector is scheduled to have its first engineering run with the RHIC beams about six months from the date of this conference. The STAR project is on schedule and expects to recomplete on time.

  20. Integrated Multilayer Insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dye, Scott

    2009-01-01

    Integrated multilayer insulation (IMLI) is being developed as an improved alternative to conventional multilayer insulation (MLI), which is more than 50 years old. A typical conventional MLI blanket comprises between 10 and 120 metallized polymer films separated by polyester nets. MLI is the best thermal- insulation material for use in a vacuum, and is the insulation material of choice for spacecraft and cryogenic systems. However, conventional MLI has several disadvantages: It is difficult or impossible to maintain the desired value of gap distance between the film layers (and consequently, it is difficult or impossible to ensure consistent performance), and fabrication and installation are labor-intensive and difficult. The development of IMLI is intended to overcome these disadvantages to some extent and to offer some additional advantages over conventional MLI. The main difference between IMLI and conventional MLI lies in the method of maintaining the gaps between the film layers. In IMLI, the film layers are separated by what its developers call a micro-molded discrete matrix, which can be loosely characterized as consisting of arrays of highly engineered, small, lightweight, polymer (typically, thermoplastic) frames attached to, and placed between, the film layers. The term "micro-molded" refers to both the smallness of the frames and the fact that they are fabricated in a process that forms precise small features, described below, that are essential to attainment of the desired properties. The term "discrete" refers to the nature of the matrix as consisting of separate frames, in contradistinction to a unitary frame spanning entire volume of an insulation blanket.

  1. Insulation Test Cryostat with Lift Mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fesmire, James E. (Inventor); Dokos, Adam G. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A multi-purpose, cylindrical thermal insulation test apparatus is used for testing insulation materials and systems of materials using a liquid boil-off calorimeter system for absolute measurement of the effective thermal conductivity (k-value) and heat flux of a specimen material at a fixed environmental condition (cold-side temperature, warm-side temperature, vacuum pressure level, and residual gas composition). An inner vessel receives liquid with a normal boiling point below ambient temperature, such as liquid nitrogen, enclosed within a vacuum chamber. A cold mass assembly, including upper and lower guard chambers and middle test vessel, is suspended from a lid of the vacuum canister. Each of the three chambers is filled and vented through a single feedthrough. All fluid and instrumentation feedthroughs are mounted and suspended from a top domed lid allowing easy removal of the cold mass. A lift mechanism allows manipulation of the cold mass assembly and insulation test article.

  2. Automotive Insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Under a Space Act Agreement between Boeing North America and BSR Products, Space Shuttle Thermal Protection System (TPS) materials are now used to insulate race cars. BSR has created special TPS blanket insulation kits for use on autos that take part in NASCAR events, and other race cars through its nationwide catalog distribution system. Temperatures inside a race car's cockpit can soar to a sweltering 140 to 160 degrees, with the extreme heat coming through the engine firewall, transmission tunnel, and floor. It is common for NASCAR drivers to endure blisters and burns due to the excessive heat. Tests on a car insulated with the TPS material showed a temperature drop of some 50 degrees in the driver's cockpit. BSR-TPS Products, Inc. now manufactures insulation kits for distribution to race car teams around the world.

  3. Thermal Insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    Commercially known as Solimide, Temptronics, Inc.'s thermal insulation has application in such vehicles as aircraft, spacecraft and surface transportation systems (i.e. rapid transit cars, trains, buses, and ships) as acoustical treatment for door, wall, and ceiling panels, as a means of reducing vibrations, and as thermal insulation (also useful in industrial equipment). Product originated from research conducted by Johnson Space Center on advanced flame-resistant materials for minimizing fire hazard in the Shuttle and other flight vehicles.

  4. Proceedings of the third workshop on experiments and detectors for a relativistic heavy ion collider (RHIC)

    SciTech Connect

    Shivakumar, B.; Vincent, P.

    1988-01-01

    This report contains papers on the following topics: the RHIC Project; summary of the working group on calorimetry; J//Psi/ measurements in heavy ion collisions at CERN; QCD jets at RHIC; tracking and particle identification; a 4..pi.. tracking spectrometer for RHIC; Bose-Einstein measurements at RHIC in light of new data; summary of working group on read-out electronics; data acquisition for RHIC; summary of the working group on detector simulation; B-physics at RHIC; and CP violation revisited at BNL, B-physics at RHIC.

  5. Advanced Space Suit Insulation Feasibility Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trevino, Luis A.; Orndoff, Evelyne S.

    2000-01-01

    For planetary applications, the space suit insulation has unique requirements because it must perform in a dynamic mode to protect humans in the harsh dust, pressure and temperature environments. Since the presence of a gaseous planetary atmosphere adds significant thermal conductance to the suit insulation, the current multi-layer flexible insulation designed for vacuum applications is not suitable in reduced pressure planetary environments such as that of Mars. Therefore a feasibility study has been conducted at NASA to identify the most promising insulation concepts that can be developed to provide an acceptable suit insulation. Insulation concepts surveyed include foams, microspheres, microfibers, and vacuum jackets. The feasibility study includes a literature survey of potential concepts, an evaluation of test results for initial insulation concepts, and a development philosophy to be pursued as a result of the initial testing and conceptual surveys. The recommended focus is on microfibers due to the versatility of fiber structure configurations, the wide choice of fiber materials available, the maturity of the fiber processing industry, and past experience with fibers in insulation applications

  6. Thermal Performance Testing of Cryogenic Insulation Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fesmire, James E.; Augustynowicz, Stan D.; Scholtens, Brekke E.

    2007-01-01

    Efficient methods for characterizing thermal performance of materials under cryogenic and vacuum conditions have been developed. These methods provide thermal conductivity data on materials under actual-use conditions and are complementary to established methods. The actual-use environment of full temperature difference in combination with vacuum-pressure is essential for understanding insulation system performance. Test articles include solids, foams, powders, layered blankets, composite panels, and other materials. Test methodology and apparatus design for several insulation test cryostats are discussed. The measurement principle is liquid nitrogen boil-off calorimetry. Heat flux capability ranges from approximately 0.5 to 500 watts per square meter; corresponding apparent thermal conductivity values range from below 0.01 up to about 60 mW/m- K. Example data for different insulation materials are also presented. Upon further standardization work, these patented insulation test cryostats can be available to industry for a wide range of practical applications.

  7. Designing insulation for cryogenic ducts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Love, C. C.

    1984-03-01

    It is pointed out that the great temperature difference between the outside of a cryogenic duct and the liquified gas it carries can cause a high heat input unless blocked by a high thermal resistance. High thermal resistance for lines needing maximum insulation is provided by metal vacuum jackets. Low-density foam is satisfactory in cases in which higher heat input can be tolerated. Attention is given to the heat transfer through a duct vacuum jacket, the calculation of heat input and the exterior surface's steady-state temperature for various thicknesses of insulation, the calculation of the heat transfer through gimbal jackets, and design specifications regarding the allowable pressure rise in the jacket's annular space.

  8. RHIC operation with asymmetric collisions in 2015

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, C.; Aschenauer, C.; Atoian, G.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Brown, K. A.; Bruno, D.; Connolly, R.; Ottavio, T. D.; Drees, K. A.; Fischer, W.; Gardner, C. J.; Gu, X.; Hayes, T.; Huang, H.; Laster, J. S.; Luo, Y.; Makdisi, Y.; Marr, G.; Marusic, A.; Meot, F.; Mernick, K.; Michnoff, R.; Minty, M.; Montag, C.; Morris, J.; Narayan, G.; Nayak, S.; Nemesure, S.; Pile, P.; Poblaguev, A.; Ranjbar, V.; Robert-Demolaize, G.; Roser, T.; Schmidke, B.; Schoefer, V.; Severino, F.; Shrey, T.; Smith, K.; Steski, D.; Tepikian, S.; Trbojevic, D.; Tsoupas, N.; Wang, G.; White, S.; Yip, K.; Zaltsman, A.; Zeno, K.; Zhang, S. Y.

    2015-08-07

    To study low-x shadowing/saturation physics as well as other nuclear effects [1], [2], proton-gold (p-Au, for 5 weeks) and proton-Aluminum (p-Al, for 2 weeks) collisions were provided for experiments in 2015 at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), with polarized proton beam in the Blue ring and Au/Al beam in the Yellow ring. The special features of the asymmetric run in 2015 will be introduced. The operation experience will be reviewed as well in the report.

  9. RHIC on "How the Universe Works"

    SciTech Connect

    Lisa, Mike

    2014-08-11

    If you want to know how the universe works, part of the answer lies in understanding the building blocks of matter—before they became inextricably bound within the protons, neutrons, and atoms that make up everything visible in our universe today. That’s why producers for the Science Channel’s documentary series “How the Universe Works” made a point of stopping by the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory, where physicists recreate post-Big Bang “primal matter” millions of times each day. Learn about RHIC’s role in exploring the building blocks of matter by watching this segment.

  10. Analytic closed orbit analysis for RHIC insertion

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.Y. . Dept. of Physics); Tepikian, S. )

    1991-01-01

    Analytic closed orbit analysis is performed to evaluate the tolerance of quadrupole misalignment and dipole errors (b{sub 0},a{sub 0}) in the RHIC insertion. Sensitivity coefficients of these errors are tabulated for different {beta}{sup 0} values. Using these sensitivity tables, we found that the power supplies ripple of 10{sup {minus}4} can cause closed orbit motion of 0.05 mm at the IP in comparison with the rms beam size of 0.3 mm. It is desirable to have the power supply ripple less than 10{sup {minus}5}. 2 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  11. Construction progress of the RHIC electron lenses

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer W.; Altinbas, Z.; Anerella, M.; Beebe, E.; et al

    2012-05-20

    In polarized proton operation the RHIC performance is limited by the head-on beam-beam effect. To overcome this limitation two electron lenses are under construction. We give an overview of the construction progress. Guns, collectors and the warm electron beam transport solenoids with their power supplies have been constructed. The superconducting solenoids that guide the electron beam during the interaction with the proton beam are near completion. A test stand has been set up to verify the performance of the gun, collector and some of the instrumentation. The infrastructure is being prepared for installation, and simulations continue to optimize the performance.

  12. LEPTON AND PHOTON PHYSICS AT RHIC.

    SciTech Connect

    TANNENBAUM,M.J.

    2003-01-06

    Results on physics at RHIC using outgoing leptons and photons will be presented from Au+Au collisions at nucleon-nucleon c.m. energies {radical}(sNN) = 130 GeV and 200 GeV, and from p-p collisions at {radical}(sNN) = 200 GeV. Introduction and motivation will be presented both from the theoretical and experimental perspectives. Topics include open charm production via single e{sup {+-}}, J/{Psi} {yields} e{sup +} + e{sup -}, {mu}{sup +} + {mu}{sup -} and inclusive photon production.

