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Sample records for rhizobium bacteroid development

  1. Organic Acid Metabolism by Isolated Rhizobium japonicum Bacteroids

    PubMed Central

    Stovall, Iris; Cole, Michael

    1978-01-01

    Rhizobium japonicum bacteroids isolated from soybean (Glycine max L.) nodules oxidized 14C-labeled succinate, pyruvate, and acetate in a manner consistent with operation of the tricarboxylic acid cycle and a partial glyoxylate cycle. Substrate carbon was incorporated into all major cellular components (cell wall + membrane, nucleic acids, and protein). PMID:16660386

  2. Suppression of nodulation gene expression in bacteroids of Rhizobium leguminosarum biovar viciae.

    PubMed Central

    Schlaman, H R; Horvath, B; Vijgenboom, E; Okker, R J; Lugtenberg, B J

    1991-01-01

    The expression of nod genes of Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. viciae in nodules of Pisum sativum was investigated at both the translational and transcriptional levels. By using immunoblots, it was found that the levels of NodA, NodI, NodE, and NodO proteins were reduced at least 14-fold in bacteriods compared with cultured cells, whereas NodD protein was reduced only 3-fold. Northern (RNA) blot hybridization, RNase protection assays, and in situ RNA hybridization together showed that, except for the nodD transcript, none of the other nod gene transcripts were present in bacteroids. The amount of nodD transcript in bacteroids was reduced only two- to threefold compared with that in cultured cells. Identical results were found with a Rhizobium strain harboring multicopies of nodD and with a strain containing a NodD protein (NodD604) which is activated independently of flavonoids. Furthermore, it was found that mature pea nodules contain inhibitors of induced nod gene transcription but that NodD604 was insensitive to these compounds. In situ RNA hybridization on sections from P. sativum and Vicia hirsuta nodules showed that transcription of inducible nod genes is switched off before the bacteria differentiate into bacteroids. This is unlikely to be due to limiting amounts of NodD, the absence of inducing compounds, or the presence of anti-inducers. The observed switch off of transcription during the development of symbiosis is a general phenomenon and is apparently caused by a yet unknown, negative regulation mechanism. Images PMID:1712355

  3. Respiratory control determines respiration and nitrogenase activity of Rhizobium leguminosarum bacteroids.

    PubMed

    Haaker, H; Szafran, M; Wassink, H; Klerk, H; Appels, M

    1996-08-01

    The relationship between the O2 input rate into a suspension of Rhizobium leguminosarum bacteroids, the cellular ATP and ADP pools, and the whole-cell nitrogenase activity during L-malate oxidation has been studied. It was observed that inhibition of nitrogenase by excess O2 coincided with an increase of the cellular ATP/ADP ratio. When under this condition the protonophore carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone (CCCP) was added, the cellular ATP/ADP ratio was lowered while nitrogenase regained activity. To explain these observations, the effects of nitrogenase activity and CCCP on the O2 consumption rate of R. leguminosarum bacteroids were determined. From 100 to 5 microM O2, a decline in the O2 consumption rate was observed to 50 to 70% of the maximal O2 consumption rate. A determination of the redox state of the cytochromes during an O2 consumption experiment indicated that at O2 concentrations above 5 microM, electron transport to the cytochromes was rate-limiting oxidation and not the reaction of reduced cytochromes with oxygen. The kinetic properties of the respiratory chain were determined from the deoxygenation of oxyglobins. In intact cells the maximal deoxygenation activity was stimulated by nitrogenase activity or CCCP. In isolated cytoplasmic membranes NADH oxidation was inhibited by respiratory control. The dehydrogenase activities of the respiratory chain were rate-limiting oxidation at O2 concentrations (if >300 nM. Below 300 nM the terminal oxidase system followed Michaelis-Menten kinetics (Km of 45 +/- 8 nM). We conclude that (i) respiration in R. leguminosarum bacteroids takes place via a respiratory chain terminating at a high-affinity oxidase system, (ii) the activity of the respiratory chain is inhibited by the proton motive force, and (iii) ATP hydrolysis by nitrogenase can partly relieve the inhibition of respiration by the proton motive force and thus stimulate respiration at nanomolar concentrations of O2.

  4. Rhizobium nodM and nodN genes are common nod genes: nodM encodes functions for efficiency of nod signal production and bacteroid maturation.

    PubMed Central

    Baev, N; Schultze, M; Barlier, I; Ha, D C; Virelizier, H; Kondorosi, E; Kondorosi, A

    1992-01-01

    Earlier, we showed that Rhizobium meliloti nodM codes for glucosamine synthase and that nodM and nodN mutants produce strongly reduced root hair deformation activity and display delayed nodulation of Medicago sativa (Baev et al., Mol. Gen. Genet. 228:113-124, 1991). Here, we demonstrate that nodM and nodN genes from Rhizobium leguminosarum biovar viciae restore the root hair deformation activity of exudates of the corresponding R. meliloti mutant strains. Partial restoration of the nodulation phenotypes of these two strains was also observed. In nodulation assays, galactosamine and N-acetylglucosamine could substitute for glucosamine in the suppression of the R. meliloti nodM mutation, although N-acetylglucosamine was less efficient. We observed that in nodules induced by nodM mutants, the bacteroids did not show complete development or were deteriorated, resulting in decreased nitrogen fixation and, consequently, lower dry weights of the plants. This mutant phenotype could also be suppressed by exogenously supplied glucosamine, N-acetylglucosamine, and galactosamine and to a lesser extent by glucosamine-6-phosphate, indicating that the nodM mutant bacteroids are limited for glucosamine. In addition, by using derivatives of the wild type and a nodM mutant in which the nod genes are expressed at a high constitutive level, it was shown that the nodM mutant produces significantly fewer Nod factors than the wild-type strain but that their chemical structures are unchanged. However, the relative amounts of analogs of the cognate Nod signals were elevated, and this may explain the observed host range effects of the nodM mutation. Our data indicate that both the nodM and nodN genes of the two species have common functions and confirm that NodM is a glucosamine synthase with the biochemical role of providing sufficient amounts of the sugar moiety for the synthesis of the glucosamine oligosaccharide signal molecules. Images PMID:1447128

  5. Fluorescence studies with malate dehydrogenase from rhizobium japonicum 3I1B-143 bacteroids: a two-tryptophan containing protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghiron, Camillo A.; Eftink, Maurice R.; Waters, James K.; Emerich, David W.

    1990-05-01

    A number of fluorescence studies, both of trp residues and bound NADH, have been reported for porcine MDH. The large number of trp residues (6) complicates the interpretation of some studies. To circumvent this we have performed studies with a two tryptophan (per subunit) MDH from Rhizobium japonicum 311B-143 bacteroids. We have performed phase/modulation fluorescence lifetime measurements, as a function of temperature and added quencher KI, in order to resolved the 1.3 ns (blue) and 6.6 ns (red) contributions from the two classes of trp residues. Anisotropy decay studies have also been performed. The binding of NADH dynamically quenches the fluorescence of both tip residues, but, unlike mammalian cytoplasmic and mitochondrial MDH, there is not a large enhancement in fluorescence of bound NADH upon forming a ternary complex with either tartronic acid or D-malonate.

  6. Terminal bacteroid differentiation in the legume-rhizobium symbiosis: nodule-specific cysteine-rich peptides and beyond.

    PubMed

    Alunni, Benoît; Gourion, Benjamin

    2016-07-01

    Contents 411 I. 411 II. 412 III. 412 IV. 413 V. 414 VI. 414 VII. 415 VIII. 415 416 References 416 SUMMARY: Terminal bacteroid differentiation (TBD) is a remarkable case of bacterial cell differentiation that occurs after rhizobia are released intracellularly within plant cells of symbiotic legume organs called nodules. The hallmarks of TBD are cell enlargement, genome amplification and membrane permeabilization. This plant-driven process is governed by a large family of bacteroid-targeted nodule-specific cysteine-rich (NCR) peptides that were until recently thought to be restricted to a specific lineage of the legume family, including the model plant Medicago truncatula. Recently, new plant and bacterial factors involved in TBD have been identified, challenging our view of this phenomenon at mechanistic and evolutionary levels. Here, we review the recent literature and discuss emerging questions about the mechanisms and the role(s) of TBD. PMID:27241115

  7. Development of a genetic system in Bacteroides. Final report, June 14, 1981-June 14, 1985

    SciTech Connect

    Gardner, J.F.; Salyers, A.A.

    1985-07-03

    We have constructed a chimeric plasmid, pE5-2, that can be mobilized from E. coli to Bacteroides by the broad host range plasmids R751 and RK2. pE5-2 is maintained in Bacteroides and carries a gene for resistance to erythromycin-clindamycin that is expressed in Bacteroides. We have discovered and described the first Bacteroides transposon, Tn4351 and we have shown that this transposon also mediates the integration of R751 into the chromosome. This feature may serve as a basis for future construction of Hfr-type strains of Bacteroides. We have cloned and characterized a regulated Bacteroides gene that codes for a polysaccharidase (chondroitin lyase). The cloned DNA appears to contain the Bacteroides promoter. Finally, we have developed a method for rapid identification of some Bacteroides species, using species-specific cloned DNA fragments. These accomplishments provide for the first time a basis for genetic analysis of human colonic Bacteroides. 5 refs., 3 figs.

  8. Identifying abnormalities in symbiotic development between Trifolium spp. and Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. trifolii leading to sub-optimal and ineffective nodule phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Melino, V. J.; Drew, E. A.; Ballard, R. A.; Reeve, W. G.; Thomson, G.; White, R. G.; O'Hara, G. W.

    2012-01-01

    Background and Aims Legumes overcome nitrogen limitations by entering into a mutualistic symbiosis with N2-fixing bacteria (rhizobia). Fully compatible associations (effective) between Trifolium spp. and Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. trifolii result from successful recognition of symbiotic partners in the rhizosphere, root hair infection and the formation of nodules where N2-fixing bacteroids reside. Poorly compatible associations can result in root nodule formation with minimal (sub-optimal) or no (ineffective) N2-fixation. Despite the abundance and persistence of strains in agricultural soils which are poorly compatible with the commercially grown clover species, little is known of how and why they fail symbiotically. The aims of this research were to determine the morphological aberrations occurring in sub-optimal and ineffective clover nodules and to determine whether reduced bacteroid numbers or reduced N2-fixing activity is the main cause for the Sub-optimal phenotype. Methods Symbiotic effectiveness of four Trifolium hosts with each of four R. leguminosarum bv. trifolii strains was assessed by analysis of plant yields and nitrogen content; nodule yields, abundance, morphology and internal structure; and bacteroid cytology, quantity and activity. Key Results Effective nodules (Nodule Function 83–100 %) contained four developmental zones and N2-fixing bacteroids. In contrast, Sub-optimal nodules of the same age (Nodule Function 24–57 %) carried prematurely senescing bacteroids and a small bacteroid pool resulting in reduced shoot N. Ineffective-differentiated nodules carried bacteroids aborted at stage 2 or 3 in differentiation. In contrast, bacteroids were not observed in Ineffective-vegetative nodules despite the presence of bacteria within infection threads. Conclusions Three major responses to N2-fixation incompatibility between Trifolium spp. and R. l. trifolii strains were found: failed bacterial endocytosis from infection threads into plant cortical

  9. Transcriptomic analysis of Rhizobium leguminosarum biovar viciae in symbiosis with host plants Pisum sativum and Vicia cracca.

    PubMed

    Karunakaran, R; Ramachandran, V K; Seaman, J C; East, A K; Mouhsine, B; Mauchline, T H; Prell, J; Skeffington, A; Poole, P S

    2009-06-01

    Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. viciae forms nitrogen-fixing nodules on several legumes, including pea (Pisum sativum) and vetch (Vicia cracca), and has been widely used as a model to study nodule biochemistry. To understand the complex biochemical and developmental changes undergone by R. leguminosarum bv. viciae during bacteroid development, microarray experiments were first performed with cultured bacteria grown on a variety of carbon substrates (glucose, pyruvate, succinate, inositol, acetate, and acetoacetate) and then compared to bacteroids. Bacteroid metabolism is essentially that of dicarboxylate-grown cells (i.e., induction of dicarboxylate transport, gluconeogenesis and alanine synthesis, and repression of sugar utilization). The decarboxylating arm of the tricarboxylic acid cycle is highly induced, as is gamma-aminobutyrate metabolism, particularly in bacteroids from early (7-day) nodules. To investigate bacteroid development, gene expression in bacteroids was analyzed at 7, 15, and 21 days postinoculation of peas. This revealed that bacterial rRNA isolated from pea, but not vetch, is extensively processed in mature bacteroids. In early development (7 days), there were large changes in the expression of regulators, exported and cell surface molecules, multidrug exporters, and heat and cold shock proteins. fix genes were induced early but continued to increase in mature bacteroids, while nif genes were induced strongly in older bacteroids. Mutation of 37 genes that were strongly upregulated in mature bacteroids revealed that none were essential for nitrogen fixation. However, screening of 3,072 mini-Tn5 mutants on peas revealed previously uncharacterized genes essential for nitrogen fixation. These encoded a potential magnesium transporter, an AAA domain protein, and proteins involved in cytochrome synthesis.

  10. Microgravity effects on the legume/Rhizobium symbiosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urban, James E.

    1997-01-01

    Symbiotic nitrogen fixation is of critical importance to world agriculture and likely will be a critical part of life support systems developed for prolonged missions in space. Bacteroid formation, an essential step in an effective Dutch White Clover/Rhizobium leguminosarum bv trifolii symbiosis, is induced by succinic acid which is produced by the plant and which is bound and incorporated by the bacterium. Aspirin mimics succinate in its role as a bacteroid inducer and measures of aspirin binding mimiced measurements of succinate binding. In normal gravity (1×g), rhizobium bacteria immediately bound relatively high levels of aspirin (or succinate) in a readily reversible manner. Within a few seconds a portion of this initially bound aspirin became irreversibly bound. In the microgravity environment aboard the NASA 930 aircraft, rhizobia did not display the initial reversible binding of succinate, but did display a similar kinetic pattern of irreversible binding, and ultimately bound 32% more succinate (Acta Astronautica 36:129-133, 1995.) In normal gravity succinate treated cells stop dividing and swell to their maximum size (twice the normal cell volume) within a time equivalent to the time required for two normal cell doublings. Swelling in microgravity was tested in FPA and BPM sample holders aboard the space shuttle (USML-1, and STS-54, 57, and 60.) The behavior of cells in the two sample holders was similar, and swelling behavior of cells in microgravity was identical to behavior in normal gravity.

  11. Effects of Boron on Rhizobium-Legume Cell-Surface Interactions and Nodule Development.

    PubMed Central

    Bolanos, L.; Brewin, N. J.; Bonilla, I.

    1996-01-01

    Boron (B) is an essential micronutrient for the development of nitrogen-fixing root nodules in pea (Pisum sativum). By using monoclonal antibodies that recognize specific glycoconjugate components implicated in legume root-nodule development, we investigated the effects of low B on the formation of infection threads and the colonization of pea nodules by Rhizobium leguminosarum bv viciae. In B-deficient nodules the proportion of infected host cells was much lower than in nodules from plants supplied with normal quantities of B. Moreover, the host cells often developed enlarged and abnormally shaped infection threads that frequently burst, releasing bacteria into damaged host cells. There was also an over-production of plant matrix material in which the rhizobial cells were embedded during their progression through the infection thread. Furthermore, in a series of in vitro binding studies, we demonstrated that the presence of B can change the affinity with which the bacterial cell surface interacts with the peribacteroid membrane glycocalyx relative to its interaction with intercellular plant matrix glycoprotein. From these observations we suggest that B plays an important role in mediating cell-surface interactions that lead to endocytosis of rhizobia by host cells and hence to the correct establishment of the symbiosis between pea and Rhizobium. PMID:12226256

  12. Protoporphyrin formation in Rhizobium japonicum.

    PubMed Central

    Keithly, J H; Nadler, K D

    1983-01-01

    The obligately aerobic soybean root nodule bacterium Rhizobium japonicum produces large amounts of heme (iron protoporphyrin) only under low oxygen tensions, such as exist in the symbiotic root nodule. Aerobically incubated suspensions of both laboratory-cultured and symbiotic bacteria (bacteroids) metabolize delta-aminolevulinic acid to uroporphyrin, coproporphyrin, and protoporphyrin. Under anaerobic conditions, suspensions of laboratory-cultured bacteria form greatly reduced amounts of protoporphyrin from delta-aminolevulinic acid, whereas protoporphyrin formation by bacteroid suspensions is unaffected by anaerobiosis, suggesting that bacteroids form protoporphyrin under anaerobic conditions more readily than do free-living bacteria. Oxygen is the major terminal electron acceptor for coproporphyrinogen oxidation in cell-free extracts of both bacteroids and free-living bacteria. In the absence of oxygen, ATP, NADP, Mg2+, and L-methionine are required for protoporphyrin formation in vitro. In the presence of these supplements, coproporphyrinogenase activity under anaerobic conditions is 5 to 10% of that observed under aerobic conditions. Two mechanisms for coproporphyrinogen oxidation exist in R. japonicum: an oxygen-dependent process and an anaerobic oxidation in which electrons are transferred to NADP. The significance of these findings with regard to heme biosynthesis in the microaerophilic soybean root nodule is discussed. PMID:6841317

  13. [The defense and regulatory mechanisms during development of legume-Rhizobium symbiosis].

    PubMed

    Glian'ko, A K; Akimova, G P; Sokolova, M G; Makarova, L E; Vasil'eva, G G

    2007-01-01

    The roles of indolylacetic acid, the peroxidase system, catalase, active oxygen species, and phenolic compounds in the physiological and biochemical mechanisms involved in the autoregulation of nodulation in the developing legume-Rhizobium symbiosis were studied. It was inferred that the concentration of indolylacetic acid in the roots of inoculated plants, controlled by the enzymes of the peroxidase complex, is the signal permitting or limiting nodulation at the initial stages of symbiotic interaction. Presumably, the change in the level of active oxygen species is determined by an antioxidant activity of phenolic compounds. During the development of symbiosis, phytohormones, antioxidant enzymes, and active oxygen species may be involved in the regulation of infection via both a direct antibacterial action and regulation of functional activity of the host plant defense systems. PMID:17619575

  14. Rhizobium lipopolysaccharide modulates infection thread development in white clover root hairs.

    PubMed Central

    Dazzo, F B; Truchet, G L; Hollingsworth, R I; Hrabak, E M; Pankratz, H S; Philip-Hollingsworth, S; Salzwedel, J L; Chapman, K; Appenzeller, L; Squartini, A

    1991-01-01

    The interaction between Rhizobium lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and white clover roots was examined. The Limulus lysate assay indicated that Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. trifolii (hereafter called R. trifolii) released LPS into the external root environment of slide cultures. Immunofluorescence and immunoelectron microscopy showed that purified LPS from R. trifolii 0403 bound rapidly to root hair tips and infiltrated across the root hair wall. Infection thread formation in root hairs was promoted by preinoculation treatment of roots with R. trifolii LPS at a low dose (up to 5 micrograms per plant) but inhibited at a higher dose. This biological activity of LPS was restricted to the region of the root present at the time of exposure to LPS, higher with LPS from cells in the early stationary phase than in the mid-exponential phase, incubation time dependent, incapable of reversing inhibition of infection by NO3- or NH4+, and conserved among serologically distinct LPSs from several wild-type R. trifolii strains (0403, 2S-2, and ANU843). In contrast, infections were not increased by preinoculation treatment of roots with LPSs from R. leguminosarum bv. viciae strain 300, R. meliloti 102F28, or members of the family Enterobacteriaceae. Most infection threads developed successfully in root hairs pretreated with R. trifolii LPS, whereas many infections aborted near their origins and accumulated brown deposits if pretreated with LPS from R. meliloti 102F28. LPS from R. leguminosarum 300 also caused most infection threads to abort. Other specific responses of root hairs to infection-stimulating LPS from R. trifolii included acceleration of cytoplasmic streaming and production of novel proteins. Combined gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy and proton nuclear magnetic resonance analyses indicated that biologically active LPS from R. trifolii 0403 in the early stationary phase had less fucose but more 2-O-methylfucose, quinovosamine, 3,6-dideoxy-3-(methylamino)galactose, and

  15. Identification of a Novel Gene for Biosynthesis of a Bacteroid-Specific Electron Carrier Menaquinone

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Fuli; Cheng, Guojun; Xu, Hui; Wang, Zhi; Lei, Lei; Li, Youguo

    2011-01-01

    Ubiquinone (UQ) has been considered as an electron mediator in electron transfer that generates ATP in Rhizobium under both free-living and symbiosis conditions. When mutated, the dmtH gene has a symbiotic phenotype of forming ineffective nodules on Astragalus sinicus. The gene was isolated from a Mesorhizobium huakuii 7653R transposon-inserted mutant library. The DNA sequence and conserved protein domain analyses revealed that dmtH encodes demethylmenaquinone (DMK) methyltransferase, which catalyzes the terminal step of menaquinone (MK) biosynthesis. Comparative analysis indicated that dmtH homologs were present in only a few Rhizobia. Real-time quantitative PCR showed dmtH is a bacteroid-specific gene. The highest expression was seen at 25 days after inoculation of strain 7653R. Gene disruption and complementation tests demonstrated that the dmtH gene was essential for bacteroid development and symbiotic nitrogen fixation ability. MK and UQ were extracted from the wild type strain 7653R and mutant strain HK116. MK-7 was accumulated under microaerobic condition and UQ-10 was accumulated under aerobic condition in M. huakuii 7653R. The predicted function of DmtH protein was confirmed by the measurement of methyltransferase activity in vitro. These results revealed that MK-7 was used as an electron carrier instead of UQ in M. huakuii 7653R bacteroids. PMID:22194970

  16. Mutations in Rhizobium phaseoli that lead to arrested development of infection threads.

    PubMed Central

    Noel, K D; Vandenbosch, K A; Kulpaca, B

    1986-01-01

    Two Rhizobium phaseoli mutants, isolated previously by Tn5 mutagenesis, elicited infection threads which ceased development prematurely, usually within root hairs. These infection threads were wide, globular, and otherwise altered in morphology, compared with normal infection threads. Anatomy and division of the root cortical cells during initial stages of nodule morphogenesis appeared normal. However, later nodule differentiation deviated considerably from normal development, and release of bacteria from infection threads was not observed. In tryptone-yeast extract medium the mutants sedimented during growth in shaken cultures and formed rough colonies on agar. Electrophoresis of washed cultures solubilized in dodecyl sulfate revealed that the major carbohydrate band was absent from the mutants. The behavior of this carbohydrate in phenol-water extraction and gel chromatography, its apparent ketodeoxyoctonate content, and its susceptibility to mild acid hydrolysis suggested that it was a lipopolysaccharide. From the results of genetic crosses or reversion analysis, the defect in synthesizing this carbohydrate material and the defect in infection could be attributed to a single mutation in each mutant. Images PMID:3782040

  17. Development of EUCAST disk diffusion method for susceptibility testing of the Bacteroides fragilis group isolates.

    PubMed

    Nagy, Elisabeth; Justesen, Ulrik Stenz; Eitel, Zsuzsa; Urbán, Edit

    2015-02-01

    With the emergence of antibiotic resistance among Bacteroides fragilis group isolates the need of susceptibility testing in routine laboratories is increasing. The aims of the present study were to evaluate the disk diffusion method for susceptibility testing in case of different clinical isolates of Bacteroides spp by comparing zone diameter results with MICs obtained earlier during an Europe-wide antibiotic susceptibility surveillance, and to propose zone diameter breakpoints, which correlate for the EUCAST MIC breakpoints. We tested 381 clinical isolates of the B. fragilis group to amoxicillin/clavulanic acid, cefoxitin, clindamycin, imipenem, metronidazole, moxifloxacin, piperacillin/tazobactam, tigecycline by agar dilution method previously. The inhibition zones of the same antibiotics including meropenem disc were determined by the disc diffusion on Brucella blood agar supplemented with haemin and vitamin K1. Plates were incubated at 37 °C in an anaerobic atmosphere for 24 h. The zone diameters were read at 100% inhibition. In case of discrepant results MICs were determined by gradient test and compared with the inhibition zones on the same plate. We found a good agreement between the inhibition zone diameters and the MICs for imipenem, metronidazole, moxifloxacin and tigecyclin. The inhibition zone diameters of meropenem also separated clearly the isolates, which can be considered wild-type isolates. In case of amoxicillin/clavulanic acid and piperacillin/tazobactam intermediate and susceptible isolates according to the MIC determination, overlap during the zone diameter determination. Isolates with an inhibition zone <23 mm for amoxicillin/clavulanic acid and <25 mm for piperacillin/tazobactam should be retested by a MIC determination method. The 10 μg clindamycin disc clearly separated the resistant and the susceptible population of B. fragilis group strains. In the case of cefoxitin only resistant population could be separated with an inhibition

  18. [The Effect of Cadmium on the Efficiency of Development of Legume-Rhizobium Symbiosis].

    PubMed

    Chuhukova, O V; Postrigan, B N; Baimiev, A Kh; Chemeris, A V

    2015-01-01

    Screening of nodule bacteria (rhizobia) forming symbiotic relationships with legumes has been performed in order to isolate strains resistant to cadmium ions in a wide range of concentrations (6-132 mg/kg). The effect ofcadmium salts (6, 12, 24 mg/kg) on the legume-rhizobium symbiosis ofthe pea Pisum sativum L. with Rhizobium leguminosarum and of the fodder galega Galega orientalis Lam. with Rhizobium galegae has been studied under experimental laboratory conditions. No statistically significant differences have been revealed in the growth and biomass of plants with regard to the control in the range of concentrations given above. However, it was found that cadmium inhibited nodulation in P. sativum and stimulated it in G. orientalis. PMID:26638242

  19. [The Effect of Cadmium on the Efficiency of Development of Legume-Rhizobium Symbiosis].

    PubMed

    Chuhukova, O V; Postrigan, B N; Baimiev, A Kh; Chemeris, A V

    2015-01-01

    Screening of nodule bacteria (rhizobia) forming symbiotic relationships with legumes has been performed in order to isolate strains resistant to cadmium ions in a wide range of concentrations (6-132 mg/kg). The effect ofcadmium salts (6, 12, 24 mg/kg) on the legume-rhizobium symbiosis ofthe pea Pisum sativum L. with Rhizobium leguminosarum and of the fodder galega Galega orientalis Lam. with Rhizobium galegae has been studied under experimental laboratory conditions. No statistically significant differences have been revealed in the growth and biomass of plants with regard to the control in the range of concentrations given above. However, it was found that cadmium inhibited nodulation in P. sativum and stimulated it in G. orientalis.

  20. Alfalfa Enod12 genes are differentially regulated during nodule development by Nod factors and Rhizobium invasion.

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, P; Crespi, M D; Szécsi, J; Allison, L A; Schultze, M; Ratet, P; Kondorosi, E; Kondorosi, A

    1994-01-01

    MsEnod12A and MsEnod12B are two early nodulin genes from alfalfa (Medicago sativa). Differential expression of these genes was demonstrated using a reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction approach. MsEnod12A RNA was detected only in nodules and not in other plant tissues. In contrast, MsEnod12B transcripts were found in nodules and also at low levels in roots, flowers, stems, and leaves. MsEnod12B expression was enhanced in the root early after inoculation with the microsymbiont Rhizobium meliloti and after treatment with purified Nod factors, whereas MsEnod12A induction was detected only when developing nodules were visible. In situ hybridization showed that in nodules, MsEnod12 expression occurred in the infection zone. In empty Fix- nodules the MsEnod12A transcript level was much reduced, and in spontaneous nodules it was not detectable. These data indicate that MsEnod12B expression in roots is related to the action of Nod factors, whereas MsEnod12A expression is associated with the invasion process in nodules. Therefore, alfalfa possesses different mechanisms regulating MsEnod12A and MsEnod12B expression. PMID:8066132

  1. Isolation of Rhizobium phaseoli Tn5-induced mutants with altered expression of cytochrome terminal oxidases o and aa3.

    PubMed Central

    Soberón, M; Membrillo-Hernández, J; Aguilar, G R; Sánchez, F

    1990-01-01

    Two Rhizobium phaseoli mutants affected in cytochrome expression were obtained by Tn5-mob mutagenesis of the wild-type strain (CE3). Mutant strain CFN031 expressed sevenfold less cytochrome o in culture, expressed cytochrome aa3 under microaerophilic culture conditions, in contrast to strain CE3, and was affected in its vegetative growth properties and proliferation inside plant host cells. Mutant CFN037 expressed cytochrome aa3 under microaerophilic culture conditions, while bacteroid development and nitrogen fixation occurred earlier than in strain CE3. Images FIG. 2 PMID:2155209

  2. Morphology of root nodules and nodule-like structures formed by Rhizobium and Agrobacterium strains containing a Rhizobium meliloti megaplasmid

    PubMed Central

    1983-01-01

    We examined expression of the megaplasmid pRme41b of Rhizobium meliloti in two different Rhizobium sp. Strains and in Agrobacterium tumefaciens. Transfer of pRme41b into these bacteria was facilitated by insertion of a recombinant plasmid coding for mobilization functions of RP4 into the nif region (Kondorosi, A., E. Kondorosi, C.E. Pankhurst, W. J. Broughton, and Z. Banfalvi, 1982, Mol. Gen. Genet., 188:433-439). In all cases, transconjugants formed nodule-like structures on the roots of Medicago sativa. These structures were largely composed of meristematic cells but they were not invaded by bacteria. Bacteria were found only within infection threads in root hairs, and within intercellular spaces of the outermost cells of the structures. The donor strain of R. meliloti containing pAK11 or pAK12 in pRme41b initially produced nodules on M. sativa that did not fix nitrogen (Fix- ). In these nodules, bacteria were released from infection threads into the host cells but they did not multiply appreciably. Any bacteroids formed degenerated prematurely. In some cases, however, reversion to a Fix+ phenotype occurred after 4 to 6 wk. Bacteria released into newly infected cells in these nodules showed normal development into bacteriods. PMID:6885919

  3. Effect of nursing methods and faeces consumption on the development of the bacteroides, lactobacillus and coliform flora in the caecum of the newborn rabbits.

    PubMed

    Kovács, Melinda; Szendro, Zsolt; Milisits, Gábor; Bóta, Brigitta; Bíró-Németh, Edit; Radnai, István; Pósa, Roland; Bónai, András; Kovács, Ferenc; Horn, Péter

    2006-01-01

    The effect of nursing method and ingestion of maternal faeces on the development of the bacteroides, lactobacillus and coliform flora of the caecum in the first 10 days of life were examined in freely nursed pups having access to maternal faeces (Group FF), pups nursed once a day and having access (Group CF), or having no access (Group CN) to maternal faeces. Colonisation of the caecum by Bacteroides commenced already on day 3 after birth. On day 2 the bacteroides counts were below 100, while on day 4 they were already between 100 and 10,000. In Group CN, the Bacteroides counts were lower (by 14 to 40%) throughout the 10-day period studied than in the groups having access to maternal faeces. Differences between groups were significant only on days 4 and 6. The average number of maternal faecal pellets left behind the doe in Group CN was 3-4 (between 0.5 and 6.4 per doe). In Groups FF and CF the pellets became smaller, crumbled and finally disappeared from the nest box, they were consumed by the pups and could be found in their gastric content. The lactobacillus counts decreased in all three groups with age, from 6.0 to 3.5 log10 CFU.g-1 (FF), 4.6 to 2.8 log10 CFU.g-1 (CF) and 5.1 to 3.1 log10 CFU.g-1 (CN), respectively. The coliform counts were higher in the first 4 days in FF (5.6 log10 CFU.g-1) than in CF (< 2 log10 CFU.g-1) and CN (2-3.6 log10 CFU.g-1) animals. Bacteroides could be cultured from the surface of the vulvar labia (max. 1000 colony count) and the vagina (max. 190 colony count), so young rabbits could become "infected" by them already in the doe's vagina. Thus prevention of ingestion of maternal faeces only slightly influenced the development of the bacteroides flora, the faeces left behind by the doe did not play an exclusive role in their colonisation.

  4. Evaluation of nitrate reductase activity in Rhizobium japonicum

    SciTech Connect

    Streeter, J.G.; DeVine, P.J.

    1983-08-01

    Nitrate reductase activity was evaluated by four approaches, using four strains of Rhizobium japonicum and 11 chlorate-resistant mutants of the four strains. It was concluded that in vitro assays with bacteria or bacteroids provide the most simple and reliable assessment of the presence or absence of nitrate reductase. Nitrite reductase activity with methyl viologen and dithionite was found, but the enzyme activity does not confound the assay of nitrate reductase. 18 references

  5. Rhizobium Infection and Nodule Development in Soybean Are Affected by Exposure of the Cotyledons to Light 1

    PubMed Central

    Malik, Nasir S. A.; Pence, Mark K.; Calvert, Harry E.; Bauer, Wolfgang D.

    1984-01-01

    The initiation of Rhizobium infections and the development of nodules on the primary root of soybean Glycine max L. Merr cv Williams seedlings are strongly affected by exposure of the cotyledons/hypocotyls to light. Seedlings in plastic growth pouches were inoculated with R. japonicum in dim light and the position of the root tip of each seedling was marked on the face of the pouch. The pouches were covered and kept in the dark for various times before exposing the upper portions of the plants (cotyledons and hypocotyls) to light. Maximum nodulation occurred if the plants were kept in the dark until 1 day after inoculation. The exposure of plants to light 2 days before inoculation reduced the number of nodules by 50% while the number of nodules was reduced by 70% if the plants were kept in the dark until 7 days after inoculation. Anatomical studies revealed that exposure to light prior to inoculation reduced both the number of infection centers with visible infection threads and the number of infections which developed nodule meristems. Plants kept in the dark for 7 days after inoculation formed a normal number of infection threads above the root tip mark, but very few of these infections developed a nodule meristem. It appears that light stimulates soybean to produce substances which can both inhibit the formation of infection threads and enhance the development of nodules from established infection threads. The effects of light on nodulation appear to be expressed independently of the Rhizobium-induced suppression of nodule formation in younger regions of the root. PMID:16663609

  6. A Peptidoglycan-Remodeling Enzyme Is Critical for Bacteroid Differentiation in Bradyrhizobium spp. During Legume Symbiosis.

    PubMed

    Gully, Djamel; Gargani, Daniel; Bonaldi, Katia; Grangeteau, Cédric; Chaintreuil, Clémence; Fardoux, Joël; Nguyen, Phuong; Marchetti, Roberta; Nouwen, Nico; Molinaro, Antonio; Mergaert, Peter; Giraud, Eric

    2016-06-01

    In response to the presence of compatible rhizobium bacteria, legumes form symbiotic organs called nodules on their roots. These nodules house nitrogen-fixing bacteroids that are a differentiated form of the rhizobium bacteria. In some legumes, the bacteroid differentiation comprises a dramatic cell enlargement, polyploidization, and other morphological changes. Here, we demonstrate that a peptidoglycan-modifying enzyme in Bradyrhizobium strains, a DD-carboxypeptidase that contains a peptidoglycan-binding SPOR domain, is essential for normal bacteroid differentiation in Aeschynomene species. The corresponding mutants formed bacteroids that are malformed and hypertrophied. However, in soybean, a plant that does not induce morphological differentiation of its symbiont, the mutation does not affect the bacteroids. Remarkably, the mutation also leads to necrosis in a large fraction of the Aeschynomene nodules, indicating that a normally formed peptidoglycan layer is essential for avoiding the induction of plant immune responses by the invading bacteria. In addition to exopolysaccharides, capsular polysaccharides, and lipopolysaccharides, whose role during symbiosis is well defined, our work demonstrates an essential role in symbiosis for yet another rhizobial envelope component, the peptidoglycan layer.

  7. Isolation of Bacteroides from fish and human fecal samples for identification of unique molecular markers.

    PubMed

    Kabiri, Leila; Alum, Absar; Rock, Channah; McLain, Jean E; Abbaszadegan, Morteza

    2013-12-01

    Bacteroides molecular markers have been used to identify human fecal contamination in natural waters, but recent work in our laboratory confirmed cross-amplification of several human-specific Bacteroides spp. assays with fecal DNA from fish. For identification of unique molecular markers, Bacteroides from human (n = 4) and fish (n = 7) fecal samples were cultured and their identities were further confirmed using Rapid ID 32A API strips. The 16S rDNA from multiple isolates from each sample was PCR amplified, cloned, and sequenced to identify unique markers for development of more stringent human-specific assays. In human feces, Bacteroides vulgatus was the dominant species (75% of isolates), whereas in tilapia feces, Bacteroides eggerthii was dominant (66%). Bacteroides from grass carp, channel catfish, and blue catfish may include Bacteroides uniformis, Bacteroides ovatus, or Bacteroides stercoris. Phylogenic analyses of the 16S rRNA gene sequences showed distinct Bacteroides groupings from each fish species, while human sequences clustered with known B. vulgatus. None of the fish isolates showed significant similarity to Bacteroides sequences currently deposited in NCBI (National Center for Biotechnology Information). This study expands the current sequence database of cultured fish Bacteroides. Such data are essential for identification of unique molecular markers in human Bacteroides that can be utilized in differentiating fish and human fecal contamination in water samples.

  8. Effects of microgravity on the binding of acetylsalicylic acid by Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. trifolii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urban, James E.; Gerren, Richard; Zoelle, Jeffery

    1995-07-01

    Bacteroids can be induced in vitro by treating growing Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. trifolii with succinic acid or succinic acid structural analogs like acetylsalicylic acid. Quantitating bacteroid induction by measuring acetylsalicylic binding under normal (1 g) conditions showed two forms of binding to occur. In one form of binding cells immediately bound comparatively high levels of acetylsalicylic acid, but the binding was quickly reversed. The second form of binding increased with time by first-order kinetics, and reached saturation in 40 s. Similar experiments performed in the microgravity environment aboard the NASA 930 aircraft showed only one form of binding and total acetylsalicylic acid bound was 32% higher than at 1 g.

  9. Evolutionary dynamics of rhizopine within spatially structured rhizobium populations

    PubMed Central

    Simms, E. L.; Bever, J. D.

    1998-01-01

    Symbiosis between legumes and nitrogen-fixing bacteria is thought to bring mutual benefit to each participant. However, it is not known how rhizobia benefit from nodulating legume hosts because they fix nitrogen only after becoming bacteroids, which are terminally differentiated cells that cannot reproduce. Because undifferentiated rhizobia in and around the nodule can reproduce, evolution of symbiotic nitrogen fixation may depend upon kin selection. In some hosts, these kin may persist in the nodule as viable, undifferentiated bacteria. In other hosts, no viable rhizobia survive to reproduce after nodule senescence. Bacteroids in these hosts may benefit their free-living kin by enhancing production of plant root exudates. However, unrelated non-mutualists may also benefit from increased plant exudates. Rhizopines, compounds produced by bacteroids in nodules and catabolized only by related free-living rhizobia, may provide a mechanism by which bacteroids can preferentially benefit kin. Despite this apparent advantage, rhizopine genotypes are relatively rare. We constructed a mathematical model to examine how mixing within rhizobium populations influences the evolution of rhizopine genotypes. Our model predicts that the success of rhizopine genotypes is strongly dependent upon the spatial genetic structure of the bacterial population; rhizopine is more likely to dominate well-mixed populations. Further, for a given level of mixing, we find that rhizopine evolves under a positive frequency-dependent process in which stochastic accumulation of rhizopine alleles is necessary for rhizopine establishment. This process leads to increased spatial structure in rhizobium populations, and suggests that rhizopine may expand the conditions under which nitrogen fixation can evolve via kin selection.

  10. (A structural assessment of the role of the cell surface carbohydrates of Rhizobium in the Rhizobium/legume symbiosis)

    SciTech Connect

    Hollingsworth, R.I.

    1991-01-01

    Research continued on the study of cell surface carbohydrates of Rhizobium. Objectives include: To characterize, at a structural level, the differences between the lipopolysaccharides of a representative number of strains from different Rhizobium species to determine which features of LPS structure are species-specific and might, therefore, be determinants of host specificity. Determine the effect(s) of nod gene induction on the structure of Rhizobium lipopolysaccharides and determine whether synthesis of a modified LPS molecule or a new surface glycoconjugate is initiated by nod gene induction. Develop a non-chemical means for rapidly screening large numbers of bacterial strains in order to determine which glycoconjugate structural features are conserved between strains of the same species. Provide the necessary structural information which, when coupled with developments in the rapidly expanding field of Rhizobium genetics, should lead to a clear understanding of the role of Rhizobium surface glycoconjugates in host/symbiont interactions. Progress is discussed.

  11. Neuraminidase in Bacteroides fragilis.

    PubMed Central

    Berg, J O; Lindqvist, L; Andersson, G; Nord, C E

    1983-01-01

    A neuraminidase from Bacteroides fragilis was purified 542-fold by isoelectric focusing, adsorption chromatography on Affi-Gel 202, and gel filtration chromatography on Sephadex G-200. On isoelectric focusing the neuraminidase was resolved into three differently charged fractions with pI values of 6.8, 7.1, and 7.4. The major component of pI 7.1 was used for further purification. The purified enzyme had optimal activity at pH 6.4 with N-acetylneuraminlactose as the substrate. Its molecular weight, determined by Sephadex G-200 gel filtration chromatography, was 92,000. The neuraminidase hydrolyzed terminal neuraminic acid residues from N-acetylneuraminlactose, fetuin, bovine submaxillary mucin, and porcine stomach lining mucin. A new method for the detection of neuraminidase activity is described which is based on rocket affinoelectrophoresis. It utilizes the differences in the interaction of sialylated and desialylated mucin with Helix pomatia lectin, enzymatic activity being detected by formation of affinorockets after incubation of the neuraminidase with bovine submaxillary mucin. PMID:6614909

  12. A rhizobium leguminosarum mutant defective in symbiotic iron acquisition

    SciTech Connect

    Nadler, K.D.; Chen, Jing-Wen; John, T.R. ); Johnston, A.W.B. )

    1990-02-01

    Iron acquisition by symbiotic Rhizobium spp. is essential for nitrogen fixation in the legume root nodule symbiosis. Rhizobium leguminosarum 116, an ineffective mutant strain with a defect in iron acquisition, was isolated after nitrosoguanidine mutagenesis of the effective strain 1062. The pop-1 mutation in strain 116 imparted to it a complex phenotype, characteristic of iron deficiency. Several iron(III)-solubilizing agents, such as citrate, hydroxyquinoline, and dihydroxybenzoate, stimulated growth of 116 on low-iron solid medium; anthranilic acid, the R. leguminosarum siderophore, inhibited low-iron growth of 116. The initial rate of {sup 55}Fe uptake by suspensions of iron-starved 116 cells was 10-fold less than that of iron-starved wild-type cells. Electron microscopic observations revealed no morphological abnormalities in the small, white nodules induced by 116. Nodule cortical cells were filled with vesicles containing apparently normal bacteroids. No premature degeneration of bacteroids or of plant cell organelles was evident. The authors mapped pop-1 by R plasmid-mediated conjugation and recombination to the ade-27-rib-2 region of the R. leguminosarum chromosome. No segregation of pop-1 and the symbiotic defect was observed among the recombinants from these crosses. Cosmid pKN1, a pLAFR1 derivative containing a 24-kilobase-pair fragment of R. leguminosarum DNA, conferred on 116 the ability to grow on dipyridyl medium and to fix nitrogen symbiotically.

  13. P Metabolism in the Bean-Rhizobium tropici Symbiosis.

    PubMed Central

    Al-Niemi, T. S.; Kahn, M. L.; McDermott, T. R.

    1997-01-01

    Nodulated legumes require more P than legumes growing on mineral nitrogen, but little is known about the basis for the higher P requirement. Experiments were conducted to determine how Rhizobium tropici responds to P limitation and to understand how P is partitioned between the symbionts under conditions of adequate or limiting P. Free-living R. tropici responds to P stress by increasing P transport capacity and inducing both an acid and an alkaline phosphatase. This P-stress response occurs when the medium P concentration decreases below 1 [mu]M. Both P-stress-inducible phosphatases are found in bacteroids taken from plants growing with adequate P, suggesting that P levels in the symbiosome space is low enough to induce the expression of these enzymes. Bacteroid alkaline phosphatase-specific activity was highest during vegetative growth of the bean plant, but decreased approximately 75% during the host reproductive stages. In hydroponic experiments 32P-tracer studies showed that in vivo rates of P accumulation were significantly higher in bacteroids from P-limited plants compared with those from plants that had been supplied with adequate P. In contrast, label accumulation in leaves was greatest in plants grown with adequate P. PMID:12223671

  14. Tetracycline transport in Bacteroides fragilis.

    PubMed Central

    Fayolle, F; Privitera, G; Sebald, M

    1980-01-01

    In susceptible strain of Bacteroides fragilis, tetracycline uptake is biphasic. The initial phase is independent of adenosine 5'-triphosphate synthesis, which is coupled to fumarate reduction; this phase is not altered by expression of tetracycline resistance genes in a resistant strain. The second phase appears to occur by active transport, since it is largely reduced by rotenone, an inhibitor of electron transport to fumarate; moreover, this phase is under negative control of the tetracycline resistance gene. PMID:7447414

  15. [A structural assessment of the role of the cell surface carbohydrates of Rhizobium in the Rhizobium/legume symbiosis]. Progress report, June 1989--June 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Hollingsworth, R.I.

    1991-12-31

    Research continued on the study of cell surface carbohydrates of Rhizobium. Objectives include: To characterize, at a structural level, the differences between the lipopolysaccharides of a representative number of strains from different Rhizobium species to determine which features of LPS structure are species-specific and might, therefore, be determinants of host specificity. Determine the effect(s) of nod gene induction on the structure of Rhizobium lipopolysaccharides and determine whether synthesis of a modified LPS molecule or a new surface glycoconjugate is initiated by nod gene induction. Develop a non-chemical means for rapidly screening large numbers of bacterial strains in order to determine which glycoconjugate structural features are conserved between strains of the same species. Provide the necessary structural information which, when coupled with developments in the rapidly expanding field of Rhizobium genetics, should lead to a clear understanding of the role of Rhizobium surface glycoconjugates in host/symbiont interactions. Progress is discussed.

  16. Identification and manipulation of Rhizobium phytohormone genes

    SciTech Connect

    Ditta, G.S.

    1988-06-27

    The goal of this project was to determine whether phytohormone production by the gram-negative bacterium Rhizobium meliloti is required for successful modulation and symbiosis with alfalfa. specifically, we undertook the study of indoleacetic acid (IAA; auxin) production by R. meliloti and sought to create a mutant totally deficient in IAA biosynthesis. For many years it has been known that rhizobia are capable of synthesizing and excreting IAA, and it has often been suggested that this could be of importance for the initiation of root nodule development. Published work demonstrating the involvement of bacterial IAA genes in pathogenesis by Pseudomonas syringae and Agrobacterium tumefaciens further emphasized the need for this type of study in Rhizobium.

  17. Lipopolysaccharide O-Chain Core Region Required for Cellular Cohesion and Compaction of In Vitro and Root Biofilms Developed by Rhizobium leguminosarum

    PubMed Central

    Russo, Daniela M.; Abdian, Patricia L.; Posadas, Diana M.; Williams, Alan; Vozza, Nicolás; Giordano, Walter; Kannenberg, Elmar; Downie, J. Allan

    2014-01-01

    The formation of biofilms is an important survival strategy allowing rhizobia to live on soil particles and plant roots. Within the microcolonies of the biofilm developed by Rhizobium leguminosarum, rhizobial cells interact tightly through lateral and polar connections, forming organized and compact cell aggregates. These microcolonies are embedded in a biofilm matrix, whose main component is the acidic exopolysaccharide (EPS). Our work shows that the O-chain core region of the R. leguminosarum lipopolysaccharide (LPS) (which stretches out of the cell surface) strongly influences bacterial adhesive properties and cell-cell cohesion. Mutants defective in the O chain or O-chain core moiety developed premature microcolonies in which lateral bacterial contacts were greatly reduced. Furthermore, cell-cell interactions within the microcolonies of the LPS mutants were mediated mostly through their poles, resulting in a biofilm with an altered three-dimensional structure and increased thickness. In addition, on the root epidermis and on root hairs, O-antigen core-defective strains showed altered biofilm patterns with the typical microcolony compaction impaired. Taken together, these results indicate that the surface-exposed moiety of the LPS is crucial for proper cell-to-cell interactions and for the formation of robust biofilms on different surfaces. PMID:25416773

  18. Rhizobium pusense is the main human pathogen in the genus Agrobacterium/Rhizobium.

    PubMed

    Aujoulat, F; Marchandin, H; Zorgniotti, I; Masnou, A; Jumas-Bilak, E

    2015-05-01

    Rhizobium pusense was recently described after isolation from the rhizosphere of chickpea. Multilocus sequence-based analysis of clinical isolates identified as Agrobacterium (Rhizobium) radiobacter demonstrated that R. pusense is the main human pathogen within Agrobacterium (Rhizobium) spp. Clinical microbiology of Agrobacterium (Rhizobium) should be considered in the light of recent taxonomic changes.

  19. Inactivation of Cephalosporins by Bacteroides

    PubMed Central

    Tally, Francis P.; O'Keefe, J. Paul; Sullivan, N. M.; Gorbach, Sherwood L.

    1979-01-01

    We investigated the relationship between β-lactamases of Bacteroides fragilis organisms and their resistance to cephalosporins. Timed killing curves were used to study the in vitro activity of three cephalosporins, cephalothin, cefazolin, and cefamandole, and a semisynthetic cephamycin, cefoxitin. Measurements of residual antibiotic concentrations in culture supernatants were made, and they were compared with the β-lactamase activity of the microorganism. A cephalosporin-susceptible strain was rapidly killed by cephalothin, cefazolin, cefamandole, and cefoxitin. Four cephalosporin-resistant strains were not killed by cephalothin, cefazolin, or cefamandole but were killed by cefoxitin. An inoculum effect was noted with cefazolin and not with cefoxitin. The resistant strains of Bacteroides inactivated the three cephalosporins, but there was no inactivation of cefoxitin. A constitutive β-lactamase was detected in all the isolates of the B. fragilis group that were resistant to the cephalosporins. There was no distinction of the species based on isoelectric focusing of the enzyme. These data suggest that inactivation by β-lactamase may be the mechanism for resistance of B. fragilis to the cephalosporins and would explain the enhanced in vitro activity of cefoxitin. PMID:525995

  20. Nitrate reduction and nitrogen fixation in symbiotic association Rhizobium-legumes.

    PubMed

    Luciński, Robert; Polcyn, Władysław; Ratajczak, Lech

    2002-01-01

    The inhibitory effect of nitrate on nitrogenase activity in root nodules of legume plants has been known for a long time. The major factor inducing changes in nitrogenase activity is the concentration of free oxygen inside nodules. Oxygen availability in the infected zone of nodule is limited, among others, by the gas diffusion resistance in nodule cortex. The presence of nitrate may cause changes in the resistance to O2 diffusion. The aim of this paper is to review literature data concerning the effect of nitrate on the symbiotic association between rhizobia and legume plants, with special emphasis on nitrogenase activity. Recent advances indicate that symbiotic associations of Rhizobium strains characterized by a high nitrate reductase activity are less susceptible to inhibition by nitrate. A thesis may be put forward that dissimilatory nitrate reduction, catalyzed by bacteroid nitrate reductase, significantly facilitates the symbiotic function of bacteroids.

  1. MgtE From Rhizobium leguminosarum Is a Mg²⁺ Channel Essential for Growth at Low pH and N2 Fixation on Specific Plants.

    PubMed

    Hood, Graham; Karunakaran, Ramakrishnan; Downie, J Allan; Poole, Philip

    2015-12-01

    MgtE is predicted to be a Rhizobium leguminosarum channel and is essential for growth when both Mg²⁺ is limiting and the pH is low. N₂was only fixed at 8% of the rate of wild type when the crop legume Pisum sativum was inoculated with an mgtE mutant of R. leguminosarum and, although bacteroids were present, they were few in number and not fully developed. R. leguminosarum MgtE was also essential for N₂fixation on the native legume Vicia hirsuta but not when in symbiosis with Vicia faba. The importance of MgtE and the relevance of the contrasting phenotypes is discussed. PMID:26422403

  2. Isolation and characterization of the membrane envelope enclosing the bacteroids in soybean root nodules

    PubMed Central

    1978-01-01

    The membrane envelope enclosing the bacteroids in soybean root nodules is shown by ultrastructural and biochemical studies to be derived from, and to retain the characteristics of, the host cell plasma membrane. During the early stages of the infection process, which occurs through an invagination, Rhizobium becomes surrounded by the host cell wall and plasma membrane, forming the infection thread. The cell wall of the infection thread is degraded by cellulolytic enzyme(s), leaving behind the enclosed plasma membrane, the membrane envelope. Cellulase activity in young nodules increases two- to threefold as compared to uninfected roots, and this activity is localized in the cell wall matrix of the infection threads. Membrane envelopes were isolated by first preparing bacteroids enclosed in the envelopes on a discontinuous sucrose gradient followed by passage through a hypodermic needle, which released the bacteroids from the membranes. This membrane then sedimented at the interface of 34--45% sucrose (mean density of 1.14 g/cm3). Membranes were characterized by phosphotungstic acid (PTA)- chromic acid staining. ATPase activity, and localization, sensitivity to nonionic detergent Nonidet P-40 (NP-40) and sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) gel electrophoresis. These analyses revealed a close similarity between plasma membrane and the membrane envelope. Incorporation of radioactive amino acids into the membrane envelope proteins was sensitive to cycloheximide, suggesting that the biosynthesis of these proteins is primarily under host-cell control. No immunoreactive material to leghemoglobin antibodies was found inside or associated with the isolated bacteroids enclosed in the membrane envelope, and its location is confined to the host cell cytoplasmic matrix. PMID:151688

  3. ndvF, a novel locus located on megaplasmid pRmeSU47b (pEXO) of Rhizobium meliloti, is required for normal nodule development.

    PubMed Central

    Charles, T C; Newcomb, W; Finan, T M

    1991-01-01

    Rhizobium meliloti strains carrying either of two overlapping deletions (delta 5408 and delta F114) of the megaplasmid pRmeSU47b form nodules on alfalfa which fail to fix N2 (Fix-). Strains carrying these deletions also fail to fluoresce on media containing calcofluor, indicating a defect in synthesis of the acidic exopolysaccharide (Exo-) of R. meliloti. We have isolated cosmid clones (pTH21 and pTH22) which complement the Fix- but not the Exo- phenotype of the strains carrying the delta 5408 and delta F114 deletions. In addition, cosmid clones which complement the Exo- phenotype fail to complement the Fix- phenotype of these deletions; thus, the Exo- phenotype is not related to the Fix- phenotype. A 5-kb region within a 7.3-kb BamHI restriction fragment was found to be required for complementation of the Fix- phenotype of the delta 5408 and delta F114 deletion strains. Tn5 insertions in the 5-kb region generated a Fix- phenotype when recombined into the wild-type genome. We have designated this locus ndvF, for nodule development. TnphoA mutagenesis of this region generated active alkaline-phosphatase gene fusions, indicating that ndvF encodes extracytoplasmic protein(s). Induction of nodules by the ndvF mutants was delayed by 2 to 3 days compared with induction by the wild-type strain. Light microscopy of nodules elicited by strains carrying the large 150-kb delta F114 deletion, a 12-kb deletion removing ndvF, or an individual ndvF::Tn5 insertion mutation demonstrated that many nodules contained few infected cortical cells, indicating that nodule development was blocked early in the infection process, before the release of bacteria from the infection threads. Images PMID:1648074

  4. Multiple antibiotic resistance in Rhizobium japonicum.

    PubMed

    Cole, M A; Elkan, G H

    1979-05-01

    A total of 48 strains of the soil bacterium Rhizobium japonicum were screened for their response to several widely used antibiotics. Over 60% of the strains were resistant to chloramphenicol, polymyxin B, and erythromycin, and 47% or more of the strains were resistant to neomycin and penicillin G, when tested by disk assay procedures. The most common grouping of resistances in strains was simultaneous resistance to tetracycline, penicillin G, neomycin, chloramphenicol, and streptomycin (25% of all strains tested). The occurrence of multiple drug resistance in a soil bacterium that is not a vertebrate pathogen suggests that chemotherapeutic use of antibiotics is not required for the development of multiple drug resistance. PMID:485137

  5. Fine Structure of Bacteroids in Root Nodules of Vigna sinensis, Acacia longifolia, Viminaria juncea, and Lupinus angustifolius

    PubMed Central

    Dart, P. J.; Mercer, F. V.

    1966-01-01

    Dart, P. J. (University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia), and F. V. Mercer. Fine structure of bacteroids in root nodules of Vigna sinensis, Acacia longifolia, Viminaria juncea, and Lupinus angustifolius. J. Bacteriol. 91:1314–1319.—In nodules of Vigna sinensis, Acacia longifolia, and Viminaria juncea, membrane envelopes enclose groups of bacteroids. The bacteroids often contain inclusion granules and electron-dense bodies, expand little during development, and retain their rod form with a compact, central nucleoid area. The membrane envelope may persist around bacteroids after host cytoplasm breakdown. In nodules of Lupinus angustifolius, the membrane envelopes enclose only one or two bacteroids, which expand noticeably during development and change from their initial rod structure. Images PMID:5929757

  6. Characterization of Bacteroides forsythus isolates.

    PubMed Central

    Takemoto, T; Kurihara, H; Dahlen, G

    1997-01-01

    Fifteen Bacteroides forsythus strains freshly isolated from patients with periodontitis were used together with three collection strains and one type strain for characterization of growth on various media; determination of enzymatic profiles, antibiotic susceptibility profiles, 16S rRNA ribotypes, sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) outer membrane protein profiles, and pathogenicity; and gas chromatography analysis by using a wound chamber model in rabbits. All strains were stimulated by N-acetylmuramic acid, while one strain needed a further supplement such as yeast extract for optimal growth. All strains showed trypsin-like activity. While 10 different ribotypes were found, the SDS-PAGE profiles revealed similar patterns for all strains. All strains were sensitive to penicillin G (MICs, <0.5 microg/ml), ampicillin (MICs, <1.0 microg/ml), amoxicillin (MICs, <0.38 microg/ml), metronidazole (MICs, <0.005 microg/ml), tetracycline (MICs, <0.19 microg/ml), doxycycline (MICs, 0.05 microg/ml), erythromycin (MICs, <0.4 microg/ml), and clindamycin (MICs, <0.016 microg/ml), while they were less sensitive to ciprofloxacin (MICs, <4 microg/ml). B. forsythus did not cause abscess formation by monoinoculation. B. forsythus coinoculated with Fusobacterium nucleatum ATCC 10953 caused abscess formation in 75% of rabbits, while it caused abscess formation in 100% of rabbits when it was coinoculated with Porphyromonas gingivalis FDC 381. In the case of the latter combination, four of six rabbits died of sepsis after 6 to 7 days, and P. gingivalis and B. forsythus were recovered from the heart blood at a proportion of 10:1. B. forsythus strains were highly virulent and invasive in combination with P. gingivalis. PMID:9163447

  7. Rhizobium leguminosarum hupE encodes a nickel transporter required for hydrogenase activity.

    PubMed

    Brito, Belén; Prieto, Rosa-Isabel; Cabrera, Ezequiel; Mandrand-Berthelot, Marie-Andrée; Imperial, Juan; Ruiz-Argüeso, Tomás; Palacios, José-Manuel

    2010-02-01

    Synthesis of the hydrogen uptake (Hup) system in Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. viciae requires the function of an 18-gene cluster (hupSLCDEFGHIJK-hypABFCDEX). Among them, the hupE gene encodes a protein showing six transmembrane domains for which a potential role as a nickel permease has been proposed. In this paper, we further characterize the nickel transport capacity of HupE and that of the translated product of hupE2, a hydrogenase-unlinked gene identified in the R. leguminosarum genome. HupE2 is a potential membrane protein that shows 48% amino acid sequence identity with HupE. Expression of both genes in the Escherichia coli nikABCDE mutant strain HYD723 restored hydrogenase activity and nickel transport. However, nickel transport assays revealed that HupE and HupE2 displayed different levels of nickel uptake. Site-directed mutagenesis of histidine residues in HupE revealed two motifs (HX(5)DH and FHGX[AV]HGXE) that are required for HupE functionality. An R. leguminosarum double mutant, SPF22A (hupE hupE2), exhibited reduced levels of hydrogenase activity in free-living cells, and this phenotype was complemented by nickel supplementation. Low levels of symbiotic hydrogenase activity were also observed in SPF22A bacteroid cells from lentil (Lens culinaris L.) root nodules but not in pea (Pisum sativum L.) bacteroids. Moreover, heterologous expression of the R. leguminosarum hup system in bacteroid cells of Rhizobium tropici and Mesorhizobium loti displayed reduced levels of hydrogen uptake in the absence of hupE. These data support the role of R. leguminosarum HupE as a nickel permease required for hydrogen uptake under both free-living and symbiotic conditions.

  8. Regulation of Syrm and Nodd3 in Rhizobium Meliloti

    PubMed Central

    Swanson, J. A.; Mulligan, J. T.; Long, S. R.

    1993-01-01

    The early steps of symbiotic nodule formation by Rhizobium on plants require coordinate expression of several nod gene operons, which is accomplished by the activating protein NodD. Three different NodD proteins are encoded by Sym plasmid genes in Rhizobium meliloti, the alfalfa symbiont. NodD1 and NodD2 activate nod operons when Rhizobium is exposed to host plant inducers. The third, NodD3, is an inducer-independent activator of nod operons. We previously observed that nodD3 carried on a multicopy plasmid required another closely linked gene, syrM, for constitutive nod operon expression. Here, we show that syrM activates expression of the nodD3 gene, and that nodD3 activates expression of syrM. The two genes constitute a self-amplifying positive regulatory circuit in both cultured Rhizobium and cells within the symbiotic nodule. We find little effect of plant inducers on the circuit or on expression of nodD3 carried on pSyma. This regulatory circuit may be important for regulation of nod genes within the developing nodule. PMID:8325480

  9. Natural relationship between bacteroides and flavobacteria.

    PubMed

    Weisburg, W G; Oyaizu, Y; Oyaizu, H; Woese, C R

    1985-10-01

    Comparisons among 16S rRNA sequences from various eubacteria reveal a natural relationship between the bacteroides (represented by the Bacteroides fragilis sequence) and a phylogenetic unit that comprises the flavobacteria, cytophagae, flexibacteria, and others (represented by the Flavobacterium heparinum sequence). Although the relationship is not a close one, it is, nevertheless, specific. rRNAs from these two organisms are not only closer to one another in overall sequence than they are to outgroup species (such as Bacillus subtilis, Escherichia coli, Desulfovibrio desulfuricans, and Agrobacterium tumefaciens), but they show common idiosyncrasies (i.e., derived characteristics) in both rRNA sequences and higher-order structures.

  10. Generalized transduction in Rhizobium meliloti.

    PubMed

    Martin, M O; Long, S R

    1984-07-01

    Generalized transduction of Rhizobium meliloti 1021 was carried out by bacteriophage N3. Genetic markers on the chromosome and the pSym megaplasmid were transduced, along with markers on several IncP plasmids. Cotransduction between transposon Tn5 insertions and integrated recombinant plasmid markers permitted correlation of cotransductional frequencies and known physical distances. Bacteriophage N3 was capable of infecting several commonly used strains of R. meliloti.

  11. Characterization of a Multidrug-Resistant, Novel Bacteroides Genomospecies

    PubMed Central

    Salipante, Stephen J.; Kalapila, Aley; Pottinger, Paul S.; Hoogestraat, Daniel R.; Cummings, Lisa; Duchin, Jeffrey S.; Sengupta, Dhruba J.; Pergam, Steven A.; Cookson, Brad T.

    2015-01-01

    Metronidazole- and carbapenem-resistant Bacteroides fragilis are rare in the United States. We isolated a multidrug-resistant anaerobe from the bloodstream and intraabdominal abscesses of a patient who had traveled to India. Whole-genome sequencing identified the organism as a novel Bacteroides genomospecies. Physicians should be aware of the possibility for concomitant carbapenem- and metronidazole-resistant Bacteroides infections. PMID:25529016

  12. Iron: an essential micronutrient for the legume-rhizobium symbiosis

    PubMed Central

    Brear, Ella M.; Day, David A.; Smith, Penelope M. C.

    2013-01-01

    Legumes, which develop a symbiosis with nitrogen-fixing bacteria, have an increased demand for iron. Iron is required for the synthesis of iron-containing proteins in the host, including the highly abundant leghemoglobin, and in bacteroids for nitrogenase and cytochromes of the electron transport chain. Deficiencies in iron can affect initiation and development of the nodule. Within root cells, iron is chelated with organic acids such as citrate and nicotianamine and distributed to other parts of the plant. Transport to the nitrogen-fixing bacteroids in infected cells of nodules is more complicated. Formation of the symbiosis results in bacteroids internalized within root cortical cells of the legume where they are surrounded by a plant-derived membrane termed the symbiosome membrane (SM). This membrane forms an interface that regulates nutrient supply to the bacteroid. Consequently, iron must cross this membrane before being supplied to the bacteroid. Iron is transported across the SM as both ferric and ferrous iron. However, uptake of Fe(II) by both the symbiosome and bacteroid is faster than Fe(III) uptake. Members of more than one protein family may be responsible for Fe(II) transport across the SM. The only Fe(II) transporter in nodules characterized to date is GmDMT1 (Glycine max divalent metal transporter 1), which is located on the SM in soybean. Like the root plasma membrane, the SM has ferric iron reductase activity. The protein responsible has not been identified but is predicted to reduce ferric iron accumulated in the symbiosome space prior to uptake by the bacteroid. With the recent publication of a number of legume genomes including Medicago truncatula and G. max, a large number of additional candidate transport proteins have been identified. Members of the NRAMP (natural resistance-associated macrophage protein), YSL (yellow stripe-like), VIT (vacuolar iron transporter), and ZIP (Zrt-, Irt-like protein) transport families show enhanced expression in

  13. High-Resolution Transcriptomic Analyses of Sinorhizobium sp. NGR234 Bacteroids in Determinate Nodules of Vigna unguiculata and Indeterminate Nodules of Leucaena leucocephala

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yan; Tian, Chang Fu; Chen, Wen Feng; Wang, Lei; Sui, Xin Hua; Chen, Wen Xin

    2013-01-01

    The rhizobium-legume symbiosis is a model system for studying mutualistic interactions between bacteria and eukaryotes. Sinorhizobium sp. NGR234 is distinguished by its ability to form either indeterminate nodules or determinate nodules with diverse legumes. Here, we presented a high-resolution RNA-seq transcriptomic analysis of NGR234 bacteroids in indeterminate nodules of Leucaena leucocephala and determinate nodules of Vigna unguiculata. In contrast to exponentially growing free-living bacteria, non-growing bacteroids from both legumes recruited several common cellular functions such as cbb3 oxidase, thiamine biosynthesis, nitrate reduction pathway (NO-producing), succinate metabolism, PHB (poly-3-hydroxybutyrate) biosynthesis and phosphate/phosphonate transporters. However, different transcription profiles between bacteroids from two legumes were also uncovered for genes involved in the biosynthesis of exopolysaccharides, lipopolysaccharides, T3SS (type three secretion system) and effector proteins, cytochrome bd ubiquinol oxidase, PQQ (pyrroloquinoline quinone), cytochrome c550, pseudoazurin, biotin, phasins and glycolate oxidase, and in the metabolism of glutamate and phenylalanine. Noteworthy were the distinct expression patterns of genes encoding phasins, which are thought to be involved in regulating the surface/volume ratio of PHB granules. These patterns are in good agreement with the observed granule size difference between bacteroids from L. leucocephala and V. unguiculata. PMID:23936444

  14. High-resolution transcriptomic analyses of Sinorhizobium sp. NGR234 bacteroids in determinate nodules of Vigna unguiculata and indeterminate nodules of Leucaena leucocephala.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; Tian, Chang Fu; Chen, Wen Feng; Wang, Lei; Sui, Xin Hua; Chen, Wen Xin

    2013-01-01

    The rhizobium-legume symbiosis is a model system for studying mutualistic interactions between bacteria and eukaryotes. Sinorhizobium sp. NGR234 is distinguished by its ability to form either indeterminate nodules or determinate nodules with diverse legumes. Here, we presented a high-resolution RNA-seq transcriptomic analysis of NGR234 bacteroids in indeterminate nodules of Leucaena leucocephala and determinate nodules of Vigna unguiculata. In contrast to exponentially growing free-living bacteria, non-growing bacteroids from both legumes recruited several common cellular functions such as cbb3 oxidase, thiamine biosynthesis, nitrate reduction pathway (NO-producing), succinate metabolism, PHB (poly-3-hydroxybutyrate) biosynthesis and phosphate/phosphonate transporters. However, different transcription profiles between bacteroids from two legumes were also uncovered for genes involved in the biosynthesis of exopolysaccharides, lipopolysaccharides, T3SS (type three secretion system) and effector proteins, cytochrome bd ubiquinol oxidase, PQQ (pyrroloquinoline quinone), cytochrome c550, pseudoazurin, biotin, phasins and glycolate oxidase, and in the metabolism of glutamate and phenylalanine. Noteworthy were the distinct expression patterns of genes encoding phasins, which are thought to be involved in regulating the surface/volume ratio of PHB granules. These patterns are in good agreement with the observed granule size difference between bacteroids from L. leucocephala and V. unguiculata.

  15. High-resolution transcriptomic analyses of Sinorhizobium sp. NGR234 bacteroids in determinate nodules of Vigna unguiculata and indeterminate nodules of Leucaena leucocephala.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; Tian, Chang Fu; Chen, Wen Feng; Wang, Lei; Sui, Xin Hua; Chen, Wen Xin

    2013-01-01

    The rhizobium-legume symbiosis is a model system for studying mutualistic interactions between bacteria and eukaryotes. Sinorhizobium sp. NGR234 is distinguished by its ability to form either indeterminate nodules or determinate nodules with diverse legumes. Here, we presented a high-resolution RNA-seq transcriptomic analysis of NGR234 bacteroids in indeterminate nodules of Leucaena leucocephala and determinate nodules of Vigna unguiculata. In contrast to exponentially growing free-living bacteria, non-growing bacteroids from both legumes recruited several common cellular functions such as cbb3 oxidase, thiamine biosynthesis, nitrate reduction pathway (NO-producing), succinate metabolism, PHB (poly-3-hydroxybutyrate) biosynthesis and phosphate/phosphonate transporters. However, different transcription profiles between bacteroids from two legumes were also uncovered for genes involved in the biosynthesis of exopolysaccharides, lipopolysaccharides, T3SS (type three secretion system) and effector proteins, cytochrome bd ubiquinol oxidase, PQQ (pyrroloquinoline quinone), cytochrome c550, pseudoazurin, biotin, phasins and glycolate oxidase, and in the metabolism of glutamate and phenylalanine. Noteworthy were the distinct expression patterns of genes encoding phasins, which are thought to be involved in regulating the surface/volume ratio of PHB granules. These patterns are in good agreement with the observed granule size difference between bacteroids from L. leucocephala and V. unguiculata. PMID:23936444

  16. Molecular Investigations of Bacteroides as Microbial Source Tracking Tools in Southeast Louisiana Watersheds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulz, C. J.; Childers, G. W.; Engel, A. S.

    2006-12-01

    Microbial Source Tracking (MST) is a developing field that is gaining increased attention. MST refers to a host of techniques that discriminates among the origins of fecal material found in natural waters from different sources (e.g. human, livestock, and wildlife) by using microbial indicator species with specificity to only certain host organisms. The development of species-specific molecular markers would allow for better evaluation of public health risks and tracking of nutrient sources impacting a watershed. Although several MST methods have been reported with varying levels of success, few offer general applicability for natural waters due to spatial and temporal constraints associated with these methods. One group of molecular MST markers that show promise for broad environmental applications are molecular 16S rDNA probes for Bacteroides. This method is based on 16S rDNA detection directly from environmental samples without the need for a preliminary cultivation step. In this study we have expanded previous sampling efforts to compile a database of over 1000 partial 16S rRNA Bacteroides genes retrieved from the fecal material of 15 different host species (human, cat, dog, pig, kangaroo). To characterize survival of Bacteroides outside of the host, survival time of the Bacteroides marker was compared to that of E.coli under varying natural environmental conditions (temperature and salinity). Bacteroides displayed a survival curve with shouldering and tailing similar to that of E.coli, but log reduction times differed with treatment. In summary, MST marker stability was identified within host species and the overall Bacteroides community structure correlated to host diet, suggesting that detection of a Bacteroides community could confidently identify fecal contamination point sources. Natural water samples from southeast Louisiana were collected for MST including the Tangipahoa River watershed where the source of fecal contamination has been hotly debated. The

  17. Peritonitis due to Rhizobium radiobacter.

    PubMed

    Marta, Raquel; Dâmaso, Catarina; Silva, José Esteves da; Almeida, Margarida

    2011-09-01

    Rhizobium radiobacter (Agrobacterium radiobacter) is an aerobic Gram-negative rod belonging to Agrobacterium genus, a group of phytopathogenic bacteria present in the soil that has been implicated in human opportunistic infections. We report a clinical case of bacterial peritonitis in a 5-year-old child with chronic renal disease in peritoneal dialysis, who had a history of direct soil contact identified. The infection was treated with ceftazidime and piperaciline+tazobactam without relapses or the need to remove the peritoneal dialysis catheter.

  18. Phylogeny of Bacteroides, Prevotella, and Porphyromonas spp. and related bacteria.

    PubMed

    Paster, B J; Dewhirst, F E; Olsen, I; Fraser, G J

    1994-02-01

    The phylogenetic structure of the bacteroides subgroup of the cytophaga-flavobacter-bacteroides (CFB) phylum was examined by 16S rRNA sequence comparative analysis. Approximately 95% of the 16S rRNA sequence was determined for 36 representative strains of species of Prevotella, Bacteroides, and Porphyromonas and related species by a modified Sanger sequencing method. A phylogenetic tree was constructed from a corrected distance matrix by the neighbor-joining method, and the reliability of tree branching was established by bootstrap analysis. The bacteroides subgroup was divided primarily into three major phylogenetic clusters which contained most of the species examined. The first cluster, termed the prevotella cluster, was composed of 16 species of Prevotella, including P. melaninogenica, P. intermedia, P. nigrescens, and the ruminal species P. ruminicola. Two oral species, P. zoogleoformans and P. heparinolytica, which had been recently placed in the genus Prevotella, did not fall within the prevotella cluster. These two species and six species of Bacteroides, including the type species B. fragilis, formed the second cluster, termed the bacteroides cluster. The third cluster, termed the porphyromonas cluster, was divided into two subclusters. The first contained Porphyromonas gingivalis, P. endodontalis, P. asaccharolytica, P. circumdentaria, P. salivosa, [Bacteroides] levii (the brackets around genus are used to indicate that the species does not belong to the genus by the sensu stricto definition), and [Bacteroides] macacae, and the second subcluster contained [Bacteroides] forsythus and [Bacteroides] distasonis. [Bacteroides] splanchnicus fell just outside the three major clusters but still belonged within the bacteroides subgroup. With few exceptions, the 16 S rRNA data were in overall agreement with previously proposed reclassifications of species of Bacteroides, Prevotella, and Porphyromonas. Suggestions are made to accommodate those species which do not

  19. Effects of culture age on symbiotic infectivity of Rhizobium japonicum

    SciTech Connect

    Bhuvaneswari, T.V.; Mills, K.K.; Crist, D.K.; Evans, W.R.; Bauer, W.D.

    1983-01-01

    The infectivity of the soybean symbiont Rhizobium japonicum changed two- to fivefold with culture age for strains 110 ARS, 138 Str Spc, and 123 Spc, whereas culture age had relatively little effect on the infectivity of strains 83 Str and 61A76 Str. Infectivity was measured by determining the number of nodules which developed on soybean primary roots in the zone which contained developing and preemergent root hairs at the time of inoculation. Root cells in this region of the host root are susceptible to Rhizobium infection, but this susceptibility is lost during acropetal development and maturation of the root cells within a period of 4 to 6 h. Profiles of nodulation frequency at different locations on the root were not affected by the age of the R. japonicum cultures, indicating that culture age affected the efficiency of Rhizobium infection rather than how soon infections were initiated after inoculation. Inoculum dose-response experiments also indicated that culture age affected the efficiency of infection. Two strains, 61A76 Str and 83 Str, were relatively inefficient at all culture ages, particularly at low inoculum doses. Changes in infectivity with culture age were reasonably well correlated with changes in the proportion of cells in a culture capable of binding soybean lectin. Suspensions of R. japonicum in water were found to retain their viability and infectivity. 15 references, 6 figures, 2 tables.

  20. [Structure of surface glycoconjugates or Rhizobium species and their function in nitrogen fixation]; Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    1991-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharides (LPS) were isolated and purified from the surface of the Rhizobium species R. trifolii, R. leguminosarium and R. meliloti. A novel core tetrasaccharide and a trisaccharide required for nodulation were discovered. Several types of LPS from a single culture, inducible by nod gene inducers, were resolved by electrophoresis and chromatography. Other potential inducers are being investigated. At least three separate loci control LPS biosynthesis in R. meliloti. We maintain secreted, sulphated LPS involved in nodulation is attached to the cell surface, and have demonstrated sulphated, lipid-linked carbohydrates on the surface of R. meliloti. Antibodies to purified cell surface carbohydrate oligomers are being prepared. These antibodies will be used to screen bacteria, and also to identify cell surface changes associated with differentiation of a bacteria to a bacteroid.

  1. Regulation of symbiotic nitrogen fixation in root nodules of alfalfa (Medicago sativa) infected with Rhizobium meliloti.

    PubMed

    Kamberger, W

    1977-10-24

    Symbiotic nitrogen fixation of Rhizobium meliloti bacteroids in Medicago sativa root nodules was suppressed by several inorganic nitrogen sources. Amino acids like glutamine, glutamic acid and aspartic acid, which can serve as sole nitrogen sources for the unnodulated plant did not influence nitrogenase activity of effective nodules, even at high concetrations. Ammonia and nitrate suppressed symbiotic nitrogen fixation in vivo only at concentrations much higher than those needed for suppression of nitrogenase activity in free living nitrogen fixing bacteria. The kinetics of suppression were slow compared with that of free living nitrogen fixing bacteria. On the other hand, nitrite, which acts as a direct inhibitor of nitrogenase, suppressed very quickly and at low concentrations. Glutamic acid and glutamine enhanced the effect of ammonia dramatically, while the suppression by nitrate was enhanced only slightly.

  2. Bacteroides acidifaciens sp. nov., isolated from the caecum of mice.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, Y; Itoh, K

    2000-01-01

    During studies of the bacterial flora in the intestines of mice, we isolated characteristic strains which lowered the pH of peptone-yeast broth containing Fildes' digest. Based on 16S rRNA sequence comparison, these isolates were considered to belong to the Bacteroides cluster in the bacteroides subgroup of the Cytophaga-Flavobacterium-Bacteroides phylum, and were divided into two groups. Their phenotypic characteristics, i.e. growth in 20% bile, aesculin hydrolysis, and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PDH) and 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase (6PGDH) activity, were the same as those of the 'Bacteroides fragilis group'. The low level of DNA-DNA hybridization with type strains in the Bacteroides cluster confirmed the novel species status of these isolates. It is proposed that these isolates be named Bacteroides acidifaciens, the type strain of which is A40T (= JCM 10556T). PMID:10826798

  3. Rhizobium radiobacter bacteremia in a neonate.

    PubMed

    Kaselitz, T B; Hariadi, N I; LiPuma, J J; Weinberg, J B

    2012-08-01

    Rhizobium radiobacter bacteremia is an infrequent cause of human infection. We report a rare manifestation of R. radiobacter infection in which bacteremia occurred in a newborn infant without other risk factors.

  4. The Rhizobium-plant symbiosis.

    PubMed Central

    van Rhijn, P; Vanderleyden, J

    1995-01-01

    Rhizobium, Bradyrhizobium, and Azorhizobium species are able to elicit the formation of unique structures, called nodules, on the roots or stems of the leguminous host. In these nodules, the rhizobia convert atmospheric N2 into ammonia for the plant. To establish this symbiosis, signals are produced early in the interaction between plant and rhizobia and they elicit discrete responses by the two symbiotic partners. First, transcription of the bacterial nodulation (nod) genes is under control of the NodD regulatory protein, which is activated by specific plant signals, flavonoids, present in the root exudates. In return, the nod-encoded enzymes are involved in the synthesis and excretion of specific lipooligosaccharides, which are able to trigger on the host plant the organogenic program leading to the formation of nodules. An overview of the organization, regulation, and function of the nod genes and their participation in the determination of the host specificity is presented. PMID:7708010

  5. A paradigm for endosymbiotic life: cell differentiation of Rhizobium bacteria provoked by host plant factors.

    PubMed

    Kondorosi, Eva; Mergaert, Peter; Kereszt, Attila

    2013-01-01

    Symbiosis between Rhizobium bacteria and legumes leads to the formation of the root nodule. The endosymbiotic bacteria reside in polyploid host cells as membrane-surrounded vesicles where they reduce atmospheric nitrogen to support plant growth by supplying ammonia in exchange for carbon sources and energy. The morphology and physiology of endosymbionts, despite their common function, are highly divergent in different hosts. In galegoid plants, the endosymbionts are terminally differentiated, uncultivable polyploid cells, with remarkably elongated and even branched Y-shaped cells. Bacteroid differentiation is controlled by host peptides, many of which have antibacterial activity and require the bacterial function of BacA. Although the precise and combined action of several hundred host peptides and BacA has yet to be discovered, similarities, especially to certain insect-bacterium symbioses involving likewise host peptides for manipulation of endosymbionts, suggest convergent evolution. Rhizobium-legume symbiosis provides a rich source of information for understanding host-controlled endosymbiotic life in eukaryotic cells.

  6. USE OF BACTEROIDES PCR-BASED METHODS TO EXAMINE FECAL CONTAMINATION SOURCES IN TROPICAL COASTAL WATERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Several library independent Microbial Source Tracking methods have been developed to rapidly determine the source of fecal contamination. Thus far, none of these methods have been tested in tropical marine waters. In this study, we used a Bacteroides 16S rDNA PCR-based...

