Science.gov

Sample records for rhizobial nodulation factors

  1. Rhizobial gibberellin negatively regulates host nodule number

    PubMed Central

    Tatsukami, Yohei; Ueda, Mitsuyoshi

    2016-01-01

    In legume–rhizobia symbiosis, the nodule number is controlled to ensure optimal growth of the host. In Lotus japonicus, the nodule number has been considered to be tightly regulated by host-derived phytohormones and glycopeptides. However, we have discovered a symbiont-derived phytohormonal regulation of nodule number in Mesorhizobium loti. In this study, we found that M. loti synthesized gibberellic acid (GA) under symbiosis. Hosts inoculated with a GA-synthesis-deficient M. loti mutant formed more nodules than those inoculated with the wild-type form at four weeks post inoculation, indicating that GA from already-incorporated rhizobia prevents new nodule formation. Interestingly, the genes for GA synthesis are only found in rhizobial species that inhabit determinate nodules. Our findings suggest that the already-incorporated rhizobia perform GA-associated negative regulation of nodule number to prevent delayed infection by other rhizobia. PMID:27307029

  2. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) as early signals in root hair cells responding to rhizobial nodulation factors

    PubMed Central

    Quinto, Carmen

    2008-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are involved in supporting polar growth in pollen tubes, fucoid cells and root hair cells. However, there is limited evidence showing ROS changes during the earliest stages of the interaction between legume roots and rhizobia. We recently reported using Phaseolus vulgaris as a model system, the occurrence of a transient increase of ROS, within seconds, at the tip of actively growing root hair cells after treatment with Nod factors (NFs).1 This transient response is NFs-specific, and clearly distinct from the ROS changes induced by a fungal elicitor, with which sustained increases in ROS signal, is observed. Since ROS levels are transiently elevated after NFs perception, we propose that this ROS response is specific of the symbiotic interaction. Furthermore, the observed ROS changes correlate spatially and temporarily with the reported transient increases in calcium levels suggesting key roles for calcium and ROS during the early NF perception. PMID:19704506

  3. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) as early signals in root hair cells responding to rhizobial nodulation factors.

    PubMed

    Cárdenas, Luis; Quinto, Carmen

    2008-12-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are involved in supporting polar growth in pollen tubes, fucoid cells and root hair cells. However, there is limited evidence showing ROS changes during the earliest stages of the interaction between legume roots and rhizobia. We recently reported using Phaseolus vulgaris as a model system, the occurrence of a transient increase of ROS, within seconds, at the tip of actively growing root hair cells after treatment with Nod factors (NFs).1 This transient response is NFs-specific, and clearly distinct from the ROS changes induced by a fungal elicitor, with which sustained increases in ROS signal, is observed. Since ROS levels are transiently elevated after NFs perception, we propose that this ROS response is specific of the symbiotic interaction. Furthermore, the observed ROS changes correlate spatially and temporarily with the reported transient increases in calcium levels suggesting key roles for calcium and ROS during the early NF perception.

  4. Rhizobial position as a main determinant in the problem of competition for nodulation in soybean.

    PubMed

    López-García, Silvina L; Vázquez, Tirso E E; Favelukes, Gabriel; Lodeiro, Aníbal R

    2002-04-01

    Selected Bradyrhizobium japonicum strains inoculated on soybean seeds often fail to occupy a significant proportion of nodules when a competitor rhizobial population is established in the soil. This competition problem could result from a genetic/ physiological advantage of the adapted soil population over the introduced inoculant or from a positional advantage, as the soil population already occupies the soil profile where the roots will penetrate, whereas the inoculant remains concentrated around the seeds. Here, we have assessed the contribution of these factors with a laboratory model in which a rhizobial population is established in sterile vermiculite. We observed that the wild-type strain B. japonicum LP 3004 was able to grow in pots with N-free plant nutrient solution-watered vermiculite for six or seven generations with a duplication rate of at least 0.7 day(-1). In addition, the rhizobial population persisted for 3 months with 10(6)-10(7) colony-forming units ml(-1) of the vermiculite-retained solution. N-starved, young rhizobial cultures are more efficient in performing several steps along their early association with soybean roots. However, N starvation during growth of rhizobia used for seed inoculation did not enhance their competitiveness against a 1 month vermiculite-established rhizobial population, which occupied more than 72% of the nodules. When a similarly established rhizobial population was recovered from the vermiculite and homogeneously suspended in plant nutrient solution, these cells were significantly less competitive (29% of nodules occupied) than rhizobia obtained from a fresh, logarithmic culture in a N-poor minimal medium, thus indicating that cell position rather than intrinsic competitiveness was the determinant for nodule occupation.

  5. Rhizobial Factors Required for Stem Nodule Maturation and Maintenance in Sesbania rostrata-Azorhizobium caulinodans ORS571 Symbiosis▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Shino; Aono, Toshihiro; Lee, Kyung-Bum; Suzuki, Tadahiro; Liu, Chi-Te; Miwa, Hiroki; Wakao, Seiji; Iki, Taichiro; Oyaizu, Hiroshi

    2007-01-01

    The molecular and physiological mechanisms behind the maturation and maintenance of N2-fixing nodules during development of symbiosis between rhizobia and legumes still remain unclear, although the early events of symbiosis are relatively well understood. Azorhizobium caulinodans ORS571 is a microsymbiont of the tropical legume Sesbania rostrata, forming N2-fixing nodules not only on the roots but also on the stems. In this study, 10,080 transposon-inserted mutants of A. caulinodans ORS571 were individually inoculated onto the stems of S. rostrata, and those mutants that induced ineffective stem nodules, as displayed by halted development at various stages, were selected. From repeated observations on stem nodulation, 108 Tn5 mutants were selected and categorized into seven nodulation types based on size and N2 fixation activity. Tn5 insertions of some mutants were found in the well-known nodulation, nitrogen fixation, and symbiosis-related genes, such as nod, nif, and fix, respectively, lipopolysaccharide synthesis-related genes, C4 metabolism-related genes, and so on. However, other genes have not been reported to have roles in legume-rhizobium symbiosis. The list of newly identified symbiosis-related genes will present clues to aid in understanding the maturation and maintenance mechanisms of nodules. PMID:17720818

  6. Identification of rhizobial strains nodulating Egyptian grain legumes.

    PubMed

    Zahran, Hamdi H; Chahboune, Rajaa; Moreno, Silvia; Bedmar, Eulogio J; Abdel-Fattah, Medhat; Yasser, Manal M; Mahmoud, Ahmed M

    2013-09-01

    Fifty four bacterial strains were isolated from root nodules of the grain legumes Cicer arietinum, Lens esculentus, Phaseolus vulgaris, Pisum sativum, and Vicia faba grown in cultivated lands of Beni-Suef Governorate (Egypt). Repetitive extragenic palindromic (REP)-polymerase chain reaction (PCR) clustered the strains into 15 REP-PCR groups. The nearly complete sequence of the 16S rRNA gene from a representative strain of each REP-PCR pattern showed that the strains were closely related to members of the family Rhizobiaceae of the Alphaproteobacteria. Pairwise alignments between globally aligned sequences indicated that the strains from V. faba had 99.6% identity with Rhizobium leguminosarum, and those from P. vulgaris 99.76% and 100% with sequences from R. leguminosarum and R. mesosinicum, respectively. Strains from P. sativum had 99.76%, 99.84%, and 99.92% sequence identity with R. leguminosarum, R. etli, and R. pisi, respectively, and those from L. esculentus had 99.61% identity with sequences from R. leguminosarum. Sequences of the strains from C. arietinum had 100% identity with those of Mesorhizobium amorphae and M. robiniae, respectively. Nitrogenase activity, determined as acetylene-dependent ethylene production, was detected in nodules formed after inoculation of the corresponding host plant with the representative rhizobial species.

  7. NODULES WITH ACTIVATED DEFENSE 1 is required for maintenance of rhizobial endosymbiosis in Medicago truncatula.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chao; Yu, Haixiang; Luo, Li; Duan, Liujian; Cai, Liuyang; He, Xinxing; Wen, Jiangqi; Mysore, Kirankumar S; Li, Guoliang; Xiao, Aifang; Duanmu, Deqiang; Cao, Yangrong; Hong, Zonglie; Zhang, Zhongming

    2016-10-01

    The symbiotic interaction between legume plants and rhizobia results in the formation of root nodules, in which symbiotic plant cells host and harbor thousands of nitrogen-fixing rhizobia. Here, a Medicago truncatula nodules with activated defense 1 (nad1) mutant was identified using reverse genetics methods. The mutant phenotype was characterized using cell and molecular biology approaches. An RNA-sequencing technique was used to analyze the transcriptomic reprogramming of nad1 mutant nodules. In the nad1 mutant plants, rhizobial infection and propagation in infection threads are normal, whereas rhizobia and their symbiotic plant cells become necrotic immediately after rhizobia are released from infection threads into symbiotic cells of nodules. Defense-associated responses were detected in nad1 nodules. NAD1 is specifically present in root nodule symbiosis plants with the exception of Morus notabilis, and the transcript is highly induced in nodules. NAD1 encodes a small uncharacterized protein with two predicted transmembrane helices and is localized at the endoplasmic reticulum. Our data demonstrate a positive role for NAD1 in the maintenance of rhizobial endosymbiosis during nodulation.

  8. DELLA-mediated gibberellin signalling regulates Nod factor signalling and rhizobial infection

    PubMed Central

    Fonouni-Farde, Camille; Tan, Sovanna; Baudin, Maël; Brault, Mathias; Wen, Jiangqi; Mysore, Kirankumar S.; Niebel, Andreas; Frugier, Florian; Diet, Anouck

    2016-01-01

    Legumes develop symbiotic interactions with rhizobial bacteria to form nitrogen-fixing nodules. Bacterial Nod factors (NFs) and plant regulatory pathways modulating NF signalling control rhizobial infections and nodulation efficiency. Here we show that gibberellin (GA) signalling mediated by DELLA proteins inhibits rhizobial infections and controls the NF induction of the infection marker ENOD11 in Medicago truncatula. Ectopic expression of a constitutively active DELLA protein in the epidermis is sufficient to promote ENOD11 expression in the absence of symbiotic signals. We show using heterologous systems that DELLA proteins can interact with the nodulation signalling pathway 2 (NSP2) and nuclear factor-YA1 (NF-YA1) transcription factors that are essential for the activation of NF responses. Furthermore, MtDELLA1 can bind the ERN1 (ERF required for nodulation 1) promoter and positively transactivate its expression. Overall, we propose that GA-dependent action of DELLA proteins may directly regulate the NSP1/NSP2 and NF-YA1 activation of ERN1 transcription to regulate rhizobial infections. PMID:27586842

  9. From β- to α-proteobacteria: the origin and evolution of rhizobial nodulation genes nodIJ.

    PubMed

    Aoki, Seishiro; Ito, Motomi; Iwasaki, Wataru

    2013-11-01

    Although many α- and some β-proteobacterial species are symbiotic with legumes, the evolutionary origin of nitrogen-fixing nodulation remains unclear. We examined α- and β-proteobacteria whose genomes were sequenced using large-scale phylogenetic profiling and revealed the evolutionary origin of two nodulation genes. These genes, nodI and nodJ (nodIJ), play key roles in the secretion of Nod factors, which are recognized by legumes during nodulation. We found that only the nodulating β-proteobacteria, including the novel strains isolated in this study, possess both nodIJ and their paralogous genes (DRA-ATPase/permease genes). Contrary to the widely accepted scenario of the α-proteobacterial origin of rhizobia, our exhaustive phylogenetic analysis showed that the entire nodIJ clade is included in the clade of Burkholderiaceae DRA-ATPase/permease genes, that is, the nodIJ genes originated from gene duplication in a lineage of the β-proteobacterial family. After duplication, the evolutionary rates of nodIJ were significantly accelerated relative to those of homologous genes, which is consistent with their novel function in nodulation. The likelihood analyses suggest that this accelerated evolution is not associated with changes in either nonsynonymous/synonymous substitution rates or transition/transversion rates, but rather, in the GC content. Although the low GC content of the nodulation genes has been assumed to reflect past horizontal transfer events from donor rhizobial genomes with low GC content, no rhizobial genome with such low GC content has yet been found. Our results encourage a reconsideration of the origin of nodulation and suggest new perspectives on the role of the GC content of bacterial genes in functional adaptation.

  10. Molybdate in Rhizobial Seed-Coat Formulations Improves the Production and Nodulation of Alfalfa.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jiqiong; Deng, Bo; Zhang, Yingjun; Cobb, Adam B; Zhang, Zhao

    2017-01-01

    Rhizobia-legume symbiosis is the most well researched biological nitrogen fixation system. Coating legume seeds with rhizobia is now a recognized practical measure for improving the production of legume corp. However, the efficacy of some commercial rhizobia inoculants cannot be guaranteed in China due to the low rate of live rhizobia in these products. A greenhouse experiment was conducted to assess the effects of different rhizobial inoculant formulations on alfalfa productivity and nitrogen fixation. Two rhizobia strains, (ACCC17631 and ACCC17676), that are effective partners with alfalfa variety Zhongmu No. 1 were assessed with different concentrations of ammonium molybdate in seed-coat formulations with two different coating adhesives. Our study showed that the growth, nodulation, and nitrogen fixation ability of the plants inoculated with the ACCC17631 rhizobial strain were greatest when the ammonium molybdate application was0.2% of the formulation. An ammonium molybdate concentration of 0.1% was most beneficial to the growth of the plants inoculated with the ACCC17676 rhizobial strain. The sodium carboxymethyl cellulose and sodium alginate, used as coating adhesives, did not have a significant effect on alfalfa biomass and nitrogen fixation. However, the addition of skimmed milk to the adhesive improved nitrogenase activity. These results demonstrate that a new rhizobial seed-coat formulation benefitted alfalfa nodulation and yield.

  11. Molybdate in Rhizobial Seed-Coat Formulations Improves the Production and Nodulation of Alfalfa

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jiqiong; Deng, Bo; Zhang, Yingjun; Cobb, Adam B.; Zhang, Zhao

    2017-01-01

    Rhizobia-legume symbiosis is the most well researched biological nitrogen fixation system. Coating legume seeds with rhizobia is now a recognized practical measure for improving the production of legume corp. However, the efficacy of some commercial rhizobia inoculants cannot be guaranteed in China due to the low rate of live rhizobia in these products. A greenhouse experiment was conducted to assess the effects of different rhizobial inoculant formulations on alfalfa productivity and nitrogen fixation. Two rhizobia strains, (ACCC17631 and ACCC17676), that are effective partners with alfalfa variety Zhongmu No. 1 were assessed with different concentrations of ammonium molybdate in seed-coat formulations with two different coating adhesives. Our study showed that the growth, nodulation, and nitrogen fixation ability of the plants inoculated with the ACCC17631 rhizobial strain were greatest when the ammonium molybdate application was0.2% of the formulation. An ammonium molybdate concentration of 0.1% was most beneficial to the growth of the plants inoculated with the ACCC17676 rhizobial strain. The sodium carboxymethyl cellulose and sodium alginate, used as coating adhesives, did not have a significant effect on alfalfa biomass and nitrogen fixation. However, the addition of skimmed milk to the adhesive improved nitrogenase activity. These results demonstrate that a new rhizobial seed-coat formulation benefitted alfalfa nodulation and yield. PMID:28099471

  12. Persistence and diversity of rhizobial bacteria nodulating alfalfa

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Most alfalfa seed is treated with an inoculant consisting of several strains of the nitrogen fixing bacterium Sinorhizobium meliloti to enhance nodulation of seedlings. One strategy for increasing alfalfa forage yields, particularly in less fertile sites, is selection and use of highly competitive a...

  13. Structural basis for regulation of rhizobial nodulation and symbiosis gene expression by the regulatory NolR

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The symbiosis between rhizobial microbes and host plants involves the coordinated expression of multiple genes, which leads to nodule formation and nitrogen fixation. As part of the transcriptional machinery for nodulation and symbiosis across a range of Rhizobium, NolR serves as a global regulatory...

  14. Differential regulation of the Epr3 receptor coordinates membrane-restricted rhizobial colonization of root nodule primordia

    PubMed Central

    Kawaharada, Yasuyuki; Nielsen, Mette W.; Kelly, Simon; James, Euan K.; Andersen, Kasper R.; Rasmussen, Sheena R.; Füchtbauer, Winnie; Madsen, Lene H.; Heckmann, Anne B.; Radutoiu, Simona; Stougaard, Jens

    2017-01-01

    In Lotus japonicus, a LysM receptor kinase, EPR3, distinguishes compatible and incompatible rhizobial exopolysaccharides at the epidermis. However, the role of this recognition system in bacterial colonization of the root interior is unknown. Here we show that EPR3 advances the intracellular infection mechanism that mediates infection thread invasion of the root cortex and nodule primordia. At the cellular level, Epr3 expression delineates progression of infection threads into nodule primordia and cortical infection thread formation is impaired in epr3 mutants. Genetic dissection of this developmental coordination showed that Epr3 is integrated into the symbiosis signal transduction pathways. Further analysis showed differential expression of Epr3 in the epidermis and cortical primordia and identified key transcription factors controlling this tissue specificity. These results suggest that exopolysaccharide recognition is reiterated during the progressing infection and that EPR3 perception of compatible exopolysaccharide promotes an intracellular cortical infection mechanism maintaining bacteria enclosed in plant membranes. PMID:28230048

  15. Cowpea Nodules Harbor Non-rhizobial Bacterial Communities that Are Shaped by Soil Type Rather than Plant Genotype

    PubMed Central

    Leite, Jakson; Fischer, Doreen; Rouws, Luc F. M.; Fernandes-Júnior, Paulo I.; Hofmann, Andreas; Kublik, Susanne; Schloter, Michael; Xavier, Gustavo R.; Radl, Viviane

    2017-01-01

    Many studies have been pointing to a high diversity of bacteria associated to legume root nodules. Even though most of these bacteria do not form nodules with legumes themselves, it was shown that they might enter infection threads when co-inoculated with rhizobial strains. The aim of this work was to describe the diversity of bacterial communities associated with cowpea (Vigna unguiculata L. Walp) root nodules using 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing, regarding the factors plant genotype and soil type. As expected, Bradyrhizobium was the most abundant genus of the detected genera. Furthermore, we found a high bacterial diversity associated to cowpea nodules; OTUs related to the genera Enterobacter, Chryseobacterium, Sphingobacterium, and unclassified Enterobacteriacea were the most abundant. The presence of these groups was significantly influenced by the soil type and, to a lesser extent, plant genotype. Interestingly, OTUs assigned to Chryseobacterium were highly abundant, particularly in samples obtained from an Ultisol soil. We confirmed their presence in root nodules and assessed their diversity using a target isolation approach. Though their functional role still needs to be addressed, we postulate that Chryseobacterium strains might help cowpea plant to cope with salt stress in semi-arid regions. PMID:28163711

  16. The Symbiosis-Related ERN Transcription Factors Act in Concert to Coordinate Rhizobial Host Root Infection1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Cerri, Marion R.; Frances, Lisa; Kelner, Audrey; Middleton, Patrick H.; Auriac, Marie-Christine; Mysore, Kirankumar S.; Erard, Monique; Barker, David G.

    2016-01-01

    Legumes improve their mineral nutrition through nitrogen-fixing root nodule symbioses with soil rhizobia. Rhizobial infection of legumes is regulated by a number of transcription factors, including ERF Required for Nodulation1 (ERN1). Medicago truncatula plants defective in ERN1 are unable to nodulate, but still exhibit early symbiotic responses including rhizobial infection. ERN1 has a close homolog, ERN2, which shows partially overlapping expression patterns. Here we show that ern2 mutants exhibit a later nodulation phenotype than ern1, being able to form nodules but with signs of premature senescence. Molecular characterization of the ern2-1 mutation reveals a key role for a conserved threonine for both DNA binding and transcriptional activity. In contrast to either single mutant, the double ern1-1 ern2-1 line is completely unable to initiate infection or nodule development. The strong ern1-1 ern2-1 phenotype demonstrates functional redundancy between these two transcriptional regulators and reveals the essential role of ERN1/ERN2 to coordinately induce rhizobial infection and nodule organogenesis. While ERN1/ERN2 act in concert in the root epidermis, only ERN1 can efficiently allow the development of mature nodules in the cortex, probably through an independent pathway. Together, these findings reveal the key roles that ERN1/ERN2 play at the very earliest stages of root nodule development. PMID:27208242

  17. Phylogenetic diversity of rhizobial species and symbiovars nodulating Phaseolus vulgaris in Iran.

    PubMed

    Rouhrazi, Kiomars; Khodakaramian, Gholam; Velázquez, Encarna

    2016-03-01

    The phylogenetic diversity of 29 rhizobial strains nodulating Phaseolus vulgaris in Iran was analysed on the basis of their core and symbiotic genes. These strains displayed five 16S rRNA-RFLP patterns and belong to eight ERIC-PCR clusters. The phylogenetic analyses of 16S rRNA, recA and atpD core genes allowed the identification of several strains as Rhizobium sophoriradicis, R. leguminosarum, R. tropici and Pararhizobium giardinii, whereas other strains represented a new phylogenetic lineage related to R. vallis. These strains and those identified as R. sophoriradicis and R. leguminosarum belong to the symbiovar phaseoli carrying the γ nodC allele distributed in P. vulgaris endosymbionts in America, Europe, Africa and Asia. The strain identified as R. tropici belongs to the symbiovar tropici carried by strains of R. tropici, R. leucaenae, R. lusitanum and R. freirei nodulating P. vulgaris in America, Africa and Asia. The strain identified as P. giardinii belongs to the symbiovar giardinii together with the type strain of this species nodulating P. vulgaris in France. It is remarkable that the recently described species R. sophoriradicis is worldwide distributed in P. vulgaris nodules carrying the γ nodC allele of symbiovar phaseoli harboured by rhizobia isolated in the American distribution centers of this legume. © FEMS 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Compatibility of rhizobial genotypes within natural populations of Rhizobium leguminosarum biovar viciae for nodulation of host legumes.

    PubMed

    Laguerre, Gisèle; Louvrier, Philippe; Allard, Marie-Reine; Amarger, Noëlle

    2003-04-01

    Populations of Rhizobium leguminosarum biovar viciae were sampled from two bulk soils, rhizosphere, and nodules of host legumes, fava bean (Vicia faba) and pea (Pisum sativum) grown in the same soils. Additional populations nodulating peas, fava beans, and vetches (Vicia sativa) grown in other soils and fava bean-nodulating strains from various geographic sites were also analyzed. The rhizobia were characterized by repetitive extragenomic palindromic-PCR fingerprinting and/or PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) of 16S-23S ribosomal DNA intergenic spacers as markers of the genomic background and PCR-RFLP of a nodulation gene region, nodD, as a marker of the symbiotic component of the genome. Pairwise comparisons showed differences among the genetic structures of the bulk soil, rhizosphere, and nodule populations and in the degree of host specificity within the Vicieae cross-inoculation group. With fava bean, the symbiotic genotype appeared to be the preponderant determinant of the success in nodule occupancy of rhizobial genotypes independently of the associated genomic background, the plant genotype, and the soil sampled. The interaction between one particular rhizobial symbiotic genotype and fava bean seems to be highly specific for nodulation and linked to the efficiency of nitrogen fixation. By contrast with bulk soil and fava bean-nodulating populations, the analysis of pea-nodulating populations showed preferential associations between genomic backgrounds and symbiotic genotypes. Both components of the rhizobial genome may influence competitiveness for nodulation of pea, and rhizosphere colonization may be a decisive step in competition for nodule occupancy.

  19. Compatibility of Rhizobial Genotypes within Natural Populations of Rhizobium leguminosarum Biovar viciae for Nodulation of Host Legumes

    PubMed Central

    Laguerre, Gisèle; Louvrier, Philippe; Allard, Marie-Reine; Amarger, Noëlle

    2003-01-01

    Populations of Rhizobium leguminosarum biovar viciae were sampled from two bulk soils, rhizosphere, and nodules of host legumes, fava bean (Vicia faba) and pea (Pisum sativum) grown in the same soils. Additional populations nodulating peas, fava beans, and vetches (Vicia sativa) grown in other soils and fava bean-nodulating strains from various geographic sites were also analyzed. The rhizobia were characterized by repetitive extragenomic palindromic-PCR fingerprinting and/or PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) of 16S-23S ribosomal DNA intergenic spacers as markers of the genomic background and PCR-RFLP of a nodulation gene region, nodD, as a marker of the symbiotic component of the genome. Pairwise comparisons showed differences among the genetic structures of the bulk soil, rhizosphere, and nodule populations and in the degree of host specificity within the Vicieae cross-inoculation group. With fava bean, the symbiotic genotype appeared to be the preponderant determinant of the success in nodule occupancy of rhizobial genotypes independently of the associated genomic background, the plant genotype, and the soil sampled. The interaction between one particular rhizobial symbiotic genotype and fava bean seems to be highly specific for nodulation and linked to the efficiency of nitrogen fixation. By contrast with bulk soil and fava bean-nodulating populations, the analysis of pea-nodulating populations showed preferential associations between genomic backgrounds and symbiotic genotypes. Both components of the rhizobial genome may influence competitiveness for nodulation of pea, and rhizosphere colonization may be a decisive step in competition for nodule occupancy. PMID:12676710

  20. Biosynthesis of compatible solutes in rhizobial strains isolated from Phaseolus vulgaris nodules in Tunisian fields

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Associated with appropriate crop and soil management, inoculation of legumes with microbial biofertilizers can improve food legume yield and soil fertility and reduce pollution by inorganic fertilizers. Rhizospheric bacteria are subjected to osmotic stress imposed by drought and/or NaCl, two abiotic constraints frequently found in semi-arid lands. Osmostress response in bacteria involves the accumulation of small organic compounds called compatible solutes. Whereas most studies on rhizobial osmoadaptation have focussed on the model species Sinorhizobium meliloti, little is known on the osmoadaptive mechanisms used by native rhizobia, which are good sources of inoculants. In this work, we investigated the synthesis and accumulations of compatible solutes by four rhizobial strains isolated from root nodules of Phaseolus vulgaris in Tunisia, as well as by the reference strain Rhizobium tropici CIAT 899T. Results The most NaCl-tolerant strain was A. tumefaciens 10c2, followed (in decreasing order) by R. tropici CIAT 899, R. leguminosarum bv. phaseoli 31c3, R. etli 12a3 and R. gallicum bv. phaseoli 8a3. 13C- and 1H-NMR analyses showed that all Rhizobium strains synthesized trehalose whereas A. tumefaciens 10c2 synthesized mannosucrose. Glutamate synthesis was also observed in R. tropici CIAT 899, R. leguminosarum bv. phaseoli 31c3 and A. tumefaciens 10c2. When added as a carbon source, mannitol was also accumulated by all strains. Accumulation of trehalose in R. tropici CIAT 899 and of mannosucrose in A. tumefaciens 10c2 was osmoregulated, suggesting their involvement in osmotolerance. The phylogenetic analysis of the otsA gene, encoding the trehalose-6-phosphate synthase, suggested the existence of lateral transfer events. In vivo 13C labeling experiments together with genomic analysis led us to propose the uptake and conversion pathways of different carbon sources into trehalose. Collaterally, the β-1,2-cyclic glucan from R. tropici CIAT 899 was co

  1. Medicago truncatula NIN Is Essential for Rhizobial-Independent Nodule Organogenesis Induced by Autoactive Calcium/Calmodulin-Dependent Protein Kinase1

    PubMed Central

    Marsh, John F.; Rakocevic, Alexandra; Mitra, Raka M.; Brocard, Lysiane; Sun, Jongho; Eschstruth, Alexis; Long, Sharon R.; Schultze, Michael; Ratet, Pascal; Oldroyd, Giles E.D.

    2007-01-01

    The symbiotic association between legumes and nitrogen-fixing bacteria collectively known as rhizobia results in the formation of a unique plant root organ called the nodule. This process is initiated following the perception of rhizobial nodulation factors by the host plant. Nod factor (NF)-stimulated plant responses, including nodulation-specific gene expression, is mediated by the NF signaling pathway. Plant mutants in this pathway are unable to nodulate. We describe here the cloning and characterization of two mutant alleles of the Medicago truncatula ortholog of the Lotus japonicus and pea (Pisum sativum) NIN gene. The Mtnin mutants undergo excessive root hair curling but are impaired in infection and fail to form nodules following inoculation with Sinorhizobium meliloti. Our investigation of early NF-induced gene expression using the reporter fusion ENOD11∷GUS in the Mtnin-1 mutant demonstrates that MtNIN is not essential for early NF signaling but may negatively regulate the spatial pattern of ENOD11 expression. It was recently shown that an autoactive form of a nodulation-specific calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase is sufficient to induce nodule organogenesis in the absence of rhizobia. We show here that MtNIN is essential for autoactive calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase-induced nodule organogenesis. The non-nodulating hcl mutant has a similar phenotype to Mtnin, but we demonstrate that HCL is not required in this process. Based on our data, we suggest that MtNIN functions downstream of the early NF signaling pathway to coordinate and regulate the correct temporal and spatial formation of root nodules. PMID:17369436

  2. Structural basis for regulation of rhizobial nodulation and symbiosis gene expression by the regulatory protein NolR.

    PubMed

    Lee, Soon Goo; Krishnan, Hari B; Jez, Joseph M

    2014-04-29

    The symbiosis between rhizobial microbes and host plants involves the coordinated expression of multiple genes, which leads to nodule formation and nitrogen fixation. As part of the transcriptional machinery for nodulation and symbiosis across a range of Rhizobium, NolR serves as a global regulatory protein. Here, we present the X-ray crystal structures of NolR in the unliganded form and complexed with two different 22-base pair (bp) double-stranded operator sequences (oligos AT and AA). Structural and biochemical analysis of NolR reveals protein-DNA interactions with an asymmetric operator site and defines a mechanism for conformational switching of a key residue (Gln56) to accommodate variation in target DNA sequences from diverse rhizobial genes for nodulation and symbiosis. This conformational switching alters the energetic contributions to DNA binding without changes in affinity for the target sequence. Two possible models for the role of NolR in the regulation of different nodulation and symbiosis genes are proposed. To our knowledge, these studies provide the first structural insight on the regulation of genes involved in the agriculturally and ecologically important symbiosis of microbes and plants that leads to nodule formation and nitrogen fixation.

  3. Genomic studies of nitrogen-fixing rhizobial strains from Phaseolus vulgaris seeds and nodules.

    PubMed

    Peralta, Humberto; Aguilar, Alejandro; Díaz, Rafael; Mora, Yolanda; Martínez-Batallar, Gabriel; Salazar, Emmanuel; Vargas-Lagunas, Carmen; Martínez, Esperanza; Encarnación, Sergio; Girard, Lourdes; Mora, Jaime

    2016-09-06

    Rhizobia are soil bacteria that establish symbiotic relationships with legumes and fix nitrogen in root nodules. We recently reported that several nitrogen-fixing rhizobial strains, belonging to Rhizobium phaseoli, R. trifolii, R. grahamii and Sinorhizobium americanum, were able to colonize Phaseolus vulgaris (common bean) seeds. To gain further insight into the traits that support this ability, we analyzed the genomic sequences and proteomes of R. phaseoli (CCGM1) and S. americanum (CCGM7) strains from seeds and compared them with those of the closely related strains CIAT652 and CFNEI73, respectively, isolated only from nodules. In a fine structural study of the S. americanum genomes, the chromosomes, megaplasmids and symbiotic plasmids were highly conserved and syntenic, with the exception of the smaller plasmid, which appeared unrelated. The symbiotic tract of CCGM7 appeared more disperse, possibly due to the action of transposases. The chromosomes of seed strains had less transposases and strain-specific genes. The seed strains CCGM1 and CCGM7 shared about half of their genomes with their closest strains (3353 and 3472 orthologs respectively), but a large fraction of the rest also had homology with other rhizobia. They contained 315 and 204 strain-specific genes, respectively, particularly abundant in the functions of transcription, motility, energy generation and cofactor biosynthesis. The proteomes of seed and nodule strains were obtained and showed a particular profile for each of the strains. About 82 % of the proteins in the comparisons appeared similar. Forty of the most abundant proteins in each strain were identified; these proteins in seed strains were involved in stress responses and coenzyme and cofactor biosynthesis and in the nodule strains mainly in central processes. Only 3 % of the abundant proteins had hypothetical functions. Functions that were enriched in the genomes and proteomes of seed strains possibly participate in the successful

  4. [Genetic diversity of rhizobial bacteria nodulating Tibetia himalaica in eastern Qinghai-Tibet plateau].

    PubMed

    Jiang, Huaming; Zhao, Ke; Liu, Songqing; Liu, Xinchun; Li, Renquan; Peng, Wanren; Zhang, Bo; Zhang, Xiaoping

    2013-07-04

    Genetic diversity of the rhizobial bacteria nodulating Tibetia himalaica in the eastern part of Qinghai-Tibet Plateau (Ganzi State, Sichuan) were evaluated. The pure culture method was used for isolating the rhiobial strains from the nodules. BOXAIR, 16S rDNA sequences, 16S rDNA PCR-RFLP and Principal Component Analysis (PCA) were used to determine the genetic diversity and phylogenetic relationships. The growth in different salt contents, pH and temperatures were tested. In total 22 strains were isolated from 12 samples in 8 counties. The strains tested were classified into 4 clusters in 16S rDNA PCR-RFLP, and 8 clusters were formed in BOXAIR. The 16S rDNA Simpson genetic diversity index was D = 0. 872. The strains tested were closely related to Rhizobium (11/22 strains), Mesorhizobium (4/22 strains) and Rhizobium- Agrobacterium (7/22 strains). All strains could regularly grow in YMA medium amended with 1% NaCl, and 15/22 strains could grow in 4% NaCl. SCAU679, SCAU694 and SCAU706 could adapt to 7% NaCl, while SCAU689 could tolerant 8% NaCl. Among the strains tested, 15 strains could grow in the pH range from 4.0 to 11; 16 isolates grew well from 4 to 45 degrees C, and all of 22 strains could grow at 28 degrees C after treatment at 60 degrees C for 10 min. This study revealed the high genetic diversity of the rhizobia isolated from Tibetia himalaica in the eastern part of Qinghai-Tibet Plateau. The strains tested were adapted to high salt, different range of temperatures and pH.

  5. Mesorhizobium caraganae sp. nov., a novel rhizobial species nodulated with Caragana spp. in China.

    PubMed

    Guan, Su Hua; Chen, Wen Feng; Wang, En Tao; Lu, Yang Li; Yan, Xue Rui; Zhang, Xiao Xia; Chen, Wen Xin

    2008-11-01

    Five rhizobial strains representing the largest group in the genus Mesorhizobium associated with Caragana spp. in China were characterized taxonomically. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences indicated that these microsymbionts belonged to the genus Mesorhizobium, with Mesorhizobium tianshanense USDA 3592(T), Mesorhizobium temperatum SDW018(T) and Mesorhizobium mediterraneum UPM-Ca36(T) as the closest neighbours (>/=99.5 % 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity). Genotypic fingerprinting by whole-cell protein electrophoresis, DNA-DNA hybridization, comparative housekeeping sequence analysis of the atpD, glnII and recA genes, fatty acid profiles and a series of phenotypic and physiological tests allowed the novel group to be differentiated from all previously recognized species of the genus Mesorhizobium. This group therefore represents a novel species, for which the name Mesorhizobium caraganae sp. nov. is proposed with the type strain CCBAU 11299(T) (=LMG 24397(T)=HAMBI 2990(T)). Cross-inoculation tests showed that strain CCBAU 11299(T) could form effective nodules on Caragana microphylla, Caragana intermedia, Glycyrrhiza uralensis, Astragalus adsurgens and Phaseolus vulgaris.

  6. Medicago truncatula ERN transcription factors: regulatory interplay with NSP1/NSP2 GRAS factors and expression dynamics throughout rhizobial infection.

    PubMed

    Cerri, Marion R; Frances, Lisa; Laloum, Tom; Auriac, Marie-Christine; Niebel, Andreas; Oldroyd, Giles E D; Barker, David G; Fournier, Joëlle; de Carvalho-Niebel, Fernanda

    2012-12-01

    Rhizobial nodulation factors (NFs) activate a specific signaling pathway in Medicago truncatula root hairs that involves the complex interplay of Nodulation Signaling Pathway1 (NSP1)/NSP2 GRAS and Ethylene Response Factor Required for Nodulation1 (ERN1) transcription factors (TFs) to achieve full ENOD11 transcription. ERN1 acts as a direct transcriptional regulator of ENOD11 through the activation of the NF-responsive "NF box." Here, we show that NSP1, when combined with NSP2, can act as a strong positive regulator of ERN1 and ENOD11 transcription. Although ERN1 and NSP1/NSP2 both activate ENOD11, two separate promoter regions are involved that regulate expression during consecutive symbiotic stages. Our findings indicate that ERN1 is required to activate NF-elicited ENOD11 expression exclusively during early preinfection, while NSP1/NSP2 mediates ENOD11 expression during subsequent rhizobial infection. The relative contributions of ERN1 and the closely related ERN2 to the rhizobial symbiosis were then evaluated by comparing their regulation and in vivo dynamics. ERN1 and ERN2 exhibit expression profiles compatible with roles during NF signaling and subsequent infection. However, differences in expression levels and spatiotemporal profiles suggest specialized functions for these two TFs, ERN1 being involved in stages preceding and accompanying infection thread progression while ERN2 is only involved in certain stages of infection. By cross complementation, we show that ERN2, when expressed under the control of the ERN1 promoter, can restore both NF-elicited ENOD11 expression and nodule formation in an ern1 mutant background. This indicates that ERN1 and ERN2 possess similar biological activities and that functional diversification of these closely related TFs relies primarily on changes in tissue-specific expression patterns.

  7. Hijacking of leguminous nodulation signaling by the rhizobial type III secretion system

    PubMed Central

    Okazaki, Shin; Kaneko, Takakazu; Sato, Shusei; Saeki, Kazuhiko

    2013-01-01

    Root–nodule symbiosis between leguminous plants and nitrogen-fixing bacteria (rhizobia) involves molecular communication between the two partners. Key components for the establishment of symbiosis are rhizobium-derived lipochitooligosaccharides (Nod factors; NFs) and their leguminous receptors (NFRs) that initiate nodule development and bacterial entry. Here we demonstrate that the soybean microsymbiont Bradyrhizobium elkanii uses the type III secretion system (T3SS), which is known for its delivery of virulence factors by pathogenic bacteria, to promote symbiosis. Intriguingly, wild-type B. elkanii, but not the T3SS-deficient mutant, was able to form nitrogen-fixing nodules on soybean nfr mutant En1282. Furthermore, even the NF-deficient B. elkanii mutant induced nodules unless T3SS genes were mutated. Transcriptional analysis revealed that expression of the soybean nodulation-specific genes ENOD40 and NIN was increased in the roots of En1282 inoculated with B. elkanii but not with its T3SS mutant, suggesting that T3SS activates host nodulation signaling by bypassing NF recognition. Root-hair curling and infection threads were not observed in the roots of En1282 inoculated with B. elkanii, indicating that T3SS is involved in crack entry or intercellular infection. These findings suggest that B. elkanii has adopted a pathogenic system for activating host symbiosis signaling to promote its infection. PMID:24082124

  8. Controlling the expression of rhizobial genes during nodule development with elements and an inducer of the lac operon.

    PubMed

    Box, Jodie; Noel, K Dale

    2011-04-01

    A simple strategy was tested for imposing artificial regulation of rhizobial genes during nodule development. Isopropyl-β-d-1-thiogalactoside (IPTG) was added to liquid root media to sustain expression of rhizobial genes controlled by Escherichia coli lac promoter/operators and repressor gene lacI. Conversely, a rinsing protocol was devised to remove IPTG sufficiently that genes could be repressed after having been induced. gusA under this control exhibited clearly delineated expression and repression in both the determinate Rhizobium etli-Phaseolus vulgaris and the indeterminate Sinorhizobium meliloti-Medicago sativa symbioses. Apparently, IPTG was taken up in sufficiently undegraded concentrations that gene expression was derepressed even in interior portions of the nodule. Moreover, the rinsing protocol led to obvious repression of gusA. Importantly, no deleterious effects of IPTG on nodule development, infection, or nitrogen fixation were observed. An R. etli CE3 gene required for lipopolysaccharide O antigen and infection on bean was put under this control by means of a two-plasmid construct. When this construct was added to a strain with a null mutation in this gene, infection, nodule development, and nitrogenase activity all depended on the length of time before IPTG was rinsed from the roots after inoculation.

  9. Impact of the energy crop Jatropha curcas L. on the composition of rhizobial populations nodulating cowpea (Vigna unguiculata L.) and acacia (Acacia seyal L.).

    PubMed

    Dieng, Amadou; Duponnois, Robin; Floury, Antoine; Laguerre, Gisèle; Ndoye, Ibrahima; Baudoin, Ezékiel

    2015-03-01

    Jatropha curcas, a Euphorbiaceae species that produces many toxicants, is increasingly planted as an agrofuel plant in Senegal. The purpose of this study was to determine whether soil priming induced by J. curcas monoculture could alter the rhizobial populations that nodulate cowpea and acacia, two locally widespread legumes. Soil samples were transferred into a greenhouse from three fields previously cultivated with Jatropha for 1, 2, and 15 years, and the two trap legumes were grown in them. Control soil samples were also taken from adjacent Jatropha-fallow plots. Both legumes tended to develop fewer but larger nodules when grown in Jatropha soils. Nearly all the nifH sequences amplified from nodule DNA were affiliated to the Bradyrhizobium genus. Only sequences from Acacia seyal nodules grown in the most recent Jatropha plantation were related to the Mesorhizobium genus, which was much a more conventional finding on A. seyal than the unexpected Bradyrhizobium genus. Apart from this particular case, only minor differences were found in the respective compositions of Jatropha soil versus control soil rhizobial populations. Lastly, the structure of these rhizobial populations was systematically imbalanced owing to the overwhelming dominance of a very small number of nifH genotypes, some of which were identical across soil types or even sites. Despite these weak and sparse effects on rhizobial diversity, future investigations should focus on the characterization of the nitrogen-fixing abilities of the predominant rhizobial strains.

  10. Rhizobial Diversity and Nodulation Characteristics of the Extremely Promiscuous Legume Sophora flavescens.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Yin Shan; Liu, Yuan Hui; Yan, Hui; Wang, En Tao; Tian, Chang Fu; Chen, Wen Xin; Guo, Bao Lin; Chen, Wen Feng

    2015-12-01

    In present study, we report our extensive survey on the diversity and biogeography of rhizobia associated with Sophora flavescens, a sophocarpidine (matrine)-containing medicinal legume. We additionally investigated the cross nodulation, infection pattern, light and electron microscopies of root nodule sections of S. flavescens infected by various rhizobia. Seventeen genospecies of rhizobia belonging to five genera with seven types of symbiotic nodC genes were found to nodulate S. flavescens in natural soils. In the cross-nodulation tests, most representative rhizobia in class α-Proteobacteria, whose host plants belong to different cross-nodulation groups, form effective indeterminate nodules, while representative rhizobia in class β-Proteobacteria form ineffective nodules on S. flavescens. Highly host-specific biovars of Rhizobium leguminosarum (bv. trifolii and bv. viciae) and Rhizobium etli bv. phaseoli could establish symbioses with S. flavescens, providing further evidence that S. flavescens is an extremely promiscuous legume and it does not have strict selectivity on either the symbiotic genes or the species-determining housekeeping genes of rhizobia. Root-hair infection is found as the pattern that rhizobia have gained entry into the curled root hairs. Electron microscopies of ultra-thin sections of S. flavescens root nodules formed by different rhizobia show that the bacteroids are regular or irregular rod shape and nonswollen types. Some bacteroids contain poly-β-hydroxybutyrate (PHB), while others do not, indicating the synthesis of PHB in bacteroids is rhizobia-dependent. The extremely promiscuous symbiosis between S. flavescens and different rhizobia provide us a basis for future studies aimed at understanding the molecular interactions of rhizobia and legumes.

  11. Ensifer shofinae sp. nov., a novel rhizobial species isolated from root nodules of soybean (Glycine max).

    PubMed

    Chen, Wen Hao; Yang, Sheng Hui; Li, Zhao Hu; Zhang, Xiao Xia; Sui, Xin Hua; Wang, En Tao; Chen, Wen Xin; Chen, Wen Feng

    2017-04-01

    Two bacterial strains isolated from root nodules of soybean were characterized phylogenetically as members of a distinct group in the genus Ensifer based on 16S rRNA gene comparisons. They were also verified as a separated group by the concatenated sequence analyses of recA, atpD and glnII (with similarities ≤93.9% to the type strains for defined species), and by the average nucleotide identities (ANI) between the whole genome sequence of the representative strain CCBAU 251167(T) and those of the closely related strains in Ensifer glycinis and Ensifer fredii (90.5% and 90.3%, respectively). Phylogeny of symbiotic genes (nodC and nifH) grouped these two strains together with some soybean-nodulating strains of E. fredii, E. glycinis and Ensifer sojae. Nodulation tests indicated that the representative strain CCBAU 251167(T) could form root nodules with capability of nitrogen fixing on its host plant and Glycine soja, Cajanus cajan, Vigna unguiculata, Phaseolus vulgaris and Astragalus membranaceus, and it formed ineffective nodules on Leucaena leucocephala. Strain CCBAU 251167(T) contained fatty acids 18:1 ω9c, 18:0 iso and 20:0, differing from other related strains. Utilization of l-threonine and d-serine as carbon source, growth at pH 6.0 and intolerance of 1% (w/v) NaCl distinguished strain CCBAU 251167(T) from other type strains of the related species. The genome size of CCBAU 251167(T) was 6.2Mbp, comprising 7,581 predicted genes with DNA G+C content of 59.9mol% and 970 unique genes. Therefore, a novel species, Ensifer shofinae sp. nov., is proposed, with CCBAU 251167(T) (=ACCC 19939(T)=LMG 29645(T)) as type strain. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  12. Single-plant, sterile microcosms for nodulation and growth of the legume plant Medicago truncatula with the rhizobial symbiont Sinorhizobium meliloti.

    PubMed

    Jones, Kathryn M; Mendis, Hajeewaka C; Queiroux, Clothilde

    2013-10-01

    Rhizobial bacteria form symbiotic, nitrogen-fixing nodules on the roots of compatible host legume plants. One of the most well-developed model systems for studying these interactions is the plant Medicago truncatula cv. Jemalong A17 and the rhizobial bacterium Sinorhizobium meliloti 1021. Repeated imaging of plant roots and scoring of symbiotic phenotypes requires methods that are non-destructive to either plants or bacteria. The symbiotic phenotypes of some plant and bacterial mutants become apparent after relatively short periods of growth, and do not require long-term observation of the host/symbiont interaction. However, subtle differences in symbiotic efficiency and nodule senescence phenotypes that are not apparent in the early stages of the nodulation process require relatively long growth periods before they can be scored. Several methods have been developed for long-term growth and observation of this host/symbiont pair. However, many of these methods require repeated watering, which increases the possibility of contamination by other microbes. Other methods require a relatively large space for growth of large numbers of plants. The method described here, symbiotic growth of M. truncatula/S. meliloti in sterile, single-plant microcosms, has several advantages. Plants in these microcosms have sufficient moisture and nutrients to ensure that watering is not required for up to 9 weeks, preventing cross-contamination during watering. This allows phenotypes to be quantified that might be missed in short-term growth systems, such as subtle delays in nodule development and early nodule senescence. Also, the roots and nodules in the microcosm are easily viewed through the plate lid, so up-rooting of the plants for observation is not required.

  13. Analysis of genomic diversity among photosynthetic stem-nodulating rhizobial strains from northeast Argentina.

    PubMed

    Montecchia, Marcela S; Kerber, Norma L; Pucheu, Norma L; Perticari, Alejandro; García, Augusto F

    2002-10-01

    The genomic diversity among photosynthetic rhizobia from northeast Argentina was assessed. Forty six isolates obtained from naturally occurring stem and root nodules of Aeschynomene rudis plants were analyzed by three molecular typing methods with different levels of taxonomic resolution: repetitive sequence-based PCR (rep-PCR) genomic fingerprinting with BOX and REP primers, amplified 16S rDNA restriction analysis (ARDRA), and 16S-23S rDNA intergenic spacer-restriction fragment length polymorphism (IGS-RFLP) analysis. The in vivo absorption spectra of membranes of strains were similar in the near infrared region with peaks at 870 and 800 nm revealing the presence of light harvesting complex I, bacteriochlorophyll-binding polypeptides (LHI-Bchl complex). After extraction with acetone-methanol the spectra differed in the visible part displaying peaks belonging to canthaxanthin or spirilloxanthin as the main carotenoid complement. The genotypic characterization by rep-PCR revealed a high level of genomic diversity among the isolates and almost all the photosynthetic ones have identical ARDRA patterns and fell into one cluster different from Bradyrhizobium japonicum and Bradyrhizobium elkanii. In the combined analysis of ARDRA and rep-PCR fingerprints, 7 clusters were found including most of the isolates. Five of those contained only photosynthetic isolates; all canthaxanthin-containing strains grouped in one cluster, most of the other photosynthetic isolates were grouped in a second large cluster, while the remaining three clusters contained a few strains. The other two clusters comprising reference strains of B. japonicum and B. elkanii, respectively. The IGS-RFLP analysis produced similar clustering for almost all the strains. The 16S rRNA gene sequence of one representative isolate was determined and the DNA sequence analysis confirmed the position of photosynthetic rhizobia in a distinct phylogenetic group within the Bradyrhizobium rDNA cluster.

  14. Rhizobial strains isolated from nodules of Medicago marina in southwest Spain are abiotic-stress tolerant and symbiotically diverse.

    PubMed

    Alías-Villegas, Cynthia; Cubo, M Teresa; Lara-Dampier, Victoria; Bellogín, Ramón A; Camacho, María; Temprano, Francisco; Espuny, M Rosario

    2015-10-01

    The isolation and characterisation of nitrogen-fixing root nodule bacteria from Medicago marina, a tolerant legume species, were studied in two areas from southwest Spain. A total of 30 out of 82 isolates with distinct ERIC-PCR fingerprints were analysed on the basis of molecular (PCR-RFLP of the 16S-23S rDNA intergenic spacer region (IGS) with two endonucleases, analysis of the 16S rDNA and symbiotic nodC gene sequences, plasmid profiles and SDS-PAGE of LPS, including the partial sequence of the housekeeping gene glnII and the symbiotic gene nodA of some representatives), physiological (utilisation of sole carbon sources, tolerance to antibiotics, NaCl, heavy metals, temperature and pH) and symbiotic parameters (efficacy on M. marina, M. minima, M. murex, M. orbicularis, M. polymorpha, M. sativa and M. truncatula). All the bacteria isolated from M. marina nodules belonged to Ensifer meliloti, except for one strain that belonged to E. medicae. To determine the nodulation range of M. marina, 10 different Ensifer species were tested for their ability to nodulate on this plant. E. kummerowiae CCBAU 71714 and the E. medicae control strain M19.1 were the only Ensifer species tested that developed nitrogen-fixing nodules on this plant. Most of the M. marina-nodulating strains showed tolerance to stress factors and all of them shared the presence of a gene similar to cadA, a gene that encodes for a PIB-type ATPase, which is a transporter belonging to the large superfamily of ATP-driven pumps involved in the transport of metals across cell membranes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  15. LysM domain receptor kinases regulating rhizobial Nod factor-induced infection.

    PubMed

    Limpens, Erik; Franken, Carolien; Smit, Patrick; Willemse, Joost; Bisseling, Ton; Geurts, René

    2003-10-24

    The rhizobial infection of legumes has the most stringent demand toward Nod factor structure of all host responses, and therefore a specific Nod factor entry receptor has been proposed. The SYM2 gene identified in certain ecotypes of pea (Pisum sativum) is a good candidate for such an entry receptor. We exploited the close phylogenetic relationship of pea and the model legume Medicago truncatula to identify genes specifically involved in rhizobial infection. The SYM2 orthologous region of M. truncatula contains 15 putative receptor-like genes, of which 7 are LysM domain-containing receptor-like kinases (LYKs). Using reverse genetics in M. truncatula, we show that two LYK genes are specifically involved in infection thread formation. This, as well as the properties of the LysM domains, strongly suggests that they are Nod factor entry receptors.

  16. Foliar application of pyraclostrobin fungicide enhances the growth, rhizobial-nodule formation and nitrogenase activity in soybean (var. JS-335).

    PubMed

    Joshi, Juhie; Sharma, Sonika; Guruprasad, K N

    2014-09-01

    A field study was conducted to investigate the impact of the fungicide pyraclostrobin (F500 - Headline®; a.i. 20%) on the activity of nitrogenase in soybean (var. JS-335). Pyraclostrobin (F500) was applied on the leaves of soybean plants at 10 and 20 days after emergence (DAE) of seedlings at concentrations ranging from 0.05% to 1%. Leghemoglobin (Lb) content and nitrogenase activity in root nodules were analyzed at 45(th)day after emergence of seedlings indicated a remarkable increase in Lb content and enhanced activity of nitrogenase in the root nodules of pyraclostrobin treated plants. The fungicide also enhanced the number of nodules along with weight of nodules, root biomass and growth of shoot and leaves. Enhanced nitrogen fixation in the root nodules by pyraclostrobin improves the growth of the plant in soybean before flowering and pod formation which ultimately resulted in yield and yield attributes. These results suggest that pyraclostrobin (F500) can be successfully employed as a foliar spray under field conditions to enhance the growth, nitrogen assimilation and hence yield of soybean.

  17. Functional analysis of alternative transcripts of the soybean Rj2 gene that restricts nodulation with specific rhizobial strains.

    PubMed

    Tang, F; Yang, S; Zhu, H

    2016-05-01

    The Rj2 gene is a TIR-NBS-LRR-type resistance gene in soybean (Glycine max) that restricts root nodule symbiosis with a group of Bradyrhizobium japonicum strains including USDA122. Rj2 generates two distinct transcript variants in its expression profile through alternative splicing. Alternative splicing of Rj2 is caused by the retention of the 86-bp intron 4. Inclusion of intron 4 in mature mRNA introduces an in-frame stop codon; as such, the alternative transcript is predicted to encode a truncated protein consisting of the entire portion of the TIR, NBS and LRR domains but missing the C-terminal domain of the full-length Rj2 protein encoded by the regular transcript. Since alternative splicing has been shown to be essential for full activity of several plant R genes, we attempted to test whether the alternative splicing is required for Rj2-mediated nodulation restriction. Here we demonstrated that the Rj2-mediated nodulation restriction does not require the combined presence of the regular and alternative transcripts, and the expression of the regular transcript alone is sufficient to confer nodulation restriction. © 2016 German Botanical Society and The Royal Botanical Society of the Netherlands.

  18. Rhizobium calliandrae sp. nov., Rhizobium mayense sp. nov. and Rhizobium jaguaris sp. nov., rhizobial species nodulating the medicinal legume Calliandra grandiflora.

    PubMed

    Rincón-Rosales, Reiner; Villalobos-Escobedo, José M; Rogel, Marco A; Martinez, Julio; Ormeño-Orrillo, Ernesto; Martínez-Romero, Esperanza

    2013-09-01

    Calliandra grandiflora has been used as a medicinal plant for thousands of years in Mexico. Rhizobial strains were obtained from root nodules of C. grandiflora collected from different geographical regions in Chiapas and characterized by BOX-PCR, amplified rDNA restriction analysis (ARDRA) and 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis. Most isolates corresponded to members of the genus Rhizobium and those not related to species with validly published names were further characterized by recA, atpD, rpoB and nifH gene phylogenies, phenotypic and DNA-DNA hybridization analyses. Three novel related species of the genus Rhizobium within the 'Rhizobium tropici group' share the same symbiovar that may be named sv. calliandrae. The names proposed for the three novel species are Rhizobium calliandrae sp. nov. (type strain, CCGE524(T) =ATCC BAA-2435(T) =CIP 110456(T) =LBP2-1(T)), Rhizobium mayense sp. nov. (type strain, CCGE526(T) =ATCC BAA-2446(T) = CIP 110454(T) =NSJP1-1(T)) and Rhizobium jaguaris sp. nov. (type strain, CCGE525(T) =ATCC BAA-2445(T) =CIP 110453(T) =SJP1-2(T)).

  19. The rhizobial adhesion protein RapA1 is involved in adsorption of rhizobia to plant roots but not in nodulation.

    PubMed

    Mongiardini, Elías J; Ausmees, Nora; Pérez-Giménez, Julieta; Julia Althabegoiti, María; Ignacio Quelas, Juan; López-García, Silvina L; Lodeiro, Aníbal R

    2008-08-01

    The effect of the rhizobium adhesion protein RapA1 on Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. trifolii adsorption to Trifolium pratense (red clover) roots was investigated. We altered RapA1 production by cloning its encoding gene under the plac promoter into the stable vector pHC60. After introducing this plasmid in R. leguminosarum bv. trifolii, three to four times more RapA1 was produced, and two to five times higher adsorption to red clover roots was obtained, as compared with results for the empty vector. Enhanced adsorption was also observed on soybean and alfalfa roots, not related to R. leguminosarum cross inoculation groups. Although the presence of 1 mM Ca2+ during rhizobial growth enhanced adsorption, it was unrelated to RapA1 level. Similar effects were obtained when the same plasmid was introduced in Rhizobium etli for its adsorption to bean roots. Although root colonization by the RapA1-overproducing strain was also higher, nodulation was not enhanced. In addition, in vitro biofilm formation was similar to the wild-type both on polar and on hydrophobic surfaces. These results suggest that RapA1 receptors are present in root but not on inert surfaces, and that the function of this protein is related to rhizosphere colonization.

  20. Presence of diverse rhizobial communities responsible for nodulation of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) in South African and Mozambican soils.

    PubMed

    Zinga, Mwajuma K; Jaiswal, Sanjay K; Dakora, Felix D

    2017-02-01

    The diversity and phylogeny of root-nodule bacteria isolated from common bean grown in Mozambique and different provinces of South Africa was studied by restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) and phylogenetic analysis. The combined restriction banding pattern of 16S rRNA and nifH profile-generated dendrogram grouped all test isolates into four major clusters with XXI restriction groups and three clusters with VIII restriction groups. Location-based clustering was observed with the 16S rRNA RFLP analysis. Phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA, glnII, gyrB and gltA sequences showed that common bean was nodulated specifically by Rhizobium etli in Mozambican soils, and by a diverse group of Rhizobium species in South African soils (e.g. R. etli, R. phaseoli, R. sophoriradicis, R. leucaenae and novel group of Rhizobium spp.). Isolates from the Eastern Cape region of South Africa were dominated by R. leucaenae Overall, the results suggested high nodulation promiscuity of common bean grown in Southern Africa. The nifH and nodC sequence analysis classified all the test isolates with R. etli group, except for isolates TUTPVSA117, TUTPVSA114 and TUTPVSA110 which delineated with R. tropici group. This finding was inconsistent with the phylogram of the housekeeping genes, and is probably an indication of horizontal gene transfer among the Rhizobium isolates tested. © FEMS 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Mercury-resistant rhizobial bacteria isolated from nodules of leguminous plants growing in high Hg-contaminated soils.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Díez, Beatriz; Quiñones, Miguel A; Fajardo, Susana; López, Miguel A; Higueras, Pablo; Fernández-Pascual, Mercedes

    2012-10-01

    A survey of symbiotic bacteria from legumes grown in high mercury-contaminated soils (Almadén, Spain) was performed to produce a collection of rhizobia which could be well adapted to the environmental conditions of this region and be used for restoration practices. Nineteen Hg-tolerant rhizobia were isolated from nodules of 11 legume species (of the genera Medicago, Trifolium, Vicia, Lupinus, Phaseolus, and Retama) and characterized. Based on their growth on Hg-supplemented media, the isolates were classified into three susceptibility groups. The minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) and the effective concentrations that produce 50% mortality identified the patterns of mercury tolerance and showed that 15 isolates were tolerant. The dynamics of cell growth during incubation with mercury showed that five isolates were unaffected by exposure to Hg concentrations under the MICs. Genetic analyses of the 16S rRNA gene assigned ten strains to Rhizobium leguminosarum, six to Ensifer medicae, two to Bradyrhizobium canariense, and one to Rhizobium radiobacter. Inoculation of host plants and analysis of the nodC genes revealed that most of them were symbiotically effective. Finally, three isolates were selected for bioremediation processes with restoration purposes on the basis of their levels of Hg tolerance, their response to high concentrations of this heavy metal, and their genetic affiliation and nodulation capacity.

  2. Identification of a core set of rhizobial infection genes using data from single cell-types

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Da-Song; Liu, Cheng-Wu; Roy, Sonali; Cousins, Donna; Stacey, Nicola; Murray, Jeremy D.

    2015-01-01

    Genome-wide expression studies on nodulation have varied in their scale from entire root systems to dissected nodules or root sections containing nodule primordia (NP). More recently efforts have focused on developing methods for isolation of root hairs from infected plants and the application of laser-capture microdissection technology to nodules. Here we analyze two published data sets to identify a core set of infection genes that are expressed in the nodule and in root hairs during infection. Among the genes identified were those encoding phenylpropanoid biosynthesis enzymes including Chalcone-O-Methyltransferase which is required for the production of the potent Nod gene inducer 4′,4-dihydroxy-2-methoxychalcone. A promoter-GUS analysis in transgenic hairy roots for two genes encoding Chalcone-O-Methyltransferase isoforms revealed their expression in rhizobially infected root hairs and the nodule infection zone but not in the nitrogen fixation zone. We also describe a group of Rhizobially Induced Peroxidases whose expression overlaps with the production of superoxide in rhizobially infected root hairs and in nodules and roots. Finally, we identify a cohort of co-regulated transcription factors as candidate regulators of these processes. PMID:26284091

  3. [Numerical taxonomy and 16S rDNA PCR-rFLP analysis of rhizobial strains isolated from root nodules of cowpea and mung bean grown in different regions of China].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yong-fa; Wang, Feng-qin; Chen, Wen-xin

    2006-12-01

    Seventy-nine rhizobial strains, isolated from root nodules of cowpea ( Vigna unguiculata ) and mung bean (Vigna radiata ) grown in different regions of China, were studied by a fuzzy cluster analysis of 128 phenotypic characteristics. The phenotypic characterization of these strains showed that most of these strains had high stress resistance. For instance, most of them could grow from pH 5.0 to pH 11.0. Over 85% of these strains could grow well on YMA plate at 37 degrees C and several of them even could grow after a 45 minutes hot shock at 60 degrees C. Some strains had a tolerance to high concentration of Bacitracin (400 microg/mL) . The result of the fuzzy cluster analysis showed that all the strains were clustered into 2 groups, slow growers and fast growers, at the similarity level of 63.5% . At the similarity level of 79 %, there were 7 subgroups further separated. Based upon the result of the numerical taxonomy, these strains together with 22 reference stains were analyzed by the 16S rDNA PCR-RFLP. Thirty-four genotype profiles were obtained from the fingerprinting of the 16S rDNA PCR-RFLP. These strains were analyzed by GelCompare II software and clustered into 7 groups at the similarity level of 91% , which were consonant with the 7 subgroups clustered at the similarity level of 79% in numerical taxonomy. The results of numerical taxonomy and 16S rDNA PCR-RFLP analysis showed that all of the seventy-nine rhizobial Bradyrhizobium, strains isolated from root nodules of cowpea and mung bean were clustered into four genera: Agrobacterium, Rhizobium and Sinorhizobium, respectively. An individual clade without any reference stains, which was composed of CCBAU 45071, CCBAU 45111-1 and CCBAU 45248, might be a new species of Rhizobium. Overall, the study results demonstrated a high phenotypic and phylogenetic diversity of rhizobial strains nodulating cowpea and mung bean grown in different geographic regions of China.

  4. Rhizobial acyl carrier proteins and their roles in the formation of bacterial cell-surface components that are required for the development of nitrogen-fixing root nodules on legume hosts.

    PubMed

    Geiger, Otto; López-Lara, Isabel M

    2002-03-05

    Acyl carrier protein (ACP) of Escherichia coli is a small acidic protein which functions as carrier of growing acyl chains during their biosynthesis and as donor of acyl chains during transfer to target molecules. This unique ACP of E. coli is expressed constitutively. In more complex bacteria, multiple ACPs are present, indicating a channeling of pools of multi-carbon units into different biosynthetic routes. In rhizobia, for example, besides the constitutive ACP (AcpP) involved in the biosynthesis and transfer of common fatty acids, three specialized ACPs have been reported: (1) the flavonoid-inducible nodulation protein NodF, (2) AcpXL that transfers 27-hydroxyoctacosanoic acid to a sugar backbone during lipid A biosynthesis, and (3) the RkpF protein which is required for the biosynthesis of rhizobial capsular polysaccharides. All three of those specialized rhizobial ACPs are required for the biosynthesis of cell-surface molecules that play a role in establishing the symbiotic relationship between rhizobia and their legume hosts. Surprisingly, the recently sequenced genomes from Mesorhizobium loti and Sinorhizobium meliloti suggest even more candidates for ACPs in rhizobia.

  5. Nod Factor Receptors Form Heteromeric Complexes and Are Essential for Intracellular Infection in Medicago Nodules[W

    PubMed Central

    Moling, Sjef; Pietraszewska-Bogiel, Anna; Postma, Marten; Fedorova, Elena; Hink, Mark A.; Limpens, Erik; Gadella, Theodorus W.J.; Bisseling, Ton

    2014-01-01

    Rhizobial Nod factors are the key signaling molecules in the legume-rhizobium nodule symbiosis. In this study, the role of the Nod factor receptors NOD FACTOR PERCEPTION (NFP) and LYSIN MOTIF RECEPTOR-LIKE KINASE3 (LYK3) in establishing the symbiotic interface in root nodules was investigated. It was found that inside Medicago truncatula nodules, NFP and LYK3 localize at the cell periphery in a narrow zone of about two cell layers at the nodule apex. This restricted accumulation is narrower than the region of promoter activity/mRNA accumulation and might serve to prevent the induction of defense-like responses and/or to restrict the rhizobium release to precise cell layers. The distal cell layer where the receptors accumulate at the cell periphery is part of the meristem, and the proximal layer is part of the infection zone. In these layers, the receptors can most likely perceive the bacterial Nod factors to regulate the formation of symbiotic interface. Furthermore, our Förster resonance energy transfer-fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy analysis indicates that NFP and LYK3 form heteromeric complexes at the cell periphery in M. truncatula nodules. PMID:25351493

  6. Engineering Rhizobial Bioinoculants: A Strategy to Improve Iron Nutrition

    PubMed Central

    Geetha, S. J.; Joshi, Sanket J.

    2013-01-01

    Under field conditions, inoculated rhizobial strains are at a survival disadvantage as compared to indigenous strains. In order to out-compete native rhizobia it is not only important to develop strong nodulation efficiency but also increase their competence in the soil and rhizosphere. Competitive survival of the inoculated strain may be improved by employing strain selection and by genetic engineering of superior nitrogen fixing strains. Iron sufficiency is an important factor determining the survival and nodulation by rhizobia in soil. Siderophores, a class of ferric specific ligands that are involved in receptor specific iron transport into bacteria, constitute an important part of iron acquisition systems in rhizobia and have been shown to play a role in symbiosis as well as in saprophytic survival. Soils predominantly have iron bound to hydroxamate siderophores, a pool that is largely unavailable to catecholate-utilizing rhizobia. Outer membrane receptors for uptake of ferric hydroxamates include FhuA and FegA which are specific for ferrichrome siderophore. Increase in nodule occupancy and enhanced plant growth of the fegA and fhuA expressing engineered bioinoculants rhizobial strain have been reported. Engineering rhizobia for developing effective bioinoculants with improved ability to utilize heterologous siderophores could provide them with better iron acquisition ability and consequently, rhizospheric stability. PMID:24319357

  7. A Phylogenetically Conserved Group of Nuclear Factor-Y Transcription Factors Interact to Control Nodulation in Legumes1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Laloum, Tom; Lepage, Agnès; Ariel, Federico; Frances, Lisa; Gamas, Pascal; de Carvalho-Niebel, Fernanda

    2015-01-01

    The endosymbiotic association between legumes and soil bacteria called rhizobia leads to the formation of a new root-derived organ called the nodule in which differentiated bacteria convert atmospheric nitrogen into a form that can be assimilated by the host plant. Successful root infection by rhizobia and nodule organogenesis require the activation of symbiotic genes that are controlled by a set of transcription factors (TFs). We recently identified Medicago truncatula nuclear factor-YA1 (MtNF-YA1) and MtNF-YA2 as two M. truncatula TFs playing a central role during key steps of the Sinorhizobium meliloti-M. truncatula symbiotic interaction. NF-YA TFs interact with NF-YB and NF-YC subunits to regulate target genes containing the CCAAT box consensus sequence. In this study, using a yeast two-hybrid screen approach, we identified the NF-YB and NF-YC subunits able to interact with MtNF-YA1 and MtNF-YA2. In yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) and in planta, we further demonstrated by both coimmunoprecipitation and bimolecular fluorescence complementation that these NF-YA, -B, and -C subunits interact and form a stable NF-Y heterotrimeric complex. Reverse genetic and chromatin immunoprecipitation-PCR approaches revealed the importance of these newly identified NF-YB and NF-YC subunits for rhizobial symbiosis and binding to the promoter of MtERN1 (for Ethylene Responsive factor required for Nodulation), a direct target gene of MtNF-YA1 and MtNF-YA2. Finally, we verified that a similar trimer is formed in planta by the common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) NF-Y subunits, revealing the existence of evolutionary conserved NF-Y protein complexes to control nodulation in leguminous plants. This sheds light on the process whereby an ancient heterotrimeric TF mainly controlling cell division in animals has acquired specialized functions in plants. PMID:26432878

  8. A Phylogenetically Conserved Group of Nuclear Factor-Y Transcription Factors Interact to Control Nodulation in Legumes.

    PubMed

    Baudin, Maël; Laloum, Tom; Lepage, Agnès; Rípodas, Carolina; Ariel, Federico; Frances, Lisa; Crespi, Martin; Gamas, Pascal; Blanco, Flavio Antonio; Zanetti, Maria Eugenia; de Carvalho-Niebel, Fernanda; Niebel, Andreas

    2015-12-01

    The endosymbiotic association between legumes and soil bacteria called rhizobia leads to the formation of a new root-derived organ called the nodule in which differentiated bacteria convert atmospheric nitrogen into a form that can be assimilated by the host plant. Successful root infection by rhizobia and nodule organogenesis require the activation of symbiotic genes that are controlled by a set of transcription factors (TFs). We recently identified Medicago truncatula nuclear factor-YA1 (MtNF-YA1) and MtNF-YA2 as two M. truncatula TFs playing a central role during key steps of the Sinorhizobium meliloti-M. truncatula symbiotic interaction. NF-YA TFs interact with NF-YB and NF-YC subunits to regulate target genes containing the CCAAT box consensus sequence. In this study, using a yeast two-hybrid screen approach, we identified the NF-YB and NF-YC subunits able to interact with MtNF-YA1 and MtNF-YA2. In yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) and in planta, we further demonstrated by both coimmunoprecipitation and bimolecular fluorescence complementation that these NF-YA, -B, and -C subunits interact and form a stable NF-Y heterotrimeric complex. Reverse genetic and chromatin immunoprecipitation-PCR approaches revealed the importance of these newly identified NF-YB and NF-YC subunits for rhizobial symbiosis and binding to the promoter of MtERN1 (for Ethylene Responsive factor required for Nodulation), a direct target gene of MtNF-YA1 and MtNF-YA2. Finally, we verified that a similar trimer is formed in planta by the common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) NF-Y subunits, revealing the existence of evolutionary conserved NF-Y protein complexes to control nodulation in leguminous plants. This sheds light on the process whereby an ancient heterotrimeric TF mainly controlling cell division in animals has acquired specialized functions in plants.

  9. Lotus japonicus SUNERGOS1 encodes a predicted subunit A of a DNA topoisomerase VI that is required for nodule differentiation and accommodation of rhizobial infection

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Hwi Joong; Hossain, Md Shakhawat; Held, Mark; Hou, Hongwei; Kehl, Marilyn; Tromas, Alexandre; Sato, Shusei; Tabata, Satoshi; Andersen, Stig Uggerhøj; Stougaard, Jens; Ross, Loretta; Szczyglowski, Krzysztof

    2014-01-01

    A symbiotic mutant of Lotus japonicus, called sunergos1-1 (suner1-1), originated from a har1-1 suppressor screen. suner1-1 supports epidermal infection by Mesorhizobium loti and initiates cell divisions for organogenesis of nodule primordia. However, these processes appear to be temporarily stalled early during symbiotic interaction, leading to a low nodule number phenotype. This defect is ephemeral and near wild-type nodule numbers are reached by suner1-1 at a later point after infection. Using an approach that combined map-based cloning and next-generation sequencing we have identified the causative mutation and show that the suner1-1 phenotype is determined by a weak recessive allele, with the corresponding wild-type SUNER1 locus encoding a predicted subunit A of a DNA topoisomerase VI. Our data suggest that at least one function of SUNER1 during symbiosis is to participate in endoreduplication, which is an essential step during normal differentiation of functional, nitrogen-fixing nodules. PMID:24661810

  10. The expression of a chimeric Phaseolus vulgaris nodulin 30-GUS gene is restricted to the rhizobially infected cells in transgenic Lotus corniculatus nodules.

    PubMed

    Carsolio, C; Campos, F; Sánchez, F; Rocha-Sosa, M

    1994-12-01

    In Phaseolus vulgaris there is a nodulin family, Npv30, of ca. 30 kDa, as detected in an in vitro translation assay [2]. We isolated a gene (npv30-1) for one of the members of this family. The nucleotide sequence of the promoter of npv30-1 contains nodule-specific motifs common to other late nodulin genes. The promoter was fused to the GUS reporter gene; this chimeric fusion was introduced into Lotus corniculatus via Agrobacterium rhizogenes transformation. GUS activity was only detected in the infected cells of the nodules of transgenic plants. By contrast, the expression of a 35S-GUS construct was restricted to the uninfected cells and the vascular tissue.

  11. Host-specific Nod-factors associated with Medicago truncatula nodule infection differentially induce calcium influx and calcium spiking in root hairs

    PubMed Central

    Morieri, Giulia; Martinez, Eduardo A; Jarynowski, Andrzej; Driguez, Hugues; Morris, Richard; Oldroyd, Giles E D; Downie, J Allan

    2013-01-01

    Rhizobial nodulation (Nod) factors activate both nodule morphogenesis and infection thread development during legume nodulation. Nod factors induce two different calcium responses: intra-nuclear calcium oscillations and a calcium influx at the root hair tip. Calcium oscillations activate nodule development; we wanted to test if the calcium influx is associated with infection. Sinorhizobium meliloti nodL and nodF mutations additively reduce infection of Medicago truncatula. Nod-factors made by the nodL mutant lack an acetyl group; mutation of nodF causes the nitrogen (N)-linked C16:2 acyl chain to be replaced by C18:1. We tested whether these Nod-factors differentially induced calcium influx and calcium spiking. The absence of the NodL-determined acetyl group greatly reduced the induction of calcium influx without affecting calcium spiking. The calcium influx was even further reduced if the N-linked C16:2 acyl group was replaced by C18:1. These additive effects on calcium influx correlate with the additive effects of mutations in nodF and nodL on legume infection. Infection thread development is inhibited by ethylene, which also inhibited Nod-factor-induced calcium influx. We conclude that Nod-factor perception differentially activates the two developmental pathways required for nodulation and that activation of the pathway involving the calcium influx is important for efficient infection. PMID:24015832

  12. Symbiosis specificity in the legume: rhizobial mutualism.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dong; Yang, Shengming; Tang, Fang; Zhu, Hongyan

    2012-03-01

    Legume plants are able to engage in root nodule symbiosis with nitrogen-fixing soil bacteria, collectively called rhizobia. This mutualistic association is highly specific, such that each rhizobial species/strain interacts with only a specific group of legumes, and vice versa. Symbiosis specificity can occur at multiple phases of the interaction, ranging from initial bacterial attachment and infection to late nodule development associated with nitrogen fixation. Genetic control of symbiosis specificity is complex, involving fine-tuned signal communication between the symbiotic partners. Here we review our current understanding of the mechanisms used by the host and bacteria to choose their symbiotic partners, with a special focus on the role that the host immunity plays in controlling the specificity of the legume - rhizobial symbiosis.

  13. Analysis of nodulation kinetics in Frankia-Discaria trinervis symbiosis reveals different factors involved in the nodulation process.

    PubMed

    Gabbarini, Luciano Andrés; Wall, Luis Gabriel

    2008-08-01

    The induction of root nodule development in actinorhizal symbiosis would depend on the concentration of factors produced by the bacteria and the plant. A detailed analysis of nodulation description parameters revealed different factors related to the nodulation process. The initial time for nodulation (t(0)), the initial nodulation rate (v(0)) and the total time of nodule development (t(NOD)) were defined and consequently quantified in different experimental conditions: co-inoculation of Discaria trinervis with increasing concentrations of different non-infective bacteria together with the full compatible infective Frankia strain (the indicator strain) used at a limiting concentration or by changing plant factor(s) concentration. All the above nodulation parameters were modified by changing doses of full compatibility infective strain Frankia BCU110501; v(0) appears to be an expression of symbiotic recognition between partners as only fully symbiotic indicator Frankia BCU110501 was able to change it; t(0) seems not to reflect symbiotic recognition because it can also be modified by non-infective Frankia but suggest the existence of a basic level of plant microbe recognition. The initial time for nodulation t(0), reflecting the time required for the early interactions toward nodulation, is an inverse measure of the ability to establish early interactions toward nodulation. The increase in plant factors concentration also reduces t(0) values, suggesting that a plant factor is involved and favors very early interactions. Increases in plant factors concentration also modify the final number of nodules per plant and the nodule cluster profile along the taproot as an expression of the autoregulation phenomenon. Meanwhile, Frankia inoculums' concentration, either infective or not, modified t(NOD) in an opposite way plant factors did. In conclusion, the analysis of nodulation kinetics appears to be an appropriate tool to investigate factors involved in the symbiotic

  14. Agro-industrial waste materials and wastewater sludge for rhizobial inoculant production: a review.

    PubMed

    Ben Rebah, F; Prévost, D; Yezza, A; Tyagi, R D

    2007-12-01

    Inoculating legumes with commercial rhizobial inoculants is a common agriculture practice. Generally, inoculants are sold in liquid or in solid forms (mixed with carrier). The production of inoculants involves a step in which a high number of cells are produced, followed by the product formulation. This process is largely governed by the cost related to the medium used for rhizobial growth and by the availability of a carrier source (peat) for production of solid inoculant. Some industrial and agricultural by-products (e.g. cheese whey, malt sprouts) contain growth factors such as nitrogen and carbon, which can support growth of rhizobia. Other agro-industrial wastes (e.g. plant compost, filtermud, fly-ash) can be used as a carrier for rhizobial inoculant. More recently, wastewater sludge, a worldwide recyclable waste, has shown good potential for inoculant production as a growth medium and as a carrier (dehydrated sludge). Sludge usually contains nutrient elements at concentrations sufficient to sustain rhizobial growth and heavy metals are usually below the recommended level. In some cases, growth conditions can be optimized by a sludge pre-treatment or by the addition of nutrients. Inoculants produced in wastewater sludge are efficient for nodulation and nitrogen fixation with legumes as compared to standard inoculants. This new approach described in this review offers a safe environmental alternative for both waste treatment/disposal and inoculant production.

  15. Rhizobial strain involvement in plant growth, nodule protein composition and antioxidant enzyme activities of chickpea-rhizobia symbioses: modulation by salt stress.

    PubMed

    Mhadhbi, Haythem; Jebara, Moez; Limam, Férid; Aouani, Mohamed Elarbi

    2004-09-01

    Mesorhizobium ciceri, Mesorhizobium mediterraneum and Sinorhizobium medicae strains showed different symbiotic performances when inoculated to chickpea (Cicer arietinum L., cv. chetoui) at unstressed conditions and under salt stress. The analysis of nodular proteic composition and antioxidant enzyme activities revealed a polymorphism of patterns on SDS and native PAGE suggesting a potential dependence on the bacterial partner. Salt effect was analysed on plant growth, nitrogen fixation and antioxidant enzymes. M. ciceri, the most efficient strain, seemed to allow a best tolerance to chickpea plants under salt stress. This constraint did not affect the nodular superoxide dismutase (SOD, E.C. 1.15.1.1) activity of the symbiosis implicating the latter strain. This symbiosis showed the least decrease for the nodule protein level and the catalase (CAT, E.C. 1.11.1.6) activity, and the highest increase of peroxidase (POX, E.C. 1.11.1.7) activity that seemed to be related with the tolerance to salt.

