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Sample records for rhizobium bacteroid development

  1. [Utilization of nitrate by bacteroids and cytosol of nodules formed by Rhizobium leguminosarum].

    PubMed

    Fernández-López, M; Delgado, M J; Olivares, J; Bedmar, E J

    1989-06-01

    Nitrite production by nodules and roots of pea plants (Pisum sativum L., cultivar Alaska) inoculated with Rhizobium leguminosarum strain 3855 has been studied. Nitrate reductase (NR) activity and nitrite reductase (NiR) activity of the bacteroidal and cytosolic fractions of the nodules were also determined, as well as the nitrite content of the nodules cytosol. Nitrite production by nodules and roots from plants treated with 5 mM KNO3 was higher than that of nodules and roots from plants not treated with nitrate, and regardless of the nitrate treatment, nitrite production increased with the incubation period. The presence of nitrate, propanol or both compounds in the incubation mixtures significantly increased the nitrite production by nodules and roots. Nitrite reductase activity was detected in fresh by isolated bacteroids of R. leguminosarum strain 3855, although the presence of nitrate reductase activity could not be detected both in bacteroids of nodules isolated from plants treated or not with 5 mM KNO3. After isolation, when bacteroids were incubated in a mixture with nitrate, nitrate reductase activity developed after incubation for 12 h. Consequently, there was an increase in nitrite reductase activity, which resulted in the disappearance of the nitrite previously accumulated in the incubation medium. Nitrate utilization by bacteroids was not detected until 5 h from the beginning of the incubation period. Since the presence of chloramphenicol or rifampicin in the incubation medium prevented the development of the nitrate reductase activity, such activity was induced in bacteroids. Nitrite content and nitrate reductase and nitrite reductase activities of the cytosol from nodules of pea plants treated or not with 5 mM KNO3 varied with the buffer used for nodules homogenization. However, no nitrite was found when nodules were homogenized with ethanol, what indicates that nitrite accumulation in the cytosol occurs during the homogenization process of the

  2. [Effect of indolylacetic acid on formation of bacteroid forms of Rhizobium leguminosarum].

    PubMed

    Lobanok, E V; Bakanchikova, T I

    1979-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to study the effect of indolylacetic acid (IAA) on the strains of Rhizobium leguminosarum, effective and noneffective with respect to symbiotic nitrogen fixation (L4 and 245a, and 14--73, respectively). IAA at a concentration of 50 mcg/ml and higher inhibited the growth of the bacterium, temporarily delayed celular division, and induced intensive formation of elongated bacteroid-like cells, predominantly Y-shaped or having a clavate shape. Many bacteroid-like cells were capable of division after a certain delay.

  3. Respiratory control determines respiration and nitrogenase activity of Rhizobium leguminosarum bacteroids.

    PubMed

    Haaker, H; Szafran, M; Wassink, H; Klerk, H; Appels, M

    1996-08-01

    The relationship between the O2 input rate into a suspension of Rhizobium leguminosarum bacteroids, the cellular ATP and ADP pools, and the whole-cell nitrogenase activity during L-malate oxidation has been studied. It was observed that inhibition of nitrogenase by excess O2 coincided with an increase of the cellular ATP/ADP ratio. When under this condition the protonophore carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone (CCCP) was added, the cellular ATP/ADP ratio was lowered while nitrogenase regained activity. To explain these observations, the effects of nitrogenase activity and CCCP on the O2 consumption rate of R. leguminosarum bacteroids were determined. From 100 to 5 microM O2, a decline in the O2 consumption rate was observed to 50 to 70% of the maximal O2 consumption rate. A determination of the redox state of the cytochromes during an O2 consumption experiment indicated that at O2 concentrations above 5 microM, electron transport to the cytochromes was rate-limiting oxidation and not the reaction of reduced cytochromes with oxygen. The kinetic properties of the respiratory chain were determined from the deoxygenation of oxyglobins. In intact cells the maximal deoxygenation activity was stimulated by nitrogenase activity or CCCP. In isolated cytoplasmic membranes NADH oxidation was inhibited by respiratory control. The dehydrogenase activities of the respiratory chain were rate-limiting oxidation at O2 concentrations (if >300 nM. Below 300 nM the terminal oxidase system followed Michaelis-Menten kinetics (Km of 45 +/- 8 nM). We conclude that (i) respiration in R. leguminosarum bacteroids takes place via a respiratory chain terminating at a high-affinity oxidase system, (ii) the activity of the respiratory chain is inhibited by the proton motive force, and (iii) ATP hydrolysis by nitrogenase can partly relieve the inhibition of respiration by the proton motive force and thus stimulate respiration at nanomolar concentrations of O2.

  4. Rhizobium nodM and nodN genes are common nod genes: nodM encodes functions for efficiency of nod signal production and bacteroid maturation.

    PubMed Central

    Baev, N; Schultze, M; Barlier, I; Ha, D C; Virelizier, H; Kondorosi, E; Kondorosi, A

    1992-01-01

    Earlier, we showed that Rhizobium meliloti nodM codes for glucosamine synthase and that nodM and nodN mutants produce strongly reduced root hair deformation activity and display delayed nodulation of Medicago sativa (Baev et al., Mol. Gen. Genet. 228:113-124, 1991). Here, we demonstrate that nodM and nodN genes from Rhizobium leguminosarum biovar viciae restore the root hair deformation activity of exudates of the corresponding R. meliloti mutant strains. Partial restoration of the nodulation phenotypes of these two strains was also observed. In nodulation assays, galactosamine and N-acetylglucosamine could substitute for glucosamine in the suppression of the R. meliloti nodM mutation, although N-acetylglucosamine was less efficient. We observed that in nodules induced by nodM mutants, the bacteroids did not show complete development or were deteriorated, resulting in decreased nitrogen fixation and, consequently, lower dry weights of the plants. This mutant phenotype could also be suppressed by exogenously supplied glucosamine, N-acetylglucosamine, and galactosamine and to a lesser extent by glucosamine-6-phosphate, indicating that the nodM mutant bacteroids are limited for glucosamine. In addition, by using derivatives of the wild type and a nodM mutant in which the nod genes are expressed at a high constitutive level, it was shown that the nodM mutant produces significantly fewer Nod factors than the wild-type strain but that their chemical structures are unchanged. However, the relative amounts of analogs of the cognate Nod signals were elevated, and this may explain the observed host range effects of the nodM mutation. Our data indicate that both the nodM and nodN genes of the two species have common functions and confirm that NodM is a glucosamine synthase with the biochemical role of providing sufficient amounts of the sugar moiety for the synthesis of the glucosamine oligosaccharide signal molecules. Images PMID:1447128

  5. Fluorescence studies with malate dehydrogenase from rhizobium japonicum 3I1B-143 bacteroids: a two-tryptophan containing protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghiron, Camillo A.; Eftink, Maurice R.; Waters, James K.; Emerich, David W.

    1990-05-01

    A number of fluorescence studies, both of trp residues and bound NADH, have been reported for porcine MDH. The large number of trp residues (6) complicates the interpretation of some studies. To circumvent this we have performed studies with a two tryptophan (per subunit) MDH from Rhizobium japonicum 311B-143 bacteroids. We have performed phase/modulation fluorescence lifetime measurements, as a function of temperature and added quencher KI, in order to resolved the 1.3 ns (blue) and 6.6 ns (red) contributions from the two classes of trp residues. Anisotropy decay studies have also been performed. The binding of NADH dynamically quenches the fluorescence of both tip residues, but, unlike mammalian cytoplasmic and mitochondrial MDH, there is not a large enhancement in fluorescence of bound NADH upon forming a ternary complex with either tartronic acid or D-malonate.

  6. BacS: an abundant bacteroid protein in Rhizobium etli whose expression ex planta requires nifA.

    PubMed

    Jahn, Olivia J; Davila, Guillermo; Romero, David; Noel, K Dale

    2003-01-01

    Rhizobium etli CFN42 bacteroids from bean nodules possessed an abundant 16-kDa protein (BacS) that was found in the membrane pellet after cell disruption. This protein was not detected in bacteria cultured in tryptone-yeast extract. In minimal media, it was produced at low oxygen concentration but not in a mutant whose nifA was disrupted. N-terminal sequencing of the protein led to isolation of a bacS DNA fragment. DNA hybridization and nucleotide sequencing revealed three copies of the bacS gene, all residing on the main symbiotic plasmid of strain CFN42. A stretch of 304 nucleotides, exactly conserved upstream of all three bacS open reading frames, had very close matches with the NifA and sigma 54 consensus binding sequences. The only bacS homology in the genetic sequence databases was to three hypothetical proteins of unknown function, all from rhizobial species. Mutation and genetic complementation indicated that each of the bacS genes gives rise to a BacS polypeptide. Mutants disrupted or deleted in all three genes did not produce the BacS polypeptide but were Nod+ and Fix+ on Phaseolus vulgaris.

  7. Analysis of Poly-β-Hydroxybutyrate in Rhizobium japonicum Bacteroids by Ion-Exclusion High-Pressure Liquid Chromatography and UV Detection †

    PubMed Central

    Karr, Dale B.; Waters, James K.; Emerich, David W.

    1983-01-01

    Ion-exclusion high-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) was used to measure poly-β-hydroxybutyrate (PHB) in Rhizobium japonicum bacteroids. The products in the acid digest of PHB-containing material were fractionated by HPLC on Aminex HPX-87H ion-exclusion resin for organic acid analysis. Crotonic acid formed from PHB during acid digestion was detected by its intense absorbance at 210 nm. The Aminex-HPLC method provides a rapid and simple chromatographic technique for routine analysis of organic acids. Results of PHB analysis by Aminex-HPLC were confirmed by gas chromatography and spectrophotometric analysis. PMID:16346443

  8. Properties of NAD(+)- and NADP(+)-dependent malic enzymes of Rhizobium (Sinorhizobium) meliloti and differential expression of their genes in nitrogen-fixing bacteroids.

    PubMed

    Driscoll, B T; Finan, T M

    1997-02-01

    The wild-type NAD(+)-dependent malic enzyme (dme) gene of Rhizobium (now Sinorhizobium) meliloti was cloned and localized to a 3.1 kb region isolated on the cosmid pTH69. This cosmid complemented the symbiotic nitrogen fixation (Fix-) phenotype of R. meliloti dme mutants. The dme gene was mapped by conjugation to between the cys-11 and leu-53 markers on the R. meliloti chromosome. beta-Galactosidase activities measured in bacterial strains carrying either dme-lacZ or tme-lacZ gene fusions (the tme gene encodes NADP(+)-dependent malic enzyme) indicated that the dme gene was expressed constitutively in free-living cells and in N2-fixing bacteroids whereas expression of the tme gene was repressed in bacteroids. The R. meliloti dme gene product (DME) was overexpressed in and partially purified from Escherichia coli. The properties of this enzyme, together with those of the NADP(+)-dependent malic enzyme (TME) partially purified from R. meliloti dme mutants, were determined. Acetyl-CoA inhibited DME but not TME activity. This result supports the hypothesis that DME, together with pyruvate dehydrogenase, forms a pathway in which malate is converted to acetyl-CoA.

  9. Nickel availability to pea (Pisum sativum L.) plants limits hydrogenase activity of Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. viciae bacteroids by affecting the processing of the hydrogenase structural subunits.

    PubMed

    Brito, B; Palacios, J M; Hidalgo, E; Imperial, J; Ruiz-Argüeso, T

    1994-09-01

    Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. viciae UPM791 induces the synthesis of an [NiFe] hydrogenase in pea (Pisum sativum L.) bacteroids which oxidizes the H2 generated by the nitrogenase complex inside the root nodules. The synthesis of this hydrogenase requires the genes for the small and large hydrogenase subunits (hupS and hupL, respectively) and 15 accessory genes clustered in a complex locus in the symbiotic plasmid. We show here that the bacteroid hydrogenase activity is limited by the availability of nickel to pea plants. Addition of Ni2+ to plant nutrient solutions (up to 10 mg/liter) resulted in sharp increases (up to 15-fold) in hydrogenase activity. This effect was not detected when other divalent cations (Zn2+, Co2+, Fe2+, and Mn2+) were added at the same concentrations. Determinations of the steady-state levels of hupSL-specific mRNA indicated that this increase in hydrogenase activity was not due to stimulation of transcription of structural genes. Immunoblot analysis with antibodies raised against the large and small subunits of the hydrogenase enzyme demonstrated that in the low-nickel situation, both subunits are mainly present in slow-migrating, unprocessed forms. Supplementation of the plant nutrient solution with increasing nickel concentrations caused the conversion of the slow-migrating forms of both subunits into fast-moving, mature forms. This nickel-dependent maturation process of the hydrogenase subunits is mediated by accessory gene products, since bacteroids from H2 uptake-deficient mutants carrying Tn5 insertions in hupG and hupK and in hypB and hypE accumulated the immature forms of both hydrogenase subunits even in the presence of high nickel levels.

  10. Nickel availability to pea (Pisum sativum L.) plants limits hydrogenase activity of Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. viciae bacteroids by affecting the processing of the hydrogenase structural subunits.

    PubMed Central

    Brito, B; Palacios, J M; Hidalgo, E; Imperial, J; Ruiz-Argüeso, T

    1994-01-01

    Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. viciae UPM791 induces the synthesis of an [NiFe] hydrogenase in pea (Pisum sativum L.) bacteroids which oxidizes the H2 generated by the nitrogenase complex inside the root nodules. The synthesis of this hydrogenase requires the genes for the small and large hydrogenase subunits (hupS and hupL, respectively) and 15 accessory genes clustered in a complex locus in the symbiotic plasmid. We show here that the bacteroid hydrogenase activity is limited by the availability of nickel to pea plants. Addition of Ni2+ to plant nutrient solutions (up to 10 mg/liter) resulted in sharp increases (up to 15-fold) in hydrogenase activity. This effect was not detected when other divalent cations (Zn2+, Co2+, Fe2+, and Mn2+) were added at the same concentrations. Determinations of the steady-state levels of hupSL-specific mRNA indicated that this increase in hydrogenase activity was not due to stimulation of transcription of structural genes. Immunoblot analysis with antibodies raised against the large and small subunits of the hydrogenase enzyme demonstrated that in the low-nickel situation, both subunits are mainly present in slow-migrating, unprocessed forms. Supplementation of the plant nutrient solution with increasing nickel concentrations caused the conversion of the slow-migrating forms of both subunits into fast-moving, mature forms. This nickel-dependent maturation process of the hydrogenase subunits is mediated by accessory gene products, since bacteroids from H2 uptake-deficient mutants carrying Tn5 insertions in hupG and hupK and in hypB and hypE accumulated the immature forms of both hydrogenase subunits even in the presence of high nickel levels. Images PMID:8071205

  11. Early intestinal Bacteroides fragilis colonisation and development of asthma

    PubMed Central

    Vael, Carl; Nelen, Vera; Verhulst, Stijn L; Goossens, Herman; Desager, Kristine N

    2008-01-01

    Background The 'hygiene hypothesis' suggests that early exposure to microbes can be protective against atopic disease. The intestinal microbial flora could operate as an important postnatal regulator of the Th1/Th2 balance. The aim of the study was to investigate the association between early intestinal colonisation and the development of asthma in the first 3 years of life. Methods In a prospective birth cohort, 117 children were classified according to the Asthma Predictive Index. A positive index included wheezing during the first three years of life combined with eczema in the child in the first years of life or with a parental history of asthma. A faecal sample was taken at the age of 3 weeks and cultured on selective media. Results Asthma Predictive Index was positive in 26/117 (22%) of the children. The prevalence of colonisation with Bacteroides fragilis was higher at 3 weeks in index+ compared to index- children (64% vs. 34% p < 0,05). Bacteroides fragilis and Total Anaerobes counts at 3 weeks were significantly higher in children with a positive index as compared with those without. After adjusting for confounders a positive association was found between Bacteroides fragilis colonisation and Asthma Predictive Index (odds ratio: 4,4; confidence interval: 1,7 – 11,8). Conclusion Bacteroides fragilis colonisation at age 3 weeks is an early indicator of possible asthma later in life. This study could provide the means for more accurate targeting of treatment and prevention and thus more effective and better controlled modulation of the microbial milieu. PMID:18822123

  12. The lipopolysaccharide lipid-a long chain fatty acid is important for rhizobium leguminosarum growth and stress adaptation in free-living and nodule environments

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Rhizobium bacteria live in soil and plant environments, are capable of inducing symbiotic nodules on legumes, invade these nodules, and develop into bacteroids that fix atmospheric nitrogen into ammonium. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is anchored in the bacterial outer membrane through a specialized lipi...

  13. Cupriavidus taiwanensis bacteroids in Mimosa pudica Indeterminate nodules are not terminally differentiated.

    PubMed

    Marchetti, Marta; Catrice, Olivier; Batut, Jacques; Masson-Boivin, Catherine

    2011-03-01

    The beta-rhizobium Cupriavidus taiwanensis forms indeterminate nodules on Mimosa pudica. C. taiwanensis bacteroids resemble free-living bacteria in terms of genomic DNA content, cell size, membrane permeability, and viability, in contrast to bacteroids in indeterminate nodules of the galegoid clade. Bacteroid differentiation is thus unrelated to nodule ontogeny.

  14. Cupriavidus taiwanensis Bacteroids in Mimosa pudica Indeterminate Nodules Are Not Terminally Differentiated ▿

    PubMed Central

    Marchetti, Marta; Catrice, Olivier; Batut, Jacques; Masson-Boivin, Catherine

    2011-01-01

    The beta-rhizobium Cupriavidus taiwanensis forms indeterminate nodules on Mimosa pudica. C. taiwanensis bacteroids resemble free-living bacteria in terms of genomic DNA content, cell size, membrane permeability, and viability, in contrast to bacteroids in indeterminate nodules of the galegoid clade. Bacteroid differentiation is thus unrelated to nodule ontogeny. PMID:21257807

  15. Identifying abnormalities in symbiotic development between Trifolium spp. and Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. trifolii leading to sub-optimal and ineffective nodule phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Melino, V. J.; Drew, E. A.; Ballard, R. A.; Reeve, W. G.; Thomson, G.; White, R. G.; O'Hara, G. W.

    2012-01-01

    Background and Aims Legumes overcome nitrogen limitations by entering into a mutualistic symbiosis with N2-fixing bacteria (rhizobia). Fully compatible associations (effective) between Trifolium spp. and Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. trifolii result from successful recognition of symbiotic partners in the rhizosphere, root hair infection and the formation of nodules where N2-fixing bacteroids reside. Poorly compatible associations can result in root nodule formation with minimal (sub-optimal) or no (ineffective) N2-fixation. Despite the abundance and persistence of strains in agricultural soils which are poorly compatible with the commercially grown clover species, little is known of how and why they fail symbiotically. The aims of this research were to determine the morphological aberrations occurring in sub-optimal and ineffective clover nodules and to determine whether reduced bacteroid numbers or reduced N2-fixing activity is the main cause for the Sub-optimal phenotype. Methods Symbiotic effectiveness of four Trifolium hosts with each of four R. leguminosarum bv. trifolii strains was assessed by analysis of plant yields and nitrogen content; nodule yields, abundance, morphology and internal structure; and bacteroid cytology, quantity and activity. Key Results Effective nodules (Nodule Function 83–100 %) contained four developmental zones and N2-fixing bacteroids. In contrast, Sub-optimal nodules of the same age (Nodule Function 24–57 %) carried prematurely senescing bacteroids and a small bacteroid pool resulting in reduced shoot N. Ineffective-differentiated nodules carried bacteroids aborted at stage 2 or 3 in differentiation. In contrast, bacteroids were not observed in Ineffective-vegetative nodules despite the presence of bacteria within infection threads. Conclusions Three major responses to N2-fixation incompatibility between Trifolium spp. and R. l. trifolii strains were found: failed bacterial endocytosis from infection threads into plant cortical

  16. Development of new host-specific Bacteroides qPCRs for the identification of fecal contamination sources in water.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Doñate, Marta; Casanovas-Massana, Arnau; Muniesa, Maite; Blanch, Anicet R

    2016-02-01

    Bacteroides spp. have been proposed as indicators of fecal contamination in microbial source tracking (MST) methodologies. The aim of this study was to develop new qPCR assays that target host-specific Bacteroidal 16S ribosomal RNA genes, to determine the source of fecal contamination in water. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) was used to select for host-specific bands of Bacteroides associated with a fecal pollution source and later to design four qPCR host-specific assays. A set of common primers for Bacteroides spp., four different Bacteroides spp. host-associated hydrolysis probes (human, cattle, pig, and poultry), and one hydrolysis probe for the Bacteroides genus were designed. This set of qPCR assays together with other previously developed Bacteroidetes MST targets were used to analyze water samples with fecal contamination from the four sources studied. The host-specific Bacteroides qPCRs designed for human (HMprobeBac), pig (PGprobeBac), and poultry (PLprobeBac) were highly specific for its sources (1.0, 0.97, and 1.0, respectively) although its sensitivity was lower (0.45, 0.50, and 0.73, respectively). The cattle-specific qPCR was totally unspecific and was discarded for future experiments. When compared to previously designed assays, the human and pig qPCRs showed better accuracies (0.86 and 0.84) than their counterparts HF183 and Pig-2-Bac (0.38 and 0.65). Thus, the newly designed human, pig, and poultry qPCR assays outperform other methods developed until date and may be useful for source tracking purposes. © 2015 The Authors. MicrobiologyOpen published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Transcriptomic analysis of Rhizobium leguminosarum biovar viciae in symbiosis with host plants Pisum sativum and Vicia cracca.

    PubMed

    Karunakaran, R; Ramachandran, V K; Seaman, J C; East, A K; Mouhsine, B; Mauchline, T H; Prell, J; Skeffington, A; Poole, P S

    2009-06-01

    Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. viciae forms nitrogen-fixing nodules on several legumes, including pea (Pisum sativum) and vetch (Vicia cracca), and has been widely used as a model to study nodule biochemistry. To understand the complex biochemical and developmental changes undergone by R. leguminosarum bv. viciae during bacteroid development, microarray experiments were first performed with cultured bacteria grown on a variety of carbon substrates (glucose, pyruvate, succinate, inositol, acetate, and acetoacetate) and then compared to bacteroids. Bacteroid metabolism is essentially that of dicarboxylate-grown cells (i.e., induction of dicarboxylate transport, gluconeogenesis and alanine synthesis, and repression of sugar utilization). The decarboxylating arm of the tricarboxylic acid cycle is highly induced, as is gamma-aminobutyrate metabolism, particularly in bacteroids from early (7-day) nodules. To investigate bacteroid development, gene expression in bacteroids was analyzed at 7, 15, and 21 days postinoculation of peas. This revealed that bacterial rRNA isolated from pea, but not vetch, is extensively processed in mature bacteroids. In early development (7 days), there were large changes in the expression of regulators, exported and cell surface molecules, multidrug exporters, and heat and cold shock proteins. fix genes were induced early but continued to increase in mature bacteroids, while nif genes were induced strongly in older bacteroids. Mutation of 37 genes that were strongly upregulated in mature bacteroids revealed that none were essential for nitrogen fixation. However, screening of 3,072 mini-Tn5 mutants on peas revealed previously uncharacterized genes essential for nitrogen fixation. These encoded a potential magnesium transporter, an AAA domain protein, and proteins involved in cytochrome synthesis.