  13. On perturbative azimuthal asymmetry at RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Rezaeian, A. H.

    2008-10-13

    We investigate the azimuthal asymmetry of partons and photons produced at the initial stage of nuclear collisions at the RHIC energy originating from quark-nucleus collisions. In our approach, the azimuthal asymmetry results from the correlation between color dipole orientation and impact parameter of the collision. The asymmetry is sensitive to the rapid variation of the nuclear density at the nuclear periphery. We either introduce the color-dipole orientation into the improved Born approximation, or model the dipole partial amplitude which satisfies available DIS data. We conclude that the azimuthal asymmetry coming from these mechanisms can be sizable.

  14. TRANSVERSE OPTICS IMPROVEMENTS FOR RHIC RUN 4.

    SciTech Connect

    VAN ZEIJTS,J.

    2004-07-05

    The magnetic settings in RHIC are driven by an on-line model, and the quality of the resulting lattice functions depend on the correctness of the settings, and knowledge of the magnet transfer-functions. Here we first present the different inputs into the model, including dipole sextupole components, used to set tunes and chromaticities along the ramp. Based on an analysis of measured tunes along the FY03 polarized proton ramp, we present predictions for quadrupole transfer-function changes which have been implemented for the FY04 Au ramp. We show the improved model agreement for tunes along the ramp, and measured transverse phase-advance at store.

  15. Some calculations for the RHIC kicker

    SciTech Connect

    Claus, J.

    1996-12-01

    This paper starts with a brief discussion of the design of the RHIC injection kicker magnets which calls for longitudinal and capacitive sections of the same order as the aperture, not much larger nor much smaller. This makes accurate analytical prediction of their behavior very difficult. In order to gain at least some qualitative insight of that behavior, the author preformed calculations which are based on the actual dimensions of the kickers but which neglect the end effects of the individual sections. The effects of the sectionalization are therefore exaggerated relative to reality in the results.

  16. RHIC spin physics: Proceedings. Volume 7

    SciTech Connect

    1998-12-01

    This proceedings compiles one-page summaries and five transparencies for each talk, with the intention that the speaker should include a web location for additional information in the summary. Also, email addresses are given with the participant list. The order follows the agenda: gluon, polarimetry, accelerator, W production and quark/antiquark polarization, parity violation searches, transversity, single transverse spin, small angle elastic scattering, and the final talk on ep collisions at RHIC. The authors begin the Proceedings with the full set of transparencies from Bob Jaffe`s colloquium on spin, by popular request.

  17. HIGH CURRENT SUPERCONDUCTING CAVITIES AT RHIC.

    SciTech Connect

    CALAGA,R.BEN-ZVI,I.ZHAO,Y.ET AL.

    2004-07-05

    A five-cell high current superconducting cavity for the electron cooling project at RHIC is under fabrication. Higher order modes (HOMs), one of main limiting factors for high current energy-recovery operation, are under investigation. Calculations of HOMs using time-domain methods in Mafia will be discussed and compared to calculations in the frequency domain. Beam breakup thresholds determined from numerical codes for the five-cell cavity will be presented. A possible motivation towards a 2 x 2 superstructure using the current five-cell design will also be discussed.

  18. Properties of a symmetric RHIC insertion

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.Y.

    1991-07-01

    This report evaluates the lattice functions of the symmetric insertion proposed by A.G. Ruggiero for the RHIC insertion. The crossing geometry, Inner and Outer matching sections, and chromatic properties are studied in detail. Some properties of the missing dipole dispersion correction scheme are also discussed. We found that the chromatic properties of the symmetric insertion is not better than the antisymmetric insertion. The problem is that the four family sextupole correction scheme seems not able to improve the chromatic distortion. Analytic understanding of the failure of the four family sextupole correction scheme will be very useful. 9 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Recent Triplet Vibration Studies in RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Thieberger, P.; Bonati, R.; Corbin, G.; Jain, A.; Minty, M.; McIntyre, G.; Montag, C.; Muratore, J.; Schultheiss, C.; Seberg, S.; Tuozzolo, J.

    2010-05-23

    We report on recent developments for mitigating vibrations of the quadrupole magnets near the interaction regions of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). High precision accelerometers, geophones, and a laser vibrometer were installed around one of the two interaction points to characterize the frequencies of the mechanical motion. In addition actuators were mounted directly on the quadrupole cryostats. Using as input the locally measured motion, dynamic damping of the mechanical vibrations has been demonstrated. In this report we present these measurements and measurements of the beam response. Future options for compensating the vibrations are discussed.

  20. Collective flow measurements at RHIC energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esumi, Shinichi

    2017-04-01

    Recent experimental results on collective flow measurements from relativistic heavy-ion collider (RHIC) are presented and discussed to study high-temperature and high-density quark-nuclear matter, Quark Gluon Plasma (QGP) especially focusing on bulk properties, such as freeze-out parameters, temperature, chemical potential, collective expansion, azimuthal event anisotropy measurements. Their relations to the various correlation and fluctuation studies are also discussed, including initial geometrical and E- and B-field conditions as well as possible collective flow evolution that could even be developed in small systems. Current results and understandings from the beam energy scan program (BES) and future plans are discussed and reviewed.

  1. Polarization response of RHIC electron lens lattices

    DOE PAGES

    Ranjbar, V. H.; Méot, F.; Bai, M.; ...

    2016-10-10

    Depolarization response for a system of two orthogonal snakes at irrational tunes is studied in depth using lattice independent spin integration. Particularly, we consider the effect of overlapping spin resonances in this system, to understand the impact of phase, tune, relative location and threshold strengths of the spin resonances. Furthermore, these results are benchmarked and compared to two dimensional direct tracking results for the RHIC e-lens lattice and the standard lattice. We then consider the effect of longitudinal motion via chromatic scans using direct six dimensional lattice tracking.

  2. FEASIBILITY OF INCREASING THE ENERGY OF RHIC.

    SciTech Connect

    MACKAY,W.W.; JAIN,A.; LUCCIO,A.U.; PILAT,F.; ROSER,T.; TEPIKIAN,S.; TROBOJEVIC,D.

    2001-06-18

    In this paper we discuss the possibility of increasing the energy of beams in RHIC by as much as 30% with a modest trade-off in luminosity. The arc dipoles and quadrupoles were designed with considerable margin. For higher energies (>100 GeV/nucleon) the minimum {beta}* may be required to increase as the interaction region triplets saturate. The separator magnets (DX) have the least margin for increased field, so we consider three scenarios: allowing for a small crossing angle with the present DX magnets, upgrading the DX magnets to higher strength, and permitting a crossing angle of {approximately}1{degree} by removing the DX magnets altogether.

  3. COMMISSIONING OF RHIC AT 100 GEV / NUCLEON.

    SciTech Connect

    TRBOJEVIC,D.; AHRENS,L.; BLASKIEWICZ,M.; BRENNAN,J.M.; BAI,M.; CAMERON,P.; CARDONA,J.; CONNOLLY,R.; DREES,A.; FLILLER,R.P.; ET AL

    2002-06-02

    This report describes commissioning of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) for 100 GeV/nucleon collisions at designed luminosity. To achieve these goals new systems had to be commissioned: Gamma-t transition crossing jump quadrupoles, rebucketing with the new RF storage cavities, phase lock loop feedback, betatron and crystal collimation, beta squeeze along the ramp, Siberian snake magnets for the proton polarization run, AC dipole system chromaticity measurements along the acceleration ramp, orbit correction, new ramp management system, upgraded sequencer, new data instrumentation and logger acquisition system etc.

  4. THE RHIC BEAM ABORT KICKER SYSTEM.

    SciTech Connect

    HAHN,H.

    1999-03-29

    THE ENERGY STORED IN THE RHIC BEAM IS ABOUT 200 KJ PER RING AT DESIGN ENERGY AND INTENSITY. TO PREVENT QUENCHING OF THE SUPERCONDUCTING MAGNETS OR MATERIAL DAMAGE, THE BEAM WILL BE SAFELY DISPOSED OF BY AN INTERNAL BEAM ABORT SYSTEM, WHICH INCLUDES THE KICKER MAGNETS, THE PULSED POWER SUPPLIES, AND THE DUMP ABSORBER. DISPOSAL OF HEAVY IONS, SUCH AS GOLD, IMPOSES DESIGN CONSTRAINTS MORE SEVERE THAN THOSE FOR PROTON BEAMS OF EQUAL INTENSITY. IN ORDER TO MINIMIZE THE THERMAL SHOCK IN THE CARBON-FIBER DUMP BLOCK, THE BUNCHES MUST BE LATERALLY DISPERSED.

  5. Polarization response of RHIC electron lens lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranjbar, V. H.; Méot, F.; Bai, M.; Abell, D. T.; Meiser, D.

    2016-10-01

    Depolarization response for a system of two orthogonal snakes at irrational tunes is studied in depth using lattice independent spin integration. In particular we consider the effect of overlapping spin resonances in this system, to understand the impact of phase, tune, relative location and threshold strengths of the spin resonances. These results are benchmarked and compared to two dimensional direct tracking results for the RHIC e-lens lattice and the standard lattice. Finally we consider the effect of longitudinal motion via chromatic scans using direct six dimensional lattice tracking.

  6. Cold cathode vacuum gauging system

    DOEpatents

    Denny, Edward C.

    2004-03-09

    A vacuum gauging system of the cold cathode type is provided for measuring the pressure of a plurality of separate vacuum systems, such as in a gas centrifuge cascade. Each casing is fitted with a gauge tube assembly which communicates with the vacuum system in the centrifuge casing. Each gauge tube contains an anode which may be in the form of a slender rod or wire hoop and a cathode which may be formed by the wall of the gauge tube. The tube is provided with an insulated high voltage connector to the anode which has a terminal for external connection outside the vacuum casing. The tube extends from the casing so that a portable magnet assembly may be inserted about the tube to provide a magnetic field in the area between the anode and cathode necessary for pressure measurements in a cold cathode-type vacuum gauge arrangement. The portable magnetic assembly is provided with a connector which engages the external high voltage terminal for providing power to the anode within in the gauge tube. Measurement is made in the same manner as the prior cold cathode gauges in that the current through the anode to the cathode is measured as an indication of the pressure. By providing the portable magnetic assembly, a considerable savings in cost, installation, and maintenance of vacuum gauges for pressure measurement in a gas centrifuge cascade is realizable.

  7. Improved DC Gun Insulator

    SciTech Connect

    M.L. Neubauer, K.B. Beard, R. Sah, C. Hernandez-Garcia, G. Neil

    2009-05-01

    Many user facilities such as synchrotron light sources and free electron lasers require accelerating structures that support electric fields of 10-100 MV/m, especially at the start of the accelerator chain where ceramic insulators are used for very high gradient DC guns. These insulators are difficult to manufacture, require long commissioning times, and have poor reliability, in part because energetic electrons bury themselves in the ceramic, creating a buildup of charge and causing eventual puncture. A novel ceramic manufacturing process is proposed. It will incorporate bulk resistivity in the region where it is needed to bleed off accumulated charge caused by highly energetic electrons. This process will be optimized to provide an appropriate gradient in bulk resistivity from the vacuum side to the air side of the HV standoff ceramic cylinder. A computer model will be used to determine the optimum cylinder dimensions and required resistivity gradient for an example RF gun application. A ceramic material example with resistivity gradient appropriate for use as a DC gun insulator will be fabricated by glazing using doping compounds and tested.