  7. Rhizobium meliloti Genes Encoding Catabolism of Trigonelline Are Induced under Symbiotic Conditions.

    PubMed Central

    Boivin, C; Camut, S; Malpica, CA; Truchet, G; Rosenberg, C

    1990-01-01

    Rhizobium meliloti trc genes controlling the catabolism of trigonelline, a plant secondary metabolite often abundant in legumes, are closely linked to nif-nod genes on the symbiotic megaplasmid pSym [Boivin, C., Malpica, C., Rosenberg, C., Denarie, J., Goldman, A., Fleury, V., Maille, M., Message, B., and Tepfer, D. (1989). In Molecular Signals in the Microbe-Plant Symbiotic and Pathogenic Systems. (Berlin: Springer-Verlag), pp. 401-407]. To investigate the role of trigonelline catabolism in the Rhizobium-legume interaction, we studied the regulation of trc gene expression in free-living and in endosymbiotic bacteria using Escherichia coli lacZ as a reporter gene. Experiments performed with free-living bacteria indicated that trc genes were organized in at least four transcription units and that the substrate trigonelline was a specific inducer for three of them. Noninducing trigonelline-related compounds such as betaines appeared to antagonize the inducing effect of trigonelline. None of the general or symbiotic regulatory genes ntrA, dctB/D, or nodD seemed to be involved in trigonelline catabolism. trc fusions exhibiting a low basal and a high induced [beta]-galactosidase activity when present on pSym were used to monitor trc gene expression in alfalfa tissue under symbiotic conditions. Results showed that trc genes are induced during all the symbiotic steps, i.e., in the rhizosphere, infection threads, and bacteroids of alfalfa, suggesting that trigonelline is a nutrient source throughout the Rhizobium-legume association. PMID:12354952

  8. Products of dark CO sub 2 fixation in pea root nodules support bacteroid metabolism. [Pisum sativum L

    SciTech Connect

    Rosendahl, L.; Pedersen, W.B. ); Vance, C.P. )

    1990-05-01

    Products of the nodule cytosol in vivo dark ({sup 14}C)CO{sub 2} fixation were detected in the plant cytosol as well as in the bacteroids of pea (Pisum sativum L. cv Bodil) nodules. The distribution of the metabolites of the dark CO{sub 2} fixation products was compared in effective (fix{sup +}) nodules infected by a wild-type Rhizobium leguminosarum (MNF 300), and ineffective (fix{sup {minus}}) nodules of the R. leguminosarum mutant MNF 3080. The latter has a defect in the dicarboxylic acid transport system of the bacterial membrane. The {sup 14}C incorporation from ({sup 14}C)CO{sub 2} was about threefold greater in the wild-type nodules than in the mutant nodules. Similarly, in wild-type nodules the in vitro phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase activity was substantially greater than that of the mutant. Almost 90% of the {sup 14}C label in the cytosol was found in organic acids in both symbioses. The results indicate a central role for nodule cytosol dark CO{sub 2} fixation in the supply of the bacteroids with dicarboxylic acids.

  9. Development of a Real-Time PCR Assay for Detection and Quantification of Rhizobium leguminosarum Bacteria and Discrimination between Different Biovars in Zinc-Contaminated Soil▿

    PubMed Central

    Macdonald, Catriona A.; Clark, Ian M.; Hirsch, Penny R.; Zhao, Fang-Jie; McGrath, Steve P.

    2011-01-01

    Primers were designed to target 16S rRNA and nodD genes of Rhizobium leguminosarum from DNA extracted from two different soil types contaminated with Zn applied in sewage sludge. Numbers of rhizobia estimated using 16S rRNA gene copy number showed higher abundance than those estimated by both nodD and the most-probable-number (MPN) enumeration method using a plant trap host. Both 16S rRNA gene copies and the MPN rhizobia declined with increased levels of Zn contamination, as did the abundance of the functional gene nodD, providing compelling evidence of a toxic effect of Zn on R. leguminosarum populations in the soil. Regression analysis suggested the total Zn concentration in soil as a better predictor of rhizobial numbers than both NH4NO3-extractable and soil solution Zn. R. leguminosarum bv. viciae nodD gene copies were generally less sensitive to Zn than R. leguminosarum bv. trifolii nodD. The latter were generally below detection limits at Zn levels of >250 mg kg−1. Although there were differences in the actual numbers estimated by each approach, the response to Zn was broadly similar across all methods. These differences were likely to result from the fact that the molecular approaches assess the potential for nodulation while the MPN approach assesses actual nodulation. The results demonstrate that the use of targeted gene probes for assessing environmental perturbations of indigenous soil rhizobial populations may be more sensitive than the conventional plant bioassay and MPN methods. PMID:21602380

  10. Development of a real-time PCR assay for detection and quantification of Rhizobium leguminosarum bacteria and discrimination between different biovars in zinc-contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Macdonald, Catriona A; Clark, Ian M; Hirsch, Penny R; Zhao, Fang-Jie; McGrath, Steve P

    2011-07-01

    Primers were designed to target 16S rRNA and nodD genes of Rhizobium leguminosarum from DNA extracted from two different soil types contaminated with Zn applied in sewage sludge. Numbers of rhizobia estimated using 16S rRNA gene copy number showed higher abundance than those estimated by both nodD and the most-probable-number (MPN) enumeration method using a plant trap host. Both 16S rRNA gene copies and the MPN rhizobia declined with increased levels of Zn contamination, as did the abundance of the functional gene nodD, providing compelling evidence of a toxic effect of Zn on R. leguminosarum populations in the soil. Regression analysis suggested the total Zn concentration in soil as a better predictor of rhizobial numbers than both NH4NO3-extractable and soil solution Zn. R. leguminosarum bv. viciae nodD gene copies were generally less sensitive to Zn than R. leguminosarum bv. trifolii nodD. The latter were generally below detection limits at Zn levels of >250 mg kg(-1). Although there were differences in the actual numbers estimated by each approach, the response to Zn was broadly similar across all methods. These differences were likely to result from the fact that the molecular approaches assess the potential for nodulation while the MPN approach assesses actual nodulation. The results demonstrate that the use of targeted gene probes for assessing environmental perturbations of indigenous soil rhizobial populations may be more sensitive than the conventional plant bioassay and MPN methods.

  11. Conserved nodulation genes in Rhizobium meliloti and Rhizobium trifolii

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, R.F.; Tu, J.K.; Long, S.R.

    1985-06-01

    Plasmids which contained wild-type or mutated Rhizobium meliloti nodulation (Nod) genes were introduced into Nod/sup -/ R. trifolii mutants ANU453 and ANU851 and tested for their ability to nodulate clover. Cloned wild-type and mutated R. meliloti Nod gene segments restored ANU851 to Nod/sup +/, with the exception of nodD mutants. Similarly, wild-type and mutant R. meliloti nod genes complemented ANU453 to Nod/sup +/, except for nod CII mutants. Thus, ANU851 identifies the equivalent of the R. meliloti nodD genes, and ANU453 specifies the equivalent of the R. meliloti nodCII genes. In addition, cloned wild-type R. trifolii nod genes were introduced into seven R. meliloti Nod/sup -/ mutants. All seven mutants were restored to Nod/sup +/ on alfalfa. Our results indicate that these genes represent common nodulation functions and argue for an allelic relationship between nod genes in R. meliloti and R. trifolii.

  12. Rapid identification of clinically important bacteroides by coagglutination method.

    PubMed

    Lalitha, M K; Anandi, V; Elias, L; Kalpana, C R

    1991-03-01

    A coagglutination technique using indigenous reagents was applied for the rapid identification of Bacteroides fragilis and the black pigmented bacteroides group, using colony suspensions. All the 58 strains of B. fragilis and 42 strains of black pigmented bacteroides tested could be correctly identified by this method. The specificity of the coagglutination reagent was confirmed by the absence of cross reactivity with the related species of bacteroides, viz., B. distasonis, B. ovatus, B. vulgatus and B. thetaiotaomicron as well as other anaerobic and aerobic bacteria. A panel of four antisera against B. fragilis was required for correct identification of the strains tested, indicating the presence of multiple serotypes. On the other hand, all 42 strains of black pigmented bacteroides tested could be identified, using a single reagent as these strains appeared to have no antigenic type variants. PMID:1855827

  13. Mineral Soils as Carriers for Rhizobium Inoculants

    PubMed Central

    Chao, W.-L.; Alexander, Martin

    1984-01-01

    Mineral soil-based inoculants of Rhizobium meliloti and Rhizobium phaseoli survived better at 4°C than at higher temperatures, but ca. 15% of the cells were viable at 37°C after 27 days. Soil-based inoculants of R. meliloti, R. phaseoli, Rhizobium japonicum, and a cowpea Rhizobium sp. applied to seeds of their host legumes also survived better at low temperatures, but the percent survival of such inoculants was higher than peat-based inoculants at 35°C. Survival of R. phaseoli, R. japonicum, and cowpea rhizobia was not markedly improved when the cells were suspended in sugar solutions before drying them in soil. Nodulation was abundant on Phaseolus vulgaris derived from seeds that had been coated with a soil-based inoculant and stored for 165 days at 25°C. The increase in yield and nitrogen content of Phaseolus angularis grown in the greenhouse was the same with soil-and peat-based inoculants. We suggest that certain mineral soils can be useful and readily available carriers for legume inoculants containing desiccation-resistant Rhizobium strains. PMID:16346460

  14. The symbiovar trifolii of Rhizobium bangladeshense and Rhizobium aegyptiacum sp. nov. nodulate Trifolium alexandrinum in Egypt.

    PubMed

    Shamseldin, Abdelaal; Carro, Lorena; Peix, Alvaro; Velázquez, Encarna; Moawad, Hassan; Sadowsky, Michael J

    2016-06-01

    In the present work we analyzed the taxonomic status of several Rhizobium strains isolated from Trifolium alexandrinum L. nodules in Egypt. The 16S rRNA genes of these strains were identical to those of Rhizobium bangladeshense BLR175(T) and Rhizobium binae BLR195(T). However, the analyses of recA and atpD genes split the strains into two clusters. Cluster II strains are identified as R. bangladeshense with >98% similarity values in both genes. The cluster I strains are phylogenetically related to Rhizobium etli CFN42(T) and R. bangladeshense BLR175(T), but with less than 94% similarity values in recA and atpD genes. DNA-DNA hybridization analysis showed 42% and 48% average relatedness between the strain 1010(T) from cluster I with respect to R. bangladeshense BLR175(T) and R. etli CFN42(T), respectively. Phenotypic characteristics of cluster I strains also differed from those of their closest related Rhizobium species. Analysis of the nodC gene showed that the strains belong to two groups within the symbiovar trifolii which was identified in Egypt linked to the species R. bangladeshense. Based on the genotypic and phenotypic characteristics, the group I strains belong to a new species for which the name Rhizobium aegyptiacum sp. nov. (sv. trifolii) is proposed, with strain 1010(T) being designated as the type strain (= USDA 7124(T)=LMG 29296(T)=CECT 9098(T)).

  15. The symbiovar trifolii of Rhizobium bangladeshense and Rhizobium aegyptiacum sp. nov. nodulate Trifolium alexandrinum in Egypt.

    PubMed

    Shamseldin, Abdelaal; Carro, Lorena; Peix, Alvaro; Velázquez, Encarna; Moawad, Hassan; Sadowsky, Michael J

    2016-06-01

    In the present work we analyzed the taxonomic status of several Rhizobium strains isolated from Trifolium alexandrinum L. nodules in Egypt. The 16S rRNA genes of these strains were identical to those of Rhizobium bangladeshense BLR175(T) and Rhizobium binae BLR195(T). However, the analyses of recA and atpD genes split the strains into two clusters. Cluster II strains are identified as R. bangladeshense with >98% similarity values in both genes. The cluster I strains are phylogenetically related to Rhizobium etli CFN42(T) and R. bangladeshense BLR175(T), but with less than 94% similarity values in recA and atpD genes. DNA-DNA hybridization analysis showed 42% and 48% average relatedness between the strain 1010(T) from cluster I with respect to R. bangladeshense BLR175(T) and R. etli CFN42(T), respectively. Phenotypic characteristics of cluster I strains also differed from those of their closest related Rhizobium species. Analysis of the nodC gene showed that the strains belong to two groups within the symbiovar trifolii which was identified in Egypt linked to the species R. bangladeshense. Based on the genotypic and phenotypic characteristics, the group I strains belong to a new species for which the name Rhizobium aegyptiacum sp. nov. (sv. trifolii) is proposed, with strain 1010(T) being designated as the type strain (= USDA 7124(T)=LMG 29296(T)=CECT 9098(T)). PMID:27236564

  16. [The first metronidazole-resistant Bacteroides species isolated at Marmara University Hospital: Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron].

    PubMed

    Toprak Ülger, Nurver; Sayın, Elvan; Soyad, Ad; Dane, Faysal; Söyletir, Güner

    2013-10-01

    Bacteroides species, the predominant constituents of the human intestinal microbiota can cause serious intraabdominal and postoperative wound infections and bacteremia. Moreover, these bacteria are more resistant to antimicrobial agents than the other anaerobes. The limited number of the antimicrobials, such as carbapenems, beta-lactam/beta-lactamase inhibitors and nitroimidazoles are highly effective in eliminating Bacteroides. However, a few metronidazole-resistant isolates have been reported from several countries recently. The nim genes (nim A-G) are suggested to be responsible for the majority of the metronidazole resistance. Here, we describe a metronidazole-resistant Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron isolated from a blood culture. A gram-negative obligate anaerobic rod was isolated from the postoperative 5th day blood culture of a 62-year-old male patient with adenocarcinoma of the pancreas head. The strain was identified as B.thetaiotaomicron by using a combination of conventional tests and commercially available biochemical kits. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing was performed by agar dilution method. The resistance genes were investigated by means of PCR using specific primer pairs for nim gene. The purified PCR product was sequenced and analyzed by comparison of the consensus sequences with GenBank sequences. The MIC for metronidazole was 16 mg/L. Although the strain was intermediate according the CLSI criteria, it was resistant (> 4 mg/L) according to EUCAST criteria. The isolate was nim gene positive, and nucleotide sequencing of the PCR product shared 100% similarity with nimE gene (emb |AM042593.1 |). On the other hand the isolate was susceptible to carbapenems and sulbactam-ampicillin. Following administration of ampicillin-sulbactam, the patient's fever disappeared after 24 hours. The clinical condition improved considerably and he was discharged at day 8. The patient was followed up at the medical oncology clinic; however he died due to disease

  17. [The first metronidazole-resistant Bacteroides species isolated at Marmara University Hospital: Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron].

    PubMed

    Toprak Ülger, Nurver; Sayın, Elvan; Soyad, Ad; Dane, Faysal; Söyletir, Güner

    2013-10-01

    Bacteroides species, the predominant constituents of the human intestinal microbiota can cause serious intraabdominal and postoperative wound infections and bacteremia. Moreover, these bacteria are more resistant to antimicrobial agents than the other anaerobes. The limited number of the antimicrobials, such as carbapenems, beta-lactam/beta-lactamase inhibitors and nitroimidazoles are highly effective in eliminating Bacteroides. However, a few metronidazole-resistant isolates have been reported from several countries recently. The nim genes (nim A-G) are suggested to be responsible for the majority of the metronidazole resistance. Here, we describe a metronidazole-resistant Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron isolated from a blood culture. A gram-negative obligate anaerobic rod was isolated from the postoperative 5th day blood culture of a 62-year-old male patient with adenocarcinoma of the pancreas head. The strain was identified as B.thetaiotaomicron by using a combination of conventional tests and commercially available biochemical kits. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing was performed by agar dilution method. The resistance genes were investigated by means of PCR using specific primer pairs for nim gene. The purified PCR product was sequenced and analyzed by comparison of the consensus sequences with GenBank sequences. The MIC for metronidazole was 16 mg/L. Although the strain was intermediate according the CLSI criteria, it was resistant (> 4 mg/L) according to EUCAST criteria. The isolate was nim gene positive, and nucleotide sequencing of the PCR product shared 100% similarity with nimE gene (emb |AM042593.1 |). On the other hand the isolate was susceptible to carbapenems and sulbactam-ampicillin. Following administration of ampicillin-sulbactam, the patient's fever disappeared after 24 hours. The clinical condition improved considerably and he was discharged at day 8. The patient was followed up at the medical oncology clinic; however he died due to disease

  18. Carbon and nitrogen metabolism in Rhizobium.

    PubMed

    Poole, P; Allaway, D

    2000-01-01

    One of the paradigms of symbiotic nitrogen fixation has been that bacteroids reduce N2 to ammonium and secrete it without assimilation into amino acids. This has recently been challenged by work with soybeans showing that only alanine is excreted in 15N2 labelling experiments. Work with peas shows that the bacteroid nitrogen secretion products during in vitro experiments depend on the experimental conditions. There is a mixed secretion of both ammonium and alanine depending critically on the concentration of bacteroids and ammonium concentration. The pathway of alanine synthesis has been shown to be via alanine dehydrogenase, and mutation of this enzyme indicates that in planta there is likely to be mixed secretion of ammonium and alanine. Alanine synthesis directly links carbon catabolism and nitrogen assimilation in the bacteroid. There is now overwhelming evidence that the principal carbon sources of bacteroids are the C4-dicarboxylic acids. This is based on labelling and bacteroid respiration data, and mutation of both the dicarboxylic acid transport system (dct) and malic enzyme. L-malate is at a key bifurcation point in bacteroid metabolism, being oxidized to oxaloacetate and oxidatively decarboxylated to pyruvate. Pyruvate can be aminated to alanine or converted to acetyl-CoA where it either enters the TCA cycle by condensation with oxaloacetate or forms polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB). Thus regulation of carbon and nitrogen metabolism are strongly connected. Efficient catabolism of C4-dicarboxylates requires the balanced input and removal of intermediates from the TCA cycle. The TCA cycle in bacteroids may be limited by the redox state of NADH/NAD+ at the 2-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase complex, and a number of pathways may be involved in bypassing this block. These pathways include PHB synthesis, glutamate synthesis, glycogen synthesis, GABA shunt and glutamine cycling. Their operation may be critical in maintaining the optimum redox poise and carbon balance of

  19. Bacteroides gingivalis and Bacteroides intermedius recognize different sites on human fibrinogen

    SciTech Connect

    Lantz, M.S.; Allen, R.D.; Bounelis, P.; Switalski, L.M.; Hook, M. )

    1990-02-01

    Bacteroides (Porphyromonas) gingivalis and Bacteroides (Porphyromonas) intermedius have been implicated in the etiology of human periodontal diseases. These organisms are able to bind and degrade human fibrinogen, and these interactions may play a role in the pathogenesis of periodontal disease. In attempts to map the bacterial binding sites along the fibrinogen molecule, we have found that strains of B. gingivalis and B. intermedius, respectively, recognize spatially distant and distinct sites on the fibrinogen molecule. Isolated reduced and alkylated alpha-, beta-, and gamma-fibrinogen chains inhibited binding of 125I-fibrinogen to both Bacteroides species in a concentration-dependent manner. Plasmin fragments D and to some extent fragment E, however, produced a concentration-dependent inhibition of 125I-fibrinogen binding to B. intermedius strains but did not affect binding of 125I-fibrinogen to B. gingivalis strains. Radiolabeled fibrinogen chains and fragments were compared with 125I-fibrinogen with respect to specificity and reversibility of binding to bacteria. According to these criteria, gamma chain most closely resembled the native fibrinogen molecule in behavior toward B. gingivalis strains and fragments D most closely resembled fibrinogen in behavior toward B. intermedius strains. The ability of anti-human fibrinogen immunoglobulin G (IgG) to inhibit binding of 125I-fibrinogen to B. intermedius strains was greatly reduced by absorbing the IgG with fragments D. Absorbing the IgG with fragments D had no effect on the ability of the antibody to inhibit binding of 125I-fibrinogen to B. gingivalis strains. A purified staphylococcal fibrinogen-binding protein blocked binding of 125I-fibrinogen to B. intermedius strains but not to B. gingivalis strains.

  20. Bacteroides gingivalis and Bacteroides intermedius recognize different sites on human fibrinogen.

    PubMed Central

    Lantz, M S; Allen, R D; Bounelis, P; Switalski, L M; Hook, M

    1990-01-01

    Bacteroides (Porphyromonas) gingivalis and Bacteroides (Porphyromonas) intermedius have been implicated in the etiology of human periodontal diseases. These organisms are able to bind and degrade human fibrinogen, and these interactions may play a role in the pathogenesis of periodontal disease. In attempts to map the bacterial binding sites along the fibrinogen molecule, we have found that strains of B. gingivalis and B. intermedius, respectively, recognize spatially distant and distinct sites on the fibrinogen molecule. Isolated reduced and alkylated alpha-, beta-, and gamma-fibrinogen chains inhibited binding of 125I-fibrinogen to both Bacteroides species in a concentration-dependent manner. Plasmin fragments D and to some extent fragment E, however, produced a concentration-dependent inhibition of 125I-fibrinogen binding to B. intermedius strains but did not affect binding of 125I-fibrinogen to B. gingivalis strains. Radiolabeled fibrinogen chains and fragments were compared with 125I-fibrinogen with respect to specificity and reversibility of binding to bacteria. According to these criteria, gamma chain most closely resembled the native fibrinogen molecule in behavior toward B. gingivalis strains and fragments D most closely resembled fibrinogen in behavior toward B. intermedius strains. The ability of anti-human fibrinogen immunoglobulin G (IgG) to inhibit binding of 125I-fibrinogen to B. intermedius strains was greatly reduced by absorbing the IgG with fragments D. Absorbing the IgG with fragments D had no effect on the ability of the antibody to inhibit binding of 125I-fibrinogen to B. gingivalis strains. A purified staphylococcal fibrinogen-binding protein blocked binding of 125I-fibrinogen to B. intermedius strains but not to B. gingivalis strains. PMID:2404954

  1. Structural Characterization of the Primary O-antigenic Polysaccharide of the Rhizobium leguminosarum 3841 Lipopolysaccharide and Identification of a New 3-Acetimidoylamino-3-deoxyhexuronic Acid Glycosyl Component

    PubMed Central

    Forsberg, L. Scott; Carlson, Russell W.

    2008-01-01

    Rhizobium are Gram-negative bacteria that survive intracellularly, within host membrane-derived plant cell compartments called symbiosomes. Within the symbiosomes the bacteria differentiate to bacteroids, the active form that carries out nitrogen fixation. The progression from free-living bacteria to bacteroid is characterized by physiological and morphological changes at the bacterial surface, a phase shift with an altered array of cell surface glycoconjugates. Lipopolysaccharides undergo structural changes upon differentiation from the free living to the bacteroid (intracellular) form. The array of carbohydrate structures carried on lipopolysaccharides confer resistance to plant defense mechanisms and may serve as signals that trigger the plant to allow the infection to proceed. We have determined the structure of the major O-polysaccharide (OPS) isolated from free living Rhizobium leguminosarum 3841, a symbiont of Pisum sativum, using chemical methods, mass spectrometry, and NMR spectroscopy analysis. The OPS is composed of several unusual glycosyl residues, including 6-deoxy-3-O-methyl-d-talose and 2-acetamido-2deoxy-l-quinovosamine. In addition, a new glycosyl residue, 3-acetimidoylamino-3-deoxy-d-gluco-hexuronic acid was identified and characterized, a novel hexosaminuronic acid that does not have an amino group at the 2-position. The OPS is composed of three to four tetrasaccharide repeating units of →4)-β-dGlcp3NAmA-(1→4)-[2-O-Ac-3-O-Me-α-d-6dTalp-(1→3)]-α-l-Fucp-(1→3)-α-l-QuipNAc-(1→. The unique 3-amino hexuronate residue, rhizoaminuronic acid, is an attractive candidate for selective inhibition of OPS synthesis. PMID:18387959

  2. Role of BacA in Lipopolysaccharide Synthesis, Peptide Transport, and Nodulation by Rhizobium sp. Strain NGR234▿

    PubMed Central

    Ardissone, Silvia; Kobayashi, Hajime; Kambara, Kumiko; Rummel, Coralie; Noel, K. Dale; Walker, Graham C.; Broughton, William J.; Deakin, William J.

    2011-01-01

    BacA of Sinorhizobium meliloti plays an essential role in the establishment of nitrogen-fixing symbioses with Medicago plants, where it is involved in peptide import and in the addition of very-long-chain fatty acids (VLCFA) to lipid A of lipopolysaccharide (LPS). We investigated the role of BacA in Rhizobium species strain NGR234 by mutating the bacA gene. In the NGR234 bacA mutant, peptide import was impaired, but no effect on VLCFA addition was observed. More importantly, the symbiotic ability of the mutant was comparable to that of the wild type for a variety of legume species. Concurrently, an acpXL mutant of NGR234 was created and assayed. In rhizobia, AcpXL is a dedicated acyl carrier protein necessary for the addition of VLCFA to lipid A. LPS extracted from the NGR234 mutant lacked VLCFA, and this mutant was severely impaired in the ability to form functional nodules with the majority of legumes tested. Our work demonstrates the importance of VLCFA in the NGR234-legume symbiosis and also shows that the necessity of BacA for bacteroid differentiation is restricted to specific legume-Rhizobium interactions. PMID:21357487

  3. A Novel Tightly Regulated Gene Expression System for the Human Intestinal Symbiont Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron.

    PubMed

    Horn, Nikki; Carvalho, Ana L; Overweg, Karin; Wegmann, Udo; Carding, Simon R; Stentz, Régis

    2016-01-01

    There is considerable interest in studying the function of Bacteroides species resident in the human gastrointestinal (GI)-tract and the contribution they make to host health. Reverse genetics and protein expression techniques, such as those developed for well-characterized Escherichia coli cannot be applied to Bacteroides species as they and other members of the Bacteriodetes phylum have unique promoter structures. The availability of useful Bacteroides-specific genetic tools is therefore limited. Here we describe the development of an effective mannan-controlled gene expression system for Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron containing the mannan-inducible promoter-region of an α-1,2-mannosidase gene (BT_3784), a ribosomal binding site designed to modulate expression, a multiple cloning site to facilitate the cloning of genes of interest, and a transcriptional terminator. Using the Lactobacillus pepI as a reporter gene, mannan induction resulted in an increase of reporter activity in a time- and concentration-dependent manner with a wide range of activity. The endogenous BtcepA cephalosporinase gene was used to demonstrate the suitability of this novel expression system, enabling the isolation of a His-tagged version of BtCepA. We have also shown with experiments performed in mice that the system can be induced in vivo in the presence of an exogenous source of mannan. By enabling the controlled expression of endogenous and exogenous genes in B. thetaiotaomicron this novel inducer-dependent expression system will aid in defining the physiological role of individual genes and the functional analyses of their products. PMID:27468280

  4. A Novel Tightly Regulated Gene Expression System for the Human Intestinal Symbiont Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron

    PubMed Central

    Horn, Nikki; Carvalho, Ana L.; Overweg, Karin; Wegmann, Udo; Carding, Simon R.; Stentz, Régis

    2016-01-01

    There is considerable interest in studying the function of Bacteroides species resident in the human gastrointestinal (GI)-tract and the contribution they make to host health. Reverse genetics and protein expression techniques, such as those developed for well-characterized Escherichia coli cannot be applied to Bacteroides species as they and other members of the Bacteriodetes phylum have unique promoter structures. The availability of useful Bacteroides-specific genetic tools is therefore limited. Here we describe the development of an effective mannan-controlled gene expression system for Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron containing the mannan-inducible promoter–region of an α-1,2-mannosidase gene (BT_3784), a ribosomal binding site designed to modulate expression, a multiple cloning site to facilitate the cloning of genes of interest, and a transcriptional terminator. Using the Lactobacillus pepI as a reporter gene, mannan induction resulted in an increase of reporter activity in a time- and concentration-dependent manner with a wide range of activity. The endogenous BtcepA cephalosporinase gene was used to demonstrate the suitability of this novel expression system, enabling the isolation of a His-tagged version of BtCepA. We have also shown with experiments performed in mice that the system can be induced in vivo in the presence of an exogenous source of mannan. By enabling the controlled expression of endogenous and exogenous genes in B. thetaiotaomicron this novel inducer-dependent expression system will aid in defining the physiological role of individual genes and the functional analyses of their products. PMID:27468280

  5. Host-symbiont interactions-V. The structure of acidic extracellular polysaccharides secreted by Rhizobium leguminosarum and Rhizobium trifolii

    SciTech Connect

    Robertsen, B.K.; Aman, P.; Darvill, A.G.; McNeil, M.; Albersheim, P.

    1981-01-01

    The sequence of the glycosyl residues and the anomeric configurations of the glycosl linkages of the acidic polysaccharides secreted by Rhizobium leguminosarum 128c53, Rhizobium leguminosarum 128c63, Rhizobium trifolii NA30, and Rhizobium trifolii 0403 have been determined. Each of the glycosyl residues of these polysaccharides was determined to be in the D configuration and in the pyranose ring form. These results add support to the proposal that R. leguminosarum and R. trifolii have a particularly close genetic relationship. The significance of these results with regard to the possible function of these polysaccharides in the nodulation process is discussed. (JMT)

  6. Evolutionary origin of rhizobium Nod factor signaling.

    PubMed

    Streng, Arend; op den Camp, Rik; Bisseling, Ton; Geurts, René

    2011-10-01

    For over two decades now, it is known that the nodule symbiosis between legume plants and nitrogen fixing rhizobium bacteria is set in motion by the bacterial signal molecule named nodulation (Nod) factor. Upon Nod factor perception a signaling cascade is activated that is also essential for endomycorrhizal symbiosis (Fig. 1). This suggests that rhizobium co-opted the evolutionary far more ancient mycorrhizal signaling pathway in order to establish an endosymbiotic interaction with legumes. As arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi of the Glomeromycota phylum can establish a symbiosis with the fast majority of land plants, it is most probable that this signaling cascade is wide spread in plant kingdom. However, Nod factor perception generally is considered to be unique to legumes. Two recent breakthroughs on the evolutionary origin of Rhizobium Nod factor signaling demonstrate that this is not the case. The purification of Nod factor-like molecules excreted by the mycorrhizal fungus Glomus intraradices and the role of the LysM-type Nod factor receptor PaNFP in the non-legume Parasponia andersonii provide novel understanding on the evolution of rhizobial Nod factor signaling.

  7. Occurrence of polyamines in root nodules of Phaseolus vulgaris in symbiosis with Rhizobium tropici in response to salt stress.

    PubMed

    López-Gómez, Miguel; Cobos-Porras, Libertad; Hidalgo-Castellanos, Javier; Lluch, Carmen

    2014-11-01

    Polyamines (PAs) are low molecular weight aliphatic compounds that have been shown to be an important part of plant responses to salt stress. For that reason in this work we have investigated the involvement of PAs in the response to salt stress in root nodules of Phaseolus vulgaris in symbiosis with Rhizobium tropici. The level and variety of PAs was higher in nodules, compared to leaves and roots, and in addition to the common PAs (putrescine, spermidine and spermine) we found homospermidine (Homspd) as the most abundant polyamine in nodules. UPLC-mass spectrometry analysis revealed the presence of 4-aminobutylcadaverine (4-ABcad), only described in nodules of Vigna angularis before. Indeed, the analysis of different nodular fractions revealed higher level of 4-ABcad, as well as Homspd, in bacteroids which indicate the production of these PAs by the bacteria in symbiosis. The genes involved in PAs biosynthesis in nodules displayed an induction under salt stress conditions which was not consistent with the decline of free PAs levels, probably due to the nitrogen limitations provoked by the nitrogenase activity depletion and/or the conversion of free PAs to theirs soluble conjugated forms, that seems to be one of the mechanisms involved in the regulation of PAs levels. On the contrary, cadaverine (Cad) and 4-ABcad concentrations augmented by the salinity, which might be due to their involvement in the response of bacteroids to hyper-osmotic conditions. In conclusion, the results shown in this work suggest the alteration of the bacteroidal metabolism towards the production of uncommon PAs such as 4-ABcad in the response to salt stress in legume root nodules.

  8. Amino Acid and Vitamin Requirements of Several Bacteroides Strains

    PubMed Central

    Quinto, Grace

    1966-01-01

    Nutritional studies were performed on nine Bacteroides strains, by use of the methodology and media of anaerobic rumen microbiology. Ristella perfoetens CCI required l-arginine hydrochloride, l-tryptophan, l-leucine, l-histidine hydrochloride, l-cysteine hydrochloride, dl-valine, dl-tyrosine, and the vitamin calcium-d-pantothenate, since scant turbidity developed in media without these nutrients. R. perfoetens was stimulated by glycine, dl-lysine hydrochloride, dl-isoleucine, l-proline, l-glutamic acid, dl-alanine, dl-phenylalanine, dl-methionine, and the vitamins nicotinamide and p-aminobenzoic acid, since maximal turbidity developed more slowly in media without these nutrients than in complete medium. Medium A-23, which was devised for R. perfoetens, contained salts, 0.0002% nicotinamide and calcium d-pantothenate, 0.00001% p-aminobenzoic acid, 0.044% l-tryptophan, 0.09% l-glutamic acid, and 0.1% of the other 13 amino acids listed above. Zuberella clostridiformis and seven strains of R. pseudoinsolita did not require vitamins, and showed no absolute requirement for any one amino acid. Various strains produced maximal turbidity more slowly in media deficient in l-proline, glycine, l-glutamic acid, dl-serine, l-histidine hydrochloride, dl-alanine, or l-cysteine hydrochloride, than in complete medium. These eight strains grew optimally in medium A-23 plus 0.1% dl-serine but without vitamins. PMID:16349673

  9. Acetyl Coenzyme A Acetyltransferase of Rhizobium sp. (Cicer) Strain CC 1192.

    PubMed

    Kim, S A; Copeland, L

    1997-09-01

    To investigate why Rhizobium sp. (Cicer) strain CC 1192 cells accumulate poly-R-3-hydroxybutyrate in the free-living state but not as bacteroids in nodules on chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.) plants, we have examined the kinetic properties of acetyl coenzyme A (acetyl-CoA) acetyltransferase (also known as acetoacetyl-CoA thiolase and 3-ketothiolase [EC 2.3.1.9]) from both types of cells. The enzyme had a native molecular mass of 180 (plusmn) 4 kDa, and the subunit molecular mass was 44 (plusmn) 1 kDa. The seven amino acids from the N terminus were Lys-Ala-Ser-Ile-Val-Ile-Ala. Thiolysis and condensation activity of the enzyme from free-living CC 1192 cells were optimal at pHs 7.8 and 8.1, respectively. The relationship between substrate concentrations and initial velocity for the thiolysis reaction were hyperbolic and gave K(infm) values for acetoacetyl-CoA and CoA of 42 and 56 (mu)M, respectively. The maximum velocity in the condensation direction was approximately 10% of that of the thiolysis reaction. With highly purified preparations of the enzyme, a value of approximately 1 mM was determined for the apparent K(infm) for acetyl-CoA. However, with partially purified enzyme preparations or when N-ethylmaleimide was included in reaction mixtures the apparent K(infm) for acetyl-CoA was close to 0.3 mM. In the condensation direction, CoA was a potent linear competitive inhibitor with an inhibition constant of 11 (mu)M. The much higher affinity of the enzyme for the product CoA than the substrate acetyl-CoA could have significance in view of metabolic differences between bacteroid and free-living cells of CC 1192. We propose that in free-living CC 1192 cells, the acetyl-CoA/CoA ratio reaches a value that allows condensation activity of acetyl-CoA acetyltransferase, but that in CC 1192 bacteroids, the ratio is poised so that the formation of acetoacetyl-CoA is not favored.

  10. Bacteroides fragilis toxin 2 damages human colonic mucosa in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Riegler, M; Lotz, M; Sears, C; Pothoulakis, C; Castagliuolo, I; Wang, C; Sedivy, R; Sogukoglu, T; Cosentini, E; Bischof, G; Feil, W; Teleky, B; Hamilton, G; LaMont, J; Wenzl, E

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Strains of Bacteroides fragilis producing a 20 kDa protein toxin (B fragilis toxin (BFT) or fragilysin) are associated with diarrhoea in animals and humans. Although in vitro results indicate that BFT damages intestinal epithelial cells in culture, the effects of BFT on native human colon are not known. 
AIMS—To examine the electrophysiological and morphological effects of purified BFT-2 on human colonic mucosa in vitro. 
METHODS—For resistance (R) measurements, colonic mucosa mounted in Ussing chambers was exposed to luminal or serosal BFT-2 (1.25-10 nM) and after four hours morphological damage was measured on haematoxylin and eosin stained sections using morphometry. F actin distribution was assessed using confocal microscopy. 
RESULTS—Serosal BFT-2 for four hours was four-, two-, seven-, and threefold more potent than luminal BFT-2 in decreasing resistance, increasing epithelial 3H-mannitol permeability, and damaging crypt and surface colonocytes, respectively (p<0.05). Confocal microscopy showed reduced colonocyte F actin staining intensity after exposure to BFT-2. 
CONCLUSIONS—BFT-2 increases human colonic permeability and damages human colonic epithelial cells in vitro. These effects may be important in the development of diarrhoea and intestinal inflammation caused by B fragilis in vivo. 

 Keywords: B fragilis toxin; toxin mediated colonocyte damage; actin filaments; transepithelial resistance; morphometry PMID:10075957

  11. PCR Assay for Species-Specific Identification of Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron

    PubMed Central

    Teng, Lee-Jene; Hsueh, Po-Ren; Tsai, Jui-Chang; Chiang, Feng-Lin; Chen, Ching-Yi; Ho, Shen-Wu; Luh, Kwen-Tay

    2000-01-01

    Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron is the second most frequently encountered species of the anaerobes isolated from clinical specimens. We developed a PCR-based assay for the rapid identification of B. thetaiotaomicron. Specific primers were based on shared amplicons of about 1.2 kb generated from B. thetaiotaomicron by randomly amplified polymorphic DNA. This 1.2-kb fragment was sequenced and then used to design a set of PCR amplification primers. This PCR generated an amplification product of 721 bp, which was unique to all 65 isolates of B. thetaiotaomicron tested. There was no amplification with isolates of other bacterial species. Restriction enzyme digestion of the amplification product and dot blot hybridization further verified the specificity of the assay. These results suggest that this PCR assay targets a nucleotide sequence that is strongly conserved in B. thetaiotaomicron. This simple and rapid PCR assay provides a rapid and accurate method for identification of B. thetaiotaomicron and shows promise for the detection of B. thetaiotaomicron in clinical samples. PMID:10747167

  12. Detection of Bacteroides infection by counter immunoelectrophoresis test.

    PubMed

    Lalitha, M K; Mathai, E; Elias, L; Anandi, V; Kalpana, C R

    1991-05-01

    The counterimmunoelectrophoresis (CIE) test using sonicated antigens of Bacteroides fragilis NCTC 2553 and a B. asaccharolyticus strain, standardised in the laboratory yielded a negative result in the 50 normal sera tested, while it was positive in 24 of 34 (71%) patients with infection due to black pigmented bacteroides and in 10 of 15 (67%) with B. fragilis infection. The microagglutination test (MAT) done in parallel showed a positivity of only 44 and 40 per cent respectively. The CIE test done with B. asaccharolyticus antigen was negative in 87 per cent of patients with infection due to B. fragilis whereas MAT showed cross reactivity to a greater extent. PMID:1937595

  13. (Analysis of the Rhizobium meliloti surface):

    SciTech Connect

    Signer, E.R.

    1988-03-03

    We have identified a number of genes in Rhizobium meliloti that affect outer membrane lipopolysaccharides (LPS). These include three genes defined by mutants with different patterns of resistance to a panel of bacteriophages, of which Class 2 and 3 are closely linked to each other but not to Class 1 or 4;another gene, closely linked to Class 2 and 3, defined only by its ability to suppress Class 1 defects;and three genes, unlinked to each other, defined by mutants with increased sensitivity to deoxycholate. Of the mutants that define these genes, only those in Class 2 have a clear effect on alfalfa symbiosis, having a Fix phenotype.

  14. Differential Decay of Human Faecal Bacteroides in Marine and Freshwater

    EPA Science Inventory

    Gene sequences from Bacteroides and relatives are being considered for the enumeration of aquatic fecal contamination and estimation of public health risk. To interpret these data, it is necessary to understand the decay of molecular and cultivated indicators and pathogens in en...

  15. Discerning the Role of Bacteroides fragilis in Celiac Disease Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez, E.; Laparra, J. M.

    2012-01-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is associated with intestinal dysbiosis, which can theoretically lead to dysfunctions in host-microbe interactions and contribute to the disease. In the present study, possible differences in Bacteroides spp. and their pathogenic features between CD patients and controls were investigated. Bacteroides clones (n = 274) were isolated, identified, and screened for the presence of the virulence genes (bft and mpII) coding for metalloproteases. The proteolytic activity of selected Bacteroides fragilis strains was evaluated by zymography and, after gastrointestinal digestion of gliadin, by high-pressure liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization/tandem mass spectrometry. The effects of B. fragilis strains on Caco-2 cell culture permeability and inflammatory response to digested gliadin were determined. B. fragilis was more frequently identified in CD patients than in healthy controls, in contrast to Bacteroides ovatus. B. fragilis clones carrying virulence genes coding for metalloproteases were more abundant in CD patients than in controls. B. fragilis strains, representing the isolated clones and carrying metalloprotease genes, showed gelatinase activity and exerted the strongest adverse effects on the integrity of the Caco-2 cell monolayer. All B. fragilis strains also showed gliadin-hydrolyzing activity, and some of them generated immunogenic peptides that preserved or increased inflammatory cytokine production (tumor necrosis factor alpha) and showed increased ability to permeate through Caco-2 cell cultures. These findings suggest that increased abundance of B. fragilis strains with metalloprotease activities could play a role in CD pathogenesis, although further in vivo studies are required to support this hypothesis. PMID:22773639

  16. The nitrogenase proteins of Rhizobium meliloti: purification and properties of the MoFe and Fe components.

    PubMed

    Miller, R W; Yu, Z; Zarkadas, C G

    1993-04-21

    The alfalfa-Rhizobium meliloti symbiosis contributes a major portion of biologically fixed nitrogen to temperate zone forage crop production. Highly-purified molybdenum-iron (MoFe) and iron (Fe) nitrogenase components were obtained for the first time from extracts of R. meliloti bacteroids. Intact bacteroid cells were isolated anaerobically from 100 g quantities of alfalfa nodules following storage in liquid nitrogen. Centrifuged bacteroid extracts showed a marked reduction in specific activity when assayed at protein concentrations less than 1 mg/ml. Both nitrogenase proteins were resolved and purified to homogeneity as determined spectroscopically and by SDS-PAGE. The purified MoFe protein differed in several respects from previously characterized nitrogenase proteins. Saturation of the acetylene-reducing and proton-reducing activities of the R. meliloti MoFe protein required higher relative concentrations of Fe protein than nitrogenase proteins purified from free living diazotrophs. Electron allocation to dinitrogen reduction was sustained at component ratios similar to those present in bacteroid extracts, suggesting that while the observed saturation effects were not detrimental to physiological function in the symbiotic system, overall activity could be enhanced by higher levels of iron protein. Analyses of the MoFe protein gave 22 Fe, 22 labile sulfide and 1.7 Mo atoms per molecular unit of 215 kDa. Dithionite-reduced MoFe protein contained a spin 3/2 iron centre but had a lower visible absorbance at 360 nm than the equivalent Azotobacter chroococcum component. Amino-acid composition indicated a notably lesser tryptophan content, and cysteine content greater than that of the equivalent tetrameric protein of free living diazotrophs. Ratios of acidic and basic residues were similar to other MoFe proteins. Calculation of hydrophobicity and discriminant parameters gave values midway between those expected for soluble cytoplasmic proteins and peripheral membrane

  17. Variability among Rhizobium Strains Originating from Nodules of Vicia faba.

    PubMed

    van Berkum, P; Beyene, D; Vera, F T; Keyser, H H

    1995-07-01

    Rhizobium strains from nodules of Vicia faba were diverse in plasmid content and serology. Results of multilocus gel electrophoresis and restriction fragment length polymorphism indicated several deep chromosomal lineages among the strains. Linkage disequilibrium among the chromosomal types was detected and may have reflected variation of Rhizobium strains in the different geographical locations from which the strains originated. An investigation of pea strains with antibodies prepared against fava bean strains and restriction fragment length polymorphism analyses, targeting DNA regions coding for rRNA and nodulation, indicated that Rhizobium strains from V. faba nodules were distinguishable from those from Pisum sativum, V. villosa, and Trifolium spp. PMID:16535075

  18. Growth of fast- and slow-growing rhizobia on ethanol. [Bradyrhizobium sp. ; Rhizobium meliloti; Rhizobium loti; Rhizobium leguminosarum; Rhizobium fredii; Bradyrhizobium japonicum

    SciTech Connect

    Sadowsky, M.J.; Bohlool, B.B.

    1986-10-01

    Free-living soybean rhizobia and Bradyrhizobium spp. (lupine) have the ability to catabolize ethanol. Of the 30 strains of rhizobia examined, only the fast- and slow-growing soybean rhizobia and the slow-growing Bradyrhizobium sp (lupine) were capable of using ethanol as a sole source of carbon and energy for growth. Two strains from each of the other Rhizobium species examined (R. meliloti, R. loti, and R. leguminosarum biovars phaseoli, trifolii, and viceae) failed to grow on ethanol. One Rhizobium fredii (fast-growing) strain, USDA 191, and one (slow-growing) Bradyrhizobium japonicum strain, USDA 110, grew in ethanol up to concentrations of 3.0 and 1.0%, respectively. While three of the R. fredii strains examined (USDA 192, USDA 194, and USDA 205) utilized 0.2% acetate, only USDA 192 utilized 0.1% n-propanol. None of the three strains utilized 0.1% methanol, formate, or n-butanol as the sole carbon source.

  19. Studying Plant-Rhizobium Mutualism in the Biology Classroom: Connecting the Big Ideas in Biology through Inquiry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suwa, Tomomi; Williamson, Brad

    2014-01-01

    We present a guided-inquiry biology lesson, using the plant-rhizobium symbiosis as a model system. This system provides a rich environment for developing connections between the big ideas in biology as outlined in the College Board's new AP Biology Curriculum. Students gain experience with the practice of scientific investigation, from…

  20. Serine residue 45 of nodulation protein NodF from Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. viciae is essential for its biological function.

    PubMed Central

    Ritsema, T; Geiger, O; van Dillewijn, P; Lugtenberg, B J; Spaink, H P

    1994-01-01

    A system for testing the role of the Rhizobium nodF gene in the production of host-specific lipochitin oligosaccharides and in nodulation was developed. We show that a mutant nodF gene, in which the codon for serine residue 45 was changed to that for threonine, still expresses NodF, which, however, is no longer functional. Images PMID:8002602

  1. RNA-Seq and Microarrays Analyses Reveal Global Differential Transcriptomes of Mesorhizobium huakuii 7653R between Bacteroids and Free-Living Cells

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Jieli; Hao, Baohai; Liu, Liu; Wang, Shanming; Ma, Binguang; Yang, Yi; Xie, Fuli; Li, Youguo

    2014-01-01

    Mesorhizobium huakuii 7653R occurs either in nitrogen-fixing symbiosis with its host plant, Astragalus sinicus, or free-living in the soil. The M. huakuii 7653R genome has recently been sequenced. To better understand the complex biochemical and developmental changes that occur in 7653R during bacteroid development, RNA-Seq and Microarrays were used to investigate the differential transcriptomes of 7653R bacteroids and free-living cells. The two approaches identified several thousand differentially expressed genes. The most prominent up-regulation occurred in the symbiosis plasmids, meanwhile gene expression is concentrated to a set of genes (clusters) in bacteroids to fulfill corresponding functional requirements. The results suggested that the main energy metabolism is active while fatty acid metabolism is inactive in bacteroid and that most of genes relevant to cell cycle are down-regulated accordingly. For a global analysis, we reconstructed a protein-protein interaction (PPI) network for 7653R and integrated gene expression data into the network using Cytoscape. A highly inter-connected subnetwork, with function enrichment for nitrogen fixation, was found, and a set of hubs and previously uncharacterized genes participating in nitrogen fixation were identified. The results described here provide a broader biological landscape and novel insights that elucidate rhizobial bacteroid differentiation, nitrogen fixation and related novel gene functions. PMID:24695521

  2. Optimization of Dairy Sludge for Growth of Rhizobium Cells

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Ashok Kumar; Singh, Gauri; Gautam, Digvijay; Bedi, Manjinder Kaur

    2013-01-01

    In this study dairy sludge was evaluated as an alternative cultivation medium for Rhizobium. Growth of bacterial strains at different concentrations of Dairy sludge was monitored. Maximum growth of all strains was observed at 60% Dairy sludge concentration. At 60% optical density (OD) values are 0.804 for Rhizobium trifolii (MTCC905), 0.825 for Rhizobium trifolii (MTCC906), and 0.793 for Rhizobium meliloti (MTCC100). Growth pattern of strains was observed at 60% Dairy sludge along with different synthetic media (tryptone yeast, Rhizobium minimal medium and yeast extract mannitol). Growth in 60% Dairy sludge was found to be superior to standard media used for Rhizobium. Media were optimized using 60% dairy sludge along with different concentrations of yeast extract (1–7 g/L) and mannitol (7–13 g/L) in terms of optical density at different time intervals, that is, 24, 48 and 72 hours. Maximum growth was observed in 6 g/L of yeast extract and 12 g/L of mannitol at 48-hour incubation period in all strains. The important environmental parameters such as pH were optimized using 60% dairy sludge, 60% dairy sludge +6 g/L yeast extract, and 60% dairy sludge +12 g/L mannitol. The maximum growth of all strains was found at pH 7.0. The present study recommends the use of 60% dairy sludge as a suitable growth medum for inoculant production. PMID:24089690

  3. Optimization of dairy sludge for growth of Rhizobium cells.

    PubMed

    Singh, Ashok Kumar; Singh, Gauri; Gautam, Digvijay; Bedi, Manjinder Kaur

    2013-01-01

    In this study dairy sludge was evaluated as an alternative cultivation medium for Rhizobium. Growth of bacterial strains at different concentrations of Dairy sludge was monitored. Maximum growth of all strains was observed at 60% Dairy sludge concentration. At 60% optical density (OD) values are 0.804 for Rhizobium trifolii (MTCC905), 0.825 for Rhizobium trifolii (MTCC906), and 0.793 for Rhizobium meliloti (MTCC100). Growth pattern of strains was observed at 60% Dairy sludge along with different synthetic media (tryptone yeast, Rhizobium minimal medium and yeast extract mannitol). Growth in 60% Dairy sludge was found to be superior to standard media used for Rhizobium. Media were optimized using 60% dairy sludge along with different concentrations of yeast extract (1-7 g/L) and mannitol (7-13 g/L) in terms of optical density at different time intervals, that is, 24, 48 and 72 hours. Maximum growth was observed in 6 g/L of yeast extract and 12 g/L of mannitol at 48-hour incubation period in all strains. The important environmental parameters such as pH were optimized using 60% dairy sludge, 60% dairy sludge +6 g/L yeast extract, and 60% dairy sludge +12 g/L mannitol. The maximum growth of all strains was found at pH 7.0. The present study recommends the use of 60% dairy sludge as a suitable growth medum for inoculant production.

  4. Morphogenetic Rescue of Rhizobium meliloti Nodulation Mutants by trans-Zeatin Secretion.

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, J. B.; Long, S. R.

    1994-01-01

    The development of nitrogen-fixing nodules is induced on the roots of legume host plants by Rhizobium bacteria. We employed a novel strategy to probe the underlying mechanism of nodule morphogenesis in alfalfa roots using pTZS, a broad host range plasmid carrying a constitutive trans-zeatin secretion (tzs) gene from Agrobacterium tumefaciens T37. This plasmid suppressed the Nod- phenotype of Rhizobium nodulation mutants such that mutants harboring pTZS stimulated the formation of nodulelike structures. Alfalfa roots formed more or fewer of these nodules according to both the nitrogen content of the environment and the position along the root at which the pTZS+ bacteria were applied, which parallels the physiological and developmental regulation of true Rhizobium nodule formation. This plasmid also conferred on Escherichia coli cells the ability to induce root cortical cell mitoses. Both the pattern of induced cell divisions and the spatially restricted expression of an alfalfa nodule-specific marker gene (MsENOD2) in pTZS-induced nodules support the conclusion that localized cytokinin production produces a phenocopy of nodule morphogenesis. PMID:12244237

  5. Genome sequence and description of Bacteroides timonensis sp. nov.

    PubMed Central

    Ramasamy, Dhamodharan; Lagier, Jean-Christophe; Rossi-Tamisier, Morgane; Pfleiderer, Anne; Michelle, Caroline; Couderc, Carine; Raoult, Didier; Fournier, Pierre-Edouard

    2014-01-01

    Bacteroides timonensis strain AP1T (= CSUR P194 = DSM 26083) is the type strain of B. timonensis sp. nov. This strain, whose genome is described here, was isolated from the fecal flora of a 21-year-old French Caucasoid female who suffered from severe anorexia nervosa. Bacteroides timonensis is a Gram-negative, obligate anaerobic bacillus. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence and annotation. The 7,130,768 bp long genome (1 chromosome, no plasmid) exhibits a G+C content of 43.3% and contains 5,786 protein-coding and 59 RNA genes, including 2 rRNA genes. PMID:25197491

  6. Specificity of a Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron marker for human feces

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carson, C.A.; Christiansen, J.M.; Yampara-Iquise, H.; Benson, V.W.; Baffaut, C.; Davis, J.V.; Broz, R.R.; Kurtz, W.B.; Rogers, W.M.; Fales, W.H.

    2005-01-01

    A bacterial primer set, known to produce a 542-bp amplicon specific for Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron, generated this product in PCR with 1 ng of extracted DNA from 92% of 25 human fecal samples, 100% of 20 sewage samples, and 16% of 31 dog fecal samples. The marker was not detected in 1 ng of fecal DNA from 61 cows, 35 horses, 44 pigs, 24 chickens, 29 turkeys, and 17 geese. Copyright ?? 2005, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  7. Glycine-Glomus-Rhizobium Symbiosis

    PubMed Central

    Bethlenfalvay, Gabor J.; Brown, Milford S.; Mihara, Keiko L.; Stafford, Alan E.

    1987-01-01

    Soybean (Glycine max [L.] Merr.) plants were nodulated (Bradyrhizobium japonicum) and either inoculated with the vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal (VAM) fungus Glomus mosseae (Nicol. & Gerd.) Gerd. and Trappe or left uncolonized. All plants were grown unstressed for 21 days initially. After this period, some VAM and non-VAM plants were exposed to four 8-day drought cycles while others were kept well watered. Drought cycles were terminated by rewatering when soil moisture potentials reached −1.2 megapascal. Nodule development and activity, transpiration, leaf conductance, leaf and root parameters including fresh and dry weight, and N and P nutrition of VAM plants and of non-VAM, P-fed plants grown under the same controlled conditions were compared. All parameters, except N content, were greater in VAM plants than in P-fed, non-VAM plants when under stress. The opposite was generally true in the unstressed comparisons. Transpiration and leaf conductance were significantly greater in stressed VAM than in non-VAM plants during the first half of the final stress cycle. Values for both VAM and non-VAM plants decreased linearly with time during the cycle and converged at a high level of stress (−1.2 megapascal). Effects of VAM fungi on the consequences of drought stress relative to P nutrition and leaf gas exchange are discussed in the light of these findings and those reported in the literature. PMID:16665641

  8. Rhizobium japonicum USDA 191 has two nodD genes that differ in primary structure and function.

    PubMed

    Appelbaum, E R; Thompson, D V; Idler, K; Chartrain, N

    1988-01-01

    Several Rhizobium genes (designated nod genes) are involved in early steps in nodule formation. Here we present the results of DNA sequence and functional analysis of two nodD genes from the symbiotic plasmid of USDA 191, a fast-growing strain that forms nitrogen-fixing nodules on soybeans. Both genes encoded full-length nodD-related polypeptides, which were 69% homologous to each other. One of these genes, nodD1, complemented a Rhizobium trifolii nodD::Tn5 mutant for clover nodulation; the other gene, nodD2, did not. The nodD1 coding region was preceded by a conserved DNA sequence previously noted in other rhizobia, but no such sequence was found in front of nodD2. Plants inoculated with a nodD1 insertion mutant appeared to be nitrogen starved and had a greatly reduced nodule number. Plants inoculated with a nodD2 mutant had a partially nitrogen-starved appearance and normal nodule number, were slightly delayed in nodule formation, and formed nodules that contained reduced levels of nodulin-35 and had fewer bacteroids per infected plant cell. Thus, both of these genes are involved in symbiosis. USDA 191 carrying extra copies of nodD2 on a plasmid vector had an altered colony morphology that suggested inhibition of exopolysaccharide synthesis. The predicted gene products of nodD1 and nodD2 both showed homology to LysR, an E. coli regulatory protein. We conclude that nodD1 probably has the same function as nodD in temperate rhizobia, namely, activation of nodABC transcription in the presence of plant signals. nodD2 may be involved in regulation of exopolysaccharide synthetic genes. PMID:2826389

  9. Rhizobium japonicum USDA 191 has two nodD genes that differ in primary structure and function.

    PubMed

    Appelbaum, E R; Thompson, D V; Idler, K; Chartrain, N

    1988-01-01

    Several Rhizobium genes (designated nod genes) are involved in early steps in nodule formation. Here we present the results of DNA sequence and functional analysis of two nodD genes from the symbiotic plasmid of USDA 191, a fast-growing strain that forms nitrogen-fixing nodules on soybeans. Both genes encoded full-length nodD-related polypeptides, which were 69% homologous to each other. One of these genes, nodD1, complemented a Rhizobium trifolii nodD::Tn5 mutant for clover nodulation; the other gene, nodD2, did not. The nodD1 coding region was preceded by a conserved DNA sequence previously noted in other rhizobia, but no such sequence was found in front of nodD2. Plants inoculated with a nodD1 insertion mutant appeared to be nitrogen starved and had a greatly reduced nodule number. Plants inoculated with a nodD2 mutant had a partially nitrogen-starved appearance and normal nodule number, were slightly delayed in nodule formation, and formed nodules that contained reduced levels of nodulin-35 and had fewer bacteroids per infected plant cell. Thus, both of these genes are involved in symbiosis. USDA 191 carrying extra copies of nodD2 on a plasmid vector had an altered colony morphology that suggested inhibition of exopolysaccharide synthesis. The predicted gene products of nodD1 and nodD2 both showed homology to LysR, an E. coli regulatory protein. We conclude that nodD1 probably has the same function as nodD in temperate rhizobia, namely, activation of nodABC transcription in the presence of plant signals. nodD2 may be involved in regulation of exopolysaccharide synthetic genes.

  10. Average nucleotide identity of genome sequences supports the description of Rhizobium lentis sp. nov., Rhizobium bangladeshense sp. nov. and Rhizobium binae sp. nov. from lentil (Lens culinaris) nodules.

    PubMed

    Rashid, M Harun-or; Young, J Peter W; Everall, Isobel; Clercx, Pia; Willems, Anne; Santhosh Braun, Markus; Wink, Michael

    2015-09-01

    Rhizobial strains isolated from effective root nodules of field-grown lentil (Lens culinaris) from different parts of Bangladesh were previously analysed using sequences of the 16S rRNA gene, three housekeeping genes (recA, atpD and glnII) and three nodulation genes (nodA, nodC and nodD), DNA fingerprinting and phenotypic characterization. Analysis of housekeeping gene sequences and DNA fingerprints indicated that the strains belonged to three novel clades in the genus Rhizobium. In present study, a representative strain from each clade was further characterized by determination of cellular fatty acid compositions, carbon substrate utilization patterns and DNA-DNA hybridization and average nucleotide identity (ANI) analyses from whole-genome sequences. DNA-DNA hybridization showed 50-62% relatedness to their closest relatives (the type strains of Rhizobium etli and Rhizobium phaseoli) and 50-60% relatedness to each other. These results were further supported by ANI values, based on genome sequencing, which were 87-92% with their close relatives and 88-89% with each other. On the basis of these results, three novel species, Rhizobium lentis sp. nov. (type strain BLR27(T) = LMG 28441(T) = DSM 29286(T)), Rhizobium bangladeshense sp. nov. (type strain BLR175(T) = LMG 28442(T) = DSM 29287(T)) and Rhizobium binae sp. nov. (type strain BLR195(T) = LMG 28443(T) = DSM 29288(T)), are proposed. These species share common nodulation genes (nodA, nodC and nodD) that are similar to those of the symbiovar viciae.

  11. Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. viciae 3841 Adapts to 2,4-Dichlorophenoxyacetic Acid with "Auxin-Like" Morphological Changes, Cell Envelope Remodeling and Upregulation of Central Metabolic Pathways.

    PubMed

    Bhat, Supriya V; Booth, Sean C; McGrath, Seamus G K; Dahms, Tanya E S

    2014-01-01

    There is a growing need to characterize the effects of environmental stressors at the molecular level on model organisms with the ever increasing number and variety of anthropogenic chemical pollutants. The herbicide 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D), as one of the most widely applied pesticides in the world, is one such example. This herbicide is known to have non-targeted undesirable effects on humans, animals and soil microbes, but specific molecular targets at sublethal levels are unknown. In this study, we have used Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. viciae 3841 (Rlv) as a nitrogen fixing, beneficial model soil organism to characterize the effects of 2,4-D. Using metabolomics and advanced microscopy we determined specific target pathways in the Rlv metabolic network and consequent changes to its phenotype, surface ultrastructure, and physical properties during sublethal 2,4-D exposure. Auxin and 2,4-D, its structural analogue, showed common morphological changes in vitro which were similar to bacteroids isolated from plant nodules, implying that these changes are related to bacteroid differentiation required for nitrogen fixation. Rlv showed remarkable adaptation capabilities in response to the herbicide, with changes to integral pathways of cellular metabolism and the potential to assimilate 2,4-D with consequent changes to its physical and structural properties. This study identifies biomarkers of 2,4-D in Rlv and offers valuable insights into the mode-of-action of 2,4-D in soil bacteria. PMID:25919284

  12. Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. viciae 3841 Adapts to 2,4-Dichlorophenoxyacetic Acid with “Auxin-Like” Morphological Changes, Cell Envelope Remodeling and Upregulation of Central Metabolic Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Bhat, Supriya V.; Booth, Sean C.; McGrath, Seamus G. K.; Dahms, Tanya E. S.

    2015-01-01

    There is a growing need to characterize the effects of environmental stressors at the molecular level on model organisms with the ever increasing number and variety of anthropogenic chemical pollutants. The herbicide 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D), as one of the most widely applied pesticides in the world, is one such example. This herbicide is known to have non-targeted undesirable effects on humans, animals and soil microbes, but specific molecular targets at sublethal levels are unknown. In this study, we have used Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. viciae 3841 (Rlv) as a nitrogen fixing, beneficial model soil organism to characterize the effects of 2,4-D. Using metabolomics and advanced microscopy we determined specific target pathways in the Rlv metabolic network and consequent changes to its phenotype, surface ultrastructure, and physical properties during sublethal 2,4-D exposure. Auxin and 2,4-D, its structural analogue, showed common morphological changes in vitro which were similar to bacteroids isolated from plant nodules, implying that these changes are related to bacteroid differentiation required for nitrogen fixation. Rlv showed remarkable adaptation capabilities in response to the herbicide, with changes to integral pathways of cellular metabolism and the potential to assimilate 2,4-D with consequent changes to its physical and structural properties. This study identifies biomarkers of 2,4-D in Rlv and offers valuable insights into the mode-of-action of 2,4-D in soil bacteria. PMID:25919284

  13. Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. viciae 3841 Adapts to 2,4-Dichlorophenoxyacetic Acid with "Auxin-Like" Morphological Changes, Cell Envelope Remodeling and Upregulation of Central Metabolic Pathways.

    PubMed

    Bhat, Supriya V; Booth, Sean C; McGrath, Seamus G K; Dahms, Tanya E S

    2014-01-01

    There is a growing need to characterize the effects of environmental stressors at the molecular level on model organisms with the ever increasing number and variety of anthropogenic chemical pollutants. The herbicide 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D), as one of the most widely applied pesticides in the world, is one such example. This herbicide is known to have non-targeted undesirable effects on humans, animals and soil microbes, but specific molecular targets at sublethal levels are unknown. In this study, we have used Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. viciae 3841 (Rlv) as a nitrogen fixing, beneficial model soil organism to characterize the effects of 2,4-D. Using metabolomics and advanced microscopy we determined specific target pathways in the Rlv metabolic network and consequent changes to its phenotype, surface ultrastructure, and physical properties during sublethal 2,4-D exposure. Auxin and 2,4-D, its structural analogue, showed common morphological changes in vitro which were similar to bacteroids isolated from plant nodules, implying that these changes are related to bacteroid differentiation required for nitrogen fixation. Rlv showed remarkable adaptation capabilities in response to the herbicide, with changes to integral pathways of cellular metabolism and the potential to assimilate 2,4-D with consequent changes to its physical and structural properties. This study identifies biomarkers of 2,4-D in Rlv and offers valuable insights into the mode-of-action of 2,4-D in soil bacteria.

  14. Tn4351 transposes in Bacteroides spp. and mediates the integration of plasmid R751 into the Bacteroides chromosome

    SciTech Connect

    Shoemaker, N.B.; Getty, C.; Gardner, J.F.; Salyers, A.A.

    1986-03-01

    The gene for resistance to erythromycin and clindamycin, which is carried on the conjugative Bacteroides plasmid, pBF4, has been shown previously to be part of an element (Tn4351) that transposes in Escherichia coli. The authors have now introduced Tn4351 into Bacteroides uniformis 0061 on the following two suicide vectors: (i) the broad-host-range IncP plasmid R751 (R751::Tn4351) and (ii) pSS-2, a chimeric plasmid which contains 33 kilobases of pBF4 (including Tn4351) cloned into the IncQ plasmid RSF1010 and which is mobilized by R751. When E. coli HB101, carrying either R751::Tn4351 or R751 and pSS-2, was mated with B. uniformis under aerobic conditions, Em/sup r/ transconjugants were detected at a frequency of 10 /sup -6/ to 10/sup -5/ (R751::Tn4351) or 10/sup -8/ to 10/sup -6/ (R751 and pSS-2). In matings involving pSS-2, all Em/sup r/ transconjugants contained simple insertions of Tn4351 in the chromosome, whereas in matings involving R751::Tn4351, about half of the Em/sup r/ transconjugants had R751 cointegrated with Tn4351 in the chromosome. Of the Em/sup r/ transconjugants, 13% were auxotrophs. Bacteroides spp. which had R751 cointegrated with Tn4351 in the chromosome did not transfer R751 or Tn4351 to E. coli HB101 or to isogenic B. uniformis, nor did the integrated R751 mobilize pE5-2, an E. coli-Bacteroides shuttle vector that contains a transfer origin that is recognized by R751.

  15. Influence of environmental and genetic factors linked to celiac disease risk on infant gut colonization by Bacteroides species.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, Ester; De Palma, Giada; Capilla, Amalia; Nova, Esther; Pozo, Tamara; Castillejo, Gemma; Varea, Vicente; Marcos, Ascensión; Garrote, José Antonio; Polanco, Isabel; López, Ana; Ribes-Koninckx, Carmen; García-Novo, Maria Dolores; Calvo, Carmen; Ortigosa, Luis; Palau, Francesc; Sanz, Yolanda

    2011-08-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is an immune-mediated enteropathy involving genetic and environmental factors whose interaction might influence disease risk. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of milk-feeding practices and the HLA-DQ genotype on intestinal colonization of Bacteroides species in infants at risk of CD development. This study included 75 full-term newborns with at least one first-degree relative suffering from CD. Infants were classified according to milk-feeding practice (breast-feeding or formula feeding) and HLA-DQ genotype (high or low genetic risk). Stools were analyzed at 7 days, 1 month, and 4 months by PCR and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE). The Bacteroides species diversity index was higher in formula-fed infants than in breast-fed infants. Breast-fed infants showed a higher prevalence of Bacteroides uniformis at 1 and 4 months of age, while formula-fed infants had a higher prevalence of B. intestinalis at all sampling times, of B. caccae at 7 days and 4 months, and of B. plebeius at 4 months. Infants with high genetic risk showed a higher prevalence of B. vulgatus, while those with low genetic risk showed a higher prevalence of B. ovatus, B. plebeius, and B. uniformis. Among breast-fed infants, the prevalence of B. uniformis was higher in those with low genetic risk than in those with high genetic risk. Among formula-fed infants, the prevalence of B. ovatus and B. plebeius was increased in those with low genetic risk, while the prevalence of B. vulgatus was higher in those with high genetic risk. The results indicate that both the type of milk feeding and the HLA-DQ genotype influence the colonization process of Bacteroides species, and possibly the disease risk.

  16. Influence of Environmental and Genetic Factors Linked to Celiac Disease Risk on Infant Gut Colonization by Bacteroides Species▿

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez, Ester; De Palma, Giada; Capilla, Amalia; Nova, Esther; Pozo, Tamara; Castillejo, Gemma; Varea, Vicente; Marcos, Ascensión; Garrote, José Antonio; Polanco, Isabel; López, Ana; Ribes-Koninckx, Carmen; García-Novo, Maria Dolores; Calvo, Carmen; Ortigosa, Luis; Palau, Francesc; Sanz, Yolanda

    2011-01-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is an immune-mediated enteropathy involving genetic and environmental factors whose interaction might influence disease risk. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of milk-feeding practices and the HLA-DQ genotype on intestinal colonization of Bacteroides species in infants at risk of CD development. This study included 75 full-term newborns with at least one first-degree relative suffering from CD. Infants were classified according to milk-feeding practice (breast-feeding or formula feeding) and HLA-DQ genotype (high or low genetic risk). Stools were analyzed at 7 days, 1 month, and 4 months by PCR and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE). The Bacteroides species diversity index was higher in formula-fed infants than in breast-fed infants. Breast-fed infants showed a higher prevalence of Bacteroides uniformis at 1 and 4 months of age, while formula-fed infants had a higher prevalence of B. intestinalis at all sampling times, of B. caccae at 7 days and 4 months, and of B. plebeius at 4 months. Infants with high genetic risk showed a higher prevalence of B. vulgatus, while those with low genetic risk showed a higher prevalence of B. ovatus, B. plebeius, and B. uniformis. Among breast-fed infants, the prevalence of B. uniformis was higher in those with low genetic risk than in those with high genetic risk. Among formula-fed infants, the prevalence of B. ovatus and B. plebeius was increased in those with low genetic risk, while the prevalence of B. vulgatus was higher in those with high genetic risk. The results indicate that both the type of milk feeding and the HLA-DQ genotype influence the colonization process of Bacteroides species, and possibly the disease risk. PMID:21642397

  17. PCR-Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism Analysis for Identification of Bacteroides spp. and Characterization of Nitroimidazole Resistance Genes

    PubMed Central

    Stubbs, Simon L. J.; Brazier, Jon S.; Talbot, Paul R.; Duerden, Brian I.

    2000-01-01

    Bacteroides spp. are opportunist pathogens that cause blood and soft tissue infections and are often resistant to antimicrobial agents. We have developed a combined PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) technique to characterize the 16S rRNA gene for identification purposes and the nitroimidazole resistance (nim) gene for detection of resistance to the major antimicrobial agent used to treat Bacteroides infections: metronidazole (MTZ). PCR-RFLP analysis of 16S ribosomal (rDNA) with HpaII and TaqI produced profiles that enabled discrimination of type strains and identification of 70 test strains to the species level. The 16S rDNA PCR-RFLP identification results agreed with routine phenotypic testing for 62 of the strains. The discrepancies between phenotypic and PCR-RFLP methods for eight strains were resolved by 16S rDNA sequencing in three cases, but five strains remain unidentified. The presence of nim genes was indicated by PCR in 25 of 28 strains that exhibited reduced sensitivity to MTZ. PCR-RFLP of the nim gene products identified the four reported genes (nimA, -B, -C, and -D) and indicated the presence of a previously unreported nim gene in 5 strains. This novel nim gene exhibited 75% DNA sequence similarity with nimB. These rapid, accurate, and inexpensive methods should enable improved identification of Bacteroides spp. and the detection of MTZ resistance determinants. PMID:10970359

  18. Nodules are induced on alfalfa roots by Agrobacterium tumefaciens and Rhizobium trifolii containing small segments of the Rhizobium meliloti nodulation region

    SciTech Connect

    Hirsch, A.M.; Drake, D.; Jacobs, T.W.; Long, S.R.

    1985-01-01

    Regions of the Rhizobium meliloti nodulation genes from the symbiotic plasmid were transferred to Agrobacterium tumefaciens and Rhizobium trifolii by conjugation. The A. tumefaciens and R. trifolii trans-conjugants were unable to elicit curling of alfalfa root hairs, but were able to induce nodule development at a low frequency. These were judged to be genuine nodules on the basis of cytological and developmental criteria. Like genuine alfalfa nodules, the nodules were initiated from divisions of the inner root cortical cells. They developed a distally positioned meristem and several peripheral vascular bundles. An endodermis separated the inner tissues of the nodule from the surrounding cortex. No infection threads were found to penetrate either root hairs or the nodule cells. Bacteria were found only in intercellular spaces. Thus, alfalfa nodules induced by A. tumefaciens and R. trifolii transconjugants carrying small nodulation clones of R. meliloti were completely devoid of intracellular bacteria. When these strains were inoculated onto white clover roots, small nodule-like protrusions developed that, when examined cytologically, were found to more closely resemble roots than nodules. Although the meristem was broadened and lacked a root cap, the protrusions had a central vascular bundle and other rootlike features. The results suggest that morphogenesis of alfalfa root nodules can be uncoupled from infection thread formation. The genes encoded in the 8.7-kilobase nodulation fragment are sufficient in A. tumefaciens or R. trifolii backgrounds for nodule morphogenesis.

  19. Screening for enterotoxigenic Bacteroides fragilis in stool samples.

    PubMed

    Keenan, Jacqueline I; Aitchison, Alan; Purcell, Rachel V; Greenlees, Rosie; Pearson, John F; Frizelle, Frank A

    2016-08-01

    Bacteroides fragilis is a commensal bacterium found in the gut of most humans, however enterotoxigenic B. fragilis strains (ETBF) have been associated with diarrhoea and colorectal cancer (CRC). The purpose of this study was to establish a method of screening for the Bacteroides fragilis toxin (bft) gene in stool samples, as a means of determining if carriage of ETBF is detected more often in CRC patients than in age-matched healthy controls. Stool samples from 71 patients recently diagnosed with CRC, and 71 age-matched controls, were screened by standard and quantitative PCR using primers specific for the detection of the bft gene. Bacterial template DNA from stool samples was prepared by two methods: a sweep, where all colonies growing on Bacteroides Bile Esculin agar following stool culture for 48 h at 37 °C in an anaerobic environment were swept into sterile water and heat treated; and a direct DNA extraction from each stool sample. The bft gene was detected more frequently from DNA isolated from bacterial sweeps than from matched direct DNA extractions. qPCR was found to be more sensitive than standard PCR in detecting bft. The cumulative total of positive qPCR assays from both sample types revealed that 19 of the CRC patients had evidence of the toxin gene in their stool sample (27%), compared to seven of the age-matched controls (10%). This difference was significant (P = 0.016). Overall, ETBF carriage was detected more often in CRC patient stool samples compared to controls, but disparate findings from the different DNA preparations and testing methods suggests that poor sensitivity may limit molecular detection of ETBF in stool samples. PMID:27166180

  20. Bacteriophages infecting Bacteroides as a marker for microbial source tracking.

    PubMed

    Jofre, Joan; Blanch, Anicet R; Lucena, Francisco; Muniesa, Maite

    2014-05-15

    Bacteriophages infecting certain strains of Bacteroides are amid the numerous procedures proposed for tracking the source of faecal pollution. These bacteriophages fulfil reasonably well most of the requirements identified as appropriate for a suitable marker of faecal sources. Thus, different host strains are available that detect bacteriophages preferably in water contaminated with faecal wastes corresponding to different animal species. For phages found preferably in human faecal wastes, which are the ones that have been more extensively studied, the amounts of phages found in waters contaminated with human fecal samples is reasonably high; these amounts are invariable through the time; their resistance to natural and anthropogenic stressors is comparable to that of other relatively resistant indicator of faecal pollution such us coliphages; the abundance ratios of somatic coliphages and bacteriophages infecting Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron GA17 are unvarying in recent and aged contamination; and standardised detection methods exist. These methods are easy, cost effective and provide data susceptible of numerical analysis. In contrast, there are some uncertainties regarding their geographical stability, and consequently suitable hosts need to be isolated for different geographical areas. However, a feasible method has been described to isolate suitable hosts in a given geographical area. In summary, phages infecting Bacteroides are a marker of faecal sources that in our opinion merits being included in the "toolbox" for microbial source tracking. However, further research is still needed in order to make clear some uncertainties regarding some of their characteristics and behaviour, to compare their suitability to the one of emerging methods such us targeting Bacteroidetes by qPCR assays; or settling molecular methods for their determination.

  1. Enhancing Soybean Rhizosphere Colonization by Rhizobium japonicum

    PubMed Central

    Hossain, A. K. Maqbul; Alexander, Martin

    1984-01-01

    A study was conducted to seek means to increase the colonization of the rhizosphere of soybeans (Glycine max L. Merrill) by Rhizobium japonicum. For this purpose, a strain of R. japonicum that was resistant to benomyl, streptomycin, and erythromycin was used. The numbers of R. japonicum rose quickly in the first 2 days after soybean seeds were planted in soil and then rapidly fell. The decline was slower if the seeds were coated with benomyl. This fungicide reduced the numbers of bacteria and protozoa in the rhizosphere, but the effect became less or disappeared as the plants grew. In sterile soil inoculated with R. japonicum and a mixture of microorganisms, the numbers of R. japonicum were usually lower if protozoa were present than if they were absent. Nodulation and plant yield were increased by the addition of benomyl to soybean seeds sown in sterile soil inoculated with R. japonicum and a mixture of microorganisms. The addition of streptomycin and erythromycin to soil stimulated the growth of R. japonicum but inhibited other bacteria in the presence or absence of soybeans. The data indicate that colonization can be increased by the use of antimicrobial agents and R. japonicum strains resistant to those inhibitors. PMID:16346616

  2. Characterisation of SalRAB a Salicylic Acid Inducible Positively Regulated Efflux System of Rhizobium leguminosarum bv viciae 3841

    PubMed Central

    Tett, Adrian J.; Karunakaran, Ramakrishnan; Poole, Philip S.

    2014-01-01

    Salicylic acid is an important signalling molecule in plant-microbe defence and symbiosis. We analysed the transcriptional responses of the nitrogen fixing plant symbiont, Rhizobium leguminosarum bv viciae 3841 to salicylic acid. Two MFS-type multicomponent efflux systems were induced in response to salicylic acid, rmrAB and the hitherto undescribed system salRAB. Based on sequence similarity salA and salB encode a membrane fusion and inner membrane protein respectively. salAB are positively regulated by the LysR regulator SalR. Disruption of salA significantly increased the sensitivity of the mutant to salicylic acid, while disruption of rmrA did not. A salA/rmrA double mutation did not have increased sensitivity relative to the salA mutant. Pea plants nodulated by salA or rmrA strains did not have altered nodule number or nitrogen fixation rates, consistent with weak expression of salA in the rhizosphere and in nodule bacteria. However, BLAST analysis revealed seventeen putative efflux systems in Rlv3841 and several of these were highly differentially expressed during rhizosphere colonisation, host infection and bacteroid differentiation. This suggests they have an integral role in symbiosis with host plants. PMID:25133394

  3. Light regulates attachment, exopolysaccharide production, and nodulation in Rhizobium leguminosarum through a LOV-histidine kinase photoreceptor.

    PubMed

    Bonomi, Hernán R; Posadas, Diana M; Paris, Gastón; Carrica, Mariela del Carmen; Frederickson, Marcus; Pietrasanta, Lía Isabel; Bogomolni, Roberto A; Zorreguieta, Angeles; Goldbaum, Fernando A

    2012-07-24

    Rhizobium leguminosarum is a soil bacterium that infects root hairs and induces the formation of nitrogen-fixing nodules on leguminous plants. Light, oxygen, and voltage (LOV)-domain proteins are blue-light receptors found in higher plants and many algae, fungi, and bacteria. The genome of R. leguminosarum bv. viciae 3841, a pea-nodulating endosymbiont, encodes a sensor histidine kinase containing a LOV domain at the N-terminal end (R-LOV-HK). R-LOV-HK has a typical LOV domain absorption spectrum with broad bands in the blue and UV-A regions and shows a truncated photocycle. Here we show that the R-LOV-HK protein regulates attachment to an abiotic surface and production of flagellar proteins and exopolysaccharide in response to light. Also, illumination of bacterial cultures before inoculation of pea roots increases the number of nodules per plant and the number of intranodular bacteroids. The effects of light on nodulation are dependent on a functional lov gene. The results presented in this work suggest that light, sensed by R-LOV-HK, is an important environmental factor that controls adaptive responses and the symbiotic efficiency of R. leguminosarum.

  4. Characterisation of SalRAB a salicylic acid inducible positively regulated efflux system of Rhizobium leguminosarum bv viciae 3841.

    PubMed

    Tett, Adrian J; Karunakaran, Ramakrishnan; Poole, Philip S

    2014-01-01

    Salicylic acid is an important signalling molecule in plant-microbe defence and symbiosis. We analysed the transcriptional responses of the nitrogen fixing plant symbiont, Rhizobium leguminosarum bv viciae 3841 to salicylic acid. Two MFS-type multicomponent efflux systems were induced in response to salicylic acid, rmrAB and the hitherto undescribed system salRAB. Based on sequence similarity salA and salB encode a membrane fusion and inner membrane protein respectively. salAB are positively regulated by the LysR regulator SalR. Disruption of salA significantly increased the sensitivity of the mutant to salicylic acid, while disruption of rmrA did not. A salA/rmrA double mutation did not have increased sensitivity relative to the salA mutant. Pea plants nodulated by salA or rmrA strains did not have altered nodule number or nitrogen fixation rates, consistent with weak expression of salA in the rhizosphere and in nodule bacteria. However, BLAST analysis revealed seventeen putative efflux systems in Rlv3841 and several of these were highly differentially expressed during rhizosphere colonisation, host infection and bacteroid differentiation. This suggests they have an integral role in symbiosis with host plants.