  18. Transcriptomic Analysis of Rhizobium leguminosarum Biovar viciae in Symbiosis with Host Plants Pisum sativum and Vicia cracca▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Karunakaran, R.; Ramachandran, V. K.; Seaman, J. C.; East, A. K.; Mouhsine, B.; Mauchline, T. H.; Prell, J.; Skeffington, A.; Poole, P. S.

    2009-01-01

    Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. viciae forms nitrogen-fixing nodules on several legumes, including pea (Pisum sativum) and vetch (Vicia cracca), and has been widely used as a model to study nodule biochemistry. To understand the complex biochemical and developmental changes undergone by R. leguminosarum bv. viciae during bacteroid development, microarray experiments were first performed with cultured bacteria grown on a variety of carbon substrates (glucose, pyruvate, succinate, inositol, acetate, and acetoacetate) and then compared to bacteroids. Bacteroid metabolism is essentially that of dicarboxylate-grown cells (i.e., induction of dicarboxylate transport, gluconeogenesis and alanine synthesis, and repression of sugar utilization). The decarboxylating arm of the tricarboxylic acid cycle is highly induced, as is γ-aminobutyrate metabolism, particularly in bacteroids from early (7-day) nodules. To investigate bacteroid development, gene expression in bacteroids was analyzed at 7, 15, and 21 days postinoculation of peas. This revealed that bacterial rRNA isolated from pea, but not vetch, is extensively processed in mature bacteroids. In early development (7 days), there were large changes in the expression of regulators, exported and cell surface molecules, multidrug exporters, and heat and cold shock proteins. fix genes were induced early but continued to increase in mature bacteroids, while nif genes were induced strongly in older bacteroids. Mutation of 37 genes that were strongly upregulated in mature bacteroids revealed that none were essential for nitrogen fixation. However, screening of 3,072 mini-Tn5 mutants on peas revealed previously uncharacterized genes essential for nitrogen fixation. These encoded a potential magnesium transporter, an AAA domain protein, and proteins involved in cytochrome synthesis. PMID:19376875

  19. Microgravity effects on the legume/Rhizobium symbiosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urban, James E.

    1997-01-01

    Symbiotic nitrogen fixation is of critical importance to world agriculture and likely will be a critical part of life support systems developed for prolonged missions in space. Bacteroid formation, an essential step in an effective Dutch White Clover/Rhizobium leguminosarum bv trifolii symbiosis, is induced by succinic acid which is produced by the plant and which is bound and incorporated by the bacterium. Aspirin mimics succinate in its role as a bacteroid inducer and measures of aspirin binding mimiced measurements of succinate binding. In normal gravity (1×g), rhizobium bacteria immediately bound relatively high levels of aspirin (or succinate) in a readily reversible manner. Within a few seconds a portion of this initially bound aspirin became irreversibly bound. In the microgravity environment aboard the NASA 930 aircraft, rhizobia did not display the initial reversible binding of succinate, but did display a similar kinetic pattern of irreversible binding, and ultimately bound 32% more succinate (Acta Astronautica 36:129-133, 1995.) In normal gravity succinate treated cells stop dividing and swell to their maximum size (twice the normal cell volume) within a time equivalent to the time required for two normal cell doublings. Swelling in microgravity was tested in FPA and BPM sample holders aboard the space shuttle (USML-1, and STS-54, 57, and 60.) The behavior of cells in the two sample holders was similar, and swelling behavior of cells in microgravity was identical to behavior in normal gravity.

  20. Rhizobium meliloti mutants unable to synthesize anthranilate display a novel symbiotic phenotype.

    PubMed Central

    Barsomian, G D; Urzainqui, A; Lohman, K; Walker, G C

    1992-01-01

    Analyses of Rhizobium meliloti trp auxotrophs suggest that anthranilate biosynthesis by the R. meliloti trpE(G) gene product is necessary during nodule development for establishment of an effective symbiosis. trpE(G) mutants, as well as mutants blocked earlier along this pathway in aromatic amino acid biosynthesis, form nodules on alfalfa that have novel defects. In contrast, R. meliloti trp mutants blocked later in the tryptophan-biosynthetic pathway form normal, pink, nitrogen-fixing nodules. trpE(G) mutants form two types of elongated, defective nodules containing unusually extended invasion zones on alfalfa. One type contains bacteroids in its base and is capable of nitrogen fixation, while the other lacks bacteroids and cannot fix nitrogen. The trpE(G) gene is expressed in normal nodules. Models are discussed to account for these observations, including one in which anthranilate is postulated to act as an in planta siderophore. Images PMID:1320610

  1. [The Effect of Cadmium on the Efficiency of Development of Legume-Rhizobium Symbiosis].

    PubMed

    Chuhukova, O V; Postrigan, B N; Baimiev, A Kh; Chemeris, A V

    2015-01-01

    Screening of nodule bacteria (rhizobia) forming symbiotic relationships with legumes has been performed in order to isolate strains resistant to cadmium ions in a wide range of concentrations (6-132 mg/kg). The effect ofcadmium salts (6, 12, 24 mg/kg) on the legume-rhizobium symbiosis ofthe pea Pisum sativum L. with Rhizobium leguminosarum and of the fodder galega Galega orientalis Lam. with Rhizobium galegae has been studied under experimental laboratory conditions. No statistically significant differences have been revealed in the growth and biomass of plants with regard to the control in the range of concentrations given above. However, it was found that cadmium inhibited nodulation in P. sativum and stimulated it in G. orientalis.

  2. Alfalfa Enod12 genes are differentially regulated during nodule development by Nod factors and Rhizobium invasion.

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, P; Crespi, M D; Szécsi, J; Allison, L A; Schultze, M; Ratet, P; Kondorosi, E; Kondorosi, A

    1994-01-01

    MsEnod12A and MsEnod12B are two early nodulin genes from alfalfa (Medicago sativa). Differential expression of these genes was demonstrated using a reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction approach. MsEnod12A RNA was detected only in nodules and not in other plant tissues. In contrast, MsEnod12B transcripts were found in nodules and also at low levels in roots, flowers, stems, and leaves. MsEnod12B expression was enhanced in the root early after inoculation with the microsymbiont Rhizobium meliloti and after treatment with purified Nod factors, whereas MsEnod12A induction was detected only when developing nodules were visible. In situ hybridization showed that in nodules, MsEnod12 expression occurred in the infection zone. In empty Fix- nodules the MsEnod12A transcript level was much reduced, and in spontaneous nodules it was not detectable. These data indicate that MsEnod12B expression in roots is related to the action of Nod factors, whereas MsEnod12A expression is associated with the invasion process in nodules. Therefore, alfalfa possesses different mechanisms regulating MsEnod12A and MsEnod12B expression. PMID:8066132

  3. Isolation of Rhizobium phaseoli Tn5-induced mutants with altered expression of cytochrome terminal oxidases o and aa3.

    PubMed Central

    Soberón, M; Membrillo-Hernández, J; Aguilar, G R; Sánchez, F

    1990-01-01

    Two Rhizobium phaseoli mutants affected in cytochrome expression were obtained by Tn5-mob mutagenesis of the wild-type strain (CE3). Mutant strain CFN031 expressed sevenfold less cytochrome o in culture, expressed cytochrome aa3 under microaerophilic culture conditions, in contrast to strain CE3, and was affected in its vegetative growth properties and proliferation inside plant host cells. Mutant CFN037 expressed cytochrome aa3 under microaerophilic culture conditions, while bacteroid development and nitrogen fixation occurred earlier than in strain CE3. Images FIG. 2 PMID:2155209

  4. Morphology of root nodules and nodule-like structures formed by Rhizobium and Agrobacterium strains containing a Rhizobium meliloti megaplasmid

    PubMed Central

    1983-01-01

    We examined expression of the megaplasmid pRme41b of Rhizobium meliloti in two different Rhizobium sp. Strains and in Agrobacterium tumefaciens. Transfer of pRme41b into these bacteria was facilitated by insertion of a recombinant plasmid coding for mobilization functions of RP4 into the nif region (Kondorosi, A., E. Kondorosi, C.E. Pankhurst, W. J. Broughton, and Z. Banfalvi, 1982, Mol. Gen. Genet., 188:433-439). In all cases, transconjugants formed nodule-like structures on the roots of Medicago sativa. These structures were largely composed of meristematic cells but they were not invaded by bacteria. Bacteria were found only within infection threads in root hairs, and within intercellular spaces of the outermost cells of the structures. The donor strain of R. meliloti containing pAK11 or pAK12 in pRme41b initially produced nodules on M. sativa that did not fix nitrogen (Fix- ). In these nodules, bacteria were released from infection threads into the host cells but they did not multiply appreciably. Any bacteroids formed degenerated prematurely. In some cases, however, reversion to a Fix+ phenotype occurred after 4 to 6 wk. Bacteria released into newly infected cells in these nodules showed normal development into bacteriods. PMID:6885919

  5. Identification of a Novel Gene for Biosynthesis of a Bacteroid-Specific Electron Carrier Menaquinone

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Fuli; Cheng, Guojun; Xu, Hui; Wang, Zhi; Lei, Lei; Li, Youguo

    2011-01-01

    Ubiquinone (UQ) has been considered as an electron mediator in electron transfer that generates ATP in Rhizobium under both free-living and symbiosis conditions. When mutated, the dmtH gene has a symbiotic phenotype of forming ineffective nodules on Astragalus sinicus. The gene was isolated from a Mesorhizobium huakuii 7653R transposon-inserted mutant library. The DNA sequence and conserved protein domain analyses revealed that dmtH encodes demethylmenaquinone (DMK) methyltransferase, which catalyzes the terminal step of menaquinone (MK) biosynthesis. Comparative analysis indicated that dmtH homologs were present in only a few Rhizobia. Real-time quantitative PCR showed dmtH is a bacteroid-specific gene. The highest expression was seen at 25 days after inoculation of strain 7653R. Gene disruption and complementation tests demonstrated that the dmtH gene was essential for bacteroid development and symbiotic nitrogen fixation ability. MK and UQ were extracted from the wild type strain 7653R and mutant strain HK116. MK-7 was accumulated under microaerobic condition and UQ-10 was accumulated under aerobic condition in M. huakuii 7653R. The predicted function of DmtH protein was confirmed by the measurement of methyltransferase activity in vitro. These results revealed that MK-7 was used as an electron carrier instead of UQ in M. huakuii 7653R bacteroids. PMID:22194970

  6. Identification of a novel gene for biosynthesis of a bacteroid-specific electron carrier menaquinone.

    PubMed

    Xie, Fuli; Cheng, Guojun; Xu, Hui; Wang, Zhi; Lei, Lei; Li, Youguo

    2011-01-01

    Ubiquinone (UQ) has been considered as an electron mediator in electron transfer that generates ATP in Rhizobium under both free-living and symbiosis conditions. When mutated, the dmtH gene has a symbiotic phenotype of forming ineffective nodules on Astragalus sinicus. The gene was isolated from a Mesorhizobium huakuii 7653R transposon-inserted mutant library. The DNA sequence and conserved protein domain analyses revealed that dmtH encodes demethylmenaquinone (DMK) methyltransferase, which catalyzes the terminal step of menaquinone (MK) biosynthesis. Comparative analysis indicated that dmtH homologs were present in only a few Rhizobia. Real-time quantitative PCR showed dmtH is a bacteroid-specific gene. The highest expression was seen at 25 days after inoculation of strain 7653R. Gene disruption and complementation tests demonstrated that the dmtH gene was essential for bacteroid development and symbiotic nitrogen fixation ability. MK and UQ were extracted from the wild type strain 7653R and mutant strain HK116. MK-7 was accumulated under microaerobic condition and UQ-10 was accumulated under aerobic condition in M. huakuii 7653R. The predicted function of DmtH protein was confirmed by the measurement of methyltransferase activity in vitro. These results revealed that MK-7 was used as an electron carrier instead of UQ in M. huakuii 7653R bacteroids.

  7. Involvement of the Azorhizobial Chromosome Partition Gene (parA) in the Onset of Bacteroid Differentiation during Sesbania rostrata Stem Nodule Development ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chi-Te; Lee, Kyung-Bum; Wang, Yu-Sheng; Peng, Min-Hua; Lee, Kung-Ta; Suzuki, Shino; Suzuki, Tadahiro; Oyaizu, Hiroshi

    2011-01-01

    A parA gene in-frame deletion mutant of Azorhizobium caulinodans ORS571 (ORS571-ΔparA) was constructed to evaluate the roles of the chromosome-partitioning gene on various bacterial traits and on the development of stem-positioned nodules. The ΔparA mutant showed a pleiomorphic cell shape phenotype and was polyploid, with differences in nucleoid sizes due to dramatic defects in chromosome partitioning. Upon inoculation of the ΔparA mutant onto the stem of Sesbania rostrata, three types of immature nodule-like structures with impaired nitrogen-fixing activity were generated. Most showed signs of bacteroid early senescence. Moreover, the ΔparA cells within the nodule-like structures exhibited multiple developmental-stage phenotypes. Since the bacA gene has been considered an indicator for bacteroid formation, we applied the expression pattern of bacA as a nodule maturity index in this study. Our data indicate that the bacA gene expression is parA dependent in symbiosis. The presence of the parA gene transcript was inversely correlated with the maturity of nodule; the transcript was switched off in fully mature bacteroids. In summary, our experimental evidence demonstrates that the parA gene not only plays crucial roles in cellular development when the microbe is free-living but also negatively regulates bacteroid formation in S. rostrata stem nodules. PMID:21571889

  8. Development of EUCAST disk diffusion method for susceptibility testing of the Bacteroides fragilis group isolates.

    PubMed

    Nagy, Elisabeth; Justesen, Ulrik Stenz; Eitel, Zsuzsa; Urbán, Edit

    2015-02-01

    With the emergence of antibiotic resistance among Bacteroides fragilis group isolates the need of susceptibility testing in routine laboratories is increasing. The aims of the present study were to evaluate the disk diffusion method for susceptibility testing in case of different clinical isolates of Bacteroides spp by comparing zone diameter results with MICs obtained earlier during an Europe-wide antibiotic susceptibility surveillance, and to propose zone diameter breakpoints, which correlate for the EUCAST MIC breakpoints. We tested 381 clinical isolates of the B. fragilis group to amoxicillin/clavulanic acid, cefoxitin, clindamycin, imipenem, metronidazole, moxifloxacin, piperacillin/tazobactam, tigecycline by agar dilution method previously. The inhibition zones of the same antibiotics including meropenem disc were determined by the disc diffusion on Brucella blood agar supplemented with haemin and vitamin K1. Plates were incubated at 37 °C in an anaerobic atmosphere for 24 h. The zone diameters were read at 100% inhibition. In case of discrepant results MICs were determined by gradient test and compared with the inhibition zones on the same plate. We found a good agreement between the inhibition zone diameters and the MICs for imipenem, metronidazole, moxifloxacin and tigecyclin. The inhibition zone diameters of meropenem also separated clearly the isolates, which can be considered wild-type isolates. In case of amoxicillin/clavulanic acid and piperacillin/tazobactam intermediate and susceptible isolates according to the MIC determination, overlap during the zone diameter determination. Isolates with an inhibition zone <23 mm for amoxicillin/clavulanic acid and <25 mm for piperacillin/tazobactam should be retested by a MIC determination method. The 10 μg clindamycin disc clearly separated the resistant and the susceptible population of B. fragilis group strains. In the case of cefoxitin only resistant population could be separated with an inhibition

  9. Nif- Hup- mutants of Rhizobium japonicum.

    PubMed Central

    Moshiri, F; Stults, L; Novak, P; Maier, R J

    1983-01-01

    Two H2 uptake-negative (Hup-) Rhizobium japonicum mutants were obtained that also lacked symbiotic N2 fixation (acetylene reduction) activity. One of the mutants formed green nodules and was deficient in heme. Hydrogen oxidation activity in this mutant could be restored by the addition of heme plus ATP to crude extracts. Bacteroid extracts from the other mutant strain lacked hydrogenase activity and activity for both of the nitrogenase component proteins. Hup+ revertants of the mutant strains regained both H2 uptake ability and nitrogenase activity. Images PMID:6874648

  10. A Legume TOR Protein Kinase Regulates Rhizobium Symbiosis and Is Essential for Infection and Nodule Development.

    PubMed

    Nanjareddy, Kalpana; Blanco, Lourdes; Arthikala, Manoj-Kumar; Alvarado-Affantranger, Xóchitl; Quinto, Carmen; Sánchez, Federico; Lara, Miguel

    2016-11-01

    The target of rapamycin (TOR) protein kinase regulates metabolism, growth, and life span in yeast, animals, and plants in coordination with nutrient status and environmental conditions. The nutrient-dependent nature of TOR functionality makes this kinase a putative regulator of symbiotic associations involving nutrient acquisition. However, TOR's role in these processes remains to be understood. Here, we uncovered the role of TOR during the bean (Phaseolus vulgaris)-Rhizobium tropici (Rhizobium) symbiotic interaction. TOR was expressed in all tested bean tissues, with higher transcript levels in the root meristems and senesced nodules. We showed TOR promoter expression along the progressing infection thread and in the infected cells of mature nodules. Posttranscriptional gene silencing of TOR using RNA interference (RNAi) showed that this gene is involved in lateral root elongation and root cell organization and also alters the density, size, and number of root hairs. The suppression of TOR transcripts also affected infection thread progression and associated cortical cell divisions, resulting in a drastic reduction of nodule numbers. TOR-RNAi resulted in reduced reactive oxygen species accumulation and altered CyclinD1 and CyclinD3 expression, which are crucial factors for infection thread progression and nodule organogenesis. Enhanced expression of TOR-regulated ATG genes in TOR-RNAi roots suggested that TOR plays a role in the recognition of Rhizobium as a symbiont. Together, these data suggest that TOR plays a vital role in the establishment of root nodule symbiosis in the common bean. © 2016 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  11. Development of an acute and chronic ecotoxicity assay using lux-marked Rhizobium leguminosarum biovar trifolii.

    PubMed

    Paton, G I; Palmer, G; Burton, M; Rattray, E A; McGrath, S P; Glover, L A; Killham, K

    1997-04-01

    A soil isolate of Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. trifolii was marked with a lux CDABE gene cassette to enable the expression of bioluminescence. The suitability of the bacterium as a soil pollution biosensor was assessed using acute and chronic assays. Bacterial bioluminescence responded sensitively to the metals studied. The order of sensitivity was found to be Cd > Ni = Zn > Cu for the acute test and Cd > Ni = Zn = Cu for the chronic test. The sensitive response of the biosensor highlighted its potential for use as an indicator of soil pollution.

  12. Evaluation of nitrate reductase activity in Rhizobium japonicum

    SciTech Connect

    Streeter, J.G.; DeVine, P.J.

    1983-08-01

    Nitrate reductase activity was evaluated by four approaches, using four strains of Rhizobium japonicum and 11 chlorate-resistant mutants of the four strains. It was concluded that in vitro assays with bacteria or bacteroids provide the most simple and reliable assessment of the presence or absence of nitrate reductase. Nitrite reductase activity with methyl viologen and dithionite was found, but the enzyme activity does not confound the assay of nitrate reductase. 18 references

  13. Coordinate expression of hydrogenase and ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase in Rhizobium japonicum Hupc mutants.

    PubMed Central

    Merberg, D; Maier, R J

    1984-01-01

    In contrast to the wild type, H2 uptake-constitutive mutants of Rhizobium japonicum expressed both hydrogenase and ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase activities when grown heterotrophically. However, as bacteroids from soybean root nodules, the H2 uptake-constitutive mutants, like the wild type, did not express ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase activity. PMID:6384199

  14. Species differentiation of Bacteroides dorei from Bacteroides vulgatus and Bacteroides ovatus from Bacteroides xylanisolvens - back to basics.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Rune M; Marmolin, Ea S; Justesen, Ulrik S

    2013-12-01

    We present the results from 16S sequencing and phenotypic tests for differentiation of Bacteroides dorei from Bacteroides vulgatus and Bacteroides ovatus from Bacteroides xylanisolvens, which was not possible with MALDI-TOF MS. Testing with β-glucosidase could differentiate B. dorei from B. vulgatus and a negative catalase reaction could identify B. xylanisolvens. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Exogenous suppression of the symbiotic deficiencies of Rhizobium meliloti exo mutants.

    PubMed Central

    Urzainqui, A; Walker, G C

    1992-01-01

    The acidic exopolysaccharide (EPS I) produced by Rhizobium meliloti during symbiosis with Medicago sativa has been shown to be required for the proper development of nitrogen-fixing nodules. Cloned DNA from the exo region of R. meliloti is shown to stimulate production of the low-molecular-weight form of this exopolysaccharide, and in this report we show that the symbiotic deficiencies of two exo mutants of R. meliloti, the exoA and exoH mutants, can be rescued by the addition of this low-molecular-weight material at the time of inoculation. For exoA and exoH mutants, rescue with a preparation containing low-molecular-weight exopolysaccharide induces the formation of nitrogen-fixing nodules which appear somewhat later and at a reduced efficiency compared with wild-type-induced nodules; however, microscopic analysis of these nodules reveals similar nodule morphology and the presence of large numbers of bacteroids in each. Images PMID:1577707

  16. Lipogenesis and Redox Balance in Nitrogen-Fixing Pea Bacteroids.

    PubMed

    Terpolilli, Jason J; Masakapalli, Shyam K; Karunakaran, Ramakrishnan; Webb, Isabel U C; Green, Rob; Watmough, Nicholas J; Kruger, Nicholas J; Ratcliffe, R George; Poole, Philip S

    2016-10-15

    Within legume root nodules, rhizobia differentiate into bacteroids that oxidize host-derived dicarboxylic acids, which is assumed to occur via the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle to generate NAD(P)H for reduction of N2 Metabolic flux analysis of laboratory-grown Rhizobium leguminosarum showed that the flux from [(13)C]succinate was consistent with respiration of an obligate aerobe growing on a TCA cycle intermediate as the sole carbon source. However, the instability of fragile pea bacteroids prevented their steady-state labeling under N2-fixing conditions. Therefore, comparative metabolomic profiling was used to compare free-living R. leguminosarum with pea bacteroids. While the TCA cycle was shown to be essential for maximal rates of N2 fixation, levels of pyruvate (5.5-fold reduced), acetyl coenzyme A (acetyl-CoA; 50-fold reduced), free coenzyme A (33-fold reduced), and citrate (4.5-fold reduced) were much lower in bacteroids. Instead of completely oxidizing acetyl-CoA, pea bacteroids channel it into both lipid and the lipid-like polymer poly-β-hydroxybutyrate (PHB), the latter via a type III PHB synthase that is active only in bacteroids. Lipogenesis may be a fundamental requirement of the redox poise of electron donation to N2 in all legume nodules. Direct reduction by NAD(P)H of the likely electron donors for nitrogenase, such as ferredoxin, is inconsistent with their redox potentials. Instead, bacteroids must balance the production of NAD(P)H from oxidation of acetyl-CoA in the TCA cycle with its storage in PHB and lipids. Biological nitrogen fixation by symbiotic bacteria (rhizobia) in legume root nodules is an energy-expensive process. Within legume root nodules, rhizobia differentiate into bacteroids that oxidize host-derived dicarboxylic acids, which is assumed to occur via the TCA cycle to generate NAD(P)H for reduction of N2 However, direct reduction of the likely electron donors for nitrogenase, such as ferredoxin, is inconsistent with their redox

  17. Development and Partial Characterization of Nearly Isogenic Pea Lines (Pisum sativum L.) that Alter Uptake Hydrogenase Activity in Symbiotic Rhizobium.