  8. Aerogel Beads as Cryogenic Thermal Insulation System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fesmire, J. E.; Augustynowicz, S. D.; Rouanet, S.; Thompson, Karen (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    An investigation of the use of aerogel beads as thermal insulation for cryogenic applications was conducted at the Cryogenics Test Laboratory of NASA Kennedy Space Center. Steady-state liquid nitrogen boiloff methods were used to characterize the thermal performance of aerogel beads in comparison with conventional insulation products such as perlite powder and multilayer insulation (MLI). Aerogel beads produced by Cabot Corporation have a bulk density below 100 kilograms per cubic meter (kg/cubic m) and a mean particle diameter of 1 millimeter (mm). The apparent thermal conductivity values of the bulk material have been determined under steady-state conditions at boundary temperatures of approximately 293 and 77 kelvin (K) and at various cold vacuum pressures (CVP). Vacuum levels ranged from 10(exp -5) torr to 760 torr. All test articles were made in a cylindrical configuration with a typical insulation thickness of 25 mm. Temperature profiles through the thickness of the test specimens were also measured. The results showed the performance of the aerogel beads was significantly better than the conventional materials in both soft-vacuum (1 to 10 torr) and no-vacuum (760 torr) ranges. Opacified aerogel beads performed better than perlite powder under high-vacuum conditions. Further studies for material optimization and system application are in progress.

  9. Fast Diagnostic For Electrical Breakdowns In Vacuum

    SciTech Connect

    Houck, T L; Javedani, J B; Lahowe, D A

    2008-03-25

    The design of an inexpensive, small, high bandwidth diagnostic for the study of vacuum insulator flashover is described. The diagnostic is based on the principle of capacitive coupling and is commonly referred to as a D-dot probe due to its sensitivity to the changing of the electric displacement field. The principle challenge for the design proved to be meeting the required mechanical size for the application rather than bandwidth. An array of these probes was fabricated and used in an insulator test stand. Data from the test stand with detailed analysis is presented. A highlight of the application of the probes to the test stand was the ability to detect the charging of the insulator surface by UV illumination as a prelude to the insulator flashover. The abrupt change in the insulator's surface charge during the flashover was also detected.

  10. High luminosity electron-hadron collider eRHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Ptitsyn, V.; Aschenauer, E.; Bai, M.; Beebe-Wang, J.; Belomestnykh, S.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Blaskiewicz, M..; Calaga, R.; Chang, X.; Fedotov, A.; Gassner, D.; Hammons, L.; Hahn, H.; Hammons, L.; He, P.; Hao, Y.; Jackson, W.; Jain, A.; Johnson, E.C.; Kayran, D.; Kewisch, J.; Litvinenko, V.N.; Luo, Y.; Mahler, G.; McIntyre, G.; Meng, W.; Minty, M.; Parker, B.; Pikin, A.; Rao, T.; Roser, T.; Skaritka, J.; Sheehy, B.; Skaritka, J.; Tepikian, S.; Than, Y.; Trbojevic, D.; Tsoupas, N.; Tuozzolo, J.; Wang, G.; Webb, S.; Wu, Q.; Xu, W.; Pozdeyev, E.; Tsentalovich, E.

    2011-03-28

    We present the design of a future high-energy high-luminosity electron-hadron collider at RHIC called eRHIC. We plan on adding 20 (potentially 30) GeV energy recovery linacs to accelerate and to collide polarized and unpolarized electrons with hadrons in RHIC. The center-of-mass energy of eRHIC will range from 30 to 200 GeV. The luminosity exceeding 10{sup 34} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} can be achieved in eRHIC using the low-beta interaction region with a 10 mrad crab crossing. We report on the progress of important eRHIC R&D such as the high-current polarized electron source, the coherent electron cooling, ERL test facility and the compact magnets for recirculation passes. A natural staging scenario of step-by-step increases of the electron beam energy by building-up of eRHIC's SRF linacs is presented.

  11. Upgrade scenario for the RHIC collimation system

    SciTech Connect

    Robert-Demolaize, G.; Drees, A.

    2012-01-19

    The RHIC collimation system is used to reduce background levels in both STAR and PHENIX detectors. With a push for higher luminosity in the near future, it becomes critical to check if and how the level of performance of the collimators can be improved. The following reviews a proposal for additional collimators placed further downstream of the current system and designed to intercept the tertiary halo coming out of the IR8 insertion before it can reach the triplet quadrupoles in either STAR or PHENIX. Simulations have been peformed to quantify the efficiency of additional collimator jaws in RHIC. Each figure presented in this article clearly shows that the additional mask collimators provide the expected reduction in losses around the machine, and especially to the incoming triplet to the STAR experiment (IP6), for the Yellow beam as much as for the Blue beam. Looking at compiled statistics for all three working point cases studied, proton losses around the machine are reduced by roughly one order of magnitude: at most a factor 30 for magnet losses, and at most a factor 40 for losses in spaces between magnets.

  12. Current status of PHOBOS{at}RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Betts, R.R. |; PHOBOS Collaboration

    1996-05-01

    Four experiments are currently approved for the first measurements with colliding heavy ion beams from the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) which is scheduled to come into operation in Spring 1999. These experiments are named STAR, Phoenix, PHOBOS and Brahms. It is expected that central collisions of 100 GeV/u Au + Au at RHIC will lead to energy densities far above any so far attained in the laboratory and it is suspected and hoped that this situation will lead to qualitatively new physics perhaps associated with the creation of a large volume containing a plasma of deconfined quarks and gluons. All four experiments attempt to search for signatures of new physics through combinations of measurements of quantities such as the multiplicity of produced particles, the average transverse momentum of these particles, fluctuations in their multiplicity distribution, their flavor composition, the size scales of the volume from which they are emitted, mass shifts and changes in the decay widths of resonances which decay inside the high energy density volume etc. The PHOBOS detector addresses these issues with a Multiplicity Array which covers the pseudo-rapidity region {minus}5.3 {le} {eta} {le} 5.3 with a coverage of 85% of 4{pi} and also incorporates a Vertex Detector. The Multiplicity Array is complemented by two Multi-Particle Spectrometers, each of which cover the range 0.5 {le} {eta} {le} 1.5 and azimuthal angle range {Delta}{phi} = 11{degree}. Various trigger and monitor detectors complete PHOBOS.

  13. UP-GRADED RHIC INJECTION SYSTEM.

    SciTech Connect

    HAHN,H.FISCHER,W.SEMERTZIDIS,Y.K.WARBURTON,D.S.

    2003-05-12

    The design of the RHIC injection systems anticipated the possibility of filling and operating the rings with a 120 bunch pattern, corresponding to 110 bunches after allowing for the abort gap. Beam measurements during the 2002 run confirmed the possibility, although at the expense of severe transverse emittance growth and thus not on an operational basis. An improvement program was initiated with the goal of reducing the kicker rise time from 110 to {approx}95 ns and of minimizing pulse timing jitter and drift. The major components of the injection system are 4 kicker magnets and Blmlein pulsers using thyratron switches. The kicker terminating resistor and operating voltage was increased to reduce the rise time. Timing has been stabilized by using commercial trigger units and extremely stable dc supplies for the thyratron reservoir. A fiber optical connection between control room and the thyratron trigger unit has been provided, thereby allowing the operator to adjust timing individually for each kicker unit. The changes were successfully implemented for use in the RHIC operation.

  14. A Prototype Ionization Profile Monitor for RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Connolly, R.; Cameron, P.; Ryan, W.; Shea, T.; Sikora, R.; Tsoupas, N.

    1997-03-17

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven National Lab will accelerate and store beams of ions ranging from protons to gold nuclei. Transverse beam profiles will be obtained by measuring the distribution of free electrons formed by beam ionization of the residual gas. The electrons are swept from the beamline by a transverse electric field, amplified by a microchannel plate (MCP), and collected on a circuit board with strip anodes oriented parallel to the beam axis. A uniform magnetic field,parallel to the sweep electric field, counters the defocusing effects of space charge and recoil momentum. A single-plane prototype ionization profile montor (IPM) was installed near the end of the AGS-to-RHIC transfer line (ATR) and tested during the sextant commissioning rung. It measured vertical profiles of single bunches of Au nuclei with intensities of 0.6-1.0 x 108 particles. These profiles are compared to profiles on a fluorescent screen (WF3) located 2m downstream from the IPM. This paper describes the detector and gives results from the beam test.

  15. CONTINUOUS ABORT GAP CLEANING AT RHIC.

    SciTech Connect

    DREES,A.FLILLER,R.III.FU,W.MICHNOFF,R.

    2004-07-05

    Since the RHIC Au-Au run in the year 2001 the 200 MHz cavity system was used at storage and a 28 MHz system during injection and acceleration. The rebucketing procedure potentially causes a higher debunching rate of heavy ion beams in addition to amplifying debunching due to other mechanisms. At the end of a four hour store, debunched beam can easily account for more than 50% of the total beam intensity. This effect is even stronger with the achieved high intensities of the RHIC Au-Au run in 2004. A beam abort at the presence of a lot of debunched beam bears the risk of magnet quenching and experimental detector damage due to uncontrolled beam losses. Thus it is desirable to avoid any accumulation of debunched beam from the beginning of each store, in particular to anticipate cases of unscheduled beam aborts due to a system failure. A combination of a fast transverse kickers and the new 2-stage copper collimator system are used to clean the abort gap continuously throughout the store with a repetition rate of 1 Hz. This report gives. an overview of the new gap cleaning procedure and the achieved performance.

  16. LHC World Largest Vacuum Systems Being Commissioned at CERN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jimenez, Jose Miguel

    The CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) with its 26.7 km of circumference and three different vacuum systems for the beams and insulation vacuum for magnets and liquid helium transfer lines, will have the world's largest vacuum system operating over a wide range of pressures and employing an impressive array of vacuum technologies. This system is composed by 54 km of UHV vacuum for the circulating beams and 50 km of insulation vacuum. Over the 54 km of UHV beam vacuum, 48 km of this are at cryogenic temperature (1.9 K). The remaining 6 km of beam vacuum containing the insertions for “cleaning” the proton beams, radiofrequency cavities for accelerating the protons as well as beam-monitoring equipment is at ambient temperature and uses non-evaporable getter (NEG) coatings. The noble gases and methane is pumped out by 780 ion pumps. Pressure readings are provided by 170 Bayard-Alpert gauges and 1084 gauges (Pirani and cold cathode Penning). The cryogenic insulation vacuums while technically less demanding, impress by their size (50 km) and volume (15000 m3). Once roughed using mechanical pumps, the vacuum relies on the cryopumping which allows reaching pressure in the 10-4 Pa range.

  17. A number of upgrades on RHIC power supply system

    SciTech Connect

    Mi, C.; Bruno, D.; Drozd, J.; Nolan, T.; Orsatti, F.; Heppener, G.; Di Lieto, A.; Schultheiss, C.; Samms, T.; Zapasek, R.; Sandberg, J.