  16. Nitrogen-Fixing Rhizobial Strains Isolated from Common Bean Seeds: Phylogeny, Physiology, and Genome Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Mora, Yolanda; Díaz, Rafael; Vargas-Lagunas, Carmen; Peralta, Humberto; Guerrero, Gabriela; Aguilar, Alejandro; Encarnación, Sergio; Girard, Lourdes

    2014-01-01

    Rhizobial bacteria are commonly found in soil but also establish symbiotic relationships with legumes, inhabiting the root nodules, where they fix nitrogen. Endophytic rhizobia have also been reported in the roots and stems of legumes and other plants. We isolated several rhizobial strains from the nodules of noninoculated bean plants and looked for their provenance in the interiors of the seeds. Nine isolates were obtained, covering most known bean symbiont species, which belong to the Rhizobium and Sinorhizobium groups. The strains showed several large plasmids, except for a Sinorhizobium americanum isolate. Two strains, one Rhizobium phaseoli and one S. americanum strain, were thoroughly characterized. Optimal symbiotic performance was observed for both of these strains. The S. americanum strain showed biotin prototrophy when subcultured, as well as high pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) activity, both of which are key factors in maintaining optimal growth. The R. phaseoli strain was a biotin auxotroph, did not grow when subcultured, accumulated a large amount of poly-β-hydroxybutyrate, and exhibited low PDH activity. The physiology and genomes of these strains showed features that may have resulted from their lifestyle inside the seeds: stress sensitivity, a ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RubisCO) complex, a homocitrate synthase (usually present only in free-living diazotrophs), a hydrogenase uptake cluster, and the presence of prophages. We propose that colonization by rhizobia and their presence in Phaseolus seeds may be part of a persistence mechanism that helps to retain and disperse rhizobial strains. PMID:25002426

  17. Ultrasonographic risk factors of malignancy in thyroid nodules.

    PubMed

    Rios, A; Torregrosa, B; Rodríguez, J M; Rodríguez, D; Cepero, A; Abellán, M D; Torregrosa, N M; Hernández, A M; Parrilla, P

    2016-09-01

    Between 40 and 50 % of the population will have at least one thyroid nodule, although only 5-8 % will have a malignant one. The objective of this study was to establish the ultrasonographic characteristics which allow us to distinguish benignity from malignancy in thyroid nodules. In the study population, inclusion criteria are (1) a single thyroid nodule and (2) multinodular goiter and exclusion criteria are (1) previous thyroid surgery and (2) fine needle aspiration (FNA) in the past month. This study is a double-blind prospective study. The study protocol is as follows: (1) clinical study; (2) ultrasound examination; (3) FNA; and (4) surgery-follow-up. The variables analysed are as follows: a multinodular nodule or goitre; colloid degeneration; morphology; margins; hyperechoic rim; rim thickness; rim morphology; size; angle between the major axis and the skin; echostructure; posterior acoustic findings; calcifications; thick colloid; localization of the intrathyroid nodular tissue; and characteristics in the Doppler scan. A total of 221 thyroid nodules were analysed. The following ultrasound findings were associated with malignancy (p < 0.05): a nodule with posterior acoustic shadowing; the echotexture of the nodule; intranodular colloid degeneration; nodule margins; nodular morphology; the presence of thick colloid; the angle between the major axis and the skin; characteristics of the intranodular vessels using color Doppler and Doppler energy; and calcifications. In the multivariate analysis, the following factors persisted as predictors of malignancy: the echotexture of the nodule (odds ratio 12.81), microcalcifications (OR 9.05), and chaotic vascularisation in the Doppler energy (OR 43.47). The high-resolution ultrasound allowed for a more reliable diagnosis of malignancy. The main findings of malignancy were the hypoechogenicity echotexture, microcalcifications, and chaotic intranodular vessels using Doppler energy.

  18. Enhanced rhizobial symbiotic capacity in an allopolyploid species of Glycine (Leguminosae).

    PubMed

    Powell, Adrian F; Doyle, Jeff J

    2016-10-01

    Previous studies have shown that polyploidy can alter biotic interactions, and it has been suggested that these effects may contribute to the increased ability for colonization of new habitats shown by many allopolyploids. Little is known, however, about the effects of allopolyploidy, which combines hybridity and genome doubling, on symbiotic interactions with rhizobial bacteria. We examined interactions of the allopolyploid Glycine dolichocarpa (designated T2) with novel rhizobial partners, such as might occur in a context of colonization, and compared these with the responses of its diploid progenitors, G. tomentella (D3) and G. syndetika (D4). We assessed root hair response, nodule formation, nodule mass, nodule number, and plant biomass. The allopolyploid (T2) showed a greater root hair deformation response when exposed to rhizobia, compared with either diploid. T2 had a greater probability of forming nodules with NGR234 compared with diploid D4, and greater total nodule mass per nodulated plant compared with diploid D3. T2 also had greater plant biomass responses to nitrogen and when exposed to NGR234. The allopolyploid is characterized by transgressive responses to rhizobia for some variables, while also combining certain parental diploid responses such that its capacity for interactions with rhizobia appears to be greater than for either diploid progenitor. This overall enhanced nodulation capacity and the ability to make greater gains from exposure to both rhizobia and additional nitrogen indicate a greater potential of the allopolyploid to benefit from these factors both generally and in a context of colonization. © 2016 Botanical Society of America.

  19. Analysis of rhizobial strains nodulating Phaseolus vulgaris from Hispaniola Island, a geographic bridge between Meso and South America and the first historical link with Europe.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Alcántara, César-Antonio; Ramírez-Bahena, Martha-Helena; Mulas, Daniel; García-Fraile, Paula; Gómez-Moriano, Alicia; Peix, Alvaro; Velázquez, Encarna; González-Andrés, Fernando

    2014-03-01

    Hispaniola Island was the first stopover in the travels of Columbus between America and Spain, and played a crucial role in the exchange of Phaseolus vulgaris seeds and their endosymbionts. The analysis of recA and atpD genes from strains nodulating this legume in coastal and inner regions of Hispaniola Island showed that they were almost identical to those of the American strains CIAT 652, Ch24-10 and CNPAF512, which were initially named as Rhizobium etli and have been recently reclassified into Rhizobium phaseoli after the analysis of their genomes. Therefore, the species R. phaseoli is more abundant in America than previously thought, and since the proposal of the American origin of R. etli was based on the analysis of several strains that are currently known to be R. phaseoli, it can be concluded that both species have an American origin coevolving with their host in its distribution centres. The analysis of the symbiovar phaseoli nodC gene alleles carried by different species isolated in American and European countries suggested a Mesoamerican origin of the α allele and an Andean origin of the γ allele, which is supported by the dominance of this latter allele in Europe where mostly Andean cultivars of common beans have been traditionally cultivated. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  20. Characterization of Rhizobial Isolates of Phaseolus vulgaris by Staircase Electrophoresis of Low-Molecular-Weight RNA

    PubMed Central

    Velázquez, Encarna; Martínez-Romero, Esperanza; Rodríguez-Navarro, Dulce Nombre; Trujillo, Martha E.; Daza, Antonio; Mateos, Pedro F.; Martínez-Molina, Eustoquio; van Berkum, Peter

    2001-01-01

    Low-molecular-weight (LMW) RNA molecules were analyzed to characterize rhizobial isolates that nodulate the common bean growing in Spain. Since LMW RNA profiles, determined by staircase electrophoresis, varied across the rhizobial species nodulating beans, we demonstrated that bean isolates recovered from Spanish soils presumptively could be characterized as Rhizobium etli, Rhizobium gallicum, Rhizobium giardinii, Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. viciae and bv. trifolii, and Sinorhizobium fredii. PMID:11157280

  1. Nodulation gene factors and plant response in the Rhizobium-legume symbiosis. [Nodulation

    SciTech Connect

    Long, S.R.

    1990-01-01

    Our original application aimed to identify genes outside the common nod region involved in nodulation and host range of alfalfa. This has been revised by adding other studies on nodulation gene action and removing molecular studies of gene action. Our restated goals and progress are as follows. An early goal was identification and characterization of additional nodulation genes. By means of transposon mutagenesis, mapping and marker exchange we have established 87 independent mutations in a 20kb area represented by plasmid pRmJT5. We discovered four new genes: nodP, nodD3, syrA and syrM. The sequence, start site and protein product for nodFe, nodG, and nodH were also identified. Regulation of nod FEGH was studied. nod FEGH can be induced by luteolin in the presence of noodle; nodD1; noD3 and syrM, a symbiotic regulator gene also increase transcription of nod FEGH. syrA will interact with syrM; syrM also regulates exopolysaccharide genes and is believed to be a master regulator. As part of these studies, an in vitro transcription/translation system for Rhizobium was developed. Adjacent to nodP we discussed nodQ, nodPQ occurrs in two highly consumed copies. nodQ appears by sequence analysis to be similar to initiation and elongation factors, with the highest homology in the GDP binding domain. We have also investigated the nod strain, WL131. WL131 has an insertion, ISRm3, interrupting nodG, and a nonsase mutation in nodH, nodH is responsible for the lack of nodulation. We are currently investigating supernatant factors, host range effects C by spot inoculation, glucaronidase fusion proteins, and are developing, a single root hair inoculation protocol. 7 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  2. A Medicago truncatula Cystathionine-β-Synthase-like Domain-Containing Protein Is Required for Rhizobial Infection and Symbiotic Nitrogen Fixation.

    PubMed

    Sinharoy, Senjuti; Liu, Chengwu; Breakspear, Andrew; Guan, Dian; Shailes, Sarah; Nakashima, Jin; Zhang, Shulan; Wen, Jiangqi; Torres-Jerez, Ivone; Oldroyd, Giles; Murray, Jeremy D; Udvardi, Michael K

    2016-04-01

    The symbiosis between leguminous plants and soil rhizobia culminates in the formation of nitrogen-fixing organs called nodules that support plant growth. Two Medicago truncatula Tnt1-insertion mutants were identified that produced small nodules, which were unable to fix nitrogen effectively due to ineffective rhizobial colonization. The gene underlying this phenotype was found to encode a protein containing a putative membrane-localized domain of unknown function (DUF21) and a cystathionine-β-synthase domain. The cbs1 mutants had defective infection threads that were sometimes devoid of rhizobia and formed small nodules with greatly reduced numbers of symbiosomes. We studied the expression of the gene, designated M truncatula Cystathionine-β-Synthase-like1 (MtCBS1), using a promoter-β-glucuronidase gene fusion, which revealed expression in infected root hair cells, developing nodules, and in the invasion zone of mature nodules. An MtCBS1-GFP fusion protein localized itself to the infection thread and symbiosomes. Nodulation factor-induced Ca(2+) responses were observed in the cbs1 mutant, indicating that MtCBS1 acts downstream of nodulation factor signaling. MtCBS1 expression occurred exclusively during Medicago-rhizobium symbiosis. Induction of MtCBS1 expression during symbiosis was found to be dependent on Nodule Inception (NIN), a key transcription factor that controls both rhizobial infection and nodule organogenesis. Interestingly, the closest homolog of MtCBS1, MtCBS2, was specifically induced in mycorrhizal roots, suggesting common infection mechanisms in nodulation and mycorrhization. Related proteins in Arabidopsis have been implicated in cell wall maturation, suggesting a potential role for CBS1 in the formation of the infection thread wall.

  3. A Medicago truncatula Cystathionine-β-Synthase-like Domain-Containing Protein Is Required for Rhizobial Infection and Symbiotic Nitrogen Fixation1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Breakspear, Andrew; Guan, Dian; Nakashima, Jin; Zhang, Shulan; Torres-Jerez, Ivone; Oldroyd, Giles; Murray, Jeremy D.; Udvardi, Michael K.

    2016-01-01

    The symbiosis between leguminous plants and soil rhizobia culminates in the formation of nitrogen-fixing organs called nodules that support plant growth. Two Medicago truncatula Tnt1-insertion mutants were identified that produced small nodules, which were unable to fix nitrogen effectively due to ineffective rhizobial colonization. The gene underlying this phenotype was found to encode a protein containing a putative membrane-localized domain of unknown function (DUF21) and a cystathionine-β-synthase domain. The cbs1 mutants had defective infection threads that were sometimes devoid of rhizobia and formed small nodules with greatly reduced numbers of symbiosomes. We studied the expression of the gene, designated M. truncatula Cystathionine-β-Synthase-like1 (MtCBS1), using a promoter-β-glucuronidase gene fusion, which revealed expression in infected root hair cells, developing nodules, and in the invasion zone of mature nodules. An MtCBS1-GFP fusion protein localized itself to the infection thread and symbiosomes. Nodulation factor-induced Ca2+ responses were observed in the cbs1 mutant, indicating that MtCBS1 acts downstream of nodulation factor signaling. MtCBS1 expression occurred exclusively during Medicago-rhizobium symbiosis. Induction of MtCBS1 expression during symbiosis was found to be dependent on Nodule Inception (NIN), a key transcription factor that controls both rhizobial infection and nodule organogenesis. Interestingly, the closest homolog of MtCBS1, MtCBS2, was specifically induced in mycorrhizal roots, suggesting common infection mechanisms in nodulation and mycorrhization. Related proteins in Arabidopsis have been implicated in cell wall maturation, suggesting a potential role for CBS1 in the formation of the infection thread wall. PMID:26884486

  4. Nodulation outer proteins: double-edged swords of symbiotic rhizobia.

    PubMed

    Staehelin, Christian; Krishnan, Hari B

    2015-09-15

    Rhizobia are nitrogen-fixing bacteria that establish a nodule symbiosis with legumes. Nodule formation depends on signals and surface determinants produced by both symbiotic partners. Among them, rhizobial Nops (nodulation outer proteins) play a crucial symbiotic role in many strain-host combinations. Nops are defined as proteins secreted via a rhizobial T3SS (type III secretion system). Functional T3SSs have been characterized in many rhizobial strains. Nops have been identified using various genetic, biochemical, proteomic, genomic and experimental approaches. Certain Nops represent extracellular components of the T3SS, which are visible in electron micrographs as bacterial surface appendages called T3 (type III) pili. Other Nops are T3 effector proteins that can be translocated into plant cells. Rhizobial T3 effectors manipulate cellular processes in host cells to suppress plant defence responses against rhizobia and to promote symbiosis-related processes. Accordingly, mutant strains deficient in synthesis or secretion of T3 effectors show reduced symbiotic properties on certain host plants. On the other hand, direct or indirect recognition of T3 effectors by plant cells expressing specific R (resistance) proteins can result in effector triggered defence responses that negatively affect rhizobial infection. Hence Nops are double-edged swords that may promote establishment of symbiosis with one legume (symbiotic factors) and impair symbiotic processes when bacteria are inoculated on another legume species (asymbiotic factors). In the present review, we provide an overview of our current understanding of Nops. We summarize their symbiotic effects, their biochemical properties and their possible modes of action. Finally, we discuss future perspectives in the field of T3 effector research. © 2015 Authors; published by Portland Press Limited.

  5. The MicroRNA390/TAS3 Pathway Mediates Symbiotic Nodulation and Lateral Root Growth.

    PubMed

    Hobecker, Karen Vanesa; Reynoso, Mauricio Alberto; Bustos-Sanmamed, Pilar; Wen, Jiangqi; Mysore, Kirankumar S; Crespi, Martín; Blanco, Flavio Antonio; Zanetti, María Eugenia

    2017-08-01

    Legume roots form two types of postembryonic organs, lateral roots and symbiotic nodules. Nodule formation is the result of the interaction of legumes with rhizobia and requires the mitotic activation and differentiation of root cells as well as an independent, but coordinated, program that allows infection by rhizobia. MicroRNA390 (miR390) is an evolutionarily conserved microRNA that targets the Trans-Acting Short Interference RNA3 (TAS3) transcript. Cleavage of TAS3 by ARGONAUTE7 results in the production of trans-acting small interference RNAs, which target mRNAs encoding AUXIN RESPONSE FACTOR2 (ARF2), ARF3, and ARF4. Here, we show that activation of the miR390/TAS3 regulatory module by overexpression of miR390 in Medicago truncatula promotes lateral root growth but prevents nodule organogenesis, rhizobial infection, and the induction of two key nodulation genes, Nodulation Signaling Pathway1 (NSP1) and NSP2 Accordingly, inactivation of the miR390/TAS3 module, either by expression of a miR390 target mimicry construct or mutations in ARGONAUTE7, enhances nodulation and rhizobial infection, alters the spatial distribution of the nodules, and increases the percentage of nodules with multiple meristems. Our results revealed a key role of the miR390/TAS3 pathway in legumes as a modulator of lateral root organs, playing opposite roles in lateral root and nodule development. © 2017 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  6. A reduced fraction of plant N derived from atmospheric N (%Ndfa) and reduced rhizobial nifH gene numbers indicate a lower capacity for nitrogen fixation in nodules of white clover exposed to long-term CO2 enrichment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, T.; Bowatte, S.; Newton, P. C. D.

    2013-06-01

    Using the δ15N natural abundance method, we found that the fraction of nitrogen derived from atmospheric N (%Ndfa) in field grown white clover (Trifolium repens L.) plants was significantly lower (72.0% vs. 89.5%, p = 0.047 in a grassland exposed to elevated CO2 for 13 yr using Free Air Carbon Dioxide Enrichment (FACE). Twelve months later we conducted an experiment to investigate the reasons behind the reduced N fixation. We took cuttings from white clover plants growing in the FACE and established individual plants in a glasshouse using soil from the appropriate ambient or elevated CO2 treatments. The established plants were then transplanted back into their "rings of origin" and sampled over a 6 week period. We used molecular ecological analyses targeting nifH genes and transcripts of rhizobia in symbiosis with white clover (Trifolium repens L.) to understand the potential mechanisms. Shoot biomass was significantly lower in eCO2 but there was no difference in nodule number or mass per plant. The numbers of nifH genes and gene transcripts per nodule were significantly reduced under eCO2 but the ratio of gene to transcript number and the strains of rhizobia present were the same in both treatments. We conclude that the capacity for biological nitrogen fixation was reduced by eCO2 in white clover and was related to the reduced rhizobia numbers in nodules. We discuss the finding of reduced gene number in relation to factors controlling bacteroid DNA amount which may imply an influence of nitrogen as well as phosphorus.

  7. A reduced fraction of plant N derived from atmospheric N (%Ndfa) and reduced rhizobial nifH gene numbers indicate a lower capacity for nitrogen fixation in nodules of white clover exposed to long-term CO2 enrichment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, T.; Bowatte, S.; Newton, P. C. D.

    2013-12-01

    Using the δ15N natural abundance method, we found that the fraction of nitrogen derived from atmospheric N (%Ndfa) in field-grown white clover (Trifolium repens L.) plants was significantly lower (72.0% vs. 89.8%, p = 0.047 in a grassland exposed to elevated CO2 for 13 yr using free air carbon dioxide enrichment (FACE). Twelve months later we conducted an experiment to investigate the reasons behind the reduced N fixation. We took cuttings from white clover plants growing in the FACE and established individual plants in a glasshouse using soil from the appropriate ambient or elevated CO2 treatments. The established plants were then transplanted back into their "rings of origin" and sampled over a 6-week period. We used molecular ecological analyses targeting nifH genes and transcripts of rhizobia in symbiosis with white clover (Trifolium repens L.) to understand the potential mechanisms. Shoot biomass was significantly lower in eCO2, but there was no difference in nodule number or mass per plant. The numbers of nifH genes and gene transcripts per nodule were significantly reduced under eCO2, but the ratio of gene to transcript number and the strains of rhizobia present were the same in both treatments. We conclude that the capacity for biological nitrogen fixation was reduced by eCO2 in white clover and was related to the reduced rhizobia numbers in nodules. We discuss the finding of reduced gene number in relation to factors controlling bacteroid DNA amount, which may imply an influence of nitrogen as well as phosphorus.

  8. Nodulation gene mutants of Mesorhizobium loti R7A-nodZ and nolL mutants have host-specific phenotypes on Lotus spp.

    PubMed

    Rodpothong, Patsarin; Sullivan, John T; Songsrirote, Kriangsak; Sumpton, David; Cheung, Kenneth W J-T; Thomas-Oates, Jane; Radutoiu, Simona; Stougaard, Jens; Ronson, Clive W

    2009-12-01

    Rhizobial Nod factors induce plant responses and facilitate bacterial infection, leading to the development of nitrogen-fixing root nodules on host legumes. Nodule initiation is highly dependent on Nod-factor structure and, hence, on at least some of the nodulation genes that encode Nod-factor production. Here, we report the effects of mutations in Mesorhizobium loti R7A nodulation genes on nodulation of four Lotus spp. and on Nod-factor structure. Most mutants, including a DeltanodSDeltanolO double mutant that produced Nod factors lacking the carbamoyl and possibly N-methyl groups on the nonreducing terminal residue, were unaffected for nodulation. R7ADeltanodZ and R7ADeltanolL mutants that produced Nod factors without the (acetyl)fucose on the reducing terminal residue had a host-specific phenotype, forming mainly uninfected nodule primordia on Lotus filicaulis and L. corniculatus and effective nodules with a delay on L. japonicus. The mutants also showed significantly reduced infection thread formation and Nin gene induction. In planta complementation experiments further suggested that the acetylfucose was important for balanced signaling in response to Nod factor by the L. japonicus NFR1/NFR5 receptors. Overall the results reveal differences in the sensitivity of plant perception with respect to signaling leading to root hair deformation and nodule primordium development versus infection thread formation and rhizobial entry.

  9. Nitrogen-fixing rhizobial strains isolated from common bean seeds: phylogeny, physiology, and genome analysis.

    PubMed

    Mora, Yolanda; Díaz, Rafael; Vargas-Lagunas, Carmen; Peralta, Humberto; Guerrero, Gabriela; Aguilar, Alejandro; Encarnación, Sergio; Girard, Lourdes; Mora, Jaime

    2014-09-01

    Rhizobial bacteria are commonly found in soil but also establish symbiotic relationships with legumes, inhabiting the root nodules, where they fix nitrogen. Endophytic rhizobia have also been reported in the roots and stems of legumes and other plants. We isolated several rhizobial strains from the nodules of noninoculated bean plants and looked for their provenance in the interiors of the seeds. Nine isolates were obtained, covering most known bean symbiont species, which belong to the Rhizobium and Sinorhizobium groups. The strains showed several large plasmids, except for a Sinorhizobium americanum isolate. Two strains, one Rhizobium phaseoli and one S. americanum strain, were thoroughly characterized. Optimal symbiotic performance was observed for both of these strains. The S. americanum strain showed biotin prototrophy when subcultured, as well as high pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) activity, both of which are key factors in maintaining optimal growth. The R. phaseoli strain was a biotin auxotroph, did not grow when subcultured, accumulated a large amount of poly-β-hydroxybutyrate, and exhibited low PDH activity. The physiology and genomes of these strains showed features that may have resulted from their lifestyle inside the seeds: stress sensitivity, a ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RubisCO) complex, a homocitrate synthase (usually present only in free-living diazotrophs), a hydrogenase uptake cluster, and the presence of prophages. We propose that colonization by rhizobia and their presence in Phaseolus seeds may be part of a persistence mechanism that helps to retain and disperse rhizobial strains. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  10. Genome Wide Identification and Expression Profiling of Ethylene Receptor Genes during Soybean Nodulation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Youning; Yuan, Jinhong; Yang, Wei; Zhu, Lin; Su, Chao; Wang, Xiaodi; Wu, Haiyan; Sun, Zhengxi; Li, Xia

    2017-01-01

    It has long been known that the gaseous plant hormone ethylene plays a key role in nodulation in legumes. The perception of ethylene by a family of five membrane-localized receptors is necessary to trigger the ethylene signaling pathway, which regulates various biological responses in Arabidopsis. However, a systematic analysis of the ethylene receptors in leguminous plants and their roles in nodule development is lacking. In this study, we performed a characterization of ethylene receptor genes based on the latest Glycine max genome sequence and a public microarray database. Eleven ethylene receptor family genes were identified in soybean through homology searches, and they were divided into two subgroups. Exon-intron analysis showed that the gene structures are highly conserved within each group. Further analysis of their expression patterns showed that these ethylene receptor genes are differentially expressed in various soybean tissues and organs, including functional nodules. Notably, the ethylene receptor genes showed different responses to rhizobial infection and Nod factors, suggesting a possible role for ethylene receptors and ethylene signaling in rhizobia-host cell interactions and nodulation in soybean. Together, these data indicate the functional divergence of ethylene receptor genes in soybean, and that some of these receptors mediate nodulation, including rhizobial infection, nodule development, and nodule functionality. These findings provide a foundation for further elucidation of the molecular mechanism by which the ethylene signaling pathway regulates nodulation in soybean, as well as other legumes.

  11. Alkalinity of Lanzarote soils is a factor shaping rhizobial populations with Sinorhizobium meliloti being the predominant microsymbiont of Lotus lancerottensis.

    PubMed

    León-Barrios, Milagros; Pérez-Yépez, Juan; Dorta, Paola; Garrido, Ana; Jiménez, Concepción

    2017-02-02

    Lotus lancerottensis is an endemic species that grows widely throughout Lanzarote Island (Canary Is.). Characterization of 48 strains isolated from root nodules of plants growing in soils from eleven locations on the island showed that 38 isolates (79.1%) belonged to the species Sinorhizobium meliloti, whereas only six belonged to Mesorhizobium sp., the more common microsymbionts for the Lotus. Other genotypes containing only one isolate were classified as Pararhizobium sp., Sinorhizobium sp., Phyllobacterium sp. and Bradyrhizobium-like. Strains of S. meliloti were distributed along the island and, in most of the localities they were exclusive or major microsymbionts of L. lancerottensis. Phylogeny of the nodulation nodC gene placed the S. meliloti strains within symbiovar lancerottense and the mesorhizobial strains with the symbiovar loti. Although strains from both symbiovars produced effective N2-fixing nodules, S. meliloti symbiovar lancerottense was clearly the predominant microsymbiont of L. lancerottensis. This fact correlated with the better adaptation of strains of this species to the alkaline soils of Lanzarote, as in vitro characterization showed that while the mesorhizobial strains were inhibited by alkaline pH, S. meliloti strains grew well at pH 9.

  12. The MicroRNA390/TAS3 Pathway Mediates Symbiotic Nodulation and Lateral Root Growth1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Bustos-Sanmamed, Pilar; Mysore, Kirankumar S.

    2017-01-01

    Legume roots form two types of postembryonic organs, lateral roots and symbiotic nodules. Nodule formation is the result of the interaction of legumes with rhizobia and requires the mitotic activation and differentiation of root cells as well as an independent, but coordinated, program that allows infection by rhizobia. MicroRNA390 (miR390) is an evolutionarily conserved microRNA that targets the Trans-Acting Short Interference RNA3 (TAS3) transcript. Cleavage of TAS3 by ARGONAUTE7 results in the production of trans-acting small interference RNAs, which target mRNAs encoding AUXIN RESPONSE FACTOR2 (ARF2), ARF3, and ARF4. Here, we show that activation of the miR390/TAS3 regulatory module by overexpression of miR390 in Medicago truncatula promotes lateral root growth but prevents nodule organogenesis, rhizobial infection, and the induction of two key nodulation genes, Nodulation Signaling Pathway1 (NSP1) and NSP2. Accordingly, inactivation of the miR390/TAS3 module, either by expression of a miR390 target mimicry construct or mutations in ARGONAUTE7, enhances nodulation and rhizobial infection, alters the spatial distribution of the nodules, and increases the percentage of nodules with multiple meristems. Our results revealed a key role of the miR390/TAS3 pathway in legumes as a modulator of lateral root organs, playing opposite roles in lateral root and nodule development. PMID:28663332

  13. Abscisic acid coordinates nod factor and cytokinin signaling during the regulation of nodulation in Medicago truncatula.

    PubMed

    Ding, Yiliang; Kalo, Peter; Yendrek, Craig; Sun, Jongho; Liang, Yan; Marsh, John F; Harris, Jeanne M; Oldroyd, Giles E D

    2008-10-01

    Nodulation is tightly regulated in legumes to ensure appropriate levels of nitrogen fixation without excessive depletion of carbon reserves. This balance is maintained by intimately linking nodulation and its regulation with plant hormones. It has previously been shown that ethylene and jasmonic acid (JA) are able to regulate nodulation and Nod factor signal transduction. Here, we characterize the nature of abscisic acid (ABA) regulation of nodulation. We show that application of ABA inhibits nodulation, bacterial infection, and nodulin gene expression in Medicago truncatula. ABA acts in a similar manner as JA and ethylene, regulating Nod factor signaling and affecting the nature of Nod factor-induced calcium spiking. However, this action is independent of the ethylene signal transduction pathway. We show that genetic inhibition of ABA signaling through the use of a dominant-negative allele of ABSCISIC ACID INSENSITIVE1 leads to a hypernodulation phenotype. In addition, we characterize a novel locus of M. truncatula, SENSITIVITY TO ABA, that dictates the sensitivity of the plant to ABA and, as such, impacts the regulation of nodulation. We show that ABA can suppress Nod factor signal transduction in the epidermis and can regulate cytokinin induction of the nodule primordium in the root cortex. Therefore, ABA is capable of coordinately regulating the diverse developmental pathways associated with nodule formation and can intimately dictate the nature of the plants' response to the symbiotic bacteria.

  14. Nodulation outer proteins: double-edged swords of symbiotic rhizobia

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Rhizobia are nitrogen-fixing bacteria that establish a nodule symbiosis with legumes. Nodule formation is the result of a complex bacterial infection process, which depends on signals and surface determinants produced by both symbiotic partners. Among them, rhizobial nodulation outer proteins (Nops)...

  15. Swimming and swarming motility properties of peanut-nodulating rhizobia.

    PubMed

    Vicario, Julio C; Dardanelli, Marta S; Giordano, Walter

    2015-01-01

    Motility allows populations of bacteria to rapidly reach and colonize new microniches or microhabitats. The motility of rhizobia (symbiotic nitrogen-fixing bacteria that nodulate legume roots) is an important factor determining their competitive success. We evaluated the effects of temperature, incubation time, and seed exudates on swimming and swarming motility of five strains of Bradyrhizobium sp. (peanut-nodulating rhizobia). Swimming motility was increased by exudate exposure for all strains except native Pc34. In contrast, swarming motility was increased by exudate exposure for native 15A but unchanged for the other four strains. All five strains displayed the ability to differentiate into swarm cells. Morphological examination by scanning electron microscopy showed that the length of the swarm cells was variable, but generally greater than that of vegetative cells. Our findings suggest the importance of differential motility properties of peanut-nodulating rhizobial strains during agricultural inoculation and early steps of symbiotic interaction with the host.

  16. The Root Hair “Infectome” of Medicago truncatula Uncovers Changes in Cell Cycle Genes and Reveals a Requirement for Auxin Signaling in Rhizobial Infection[W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Breakspear, Andrew; Liu, Chengwu; Roy, Sonali; Stacey, Nicola; Rogers, Christian; Trick, Martin; Morieri, Giulia; Mysore, Kirankumar S.; Wen, Jiangqi; Oldroyd, Giles E.D.; Downie, J. Allan

    2014-01-01

    Nitrogen-fixing rhizobia colonize legume roots via plant-made intracellular infection threads. Genetics has identified some genes involved but has not provided sufficient detail to understand requirements for infection thread development. Therefore, we transcriptionally profiled Medicago truncatula root hairs prior to and during the initial stages of infection. This revealed changes in the responses to plant hormones, most notably auxin, strigolactone, gibberellic acid, and brassinosteroids. Several auxin responsive genes, including the ortholog of Arabidopsis thaliana Auxin Response Factor 16, were induced at infection sites and in nodule primordia, and mutation of ARF16a reduced rhizobial infection. Associated with the induction of auxin signaling genes, there was increased expression of cell cycle genes including an A-type cyclin and a subunit of the anaphase promoting complex. There was also induction of several chalcone O-methyltransferases involved in the synthesis of an inducer of Sinorhizobium meliloti nod genes, as well as a gene associated with Nod factor degradation, suggesting both positive and negative feedback loops that control Nod factor levels during rhizobial infection. We conclude that the onset of infection is associated with reactivation of the cell cycle as well as increased expression of genes required for hormone and flavonoid biosynthesis and that the regulation of auxin signaling is necessary for initiation of rhizobial infection threads. PMID:25527707

  17. Legume receptors perceive the rhizobial lipochitin oligosaccharide signal molecules by direct binding

    PubMed Central

    Broghammer, Angelique; Krusell, Lene; Blaise, Mickaël; Sauer, Jørgen; Sullivan, John T.; Maolanon, Nicolai; Vinther, Maria; Lorentzen, Andrea; Madsen, Esben B.; Jensen, Knud J.; Roepstorff, Peter; Thirup, Søren; Ronson, Clive W.; Thygesen, Mikkel B.; Stougaard, Jens

    2012-01-01

    Lipochitin oligosaccharides called Nod factors function as primary rhizobial signal molecules triggering legumes to develop new plant organs: root nodules that host the bacteria as nitrogen-fixing bacteroids. Here, we show that the Lotus japonicus Nod factor receptor 5 (NFR5) and Nod factor receptor 1 (NFR1) bind Nod factor directly at high-affinity binding sites. Both receptor proteins were posttranslationally processed when expressed as fusion proteins and extracted from purified membrane fractions of Nicotiana benthamiana or Arabidopsis thaliana. The N-terminal signal peptides were cleaved, and NFR1 protein retained its in vitro kinase activity. Processing of NFR5 protein was characterized by determining the N-glycosylation patterns of the ectodomain. Two different glycan structures with identical composition, Man3XylFucGlcNAc4, were identified by mass spectrometry and located at amino acid positions N68 and N198. Receptor–ligand interaction was measured by using ligands that were labeled or immobilized by application of chemoselective chemistry at the anomeric center. High-affinity ligand binding was demonstrated with both solid-phase and free solution techniques. The Kd values obtained for Nod factor binding were in the nanomolar range and comparable to the concentration range sufficient for biological activity. Structure-dependent ligand specificity was shown by using chitin oligosaccharides. Taken together, our results suggest that ligand recognition through direct ligand binding is a key step in the receptor-mediated activation mechanism leading to root nodule development in legumes. PMID:22859506

  18. [Phenotypic and genotypic characterization of twelve rhizobial isolates from different regions of Venezuela].

    PubMed

    Eugenia Marquina, María; Enrique González, Néstor; Castro, Yulimar

    2011-09-01

    Rhizobial taxonomy and systematics have progressed substantially, nevertheless, few studies have been developed on venezuelan species. This study evaluated the phenotypic and genetic variation between 12 venezuelan indigenous rhizobial isolates and 10 international referential strains, by phenotypical traits and DNA molecular markers. In this regard, a PCR-RFLP of the 16S rDNA gene, the presence of large plasmids, metabolic assays in solid media, salinity resistance, pH and temperature growth conditions, and intrinsic antibiotic resistance were assayed. In reference to the phenotypic attributes, we recognized three main groups: A group I, which comprised all the strains metabolizing between 67.5%-90% of the C and N sources. They were also acid-tolerant, as well as acid producers, capable of growing at 40 degrees C and in high salinity conditions (2-2.5% NaCl). With regard to the antibiotic sensitivity, this group was susceptible to a 30% of the antibiotic assayed. Strains belonging to Group II exhibited a lower salt tolerance (0.1-1.5%NaCl), as well as a lower acid tolerance, since they grew well at pH values equal or higher than 5.0. This group appeared to be resistant to all of the antibiotics assayed and only metabolized between 52.5%-82.5% of the C and N sources. Group III was represented by a single bacterial strain: it has a extremely low salt tolerance (0.1% NaCl). This strain grew at a pH equal or higher than 5.6, was susceptible to 50% of the antibiotics assayed and metabolized 72% of the C and N sources. On the basis of a PCR- RFLP of the 16S rDNA, three groups were also obtained. Members of the group A showed a close resemblance to Rhizobium tropici CIAT 899 and Sinorhizobium americanum CFN-EI 156, while Group B was closely related to Bradyrhizobium spp. Group C, was also represented by only one isolate. The Trebol isolate, was the only one strain able to form nodules and does not appear to be related to any of the referential rhizobial strains

  19. An ERF Transcription Factor in Medicago truncatula That Is Essential for Nod Factor Signal Transduction[W

    PubMed Central

    Middleton, Patrick H.; Jakab, Júlia; Penmetsa, R. Varma; Starker, Colby G.; Doll, Jake; Kaló, Péter; Prabhu, Radhika; Marsh, John F.; Mitra, Raka M.; Kereszt, Attila; Dudas, Brigitta; VandenBosch, Kathryn; Long, Sharon R.; Cook, Doug R.; Kiss, Gyorgy B.; Oldroyd, Giles E.D.

    2007-01-01

    Rhizobial bacteria activate the formation of nodules on the appropriate host legume plant, and this requires the bacterial signaling molecule Nod factor. Perception of Nod factor in the plant leads to the activation of a number of rhizobial-induced genes. Putative transcriptional regulators in the GRAS family are known to function in Nod factor signaling, but these proteins have not been shown to be capable of direct DNA binding. Here, we identify an ERF transcription factor, ERF Required for Nodulation (ERN), which contains a highly conserved AP2 DNA binding domain, that is necessary for nodulation. Mutations in this gene block the initiation and development of rhizobial invasion structures, termed infection threads, and thus block nodule invasion by the bacteria. We show that ERN is necessary for Nod factor–induced gene expression and for spontaneous nodulation activated by the calcium- and calmodulin-dependent protein kinase, DMI3, which is a component of the Nod factor signaling pathway. We propose that ERN is a component of the Nod factor signal transduction pathway and functions downstream of DMI3 to activate nodulation gene expression. PMID:17449807

  20. Alfalfa Enod12 genes are differentially regulated during nodule development by Nod factors and Rhizobium invasion.

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, P; Crespi, M D; Szécsi, J; Allison, L A; Schultze, M; Ratet, P; Kondorosi, E; Kondorosi, A

    1994-01-01

    MsEnod12A and MsEnod12B are two early nodulin genes from alfalfa (Medicago sativa). Differential expression of these genes was demonstrated using a reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction approach. MsEnod12A RNA was detected only in nodules and not in other plant tissues. In contrast, MsEnod12B transcripts were found in nodules and also at low levels in roots, flowers, stems, and leaves. MsEnod12B expression was enhanced in the root early after inoculation with the microsymbiont Rhizobium meliloti and after treatment with purified Nod factors, whereas MsEnod12A induction was detected only when developing nodules were visible. In situ hybridization showed that in nodules, MsEnod12 expression occurred in the infection zone. In empty Fix- nodules the MsEnod12A transcript level was much reduced, and in spontaneous nodules it was not detectable. These data indicate that MsEnod12B expression in roots is related to the action of Nod factors, whereas MsEnod12A expression is associated with the invasion process in nodules. Therefore, alfalfa possesses different mechanisms regulating MsEnod12A and MsEnod12B expression. PMID:8066132

  1. Rhizobial peptidase HrrP cleaves host-encoded signaling peptides and mediates symbiotic compatibility

    PubMed Central

    Price, Paul A.; Tanner, Houston R.; Dillon, Brett A.; Shabab, Mohammed; Walker, Graham C.; Griffitts, Joel S.

    2015-01-01

    Legume–rhizobium pairs are often observed that produce symbiotic root nodules but fail to fix nitrogen. Using the Sinorhizobium meliloti and Medicago truncatula symbiotic system, we previously described several naturally occurring accessory plasmids capable of disrupting the late stages of nodule development while enhancing bacterial proliferation within the nodule. We report here that host range restriction peptidase (hrrP), a gene found on one of these plasmids, is capable of conferring both these properties. hrrP encodes an M16A family metallopeptidase whose catalytic activity is required for these symbiotic effects. The ability of hrrP to suppress nitrogen fixation is conditioned upon the genotypes of both the host plant and the hrrP-expressing rhizobial strain, suggesting its involvement in symbiotic communication. Purified HrrP protein is capable of degrading a range of nodule-specific cysteine-rich (NCR) peptides encoded by M. truncatula. NCR peptides are crucial signals used by M. truncatula for inducing and maintaining rhizobial differentiation within nodules, as demonstrated in the accompanying article [Horváth B, et al. (2015) Proc Natl Acad Sci USA, 10.1073/pnas.1500777112]. The expression pattern of hrrP and its effects on rhizobial morphology are consistent with the NCR peptide cleavage model. This work points to a symbiotic dialogue involving a complex ensemble of host-derived signaling peptides and bacterial modifier enzymes capable of adjusting signal strength, sometimes with exploitative outcomes. PMID:26401024

  2. Rhizobial peptidase HrrP cleaves host-encoded signaling peptides and mediates symbiotic compatibility.

    PubMed

    Price, Paul A; Tanner, Houston R; Dillon, Brett A; Shabab, Mohammed; Walker, Graham C; Griffitts, Joel S

    2015-12-08

    Legume-rhizobium pairs are often observed that produce symbiotic root nodules but fail to fix nitrogen. Using the Sinorhizobium meliloti and Medicago truncatula symbiotic system, we previously described several naturally occurring accessory plasmids capable of disrupting the late stages of nodule development while enhancing bacterial proliferation within the nodule. We report here that host range restriction peptidase (hrrP), a gene found on one of these plasmids, is capable of conferring both these properties. hrrP encodes an M16A family metallopeptidase whose catalytic activity is required for these symbiotic effects. The ability of hrrP to suppress nitrogen fixation is conditioned upon the genotypes of both the host plant and the hrrP-expressing rhizobial strain, suggesting its involvement in symbiotic communication. Purified HrrP protein is capable of degrading a range of nodule-specific cysteine-rich (NCR) peptides encoded by M. truncatula. NCR peptides are crucial signals used by M. truncatula for inducing and maintaining rhizobial differentiation within nodules, as demonstrated in the accompanying article [Horváth B, et al. (2015) Proc Natl Acad Sci USA, 10.1073/pnas.1500777112]. The expression pattern of hrrP and its effects on rhizobial morphology are consistent with the NCR peptide cleavage model. This work points to a symbiotic dialogue involving a complex ensemble of host-derived signaling peptides and bacterial modifier enzymes capable of adjusting signal strength, sometimes with exploitative outcomes.

  3. [Evaluation of clinical, laboratorial and ultrasonographic predicting factors of malignancy in thyroid nodules].

    PubMed

    Rio, Ana Luiza Silva; Biscolla, Rosa Paula Mello; Andreoni, Danielle Macellaro; Camacho, Cléber Pinto; Nakabashi, Cláudia Cristina Doimo; Mamone, Maria da Conceição de Oliveira Carneiro; Ikejiri, Elza Setsuku; Matsumura, Luiza K; Hidal, Jairo Tabacow; Maciel, Rui Monteiro de Barros; Furlanetto, Reinaldo Perrone

    2011-02-01

    To evaluate the risk of malignancy in thyroid nodules through clinical, laboratory, ultrasonographic and cytological aspects. 741 nodules of 407 patients. The cytology was benign (60,5%), indeterminate (23,3%), malignant (8,3%) or nondiagnostic (7,6%). The prevalence of cancer in indeterminate citology was 18,5% (16% in follicular lesions, 44% in suspicious). The diagnosis of malignancy was 17,2% (n = 70). The frequency of cancer in women (15,2%) was lower than in men (27,9%). There was an inverse relation between age and cancer risk. There was no statistical significance in the prevalence of cancer according to number, size of nodules or TSH levels. Hypoechogenicity and microcalcifications on ultrasound were risk factors. The risk of malignancy was higher in men, hypoechoic nodules, with microcalcifications and was inversely related to age. The TSH level was not an independent factor predictive of malignancy.

  4. Factors Associated with the Prevalence of Thyroid Nodules and Goiter in Middle-Aged Euthyroid Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Klumbiene, Jurate; Verkauskiene, Rasa; Vainikonyte-Kristapone, Jelena; Seibokaite, Audrone; Ceponis, Jonas; Sidlauskas, Vygantas; Daugintyte-Petrusiene, Laura; Norkus, Antanas

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine associations of thyroid hormone levels and different metabolic parameters and anthropometric measurements with volume of nodular and nonnodular thyroid as well as with prevalence of goiter and thyroid nodules in middle-aged euthyroid subjects. Methods. The study consisted of 317 euthyroid subjects aged 48-49 from the Kaunas Cardiovascular Risk Cohort study. Thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), free thyroxine (FT4), and antithyroid peroxidase antibody (ATPO) levels, as well as anthropometric and metabolic parameters and smoking information, were evaluated. Results. In subjects with and without thyroid nodules, thyroid volume correlated with components of metabolic syndrome, body mass index (BMI), smoking, and TSH levels. In the nonnodular thyroid group, thyroid volume was also positively related to serum insulin and HOMA-IR, whereas a negative correlation between thyroid volume and leptin was identified in the nodular thyroid group. The goiter was identified in 12.3% of subjects. Female gender, thyroid nodules, smoking, BMI, and levels of TSH were independent predictors for goiter. Thyroid nodules were found in 31.2% of participants. Female gender, higher TSH levels, and thyroid volume were independent risk factors for thyroid nodules. Conclusions. Female gender, thyroid nodules, smoking, BMI, and TSH levels were identified as potential predictors of goiter. Female gender, TSH levels, and thyroid volume predicted the presence of thyroid nodules. PMID:28356911

  5. MtbHLH1, a bHLH transcription factor involved in Medicago truncatula nodule vascular patterning and nodule to plant metabolic exchanges

    PubMed Central

    Godiard, Laurence; Lepage, Agnès; Moreau, Sandra; Laporte, Damien; Verdenaud, Marion; Timmers, Ton; Gamas, Pascal

    2011-01-01

    This study aimed at defining the role of a basic helix–loop–helix (bHLH) transcription factor gene from Medicago truncatula, MtbHLH1, whose expression is upregulated during the development of root nodules produced upon infection by rhizobia bacteria. We used MtbHLH1 promoter::GUS fusions and quantitative reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction analyses to finely characterize the MtbHLH1 expression pattern. We altered MtbHLH1 function by expressing a dominantly repressed construct (CRES-T approach) and looked for possible MtbHLH1 target genes by transcriptomics. We found that MtbHLH1 is expressed in nodule primordia cells derived from pericycle divisions, in nodule vascular bundles (VBs) and in uninfected cells of the nitrogen (N) fixation zone. MtbHLH1 is also expressed in root tips, lateral root primordia cells and root VBs, and induced upon auxin treatment. Altering MtbHLH1 function led to an unusual phenotype, with a modified patterning of nodule VB development and a reduced growth of aerial parts of the plant, even though the nodules were able to fix atmospheric N. Several putative MtbHLH1 regulated genes were identified, including an asparagine synthase and a LOB (lateral organ boundary) transcription factor. Our results suggest that the MtbHLH1 gene is involved in the control of nodule vasculature patterning and nutrient exchanges between nodules and roots. PMID:21679315

  6. EFD Is an ERF transcription factor involved in the control of nodule number and differentiation in Medicago truncatula.

    PubMed

    Vernié, Tatiana; Moreau, Sandra; de Billy, Françoise; Plet, Julie; Combier, Jean-Philippe; Rogers, Christian; Oldroyd, Giles; Frugier, Florian; Niebel, Andreas; Gamas, Pascal

    2008-10-01

    Mechanisms regulating legume root nodule development are still poorly understood, and very few regulatory genes have been cloned and characterized. Here, we describe EFD (for ethylene response factor required for nodule differentiation), a gene that is upregulated during nodulation in Medicago truncatula. The EFD transcription factor belongs to the ethylene response factor (ERF) group V, which contains ERN1, 2, and 3, three ERFs involved in Nod factor signaling. The role of EFD in the regulation of nodulation was examined through the characterization of a null deletion mutant (efd-1), RNA interference, and overexpression studies. These studies revealed that EFD is a negative regulator of root nodulation and infection by Rhizobium and that EFD is required for the formation of functional nitrogen-fixing nodules. EFD appears to be involved in the plant and bacteroid differentiation processes taking place beneath the nodule meristem. We also showed that EFD activated Mt RR4, a cytokinin primary response gene that encodes a type-A response regulator. We propose that EFD induction of Mt RR4 leads to the inhibition of cytokinin signaling, with two consequences: the suppression of new nodule initiation and the activation of differentiation as cells leave the nodule meristem. Our work thus reveals a key regulator linking early and late stages of nodulation and suggests that the regulation of the cytokinin pathway is important both for nodule initiation and development.

  7. Functional analysis of chimeric lysin motif domain receptors mediating Nod factor-induced defense signaling in Arabidopsis thaliana and chitin-induced nodulation signaling in Lotus japonicus.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Xie, Zhi-Ping; Staehelin, Christian

    2014-04-01

    The expression of chimeric receptors in plants is a way to activate specific signaling pathways by corresponding signal molecules. Defense signaling induced by chitin from pathogens and nodulation signaling of legumes induced by rhizobial Nod factors (NFs) depend on receptors with extracellular lysin motif (LysM) domains. Here, we constructed chimeras by replacing the ectodomain of chitin elicitor receptor kinase 1 (AtCERK1) of Arabidopsis thaliana with ectodomains of NF receptors of Lotus japonicus (LjNFR1 and LjNFR5). The hybrid constructs, named LjNFR1-AtCERK1 and LjNFR5-AtCERK1, were expressed in cerk1-2, an A. thaliana CERK1 mutant lacking chitin-induced defense signaling. When treated with NFs from Rhizobium sp. NGR234, cerk1-2 expressing both chimeras accumulated reactive oxygen species, expressed chitin-responsive defense genes and showed increased resistance to Fusarium oxysporum. In contrast, expression of a single chimera showed no effects. Likewise, the ectodomains of LjNFR1 and LjNFR5 were replaced by those of OsCERK1 (Oryza sativa chitin elicitor receptor kinase 1) and OsCEBiP (O. sativa chitin elicitor-binding protein), respectively. The chimeras, named OsCERK1-LjNFR1 and OsCEBiP-LjNFR5, were expressed in L. japonicus NF receptor mutants (nfr1-1; nfr5-2) carrying a GUS (β-glucuronidase) gene under the control of the NIN (nodule inception) promoter. Upon chitin treatment, GUS activation reflecting nodulation signaling was observed in the roots of NF receptor mutants expressing both chimeras, whereas a single construct was not sufficient for activation. Hence, replacement of ectodomains in LysM domain receptors provides a way to specifically trigger NF-induced defense signaling in non-legumes and chitin-induced nodulation signaling in legumes. © 2014 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Nitrate regulates rhizobial and mycorrhizal symbiosis in common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.).

    PubMed

    Nanjareddy, Kalpana; Blanco, Lourdes; Arthikala, Manoj-Kumar; Affantrange, Xochitl Alvarado; Sánchez, Federico; Lara, Miguel

    2014-03-01

    Nitrogen-limited conditions are considered to be a prerequisite for legume-rhizobial symbiosis, but the effects of nitrate-rich conditions on symbiotic status remain poorly understood. We addressed this issue by examining rhizobial (Rhizobim tropici) and arbusclar mycorrhizal (Glomus intraradices) symbiosis in Phaseolus vulgaris L. cv. Negro Jamapa under nitrate pre-incubation and continuous nitrate conditions. Our results indicate that nitrate pre-incubation, independent of the concentration, did not affect nodule development. However, the continuous supply of nitrate at high concentrations impaired nodule maturation and nodule numbers. Low nitrate conditions, in addition to positively regulating nodule number, biomass, and nitrogenase activity, also extended the span of nitrogen-fixing activity. By contrast, for arbuscular mycorrhizae, continuous 10 and 50 mmol/L nitrate increased the percent root length colonization, concomitantly reduced arbuscule size, and enhanced ammonia transport without affecting phosphate transport. Therefore, in this manuscript, we have proposed the importance of nitrate as a positive regulator in promoting both rhizobial and mycorrhizal symbiosis in the common bean. © 2014 Institute of Botany, Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  9. DELLA proteins are common components of symbiotic rhizobial and mycorrhizal signalling pathways

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Yue; Liu, Huan; Luo, Dexian; Yu, Nan; Dong, Wentao; Wang, Chao; Zhang, Xiaowei; Dai, Huiling; Yang, Jun; Wang, Ertao

    2016-01-01

    Legumes form symbiotic associations with either nitrogen-fixing bacteria or arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi. Formation of these two symbioses is regulated by a common set of signalling components that act downstream of recognition of rhizobia or mycorrhizae by host plants. Central to these pathways is the calcium and calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CCaMK)–IPD3 complex which initiates nodule organogenesis following calcium oscillations in the host nucleus. However, downstream signalling events are not fully understood. Here we show that Medicago truncatula DELLA proteins, which are the central regulators of gibberellic acid signalling, positively regulate rhizobial symbiosis. Rhizobia colonization is impaired in della mutants and we provide evidence that DELLAs can promote CCaMK–IPD3 complex formation and increase the phosphorylation state of IPD3. DELLAs can also interact with NSP2–NSP1 and enhance the expression of Nod-factor-inducible genes in protoplasts. We show that DELLA is able to bridge a protein complex containing IPD3 and NSP2. Our results suggest a transcriptional framework for regulation of root nodule symbiosis. PMID:27514472

  10. Vocal fold nodules in school age children: attention deficit hyperactivity disorder as a potential risk factor.

    PubMed

    D'Alatri, Lucia; Petrelli, Livia; Calò, Lea; Picciotti, Pasqualina Maria; Marchese, Maria Raffaella; Bussu, Francesco

    2015-05-01

    To evaluate the presence of symptoms of inattention and hyperactivity/impulsivity in a population of school age children affected by vocal fold nodules. Parents and teachers of 18 children with vocal fold nodules (10 males, eight females; aged between 6 and 12 years) and 20 matched controls without dysphonia and/or vocal fold diseases (11 males, nine females; aged between 6 and 12 years) completed Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) rating scale for parents (SDAG [Scala per i Disturbi di Attenzione/Iperattività per Genitori]) and teachers (SDAI [Scala per i Disturbi di Attenzione/Iperattività per Insegnanti) rating scales containing in two subscales items that specifically evaluate the symptoms of ADHD according to the DSM-IV. All children were subjected to videolaryngoscopy. The group with vocal fold nodules scored significantly higher than the controls; the difference between the two groups was statistically significant for both the subscales of both questionnaires (SDAG and SDAI) (P < 0.05). Four children in the group with vocal fold nodules who scored higher than 14 in at least one subscale were referred for psychiatric evaluation. For two of the children, both male, a diagnosis of combined ADHD was formulated. ADHD is a possible risk factor for the development of vocal fold nodules in childhood. SDAG and SDAI rating scales may supplement the diagnostic assessment of children with vocal fold nodules. Copyright © 2015 The Voice Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Competition between rhizobia under different environmental conditions affects the nodulation of a legume.

    PubMed

    Ji, Zhao Jun; Yan, Hui; Cui, Qing Guo; Wang, En Tao; Chen, Wen Feng; Chen, Wen Xin

    2017-03-01

    Mutualistic symbiosis and nitrogen fixation of legume rhizobia play a key role in ecological environments. Although many different rhizobial species can form nodules with a specific legume, there is often a dominant microsymbiont, which has the highest nodule occupancy rates, and they are often known as the "most favorable rhizobia". Shifts in the most favorable rhizobia for a legume in different geographical regions or soil types are not well understood. Therefore, in order to explore the shift model, an experiment was designed using successive inoculations of rhizobia on one legume. The plants were grown in either sterile vermiculite or a sandy soil. Results showed that, depending on the environment, a legume could select its preferential rhizobial partner in order to establish symbiosis. For perennial legumes, nodulation is a continuous and sequential process. In this study, when the most favorable rhizobial strain was available to infect the plant first, it was dominant in the nodules, regardless of the existence of other rhizobial strains in the rhizosphere. Other rhizobial strains had an opportunity to establish symbiosis with the plant when the most favorable rhizobial strain was not present in the rhizosphere. Nodule occupancy rates of the most favorable rhizobial strain depended on the competitiveness of other rhizobial strains in the rhizosphere and the environmental adaptability of the favorable rhizobial strain (in this case, to mild vermiculite or hostile sandy soil). To produce high nodulation and efficient nitrogen fixation, the most favorable rhizobial strain should be selected and inoculated into the rhizosphere of legume plants under optimum environmental conditions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  12. Ethanol ablation of benign thyroid cysts and predominantly cystic thyroid nodules: factors that predict outcome.

    PubMed

    In, Hyun Sin; Kim, Dong Wook; Choo, Hye Jung; Jung, Soo Jin; Kang, Taewoo; Ryu, Ji Hwa

    2014-05-01

    No study has so far investigated the relationship between aspirate color or degree of aspiration on the success of ethanol ablation (EA) of cystic thyroid nodules. We aimed to evaluate the efficacy of EA of benign cystic thyroid nodules and assess the relevant factors influencing the outcome. Over a 2-year period, 64 benign cystic thyroid nodules in 62 patients were treated with EA. Several factors related to EA efficacy were evaluated, including the cystic component volume, volume and color of aspirates, degree of aspiration, and volume of injected ethanol. In all cases, we performed ultrasound follow-up for at least 12 months after the last EA session to evaluate the collapsed cystic component. The 64 treated nodules had aspirate colors that were red bloody (n = 3), dark bloody (n = 31), brownish (n = 15), greenish-yellow (n = 13), and colorless (n = 2). The degrees of aspiration were scant (n = 8), mild (n = 3), moderate (n = 8), and complete (n = 45). There was successful collapse of the cystic component after initial EA in 52 cases, but a repeat EA was employed in 12 failed cases. Statistical analysis showed that the degree of aspiration and color of aspirates correlated significantly with the success of EA. The results of this study suggest that complete aspiration of cystic contents was the most important factor in the efficacy of EA of benign cystic thyroid nodules, and greenish-yellow contents were closely related to scant or mild aspiration.

  13. Blue light does not inhibit nodulation in Sesbania rostrata.

    PubMed

    Shimomura, Aya; Arima, Susumu; Hayashi, Makoto; Maymon, Maskit; Hirsch, Ann M; Suzuki, Akihiro

    2017-01-02

    Earlier, we reported that root nodulation was inhibited by blue light irradiation of Lotus japonicus. Because some legumes do not establish nodules exclusively on underground roots, we investigated whether nodule formation in Sesbania rostrata, which forms both root and "stem" nodules following inoculation with Azorhizobium caulinodans, is inhibited by blue light as are L. japonicus nodules. We found that neither S. rostrata nodulation nor nitrogen fixation was inhibited by blue light exposure. Moreover, although A. caulinodans proliferation was not affected by blue light irradiation, bacterial survival was decreased. Therefore, blue light appears to impose different responses depending on the legume-rhizobial symbiosis.

  14. Flavones and flavonols play distinct critical roles during nodulation of Medicago truncatula by Sinorhizobium meliloti.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Juan; Subramanian, Senthil; Stacey, Gary; Yu, Oliver

    2009-01-01

    Flavonoids play critical roles in legume-rhizobium symbiosis. However, the role of individual flavonoid compounds in this process has not yet been clearly established. We silenced different flavonoid-biosynthesis enzymes to generate transgenic Medicago truncatula roots with different flavonoid profiles. Silencing of chalcone synthase, the key entry-point enzyme for flavonoid biosynthesis led to flavonoid-deficient roots. Silencing of isoflavone synthase and flavone synthase led to roots deficient for a subset of flavonoids, isoflavonoids (formononetin and biochanin A) and flavones (7,4'-dihydroxyflavone), respectively. When tested for nodulation by Sinorhizobium meliloti, flavonoid-deficient roots had a near complete loss of nodulation, whereas flavone-deficient roots had reduced nodulation. Isoflavone-deficient roots nodulated normally, suggesting that isoflavones might not play a critical role in M. truncatula nodulation, even though they are the most abundant root flavonoids. Supplementation of flavone-deficient roots with 7, 4'-dihydroxyflavone, a major inducer of S. meliloti nod genes, completely restored nodulation. However, the same treatment did not restore nodulation in flavonoid-deficient roots, suggesting that other non-nod gene-inducing flavonoid compounds are also critical to nodulation. Supplementation of roots with the flavonol kaempferol (an inhibitor of auxin transport), in combination with the use of flavone pre-treated S. meliloti cells, completely restored nodulation in flavonoid-deficient roots. In addition, S. meliloti cells constitutively producing Nod factors were able to nodulate flavone-deficient roots, but not flavonoid-deficient roots. These observations indicated that flavones might act as internal inducers of rhizobial nod genes, and that flavonols might act as auxin transport regulators during nodulation. Both these roles of flavonoids appear critical for symbiosis in M. truncatula.

  15. KNOTTED1-LIKE HOMEOBOX 3: a new regulator of symbiotic nodule development

    PubMed Central

    Azarakhsh, M.; Kirienko, A. N.; Zhukov, V. A.; Lebedeva, M. A.; Dolgikh, E. A.; Lutova, L. A.

    2015-01-01

    KNOX transcription factors (TFs) regulate different aspects of plant development essentially through their effects on phytohormone metabolism. In particular, KNOX TF SHOOTMERISTEMLESS activates the cytokinin biosynthesis ISOPENTENYL TRANSFERASE (IPT) genes in the shoot apical meristem. However, the role of KNOX TFs in symbiotic nodule development and their possible effects on phytohormone metabolism during nodulation have not been studied to date. Cytokinin is a well-known regulator of nodule development, playing the key role in the regulation of cell division during nodule primordium formation. Recently, the activation of IPT genes was shown to take place during nodulation. Therefore, it was hypothesized that KNOX TFs may regulate nodule development and activate cytokinin biosynthesis upon nodulation. This study analysed the expression of different KNOX genes in Medicago truncatula Gaertn. and Pisum sativum L. Among them, the KNOX3 gene was upregulated in response to rhizobial inoculation in both species. pKNOX3::GUS activity was observed in developing nodule primordium. KNOX3 ectopic expression caused the formation of nodule-like structures on transgenic root without bacterial inoculation, a phenotype similar to one described previously for legumes with constitutive activation of the cytokinin receptor. Furthermore, in transgenic roots with MtKNOX3 knockdown, downregulation of A-type cytokinin response genes was found, as well as the MtIPT3 and LONELYGUY2 (MtLOG2) gene being involved in cytokinin activation. Taken together, these findings suggest that KNOX3 gene is involved in symbiotic nodule development and may regulate cytokinin biosynthesis/activation upon nodule development in legume plants. PMID:26351356

  16. Identification of a dominant gene in Medicago truncatula that restricts nodulation by Sinorhizobium meliloti strain Rm41

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Leguminous plants are able to form a root nodule symbiosis with nitrogen-fixing soil bacteria called rhizobia. This symbiotic association shows a high level of specificity. Beyond the specificity for the legume family, individual legume species/genotypes can only interact with certain restricted group of bacterial species or strains. Specificity in this system is regulated by complex signal exchange between the two symbiotic partners and thus multiple genetic mechanisms could be involved in the recognition process. Knowledge of the molecular mechanisms controlling symbiotic specificity could enable genetic improvement of legume nitrogen fixation, and may also reveal the possible mechanisms that restrict root nodule symbiosis in non-legumes. Results We screened a core collection of Medicago truncatula genotypes with several strains of Sinorhizobium meliloti and identified a naturally occurring dominant gene that restricts nodulation by S. meliloti Rm41. We named this gene as Mt-NS1 (for M.truncatulanodulation specificity 1). We have mapped the Mt-NS1 locus within a small genomic region on M. truncatula chromosome 8. The data reported here will facilitate positional cloning of the Mt-NS1 gene. Conclusions Evolution of symbiosis specificity involves both rhizobial and host genes. From the bacterial side, specificity determinants include Nod factors, surface polysaccharides, and secreted proteins. However, we know relatively less from the host side. We recently demonstrated that a component of this specificity in soybeans is defined by plant NBS-LRR resistance (R) genes that recognize effector proteins delivered by the type III secretion system (T3SS) of the rhizobial symbionts. However, the lack of a T3SS in many sequenced S. meliloti strains raises the question of how the specificity is regulated in the Medicago-Sinorhizobium system beyond Nod-factor perception. Thus, cloning and characterization of Mt-NS1 will add a new dimension to our knowledge about

  17. Biogenic amines in rhizobia and legume root nodules.

    PubMed

    Fujihara, Shinsuke

    2009-01-01

    Root-nodule bacteria (rhizobia) are of great importance for nitrogen acquisition through symbiotic nitrogen fixation in a wide variety of leguminous plants. These bacteria differ from most other soil microorganisms by taking dual forms, i.e. a free-living form in soils and a symbiotic form inside of host legumes. Therefore, they should have a versatile strategy for survival, whether inhabiting soils or root nodules formed through rhizobia-legume interactions. Rhizobia generally contain large amounts of the biogenic amine homospermidine, an analog of spermidine which is an essential cellular component in most living systems. The external pH, salinity and a rapid change in osmolarity are thought to be significant environmental factors affecting the persistence of rhizobia. The present review describes the regulation of homospermidine biosynthesis in response to environmental stress and its possible functional role in rhizobia. Legume root nodules, an alternative habitat of rhizobia, usually contain a variety of biogenic amines besides homospermidine and the occurrence of some of these amines is closely associated with rhizobial infections. In the second half of this review, novel biogenic amines found in certain legume root nodules and the mechanism of their synthesis involving cooperation between the rhizobia and host legume cells are also described.

  18. Transient Nod factor-dependent gene expression in the nodulation-competent zone of soybean (Glycine max [L.] Merr.) roots.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Satomi; Reid, Dugald E; Lorenc, Michał T; Stiller, Jiri; Edwards, David; Gresshoff, Peter M; Ferguson, Brett J

    2012-10-01

    All lateral organ development in plants, such as nodulation in legumes, requires the temporal and spatial regulation of genes and gene networks. A total mRNA profiling approach using RNA-seq to target the specific soybean (Glycine max) root tissues responding to compatible rhizobia [i.e. the Zone Of Nodulation (ZON)] revealed a large number of novel, often transient, mRNA changes occurring during the early stages of nodulation. Focusing on the ZON enabled us to discard the majority of root tissues and their developmentally diverse gene transcripts, thereby highlighting the lowly and transiently expressed nodulation-specific genes. It also enabled us to concentrate on a precise moment in early nodule development at each sampling time. We focused on discovering genes regulated specifically by the Bradyrhizobium-produced Nod factor signal, by inoculating roots with either a competent wild-type or incompetent mutant (nodC(-) ) strain of Bradyrhizobium japonicum. Collectively, 2915 genes were identified as being differentially expressed, including many known soybean nodulation genes. A number of unknown nodulation gene candidates and soybean orthologues of nodulation genes previously reported in other legume species were also identified. The differential expression of several candidates was confirmed and further characterized via inoculation time-course studies and qRT-PCR. The expression of many genes, including an endo-1,4-β-glucanase, a cytochrome P450 and a TIR-LRR-NBS receptor kinase, was transient, peaking quickly during the initiation of nodule ontogeny. Additional genes were found to be down-regulated. Significantly, a set of differentially regulated genes acting in the gibberellic acid (GA) biosynthesis pathway was discovered, suggesting a novel role of GAs in nodulation. © 2012 The Authors. Plant Biotechnology Journal © 2012 Society for Experimental Biology, Association of Applied Biologists and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  19. Genetic diversity of indigenous soybean-nodulating rhizobia in response to locally-based long term fertilization in a Mollisol of Northeast China.

    PubMed

    Yan, Jun; Chen, WenFeng; Han, XiaoZeng; Wang, EnTao; Zou, WenXiu; Zhang, ZhiMing

    2017-01-01

    The influences of five different fertilizer treatments on diversity of rhizobia in soybean nodule were investigated in a long-term experiment with with four replicates: (1) control (without fertilization), (2) balanced NPK fertilizer (NPK), and (3-5) unbalanced chemical fertilizers without one of the major elements (NP, PK, and NK) in Mollisol in Northeast China. The highest soybean yield was observed in the NPK treatment. Total of 200 isolates were isolated and grouped into four Bradyrhizobium genospecies corresponding to B. japonicum, B. diazoefficiens, B. ottawaense and Bradyrhizobium sp. I, based upon the multilocus sequence analysis of 6 housekeeping genes. The Bradyrhizobium sp. I was extensively distributed throughout the study site and was recorded as the dominant soybean rhizobia (82.5-87.5%). Except the NK treatment, the other fertilizer treatments had no effect on rhizobial species composition. Compared with the CK treatment, all the fertilizer treatments decreased species richness, diversity and evenness. The soil organic carbon contents, available N content and pH were the key soil factors to rhizobial community structure. Results suggest that long-term fertilization can decrease rhizobial species diversity, while balanced fertilization with NPK is the most suitable fertilization regime if taking both soybean yields and rhizobial diversity into account.

  20. Lotus japonicus ARPC1 is required for rhizobial infection.

    PubMed

    Hossain, Md Shakhawat; Liao, Jinqiu; James, Euan K; Sato, Shusei; Tabata, Satoshi; Jurkiewicz, Anna; Madsen, Lene H; Stougaard, Jens; Ross, Loretta; Szczyglowski, Krzysztof

    2012-10-01

    Remodeling of the plant cell cytoskeleton precedes symbiotic entry of nitrogen-fixing bacteria within the host plant roots. Here we identify a Lotus japonicus gene encoding a predicted ACTIN-RELATED PROTEIN COMPONENT1 (ARPC1) as essential for rhizobial infection but not for arbuscular mycorrhiza symbiosis. In other organisms ARPC1 constitutes a subunit of the ARP2/3 complex, the major nucleator of Y-branched actin filaments. The L. japonicus arpc1 mutant showed a distorted trichome phenotype and was defective in epidermal infection thread formation, producing mostly empty nodules. A few partially colonized nodules that did form in arpc1 contained abnormal infections. Together with previously described L. japonicus Nck-associated protein1 and 121F-specific p53 inducible RNA mutants, which are also impaired in the accommodation of rhizobia, our data indicate that ARPC1 and, by inference a suppressor of cAMP receptor/WASP-family verpolin homologous protein-ARP2/3 pathway, must have been coopted during evolution of nitrogen-fixing symbiosis to specifically mediate bacterial entry.

  1. Bradyrhizobium sp. Strains That Nodulate the Leguminous Tree Acacia albida Produce Fucosylated and Partially Sulfated Nod Factors

    PubMed Central

    Ferro, Myriam; Lorquin, Jean; Ba, Salif; Sanon, Kadidia; Promé, Jean-Claude; Boivin, Catherine

    2000-01-01

    We determined the structures of Nod factors produced by six different Bradyrhizobium sp. strains nodulating the legume tree Acacia albida (syn. Faidherbia albida). Compounds from all strains were found to be similar, i.e., O-carbamoylated and substituted by an often sulfated methyl fucose and different from compounds produced by Rhizobium-Mesorhizobium-Sinorhizobium strains nodulating other species of the Acaciae tribe. PMID:11055966

  2. Biogeographical Patterns of Legume-Nodulating Burkholderia spp.: from African Fynbos to Continental Scales

    PubMed Central

    Chimphango, Samson B. M.; Stirton, Charles; Rafudeen, Suhail; Honnay, Olivier; Smets, Erik; Chen, Wen-Ming; Sprent, Janet; James, Euan K.; Muasya, A. Muthama

    2016-01-01

    global scales, including native species from the South American Caatinga and Cerrado biomes. While a global investigation of the rhizobial diversity revealed distinct nodulation and nitrogen fixation genes among South African and South American legumes, regionally distributed species in the Cape region were unrelated to geographic and host factors. PMID:27316955

  3. [Role of psychological factors in pathogenesis of disturbances of voice caused with vocal nodules].

    PubMed

    Ratajczak, Jan; Grzywacz, Krzysztof; Wojdas, Andrzej; Rapiejko, Piotr; Jurkiewicz, Dariusz

    2008-01-01

    Hoarseness is most frequent complaint notified by ill in phoniatric outpatient clinics. Looking of causes notified of disturbances of voice often we ascertain in larynx existence of vocal nodules. Changes these come into being in consequence of excessive or irregular phonations. Single incident of disturbances of voice caused with oedema changes nascent of in consequence of inappropriate work with voice does not wake of our trouble, instead returns this of type of complaint provoke to other researches coexisting of etiological factors this diseases. Estimation of influence of individual personality trait of ill on formation of vocal nodules. One examined 20 patients with vocal nodules classified to treatments operating and 20 without disturbances of voice. All patients were subjected to otolaryngological and stroboscopic examinations. Character created of voice one examined at help of scale GRBAS, instead influence of disturbances of voice on quality of life ill at help of test VHI. Psychological examinations one executed using questionnaire State-Trait-Anxiety-Inventory (STAI), questionnaire NEO-FFI and questionnaire of aggression Buss-Perry. Obtained results showed, that persons with returning vocal nodules, both during of research as in different situations everyday lives characterizes with higher level of fear and have greater inclination to worry oneself. Ill from groups examined in greater degree are extroverts, show greater activity and more are contagious socially in comparison to persons of comparative group. Attitude this in situations extorting rivalry will be able to be ruthless, are well organized guided, scrupulous and consistently endeavour to aim. Wanting efficiently to treat persons with returning vocal nodules we should subject to ill psychological examination and in once of ascertainment of irregularity to correct it, what at simultaneous correct treatment of organic changes should diminish frequency or to eliminate returns of disease. Skill

  4. Silencing of the Rac1 GTPase MtROP9 in Medicago truncatula stimulates early mycorrhizal and oomycete root colonizations but negatively affects rhizobial infection.

    PubMed

    Kiirika, Leonard Muriithi; Bergmann, Hannah Friederike; Schikowsky, Christine; Wimmer, Diana; Korte, Joschka; Schmitz, Udo; Niehaus, Karsten; Colditz, Frank

    2012-05-01

    RAC/ROP proteins (ρ-related GTPases of plants) are plant-specific small G proteins that function as molecular switches within elementary signal transduction pathways, including the regulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation during early microbial infection via the activation of NADPH oxidase homologs of plants termed RBOH (for respiratory burst oxidase homolog). We investigated the role of Medicago truncatula Jemalong A17 small GTPase MtROP9, orthologous to Medicago sativa Rac1, via an RNA interference silencing approach. Composite M. truncatula plants (MtROP9i) whose roots have been transformed by Agrobacterium rhizogenes carrying the RNA interference vector were generated and infected with the symbiotic arbuscular mycorrhiza fungus Glomus intraradices and the rhizobial bacterium Sinorhizobium meliloti as well as with the pathogenic oomycete Aphanomyces euteiches. MtROP9i transgenic lines showed a clear growth-reduced phenotype and revealed neither ROS generation nor MtROP9 and MtRBOH gene expression after microbial infection. Coincidently, antioxidative compounds were not induced in infected MtROP9i roots, as documented by differential proteomics (two-dimensional differential gel electrophoresis). Furthermore, MtROP9 knockdown clearly promoted mycorrhizal and A. euteiches early hyphal root colonization, while rhizobial infection was clearly impaired. Infected MtROP9i roots showed, in part, extremely swollen noninfected root hairs and reduced numbers of deformed nodules. S. meliloti nodulation factor treatments of MtROP9i led to deformed root hairs showing progressed swelling of its upper regions or even of the entire root hair and spontaneous constrictions but reduced branching effects occurring only at swollen root hairs. These results suggest a key role of Rac1 GTPase MtROP9 in ROS-mediated early infection signaling.

  5. Phytosulfokine Is Involved in Positive Regulation of Lotus japonicus Nodulation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chao; Yu, Haixiang; Zhang, Zhongming; Yu, Liangliang; Xu, Xiaoshu; Hong, Zonglie; Luo, Li

    2015-08-01

    Phytosulfokine (PSK) is a tyrosine-sulfated peptide that is widely distributed in plants, participating in cell proliferation, differentiation, and innate immunity. The potential role of PSK in nodulation in legumes has not been reported. In this work, five PSK precursor genes were identified in Lotus japonicas, designated as LjPSK1 to LjPSK5. Three of them (LjPSK1, LjPSK4, and LjPSK5) were found to be expressed in nitrogen-fixing root nodules. LjPSK1 and LjPSK4 were not induced at the early stage of nodulation. Interestingly, while the expression of LjPSK4 was also found in spontaneous nodules without rhizobial colonization, LjPSK1 was not induced in these pseudo nodules. Promoter-β-glucuronidase analysis revealed that LjPSK1 was highly expressed in enlarged symbiotic cells of nodules. Exogenous addition of 1 1M synthetic PSK peptide resulted in increased nodule numbers per plant. Consistently, the number of mature nodules but not the events of rhizobial infection and nodule initiation was increased by overexpressing LjPSK1 in transgenic hairy roots, in which the expression of jasmonate-responsive genes was found to be repressed. These results suggest that PSK is a new peptide signal that regulates nodulation in legumes, probably through cross-talking with other phytohormones.

  6. Nod Factor-Independent Nodulation in Aeschynomene evenia Required the Common Plant-Microbe Symbiotic Toolkit.

    PubMed

    Fabre, Sandrine; Gully, Djamel; Poitout, Arthur; Patrel, Delphine; Arrighi, Jean-François; Giraud, Eric; Czernic, Pierre; Cartieaux, Fabienne

    2015-12-01

    Nitrogen fixation in the legume-rhizobium symbiosis is a crucial area of research for more sustainable agriculture. Our knowledge of the plant cascade in response to the perception of bacterial Nod factors has increased in recent years. However, the discovery that Nod factors are not involved in the Aeschynomene-Bradyrhizobium spp. interaction suggests that alternative molecular dialogues may exist in the legume family. We evaluated the conservation of the signaling pathway common to other endosymbioses using three candidate genes: Ca(2+)/Calmodulin-Dependent Kinase (CCaMK), which plays a central role in cross signaling between nodule organogenesis and infection processes; and Symbiosis Receptor Kinase (SYMRK) and Histidine Kinase1 (HK1), which act upstream and downstream of CCaMK, respectively. We showed that CCaMK, SYMRK, and HK1 are required for efficient nodulation in Aeschynomene evenia. Our results demonstrate that CCaMK and SYMRK are recruited in Nod factor-independent symbiosis and, hence, may be conserved in all vascular plant endosymbioses described so far.

  7. Multiple nodulation genes are up-regulated during establishment of reniform nematode feeding sites in soybean.

    PubMed

    Redding, Nathan Wayne; Agudelo, Paula; Wells, Christina E

    2017-09-15

    The semi-endoparastic reniform nematode (Rotylenchulus reniformis) infects over 300 plant species. Females penetrate host roots and induce formation of complex, multinucleate feeding sites called syncytia. While anatomical changes associated with reniform nematode infection are well documented, little is known about their molecular basis. We grew soybean (Glycine max) in a split-root growth system, inoculated half of each root system with R. reniformis, and quantified gene expression in infected and control root tissue at four dates after inoculation. Over 6,000 genes were differentially expressed between inoculated and control roots on at least one date (FDR = 0.01, |log2FC| ≥ 1), and 507 gene sets were significantly enriched or depleted in inoculated roots (FDR = 0.05). Numerous genes up-regulated during syncytium formation had previously been associated with rhizobia nodulation. These included the nodule-initiating transcription factors CYCLOPS, NSP1, NSP2, and NIN, as well as multiple nodulins associated with the plant-derived peribacteroid membrane. Nodulation-related NIP aquaporins and SWEET sugar transporters were induced, as were plant CLAVATA3/ESR-related (CLE) signaling proteins and cell cycle regulators such as CCS52A and E2F. Nodulins and nodule-associated genes may have ancestral functions in normal root development and mycorrhization that have been co-opted by both parasitic nematodes and rhizobial bacteria to promote feeding site and nodule formation.

  8. Diversity of field isolates of sinorhizobium meliloti nodulating alfalfa

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Most alfalfa seed is treated with a rhizobial inoculant consisting of one or more strains of Sinorhizobium meliloti before planting to enhance nodulation of seedlings. However, little is known about the persistence of inoculated strains later in the season. There is also a paucity of information on ...

  9. Adaptive evolution of the symbiotic gene NORK is not correlated with shifts of rhizobial specificity in the genus Medicago

    PubMed Central

    De Mita, Stéphane; Santoni, Sylvain; Ronfort, Joëlle; Bataillon, Thomas

    2007-01-01

    Background The NODULATION RECEPTOR KINASE (NORK) gene encodes a Leucine-Rich Repeat (LRR)-containing receptor-like protein and controls the infection by symbiotic rhizobia and endomycorrhizal fungi in Legumes. The occurrence of numerous amino acid changes driven by directional selection has been reported in this gene, using a limited number of messenger RNA sequences, but the functional reason of these changes remains obscure. The Medicago genus, where changes in rhizobial associations have been previously examined, is a good model to test whether the evolution of NORK is influenced by rhizobial interactions. Results We sequenced a region of 3610 nucleotides (encoding a 392 amino acid-long region of the NORK protein) in 32 Medicago species. We confirm that positive selection in NORK has occurred within the Medicago genus and find that the amino acid positions targeted by selection occur in sites outside of solvent-exposed regions in LRRs, and other sites in the N-terminal region of the protein. We tested if branches of the Medicago phylogeny where changes of rhizobial symbionts occurred displayed accelerated rates of amino acid substitutions. Only one branch out of five tested, leading to M. noeana, displays such a pattern. Among other branches, the most likely for having undergone positive selection is not associated with documented shift of rhizobial specificity. Conclusion Adaptive changes in the sequence of the NORK receptor have involved the LRRs, but targeted different sites than in most previous studies of LRR proteins evolution. The fact that positive selection in NORK tends not to be associated to changes in rhizobial specificity indicates that this gene was probably not involved in evolving rhizobial preferences. Other explanations (e.g. coevolutionary arms race) must be tested to explain the adaptive evolution of NORK. PMID:17986323

  10. Genetic diversity of rhizobial symbionts isolated from legume species within the genera Astragalus, Oxytropis, and Onobrychis.