    PubMed

    Phillips, D A; Kapulnik, Y; Bedmar, E J; Joseph, C M

    1990-04-01

    Some Rhizobium bacteria have H(2)-uptake (Hup) systems that oxidize H(2) evolved from nitrogenase in leguminous root nodules. Pea (Pisum sativum L.) cultivars ;JI1205' and ;Alaska' produce high Hup (Hup(++)) and moderate Hup (Hup(+)) phenotypes, respectively, in Rhizobium leguminosarum 128C53. The physiological significance and biochemical basis of this host plant genetic effect are unknown. The purpose of this investigation was to advance basic Hup studies by developing nearly isogenic lines of peas that alter Hup phenotypes in R. leguminosarum strains containing hup genes. Eight pairs of nearly isogenic pea lines that produce Hup(++) and Hup(+) phenotypes in R. leguminosarum 128C53 were identified in 173 F(2)-derived F(6) families produced from crosses between JI1205 and Alaska. Tests with the pea isolines and three strains of hup-containing R. leguminosarum showed that the isolines altered Hup activity significantly (P

  18. A Peptidoglycan-Remodeling Enzyme Is Critical for Bacteroid Differentiation in Bradyrhizobium spp. During Legume Symbiosis.

    PubMed

    Gully, Djamel; Gargani, Daniel; Bonaldi, Katia; Grangeteau, Cédric; Chaintreuil, Clémence; Fardoux, Joël; Nguyen, Phuong; Marchetti, Roberta; Nouwen, Nico; Molinaro, Antonio; Mergaert, Peter; Giraud, Eric

    2016-06-01

    In response to the presence of compatible rhizobium bacteria, legumes form symbiotic organs called nodules on their roots. These nodules house nitrogen-fixing bacteroids that are a differentiated form of the rhizobium bacteria. In some legumes, the bacteroid differentiation comprises a dramatic cell enlargement, polyploidization, and other morphological changes. Here, we demonstrate that a peptidoglycan-modifying enzyme in Bradyrhizobium strains, a DD-carboxypeptidase that contains a peptidoglycan-binding SPOR domain, is essential for normal bacteroid differentiation in Aeschynomene species. The corresponding mutants formed bacteroids that are malformed and hypertrophied. However, in soybean, a plant that does not induce morphological differentiation of its symbiont, the mutation does not affect the bacteroids. Remarkably, the mutation also leads to necrosis in a large fraction of the Aeschynomene nodules, indicating that a normally formed peptidoglycan layer is essential for avoiding the induction of plant immune responses by the invading bacteria. In addition to exopolysaccharides, capsular polysaccharides, and lipopolysaccharides, whose role during symbiosis is well defined, our work demonstrates an essential role in symbiosis for yet another rhizobial envelope component, the peptidoglycan layer.

  19. The Lipopolysaccharide Lipid A Long-Chain Fatty Acid Is Important for Rhizobium leguminosarum Growth and Stress Adaptation in Free-Living and Nodule Environments.

    PubMed

    Bourassa, Dianna V; Kannenberg, Elmar L; Sherrier, D Janine; Buhr, R Jeffrey; Carlson, Russell W

    2017-02-01

    Rhizobium bacteria live in soil and plant environments, are capable of inducing symbiotic nodules on legumes, invade these nodules, and develop into bacteroids that fix atmospheric nitrogen into ammonia. Rhizobial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is anchored in the bacterial outer membrane through a specialized lipid A containing a very long-chain fatty acid (VLCFA). VLCFA function for rhizobial growth in soil and plant environments is not well understood. Two genes, acpXL and lpxXL, encoding acyl carrier protein and acyltransferase, are among the six genes required for biosynthesis and transfer of VLCFA to lipid A. Rhizobium leguminosarum mutant strains acpXL, acpXL(-)/lpxXL(-), and lpxXL(-) were examined for LPS structure, viability, and symbiosis. Mutations in acpXL and lpxXL abolished VLCFA attachment to lipid A. The acpXL mutant transferred a shorter acyl chain instead of VLCFA. Strains without lpxXL neither added VLCFA nor a shorter acyl chain. In all strains isolated from nodule bacteria, lipid A had longer acyl chains compared with laboratory-cultured bacteria, whereas mutant strains displayed altered membrane properties, modified cationic peptide sensitivity, and diminished levels of cyclic β-glucans. In pea nodules, mutant bacteroids were atypically formed and nitrogen fixation and senescence were affected. The role of VLCFA for rhizobial environmental fitness is discussed.

  20. Comparison of nucleic acid content in populations of free-living and symbiotic Rhizobium meliloti by flow microfluorometry.

    PubMed Central

    Paau, A S; Lee, D; Cowles, J R

    1977-01-01

    Populations of symbiotic Rhizobium meliloti extracted from alfalfa nodules were shown by flow microfluorometry to contain a significant number of bacteroids with higher nucleic acid content than the free-living rhizobia. Bacteroids with lower nucleic acid content than the free-living bacteria were not detected in significant quantities in these populations. These results indicate that the incapability of bacteroids to reestablish growth in nutrient media may not be caused by a decrease in nucleic acid content of the symbiotic rhizobia. PMID:838682

  1. Isolation of Bacteroides from fish and human fecal samples for identification of unique molecular markers.

    PubMed

    Kabiri, Leila; Alum, Absar; Rock, Channah; McLain, Jean E; Abbaszadegan, Morteza

    2013-12-01

    Bacteroides molecular markers have been used to identify human fecal contamination in natural waters, but recent work in our laboratory confirmed cross-amplification of several human-specific Bacteroides spp. assays with fecal DNA from fish. For identification of unique molecular markers, Bacteroides from human (n = 4) and fish (n = 7) fecal samples were cultured and their identities were further confirmed using Rapid ID 32A API strips. The 16S rDNA from multiple isolates from each sample was PCR amplified, cloned, and sequenced to identify unique markers for development of more stringent human-specific assays. In human feces, Bacteroides vulgatus was the dominant species (75% of isolates), whereas in tilapia feces, Bacteroides eggerthii was dominant (66%). Bacteroides from grass carp, channel catfish, and blue catfish may include Bacteroides uniformis, Bacteroides ovatus, or Bacteroides stercoris. Phylogenic analyses of the 16S rRNA gene sequences showed distinct Bacteroides groupings from each fish species, while human sequences clustered with known B. vulgatus. None of the fish isolates showed significant similarity to Bacteroides sequences currently deposited in NCBI (National Center for Biotechnology Information). This study expands the current sequence database of cultured fish Bacteroides. Such data are essential for identification of unique molecular markers in human Bacteroides that can be utilized in differentiating fish and human fecal contamination in water samples.

  2. Rhizobium leguminosarum Biovar viciae Symbiotic Hydrogenase Activity and Processing Are Limited by the Level of Nickel in Agricultural Soils

    PubMed Central

    Ureta, Ana-Claudia; Imperial, Juan; Ruiz-Argüeso, Tomás; Palacios, Jose M.

    2005-01-01

    Analysis of levels of hydrogenase processing and activity in Rhizobium leguminosarum biovar viciae bacteroids from pea (Pisum sativum) plants showed that the oxidation of nitrogenase-evolved hydrogen is limited by the availability of nickel in agricultural soils. This limitation was overcome by using an inoculant strain engineered for higher hydrogenase expression. PMID:16269813

  3. (A structural assessment of the role of the cell surface carbohydrates of Rhizobium in the Rhizobium/legume symbiosis)

    SciTech Connect

    Hollingsworth, R.I.

    1991-01-01

    Research continued on the study of cell surface carbohydrates of Rhizobium. Objectives include: To characterize, at a structural level, the differences between the lipopolysaccharides of a representative number of strains from different Rhizobium species to determine which features of LPS structure are species-specific and might, therefore, be determinants of host specificity. Determine the effect(s) of nod gene induction on the structure of Rhizobium lipopolysaccharides and determine whether synthesis of a modified LPS molecule or a new surface glycoconjugate is initiated by nod gene induction. Develop a non-chemical means for rapidly screening large numbers of bacterial strains in order to determine which glycoconjugate structural features are conserved between strains of the same species. Provide the necessary structural information which, when coupled with developments in the rapidly expanding field of Rhizobium genetics, should lead to a clear understanding of the role of Rhizobium surface glycoconjugates in host/symbiont interactions. Progress is discussed.

  4. Antigenic Analysis of Rhizobium japonicum by Immunodiffusion

    PubMed Central

    Dudman, W. F.

    1971-01-01

    Immunodiffusion reactions were studied with seven strains of Rhizobium japonicum and three strains of the cowpea miscellany by using antisera against eight of the strains. Most strains yielded only weak precipitin bands when untreated cell suspensions were used as antigens in the diffusions. Ultrasonic disruption or heat treatment of the cells led to stronger bands, and immersion in boiling water for 20 min was used as the standard procedure for preparing these bacteria for immunodiffusion analysis. Heat-labile antigens were detected in only a few strains; the major antigens of all of the strains appeared to be heat-stable. Many of the strains cross-reacted, sometimes in a nonreciprocal manner; unheated cell suspensions cross-reacted more widely but more weakly than the heated suspensions. Heat-treated crushed nodule preparations reacted well in immunodiffusions. The antigens of cultured cell and nodule extract (bacteroid) forms of three strains were compared. In one of these strains, an antigen present in the cultured cells was absent from the bacteroids. Unknown strains present in soybean root nodules were readily identified by immunodiffusion. Images PMID:4998353

  5. Effects of microgravity on the binding of acetylsalicylic acid by Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. trifolii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urban, James E.; Gerren, Richard; Zoelle, Jeffery

    1995-07-01

    Bacteroids can be induced in vitro by treating growing Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. trifolii with succinic acid or succinic acid structural analogs like acetylsalicylic acid. Quantitating bacteroid induction by measuring acetylsalicylic binding under normal (1 g) conditions showed two forms of binding to occur. In one form of binding cells immediately bound comparatively high levels of acetylsalicylic acid, but the binding was quickly reversed. The second form of binding increased with time by first-order kinetics, and reached saturation in 40 s. Similar experiments performed in the microgravity environment aboard the NASA 930 aircraft showed only one form of binding and total acetylsalicylic acid bound was 32% higher than at 1 g.

  6. A Legume TOR Protein Kinase Regulates Rhizobium Symbiosis and Is Essential for Infection and Nodule Development1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Blanco, Lourdes; Quinto, Carmen

    2016-01-01

    The target of rapamycin (TOR) protein kinase regulates metabolism, growth, and life span in yeast, animals, and plants in coordination with nutrient status and environmental conditions. The nutrient-dependent nature of TOR functionality makes this kinase a putative regulator of symbiotic associations involving nutrient acquisition. However, TOR’s role in these processes remains to be understood. Here, we uncovered the role of TOR during the bean (Phaseolus vulgaris)-Rhizobium tropici (Rhizobium) symbiotic interaction. TOR was expressed in all tested bean tissues, with higher transcript levels in the root meristems and senesced nodules. We showed TOR promoter expression along the progressing infection thread and in the infected cells of mature nodules. Posttranscriptional gene silencing of TOR using RNA interference (RNAi) showed that this gene is involved in lateral root elongation and root cell organization and also alters the density, size, and number of root hairs. The suppression of TOR transcripts also affected infection thread progression and associated cortical cell divisions, resulting in a drastic reduction of nodule numbers. TOR-RNAi resulted in reduced reactive oxygen species accumulation and altered CyclinD1 and CyclinD3 expression, which are crucial factors for infection thread progression and nodule organogenesis. Enhanced expression of TOR-regulated ATG genes in TOR-RNAi roots suggested that TOR plays a role in the recognition of Rhizobium as a symbiont. Together, these data suggest that TOR plays a vital role in the establishment of root nodule symbiosis in the common bean. PMID:27698253

  7. Evolutionary dynamics of rhizopine within spatially structured rhizobium populations

    PubMed Central

    Simms, E. L.; Bever, J. D.

    1998-01-01

    Symbiosis between legumes and nitrogen-fixing bacteria is thought to bring mutual benefit to each participant. However, it is not known how rhizobia benefit from nodulating legume hosts because they fix nitrogen only after becoming bacteroids, which are terminally differentiated cells that cannot reproduce. Because undifferentiated rhizobia in and around the nodule can reproduce, evolution of symbiotic nitrogen fixation may depend upon kin selection. In some hosts, these kin may persist in the nodule as viable, undifferentiated bacteria. In other hosts, no viable rhizobia survive to reproduce after nodule senescence. Bacteroids in these hosts may benefit their free-living kin by enhancing production of plant root exudates. However, unrelated non-mutualists may also benefit from increased plant exudates. Rhizopines, compounds produced by bacteroids in nodules and catabolized only by related free-living rhizobia, may provide a mechanism by which bacteroids can preferentially benefit kin. Despite this apparent advantage, rhizopine genotypes are relatively rare. We constructed a mathematical model to examine how mixing within rhizobium populations influences the evolution of rhizopine genotypes. Our model predicts that the success of rhizopine genotypes is strongly dependent upon the spatial genetic structure of the bacterial population; rhizopine is more likely to dominate well-mixed populations. Further, for a given level of mixing, we find that rhizopine evolves under a positive frequency-dependent process in which stochastic accumulation of rhizopine alleles is necessary for rhizopine establishment. This process leads to increased spatial structure in rhizobium populations, and suggests that rhizopine may expand the conditions under which nitrogen fixation can evolve via kin selection.

  8. In vivo cloning strategy for Rhizobium plasmids.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Lucas, I; Mavingui, P; Finan, T; Chain, P; Martínez-Romero, E

    2002-10-01

    We have developed a simple system to clone indigenous Rhizobium plasmids into E. coli. The strategy consists of three matings: the first is to insert Tn5 in the plasmid to be cloned, the second incorporates the integrative vector into the inserted Tn5 in the native Rhizobium plasmid, and the last mating transfers the target plasmid directly into E. coli. This mating-based system was successfully used to clone plasmids of Rhizobium species with sizes ranging from 150 to 270 kb. In addition, a 500-kb fragment of a 600-kb megaplasmid was also cloned. This strategy could be used for cloning indigenous replicons of other gram-negative bacteria into a different host.

  9. Comparing Symbiotic Efficiency between Swollen versus Nonswollen Rhizobial Bacteroids1[C][W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Oono, Ryoko; Denison, R. Ford

    2010-01-01

    Symbiotic rhizobia differentiate physiologically and morphologically into nitrogen-fixing bacteroids inside legume host nodules. The differentiation is apparently terminal in some legume species, such as peas (Pisum sativum) and peanuts (Arachis hypogaea), likely due to extreme cell swelling induced by the host. In other legume species, such as beans (Phaseolus vulgaris) and cowpeas (Vigna unguiculata), differentiation into bacteroids, which are similar in size and shape to free-living rhizobia, is reversible. Bacteroid modification by plants may affect the effectiveness of the symbiosis. Here, we compare symbiotic efficiency of rhizobia in two different hosts where the rhizobia differentiate into swollen nonreproductive bacteroids in one host and remain nonswollen and reproductive in the other. Two such dual-host strains were tested: Rhizobium leguminosarum A34 in peas and beans and Bradyrhizobium sp. 32H1 in peanuts and cowpeas. In both comparisons, swollen bacteroids conferred more net host benefit by two measures: return on nodule construction cost (plant growth per gram nodule growth) and nitrogen fixation efficiency (H2 production by nitrogenase per CO2 respired). Terminal bacteroid differentiation among legume species has evolved independently multiple times, perhaps due to the increased host fitness benefits observed in this study. PMID:20837702

  10. A rhizobium leguminosarum mutant defective in symbiotic iron acquisition

    SciTech Connect

    Nadler, K.D.; Chen, Jing-Wen; John, T.R. ); Johnston, A.W.B. )

    1990-02-01

    Iron acquisition by symbiotic Rhizobium spp. is essential for nitrogen fixation in the legume root nodule symbiosis. Rhizobium leguminosarum 116, an ineffective mutant strain with a defect in iron acquisition, was isolated after nitrosoguanidine mutagenesis of the effective strain 1062. The pop-1 mutation in strain 116 imparted to it a complex phenotype, characteristic of iron deficiency. Several iron(III)-solubilizing agents, such as citrate, hydroxyquinoline, and dihydroxybenzoate, stimulated growth of 116 on low-iron solid medium; anthranilic acid, the R. leguminosarum siderophore, inhibited low-iron growth of 116. The initial rate of {sup 55}Fe uptake by suspensions of iron-starved 116 cells was 10-fold less than that of iron-starved wild-type cells. Electron microscopic observations revealed no morphological abnormalities in the small, white nodules induced by 116. Nodule cortical cells were filled with vesicles containing apparently normal bacteroids. No premature degeneration of bacteroids or of plant cell organelles was evident. The authors mapped pop-1 by R plasmid-mediated conjugation and recombination to the ade-27-rib-2 region of the R. leguminosarum chromosome. No segregation of pop-1 and the symbiotic defect was observed among the recombinants from these crosses. Cosmid pKN1, a pLAFR1 derivative containing a 24-kilobase-pair fragment of R. leguminosarum DNA, conferred on 116 the ability to grow on dipyridyl medium and to fix nitrogen symbiotically.

  11. Bacteroides buccae and related taxa in necrotic root canal infections.

    PubMed Central

    Haapasalo, M

    1986-01-01

    Fifty-seven adults with apical periodontitis were examined for the presence of nonpigmented Bacteroides species in 62 infected root canals. Nonpigmented Bacteroides species were found in 35 canals. In four cases two nonpigmented Bacteroides species and in one case three nonpigmented Bacteroides species were found. Species belonging to the B. fragilis group were not isolated. The most frequently isolated species were B. buccae (15 strains), B. oris (12 strains), and B. oralis (7 strains). alpha-Fucosidase, beta-N-acetylglucosaminidase, and beta-xylosidase appeared to be useful in the identification of B. buccae and B. oris. Corroding Bacteroides species were not found; all corroding strains were identified as Wolinella recta. The occurrence of nonpigmented Bacteroides species was compared with the severity of the periapical infection. A total of 13 B. buccae strains were found in acute infections and only 2 strains were found in asymptomatic infections, whereas other nonpigmented Bacteroides species were present in acutely infected and asymptomatic teeth with nearly equal frequency. Ultrastructural study of 13 B. buccae strains showed that 8 strains had a crystalline proteinaceous surface layer (S-layer) outside the outer membrane, but all 13 strains had areas of crystalline protein throughout in the outer membrane. The results suggest that B. buccae may have a specific role in the development of an acute opportunistic infection. Images PMID:3782459

  12. Rhizobium japonicum mutants defective in symbiotic nitrogen fixation.

    PubMed Central

    Noel, K D; Stacey, G; Tandon, S R; Silver, L E; Brill, W J

    1982-01-01

    Rhizobium japonicum strains 3I1b110 and 61A76 were mutagenized to obtain 25 independently derived mutants that produced soybean nodules defective in nitrogen fixation, as assayed by acetylene reduction. The proteins of both the bacterial and the plant portions of the nodules were analyzed by two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. All of the mutants had lower-than-normal levels of the nitrogenase components, and all but four contained a prominent bacteroid protein not observed in wild-type bacteroids. Experiments with bacteria grown ex planta suggested that this protein was derepressed by the absence of ammonia. Nitrogenase component II of one mutant was altered in isoelectric point. The soluble plant fraction of the nodules of seven mutants had very low levels of heme, yet the nodules of five of these seven mutants contained the polypeptide of leghemoglobin. Thus, the synthesis of the globin may not be coupled to the content of available heme in soybean nodules. The nodules of the other two of these seven mutants lacked not only leghemoglobin but most of the other normal plant and bacteroid proteins. Ultrastructural examination of nodules formed by these two mutants indicated normal ramification of infection threads but suggested a problem in subsequent survival of the bacteria and their release from the infection threads. Images PMID:6956566

  13. Comparison of the Sphingolipid Content of Rumen Bacteroides Species

    PubMed Central

    Kunsman, Joseph E.; Caldwell, Daniel R.

    1974-01-01

    Ten strains of Bacteroides ruminicola were found to contain phosphosphingolipids. Four strains of Bacteroides amylophilus and one strain each of Bacteroides succinogenes and Bacteroides sp. were devoid of phosphosphingolipids. PMID:4476196

  14. Enhanced expression of Rhizobium etli cbb₃ oxidase improves drought tolerance of common bean symbiotic nitrogen fixation.

    PubMed

    Talbi, C; Sánchez, C; Hidalgo-Garcia, A; González, E M; Arrese-Igor, C; Girard, L; Bedmar, E J; Delgado, M J

    2012-09-01

    To investigate the involvement of Rhizobium etli cbb(3) oxidase in the response of Phaseolus vulgaris to drought, common bean plants were inoculated with the R. etli strain, CFNX713, overexpressing this oxidase in bacteroids (cbb(3)(+)) and subjected to drought conditions. The negative effect of drought on plant and nodule dryweight, nitrogen content, and nodule functionality was more pronounced in plants inoculated with the wild-type (WT) strain than in those inoculated with the cbb(3)(+) strain. Regardless of the plant treatment, bacteroids produced by the cbb(3)(+) strain showed higher respiratory capacity than those produced by the WT strain. Inoculation of plants with the cbb(3)(+) strain alleviated the negative effect of a moderate drought on the respiratory capacity of bacteroids and the energy charge of the nodules. Expression of the FixP and FixO components of the cbb(3) oxidase was higher in bacteroids of the cbb(3)(+) strain than in those of the WT strain under all experimental conditions. The decline in sucrose synthase activity and the decrease in dicarboxylic acids provoked by moderate drought stress were more pronounced in nodules from plants inoculated with the WT strain than in those inoculated with the cbb(3)(+) strain. Taken together, these results suggest that inoculation of plants with a R. etli strain having enhanced expression of cbb(3) oxidase in bacteroids reduces the sensitivity of P. vulgaris-R. etli symbiosis to drought and can modulate carbon metabolism in nodules.

  15. [A structural assessment of the role of the cell surface carbohydrates of Rhizobium in the Rhizobium/legume symbiosis]. Progress report, June 1989--June 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Hollingsworth, R.I.

    1991-12-31

    Research continued on the study of cell surface carbohydrates of Rhizobium. Objectives include: To characterize, at a structural level, the differences between the lipopolysaccharides of a representative number of strains from different Rhizobium species to determine which features of LPS structure are species-specific and might, therefore, be determinants of host specificity. Determine the effect(s) of nod gene induction on the structure of Rhizobium lipopolysaccharides and determine whether synthesis of a modified LPS molecule or a new surface glycoconjugate is initiated by nod gene induction. Develop a non-chemical means for rapidly screening large numbers of bacterial strains in order to determine which glycoconjugate structural features are conserved between strains of the same species. Provide the necessary structural information which, when coupled with developments in the rapidly expanding field of Rhizobium genetics, should lead to a clear understanding of the role of Rhizobium surface glycoconjugates in host/symbiont interactions. Progress is discussed.