    2015-05-03

    This year marks the 15th run for the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). Operation of a reliable superconducting magnet power supply system is a key factor of an accelerator’s performance. Over the past 15 years, the RHIC power supply group has made many improvements to increase the machine availability and reduce failures. During these past 15 years of operating RHIC a lot of problems have been solved or addressed. In this paper some of the essential upgrades/improvements are discussed.

  18. MEASUREMENT AND CORRECTION OF NONLINEAR CHROMATICITY IN RHIC.

    SciTech Connect

    TEPIKIAN, S.; CAMERON, P.; DELLA PENNA, A.; PTITSYN, V.

    2005-05-16

    To improve luminosity in RHIC by using smaller {beta}*, higher order chromatic effects may need to be corrected [1]. Measuring of higher order chromaticities is discussed and compared to a model of RHIC, showing agreement. Assuming round beams, four families of octupoles are used to correct the second order chromaticities while keeping under control the amplitude dependent betatron tune spread in the beams. We show that the octupoles can reduce the second order chromaticity in RHIC, but they have insufficient strength for complete correction.

  19. IBS simulation with different RF configurations in RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, C.; Fedotov, A.; Minty, M.; Ptitsyn, V.

    2016-11-07

    It is a crucial task to understand the beam emittance growth during RHIC cycle and the underlying causes. One would benefit not just for the current operation of RHIC, also for the design of eRHIC. This report focuses on the Intra-Beam Scattering (IBS) contribution to the emittance growth of the proton beam with two different configurations of RF system. The answers to these questions will be given in the end of the report; can IBS explain the emittance growth all alone? What’s the difference of IBS growth rates for different RF configurations?

  20. Beam-Beam issues in eRHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Hao, Y.; Heimerle, M.; Ptitsyn, V.

    2010-08-03

    eRHIC, a future electron-ion collider developed at BNL, aims to provide electron-ion collisions by adding a new electron accelerator to the existing RHIC ion accelerator rings [1]. Possible options for accelerating high average current electron beam include an energy-recovery linac (ERL) or a storage ring. Since the proton beam is circulating in the accelerator ring, corresponding collision schemes are called as the linac-ring and the ring-ring. The electron accelerator option based on the electron storage ring was studied on earlier stages of eRHIC design [2].

  1. Status of Proton Polarization in Rhic and AGS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mackay, W. W.; Bai, M.; Huang, H.; Ahrens, L.; Alekseev, I. G.; Bravar, A.; Brown, K.; Bunce, G.; Calaga, R.; Courant, E. D.; Drees, A.; Fischer, W.; Gardner, C.; Glenn, J. W.; Gupta, R.; Igo, G.; Iriso, U.; Jinnouchi, O.; Kurita, K.; Luccio, A. U.; Luo, Y.; Makdisi, Y.; Marr, G.; Montag, C.; Nass, A.; Okada, H.; Okamura, M.; Pilat, F.; Ptitsyn, V.; Roser, T.; Saito, N.; Satogata, T.; Spinka, H.; Stephenson, E. J.; Svirida, D. N.; Takano, J.; Tepikian, S.; Tomas, R.; Tsoupas, N.; Underwood, D.; Whitten, C.; Wood, J.; Zeijts, J. Van; Zelenski, A.; Zeno, K.; Zhang, S. Y.

    2005-08-01

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) has collided protons with both transverse and longitudinal polarization at a centre-of-mass energy of 200 GeV. Future running will extend this to 500 GeV. This paper describes the methods used to accelerate and manipulate polarized proton beams in RHIC and its injectors. Special techniques include the use of a partial Siberian snake and an AC dipole in the AGS. In RHIC we use superconducting helical Siberian snakes for acceleration, and eight superconducting helical rotators for independent control of polarization directions at two interaction regions. The present status and future plans for the polarized proton program will be reviewed.

  2. Radiation Insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    The Apollo and subsequent spacecraft have had highly effective radiation barriers; made of aluminized polymer film, they bar or let in heat to maintain consistent temperatures inside. Tech 2000, formerly Quantum International Corporation used the NASA technology in its insulating materials, Super "Q" Radiant Barrier, for home, industry and mobile applications. The insulation combines industrial aluminum foil overlaid around a core of another material, usually propylene or mylar. The outer layer reflects up to 97 percent of heat; the central layer creates a thermal break in the structure and thus allows low radiant energy emission. The Quantum Cool Wall, used in cars and trucks, takes up little space while providing superior insulation, thus reducing spoilage and costs. The panels can also dampen sound and engine, exhaust and solar heat.

  3. Thermal Performance Testing of Order Dependancy of Aerogels Multilayered Insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Wesley L.; Fesmire, James E.; Demko, J. A.

    2009-01-01

    Robust multilayer insulation systems have long been a goal of many research projects. Such insulation systems must provide some degree of structural support and also mechanical integrity during loss of vacuum scenarios while continuing to provide insulative value to the vessel. Aerogel composite blankets can be the best insulation materials in ambient pressure environments; in high vacuum, the thermal performance of aerogel improves by about one order of magnitude. Standard multilayer insulation (MU) is typically 50% worse at ambient pressure and at soft vacuum, but as much as two or three orders of magnitude better at high vacuum. Different combinations of aerogel and multilayer insulation systems have been tested at Cryogenics Test Laboratory of NASA Kennedy Space Center. Analysis performed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory showed an importance to the relative location of the MU and aerogel blankets. Apparent thermal conductivity testing under cryogenic-vacuum conditions was performed to verify the analytical conclusion. Tests results are shown to be in agreement with the analysis which indicated that the best performance is obtained with aerogel layers located in the middle of the blanket insulation system.

  4. Insulation Material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    Manufactured by Hitco Materials Division of Armco, Inc. a ceramic fiber insulation material known as Refrasil has been used extensively as a heat-absorbing ablative reinforcement for such space systems as rocket motor nozzles, combustion chambers, and re-entry shields. Refrasil fibers are highly porous and do not melt or vaporize until fibers exceed 3,100 degrees Fahrenheit. Due to these and other properties, Refrasil has found utility in a number of industrial high temperature applications where glass, asbestos and other materials fail. Hitco used this insulation to assist Richardson Co., Inc. in the manufacturing of hard rubber and plastic molded battery cases.

  5. Mechanical design of 56 MHz superconducting RF cavity for RHIC collider

    SciTech Connect

    Pai, C.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Burrill, A.; Chang, X.; McIntyre, G.; Than, Y.; Tuozzolo, J.; Wu, Q.

    2011-03-28

    A 56 MHz Superconducting RF Cavity operating at 4.4K is being constructed for the RHIC collider. This cavity is a quarter wave resonator with beam transmission along the centerline. This cavity will increase collision luminosity by providing a large longitudinal bucket for stored bunches of RHIC ion beam. The major components of this assembly are the niobium cavity with the mechanical tuner, its titanium helium vessel and vacuum cryostat, the support system, and the ports for HOM and fundamental dampers. The cavity and its helium vessel must meet equivalent safety with the ASME pressure vessel code and it must not be sensitive to frequency shift due to pressure fluctuations from the helium supply system. Frequency tuning achieved by a two stage mechanical tuner is required to meet performance parameters. This tuner mechanism pushes and pulls the tuning plate in the gap of niobium cavity. The tuner mechanism has two separate drive systems to provide both coarse and fine tuning capabilities. This paper discusses the design detail and how the design requirements are met.

  6. phi meson measurements and flavor-dependent nuclear suppression at RHIC-PHENIX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kijima, Kotaro M.; PHENIX Collaboration

    2010-09-01

    Measurement of low mass vector mesons (ρ, ω, phi) provides important information to understand the properties of quark-gluon plasma (QGP) created in the central heavy-ion collision at RHIC. The mass and branching ratio of the phi meson decay into di-electron and di-kaon could be modified in the excited vacuum due to the effect of partial chiral symmetry restoration. In addition, phi meson contains hidden strangeness and hence its measurement can figure out the strangeness production. The suppression pattern of phi meson with high transverse momentum in heavy-ion collisions, compared to scaled p + p results, provides the information to understand the mechanism of production and energy loss of strange quark with the strongly coupled matter. The PHENIX experiment at RHIC has measured the phi meson production in p+p, d+Au and Au+Au collisions at \\sqrt{s_{NN}} up to 200 GeV at mid-rapidity. In this paper, we will present recent PHENIX results about the phi meson production. The mass peaks for phi have been observed in both di-electron and di-kaon invariant mass spectra. The extracted spectra, mass and width of phi in p+p, d+Au and Au+Au are reviewed. Moreover, we compare the nuclear modification factors of various hadrons and discuss flavor dependence of their suppression patterns.

  7. Enhancing RHIC luminosity capabilities with in-situ beam piple coating

    SciTech Connect

    Herschcovitch,A.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Fischer, W.; Poole, H. J.

    2009-05-04

    Electron clouds have been observed in many accelerators, including the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). They can limit the machine performance through pressure degradation, beam instabilities or incoherent emittance growth. The formation of electron clouds can be suppressed with beam pipe surfaces that have low secondary electron yield. At the same time, high wall resistivity in accelerators can result in levels of ohmic heating unacceptably high for superconducting magnets. This is a concern for the RHIC machine, as its vacuum chamber in the superconducting dipoles is made from relatively high resistivity 316LN stainless steel. The high resistivity can be addressed with a copper (Cu) coating; a reduction in the secondary electron yield can be achieved with a titanium nitride (TiN) or amorphous carbon (a-C) coating. Applying such coatings in an already constructed machine is rather challenging. We started developing a robotic plasma deposition technique for in-situ coating of long, small diameter tubes. The technique entails fabricating a device comprised of staged magnetrons and/or cathodic arcs mounted on a mobile mole for deposition of about 5 {micro}m (a few skin depths) of Cu followed by about 0.1 {micro}m of TiN (or a-C).

  8. Nanogel Aerogel as Load Bearing Insulation for Cryogenic Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koravos, J. J.; Miller, T. M.; Fesmire, J. E.; Coffman, B. E.

    2010-04-01

    Load support structures in cryogenic storage, transport and processing systems are large contributors to the total heat leak of the system. Conventional insulation systems require the use of these support members in order to stabilize the process fluid enclosure and prevent degradation of insulation performance due to compression. Removal of these support structures would substantially improve system efficiency. Nanogel aerogel insulation performance is tested at vacuum pressures ranging from high vacuum to atmospheric pressure and under loads from loosely packed to greater than 10,000 Pa. Insulation performance is determined using boil-off calorimetry with liquid nitrogen as the latent heat recipient. Two properties of the aerogel insulation material suit it to act as a load bearing "structure" in a process vessel: (1) Ability to maintain thermal performance under load; (2) Elasticity when subjected to load. Results of testing provide positive preliminary indication that these properties allow Nanogel aerogel to effectively be used as a load bearing insulation in cryogenic systems.