    PubMed Central

    Laguerre, G; van Berkum, P; Amarger, N; Prévost, D

    1997-01-01

    The genetic diversity of 44 rhizobial isolates from Astragalus, Oxytropis, and Onobrychis spp. originating from different geographic locations was evaluated by mapped restriction site polymorphism (MRSP) analysis of 16S rRNA genes and by PCR DNA fingerprinting with repetitive sequences (REP-PCR). A comparison of tree topologies of reference strains constructed with data obtained by MRSP and by 16S rRNA gene sequence analyses showed that the topologies were in good agreement, indicating that the MSRP approach results in reasonable estimates of rhizobial phylogeny. The isolates were distributed into 14 distinct 16S rRNA gene types clustering into three major groups which corresponded with three of the genera within the legume symbionts. Most of the isolates were within the genus Mesorhizobium. Five were identified with different genomic species nodulating Lotus spp. and Cicer arietinum. Three Astragalus isolates were classified as Bradyrhizobium, one being similar to Bradyrhizobium elkanii and another being similar to Bradyrhizobium japonicum. Six of the isolates were related to species within the genus Rhizobium. Two were similar to Rhizobium leguminosarum, and the remainder were identified as Rhizobium gallicum. DNA fingerprinting by REP-PCR revealed a high level of diversity within single 16S ribosomal DNA types. The 44 isolates were distributed into 34 REP groups. Rhizobial classification at the genus and probably also the species levels was independent of geographic origin and host plant affinity. PMID:9406393

  11. Soybean miR172c Targets the Repressive AP2 Transcription Factor NNC1 to Activate ENOD40 Expression and Regulate Nodule Initiation[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Youning; Wang, Lixiang; Zou, Yanmin; Chen, Liang; Cai, Zhaoming; Zhang, Senlei; Zhao, Fang; Tian, Yinping; Jiang, Qiong; Ferguson, Brett J.; Gresshoff, Peter M.; Li, Xia

    2014-01-01

    MicroRNAs are noncoding RNAs that act as master regulators to modulate various biological processes by posttranscriptionally repressing their target genes. Repression of their target mRNA(s) can modulate signaling cascades and subsequent cellular events. Recently, a role for miR172 in soybean (Glycine max) nodulation has been described; however, the molecular mechanism through which miR172 acts to regulate nodulation has yet to be explored. Here, we demonstrate that soybean miR172c modulates both rhizobium infection and nodule organogenesis. miR172c was induced in soybean roots inoculated with either compatible Bradyrhizobium japonicum or lipooligosaccharide Nod factor and was highly upregulated during nodule development. Reduced activity and overexpression of miR172c caused dramatic changes in nodule initiation and nodule number. We show that soybean miR172c regulates nodule formation by repressing its target gene, Nodule Number Control1, which encodes a protein that directly targets the promoter of the early nodulin gene, ENOD40. Interestingly, transcriptional levels of miR172c were regulated by both Nod Factor Receptor1α/5α-mediated activation and by autoregulation of nodulation-mediated inhibition. Thus, we established a direct link between miR172c and the Nod factor signaling pathway in addition to adding a new layer to the precise nodulation regulation mechanism of soybean. PMID:25549672

  12. The NIN Transcription Factor Coordinates Diverse Nodulation Programs in Different Tissues of the Medicago truncatula Root[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jiyoung; Frances, Lisa; Ding, Yiliang; Sun, Jongho; Guan, Dian; de Carvalho-Niebel, Fernanda; Oldroyd, Giles E.D.

    2015-01-01

    Biological nitrogen fixation in legumes occurs in nodules that are initiated in the root cortex following Nod factor recognition at the root surface, and this requires coordination of diverse developmental programs in these different tissues. We show that while early Nod factor signaling associated with calcium oscillations is limited to the root surface, the resultant activation of Nodule Inception (NIN) in the root epidermis is sufficient to promote cytokinin signaling and nodule organogenesis in the inner root cortex. NIN or a product of its action must be associated with the transmission of a signal between the root surface and the cortical cells where nodule organogenesis is initiated. NIN appears to have distinct functions in the root epidermis and the root cortex. In the epidermis, NIN restricts the extent of Early Nodulin 11 (ENOD11) expression and does so through competitive inhibition of ERF Required for Nodulation (ERN1). In contrast, NIN is sufficient to promote the expression of the cytokinin receptor Cytokinin Response 1 (CRE1), which is restricted to the root cortex. Our work in Medicago truncatula highlights the complexity of NIN action and places NIN as a central player in the coordination of the symbiotic developmental programs occurring in differing tissues of the root that combined are necessary for a nitrogen-fixing symbiosis. PMID:26672071

  13. Nod factors stimulate seed germination and promote growth and nodulation of pea and vetch under competitive conditions.

    PubMed

    Kidaj, Dominika; Wielbo, Jerzy; Skorupska, Anna

    2012-03-20

    Nod factors are lipochitooligosaccharide (LCO) produced by soil bacteria commonly known as rhizobia acting as signals for the legume plants to initiate symbiosis. Nod factors trigger early symbiotic responses in plant roots and initiate the development of specialized plant organs called nodules, where biological nitrogen fixation takes place. Here, the effect of specific LCO originating from flavonoid induced Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. viciae GR09 culture was studied on germination, plant growth and nodulation of pea and vetch. A crude preparation of GR09 LCO significantly enhanced symbiotic performance of pea and vetch grown under laboratory conditions and in the soil. Moreover, the effect of GR09 LCOs seed treatments on the genetic diversity of rhizobia recovered from vetch and pea nodules was presented.

  14. CT Scan Screening for Lung Cancer: Risk Factors for Nodules and Malignancy in a High-Risk Urban Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Greenberg, Alissa K.; Lu, Feng; Goldberg, Judith D.; Eylers, Ellen; Tsay, Jun-Chieh; Yie, Ting-An; Naidich, David; McGuinness, Georgeann; Pass, Harvey; Tchou-Wong, Kam-Meng; Addrizzo-Harris, Doreen; Chachoua, Abraham; Crawford, Bernard; Rom, William N.

    2012-01-01

    Background Low-dose computed tomography (CT) for lung cancer screening can reduce lung cancer mortality. The National Lung Screening Trial reported a 20% reduction in lung cancer mortality in high-risk smokers. However, CT scanning is extremely sensitive and detects non-calcified nodules (NCNs) in 24–50% of subjects, suggesting an unacceptably high false-positive rate. We hypothesized that by reviewing demographic, clinical and nodule characteristics, we could identify risk factors associated with the presence of nodules on screening CT, and with the probability that a NCN was malignant. Methods We performed a longitudinal lung cancer biomarker discovery trial (NYU LCBC) that included low-dose CT-screening of high-risk individuals over 50 years of age, with more than 20 pack-year smoking histories, living in an urban setting, and with a potential for asbestos exposure. We used case-control studies to identify risk factors associated with the presence of nodules (n = 625) versus no nodules (n = 557), and lung cancer patients (n = 30) versus benign nodules (n = 128). Results The NYU LCBC followed 1182 study subjects prospectively over a 10-year period. We found 52% to have NCNs >4 mm on their baseline screen. Most of the nodules were stable, and 9.7% of solid and 26.2% of sub-solid nodules resolved. We diagnosed 30 lung cancers, 26 stage I. Three patients had synchronous primary lung cancers or multifocal disease. Thus, there were 33 lung cancers: 10 incident, and 23 prevalent. A sub-group of the prevalent group were stable for a prolonged period prior to diagnosis. These were all stage I at diagnosis and 12/13 were adenocarcinomas. Conclusions NCNs are common among CT-screened high-risk subjects and can often be managed conservatively. Risk factors for malignancy included increasing age, size and number of nodules, reduced FEV1 and FVC, and increased pack-years smoking. A sub-group of screen-detected cancers are slow-growing and may contribute to

  15. Nod factor supply under water stress conditions modulates cytokinin biosynthesis and enhances nodule formation and N nutrition in soybean.

    PubMed

    Prudent, Marion; Salon, Christophe; Smith, Donald L; Emery, R J Neil

    2016-09-01

    Nod factors (NF) are molecules produced by rhizobia which are involved in the N2-fixing symbiosis with legume plants, enabling the formation of specific organs called nodules. Under drought conditions, nitrogen acquisition by N2-fixation is depressed, resulting in low legume productivity. In this study, we evaluated the effects of NF supply on nitrogen acquisition and on cytokinin biosynthesis of soybean plants grown under drought. NF supply to water stressed soybeans increased the CK content of all organs. The profile of CK metabolites also shifted from t-Z to cis-Z and an accumulation of nucleotide and glucoside conjugates. The changes in CK coincided with enhanced nodule formation with sustained nodule specific activity, which ultimately increased the total nitrogen fixed by the plant.

  16. Bacterial-induced calcium oscillations are common to nitrogen-fixing associations of nodulating legumes and nonlegumes.

    PubMed

    Granqvist, Emma; Sun, Jongho; Op den Camp, Rik; Pujic, Petar; Hill, Lionel; Normand, Philippe; Morris, Richard J; Downie, J Allan; Geurts, Rene; Oldroyd, Giles E D

    2015-08-01

    Plants that form root-nodule symbioses are within a monophyletic 'nitrogen-fixing' clade and associated signalling processes are shared with the arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis. Central to symbiotic signalling are nuclear-associated oscillations in calcium ions (Ca(2+) ), occurring in the root hairs of several legume species in response to the rhizobial Nod factor signal. In this study we expanded the species analysed for activation of Ca(2+) oscillations, including nonleguminous species within the nitrogen-fixing clade. We showed that Ca(2+) oscillations are a common feature of legumes in their association with rhizobia, while Cercis, a non-nodulating legume, does not show Ca(2+) oscillations in response to Nod factors from Sinorhizobium fredii NGR234. Parasponia andersonii, a nonlegume that can associate with rhizobia, showed Nod factor-induced calcium oscillations to S. fredii NGR234 Nod factors, but its non-nodulating sister species, Trema tomentosa, did not. Also within the nitrogen-fixing clade are actinorhizal species that associate with Frankia bacteria and we showed that Alnus glutinosa induces Ca(2+) oscillations in root hairs in response to exudates from Frankia alni, but not to S. fredii NGR234 Nod factors. We conclude that the ability to mount Ca(2+) oscillations in response to symbiotic bacteria is a common feature of nodulating species within the nitrogen-fixing clade.

  17. NrcR, a New Transcriptional Regulator of Rhizobium tropici CIAT 899 Involved in the Legume Root-Nodule Symbiosis

    PubMed Central

    del Cerro, Pablo; Rolla-Santos, Amanda A. P.; Valderrama-Fernández, Rocío; Gil-Serrano, Antonio; Bellogín, Ramón A.; Gomes, Douglas Fabiano; Pérez-Montaño, Francisco; Megías, Manuel; Hungría, Mariangela; Ollero, Francisco Javier

    2016-01-01

    The establishment of nitrogen-fixing rhizobium-legume symbioses requires a highly complex cascade of events. In this molecular dialogue the bacterial NodD transcriptional regulators in conjunction with plant inducers, mostly flavonoids, are responsible for the biosynthesis and secretion of Nod factors which are key molecules for successful nodulation. Other transcriptional regulators related to the symbiotic process have been identified in rhizobial genomes, including negative regulators such as NolR. Rhizobium tropici CIAT 899 is an important symbiont of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.), and its genome encompasses intriguing features such as five copies of nodD genes, as well as other possible transcriptional regulators including the NolR protein. Here we describe and characterize a new regulatory gene located in the non-symbiotic plasmid pRtrCIAT899c, that shows homology (46% identity) with the nolR gene located in the chromosome of CIAT 899. The mutation of this gene, named nrcR (nolR-like plasmid c Regulator), enhanced motility and exopolysaccharide production in comparison to the wild-type strain. Interestingly, the number and decoration of Nod Factors produced by this mutant were higher than those detected in the wild-type strain, especially under salinity stress. The nrcR mutant showed delayed nodulation and reduced competitiveness with P. vulgaris, and reduction in nodule number and shoot dry weight in both P. vulgaris and Leucaena leucocephala. Moreover, the mutant exhibited reduced capacity to induce the nodC gene in comparison to the wild-type CIAT 899. The finding of a new nod-gene regulator located in a non-symbiotic plasmid may reveal the existence of even more complex mechanisms of regulation of nodulation genes in R. tropici CIAT 899 that may be applicable to other rhizobial species. PMID:27096734

  18. [Influence of calcium and rhizobial infections (Rhizobium leguminosarum) on the dynamics of nitric oxide (NO) content in roots of etiolated pea (Pisum sativum L.) seedlings].

    PubMed

    Glian'ko, A K; Ishchenko, A A; Stepanov, A V

    2014-01-01

    The effect of exogenous calcium (Ca2+) and rhizobial infections (Rhizobium leguminosarum bv viceae) on the dynamics of the level of nitric oxide (NO) was studied in cross cuts of roots of two-day-old etiolated pea seedlings (Pisum sativum L.) using a DAF-2DA fluorescent probe. Fluctuations of the NO level, indicating the presence of a rhythm in the generation of NO in roots, were observed during the incubation of seedlings in water, a CaCl2 solution, and with rhizobial infections. Exogenous factors (Ca2+ and two rhizobial stamms) change the time dynamics of the NO level in comparison with the control (water).

  19. PUB1 Interacts with the Receptor Kinase DMI2 and Negatively Regulates Rhizobial and Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Symbioses through Its Ubiquitination Activity in Medicago truncatula1

    PubMed Central

    Camut, Sylvie; Camps, Céline; Rembliere, Céline; de Carvalho-Niebel, Fernanda; Timmers, Ton; Gasciolli, Virginie; Thompson, Richard; Lefebvre, Benoit; Cullimore, Julie; Hervé, Christine

    2016-01-01

    PUB1, an E3 ubiquitin ligase, which interacts with and is phosphorylated by the LYK3 symbiotic receptor kinase, negatively regulates rhizobial infection and nodulation during the nitrogen-fixing root nodule symbiosis in Medicago truncatula. In this study, we show that PUB1 also interacts with and is phosphorylated by DOES NOT MAKE INFECTIONS 2, the key symbiotic receptor kinase of the common symbiosis signaling pathway, required for both the rhizobial and the arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) endosymbioses. We also show here that PUB1 expression is activated during successive stages of root colonization by Rhizophagus irregularis that is compatible with its interaction with DOES NOT MAKE INFECTIONS 2. Through characterization of a mutant, pub1-1, affected by the E3 ubiquitin ligase activity of PUB1, we have shown that the ubiquitination activity of PUB1 is required to negatively modulate successive stages of infection and development of rhizobial and AM symbioses. In conclusion, PUB1 represents, to our knowledge, a novel common component of symbiotic signaling integrating signal perception through interaction with and phosphorylation by two key symbiotic receptor kinases, and downstream signaling via its ubiquitination activity to fine-tune both rhizobial and AM root endosymbioses. PMID:26839127

  20. Nodule characterization: subsolid nodules.

    PubMed

    Raad, Roy A; Suh, James; Harari, Saul; Naidich, David P; Shiau, Maria; Ko, Jane P

    2014-01-01

    In this review, we focus on the radiologic, clinical, and pathologic aspects primarily of solitary subsolid pulmonary nodules. Particular emphasis will be placed on the pathologic classification and correlative computed tomography (CT) features of adenocarcinoma of the lung. The capabilities of fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography-CT and histologic sampling techniques, including CT-guided biopsy, endoscopic-guided biopsy, and surgical resection, are discussed. Finally, recently proposed management guidelines by the Fleischner Society and the American College of Chest Physicians are reviewed.

  1. Factors Influencing the Synthesis of Polysaccharide by Bradyrhizobium japonicum Bacteroids in Field-Grown Soybean Nodules

    PubMed Central

    Streeter, John G.; Salminen, Seppo O.; Beuerlein, James E.; Schmidt, Walter H.

    1994-01-01

    Certain strains of Bradyrhizobium japonicum produce large quantities of polysaccharide in soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merr.) nodules, and nodule polysaccharide (NPS) is different from that produced in culture. A previous survey of field-grown plants showed highly variable levels of NPS among field sites. To obtain clues about the possible function of NPS, we conducted two additional surveys of field-grown plants. The amount of polysaccharide in bulk samples of nodules was not associated with soil type, texture, slope, drainage, or any of the measured soil chemical properties except pH and [Ca]. Correlations with pH and [Ca] were positive and highly significant for two independent surveys involving a total of 77 sites in two years. In a preliminary comparison of high and low levels of Ca supplied to soybean plants grown in silica sand in a greenhouse, a high level of Ca (200 mg of Ca liter-1) increased the NPS level and increased the Ca content of the polysaccharide fraction. B. japonicum isolates from 450 nodules collected at 10 field sites in 1993 were used to form nodules on soybean plants grown in sand culture in a greenhouse in order to examine bacterial phenotype under controlled conditions. Results showed that the NPS level in the bulk nodule sample from any given site was a function of the proportion of nodule occupants that were capable of NPS synthesis. Thus, a higher soil pH and/or [Ca] may positively influence the survival of B. japonicum capable of synthesis of the nodule-specific polysaccharide. PMID:16349358

  2. The Role of Flavonoids in Nodulation Host-Range Specificity: An Update

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Cheng-Wu; Murray, Jeremy D.

    2016-01-01

    Flavonoids are crucial signaling molecules in the symbiosis between legumes and their nitrogen-fixing symbionts, the rhizobia. The primary function of flavonoids in the interaction is to induce transcription of the genes for biosynthesis of the rhizobial signaling molecules called Nod factors, which are perceived by the plant to allow symbiotic infection of the root. Many legumes produce specific flavonoids that only induce Nod factor production in homologous rhizobia, and therefore act as important determinants of host range. Despite a wealth of evidence on legume flavonoids, relatively few have proven roles in rhizobial infection. Recent studies suggest that production of key “infection” flavonoids is highly localized at infection sites. Furthermore, some of the flavonoids being produced at infection sites are phytoalexins and may have a role in the selection of compatible symbionts during infection. The molecular details of how flavonoid production in plants is regulated during nodulation have not yet been clarified, but nitrogen availability has been shown to play a role. PMID:27529286

  3. Leguminous plants: inventors of root nodules to accommodate symbiotic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Suzaki, Takuya; Yoro, Emiko; Kawaguchi, Masayoshi

    2015-01-01

    Legumes and a few other plant species can establish a symbiotic relationship with nitrogen-fixing rhizobia, which enables them to survive in a nitrogen-deficient environment. During the course of nodulation, infection with rhizobia induces the dedifferentiation of host cells to form primordia of a symbiotic organ, the nodule, which prepares plants to accommodate rhizobia in host cells. While these nodulation processes are known to be genetically controlled by both plants and rhizobia, recent advances in studies on two model legumes, Lotus japonicus and Medicago truncatula, have provided great insight into the underlying plant-side molecular mechanism. In this chapter, we review such knowledge, with particular emphasis on two key processes of nodulation, nodule development and rhizobial invasion. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Biotinylation of the rhizobial cyclic β-glucans and succinoglycans crucial for symbiosis with legumes.

    PubMed

    Cho, Eunae; Kwon, Chanho; Lee, Sanghoo; Tahir, Muhammad Nazir; Park, Seyeon; Jung, Seunho

    2014-05-07

    The cyclic β-glucans and succinoglycans produced by rhizobia are required for nodulation during symbiosis with legume hosts. However, only gene deletion analyses have been used to investigate their biological importance. For future studies on the physiological activity of those during symbiosis, biochemical methods need to be developed with separate carbohydrate compounds. Here, we isolated and purified rhizobial cellular carbohydrates using various chromatographic methods. Purified cyclic β-glucans, cyclosophoraoses, were monofunctionalized with biotin using the following three steps: tosylation, azidation, and amination. The mono-6-amino-cyclosophoraoses were linked with biotinamidohexanoic acid N-hydroxysuccinimide ester. Succinoglycans and monomers were tagged with biotinamidocaproyl hydrazide at the reducing sugar via reductive amination. The resulting biotinylated rhizobial carbohydrates were characterized by Fourier transform infrared and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectroscopy, and electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. The resulting neoglycoconjugates can be used as solid probes to study putative plant receptors and for non-invasive imaging for in vivo tracing.

  5. Effects of salt stress and rhizobial inoculation on growth and nitrogen fixation of three peanut cultivars.

    PubMed

    El-Akhal, M R; Rincón, A; Coba de la Peña, T; Lucas, M M; El Mourabit, N; Barrijal, S; Pueyo, J J

    2013-03-01

    Increasing soil salinity represents a major constraint for agriculture in arid and semi-arid lands, where mineral nitrogen (N) deficiency is also a frequent characteristic of soils. Biological N fixation by legumes may constitute a sustainable alternative to chemical fertilisation in salinity-affected areas, provided that adapted cultivars and inoculants are available. Here, the performance of three peanut cultivars nodulated with two different rhizobial strains that differ in their salt tolerance was evaluated under moderately saline water irrigation and compared with that of N-fertilised plants. Shoot weight was used as an indicator of yield. Under non-saline conditions, higher yields were obtained using N fertilisation rather than inoculation for all the varieties tested. However, under salt stress, the yield of inoculated plants became comparable to that of N-fertilised plants, with minor differences depending on the peanut cultivar and rhizobial strain. Our results indicate that N fixation might represent an economical, competitive and environmentally friendly choice with respect to mineral N fertilisation for peanut cultivation under moderate saline conditions.

  6. Partial Purification of a Legume Nodulation Factor Present in Coconut Water 1

    PubMed Central

    Schaffer, A. G.; Alexander, M.

    1967-01-01

    The nodulation of adventitious roots growing from segments of bean hypocotyl tissue was used as a bioassay for the material present in coconut water which stimulated nodulation. The active material in coconut water is acidic, but it was not possible to extract it from an acid solution with organic solvents. A purification of approximately 70-fold (on a dry wt basis) was obtained using activated charcoal, but at least 10 different compounds were present in the active fractions. A purified fraction of coconut water, which is stimulatory to the growth of carrot root explants, was active in the nodulation assay at a concentration of 2 μg/ml. This represents a 4000-fold purification of the diffusible fraction of coconut water. The charcoal fractionation procedure can be applied to the active material present in extracts of bean leaves. PMID:16656538

  7. Are risk factors common to thyroid cancer and nodule? A forty years observational time-trend study.

    PubMed

    Carpi, Angelo; Rossi, Giuseppe; Romani, Rossana; Di Coscio, Giancarlo; Nicolini, Andrea; Simoncini, Tommaso; Russo, Matteo; Mechanick, Jeffrey

    2012-01-01

    A progressive increase in the incidence of thyroid cancer (TC) has been reported over the last few decades. This either reflects the increased number of newly discovered and accurately selected thyroid nodules with more sensitive technologies and a relative more potent carcinogenic effect of pathogenetic factors in malignant, but not benign nodules. This observational time-trend study addresses this issue by analysing the proportion of TC within 8411 consecutive thyroid nodule (TN) patients evaluated in Pisa by the same pathology Department and individual clinician over a four-decade period. From 1972 to 1979 surgery was used to detect TC among the TN patients: 1140 TN patients were operated on and 35 cancers were detected (3.1% of all the TN patients). Subsequently, needle aspiration techniques were used to select TN for surgery. From 1980 to 1992, 5403 TN patients were examined, 483 were selected for surgery, and 150 cancers were found (2.8% of all the TN patients). From 1993 to 2010, 1568 TN patients were examined, 143 were selected for surgery, and 46 cancers were found (2.9% of all the TN patients). Therefore, in the University Hospital of Pisa, and independent of preoperative TN selection protocols, these proportions of TN eventually found to harbor TC remained statistically unchanged over 40 years (p = 0.810). This finding suggests that pathogenic risk factors and more sensitive diagnostic technologies did not differentially affect the incidence of TN and TC.

  8. Wide distribution range of rhizobial symbionts associated with pantropical sea-dispersed legumes.

    PubMed

    Bamba, Masaru; Nakata, Sayuri; Aoki, Seishiro; Takayama, Koji; Núñez-Farfán, Juan; Ito, Motomi; Miya, Masaki; Kajita, Tadashi

    2016-12-01

    To understand the geographic distributions of rhizobia that associated with widely distributed wild legumes, 66 nodules obtained from 41 individuals including three sea-dispersed legumes (Vigna marina, Vigna luteola, and Canavalia rosea) distributed across the tropical and subtropical coastal regions of the world were studied. Partial sequences of 16S rRNA and nodC genes extracted from the nodules showed that only Bradyrhizobium and Sinorhizobium were associated with the pantropical legumes, and some of the symbiont strains were widely distributed over the Pacific. Horizontal gene transfer of nodulation genes were observed within the Bradyrhizobium and Sinorhizobium lineages. BLAST searches in GenBank also identified records of these strains from various legumes across the world, including crop species. However, one of the rhizobial strains was not found in GenBank, which implies the strain may have adapted to the littoral environment. Our results suggested that some rhizobia, which associate with the widespread sea-dispersed legume, distribute across a broad geographic range. By establishing symbiotic relationships with widely distributed rhizobia, the pantropical legumes may also be able to extend their range much further than other legume species.

  9. Cytokinin responses counterpoint auxin signaling during rhizobial infection

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Cheng-Wu; Breakspear, Andrew; Roy, Sonali; Murray, Jeremy D

    2015-01-01

    The transcriptomics approach to study gene expression in root hairs from M. truncatula has shed light on the developmental events during rhizobial infection and the underlying hormone responses. This approach revealed the induction of several cyclins and an aurora kinase which suggests that the cell-division machinery plays a role in rhizobial infection. Changes in the cell cycle in plants are governed by hormones, in particular auxin and cytokinin. Through gene expression and genetic analyses, we have shown auxin plays a role during rhizobial infection. Here we provide further analysis of the data showing the induction of a set of cytokinin signaling components. These include genes encoding 2 cytokinin-activating enzymes, the cytokinin receptor CRE1, and 5 type-A cytokinin response regulators. We discuss the possible interactions between auxin and cytokinin signaling during the infection process. We also consider a potential role for cytokinin signaling in rhizobial attachment. PMID:26176899

  10. Legume-Rhizobium Interactions: Cowpea Root Exudate Elicits Faster Nodulation Response by Rhizobium Species

    PubMed Central

    Bhagwat, Arvind A.; Thomas, Joseph

    1982-01-01

    Preinfection events in legume-Rhizobium symbiosis were analyzed by studying the different nodulation behaviors of two rhizobial strains in cowpeas (Vigna sinensis). Log-phase cultures of Rhizobium sp. strain 1001, an isolate from the plant nodule, initiated host responses leading to infection within 2 h after inoculation, whereas log-phase cultures of Rhizobium sp. strain 32H1 took at least 7 h to trigger a discernible response. The delay observed with strain 32H1 could be eliminated by incubating the rhizobial suspension, before inoculation, for 4.5 h either in the cowpea rhizosphere/rhizoplane condition or in the root exudate of cowpea plants, grown without NH4+ in the rooting medium. The delay could not be eliminated by incubating the rhizobial suspension in the rooting medium of plants grown in the presence of 5 mM NH4+, indicating that there is a regulatory role of combined nitrogen in triggering preinfection events by the legume. The substance(s) in the root exudate which elicited the faster nodulation response by Rhizobium sp. strain 32H1 could be separated into a high-molecular-weight fraction by Sephadex G-100 gel filtration. The data support the notion that legume roots release substances that favor the development of rhizobial features essential for infection and nodulation. PMID:16345989

  11. The Prevalence of Thyroid Nodules and an Analysis of Related Lifestyle Factors in Beijing Communities

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Hua; Tian, Yongfeng; Yan, Wenhua; Kong, Yue; Wang, Haibin; Wang, Anping; Dou, Jingtao; Liang, Ping; Mu, Yiming

    2016-01-01

    Thyroid nodules (TNs) have annual increasing trends worldwide, and large-scale investigations on the prevalence of TNs in Beijing communities have not been conducted since the introduction of salt iodization in 1995. We performed a cross-sectional study to determine the prevalence of TNs, their epidemiological characteristics, and their correlation with lifestyle factors. A total of 6324 permanent residents aged 18 years or older (mean age, 52.15 ± 11.58 years) from seven representative communities in Beijing were included in the analyses. Once informed consent was obtained, the subjects were asked to complete questionnaires, a physical examination, and thyroid ultrasound. A total of 3100 cases had TNs. The overall prevalence rate was 49.0%, and the age-standardized prevalence was 40.1%, which increased significantly as age increased (p < 0.001). The prevalence was significantly higher in females compared to males (p < 0.001), and it was significantly higher among female current smokers and former smokers compared to non-smokers (p = 0.007). There was no correlation between alcohol consumption and TNs, and there were no significant differences in the prevalence among different groups of taste preference. The prevalence decreased with an increased frequency of seafood intake (p = 0.015) and with higher literacy levels (p < 0.001). The Cochran–Armitage trend test showed that the prevalence significantly increased with decreased physical labor and exercise intensity (p < 0.001, p = 0.009). Logistic regression analysis showed that age (Odds ratio (OR) = 1.039 (1.034–1.044), p < 0.001), the female sex (OR = 1.789 (1.527–2.097)), Body mass index (BMI) (OR = 1.019 (1.005–1.034)), and current smoking habits (OR = 1.246 (1.046–1.483)) were independent risk factors for TNs. Our findings indicate that there is a high prevalence of TNs in Beijing, with a higher prevalence in females than in males. Moreover, the prevalence increases as age increases. Smoking and BMI

  12. The identification of novel loci required for appropriate nodule development in Medicago truncatula.

    PubMed

    Domonkos, Agota; Horvath, Beatrix; Marsh, John F; Halasz, Gabor; Ayaydin, Ferhan; Oldroyd, Giles E D; Kalo, Peter

    2013-10-11

    The formation of functional symbiotic nodules is the result of a coordinated developmental program between legumes and rhizobial bacteria. Genetic analyses in legumes have been used to dissect the signaling processes required for establishing the legume-rhizobial endosymbiotic association. Compared to the early events of the symbiotic interaction, less attention has been paid to plant loci required for rhizobial colonization and the functioning of the nodule. Here we describe the identification and characterization of a number of new genetic loci in Medicago truncatula that are required for the development of effective nitrogen fixing nodules. Approximately 38,000 EMS and fast neutron mutagenized Medicago truncatula seedlings were screened for defects in symbiotic nitrogen fixation. Mutant plants impaired in nodule development and efficient nitrogen fixation were selected for further genetic and phenotypic analysis. Nine mutants completely lacking in nodule formation (Nod-) represented six complementation groups of which two novel loci have been identified. Eight mutants with ineffective nodules (Fix-) represented seven complementation groups, out of which five were new monogenic loci. The Fix- M. truncatula mutants showed symptoms of nitrogen deficiency and developed small white nodules. Microscopic analysis of Fix- nodules revealed that the mutants have defects in the release of rhizobia from infection threads, differentiation of rhizobia and maintenance of persistence of bacteria in nodule cells. Additionally, we monitored the transcriptional activity of symbiosis specific genes to define what transcriptional stage of the symbiotic process is blocked in each of the Fix- mutants. Based on the phenotypic and gene expression analysis a functional hierarchy of the FIX genes is proposed. The new symbiotic loci of M. truncatula isolated in this study provide the foundation for further characterization of the mechanisms underpinning nodulation, in particular the later

  13. Identification of the rhizobial symbiont of Astragalus glombiformis in Eastern Morocco as Mesorhizobium camelthorni.

    PubMed

    Guerrouj, Kamal; Pérez-Valera, Eduardo; Chahboune, Rajaa; Abdelmoumen, Hanaa; Bedmar, Eulogio J; El Idrissi, Mustapha Missbah

    2013-08-01

    Astragalus gombiformis is a desert symbiotic nitrogen-fixing legume of great nutritional value as fodder for camels and goats. However, there are no data published on the rhizobial bacteria that nodulate this wild legume in northern Africa. Thirty-four rhizobial bacteria were isolated from root nodules of A. gombifomis grown in sandy soils of the South-Eastern of Morocco. Twenty-five isolates were able to renodulate their original host and possessed a nodC gene copy. The phenotypic and genotypic characterizations carried out illustrated the diversity of the isolates. Phenotypic analysis showed that isolates used a great number of carbohydrates as sole carbon source. However, although they were isolated from arid sandy soils, the isolates do not tolerate drought stress applied in vitro. The phenotypic diversity corresponded mainly to the diversity in the use of some carbohydrates. The genetic analysis as assessed by repetitive extragenic palindromic (REP)-polymerase chain reaction (PCR) showed that the isolates clustered into 3 groups at a similarity coefficient of 81 %. The nearly-complete 16S rRNA gene sequence from a representative strain of each PCR-group showed they were closely related to members of the genus Mesorhizobium of the family Phyllobactericeae within the Alphaproteobacteria. Sequencing of the housekeeping genes atpD, glnII and recA, and their concatenated phylogenetic analysis, showed they are closely related to Mesorhizobium camelthorni. Sequencing of the symbiotic nodC gene from each strain revealed they had 83.53 % identity with the nodC sequence of the type strain M. camelthorni CCNWXJ 40-4(T.)

  14. Virtual touch tissue imaging and quantification (VTIQ) in the evaluation of thyroid nodules: the associated factors leading to misdiagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Cheng-Yu; Lei, Kai-Rong; Liu, Bo-Ji; Bo, Xiao-Wan; Li, Xiao-Long; He, Ya-Ping; Wang, Dan; Ren, Wei-Wei; Zhao, Chong-Ke; Xu, Hui-Xiong

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate the associated factors leading to misdiagnosis with VTIQ for differentiation between benign from malignant thyroid nodules (TNs). The study included 238 benign TNs and 150 malignant TNs. Conventional ultrasound (US) features and VTIQ parameters were obtained and compared with the reference standard of histopathological and/or cytological results. Binary logistic regression analysis was performed to select independent variables leading to misdiagnosis. The maximum shear wave speed (SWS) (SWS-max), mean SWS (SWS-mean), SWS-ratio and standard deviation of SWS (SWS-SD) were significantly higher for malignant TNs compared with benign TNs (all P < 0.001). SWS-mean achieved the highest diagnostic performance with a cut-off value of 3.15 m/s. False positive rate was 13.4% (32/238) while false negative rate was 35.3% (53/150). Intranodular calcification (OR: 1.715) was significantly associated with false positive VTIQ findings, while nodule size (OR: 0.936) and echotexture of the thyroid gland (OR: 0.033) were negatively associated with them. Nodule depth (OR: 0.881) and TI-RADS category (OR: 0.563) were negatively associated with false negative VTIQ findings. These US characteristic of TNs should be taken into consideration when interpreting the results of VTIQ examinations. PMID:28157195

  15. Thyroid nodule

    MedlinePlus

    ... has grown Another possible treatment is an ethanol (alcohol) injection into the nodule to shrink ... Division of Metabolism, Endocrinology & Nutrition, University of Washington School of Medicine, ...

  16. Manganese nodules

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hein, James R.; Harff, Jan; Petersen, Sven; Thiede, Jorn

    2016-01-01

    The existence of manganese (Mn) nodules (Fig. 1) has been known since the late 1800s when they were collected during the Challenger expedition of 1873–1876. However, it was not until after WWII that nodules were further studied in detail for their ability to adsorb metals from seawater. Many of the early studies did not distinguish Mn nodules from Mn crusts. Economic interest in Mn nodules began in the late 1950s and early 1960s when John Mero finished his Ph.D. thesis on this subject, which was published...

  17. Nonlinear Time Series Analysis of Nodulation Factor Induced Calcium Oscillations: Evidence for Deterministic Chaos?

    PubMed Central

    Hazledine, Saul; Sun, Jongho; Wysham, Derin; Downie, J. Allan; Oldroyd, Giles E. D.; Morris, Richard J.

    2009-01-01

    Legume plants form beneficial symbiotic interactions with nitrogen fixing bacteria (called rhizobia), with the rhizobia being accommodated in unique structures on the roots of the host plant. The legume/rhizobial symbiosis is responsible for a significant proportion of the global biologically available nitrogen. The initiation of this symbiosis is governed by a characteristic calcium oscillation within the plant root hair cells and this signal is activated by the rhizobia. Recent analyses on calcium time series data have suggested that stochastic effects have a large role to play in defining the nature of the oscillations. The use of multiple nonlinear time series techniques, however, suggests an alternative interpretation, namely deterministic chaos. We provide an extensive, nonlinear time series analysis on the nature of this calcium oscillation response. We build up evidence through a series of techniques that test for determinism, quantify linear and nonlinear components, and measure the local divergence of the system. Chaos is common in nature and it seems plausible that properties of chaotic dynamics might be exploited by biological systems to control processes within the cell. Systems possessing chaotic control mechanisms are more robust in the sense that the enhanced flexibility allows more rapid response to environmental changes with less energetic costs. The desired behaviour could be most efficiently targeted in this manner, supporting some intriguing speculations about nonlinear mechanisms in biological signaling. PMID:19675679

  18. Nonlinear time series analysis of nodulation factor induced calcium oscillations: evidence for deterministic chaos?

    PubMed

    Hazledine, Saul; Sun, Jongho; Wysham, Derin; Downie, J Allan; Oldroyd, Giles E D; Morris, Richard J

    2009-08-13

    Legume plants form beneficial symbiotic interactions with nitrogen fixing bacteria (called rhizobia), with the rhizobia being accommodated in unique structures on the roots of the host plant. The legume/rhizobial symbiosis is responsible for a significant proportion of the global biologically available nitrogen. The initiation of this symbiosis is governed by a characteristic calcium oscillation within the plant root hair cells and this signal is activated by the rhizobia. Recent analyses on calcium time series data have suggested that stochastic effects have a large role to play in defining the nature of the oscillations. The use of multiple nonlinear time series techniques, however, suggests an alternative interpretation, namely deterministic chaos. We provide an extensive, nonlinear time series analysis on the nature of this calcium oscillation response. We build up evidence through a series of techniques that test for determinism, quantify linear and nonlinear components, and measure the local divergence of the system. Chaos is common in nature and it seems plausible that properties of chaotic dynamics might be exploited by biological systems to control processes within the cell. Systems possessing chaotic control mechanisms are more robust in the sense that the enhanced flexibility allows more rapid response to environmental changes with less energetic costs. The desired behaviour could be most efficiently targeted in this manner, supporting some intriguing speculations about nonlinear mechanisms in biological signaling.

  19. The Medicago truncatula lysin [corrected] motif-receptor-like kinase gene family includes NFP and new nodule-expressed genes.

    PubMed

    Arrighi, Jean-François; Barre, Annick; Ben Amor, Besma; Bersoult, Anne; Soriano, Lidia Campos; Mirabella, Rossana; de Carvalho-Niebel, Fernanda; Journet, Etienne-Pascal; Ghérardi, Michèle; Huguet, Thierry; Geurts, René; Dénarié, Jean; Rougé, Pierre; Gough, Clare

    2006-09-01

    Rhizobial Nod factors are key symbiotic signals responsible for starting the nodulation process in host legume plants. Of the six Medicago truncatula genes controlling a Nod factor signaling pathway, Nod Factor Perception (NFP) was reported as a candidate Nod factor receptor gene. Here, we provide further evidence for this by showing that NFP is a lysin [corrected] motif (LysM)-receptor-like kinase (RLK). NFP was shown both to be expressed in association with infection thread development and to be involved in the infection process. Consistent with deviations from conserved kinase domain sequences, NFP did not show autophosphorylation activity, suggesting that NFP needs to associate with an active kinase or has unusual functional characteristics different from classical kinases. Identification of nine new M. truncatula LysM-RLK genes revealed a larger family than in the nonlegumes Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) or rice (Oryza sativa) of at least 17 members that can be divided into three subfamilies. Three LysM domains could be structurally predicted for all M. truncatula LysM-RLK proteins, whereas one subfamily, which includes NFP, was characterized by deviations from conserved kinase sequences. Most of the newly identified genes were found to be expressed in roots and nodules, suggesting this class of receptors may be more extensively involved in nodulation than was previously known.

  20. Identification and structure of the Rhizobium galegae common nodulation genes: evidence for horizontal gene transfer.

    PubMed

    Suominen, L; Roos, C; Lortet, G; Paulin, L; Lindström, K

    2001-06-01

    Rhizobia are soil bacteria able to fix atmospheric nitrogen in symbiosis with leguminous plants. In response to a signal cascade coded by genes of both symbiotic partners, a specific plant organ, the nodule, is formed. Rhizobial nodulation (nod) genes trigger nodule formation through the synthesis of Nod factors, a family of chitolipooligosaccharides that are specifically recognized by the host plant at the first stages of the nodulation process. Here, we present the organization and sequence of the common nod genes from Rhizobium galegae, a symbiotic member of the RHIZOBIACEAE: This species has an intriguing phylogenetic position, being symbiotic among pathogenic agrobacteria, which induce tumors instead of nodules in plant shoots or roots. This apparent incongruence raises special interest in the origin of the symbiotic apparatus of R. galegae. Our analysis of DNA sequence data indicated that the organization of the common nod gene region of R. galegae was similar to that of Sinorhizobium meliloti and Rhizobium leguminosarum, with nodIJ downstream of nodABC and the regulatory nodD gene closely linked to the common nod operon. Moreover, phylogenetic analyses of the nod gene sequences showed a close relationship especially between the common nodA sequences of R. galegae, S. meliloti, and R. leguminosarum biovars viciae and trifolii. This relationship in structure and sequence contrasts with the phylogeny based on 16S rRNA, which groups R. galegae close to agrobacteria and separate from most other rhizobia. The topology of the nodA tree was similar to that of the corresponding host plant tree. Taken together, these observations indicate that lateral nod gene transfer occurred from fast-growing rhizobia toward agrobacteria, after which the symbiotic apparatus evolved under host plant constraint.

  1. Evolutionary history shapes patterns of mutualistic benefit in Acacia-rhizobial interactions.

    PubMed

    Barrett, Luke G; Zee, Peter C; Bever, James D; Miller, Joseph T; Thrall, Peter H

    2016-07-01

    The ecological and evolutionary factors that drive the emergence and maintenance of variation in mutualistic benefit (i.e., the benefits provided by one partner to another) in mutualistic symbioses are not well understood. In this study, we evaluated the role that host and symbiont phylogeny might play in determining patterns of mutualistic benefit for interactions among nine species of Acacia and 31 strains of nitrogen-fixing rhizobial bacteria. Using phylogenetic comparative methods we compared patterns of variation in mutualistic benefit (host response to inoculation) to rhizobial phylogenies constructed from housekeeping and symbiosis genes; and a multigene host phylogeny. We found widespread genotype-by-genotype variation in patterns of plant growth. A relatively large component of this variation (21-28%) was strongly influenced by the interacting evolutionary histories of both partners, such that phylogenetically similar host species had similar growth responses when inoculated with phylogenetically similar rhizobia. We also found a relatively large nonphylogenetic effect for the average mutualistic benefit provided by rhizobia to plants, such that phylogenetic relatedness did not predict the overall benefit provided by rhizobia across all hosts. We conclude that phylogenetic relatedness should frequently predict patterns of mutualistic benefit in acacia-rhizobial mutualistic interactions; but that some mutualistic traits also evolve independently of the phylogenies.

  2. Manganese nodules

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hein, James R.; Harff, Jan; Petersen, Sven; Thiede, Jorn

    2016-01-01

    The existence of manganese (Mn) nodules (Figure 1) has been known since the late 1800s when they were collected during the Challenger expedition of 1873–1876. However, it was not until after WWII that nodules were further studied in detail for their ability to adsorb metals from seawater. Many of the early studies did not distinguish Mn nodules from Mn crusts. Economic interest in Mn nodules began in the late 1950s and early 1960s when John Mero finished his Ph.D. thesis on this subject, which was published in the journal Economic Geology (Mero, 1962) and later as a book (Mero, 1965). By the mid-1970s, large consortia had formed to search for and mine Mn nodules that occur between the Clarion and Clipperton fracture zones (CCZ) in the NE Pacific (Figure 2). This is still the area considered of greatest economic potential in the global ocean because of high nickel (Ni), copper (Cu), and Mn contents and the dense distribution of nodules in the area. While the mining of nodules was fully expected to begin in the late 1970s or early 1980s, this never occurred due to a downturn in the price of metals on the global market. Since then, many research cruises have been undertaken to study the CCZ nodules, and now 15 contracts for exploration sites have been given or are pending by the International Seabed Authority (ISA). Many books and science journal articles have been published summarizing the early work (e.g., Baturin, 1988; Halbach et al., 1988), and research has continued to the present day (e.g., ISA, 1999; ISA, 2010). Although the initial attraction for nodules was their high Ni, Cu, and Mn contents, subsequent work has shown that nodules host large quantities of other critical metals needed for high-tech, green-tech, and energy applications (Hein et al., 2013; Hein and Koschinsky, 2014).

  3. Rhizobium meliloti lipooligosaccharide nodulation factors: different structural requirements for bacterial entry into target root hair cells and induction of plant symbiotic developmental responses.

    PubMed

    Ardourel, M; Demont, N; Debellé, F; Maillet, F; de Billy, F; Promé, J C; Dénarié, J; Truchet, G

    1994-10-01

    Rhizobium meliloti produces lipochitooligosaccharide nodulation NodRm factors that are required for nodulation of legume hosts. NodRm factors are O-acetylated and N-acylated by specific C16-unsaturated fatty acids. nodL mutants produce non-O-acetylated factors, and nodFE mutants produce factors with modified acyl substituents. Both mutants exhibited a significantly reduced capacity to elicit infection thread (IT) formation in alfalfa. However, once initiated, ITs developed and allowed the formation of nitrogen-fixing nodules. In contrast, double nodF/nodL mutants were unable to penetrate into legume hosts and to form ITs. Nevertheless, these mutants induced widespread cell wall tip growth in trichoblasts and other epidermal cells and were also able to elicit cortical cell activation at a distance. NodRm factor structural requirements are thus clearly more stringent for bacterial entry than for the elicitation of developmental plant responses.

  4. Nod Factor-Independent Nodulation in Aeschynomene evenia Required the Common Plant-Microbe Symbiotic Toolkit1

    PubMed Central

    Fabre, Sandrine; Gully, Djamel; Poitout, Arthur; Patrel, Delphine; Arrighi, Jean-François; Cartieaux, Fabienne

    2015-01-01

    Nitrogen fixation in the legume-rhizobium symbiosis is a crucial area of research for more sustainable agriculture. Our knowledge of the plant cascade in response to the perception of bacterial Nod factors has increased in recent years. However, the discovery that Nod factors are not involved in the Aeschynomene-Bradyrhizobium spp. interaction suggests that alternative molecular dialogues may exist in the legume family. We evaluated the conservation of the signaling pathway common to other endosymbioses using three candidate genes: Ca2+/Calmodulin-Dependent Kinase (CCaMK), which plays a central role in cross signaling between nodule organogenesis and infection processes; and Symbiosis Receptor Kinase (SYMRK) and Histidine Kinase1 (HK1), which act upstream and downstream of CCaMK, respectively. We showed that CCaMK, SYMRK, and HK1 are required for efficient nodulation in Aeschynomene evenia. Our results demonstrate that CCaMK and SYMRK are recruited in Nod factor-independent symbiosis and, hence, may be conserved in all vascular plant endosymbioses described so far. PMID:26446590

  5. [Milker's nodules].

    PubMed

    Hansen, S K; Mertz, H; Krogdahl, A S; Veien, N K

    1997-01-20

    Milker's nodule is a parapox virus infection seen mostly on the hands of dairy farmers. We saw 15 cases over a period of two years in the County of North Jutland. Clinically, milker's nodule goes through a papular, a nodular and a crusted stage. Most patients were seen when the infection was in the nodular stage, an often painful condition requiring treatment. Three patients developed an erythema multiformelike secondary eruption. Lesions from nine patients were removed for histological examination. The histology of all lesions was consistent with milker's nodule. In three of seven patients parapox virus was demonstrated by electron microscopy. Treatment was commonly curettage followed by cauterization.

  6. Isolation and Characterization of Nodule-Associated Exiguobacterium sp. from the Root Nodules of Fenugreek (Trigonella foenum-graecum) and Their Possible Role in Plant Growth Promotion

    PubMed Central

    Rajendran, Geetha; Patel, Maheshwari H.; Joshi, Sanket J.

    2012-01-01

    One of the ways to increase the competitive survivability of rhizobial biofertilizers and thus achieve better plant growth under such conditions is by modifying the rhizospheric environment or community by addition of nonrhizobial nodule-associated bacteria (NAB) that cause better nodulation and plant growth when coinoculated with rhizobia. A study was performed to investigate the most commonly associated nodule-associated bacteria and the rhizospheric microorganisms associated with the Fenugreek (Trigonella foenum-graecum) plant. Isolation of nonrhizobial isolates from root nodules of Fenugreek was carried out along with the rhizospheric isolates. About 64.7% isolates obtained from Fenugreek nodules were gram-negative coccobacilli, 29.41% were gram-positive bacilli, and all rhizospheric isolates except one were gram-positive bacilli. All the isolates were characterized for their plant growth promoting (PGP) activities. Two of the NAB isolates M2N2c and B1N2b (Exiguobacterium sp.) showed maximum positive PGP features. Those NAB isolates when coinoculated with rhizobial strain—S. meliloti, showed plant growth promotion with respect to increase in plant's root and shoot length, chlorophyll content, nodulation efficiency, and nodule dry weight. PMID:22518149

  7. SUBFOVEAL NODULE IN COATS' DISEASE

    PubMed Central

    Daruich, Alejandra L.; Moulin, Alexandre P.; Tran, Hoai V.; Matet, Alexandre

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the prevalence, clinical characteristics and nature of subfoveal nodules in Coats' disease and the associated impact on the long-term visual outcome. Methods: Consecutive cases of Coats' disease with foveal exudation were retrospectively reviewed. The presence of a subfoveal nodule or macular fibrosis was recorded. Clinical characteristics, retinal imaging, and outcome were analyzed by comparative analysis. The histopathological description of an enucleated eye with subfoveal nodule was performed. Results: Among 40 patients presenting unilateral Stage 2B or 3A1 Coats' disease, a subfoveal nodule was detected in 21 patients (52.5%). The median follow-up was 4.7 years. Nineteen patients (47.5%) did not present a subfoveal nodule. Three patients (15.8%) without subfoveal nodule and 21 patients (100%) with subfoveal nodule progressed to a macular fibrotic scar (P < 0.0001), and the mean time of macular fibrosis onset was 11.0 ± 2.6 months. Final visual acuity was significantly worse in patients who presented a subfoveal nodule at diagnosis (P = 0.01). Of 18 cases with subfoveal nodule who underwent fluorescein angiography, retinal–retinal anastomosis and neovascularization were detected in 13 (72.2%) and 2 eyes (11.1%), respectively. Histopathological analysis of a subfoveal nodule revealed an aggregate of proteinaceous material including fibrin, spindle cells, macrophages, and pigmented cells. Conclusion: The presence of a subfoveal nodule at presentation is a predictive factor for macular fibrosis development and worse visual outcome in patients with Coats' disease. These observations suggest an updated classification introducing two subcategories within Stage 2B: without subfoveal nodule (Stage 2B1) and with subfoveal nodule (Stage 2B2). PMID:28030429

  8. [Thyroid nodules: clinical management and differential diagnosis].

    PubMed

    Giovanella, L

    2009-01-21

    Thyroid nodules are common and are frequently benign. The prevalence of thyroid nodules ranges from 3-7% (palpation) to 50% (ultrasonography). Thyroid cancer occurs in 5-10% of nodules. Thyroid ultrasonography (US) is not a screening test but all patients with palpable thyroid nodule should undergo US examination. US-guided fine-needle aspiration citology (FNC) is recommendend for nodules with suspicious features at US examination or when clinical risk factors occur. A radioisotope scan is useful if the TSH is low or suppressed to detect (benign) functioning nodules.

  9. Predictive factors of diagnostic accuracy of CT-guided transthoracic fine-needle aspiration for solid noncalcified, subsolid and mixed pulmonary nodules.

    PubMed

    De Filippo, Massimo; Saba, Luca; Concari, Giorgio; Nizzoli, Rita; Ferrari, Lilia; Tiseo, Marcello; Ardizzoni, Andrea; Sverzellati, Nicola; Paladini, Ilaria; Ganazzoli, Chiara; Sconfienza, Luca Maria; Carrafiello, Giampaolo; Brunese, Luca; Genovese, Eugenio Annibale; Ampollini, Luca; Carbognani, Paolo; Rusca, Michele; Zompatori, Maurizio; Rossi, Cristina

    2013-10-01

    The aim of this study was to analyse factors predicting the diagnostic accuracy of computed tomography (CT)-guided transthoracic fine-needle aspiration (TTFNA) for solid noncalcified, subsolid and mixed pulmonary nodules, with particular attention to those responsible for false negative results with a view to suggesting a method for their correction. From January 2007 to March 2010, we retrospectively reviewed the CT images of 198 patients of both sexes (124 males and 74 females; mean age, 70 years; range age, 44-90) used for the guidance of TTFNA of pulmonary nodules. Aspects considered were: lesion size and density, distance from the pleura, and lesion site. Multiplanar reformatted images (MPR) were retrospectively obtained in the sagittal and axial oblique planes relative to needle orientation. The overall diagnostic accuracy of TTFNA CT-guided biopsy was 86% for nodules between 0.7 and 3 cm, 83.3% for those between 0.7 and 1.5 cm, and 92% for those between 2 and 3 cm. Accuracy was 95.1% for solid pulmonary nodules, 84.6% for mixed nodules, and 66.6% for subsolid nodules. The diagnostic accuracy of CT-guided TTFNA in relation to the distance between the nodule and the pleural plane was 95.6% for lesions adhering to the pleura and 83.5% for central ones. The diagnostic accuracy was 84.2% for the pulmonary upper lobe nodules, 85.3% for the lower lobe and 90.9% for those in the lingula and middle lobe. In 75% of false negative and inadequate/insufficient cases the needle was found to lie outside the lesion, after reconstruction of the needle path by MPR. The positive predictive factors of CT-guided TTFNA are related to the nodule size, density and distance from the pleural plane. The most common negative predictive factor of CT-guided TTFNA is the wrong position of the needle tip, as observed in the sagittal and axial oblique sections of the MPR reconstructions. The diagnostic accuracy of CT-guided TTFNA can therefore be improved by using the MPR technique to plan

  10. [Evolution of Root Nodule Bacteria: Reconstruction of the Speciation Processes Resulting from Genomic Rearrangements in a Symbiotic System].

    PubMed

    Provorov, N A; Andronov, E E

    2016-01-01

    The processes of speciation and macroevolution of root nodule bacteria (rhizobia), based on deep rearrangements of their genomes and occurring in the N₂-fixing symbiotic system, are reconstructed. At the first stage of rhizobial evolution, transformation of free-living diazotrophs (related to Rhodopseudomonas) to symbiotic N₂-fixers (Bradyrhizobium) occurred due to the acquisition of the fix gene system, which is responsible for providing nitrogenase with electrons and reducing equivalents, as well as for oxygen-dependent regulation of nitrogenase synthesis in planta, and then of the nod genes responsible for the synthesis of the lipo- chito-oligosaccharide Nod factors, which induce root nodule development. The subsequent rearrangements of bacterial genomes included: (1) increased volume of hereditary information supported by species, genera (pan-genome), and individual strains; (2) transition from the unitary genome to a multicomponent one; and (3) enhanced levels of bacterial genetic plasticity and horizontal gene transfer, resulting in formation of new genera, of which Mesorhizobium, Rhizobium, and Sinorhizobium are the largest, and of over 100 species. Rhizobial evolution caused by development and diversification of the Nod factor synthesizing systems may result in both increased host specificity range (transition of Bradyrhizobium from autotrophic to symbiotrophic carbon metabolism in interaction with a broad spectrum of legumes) and to its contraction (transition of Rhizobium and Sinorhizobium to "altruistic" interaction with legumes of the galegoid clade). Reconstruction of the evolutionary pathway from symbiotic N₂-fixers to their free-living ancestors makes it possible to initiate the studies based on up-to-date genome screening technologies and aimed at the issues of genetic integration of organisms into supracpecies complexes, ratios of the macro- and microevolutionary mechanisms, and developmetn of cooperative adaptations based on altruistic

  11. GS52 Ecto-Apyrase Plays a Critical Role during Soybean Nodulation1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Govindarajulu, Manjula; Kim, Sung-Yong; Libault, Marc; Berg, R. Howard; Tanaka, Kiwamu; Stacey, Gary; Taylor, Christopher G.

    2009-01-01

    Apyrases are non-energy-coupled nucleotide phosphohydrolases that hydrolyze nucleoside triphosphates and nucleoside diphosphates to nucleoside monophosphates and orthophosphates. GS52, a soybean (Glycine soja) ecto-apyrase, was previously shown to be induced very early in response to inoculation with the symbiotic bacterium Bradyrhizobium japonicum. Overexpression of the GS52 ecto-apyrase in Lotus japonicus increased the level of rhizobial infection and enhanced nodulation. These data suggest a critical role for the GS52 ecto-apyrase during nodulation. To further investigate the role of GS52 during nodulation, we used RNA interference to silence GS52 expression in soybean (Glycine max) roots using Agrobacterium rhizogenes-mediated root transformation. Transcript levels of GS52 were significantly reduced in GS52 silenced roots and these roots exhibited reduced numbers of mature nodules. Development of the nodule primordium and subsequent nodule maturation was significantly suppressed in GS52 silenced roots. Transmission electron micrographs of GS52 silenced root nodules showed that early senescence and infected cortical cells were devoid of symbiosome-containing bacteroids. Application of exogenous adenosine diphosphate to silenced GS52 roots restored nodule development. Restored nodules contained bacteroids, thus indicating that extracellular adenosine diphosphate is important during nodulation. These results clearly suggest that GS52 ecto-apyrase catalytic activity is critical for the early B. japonicum infection process, initiation of nodule primordium development, and subsequent nodule organogenesis in soybean. PMID:19036836

  12. Induction of host defences by Rhizobium during ineffective nodulation of pea (Pisum sativum L.) carrying symbiotically defective mutations sym40 (PsEFD), sym33 (PsIPD3/PsCYCLOPS) and sym42.

    PubMed

    Ivanova, Kira A; Tsyganova, Anna V; Brewin, Nicholas J; Tikhonovich, Igor A; Tsyganov, Viktor E

    2015-11-01

    Rhizobia are able to establish a beneficial interaction with legumes by forming a new organ, called the symbiotic root nodule, which is a unique ecological niche for rhizobial nitrogen fixation. Rhizobial infection has many similarities with pathogenic infection and induction of defence responses accompanies both interactions, but defence responses are induced to a lesser extent during rhizobial infection. However, strong defence responses may result from incompatible interactions between legumes and rhizobia due to a mutation in either macro- or microsymbiont. The aim of this research was to analyse different plant defence reactions in response to Rhizobium infection for several pea (Pisum sativum) mutants that result in ineffective symbiosis. Pea mutants were examined by histochemical and immunocytochemical analyses, light, fluorescence and transmission electron microscopy and quantitative real-time PCR gene expression analysis. It was observed that mutations in pea symbiotic genes sym33 (PsIPD3/PsCYCLOPS encoding a transcriptional factor) and sym40 (PsEFD encoding a putative negative regulator of the cytokinin response) led to suberin depositions in ineffective nodules, and in the sym42 there were callose depositions in infection thread (IT) and host cell walls. The increase in deposition of unesterified pectin in IT walls was observed for mutants in the sym33 and sym42; for mutant in the sym42, unesterified pectin was also found around degrading bacteroids. In mutants in the genes sym33 and sym40, an increase in the expression level of a gene encoding peroxidase was observed. In the genes sym40 and sym42, an increase in the expression levels of genes encoding a marker of hypersensitive reaction and PR10 protein was demonstrated. Thus, a range of plant defence responses like suberisation, callose and unesterified pectin deposition as well as activation of defence genes can be triggered by different pea single mutations that cause perception of an otherwise

  13. The Medicago truncatula Lysine Motif-Receptor-Like Kinase Gene Family Includes NFP and New Nodule-Expressed Genes1[W

    PubMed Central

    Arrighi, Jean-François; Barre, Annick; Ben Amor, Besma; Bersoult, Anne; Soriano, Lidia Campos; Mirabella, Rossana; de Carvalho-Niebel, Fernanda; Journet, Etienne-Pascal; Ghérardi, Michèle; Huguet, Thierry; Geurts, René; Dénarié, Jean; Rougé, Pierre; Gough, Clare

    2006-01-01

    Rhizobial Nod factors are key symbiotic signals responsible for starting the nodulation process in host legume plants. Of the six Medicago truncatula genes controlling a Nod factor signaling pathway, Nod Factor Perception (NFP) was reported as a candidate Nod factor receptor gene. Here, we provide further evidence for this by showing that NFP is a lysine motif (LysM)-receptor-like kinase (RLK). NFP was shown both to be expressed in association with infection thread development and to be involved in the infection process. Consistent with deviations from conserved kinase domain sequences, NFP did not show autophosphorylation activity, suggesting that NFP needs to associate with an active kinase or has unusual functional characteristics different from classical kinases. Identification of nine new M. truncatula LysM-RLK genes revealed a larger family than in the nonlegumes Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) or rice (Oryza sativa) of at least 17 members that can be divided into three subfamilies. Three LysM domains could be structurally predicted for all M. truncatula LysM-RLK proteins, whereas one subfamily, which includes NFP, was characterized by deviations from conserved kinase sequences. Most of the newly identified genes were found to be expressed in roots and nodules, suggesting this class of receptors may be more extensively involved in nodulation than was previously known. PMID:16844829

  14. Lung Nodules: Overview

    MedlinePlus

    ... Research & Science Education & Training Home Conditions Lung Nodules Lung Nodules Make an Appointment Find a Doctor Ask ... Kern, MD (June 01, 2016) What is a lung nodule? A lung nodule is also called a ...

  15. Lung Nodules: Overview

    MedlinePlus

    ... Research & Science Education & Training Home Conditions Lung Nodules Lung Nodules Make an Appointment Find a Doctor Ask ... Kern, MD (June 01, 2016) What is a lung nodule? A lung nodule is also called a ...

  16. Strigolactones promote nodulation in pea.

    PubMed

    Foo, Eloise; Davies, Noel W

    2011-11-01

    Strigolactones are recently defined plant hormones with roles in mycorrhizal symbiosis and shoot and root architecture. Their potential role in controlling nodulation, the related symbiosis between legumes and Rhizobium bacteria, was explored using the strigolactone-deficient rms1 mutant in pea (Pisum sativum L.). This work indicates that endogenous strigolactones are positive regulators of nodulation in pea, required for optimal nodule number but not for nodule formation per se. rms1 mutant root exudates and root tissue are almost completely deficient in strigolactones, and rms1 mutant plants have approximately 40% fewer nodules than wild-type plants. Treatment with the synthetic strigolactone GR24 elevated nodule number in wild-type pea plants and also elevated nodule number in rms1 mutant plants to a level similar to that seen in untreated wild-type plants. Grafting studies revealed that nodule number and strigolactone levels in root tissue of rms1 roots were unaffected by grafting to wild-type scions indicating that strigolactones in the root, but not shoot-derived factors, regulate nodule number and provide the first direct evidence that the shoot does not make a major contribution to root strigolactone levels.

  17. Changes in ascorbate peroxidase, catalase, guaiacol peroxidase and superoxide dismutase activities in common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) nodules under salt stress.

    PubMed

    Jebara, Salwa; Jebara, Moez; Limam, Férid; Aouani, Mohamed Elarbi

    2005-08-01

    To analyse nodular antioxidant enzyme expression in response to salt stress, Phaseolus vulgaris genotype BAT477 was inoculated with reference strain CIAT899, and treated with 50 mM NaCl. Plant growth, nodulation and nitrogen fixing activity were analysed. Results showed that: (1) all parameters, particularly in nodules, were affected by salt treatments, and (2) confirmed preferential growth allocation to roots. The ARA was significantly decreased by salt treatments. Protein dosage confirmed that nodules were more affected by salt treatment than were roots. We analysed superoxide dismutase, catalase, ascorbate peroxidase and peroxidase in nodules, roots and a free rhizobial strain. Our results indicated that SOD and CAT nodular isozymes had bacterial and root origins. The SOD expressed the same CuZn, Fe and Mn SOD isoforms in nodules and roots, whereas in free rhizobia we found only one Fe and Mn SOD. APX and POX nodule and root profiles had only root origins, as no rhizobial band was detected. Under salt stress, plant growth, nitrogen fixation and activities of antioxidant defense enzymes in nodules were affected. Thus, these enzymes appear to preserve symbiosis from stress turned out that NaCl salinity lead to a differential regulation of distinct SOD and POX isoenzyme. So their levels in nodules appeared to be consistent with a symbiotic nitrogen fixing efficiency hypothesis, and they seem to function as the molecular mechanisms underlying the nodule response to salinity.

  18. Grafting analysis indicates that malfunction of TRICOT in the root causes a nodulation-deficient phenotype in Lotus japonicus.

    PubMed

    Suzaki, Takuya; Kawaguchi, Masayoshi

    2013-03-01

    Leguminous plants develop root nodules in symbiosis with soil rhizobia. Nodule formation occurs following rhizobial infection of the host root that induces dedifferentiation of some cortical cells and the initiation of a new developmental program to form nodule primordia. In a recent study, we identified a novel gene, TRICOT (TCO), that acts as a positive regulator of nodulation in Lotus japonicus. In addition to its role in nodulation, tco mutant plants display pleiotropic defects including abnormal shoot apical meristem formation. Here, we investigated the effect of the tco mutation on nodulation using a grafting approach. The results strongly indicate that the nodulation-deficient phenotype of the mutant results from malfunction of the TCO gene in the root.

  19. New aspect of plant–rhizobia interaction: Alkaloid biosynthesis in Crotalaria depends on nodulation

    PubMed Central

    Irmer, Simon; Podzun, Nora; Langel, Dorothee; Heidemann, Franziska; Kaltenegger, Elisabeth; Schemmerling, Brigitte; Geilfus, Christoph-Martin; Zörb, Christian; Ober, Dietrich

    2015-01-01

    Infection of legume hosts by rhizobial bacteria results in the formation of a specialized organ, the nodule, in which atmospheric nitrogen is reduced to ammonia. Nodulation requires the reprogramming of the plant cell, allowing the microsymbiont to enter the plant tissue in a highly controlled manner. We have found that, in Crotalaria (Fabaceae), this reprogramming is associated with the biosynthesis of pyrrolizidine alkaloids (PAs). These compounds are part of the plant’s chemical defense against herbivores and cannot be regarded as being functionally involved in the symbiosis. PAs in Crotalaria are detectable only when the plants form nodules after infection with their rhizobial partner. The identification of a plant-derived sequence encoding homospermidine synthase (HSS), the first pathway-specific enzyme of PA biosynthesis, suggests that the plant and not the microbiont is the producer of PAs. Transcripts of HSS are detectable exclusively in the nodules, the tissue with the highest concentration of PAs, indicating that PA biosynthesis is restricted to the nodules and that the nodules are the source from which the alkaloids are transported to the above ground parts of the plant. The link between nodulation and the biosynthesis of nitrogen-containing alkaloids in Crotalaria highlights a further facet of the effect of symbiosis with rhizobia on the ecologically important trait of the plant’s chemical defense. PMID:25775562

  20. Phylogeny of nodulation genes and symbiotic diversity of Acacia senegal (L.) Willd. and A. seyal (Del.) Mesorhizobium strains from different regions of Senegal.

    PubMed

    Bakhoum, Niokhor; Galiana, Antoine; Le Roux, Christine; Kane, Aboubacry; Duponnois, Robin; Ndoye, Fatou; Fall, Dioumacor; Noba, Kandioura; Sylla, Samba Ndao; Diouf, Diégane

    2015-04-01

    Acacia senegal and Acacia seyal are small, deciduous legume trees, most highly valued for nitrogen fixation and for the production of gum arabic, a commodity of international trade since ancient times. Symbiotic nitrogen fixation by legumes represents the main natural input of atmospheric N2 into ecosystems which may ultimately benefit all organisms. We analyzed the nod and nif symbiotic genes and symbiotic properties of root-nodulating bacteria isolated from A. senegal and A. seyal in Senegal. The symbiotic genes of rhizobial strains from the two Acacia species were closed to those of Mesorhizobium plurifarium and grouped separately in the phylogenetic trees. Phylogeny of rhizobial nitrogen fixation gene nifH was similar to those of nodulation genes (nodA and nodC). All A. senegal rhizobial strains showed identical nodA, nodC, and nifH gene sequences. By contrast, A. seyal rhizobial strains exhibited different symbiotic gene sequences. Efficiency tests demonstrated that inoculation of both Acacia species significantly affected nodulation, total dry weight, acetylene reduction activity (ARA), and specific acetylene reduction activity (SARA) of plants. However, these cross-inoculation tests did not show any specificity of Mesorhizobium strains toward a given Acacia host species in terms of infectivity and efficiency as stated by principal component analysis (PCA). This study demonstrates that large-scale inoculation of A. senegal and A. seyal in the framework of reafforestation programs requires a preliminary step of rhizobial strain selection for both Acacia species.

  1. Small-Subunit rRNA Genotyping of Rhizobia Nodulating Australian Acacia spp.

    PubMed Central

    Lafay, Bénédicte; Burdon, Jeremy J.

    2001-01-01

    The structure of rhizobial communities nodulating Acacia in southeastern Australia from south Queensland to Tasmania was investigated by a molecular approach. A total of 118 isolates from nodule samples from 13 different Acacia species collected at 44 sites were characterized by small-subunit (SSU) ribosomal DNA (rDNA) PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis. Nine rhizobial genomospecies were identified, and these taxa corresponded to previously described genomospecies (B. Lafay and J. J. Burdon, Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 64:3989–3997, 1998). Eight of these genomospecies belonged to the Bradyrhizobium lineage and accounted for 96.6% of the isolates. The remaining genomospecies corresponded to Rhizobium tropici. For analysis of geographic patterns, results were grouped into five latitudinal regions regardless of host origin. In each region, as observed previously for rhizobial isolates taken from non-Acacia legumes (Lafay and Burdon, Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 64:3989–3997, 1998), rhizobial communities were dominated by one or two genomospecies, the identities of which varied from place to place. Despite this similarity in patterns, the most abundant genomospecies for Acacia isolates differed from the genomospecies found in the non-Acacia-derived rhizobial collection, suggesting that there is a difference in nodulation patterns of the Mimosoideae and the Papilionoideae. Only two genomospecies were both widespread and relatively abundant across the range of sites sampled. Genomospecies A was found in all regions except the most northern sites located in Queensland, whereas genomospecies B was not detected in Tasmania. This suggests that genomospecies A might be restricted to the more temperate regions of Australia, whereas in contrast, genomospecies B occurs in different climatic and edaphic conditions across the whole continent. The latter hypothesis is supported by the presence of genomospecies B in southwestern Australia, based on partial SSU r

  2. Water-tolerant legume nodulation.

    PubMed

    Capoen, Ward; Goormachtig, Sofie; Holsters, Marcelle

    2010-03-01

    Water-tolerant nodulation is an adaptation of legumes that grow in wet or temporarily flooded habitats. This nodulation mode takes place at lateral root bases via intercellular bacterial invasion in cortical infection pockets. The tropical legume Sesbania rostrata has become a model for the study of the molecular basis of crack entry nodulation compared with root hair curl nodulation. For intercellular invasion, Nodulation Factor (NF) signalling recruits an ethylene-dependent, common Sym gene-independent pathway, leading to local cell death. The NF structure requirements are less stringent than for intracellular invasion in root hairs, which is correlated with a very specific NF-induced calcium spiking signature, presumably necessary for correct gene expression to assemble a functional entry complex in the epidermis.

  3. Genes Essential for Nod Factor Production and Nodulation Are Located on a Symbiotic Amplicon (AMPRtrCFN299pc60) in Rhizobium tropici

    PubMed Central

    Mavingui, Patrick; Laeremans, Toon; Flores, Margarita; Romero, David; Martínez-Romero, Esperanza; Palacios, Rafael

    1998-01-01

    Amplifiable DNA regions (amplicons) have been identified in the genome of Rhizobium etli. Here we report the isolation and molecular characterization of a symbiotic amplicon of Rhizobium tropici. To search for symbiotic amplicons, a cartridge containing a kanamycin resistance marker that responds to gene dosage and conditional origins of replication and transfer was inserted in the nodulation region of the symbiotic plasmid (pSym) of R. tropici CFN299. Derivatives harboring amplifications were selected by increasing the concentration of kanamycin in the cell culture. The amplified DNA region was mobilized into Escherichia coli and then into Agrobacterium tumefaciens. The 60-kb symbiotic amplicon, which we termed AMPRtrCFN299pc60, contains several nodulation and nitrogen fixation genes and is flanked by a novel insertion sequence ISRtr1. Amplification of AMPRtrCFN299pc60 through homologous recombination between ISRtr1 repeats increased the amount of Nod factors. Strikingly, the conjugal transfer of the amplicon into a plasmidless A. tumefaciens strain confers on the transconjugant the ability to produce R. tropici Nod factors and to nodulate Phaseolus vulgaris, indicating that R. tropici genes essential for the nodulation process are confined to an ampliable DNA region of the pSym. PMID:9603874

  4. Factors affecting uncertainty in lung nodule volume estimation with CT: comparisons of findings from two estimation methods in a phantom study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qin; Gavrielides, Marios A.; Zeng, Rongping; Myers, Kyle J.; Sahiner, Berkman; Petrick, Nicholas

    2015-03-01

    This work aimed to compare two different types of volume estimation methods (a model-based and a segmentationbased method) in terms of identifying factors affecting measurement uncertainty. Twenty-nine synthetic nodules with varying size, radiodensity, and shape were placed in an anthropomorphic thoracic phantom and scanned with a 16- detector row CT scanner. Ten repeat scans were acquired using three exposures and two slice collimations, and were reconstructed with varying slice thicknesses. Nodule volumes were estimated from the reconstructed data using a matched-filter and a segmentation approach. Log transformed volumes were used to obtain measurement error with truth obtained through micro-CT. ANOVA and multiple linear regression were applied to measurement error to identify significant factors affecting volume estimation for each method. Root mean square of measurement errors (RMSE) for meaningful subgroups, repeatability coefficients (RC) for different imaging protocols, and reproducibility coefficients (RDC) for thin and thick collimation conditions were evaluated. Results showed that for both methods, nodule size, shape and slice thickness were significant factors. Collimation was significant for the matched-filter method. RMSEs for matched-filter measurements were in general smaller than segmentation. To achieve RMSE on the order of 15% or less for {5, 8, 9, 10mm} nodules, the corresponding maximum allowable slice thicknesses were {3, 5, 5, 5mm} for the matched-filter and {0.8, 3, 3, 3mm} for the segmentation method. RCs showed similar patterns for both methods, increasing with slice thickness. For 8-10mm nodules, the measurements were highly repeatable provided the slice thickness was ≤3mm, regardless of method and across varying acquisition conditions. RDCs were lower for thin collimation than thick collimation protocols. While RDC of matched filter volume estimation results was always lower than segmentation results, for 8-10mm nodules with thin

  5. Enhanced nodulation of peanut when co-inoculated with fungal endophyte Phomopsis liquidambari and bradyrhizobium.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Wang, Hong-Wei; Wang, Xing-Xiang; Xie, Xing-Guang; Siddikee, Md Ashaduzzaman; Xu, Ri-Sheng; Dai, Chuan-Chao

    2016-01-01

    In peanut continuous cropping soil, the application of fungal endophyte Phomopsis liquidambari B3 showed peanut pod yield promotion and root nodule number increase. P. liquidambari improved soil environment by degrading allelochemicals and thus promoted peanut pod yield. Furthermore, peanut yield promotion is in part due to the root nodule increase since nodular nitrogen fixation provides the largest source of nitrogen for peanut. However, it is unknown whether this nodule number increase is induced by fungal endophyte. We therefore conducted several pot experiments using vermiculite to investigate the effects of P. liquidambari on peanut-bradyrhizobium nodulation. Our results showed that P. liquidambari co-inoculated with bradyrhizobium increased root nodule number and shoot accumulated nitrogen by 28.25% and 29.71%, respectively. Nodulation dynamics analysis showed that P. liquidambari accelerated nodule initiation and subsequent nodule development. Meanwhile, P. liquidambari was able to colonize the peanut root as an endophyte. The dynamics of P. liquidambari and bradyrhizobial root colonization analysis showed that P. liquidambari inoculation significantly increased the rate of bradyrhizobial colonization. Furthermore, P. liquidambari inoculation significantly increased flavonoids synthesis-related enzymes activities, two common types of flavonoid (luteolin and quercetin-peanut rhizobial nod gene inducer) secretion and lateral root (peanut rhizobial infection site) formation, indicating that P. liquidambari altered the peanut nodulation-related physiological and metabolic activities. These obtained results confirmed the direct contribution of P. liquidambari in enhancing peanut-bradyrhizobium interaction, nodulation and yield.

  6. Is malignant nodule topography an additional risk factor for metastatic disease in low-risk differentiated thyroid cancer?

    PubMed

    Campennì, Alfredo; Giovanella, Luca; Siracusa, Massimiliano; Stipo, Maria Elena; Alibrandi, Angela; Cucinotta, Mariapaola; Ruggeri, Rosaria M; Baldari, Sergio

    2014-11-01

    Differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) is the most common endocrine malignancy. In recent decades, the incidence has been increasing, largely due to increased detection of patients with low-risk or very low-risk DTC. According to European Thyroid Association and American Thyroid Association guidelines, radioiodine (RAI) thyroid remnant ablation is not indicated in very low-risk patients, while its role is still debated in low-risk patients. Accordingly, risk stratification of DTC patients is pivotal when deciding for or against RAI ablation. Presently, risk stratification is based on pTNM staging integrated with clinical parameters. The aim of our study was to evaluate the relationship between location of malignant thyroid nodules within the thyroid gland and the presence of loco-regional and/or distant metastases in patients with pT1a-pT1b DTCs. We reviewed the records of 246 patients (214 women, 32 men; female-to-male ratio 6.7:1) affected by unifocal DTC ≤ 2 cm, who had undergone RAI thyroid remnant ablation (activity ranged 555-4588 MBq) after levothyroxine withdrawal or after recombinant human TSH (rhTSH) stimulation. The majority of the patients (91.5%) were affected by papillary thyroid carcinoma. Metastases were discovered by posttreatment whole-body scintigraphy in 29 out of 246 (11.8%) patients. In patients with metastases, malignant thyroid nodules were located in the right lobe (14/123, 11.4%), left lobe (7/95, 7.4%), and isthmus (8/27, 29.6%). The prevalence of metastases was significantly higher in patients with DTC located in the isthmus, compared to other sites (χ(2) = 9.6, p = 0.002). Our data show for the first time that a location of a thyroid cancer in the isthmus is an additional risk factor for RAI avid metastatic disease in pT1a-pT1b DTC patients, regardless of the presence or absence of other risk factors.

  7. MicroRNA167-Directed Regulation of the Auxin Response Factors GmARF8a and GmARF8b Is Required for Soybean Nodulation and Lateral Root Development.

    PubMed

    Wang, Youning; Li, Kexue; Chen, Liang; Zou, Yanmin; Liu, Haipei; Tian, Yinping; Li, Dongxiao; Wang, Rui; Zhao, Fang; Ferguson, Brett J; Gresshoff, Peter M; Li, Xia

    2015-07-01

    Legume root nodules convert atmospheric nitrogen gas into ammonium through symbiosis with a prokaryotic microsymbiont broadly called rhizobia. Auxin signaling is required for determinant nodule development; however, the molecular mechanism of auxin-mediated nodule formation remains largely unknown. Here, we show in soybean (Glycine max) that the microRNA miR167 acts as a positive regulator of lateral root organs, namely nodules and lateral roots. miR167c expression was up-regulated in the vasculature, pericycle, and cortex of soybean roots following inoculation with Bradyrhizobium japonicum strain USDA110 (the microsymbiont). It was found to positively regulate nodule numbers directly by repressing the target genes GmARF8a and GmARF8b (homologous genes of Arabidopsis [Arabidopsis thaliana] AtARF8 that encode auxin response factors). Moreover, the expression of miR167 and its targets was up- and down-regulated by auxin, respectively. The miR167-GmARF8 module also positively regulated nodulation efficiency under low microsymbiont density, a condition often associated with environmental stress. The regulatory role of miR167 on nodule initiation was dependent on the Nod factor receptor GmNFR1α, and it acts upstream of the nodulation-associated genes nodule inception, nodulation signaling pathway1, early nodulin40-1, NF-YA1 (previously known as HAEM activator protein2-1), and NF-YA2. miR167 also promoted lateral root numbers. Collectively, our findings establish a key role for the miR167-GmARF8 module in auxin-mediated nodule and lateral root formation in soybean. © 2015 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  8. MicroRNA167-Directed Regulation of the Auxin Response Factors GmARF8a and GmARF8b Is Required for Soybean Nodulation and Lateral Root Development1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Youning; Li, Kexue; Chen, Liang; Zou, Yanmin; Tian, Yinping; Li, Dongxiao; Wang, Rui; Zhao, Fang; Ferguson, Brett J.; Gresshoff, Peter M.