  16. Legume-Rhizobium Interactions: Cowpea Root Exudate Elicits Faster Nodulation Response by Rhizobium Species

    PubMed Central

    Bhagwat, Arvind A.; Thomas, Joseph

    1982-01-01

    Preinfection events in legume-Rhizobium symbiosis were analyzed by studying the different nodulation behaviors of two rhizobial strains in cowpeas (Vigna sinensis). Log-phase cultures of Rhizobium sp. strain 1001, an isolate from the plant nodule, initiated host responses leading to infection within 2 h after inoculation, whereas log-phase cultures of Rhizobium sp. strain 32H1 took at least 7 h to trigger a discernible response. The delay observed with strain 32H1 could be eliminated by incubating the rhizobial suspension, before inoculation, for 4.5 h either in the cowpea rhizosphere/rhizoplane condition or in the root exudate of cowpea plants, grown without NH4+ in the rooting medium. The delay could not be eliminated by incubating the rhizobial suspension in the rooting medium of plants grown in the presence of 5 mM NH4+, indicating that there is a regulatory role of combined nitrogen in triggering preinfection events by the legume. The substance(s) in the root exudate which elicited the faster nodulation response by Rhizobium sp. strain 32H1 could be separated into a high-molecular-weight fraction by Sephadex G-100 gel filtration. The data support the notion that legume roots release substances that favor the development of rhizobial features essential for infection and nodulation. PMID:16345989

  17. Identification and manipulation of Rhizobium phytohormone genes

    SciTech Connect

    Ditta, G.S.

    1988-06-27

    The goal of this project was to determine whether phytohormone production by the gram-negative bacterium Rhizobium meliloti is required for successful modulation and symbiosis with alfalfa. specifically, we undertook the study of indoleacetic acid (IAA; auxin) production by R. meliloti and sought to create a mutant totally deficient in IAA biosynthesis. For many years it has been known that rhizobia are capable of synthesizing and excreting IAA, and it has often been suggested that this could be of importance for the initiation of root nodule development. Published work demonstrating the involvement of bacterial IAA genes in pathogenesis by Pseudomonas syringae and Agrobacterium tumefaciens further emphasized the need for this type of study in Rhizobium.

  18. Development and Partial Characterization of Nearly Isogenic Pea Lines (Pisum sativum L.) that Alter Uptake Hydrogenase Activity in Symbiotic Rhizobium1

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Donald A.; Kapulnik, Yoram; Bedmar, Eulogio J.; Joseph, Cecillia M.

    1990-01-01

    Some Rhizobium bacteria have H2-uptake (Hup) systems that oxidize H2 evolved from nitrogenase in leguminous root nodules. Pea (Pisum sativum L.) cultivars `JI1205' and `Alaska' produce high Hup (Hup++) and moderate Hup (Hup+) phenotypes, respectively, in Rhizobium leguminosarum 128C53. The physiological significance and biochemical basis of this host plant genetic effect are unknown. The purpose of this investigation was to advance basic Hup studies by developing nearly isogenic lines of peas that alter Hup phenotypes in R. leguminosarum strains containing hup genes. Eight pairs of nearly isogenic pea lines that produce Hup++ and Hup+ phenotypes in R. leguminosarum 128C53 were identified in 173 F2-derived F6 families produced from crosses between JI1205 and Alaska. Tests with the pea isolines and three strains of hup-containing R. leguminosarum showed that the isolines altered Hup activity significantly (P ≤ 0.05) in 19 of 24 symbiotic combinations. Analyses of Hup phenotypes in F6 families, the F1 population, and two backcrosses suggested involvement of a single genetic locus. Three of the eight pairs of isolines were identified as being suitable for physiological studies, because the two lines in each pair showed similar growth, N assimilation, and flowering traits under nonsymbiotic conditions. Tests of those lines under N2-dependent conditions with isogenic Hup+ and negligible Hup (Hup−) mutants of R. leguminosarum 128C53 showed that, in symbioses with Hup+ rhizobia, two out of three Hup++ pea lines decreased N2 fixation relative to Hup+ peas. In one of those cases, however, the Hup++ plant line also decreased fixation by Hup− rhizobia. When results were averaged across all rhizobia tested, Hup+ pea isolines had 8.2% higher dry weight (P ≤ 0.05) and fixed 12.6% more N2 (P ≤ 0.05) than Hup++ isolines. Pea lines described here may help identify host plant factors that influence rhizobial Hup activity and should assist in clarifying how Hup systems

  19. Lipopolysaccharide O-Chain Core Region Required for Cellular Cohesion and Compaction of In Vitro and Root Biofilms Developed by Rhizobium leguminosarum

    PubMed Central

    Russo, Daniela M.; Abdian, Patricia L.; Posadas, Diana M.; Williams, Alan; Vozza, Nicolás; Giordano, Walter; Kannenberg, Elmar; Downie, J. Allan

    2014-01-01

    The formation of biofilms is an important survival strategy allowing rhizobia to live on soil particles and plant roots. Within the microcolonies of the biofilm developed by Rhizobium leguminosarum, rhizobial cells interact tightly through lateral and polar connections, forming organized and compact cell aggregates. These microcolonies are embedded in a biofilm matrix, whose main component is the acidic exopolysaccharide (EPS). Our work shows that the O-chain core region of the R. leguminosarum lipopolysaccharide (LPS) (which stretches out of the cell surface) strongly influences bacterial adhesive properties and cell-cell cohesion. Mutants defective in the O chain or O-chain core moiety developed premature microcolonies in which lateral bacterial contacts were greatly reduced. Furthermore, cell-cell interactions within the microcolonies of the LPS mutants were mediated mostly through their poles, resulting in a biofilm with an altered three-dimensional structure and increased thickness. In addition, on the root epidermis and on root hairs, O-antigen core-defective strains showed altered biofilm patterns with the typical microcolony compaction impaired. Taken together, these results indicate that the surface-exposed moiety of the LPS is crucial for proper cell-to-cell interactions and for the formation of robust biofilms on different surfaces. PMID:25416773

  20. Immunosuppression during Rhizobium-legume symbiosis.

    PubMed

    Luo, Li; Lu, Dawei

    2014-01-01

    Rhizobium infects host legumes to elicit new plant organs, nodules where dinitrogen is fixed as ammonia that can be directly utilized by plants. The nodulation factor (NF) produced by Rhizobium is one of the determinant signals for rhizobial infection and nodule development. Recently, it was found to suppress the innate immunity on host and nonhost plants as well as its analogs, chitins. Therefore, NF can be recognized as a microbe/pathogen-associated molecular pattern (M/PAMP) like chitin to induce the M/PAMP triggered susceptibility (M/PTS) of host plants to rhizobia. Whether the NF signaling pathway is directly associated with the innate immunity is not clear till now. In fact, other MAMPs such as lipopolysaccharide (LPS), exopolysaccharide (EPS) and cyclic-β-glucan, together with type III secretion system (T3SS) effectors are also required for rhizobial infection or survival in leguminous nodule cells. Interestingly, most of them play similarly negative roles in the innate immunity of host plants, though their signaling is not completely elucidated. Taken together, we believe that the local immunosuppression on host plants induced by Rhizobium is essential for the establishment of their symbiosis.

  1. Rhizobium pusense is the main human pathogen in the genus Agrobacterium/Rhizobium.

    PubMed

    Aujoulat, F; Marchandin, H; Zorgniotti, I; Masnou, A; Jumas-Bilak, E

    2015-05-01

    Rhizobium pusense was recently described after isolation from the rhizosphere of chickpea. Multilocus sequence-based analysis of clinical isolates identified as Agrobacterium (Rhizobium) radiobacter demonstrated that R. pusense is the main human pathogen within Agrobacterium (Rhizobium) spp. Clinical microbiology of Agrobacterium (Rhizobium) should be considered in the light of recent taxonomic changes.

  2. Design of species-specific oligonucleotide probes for the detection of Bacteroides and Parabacteroides by fluorescence in situ hybridization and their application to the analysis of mouse caecal Bacteroides-Parabacteroides microbiota.

    PubMed

    Momose, Y; Park, S H; Miyamoto, Y; Itoh, K

    2011-07-01

    To develop species-specific monitoring techniques for rapid detection of Bacteroides and Parabacteroides inhabiting the mouse intestine by fluorescence in situ hybridization. The specificity of oligonucleotide probes was evaluated by fluorescence whole-cell hybridization. Oligonucleotide probes specific for each species hybridized only with the target bacteria. Using these probes, caecal Bacteroides-Parabacteroides microbiota of conventional mice and specific pathogen-free (SPF) mice from three different breeders were analysed. It was shown that Bacteroides acidifaciens Group-1, Group-2 and Group-3 were dominant in conventional mice and SPF mice from two out of three breeders. Bacteroides vulgatus and Parabacteroides distasonis were detected in one of these two SPF breeding colonies in addition to Bact. acidifaciens. SPF mice of the remaining breeder harboured characteristic Bacteroides-Parabacteroides microbiota, consisting of Bacteroides sp. ASF519 and Bacteroides caccae. Bacteroides acidifaciens is the dominant and most typical species in the mouse Bacteroides-Parabacteroides microbiota. The Group-3 was identified as a novel group and revealed to occupy a major niche together with Bact. acidifaciens Group-1 and Group-2. The species-specific probe set developed in this study was the efficient tool for rapid detection of target bacterial groups inhabiting the mouse intestine. The results of this study provide important new information on the mouse Bacteroides-Parabacteroides community. © 2011 The Authors. Journal of Applied Microbiology © 2011 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  3. Introduction of the Escherichia coli gdhA gene into Rhizobium phaseoli: effect on nitrogen fixation.

    PubMed Central

    Bravo, A; Becerril, B; Mora, J

    1988-01-01

    Rhizobium phaseoli lacks glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) and assimilates ammonium by the glutamine synthetase-glutamate synthase pathway. A strain of R. phaseoli harboring the Escherichia coli GDH structural gene (gdhA) was constructed. GDH activity was expressed in R. phaseoli in the free-living state and in symbiosis. Nodules with bacteroids that expressed GDH activity had severe impairment of nitrogen fixation. Also, R. phaseoli cells that lost GDH activity and assimilated ammonium by the glutamine synthetase-glutamate synthase pathway preferentially nodulated Phaseolus vulgaris. PMID:2892830

  4. Mode of Birth Influences Preterm Infant Intestinal Colonization With Bacteroides Over the Early Neonatal Period.

    PubMed

    Gregory, Katherine E; LaPlante, Rose D; Shan, Gururaj; Kumar, Deepak Vijaya; Gregas, Matt

    2015-12-01

    Intestinal colonization during infancy is important to short- and long-term health outcomes. Bacteroides, an early member of the intestinal microbiome, is necessary for breaking down complex molecules within the intestine and function to assist the body's immune system in fighting against potentially harmful pathogens. Little is known about the colonization pattern of Bacteroides in preterm infants during the early neonatal period. This study measured Bacteroides colonization during the early neonatal period in a population of preterm infants, based on clinical factors including mode of birth, antibiotics, and nutrition. Bacterial DNA was isolated from 144 fecal samples from 29 preterm infants and analyzed using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. Analyses included liner mixed models to determine which clinical factors affect Bacteroides colonization of the infant gut. We found that infants born via vaginal canal had a higher rate of increase in Bacteroides than infants born via cesarean section (P < .001). We did not find significant associations between antibiotic administration and differences in nutritional exposures with Bacteroides colonization. These findings highlight the significant influence of mode of birth on Bacteroides colonization. While mode of birth is not always modifiable, these study findings may help develop interventions for preterm infants born via cesarean section aimed at overcoming delayed Bacteroides colonization. Greater study of the intestinal microbiome and the clinical factors relevant to the preterm infant is needed so that interventions may be developed and tested, resulting in optimal microbial and immune health.

  5. Mode of Birth Influences Preterm Infant Intestinal Colonization with Bacteroides Over the Early Neonatal Period

    PubMed Central

    Gregory, Katherine E.; LaPlante, Rose D.; Shan, Gururaj; Kumar, Deepak Vijaya; Gregas, Matt

    2015-01-01

    Background Intestinal colonization during infancy is important to short and long term health outcomes. Bacteroides, an early member of the intestinal microbiome, are necessary for breaking down complex molecules within the intestine and function to assist the body’s immune system in fighting against potentially harmful pathogens. Little is known about the colonization pattern of Bacteroides in preterm infants during the early neonatal period. Purpose This study measured Bacteroides colonization during the early neonatal period in a population of preterm infants based on clinical factors including mode of birth, antibiotics, and nutrition. Methods Bacterial DNA was isolated from 144 fecal samples from 29 preterm infants and analyzed using quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Analyses included liner mixed models to determine which clinical factors affect Bacteroides colonization of the infant gut. Results We found that infants born via vaginal canal had a higher rate of increase in Bacteroides than infants born via Cesarean section (p<.001). We did not find significant associations between antibiotic administration and differences in nutritional exposures with Bacteroides colonization. Implications for Practice These findings highlight the significant influence of mode of birth on Bacteroides colonization. While mode of birth is not always modifiable, these study findings may help develop interventions for preterm infants born via Cesarean section aimed at overcoming delayed Bacteroides colonization. Implications for Research Greater study of the intestinal microbiome and the clinical factors relevant to the preterm infant is needed so that interventions may be developed and tested, resulting in optimal microbial and immune health. PMID:26551793

  6. Acetoacetyl Coenzyme A Reductase and Polyhydroxybutyrate Synthesis in Rhizobium (Cicer) sp. Strain CC 1192

    PubMed Central

    Chohan, Shahid N.; Copeland, Les

    1998-01-01

    Biochemical controls that regulate the biosynthesis of poly-3-hydroxybutyrate (PHB) were investigated in Rhizobium (Cicer) sp. strain CC 1192. This species is of interest for studying PHB synthesis because the polymer accumulates to a large extent in free-living cells but not in bacteroids during nitrogen-fixing symbiosis with chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.) plants. Evidence is presented that indicates that CC 1192 cells retain the enzymic capacity to synthesize PHB when they differentiate from the free-living state to the bacteroid state. This evidence includes the incorporation by CC 1192 bacteroids of radiolabel from [14C]malate into 3-hydroxybutyrate which was derived by chemically degrading insoluble material from bacteroid pellets. Furthermore, the presence of an NADPH-dependent acetoacetyl coenzyme A (CoA) reductase, which was specific for R-(−)-3-hydroxybutyryl-CoA and NADP+ in the oxidative direction, was demonstrated in extracts from free-living and bacteroid cells of CC 1192. Activity of this enzyme in the reductive direction appeared to be regulated at the biochemical level mainly by the availability of substrates. The CC 1192 cells also contained an NADH-specific acetoacetyl-CoA reductase which oxidized S-(+)-3-hydroxybutyryl-CoA. A membrane preparation from CC 1192 bacteroids readily oxidized NADH but not NADPH, which is suggested to be a major source of reductant for nitrogenase. Thus, a high ratio of NADPH to NADP+, which could enhance delivery of reductant to nitrogenase, could also favor the reduction of acetoacetyl-CoA for PHB synthesis. This would mean that fine controls that regulate the partitioning of acetyl-CoA between citrate synthase and 3-ketothiolase are important in determining whether PHB accumulates. PMID:9687441

  7. Effective Symbiosis between Rhizobium etli and Phaseolus vulgaris Requires the Alarmone ppGpp

    PubMed Central

    Moris, Martine; Braeken, Kristien; Schoeters, Eric; Verreth, Christel; Beullens, Serge; Vanderleyden, Jos; Michiels, Jan

    2005-01-01

    The symbiotic interaction between Rhizobium etli and Phaseolus vulgaris, the common bean plant, ultimately results in the formation of nitrogen-fixing nodules. Many aspects of the intermediate and late stages of this interaction are still poorly understood. The R. etli relA gene was identified through a genome-wide screening for R. etli symbiotic mutants. RelA has a pivotal role in cellular physiology, as it catalyzes the synthesis of (p)ppGpp, which mediates the stringent response in bacteria. The synthesis of ppGpp was abolished in an R. etli relA mutant strain under conditions of amino acid starvation. Plants nodulated by an R. etli relA mutant had a strongly reduced nitrogen fixation activity (75% reduction). Also, at the microscopic level, bacteroid morphology was altered, with the size of relA mutant bacteroids being increased compared to that of wild-type bacteroids. The expression of the σN-dependent nitrogen fixation genes rpoN2 and iscN was considerably reduced in the relA mutant. In addition, the expression of the relA gene was negatively regulated by RpoN2, the symbiosis-specific σN copy of R. etli. Therefore, an autoregulatory loop controlling the expression of relA and rpoN2 seems operative in bacteroids. The production of long- and short-chain acyl-homoserine-lactones by the cinIR and raiIR systems was decreased in an R. etli relA mutant. Our results suggest that relA may play an important role in the regulation of gene expression in R. etli bacteroids and in the adaptation of bacteroid physiology. PMID:16030240

  8. Products of Dark CO2 Fixation in Pea Root Nodules Support Bacteroid Metabolism 1

    PubMed Central

    Rosendahl, Lis; Vance, Carroll P.; Pedersen, Walther B.

    1990-01-01

    Products of the nodule cytosol in vivo dark [14C]CO2 fixation were detected in the plant cytosol as well as in the bacteroids of pea (Pisum sativum L. cv “Bodil”) nodules. The distribution of the metabolites of the dark CO2 fixation products was compared in effective (fix+) nodules infected by a wild-type Rhizobium leguminosarum (MNF 300), and ineffective (fix−) nodules of the R. leguminosarum mutant MNF 3080. The latter has a defect in the dicarboxylic acid transport system of the bacterial membrane. The 14C incorporation from [14C]CO2 was about threefold greater in the wild-type nodules than in the mutant nodules. Similarly, in wild-type nodules the in vitro phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase activity was substantially greater than that of the mutant. Almost 90% of the 14C label in the cytosol was found in organic acids in both symbioses. Malate comprised about half of the total cytosol organic acid content on a molar basis, and more than 70% of the cytosol radioactivity in the organic acid fraction was detected in malate in both symbioses. Most of the remaining 14C was contained in the amino acid fraction of the cytosol in both symbioses. More than 70% of the 14C label found in the amino acids of the cytosol was incorporated in aspartate, which on a molar basis comprised only about 1% of the total amino acid pool in the cytosol. The extensive 14C labeling of malate and aspartate from nodule dark [14C]CO2 fixation is consistent with the role of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxlase in nodule dark CO2 fixation. Bacteroids from the effective wild-type symbiosis accumulated sevenfold more 14C than did the dicarboxylic acid transport defective bacteroids. The bacteroids of the effective MNF 300 symbiosis contained the largest proportion of the incorporated 14C in the organic acids, whereas ineffective MNF 3080 bacteroids mainly contained 14C in the amino acid fraction. In both symbioses a larger proportion of the bacteroid 14C label was detected in malate and aspartate

  9. Pyruvate is synthesized by two pathways in pea bacteroids with different efficiencies for nitrogen fixation.

    PubMed

    Mulley, Geraldine; Lopez-Gomez, Miguel; Zhang, Ye; Terpolilli, Jason; Prell, Jurgen; Finan, Turlough; Poole, Philip

    2010-10-01

    Nitrogen fixation in legume bacteroids is energized by the metabolism of dicarboxylic acids, which requires their oxidation to both oxaloacetate and pyruvate. In alfalfa bacteroids, production of pyruvate requires NAD+ malic enzyme (Dme) but not NADP+ malic enzyme (Tme). However, we show that Rhizobium leguminosarum has two pathways for pyruvate formation from dicarboxylates catalyzed by Dme and by the combined activities of phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) carboxykinase (PckA) and pyruvate kinase (PykA). Both pathways enable N2 fixation, but the PckA/PykA pathway supports N2 fixation at only 60% of that for Dme. Double mutants of dme and pckA/pykA did not fix N2. Furthermore, dme pykA double mutants did not grow on dicarboxylates, showing that they are the only pathways for the production of pyruvate from dicarboxylates normally expressed. PckA is not expressed in alfalfa bacteroids, resulting in an obligate requirement for Dme for pyruvate formation and N2 fixation. When PckA was expressed from a constitutive nptII promoter in alfalfa dme bacteroids, acetylene was reduced at 30% of the wild-type rate, although this level was insufficient to prevent nitrogen starvation. Dme has N-terminal, malic enzyme (Me), and C-terminal phosphotransacetylase (Pta) domains. Deleting the Pta domain increased the peak acetylene reduction rate in 4-week-old pea plants to 140 to 150% of the wild-type rate, and this was accompanied by increased nodule mass. Plants infected with Pta deletion mutants did not have increased dry weight, demonstrating that there is not a sustained change in nitrogen fixation throughout growth. This indicates a complex relationship between pyruvate synthesis in bacteroids, nitrogen fixation, and plant growth.

  10. Genomic instability in Rhizobium phaseoli.

    PubMed Central

    Flores, M; González, V; Pardo, M A; Leija, A; Martínez, E; Romero, D; Piñero, D; Dávila, G; Palacios, R

    1988-01-01

    Experience from different laboratories indicates that Rhizobium strains can generate variability in regard to some phenotypic characteristics such as colony morphology or symbiotic properties. On the other hand, several reports suggest that under certain stress conditions or genetic manipulations Rhizobium cells can present genomic rearrangements. In search of frequent genomic rearrangements, we analyzed three Rhizobium strains under laboratory conditions that are not considered to cause stress in bacterial populations. DNAs from direct descendants of a single cell were analyzed in regard to the hybridization patterns obtained, using as probes different recombinant plasmids or cosmids; while most of the probes utilized did not show differences in the hybridization patterns, some of them revealed the occurrence of frequent genomic rearrangements. The implications and possible biological significance of these observations are discussed. Images PMID:3343217

  11. Rhizobium etli asparaginase II

    PubMed Central

    Huerta-Saquero, Alejandro; Evangelista-Martínez, Zahaed; Moreno-Enriquez, Angélica; Perez-Rueda, Ernesto

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial l-asparaginase has been a universal component of therapies for childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia since the 1970s. Two principal enzymes derived from Escherichia coli and Erwinia chrysanthemi are the only options clinically approved to date. We recently reported a study of recombinant l-asparaginase (AnsA) from Rhizobium etli and described an increasing type of AnsA family members. Sequence analysis revealed four conserved motifs with notable differences with respect to the conserved regions of amino acid sequences of type I and type II l-asparaginases, particularly in comparison with therapeutic enzymes from E. coli and E. chrysanthemi. These differences suggested a distinct immunological specificity. Here, we report an in silico analysis that revealed immunogenic determinants of AnsA. Also, we used an extensive approach to compare the crystal structures of E. coli and E. chrysantemi asparaginases with a computational model of AnsA and identified immunogenic epitopes. A three-dimensional model of AsnA revealed, as expected based on sequence dissimilarities, completely different folding and different immunogenic epitopes. This approach could be very useful in transcending the problem of immunogenicity in two major ways: by chemical modifications of epitopes to reduce drug immunogenicity, and by site-directed mutagenesis of amino acid residues to diminish immunogenicity without reduction of enzymatic activity. PMID:22895060

  12. Common links in the structure and cellular localization of Rhizobium chitolipooligosaccharides and general Rhizobium membrane phospholipid and glycolipid components.