  9. RHIC POWER SUPPLIES - LESSONS LEARNED FROM THE 1999 - 2001 RHIC RUNS.

    SciTech Connect

    BRUNO,D.ENG,W.GANETIS,G.LAMBIASE,R.F.LOUIE,W.SANDBERG,J.SCHULTHEISS,C.

    2003-05-12

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) was commissioned in 1999 and 2000. The two RHIC rings require a total of 933 power supplies (PSs) to supply currents to highly inductive superconducting magnets. These units function as 4 main PSs, 237 insertion region (02) PSs, 24 sextupole PSs, 24 Gamma-T PSs, 8 snake PSs, 16 spin rotator PSs, and 620 correction PSs. PS reliability in this type of machine is of utmost importance because the IR PSs are nested within other IR PSs, and these are all nested within the main PSs. This means if any main or IR PS trips off due to a PS fault or quench indication, then all the IR and main PSs in that ring must follow. When this happens, the Quench Protection Assemblies (QPA's) for each unit disconnects the PSs from the circuit and absorb the stored energy in the magnets. Commissioning these power supplies and QPA's was and still is a learning experience. A summary of the major problems encountered during these first three RHIC runs will be presented along with solutions.

  10. Insulator Surface Flashover Due to UV Illumination

    SciTech Connect

    Javedani, J B; Houck, T L; Lahowe, D A; Vogtlin, G E; Goerz, D A

    2009-07-27

    The surface of an insulator under vacuum and under electrical charge will flashover when illuminated by a critical dose of ultra-violet (UV) radiation - depending on the insulator size and material, insulator cone angle, the applied voltage and insulator shot-history. A testbed comprised of an excimer laser (KrF, 248 nm, {approx}16 MW, 30 ns FWHM,), a vacuum chamber, and a negative polarity dc high voltage power supply ({le} -60 kV) were assembled to test 1.0 cm thick angled insulators for surface-flashover. Several candidate insulator materials, e.g. High Density Polyethylene (HDPE), Rexolite{reg_sign} 1400, Macor{trademark} and Mycalex, of varying cone angles were tested against UV illumination. Commercial energy meters were used to measure the UV fluence of the pulsed laser beam. In-house designed and fabricated capacitive probes (D-dots, >12 GHz bandwidth) were embedded in the anode electrode underneath the insulator to determine the time of UV arrival and time of flashover. Of the tested insulators, the +45 degree Rexolite insulator showed more resistance to UV for surface flashover; at UV fluence level of less than 13 mJ/cm{sup 2}, it was not possible to induce a flashover for up to -60 kV of DC potential across the insulator's surface. The probes also permitted the electrical charge on the insulator before and after flashover to be inferred. Photon to electron conversion efficiency for the surface of Rexolite insulator was determined from charge-balance equation. In order to understand the physical mechanism leading to flashover, we further experimented with the +45 degree Rexolite insulator by masking portions of the UV beam to illuminate only a section of the insulator surface; (1) the half nearest the cathode and subsequently, (2) the half nearest the anode. The critical UV fluence and time to flashover were measured and the results in each case were then compared with the base case of full-beam illumination. It was discovered that the time for the

  11. Methods to Increase Electrical Breakdown Threshold of Polystyrene Insulators

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-06-01

    in applications where high voltage is applied to dielectric insulators . Results in [2] have shown that flashover on or near the surface of the...Studies conducted in [9] have shown a direct correlation between shape of the insulator and surface flashover . Changing the angle of the...and vacuum technologies to modify the microscale structures on the surface of the polymer insulators in an effort to increase the electrical strength

  12. Effect of environment on insulation materials, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parmley, R. T.; Smith, F. J.; Glassford, A. P.; Coleman, J.; Stevenson, D. R.

    1973-01-01

    Twenty candidate multilayer insulation and insulation related materials were subjected to eight conditions that represent possible operational environments. These exposures include ground contaminants, various operational temperatures, space vacuum, space-vented propellants, and tank leakage. The objective of this program was to obtain and evaluate the data from these exposures to provide both a quantitative and qualitative description of the degradation to certain physical and thermal properties, and from this, to obtain a better understanding of the environmental effects on the insulation performance.

  13. Radiation Insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    Radiation insulation technology from Apollo and subsequent spacecraft was used to develop superinsulators, used by makers of cold weather apparel, to make parkas, jackets, boots and outdoor gear such as sleeping bags. The radiant barrier technology offers warmth retention at minimal weight and bulk.

  14. Insulation Material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    Apex Mills Corporation's superinsulators are used by makers of cold weather apparel, parkas, jackets, boots and outdoor gear such as sleeping bags. Their attraction in such applications is that radiant barrier insulation offers excellent warmth retention at minimal weight and bulk.

  15. Window insulator

    SciTech Connect

    Nesbitt, W. A.

    1985-10-01

    An insulator for mounting to a window. A pair of plastic layers including a plurality of partitions positioned therebetween form air pockets between the layers. A plurality of suction cups and suction grooves arranged in rows on one outer surface of the sheet removably secure the sheet to a window. The sheet includes a circumferentially extending recessed portion receiving the window frame.

  16. Radiation Insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    Radiation insulation technology from Apollo and subsequent spacecraft was used to develop superinsulators, used by makers of cold weather apparel, to make parkas, jackets, boots and outdoor gear such as sleeping bags. The radiant barrier technology offers warmth retention at minimal weight and bulk.

  17. Lattice design for the ERL electron ion collider in RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Trbojevic, D.; Beebe-Wang, J.; Tsoupas, N.; Chang, X.; Kayran, D.; Ptitsyn, V.; Litvinenko, V.; Hao, Y.; Parker, B.; Pozdeyev, E.

    2010-05-23

    We present electron ion collider lattice design for the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (eRHIC) where the electrons have multi-passes through recirculating linacs (ERL) and arcs placed in the existing RHIC tunnel. The present RHIC interaction regions (IR's), where the electron ion collisions will occur, are modified to allow for the large luminosity. Staging of eRHIC will bring the electron energy from 4 up to 20 (30) GeV as the superconducting cavities are built and installed sequentially. The synchrotron radiation from electrons at the IR is reduced as they arrive straight to the collision while ions and protons come with 10 mrad crossing angle using the crab cavities.

  18. Status of superconducting magnet development (SSC, RHIC, LHC)

    SciTech Connect

    Wanderer, P.

    1993-12-31

    This paper summarize recent superconducting accelerator magnet construction and test activities at the Superconducting Super Collider Laboratory (SSC), the Large Hadron Collider at CERN (LHC), and the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider at Brookhaven (RHIC). Future plan are also presented.

  19. Experience with IBS-suppression lattice in RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Litvinenko,V.N.; Luo, Y.; Ptitsyn, V.; Satogata, T.; Tepikian, S.; Bai, M.; Bruno, D.; Cameron, P.; Connolly, R.; Della Penna, A.; Drees, A.; Fedotov, A.; Ganetis, G.; Hoff, L.; Louie, W.; Malitsky, N.; Marr, G.; Marusic, A.; Montag, C.; Pilat, F.; Roser, T.; Trbojevic, D.; Tsoupas, N.

    2008-06-23

    An intra-beam scattering (IBS) is the limiting factor of the luminosity lifetime for RHIC operating with heavy ions. In order to suppress the IBS we designed and implemented new lattice with higher betatron tunes. This lattice had been developed during last three years and had been used for gold ions in yellow ring of the RHIC during d-Au part of the RHIC Run-8. The use of this lattice allowed both significant increases in the luminosity lifetime and the luminosity levels via reduction of beta-stars in the IPS. In this paper we report on the development, the tests and the performance of IBS-suppression lattice in RHIC, including the resulting increases in the peak and the average luminosity. We also report on our plans for future steps with the IBS suppression.

  20. ON THE FEASIBILITY OF POLARIZED HEAVY IONS IN RHIC.

    SciTech Connect

    MACKAY, W.W.

    2006-06-23

    Heavy nonspherical ions such as uranium have been proposed for collisions in RHIC[1]. When two such ions collide with their long axes aligned parallel to the beams (large helicities), then the plasma density might be as much as 60% higher. Since the collisions might have any orientation of the two nuclei, the alignment of the nuclei must be inferred from a complicated unfolding of multiplicity distributions. Instead, if it would be possible to polarize the ions and control the orientation in RHIC, then a much better sensitivity might be obtained. This paper investigates the manipulation of such polarized ions with highly distorted shapes in RHIC. A number of ion species are considered as possibilities with either full or partial Siberian snakes in RHIC.

  1. Beam dynamics limits for low-energy RHIC operation

    SciTech Connect

    Fedotov,A.V.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Chang, X.; Kayran, D.; Litvinenko, V.N.; Pozdeyev, E.; Satogata, T.

    2008-08-25

    There is a strong interest in low-energy RHIC operations in the single-beam total energy range of 2.5-25 GeV/nucleon [1-3]. Collisions in this energy range, much of which is below nominal RHIC injection energy, will help to answer one of the key questions in the field of QCD about the existence and location of a critical point on the QCD phase diagram [4]. There have been several short test runs during 2006-2008 RHIC operations to evaluate RHIC operational challenges at these low energies [5]. Beam lifetimes observed during the test runs were limited by machine nonlinearities. This performance limit can be improved with sufficient machine tuning. The next luminosity limitation comes from transverse and longitudinal Intra-beam Scattering (IBS), and ultimately from the space-charge limit. Here we summarize dynamic effects limiting beam lifetime and possible improvement with electron cooling.

  2. PROGRESS OF HIGH-ENERGY ELECTRON COOLING FOR RHIC.

    SciTech Connect

    FEDOTOV,A.V.

    2007-09-10

    The fundamental questions about QCD which can be directly answered at Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) call for large integrated luminosities. The major goal of RHIC-I1 upgrade is to achieve a 10 fold increase in luminosity of Au ions at the top energy of 100 GeV/nucleon. Such a boost in luminosity for RHIC-II is achievable with implementation of high-energy electron cooling. The design of the higher-energy cooler for RHIC-II recently adopted a non-magnetized approach which requires a low temperature electron beam. Such electron beams will be produced with a superconducting Energy Recovery Linac (ERL). Detailed simulations of the electron cooling process and numerical simulations of the electron beam transport including the cooling section were performed. An intensive R&D of various elements of the design is presently underway. Here, we summarize progress in these electron cooling efforts.

  3. Theoretical perspective on RHIC (relativistic heavy ion collider) physics

    SciTech Connect

    Dover, C.B.

    1990-10-01

    We discuss the status of the relativistic heavy ion collider (RHIC) project at Brookhaven, and assess some key experiments which propose to detect the signatures of a transient quark-gluon plasma (QGP) phase in such collisions. 24 refs.

  4. A mulitple cathode gun design for the eRHIC polarized electron source

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, X.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Kewisch, J.; Litvinenko, V.; Pikin, A.; Ptitsyn, V.; Rao, T.; Sheehy, B.; Skaritka, J.; Wang, E.; Wu, Q.; Xin, T.