  5. Light regulates attachment, exopolysaccharide production, and nodulation in Rhizobium leguminosarum through a LOV-histidine kinase photoreceptor

    PubMed Central

    Bonomi, Hernán R.; Posadas, Diana M.; Paris, Gastón; Carrica, Mariela del Carmen; Frederickson, Marcus; Pietrasanta, Lía Isabel; Bogomolni, Roberto A.; Zorreguieta, Angeles; Goldbaum, Fernando A.

    2012-01-01

    Rhizobium leguminosarum is a soil bacterium that infects root hairs and induces the formation of nitrogen-fixing nodules on leguminous plants. Light, oxygen, and voltage (LOV)-domain proteins are blue-light receptors found in higher plants and many algae, fungi, and bacteria. The genome of R. leguminosarum bv. viciae 3841, a pea-nodulating endosymbiont, encodes a sensor histidine kinase containing a LOV domain at the N-terminal end (R-LOV-HK). R-LOV-HK has a typical LOV domain absorption spectrum with broad bands in the blue and UV-A regions and shows a truncated photocycle. Here we show that the R-LOV-HK protein regulates attachment to an abiotic surface and production of flagellar proteins and exopolysaccharide in response to light. Also, illumination of bacterial cultures before inoculation of pea roots increases the number of nodules per plant and the number of intranodular bacteroids. The effects of light on nodulation are dependent on a functional lov gene. The results presented in this work suggest that light, sensed by R-LOV-HK, is an important environmental factor that controls adaptive responses and the symbiotic efficiency of R. leguminosarum. PMID:22773814

  6. Light regulates attachment, exopolysaccharide production, and nodulation in Rhizobium leguminosarum through a LOV-histidine kinase photoreceptor.

    PubMed

    Bonomi, Hernán R; Posadas, Diana M; Paris, Gastón; Carrica, Mariela del Carmen; Frederickson, Marcus; Pietrasanta, Lía Isabel; Bogomolni, Roberto A; Zorreguieta, Angeles; Goldbaum, Fernando A

    2012-07-24

    Rhizobium leguminosarum is a soil bacterium that infects root hairs and induces the formation of nitrogen-fixing nodules on leguminous plants. Light, oxygen, and voltage (LOV)-domain proteins are blue-light receptors found in higher plants and many algae, fungi, and bacteria. The genome of R. leguminosarum bv. viciae 3841, a pea-nodulating endosymbiont, encodes a sensor histidine kinase containing a LOV domain at the N-terminal end (R-LOV-HK). R-LOV-HK has a typical LOV domain absorption spectrum with broad bands in the blue and UV-A regions and shows a truncated photocycle. Here we show that the R-LOV-HK protein regulates attachment to an abiotic surface and production of flagellar proteins and exopolysaccharide in response to light. Also, illumination of bacterial cultures before inoculation of pea roots increases the number of nodules per plant and the number of intranodular bacteroids. The effects of light on nodulation are dependent on a functional lov gene. The results presented in this work suggest that light, sensed by R-LOV-HK, is an important environmental factor that controls adaptive responses and the symbiotic efficiency of R. leguminosarum. PMID:22773814

  7. [LEGUME-RHIZOBIUM SYMBIOSIS PROTEOMICS: ACHIEVEMENTS AND PERSPECTIVES].

    PubMed

    Kondratiuk, Iu Iu; Mamenko, P M; Kots, S Ya

    2015-01-01

    The present review contains results of proteomic researches of legume-rhizobium symbiosis. The technical difficulties associated with the methods of obtaining protein extracts from symbiotic structures and ways of overcoming them were discussed. The changes of protein synthesis under formation and functioning of symbiotic structures were shown. Special attention has been given to the importance of proteomic studies of plant-microbe structures in the formation of adaptation strategies under adverse environmental conditions. The technical and conceptual perspectives of legume-rhizobium symbiosis proteomics were shown.

  8. Heme compounds as iron sources for nonpathogenic Rhizobium bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Noya, F; Arias, A; Fabiano, E

    1997-01-01

    Many animal-pathogenic bacteria can use heme compounds as iron sources. Like these microorganisms, rhizobium strains interact with host organisms where heme compounds are available. Results presented in this paper indicate that the use of hemoglobin as an iron source is not restricted to animal-pathogenic microorganisms. We also demonstrate that heme, hemoglobin, and leghemoglobin can act as iron sources under iron-depleted conditions for Rhizobium meliloti 242. Analysis of iron acquisition mutant strains indicates that siderophore-, heme-, hemoglobin-, and leghemoglobin-mediated iron transport systems expressed by R. meliloti 242 share at least one component. PMID:9139934

  9. Serological identification of oral Bacteroides spp. by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay.

    PubMed Central

    Ebersole, J L; Frey, D E; Taubman, M A; Smith, D J; Socransky, S S; Tanner, A C

    1984-01-01

    A rapid method for identifying black-pigmented oral Bacteroides spp. is described. Species-specific rabbit antisera to Bacteroides gingivalis, B. intermedius, and B. melaninogenicus were used in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay to identify clinical isolates of black-pigmented Bacteroides spp. from humans. The results showed excellent agreement with biochemical identification of B. gingivalis and B. intermedius. Only 36% of the B. melaninogenicus isolates were identified with the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, suggesting that this group of black-pigmented Bacteroides spp. is made up of more than one serotype. The serological enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay should enable rapid identification of black-pigmented Bacteroides spp. isolated from sites of oral diseases and may also be used to identify the presence of these organisms in complex bacterial mixtures from oral sites. PMID:6736225

  10. Protein phosphorylation in Bradyrhizobium japonicum bacteroids and cultures

    SciTech Connect

    Karr, D.B.; Emerich, D.W. )

    1989-06-01

    Protein phosphorylation was demonstrated in Bradyrhizobium japonicum bacteroids in vivo and in cultures in vivo and in vitro. Comparison of in vivo-labeled phosphoproteins of bacteroids and of cultured cells showed differences in both the pattern and intensity of labeling. In cultured cells, comparison of the labeling patterns and intensities of in vivo- and in vitro-labeled phosphoproteins showed a number of similarities; however, several phosphoproteins were found only after one of the two labeling conditions. The labeling intensity was time dependent in both in vivo and in vitro assays and was dependent on the presence of magnesium in in vitro assays. Differences in the rates of phosphorylation and dephosphorylation were noted for a number of proteins. The level of incorporation of {sup 32}P into protein was only 2% or less of the total phosphate accumulated during the in vivo labeling period. Several isolation and sample preparation procedures resulted in differences in labeling patterns. Phosphatase inhibitors and several potential metabolic effectors had negligible effects on the phosphorylation pattern. There were no significant changes in the phosphorylation patterns of cells cultured on mannitol, acetate, and succinate, although the intensity of the labeling did vary with the carbon source.

  11. Protection of sheep against experimental footrot by vaccination with pili purified from Bacteroides nodosus.

    PubMed

    Every, D; Skerman, T M

    1982-10-01

    Merino sheep vaccinated with either whole Bacteroides nodosus organisms, a crude surface antigen preparation or highly purified pili (>99% homogeneity) in oil adjuvant, developed significant resistance to artificial footrot infection when compared with unvaccinated control sheep inoculated with saline-in-oil emulsion (Freund;s incomplete adjuvant) alone. The pili-vaccinated sheep generally had higher K-agglutinating antibody titres than sheep vaccinated with whole B. nodosus. These results confirmed the role of B. nodosus pilus protein both as a protective antigen and the K-agglutinogen. Vaccines prepared with Freund;s incomplete adjuvant containing either purified pili, crude pili or B. nodosus whole cells did not produce significantly different injection-site reactions. PMID:16030827

  12. Diversity of Rhizobium leguminosarum from pea fields in Washington State

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rhizobia-mediated biological nitrogen (N) fixation in legumes contributes to yield potential in these crops and also provides residual fertilizer to subsequent cereals. Our objectives were to collect isolates of Rhizobium leguminosarum from several pea fields in Washington, examine genetic diversity...

  13. Infection and nodulation of clover by nonmotile Rhizobium trifolii

    SciTech Connect

    Napoli, C.; Albersheim, P.

    1980-02-01

    Nonmotile mutants of Rhizobium trifolii were isolated to determine whether bacterial motility is required for the infection and nodulation of clover. The nonmotile mutants were screened for their ability to infect and nodulate clover seedlings in Fahraeus glass slide assemblies, plastic growth pouches, and vermiculite-sand-filled clay pots. In each system, the nonmotile mutants were able to infect and nodulate clover.

  14. Rhizobium laguerreae sp. nov. nodulates Vicia faba on several continents.

    PubMed

    Saïdi, Sabrine; Ramírez-Bahena, Martha-Helena; Santillana, Nery; Zúñiga, Doris; Álvarez-Martínez, Estela; Peix, Alvaro; Mhamdi, Ridha; Velázquez, Encarna

    2014-01-01

    Several fast-growing strains nodulating Vicia faba in Peru, Spain and Tunisia formed a cluster related to Rhizobium leguminosarum. The 16S rRNA gene sequences were identical to that of R. leguminosarum USDA 2370(T), whereas rpoB, recA and atpD gene sequences were phylogenetically distant, with sequence similarities of less than 96 %, 97 % and 94 %, respectively. DNA-DNA hybridization analysis showed a mean relatedness value of 43 % between strain FB206(T) and R. leguminosarum USDA 2370(T). Phenotypic characteristics of the novel strains also differed from those of the closest related species of the genus Rhizobium. Therefore, based on genotypic and phenotypic data obtained in this study, we propose to classify this group of strains nodulating Vicia faba as a novel species of the genus Rhizobium named Rhizobium laguerreae sp. nov. The type strain is FB206(T) ( = LMG 27434(T) = CECT 8280(T)).

  15. Draft Genome Sequence of Rhizobium rhizogenes Strain ATCC 15834

    PubMed Central

    Kajala, Kaisa; Coil, David A.

    2014-01-01

    Here, we present the draft genome of Rhizobium rhizogenes strain ATCC 15834. The genome contains 7,070,307 bp in 43 scaffolds. R. rhizogenes, also known as Agrobacterium rhizogenes, is a plant pathogen that causes hairy root disease. This hairy root induction has been used in biotechnology for the generation of transgenic root cultures. PMID:25359916

  16. Bacteremia caused by Rhizobium radiobacter in a preterm neonate.

    PubMed

    Khan, Seema; Al-Sweih, Noura; Othman, Abdul Hafez; Dhar, Rita

    2014-02-01

    The authors report a case of bacteremia due to Rhizobium radiobacter in a preterm neonate. Although the baby recovered from the septic episode following therapy with appropriate antibiotics he succumbed to complications, mainly associated with prematurity. This case highlights a rare manifestation of R.radiobacter infection in a neonate in whom the source of the organism remained undiscovered.

  17. A rhizobium selenitireducens protein showing selenite reductase activity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Biobarriers remove, via precipitation, the metalloid selenite (SeO3–2) from groundwater; a process that involves the biological reduction of soluble SeO3–2 to insoluble elemental red selenium (Se0). The enzymes associated with this reduction process are poorly understood. In Rhizobium selenitiredu...

  18. Production of nodulation factors by Rhizobium meliloti: fermentation, purification and characterization of glycolipids.

    PubMed

    Kohring, B; Baier, R; Niehaus, K; Pühler, A; Flaschel, E

    1997-12-01

    Lipooligosaccharides, synthesized by soil bacteria of the genera Rhizobium, are known to have multifunctional effects on a wide variety of plants as signal substances in symbiosis initiation, cell response elicitation and growth regulation. These so called nodulation (Nod-) factors represent interesting biotechnological products with respect to fundamental studies of symbiotic interactions as well as for potential applications. Therefore, a batch fermentation process on a scale of 30 l has been developed by means of the Rhizobium meliloti strain R.m. 1021 (pEK327) strongly overexpressing the genes for the synthesis of Nod factors. Induction by the flavone luteolin led to growth associated production of the lipooligosaccharides. Ultrafiltration was used for separating the biomass from the filtrate containing the extracellular Nod factors. Simultaneously, ultrafiltration reduced the amount of lipophilic substances, which would otherwise interfere with processes downstream. The second separation step consisted in adsorption on XAD-2, a nonspecific hydrophobic adsorptive resin. Adsorption of Nod factors was carried out by batch operation of a stirred tank. Desorption was performed by elution with methanol in a fixed bed column. A semi-preparative reversed phase HPLC (Polygoprep 100-30 C18) was chosen as the final purification step. The Nod factors were obtained after evaporation and lyophilization. Thus, about 600 mg of Nod factors were produced from 20 l of fermentation broth. The Nod factors produced by Rhizobium meliloti R.m. 1021 (pEK327) were identified by liquid secondary ion mass spectrometry and by reversed-phase HPLC as fluorescent derivatives of 2-aminobenzamide. The biological activity of the products was demonstrated by means of the root hair deformation (HAD-) assay.

  19. Rhizobium lemnae sp. nov., a bacterial endophyte of Lemna aequinoctialis.

    PubMed

    Kittiwongwattana, Chokchai; Thawai, Chitti

    2014-07-01

    Bacterial strain L6-16(T) was isolated from Lemna aequinoctialis. Cells were Gram-stain-negative, rod-shaped and motile with monopolar flagella. The phylogenetic analysis of its nearly complete 16S rRNA gene sequence revealed that strain L6-16(T) was a member of the genus Rhizobium. Its closest relative was Rhizobium tarimense PL-41(T) with a 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity value of 98.3%. Sequence similarity analysis of the housekeeping recA and atpD genes showed low levels of sequence similarity (<93.9%) between strain L6-16(T) and other species of the genus Rhizobium. Strain L6-16(T) was able to grow between pH 5 and 11 (optimum 7.0) and at temperatures ranging from 20 to 41 °C (optimum 30 °C). It tolerated NaCl up to 1 % (w/v) (optimum 0.5%). C18 : 1ω7c and/or C18 :  1ω6c (summed feature 8; 79.5%) were found as predominant cellular fatty acids. The DNA G+C content of strain L6-16(T) was 58.1 mol% (Tm). Based on low levels of DNA-DNA relatedness, strain L6-16(T) was distinct from members of phylogenetically related species including R. tarimense PL-41(T) (38.3 ± 0.8%), Rhizobium rosettiformans W3(T) (6.9 ± 0.4%) and Rhizobium pseudoryzae J3-A127(T) (12.3 ± 0.6 %). Strain L6-16(T) was unable to nodulate the roots of Phaseolus vulgaris, and nodC and nifH genes were not detected. The results obtained from phylogenetic analyses, phenotypic characterization and DNA-DNA hybridization indicated that strain L6-16(T) represents a novel species of the genus Rhizobium, for which the name Rhizobium lemnae sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is L6-16(T) ( = NBRC 109339(T) = BCC 55143(T)).

  20. Infection of soybean and pea nodules by Rhizobium spp. purine auxotrophs in the presence of 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide riboside.

    PubMed Central

    Newman, J D; Diebold, R J; Schultz, B W; Noel, K D

    1994-01-01

    Purine auxotrophs of various Rhizobium species are symbiotically defective, usually unable to initiate or complete the infection process. Earlier studies demonstrated that, in the Rhizobium etli-bean symbiosis, infection by purine auxotrophs is partially restored by supplementation of the plant medium with 5-amino-imidazole-4-carboxamide (AICA) riboside, the unphosphorylated form of the purine biosynthetic intermediate AICAR. The addition of purine to the root environment does not have this effect. In this study, purine auxotrophs of Rhizobium fredii HH303 and Rhizobium leguminosarum 128C56 (bv. viciae) were examined. Nutritional and genetic characterization indicated that each mutant was blocked in purine biosynthesis prior to the production of AICAR. R. fredii HH303 and R. leguminosarum 128C56 appeared to be deficient in AICA riboside transport and/or conversion into AICAR, and the auxotrophs derived from them grew very poorly with AICA riboside as a purine source. All of the auxotrophs elicited poorly developed, uninfected nodules on their appropriate hosts. On peas, addition of AICA riboside or purine to the root environment led to enhanced nodulation; however, infection threads were observed only in the presence of AICA riboside. On soybeans, only AICA riboside was effective in enhancing nodulation and promoting infection. Although AICA riboside supplementation of the auxotrophs led to infection thread development on both hosts, the numbers of bacteria recovered from the nodules were still 2 or more orders of magnitude lower than in fully developed nodules populated by wild-type bacteria. The ability to AICA riboside to promote infection by purine auxotrophs, despite serving as a very poor purine source for these strains, supports the hypothesis that AICAR plays a role in infection other than merely promoting bacterial growth. Images PMID:8195084

  1. Determinants of nodulation competitiveness in Rhizobium etli. Final report for period September 30, 1996--September 29, 1999

    SciTech Connect

    Handelsman, Jo

    2000-01-04

    Nitrogen is a major limiting nutrient in crop production. Chemical fertilizers, which are used extensively to meet crop nitrogen requirements, contribute to the high energy inputs of modern agriculture and cause human health and environmental problems. Legumes and their bacterial associates have long been used in crop rotations to replenish soil nitrogen, but effective and reliable biological nitrogen fixation for beans is prevented by the lack of nodulation competitiveness of many Rhizobium strains used as inoculants. The result is that the inoculant strains will not occupy the host's nodules and no benefit will be derived from inoculation. Many indigenous soil strains of Rhizobium etli bv. phaseoli, the symbiont of bean, nodulate but fix little or no nitrogen, and therefore the nodulation competitiveness problem is significant for achieving maximum nitrogen benefit from bean crops. This project was directed toward developing an understanding of the basis of nodulation competitiveness.

  2. Peribacteroid space acidification: a marker of mature bacteroid functioning in Medicago truncatula nodules.

    PubMed

    Pierre, Olivier; Engler, Gilbert; Hopkins, Julie; Brau, Frédéric; Boncompagni, Eric; Hérouart, Didier

    2013-11-01

    Legumes form a symbiotic interaction with Rhizobiaceae bacteria, which differentiate into nitrogen-fixing bacteroids within nodules. Here, we investigated in vivo the pH of the peribacteroid space (PBS) surrounding the bacteroid and pH variation throughout symbiosis. In vivo confocal microscopy investigations, using acidotropic probes, demonstrated the acidic state of the PBS. In planta analysis of nodule senescence induced by distinct biological processes drastically increased PBS pH in the N2 -fixing zone (zone III). Therefore, the PBS acidification observed in mature bacteroids can be considered as a marker of bacteroid N2 fixation. Using a pH-sensitive ratiometric probe, PBS pH was measured in vivo during the whole symbiotic process. We showed a progressive acidification of the PBS from the bacteroid release up to the onset of N2 fixation. Genetic and pharmacological approaches were conducted and led to disruption of the PBS acidification. Altogether, our findings shed light on the role of PBS pH of mature bacteroids in nodule functioning, providing new tools to monitor in vivo bacteroid physiology.

  3. Rhizobium phaseoli symbiotic mutants with transposon Tn5 insertions.

    PubMed Central

    Noel, K D; Sanchez, A; Fernandez, L; Leemans, J; Cevallos, M A

    1984-01-01

    Rhizobium phaseoli CFN42 DNA was mutated by random insertion of Tn5 from suicide plasmid pJB4JI to obtain independently arising strains that were defective in symbiosis with Phaseolus vulgaris but grew normally outside the plant. When these mutants were incubated with the plant, one did not initiate visible nodule tissue (Nod-), seven led to slow nodule development (Ndv), and two led to superficially normal early nodule development but lacked symbiotic nitrogenase activity (Sna-). The Nod- mutant lacked the large transmissible indigenous plasmid pCFN42d that has homology to Klebsiella pneumoniae nitrogenase (nif) genes. The other mutants had normal plasmid content. In the two Sna- mutants and one Ndv mutant, Tn5 had inserted into plasmid pCFN42d outside the region of nif homology. The insertions of the other Ndv mutants were apparently in the chromosome. They were not in plasmids detected on agarose gels, and, in contrast to insertions on indigenous plasmids, they were transmitted in crosses to wild-type strain CFN42 at the same frequency as auxotrophic markers and with the same enhancement of transmission by conjugation plasmid R68.45. In these Ndv mutants the Tn5 insertions were the same as or very closely linked to mutations causing the Ndv phenotype. However, in two mutants with Tn5 insertions on plasmid pCFN42d, an additional mutation on the same plasmid, rather than Tn5, was responsible for the Sna- or Ndv phenotype. When plasmid pJB4JI was transferred to two other R. phaseoli strains, analysis of symbiotic mutants was complicated by Tn5-containing deleted forms of pJB4JI that were stably maintained. Images PMID:6325385

  4. Isolation of Bacteroides ureolyticus (B corrodens) from clinical infections.

    PubMed Central

    Duerden, B; Bennet, K W; Faulkner, J

    1982-01-01

    The introduction of an improved anaerobic system resulted in the isolation of Bacteroides ureolyticus (B corrodens) in numbers that suggested a pathogenic role from many more clinical specimens. During a three-year period B ureolyticus was isolated from 103 fairly superficial necrotic or gangrenous lesions all of which showed evidence of active infection. These included 27 perineal or genital infections, 15 perianal abscesses, 15 other soft tissue infections such as pilonidal abscesses and infected sebaceous cysts and 16 ulcers or gangrenous lesions of the lower limb. B ureolyticus was rarely isolated in pure culture but was usually one of the predominant organisms; the other organisms were mostly anaerobes and the combination of B ureolyticus with anaerobic Gram-positive cocci was particularly noticeable. The isolation and identification of B ureolyticus is not difficult but depends upon a reliable anaerobic system and the incubation of primary cultures for at least 72 h. PMID:7068922

  5. Properties of novel beta-lactamase produced by Bacteroides fragilis.

    PubMed Central

    Yotsuji, A; Minami, S; Inoue, M; Mitsuhashi, S

    1983-01-01

    Bacteroides fragilis strains were isolated from clinical specimens. B. fragilis G-237 was highly resistant to beta-lactam antibiotics due to beta-lactamase production. The purified enzyme from this strain gave a single protein band on polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The isoelectric point was 4.8, and the molecular weight was estimated to be 26,000 by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The enzyme activity was inhibited by p-chloromercuribenzoate and iodine but not by clavulanic acid or sulbactam. The purified enzyme showed a unique substrate profile by hydrolyzing at a high rate most of the cephalosporins, including cephamycin derivatives, penicillins, and imipenem (formerly imipemide, N-formimidoyl thienamycin, or MK 0787). PMID:6607033

  6. Characterization of a polysaccharide antigen from Bacteroides gingivalis.

    PubMed

    Schifferle, R E; Reddy, M S; Zambon, J J; Genco, R J; Levine, M J

    1989-11-01

    A polysaccharide Ag (PS) was isolated from the phenol-water extract of Bacteroides gingivalis strain A7A1-28 and separated from LPS by Sephacryl S-400 HR chromatography. The PS was composed of glucose, glucosamine, galactosamine, and galactosaminuronic acid, while the LPS contained rhamnose, mannose, galactose, glucose, glucosamine, galactosamine, phosphate, and lipid, but not galactosaminuronic acid. The PS and LPS were immunochemically distinct by immunoelectrophoresis in agarose with homologous rabbit antiserum. The phenol-water extract from strain A7A1-28 was immunoreactive by immunoelectrophoresis against antisera to three additional strains of B. gingivalis, however, the PS was only reactive with homologous serum. Immunochemical characterization of decarboxylated and deacetylated PS derivatives suggest that the acetylation of the amino sugars, but not the presence of the carboxylate residue on galactosaminuronic acid contributes to major immunodeterminant expression.

  7. Carbohydrate, Organic Acid, and Amino Acid Composition of Bacteroids and Cytosol from Soybean Nodules 1

    PubMed Central

    Streeter, John G.

    1987-01-01

    Metabolites in Bradyrhizobium japonicum bacteroids and in Glycine max (L.) Merr. cytosol from root nodules were analyzed using an isolation technique which makes it possible to estimate and correct for changes in concentration which may occur during bacteroid isolation. Bacteroid and cytosol extracts were fractionated on ion-exchange columns and were analyzed for carbohydrate composition using gas-liquid chromatography and for organic acid and amino acid composition using high performance liquid chromatography. Analysis of organic acids in plant tissues as the phenacyl derivatives is reported for the first time and this approach revealed the presence of several unknown organic acids in nodules. The time required for separation of bacteroids and cytosol was varied, and significant change in concentration of individual compounds during the separation of the two fractions was estimated by calculating the regression of concentration on time. When a statistically significant slope was found, the true concentration was estimated by extrapolating the regression line to time zero. Of 78 concentration estimates made, there was a statistically significant (5% level) change in concentration during sample preparation for only five metabolites: glucose, sucrose, and succinate in the cytosol and d-pinitol and serine in bacteroids. On a mass basis, the major compounds in bacteroids were (descending order of concentration): myo-inositol, d-chiro-inositol, α,α-trehalose, sucrose, aspartate, glutamate, d-pinitol, arginine, malonate, and glucose. On a proportional basis (concentration in bacteroid as percent of concentration in bacteroid + cytosol fractions), the major compounds were: α-aminoadipate (94), trehalose (66), lysine (58), and arginine (46). The results indicate that metabolite concentrations in bacteroids can be reliably determined. PMID:16665774

  8. 5S ribosomal ribonucleic acid sequences in Bacteroides and Fusobacterium: evolutionary relationships within these genera and among eubacteria in general

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van den Eynde, H.; De Baere, R.; Shah, H. N.; Gharbia, S. E.; Fox, G. E.; Michalik, J.; Van de Peer, Y.; De Wachter, R.

    1989-01-01

    The 5S ribosomal ribonucleic acid (rRNA) sequences were determined for Bacteroides fragilis, Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron, Bacteroides capillosus, Bacteroides veroralis, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Anaerorhabdus furcosus, Fusobacterium nucleatum, Fusobacterium mortiferum, and Fusobacterium varium. A dendrogram constructed by a clustering algorithm from these sequences, which were aligned with all other hitherto known eubacterial 5S rRNA sequences, showed differences as well as similarities with respect to results derived from 16S rRNA analyses. In the 5S rRNA dendrogram, Bacteroides clustered together with Cytophaga and Fusobacterium, as in 16S rRNA analyses. Intraphylum relationships deduced from 5S rRNAs suggested that Bacteroides is specifically related to Cytophaga rather than to Fusobacterium, as was suggested by 16S rRNA analyses. Previous taxonomic considerations concerning the genus Bacteroides, based on biochemical and physiological data, were confirmed by the 5S rRNA sequence analysis.

  9. The Bacteroides fragilis Toxin Gene Is Prevalent in the Colon Mucosa of Colorectal Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Boleij, Annemarie; Hechenbleikner, Elizabeth M.; Goodwin, Andrew C.; Badani, Ruchi; Stein, Ellen M.; Lazarev, Mark G.; Ellis, Brandon; Carroll, Karen C.; Albesiano, Emilia; Wick, Elizabeth C.; Platz, Elizabeth A.; Pardoll, Drew M.; Sears, Cynthia L.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Enterotoxigenic Bacteroides fragilis (ETBF) produces the Bacteroides fragilis toxin, which has been associated with acute diarrheal disease, inflammatory bowel disease, and colorectal cancer (CRC). ETBF induces colon carcinogenesis in experimental models. Previous human studies have demonstrated frequent asymptomatic fecal colonization with ETBF, but no study has investigated mucosal colonization that is expected to impact colon carcinogenesis. Methods. We compared the presence of the bft gene in mucosal samples from colorectal neoplasia patients (cases, n = 49) to a control group undergoing outpatient colonoscopy for CRC screening or diagnostic workup (controls, n = 49). Single bacterial colonies isolated anaerobically from mucosal colon tissue were tested for the bft gene with touch-down polymerase chain reaction. Results. The mucosa of cases was significantly more often bft-positive on left (85.7%) and right (91.7%) tumor and/or paired normal tissues compared with left and right control biopsies (53.1%; P = .033 and 55.5%; P = .04, respectively). Detection of bft was concordant in most paired mucosal samples from individual cases or controls (75% cases; 67% controls). There was a trend toward increased bft positivity in mucosa from late- vs early-stage CRC patients (100% vs 72.7%, respectively; P = .093). In contrast to ETBF diarrheal disease where bft-1 detection dominates, bft-2 was the most frequent toxin isotype identified in both cases and controls, whereas multiple bft isotypes were detected more frequently in cases (P ≤ .02). Conclusions. The bft gene is associated with colorectal neoplasia, especially in late-stage CRC. Our results suggest that mucosal bft exposure is common and may be a risk factor for developing CRC. PMID:25305284

  10. Persistence of Bacteroides ovatus under simulated sunlight irradiation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Bacteroides ovatus, a member of the genus Bacteroides, is considered for use in molecular-based methods as a general fecal indicator. However, knowledge on its fate and persistence after a fecal contamination event remains limited. In this study, the persistence of B. ovatus was evaluated under simulated sunlight exposure and in conditions similar to freshwater and seawater. By combining propidium monoazide (PMA) treatment and quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) detection, the decay rates of B. ovatus were determined in the presence and absence of exogenous photosensitizers and in salinity up to 39.5 parts per thousand at 27°C. Results UVB was found to be important for B. ovatus decay, averaging a 4 log10 of decay over 6 h of exposure without the presence of extracellular photosensitizers. The addition of NaNO2, an exogenous sensitizer producing hydroxyl radicals, did not significantly change the decay rate of B. ovatus in both low and high salinity water, while the exogenous sensitizer algae organic matter (AOM) slowed down the decay of B. ovatus in low salinity water. At seawater salinity, the decay rate of B. ovatus was slower than that in low salinity water, except when both NaNO2 and AOM were present. Conclusion The results of laboratory experiments suggest that if B. ovatus is released into either freshwater or seawater environment in the evening, 50% of it may be intact by the next morning; if it is released at noon, only 50% may be intact after a mere 5 min of full spectrum irradiation on a clear day. This study provides a mechanistic understanding to some of the important environmental relevant factors that influenced the inactivation kinetics of B. ovatus in the presence of sunlight irradiation, and would facilitate the use of B. ovatus to indicate the occurrence of fecal contamination. PMID:24993443

  11. Gene transfer into Solanum tuberosum via Rhizobium spp.

    PubMed

    Wendt, Toni; Doohan, Fiona; Winckelmann, Dominik; Mullins, Ewen

    2011-04-01

    Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation (ATMT) is the preferred technique for gene transfer into crops. A major disadvantage of the technology remains the complexity of the patent landscape that surrounds ATMT which restricts its use for commercial applications. An alternative system has been described (Broothaerts et al. in Nature 433:629-633, 2005) detailing the propensity of three rhizobia to transform the model crop Arabidopsis thaliana, the non-food crop Nicotiana tabacum and, at a very low frequency, the monocotyledonous crop Oryza sativa. In this report we describe for the first time the genetic transformation of Solanum tuberosum using the non-Agrobacterium species Sinorhizobium meliloti, Rhizobium sp. NGR234 and Mesorhizobium loti. This was achieved by combining an optimal bacterium and host co-cultivation period with a low antibiotic regime during the callus and shoot induction stages. Using this optimized protocol the transformation frequency (calculated as % of shoots equipped with root systems with the ability to grow in rooting media supplemented with 25 μg/ml hygromycin) of the rhizobia strains was calculated at 4.72, 5.85 and 1.86% for S. meliloti, R. sp. NGR234 and M. loti respectively, compared to 47.6% for the A. tumefaciens control. Stable transgene integration and expression was confirmed via southern hybridisation, quantitative PCR analysis and histochemical screening of both leaf and/or tuber tissue. In light of the rapid advances in potato genomics, combined with the sequencing of the potato genome, the ability of alternative bacteria species to genetically transform this major food crop will provide a novel resource to the Solanaceae community as it continues to develop potato as both a food and non-food crop.

  12. Rhizobium meliloti exopolysaccharide Mutants Elicit Feedback Regulation of Nodule Formation in Alfalfa 1

    PubMed Central

    Caetano-Anollés, Gustavo; Lagares, Antonio; Bauer, Wolfgang D.

    1990-01-01

    Nodule formation by wild-type Rhizobium meliloti is strongly suppressed in younger parts of alfalfa (Medicago sativum L.) root systems as a feedback response to development of the first nodules (G Caetano-Anollés, WD Bauer [1988] Planta 175: 546-557). Mutants of R. meliloti deficient in exopolysaccharide synthesis can induce the formation of organized nodular structures (pseudonodules) on alfalfa roots but are defective in their ability to invade and multiply within host tissues. The formation of empty pseudonodules by exo mutants was found to elicit a feedback suppression of nodule formation similar to that elicited by the wild-type bacteria. Inoculation of an exo mutant onto one side of a split-root system 24 hours before inoculation of the second side with wild-type cells suppressed wild-type nodule formation on the second side in proportion to the extent of pseudonodule formation by the exo mutants. The formation of pseudonodules is thus sufficient to elicit systemic feedback control of nodulation in the host root system: infection thread development and internal proliferation of the bacteria are not required for elicitation of feedback. Pseudonodule formation by the exo mutants was found to be strongly suppressed in split-root systems by prior inoculation on the opposite side with the wild type. Thus, feedback control elicited by the wild-type inhibits Rhizobium-induced redifferentiation of host root cells. PMID:16667284

  13. Rhizobium meliloti exopolysaccharide mutants elicit feedback regulation of nodule formation in alfalfa

    SciTech Connect

    Caetano-Anolles, G.; Lagares, A.; Bauer, W.D. )

    1990-02-01

    Nodule formation by wild-type Rhizobium meliloti is strongly suppressed in younger parts of alfalfa (Medicago sativum L.) root systems as a feedback response to development of the first nodules. Mutants of R. meliloti deficient in exopolysaccharide synthesis can induce the formation of organized nodular structures (pseudonodules) on alfalfa roots but are defective in their ability to invade and multiply within host tissues. The formation of empty pseudonodules by exo mutants was found to elicit a feedback suppression of nodule formation similar to that elicited by the wild-type bacteria. Inoculation of an exo mutant onto one side of a split-root system 24 hours before inoculation of the second side with wild-type cells suppressed wild-type nodule formation on the second side in proportion to the extent of pseudonodule formation by the exo mutants. The formation of pseudonodules is thus sufficient to elicit systemic feedback control of nodulation in the host root system: infection thread development and internal proliferation of the bacteria are not required for elicitation of feedback. Pseudonodule formation by the exo mutants was found to be strongly suppressed in split-root systems by prior inoculation on the opposite side with the wild type. Thus, feedback control elicited by the wild-type inhibits Rhizobium-induced redifferentiation of host root cells.

  14. Non-contiguous finished genome sequence of Bacteroides coprosuis type strain (PC 139T)

    SciTech Connect

    Land, Miriam L; Held, Brittany; Gronow, Sabine; Abt, Birte; Lucas, Susan; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Nolan, Matt; Tice, Hope; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Pitluck, Sam; Liolios, Konstantinos; Pagani, Ioanna; Ivanova, N; Mavromatis, K; Pati, Amrita; Tapia, Roxanne; Han, Cliff; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Hauser, Loren John; Brambilla, Evelyne-Marie; Rohde, Manfred; Goker, Markus; Detter, J. Chris; Woyke, Tanja; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Lapidus, Alla L.

    2011-01-01

    Bacteroides coprosuis Whitehead et al. 2005 belongs to the genus Bacteroides, which is a member of the family Bacteroidaceae. Members of the genus Bacteroides in general are known as beneficial protectors of animal guts against pathogenic microorganisms, and as contributors to the degradation of complex molecules such as polysaccharides. B. coprosuis itself was isolated from a manure storage pit of a swine facility, but has not yet been found in an animal host. The species is of interest solely because of its isolated phylogenetic location. The genome of B. coprosuis is already the 5th sequenced type strain genome from the genus Bacteroides. The 2,991,798 bp long genome with its 2,461 protein-coding and 78 RNA genes and is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  15. Degradation of the human proteinase inhibitors alpha-1-antitrypsin and alpha-2-macroglobulin by Bacteroides gingivalis.

    PubMed Central

    Carlsson, J; Herrmann, B F; Höfling, J F; Sundqvist, G K

    1984-01-01

    Various strains of black-pigmented Bacteroides species were grown on horse blood agar and suspended in human serum. After various times of incubation the effect of the bacteria on the serum was evaluated by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and "rocket" immunoelectrophoresis. The formation of trichloroacetic acid-soluble material in the suspensions and the capacity of the treated sera to inhibit the activity of trypsin were also determined. The two tested strains of Bacteroides gingivalis (W83, H185) degraded most serum proteins, including the plasma proteinase inhibitors alpha-1-antitrypsin and alpha-2-macroglobulin. They did not, however, degrade alpha-1-antichymotrypsin. Bacteroides intermedius NCTC 9336, Bacteroides asaccharolyticus NCTC 9337, and an asaccharolytic oral strain different from B. gingivalis (BN11a-f) did not degrade the plasma proteinase inhibitors. These strains were, however, able to inactivate the capacity of serum to inhibit the activity of trypsin. Images PMID:6198282

  16. Basis for the competitiveness of rhizobium japonicum in nodulation of soybean. Final progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Bauer, W.D.; Evans, W.R.

    1984-07-30

    These studies were concerned with the determination of the characteristics of the soybean symbiont R. japonicum that are crucial to the inoculum competitiveness of one strain of the bacterium over other strains with respect to nodule formation. Our work has been focused on the initial infection events, such as attachment, which precede the development of a fully functional nodule because it is these primary events which determine the success or failure of a particular rhizobia to initiate infections. Experiments concerned with the attachment of R. japonicum to soybean roots have indicated that both soybean symbiotic and non-symbiotic species of rhizobia attach comparably well to soybean roots. There was no evidence of attachment mediated by soybean lectin, as previously claimed, but evidence was obtained for attachment mediated by pili on the Rhizobium cells. It was also found that the efficiency of infection varied substantially with culture age for certain strains while with other strains the efficiency of infection remained approximately constant during growth. We have utilized these observations to investigate the relationship between the efficiency of infection and competitiveness. An unexpected outcome of these studies was the finding that R. japonicum, and other slow-growing Rhizobium species, maintain both viability and symbiotic infectivity over prolonged periods of storage at ambient temperatures when suspended in water. The simplicity and cost-effectiveness of this storage procedure may provide an alternative method to the current practices employed in inoculum preparation. 2 figures, 3 tables.

  17. Widespread distribution and high abundance of Rhizobium radiobacter within Mediterranean subsurface sediments.

    PubMed

    Süss, Jacqueline; Schubert, Karin; Sass, Henrik; Cypionka, Heribert; Overmann, Jörg; Engelen, Bert

    2006-10-01

    Eastern Mediterranean sediments are characterized by the occurrence of distinct, organic-rich layers, called sapropels. These harbour elevated microbial numbers in comparison with adjacent carbon-lean intermediate layers. A recently obtained culture collection from these sediments was composed of 20% of strains closely related to Rhizobium radiobacter, formerly classified as Agrobacterium tumefaciens. To prove and quantify the in situ abundance of R. radiobacter, a highly specific quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) protocol was developed. To convert quantification results into cell numbers, the copy number of rrn operons per genome was determined. Southern hybridization showed that our isolates contained four operons. Finally, quantitative PCR was applied to 45 sediment samples obtained across the eastern Mediterranean. Rhizobium radiobacter was present in 38 of 45 samples indicating an almost ubiquitous distribution. In total, 25-40 000 cells per gram of sediment were detected, corresponding to 0.001-5.1% of the bacterial cells. In general, the relative and absolute abundance of R. radiobacter increased with depth and was higher in sapropels than in intermediate layers. This indicates that R. radiobacter forms an active population in up to 200 000 years old sapropels. The present study shows for the first time that a cultivated subsurface bacterium is highly abundant in this environment.

  18. Cytochrome aa3 gene regulation in members of the family Rhizobiaceae: comparison of copper and oxygen effects in Bradyrhizobium japonicum and Rhizobium tropici.

    PubMed Central

    Gabel, C; Bittinger, M A; Maier, R J

    1994-01-01

    Dithionite-reduced minus ferricyanide-oxidized difference spectra on membranes from Rhizobium tropici (formerly Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. phaseoli) incubated at progressively lower O2 concentrations showed only a slight concomitant decrease in A603, the alpha-peak of cytochrome aa3. In contrast to previous results on Bradyrhizobium japonicum, R. tropici showed no significant O2-mediated reduction in the level of either coxA transcription or cytochrome aa3 activity (as measured by ascorbate-N,N,N',N'-tetramethyl-p-phenylenediamine [TMPD] oxidase) even in the cells incubated at 12.5 microM O2. Bean nodule R. tropici bacteroids contained 65% of the fully aerobic free-living levels of the coxA transcript. Primer extension analyses established the transcription initiation site of the R. tropici coxA genes. Sequence analyses of the regions upstream of the transcription initiation site revealed no homology with previously reported Rhizobiaceae family promoters, including the coxA promoter of B. japonicum. The R. tropici deduced CoxA sequence itself is highly homologous to the B. japonicum and Paracoccus denitrificans CoxA sequences. In both B. japonicum and R. tropici, coxA transcript levels were the same for cells grown with copper (0.02 microM) in the medium or in medium completely devoid of copper. However, a posttranscriptional effect of copper deprivation was observed for both bacteria; difference absorption spectra on membranes from cells grown without copper showed that B. japonicum lacked spectroscopically detectable cytochrome aa3, whereas R. tropici retained approximately 50% of normal cytochrome aa3 levels. Images PMID:8117073

  19. Evidence for free-living Bacteroides in Cladophora along the shores of the Great Lakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Whitman, Richard L.; Byappanahalli, Muruleedhara; Spoljaric, Ashley; Przybyla-Kelly, Katarzyna; Shively, Dawn A.; Nevers, Meredith

    2014-01-01

    Bacteroides is assumed to be restricted to the alimentary canal of animals and humans and is considered to be non-viable in ambient environments. We hypothesized that Bacteroides could persist and replicate within beach-stranded Cladophora glomerata mats in southern Lake Michigan, USA. Mean Bacteroides concentration (per GenBac3 Taqman quantitative PCR assay) during summer 2012 at Jeorse Park Beach was 5.2 log calibrator cell equivalents (CCE) g-1 dry weight (dw), ranging from 3.7 to 6.7. We monitored a single beach-stranded mat for 3 wk; bacterial concentrations increased by 1.6 log CCE g-1 dw and correlated significantly with ambient temperature (p = 0.003). Clonal growth was evident, as observed by >99% nucleotide sequence similarity among clones. In in vitro studies, Bacteroides concentrations increased by 5.5 log CCE g-1 after 7 d (27°C) in fresh Cladophora collected from rocks. Partial sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene of 36 clones from the incubation experiment showed highly similar genotypes (≥97% sequence overlap). The closest enteric Bacteroides spp. from the National Center for Biotechnology Information database were only 87 to 91% similar. Genomic similarity, clonality, growth, and persistence collectively suggest that putative, free-living Bacteroides inhabit Cladophora mats of southern Lake Michigan. These findings may have important biological, medical, regulatory, microbial source tracking, and public health implications.

  20. Regulation of phenolic catabolism in Rhizobium leguminosarum biovar trifolii

    SciTech Connect

    Parke, D. ); Rynne, F.; Glenn, A. )

    1991-09-01

    In members of the family Rhizobiaceae, many phenolic compounds are degraded by the protocatechuate branch of the {beta}-ketoadipate pathway, In this paper the authors describe a novel pattern of induction of protocatechuate (pca) genes in Rhizobium leguminosarum biovar trifolii. Isolation of pca mutant strains revealed that 4-hydroxybenzoate, quinate, and 4-coumarate are degraded via the protocatechuate pathway. At least three inducers govern catabolism of 4-hydroxybenzoate to succinyl coenzyme A and acetyl coenzyme A. The enzyme that catalyzes the initial step is induced by its substrate, whereas the catabolite {beta}-carboxy-cis, cis-muconate induces enzymes for the upper protocatechuate pathway, and {beta}-ketoadipate elicits expression of the enzyme for a subsequent step, {beta}-ketoadipate succinyl-coenzyme A transferase. Elucidation of the induction pattern relied in part on complementation of mutant Rhizobium strains by known subclones of Acinetobacter genes expressed off the lac promoter in a broad-host-range vector.

  1. Impact of heavy metals on an arctic rhizobium

    SciTech Connect

    Appanna, V.D. )

    1991-03-01

    Bacteria belonging to the genus Rhizobium, when residing in the root nodules of leguminous plants, fix nitrogen and thus contribute very significantly to the global nitrogen and thus contribute very significantly to the global nitrogen budget. Although there is paucity of data concerning the effects of metal pollutants on these agronomically important organisms, their negative impact on the nitrogen fixing ability of these microbes is evident. As rhizobia from root nodules of arctic legumes have been demonstrated to contribute significantly to the ecological balance in this region, the impact of some metals, found in elevated amounts in acidic surroundings on this unique Rhizobium has been assessed. In this paper the ability of the microbe to tolerate abnormal levels of manganese and aluminum is reported and the effectiveness of iron in reversing cadmium toxicity is also discussed.

  2. Fatty Acids Present in the Lipopolysaccharide of Rhizobium trifolii

    PubMed Central

    Russa, R.; Lorkiewicz, Z.

    1974-01-01

    Approximately 70% of the fatty acids recovered after acid or alkaline hydrolysis of the lipopolysaccharide of Rhizobium trifolii were hydroxy fatty acids identified as hydroxymyristic and hydroxypalmitic acids. Palmitic acid was the only saturated fatty acid found in the lipopolysaccharide of R. trifolii. Octadecenoic and a small amount of hexadecenoic acids were also identified. The results of BF3 methanolysis and hydroxylaminolysis suggest that hydroxypalmitic acid is N-acyl bound. PMID:4852028

  3. Rhizobium pongamiae sp. nov. from Root Nodules of Pongamia pinnata

    PubMed Central

    Kesari, Vigya; Ramesh, Aadi Moolam; Rangan, Latha

    2013-01-01

    Pongamia pinnata has an added advantage of N2-fixing ability and tolerance to stress conditions as compared with other biodiesel crops. It harbours “rhizobia” as an endophytic bacterial community on its root nodules. A gram-negative, nonmotile, fast-growing, rod-shaped, bacterial strain VKLR-01T was isolated from root nodules of Pongamia that grew optimal at 28°C, pH 7.0 in presence of 2% NaCl. Isolate VKLR-01 exhibits higher tolerance to the prevailing adverse conditions, for example, salt stress, elevated temperatures and alkalinity. Strain VKLR-01T has the major cellular fatty acid as C18:1  ω7c (65.92%). Strain VKLR-01T was found to be a nitrogen fixer using the acetylene reduction assay and PCR detection of a nifH gene. On the basis of phenotypic, phylogenetic distinctiveness and molecular data (16S rRNA, recA, and atpD gene sequences, G + C content, DNA-DNA hybridization etc.), strain VKLR-01T = (MTCC 10513T = MSCL 1015T) is considered to represent a novel species of the genus Rhizobium for which the name Rhizobium pongamiae sp. nov. is proposed. Rhizobium pongamiae may possess specific traits that can be transferred to other rhizobia through biotechnological tools and can be directly used as inoculants for reclamation of wasteland; hence, they are very important from both economic and environmental prospects. PMID:24078904

  4. Rhizobium pongamiae sp. nov. from root nodules of Pongamia pinnata.

    PubMed

    Kesari, Vigya; Ramesh, Aadi Moolam; Rangan, Latha

    2013-01-01

    Pongamia pinnata has an added advantage of N2-fixing ability and tolerance to stress conditions as compared with other biodiesel crops. It harbours "rhizobia" as an endophytic bacterial community on its root nodules. A gram-negative, nonmotile, fast-growing, rod-shaped, bacterial strain VKLR-01(T) was isolated from root nodules of Pongamia that grew optimal at 28°C, pH 7.0 in presence of 2% NaCl. Isolate VKLR-01 exhibits higher tolerance to the prevailing adverse conditions, for example, salt stress, elevated temperatures and alkalinity. Strain VKLR-01(T) has the major cellular fatty acid as C(18:1) ω7c (65.92%). Strain VKLR-01(T) was found to be a nitrogen fixer using the acetylene reduction assay and PCR detection of a nifH gene. On the basis of phenotypic, phylogenetic distinctiveness and molecular data (16S rRNA, recA, and atpD gene sequences, G + C content, DNA-DNA hybridization etc.), strain VKLR-01(T) = (MTCC 10513(T) = MSCL 1015(T)) is considered to represent a novel species of the genus Rhizobium for which the name Rhizobium pongamiae sp. nov. is proposed. Rhizobium pongamiae may possess specific traits that can be transferred to other rhizobia through biotechnological tools and can be directly used as inoculants for reclamation of wasteland; hence, they are very important from both economic and environmental prospects. PMID:24078904

  5. Influence of host cultivars and Rhizobium species on the growth and symbiotic performance of Phaseolus vulgaris under salt stress.

    PubMed

    Bouhmouch, Ilham; Souad-Mouhsine, Bouchra; Brhada, Fatiha; Aurag, Jamal

    2005-10-01

    In order to study the effect of salt stress on the Rhizobium-common bean symbiosis, we investigated the response of both partners, separately and in symbiosis. The comparison of the behaviour of five cultivars of Phaseolus vulgaris differing in seed colour, growing on nitrates and different concentrations of NaCl, showed genotypic variation with respect to salt tolerance. Coco Blanc was the most sensitive cultivar, whereas SMV 29-21 was the most tolerant one. At the Rhizobium level, two strains previously selected for their salt tolerance were used: Rhizobium tropici strain RP163 and Rhizobium giardinii strain RP161. Their relative growth was moderately decreased at 250mM NaCl, but they were able to grow at a low rate in the presence of 342 mM NaCl. Their viability at the minimal inhibitory concentration was slightly affected. The effect of salinity on Rhizobium-plant association was studied by using the tolerant variety SMV 29-21 and the sensitive one Coco Blanc inoculated separately with both strains. In the absence of salinity, the strains induced a significantly higher number of nodules on the roots of the cultivar SMV 29-21 compared to those of Coco Blanc. Concerning effectiveness, both strains were similarly effective with SMV 29-21, but not with Coco Blanc. In the presence of salinity, Coco Blanc was more severely affected when associated with RP163 than with RP161. Salinity affected the nodulation development more than it affected the infection steps. Neither of the two strains was able to nodulate SMV 29-21 under saline conditions, in spite of the fact that this was considered the most salt-tolerant variety. The unsuccessful nodulation of SMV 29-21 could be related to the inhibition by salt of one or more steps of the early events of the infection process. In conclusion, N-fixing plants were found to be more sensitive to salt stress than those depending on mineral nitrogen. Evidence presented here suggests that a best symbiotic N2 fixation under salinity

  6. Draft Genome Sequences of Four Novel Thermal- and Alkaline-Tolerant Egyptian Rhizobium Strains Nodulating Berseem Clover

    PubMed Central

    Shamseldin, Abdelaal; Nelson, Matthew S.; Staley, Christopher; Guhlin, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    Four Rhizobium strains were isolated from berseem clover in Egypt. The symbiotically effective, salt-tolerant, strain Rhiz950 was identified as new species, Rhizobium aegypticaum sv. trifolii (USDA 7124T). The other three thermal- and pH-tolerant strains were identified as Rhizobium bangladeshense sv. trifolii, the type strain is USDA 7125T. PMID:27635006

  7. Draft Genome Sequences of Four Novel Thermal- and Alkaline-Tolerant Egyptian Rhizobium Strains Nodulating Berseem Clover.

    PubMed

    Shamseldin, Abdelaal; Nelson, Matthew S; Staley, Christopher; Guhlin, Joseph; Sadowsky, Michael J

    2016-01-01

    Four Rhizobium strains were isolated from berseem clover in Egypt. The symbiotically effective, salt-tolerant, strain Rhiz950 was identified as new species, Rhizobium aegypticaum sv. trifolii (USDA 7124(T)). The other three thermal- and pH-tolerant strains were identified as Rhizobium bangladeshense sv. trifolii, the type strain is USDA 7125(T). PMID:27635006

  8. Determination of some in vitro growth requirements of Bacteroides nodosus.

    PubMed

    Skerman, T M

    1975-03-01

    Physical and nutritional factors required for growth of Bacteroides nodosus isolates from ovine foot-rot lesions were examined. Simplified anaerobic culture techniques were devised utilizing a fully soluble, autoclavable, liquid medium (TAS) which contained proteose-peptone, yeast and meat extracts and certain other essential compounds required to promote prompt and serially transferrable growth of cultures from small inocula. The latter included Trypticase, arginine, a reducing agent (most suitably thioglycollic acid) and CO2; serine and Mg2+ markedly increased growth yields. Trypticase could not be replaced by a commercial preparation of acid-hydrolysed casein; other forms of hydrolysed protein gave delayed and inconsistent growth. Maximum growth of cultures required concentrations of 0-02 to 0-35 M-arginine, which could not be replaced by glutamic acid, citrulline or ornithine. Exogenous carbohydrate compounds were not required. The temperature range for optimum growth of cultures was 37 to 39 degrees C, and anaerobic culture conditions were essential for growth and the production of B. nodosus organisms of normal morphology. Solidified TAS media for the isolation and maintenance of B. nodosus cultures were also devised. PMID:1133574

  9. Determination of some in vitro growth requirements of Bacteroides nodosus.

    PubMed

    Skerman, T M

    1975-03-01

    Physical and nutritional factors required for growth of Bacteroides nodosus isolates from ovine foot-rot lesions were examined. Simplified anaerobic culture techniques were devised utilizing a fully soluble, autoclavable, liquid medium (TAS) which contained proteose-peptone, yeast and meat extracts and certain other essential compounds required to promote prompt and serially transferrable growth of cultures from small inocula. The latter included Trypticase, arginine, a reducing agent (most suitably thioglycollic acid) and CO2; serine and Mg2+ markedly increased growth yields. Trypticase could not be replaced by a commercial preparation of acid-hydrolysed casein; other forms of hydrolysed protein gave delayed and inconsistent growth. Maximum growth of cultures required concentrations of 0-02 to 0-35 M-arginine, which could not be replaced by glutamic acid, citrulline or ornithine. Exogenous carbohydrate compounds were not required. The temperature range for optimum growth of cultures was 37 to 39 degrees C, and anaerobic culture conditions were essential for growth and the production of B. nodosus organisms of normal morphology. Solidified TAS media for the isolation and maintenance of B. nodosus cultures were also devised.

  10. Genomic Diversity of Enterotoxigenic Strains of Bacteroides fragilis

    PubMed Central

    Pierce, Jessica V.; Bernstein, Harris D.

    2016-01-01

    Enterotoxigenic (ETBF) strains of Bacteroides fragilis are the subset of strains that secrete a toxin called fragilysin (Bft). Although ETBF strains are known to cause diarrheal disease and have recently been associated with colorectal cancer, they have not been well characterized. By sequencing the complete genome of four ETBF strains, we found that these strains exhibit considerable variation at the genomic level. Only a small number of genes that are located primarily in the Bft pathogenicity island (BFT PAI) and the flanking CTn86 conjugative transposon are conserved in all four strains and a fifth strain whose genome was previously sequenced. Interestingly, phylogenetic analysis strongly suggests that the BFT PAI was acquired by non-toxigenic (NTBF) strains multiple times during the course of evolution. At the phenotypic level, we found that the ETBF strains were less fit than the NTBF strain NCTC 9343 and were susceptible to a growth-inhibitory protein that it produces. The ETBF strains also showed a greater tendency to form biofilms, which may promote tumor formation, than NTBF strains. Although the genomic diversity of ETBF strains raises the possibility that they vary in their pathogenicity, our experimental results also suggest that they share common properties that are conferred by different combinations of non-universal genetic elements. PMID:27348220

  11. Induction of chondroitin sulfate lyase activity in Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron.

    PubMed Central

    Salyers, A A; Kotarski, S F

    1980-01-01

    Chondroitin sulfate lyase (EC 4.2.2.4) was present constitutively at low levels (0.06 to 0.08 U/mg of protein) in cells of Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron which were growing on glucose or other monosaccharides. When these uninduced bacteria were incubated with chondroitin sulfate A (5 mg/ml), chondroitin sulfate lyase specific activity increased more than 10-fold within 90 min. Synthesis of ribonucleic acid and of protein was required for induction, and induction was sensitive to oxygen. The disaccharides which resulted from chondroitinase action did not act as inducers, nor did tetrasaccharides or hexasaccharides obtained by digestion of chondroitin sulfate with bovine testicular hyaluronidase. None of these substances was taken up by uninduced cells; they may not have been able to penetrate the outer membrane. The smallest oligomer capable of acting as an inducer was the outer membrane. The smallest oligomer capable of acting as an inducer was the octassacharide. Oligomers larger than the octassacharide induced chondroitin lyase activity nearly as well as intact chondroitin sulfate. PMID:6782077

  12. DNA Inversion Regulates Outer Membrane Vesicle Production in Bacteroides fragilis

    PubMed Central

    Nakayama-Imaohji, Haruyuki; Hirota, Katsuhiko; Yamasaki, Hisashi; Yoneda, Saori; Nariya, Hirofumi; Suzuki, Motoo; Secher, Thomas; Miyake, Yoichiro; Oswald, Eric; Hayashi, Tetsuya; Kuwahara, Tomomi

    2016-01-01

    Phase changes in Bacteroides fragilis, a member of the human colonic microbiota, mediate variations in a vast array of cell surface molecules, such as capsular polysaccharides and outer membrane proteins through DNA inversion. The results of the present study show that outer membrane vesicle (OMV) formation in this anaerobe is also controlled by DNA inversions at two distantly localized promoters, IVp-I and IVp-II that are associated with extracellular polysaccharide biosynthesis and the expression of outer membrane proteins. These promoter inversions are mediated by a single tyrosine recombinase encoded by BF2766 (orthologous to tsr19 in strain NCTC9343) in B. fragilis YCH46, which is located near IVp-I. A series of BF2766 mutants were constructed in which the two promoters were locked in different configurations (IVp-I/IVp-II = ON/ON, OFF/OFF, ON/OFF or OFF/ON). ON/ON B. fragilis mutants exhibited hypervesiculating, whereas the other mutants formed only a trace amount of OMVs. The hypervesiculating ON/ON mutants showed higher resistance to treatment with bile, LL-37, and human β-defensin 2. Incubation of wild-type cells with 5% bile increased the population of cells with the ON/ON genotype. These results indicate that B. fragilis regulates the formation of OMVs through DNA inversions at two distantly related promoter regions in response to membrane stress, although the mechanism underlying the interplay between the two regions controlled by the invertible promoters remains unknown. PMID:26859882

  13. Association of Enterotoxigenic Bacteroides fragilis Infection with Inflammatory Diarrhea

    PubMed Central

    Sears, Cynthia L.; Islam, Salequl; Saha, Amit; Arjumand, Maleka; Alam, Nur Haque; Faruque, A. S. G.; Salam, M. A.; Shin, Jai; Hecht, David; Weintraub, Andrej; Sack, R. Bradley; Qadri, Firdausi

    2011-01-01

    Background Diarrheal illnesses remain a leading cause of morbidity and mortality globally, with increasing recognition of long-term sequelae, including postinfectious irritable bowel syndrome and growth faltering, as well as cognitive deficits in children. Identification of specific etiologic agents is often lacking. In vitro and in vivo data suggest that enterotoxigenic Bacteroides fragilis (ETBF) may contribute to the burden of colonic inflammatory diarrheal disease. The study goal was to investigate the pathogenesis of ETBF diarrheal illnesses. Methods We performed an observational study of children and adults with acute diarrheal illnesses in Dhaka, Bangladesh, from January 2004 through November 2005, to define the clinical presentation, intestinal inflammatory responses, and systemic and intestinal antibody responses to ETBF. Other enteric pathogens were also evaluated. Results ETBF was identified to cause a clinical syndrome with marked abdominal pain and nonfebrile inflammatory diarrhea in both children (age, >1 year) and adults. Fecal leukocytes, lactoferrin, and proinflammatory cytokines (interleukin 8, tumor necrosis factor–α)—as well as B. fragilis toxin systemic antitoxin responses—increased rapidly in ETBF-infected patients. Evidence of intestinal inflammation often persisted for at least 3 weeks, despite antibiotic therapy. Conclusions ETBF infection is a newly recognized cause of inflammatory diarrhea in children and adults. Future studies are needed to evaluate the role of ETBF in persistent colonic inflammation and other morbid sequelae of acute diarrheal disease. PMID:18680416

  14. Activation Mechanism of the Bacteroides fragilis Cysteine Peptidase, Fragipain.

    PubMed

    Herrou, Julien; Choi, Vivian M; Bubeck Wardenburg, Juliane; Crosson, Sean

    2016-07-26

    Enterotoxigenic Bacteroides fragilis produces a secreted metalloprotease known as B. fragilis toxin (BFT), which contributes to anaerobic sepsis, colitis, and colonic malignancy in mouse models of disease. A C11 family cysteine protease, fragipain (Fpn), directly activates BFT in the B. fragilis cell by removing the BFT prodomain. Fpn is itself a proenzyme and is autoactivated upon cleavage at an arginine residue in its activation loop. We have defined the proteolytic active site of Fpn, demonstrated that Fpn autoactivation can occur by an in trans loop cleavage mechanism, and characterized structural features of the Fpn activation loop that control peptidase activity against several substrates, including BFT. An arginine residue at the autocleavage site determines the fast activation kinetics of Fpn relative to the homologous C11 protease, PmC11, which is cleaved at lysine. Arginine to alanine substitution at the cleavage site ablated peptidase activity, as did partial truncation of the Fpn activation loop. However, complete truncation of the activation loop yielded an uncleaved, pro form of Fpn that was active as a peptidase against both Fpn and BFT substrates. Thus, Fpn can be transformed into an active peptidase in the absence of activation loop cleavage. This study provides insight into the mechanism of fragipain activation and, more generally, defines the role of the C11 activation loop in the control of peptidase activity and substrate specificity.

  15. Vaginal carriage of enterotoxigenic Bacteroides fragilis in pregnant women.

    PubMed Central

    Leszczynski, P; van Belkum, A; Pituch, H; Verbrugh, H; Meisel-Mikolajczyk, F

    1997-01-01

    Bacteroides fragilis is an anaerobic bacterial species that is involved in gynecological infections and pathology. The incidence of vaginal carriage is largely unknown, and in order to study this, 120 pregnant women attending a general hospital for delivery were examined. Cultures were positive for eight of these women (6.6%). Interestingly, potential clonal relatedness could be demonstrated among several of the nonenterotoxigenic B. fragilis strains. Among the strains, only one produced metalloprotease enterotoxin. The presence of the gene for the metalloprotease, giving rise to the pathogenic effect on cultured eukaryotic HT29/C1 cells, was confirmed by a newly designed specific PCR assay. The enterotoxigenic B. fragilis (ETBF) strain was analyzed with the help of arbitrarily primed PCR (AP-PCR) and PCR-mediated ribotyping. The ETBF strain was shown to be genetically different compared to several other strains obtained from diverse sources. Our data indicate a relatively high vaginal B. fragilis carriage rate among pregnant women in Warsaw, Poland. Although neither ETBF nor B. fragilis colonization presented a clinical problem, the possible genetic relatedness among the colonizing B. fragilis strains indicates the need for additional research in the field of ETBF transmission and molecular epidemiology. PMID:9350755

  16. In vitro utilization of mucin by Bacteroides fragilis.

    PubMed Central

    Roberton, A M; Stanley, R A

    1982-01-01

    A method for isolating pig colon mucin in a soluble high-molecular-weight form, suitable for addition to bacterial growth media, is described. This preparation was utilized as a sole carbohydrate energy source by two strains of Bacteroides fragilis. The extent of degradation was compared with that of commercial pig gastric mucin by the same strains. Gas-liquid chromatographic analysis of the mucin carbohydrates and gel chromatography of the preparations were carried out before and after in vitro degradation. The mucin carbohydrates were utilized only to a very limited extent, colon mucin being more resistant to degradation than gastric mucin. Both mucins chromatographed at or near the excluded volume on Sepharose 4B, and only in the case of ATCC 25285 grown on gastric mucin was a significant degradation peak detected. If mucins are degraded in vivo by the sequential action of several bacteria, a pure culture in vitro might be expected to degrade mucins to a limited extent only. Techniques previously used to examine mucin utilization by pure cultures may have overlooked limited mucin degradation demonstrated by the methods used in this work. PMID:6174077

  17. A comparative study of three bacteriocins of Bacteroides fragilis.

    PubMed

    Riley, T V; Mee, B J

    1985-01-01

    Three different bacteriocins produced by strains of Bacteroides fragilis were compared in terms of their production kinetics, physico-chemical nature, and action on macromolecular synthesis in a common indicator strain. Bacteriocin 78/438 was produced during the logarithmic growth phase, was thermolabile and stable between pH 5 and 9. It was susceptible to trypsin and pepsin, and affected DNA, RNA and protein syntheses in susceptible cells. Bacteriocin A49 was produced during the stationary growth phase, was thermolabile and stable between pH 7 and 9. This bacteriocin was also susceptible to trypsin and pepsin, but only RNA synthesis was affected in the indicator strain. Bacteriocin A55 differed markedly from both 78/438 and A49, and was found to be predominantly cell-bound, resistant to inactivation by high temperatures and stable over a wide pH range of 2 to 12. It was susceptible to trypsin but resistant to pepsin. A55 had a delayed effect on macromolecular synthesis with DNA synthesis being inhibited after 60 min. With all three bacteriocins, killing of the indicator strain followed single hit kinetics with the interaction of bacteriocin and target cell occurring in two stages. Killing by bacteriocin A55 was much slower than the other two and this may be related to its effect on macromolecular synthesis. The killing action of all three bacteriocins was dependent on the growth phase of the susceptible cells.

  18. Root Exudates of Various Host Plants of Rhizobium leguminosarum Contain Different Sets of Inducers of Rhizobium Nodulation Genes.

    PubMed

    Zaat, S A; Wijffelman, C A; Mulders, I H; van Brussel, A A; Lugtenberg, B J

    1988-04-01

    Rhizobium promoters involved in the formation of root nodules on leguminous plants are activated by flavonoids in plant root exudate. A series of Rhizobium strains which all contain the inducible Rhizobium leguminosarum nodA promoter fused to the Escherichia coli lacZ gene, and which differ only in the source of the regulatory nodD gene, were recently used to show that the regulatory nodD gene determines which flavonoids are able to activate the nodA promoter (HP Spaink, CA Wijffelman, E Pees, RJH Okker, BJJ Lugtenberg 1987 Nature 328: 337-340). Since these strains therefore are able to discriminate between various flavonoids, they were used to determine whether or not plants that are nodulated by R. leguminosarum produce different inducers. After chromatographic separation of root exudate constituents from Vicia sativa L. subsp. nigra (L.), V. hirsuta (L.) S.F. Gray, Pisum sativum L. cv Rondo, and Trifolium subterraneum L., the fractions were tested with a set of strains containing a nodD gene of R. leguminosarum, R. trifolii, or Rhizobium meliloti, respectively. It appeared that the source of nodD determined whether, and to what extent, the R. leguminosarum nodA promoter was induced. Lack of induction could not be attributed to the presence of inhibitors. Most of the inducers were able to activate the nodA promoter in the presence of one particular nodD gene only. The inducers that were active in the presence of the R. leguminosarum nodD gene were different in each root exudate.

  19. The calcium-stimulated lipid A 3-O deacylase from Rhizobium etli is not essential for plant nodulation.

    PubMed

    Sohlenkamp, Christian; Raetz, Christian R H; Ingram, Brian O

    2013-07-01

    The lipid A component of lipopolysaccharide from the nitrogen-fixing plant endosymbiont, Rhizobium etli, is structurally very different from that found in most enteric bacteria. The lipid A from free-living R. etli is structurally heterogeneous and exists as a mixture of species which are either pentaacylated or tetraacylated. In contrast, the lipid A from R. etli bacteroids is reported to consist exclusively of tetraacylated lipid A species. The tetraacylated lipid A species in both cases lack a beta-hydroxymyristoyl chain at the 3-position of lipid A. Here, we show that the lipid A modification enzyme responsible for 3-O deacylation in R. etli is a homolog of the PagL protein originally described in Salmonella enterica sv. typhimurium. In contrast to the PagL proteins described from other species, R. etli PagL displays a calcium dependency. To determine the importance of the lipid A modification catalyzed by PagL, we isolated and characterized a R. etli mutant deficient in the pagL gene. Mass spectrometric analysis confirmed that the mutant strain was exclusively tetraacylated and radiochemical analysis revealed that 3-O deacylase activity was absent in membranes prepared from the mutant. The R. etli mutant was not impaired in its ability to form nitrogen-fixing nodules on Phaseolus vulgaris but it displayed slower nodulation kinetics relative to the wild-type strain. The lipid A modification catalyzed by R. etli PagL, therefore, is not required for nodulation but may play other roles such as protecting bacterial endosymbionts from plant immune responses during infection. PMID:24046865

  20. The calcium-stimulated lipid A 3-O deacylase from Rhizobium etli is not essential for plant nodulation.

    PubMed

    Sohlenkamp, Christian; Raetz, Christian R H; Ingram, Brian O

    2012-07-01

    The lipid A component of lipopolysaccharide from the nitrogen-fixing plant endosymbiont, Rhizobium etli, is structurally very different from that found in most enteric bacteria. The lipid A from free-living R. etli is structurally heterogeneous and exists as a mixture of species which are either pentaacylated or tetraacylated. In contrast, the lipid A from R. etli bacteroids is reported to consist exclusively of tetraacylated lipid A species. The tetraacylated lipid A species in both cases lack a β-hydroxymyristoyl chain at the 3-position of lipid A. Here, we show that the lipid A modification enzyme responsible for 3-O deacylation in R. etli is a homolog of the PagL protein originally described in Salmonella enterica sv. typhimurium. In contrast to the PagL proteins described from other species, R. etli PagL displays a calcium dependency. To determine the importance of the lipid A modification catalyzed by PagL, we isolated and characterized a R. etli mutant deficient in the pagL gene. Mass spectrometric analysis confirmed that the mutant strain was exclusively tetraacylated and radiochemical analysis revealed that 3-O deacylase activity was absent in membranes prepared from the mutant. The R. etli mutant was not impaired in its ability to form nitrogen-fixing nodules on Phaseolus vulgaris but it displayed slower nodulation kinetics relative to the wild-type strain. The lipid A modification catalyzed by R. etli PagL, therefore, is not required for nodulation but may play other roles such as protecting bacterial endosymbionts from plant immune responses during infection. PMID:23583844

  1. Effects of nano-ZnO on the agronomically relevant Rhizobium-legume symbiosis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The impact of nano-ZnO (nZnO) on Rhizobium-legume symbiosis was studied with garden pea and its compatible bacterial partner Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. viciae 3841. Exposure of peas to nZnO had no impact on germination, but significantly affected root length. Chronic exposure of plant to nZnO impac...

  2. Effects of nano-TiO2 on the agronomically-relevant Rhizobium-legume symbiosis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The impact of nano-TiO2 on Rhizobium-legume symbiosis was studied using garden peas and the compatible bacterial partner Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. viciae 3841. Exposure to nano-TiO2 did not affect the germination of peas grown aseptically, nor did it impact the gross root structure. However, nano-...

  3. Rhizobium selenireducens sp. nov.: A selenite reducing a-Proteobacteria isolated from a bioreactor

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A Gram-negative, non-pigmented bacterium designated strain B1 was isolated from a laboratory bioreactor that reduced selenate to elemental red selenium (Se0). 16S rRNA gene sequence alignment identified the isolate as a Rhizobium sp. belonging to the Rhizobium clade that includes R. daejeonense, R....

  4. Draft Genome Sequence of Rhizobium sp. GHKF11, Isolated from Farmland Soil in Pecan Grove, Texas

    PubMed Central

    Damania, Ashish

    2016-01-01

    Rhizobium sp. GHKF11 is an organophosphate-degrading bacterial strain that was isolated from farmland soil in Pecan Grove, Texas, USA. In addition to a capacity for pesticide degradation, GHKF11 shares conserved traits with other Rhizobium spp., including heavy metal resistance and transport genes that may have significant agricultural biotechnology applications. PMID:27445376

  5. Draft Genome Sequence of Rhizobium sp. GHKF11, Isolated from Farmland Soil in Pecan Grove, Texas.

    PubMed

    Iyer, Rupa; Damania, Ashish

    2016-01-01

    Rhizobium sp. GHKF11 is an organophosphate-degrading bacterial strain that was isolated from farmland soil in Pecan Grove, Texas, USA. In addition to a capacity for pesticide degradation, GHKF11 shares conserved traits with other Rhizobium spp., including heavy metal resistance and transport genes that may have significant agricultural biotechnology applications. PMID:27445376

  6. Purification and characterization of 1-nitropyrene nitroreductases from Bacteroides fragilis.

    PubMed Central

    Kinouchi, T; Ohnishi, Y

    1983-01-01

    We isolated four nitroreductases from Bacteroides fragilis GAI0624 and examined their physicochemical and functional properties. Two major enzyme activities were found in the adsorbed and unadsorbed fractions from DEAE-cellulose column chromatography. The adsorbed fraction was subjected to Sephadex G-200 column chromatography, and two further activities were separated. One has high nitroreductase activity (nitroreductase I), and the other has low activity and relatively high molecular weight (nitroreductase III). The nitroreductase I fraction was subjected to hydroxylapatite and chromatofocusing column chromatography, and nitroreductase I was purified about 416-fold with a yield of 6.77%. The unadsorbed fraction from DEAE-cellulose column chromatography was subjected to Sepharose 2B and Sepharose 6B column chromatography. Two enzyme activities were obtained by the Sepharose 6B column chromatography. One has high activity (nitroreductase II), and the other has low activity (nitroreductase IV). Nitroreductase II was rechromatographed by Sepharose 6B gel filtration and purified about 178-fold with a yield of 9.65%. The four enzymes (nitroreductases I, II, III, and IV) were shown to be different by several criteria. Their molecular weights, determined by gel filtration, were 52,000, 320,000, 180,000, and 680,000, respectively. The substrate specificity, the effect on mutagenicity of mutagenic nitro compounds, of nitroreductases I, III, and IV was relatively high for 1-nitropyrene, dinitropyrenes, and 4-nitroquinoline 1-oxide, respectively, but nitroreductase II had broad specificity. Nitroreductase activity required a coenzyme; nitroreductases II, III, and IV were NADPH linked, but nitroreductase I was NADH linked. All enzyme activity was enhanced by addition of flavin mononucleotide and inhibited significantly by dicumarol, p-chloromercuribenzoic acid, o-iodosobenzoic acid, sodium azide, and Cu2+.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) Images PMID:6639014

  7. Suppurative otitis and ascending meningoencephalitis associated with Bacteroides tectus and Porphyromonas gulae in a captive Parma wallaby (Macropus parma) with toxoplasmosis.

    PubMed

    Giannitti, Federico; Schapira, Andrea; Anderson, Mark; Clothier, Kristin

    2014-09-01

    A 6-year-old female Parma wallaby (Macropus parma) at a zoo in California developed acute ataxia and left-sided circling. Despite intensive care, clinical signs progressed to incoordination and prostration, and the animal was euthanized. At necropsy, the left tympanic cavity was filled with homogeneous suppurative exudate that extended into the cranium expanding the meninges and neuroparenchyma in the lateral and ventral aspect of the caudal ipsilateral brainstem and medulla oblongata. Microscopically, the brainstem showed regional severe suppurative meningoencephalitis with large numbers of neutrophils, fewer macrophages, and lymphocytes admixed with fibrin, necrotic cellular debris, hemorrhage, and mineralization, with numerous intralesional Gram-negative bacilli. Bacteroides spp. and Porphyromonas spp. were isolated on anaerobic culture from the meninges, and the bacteria were further characterized by partial 16S ribosomal RNA gene sequencing as Bacteroides tectus and Porphyromonas gulae. Bacterial aerobic culture from the meninges yielded very low numbers of mixed flora and Proteus spp., which were considered contaminants. Culture of Mycoplasma spp. from middle ear and meninges was negative. Additionally, Toxoplasma gondii cysts were detected by immunohistochemistry in the heart and brain, and anti-Toxoplasma antibodies were detected in serum. The genera Bacteroides and Porphyromonas have been associated with oral disease in marsupials; but not with otitis and meningoencephalitis. The results of the present work highlight the importance of performing anaerobic cultures in the diagnostic investigation of cases of suppurative otitis and meningoencephalitis in macropods. PMID:25057163

  8. Relative adherence of Bacteroides species and strains to Actinomyces viscosus on saliva-coated hydroxyapatite

    SciTech Connect

    Li, J.; Ellen, R.P. )

    1989-09-01

    The study was designed to compare the adherence of several Bacteroides species to A. viscosus. Using 3H, we labeled 24 laboratory strains, including 13 Bacteroides species and 11 fresh clinical isolates of three Bacteroides species. Their adherence to A. viscosus bound to a saliva-coated mineral surface was quantified by liquid scintillation. Adherence relative to a standard strain, B. gingivalis 2561, was compared. Among the lab bacteroides, those of B. gingivalis (eight strains) were the greatest binders (mean, 80.5 {plus minus} 12.4%). Strains of other lab bacteroides bound less well (mean, 33.4 {plus minus} 6.3%). The difference in means was statistically significant (p less than 0.01). The mean for B. gingivalis strains was also significantly greater than that for strains of B. intermedius (51.7 {plus minus} 6.2%). Attachment of B. gingivalis was saturable in experiments in which either input concentration or time was the independent variable, indicating that B. gingivalis cells do not accumulate in this vitro simulation of plaque formation by binding to each other. Subculture did not seem to affect the degree of binding.

  9. Fate of Nodule-Specific Polysaccharide Produced by Bradyrhizobium japonicum Bacteroids.

    PubMed Central

    Streeter, J. G.; Peters, N. K.; Salminen, S. O.; Pladys, D.; Zhaohua, P.

    1995-01-01

    A polysaccharide produced by Bradyrhizobium japonicum bacteroids in nodules (NPS) on soybean (Glycine max [L.] Merr.) roots is different in composition and structure from the extracellular polysaccharide produced in culture by this organism. Isogenic strains either capable or incapable of NPS synthesis supported similar rates of plant growth and nitrogenase activity, indicating that polysaccharide deposition was not detrimental. The possibility that NPS may have some protective or nutritional role for bacteroids was considered. Analysis of disintegrating nodules over periods of 1 to 3 months indicated greater recovery of viable bacteria from NPS+ nodules prior to the breakdown of NPS. During and after the breakdown of NPS, the decline in viable bacteria was similar for NPS+ and NPS- strains. Bacteroid destruction in senescing nodules may be accelerated by exposure to proteolytic enzymes in host cytoplasm; however, highly purified NPS had no significant effect on the in vitro activity of partially purified proteases, so protection of bacteroids via this mechanism is unlikely. B. japonicum USDA 438 did not utilize NPS as a carbon source for growth in liquid culture. In vitro assays of NPS depolymerase activity in cultured bacteria and bacteroids were negative using a variety of strains, all of which contained extracellular polysaccharide depolymerase. It seems highly unlikely that B. japonicum can utilize the polysaccharide it synthesizes in nodules, and NPS breakdown in senescing nodules is probably caused by saprophytic fungi. PMID:12228408

  10. Functional characterization of aroA from Rhizobium leguminosarum with significant glyphosate tolerance in transgenic Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Han, Jing; Tian, Yong-Sheng; Xu, Jing; Wang, Li-Juan; Wang, Bo; Peng, Ri-He; Yao, Quan-Hong

    2014-09-01

    Glyphosate is the active component of the top-selling herbicide, the phytotoxicity of which is due to its inhibition of the shikimic acid pathway. 5-Enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase (EPSPS) is a key enzyme in the shikimic acid pathway. Glyphosate tolerance in plants can be achieved by the expression of a glyphosate-insensitive aroA gene (EPSPS). In this study, we used a PCR-based two-step DNA synthesis method to synthesize a new aroA gene (aroAR. leguminosarum) from Rhizobium leguminosarum. In vitro glyphosate sensitivity assays showed that aroAR. leguminosarum is glyphosate tolerant. The new gene was then expressed in E. coli and key kinetic values of the purified enzyme were determined. Furthermore, we transformed the aroA gene into Arabidopsis thaliana by the floral dip method. Transgenic Arabidopsis with the aroAR. leguminosarum gene was obtained to prove its potential use in developing glyphosate-resistant crops.

  11. A partial phylogenetic analysis of the "flavobacter-bacteroides" phylum: basis for taxonomic restructuring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gherna, R.; Woese, C. R.

    1992-01-01

    On the basis of small subunit rRNA sequence analyses five major subgroups within the flavobacteria-bacteroides phylum have been defined. These are tentatively designated the cytophaga subgroup (comprising largely Cytophaga species), the flavobacter subgroup (comprising the true flavobacteria and the polyphyletic genus Weeksella), the bacteroides subgroup (comprising the bacteroides and certain cytophaga-like bacteria), the sphingobacter subgroup (which contains the known sphingolipid-producing members of the phylum), and the saprospira subgroup (comprising particular species of Flexibacter, Flavobacterium, Haliscomenobacter, and, of course, the genus Saprospira). These groupings are given not only by evolutionary distance analysis, but can be defined and distinguished on the basis of a simple small subunit rRNA signatures.

  12. Novel Bacteroides host strains for detection of human- and animal-specific bacteriophages in water.

    PubMed

    Wicki, Melanie; Auckenthaler, Adrian; Felleisen, Richard; Tanner, Marcel; Baumgartner, Andreas

    2011-03-01

    Bacteriophages active against specific Bacteroides host strains were shown to be suitable for detection of human faecal pollution. However, the practical application of this finding is limited because some specific host strains were restricted to certain geographic regions. In this study, novel Bacteroides host strains were isolated that discriminate human and animal faecal pollution in Switzerland. Two strains specific for bacteriophages present in human faecal contamination and three strains specific for bacteriophages indicating animal faecal contamination were evaluated. Bacteriophages infecting human strains were exclusively found in human wastewater, whereas animal strains detected bacteriophages only in animal waste. The newly isolated host strains could be used to determine the source of surface and spring water faecal contamination in field situations. Applying the newly isolated host Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron ARABA 84 for detection of bacteriophages allowed the detection of human faecal contamination in spring water.