    PubMed

    Cedergren, R A; Lee, J; Ross, K L; Hollingsworth, R I

    1995-04-04

    Several common links between the structural chemistry of the chitolipooligosaccharides of Rhizobium and the general rhizobial membrane lipid and lipopolysaccharide chemistry of these bacteria have been uncovered. Aspects of common chemistry include sulfation, methylation, and the position and extent of fatty acyl chain unsaturation. We find that bacteria which are known to synthesize sulfated chitolipooligosaccharides (such as Rhizobium meliloti strains and the broad-host-range Rhizobium species strain NGR234) also have sulfated lipopolysaccharides. Their common origins of sulfation have been demonstrated by using mutants which are known to be impaired in sulfating their chitolipooligosaccharides. In such cases, there is a corresponding diminution or complete lack of sulfation of the lipopolysaccharides. The structural diversity of the fatty acids observed in the chitolipooligosaccharides is also observed in the other membrane lipids. For instance, the doubly unsaturated fatty acids which are known to be predominant components of R. meliloti chitolipooligosaccharides were also found in the usual phospholipids and glycolipids. Also, the known functionalization of the chitolipooligosaccharides of R. sp. NGR234 by O- and N-methylation was also reflected in the lipopolysaccharide of this organism. The common structural features of chitolipooligosaccharides and membrane components are consistent with a substantial degree of biosynthetic overlap and a large degree of cellular, spatial overlap between these molecules. The latter aspect is clearly demonstrated here since we show that the chitolipooligosaccharides are, in fact, normal membrane components of Rhizobium. This increases the importance of understanding the role of the bacterial cell surface chemistry in the Rhizobium/legume symbiosis and developing a comprehensive understanding of the highly integrated membrane lipid and glycolipid chemistry of Rhizobium.

  13. Patient-Specific Bacteroides Genome Variants in Pouchitis.

    PubMed

    Vineis, Joseph H; Ringus, Daina L; Morrison, Hilary G; Delmont, Tom O; Dalal, Sushila; Raffals, Laura H; Antonopoulos, Dionysios A; Rubin, David T; Eren, A Murat; Chang, Eugene B; Sogin, Mitchell L

    2016-11-15

    A 2-year longitudinal microbiome study of 22 patients who underwent colectomy with an ileal pouch anal anastomosis detected significant increases in distinct populations of Bacteroides during 9 of 11 patient visits that coincided with inflammation (pouchitis). Oligotyping and metagenomic short-read annotation identified Bacteroides populations that occurred in early samples, bloomed during inflammation, and reappeared after antibiotic treatment. Targeted cultivation of Bacteroides isolates from the same individual at multiple time points and from several patients detected subtle genomic changes, including the identification of rapidly evolving genomic elements that differentiate isogenic strains of Bacteroides fragilis from the mucosa versus lumen. Each patient harbored Bacteroides spp. that are closely related to commonly occurring clinical isolates, including Bacteroides ovatus, B. thetaiotaomicron, B. vulgatus, and B. fragilis, which contained unique loci in different patients for synthesis of capsular polysaccharides. The presence of unique Bacteroides capsular polysaccharide loci within different hosts and between the lumen and mucosa may represent adaptations to stimulate, suppress, and evade host-specific immune responses at different microsites of the ileal pouch. This longitudinal study provides an opportunity to describe shifts in the microbiomes of individual patients who suffer from ulcerative colitis (UC) prior to and following inflammation. Pouchitis serves as a model for UC with a predictable incidence of disease onset and enables prospective longitudinal investigations of UC etiology prior to inflammation. Because of insufficient criteria for predicting which patients will develop UC or pouchitis, the interpretation of cross-sectional study designs suffers from lack of information about the microbiome structure and host gene expression patterns that directly correlate with the onset of disease. Our unique longitudinal study design allows each

  14. Intestinal Bacteroides species associated with coeliac disease.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, Ester; Donat, Ester; Ribes-Koninckx, Carmen; Calabuig, Miguel; Sanz, Yolanda

    2010-12-01

    To characterise the predominant species of bacterial populations associated with duodenal biopsies of paediatric patients with active and treated coeliac disease. 20 biopsy specimens from patients with active coeliac disease, 12 from patients with treated coeliac disease, and eight from age-matched controls were evaluated for comparative purposes. Bacteroides, Bifidobacterium and lactic acid bacteria (LAB) populations were analysed by PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis using group-specific primers. Bacteroides diversity was higher in biopsy specimens from controls than in those from patients with active and treated coeliac disease. Bacteroides distasonis, Bacteroides fragilis/Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron, Bacteroides uniformis and Bacteroides ovatus were more abundant in controls than in patients with coeliac disease (p<0.05). Bacteroides vulgatus was more frequently detected in controls than in patients with treated coeliac disease (p<0.01). Bacteroides dorei was more common in patients with active coeliac disease than in those with treated coeliac disease and control children (p<0.01). Bifidobacterium diversity was higher in patients with coeliac disease than in controls. Bifidobacterium adolescentis and Bifidobacterium animalis subsp lactis were more prevalent in patients with active coeliac disease than in patients with treated coeliac disease and control children. A higher LAB diversity was found in patients with treated coeliac disease and controls than in patients with active coeliac disease. Weissella spp and Lactobacillus fermentum were more frequently detected in patients with treated coeliac disease than in controls and patients with active coeliac disease. Bacteroides, Bifidobacterium and LAB populations in the duodenum of Spanish children with typical coeliac disease (active and treated) and controls differ in diversity and species composition; this could contribute to features of the disease.

  15. A Rhizobium leguminosarum mutant defective in symbiotic iron acquisition.

    PubMed Central

    Nadler, K D; Johnston, A W; Chen, J W; John, T R

    1990-01-01

    Iron acquisition by symbiotic Rhizobium spp. is essential for nitrogen fixation in the legume root nodule symbiosis. Rhizobium leguminosarum 116, an ineffective mutant strain with a defect in iron acquisition, was isolated after nitrosoguanidine mutagenesis of the effective strain 1062. The pop-1 mutation in strain 116 imparted to it a complex phenotype, characteristic of iron deficiency: the accumulation of porphyrins (precursors of hemes) so that colonies emitted a characteristic pinkish-red fluorescence when excited by UV light, reduced levels of cytochromes b and c, and wild-type growth on high-iron media but low or no growth in low-iron broth and on solid media supplemented with the iron scavenger dipyridyl. Several iron(III)-solubilizing agents, such as citrate, hydroxyquinoline, and dihydroxybenzoate, stimulated growth of 116 on low-iron solid medium; anthranilic acid, the R. leguminosarum siderophore, inhibited low-iron growth of 116. The initial rate of 55Fe uptake by suspensions of iron-starved 116 cells was 10-fold less than that of iron-starved wild-type cells. Electron microscopic observations revealed no morphological abnormalities in the small, white nodules induced by 116. Nodule cortical cells were filled with vesicles containing apparently normal bacteroids. No premature degeneration of bacteroids or of plant cell organelles was evident. We mapped pop-1 by R plasmid-mediated conjugation and recombination to the ade-27-rib-2 region of the R. leguminosarum chromosome. No segregation of pop-1 and the symbiotic defect was observed among the recombinants from these crosses. Cosmid pKN1, a pLAFR1 derivative containing a 24-kilobase-pair fragment of R. leguminosarum DNA, conferred on 116 the ability to grow on dipyridyl medium and to fix nitrogen symbiotically. These results indicate that the insert cloned in pKN1 encodes an element of the iron acquisition system of R. leguminosarum that is essential for symbiotic nitrogen fixation. Images FIG. 3A-3B FIG

  16. Fine Structure of Bacteroids in Root Nodules of Vigna sinensis, Acacia longifolia, Viminaria juncea, and Lupinus angustifolius

    PubMed Central

    Dart, P. J.; Mercer, F. V.

    1966-01-01

    Dart, P. J. (University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia), and F. V. Mercer. Fine structure of bacteroids in root nodules of Vigna sinensis, Acacia longifolia, Viminaria juncea, and Lupinus angustifolius. J. Bacteriol. 91:1314–1319.—In nodules of Vigna sinensis, Acacia longifolia, and Viminaria juncea, membrane envelopes enclose groups of bacteroids. The bacteroids often contain inclusion granules and electron-dense bodies, expand little during development, and retain their rod form with a compact, central nucleoid area. The membrane envelope may persist around bacteroids after host cytoplasm breakdown. In nodules of Lupinus angustifolius, the membrane envelopes enclose only one or two bacteroids, which expand noticeably during development and change from their initial rod structure. Images PMID:5929757

  17. Cefoxitin inactivation by Bacteroides fragilis.

    PubMed

    Cuchural, G J; Tally, F P; Jacobus, N V; Marsh, P K; Mayhew, J W

    1983-12-01

    We have surveyed the susceptibility of 1,575 clinical isolates of the Bacteroides fragilis group of organisms to cefoxitin and eight other antimicrobial agents. Eleven isolates, 0.7% of the total, were highly cefoxitin resistant and had minimum inhibitory concentrations of greater than or equal to 64 micrograms/ml. These isolates were also resistant to other beta-lactam antibiotics. Of 11 isolates, 4 were able to inactivate cefoxitin in broth cultures, as measured by microbiological and high-pressure liquid chromatography assays. Two distinct patterns of cefoxitin breakdown products were detected by high-pressure liquid chromatography analysis. The beta-lactamase inhibitors clavulanic acid and sulbactam failed to show synergism with cefoxitin. These data demonstrate that members of the B. fragilis group have acquired a novel resistance mechanism enabling them to inactivate cefoxitin.

  18. Genetic analysis of the Rhizobium meliloti bacA gene: functional interchangeability with the Escherichia coli sbmA gene and phenotypes of mutants.

    PubMed

    Ichige, A; Walker, G C

    1997-01-01

    The Rhizobium meliloti bacA gene encodes a function that is essential for bacterial differentiation into bacteroids within plant cells in the symbiosis between R. meliloti and alfalfa. An Escherichia coli homolog of BacA, SbmA, is implicated in the uptake of microcin B17, microcin J25 (formerly microcin 25), and bleomycin. When expressed in E. coli with the lacZ promoter, the R. meliloti bacA gene was found to suppress all the known defects of E. coli sbmA mutants, namely, increased resistance to microcin B17, microcin J25, and bleomycin, demonstrating the functional similarity between the two proteins. The R. meliloti bacA386::Tn(pho)A mutant, as well as a newly constructed bacA deletion mutant, was found to show increased resistance to bleomycin. However, it also showed increased resistance to certain aminoglycosides and increased sensitivity to ethanol and detergents, suggesting that the loss of bacA function causes some defect in membrane integrity. The E. coli sbmA gene suppressed all these bacA mutant phenotypes as well as the Fix- phenotype when placed under control of the bacA promoter. Taken together, these results strongly suggest that the BacA and SbmA proteins are functionally similar and thus provide support for our previous hypothesis that BacA may be required for uptake of some compound that plays an important role in bacteroid development. However, the additional phenotypes of bacA mutants identified in this study suggest the alternative possibility that BacA may be needed for membrane integrity, which is likely to be critically important during the early stages of bacterial differentiation within plant cells.

  19. Bacteroides clarus sp. nov., Bacteroides fluxus sp. nov. and Bacteroides oleiciplenus sp. nov., isolated from human faeces.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Yohei; Nagai, Fumiko; Morotomi, Masami; Sakon, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Ryuichiro

    2010-08-01

    Three Gram-stain-negative, obligately anaerobic, non-spore-forming, rod-shaped bacteria (strains YIT 12056T, YIT 12057T and YIT 12058T) were isolated from human faeces. These strains were characterized by phylogenetic analyses based on 16S rRNA gene sequence and phenotypic tests. 16S rRNA gene sequence analyses revealed that strains YIT 12056T, YIT 12057T and YIT 12058T were most closely related to the type strains of Bacteroides gallinarum, Bacteroides uniformis and Bacteroides intestinalis with approximate similarity values of 96.6, 95.0 and 96.7%, respectively. The DNA G+C contents of the novel strains were 45.3 (YIT 12056T), 45.2 (YIT 12057T) and 43.6 mol% (YIT 12058T) and the major respiratory quinones of all three isolates were menaquinones MK-10 and MK-11. These properties were typical for members of the genus Bacteroides. The results of the other phenotypic analyses also supported the affiliation of these strains to the genus Bacteroides. The 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis, analysis of the major cellular fatty acids and other biochemical tests enabled the genotypic and phenotypic differentiation of the three new strains. Based on these data, three novel species, Bacteroides clarus sp. nov., Bacteroides fluxus sp. nov. and Bacteroides oleiciplenus sp. nov. are proposed. The type strains of B. clarus, B. fluxus and B. oleiciplenus are YIT 12056T (=JCM 16067T=DSM 22519T), YIT 12057T (=JCM 16101T=DSM 22534T) and YIT 12058T (=JCM 16102T=DSM 22535T), respectively.

  20. Iron: an essential micronutrient for the legume-rhizobium symbiosis

    PubMed Central

    Brear, Ella M.; Day, David A.; Smith, Penelope M. C.

    2013-01-01

    Legumes, which develop a symbiosis with nitrogen-fixing bacteria, have an increased demand for iron. Iron is required for the synthesis of iron-containing proteins in the host, including the highly abundant leghemoglobin, and in bacteroids for nitrogenase and cytochromes of the electron transport chain. Deficiencies in iron can affect initiation and development of the nodule. Within root cells, iron is chelated with organic acids such as citrate and nicotianamine and distributed to other parts of the plant. Transport to the nitrogen-fixing bacteroids in infected cells of nodules is more complicated. Formation of the symbiosis results in bacteroids internalized within root cortical cells of the legume where they are surrounded by a plant-derived membrane termed the symbiosome membrane (SM). This membrane forms an interface that regulates nutrient supply to the bacteroid. Consequently, iron must cross this membrane before being supplied to the bacteroid. Iron is transported across the SM as both ferric and ferrous iron. However, uptake of Fe(II) by both the symbiosome and bacteroid is faster than Fe(III) uptake. Members of more than one protein family may be responsible for Fe(II) transport across the SM. The only Fe(II) transporter in nodules characterized to date is GmDMT1 (Glycine max divalent metal transporter 1), which is located on the SM in soybean. Like the root plasma membrane, the SM has ferric iron reductase activity. The protein responsible has not been identified but is predicted to reduce ferric iron accumulated in the symbiosome space prior to uptake by the bacteroid. With the recent publication of a number of legume genomes including Medicago truncatula and G. max, a large number of additional candidate transport proteins have been identified. Members of the NRAMP (natural resistance-associated macrophage protein), YSL (yellow stripe-like), VIT (vacuolar iron transporter), and ZIP (Zrt-, Irt-like protein) transport families show enhanced expression in

  1. The naringenin-induced exoproteome of Rhizobium etli CE3.

    PubMed

    Meneses, Niurka; Taboada, Hermenegildo; Dunn, Michael F; Vargas, María Del Carmen; Buchs, Natasha; Heller, Manfred; Encarnación, Sergio

    2017-03-02

    Flavonoids excreted by legume roots induce the expression of symbiotically essential nodulation (nod) genes in rhizobia, as well as that of specific protein export systems. In the bean microsymbiont Rhizobium etli CE3, nod genes are induced by the flavonoid naringenin. In this study, we identified 693 proteins in the exoproteome of strain CE3 grown in minimal medium with or without naringenin, with 101 and 100 exoproteins being exclusive to these conditions, respectively. Four hundred ninety-two (71%) of the extracellular proteins were found in both cultures. Of the total exoproteins identified, nearly 35% were also present in the intracellular proteome of R. etli bacteroids, 27% had N-terminal signal sequences and a significant number had previously demonstrated or possible novel roles in symbiosis, including bacterial cell surface modification, adhesins, proteins classified as MAMPs (microbe-associated molecular patterns), such as flagellin and EF-Tu, and several normally cytoplasmic proteins as Ndk and glycolytic enzymes, which are known to have extracellular "moonlighting" roles in bacteria that interact with eukaryotic cells. It is noteworthy that the transmembrane ß (1,2) glucan biosynthesis protein NdvB, an essential symbiotic protein in rhizobia, was found in the R. etli naringenin-induced exoproteome. In addition, potential binding sites for two nod-gene transcriptional regulators (NodD) occurred somewhat more frequently in the promoters of genes encoding naringenin-induced exoproteins in comparison to those ofexoproteins found in the control condition.

  2. Cloning and characterization of hydrogen uptake genes from Rhizobium leguminosarum.

    PubMed Central

    Leyva, A; Palacios, J M; Mozo, T; Ruiz-Argüeso, T

    1987-01-01

    A gene library of genomic DNA from the hydrogen uptake (Hup)-positive strain 128C53 of Rhizobium leguminosarum was constructed by using the broad-host-range mobilizable cosmid vector pLAFR1. The resulting recombinant cosmids contained insert DNA averaging 21 kilobase pairs (kb) in length. Two clones from the above gene library were identified by colony hybridization with DNA sequences from plasmid pHU1 containing hup genes of Bradyhizobium japonicum. The corresponding recombinant cosmids, pAL618 and pAL704, were isolated, and a region of about 28 kb containing the sequences homologous to B. japonicum hup-specific DNA was physically mapped. Further hybridization analysis with three fragments from pHU1 (5.9-kb HindIII, 2.9-kb EcoRI, and 5.0-kb EcoRI) showed that the overall arrangement of the R. leguminosarum hup-specific region closely parallels that of B. japonicum. The presence of functional hup genes within the isolated cosmid DNA was demonstrated by site-directed Tn5 mutagenesis of the 128C53 genome and analysis of the Hup phenotype of the Tn5 insertion strains in symbiosis with peas. Transposon Tn5 insertions at six different sites spanning 11 kb of pAL618 completely suppressed the hydrogenase activity of the pea bacteroids. Images PMID:2822654

  3. Study on the diversity of Bacteroides and Clostridium in patients with primary gout.

    PubMed

    Xing, Shi-Chao; Meng, Dong-Mei; Chen, Ying; Jiang, Gang; Liu, Xi-Shuang; Li, Na; Yan, Yao-Yao; Li, Chang-Gui

    2015-03-01

    To analyze the diversity of both Bacteroides and Clostridium in patients with primary gout and the difference from that of normal individuals. And to investigate the relationship between the primary gout and the intestinal flora. Fecal samples of 90 cases with the primary gout and 94 cases normal comparison group were selected, together with the cases that match the filter criteria. The DNA is extracted from the feces. 16S rRNA specific primers of both Bacteroides and Clostridium were adopted for the PCR amplification. The molecular fingerprints of Bacteroides and Clostridium in both the primary gout group and the normal control group were obtained through DGGE and subjected for further analysis on both the diversity and the similarity. Compared with normal individuals, the number of bands and Shannon-Weaver (H') of Bacteroides in patients with primary gout was not reduced, but significantly decreased in Clostridium. Furthermore, the intra-group and inter-group similarity of both Bacteroides and Clostridium were lower. The primary gout has caused the structural change of both Bacteroides and Clostridium, inducing the low similarity, especially for Clostridium. It has statistic significance. The gut predominant flora may play an important role in the development of primary gout.

  4. Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron and Faecalibacterium prausnitzii influence the production of mucus glycans and the development of goblet cells in the colonic epithelium of a gnotobiotic model rodent

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The intestinal mucus layer plays a key role in the maintenance of host-microbiota homeostasis. To document the crosstalk between the host and microbiota, we used gnotobiotic models to study the influence of two major commensal bacteria, Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron and Faecalibacterium prausnitzii, on this intestinal mucus layer. B. thetaiotaomicron is known to use polysaccharides from mucus, but its effect on goblet cells has not been addressed so far. F. prausnitzii is of particular physiological importance because it can be considered as a sensor and a marker of human health. We determined whether B. thetaiotaomicron affected goblet cell differentiation, mucin synthesis and glycosylation in the colonic epithelium. We then investigated how F. prausnitzii influenced the colonic epithelial responses to B. thetaiotaomicron. Results B. thetaiotaomicron, an acetate producer, increased goblet cell differentiation, expression of mucus-related genes and the ratio of sialylated to sulfated mucins in mono-associated rats. B. thetaiotaomicron, therefore, stimulates the secretory lineage, favoring mucus production. When B. thetaiotaomicron was associated with F. prausnitzii, an acetate consumer and a butyrate producer, the effects on goblet cells and mucin glycosylation were diminished. F. prausnitzii, by attenuating the effects of B. thetaiotaomicron on mucus, may help the epithelium to maintain appropriate proportions of different cell types of the secretory lineage. Using a mucus-producing cell line, we showed that acetate up-regulated KLF4, a transcription factor involved in goblet cell differentiation. Conclusions B. thetaiotaomicron and F. prausnitzii, which are metabolically complementary, modulate, in vivo, the intestinal mucus barrier by modifying goblet cells and mucin glycosylation. Our study reveals the importance of the balance between two main commensal bacteria in maintaining colonic epithelial homeostasis via their respective effects on mucus. PMID

  5. Identification of feces by detection of Bacteroides genes.

    PubMed

    Nakanishi, Hiroaki; Shojo, Hideki; Ohmori, Takeshi; Hara, Masaaki; Takada, Aya; Adachi, Noboru; Saito, Kazuyuki

    2013-01-01

    In forensic science, the identification of feces is very important in a variety of crime investigations. However, no sensitive and simple fecal identification method using molecular biological techniques has been reported. Here, we focused on the fecal bacteria, Bacteroides uniformis, Bacteroides vulgatus and Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron, and developed a novel fecal identification method by detection of the gene sequences specific to these bacteria in various body (feces, blood, saliva, semen, urine, vaginal fluids and skin surfaces) and forensic (anal adhesions) specimens. Bacterial gene detection was performed by real-time PCR using a minor groove binding probe to amplify the RNA polymerase β-subunit gene of B. uniformis and B. vulgatus, and the α-1-6 mannanase gene of B. thetaiotaomicron. At least one of these bacteria was detected in the feces of 20 donors; the proportions of B. uniformis, B. vulgatus and B. thetaiotaomicron were 95, 85 and 60%, respectively. Bacteroides vulgatus was also detected in one of six vaginal fluid samples, but B. thetaiotaomicron and B. uniformis were not detected in body samples other than feces. Further, we applied this method to forensic specimens from 18 donors. Eighteen anal adhesions also contained at least one of three bacteria; B. uniformis, B. vulgatus and B. thetaiotaomicron were detected in 89, 78 and 56%, respectively, of the specimens. Thus, these bacteria were present at a high frequency in the fecal and forensic specimens, while either B. uniformis or B. vulgatus was detected in all samples. Therefore, B. uniformis and B. vulgatus represent more appropriate target species than B. thetaiotaomicron for the identification of fecal material. If B. vulgatus and/or B. uniformis are detected, it is likely that the sample contains feces. Taken together, our results suggest that the use of molecular biological techniques will aid the detection of feces in forensic practice, although it is possible that the samples contained

  6. Modulation of endogenous indole-3-acetic acid biosynthesis in bacteroids within Medicago sativa nodules.

    PubMed

    Bianco, C; Senatore, B; Arbucci, S; Pieraccini, G; Defez, R

    2014-07-01

    To evaluate the dose-response effects of endogenous indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) on Medicago plant growth and dry weight production, we increased the synthesis of IAA in both free-living and symbiosis-stage rhizobial bacteroids during Rhizobium-legume symbiosis. For this purpose, site-directed mutagenesis was applied to modify an 85-bp promoter sequence, driving the expression of iaaM and tms2 genes for IAA biosynthesis. A positive correlation was found between the higher expression of IAA biosynthetic genes in free-living bacteria and the increased production of IAA under both free-living and symbiotic conditions. Plants nodulated by RD65 and RD66 strains, synthetizing the highest IAA concentration, showed a significant (up to 73%) increase in the shoot fresh weight and upregulation of nitrogenase gene, nifH, compared to plants nodulated by the wild-type strain. When these plants were analyzed by confocal microscopy, using an anti-IAA antibody, the strongest signal was observed in bacteroids of Medicago sativa RD66 (Ms-RD66) plants, even when they were located in the senescent nodule zone. We show here a simple system to modulate endogenous IAA biosynthesis in bacteria nodulating legumes suitable to investigate which is the maximum level of IAA biosynthesis, resulting in the maximal increase of plant growth.