    2011-03-28

    The future electron-ion collider eRHIC requires a high average current ({approx}50 mA), short bunch ({approx}3 mm), low emittance ({approx}20 {micro}m) polarized electron source. The maximum average current of a polarized electron source so far is more than 1 mA, but much less than 50 mA, from a GaAs:Cs cathode. One possible approach to overcome the average current limit and to achieve the required 50 mA beam for eRHIC, is to combine beamlets from multiple cathodes to one beam. In this paper, we present the feasibility studies of this technique. The future eRHIC project, next upgrade of RHIC, will be the first electron-heavy ion collider in the world. It requires polarized electron source with a high average current ({approx}50 mA), short bunch ({approx}3 mm), emittance of about 20 {micro}m and energy spread of {approx}1% at 10 MeV. The state-of-art polarized electron cathode can generate average current of about more than 1 mA, but much less than 50 mA. The current is limited by the low quantum efficiency, space charge and ultra-high vacuum requirement of the polarized cathode. A possible approach to achieve the 50 mA beam is to employ multiple cathodes, such as 20 cathodes, and funnel the multiple bunched beams from cathodes to the same axis. Fig.1 illustrates schematically the concept of combining the multiple beams. We name it as 'Gatling gun' because it bears functional similarity to a Gatling gun. Laser beams strike the cathodes sequentially with revolution frequency of 700 kHz. Each beam bunch is focused by a solenoid and is bent toward the combiner. The combiner with rotating bending field bends all bunches arriving the combiner with a rotational pattern to the same axis. The energy of each bunch is modified by a bunching cavity (112MHz) and a 3rd harmonic cavity (336MHz). The bunch length is compressed ballistically in the drift space and is frozen after energy has been boosted to 10 MeV by the Booster linac. Each beam bunch contains 3.5 nC charge. The

  5. Microsphere insulation systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, Mark S. (Inventor); Willen, Gary S. (Inventor); Mohling, Robert A. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    A new insulation system is provided that contains microspheres. This insulation system can be used to provide insulated panels and clamshells, and to insulate annular spaces around objects used to transfer, store, or transport cryogens and other temperature-sensitive materials. This insulation system provides better performance with reduced maintenance than current insulation systems.

  6. Heavy Flavor Measurements at the RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Donadelli, Marisilvia

    2010-11-12

    The main focus of the heavy flavor program at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) facility is to investigate the properties of the Quark-Gluon Plasma poduced in ultra-relativistic heavy ion collisions, by studying its effect on open heavy flavor and quarkonia production. The measurements shown in this Letter were performed by PHENIX and STAR experiments in p+p, d+Au, Au+Au collisions at {radical}(S{sub NN}) = 200 GeV. Charm and beauty cross sections are measured and compared through single lepton, and lepton-hadron correlations in p+p collisions. R{sub AA} modification factor for single electrons in Au+Au collisions is presented. Quarkonia measurements include J/{Psi}, {Psi}' and {Upsilon} yields as well as rapidity dependence, and modification factors for J/{Psi} in d+Au collisions and for {Upsilon} in Au+Au collisions.

  7. RHIC on "How the Universe Works"

    ScienceCinema

    Lisa, Mike

    2016-07-12

    If you want to know how the universe works, part of the answer lies in understanding the building blocks of matter—before they became inextricably bound within the protons, neutrons, and atoms that make up everything visible in our universe today. That’s why producers for the Science Channel’s documentary series “How the Universe Works” made a point of stopping by the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory, where physicists recreate post-Big Bang “primal matter” millions of times each day. Learn about RHIC’s role in exploring the building blocks of matter by watching this segment.

  8. Physics at Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC)

    SciTech Connect

    Shuryak, E.V.

    1990-08-01

    This introductory talk contains a brief discussion of future experiments at RHIC related to physics of superdense matter. In particular, we consider the relation between space-time picture of the collision and spectra of the observed secondaries. We discuss where one should look for QGP signals and for possible manifestation of the phase transition. We pay more attention to a rather new topic: hadron modification in the gas phase, which is interesting by itself as a collective phenomenon, and also as a precursor indicating what happens with hadrons near the phase transition. We briefly review current understanding of the photon physics, dilepton production, charm and strangeness and J/{psi} suppression. At the end we try to classify all possible experiments. 47 refs., 3 figs.

  9. EXOTIC PARTICLE SEARCHES WITH STAR AT RHIC.

    SciTech Connect

    KANABA,S.

    2004-03-15

    We present preliminary results of the STAR experiment at RHIC on exotic particle searches in minimum bias Au + Au collisions at {radical} s{sub NN} = 200 GeV. We observe a narrow peak at 1734 {+-} 0.5 {+-} 5 MeV in the {lambda}K{sub s}{sup 0} invariant mass with width consistent with the experimental resolution of about 6 MeV within the errors. The statistical significance can be quantified between 3 and 6 {sigma} depending on cuts and methods. If this peak corresponds to a real particle state it would be a candidate for the N{sup 0} or the {Xi}{sup 0} I = 1/2 pentaquark states.

  10. Hadron spectroscopy and B physics at RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, S.U.; Weygand, D.P.; Willutzki, H.J.

    1991-11-01

    A description is given of the physics opportunities at RHIC regarding quark-gluon spectroscopy. The basic idea is to isolate with appropriate triggers the sub-processes pomeron + pomeron {yields} hadrons and {gamma}{sup *} + {gamma}{sup *} {yields} hadrons with the net effective mass of hadrons in the range of 1.0 to 10.0 GeV, in order to study the hadronic states composed of quarks and gluons. The double-pomeron interactions are expected to produce glueballs and hybrids preferentially, while the two-offshell-photon initial states should couple predominantly to quarkonia and multiquark states. Of particular interest is the possibility of carrying out a CP-violation study in the self-tagging B decays, B{sub d}{sup 0} {yields} K{sup +}{pi}{sup {minus}} and {bar B}{sub d}{sup 0} {yields} K{sup {minus}}{pi}{sup +}. 20 refs., 4 figs.

  11. RHIC 10 Hz global orbit feedback system

    SciTech Connect

    Michnoff, R.; Arnold, L.; Carboni, L.; Cerniglia, P; Curcio, A.; DeSanto, L.; Folz, C.; Ho, C.; Hoff, L.; Hulsart, R.; Karl, R.; Luo, Y.; Liu, C.; MacKay, W.; Mahler, G.; Meng, W.; Mernick, K.; Minty, M.; Montag, C.; Olsen, R.; Piacentino, J.; Popken, P.; Przybylinski, R.; Ptitsyn, V.; Ritter, J.; Schoenfeld, R.; Thieberger, P.; Tuozzolo, J.; Weston, A.; White, J.; Ziminski, P.; Zimmerman, P.

    2011-03-28

    Vibrations of the cryogenic triplet magnets at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) are suspected to be causing the horizontal beam perturbations observed at frequencies around 10 Hz. Several solutions to counteract the effect have been considered in the past, including a local beam feedback system at each of the two experimental areas, reinforcing the magnet base support assembly, and a mechanical servo feedback system. However, the local feedback system was insufficient because perturbation amplitudes outside the experimental areas were still problematic, and the mechanical solutions are very expensive. A global 10 Hz orbit feedback system consisting of 36 beam position monitors (BPMs) and 12 small dedicated dipole corrector magnets in each of the two 3.8 km circumference counter-rotating rings has been developed and commissioned in February 2011. A description of the system architecture and results with beam will be discussed.

  12. Note on polarized RHIC bunch arrangement

    SciTech Connect

    Underwood, D.

    1996-08-30

    We discuss what combinations of bunch polarization in the two RHIC rings are necessary to do the physics measurements at various interaction regions. We also consider the bunches for both the pion inclusive and p-p elastic polarization measurements. Important factors to consider are the direction of the polarization with respect to the momentum in each bunch, the beam gas backgrounds, and the simulation of zero - polarization in one beam by averaging + and - helicity, and luminosity monitoring for normalization. These considerations can be addressed by setting the relative number of each of the 9 combinations possible at each of the 6 interaction regions. The combinations are (+ empty -) yellow X (+ empty -)blue, where yellow and blue are the counter-rotating rings.

  13. Code generation of RHIC accelerator device objects

    SciTech Connect

    Olsen, R.H.; Hoff, L.; Clifford, T.

    1995-12-01

    A RHIC Accelerator Device Object is an abstraction which provides a software view of a collection of collider control points known as parameters. A grammar has been defined which allows these parameters, along with code describing methods for acquiring and modifying them, to be specified efficiently in compact definition files. These definition files are processed to produce C++ source code. This source code is compiled to produce an object file which can be loaded into a front end computer. Each loaded object serves as an Accelerator Device Object class definition. The collider will be controlled by applications which set and get the parameters in instances of these classes using a suite of interface routines. Significant features of the grammar are described with details about the generated C++ code.

  14. MEASUREMENT OF TRANSVERSE ECHOES IN RHIC.

    SciTech Connect

    FISCHER, W.; SATOGATA, T.; TOMAS. R.

    2005-05-16

    Beam echoes are a very sensitive method to measure diffusion, and longitudinal echo measurements were performed in a number of machines. In RHIC, for the first time, a transverse beam echo was observed after applying a dipole kick followed by a quadrupole .kick. After application of the dipole kick, the dipole moment decohered completely due to lattice nonlinearities. When a quadrupole kick is applied at time {tau} after the dipole kick, the beam re-cohered at time 2{tau} thus showing an echo response. We describe the experimental setup and measurement results. In the measurements the dipole and quadrupole kick amplitudes, amplitude dependent tune shift, and the time between dipole and quadrupole kick were varied. In addition, measurements were taken with gold bunches of different intensities. These should exhibit different transverse diffusion rates due to intra-beam scattering.

  15. ALL-FERRITE RHIC INJECTION KICKER

    SciTech Connect

    HAHN,H.; FISCHER,W.; PTITSYN,V.I.; TUOZZOLO,J.E.

    2001-06-18

    Ion beams are transferred from the AGS into RHIC in boxcar fashion as single bunches. The nominal design assumes 60 bunches per ring but increasing the number of bunches to gain luminosity is possible, thereby requiring injection kickers with a shorter rise time. The original injection system consists of traveling-wave dielectric loaded kicker magnets and a Blumlein pulser with a rise time adequate for the present operation. Voltage breakdown in the dielectric kickers suggested the use of all-ferrite magnets. In order to minimize the conversion cost, the design of the all-ferrite kicker uses the same components as the dielectric loaded units. The all-ferrite kickers showed in bench measured good breakdown properties and a current rise time of < 50 ns. A prototype kicker has been installed in the blue ring and was tested with beam. Beam measurements indicate suitability of all-ferrite kicker magnets for upgraded operation.

  16. COUPLING MEASUREMENT AND CORRECTION AT RHIC.

    SciTech Connect

    PILAT,F.; BEEBE-WANG,J.; FISCHER,W.; PTITSYN,V.; SATOGATA,T.