    2015-01-01

    Legume root nodules convert atmospheric nitrogen gas into ammonium through symbiosis with a prokaryotic microsymbiont broadly called rhizobia. Auxin signaling is required for determinant nodule development; however, the molecular mechanism of auxin-mediated nodule formation remains largely unknown. Here, we show in soybean (Glycine max) that the microRNA miR167 acts as a positive regulator of lateral root organs, namely nodules and lateral roots. miR167c expression was up-regulated in the vasculature, pericycle, and cortex of soybean roots following inoculation with Bradyrhizobium japonicum strain USDA110 (the microsymbiont). It was found to positively regulate nodule numbers directly by repressing the target genes GmARF8a and GmARF8b (homologous genes of Arabidopsis [Arabidopsis thaliana] AtARF8 that encode auxin response factors). Moreover, the expression of miR167 and its targets was up- and down-regulated by auxin, respectively. The miR167-GmARF8 module also positively regulated nodulation efficiency under low microsymbiont density, a condition often associated with environmental stress. The regulatory role of miR167 on nodule initiation was dependent on the Nod factor receptor GmNFR1α, and it acts upstream of the nodulation-associated genes NODULE INCEPTION, NODULATION SIGNALING PATHWAY1, EARLY NODULIN40-1, NF-YA1 (previously known as HAEM ACTIVATOR PROTEIN2-1), and NF-YA2. miR167 also promoted lateral root numbers. Collectively, our findings establish a key role for the miR167-GmARF8 module in auxin-mediated nodule and lateral root formation in soybean. PMID:25941314

  9. Low-intensity laser irradiation stimulates bone nodule formation via insulin-like growth factor-I expression in rat calvarial cells.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Noriyoshi; Mayahara, Kotoe; Kiyosaki, Takeshi; Yamaguchi, Akikuni; Ozawa, Yasuhiro; Abiko, Yoshimitsu

    2007-07-01

    We previously reported that low-intensity laser irradiation stimulated bone nodule formation through enhanced cellular proliferation and differentiation. However, the mechanisms of irradiation are unclear. Thus, we attempted to determine the responsibility of insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-I for the action observed. Osteoblast-like cells were isolated from fetal rat calvariae and cultured with rat recombinant (r) IGF-I, IGF-I-antibody (Ab), and/or the cells were irradiated once (3.75 J/cm(2)) with a low-intensity Ga-Al-As laser (830 nm). The number and area of bone nodules formed in the culture were analyzed, and IGF-I expression was also examined. Treatment with rIGF-I significantly stimulated the number and area of bone nodules. This stimulatory effect was quite similar to those by laser irradiation, and this stimulation was abrogated dose-dependently by treatment with IGF-I-Ab. Moreover, laser irradiation significantly increased IGF-I protein and gene expression. The stimulatory effect of bone nodule formation by low-intensity laser irradiation will be at least partly mediated by IGF-I expression. (c) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  10. The Medicago Genome Provides Insight into the Evolution of Rhizobial Symbioses

    PubMed Central

    Young, Nevin D.; Debellé, Frédéric; Oldroyd, Giles E. D.; Geurts, Rene; Cannon, Steven B.; Udvardi, Michael K.; Benedito, Vagner A.; Mayer, Klaus F. X.; Gouzy, Jérôme; Schoof, Heiko; Van de Peer, Yves; Proost, Sebastian; Cook, Douglas R.; Meyers, Blake C.; Spannagl, Manuel; Cheung, Foo; De Mita, Stéphane; Krishnakumar, Vivek; Gundlach, Heidrun; Zhou, Shiguo; Mudge, Joann; Bharti, Arvind K.; Murray, Jeremy D.; Naoumkina, Marina A.; Rosen, Benjamin; Silverstein, Kevin A. T.; Tang, Haibao; Rombauts, Stephane; Zhao, Patrick X.; Zhou, Peng; Barbe, Valérie; Bardou, Philippe; Bechner, Michael; Bellec, Arnaud; Berger, Anne; Bergès, Hélène; Bidwell, Shelby; Bisseling, Ton; Choisne, Nathalie; Couloux, Arnaud; Denny, Roxanne; Deshpande, Shweta; Dai, Xinbin; Doyle, Jeff; Dudez, Anne-Marie; Farmer, Andrew D.; Fouteau, Stéphanie; Franken, Carolien; Gibelin, Chrystel; Gish, John; Goldstein, Steven; González, Alvaro J.; Green, Pamela J.; Hallab, Asis; Hartog, Marijke; Hua, Axin; Humphray, Sean; Jeong, Dong-Hoon; Jing, Yi; Jöcker, Anika; Kenton, Steve M.; Kim, Dong-Jin; Klee, Kathrin; Lai, Hongshing; Lang, Chunting; Lin, Shaoping; Macmil, Simone L; Magdelenat, Ghislaine; Matthews, Lucy; McCorrison, Jamison; Monaghan, Erin L.; Mun, Jeong-Hwan; Najar, Fares Z.; Nicholson, Christine; Noirot, Céline; O’Bleness, Majesta; Paule, Charles R.; Poulain, Julie; Prion, Florent; Qin, Baifang; Qu, Chunmei; Retzel, Ernest F.; Riddle, Claire; Sallet, Erika; Samain, Sylvie; Samson, Nicolas; Sanders, Iryna; Saurat, Olivier; Scarpelli, Claude; Schiex, Thomas; Segurens, Béatrice; Severin, Andrew J.; Sherrier, D. Janine; Shi, Ruihua; Sims, Sarah; Singer, Susan R.; Sinharoy, Senjuti; Sterck, Lieven; Viollet, Agnès; Wang, Bing-Bing; Wang, Keqin; Wang, Mingyi; Wang, Xiaohong; Warfsmann, Jens; Weissenbach, Jean; White, Doug D.; White, Jim D.; Wiley, Graham B.; Wincker, Patrick; Xing, Yanbo; Yang, Limei; Yao, Ziyun; Ying, Fu; Zhai, Jixian; Zhou, Liping; Zuber, Antoine; Dénarié, Jean; Dixon, Richard A.; May, Gregory D.; Schwartz, David C.; Rogers, Jane; Quétier, Francis; Town, Christopher D.; Roe, Bruce A.

    2011-01-01

    Legumes (Fabaceae or Leguminosae) are unique among cultivated plants for their ability to carry out endosymbiotic nitrogen fixation with rhizobial bacteria, a process that takes place in a specialized structure known as the nodule. Legumes belong to one of the two main groups of eurosids, the Fabidae, which includes most species capable of endosymbiotic nitrogen fixation 1. Legumes comprise several evolutionary lineages derived from a common ancestor 60 million years ago (Mya). Papilionoids are the largest clade, dating nearly to the origin of legumes and containing most cultivated species 2. Medicago truncatula (Mt) is a long-established model for the study of legume biology. Here we describe the draft sequence of the Mt euchromatin based on a recently completed BAC-assembly supplemented with Illumina-shotgun sequence, together capturing ~94% of all Mt genes. A whole-genome duplication (WGD) approximately 58 Mya played a major role in shaping the Mt genome and thereby contributed to the evolution of endosymbiotic nitrogen fixation. Subsequent to the WGD, the Mt genome experienced higher levels of rearrangement than two other sequenced legumes, Glycine max (Gm) and Lotus japonicus (Lj). Mt is a close relative of alfalfa (M. sativa), a widely cultivated crop with limited genomics tools and complex autotetraploid genetics. As such, the Mt genome sequence provides significant opportunities to expand alfalfa’s genomic toolbox. PMID:22089132

  11. Shoot-derived cytokinins systemically regulate root nodulation.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Takema; Suzaki, Takuya; Soyano, Takashi; Kojima, Mikiko; Sakakibara, Hitoshi; Kawaguchi, Masayoshi

    2014-09-19

    Legumes establish symbiotic associations with nitrogen-fixing bacteria (rhizobia) in root nodules to obtain nitrogen. Legumes control nodule number through long-distance communication between roots and shoots, maintaining the proper symbiotic balance. Rhizobial infection triggers the production of mobile CLE-RS1/2 peptides in Lotus japonicus roots; the perception of the signal by receptor kinase HAR1 in shoots presumably induces the production of an unidentified shoot-derived inhibitor (SDI) that translocates to roots and blocks further nodule development. Here we show that, CLE-RS1/2-HAR1 signalling activates the production of shoot-derived cytokinins, which have an SDI-like capacity to systemically suppress nodulation. In addition, we show that LjIPT3 is involved in nodulation-related cytokinin production in shoots. The expression of LjIPT3 is activated in an HAR1-dependent manner. We further demonstrate shoot-to-root long-distance transport of cytokinin in L. japonicus seedlings. These findings add essential components to our understanding of how legumes control nodulation to balance nutritional requirements and energy status.

  12. Rhizobial symbiosis effect on the growth, metal uptake, and antioxidant responses of Medicago lupulina under copper stress.

    PubMed

    Kong, Zhaoyu; Mohamad, Osama Abdalla; Deng, Zhenshan; Liu, Xiaodong; Glick, Bernard R; Wei, Gehong

    2015-08-01

    The effects of rhizobial symbiosis on the growth, metal uptake, and antioxidant responses of Medicago lupulina in the presence of 200 mg kg(-1) Cu(2+) throughout different stages of symbiosis development were studied. The symbiosis with Sinorhizobium meliloti CCNWSX0020 induced an increase in plant growth and nitrogen content irrespective of the presence of Cu(2+). The total amount of Cu uptake of inoculated plants significantly increased by 34.0 and 120.4% in shoots and roots, respectively, compared with non-inoculated plants. However, although the rhizobial symbiosis promoted Cu accumulation both in shoots and roots, the increase in roots was much higher than in shoots, thus decreasing the translocation factor and helping Cu phytostabilization. The rate of lipid peroxidation was significantly decreased in both shoots and roots of inoculated vs. non-inoculated plants when measured either 8, 13, or 18 days post-inoculation. In comparison with non-inoculated plants, the activities of superoxide dismutase and ascorbate peroxidase of shoots of inoculated plants exposed to excess Cu were significantly elevated at different stages of symbiosis development; similar increases occurred in the activities of superoxide dismutase, catalase, and glutathione reductase of inoculated roots. The symbiosis with S. meliloti CCNWSX0020 also upregulated the corresponding genes involved in antioxidant responses in the plants treated with excess Cu. The results indicated that the rhizobial symbiosis with S. meliloti CCNWSX0020 not only enhanced plant growth and metal uptake but also improved the responses of plant antioxidant defense to excess Cu stress.

  13. Lipo-chitooligosaccharidic nodulation factors and their perception by plant receptors.

    PubMed

    Fliegmann, Judith; Bono, Jean-Jacques

    2015-10-01

    Lipo-chitooligosaccharides produced by nitrogen-fixing rhizobia are signaling molecules involved in the establishment of an important agronomical and ecological symbiosis with plants. These compounds, known as Nod factors, are biologically active on plant roots at very low concentrations indicating that they are perceived by specific receptors. This article summarizes the main strategies developed for the syntheses of bioactive Nod factors and their derivatives in order to better understand their mode of perception. Different Nod factor receptors and LCO-binding proteins identified by genetic or biochemical approaches are also presented, indicating perception mechanisms that seem to be more complicated than expected, probably involving multi-component receptor complexes.

  14. SCARN a Novel Class of SCAR Protein That Is Required for Root-Hair Infection during Legume Nodulation.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Liping; Lin, Jie-Shun; Xu, Ji; Sato, Shusei; Parniske, Martin; Wang, Trevor L; Downie, J Allan; Xie, Fang

    2015-10-01

    Rhizobial infection of legume root hairs requires a rearrangement of the actin cytoskeleton to enable the establishment of plant-made infection structures called infection threads. In the SCAR/WAVE (Suppressor of cAMP receptor defect/WASP family verpolin homologous protein) actin regulatory complex, the conserved N-terminal domains of SCAR proteins interact with other components of the SCAR/WAVE complex. The conserved C-terminal domains of SCAR proteins bind to and activate the actin-related protein 2/3 (ARP2/3) complex, which can bind to actin filaments catalyzing new actin filament formation by nucleating actin branching. We have identified, SCARN (SCAR-Nodulation), a gene required for root hair infection of Lotus japonicus by Mesorhizobium loti. Although the SCARN protein is related to Arabidopsis thaliana SCAR2 and SCAR4, it belongs to a distinct legume-sub clade. We identified other SCARN-like proteins in legumes and phylogeny analyses suggested that SCARN may have arisen from a gene duplication and acquired specialized functions in root nodule symbiosis. Mutation of SCARN reduced formation of infection-threads and their extension into the root cortex and slightly reduced root-hair length. Surprisingly two of the scarn mutants showed constitutive branching of root hairs in uninoculated plants. However we observed no effect of scarn mutations on trichome development or on the early actin cytoskeletal accumulation that is normally seen in root hair tips shortly after M. loti inoculation, distinguishing them from other symbiosis mutations affecting actin nucleation. The C-terminal domain of SCARN binds to ARPC3 and ectopic expression of the N-terminal SCAR-homology domain (but not the full length protein) inhibited nodulation. In addition, we found that SCARN expression is enhanced by M. loti in epidermal cells and that this is directly regulated by the NODULE INCEPTION (NIN) transcription factor.

  15. SCARN a Novel Class of SCAR Protein That Is Required for Root-Hair Infection during Legume Nodulation

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Liping; Lin, Jie-shun; Xu, Ji; Sato, Shusei; Parniske, Martin; Wang, Trevor L.; Downie, J. Allan; Xie, Fang

    2015-01-01

    Rhizobial infection of legume root hairs requires a rearrangement of the actin cytoskeleton to enable the establishment of plant-made infection structures called infection threads. In the SCAR/WAVE (Suppressor of cAMP receptor defect/WASP family verpolin homologous protein) actin regulatory complex, the conserved N-terminal domains of SCAR proteins interact with other components of the SCAR/WAVE complex. The conserved C-terminal domains of SCAR proteins bind to and activate the actin-related protein 2/3 (ARP2/3) complex, which can bind to actin filaments catalyzing new actin filament formation by nucleating actin branching. We have identified, SCARN (SCAR-Nodulation), a gene required for root hair infection of Lotus japonicus by Mesorhizobium loti. Although the SCARN protein is related to Arabidopsis thaliana SCAR2 and SCAR4, it belongs to a distinct legume-sub clade. We identified other SCARN-like proteins in legumes and phylogeny analyses suggested that SCARN may have arisen from a gene duplication and acquired specialized functions in root nodule symbiosis. Mutation of SCARN reduced formation of infection-threads and their extension into the root cortex and slightly reduced root-hair length. Surprisingly two of the scarn mutants showed constitutive branching of root hairs in uninoculated plants. However we observed no effect of scarn mutations on trichome development or on the early actin cytoskeletal accumulation that is normally seen in root hair tips shortly after M. loti inoculation, distinguishing them from other symbiosis mutations affecting actin nucleation. The C-terminal domain of SCARN binds to ARPC3 and ectopic expression of the N-terminal SCAR-homology domain (but not the full length protein) inhibited nodulation. In addition, we found that SCARN expression is enhanced by M. loti in epidermal cells and that this is directly regulated by the NODULE INCEPTION (NIN) transcription factor. PMID:26517270

  16. Harnessing Wharton's jelly stem cell differentiation into bone-like nodule on calcium phosphate substrate without osteoinductive factors.

    PubMed

    Mechiche Alami, S; Rammal, H; Boulagnon-Rombi, C; Velard, F; Lazar, F; Drevet, R; Laurent Maquin, D; Gangloff, S C; Hemmerlé, J; Voegel, J C; Francius, G; Schaaf, P; Boulmedais, F; Kerdjoudj, H

    2017-02-01

    An important aim of bone regenerative medicine is to design biomaterials with controlled chemical and topographical features to guide stem cell fate towards osteoblasts without addition of specific osteogenic factors. Herein, we find that sprayed bioactive and biocompatible calcium phosphate substrates (CaP) with controlled topography induce, in a well-orchestrated manner, Wharton's jelly stem cells (WJ-SCs) differentiation into osteoblastic lineage without any osteogenic supplements. The resulting WJ-SCs commitment exhibits features of native bone, through the formation of three-dimensional bone-like nodule with osteocyte-like cells embedded into a mineralized type I collagen. To our knowledge, these results present the first observation of a whole differentiation process from stem cell to osteocytes-like on a synthetic material. This suggests a great potential of sprayed CaP and WJ-SCs in bone tissue engineering. These unique features may facilitate the transition from bench to bedside and the development of successful engineered bone.

  17. Nodulation of Cyclopia spp. (Leguminosae, Papilionoideae) by Burkholderia tuberum

    PubMed Central

    Elliott, Geoffrey N.; Chen, Wen-Ming; Bontemps, Cyril; Chou, Jui-Hsing; Young, J. Peter W.; Sprent, Janet I.; James, Euan K.

    2007-01-01

    Background and Aims Species of the genus Burkholderia, from the Betaproteobacteria, have been isolated from legume nodules, but so far they have only been shown to form symbioses with species of Mimosa, sub-family Mimosoideae. This work investigates whether Burkholderia tuberum strains STM678 (isolated from Aspalathus carnosa) and DUS833 (from Aspalathus callosa) can nodulate species of the South African endemic papilionoid genera Cyclopia (tribe Podalyrieae) and Aspalathus (Crotalarieae) as well as the promiscuous legume Macroptilium atropurpureum (Phaseoleae). Method Bacterial strains and the phylogeny of their symbiosis-related (nod) genes were examined via 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Seedlings were grown in liquid culture and inoculated with one of the two strains of B. tuberum or with Sinorhizobium strain NGR 234 (from Lablab purpureus), Mesorhizobium strain DUS835 (from Aspalathus linearis) or Methylobacterium nodulans (from Crotalaria podocarpa). Some nodules, inoculated with green fluorescence protein (GFP)-tagged strains, were examined by light and electron microscopy coupled with immunogold labelling with a Burkholderia-specific antibody. The presence of active nitrogenase was checked by immunolabelling of nitrogenase and by the acetylene reduction assay. B. tuberum STM678 was also tested on a wide range of legumes from all three sub-families. Key Results Nodules were not formed on any of the Aspalathus spp. Only B. tuberum nodulated Cyclopia falcata, C. galioides, C. genistoides, C. intermedia and C. pubescens. It also effectively nodulated M. atropurpureum but no other species tested. GFP-expressing inoculant strains were located inside infected cells of C. genistoides, and bacteroids in both Cyclopia spp. and M. atropurpureum were immunogold-labelled with antibodies against Burkholderia and nitrogenase. Nitrogenase activity was also shown using the acetylene reduction assay. This is the first demonstration that a β-rhizobial strain can effectively

  18. Deep Sequencing of the Medicago truncatula Root Transcriptome Reveals a Massive and Early Interaction between Nodulation Factor and Ethylene Signals1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Larrainzar, Estíbaliz; Riely, Brendan K.; Kim, Sang Cheol; Carrasquilla-Garcia, Noelia; Yu, Hee-Ju; Hwang, Hyun-Ju; Oh, Mijin; Kim, Goon Bo; Surendrarao, Anandkumar K.; Chasman, Deborah; Siahpirani, Alireza F.; Penmetsa, Ramachandra V.; Lee, Gang-Seob; Kim, Namshin; Roy, Sushmita; Mun, Jeong-Hwan; Cook, Douglas R.

    2015-01-01

    The legume-rhizobium symbiosis is initiated through the activation of the Nodulation (Nod) factor-signaling cascade, leading to a rapid reprogramming of host cell developmental pathways. In this work, we combine transcriptome sequencing with molecular genetics and network analysis to quantify and categorize the transcriptional changes occurring in roots of Medicago truncatula from minutes to days after inoculation with Sinorhizobium medicae. To identify the nature of the inductive and regulatory cues, we employed mutants with absent or decreased Nod factor sensitivities (i.e. Nodulation factor perception and Lysine motif domain-containing receptor-like kinase3, respectively) and an ethylene (ET)-insensitive, Nod factor-hypersensitive mutant (sickle). This unique data set encompasses nine time points, allowing observation of the symbiotic regulation of diverse biological processes with high temporal resolution. Among the many outputs of the study is the early Nod factor-induced, ET-regulated expression of ET signaling and biosynthesis genes. Coupled with the observation of massive transcriptional derepression in the ET-insensitive background, these results suggest that Nod factor signaling activates ET production to attenuate its own signal. Promoter:β-glucuronidase fusions report ET biosynthesis both in root hairs responding to rhizobium as well as in meristematic tissue during nodule organogenesis and growth, indicating that ET signaling functions at multiple developmental stages during symbiosis. In addition, we identified thousands of novel candidate genes undergoing Nod factor-dependent, ET-regulated expression. We leveraged the power of this large data set to model Nod factor- and ET-regulated signaling networks using MERLIN, a regulatory network inference algorithm. These analyses predict key nodes regulating the biological process impacted by Nod factor perception. We have made these results available to the research community through a searchable online

  19. GmTIR1/GmAFB3-based auxin perception regulated by miR393 modulates soybean nodulation.

    PubMed

    Cai, Zhaoming; Wang, Youning; Zhu, Lin; Tian, Yinping; Chen, Liang; Sun, Zhengxi; Ullah, Ihteram; Li, Xia

    2017-07-01

    Auxins play important roles in the nodulation of legumes. However, the mechanism by which auxin signaling regulates root nodulation is largely unknown. In particular, the role of auxin receptors and their regulation in determinate nodule development remains elusive. We checked the expression pattern of the auxin receptor GmTIR1/GmAFB3 genes in soybean. We analyzed the functions of GmTIR1/AFB3 in the regulation of rhizobial infection and nodule number, and also tested the functions of miR393 during nodulation and its relationship with GmTIR1/AFB3. The results showed that GmTIR1 and GmAFB3 genes exhibit diverse expression patterns during nodulation and overexpression of GmTIR1 genes significantly increased inflection foci and eventual nodule number. GmTIR1/AFB3 genes were post-transcriptionally cleaved by miR393 family and knock-down of the miR393 family members significantly increased rhizobial infection and the nodule number. Overexpression of the mutated form of GmTIR1C at the miR393 cleavage site that is resistant to miR393 cleavage led to a further increase in the number of infection foci and nodules, suggesting that miR393s modulate nodulation by directly targeting GmTIR1C. This study demonstrated that GmTIR1- and GmAFB3-mediated auxin signaling, that is spatio-temporally regulated by miR393, plays a crucial role in determinate nodule development in soybean. © 2017 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2017 New Phytologist Trust.

  20. The clinical importance of the thyroid nodules during anti-tumor necrosis factor therapy in patients with axial spondyloarthritis.

    PubMed

    Terlemez, Rana; Akgün, Kenan; Palamar, Deniz; Boz, Sinan; Sarı, Hidayet

    2017-03-30

    The clinical importance of the thyroid nodules in patients with axial spondyloarthritis (ax-SpA) rests with the need to exclude thyroid malignancy. The aim of this study is to assess the risk of thyroid malignancy in ax-SpA patients receiving anti-TNF therapy. From September 2015 until December 2015, 70 patients diagnosed with ax-SpA were included in the research. Forty of the patients had received anti-TNF therapy, and 30 of the patients were anti-TNF naive. All cases were screened for the presence of nodules in the thyroid gland with ultrasound. Of the patients that received anti-TNF therapy, 15 (37.5%); and of the anti-TNF naive patients, 11 (36.7%) had thyroid nodule(s). Four patients from the anti-TNF group underwent fine needle aspiration biopsy of the nodules, and two of them were diagnosed with papillary thyroid carcinoma. None of the nodules in anti-TNF naive patients required biopsy. When compared to the normal population, the standardized incidence ratio (SIR) was found to be increased in both male (SIR 2.03, 95% CI 1.9 to 18) and female (SIR 2.7, 95% CI 2.6 to 24) cases. It is not yet established whether the development of cancer during the treatment process is the effect of the treatment or if it is a part of the natural course of the disease or if it is coincidental. We saw a mild increase in thyroid malignancies in ax-SpA patients who received anti-TNF therapy. Therefore, we believe that the thyroid gland should also be taken into consideration while screening for malignancy before anti-TNF therapy.

  1. The High-Affinity Phosphate Transporter GmPT5 Regulates Phosphate Transport to Nodules and Nodulation in Soybean1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Lu; Zhao, Jing; Tian, Jiang; Chen, Liyu; Sun, Zhaoan; Guo, Yongxiang; Lu, Xing; Gu, Mian; Xu, Guohua; Liao, Hong

    2012-01-01

    Legume biological nitrogen (N) fixation is the most important N source in agroecosystems, but it is also a process requiring a considerable amount of phosphorus (P). Therefore, developing legume varieties with effective N2 fixation under P-limited conditions could have profound significance for improving agricultural sustainability. We show here that inoculation with effective rhizobial strains enhanced soybean (Glycine max) N2 fixation and P nutrition in the field as well as in hydroponics. Furthermore, we identified and characterized a nodule high-affinity phosphate (Pi) transporter gene, GmPT5, whose expression was elevated in response to low P. Yeast heterologous expression verified that GmPT5 was indeed a high-affinity Pi transporter. Localization of GmPT5 expression based on β-glucuronidase staining in soybean composite plants with transgenic roots and nodules showed that GmPT5 expression occurred principally in the junction area between roots and young nodules and in the nodule vascular bundles for juvenile and mature nodules, implying that GmPT5 might function in transporting Pi from the root vascular system into nodules. Overexpression or knockdown of GmPT5 in transgenic composite soybean plants altered nodulation and plant growth performance, which was partially dependent on P supply. Through both in situ and in vitro 33P uptake assays using transgenic soybean roots and nodules, we demonstrated that GmPT5 mainly functions in transporting Pi from roots to nodules, especially under P-limited conditions. We conclude that the high-affinity Pi transporter, GmPT5, controls Pi entry from roots to nodules, is critical for maintaining Pi homeostasis in nodules, and subsequently regulates soybean nodulation and growth performance. PMID:22740613

  2. A Novel Sucrose-Regulatory MADS-Box Transcription Factor GmNMHC5 Promotes Root Development and Nodulation in Soybean (Glycine max [L.] Merr.).

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei; Han, Xiangdong; Zhan, Ge; Zhao, Zhenfang; Feng, Yongjun; Wu, Cunxiang

    2015-08-31

    The MADS-box protein family includes many transcription factors that have a conserved DNA-binding MADS-box domain. The proteins in this family were originally recognized to play prominent roles in floral development. Recent findings, especially with regard to the regulatory roles of the AGL17 subfamily in root development, have greatly broadened their known functions. In this study, a gene from soybean (Glycine max [L.] Merr.), GmNMHC5, was cloned from the Zigongdongdou cultivar and identified as a member of the AGL17 subfamily. Real-time fluorescence quantitative PCR analysis showed that GmNMHC5 was expressed at much higher levels in roots and nodules than in other organs. The activation of expression was first examined in leaves and roots, followed by shoot apexes. GmNMHC5 expression levels rose sharply when the plants were treated under short-day conditions (SD) and started to pod, whereas low levels were maintained in non-podding plants under long-day conditions (LD). Furthermore, overexpression of GmNMHC5 in transgenic soybean significantly promoted lateral root development and nodule building. Moreover, GmNMHC5 is upregulated by exogenous sucrose. These results indicate that GmNMHC5 can sense the sucrose signal and plays significant roles in lateral root development and nodule building.

  3. South african papilionoid legumes are nodulated by diverse burkholderia with unique nodulation and nitrogen-fixation Loci.

    PubMed

    Beukes, Chrizelle W; Venter, Stephanus N; Law, Ian J; Phalane, Francina L; Steenkamp, Emma T

    2013-01-01

    The root-nodule bacteria of legumes endemic to the Cape Floristic Region are largely understudied, even though recent reports suggest the occurrence of nodulating Burkholderia species unique to the region. In this study, we considered the diversity and evolution of nodulating Burkholderia associated with the endemic papilionoid tribes Hypocalypteae and Podalyrieae. We identified distinct groups from verified rhizobial isolates by phylogenetic analyses of the 16S rRNA and recA housekeeping gene regions. In order to gain insight into the evolution of the nodulation and diazotrophy of these rhizobia we analysed the genes encoding NifH and NodA. The majority of these 69 isolates appeared to be unique, potentially representing novel species. Evidence of horizontal gene transfer determining the symbiotic ability of these Cape Floristic Region isolates indicate evolutionary origins distinct from those of nodulating Burkholderia from elsewhere in the world. Overall, our findings suggest that Burkholderia species associated with fynbos legumes are highly diverse and their symbiotic abilities have unique ancestries. It is therefore possible that the evolution of these bacteria is closely linked to the diversification and establishment of legumes characteristic of the Cape Floristic Region.

  4. South African Papilionoid Legumes Are Nodulated by Diverse Burkholderia with Unique Nodulation and Nitrogen-Fixation Loci

    PubMed Central

    Beukes, Chrizelle W.; Venter, Stephanus N.; Law, Ian J.; Phalane, Francina L.; Steenkamp, Emma T.

    2013-01-01

    The root-nodule bacteria of legumes endemic to the Cape Floristic Region are largely understudied, even though recent reports suggest the occurrence of nodulating Burkholderia species unique to the region. In this study, we considered the diversity and evolution of nodulating Burkholderia associated with the endemic papilionoid tribes Hypocalypteae and Podalyrieae. We identified distinct groups from verified rhizobial isolates by phylogenetic analyses of the 16S rRNA and recA housekeeping gene regions. In order to gain insight into the evolution of the nodulation and diazotrophy of these rhizobia we analysed the genes encoding NifH and NodA. The majority of these 69 isolates appeared to be unique, potentially representing novel species. Evidence of horizontal gene transfer determining the symbiotic ability of these Cape Floristic Region isolates indicate evolutionary origins distinct from those of nodulating Burkholderia from elsewhere in the world. Overall, our findings suggest that Burkholderia species associated with fynbos legumes are highly diverse and their symbiotic abilities have unique ancestries. It is therefore possible that the evolution of these bacteria is closely linked to the diversification and establishment of legumes characteristic of the Cape Floristic Region. PMID:23874611

  5. Impaired glucose metabolism is a risk factor for increased thyroid volume and nodule prevalence in a mild-to-moderate iodine deficient area.

    PubMed

    Anil, Cuneyd; Akkurt, Aysen; Ayturk, Semra; Kut, Altug; Gursoy, Alptekin

    2013-07-01

    Insulin resistance (IR) is a key factor involved in the pathogenesis of impaired glucose metabolism. IR is associated with increased thyroid volume and nodule prevalence in patients with metabolic syndrome. Data on the association of thyroid morphology and abnormal glucose metabolism are limited. This prospective study was carried out to evaluate thyroid volume and nodule prevalence in patients with pre-diabetes and type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) in a mild-to-moderate iodine deficient area. Data were gathered on all newly diagnosed patients with pre-diabetes and type 2 diabetes mellitus between May 2008 and February 2010. 156 patients with pre-diabetes and 123 patients with type 2 DM were randomly matched for age, gender, and smoking habits with 114 subjects with normal glucose metabolism. Serum thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) and thyroid ultrasonography was performed in all participants. Mean TSH level in the diabetes group (1.9±0.9 mIU/L) was higher than in the control group (1.4±0.8 mIU/L) and the pre-diabetes group (1.5±0.8 mIU/L) (P<0.0001 for both). Mean thyroid volume was higher in the pre-diabetes (18.2±9.2mL) and diabetes (20.0±8.2mL) groups than in controls (11.4±3.8mL) (P<0.0001 for both). Percentage of patients with thyroid nodules was also higher in the pre-diabetes (51.3%) and diabetes groups (61.8%) than in controls (23.7%) (P<0.0001 for both). The results suggest that patients with impaired glucose metabolism have significantly increased thyroid volume and nodule prevalence. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Nodule morphology, symbiotic specificity and association with unusual rhizobia are distinguishing features of the genus Listia within the Southern African crotalarioid clade Lotononis s.l.

    PubMed

    Ardley, Julie K; Reeve, Wayne G; O'Hara, Graham W; Yates, Ron J; Dilworth, Michael J; Howieson, John G

    2013-07-01

    The legume clade Lotononis sensu lato (s.l.; tribe Crotalarieae) comprises three genera: Listia, Leobordea and Lotononis sensu stricto (s.s.). Listia species are symbiotically specific and form lupinoid nodules with rhizobial species of Methylobacterium and Microvirga. This work investigated whether these symbiotic traits were confined to Listia by determining the ability of rhizobial strains isolated from species of Lotononis s.l. to nodulate Listia, Leobordea and Lotononis s.s. hosts and by examining the morphology and structure of the resulting nodules. Rhizobia were characterized by sequencing their 16S rRNA and nodA genes. Nodulation and N2 fixation on eight taxonomically diverse Lotononis s.l. species were determined in glasshouse trials. Nodules of all hosts, and the process of infection and nodule initiation in Listia angolensis and Listia bainesii, were examined by light microscopy. Rhizobia associated with Lotononis s.l. were phylogenetically diverse. Leobordea and Lotononis s.s. isolates were most closely related to Bradyrhizobium spp., Ensifer meliloti, Mesorhizobium tianshanense and Methylobacterium nodulans. Listia angolensis formed effective nodules only with species of Microvirga. Listia bainesii nodulated only with pigmented Methylobacterium. Five lineages of nodA were found. Listia angolensis and L. bainesii formed lupinoid nodules, whereas nodules of Leobordea and Lotononis s.s. species were indeterminate. All effective nodules contained uniformly infected central tissue. Listia angolensis and L. bainesii nodule initials occurred on the border of the hypocotyl and along the tap root, and nodule primordia developed in the outer cortical layer. Neither root hair curling nor infection threads were seen. Two specificity groups occur within Lotononis s.l.: Listia species are symbiotically specific, while species of Leobordea and Lotononis s.s. are generally promiscuous and interact with rhizobia of diverse chromosomal and symbiotic lineages. The

  7. Nodule morphology, symbiotic specificity and association with unusual rhizobia are distinguishing features of the genus Listia within the southern African crotalarioid clade Lotononis s.l.

    PubMed Central

    Ardley, Julie K.; Reeve, Wayne G.; O'Hara, Graham W.; Yates, Ron J.; Dilworth, Michael J.; Howieson, John G.

    2013-01-01

    Background and Aims The legume clade Lotononis sensu lato (s.l.; tribe Crotalarieae) comprises three genera: Listia, Leobordea and Lotononis sensu stricto (s.s.). Listia species are symbiotically specific and form lupinoid nodules with rhizobial species of Methylobacterium and Microvirga. This work investigated whether these symbiotic traits were confined to Listia by determining the ability of rhizobial strains isolated from species of Lotononis s.l. to nodulate Listia, Leobordea and Lotononis s.s. hosts and by examining the morphology and structure of the resulting nodules. Methods Rhizobia were characterized by sequencing their 16S rRNA and nodA genes. Nodulation and N2 fixation on eight taxonomically diverse Lotononis s.l. species were determined in glasshouse trials. Nodules of all hosts, and the process of infection and nodule initiation in Listia angolensis and Listia bainesii, were examined by light microscopy. Key Results Rhizobia associated with Lotononis s.l. were phylogenetically diverse. Leobordea and Lotononis s.s. isolates were most closely related to Bradyrhizobium spp., Ensifer meliloti, Mesorhizobium tianshanense and Methylobacterium nodulans. Listia angolensis formed effective nodules only with species of Microvirga. Listia bainesii nodulated only with pigmented Methylobacterium. Five lineages of nodA were found. Listia angolensis and L. bainesii formed lupinoid nodules, whereas nodules of Leobordea and Lotononis s.s. species were indeterminate. All effective nodules contained uniformly infected central tissue. Listia angolensis and L. bainesii nodule initials occurred on the border of the hypocotyl and along the tap root, and nodule primordia developed in the outer cortical layer. Neither root hair curling nor infection threads were seen. Conclusions Two specificity groups occur within Lotononis s.l.: Listia species are symbiotically specific, while species of Leobordea and Lotononis s.s. are generally promiscuous and interact with rhizobia of

  8. micro RNA 172 (miR172) signals epidermal infection and is expressed in cells primed for bacterial invasion in Lotus japonicus roots and nodules.

    PubMed

    Holt, Dennis B; Gupta, Vikas; Meyer, Dörte; Abel, Nikolaj B; Andersen, Stig U; Stougaard, Jens; Markmann, Katharina

    2015-10-01

    Legumes interact with rhizobial bacteria to form nitrogen-fixing root nodules. Host signalling following mutual recognition ensures a specific response, but is only partially understood. Focusing on the stage of epidermal infection with Mesorhizobium loti, we analysed endogenous small RNAs (sRNAs) of the model legume Lotus japonicus to investigate their involvement in host response regulation. We used Illumina sequencing to annotate the L. japonicus sRNA-ome and isolate infection-responsive sRNAs, followed by candidate-based functional characterization. Sequences from four libraries revealed 219 novel L. japonicus micro RNAs (miRNAs) from 114 newly assigned families, and 76 infection-responsive sRNAs. Unlike infection-associated coding genes such as NODULE INCEPTION (NIN), a micro RNA 172 (miR172) isoform showed strong accumulation in dependency of both Nodulation (Nod) factor and compatible rhizobia. The genetics of miR172 induction support the existence of distinct epidermal and cortical signalling events. MIR172a promoter activity followed a previously unseen pattern preceding infection thread progression in epidermal and cortical cells. Nodule-associated miR172a expression was infection-independent, representing the second of two genetically separable activity waves. The combined data provide a valuable resource for further study, and identify miR172 as an sRNA marking successful epidermal infection. We show that miR172 acts upstream of several APETALA2-type (AP2) transcription factors, and suggest that it has a role in fine-tuning AP2 levels during bacterial symbiosis.

  9. Enzymatic Activity of the Soybean Ecto-Apyrase GS52 Is Essential for Stimulation of Nodulation1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Kiwamu; Nguyen, Cuong T.; Libault, Marc; Cheng, Jianlin; Stacey, Gary

    2011-01-01

    Nitrogen is an essential nutrient for plant growth. In the Rhizobium-legume symbiosis, root nodules are the sites of bacterial nitrogen fixation, in which atmospheric nitrogen is converted into a form that plants can utilize. While recent studies suggested an important role for the soybean (Glycine max) ecto-apyrase GS52 in rhizobial root hair infection and root nodule formation, precisely how this protein impacts the nodulation process remains undetermined. In this study, the biochemical characteristics of the GS52 enzyme were investigated. Computer modeling of the GS52 apyrase structure identified key amino acid residues important for catalytic activity, which were subsequently mutagenized. Although the GS52 enzyme exhibited broad substrate specificity, its activity on pyrimidine nucleotides and diphosphate nucleotides was significantly higher than on ATP. This result was corroborated by structural modeling of GS52, which predicted a low specificity for the adenine base within the substrate-binding pocket of the enzyme. The wild-type enzyme and its inactive mutant forms were expressed in soybean roots in order to evaluate the importance of GS52 enzymatic activity for nodulation. The results indicated a clear correlation between GS52 enzymatic activity and nodule number. Altogether, our study indicates that the catalytic activity of the GS52 apyrase, likely acting on extracellular nucleotides, is critical for rhizobial infection and nodulation. PMID:21346172

  10. Metal biosorption capability of Cupriavidus taiwanensis and its effects on heavy metal removal by nodulated Mimosa pudica.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wen-Ming; Wu, Chih-Hui; James, Euan K; Chang, Jo-Shu

    2008-03-01

    A novel metal biosorption system consisting of the symbiotic combination of an indigenous metal-resistant rhizobial strain, Cupriavidus taiwanensis TJ208, and its host plant Mimosa pudica has been developed for the removal of heavy-metal pollutants. Free-living C. taiwanensis TJ208 cells were able to adsorb 50.1, 19.0, and 19.6 mg/g of Pb, Cu, and Cd, respectively. After nodulation via inoculation with strain TJ208, the metal uptake ability of M. pudica markedly increased, as the nodulated M. pudica displayed a high metal uptake capacity (qmax) of 485, 25, and 43 mg/g, respectively, which is 86, 12, and 70% higher than that of nodule-free plants. Moreover, with TJ208 nodules, the M. pudica plant also displayed a 71, 81, and 33% enhancement in metal adsorption efficiency (eta) for Pb, Cu, and Cd, respectively. The nodulation appeared to give the greatest enhancing effect on the uptake of Pb, which is consistent with the preference of metal adsorption ability of TJ208. This seems to indicate the crucial role that the rhizobial strain may play in stimulating metal uptake of the nodulated plant. Furthermore, the results show that metal accumulation in the nodulated plant mainly occurred in the roots, accounting for 65-95% of total metal uptake. In contrast, the nodules and the shoots only contributed to 3-12 and 2-23% of total metal uptake, respectively. Nevertheless, the specific adsorption capacity of nodules is comparable to that of the roots. Hence, this work demonstrates the feasibility and effectiveness of using the nodulated plants to promote phyto-removal of heavy metals from the polluted environment as well as to restrict the metal contaminants in the unharmful region of the plant.

  11. Clinicopathologic Factors and Thyroid Nodule Sonographic Features for Predicting Central Lymph Node Metastasis in Papillary Thyroid Microcarcinoma: A Retrospective Study of 1204 Patients.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wen-Han; Xu, Shang-Yan; Zhan, Wei-Wei

    2016-11-01

    Preoperative prediction of lymph node metastasis is of clinical importance for the surgical treatment of thyroid tumor. The purpose of this study was to evaluate clinicopathologic factors and thyroid nodule sonographic features predictive of central lymph node metastasis in papillary thyroid microcarcinoma. Clinicopathologic factors and thyroid nodule sonographic features of 1204 patients with papillary thyroid microcarcinoma were retrospectively reviewed from January 2014 to June 2015. Central lymph node dissection was performed on each patient. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to analyze the clinicopathologic factors and thyroid nodule sonographic features associated with central lymph node metastasis in papillary thyroid microcarcinoma. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated to assess the relevance of all potential predictive factors. Central lymph node metastasis was detected in 395 of the 1204 patients (32.81%). By univariate and multivariate analyses, younger age (≤43 years), male sex, larger tumor size (≥7 mm), multifocal papillary thyroid microcarcinoma and microcalcification were independently associated with central lymph node metastasis in papillary thyroid microcarcinoma (P < .05). The ORs were 1.920 (95% CI, 1.476-2.499), 1.665 (95% CI, 1.234-2.247), 1.534 (95% CI, 1.177-2.000), 2.120 (95% CI, 1.563-2.877), and 4.109 (95% CI, 3.118-5.414), respectively. Central lymph node metastasis is highly prevalent in papillary thyroid microcarcinoma. Younger age (≤43 years), male sex, larger tumor size (≥7 mm), multifocal papillary thyroid microcarcinoma, and microcalcification were independent predictors of central lymph node metastasis. Surgeons and radiologists need to pay more attention to patients with papillary thyroid microcarcinoma who have these risk predictors. © 2016 by the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine.

  12. Nodulation and nitrogen fixation by Mimosa spp. in the Cerrado and Caatinga biomes of Brazil.

    PubMed

    dos Reis, Fábio Bueno; Simon, Marcelo F; Gross, Eduardo; Boddey, Robert M; Elliott, Geoffrey N; Neto, Nicolau E; Loureiro, M de Fatima; de Queiroz, Luciano P; Scotti, Maria Rita; Chen, Wen-Ming; Norén, Agneta; Rubio, Maria C; de Faria, Sergio M; Bontemps, Cyril; Goi, Silvia R; Young, J Peter W; Sprent, Janet I; James, Euan K

    2010-06-01

    *An extensive survey of nodulation in the legume genus Mimosa was undertaken in two major biomes in Brazil, the Cerrado and the Caatinga, in both of which there are high degrees of endemicity of the genus. *Nodules were collected from 67 of the 70 Mimosa spp. found. Thirteen of the species were newly reported as nodulating. Nodules were examined by light and electron microscopy, and all except for M. gatesiae had a structure typical of effective Mimosa nodules. The endosymbiotic bacteria in nodules from all of the Mimosa spp. were identified as Burkholderia via immunolabelling with an antibody against Burkholderia phymatum STM815. *Twenty of the 23 Mimosa nodules tested were shown to contain nitrogenase by immunolabelling with an antibody to the nitrogenase Fe- (nifH) protein, and using the delta(15)N ((15)N natural abundance) technique, contributions by biological N(2) fixation of up to 60% of total plant N were calculated for Caatinga Mimosa spp. *It is concluded that nodulation in Mimosa is a generic character, and that the preferred symbionts of Brazilian species are Burkholderia. This is the first study to demonstrate N(2) fixation by beta-rhizobial symbioses in the field.

  13. The nodule conductance to O₂ diffusion increases with phytase activity in N₂-fixing Phaseolus vulgaris L.

    PubMed

    Lazali, Mohamed; Drevon, Jean Jacques

    2014-07-01

    To understand the relationship between phosphorus use efficiency (PUE) and respiration for symbiotic nitrogen fixation (SNF) in legume nodules, six recombinant inbred lines of common bean (RIL Phaseolus vulgaris L.), contrasting in PUE for SNF, were inoculated with Rhizobium tropici CIAT899, and grown under hydroaeroponic culture with sufficient versus deficient P supply (250 versus 75 μmol P plant(-1) week(-1)). At the flowering stage, the biomass of plants and phytase activity in nodules were analyzed after measuring O2 uptake by nodulated roots. Our results show that the P-deficiency significantly increased the phytase activity in nodules of all RILs though with highest extent for RILs 147, 29 and 83 (ca 45%). This increase in phytase activity was associated with an increase in nodule respiration (ca 22%) and in use of the rhizobial symbiosis (ca 21%). A significant correlation was found under P-deficiency between nodule O2 permeability and phytase activity in nodules for RILs 104, 34 and 115. This observation is to our knowledge the first description of a correlation between O2 permeability and phytase activity of a legume nodule. It is concluded that the variation of phytase activity in nodules can increase the internal utilization of P and might be involved in the regulation of nodule permeability for the respiration linked with SNF and the adaptation to P-deficiency. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. Production of 3-indolylacetic acid in root nodules and culture by a Rhizobium species isolated from root nodules of the leguminous pulse Phaseolus mungo.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, S; Sengupta, C; Maiti, T K; Basu, P S

    2008-01-01

    The root nodules of Phaseolus mungo (a herbaceous leguminous pulse) contained a high amount of 3-indolylacetic acid (IAA). A tryptophan pool present in the nodule might play the role of precursor for IAA production. From the root nodule a Rhizobium sp. was isolated. The symbiont produced a large amount of IAA (142 microg/mL) from L-tryptophan-supplemented basal medium. The production of IAA by the symbiont was much increased over the control when a L-tryptophan (2 mg/mL) supplemented C-free mineral medium was enriched with mannitol (1 %), L-asparagine (0.3 %) and thiamine hydrochloride (1 microg/mL). The possible role of the rhizobial production of IAA on the rhizobia-legume symbiosis is discussed.

  15. Influence of the size of indigenous rhizobial populations on establishment and symbiotic performance of introduced rhizobia on field-grown legumes.

    PubMed

    Thies, J E; Singleton, P W; Bohlool, B B

    1991-01-01

    significantly increased 85% of the time. Yield was significantly increased in only 6% of the observations when numbers of indigenous rhizobia were greater than 10 cells g of soil. A significant response to N application, significant increases in nodule parameters, and greater than 50% nodule occupancy by inoculant rhizobia did not necessarily coincide with significant inoculation responses. No less than a doubling of nodule mass and 66% nodule occupancy by inoculant rhizobia were required to significantly increase the yield of inoculated crops over that of uninoculated crops. However, lack of an inoculation response was common even when inoculum strains occupied the majority of nodules. In these trials, the symbiotic yield of crops was, on average, only 88% of the maximum yield potential, as defined by the fertilizer N treatment. The difference between the yield of N-fertilized crops and that of N(2)-fixing crops indicates a potential for improving inoculation technology, the N(2) fixation capacity of rhizobial strains, and the efficiency of symbiosis. In this study, we show that the probability of enhancing yield with existing inoculation technology decreases dramatically with increasing numbers of indigenous rhizobia.

  16. Influence of the Size of Indigenous Rhizobial Populations on Establishment and Symbiotic Performance of Introduced Rhizobia on Field-Grown Legumes †

    PubMed Central

    Thies, Janice E.; Singleton, Paul W.; Bohlool, B. Ben

    1991-01-01

    significantly increased 85% of the time. Yield was significantly increased in only 6% of the observations when numbers of indigenous rhizobia were greater than 10 cells g of soil-1. A significant response to N application, significant increases in nodule parameters, and greater than 50% nodule occupancy by inoculant rhizobia did not necessarily coincide with significant inoculation responses. No less than a doubling of nodule mass and 66% nodule occupancy by inoculant rhizobia were required to significantly increase the yield of inoculated crops over that of uninoculated crops. However, lack of an inoculation response was common even when inoculum strains occupied the majority of nodules. In these trials, the symbiotic yield of crops was, on average, only 88% of the maximum yield potential, as defined by the fertilizer N treatment. The difference between the yield of N-fertilized crops and that of N2-fixing crops indicates a potential for improving inoculation technology, the N2 fixation capacity of rhizobial strains, and the efficiency of symbiosis. In this study, we show that the probability of enhancing yield with existing inoculation technology decreases dramatically with increasing numbers of indigenous rhizobia. PMID:16348393

  17. Legume NADPH Oxidases Have Crucial Roles at Different Stages of Nodulation.

    PubMed

    Montiel, Jesús; Arthikala, Manoj-Kumar; Cárdenas, Luis; Quinto, Carmen

    2016-05-18

    Plant NADPH oxidases, formerly known as respiratory burst oxidase homologues (RBOHs), are plasma membrane enzymes dedicated to reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. These oxidases are implicated in a wide variety of processes, ranging from tissue and organ growth and development to signaling pathways in response to abiotic and biotic stimuli. Research on the roles of RBOHs in the plant's response to biotic stresses has mainly focused on plant-pathogen interactions; nonetheless, recent findings have shown that these oxidases are also involved in the legume-rhizobia symbiosis. The legume-rhizobia symbiosis leads to the formation of the root nodule, where rhizobia reduce atmospheric nitrogen to ammonia. A complex signaling and developmental pathway in the legume root hair and root facilitate rhizobial entrance and nodule organogenesis, respectively. Interestingly, several reports demonstrate that RBOH-mediated ROS production displays versatile roles at different stages of nodulation. The evidence collected to date indicates that ROS act as signaling molecules that regulate rhizobial invasion and also function in nodule senescence. This review summarizes discoveries that support the key and versatile roles of various RBOH members in the legume-rhizobia symbiosis.

  18. Legume NADPH Oxidases Have Crucial Roles at Different Stages of Nodulation

    PubMed Central

    Montiel, Jesús; Arthikala, Manoj-Kumar; Cárdenas, Luis; Quinto, Carmen

    2016-01-01

    Plant NADPH oxidases, formerly known as respiratory burst oxidase homologues (RBOHs), are plasma membrane enzymes dedicated to reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. These oxidases are implicated in a wide variety of processes, ranging from tissue and organ growth and development to signaling pathways in response to abiotic and biotic stimuli. Research on the roles of RBOHs in the plant’s response to biotic stresses has mainly focused on plant-pathogen interactions; nonetheless, recent findings have shown that these oxidases are also involved in the legume-rhizobia symbiosis. The legume-rhizobia symbiosis leads to the formation of the root nodule, where rhizobia reduce atmospheric nitrogen to ammonia. A complex signaling and developmental pathway in the legume root hair and root facilitate rhizobial entrance and nodule organogenesis, respectively. Interestingly, several reports demonstrate that RBOH-mediated ROS production displays versatile roles at different stages of nodulation. The evidence collected to date indicates that ROS act as signaling molecules that regulate rhizobial invasion and also function in nodule senescence. This review summarizes discoveries that support the key and versatile roles of various RBOH members in the legume-rhizobia symbiosis. PMID:27213330

  19. Crotalarieae and Genisteae of the South African Great Escarpment are nodulated by novel Bradyrhizobium species with unique and diverse symbiotic loci.

    PubMed

    Beukes, Chrizelle W; Stępkowski, Tomasz; Venter, Stephanus N; Cłapa, Tomasz; Phalane, Francina L; le Roux, Marianne M; Steenkamp, Emma T

    2016-07-01

    The genus Bradyrhizobium contains predominantly nitrogen-fixing legume symbionts. Phylogenetic analysis of the genes responsible for their symbiotic abilities (i.e., those encoded on the nodulation [nod] and nitrogen-fixation [nif] loci) has facilitated the development of an extensive phylogeographic framework for the genus. This framework however contains only a few nodulating isolates from Africa. Here we focused on nodulating Bradyrhizobium isolates associated with native southern African legumes in the tribes Genisteae and Crotalarieae found along the Great Escarpment in the Mpumalanga Province of South Africa. The aims of this study were to: (1) obtain rhizobial isolates from legumes in the Genisteae and Crotalarieae; (2) verify their nodulation ability; (3) characterize them to species level based on phylogenetic analyses of several protein coding gene regions (atpD, dnaK, glnII, recA, rpoB and gyrB) and (4) determine their placement in the phylogeographic framework inferred from the sequences of the symbiotic loci nodA and nifD. Twenty of the 21 Bradyrhizobium isolates belonged to six novel species, while one was conspecific with the recently described B. arachidis. Among these isolates, the nodA phylogeny revealed several new clades, with 18 of our isolates found in Clades XIV and XV, and only three forming part of the cosmopolitan Clade III. These strains formed predominantly the same groups in the nifD phylogeny although with slight differences; indicating that both vertical and horizontal inheritance of the symbiotic loci occurred. These findings suggest that the largely unexplored diversity of indigenous African rhizobia are characterized by unique ancestries that might mirror the distribution of their hosts and the environmental factors driving their evolution. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Endemic Mimosa species from Mexico prefer alphaproteobacterial rhizobial symbionts.

    PubMed

    Bontemps, Cyril; Rogel, Marco Antonio; Wiechmann, Anja; Mussabekova, Assel; Moody, Sarah; Simon, Marcelo F; Moulin, Lionel; Elliott, Geoffrey N; Lacercat-Didier, Laurence; Dasilva, Cindy; Grether, Rosaura; Camargo-Ricalde, Sara L; Chen, Weimin; Sprent, Janet I; Martínez-Romero, Esperanza; Young, J Peter W; James, Euan K

    2016-01-01

    The legume genus Mimosa has > 500 species, with two major centres of diversity, Brazil (c. 350 spp.) and Mexico (c. 100 spp.). In Brazil most species are nodulated by Burkholderia. Here we asked whether this is also true of native and endemic Mexican species. We have tested this apparent affinity for betaproteobacteria by examining the symbionts of native and endemic species of Mimosa in Mexico, especially from the central highlands where Mimosa spp. have diversified. Nodules were tested for betaproteobacteria using in situ immunolocalization. Rhizobia isolated from the nodules were genetically characterized and tested for their ability to nodulate Mimosa spp. Immunological analysis of 25 host taxa suggested that most (including all the highland endemics) were not nodulated by betaproteobacteria. Phylogenetic analyses of 16S rRNA, recA, nodA, nodC and nifH genes from 87 strains isolated from 20 taxa confirmed that the endemic Mexican Mimosa species favoured alphaproteobacteria in the genera Rhizobium and Ensifer: this was confirmed by nodulation tests. Host phylogeny, geographic isolation and coevolution with symbionts derived from very different soils have potentially contributed to the striking difference in the choice of symbiotic partners by Mexican and Brazilian Mimosa species.

  1. Cyanobacterial extracts containing microcystins affect the growth, nodulation process and nitrogen uptake of faba bean (Vicia faba L., Fabaceae).

    PubMed

    Lahrouni, Majida; Oufdou, Khalid; Faghire, Mustapha; Peix, Alvaro; El Khalloufi, Fatima; Vasconcelos, Vitor; Oudra, Brahim

    2012-04-01

    The use of irrigation water containing cyanobacterial toxins may generate a negative impact in both yield and quality of agricultural crops causing significant economic losses. We evaluated the effects of microcystins (MC) on the growth, nodulation process and nitrogen uptake of a Faba bean cultivar (Vicia faba L., Fabaceae), particularly the effect of MC on rhizobia-V. faba symbiosis. Three rhizobial strains (RhOF4, RhOF6 and RhOF21), isolated from nodules of local V. faba were tested. The exposure of rhizobia to MC showed that the toxins had a negative effect on the rhizobial growth especially at the highest concentrations of 50 and 100 μg/l. The germination of faba bean seeds was also affected by cyanotoxins. We registered germination rates of 75 and 68.75% at the toxin levels of 50 and 100 μg/l as compared to the control (100%). The obtained results also showed there was a negative effect of MC on plants shoot, root (dry weight) and total number of nodules per plant. Cyanotoxins exposure induced a significant effect on nitrogen assimilation by faba bean seedlings inoculated with selected rhizobial strains RhOF6 and RhOF21, while the effect was not significant on beans seedling inoculated with RhOF4. This behavior of tolerant rhizobia-legumes symbioses may constitute a very important pathway to increase soil fertility and quality and can represent a friendly biotechnological way to remediate cyanotoxins contamination in agriculture.

  2. Genes involved in the formation and assembly of rhizobial cytochromes and their role in symbiotic nitrogen fixation.

    PubMed

    Delgado, M J; Bedmar, E J; Downie, J A

    1998-01-01

    Rhizobia fix nitrogen in a symbiotic association with leguminous plants and this occurs in nodules. A low-oxygen environment is needed for nitrogen fixation, which paradoxically has a requirement for rapid respiration to produce ATP. These conflicting demands are met by control of oxygen flux and production of leghaemoglobin (an oxygen carrier) by the plant, coupled with the expression of a high-affinity oxidase by the nodule bacteria (bacteroids). Many of the bacterial genes encoding cytochrome synthesis and assembly have been identified in a variety of rhizobial strains. Nitrogen-fixing bacteroids use a cytochrome cbb3-type oxidase encoded by the fixNOQP operon; electron transfer to this high-affinity oxidase is via the cytochrome bc1 complex. During free-living growth, electron transport from the cytochrome bc1 complex to cytochrome aa3 occurs via a transmembrane cytochrome c (CycM). In some rhizobia (such as Bradyrhizobium japonicum) there is a second cytochrome oxidase that also requires electron transport via the cytochrome bc1 complex. In parallel with these cytochrome c oxidases there are quinol oxidases that are expressed during free-living growth. A cytochrome bb3 quinol oxidase is thought to be present in B. japonicum; in Rhizobium leguminosarum, Rhizobium etli and Azorhizobium caulinodans cytochrome d-type oxidases have been identified. Spectroscopic data suggest the presence of a cytochrome o-type oxidase in several rhizobia, although the absence of haem O in B. japonicum may indicate that the absorption attributed to cytochrome o could be due to a high-spin cytochrome b in a cytochrome bb3-type oxidase. In some rhizobia, mutation of genes involved in cytochrome c assembly does not strongly affect growth, presumably because the bacteria utilize the cytochrome c-independent quinol oxidases. In this review, we outline the work on various rhizobial mutants affected in different components of the electron transport pathways, and the effects of these

  3. Nitrogen-Fixing Nodules Are an Important Source of Reduced Sulfur, Which Triggers Global Changes in Sulfur Metabolism in Lotus japonicus.

    PubMed

    Kalloniati, Chrysanthi; Krompas, Panagiotis; Karalias, Georgios; Udvardi, Michael K; Rennenberg, Heinz; Herschbach, Cornelia; Flemetakis, Emmanouil

    2015-09-01

    We combined transcriptomic and biochemical approaches to study rhizobial and plant sulfur (S) metabolism in nitrogen (N) fixing nodules (Fix(+)) of Lotus japonicus, as well as the link of S-metabolism to symbiotic nitrogen fixation and the effect of nodules on whole-plant S-partitioning and metabolism. Our data reveal that N-fixing nodules are thiol-rich organs. Their high adenosine 5'-phosphosulfate reductase activity and strong (35)S-flux into cysteine and its metabolites, in combination with the transcriptional upregulation of several rhizobial and plant genes involved in S-assimilation, highlight the function of nodules as an important site of S-assimilation. The higher thiol content observed in nonsymbiotic organs of N-fixing plants in comparison to uninoculated plants could not be attributed to local biosynthesis, indicating that nodules are an important source of reduced S for the plant, which triggers whole-plant reprogramming of S-metabolism. Enhanced thiol biosynthesis in nodules and their impact on the whole-plant S-economy are dampened in plants nodulated by Fix(-) mutant rhizobia, which in most respects metabolically resemble uninoculated plants, indicating a strong interdependency between N-fixation and S-assimilation. © 2015 American Society of Plant Biologists. All rights reserved.

  4. Nitrogen-Fixing Nodules Are an Important Source of Reduced Sulfur, Which Triggers Global Changes in Sulfur Metabolism in Lotus japonicus

    PubMed Central

    Kalloniati, Chrysanthi; Krompas, Panagiotis; Udvardi, Michael K.; Flemetakis, Emmanouil

    2015-01-01

    We combined transcriptomic and biochemical approaches to study rhizobial and plant sulfur (S) metabolism in nitrogen (N) fixing nodules (Fix+) of Lotus japonicus, as well as the link of S-metabolism to symbiotic nitrogen fixation and the effect of nodules on whole-plant S-partitioning and metabolism. Our data reveal that N-fixing nodules are thiol-rich organs. Their high adenosine 5′-phosphosulfate reductase activity and strong 35S-flux into cysteine and its metabolites, in combination with the transcriptional upregulation of several rhizobial and plant genes involved in S-assimilation, highlight the function of nodules as an important site of S-assimilation. The higher thiol content observed in nonsymbiotic organs of N-fixing plants in comparison to uninoculated plants could not be attributed to local biosynthesis, indicating that nodules are an important source of reduced S for the plant, which triggers whole-plant reprogramming of S-metabolism. Enhanced thiol biosynthesis in nodules and their impact on the whole-plant S-economy are dampened in plants nodulated by Fix− mutant rhizobia, which in most respects metabolically resemble uninoculated plants, indicating a strong interdependency between N-fixation and S-assimilation. PMID:26296963

  5. Roles of rhizobial symbionts in selenium hyperaccumulation in Astragalus (Fabaceae).

    PubMed

    Alford, Élan R; Lindblom, Stormy D; Pittarello, Marco; Freeman, John L; Fakra, Sirine C; Marcus, Matthew A; Broeckling, Corey; Pilon-Smits, Elizabeth A H; Paschke, Mark W

    2014-11-01

    Are there dimensions of symbiotic root interactions that are overlooked because plant mineral nutrition is the foundation and, perhaps too often, the sole explanation through which we view these relationships? In this paper we investigate how the root nodule symbiosis in selenium (Se) hyperaccumulator and nonaccumulator Astragalus species influences plant selenium (Se) accumulation. In greenhouse studies, Se was added to nodulated and nonnodulated hyperaccumulator and nonaccumulator Astragalus plants, followed by investigation of nitrogen (N)-Se relationships. Selenium speciation was also investigated, using x-ray microprobe analysis and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS). Nodulation enhanced biomass production and Se to S ratio in both hyperaccumulator and nonaccumulator plants. The hyperaccumulator contained more Se when nodulated, while the nonaccumulator contained less S when nodulated. Shoot [Se] was positively correlated with shoot N in Se-hyperaccumulator species, but not in nonhyperaccumulator species. The x-ray microprobe analysis showed that hyperaccumulators contain significantly higher amounts of organic Se than nonhyperaccumulators. LC-MS of A. bisulcatus leaves revealed that nodulated plants contained more γ-glutamyl-methylselenocysteine (γ-Glu-MeSeCys) than nonnodulated plants, while MeSeCys levels were similar. Root nodule mutualism positively affects Se hyperaccumulation in Astragalus. The microbial N supply particularly appears to contribute glutamate for the formation of γ-Glu-MeSeCys. Our results provide insight into the significance of symbiotic interactions in plant adaptation to edaphic conditions. Specifically, our findings illustrate that the importance of these relationships are not limited to alleviating macronutrient deficiencies. © 2014 Botanical Society of America, Inc.

  6. Two CCAAT-box-binding transcription factors redundantly regulate early steps of the legume-rhizobia endosymbiosis.

    PubMed

    Laloum, Tom; Baudin, Maël; Frances, Lisa; Lepage, Agnes; Billault-Penneteau, Benjamin; Cerri, Marion R; Ariel, Federico; Jardinaud, Marie-Françoise; Gamas, Pascal; de Carvalho-Niebel, Fernanda; Niebel, Andreas

    2014-09-01

    During endosymbiotic interactions between legume plants and nitrogen-fixing rhizobia, successful root infection by bacteria and nodule organogenesis requires the perception and transduction of bacterial lipo-chitooligosaccharidic signal called Nod factor (NF). NF perception in legume roots leads to the activation of an early signaling pathway and of a set of symbiotic genes which is controlled by specific early transcription factors (TFs) including CYCLOPS/IPD3, NSP1, NSP2, ERN1 and NIN. In this study, we bring convincing evidence that the Medicago truncatula CCAAT-box-binding NF-YA1 TF, previously associated with later stages of rhizobial infection and nodule meristem formation is, together with its closest homolog NF-YA2, also an essential positive regulator of the NF-signaling pathway. Here we show that NF-YA1 and NF-YA2 are both expressed in epidermal cells responding to NFs and their knock-down by reverse genetic approaches severely affects the NF-induced expression of symbiotic genes and rhizobial infection. Further over-expression, transactivation and ChIP-PCR approaches indicate that NF-YA1 and NF-YA2 function, at least in part, via the direct activation of ERN1. We thus propose a model in which NF-YA1 and NF-YA2 appear as early symbiotic regulators acting downstream of DMI3 and NIN and possibly within the same regulatory complexes as NSP1/2 to directly activate the expression of ERN1.

  7. Enhanced nodulation and nodule development by nolR mutants of Sinorhizobium medicae on specific Medicago host genotypes.

    PubMed

    Sugawara, Masayuki; Sadowsky, Michael J

    2014-04-01

    The nolR gene encodes a negatively acting, transcriptional regulatory protein of core Nod-factor biosynthetic genes in the sinorhizobia. Although previous reports showed that nolR modulates Nod-factor production and enhances nodulation speed of Sinorhizobium meliloti on alfalfa, there have been no reports for the symbiotic function of this gene in the S. medicae-Medicago truncatula symbiosis. Here, we constructed an nolR mutant of S. medicae WSM419 and evaluated mutant and wild-type strains for their nodulation ability, competitiveness, host specificity, and density-dependent nodulation phenotypes. When the mutant was inoculated at low and medium population densities, it showed enhanced nodule formation during the initial stages of nodulation. Results of quantitative competitive nodulation assays indicated that an nolR mutant had 2.3-fold greater competitiveness for nodulation on M. truncatula 'A17' than did the wild-type strain. Moreover, the nodulation phenotype of the nolR mutant differed among Medicago genotypes and showed significantly enhanced nodule development on M. tricycla. Taken together, these results indicated that mutation of nolR in S. medicae positively influenced nodule initiation, competitive nodulation, and nodule development at later nodulation stages. This may allow nolR mutants of S. medicae to have a selective advantage under field conditions.

  8. The Lipopolysaccharide Lipid A Long-Chain Fatty Acid Is Important for Rhizobium leguminosarum Growth and Stress Adaptation in Free-Living and Nodule Environments.

    PubMed

    Bourassa, Dianna V; Kannenberg, Elmar L; Sherrier, D Janine; Buhr, R Jeffrey; Carlson, Russell W

    2017-02-01

    Rhizobium bacteria live in soil and plant environments, are capable of inducing symbiotic nodules on legumes, invade these nodules, and develop into bacteroids that fix atmospheric nitrogen into ammonia. Rhizobial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is anchored in the bacterial outer membrane through a specialized lipid A containing a very long-chain fatty acid (VLCFA). VLCFA function for rhizobial growth in soil and plant environments is not well understood. Two genes, acpXL and lpxXL, encoding acyl carrier protein and acyltransferase, are among the six genes required for biosynthesis and transfer of VLCFA to lipid A. Rhizobium leguminosarum mutant strains acpXL, acpXL(-)/lpxXL(-), and lpxXL(-) were examined for LPS structure, viability, and symbiosis. Mutations in acpXL and lpxXL abolished VLCFA attachment to lipid A. The acpXL mutant transferred a shorter acyl chain instead of VLCFA. Strains without lpxXL neither added VLCFA nor a shorter acyl chain. In all strains isolated from nodule bacteria, lipid A had longer acyl chains compared with laboratory-cultured bacteria, whereas mutant strains displayed altered membrane properties, modified cationic peptide sensitivity, and diminished levels of cyclic β-glucans. In pea nodules, mutant bacteroids were atypically formed and nitrogen fixation and senescence were affected. The role of VLCFA for rhizobial environmental fitness is discussed.

  9. Control of root architecture and nodulation by the LATD/NIP transporter.

    PubMed

    Harris, Jeanne M; Dickstein, Rebecca

    2010-11-01

    The Medicago truncatula LATD/NIP gene is essential for the development of lateral and primary root and nitrogen-fixing nodule meristems as well as for rhizobial invasion of nodules. LATD/NIP encodes a member of the NRT1(PTR1) nitrate and di-and tri-peptide transporter family, suggesting that its function is to transport one of these or another compound(s). Because latd/nip mutants can have their lateral and primary root defects rescued by ABA, ABA is a potential substrate for transport. LATD/NIP expression in the root meristem was demonstrated to be regulated by auxin, cytokinin and abscisic acid, but not by nitrate. LATD/NIP's potential function and its role in coordinating root architecture and nodule formation are discussed.

  10. Bioproduction of ascorbic acid in root nodule and root of the legume pulse Phaseolus mungo.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, S; Maiti, T K; Basu, P S

    2008-05-01

    The root nodules of Phaseolus mungo (L.), a herbaceous leguminous pulse, contain high amounts of ascorbic acid (AsA). A glucose pool present in the nodule might serve as precursor for AsA production. From root nodule, a Rhizobium sp. was isolated. The symbiont produced a large amount of AsA (290.5 microg/ml) from glucose-supplemented basal medium. The production of AsA by the symbiont was much greater than that of the control when the glucose (0.5%)-supplemented mineral medium was enriched with thiamine hydrochloride (20 microg/100 ml), biotin (20 microg/100 ml), and L-asparagine (0.2%). The possible role of the rhizobial production of AsA on rhizobia-legume symbiosis is discussed.

  11. Nitrate inhibits soybean nodulation by regulating expression of CLE genes.

    PubMed

    Lim, Chae Woo; Lee, Young Woo; Lee, Sung Chul; Hwang, Cheol Ho

    2014-12-01

    Nitrogen compounds such as nitrate act as a potential inhibitor for legume nodulation. In this study, we isolated a new CLE gene, GmNIC2, from nitrate-treated roots, which shares high sequence homology with nitrate-induced CLE gene GmNIC1. Similar to GmNIC1, the expression level of GmNIC2 was not significantly altered in roots by rhizobial inoculation and was much higher in young nodules than in roots. In addition, overexpression of GmNIC2 led to similar nodulation inhibition of transgenic hairy roots to that of GmNIC1, which occurred in GmNARK-dependent manner and at the local level. By analyzing GmNARK loss-of-function mutant, SS2-2, it was found that expression levels of GmNIC1 and GmNIC2 in the SS2-2 roots were lower than in the wild type (WT) roots in response to nitrate. In contrast to GmNIC1 and GmNIC2, expressions of GmRIC1 and GmRIC2 genes that are related to the autoregulation of nodulation (AON) were strongly suppressed both of the soybeans during all periods of nitrate treatment and even were not induced by additional inoculation with rhizobia. Taken together, the results of this study suggest that GmNIC2, as an active homologous gene located in chromosome 13, acts locally to suppress nodulation, like GmNIC1, and nitrate inhibition of nodulation is led by fine-tuned regulation of both nitrate-induced CLEs and rhizobia-induced CLEs. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  12. Nodulation in Dimorphandra wilsonii Rizz. (Caesalpinioideae), a Threatened Species Native to the Brazilian Cerrado

    PubMed Central

    Fonseca, Márcia Bacelar; Peix, Alvaro; de Faria, Sergio Miana; Mateos, Pedro F.; Rivera, Lina P.; Simões-Araujo, Jean L.; França, Marcel Giovanni Costa; dos Santos Isaias, Rosy Mary; Cruz, Cristina; Velázquez, Encarna; Scotti, Maria Rita; Sprent, Janet I.; James, Euan K.

    2012-01-01

    The threatened caesalpinioid legume Dimorphandra wilsonii, which is native to the Cerrado biome in Brazil, was examined for its nodulation and N2-fixing ability, and was compared with another, less-threatened species, D. jorgei. Nodulation and potential N2 fixation was shown on seedlings that had been inoculated singly with five bradyrhizobial isolates from mature D. wilsonii nodules. The infection of D. wilsonii by two of these strains (Dw10.1, Dw12.5) was followed in detail using light and transmission electron microscopy, and was compared with that of D. jorgei by Bradyrhizobium strain SEMIA6099. The roots of D. wilsonii were infected via small transient root hairs at 42 d after inoculation (dai), and nodules were sufficiently mature at 63 dai to express nitrogenase protein. Similar infection and nodule developmental processes were observed in D. jorgei. The bacteroids in mature Dimorphandra nodules were enclosed in plant cell wall material containing a homogalacturonan (pectic) epitope that was recognized by the monoclonal antibody JIM5. Analysis of sequences of their rrs (16S rRNA) genes and their ITS regions showed that the five D. wilsonii strains, although related to SEMIA6099, may constitute five undescribed species of genus Bradyrhizobium, whilst their nodD and nifH gene sequences showed that they formed clearly separated branches from other rhizobial strains. This is the first study to describe in full the N2-fixing symbiotic interaction between defined rhizobial strains and legumes in the sub-family Caesalpinioideae. This information will hopefully assist in the conservation of the threatened species D. wilsonii. PMID:23185349

  13. Characterization and diversity of rhizobia nodulating selected tree legumes in Ghana.

    PubMed

    Boakye, Emmanuel Yaw; Lawson, Innocent Yao Dotse; Danso, Seth Kofi Akyea; Offei, Samuel Kwame

    The study was conducted to assess the characteristics and diversity of the rhizobia that nodulate some prominent tree legumes in three soils of Ghana. Five introduced and/or indigenous tree legumes were initially assessed for nodulation in three Ghanaian soils. After 12 weeks of growth in nursery pots the 200 rhizobial strains isolated from their nodules were characterized culturally, metabolically and phenotypically. Sixty of these isolates were selected randomly and their genotypic characteristics determined using PCR-RFLP of 16S rRNA and intergenic spacer (ITS) genes. Each tree legume was nodulated by isolates classified as fast or very fast-growers or by isolates classified as slow- or very slow-growers with 54 % of all the 200 isolates belonging to fast- or very fast-growers. Morphologically, eighty five percent of the colonies formed on yeast extract mannitol agar were wet and gummy while 70 % were acid tolerant, i.e. they were able to grow at a pH of 3.5. Combined restriction of the 16S rRNA genes of the 60 rhizobial isolates with five restriction enzymes clearly distinguished seven different clusters at 80 % similarity level. The majority of A. lebbeck isolates were distinct from those of the Acacias and L. leucocephala. The M. thonningii isolates were related to L. leucocephala isolates. Simple PCR of the ITS DNA provided several distinct band sizes indicating great variation among the isolates and restriction of the ITS with three different enzymes did not yield many further differences. Molecular techniques revealed a great diversity among the rhizobia that nodulate tree legumes in the tropics and this may explain why many introduced and/or indigenous trees are able to form nodules with indigenous rhizobia in this region.

  14. Genetic Variability in Nodulation and Root Growth Affects Nitrogen Fixation and Accumulation in Pea

    PubMed Central

    Bourion, Virginie; Laguerre, Gisele; Depret, Geraldine; Voisin, Anne-Sophie; Salon, Christophe; Duc, Gerard

    2007-01-01

    Background and Aims Legume nitrogen is derived from two different sources, symbiotically fixed atmospheric N2 and soil N. The effect of genetic variability of root and nodule establishment on N acquisition and seed protein yield was investigated under field conditions in pea (Pisum sativum). In addition, these parameters were related to the variability in preference for rhizobial genotypes. Methods Five different spring pea lines (two hypernodulating mutants and three cultivars), previously identified in artificial conditions as contrasted for both root and nodule development, were characterized under field conditions. Root and nodule establishment was examined from the four-leaf stage up to the beginning of seed filling and was related to the patterns of shoot dry matter and nitrogen accumulation. The genetic structure of rhizobial populations associated with the pea lines was obtained by analysis of nodule samples. The fraction of nitrogen derived from symbiotic fixation was estimated at the beginning of seed filling and at physiological maturity, when seed protein content and yield were determined. Key Results The hypernodulating mutants established nodules earlier and maintained them longer than was the case for the three cultivars, whereas their root development and nitrogen accumulation were lower. The seed protein yield was higher in ‘Athos’ and ‘Austin’, the two cultivars with increased root development, consistent with their higher N absorption during seed filling. Conclusion The hypernodulating mutants did not accumulate more nitrogen, probably due to the C cost for nodulation being higher than for root development. Enhancing exogenous nitrogen supply at the end of the growth cycle, by increasing the potential for root N uptake from soil, seems a good option for improving pea seed filling. PMID:17670753

  15. Nodulation competitiveness of Ensifer meliloti alfalfa nodule isolates and their potential for application as inoculants.

    PubMed

    Marek-Kozaczuk, Monika; Wielbo, Jerzy; Pawlik, Anna; Skorupska, Anna

    2014-01-01

    Alfalfa (Medicago sativa) is a widely cultivated legume, which enters into nitrogen-fixing symbiosis with Ensifer (Sinorhizobium) spp. In this study, an autochthonous rhizobial population of Ensifer sp. occupying alfalfa nodules grown in arable soil was used as the basis for selection of potential inoculants. Alfalfa nodule isolates were identified as Ensifer meliloti by partial 16S rDNA, recA, atpD and nodC nucleotide sequencing. The sampled isolates displayed different symbiotic performance and diversity in the number of plasmids and molecular weight. Isolates that were the most efficient in symbiotic nitrogen fixation were tagged with a constitutively expressed gusA gene carried by a stable plasmid vector pJBA21Tc and used in competition experiments in soil under greenhouse conditions. Two E. meliloti strains LU09 and LU12, which effectively competed with indigenous soil rhizobia, were selected. The metabolic profiles of these selected strains showed differences in the use of carbon and energy sources. In addition, the LU09 strain exhibited bacteriocin production and LU12 mineral phosphate solubilization, which are valuable traits for soil survival. These strains may be considered as potential biofertilizers for alfalfa cultivation.

  16. The Independent Acquisition of Plant Root Nitrogen-Fixing Symbiosis in Fabids Recruited the Same Genetic Pathway for Nodule Organogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Svistoonoff, Sergio; Benabdoun, Faiza Meriem; Nambiar-Veetil, Mathish; Imanishi, Leandro; Vaissayre, Virginie; Cesari, Stella; Diagne, Nathalie; Hocher, Valérie; de Billy, Françoise; Bonneau, Jocelyne; Wall, Luis; Ykhlef, Nadia; Rosenberg, Charles; Bogusz, Didier; Franche, Claudine; Gherbi, Hassen

    2013-01-01

    Only species belonging to the Fabid clade, limited to four classes and ten families of Angiosperms, are able to form nitrogen-fixing root nodule symbioses (RNS) with soil bacteria. This concerns plants of the legume family (Fabaceae) and Parasponia (Cannabaceae) associated with the Gram-negative proteobacteria collectively called rhizobia and actinorhizal plants associated with the Gram-positive actinomycetes of the genus Frankia. Calcium and calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CCaMK) is a key component of the common signaling pathway leading to both rhizobial and arbuscular mycorrhizal symbioses (AM) and plays a central role in cross-signaling between root nodule organogenesis and infection processes. Here, we show that CCaMK is also needed for successful actinorhiza formation and interaction with AM fungi in the actinorhizal tree Casuarina glauca and is also able to restore both nodulation and AM symbioses in a Medicago truncatula ccamk mutant. Besides, we expressed auto-active CgCCaMK lacking the auto-inhibitory/CaM domain in two actinorhizal species: C. glauca (Casuarinaceae), which develops an intracellular infection pathway, and Discaria trinervis (Rhamnaceae) which is characterized by an ancestral intercellular infection mechanism. In both species, we found induction of nodulation independent of Frankia similar to response to the activation of CCaMK in the rhizobia-legume symbiosis and conclude that the regulation of actinorhiza organogenesis is conserved regardless of the infection mode. It has been suggested that rhizobial and actinorhizal symbioses originated from a common ancestor with several independent evolutionary origins. Our findings are consistent with the recruitment of a similar genetic pathway governing rhizobial and Frankia nodule organogenesis. PMID:23741336

  17. The independent acquisition of plant root nitrogen-fixing symbiosis in Fabids recruited the same genetic pathway for nodule organogenesis.