  7. Effects of culture age on symbiotic infectivity of Rhizobium japonicum

    SciTech Connect

    Bhuvaneswari, T.V.; Mills, K.K.; Crist, D.K.; Evans, W.R.; Bauer, W.D.

    1983-01-01

    The infectivity of the soybean symbiont Rhizobium japonicum changed two- to fivefold with culture age for strains 110 ARS, 138 Str Spc, and 123 Spc, whereas culture age had relatively little effect on the infectivity of strains 83 Str and 61A76 Str. Infectivity was measured by determining the number of nodules which developed on soybean primary roots in the zone which contained developing and preemergent root hairs at the time of inoculation. Root cells in this region of the host root are susceptible to Rhizobium infection, but this susceptibility is lost during acropetal development and maturation of the root cells within a period of 4 to 6 h. Profiles of nodulation frequency at different locations on the root were not affected by the age of the R. japonicum cultures, indicating that culture age affected the efficiency of Rhizobium infection rather than how soon infections were initiated after inoculation. Inoculum dose-response experiments also indicated that culture age affected the efficiency of infection. Two strains, 61A76 Str and 83 Str, were relatively inefficient at all culture ages, particularly at low inoculum doses. Changes in infectivity with culture age were reasonably well correlated with changes in the proportion of cells in a culture capable of binding soybean lectin. Suspensions of R. japonicum in water were found to retain their viability and infectivity. 15 references, 6 figures, 2 tables.

  8. The effect of environmental conditions on expression of Bacteroides fragilis and Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron C10 protease genes

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Bacteroides fragilis and Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron are members of the normal human intestinal microbiota. However, both organisms are capable of causing opportunistic infections, during which the environmental conditions to which the bacteria are exposed change dramatically. To further explore their potential for contributing to infection, we have characterized the expression in B. thetaiotaomicron of four homologues of the gene encoding the C10 cysteine protease SpeB, a potent extracellular virulence factor produced by Streptococcus pyogenes. Results We identified a paralogous set of genes (btp genes) in the B. thetaiotaomicron genome, that were related to C10 protease genes we recently identified in B. fragilis. Similar to C10 proteases found in B. fragilis, three of the B. thetaiotaomicron homologues were transcriptionally coupled to genes encoding small proteins that are similar in structural architecture to Staphostatins, protease inhibitors associated with Staphopains in Staphylococcus aureus. The expression of genes for these C10 proteases in both B. fragilis and B. thetaiotaomicron was found to be regulated by environmental stimuli, in particular by exposure to oxygen, which may be important for their contribution to the development of opportunistic infections. Conclusions Genes encoding C10 proteases are increasingly identified in operons which also contain genes encoding proteins homologous to protease inhibitors. The Bacteroides C10 protease gene expression levels are responsive to different environmental stimuli suggesting they may have distinct roles in the bacterial-host interaction. PMID:22943521

  9. The effect of environmental conditions on expression of Bacteroides fragilis and Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron C10 protease genes.

    PubMed

    Thornton, Roibeard F; Murphy, Elizabeth C; Kagawa, Todd F; O'Toole, Paul W; Cooney, Jakki C

    2012-09-03

    Bacteroides fragilis and Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron are members of the normal human intestinal microbiota. However, both organisms are capable of causing opportunistic infections, during which the environmental conditions to which the bacteria are exposed change dramatically. To further explore their potential for contributing to infection, we have characterized the expression in B. thetaiotaomicron of four homologues of the gene encoding the C10 cysteine protease SpeB, a potent extracellular virulence factor produced by Streptococcus pyogenes. We identified a paralogous set of genes (btp genes) in the B. thetaiotaomicron genome, that were related to C10 protease genes we recently identified in B. fragilis. Similar to C10 proteases found in B. fragilis, three of the B. thetaiotaomicron homologues were transcriptionally coupled to genes encoding small proteins that are similar in structural architecture to Staphostatins, protease inhibitors associated with Staphopains in Staphylococcus aureus. The expression of genes for these C10 proteases in both B. fragilis and B. thetaiotaomicron was found to be regulated by environmental stimuli, in particular by exposure to oxygen, which may be important for their contribution to the development of opportunistic infections. Genes encoding C10 proteases are increasingly identified in operons which also contain genes encoding proteins homologous to protease inhibitors. The Bacteroides C10 protease gene expression levels are responsive to different environmental stimuli suggesting they may have distinct roles in the bacterial-host interaction.

  10. [Structure of surface glycoconjugates or Rhizobium species and their function in nitrogen fixation]; Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    1991-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharides (LPS) were isolated and purified from the surface of the Rhizobium species R. trifolii, R. leguminosarium and R. meliloti. A novel core tetrasaccharide and a trisaccharide required for nodulation were discovered. Several types of LPS from a single culture, inducible by nod gene inducers, were resolved by electrophoresis and chromatography. Other potential inducers are being investigated. At least three separate loci control LPS biosynthesis in R. meliloti. We maintain secreted, sulphated LPS involved in nodulation is attached to the cell surface, and have demonstrated sulphated, lipid-linked carbohydrates on the surface of R. meliloti. Antibodies to purified cell surface carbohydrate oligomers are being prepared. These antibodies will be used to screen bacteria, and also to identify cell surface changes associated with differentiation of a bacteria to a bacteroid.

  11. Characterization of Bacteroides forsythus isolates.

    PubMed Central

    Takemoto, T; Kurihara, H; Dahlen, G

    1997-01-01

    Fifteen Bacteroides forsythus strains freshly isolated from patients with periodontitis were used together with three collection strains and one type strain for characterization of growth on various media; determination of enzymatic profiles, antibiotic susceptibility profiles, 16S rRNA ribotypes, sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) outer membrane protein profiles, and pathogenicity; and gas chromatography analysis by using a wound chamber model in rabbits. All strains were stimulated by N-acetylmuramic acid, while one strain needed a further supplement such as yeast extract for optimal growth. All strains showed trypsin-like activity. While 10 different ribotypes were found, the SDS-PAGE profiles revealed similar patterns for all strains. All strains were sensitive to penicillin G (MICs, <0.5 microg/ml), ampicillin (MICs, <1.0 microg/ml), amoxicillin (MICs, <0.38 microg/ml), metronidazole (MICs, <0.005 microg/ml), tetracycline (MICs, <0.19 microg/ml), doxycycline (MICs, 0.05 microg/ml), erythromycin (MICs, <0.4 microg/ml), and clindamycin (MICs, <0.016 microg/ml), while they were less sensitive to ciprofloxacin (MICs, <4 microg/ml). B. forsythus did not cause abscess formation by monoinoculation. B. forsythus coinoculated with Fusobacterium nucleatum ATCC 10953 caused abscess formation in 75% of rabbits, while it caused abscess formation in 100% of rabbits when it was coinoculated with Porphyromonas gingivalis FDC 381. In the case of the latter combination, four of six rabbits died of sepsis after 6 to 7 days, and P. gingivalis and B. forsythus were recovered from the heart blood at a proportion of 10:1. B. forsythus strains were highly virulent and invasive in combination with P. gingivalis. PMID:9163447

  12. High-Resolution Transcriptomic Analyses of Sinorhizobium sp. NGR234 Bacteroids in Determinate Nodules of Vigna unguiculata and Indeterminate Nodules of Leucaena leucocephala

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yan; Tian, Chang Fu; Chen, Wen Feng; Wang, Lei; Sui, Xin Hua; Chen, Wen Xin

    2013-01-01

    The rhizobium-legume symbiosis is a model system for studying mutualistic interactions between bacteria and eukaryotes. Sinorhizobium sp. NGR234 is distinguished by its ability to form either indeterminate nodules or determinate nodules with diverse legumes. Here, we presented a high-resolution RNA-seq transcriptomic analysis of NGR234 bacteroids in indeterminate nodules of Leucaena leucocephala and determinate nodules of Vigna unguiculata. In contrast to exponentially growing free-living bacteria, non-growing bacteroids from both legumes recruited several common cellular functions such as cbb3 oxidase, thiamine biosynthesis, nitrate reduction pathway (NO-producing), succinate metabolism, PHB (poly-3-hydroxybutyrate) biosynthesis and phosphate/phosphonate transporters. However, different transcription profiles between bacteroids from two legumes were also uncovered for genes involved in the biosynthesis of exopolysaccharides, lipopolysaccharides, T3SS (type three secretion system) and effector proteins, cytochrome bd ubiquinol oxidase, PQQ (pyrroloquinoline quinone), cytochrome c550, pseudoazurin, biotin, phasins and glycolate oxidase, and in the metabolism of glutamate and phenylalanine. Noteworthy were the distinct expression patterns of genes encoding phasins, which are thought to be involved in regulating the surface/volume ratio of PHB granules. These patterns are in good agreement with the observed granule size difference between bacteroids from L. leucocephala and V. unguiculata. PMID:23936444

  13. High-resolution transcriptomic analyses of Sinorhizobium sp. NGR234 bacteroids in determinate nodules of Vigna unguiculata and indeterminate nodules of Leucaena leucocephala.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; Tian, Chang Fu; Chen, Wen Feng; Wang, Lei; Sui, Xin Hua; Chen, Wen Xin

    2013-01-01

    The rhizobium-legume symbiosis is a model system for studying mutualistic interactions between bacteria and eukaryotes. Sinorhizobium sp. NGR234 is distinguished by its ability to form either indeterminate nodules or determinate nodules with diverse legumes. Here, we presented a high-resolution RNA-seq transcriptomic analysis of NGR234 bacteroids in indeterminate nodules of Leucaena leucocephala and determinate nodules of Vigna unguiculata. In contrast to exponentially growing free-living bacteria, non-growing bacteroids from both legumes recruited several common cellular functions such as cbb3 oxidase, thiamine biosynthesis, nitrate reduction pathway (NO-producing), succinate metabolism, PHB (poly-3-hydroxybutyrate) biosynthesis and phosphate/phosphonate transporters. However, different transcription profiles between bacteroids from two legumes were also uncovered for genes involved in the biosynthesis of exopolysaccharides, lipopolysaccharides, T3SS (type three secretion system) and effector proteins, cytochrome bd ubiquinol oxidase, PQQ (pyrroloquinoline quinone), cytochrome c550, pseudoazurin, biotin, phasins and glycolate oxidase, and in the metabolism of glutamate and phenylalanine. Noteworthy were the distinct expression patterns of genes encoding phasins, which are thought to be involved in regulating the surface/volume ratio of PHB granules. These patterns are in good agreement with the observed granule size difference between bacteroids from L. leucocephala and V. unguiculata.

  14. Effect of Plasmid pIJ1008 from Rhizobium leguminosarum on Symbiotic Function of Rhizobium meliloti.

    PubMed

    Bedmar, E J; Brewin, N J; Phillips, D A

    1984-04-01

    Plasmid pIJ1008, which carries determinants for uptake hydrogenase (Hup) activity, was transferred from Rhizobium leguminosarum to Rhizobium meliloti without impairing the capacity of the latter species to form root nodules on alfalfa. The plasmid was still present in rhizobia reisolated from the root nodules of 12 different alfalfa cultivars, but only low levels of Hup activity were detected in alfalfa.

  15. Characterization of a multidrug-resistant, novel Bacteroides genomospecies.

    PubMed

    Salipante, Stephen J; Kalapila, Aley; Pottinger, Paul S; Hoogestraat, Daniel R; Cummings, Lisa; Duchin, Jeffrey S; Sengupta, Dhruba J; Pergam, Steven A; Cookson, Brad T; Butler-Wu, Susan M

    2015-01-01

    Metronidazole- and carbapenem-resistant Bacteroides fragilis are rare in the United States. We isolated a multidrug-resistant anaerobe from the bloodstream and intraabdominal abscesses of a patient who had traveled to India. Whole-genome sequencing identified the organism as a novel Bacteroides genomospecies. Physicians should be aware of the possibility for concomitant carbapenem- and metronidazole-resistant Bacteroides infections.

  16. The Rhizobium-plant symbiosis.

    PubMed Central

    van Rhijn, P; Vanderleyden, J

    1995-01-01

    Rhizobium, Bradyrhizobium, and Azorhizobium species are able to elicit the formation of unique structures, called nodules, on the roots or stems of the leguminous host. In these nodules, the rhizobia convert atmospheric N2 into ammonia for the plant. To establish this symbiosis, signals are produced early in the interaction between plant and rhizobia and they elicit discrete responses by the two symbiotic partners. First, transcription of the bacterial nodulation (nod) genes is under control of the NodD regulatory protein, which is activated by specific plant signals, flavonoids, present in the root exudates. In return, the nod-encoded enzymes are involved in the synthesis and excretion of specific lipooligosaccharides, which are able to trigger on the host plant the organogenic program leading to the formation of nodules. An overview of the organization, regulation, and function of the nod genes and their participation in the determination of the host specificity is presented. PMID:7708010

  17. Polyol metabolism by Rhizobium trifolii.

    PubMed Central

    Primrose, S B; Ronson, C W

    1980-01-01

    In Rhizobium trifolii 7000, the polyols myo-inositol, xylitol, ribitol, D-arabitol, D-mannitol, D-sorbital, and dulcitol are metabolized by inducible nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide-dependent polyol dehydrogenases. Five different polyol dehydrogenases were recognized: inositol dehydrogenase, specific for inositil; ribitol dehydrogenase, specific for ribitol; D-arabitol dehydrogenase, which oxidized D-arabitol, D-mannitol, and D-sorbitol; xylitol dehydrogenase, which oxidized xylitol and D-sorbitol; and dulcitol dehydrogenase, which oxidized dulcitol, ribitol, xylitol, and sorbitol. Apart from inositil and xylitol, all of the polyols induced more than one polyol dehydrogenase and polyol transport system, but the heterologous polyol dehydrogenases and polyol transport systems were not coordinately induced by a particular polyol. With the exception of xylitol, all of the polyols tested served as growth substrates. A mutant of trifolii 7000, which was constitutive for dulcitol dehydrogenase, could also grow on xylitol. PMID:6767702

  18. Natural relationship between bacteroides and flavobacteria.

    PubMed

    Weisburg, W G; Oyaizu, Y; Oyaizu, H; Woese, C R

    1985-10-01

    Comparisons among 16S rRNA sequences from various eubacteria reveal a natural relationship between the bacteroides (represented by the Bacteroides fragilis sequence) and a phylogenetic unit that comprises the flavobacteria, cytophagae, flexibacteria, and others (represented by the Flavobacterium heparinum sequence). Although the relationship is not a close one, it is, nevertheless, specific. rRNAs from these two organisms are not only closer to one another in overall sequence than they are to outgroup species (such as Bacillus subtilis, Escherichia coli, Desulfovibrio desulfuricans, and Agrobacterium tumefaciens), but they show common idiosyncrasies (i.e., derived characteristics) in both rRNA sequences and higher-order structures.

  19. A paradigm for endosymbiotic life: cell differentiation of Rhizobium bacteria provoked by host plant factors.

    PubMed

    Kondorosi, Eva; Mergaert, Peter; Kereszt, Attila

    2013-01-01

    Symbiosis between Rhizobium bacteria and legumes leads to the formation of the root nodule. The endosymbiotic bacteria reside in polyploid host cells as membrane-surrounded vesicles where they reduce atmospheric nitrogen to support plant growth by supplying ammonia in exchange for carbon sources and energy. The morphology and physiology of endosymbionts, despite their common function, are highly divergent in different hosts. In galegoid plants, the endosymbionts are terminally differentiated, uncultivable polyploid cells, with remarkably elongated and even branched Y-shaped cells. Bacteroid differentiation is controlled by host peptides, many of which have antibacterial activity and require the bacterial function of BacA. Although the precise and combined action of several hundred host peptides and BacA has yet to be discovered, similarities, especially to certain insect-bacterium symbioses involving likewise host peptides for manipulation of endosymbionts, suggest convergent evolution. Rhizobium-legume symbiosis provides a rich source of information for understanding host-controlled endosymbiotic life in eukaryotic cells.

  20. Characterization of Two Inducible Phosphate Transport Systems in Rhizobium tropici

    PubMed Central

    Botero, Lina M.; Al-Niemi, Thamir S.; McDermott, Timothy R.

    2000-01-01

    Rhizobium tropici forms nitrogen-fixing nodules on the roots of the common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris). Like other legume-Rhizobium symbioses, the bean-R. tropici association is sensitive to the availability of phosphate (Pi). To better understand phosphorus movement between the bacteroid and the host plant, Pi transport was characterized in R. tropici. We observed two Pi transport systems, a high-affinity system and a low-affinity system. To facilitate the study of these transport systems, a Tn5B22 transposon mutant lacking expression of the high-affinity transport system was isolated and used to characterize the low-affinity transport system in the absence of the high-affinity system. The Km and Vmax values for the low-affinity system were estimated to be 34 ± 3 μM Pi and 118 ± 8 nmol of Pi · min−1 · mg (dry weight) of cells−1, respectively, and the Km and Vmax values for the high-affinity system were 0.45 ± 0.01 μM Pi and 86 ± 5 nmol of Pi · min−1 · mg (dry weight) of cells−1, respectively. Both systems were inducible by Pi starvation and were also shock sensitive, which indicated that there was a periplasmic binding-protein component. Neither transport system appeared to be sensitive to the proton motive force dissipator carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone, but Pi transport through both systems was eliminated by the ATPase inhibitor N,N′-dicyclohexylcarbodiimide; the Pi transport rate was correlated with the intracellular ATP concentration. Also, Pi movement through both systems appeared to be unidirectional, as no efflux or exchange was observed with either the wild-type strain or the mutant. These properties suggest that both Pi transport systems are ABC type systems. Analysis of the transposon insertion site revealed that the interrupted gene exhibited a high level of homology with kdpE, which in several bacteria encodes a cytoplasmic response regulator that governs responses to low potassium contents and/or changes in medium

  1. Bacteroides barnesiae sp. nov., Bacteroides salanitronis sp. nov. and Bacteroides gallinarum sp. nov., isolated from chicken caecum.

    PubMed

    Lan, Pham Thi Ngoc; Sakamoto, Mitsuo; Sakata, Shinji; Benno, Yoshimi

    2006-12-01

    Eight bacterial strains isolated from the caecum of chicken, BL2(T), BL66, EG3, EG6, M27, BL78(T), C35(T) and C43, were characterized by determining their phenotypic characteristics, cellular fatty acid profiles, menaquinone profiles and phylogenetic positions based on 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis. 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis showed that these isolates belonged to the genus Bacteroides. One group of five strains (BL2(T), BL66, EG3, EG6 and M27) was related most closely to Bacteroides coprocola JCM 12979(T), with approximately 93 % 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity, and to Bacteroides plebeius JCM 12973(T), with about 92 % similarity, and shared >or=99.6 % similarity with each other. Strain BL78(T) exhibited 90.5 % similarity to B. plebeius JCM 12973(T) and 89.8 % similarity to B. coprocola JCM 12979(T) and differed from the above group of five strains at >or=10 % sequence divergence. Strains C35(T) and C43 were related most closely to Bacteroides eggerthii JCM 12986(T), with 95.1 % sequence similarity, to Bacteroides stercoris JCM 9496(T), with 94.6 % similarity, and to Bacteroides uniformis JCM 5828(T), with 94.4 % similarity, and shared 100 % similarity with each other. From results of phenotypic examination, cellular fatty acid composition analysis, menaquinone composition analysis and DNA G+C contents, the group of five strains as well as strain BL78(T) were shown to differ from the type strains of B. coprocola and B. plebeius. Strain BL78(T) differed from the others based on its menaquinone composition, which included MK-11 and MK-12. Strains C35(T) and C43 could also be differentiated from the type strains of B. eggerthii, B. stercoris and B. uniformis. The group of five strains, strain BL78(T), B. coprocola JCM 12979(T) and B. plebeius JCM 12973(T) showed low levels of DNA-DNA relatedness (<35 %) with each other. High levels of DNA-DNA relatedness were obtained within the group of five strains (>75 %). Strains C35(T) and C43 exhibited a high level of

  2. Rhizobium meliloti Genes Encoding Catabolism of Trigonelline Are Induced under Symbiotic Conditions.

    PubMed Central

    Boivin, C; Camut, S; Malpica, CA; Truchet, G; Rosenberg, C

    1990-01-01

    Rhizobium meliloti trc genes controlling the catabolism of trigonelline, a plant secondary metabolite often abundant in legumes, are closely linked to nif-nod genes on the symbiotic megaplasmid pSym [Boivin, C., Malpica, C., Rosenberg, C., Denarie, J., Goldman, A., Fleury, V., Maille, M., Message, B., and Tepfer, D. (1989). In Molecular Signals in the Microbe-Plant Symbiotic and Pathogenic Systems. (Berlin: Springer-Verlag), pp. 401-407]. To investigate the role of trigonelline catabolism in the Rhizobium-legume interaction, we studied the regulation of trc gene expression in free-living and in endosymbiotic bacteria using Escherichia coli lacZ as a reporter gene. Experiments performed with free-living bacteria indicated that trc genes were organized in at least four transcription units and that the substrate trigonelline was a specific inducer for three of them. Noninducing trigonelline-related compounds such as betaines appeared to antagonize the inducing effect of trigonelline. None of the general or symbiotic regulatory genes ntrA, dctB/D, or nodD seemed to be involved in trigonelline catabolism. trc fusions exhibiting a low basal and a high induced [beta]-galactosidase activity when present on pSym were used to monitor trc gene expression in alfalfa tissue under symbiotic conditions. Results showed that trc genes are induced during all the symbiotic steps, i.e., in the rhizosphere, infection threads, and bacteroids of alfalfa, suggesting that trigonelline is a nutrient source throughout the Rhizobium-legume association. PMID:12354952

  3. Bacteroides sartorii is an earlier heterotypic synonym of Bacteroides chinchillae and has priority.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Mitsuo; Ohkuma, Moriya

    2012-06-01

    Strains of the recently proposed species Bacteroides chinchillae share more than 99.4 % 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity with the type strain of Bacteroides sartorii although these two species do not appear to be similar from their published descriptions. The aim of this study was to perform phenotypic and genetic analyses of both species to clarify their taxonomic position. B. chinchillae JCM 16497(T) exhibited high hsp60 gene sequence similarity with B. sartorii JCM 17136(T) (100 %) as well as B. chinchillae JCM 16498 (100 %). The hsp60 gene sequence analysis and levels of DNA-DNA relatedness observed demonstrated B. sartorii JCM 17136(T), B. chinchillae JCM 16497(T), and B. chinchillae JCM 16498 are members of a single species. Based on these data, we propose Bacteroides chinchillae as a later heterotypic synonym of Bacteroides sartorii. An emended description of B. sartorii is provided.

  4. Molecular Investigations of Bacteroides as Microbial Source Tracking Tools in Southeast Louisiana Watersheds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulz, C. J.; Childers, G. W.; Engel, A. S.