    2002-06-02

    Coupling correction at RHIC has been operationally achieved through a two-step process: using local triplet skew quadrupoles to compensate coupling corn rolled low-beta triplet quadrupoles, and minimizing the tune separation and residual coupling with orthogonal global skew quadrupole families. An application has been developed for global correction that allows skew quadrupole tuning and tune display with a choice of different tune measurement techniques, including tune-meter, Schottky and phase lock loop (PLL). Coupling effects have been analysed by using 1024-turn (TBT) information from the beam position monitor (BPM) system. These data allow the reconstruction of the off-diagonal terms of the transfer matrix, a measure of global coupling. At both injection and storage energies, coordination of tune meter kicks with TBT acquisition at 322 BPM's in each ring allows the measurement of local coupling at all BPM locations.

  17. RHIC AC DIPOLE DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION.

    SciTech Connect

    BAI,M.; METH,M.; PAI,C.; PARKER,B.; PEGGS,S.; ROSER,T.; SANDERS,R.; TRBOJEVIC,D.; ZALTSMAN,A.

    2001-06-18

    Two ac dipoles with vertical and horizontal magnetic field have been proposed at RHIC for applications in linear and non-linear beam dynamics and spin manipulations. A magnetic field amplitude of 380 Gm is required to produce a coherent oscillation of 5 times the rms beam size at the top energy. We take the ac dipole frequency to be 1.0% of the revolution frequency away from the betatron frequency. To achieve the strong magnetic field with minimum power loss, an air-core magnet with two seven turn winding of low loss Litz wire resonating at 64 kHz is designed. The system is also designed to allow one to connect the two magnet winding in series to resonate at 37 kHz for the spin manipulation. Measurements of a half length prototype magnet are also presented.

  18. Breakthrough: RHIC Explores Matter at the Dawn of Time

    SciTech Connect

    Paul Sorensen

    2012-06-24

    Physicist Paul Sorensen describes discoveries made at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), a particle accelerator at the U.S. Department of Energy's Brookhaven National Laboratory. At RHIC, scientists from around the world study what the universe may have looked like in the first microseconds after its birth, helping us to understand more about why the physical world works the way it does -- from the smallest particles to the largest stars.

  19. Breakthrough: RHIC Explores Matter at the Dawn of Time

    ScienceCinema

    Paul Sorensen

    2016-07-12

    Physicist Paul Sorensen describes discoveries made at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), a particle accelerator at the U.S. Department of Energy's Brookhaven National Laboratory. At RHIC, scientists from around the world study what the universe may have looked like in the first microseconds after its birth, helping us to understand more about why the physical world works the way it does -- from the smallest particles to the largest stars.

  20. SYNTHESIZER CONTROLLED BEAM TRANSFER FROM THE AGS TO RHIC.

    SciTech Connect

    DELONG,J.; BRENNAN,J.M.; FISCHER,W.; HAYES,T.; SMITH,K.; VALENTINO,S.

    2001-06-18

    To ensure minimal losses and to preserve longitudinal emittance, beam is transferred from the AGS to the RHIC bunch to bucket. This requires precision frequency and phase control for synchronization and kicker timing. The required precision is realized with a set of Direct Digital Synthesizers. Each synthesizer can be frequency and phase modulated to align the AGS bunch to the target bucket in the RHIC phase.

  1. Polarized proton acceleration program at the AGS and RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Y.Y.

    1995-06-01

    Presented is an overview of the program for acceleration of polarized protons in the AGS and their injection into the RHIC collider. The problem of depolarizing resonances in strong focusing circulator accelerators is discussed. The intrinsic resonances are jumped over by the fast tune jump, and a partial Siberian Snake is used to compensate for over forty imperfection resonances in the AGS. Two sets of full Siberian Snake and spin rotators will be employed in RHIC.

  2. COOLING DYNAMICS STUDIES AND SCENARIOS FOR THE RHIC COOLER.

    SciTech Connect

    FEDOTOV,A.V.; BEN-ZVI,I.; LITVINENKO, V.

    2005-05-16

    In this paper, we discuss various electron cooling dynamics studies for RHIC. We also present simulations [1] of various possibilities of using electron cooling at RHIC, which includes cooling at the top energy, pre-cooling at low energy, aspects of transverse and longitudinal cooling and their impact on the luminosity. Electron cooling at various collision energies both for heavy ions and protons is also discussed.

  3. MEASUREMENT OF MULTIPOLE STRENGTHS FROM RHIC BPM DATA.

    SciTech Connect

    TOMAS,R.BAI,M.FISCHER,W.ET AL.

    2004-07-05

    Recently resonance driving terms were successfully measured in the CERN SPS and the BNL RHIC from the Fourier spectrum of BPM data. Based on these measurements a new analysis has been derived to extract multipole strengths. In this paper we present experimental measurements of sextupolar and skew quadrupolar strengths carried out at RHIC. A non-destructive measurement using an AC dipole is also presented.

  4. MEASURING LOCAL GRADIENT AND SKEW QUADRUPOLE ERRORS IN RHIC IRS.

    SciTech Connect

    CARDONA,J.; PEGGS,S.; PILAT,R.; PTITSYN,V.

    2004-07-05

    The measurement of local linear errors at RHIC interaction regions using an ''action and phase'' analysis of difference orbits has already been presented. This paper evaluates the accuracy of this technique using difference orbits that were taken when known gradient errors and skew quadrupole errors were intentionally introduced. It also presents action and phase analysis of simulated orbits when controlled errors are intentionally placed in a RHIC simulation model.

  5. Tracking studies in eRHIC energy-recovery recirculator

    SciTech Connect

    Meot, F.; Brooks, S.; Ptitsyn, V.; Trbojevic, D.; Tsoupas, N.

    2015-07-13

    Beam and polarization tracking studies in eRHIC energy recovery electron recirculator are presented, based on a very preliminary design of the FFAG lattice. These simulations provide examples of some of the beam and spin optics aspects of the linear FFAG lattice concept and its application in eRHIC, they provide code benchmarking for synchrotron radiation and spin diffusion in addition, and pave the way towards end-to-end 6-D(phasespace)+3D(spin) tracking simulations.

  6. Polarization simulations in the RHIC run 15 lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Meot, F.; Huang, H.; Luo, Y.; Ranjbar, V.; Robert-Demolaize, G.; White, S.

    2015-05-03

    RHIC polarized proton Run 15 uses a new acceleration ramp optics, compared to RHIC Run 13 and earlier runs, in relation with electron-lens beam-beam compensation developments. The new optics induces different strengths in the depolarizing snake resonance sequence, from injection to top energy. As a consequence, polarization transport along the new ramp has been investigated, based on spin tracking simulations. Sample results are reported and discussed.

  7. Water absorption and desorption in shuttle ablator and insulation materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitaker, A. F.; Smith, C. F.; Wooden, V. A.; Cothren, B. E.; Gregory, H.

    1982-01-01

    Shuttle systems ablator and insulation materials underwent water soak with subsequent water desorption in vacuum. Water accumulation in these materials after a soak for 24 hours ranged from +1.1% for orbiter tile to +161% for solid rocket booster MSA-1. After 1 minute in vacuum, water retention ranged from none in the orbiter tile to +70% for solid rocket booster cork.

  8. Design of the EBIS vacuum system

    SciTech Connect

    Mapes, M.; Smart, L.; Weiss, D.

    2011-03-28

    At Brookhaven National Laboratory the Electron Beam Ion Source (EBIS) is presently being commissioned. The EBIS will be a new heavy ion pre-injector for the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). The new preinjector has the potential for significant future intensity increases and can produce heavy ion beams of all species including uranium. The background pressure in the ionization region of the EBIS required to be low enough that it does not produce a significant number of ions from background gas. The pressure in the regions of the electron gun and electron collector can be higher than in the ionization region provided there is efficient vacuum separation between the sections. For injection the ions must be accelerated to 100KV by pulsing the EBIS platform. All associated equipment including the vacuum equipment on the platform is at a 100KV potential. The vacuum system design and the vacuum controls for the EBIS platform and transport system will be presented as well as the interface with the Booster Ring which has a pressure 10-11 Torr.

  9. SEALED INSULATOR BUSHING

    DOEpatents

    Carmichael, H.

    1952-11-11

    The manufacture of electrode insulators that are mechanically strong, shock-proof, vacuum tight, and are capable of withstanding gas pressures of many atmospheres under intense neutron bombardment, such as may be needed in an ionization chamber, is described. The ansulator comprises a bolt within a quartz tube, surrounded by a bushing held in place by two quartz rings, and tightened to a pressure of 1,000 pounds per square inch by a nut and washer. Quartz is the superior material to meet these conditions, however, to withstand this pressure the quartz must be fire polished, lapped to form smooth and parallel surfaces, and again fire polished to form an extremely smooth and fracture resistant mating surface.

  10. Commissioning results from the recently upgraded RHIC LLRF system

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, K.S.; Harvey, M.; Hayes, T.; Narayan, G.; Severino, F.; Yuan, S.; Zaltsman, A.

    2011-03-28

    During RHIC Run 10, the first phase of the LLRF Upgrade was successfully completed. This involved replacing the aging VME based system with a modern digital system based on the recently developed RHIC LLRF Upgrade Platform, and commissioning the system as part of the normal RHIC start up process. At the start of Run 11, the second phase of the upgrade is underway, involving a significant expansion of both hardware and functionality. This paper will review the commissioning effort and provide examples of improvements in system performance, flexibility and scalability afforded by the new platform. The RHIC LLRF upgrade is based on the recently developed RHIC LLRF Upgrade Platform. The major design goals of the platform are: (1) Design a stand alone, generic, digital, modular control architecture which can be configured to satisfy all of the application demands we currently have, and which will be supportable and upgradeable into the foreseeable future; and (2) It should integrate seamlessly into existing controls infrastructure, be easy to deploy, provide access to all relevant control parameters (eliminate knobs), provide vastly improved diagnostic data capabilities, and permit remote reconfiguration. Although the system is still in its infancy, we think the initial commissioning results from RHIC indicate that these goals have been achieved, and that we've only begun to realize the benefits the platform provides.

  11. Proceedings of the symposium on RHIC detector R&D

    SciTech Connect

    Makdisi, Y.; Stevens, A.J.

    1991-12-31

    This report contains papers on the following topics: Development of Analog Memories for RHIC Detector Front-end Electronic Systems; Monolithic Circuit Development for RHIC at Oak Ridge National Laboratory; Highly Integrated Electronics for the STAR TPC; Monolithic Readout Circuits for RHIC; New Methods for Trigger Electronics Development; Neurocomputing methods for Pattern Recognition in Nuclear Physics; The Development of a Silicon Multiplicity Detector System; The Vertex Detector for the Lepton/Photon Collaboration; Simulations of Silicon Vertex Tracker for STAR Experiment at RHIC; Calorimeter/Absorber Optimization for a RHIC Dimuon Experiment (RD-10 Project); Applications of the LAHET simulation Code to Relativistic Heavy Ion Detectors; Highly Segmented, High Resolution Time-of-Flight System; Research and Development on a Sub 100 Picosecond Time-of-Flight System Based on Silicon Avalance Diodes; Behavior of TPC`s in a High Particle Flux Environment; Generic R&D on Undoped Cesium Iodide and Lead Fluoride; and A Transition Radiation Detector for RHIC Featuring Accurate Tracking and dE/dx Particle Identification. Selected papers were processed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  12. ELECTRON COOLING SIMULATIONS FOR LOW-ENERGY RHIC OPERATION.