  13. A novel strain of Bacteroides fragilis enhances phagocytosis and polarises M1 macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Huimin; Li, Zhengchao; Tan, Yafang; Guo, Zhaobiao; Liu, Yangyang; Wang, Ye; Yuan, Yuan; Yang, Ruifu; Bi, Yujing; Bai, Yang; Zhi, Fachao

    2016-01-01

    Commensal Bacteroides fragilis possesses immune-regulatory characteristics. Consequently, it has been proposed as a potential novel probiotic because of its therapeutic effects on immune imbalance, mental disorders and inflammatory diseases. Macrophages play a central role in the immune response, developing either a classical-M1 or an alternative-M2 phenotype after stimulation with various signals. The interactions between macrophages and B. fragilis, however, remain to be defined. Here, a new isolate of B. fragilis, ZY-312, was shown to possess admirable properties, including tolerance to simulated gastric fluid, intestinal fluid and ox bile, and good safety (MOI = 100, 200) and adherent ability (MOI = 100) to LoVo cells. Isolate ZY-312 cell lysate promoted phagocytosis of fluorescent microspheres and pathogenic bacteria in bone marrow-derived macrophage (BMDM) cells. Gene expression of IL-12, iNOS and IL-1β in BMDM cells was increased after treatment with ZY-312, indicating the induction of M1 macrophages, consistent with enhanced secretion of NO. Cell surface expression of CD80 and CD86 was also increased. This study is the first to demonstrate that B. fragilis enhances the phagocytic functions of macrophages, polarising them to an M1 phenotype. Our findings provide insight into the close relationship between B. fragilis and the innate immune system. PMID:27381366

  14. Comparison of standard, quantitative and digital PCR in the detection of enterotoxigenic Bacteroides fragilis

    PubMed Central

    Purcell, Rachel V.; Pearson, John; Frizelle, Frank A.; Keenan, Jacqueline I.

    2016-01-01

    Gut colonization with enterotoxigenic Bacteroides fragilis (ETBF) appears to be associated with the development of colorectal cancer. However, differences in carriage rates are seen with various testing methods and sampling sites. We compared standard PCR, SYBR green and TaqMan quantitative PCR (qPCR) and digital PCR (dPCR) in detecting the B. fragilis toxin (bft) gene from cultured ETBF, and from matched luminal and faecal stool samples from 19 colorectal cancer patients. Bland-Altman analysis found that all three quantitative methods performed comparably in detecting bft from purified bacterial DNA, with the same limits of detection (<1 copy/μl). However, SYBR qPCR under-performed compared to TaqMan qPCR and dPCR in detecting bft in clinical stool samples; 13/38 samples were reported positive by SYBR, compared to 35 and 36 samples by TaqMan and dPCR, respectively. TaqMan qPCR and dPCR gave bft copy numbers that were 48-fold and 75-fold higher for the same samples than SYBR qPCR, respectively (p < 0.001). For samples that were bft-positive in both fecal and luminal stools, there was no difference in relative abundance between the sites, by any method tested. From our findings, we recommend the use of TaqMan qPCR as the preferred method to detect ETBF from clinical stool samples. PMID:27686415

  15. Monoculture parameters successfully predict coculture growth kinetics of Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron and two Bifidobacterium strains.

    PubMed

    Van Wey, A S; Cookson, A L; Roy, N C; McNabb, W C; Soboleva, T K; Shorten, P R

    2014-11-17

    Microorganisms rarely live in isolation but are most often found in a consortium. This provides the potential for cross-feeding and nutrient competition among the microbial species, which make it challenging to predict the growth kinetics in coculture. In this paper we developed a mathematical model to describe substrate consumption and subsequent microbial growth and metabolite production for bacteria grown in monoculture. The model characterized substrate utilization kinetics of 18 Bifidobacterium strains. Some bifidobacterial strains demonstrated preferential degradation of oligofructose in that sugars with low degree of polymerization (DP) (DP≤3 or 4) were metabolized before sugars of higher DP, or vice versa. Thus, we expanded the model to describe the preferential degradation of oligofructose. In addition, we adapted the model to describe the competition between human colonic bacteria Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron LMG 11262 and Bifidobacterium longum LMG 11047 or Bifidobacterium breve Yakult for inulin as well as cross-feeding of breakdown products from the extracellular hydrolysis of inulin by B. thetaiotaomicron LMG 11262. We found that the coculture growth kinetics could be predicted based on the respective monoculture growth kinetics. Using growth kinetics from monoculture experiments to predict coculture dynamics will reduce the number of in vitro experiments required to parameterize multi-culture models.

  16. Comparative properties of glutamine synthetases I and II in Rhizobium and Agrobacterium spp.

    PubMed Central

    Fuchs, R L; Keister, D L

    1980-01-01

    Some properties of glutamine synthetase I (GSI) and GSII are described for a fast-growing Rhizobium sp. (Rhizobium trifolii T1), a slow-growing Rhizobium sp. (Rhizobium japonicum USDA 83), and Agrobacterium tumefaciens C58. GSII of the fast-growing Rhizobium sp. and GSII of the Agrobacterium sp. were considerably more heat labile than GSII of the slow-growing Rhizobium sp. As previously shown in R. japonicum 61A76, GSI became adenylylated rapidly in all species tested in response to ammonium. GSII activity disappeared within one generation of growth in two of the strains, but the disappearance of GSII activity required two generations in another. Isoactivity points for transferase assay, which were derived from the pH curves of adenylylated GSI and deadenylylated GSI, were approximately pH 7.8 for both R. trifolii and A. tumefaciens. No isoactivity point was found for R. japonicum under the standard assay conditions used. When the feedback inhibitor glycine was used to inhibit differentially the adenylylated GSI and deadenylylated GSI of R. japonicum, an isoactivity point was observed at pH 7.3. Thus, the transferase activity of GSI could be determined independent of the state of adenylation. A survey of 23 strains of bacteria representing 11 genera indicated that only Rhizobium spp. and Agrobacterium spp. contained GSII. Thus, this enzyme appears to be unique for the Rhizobiaceae. PMID:6107288

  17. Complete genome sequence of Bacteroides salanitronis type strain (BL78T)

    SciTech Connect

    Gronow, Sabine; Held, Brittany; Lucas, Susan; Lapidus, Alla L.; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Nolan, Matt; Tice, Hope; Deshpande, Shweta; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Pitluck, Sam; Liolios, Konstantinos; Pagani, Ioanna; Ivanova, N; Mavromatis, K; Pati, Amrita; Tapia, Roxanne; Han, Cliff; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Land, Miriam L; Hauser, Loren John; Chang, Yun-Juan; Jeffries, Cynthia; Brambilla, Evelyne-Marie; Rohde, Manfred; Goker, Markus; Detter, J. Chris; Woyke, Tanja; Bristow, James; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Eisen, Jonathan

    2011-01-01

    Bacteroides salanitronis Lan et al. 2006 is a species of the genus Bacteroides, which belongs to the family Bacteroidaceae. The species is of interest because it was isolated from the gut of a chicken and the growing awareness that the anaerobic microflora of the cecum is of benefit for the host and may impact poultry farming. The 4,308,663 bp long genome consists of a 4.24 Mbp chromosome and three plasmids (6 kbp, 19 kbp, 40 kbp) containing 3,737 protein-coding and 101 RNA genes and is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  18. Primary Bacteremia Caused by Rhizobium radiobacter in Neonate: A Rare Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Beriha, Siba Shanker

    2015-01-01

    Rhizobium radiobacter is a gram-negative tumourigenic plant pathogen that rarely causes infections in humans. Rhizobium radiobacter has a strong predilection to cause infection particularly in those patients who have long standing indwelling foreign devices. Herewith we report a rare case of Rhizobium radiobacter bacteremia in a new born baby without other risk factors. The patient was successfully treated with gentamicin and imipenem. To the best of our knowledge this is the first documented case of R. radiobacter from India causing neonatal infection. PMID:26557521

  19. Composition of the Capsular and Extracellular Polysaccharides of Rhizobium japonicum

    PubMed Central

    Mort, Andrew J.; Bauer, Wolfgang D.

    1980-01-01

    The chemical compositions of the capsular and extracellular polysaccharides of two strains of Rhizobium japonicum (311b 138 and 110) have been determined and correlated as a function of culture age with the ability of the bacteria from which they were obtained to bind soybean seed lectin. Each of the polysaccharides contains approximately constant amounts of mannosyl, glucosyl, and galacturonosyl residues in a molar ratio of 1:2:1. In addition they contain variable amounts of galactosyl and 4-O-methyl galactosyl residues. The total of galactose plus 4-O-methyl galactose, however, is constant and equivalent to the amount of mannose, indicating that the 4-O-methyl galactose residues arise by methylation of galactose residues in the polysaccharides. In both strains the proportion of galactose to methyl galactose is considerably greater in the polysaccharide from bacteria which do bind lectin than in the polysaccharide from bacteria which do not bind lectin. In addition to the changes in polysaccharide composition, there is a reduction of about 50% in the percentage of cells which are encapsulated as the cultures mature from early to late log phase. Since only capsulated cells bind lectin, the combination of the change in capsular composition and loss of encapsulation is probably sufficient to account for the loss of lectin binding capacity during growth of cultures of Rhizobium japonicum 311b 138 and 110. Images PMID:16661379

  20. [Infective endocarditis by Rhizobium radiobacter. A case report].

    PubMed

    Piñerúa Gonsálvez, Jean Félix; Zambrano Infantinot, Rosanna del Carmen; Calcaño, Carlos; Montaño, César; Fuenmayor, Zaida; Rodney, Henry; Rodney, Marianela

    2013-03-01

    Rhizobium radiobacter is a Gram-negative, nitrogen-fixing bacterium, which is found mainly on the ground. It rarely causes infections in humans. It has been associated with bacteremia, secondary to colonization of intravascular catheters, in immunocompromised patients. The aim of this paper was to report the case of an infective endocarditis caused by R. radiobacter, in a 47-year-old male, diagnosed with chronic kidney disease stage 5, on replacement therapy with hemodialysis and who attended the medical center with fever of two weeks duration. The patient was hospitalized and samples of peripheral blood were taken for culture. Empirical antibiotic therapy was started with cefotaxime plus vancomycin. The transthoracic echocardiogram revealed fusiform vegetation on the tricuspid valve, with grade III-IV/IV regurgitation. On the seventh day after the start of antibiotic therapy, the patient had a clinical and paraclinical improvement. The bacterium identified by blood culture was Rhizobium radiobacter, ceftriaxone-resistant and sensitive to imipenem, amikacin, ampicillin and ampicillin/sulbactam. Because of the clinical improvement, it was decided to continue treatment with vancomycin and additionally, with imipenem. At 14 days after the start of antibiotic therapy, the patient was discharged with outpatient treatment with imipenem up to six weeks of treatment. The control echocardiogram showed the absence of vegetation on the tricuspid valve. This case suggests that R. radiobacter can cause endocarditis in patients with intravascular catheters.

  1. Bacterial polysaccharide which binds Rhizobium trifolii to clover root hairs.

    PubMed Central

    Dazzo, F B; Brill, W J

    1979-01-01

    Immunofluorescence, quantitative immunoprecipitation, and inhibition of bacterial agglutination and passive hemagglutination indicate that cross-reactive antigenic determinants are present on the surface of Rhizobium trifolii and clover roots. These determinants are immunochemically unique to this Rhizobium-legume cross-inoculation group. The multivalent lectin trifoliin and antibody to the clover root antigenic determinants bind competitively to two acidic heteropolysaccharides isolated from capsular material of R. Trifolii 0403. The major polysaccharide is an antigen which lacks heptose, 2-keto-3-deoxyoctulosonic acid, and endotoxic lipid A. The minor polysaccharide in the capsular material of R. Trifolii 0403 contains the same antigen in addition to heptose, 2-keto-3-deoxyoctonate, and lipid A. The acidic polysaccharides of two strains of R. trifolii share the clover r-ot cross-reactive antigenic determinant despite other differences in their carbohydrate composition. Studies with monovalent antigen-binding fragments of anti-clover root antibody and Azotobacter vinelandii hybrid transformants carrying the unique antigenic determinant suggest that these polysaccharides bind R. trifolii to the clover root hair tips which contain trifoliin. Images PMID:86535

  2. Resistance of Rhizobium strains to phygon, spergon, and thiram.

    PubMed

    Odeyemi, O; Alexander, M

    1977-04-01

    Strains of Rhizobium meliloti, Rhizobium sp. nodulating cowpeas, and R. phaseoli derived from cultures susceptible to tetramethylthiuram disulfide (thiram), 2,3-dichloro-1,4-naphthoquinone (phygon), and 2,3,5,6-tetrachloro-p-benzoquinone (spergon), respectively, grew in the presence of high concentrations of the fungicides and converted them to products not toxic to the sensitive rhizobia. The results of chemical assays demonstrated that the pesticides were destroyed by the resistant bacteria but not by the susceptible parent rhizobia. Resting cells of thiram-metabolizing R. meliloti formed large quantities of dimethyldithiocarbamate, dimethylamine, and CS2 from the pesticide. The products were characterized by gas and thin-layer chromatography, colorimetric reactions, and ultraviolet spectrometry. Dimethylamine and CS2 were formed spontaneously from dimethyldithiocarbamate, but the yield was higher in the presence of R. meliloti. The phygon-resistant bacterium converted the fungicide to five metabolites and thereby rendered the chemical nontoxic to a test fungus. The resistant strain of R. phaseoli generated at least one organic product and released about one-third of the chlorine during its detoxication of spergon.

  3. Resistance of Rhizobium strains to phygon, spergon, and thiram.

    PubMed Central

    Odeyemi, O; Alexander, M

    1977-01-01

    Strains of Rhizobium meliloti, Rhizobium sp. nodulating cowpeas, and R. phaseoli derived from cultures susceptible to tetramethylthiuram disulfide (thiram), 2,3-dichloro-1,4-naphthoquinone (phygon), and 2,3,5,6-tetrachloro-p-benzoquinone (spergon), respectively, grew in the presence of high concentrations of the fungicides and converted them to products not toxic to the sensitive rhizobia. The results of chemical assays demonstrated that the pesticides were destroyed by the resistant bacteria but not by the susceptible parent rhizobia. Resting cells of thiram-metabolizing R. meliloti formed large quantities of dimethyldithiocarbamate, dimethylamine, and CS2 from the pesticide. The products were characterized by gas and thin-layer chromatography, colorimetric reactions, and ultraviolet spectrometry. Dimethylamine and CS2 were formed spontaneously from dimethyldithiocarbamate, but the yield was higher in the presence of R. meliloti. The phygon-resistant bacterium converted the fungicide to five metabolites and thereby rendered the chemical nontoxic to a test fungus. The resistant strain of R. phaseoli generated at least one organic product and released about one-third of the chlorine during its detoxication of spergon. PMID:869529

  4. A revision of Rhizobium Frank 1889, with an emended description of the genus, and the inclusion of all species of Agrobacterium Conn 1942 and Allorhizobium undicola de Lajudie et al. 1998 as new combinations: Rhizobium radiobacter, R. rhizogenes, R. rubi, R. undicola and R. vitis.

    PubMed

    Young, J M; Kuykendall, L D; Martínez-Romero, E; Kerr, A; Sawada, H

    2001-01-01

    Rhizobium, Agrobacterium and Allorhizobium are genera within the bacterial family Rhizobiaceae, together with Sinorhizobium. The species of Agrobacterium, Agrobacterium tumefaciens (syn. Agrobacterium radiobacter), Agrobacterium rhizogenes, Agrobacterium rubi and Agrobacterium vitis, together with Allorhizobium undicola, form a monophyletic group with all Rhizobium species, based on comparative 16S rDNA analyses. Agrobacterium is an artificial genus comprising plant-pathogenic species. The monophyletic nature of Agrobacterium, Allorhizobium and Rhizobium and their common phenotypic generic circumscription support their amalgamation into a single genus, Rhizobium. Agrobacterium tumefaciens was conserved as the type species of Agrobacterium, but the epithet radiobacter would take precedence as Rhizobium radiobacter in the revised genus. The proposed new combinations are Rhizobium radiobacter, Rhizobium rhizogenes, Rhizobium rubi, Rhizobium undicola and Rhizobium vitis.

  5. DESIGN AND EVALUATION OF BACTEROIDES DNA PROBES FOR THE SPECIFIC DETECTION OF HUMAN FECAL POLLUTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Because Bacteroides spp. are obligate anaerobes that dominate the human fecal flora, and because some species may live only in the human intestine, these bacteria might be useful to distinguish human from nonhuman sources of fecal pollution. To test this hypothesis, PCR primers s...

  6. Extensive Mobilome-Driven Genome Diversification in Mouse Gut-Associated Bacteroides vulgatus mpk.

    PubMed

    Lange, Anna; Beier, Sina; Steimle, Alex; Autenrieth, Ingo B; Huson, Daniel H; Frick, Julia-Stefanie

    2016-01-01

    Like many other Bacteroides species, Bacteroides vulgatus strain mpk, a mouse fecal isolate which was shown to promote intestinal homeostasis, utilizes a variety of mobile elements for genome evolution. Based on sequences collected by Pacific Biosciences SMRT sequencing technology, we discuss the challenges of assembling and studying a bacterial genome of high plasticity. Additionally, we conducted comparative genomics comparing this commensal strain with the B. vulgatus type strain ATCC 8482 as well as multiple other Bacteroides and Parabacteroides strains to reveal the most important differences and identify the unique features of B. vulgatus mpk. The genome of B. vulgatus mpk harbors a large and diverse set of mobile element proteins compared with other sequenced Bacteroides strains. We found evidence of a number of different horizontal gene transfer events and a genome landscape that has been extensively altered by different mobilization events. A CRISPR/Cas system could be identified that provides a possible mechanism for preventing the integration of invading external DNA. We propose that the high genome plasticity and the introduced genome instabilities of B. vulgatus mpk arising from the various mobilization events might play an important role not only in its adaptation to the challenging intestinal environment in general, but also in its ability to interact with the gut microbiota.

  7. In vitro kinetic analysis of oligofructose consumption by Bacteroides and Bifidobacterium spp. indicates different degradation mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Van der Meulen, Roel; Makras, Lefteris; Verbrugghe, Kristof; Adriany, Tom; De Vuyst, Luc

    2006-02-01

    The growth of pure cultures of Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron LMG 11262 and Bacteroides fragilis LMG 10263 on fructose and oligofructose was examined and compared to that of Bifidobacterium longum BB536 through in vitro laboratory fermentations. Gas chromatography (GC) analysis was used to determine the different fractions of oligofructose and their degradation during the fermentation process. Both B. thetaiotaomicron LMG 11262 and B. fragilis LMG 10263 were able to grow on oligofructose as fast as on fructose, succinic acid being the major metabolite produced by both strains. B. longum BB536 grew slower on oligofructose than on fructose. Acetic acid and lactic acid were the main metabolites produced when fructose was used as the sole energy source. Increased amounts of formic acid and ethanol were produced when oligofructose was used as an energy source at the cost of lactic acid. Detailed kinetic analysis revealed a preferential metabolism of the short oligofructose fractions (e.g., F2 and F3) for B. longum BB536. After depletion of the short fractions, the larger oligofructose fractions (e.g., F4, GF4, F5, GF5, and F6) were metabolized, too. Both Bacteroides strains did not display such a preferential metabolism and degraded all oligofructose fractions simultaneously, transiently increasing the fructose concentration in the medium. This suggests a different mechanism for oligofructose breakdown between the strain of Bifidobacterium and both strains of Bacteroides, which helps to explain the bifidogenic nature of inulin-type fructans.

  8. Near-complete genome sequence of the cellulolytic Bacterium Bacteroides (Pseudobacteroides) cellulosolvens ATCC 35603

    DOE PAGES

    Dassa, Bareket; Utturkar, Sagar M.; Hurt, Richard A.; Klingeman, Dawn Marie; Keller, Martin; Xu, Jian; Reddy, Harish Kumar; Borovok, Ilya; Grinberg, Inna Rozman; Lamed, Raphael; et al

    2015-09-24

    We report the single-contig genome sequence of the anaerobic, mesophilic, cellulolytic bacterium, Bacteroides cellulosolvens. The bacterium produces a particularly elaborate cellulosome system, whereas the types of cohesin-dockerin interactions are opposite of other known cellulosome systems: cell-surface attachment is thus mediated via type-I interactions whereas enzymes are integrated via type-II interactions.

  9. Effect of salt stress on glycine betaine biosynthesis and catabolism by Medicago sativa bacteroids

    SciTech Connect

    Fougere, F.; Poggi, M.-C.; Le Rudulier, D. )

    1990-05-01

    Previous works have shown that glycine betaine (GB) and choline (Cho) are actively taken up by Medicago sativa bacteroids isolated from 4-week-old nodules. Here, we have investigated the effects of NaCl on the fte of Cho and GB. Bacteroids were incubated in low- or high-salt-medium (0.4 M NaCl) and supplemented with {sup 14}C 1,2-Cho or {sup 14}C 1,2-GB. After 3 hours, radioactivity was measured in CO{sub 2} released, in ethanol-soluble and insoluble fractions. In absence of salt, a low proportion of the labelling was found in soluble fraction: 47 and 19% after Cho or GB supply, respectively. On the contrary, in high-salt-medium, the soluble fraction still contained 85% of the radioactivity with GB corresponding to 92-98%. Both enzymes involved in GB biosynthesis from Cho were studied. Choline oxidase activity was enhanced by 59%, while betainal dehydrogenase activity remained unchanged after bacteroid incubation in high-salt-medium. Thus, GB accumulation in salt-stressed bacteroids would be likely a consequence of a decrease of its catabolism rather than an increase of its biosynthesis.

  10. Growth inhibitory effects of endotoxins from Bacteroides gingivalis and intermedius on human gingival fibroblasts in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Layman, D.L.; Diedrich, D.L.

    1987-06-01

    Purified endotoxin or lipopolysaccharide from Bacteroides gingivalis and Bacteroides intermedius caused a similar dose-dependent inhibition of growth of cultured human gingival fibroblasts as determined by /sup 3/H-thymidine incorporation and direct cell count. Approximately 200 micrograms/ml endotoxin caused a 50% reduction in /sup 3/H-thymidine uptake of logarithmically growing cells. Inhibition of growth was similar in cultures of fibroblasts derived from either healthy or diseased human gingiva. When examining the change in cell number with time of exposure in culture, the rate of proliferation was significantly suppressed during the logarithmic phase of growth. However, the cells recovered so that the rate of proliferation, although reduced, was sufficient to produce a cell density similar to the control cells with prolonged culture. The endotoxins were characterized by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The profiles of the Bacteroides endotoxins were different. B. gingivalis endotoxin showed a wide range of distinct bands indicating a heterogeneous distribution of molecular species. Endotoxin from B. intermedius exhibited a few discrete low molecular weight bands, but the majority of the lipopolysaccharides electrophoresed as a diffuse band of high molecular weight material. The apparent heterogeneity of the two Bacteroides endotoxins and the similarity in growth inhibitory capacity suggest that growth inhibitory effects of these substances cannot be attributed to any polysaccharide species of endotoxin.

  11. Extensive Mobilome-Driven Genome Diversification in Mouse Gut-Associated Bacteroides vulgatus mpk

    PubMed Central

    Lange, Anna; Beier, Sina; Steimle, Alex; Autenrieth, Ingo B.; Huson, Daniel H.; Frick, Julia-Stefanie

    2016-01-01

    Like many other Bacteroides species, Bacteroides vulgatus strain mpk, a mouse fecal isolate which was shown to promote intestinal homeostasis, utilizes a variety of mobile elements for genome evolution. Based on sequences collected by Pacific Biosciences SMRT sequencing technology, we discuss the challenges of assembling and studying a bacterial genome of high plasticity. Additionally, we conducted comparative genomics comparing this commensal strain with the B. vulgatus type strain ATCC 8482 as well as multiple other Bacteroides and Parabacteroides strains to reveal the most important differences and identify the unique features of B. vulgatus mpk. The genome of B. vulgatus mpk harbors a large and diverse set of mobile element proteins compared with other sequenced Bacteroides strains. We found evidence of a number of different horizontal gene transfer events and a genome landscape that has been extensively altered by different mobilization events. A CRISPR/Cas system could be identified that provides a possible mechanism for preventing the integration of invading external DNA. We propose that the high genome plasticity and the introduced genome instabilities of B. vulgatus mpk arising from the various mobilization events might play an important role not only in its adaptation to the challenging intestinal environment in general, but also in its ability to interact with the gut microbiota. PMID:27071651

  12. Cellulase and xylanase release from Bacteroides succinogenes and its importance in the rumen environment

    SciTech Connect

    Forsberg, C.W.; Beveridge, T.J.; Hellstrom, A.

    1981-11-01

    During growth of Bacteroides succinogenes in a liquid medium with cellulose as the source of carbohydrate, greater than 80% of the carboxymethylcellulase (endo-beta-1,4-glucanase), xylanase, and aryl-beta-xylosidase and 50% of the aryl-beta-glucosidase released from cells into the culture fluid. Less than 25% of the cellobiase activity was detected in the culture fluid. Approximately 50% of each of the released enzymes measured was associated with sedimentable subcellular membrane vesicles. The vesicles appeared to be released from the outer membrane of intact cells by bleb formation, primarily in pockets between the cells and the cellulose, although a few unattached cells with blebs were seen. Many vesicles were seen adhering to cellulose, and they were also seen free in the culture fluid. These data suggest that Bacteroides succinogenes releases hydrolytic enzymes in non-sedimentable and particulate forms during growth by a mechanism which has until now received little attention. Cellulose incubated in a porous nylon bag in the rumen was colonized by bacteria resembling Bacteroides succinogenes, and subcellular vesicles were seen penetrating channels and fractures in the cellulose. On this basis, it is suggested that bacteroides succinogenes cells in the rumen contribute to an extracellular population of subcellular vesicles that possess cellulolytic and hemicellulolytic activities which probably enhance polymer digestion and provide a source of sugars for microbes lacking polymer-degrading activity, thereby contributing to a stable heterogeneous microbial population. (Refs. 46).

  13. A proteomic approach towards understanding the cross talk between Bacteroides fragilis and Bifidobacterium longum in coculture.

    PubMed

    Rios-Covián, David; Sánchez, Borja; Martínez, Noelia; Cuesta, Isabel; Hernández-Barranco, Ana M; de Los Reyes-Gavilán, Clara G; Gueimonde, Miguel

    2016-07-01

    A better understanding of the interactions among intestinal microbes is needed to decipher the complex cross talk that takes place within the human gut. Bacteroides and Bifidobacterium genera are among the most relevant intestinal bacteria, and it has been previously reported that coculturing of these 2 microorganisms affects their survival. Therefore, coculturing of Bifidobacterium longum NB667 and Bacteroides fragilis DSMZ2151 was performed with the aim of unravelling the mechanisms involved in their interaction. To this end, we applied proteomic (2D-DIGE) analyses, and by chromatographic techniques we quantified the bacterial metabolites produced during coincubation. Coculture stimulated the growth of B. longum, retarding that of B. fragilis, with concomitant changes in the production of some proteins and metabolites of both bacteria. The combined culture promoted upregulation of the bifidobacterial pyruvate kinase and downregulation of the Bacteroides phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase - 2 enzymes involved in the catabolism of carbohydrates. Moreover, B. fragilis FKBP-type peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerase, a protein with chaperone-like activity, was found to be overproduced in coculture, suggesting the induction of a stress response in this microorganism. This study provides mechanistic data to deepen our understanding of the interaction between Bacteroides and Bifidobacterium intestinal populations.

  14. (Basis for the competitiveness of Rhizobium japonicum in nodulation of soybean). Progress report, 1984

    SciTech Connect

    Bauer, W.D.; Evans, W.R.

    1984-01-01

    Those characteristics of Rhizobium cells that are most crucial in determining their competitive success when inoculated onto seed in the field are sought. Initial studies of Rhizobium attachment to root surfaces revealed that only a small subpopulation of the cells in an R. japonicum culture are capable of firmly attaching to soybean roots. The size of the attachment-competent subpopulation depends on strain and culture age. Attachment of rhizobia to roots was found to be linearly proportional to the bacterial concentration. The rate of attachment is constant under our conditions for approximately 60 min, then rapidly levels off to approximately zero. Once attached to the root surface, Rhizobium cells seldom spontaneously detach. Rhizobia of several different species all attached comparably well to soybean roots. Attachment of various Rhizobium species to the root hairs of soybean seedlings likewise showed no evidence of host specificity or selectivity. 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. Survival of Rhizobium phaseoli in coal-based legume inoculants applied to seeds

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, S.L.; Berryhill, D.L.

    1983-02-01

    Eight coals used as carriers in legume inoculants promoted the survival of Rhizobium phaseoli on pinto bean seeds. Although peat was more protective, most coal-based inoculants provided >10/sup 4/ viable rhizobia per seed after 4 weeks.

  16. Permanent draft genome of the malachite-green-tolerant bacterium Rhizobium sp. MGL06.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang; Wang, Runping; Zeng, Runying

    2014-12-01

    Rhizobium sp. MGL06, the first Rhizobium isolate from a marine environment, is a malachite-green-tolerant bacterium with a broader salinity tolerance (range: 0.5% to 9%) than other rhizobia. This study sequences and annotates the draft genome sequence of this strain. Genome sequence information provides a basis for analyzing the malachite green tolerance, broad salinity adaptation, nitrogen fixation properties, and taxonomic classification of the isolate.

  17. "Bacteroides goldsteinii sp. nov." isolated from clinical specimens of human intestinal origin.

    PubMed

    Song, Yuli; Liu, Chengxu; Lee, Julia; Bolanos, Mauricio; Vaisanen, Marja-Liisa; Finegold, Sydney M

    2005-09-01

    Phenotypic and phylogenetic studies were performed on an unknown gram-negative, strictly anaerobic, rod-shaped bacterium isolated from human clinical specimens. This organism was indole negative, resistant to 20% bile, produced acetic and a lesser amount of succinic acids as the major end products of glucose metabolism, and possessed a G+C content of approximately 43 mol%. Comparative 16S rRNA gene sequencing demonstrated that the unidentified bacterium was a member of the Cytophaga-Flavobacter-Bacteroides phylum of gram-negative bacteria and formed a close association (with an average sequence similarity of 93.6%) with the second subcluster of the Porphyromonas cluster in the Bacteroides subgroup. Phylogenetically and phenotypically it resembled Bacteroides merdae; however, a 16S rRNA gene sequence divergence of approximately 5.5% between the unknown bacterium and B. merdae, as well as distinguishable biochemical characteristics, demonstrate that the unknown bacterium is genotypically and phenotypically distinct and represents a previously unknown subline within the Porphyromonas phylogenetic cluster. Furthermore, a DNA-DNA reassociation value of 17.8% between isolates WAL 12034(T) (the type strain of this novel taxon) and ATCC 43184(T) (B. merdae type strain) also documented the separateness of the unknown species and B. merdae. Based on the phenotypic and phylogenetic findings, a new species, "Bacteroides goldsteinii sp. nov," is proposed. The G+C content of the DNA is 43 mol% for Bacteroides. The type strain of "B. goldsteinii" is WAL 12034(T) (= CCUG 48944(T) = ATCC BAA-1180(T)). PMID:16145101

  18. Expression of Rhizobium leguminosarum CFN42 genes for lipopolysaccharide in strains derived from different R. leguminosarum soil isolates

    SciTech Connect

    Brink, B.A.; Noel, K.D. ); Miller, J.; Carlson, R.W. )

    1990-02-01

    Two mutant derivatives of Rhizobium leguminosarum ANU843 defective in lipopolysaccharide (LPS) were isolated. The LPSs of both mutants lacked O antigen and some sugar residues of the LPS core oligosaccharides. Genetic regions previously cloned from another Rhizobium leguminosarum wild-type isolate, strain CFN42, were used to complement these mutants. One mutant was complemented to give LPS that was apparently identical to the LPS of strain ANU843 in antigenicity, electrophoretic mobility, and sugar composition. The other mutant was complemented by a second CFN42lps genetic region. In this case the resulting LPS contained O-antigen sugars characteristic of donor strain CFN42 and reacted weakly with antiserum against CFN42 cells, but did not react detectably with antiserum against ANU843 cells. Therefore, one of the CFN42 lps genetic regions specifies a function that is conserved between the two R. leguminosarum wild-type isolates, whereas the other region, at least in part, specifies a strain-specific LPS structure. Transfer of these two genetic regions into wild-type strains derived from R. leguminosarum ANU843 and 128C53 gave results consistent with this conclusion. The mutants derived from strain ANU843 elicited incompletely developed clover nodules that exhibited low bacterial populations and very low nitrogenase activity. Both mutants elicited normally developed, nitrogen-fixing clover nodules when they carried CFN42 lps DNA that permitted synthesis of O-antigen-containing LPS, regardless of whether the O antigen was the one originally made by strain ANU843.

  19. Lipopolysaccharide mutants of Rhizobium meliloti are not defective in symbiosis

    SciTech Connect

    Clover, R.H.; Kieber, J.; Signer, E.R. )

    1989-07-01

    Mutants of Rhizobium meliloti selected primarily for bacteriophage resistance fall into 13 groups. Mutants in the four best-characterized groups (class A, lpsB, lpsC, and class D), which map to the rhizobial chromosome, appear to affect lipopolysaccharide (LPS) as judged by the reactivity with monoclonal antibodies and behavior on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gels of extracted LPS. Mutations in all 13 groups, in an otherwise wild-type genetic background, are Fix{sup +} on alfalfa. This suggests that LPS does not play a major role in symbiosis. Mutations in lpsB, however, are Fix{sup {minus}} in one particular genetic background, evidently because of the cumulative effect of several independent background mutations. In addition, an auxotrophic mutation evidently equivalent to Escherichia coli carAB is Fix{sup {minus}} on alfalfa.

  20. Acid tolerance of rhizobium trifolii in culture media

    SciTech Connect

    Thornton, F.C.; Davey, C.B.

    1983-01-01

    Tolerance to acidity (pH 4.2 to 4.6), low P (1 to 6 ..mu..M) and high Al (15 to 40..mu..M) for 100 strains of Rhizobium trifolii was assessed in liquid culture media in the laboratory. Response to acidity and Al varied among strains as evidenced by lower maximum cell densities and reduced growth rates, most preceded by a lag phase. Tolerance to acidity did not imply tolerance to Al in all cases. Strains were capable of tolerating higher levels of Al if acidity was reduced. Limitations in rhizobial growth due to low P concentrations were not as severe a stress as high acidity or high Al concentration.

  1. Dechlorination of Atrazine by a Rhizobium sp. Isolate

    PubMed Central

    Bouquard, C.; Ouazzani, J.; Prome, J.; Michel-Briand, Y.; Plesiat, P.

    1997-01-01

    A Rhizobium sp. strain, named PATR, was isolated from an agricultural soil and found to actively degrade the herbicide atrazine. Incubation of PATR in a basal liquid medium containing 30 mg of atrazine liter(sup-1) resulted in the rapid consumption of the herbicide and the accumulation of hydroxyatrazine as the only metabolite detected after 8 days of culture. Experiments performed with ring-labeled [(sup14)C]atrazine indicated no mineralization. The enzyme responsible for the hydroxylation of atrazine was partially purified and found to consist of four 50-kDa subunits. Its synthesis in PATR was constitutive. This new atrazine hydrolase demonstrated 92% sequence identity through a 24-amino-acid fragment with atrazine chlorohydrolase AtzA produced by Pseudomonas sp. strain ADP. PMID:16535552

  2. Effect of environmental pH on enzyme activity and growth of Bacteroides gingivalis W50.

    PubMed Central

    McDermid, A S; McKee, A S; Marsh, P D

    1988-01-01

    Since the pH of the gingival crevice increases from below neutrality in health to above pH 8 in disease, we decided to investigate the effect of environmental pH on the growth and enzyme activity of Bacteroides gingivalis W50. Cells were grown in a chemostat under hemin-excess conditions over a range of pH values; stable growth was observed only between pH 6.7 and 8.3, with the maximum yields obtained between pH 7.0 and 8.0. The enzyme profile of cells varied markedly with pH. Enzymes with a specificity for gingival connective tissue (collagenase, hyaluronidase) were produced optimally at or below neutral pH, whereas trypsinlike activity increased with the growth pH and was maximal at pH 8.0. Chymotrypsinlike activity was generally low, although its activity was highest at the extremes of growth pH, i.e., at pH 6.7 and 8.3. Inhibitor studies provided evidence that the breakdown of collagen involved the concerted action of both a collagenase and the trypsinlike enzyme. The ratio of trypsin to collagenolytic activity rose from 1:1 during growth at neutral pH and below to almost 7:1 during growth at pH 8.3. Thus B. gingivalis appears to be uniquely adapted as a periodontopathic organism in that under environmental conditions likely to prevail during the initial stages of pocket development it produces maximally those enzymes with a tissue-damaging potential. Then, as the pH of the pocket rises during the host inflammatory response, the activity of the trypsinlike enzyme increases markedly, which may enable cells to inactivate key components of the host defenses such as immunoglobulins and complement. PMID:3281900

  3. Purification and some properties of an extracellular alpha-amylase from Bacteroides amylophilus.

    PubMed Central

    McWethy, S J; Hartman, P A

    1977-01-01

    A medium was developed to obtain maximum yields of extracellular amylase from Bacteroides amylophilus 70. Crude enzyme preparation, obtained by ammonium sulfate precipitation of cell-free broth, contained six amylolytic isoenzymes that were detected by isoelectric focusing and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. One of these amylases was purified by diethylaminoethyl-Sephadex A-50 ion-exchange chromatography and Sephadex G-200 gel filtration techniques. Some properties of the purified extracellular alpha-amylase were: optimum pH, 6.3; optimum temperature, 43 degrees C: PH stability range, 5.8 to 7.5; isoelectric point, pH 4.6; molecular weight, 92,000 (by sodium dodecyl sulfatedisc gel electrophoresis); and sugars causing inhibition, cyclomaltoheptaose, cyclomaltohexaose, and alpha-d-phenylglucoside. In addition, Ca2+ and Co2+ were strong activators,and Hg2+ was a strong inhibitior; all other cations were slightly stimulatory. Dialysis against 0.01 M ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid caused a 58% loss of activity that was restored to 92% of the original by the addition of 0.04 M Ca2+. The enzyme affected a blue-value-reducing-value curve characteristic of alpha-type amylases. The relative rates of hydrolysis of amylose, soluble starch, amylopectin, and dextrin were 100, 97, 92, and 60%, respectively; Michaelis constants for these substrates were 18.2, 18.7, 18.2, and 16.7 mumol of d-glucosidic bond/liter, respectively. The enzyme degraded maize (corn) starch granules to some extent and had relatively little activity on potato starch granules. Images PMID:14926

  4. Biosynthesis of Rhizobium meliloti lipooligosaccharide Nod factors: NodA is required for an N-acyltransferase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Atkinson, E.M.; Long, S.R. ); Palcic, M.M.; Hindsgaul, O. )

    1994-08-30

    Rhizobium bacteria synthesize N-acylated [beta]-1,4-N-acetylglucosamine lipooligosaccharides, called Nod factors, which act as morphogenic signal molecules to legume roots during development of nitrogen-fixing nodules. The biosynthesis of Nod factors is genetically dependent upon the nodulation (nod) genes, including the common nod genes nodABC. We used the Rhizobium meliloti NodH sulfotransferase to prepare [sup 35]S-labeled oligosaccharides which served as metabolic tracers for Nod enzyme activities. This approach provides a general method for following chitooligosaccharide modifications. We found nodAB-dependent conversion of N-acetylchitotetraose (chitotetraose) monosulfate into hydrophobic compounds which by chromatographic and chemical tests were equivalent to acylated Nod factors. Sequential incubation of labeled intermediates with Escherichia coli containing either NodA or NodB showed that NodB was required before NodA during Nod factor biosynthesis. The acylation activity was sensitive to oligosaccharide chain length, with chitotetraose serving as a better substrate than chitobiose or chitotriose. We constructed a putative Nod factor intermediate, GlcN-[beta]1,4-(GlcNac)[sub 3], by enzymatic synthesis and labeled it by NodH-mediated sulfation to create a specific metabolic probe. Acylation of this oligosaccharide required only NodA. These results confirm previous reports that NodB is an N-deacetylase and suggest that NodA is an N-acyltransferase. 31 refs., 6 figs.

  5. Induction of host defences by Rhizobium during ineffective nodulation of pea (Pisum sativum L.) carrying symbiotically defective mutations sym40 (PsEFD), sym33 (PsIPD3/PsCYCLOPS) and sym42.

    PubMed

    Ivanova, Kira A; Tsyganova, Anna V; Brewin, Nicholas J; Tikhonovich, Igor A; Tsyganov, Viktor E

    2015-11-01

    Rhizobia are able to establish a beneficial interaction with legumes by forming a new organ, called the symbiotic root nodule, which is a unique ecological niche for rhizobial nitrogen fixation. Rhizobial infection has many similarities with pathogenic infection and induction of defence responses accompanies both interactions, but defence responses are induced to a lesser extent during rhizobial infection. However, strong defence responses may result from incompatible interactions between legumes and rhizobia due to a mutation in either macro- or microsymbiont. The aim of this research was to analyse different plant defence reactions in response to Rhizobium infection for several pea (Pisum sativum) mutants that result in ineffective symbiosis. Pea mutants were examined by histochemical and immunocytochemical analyses, light, fluorescence and transmission electron microscopy and quantitative real-time PCR gene expression analysis. It was observed that mutations in pea symbiotic genes sym33 (PsIPD3/PsCYCLOPS encoding a transcriptional factor) and sym40 (PsEFD encoding a putative negative regulator of the cytokinin response) led to suberin depositions in ineffective nodules, and in the sym42 there were callose depositions in infection thread (IT) and host cell walls. The increase in deposition of unesterified pectin in IT walls was observed for mutants in the sym33 and sym42; for mutant in the sym42, unesterified pectin was also found around degrading bacteroids. In mutants in the genes sym33 and sym40, an increase in the expression level of a gene encoding peroxidase was observed. In the genes sym40 and sym42, an increase in the expression levels of genes encoding a marker of hypersensitive reaction and PR10 protein was demonstrated. Thus, a range of plant defence responses like suberisation, callose and unesterified pectin deposition as well as activation of defence genes can be triggered by different pea single mutations that cause perception of an otherwise

  6. Alfalfa yield response to inoculation with recombinant strains of Rhizobium meliloti with an extra copy of dctABD and/or modified nifA expression.

    PubMed

    Bosworth, A H; Williams, M K; Albrecht, K A; Kwiatkowski, R; Beynon, J; Hankinson, T R; Ronson, C W; Cannon, F; Wacek, T J; Triplett, E W

    1994-10-01

    The construction of rhizobial strains which increase plant biomass under controlled conditions has been previously reported. However, there is no evidence that these newly constructed strains increase legume yield under agricultural conditions. This work tested the hypothesis that carefully manipulating expression of additional copies of nifA and dctABD in strains of Rhizobium meliloti would increase alfalfa yield in the field. The rationale for this hypothesis is based on the positive regulatory role that nifA plays in the expression of the nif regulon and the fact that a supply of dicarboxylic acids from the plant is required as a carbon and energy source for nitrogen fixation by the Rhizobium bacteroids in the nodule. These recombinant strains, as well as the wild-type strains from which they were derived, are ideal tools to examine the effects of modifying or increasing the expression of these genes on alfalfa biomass. The experimental design comprised seven recombinant strains, two wild-type strains, and an uninoculated control. Each treatment was replicated eight times and was conducted at four field sites in Wisconsin. Recombinant strain RMBPC-2, which has an additional copy of both nifA and dctABD, increased alfalfa biomass by 12.9% compared with the yield with the wild-type strain RMBPC and 17.9% over that in the uninoculated control plot at the site where soil nitrogen and organic matter content was lowest. These increases were statistically significant at the 5% confidence interval for each of the three harvests made during the growing season. Strain RMBPC-2 did increase alfalfa biomass at the Hancock site; however, no other significant increases or decreases in alfalfa biomass were observed with the seven other recombinant strains at that site. At three sites where this experiment was conducted, either native rhizobial populations or soil nitrogen concentrations were high. At these sites, none of the recombinant strains affected yield. We conclude that

  7. Introduction of a novel pathway for IAA biosynthesis to rhizobia alters vetch root nodule development.

    PubMed

    Camerini, Serena; Senatore, Beatrice; Lonardo, Enza; Imperlini, Esther; Bianco, Carmen; Moschetti, Giancarlo; Rotino, Giuseppe L; Campion, Bruno; Defez, Roberto

    2008-07-01

    We introduced into Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. viciae LPR1105 a new pathway for the biosynthesis of the auxin, indole-3-acetic acid (IAA), under the control of a stationary phase-activated promoter active both in free-living bacteria and bacteroids. The newly introduced genes are the iaaM gene from Pseudomonas savastanoi and the tms2 gene from Agrobacterium tumefaciens. Free-living bacteria harbouring the promoter-iaaMtms2 construct release into the growth medium 14-fold more IAA than the wild-type parental strain. This IAA overproducing R. l. viciae, the RD20 strain, elicits the development of vetch root nodules containing up to 60-fold more IAA than nodules infected by the wild-type strain LPR1105. Vetch root nodules derived from RD20 are fewer in number per plant, heavier in terms of dry weight and show an enlarged and more active meristem. A significant increase in acetylene reduction activity was measured in nodules elicited in vetch by RD20.

  8. The Regulatory Protein RosR Affects Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. trifolii Protein Profiles, Cell Surface Properties, and Symbiosis with Clover

    PubMed Central

    Rachwał, Kamila; Boguszewska, Aleksandra; Kopcińska, Joanna; Karaś, Magdalena; Tchórzewski, Marek; Janczarek, Monika

    2016-01-01

    Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. trifolii is capable of establishing a symbiotic relationship with plants from the genus Trifolium. Previously, a regulatory protein encoded by rosR was identified and characterized in this bacterium. RosR possesses a Cys2-His2-type zinc finger motif and belongs to Ros/MucR family of rhizobial transcriptional regulators. Transcriptome profiling of the rosR mutant revealed a role of this protein in several cellular processes, including the synthesis of cell-surface components and polysaccharides, motility, and bacterial metabolism. Here, we show that a mutation in rosR resulted in considerable changes in R. leguminosarum bv. trifolii protein profiles. Extracellular, membrane, and periplasmic protein profiles of R. leguminosarum bv. trifolii wild type and the rosR mutant were examined, and proteins with substantially different abundances between these strains were identified. Compared with the wild type, extracellular fraction of the rosR mutant contained greater amounts of several proteins, including Ca2+-binding cadherin-like proteins, a RTX-like protein, autoaggregation protein RapA1, and flagellins FlaA and FlaB. In contrast, several proteins involved in the uptake of various substrates were less abundant in the mutant strain (DppA, BraC, and SfuA). In addition, differences were observed in membrane proteins of the mutant and wild-type strains, which mainly concerned various transport system components. Using atomic force microscopy (AFM) imaging, we characterized the topography and surface properties of the rosR mutant and wild-type cells. We found that the mutation in rosR gene also affected surface properties of R. leguminosarum bv. trifolii. The mutant cells were significantly more hydrophobic than the wild-type cells, and their outer membrane was three times more permeable to the hydrophobic dye N-phenyl-1-naphthylamine. The mutation of rosR also caused defects in bacterial symbiotic interaction with clover plants. Compared with

  9. The Regulatory Protein RosR Affects Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. trifolii Protein Profiles, Cell Surface Properties, and Symbiosis with Clover.

    PubMed

    Rachwał, Kamila; Boguszewska, Aleksandra; Kopcińska, Joanna; Karaś, Magdalena; Tchórzewski, Marek; Janczarek, Monika

    2016-01-01

    Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. trifolii is capable of establishing a symbiotic relationship with plants from the genus Trifolium. Previously, a regulatory protein encoded by rosR was identified and characterized in this bacterium. RosR possesses a Cys2-His2-type zinc finger motif and belongs to Ros/MucR family of rhizobial transcriptional regulators. Transcriptome profiling of the rosR mutant revealed a role of this protein in several cellular processes, including the synthesis of cell-surface components and polysaccharides, motility, and bacterial metabolism. Here, we show that a mutation in rosR resulted in considerable changes in R. leguminosarum bv. trifolii protein profiles. Extracellular, membrane, and periplasmic protein profiles of R. leguminosarum bv. trifolii wild type and the rosR mutant were examined, and proteins with substantially different abundances between these strains were identified. Compared with the wild type, extracellular fraction of the rosR mutant contained greater amounts of several proteins, including Ca(2+)-binding cadherin-like proteins, a RTX-like protein, autoaggregation protein RapA1, and flagellins FlaA and FlaB. In contrast, several proteins involved in the uptake of various substrates were less abundant in the mutant strain (DppA, BraC, and SfuA). In addition, differences were observed in membrane proteins of the mutant and wild-type strains, which mainly concerned various transport system components. Using atomic force microscopy (AFM) imaging, we characterized the topography and surface properties of the rosR mutant and wild-type cells. We found that the mutation in rosR gene also affected surface properties of R. leguminosarum bv. trifolii. The mutant cells were significantly more hydrophobic than the wild-type cells, and their outer membrane was three times more permeable to the hydrophobic dye N-phenyl-1-naphthylamine. The mutation of rosR also caused defects in bacterial symbiotic interaction with clover plants. Compared with

  10. The Regulatory Protein RosR Affects Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. trifolii Protein Profiles, Cell Surface Properties, and Symbiosis with Clover

    PubMed Central

    Rachwał, Kamila; Boguszewska, Aleksandra; Kopcińska, Joanna; Karaś, Magdalena; Tchórzewski, Marek; Janczarek, Monika

    2016-01-01

    Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. trifolii is capable of establishing a symbiotic relationship with plants from the genus Trifolium. Previously, a regulatory protein encoded by rosR was identified and characterized in this bacterium. RosR possesses a Cys2-His2-type zinc finger motif and belongs to Ros/MucR family of rhizobial transcriptional regulators. Transcriptome profiling of the rosR mutant revealed a role of this protein in several cellular processes, including the synthesis of cell-surface components and polysaccharides, motility, and bacterial metabolism. Here, we show that a mutation in rosR resulted in considerable changes in R. leguminosarum bv. trifolii protein profiles. Extracellular, membrane, and periplasmic protein profiles of R. leguminosarum bv. trifolii wild type and the rosR mutant were examined, and proteins with substantially different abundances between these strains were identified. Compared with the wild type, extracellular fraction of the rosR mutant contained greater amounts of several proteins, including Ca2+-binding cadherin-like proteins, a RTX-like protein, autoaggregation protein RapA1, and flagellins FlaA and FlaB. In contrast, several proteins involved in the uptake of various substrates were less abundant in the mutant strain (DppA, BraC, and SfuA). In addition, differences were observed in membrane proteins of the mutant and wild-type strains, which mainly concerned various transport system components. Using atomic force microscopy (AFM) imaging, we characterized the topography and surface properties of the rosR mutant and wild-type cells. We found that the mutation in rosR gene also affected surface properties of R. leguminosarum bv. trifolii. The mutant cells were significantly more hydrophobic than the wild-type cells, and their outer membrane was three times more permeable to the hydrophobic dye N-phenyl-1-naphthylamine. The mutation of rosR also caused defects in bacterial symbiotic interaction with clover plants. Compared with

  11. Effect of oxygen radicals and peroxide on survival after ultraviolet irradiation and liquid holding recovery of Bacteroides fragilis

    SciTech Connect

    Slade, H.J.K.; Jones, D.T.; Woods, D.R.

    1981-08-01

    The survival of Bacteroides fragilis cells after far-ultraviolet irradiation under anaerobic and aerobic conditions and the liquid holding recovery under aerobic conditions were not affected by peroxide or quenchers of toxic oxygen derivatives.

  12. Effect of clavulanic acid on the activities of ten beta-lactam agents against members of the Bacteroides fragilis group.

    PubMed Central

    Lamothe, F; Auger, F; Lacroix, J M

    1984-01-01

    Clavulanic acid reduced the MICs of amoxicillin, carbencillin , cefamandole, cefotaxime, ceftazidime, ceftizoxime, cephalothin, and penicillin G, but not of cefoxitin or moxalactam, against 77 isolates of the Bacteroides fragilis group, all rapidly beta-lactamase positive by the nitrocefin slide test. It had no effect on the susceptibilities of eight Bacteroides distasonis strains that were slowly beta-lactamase positive (18 h of incubation). PMID:6732233

  13. crinkle, a novel symbiotic mutant that affects the infection thread growth and alters the root hair, trichome, and seed development in Lotus japonicus.

    PubMed

    Tansengco, Myra L; Hayashi, Makoto; Kawaguchi, Masayoshi; Imaizumi-Anraku, Haruko; Murooka, Yoshikatsu

    2003-03-01

    To elucidate the mechanisms involved in Rhizobium-legume symbiosis, we examined a novel symbiotic mutant, crinkle (Ljsym79), from the model legume Lotus japonicus. On nitrogen-starved medium, crinkle mutants inoculated with the symbiont bacterium Mesorhizobium loti MAFF 303099 showed severe nitrogen deficiency symptoms. This mutant was characterized by the production of many bumps and small, white, uninfected nodule-like structures. Few nodules were pale-pink and irregularly shaped with nitrogen-fixing bacteroids and expressing leghemoglobin mRNA. Morphological analysis of infected roots showed that nodulation in crinkle mutants is blocked at the stage of the infection process. Confocal microscopy and histological examination of crinkle nodules revealed that infection threads were arrested upon penetrating the epidermal cells. Starch accumulation in uninfected cells and undeveloped vascular bundles were also noted in crinkle nodules. Results suggest that the Crinkle gene controls the infection process that is crucial during the early stage of nodule organogenesis. Aside from the symbiotic phenotypes, crinkle mutants also developed morphological alterations, such as crinkly or wavy trichomes, short seedpods with aborted embryos, and swollen root hairs. crinkle is therefore required for symbiotic nodule development and for other aspects of plant development.

  14. Complete genome sequence of Bacteroides helcogenes type strain (P 36-108T)

    SciTech Connect

    Pati, Amrita; Gronow, Sabine; Zeytun, Ahmet; Lapidus, Alla L.; Nolan, Matt; Hammon, Nancy; Deshpande, Shweta; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Tapia, Roxanne; Han, Cliff; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Pitluck, Sam; Liolios, Konstantinos; Pagani, Ioanna; Ivanova, N; Mavromatis, K; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Land, Miriam L; Hauser, Loren John; Chang, Yun-Juan; Jeffries, Cynthia; Detter, J. Chris; Brambilla, Evelyne-Marie; Rohde, Manfred; Goker, Markus; Woyke, Tanja; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Lucas, Susan

    2011-01-01

    Bacteroides helcogenes Benno et al. 1983 is of interest because of its isolated phylogenetic location and, although it has been found in pig feces and is known to be pathogenic for pigs, occurrence of this bacterium is rare and it does not cause significant damage in intensive animal husbandry. The genome of B. helcogenes P 36-108T is already the fifth completed and published type strain genome from the genus Bacteroides in the family Bacteroidaceae. The 3,998,906 bp long genome with its 3,353 protein-coding and 83 RNA genes consists of one circular chromosome and is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  15. Hydrogen Inhibition of Nitrogen Reduction by Nitrogenase in Isolated Soybean Nodule Bacteroids 1

    PubMed Central

    Rasche, Madeline E.; Arp, Daniel J.

    1989-01-01

    Dihydrogen, a by-product of biological nitrogen fixation, is a competitive inhibitor of N2 reduction by nitrogenase. To evaluate the significance of H2 inhibition in vivo, we have measured the apparent inhibition constant for H2 inhibition of N2 reduction in Bradyrhizobium japonicum bacteroids isolated from soybean nodules. The rate of N2 reduction was measured as ammonia production by bacteroids incubated in a buffer containing 200 micromolar leghemoglobin and 10 millimolar succinate under 0.02 atmosphere O2 and various concentrations of N2 and H2. The apparent inhibition constant for H2 under these conditions was determined to be approximately 0.03 atmosphere. This relatively low value strengthens the proposal that H2 inhibition of N2 reduction may be a significant factor in lowering the efficiency of nitrogen fixation in legume nodules. PMID:16667084

  16. API ZYM system for identification of Bacteroides spp., Capnocytophaga spp., and spirochetes of oral origin.

    PubMed Central

    Laughon, B E; Syed, S A; Loesche, W J

    1982-01-01

    A total of 80 oral strains of Bacteroides gingivalis, B. asaccharolyticus, B. melaninogenicus subsp. intermedius, B. melaninogenicus subsp. melaninogenicus, Capnocytophaga, Treponema denticola, and T. vincentii were characterized with the API ZYM system for 19 enzyme activities. Comparison of anaerobic and aerobic incubation with nine reference strains of these organisms showed no important differences. The key differential tests for black-pigmented Bacteroides strains and treponemes of oral origin were trypsin, alpha-glucosidase, and N-acetyl-beta-glucosaminidase. All Capnocytophaga strains produced distinctive aminopeptidase activities but varied in their glycosidic capabilities. The presence of a trypsin-like activity in B. gingivalis, T. denticola, and a group of Capnocytophaga strains may contribute to tissue destruction in periodontal disease. PMID:6764781

  17. Molecular cloning and sequencing of the gene encoding the fimbrial subunit protein of Bacteroides gingivalis.

    PubMed Central

    Dickinson, D P; Kubiniec, M A; Yoshimura, F; Genco, R J

    1988-01-01

    The gene encoding the fimbrial subunit protein of Bacteroides gingivalis 381, fimbrilin, has been cloned and sequenced. The gene was present as a single copy on the bacterial chromosome, and the codon usage in the gene conformed closely to that expected for an abundant protein. The predicted size of the mature protein was 35,924 daltons, and the secretory form may have had a 10-amino-acid, hydrophilic leader sequence similar to the leader sequences of the MePhe fimbriae family. The protein sequence had no marked similarity to known fimbrial sequences, and no homologous sequences could be found in other black-pigmented Bacteroides species, suggesting that fimbrillin represents a class of fimbrial subunit protein of limited distribution. Images PMID:2895100

  18. Metronidazole- and carbapenem-resistant bacteroides thetaiotaomicron isolated in Rochester, Minnesota, in 2014.

    PubMed

    Sadarangani, Sapna P; Cunningham, Scott A; Jeraldo, Patricio R; Wilson, John W; Khare, Reeti; Patel, Robin

    2015-07-01

    Emerging antimicrobial resistance in members of the Bacteroides fragilis group is a concern in clinical medicine. Although metronidazole and carbapenem resistance have been reported in Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron, a member of the B. fragilis group, they have not, to the best of our knowledge, been reported together in the same B. thetaiotaomicron isolate. Herein, we report isolation of piperacillin-tazobactam-, metronidazole-, clindamycin-, ertapenem-, and meropenem-resistant B. thetaiotaomicron from a patient with postoperative intra-abdominal abscess and empyema. Whole-genome sequencing demonstrated the presence of nimD with at least a portion of IS1169 upstream, a second putative nim gene, two β-lactamase genes (one of which has not been previously reported), two tetX genes, tetQ, ermF, two cat genes, and a number of efflux pumps. This report highlights emerging antimicrobial resistance in B. thetaiotaomicron and the importance of identification and antimicrobial susceptibility testing of selected anaerobic bacteria.

  19. Marsh soils as potential sinks for Bacteroides fecal indicator bacteria, Waccamaw National Wildlife Refuge, Georgetown, SC, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Drexler, Judith Z.; Johnson, Heather E.; Duris, Joseph W.; Krauss, Ken W.

    2014-01-01

    A soil core collected in a tidal freshwater marsh in the Waccamaw National Wildlife Refuge (Georgetown, SC) exuded a particularly strong odor of cow manure upon extrusion. In order to test for manure and determine its provenance, we carried out microbial source tracking using DNA markers for Bacteroides, a noncoliform, anaerobic bacterial group that represents a broad group of the fecal population. Three core sections from 0-3 cm, 9-12 cm and 30-33 were analyzed for the presence of Bacteroides. The ages of core sediments were estimated using 210Pb and 137Cs dating. All three core sections tested positive for Bacteroides DNA markers related to cow or deer feces. Because cow manure is stockpiled, used as fertilizer, and a source of direct contamination in the Great Pee Dee River/Winyah Bay watershed, it is very likely the source of the Bacteroides that was deposited on the marsh. The mid-points of the core sections were dated as follows: 0-3 cm: 2009; 9-12 cm: 1999, and 30-33 cm: 1961. The presence of Bacteroides at different depths/ages in the soil profile indicates that soils in tidal freshwater marshes are, at the least, capable of being short-term sinks for Bacteroides and, may have the potential to be long-term sinks of stable, naturalized populations.

  20. Nitrogen-fixing Rhizobium-legume symbiosis: are polyploidy and host peptide-governed symbiont differentiation general principles of endosymbiosis?

    PubMed Central

    Maróti, Gergely; Kondorosi, Éva

    2014-01-01

    The symbiosis between rhizobia soil bacteria and legumes is facultative and initiated by nitrogen starvation of the host plant. Exchange of signal molecules between the partners leads to the formation of root nodules where bacteria are converted to nitrogen-fixing bacteroids. In this mutualistic symbiosis, the bacteria provide nitrogen sources for plant growth in return for photosynthates from the host. Depending on the host plant the symbiotic fate of bacteria can either be reversible or irreversible. In Medicago plants the bacteria undergo a host-directed multistep differentiation process culminating in the formation of elongated and branched polyploid bacteria with definitive loss of cell division ability. The plant factors are nodule-specific symbiotic peptides. About 500 of them are cysteine-rich NCR peptides produced in the infected plant cells. NCRs are targeted to the endosymbionts and the concerted action of different sets of peptides governs different stages of endosymbiont maturation. This review focuses on symbiotic plant cell development and terminal bacteroid differentiation and demonstrates the crucial roles of symbiotic peptides by showing an example of multi-target mechanism exerted by one of these symbiotic peptides. PMID:25071739

  1. Characterization of bactericidal activity of clindamycin against Bacteroides fragilis via kill curve methods.

    PubMed Central

    Klepser, M E; Banevicius, M A; Quintiliani, R; Nightingale, C H

    1996-01-01

    Kill curves were determined for five isolates of Bacteroides fragilis with clindamycin at concentrations equal to the MIC or to 4, 16, and 64 times the MIC. Examination of plots of log CFU per milliliter versus time revealed no association between the clindamycin concentration and the rate and extent of the bactericidal activity against B. fragilis at or below 64 times the MIC. PMID:8843310

  2. Augmentation of the in vitro activity of azlocillin against Bacteroides fragilis by clavulanic acid.

    PubMed Central

    Bansal, M B; Chuah, S K; Thadepalli, H

    1984-01-01

    Azlocillin was active against 90% of 154 strains of Bacteroides fragilis at a concentration of 64 micrograms/ml. Twenty-eight strains of B. fragilis with an azlocillin MIC of greater than or equal to 8 micrograms/ml were retested with a combination of azlocillin plus clavulanic acid. Of these strains, 71% showed a 4- to 32-fold decrease in the MIC of azlocillin plus clavulanic acid. PMID:6517552

  3. Nodules Initiated by Rhizobium meliloti Exopolysaccharide Mutants Lack a Discrete, Persistent Nodule Meristem 1

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Cheng; Signer, Ethan R.; Hirsch, Ann M.

    1992-01-01

    Infection of alfalfa with Rhizobium meliloti exo mutants deficient in exopolysaccharide results in abnormal root nodules that are devoid of bacteria and fail to fix nitrogen. Here we report further characterization of these abnormal nodules. Tightly curled root hairs or shepherd's crooks were found after inoculation with Rm 1021-derived exo mutants, but curling was delayed compared with wild-type Rm 1021. Infection threads were initiated in curled root hairs by mutants as well as by wild-type R. meliloti, but the exo mutant-induced threads aborted within the peripheral cells of the developing nodule. Also, nodules elicited by Rm 1021-derived exo mutants were more likely to develop on secondary roots than on the primary root. In contrast with wild-type R. meliloti-induced nodules, the exo mutant-induced nodules lacked a well defined apical meristem, presumably due to the abortion of the infection threads. The relationship of these findings to the physiology of nodule development is discussed. ImagesFigure 3Figure 1Figure 2Figure 4 PMID:16668605

  4. Enhanced nitrogen fixation in a Rhizobium etli ntrC mutant that overproduces the Bradyrhizobium japonicum symbiotic terminal oxidase cbb{sub 3}

    SciTech Connect

    Soberon, M.; Lopez, O.; Morera, C.; Girard, M.L.; Tabche, M.L.; Miranda, J.

    1999-05-01

    The ntrC gene codes for a transcriptional activator protein that modulates gene expression in response to nitrogen. The cytochrome production pattern of a Rhizobium etli ntrC mutant (CFN2012) was studied. CO difference spectral analysis of membranes showed that CFN2012 produced a terminal oxidase similar to the symbiotic terminal oxidase of bacteroids in free-living cells under aerobic conditions, with a characteristic trough at 553 nm. CFN2012 produced two c-type cytochromes with molecular masses of 27 and 32 kDa in contrast with the wild-type strain, which produced only a 32-kDa c-tye cytochrome. The expression levels of the R. etli fix/NOQP operon, which codes for terminal oxidase cbb{sub 3}, were not affected by the ntrC mutation. However, the production levels of the two c-type cytochromes (27 and 32 kDa) were enhanced at least eightfold when the Bradyrhizobium japonicum fixNOQP operon was expressed in CFN2012 from the nptII promoter (pMSfix{sup c}), suggesting that these proteins are subunits FixO (27 kDa) and FixP (32 kDa) of cbb{sub 3} and that CFN2012/pMSfix{sup c} overproduced this terminal oxidase. CFN2012/pMSfix{sup c} showed a significant increase in its symbiotic performance as judged by the determination of nitrogenase activities of plants inoculated with this strain, suggesting that the overproduction of cbb{sub 3} terminal oxidase correlates with an enhancement in symbiotic nitrogen fixation.

  5. The Stringent Response Is Required for Amino Acid and Nitrate Utilization, Nod Factor Regulation, Nodulation, and Nitrogen Fixation in Rhizobium etli†

    PubMed Central

    Calderón-Flores, Arturo; Du Pont, Gisela; Huerta-Saquero, Alejandro; Merchant-Larios, Horacio; Servín-González, Luis; Durán, Socorro

    2005-01-01

    A Rhizobium etli Tn5 insertion mutant, LM01, was selected for its inability to use glutamine as the sole carbon and nitrogen source. The Tn5 insertion in LM01 was localized to the rsh gene, which encodes a member of the RelA/SpoT family of proteins. The LM01 mutant was affected in the ability to use amino acids and nitrate as nitrogen sources and was unable to accumulate (p)ppGpp when grown under carbon and nitrogen starvation, as opposed to the wild-type strain, which accumulated (p)ppGpp under these conditions. The R. etli rsh gene was found to restore (p)ppGpp accumulation to a ΔrelA ΔspoT mutant of Escherichia coli. The R. etli Rsh protein consists of 744 amino acids, and the Tn5 insertion in LM01 results in the synthesis of a truncated protein of 329 amino acids; complementation experiments indicate that this truncated protein is still capable of (p)ppGpp hydrolysis. A second rsh mutant of R. etli, strain AC1, was constructed by inserting an Ω element at the beginning of the rsh gene, resulting in a null allele. Both AC1 and LM01 were affected in Nod factor production, which was constitutive in both strains, and in nodulation; nodules produced by the rsh mutants in Phaseolus vulgaris were smaller than those produced by the wild-type strain and did not fix nitrogen. In addition, electron microscopy revealed that the mutant bacteroids lacked poly-β-hydroxybutyrate granules. These results indicate a central role for the stringent response in symbiosis. PMID:16030199

  6. Maturation of Rhizobium leguminosarum Hydrogenase in the Presence of Oxygen Requires the Interaction of the Chaperone HypC and the Scaffolding Protein HupK*

    PubMed Central

    Albareda, Marta; Pacios, Luis F.; Manyani, Hamid; Rey, Luis; Brito, Belén; Imperial, Juan; Ruiz-Argüeso, Tomás; Palacios, Jose M.

    2014-01-01

    [NiFe] hydrogenases are key enzymes for the energy and redox metabolisms of different microorganisms. Synthesis of these metalloenzymes involves a complex series of biochemical reactions catalyzed by a plethora of accessory proteins, many of them required to synthesize and insert the unique NiFe(CN)2CO cofactor. HypC is an accessory protein conserved in all [NiFe] hydrogenase systems and involved in the synthesis and transfer of the Fe(CN)2CO cofactor precursor. Hydrogenase accessory proteins from bacteria-synthesizing hydrogenase in the presence of oxygen include HupK, a scaffolding protein with a moderate sequence similarity to the hydrogenase large subunit and proposed to participate as an intermediate chaperone in the synthesis of the NiFe cofactor. The endosymbiotic bacterium Rhizobium leguminosarum contains a single hydrogenase system that can be expressed under two different physiological conditions: free-living microaerobic cells (∼12 μm O2) and bacteroids from legume nodules (∼10–100 nm O2). We have used bioinformatic tools to model HupK structure and interaction of this protein with HypC. Site-directed mutagenesis at positions predicted as critical by the structural analysis have allowed the identification of HupK and HypC residues relevant for the maturation of hydrogenase. Mutant proteins altered in some of these residues show a different phenotype depending on the physiological condition tested. Modeling of HypC also predicts the existence of a stable HypC dimer whose presence was also demonstrated by immunoblot analysis. This study widens our understanding on the mechanisms for metalloenzyme biosynthesis in the presence of oxygen. PMID:24942742

  7. Rhizobium grahamii sp. nov., from nodules of Dalea leporina, Leucaena leucocephala and Clitoria ternatea, and Rhizobium mesoamericanum sp. nov., from nodules of Phaseolus vulgaris, siratro, cowpea and Mimosa pudica.

    PubMed

    López-López, Aline; Rogel-Hernández, Marco A; Barois, Isabelle; Ortiz Ceballos, Angel I; Martínez, Julio; Ormeño-Orrillo, Ernesto; Martínez-Romero, Esperanza

    2012-09-01

    Two novel related Rhizobium species, Rhizobium grahamii sp. nov. and Rhizobium mesoamericanum sp. nov., were identified by a polyphasic approach using DNA-DNA hybridization, whole-genome sequencing and phylogenetic and phenotypic characterization including nodulation of Leucaena leucocephala and Phaseolus vulgaris (bean). As similar bacteria were found in the Los Tuxtlas rainforest in Mexico and in Central America, we suggest the existence of a Mesoamerican microbiological corridor. The type strain of Rhizobium grahamii sp. nov. is CCGE 502(T) (= ATCC BAA-2124(T) = CFN 242(T) = Dal4(T) = HAMBI 3152(T)) and that of Rhizobium mesoamericanum sp. nov. is CCGE 501(T) (= ATCC BAA-2123(T) = HAMBI 3151(T) = CIP 110148(T) = 1847(T)). PMID:22081714

  8. Natural occurrence of black-pigmented Bacteroides species in the gingival crevice of the squirrel monkey.

    PubMed Central

    Clark, W B; Magnusson, I; Abee, C; Collins, B; Beem, J E; McArthur, W P

    1988-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine whether the squirrel monkey (Saimiri scuireus) is indigenously colonized with black-pigmented bacteroides (BPB) resembling human Bacteroides gingivalis and Bacteroides intermedius (suspected periodontal pathogens) and to determine the usefulness of the squirrel monkey as an in vivo model for studying colonization by putative pathogens. We assayed the subgingival plaques of 138 monkeys of various ages and in four different colonies for the presence of anaerobic BPB microorganisms. We also tested half the animals for the presence of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans. Clinical indices and levels of serum antibody to B. gingivalis were recorded. We detected BPB in 50% of the animals and A. actinomycetemcomitans in 69% of the animals. The presence of BPB was generally associated with increased age, increased gingival index, presence of calculus, and increased levels of serum antibody. These data indicate that the squirrel monkey may be a good model for studying the parameters of natural infection of the gingival crevice with suspected periodontopathogenic BPB microorganisms. PMID:3410543

  9. Biochemical and serological characterization of Bacteroides intermedius strains isolated from the deep periodontal pocket.

    PubMed Central

    Dahlén, G; Wikström, M; Renvert, S; Gmür, R; Guggenheim, B

    1990-01-01

    Fifty-one fluorescence-positive black-pigmented Bacteroides strains obtained from 51 patients with deep periodontal pockets (greater than 6 mm) were identified and characterized. Fifty of these strains were presumptively identified as Bacteroides intermedius according to the indole reaction. This was confirmed by further biochemical characterization. The 50 strains from diseased sites were then compared with 16 B. intermedius strains isolated from periodontally healthy individuals with no signs of destructive periodontal disease. Tests for antimicrobial susceptibility showed similar patterns for all 50 pocket-derived strains, except for one beta-lactamase-positive strain that was resistant to penicillin G and ampicillin. Forty-seven strains were tested for binding of three monoclonal antibodies defining three distinct serogroups of B. intermedius. Thirty-one strains belonged to serogroup I, three to serogroup II and thirteen to serogroup III. In comparison to the strains from the shallow periodontal pockets, serogroup I was significantly overrepresented in the patient group with periodontal disease. We conclude that saccharolytic black-pigmented Bacteroides species from deep periodontal pockets constituted, with very rare exceptions, a biochemically homogeneous but antigenically heterogeneous group of B. intermedius and that serogroup I is predominantly found in deep periodontal lesions. PMID:2229351

  10. Different metabolic features of Bacteroides fragilis growing in the presence of glucose and exopolysaccharides of bifidobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Rios-Covian, David; Sánchez, Borja; Salazar, Nuria; Martínez, Noelia; Redruello, Begoña; Gueimonde, Miguel; de los Reyes-Gavilán, Clara G.

    2015-01-01

    Bacteroides is among the most abundant microorganism inhabiting the human intestine. They are saccharolytic bacteria able to use dietary or host-derived glycans as energy sources. Some Bacteroides fragilis strains contribute to the maturation of the immune system but it is also an opportunistic pathogen. The intestine is the habitat of most Bifidobacterium species, some of whose strains are considered probiotics. Bifidobacteria can synthesize exopolysaccharides (EPSs), which are complex carbohydrates that may be available in the intestinal environment. We studied the metabolism of B. fragilis when an EPS preparation from bifidobacteria was added to the growth medium compared to its behavior with added glucose. 2D-DIGE coupled with the identification by MALDI-TOF/TOF evidenced proteins that were differentially produced when EPS was added. The results were supported by RT-qPCR gene expression analysis. The intracellular and extracellular pattern of certain amino acids, the redox balance and the α-glucosidase activity were differently affected in EPS with respect to glucose. These results allowed us to hypothesize that three general main events, namely the activation of amino acids catabolism, enhancement of the transketolase reaction from the pentose-phosphate cycle, and activation of the succinate-propionate pathway, promote a shift of bacterial metabolism rendering more reducing power and optimizing the energetic yield in the form of ATP when Bacteroides grow with added EPSs. Our results expand the knowledge about the capacity of B. fragilis for adapting to complex carbohydrates and amino acids present in the intestinal environment. PMID:26347720

  11. Rhizobium tarimense sp. nov., isolated from soil in the ancient Khiyik River.

    PubMed

    Turdahon, Maripat; Osman, Ghenijan; Hamdun, Maryam; Yusuf, Khayir; Abdurehim, Zumret; Abaydulla, Gulsumay; Abdukerim, Muhtar; Fang, Chengxiang; Rahman, Erkin

    2013-07-01

    A Gram-negative, non-motile, pale-yellow, rod-shaped bacterial strain, PL-41(T), was isolated from Populus euphratica forest soil at the ancient Khiyik River valley in Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region, People's Republic of China. Strain PL-41(T) grew optimally at 30 °C and pH 7.0-8.0. The major quinone was Q-10. The predominant cellular fatty acids of strain PL-41(T) were summed feature 8 (comprising C18 : 1ω7c and C18 : 1ω6c), C16 : 0 and C19 : 0 cyclo ω8c. Polar lipids of strain PL-41(T) include two unidentified aminophospholipids (APL1, 2), two unidentified phospholipids (PL1, 2), phosphatidylcholine and three unidentified lipids (L1-3). Strain PL-41(T) showed 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity of 97.0-97.5 % to the type strains of recognized species of the genus Rhizobium. Phylogenetic analysis of strain PL-41(T) based on the sequences of housekeeping genes recA and atpD confirmed (similarities are less than 90 %) its position as a distinct species of the genus Rhizobium. The DNA G+C content was 57.8 mol%. DNA-DNA relatedness between strain PL-41(T) and the type strains of Rhizobium huautlense S02(T), Rhizobium alkalisoli CCBAU 01393(T), Rhizobium vignae CCBAU 05176(T) and Rhizobium loessense CCBAU 7190B(T) were 33.4, 22.6, 25.5 and 45.1 %, respectively, indicating that strain PL-41(T) was distinct from them genetically. Strain PL-41(T) also can be differentiated from these four phylogenetically related species of the genus Rhizobium by various phenotypic properties. On the basis of phenotypic properties, phylogenetic distinctiveness and genetic data, strain PL-41(T) is considered to represent a novel species of the genus Rhizobium, for which the name Rhizobium tarimense sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is PL-41(T) ( = CCTCC AB 2011011(T) = NRRL B-59556(T)). PMID:23203621

  12. Draft Genome Sequence of a Phthalate Ester-Degrading Bacterium, Rhizobium sp. LMB-1, Isolated from Cultured Soil

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Wen-Juan

    2015-01-01

    Rhizobium sp. LMB-1, newly isolated from greenhouse soil, can effectively degrade phthalate. Here, we present a 5.2-Mb assembly of this Rhizobium sp. genome for the first time. It may provide abundant molecular information for the transformation of phthalates. PMID:25953182

  13. The structure of legume-rhizobium interaction networks and their response to tree invasions.

    PubMed

    Le Roux, Johannes J; Mavengere, Natasha R; Ellis, Allan G

    2016-01-01

    Establishing mutualistic interactions in novel environments is important for the successful establishment of some non-native plant species. These associations may, in turn, impact native species interaction networks as non-natives become dominant in their new environments. Using phylogenetic and ecological interaction network approaches we provide the first report of the structure of belowground legume-rhizobium interaction networks and how they change along a gradient of invasion (uninvaded, semi invaded and heavily invaded sites) by Australian Acacia species in South Africa's Cape Floristic Region. We found that native and invasive legumes interact with distinct rhizobial lineages, most likely due to phylogenetic uniqueness of native and invasive host plants. Moreover, legume-rhizobium interaction networks are not nested, but significantly modular with high levels of specialization possibly as a result of legume-rhizobium co-evolution. Although network topology remained constant across the invasion gradient, composition of bacterial communities associated with native legumes changed dramatically as acacias increasingly dominated the landscape. In stark contrast to aboveground interaction networks (e.g. pollination and seed dispersal) we show that invasive legumes do not infiltrate existing native legume-rhizobium networks but rather form novel modules. This absence of mutualist overlap between native and invasive legumes suggests the importance of co-invading rhizobium-acacia species complexes for Acacia invasion success, and argues against a ubiquitous role for the formation and evolutionary refinement of novel interactions.

  14. Characterization of the N2O-producing soil bacterium Rhizobium azooxidifex sp. nov.

    PubMed

    Behrendt, Undine; Kämpfer, Peter; Glaeser, Stefanie P; Augustin, Jürgen; Ulrich, Andreas

    2016-06-01

    In the context of studying the bacterial community involved in nitrogen transformation processes in arable soils exposed to different extents of erosion and sedimentation in a long-term experiment (CarboZALF), a strain was isolated that reduced nitrate to nitrous oxide without formation of molecular nitrogen. The presence of the functional gene nirK, encoding the respiratory copper-containing nitrite reductase, and the absence of the nitrous oxide reductase gene nosZ indicated a truncated denitrification pathway and that this bacterium may contribute significantly to the formation of the important greenhouse gas N2O. Phylogenetic analysis based on the 16S rRNA gene sequence and the housekeeping genes recA and atpD demonstrated that the investigated soil isolate belongs to the genus Rhizobium. The closest phylogenetic neighbours were the type strains of Rhizobium. subbaraonis and Rhizobium. halophytocola. The close relationship with R. subbaraonis was reflected by similarity analysis of the recA and atpD genes and their amino acid positions. DNA-DNA hybridization studies revealed genetic differences at the species level, which were substantiated by analysis of the whole-cell fatty acid profile and several distinct physiological characteristics. Based on these results, it was concluded that the soil isolate represents a novel species of the genus Rhizobium, for which the name Rhizobium azooxidifex sp. nov. (type strain Po 20/26T=DSM 100211T=LMG 28788T) is proposed. PMID:27030972

  15. The structure of legume-rhizobium interaction networks and their response to tree invasions.

    PubMed

    Le Roux, Johannes J; Mavengere, Natasha R; Ellis, Allan G

    2016-01-01

    Establishing mutualistic interactions in novel environments is important for the successful establishment of some non-native plant species. These associations may, in turn, impact native species interaction networks as non-natives become dominant in their new environments. Using phylogenetic and ecological interaction network approaches we provide the first report of the structure of belowground legume-rhizobium interaction networks and how they change along a gradient of invasion (uninvaded, semi invaded and heavily invaded sites) by Australian Acacia species in South Africa's Cape Floristic Region. We found that native and invasive legumes interact with distinct rhizobial lineages, most likely due to phylogenetic uniqueness of native and invasive host plants. Moreover, legume-rhizobium interaction networks are not nested, but significantly modular with high levels of specialization possibly as a result of legume-rhizobium co-evolution. Although network topology remained constant across the invasion gradient, composition of bacterial communities associated with native legumes changed dramatically as acacias increasingly dominated the landscape. In stark contrast to aboveground interaction networks (e.g. pollination and seed dispersal) we show that invasive legumes do not infiltrate existing native legume-rhizobium networks but rather form novel modules. This absence of mutualist overlap between native and invasive legumes suggests the importance of co-invading rhizobium-acacia species complexes for Acacia invasion success, and argues against a ubiquitous role for the formation and evolutionary refinement of novel interactions. PMID:27255514

  16. Physiology of ex planta nitrogenase activity in Rhizobium japonicum

    SciTech Connect

    Agarwal, A.K.; Keister, D.L.