    2006-12-01

    Microbial Source Tracking (MST) is a developing field that is gaining increased attention. MST refers to a host of techniques that discriminates among the origins of fecal material found in natural waters from different sources (e.g. human, livestock, and wildlife) by using microbial indicator species with specificity to only certain host organisms. The development of species-specific molecular markers would allow for better evaluation of public health risks and tracking of nutrient sources impacting a watershed. Although several MST methods have been reported with varying levels of success, few offer general applicability for natural waters due to spatial and temporal constraints associated with these methods. One group of molecular MST markers that show promise for broad environmental applications are molecular 16S rDNA probes for Bacteroides. This method is based on 16S rDNA detection directly from environmental samples without the need for a preliminary cultivation step. In this study we have expanded previous sampling efforts to compile a database of over 1000 partial 16S rRNA Bacteroides genes retrieved from the fecal material of 15 different host species (human, cat, dog, pig, kangaroo). To characterize survival of Bacteroides outside of the host, survival time of the Bacteroides marker was compared to that of E.coli under varying natural environmental conditions (temperature and salinity). Bacteroides displayed a survival curve with shouldering and tailing similar to that of E.coli, but log reduction times differed with treatment. In summary, MST marker stability was identified within host species and the overall Bacteroides community structure correlated to host diet, suggesting that detection of a Bacteroides community could confidently identify fecal contamination point sources. Natural water samples from southeast Louisiana were collected for MST including the Tangipahoa River watershed where the source of fecal contamination has been hotly debated. The

  5. Development of a Real-Time PCR Assay for Detection and Quantification of Rhizobium leguminosarum Bacteria and Discrimination between Different Biovars in Zinc-Contaminated Soil▿

    PubMed Central

    Macdonald, Catriona A.; Clark, Ian M.; Hirsch, Penny R.; Zhao, Fang-Jie; McGrath, Steve P.

    2011-01-01

    Primers were designed to target 16S rRNA and nodD genes of Rhizobium leguminosarum from DNA extracted from two different soil types contaminated with Zn applied in sewage sludge. Numbers of rhizobia estimated using 16S rRNA gene copy number showed higher abundance than those estimated by both nodD and the most-probable-number (MPN) enumeration method using a plant trap host. Both 16S rRNA gene copies and the MPN rhizobia declined with increased levels of Zn contamination, as did the abundance of the functional gene nodD, providing compelling evidence of a toxic effect of Zn on R. leguminosarum populations in the soil. Regression analysis suggested the total Zn concentration in soil as a better predictor of rhizobial numbers than both NH4NO3-extractable and soil solution Zn. R. leguminosarum bv. viciae nodD gene copies were generally less sensitive to Zn than R. leguminosarum bv. trifolii nodD. The latter were generally below detection limits at Zn levels of >250 mg kg−1. Although there were differences in the actual numbers estimated by each approach, the response to Zn was broadly similar across all methods. These differences were likely to result from the fact that the molecular approaches assess the potential for nodulation while the MPN approach assesses actual nodulation. The results demonstrate that the use of targeted gene probes for assessing environmental perturbations of indigenous soil rhizobial populations may be more sensitive than the conventional plant bioassay and MPN methods. PMID:21602380

  6. Characterization of the urease gene cluster from Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. viciae.

    PubMed

    Toffanin, Annita; Cadahia, Esther; Imperial, Juan; Ruiz-Argüeso, Tomás; Palacios, Manuel

    2002-04-01

    Moderate levels of urease activity (ca. 300 mU mg(-1)) were detected in Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. viciae UPM791 vegetative cells. This activity did not require urea for induction and was partially repressed by the addition of ammonium into the medium. Lower levels of urease activity (ca. 100 mU mg(-1)) were detected also in pea bacteroids. A DNA region of ca. 9 kb containing the urease structural genes ( ureA, ureB and ureC), accessory genes ( ureD, ureE, ureF, and ureG), and five additional ORFs ( orf83, orf135, orf207, orf223, and orf287) encoding proteins of unknown function was sequenced. Three of these ORFs ( orf83, orf135 and orf207) have a homologous counterpart in a gene cluster from Sinorhizobium meliloti, reported to be involved in urease and hydrogenase activities. R. leguminosarum mutant strains carrying Tn 5 insertions within this region exhibited a urease-negative phenotype, but induced wild-type levels of hydrogenase and nitrogenase activities in bacteroids. orf287 encodes a potential transmembrane protein with a C-terminal GGDEF domain. A mutant affected in orf287 exhibited normal levels of urease activity in culture cells. Experiments aimed at cross-complementing Ni-binding proteins required for urease and hydrogenase synthesis (UreE and HypB, respectively) indicated that these two proteins are not functionally interchangeable in R. leguminosarum.

  7. Defining the bacteroides ribosomal binding site.

    PubMed

    Wegmann, Udo; Horn, Nikki; Carding, Simon R

    2013-03-01

    The human gastrointestinal tract, in particular the colon, hosts a vast number of commensal microorganisms. Representatives of the genus Bacteroides are among the most abundant bacterial species in the human colon. Bacteroidetes diverged from the common line of eubacterial descent before other eubacterial groups. As a result, they employ unique transcription initiation signals and, because of this uniqueness, they require specific genetic tools. Although some tools exist, they are not optimal for studying the roles and functions of these bacteria in the human gastrointestinal tract. Focusing on translation initiation signals in Bacteroides, we created a series of expression vectors allowing for different levels of protein expression in this genus, and we describe the use of pepI from Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. lactis as a novel reporter gene for Bacteroides. Furthermore, we report the identification of the 3' end of the 16S rRNA of Bacteroides ovatus and analyze in detail its ribosomal binding site, thus defining a core region necessary for efficient translation, which we have incorporated into the design of our expression vectors. Based on the sequence logo information from the 5' untranslated region of other Bacteroidales ribosomal protein genes, we conclude that our findings are relevant to all members of this order.

  8. Molybdate transport by Bradyrhizobium japonicum bacteroids.

    PubMed

    Maier, R J; Graham, L

    1988-12-01

    Bacteroid suspensions of Bradyrhizobium japonicum USDA 136 isolated from soybeans grown in Mo-deficient conditions were able to transport molybdate at a nearly constant rate for up to 1 min. The apparent Km for molybdate was 0.1 microM, and the Vmax was about 5 pmol/min per mg (dry weight) of bacteroid. Supplementation of bacteroid suspensions with oxidizable carbon sources did not markedly increase molybdate uptake rates. Anaerobically isolated bacteroids accumulated twice as much Mo in 1 h as aerobically isolated cells did, but the first 5 min of molybdate uptake was not dependent on the isolation condition with respect to O2. Respiratory inhibitors such as cyanide, azide, and hydroxylamine did not appreciably affect molybdate uptake, even at concentrations that inhibited O2 uptake. The uncouplers carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone (CCCP) and carbonyl cyanide p-trifluoromethoxyphenylhydrazone (FCCP) and the ionophores nigericin and monensin significantly inhibited molybdate uptake. The electrogenic ionophores valinomycin and gramicidin stimulated molybdate uptake. Rapid pH shift experiments indicated that molybdate transport depends on a transmembrane proton gradient (delta pH), and it is probably transported electroneutrally as H2MoO4. Most of the 99MoO4(2-) taken up was not exchangeable with a 100-fold excess of unlabeled MoO4(2-). Tungstate was a competitive inhibitor of molybdate uptake, with a Ki of 0.034 microM, and vanadate inhibited molybdate uptake slightly.

  9. Defining the Bacteroides Ribosomal Binding Site

    PubMed Central

    Horn, Nikki; Carding, Simon R.

    2013-01-01

    The human gastrointestinal tract, in particular the colon, hosts a vast number of commensal microorganisms. Representatives of the genus Bacteroides are among the most abundant bacterial species in the human colon. Bacteroidetes diverged from the common line of eubacterial descent before other eubacterial groups. As a result, they employ unique transcription initiation signals and, because of this uniqueness, they require specific genetic tools. Although some tools exist, they are not optimal for studying the roles and functions of these bacteria in the human gastrointestinal tract. Focusing on translation initiation signals in Bacteroides, we created a series of expression vectors allowing for different levels of protein expression in this genus, and we describe the use of pepI from Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. lactis as a novel reporter gene for Bacteroides. Furthermore, we report the identification of the 3′ end of the 16S rRNA of Bacteroides ovatus and analyze in detail its ribosomal binding site, thus defining a core region necessary for efficient translation, which we have incorporated into the design of our expression vectors. Based on the sequence logo information from the 5′ untranslated region of other Bacteroidales ribosomal protein genes, we conclude that our findings are relevant to all members of this order. PMID:23335775

  10. Active Efflux of Norfloxacin by Bacteroides fragilis

    PubMed Central

    Miyamae, Shin; Nikaido, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Yoshinobu; Yoshimura, Fuminobu

    1998-01-01

    Norfloxacin was actively pumped out by Bacteroides fragilis, which is intrinsically resistant to most fluoroquinolones. Reserpine moderately inhibited the efflux. A one-step spontaneous mutant had increased resistance to norfloxacin, ethidium bromide, and puromycin, a result suggesting that the efflux is catalyzed by a multidrug pump with specificity similar to that of NorA/Bmr. PMID:9687419

  11. Interaction of Bacteroides fragilis and Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron with the kallikrein–kinin system

    PubMed Central

    Mörgelin, Matthias; Cooney, Jakki C.; Frick, Inga-Maria

    2011-01-01

    Many bacterial pathogens interfere with the contact system (kallikrein–kinin system) in human plasma. Activation of this system has two consequences: cleavage of high-molecular-mass kininogen (HK) resulting in release of the potent proinflammatory peptide bradykinin, and initiation of the intrinsic pathway of coagulation. In this study, two species of the Gram-negative anaerobic commensal organism Bacteroides, namely Bacteroides fragilis and Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron, were found to bind HK and fibrinogen, the major clotting protein, from human plasma as shown by immunoelectron microscopy and Western blot analysis. In addition, these Bacteroides species were capable of activating the contact system at its surface leading to a significant prolongation of the intrinsic coagulation time and also to the release of bradykinin. Members of the genus Bacteroides have been known to act as opportunistic pathogens outside the gut, with B. fragilis being the most common isolate from clinical infections, such as intra-abdominal abscesses and bacteraemia. The present results thus provide more insight into how Bacteroides species cause infection. PMID:21527472

  12. Interaction of Bacteroides fragilis and Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron with the kallikrein-kinin system.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Elizabeth C; Mörgelin, Matthias; Cooney, Jakki C; Frick, Inga-Maria

    2011-07-01

    Many bacterial pathogens interfere with the contact system (kallikrein-kinin system) in human plasma. Activation of this system has two consequences: cleavage of high-molecular-mass kininogen (HK) resulting in release of the potent proinflammatory peptide bradykinin, and initiation of the intrinsic pathway of coagulation. In this study, two species of the Gram-negative anaerobic commensal organism Bacteroides, namely Bacteroides fragilis and Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron, were found to bind HK and fibrinogen, the major clotting protein, from human plasma as shown by immunoelectron microscopy and Western blot analysis. In addition, these Bacteroides species were capable of activating the contact system at its surface leading to a significant prolongation of the intrinsic coagulation time and also to the release of bradykinin. Members of the genus Bacteroides have been known to act as opportunistic pathogens outside the gut, with B. fragilis being the most common isolate from clinical infections, such as intra-abdominal abscesses and bacteraemia. The present results thus provide more insight into how Bacteroides species cause infection.

  13. Conserved nodulation genes in Rhizobium meliloti and Rhizobium trifolii

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, R.F.; Tu, J.K.; Long, S.R.

    1985-06-01

    Plasmids which contained wild-type or mutated Rhizobium meliloti nodulation (Nod) genes were introduced into Nod/sup -/ R. trifolii mutants ANU453 and ANU851 and tested for their ability to nodulate clover. Cloned wild-type and mutated R. meliloti Nod gene segments restored ANU851 to Nod/sup +/, with the exception of nodD mutants. Similarly, wild-type and mutant R. meliloti nod genes complemented ANU453 to Nod/sup +/, except for nod CII mutants. Thus, ANU851 identifies the equivalent of the R. meliloti nodD genes, and ANU453 specifies the equivalent of the R. meliloti nodCII genes. In addition, cloned wild-type R. trifolii nod genes were introduced into seven R. meliloti Nod/sup -/ mutants. All seven mutants were restored to Nod/sup +/ on alfalfa. Our results indicate that these genes represent common nodulation functions and argue for an allelic relationship between nod genes in R. meliloti and R. trifolii.

  14. Mineral Soils as Carriers for Rhizobium Inoculants

    PubMed Central

    Chao, W.-L.; Alexander, Martin

    1984-01-01

    Mineral soil-based inoculants of Rhizobium meliloti and Rhizobium phaseoli survived better at 4°C than at higher temperatures, but ca. 15% of the cells were viable at 37°C after 27 days. Soil-based inoculants of R. meliloti, R. phaseoli, Rhizobium japonicum, and a cowpea Rhizobium sp. applied to seeds of their host legumes also survived better at low temperatures, but the percent survival of such inoculants was higher than peat-based inoculants at 35°C. Survival of R. phaseoli, R. japonicum, and cowpea rhizobia was not markedly improved when the cells were suspended in sugar solutions before drying them in soil. Nodulation was abundant on Phaseolus vulgaris derived from seeds that had been coated with a soil-based inoculant and stored for 165 days at 25°C. The increase in yield and nitrogen content of Phaseolus angularis grown in the greenhouse was the same with soil-and peat-based inoculants. We suggest that certain mineral soils can be useful and readily available carriers for legume inoculants containing desiccation-resistant Rhizobium strains. PMID:16346460

  15. Bacteroides chinchillae sp. nov. and Bacteroides rodentium sp. nov., isolated from chinchilla (Chinchilla lanigera) faeces.

    PubMed

    Kitahara, Maki; Tsuchida, Sayaka; Kawasumi, Koh; Amao, Hiromi; Sakamoto, Mitsuo; Benno, Yoshimi; Ohkuma, Moriya

    2011-04-01

    Gram-negative anaerobic rods were isolated from chinchilla (Chinchilla lanigera) faeces and three strains, ST170(T), ST180 and ST28(T), were investigated taxonomically. On the basis of phylogenetic analyses and specific phenotypic characteristics, the three strains belonged to the genus Bacteroides. Phylogenetic analysis of their 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed that strains ST170(T) and ST180 formed a single cluster and a distinct line of descent. Strain ST170(T) exhibited 99.7 % 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity with strain ST180 and 95.1, 94.6 and 94.4 % 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity with Bacteroides massiliensis JCM 13223(T), Bacteroides dorei JCM 13471(T) and Bacteroides vulgatus JCM 5826(T), respectively. Strain ST28(T) also formed a distinct line of descent and exhibited the highest 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity with Bacteroides uniformis JCM 5828(T) (98.1 %). Low DNA-DNA relatedness (1 %) between strain ST28(T) and B. uniformis JCM 5828(T) clearly indicated that they belonged to different species. Analysis of hsp60 sequences also supported these relationships. The DNA G+C contents of strains ST170(T) and ST28(T) were 45.2 and 41.0 mol%, respectively. On the basis of phenotypic characteristics and phylogenetic data, two novel species, Bacteroides chinchillae sp. nov. (type strain ST170(T)  = JCM 16497(T)  = CCUG 59335(T)) and Bacteroides rodentium sp. nov. (type strain ST28(T)  = JCM 16496(T)  = CCUG 59334(T)), are proposed.

  16. Strain identification and quorum sensing inhibition characterization of marine-derived Rhizobium sp. NAO1

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Hong; Zhu, Xiaoshan; Yu, Shenchen; Chen, Lu; Jin, Hui; Cai, Zhonghua

    2017-01-01

    A novel strategy for combating pathogens is through the ongoing development and use of anti-quorum sensing (QS) treatments such as therapeutic bacteria or their anti-QS substances. Relatively little is known about the bacteria that inhabit the open ocean and of their potential anti-pathogenic attributes; thus, in an initiative to identify these types of therapeutic bacteria, planktonic microbes from the North Atlantic Ocean were collected, isolated, cultured and screened for anti-QS activity. Screening analysis identified one such strain, Rhizobium sp. NAO1. Extracts of Rhizobium sp. NAO1 were identified via ultra-performance liquid chromatography (UPLC) analysis. They were shown to contain N-acyl homoserine lactone (AHL)-based QS analogues (in particular, the N-butyryl homoserine lactone (C4-AHL) analogue) and could disrupt biofilm formation by Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1. QS inhibition was confirmed using confocal scanning laser microscopy and growth curves, and it was shown to occur in a dose-dependent manner without affecting bacterial growth. Secondary metabolites of Rhizobium sp. NAO1 inhibited PAO1 pathogenicity by downregulating AHL-mediated virulence factors such as elastase activity and siderophore production. Furthermore, as a result of biofilm structure damage, the secondary metabolite products of Rhizobium sp. NAO1 significantly increased the sensitivity of PAO1 to aminoglycoside antibiotics. Our results demonstrated that Rhizobium sp. strain NAO1 has the ability to disrupt P. aeruginosa PAO1 biofilm architecture, in addition to attenuating P. aeruginosa PAO1 virulence factor production and pathogenicity. Therefore, the newly identified ocean-derived Rhizobium sp. NAO1 has the potential to serve as a QS inhibitor and may be a new microbial resource for drug development. PMID:28405399

  17. Strain identification and quorum sensing inhibition characterization of marine-derived Rhizobium sp. NAO1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Hong; Zhou, Jin; Zhu, Xiaoshan; Yu, Shenchen; Chen, Lu; Jin, Hui; Cai, Zhonghua

    2017-03-01

    A novel strategy for combating pathogens is through the ongoing development and use of anti-quorum sensing (QS) treatments such as therapeutic bacteria or their anti-QS substances. Relatively little is known about the bacteria that inhabit the open ocean and of their potential anti-pathogenic attributes; thus, in an initiative to identify these types of therapeutic bacteria, planktonic microbes from the North Atlantic Ocean were collected, isolated, cultured and screened for anti-QS activity. Screening analysis identified one such strain, Rhizobium sp. NAO1. Extracts of Rhizobium sp. NAO1 were identified via ultra-performance liquid chromatography (UPLC) analysis. They were shown to contain N-acyl homoserine lactone (AHL)-based QS analogues (in particular, the N-butyryl homoserine lactone (C4-AHL) analogue) and could disrupt biofilm formation by Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1. QS inhibition was confirmed using confocal scanning laser microscopy and growth curves, and it was shown to occur in a dose-dependent manner without affecting bacterial growth. Secondary metabolites of Rhizobium sp. NAO1 inhibited PAO1 pathogenicity by downregulating AHL-mediated virulence factors such as elastase activity and siderophore production. Furthermore, as a result of biofilm structure damage, the secondary metabolite products of Rhizobium sp. NAO1 significantly increased the sensitivity of PAO1 to aminoglycoside antibiotics. Our results demonstrated that Rhizobium sp. strain NAO1 has the ability to disrupt P. aeruginosa PAO1 biofilm architecture, in addition to attenuating P. aeruginosa PAO1 virulence factor production and pathogenicity. Therefore, the newly identified ocean-derived Rhizobium sp. NAO1 has the potential to serve as a QS inhibitor and may be a new microbial resource for drug development.

  18. Risk Factors for Resistance to β-Lactam/β-Lactamase Inhibitors and Ertapenem in Bacteroides Bacteremia.

    PubMed

    Smith, Janessa M; Avdic, Edina; Tamma, Pranita D; Zhang, Long; Carroll, Karen C; Cosgrove, Sara E

    2015-08-01

    The objective of this study was to determine risk factors for the development of resistance to β-lactams/β-lactamase inhibitors (βL/βLIs) and ertapenem among Bacteroides species bacteremia. We conducted a retrospective case-control study of 101 adult patients with Bacteroides species bacteremia at a 1,051-bed tertiary care medical center. The duration of exposure to βL/βLIs (odds ratio [OR], 1.25; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.08 to 2.31) was the only independent risk factor for resistance. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  19. Effect of Plasmid pIJ1008 from Rhizobium leguminosarum on Symbiotic Function of Rhizobium meliloti

    PubMed Central

    Bedmar, E. J.; Brewin, N. J.; Phillips, D. A.

    1984-01-01

    Plasmid pIJ1008, which carries determinants for uptake hydrogenase (Hup) activity, was transferred from Rhizobium leguminosarum to Rhizobium meliloti without impairing the capacity of the latter species to form root nodules on alfalfa. The plasmid was still present in rhizobia reisolated from the root nodules of 12 different alfalfa cultivars, but only low levels of Hup activity were detected in alfalfa. PMID:16346527

  20. Interactions of Bacteroides gingivalis with fibrinogen.

    PubMed Central

    Lantz, M S; Rowland, R W; Switalski, L M; Höök, M

    1986-01-01

    Results of previous studies from our laboratory have shown that a strain of Bacteroides intermedius isolated originally from a patient with acute necrotizing ulcerative gingivitis binds and degrades human fibrinogen (M.S. Lantz, L.M. Switalski, K.S. Kornman, and M. Hook, J. Bacteriol. 163:623-628, 1985). We report that strains of Bacteroides gingivalis, an organism implicated in the etiology of several forms of periodontitis, also bind and degrade fibrinogen. The binding is rapid, reversible, saturable, and specific. The number of fibrinogen-binding sites per cell varies from 500 to 1,500 in different batches of bacteria, and the dissociation constant for the complex is on the order of 10(-8) M. B. gingivalis possesses cell-associated fibrinogenolytic activity that is activated by dithiothreitol and blocked by thiol protease inhibitors. Interaction with fibrinogen may mediate colonization and establishment of these organisms in the periodontal microbiota. Images PMID:3096886

  1. The symbiovar trifolii of Rhizobium bangladeshense and Rhizobium aegyptiacum sp. nov. nodulate Trifolium alexandrinum in Egypt.

    PubMed

    Shamseldin, Abdelaal; Carro, Lorena; Peix, Alvaro; Velázquez, Encarna; Moawad, Hassan; Sadowsky, Michael J

    2016-06-01

    In the present work we analyzed the taxonomic status of several Rhizobium strains isolated from Trifolium alexandrinum L. nodules in Egypt. The 16S rRNA genes of these strains were identical to those of Rhizobium bangladeshense BLR175(T) and Rhizobium binae BLR195(T). However, the analyses of recA and atpD genes split the strains into two clusters. Cluster II strains are identified as R. bangladeshense with >98% similarity values in both genes. The cluster I strains are phylogenetically related to Rhizobium etli CFN42(T) and R. bangladeshense BLR175(T), but with less than 94% similarity values in recA and atpD genes. DNA-DNA hybridization analysis showed 42% and 48% average relatedness between the strain 1010(T) from cluster I with respect to R. bangladeshense BLR175(T) and R. etli CFN42(T), respectively. Phenotypic characteristics of cluster I strains also differed from those of their closest related Rhizobium species. Analysis of the nodC gene showed that the strains belong to two groups within the symbiovar trifolii which was identified in Egypt linked to the species R. bangladeshense. Based on the genotypic and phenotypic characteristics, the group I strains belong to a new species for which the name Rhizobium aegyptiacum sp. nov. (sv. trifolii) is proposed, with strain 1010(T) being designated as the type strain (= USDA 7124(T)=LMG 29296(T)=CECT 9098(T)).