    PubMed

    Svistoonoff, Sergio; Benabdoun, Faiza Meriem; Nambiar-Veetil, Mathish; Imanishi, Leandro; Vaissayre, Virginie; Cesari, Stella; Diagne, Nathalie; Hocher, Valérie; de Billy, Françoise; Bonneau, Jocelyne; Wall, Luis; Ykhlef, Nadia; Rosenberg, Charles; Bogusz, Didier; Franche, Claudine; Gherbi, Hassen

    2013-01-01

    Only species belonging to the Fabid clade, limited to four classes and ten families of Angiosperms, are able to form nitrogen-fixing root nodule symbioses (RNS) with soil bacteria. This concerns plants of the legume family (Fabaceae) and Parasponia (Cannabaceae) associated with the Gram-negative proteobacteria collectively called rhizobia and actinorhizal plants associated with the Gram-positive actinomycetes of the genus Frankia. Calcium and calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CCaMK) is a key component of the common signaling pathway leading to both rhizobial and arbuscular mycorrhizal symbioses (AM) and plays a central role in cross-signaling between root nodule organogenesis and infection processes. Here, we show that CCaMK is also needed for successful actinorhiza formation and interaction with AM fungi in the actinorhizal tree Casuarina glauca and is also able to restore both nodulation and AM symbioses in a Medicago truncatula ccamk mutant. Besides, we expressed auto-active CgCCaMK lacking the auto-inhibitory/CaM domain in two actinorhizal species: C. glauca (Casuarinaceae), which develops an intracellular infection pathway, and Discaria trinervis (Rhamnaceae) which is characterized by an ancestral intercellular infection mechanism. In both species, we found induction of nodulation independent of Frankia similar to response to the activation of CCaMK in the rhizobia-legume symbiosis and conclude that the regulation of actinorhiza organogenesis is conserved regardless of the infection mode. It has been suggested that rhizobial and actinorhizal symbioses originated from a common ancestor with several independent evolutionary origins. Our findings are consistent with the recruitment of a similar genetic pathway governing rhizobial and Frankia nodule organogenesis.

  18. Gibberellins Are Involved in Nodulation of Sesbania rostrata1

    PubMed Central

    Lievens, Sam; Goormachtig, Sofie; Den Herder, Jeroen; Capoen, Ward; Mathis, René; Hedden, Peter; Holsters, Marcelle

    2005-01-01

    Upon submergence, Azorhizobium caulinodans infects the semiaquatic legume Sesbania rostrata via the intercellular crack entry process, resulting in lateral root-based nodules. A gene encoding a gibberellin (GA) 20-oxidase, SrGA20ox1, involved in GA biosynthesis, was transiently up-regulated during lateral root base nodulation. Two SrGA20ox1 expression patterns were identified, one related to intercellular infection and a second observed in nodule meristem descendants. The infection-related expression pattern depended on bacterially produced nodulation (Nod) factors. Pharmacological studies demonstrated that GAs were involved in infection pocket and infection thread formation, two Nod factor-dependent events that initiate lateral root base nodulation, and that they were also needed for nodule primordium development. Moreover, GAs inhibited the root hair curling process. These results show that GAs are Nod factor downstream signals for nodulation in hydroponic growth. PMID:16258018

  19. Nitrogen-fixing rhizobial strains isolated from Desmodium incanum DC in Argentina: Phylogeny, biodiversity and symbiotic ability.

    PubMed

    Toniutti, María Antonieta; Fornasero, Laura Viviana; Albicoro, Francisco Javier; Martini, María Carla; Draghi, Walter; Alvarez, Florencia; Lagares, Antonio; Pensiero, José Francisco; Del Papa, María Florencia

    2017-07-01

    Desmodium spp. are leguminous plants belonging to the tribe Desmodieae of the subfamily Papilionoideae. They are widely distributed in temperated and subtropical regions and are used as forage plants, for biological control, and in traditional folk medicine. The genus includes pioneer species that resist the xerothermic environment and grow in arid, barren sites. Desmodium species that form nitrogen-fixing symbiosis with rhizobia play an important role in sustainable agriculture. In Argentina, 23 native species of this genus have been found, including Desmodium incanum. In this study, a total of 64 D. incanum-nodulating rhizobia were obtained from root nodules of four Argentinean plant populations. Rhizobia showed different abiotic-stress tolerances and a remarkable genetic diversity using PCR fingerprinting, with more than 30 different amplification profiles. None of the isolates were found at more than one site, thus indicating a high level of rhizobial diversity associated with D. incanum in Argentinean soils. In selected isolates, 16S rDNA sequencing and whole-cell extract MALDI TOF analysis revealed the presence of isolates related to Bradyrhizobium elkanii, Bradyrhizobium japonicum, Bradyrhizobium yuanmingense, Bradyrhizobium liaoningense, Bradyrhizobium denitrificans and Rhizobium tropici species. In addition, the nodC gene studied in the selected isolates showed different allelic variants. Isolates were phenotypically characterized by assaying their growth under different abiotic stresses. Some of the local isolates were remarkably tolerant to high temperatures, extreme pH and salinity, which are all stressors commonly found in Argentinean soils. One of the isolates showed high tolerance to temperature and extreme pH, and produced higher aerial plant dry weights compared to other inoculated treatments. These results indicated that local isolates could be efficiently used for D. incanum inoculation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  20. Prevalence of the Rhizobium etli-Like Allele in Genes Coding for 16S rRNA among the Indigenous Rhizobial Populations Found Associated with Wild Beans from the Southern Andes in Argentina

    PubMed Central

    Aguilar, O. Mario; López, María Verónica; Riccillo, Pablo M.; González, Ramón A.; Pagano, Marcela; Grasso, Daniel H.; Pühler, Alfred; Favelukes, Gabriel

    1998-01-01

    A collection of rhizobial isolates from nodules of wild beans, Phaseolus vulgaris var. aborigineus, found growing in virgin lands in 17 geographically separate sites in northwest Argentina was characterized on the basis of host range, growth, hybridization to a nifH probe, analysis of genes coding for 16S rRNA (16S rDNA), DNA fingerprinting, and plasmid profiles. Nodules in field-collected wild bean plants were largely dominated by rhizobia carrying the 16S rDNA allele of Rhizobium etli. A similar prevalence of the R. etli allele was observed among rhizobia trapped from nearby soil. Intragroup diversity of wild bean isolates with either R. etli-like or Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. phaseoli-like alleles was generally found across northwest Argentina. The predominance of the R. etli allele suggests that in this center of origin of P. vulgaris the coevolution of Rhizobium spp. and primitive beans has resulted in this preferential symbiotic association. PMID:9726909

  1. Ribosomal protein biomarkers provide root nodule bacterial identification by MALDI-TOF MS.

    PubMed

    Ziegler, Dominik; Pothier, Joël F; Ardley, Julie; Fossou, Romain Kouakou; Pflüger, Valentin; de Meyer, Sofie; Vogel, Guido; Tonolla, Mauro; Howieson, John; Reeve, Wayne; Perret, Xavier

    2015-07-01

    Accurate identification of soil bacteria that form nitrogen-fixing associations with legume crops is challenging given the phylogenetic diversity of root nodule bacteria (RNB). The labor-intensive and time-consuming 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) sequencing and/or multilocus sequence analysis (MLSA) of conserved genes so far remain the favored molecular tools to characterize symbiotic bacteria. With the development of mass spectrometry (MS) as an alternative method to rapidly identify bacterial isolates, we recently showed that matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) time-of-flight (TOF) can accurately characterize RNB found inside plant nodules or grown in cultures. Here, we report on the development of a MALDI-TOF RNB-specific spectral database built on whole cell MS fingerprints of 116 strains representing the major rhizobial genera. In addition to this RNB-specific module, which was successfully tested on unknown field isolates, a subset of 13 ribosomal proteins extracted from genome data was found to be sufficient for the reliable identification of nodule isolates to rhizobial species as shown in the putatively ascribed ribosomal protein masses (PARPM) database. These results reveal that data gathered from genome sequences can be used to expand spectral libraries to aid the accurate identification of bacterial species by MALDI-TOF MS.

  2. Evolutionary origin of rhizobium Nod factor signaling

    PubMed Central

    Streng, Arend; op den Camp, Rik; Bisseling, Ton

    2011-01-01

    For over two decades now, it is known that the nodule symbiosis between legume plants and nitrogen fixing rhizobium bacteria is set in motion by the bacterial signal molecule named nodulation (Nod) factor.1 Upon Nod factor perception a signaling cascade is activated that is also essential for endomycorrhizal symbiosis (Fig. 1). This suggests that rhizobium co-opted the evolutionary far more ancient mycorrhizal signaling pathway in order to establish an endosymbiotic interaction with legumes.2 As arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi of the Glomeromycota phylum can establish a symbiosis with the vast majority of land plants, it is most probable that this signaling cascade is wide spread in the plant kingdom.3 However, Nod factor perception generally is considered to be unique to legumes. Two recent breakthroughs on the evolutionary origin of rhizobium Nod factor signaling demonstrate that this is not the case.4,5 The purification of Nod factor-like molecules excreted by the mycorrhizal fungus Glomus intraradices and the role of the LysM-type Nod factor receptor PaNFP in the non-legume Parasponia andersonii provide novel understanding on the evolution of rhizobial Nod factor signaling. PMID:21904113

  3. Denitrification ability of rhizobial strains isolated from Lotus sp.

    PubMed

    Monza, Jorge; Irisarri, Pilar; Díaz, Pedro; Delgado, Ma Jesús; Mesa, Socorro; Bedmar, Eulogio J

    2006-01-01

    Ten rhizobial strains isolated from Lotus sp. have been characterized by their ability to denitrify. Out of the 10 strains, the five slow-growing isolates grew well under oxygen-limiting conditions with nitrate as a sole nitrogen source, and accumulated nitrous oxide in the growth medium when acetylene was used to inhibit nitrous oxide reductase activity. All five strains contained DNA homologous to the Bradyrhizobium japonicum nirK, norBDQ and nosZ genes. In contrast, fast-growing lotus rhizobia were incapable of growing under nitrate-respiring conditions, and did not accumulate nitrous oxide in the growth medium. DNA from each of the five fast-growing strains showed a hybridization band with the B. japonicum nirK gene but not with norBDQ and nosZ genes. Partial 16S rDNA gene sequencing revealed that fast-growing strains could be identified as Mesorhizobium loti species and the slow-growers as Bradyrhizobium sp.

  4. Characteristics of Woodland Rhizobial Populations from Surface- and Deep-Soil Environments of the Sonoran Desert

    PubMed Central

    Waldon, Hollis B.; Jenkins, Michael B.; Virginia, Ross A.; Harding, Ethelynda E.

    1989-01-01

    A collection of 74 rhizobial isolates recovered from nodules of the desert woody legumes Prosopis glandulosa, Psorothamnus spinosus, and Acacia constricta were characterized by using 61 nutritional and biochemical tests. We compared isolates from A. constricta and Prosopis glandulosa and tested the hypothesis that the rhizobia from a deep-phreatic rooting zone of a Prosopis woodland in the Sonoran Desert of southern California were phenetically distinct from rhizobia from surface soils. Cluster analysis identified four major homogeneous groups. The first phenon contained slow-growing (SG) Prosopis rhizobia from surface and deep-phreatic-soil environments. These isolates grew poorly on most of the media used in the study, probably because of their requirement for a high medium pH. The second group of isolates primarily contained SG Prosopis rhizobia from the deep-phreatic rooting environment and included two fast-growing (FG) Psorothamnus rhizobia. These isolates were nutritionally versatile and grew over a broad pH range. The third major phenon was composed mainly of FG Prosopis rhizobia from surface and dry subsurface soils. While these isolates used a restricted range of carbohydrates (including sucrose) as sole carbon sources, they showed better growth on a range of organic acids as sole carbon sources and amino acids as sole carbon and nitrogen sources than did other isolates in the study. They grew better at 36°C than at 26°C. The FG Acacia rhizobia from surface-soil environments formed a final major phenon that was distinct from the Prosopis isolates. They produced very high absorbance readings on all of the carbohydrates tested except sucrose, grew poorly on many of the other substrates tested, and preferred a 36 to a 26°C incubation temperature. The surface populations of Prosopis rhizobia required a higher pH for growth and, under the conditions used in this study, were less tolerant of low solute potential and high growth temperature than were phreatic

  5. A comparative genomics screen identifies a Sinorhizobium meliloti 1021 sodM-like gene strongly expressed within host plant nodules

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background We have used the genomic data in the Integrated Microbial Genomes system of the Department of Energy’s Joint Genome Institute to make predictions about rhizobial open reading frames that play a role in nodulation of host plants. The genomic data was screened by searching for ORFs conserved in α-proteobacterial rhizobia, but not conserved in closely-related non-nitrogen-fixing α-proteobacteria. Results Using this approach, we identified many genes known to be involved in nodulation or nitrogen fixation, as well as several new candidate genes. We knocked out selected new genes and assayed for the presence of nodulation phenotypes and/or nodule-specific expression. One of these genes, SMc00911, is strongly expressed by bacterial cells within host plant nodules, but is expressed minimally by free-living bacterial cells. A strain carrying an insertion mutation in SMc00911 is not defective in the symbiosis with host plants, but in contrast to expectations, this mutant strain is able to out-compete the S. meliloti 1021 wild type strain for nodule occupancy in co-inoculation experiments. The SMc00911 ORF is predicted to encode a “SodM-like” (superoxide dismutase-like) protein containing a rhodanese sulfurtransferase domain at the N-terminus and a chromate-resistance superfamily domain at the C-terminus. Several other ORFs (SMb20360, SMc01562, SMc01266, SMc03964, and the SMc01424-22 operon) identified in the screen are expressed at a moderate level by bacteria within nodules, but not by free-living bacteria. Conclusions Based on the analysis of ORFs identified in this study, we conclude that this comparative genomics approach can identify rhizobial genes involved in the nitrogen-fixing symbiosis with host plants, although none of the newly identified genes were found to be essential for this process. PMID:22587634

  6. Competition among rhizobium species for nodulation of Leucaena leucocephala in two tropical soils

    SciTech Connect

    Moawad, H.; Bohlool, B.B.

    1984-07-01

    The successful nodulation of legumes by a Rhizobium strain is determined by the competitve ability of that strain against the mixture of other native and inoculant rhizobia. Competition among six Leucaena rhizobial strains in single and multistrain inoculants were studied. Field inoculation trials were conducted in an oxisol and a mollisol soil, both of which contained indigenous Leucaena-nodulating rhizobia. Strain-specific fluorescent antibodies were used for the identification of the strains in Leucaena nodules. Mixtures of three recommended inoculum strains for Leucaena species (TAL82, TAL582, and TAL1145) were used in peat-based inocula either alone or with one of the three other strains isolated from the sites, B213, B214, and B215. Each of these latter three strains was also used as single-strain inocula to study their competition with the native rhizobia in the two soil systems. In the oxisol soil, strains B213 and B215, when used as single-strain inocula, outcompeted the native rhizobia and formed 92 and 62% of the nodules, respectively. Strain B214 was the least competitive in oxisol soil, where it formed 30% of the nodules, and the best in mollisol soil, where it formed 70% of the nodules. The most successful competitor for nodulation in multistrain inocula was strain TAL1145, which outcompeted native and other inoculum Leucaena rhizobia is both soils. None of the strains in single or multistrain inoculants was capable of completely overcoming the resident rhizobia, which formed 4 to 70% of the total nodules in oxisol soil and 12 to 72% in mollisol soil. No strong relationship was detected between the size of the rhizosphere population of a strain and its successful occupation of nodules. 24 references.

  7. Solitary Pulmonary Nodule

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-05-01

    Benign nodules generally fall into two categories making up 90% of all benign lesions. These are infectious granulomas incorporating 80% of benign...nodules and hamartomas comprising 10% of the remainder. Infectious granulomas are generally caused by fungi endemic to the environment or

  8. [Pulmonary nodules and arachnophobia].

    PubMed

    Colinet, B; Dargent, J-L; Fremault, A

    2014-01-01

    Pulmonary nodules are a common reason for consultation and their investigation must always exclude a possible neoplastic cause. This means that, in addition to a thorough history, investigations may be necessary which are sometimes invasive and therefore potentially a cause of iatrogenic harm. The toxic aetiologies for pulmonary nodules are rare. We report a case of a patient with pulmonary nodules occurring predominantly in the right lung, about 1cm in diameter, non-cavitating without calcification, and sometimes surrounded by a peripheral halo. The nodules were a chance finding during preoperative evaluation. After a comprehensive review, a reaction to an inhaled irritant was the preferred hypothesis, specifically overuse of a compound insecticide containing, in addition to the propellant gas and solvent type hydrocarbon - a mixture of piperonyl butoxide, of esbiothrine and permethrin. Removal of this led to the complete disappearance of nodules. Pathological examination identified bronchiolitis obliterans with organising pneumonia accompanied by non-necrotizing granulomas and lipid vacuoles.

  9. Different Pathways Act Downstream of the CEP Peptide Receptor CRA2 to Regulate Lateral Root and Nodule Development1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Mohd-Radzman, Nadiatul A.; Ivanovici, Ariel; Frugier, Florian; Djordjevic, Michael A.

    2016-01-01

    C-TERMINALLY ENCODED PEPTIDEs (CEPs) control root system architecture in a non-cell-autonomous manner. In Medicago truncatula, MtCEP1 affects root development by increasing nodule formation and inhibiting lateral root emergence by unknown pathways. Here, we show that the MtCEP1 peptide-dependent increase in nodulation requires the symbiotic signaling pathway and ETHYLENE INSENSITIVE2 (EIN2)/SICKLE (SKL), but acts independently of SUPER NUMERIC NODULES. MtCEP1-dependent inhibition of lateral root development acts through an EIN2-independent mechanism. MtCEP1 increases nodulation by promoting rhizobial infections, the developmental competency of roots for nodulation, the formation of fused nodules, and an increase in frequency of nodule development that initiates at proto-phloem poles. These phenotypes are similar to those of the ein2/skl mutant and support that MtCEP1 modulates EIN2-dependent symbiotic responses. Accordingly, MtCEP1 counteracts the reduction in nodulation induced by increasing ethylene precursor concentrations, and an ethylene synthesis inhibitor treatment antagonizes MtCEP1 root phenotypes. MtCEP1 also inhibits the development of EIN2-dependent pseudonodule formation. Finally, mutants affecting the COMPACT ROOT ARCHITECTURE2 (CRA2) receptor, which is closely related to the Arabidopsis CEP Receptor1, are unresponsive to MtCEP1 effects on lateral root and nodule formation, suggesting that CRA2 is a CEP peptide receptor mediating both organogenesis programs. In addition, an ethylene inhibitor treatment counteracts the cra2 nodulation phenotype. These results indicate that MtCEP1 and its likely receptor, CRA2, mediate nodulation and lateral root development through different pathways. PMID:27342310

  10. Effect of Co-Inoculation with Mycorrhiza and Rhizobia on the Nodule Trehalose Content of Different Bean Genotypes

    PubMed Central

    Ballesteros-Almanza, L; Altamirano-Hernandez, J; Peña-Cabriales, J.J; Santoyo, G; Sanchez-Yañez, J.M; Valencia-Cantero, E; Macias-Rodriguez, L; Lopez-Bucio, J; Cardenas-Navarro, R; Farias-Rodriguez, R

    2010-01-01

    Studies on Rhizobium-legume symbiosis show that trehalose content in nodules under drought stress correlates positively with an increase in plant tolerance to this stress. Fewer reports describe trehalose accumulation in mycorrhiza where, in contrast with rhizobia, there is no flux of carbohydrates from the microsymbiont to the plant. However, the trehalose dynamics in the Mycorrhiza-Rhizobium-Legume tripartite symbiosis is unknown. The present study explores the role of this tripartite symbiosis in the trehalose content of nodules grown under contrasting moisture conditions. Three wild genotypes (P. filiformis, P. acutifolis and P. vulgaris) and two commercial genotypes of Phaseolus vulgaris (Pinto villa and Flor de Mayo) were used. Co-inoculation treatments were conducted with Glomus intraradices and a mixture of seven native rhizobial strains, and trehalose content was determined by GC/MS. The results showed a negative effect of mycorrhizal inoculation on nodule development, as mycorrhized plants showed fewer nodules and lower nodule dry weight compared to plants inoculated only with Rhizobium. Mycorrhizal colonization was also higher in plants inoculated only with Glomus as compared to plants co-inoculated with both microsymbionts. In regard to trehalose, co-inoculation negatively affects its accumulation in the nodules of each genotype tested. However, the correlation analysis showed a significantly positive correlation between mycorrhizal colonization and nodule trehalose content. PMID:21253462

  11. Regulatory nodD1 and nodD2 genes of Rhizobium tropici strain CIAT 899 and their roles in the early stages of molecular signaling and host-legume nodulation.

    PubMed

    del Cerro, Pablo; Rolla-Santos, Amanda Alves Paiva; Gomes, Douglas Fabiano; Marks, Bettina Berquó; Pérez-Montaño, Francisco; Rodríguez-Carvajal, Miguel Ángel; Nakatani, André Shigueyoshi; Gil-Serrano, Antonio; Megías, Manuel; Ollero, Francisco Javier; Hungria, Mariangela

    2015-03-28

    Nodulation and symbiotic nitrogen fixation are mediated by several genes, both of the host legume and of the bacterium. The rhizobial regulatory nodD gene plays a critical role, orchestrating the transcription of the other nodulation genes. Rhizobium tropici strain CIAT 899 is an effective symbiont of several legumes-with an emphasis on common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris)-and is unusual in carrying multiple copies of nodD, the roles of which remain to be elucidated. Phenotypes, Nod factors and gene expression of nodD1 and nodD2 mutants of CIAT 899 were compared with those of the wild type strain, both in the presence and in the absence of the nod-gene-inducing molecules apigenin and salt (NaCl). Differences between the wild type and mutants were observed in swimming motility and IAA (indole acetic acid) synthesis. In the presence of both apigenin and salt, large numbers of Nod factors were detected in CIAT 899, with fewer detected in the mutants. nodC expression was lower in both mutants; differences in nodD1 and nodD2 expression were observed between the wild type and the mutants, with variation according to the inducing molecule, and with a major role of apigenin with nodD1 and of salt with nodD2. In the nodD1 mutant, nodulation was markedly reduced in common bean and abolished in leucaena (Leucaena leucocephala) and siratro (Macroptilium atropurpureum), whereas a mutation in nodD2 reduced nodulation in common bean, but not in the other two legumes. Our proposed model considers that full nodulation of common bean by R. tropici requires both nodD1 and nodD2, whereas, in other legume species that might represent the original host, nodD1 plays the major role. In general, nodD2 is an activator of nod-gene transcription, but, in specific conditions, it can slightly repress nodD1. nodD1 and nodD2 play other roles beyond nodulation, such as swimming motility and IAA synthesis.

  12. Rhizobial characterization in revegetated areas after bauxite mining.

    PubMed

    Borges, Wardsson Lustrino; Prin, Yves; Ducousso, Marc; Le Roux, Christine; de Faria, Sergio Miana

    2016-01-01

    Little is known regarding how the increased diversity of nitrogen-fixing bacteria contributes to the productivity and diversity of plants in complex communities. However, some authors have shown that the presence of a diverse group of nodulating bacteria is required for different plant species to coexist. A better understanding of the plant symbiotic organism diversity role in natural ecosystems can be extremely useful to define recovery strategies of environments that were degraded by human activities. This study used ARDRA, BOX-PCR fingerprinting and sequencing of the 16S rDNA gene to assess the diversity of root nodule nitrogen-fixing bacteria in former bauxite mining areas that were replanted in 1981, 1985, 1993, 1998, 2004 and 2006 and in a native forest. Among the 12 isolates for which the 16S rDNA gene was partially sequenced, eight, three and one isolate(s) presented similarity with sequences of the genera Bradyrhizobium, Rhizobium and Mesorhizobium, respectively. The richness, Shannon and evenness indices were the highest in the area that was replanted the earliest (1981) and the lowest in the area that was replanted most recently (2006). Copyright © 2016 Sociedade Brasileira de Microbiologia. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  13. Proof that Burkholderia strains form effective symbioses with legumes: a study of novel Mimosa-nodulating strains from South America.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wen-Ming; de Faria, Sergio M; Straliotto, Rosângela; Pitard, Rosa M; Simões-Araùjo, Jean L; Chou, Jui-Hsing; Chou, Yi-Ju; Barrios, Edmundo; Prescott, Alan R; Elliott, Geoffrey N; Sprent, Janet I; Young, J Peter W; James, Euan K

    2005-11-01

    Twenty Mimosa-nodulating bacterial strains from Brazil and Venezuela, together with eight reference Mimosa-nodulating rhizobial strains and two other beta-rhizobial strains, were examined by amplified rRNA gene restriction analysis. They fell into 16 patterns and formed a single cluster together with the known beta-rhizobia, Burkholderia caribensis, Burkholderia phymatum, and Burkholderia tuberum. The 16S rRNA gene sequences of 15 of the 20 strains were determined, and all were shown to belong to the genus Burkholderia; four distinct clusters could be discerned, with strains isolated from the same host species usually clustering very closely. Five of the strains (MAP3-5, Br3407, Br3454, Br3461, and Br3469) were selected for further studies of the symbiosis-related genes nodA, the NodD-dependent regulatory consensus sequences (nod box), and nifH. The nodA and nifH sequences were very close to each other and to those of B. phymatum STM815, B. caribensis TJ182, and Cupriavidus taiwanensis LMG19424 but were relatively distant from those of B. tuberum STM678. In addition to nodulating their original hosts, all five strains could also nodulate other Mimosa spp., and all produced nodules on Mimosa pudica that had nitrogenase (acetylene reduction) activities and structures typical of effective N2-fixing symbioses. Finally, both wild-type and green fluorescent protein-expressing transconjugant strains of Br3461 and MAP3-5 produced N2-fixing nodules on their original hosts, Mimosa bimucronata (Br3461) and Mimosa pigra (MAP3-5), and hence this confirms strongly that Burkholderia strains can form effective symbioses with legumes.

  14. Proof that Burkholderia Strains Form Effective Symbioses with Legumes: a Study of Novel Mimosa-Nodulating Strains from South America

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wen-Ming; de Faria, Sergio M.; Straliotto, Rosângela; Pitard, Rosa M.; Simões-Araùjo, Jean L.; Chou, Jui-Hsing; Chou, Yi-Ju; Barrios, Edmundo; Prescott, Alan R.; Elliott, Geoffrey N.; Sprent, Janet I.; Young, J. Peter W.; James, Euan K.

    2005-01-01

    Twenty Mimosa-nodulating bacterial strains from Brazil and Venezuela, together with eight reference Mimosa-nodulating rhizobial strains and two other β-rhizobial strains, were examined by amplified rRNA gene restriction analysis. They fell into 16 patterns and formed a single cluster together with the known β-rhizobia, Burkholderia caribensis, Burkholderia phymatum, and Burkholderia tuberum. The 16S rRNA gene sequences of 15 of the 20 strains were determined, and all were shown to belong to the genus Burkholderia; four distinct clusters could be discerned, with strains isolated from the same host species usually clustering very closely. Five of the strains (MAP3-5, Br3407, Br3454, Br3461, and Br3469) were selected for further studies of the symbiosis-related genes nodA, the NodD-dependent regulatory consensus sequences (nod box), and nifH. The nodA and nifH sequences were very close to each other and to those of B. phymatum STM815, B. caribensis TJ182, and Cupriavidus taiwanensis LMG19424 but were relatively distant from those of B. tuberum STM678. In addition to nodulating their original hosts, all five strains could also nodulate other Mimosa spp., and all produced nodules on Mimosa pudica that had nitrogenase (acetylene reduction) activities and structures typical of effective N2-fixing symbioses. Finally, both wild-type and green fluorescent protein-expressing transconjugant strains of Br3461 and MAP3-5 produced N2-fixing nodules on their original hosts, Mimosa bimucronata (Br3461) and Mimosa pigra (MAP3-5), and hence this confirms strongly that Burkholderia strains can form effective symbioses with legumes. PMID:16269788

  15. A phytase gene is overexpressed in root nodules cortex of Phaseolus vulgaris-rhizobia symbiosis under phosphorus deficiency.

    PubMed

    Lazali, Mohamed; Zaman-Allah, Mainassara; Amenc, Laurie; Ounane, Ghania; Abadie, Josiane; Drevon, Jean-Jacques

    2013-08-01

    Phosphorus is an essential nutrient for rhizobial symbioses to convert N2 into NH4 usable for N nutrition in legumes and N cycle in ecosystems. This N2 fixation process occurs in nodules with a high energy cost. Phytate is the major storage form of P and accounts for more than 50 % of the total P in seeds of cereals and legumes. The phytases, a group of enzymes widely distributed in plant and microorganisms, are able to hydrolyze a variety of inositol phosphates. Recently, phytase activity was discovered in nodules. However, the gene expression localization and its role in N2-fixing nodules are still unknown. In this work, two recombinant inbred lines (RILs) of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.), selected as contrasting for N2 fixation under P deficiency, namely RILs 115 (P-efficient) and 147 (P-inefficient) were inoculated with Rhizobium tropici CIAT 899, and grown under hydroaeroponic conditions with sufficient versus deficient P supply. With in situ RT-PCR methodology, we found that phytase transcripts were particularly abundant in the nodule cortex and infected zone of both RILs. Under P deficiency, phytase transcripts were significantly more abundant for RIL115 than for RIL147, and more in the outer cortex than in the infected zone. Additionally, the high expression of phytase among nodule tissues for the P-deficient RIL115 was associated with an increase in phytase (33 %) and phosphatase (49 %) activities and efficiency in use of the rhizobial symbiosis (34 %). It is argued that phytase activity in nodules would contribute to the adaptation of the rhizobia-legume symbiosis to low-P environments.

  16. A study on the prevalence of bacteria that occupy nodules within single peanut plants.

    PubMed

    Angelini, Jorge; Ibáñez, Fernando; Taurian, Tania; Tonelli, María Laura; Valetti, Lucio; Fabra, Adriana

    2011-06-01

    In this study, bacteria hosted in root nodules of single plants of legume Arachis hypogaea L. (peanut) cv Tegua Runner growing at field were isolated. The collection of nodule isolates included both fast and slow growing strains. Their genetic diversity was assessed in order to identify the more frequently rhizobial strain associated to nodules from single plants. Molecular fingerprinting of 213 nodular isolates indicated heterogeneity, absence of a dominant genotype and, therefore, of a unique strains highly competitive. Efficient nitrogen-fixing isolates were identified as Bradyrhizobium sp. by phylogenetic analysis of the sequences of their 16S rRNA genes. The genetic diversity of 68 peanut nodulating isolates from all the collected plants was also analyzed. Considering their ERIC-PCR profiles, they were grouped in eighteen different OTUs for 60% similarity cut-off. Results obtained in this study indicate that the genetic diversity of rhizobia occupying nodules from single plant is very high, without the presence of a dominant strain. Therefore, the identification of useful peanut rhizobia for agricultural purposes requires strongly the selection, among the diverse population, of a very competitive genotype in combination with a high-symbiotic performance.

  17. Root nodule bacteria from Clitoria ternatea L. are putative invasive nonrhizobial endophytes.

    PubMed

    Aeron, Abhinav; Chauhan, Puneet Singh; Dubey, Ramesh Chand; Maheshwari, Dinesh Kumar; Bajpai, Vivek K

    2015-02-01

    In this study, bacteria (8 species and 5 genera) belonging to the classes Betaproteobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria, and Sphingobacteria were isolated from root nodules of the multipurpose legume Clitoria ternatea L. and identified on the basis of partial 16S rRNA sequencing. The root nodule bacteria were subjected to phenotypic clustering and diversity studies using biochemical kits, including Hi-Media Carbokit™, Enterobacteriaceae™ identification kit, ERIC-PCR, and 16S ARDRA. All the strains showed growth on Ashby's N-free media over 7 generations, indicative of presumptive nitrogen fixation and further confirmed by amplification of the nifH gene. None of the strains showed the capability to renodulate the host plant, neither alone nor in combination with standard rhizobial strains, which was further confirmed by the absence of nodC bands in PCR assay. The results clearly indicate the common existence of nonrhizobial microflora inside the root nodules of legumes, which were thought to be colonized only by rhizobia and were responsible for N2 fixation in leguminous crops. However, with the recent discovery of nodule endophytes from a variety of legumes, as also observed here, it can be assumed that symbiotic rhizobia are not all alone and that these invasive endophytes belonging to various bacterial genera are more than just opportunistic colonizers of specialized nodule niche.

  18. [Analysis of Symbiotic Genes of Leguminous Plants Nodule Bacteria Grown in the Southern Urals].

    PubMed

    Baymiev, An Kh; Ivanova, E S; Gumenko, R S; Chubukova, O V; Baymiev, Al Kh

    2015-12-01

    Bacterial strains isolated from the nodules, tissues, and root surface of wild legumes growing in the Southern Urals related to the tribes Galegeae, Hedysareae, Genisteae, Trifolieae, and Loteae were examined for the presence in their genomes of symbiotic (sym) genes. It was found that the sym-genes are present in microorganisms isolated only from the nodules of the analyzed plants (sym+ -strains). Phylogenetic analysis of sym+ -strains on the basis of a comparative analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences showed that sym+ -strains belong to five families of nodule bacteria: Mesorhizobium, Bradyrhizobium, Sinorhizobium, Rhizobium, and Phyllobacterium. A study the phylogeny of the sym-genes showed that the nodule bacteria of leguminous plants of the Southern Urals at the genus level are mainly characterized by a parallel evolution of symbiotic genes and the 16S rRNA gene. Thus, cases of horizontal transfer of sym genes, which sometimes leads to the formation of certain types of atypical rhizobial strains ofleguminous plants, are detected in nodule bacteria populations.

  19. Plant nodulation inducers enhance horizontal gene transfer of Azorhizobium caulinodans symbiosis island.

    PubMed

    Ling, Jun; Wang, Hui; Wu, Ping; Li, Tao; Tang, Yu; Naseer, Nawar; Zheng, Huiming; Masson-Boivin, Catherine; Zhong, Zengtao; Zhu, Jun

    2016-11-29

    Horizontal gene transfer (HGT) of genomic islands is a driving force of bacterial evolution. Many pathogens and symbionts use this mechanism to spread mobile genetic elements that carry genes important for interaction with their eukaryotic hosts. However, the role of the host in this process remains unclear. Here, we show that plant compounds inducing the nodulation process in the rhizobium-legume mutualistic symbiosis also enhance the transfer of symbiosis islands. We demonstrate that the symbiosis island of the Sesbania rostrata symbiont, Azorhizobium caulinodans, is an 87.6-kb integrative and conjugative element (ICE(Ac)) that is able to excise, form a circular DNA, and conjugatively transfer to a specific site of gly-tRNA gene of other rhizobial genera, expanding their host range. The HGT frequency was significantly increased in the rhizosphere. An ICE(Ac)-located LysR-family transcriptional regulatory protein AhaR triggered the HGT process in response to plant flavonoids that induce the expression of nodulation genes through another LysR-type protein, NodD. Our study suggests that rhizobia may sense rhizosphere environments and transfer their symbiosis gene contents to other genera of rhizobia, thereby broadening rhizobial host-range specificity.

  20. api, A novel Medicago truncatula symbiotic mutant impaired in nodule primordium invasion.

    PubMed

    Teillet, Alice; Garcia, Joseph; de Billy, Françoise; Gherardi, Michèle; Huguet, Thierry; Barker, David G; de Carvalho-Niebel, Fernanda; Journet, Etienne-Pascal

    2008-05-01

    Genetic approaches have proved to be extremely useful in dissecting the complex nitrogen-fixing Rhizobium-legume endosymbiotic association. Here we describe a novel Medicago truncatula mutant called api, whose primary phenotype is the blockage of rhizobial infection just prior to nodule primordium invasion, leading to the formation of large infection pockets within the cortex of noninvaded root outgrowths. The mutant api originally was identified as a double symbiotic mutant associated with a new allele (nip-3) of the NIP/LATD gene, following the screening of an ethylmethane sulphonate-mutagenized population. Detailed characterization of the segregating single api mutant showed that rhizobial infection is also defective at the earlier stage of infection thread (IT) initiation in root hairs, as well as later during IT growth in the small percentage of nodules which overcome the primordium invasion block. Neither modulating ethylene biosynthesis (with L-alpha-(2-aminoethoxyvinylglycine or 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid) nor reducing ethylene sensitivity in a skl genetic background alters the basic api phenotype, suggesting that API function is not closely linked to ethylene metabolism or signaling. Genetic mapping places the API gene on the upper arm of the M. truncatula linkage group 4, and epistasis analyses show that API functions downstream of BIT1/ERN1 and LIN and upstream of NIP/LATD and the DNF genes.

  1. Increased expression of stathmin and elongation factor 1α in precancerous nodules with telomere dysfunction in hepatitis B viral cirrhotic patients.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Ei Yong; Yoo, Jeong Eun; Rhee, Hyungjin; Kim, Myung Soo; Choi, Junjeong; Ko, Jung Eun; Lee, Jee San; Park, Young Nyun

    2014-05-31

    Telomere dysfunction is important in carcinogenesis, and recently, stathmin and elongation factor 1α (EF1α) were reported to be up-regulated in telomere dysfunctional mice. In the present study, the expression levels of stathmin and EF1α in relation to telomere length, telomere dysfunction-induced foci (TIF), γ-H2AX, and p21WAF1/CIP1 expression were assessed in specimens of hepatitis B virus (HBV)-related multistep hepatocarcinogenesis, including 13 liver cirrhosis specimens, 14 low-grade dysplastic nodules (DN), 17 high-grade DNs, and 14 hepatocellular carcinomas (HCC). Five normal liver specimens were used as controls. TIF were analyzed by telomere fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) combined with immunostaining, while the protein expressions of stathmin, EF1α, γ-H2AX, and p21WAF1/CIP1 were detected by immunohistochemistry. The expressions of stathmin and EF1α gradually increased as multistep hepatocarcinogenesis progressed, showing the highest levels in HCC. Stathmin mRNA levels were higher in high-grade DNs than normal liver and liver cirrhosis, whereas EF1α mRNA expression did not show such a difference. The protein expressions of stathmin and EF1α were found in DNs of precancerous lesions, whereas they were absent or present at very low levels in normal liver and liver cirrhosis. Stathmin histoscores were higher in high-grade DNs and low-grade DNs than in normal liver (all, P<0.05). EF1α histoscores were higher in high-grade DNs than in normal liver and liver cirrhosis (all, P<0.05). Stathmin mRNA levels and histoscores, as well as EF1α histoscores (but not mRNA levels), were positively correlated with telomere shortening and γ-H2AX labeling index (all, P<0.05). EF1α histoscores were also positively correlated with TIF (P<0.001). Significantly greater inactivation of p21WAF1/CIP1 was observed in low-grade DNs, high-grade DNs, and HCC, compared to liver cirrhosis (all, P<0.05). p21WAF1/CIP1 labeling index was inversely correlated with TIF

  2. Influence of tree canopy on N₂ fixation by pasture legumes and soil rhizobial abundance in Mediterranean oak woodlands.

    PubMed

    Carranca, C; Castro, I V; Figueiredo, N; Redondo, R; Rodrigues, A R F; Saraiva, I; Maricato, R; Madeira, M A V

    2015-02-15

    Symbiotic N2 fixation is of primordial significance in sustainable agro-forestry management as it allows reducing the use of mineral N in the production of mixed stands and by protecting the soils from degradation. Thereby, on a 2-year basis, N2 fixation was evaluated in four oak woodlands under Mediterranean conditions using a split-plot design and three replicates. (15)N technique was used for determination of N2 fixation rate. Variations in environmental conditions (temperature, rainfall, radiation) by the cork tree canopy as well as the age of stands and pasture management can cause great differences in vegetation growth, legume N2 fixation, and soil rhizobial abundance. In the present study, non-legumes dominated the swards, in particular beneath the tree canopy, and legumes represented only 42% of total herbage. A 2-fold biomass reduction was observed in the oldest sown pasture in relation to the medium-age sward (6 t DW ha(-1)yr(-1)). Overall, competition of pasture growth for light was negligible, but soil rhizobial abundance and symbiotic N2 fixation capacity were highly favored by this environmental factor in the spring and outside the influence of tree canopy. Nitrogen derived from the atmosphere was moderate to high (54-72%) in unsown and sown swards. Inputs of fixed N2 increased from winter to spring due to more favorable climatic conditions (temperature and light intensity) for both rhizobia and vegetation growths. Assuming a constant fixation rate at each seasonal period, N2 fixation capacity increased from about 0.10 kg N ha(-1) per day in the autumn-winter period to 0.15 kg N ha(-1) per day in spring. Belowground plant material contributed to 11% of accumulated N in pasture legumes and was not affected by canopy. Size of soil fixing bacteria contributed little to explain pasture legumes N. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Phyllobacterium loti sp. nov. isolated from nodules of Lotus corniculatus

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez, Maximo; Ramírez-Bahena, Martha-Helena; Peix, Alvaro; Lorite, María J.; Sanjuán, Juan; Monza, Jorge

    2014-01-01

    Strain S658T was isolated from a Lotus corniculatus nodule in a soil sample obtained in Uruguay. Phylogenetic analysis of the 16S rRNA gene and atpD gene showed that this strain clustered within the genus Phyllobacterium. The closest related species was, in both cases, Phyllobacterium trifolii PETP02T with 99.8 % sequence similarity in the 16S rRNA gene and 96.1 % in the atpD gene. The 16S rRNA gene contains an insert at the beginning of the sequence that has no similarities with other inserts present in the same gene in described rhizobial species. Ubiquinone Q-10 was the only quinone detected. Strain S658T differed from its closest relatives through its growth in diverse culture conditions and in the assimilation of several carbon sources. It was not able to reproduce nodules in Lotus corniculatus. The results of DNA–DNA hybridization, phenotypic tests and fatty acid analyses confirmed that this strain should be classified as a representative of a novel species of the genus Phyllobacterium, for which the name Phyllobacterium loti sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is S658T( = LMG 27289T = CECT 8230T). PMID:24271211

  4. Phyllobacterium loti sp. nov. isolated from nodules of Lotus corniculatus.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, Maximo; Ramírez-Bahena, Martha-Helena; Peix, Alvaro; Lorite, María J; Sanjuán, Juan; Velázquez, Encarna; Monza, Jorge

    2014-03-01

    Strain S658(T) was isolated from a Lotus corniculatus nodule in a soil sample obtained in Uruguay. Phylogenetic analysis of the 16S rRNA gene and atpD gene showed that this strain clustered within the genus Phyllobacterium. The closest related species was, in both cases, Phyllobacterium trifolii PETP02(T) with 99.8 % sequence similarity in the 16S rRNA gene and 96.1 % in the atpD gene. The 16S rRNA gene contains an insert at the beginning of the sequence that has no similarities with other inserts present in the same gene in described rhizobial species. Ubiquinone Q-10 was the only quinone detected. Strain S658(T) differed from its closest relatives through its growth in diverse culture conditions and in the assimilation of several carbon sources. It was not able to reproduce nodules in Lotus corniculatus. The results of DNA-DNA hybridization, phenotypic tests and fatty acid analyses confirmed that this strain should be classified as a representative of a novel species of the genus Phyllobacterium, for which the name Phyllobacterium loti sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is S658(T)( = LMG 27289(T) = CECT 8230(T)).

  5. Nodule-Specific Polypeptides from Effective Alfalfa Root Nodules and from Ineffective Nodules Lacking Nitrogenase 1

    PubMed Central

    Lang-Unnasch, Naomi; Ausubel, Frederick M.

    1985-01-01

    In addition to leghemoglobin, at least nine nodule-specific polypeptides from the alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.)-Rhizobium meliloti symbiosis were identified by immune assay. Some of these polypeptides may be subunits of larger proteins but none appeared to be subunits of the same multimeric protein. All nine of the nodule-specific polypeptides were localized to within the plant cytosol; they were not found in extracts of bacteroids or in the peribacteroid space. At least one of these nodule-specific polypeptides was found to be antigenically related to nodule-specific polypeptides in pea and/or soybean. Ineffective nodules elicited by R. meliloti strains containing mutations in four different genes required for nitrogenase synthesis contained reduced concentrations of leghemoglobin and of several of the nodule-specific polypeptides. Other nodule-specific polypeptides were unaltered or actually enriched in the ineffective nodules. Many of the differences between the ineffective and effective nodules were apparent in nodules harvested shortly after the nodules became visible. These differences were greatly amplified in older nodules. When the four ineffective nodule types were compared to one another, there were clear quantitative differences in the concentrations of several of the nodule-specific polypeptides. These differences suggest that lack of a functional nitrogenase does not have a single direct effect on nodule development. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 PMID:16664146

  6. Rhizobium-legume symbiosis in the absence of Nod factors: two possible scenarios with or without the T3SS.

    PubMed

    Okazaki, Shin; Tittabutr, Panlada; Teulet, Albin; Thouin, Julien; Fardoux, Joël; Chaintreuil, Clémence; Gully, Djamel; Arrighi, Jean-François; Furuta, Noriyuki; Miwa, Hiroki; Yasuda, Michiko; Nouwen, Nico; Teaumroong, Neung; Giraud, Eric

    2016-01-01

    The occurrence of alternative Nod factor (NF)-independent symbiosis between legumes and rhizobia was first demonstrated in some Aeschynomene species that are nodulated by photosynthetic bradyrhizobia lacking the canonical nodABC genes. In this study, we revealed that a large diversity of non-photosynthetic bradyrhizobia, including B. elkanii, was also able to induce nodules on the NF-independent Aeschynomene species, A. indica. Using cytological analysis of the nodules and the nitrogenase enzyme activity as markers, a gradient in the symbiotic interaction between bradyrhizobial strains and A. indica could be distinguished. This ranged from strains that induced nodules that were only infected intercellularly to rhizobial strains that formed nodules in which the host cells were invaded intracellularly and that displayed a weak nitrogenase activity. In all non-photosynthetic bradyrhizobia, the type III secretion system (T3SS) appears required to trigger nodule organogenesis. In contrast, genome sequence analysis revealed that apart from a few exceptions, like the Bradyrhizobium ORS285 strain, photosynthetic bradyrhizobia strains lack a T3SS. Furthermore, analysis of the symbiotic properties of an ORS285 T3SS mutant revealed that the T3SS could have a positive or negative role for the interaction with NF-dependent Aeschynomene species, but that it is dispensable for the interaction with all NF-independent Aeschynomene species tested. Taken together, these data indicate that two NF-independent symbiotic processes are possible between legumes and rhizobia: one dependent on a T3SS and one using a so far unknown mechanism.

  7. Rhizobium–legume symbiosis in the absence of Nod factors: two possible scenarios with or without the T3SS

    PubMed Central

    Okazaki, Shin; Tittabutr, Panlada; Teulet, Albin; Thouin, Julien; Fardoux, Joël; Chaintreuil, Clémence; Gully, Djamel; Arrighi, Jean- François; Furuta, Noriyuki; Miwa, Hiroki; Yasuda, Michiko; Nouwen, Nico; Teaumroong, Neung; Giraud, Eric

    2016-01-01

    The occurrence of alternative Nod factor (NF)-independent symbiosis between legumes and rhizobia was first demonstrated in some Aeschynomene species that are nodulated by photosynthetic bradyrhizobia lacking the canonical nodABC genes. In this study, we revealed that a large diversity of non-photosynthetic bradyrhizobia, including B. elkanii, was also able to induce nodules on the NF-independent Aeschynomene species, A. indica. Using cytological analysis of the nodules and the nitrogenase enzyme activity as markers, a gradient in the symbiotic interaction between bradyrhizobial strains and A. indica could be distinguished. This ranged from strains that induced nodules that were only infected intercellularly to rhizobial strains that formed nodules in which the host cells were invaded intracellularly and that displayed a weak nitrogenase activity. In all non-photosynthetic bradyrhizobia, the type III secretion system (T3SS) appears required to trigger nodule organogenesis. In contrast, genome sequence analysis revealed that apart from a few exceptions, like the Bradyrhizobium ORS285 strain, photosynthetic bradyrhizobia strains lack a T3SS. Furthermore, analysis of the symbiotic properties of an ORS285 T3SS mutant revealed that the T3SS could have a positive or negative role for the interaction with NF-dependent Aeschynomene species, but that it is dispensable for the interaction with all NF-independent Aeschynomene species tested. Taken together, these data indicate that two NF-independent symbiotic processes are possible between legumes and rhizobia: one dependent on a T3SS and one using a so far unknown mechanism. PMID:26161635

  8. Characterization of the papilionoid-Burkholderia interaction in the Fynbos biome: The diversity and distribution of beta-rhizobia nodulating Podalyria calyptrata (Fabaceae, Podalyrieae).

    PubMed

    Lemaire, Benny; Van Cauwenberghe, Jannick; Verstraete, Brecht; Chimphango, Samson; Stirton, Charles; Honnay, Olivier; Smets, Erik; Sprent, Janet; James, Euan K; Muasya, A Muthama

    2016-02-01

    The South African Fynbos soils are renowned for nitrogen-fixing Burkholderia associated with diverse papilionoid legumes of the tribes Crotalarieae, Hypocalypteae, Indigofereae, Phaseoleae and Podalyrieae. However, despite numerous rhizobial studies in the region, the symbiotic diversity of Burkholderia has not been investigated in relation to a specific host legume and its geographical provenance. This study analyzed the diversity of nodulating strains of Burkholderia from the legume species Podalyria calyptrata. Diverse lineages were detected that proved to be closely related to Burkholderia taxa, originating from hosts in other legume tribes. By analyzing the genetic variation of chromosomal (recA) and nodulation (nodA) sequence data in relation to the sampling sites we assessed the geographical distribution patterns of the P. calyptrata symbionts. Although we found a degree of genetically differentiated rhizobial populations, a correlation between genetic (recA and nodA) and geographic distances among populations was not observed, suggesting high rates of dispersal and rhizobial colonization within Fynbos soils.

  9. Determination of symbiotic nodule occupancy in the model Vicia tetrasperma using a fluorescence scanner.

    PubMed

    Novák, Karel

    2011-04-01

    Fluorescent tagging of nodule bacteria forming symbioses with legume host plants represents a tool for vital tracking of bacteria inside the symbiotic root nodules and monitoring changes in gene activity. The constitutive expression of heterologous fluorescent proteins, such as green fluorescent protein (GFP), also allows screening for nodule occupancy by a particular strain. Imaging of the fluorescence signal on a macro-scale is associated with technical problems due to the robustness of nodule tissues and a high level of autofluorescence. These limitations can be reduced by the use of a model species with a fine root system, such as Vicia tetrasperma. Further increases in the sensitivity and specificity of the detection and in image resolution can be attained by the use of a fluorescence scanner. Compared with the standard CCD-type cameras, the availability of a laser source of a specified excitation wavelength decreases non-specific autofluorescence while the photomultiplier tubes in emission detection significantly increase sensitivity. The large scanning area combined with a high resolution allow us to visualize individual nodules during the scan of whole root systems. Using a fluorescence scanner with excitation wavelength of 488 nm, a band-pass specific emission channel of 532 nm and a long-pass background channel of 555 nm, it was possible to distinguish nodules occupied by a rhizobial strain marked with one copy of cycle3 GFP from nodules colonized by the wild-type strain. The main limitation of the current plant model and GFP with the wild-type emission peak at 409 nm is a sharp increase in root autofluorescence below 550 nm. The selectivity of the technique can be enhanced by the use of red-shifted fluorophores and the contrasting labelling of the variants, provided that the excitation (482 nm) and emission (737 nm) maxima corresponding to root chlorophyll are respected.

  10. Expression of the CLE-RS3 gene suppresses root nodulation in Lotus japonicus.

    PubMed

    Nishida, Hanna; Handa, Yoshihiro; Tanaka, Sachiko; Suzaki, Takuya; Kawaguchi, Masayoshi

    2016-09-01

    Cell-to-cell communication, principally mediated by short- or long-range mobile signals, is involved in many plant developmental processes. In root nodule symbiosis, a mutual relationship between leguminous plants and nitrogen-fixing rhizobia, the mechanism for the autoregulation of nodulation (AON) plays a key role in preventing the production of an excess number of nodules. AON is based on long-distance cell-to-cell communication between roots and shoots. In Lotus japonicus, two CLAVATA3/ESR-related (CLE) peptides, encoded by CLE-ROOT SIGNAL 1 (CLE-RS1) and -RS2, act as putative root-derived signals that transmit signals inhibiting further nodule development through interaction with a shoot-acting receptor-like kinase HYPERNODULATION ABERRANT ROOT FORMATION 1 (HAR1). Here, an in silico search and subsequent expression analyses enabled us to identify two new L. japonicus CLE genes that are potentially involved in nodulation, designated as CLE-RS3 and LjCLE40. Time-course expression patterns showed that CLE-RS1/2/3 and LjCLE40 expression is induced during nodulation with different activation patterns. Furthermore, constitutive expression of CLE-RS3 significantly suppressed nodule formation in a HAR1-dependent manner. TOO MUCH LOVE, a root-acting regulator of AON, is also required for the CLE-RS3 action. These results suggest that CLE-RS3 is a new component of AON in L. japonicus that may act as a potential root-derived signal through interaction with HAR1. Because CLE-RS2, CLE-RS3 and LjCLE40 are located in tandem in the genome and their expression is induced not only by rhizobial infection but also by nitrate, these genes may have duplicated from a common gene.

  11. Occurrence of nodulation in unexplored leguminous trees native to the West African tropical rainforest and inoculation response of native species useful in reforestation.

    PubMed

    Diabate, Moussa; Munive, Antonio; de Faria, Sérgio Miana; Ba, Amadou; Dreyfus, Bernard; Galiana, Antoine

    2005-04-01

    Despite the abundance and diversity of timber tree legumes in the West African rainforest, their ability to form nitrogen-fixing nodules in symbiosis with rhizobia, and their response to rhizobial inoculation, remain poorly documented. In the first part of this study the occurrence of nodulation was determined in 156 leguminous species growing in six natural forest areas in Guinea, mostly mature trees. In the second part, an in situ experiment of rhizobial inoculation was performed on eight selected tree species belonging to three genera: Albizia, Erythrophleum and Millettia. Of the 97 plant species and 14 genera that had never been examined before this study, 31 species and four genera were reported to be nodulated. After 4 months of growing in a nursery and a further 11 months after transplantation of plants to the field, we observed a highly significant (P < 0.001) and positive effect of inoculation with Bradyrhizobium sp. strains on the growth of the eight tree species tested. The importance of determining the nodulation ability of unexplored local trees and subsequently using this information for inoculation in reforestation programmes was demonstrated. Copyright New Phytologist (2005).

  12. Genetic diversity, community structure and distribution of rhizobia in the root nodules of Caragana spp. from arid and semi-arid alkaline deserts, in the north of China.

    PubMed

    Li, Mao; Li, Yán; Chen, Wen Feng; Sui, Xin Hua; Li, Ying; Li, Yàn; Wang, En Tao; Chen, Wen Xin

    2012-06-01

    The genetic diversity of 88 Caragana nodule rhizobial isolates, collected from arid and semi-arid alkaline sandy soils in the north of China, was assessed by PCR-RFLP of the 16S rRNA gene and the 16S-23S IGS, as well as the phylogenies of housekeeping genes (atpD, glnII and recA) and symbiotic genes (nodC and nifH). Of the 88 strains, 69 were placed in the genus Mesorhizobium, 16 in Rhizobium and 3 in Bradyrhizobium. Mesorhizobium amorphae, Mesorhizobium septentrionale, Mesorhizobium temperatum and Rhizobium yanglingense were the four predominant microsymbionts associated with Caragana spp. in the surveyed regions, and M. septentrionale was widely distributed among the sampling sites. Phylogenies of nodC and nifH genes showed that two kinds of symbiotic genes existed, corresponding to Mesorhizobium and Rhizobium, respectively. Available phosphorous (P) and potassium (K) contents were the main soil factors correlated with the distribution of these rhizobia in the sampling regions. Positive correlations between the available higher P content/lower K content and the dominance of Mesorhizobium species (M. temperatum, M. amorphae and M. septentrionale), and between the lower P content/higher K content and the dominance of R. yanglingense were found.

  13. CLE peptides control Medicago truncatula nodulation locally and systemically.

    PubMed

    Mortier, Virginie; Den Herder, Griet; Whitford, Ryan; Van de Velde, Willem; Rombauts, Stephane; D'Haeseleer, Katrien; Holsters, Marcelle; Goormachtig, Sofie

    2010-05-01

    The CLAVATA3/embryo-surrounding region (CLE) peptides control the fine balance between proliferation and differentiation in plant development. We studied the role of CLE peptides during indeterminate nodule development and identified 25 MtCLE peptide genes in the Medicago truncatula genome, of which two genes, MtCLE12 and MtCLE13, had nodulation-related expression patterns that were linked to proliferation and differentiation. MtCLE13 expression was up-regulated early in nodule development. A high-to-low expression gradient radiated from the inner toward the outer cortical cell layers in a region defining the incipient nodule. At later stages, MtCLE12 and MtCLE13 were expressed in differentiating nodules and in the apical part of mature, elongated nodules. Functional analysis revealed a putative role for MtCLE12 and MtCLE13 in autoregulation of nodulation, a mechanism that controls the number of nodules and involves systemic signals mediated by a leucine-rich repeat receptor-like kinase, SUNN, which is active in the shoot. When MtCLE12 and MtCLE13 were ectopically expressed in transgenic roots, nodulation was abolished at the level of the nodulation factor signal transduction, and this inhibition involved long-distance signaling. In addition, composite plants with roots ectopically expressing MtCLE12 or MtCLE13 had elongated petioles. This systemic effect was not observed in transgenic roots ectopically expressing MtCLE12 and MtCLE13 in a sunn-1 mutant background, although nodulation was still strongly reduced. These results suggest multiple roles for CLE signaling in nodulation.

  14. Abundance and diversity of soybean-nodulating rhizobia in black soil are impacted by land use and crop management.

    PubMed

    Yan, Jun; Han, Xiao Zeng; Ji, Zhao Jun; Li, Yan; Wang, En Tao; Xie, Zhi Hong; Chen, Wen Feng

    2014-09-01

    To investigate the effects of land use and crop management on soybean rhizobial communities, 280 nodule isolates were trapped from 7 fields with different land use and culture histories. Besides the known Bradyrhizobium japonicum, three novel genospecies were isolated from these fields. Grassland (GL) maintained a higher diversity of soybean bradyrhizobia than the other cultivation systems. Two genospecies (Bradyrhizobium spp. I and III) were distributed widely in all treatments, while Bradyrhizobium sp. II was found only in GL treatment. Cultivation with soybeans increased the rhizobial abundance and diversity, except for the soybean monoculture (S-S) treatment. In monoculture systems, soybeans favored Bradyrhizobium sp. I, while maize and wheat favored Bradyrhizobium sp. III. Fertilization decreased the rhizobial diversity indexes but did not change the species composition. The organic carbon (OC) and available phosphorus (AP) contents and pH were the main soil parameters positively correlated with the distribution of Bradyrhizobium spp. I and II and Bradyrhizobium japonicum and negatively correlated with Bradyrhizobium sp. III. These results revealed that different land uses and crop management could not only alter the diversity and abundance of soybean rhizobia, but also change interactions between rhizobia and legume or nonlegume plants, which offered novel information about the biogeography of rhizobia.

  15. Ancient Heavy Metal Contamination in Soils as a Driver of Tolerant Anthyllis vulneraria Rhizobial Communities.

    PubMed

    Mohamad, Roba; Maynaud, Geraldine; Le Quéré, Antoine; Vidal, Céline; Klonowska, Agnieszka; Yashiro, Erika; Cleyet-Marel, Jean-Claude; Brunel, Brigitte

    2017-01-15

    Anthyllis vulneraria is a legume associated with nitrogen-fixing rhizobia that together offer an adapted biological material for mine-soil phytostabilization by limiting metal pollution. To find rhizobia associated with Anthyllis at a given site, we evaluated the genetic and phenotypic properties of a collection of 137 rhizobia recovered from soils presenting contrasting metal levels. Zn-Pb mine soils largely contained metal-tolerant rhizobia belonging to Mesorhizobium metallidurans or to another sister metal-tolerant species. All of the metal-tolerant isolates harbored the cadA marker gene (encoding a metal-efflux PIB-type ATPase transporter). In contrast, metal-sensitive strains were taxonomically distinct from metal-tolerant populations and consisted of new Mesorhizobium genospecies. Based on the symbiotic nodA marker, the populations comprise two symbiovar assemblages (potentially related to Anthyllis or Lotus host preferences) according to soil geographic locations but independently of metal content. Multivariate analysis showed that soil Pb and Cd concentrations differentially impacted the rhizobial communities and that a rhizobial community found in one geographically distant site was highly divergent from the others. In conclusion, heavy metal levels in soils drive the taxonomic composition of Anthyllis-associated rhizobial populations according to their metal-tolerance phenotype but not their symbiotic nodA diversity. In addition to heavy metals, local soil physicochemical and topoclimatic conditions also impact the rhizobial beta diversity. Mesorhizobium communities were locally adapted and site specific, and their use is recommended for the success of phytostabilization strategies based on Mesorhizobium-legume vegetation. Phytostabilization of toxic mine spoils limits heavy metal dispersion and environmental pollution by establishing a sustainable plant cover. This eco-friendly method is facilitated by the use of selected and adapted cover crop legumes

  16. Ancient Heavy Metal Contamination in Soils as a Driver of Tolerant Anthyllis vulneraria Rhizobial Communities

    PubMed Central

    Mohamad, Roba; Maynaud, Geraldine; Le Quéré, Antoine; Vidal, Céline; Klonowska, Agnieszka; Yashiro, Erika; Cleyet-Marel, Jean-Claude

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Anthyllis vulneraria is a legume associated with nitrogen-fixing rhizobia that together offer an adapted biological material for mine-soil phytostabilization by limiting metal pollution. To find rhizobia associated with Anthyllis at a given site, we evaluated the genetic and phenotypic properties of a collection of 137 rhizobia recovered from soils presenting contrasting metal levels. Zn-Pb mine soils largely contained metal-tolerant rhizobia belonging to Mesorhizobium metallidurans or to another sister metal-tolerant species. All of the metal-tolerant isolates harbored the cadA marker gene (encoding a metal-efflux PIB-type ATPase transporter). In contrast, metal-sensitive strains were taxonomically distinct from metal-tolerant populations and consisted of new Mesorhizobium genospecies. Based on the symbiotic nodA marker, the populations comprise two symbiovar assemblages (potentially related to Anthyllis or Lotus host preferences) according to soil geographic locations but independently of metal content. Multivariate analysis showed that soil Pb and Cd concentrations differentially impacted the rhizobial communities and that a rhizobial community found in one geographically distant site was highly divergent from the others. In conclusion, heavy metal levels in soils drive the taxonomic composition of Anthyllis-associated rhizobial populations according to their metal-tolerance phenotype but not their symbiotic nodA diversity. In addition to heavy metals, local soil physicochemical and topoclimatic conditions also impact the rhizobial beta diversity. Mesorhizobium communities were locally adapted and site specific, and their use is recommended for the success of phytostabilization strategies based on Mesorhizobium-legume vegetation. IMPORTANCE Phytostabilization of toxic mine spoils limits heavy metal dispersion and environmental pollution by establishing a sustainable plant cover. This eco-friendly method is facilitated by the use of selected and adapted

  17. Nodule performance within a changing environmental context.

    PubMed

    Aranjuelo, Iker; Arrese-Igor, Cesar; Molero, Gemma

    2014-07-15

    Global climate models predict that future environmental conditions will see alterations in temperature, water availability and CO2 concentration ([CO2]) in the atmosphere. Climate change will reinforce the need to develop highly productive crops. For this purpose it is essential to identify target traits conditioning plant performance in changing environments. N2 fixing plants represent the second major crop of agricultural importance worldwide. The current review provides a compilation of results from existing literature on the effects of several abiotic stress conditions on nodule performance and N2 fixation. The environmental factors analysed include water stress, salinity, temperature, and elevated [CO2]. Despite the large number of studies analysing [CO2] effects in plants, frequently they have been conducted under optimal growth conditions that are difficult to find in natural conditions where different stresses often occur simultaneously. This is why we have also included a section describing the current state of knowledge of interacting environmental conditions in nodule functioning. Regardless of the environmental factor considered, it is evident that some general patterns of nodule response are observed. Nodule carbohydrate and N compound availability, together with the presence of oxygen reactive species (ROS) have proven to be the key factors modulating N2 fixation at the physiological/biochemical levels. However, with the exception of water availability and [CO2], it should also be considered that nodule performance has not been characterised in detail under other limiting growth conditions. This highlights the necessity to conduct further studies considering these factors. Finally, we also observe that a better understanding of these metabolic effects of changing environment in nodule functioning would require an integrated and synergistic investigation based on widely used and novel protocols such as transcriptomics, proteomics, metabolomics and

  18. Improved characterization of nod factors and genetically based variation in LysM Receptor domains identify amino acids expendable for nod factor recognition in Lotus spp.

    PubMed

    Bek, Anita S; Sauer, Jørgen; Thygesen, Mikkel B; Duus, Jens Ø; Petersen, Bent O; Thirup, Søren; James, Euan; Jensen, Knud J; Stougaard, Jens; Radutoiu, Simona

    2010-01-01

    Formation of functional nodules is a complex process depending on host-microsymbiont compatibility in all developmental stages. This report uses the contrasting symbiotic phenotypes of Lotus japonicus and L. pedunculatus, inoculated with Mesorhizobium loti or the Bradyrhizobium sp. (Lotus), to investigate the role of Nod factor structure and Nod factor receptors (NFR) for rhizobial recognition, infection thread progression, and bacterial persistence within nodule cells. A key contribution was the use of 800 MHz nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and ultrahigh-performance liquid chromatography coupled to quadrupole-time-of-flight mass spectrometry for Nod factor analysis. The Nod factor decorations at the nonreducing end differ between Bradyrhizobium sp. (Lotus) and M. loti, and the NFR1/NFR5 extracellular regions of L. pedunculatus and L. japonicus were found to vary in amino acid composition. Genetic transformation experiments using chimeric and wild-type receptors showed that both receptor variants recognize the structurally different Nod factors but the later symbiotic phenotype remained unchanged. These results highlight the importance of additional checkpoints during nitrogen-fixing symbiosis and define several amino acids in the LysM domains as expendable for perception of the two differentially carbamoylated Nod factors.

  19. Nod factor enhances calcium uptake by soybean.

    PubMed

    Supanjani, S; Habib, A; Mabood, F; Lee, K D; Donnelly, D; Smith, D L

    2006-01-01

    Inoculation with rhizobia or application of Nod factors (lipo-chitooligosaccharides, LCOs) causes transient increases in cytosolic calcium concentration in root hairs of legume plants. We conducted experiments to evaluate whether application of LCO and inoculation with rhizobia improved (45)CaCl(2) uptake into soybean (Glycine max [L.] Merr.) leaves. Roots of soybean seedlings with one developing trifoliolate were immersed in Murashige and Skoog (MS) basal liquid medium containing treatment solutions and (45)CaCl(2), and the plants were incubated under continuous light. After 24 h, leaf samples were taken, and their radioactivity levels were determined. Addition of NodBj-V (C18:1 MeFuc) at a concentration of 10(-7) M increased (45)Ca(2+) uptake. Inoculation with genistein-induced Bradyrhizobium japonicum strain 532C and USDA3 also increased (45)Ca(2+) uptake; whereas, inoculation with strain Bj-168, a nodC-mutant incapable of producing LCO, did not. Rhizobia that do not normally nodulate soybean, i.e. Rhizobium leguminosarum, and Sinorhizobium meliloti did not affect calcium uptake, nor did the tetramer or pentamer of chitosan, or lumichrome. Surprisingly, Rhizobium sp. NGR234, which can nodulate some types of soybean, although without effective N(2)-fixation, also did not affect calcium uptake. This work suggests that the rhizobial symbiosis, in addition to its known role in provision of nitrogen fixation, also improves early calcium uptake into soybean plants.

  20. Diverse nodule bacteria were associated with Astragalus species in arid region of northwestern China.

    PubMed

    Chen, Weimin; Sun, Liangliang; Lu, Jianjun; Bi, Liangliang; Wang, Entao; Wei, Gehong

    2015-01-01

    The legume species of Astragalus as traditional Chinese medicine source and environmental protection plants showed an extensive distribution in the arid region of northwestern China. However, few rhizobia associating with Astragalus have been investigated in this region so far. In this study, 78 endophytic bacteria were isolated from root nodules of 12 Astragalus species and characterized by the PCR-RFLP of 16S rRNA gene and symbiotic genes together with the phylogenetic analysis. Results showed that the majority (53%) of isolates are non-nodulating Agrobacterium sp. and the rest are Mesorhizobium genomic species (41%), Ensifer spp. and Rhizobium gallicum (6%), respectively. Mesorhizobium genomic species are broadly distributed in the Astragalus symbioses and most of them share similar symbiotic genes. It seems that horizontal gene transfer occurred frequently among different genomic species independent of their original hosts and sites. Astragalus adsurgens is nodulated by a widely range of rhizobial species in the nodulation test, revealing that it could play an important role in diversification of Astragalus symbionts and that might be a reason for its wide adaptation to diverse environments. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Modulation of endogenous indole-3-acetic acid biosynthesis in bacteroids within Medicago sativa nodules.

    PubMed

    Bianco, C; Senatore, B; Arbucci, S; Pieraccini, G; Defez, R

    2014-07-01

    To evaluate the dose-response effects of endogenous indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) on Medicago plant growth and dry weight production, we increased the synthesis of IAA in both free-living and symbiosis-stage rhizobial bacteroids during Rhizobium-legume symbiosis. For this purpose, site-directed mutagenesis was applied to modify an 85-bp promoter sequence, driving the expression of iaaM and tms2 genes for IAA biosynthesis. A positive correlation was found between the higher expression of IAA biosynthetic genes in free-living bacteria and the increased production of IAA under both free-living and symbiotic conditions. Plants nodulated by RD65 and RD66 strains, synthetizing the highest IAA concentration, showed a significant (up to 73%) increase in the shoot fresh weight and upregulation of nitrogenase gene, nifH, compared to plants nodulated by the wild-type strain. When these plants were analyzed by confocal microscopy, using an anti-IAA antibody, the strongest signal was observed in bacteroids of Medicago sativa RD66 (Ms-RD66) plants, even when they were located in the senescent nodule zone. We show here a simple system to modulate endogenous IAA biosynthesis in bacteria nodulating legumes suitable to investigate which is the maximum level of IAA biosynthesis, resulting in the maximal increase of plant growth.

  2. Diverse bacteria isolated from root nodules of wild Vicia species grown in temperate region of China.

    PubMed

    Lei, Xia; Wang, En Tao; Chen, Wen Feng; Sui, Xin Hua; Chen, Wen Xin

    2008-12-01

    In the present study, a total of 154 bacterial strains isolated from nodules of eighteen Vicia species mainly grown in the temperate Chinese provinces were characterized by ARDRA, ITS PCR-RFLP, BOX-PCR, sequencing of 16S rDNA, nodC, nifH, atpD and glnII, and nodulation tests. The results demonstrated that most of the R. leguminosarum strains were effective microsymbionts of the wild Vicia species, while genomic species related to Rhizobium gallicum, Mesorhizobium huakuii, Ensifer meliloti and Bradyrhizobium spp. were symbiotic bacteria occasionally nodulating with Vicia species. In addition, fourteen strains related to Agrobacterium, Phyllobacterium, Ensifer, Shinella and R. tropici, as well as 22 strains of R. leguminosarum might be nodule endophytes without symbiotic genes. Diverse symbiotic gene lineages were found among the test strains and a strong association was found among the symbiotic gene types and genomic species, indicating the absence of lateral gene transfer. These results greatly enlarged the rhizobial spectrum of Vicia species.

  3. Genetic characterization of fast-growing rhizobia able to nodulate Prosopis alba in North Spain.

    PubMed

    Iglesias, Olga; Rivas, Raúl; García-Fraile, Paula; Abril, Adriana; Mateos, Pedro F; Martinez-Molina, Eustoquio; Velázquez, Encarna

    2007-12-01

    Prosopis is a Mimosaceae legume tree indigenous to South America and not naturalized in Europe. In this work 18 rhizobial strains nodulating Prosopis alba roots were isolated from a soil in North Spain that belong to eight different randomly amplified polymorphic DNA groups phylogenetically related to Sinorhizobium medicae, Sinorhizobium meliloti and Rhizobium giardinii according to their intergenic spacer and 16S rRNA gene sequences. The nodC genes of isolates close to S. medicae and S. meliloti were identical to those of S. medicae USDA 1,037(T) and S. meliloti LMG 6,133(T) and accordingly all these strains were able to nodulate both alfalfa and Prosopis. These nodC genes were phylogenetically divergent from those of the isolates close to R. giardinii that were identical to that of R. giardinii H152(T) and therefore all these strains formed nodules in common beans and Prosopis. The nodC genes of the strains isolated in Spain were phylogenetically divergent from that carried by Mesorhizobium chacoense Pr-5(T) and Sinorhizobium arboris LMG 1,4919(T) nodulating Prosopis in America and Africa, respectively. Therefore, Prosopis is a promiscuous host which can establish symbiosis with strains carrying very divergent nodC genes and this promiscuity may be an important advantage for this legume tree to be used in reforestation.

  4. New Betaproteobacterial Rhizobium Strains Able To Efficiently Nodulate Parapiptadenia rigida (Benth.) Brenan

    PubMed Central

    Taulé, Cecilia; Zabaleta, María; Mareque, Cintia; Platero, Raúl; Sanjurjo, Lucía; Sicardi, Margarita; Frioni, Lillian; Battistoni, Federico

    2012-01-01

    Among the leguminous trees native to Uruguay, Parapiptadenia rigida (Angico), a Mimosoideae legume, is one of the most promising species for agroforestry. Like many other legumes, it is able to establish symbiotic associations with rhizobia and belongs to the group known as nitrogen-fixing trees, which are major components of agroforestry systems. Information about rhizobial symbionts for this genus is scarce, and thus, the aim of this work was to identify and characterize rhizobia associated with P. rigida. A collection of Angico-nodulating isolates was obtained, and 47 isolates were selected for genetic studies. According to enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus PCR patterns and restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis of their nifH and 16S rRNA genes, the isolates could be grouped into seven genotypes, including the genera Burkholderia, Cupriavidus, and Rhizobium, among which the Burkholderia genotypes were the predominant group. Phylogenetic studies of nifH, nodA, and nodC sequences from the Burkholderia and the Cupriavidus isolates indicated a close relationship of these genes with those from betaproteobacterial rhizobia (beta-rhizobia) rather than from alphaproteobacterial rhizobia (alpha-rhizobia). In addition, nodulation assays with representative isolates showed that while the Cupriavidus isolates were able to effectively nodulate Mimosa pudica, the Burkholderia isolates produced white and ineffective nodules on this host. PMID:22226956

  5. Diversity of Rhizobia Nodulating Phaseolus vulgaris L. in Two Kenyan Soils with Contrasting pHs

    PubMed Central

    Anyango, B.; Wilson, K. J.; Beynon, J. L.; Giller, K. E.

    1995-01-01

    Rhizobia were isolated from two Kenyan soils with pHs of 4.5 and 6.8 and characterized on the basis of their host ranges for nodulation and nitrogen fixation, colony morphologies, restriction fragment fingerprints, and hybridization with a nifH probe. The populations of rhizobia nodulating Phaseolus vulgaris in the two soils were similar in numbers and in effectiveness of N(inf2) fixation but were markedly different in composition. The population in the Naivasha soil (pH 6.8) was dominated by isolates specific in host range for nodulation to P. vulgaris; these all had multiple copies, in most cases four, of the structural nitrogenase gene nifH. Only one of the isolates from this soil formed effective nodules on Leucaena leucocephala, and this isolate had only a single copy of nifH. By contrast, the population in the acid Daka-ini soil (pH 4.5) was composed largely of broad-host-range isolates which had single copies of nifH. The isolates from the Daka-ini soil which were specific to P. vulgaris generally had three copies of nifH, although one isolate had only two copies. These rhizobial isolates are indigenous to Kenyan soils and yet have marked similarities to previously described Rhizobium species from other continents. PMID:16535165

  6. A bioinformatics insight to rhizobial globins: gene identification and mapping, polypeptide sequence and phenetic analysis, and protein modeling.

    PubMed Central

    Gesto-Borroto, Reinier; Sánchez-Sánchez, Miriam; Arredondo-Peter, Raúl

    2015-01-01

    Globins (Glbs) are proteins widely distributed in organisms. Three evolutionary families have been identified in Glbs: the M, S and T Glb families. The M Glbs include flavohemoglobins (fHbs) and single-domain Glbs (SDgbs); the S Glbs include globin-coupled sensors (GCSs), protoglobins and sensor single domain globins, and the T Glbs include truncated Glbs (tHbs). Structurally, the M and S Glbs exhibit 3/3-folding whereas the T Glbs exhibit 2/2-folding. Glbs are widespread in bacteria, including several rhizobial genomes. However, only few rhizobial Glbs have been characterized. Hence, we characterized Glbs from 62 rhizobial genomes using bioinformatics methods such as data mining in databases, sequence alignment, phenogram construction and protein modeling. Also, we analyzed soluble extracts from Bradyrhizobium japonicum USDA38 and USDA58 by (reduced + carbon monoxide (CO) minus reduced) differential spectroscopy. Database searching showed that only fhb, sdgb, gcs and thb genes exist in the rhizobia analyzed in this work. Promoter analysis revealed that apparently several rhizobial glb genes are not regulated by a -10 promoter but might be regulated by -35 and Fnr (fumarate-nitrate reduction regulator)-like promoters. Mapping analysis revealed that rhizobial fhbs and thbs are flanked by a variety of genes whereas several rhizobial sdgbs and gcss are flanked by genes coding for proteins involved in the metabolism of nitrates and nitrites and chemotaxis, respectively. Phenetic analysis showed that rhizobial Glbs segregate into the M, S and T Glb families, while structural analysis showed that predicted rhizobial SDgbs and fHbs and GCSs globin domain and tHbs fold into the 3/3- and 2/2-folding, respectively. Spectra from B. japonicum USDA38 and USDA58 soluble extracts exhibited peaks and troughs characteristic of bacterial and vertebrate Glbs thus indicating that putative Glbs are synthesized in B. japonicum USDA38 and USDA58. PMID:26594329

  7. A transcriptomic analysis of the effect of genistein on Sinorhizobium fredii HH103 reveals novel rhizobial genes putatively involved in symbiosis

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Montaño, F.; Jiménez-Guerrero, I.; Acosta-Jurado, S.; Navarro-Gómez, P.; Ollero, F. J.; Ruiz-Sainz, J. E.; López-Baena, F. J.; Vinardell, J. M.

    2016-01-01

    Sinorhizobium fredii HH103 is a rhizobial soybean symbiont that exhibits an extremely broad host-range. Flavonoids exuded by legume roots induce the expression of rhizobial symbiotic genes and activate the bacterial protein NodD, which binds to regulatory DNA sequences called nod boxes (NB). NB drive the expression of genes involved in the production of molecular signals (Nod factors) as well as the transcription of ttsI, whose encoded product binds to tts boxes (TB), inducing the secretion of proteins (effectors) through the type 3 secretion system (T3SS). In this work, a S. fredii HH103 global gene expression analysis in the presence of the flavonoid genistein was carried out, revealing a complex regulatory network. Three groups of genes differentially expressed were identified: i) genes controlled by NB, ii) genes regulated by TB, and iii) genes not preceded by a NB or a TB. Interestingly, we have found differentially expressed genes not previously studied in rhizobia, being some of them not related to Nod factors or the T3SS. Future characterization of these putative symbiotic-related genes could shed light on the understanding of the complex molecular dialogue established between rhizobia and legumes. PMID:27539649

  8. Increased expression of stathmin and elongation factor 1α in precancerous nodules with telomere dysfunction in hepatitis B viral cirrhotic patients

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Telomere dysfunction is important in carcinogenesis, and recently, stathmin and elongation factor 1α (EF1α) were reported to be up-regulated in telomere dysfunctional mice. Methods In the present study, the expression levels of stathmin and EF1α in relation to telomere length, telomere dysfunction-induced foci (TIF), γ-H2AX, and p21WAF1/CIP1 expression were assessed in specimens of hepatitis B virus (HBV)-related multistep hepatocarcinogenesis, including 13 liver cirrhosis specimens, 14 low-grade dysplastic nodules (DN), 17 high-grade DNs, and 14 hepatocellular carcinomas (HCC). Five normal liver specimens were used as controls. TIF were analyzed by telomere fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) combined with immunostaining, while the protein expressions of stathmin, EF1α, γ-H2AX, and p21WAF1/CIP1 were detected by immunohistochemistry. Result The expressions of stathmin and EF1α gradually increased as multistep hepatocarcinogenesis progressed, showing the highest levels in HCC. Stathmin mRNA levels were higher in high-grade DNs than normal liver and liver cirrhosis, whereas EF1α mRNA expression did not show such a difference. The protein expressions of stathmin and EF1α were found in DNs of precancerous lesions, whereas they were absent or present at very low levels in normal liver and liver cirrhosis. Stathmin histoscores were higher in high-grade DNs and low-grade DNs than in normal liver (all, P < 0.05). EF1α histoscores were higher in high-grade DNs than in normal liver and liver cirrhosis (all, P < 0.05). Stathmin mRNA levels and histoscores, as well as EF1α histoscores (but not mRNA levels), were positively correlated with telomere shortening and γ-H2AX labeling index (all, P < 0.05). EF1α histoscores were also positively correlated with TIF (P < 0.001). Significantly greater inactivation of p21WAF1/CIP1 was observed in low-grade DNs, high-grade DNs, and HCC, compared to liver cirrhosis (all, P < 0.05). p21WAF1

  9. The Sinorhizobium (Ensifer) fredii HH103 Nodulation Outer Protein NopI Is a Determinant for Efficient Nodulation of Soybean and Cowpea Plants.