    1983-05-01

    Thirty-nine wild-type strains of Rhizobium japonicum have been studied for their ability to synthesize nitrogenase ex planta in defined liquid media under microaerobic conditions. Twenty-one produced more than trace amounts of acetylene reduction activity, but only a few of these yielded high activity. The oxygen response curves were similar for most of the nitrogenase-positive strains. The strains derepressible for activity had several phenotypic characteristics different from non-derepressible strains. These included slower growth and lower oxygen consumption under microaerobic conditions and lower extracellular polysaccharide production. Extracellular polysaccharide production during growth on gluconate in every nitrogenase-positive strain assayed was lower under both aerobic and microaerobic conditions than the non-depressible strains. These phenotypic characteristics may be representative of a genotype of a subspecies of R. japonicum. These studies were done in part to enlarge the base number of strains available for studies on the physiology, biochemistry, and genetics of nitrogen fixation. (35 Refs.)

  17. Regulation of transcription and activity of Rhizobium etli glutaminase A.

    PubMed

    Huerta-Saquero, Alejandro; Calderón-Flores, Arturo; Díaz-Villaseñor, Andrea; Du Pont, Gisela; Durán, Socorro

    2004-08-01

    The present study determines the regulatory mechanisms that operate on Rhizobium etli glutaminase A. glsA gene expression levels were evaluated under several metabolic conditions by fusions of the glsA gene promoter and the transcriptional reporter cassette uidA2-aad. glsA expression was directly correlated to the glutaminase A activity found under the tested growth conditions, reaching its maximum level in the presence of glutamine and during exponential growth phase. Glutamine induces glsA expression. The influence of allosteric metabolites on glutaminase A activity was also determined. The purified enzyme was inhibited by 2-oxoglutarate and pyruvate, whereas oxaloacetate and glyoxylate modulate it positively. Glutaminase A is not inhibited by glutamate and is activated by ammonium. Glutaminase A participates in an ATP-consuming cycle where glutamine is continually degraded and resynthesized by glutamine synthetase (GS). GS and glutaminase A activities appear simultaneously during bacterial growth under different metabolic conditions and their control mechanisms are not reciprocal. Slight overproduction in glutaminase A expression causes a reduction in growth yield and a dramatic decrease in bacterial growth. We propose a model for regulation of glutaminase A, and discuss its contribution to glutamine cycle regulation. PMID:15279892

  18. Quorum signal molecules as biosurfactants affecting swarming in Rhizobium etli

    PubMed Central

    Daniels, Ruth; Reynaert, Sven; Hoekstra, Hans; Verreth, Christel; Janssens, Joost; Braeken, Kristien; Fauvart, Maarten; Beullens, Serge; Heusdens, Christophe; Lambrichts, Ivo; De Vos, Dirk E.; Vanderleyden, Jos; Vermant, Jan; Michiels, Jan

    2006-01-01

    Swarming motility is suggested to be a social phenomenon that enables groups of bacteria to coordinately and rapidly move atop solid surfaces. This multicellular behavior, during which the apparently organized bacterial populations are embedded in an extracellular slime layer, has previously been linked with biofilm formation and virulence. Many population density-controlled activities involve the activation of complex signaling pathways using small diffusible molecules, also known as autoinducers. In Gram-negative bacteria, quorum sensing (QS) is achieved primarily by means of N-acylhomoserine lactones (AHLs). Here, we report on a dual function of AHL molecules in controlling swarming behavior of Rhizobium etli, the bacterial symbiotic partner of the common bean plant. The major swarming regulator of R. etli is the cinIR QS system, which is specifically activated in swarming cells by its cognate AHL and other long-chain AHLs. This signaling role of long-chain AHLs is required for high-level expression of the cin and rai QS systems. Besides this signaling function, the long-chain AHLs also have a direct role in surface movement of swarmer cells as these molecules possess significant surface activity and induce liquid flows, known as Marangoni flows, as a result of gradients in surface tension at biologically relevant concentrations. These results point to an as-yet-undisclosed direct role of long-chain AHL molecules as biosurfactants. PMID:16990436

  19. High catalase production by Rhizobium radiobacter strain 2-1.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Mami; Nakajima-Kambe, Toshiaki; Katayama, Hideki; Higuchi, Kazuhiko; Kawasaki, Yoshio; Fuji, Ryujiro

    2008-12-01

    To promote the application of catalase for treating wastewater containing hydrogen peroxide, bacteria exhibiting high catalase activity were screened. A bacterium, designated strain 2-1, with high catalase activity was isolated from the wastewater of a beverage factory that uses hydrogen peroxide. Strain 2-1 was identified as Rhizobium radiobacter (formerly known as Agrobacterium tumefaciens) on the basis of both phenotypic and genotypic characterizations. Although some strains of R. radiobacter are known plant pathogens, polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis showed that strain 2-1 has no phytopathogenic factor. Compared with a type strain of R. radiobacter, the specific catalase activity of strain 2-1 was approximately 1000-fold. Moreover, Strain 2-1 grew faster and exhibited considerably higher catalase activity than other microorganisms that have been used for industrial catalase production. Strain 2-1 is harmless to humans and the environment and produces catalase efficiently, suggesting that strain 2-1 is a good resource for the mass production of catalase for the treatment of hydrogen peroxide-containing wastewater. PMID:19134550

  20. Specificity of Octopine Uptake by Rhizobium and Pseudomonas Strains

    PubMed Central

    Bergeron, Janique; MacLeod, Robert A.; Dion, Patrice

    1990-01-01

    The octopine-utilizing strain Agrobacterium tumefaciens B6S3 and three nonagrobacteria which had the capacity to utilize this opine were compared for octopine uptake. The characteristics of uptake by Rhizobium meliloti A3 and strain B6S3 were similar. In both bacteria, uptake activity was inducible by octopine and by the related opine octopinic acid, and competition assays showed that these two opine substrates were accepted by the same uptake system with an equivalent affinity. Cells of Pseudomonas putida 203 accumulated octopine against a concentration gradient, and this activity was induced specifically by octopine. While strain 203 did not utilize octopinic acid, a spontaneous mutant with a combined capacity for octopine and octopinic acid utilization was obtained. Both opines induced octopine uptake by this mutant, but octopinic acid was not a substrate for the induced system. Thus, the Pseudomonas uptake system exhibited a different specificity for octopine than the corresponding Agrobacterium system. The nonfluorescent pseudomonad GU187j, which utilized the three related opines octopine, octopinic acid, and nopaline, was constitutive for octopine uptake. Strain GU187j possessed a system which accepted these three opines, but not arginine or ornithine, with a similar affinity. PMID:16348194

  1. Processing parameters matching effects upon Rhizobium tropici biopolymers' rheological properties.

    PubMed

    Pimenta, Flávia Duta; Lopes, Léa Maria de Almeida; de França, Francisca Pessôa

    2008-07-01

    The combined effects of the processing parameters upon rheological properties of biopolymers produced by Rhizobium tropici were studied as a function of the Ca(+2) ions' concentration variation, yeast extract concentration added to the medium, aeration, and agitation, maintaining the mannitol concentration in 10 g/L. The experiments were carried out using a fermenter with 20-L capacity as a reactor. All processing parameters were monitored online. The temperature [(30 +/- 1) degrees C] and pH values (7.0) were kept constant throughout the experimental time. As a statistical tool, a complete 2(3) factorial design with central point and response surface was used to investigate the interactions between relevant variables of the fermentation process: calcium carbonate concentration, yeast extract concentration, aeration, and agitation. The processing parameter setup for reaching the maximum response for rheological propriety production was obtained when applying mannitol concentration of 10.0 g/L, calcium carbonate concentration 1.0 g/L, yeast extract concentration 1.0 g/L, aeration 1.30 vvm, and agitation 800 rpm. The viscosimetric investigation of polysaccharide solutions exposed their shear-thinning behavior and polyelectrolytic feature.

  2. Transformation of Rhizobium meliloti 41 with plasmid DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Kiss, G B; Kálmán, Z

    1982-01-01

    Plasmid pGV1106, a derivative of the wide-host-range plasmid S-a of the W incompatibility group, was introduced into Rhizobium meliloti 41 by plasmid-mediated mobilization to overcome the restriction of foreign DNA. The mobilized plasmid pKK2 differed from the original pGV1106 by an extra piece of DNA of 1.3 kilobase pairs which supposedly originated from pJB3JI used for mobilization. If pKK2 was isolated from R. meliloti 41, it could be successfully reintroduced by transformation. The transformation frequency was low (10 to 54 colonies per micrograms of plasmid DNA) but reproducible, and several lines of evidence showed that it was the consequence of plasmid DNA uptake. The small size (10.3 kilobases) and elevated copy number (10 to 15 copies per cell) of pKK2 make it a potentially useful cloning vector for the study of symbiotic nitrogen fixation genes of R. meliloti 41. Images PMID:6279558

  3. Processing parameters matching effects upon Rhizobium tropici biopolymers' rheological properties.

    PubMed

    Pimenta, Flávia Duta; Lopes, Léa Maria de Almeida; de França, Francisca Pessôa

    2008-07-01

    The combined effects of the processing parameters upon rheological properties of biopolymers produced by Rhizobium tropici were studied as a function of the Ca(+2) ions' concentration variation, yeast extract concentration added to the medium, aeration, and agitation, maintaining the mannitol concentration in 10 g/L. The experiments were carried out using a fermenter with 20-L capacity as a reactor. All processing parameters were monitored online. The temperature [(30 +/- 1) degrees C] and pH values (7.0) were kept constant throughout the experimental time. As a statistical tool, a complete 2(3) factorial design with central point and response surface was used to investigate the interactions between relevant variables of the fermentation process: calcium carbonate concentration, yeast extract concentration, aeration, and agitation. The processing parameter setup for reaching the maximum response for rheological propriety production was obtained when applying mannitol concentration of 10.0 g/L, calcium carbonate concentration 1.0 g/L, yeast extract concentration 1.0 g/L, aeration 1.30 vvm, and agitation 800 rpm. The viscosimetric investigation of polysaccharide solutions exposed their shear-thinning behavior and polyelectrolytic feature. PMID:18437296

  4. Herbivores alter the fitness benefits of a plant-rhizobium mutualism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heath, Katy D.; Lau, Jennifer A.

    2011-03-01

    Mutualisms are best understood from a community perspective, since third-party species have the potential to shift the costs and benefits in interspecific interactions. We manipulated plant genotypes, the presence of rhizobium mutualists, and the presence of a generalist herbivore and assessed the performance of all players in order to test whether antagonists might alter the fitness benefits of plant-rhizobium mutualism, and vice versa how mutualists might alter the fitness consequences of plant-herbivore antagonism. We found that plants in our experiment formed more associations with rhizobia (root nodules) in the presence of herbivores, thereby increasing the fitness benefits of mutualism for rhizobia. In contrast, the effects of rhizobia on herbivores were weak. Our data support a community-dependent view of these ecological interactions, and suggest that consideration of the aboveground herbivore community can inform ecological and evolutionary studies of legume-rhizobium interactions.

  5. Role of nickel in membrane-bound hydrogenase and nickel metabolism in Rhizobium japonicum

    SciTech Connect

    Stults, L.W.

    1986-01-01

    The membrane-bound hydrogenase of Rhizobium japonicum requires nickel for activity. Radioactive /sup 63/Ni co-migrates with hydrogenase activity in native gel systems and co-elutes with purified hydrogenase form an affinity matrix column. A simplified scheme for the purification of hydrogenase has been developed and constitutes the first report of the aerobic purification of this enzyme from R. japonicum. The aerobic purification utilizes the general affinity matrix. Reactive Red 120-agarose and results in higher specific activity and yield of enzyme than previously reported. The stability of aerobically purified hydrogenase to oxygen is substantially greater than that reported for anaerobically isolated enzyme. Reduction of the aerobically purified enzyme in the presence of oxygen, however, results in the rapid loss of activity. R. japonicum cells accumulate nickel during heterotrophic growth and as non-growing cells. The hydrogenase constitutive mutant SR470 accumulates substantially greater amounts of nickel under both conditions. Kinetic studies indicate that the nickel uptake system in the hydrogenase constitutive mutant SR470 is upregulated relative to SRwt cells. The uptake system is specific for nickel, although a 10-fold excess (relative to nickel) of copper or zinc inhibits nickel uptake. The nickel uptake system appears to require energy. Under nickel-free conditions hydrogenase protein is not synthesized as determined by cross-reactivity with antibodies directed against hydrogenase, indicating that nickel regulates the formation of the enzyme as well as being a constituent of the active protein.

  6. Stable Tagging of Rhizobium meliloti with the Firefly Luciferase Gene for Environmental Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Cebolla, Angel; Ruiz-Berraquero, Francisco; Palomares, Antonio Jose

    1993-01-01

    A system for stable tagging of gram-negative bacteria with the firefly luciferase gene, luc, is described. A previously constructed fusion constitutively expressing luc from the λpR promoter was used. Stable integration into the bacterial genome was achieved by use of mini-Tn5 delivery vectors. The procedure developed was applied for tagging of representative gram-negative bacteria, such as Escherichia coli, Rhizobium meliloti, Pseudomonas putida, and Agrobacterium tumefaciens. The system permitted the detection of tagged R. meliloti in the presence of more than 105 CFU per plate without the use of any selective markers (such as antibiotic resistance genes). No significant differences in growth rates or soil survival were found between the marked strain and the wild-type strain. Studies of bioluminescent R. meliloti also revealed a good correlation between cell biomass and bioluminescence. The firefly luciferase tagging system is an easy, safe, and sensitive method for the detection and enumeration of bacteria in the environment. Images PMID:16349015

  7. Genetic Locus Required for Antigenic Maturation of Rhizobium etli CE3 Lipopolysaccharide

    PubMed Central

    Duelli, Dominik M.; Tobin, Andrea; Box, Jodie M.; Kolli, V. S. Kumar; Carlson, Russell W.; Noel, K. Dale

    2001-01-01

    Rhizobium etli modifies lipopolysaccharide (LPS) structure in response to environmental signals, such as low pH and anthocyanins. These LPS modifications result in the loss of reactivity with certain monoclonal antibodies. The same antibodies fail to recognize previously isolated R. etli mutant strain CE367, even in the absence of such environmental cues. Chemical analysis of the LPS in strain CE367 demonstrated that it lacked the terminal sugar of the wild-type O antigen, 2,3,4-tri-O-methylfucose. A 3-kb stretch of DNA, designated as lpe3, restored wild-type antigenicity when transferred into CE367. From the sequence of this DNA, five open reading frames were postulated. Site-directed mutagenesis and complementation analysis suggested that the genes were organized in at least two transcriptional units, both of which were required for the production of LPS reactive with the diagnostic antibodies. Growth in anthocyanins or at low pH did not alter the specific expression of gusA from the transposon insertion of mutant CE367, nor did the presence of multiple copies of lpe3 situated behind a strong, constitutive promoter prevent epitope changes induced by these environmental cues. Mutations of the lpe genes did not prevent normal nodule development on Phaseolus vulgaris and had very little effect on the occupation of nodules in competition with the wild-type strain. PMID:11567006

  8. Transcriptomic analysis of the process of biofilm formation in Rhizobium etli CFN42.

    PubMed

    Reyes-Pérez, Agustín; Vargas, María Del Carmen; Hernández, Magdalena; Aguirre-von-Wobeser, Eneas; Pérez-Rueda, Ernesto; Encarnacion, Sergio

    2016-11-01

    Organisms belonging to the genus Rhizobium colonize leguminous plant roots and establish a mutually beneficial symbiosis. Biofilms are structured ecosystems in which microbes are embedded in a matrix of extracellular polymeric substances, and their development is a multistep process. The biofilm formation processes of R. etli CFN42 were analyzed at an early (24-h incubation) and mature stage (72 h), comparing cells in the biofilm with cells remaining in the planktonic stage. A genome-wide microarray analysis identified 498 differentially regulated genes, implying that expression of ~8.3 % of the total R. etli gene content was altered during biofilm formation. In biofilms-attached cells, genes encoding proteins with diverse functions were overexpressed including genes involved in membrane synthesis, transport and chemotaxis, repression of flagellin synthesis, as well as surface components (particularly exopolysaccharides and lipopolysaccharides), in combination with the presence of activators or stimulators of N-acyl-homoserine lactone synthesis This suggests that R. etli is able to sense surrounding environmental conditions and accordingly regulate the transition from planktonic and biofilm growth. In contrast, planktonic cells differentially expressed genes associated with transport, motility (flagellar and twitching) and inhibition of exopolysaccharide synthesis. To our knowledge, this is the first report of nodulation and nitrogen assimilation-related genes being involved in biofilm formation in R. etli. These results contribute to the understanding of the physiological changes involved in biofilm formation by bacteria.

  9. Production of Rhizobium Inoculants for Lupinus nootkatensis on Nutrient-Supplemented Pumice.

    PubMed

    Einarsson, S; Gudmundsson, J; Sverrisson, H; Kristjansson, J K; Runolfsson, S

    1993-11-01

    The use of the legume Lupinus nootkatensis as a pioneer plant to fight soil erosion and to reclaim eroded soils in Iceland has been under development for a few years. Production of a robust, low-cost bacterial inoculant was therefore a prerequisite for the extended use of this plant. Volcanic pumice is a naturally expanded mineral which is available in vast amounts in Iceland. It was tested as a carrier for solid fermentation of Rhizobium lupini. Nutrient-supplemented pumice containing a small percentage of peat and diatomaceous earth and kept in sterile plastic bags promoted good growth of the bacteria. Viable-colony counts remained stable at 10 to 10/g for at least 35 weeks when the carrier was stored at 22 degrees C. The pumice-based inoculant had good storage and handling properties and could be mixed directly with the seeds during the sowing process. When seeds of L. nootkatensis were sown manually into nutrient-poor eroded sandy soils, about 56% of the first-year plants were successfully nodulated.

  10. Characterization of Rhizobium grahamii extrachromosomal replicons and their transfer among rhizobia

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Rhizobium grahamii belongs to a new phylogenetic group of rhizobia together with Rhizobium mesoamericanum and other species. R. grahamii has a broad-host-range that includes Leucaena leucocephala and Phaseolus vulgaris, although it is a poor competitor for P. vulgaris nodulation in the presence of Rhizobium etli or Rhizobium phaseoli strains. This work analyzed the genome sequence and transfer properties of R. grahamii plasmids. Results Genome sequence was obtained from R. grahamii CCGE502 type strain isolated from Dalea leporina in Mexico. The CCGE502 genome comprises one chromosome and two extrachromosomal replicons (ERs), pRgrCCGE502a and pRgrCCGE502b. Additionally, a plasmid integrated in the CCGE502 chromosome was found. The genomic comparison of ERs from this group showed that gene content is more variable than average nucleotide identity (ANI). Well conserved nod and nif genes were found in R. grahamii and R. mesoamericanum with some differences. R. phaseoli Ch24-10 genes expressed in bacterial cells in roots were found to be conserved in pRgrCCGE502b. Regarding conjugative transfer we were unable to transfer the R. grahamii CCGE502 symbiotic plasmid and its megaplasmid to other rhizobial hosts but we could transfer the symbiotic plasmid to Agrobacterium tumefaciens with transfer dependent on homoserine lactones. Conclusion Variable degrees of nucleotide identity and gene content conservation were found among the different R. grahamii CCGE502 replicons in comparison to R. mesoamericanum genomes. The extrachromosomal replicons from R. grahamii were more similar to those found in phylogenetically related Rhizobium species. However, limited similarities of R. grahamii CCGE502 symbiotic plasmid and megaplasmid were observed in other more distant Rhizobium species. The set of conserved genes in R. grahamii comprises some of those that are highly expressed in R. phaseoli on plant roots, suggesting that they play an important role in root colonization

  11. Rhizobium nepotum sp. nov. isolated from tumors on different plant species.

    PubMed

    Puławska, Joanna; Willems, Anne; De Meyer, Sofie E; Süle, Sandor

    2012-06-01

    Five Gram-negative, rod-shaped, non-spore-forming bacteria were isolated from galls on different plant species in Hungary: strain 39/7(T) from Prunus cerasifera Myrobalan, strain 0 from grapevine var. Ezerjó, strain 7/1 from raspberry var. Findus and in Poland, strain C3.4.1 from Colt rootstock (Prunus avium × Prunus pseudocerasus) and strain CP17.2.2 from Prunus avium. Only one of these isolates, strain 0, is able to cause crown gall on different plant species. On the basis of 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity, the strains cluster together and belong to the genus Rhizobium and their closest relative is Rhizobium radiobacter (99.1%). Phylogenetic analysis of the novel strains using housekeeping genes atpD, glnA, gyrB, recA and rpoB revealed their distinct position separate from other known Rhizobium species and confirmed their relation to Rhizobium radiobacter. The major cellular fatty acids are 18:1 w7c, 16:0, 16:0 3OH, summed feature 2 (comprising 12:0 aldehyde, 16:1 iso I and/or 14:0 3OH) and summed feature 3 (comprising 16:1 w7c and/or 15 iso 2OH). DNA-DNA hybridization of strain 39/7(T) with the type strain of R. radiobacter LMG 140(T) revealed 45% DNA-DNA hybridization. Phenotypic and physiological properties differentiate the novel isolates from other closely related species. On the basis of the results obtained, the five isolates are considered to represent a novel species of the genus Rhizobium, for which the name Rhizobium nepotum sp. nov. (type strain 39/7(T)=LMG 26435(T)=CFBP 7436(T)) is proposed. PMID:22463808

  12. Rhizobium pusense sp. nov., isolated from the rhizosphere of chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.).

    PubMed

    Panday, Digvijay; Schumann, Peter; Das, Subrata K

    2011-11-01

    A novel bacterial strain, designated NRCPB10(T), was isolated from rhizosphere soil of chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.) in Pusa, New Delhi, India. The 16S rRNA gene sequence of strain NRCPB10(T) showed highest similarity (98.9 %) to that of Rhizobium radiobacter NCPPB 2437(T), followed by Rhizobium larrymoorei AF3-10(T) (97.7 %) and Rhizobium rubi IFO 13261(T) (97.4 %). Phylogenetic analysis of strain NRCPB10(T) based on the housekeeping genes recA and atpD confirmed its position as distinct from recognized Rhizobium species. Levels of DNA-DNA relatedness between strain NRCPB10(T) and R. radiobacter ICMP 5785(T), R. larrymoorei LMG 21410(T) and R. rubi ICMP 6428(T) were 51.0, 32.6 and 27.3 %, respectively. Cellular fatty acids of strain NRCPB10(T) were C(18 : 1)ω7c (58.9 %), C(16 : 0) (15.5 %), C(19 : 0) cyclo ω8c (11.5 %), iso-C(16 : 1) (5.8 %), C(16 : 0) 3-OH (4.5 %), C(16 : 1)ω7c (2.1 %) and C(18 : 0) (1.3 %). The G+C content of the genomic DNA of strain NRCPB10(T) was 59.0 mol%. Strain NRCPB10(T) did not nodulate chickpea plants or induce tumours in tobacco plants. Phenotypic and physiological properties along with SDS-PAGE of whole-cell soluble proteins differentiated strain NRCPB10(T) from its closest phylogenetic neighbours. On the basis of data from the present polyphasic taxonomic study, strain NRCPB10(T) is considered to represent a novel species of the genus Rhizobium, for which the name Rhizobium pusense sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is NRCPB10(T) ( = LMG 25623(T) = JCM 16209(T) = NCIMB 14639(T)).

  13. Effect of some herbicides used in Nigeria on Rhizobium phaseoli, Azotobacter vinelandii and Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Adeleye, I A; Okorodudu, E; Lawal, O

    2004-04-01

    The effect of three herbicides namely Agroxone, Atranex 50SC and 2,4-Damine on Azotobacter vinelandii, Rhizobium phaseoli and Bacillus subtilis were studied. These bacteria were isolated from a bean-garden in Lagos. The results revealed that 2, 4-Damine was the most toxic of the three herbicides studied and Azotobacter vinelandii was found to be most sensitive to the herbicides. There was a reduction in LC50 of herbicides with increased number of days. The percentage survival decreased with increased concentration of herbicides and days for Rhizobium phaseoli and Azotobacter vinelandii while an initial reduction in population was followed by increased percentage survival of organisms for Bacillus subtilis.

  14. Interactions between Bifidobacterium and Bacteroides Species in Cofermentations Are Affected by Carbon Sources, Including Exopolysaccharides Produced by Bifidobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Rios-Covian, David; Arboleya, Silvia; Hernandez-Barranco, Ana M.; Alvarez-Buylla, Jorge R.; Ruas-Madiedo, Patricia; Gueimonde, Miguel

    2013-01-01

    Cocultures of strains from two Bifidobacterium and two Bacteroides species were performed with exopolysaccharides (EPS) previously purified from bifidobacteria, with inulin, or with glucose as the carbon source. Bifidobacterium longum NB667 and Bifidobacterium breve IPLA20004 grew in glucose but showed poor or no growth in complex carbohydrates (inulin, EPS E44, and EPS R1), whereas Bacteroides grew well in the four carbon sources tested. In the presence of glucose, the growth of Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron DSM-2079 was inhibited by B. breve, whereas it remained unaffected in the presence of B. longum. Ba. fragilis DSM-2151 contributed to a greater survival of B. longum, promoting changes in the synthesis of short-chain fatty acids (SCFA) and organic acids in coculture with respect to monocultures. In complex carbohydrates, cocultures of bifidobacterium strains with Ba. thetaiotaomicron did not modify the behavior of Bacteroides nor improve the poor growth of bifidobacteria. The metabolic activity of Ba. fragilis in coculture with bifidobacteria was not affected by EPS, but greater survival of bifidobacteria at late stages of incubation occurred in cocultures than in monocultures, leading to a higher production of acetic acid than in monocultures. Therefore, cocultures of Bifidobacterium and Bacteroides can behave differently against fermentable carbohydrates as a function of the specific characteristics of the strains from each species. These results stress the importance of considering specific species and strain interactions and not simply higher taxonomic divisions in the relationship among intestinal microbial populations and their different responses to probiotics and prebiotics. PMID:24077708

  15. An electron microscope survey of the surface structures and hydrophobicity of oral and non-oral species of the bacterial genus Bacteroides.

    PubMed

    Handley, P S; Tipler, L S

    1986-01-01

    Seventeen strains of Bacteroides representing 10 species were examined by negative staining; the majority were from the mouth but a few non-oral strains were included. Seven species had peritrichously-arranged, non-flagellar appendages which could be divided by morphology and ultrastructure into two subgroups, fibrils and fimbriae. Bacteroides asaccharolyticus strains B536 and B537 and Bacteroides gingivalis strains W50, W83, WPH15 and WPH35 had fimbriae with mean width of 4.4 nm and 0.5 to 6.0 microns long depending on the strain. The fimbrial length within each strain also varied. Fibrils were present on two fresh oral isolates of Bacteroides melaninogenicus, Bacteroides intermedius strains T588 and W09, Bacteroides corporis ATCC 33547, Bacteroides oralis ATCC 33269 and Bacteroides buccae ATCC 33574. Fibrils consistently clumped into bundles of variable thickness and formed a fringe around the cell periphery, ranging from 0.27 to 1.2 microns long depending on the strain. Fibril lengths of each strain were uniform. Fibrils had no measurable width and the clumps tapered towards the free ends. Bacteroides loeschii VPI 9085, Bacteroides pentosaceus strains NP333 and J1 and Bacteroides capillosus 29799 had no detectable surface appendages. Fimbriate strains had a layer outside the outer membrane, with a mean thickness of between 17.8 and 28.6 nm. Both fibrillar and fimbriate strains produced many small membranous vesicles budding from the outer membrane. There were two morphological forms of vesicles, ones with either fimbriae or fibrils (species-dependent) and ones with no attached appendages. Of eleven strains tested for cell-surface hydrophobicity by partitioning between hexadecane and buffer, all but one was non-hydrophobic.

  16. Genetic regulation of nitrogen fixation in Rhizobium meliloti.

    PubMed

    Cebolla, A; Palomares, A J

    1994-12-01

    The soil bacterium Rhizobium meliloti fixes dinitrogen when associated with root nodules formed on its plant host, Medicago sativa (alfalfa). The expression of most of the known genes required for nitrogen fixation (nif and fix genes), including the structural genes for nitrogenase, is induced in response to a decrease in oxygen concentration. Induction of nif and fix gene expression by low oxygen is physiologically relevant because a low-oxygen environment is maintained in root nodules to prevent inactivation of the highly oxygen-sensitive nitrogenase enzyme. The genes responsible for sensing and transducing the low oxygen signal, fixL and fixJ, encode proteins (FixL and FixJ, respectively) that are homologous to a large family of bacterial proteins involved in signal transduction, the two component regulatory system proteins. The two components consist of a sensor protein, to which FixL is homologous, and a response regulator protein, to which FixJ is homologous. The sensor protein respond to an activating signal by autophosphorylating and then transferring the phosphate to its cognate response regulator protein. The phosphorylated response regulator, which is often a transcriptional activator, is then able to activate its target. A cascade model of nif and fix gene regulation in R. meliloti has been proposed, whereby FixL acts as an oxygen sensor as the initial event in the cascade and transmits this information to FixJ. FixJ, which possesses a putative helix-turn-helix DNA-binding motif, then activates transcription of the nifA and fixK genes. The nifA and fixK gene products, are transcriptional activators of at least 14 other nif and fix genes.

  17. Sodium stimulation of uptake hydrogenase activity in symbiotic Rhizobium.

    PubMed

    Kapulnik, Y; Phillips, D A

    1986-10-01

    Initial observations showed a 100% increase in H(2)-uptake (Hup) activity of Rhizobium leguminosarum strain 3855 in pea root nodules (Pisum sativum L. cv Alaska) on plants growing in a baked clay substrate relative to those growing in vermiculite, and an investigation of nutrient factors responsible for the phenomenon was initiated. Significantly greater Hup activity was first measured in the clay-grown plants 24 days after germination, and higher activity was maintained relative to the vermiculite treatment until experiments were terminated at day 32. The increase in Hup activity was associated with a decrease in H(2) evolution for plants with comparable rates of acetylene reduction. Analyses of the clay showed that it contained more Na(+) (29 versus 9 milligrams per kilogram) and less K(+) (6 versus 74 milligrams per kilogram) than the vermiculite. Analyses of plants, however, showed a large increase in Na(+) concentration of clay-grown plants with a much smaller reduction in K(+) concentration. In tests with the same organisms in a hydroponic system with controlled pH, 40 millimolar NaCl increased Hup activity more than 100% over plants grown in solutions lacking NaCl. Plants with increased Hup activity, however, did not have greater net carbon or total nitrogen assimilation. KCl treatments from 5 to 80 millimolar produced slight increased in Hup activity at 10 millimolar KCl, and tests with other salts in the hydroponic system indicated that only Na(+) strongly promoted Hup activity. Treating vermiculite with 50 millimolar NaCl increased Na(+) concentration in pea plant tissue and greatly promoted Hup activity of root nodules in a manner analogous to the original observation with the clay rooting medium. A wider generality of the phenomenon was suggested by demonstrating that exogenous Na(+) increased Hup activity of other R. leguminosarum strains and promoted Hup activity of R. meliloti strain B300 in alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.).

  18. Efflux Pump Overexpression in Multiple-Antibiotic-Resistant Mutants of Bacteroides fragilis

    PubMed Central

    Pumbwe, Lilian; Glass, Daniel; Wexler, Hannah M.

    2006-01-01

    Multidrug-resistant mutants of a wild-type Bacteroides fragilis strain (strain ADB77) and a quadruple resistance nodulation division family efflux pump deletion mutant (ADB77 ΔbmeB1 ΔbmeB3 ΔbmeB12 ΔbmeB15) were selected with antimicrobials. Ampicillin, doripenem, imipenem, levofloxacin, and metronidazole selected for mutants from both strains; cefoxitin selected for mutants from strain ADB77 only; and sodium dodecyl sulfate selected mutants from ADB77ΔbmeB1 ΔbmeB3 ΔbmeB12 ΔbmeB15 only. The mutants overexpressed one or more efflux pumps. PMID:16940115

  19. Human complement activation by lipopolysaccharides from bacteroides oralis, fusobacterium nucleatum, and veillonella parvula.

    PubMed Central

    Nygren, H; Dahlén, G; Nilsson, L A

    1979-01-01

    The properties of different lipopolysaccharide (LPS) preparations to induce C3 conversion in human serum was studied by means of crossed immunoelectrophoresis. C3 conversion by the alternative pathway was evaluated after calcium depletion, and lipid A-dependent activation was measured by means of inhibition with polymyxin B sulfate. LPS from Bacteroides oralis converted Co mainly via the alternative pathway, whereas LPS from Fusobacterium nucleatum and Veillonella parvula const pronounced lipid A-dependent conversion. The results are discussed in relation to the chemical composition of the LPS preparations. Images PMID:121108

  20. Role of Enterotoxigenic Bacteroides fragilis in Children Less Than 5 Years of Age With Diarrhea in Tabriz, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Akhi, Mohammad Taghi; Jedari Seifi, Sirus; Asgharzadeh, Mohammad; Ahangarzadeh Rezaee, Mohammad; Abdoli Oskuei, Shahram; Pirzadeh, Tahereh; Memar, Mohammad Yousef; Alizadeh, Naser; Seifi Yarijan Sofla, Hasan

    2016-01-01

    Background Diarrhea is the most frequent health problem among children in developing countries. Defining the etiology of acute diarrhea is critical to disease therapy and prevention. Some anaerobic bacteria such as Enterotoxigenic Bacteroides fragilis (ETBF) strains cause diarrheal disease by production of enterotoxin in children less than 5 years old. Objectives This study aimed to evaluate the prevalence of ETBF among common bacteria and viruses causing diarrhea in children aged less than five years. Materials and Methods One hundred diarrheal stools were cultured for detection of aerobic and anaerobic pathogen bacteria by direct plating on selective media and antibiotic susceptibility tests were performed according to clinical and laboratory standards institute (CLSI) guidelines on isolates of ETBF. The enterotoxigenic gene among B. fragilis isolates was also investigated using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method. Detection of viral pathogens was carried out using the latex agglutination test. Results Ten B. fragilis were isolated from 100 diarrheal fecal specimens. All isolates were susceptible to metronidazole, while 10% were susceptible to clindamycin. Four (40%) ETBF were isolated. Rotaviruses (57.2%) and adenoviruses (18.6%) were the most frequently detected etiological agents. Conclusions ETBF is one of the etiological agents that may cause diarrhea in children but it is not the commonest of them. Metronidazole is still an effective antibiotic against B. fragilis. Viruses are the most important etiological agents of diarrhea in children less than 5 years of age. PMID:27635209

  1. Monoclonal antibody against Porphyromonas (Bacteroides) endodontalis lipopolysaccharide and application of the antibody for direct identification of the species.

    PubMed Central

    Hanazawa, S; Sagiya, T; Kitami, H; Ohta, K; Nishikawa, H; Kitano, S

    1991-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to develop a monoclonal antibody that recognizes the shared antigen of Porphyromonas endodontalis so that we could use the antibody in direct identification and detection of P. endodontalis in infectious material from apical periodontal patients. We established a hybridoma cell line producing monoclonal antibody (BEB5) specific for P. endodontalis. BEB5 antibody reacted with all of the P. endodontalis strains tested, but not with any of the other black-pigmented Porphyromonas and Bacteroides spp. The antibody reacted specifically with the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) of three P. endodontalis strains of different serotypes (O1K1, O1K2, and O1K-). Western blotting (immunoblotting) analysis confirmed the specificity of the antibody to these LPSs, because the antibody recognized the typical "repetitive ladder" pattern characteristic of LPS on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide electrophoretic gels. These observations demonstrate that P. endodontalis LPS is the shared antigen of this species. The antibody can specifically identify P. endodontalis on nitrocellulose membrane blots of bacterial colonies grown on agar. The antibody is also capable of directly detecting the presence of P. endodontalis in infectious material by immunoslot blot assay. These results indicate that LPS is the shared antigen of P. endodontalis and that BEB5 antibody against LPS is a useful one for direct identification and detection of the organisms in samples from apical periodontal patients. Images PMID:1774262

  2. Role of Enterotoxigenic Bacteroides fragilis in Children Less Than 5 Years of Age With Diarrhea in Tabriz, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Akhi, Mohammad Taghi; Jedari Seifi, Sirus; Asgharzadeh, Mohammad; Ahangarzadeh Rezaee, Mohammad; Abdoli Oskuei, Shahram; Pirzadeh, Tahereh; Memar, Mohammad Yousef; Alizadeh, Naser; Seifi Yarijan Sofla, Hasan

    2016-01-01

    Background Diarrhea is the most frequent health problem among children in developing countries. Defining the etiology of acute diarrhea is critical to disease therapy and prevention. Some anaerobic bacteria such as Enterotoxigenic Bacteroides fragilis (ETBF) strains cause diarrheal disease by production of enterotoxin in children less than 5 years old. Objectives This study aimed to evaluate the prevalence of ETBF among common bacteria and viruses causing diarrhea in children aged less than five years. Materials and Methods One hundred diarrheal stools were cultured for detection of aerobic and anaerobic pathogen bacteria by direct plating on selective media and antibiotic susceptibility tests were performed according to clinical and laboratory standards institute (CLSI) guidelines on isolates of ETBF. The enterotoxigenic gene among B. fragilis isolates was also investigated using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method. Detection of viral pathogens was carried out using the latex agglutination test. Results Ten B. fragilis were isolated from 100 diarrheal fecal specimens. All isolates were susceptible to metronidazole, while 10% were susceptible to clindamycin. Four (40%) ETBF were isolated. Rotaviruses (57.2%) and adenoviruses (18.6%) were the most frequently detected etiological agents. Conclusions ETBF is one of the etiological agents that may cause diarrhea in children but it is not the commonest of them. Metronidazole is still an effective antibiotic against B. fragilis. Viruses are the most important etiological agents of diarrhea in children less than 5 years of age.

  3. The structure of legume–rhizobium interaction networks and their response to tree invasions

    PubMed Central

    Le Roux, Johannes J.; Mavengere, Natasha R.; Ellis, Allan G.

    2016-01-01

    Establishing mutualistic interactions in novel environments is important for the successful establishment of some non-native plant species. These associations may, in turn, impact native species interaction networks as non-natives become dominant in their new environments. Using phylogenetic and ecological interaction network approaches we provide the first report of the structure of belowground legume–rhizobium interaction networks and how they change along a gradient of invasion (uninvaded, semi invaded and heavily invaded sites) by Australian Acacia species in South Africa’s Cape Floristic Region. We found that native and invasive legumes interact with distinct rhizobial lineages, most likely due to phylogenetic uniqueness of native and invasive host plants. Moreover, legume–rhizobium interaction networks are not nested, but significantly modular with high levels of specialization possibly as a result of legume–rhizobium co-evolution. Although network topology remained constant across the invasion gradient, composition of bacterial communities associated with native legumes changed dramatically as acacias increasingly dominated the landscape. In stark contrast to aboveground interaction networks (e.g. pollination and seed dispersal) we show that invasive legumes do not infiltrate existing native legume–rhizobium networks but rather form novel modules. This absence of mutualist overlap between native and invasive legumes suggests the importance of co-invading rhizobium–acacia species complexes for Acacia invasion success, and argues against a ubiquitous role for the formation and evolutionary refinement of novel interactions. PMID:27255514

  4. Beta-2-linked glucans secreted by fast-growing species of Rhizobium

    SciTech Connect

    York, W.S.; McNeil, M.; Darvill, A.G.; Albersheim, P.

    1980-04-01

    Fast-growing species of Rhizobium were found to secrete low-molecular-weight ..beta..-2-linked glucans when cultured in synthetic liquid medium. These glucans are quite similar to ..beta..-2-linked glucans produced by species of Agrobacterium. No reducing terminus was detected in these glucans.

  5. Rhizobium anhuiense sp. nov., isolated from effective nodules of Vicia faba and Pisum sativum.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu Jing; Zheng, Wen Tao; Everall, Isobel; Young, J Peter W; Zhang, Xiao Xia; Tian, Chang Fu; Sui, Xin Hua; Wang, En Tao; Chen, Wen Xin

    2015-09-01

    Four rhizobia-like strains, isolated from root nodules of Pisum sativum and Vicia faba grown in Anhui and Jiangxi Provinces of China, were grouped into the genus Rhizobium but were distinct from all recognized species of the genus Rhizobium by phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA and housekeeping genes. The combined sequences of the housekeeping genes atpD, recA and glnII for strain CCBAU 23252(T) showed 86.9 to 95% similarity to those of known species of the genus Rhizobium. All four strains had nodC and nifH genes and could form effective nodules with Pisum sativum and Vicia faba, and ineffective nodules with Phaseolus vulgaris, but did not nodulate Glycine max, Arachis hypogaea, Medicago sativa, Trifolium repens or Lablab purpureus in cross-nodulation tests. Fatty acid composition, DNA-DNA relatedness and a series of phenotypic tests also separated these strains from members of closely related species. Based on all the evidence, we propose a novel species, Rhizobium anhuiense sp. nov., and designate CCBAU 23252(T) ( = CGMCC 1.12621(T) = LMG 27729(T)) as the type strain. This strain was isolated from a root nodule of Vicia faba and has a DNA G+C content of 61.1 mol% (Tm).

  6. Rhizobium freirei sp. nov., a symbiont of Phaseolus vulgaris that is very effective at fixing nitrogen.

    PubMed

    Dall'Agnol, Rebeca Fuzinatto; Ribeiro, Renan Augusto; Ormeño-Orrillo, Ernesto; Rogel, Marco Antonio; Delamuta, Jakeline Renata Marçon; Andrade, Diva Souza; Martínez-Romero, Esperanza; Hungria, Mariangela

    2013-11-01

    Common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) can establish symbiotic associations with several Rhizobium species; however, the effectiveness of most strains at fixing nitrogen under field conditions is very low. PRF 81(T) is a very effective strain, usually referred to as Rhizobium tropici and used successfully in thousands of doses of commercial inoculants for the common bean crop in Brazil; it has shown high rates of nitrogen fixation in all areas representative of the crop in the country. Here, we present results that indicate that PRF 81(T), although it belongs to the 'R. tropici group', which includes 10 Rhizobium species, R. tropici, R. leucaenae, R. lusitanum, R. multihospitium, R. miluonense, R. hainanense, R. calliandrae, R. mayense, R. jaguaris and R. rhizogenes, represents a novel species. Several morpho-physiological traits differentiated PRF 81(T) from related species. Differences were also confirmed in the analysis of rep-PCR (sharing less than 45 % similarity with the other species), MLSA with recA, atpD and rpoB genes, and DNA-DNA hybridization. The novel species, for which we propose the name Rhizobium freirei sp. nov., is able to establish effective root nodule symbioses with Phaseolus vulgaris, Leucaena leucocephala, Leucaena esculenta, Crotalaria juncea and Macroptilium atropurpureum. The type strain is PRF 81(T) ( = CNPSo 122(T) = SEMIA 4080(T) = IPR-Pv81(T) = WDCM 440(T)). PMID:23771622

  7. Response of Andean and Mesoamerican common bean genotypes to inoculation with rhizobium strains.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In most common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) production regions of Latin America, inoculants are rarely used by farmers in spite of several studies that demonstrate the importance of Rhizobium inoculation on commercial production of legume crops. This study investigated specific bean host plant-Rhizo...

  8. [Combined remediation effects of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi-legumes-rhizobium symbiosis on PCBs contaminated soils].

    PubMed

    Teng, Ying; Luo, Yong-Ming; Gao, Jun; Li, Zhen-Gao

    2008-10-01

    The combined remediation effects of dual inoculation with an arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus (AM) and rhizabium (Rhizobium meliloti) with a host plant (alfalfa) on PCBs contaminated soils was studied using pot experiments. The results showed that alfalfa had a clear role in PCBs removal in soils compared with treatments without alfalfa and inoculated microorganisms, PCBs concentration in lightly and heavily polluted soils decreased 15.8% and 23.5%, respectively. After planting alfalfa with single incubation of Glomus caledonium, PCBs concentration decreased 14.8% and 24.1% from lightly and heavily polluted soils, decreased 20.6% and 25.5% for single incubation of Rhizobium meliloti, respectively. After dual incubation with Glomus caledonium and Rhizobium meliloi, PCBs concentration in lightly and heavily polluted soils decreased 23.2% and 26.9%. We also observed that soil microbial communities in alfalfa rhizosphere soils had a higher carbon utilization rate, improving the functional diversity of the soil microbial community. The results suggest that dual incubation of Glomus caledonium and Rhizobium meliloti has great potential in remediation of PCBs contaminated soils.

  9. Accumulation of Amino Acids in Rhizobium sp. Strain WR1001 in Response to Sodium Chloride Salinity

    PubMed Central

    Hua, Sui-Sheng T.; Tsai, Victor Y.; Lichens, Georgia M.; Noma, Amy T.

    1982-01-01

    Rhizobium sp. strain WR1001, isolated from the Sonoran Desert by Eskew and Ting, was found to be able to grow in defined medium containing NaCl up to 500 mM, a concentration approaching that of sea water. Therefore, it is a valuable strain for studying the biochemical basis of salt tolerance. Intracellular free glutamate was found to increase rapidly in response to osmotic stress by NaCl. It accounted for 88% of the amino acid pool when the bacterium was grown in 500 mM NaCl. The role of glutamate dehydrogenase in glutamate biosynthesis was examined in several Rhizobium strains. Both NADH- and NADPH-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase activities in various Rhizobium strains were observed. The range of activity differed considerably depending on the particular strain. KCl (500 mM) did not stimulate glutamate dehydrogenase activity, as reported in a number of bacterial strains by Measures. The low activity of glutamate dehydrogenase in Rhizobium sp. strain WR1001 apparently cannot fulfill a biosynthetic function of glutamate formation in response to medium NaCl concentrations. PMID:16346049

  10. Native mitral valve endocarditis due to Rhizobium Radiobacter - first case report.

    PubMed

    Guerra, Nuno Carvalho; Nobre, Angelo; Cravino, João

    2013-01-01

    Rhizobium Radiobacter (RR) has rarely been associated with human infection, mainly sepsis or bacteremia, and an unique case of prosthetic aortic endocarditis has been reported. We present a case of native mitral valve endocarditis to RR, to our knowledge the first clinical report of such infection.

  11. Three cases of post-cataract surgery endophthalmitis due to Rhizobium (Agrobacterium) radiobacter.

    PubMed

    Moreau-Gaudry, Viviane; Chiquet, Christophe; Boisset, Sandrine; Croize, Jacques; Benito, Yvonne; Cornut, Pierre Loïc; Bron, Alain; Vandenesch, François; Maurin, Max

    2012-04-01

    We present three unrelated post-cataract surgery endophthalmitis cases caused by Rhizobium radiobacter, hospitalized in three different hospitals. Early diagnosis was obtained in two cases by bacterial DNA detection in vitreous samples. All patients recovered from infection, but pars plana vitrectomy was needed in two patients due to rapid clinical deterioration.

  12. Preservation of Rhizobium viability and symbiotic infectivity by suspension in water

    SciTech Connect

    Crist, D.K.; Wyza, R.E.; Mills, K.K.; Bauer, W.D.; Evans, W.R.

    1984-05-01

    Three Rhizobium japonicum strains and two slow-growing cowpea-type Rhizobium strains were found to remain viable and able to rapidly nodulate their respective hosts after being stored in purified water at ambient temperatures for periods of 1 year and longer. Three fast-growing Rhizobium species did not remain viable under the same water storage conditions. After dilution of slow-growing Rhizobium strains with water to 10/sup 3/ to 10/sup 5/ cells ml/sup -1/, the bacteria multiplied until the viable cell count reached levels of between 10/sub 6/ and 10/sup 7/ cells ml/sup -1/. The viable cell count subsequently remained fairly constant. When the rhizobia were diluted to 10/sup 7/ cells ml/sup -1/, they did not multiply, but full viability was maintained. If the rhizobia were washed and suspended at 10/sup 9/ cells ml/sup -1/, viability slowly declined to 10/sup 7/ cells ml/sup -1/ during 9 months of storage. Scanning electron microscopy showed that no major morphological changes took place during storage. Preservation of slow-growing rhizobia in water suspensions could provide a simple and inexpensive alternative to current methods for the preservation of rhizobia for legume inoculation. 25 references, 7 figures, 2 tables.

  13. Isolation and characterization of Bacteroides host strain HB-73 used to detect sewage specific phages in Hawaii.

    PubMed

    Vijayavel, Kannappan; Fujioka, Roger; Ebdon, James; Taylor, Huw

    2010-06-01

    Previous studies have shown that Escherichia coli and enterococci are unreliable indicators of fecal contamination in Hawaii because of their ability to multiply in environmental soils. In this study, the method of detecting Bacteroides phages as specific markers of sewage contamination in Hawaii's recreational waters was evaluated because these sewage specific phages cannot multiply under environmental conditions. Bacteroides hosts (GB-124, GA-17), were recovered from sewage samples in Europe and were reported to be effective in detecting phages from sewage samples obtained in certain geographical areas. However, GB-124 and GA-17 hosts were ineffective in detecting phages from sewage samples obtained in Hawaii. Bacteroides host HB-73 was isolated from a sewage sample in Hawaii, confirmed as a Bacteroides sp. and shown to recover phages from multiple sources of sewage produced in Hawaii at high concentrations (5.2-7.3 x 10(5) PFU/100 mL). These Bacteroides phages were considered as potential markers of sewage because they also survived for three days in fresh stream water and two days in marine water. Water samples from Hawaii's coastal swimming beaches and harbors, which were known to be contaminated with discharges from streams, were shown to contain moderate (20-187 CFU/100 mL) to elevated (173-816 CFU/100 mL) concentrations of enterococci. These same samples contained undetectable levels (<10 PFU/100 mL) of F+ coliphage and Bacteroides phages and provided evidence to suggest that these enterococci may not necessarily be associated with the presence of raw sewage. These results support previous conclusions that discharges from streams are the major sources of enterococci in coastal waters of Hawaii and the most likely source of these enterococci is from environmental soil rather than from sewage. PMID:20451947

  14. Rhizobium marinum sp. nov., a malachite-green-tolerant bacterium isolated from seawater.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang; Wang, Run-Ping; Ren, Chong; Lai, Qi-Liang; Zeng, Run-Ying

    2015-12-01

    A motile, Gram-stain-negative, non-pigmented bacterial strain, designated MGL06T, was isolated from seawater of the South China Sea on selection medium containing 0.1 % (w/v) malachite green. Strain MGL06T showed highest 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity to Rhizobium vignae CCBAU 05176T (97.2 %), and shared 93.2-96.9 % with the type strains of other recognized Rhizobium species. Phylogenetic analyses based on 16S rRNA and housekeeping gene sequences showed that strain MGL06T belonged to the genus Rhizobium. Mean levels of DNA-DNA relatedness between strain MGL06T and R. vignae CCBAU 05176T, Rhizobium huautlense S02T and Rhizobium alkalisoli CCBAU 01393T were 20 ± 3, 18 ± 2 and 14 ± 3 %, respectively, indicating that strain MGL06T was distinct from them genetically. Strain MGL06T did not form nodules on three different legumes, and the nodD and nifH genes were also not detected by PCR or based on the draft genome sequence. Strain MGL06T contained Q-10 as the predominant ubiquinone. The major fatty acid was C18 : 1ω7c/C18 : 1ω6c with minor amounts of C19 : 0 cyclo ω8c, C16 : 0 and C18 : 1ω7c 11-methyl. Polar lipids of strain MGL06T included unknown glycolipids, phosphatidylcholine, aminolipid, phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylethanolamine, diphosphatidylglycerol, an unknown polar lipid and aminophospholipid. Based on its phenotypic and genotypic data, strain MGL06T represents a novel species of the genus Rhizobium, for which the name Rhizobium marinum sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is MGL06T ( = MCCC 1A00836T = JCM 30155T).

  15. Rhizobium marinum sp. nov., a malachite-green-tolerant bacterium isolated from seawater.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang; Wang, Run-Ping; Ren, Chong; Lai, Qi-Liang; Zeng, Run-Ying

    2015-12-01

    A motile, Gram-stain-negative, non-pigmented bacterial strain, designated MGL06T, was isolated from seawater of the South China Sea on selection medium containing 0.1 % (w/v) malachite green. Strain MGL06T showed highest 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity to Rhizobium vignae CCBAU 05176T (97.2 %), and shared 93.2-96.9 % with the type strains of other recognized Rhizobium species. Phylogenetic analyses based on 16S rRNA and housekeeping gene sequences showed that strain MGL06T belonged to the genus Rhizobium. Mean levels of DNA-DNA relatedness between strain MGL06T and R. vignae CCBAU 05176T, Rhizobium huautlense S02T and Rhizobium alkalisoli CCBAU 01393T were 20 ± 3, 18 ± 2 and 14 ± 3 %, respectively, indicating that strain MGL06T was distinct from them genetically. Strain MGL06T did not form nodules on three different legumes, and the nodD and nifH genes were also not detected by PCR or based on the draft genome sequence. Strain MGL06T contained Q-10 as the predominant ubiquinone. The major fatty acid was C18 : 1ω7c/C18 : 1ω6c with minor amounts of C19 : 0 cyclo ω8c, C16 : 0 and C18 : 1ω7c 11-methyl. Polar lipids of strain MGL06T included unknown glycolipids, phosphatidylcholine, aminolipid, phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylethanolamine, diphosphatidylglycerol, an unknown polar lipid and aminophospholipid. Based on its phenotypic and genotypic data, strain MGL06T represents a novel species of the genus Rhizobium, for which the name Rhizobium marinum sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is MGL06T ( = MCCC 1A00836T = JCM 30155T). PMID:26374202

  16. Molecular cloning of higher-plant 3-oxoacyl-(acyl carrier protein) reductase. Sequence identities with the nodG-gene product of the nitrogen-fixing soil bacterium Rhizobium meliloti.

    PubMed Central

    Slabas, A R; Chase, D; Nishida, I; Murata, N; Sidebottom, C; Safford, R; Sheldon, P S; Kekwick, R G; Hardie, D G; Mackintosh, R W

    1992-01-01

    cDNA clones encoding the fatty-acid- biosynthetic enzyme NADPH-linked 3-oxoacyl-(acyl carrier protein) (ACP) reductase were isolated from a Brassica napus (rape) developing seed library and from an Arabidopsis thaliana (thale cress) leaf library. The N-terminal end of the coding region shows features typical of a stromal-targeting plastid-transit peptide. The deduced amino acid sequences have 41% and 55% identity respectively with the nodG-gene product of Rhizobium meliloti, one of the host-specific genes that restrict infectivity of this bacterium to a small range of host plants. The probability that the nodG-gene product is a oxoreductase strengthens the hypothesis that some of the host-specific nod-gene products are enzymes which synthesize polyketides that uniquely modify the Rhizobium nodulation signal molecule. PMID:1575676

  17. High quality draft genome sequence of Bacteroides barnesiae type strain BL2T (DSM 18169T) from chicken caecum

    DOE PAGES

    Sakamoto, Mitsuo; Lapidus, Alla L.; Han, James; Trong, Stephan; Haynes, Matthew; Reddy, T. B. K.; Mikhailova, Natalia; Huntemann, Marcel; Pati, Amrita; Ivanova, Natalia N.; et al

    2015-08-02

    Bacteroides barnesiae Lan et al. 2006 is a species of the genus Bacteroides, which belongs to the family Bacteroidaceae. Strain BL2T is of interest because it was isolated from the gut of a chicken and the growing awareness that the anaerobic microbiota of the caecum is of benefit for the host and may impact poultry farming. We report that the 3,621,509 bp long genome with its 3,059 protein-coding and 97 RNA genes is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Type Strains, Phase I: the one thousand microbial genomes (KMG) project.

  18. The methylome of the gut microbiome: disparate Dam methylation patterns in intestinal Bacteroides dorei.

    PubMed

    Leonard, Michael T; Davis-Richardson, Austin G; Ardissone, Alexandria N; Kemppainen, Kaisa M; Drew, Jennifer C; Ilonen, Jorma; Knip, Mikael; Simell, Olli; Toppari, Jorma; Veijola, Riitta; Hyöty, Heikki; Triplett, Eric W

    2014-01-01

    Despite the large interest in the human microbiome in recent years, there are no reports of bacterial DNA methylation in the microbiome. Here metagenomic sequencing using the Pacific Biosciences platform allowed for rapid identification of bacterial GATC methylation status of a bacterial species in human stool samples. For this work, two stool samples were chosen that were dominated by a single species, Bacteroides dorei. Based on 16S rRNA analysis, this species represented over 45% of the bacteria present in these two samples. The B. dorei genome sequence from these samples was determined and the GATC methylation sites mapped. The Bacteroides dorei genome from one subject lacked any GATC methylation and lacked the DNA adenine methyltransferase genes. In contrast, B. dorei from another subject contained 20,551 methylated GATC sites. Of the 4970 open reading frames identified in the GATC methylated B. dorei genome, 3184 genes were methylated as well as 1735 GATC methylations in intergenic regions. These results suggest that DNA methylation patterns are important to consider in multi-omic analyses of microbiome samples seeking to discover the diversity of bacterial functions and may differ between disease states. PMID:25101067

  19. Activation of Bacteroides fragilis toxin by a novel bacterial protease contributes to anaerobic sepsis in mice.

    PubMed

    Choi, Vivian M; Herrou, Julien; Hecht, Aaron L; Teoh, Wei Ping; Turner, Jerrold R; Crosson, Sean; Bubeck Wardenburg, Juliane

    2016-05-01

    Bacteroides fragilis is the leading cause of anaerobic bacteremia and sepsis. Enterotoxigenic strains that produce B. fragilis toxin (BFT, fragilysin) contribute to colitis and intestinal malignancy, yet are also isolated in bloodstream infection. It is not known whether these strains harbor unique genetic determinants that confer virulence in extra-intestinal disease. We demonstrate that BFT contributes to sepsis in mice, and we identify a B. fragilis protease called fragipain (Fpn) that is required for the endogenous activation of BFT through the removal of its auto-inhibitory prodomain. Structural analysis of Fpn reveals a His-Cys catalytic dyad that is characteristic of C11-family cysteine proteases that are conserved in multiple pathogenic Bacteroides spp. and Clostridium spp. Fpn-deficient, enterotoxigenic B. fragilis has an attenuated ability to induce sepsis in mice; however, Fpn is dispensable in B. fragilis colitis, wherein host proteases mediate BFT activation. Our findings define a role for B. fragilis enterotoxin and its activating protease in the pathogenesis of bloodstream infection, which indicates a greater complexity of cellular targeting and activity of BFT than previously recognized. The expression of fpn by both toxigenic and nontoxigenic strains suggests that this protease may contribute to anaerobic sepsis in ways that extend beyond its role in toxin activation. It could thus potentially serve as a target for disease modification.

  20. Safety Assessment of Bacteroides uniformis CECT 7771 Isolated from Stools of Healthy Breast-Fed Infants

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Murga, M. Leonor; Sanz, Yolanda

    2016-01-01

    Background Bacteroides uniformis CECT 7771 is a potential probiotic strain, originally isolated from the stools of healthy breast-feed infants. The strain showed pre-clinical efficacy in a mouse obesity model. The objective of this study was to evaluate its potential toxicity and translocation ability after acute oral administration to mice. Methods and Findings A safety study was conducted in immunocompetent and immunosuppressed C57BL-6 mice. Both mouse groups (n = 10 per group) were fed orally 2 x 109 colony forming units (cfu)/day of B. uniformis CECT 7771 or placebo by gavage for 6 days. Throughout this time, feed and water intake and body weight were monitored. Afterwards, mice were sacrificed and biological samples were collected to analyze blood and urine biochemistry, inflammatory and immune markers; gut mucosal histology and bacterial translocation to peripheral tissues. The results demonstrated that acute ingestion of this Bacteroides strain had no adverse effects on the animals’ general health status or food intake, nor did it affect biochemical indicators of liver, kidney and pancreatic function or gut mucosal histology. Findings also demonstrated that administration did not lead to bacterial translocation to blood, liver or mesenteric lymph nodes. B. uniformis CECT 7771 also downregulated gene and protein expression (iNOS and PPAR-γ) and inflammatory cytokines induced by immunosuppression. Conclusions The findings indicate that the acute oral consumption of B. uniformis CECT 7771 does not raise safety concerns in mice. Further studies in humans should be conducted. PMID:26784747

  1. The methylome of the gut microbiome: disparate Dam methylation patterns in intestinal Bacteroides dorei.

    PubMed

    Leonard, Michael T; Davis-Richardson, Austin G; Ardissone, Alexandria N; Kemppainen, Kaisa M; Drew, Jennifer C; Ilonen, Jorma; Knip, Mikael; Simell, Olli; Toppari, Jorma; Veijola, Riitta; Hyöty, Heikki; Triplett, Eric W

    2014-01-01

    Despite the large interest in the human microbiome in recent years, there are no reports of bacterial DNA methylation in the microbiome. Here metagenomic sequencing using the Pacific Biosciences platform allowed for rapid identification of bacterial GATC methylation status of a bacterial species in human stool samples. For this work, two stool samples were chosen that were dominated by a single species, Bacteroides dorei. Based on 16S rRNA analysis, this species represented over 45% of the bacteria present in these two samples. The B. dorei genome sequence from these samples was determined and the GATC methylation sites mapped. The Bacteroides dorei genome from one subject lacked any GATC methylation and lacked the DNA adenine methyltransferase genes. In contrast, B. dorei from another subject contained 20,551 methylated GATC sites. Of the 4970 open reading frames identified in the GATC methylated B. dorei genome, 3184 genes were methylated as well as 1735 GATC methylations in intergenic regions. These results suggest that DNA methylation patterns are important to consider in multi-omic analyses of microbiome samples seeking to discover the diversity of bacterial functions and may differ between disease states.

  2. Multiple Signals Govern Utilization of a Polysaccharide in the Gut Bacterium Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron

    PubMed Central

    Schwalm, Nathan D.; Townsend, Guy E.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The utilization of simple sugars is widespread across all domains of life. In contrast, the breakdown of complex carbohydrates is restricted to a subset of organisms. A regulatory paradigm for integration of complex polysaccharide breakdown with simple sugar utilization was established in the mammalian gut symbiont Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron, whereby sensing of monomeric fructose regulates catabolism of both fructose and polymeric fructans. We now report that a different regulatory paradigm governs utilization of monomeric arabinose and the arabinose polymer arabinan. We establish that (i) arabinan utilization genes are controlled by a transcriptional activator that responds to arabinan and by a transcriptional repressor that responds to arabinose, (ii) arabinose utilization genes are regulated directly by the arabinose-responding repressor but indirectly by the arabinan-responding activator, and (iii) activation of both arabinan and arabinose utilization genes requires a pleiotropic transcriptional regulator necessary for survival in the mammalian gut. Genomic analysis predicts that this paradigm is broadly applicable to the breakdown of other polysaccharides in both B. thetaiotaomicron and other gut Bacteroides spp. The uncovered mechanism enables regulation of polysaccharide utilization genes in response to both the polysaccharide and its breakdown products. PMID:27729509

  3. Identification and Phylogeny of the First T Cell Epitope Identified from a Human Gut Bacteroides Species.

    PubMed

    Perez-Muñoz, Maria Elisa; Joglekar, Payal; Shen, Yi-Ju; Shen, Yi-Ji; Chang, Kuan Y; Peterson, Daniel A

    2015-01-01

    Host T cell reactivity toward gut bacterial epitopes has been recognized as part of disease pathogenesis. However, the specificity of T cells that recognize this vast number of epitopes has not yet been well described. After colonizing a C57BL/6J germ-free mouse with the human gut symbiotic bacteria Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron, we isolated a T cell that recognized these bacteria in vitro. Using this T cell, we mapped the first known non-carbohydrate T cell epitope within the phylum Bacteroidetes. The T cell also reacted to two other additional Bacteroides species. We identified the peptide that stimulated the T cell by using a genetic approach. Genomic data from the epitope-positive and epitope-negative bacteria explain the cross-reactivity of the T cell to multiple species. This epitope degeneracy should shape our understanding of the T cell repertoire stimulated by the complex microbiome residing in the gastrointestinal tract in both healthy and disease states. PMID:26637014

  4. Nodulation gene factors and plant response in the Rhizobium-legume symbiosis. [Nodulation

    SciTech Connect

    Long, S.R.

    1990-01-01

    Our original application aimed to identify genes outside the common nod region involved in nodulation and host range of alfalfa. This has been revised by adding other studies on nodulation gene action and removing molecular studies of gene action. Our restated goals and progress are as follows. An early goal was identification and characterization of additional nodulation genes. By means of transposon mutagenesis, mapping and marker exchange we have established 87 independent mutations in a 20kb area represented by plasmid pRmJT5. We discovered four new genes: nodP, nodD3, syrA and syrM. The sequence, start site and protein product for nodFe, nodG, and nodH were also identified. Regulation of nod FEGH was studied. nod FEGH can be induced by luteolin in the presence of noodle; nodD1; noD3 and syrM, a symbiotic regulator gene also increase transcription of nod FEGH. syrA will interact with syrM; syrM also regulates exopolysaccharide genes and is believed to be a master regulator. As part of these studies, an in vitro transcription/translation system for Rhizobium was developed. Adjacent to nodP we discussed nodQ, nodPQ occurrs in two highly consumed copies. nodQ appears by sequence analysis to be similar to initiation and elongation factors, with the highest homology in the GDP binding domain. We have also investigated the nod strain, WL131. WL131 has an insertion, ISRm3, interrupting nodG, and a nonsase mutation in nodH, nodH is responsible for the lack of nodulation. We are currently investigating supernatant factors, host range effects C by spot inoculation, glucaronidase fusion proteins, and are developing, a single root hair inoculation protocol. 7 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Foliar Chlorosis in Symbiotic Host and Nonhost Plants Induced by Rhizobium tropici Type B Strains

    PubMed Central

    O'Connell, Kevin P.; Handelsman, Jo

    1993-01-01

    Rhizobium tropici CIAT899 induced chlorosis in the leaves of its symbiotic hosts, common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.), siratro (Macroptilium atropurpureum Urb.), and Leucaena leucocephala (Lam.) de Wit. Chlorosis induction by strains CIAT899 and CT9005, an exopolysaccharide-deficient mutant of CIAT899, required carbon substrate. When the bacteria were added at planting in a solution of mannitol (50 g/liter), as few as 103 cells of CIAT899 were sufficient to induce chlorosis in bean plants. All carbon sources tested, including organic acids and mono- and disaccharides, supported chlorosis induction. The addition of a carbon source did not affect the growth rate or the population density of CT9005 in the bean plant rhizosphere. Cell-free filtrates of cultures of CT9005 did not induce detectable chlorosis. All type B strains of R. tropici tested also induced chlorosis in common bean. Type A strains of R. tropici and all other species of bacteria tested did not induce chlorosis. Several lines of evidence indicated that nodulation was not required for chlorosis induction. Strain RSP900, a pSym-cured derivative of CIAT899, induced chlorosis in wild-type P. vulgaris. In addition, NOD125, a nodulation-defective line of common bean, developed chlorosis when inoculated with CIAT899, but did not develop nodules. CIAT899 consistently induced severe chlorosis in the leaves of the nonhost legumes alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) and Berseem clover (Trifolium alexandrinum L.), and induced chlorosis in 29 to 58% of the plants tested of sunflower, cucumber, and tomato seedlings, but it did not induce chlorosis in the leaves of corn or wheat. Chlorosis induction in nonhost plants also required carbon substrate. The data are consistent with the hypothesis that R. tropici type B strains produce a chlorosis-inducing factor that affects a wide range of plant species. PMID:16348994

  6. Role of Motility and Chemotaxis in Efficiency of Nodulation by Rhizobium meliloti1

    PubMed Central

    Caetano-Anollés, Gustavo; Wall, Luis G.; De Micheli, Ana T.; Macchi, Edgardo M.; Bauer, Wolfgang D.; Favelukes, Gabriel

    1988-01-01

    Spontaneous mutants of Rhizobium meliloti L5-30 defective in motility or chemotaxis were isolated and compared against the parent with respect to symbiotic competence. Each of the mutants was able to generate normal nodules on the host plant alfalfa (Medicago sativa), but had slightly delayed nodule formation, diminished nodulation in the initially susceptible region of the host root, and relatively low representation in nodules following co-inoculation with equal numbers of the parent. When inoculated in growth pouches with increasing dosages of the parental strain, the number of nodules formed in the initially susceptible region of the root increased sigmoidally, with an optimum concentration of about 105 to 106 bacteria/plant. The dose-response behavior of the nonmotile and nonchemotactic mutants was similar, but they required 10- to 30-fold higher concentrations of bacteria to generate the same number of nodules. The distribution frequencies of nodules at different positions along the primary root were very similar for the mutants and parent, indicating that reduced nodulation by the mutants in dose-response experiments probably reflects reduced efficiency of nodule initiation rather than developmentally delayed nodule initiation. The number of bacteria that firmly adsorbed to the host root surface during several hours of incubation was 5- to 20-fold greater for the parent than the mutants. The mutants were also somewhat less effective than their parent as competitors in root adsorption assays. It appears that motility and chemotaxis are quantitatively important traits that facilitate the initial contact and adsorption of symbiotic rhizobia to the host root surface, increase the efficiency of nodule initiation, and increase the rate of infection development. Images Fig. 2 PMID:16666059

  7. Rhizobium meliloti mutants that overproduce the R. meliloti acidic Calcofluor-binding exopolysaccharide

    SciTech Connect

    Doherty, D.; Glazebrook, J.; Walker, G.C. ); Leigh, J.A. )

    1988-09-01

    The acidic Calcofluor-binding exopolysaccharide of Rhizobium meliloti Rm1021 plays one or more critical roles in nodule invasion and possible in nodule development. Two loci, exoR and exoS, that effect the regulation of synthesis of this exopolysaccharide were identified by screening for derivatives of strain Rm1021 that formed mucoid colonies that fluoresced extremely brightly under UV light when grown on medium containing Calcofluor. The exopolysaccharide produced in large quantities by the exoR95::Tn5 and exoS96::Tn5 strains was indistinguishable from that produced by the parental strain Rm1021, and its synthesis required the function of at least the exoA, exoB, and exoF genes. Both the exoR and exoS loci were located on the chromosome, and the exo96::Tn5 mutation was 84% linked to the trp-33 mutation by {Phi}M12 transduction. Synthesis of the Calcofluor-binding exopolysaccharide by strain Rm1021 was greatly stimulated by starvation for ammonia. In contrast, the exoR95::Tn5 mutant produced high levels of exopolysaccharide regardless of the presence or absence of ammonia in the medium. The exoS96::Tn5 mutant produced elevated amounts of exopolysaccharide in the presence of ammonia, but higher amounts were observed after starvation for ammonia. The presence of either mutation increased the level of expression of exoF::TnphoA and exoP::TnphoA fusions. Analyses of results obtained when alfalfa seedlings were inoculated with the exoR95::Tn5 strain indicated that the mutant strain could not invade nodules. However, pseudorevertants that retained the original exoR95::Tn5 mutant but acquired unlinked suppressors so that they produced an approximately normal amount of exopolysaccharide were able to invade nodules and fix nitrogen.

  8. Reactive Oxygen Species and Nitric Oxide Control Early Steps of the Legume - Rhizobium Symbiotic Interaction.

    PubMed

    Damiani, Isabelle; Pauly, Nicolas; Puppo, Alain; Brouquisse, Renaud; Boscari, Alexandre

    2016-01-01

    The symbiotic interaction between legumes and nitrogen-fixing rhizobium bacteria leads to the formation of a new organ, the nodule. Early steps of the interaction are characterized by the production of bacterial Nod factors, the reorientation of root-hair tip growth, the formation of an infection thread (IT) in the root hair, and the induction of cell division in inner cortical cells of the root, leading to a nodule primordium formation. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) and nitric oxide (NO) have been detected in early steps of the interaction. ROS/NO are determinant signals to arbitrate the specificity of this mutualistic association and modifications in their content impair the development of the symbiotic association. The decrease of ROS level prevents root hair curling and ITs formation, and that of NO conducts to delayed nodule formation. In root hairs, NADPH oxidases were shown to produce ROS which could be involved in the hair tip growth process. The use of enzyme inhibitors suggests that nitrate reductase and NO synthase-like enzymes are the main route for NO production during the early steps of the interaction. Transcriptomic analyses point to the involvement of ROS and NO in the success of the infection process, the induction of early nodulin gene expression, and the repression of plant defense, thereby favoring the establishment of the symbiosis. The occurrence of an interplay between ROS and NO was further supported by the finding of both S-sulfenylated and S-nitrosylated proteins during early symbiotic interaction, linking ROS/NO production to a redox-based regulation of the symbiotic process. PMID:27092165

  9. Reactive Oxygen Species and Nitric Oxide Control Early Steps of the Legume – Rhizobium Symbiotic Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Damiani, Isabelle; Pauly, Nicolas; Puppo, Alain; Brouquisse, Renaud; Boscari, Alexandre

    2016-01-01

    The symbiotic interaction between legumes and nitrogen-fixing rhizobium bacteria leads to the formation of a new organ, the nodule. Early steps of the interaction are characterized by the production of bacterial Nod factors, the reorientation of root-hair tip growth, the formation of an infection thread (IT) in the root hair, and the induction of cell division in inner cortical cells of the root, leading to a nodule primordium formation. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) and nitric oxide (NO) have been detected in early steps of the interaction. ROS/NO are determinant signals to arbitrate the specificity of this mutualistic association and modifications in their content impair the development of the symbiotic association. The decrease of ROS level prevents root hair curling and ITs formation, and that of NO conducts to delayed nodule formation. In root hairs, NADPH oxidases were shown to produce ROS which could be involved in the hair tip growth process. The use of enzyme inhibitors suggests that nitrate reductase and NO synthase-like enzymes are the main route for NO production during the early steps of the interaction. Transcriptomic analyses point to the involvement of ROS and NO in the success of the infection process, the induction of early nodulin gene expression, and the repression of plant defense, thereby favoring the establishment of the symbiosis. The occurrence of an interplay between ROS and NO was further supported by the finding of both S-sulfenylated and S-nitrosylated proteins during early symbiotic interaction, linking ROS/NO production to a redox-based regulation of the symbiotic process. PMID:27092165

  10. Occurrence of bacteriophages infecting Bacteroides host strains (ARABA 84 and GB-124) in fecal samples of human and animal origin.

    PubMed

    Diston, David; Wicki, Melanie

    2015-09-01

    Bacteriophage-based microbial source-tracking studies are an economical and simple way of identifying fecal sources in polluted water systems. Recently isolated Bacteroides spp. strains ARABA 84, and GB-124 have been shown to detect bacteriophages exclusively in aquatic systems impacted by human fecal material. To date, limited examination of the occurrence or concentration of phages capable of infecting Bacteroides fragilis strain GB-124 or B. thetaiotaomicron strain ARABA 84 in human and animal feces has been carried out. This study reports the prevalence rates and concentrations of phages infecting ARABA 84 and GB-124 host strains in human and a range of animal feces. Discrete human fecal samples (n=55) and pooled animal samples (n=46, representing the feces of over 230 animals) were examined for phages infecting the host strains ARABA 84, GB-124, and E. coli strain WG5. Both human Bacteroides host strains were highly specific (95% and 100% for ARABA 84 and GB-124, respectively), challenging results from previous studies. This study supports the use of Bacteroides strains GB-124 and ARABA 84 in fecal source tracking studies for the detection of human fecal contamination.

  11. Improved HF183 reverse primer and probe for greater analytical sensitivity of human Bacteroides in the environment

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background: Numerous indicators have been used to assess the presence of fecal pollution, many relying on molecular methods such as qPCR. One of the targets frequently used, the human-associated Bacteroides 16s rRNA region, has several assays in current usage. These assays vary...

  12. Evaluation of Bacteroides fragilis GB-124 bacteriophages as novel human-associated faecal indicators in the United States

    EPA Science Inventory

    Phages infecting human-associated Bacteroides fragilis (GB-124 phages) have been employed in the European Union (EU) to identify human fecal pollution, but their utility for U.S. was unclear. Primary sewage effluent samples were collected seasonally from seven wastewater treatme...

  13. Regulated expression of polysaccharide utilization and capsular biosynthesis loci in biofilm and planktonic Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron during growth in chemostats

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron is a prominent member of the human distal gut microbiota that specializes in breaking down diet and host-derived polysaccharides. While polysaccharide utilization has been well studied in B. thetaiotaomicron, other aspects of its behavior are less well characterized, in...

  14. Terminal Bacteroid Differentiation Is Associated With Variable Morphological Changes in Legume Species Belonging to the Inverted Repeat-Lacking Clade.

    PubMed

    Montiel, Jesús; Szűcs, Attila; Boboescu, Iulian Z; Gherman, Vasile D; Kondorosi, Éva; Kereszt, Attila

    2016-03-01

    Medicago and closely related legume species from the inverted repeat-lacking clade (IRLC) impose terminal differentiation onto their bacterial endosymbionts, manifested in genome endoreduplication, cell enlargement, and loss of cell-division capacity. Nodule-specific cysteine-rich (NCR) secreted host peptides are plant effectors of this process. As bacteroids in other IRLC legumes, such as Cicer arietinum and Glycyrrhiza lepidota, were reported not to display features of terminal differentiation, we investigated the fate of bacteroids in species from these genera as well as in four other species representing distinct genera of the phylogenetic tree for this clade. Bacteroids in all tested legumes proved to be larger in size and DNA content than cultured cells; however, the degree of cell elongation was rather variable in the different species. In addition, the reproductive ability of the bacteroids isolated from these legumes was remarkably reduced. In all IRLC species with available sequence data, the existence of NCR genes was found. These results indicate that IRLC legumes provoke terminal differentiation of their endosymbionts with different morphotypes, probably with the help of NCR peptides.

  15. Comparison of Bacteroides-Prevotella 16S rRNA genetic markers for fecal samples from different animal species

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fogarty, L.R.; Voytek, M.A.

    2005-01-01

    To effectively manage surface and ground waters it is necessary to improve our ability to detect and identify sources of fecal contamination. We evaluated the use of the anaerobic bacterial group Bacteroides-Prevotella as a potential fecal indicator. Terminal restriction length polymorphism (T-RFLP) of the 16S rRNA genes from this group was used to determine differences in populations and to identify any unique populations in chickens, cows, deer, dogs, geese, horses, humans, pigs, and seagulls. The group appears to be a good potential fecal indicator in all groups tested except for avians. Cluster analysis of Bacteroides-Prevotella community T-RFLP profiles indicates that Bacteroides-Prevotella populations from samples of the same host species are much more similar to each other than to samples from different source species. We were unable to identify unique peaks that were exclusive to any source species; however, for most host species, at least one T-RFLP peak was identified to be more commonly found in that species, and a combination of peaks could be used to identify the source. T-RFLP profiles obtained from water spiked with known-source feces contained the expected diagnostic peaks from the source. These results indicate that the approach of identifying Bacteroides-Prevotella molecular markers associated with host species might be useful in identifying sources of fecal contamination in the environment.

  16. Bacteroides fragilis in biopsies of patients with major abscesses and diabetic foot infections: direct molecular versus culture-based detection.

    PubMed

    Stappers, Mark H T; Hagen, Ferry; Reimnitz, Peter; Mouton, Johan W; Meis, Jacques F; Gyssens, Inge C

    2016-06-01

    Direct determination by pathogen-specific real-time PCR assay for Bacteroides fragilis was compared to culture in major abscess and diabetic foot infection biopsy samples. Real-time PCR resulted in an increased detection rate of 12% for B. fragilis and could improve the detection of B. fragilis in clinical samples. PMID:27112830

  17. Characterization of the gene encoding nitrite reductase and the physiological consequences of its expression in the nondenitrifying Rhizobium {open_quotes}hedysari{close_quotes} strain HCNT1

    SciTech Connect

    Toffanin, A.; Shapleigh, J.P.; Maskus, M.

    1996-11-01

    Rhizobium {open_quotes}hedysari{close_quotes} HCNT1 is an unclassified rhizobium which contains a nitric oxide-producing nitrite reductase but is apparently incapable of coupling the reduction of nitrite to energy conservation. The gene encoding the nitrite reductase, nirK, has been cloned and sequenced and was found to encode a protein closely related to the copper-containing family of nitrite reductases. Unlike other members of this family, nirK expression in HCNT1 is not dependent on the presence of nitrogen oxides, being dependent only on oxygen concentration. Oxygen respiration of microaerobically grown Nir-deficient cells is not affected by concentrations of nitrite that completely inhibit oxygen respiration in wild-type cells. This loss of sensitivity suggests that the product of nitrite reductase, nitric oxide, is responsible for inhibition of oxygen respiration. By using a newly developed chemically modified electrode to detect nitric oxide, it was found that nitrite reduction by HCNT1 produces significantly higher nitric oxide concentrations than are observed in true denitrifiers. This indicates that nitrite reductase is the only nitrogen oxide reductase active in HCNT1. The capacity to generate such large concentrations of freely diffusible nitric oxide as a consequence of nitrite respiration makes HCNT1 unique among bacteria. 33 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Reduction in pathogen populations at grapevine wound sites is associated with the mechanism underlying the biological control of crown gall by rhizobium vitis strain ARK-1.