    SciTech Connect

    FEDOTOV,A.V.; BEN-ZVI, I.; CHANG, X.; KAYRAN, D.; SATOGATA, T.

    2007-09-10

    Recently, a strong interest emerged in running the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at low beam total energies of 2.5-25 GeV/nucleon, substantially lower than the nominal beam total energy of 100 GeV/nucleon. Collisions in this low energy range are motivated by one of the key questions of quantum chromodynamics (QCD) about the existence and location of critical point on the QCD phase diagram. Applying electron cooling directly at these low energies in RHIC would result in significant luminosity increase and long beam stores for physics. Without direct cooling in RHIC at these low energies, beam lifetime and store times are very short, limited by strong transverse and longitudinal intrabeam scattering (IBS). In addition, for the lowest energies of the proposed energy scan, the longitudinal emittance of ions injected from the AGS into RHIC may be too big to fit into the RHIC RF bucket. An improvement in the longitudinal emittance of the ion beam can be provided by an electron cooling system at the AGS injection energy. Simulations of electron cooling both for direct cooling at low energies in RHIC and for injection energy cooling in the AGS were performed and are summarized in this report.

  13. High Luminosity Heavy Quark and Electromagnetic Probes at RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    David, G; Frawley, A D; Rapp, R; Ullrich, T; Vogt, R; Xu, Z

    2008-03-30

    The Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory was designed to study the properties of quantum chromodynamics (QCD) in a hot and dense medium. The first years of RHIC operation and accompanying theoretical studies have helped pinpoint certain classes of measurements needed to more fully probe the medium and determine its properties. The medium created in these heavy-ion (AA) collisions appears to thermalize quickly and exhibits collective flow patterns consistent with hydrodynamic predictions. The initial temperature of the medium is not known and it is not yet understood whether deconfinement and chiral symmetry restoration are realized during its evolution. The answers to these questions require higher luminosities and detector upgrades, referred to as RHIC-II. The goal of RHIC II is to achieve the answers to the above questions by increasing the ion luminosity. The measurements thus far at RHIC could not fully address these fundamental questions, either due to incomplete detection capabilities or insufficient statistics to draw meaningful and robust conclusions. Working groups were formed to determine which physics topics could best be addressed by the combination of planned upgrades and increased luminosity. Reports from each working group were used to prepare a white paper for RHIC II, along with additional inputs from the conveners of all working groups.

  14. Integrated and Load Responsive Multilayer Insulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dye, S.; Kopelove, A.; Mills, G. L.

    2010-04-01

    Multilayer insulation (MLI) is used to reduce heat leak into cryogenic systems such as tanks, dewars and instruments, and used to control spacecraft heat leak. MLI is typically used in a high vacuum (<10-3 Pa) where its performance usually exceeds other insulations by 10-fold. Conventional MLI consists of layers of low thermal emissivity metalized polymer sheets separated by low conductance netting spacers. We report on an improved MLI in which the spacer netting is replaced by micro-molded polymer parts with low thermal conductance that provide controlled layer spacing. Integrated MLI (IMLI) is a precisely engineered insulation system with advantages over conventional MLI, including higher performance, more predictable performance, more robust, lower particulate contamination, optional electrical conduction and lower cost. A second novel insulation, Load Responsive MLI (LRMLI) is described which uses polymer spacers that dynamically respond to load, compressing to support a thin, lightweight vacuum shell under one atmosphere external pressure, and decompressing under reduced atmospheric pressure or vacuum for lower heat leak. Structural and thermal analysis and testing results are presented. IMLI and LRMLI performance are compared to conventional MLI and polymer Spray On Foam Insulation (SOFI).

  15. Window Insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    A highly reflective insulating material developed to protect NASA spacecraft from intense solar radiation is now being used in a commercially-available window-insulating product which offers significant energy savings. Called Nunsun, it is a thin metallized film adhesively bonded to windows of homes, office buildings, schools, industrial plants and other facilities; the film reflects the sun's heat and glare outward, thereby cutting down on energy costs for cooling. Trained dealer personnel can affix the film to windows of any size in minutes (right), converting ordinary glass to heat-reflective mirror glass at a fraction of the cost. Manufactured by National Metallizing, a division of Standard Packaging Corporation, Cranbury, New Jersey, Nunsun is also available in windowshade form.

  16. Overview of recent studies and modifications being made to RHIC to mitigate the effects of a potential failure to the helium distribution system

    SciTech Connect

    Tuozzolo, J.; Bruno, D.; DiLieto, A.; Heppner, G.; Karol, R.; Lessard,E.; Liaw, C-J; McIntyre, G; Mi, C.; Reich, J.; Sandberg, J.; Seberg, S.; Smart, L.; Tallerico, T.; Theisen, C.; Todd, R.; Zapasek R.

    2011-03-28

    In order to cool the superconducting magnets in RHIC, its helium refrigerator distributes 4.5 K helium throughout the tunnel along with helium distribution for the magnet line recoolers, the heat shield, and the associated return lines. The worse case for failure would be a release from the magnet distribution line which operates at 3.5 to 4.5 atmospheres and contains the energized magnet but with a potential energy of 70 MJoules should the insulation system fail or an electrical connection opens. Studies were done to determine release rate of the helium and the resultant reduction in O{sub 2} concentration in the RHIC tunnel and service buildings. Equipment and components were also reviewed for design and reliability and modifications were made to reduce the likelihood of failure and to reduce the volume of helium that could be released.

  17. Status and Outlook for the RHIC Luminosity Upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Mei

    2010-02-01

    As the world highest energy heavy ion collider, the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory has been the center for exploring the universe at its infant stage. The operations of RHIC over the past decade has produced many results. A new state of matter, the quark-gluon plasma which is believed to only have existed right after the birth of the universe, was first observed at RHIC during the collisions of Au ions. The experimental data also revealed that this new state of matter behaves like a perfect fluid. In addition to the heavy ion program, RHIC is also capable to accelerate polarized proton beams to high energy, which allows one to explore the spin structure of polarized protons. Both the heavy ion program and spin physics program require high luminosities at RHIC. Various efforts aimed at increasing the RHIC luminosity of heavy ion and polarized proton collisions, such as NEG coating beam pipes to reduce electron clouds, using intrabeam scattering lattice for heavy ion operations as well as longitudinal stochastic cooling. The average store luminosity of Au collisions at a beam energy of 100 GeV/u has reached 1027cm-2s-1. The average store luminosity of RHIC polarized proton collisions at a beam energy of 100 GeV reached 28x1030cm-2s-1 and 55x1030 cm-2s-1 for the polarized proton collisions at a beam energy 250 GeV. Currently, the luminosity is limited by beam-beam effects for polarized proton collisions and intrabeam scattering for heavy ion collisions. Novel techniques are explored and under development to address these issues. The addition of transverse stochastic cooling will minimize the beam size growth due to intrabeam scattering and increase the heavy ion luminosity lifetime. The technique of using 9MHz cavity to accelerate polarized protons minimizes the electron cloud effect, which can cause emittance blowup. It also helps to preserve the longitudinal emittance and yields shorter bunches. The technique of employing an

  18. Using fiberglass volumes for VPI of superconductive magnetic systems' insulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreev, I. S.; Bezrukov, A. A.; Bursikov, A. S.; Klimchenko, Y. A.; Marushin, E. L.; Mednikov, A. A.; Pischugin, A. B.; Rodin, I. Y.; Stepanov, D. B.

    2014-01-01

    The paper describes the method of manufacturing fiberglass molds for vacuum pressure impregnation (VPI) of high-voltage insulation of superconductive magnetic systems (SMS) with epoxidian hot-setting compounds. The basic advantages of using such vacuum volumes are improved quality of insulation impregnation in complex-shaped areas, and considerable cost-saving of preparing VPI of large-sized components due to dispensing with the stage of fabricating a metal impregnating volume. Such fiberglass vacuum molds were used for VPI of high-voltage insulation samples of an ITER reactor's PF1 poloidal coil. Electric insulation of these samples has successfully undergone a wide range of high-voltage and mechanical tests at room and cryogenic temperatures. Some results of the tests are also given in this paper.

  19. Using fiberglass volumes for VPI of superconductive magnetic systems’ insulation

    SciTech Connect

    Andreev, I. S.; Bezrukov, A. A.; Pischugin, A. B.; Bursikov, A. S.; Klimchenko, Y. A.; Marushin, E. L.; Mednikov, A. A.; Rodin, I. Y.; Stepanov, D. B.

    2014-01-29

    The paper describes the method of manufacturing fiberglass molds for vacuum pressure impregnation (VPI) of high-voltage insulation of superconductive magnetic systems (SMS) with epoxidian hot-setting compounds. The basic advantages of using such vacuum volumes are improved quality of insulation impregnation in complex-shaped areas, and considerable cost-saving of preparing VPI of large-sized components due to dispensing with the stage of fabricating a metal impregnating volume. Such fiberglass vacuum molds were used for VPI of high-voltage insulation samples of an ITER reactor’s PF1 poloidal coil. Electric insulation of these samples has successfully undergone a wide range of high-voltage and mechanical tests at room and cryogenic temperatures. Some results of the tests are also given in this paper.

  20. Ultra-Violet Induced Insulator Flashover

    SciTech Connect

    Javedani, J B; Houck, T L; Kelly, B T; Lahowe, D A; Shirk, M D; Goerz, D A

    2008-05-21

    Insulators are critical components in high-energy, pulsed power systems. It is known that the vacuum surface of the insulator will flashover when illuminated by ultraviolet (UV) radiation depending on the insulator material, insulator cone angle, applied voltage and insulator shot-history. A testbed comprised of an excimer laser (KrF, 248 nm, {approx} 2 MW/cm{sup 2}, 30 ns FWHM,), a vacuum chamber (low 1.0E-6 torr), and dc high voltage power supply (<60 kV) was assembled for insulator testing to measure the UV dose during a flashover event. Five in-house developed and calibrated fast D-Dot probes (>12 GHz, bandwidth) were embedded in the anode electrode underneath the insulator to determine the time of flashover with respect to UV arrival. A commercial energy meter were used to measure the UV fluence for each pulse. Four insulator materials High Density Polyethylene, Rexolite{reg_sign} 1400, Macor{trademark} and Mycalex with side-angles of 0, {+-}30, and {+-}45 degrees, 1.0 cm thick samples, were tested with a maximum UV fluence of 75 mJ/cm{sup 2} and at varying electrode charge (10 kV to 60 kV). This information clarified/corrected earlier published studies. A new phenomenon was observed related to the UV power level on flashover that as the UV pulse intensity was increased, the UV fluence on the insulator prior to flashover was also increased. This effect would bias the data towards higher minimum flashover fluence.