    PubMed

    Jiménez-Guerrero, Irene; Pérez-Montaño, Francisco; Medina, Carlos; Ollero, Francisco Javier; López-Baena, Francisco Javier

    2017-03-01

    The type III secretion system (T3SS) is a specialized secretion apparatus that is commonly used by many plant and animal pathogenic bacteria to deliver proteins, termed effectors, to the interior of the host cells. These effectors suppress host defenses and interfere with signal transduction pathways to promote infection. Some rhizobial strains possess a functional T3SS, which is involved in the suppression of host defense responses, host range determination, and symbiotic efficiency. The analysis of the genome of the broad-host-range rhizobial strain Sinorhizobium fredii HH103 identified eight genes that code for putative T3SS effectors. Three of these effectors, NopL, NopP, and NopI, are Rhizobium specific. In this work, we demonstrate that NopI, whose amino acid sequence shows a certain similarity with NopP, is secreted through the S. fredii HH103 T3SS in response to flavonoids. We also determined that NopL can be considered an effector since it is directly secreted to the interior of the host cell as demonstrated by adenylate cyclase assays. Finally, the symbiotic phenotype of single, double, and triple nopI, nopL, and nopP mutants in soybean and cowpea was assayed, showing that NopI plays an important role in determining the number of nodules formed in both legumes and that the absence of both NopL and NopP is highly detrimental for symbiosis.IMPORTANCE The paper is focused on three Rhizobium-specific T3SS effectors of Sinorhizobium fredii HH103, NopL, NopP, and NopI. We demonstrate that S. fredii HH103 is able to secrete through the T3SS in response to flavonoids the nodulation outer protein NopI. Additionally, we determined that NopL can be considered an effector since it is secreted to the interior of the host cell as demonstrated by adenylate cyclase assays. Finally, nodulation assays of soybean and cowpea indicated that NopI is important for the determination of the number of nodules formed and that the absence of both NopL and NopP negatively affected

  10. The Sinorhizobium (Ensifer) fredii HH103 Nodulation Outer Protein NopI Is a Determinant for Efficient Nodulation of Soybean and Cowpea Plants

    PubMed Central

    Jiménez-Guerrero, Irene; Pérez-Montaño, Francisco; Medina, Carlos; Ollero, Francisco Javier

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The type III secretion system (T3SS) is a specialized secretion apparatus that is commonly used by many plant and animal pathogenic bacteria to deliver proteins, termed effectors, to the interior of the host cells. These effectors suppress host defenses and interfere with signal transduction pathways to promote infection. Some rhizobial strains possess a functional T3SS, which is involved in the suppression of host defense responses, host range determination, and symbiotic efficiency. The analysis of the genome of the broad-host-range rhizobial strain Sinorhizobium fredii HH103 identified eight genes that code for putative T3SS effectors. Three of these effectors, NopL, NopP, and NopI, are Rhizobium specific. In this work, we demonstrate that NopI, whose amino acid sequence shows a certain similarity with NopP, is secreted through the S. fredii HH103 T3SS in response to flavonoids. We also determined that NopL can be considered an effector since it is directly secreted to the interior of the host cell as demonstrated by adenylate cyclase assays. Finally, the symbiotic phenotype of single, double, and triple nopI, nopL, and nopP mutants in soybean and cowpea was assayed, showing that NopI plays an important role in determining the number of nodules formed in both legumes and that the absence of both NopL and NopP is highly detrimental for symbiosis. IMPORTANCE The paper is focused on three Rhizobium-specific T3SS effectors of Sinorhizobium fredii HH103, NopL, NopP, and NopI. We demonstrate that S. fredii HH103 is able to secrete through the T3SS in response to flavonoids the nodulation outer protein NopI. Additionally, we determined that NopL can be considered an effector since it is secreted to the interior of the host cell as demonstrated by adenylate cyclase assays. Finally, nodulation assays of soybean and cowpea indicated that NopI is important for the determination of the number of nodules formed and that the absence of both NopL and NopP negatively

  11. A Chemotaxis Receptor Modulates Nodulation during the Azorhizobium caulinodans-Sesbania rostrata Symbiosis

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Nan; Liu, Wei; Li, Yan; Wu, Hailong; Zhang, Zhenhai; Elmerich, Claudine

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Azorhizobium caulinodans ORS571 is a free-living nitrogen-fixing bacterium which can induce nitrogen-fixing nodules both on the root and the stem of its legume host Sesbania rostrata. This bacterium, which is an obligate aerobe that moves by means of a polar flagellum, possesses a single chemotaxis signal transduction pathway. The objective of this work was to examine the role that chemotaxis and aerotaxis play in the lifestyle of the bacterium in free-living and symbiotic conditions. In bacterial chemotaxis, chemoreceptors sense environmental changes and transmit this information to the chemotactic machinery to guide motile bacteria to preferred niches. Here, we characterized a chemoreceptor of A. caulinodans containing an N-terminal PAS domain, named IcpB. IcpB is a soluble heme-binding protein that localized at the cell poles. An icpB mutant strain was impaired in sensing oxygen gradients and in chemotaxis response to organic acids. Compared to the wild-type strain, the icpB mutant strain was also affected in the production of extracellular polysaccharides and impaired in flocculation. When inoculated alone, the icpB mutant induced nodules on S. rostrata, but the nodules formed were smaller and had reduced N2-fixing activity. The icpB mutant failed to nodulate its host when inoculated competitively with the wild-type strain. Together, the results identify chemotaxis and sensing of oxygen by IcpB as key regulators of the A. caulinodans-S. rostrata symbiosis. IMPORTANCE Bacterial chemotaxis has been implicated in the establishment of various plant-microbe associations, including that of rhizobial symbionts with their legume host. The exact signal(s) detected by the motile bacteria that guide them to their plant hosts remain poorly characterized. Azorhizobium caulinodans ORS571 is a diazotroph that is a motile and chemotactic rhizobial symbiont of Sesbania rostrata, where it forms nitrogen-fixing nodules on both the roots and the stems of the legume host

  12. A Chemotaxis Receptor Modulates Nodulation during the Azorhizobium caulinodans-Sesbania rostrata Symbiosis.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Nan; Liu, Wei; Li, Yan; Wu, Hailong; Zhang, Zhenhai; Alexandre, Gladys; Elmerich, Claudine; Xie, Zhihong

    2016-06-01

    Azorhizobium caulinodans ORS571 is a free-living nitrogen-fixing bacterium which can induce nitrogen-fixing nodules both on the root and the stem of its legume host Sesbania rostrata This bacterium, which is an obligate aerobe that moves by means of a polar flagellum, possesses a single chemotaxis signal transduction pathway. The objective of this work was to examine the role that chemotaxis and aerotaxis play in the lifestyle of the bacterium in free-living and symbiotic conditions. In bacterial chemotaxis, chemoreceptors sense environmental changes and transmit this information to the chemotactic machinery to guide motile bacteria to preferred niches. Here, we characterized a chemoreceptor of A. caulinodans containing an N-terminal PAS domain, named IcpB. IcpB is a soluble heme-binding protein that localized at the cell poles. An icpB mutant strain was impaired in sensing oxygen gradients and in chemotaxis response to organic acids. Compared to the wild-type strain, the icpB mutant strain was also affected in the production of extracellular polysaccharides and impaired in flocculation. When inoculated alone, the icpB mutant induced nodules on S. rostrata, but the nodules formed were smaller and had reduced N2-fixing activity. The icpB mutant failed to nodulate its host when inoculated competitively with the wild-type strain. Together, the results identify chemotaxis and sensing of oxygen by IcpB as key regulators of the A. caulinodans-S. rostrata symbiosis. Bacterial chemotaxis has been implicated in the establishment of various plant-microbe associations, including that of rhizobial symbionts with their legume host. The exact signal(s) detected by the motile bacteria that guide them to their plant hosts remain poorly characterized. Azorhizobium caulinodans ORS571 is a diazotroph that is a motile and chemotactic rhizobial symbiont of Sesbania rostrata, where it forms nitrogen-fixing nodules on both the roots and the stems of the legume host. We identify here a

  13. Thyroid nodules and cancers in children.

    PubMed

    Josefson, Jami; Zimmerman, Donald

    2008-09-01

    The incidence of thyroid nodules in children is estimated to be 1 to 1.5% based on clinical examination. Children with thyroid nodules, compared to adults with thyroid nodules, have a fourfold greater risk of developing malignant thyroid disease. Differentiated thyroid carcinoma is the most common pediatric endocrine tumor, constituting 0.5-3% of all childhood malignancies. The thyroid is one of the most frequent sites of secondary neoplasm in children who receive radiation therapy for other malignancies. Thyroid carcinoma has been studied extensively in adults. However, the pediatric literature on this subject is much less complete, owing to the rarity of its diagnosis. This article reviews the predisposing factors, genetics, pathology, pathogenesis , clinical presentation, detailed treatment and follow-up management of children with thyroid carcinoma. Additionally, a discussion regarding the controversial aspects of radioiodine therapy in children is included.

  14. Symbiotic Effectiveness of Rhizobial Mutualists Varies in Interactions with Native Australian Legume Genera

    PubMed Central

    Thrall, Peter H.; Laine, Anna-Liisa; Broadhurst, Linda M.; Bagnall, David J.; Brockwell, John

    2011-01-01

    Background and Objectives Interactions between plants and beneficial soil organisms (e.g. rhizobial bacteria, mycorrhizal fungi) are models for investigating the ecological impacts of such associations in plant communities, and the evolution and maintenance of variation in mutualisms (e.g. host specificity and the level of benefits provided). With relatively few exceptions, variation in symbiotic effectiveness across wild host species is largely unexplored. Methods We evaluated these associations using representatives of several legume genera which commonly co-occur in natural ecosystems in south-eastern Australia and an extensive set of rhizobial strains isolated from these hosts. These strains had been previously assigned to specific phylotypes on the basis of molecular analyses. In the first of two inoculation experiments, the growth responses of each host species was evaluated with rhizobial strains isolated from that species. The second experiment assessed performance across genera and the extent of host specificity using a subset of these strains. Results While host growth responses to their own (sympatric) isolates varied considerably, rhizobial phylotype was a significant predictor of symbiotic performance, indicating that bacterial species designations on the basis of molecular markers have ecological importance. Hosts responded in qualitatively different ways to sympatric and allopatric strains of rhizobia, ranging from species with a clear preference for their own strains, to those that were broad generalists, through to species that grew significantly better with allopatric strains. Conclusion Theory has focused on trade-offs between the provision of benefits and symbiont competitive ability that might explain the persistence of less beneficial strains. However, differences in performance among co-occurring host species could also drive such patterns. Our results thus highlight the likely importance of plant community structure in maintaining variation

  15. Remodeling of the infection chamber before infection thread formation reveals a two-step mechanism for rhizobial entry into the host legume root hair.

    PubMed

    Fournier, Joëlle; Teillet, Alice; Chabaud, Mireille; Ivanov, Sergey; Genre, Andrea; Limpens, Erik; de Carvalho-Niebel, Fernanda; Barker, David G

    2015-04-01

    In many legumes, root entry of symbiotic nitrogen-fixing rhizobia occurs via host-constructed tubular tip-growing structures known as infection threads (ITs). Here, we have used a confocal microscopy live-tissue imaging approach to investigate early stages of IT formation in Medicago truncatula root hairs (RHs) expressing fluorescent protein fusion reporters. This has revealed that ITs only initiate 10 to 20 h after the completion of RH curling, by which time major modifications have occurred within the so-called infection chamber, the site of bacterial entrapment. These include the accumulation of exocytosis (M. truncatula Vesicle-Associated Membrane Protein721e)- and cell wall (M. truncatula EARLY NODULIN11)-associated markers, concomitant with radial expansion of the chamber. Significantly, the infection-defective M. truncatula nodule inception-1 mutant is unable to create a functional infection chamber. This underlines the importance of the NIN-dependent phase of host cell wall remodeling that accompanies bacterial proliferation and precedes IT formation, and leads us to propose a two-step model for rhizobial infection initiation in legume RHs.

  16. Isolation and Characterization of Alfalfa-Nodulating Rhizobia Present in Acidic Soils of Central Argentina and Uruguay

    PubMed Central

    del Papa, María F.; Balagué, Laura J.; Sowinski, Susana Castro; Wegener, Caren; Segundo, Eduardo; Abarca, Francisco Martínez; Toro, Nicolás; Niehaus, Karsten; Pühler, Alfred; Aguilar, O. Mario; Martínez-Drets, Gloria; Lagares, Antonio

    1999-01-01

    We describe the isolation and characterization of alfalfa-nodulating rhizobia from acid soils of different locations in Central Argentina and Uruguay. A collection of 465 isolates was assembled, and the rhizobia were characterized for acid tolerance. Growth tests revealed the existence of 15 acid-tolerant (AT) isolates which were able to grow at pH 5.0 and formed nodules in alfalfa with a low rate of nitrogen fixation. Analysis of those isolates, including partial sequencing of the genes encoding 16S rRNA and genomic PCR-fingerprinting with MBOREP1 and BOXC1 primers, demonstrated that the new isolates share a genetic background closely related to that of the previously reported Rhizobium sp. Or191 recovered from an acid soil in Oregon (B. D. Eardly, J. P. Young, and R. K. Selander, Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 58:1809–1815, 1992). Growth curves, melanin production, temperature tolerance, and megaplasmid profiles of the AT isolates were all coincident with these characteristics in strain Or191. In addition to the ability of all of these strains to nodulate alfalfa (Medicago sativa) inefficiently, the AT isolates also nodulated the common bean and Leucaena leucocephala, showing an extended host range for nodulation of legumes. In alfalfa, the time course of nodule formation by the AT isolate LPU 83 showed a continued nodulation restricted to the emerging secondary roots, which was probably related to the low rate of nitrogen fixation by the largely ineffective nodules. Results demonstrate the complexity of the rhizobial populations present in the acidic soils represented by a main group of N2-fixing rhizobia and a second group of ineffective and less-predominant isolates related to the AT strain Or191. PMID:10103231

  17. OxyR-regulated catalase activity is critical for oxidative stress resistance, nodulation and nitrogen fixation in Azorhizobium caulinodans.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yue; Nickels, Logan M; Wang, Hui; Ling, Jun; Zhong, Zengtao; Zhu, Jun

    2016-07-01

    The legume-rhizobial interaction results in the formation of symbiotic nodules in which rhizobia fix nitrogen. During the process of symbiosis, reactive oxygen species (ROS) are generated. Thus, the response of rhizobia to ROS is important for successful nodulation and nitrogen fixation. In this study, we investigated how Azorhizobium caulinodans, a rhizobium that forms both root and stem nodules on its host plant, regulates ROS resistance. We found that in-frame deletions of a gene encoding the putative catalase-peroxidase katG or a gene encoding a LysR-family regulatory protein, oxyR, exhibited increased sensitivity to H2O2 We then showed that OxyR positively regulated katG expression in an H2O2-independent fashion. Furthermore, we found that deletion of katG or oxyR led to significant reduction in the number of stem nodules and decrease of nitrogen fixation capacities in symbiosis. Our results revealed that KatG and OxyR are not only critical for antioxidant defense in vitro, but also important for nodule formation and nitrogen fixation during interaction with plant hosts. © FEMS 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Comparison of rhizobia that nodulate Medicago laciniata and Medicago truncatula present in a single Tunisian arid soil.

    PubMed

    Badri, Y; Zribi, K; Badri, M; Huguet, T; van Berkum, P; Aouani, M E

    2007-02-01

    The rhizobia present in a single arid region Tunisian soil that nodulate Medicago laciniata and Medicago truncatula were compared. All isolates, 40 from each host, were Sinorhizobium meliloti based on 16S rRNA polymerase chain reaction restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) patterns and subsequent confirmation by sequence analysis of the 16S rRNA genes in four representatives from each host species. There was no apparent relationship between Medicago host species of isolation and the nodulating rhizobial genome as determined by repetitive extragenic palandromic PCR. The isolates of M. laciniata were distinguished from those of M. truncatula present in the same soil by variation in PCR-RFLP of nifDK, indicating that this dissimilarity is originally genetic and not geographic. While forming effective symbioses with their own respective isolates, both M. laciniata and M. truncatula formed ineffective true nodules, nodule-like structures, or no nodules at all in cross-inoculation tests, as confirmed by the histological observations.

  19. Characterization of root-nodule bacteria isolated from Vicia faba and selection of plant growth promoting isolates.

    PubMed

    Saïdi, Sabrine; Chebil, Samir; Gtari, Maher; Mhamdi, Ridha

    2013-06-01

    A collection of 104 isolates from root-nodules of Vicia faba was submitted to 16S rRNA PCR-RFLP typing. A representative sample was further submitted to sequence analysis of 16S rRNA. Isolates were assigned to 12 genera. All the nodulating isolates (45 %) were closely related to Rhizobium leguminosarum USDA2370(T) (99.34 %). The remaining isolates, including potential human pathogens, failed to nodulate their original host. They were checked for presence of symbiotic genes, P-solubilization, phytohormone and siderophore production, and then tested for their growth promoting abilities. Results indicated that 9 strains could induce significant increase (41-71 %) in shoot dry yield of faba bean. A Pseudomonas strain was further assessed in on-farm trial in combination with a selected rhizobial strain. This work indicated that nodule-associated bacteria could be a valuable pool for selection of effective plant growth promoting isolates. Nevertheless, the possible involvement of nodules in increasing risks related to pathogenic bacteria should not be neglected and needs to be investigated further.

  20. NODULE INCEPTION Directly Targets NF-Y Subunit Genes to Regulate Essential Processes of Root Nodule Development in Lotus japonicus

    PubMed Central

    Soyano, Takashi; Kouchi, Hiroshi; Hirota, Atsuko; Hayashi, Makoto

    2013-01-01

    The interactions of legumes with symbiotic nitrogen-fixing bacteria cause the formation of specialized lateral root organs called root nodules. It has been postulated that this root nodule symbiosis system has recruited factors that act in early signaling pathways (common SYM genes) partly from the ancestral mycorrhizal symbiosis. However, the origins of factors needed for root nodule organogenesis are largely unknown. NODULE INCEPTION (NIN) is a nodulation-specific gene that encodes a putative transcription factor and acts downstream of the common SYM genes. Here, we identified two Nuclear Factor-Y (NF-Y) subunit genes, LjNF-YA1 and LjNF-YB1, as transcriptional targets of NIN in Lotus japonicus. These genes are expressed in root nodule primordia and their translational products interact in plant cells, indicating that they form an NF-Y complex in root nodule primordia. The knockdown of LjNF-YA1 inhibited root nodule organogenesis, as did the loss of function of NIN. Furthermore, we found that NIN overexpression induced root nodule primordium-like structures that originated from cortical cells in the absence of bacterial symbionts. Thus, NIN is a crucial factor responsible for initiating nodulation-specific symbiotic processes. In addition, ectopic expression of either NIN or the NF-Y subunit genes caused abnormal cell division during lateral root development. This indicated that the Lotus NF-Y subunits can function to stimulate cell division. Thus, transcriptional regulation by NIN, including the activation of the NF-Y subunit genes, induces cortical cell division, which is an initial step in root nodule organogenesis. Unlike the legume-specific NIN protein, NF-Y is a major CCAAT box binding protein complex that is widespread among eukaryotes. We propose that the evolution of root nodules in legume plants was associated with changes in the function of NIN. NIN has acquired functions that allow it to divert pathways involved in the regulation of cell division to

  1. Comparative genomics of rhizobia nodulating soybean suggests extensive recruitment of lineage-specific genes in adaptations.

    PubMed

    Tian, Chang Fu; Zhou, Yuan Jie; Zhang, Yan Ming; Li, Qin Qin; Zhang, Yun Zeng; Li, Dong Fang; Wang, Shuang; Wang, Jun; Gilbert, Luz B; Li, Ying Rui; Chen, Wen Xin

    2012-05-29

    The rhizobium-legume symbiosis has been widely studied as the model of mutualistic evolution and the essential component of sustainable agriculture. Extensive genetic and recent genomic studies have led to the hypothesis that many distinct strategies, regardless of rhizobial phylogeny, contributed to the varied rhizobium-legume symbiosis. We sequenced 26 genomes of Sinorhizobium and Bradyrhizobium nodulating soybean to test this hypothesis. The Bradyrhizobium core genome is disproportionally enriched in lipid and secondary metabolism, whereas several gene clusters known to be involved in osmoprotection and adaptation to alkaline pH are specific to the Sinorhizobium core genome. These features are consistent with biogeographic patterns of these bacteria. Surprisingly, no genes are specifically shared by these soybean microsymbionts compared with other legume microsymbionts. On the other hand, phyletic patterns of 561 known symbiosis genes of rhizobia reflected the species phylogeny of these soybean microsymbionts and other rhizobia. Similar analyses with 887 known functional genes or the whole pan genome of rhizobia revealed that only the phyletic distribution of functional genes was consistent with the species tree of rhizobia. Further evolutionary genetics revealed that recombination dominated the evolution of core genome. Taken together, our results suggested that faithfully vertical genes were rare compared with those with history of recombination including lateral gene transfer, although rhizobial adaptations to symbiotic interactions and other environmental conditions extensively recruited lineage-specific shell genes under direct or indirect control through the speciation process.

  2. Noduler an immune protein augments infection-induced cell proliferation through cross-talking with p38 MAPK.

    PubMed

    Satyavathi, Valluri V; Narra, Deepa; Nagaraju, Javaregowda

    2016-02-01

    Noduler, an immune protein that mediates nodule formation by binding to specific bacteria and hemocytes was previously reported in the wild tasar silkworm, Antheraea mylitta. However, the molecular mechanism underlying nodulation in lepidopterans remains unclear. The present study is performed to investigate the functional connection between Noduler with various signalling pathways. It was observed that Noduler is an upstream factor in the phenoloxidase cascade and its knockdown has no direct effect on Toll/Imd pathway inducible genes. Additionally, Noduler was shown to stimulate cell proliferation via activation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK). Inhibition of p38 in the infected hemocytes cultured in vitro resulted in reduced cell proliferation and melanization. These results suggest that Noduler mediates nodulation via p38/MAPK signalling. This is the first report implicating the p38 MAPK signalling pathway in the nodulation response of insects.

  3. NopP, a phosphorylated effector of Rhizobium sp. strain NGR234, is a major determinant of nodulation of the tropical legumes Flemingia congesta and Tephrosia vogelii.

    PubMed

    Skorpil, Peter; Saad, Maged M; Boukli, Nawal M; Kobayashi, Hajime; Ares-Orpel, Florencia; Broughton, William J; Deakin, William J

    2005-09-01

    Rhizobium sp. NGR234 nodulates many plants, some of which react to proteins secreted via a type three secretion system (T3SS) in a positive- (Flemingia congesta, Tephrosia vogelii) or negative- (Crotalaria juncea, Pachyrhizus tuberosus) manner. T3SSs are devices that Gram-negative bacteria use to inject effector proteins into the cytoplasm of eukaryotic cells. The only two rhizobial T3SS effector proteins characterized to date are NopL and NopP of NGR234. NopL can be phosphorylated by plant kinases and we show this to be true for NopP as well. Mutation of nopP leads to a dramatic reduction in nodule numbers on F. congesta and T. vogelii. Concomitant mutation of nopL and nopP further diminishes nodulation capacity to levels that, on T. vogelii, are lower than those produced by the T3SS null mutant NGR(Omega)rhcN. We also show that the T3SS of NGR234 secretes at least one additional effector, which remains to be identified. In other words, NGR234 secretes a cocktail of effectors, some of which have positive effects on nodulation of certain plants while others are perceived negatively and block nodulation. NopL and NopP are two components of this mix that extend the ability of NGR234 to nodulate certain legumes.

  4. The plant RWP-RK transcription factors: key regulators of nitrogen responses and of gametophyte development.

    PubMed

    Chardin, Camille; Girin, Thomas; Roudier, François; Meyer, Christian; Krapp, Anne

    2014-10-01

    The plant specific RWP-RK family of transcription factors, initially identified in legumes and Chlamydomonas, are found in all vascular plants, green algae, and slime molds. These proteins possess a characteristic RWP-RK motif, which mediates DNA binding. Based on phylogenetic and domain analyses, we classified the RWP-RK proteins of six different species in two subfamilies: the NIN-like proteins (NLPs), which carry an additional PB1 domain at their C-terminus, and the RWP-RK domain proteins (RKDs), which are divided into three subgroups. Although, the functional analysis of this family is still in its infancy, several RWP-RK proteins have a key role in regulating responses to nitrogen availability. The nodulation-specific NIN proteins are involved in nodule organogenesis and rhizobial infection under nitrogen starvation conditions. Arabidopsis NLP7 in particular is a major player in the primary nitrate response. Several RKDs act as transcription factors involved in egg cell specification and differentiation or gametogenesis in algae, the latter modulated by nitrogen availability. Further studies are required to extend the general picture of the functional role of these exciting transcription factors.

  5. Higher TSH can be used as an additional risk factor in prediction of malignancy in euthyroid thyroid nodules evaluated by cytology based on Bethesda system.

    PubMed

    Baser, Husniye; Topaloglu, Oya; Tam, Abbas Ali; Evranos, Berna; Alkan, Afra; Sungu, Nuran; Dumlu, Ersin Gurkan; Ersoy, Reyhan; Cakir, Bekir

    2016-08-01

    Recently, it has been suggested that thyrotropin (TSH) concentration can be used as a marker for prediction of thyroid malignancy. In this study, we aimed to investigate the association between TSH levels and prediction of malignancy in euthyroid patients with different Bethesda categories. The data of 1433 euthyroid patients with 3206 thyroid nodules who underwent thyroidectomy were screened retrospectively. The preoperative cytology results, thyroid function tests, thyroid autoantibodies, and presence of histopathological Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT) were recorded. Of the 1433 patients, 585 (40.8 %) had malignant and 848 (59.2 %) had benign histopathology. Malignant group had smaller nodule size, elevated TSH levels, and higher rate of presence of HT compared to benign group (p < 0.001, all). Cytology results of 3206 nodules were as follows: 832 nondiagnostic (ND), 1666 benign, 392 atypia of undetermined significance/follicular lesion of undetermined significance (AUS/FLUS), 68 follicular neoplasm/suspicious for follicular neoplasm (FN/SFN), 133 suspicious for malignancy (SM), and 115 malignant. Both SM and malignant cytology groups had higher TSH levels than other 4 Bethesda categories (p < 0.05, all). Benign cytology group had significantly lower TSH levels compared to other cytology groups (p < 0.05, all). Patients with malignant final histopathology in ND and AUS/FLUS cytology groups had significantly higher TSH levels compared to patients with benign final histopathology (p < 0.05, all). Moreover, TSH levels showed to increase from Bethesda categories II to VI. In addition to cytology, higher TSH levels can be used as a supplementary marker in prediction of malignancy in certain Bethesda categories.

  6. Nodulation of Lupinus albus by Strains of Ochrobactrum lupini sp. nov.

    PubMed Central

    Trujillo, Martha E.; Willems, Anne; Abril, Adriana; Planchuelo, Ana-María; Rivas, Raúl; Ludeña, Dolores; Mateos, Pedro F.; Martínez-Molina, Eustoquio; Velázquez, Encarna

    2005-01-01

    The nodulation of legumes has for more than a century been considered an exclusive capacity of a group of microorganisms commonly known as rhizobia and belonging to the α-Proteobacteria. However, in the last 3 years four nonrhizobial species, belonging to α and β subclasses of the Proteobacteria, have been described as legume-nodulating bacteria. In the present study, two fast-growing strains, LUP21 and LUP23, were isolated from nodules of Lupinus honoratus. The phylogenetic analysis based on the 16S and 23S rRNA gene sequences showed that the isolates belong to the genus Ochrobactrum. The strains were able to reinfect Lupinus plants. A plasmid profile analysis showed the presence of three plasmids. The nodD and nifH genes were located on these plasmids, and their sequences were obtained. These sequences showed a close resemblance to the nodD and nifH genes of rhizobial species, suggesting that the nodD and nifH genes carried by strain LUP21T were acquired by horizontal gene transfer. A polyphasic study including phenotypic, chemotaxonomic, and molecular features of the strains isolated in this study showed that they belong to a new species of the genus Ochrobactrum for which we propose the name Ochrobactrum lupini sp. nov. Strain LUP21T (LMG 20667T) is the type strain. PMID:15746334

  7. Cytisus villosus from Northeastern Algeria is nodulated by genetically diverse Bradyrhizobium strains.

    PubMed

    Ahnia, Hadjira; Boulila, Farida; Boulila, Abdelghani; Boucheffa, Karima; Durán, David; Bourebaba, Yasmina; Salmi, Adouda; Imperial, Juan; Ruiz-Argüeso, Tomás; Rey, Luis

    2014-06-01

    Fifty-one rhizobial strains isolated from root nodules of Cytisus villosus growing in Northeastern Algeria were characterized by genomic and phenotypic analyses. Isolates were grouped into sixteen different patterns by PCR-RAPD. The phylogenetic status of one representative isolate from each pattern was examined by multilocus sequence analyses of four housekeeping genes (16S rRNA, glnII, recA, and atpD) and one symbiotic gene (nodC). Analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences showed that all the isolates belonged to the genus Bradyrhizobium. Phylogenetic analyses based on individual or concatenated genes glnII, recA, and atpD indicated that strains cluster in three distinct groups. Ten out of the sixteen strains grouped together with Bradyrhizobium japonicum, while a second group of four clustered with Bradyrhizobium canariense. The third group, represented by isolates CTS8 and CTS57, differed significantly from all other bradyrhizobia known to nodulate members of the Genisteae tribe. In contrast with core genes, sequences of the nodC symbiotic gene from all the examined strains form a homogeneous group within the genistearum symbiovar of Bradyrhizobium. All strains tested nodulated Lupinus angustifolius, Lupinus luteus, and Spartium junceum but not Glycine max. From these results, it is concluded that C. villosus CTS8 and CTS57 strains represent a new lineage within the Bradyrhizobium genus.

  8. Transcriptome profiles reveal gene regulation of peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.) nodulation

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Ze; Liu, Fengxia; Wang, Liping; Zhou, Hai; Paudel, Dev; Tan, Lubin; Maku, James; Gallo, Maria; Wang, Jianping

    2017-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms of symbiosis in cultivated peanut with a ‘crack entry’ infection process are largely understudied. In this study, we investigated the root transcriptional profiles of two pairs of non-nodulating (nod−) and nodulating (nod+) sister inbred peanut lines, E4/E5 and E7/E6, and their nod+ parents, F487A and PI262090 during rhizobial infection and nodule initiation by using RNA-seq technology. A total of 143, 101, 123, 215, 182, and 289 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were identified in nod− E4, E7 and nod+ E5, E6, F487A, and PI262090 after inoculation with Bradyrhizobium sp. Different deficiencies at upstream of symbiotic signaling pathway were revealed in the two nod− genotypes. DEGs specific in nod+ genotypes included orthologs to some known symbiotic signaling pathway genes, such as NFR5, NSP2, NIN, ERN1, and many other novel and/or functionally unknown genes. Gene ontology (GO) enrichment analysis of nod+ specific DEGs revealed 54 significantly enriched GO terms, including oxidation-reduction process, metabolic process, and catalytic activity. Genes related with plant defense systems, hormone biosynthesis and response were particularly enriched. To our knowledge, this is the first report revealing symbiosis-related genes in a genome-wide manner in peanut representative of the ‘crack entry’ species. PMID:28059169

  9. Chemical control of interstrain competition for soybean nodulation by Bradyrhizobium japonicum.

    PubMed Central

    Cunningham, S; Kollmeyer, W D; Stacey, G

    1991-01-01

    Previous research has shown that a significant limitation to the agricultural use of improved rhizobial inoculant strains is competition from the indigenous soil population. In this work, we sought to test whether chemical inhibitors of flavonoid-induced nod gene expression in Bradyrhizobium japonicum could be identified and utilized to affect interstrain competition for nodulation of soybeans. Approximately 1,000 structural and functional analogs of the known, natural inducers of nod gene expression were tested on six strains of B. japonicum containing a nodY-lacZ fusion. We successfully identified effective inhibitors of nodY expression. The addition of the inhibitor 7-hydroxy-5-methylflavone significantly inhibited nodulation by a sensitive strain and could be used to effectively manipulate the competition between strains for soybean nodulation. However, this work also uncovered significant limitations for the practical use of this methodology. For example, despite the almost universal induction response to the identified natural inducers, there was a wide variability among strains in their response to any specific inhibitor. Given this unexpected variability, the cost of registration of an agronomic chemical, and the potential for the development of resistant field populations, it is unlikely that chemical inhibitors can be successfully applied to a field situation. PMID:1892378

  10. Genome sequence of the Medicago-nodulating Ensifer meliloti commercial inoculant strain RRI128

    PubMed Central

    Reeve, Wayne; Ballard, Ross; Drew, Elizabeth; Tian, Rui; Bräu, Lambert; Goodwin, Lynne; Huntemann, Marcel; Han, James; Tatiparthi, Reddy; Chen, Amy; Mavrommatis, Konstantinos; Markowitz, Victor; Palaniappan, Krishna; Ivanova, Natalia; Pati, Amrita; Woyke, Tanja; Kyrpides, Nikos

    2014-01-01

    Ensifer meliloti strain RRI128 is an aerobic, motile, Gram-negative, non-spore-forming rod. RRI128 was isolated from a nodule recovered from the roots of barrel medic (Medicago truncatula) grown in the greenhouse and inoculated with soil collected from Victoria, Australia. The strain is used in commercial inoculants in Australia. RRI128 nodulates and forms an effective symbiosis with a diverse range of lucerne cultivars (Medicago sativa) and several species of annual medic (M. truncatula, Medicago littoralis and Medicago tornata), but forms an ineffective symbiosis with Medicago polymorpha. Here we describe the features of E. meliloti strain RRI128, together with genome sequence information and annotation. The 6,900,273 bp draft genome is arranged into 156 scaffolds of 157 contigs, contains 6,683 protein-coding genes and 87 RNA-only encoding genes, and is one of 100 rhizobial genomes sequenced as part of the DOE Joint Genome Institute 2010 Genomic Encyclopedia for Bacteria and Archaea-Root Nodule Bacteria (GEBA-RNB) project. PMID:25197447

  11. Genome sequence of the Medicago-nodulating Ensifer meliloti commercial inoculant strain RRI128.

    PubMed

    Reeve, Wayne; Ballard, Ross; Drew, Elizabeth; Tian, Rui; Bräu, Lambert; Goodwin, Lynne; Huntemann, Marcel; Han, James; Tatiparthi, Reddy; Chen, Amy; Mavrommatis, Konstantinos; Markowitz, Victor; Palaniappan, Krishna; Ivanova, Natalia; Pati, Amrita; Woyke, Tanja; Kyrpides, Nikos

    2014-06-15

    Ensifer meliloti strain RRI128 is an aerobic, motile, Gram-negative, non-spore-forming rod. RRI128 was isolated from a nodule recovered from the roots of barrel medic (Medicago truncatula) grown in the greenhouse and inoculated with soil collected from Victoria, Australia. The strain is used in commercial inoculants in Australia. RRI128 nodulates and forms an effective symbiosis with a diverse range of lucerne cultivars (Medicago sativa) and several species of annual medic (M. truncatula, Medicago littoralis and Medicago tornata), but forms an ineffective symbiosis with Medicago polymorpha. Here we describe the features of E. meliloti strain RRI128, together with genome sequence information and annotation. The 6,900,273 bp draft genome is arranged into 156 scaffolds of 157 contigs, contains 6,683 protein-coding genes and 87 RNA-only encoding genes, and is one of 100 rhizobial genomes sequenced as part of the DOE Joint Genome Institute 2010 Genomic Encyclopedia for Bacteria and Archaea-Root Nodule Bacteria (GEBA-RNB) project.

  12. Genome sequence of the clover-nodulating Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. trifolii strain SRDI565.

    PubMed Central

    Reeve, Wayne; Drew, Elizabeth; Ballard, Ross; Melino, Vanessa; Tian, Rui; De Meyer, Sofie; Brau, Lambert; Ninawi, Mohamed; Teshima, Hazuki; Goodwin, Lynne; Chain, Patrick; Liolios, Konstantinos; Pati, Amrita; Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Ivanova, Natalia; Markowitz, Victor; Woyke, Tanja; Kyrpides, Nikos

    2013-01-01

    Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. trifolii SRDI565 (syn. N8-J) is an aerobic, motile, Gram-negative, non-spore-forming rod. SRDI565 was isolated from a nodule recovered from the roots of the annual clover Trifolium subterraneum subsp. subterraneum grown in the greenhouse and inoculated with soil collected from New South Wales, Australia. SRDI565 has a broad host range for nodulation within the clover genus, however N2-fixation is sub-optimal with some Trifolium species and ineffective with others. Here we describe the features of R. leguminosarum bv. trifolii strain SRDI565, together with genome sequence information and annotation. The 6,905,599 bp high-quality-draft genome is arranged into 7 scaffolds of 7 contigs, contains 6,750 protein-coding genes and 86 RNA-only encoding genes, and is one of 100 rhizobial genomes sequenced as part of the DOE Joint Genome Institute 2010 Genomic Encyclopedia for Bacteria and Archaea-Root Nodule Bacteria (GEBA-RNB) project. PMID:24976879

  13. Hybrid Classification of Pulmonary Nodules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, S. L. A.; Kouzani, A. Z.; Hu, E. J.

    Automated classification of lung nodules is challenging because of the variation in shape and size of lung nodules, as well as their associated differences in their images. Ensemble based learners have demonstrated the potentialof good performance. Random forests are employed for pulmonary nodule classification where each tree in the forest produces a classification decision, and an integrated output is calculated. A classification aided by clustering approach is proposed to improve the lung nodule classification performance. Three experiments are performed using the LIDC lung image database of 32 cases. The classification performance and execution times are presented and discussed.

  14. Genome sequence of the Trifolium rueppellianum -nodulating Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. trifolii strain WSM2012.

    PubMed Central

    Reeve, Wayne; Melino, Vanessa; Ardley, Julie; Tian, Rui; De Meyer, Sofie; Terpolilli, Jason; Tiwari, Ravi; Yates, Ronald; O’Hara, Graham; Howieson, John; Ninawi, Mohamed; Held, Brittany; Bruce, David; Detter, Chris; Tapia, Roxanne; Han, Cliff; Wei, Chia-Lin; Huntemann, Marcel; Han, James; Chen, I-Min; Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Markowitz, Victor; Szeto, Ernest; Ivanova, Natalia; Mikhailova, Natalia; Pagani, Ioanna; Pati, Amrita; Goodwin, Lynne; Woyke, Tanja; Kyrpides, Nikos

    2013-01-01

    Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. trifolii WSM2012 (syn. MAR1468) is an aerobic, motile, Gram-negative, non-spore-forming rod that was isolated from an ineffective root nodule recovered from the roots of the annual clover Trifolium rueppellianum Fresen growing in Ethiopia. WSM2012 has a narrow, specialized host range for N2-fixation. Here we describe the features of R. leguminosarum bv. trifolii strain WSM2012, together with genome sequence information and annotation. The 7,180,565 bp high-quality-draft genome is arranged into 6 scaffolds of 68 contigs, contains 7,080 protein-coding genes and 86 RNA-only encoding genes, and is one of 20 rhizobial genomes sequenced as part of the DOE Joint Genome Institute 2010 Community Sequencing Program. PMID:24976885

  15. Genome sequence of the South American clover-nodulating Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. trifolii strain WSM597

    PubMed Central

    Reeve, Wayne; Terpolilli, Jason; Melino, Vanessa; Ardley, Julie; Tian, Rui; De Meyer, Sofie; Tiwari, Ravi; Yates, Ronald; O’Hara, Graham; Howieson, John; Ninawi, Mohamed; Held, Brittany; Bruce, David; Detter, Chris; Tapia, Roxanne; Han, Cliff; Wei, Chia-Lin; Huntemann, Marcel; Han, James; Chen, I-Min; Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Markowitz, Victor; Ivanova, Natalia; Ovchinnikova, Galina; Pagani, Ioanna; Pati, Amrita; Goodwin, Lynne; Woyke, Tanja; Kyrpides, Nikos

    2013-01-01

    Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. trifolii strain WSM597 is an aerobic, motile, Gram-negative, non-spore-forming rod isolated from a root nodule of the annual clover Trifolium pallidum L. growing at Glencoe Research Station near Tacuarembó, Uruguay. This strain is generally ineffective for nitrogen (N2) fixation with clovers of Mediterranean, North American and African origin, but is effective on the South American perennial clover T. polymorphum Poir. Here we describe the features of R. leguminosarum bv. trifolii strain WSM597, together with genome sequence information and annotation. The 7,634,384 bp high-quality-draft genome is arranged in 2 scaffolds of 53 contigs, contains 7,394 protein-coding genes and 87 RNA-only encoding genes, and is one of 20 rhizobial genomes sequenced as part of the DOE Joint Genome Institute 2010 Community Sequencing Program. PMID:24976883

  16. Genome sequence of the Lebeckia ambigua-nodulating "Burkholderia sprentiae" strain WSM5005(T.).

    PubMed

    Reeve, Wayne; De Meyer, Sofie; Terpolilli, Jason; Melino, Vanessa; Ardley, Julie; Rui, Tian; Tiwari, Ravi; Howieson, John; Yates, Ron; O'Hara, Graham; Lu, Megan; Bruce, David; Detter, Chris; Tapia, Roxanne; Han, Cliff; Wei, Chia-Lin; Huntemann, Marcel; Han, James; Chen, I-Min; Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Markowitz, Victor; Szeto, Ernest; Ivanova, Natalia; Mikhailova, Natalia; Ovchinnikova, Galina; Pagani, Ioanna; Pati, Amrita; Goodwin, Lynne; Peters, Lin; Pitluck, Sam; Woyke, Tanja; Kyrpides, Nikos

    2013-12-20

    "Burkholderia sprentiae" strain WSM5005(T) is an aerobic, motile, Gram-negative, non-spore-forming rod that was isolated in Australia from an effective N2-fixing root nodule of Lebeckia ambigua collected in Klawer, Western Cape of South Africa, in October 2007. Here we describe the features of "Burkholderia sprentiae" strain WSM5005(T), together with the genome sequence and its annotation. The 7,761,063 bp high-quality-draft genome is arranged in 8 scaffolds of 236 contigs, contains 7,147 protein-coding genes and 76 RNA-only encoding genes, and is one of 20 rhizobial genomes sequenced as part of the DOE Joint Genome Institute 2010 Community Sequencing Program.

  17. Genome sequence of the Ornithopus/Lupinus-nodulating Bradyrhizobium sp. strain WSM471

    PubMed Central

    Reeve, Wayne; De Meyer, Sofie; Terpolilli, Jason; Melino, Vanessa; Ardley, Julie; Tian, Rui; Tiwari, Ravi; Howieson, John; Yates, Ronald; O’Hara, Graham; Ninawi, Mohamed; Lu, Megan; Bruce, David; Detter, Chris; Tapia, Roxanne; Han, Cliff; Wei, Chia-Lin; Huntemann, Marcel; Han, James; Chen, I-Min; Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Markowitz, Victor; Ivanova, Natalia; Pagani, Ioanna; Pati, Amrita; Goodwin, Lynne; Woyke, Tanja; Kyrpides, Nikos

    2013-01-01

    Bradyrhizobium sp. strain WSM471 is an aerobic, motile, Gram-negative, non-spore-forming rod that was isolated from an effective nitrogen- (N2) fixing root nodule formed on the annual legume Ornithopus pinnatus (Miller) Druce growing at Oyster Harbour, Albany district, Western Australia in 1982. This strain is in commercial production as an inoculant for Lupinus and Ornithopus. Here we describe the features of Bradyrhizobium sp. strain WSM471, together with genome sequence information and annotation. The 7,784,016 bp high-quality-draft genome is arranged in 1 scaffold of 2 contigs, contains 7,372 protein-coding genes and 58 RNA-only encoding genes, and is one of 20 rhizobial genomes sequenced as part of the DOE Joint Genome Institute 2010 Community Sequencing Program. PMID:24976882

  18. Genome sequence of the South American clover-nodulating Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. trifolii strain WSM597.

    PubMed

    Reeve, Wayne; Terpolilli, Jason; Melino, Vanessa; Ardley, Julie; Tian, Rui; De Meyer, Sofie; Tiwari, Ravi; Yates, Ronald; O'Hara, Graham; Howieson, John; Ninawi, Mohamed; Held, Brittany; Bruce, David; Detter, Chris; Tapia, Roxanne; Han, Cliff; Wei, Chia-Lin; Huntemann, Marcel; Han, James; Chen, I-Min; Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Markowitz, Victor; Ivanova, Natalia; Ovchinnikova, Galina; Pagani, Ioanna; Pati, Amrita; Goodwin, Lynne; Woyke, Tanja; Kyrpides, Nikos

    2013-12-20

    Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. trifolii strain WSM597 is an aerobic, motile, Gram-negative, non-spore-forming rod isolated from a root nodule of the annual clover Trifolium pallidum L. growing at Glencoe Research Station near Tacuarembó, Uruguay. This strain is generally ineffective for nitrogen (N2) fixation with clovers of Mediterranean, North American and African origin, but is effective on the South American perennial clover T. polymorphum Poir. Here we describe the features of R. leguminosarum bv. trifolii strain WSM597, together with genome sequence information and annotation. The 7,634,384 bp high-quality-draft genome is arranged in 2 scaffolds of 53 contigs, contains 7,394 protein-coding genes and 87 RNA-only encoding genes, and is one of 20 rhizobial genomes sequenced as part of the DOE Joint Genome Institute 2010 Community Sequencing Program.

  19. Genome sequence of the Ornithopus/Lupinus-nodulating Bradyrhizobium sp. strain WSM471.

    PubMed

    Reeve, Wayne; De Meyer, Sofie; Terpolilli, Jason; Melino, Vanessa; Ardley, Julie; Tian, Rui; Tiwari, Ravi; Howieson, John; Yates, Ronald; O'Hara, Graham; Ninawi, Mohamed; Lu, Megan; Bruce, David; Detter, Chris; Tapia, Roxanne; Han, Cliff; Wei, Chia-Lin; Huntemann, Marcel; Han, James; Chen, I-Min; Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Markowitz, Victor; Ivanova, Natalia; Pagani, Ioanna; Pati, Amrita; Goodwin, Lynne; Woyke, Tanja; Kyrpides, Nikos

    2013-12-20

    Bradyrhizobium sp. strain WSM471 is an aerobic, motile, Gram-negative, non-spore-forming rod that was isolated from an effective nitrogen- (N2) fixing root nodule formed on the annual legume Ornithopus pinnatus (Miller) Druce growing at Oyster Harbour, Albany district, Western Australia in 1982. This strain is in commercial production as an inoculant for Lupinus and Ornithopus. Here we describe the features of Bradyrhizobium sp. strain WSM471, together with genome sequence information and annotation. The 7,784,016 bp high-quality-draft genome is arranged in 1 scaffold of 2 contigs, contains 7,372 protein-coding genes and 58 RNA-only encoding genes, and is one of 20 rhizobial genomes sequenced as part of the DOE Joint Genome Institute 2010 Community Sequencing Program.

  20. Genome sequence of the Lebeckia ambigua-nodulating “Burkholderia sprentiae” strain WSM5005T

    PubMed Central

    Reeve, Wayne; De Meyer, Sofie; Terpolilli, Jason; Melino, Vanessa; Ardley, Julie; Rui, Tian; Tiwari, Ravi; Howieson, John; Yates, Ron; O’Hara, Graham; Lu, Megan; Bruce, David; Detter, Chris; Tapia, Roxanne; Han, Cliff; Wei, Chia-Lin; Huntemann, Marcel; Han, James; Chen, I-Min; Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Markowitz, Victor; Szeto, Ernest; Ivanova, Natalia; Mikhailova, Natalia; Ovchinnikova, Galina; Pagani, Ioanna; Pati, Amrita; Goodwin, Lynne; Peters, Lin; Pitluck, Sam; Woyke, Tanja; Kyrpides, Nikos

    2013-01-01

    “Burkholderia sprentiae” strain WSM5005T is an aerobic, motile, Gram-negative, non-spore-forming rod that was isolated in Australia from an effective N2-fixing root nodule of Lebeckia ambigua collected in Klawer, Western Cape of South Africa, in October 2007. Here we describe the features of “Burkholderia sprentiae” strain WSM5005T, together with the genome sequence and its annotation. The 7,761,063 bp high-quality-draft genome is arranged in 8 scaffolds of 236 contigs, contains 7,147 protein-coding genes and 76 RNA-only encoding genes, and is one of 20 rhizobial genomes sequenced as part of the DOE Joint Genome Institute 2010 Community Sequencing Program. PMID:24976894

  1. Genome sequence of the Trifolium rueppellianum -nodulating Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. trifolii strain WSM2012.

    PubMed

    Reeve, Wayne; Melino, Vanessa; Ardley, Julie; Tian, Rui; De Meyer, Sofie; Terpolilli, Jason; Tiwari, Ravi; Yates, Ronald; O'Hara, Graham; Howieson, John; Ninawi, Mohamed; Held, Brittany; Bruce, David; Detter, Chris; Tapia, Roxanne; Han, Cliff; Wei, Chia-Lin; Huntemann, Marcel; Han, James; Chen, I-Min; Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Markowitz, Victor; Szeto, Ernest; Ivanova, Natalia; Mikhailova, Natalia; Pagani, Ioanna; Pati, Amrita; Goodwin, Lynne; Woyke, Tanja; Kyrpides, Nikos

    2013-12-20

    Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. trifolii WSM2012 (syn. MAR1468) is an aerobic, motile, Gram-negative, non-spore-forming rod that was isolated from an ineffective root nodule recovered from the roots of the annual clover Trifolium rueppellianum Fresen growing in Ethiopia. WSM2012 has a narrow, specialized host range for N2-fixation. Here we describe the features of R. leguminosarum bv. trifolii strain WSM2012, together with genome sequence information and annotation. The 7,180,565 bp high-quality-draft genome is arranged into 6 scaffolds of 68 contigs, contains 7,080 protein-coding genes and 86 RNA-only encoding genes, and is one of 20 rhizobial genomes sequenced as part of the DOE Joint Genome Institute 2010 Community Sequencing Program.

  2. Interactions between ethylene, gibberellins, and brassinosteroids in the development of rhizobial and mycorrhizal symbioses of pea

    PubMed Central

    Foo, Eloise; McAdam, Erin L.; Weller, James L.; Reid, James B.

    2016-01-01

    The regulation of arbuscular mycorrhizal development and nodulation involves complex interactions between the plant and its microbial symbionts. In this study, we use the recently identified ethylene-insensitive ein2 mutant in pea (Pisum sativum L.) to explore the role of ethylene in the development of these symbioses. We show that ethylene acts as a strong negative regulator of nodulation, confirming reports in other legumes. Minor changes in gibberellin1 and indole-3-acetic acid levels in ein2 roots appear insufficient to explain the differences in nodulation. Double mutants produced by crosses between ein2 and the severely gibberellin-deficient na and brassinosteroid-deficient lk mutants showed increased nodule numbers and reduced nodule spacing compared with the na and lk single mutants, but nodule numbers and spacing were typical of ein2 plants, suggesting that the reduced number of nodules in na and lk plants is largely due to the elevated ethylene levels previously reported in these mutants. We show that ethylene can also negatively regulate mycorrhizae development when ethylene levels are elevated above basal levels, consistent with a role for ethylene in reducing symbiotic development under stressful conditions. In contrast to the hormone interactions in nodulation, ein2 does not override the effect of lk or na on the development of arbuscular mycorrhizae, suggesting that brassinosteroids and gibberellins influence this process largely independently of ethylene. PMID:26889005

  3. Interactions between ethylene, gibberellins, and brassinosteroids in the development of rhizobial and mycorrhizal symbioses of pea.

    PubMed

    Foo, Eloise; McAdam, Erin L; Weller, James L; Reid, James B

    2016-04-01

    The regulation of arbuscular mycorrhizal development and nodulation involves complex interactions between the plant and its microbial symbionts. In this study, we use the recently identified ethylene-insensitive ein2 mutant in pea (Pisum sativum L.) to explore the role of ethylene in the development of these symbioses. We show that ethylene acts as a strong negative regulator of nodulation, confirming reports in other legumes. Minor changes in gibberellin1 and indole-3-acetic acid levels in ein2 roots appear insufficient to explain the differences in nodulation. Double mutants produced by crosses between ein2 and the severely gibberellin-deficient na and brassinosteroid-deficient lk mutants showed increased nodule numbers and reduced nodule spacing compared with the na and lk single mutants, but nodule numbers and spacing were typical of ein2 plants, suggesting that the reduced number of nodules innaandlkplants is largely due to the elevated ethylene levels previously reported in these mutants. We show that ethylene can also negatively regulate mycorrhizae development when ethylene levels are elevated above basal levels, consistent with a role for ethylene in reducing symbiotic development under stressful conditions. In contrast to the hormone interactions in nodulation, ein2 does not override the effect of lk or na on the development of arbuscular mycorrhizae, suggesting that brassinosteroids and gibberellins influence this process largely independently of ethylene.

  4. Bacteriology of Manganese Nodules

    PubMed Central

    Trimble, R. B.; Ehrlich, H. L.

    1968-01-01

    MnO2 reduction by aerobic growing cultures of Bacillus 29 and coccus 32, isolated from ferromanganese nodules, was assessed for 7 days. A 1-day lag was observed before the onset of MnO2 reduction by either culture. Addition of HgCl2 to a final concentration of about 10-3 M caused a rapid cessation of MnO2 reduction by the growing cultures. Neither culture reduced MnO2 when grown under continued anaerobiosis from the start of an experiment. However, if conditions were made anaerobic after MnO2 reduction was initiated, reduction continued at a rate only slightly lower than that under aerobic conditions. Resting-cell cultures reduced MnO2 equally well aerobically and anaerobically, provided that ferricyanide was present to serve as electron carrier. These findings showed that oxygen is needed for culture adaptation to MnO2 reduction, and that oxygen does not interfere with microbial MnO2 reduction itself. Both cultures caused sharp drops in the pH of the medium during MnO2 reduction: with coccus 32, during the entire incubation time; with Bacillus 29, for the first 3 days. The Eh of the medium fluctuated with either culture and never fell below 469 mv with Bacillus 29 and below 394 mv with coccus 32. The rates of glucose consumption and Mn2+ release by Bacillus 29 and coccus 32 were fairly constant, but the rates of lactate and pyruvate production were not. Although acid production undoubtedly helped in the reduction of pyrolusite (MnO2) by the bacteria, it did not appear to be important in the reduction of manganese oxide in ferromanganese nodules, as shown by the results with a nodule enrichment. PMID:16349802

  5. Multiple pulmonary rheumatoid nodules.

    PubMed

    Sargin, Gokhan; Senturk, Taskin

    2015-01-01

    We present a case of 45-year-old female patient with the diagnosis of seropositive rheumatoid arthritis, who was admitted to our rheumatology department with exacerbation of the disease. The patient's disease activity score (DAS 28) was 6.9. Physical examination revealed changes in the lung auscultation as a rough breathing sound at the middle and lower lobe of the right lung. Chest X-ray revealed multiple nodular densities in both lungs. Lung biopsy was performed for the diagnosis and revealed necrotizing granulomas with central fibrinoid necrosis surrounded by epithelioid cells. Such a histopathological picture is typical for rheumatoid nodules. Finally the patient was treated with rituximab, with significant improvement.

  6. Toward precise pulmonary nodule descriptors for nodule type classification.

    PubMed

    Farag, Amal; Elhabian, Shireen; Graham, James; Farag, Aly; Falk, Robert

    2010-01-01

    A framework for nodule feature-based extraction is presented to classify lung nodules in low-dose CT slices (LDCT) into four categories: juxta, well-circumscribed, vascularized and pleural-tail, based on the extracted information. The Scale Invariant Feature Transform (SIFT) and an adaptation to Daugman's Iris Recognition algorithm are used for analysis. The SIFT descriptor results are projected to lower-dimensional subspaces using PCA and LDA. Complex Gabor wavelet nodule response obtained from an adopted Daugman Iris Recognition algorithm revealed improvements from the original Daugman binary iris code. This showed that binarized nodule responses (codes) are inadequate for classification since nodules lack texture concentration as seen in the iris, while the SIFT algorithm projected using PCA showed robustness and precision in classification.

  7. The GmFWL1 (FW2-2-like) nodulation gene encodes a plasma membrane microdomain-associated protein.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Zhenzhen; Brechenmacher, Laurent; Smith, Benjamin; Strout, Gregory W; Mangin, William; Taylor, Christopher; Russell, Scott D; Stacey, Gary; Libault, Marc

    2017-08-01

    The soybean gene GmFWL1 (FW2-2-like1) belongs to a plant-specific family that includes the tomato FW2-2 and the maize CNR1 genes, two regulators of plant development. In soybean, GmFWL1 is specifically expressed in root hair cells in response to rhizobia and in nodules. Silencing of GmFWL1 expression significantly reduced nodule numbers supporting its role during soybean nodulation. While the biological role of GmFWL1 has been described, its molecular function and, more generally, the molecular function of plant FW2-2-like proteins is unknown. In this study, we characterized the role of GmFWL1 as a membrane microdomain-associated protein. Specifically, using biochemical, molecular and cellular methods, our data show that GmFWL1 interacts with various proteins associated with membrane microdomains such as remorin, prohibitins and flotillins. Additionally, comparative genomics revealed that GmFWL1 interacts with GmFLOT2/4 (FLOTILLIN2/4), the soybean ortholog to Medicago truncatula FLOTILLIN4, a major regulator of the M. truncatula nodulation process. We also observed that, similarly to MtFLOT4 and GmFLOT2/4, GmFWL1 was localized at the tip of the soybean root hair cells in response to rhizobial inoculation supporting the early function of GmFWL1 in the rhizobium infection process. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Characterization of root-nodulating bacteria associated to Prosopis farcta growing in the arid regions of Tunisia.

    PubMed

    Fterich, A; Mahdhi, M; Caviedes, M A; Pajuelo, E; Rivas, R; Rodriguez-Llorente, I D; Mars, M

    2011-06-01

    Diversity of 50 bacterial isolates recovered from root nodules of Prosopis farcta grown in different arid soils in Tunisia, was investigated. Characterization of isolates was assessed using a polyphasic approach including phenotypic characteristics, 16S rRNA gene PCR--RFLP and sequencing, nodA gene sequencing and MLSA. It was found that most of isolates are tolerant to high temperature (40°C) and salinity (3%). Genetic characterization emphasizes that isolates were assigned to the genus Ensifer (80%), Mesorhizobium (4%) and non-nodulating endophytic bacteria (16%). Forty isolates belonging to the genus Ensifer were affiliated to Ensifer meliloti, Ensifer xinjiangense/Ensifer fredii and Ensifer numidicus species. Two isolates belonged to the genus Mesorhizobium. Eight isolates failing to renodulate their host plant were endophytic bacteria and belonged to Bacillus, Paenibacillus and Acinetobacter genera. Symbiotic properties of nodulating isolates showed a diversity in their capacity to infect their host plant and fix atmospheric nitrogen. Isolate PG29 identified as Ensifer meliloti was the most effective one. Ability of Prosopis farcta to establish symbiosis with rhizobial species confers an important advantage for this species to be used in reforestation programs. This study offered the first systematic information about the diversity of microsymbionts nodulating Prosopis farcta in the arid regions of Tunisia.

  9. Monitoring the colonization and infection of legume nodules by Micromonospora in co-inoculation experiments with rhizobia.

    PubMed

    Benito, Patricia; Alonso-Vega, Pablo; Aguado, Carolina; Luján, Rafael; Anzai, Yojiro; Hirsch, Ann M; Trujillo, Martha E

    2017-09-08

    The discovery that the actinobacterium Micromonospora inhabits nitrogen-fixing nodules raised questions as to its potential ecological role. The capacity of two Micromonospora strains to infect legumes other than their original host, Lupinus angustifolius, was investigated using Medicago and Trifolium as test plants. Compatible rhizobial strains were used for coinoculation of the plants because Micromonospora itself does not induce nodulation. Over 50% of nodules from each legume housed Micromonospora, and using 16S rRNA gene sequence identification, we verified that the reisolated strains corresponded to the microorganisms inoculated. Entry of the bacteria and colonization of the plant hosts were monitored using a GFP-tagged Lupac 08 mutant together with rhizobia, and by using immunogold labeling. Strain Lupac 08 was localized in plant tissues, confirming its capacity to enter and colonize all hosts. Based on studying three different plants, our results support a non-specific relationship between Micromonospora and legumes. Micromonospora Lupac 08, originally isolated from Lupinus re-enters root tissue, but only when coinoculated with the corresponding rhizobia. The ability of Micromonospora to infect and colonize different legume species and function as a potential plant-growth promoting bacterium is relevant because this microbe enhances the symbiosis without interfering with the host and its nodulating and nitrogen-fixing microbes.

  10. Rhizobial galactoglucan determines the predatory pattern of Myxococcus xanthus and protects Sinorhizobium meliloti from predation.

    PubMed

    Pérez, Juana; Jiménez-Zurdo, José I; Martínez-Abarca, Francisco; Millán, Vicenta; Shimkets, Lawrence J; Muñoz-Dorado, José

    2014-07-01

    Myxococcus xanthus is a social bacterium that preys on prokaryotic and eukaryotic microorganisms. Co-culture of M. xanthus with reference laboratory strains and field isolates of the legume symbiont Sinorhizobium meliloti revealed two different predatory patterns that resemble frontal and wolf-pack attacks. Use of mutants impaired in the two types of M. xanthus surface motility (A or adventurous and S or social motility) and a csgA mutant, which is unable to form macroscopic travelling waves known as ripples, has demonstrated that both motility systems but not rippling are required for efficient predation. To avoid frontal attack and reduce killing rates, rhizobial cells require a functional expR gene. ExpR regulates expression of genes involved in a variety of functions. The use of S. meliloti mutants impaired in several of these functions revealed that the exopolysaccharide galactoglucan (EPS II) is the major determinant of the M. xanthus predatory pattern. The data also suggest that this biopolymer confers an ecological advantage to rhizobial survival in soil, which may have broad environmental implications.

  11. Rhizobial galactoglucan determines the predatory pattern of Myxococcus xanthus and protects Sinorhizobium meliloti from predation

    PubMed Central

    Pérez, Juana; Jiménez-Zurdo, José I.; Martínez-Abarca, Francisco; Millán, Vicenta; Shimkets, Lawrence J.; Muñoz-Dorado, José

    2014-01-01

    Summary Myxococcus xanthus is a social bacterium that preys on prokaryotic and eukaryotic microorganisms. Co-culture of M. xanthus with reference laboratory strains and field isolates of the legume symbiont Sinorhizobium meliloti revealed two different predatory patterns that resemble frontal and wolfpack attacks. Use of mutants impaired in the two types of M. xanthus surface motility (A or adventurous and S or social motility) and a csgA mutant, which is unable to form macroscopic travelling waves known as ripples, has demonstrated that both motility systems but not rippling are required for efficient predation. To avoid frontal attack and reduce killing rates, rhizobial cells require a functional expR gene. ExpR regulates expression of genes involved in a variety of functions. The use of S. meliloti mutants impaired in several of these functions revealed that the exopolysaccharide galactoglucan (EPS II) is the major determinant of the M. xanthus predatory pattern. The data also suggest that this biopolymer confers an ecological advantage to rhizobial survival in soil, which may have broad environmental implications. PMID:24707988

  12. Dissecting the Root Nodule Transcriptome of Chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.).

    PubMed

    Kant, Chandra; Pradhan, Seema; Bhatia, Sabhyata

    2016-01-01

    A hallmark trait of chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.), like other legumes, is the capability to convert atmospheric nitrogen (N2) into ammonia (NH3) in symbiotic association with Mesorhizobium ciceri. However, the complexity of molecular networks associated with the dynamics of nodule development in chickpea need to be analyzed in depth. Hence, in order to gain insights into the chickpea nodule development, the transcriptomes of nodules at early, middle and late stages of development were sequenced using the Roche 454 platform. This generated 490.84 Mb sequence data comprising 1,360,251 reads which were assembled into 83,405 unigenes. Transcripts were annotated using Gene Ontology (GO), Cluster of Orthologous Groups (COG) and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) metabolic pathways analysis. Differential expression analysis revealed that a total of 3760 transcripts were differentially expressed in at least one of three stages, whereas 935, 117 and 2707 transcripts were found to be differentially expressed in the early, middle and late stages of nodule development respectively. MapMan analysis revealed enrichment of metabolic pathways such as transport, protein synthesis, signaling and carbohydrate metabolism during root nodulation. Transcription factors were predicted and analyzed for their differential expression during nodule development. Putative nodule specific transcripts were identified and enriched for GO categories using BiNGO which revealed many categories to be enriched during nodule development, including transcription regulators and transporters. Further, the assembled transcriptome was also used to mine for genic SSR markers. In conclusion, this study will help in enriching the transcriptomic resources implicated in understanding of root nodulation events in chickpea.

  13. Dissecting the Root Nodule Transcriptome of Chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.)

    PubMed Central

    Kant, Chandra; Pradhan, Seema; Bhatia, Sabhyata

    2016-01-01

    A hallmark trait of chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.), like other legumes, is the capability to convert atmospheric nitrogen (N2) into ammonia (NH3) in symbiotic association with Mesorhizobium ciceri. However, the complexity of molecular networks associated with the dynamics of nodule development in chickpea need to be analyzed in depth. Hence, in order to gain insights into the chickpea nodule development, the transcriptomes of nodules at early, middle and late stages of development were sequenced using the Roche 454 platform. This generated 490.84 Mb sequence data comprising 1,360,251 reads which were assembled into 83,405 unigenes. Transcripts were annotated using Gene Ontology (GO), Cluster of Orthologous Groups (COG) and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) metabolic pathways analysis. Differential expression analysis revealed that a total of 3760 transcripts were differentially expressed in at least one of three stages, whereas 935, 117 and 2707 transcripts were found to be differentially expressed in the early, middle and late stages of nodule development respectively. MapMan analysis revealed enrichment of metabolic pathways such as transport, protein synthesis, signaling and carbohydrate metabolism during root nodulation. Transcription factors were predicted and analyzed for their differential expression during nodule development. Putative nodule specific transcripts were identified and enriched for GO categories using BiNGO which revealed many categories to be enriched during nodule development, including transcription regulators and transporters. Further, the assembled transcriptome was also used to mine for genic SSR markers. In conclusion, this study will help in enriching the transcriptomic resources implicated in understanding of root nodulation events in chickpea. PMID:27348121

  14. Diverse Bacteria Affiliated with the Genera Microvirga, Phyllobacterium, and Bradyrhizobium Nodulate Lupinus micranthus Growing in Soils of Northern Tunisia.

    PubMed

    Msaddak, Abdelhakim; Durán, David; Rejili, Mokhtar; Mars, Mohamed; Ruiz-Argüeso, Tomás; Imperial, Juan; Palacios, José; Rey, Luis

    2017-03-15

    The genetic diversity of bacterial populations nodulating Lupinus micranthus in five geographical sites from northern Tunisia was examined. Phylogenetic analyses of 50 isolates based on partial sequences of recA and gyrB grouped strains into seven clusters, five of which belong to the genus Bradyrhizobium (28 isolates), one to Phyllobacterium (2 isolates), and one, remarkably, to Microvirga (20 isolates). The largest Bradyrhizobium cluster (17 isolates) grouped with the B. lupini species, and the other five clusters were close to different recently defined Bradyrhizobium species. Isolates close to Microvirga were obtained from nodules of plants from four of the five sites sampled. We carried out an in-depth phylogenetic study with representatives of the seven clusters using sequences from housekeeping genes (rrs, recA, glnII, gyrB, and dnaK) and obtained consistent results. A phylogeny based on the sequence of the symbiotic gene nodC identified four groups, three formed by Bradyrhizobium isolates and one by the Microvirga and Phyllobacterium isolates. Symbiotic behaviors of the representative strains were tested, and some congruence between symbiovars and symbiotic performance was observed. These data indicate a remarkable diversity of L. micranthus root nodule symbionts in northern Tunisia, including strains from the Bradyrhizobiaceae, Methylobacteriaceae, and Phyllobacteriaceae families, in contrast with those of the rhizobial populations nodulating lupines in the Old World, including L. micranthus from other Mediterranean areas, which are nodulated mostly by Bradyrhizobium strains.IMPORTANCELupinus micranthus is a legume broadly distributed in the Mediterranean region and plays an important role in soil fertility and vegetation coverage by fixing nitrogen and solubilizing phosphate in semiarid areas. Direct sowing to extend the distribution of this indigenous legume can contribute to the prevention of soil erosion in pre-Saharan lands of Tunisia. However

  15. Diverse Bacteria Affiliated with the Genera Microvirga, Phyllobacterium, and Bradyrhizobium Nodulate Lupinus micranthus Growing in Soils of Northern Tunisia

    PubMed Central

    Msaddak, Abdelhakim; Durán, David; Rejili, Mokhtar; Mars, Mohamed; Ruiz-Argüeso, Tomás; Imperial, Juan; Palacios, José

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT The genetic diversity of bacterial populations nodulating Lupinus micranthus in five geographical sites from northern Tunisia was examined. Phylogenetic analyses of 50 isolates based on partial sequences of recA and gyrB grouped strains into seven clusters, five of which belong to the genus Bradyrhizobium (28 isolates), one to Phyllobacterium (2 isolates), and one, remarkably, to Microvirga (20 isolates). The largest Bradyrhizobium cluster (17 isolates) grouped with the B. lupini species, and the other five clusters were close to different recently defined Bradyrhizobium species. Isolates close to Microvirga were obtained from nodules of plants from four of the five sites sampled. We carried out an in-depth phylogenetic study with representatives of the seven clusters using sequences from housekeeping genes (rrs, recA, glnII, gyrB, and dnaK) and obtained consistent results. A phylogeny based on the sequence of the symbiotic gene nodC identified four groups, three formed by Bradyrhizobium isolates and one by the Microvirga and Phyllobacterium isolates. Symbiotic behaviors of the representative strains were tested, and some congruence between symbiovars and symbiotic performance was observed. These data indicate a remarkable diversity of L. micranthus root nodule symbionts in northern Tunisia, including strains from the Bradyrhizobiaceae, Methylobacteriaceae, and Phyllobacteriaceae families, in contrast with those of the rhizobial populations nodulating lupines in the Old World, including L. micranthus from other Mediterranean areas, which are nodulated mostly by Bradyrhizobium strains. IMPORTANCE Lupinus micranthus is a legume broadly distributed in the Mediterranean region and plays an important role in soil fertility and vegetation coverage by fixing nitrogen and solubilizing phosphate in semiarid areas. Direct sowing to extend the distribution of this indigenous legume can contribute to the prevention of soil erosion in pre-Saharan lands of Tunisia

  16. Hydrogenase in actinorhizal root nodules and root nodule homogenates.

    PubMed Central

    Benson, D R; Arp, D J; Burris, R H

    1980-01-01

    Hydrogenases were measured in intact actinorhizal root nodules and from disrupted nodules of Alnus glutinosa, Alnus rhombifolia, Alnus rubra, and Myrica pensylvanica. Whole nodules took up H2 in an O2-dependent reaction. Endophyte preparations oxidized H2 through the oxyhydrogen reaction, but rates were enhanced when hydrogen uptake was coupled to artificial electron acceptors. Oxygen inhibited artifical acceptor-dependent H2 uptake. The hydrogenase system from M. pensylvanica had a different pattern of coupling to various electron acceptors than the hydrogenase systems from the alders; only the bayberry system evolved H2 from reduced viologen dyes. PMID:6989799

  17. MtNF-YA1, A Central Transcriptional Regulator of Symbiotic Nodule Development, Is Also a Determinant of Medicago truncatula Susceptibility toward a Root Pathogen

    PubMed Central

    Rey, Thomas; Laporte, Philippe; Bonhomme, Maxime; Jardinaud, Marie-Françoise; Huguet, Stéphanie; Balzergue, Sandrine; Dumas, Bernard; Niebel, Andreas; Jacquet, Christophe

    2016-01-01

    Plant NF-Y transcription factors control a wide array of biological functions enabling appropriate reproductive and developmental processes as well as adaptation to various abiotic and biotic environments. In Medicago truncatula, MtNF-YA1 was previously identified as a key determinant for nodule development and establishment of rhizobial symbiosis. Here, we highlight a new role for this protein in compatibility to Aphanomyces euteiches, a root pathogenic oomycete. The Mtnf-ya1-1 mutant plants showed better survival rate, reduced symptoms, and increased development of their root apparatus as compared to their wild-type (WT) background A17. MtNF-YA-1 was specifically up-regulated by A. euteiches in F83005.5, a highly susceptible natural accession of M. truncatula while transcript level remained stable in A17, which is partially resistant. The role of MtNF-YA1 in F83005.5 susceptibility was further documented by reducing MtNF-YA1 expression either by overexpression of the miR169q, a microRNA targeting MtNF-YA1, or by RNAi approaches leading to a strong enhancement in the resistance of this susceptible line. Comparative analysis of the transcriptome of WT and Mtnf-ya1-1 led to the identification of 1509 differentially expressed genes. Among those, almost 36 defense-related genes were constitutively expressed in Mtnf-ya1-1, while 20 genes linked to hormonal pathways were repressed. In summary, we revealed an unexpected dual role for this symbiotic transcription factor as a key player in the compatibility mechanisms to a pathogen. PMID:27994614

  18. MtNF-YA1, A Central Transcriptional Regulator of Symbiotic Nodule Development, Is Also a Determinant of Medicago truncatula Susceptibility toward a Root Pathogen.

    PubMed

    Rey, Thomas; Laporte, Philippe; Bonhomme, Maxime; Jardinaud, Marie-Françoise; Huguet, Stéphanie; Balzergue, Sandrine; Dumas, Bernard; Niebel, Andreas; Jacquet, Christophe

    2016-01-01

    Plant NF-Y transcription factors control a wide array of biological functions enabling appropriate reproductive and developmental processes as well as adaptation to various abiotic and biotic environments. In Medicago truncatula, MtNF-YA1 was previously identified as a key determinant for nodule development and establishment of rhizobial symbiosis. Here, we highlight a new role for this protein in compatibility to Aphanomyces euteiches, a root pathogenic oomycete. The Mtnf-ya1-1 mutant plants showed better survival rate, reduced symptoms, and increased development of their root apparatus as compared to their wild-type (WT) background A17. MtNF-YA-1 was specifically up-regulated by A. euteiches in F83005.5, a highly susceptible natural accession of M. truncatula while transcript level remained stable in A17, which is partially resistant. The role of MtNF-YA1 in F83005.5 susceptibility was further documented by reducing MtNF-YA1 expression either by overexpression of the miR169q, a microRNA targeting MtNF-YA1, or by RNAi approaches leading to a strong enhancement in the resistance of this susceptible line. Comparative analysis of the transcriptome of WT and Mtnf-ya1-1 led to the identification of 1509 differentially expressed genes. Among those, almost 36 defense-related genes were constitutively expressed in Mtnf-ya1-1, while 20 genes linked to hormonal pathways were repressed. In summary, we revealed an unexpected dual role for this symbiotic transcription factor as a key player in the compatibility mechanisms to a pathogen.

  19. Genetic diversity of indigenous rhizobial symbionts of the Lupinus mariae-josephae endemism from alkaline-limed soils within its area of distribution in Eastern Spain.

    PubMed

    Durán, David; Rey, L; Sánchez-Cañizares, C; Navarro, A; Imperial, J; Ruiz-Argueso, T

    2013-03-01

    The genomic diversity of a collection of 103 indigenous rhizobia isolates from Lupinus mariae-josephae (Lmj), a recently described Lupinus species endemic to alkaline-limed soils from a restricted habitat in Eastern Spain, was investigated by molecular methods. Isolates were obtained from soils of four geographic locations in the Valencia province that harbored the known Lmj plant populations. Using an M13 RAPD fingerprinting technique, 19 distinct RAPD profiles were identified. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rDNA and the housekeeping genes glnII, recA and atpD showed a high diversity of native Bradyrhizobium strains that were able to establish symbiosis with Lmj. All the strains grouped in a clade unrelated to strains of the B. canariense and B. japonicum lineages that establish symbioses with lupines in acid soils of the Mediterranean area. The phylogenetic tree based on concatenated glnII, recA and atpD gene sequences grouped the Lmj isolates in six different operational taxonomic units (OTUs) at the 93% similarity level. These OTUs were not associated to any specific geographical location, and their observed divergence predicted the existence of different Bradyrhizobium genomic species. In contrast, phylogenetic analysis of symbiotic genes based on nodC and nodA gene sequences, defined only two distinct clusters among the Lmj strains. These two Lmj nod gene types were largely distinct from nod genes of bradyrhizobia nodulating other Old World lupine species. The singularity and large diversity of these strains in such a small geographical area makes this an attractive system for studying the evolution and adaptation of the rhizobial symbiont to the plant host. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  20. The DMI1 and DMI2 early symbiotic genes of medicago truncatula are required for a high-affinity nodulation factor-binding site associated to a particulate fraction of roots.

    PubMed

    Hogg, Bridget V; Cullimore, Julie V; Ranjeva, Raoul; Bono, Jean-Jacques

    2006-01-01

    The establishment of the legume-rhizobia symbiosis between Medicago spp. and Sinorhizobium meliloti is dependent on the production of sulfated lipo-chitooligosaccharidic nodulation (Nod) factors by the bacterial partner. In this article, using a biochemical approach to characterize putative Nod factor receptors in the plant host, we describe a high-affinity binding site (Kd = 0.45 nm) for the major Nod factor produced by S. meliloti. This site is termed Nod factor-binding site 3 (NFBS3). NFBS3 is associated to a high-density fraction prepared from roots of Medicago truncatula and shows binding specificity for lipo-chitooligosaccharidic structures. As for the previously characterized binding sites (NFBS1 and NFBS2), NFBS3 does not recognize the sulfate group on the S. meliloti Nod factor. Studies of Nod factor binding in root extracts of early symbiotic mutants of M. truncatula reveals that the new site is present in Nod factor perception and does not make infections 3 (dmi3) mutants but is absent in dmi1 and dmi2 mutants. Roots and cell cultures of all these mutants still contain sites similar to NFBS1 and NFBS2, respectively. These results suggest that NFBS3 is different from NFBS2 and NFBS1 and is dependent on the common symbiotic genes DMI1 and DMI2 required for establishment of symbioses with both rhizobia and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi. The potential role of this site in the establishment of root endosymbioses is discussed.

  1. Molecular characterization and identification of plant growth promoting endophytic bacteria isolated from the root nodules of pea (Pisum sativum L.).