    PubMed

    Kawaguchi, Akira

    2014-09-17

    A nonpathogenic strain of Rhizobium (=Agrobacterium) vitis, ARK-1, limited the development of grapevine crown gall. A co-inoculation with ARK-1 and the tumorigenic strain VAT07-1 at a 1:1 cell ratio resulted in a higher population of ARK-1 than VAT07-1 in shoots without tumors, but a significantly lower population of ARK-1 than VAT07-1 in grapevine shoots with tumors. ARK-1 began to significantly suppress the VAT07-1 population 2 d after the inoculation. This result indicated that ARK-1 reduced the pathogen population at the wound site through biological control. Although ARK-1 produced a zone of inhibition against other tumorigenic Rhizobium spp. in in vitro assays, antibiosis depended on the culture medium. ARK-1 did not inhibit the growth of tumorigenic R. radiobacter strain AtC1 in the antibiosis assay, but suppressed the AtC1-induced formation of tumors on grapevine shoots, suggesting that antibiosis by ARK-1 may not be the main mechanism responsible for biological control. PMID:25077443

  19. Reduction in Pathogen Populations at Grapevine Wound Sites is Associated with the Mechanism Underlying the Biological Control of Crown Gall by Rhizobium vitis Strain ARK-1

    PubMed Central

    Kawaguchi, Akira

    2014-01-01

    A nonpathogenic strain of Rhizobium (=Agrobacterium) vitis, ARK-1, limited the development of grapevine crown gall. A co-inoculation with ARK-1 and the tumorigenic strain VAT07-1 at a 1:1 cell ratio resulted in a higher population of ARK-1 than VAT07-1 in shoots without tumors, but a significantly lower population of ARK-1 than VAT07-1 in grapevine shoots with tumors. ARK-1 began to significantly suppress the VAT07-1 population 2 d after the inoculation. This result indicated that ARK-1 reduced the pathogen population at the wound site through biological control. Although ARK-1 produced a zone of inhibition against other tumorigenic Rhizobium spp. in in vitro assays, antibiosis depended on the culture medium. ARK-1 did not inhibit the growth of tumorigenic R. radiobacter strain AtC1 in the antibiosis assay, but suppressed the AtC1-induced formation of tumors on grapevine shoots, suggesting that antibiosis by ARK-1 may not be the main mechanism responsible for biological control. PMID:25077443

  20. Application of a direct fluorescence-based live/dead staining combined with fluorescence in situ hybridization for assessment of survival rate of Bacteroides spp. in drinking water.

    PubMed

    Savichtcheva, Olga; Okayama, Noriko; Ito, Tsukasa; Okabe, Satoshi

    2005-11-01

    To evaluate the viability and survival ability of fecal Bacteroides spp. in environmental waters, a fluorescence-based live/dead staining method using ViaGram Red+ Bacterial gram stain and viability kit was combined with fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) with 16S rRNA-targeted oligonucleotide probe (referred as LDS-FISH). The proposed LDS-FISH was a direct and reliable method to detect fecal Bacteroides cells and their viability at single-cell level in complex microbial communities. The pure culture of Bacteroides fragilis and whole human feces were dispersed in aerobic drinking water and incubated at different water temperatures (4 degrees C, 13 degrees C, 18 degrees C, and 24 degrees C), and then the viability of B. fragilis and fecal Bacteroides spp. were determined by applying the LDS-FISH. The results revealed that temperature and the presence of oxygen have significant effects on the survival ability. Increasing the temperature resulted in a rapid decrease in the viability of both pure cultured B. fragilis cells and fecal Bacteroides spp. The live pure cultured B. fragilis cells could be found at the level of detection in drinking water for 48 h of incubation at 24 degrees C, whereas live fecal Bacteroides spp. could be detected for only 4 h of incubation at 24 degrees C. The proposed LDS-FISH method should provide useful quantitative information on the presence and viability of Bacteroides spp., a potential alternative fecal indicator, in environmental waters.

  1. Genetic determinants of in vivo fitness and diet responsiveness in multiple human gut Bacteroides.

    PubMed

    Wu, Meng; McNulty, Nathan P; Rodionov, Dmitry A; Khoroshkin, Matvei S; Griffin, Nicholas W; Cheng, Jiye; Latreille, Phil; Kerstetter, Randall A; Terrapon, Nicolas; Henrissat, Bernard; Osterman, Andrei L; Gordon, Jeffrey I

    2015-10-01

    Libraries of tens of thousands of transposon mutants generated from each of four human gut Bacteroides strains, two representing the same species, were introduced simultaneously into gnotobiotic mice together with 11 other wild-type strains to generate a 15-member artificial human gut microbiota. Mice received one of two distinct diets monotonously, or both in different ordered sequences. Quantifying the abundance of mutants in different diet contexts allowed gene-level characterization of fitness determinants, niche, stability, and resilience and yielded a prebiotic (arabinoxylan) that allowed targeted manipulation of the community. The approach described is generalizable and should be useful for defining mechanisms critical for sustaining and/or approaches for deliberately reconfiguring the highly adaptive and durable relationship between the human gut microbiota and host in ways that promote wellness. PMID:26430127

  2. Bacteroides fragilis induce necrosis on mice peritoneal macrophages: In vitro and in vivo assays

    SciTech Connect

    Vieira, J.M.B.D.; Seabra, S.H.; Vallim, D.C.; Americo, M.A.; Fracallanza, S.E.L.; Vommaro, R.C.; Domingues, R.M.C.P.

    2009-10-02

    Bacteroides fragilis is an anaerobic bacteria component of human intestinal microbiota and agent of infections. In the host B. fragilis interacts with macrophages, which produces toxic radicals like NO. The interaction of activated mice peritoneal macrophages with four strains of B. fragilis was evaluated on this study. Previously was shown that such strains could cause metabolic and morphologic alterations related to macrophage death. In this work propidium iodide staining showed the strains inducing macrophage necrosis in that the labeling was evident. Besides nitroblue tetrazolium test showed that B. fragilis stimulates macrophage to produce oxygen radicals. In vivo assays performed in BalbC mice have results similar to those for in vitro tests as well as scanning electron microscopy, which showed the same surface pore-like structures observed in vitro before. The results revealed that B. fragilis strains studied lead to macrophage death by a process similar to necrosis.

  3. Genetic determinants of in vivo fitness and diet responsiveness in multiple human gut Bacteroides

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Meng; McNulty, Nathan P.; Rodionov, Dmitry A.; Khoroshkin, Matvei S.; Griffin, Nicholas W.; Cheng, Jiye; Latreille, Phil; Kerstetter, Randall A.; Terrapon, Nicolas; Henrissat, Bernard; Osterman, Andrei L.; Gordon, Jeffrey I.

    2015-01-01

    Libraries of tens of thousands of transposon mutants generated from each of four human gut Bacteroides strains, two representing the same species, were introduced simultaneously into gnotobiotic mice together with 11 other wild-type strains to generate a 15-member artificial human gut microbiota. Mice received one of two distinct diets monotonously, or both in ordered sequence. Quantifying the abundance of mutants in different diet contexts allowed gene-level characterization of fitness determinants, niche, stability and resilience, and yielded a prebiotic (arabinoxylan) that allowed targeted manipulation of the community. The approach described is generalizable and should be useful for defining mechanisms critical for sustaining and/or approaches for deliberately reconfiguring the highly adaptive and durable relationship between the human gut microbiota and host in ways that promote wellness. PMID:26430127

  4. Symbiotic relationship of Bacteroides cellulosolvens and Clostridium saccharolyticum in cellulose fermentation

    SciTech Connect

    Murray, W.D.

    1986-04-01

    In coculture, Bacteroides cellulosolvens and Clostridium saccharolyticum fermented 33% more cellulose than did B. cellulosolvens alone. Also, cellulose digestion continued at a maximum rate 48 h longer in coculture. B. cellulosolvens hydrolyzes cellulose and supplies C. saccharolyticum with sugars and a growth factor replaceable by yeast extract. Alone, B. cellulosovens exhibited an early cessation of growth which was not due to nutrient depletion, low pH, or toxic accumulation of acetic acid, ethanol, lactic acid, H/sub 2/, CO/sub 2/, cellobiose, glucose, or xylose. However, a 1-h incubation of B. cellulosolvens spent-culture medium with C. saacharolyticum cells starved for growth factor allowed a resumption of B. cellulosolvens growth. The symbiotic relationship of this naturally occurring coculture is one of mutualism, in which the cellulolytic microbe supplies the saccharolytic microbe with nutrients, and in turn the saccharolytic microbe removes a secondary metabolite toxic to the primary microbe.

  5. The gut commensal Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron exacerbates enteric infection through modification of the metabolic landscape

    PubMed Central

    Curtis, Meredith M.; Hu, Zeping; Klimko, Claire; Narayanan, Sanjeev; Deberardinis, Ralph; Sperandio, Vanessa

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY The enteric pathogen enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) causes severe diarrhea but the influence of the gut microbiota on EHEC infection is largely unknown. A predominant member of the microbiota, Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron (Bt), is resident at EHEC attachment sites. We show that Bt enhances EHEC virulence gene expression through the transcription factor, Cra, which is functionally sensitive to sugar concentrations. This enhanced virulence accompanies increased formation of attaching and effacing (AE) lesions requisite for EHEC colonization. Infection with Citrobacter rodentium, a natural mouse pathogen homologous to EHEC, in Bt-reconstituted mice results in increased gut permeability along with exacerbated host pathology and mortality compared to mice deplete of microflora. Bt modifies the metabolite environment at infection sites, increasing metabolites involved in gluconeogenesis, with stark increases in succinate, which can be sensed by Cra. Our findings suggest that microbiota composition affects disease outcome and may explain links between microbiota composition and disease susceptibility. PMID:25498343

  6. Bacteroides gingivalis-Actinomyces viscosus cohesive interactions as measured by a quantitative binding assay

    SciTech Connect

    Schwarz, S.; Ellen, R.P.; Grove, D.A.

    1987-10-01

    There is limited evidence, mostly indirect, to suggest that the adherence of Bacteroides gingivalis to teeth may be enhanced by the presence of gram-positive dental plaque bacteria like Actinomyces viscosus. The purpose of this study was to carry out direct quantitative assessments of the cohesion of B gingivalis and A. viscosus by using an in vitro assay modeled on the natural sequence in which these two species colonize the teeth. The assay allowed comparisons to be made of the adherence of /sup 3/H-labeled B. gingivalis 2561 and 381 to saliva-coated hydroxyapatite beads (S-HA) and A. viscosus WVU627- or T14V-coated S-HA (actinobeads) in equilibrium and kinetics binding studies. A series of preliminary binding studies with 3H-labeled A. viscosus and parallel studies by scanning electron microscopy with unlabeled A. viscosus were conducted to establish a protocol by which actinobeads suitable for subsequent Bacteroides adherence experiments could be prepared. By scanning electron microscopy, the actinobeads had only small gaps of exposed S-HA between essentially irreversibly bound A. viscosus cells. Furthermore, B. gingivalis cells appeared to bind preferentially to the Actinomyces cells instead of the exposed S-HA. B. gingivalis binding to both S-HA and actinobeads was saturable with at least 2 X 10(9) to 3 X 10(9) cells per ml, and equilibrium with saturating concentrations was reached within 10 to 20 min. B. gingivalis always bound in greater numbers to the actinobeads than to S-HA. These findings provide direct measurements supporting the concept that cohesion with dental plaque bacteria like A. viscosus may foster the establishment of B. gingivalis on teeth by enhancing its adherence.

  7. Use of a species-specific DNA hybridization probe for enumerating Bacteroides vulgatus in human feces.

    PubMed Central

    Kuritza, A P; Salyers, A A

    1985-01-01

    pBV-1, a recombinant plasmid that contains a chromosomal DNA fragment from Bacteroides vulgatus, hybridized to DNA from B. vulgatus but not to DNA from other colonic Bacteroides species. This plasmid was used as a DNA probe to detect and enumerate B. vulgatus in pure culture, in mixed cultures, and in a bacterial fraction from human feces. Bacteria in a pure or mixed culture were lysed by heating the culture in NaOH. The DNA in the disrupted cell suspension was then trapped on nitrocellulose paper by vacuum filtration. If fecal samples were used instead of pure or mixed cultures, it was first necessary to partially purify the DNA by low-speed centrifugation (2,000 X g) and phenol-chloroform extraction before filtering. When 32P-labeled pBV-1 was incubated with filters containg B. vulgatus DNA, the amount of radioactivity that bound to the filters was proportional to the number of B. vulgatus filtered as long as the filtering capacity of the nitrocellulose was not exceeded. Using this procedure, we obtained a value for the concentration of B. vulgatus in human feces (2 X 10(10) to 3 X 10(10) per g of dry weight) that is similar to values obtained by other investigators using conventional bacteriological techniques (3 X 10(10) to 6 X 10(10) per g of dry weight). The advantage of the DNA hybridization method over conventional techniques is that it is not necessary to isolate pure cultures of bacteria from complex specimens such as feces. Furthermore, our method bypasses the cumbersome set of biochemical tests normally used to identify anaerobic bacteria. The major limitation of our method is its sensitivity.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:4083890

  8. Characterization of a pyridine nucleotide-nonspecific glutamate dehydrogenase from Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron.

    PubMed Central

    Glass, T L; Hylemon, P B

    1980-01-01

    An oxidized nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate/oxidized nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADP+/NAD+) nonspecific L-glutamate dehydrogenase from Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron was purified 40-fold (NADP+ or NAD+ activity) over crude cell extract by heat treatment, (NH4)2SO2 fractionation, diethylaminoethyl-cellulose, Bio-Gel A 1.5m, and hydroxylapatite chromatography. Both NADP+- and NAD+-dependent activities coeluted from all chromatographic treatments. Moreover, a constant ratio of NADP+/NAD+ specific activities was demonstrated at each purification step. Both activities also comigrated in 6% nondenaturing polyacrylamide gels. Affinity chromatography of the 40-fold-purified enzyme using Procion RED HE-3B gave a preparation containing both NADP+- and NAD+-linked activities which showed a single protein band of 48,5000 molecular weight after sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gradient gel electrophoresis. The dual pyridine nucleotide nature of the enzyme was most readily apparent in the oxidative direction. Reductively, the enzyme was 30-fold more active with reduced NADP than with reduced NAD. Nonlinear concave 1/V versus 1/S plots were observed for reduced NADP and NH4Cl. Salts (0.1 M) stimulated the NADP+-linked reaction, inhibited the NAD+-linked reaction, and had little effect on the reduced NADP-dependent reaction. The stimulatory effect of salts (NADP+) was nonspecific, regardless of the anion or cation, whereas the degree of NAD+-linked inhibition decreased in the order to I- greater than Br- greater than Cl- greater than F-. Both NADP+ and NAD+ glutamate dehydrogenase activities were also detected in cell extracts from representative strains of other bacteroides deoxyribonucleic acid homology groups. Images PMID:7364728

  9. Transfer of R factors to and between genetically marked sublines of Rhizobium japonicum.

    PubMed

    Kuykendall, L D

    1979-05-01

    Plasmids R1822 and pRD1 of the P-1 incompatibility group, for which Rhizobium japonicum had not previously been shown to serve as host, were introduced into a strain of R. japonicum. Acquisition of R68 and R68.45 plasmids by this Rhizobium was equivocal. Transfer of R1822 from Pseudomonas aeruginosa and of pRD1 from Escherichia coli to R. japonicum was unambiguous, because the exconjugants subsequently cotransferred the three R-factor resistance determinants (kanamycin, tetracycline, and penicillin) between genetically marked sublines of strain I-110. Under optimal conditions the transfer of R1822 and pRD1 occurred at frequencies of approximately 10(-3) in plate matings of strains bearing as many as five dissimilar genetic markers. In matings with R1822 on membrane filters, recombinants were formed at incidences as high as 4%. PMID:114109

  10. Narrow- and Broad-Host-Range Symbiotic Plasmids of Rhizobium spp. Strains That Nodulate Phaseolus vulgaris

    PubMed Central

    Brom, Susana; Martinez, Esperanza; Dávila, Guillermo; Palacios, Rafael

    1988-01-01

    Agrobacterium transconjugants containing symbiotic plasmids from different Rhizobium spp. strains that nodulate Phaseolus vulgaris were obtained. All transconjugants conserved the parental nodulation host range. Symbiotic (Sym) plasmids of Rhizobium strains isolated originally from P. vulgaris nodules, which had a broad nodulation host range, and single-copy nitrogenase genes conferred a Fix+ phenotype to the Agrobacterium transconjugants. A Fix− phenotype was obtained with Sym plasmids of strains isolated from P. vulgaris nodules that had a narrow host range and reiterated nif genes, as well as with Sym plasmids of strains isolated from other legumes that presented single nif genes and a broad nodulation host range. This indicates that different types of Sym plasmids can confer the ability to establish an effective symbiosis with P. vulgaris. Images PMID:16347637

  11. Phylogenetic relationships and host range of Rhizobium spp. that nodulate Phaseolus vulgaris L.

    PubMed Central

    Hernandez-Lucas, I; Segovia, L; Martinez-Romero, E; Pueppke, S G

    1995-01-01

    We determined the nucleotide sequences of 16S rRNA gene segments from five Rhizobium strains that have been isolated from tropical legume species. All share the capacity to nodulate Phaseolus vulgaris L., the common bean. Phylogenetic analysis confirmed that these strains are of two different chromosomal lineages. We defined the host ranges of two strains of Rhizobium etli and three strains of R. tropici, comparing them with those of the two most divergently related new strains. Twenty-two of the 43 tested legume species were nodulated by three or more of these strains. All seven strains have broad host ranges that include woody species such as Albizia lebbeck, Gliricidia maculata, and Leucaena leucocephala. PMID:7618891

  12. Selection for cheating across disparate environments in the legume-rhizobium mutualism.

    PubMed

    Porter, Stephanie S; Simms, Ellen L

    2014-09-01

    The primary dilemma in evolutionarily stable mutualisms is that natural selection for cheating could overwhelm selection for cooperation. Cheating need not entail parasitism; selection favours cheating as a quantitative trait whenever less-cooperative partners are more fit than more-cooperative partners. Mutualisms might be stabilised by mechanisms that direct benefits to more-cooperative individuals, which counter selection for cheating; however, empirical evidence that natural selection favours cheating in mutualisms is sparse. We measured selection on cheating in single-partner pairings of wild legume and rhizobium lineages, which prevented legume choice. Across contrasting environments, selection consistently favoured cheating by rhizobia, but did not favour legumes that provided less benefit to rhizobium partners. This is the first simultaneous measurement of selection on cheating across both host and symbiont lineages from a natural population. We empirically confirm selection for cheating as a source of antagonistic coevolutionary pressure in mutualism and a biological dilemma for models of cooperation.

  13. Transmissible Resistance to Penicillin G, Neomycin, and Chloramphenicol in Rhizobium japonicum1

    PubMed Central

    Cole, Michael A.; Elkan, Gerald H.

    1973-01-01

    The genetic basis for resistance to a number of antibiotics was examined in Rhizobium japonicum. Resistance to penicillin G, neomycin, and chloramphenicol appears to be mediated by an extrachromosomal element similar to that found in the Enterobacteriaceae. Resistance to these antibiotics was eliminated from cells by treatment with acridine orange, and resistance to all three antibiotics could be transferred en bloc to Agrobacterium tumefaciens under conditions excluding transformation or transduction as possible genetic mechanisms. PMID:4491197

  14. Biosynthesis and degradation of nodule-specific Rhizobium loti compounds in Lotus nodules.

    PubMed Central

    Scott, D B; Wilson, R; Shaw, G J; Petit, A; Tempe, J

    1987-01-01

    Two nodule-specific Rhizobium loti compounds were identified in Lotus tenuis and Lotus pedunculatus nodules induced by strain NZP2037. One, a silver nitrate-positive cation called rhizolotine, has been characterized as the riboside of a novel alpha-hydroxyimino acid containing a 1,4,5,6-tetrahydropyrimidine ring (G. J. Shaw, R. D. Wilson, G. A. Lane, L. D. Kennedy, D. B. Scott, and G. J. Gainsford, J. Chem. Soc. Chem. Commun., p. 180-181, 1986), and the other, yellow-1, stains yellow with ninhydrin. Both compounds were degraded by R. loti NZP2037 but not by strains of Rhizobium meliloti, Rhizobium trifolii, or Agrobacterium tumefaciens. Under the conditions tested neither compound was able to serve as a sole source of C or N for growth of R. loti NZP2037. Rhizolotine and yellow-1 were found in nodules from a range of different legumes inoculated with NZP2037, suggesting that the Rhizobium and not the host plant determines their synthesis. Neither compound was found in nodulelike structures of L. pedunculatus induced by transposon Tn5-induced noninfectious (Inf-) mutants of NZP2037 or in similar structures induced by a transconjugant of NZP2037 containing the symbiotic (Sym) cointegrate plasmid pPN1 of R. trifolii. Both compounds were also absent in the ineffective nodules induced by the bacterial-release-negative (Bar-) mutant, strain PN239. However, both compounds were present in nodules induced by the fixation-negative (Fix-) mutant PN235 and in Fix+ nodules formed by a plasmid-cured derivative of NZP2037. These results would suggest that infection and bacterial release from the infection thread are necessary for nodule (symbiotic) synthesis of these compounds. Images PMID:3025173

  15. Rhizobium anhuiense as the predominant microsymbionts of Lathyrus maritimus along the Shandong Peninsula seashore line.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; Wang, En Tao; Liu, Yajing; Li, Xiangyue; Yu, Bing; Ren, Chenggang; Liu, Wei; Li, Yunzhao; Xie, Zhihong

    2016-09-01

    Beach pea [Lathyrus maritimus Bigelow, or Lathyrus japonicus subsp. maritimus (L.) P.W. Ball] is a wild legume distributed on the seashore line, and the rhizobia nodulating with this plant have been reported only rarely. In order to reveal the diversity of beach pea rhizobia on the seashore line of Shandong Peninsula, China, a total of 124 bacterial strains were isolated from the root nodules of beach pea plants collected from five sites. All the isolates were divided into five recA types after screening by recA gene sequence analysis and they consisted of Rhizobium anhuiense covering 122 symbiotic isolates in three recA types, as well as two single isolates Rhizobium sp. and Rhizobium lusitanum representing distinct recA types. The recA genotype III of R. anhuiense (103 isolates) represented by strain YIC11270 was dominant at all five sampling sites. Identical symbiotic genes (nodC and nifH) were detected in the three recA genotypes of R. anhuiense isolates that were closely related to those of the pea and faba rhizobia. This study clarified that R. anhuiense was the main symbiont for beach pea rhizobia on the seashore line of Shandong Peninsula. The low level genetic diversity of beach pea rhizobia revealed by both MLSA and the symbiotic genes might be related to the strong selection pressure produced by the saline-alkaline environment and the host plants. PMID:27480059

  16. Intra- and interspecies transfer and expression of Rhizobium japonicum hydrogen uptake genes and autotrophic growth capability

    PubMed Central

    Lambert, Grant R.; Cantrell, Michael A.; Hanus, F. Joe; Russell, Sterling A.; Haddad, Karen R.; Evans, Harold J.

    1985-01-01

    Cosmids containing hydrogen uptake genes have previously been isolated in this laboratory. Four new cosmids that contain additional hup gene(s) have now been identified by conjugal transfer of a Rhizobium japonicum 122DES gene bank into a Tn5-generated Hup- mutant and screening for the acquisition of Hup activity. The newly isolated cosmids, pHU50-pHU53, contain part of the previously isolated pHU1 but extend as far as 20 kilobases beyond its border. pHU52 complements five of six Hup- mutants and confers activity on several Hup- wild-type R. japonicum strains in the free-living state and where tested in nodules. Transconjugants obtained from interspecies transfer of pHU52 to Rhizobium meliloti 102F28, 102F32, and 102F51 and Rhizobium leguminosarum 128C53 showed hydrogen-dependent methyleneblue reduction, performed the oxyhydrogen reaction, and showed hydrogen-dependent autotrophic growth by virtue of the introduced genes. The identity of the presumptive transconjugants was confirmed by antibiotic-resistance profiles and by plant nodulation tests. Images PMID:16578786

  17. NPR1 Protein Regulates Pathogenic and Symbiotic Interactions between Rhizobium and Legumes and Non-Legumes

    PubMed Central

    Peleg-Grossman, Smadar; Golani, Yael; Kaye, Yuval; Melamed-Book, Naomi; Levine, Alex

    2009-01-01

    Background Legumes are unique in their ability to establish symbiotic interaction with rhizobacteria from Rhizobium genus, which provide them with available nitrogen. Nodulation factors (NFs) produced by Rhizobium initiate legume root hair deformation and curling that entrap the bacteria, and allow it to grow inside the plant. In contrast, legumes and non-legumes activate defense responses when inoculated with pathogenic bacteria. One major defense pathway is mediated by salicylic acid (SA). SA is sensed and transduced to downstream defense components by a redox-regulated protein called NPR1. Methodology/Principal Findings We used Arabidopsis mutants in SA defense pathway to test the role of NPR1 in symbiotic interactions. Inoculation of Sinorhizobium meliloti or purified NF on Medicago truncatula or nim1/npr1 A. thaliana mutants induced root hair deformation and transcription of early and late nodulins. Application of S. meliloti or NF on M. truncatula or A. thaliana roots also induced a strong oxidative burst that lasted much longer than in plants inoculated with pathogenic or mutualistic bacteria. Transient overexpression of NPR1 in M. truncatula suppressed root hair curling, while inhibition of NPR1 expression by RNAi accelerated curling. Conclusions/Significance We show that, while NPR1 has a positive effect on pathogen resistance, it has a negative effect on symbiotic interactions, by inhibiting root hair deformation and nodulin expression. Our results also show that basic plant responses to Rhizobium inoculation are conserved in legumes and non-legumes. PMID:20027302

  18. [Effects of Rhizobium meliloti on PCBs degradation and transformation in solution culture].

    PubMed

    Xu, Li; Teng, Ying; Luo, Yong-Ming; Li, Zhen-Gao

    2010-01-01

    The capability of Rhizobium meliloti on degrading 2,4,4'-trichlorobiphenyl and 18 kinds of polychlorinated biphenyl congener mixtures was studied by shaking flask experiment. The results showed that the degradation capability of Rhizobium meliloti to 2, 4, 4'-trichlorobiphenyl increased gradually with the increasing concentration of 2, 4, 4'-trichlorobiphenyl. After 7 days, the degradation rates of 2, 4, 4'-trichlorobiphenyl under 1.0, 5.0 10.0, 25.0, 50.0 mg x L(-1) concentration of 2, 4, 4'-trichlorobiphenyl were 34.0%, 48.3%, 69.7%, 96.0%, 98.5% respectively. Meanwhile some new intermediate products were found in the solution culture. The capability of Rhizobium meliloti on degrading 18 kinds of polychlorinated biphenyls congener mixtures appeared in a trend from low to high, then decreased to a certain balance with the increasing concentration of the mixture. The highest degradation rate was 54.7%, and moreover, a transformation process from higher chlorinated PCBs congeners to lower chlorinated PCBs congeners emerged.

  19. Rhizobium capsici sp. nov., isolated from root tumor of a green bell pepper (Capsicum annuum var. grossum) plant.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shih-Yao; Hung, Mei-Hua; Hameed, Asif; Liu, You-Cheng; Hsu, Yi-Han; Wen, Cheng-Zhe; Arun, A B; Busse, Hans-Jürgen; Glaeser, Stefanie P; Kämpfer, Peter; Young, Chiu-Chung

    2015-03-01

    A novel, Gram-staining-negative, rod-shaped, aerobic and motile bacterium, designated strain CC-SKC2(T), was isolated from the root tumor of a green bell pepper (Capsicum annuum var. grossum) plant in Taiwan. Cells were positive for oxidase and catalase activities and exhibited growth at 25-37 °C, pH 4.0-9.0 and tolerated NaCl concentrations up to 4.0 % (w/v). Strain CC-SKC2(T) is able to trigger nodulation in soybean (Glycine max Merr.), but not in Capsicum annuum var. grossum, red bean (Vigna angularis), sesbania (Sesbania roxburghii Merr.) or alfalfa (Medicago varia Martin.). The novel strain shared highest 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity to Rhizobium rhizoryzae KCTC 23652(T) and Rhizobium straminoryzae CC-LY845(T) (both 97.5 %) followed by Rhizobium lemnae L6-16(T) (97.3 %), Rhizobium pseudoryzae KCTC 23294(T) (97.1 %), and Rhizobium paknamense NBRC 109338(T) (97.0 %), whereas other Rhizobium species shared <96.7 % similarity. The DNA-DNA relatedness values of strain CC-SKC2(T) with R. rhizoryzae KCTC 23652(T), R. pseudoryzae KCTC 23294(T) and R. paknamense NBRC 109338(T) were 11.4, 17.2 and 17.0 %, respectively (reciprocal values were 11.1, 28.3 and 24.0 %, respectively). Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA, atpD and recA genes revealed a distinct taxonomic position attained by strain CC-SKC2(T) with respect to other Rhizobium species. The major fatty acids in strain CC-SKC2(T) were C16:0, C19:0 cyclo ω8c, C14:0 3-OH and/or C16:1 iso I and C18:1 ω7c and/or C18:1 ω6c. The polyamine pattern showed predominance of spermidine and moderate amounts of sym-homospermidine. The predominant quinone system was ubiquinone (Q-10) and the DNA G+C content was 60.5 mol%. On the basis of polyphasic taxonomic evidence presented here, strain CC-SKC2(T) is proposed to represent a novel species within the genus Rhizobium, for which the name Rhizobium capsici sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is CC-SKC2(T) (=BCRC 80699(T) = JCM 19535(T)).

  20. Rhizobium capsici sp. nov., isolated from root tumor of a green bell pepper (Capsicum annuum var. grossum) plant.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shih-Yao; Hung, Mei-Hua; Hameed, Asif; Liu, You-Cheng; Hsu, Yi-Han; Wen, Cheng-Zhe; Arun, A B; Busse, Hans-Jürgen; Glaeser, Stefanie P; Kämpfer, Peter; Young, Chiu-Chung

    2015-03-01

    A novel, Gram-staining-negative, rod-shaped, aerobic and motile bacterium, designated strain CC-SKC2(T), was isolated from the root tumor of a green bell pepper (Capsicum annuum var. grossum) plant in Taiwan. Cells were positive for oxidase and catalase activities and exhibited growth at 25-37 °C, pH 4.0-9.0 and tolerated NaCl concentrations up to 4.0 % (w/v). Strain CC-SKC2(T) is able to trigger nodulation in soybean (Glycine max Merr.), but not in Capsicum annuum var. grossum, red bean (Vigna angularis), sesbania (Sesbania roxburghii Merr.) or alfalfa (Medicago varia Martin.). The novel strain shared highest 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity to Rhizobium rhizoryzae KCTC 23652(T) and Rhizobium straminoryzae CC-LY845(T) (both 97.5 %) followed by Rhizobium lemnae L6-16(T) (97.3 %), Rhizobium pseudoryzae KCTC 23294(T) (97.1 %), and Rhizobium paknamense NBRC 109338(T) (97.0 %), whereas other Rhizobium species shared <96.7 % similarity. The DNA-DNA relatedness values of strain CC-SKC2(T) with R. rhizoryzae KCTC 23652(T), R. pseudoryzae KCTC 23294(T) and R. paknamense NBRC 109338(T) were 11.4, 17.2 and 17.0 %, respectively (reciprocal values were 11.1, 28.3 and 24.0 %, respectively). Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA, atpD and recA genes revealed a distinct taxonomic position attained by strain CC-SKC2(T) with respect to other Rhizobium species. The major fatty acids in strain CC-SKC2(T) were C16:0, C19:0 cyclo ω8c, C14:0 3-OH and/or C16:1 iso I and C18:1 ω7c and/or C18:1 ω6c. The polyamine pattern showed predominance of spermidine and moderate amounts of sym-homospermidine. The predominant quinone system was ubiquinone (Q-10) and the DNA G+C content was 60.5 mol%. On the basis of polyphasic taxonomic evidence presented here, strain CC-SKC2(T) is proposed to represent a novel species within the genus Rhizobium, for which the name Rhizobium capsici sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is CC-SKC2(T) (=BCRC 80699(T) = JCM 19535(T)). PMID:25555455

  1. Synergism of VAM and Rhizobium on production and metabolism of IAA in roots and root nodules of Vigna mungo.

    PubMed

    Chakrabarti, Jayanta; Chatterjee, Sabyasachi; Ghosh, Sisir; Chatterjee, Narayan Chandra; Dutta, Sikha

    2010-09-01

    Mature and healthy root nodules of Vigna mungo appeared to contain higher amount of indole-acetic acid (IAA) than non-nodulated roots. Dual effect of VAM fungus, Glomus fasciculatum and the nitrogen-fixing bacteria, Rhizobium sp. on the nodulation of roots of V. mungo was studied. It was recorded that the roots which were inoculated simultaneously with both the symbionts i.e., G. fasciculatum and Rhizobium exhibited greater amount of IAA production than the non-inoculated roots. A tryptophan pool present in the mature nodules and young leaves might serve as a precursor for IAA production in the roots and in the nodules. Activity of IAA-metabolizing enzymes, such as IAA oxidase, peroxidase, and polyphenol oxidase was investigated which indicates the active metabolism of IAA in roots and nodules. The Rhizobium symbiont isolated from fresh nodules of V. mungo produced significant amount of IAA under in vitro condition when tryptophan was added to the medium as precursor. Present study represents some beneficial effects of Rhizobium and G. fasciculatum on the production and metabolism of IAA in roots and nodules of V. mungo. The important physiological implication of the study on IAA production and its metabolism in Rhizobium-Legume-VAM tripartite symbiosis is certainly representing a new approach to satisfy the hormonal balance in the host plant.

  2. Colonization and nitrogenase activity of Triticum aestivum (cv. Baccross and Mahdavi) to the dual inoculation with Azospirillum brasilense and Rhizobium meliloti plus 2,4-D.

    PubMed

    Mehry, Askary; Akbar, Mostajeran; Giti, Emtiazi

    2008-06-15

    The potential enhancement of root colonization and nitrogenase activity of wheat cultivars (Baccross and Mahdavi) was studied with application of two Azospirillum brasilense strains (native and Sp7) co-inoculated with two Rhizobium meliloti strains (native and DSMZ 30135). The results indicated that the colonization was different due to the strains and cultivars of wheat were used. Native A. brasilense colonized wheat root better than Sp7 strain. However, Baccross cv. reacted better with native Azospirillum compared to Mahdavi cv. which reacted better with Sp7. When plants inoculated with dual inoculants (SP7 with standard Rhizobium), the colonization of Azospirillum were increased significantly (from 1.67 x 10(5) to 22 x 10(5) cfu g(-1) FW for Baccras cv. and 3.67 x 10(5) to 26 x 10(5) cfu g(-1) FW for Mahdavi cultivar). When the standard Rhizobium as co-inoculants changed to the native Rhizobium, the colonization of Azospirillum was higher when compared to the single inoculants but was almost the same when compared to the standard Rhizobium. When the standard or native strains of Rhizobium used as single inoculation of wheat roots, the number of Rhizobium in the wheat roots were not changed significantly. However, when plants co-inoculated with Rhizobium and Azospirillum, the colonization of Rhizobium was increased. Co-inoculation of standard strain of R. melilot with A. brasilense Sp7 showed that the colonization of Rhizobium were increased from 0.67 x 10(5) to 21 x 10(5) cfu g(-1) FW for Baccross cv. and 0.33 x 10(5) to 18 x 10(5) cfu g(-1) FW for Mahdavi cv. This behavior was the same when inoculation of Rhizobium was happened with the native one. In dual inoculation, the highest nitrogenase activity was measured in combination of the local strains (native A. brasilense with the native R. meliloti) and the lower one belongs to the combination of standard strains (Sp7 with standard R. meliloti). The difference in nirtogenase activity for different cultivars of

  3. Maize growth promotion by inoculation with Azospirillum brasilense and metabolites of Rhizobium tropici enriched on lipo-chitooligosaccharides (LCOs).

    PubMed

    Marks, Bettina Berquó; Megías, Manuel; Ollero, Francisco Javier; Nogueira, Marco Antonio; Araujo, Ricardo Silva; Hungria, Mariangela

    2015-12-01

    There is an increasing interest in the development and use of inoculants carrying plant growth-promoting bacteria (PGPB) in crops of agronomic interest. The great majority of the inoculants commercialized worldwide contain rhizobia for legume crops, but the use of PGPB as Azospirillum spp. for non-legume is expanding, as well as of inoculants combining microorganisms and microbial metabolites. In this study we evaluated the effects of inoculants containing Azospirillum brasilense with or without metabolites of Rhizobium tropici strain CIAT 899 highly enriched in lipo-chitooligosaccharides (LCOs) in six field experiments performed for three summer crop seasons in Brazil with maize (Zea mays L.). Inoculants and metabolites were applied either at sowing by seed inoculation, or by leaf spray at the V3 stage of plant growth. Improvement in shoot dry weight (SDW) and total N accumulated in shoots (TNS) by single, but especially by dual inoculation was observed in some of the experiments. Statistically significant increases in grain yield in relation to the non-inoculated control were observed in five out of six experiments when maize was inoculated with Azospirillum supplied with enriched metabolites of R. tropici applied by seed or leaf spray inoculation. The results give strength to the development of a new generation of inoculants carrying microorganisms and microbial molecules.

  4. Maize growth promotion by inoculation with Azospirillum brasilense and metabolites of Rhizobium tropici enriched on lipo-chitooligosaccharides (LCOs).

    PubMed

    Marks, Bettina Berquó; Megías, Manuel; Ollero, Francisco Javier; Nogueira, Marco Antonio; Araujo, Ricardo Silva; Hungria, Mariangela

    2015-12-01

    There is an increasing interest in the development and use of inoculants carrying plant growth-promoting bacteria (PGPB) in crops of agronomic interest. The great majority of the inoculants commercialized worldwide contain rhizobia for legume crops, but the use of PGPB as Azospirillum spp. for non-legume is expanding, as well as of inoculants combining microorganisms and microbial metabolites. In this study we evaluated the effects of inoculants containing Azospirillum brasilense with or without metabolites of Rhizobium tropici strain CIAT 899 highly enriched in lipo-chitooligosaccharides (LCOs) in six field experiments performed for three summer crop seasons in Brazil with maize (Zea mays L.). Inoculants and metabolites were applied either at sowing by seed inoculation, or by leaf spray at the V3 stage of plant growth. Improvement in shoot dry weight (SDW) and total N accumulated in shoots (TNS) by single, but especially by dual inoculation was observed in some of the experiments. Statistically significant increases in grain yield in relation to the non-inoculated control were observed in five out of six experiments when maize was inoculated with Azospirillum supplied with enriched metabolites of R. tropici applied by seed or leaf spray inoculation. The results give strength to the development of a new generation of inoculants carrying microorganisms and microbial molecules. PMID:26567001

  5. Sinorhizobium fredii HH103 bacteroids are not terminally differentiated and show altered O-antigen in nodules of the Inverted Repeat-Lacking Clade legume Glycyrrhiza uralensis.

    PubMed

    Crespo-Rivas, Juan C; Guefrachi, Ibtissem; Mok, Kenny C; Villaécija-Aguilar, José A; Acosta-Jurado, Sebastián; Pierre, Olivier; Ruiz-Sainz, José E; Taga, Michiko E; Mergaert, Peter; Vinardell, José M

    2016-09-01

    In rhizobial species that nodulate inverted repeat-lacking clade (IRLC) legumes, such as the interaction between Sinorhizobium meliloti and Medicago, bacteroid differentiation is driven by an endoreduplication event that is induced by host nodule-specific cysteine rich (NCR) antimicrobial peptides and requires the participation of the bacterial protein BacA. We have studied bacteroid differentiation of Sinorhizobium fredii HH103 in three host plants: Glycine max, Cajanus cajan and the IRLC legume Glycyrrhiza uralensis. Flow cytometry, microscopy analyses and viability studies of bacteroids as well as confocal microscopy studies carried out in nodules showed that S. fredii HH103 bacteroids, regardless of the host plant, had deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) contents, cellular sizes and survival rates similar to those of free-living bacteria. Contrary to S. meliloti, S. fredii HH103 showed little or no sensitivity to Medicago NCR247 and NCR335 peptides. Inactivation of S. fredii HH103 bacA neither affected symbiosis with Glycyrrhiza nor increased bacterial sensitivity to Medicago NCRs. Finally, HH103 bacteroids isolated from Glycyrrhiza, but not those isolated from Cajanus or Glycine, showed an altered lipopolysaccharide. Our studies indicate that, in contrast to the S. meliloti-Medicago model symbiosis, bacteroids in the S. fredii HH103-Glycyrrhiza symbiosis do not undergo NCR-induced and bacA-dependent terminal differentiation. PMID:26521863

  6. Structural and mechanistic insights into a Bacteroides vulgatus retaining N-acetyl-β-galactosaminidase that uses neighbouring group participation.

    PubMed

    Roth, C; Petricevic, M; John, A; Goddard-Borger, E D; Davies, G J; Williams, S J

    2016-09-25

    Bacteroides vulgatus is a member of the human microbiota whose abundance is increased in patients with Crohn's disease. We show that a B. vulgatus glycoside hydrolase from the carbohydrate active enzyme family GH123, BvGH123, is an N-acetyl-β-galactosaminidase that acts with retention of stereochemistry, and, through a 3-D structure in complex with Gal-thiazoline, provide evidence in support of a neighbouring group participation mechanism. PMID:27546776

  7. Decrease in anaerobe-related bacteraemias and increase in Bacteroides species isolation rate from 1998 to 2007: a retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Lazarovitch, Tsilia; Freimann, Sarit; Shapira, Galina; Blank, Helena

    2010-06-01

    Conflicting data have accumulated in recent years regarding the incidence of anaerobic bacteraemias. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of bacteraemias due to anaerobic bacteria and evaluate the importance of anaerobic blood cultures in a university hospital in Israel. A retrospective survey which focused on anaerobic blood culture bottles was performed on blood cultures received in our laboratory during the decade from January 1998 to December 2007. Anaerobic-related bacteraemias decreased during that period, whereas a significant increase was observed in Bacteroides species isolated from the blood cultures (from 18% during 1998-2002 to 43% during 2003-2007). Comparison of the medical records of 54 patients with Bacteroides-related bacteraemia during the two end periods (1998-1999 and 2006-2007) revealed a marked increase in complex underlying diseases. Hypertension and diabetes mellitus type II were found in 29% of the patients in 1998-1999 and increased to 43-45% of the patients in 2006-2007. Ischemic heart disease also increased from 14% of the patients in 1998-1999 to 43% in 2006-2007. We conclude that although positive anaerobic blood cultures account for a small percentage of positive blood samples, the growing involvement of Bacteroides species-related bacteraemias together with an increase in complex underlying diseases in these patients emphasize the importance of anaerobic blood cultures, particularly in patients with co-morbidities.

  8. Inoculation of the nonlegume Capsicum annuum (L.) with Rhizobium strains. 1. Effect on bioactive compounds, antioxidant activity, and fruit ripeness.

    PubMed

    Silva, Luís R; Azevedo, Jessica; Pereira, Maria J; Carro, Lorena; Velazquez, Encarna; Peix, Alvaro; Valentão, Patrícia; Andrade, Paula B

    2014-01-22

    Pepper (Capsicum annuum L.) is an economically important agricultural crop and an excellent dietary source of natural colors and antioxidant compounds. The levels of these compounds can vary according to agricultural practices, like inoculation with plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria. In this work we evaluated for the first time the effect of the inoculation of two Rhizobium strains on C. annuum metabolites and bioactivity. The results revealed a decrease of organic acids and no effect on phenolics and capsaicinoids of leaves from inoculated plants. In the fruits from inoculated plants organic acids and phenolic compounds decreased, showing that fruits from inoculated plants present a higher ripeness stage than those from uninoculated ones. In general, the inoculation with Rhizobium did not improve the antioxidant activity of pepper fruits and leaves. Considering the positive effect on fruit ripening, the inoculation of C. annuum with Rhizobium is a beneficious agricultural practice for this nonlegume.

  9. Relevance of fucose-rich extracellular polysaccharides produced by Rhizobium sullae strains nodulating Hedysarum coronarium l. legumes.

    PubMed

    Gharzouli, Razika; Carpéné, Marie-Anne; Couderc, François; Benguedouar, Ammar; Poinsot, Véréna

    2013-03-01

    Specific and complex interactions between soil bacteria, known as rhizobia, and their leguminous host plants result in the development of root nodules. This process implies a complex dialogue between the partners. Rhizobia synthesize different classes of polysaccharides: exopolysaccharides (EPS), Kdo-rich capsular polysaccharides, lipopolysaccharides, and cyclic β-(1,2)-glucans. These polymers are actors of a successful symbiosis with legumes. We focus here on studying the EPS produced by Rhizobium sullae bacteria that nodulate Hedysarum coronarium L., largely distributed in Algeria. We describe the influence of the carbon source on the production and on the composition of EPS produced by R. sullae A6 and RHF strains. High-molecular-weight EPS preserve the bacteria from desiccation. The structural characterization of the EPS produced by R. sullae strains has been performed through sugar analysis by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The low-molecular-weight EPS of one strain (RHF) has been totally elucidated using nuclear magnetic resonance and quantitative time-of-flight tandem mass spectrometry analyses. An unusual fucose-rich EPS has been characterized. The presence of this deoxy sugar seems to be related to nodulation capacity.

  10. Electron transport system of the protoheme-requiring anaerobe Bacteroides melaninogenicus.

    PubMed

    Rizza, V; Sinclair, P R; White, D C; Cuorant, P R

    1968-09-01

    Protoheme is essential for the growth of some strains of Bacteroides melaninogenicus. At low concentrations in the growth medium, protoheme determines the doubling time, total cell yield, and amount of cytochrome per bacterium. At high protoheme concentrations, the doubling time, total cell yield, and amount of enzymatically reducible cytochrome appear to remain nearly constant, and protoheme is accumulated by the cell. The accumulated protoheme can support the growth of the bacterium for at least eight generations in a protoheme-free medium. When growth and cytochrome content are proportional during growth at low protoheme concentrations, the bacteria incorporate 10 to 20% of the total available protoheme into a membrane-bound respiratory system. This respiratory system includes cytochrome c, a carbon monoxide-binding pigment, and possibly flavoproteins. The pigments can be reversibly reduced by reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide or endogenous metabolism and can be oxidized anaerobically by fumarate or by shaking in air. Electron transport is inhibited by 2-n-nonyl-4-hydroxy-quinoline-N-oxide.

  11. Purification of pili from Bacteroides nodosus and an examination of their chemical, physical and serological properties.

    PubMed

    Every, D

    1979-12-01

    Pili from Bacteroides nodosus were purified to greater than 99% homogeneity by precipitation at pH 4.0 and in MgCl2 followed by chromatography on BioGel A150. The pili were composed entirely of one type of polypeptide subunit, pilin. No carbohydrates, nucleic acid, lipid, lipopolysaccharide or phosphate could be detected in purified pili preparations. The molecular weight of pilin from B. nodosus strains 91B and 198 was 18,400 and from strain 80 was 19,300. The isoelectric points of pili from B. nodosus strains 91B and 80 were both 4.5. The buoyant densities of pili from strains 91B, 80 and 198 were 1.287, 1.284 and 1.286 g ml-1, respectively. The three strains of B. nodosus did not cross-react in K-agglutination tests and produced pili which did not cross-react in immunodiffusion tests. Antiserum to highly purified pili caused a characteristic K-type agglutination reaction. It was concluded that pili are the K-agglutinogen. PMID:43354

  12. Expression of a Uniquely Regulated Extracellular Polysaccharide Confers a Large-Capsule Phenotype to Bacteroides fragilis▿

    PubMed Central

    Chatzidaki-Livanis, Maria; Coyne, Michael J.; Roche-Hakansson, Hazeline; Comstock, Laurie E.

    2008-01-01

    Bacteroides fragilis synthesizes eight distinct capsular polysaccharides, more than any described bacterium outside the order Bacteroidales. Here, we show that this organism also produces a high-molecular-weight extracellular polysaccharide (EPS). Expression of the EPS results in the formation of a large polysaccharide layer around the bacteria which prevents them from forming a tight pellet upon centrifugation and from entering a Percoll density gradient. Like expression of the capsular polysaccharides, expression of the EPS is phase variable and dictated by DNA inversion of its promoter. EPS expression is regulated at one level by the DNA invertase Tsr19, which is encoded by a gene immediately upstream of the EPS locus and inverts the EPS promoter, causing an on or off phenotype. Expression of the EPS is also regulated at another level, which dictates the amount of EPS produced. By analyzing a panel of tsr19 deletion mutants, we found that the number of inverted repeats (IRs) flanking the promoter is variable. Transcription into the EPS genes is greater in mutants with a single IR between the promoter and the downstream EPS genes than in mutants with more than one IR in this region, correlating with the synthesis of more EPS. By analyzing the relative orientations of the EPS promoter of bacteria obtained from human fecal samples, we showed that both DNA inversion and variation in the number of IRs are active processes of B. fragilis in the endogenous human intestinal ecosystem. PMID:18039760

  13. Differential proteomic analysis of outer membrane enriched extracts of Bacteroides fragilis grown under bile salts stress.

    PubMed

    Boente, Renata F; Pauer, Heidi; Silva, Deborah N S; Filho, Joaquim Santos; Sandim, Vanessa; Antunes, Luis Caetano M; Ferreira, Rosana Barreto Rocha; Zingali, Russolina B; Domingues, Regina M C P; Lobo, Leandro A

    2016-06-01

    Bacteroides fragilis is the most commonly isolated anaerobic bacteria from infectious processes. Several virulence traits contribute to the pathogenic nature of this bacterium, including the ability to tolerate the high concentrations of bile found in the gastrointestinal tract (GIT). The activity of bile salts is similar to detergents and may lead to membrane permeabilization and cell death. Modulation of outer membrane proteins (OMPs) is considered a crucial event to bile salts resistance. The primary objective of the current work was to identify B. fragilis proteins associated with the stress induced by high concentration of bile salts. The outer membrane of B. fragilis strain 638R was isolated after growth either in the presence of 2% conjugated bile salts or without bile salts. The membrane fractions were separated on SDS-PAGE and analyzed by ESI-Q/TOF tandem mass spectrometry. A total of 37 proteins were identified; among them nine were found to be expressed exclusively in the absence of bile salts whereas eight proteins were expressed only in the presence of bile salts. These proteins are related to cellular functions such as transport through membrane, nutrient uptake, and protein-protein interactions. This study demonstrates the alteration of OMPs composition in B. fragilis during bile salts stress resistance and adaptation to environmental changes. Proteomics of OMPs was also shown to be a useful approach in the identification of new targets for functional analyses.

  14. Metabolism of a 5-nitroimidazole in susceptible and resistant isogenic strains of Bacteroides fragilis.

    PubMed Central

    Carlier, J P; Sellier, N; Rager, M N; Reysset, G

    1997-01-01

    We investigated the metabolism of dimetridazole (1,2-dimethyl-5-nitroimidazole) (DMZ) by the resting cell method in a susceptible strain of Bacteroides fragilis and in the same strain containing the nimA gene, which conferred resistance to 5-nitroimidazole drugs. In both cases, under strict anaerobic conditions DMZ was metabolized without major ring cleavage or nitrate formation. However, one of two distinct metabolic pathways is involved, depending on the susceptibility of the strain. In the susceptible strain, the classical reduction pathway of nitroaromatic compounds is followed at least as far as the nitroso-radical anion, with further formation of the azo-dimer: 5,5'-azobis-(1,2-dimethylimidazole). In the resistant strain, DMZ is reduced to the amine derivative, namely, 5-amino-1,2-dimethylimidazole, preventing the formation of the toxic form of the drug. The specificity of the six-electron reduction of the nitro group, which is restricted to 4- and 5-nitroimidazole, suggests an enzymatic reaction. We thus conclude that nimA and related genes may encode a 5-nitroimidazole reductase. PMID:9210672

  15. Structural dissection of a complex Bacteroides ovatus gene locus conferring xyloglucan metabolism in the human gut.

    PubMed

    Hemsworth, Glyn R; Thompson, Andrew J; Stepper, Judith; Sobala, Łukasz F; Coyle, Travis; Larsbrink, Johan; Spadiut, Oliver; Goddard-Borger, Ethan D; Stubbs, Keith A; Brumer, Harry; Davies, Gideon J

    2016-07-01

    The human gastrointestinal tract harbours myriad bacterial species, collectively termed the microbiota, that strongly influence human health. Symbiotic members of our microbiota play a pivotal role in the digestion of complex carbohydrates that are otherwise recalcitrant to assimilation. Indeed, the intrinsic human polysaccharide-degrading enzyme repertoire is limited to various starch-based substrates; more complex polysaccharides demand microbial degradation. Select Bacteroidetes are responsible for the degradation of the ubiquitous vegetable xyloglucans (XyGs), through the concerted action of cohorts of enzymes and glycan-binding proteins encoded by specific xyloglucan utilization loci (XyGULs). Extending recent (meta)genomic, transcriptomic and biochemical analyses, significant questions remain regarding the structural biology of the molecular machinery required for XyG saccharification. Here, we reveal the three-dimensional structures of an α-xylosidase, a β-glucosidase, and two α-l-arabinofuranosidases from the Bacteroides ovatus XyGUL. Aided by bespoke ligand synthesis, our analyses highlight key adaptations in these enzymes that confer individual specificity for xyloglucan side chains and dictate concerted, stepwise disassembly of xyloglucan oligosaccharides. In harness with our recent structural characterization of the vanguard endo-xyloglucanse and cell-surface glycan-binding proteins, the present analysis provides a near-complete structural view of xyloglucan recognition and catalysis by XyGUL proteins. PMID:27466444

  16. Cloning, expression, and sequencing of a protease gene from Bacteroides forsythus ATCC 43037 in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Saito, T; Ishihara, K; Kato, T; Okuda, K

    1997-01-01

    We have isolated and characterized an N-benzoyl-Val-Gly-Arg-p-nitroanilide-specific protease gene, designated prtH, from Bacteroides forsythus ATCC 43037. Nucleotide sequencing of the DNA insert from the clone (hereafter referred to as clone FST) revealed that the protease activity corresponded to an open reading frame consisting of 1,272 bp coding for a 47.8-kDa protein. When plasmid pFST was used as a probe in Southern hybridization, Sau3AI-digested chromosomal DNA of B. forsythus ATCC 43037 as well as the chromosomal DNAs of the isolated strains Ta4, TR5, and YG2 showed 0.6- and 0.8-kb hybridizing bands. The cell-free extracts of clone FST showed hemolytic activity on human blood cells. The hydrolytic activity of cell extracts of the pFST clone was inhibited by p-toluenesulfonyl-L-lysine chloromethyl ketone hydrochloride, leupeptin, N-ethylmaleimide, iodoacetic acid, iodoaceteamide, and EDTA. PMID:9353083

  17. Differential Metabolism of Exopolysaccharides from Probiotic Lactobacilli by the Human Gut Symbiont Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron.

    PubMed

    Lammerts van Bueren, Alicia; Saraf, Aakanksha; Martens, Eric C; Dijkhuizen, Lubbert

    2015-06-15

    Probiotic microorganisms are ingested as food or supplements and impart positive health benefits to consumers. Previous studies have indicated that probiotics transiently reside in the gastrointestinal tract and, in addition to modulating commensal species diversity, increase the expression of genes for carbohydrate metabolism in resident commensal bacterial species. In this study, it is demonstrated that the human gut commensal species Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron efficiently metabolizes fructan exopolysaccharide (EPS) synthesized by probiotic Lactobacillus reuteri strain 121 while only partially degrading reuteran and isomalto/malto-polysaccharide (IMMP) α-glucan EPS polymers. B. thetaiotaomicron metabolized these EPS molecules via the activation of enzymes and transport systems encoded by dedicated polysaccharide utilization loci specific for β-fructans and α-glucans. Reduced metabolism of reuteran and IMMP α-glucan EPS molecules may be due to reduced substrate binding by components of the starch utilization system (sus). This study reveals that microbial EPS substrates activate genes for carbohydrate metabolism in B. thetaiotaomicron and suggests that microbially derived carbohydrates provide a carbohydrate-rich reservoir for B. thetaiotaomicron nutrient acquisition in the gastrointestinal tract. PMID:25841008

  18. Isolation, Detection, and Characterization of Enterotoxigenic Bacteroides fragilis in Clinical Samples

    PubMed Central

    Fathi, Payam; Wu, Shaoguang

    2016-01-01

    Bacteroides fragilis is an extensively studied anaerobic bacterium comprising the normal flora of the human gut. B. fragilis is known to be one of the most commonly isolated species from clinical samples and has been shown to cause a wide range of pathologies in humans [1, 2]. As an opportunistic pathogen B. fragilis can cause abscess formation and bacteremia [2]. Additionally in its enterotoxigenic form, B. fragilis is a known cause of diarrheal illness, is associated with inflammatory bowel disease, and has been recently characterized in patients with colon cancer [3 - 5]. As research in the field of the gut microbiome continues to expand at an ever increasing rate due to advances in the availability of next generation sequencing and analysis tools it is important to outline various molecular methods that can be employed in quickly detecting and isolating relevant strains of B. fragilis. This review outlines methods that are routinely employed in the isolation and detection of B. fragilis, with an emphasis on characterizing enterotoxigenic B. fragilis (ETBF) strains. PMID:27335618

  19. How does oxygen inhibit central metabolism in the obligate anaerobe Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron.

    PubMed

    Pan, N; Imlay, J A

    2001-03-01

    The molecular basis of obligate anaerobiosis is not well established. Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron is an opportunistic pathogen that cannot grow in fully aerobic habitats. Because microbial niches reflect features of energy-producing strategies, we suspected that aeration would interfere with its central metabolism. In anaerobic medium, this bacterium fermented carbohydrates to a mixture of succinate, propionate and acetate. When cultures were exposed to air, the formation of succinate and propionate ceased abruptly. In vitro analysis demonstrated that the fumarase of the succinate-propionate pathway contains an iron-sulphur cluster that is sensitive to superoxide. In vivo, fumarase activity fell to < 5% when cells were aerated; virtually all activity was recovered after extracts were chemically treated to rebuild iron-sulphur clusters. Aeration minimally affected the remainder of this pathway. However, aeration reduced pyruvate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase (PFOR), the first enzyme in the acetate fermentation branch, to 3% of its anaerobic activity. This cluster-containing enzyme was damaged in vitro by molecular oxygen but not by superoxide. Thus, aerobic growth is precluded by the vulnerability of these iron-sulphur cluster enzymes to oxidation. Importantly, both enzymes were maintained in a stable, inactive form for long periods in aerobic cells; they were then rapidly repaired when the bacterium was returned to anaerobic medium. This result explains how this pathogen can easily recover from occasional exposure to oxygen. PMID:11260473

  20. The Bacteroides sp. 3_1_23 Pif1 protein is a multifunctional helicase.

    PubMed

    Liu, Na-Nv; Duan, Xiao-Lei; Ai, Xia; Yang, Yan-Tao; Li, Ming; Dou, Shuo-Xing; Rety, Stephane; Deprez, Eric; Xi, Xu-Guang

    2015-10-15

    ScPif1 DNA helicase is the prototypical member of a 5'-to-3' helicase superfamily conserved from bacteria to human and plays various roles in the maintenance of genomic homeostasis. While many studies have been performed with eukaryotic Pif1 helicases, including yeast and human Pif1 proteins, the potential functions and biochemical properties of prokaryotic Pif1 helicases remain largely unknown. Here, we report the expression, purification and biochemical analysis of Pif1 helicase from Bacteroides sp. 3_1_23 (BsPif1). BsPif1 binds to a large panel of DNA substrates and, in particular, efficiently unwinds partial duplex DNAs with 5'-overhang, fork-like substrates, D-loop and flap-like substrates, suggesting that BsPif1 may act at stalled DNA replication forks and enhance Okazaki fragment maturation. Like its eukaryotic homologues, BsPif1 resolves R-loop structures and unwinds DNA-RNA hybrids. Furthermore, BsPif1 efficiently unfolds G-quadruplexes and disrupts nucleoprotein complexes. Altogether, these results highlight that prokaryotic Pif1 helicases may resolve common issues that arise during DNA transactions. Interestingly, we found that BsPif1 is different from yeast Pif1, but resembles more human Pif1 with regard to substrate specificity, helicase activity and mode of action. These findings are discussed in the context of the possible functions of prokaryotic Pif1 helicases in vivo. PMID:26384418

  1. Levan Enhances Associated Growth of Bacteroides, Escherichia, Streptococcus and Faecalibacterium in Fecal Microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Adamberg, Kaarel; Tomson, Katrin; Talve, Tiina; Pudova, Ksenia; Puurand, Marju; Visnapuu, Triinu; Alamäe, Tiina; Adamberg, Signe

    2015-01-01

    The role of dietary fiber in supporting healthy gut microbiota and overall well-being of the host has been revealed in several studies. Here, we show the effect of a bacterial polyfructan levan on the growth dynamics and metabolism of fecal microbiota in vitro by using isothermal microcalorimetry. Eleven fecal samples from healthy donors were incubated in phosphate-buffered defined medium with or without levan supplementation and varying presence of amino acids. The generation of heat, changes in pH and microbiota composition, concentrations of produced and consumed metabolites during the growth were determined. The composition of fecal microbiota and profile of metabolites changed in response to substrate (levan and amino acids) availability. The main products of levan metabolism were acetic, lactic, butyric, propionic and succinic acids and carbon dioxide. Associated growth of levan-degrading (e.g. Bacteroides) and butyric acid-producing (e.g. Faecalibacterium) taxa was observed in levan-supplemented media. The study shows that the capacity of levan and possibly also other dietary fibers/prebiotics to modulate the composition and function of colon microbiota can be predicted by using isothermal microcalorimetry of fecal samples linked to metabolite and consortia analyses. PMID:26629816

  2. Formation of glycosidases in batch and continuous culture of Bacteroides fragilis.

    PubMed

    Berg, J O; Nord, C E; Wadström, T

    1978-02-01

    Nine strains of bacteroides fragilis were cultivated in stirred fermentors and tested for their ability to produce glycosidases. B. fragilis subsp. vulgatus B70 was used for optimizing the production of glycosidases. The highest bacterial yield was obtained in proteose peptone-yeast extract medium. The optimum pH for maximal bacterial yield was 7.0, and the optimum temperature for growth was 37 degrees C. The formation of glycosidases was optimal between pH 6.5 and 7.5, and the optimum temperature for synthesis of glycosidases was between 33 and 37 degrees C. Culture under controlled conditions in fermentors gave more reproducible production of glycosidases than static cultures in bottles. The strain was also grown in continuous culture at a dilution rate of 0.1 liter/h at pH 7.0 and 37 degrees C with a yield of 2.0 mg of dry weight per ml in the complex medium. The formation of glycosidases remained constant during the entire continuous process.

  3. Formation of beta-lactamase in Bacteroides fragilis: cell-bound and extracellular activity.

    PubMed

    Olsson, B; Nord, C E; Wadström, T

    1976-05-01

    Nine strains of Bacteroides fragilis were cultivated in stirred fermentors and tested for their ability to produce beta-lactamase. There was a correlation between formation of beta-lactamase and high values of the minimal inhibitory concentration against beta-lactam antibiotics. B. fragilis strain B70 was used for optimizing the production of beta-lactamase. The highest bacterial yield was obtained in a proteose peptone-yeast extract medium. Optimal conditions for growth and beta-lactamase production were obtained at 37 C and pH 7.0. The beta-lactamase was released into the surrounding medium during the growth period to about 50%. Osmotic shock released about 20% of the total activity, and remaining activity was found in the cytoplasmic fraction. Substrate profile studies on four beta-lactamase-producing strains showed that the enzymes were mainly cephalosporinases. They are inhibited by cloxacillin, p-chloromercuribenzoate, and iodine. Analytical isoelectric focusing in polyacrylamide gel gave an isoelectric point of 4.9 +/- 0.2 for three of the strains and 5.6 +/- 0.2 for one. Comparison with beta-lactamases from aerobic gram-negative species with regard to isoelectric points showed no similarities. Also the molecular weight of the beta-lactamase from strain B70 of 43,000 indicates that this is a new class of beta-lactamase.

  4. The Bacteroides sp. 3_1_23 Pif1 protein is a multifunctional helicase.

    PubMed

    Liu, Na-Nv; Duan, Xiao-Lei; Ai, Xia; Yang, Yan-Tao; Li, Ming; Dou, Shuo-Xing; Rety, Stephane; Deprez, Eric; Xi, Xu-Guang

    2015-10-15

    ScPif1 DNA helicase is the prototypical member of a 5'-to-3' helicase superfamily conserved from bacteria to human and plays various roles in the maintenance of genomic homeostasis. While many studies have been performed with eukaryotic Pif1 helicases, including yeast and human Pif1 proteins, the potential functions and biochemical properties of prokaryotic Pif1 helicases remain largely unknown. Here, we report the expression, purification and biochemical analysis of Pif1 helicase from Bacteroides sp. 3_1_23 (BsPif1). BsPif1 binds to a large panel of DNA substrates and, in particular, efficiently unwinds partial duplex DNAs with 5'-overhang, fork-like substrates, D-loop and flap-like substrates, suggesting that BsPif1 may act at stalled DNA replication forks and enhance Okazaki fragment maturation. Like its eukaryotic homologues, BsPif1 resolves R-loop structures and unwinds DNA-RNA hybrids. Furthermore, BsPif1 efficiently unfolds G-quadruplexes and disrupts nucleoprotein complexes. Altogether, these results highlight that prokaryotic Pif1 helicases may resolve common issues that arise during DNA transactions. Interestingly, we found that BsPif1 is different from yeast Pif1, but resembles more human Pif1 with regard to substrate specificity, helicase activity and mode of action. These findings are discussed in the context of the possible functions of prokaryotic Pif1 helicases in vivo.

  5. Detection of integron-associated gene cassettes and other antimicrobial resistance genes in enterotoxigenic Bacteroides fragilis.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Anirban; Pazhani, Gururaja P; Dharanidharan, Ramamurthy; Ghosh, Amit; Ramamurthy, Thandavarayan

    2015-06-01

    Twenty seven Enterotoxigenic Bacteroides fragilis (ETBF) strains isolated from children in Kolkata, India, were tested for their antimicrobial resistance, presence of integrons and resistance encoding genes. Almost all the strains (>90%) were resistant to two or more antimicrobials. About 59-92% of the strains were resistant to ampicillin, amoxicillin, streptomycin, tetracycline, ciprofloxacin and norfloxacin. Most of these antimicrobial agents have been used in the treatment of diarrhea and other infectious diseases. In addition, about half a number of strains (48-55%) were resistant to clindamycin, cefotaxime, ceftazidime, ampicillin/sulbactam and trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole. Moxifloxacin and metronidazole resistance ranged from 30 to 40%. All strains however, were found to be susceptible to chloramphenicol and imipenem. Class 1 integrase (intI1) was detected in seven and class 2 integrase (intI2) in one of the twenty seven ETBF strains. Resistance gene cassettes carried by these integrons had different alleles of dfr or aad genes. Beside these integron-borne genes, other genes encoding different antimicrobial resistance were also detected. Resistance genes such as cep(A) and tet(Q) were detected in most of the ETBF strains. To the best of our knowledge, this work constituted the first extensive report from India on the detection of integrons and antimicrobial resistance genes in ETBF. PMID:25634362

  6. Isolation and some properties of exohemagglutinin from the culture medium of Bacteroides gingivalis 381.

    PubMed Central

    Inoshita, E; Amano, A; Hanioka, T; Tamagawa, H; Shizukuishi, S; Tsunemitsu, A

    1986-01-01

    Exohemagglutinin was found in the culture medium of Bacteroides gingivalis 381. Exohemagglutinin was purified 3,150-fold from culture fluid by ultracentrifugation followed by gel filtration on Sepharose CL-4B and by affinity chromatography on arginine-agarose. Examination of the final preparation of exohemagglutinin by biochemical analysis and sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis revealed that the isolated exohemagglutinin contained three major proteins but not a detectable lipopolysaccharide. Hemagglutination inhibition experiments showed that the activity of exohemagglutinin was inhibited by L-arginine and the arginine-containing peptides, although the activity was unaffected by the sugars tested. Some protein and glycoproteins that were examined also exhibited the inhibitory activity. When the bovine submaxillary mucin was chemically modified by beta-elimination and bovine serum albumin was modified by guanidination, the inhibitory effects on hemagglutination were significantly enhanced. These results suggest that the hemagglutination of the isolated exohemagglutinin may be involved in arginine residues as components of ligand-binding sites on erythrocytes. Images PMID:3699890

  7. Levan Enhances Associated Growth of Bacteroides, Escherichia, Streptococcus and Faecalibacterium in Fecal Microbiota.

    PubMed

    Adamberg, Kaarel; Tomson, Katrin; Talve, Tiina; Pudova, Ksenia; Puurand, Marju; Visnapuu, Triinu; Alamäe, Tiina; Adamberg, Signe

    2015-01-01

    The role of dietary fiber in supporting healthy gut microbiota and overall well-being of the host has been revealed in several studies. Here, we show the effect of a bacterial polyfructan levan on the growth dynamics and metabolism of fecal microbiota in vitro by using isothermal microcalorimetry. Eleven fecal samples from healthy donors were incubated in phosphate-buffered defined medium with or without levan supplementation and varying presence of amino acids. The generation of heat, changes in pH and microbiota composition, concentrations of produced and consumed metabolites during the growth were determined. The composition of fecal microbiota and profile of metabolites changed in response to substrate (levan and amino acids) availability. The main products of levan metabolism were acetic, lactic, butyric, propionic and succinic acids and carbon dioxide. Associated growth of levan-degrading (e.g. Bacteroides) and butyric acid-producing (e.g. Faecalibacterium) taxa was observed in levan-supplemented media. The study shows that the capacity of levan and possibly also other dietary fibers/prebiotics to modulate the composition and function of colon microbiota can be predicted by using isothermal microcalorimetry of fecal samples linked to metabolite and consortia analyses. PMID:26629816

  8. Structural dissection of a complex Bacteroides ovatus gene locus conferring xyloglucan metabolism in the human gut

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Andrew J.; Stepper, Judith; Sobala, Łukasz F.; Coyle, Travis; Larsbrink, Johan; Spadiut, Oliver; Goddard-Borger, Ethan D.; Stubbs, Keith A.; Brumer, Harry; Davies, Gideon J.

    2016-01-01

    The human gastrointestinal tract harbours myriad bacterial species, collectively termed the microbiota, that strongly influence human health. Symbiotic members of our microbiota play a pivotal role in the digestion of complex carbohydrates that are otherwise recalcitrant to assimilation. Indeed, the intrinsic human polysaccharide-degrading enzyme repertoire is limited to various starch-based substrates; more complex polysaccharides demand microbial degradation. Select Bacteroidetes are responsible for the degradation of the ubiquitous vegetable xyloglucans (XyGs), through the concerted action of cohorts of enzymes and glycan-binding proteins encoded by specific xyloglucan utilization loci (XyGULs). Extending recent (meta)genomic, transcriptomic and biochemical analyses, significant questions remain regarding the structural biology of the molecular machinery required for XyG saccharification. Here, we reveal the three-dimensional structures of an α-xylosidase, a β-glucosidase, and two α-l-arabinofuranosidases from the Bacteroides ovatus XyGUL. Aided by bespoke ligand synthesis, our analyses highlight key adaptations in these enzymes that confer individual specificity for xyloglucan side chains and dictate concerted, stepwise disassembly of xyloglucan oligosaccharides. In harness with our recent structural characterization of the vanguard endo-xyloglucanse and cell-surface glycan-binding proteins, the present analysis provides a near-complete structural view of xyloglucan recognition and catalysis by XyGUL proteins. PMID:27466444

  9. Differential Metabolism of Exopolysaccharides from Probiotic Lactobacilli by the Human Gut Symbiont Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron

    PubMed Central

    Saraf, Aakanksha; Martens, Eric C.; Dijkhuizen, Lubbert

    2015-01-01

    Probiotic microorganisms are ingested as food or supplements and impart positive health benefits to consumers. Previous studies have indicated that probiotics transiently reside in the gastrointestinal tract and, in addition to modulating commensal species diversity, increase the expression of genes for carbohydrate metabolism in resident commensal bacterial species. In this study, it is demonstrated that the human gut commensal species Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron efficiently metabolizes fructan exopolysaccharide (EPS) synthesized by probiotic Lactobacillus reuteri strain 121 while only partially degrading reuteran and isomalto/malto-polysaccharide (IMMP) α-glucan EPS polymers. B. thetaiotaomicron metabolized these EPS molecules via the activation of enzymes and transport systems encoded by dedicated polysaccharide utilization loci specific for β-fructans and α-glucans. Reduced metabolism of reuteran and IMMP α-glucan EPS molecules may be due to reduced substrate binding by components of the starch utilization system (sus). This study reveals that microbial EPS substrates activate genes for carbohydrate metabolism in B. thetaiotaomicron and suggests that microbially derived carbohydrates provide a carbohydrate-rich reservoir for B. thetaiotaomicron nutrient acquisition in the gastrointestinal tract. PMID:25841008

  10. Structural analysis of arabinose-5-phosphate isomerase from Bacteroides fragilis and functional implications

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, Hsiu-Ju; Grant, Joanna C.; Farr, Carol L.; Jaroszewski, Lukasz; Knuth, Mark W.; Miller, Mitchell D.; Elsliger, Marc-André; Deacon, Ashley M.; Godzik, Adam; Lesley, Scott A.; Wilson, Ian A.

    2014-01-01

    The crystal structure of arabinose-5-phosphate isomerase (API) from Bacteroides fragilis (bfAPI) was determined at 1.7 Å resolution and was found to be a tetramer of a single-domain sugar isomerase (SIS) with an endogenous ligand, CMP-Kdo (cytidine 5′-monophosphate-3-deoxy-d-manno-oct-2-ulosonate), bound at the active site. API catalyzes the reversible isomerization of d-ribulose 5-phosphate to d-arabinose 5-phosphate in the first step of the Kdo biosynthetic pathway. Interestingly, the bound CMP-Kdo is neither the substrate nor the product of the reaction catalyzed by API, but corresponds to the end product in the Kdo biosynthetic pathway and presumably acts as a feedback inhibitor for bfAPI. The active site of each monomer is located in a surface cleft at the tetramer interface between three monomers and consists of His79 and His186 from two different adjacent monomers and a Ser/Thr-rich region, all of which are highly conserved across APIs. Structure and sequence analyses indicate that His79 and His186 may play important catalytic roles in the isomerization reaction. CMP-Kdo mimetics could therefore serve as potent and specific inhibitors of API and provide broad protection against many different bacterial infections. PMID:25286848

  11. The rec A operon: a novel stress response gene cluster in Bacteroides fragilis

    PubMed Central

    Nicholson, Samantha A; Smalley, Darren; Smith, C. Jeffrey; Abratt, Valerie R

    2014-01-01

    Bacteroides fragilis, an opportunistic pathogen of humans, is a leading cause of bacteraemias and anaerobic abscesses which are often treated with metronidazole, a drug which damages DNA. This study investigated the responses of the B. fragilis recA three gene operon to the stress experienced during metronidazole treatment and exposure to reactive oxygen species simulating those generated by the host immune system during infection. A transcriptionally regulated response was observed using quantitative RT-PCR after metronidazole and hydrogen peroxide treatment, with all three genes being upregulated under stress conditions. In vivo and in vitro analysis of the functional role of the second gene of the operon was done using heterologous complementation and protein expression (in Escherichia coli), with subsequent biochemical assay. This gene encoded a functional bacterioferritin co-migratory protein (BCP) which was thiol-specific and had antioxidant properties, including protection of the glutamine synthetase III enzyme. This in vitro data supports the hypothesis that the genes of the operon may be involved in protection of the bacteria from the oxidative burst during tissue invasion and may play a significant role in bacterial survival and metronidazole resistance during treatment of B. fragilis infections. PMID:24703997

  12. A Scaffoldin of the Bacteroides cellulosolvens Cellulosome That Contains 11 Type II Cohesins

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Shi-You; Bayer, Edward A.; Steiner, David; Shoham, Yuval; Lamed, Raphael

    2000-01-01

    A cellulosomal scaffoldin gene, termed cipBc, was identified and sequenced from the mesophilic cellulolytic anaerobe Bacteroides cellulosolvens. The gene encodes a 2,292-residue polypeptide (excluding the signal sequence) with a calculated molecular weight of 242,437. CipBc contains an N-terminal signal peptide, 11 type II cohesin domains, an internal family III cellulose-binding domain (CBD), and a C-terminal dockerin domain. Its CBD belongs to family IIIb, like that of CipV from Acetivibrio cellulolyticus but unlike the family IIIa CBDs of other clostridial scaffoldins. In contrast to all other scaffoldins thus far described, CipBc lacks a hydrophilic domain or domain X of unknown function. The singularity of CipBc, however, lies in its numerous type II cohesin domains, all of which are very similar in sequence. One of the latter cohesin domains was expressed, and the expressed protein interacted selectively with cellulosomal enzymes, one of which was identified as a family 48 glycosyl hydrolase on the basis of partial sequence alignment. By definition, the dockerins, carried by the cellulosomal enzymes of this species, would be considered to be type II. This is the first example of authentic type II cohesins that are confirmed components of a cellulosomal scaffoldin subunit rather than a cell surface anchoring component. The results attest to the emerging diversity of cellulosomes and their component sequences in nature. PMID:10940036

  13. Structural analysis of arabinose-5-phosphate isomerase from Bacteroides fragilis and functional implications.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Hsiu Ju; Grant, Joanna C; Farr, Carol L; Jaroszewski, Lukasz; Knuth, Mark W; Miller, Mitchell D; Elsliger, Marc André; Deacon, Ashley M; Godzik, Adam; Lesley, Scott A; Wilson, Ian A

    2014-10-01

    The crystal structure of arabinose-5-phosphate isomerase (API) from Bacteroides fragilis (bfAPI) was determined at 1.7 Å resolution and was found to be a tetramer of a single-domain sugar isomerase (SIS) with an endogenous ligand, CMP-Kdo (cytidine 5'-monophosphate-3-deoxy-D-manno-oct-2-ulosonate), bound at the active site. API catalyzes the reversible isomerization of D-ribulose 5-phosphate to D-arabinose 5-phosphate in the first step of the Kdo biosynthetic pathway. Interestingly, the bound CMP-Kdo is neither the substrate nor the product of the reaction catalyzed by API, but corresponds to the end product in the Kdo biosynthetic pathway and presumably acts as a feedback inhibitor for bfAPI. The active site of each monomer is located in a surface cleft at the tetramer interface between three monomers and consists of His79 and His186 from two different adjacent monomers and a Ser/Thr-rich region, all of which are highly conserved across APIs. Structure and sequence analyses indicate that His79 and His186 may play important catalytic roles in the isomerization reaction. CMP-Kdo mimetics could therefore serve as potent and specific inhibitors of API and provide broad protection against many different bacterial infections.

  14. Activity of cefazolin and two beta-lactamase inhibitors, clavulanic acid and sulbactam, against Bacteroides fragilis.

    PubMed Central

    Fekete, T; McGowen, J; Cundy, K R

    1987-01-01

    One hundred clinical isolates of the Bacteroides fragilis group of bacteria were tested by agar dilution for susceptibility to cefazolin alone or in combination with clavulanic acid or sulbactam. For cefazolin, the MIC for 50% of the isolates (MIC50) was 32 micrograms/ml, the breakpoint for susceptibility. With the addition of 0.5 micrograms of clavulanic acid per ml, the MIC for 90% of the isolates (MIC90) was 8 micrograms/ml, well within the achievable range of concentrations in serum or tissue. Similarly, with the addition of 0.5 micrograms of sulbactam per ml, the MIC90 was 16 micrograms/ml. The addition of a higher concentration (4.0 micrograms/ml) of clavulanic acid or sulbactam resulted in MIC90S which were fourfold lower than those with 0.5 micrograms/ml. A fixed ratio of cefazolin-beta-lactamase inhibitor of 4:1 resulted in an MIC50 and MIC90 which were intermediate between the 0.5- and 4.0-micrograms/ml fixed concentration of beta-lactamase inhibitor. PMID:3032097

  15. The symbiotic defect of Rhizobium meliloti exopolysaccharide mutants is suppressed by lpsZ sup + , a gene involved in lipopolysaccharide biosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, M.N.V.; Klein, S.; Signer, E.R. ); Hollingsworth, R.I. )

    1990-05-01

    exo mutants of Rhizobium meliloti SU47, which fail to secrete acidic extracellular polysaccharide (EPS), induce Fix{sup {minus}} nodules on alfalfa. However, mutants of R. meliloti Rm41 carrying the same exo lesions induce normal Fix{sup +} nodules. The authors show that such induction is due to a gene from strain Rm41, which they call lpsZ{sup +}, that is missing in strain SU47. lpsZ{sup +} does not restore EPS production but instead alters the composition an structure of lipopolysaccharide. In both SU47 and Rm41, either lpsZ{sup +} or exo{sup +} is sufficient for normal nodulation. This suggests that in R. meliloti EPS and lipopolysaccharide can perform the same function in nodule development.

  16. Phylogenetic diversity of Rhizobium strains nodulating diverse legume species growing in Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Degefu, Tulu; Wolde-meskel, Endalkachew; Frostegård, Åsa

    2013-06-01

    The taxonomic diversity of thirty-seven Rhizobium strains, isolated from nodules of leguminous trees and herbs growing in Ethiopia, was studied using multilocus sequence analyses (MLSA) of six core and two symbiosis-related genes. Phylogenetic analysis based on the 16S rRNA gene grouped them into five clusters related to nine Rhizobium reference species (99-100% sequence similarity). In addition, two test strains occupied their own independent branches on the phylogenetic tree (AC86a2 along with R. tibeticum; 99.1% similarity and AC100b along with R. multihospitium; 99.5% similarity). One strain from Milletia ferruginea was closely related (>99%) to the genus Shinella, further corroborating earlier findings that nitrogen-fixing bacteria are distributed among phylogenetically unrelated taxa. Sequence analyses of five housekeeping genes also separated the strains into five well-supported clusters, three of which grouped with previously studied Ethiopian common bean rhizobia. Three of the five clusters could potentially be described into new species. Based on the nifH genes, most of the test strains from crop legumes were closely related to several strains of Ethiopian common bean rhizobia and other symbionts of bean plants (R. etli and R. gallicum sv. phaseoli). The grouping of the test strains based on the symbiosis-related genes was not in agreement with the housekeeping genes, signifying differences in their evolutionary history. Our earlier studies revealing a large diversity of Mesorhizobium and Ensifer microsymbionts isolated from Ethiopian legumes, together with the results from the present analysis of Rhizobium strains, suggest that this region might be a potential hotspot for rhizobial biodiversity. PMID:23643092

  17. Effects of decomposing rice straw on growth of and nitrogen fixation by Rhizobium

    SciTech Connect

    Rice, E.L.; Huang, C.Y.; Lin, C.Y.

    1981-03-01

    Five phenolic compounds produced in decomposing rice straw and sterile extracts of decomposing rice straw in soil were very inhibitory to growth of three strains of Rhizobium. The effects were additive and in several instances synergistic. The phenolic compounds also reduced nodule numbers and hemoglobin content of the nodules in two bean (Phaseohus vulgaris) varieties. Extracts of decomposing rice straw in soil (same concentration as in the soil) significantly reduced N/sub 2/ fixation (acetylene reduction) in Bush Black Seeded beans. This may explain in part the great reduction in soybean yields in Taiwan following rice crops when the rice stubble is left in the field.

  18. DNA, a possible site of action of aluminum in Rhizobium spp

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, A.C.; Wood, M. )

    1990-12-01

    Al was found to penetrate the cell envelopes of both sensitive and tolerant Rhizobium strains and bind to DNA in vivo. Despite causing a reduction viability, Al stimulated DNA synthesis in the sensitive strain, which suggested that an excision repair mechanism was operating. The Al-stimulated DNA synthesis was reduced by the simultaneous addition of chloramphenicol. In contrast to the sensitive strain, DNA synthesis was unaffected by Al binding to DNA in the tolerant strain. It is proposed that Al enters the cell and binds to the DNA helix, increasing stabilization and preventing successful replication. Different repair mechanisms appear to operate in response to Al in tolerant and sensitive strains.

  19. Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi and rhizobium facilitate nitrogen uptake and transfer in soybean/maize intercropping system

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Lingbo; Zhang, Aiyuan; Wang, Fei; Han, Xiaoguang; Wang, Dejiang; Li, Shumin

    2015-01-01

    The tripartite symbiosis between legumes, rhizobia and mycorrhizal fungi are generally considered to be beneficial for the nitrogen (N) uptake of legumes, but the facilitation of symbiosis in legume/non-legume intercropping systems is not clear. Therefore, the aims of the research are as follows: (1) to verify if the dual inoculation can facilitate the N uptake and N transfer in maize/soybean intercropping systems and (2) to calculate how much N will be transferred from soybean to maize. A pot experiment with different root separations [solid barrier, mesh (30 μm) barrier and no barrier] was conducted, and the 15N isotopic tracing method was used to calculate how much N transferred from soybean to maize inoculated with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) and rhizobium in a soybean (Glycine max L.cv. Dongnong No. 42)/maize (Zea mays L.cv. Dongnong No. 48) intercropping system. Compared with the Glomus mosseae inoculation (G.m.), Rhizobium SH212 inoculation (SH212), no inoculation (NI), the dual inoculation (SH212+G.m.) increased the N uptake of soybean by 28.69, 39.58, and 93.07% in a solid barrier system. N uptake of maize inoculated with both G. mosseae and rhizobium was 1.20, 1.28, and 1.68 times more than that of G.m., SH212 and NI, respectively, in solid barrier treatments. In addition, the amount of N transferred from soybean to maize in a dual inoculation system with a mesh barrier was 7.25, 7.01, and 11.45 mg more than that of G.m., SH212 and NI and similarly, 6.40, 7.58, and 12.46 mg increased in no barrier treatments. Inoculating with both AMF and rhizobium in the soybean/maize intercropping system improved the N fixation efficiency of soybean and promoted N transfer from soybean to maize, resulting in the improvement of yield advantages of legume/non-legume intercropping. PMID:26029236

  20. Rhizobium meliloti chromosomal loci required for suppression of exopolysaccharide mutations by lipopolysaccharide

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, M.N.V.; Brzoska, P.M.; Signer, E.R. ); Hollingsworth, R.I. )

    1990-11-01

    Mutants of alfalfa symbiont Rhizobium meliloti SU47 that fail to make extracellular polysaccharide (exo mutants) induce the formation of nodules that are devoid of bacteria and consequently do not fix nitrogen. This Fix{sup {minus}} phenotype can be suppressed by an R. meliloti Rm41 gene that affects lipopolysaccharide structure. Here we describe mutations preventing suppression that map at two new chromosomal loci, lpsY and lpsX, present in both strains. Two other lps mutations isolated previously from SU47 also prevented suppression.

  1. Underexpression of Ap from R-Plasmids in Fast-Growing Rhizobium Species

    PubMed Central

    Sikka, Virendra K.; Kumar, Sushil

    1984-01-01

    The presence of the plasmid RP1 in the cells of Rhizobium leguminosarum strains Rld1, 300, and 248, R. phaseoli 1233, R. trifolii strains T1 and 6661, and R. meliloti 4013 was found to appreciably increase bacterial resistance toward kanamycin and tetracycline but not toward ampicillin. The presence of 16 other R-plasmids in R. leguminosarum was also found to either not increase or only marginally increase bacterial resistance toward ampicillin. It appears now that underexpression of the plasmid-specified ampicillin function is common to most fast- and slow-growing rhizobia. PMID:16346686

  2. Rhizobium meliloti nodD genes mediate host-specific activation of nodABC.

    PubMed Central

    Honma, M A; Asomaning, M; Ausubel, F M

    1990-01-01

    To differentiate among the roles of the three nodD genes of Rhizobium meliloti 1021, we studied the activation of a nodC-lacZ fusion by each of the three nodD genes in response to root exudates from several R. meliloti host plants and in response to the flavone luteolin. We found (i) that the nodD1 and nodD2 products (NodD1 and NodD2) responded differently to root exudates from a variety of hosts, (ii) that NodD1 but not NodD2 responded to luteolin, (iii) that NodD2 functioned synergistically with NodD1 or NodD3, (iv) that NodD2 interfered with NodD1-mediated activation of nodC-lacZ in response to luteolin, and (v) that a region adjacent to and upstream of nodD2 was required for NodD2-mediated activation of nodC-lacZ. We also studied the ability of each of the three R. meliloti nodD genes to complement nodD mutations in R. trifolii and Rhizobium sp. strain NGR234. We found (i) that nodD1 complemented an R. trifolii nodD mutation but not a Rhizobium sp. strain NGR234 nodD1 mutation and (ii) that R. meliloti nodD2 or nodD3 plus R. meliloti syrM complemented the nodD mutations in both R. trifolii and Rhizobium sp. strain NGR234. Finally, we determined the nucleotide sequence of the R. meliloti nodD2 gene and found that R. meliloti NodD1 and NodD2 are highly homologous except in the C-terminal region. Our results support the hypothesis that R. meliloti utilizes the three copies of nodD to optimize the interaction with each of its legume hosts. PMID:2298703

  3. Tsukamurella tyrosinosolvens and Rhizobium radiobacter sepsis presenting with septic pulmonary emboli.

    PubMed

    Romano, L; Spanu, T; Calista, F; Zappacosta, B; Mignogna, S; Sali, M; Fiori, B; Fadda, G

    2011-07-01

    Septic pulmonary embolism (SPE) is an uncommon, but life-threatening event that is usually associated with extrapulmonary infections. We report the first case of bilateral SPE secondary to a central venous catheter-related bloodstream infection involving pathogens commonly considered environmental contaminants: Tsukamurella tyrosinosolvens and Rhizobium radiobacter. Empirical levofloxacin treatment was confirmed by in vitro susceptibility data and produced prompt clinical improvement, but removal of the infected line proved indispensable for eradication of the infection. Laboratory personnel should be aware of the pathogenic potential of these environmental organisms, particularly in immunocompromised hosts with indwelling catheters.

  4. Implantable vascular access port-associated bloodstream infection caused by Rhizobium radiobacter: a case report.

    PubMed

    Karadağ-Öncel, Eda; Ozsürekci, Yasemin; Aytaç, Selin; Kara, Ateş; Cengiz, Ali Bülent; Ceyhan, Mehmet

    2013-01-01

    Rhizobium radiobacter is an uncommon opportunistic pathogen present in soil. It has been particularly associated with indwelling intravascular devices in immunocompromised patients. Reported herein is a case of R. radiobacter bloodstream infection associated with an implantable vascular access port, which was easily controlled with antimicrobial treatment and did not require removal of the intravascular device, in a child diagnosed with acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Also included is a review of the pertinent literature regarding the clinical presentation and management of R. radiobacter infections in the childhood period.

  5. l-2-Haloacid dehalogenase (DehL) from Rhizobium sp. RC1.

    PubMed

    Adamu, Aliyu; Wahab, Roswanira Abdul; Huyop, Fahrul

    2016-01-01

    l-2-Haloacid dehalogenase (DehL) from Rhizobium sp. RC1 is a stereospecific enzyme that acts exclusively on l-isomers of 2-chloropropionate and dichloroacetate. The amino acid sequence of this enzyme is substantially different from those of other l-specific dehalogenases produced by other organisms. DehL has not been crystallised, and hence its three-dimensional structure is unavailable. Herein, we review what is known concerning DehL and tentatively identify the amino acid residues important for catalysis based on a comparative structural and sequence analysis with well-characterised l-specific dehalogenases. PMID:27347470

  6. Production and composition of extracellular polysaccharide synthesized by a Rhizobium isolate of Vigna mungo (L.) Hepper.

    PubMed

    Mandal, Santi Mohan; Ray, Bimalendu; Dey, Satyahari; Pati, Bikas Ranjan

    2007-08-01

    An extracellular polysaccharide (EPS) was produced by a Rhizobium sp. isolated from the root nodules of Vigna mungo (L.) Hepper. Maximum EPS production (346 mg l(-1)) was when the yeast extract basal medium was supplemented with mannitol (1%), biotin (1.5 mg l(-1)) and asparagine (0.3%). Ribose (53%) and mannose (47%) were the principle monomers of the EPS. Chemical, chromatographic and spectroscopic analysis showed that this polymer, which has Man(4)Rib(1) as an oligomeric subunit, has an apparent molecular mass of 750 kDa.

  7. Identification of inoculant strains and naturalized populations ofRhizobium leguminosarum bvtrifolii using complementary methodologies.

    PubMed

    Fabiano, E; Arias, A

    1990-06-01

    Introduced clovers (Trifolium repens andTrifolium subterraneum) fall to persist more than two years in Uruguayan improved pastures. Three strains of naturalizedRhizobium leguminosarum bvtrifolii, isolated from persistent clover pastures inoculated several years ago, and two commercial inoculant strains have been identified. Serological techniques (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay-ELISA) and total cell protein pattern have been selected as sensitive and reliable methods for strain identification. Indirect ELISA was suitable for detecting rhizobia in cultures or in nodules. Two of the naturalized strains had distinct protein profiles but they could not be differentiated by the immunological method with a polyclonal antibody. PMID:24429983

  8. Proteins Exported via the PrsD-PrsE Type I Secretion System and the Acidic Exopolysaccharide Are Involved in Biofilm Formation by Rhizobium leguminosarum

    PubMed Central

    Russo, Daniela M.; Williams, Alan; Edwards, Anne; Posadas, Diana M.; Finnie, Christine; Dankert, Marcelo; Downie, J. Allan; Zorreguieta, Angeles

    2006-01-01

    The type I protein secretion system of Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. viciae encoded by the prsD and prsE genes is responsible for secretion of the exopolysaccharide (EPS)-glycanases PlyA and PlyB. The formation of a ring of biofilm on the surface of the glass in shaken cultures by both the prsD and prsE secretion mutants was greatly affected. Confocal laser scanning microscopy analysis of green-fluorescent-protein-labeled bacteria showed that during growth in minimal medium, R. leguminosarum wild type developed microcolonies, which progress to a characteristic three-dimensional biofilm structure. However, the prsD and prsE secretion mutants were able to form only an immature biofilm structure. A mutant disrupted in the EPS-glycanase plyB gene showed altered timing of biofilm formation, and its structure was atypical. A mutation in an essential gene for EPS synthesis (pssA) or deletion of several other pss genes involved in EPS synthesis completely abolished the ability of R. leguminosarum to develop a biofilm. Extracellular complementation studies of mixed bacterial cultures confirmed the role of the EPS and the modulation of the biofilm structure by the PrsD-PrsE secreted proteins. Protein analysis identified several additional proteins secreted by the PrsD-PrsE secretion system, and N-terminal sequencing revealed peptides homologous to the N termini of proteins from the Rap family (Rhizobium adhering proteins), which could have roles in cellular adhesion in R. leguminosarum. We propose a model for R. leguminosarum in which synthesis of the EPS leads the formation of a biofilm and several PrsD-PrsE secreted proteins are involved in different aspects of biofilm maturation, such as modulation of the EPS length or mediating attachment between bacteria. PMID:16740954

  9. [A new butyric acid-producing bacteroides species: B. splanchnicus n. sp. (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Werner, H; Rintelen, G; Kunstek-Santos, H

    1975-01-01

    Three butyric acid-producing saccharolytic Bacteroides cultures (1651/6, BM 158, and IPP 3751) were described by WERNER and REICHERTZ in 1971 (Zbl.Bakt.Hyg., I. Abt. Orig. A 217,206-216). Since then, 6 strains closely resembling 1651/6 were isolated from stool specimens and surgically removed appendices. In the present communication, strains 1651/6, S2/34, S3/38, S4/28, S6/6, A5/2 are described as members of a new species, Bacteroides splanchnicus n.sp. The strains were morphologically very similar (Gram negative non-sporing non-motile rods, 1-2.5 mu in length and 0.7 mu in width) and fermented glucose, fructose, galactose, mannose, lactose, and arabinose (pH values of 4.6-5.4, moderate gas formation). Negative reactions (pH values of 5.8-7.2) were observed with 20 other carbohydrates. The strains were positive in the glutamic acid decarboxylase test and formed indole and H2S. In peptone-yeast extract broth and peptone-yeast extract-glucose broth acetic, propionic, isobutyric, butyric, and isovaleric acids were produced. Washed cells of strains 1651/6 and S4/28 incubated anaerobically in sterile solutions of single amino acids produced butyrate from lysine only. Abundant butyric acid was also produced from glucose. The in vitro activity of 15 antibiotics on 5 strains was studied by broth dilution tests. Uniformly, the strains showed resistance to aminoglycosides and polymyxins (MIC values, 60-500 mug/ml) and susceptibility to tetracyclines, lincomycin, clindamycin, rifampicin, and erythromycin (MIC values, 0.05-0.5 mug/ml). Chloramphenicol, penicillins, and cephalosporins showed bacteriostatic activity at concentrations of 5-40 mug/ml. The serological behaviour of 5 strains was studied in cross-agglutination and gel-diffusion experiments. Cross-reactivity was pronounced in gel-diffusion tests using rabbit antisera and autoclaved extracts and extracts prepared by repeated deep-freezing and thawing of whole cell suspensions as antigens. However, antisera against the

  10. RapA2 Is a Calcium-binding Lectin Composed of Two Highly Conserved Cadherin-like Domains That Specifically Recognize Rhizobium leguminosarum Acidic Exopolysaccharides*

    PubMed Central

    Abdian, Patricia L.; Caramelo, Julio J.; Ausmees, Nora; Zorreguieta, Angeles

    2013-01-01

    In silico analyses have revealed a conserved protein domain (CHDL) widely present in bacteria that has significant structural similarity to eukaryotic cadherins. A CHDL domain was shown to be present in RapA, a protein that is involved in autoaggregation of Rhizobium cells, biofilm formation, and adhesion to plant roots as shown by us and others. Structural similarity to cadherins suggested calcium-dependent oligomerization of CHDL domains as a mechanistic basis for RapA action. Here we show by circular dichroism spectroscopy, light scattering, isothermal titration calorimetry, and other methods that RapA2 from Rhizobium leguminosarum indeed exhibits a cadherin-like β-sheet conformation and that its proper folding and stability are dependent on the binding of one calcium ion per protein molecule. By further in silico analysis we also reveal that RapA2 consists of two CHDL domains and expand the range of CHDL-containing proteins in bacteria and archaea. However, light scattering assays at various concentrations of added calcium revealed that RapA2 formed neither homo-oligomers nor hetero-oligomers with RapB (a distinct CHDL protein), indicating that RapA2 does not mediate cellular interactions through a cadherin-like mechanism. Instead, we demonstrate that RapA2 interacts specifically with the acidic exopolysaccharides (EPSs) produced by R. leguminosarum in a calcium-dependent manner, sustaining a role of these proteins in the development of the biofilm matrix made of EPS. Because EPS binding by RapA2 can only be attributed to its two CHDL domains, we propose that RapA2 is a calcium-dependent lectin and that CHDL domains in various bacterial and archaeal proteins confer carbohydrate binding activity to these proteins. PMID:23235153

  11. Exploratory Investigation of Bacteroides fragilis Transcriptional Response during In vitro Exposure to Subinhibitory Concentration of Metronidazole

    PubMed Central

    de Freitas, Michele C. R.; Resende, Juliana A.; Ferreira-Machado, Alessandra B.; Saji, Guadalupe D. R. Q.; de Vasconcelos, Ana T. R.; da Silva, Vânia L.; Nicolás, Marisa F.; Diniz, Cláudio G.

    2016-01-01

    Bacteroides fragilis, member from commensal gut microbiota, is an important pathogen associated to endogenous infections and metronidazole remains a valuable antibiotic for the treatment of these infections, although bacterial resistance is widely reported. Considering the need of a better understanding on the global mechanisms by which B. fragilis survive upon metronidazole exposure, we performed a RNA-seq transcriptomic approach with validation of gene expression results by qPCR. Bacteria strains were selected after in vitro subcultures with subinhibitory concentration (SIC) of the drug. From a wild type B. fragilis ATCC 43859 four derivative strains were selected: first and fourth subcultures under metronidazole exposure and first and fourth subcultures after drug removal. According to global gene expression analysis, 2,146 protein coding genes were identified, of which a total of 1,618 (77%) were assigned to a Gene Ontology term (GO), indicating that most known cellular functions were taken. Among these 2,146 protein coding genes, 377 were shared among all strains, suggesting that they are critical for B. fragilis survival. In order to identify distinct expression patterns, we also performed a K-means clustering analysis set to 15 groups. This analysis allowed us to detect the major activated or repressed genes encoding for enzymes which act in several metabolic pathways involved in metronidazole response such as drug activation, defense mechanisms against superoxide ions, high expression level of multidrug efflux pumps, and DNA repair. The strains collected after metronidazole removal were functionally more similar to those cultured under drug pressure, reinforcing that drug-exposure lead to drastic persistent changes in the B. fragilis gene expression patterns. These results may help to elucidate B. fragilis response during metronidazole exposure, mainly at SIC, contributing with information about bacterial survival strategies under stress conditions in their

  12. The Bfp60 surface adhesin is an extracellular matrix and plasminogen protein interacting in Bacteroides fragilis

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira Ferreira, Eliane; Teixeira, Felipe; Cordeiro, Fabiana; Lobo, Leandro Araujo; Rocha, Edson R.; Smith, Jeffrey C.; Domingues, Regina M C P

    2014-01-01

    Plasminogen (Plg) is a highly abundant protein found in the plasma component of blood and is necessary for the degradation of fibrin, collagen, and other structural components of tissues. This fibrinolytic system is utilized by several pathogenic species of bacteria to manipulate the host plasminogen system and facilitate invasion of tissues during infection by modifying the activation of this process through the binding of Plg at their surface. Bacteroides fragilis is the most commonly isolated Gram-negative obligate anaerobe from human clinical infections, such as intra-abdominal abscesses and anaerobic bacteraemia. The ability of B. fragilis to convert plasminogen (Plg) into plasmin has been associated with an outer membrane protein named Bfp60. In this study, we characterized the function of Bfp60 protein in B. fragilis 638R by constructing the bfp60 defective strain and comparing its with that of the wild type regarding binding to laminin-1 (LMN-1) and activation of Plg into plasmin. Although the results showed in this study indicate that Bfp60 surface protein of B. fragilis is important for the recognition of LMN-1 and Plg activation, a significant slow activation of Plg into plasmin was observed in the mutant strain. For that reason, the possibility of another unidentified mechanism activating Plg is also present in B. fragilis can not be discarded. The results demonstrate that Bfp60 protein is responsible for the recognition of laminin and Plg-plasmin activation. Although the importance of this protein is still unclear in the pathogenicity of the species, it is accepted that since other pathogenic bacteria use this mechanism to disseminate through the extracellular matrix during the infection, it should also contribute to the virulence of B. fragilis. PMID:23850366

  13. Azide protection of bacteroides superoxide dismutases from inactivation by hydrogen peroxide

    SciTech Connect

    Barkley, K.B.; Gregory, E.M.

    1986-05-01

    The anaerobes Bacteroides fragilis, B. distasonis and B. thetaiotaomicron produce an iron-containing superoxide dismutase (FeSOD). These FeSODs are reversibly inhibited by 1 mM azide (NaN/sub 3/) and are irreversibly inactivated upon incubation with hydrogen peroxide (H/sub 2/O/sub 2/). H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ inactivation of the enzyme likely depends on a Fenton type reaction with the production of hydroxyl radical (OH). Addition of NaN/sub 3/ to the enzyme solution decreased the rate of inactivation by H/sub 2/O/sub 2/. After 20 minutes incubation of purified B. distasonis FeSOD with 2.5 mM H/sub 2/O/sub 2/, 61% of the initial enzymatic activity remained when 1 mM NaN/sub 3/ was also present compared with 29% activity without NaN/sub 3/. Similar results were seen with FeSOD from B. fragilis and B. thetaiotaomicron. Metal analyses of the native, peroxidized, and NaN/sub 3/ protected samples are consistent with loss of Fe from the enzyme upon peroxidation, but retention of Fe and enzymatic activity in the NaN/sub 3/ protected sample. Protection of FeSOD activity from H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ inactivation was dependent on NaN/sub 3/ concentration. Anionic hydroxyl radical scavengers, such as urate and xanthine did not significantly protect the enzyme. The results are consistent with binding of azide to the active site either preventing entry of H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ or altering Fe redox potential, preventing OH production.

  14. Specific cell components of Bacteroides gingivalis mediate binding and degradation of human fibrinogen

    SciTech Connect

    Lantz, M.S.; Allen, R.D.; Vail, T.A.; Switalski, L.M.; Hook, M. )

    1991-01-01

    Bacteroides (Porphyromonas) gingivalis, which has been implicated as an etiologic agent in human periodontal diseases, has been shown to bind and degrade human fibrinogen. B. gingivalis strains bind fibrinogen reversibly and with high affinity and bind to a specific region of the fibrinogen molecule that appears to be located between the D and E domains. The authors now report that human fibrinogen is bound and then degraded by specific B. gingivalis components that appear to be localized at the cell surface. Fibrinogen binding to bacterial cells occurred at 4, 22, and 37{degree}C. A functional fibrinogen-binding component (M{sub r}, 150 000) was identified when sodium dodecyl sulfate-solubilized bacteria were fractionated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, transferred to nitrocellulose membranes, and probed with {sup 125}I-fibrinogen. Fibrinogen degradation did not occur at 4{degree}C but did occur at 22 and 37{degree}C. When bacteria and iodinated fibrinogen were incubated at 37{degree}C, two major fibrinogen fragments (M{sub r}, 97 000 and 50 000) accumulated in incubation mixture supernatant fractions. Two major fibrinogen-degrading components (M{sub r}, 120 000 and 150 000) have been identified by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis in substrate-containing gels. Fibrinogen degradation by the M{sub r}-120 000 and -150 000 proteases was enhanced by reducing agents, completely inhibited by N-{alpha}-p-tosyl-L-lysyl chloromethyl ketone, and partially inhibited by n-ethyl maleimide, suggesting that these enzymes are thiol-dependent proteases with trypsinlike substrate specificity. The fibrinogen-binding component could be separated from the fibrinogen-degrading components by selective solubilization of bacteria in sodium deoxycholate.

  15. Lactate dehydrogenase activity in Bacteroides fragilis group strains with induced resistance to metronidazole.

    PubMed

    Presečki Stanko, Aleksandra; Sóki, Jozsef; Varda Brkić, Dijana; Plečko, Vanda

    2016-06-01

    The aims of this study were to induce in vitro metronidazole resistance in nim-negative Bacteroides fragilis group strains and to determine the lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity of the induced strains. A collection of B. fragilis group strains were identified by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF/MS). Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) for metronidazole were determined by the agar dilution technique. The presence of nim genes was screened by PCR. A sample of 52 nim-negative metronidazole-susceptible strains were selected at random and were exposed to metronidazole in the resistance induction experiment. LDH activity was measured by spectrophotometry. Of the 52 selected strains, 12 (23.1%) acquired resistance to metronidazole. MICs ranged from 8mg/L to 96mg/L. Eight of the twelve induced strains displayed decreased LDH activity, whilst only one expressed a significant increase in LDH activity with LDH values of 49.1U/mg and 222.0U/mg, respectively. In conclusion, in vitro induction of metronidazole resistance could be selected in nim-negative B. fragilis group strains. A statistically significant decrease in LDH activity was in contrast to previous findings in which, underlying higher metronidazole MICs, an increase in LDH activity compensated for the decreased activity of pyruvate-ferredoxin oxidoreductase (PFOR). These findings could be explained if the induction caused only physiological and not genetic changes. We believe that genetic mutations in the B. fragilis strain that demonstrated an emergent increase in LDH activity were responsible for the increased activity. PMID:27436459

  16. Adhesion of Actinomyces viscosus to Porphyromonas (Bacteroides) gingivalis-coated hexadecane droplets.

    PubMed Central

    Rosenberg, M; Buivids, I A; Ellen, R P

    1991-01-01

    Interbacterial adhesion (coadhesion) is considered a major determinant of dental plaque ecology. In this report, we studied several aspects of the adhesion of Porphyromonas (Bacteroides) gingivalis to hexadecane in order to use the liquid hydrocarbon as a convenient substratum for coadhesion assays. Washed suspensions of hydrophobic P. gingivalis 2561 cells were vortexed with hexadecane to yield highly stable cell-coated droplets. Kinetics of coadhesion between Actinomyces viscosus cells and P. gingivalis-coated hexadecane droplets (PCHD) was subsequently studied. Aliquots of PCHD were added to A. viscosus suspensions, and the mixtures were gently rotated. Avid adhesion of A. viscosus cells to the immobilized P. gingivalis layer could be readily measured by the decrease in turbidity in the aqueous phase, following phase separation. Despite the ability of A. viscosus cells to adsorb to hexadecane following vigorous mixing, gentle mixing did not appreciably promote adhesion to bare hexadecane. Moreover, extensive microscopic examinations revealed that A. viscosus cells adhered exclusively to the bound P. gingivalis cells rather than to exposed areas of hexadecane. Coadhesion of A. viscosus to the PCHD appeared to follow first-order kinetics, attaining 80% levels within 30 min. Electron micrographs revealed A. viscosus cells adhering to the P. gingivalis cell layer adsorbed at the hexadecane-water interface. Interestingly, P. gingivalis cells did not appear to penetrate the hexadecane. A viscosus mutants lacking type 1 or type 2 fimbriae or both were still able to bind to the PCHD. No obvious correlation was observed between relative hydrophobicity of A. viscosus strains and their binding to PCHD. However, defatted bovine serum albumin, an inhibitor of hydrophobic interactions, was the most potent inhibitor among those tested. The data suggest that this approach provides a simple, quantitative technique for studying kinetics of bacterial coadhesion which is amenable

  17. Evidence that Porphyromonas (Bacteroides) gingivalis fimbriae function in adhesion to Actinomyces viscosus.

    PubMed Central

    Goulbourne, P A; Ellen, R P

    1991-01-01

    Porphyromonas (Bacteroides) gingivalis adheres to gram-positive bacteria, such as Actinomyces viscosus, when colonizing the tooth surface. However, little is known of the adhesins responsible for this interaction. A series of experiments were performed to determine whether P. gingivalis fimbriae function in its coadhesion with A. viscosus. Fimbriae typical of P. gingivalis were isolated from strain 2561 (ATCC 33277) by the method of Yoshimura et al. (F. Yoshimura, K. Takahashi, Y. Nodasaka, and T. Suzuki, J. Bacteriol. 160:949-957, 1984) in fractions enriched with a 40-kDa subunit, the fimbrillin monomer, P. gingivalis-A. viscosus coaggregation was inhibited by purified rabbit antifimbrial immunoglobulin G (IgG) at dilutions eightfold higher than those of preimmune IgG, providing indirect evidence implicating P. gingivalis fimbriae in coadhesion. Three types of direct binding assays further supported this observation. (i) Mixtures of isolated P. gingivalis fimbriae and A. viscosus WVU627 cells were incubated for 1 h, washed vigorously with phosphate-buffered saline (pH 7.2), and subjected to electrophoresis. Transblots onto nitrocellulose were probed with antifimbrial antiserum. Fimbrillin labeled positively on these blots. No reaction occurred with the control protein, porcine serum albumin, when blots were exposed to anti-porcine serum albumin, (ii) A. viscosus cells incubated with P. gingivalis fimbriae were agglutinated only after the addition of antifimbrial antibodies. (iii) Binding curves generated from an enzyme immunoassay demonstrated concentration-dependent binding of P. gingivalis fimbriae to A. viscosus cells. From these lines of evidence, P. gingivalis fimbriae appear to be capable of binding to A. viscosus and mediating the coadhesion of these species. Images PMID:1679428

  18. Comparison of the transport of Bacteroides fragilis and Escherichia coli within saturated sand packs.

    PubMed

    Johanson, Jennifer J; Feriancikova, Lucia; Banerjee, Areen; Saffarini, Daâd A; Wang, Lixia; Li, Jin; Grundl, Timothy J; Xu, Shangping

    2014-11-01

    Pathogens in groundwater accounted for ∼50% of waterborne disease outbreaks in the United States between 1971 and 2006. The fast and reliable detection of groundwater microbial contamination and the identification of the contamination sources are of critical importance to the protection of public health. Recent studies suggested that fecal anaerobe Bacteriodes spp. could be employed as an effective tool for surface water microbial source tracking (MST). The usefulness of Bacteroides spp. for groundwater MST depends strongly on its mobility within the subsurface system. This research provides laboratory results comparing transport and attachment of E. coli K12 and B. fragilis within packed quartz sands. The results indicate that at low ionic strengths both E. coli K12 and B. fragilis are readily transported through saturated sand packs. At higher ionic strengths such as may be found near concentrated sources of fecal contamination, B. fragilis displayed significantly higher mobility than E. coli K12. Analysis of the extended Derjaguin-Landau-Verweu-Overbeek (XDLVO) energy interactions for both types of bacteria showed a significant repulsive energy barrier exists between the sand surface and the bacteria, precluding attachment directly to the sand surface. However a secondary minimum energy level exists under higher ionic strength conditions. The depth of this energy low is greater for E. coli K12, which results in greater attachment of E. coli K12 than of B. fragilis. The high mobility of B. fragilis suggests that it represents a promising tool for the detection of groundwater fecal contamination as well as the identification of the microbial sources.

  19. Characterization of the integrase of NBU1, a Bacteroides mobilizable transposon.

    PubMed

    Rajeev, Lara; Salyers, Abigail A; Gardner, Jeffrey F

    2006-08-01

    NBU1 is a Bacteroides mobilizable transposon (MTn) that is integrated within the host chromosome and requires CTnDOT functions for its excision and transfer into a new host. The NBU1 integrase IntN1 has been classified as a tyrosine recombinase based on the presence of conserved residues. We created alanine mutants of the residues R291, K314, H393, R396, H419 and the conserved substitution Y429F and tested them for integration efficiency. The results suggest that these residues in IntN1 are important for integration, and Y429 could be the catalytic nucleophile. We employed suicide substrates and partially purified IntN1 to determine the positions of IntN1 cleavage within the 14 bp common core region that is identical in both NBU1 att sites. We show that IntN1 makes 7 bp staggered cuts on the top and bottom strands. From previous mutational analysis of the att sites, we show that two specific mutations near the site of bottom strand cleavage within this 7 bp region increased integration, and mutations of the two bases near top strand cleavage site had no effect on integration. These results indicate that IntN1 lacks the strict requirement for homology between the recombining sites seen with other tyrosine recombinases. We also show that phosphorothioate substitutions at the cleavage site and 1 bp downstream inhibited cleavage by IntN1. This differs from other studied tyrosine recombinases where inhibition occurs by substitutions at the cleavage site only.

  20. Bacteroides fragilis Lipopolysaccharide and Inflammatory Signaling in Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lukiw, Walter J.

    2016-01-01

    The human microbiome consists of ~3.8 × 1013 symbiotic microorganisms that form a highly complex and dynamic ecosystem: the gastrointestinal (GI) tract constitutes the largest repository of the human microbiome by far, and its impact on human neurological health and disease is becoming increasingly appreciated. Bacteroidetes, the largest phylum of Gram-negative bacteria in the GI tract microbiome, while generally beneficial to the host when confined to the GI tract, have potential to secrete a remarkably complex array of pro-inflammatory neurotoxins that include surface lipopolysaccharides (LPSs) and toxic proteolytic peptides. The deleterious effects of these bacterial exudates appear to become more important as GI tract and blood-brain barriers alter or increase their permeability with aging and disease. For example, presence of the unique LPSs of the abundant Bacteroidetes species Bacteroides fragilis (BF-LPS) in the serum represents a major contributing factor to systemic inflammation. BF-LPS is further recognized by TLR2, TLR4, and/or CD14 microglial cell receptors as are the pro-inflammatory 42 amino acid amyloid-beta (Aβ42) peptides that characterize Alzheimer’s disease (AD) brain. Here we provide the first evidence that BF-LPS exposure to human primary brain cells is an exceptionally potent inducer of the pro-inflammatory transcription factor NF-kB (p50/p65) complex, a known trigger in the expression of pathogenic pathways involved in inflammatory neurodegeneration. This ‘Perspectives communication’ will in addition highlight work from recent studies that advance novel and emerging concepts on the potential contribution of microbiome-generated factors, such as BF-LPS, in driving pro-inflammatory degenerative neuropathology in the AD brain. PMID:27725817

  1. Loss of NHE3 alters gut microbiota composition and influences Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron growth.

    PubMed

    Engevik, Melinda A; Aihara, Eitaro; Montrose, Marshall H; Shull, Gary E; Hassett, Daniel J; Worrell, Roger T

    2013-11-15

    Changes in the intestinal microbiota have been linked to diabetes, obesity, inflammatory bowel disease, and Clostridium difficile (C. difficile)-associated disease. Despite this, it remains unclear how the intestinal environment, set by ion transport, affects luminal and mucosa-associated bacterial composition. Na(+)/H(+)-exchanger isoform 3 (NHE3), a target of C. difficile toxin B, plays an integral role in intestinal Na(+) absorption. Thus the NHE3-deficient mouse model was chosen to examine the effect of pH and ion composition on bacterial growth. We hypothesized that ion transport-induced change in the intestinal environment would lead to alteration of the microbiota. Region-specific changes in ion composition and pH correlated with region-specific alteration of luminal and mucosal-associated bacteria with general decreases in Firmicutes and increases in Bacteroidetes members. Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron (B. thetaiotaomicron) increased in NHE3(-/-) terminal ileum and was examined in vitro to determine whether altered Na(+) was sufficient to affect growth. Increased in vitro growth of B. thetaiotaomicron occurred in 43 mM Na(+) correlating with the NHE3(-/-) mouse terminal ileum [Na(+)]. NHE3(-/-) terminal ileum displayed increased fut2 mRNA and fucosylation correlating with B. thetaiotaomicron growth. Inoculation of B. thetaiotaomicron in wild-type and NHE3(-/-) terminal ileum organoids displayed increased fut2 and fucosylation, indicating that B. thetaiotaomicron alone is sufficient for the increased fucosylation seen in vivo. These data demonstrate that loss of NHE3 alters the intestinal environment, leading to region-specific changes in bacteria, and shed light on the growth requirements of some gut microbiota members, which is vital for creating better treatments of complex diseases with an altered gut microbiota.

  2. Specific cell components of Bacteroides gingivalis mediate binding and degradation of human fibrinogen.

    PubMed Central

    Lantz, M S; Allen, R D; Vail, T A; Switalski, L M; Hook, M

    1991-01-01

    Bacteroides (Porphyromonas) gingivalis, which has been implicated as an etiologic agent in human periodontal diseases, has been shown to bind and degrade human fibrinogen. B. gingivalis strains bind fibrinogen reversibly and with high affinity and bind to a specific region of the fibrinogen molecule that appears to be located between the D and E domains (M. S. Lantz, R. D. Allen, P. Bounelis, L. M. Switalski, and M. Hook, J. Bacteriol. 172:716-726, 1990). We now report that human fibrinogen is bound and then degraded by specific B. gingivalis components that appear to be localized at the cell surface. Fibrinogen binding to bacterial cells occurred at 4, 22, and 37 degrees C. A functional fibrinogen-binding component (Mr, 150,000) was identified when sodium dodecyl sulfate-solubilized bacteria were fractionated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, transferred to nitrocellulose membranes, and probed with 125I-fibrinogen. Fibrinogen degradation did not occur at 4 degrees C but did occur at 22 and 37 degrees C. When bacteria and iodinated fibrinogen were incubated at 37 degrees C, two major fibrinogen fragments (Mr, 97,000 and 50,000) accumulated in incubation mixture supernatant fractions. Two major fibrinogen-degrading components (Mr, 120,000 and 150,000) have been identified by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis in substrate-containing gels. Fibrinogen degradation by the Mr-120,000 and -150,000 proteases was enhanced by reducing agents, completely inhibited by N-alpha-p-tosyl-L-lysyl chloromethyl ketone, and partially inhibited by n-ethyl maleimide, suggesting that these enzymes are thiol-dependent proteases with trypsinlike substrate specificity. The fibrinogen-binding component could be separated from the fibrinogen-degrading components by selective solubilization of bacteria in sodium deoxycholate. Images PMID:1987144

  3. Effects of Salt Stress on Amino Acid, Organic Acid, and Carbohydrate Composition of Roots, Bacteroids, and Cytosol of Alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) 1

    PubMed Central

    Fougère, Francoise; Le Rudulier, Daniel; Streeter, John G.

    1991-01-01

    Ethanol-soluble organic acid, carbohydrate, and amino acid constituents of alfalfa (Medicago sativa) roots and nodules (cytosol and bacteroids) have been identified by gas-liquid chromatography and high performance liquid chromatography. Among organic acids, citrate was the predominant compound in roots and cytosol, with malonate present in the highest concentration in bacteroids. These two organic acids together with malate and succinate accounted for more than 85% of the organic acid pool in nodules and for 97% in roots. The major carbohydrates in roots, nodule cytosol, and bacteroids were (descending order of concentration): sucrose, pinitol, glucose, and ononitol. Maltose and trehalose appeared to be present in very low concentrations. Asparagine, glutamate, alanine, γ-aminobutyrate, and proline were the major amino acids in cytosol and bacteroids. In addition to these solutes, serine and glutamine were well represented in roots. When alfalfa plants were subjected to 0.15 m sodium chloride stress for 2 weeks, total organic acid concentration in nodules and roots were depressed by more than 40%, whereas lactate concentration increased by 11, 27, and 94% in cytosol, roots, and bacteroids, respectively. In bacteroids, lactate became the most abundant organic acid and might contribute partly to the osmotic adjustment. On the other hand, salt stress induced a large increase in the amino acid and carbohydrate pools. Within the amino acids, proline showed the largest increase, 11.3-, 12.8-, and 8.0-fold in roots, cytosol, and bacteroids, respectively. Its accumulation reflected an osmoregulatory mechanism not only in roots but also in nodule tissue. In parallel, asparagine concentration was greatly enhanced; this amide remained the major nitrogen solute and, in bacteroids, played a significant role in osmoregulation. On the contrary, the salt treatment had a very limited effect on the concentration of other amino acids. Among carbohydrates, pinitol concentration was

  4. Prebiotic Effects of Wheat Arabinoxylan Related to the Increase in Bifidobacteria, Roseburia and Bacteroides/Prevotella in Diet-Induced Obese Mice

    PubMed Central

    Neyrinck, Audrey M.; Possemiers, Sam; Druart, Céline; Van de Wiele, Tom; De Backer, Fabienne; Cani, Patrice D.; Larondelle, Yvan; Delzenne, Nathalie M.

    2011-01-01

    Background Alterations in the composition of gut microbiota - known as dysbiosis - has been proposed to contribute to the development of obesity, thereby supporting the potential interest of nutrients targeting the gut with beneficial effect for host adiposity. We test the ability of a specific concentrate of water-extractable high molecular weight arabinoxylans (AX) from wheat to modulate both the gut microbiota and lipid metabolism in high-fat (HF) diet-induced obese mice. Methodology/Principal Findings Mice were fed either a control diet (CT) or a HF diet, or a HF diet supplemented with AX (10% w/w) during 4 weeks. AX supplementation restored the number of bacteria that were decreased upon HF feeding, i.e. Bacteroides-Prevotella spp. and Roseburia spp. Importantly, AX treatment markedly increased caecal bifidobacteria content, in particular Bifidobacterium animalis lactis. This effect was accompanied by improvement of gut barrier function and by a lower circulating inflammatory marker. Interestingly, rumenic acid (C18:2 c9,t11) was increased in white adipose tissue due to AX treatment, suggesting the influence of gut bacterial metabolism on host tissue. In parallel, AX treatment decreased adipocyte size and HF diet-induced expression of genes mediating differentiation, fatty acid uptake, fatty acid oxidation and inflammation, and decreased a key lipogenic enzyme activity in the subcutaneous adipose tissue. Furthermore, AX treatment significantly decreased HF-induced adiposity, body weight gain, serum and hepatic cholesterol accumulation and insulin resistance. Correlation analysis reveals that Roseburia spp. and Bacteroides/Prevotella levels inversely correlate with these host metabolic parameters. Conclusions/Significance Supplementation of a concentrate of water-extractable high molecular weight AX in the diet counteracted HF-induced gut dysbiosis together with an improvement of obesity and lipid-lowering effects. We postulate that hypocholesterolemic, anti

  5. Population genomics of the symbiotic plasmids of sympatric nitrogen-fixing Rhizobium species associated with Phaseolus vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Pérez Carrascal, Olga M; VanInsberghe, David; Juárez, Soledad; Polz, Martin F; Vinuesa, Pablo; González, Víctor

    2016-09-01

    Cultivated common beans are the primary protein source for millions of people around the world who subsist on low-input agriculture, enabled by the symbiotic N2 -fixation these legumes perform in association with rhizobia. Within a single agricultural plot, multiple Rhizobium species can nodulate bean roots, but it is unclear how genetically isolated these species remain in sympatry. To better understand this issue, we sequenced and compared the genomes of 33 strains isolated from the rhizosphere and root nodules of a particular bean variety grown in the same agricultural plot. We found that the Rhizobium species we observed coexist with low genetic recombination across their core genomes. Accessory plasmids thought to be necessary for the saprophytic lifestyle in soil show similar levels of genetic isolation, but with higher rates of recombination than the chromosomes. However, the symbiotic plasmids are extremely similar, with high rates of recombination and do not appear to have co-evolved with the chromosome or accessory plasmids. Therefore, while Rhizobium species are genetically isolated units within the microbial community, a common symbiotic plasmid allows all Rhizobium species to engage in symbiosis with the same host in a single agricultural plot. PMID:27312778

  6. Presence of opportunistic bacteria (Rhizobium spp.) with potential for molecular misdiagnosis among canine and feline clinical samples.

    PubMed

    Tabar, Maria-Dolores; Altet, Laura; Roura, Xavier; Sánchez, Armand; Ferrer, Lluís; Francino, Olga

    2010-08-01

    Rhizobium radiobacter was detected in 12 of 187 dogs and 2 of 100 cats using a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay formerly designed for the Rickettsia genus. Although PCR primers used for pathogenic infectious agents are specifically assessed to avoid cross-amplification, this retrospective study highlights the importance of sequencing to avoid molecular misdiagnosis.

  7. Applying reversible mutations of nodulation and nitrogen-fixation genes to study social cheating in Rhizobium etli-legume interaction.

    PubMed

    Ling, Jun; Zheng, Huiming; Katzianer, David S; Wang, Hui; Zhong, Zengtao; Zhu, Jun

    2013-01-01

    Mutualisms are common in nature, though these symbioses can be quite permeable to cheaters in situations where one individual parasitizes the other by discontinuing cooperation yet still exploits the benefits of the partnership. In the Rhizobium-legume system, there are two separate contexts, namely nodulation and nitrogen fixation processes, by which resident Rhizobium individuals can benefit by cheating. Here, we constructed reversible and irreversible mutations in key nodulation and nitrogen-fixation pathways of Rhizobium etli and compared their interaction with plant hosts Phaseolus vulgaris to that of wild type. We show that R. etli reversible mutants deficient in nodulation factor production are capable of intra-specific cheating, wherein mutants exploit other Rhizobium individuals capable of producing these factors. Similarly, we show that R. etli mutants are also capable of cheating inter-specifically, colonizing the host legume yet contributing nothing to the partnership in terms of nitrogen fixation. Our findings indicate that cheating is possible in both of these frameworks, seemingly without damaging the stability of the mutualism itself. These results may potentially help explain observations suggesting that legume plants are commonly infected by multiple bacterial lineages during the nodulation process.

  8. Applying Reversible Mutations of Nodulation and Nitrogen-Fixation Genes to Study Social Cheating in Rhizobium etli-Legume Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hui; Zhong, Zengtao; Zhu, Jun

    2013-01-01

    Mutualisms are common in nature, though these symbioses can be quite permeable to cheaters in situations where one individual parasitizes the other by discontinuing cooperation yet still exploits the benefits of the partnership. In the Rhizobium-legume system, there are two separate contexts, namely nodulation and nitrogen fixation processes, by which resident Rhizobium individuals can benefit by cheating. Here, we constructed reversible and irreversible mutations in key nodulation and nitrogen-fixation pathways of Rhizobium etli and compared their interaction with plant hosts Phaseolus vulgaris to that of wild type. We show that R. etli reversible mutants deficient in nodulation factor production are capable of intra-specific cheating, wherein mutants exploit other Rhizobium individuals capable of producing these factors. Similarly, we show that R. etli mutants are also capable of cheating inter-specifically, colonizing the host legume yet contributing nothing to the partnership in terms of nitrogen fixation. Our findings indicate that cheating is possible in both of these frameworks, seemingly without damaging the stability of the mutualism itself. These results may potentially help explain observations suggesting that legume plants are commonly infected by multiple bacterial lineages during the nodulation process. PMID:23922937

  9. Performance of fenugreek bioinoculated with Rhizobium meliloti strains under semi-arid condition.

    PubMed

    Singh, N K; Patel, D B

    2016-01-01

    Rhizobium meliloti strains were isolated from the fields of S.D. Agricultural University (Gujarat, India) and were maintained in the Congo Red Yeast Extract Mannitol Agar medium. These strains were tested for their effectiveness for fenugreek crop grown under semi-arid condition. Among the six Rhizobium strains, FRS-7 strain showed best plant growth parameters like shoot length, shoot dry weight, shoot total nitrogen, root length, root dry weight, root total nitrogen, seed yield, 1000 grain weight, number of root nodules, and nodules fresh and dry weight. The performance of this strain was better as compared to 20 kgN ha(-1) treatment through urea and was even far better over control plot. Seed yields obtained with FRS-7 during two years were 10.14 and 9.66 q ha(-1); which was about 36.8% and 45.9% high over control. This strain resulted in saving of about 20 kgN ha(-1) accompanied with better crop yield and soil health. Results of the present experiments can be utilized in integrated nutrient management for cultivation of fenugreek in semi-arid areas to provide sustainability to agricultural productivity in such regions. PMID:26930857

  10. Extended region of nodulation genes in Rhizobium meliloti 1021. I. Phenotypes of Tn5 insertion mutants

    SciTech Connect

    Swanson, J.A.; Tu, J.K.; Ogawa, J.; Sanga, R.; Fisher, R.F.; Long, S.R.

    1987-10-01

    Rhizobium meliloti Nod/sup -/ mutant WL131, a derivative of wild-type strain 102F51, was complemented by a clone bank of wild-type R. meliloti 1021 DNA, and clone pRmJT5 was recovered. Transfer of pRmJT5 conferred alfalfa nodulation on other Rhizobium species, indicating a role in host range determination for pRmJT5. Mutagenesis of pRmJT5 revealed several segments in which transposon insertion causes delay in nodulation, and/or marked reduction of the number of nodules formed on host alfalfa plants. The set of mutants indicated five regions in which nod genes are located; one mutant, nod-216, is located in a region not previously reported to encode a nodulation gene. Other mutant phenotypes correlated with the positions of open reading frames for nodH, nodF and nodE, and with a 2.2-kb EcoRI fragment. A mutant in nodG had no altered phenotype in this strain. One nodulation mutant was shown to be a large deletion of the common nod gene region. The authors present a discussion comparing the various studies made on this extended nod gene region.

  11. Rhizobium-Legume Symbiosis and Nitrogen Fixation under Severe Conditions and in an Arid Climate

    PubMed Central

    Zahran, Hamdi Hussein

    1999-01-01

    Biological N2 fixation represents the major source of N input in agricultural soils including those in arid regions. The major N2-fixing systems are the symbiotic systems, which can play a significant role in improving the fertility and productivity of low-N soils. The Rhizobium-legume symbioses have received most attention and have been examined extensively. The behavior of some N2-fixing systems under severe environmental conditions such as salt stress, drought stress, acidity, alkalinity, nutrient deficiency, fertilizers, heavy metals, and pesticides is reviewed. These major stress factors suppress the growth and symbiotic characteristics of most rhizobia; however, several strains, distributed among various species of rhizobia, are tolerant to stress effects. Some strains of rhizobia form effective (N2-fixing) symbioses with their host legumes under salt, heat, and acid stresses, and can sometimes do so under the effect of heavy metals. Reclamation and improvement of the fertility of arid lands by application of organic (manure and sewage sludge) and inorganic (synthetic) fertilizers are expensive and can be a source of pollution. The Rhizobium-legume (herb or tree) symbiosis is suggested to be the ideal solution to the improvement of soil fertility and the rehabilitation of arid lands and is an important direction for future research. PMID:10585971

  12. Multiple copies of nodD in Rhizobium tropici CIAT899 and BR816.

    PubMed Central

    van Rhijn, P J; Feys, B; Verreth, C; Vanderleyden, J

    1993-01-01

    Rhizobium tropici strains are able to nodulate a wide range of host plants: Phaseolus vulgaris, Leucaena spp., and Macroptilium atropurpureum. We studied the nodD regulatory gene for nodulation of two R. tropici strains: CIAT899, the reference R. tropici type IIb strain, and BR816, a heat-tolerant strain isolated from Leucaena leucocephala. A survey revealed several nodD-hybridizing DNA regions in both strains: five distinct regions in CIAT899 and four distinct regions in BR816. Induction experiments of a nodABC-uidA fusion in combination with different nodD-hybridizing fragments in the presence of root exudates of the different hosts indicate that one particular nodD copy contributes to nodulation gene induction far more than any other nodD copy present. The nucleotide sequences of both nodD genes are reported here and show significant homology to those of the nodD genes of other rhizobia and a Bradyrhizobium strain. A dendrogram based on the protein sequences of 15 different NodD proteins shows that the R. tropici NodD proteins are linked most closely to each other and then to the NodD of Rhizobium phaseoli 8002. Images PMID:8419293

  13. Industrial wastewater as raw material for exopolysaccharide production by Rhizobium leguminosarum.

    PubMed

    Sellami, Mohamed; Oszako, Tomasz; Miled, Nabil; Ben Rebah, Faouzi

    2015-06-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the exopolysaccharide (EPS) production by Rhizobium leguminosarum cultivated in wastewater generated by oil companies (WWOC1 and WWOC2) and fish processing industry (WWFP). The results obtained in Erlenmeyer flasks indicated that the rhizobial strain grew well in industrial wastewater. Generally, wastewater composition affected the growth and the EPS production. WWFP allowed good bacterial growth similar to that obtained with the standard medium (YMB). During growth, various quantities of EPS were produced and yields varied depending on the media. Growing in YMB, EPS production did not exceed 9.7 g/L obtained after 72 h of growth. In wastewater, the maximum EPS value reached 11.1 g/L obtained with the fish processing wastewater, after 72 h of growth. The use of a mixture of the oil company wastewater (WWOC2) and the fish processing wastewater (WWFP) as culture medium affected not only the rhizobial strain growth, but also EPS production. The highest EPS (42.4 g/L, after 96 h of culture) was obtained using a ratio of WWFP and WWOC2 of 50:50 (v:v). Therefore, this work shows the ability of Rhizobium leguminosarum, growing in industrial wastewater as new economic medium, to produce EPS. This biopolymer could be applied in enormous biotechnological areas.

  14. Isolation and characterization of an early colonizing Rhizobium sp. R8 from a household toilet bowl.

    PubMed

    Fukano, Toru; Gomi, Mitsuhiro; Osaki, Yukihiko; Morikawa, Masaaki

    2015-01-01

    The bacterial community structure was compared between the third days', one week', and three weeks' biofilm samples from the surface of a household toilet bowl. It was found that the PCR-DGGE band pattern of 16S rRNA gene was dramatically changed after the third day and was not further changed until three weeks. This result suggests that there are early and late colonizing bacterial groups. One of the early colonizers isolated from the third days' sample was Rhizobium sp. R8, a closest relative to Rhizobium giardinii, which exhibited the highest biofilm formation activity in an artificial urine condition. R8 produced extracellular polysaccharides containing galactose, glucose, and mannose at the molar ratio of 8:1:1, which were probably responsible for the biofilm formation. Its excelled biofilm formation and urease activities together with the lack of nodulation and nitrogen fixing genes in R8 suggest that this strain has been specifically adapted to urine condition in a toilet bowl. PMID:25707633

  15. Novel organization of the common nodulation genes in Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. phaseoli strains.

    PubMed Central

    Vázquez, M; Dávalos, A; de las Peñas, A; Sánchez, F; Quinto, C

    1991-01-01

    Nodulation by Rhizobium, Bradyrhizobium, and Azorhizobium species in the roots of legumes and nonlegumes requires the proper expression of plant genes and of both common and specific bacterial nodulation genes. The common nodABC genes form an operon or are physically mapped together in all species studied thus far. Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. phaseoli strains are classified in two groups. The type I group has reiterated nifHDK genes and a narrow host range of nodulation. The type II group has a single copy of the nifHDK genes and a wide host range of nodulation. We have found by genetic and nucleotide sequence analysis that in type I strain CE-3, the functional common nodA gene is separated from the nodBC genes by 20 kb and thus is transcriptionally separated from the latter genes. This novel organization could be the result of a complex rearrangement, as we found zones of identity between the two separated nodA and nodBC regions. Moreover, this novel organization of the common nodABC genes seems to be a general characteristic of R. leguminosarum bv. phaseoli type I strains. Despite the separation, the coordination of the expression of these genes seems not to be altered. PMID:1991718

  16. Multiple genetic controls on Rhizobium meliloti syrA, a regulator of exopolysaccharide abundance.

    PubMed Central

    Barnett, M J; Swanson, J A; Long, S R

    1998-01-01

    Exopolysaccharides (EPS) are produced by a wide assortment of bacteria including plant pathogens and rhizobial symbionts. Rhizobium meliloti mutants defective in EPS production fail to invade alfalfa nodules. Production of EPS in R. meliloti is likely controlled at several levels. We have characterized a new gene of this regulatory circuit. syrA was identified by its ability to confer mucoid colony morphology and by its ability to suppress the colonial phenotype of an exoD mutant. Here we show that syrA encodes a 9-kD hydrophobic protein that has sequence similarity to two other EPS regulatory proteins: ExoX of Rhizobium NGR234 and R. meliloti, and Psi of R. leguminosarum bv. phaseoli. The syrA transcription start site lies 522 nucleotides upstream of a non-canonical TTG start codon. The syrA promoter region is similar to the promoter region of the nodulation regulatory protein, nodD3. We found that in free-living bacteria, syrA expression is activated by the regulatory locus, syrM, but not by nodD3. In planta, syrM is not required for expression of syrA. Instead, expression of the nitrogen fixation (nifHDKE) genes upstream of syrA plays a role. Specific and distinct sets of genetic controls may operate at different times during nodule invasion. PMID:9475718

  17. Production of Proteasome Inhibitor Syringolin A by the Endophyte Rhizobium sp. Strain AP16

    PubMed Central

    Bigler, Laurent; Dudler, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Syringolin A, the product of a mixed nonribosomal peptide synthetase/polyketide synthase encoded by the syl gene cluster, is a virulence factor secreted by certain Pseudomonas syringae strains. Together with the glidobactins produced by a number of beta- and gammaproteobacterial human and animal pathogens, it belongs to the syrbactins, a structurally novel class of proteasome inhibitors. In plants, proteasome inhibition by syringolin A-producing P. syringae strains leads to the suppression of host defense pathways requiring proteasome activity, such as the ones mediated by salicylic acid and jasmonic acid. Here we report the discovery of a syl-like gene cluster with some unusual features in the alphaproteobacterial endophyte Rhizobium sp. strain AP16 that encodes a putative syringolin A-like synthetase whose components share 55% to 65% sequence identity (72% to 79% similarity) at the amino acid level. As revealed by average nucleotide identity (ANI) calculations, this strain likely belongs to the same species as biocontrol strain R. rhizogenes K84 (formely known as Agrobacterium radiobacter K84), which, however, carries a nonfunctional deletion remnant of the syl-like gene cluster. Here we present a functional analysis of the syl-like gene cluster of Rhizobium sp. strain AP16 and demonstrate that this endophyte synthesizes syringolin A and some related minor variants, suggesting that proteasome inhibition by syrbactin production can be important not only for pathogens but also for endophytic bacteria in the interaction with their hosts. PMID:24727275

  18. Mimosine Content of Leucaena leucocephala and the Sensitivity of Rhizobium to Mimosine.

    PubMed

    Mathews, A; Vittal Rai, P

    1985-01-01

    Mimosine was qualitatively and quantitatively estimated from the different parts of Leucaena leucocephala strains K-8 and K-67. The amount of mimosine as percentage of dry weight in the two strains were, respectively, as follows: seeds, 6.82, 9.98; old leaves, 1.5, 1.33; young leaves, 2.85, 3.33; main root, 1.13, 1.02; lateral roots, 1.46, 1.17; stems, 0.73, 0.33. Rhizobium isolates from L. leucocephala (UAS-Ll-8, UAS-Ll-67), Mimosa pudica (UAS-Mp) and Prosopis juliflora (UAS-Pj) formed an effective (nod(+) fix(+)) association with Leucaena, while an isolate from Crotalaria sp. (UAS-Cr) proved to be ineffective (nod(+) fix(-)). All isolates performed better than reference strain TAL-82. Strain UAS-Pj gave optimum nodulation and plant growth characteristics. The effect of mimosine on the vegetative Rhizobium cultures was studied by the lawn method of growing rhizobia, using 2.5 to 15 mg·ml(-1) mimosine. All the effective strains were stimulated by mimosine up to 7.5 mg·ml(-1)strains. UAS-Ll-8 and UAS-Ll-67 were stimulated up to 15 mg·ml(-1) of mimosine. The ineffective strain UAS-Cr was inhibited at all the concentrations of mimosine tried.

  19. Revegetating fly ash landfills with Prosopis juliflora L.: impact of different amendments and Rhizobium inoculation.

    PubMed

    Rai, U N; Pandey, K; Sinha, S; Singh, A; Saxena, R; Gupta, D K

    2004-05-01

    A revegetation trial was conducted to evaluate the feasibility of growing a legume species, Prosopis juliflora L., on fly ash ameliorated with combination of various organic amendments, blue-green algal biofertilizer and Rhizobium inoculation. Significant enhancements in plant biomass, photosynthetic pigments, protein content and in vivo nitrate reductase activity were found in the plants grown on ameliorated fly ash in comparison to the plants growing in unamended fly ash or garden soil. Higher growth was obtained in fly ash amended with blue-green algae (BGA) than farmyard manure or press mud (PM), a waste from sugar-processing industry, due to the greater contribution of plant nutrients, supply of fixed nitrogen and increased availability of phosphorus. Nodulation was suppressed in different amendments of fly ash with soil in a concentration-duration-dependent manner, but not with other amendments. Plants accumulated higher amounts of Fe, Mn, Cu, Zn and Cr in various fly ash amendments than in garden soil. Further, inoculation of the plant with a fly ash tolerant Rhizobium strain conferred tolerance for the plant to grow under fly ash stress conditions with more translocation of metals to the above ground parts. The results showed the potential of P. juliflora to grow in plantations on fly ash landfills and to reduce the metal contents of fly ash by bioaccumulation in its tissues.

  20. Natural endophytic association between Rhizobium etli and maize (Zea mays L.).

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez-Zamora, M L; Martínez-Romero, E

    2001-10-01

    Maize (Zea mays) and bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) have been traditionally grown in association for thousands of years in Mesoamerica. From surface sterilized maize roots, we have isolated over 60 Rhizobium strains that correspond to Rhizobium etli bv. phaseoli (the main symbiont of bean) on the basis of 16S rRNA gene restriction patterns, metabolic enzyme electropherotypes, organization of nif genes, and the ability to nodulate beans. The colonization capacity of some of the isolates was tested with an unimproved maize cultivar and with 30 maize land races. Increases in plant dry weight upon R. etli inoculation were recorded with some of the land races, and these increases may be related to plant growth promotion effects. Additionally, from within maize grown in monoculture we have also recovered R. etli isolates recognizable by their 16S rRNA gene types, which lack nif genes and are incapable of nodulating bean. These strains are presumed to correspond to the earlier described non-symbiotic R. etli obtained from bean rhizosphere. PMID:11566384

  1. Role of Rhizobium endoglucanase CelC2 in cellulose biosynthesis and biofilm formation on plant roots and abiotic surfaces

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The synthesis of cellulose is among the most important but poorly understood biochemical processes, especially in bacteria, due to its complexity and high degree of regulation. In this study, we analyzed both the production of cellulose by all known members of the Rhizobiaceae and the diversity of Rhizobium celABC operon predicted to be involved in cellulose biosynthesis. We also investigated the involvement in cellulose production and biofilm formation of celC gene encoding an endoglucanase (CelC2) that is required for canonical symbiotic root hair infection by Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. trifolii. Results ANU843 celC mutants lacking (ANU843ΔC2) or overproducing cellulase (ANU843C2+) produced greatly increased or reduced amounts of external cellulose micro fibrils, respectively. Calcofluor-stained cellulose micro fibrils were considerably longer when formed by ANU843ΔC2 bacteria rather than by the wild-type strain, in correlation with a significant increase in their flocculation in batch culture. In contrast, neither calcofluor-stained extracellular micro fibrils nor flocculation was detectable in ANU843C2+ cells. To clarify the role of cellulose synthesis in Rhizobium cell aggregation and attachment, we analyzed the ability of these mutants to produce biofilms on different surfaces. Alteration of wild-type CelC2 levels resulted in a reduced ability of bacteria to form biofilms both in abiotic surfaces and in planta. Conclusions Our results support a key role of the CelC2 cellulase in cellulose biosynthesis by modulating the length of the cellulose fibrils that mediate firm adhesion among Rhizobium bacteria leading to biofilm formation. Rhizobium cellulose is an essential component of the biofilm polysaccharidic matrix architecture and either an excess or a defect of this “building material” seem to collapse the biofilm structure. These results position cellulose hydrolytic enzymes as excellent anti-biofilm candidates. PMID:22970813

  2. Rhizobium ecuadorense sp. nov., an indigenous N2-fixing symbiont of the Ecuadorian common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) genetic pool.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Renan Augusto; Martins, Talita Busulini; Ormeño-Orrillo, Ernesto; Marçon Delamuta, Jakeline Renata; Rogel, Marco Antonio; Martínez-Romero, Esperanza; Hungria, Mariangela

    2015-09-01

    There are two major centres of genetic diversification of common bean (Phaseolus vilgaris L.), the Mesoamerican and the Andean, and the legume is capable of establishing nitrogen-fixing symbioses with several rhizobia; Rhizobium etli seems to be the dominant species in both centres. Another genetic pool of common bean, in Peru and Ecuador, is receiving increasing attention, and studies of microsymbionts from the region can help to increase our knowledge about coevolution of this symbiosis. We have previously reported several putative new lineages from this region and here present data indicating that strains belonging to one of them, PEL4, represent a novel species. Based on 16S rRNA gene sequence phylogeny, PEL4 strains are positioned in the Rhizobium phaseoli/R. etli/Rhizobium leguminosarum clade, but show unique properties in several morphological, physiological and biochemical analyses, as well as in BOX-PCR profiles ( < 75% similarity with related species). PEL4 strains also differed from related species based on multilocus sequence analysis of three housekeeping genes (glnII, gyrB and recA). Nucleotide identities of the three concatenated genes between PEL4 strains and related species ranged from 91.8 to 94.2%, being highest with Rhizobium fabae. DNA-DNA hybridization ( < 47% DNA relatedness) and average nucleotide identity values of the whole genomes ( < 90.2%) also supported the novel species status. The PEL4 strains were effective in nodulating and fixing N2 with common beans. The data supported the view that PEL4 strains represent a novel species, Rhizobium ecuadorense sp. nov. The type strain is CNPSo 671(T) ( = UMR 1450(T) = PIMAMPIRS I 5(T) = LMG 27578(T)).

  3. Population structure and distribution of virulence-related genes of Bacteroides fragilis isolates from Korea and Japan.

    PubMed

    Ko, Kwan Soo; Kuwahara, Tomomi; Lee, Kyungwon; Kook, Yoon-Hoh

    2009-07-01

    Sequences for rpoB, gyrB, pdiA, and ompA were determined from 63 Bacteroides fragilis isolates, which were from Korea and Japan and include 4 reference strains. All 4 gene sequences supported clear separation of the cfi(+) group from the cfi(-) group. Combined sequences of the 60 division I isolates (cfi(-)) produced 45 different clones. Apparent discordance of gene trees, index of association, maximum likelihood test, and homoplasy ratio all supported a high frequency of recombination. There was no association between the presence of virulence-related genes and phylogenetic clustering in any gene tree.

  4. A Rhizobium leguminosarum CHDL- (Cadherin-Like-) Lectin Participates in Assembly and Remodeling of the Biofilm Matrix

    PubMed Central

    Vozza, Nicolás F.; Abdian, Patricia L.; Russo, Daniela M.; Mongiardini, Elías J.; Lodeiro, Aníbal R.; Molin, Søren; Zorreguieta, Angeles

    2016-01-01

    In natural environments most bacteria live in multicellular structures called biofilms. These cell aggregates are enclosed in a self-produced polymeric extracellular matrix, which protects the cells, provides mechanical stability and mediates cellular cohesion and adhesion to surfaces. Although important advances were made in the identification of the genetic and extracellular factors required for biofilm formation, the mechanisms leading to biofilm matrix assembly, and the roles of extracellular proteins in these processes are still poorly understood. The symbiont Rhizobium leguminosarum requires the synthesis of the acidic exopolysaccharide and the PrsDE secretion system to develop a mature biofilm. PrsDE is responsible for the secretion of the Rap family of proteins that share one or two Ra/CHDL (cadherin-like-) domains. RapA2 is a calcium-dependent lectin with a cadherin-like β sheet structure that specifically recognizes the exopolysaccharide, either as a capsular polysaccharide (CPS) or in its released form [extracellular polysaccharide (EPS)]. In this study, using gain and loss of function approaches combined with phenotypic and microscopic studies we demonstrated that RapA lectins are involved in biofilm matrix development and cellular cohesion. While the absence of any RapA protein increased the compactness of bacterial aggregates, high levels of RapA1 expanded distances between cells and favored the production of a dense matrix network. Whereas endogenous RapA(s) are predominantly located at one bacterial pole, we found that under overproduction conditions, RapA1 surrounded the cell in a way that was reminiscent of the capsule. Accordingly, polysaccharide analyses showed that the RapA lectins promote CPS formation at the expense of lower EPS production. Besides, polysaccharide analysis suggests that RapA modulates the EPS size profile. Collectively, these results show that the interaction of RapA lectins with the polysaccharide is involved in rhizobial

  5. Vitamin B12 Uptake by the Gut Commensal Bacteria Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron Limits the Production of Shiga Toxin by Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Cordonnier, Charlotte; Le Bihan, Guillaume; Emond-Rheault, Jean-Guillaume; Garrivier, Annie; Harel, Josée; Jubelin, Grégory

    2016-01-01

    Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) are foodborne pathogens responsible for the development of bloody diarrhea and renal failure in humans. Many environmental factors have been shown to regulate the production of Shiga toxin 2 (Stx2), the main virulence factor of EHEC. Among them, soluble factors produced by human gut microbiota and in particular, by the predominant species Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron (B. thetaiotaomicron), inhibit Stx2 gene expression. In this study, we investigated the molecular mechanisms underlying the B. thetaiotaomicron-dependent inhibition of Stx2 production by EHEC. We determined that Stx2-regulating molecules are resistant to heat treatment but do not correspond to propionate and acetate, two short-chain fatty acids produced by B. thetaiotaomicron. Moreover, screening of a B. thetaiotaomicron mutant library identified seven mutants that do not inhibit Stx2 synthesis by EHEC. One mutant has impaired production of BtuB, an outer membrane receptor for vitamin B12. Together with restoration of Stx2 level after vitamin B12 supplementation, these data highlight vitamin B12 as a molecule produced by gut microbiota that modulates production of a key virulence factor of EHEC and consequently may affect the outcome of an infection. PMID:26742075

  6. Vitamin B12 Uptake by the Gut Commensal Bacteria Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron Limits the Production of Shiga Toxin by Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Cordonnier, Charlotte; Le Bihan, Guillaume; Emond-Rheault, Jean-Guillaume; Garrivier, Annie; Harel, Josée; Jubelin, Grégory

    2016-01-05

    Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) are foodborne pathogens responsible for the development of bloody diarrhea and renal failure in humans. Many environmental factors have been shown to regulate the production of Shiga toxin 2 (Stx2), the main virulence factor of EHEC. Among them, soluble factors produced by human gut microbiota and in particular, by the predominant species Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron (B. thetaiotaomicron), inhibit Stx2 gene expression. In this study, we investigated the molecular mechanisms underlying the B. thetaiotaomicron-dependent inhibition of Stx2 production by EHEC. We determined that Stx2-regulating molecules are resistant to heat treatment but do not correspond to propionate and acetate, two short-chain fatty acids produced by B. thetaiotaomicron. Moreover, screening of a B. thetaiotaomicron mutant library identified seven mutants that do not inhibit Stx2 synthesis by EHEC. One mutant has impaired production of BtuB, an outer membrane receptor for vitamin B12. Together with restoration of Stx2 level after vitamin B12 supplementation, these data highlight vitamin B12 as a molecule produced by gut microbiota that modulates production of a key virulence factor of EHEC and consequently may affect the outcome of an infection.

  7. Genetics and biochemistry of the Rhizobium meliloti acidic extracellular heteropolysaccharide and its role in nodulation: Annual report for the period 1 June 1987-31 May 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Leigh, J.A.

    1988-01-01

    The symbiotic association of Rhizobium with legumes results in a vital supply of inexpensive nitrogen for the growth of crops such as soybean and alfalfa. In a complex series of events, the bacterial symbiont, Rhizobium, induces the formation of a specialilzed root structure, the nodule. Rhizobium then enters the cells of the nodule and fixes nitrogen. We are interested in an extracellular polysaccharide, produced by Rhizobium, which is required for nodule entry. We have found that R. meliloti mutants which produce the polysaccharide but fail to enter nodules, actually produce an abnormal form of the polysacchardie which lacks succinate. Recently we have discovered a second polysaccharide which can be produced in place of the first polysacchaaride and also satisfy the requirement for nodule entry. We are studying the gentic regulation of the production of the two polysaccharides.

  8. Effect of Rhizobium sp. BARIRGm901 inoculation on nodulation, nitrogen fixation and yield of soybean (Glycine max) genotypes in gray terrace soil.

    PubMed

    Alam, Faridul; Bhuiyan, M A H; Alam, Sadia Sabrina; Waghmode, Tatoba R; Kim, Pil Joo; Lee, Yong Bok

    2015-01-01

    Soybean plants require high amounts of nitrogen, which are mainly obtained from biological nitrogen fixation. A field experiment was conducted by soybean (Glycine max) genotypes, growing two varieties (Shohag and BARI Soybean6) and two advanced lines (MTD10 and BGM02026) of soybean with or without Rhizobium sp. BARIRGm901 inoculation. Soybean plants of all genotypes inoculated with Rhizobium sp. BARIRGm901 produced greater nodule numbers, nodule weight, shoot and root biomass, and plant height than non-inoculated plants. Similarly, inoculated plants showed enhanced activity of nitrogenase (NA) enzyme, contributing to higher nitrogen fixation and assimilation, compared to non-inoculated soybean plants in both years. Plants inoculated with Rhizobium sp. BARIRGm901 also showed higher pod, stover, and seed yield than non-inoculated plants. Therefore, Rhizobium sp. BARIRGm901 established an effective symbiotic relationship with a range of soybean genotypes and thus increased the nodulation, growth, and yield of soybean grown in gray terrace soils in Bangladesh.

  9. Application of Bacteroides fragilis phage as an alternative indicator of sewage pollution in Tampa Bay, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McLaughlin, M.R.; Rose, J.B.

    2006-01-01

    Traditional fecal coliform bacterial indicators have been found to be severely limited in determining the significance and sources of fecal contamination in ambient waters of tropical and subtropical regions. The bacteriophages that infect Bacteroides fragilis have been suggested as better fecal indicators and at least one type may be human specific. In this study, the phages that infect B. fragilis host RYC2056 (RYC), including phage B56-3, and host ATCC 51477-HSP40 (HSP), including the human specific phage B40-8, were evaluated in the drainage basins of Tampa Bay, 7 samples (n = 62), or 11%, tested positive for the presence of phages infecting the host HSP, whereas 28 samples, or 45%, tested positive using the host RYC. A survival study was also done to compare the persistence of phages B56-3 and B40-8 to MS2 coliphage in seawater at various temperatures. The decay rates for MS2 were 0.239 log 10 d-1 at 10??C, but increased to 0.896 at 20??C and 2.62 log10 d-1 at 30??C. The two B. fragilis phages persisted much longer in the seawater compared to the coliphage and showed little variation between the temperatures. All sewage influents sampled from area wastewater treatment plants contained phages that infected the two B. fragilis hosts at levels from 1.2 ?? 104 to 1.11 ?? 10 5 pfu 100 ml-1 for host RYC and 67 to 350 pfu 100 ml -1 for host HSP. Of the 7 chlorinated effluent samples tested, 3 were positive for the presence of the phage using the host RYC and the phage enrichment method, with levels estimated to be <10 pfu 100 ml-1. No phages were detected using the host HSP in the treated sewage effluent. Coliphages were found in 3 of the 7 effluent samples at a range of 30 to 1.2 ?? 103 pfu 100 ml-1. ?? 2006 Estuarine Research Federation.

  10. The survival rate of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans, Porphyromonas gingivalis, and Bacteroides forsythus following 4 randomized treatment modalities.

    PubMed

    Shiloah, J; Patters, M R; Dean, J W; Bland, P; Toledo, G

    1997-08-01

    The overall goal of this clinical study was to determine the short-term anti-infective effects of four randomized treatment modalities on Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans (Aa), Porphyromonas gingivalis (Pg), and Bacteroides forsythus (Bf) and determine the effects of bacterial survival on treatment outcomes in patients with adult periodontitis. Twelve adult patients requiring therapy for moderate periodontitis were selected for this study. All patients had at least one tooth in each quadrant that had an inflamed pocket of probing depth > or =5 mm with probing attachment loss that harbored at least one of the following three periodontal pathogens: Aa, Pg, or Bf. The number of target organisms per site was determined pre-operatively, at 1 week, and 1 month and 3 months postoperatively utilizing DNA probes. One quadrant in each patient was randomly assigned to each one of the following four treatment groups: 1) scaling and root planing (SRP group); 2) pocket reduction through osseous surgery and apically-positioned flap (OS group); 3) modified Widman flap (MWF group); and 4) modified Widman flap and topical application of saturated citric acid at pH 1 for 3 minutes (CA group). The 4 treatment modalities were performed in one appointment. No postoperative antibiotics were used. Patients were instructed to supplement their daily oral hygiene with chlorohexidine oral rinse during the study. The results of this investigation indicated that: 1) none of the treatment modalities was effective in eliminating the target species; 2) the incidence of infected sites for all groups was 100% preoperatively; 62.5%, 33.3%, and 31.3% at 1 week, and 1 and 3 months postoperatively, respectively; 3) these infected sites lost 1.1 +/- 0.4 mm of probing attachment compared to gain of 0.0 +/- 0.3 mm for uninfected sites; 4) the infected sites had higher plaque and bleeding on probing 0.9 +/- 0.3, 73 +/- 12%, respectively, compared to 0.3 +/- 0.1 and 30 +/- 8% for the uninfected sites

  11. Porphyromonas (Bacteroides) gingivalis fimbrillin: size, amino-terminal sequence, and antigenic heterogeneity.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, J Y; Sojar, H T; Bedi, G S; Genco, R J

    1991-01-01

    Bacterial fimbriae mediate cell adhesion and are important in colonization. Fimbrial proteins from strains of Porphyromonas (Bacteroides) gingivalis isolated from different individuals were compared for their size, amino-terminal sequence, and antigenic diversity. Two major protein components of the crude fimbrial preparations differed in apparent molecular mass, ranging from 41 to 49 kDa for the fimbrillin monomer and from 61 to 78 kDa for the other major protein. The amino-terminal sequence of the antigenically related group of proteins of the fimbrillin monomer in the 41- to 49-kDa range showed significant homology; however, minor sequence heterogeneity was observed, mainly in residues 4 to 6. One of the observed amino-terminal sequences, AFGVGDDESKVAKLTVMVYNG, resembled the deduced sequence of P. gingivalis 381 (D.P. Dickinson, M. K. Kubiniec, F. Yoshimura, and R.J. Genco, J. Bacteriol. 170:1658-1665, 1988). Fimbriae from all the strains of P. gingivalis showing this sequence contained a fimbrillin monomer of 43 kDa and showed a strong reaction with both polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies directed to the fimbriae from P. gingivalis 2561 (381). Fimbriae from strains showing amino-terminal sequence variations in residues 4 to 6 (i.e., substitution of VGD with either E or NAG) were more diverse in their molecular sizes. Most of these variant fimbriae showed weak reactions with the polyclonal antibodies and no reaction with the monoclonal antibodies induced to the fimbriae of strain 2561. No correlation could be established between the molecular size and immunological reactivity of the fimbrillin monomer of P. gingivalis strains. Strains 9-14K-1 and HG 564 not only showed markedly different sequences from the other three amino-terminal sequences but also did not react with either polyclonal or monoclonal antibodies to the fimbriae of strain 2561. Strains W50, W83, and AJW 5 failed to show any immunological reactivity with the antibodies to fimbrillin or fimbriae

  12. Pharmacodynamics of trovafloxacin and levofloxacin against Bacteroides fragilis in an in vitro pharmacodynamic model.