    PubMed

    Tariq, Mohsin; Hameed, Sohail; Yasmeen, Tahira; Zahid, Mehwish; Zafar, Marriam

    2014-02-01

    Root nodule accommodates various non-nodulating bacteria at varying densities. Present study was planned to identify and characterize the non-nodulating bacteria from the pea plant. Ten fast growing bacteria were isolated from the root nodules of cultivated pea plants. These bacterial isolates were unable to nodulate pea plants in nodulation assay, which indicate the non-rhizobial nature of these bacteria. Bacterial isolates were tested in vitro for plant growth promoting properties including indole acetic acid (IAA) production, nitrogen fixation, phosphate solubilization, root colonization and biofilm formation. Six isolates were able to produce IAA at varying level from 0.86 to 16.16 μg ml(-1), with the isolate MSP9 being most efficient. Only two isolates, MSP2 and MSP10, were able to fix nitrogen. All isolates were able to solubilize inorganic phosphorus ranging from 5.57 to 11.73 μg ml(-1), except MSP4. Bacterial isolates showed considerably better potential for colonization on pea roots. Isolates MSP9 and MSP10 were most efficient in biofilm formation on polyvinyl chloride, which indicated their potential to withstand various biotic and abiotic stresses, whereas the remaining isolates showed a very poor biofilm formation ability. The most efficient plant growth promoting agents, MSP9 and MSP10, were phylogenetically identified by 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis as Ochrobactrum and Enterobacter, respectively, with 99% similarity. It is suggested the potential endophytic bacterial strains, Ochrobactrum sp. MSP9 and Enterobacter sp. MSP10, can be used as biofertilizers for various legume and non-legume crops after studying their interaction with the host crop and field evaluation.

  2. Soybean root nodule acid phosphatase.

    PubMed Central

    Penheiter, A R; Duff, S M; Sarath, G

    1997-01-01

    Acid phosphatases are ubiquitous enzymes that exhibit activity against a variety of substrates in vitro, although little is known about their intracellular function. In this study, we report the isolation, characterization, and partial sequence of the major acid phosphatase from soybean (Glycine max L.) root nodules. The phosphatase was purified predominantly as a heterodimer with subunits of 28 and 31 kD; homodimers of both subunits were also observed and exhibited phosphatase activity. In addition to the general phosphatase substrate, p-nitrophenyl phosphate, the heterodimeric form of the enzyme readily hydrolyzed 5'-nucleotides, flavin mononucleotide, and O-phospho-L-Tyr. Low or negligible activity was observed with ATP or polyphosphate. Purified nodule acid phosphatase was stimulated by magnesium, inhibited by calcium and EDTA, and competitively inhibited by cGMP and cAMP with apparent Ki values of 7 and 12 microM, respectively. Partial N-terminal and internal sequencing of the nodule acid phosphatase revealed homology to the soybean vegetative storage proteins. There was a 17-fold increase in enzyme activity and a noticeable increase in protein levels detected by immunoblotting methods during nodule development. Both of these parameters were low in young nodules and reached a peak in mature, functional nodules, suggesting that this enzyme is important for efficient nodule metabolism. PMID:9193092

  3. Thyroid Nodule Size at Ultrasound as a Predictor of Malignancy and Final Pathologic Size.

    PubMed

    Cavallo, Allison; Johnson, Daniel N; White, Michael G; Siddiqui, Saaduddin; Antic, Tatjana; Mathew, Melvy; Grogan, Raymon H; Angelos, Peter; Kaplan, Edwin L; Cipriani, Nicole A

    2017-05-01

    Thyroid-related mortality has remained constant despite the increasing incidence of thyroid carcinoma. Most thyroid nodules are benign; therefore, ultrasound and fine needle aspiration (FNA) are integral in cancer screening. We hypothesize that increased nodule size at ultrasound does not predict malignancy and correlation between nodule size at ultrasound and pathologic exam is good. Resected thyroids with preoperative ultrasounds were identified. Nodule size at ultrasound, FNA diagnosis by Bethesda category, size at pathologic examination, and final histologic diagnosis were recorded. Nodule characteristics at ultrasound and FNA diagnoses were correlated with gross characteristics and histologic diagnoses. Nodules for which correlation could not be established were excluded. Of 1003 nodules from 659 patients, 26% were malignant. Nodules <2 cm had the highest malignancy rate (∼30%). Risk was similar (∼20%) for nodules ≥2 cm. Of the 548 subject to FNA, 38% were malignant. Decreasing malignancy rates were observed with increasing size (57% for nodules <1 cm to 20% for nodules >6 cm). At ultrasound size cutoffs of 2, 3, 4, and 5 cm, smaller nodules had higher malignancy rates than larger nodules. Of the 455 not subject to FNA, 11% were malignant. Ultrasound size alone is a poor predictor of malignancy, but a relatively good predictor of final pathologic size (R(2) = 0.748), with less correlation at larger sizes. In nodules subject to FNA, false negative diagnoses were highest (6-8%) in nodules 3-6 cm, mostly due to encapsulated follicular variant of papillary carcinoma. Thyroid nodule size is inversely related to malignancy risk, as larger nodules have lower malignancy rates. However, the relationship of size to malignancy varies by FNA status. All nodules (regardless of FNA status) demonstrate a risk trough at ≥2 cm. Nodules subject to FNA show step-wise decline in malignancy rates by size, demonstrating that size alone should not be

  4. A receptor kinase gene of the LysM type is involved in legume perception of rhizobial signals.

    PubMed

    Madsen, Esben Bjørn; Madsen, Lene Heegaard; Radutoiu, Simona; Olbryt, Magdalena; Rakwalska, Magdalena; Szczyglowski, Krzysztof; Sato, Shusei; Kaneko, Takakazu; Tabata, Satoshi; Sandal, Niels; Stougaard, Jens

    2003-10-09

    Plants belonging to the legume family develop nitrogen-fixing root nodules in symbiosis with bacteria commonly known as rhizobia. The legume host encodes all of the functions necessary to build the specialized symbiotic organ, the nodule, but the process is elicited by the bacteria. Molecular communication initiates the interaction, and signals, usually flavones, secreted by the legume root induce the bacteria to produce a lipochitin-oligosaccharide signal molecule (Nod-factor), which in turn triggers the plant organogenic process. An important determinant of bacterial host specificity is the structure of the Nod-factor, suggesting that a plant receptor is involved in signal perception and signal transduction initiating the plant developmental response. Here we describe the cloning of a putative Nod-factor receptor kinase gene (NFR5) from Lotus japonicus. NFR5 is essential for Nod-factor perception and encodes an unusual transmembrane serine/threonine receptor-like kinase required for the earliest detectable plant responses to bacteria and Nod-factor. The extracellular domain of the putative receptor has three modules with similarity to LysM domains known from peptidoglycan-binding proteins and chitinases. Together with an atypical kinase domain structure this characterizes an unusual receptor-like kinase.

  5. Diversity analyses of Aeschynomene symbionts in Tropical Africa and Central America reveal that nod-independent stem nodulation is not restricted to photosynthetic bradyrhizobia.

    PubMed

    Miché, Lucie; Moulin, Lionel; Chaintreuil, Clémence; Contreras-Jimenez, José Luis; Munive-Hernández, José-Antonio; Del Carmen Villegas-Hernandez, María; Crozier, Françoise; Béna, Gilles

    2010-08-01

    Tropical aquatic legumes of the genus Aeschynomene are unique in that they can be stem-nodulated by photosynthetic bradyrhizobia. Moreover, a recent study demonstrated that two Aeschynomene indica symbionts lack canonical nod genes, thereby raising questions about the distribution of such atypical symbioses among rhizobial-legume interactions. Population structure and genomic diversity were compared among stem-nodulating bradyrhizobia isolated from various Aeschynomene species of Central America and Tropical Africa. Phylogenetic analyses based on the recA gene and whole-genome amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) fingerprints on 110 bacterial strains highlighted that all the photosynthetic strains form a separate cluster among bradyrhizobia, with no obvious structuring according to their geographical or plant origins. Nod-independent symbiosis was present in all sampling areas and seemed to be linked to Aeschynomene host species. However, it was not strictly dependent on photosynthetic ability, as exemplified by a newly identified cluster of strains that lacked canonical nod genes and efficiently stem-nodulated A. indica, but were not photosynthetic. Interestingly, the phenotypic properties of this new cluster of bacteria were reflected by their phylogenetical position, as being intermediate in distance between classical root-nodulatingBradyrhizobium spp. and photosynthetic ones. This result opens new prospects about stem-nodulating bradyrhizobial evolution.

  6. Symbiotic relationships of legumes and nodule bacteria on Barro Colorado Island, Panama: a review.

    PubMed

    Parker, Matthew A

    2008-05-01

    Abstract New data on 129 bacterial isolates were analyzed together with prior samples to characterize community-level patterns of legume-rhizobial symbiosis on Barro Colorado Island (BCI), Panama. Nodules have been sampled from 24 BCI legume species in 18 genera, representing about one quarter of the legume species and one half of the genera on the island. Most BCI legumes associated exclusively with nodule symbionts in the genus Bradyrhizobium, which comprised 86.3% of all isolates (315 of 365). Most of the remaining isolates (44 of 365) belonged to the beta-proteobacterial genus Burkholderia; these were restricted to two genera in the legume subfamily Mimosoideae. Multilocus sequence analysis indicated that BCI Bradyrhizobium strains were differentiated into at least eight lineages with deoxyribonucleic acid divergence of the same magnitude as found among currently recognized species in this bacterial genus. Two of these lineages were widely distributed across BCI legumes. One lineage was utilized by 15 host species of diverse life form (herbs, lianas, and trees) in 12 genera spanning two legume subfamilies. A second common lineage closely related to the taxon B. elkanii was associated with at least five legume genera in four separate tribes. Thus, BCI legume species from diverse clades within the family frequently share interaction with a few common lineages of nodule symbionts. However, certain host species were associated with unique symbiont lineages that have not been found on other coexisting BCI legumes. More comprehensive sampling of host taxa will be needed to characterize the overall diversity of nodule bacteria and the patterns of symbiont sharing among legumes in this community.

  7. Crosstalk between the nodulation signaling pathway and the autoregulation of nodulation in Medicago truncatula.

    PubMed

    Saur, Isabel M L; Oakes, Marie; Djordjevic, Michael A; Imin, Nijat

    2011-06-01

    A subset of CLAVATA3/endosperm-surrounding region-related (CLE) peptides are involved in autoregulation of nodulation (AON) in Medicago truncatula (e.g. MtCLE12 and MtCLE13). However, their linkage to other components of the AON pathways downstream of the shoot-derived inhibitor (SDI) is not understood. We have ectopically expressed the putative peptide ligand encoding genes MtCLE12 and MtCLE13 in M. truncatula which abolished nodulation completely in wild-type roots but not in the supernodulating null mutant sunn-4. Further, root growth inhibition was detected when MtCLE12 was ectopically expressed in wild-type roots or synthetic CLE12 peptide was applied exogenously. To identify downstream genes, roots of wild-type and sunn-4 mutant overexpressing MtCLE12 were used for quantitative gene expression analysis. We found that, in 35S:MtCLE12 roots, NODULE INCEPTION (NIN, a central regulator of nodulation) was down-regulated, whereas MtEFD (ethylene response factor required for nodule differentiation) and MtRR8 (a type-A response regulator thought to be involved in the negative regulation of cytokinin signaling), were up-regulated. Moreover, we found that the up-regulation of MtEFD and MtRR8 caused by overexpressing MtCLE12 is SUNN-dependent. Hence, our data link for the first time the pathways for Nod factor signaling, cytokinin perception and AON. © 2011 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2011 New Phytologist Trust.

  8. Nod factors and a diffusible factor from arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi stimulate lateral root formation in Medicago truncatula via the DMI1/DMI2 signalling pathway.

    PubMed

    Oláh, Boglárka; Brière, Christian; Bécard, Guillaume; Dénarié, Jean; Gough, Clare

    2005-10-01

    Legumes form two different types of intracellular root symbioses, with fungi and bacteria, resulting in arbuscular mycorrhiza and nitrogen-fixing nodules, respectively. Rhizobial signalling molecules, called Nod factors, play a key role in establishing the rhizobium-legume association and genes have been identified in Medicago truncatula that control a Nod factor signalling pathway leading to nodulation. Three of these genes, the so-called DMI1, DMI2 and DMI3 genes, are also required for formation of mycorrhiza, indicating that the symbiotic pathways activated by both the bacterial and the fungal symbionts share common steps. To analyse possible cross-talk between these pathways we have studied the effect of treatment with Nod factors on mycorrhization in M. truncatula. We show that Nod factors increase mycorrhizal colonization and stimulate lateral root formation. The stimulation of lateral root formation by Nod factors requires both the same structural features of Nod factors and the same plant genes (NFP, DMI1, DMI2, DMI3 and NSP1) that are required for other Nod factor-induced symbiotic responses such as early nodulin gene induction and cortical cell division. A diffusible factor from arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi was also found to stimulate lateral root formation, while three root pathogens did not have the same effect. Lateral root formation induced by fungal signal(s) was found to require the DMI1 and DMI2 genes, but not DMI3. The idea that this diffusible fungal factor might correspond to a previously hypothesized mycorrhizal signal, the 'Myc factor', is discussed.

  9. Transcript profiling of common bean nodules subjected to oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Ramírez, Mario; Guillén, Gabriel; Fuentes, Sara I; Iñiguez, Luis P; Aparicio-Fabre, Rosaura; Zamorano-Sánchez, David; Encarnación-Guevara, Sergio; Panzeri, Dario; Castiglioni, Bianca; Cremonesi, Paola; Strozzi, Francesco; Stella, Alessandra; Girard, Lourdes; Sparvoli, Francesca; Hernández, Georgina

    2013-11-01

    Several environmental stresses generate high amounts of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in plant cells, resulting in oxidative stress. Symbiotic nitrogen fixation (SNF) in the legume-rhizobia symbiosis is sensitive to damage from oxidative stress. Active nodules of the common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) exposed to the herbicide paraquat (1,1'-dimethyl-4,4'-bipyridinium dichloride hydrate), which stimulates ROS accumulation, exhibited reduced nitrogenase activity and ureide content. We analyzed the global gene response of nodules subjected to oxidative stress using the Bean Custom Array 90K, which includes probes from 30,000 expressed sequence tags (ESTs). A total of 4280 ESTs were differentially expressed in stressed bean nodules; of these, 2218 were repressed. Based on Gene Ontology analysis, these genes were grouped into 42 different biological process categories. Analysis with the PathExpress bioinformatic tool, adapted for bean, identified five significantly repressed metabolic pathways related to carbon/nitrogen metabolism, which is crucial for nodule function. Quantitative reverse transcription (qRT)-PCR analysis of transcription factor (TF) gene expression showed that 67 TF genes were differentially expressed in nodules exposed to oxidative stress. Putative cis-elements recognized by highly responsive TF were detected in promoter regions of oxidative stress regulated genes. The expression of oxidative stress responsive genes and of genes important for SNF in bacteroids analyzed in stressed nodules revealed that these conditions elicited a transcriptional response. © 2013 Scandinavian Plant Physiology Society.

  10. MAP Kinase-Mediated Negative Regulation of Symbiotic Nodule Formation in Medicago truncatula

    PubMed Central

    Ryu, Hojin; Laffont, Carole; Frugier, Florian; Hwang, Ildoo

    2017-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling cascades play critical roles in various cellular events in plants, including stress responses, innate immunity, hormone signaling, and cell specificity. MAPK-mediated stress signaling is also known to negatively regulate nitrogen-fixing symbiotic interactions, but the molecular mechanism of the MAPK signaling cascades underlying the symbiotic nodule development remains largely unknown. We show that the MtMKK5-MtMPK3/6 signaling module negatively regulates the early symbiotic nodule formation, probably upstream of ERN1 (ERF Required for Nodulation 1) and NSP1 (Nod factor Signaling Pathway 1) in Medicago truncatula. The overexpression of MtMKK5 stimulated stress and defense signaling pathways but also reduced nodule formation in M. truncatula roots. Conversely, a MAPK specific inhibitor, U0126, enhanced nodule formation and the expression of an early nodulation marker gene, MtNIN. We found that MtMKK5 directly activates MtMPK3/6 by phosphorylating the TEY motif within the activation loop and that the MtMPK3/6 proteins physically interact with the early nodulation-related transcription factors ERN1 and NSP1. These data suggest that the stress signaling-mediated MtMKK5/MtMPK3/6 module suppresses symbiotic nodule development via the action of early nodulation transcription factors. PMID:28152300

  11. Is ultrasonographically detected nodule diameter concordant with pathological tumor size?

    PubMed

    Bilginer, Muhammet Cuneyt; Ozdemir, Didem; Baser, Husniye; Dogan, Hayriye Tatli; Yalcin, Abdussamed; Ersoy, Reyhan; Cakir, Bekir

    2017-06-01

    We aimed to compare preoperative ultrasonographical and postoperative histopathological diameters of differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) lesions and investigate possible factors that can predict the discordance between two measurements. Data of patients with histopathologically confirmed DTC were reviewed retrospectively. Nodules evaluated by preoperative US were matched with histopathologically examined nodules. Incidental tumors and nodules that can not be matched in US and histopathology reports were excluded. Preoperative US diameter and postoperative histopathological size were compared and percentage difference between two measurements was calculated for each lesion. There were 607 DTC foci in 562 patients. Mean US diameter was significantly higher than histopathological diameter (21.0 ± 15.6 mm vs 17.3 ± 13.6, p < 0.001). US diameter was higher than tumor size in 444 (73.1%), equal in 15 (2.5%) and lower in 148 (24.4%) nodules. Marginal irregularity was observed in 253 (57%) lesions with US diameter > tumor size and 108 (73%) lesions with US diameter < tumor size (p = 0.010). Rate of nodules with peripheral halo was higher in lesions with US diameter > tumor size (30.6% vs 20.3%, p = 0.015). In nodules with US diameter > tumor size, percentage difference was lower in nodules with microcalcification (p = 0.020) and higher in cytologically benign nodules (p < 0.001). Among nodules with US diameter < tumor size, <1 cm nodules had significantly higher percentage difference compared to 1-1.9, 2-3.9 and ≥ 4 cm nodules (p = 0.005). Ultrasonographically determined diameter is higher than histopathologically determined size in a considerable ratio of DTCs. It might be helpful to consider this discordance while deciding surgical extent in these patients. Copyright © 2017 IJS Publishing Group Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Thyroid Nodules and Thyroid Cancer: Surgical Aspects

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Orlo H.

    1980-01-01

    Patients with thyroid nodules must be treated selectively because these nodules develop far more frequently than does thyroid cancer. A thorough clinical history, family history and history of radiation, as well as an accurate physical examination, are very important in determining whether surgical treatment is indicated. Thyroid function tests, a radioactive isotope scan, a thyroid echogram and fine-needle biopsy are also useful. Although there is considerable debate concerning the amount of thyroid tissue that should be removed at operation, the minimal procedure for a “cold,” solid thyroid nodule is a total thyroid lobectomy and isthmectomy. This is the treatment of choice for patients with occult papillary thyroid carcinoma. Partial lobectomy is to be discouraged. Near total or total thyroidectomy should be considered for all other patients with differentiated thyroid cancer. Many factors influence the prognosis of patients with thyroid cancer including age, sex, type of thyroid cancer, invasion, symptoms, lymph node metastasis, metastasis to distant sites, extent of the surgical procedure, and use of radioactive iodine and thyroid hormone. With adequate treatment, the prognosis for differentiated thyroid carcinoma is excellent. PMID:7222643

  13. [Pulmonary nodule: a bayesian approach].

    PubMed

    Meert, A-P

    2010-01-01

    A solitary pulmonary nodule is a common clinical problem. It is usually detected incidentally. The prevalence of solitary pulmonary nodule (SPN) in the lung cancer screening study varies from 8 to 50% (with a prevalence of malignant nodule from 1 to 13%). The bayesian approach can help us to identify promptly malignant nodule in order to treat them surgically and to avoid surgery for benign nodules. Therefore, it is needed to estimate the probability of cancer (Pca) in the SPN. Likelihood ratio (LR) for overall prevalence of malignancy and for different clinical and radiological information (age, smoking exposure, symptoms, cancer history, nodule size, spiculation, calcification, location, growth...) can be obtained from the literature. The odds of cancer-malignancy (odds ca) can be calculated by multiplying all of these LRs together. The Pca = odds ca/1+odds ca. Using this bayeasian approach, the probability of cancer based on an abnormal or normal fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose-positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) scan has been estimated. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value of PET scan are respectively about 90%, 83%, 92% and 90%. Moreover, the LR for malignancy are higher with an abnormal PET scan when compared to most clinical and radiological LRs. Today, the Bayesian approach of SPN must include PET scan.

  14. Radiology reports for incidental thyroid nodules on CT and MRI: high variability across subspecialties.

    PubMed

    Grady, A T; Sosa, J A; Tanpitukpongse, T P; Choudhury, K R; Gupta, R T; Hoang, J K

    2015-02-01

    Variability in radiologists' reporting styles and recommendations for incidental thyroid nodules can lead to confusion among clinicians and may contribute to inconsistent patient care. Our aim was to describe reporting practices of radiologists for incidental thyroid nodules seen on CT and MR imaging and to determine factors that influence reporting styles. This is a retrospective study of patients with incidental thyroid nodules reported on CT and MR imaging between January and December 2011, identified by text search for "thyroid nodule" in all CT and MR imaging reports. The studies included CT and MR imaging scans of the neck, spine, and chest. Radiology reports were divided into those that mentioned the incidental thyroid nodules only in the "Findings" section versus those that reported the incidental thyroid nodules in the "Impression" section as well, because this latter reporting style gives more emphasis to the finding. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to identify radiologist, patient, and nodule characteristics that influenced reporting styles. Three hundred seventy-five patients met the criterion of having incidental thyroid nodules. One hundred thirty-eight (37%) patients had incidental thyroid nodules reported in the "Impression" section. On multivariate analysis, only radiologists' divisions and nodule size were associated with reporting in "Impression." Chest radiologists and neuroradiologists were more likely to report incidental thyroid nodules in the "Impression" section than their abdominal imaging colleagues, and larger incidental thyroid nodules were more likely to be reported in "Impression" (P ≤ .03). Seventy-three percent of patients with incidental thyroid nodules of ≥20 mm were reported in the "Impression" section, but higher variability in reporting was seen for incidental thyroid nodules measuring 10-14 mm and 15-19 mm, which were reported in "Impression" for 61% and 50% of patients, respectively. Reporting

  15. Prognosis of Thyroid Nodules in Individuals Living in the Zhitomir Region of Ukraine

    PubMed Central

    Hayashida, Naomi; Sekitani, Yui; Takahashi, Jumpei; Kozlovsky, Alexander A.; Gutevych, Oleksandr K.; Saiko, Aleksey S.; Nirova, Nina V.; Petrova, Anjela A.; Rafalskiy, Ruslan M.; Chorny, Sergey A.; Daniliuk, Valery V.; Anami, Masanobu; Yamashita, Shunichi; Takamura, Noboru

    2012-01-01

    Objective After the accident at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant (CNPP), the incidence of thyroid cancer increased among children. Recently, a strong relationship between solid thyroid nodules and the incidence of thyroid cancer was shown in atomic bomb survivors. To assess the prognosis of benign thyroid nodules in individuals living in the Zhitomir region of Ukraine, around the CNPP, we conducted a follow-up investigation of screening data from 1991 to 2000 in the Ukraine. Patients and Methods Participants of this study were 160 inhabitants with thyroid nodules (nodule group) and 160 inhabitants without thyroid nodules (normal control group) intially identified by ultrasonography from 1991 to 2000. All participants were aged 0 to 10 years old and lived in the same area at the time of the accident. We performed follow-up screening of participants and assessed thyroid nodules by fine needle aspiration biopsy. Results Among the nodule group participants, the number and size of nodules were significantly increased at the follow-up screening compared with the initial screening. No thyroid nodules were observed among the normal control group participants. The prevalence of thyroid abnormality, especially nodules that could be cancerous (malignant or suspicious by fine needle aspiration biopsy), was 7.5% in the nodule group and 0% in the normal control group (P<0.001). Conclusions Our study indicated that a thyroid nodule in childhood is a prognostic factor associated with an increase in the number and size of nodules in individuals living in the Zhitomir region of Ukraine. PMID:23209797

  16. microRNA160 dictates stage-specific auxin and cytokinin sensitivities and directs soybean nodule development.

    PubMed

    Nizampatnam, Narasimha Rao; Schreier, Spencer John; Damodaran, Suresh; Adhikari, Sajag; Subramanian, Senthil

    2015-10-01

    Legume nodules result from coordinated interactions between the plant and nitrogen-fixing rhizobia. The phytohormone cytokinin promotes nodule formation, and recent findings suggest that the phytohormone auxin inhibits nodule formation. Here we show that microRNA160 (miR160) is a key signaling element that determines the auxin/cytokinin balance during nodule development in soybean (Glycine max). miR160 appears to promote auxin activity by suppressing the levels of the ARF10/16/17 family of repressor ARF transcription factors. Using quantitative PCR assays and a fluorescence miRNA sensor, we show that miR160 levels are relatively low early during nodule formation and high in mature nodules. We had previously shown that ectopic expression of miR160 in soybean roots led to a severe reduction in nodule formation, coupled with enhanced sensitivity to auxin and reduced sensitivity to cytokinin. Here we show that exogenous cytokinin restores nodule formation in miR160 over-expressing roots. Therefore, low miR160 levels early during nodule development favor cytokinin activity required for nodule formation. Suppression of miR160 levels using a short tandem target mimic (STTM160) resulted in reduced sensitivity to auxin and enhanced sensitivity to cytokinin. In contrast to miR160 over-expressing roots, STTM160 roots had increased nodule formation, but nodule maturation was significantly delayed. Exogenous auxin partially restored proper nodule formation and maturation in STTM160 roots, suggesting that high miR160 activity later during nodule development favors auxin activity and promotes nodule maturation. Therefore, miR160 dictates developmental stage-specific sensitivities to auxin and cytokinin to direct proper nodule formation and maturation in soybean.

  17. Soybean nodule-enhanced CLE peptides in roots act as signals in GmNARK-mediated nodulation suppression.

    PubMed

    Lim, Chae Woo; Lee, Young Woo; Hwang, Cheol Ho

    2011-09-01

    The number of nodules formed in the roots of leguminous plants is systemically controlled by autoregulation of nodulation (AON). This study characterized two of the CLAVATA3/endosperm-surrounding region (CLE) genes involved in AON signal transduction. The GmRIC1 and GmRIC2 genes initiated expression solely in the roots at approximately 3 days after inoculation (DAI) with Nod factor-producing rhizobia, corresponding to the time point of AON, and the expression was up-regulated by cytokinins. Levels of GmRIC1 and GmRIC2 gene expression were much higher in the supernodulation mutant, SS2-2, than in wild-type (WT) soybeans during nodule development, even after initiation of nitrogen fixation. At 3 DAI, GmRIC2 was induced in the cells of the pericycle and the outer cortex, which undergo cell division to form nodule primordia and spreads from the central region to the whole nodule as it develops. Overexpression of GmRIC1 and GmRIC2 strongly suppressed the nodulation of WT roots as well as transgenic hairy roots in a GmNARK-dependent manner. This systemic suppression of nodulation was caused by the secretion of two CLE proteins into the extracellular space. Double grafting between WT and SS2-2 soybeans showed that signal Q is larger in SS2-2 than in WT roots during nodulation. The results of this study suggest that GmRIC1 and GmRIC2 are good candidates for root-derived signal Q in AON signal transduction.

  18. Shoot HAR1 mediates nitrate inhibition of nodulation in Lotus japonicus.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Satoru; Kawaguchi, Masayoshi

    2015-01-01

    Nitrate is a major environmental factor in the inhibition of nodulation. In a model legume Lotus japonicus, a CLV1-like receptor kinase, HAR1, mediates nitrate inhibition and autoregulation of nodulation. Autoregulation of nodulation involves root-to-shoot-to-root long-distance communication, and HAR1 functions in shoots. However, it remains elusive where HAR1 functions in the nitrate inhibition of nodulation. We performed grafting experiments with the har1 mutant under various nitrate conditions, and found that shoot HAR1 is critical for the inhibition of nodulation at 10 mM nitrate. Combined with our recent finding that the nitrate-induced CLE-RS2 glycopeptide binds directly to the HAR1 receptor, this result suggests that CLE-RS2/HAR1 long-distance signaling plays an important role in the both nitrate inhibition and the autoregulation of nodulation.

  19. The efficacy of apparent diffusion coefficient value calculation in differentiation between malignant and benign thyroid nodules.

    PubMed

    Dilli, Alper; Ayaz, Umit Yasar; Cakir, Evrim; Cakal, Erman; Gultekin, Salih Sinan; Hekimoglu, Baki

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) calculation in differentiation between malignant and benign thyroid nodules. A prospective study was conducted in 52 patients. Diffusion-weighted echoplanar imaging was performed and b factors were taken as 0 and 400 s/mm(2). The mean ADC value for malignant thyroid nodules was 0.829±0.179×10(-3) mm(2)/s and that for benign thyroid nodules was 1.984±0.482×10(-3) mm(2)/s. The mean ADC value for malignant nodules was significantly lower than that for benign nodules (P=.0001). ADC value calculation is an effective method in differentiation of malignant thyroid nodules from benign ones. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Composition and formation of metal nodules and veins in ordinary chondrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Widom, E.; Rubin, A. E.; Wasson, J. T.

    1986-01-01

    Five large metal nodules, a composite sample of five small metal nodules, one troilite nodule, and two metal veins from five ordinary chondrites were analyzed by electron microprobe and neutron activation analysis. Metal nodules and veins in H chondrites generally consist of large single crystals of kamacite, whereas L nodules contain significant taenite. Most nodules and veins are depleted by large factors ranging up to 240 in refractory siderophiles (Re, Os, Ir, Pt). Tungsten (normally a refractory siderophile) and Au, As, and Ga (volatile siderophiles) have abundance ratios similar to those of the common siderophiles Fe, Co and Ni. It is proposed that the metal with extremely low refractory-element contents was produced by shock-induced vaporization of chondritic material. The refractory elements condensed near the point of vaporization and were not transported with the vapor. Because the shock-generated gas was mildly oxidizing, W formed volatile oxides.

  1. Rhizobium tubonense sp. nov., isolated from root nodules of Oxytropis glabra.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Rong Juan; Hou, Bao Chao; Wang, En Tao; Li, Ying; Zhang, Xiao Xia; Chen, Wen Xin

    2011-03-01

    Four rhizobial strains, designated CCBAU 85046(T), CCBAU 85051, CCBAU 85048 and CCBAU 85049, isolated from root nodules of Oxytropis glabra grown in Tibet, China, were previously defined, using amplified 16S rRNA gene restriction analysis, as a novel group within the genus Rhizobium. To clarify their taxonomic position, these strains were further analysed and compared with reference strains of related bacteria using a polyphasic approach. The 16S rRNA gene analysis showed that the four isolates formed a distinct phylogenetic lineage in the genus Rhizobium. The isolates showed highest sequence similarity (97.8  %) to Rhizobium indigoferae CCBAU 71042(T). Phenotypic and physiological tests, DNA-DNA hybridization, phylogenetic analyses of housekeeping genes recA, atpD and glnII and fatty acid profiles also indicated that these four strains constitute a novel group distinct from recognized species of the genus Rhizobium. Based on this evidence, strains CCBAU 85046(T), CCBAU 85051, CCBAU 85048 and CCBAU 85049 represent a novel species in the genus Rhizobium, for which the name Rhizobium tubonense sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is CCBAU 85046(T) (=LMG 25225(T) =HAMBI 3066(T)) and its DNA G+C content is 59.52 % (T(m)). Strain CCBAU 85046(T) could form effective nodules on plant species Vigna unguiculata and Medicago sativa but not on its host of origin Oxytropis glabra.

  2. Diversity and symbiotic effectiveness of indigenous rhizobia-nodulating Adesmia bicolor in soils of Central Argentina.

    PubMed

    Bianco, Luciana; Angelini, Jorge; Fabra, Adriana; Malpassi, Rosana

    2013-02-01

    Native perennial legume Adesmia bicolor reveals characteristics that are key to securing persistence under grazing. Literature on the diversity and symbiotic effectiveness of indigenous rhizobia-nodulating A. bicolor in central Argentina is limited. The purpose of this study was therefore to determine phenotypic and genotypic variability as well as biological N-fixation effectiveness in rhizobia isolated from A. bicolor nodules. To this end, repetitive genomic regions were analyzed using ERIC primers. In the greenhouse, plants were grown under a (i) N-fertilized treatment, (ii) N-free control treatment, and (iii) rhizobia inoculation treatment. Dry weight and N-content were analyzed. All isolates belonged to Rhizobium genus and showed high symbiotic effectiveness. The N-content/subterranean N-content ratio in aerial and subterranean parts of inoculated plants was higher than that observed in N-fertilized plants during the vegetative stage. Results from this study demonstrate that symbiosis between native rhizobial strains and A. bicolor is very effective.

  3. Genome sequence of the clover-nodulating Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. trifolii strain SRDI943.

    PubMed Central

    Reeve, Wayne; Drew, Elizabeth; Ballard, Ross; Melino, Vanessa; Tian, Rui; De Meyer, Sofie; Brau, Lambert; Ninawi, Mohamed; Daligault, Hajnalka; Davenport, Karen; Erkkila, Tracy; Goodwin, Lynne; Gu, Wei; Munk, Christine; Teshima, Hazuki; Xu, Yan; Chain, Patrick; Kyrpides, Nikos

    2013-01-01

    Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. trifolii SRDI943 (strain syn. V2-2) is an aerobic, motile, Gram-negative, non-spore-forming rod that was isolated from a root nodule of Trifolium michelianum Savi cv. Paradana that had been grown in soil collected from a mixed pasture in Victoria, Australia. This isolate was found to have a broad clover host range but was sub-optimal for nitrogen fixation with T. subterraneum (fixing 20-54% of reference inoculant strain WSM1325) and was found to be totally ineffective with the clover species T. polymorphum and T. pratense. Here we describe the features of R. leguminosarum bv. trifolii strain SRDI943, together with genome sequence information and annotation. The 7,412,387 bp high-quality-draft genome is arranged into 5 scaffolds of 5 contigs, contains 7,317 protein-coding genes and 89 RNA-only encoding genes, and is one of 100 rhizobial genomes sequenced as part of the DOE Joint Genome Institute 2010 Genomic Encyclopedia for Bacteria and Archaea-Root Nodule Bacteria (GEBA-RNB) project. PMID:24976880

  4. Fate map of Medicago truncatula root nodules.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Ting Ting; Schilderink, Stefan; Moling, Sjef; Deinum, Eva E; Kondorosi, Eva; Franssen, Henk; Kulikova, Olga; Niebel, Andreas; Bisseling, Ton

    2014-09-01

    Legume root nodules are induced by N-fixing rhizobium bacteria that are hosted in an intracellular manner. These nodules are formed by reprogramming differentiated root cells. The model legume Medicago truncatula forms indeterminate nodules with a meristem at their apex. This organ grows by the activity of the meristem that adds cells to the different nodule tissues. In Medicago sativa it has been shown that the nodule meristem is derived from the root middle cortex. During nodule initiation, inner cortical cells and pericycle cells are also mitotically activated. However, whether and how these cells contribute to the mature nodule has not been studied. Here, we produce a nodule fate map that precisely describes the origin of the different nodule tissues based on sequential longitudinal sections and on the use of marker genes that allow the distinction of cells originating from different root tissues. We show that nodule meristem originates from the third cortical layer, while several cell layers of the base of the nodule are directly formed from cells of the inner cortical layers, root endodermis and pericycle. The latter two differentiate into the uninfected tissues that are located at the base of the mature nodule, whereas the cells derived from the inner cortical cell layers form about eight cell layers of infected cells. This nodule fate map has then been used to re-analyse several mutant nodule phenotypes. This showed, among other things, that intracellular release of rhizobia in primordium cells and meristem daughter cells are regulated in a different manner.

  5. Medicago truncatula natural resistance-associated macrophage Protein1 is required for iron uptake by rhizobia-infected nodule cells.

    PubMed

    Tejada-Jiménez, Manuel; Castro-Rodríguez, Rosario; Kryvoruchko, Igor; Lucas, M Mercedes; Udvardi, Michael; Imperial, Juan; González-Guerrero, Manuel

    2015-05-01

    Iron is critical for symbiotic nitrogen fixation (SNF) as a key component of multiple ferroproteins involved in this biological process. In the model legume Medicago truncatula, iron is delivered by the vasculature to the infection/maturation zone (zone II) of the nodule, where it is released to the apoplast. From there, plasma membrane iron transporters move it into rhizobia-containing cells, where iron is used as the cofactor of multiple plant and rhizobial proteins (e.g. plant leghemoglobin and bacterial nitrogenase). MtNramp1 (Medtr3g088460) is the M. truncatula Natural Resistance-Associated Macrophage Protein family member, with the highest expression levels in roots and nodules. Immunolocalization studies indicate that MtNramp1 is mainly targeted to the plasma membrane. A loss-of-function nramp1 mutant exhibited reduced growth compared with the wild type under symbiotic conditions, but not when fertilized with mineral nitrogen. Nitrogenase activity was low in the mutant, whereas exogenous iron and expression of wild-type MtNramp1 in mutant nodules increased nitrogen fixation to normal levels. These data are consistent with a model in which MtNramp1 is the main transporter responsible for apoplastic iron uptake by rhizobia-infected cells in zone II.

  6. Genome sequence of Ensifer medicae strain WSM1115; an acid-tolerant Medicago-nodulating microsymbiont from Samothraki, Greece.

    PubMed

    Reeve, Wayne; Ballard, Ross; Howieson, John; Drew, Elizabeth; Tian, Rui; Bräu, Lambert; Munk, Christine; Davenport, Karen; Chain, Patrick; Goodwin, Lynne; Pagani, Ioanna; Huntemann, Marcel; Mavrommatis, Konstantinos; Pati, Amrita; Markowitz, Victor; Ivanova, Natalia; Woyke, Tanja; Kyrpides, Nikos

    2014-06-15

    Ensifer medicae strain WSM1115 forms effective nitrogen fixing symbioses with a range of annual Medicago species and is used in commercial inoculants in Australia. WSM1115 is an aerobic, motile, Gram-negative, non-spore-forming rod. It was isolated from a nodule recovered from the root of burr medic (Medicago polymorpha) collected on the Greek Island of Samothraki. WSM1115 has a broad host range for nodulation and N2 fixation capacity within the genus Medicago, although this does not extend to all medic species. WSM1115 is considered saprophytically competent in moderately acid soils (pH(CaCl2) 5.0), but it has failed to persist at field sites where soil salinity exceeded 10 ECe (dS/m). Here we describe the features of E. medicae strain WSM1115, together with genome sequence information and its annotation. The 6,861,065 bp high-quality-draft genome is arranged into 7 scaffolds of 28 contigs, contains 6,789 protein-coding genes and 83 RNA-only encoding genes, and is one of 100 rhizobial genomes sequenced as part of the DOE Joint Genome Institute 2010 Genomic Encyclopedia for Bacteria and Archaea-Root Nodule Bacteria (GEBA-RNB) project.

  7. Genome sequence of Ensifer medicae strain WSM1115; an acid-tolerant Medicago-nodulating microsymbiont from Samothraki, Greece

    PubMed Central

    Reeve, Wayne; Ballard, Ross; Howieson, John; Drew, Elizabeth; Tian, Rui; Bräu, Lambert; Munk, Christine; Davenport, Karen; Chain, Patrick; Goodwin, Lynne; Pagani, Ioanna; Huntemann, Marcel; Mavrommatis, Konstantinos; Pati, Amrita; Markowitz, Victor; Ivanova, Natalia; Woyke, Tanja; Kyrpides, Nikos

    2013-01-01

    Ensifer medicae strain WSM1115 forms effective nitrogen fixing symbioses with a range of annual Medicago species and is used in commercial inoculants in Australia. WSM1115 is an aerobic, motile, Gram-negative, non-spore-forming rod. It was isolated from a nodule recovered from the root of burr medic (Medicago polymorpha) collected on the Greek Island of Samothraki. WSM1115 has a broad host range for nodulation and N2 fixation capacity within the genus Medicago, although this does not extend to all medic species. WSM1115 is considered saprophytically competent in moderately acid soils (pH(CaCl2) 5.0), but it has failed to persist at field sites where soil salinity exceeded 10 ECe (dS/m). Here we describe the features of E. medicae strain WSM1115, together with genome sequence information and its annotation. The 6,861,065 bp high-quality-draft genome is arranged into 7 scaffolds of 28 contigs, contains 6,789 protein-coding genes and 83 RNA-only encoding genes, and is one of 100 rhizobial genomes sequenced as part of the DOE Joint Genome Institute 2010 Genomic Encyclopedia for Bacteria and Archaea-Root Nodule Bacteria (GEBA-RNB) project. PMID:25197437

  8. Are common symbiosis genes required for endophytic rice-rhizobial interactions?

    PubMed

    Chen, Caiyan; Zhu, Hongyan

    2013-09-01

    Legume plants are able to establish root nodule symbioses with nitrogen-fixing bacteria, called rhizobia. Recent studies revealed that the root nodule symbiosis has co-opted the signaling pathway that mediates the ancestral mycorrhizal symbiosis that occurs in most land plants. Despite being unable to induce nodulation, rhizobia have been shown to be able to infect and colonize the roots of non-legumes such as rice. One fascinating question is whether establishment of such associations requires the common symbiosis (Sym) genes that are essential for infection of plant cells by mycorrhizal fungi and rhizobia in legumes. Here, we demonstrated that the common Sym genes are not required for endophytic colonization of rice roots by nitrogen-fixing rhizobia.

  9. Plasmid-linked nif and “nod” genes in fast-growing rhizobia that nodulate Glycine max, Psophocarpus tetragonolobus, and Vigna unguiculata

    PubMed Central

    Broughton, William J.; Heycke, Nina; Z.A., Heiner Meyer; Pankhurst, Clive E.

    1984-01-01

    Forty-nine fast-growing Rhizobium strains from the nodules of 26 different tropical legume genera were screened to find isolates that would (i) nodulate, e.g., winged beans, so producing large nodules for RNA and protein isolation; (ii) also nodulate various small-seeded legumes, thus allowing screening of large numbers of mutants; and (iii) harbor plasmids containing nif structural genes as well as other functions involved in nodulation. On the basis of six different criteria, this rhizobial group appeared intermediate between classical fast- and slow-growing organisms, yet all contained plasmids. Plasmid numbers varied from one to five. Hybridizations between DNA prepared from nifDH and the putatative “nod” region of R. meliloti and these plasmids bound to nitrocellulose filters suggested that nif-nod genes are linked on a single sym plasmid. A broad-host-range strain containing a single sym plasmid was chosen for further study. Its plasmid, pMPIK3030a, was isolated on cesium chloride gradients and cloned in the cosmid pJB8, and the overlapping fragments were mapped by homology with the nif and nod regions of R. meliloti. As the wild-type plasmid pMPIK3030a was not self-transmissible, confirmation that the nod genes detected by homology were responsible for nodulation was obtained by introducing the mobilization functions of RP4 (together with Tn5) and selecting transconjugants resistant to kanamycin and neomycin. Transconjugants (obtained at a frequency of about 10-6 per recipient) in Agrobacterium tumefaciens cured of the Ti plasmid produced ineffective nodules on Vigna unguiculata, those in nonnodulating (Nod-) R. meliloti were partially effective, while those in Nod-R. leguminosarum were often fully effective. Images PMID:16593465

  10. Pleiotropic effect of fluoranthene on anthocyanin synthesis and nodulation of Medicago sativa is reversed by the plant flavone luteolin

    SciTech Connect

    Wetzel, A.; Parniske, M.; Werner, D.

    1995-05-01

    The symbiosis between leguminous plants and soil bacteria of the genus Rhizobium is of considerable agronominal importance. Recently it has been found, that polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs; e.g. anthracene, phenanthrene, fluoranthene), occurring as ubiquitous environmental contaminants can inhibit nodulation of Medicago sativa. Fluoranthene is one of the dominant PAHs found in urban particulate matter, sewage sludge or beside motorways. Several organisms have been shown to be able to metabolize and mineralize fluoranthene but the uptake of fluoranthene is limited due to low solubility of fluoranthene in water and strong adsorption to humic substances in soil. Rhizobium meliloti cannot degrade fluoranthene. Toxic effects of fluoranthene on bacterial growth have never been observed. In contrast to their rhizobial symbiotic partners, alfalfa plants grown on a solidified fluoranthene-containing medium, exhibited symptoms of toxicity. They showed a dose-responsive decrease in shoot length and, if inoculated with R. meliloti, inhibition of nodule formation. Growth retardation is accompanied by a decrease in anthocyanin pigmentation of shoots, and an atypical accumulation of anthocyanins in roots. Plant flavonoids are known to play a central role in the signal exchange of the Legume-Rhizobium symbiosis. Phenylpropane derived compounds and flavonoids have been implicated in nodule development. Since fluoranthene impairs nodulation and induces the production of anthocyanins, it is possible that these events are causally linked via phenylpropanoid metabolism. These experiments attempt to overcome the inhibitory effects of fluoranthene by exogeneous application of the flavonoid luteolin. This paper demonstrates that luteolin antagonizes the fluoranthene mediated inhibition of nodule formation and prevents the accumulation of anthocyanins in roots. 29 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Positioning the nodule, the hormone dictum

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Yiliang

    2009-01-01

    The formation of a nitrogen-fixing nodule involves two diverse developmental processes in the legume root: infection thread initiation in epidermal cells and nodule primordia formation in the cortex. Several plant hormones have been reported to positively or negatively regulate nodulation. These hormones function at different stages in the nodulation process and may facilitate the coordinated development of the epidermal and cortical developmental programs that are necessary to allow bacterial infection into the developing nodule. In this paper, we review and discuss how the tissue specific nature of hormonal action dictates where, when and how a nodule is formed. PMID:19649179

  12. Interaction of a rhizobial DNA-binding protein with the promoter region of a plant leghemoglobin gene

    SciTech Connect

    Welters, P.; Metz, B.; Felix, G.; Palme, K. ); Szczyglowski, K. ); Bruijn, F.J. de Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI )

    1993-08-01

    A nucleotide sequence was identified approximately 650 bp upstream of the Sesbania rostrata leghemoglobin gene Srglb3 start codon, which interacts specifically with a proteinaceous DNA-binding factor found in nodule extracts but not in extracts from leaves or root. The binding site for this factor was delimited using footprinting techniques. The DNA-binding activity of this factor was found to be heat stable, dependent on divalent cations, and derived from the (infecting) Azorhizobium caulinodans bacteria or bacteroids (A. caulinodans bacterial binding factor 1, AcBBF1). A 9- to 10-kD protein was isolated from a free-living culture of A. caulinodans that co-purifies with the DNA-binding activity (A. caulinodans bacterial binding protein 1, AcBBP1) and interacts specifically with its target (S. rostrata bacterial binding site 1, SrBBS1). The amino acid sequence of the N-terminal 27 residues of AcBBP1 was determined and was found to share significant similarity (46% identity; 68% similarity) with a domain of the herpes simplex virus major DNA-binding protein infected cell protein 8(ICP8). An insertion mutation in the SrBBS1 was found to result in a substantial reduction of the expression of a Srglb3-gus reporter gene fusion in nodules of transgenic Lotus corniculatus plants, suggesting a role for this element in Srglb3 promoter activity. Based on these results, the authors propose that (a) bacterial transacting factor(s) may play a role in infected cell-specific expression of the symbiotically induced plant lb genes. 70 refs., 11 figs.

  13. Ectopic expression of miR160 results in auxin hypersensitivity, cytokinin hyposensitivity, and inhibition of symbiotic nodule development in soybean.

    PubMed

    Turner, Marie; Nizampatnam, Narasimha Rao; Baron, Mathieu; Coppin, Stéphanie; Damodaran, Suresh; Adhikari, Sajag; Arunachalam, Shivaram Poigai; Yu, Oliver; Subramanian, Senthil

    2013-08-01

    Symbiotic root nodules in leguminous plants result from interaction between the plant and nitrogen-fixing rhizobia bacteria. There are two major types of legume nodules, determinate and indeterminate. Determinate nodules do not have a persistent meristem, while indeterminate nodules have a persistent meristem. Auxin is thought to play a role in the development of both these types of nodules. However, inhibition of rootward auxin transport at the site of nodule initiation is crucial for the development of indeterminate nodules but not determinate nodules. Using the synthetic auxin-responsive DR5 promoter in soybean (Glycine max), we show that there is relatively low auxin activity during determinate nodule initiation and that it is restricted to the nodule periphery subsequently during development. To examine if and what role auxin plays in determinate nodule development, we generated soybean composite plants with altered sensitivity to auxin. We overexpressed microRNA393 to silence the auxin receptor gene family, and these roots were hyposensitive to auxin. These roots nodulated normally, suggesting that only minimal/reduced auxin signaling is required for determinate nodule development. We overexpressed microRNA160 to silence a set of repressor auxin response factor transcription factors, and these roots were hypersensitive to auxin. These roots were not impaired in epidermal responses to rhizobia but had significantly reduced nodule primordium formation, suggesting that auxin hypersensitivity inhibits nodule development. These roots were also hyposensitive to cytokinin and had attenuated expression of key nodulation-associated transcription factors known to be regulated by cytokinin. We propose a regulatory feedback loop involving auxin and cytokinin during nodulation.

  14. CLE Peptides Control Medicago truncatula Nodulation Locally and Systemically1[C][W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Mortier, Virginie; Den Herder, Griet; Whitford, Ryan; Van de Velde, Willem; Rombauts, Stephane; D'haeseleer, Katrien; Holsters, Marcelle; Goormachtig, Sofie

    2010-01-01

    The CLAVATA3/embryo-surrounding region (CLE) peptides control the fine balance between proliferation and differentiation in plant development. We studied the role of CLE peptides during indeterminate nodule development and identified 25 MtCLE peptide genes in the Medicago truncatula genome, of which two genes, MtCLE12 and MtCLE13, had nodulation-related expression patterns that were linked to proliferation and differentiation. MtCLE13 expression was up-regulated early in nodule development. A high-to-low expression gradient radiated from the inner toward the outer cortical cell layers in a region defining the incipient nodule. At later stages, MtCLE12 and MtCLE13 were expressed in differentiating nodules and in the apical part of mature, elongated nodules. Functional analysis revealed a putative role for MtCLE12 and MtCLE13 in autoregulation of nodulation, a mechanism that controls the number of nodules and involves systemic signals mediated by a leucine-rich repeat receptor-like kinase, SUNN, which is active in the shoot. When MtCLE12 and MtCLE13 were ectopically expressed in transgenic roots, nodulation was abolished at the level of the nodulation factor signal transduction, and this inhibition involved long-distance signaling. In addition, composite plants with roots ectopically expressing MtCLE12 or MtCLE13 had elongated petioles. This systemic effect was not observed in transgenic roots ectopically expressing MtCLE12 and MtCLE13 in a sunn-1 mutant background, although nodulation was still strongly reduced. These results suggest multiple roles for CLE signaling in nodulation. PMID:20348212

  15. Legume nodule senescence: roles for redox and hormone signalling in the orchestration of the natural aging process.

    PubMed

    Puppo, Alain; Groten, Karin; Bastian, Fabiola; Carzaniga, Raffaella; Soussi, Mariam; Lucas, M Mercedes; de Felipe, Maria Rosario; Harrison, Judith; Vanacker, Hélène; Foyer, Christine H

    2005-03-01

    Research on legume nodule development has contributed greatly to our current understanding of plant-microbe interactions. However, the factors that orchestrate root nodule senescence have received relatively little attention. Accumulating evidence suggests that redox signals contribute to the establishment of symbiosis and senescence. Although degenerative in nature, nodule senescence is an active process programmed in development in which reactive oxygen species (ROS), antioxidants, hormones and proteinases have key roles. Nodules have high levels of the redox buffers, ascorbate and glutathione, which are important in the nodulation process and in senescence. These metabolites decline with N-fixation as the nodule ages but the resultant decrease in redox buffering capacity does not necessarily lead to enhanced ROS or oxidative stress. We propose models by which ROS and antioxidants interact with hormones such as abscisic acid in the orchestration of nodule senescence.

  16. Genetic diversity of symbiotic Paraburkholderia species isolated from nodules of Mimosa pudica (L.) and Phaseolus vulgaris (L.) grown in soils of the Brazilian Atlantic Forest (Mata Atlântica).

    PubMed

    Dall'Agnol, Rebeca Fuzinatto; Bournaud, Caroline; de Faria, Sérgio Miana; Béna, Gilles; Moulin, Lionel; Hungria, Mariangela

    2017-04-01

    Some species of the genus Paraburkholderia that are able to nodulate and fix nitrogen in symbiosis with legumes are called β-rhizobia and represent a group of ecological and biotechnological importance. We used Mimosa pudica and Phaseolus vulgaris to trap 427 rhizobial isolates from rhizospheric soil of Mimoseae trees in the Brazilian Atlantic Forest. Eighty-four representative strains were selected according to the 16S rRNA haplotypes and taxonomically characterized using a concatenated 16S rRNA-recA phylogeny. Most strains were assembled in the genus Paraburkholderia, including Paraburkholderia sabiae and Pa. nodosa. Mesorhizobium (α-rhizobia) and Cupriavidus (β-rhizobia) were also isolated, but in smaller proportions. Multilocus sequence analysis and BOX-PCR analyses indicated that six clusters of Paraburkholderia represent potential new species. In the phylogenetic analysis of the nodC gene, the majority of the strains were positioned in the same groups as in the 16S rRNA-recA tree, indicative of stability and vertical inheritance, but we also identified horizontal transfer of nodC in Pa. sabiae. All α- and β-rhizobial species were trapped by both legumes, although preferences of the host plants for specific rhizobial species have been observed. © FEMS 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Genetic diversity and community structure of rhizobia nodulating Sesbania cannabina in saline-alkaline soils.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; Li, Xiangyue; Liu, Yajing; Wang, En Tao; Ren, Chenggang; Liu, Wei; Xu, Hualing; Wu, Hailong; Jiang, Nan; Li, Yunzhao; Zhang, Xiaoli; Xie, Zhihong

    2016-05-01

    Sesbania cannabina is a plant that grows naturally along the seashores in Rudong County, China (RDC) and it has been introduced into the Yellow River Delta (YRD) as a pioneer plant to improve the saline-alkaline soils. In order to investigate the diversity of S. cannabina rhizobia in these soils, a total of 198 rhizobial isolates were characterized and phylogenetic trees were constructed based on data from multilocus sequence analysis (MLSA) of the housekeeping genes recA, atpD and glnII, as well as 16S rRNA. Symbiotic features were also studied by establishing the phylogeny of the symbiotic genes nodA and nifH, and by performing nodulation assays. The isolates had highly conserved symbiotic genes and were classified into nine genospecies belonging to the genera Ensifer, Agrobacterium, Neorhizobium and Rhizobium. A unique community structure was detected in the rhizobia associated with S. cannabina in the saline-alkaline soils that was characterized by five novel genospecies and four defined species. In addition, Ensifer sp. I was the predominant rhizobia in YRD, whereas Ensifer meliloti and Neorhizobium huautlense were the dominant species in RDC. Therefore, the study demonstrated for the first time that this plant strongly selected the symbiotic gene background but not the genomic background of its microsymbionts. In addition, biogeographic patterns existed in the rhizobial populations associated with S. cannabina, which were mainly correlated with pH and salinity, as well as the mineral nutrient contents. This study provided novel information concerning the interaction between soil conditions, host plant and rhizobia, in addition to revealing the diversity of S. cannabina rhizobia in saline-alkaline soils.

  18. Prognostic Significance of Concurrent Hypovascular and Hypervascular Nodules in Patients with Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Ogasawara, Sadahisa; Chiba, Tetsuhiro; Motoyama, Tenyu; Kanogawa, Naoya; Saito, Tomoko; Shinozaki, Yusuke; Suzuki, Eiichiro; Ooka, Yoshihiko; Tawada, Akinobu; Kato, Hideyuki; Okabe, Shinichiro; Kanai, Fumihiko; Yoshikawa, Masaharu; Yokosuka, Osamu

    2016-01-01

    Background Hypovascular nodules often occur together with hypervascular hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). However, it remains controversial whether hypovascular nodules associated with hypervascular HCC have any prognostic value. This study evaluated the prognostic impact of hypovascular nodules co-existing with hypervascular HCC as diagnosed by computed tomography during arterial portography (CTAP) and computed tomography during hepatic arteriography (CTHA), which can sensitively capture the dynamic changes in blood flow through the portal vein and hepatic artery in patients with early stage HCC. Methods A total of 152 patients with hypervascular HCC (≤ 30 mm, ≤ 3 nodules), who underwent initial local ablation, were analyzed retrospectively. All patients received CTAP and CTHA prior to treatment. Overall survival (OS) was compared among group A (hypervascular HCC only, 107 patients) and group B (hypovascular nodules and hypervascular HCC, 45 patients). Results Among all hypovascular nodules, 81% (46 of 57) developed hypervascularization within the follow-up period. The 1- and 2-year hypervascularization rates were 17% and 51%, respectively. OS was significantly longer for group A than for group B (P < 0.001). A Cox proportional-hazards model identified the presence of hypovascular nodules concurrent with hypervascular HCC as an independent poor prognostic factor. Conclusion The prognosis of hypervascular HCC patients with hypovascular nodules detected during CTAP and CTHA is poor. Clinical HCC categories seem to be dissimilar between patients with and without hypovascular nodules. PMID:27649084

  19. Quantitative sonographic image analysis for hepatic nodules: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Naoki; Ogawa, Masahiro; Takayasu, Kentaro; Hirayama, Midori; Miura, Takao; Shiozawa, Katsuhiko; Abe, Masahisa; Nakagawara, Hiroshi; Moriyama, Mitsuhiko; Udagawa, Seiichi

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the feasibility of quantitative image analysis to differentiate hepatic nodules on gray-scale sonographic images. We retrospectively evaluated 35 nodules from 31 patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), 60 nodules from 58 patients with liver hemangioma, and 22 nodules from 22 patients with liver metastasis. Gray-scale sonographic images were evaluated with subjective judgment and image analysis using ImageJ software. Reviewers classified the shape of nodules as irregular or round, and the surface of nodules as rough or smooth. Circularity values were lower in the irregular group than in the round group (median 0.823, 0.892; range 0.641-0.915, 0.784-0.932, respectively; P = 3.21 × 10(-10)). Solidity values were lower in the rough group than in the smooth group (median 0.957, 0.968; range 0.894-0.986, 0.933-0.988, respectively; P = 1.53 × 10(-4)). The HCC group had higher circularity and solidity values than the hemangioma group. The HCC and liver metastasis groups had lower median, mean, modal, and minimum gray values than the hemangioma group. Multivariate analysis showed circularity [standardized odds ratio (OR), 2.077; 95 % confidential interval (CI) = 1.295-3.331; P = 0.002] and minimum gray value (OR 0.482; 95 % CI = 0.956-0.990; P = 0.001) as factors predictive of malignancy. The combination of subjective judgment and image analysis provided 58.3 % sensitivity and 89.5 % specificity with AUC = 0.739, representing an improvement over subjective judgment alone (68.4 % sensitivity, 75.0 % specificity, AUC = 0.701) (P = 0.008). Quantitative image analysis for ultrasonic images of hepatic nodules may correlate with subjective judgment in predicting malignancy.

  20. Diagnostic feasibility and safety of CT-guided core biopsy for lung nodules less than or equal to 8 mm: A single-institution experience.

    PubMed

    Chang, Ying-Yueh; Chen, Chun-Ku; Yeh, Yi-Chen; Wu, Mei-Han

    2017-09-07

    This retrospective study evaluated the diagnostic yield and safety of CT-guided core biopsy of pulmonary nodules ≤8 mm. We determined the diagnostic yield and safety profile of CT-guided lung biopsies for 125 pulmonary nodules ≤8 mm. Pathological diagnoses were made by a combination of histopathological examination and imprint cytology. Results were compared with biopsy results for 134 pulmonary nodules >8 and ≤10 mm. Final diagnoses were established in 94 nodules ≤8 mm. The sensitivity, specificity and diagnostic accuracy of CT-guided core biopsy for nodules ≤8 mm were 87.1 % (61/70 nodules), 100 % (24/24) and 90.4 % (85/94), respectively. Diagnostic failure rates were comparable for nodules ≤8 mm and nodules >8 mm and ≤10 mm (9/94, 9.6 % and 7/111, 6.3 %, respectively, P=0.385). The rate of tube thoracostomy for nodules ≤8 mm was comparable to that for nodules >8 and ≤10 mm (1.6 % vs. 0.7 %, P=0.611). Nodules ≤6 mm had a higher non-diagnostic result rate of 15.4 % (6/39) than did nodules >8 and ≤10 mm (3.7 %, 5/134, P=0.017). CT-guided pulmonary biopsy is feasible for lung nodules ≤8 mm, especially those >6 mm, and has an acceptable diagnostic yield and safety profile. • CT-guided biopsy of lung nodules ≤8 mm has high diagnostic accuracy. • Safety profiles are similar between nodules ≤8 mm and 8-10 mm. • Nodules ≤6 mm have higher rates of non-diagnostic results in biopsy. • Non-subpleural nodules and old age are risk factors for higher grade haemorrhage. • Biopsy is feasible for diagnosing nodules >6 and ≤8 mm.

  1. Cicer canariense, an endemic legume to the Canary Islands, is nodulated in mainland Spain by fast-growing strains from symbiovar trifolii phylogenetically related to Rhizobium leguminosarum.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Hidalgo, Pilar; Flores-Félix, José-David; Menéndez, Esther; Rivas, Raúl; Carro, Lorena; Mateos, Pedro F; Martínez-Molina, Eustoquio; León-Barrios, Milagros; Velázquez, Encarna

    2015-07-01

    Cicer canariense is a threatened endemic legume from the Canary Islands where it can be nodulated by mesorhizobial strains from the symbiovar ciceri, which is the common worldwide endosymbiont of Cicer arietinum linked to the genus Mesorhizobium. However, when C. canariense was cultivated in a soil from mainland Spain, where the symbiovar ciceri is present, only fast-growing rhizobial strains were unexpectedly isolated from its nodules. These strains were classified into the genus Rhizobium by analysis of the recA and atpD genes, and they were phylogenetically related to Rhizobium leguminosarum. The analysis of the nodC gene showed that the isolated strains belonged to the symbiovar trifolii that harbored a nodC allele (β allele) different to that harbored by other strains from this symbiovar. Nodulation experiments carried out with the lacZ-labeled strain RCCHU01, representative of the β nodC allele, showed that it induced curling of root hairs, infected them through infection threads, and formed typical indeterminate nodules where nitrogen fixation took place. This represents a case of exceptional performance between the symbiovar trifolii and a legume from the tribe Cicereae that opens up new possibilities and provides new insights into the study of rhizobia-legume symbiosis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  2. Rhizobia from Lanzarote, the Canary Islands, That Nodulate Phaseolus vulgaris Have Characteristics in Common with Sinorhizobium meliloti Isolates from Mainland Spain▿

    PubMed Central

    Zurdo-Piñeiro, José Luis; García-Fraile, Paula; Rivas, Raúl; Peix, Alvaro; León-Barrios, Milagros; Willems, Anne; Mateos, Pedro Francisco; Martínez-Molina, Eustoquio; Velázquez, Encarna; van Berkum, Peter

    2009-01-01

    The stable, low-molecular-weight (LMW) RNA fractions of several rhizobial isolates of Phaseolus vulgaris grown in the soil of Lanzarote, an island of the Canary Islands, were identical to a less-common pattern found within Sinorhizobium meliloti (assigned to group II) obtained from nodules of alfalfa and alfalfa-related legumes grown in northern Spain. The P. vulgaris isolates and the group II LMW RNA S. meliloti isolates also were distinguishable in that both had two conserved inserts of 20 and 46 bp in the 16S-23S internal transcribed spacer region that were not present in other strains of S. meliloti. The isolates from P. vulgaris nodulated bean but not Medicago sativa, while those recovered from Medicago, Melilotus, and Trigonella spp. nodulated both host legumes. The bean isolates also were distinguished from those of Medicago, Melilotus, and Trigonella spp. by nodC sequence analysis. The nodC sequences of the bean isolates were most similar to those reported for S. meliloti bv. mediterranense and Sinorhizobium fredii bv. mediterranense (GenBank accession numbers DQ333891 and AF217267, respectively). None of the evidence placed the bean isolates from Lanzarote in the genus Rhizobium, which perhaps is inconsistent with seed-borne transmission of Rhizobium etli from the Americas to the Canaries as an explanation for the presence of bean-nodulating rhizobia in soils of Lanzarote. PMID:19218416

  3. Phenotypic, genomic and phylogenetic characteristics of rhizobia isolated from root nodules of Robinia pseudoacacia (black locust) growing in Poland and Japan.

    PubMed

    Mierzwa, Bozena; Wdowiak-Wróbel, Sylwia; Małek, Wanda

    2009-09-01

    Rhizobial strains, rescued from the root nodules of Robinia pseudoacacia growing in Japan and Poland, were characterized for the phenotypic properties, genomic diversity as well as phylogeny and compared with the reference strains representing different species and genera of nodule bacteria. They had a moderately slow growth rate, a low tolerance to antibiotics, a moderate resistance to NaCl and produced acid in yeast mannitol agar. Cluster analysis based on the phenotypic features divided all bacteria involved in this study into four phena, comprising: (1) Rhizobium sp. + Sinorhizobium sp., (2) Bradyrhizobium sp., (3) R. pseudoacacia microsymbionts + Mesorhizobium sp., and (4) Rhizobium galegae strains at similarity coefficient of 74%. R. pseudoacacia nodule isolates and Mesorhizobium species were placed on a single branch clearly distinct from other rhizobium genera lineages. Strains representing R. pseudoacacia microsymbionts shared 98-99% 16S rDNA sequence identity with Mesorhizobium species and in 16S rDNA phylogenetic tree all these bacteria formed common cluster. The rhizobia tested are genomically heterogeneous as indicated by the AFLP (Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphism) method. The bacteria studied exhibited high degree of specificity for nodulation. Nitrogenase structural genes in these strains were located on 771-961 kb megaplasmids.

  4. Characterization and genus identification of rhizobial symbionts from Caragana arborescens in western Canada.

    PubMed

    Moukoumi, Judicaël; Hynes, Russell K; Dumonceaux, Timothy J; Town, Jennifer; Bélanger, Nicolas

    2013-06-01

    Naturally occurring nitrogen-fixing symbionts from root nodules of caragana (Caragana arborescens) growing in central Saskatchewan were isolated following surface sterilization of caragana root nodules and squashing and spreading of the contents on yeast extract - mannitol medium. The symbiotic nature of the strains was confirmed following inoculation onto surface-sterilized C. arborescens seed in a gnotobiotic Leonard jar system. The Rhizobium isolates from C. arborescens root nodules were intermediate in generation time (g) (mean g of 5 isolates was 6.41 h) compared with the fast growers, Rhizobium leguminosarum NRG457 (g: 4.44 h), Rhizobium tropici 899 (g: 3.19 h), and Sinorhizobium meliloti BALSAC (g: 3.45 h), but they were faster than the slow-growing Bradyrhizobium japonicum USDA 110 (g: 13.86 h) and similar to Mesorhizobium amorphae (g: 7.76 h). Nitrogen derived from fixation by measuring changes in δ(15)N natural abundance in plant tissue confirmed the effectiveness of the strains; approximately 80% N2 from fixation. Strain identification was carried out by determining the sequences of 3 genes: 16S rRNA-encoding genes, cpn60, and recA. This analysis determined that the symbiotic partner of Canadian C. arborescens belongs to the genus Mesorhizobium and seems more related to M. loti than to previously described caragana symbionts like M. caraganae. This is the first report of Mesorhizobium sp. nodulating C. arborescens in western Canada.

  5. Genetic diversity and symbiotic compatibility among rhizobial strains and Desmodium incanum and Lotus spp. plants.

    PubMed

    Granada, Camille E; Strochein, Marcos; Vargas, Luciano K; Bruxel, Manuela; de Sá, Enilson Luiz Saccol; Passaglia, Luciane M P

    2014-06-01

    This work aimed to evaluate the symbiotic compatibility and nodulation efficiency of rhizobia isolated from Desmodium incanum, Lotus corniculatus, L. subbiflorus, L. uliginosus and L. glaber plants by cross-inoculation. Twelve reference strains and 21 native isolates of rhizobia were genetically analyzed by the BOX-PCR technique, which showed a high genetic diversity among the rhizobia studied. The isolates were also characterized based on their production of indolic compounds and siderophores, as well as on their tolerance to salinity. Fifteen of the 33 rhizobia analyzed were able to produce indolic compounds, whereas 13 produced siderophores. All the tested rhizobia were sensitive to high salinity, although some were able to grow in solutions of up to 2% NaCl. Most of the native rhizobia isolated from L. uliginosus were able to induce nodulation in all plant species studied. In a greenhouse experiment using both D. incanum and L. corniculatus plants, the rhizobia isolate UFRGS Lu2 promoted the greatest plant growth. The results demonstrate that there are native rhizobia in the soils of southern Brazil that have low host specificity and are able to induce nodulation and form active nodules in several plant species.

  6. Genetic diversity and symbiotic compatibility among rhizobial strains and Desmodium incanum and Lotus spp. plants

    PubMed Central

    Granada, Camille E.; Strochein, Marcos; Vargas, Luciano K.; Bruxel, Manuela; de Sá, Enilson Luiz Saccol; Passaglia, Luciane M.P.

    2014-01-01

    This work aimed to evaluate the symbiotic compatibility and nodulation efficiency of rhizobia isolated from Desmodium incanum, Lotus corniculatus, L. subbiflorus, L. uliginosus and L. glaber plants by cross-inoculation. Twelve reference strains and 21 native isolates of rhizobia were genetically analyzed by the BOX-PCR technique, which showed a high genetic diversity among the rhizobia studied. The isolates were also characterized based on their production of indolic compounds and siderophores, as well as on their tolerance to salinity. Fifteen of the 33 rhizobia analyzed were able to produce indolic compounds, whereas 13 produced siderophores. All the tested rhizobia were sensitive to high salinity, although some were able to grow in solutions of up to 2% NaCl. Most of the native rhizobia isolated from L. uliginosus were able to induce nodulation in all plant species studied. In a greenhouse experiment using both D. incanum and L. corniculatus plants, the rhizobia isolate UFRGS Lu2 promoted the greatest plant growth. The results demonstrate that there are native rhizobia in the soils of southern Brazil that have low host specificity and are able to induce nodulation and form active nodules in several plant species. PMID:25071405

  7. Interaction of root nodule size and oxygen pressure on the rate of nitrogen fixation by cowpea and peanut

    SciTech Connect

    Sen, D.; Weaver, R.W.

    1987-04-01

    Size and anatomical features of nodules influence the rate of O/sub 2/ diffusion into nodules. Availability of oxygen can be a limiting factor in nitrogen fixation. Larger nodules have thicker cortices and low surface to volume ratio leading to lower rates of gaseous diffusion. Increased oxygen pressure in the environment alters the rate of nitrogen fixation but the rate of change may depend on the nodule size. This was investigated by measuring /sup 15/N/sub 2/ incorporation into nodules. Root nodules from 38 day old cowpea and peanut plants were collected and sorted into size groups having diameters of >3 mm, 2-3 mm, and just below 2 mm. Samples of each size group were enclosed in tubes and exposed to various combination of oxygen (8-28%) and /sup 15/N/sub 2/. With higher O/sub 2/ pressure all nodules showed increased N/sub 2/ fixation but the largest nodules showed the maximum increase. Specific activity of larger nodules was higher for N/sub 2/ fixation. For the sizes of nodules examined the largest nodules did not reflect any of the disadvantages of the large size but the benefits of higher rates of O/sub 2/ entry was evident.

  8. Basis for the competitiveness of Rhizobium japonicum in nodulation of soybean. Final progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, W.R.; Bauer, W.D.

    1986-07-30

    This study sought to identify molecular, genetic and environmental factors most crucial to the ability of an inoculated strain of rhizobia to nodulate soybean roots in the face of competition from indigenous microorganisms. Co-inoculation of a more efficient strain with a less-efficient strain resulted in the more efficient strain occupying a higher percentage of nodules. When culture conditions became less stringent the less efficient strain became more competitive. The number of infections formed was related in a direct manner to nodulation efficiency. The strain which was more nodulation efficient also was more infection efficient. That the number of infections per se, as determined in a single inoculum, can not be the only factor in determining the competency was indicated by experiments in which one strain formed more total infection yet nodule occupancy was equally distributed. 5 figs., 9 tabs.

  9. Differentially expressed genes in mycorrhized and nodulated roots of common bean are associated with defense, cell wall architecture, N metabolism, and P metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Gómez, Brenda-Mariana; Blanco, Lourdes; Lara, Miguel

    2017-01-01

    Legumes participate in two important endosymbiotic associations, with phosphorus-acquiring arbuscular mycorrhiza (AM, soil fungi) and with nitrogen-fixing bacterial rhizobia. These divergent symbionts share a common symbiotic signal transduction pathway that facilitates the establishment of mycorrhization and nodulation in legumes. However, the unique and shared downstream genes essential for AM and nodule development have not been identified in crop legumes. Here, we used ion torrent next-generation sequencing to perform comparative transcriptomics of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) roots colonized by AM or rhizobia. We analyzed global gene expression profiles to identify unique and shared differentially expressed genes (DEGs) that regulate these two symbiotic interactions, and quantitatively compared DEG profiles. We identified 3,219 (1,959 upregulated and 1,260 downregulated) and 2,645 (1,247 upregulated and 1,398 downregulated) unigenes that were differentially expressed in response to mycorrhizal or rhizobial colonization, respectively, compared with uninoculated roots. We obtained quantitative expression profiles of unique and shared genes involved in processes related to defense, cell wall structure, N metabolism, and P metabolism in mycorrhized and nodulated roots. KEGG pathway analysis indicated that most genes involved in jasmonic acid and salicylic acid signaling, N metabolism, and inositol phosphate metabolism are variably expressed during symbiotic interactions. These combined data provide valuable information on symbiotic gene signaling networks that respond to mycorrhizal and rhizobial colonization, and serve as a guide for future genetic strategies to enhance P uptake and N-fixing capacity to increase the net yield of this valuable grain legume. PMID:28771548

  10. Differentially expressed genes in mycorrhized and nodulated roots of common bean are associated with defense, cell wall architecture, N metabolism, and P metabolism.

    PubMed

    Nanjareddy, Kalpana; Arthikala, Manoj-Kumar; Gómez, Brenda-Mariana; Blanco, Lourdes; Lara, Miguel

    2017-01-01

    Legumes participate in two important endosymbiotic associations, with phosphorus-acquiring arbuscular mycorrhiza (AM, soil fungi) and with nitrogen-fixing bacterial rhizobia. These divergent symbionts share a common symbiotic signal transduction pathway that facilitates the establishment of mycorrhization and nodulation in legumes. However, the unique and shared downstream genes essential for AM and nodule development have not been identified in crop legumes. Here, we used ion torrent next-generation sequencing to perform comparative transcriptomics of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) roots colonized by AM or rhizobia. We analyzed global gene expression profiles to identify unique and shared differentially expressed genes (DEGs) that regulate these two symbiotic interactions, and quantitatively compared DEG profiles. We identified 3,219 (1,959 upregulated and 1,260 downregulated) and 2,645 (1,247 upregulated and 1,398 downregulated) unigenes that were differentially expressed in response to mycorrhizal or rhizobial colonization, respectively, compared with uninoculated roots. We obtained quantitative expression profiles of unique and shared genes involved in processes related to defense, cell wall structure, N metabolism, and P metabolism in mycorrhized and nodulated roots. KEGG pathway analysis indicated that most genes involved in jasmonic acid and salicylic acid signaling, N metabolism, and inositol phosphate metabolism are variably expressed during symbiotic interactions. These combined data provide valuable information on symbiotic gene signaling networks that respond to mycorrhizal and rhizobial colonization, and serve as a guide for future genetic strategies to enhance P uptake and N-fixing capacity to increase the net yield of this valuable grain legume.

  11. Lung nodules detection in chest radiography: image components analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Tao; Mou, Xuanqin; Yang, Ying; Yan, Hao

    2009-02-01

    We aimed to evaluate the effect of different components of chest image on performances of both human observer and channelized Fisher-Hotelling model (CFH) in nodule detection task. Irrelevant and relevant components were separated from clinical chest radiography by employing Principal Component Analysis (PCA) methods. Human observer performance was evaluated in two-alternative forced-choice (2AFC) on original clinical images and anatomical structure only images obtained by PCA methods. Channelized Fisher-Hotelling model with Laguerre-Gauss basis function was evaluated to predict human performance. We show that relevant component is the primary factor influencing on nodule detection in chest radiography. There is obvious difference of detectability between human observer and CFH model for nodule detection in images only containing anatomical structure. CFH model should be used more carefully.

  12. A mRNA-based thermosensor controls expression of rhizobial heat shock genes

    PubMed Central

    Nocker, Andreas; Hausherr, Thomas; Balsiger, Sylvia; Krstulovic, Nila-Pia; Hennecke, Hauke; Narberhaus, Franz

    2001-01-01

    Expression of several heat shock operons, mainly coding for small heat shock proteins, is under the control of ROSE (repression of heat shock gene expression) in various rhizobial species. This negatively cis-acting element confers temperature control by preventing expression at physiological temperatures. We provide evidence that ROSE-mediated regulation occurs at the post-transcriptional level. A detailed mutational analysis of ROSE1–hspA translationally fused to lacZ revealed that its highly conserved 3′-half is required for repression at normal temperatures (30°C). The mRNA in this region is predicted to form an extended secondary structure that looks very similar in all 15 known ROSE elements. Nucleotides involved in base pairing are strongly conserved, whereas nucleotides in loop regions are more divergent. Base substitutions leading to derepression of the lacZ fusion at 30°C exclusively resided in potential stem structures. Optimised base pairing by elimination of a bulged residue and by introduction of complementary nucleotides in internal loops resulted in ROSE elements that were tightly repressed not only at normal but also at heat shock temperatures. We propose a model in which the temperature-regulated secondary structure of ROSE mRNA influences heat shock gene expression by controlling ribosome access to the ribosome-binding site. PMID:11726689

  13. A mRNA-based thermosensor controls expression of rhizobial heat shock genes.

    PubMed

    Nocker, A; Hausherr, T; Balsiger, S; Krstulovic, N P; Hennecke, H; Narberhaus, F

    2001-12-01

    Expression of several heat shock operons, mainly coding for small heat shock proteins, is under the control of ROSE (repression of heat shock gene expression) in various rhizobial species. This negatively cis-acting element confers temperature control by preventing expression at physiological temperatures. We provide evidence that ROSE-mediated regulation occurs at the post-transcriptional level. A detailed mutational analysis of ROSE(1)-hspA translationally fused to lacZ revealed that its highly conserved 3'-half is required for repression at normal temperatures (30 degrees C). The mRNA in this region is predicted to form an extended secondary structure that looks very similar in all 15 known ROSE elements. Nucleotides involved in base pairing are strongly conserved, whereas nucleotides in loop regions are more divergent. Base substitutions leading to derepression of the lacZ fusion at 30 degrees C exclusively resided in potential stem structures. Optimised base pairing by elimination of a bulged residue and by introduction of complementary nucleotides in internal loops resulted in ROSE elements that were tightly repressed not only at normal but also at heat shock temperatures. We propose a model in which the temperature-regulated secondary structure of ROSE mRNA influences heat shock gene expression by controlling ribosome access to the ribosome-binding site.

  14. Cowpea and peanut in southern Africa are nodulated by diverse Bradyrhizobium strains harboring nodulation genes that belong to the large pantropical clade common in Africa.

    PubMed

    Steenkamp, Emma T; Stepkowski, Tomasz; Przymusiak, Anna; Botha, Wilhelm J; Law, Ian J

    2008-09-01

    Cowpea (Vigna unguiculata) and peanut (Arachis hypogaea) in southern Africa are nodulated by a genetically diverse group of Bradyrhizobium strains. To determine the identity of these bacteria, a collection of 22 isolates originating from the root nodules of both hosts in Botswana and South Africa was investigated using the combined sequences for the core genome genes rrs, recA, and glnII. These data separated the majority of the isolates into one of three unique lineages that most likely represent novel Bradyrhizobium species. Some isolates were also conspecific with B. yuanmingense and with B. elkanii, although none grouped with B. japonicum, B. canariense or B. liaoningense. To study the evolution of nodulation genes in these bacteria, the common nodulation gene, nodA, and host-specific nodulation genes, nodZ, noeE, and noeI, were analyzed. The nodA phylogeny showed that the cowpea and peanut Bradyrhizobium isolates represent various locally adapted groups or ecotypes that form part of Clade III of the seven known BradyrhizobiumnodA clades. This large and highly diverse clade comprises all strains from sub-Saharan Africa, as well as some originating from the Americas, Australia, Indonesia, China and Japan. Some similar groupings were supported by the other nodulation genes, although the overall phylogenies for the nodulation genes were incongruent with that inferred from the core genome genes, suggesting that horizontal gene transfer significantly influences the evolution of cowpea and peanut root-nodule bacteria. Furthermore, identification of the nodZ, noeI, and noeE genes in the isolates tested indicates that African Bradyrhizobium species may produce highly decorated nodulation factors, which potentially represent an important adaptation enabling nodulation of a great variety of legumes inhabiting the African continent.