    PubMed

    Peterson, M L; Hovde, L B; Wright, D H; Brown, G H; Hoang, A D; Rotschafer, J C

    2002-01-01

    An in vitro pharmacodynamic investigation was conducted to explore whether the area under the concentration time curve from 0 to 24 h (AUC(0-24))/MIC ratio could predict fluoroquinolone performance against Bacteroides fragilis. An in vitro model was used to generate kill curves for trovafloxacin (TVA) and levofloxacin (LVX) at AUC(0-24)/MIC ratios of 1 to 406 against three strains of B. fragilis (ATCC 25285, ATCC 23745, and clinical isolate M97-117). TVA and LVX were bolused prior to the start of experiments to achieve the corresponding AUC(0-24)/MIC ratio. Experiments were performed in duplicate over 24 h and in an anaerobic environment. Analyses of antimicrobial performance were conducted by comparing the rates of bacterial kill (K) using nonlinear regression analysis with 95% confidence intervals. Statistical significance was defined as a lack of overlap in the 95% confidence limits generated from the slope of each kill curve. For both TVA and LVX, K was maximized once an AUC(0-24)/MIC ratio of > or =40 was achieved and was not further increased despite a 10-fold increase in AUC(0-24)/MIC from approximately 40 to 400 against all three strains of B. fragilis. No significant differences were found in K between AUC(0-24)/MIC ratios of approximately 40 to 200. In experiments where AUC(0-24)/MIC ratios that were > or = 5 and < or = 44 were conducted, 64% demonstrated regrowth at 24 h. Resistant strains were selected in 50% of those experiments, demonstrating regrowth, which resulted in increased MICs of two- to 16-fold for both TVA and LVX. Regrowth did not occur, nor were resistant strains selected in any studies with an AUC/MIC that was > 44. Our findings suggest that fluoroquinolones provide antibacterial effects against B. fragilis in a concentration-independent manner associated with an AUC(0-24)/MIC ratio of > or =40. Also, the potential for the selection of resistant strains of B. fragilis may increase with an AUC(0-24)/MIC ratio of < or =44. PMID:11751135

  13. Mutation of praR in Rhizobium leguminosarum enhances root biofilms, improving nodulation competitiveness by increased expression of attachment proteins

    PubMed Central

    Frederix, Marijke; Edwards, Anne; Swiderska, Anna; Stanger, Andrew; Karunakaran, Ramakrishnan; Williams, Alan; Abbruscato, Pamela; Sanchez-Contreras, Maria; Poole, Philip S; Downie, J Allan

    2014-01-01

    In Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. viciae, quorum-sensing is regulated by CinR, which induces the cinIS operon. CinI synthesizes an AHL, whereas CinS inactivates PraR, a repressor. Mutation of praR enhanced biofilms in vitro. We developed a light (lux)-dependent assay of rhizobial attachment to roots and demonstrated that mutation of praR increased biofilms on pea roots. The praR mutant out-competed wild-type for infection of pea nodules in mixed inoculations. Analysis of gene expression by microarrays and promoter fusions revealed that PraR represses its own transcription and mutation of praR increased expression of several genes including those encoding secreted proteins (the adhesins RapA2, RapB and RapC, two cadherins and the glycanase PlyB), the polysaccharide regulator RosR, and another protein similar to PraR. PraR bound to the promoters of several of these genes indicating direct repression. Mutations in rapA2, rapB, rapC, plyB, the cadherins or rosR did not affect the enhanced root attachment or nodule competitiveness of the praR mutant. However combinations of mutations in rapA, rapB and rapC abolished the enhanced attachment and nodule competitiveness. We conclude that relief of PraR-mediated repression determines a lifestyle switch allowing the expression of genes that are important for biofilm formation on roots and the subsequent initiation of infection of legume roots. PMID:24942546

  14. Genetic basis for Rhizobium etli CE3 O-antigen O-methylated residues that vary according to growth conditions.

    PubMed

    Ojeda, Kristylea J; Box, Jodie M; Noel, K Dale

    2010-02-01

    The Rhizobium etli CE3 O antigen is a fixed-length heteropolymer with O methylation being the predominant type of sugar modification. There are two O-methylated residues that occur, on average, once per complete O antigen: a multiply O-methylated terminal fucose and 2-O methylation of a fucose residue within a repeating unit. The amount of the methylated terminal fucose decreases and the amount of 2-O-methylfucose increases when bacteria are grown in the presence of the host plant, Phaseolus vulgaris, or its seed exudates. Insertion mutagenesis was used to identify open reading frames required for the presence of these O-methylated residues. The presence of the methylated terminal fucose required genes wreA, wreB, wreC, wreD, and wreF, whereas 2-O methylation of internal fucoses required the methyltransferase domain of bifunctional gene wreM. Mutants lacking only the methylated terminal fucose, lacking only 2-O methylation, or lacking both the methylated terminal fucose and 2-O methylation exhibited no other lipopolysaccharide structural defects. Thus, neither of these decorations is required for normal O-antigen length, transport, or assembly into the final lipopolysaccharide. This is in contrast to certain enteric bacteria in which the absence of a terminal decoration severely affects O-antigen length and transport. R. etli mutants lacking only the methylated terminal fucose were not altered in symbiosis with host Phaseolus vulgaris, whereas mutants lacking only 2-O-methylfucose exhibited a delay in nodule development during symbiosis. These results support previous conclusions that the methylated terminal fucose is dispensable for symbiosis, whereas 2-O methylation of internal fucoses somehow facilitates early events in symbiosis. PMID:19948805

  15. Genetic Basis for Rhizobium etli CE3 O-Antigen O-Methylated Residues That Vary According to Growth Conditions▿

    PubMed Central

    Ojeda, Kristylea J.; Box, Jodie M.; Noel, K. Dale

    2010-01-01

    The Rhizobium etli CE3 O antigen is a fixed-length heteropolymer with O methylation being the predominant type of sugar modification. There are two O-methylated residues that occur, on average, once per complete O antigen: a multiply O-methylated terminal fucose and 2-O methylation of a fucose residue within a repeating unit. The amount of the methylated terminal fucose decreases and the amount of 2-O-methylfucose increases when bacteria are grown in the presence of the host plant, Phaseolus vulgaris, or its seed exudates. Insertion mutagenesis was used to identify open reading frames required for the presence of these O-methylated residues. The presence of the methylated terminal fucose required genes wreA, wreB, wreC, wreD, and wreF, whereas 2-O methylation of internal fucoses required the methyltransferase domain of bifunctional gene wreM. Mutants lacking only the methylated terminal fucose, lacking only 2-O methylation, or lacking both the methylated terminal fucose and 2-O methylation exhibited no other lipopolysaccharide structural defects. Thus, neither of these decorations is required for normal O-antigen length, transport, or assembly into the final lipopolysaccharide. This is in contrast to certain enteric bacteria in which the absence of a terminal decoration severely affects O-antigen length and transport. R. etli mutants lacking only the methylated terminal fucose were not altered in symbiosis with host Phaseolus vulgaris, whereas mutants lacking only 2-O-methylfucose exhibited a delay in nodule development during symbiosis. These results support previous conclusions that the methylated terminal fucose is dispensable for symbiosis, whereas 2-O methylation of internal fucoses somehow facilitates early events in symbiosis. PMID:19948805

  16. Varying the Abundance of O Antigen in Rhizobium etli and Its Effect on Symbiosis with Phaseolus vulgaris

    PubMed Central

    Noel, K. Dale; Forsberg, Lennart S.; Carlson, Russell W.

    2000-01-01

    Judged by migration of its lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in gel electrophoresis, the O antigen of Rhizobium etli mutant strain CE166 was apparently of normal size. However, its LPS sugar composition and staining of the LPS bands after electrophoresis indicated that the proportion of its LPS molecules that possessed O antigen was only 40% of the wild-type value. Its LPS also differed from the wild type by lacking quinovosamine (2-amino-2,6-dideoxyglucose). Both of these defects were due to a single genetic locus carrying a Tn5 insertion. The deficiency in O-antigen amount, but not the absence of quinovosamine, was suppressed by transferring into this strain recombinant plasmids that shared a 7.8-kb stretch of the R. etli CE3 lps genetic region α, even though this suppressing DNA did not carry the genetic region mutated in strain CE166. Strain CE166 gave rise to pseudonodules on legume host Phaseolus vulgaris, whereas the mutant suppressed by DNA from lps region α elicited nitrogen-fixing nodules. However, the nodules in the latter case developed slowly and were widely dispersed. Two other R. etli mutants that had one-half or less of the normal amount of O antigen also gave rise to pseudonodules on P. vulgaris. The latter strains were mutated in lps region α and could be restored to normal LPS content and normal symbiosis by complementation with wild-type DNA from this region. Hence, the symbiotic role of LPS requires near-normal abundance of O antigen and may require a structural feature conferred by quinovosamine. PMID:10986232

  17. The extent of migration of the Holliday junction is a crucial factor for gene conversion in Rhizobium etli.

    PubMed

    Castellanos, Mildred; Romero, David

    2009-08-01

    Gene conversion, defined as the nonreciprocal transfer of DNA, is one result of homologous recombination. Three steps in recombination could give rise to gene conversion: (i) DNA synthesis for repair of the degraded segment, (ii) Holliday junction migration, leading to heteroduplex formation, and (iii) repair of mismatches in the heteroduplex. There are at least three proteins (RuvAB, RecG, and RadA) that participate in the second step. Their roles have been studied for homologous recombination, but evidence of their relative role in gene conversion is lacking. In this work, we showed the effect on gene conversion of mutations in ruvB, recG, and radA in Rhizobium etli, either alone or in combination, using a cointegration strategy previously developed in our laboratory. The results indicate that the RuvAB system is highly efficient for gene conversion, since its absence provokes smaller gene conversion segments than those in the wild type as well as a shift in the preferred position of conversion tracts. The RecG system possesses a dual role for gene conversion. Inactivation of recG leads to longer gene conversion tracts than those in the wild type, indicating that its activity may hinder heteroduplex extension. However, under circumstances where it is the only migration activity present (as in the ruvB radA double mutant), conversion segments can still be seen, indicating that RecG can also promote gene conversion. RadA is the least efficient system in R. etli but is still needed for the production of detectable gene conversion tracts.

  18. Distribution of a Population of Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. trifolii among Different Size Classes of Soil Aggregates.

    PubMed

    Mendes, I C; Bottomley, P J

    1998-03-01

    A combination of the plant infection-soil dilution technique (most-probable-number [MPN] technique) and immunofluorescence direct count (IFDC) microscopy was used to examine the effects of three winter cover crop treatments on the distribution of a soil population of Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. trifolii across different size classes of soil aggregates (<0.25, 0.25 to 0.5, 0.5 to 1.0, 1.0 to 2.0, and 2.0 to 5.0 mm). The aggregates were prepared from a Willamette silt loam soil immediately after harvest of broccoli (September 1995) and before planting and after harvest of sweet corn (June and September 1996, respectively). The summer crops were grown in soil that had been either fallowed or planted with a cover crop of red clover (legume) or triticale (cereal) from September to April. The Rhizobium soil population was heterogeneously distributed across the different size classes of soil aggregates, and the distribution was influenced by cover crop treatment and sampling time. On both September samplings, the smallest size class of aggregates (<0.25 mm) recovered from the red clover plots carried between 30 and 70% of the total nodulating R. leguminosarum population, as estimated by the MPN procedure, while the same aggregate size class from the June sampling carried only approximately 6% of the population. In June, IDFC microscopy revealed that the 1.0- to 2.0-mm size class of aggregates from the red clover treatment carried a significantly greater population density of the successful nodule-occupying serotype, AR18, than did the aggregate size classes of <0.5 mm, and 2 to 5 mm. In September, however, the population profile of AR18 had shifted such that the density was significantly greater in the 0.25- to 0.5-mm size class than in aggregates of <0.25 mm and >1.0 mm. The populations of two other Rhizobium serotypes (AR6 and AS36) followed the same trends of distribution in the June and September samplings. These data indicate the existence of structural microsites

  19. Characterization of Glycosaminoglycan (GAG) Sulfatases from the Human Gut Symbiont Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron Reveals the First GAG-specific Bacterial Endosulfatase*

    PubMed Central

    Ulmer, Jonathan E.; Vilén, Eric Morssing; Namburi, Ramesh Babu; Benjdia, Alhosna; Beneteau, Julie; Malleron, Annie; Bonnaffé, David; Driguez, Pierre-Alexandre; Descroix, Karine; Lassalle, Gilbert; Le Narvor, Christine; Sandström, Corine; Spillmann, Dorothe; Berteau, Olivier

    2014-01-01

    Despite the importance of the microbiota in human physiology, the molecular bases that govern the interactions between these commensal bacteria and their host remain poorly understood. We recently reported that sulfatases play a key role in the adaptation of a major human commensal bacterium, Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron, to its host (Benjdia, A., Martens, E. C., Gordon, J. I., and Berteau, O. (2011) J. Biol. Chem. 286, 25973–25982). We hypothesized that sulfatases are instrumental for this bacterium, and related Bacteroides species, to metabolize highly sulfated glycans (i.e. mucins and glycosaminoglycans (GAGs)) and to colonize the intestinal mucosal layer. Based on our previous study, we investigated 10 sulfatase genes induced in the presence of host glycans. Biochemical characterization of these potential sulfatases allowed the identification of GAG-specific sulfatases selective for the type of saccharide residue and the attachment position of the sulfate group. Although some GAG-specific bacterial sulfatase activities have been described in the literature, we report here for the first time the identity and the biochemical characterization of four GAG-specific sulfatases. Furthermore, contrary to the current paradigm, we discovered that B. thetaiotaomicron possesses an authentic GAG endosulfatase that is active at the polymer level. This type of sulfatase is the first one to be identified in a bacterium. Our study thus demonstrates that bacteria have evolved more sophisticated and diverse GAG sulfatases than anticipated and establishes how B. thetaiotaomicron, and other major human commensal bacteria, can metabolize and potentially tailor complex host glycans. PMID:25002587

  20. Bacteroides intestinalis DSM 17393, a member of the human colonic microbiome, upregulates multiple endoxylanases during growth on xylan

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Kui; Pereira, Gabriel V.; Cavalcante, Janaina J. V.; Zhang, Meiling; Mackie, Roderick; Cann, Isaac

    2016-01-01

    Many human diets contain arabinoxylan, and the ease of genome sequencing coupled with reduced cost have led to unraveling the arsenal of genes utilized by the colonic Bacteroidetes to depolymerize this polysaccharide. The colonic Bacteroidetes with potential to ferment arabinoxylans include Bacteroides intestinalis. In this study, we analyzed the hydrolytic activities of members of a xylan degradation cluster encoded on the genome of Bacteroides intestinalis DSM 17393. Here, it is demonstrated that a cocktail of the xylanolytic enzymes completely hydrolyze arabinoxylans found in human diets. We show that this bacterium and relatives have evolved and secrete a unique bifunctional endoxylanase/arabinofuranosidase in the same polypeptide. The bifunctional enzyme and other secreted enzymes attack the polysaccharides extracellularly to remove the side-chains, exposing the xylan backbone for cleavage to xylo-oligosaccharides and xylose. These end products are transported into the cell where a β-xylosidase cleaves the oligosaccharides to fermentable sugars. While our experiments focused on B. intestinalis, it is likely that the extracellular enzymes also release nutrients to members of the colonic microbial community that practice cross-feeding. The presence of the genes characterized in this study in other colonic Bacteroidetes suggests a conserved strategy for energy acquisition from arabinoxylan, a component of human diets. PMID:27681607

  1. Effectiveness of halo-tolerant, auxin producing Pseudomonas and Rhizobium strains to improve osmotic stress tolerance in mung bean (Vigna radiata L.).

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Maqshoof; Zahir, Zahir A; Nazli, Farheen; Akram, Fareeha; Arshad, Muhammad; Khalid, Muhammad

    2013-12-01

    Halo-tolerant, auxin producing bacteria could be used to induce salt tolerance in plants. A number of Rhizobium and auxin producing rhizobacterial strains were assessed for their ability to tolerate salt stress by conducting osmoadaptation assay. The selected strains were further screened for their ability to induce osmotic stress tolerance in mung bean seedlings under salt-stressed axenic conditions in growth pouch/jar trials. Three most effective strains of Rhizobium and Pseudomonas containing ACC-deaminase were evaluated in combination, for their ability to induce osmotic stress tolerance in mung bean at original, 4, and 6 dS m(-1) under axenic conditions. Results showed that sole inoculation of Rhizobium and Pseudomonas strains improved the total dry matter up to 1.4, and 1.9 fold, respectively, while the increase in salt tolerance index was improved up to 1.3 and 2.0 fold by the Rhizobium and Pseudomonas strains, respectively. However, up to 2.2 fold increase in total dry matter and salt tolerance index was observed due to combined inoculation of Rhizobium and Pseudomonas strains. So, combined application of Rhizobium and Pseudomonas strains could be explored as an effective strategy to induce osmotic stress tolerance in mung bean. PMID:24688532

  2. Effectiveness of halo-tolerant, auxin producing Pseudomonas and Rhizobium strains to improve osmotic stress tolerance in mung bean (Vigna radiata L.)

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Maqshoof; Zahir, Zahir A.; Nazli, Farheen; Akram, Fareeha; Arshad, Muhammad; Khalid, Muhammad

    2013-01-01

    Halo-tolerant, auxin producing bacteria could be used to induce salt tolerance in plants. A number of Rhizobium and auxin producing rhizobacterial strains were assessed for their ability to tolerate salt stress by conducting osmoadaptation assay. The selected strains were further screened for their ability to induce osmotic stress tolerance in mung bean seedlings under salt-stressed axenic conditions in growth pouch/jar trials. Three most effective strains of Rhizobium and Pseudomonas containing ACC-deaminase were evaluated in combination, for their ability to induce osmotic stress tolerance in mung bean at original, 4, and 6 dS m−1 under axenic conditions. Results showed that sole inoculation of Rhizobium and Pseudomonas strains improved the total dry matter up to 1.4, and 1.9 fold, respectively, while the increase in salt tolerance index was improved up to 1.3 and 2.0 fold by the Rhizobium and Pseudomonas strains, respectively. However, up to 2.2 fold increase in total dry matter and salt tolerance index was observed due to combined inoculation of Rhizobium and Pseudomonas strains. So, combined application of Rhizobium and Pseudomonas strains could be explored as an effective strategy to induce osmotic stress tolerance in mung bean. PMID:24688532

  3. The evolution of specificity in the legume-rhizobium symbiosis.

    PubMed

    Young, J P; Johnston, A W

    1989-11-01

    We know more about the partnership between legumes and their root-nodule bacteria than about any other symbiosis or any other plant-microbe interaction. In the light of recent research we are beginning to see details of an elaborate tapestry. The rhizobia are not a self-contained branch on the bacterial tree; their ancestry is intertwined with that of photosynthetic and pathogenic bacteria. Their host ranges, which vary enormously in breadth, overlap to form a tangled web of interconnections between plants and bacteria, and mechanisms of infection and nodule development are more diverse than we once thought. From genetic analysis of the bacteria we learn that specificity is not the province of special 'host-range determinants', but is affected by a wide range of genes with diverse modes of action. The symbiosis is a rich resource for evolutionary fact and speculation, but its complexity and diversity should warn us not to expect easy answers.

  4. Isolation and characterization of Rhizobium meliloti mutants affected in exopolysaccharide production.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Navarro, D N; Palomares, A J; Casadesús, J

    1991-06-01

    Rhizobium meliloti mutants affected in the production of exopolysaccharide (EPS) were isolated after N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine mutagenesis. The mutants were classified into three phenotypic classes: (I) Exo-, rough mutants lacking exopolysaccharide; (II) Exos (for "small") which form tiny, compact colonies and synthesize reduced amounts of EPS; and (III) Exoc (for "constitutive"), hypermucoid mutants which overproduce EPS. Hypermucoid strains showed increased resistance to desiccation. All the mutants were able to nodulate, although a significant decrease in infectivity degree and/or competitiveness was found in rough and compact strains. Two mutants proved to be deficient in nitrogen fixation. Complementation analysis with cloned R. meliloti exo genes could not be applied to the study of these Fix- mutants because introduction of plasmids derived from cosmid vector pLAFR1 caused loss of nodulating ability. However, complementation of calcofluor staining and EPS production was observed. Complementation with certain exo genes also caused a marked increase in motility.

  5. Isolation and characterization of the recA gene of Rhizobium meliloti.

    PubMed Central

    Better, M; Helinski, D R

    1983-01-01

    Interspecific complementation of an Escherichia coli recA mutant with plasmids containing a gene bank of Rhizobium meliloti DNA was used to identify a clone which contains the recA gene of R. meliloti. The R. meliloti recA protein can function in recombination and in response to DNA damage when expressed in an E. coli recA host, and hybridization studies have shown that DNA sequence homology exists between the recA gene of E. coli and that of R. meliloti. The isolated R. meliloti recA DNA was used to construct a recA R. meliloti, and this bacterium was not deficient in its ability to carry out symbiotic nitrogen fixation. Images PMID:6305915

  6. [Characteristics of Natural Selection in Populations of Nodule Bacteria (Rhizobium leguminosarum) Interacting With Different Host Plants].

    PubMed

    Andronov, E E; Igolkina, A A; Kimeklis, A K; Vorobyov, N I; Provorov, N A

    2015-10-01

    Using high throughput sequencing of the nodA gene, we studied the population dynamics of Rhizobium leguminosarum (bv. viciae, bv. trifolii) in rhizospheric and nodular subpopulations associated with the leguminous plants representing different cross-inoculation groups (Vicia sativa, Lathyrus pratensis of the vetch/vetchling/pea group and Trifolium hybridum of the clover group). The "rhizosphere-nodules" transitions result in either an increase or decrease in the frequencies of 10 of the 23 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) (which were identified with 95% similarity) depending on the symbiotic specificity and phylogenetic positions of OTUs. Statistical and bioinformatical analysis of the population structures suggest that the type of natural selection responsible for these changes may be diversifying at the whole-population level and frequency-dependent at the OTU-specific level, ensuring the divergent evolution of rhizobia interacting with different host species. PMID:27169225

  7. [Detection of pathogenic bacteria Rhizobium vitis in vineyards of the south of Ukraine].

    PubMed

    Korotaieva N V; Limanska N V

    2015-01-01

    The total number of microbiota from grape crown gall tissues ranged from (2,3 ± 0.8) x 10(3) to (7.3 ± 0.4) x 10(5) CFU/g. The amount of bacteria from Rhizobium genus reached from (1.2 ±0.2) x 10(2) to (2.1 ± 0.2) x 10(4) CFU/g depending on a tested plant. It was found out that only a small percentage of the strains (3.1 - 4.9%) were oncogenic. New pathogenic strains (R. vitis ONU388, R. vitis ONU389 and R. vitis ONU390) possessing plasmid genes of pathogenicity virC, ipt and virD2 were isolated. PMID:26036030

  8. Three GroEL homologues from Rhizobium leguminosarum have distinct in vitro properties.

    PubMed

    George, Roger; Kelly, Sharon M; Price, Nicholas C; Erbse, Annette; Fisher, Mark; Lund, Peter A

    2004-11-12

    The GroEL molecular chaperone of Escherichia coli and its cofactor GroES are highly conserved, and are required for the folding of many proteins. Most but not all bacteria express single GroEL and GroES proteins. Rhizobium leguminosarum strain A34 encodes three complete operons encoding homologues to GroEL and GroES. We have used circular dichroism and measurement of ATPase activity to compare the stabilities of these chaperonins after expression in and purification from E. coli. Significant differences in the stabilities of the proteins with respect to denaturant and temperature were found. The proteins also differed in their ability to refold denatured lactate dehydrogenase. This study, the first to compare the properties of three different GroEL homologues from the same organism, shows that despite the high degree of similarity between different homologues, they can display distinct properties in vitro.

  9. Organization, structure and symbiotic function of Rhizobium meliloti nodulation genes determining host specificity for alfalfa.

    PubMed

    Horvath, B; Kondorosi, E; John, M; Schmidt, J; Török, I; Györgypal, Z; Barabas, I; Wieneke, U; Schell, J; Kondorosi, A

    1986-08-01

    In R. meliloti we have identified four nodulation genes determining plant host-range specificity and have designated them hsnABC and D. The genes code for 9.7, 41.7, 26.7, and 28.6 kd proteins, respectively, and are organized into two transcriptional units. Mutations in these genes affect nodulation of their natural plant hosts Medicago sativa and Melilotus albus to different extents and hsnD mutants have an altered host-range. These Nod- mutations are not complementable by nodulation genes of other Rhizobium species such as R. leguminosarum. The hsn genes determine plant-specific infection through root hairs: hsnD is required for host-specific root hair curling and nodule initiation while the hsnABC genes control infection thread growth from the root hairs.

  10. Biodegradation of hazardous triphenylmethane dye methyl violet by Rhizobium radiobacter (MTCC 8161).

    PubMed

    Parshetti, Ganesh; Saratale, Ganesh; Telke, Amar; Govindwar, Sanjay

    2009-09-01

    Rhizobium radiobacter MTCC 8161 completely decolorized methyl violet (10 mg l(-1)) within 8 h both at static and shaking conditions. The decolorization time increased with increasing dye concentration. The effect of different carbon and nitrogen sources on the decolorization of methyl violet was studied. The maximum decolorization was observed in the presence of sucrose (1%) and urea (1%). UV-Visible, HPLC and FTIR analysis of extracted products confirmed biodegradation of methyl violet. The significant increase in the activities of lignin peroxidase and aminopyrine N-demethylase in the cells obtained after decolorization indicated involvement of these enzymes in the decolorization process. In addition to methyl violet, this strain also shows an ability to decolorize various industrial dyes, (red HE7B, yellow 4G, blue 2B, navy blue HE22, red M5B and red HE3B).

  11. Localized Changes in Flavonoid Biosynthesis in Roots of Lotus pedunculatus after Infection by Rhizobium loti1

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, James E.; Rao, J. Raghavendra

    1992-01-01

    Two-dimensional paper chromatography in four solvent systems, high-sensitivity spray reagents, and UV absorption spectroscopy were used to separate and characterize flavonoids and isoflavonoids in roots and root nodules of 20-d-old Lotus pedunculatus Cav. Seedlings were grown either under sterile conditions or after inoculation with Fix+ or Fix− strains of Rhizobium loti. Flavonoids rather than isoflavonoids predominated in all tissues. Flavonoid profiles in sterile and denodulated root tissues were remarkably similar, both qualitatively and quantitatively. At least 14 partially purified flavonoid aglycones and conjugates were found in root extracts; denodulated root tissues contained no compounds that were not also present in sterile roots. Fix+ rhizobia were responsible for major postinfection shifts in plant flavonoid biosynthesis at the sites of nodule morphogenesis. Polymeric flavolans were absent from Fix+ nodules but present in all root tissues and in Fix− nodules. Catechin was detected only in Fix+ nodules. PMID:16652981

  12. Genome sequence of the clover-nodulating Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. trifolii strain TA1

    PubMed Central

    Reeve, Wayne; Tian, Rui; De Meyer, Sofie; Melino, Vanessa; Terpolilli, Jason; Ardley, Julie; Tiwari, Ravi; Howieson, John; Yates, Ronald; O’Hara, Graham; Ninawi, Mohamed; Teshima, Hazuki; Bruce, David; Detter, Chris; Tapia, Roxanne; Han, Cliff; Wei, Chia-Lin; Huntemann, Marcel; Han, James; Chen, I-Min; Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Markowitz, Victor; Ivanova, Natalia; Ovchinnikova, Galina; Pagani, Ioanna; Pati, Amrita; Goodwin, Lynne; Pitluck, Sam; Woyke, Tanja; Kyrpides, Nikos

    2013-01-01

    Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. trifolii strain TA1 is an aerobic, motile, Gram-negative, non-spore-forming rod that is an effective nitrogen fixing microsymbiont on the perennial clovers originating from Europe and the Mediterranean basin. TA1 however is ineffective with many annual and perennial clovers originating from Africa and America. Here we describe the features of R. leguminosarum bv. trifolii strain TA1, together with genome sequence information and annotation. The 8,618,824 bp high-quality-draft genome is arranged in a 6 scaffold of 32 contigs, contains 8,493 protein-coding genes and 83 RNA-only encoding genes, and is one of 20 rhizobial genomes sequenced as part of the DOE Joint Genome Institute 2010 Community Sequencing Program. PMID:24976881

  13. Synergy between Rhizobium phaseoli and Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans in the Bioleaching Process of Copper

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Xuecheng; Li, Dongwei

    2016-01-01

    This study investigates the synergy of Rhizobium phaseoli and Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans in the bioleaching process of copper. The results showed that additional R. phaseoli could increase leaching rate and cell number of A. ferrooxidans. When the initial cell number ratio between A. ferrooxidans and R. phaseoli was 2 : 1, A. ferrooxidans attained the highest final cell number of approximately 2 × 108 cells/mL and the highest copper leaching rate of 29%, which is 7% higher than that in the group with A. ferrooxidans only. R. phaseoli may use metabolized polysaccharides from A. ferrooxidans, and organic acids could chelate or precipitate harmful heavy metals to reduce their damage on A. ferrooxidans and promote its growth. Organic acids could also damage the mineral lattice to increase the leaching effect. PMID:26942203

  14. Isolation of a strain of Agrobacterium tumefaciens (Rhizobium radiobacter) utilizing methylene urea (ureaformaldehyde) as nitrogen source.

    PubMed

    Koivunen, Marja E; Morisseau, Christophe; Horwath, William R; Hammock, Bruce D

    2004-03-01

    Methylene ureas (MU) are slow-release nitrogen fertilizers degraded in soil by microbial enzymatic activity. Improved utilization of MU in agricultural production requires more knowledge about the organisms and enzymes responsible for its degradation. A Gram-negative, MU-degrading organism was isolated from a soil in Sacramento Valley, California. The bacterium was identified as Agrobacterium tumefaciens (recently also known as Rhizobium radiobacter) using both genotypic and phenotypic characterization. The pathogenic nature of the organism was confirmed by a bioassay on carrot disks. The MU-hydrolyzing enzyme (MUase) was intracellular and was induced by using MU as a sole source of nitrogen. The bacterial growth was optimized in NH4Cl, urea, or peptone, whereas the production and specific activity of MUase were maximized with either NH4Cl or urea as a nitrogen source. The result has a practical significance, demonstrating a potential to select for this plant pathogen in soils fertilized with MU.

  15. [Detection of pathogenic bacteria Rhizobium vitis in vineyards of the south of Ukraine].

    PubMed

    Korotaieva N V; Limanska N V

    2015-01-01

    The total number of microbiota from grape crown gall tissues ranged from (2,3 ± 0.8) x 10(3) to (7.3 ± 0.4) x 10(5) CFU/g. The amount of bacteria from Rhizobium genus reached from (1.2 ±0.2) x 10(2) to (2.1 ± 0.2) x 10(4) CFU/g depending on a tested plant. It was found out that only a small percentage of the strains (3.1 - 4.9%) were oncogenic. New pathogenic strains (R. vitis ONU388, R. vitis ONU389 and R. vitis ONU390) possessing plasmid genes of pathogenicity virC, ipt and virD2 were isolated.

  16. Effects of pesticide seed treatments on Rhizobium japonicum and its symbiotic relationship with soybean.

    PubMed

    Tu, C M

    1977-08-01

    Seventeen Rhizobium japonicum cultures isolated from soybean nodules induced formation of nodules on taproots of soybean plants. All isolates reduced acetylene to ethylene to different extents in vitro. Paper disc assay indicated that two insecticides, lindane (gamma-1,2,3,4,5,6-hexachlorocyclohexane), chlorpyrifos (O,O-diethyl O-3,5,6-trichloro-2-pyridyl phosphorothioate), and a fungicide, thiram (tetramethylthiuram disulphide) individually or in combination caused significant inhibition of the growth of R. japonicum No. 16. The effects of insecticide-fungicide seed treatments on the nitrogenase activity of soybean plants in nitrogen-fixing capacity, weights of leaves, stems, and nodules were determined. Thiram, singly or in combination with lindane and/or chlorpyrifos, significantly delayed growth of the plants and affected the activity of nitrogenase in the fixation of nitrogen 3 weeks after treatments. No drastic effect of any of the pesticide treatments on soybean plant growth was observed after 8 weeks.

  17. Effect of process parameters on production of a biopolymer by Rhizobium sp.

    PubMed

    Duta, Flávia Pereira; De França, Francisca Pessôa; Sérvulo, Eliana Flávia Camporese; De Almeida Lopes, Léa Maria; Da Costa, Antonio Carlos Augusto; Barros, Ana

    2004-01-01

    The production of biopolymers by a Rhizobium strain was studied under batch and bioreactor conditions. The best viscosity levels were obtained under low mannitol concentrations as well as low agitation and aeration conditions. Infrared spectra indicated the presence of chemical groups characteristic of microbially produced biopolymers, including C = O and O-acetyl groups. Thermogravimetric analysis showed the characteristic degradation profiles of the exopolysaccharide produced (T(onset) = 290degreesC). The experimental design showed that a low substrate concentration (10.0 g/L), and low aeration (0.2 vvm) and agitation (200 rpm) levels should be used. The maximum yield of the process was a Yp/s (g/g) of 0.19 +/- 0.1, obtained under optimized conditions.

  18. Field study of a soil-soybean plant-Rhizobium system amended with cadmium

    SciTech Connect

    Borges, A.C.; Wollum, A.G. II

    1980-07-01

    Soybean plants (Glycine max (L.) Merr.) were cropped over a period of 3 years, under field conditions, in a soil amended with Cd (as CdCl/sub 2/ . 2 1/2 H/sub 2/O) at rates corresponding to 0, 3.3, 12.5, and 22.8 kg Cd/ha in order to evaluate the effect of Cd on seed yield, Cd accumulation in seeds, and the distribution of indigenous Rhizobium japonicum strains. Cadmium migration from the cultivated layers of the subsoil during 3 years was not significant. Soybean seed yields were affected significantly only when DTPA-TEA-extractable Cd was > 1.57 ..mu..g Cd/g in the cultivated layers of the soil, suggesting that only in cases of extreme Cd contamination would significant yield reduction occur. Cadmium content of seeds increased from year to year with values > 1 ..mu..g Cd/g being found only when Cd had been added. Grain yield decreased only in the high Cd treatments. Therefore, grain yield would be a poor indicator of Cd contamination in a soil cropped with soybeans. The results also suggested DTPA-TEA-extractable soil Cd does not accurately measure the readily available pool of Cd for soybean plants. Rather Cd content of seeds appears to be a better indicator of the extent of Cd contamination. Rhizobium japonicum strain distribution was not affected by the presence of Cd in the soil. Sero-groups 24, 31, 76, and 94 dominated the area surveyed.

  19. Rhizobium sp. strain NGR234 NodZ protein is a fucosyltransferase.

    PubMed Central

    Quesada-Vincens, D; Fellay, R; Nasim, T; Viprey, V; Burger, U; Prome, J C; Broughton, W J; Jabbouri, S

    1997-01-01

    Rhizobium sp. strain NGR234 produces a large family of lipochitooligosaccharide Nod factors carrying specific substituents. Among them are 3-O- (or 4-O-) and 6-O-carbamoyl groups, an N-methyl group, and a 2-O-methylfucose residue which may bear either 3-O-sulfate or 4-O-acetyl substitutions. Investigations on the genetic control of host specificity revealed a number of loci which directly affect Nod factor structure. Here we show that insertion and frameshift mutations in the nodZ gene abolish fucosylation of Nod factors. In vitro assays using GDP-L-fucose as the fucose donor show that fucosyltransferase activity is associated with the nodZ gene product (NodZ). NodZ is located in the soluble protein fraction of NGR234 cells. Together with extra copies of the nodD1 gene, the nodZ gene and its associated nod box were introduced into ANU265, which is NGR234 cured of the symbiotic plasmid. Crude extracts of this transconjugant possess fucosyltransferase activity. Fusion of a His6 tag to the NodZ protein expressed in Escherichia coli yielded a protein able to fucosylate both nonfucosylated NodNGR factors and oligomers of chitin. NodZ is inactive on monomeric N-acetyl-D-glucosamine and on desulfated Rhizobium meliloti Nod factors. Kinetic analyses showed that the NodZ protein is more active on oligomers of chitin than on nonfucosylated NodNGR factors. Pentameric chitin is the preferred substrate. These data suggest that fucosylation occurs before acylation of the Nod factors. PMID:9260950

  20. Relatedness Among Rhizobium and Agrobacterium Species Determined by Three Methods of Nucleic Acid Hybridization

    PubMed Central

    Gibbins, Ann M.; Gregory, K. F.

    1972-01-01

    Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) was isolated from 20 strains of Rhizobium and Agrobacterium and from one strain of Serratia marcescens; the guanine plus cytosine content of each DNA sample was determined by thermal denaturation. Radioactive DNA was isolated from three reference strains following the uptake of [2-14C]thymidine in the presence of deoxyadenosine. Ribonucleic acid (RNA) polymerase was used to synthesize radioactive RNA on DNA templates from the three reference strains. Radioactive DNA and RNA from the three reference strains were each hybridized with filter-bound DNA from all of the 21 test strains in 6 × SSC (standard saline citrate) and 50% formamide at 43 C for 40 hr. DNA/DNA relatedness was also determined by spectrophotometric measurement of the rates of association of single-stranded DNA. The order of relatedness between strains was similar by each method. Overall standard deviations for the DNA/DNA and DNA/RNA membrane filter techniques were ±0.87 and ±1.03%, respectively; that for the spectrophotometric technique was ±4.11%. The DNA/DNA membrane technique gave higher absolute values of hybridization than did the DNA/RNA technique. R. leguminosarum and R. trifolii could not be distinguished from each other by these techniques. These results also indicated close relationships between R. lupini and R. japonicum, and (with less certainty) between R. meliloti and R. phaseoli. Of all the rhizobia tested against the A. tumefaciens 371 reference strain, the R. japonicum strains were the most unrelated. The three Agrobacterium strains used were as related to the R. lupini and R. leguminosarum references as were several rhizobium strains. PMID:4591471

  1. Ethnic diversity of gut microbiota: species characterization of Bacteroides fragilis group and genus Bifidobacterium in healthy Belgian adults, and comparison with data from Japanese subjects.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Eiji; Matsuki, Takahiro; Kubota, Hiroyuki; Makino, Hiroshi; Sakai, Takafumi; Oishi, Kenji; Kushiro, Akira; Fujimoto, Junji; Watanabe, Koichi; Watanuki, Masaaki; Tanaka, Ryuichiro

    2013-08-01

    The composition of the human gut microbiota is related to host health, and it is thought that dietary habits may play a role in shaping this composition. Here, we examined the population size and prevalence of six predominant bacterial genera and the species compositions of genus Bifidobacterium (g-Bifid) and Bacteroides fragilis group (g-Bfra) in 42 healthy Belgian adults by quantitative PCR (qPCR) over a period of one month. The population sizes and prevalence of these bacteria were basically stable throughout the study period. The predominant g-Bifid species were Bifidobacterium adolescentis and Bifidobacterium longum ss. longum, and the predominant g-Bfra species were Bacteroides vulgatus, Bacteroides uniformis, and Bacteroides ovatus. The Belgian gut microbiota data were then compared with gut microbiota data from 46 Japanese subjects collected according to the same protocol (Matsuki et al., Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 70, 167-173, 2004). The population size and prevalence of Bifidobacterium catenulatum group were significantly lower in the Belgian gut microbiota than in the Japanese gut microbiota (P < 0.001); however, the population size and prevalence of g-Bifid did not differ. This species-level qPCR analysis will be helpful for investigating the diversity of gut microbiota among ethnic groups.

  2. Xylan-regulated Delivery of Human Keratinocyte Growth Factor-2 to the Inflamed Colon by the Human Anaerobic Commensal Bacterium Bacteroides ovatus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The use of genetically modified bacteria to deliver biologically active molecules directly to the gut has become an increasingly attractive area of investigation. The challenge of regulation of production of the therapeutic molecule and colonization of the bowel led us to investigate Bacteroides ov...

  3. Draft Genome Sequence of "Candidatus Bacteroides periocalifornicus," a New Member of the Bacteriodetes Phylum Found within the Oral Microbiome of Periodontitis Patients.

    PubMed

    McLean, Jeffrey S; Liu, Quanhui; Thompson, John; Edlund, Anna; Kelley, Scott

    2015-01-01

    Here we present the draft genome of a distantly related member within the phylum Bacteriodetes, "Candidatus Bacteroides periocalifornicus." The draft genome sequence was assembled with metagenomic data from a patient with periodontitis. The closest relative has less than 68% average nucleic identity, supporting a novel family within Bacteriodetes.

  4. Probabilistic analysis showing that a combination of bacteroides and methanobrevibacter source tracking markers is effective for identifying waters contaminated by human fecal pollution

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnston, Christopher; Byappanahalli, Muruleedhara N.; Gibson, Jacqueline MacDonald; Ufnar, Jennifer A.; Whitman, Richard L.; Stewart, Jill R.

    2013-01-01

    Microbial source tracking assays to identify sources of waterborne contamination typically target genetic markers of host-specific microorganisms. However, no bacterial marker has been shown to be 100% host-specific, and cross-reactivity has been noted in studies evaluating known source samples. Using 485 challenge samples from 20 different human and animal fecal sources, this study evaluated microbial source tracking markers including the Bacteroides HF183 16S rRNA, M. smithii nifH, and Enterococcus esp gene targets that have been proposed as potential indicators of human fecal contamination. Bayes' Theorem was used to calculate the conditional probability that these markers or a combination of markers can correctly identify human sources of fecal pollution. All three human-associated markers were detected in 100% of the sewage samples analyzed. Bacteroides HF183 was the most effective marker for determining whether contamination was specifically from a human source, and greater than 98% certainty that contamination was from a human source was shown when both Bacteroides HF183 and M. smithii nifH markers were present. A high degree of certainty was attained even in cases where the prior probability of human fecal contamination was as low as 8.5%. The combination of Bacteroides HF183 and M. smithii nifH source tracking markers can help identify surface waters impacted by human fecal contamination, information useful for prioritizing restoration activities or assessing health risks from exposure to contaminated waters.

  5. Near-complete genome sequence of the cellulolytic Bacterium Bacteroides (Pseudobacteroides) cellulosolvens ATCC 35603

    SciTech Connect

    Dassa, Bareket; Utturkar, Sagar M.; Hurt, Richard A.; Klingeman, Dawn Marie; Keller, Martin; Xu, Jian; Reddy, Harish Kumar; Borovok, Ilya; Grinberg, Inna Rozman; Lamed, Raphael; Zhivin, Olga; Bayer, Edward A.; Brown, Steven D.

    2015-09-24

    We report the single-contig genome sequence of the anaerobic, mesophilic, cellulolytic bacterium, Bacteroides cellulosolvens. The bacterium produces a particularly elaborate cellulosome system, whereas the types of cohesin-dockerin interactions are opposite of other known cellulosome systems: cell-surface attachment is thus mediated via type-I interactions whereas enzymes are integrated via type-II interactions.

  6. Pirin-like proteins are regulated by oxidative stress and iron in bacteroides fragilis and involved in the modulation of central energy metabolism and metronidazole susceptibility

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bacteroides fragilis is the most frequent anaerobe isolated from human infections. Clinical isolates of B. fragilis are among the highest aerotolerant anaerobic bacteria. The oxidative stress response (OSR) in B. fragilis induces an array of genes enabling them to survive prolonged oxygen exposure i...

  7. Draft Genome Sequence of "Candidatus Bacteroides periocalifornicus," a New Member of the Bacteriodetes Phylum Found within the Oral Microbiome of Periodontitis Patients.

    PubMed

    McLean, Jeffrey S; Liu, Quanhui; Thompson, John; Edlund, Anna; Kelley, Scott

    2015-01-01

    Here we present the draft genome of a distantly related member within the phylum Bacteriodetes, "Candidatus Bacteroides periocalifornicus." The draft genome sequence was assembled with metagenomic data from a patient with periodontitis. The closest relative has less than 68% average nucleic identity, supporting a novel family within Bacteriodetes. PMID:26701081

  8. Draft Genome Sequence of “Candidatus Bacteroides periocalifornicus,” a New Member of the Bacteriodetes Phylum Found within the Oral Microbiome of Periodontitis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Quanhui; Thompson, John; Edlund, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Here we present the draft genome of a distantly related member within the phylum Bacteriodetes, “Candidatus Bacteroides periocalifornicus.” The draft genome sequence was assembled with metagenomic data from a patient with periodontitis. The closest relative has less than 68% average nucleic identity, supporting a novel family within Bacteriodetes. PMID:26701081

  9. Bacteroides isolated from four mammalian hosts lack host-specific 16S rRNA gene phylogeny and carbon and nitrogen utilization patterns*

    PubMed Central

    Atherly, Todd; Ziemer, Cherie J

    2014-01-01

    One-hundred-and-three isolates of Bacteroides ovatus,B. thetaiotaomicron, and B. xylanisolvens were recovered from cow, goat, human, and pig fecal enrichments with cellulose or xylan/pectin. Isolates were compared using 16S rRNA gene sequencing, repetitive sequence-based polymerase chain reaction (rep-PCR), and phenotypic microarrays. Analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed high sequence identity in these Bacteroides; with distinct phylogenetic groupings by bacterial species but not host origin. Phenotypic microarray analysis demonstrated these Bacteroides shared the ability to utilize many of the same carbon substrates, without differences due to species or host origin, indicative of their broad carbohydrate fermentation abilities. Limited nitrogen substrates were utilized; in addition to ammonia, guanine, and xanthine, purine derivatives were utilized by most isolates followed by a few amino sugars. Only rep-PCR analysis demonstrated host-specific patterns, indicating that genomic changes due to coevolution with host did not occur by mutation in the 16S rRNA gene or by a gain or loss of carbohydrate utilization genes within these Bacteroides. This is the first report to indicate that host-associated genomic differences are outside of 16S rRNA gene and carbohydrate utilization genes and suggest conservation of specific bacterial species with the same functionality across mammalian hosts for this Bacteroidetes clade. PMID:24532571

  10. Bacteroides isolated from four mammalian hosts lack host-specific 16S rRNA gene phylogeny and carbon and nitrogen utilization patterns.

    PubMed

    Atherly, Todd; Ziemer, Cherie J

    2014-04-01

    One-hundred-and-three isolates of Bacteroides ovatus, B. thetaiotaomicron, and B. xylanisolvens were recovered from cow, goat, human, and pig fecal enrichments with cellulose or xylan/pectin. Isolates were compared using 16S rRNA gene sequencing, repetitive sequence-based polymerase chain reaction (rep-PCR), and phenotypic microarrays. Analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed high sequence identity in these Bacteroides; with distinct phylogenetic groupings by bacterial species but not host origin. Phenotypic microarray analysis demonstrated these Bacteroides shared the ability to utilize many of the same carbon substrates, without differences due to species or host origin, indicative of their broad carbohydrate fermentation abilities. Limited nitrogen substrates were utilized; in addition to ammonia, guanine, and xanthine, purine derivatives were utilized by most isolates followed by a few amino sugars. Only rep-PCR analysis demonstrated host-specific patterns, indicating that genomic changes due to coevolution with host did not occur by mutation in the 16S rRNA gene or by a gain or loss of carbohydrate utilization genes within these Bacteroides. This is the first report to indicate that host-associated genomic differences are outside of 16S rRNA gene and carbohydrate utilization genes and suggest conservation of specific bacterial species with the same functionality across mammalian hosts for this Bacteroidetes clade.

  11. Dual inoculation with an Aarbuscular Mycorrhizal fungus and Rhizobium to facilitate the growth of alfalfa on coal mine substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, F.Y.; Bi, Y.L.; Wong, M.H.

    2009-07-01

    A pot experiment was conducted to investigate the effects of Glomus mosseae and Rhizobium on Medicago sativa grown on three types of coal mine substrates, namely a mixture of coal wastes and sands (CS), coal wastes and fly ash (CF), and fly ash (FA). Inoculation with Rhizobium alone did not result in any growth response but G. mosseae alone displayed a significant effect on plant growth. G. mosseae markedly increased the survival rate of M. sativa in CS substrate. In CF and FA substrates the respective oven dry weights of M. sativa inoculated with G. mosseae were 1.8 and 5.1 times higher than those without inoculation. Based on nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P) and potassium (K) uptake and legume growth, the results also show that dual inoculation in CS and CF substrates elicited a synergistic effect. This indicates that inoculation with arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi may be a promising approach for revegetation of coal mine substrates.

  12. Determination of Hydrogenase in Free-living Cultures of Rhizobium japonicum and Energy Efficiency of Soybean Nodules 1

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Soo T.

    1978-01-01

    A sensitive tritium exchange assay was applied to the Rhizobium system for measuring the expression of uptake hydrogenase in free-living cultures of Rhizobium japonicum. Hydrogenase was detected about 45 hours after inoculation of cultures maintained under microaerophilic conditions (about 0.1% O2). The tritium exchange assay was used to screen a variety of different strains of R. japonicum (including major production strains) with the findings that about 30% of the strains expressed hydrogenase activity with identical results being observed using an alternative assay based on uptake of H2. The relative efficiency of intact soybean nodules inoculated with 10 different rhizobial strains gave results identical to those obtained using free-living cultures. The tritium exchange assay provides an easy, quick, and accurate assessment of H2 uptake efficiency of intact nodules. PMID:16660568

  13. Inoculation of the nonlegume Capsicum annuum L. with Rhizobium strains. 2. Changes in sterols, triterpenes, fatty acids, and volatile compounds.

    PubMed

    Silva, Luís R; Azevedo, Jessica; Pereira, Maria J; Carro, Lorena; Velazquez, Encarna; Peix, Alvaro; Valentão, Patrícia; Andrade, Paula B

    2014-01-22

    Peppers (Capsicum spp.) are consumed worldwide, imparting flavor, aroma, and color to foods, additionally containing high concentrations of biofunctional compounds. This is the first report about the effect of the inoculation of two Rhizobium strains on sterols, triterpenes, fatty acids, and volatile compounds of leaves and fruits of pepper (Capsicum annuum L.) plants. Generally, inoculation with strain TVP08 led to the major changes, being observed a decrease of sterols and triterpenes and an increase of fatty acids, which are related to higher biomass, growth, and ripening of pepper fruits. The increase of volatile compounds may reflect the elicitation of plant defense after inoculation, since the content on methyl salicylate was significantly increased in inoculated material. The findings suggest that inoculation with Rhizobium strains may be employed to manipulate the content of interesting metabolites in pepper leaves and fruits, increasing potential health benefits and defense abilities of inoculated plants.

  14. Mimosine, a Toxin Present in Leguminous Trees (Leucaena spp.), Induces a Mimosine-Degrading Enzyme Activity in Some Rhizobium Strains

    PubMed Central

    Soedarjo, Muchdar; Hemscheidt, Thomas K.; Borthakur, Dulal

    1994-01-01

    Thirty-seven Rhizobium isolates obtained from the nodules of leguminous trees (Leucaena spp.) were selected on the basis of their ability to catabolize mimosine, a toxin found in large quantities in the seeds, foliage, and roots of plants of the genera Leucaena and Mimosa. A new medium containing mimosine as the sole source of carbon and nitrogen was used for selection. The enzymes of the mimosine catabolic pathway were inducible and were present in the soluble fraction of the cell extract of induced cells. On the basis of a comparison of the growth rates of Rhizobium strains on general carbon and nitrogen sources versus mimosine, the toxin appears to be converted mostly to biomass and carbon dioxide. Most isolates able to grow on mimosine as a source of carbon and nitrogen are also able to utilize 3-hydroxy-4-pyridone, a toxic intermediate of mimosine degradation in other organisms. PMID:16349454

  15. In vitro sulfotransferase activity of NodH, a nodulation protein of Rhizobium meliloti required for host-specific nodulation.

    PubMed Central

    Ehrhardt, D W; Atkinson, E M; Faull, K F; Freedberg, D I; Sutherlin, D P; Armstrong, R; Long, S R

    1995-01-01

    Early stages of nodulation involve the exchange of signals between the bacterium and the host plant. Bacterial nodulation (nod) genes are required for Rhizobium spp. to synthesize lipooligosaccharide morphogens, termed Nod factors. The common nod genes encode enzymes that synthesize the factor core structure, which is modified by host-specific gene products. Here we show direct in vitro evidence that Rhizobium meliloti NodH, a host-specific nodulation gene, catalyzes the transfer of sulfate from 3'-phosphoadenosine 5'-phosphosulfate to the terminal 6-O position of Nod factors, and we show substrate requirements for the reaction. Our results indicate that polymerization of the chitooligosaccharide backbone likely precedes sulfation and that sulfation is not absolutely dependent on the presence or the particular structure of the N-acyl modification. NodH sulfation provides a tool for the enzymatic in vitro synthesis of novel Nod factors, or putative Nod factors intermediates, with high specific activity. PMID:7592390

  16. Stimulation of indoleacetic acid production in a Rhizobium isolate of Vigna mungo by root nodule phenolic acids.

    PubMed

    Mandal, Santi M; Mandal, Santi; Mandal, Mahitosh; Das, Amit K; Das, Amit; Pati, Bikas R; Pati, Bikas; Ghosh, Ananta K; Ghosh, Ananta

    2009-04-01

    The influence of endogenous root nodules phenolic acids on indoleacetic acid (IAA) production by its symbiont (Rhizobium) was examined. The root nodules contain higher amount of IAA and phenolic acids than non-nodulated roots. Presence of IAA metabolizing enzymes, IAA oxidase, peroxidase, and polyphenol oxidase indicate the metabolism of IAA in the nodules and roots. Three most abundant endogenous root nodule phenolic acids (protocatechuic acid, 4-hydroxybenzaldehyde and p-coumaric acid) have been identified and their effects on IAA production by the symbiont have been studied in L-tryptophan supplemented yeast extract basal medium. Protocatechuic acid (1.5 microg ml(-1)) showed maximum stimulation (2.15-fold over control) of IAA production in rhizobial culture. These results indicate that the phenolic acids present in the nodule might serve as a stimulator for IAA production by the symbiont (Rhizobium).

  17. Two rhizobacterial strains, individually and in interactions with Rhizobium sp., enhance fusarial wilt control, growth, and yield in pigeon pea.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Swarnalee; Morang, Pranjal; Kumar S, Nishanth; Dileep Kumar, B S

    2014-09-01

    A Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain, RRLJ 04, and a Bacillus cereus strain, BS 03, were tested both individually and in combination with a Rhizobium strain, RH 2, for their ability to enhance plant growth and nodulation in pigeon pea (Cajanus cajan L.) under gnotobiotic, greenhouse and field conditions. Both of the rhizobacterial strains exhibited a positive effect on growth in terms of shoot height, root length, fresh and dry weight, nodulation and yield over the non-treated control. Co-inoculation of seeds with these strains and Rhizobium RH 2 also reduced the number of wilted plants, when grown in soil infested with Fusarium udum. Gnotobiotic studies confirmed that the suppression of wilt disease was due to the presence of the respective PGPR strains. Seed bacterization with drug-marked mutants of RRLJ 04 and BS 03 confirmed their ability to colonize and multiply along the roots. The results suggest that co-inoculation of these strains with Rhizobium strain RH 2 can be further exploited for enhanced growth, nodulation and yield in addition to control of fusarial wilt in pigeon pea. PMID:25224506

  18. A β-mannan utilization locus in Bacteroides ovatus involves a GH36 α-galactosidase active on galactomannans.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Sumitha K; Bågenholm, Viktoria; Pudlo, Nicholas A; Bouraoui, Hanene; Koropatkin, Nicole M; Martens, Eric C; Stålbrand, Henrik

    2016-07-01

    The Bacova_02091 gene in the β-mannan utilization locus of Bacteroides ovatus encodes a family GH36 α-galactosidase (BoGal36A), transcriptionally upregulated during growth on galactomannan. Characterization of recombinant BoGal36A reveals unique properties compared to other GH36 α-galactosidases, which preferentially hydrolyse terminal α-galactose in raffinose family oligosaccharides. BoGal36A prefers hydrolysing internal galactose substitutions from intact and depolymerized galactomannan. BoGal36A efficiently releases (> 90%) galactose from guar and locust bean galactomannans, resulting in precipitation of the polysaccharides. As compared to other GH36 structures, the BoGal36A 3D model displays a loop deletion, resulting in a wider active site cleft which likely can accommodate a galactose-substituted polymannose backbone.

  19. Structure and sequence analyses of Bacteroides proteins BVU_4064 and BF1687 reveal presence of two novel predominantly-beta domains, predicted to be involved in lipid and cell surface interactions

    DOE PAGES

    Natarajan, Padmaja; Punta, Marco; Kumar, Abhinav; Yeh, Andrew P; Godzik, Adam; Aravind, L.

    2015-01-16

    N-terminal domains of BVU_4064 and BF1687 proteins from Bacteroides vulgatus and Bacteroides fragilis respectively are members of the Pfam family PF12985 (DUF3869). Proteins containing a domain from this family can be found in most Bacteroides species and, in large numbers, in all human gut microbiome samples. Both BVU_4064 and BF1687 proteins have a consensus lipobox motif implying they are anchored to the membrane, but their functions are otherwise unknown. The C-terminal half of BVU_4064 is assigned to protein family PF12986 (DUF3870); the equivalent part of BF1687 was unclassified.

  20. Chrysoeriol and Luteolin Released from Alfalfa Seeds Induce nod Genes in Rhizobium meliloti1

    PubMed Central

    Hartwig, Ueli A.; Maxwell, Carl A.; Joseph, Cecillia M.; Phillips, Donald A.

    1990-01-01

    Flavonoid signals from alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) seed and root exudates induce transcription of nodulation (nod) genes in Rhizobium meliloti. The flavone luteolin previously was isolated from alfalfa seeds by other workers and identified as the first nod gene inducer for R. meliloti. Our recent study of `Moapa 69' alfalfa root exudates found no luteolin but did identify three other nod gene inducers: 4,4′-dihydroxy-2′-methoxychalcone, 4′,7-dihydroxyflavone, and 4′,7-dihydroxyflavanone. The goal of the current study was to identify and quantify nod gene-inducing flavonoids that may influence Rhizobium populations around a germinating alfalfa seed. Aqueous rinses of Moapa 69 alfalfa seeds were collected and assayed for induction of a nodABC-lacZ fusion in R. meliloti. During the first 4 hours of imbibition, total nod gene-inducing activity was released from seeds at 100-fold higher rates than from roots of 72-hour-old seedlings. Five flavonoids were purified and identified by spectroscopic analyses (ultraviolet/visible absorbance, proton nuclear magnetic resonance, and mass spectroscopy) and comparison with authentic standards. Two very active nod gene-inducing flavonoids, chrysoeriol (3′-methoxyluteolin) and luteolin, were identified in seed rinses. Luteolin required a higher concentration (18 nanomolar) than chrysoeriol (5 nanomolar) for half-maximum induction of nodABC-lacZ in R. meliloti, and both were less active than 4,4′-dihydroxy-2′-methoxychalcone (2 nanomolar) from root exudates. Seeds exuded three other luteolin derivatives: luteolin-7-O-glucoside, 5-methoxyluteolin, and 3′,5-dimethoxyluteolin. Their combined quantities were 24-fold greater than that of luteolin plus chrysoeriol. Most nod gene-inducing activity of these luteolin derivatives apparently is associated with degradation to luteolin and chrysoeriol. However, their presence in large quantities suggests that they may contribute significantly to nod gene-inducing activity in the

  1. Fungicide Enhancement of Nitrogen Fixation and Colonization of Phaseolus vulgaris by Rhizobium phaseoli.

    PubMed

    Lennox, L B; Alexander, M

    1981-02-01

    The number and weight of pods and the weight and nitrogen content of the tops of beans (Phaseolus vulgaris) derived from seeds inoculated with a thiram-resistant strain of Rhizobium phaseoli were increased if the seeds were treated with thiram before sowing in soil. A greater percentage of the nodules on 21-day-old plants were derived from the resistant strain, more nodules were formed, and these nodules were more effective in the presence of the fungicide than in its absence. These differences in nodule numbers were no longer present in 56-day-old plants, and only a small percentage of the nodules contained the resistant strain. The abundance of the fungicide-tolerant R. phaseoli increased rapidly soon after planting the seed and subsequently fell markedly, but the rate of decline was less if the seeds had been treated with the chemical. Protozoa also proliferated if thiram had not been applied to the seed, but their numbers were deleteriously influenced by thiram. Bdellovibrio, bacteriophages, and lytic micro-organisms acting on R. phaseoli were rare under these conditions. Ciliates and flagellated protozoa were initially suppressed by planting thiram-coated bean seeds in nonsterile soil, but the former were inhibited longer than the latter and the ciliate numbers never fully recovered if the seeds were treated with the fungicide. The resistant strain grew well in sterile soil also inoculated with a protozoa-free mixture of soil microorganisms whether thiram was added or not, but after an initial rise in numbers, its abundance fell if the mixture contained protozoa; the rate of this fall was delayed by the fungicide. The numbers of R. phaseoli were consistently less in sterile soil inoculated with the rhizobium plus a mixture of soil microorganisms containing ciliates and other protozoa than if the inoculum contained other protozoa but no ciliates. These results suggest that a suppression of protozoa, and possibly especially the ciliates, accounts for the

  2. Fungicide Enhancement of Nitrogen Fixation and Colonization of Phaseolus vulgaris by Rhizobium phaseoli

    PubMed Central

    Lennox, Linda B.; Alexander, Martin

    1981-01-01

    The number and weight of pods and the weight and nitrogen content of the tops of beans (Phaseolus vulgaris) derived from seeds inoculated with a thiram-resistant strain of Rhizobium phaseoli were increased if the seeds were treated with thiram before sowing in soil. A greater percentage of the nodules on 21-day-old plants were derived from the resistant strain, more nodules were formed, and these nodules were more effective in the presence of the fungicide than in its absence. These differences in nodule numbers were no longer present in 56-day-old plants, and only a small percentage of the nodules contained the resistant strain. The abundance of the fungicide-tolerant R. phaseoli increased rapidly soon after planting the seed and subsequently fell markedly, but the rate of decline was less if the seeds had been treated with the chemical. Protozoa also proliferated if thiram had not been applied to the seed, but their numbers were deleteriously influenced by thiram. Bdellovibrio, bacteriophages, and lytic micro-organisms acting on R. phaseoli were rare under these conditions. Ciliates and flagellated protozoa were initially suppressed by planting thiram-coated bean seeds in nonsterile soil, but the former were inhibited longer than the latter and the ciliate numbers never fully recovered if the seeds were treated with the fungicide. The resistant strain grew well in sterile soil also inoculated with a protozoa-free mixture of soil microorganisms whether thiram was added or not, but after an initial rise in numbers, its abundance fell if the mixture contained protozoa; the rate of this fall was delayed by the fungicide. The numbers of R. phaseoli were consistently less in sterile soil inoculated with the rhizobium plus a mixture of soil microorganisms containing ciliates and other protozoa than if the inoculum contained other protozoa but no ciliates. These results suggest that a suppression of protozoa, and possibly especially the ciliates, accounts for the

  3. Chemotaxis of Rhizobium meliloti towards Nodulation Gene-Inducing Compounds from Alfalfa Roots

    PubMed Central

    Dharmatilake, Amitha J.; Bauer, Wolfgang D.

    1992-01-01

    Luteolin, a flavone present in seed exudates of alfalfa, induces nodulation genes (nod) in Rhizobium meliloti and also serves as a biochemically specific chemoattractant for the bacterium. The present work shows that R. meliloti RCR2011 is capable of very similar chemotactic responses towards 4′,7-dihydroxyflavone, 4′,7-Dihydroxyflavanone, and 4,4′-dihydroxy-2-methoxychalcone, the three principal nod gene inducers secreted by alfalfa roots. Chemotactic responses to the root-secreted nod inducers in capillary assays were usually two- to four-fold above background and, for the flavone and flavonone, occurred at concentrations lower than those required for half-maximal induction of the nodABC genes. Complementation experiments indicated that the lack of chemotactic responsiveness to luteolin seen in nodD1 and nodA mutants of R. meliloti was not due to mutations in the nod genes, as previously thought. Thus, while nod gene induction and flavonoid chemotaxis have the same biochemical specificity, these two functions appear to have independent receptors or transduction pathways. The wild-type strain was found to suffer selective, spontaneous loss of chemotaxis towards flavonoids during laboratory subculture. PMID:16348685

  4. Transformation of pWWO in Rhizobium leguminosarum DPT to Engineer Toluene Degrading Ability for Rhizoremediation.

    PubMed

    Goel, Garima; Pandey, Piyush; Sood, Anchal; Bisht, Sandeep; Maheshwari, D K; Sharma, G D

    2012-06-01

    Rhizoremediation of organic xenobiotics is based on interactions between plants and their associated micro-organisms. The present work was designed to engineer a bacterial system having toluene degradation ability along with plant growth promoting characteristics for effective rhizoremediation. pWWO harboring the genes responsible for toluene breakdown was isolated from Pseudomonas putida MTCC 979 and successfully transformed in Rhizobium DPT. This resulted in a bacterial strain (DPT(T)) which had the ability to degrade toluene as well as enhance growth of host plant. The frequency of transformation was recorded 5.7 × 10(-6). DPT produced IAA, siderophore, chitinase, HCN, ACC deaminase, solubilized inorganic phosphate, fixed atmospheric nitrogen and inhibited the growth of Fusarium oxysporum and Macrophomina phaseolina in vitro. During pot assay, 50 ppm toluene in soil was found to inhibit the germination of Cajanus cajan seeds. However when the seeds bacterized with toluene degrading P. putida or R. leguminosarum DPT were sown in pots, again no germination was observed. Non-bacterized as well as bacterized seeds germinated successfully in toluene free soil as control. The results forced for an alternative mode of application of bacteria for rhizoremediation purpose. Hence bacterial suspension was mixed with soil having 50 ppm of toluene. Germination index in DPT treated soil was 100% while in P. putida it was 50%. Untreated soil with toluene restricted the seeds to germinate. PMID:23729882

  5. Osmotic control of glycine betaine biosynthesis and degradation in Rhizobium meliloti.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, L T; Pocard, J A; Bernard, T; Le Rudulier, D

    1988-01-01

    Intracellular accumulation of glycine betaine has been shown to confer an enhanced level of osmotic stress tolerance in Rhizobium meliloti. In this study, we used a physiological approach to investigate the mechanism by which glycine betaine is accumulated in osmotically stressed R. meliloti. Results from growth experiments, 14C labeling of intermediates, and enzyme activity assays are presented. The results provide evidence for the pathway of biosynthesis and degradation of glycine betaine and the osmotic effects on this pathway. High osmolarity in the medium decreased the activities of the enzymes involved in the degradation of glycine betaine but not those of enzymes that lead to its biosynthesis from choline. Thus, the concentration of the osmoprotectant glycine betaine is increased in stressed cells. This report demonstrates the ability of the osmolarity of the growth medium to regulate the use of glycine betaine as a carbon and nitrogen source or as an osmoprotectant. The mechanisms of osmoregulation in R. meliloti and Escherichia coli are compared. PMID:3290197

  6. Role of motility and chemotaxis in efficiency of nodulation by Rhizobium meliloti. [Medicago sation

    SciTech Connect

    Caetano-Anolles, G.; Wall, L.G.; De Micheli, A.T.; Macchi, E.M.; Bauer, W.D.; Favelukes, G. )

    1988-04-01

    Spontaneous mutants of Rhizobium meliloti L5-30 defective in motility or chemotaxis were isolated and compared against the parent with respect to symbiotic competence. Each of the mutants were able to generate normal nodules on the host plant alfalfa (Medicago sativa), but had slightly delayed nodule formation, diminished nodulation int he initially susceptible region of the host root, and relatively low representation in nodules following co-inoculation with equal numbers of the parent. When inoculated in growth pouches with increasing dosages of the parental strain, the number of nodules formed in the initially susceptible region of the root increased sigmoidally, with an optimum concentration of about 10{sup 5} to 10{sup 6} bacteria/plant. The dose-response behavior of the nonmotile and nonchemotactic mutants was similar, but they required 10- to 30-fold higher concentrations of bacteria to generate the same number of nodules. The distribution frequencies of nodules at different positions along the primary root were very similar for the mutants and parent, indicating that reduced nodulation by the mutants in dose-response experiments probably reflects reduced efficiency of nodule initiation rather than developmentally delayed nodule initiation. The number of bacteria that firmly adsorbed to the host root surface during several hours of incubation was 5- to 20-fold greater for the parent than the mutants.

  7. Biochemical characterization of L-carnitine dehydrogenases from Rhizobium sp. and Xanthomonas translucens.

    PubMed

    Arima, Jiro; Uesumi, Akifumi; Mitsuzumi, Hitoshi; Mori, Nobuhiro

    2010-01-01

    Recently, we obtained two L-carnitine dehydrogenases (CDHs) from soil isolates, Rhizobium sp. (Rs-CDH) and Xanthomonas translucens (Xt-CDH). The respective molecular masses of Rs-CDH and Xt-CDH were approximately 50 kDa and 37 kDa. In this study, the genes encoding both enzymes were cloned. Their primary structures exhibited high identities with those of 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenases. In addition, Rs-CDH had a 180-residue long extra sequence in its C-terminal region. Except for the initial 20 residues, the extra sequence exhibited similarity to thioesterase. The activity of Rs-CDH was affected only slightly by deletion of thioesterase domain, but it was eliminated by the deletion of the whole C-terminal extra sequence. A further deletion experiment indicated that the region of Ala330-Pro335 of Rs-CDH has important functions in catalytic activity. Moreover, based on the deletion experiment on Xt-CDH, the five-residue tail is considered to have a function similar to Ala330-Pro335 of Rs-CDH. PMID:20530902

  8. Molecular phylogenetic analysis of Rhizobium sullae isolated from Algerian Hedysarum flexuosum.

    PubMed

    Aliliche, Khadidja; Beghalem, Hamida; Landoulsi, Ahmed; Chriki, Ali

    2016-07-01

    Isolates from root nodules of Hedysarum flexuosum, sampled from north region of Algeria, were analyzed on the basis of their phenotypic and molecular characteristics. They were tested for their tolerance to NaCl, pH, temperatures, antibiotics and heavy metals resistance. Interestingly, the isolate Hf_04N appeared resistant to ZnCl2 (50 μg/mL) and grew at high saline concentration up to 9 %. The phylogenetic positions of five isolates were studied by comparative sequence analysis of 16S rRNA, recA, nifH and nodD genes. There were grouped close to the Rhizobium sullae type strain in relation to their 16S rRNA, recA and nifH genes-based phylogenies. By contrast, the tree of nodD gene was not congruent with ribosomal, housekeeping and nitrogen fixation genes. We suggest that our strains have a novel nodD gene. The detection of conserved domains of NodD protein and nitrogenase reductase enzyme, confirm their ability to nodulate and fix nitrogen.

  9. Molecular phylogenetic analysis of Rhizobium sullae isolated from Algerian Hedysarum flexuosum.

    PubMed

    Aliliche, Khadidja; Beghalem, Hamida; Landoulsi, Ahmed; Chriki, Ali

    2016-07-01

    Isolates from root nodules of Hedysarum flexuosum, sampled from north region of Algeria, were analyzed on the basis of their phenotypic and molecular characteristics. They were tested for their tolerance to NaCl, pH, temperatures, antibiotics and heavy metals resistance. Interestingly, the isolate Hf_04N appeared resistant to ZnCl2 (50 μg/mL) and grew at high saline concentration up to 9 %. The phylogenetic positions of five isolates were studied by comparative sequence analysis of 16S rRNA, recA, nifH and nodD genes. There were grouped close to the Rhizobium sullae type strain in relation to their 16S rRNA, recA and nifH genes-based phylogenies. By contrast, the tree of nodD gene was not congruent with ribosomal, housekeeping and nitrogen fixation genes. We suggest that our strains have a novel nodD gene. The detection of conserved domains of NodD protein and nitrogenase reductase enzyme, confirm their ability to nodulate and fix nitrogen. PMID:27034287

  10. Nitrogenase activity in Trifolium subterraneum L. in relation to the uptake of nitrate ions. [Rhizobium trifolii

    SciTech Connect

    Silsbury, J.H.

    1987-07-01

    An experiment was conducted to test the hypothesis that, when nitrogenase and nitrate reductase both contribute to the nitrogen nutrition of a nodulated legume, nitrogenase activity is inversely proportional to the rate of accumulation of organic nitrogen derived from the reduction of nitrate. Trifolium subterraneum L. plants, inoculated with Rhizobium trifolii and sown as small swards, were allowed to establish a closed canopy and steady rates of growth, dinitrogen fixation, and nitrogen accumulation. Swards were then supplied with nutrient solutions of 0, 0.5, 1.0, or 2.5 mM NO/sub 3//sup -/ with a 29.69% enrichment of /sup 15/N and allowed to grow for a further 33 days. Harvests were made to measure dry weight, nitrogen accumulation, /sup 15/N accumulation, NO/sub 3//sup -/ content and nitrogenase activity by acetylene reduction assay. Since the /sup 15/N of the plant organic matter could have been derived only from the NO/sub 3//sup -/ of the nutrient solution, its rate of accumulation provided a measure of the rate of NO/sub 3//sup -/ reduction. It was found that as this rate increased in response to external NO/sub 3//sup -/ concentration the rate of nitrogenase activity decreased proportionately. It is concluded that the reduction of nitrate and the reduction of dinitrogen act in a complementary manner to supply a plant with organic nitrogen for growth.

  11. Osmotic control of glycine betaine biosynthesis and degradation in Rhizobium meliloti

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, L.T.; Pocard, J.A.; Bernard, T.; Le Rudulier, D.

    1988-07-01

    Intracellular accumulation of glycine betaine has been shown to confer an enhanced level of osmotic stress tolerance in Rhizobium meliloti. In this study, the authors used a physiological approach to investigate the mechanism by which glycine betaine is accumulated in osmotically stressed R. meliloti. Results from growth experiments, /sup 14/C labeling of intermediates, and enzyme activity assays are presented. The results provide evidence for the pathway of biosynthesis and degradation of glycine betaine and the osmotic effects on this pathway. High osmolarity in the medium decreased the activities of the enzymes involved in the degradation of glycine betaine but not those of enzymes that lead to its biosynthesis from choline. Thus, the concentration of the osmoprotectant glycine betaine is increased in stressed cells. This report demonstrates the ability of the osmolarity of the growth medium to regulate the use of glycine betaine as a carbon and nitrogen source or as an osmoprotectant. The mechanisms of osmoregulation in R. meliloti and Escherichia coli are compared.

  12. Symbiont abundance is more important than pre-infection partner choice in a Rhizobium - legume mutualism.

    PubMed

    Van Cauwenberghe, Jannick; Lemaire, Benny; Stefan, Andrei; Efrose, Rodica; Michiels, Jan; Honnay, Olivier

    2016-07-01

    It is known that the genetic diversity of conspecific rhizobia present in root nodules differs greatly among populations of a legume species, which has led to the suggestion that both dispersal limitation and the local environment affect rhizobial genotypic composition. However, it remains unclear whether rhizobial genotypes residing in root nodules are representative of the entire population of compatible symbiotic rhizobia. Since symbiotic preferences differ among legume populations, the genetic composition of rhizobia found within nodules may reflect the preferences of the local hosts, rather than the full diversity of potential nodulating rhizobia present in the soil. Here, we assessed whether Vicia cracca legume hosts of different provenances select different Rhizobium leguminosarum genotypes than sympatric V. cracca hosts, when presented a natural soil rhizobial population. Through combining V. cracca plants and rhizobia from adjacent and more distant populations, we found that V. cracca hosts are relatively randomly associated with rhizobial genotypes. This indicates that pre-infection partner choice is relatively weak in certain legume hosts when faced with a natural population of rhizobia. PMID:27269381

  13. Selecting Rhizobium meliloti for inoculation of alfalfa planted in acid soils

    SciTech Connect

    Lowendorf, H.S.; Alexander, M.

    1983-01-01

    The study was conducted to obtain Rhizobium meliloti strains suitable for use with alfalfa grown in acid soils. Thirteen strains of R. meliloti were examined for their ability to grow in acidified culture media and seven of these were characterized for the ability to surive in acid and limed nonsterile soils or grow in the presence of the host legume, Medicago sativa L. The pH values of the most acid, defined medium that permitted growth of the bacteria from a small inoculum ranged from pH 5.3 to 6.0. For R. meliloti 411SE1 and GH1-1SE1, the minimum pH that allowed for growth, the critical pH, was not a dependable indicator of survival in a more acid medium. Strains of R. meliloti with relatively low critical pH values survived better in a limed soil but not in acid soils than strains with higher critical pH values. Three strains of R. meliloti previously identified as good inoculants for alfalfa in acid soils did not consistently survive beter than other strains in a planted or unplanted acid soil of pH 5.3. However, the plants increase the population densities of these three strains more than other strains. These results suggest that R. meliloti strains suitable for inoculation of alfalfa in acid soils may be selected not by simple saprophytic properties but by their stimulation by the host legume in acid soils.

  14. Role of dark carbon dioxide fixation in root nodules of soybean. [Rhizobium japonicum

    SciTech Connect

    King, B.J.; Layzell, D.B.; Canvin, D.T.

    1986-05-01

    The magnitude and role of dark Co/sub 2/ fixation were examined in nodules of intact soybean plants (Harosoy 63 x Rhizobium japonicum strain USDA 16). The estimated rate of nodule dark CO/sub 2/ fixation, based on a 2 minute pulse-feed with /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ under saturating conditions, was 102 micromoles per gram dry weight per hour. This was equivalent to 14% of net nodule respiration. Only 18% of this CO/sub 2/ fixation was estimated to be required for organic and amino acid synthesis for growth and export processes. The major portion (75-92%) of fixed label was released as CO/sub 2/ within 60 minutes. The labeling pattern during pulse-chase experiments was consistent with CO/sub 2/ fixation by phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase. During the chase, the greatest loss of label occurred in organic acids. Exposure of nodulated roots to Ar:O/sub 2/(80:20) did not affect dark CO/sub 2/ fixation, while exposure to O/sub 2/:CO/sub 2/(95:5) resulted in 54% inhibition. From these results, it was concluded that at least 66% of dark CO/sub 2/ fixation in soybean may be involved with the production of organic acids, which when oxidized would be capable of providing at least 48% of the requirement for ATP equivalents to support nitrogenase activity.

  15. A second exopolysaccharide of Rhizobium meliloti strain SU47 that can function in root nodule invasion

    SciTech Connect

    Zhan, Hangjun; Levery, S.B.; Lee, C.C.; Leigh, J.A. )

    1989-05-01

    Rhizobium meliloti strain SU47 produces the calcofluor-binding exopolysaccharide, succinoglycan, that is required for alfalfa root nodule invasion. Strains derived from R. meliloti SU47 secreted an acidic exopolysaccharide, EPSb, that replaced succinoglycan in nodule invasion. EPSb, which has not formerly been identified among the Rhizobiaceae, consisted of the repeating unit 4,6-O-(1-carboxyethylidene)-{alpha}-D-Galp1{yields}3(X-O-Ac)-{beta}-D-Glcp1{yields}3. EPSb synthesis occurred either in strains containing a mutation in a locus designated mucR or in strains with a recombinant cosmid pMuc. mucR mapped slightly counterclockwise from pyr49 on the chromosome, while pMuc contained genes mapping to the megaplasmid pRmeSU47b. In exoA, -F, and -H mutants, which are deficient in normal succinoglycan secretion and nodule invasion, a transposon Tn5 insertion in mucR or the presence of pMuc resulted in EPSb secretion and a restoration of nodule invasion on Medicago sativa and Melilotus alba. Mutants in exoB and exoC were incapable of succinoglycan and EPSb secretion as well as nodule invasion. A mutant that secreted succinoglycan but was incapable of EPSb secretion invaded nodules normally.

  16. Narrow-host-range bacteriophages that infect Rhizobium etli associate with distinct genomic types.

    PubMed

    Santamaría, Rosa Isela; Bustos, Patricia; Sepúlveda-Robles, Omar; Lozano, Luis; Rodríguez, César; Fernández, José Luis; Juárez, Soledad; Kameyama, Luis; Guarneros, Gabriel; Dávila, Guillermo; González, Víctor

    2014-01-01

    In this work, we isolated and characterized 14 bacteriophages that infect Rhizobium etli. They were obtained from rhizosphere soil of bean plants from agricultural lands in Mexico using an enrichment method. The host range of these phages was narrow but variable within a collection of 48 R. etli strains. We obtained the complete genome sequence of nine phages. Four phages were resistant to several restriction enzymes and in vivo cloning, probably due to nucleotide modifications. The genome size of the sequenced phages varied from 43 kb to 115 kb, with a median size of ≈ 45 to 50 kb. A large proportion of open reading frames of these phage genomes (65 to 70%) consisted of hypothetical and orphan genes. The remainder encoded proteins needed for phage morphogenesis and DNA synthesis and processing, among other functions, and a minor percentage represented genes of bacterial origin. We classified these phages into four genomic types on the basis of their genomic similarity, gene content, and host range. Since there are no reports of similar sequences, we propose that these bacteriophages correspond to novel species.

  17. Regulatory functions of the three nodD genes of Rhizobium leguminosarum biovar phaseoli.

    PubMed

    Davis, E O; Johnston, A W

    1990-06-01

    The three nodD genes of a strain of Rhizobium leguminosarum biovar phaseoli were cloned to study their effects on transcription of themselves and of the nodC genes of biovars phaseoli and viciae. Efficient transcription of nodD1 required nodD1 and was enhanced by exposure of the cells to bean exudate consistent with the presence of a nod-box preceding the noIE-nodD1 operon. Transcription of nodD2 and nodD3 was constitutive. nodC of R. leguminosarum biovar phaseoli was activated by each of the nodD genes of that biovar in the absence of inducers but expression was enhanced in cells grown with bean exudate or the flavonoids genistein or naringenin. A mutant of nodD2, lacking 60 bp at its 3' end, activated nodC in the presence of inducer, but was defective in regulating certain of the nodD genes. The nodC gene of R. leguminosarum biovar viciae responded differently to the various nodD genes of R. leguminosarum biovar phaseoli than did the nodC of the latter biovar. PMID:2120543

  18. The relaxase of the Rhizobium etli symbiotic plasmid shows nic site cis-acting preference.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Mendoza, Daniel; Lucas, María; Muñoz, Socorro; Herrera-Cervera, José A; Olivares, José; de la Cruz, Fernando; Sanjuán, Juan

    2006-11-01

    Genetic and biochemical characterization of TraA, the relaxase of symbiotic plasmid pRetCFN42d from Rhizobium etli, is described. After purifying the relaxase domain (N265TraA), we demonstrated nic binding and cleavage activity in vitro and thus characterized for the first time the nick site (nic) of a plasmid in the family Rhizobiaceae. We studied the range of N265TraA relaxase specificity in vitro by testing different oligonucleotides in binding and nicking assays. In addition, the ability of pRetCFN42d to mobilize different Rhizobiaceae plasmid origins of transfer (oriT) was examined. Data obtained with these approaches allowed us to establish functional and phylogenetic relationships between different plasmids of this family. Our results suggest novel characteristics of the R. etli pSym relaxase for previously described conjugative systems, with emphasis on the oriT cis-acting preference of this enzyme and its possible biological relevance.

  19. The Rhizobium etli opt operon is required for symbiosis and stress resistance.

    PubMed

    Vos, K; Braeken, K; Fauvart, M; Ndayizeye, M; Verhaert, J; Zachurzok, S; Lambrichts, I; Michiels, J

    2007-07-01

    Rhizobium etli is a Gram-negative root-colonizing soil bacterium capable of fixing nitrogen while living in symbiosis with its leguminous host Phaseolus vulgaris. A genome-wide screening for R. etli symbiotic mutants revealed a R. etli operon encoding an oligopeptide ABC-transporter (Opt), two redA homologous genes and one redB gene. Expression analysis showed this opt operon to be transcribed both under free-living and symbiotic conditions and expression levels were demonstrated to be growth-phase-dependent. Plants nodulated by R. etli opt mutants showed a reduced symbiotic nitrogen fixation activity (approximately 50% reduction). Growth experiments with opt mutants in the presence of oligopeptides as the sole nitrogen source confirmed the involvement of the opt genes in oligopeptide uptake. Further phenotypic analysis of the opt mutants revealed them to display an enhanced resistance to the oligopeptide antibiotic bacitracin, an increased susceptibility to the beta-lactam antibiotic ampicillin and a decreased osmotolerance. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that the opt operon plays a crucial role during symbiosis and stress resistance. PMID:17564602

  20. Rhizobium Radiobacter Infection in a 27-Year-Old African American Woman With Munchausen Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sawhney, Sameer; Naab, Tammey; Oneal, Partricia

    2016-08-01

    Rhizobium radiobacter is an opportunistic, usually saprophytic, gram-negative bacillus found in agricultural soil. Isolation from blood has been reported most often in hospitalized patients harboring malignant neoplasms or human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) associated immunosuppression, who have catheter or medical device-related febrile neutropenia; treatment involves removal of the catheter or implanted medical device.(1)Herein, we report a case of a 27-year-old African American woman with sickle cell anemia who sought treatment of generalized body pain, shaking, chills, dyspnea, and fever, suggestive of sickle cell crisis. As part of her work up, routine blood cultures were drawn, revealing the presence of a Gram negative bacillus that was identified as the nonfermenter bacillus R. radiobacter The patient displayed a unique infection with R. radiobacter sepsis in a patient secondary to self-injection of organic material into a peripheral line during hospitalization. The growth of an unusual organism in the blood of a patient, without the usual risk factors of R. radiobacter, raised suspicion of a factitious psychiatric disorder known as Munchausen syndrome, which was confirmed when we discovered self-injection of feces and dirt into a central intravenous (IV) line. PMID:27107290