  15. Radiofrequency ablation of benign thyroid nodules: safety and imaging follow-up in 236 patients.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Woo Kyoung; Baek, Jung Hwan; Rhim, Hyunchul; Kim, Yoon Suk; Kwak, Min Sook; Jeong, Hyun Jo; Lee, Ducky

    2008-06-01

    This study evaluated the safety and volume reduction of ultrasonography (US)-guided radiofrequency ablation (RFA) for benign thyroid nodules, and the factors affecting the results obtained. A total of 302 benign thyroid nodules in 236 euthyroid patients underwent RFA between June 2002 and January 2005. RFA was carried out using an internally cooled electrode under local anesthesia. The volume-reduction ratio (VRR) was assessed by US and safety was determined by observing the complications during the follow-up period (1-41 months). The correlation between the VRR and several factors (patient age, volume and composition of the index nodule) was evaluated. The volume of index nodules was 0.11-95.61 ml (mean, 6.13 +/- 9.59 ml). After ablation, the volume of index nodules decreased to 0.00-26.07 ml (mean, 1.12 +/- 2.92 ml) and the VRR was 12.52-100% (mean, 84.11 +/- 14.93%) at the last follow-up. A VRR greater than 50% was observed in 91.06% of nodules, and 27.81% of index nodules disappeared. The complications encountered were pain, hematoma and transient voice changes. In conclusion, RFA is a safe modality effective at reducing volume in benign thyroid nodules.

  16. Impact of rhizobial inoculation on Acacia senegal (L.) Willd. growth in greenhouse and soil functioning in relation to seed provenance and soil origin.

    PubMed

    Bakhoum, Niokhor; Ndoye, Fatou; Kane, Aboubacry; Assigbetse, Komi; Fall, Dioumacor; Sylla, Samba Ndao; Noba, Kandioura; Diouf, Diégane

    2012-07-01

    Rhizobial inoculation has a positive impact on plants growth; however, there is little information about its effect on soil microbial communities and their activity in the rhizosphere. It was therefore necessary to test the effect of inoculation of Acacia senegal (L.) Willd. seedlings with selected rhizobia on plant growth, structure and diversity of soil bacterial communities and soil functioning in relation to plant provenance and soil origin. In order to carry out this experiment, three A. senegal seeds provenance from Kenya, Niger, and Senegal were inoculated with selected rhizobial strains. They have been further grown during 4 months in greenhouse conditions in two non-disinfected soils, Dahra and Goudiry coming respectively from arid and semi-arid areas. The principal component analysis (ACP) showed an inoculation effect on plant growth, rhizospheric bacterial diversity and soil functioning. However, the performances of the rhizobial strains varied in relation to the seed provenance and the soil origin. The selected rhizobial strains, the A. senegal provenance and the soil origin have modified the structure and the diversity of soil bacterial communities as measured by principal component analysis/denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis analyses. It is interesting to note that bacterial communities of Dahra soil were highly structured according to A. senegal provenance, whereas they were structured in relation to rhizobial inoculation in Goudiry soil. Besides, the impact of inoculation on soil microbial activities measured by fluorescein diacetate analyses varied in relation to plant provenance and soil origin. Nevertheless, total microbial activity was about two times higher in Goudiry, arid soil than in Dahra, semi-arid soil. Our results suggest that the rhizobial inoculation is a suitable tool for improving plants growth and soil fertility. Yet, the impact is dependent on inoculants, plant provenance and soil origin. It will, therefore, be crucial to

  17. Contribution of NFP LysM domains to the recognition of Nod factors during the Medicago truncatula/Sinorhizobium meliloti symbiosis.

    PubMed

    Bensmihen, Sandra; de Billy, Françoise; Gough, Clare

    2011-01-01

    The root nodule nitrogen fixing symbiosis between legume plants and soil bacteria called rhizobia is of great agronomical and ecological interest since it provides the plant with fixed atmospheric nitrogen. The establishment of this symbiosis is mediated by the recognition by the host plant of lipo-chitooligosaccharides called Nod Factors (NFs), produced by the rhizobia. This recognition is highly specific, as precise NF structures are required depending on the host plant. Here, we study the importance of different LysM domains of a LysM-Receptor Like Kinase (LysM-RLK) from Medicago truncatula called Nod factor perception (NFP) in the recognition of different substitutions of NFs produced by its symbiont Sinorhizobium meliloti. These substitutions are a sulphate group at the reducing end, which is essential for host specificity, and a specific acyl chain at the non-reducing end, that is critical for the infection process. The NFP extracellular domain (ECD) contains 3 LysM domains that are predicted to bind NFs. By swapping the whole ECD or individual LysM domains of NFP for those of its orthologous gene from pea, SYM10 (a legume plant that interacts with another strain of rhizobium producing NFs with different substitutions), we showed that NFP is not directly responsible for specific recognition of the sulphate substitution of S. meliloti NFs, but probably interacts with the acyl substitution. Moreover, we have demonstrated the importance of the NFP LysM2 domain for rhizobial infection and we have pinpointed the importance of a single leucine residue of LysM2 in that step of the symbiosis. Together, our data put into new perspective the recognition of NFs in the different steps of symbiosis in M. truncatula, emphasising the probable existence of a missing component for early NF recognition and reinforcing the important role of NFP for NF recognition during rhizobial infection.

  18. Contribution of NFP LysM Domains to the Recognition of Nod Factors during the Medicago truncatula/Sinorhizobium meliloti Symbiosis

    PubMed Central

    Bensmihen, Sandra; de Billy, Françoise; Gough, Clare

    2011-01-01

    The root nodule nitrogen fixing symbiosis between legume plants and soil bacteria called rhizobia is of great agronomical and ecological interest since it provides the plant with fixed atmospheric nitrogen. The establishment of this symbiosis is mediated by the recognition by the host plant of lipo-chitooligosaccharides called Nod Factors (NFs), produced by the rhizobia. This recognition is highly specific, as precise NF structures are required depending on the host plant. Here, we study the importance of different LysM domains of a LysM-Receptor Like Kinase (LysM-RLK) from Medicago truncatula called Nod factor perception (NFP) in the recognition of different substitutions of NFs produced by its symbiont Sinorhizobium meliloti. These substitutions are a sulphate group at the reducing end, which is essential for host specificity, and a specific acyl chain at the non-reducing end, that is critical for the infection process. The NFP extracellular domain (ECD) contains 3 LysM domains that are predicted to bind NFs. By swapping the whole ECD or individual LysM domains of NFP for those of its orthologous gene from pea, SYM10 (a legume plant that interacts with another strain of rhizobium producing NFs with different substitutions), we showed that NFP is not directly responsible for specific recognition of the sulphate substitution of S. meliloti NFs, but probably interacts with the acyl substitution. Moreover, we have demonstrated the importance of the NFP LysM2 domain for rhizobial infection and we have pinpointed the importance of a single leucine residue of LysM2 in that step of the symbiosis. Together, our data put into new perspective the recognition of NFs in the different steps of symbiosis in M. truncatula, emphasising the probable existence of a missing component for early NF recognition and reinforcing the important role of NFP for NF recognition during rhizobial infection. PMID:22087221

  19. Influence of atmospheric [CO2] on growth, carbon allocation and cost of plant tissues on leaf nitrogen concentration maintenance in nodulated Medicago sativa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereyra, Gabriela; Hartmann, Henrik; Ziegler, Waldemar; Michalzik, Beate; Gonzalez-Meler, Miquel; Trumbore, Susan

    2015-04-01

    Plant carbon (C) allocation and plant metabolic processes (i.e. photosynthesis and respiration) can be affected by changes in C availability, for example from changing atmospheric [CO2]. In nodulated plants, C availability may also influence nitrogen (N) fixation by bacteriods. But C allocation and N fixation are often studied independently and hence do not allow elucidating interactive effects. We investigated how different atmospheric [CO2] (Pleistocene: 170 ppm, ambient: 400 ppm and projected future: 700 ppm) influence plant growth, allocation to nodules, and the ratio of photosynthesis-to-respiration (R:A) as an indicator of C cost in Medicago sativa inoculated with Ensifer meliloti. M. sativa grew c. 38% more nodules at 400 ppm and 700 ppm than at 170 ppm. However, ratios of above- and belowground plant biomass to nodule biomass were constant over time and independent of atmospheric [CO2]. Total non-structural carbohydrate concentrations were not significantly different between plants grown at 400 and 700 ppm, but were four to five-fold higher than in 170 ppm plants. Leaf level N concentration was similar across treatments, but N-based photosynthetic rates were 82% and 93% higher in leaves of plants grown at 400 and 700 ppm, respectively, than plants grown at 170 ppm. In addition, leaf R:A was greater (48% or 55%) in plants grown at 170 ppm than plants grown at 400 and 700 ppm. Similarly, the greatest proportion of assimilated CO2 released by root respiration occurred in rhizobial plants growing at 170 ppm. Our results suggest that C limitation in nodulated Medicago sativa plants did not influence C allocation to nodule biomass but caused a proportionally greater allocation of C to belowground respiration, most likely to bacteriods. This suggests that N tissue concentration was maintained at low [CO2] by revving up bacteriod metabolism and at the expense of non-structural carbohydrate reserves.

  20. Knockdown of LjIPT3 influences nodule development in Lotus japonicus.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yaping; Chen, Wei; Li, Xueliu; Jiang, Huawu; Wu, Pingzhi; Xia, Kuaifei; Yang, Yali; Wu, Guojiang

    2014-01-01

    Cytokinins play important roles in legume-rhizobia symbiosis. Here we report isolation of six genes encoding isopentenyl transferase (IPT) from Lotus japonicus, which catalyze the rate-limiting step of cytokinin biosynthesis. The LjIPT3 gene was found to be up-regulated in infected roots and mature nodules. Histochemical analysis demonstrated expression of Pro(LjIPT3):GUS (β-glucuronidase) in vegetative and reproductive organs, and was especially high in the vascular bundles of roots. When inoculated with Mesorhizobium loti MAFF303099, LjIPT3 was undetectable in the nodule primordia and developing nodules, and later it was expressed only in the vascular bundles of mature nodules. In addition, knockdown of LjIPT3 (LjIPT3i) by RNA interference reduced levels of endogenous cytokinins, affected plant development and accelerated Chl degradation during dark-induced leaf senescence. Compared with the wild type, LjIPT3i plants produced fewer infection threads and nodules. In addition, expression of downstream nodulation-related transcription factor genes LjNSP1, LjNSP2 and LjNIN decreased dramatically in LjIPT3i plants. These results suggest that LjIPT3 regulates the CRE1-dependent cytokinin pathway, affecting nodule initiation and thereby influencing the number of infection threads and nodules. Detection of nitrogenase activity and observation of nodule structure showed that endogenous cytokinins are required for full development of the infected cells in mature nodules by preventing early senescence. Therefore, our results indicate that the LjIPT3 gene product is required for nodule initiation and development, and does not appear to be involved in early infection events.

  1. Expression of nir, nor and nos denitrification genes from Bradyrhizobium japonicum in soybean root nodules.

    PubMed

    Mesa, Socorno; Alché Jd, Juan de Dios; Bedmar, Eulogio; Delgado, Maria J.

    2004-02-01

    Expression of Bradyrhizobium japonicum wild-type strain USDA110 nirK, norC and nosZ denitrification genes in soybean root nodules was studied by in situ histochemical detection of beta-galactosidase activity. Similarly, P(nirK)-lacZ, P(norC)-lacZ, and P(nosZ)-lacZ fusions were also expressed in bacteroids isolated from root nodules. Levels of beta-galactosidase activity were similar in both bacteroids and nodule sections from plants that were solely N(2)-dependent or grown in the presence of 4 mM KNO(3). These findings suggest that oxygen, and not nitrate, is the main factor controlling expression of denitrification genes in soybean nodules. In plants not amended with nitrate, B. japonicum mutant strains GRK308, GRC131, and GRZ25, that were altered in the structural nirK, norC and nosZ genes, respectively, showed a wild-type phenotype with regard to nodule number and nodule dry weight as well as plant dry weight and nitrogen content. In the presence of 4 mM KNO(3), plants inoculated with either GRK308 or GRC131 showed less nodules, and lower plant dry weight and nitrogen content, relative to those of strains USDA110 and GRZ25. Taken together, the present results revealed that although not essential for nitrogen fixation, mutation of either the structural nirK or norC genes encoding respiratory nitrite reductase and nitric oxide reductase, respectively, confers B. japonicum reduced ability for nodulation in soybean plants grown with nitrate. Furthermore, because nodules formed by each the parental and mutant strains exhibited nitrogenase activity, it is possible that denitrification enzymes play a role in nodule formation rather than in nodule function.

  2. Phylogenetic perspectives on the origins of nodulation.

    PubMed

    Doyle, Jeff J

    2011-11-01

    Recent refinements to the phylogeny of rosid angiosperms support the conclusion that nodulation has evolved several times in the so-called N(2)-fixing clade (NFC), and provide dates for these origins. The hypothesized predisposition that enabled the evolution of nodulation occurred approximately 100 million years ago (MYA), was retained in the various lineages that radiated rapidly shortly thereafter, and was functional in its non-nodulation role for at least an additional 30 million years in each nodulating lineage. Legumes radiated rapidly shortly after their origin approximately 60 MYA, and nodulation most likely evolved several times during this radiation. The major lineages of papilionoid legumes diverged close to the time of origin of nodulation, accounting for the diversity of nodule biology in the group. Nodulation symbioses exemplify the concept of "deep homology," sharing various homologous components across nonhomologous origins of nodulation, largely due to recruitment from existing functions, notably the older arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis. Although polyploidy may have played a role in the origin of papilionoid legume nodules, it did not do so in other legumes, nor did the prerosid whole-genome triplication lead directly to the predisposition of nodulation.

  3. Rhizobial synthesized cytokinins contribute to but are not essential for the symbiotic interaction between photosynthetic Bradyrhizobia and Aeschynomene legumes.

    PubMed

    Podlešáková, Kateřina; Fardoux, Joel; Patrel, Delphine; Bonaldi, Katia; Novák, Ondřej; Strnad, Miroslav; Giraud, Eric; Spíchal, Lukáš; Nouwen, Nico

    2013-10-01

    Cytokinins (CK) play an important role in the formation of nitrogen-fixing root nodules. It has been known for years that rhizobia secrete CK in the extracellular medium but whether they play a role in nodule formation is not known. We have examined this question using the photosynthetic Bradyrhizobium sp. strain ORS285 which is able to nodulate Aeschynomene afraspera and A. indica using a Nod-dependent or Nod-independent symbiotic process, respectively. CK profiling showed that the most abundant CK secreted by Bradyrhizobium sp. strain ORS285 are the 2MeS (2-methylthiol) derivatives of trans-zeatin and isopentenyladenine. In their pure form, these CK can activate legume CK receptors in vitro, and their exogenous addition induced nodule-like structures on host plants. Deletion of the miaA gene showed that transfer RNA degradation is the source of CK production in Bradyrhizobium sp. strain ORS285. In nodulation studies performed with A. indica and A. afraspera, the miaA mutant had a 1-day delay in nodulation and nitrogen fixation. Moreover, A. indica plants formed considerably smaller but more abundant nodules when inoculated with the miaA mutant. These data show that CK produced by Bradyrhizobium sp. strain ORS285 are not the key signal triggering nodule formation during the Nod-independent symbiosis but they contribute positively to nodule development in Aeschynomene plants.

  4. Recombination and horizontal transfer of nodulation and ACC deaminase (acdS) genes within Alpha- and Betaproteobacteria nodulating legumes of the Cape Fynbos biome.

    PubMed

    Lemaire, Benny; Van Cauwenberghe, Jannick; Chimphango, Samson; Stirton, Charles; Honnay, Olivier; Smets, Erik; Muasya, A Muthama

    2015-11-01

    The goal of this work is to study the evolution and the degree of horizontal gene transfer (HGT) within rhizobial genera of both Alphaproteobacteria (Mesorhizobium, Rhizobium) and Betaproteobacteria (Burkholderia), originating from South African Fynbos legumes. By using a phylogenetic approach and comparing multiple chromosomal and symbiosis genes, we revealed conclusive evidence of high degrees of horizontal transfer of nodulation genes among closely related species of both groups of rhizobia, but also among species with distant genetic backgrounds (Rhizobium and Mesorhizobium), underscoring the importance of lateral transfer of symbiosis traits as an important evolutionary force among rhizobia of the Cape Fynbos biome. The extensive exchange of symbiosis genes in the Fynbos is in contrast with a lack of significant events of HGT among Burkholderia symbionts from the South American Cerrado and Caatinga biome. Furthermore, homologous recombination among selected housekeeping genes had a substantial impact on sequence evolution within Burkholderia and Mesorhizobium. Finally, phylogenetic analyses of the non-symbiosis acdS gene in Mesorhizobium, a gene often located on symbiosis islands, revealed distinct relationships compared to the chromosomal and symbiosis genes, suggesting a different evolutionary history and independent events of gene transfer. The observed events of HGT and incongruence between different genes necessitate caution in interpreting topologies from individual data types.

  5. A Report of 10 Individuals with Weathering Nodules and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Udkoff, Jeremy; Cohen, Philip R

    2016-01-01

    Weathering nodules are a benign skin condition that usually present as papules on the helices of patients with significant prior sun exposure. They are easily recognized clinically and blanch upon application of pressure to the adjacent helical rim: a positive blanch sign. We describe the clinical presentation of weathering nodules in 10 patients, nine men and one woman, aging from 38 to 70 (median 59), and their associated risk factors. Eight patients had a history of actinic keratosis, three had a history of nonmelanoma skin cancer, and all patients had increased Sun exposure through outdoor activities. Weathering nodules are rarely mentioned in the literature and may be confused with other cutaneous disorders. Therefore, it is paramount for clinicians to become familiar with weathering nodules and include them in the differential diagnosis of ear nodules. Appropriate diagnosis will help avoid unnecessary biopsies while reassuring the patient that the lesions are benign. PMID:27512191

  6. A Report of 10 Individuals with Weathering Nodules and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Udkoff, Jeremy; Cohen, Philip R

    2016-01-01

    Weathering nodules are a benign skin condition that usually present as papules on the helices of patients with significant prior sun exposure. They are easily recognized clinically and blanch upon application of pressure to the adjacent helical rim: a positive blanch sign. We describe the clinical presentation of weathering nodules in 10 patients, nine men and one woman, aging from 38 to 70 (median 59), and their associated risk factors. Eight patients had a history of actinic keratosis, three had a history of nonmelanoma skin cancer, and all patients had increased Sun exposure through outdoor activities. Weathering nodules are rarely mentioned in the literature and may be confused with other cutaneous disorders. Therefore, it is paramount for clinicians to become familiar with weathering nodules and include them in the differential diagnosis of ear nodules. Appropriate diagnosis will help avoid unnecessary biopsies while reassuring the patient that the lesions are benign.

  7. Comparing Symbiotic Efficiency between Swollen versus Nonswollen Rhizobial Bacteroids1[C][W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Oono, Ryoko; Denison, R. Ford

    2010-01-01

    Symbiotic rhizobia differentiate physiologically and morphologically into nitrogen-fixing bacteroids inside legume host nodules. The differentiation is apparently terminal in some legume species, such as peas (Pisum sativum) and peanuts (Arachis hypogaea), likely due to extreme cell swelling induced by the host. In other legume species, such as beans (Phaseolus vulgaris) and cowpeas (Vigna unguiculata), differentiation into bacteroids, which are similar in size and shape to free-living rhizobia, is reversible. Bacteroid modification by plants may affect the effectiveness of the symbiosis. Here, we compare symbiotic efficiency of rhizobia in two different hosts where the rhizobia differentiate into swollen nonreproductive bacteroids in one host and remain nonswollen and reproductive in the other. Two such dual-host strains were tested: Rhizobium leguminosarum A34 in peas and beans and Bradyrhizobium sp. 32H1 in peanuts and cowpeas. In both comparisons, swollen bacteroids conferred more net host benefit by two measures: return on nodule construction cost (plant growth per gram nodule growth) and nitrogen fixation efficiency (H2 production by nitrogenase per CO2 respired). Terminal bacteroid differentiation among legume species has evolved independently multiple times, perhaps due to the increased host fitness benefits observed in this study. PMID:20837702

  8. Weightlifter's Nodule: A New Variant of Athlete's Nodule.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, Jamie; Campanelli, Carmen; Lee, Jason B

    2015-01-01

    A 17-year-old high school football player presented to our dermatology clinic complaining of two asymptomatic lumps on the upper part of his back. The first lump was noticed on the right side of the upper aspect of his back following a weightlifting session. The second lump appeared on the left side of the upper part of his back several weeks later. The patient's personal and family medical history was unremarkable. Physical examination revealed an ill-defined, firm, mobile subcutaneous nodule measuring approximately 3 cm on the right upper part of the back and a similar but smaller nodule on the left upper portion of the back (Figure 1). The location of the lesions corresponded to the areas of maximal pressure produced by a squat bar that he uses frequently during weightlifting (Figure 2). Histologic analysis of the right lesion revealed a markedly expanded dermis caused by a striking increase in the number of collagen bundles that were relatively normal in thickness, accompanied by a subtle increase in the number of fibroblasts (Figure 3). In some foci, fibroplasia along with increased deposition of mucin further contributed to the expansion of the dermis (Figure 3). Although the process spanned the entire dermis, it was more pronounced in the deep reticular dermis, particularly near the subcutis as collagen bundles were arranged in a more haphazard array in this region. Verhoeff-Van Gieson stain revealed diminished and fragmented elastic fibers within some of the involved areas. This reactive fibrosis can be seen in athlete's nodules as a result of repetitive blunt pressure. We proposed a diagnosis of weightlifter's nodule to further classify these lesions and the patient was instructed to discontinue associated weightlifting activities.

  9. Phosphorylation-Dependent Regulation of G-Protein Cycle during Nodule Formation in Soybean[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Signaling pathways mediated by heterotrimeric G-protein complexes comprising Gα, Gβ, and Gγ subunits and their regulatory RGS (Regulator of G-protein Signaling) protein are conserved in all eukaryotes. We have shown that the specific Gβ and Gγ proteins of a soybean (Glycine max) heterotrimeric G-protein complex are involved in regulation of nodulation. We now demonstrate the role of Nod factor receptor 1 (NFR1)-mediated phosphorylation in regulation of the G-protein cycle during nodulation in soybean. We also show that during nodulation, the G-protein cycle is regulated by the activity of RGS proteins. Lower or higher expression of RGS proteins results in fewer or more nodules, respectively. NFR1 interacts with RGS proteins and phosphorylates them. Analysis of phosphorylated RGS protein identifies specific amino acids that, when phosphorylated, result in significantly higher GTPase accelerating activity. These data point to phosphorylation-based regulation of G-protein signaling during nodule development. We propose that active NFR1 receptors phosphorylate and activate RGS proteins, which help maintain the Gα proteins in their inactive, trimeric conformation, resulting in successful nodule development. Alternatively, RGS proteins might also have a direct role in regulating nodulation because overexpression of their phospho-mimic version leads to partial restoration of nodule formation in nod49 mutants. PMID:26498905

  10. Intracellular catalytic domain of symbiosis receptor kinase hyperactivates spontaneous nodulation in absence of rhizobia.

    PubMed

    Saha, Sudip; Dutta, Ayan; Bhattacharya, Avisek; DasGupta, Maitrayee

    2014-12-01

    Symbiosis Receptor Kinase (SYMRK), a member of the Nod factor signaling pathway, is indispensible for both nodule organogenesis and intracellular colonization of symbionts in rhizobia-legume symbiosis. Here, we show that the intracellular kinase domain of a SYMRK (SYMRK-kd) but not its inactive or full-length version leads to hyperactivation of the nodule organogenic program in Medicago truncatula TR25 (symrk knockout mutant) in the absence of rhizobia. Spontaneous nodulation in TR25/SYMRK-kd was 6-fold higher than rhizobia-induced nodulation in TR25/SYMRK roots. The merged clusters of spontaneous nodules indicated that TR25 roots in the presence of SYMRK-kd have overcome the control over both nodule numbers and their spatial position. In the presence of rhizobia, SYMRK-kd could rescue the epidermal infection processes in TR25, but colonization of symbionts in the nodule interior was significantly compromised. In summary, ligand-independent deregulated activation of SYMRK hyperactivates nodule organogenesis in the absence of rhizobia, but its ectodomain is required for proper symbiont colonization.

  11. A Legume Genetic Framework Controls Infection of Nodules by Symbiotic and Endophytic Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Zgadzaj, Rafal; James, Euan K.; Kelly, Simon; Kawaharada, Yasuyuki; de Jonge, Nadieh; Jensen, Dorthe B.; Madsen, Lene H.; Radutoiu, Simona

    2015-01-01

    Legumes have an intrinsic capacity to accommodate both symbiotic and endophytic bacteria within root nodules. For the symbionts, a complex genetic mechanism that allows mutual recognition and plant infection has emerged from genetic studies under axenic conditions. In contrast, little is known about the mechanisms controlling the endophytic infection. Here we investigate the contribution of both the host and the symbiotic microbe to endophyte infection and development of mixed colonised nodules in Lotus japonicus. We found that infection threads initiated by Mesorhizobium loti, the natural symbiont of Lotus, can selectively guide endophytic bacteria towards nodule primordia, where competent strains multiply and colonise the nodule together with the nitrogen-fixing symbiotic partner. Further co-inoculation studies with the competent coloniser, Rhizobium mesosinicum strain KAW12, show that endophytic nodule infection depends on functional and efficient M. loti-driven Nod factor signalling. KAW12 exopolysaccharide (EPS) enabled endophyte nodule infection whilst compatible M. loti EPS restricted it. Analysis of plant mutants that control different stages of the symbiotic infection showed that both symbiont and endophyte accommodation within nodules is under host genetic control. This demonstrates that when legume plants are exposed to complex communities they selectively regulate access and accommodation of bacteria occupying this specialized environmental niche, the root nodule. PMID:26042417

  12. A legume genetic framework controls infection of nodules by symbiotic and endophytic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Zgadzaj, Rafal; James, Euan K; Kelly, Simon; Kawaharada, Yasuyuki; de Jonge, Nadieh; Jensen, Dorthe B; Madsen, Lene H; Radutoiu, Simona

    2015-06-01

    Legumes have an intrinsic capacity to accommodate both symbiotic and endophytic bacteria within root nodules. For the symbionts, a complex genetic mechanism that allows mutual recognition and plant infection has emerged from genetic studies under axenic conditions. In contrast, little is known about the mechanisms controlling the endophytic infection. Here we investigate the contribution of both the host and the symbiotic microbe to endophyte infection and development of mixed colonised nodules in Lotus japonicus. We found that infection threads initiated by Mesorhizobium loti, the natural symbiont of Lotus, can selectively guide endophytic bacteria towards nodule primordia, where competent strains multiply and colonise the nodule together with the nitrogen-fixing symbiotic partner. Further co-inoculation studies with the competent coloniser, Rhizobium mesosinicum strain KAW12, show that endophytic nodule infection depends on functional and efficient M. loti-driven Nod factor signalling. KAW12 exopolysaccharide (EPS) enabled endophyte nodule infection whilst compatible M. loti EPS restricted it. Analysis of plant mutants that control different stages of the symbiotic infection showed that both symbiont and endophyte accommodation within nodules is under host genetic control. This demonstrates that when legume plants are exposed to complex communities they selectively regulate access and accommodation of bacteria occupying this specialized environmental niche, the root nodule.

  13. Multicenter experience with electromagnetic navigation bronchoscopy for the diagnosis of pulmonary nodules.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Kurt W; Hsia, David W; Seijo, Luis M; Feller-Kopman, David J; Lamb, Carla; Berkowitz, David; Curran-Everett, Douglas; Musani, Ali I

    2012-07-01

    Physicians are increasingly encountering lung nodules in their practice, and tissue diagnosis is often required. Conventional bronchoscopic sampling yields a range from 14% to 69% depending on the nodule size and location within the lung. We aimed to evaluate the diagnostic yield of electromagnetic navigation bronchoscopy (ENB) in multiple centers and to determine what factors affect the yield of ENB. A retrospective analysis of 92 consecutive ENB procedures at 5 centers was carried out. Data were collected on patient demographics, nodule characteristics, complications, type of samples obtained, diagnosis, and follow-up studies. Variables were analyzed to determine as to which factors had an impact on the diagnostic yield with multiple logistic regression analysis. Ninety-two patients underwent EMB at 5 centers between December 2008 and October 2009. The average nodule size was 2.61 cm (SD 1.42) at a distance of 1.81 cm (SD 1.32) from the pleural surface. The overall yield for ENB-guided sampling of pulmonary nodules was 65% (60/92). The ENB yield for nodules ≤2 versus >2 cm in size was significantly less after controlling for the distance from the pleura (50% vs. 76%, respectively; P=0.01). The distance from the pleura did not affect the ENB diagnostic yield after controlling for nodule size (P=0.92). The lobar location of the nodule also did not affect the diagnostic yield (P=0.59). The diagnostic yield of ENB-guided sampling of pulmonary nodules is impacted by the nodule size, but not by the distance from the pleura or the lobar location.

  14. CYTOKININ OXIDASE/DEHYDROGENASE3 Maintains Cytokinin Homeostasis during Root and Nodule Development in Lotus japonicus1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Heckmann, Anne B.; Kelly, Simon

    2016-01-01

    Cytokinins are required for symbiotic nodule development in legumes, and cytokinin signaling responses occur locally in nodule primordia and in developing nodules. Here, we show that the Lotus japonicus Ckx3 cytokinin oxidase/dehydrogenase gene is induced by Nod factor during the early phase of nodule initiation. At the cellular level, pCkx3::YFP reporter-gene studies revealed that the Ckx3 promoter is active during the first cortical cell divisions of the nodule primordium and in growing nodules. Cytokinin measurements in ckx3 mutants confirmed that CKX3 activity negatively regulates root cytokinin levels. Particularly, tZ and DHZ type cytokinins in both inoculated and uninoculated roots were elevated in ckx3 mutants, suggesting that these are targets for degradation by the CKX3 cytokinin oxidase/dehydrogenase. The effect of CKX3 on the positive and negative roles of cytokinin in nodule development, infection and regulation was further clarified using ckx3 insertion mutants. Phenotypic analysis indicated that ckx3 mutants have reduced nodulation, infection thread formation and root growth. We also identify a role for cytokinin in regulating nodulation and nitrogen fixation in response to nitrate as ckx3 phenotypes are exaggerated at increased nitrate levels. Together, these findings show that cytokinin accumulation is tightly regulated during nodulation in order to balance the requirement for cell divisions with negative regulatory effects of cytokinin on infection events and root development. PMID:26644503

  15. A gene-based map of the Nod factor-independent Aeschynomene evenia sheds new light on the evolution of nodulation and legume genomes

    PubMed Central

    Chaintreuil, Clémence; Rivallan, Ronan; Bertioli, David J.; Klopp, Christophe; Gouzy, Jérôme; Courtois, Brigitte; Leleux, Philippe; Martin, Guillaume; Rami, Jean-François; Gully, Djamel; Parrinello, Hugues; Séverac, Dany; Patrel, Delphine; Fardoux, Joël; Ribière, William; Boursot, Marc; Cartieaux, Fabienne; Czernic, Pierre; Ratet, Pascal; Mournet, Pierre; Giraud, Eric; Arrighi, Jean-François

    2016-01-01

    Aeschynomene evenia has emerged as a new model legume for the deciphering of the molecular mechanisms of an alternative symbiotic process that is independent of the Nod factors. Whereas most of the research on nitrogen-fixing symbiosis, legume genetics and genomics has so far focused on Galegoid and Phaseolid legumes, A. evenia falls in the more basal and understudied Dalbergioid clade along with peanut (Arachis hypogaea). To provide insights into the symbiotic genes content and the structure of the A. evenia genome, we established a gene-based genetic map for this species. Firstly, an RNAseq analysis was performed on the two parental lines selected to generate a F2 mapping population. The transcriptomic data were used to develop molecular markers and they allowed the identification of most symbiotic genes. The resulting map comprised 364 markers arranged in 10 linkage groups (2n = 20). A comparative analysis with the sequenced genomes of Arachis duranensis and A. ipaensis, the diploid ancestors of peanut, indicated blocks of conserved macrosynteny. Altogether, these results provided important clues regarding the evolution of symbiotic genes in a Nod factor-independent context. They provide a basis for a genome sequencing project and pave the way for forward genetic analysis of symbiosis in A. evenia. PMID:27298380

  16. A gene-based map of the Nod factor-independent Aeschynomene evenia sheds new light on the evolution of nodulation and legume genomes.

    PubMed

    Chaintreuil, Clémence; Rivallan, Ronan; Bertioli, David J; Klopp, Christophe; Gouzy, Jérôme; Courtois, Brigitte; Leleux, Philippe; Martin, Guillaume; Rami, Jean-François; Gully, Djamel; Parrinello, Hugues; Séverac, Dany; Patrel, Delphine; Fardoux, Joël; Ribière, William; Boursot, Marc; Cartieaux, Fabienne; Czernic, Pierre; Ratet, Pascal; Mournet, Pierre; Giraud, Eric; Arrighi, Jean-François

    2016-08-01

    Aeschynomene evenia has emerged as a new model legume for the deciphering of the molecular mechanisms of an alternative symbiotic process that is independent of the Nod factors. Whereas most of the research on nitrogen-fixing symbiosis, legume genetics and genomics has so far focused on Galegoid and Phaseolid legumes, A. evenia falls in the more basal and understudied Dalbergioid clade along with peanut (Arachis hypogaea). To provide insights into the symbiotic genes content and the structure of the A. evenia genome, we established a gene-based genetic map for this species. Firstly, an RNAseq analysis was performed on the two parental lines selected to generate a F2 mapping population. The transcriptomic data were used to develop molecular markers and they allowed the identification of most symbiotic genes. The resulting map comprised 364 markers arranged in 10 linkage groups (2n = 20). A comparative analysis with the sequenced genomes of Arachis duranensis and A. ipaensis, the diploid ancestors of peanut, indicated blocks of conserved macrosynteny. Altogether, these results provided important clues regarding the evolution of symbiotic genes in a Nod factor-independent context. They provide a basis for a genome sequencing project and pave the way for forward genetic analysis of symbiosis in A. evenia.

  17. Perianal pseudoverrucous papules and nodules

    PubMed Central

    Dandale, Ameet; Dhurat, Rachita; Ghate, Smita

    2013-01-01

    Perianal pseudoverrucous papules and nodules (PPPN) is a rare entity attributed to chronic irritation. We came across this entity in a case of spina bifida. A 14 year old girl having spina bifida at L3 presented with complaints of multiple asymptomatic whitish lesions on the inner aspect of thighs and labia majora since early childhood. She had incontinence of stool and urine since birth. Cutaneous examination revealed multiple 3-12 mm flat topped moist papules, few verrucous nodules, some of these lesions coalesced to form plaques at the perianal area extending upto the labia majora. On histology marked epidermal hyperplasia and pale keratinocytes in the epidermis was seen. This confirmed the diagnosis of PPPN. This rare condition can be mistaken with sexually transmitted diseases leading to unnecessary investigations and treatment. PMID:23919056

  18. Automatic lung nodule classification with radiomics approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Jingchen; Wang, Qian; Ren, Yacheng; Hu, Haibo; Zhao, Jun

    2016-03-01

    Lung cancer is the first killer among the cancer deaths. Malignant lung nodules have extremely high mortality while some of the benign nodules don't need any treatment .Thus, the accuracy of diagnosis between benign or malignant nodules diagnosis is necessary. Notably, although currently additional invasive biopsy or second CT scan in 3 months later may help radiologists to make judgments, easier diagnosis approaches are imminently needed. In this paper, we propose a novel CAD method to distinguish the benign and malignant lung cancer from CT images directly, which can not only improve the efficiency of rumor diagnosis but also greatly decrease the pain and risk of patients in biopsy collecting process. Briefly, according to the state-of-the-art radiomics approach, 583 features were used at the first step for measurement of nodules' intensity, shape, heterogeneity and information in multi-frequencies. Further, with Random Forest method, we distinguish the benign nodules from malignant nodules by analyzing all these features. Notably, our proposed scheme was tested on all 79 CT scans with diagnosis data available in The Cancer Imaging Archive (TCIA) which contain 127 nodules and each nodule is annotated by at least one of four radiologists participating in the project. Satisfactorily, this method achieved 82.7% accuracy in classification of malignant primary lung nodules and benign nodules. We believe it would bring much value for routine lung cancer diagnosis in CT imaging and provide improvement in decision-support with much lower cost.

  19. Phenotypic and genotypic characterizations of rhizobia isolated from root nodules of peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.) grown in Moroccan soils.

    PubMed

    El-Akhal, M Rabie; Rincon, Ana; Mourabit, Nourdin El; Pueyo, Jose J; Barrijal, Said

    2009-10-01

    The phenotypic and genotypic characterization of sixty-two rhizobial isolates obtained from nodules of Arachis hypogaea in north-western Morocco was performed. Their physiological and biochemical properties revealed a great deal of diversity among them. Isolates were classified into two major groups based on the numerical analysis of their phenotypic and genotypic characteristics. Isolates in the first group were alkali- and salt-sensitive, slow or extra-slow growers; they did not use disaccharides as carbon source and varied in the use of amino acids. ARDRA analysis of the 16S rDNA region grouped them together with reference strains belonging to the genus Bradyrhizobium. In the second group, isolates were fast growers, acid-sensitive, and alkali- and salt-tolerant; they used both mono and disaccharides as carbon sources, and methionine was the only amino acid they could metabolize as a nitrogen source. ARDRA analysis grouped them with fast-growing reference strains. Both groups exhibited a range of variability in tolerance to heavy metals. The Intergenic Spacer (IGS)-PCR fingerprinting analysis confirmed a high genotypic diversity at the strain level. This characterization provides a basis for the selection of peanut-nodulating rhizobia which may have applications in formulating appropriate inocula for improving peanut crop yield on Moroccan soils, including saline and acidic marginal areas.

  20. Medicago truncatula root nodule proteome analysis reveals differential plant and bacteroid responses to drought stress.

    PubMed

    Larrainzar, Estíbaliz; Wienkoop, Stefanie; Weckwerth, Wolfram; Ladrera, Rubén; Arrese-Igor, Cesar; González, Esther M

    2007-07-01

    Drought is one of the environmental factors most affecting crop production. Under drought, symbiotic nitrogen fixation is one of the physiological processes to first show stress responses in nodulated legumes. This inhibition process involves a number of factors whose interactions are not yet understood. This work aims to further understand changes occurring in nodules under drought stress from a proteomic perspective. Drought was imposed on Medicago truncatula 'Jemalong A17' plants grown in symbiosis with Sinorhizobium meliloti strain 2011. Changes at the protein level were analyzed using a nongel approach based on liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry. Due to the complexity of nodule tissue, the separation of plant and bacteroid fractions in M. truncatula root nodules was first checked with the aim of minimizing cross contamination between the fractions. Second, the protein plant fraction of M. truncatula nodules was profiled, leading to the identification of 377 plant proteins, the largest description of the plant nodule proteome so far. Third, both symbiotic partners were independently analyzed for quantitative differences at the protein level during drought stress. Multivariate data mining allowed for the classification of proteins sets that were involved in drought stress responses. The isolation of the nodule plant and bacteroid protein fractions enabled the independent analysis of the response of both counterparts, gaining further understanding of how each symbiotic member is distinctly affected at the protein level under a water-deficit situation.

  1. Radiofrequency ablation of benign thyroid nodules: evaluation of the treatment efficacy using ultrasonography

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of radiofrequency (RF) ablation for benign thyroid nodules and assess the usefulness of internal factors (ultrasonographic findings) and external factors (treatment-related findings) in prediction of treatment efficacy. Methods: We evaluated 22 benign thyroid nodules from 19 patients treated with RF ablation between March 2010 and January 2013. The internal and external factors of these nodules were retrospectively reviewed and correlated with the therapeutic success and the volume reduction ratio (VRR). The volume and size of the nodules were determined before treatment, and the VRR was calculated at 6-month and 1-year follow-up examinations after RF ablation. Therapeutic success was defined as a >50% volume reduction. Results: The mean VRRs were 66.1±18.7% at 6 months and 74.3±16.7% at 1 year. The therapeutic success rate after 6 months and 1 year was 81.8% and 90.9%, respectively. At the 1-year follow-up, the margin of the nodule correlated with therapeutic success. Most of the successfully ablated nodules showed well-defined margins on initial ultrasonography (18/20, 90%) (P=0.026). In addition, nodules with ill-defined margins showed a tendency toward having a low VRR at the 6-month and 1-year follow-up examinations. Conclusion: RF ablation was effective in decreasing the volume of benign thyroid nodules. Thyroid nodules with well-defined margins tended to show successful outcomes at the 1-year follow-up examination after RF ablation. PMID:27101983

  2. Novel Cupriavidus Strains Isolated from Root Nodules of Native Uruguayan Mimosa Species.

    PubMed

    Platero, Raúl; James, Euan K; Rios, Cecilia; Iriarte, Andrés; Sandes, Laura; Zabaleta, María; Battistoni, Federico; Fabiano, Elena

    2016-06-01

    The large legume genus Mimosa is known to be associated with both alphaproteobacterial and betaproteobacterial symbionts, depending on environment and plant taxonomy, e.g., Brazilian species are preferentially nodulated by Burkholderia, whereas those in Mexico are associated with alphaproteobacterial symbionts. Little is known, however, about the symbiotic preferences of Mimosa spp. at the southern subtropical limits of the genus. In the present study, rhizobia were isolated from field-collected nodules from Mimosa species that are native to a region in southern Uruguay. Phylogenetic analyses of sequences of the 16S rRNA, recA, and gyrB core genome and the nifH and nodA symbiosis-essential loci confirmed that all the isolates belonged to the genus Cupriavidus However, none were in the well-described symbiotic species C. taiwanensis, but instead they were closely related to other species, such as C. necator, and to species not previously known to be symbiotic (or diazotrophic), such as C. basilensis and C. pinatubonensis Selection of these novel Cupriavidus symbionts by Uruguayan Mimosa spp. is most likely due to their geographical separation from their Brazilian cousins and to the characteristics of the soils in which they were found. With the aim of exploring the diversity of rhizobia associated with native Mimosa species, symbionts were isolated from root nodules on five Mimosa species that are native to a region in southern Uruguay, Sierra del Abra de Zabaleta. In contrast to data obtained in the major centers of diversification of the genus Mimosa, Brazil and Mexico, where it is mainly associated with Burkholderia and Rhizobium/Ensifer, respectively, the present study has shown that all the isolated symbiotic bacteria belonged to the genus Cupriavidus Interestingly, none of nodules contained bacteria belonging to the well-described symbiotic species C. taiwanensis, but instead they were related to other Cupriavidus species such as C. necator and C

  3. Novel Cupriavidus Strains Isolated from Root Nodules of Native Uruguayan Mimosa Species

    PubMed Central

    James, Euan K.; Rios, Cecilia; Iriarte, Andrés; Sandes, Laura; Zabaleta, María; Battistoni, Federico; Fabiano, Elena

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The large legume genus Mimosa is known to be associated with both alphaproteobacterial and betaproteobacterial symbionts, depending on environment and plant taxonomy, e.g., Brazilian species are preferentially nodulated by Burkholderia, whereas those in Mexico are associated with alphaproteobacterial symbionts. Little is known, however, about the symbiotic preferences of Mimosa spp. at the southern subtropical limits of the genus. In the present study, rhizobia were isolated from field-collected nodules from Mimosa species that are native to a region in southern Uruguay. Phylogenetic analyses of sequences of the 16S rRNA, recA, and gyrB core genome and the nifH and nodA symbiosis-essential loci confirmed that all the isolates belonged to the genus Cupriavidus. However, none were in the well-described symbiotic species C. taiwanensis, but instead they were closely related to other species, such as C. necator, and to species not previously known to be symbiotic (or diazotrophic), such as C. basilensis and C. pinatubonensis. Selection of these novel Cupriavidus symbionts by Uruguayan Mimosa spp. is most likely due to their geographical separation from their Brazilian cousins and to the characteristics of the soils in which they were found. IMPORTANCE With the aim of exploring the diversity of rhizobia associated with native Mimosa species, symbionts were isolated from root nodules on five Mimosa species that are native to a region in southern Uruguay, Sierra del Abra de Zabaleta. In contrast to data obtained in the major centers of diversification of the genus Mimosa, Brazil and Mexico, where it is mainly associated with Burkholderia and Rhizobium/Ensifer, respectively, the present study has shown that all the isolated symbiotic bacteria belonged to the genus Cupriavidus. Interestingly, none of nodules contained bacteria belonging to the well-described symbiotic species C. taiwanensis, but instead they were related to other Cupriavidus species such as C

  4. Genetic diversity and evolution of Bradyrhizobium populations nodulating Erythrophleum fordii, an evergreen tree indigenous to the southern subtropical region of China.

    PubMed

    Yao, Yao; Wang, Rui; Lu, Jun Kun; Sui, Xin Hua; Wang, En Tao; Chen, Wen Xin

    2014-10-01

    The nodulation of Erythrophleum fordii has been recorded recently, but its microsymbionts have never been studied. To investigate the diversity and biogeography of rhizobia associated with this leguminous evergreen tree, root nodules were collected from the southern subtropical region of China. A total of 166 bacterial isolates were obtained from the nodules and characterized. In a PCR-based restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis of ribosomal intergenic sequences, the isolates were classified into 22 types within the genus Bradyrhizobium. Sequence analysis of 16S rRNA, ribosomal intergenic spacer (IGS), and the housekeeping genes recA and glnII classified the isolates into four groups: the Bradyrhizobium elkanii and Bradyrhizobium pachyrhizi groups, comprising the dominant symbionts, Bradyrhizobium yuanmingense, and an unclassified group comprising the minor symbionts. The nodC and nifH phylogenetic trees defined five or six lineages among the isolates, which was largely consistent with the definition of genomic species. The phylogenetic results and evolutionary analysis demonstrated that mutation and vertical transmission of genes were the principal processes for the divergent evolution of Bradyrhizobium species associated with E. fordii, while lateral transfer and recombination of housekeeping and symbiotic genes were rare. The distribution of the dominant rhizobial populations was affected by soil pH and effective phosphorus. This is the first report to characterize E. fordii rhizobia. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  5. The presence of nodules on legume root systems can alter phenotypic plasticity in response to internal nitrogen independent of nitrogen fixation.

    PubMed

    Goh, Chooi-Hua; Nicotra, Adrienne B; Mathesius, Ulrike

    2016-04-01

    All higher plants show developmental plasticity in response to the availability of nitrogen (N) in the soil. In legumes, N starvation causes the formation of root nodules, where symbiotic rhizobacteria fix atmospheric N2 for the host in exchange for fixed carbon (C) from the shoot. Here, we tested whether plastic responses to internal [N] of legumes are altered by their symbionts. Glasshouse experiments compared root phenotypes of three legumes, Medicago truncatula, Medicago sativa and Trifolium subterraneum, inoculated with their compatible symbiont partners and grown under four nitrate levels. In addition, six strains of rhizobia, differing in their ability to fix N2 in M. truncatula, were compared to test if plastic responses to internal [N] were dependent on the rhizobia or N2 -fixing capability of the nodules. We found that the presence of rhizobia affected phenotypic plasticity of the legumes to internal [N], particularly in root length and root mass ratio (RMR), in a plant species-dependent way. While root length responses of M. truncatula to internal [N] were dependent on the ability of rhizobial symbionts to fix N2 , RMR response to internal [N] was dependent only on initiation of nodules, irrespective of N2 -fixing ability of the rhizobia strains.

  6. Medicago truncatula Natural Resistance-Associated Macrophage Protein1 Is Required for Iron Uptake by Rhizobia-Infected Nodule Cells1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Tejada-Jiménez, Manuel; Castro-Rodríguez, Rosario; Kryvoruchko, Igor; Lucas, M. Mercedes; Udvardi, Michael; Imperial, Juan; González-Guerrero, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Iron is critical for symbiotic nitrogen fixation (SNF) as a key component of multiple ferroproteins involved in this biological process. In the model legume Medicago truncatula, iron is delivered by the vasculature to the infection/maturation zone (zone II) of the nodule, where it is released to the apoplast. From there, plasma membrane iron transporters move it into rhizobia-containing cells, where iron is used as the cofactor of multiple plant and rhizobial proteins (e.g. plant leghemoglobin and bacterial nitrogenase). MtNramp1 (Medtr3g088460) is the M. truncatula Natural Resistance-Associated Macrophage Protein family member, with the highest expression levels in roots and nodules. Immunolocalization studies indicate that MtNramp1 is mainly targeted to the plasma membrane. A loss-of-function nramp1 mutant exhibited reduced growth compared with the wild type under symbiotic conditions, but not when fertilized with mineral nitrogen. Nitrogenase activity was low in the mutant, whereas exogenous iron and expression of wild-type MtNramp1 in mutant nodules increased nitrogen fixation to normal levels. These data are consistent with a model in which MtNramp1 is the main transporter responsible for apoplastic iron uptake by rhizobia-infected cells in zone II. PMID:25818701

  7. Hemoglobin LjGlb1-1 is involved in nodulation and regulates the level of nitric oxide in the Lotus japonicus–Mesorhizobium loti symbiosis

    PubMed Central

    Fukudome, Mitsutaka; Calvo-Begueria, Laura; Kado, Tomohiro; Osuki, Ken-ichi; Rubio, Maria Carmen; Murakami, Ei-ichi; Nagata, Maki; Kucho, Ken-ichi; Sandal, Niels; Stougaard, Jens; Becana, Manuel; Uchiumi, Toshiki

    2016-01-01

    Leghemoglobins transport and deliver O2 to the symbiosomes inside legume nodules and are essential for nitrogen fixation. However, the roles of other hemoglobins (Hbs) in the rhizobia–legume symbiosis are unclear. Several Lotus japonicus mutants affecting LjGlb1-1, a non-symbiotic class 1 Hb, have been used to study the function of this protein in symbiosis. Two TILLING alleles with single amino acid substitutions (A102V and E127K) and a LORE1 null allele with a retrotransposon insertion in the 5′-untranslated region (96642) were selected for phenotyping nodulation. Plants of all three mutant lines showed a decrease in long infection threads and nodules, and an increase in incipient infection threads. About 4h after inoculation, the roots of mutant plants exhibited a greater transient accumulation of nitric oxide (NO) than did the wild-type roots; nevertheless, in vitro NO dioxygenase activities of the wild-type, A102V, and E127K proteins were similar, suggesting that the mutated proteins are not fully functional in vivo. The expression of LjGlb1-1, but not of the other class 1 Hb of L. japonicus (LjGlb1-2), was affected during infection of wild-type roots, further supporting a specific role for LjGlb1-1. In conclusion, the LjGlb1-1 mutants reveal that this protein is required during rhizobial infection and regulates NO levels. PMID:27443280

  8. Rhizobium etli and Rhizobium gallicum nodulate common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) in a traditionally managed milpa plot in Mexico: population genetics and biogeographic implications.

    PubMed

    Silva, Claudia; Vinuesa, Pablo; Eguiarte, Luis E; Martínez-Romero, Esperanza; Souza, Valeria

    2003-02-01

    The stability of the genetic structure of rhizobial populations nodulating Phaseolus vulgaris cultivated in a traditionally managed milpa plot in Mexico was studied over three consecutive years. The set of molecular markers analyzed (including partial rrs, glnII, nifH, and nodB sequences), along with host range experiments, placed the isolates examined in Rhizobium etli bv. phaseoli and Rhizobium gallicum bv. gallicum. Cluster analysis of multilocus enzyme electrophoresis and plasmid profile data separated the two species and identified numerically dominant clones within each of them. Population genetic analyses showed that there was high genetic differentiation between the two species and that there was low intrapopulation differentiation of the species over the 3 years. The results of linkage disequilibrium analyses are consistent with an epidemic genetic structure for both species, with frequent genetic exchange taking place within conspecific populations but not between the R. etli and R. gallicum populations. A subsample of isolates was selected and used for 16S ribosomal DNA PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis, nifH copy number determination, and host range experiments. Plasmid profiles and nifH hybridization patterns also revealed the occurrence of lateral plasmid transfer among distinct multilocus genotypes within species but not between species. Both species were recovered from nodules of the same plants, indicating that mechanisms other than host, spatial, or temporal isolation may account for the genetic barrier between the species. The biogeographic implications of finding an R. gallicum bv. gallicum population nodulating common bean in America are discussed.

  9. Genetic Diversity and Evolution of Bradyrhizobium Populations Nodulating Erythrophleum fordii, an Evergreen Tree Indigenous to the Southern Subtropical Region of China

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Yao; Wang, Rui; Lu, Jun Kun; Wang, En Tao; Chen, Wen Xin

    2014-01-01

    The nodulation of Erythrophleum fordii has been recorded recently, but its microsymbionts have never been studied. To investigate the diversity and biogeography of rhizobia associated with this leguminous evergreen tree, root nodules were collected from the southern subtropical region of China. A total of 166 bacterial isolates were obtained from the nodules and characterized. In a PCR-based restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis of ribosomal intergenic sequences, the isolates were classified into 22 types within the genus Bradyrhizobium. Sequence analysis of 16S rRNA, ribosomal intergenic spacer (IGS), and the housekeeping genes recA and glnII classified the isolates into four groups: the Bradyrhizobium elkanii and Bradyrhizobium pachyrhizi groups, comprising the dominant symbionts, Bradyrhizobium yuanmingense, and an unclassified group comprising the minor symbionts. The nodC and nifH phylogenetic trees defined five or six lineages among the isolates, which was largely consistent with the definition of genomic species. The phylogenetic results and evolutionary analysis demonstrated that mutation and vertical transmission of genes were the principal processes for the divergent evolution of Bradyrhizobium species associated with E. fordii, while lateral transfer and recombination of housekeeping and symbiotic genes were rare. The distribution of the dominant rhizobial populations was affected by soil pH and effective phosphorus. This is the first report to characterize E. fordii rhizobia. PMID:25085491

  10. Ultrasonography of thyroid nodules: a pictorial review.

    PubMed

    Xie, Cheng; Cox, Peter; Taylor, Nia; LaPorte, Sarah

    2016-02-01

    Thyroid nodules are a common occurrence in the general population, and these incidental thyroid nodules are often referred for ultrasound (US) evaluation. US provides a safe and fast method of examination. It is sensitive for the detection of thyroid nodules, and suspicious features can be used to guide further investigation/management decisions. However, given the financial burden on the health service and unnecessary anxiety for patients, it is unrealistic to biopsy every thyroid nodule to confirm diagnosis. The British Thyroid Association (BTA) has recently produced a US classification (U1-U5) of thyroid nodules to facilitate the decision-making process regarding the need to perform fine-needle aspiration cytology (FNAC) for suspicious cases. In this pictorial review, we provide a complete series of sonographic images to illustrate benign and malignant features of thyroid nodules according to the U1-5 classification. Specifically, we highlight morphologic characteristic of the nodule, including its echo signal in relation to its consistency, nodular size, number and contour. Additional diagnostic features such as halo, colloid, calcification and vascular patterns are also discussed in detail. The aim is to assist radiologists and clinicians in recognising sonographic patterns of benign, suspicious and malignant nodules based on U1-5 criteria, and in planning for further investigations. • Ultrasound is sensitive in identifying suspicious features, which require aspiration. • Whether nodules require aspiration should be based on sonographic features and clinical findings. • U1-5 classification of sonographic findings can help determine whether aspiration is necessary.

  11. Mechanistic action of gibberellins in legume nodulation.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Satomi; Gresshoff, Peter M; Ferguson, Brett J

    2014-10-01

    Legume plants are capable of entering into a symbiotic relationship with rhizobia bacteria. This results in the formation of novel organs on their roots, called nodules, in which the bacteria capture atmospheric nitrogen and provide it as ammonium to the host plant. Complex molecular and physiological changes are involved in the formation and establishment of such nodules. Several phytohormones are known to play key roles in this process. Gibberellins (gibberellic acids; GAs), a class of phytohormones known to be involved in a wide range of biological processes (i.e., cell elongation, germination) are reported to be involved in the formation and maturation of legume nodules, highlighted by recent transcriptional analyses of early soybean symbiotic steps. Here, we summarize what is currently known about GAs in legume nodulation and propose a model of GA action during nodule development. Results from a wide range of studies, including GA application, mutant phenotyping, and gene expression studies, indicate that GAs are required at different stages, with an optimum, tightly regulated level being key to achieve successful nodulation. Gibberellic acids appear to be required at two distinct stages of nodulation: (i) early stages of rhizobia infection and nodule primordium establishment; and (ii) later stages of nodule maturation. © 2014 Institute of Botany, Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  12. Transcriptional networks leading to symbiotic nodule organogenesis.

    PubMed

    Soyano, Takashi; Hayashi, Makoto

    2014-08-01

    The symbiosis with nitrogen-fixing bacteria leading to root nodules is a relatively recent evolutionary innovation and limited to a distinct order of land plants. It has long been a mystery how plants have invented this complex trait. However, recent advances in molecular genetics of model legumes has elucidated genes involved in the development of root nodules, providing insights into this process. Here we discuss how the de novo assembly of transcriptional networks may account for the predisposition to nodulate. Transcriptional networks and modes of gene regulation from the arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis, nitrate responses and aspects of lateral root development have likely all contributed to the emergence and development of root nodules.

  13. An onchocercal nodule appearing during diethylcarbamazine therapy.

    PubMed

    Boye, E S; Connor, D H

    1982-11-01

    We describe the appearance of an onchocercal nodule in a patient during treatment with diethylcarbamazine (DEC). This is a unique occurrence. DEC has been employed in the treatment of onchocerciasis for many years, but there have been no reports of any effects of DEC on nodules. Histopathological studies in which nodules have been examined before and after treatment of patients with DEC have not revealed any changes induced by such treatment. The histological appearance of this nodule is described, and the probable mechanism of its enlargement is discussed.

  14. Multivariate evaluation of Thyroid Imaging Reporting and Data System (TI-RADS) in diagnosis malignant thyroid nodule: application to PCA and PLS-DA analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tan; Li, Fangxuan; Mu, Jiali; Liu, Juntian; Zhang, Sheng

    2017-06-01

    To explore the significance of ultrasonic features in differential diagnosis of thyroid nodules via combining the thyroid imaging reporting and data system (TI-RADS) and multivariate statistical analysis. Patients who received surgical treatment and was diagnosed with single thyroid nodule by postoperative pathology and preoperative ultrasound were enrolled in this study. Multivariate analysis was applied to assess the significant ultrasonic features which correlated with identifying benign or malignance and grading the TI-RADS classification of thyroid nodule. There were significant differences in the nodule size, aspect ratio, internal, echogenicity, boundary, presence or absence of calcifications, calcification type and CDFI between benign and malignant thyroid nodules. Multivariate analysis showed clear-cut distinction both between benign and malignance and among different TI-RADS categories of malignancy nodules. The shape and calcification of the nodule were important factors for distinguish the benign and malignance. Height of the nodule, aspect and calcification was important factors for grading TI-RADS categories of malignancy thyroid nodules. Ill-defined boundary, irregular shape and presence of calcification related with highly malignant risk for thyroid nodule. The larger height and aspect and presence of calcification related with higher TI-RADS classification of malignancy thyroid nodule.

  15. Analysis of nodule senescence in pea (Pisum sativum L.) using laser microdissection, real-time PCR, and ACC immunolocalization.

    PubMed

    Serova, Tatiana A; Tikhonovich, Igor A; Tsyganov, Viktor E

    2017-05-01

    A delay in the senescence of symbiotic nodules could prolong active nitrogen fixation, resulting in improved crop yield and a reduced need for chemical fertilizers. The molecular genetic mechanisms underlying nodule senescence have not been extensively studied with a view to breeding varieties with delayed nodule senescence. In such studies, plant mutants with the phenotype of premature degradation of symbiotic structures are useful models to elucidate the genetic basis of nodule senescence. Using a dataset from transcriptome analysis of Medicago truncatula Gaertn. nodules and previous studies on pea (Pisum sativum L.) nodules, we developed a set of molecular markers based on genes that are known to be activated during nodule senescence. These genes encode cysteine proteases, a thiol protease, a bZIP transcription factor, enzymes involved in the biosynthesis of ethylene (ACS2 for ACC synthase and ACO1 for ACC oxidase) and ABA (AO3 for aldehyde oxidase), and an enzyme involved in catabolism of gibberellins (GA 2-oxidase). We analyzed the transcript levels of these genes in the nodules of two pea wild-types (cv. Sparkle and line Sprint-2) and two mutant lines, one showing premature nodule senescence (E135F (sym13)) and one showing no morphological signs of symbiotic structure degradation (Sprint-2Fix(-) (sym31)). Real-time PCR analyses revealed that all of the selected genes showed increased transcript levels during nodule aging in all phenotypes. Remarkably, at 4 weeks after inoculation (WAI), the transcript levels of all analyzed genes were significantly higher in the early senescent nodules of the mutant line E135F (sym13) and in nodules of the mutant Sprint-2Fix(-) (sym31) than in the active nitrogen-fixing nodules of wild-types. In contrast, the transcript levels of the same genes of both wild-types were significantly increased only at 6 WAI. We evaluated the expression of selected markers in the different histological nodule zones of pea cv. Sparkle and its

  16. Effects of Titanium Dioxide Nanoparticles on Red Clover and Its Rhizobial Symbiont

    PubMed Central

    Moll, Janine; Okupnik, Annette; Gogos, Alexander; Knauer, Katja; Bucheli, Thomas D.; van der Heijden, Marcel G. A.; Widmer, Franco

    2016-01-01

    Titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2 NPs) are in consideration to be used in plant protection products. Before these products can be placed on the market, ecotoxicological tests have to be performed. In this study, the nitrogen fixing bacterium Rhizobium trifolii and red clover were exposed to two TiO2 NPs, i.e., P25, E171 and a non-nanomaterial TiO2. Growth of both organisms individually and their symbiotic root nodulation were investigated in liquid and hydroponic systems. While 23 and 18 mg l-1 of E171 and non-nanomaterial TiO2 decreased the growth rate of R. trifolii by 43 and 23% respectively, P25 did not cause effects. Shoot length of red clover decreased between 41 and 62% for all tested TiO2 NPs. In 21% of the TiO2 NP treated plants, no nodules were found. At high concentrations certain TiO2 NPs impaired R. trifolii as well as red clover growth and their symbiosis in the hydroponic systems. PMID:27171465

  17. Ochrobactrum cytisi sp. nov., isolated from nodules of Cytisus scoparius in Spain.

    PubMed

    Zurdo-Piñeiro, José Luis; Rivas, Raúl; Trujillo, Martha E; Vizcaíno, Nieves; Carrasco, José Antonio; Chamber, Manuel; Palomares, Antonio; Mateos, Pedro F; Martínez-Molina, Eustoquio; Velázquez, Encarna

    2007-04-01

    Two strains named ESC1(T) and ESC5 were isolated from nodules of Cytisus scoparius growing in a Spanish soil. Phylogenetic analysis of the 16S rRNA gene showed that these strains belong to the genus Ochrobactrum, their closest relatives being Ochrobactrum anthropi and Ochrobactrum lupini, with 100 and 99.9 % similarity to the respective type strains. Despite this high similarity, the results of DNA-DNA hybridization, phenotypic tests and fatty acid analyses showed that these strains represent a novel species of genus Ochrobactrum. The DNA-DNA hybridization values were respectively 70, 66 and 55 % with respect to O. lupini LUP21(T), O. anthropi DSM 6882(T) and Ochrobactrum tritici DSM 13340(T). The predominant fatty acids were C(18 : 1)omega7c and C(18 : 1) 2-OH. Strains ESC1(T) and ESC5 were strictly aerobic and were able to reduce nitrate and to hydrolyse aesculin. They produced beta-galactosidase and beta-glucosidase and did not produce urease after 48 h incubation. The G+C content of strain ESC1(T) was 56.4 mol%. Both strains ESC1(T) and ESC5 contained nodD and nifH genes on megaplasmids that were related phylogenetically to those of rhizobial strains nodulating Phaseolus, Leucaena, Trifolium and Lupinus. From the results of this work, we propose that the strains isolated in this study be included in a novel species named Ochrobactrum cytisi sp. nov. The type strain is ESC1(T) (=LMG 22713(T)=CECT 7172(T)).

  18. Burkholderia kirstenboschensis sp. nov. nodulates papilionoid legumes indigenous to South Africa.

    PubMed

    Steenkamp, Emma T; van Zyl, Elritha; Beukes, Chrizelle W; Avontuur, Juanita R; Chan, Wai Yin; Palmer, Marike; Mthombeni, Lunghile S; Phalane, Francina L; Sereme, T Karabo; Venter, Stephanus N

    2015-12-01

    Despite the diversity of Burkholderia species known to nodulate legumes in introduced and native regions, relatively few taxa have been formally described. For example, the Cape Floristic Region of South Africa is thought to represent one of the major centres of diversity for the rhizobial members of Burkholderia, yet only five species have been described from legumes occurring in this region and numerous are still awaiting taxonomic treatment. Here, we investigated the taxonomic status of 12 South African root-nodulating Burkholderia isolates from native papilionoid legumes (Hypocalyptus coluteoides, H. oxalidifolius, H. sophoroides and Virgilia oroboides). Analysis of four gene regions (16S rRNA, recA, atpD and rpoB) revealed that the isolates represent a genealogically unique and exclusive assemblage within the genus. Its distinctness was supported by all other aspects of the polyphasic approach utilized, including the genome-based criteria DNA-DNA hybridization (≥70.9%) and average nucleotide identities (≥96%). We accordingly propose the name B. kirstenboschensis sp. nov. for this taxon with isolate Kb15(T) (=LMG 28727(T); =SARC 695(T)) as its type strain. Our data showed that intraspecific genome size differences (≥0.81 Mb) and the occurrence of large DNA regions that are apparently unique to single individuals (16-23% of an isolate's genome) can significantly limit the value of data obtained from DNA-DNA hybridization experiments. Substitution of DNA-DNA hybridization with whole genome sequencing as a prerequisite for the description of Burkholderia species will undoubtedly speed up the pace at which their diversity are documented, especially in hyperdiverse regions such as the Cape Floristic Region.

  19. [Root Nodule Bacteria Sinorhizobium meliloti: Tolerance to Salinity and Bacterial Genetic Determinants].

    PubMed

    Roumiantseva, M L; Muntyan, V S

    2015-01-01

    The theoretical and experimental data on salt tolerance of root nodule bacteria Sinorhizobium meliloti (Ensifer meliloti), an alfalfa symbiont, and on genetic determination of this feature are reviewed. Extensive data on the genes affecting adaptation of proteobacteria are provided, as well as on the groups of genes with activity depending on the osmolarity of the medium. Structural and functional polymorphism of the bet genes involved in betaine synthesis and transport in S. meliloti is discussed. The phenotypic and. genotypic polymorphism in 282 environmental rhizobial strains isolated from the centers of alfalfa diversity affected by aridity and salinity is discussed. The isolates from the Aral Sea area and northern Caucasus were shown to possess the betC gene represented by two types of alleles: the dominant A-type allele found in Rm 1021 and the less common divergent E-type allele, which was revealed in regions at the frequencies at the frequencies of 0.35 and 0.48, respectively. In the isolates with the salt-tolerant phenotype, which were isolated from root nodules and subsequently formed less effective symbioses with alfalfa, the frequency of E-type alleles was 2.5 times higher. Analysis of the nucleotide and amino acid sequences of the E-type allele of the betC gene revealed that establishment of this allele in the population was a result of positive selection. It is concluded that diversification of the functionally diverse bet genes occurring in S. meliloti affects the salt tolerance and symbiotic effectivity of rhizobia.

  20. Bradyrhizobium ganzhouense sp. nov., an effective symbiotic bacterium isolated from Acacia melanoxylon R. Br. nodules

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Jun Kun; Dou, Ya Jing; Zhu, Ya Jie; Wang, Sheng Kun; Sui, Xin Hua

    2014-01-01

    Three slow-growing rhizobial strains, designated RITF806T, RITF807 and RITF211, isolated from root nodules of Acacia melanoxylon grown in Ganzhou city, Jiangxi Province, China, had been previously defined, based on amplified 16S rRNA gene restriction analysis, as a novel group within the genus Bradyrhizobium. To clarify their taxonomic position, these strains were further analysed and compared with reference strains of related bacteria using a polyphasic approach. According to 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis, the isolates formed a group that was closely related to ‘Bradyrhizobium rifense’ CTAW71, with a similarity value of 99.9 %. In phylogenetic analyses of the housekeeping and symbiotic gene sequences, the three strains formed a distinct lineage within the genus Bradyrhizobium, which was consistent with the results of DNA–DNA hybridization. In analyses of cellular fatty acids and phenotypic features, some differences were found between the novel group and related species of the genus Bradyrhizobium, indicating that these three strains constituted a novel group distinct from any recognized species of the genus Bradyrhizobium. Based on the data obtained in this study, we conclude that our strains represent a novel species of the genus Bradyrhizobium, for which the name Bradyrhizobium ganzhouense sp. nov. is proposed, with RITF806T ( = CCBAU 101088T = JCM 19881T) as the type strain. The DNA G+C content of strain RITF806T is 64.6 mol% (Tm). PMID:24585376

  1. Genome sequence of the lupin-nodulating Bradyrhizobium sp. strain WSM1417

    PubMed Central

    Reeve, Wayne; Terpolilli, Jason; Melino, Vanessa; Ardley, Julie; Tian, Rui; De Meyer, Sofie; Tiwari, Ravi; Yates, Ronald; O’Hara, Graham; Howieson, John; Ninawi, Mohamed; Teshima, Hazuki; Bruce, David; Detter, Chris; Tapia, Roxanne; Han, Cliff; Wei, Chia-Lin; Huntemann, Marcel; Han, James; Chen, I-Min; Mavrommatis, Konstantinos; Markowitz, Victor; Ivanova, Natalia; Ovchinnikova, Galina; Pagani, Ioanna; Pati, Amrita; Goodwin, Lynne; Peters, Lin; Woyke, Tanja; Kyrpides, Nikos

    2013-01-01

    Bradyrhizobium sp. strain WSM1417 is an aerobic, motile, Gram-negative, non-spore-forming rod that was isolated from an effective nitrogen (N2) fixing root nodule of Lupinus sp. collected in Papudo, Chile, in 1995. However, this microsymbiont is a poorly effective N2 fixer with the legume host Lupinus angustifolius L.; a lupin species of considerable economic importance in both Chile and Australia. The symbiosis formed with L. angustifolius produces less than half of the dry matter achieved by the symbioses with commercial inoculant strains such as Bradyrhizobium sp. strain WSM471. Therefore, WSM1417 is an important candidate strain with which to investigate the genetics of effective N2 fixation in the lupin-bradyrhizobia symbioses. Here we describe the features of Bradyrhizobium sp. strain WSM1417, together with genome sequence information and annotation. The 8,048,963 bp high-quality-draft genome is arranged in a single scaffold of 2 contigs, contains 7,695 protein-coding genes and 77 RNA-only encoding genes, and is one of 20 rhizobial genomes sequenced as part of the DOE Joint Genome Institute 2010 Community Sequencing Program. PMID:24976884

  2. Phenotypic and genotypic diversity of rhizobia nodulating Pterocarpus erinaceus and P. lucens in Senegal.

    PubMed

    Sylla, Samba Ndao; Samba, Ramatoulaye Thiaba; Neyra, Marc; Ndoye, Ibrahima; Giraud, Eric; Willems, Anne; de Lajudie, Philippe; Dreyfus, Bernard

    2002-12-01

    A total of fifty root nodules isolates of fast-growing and slow growing rhizobia from Pterocarpus ennaceus and Pterocarpus lucens respectively native of sudanean and sahelian regions of Senegal were characterized. These isolates were compared to representative strains of known rhizobial species. Twenty-two new isolates were slow growers and twenty-eight were fast growers. A polyphasic approach was performed including comparative total protein sodium dodecyl sulphate polyacrylamide gel (SDS-PAGE) profile analysis; 16S rDNA and 16S-23S rDNA intergenic spacer (IGS) sequence analysis. By SDS-PAGE the slow growing isolates grouped in one major cluster containing reference strains of Bradyrhizobium sp. including strains isolated in Africa, in Brazil and in New Zealand. Most of the fast-growing rhizobia grouped in four different clusters or were separate strains related to Rhizobium and Mesorhizobium strains. The 16S rDNA and 16S-23S rDNA IGS sequences analysis showed accurately the differentiation of fast growing rhizobia among the Rhizobium and Mesorbizobium genospecies. The representative strains of slow growing rhizobia were identified as closely related to Bradyrbizobium elkanii and Bradyrhizobium japonicum. Based on 16S rDNA sequence analysis, one slow growing strain (ORS199) was phylogenetically related to Bradyrbizobium sp. (Lupinus) and Blastobacter denitrificans. This position of ORS 199 was not confirmed by IGS sequence divergence. We found no clear relation between the diversity of strains, the host plants and the ecogeographical origins.

  3. Genome sequence of the lupin-nodulating Bradyrhizobium sp. strain WSM1417.

    PubMed

    Reeve, Wayne; Terpolilli, Jason; Melino, Vanessa; Ardley, Julie; Tian, Rui; De Meyer, Sofie; Tiwari, Ravi; Yates, Ronald; O'Hara, Graham; Howieson, John; Ninawi, Mohamed; Teshima, Hazuki; Bruce, David; Detter, Chris; Tapia, Roxanne; Han, Cliff; Wei, Chia-Lin; Huntemann, Marcel; Han, James; Chen, I-Min; Mavrommatis, Konstantinos; Markowitz, Victor; Ivanova, Natalia; Ovchinnikova, Galina; Pagani, Ioanna; Pati, Amrita; Goodwin, Lynne; Peters, Lin; Woyke, Tanja; Kyrpides, Nikos

    2013-12-20

    Bradyrhizobium sp. strain WSM1417 is an aerobic, motile, Gram-negative, non-spore-forming rod that was isolated from an effective nitrogen (N2) fixing root nodule of Lupinus sp. collected in Papudo, Chile, in 1995. However, this microsymbiont is a poorly effective N2 fixer with the legume host Lupinus angustifolius L.; a lupin species of considerable economic importance in both Chile and Australia. The symbiosis formed with L. angustifolius produces less than half of the dry matter achieved by the symbioses with commercial inoculant strains such as Bradyrhizobium sp. strain WSM471. Therefore, WSM1417 is an important candidate strain with which to investigate the genetics of effective N2 fixation in the lupin-bradyrhizobia symbioses. Here we describe the features of Bradyrhizobium sp. strain WSM1417, together with genome sequence information and annotation. The 8,048,963 bp high-quality-draft genome is arranged in a single scaffold of 2 contigs, contains 7,695 protein-coding genes and 77 RNA-only encoding genes, and is one of 20 rhizobial genomes sequenced as part of the DOE Joint Genome Institute 2010 Community Sequencing Program.

  4. Elastosonographic evaluation of thyroid nodules in acromegaly.

    PubMed

    Scacchi, Massimo; Andrioli, Massimiliano; Carzaniga, Chiara; Vitale, Giovanni; Moro, Mirella; Poggi, Luca; Pecori Giraldi, Francesca; Fatti, Letizia M; Cavagnini, Francesco

    2009-10-01

    Ultrasound-elastography (US-E) appears to be a helpful tool for the diagnosis of thyroid cancer. In acromegaly, the prevalence of thyroid cancer is still debated. The aims of this study were to evaluate thyroid nodules in acromegaly and to establish the accuracy of US-E in providing information on their nature, using cytological analysis as a reference. US-E was applied to 90 nodules detected in 25 acromegalic patients and to 94 nodules found in 31 non-acromegalic goitrous subjects. The lesions were classified according to the elasticity scores (ES) as soft (ES 1-2) or hard (ES 3-4). Fine needle aspiration cytology could be performed in 60.8% of hard nodules in acromegalics and in 86.7% of hard nodules in controls. The prevalence of hard nodules was significantly higher in the whole group of acromegalic patients than in controls (56.8 vs 16.0%, P<0.0001). The prevalence of hard nodules in patients with active acromegaly (68.9%) was greater, though not to a statistically significant extent, than that observed in cured (44.4%) and controlled (52.5%) patients. Cytology revealed malignancy or suspect malignancy in four of the nodules of non-acromegalic subjects and in none of the nodules of acromegalic patients. This study has demonstrated a high prevalence of stiff thyroid nodules in acromegaly, greater than that found in non-acromegalic goitrous subjects. In acromegalics, hard nodules appeared not to be malignant on cytopathological examination and are probably of fibrous nature. Thus, US-E appears to be of limited value for the diagnosis of thyroid cancer in acromegaly.

  5. Effect of salinity on root-nodule conductance to the oxygen diffusion in the Cicer arietinum-Mesorhizobium ciceri symbiosis.

    PubMed

    L'taief, Boulbaba; Sifi, Bouaziz; Zaman-Allah, Mainassara; Drevon, Jean-Jacques; Lachaâl, Mokhtar

    2007-08-01

    Nodule conductance to O2 diffusion has been involved as a major factor of the inhibition of N2 fixation by soil salinity that severely reduces the production of grain legumes. In order to determine the effect of this constraint on the nodule conductance, oxygen uptake by the nodulated roots of Cicer arietinum was measured by recording the concentration of O2 as a function of pO2 in a gas-tight incubator. After germination and inoculation with the strain Mesorhizobium ciceri UPMCa7, the varieties Amdoun 1 and INRAT 93-1 were hydroponically grown in a glasshouse on 1L glass bottles filled with nutrient solution containing 25 mM NaCl. Salinity induced a marked decrease in shoot (30% versus 14%), root (43% versus 20%), and nodule biomass (100% versus 43%) for Amdoun 1 relative to INRAT 93-1. Although salinity completely prevented nodule formation in the sensitive variety Amdoun 1, nodule number and biomass were higher in the first than in the second variety in the absence of salt. This effect was associated with a significantly higher O2 uptake by nodulated root (510 versus 255 micromol O2 plant(-1)h(-1)) and nodule conductance (20 versus 5 microm s(-1)) in Amdoun 1 than in INRAT 93-1. Salinity did not significantly change the nodule conductance and nodule permeability for INRAT 93-1. Thus, the salt tolerance of this variety appears to be associated with stability in nodule conductance and the capacity to form nodules under salt constraint.

  6. Comparative transcriptome analysis of nodules of two Mesorhizobium-chickpea associations with differential symbiotic efficiency under phosphate deficiency.

    PubMed

    Nasr Esfahani, Maryam; Inoue, Komaki; Chu, Ha Duc; Nguyen, Kien Huu; Van Ha, Chien; Watanabe, Yasuko; Burritt, David J; Herrera-Estrella, Luis; Mochida, Keiichi; Tran, Lam-Son Phan

    2017-09-01

    Phosphate (Pi) deficiency is known to be a major limitation for symbiotic nitrogen fixation (SNF), and hence legume crop productivity globally. However, very little information is available on the adaptive mechanisms, particularly in the important legume crop chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.), which enable nodules to respond to low-Pi availability. Thus, to elucidate these mechanisms in chickpea nodules at molecular level, we used an RNA sequencing approach to investigate transcriptomes of the nodules in Mesorhizobium mediterraneum SWRI9-(MmSWRI9)-chickpea and M. ciceri CP-31-(McCP-31)-chickpea associations under Pi-sufficient and Pi-deficient conditions, of which the McCP-31-chickpea association has a better SNF capacity than the MmSWRI9-chickpea association during Pi starvation. Our investigation revealed that more genes showed altered expression patterns in MmSWRI9-induced nodules than in McCP-31-induced nodules (540 vs. 225) under Pi deficiency, suggesting that the Pi-starvation-more-sensitive MmSWRI9-induced nodules required expression change in a larger number of genes to cope with low-Pi stress than the Pi-starvation-less-sensitive McCP-31-induced nodules. The functional classification of differentially expressed genes (DEGs) was examined to gain an understanding of how chickpea nodules respond to Pi starvation, caused by soil Pi deficiency. As a result, more DEGs involved in nodulation, detoxification, nutrient/ion transport, transcriptional factors, key metabolic pathways, Pi remobilization and signalling were found in Pi-starved MmSWRI9-induced nodules than in Pi-starved McCP-31-induced nodules. Our findings have enabled the identification of molecular processes that play important roles in the acclimation of nodules to Pi deficiency, ultimately leading to the development of Pi-efficient chickpea symbiotic associations suitable for Pi-deficient soils. © 2017 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Ultrasound-Pathology Discordant Nodules on Core-Needle Biopsy: Malignancy Risk and Management Strategy.

    PubMed

    Chung, Sae Rom; Baek, Jung Hwan; Park, Hye Sun; Choi, Young Jun; Sung, Tae-Yon; Song, Dong Eun; Kim, Tae Yong; Lee, Jeong Hyun

    2017-05-01

    The reported malignancy rates of thyroid nodules that appear suspicious on ultrasound (US) but yield benign fine-needle aspiration (FNA) cytology results range from 13.6% to 56.6%. Howev