  2. USE OF BACTEROIDES PCR-BASED METHODS TO EXAMINE FECAL CONTAMINATION SOURCES IN TROPICAL COASTAL WATERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Several library independent Microbial Source Tracking methods have been developed to rapidly determine the source of fecal contamination. Thus far, none of these methods have been tested in tropical marine waters. In this study, we used a Bacteroides 16S rDNA PCR-based...

  3. USE OF BACTEROIDES PCR-BASED METHODS TO EXAMINE FECAL CONTAMINATION SOURCES IN TROPICAL COASTAL WATERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Several library independent Microbial Source Tracking methods have been developed to rapidly determine the source of fecal contamination. Thus far, none of these methods have been tested in tropical marine waters. In this study, we used a Bacteroides 16S rDNA PCR-based...

  4. Bacteroides stercorirosoris sp. nov. and Bacteroides faecichinchillae sp. nov., isolated from chinchilla (Chinchilla lanigera) faeces.

    PubMed

    Kitahara, Maki; Sakamoto, Mitsuo; Tsuchida, Sayaka; Kawasumi, Koh; Amao, Hiromi; Benno, Yoshimi; Ohkuma, Moriya

    2012-05-01

    Strains of gram-negative anaerobic rods were isolated from chinchilla (Chinchilla lanigera) faeces, and three strains, ST161(T), ST33 and ST37(T), were investigated taxonomically. Based on phylogenetic analyses and specific phenotypic characteristics, the three strains were allocated to the genus Bacteroides. Phylogenetic analyses of their 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed that strain ST161(T) formed a distinct line of descent, with highest sequence similarity to strain ST33 (98.7 %) and Bacteroides oleiciplenus JCM 16102(T) (97.7 %). High levels of DNA-DNA relatedness (79-89 %) were found between strains ST161(T) and ST33, but low levels were found between strain ST161(T) and B. oleiciplenus JCM 16102(T) (33-37 %) and between strain ST33 and B. oleiciplenus JCM 16102(T) (33-37 %). These data clearly indicated that strains ST161(T) and ST33 represent a single novel species. 16S rRNA gene sequence analyses showed that strain ST37(T) also formed a distinct line of descent, with highest sequence similarity to Bacteroides acidifaciens JCM 10556(T) (96.5 %) and Bacteroides caccae JCM 9498(T) (95.6 %). Analysis of hsp60 gene sequences also supported these relationships. Based on phenotypic and phylogenetic characteristics, two novel species, Bacteroides stercorirosoris sp. nov. and Bacteroides faecichinchillae sp. nov., are thus proposed. The type strains of B. stercorirosoris and B. faecichinchillae are ST161(T) ( = JCM 17103(T) = CCUG 60872(T)) and ST37(T) ( = JCM 17102(T) = CCUG 60873(T)), respectively. The DNA G+C contents of strains ST161(T) and ST37(T) were 45.7 and 41.0 mol%, respectively.

  5. Autotransmissible resident plasmid of Rhizobium meliloti.

    PubMed

    Bedmar, E J; Olivares, J

    1980-01-01

    A resident plasmid of wild-type strains of Rhizobium meliloti of 59.6 megadaltons has been shown to be transferred at a high frequency to "cured" strains of this bacterial species. This plasmid, named pEZ1, that confers phage-sensitivity to cells carrying it is also transmissible to Escherichia coli and from it to "cured" R. meliloti strains.

  6. Products of dark CO sub 2 fixation in pea root nodules support bacteroid metabolism. [Pisum sativum L

    SciTech Connect

    Rosendahl, L.; Pedersen, W.B. ); Vance, C.P. )

    1990-05-01

    Products of the nodule cytosol in vivo dark ({sup 14}C)CO{sub 2} fixation were detected in the plant cytosol as well as in the bacteroids of pea (Pisum sativum L. cv Bodil) nodules. The distribution of the metabolites of the dark CO{sub 2} fixation products was compared in effective (fix{sup +}) nodules infected by a wild-type Rhizobium leguminosarum (MNF 300), and ineffective (fix{sup {minus}}) nodules of the R. leguminosarum mutant MNF 3080. The latter has a defect in the dicarboxylic acid transport system of the bacterial membrane. The {sup 14}C incorporation from ({sup 14}C)CO{sub 2} was about threefold greater in the wild-type nodules than in the mutant nodules. Similarly, in wild-type nodules the in vitro phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase activity was substantially greater than that of the mutant. Almost 90% of the {sup 14}C label in the cytosol was found in organic acids in both symbioses. The results indicate a central role for nodule cytosol dark CO{sub 2} fixation in the supply of the bacteroids with dicarboxylic acids.

  7. Bacteroides faecis and Bacteroides intestinalis recovered from clinical specimens of human intestinal origin.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yangsoon; Kim, Hyun Soo; Yong, Dongeun; Jeong, Seok Hoon; Lee, Kyungwon; Chong, Yunsop

    2015-01-01

    We report three cases of recently named Bacteroides spp. isolates, two B. faecis isolates and one B. intestinalis isolate from clinical specimens of inpatients at a Korean tertiary-care hospital in 2011. All isolates were susceptible to piperacillin-tazobactam, imipenem, meropenem, chloramphenicol, and metronidazole.

  8. Isolation and characterization of Rhizobium sp. strain YS-1r that degrades lignin in plant biomass.

    PubMed

    Jackson, C A; Couger, M B; Prabhakaran, M; Ramachandriya, K D; Canaan, P; Fathepure, B Z

    2017-04-01

    The aim of this work was to isolate novel lignin-degrading organisms. Several pure cultures of bacteria that degrade lignin were isolated from bacterial consortia developed from decaying biomass. Among the isolates, Rhizobium sp. strain YS-1r (closest relative of Rhizobium petrolearium strain SL-1) was explored for its lignin-degrading ability. Microcosm studies showed that strain YS-1r was able to degrade a variety of lignin monomers, dimers and also native lignin in switchgrass and alfalfa. The isolate demonstrated lignin peroxidase (LiP) activity when grown on alkali lignin, p-anisoin, switchgrass or alfalfa, and only negligible activity was measured in glucose-grown cells suggesting inducible nature of the LiP activity. Analysis of the strain YS-1r genome revealed the presence of a variety of genes that code for various lignin-oxidizing, H2 O2 -producing as well as polysaccharide-hydrolysing enzymes. This study shows both the genomic and physiological capability of bacteria in the genus Rhizobium to metabolize lignin and lignin-like compounds. This is the first detailed report on the lignocellulose-degrading ability of a Rhizobium species and thus this study expands the role of alpha-proteobacteria in the degradation of lignin. The organism's ability to degrade lignin is significant since Rhizobia are widespread in soil, water and plant rhizospheres and some fix atmospheric nitrogen and also have the ability to degrade aromatic hydrocarbons. © 2017 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  9. Oligogalacturonides: novel signaling molecules in Rhizobium-legume communications.

    PubMed

    Moscatiello, Roberto; Baldan, Barbara; Squartini, Andrea; Mariani, Paola; Navazio, Lorella

    2012-11-01

    Oligogalacturonides are pectic fragments of the plant cell wall, whose signaling role has been described thus far during plant development and plant-pathogen interactions. In the present work, we evaluated the potential involvement of oligogalacturonides in the molecular communications between legumes and rhizobia during the establishment of nitrogen-fixing symbiosis. Oligogalacturonides with a degree of polymerization of 10 to 15 were found to trigger a rapid intracellular production of reactive oxygen species in Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. viciae 3841. Accumulation of H(2)O(2), detected by both 2',7'-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate-based fluorescence and electron-dense deposits of cerium perhydroxides, was transient and did not affect bacterial cell viability, due to the prompt activation of the katG gene encoding a catalase. Calcium measurements carried out in R. leguminosarum transformed with the bioluminescent Ca(2+) reporter aequorin demonstrated the induction of a rapid and remarkable intracellular Ca(2+) increase in response to oligogalacturonides. When applied jointly with naringenin, oligogalacturonides effectively inhibited flavonoid-induced nod gene expression, indicating an antagonistic interplay between oligogalacturonides and inducing flavonoids in the early stages of plant root colonization. The above data suggest a novel role for oligogalacturonides as signaling molecules released in the rhizosphere in the initial rhizobium-legume interaction.

  10. Development of Bacteroides 16S rRNA Gene TaqMan-Based Real-Time PCR Assays for Estimation of Total, Human, and Bovine Fecal Pollution in Water

    PubMed Central

    Layton, Alice; McKay, Larry; Williams, Dan; Garrett, Victoria; Gentry, Randall; Sayler, Gary

    2006-01-01

    Bacteroides species are promising indicators for differentiating livestock and human fecal contamination in water because of their high concentration in feces and potential host specificity. In this study, a real-time PCR assay was designed to target Bacteroides species (AllBac) present in human, cattle, and equine feces. Direct PCR amplification (without DNA extraction) using the AllBac assay was tested on feces diluted in water. Fecal concentrations and threshold cycle were linearly correlated, indicating that the AllBac assay can be used to estimate the total amount of fecal contamination in water. Real-time PCR assays were also designed for bovine-associated (BoBac) and human-associated (HuBac) Bacteroides 16S rRNA genes. Assay specificities were tested using human, bovine, swine, canine, and equine fecal samples. The BoBac assay was specific for bovine fecal samples (100% true-positive identification; 0% false-positive identification). The HuBac assay had a 100% true-positive identification, but it also had a 32% false-positive rate with potential for cross-amplification with swine feces. The assays were tested using creek water samples from three different watersheds. Creek water did not inhibit PCR, and results from the AllBac assay were correlated with those from Escherichia coli concentrations (r2 = 0.85). The percentage of feces attributable to bovine and human sources was determined for each sample by comparing the values obtained from the BoBac and HuBac assays with that from the AllBac assay. These results suggest that real-time PCR assays without DNA extraction can be used to quantify fecal concentrations and provide preliminary fecal source identification in watersheds. PMID:16751534

  11. Anaerobic utilization of Fe(III)-xenosiderophores among Bacteroides species and the distinct assimilation of Fe(III)-ferrichrome by Bacteroides fragilis within the genus.

    PubMed

    Rocha, Edson R; Krykunivsky, Anna S

    2017-04-11

    In this study, we show that Bacteroides species utilize Fe(III)-xenosiderophores as the only source of exogenous iron to support growth under iron-limiting conditions in vitro anaerobically. Bacteroides fragilis was the only species able to utilize Fe(III)-ferrichrome while Bacteroides vulgatus ATCC 8482 and Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron VPI 5482 were able to utilize both Fe(III)-enterobactin and Fe(III)-salmochelin S4 as the only source of iron in a dose-dependent manner. We have investigated the way B. fragilis assimilates Fe(III)-ferrichrome as initial model to understand the utilization of xenosiderophores in anaerobes. B. fragilis contains two outer membrane TonB-dependent transporters (TBDTs), FchA1 and FchA2, which are homologues to Escherichia coli ferrichrome transporter FhuA. The disruption of fchA1 gene had only partial growth defect on Fe(III)-ferrichrome while the fchA2 mutant had no growth defect compared to the parent strain. The genetic complementation of fchA1 gene restored growth to parent strain levels indicating that it plays a role in Fe(III)-ferrichrome assimilation though we cannot rule out some functional overlap in transport systems as B. fragilis contains abundant TBDTs whose functions are yet not understood. However, the growth of B. fragilis on Fe(III)-ferrichrome was abolished in a feoAB mutant indicating that Fe(III)-ferrichrome transported into the periplasmic space was reduced in the periplasm releasing ferrous iron prior to transport through the FeoAB transport system. Moreover, the release of iron from the ferrichrome may be linked to the thiol redox system as the trxB deletion mutant was also unable to grow in the presence of Fe(III)-ferrichrome. The genetic complementation of feoAB and trxB mutants completely restored growth on Fe(III)-ferrichrome. Taken together, these findings show that Bacteroides species have developed mechanisms to utilize ferric iron bound to xenosiderophores under anaerobic growth conditions though the

  12. Role of BacA in Lipopolysaccharide Synthesis, Peptide Transport, and Nodulation by Rhizobium sp. Strain NGR234▿

    PubMed Central

    Ardissone, Silvia; Kobayashi, Hajime; Kambara, Kumiko; Rummel, Coralie; Noel, K. Dale; Walker, Graham C.; Broughton, William J.; Deakin, William J.

    2011-01-01

    BacA of Sinorhizobium meliloti plays an essential role in the establishment of nitrogen-fixing symbioses with Medicago plants, where it is involved in peptide import and in the addition of very-long-chain fatty acids (VLCFA) to lipid A of lipopolysaccharide (LPS). We investigated the role of BacA in Rhizobium species strain NGR234 by mutating the bacA gene. In the NGR234 bacA mutant, peptide import was impaired, but no effect on VLCFA addition was observed. More importantly, the symbiotic ability of the mutant was comparable to that of the wild type for a variety of legume species. Concurrently, an acpXL mutant of NGR234 was created and assayed. In rhizobia, AcpXL is a dedicated acyl carrier protein necessary for the addition of VLCFA to lipid A. LPS extracted from the NGR234 mutant lacked VLCFA, and this mutant was severely impaired in the ability to form functional nodules with the majority of legumes tested. Our work demonstrates the importance of VLCFA in the NGR234-legume symbiosis and also shows that the necessity of BacA for bacteroid differentiation is restricted to specific legume-Rhizobium interactions. PMID:21357487

  13. A Transmissible Plant Shoot Factor Promotes Uptake Hydrogenase Activity in Rhizobium Symbionts 1

    PubMed Central

    Bedmar, Eulogio J.; Phillips, Donald A.

    1984-01-01

    Shoot/root grafting studies showed organ and host cultivar effects on net H2 evolution from Pisum sativum L. root nodules. Net H2 evolution from those nodules represents the sum of H2 formed by Rhizobium nitrogenase and H2 oxidized by any uptake hydrogenase present in the bacteria. Grafts between pea cultivars `JI1205' or `Alaska' and `Feltham First' in symbioses with R. leguminosarum 128C53 showed that shoots of both JI1205 and Alaska increased H2 uptake significantly (P ≤ 0.05) in Feltham First root nodules. The same plants also had less net H2 evolution at similar rates of C2H2 reduction than plants formed by grafting Feltham First shoots on Feltham First roots. Although JI1205 and Alaska shoots increased H2-uptake activity of Feltham First root nodules 28 days after the graft was made, intermediate to high levels of H2 uptake activity were still present in nodules on roots of both JI1205 and Alaska grafted to Feltham First shoots. These results indicate the presence of a transmissible shoot factor(s) which can increase uptake hydrogenase activity in a Rhizobium symbiont and show that root genotype also can influence that parameter. Parallel grafting experiments using the same pea cultivars in symbioses with R. leguminosarum strain 300, which lacks uptake hydrogenase activity, suggested that a transmissible shoot factor(s) altered H2 formation from nitrogenase by changing the electron allocation coefficient of that enzyme complex. The root and shoot factor(s) detected in this study had no permanent effect on strain 128C53. Bacterial cells isolated from Feltham First nodules with low H2 uptake activity formed root nodules on JI1205 and Alaska with high H2 uptake activity. Bacteroids isolated from nodules on intact JI1205, Alaska, or Feltham First plants with high, medium, or low H2 uptake activity, respectively, maintained those phenotypes during in vitro assays. PMID:16663677

  14. A transmissible plant shoot factor promotes uptake hydrogenase activity in Rhizobium symbionts.

    PubMed

    Bedmar, E J; Phillips, D A

    1984-07-01

    Shoot/root grafting studies showed organ and host cultivar effects on net H(2) evolution from Pisum sativum L. root nodules. Net H(2) evolution from those nodules represents the sum of H(2) formed by Rhizobium nitrogenase and H(2) oxidized by any uptake hydrogenase present in the bacteria. Grafts between pea cultivars ;JI1205' or ;Alaska' and ;Feltham First' in symbioses with R. leguminosarum 128C53 showed that shoots of both JI1205 and Alaska increased H(2) uptake significantly (P Rhizobium symbiont and show that root genotype also can influence that parameter.Parallel grafting experiments using the same pea cultivars in symbioses with R. leguminosarum strain 300, which lacks uptake hydrogenase activity, suggested that a transmissible shoot factor(s) altered H(2) formation from nitrogenase by changing the electron allocation coefficient of that enzyme complex.The root and shoot factor(s) detected in this study had no permanent effect on strain 128C53. Bacterial cells isolated from Feltham First nodules with low H(2) uptake activity formed root nodules on JI1205 and Alaska with high H(2) uptake activity. Bacteroids isolated from nodules on intact JI1205, Alaska, or Feltham First plants with high, medium, or low H(2) uptake activity, respectively, maintained those phenotypes during in vitro assays.

  15. Host-symbiont interactions-V. The structure of acidic extracellular polysaccharides secreted by Rhizobium leguminosarum and Rhizobium trifolii

    SciTech Connect

    Robertsen, B.K.; Aman, P.; Darvill, A.G.; McNeil, M.; Albersheim, P.

    1981-01-01

    The sequence of the glycosyl residues and the anomeric configurations of the glycosl linkages of the acidic polysaccharides secreted by Rhizobium leguminosarum 128c53, Rhizobium leguminosarum 128c63, Rhizobium trifolii NA30, and Rhizobium trifolii 0403 have been determined. Each of the glycosyl residues of these polysaccharides was determined to be in the D configuration and in the pyranose ring form. These results add support to the proposal that R. leguminosarum and R. trifolii have a particularly close genetic relationship. The significance of these results with regard to the possible function of these polysaccharides in the nodulation process is discussed. (JMT)

  16. Rhizobium japonicum mutants that are hypersensitive to repression of H2 uptake by oxygen.

    PubMed

    Maier, R J; Merberg, D M

    1982-04-01

    The synthesis of an H2 oxidation system in free-living Rhizobium japonicum wild-type strain SR is repressed by oxygen. Maximal H2 uptake rates were obtained in strain SR after derepression in 11 microM or less dissolved oxygen. Oxygen levels above 45 microM completely repressed H2 uptake in strain SR. Five R. japonicum mutant strains that are hypersensitive to repression or H2 oxidation by oxygen were derived from strain SR. The mutants were obtained by screening H2 uptake-negative mutants that retained the ability to oxidize H2 as bacteroids from soybean nodules. As bacteroids, the five mutant strains were capable of H2 oxidation rates comparable to that of the wild type. The mutants did not take up H2 when derepressed in 22 microM dissolved oxygen, whereas strain SR had substantial activity at this oxygen concentration. The O2 repression of H2 uptake in both the wild-type and two mutant strains, SR174 and SR200, was rapid and was similar to the effect of inhibiting synthesis of H2 uptake system components with rifampin. None of the mutant strains was able to oxidize H2 when the artificial electron acceptors methylene blue or phenazine methosulfate were provided. The mutant strains were not sensitive to killing by oxygen, they took up O2 at rates similar to strain SR, and they did not produce an H2 uptake system that was oxygen labile. Cyclic AMP levels were comparable in strain SR and the five mutant strains after subjection of the cultures to the derepression conditions.

  17. Rhizobium japonicum mutants that are hypersensitive to repression of H2 uptake by oxygen.

    PubMed Central

    Maier, R J; Merberg, D M

    1982-01-01

    The synthesis of an H2 oxidation system in free-living Rhizobium japonicum wild-type strain SR is repressed by oxygen. Maximal H2 uptake rates were obtained in strain SR after derepression in 11 microM or less dissolved oxygen. Oxygen levels above 45 microM completely repressed H2 uptake in strain SR. Five R. japonicum mutant strains that are hypersensitive to repression or H2 oxidation by oxygen were derived from strain SR. The mutants were obtained by screening H2 uptake-negative mutants that retained the ability to oxidize H2 as bacteroids from soybean nodules. As bacteroids, the five mutant strains were capable of H2 oxidation rates comparable to that of the wild type. The mutants did not take up H2 when derepressed in 22 microM dissolved oxygen, whereas strain SR had substantial activity at this oxygen concentration. The O2 repression of H2 uptake in both the wild-type and two mutant strains, SR174 and SR200, was rapid and was similar to the effect of inhibiting synthesis of H2 uptake system components with rifampin. None of the mutant strains was able to oxidize H2 when the artificial electron acceptors methylene blue or phenazine methosulfate were provided. The mutant strains were not sensitive to killing by oxygen, they took up O2 at rates similar to strain SR, and they did not produce an H2 uptake system that was oxygen labile. Cyclic AMP levels were comparable in strain SR and the five mutant strains after subjection of the cultures to the derepression conditions. PMID:6277861

  18. Conserved Plasmid Hydrogen-Uptake (hup)-Specific Sequences within Hup+Rhizobium leguminosarum Strains

    PubMed Central

    Leyva, Antonio; Palacios, José M.; Ruiz-Argüeso, Tomás

    1987-01-01

    Thirteen Rhizobium leguminosarum strains previously reported as H2-uptake hydrogenase positive (Hup+) or negative (Hup−) were analyzed for the presence and conservation of DNA sequences homologous to cloned Bradyrhizobium japonicum hup-specific DNA from cosmid pHU1 (M. A. Cantrell, R. A. Haugland, and H. J. Evans, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 80:181-185, 1983). The Hup phenotype of these strains was reexamined by determining hydrogenase activity induced in bacteroids from pea nodules. Five strains, including H2 oxidation-ATP synthesis-coupled and -uncoupled strains, induced significant rates of H2-uptake hydrogenase activity and contained DNA sequences homologous to three probe DNA fragments (5.9-kilobase [kb] HindIII, 2.9-kb EcoRI, and 5.0-kb EcoRI) from pHU1. The pattern of genomic DNA HindIII and EcoRI fragments with significant homology to each of the three probes was identical in all five strains regardless of the H2-dependent ATP generation trait. The restriction fragments containing the homology totalled about 22 kb of DNA common to the five strains. In all instances the putative hup sequences were located on a plasmid that also contained nif genes. The molecular sizes of the identified hup-sym plasmids ranged between 184 and 212 megadaltons. No common DNA sequences homologous to B. japonicum hup DNA were found in genomic DNA from any of the eight remaining strains showing no significant hydrogenase activity in pea bacteroids. These results suggest that the identified DNA region contains genes essential for hydrogenase activity in R. leguminosarum and that its organization is highly conserved within Hup+ strains in this symbiotic species. Images PMID:16347471

  19. Evolutionary origin of rhizobium Nod factor signaling

    PubMed Central

    Streng, Arend; op den Camp, Rik; Bisseling, Ton

    2011-01-01

    For over two decades now, it is known that the nodule symbiosis between legume plants and nitrogen fixing rhizobium bacteria is set in motion by the bacterial signal molecule named nodulation (Nod) factor.1 Upon Nod factor perception a signaling cascade is activated that is also essential for endomycorrhizal symbiosis (Fig. 1). This suggests that rhizobium co-opted the evolutionary far more ancient mycorrhizal signaling pathway in order to establish an endosymbiotic interaction with legumes.2 As arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi of the Glomeromycota phylum can establish a symbiosis with the vast majority of land plants, it is most probable that this signaling cascade is wide spread in the plant kingdom.3 However, Nod factor perception generally is considered to be unique to legumes. Two recent breakthroughs on the evolutionary origin of rhizobium Nod factor signaling demonstrate that this is not the case.4,5 The purification of Nod factor-like molecules excreted by the mycorrhizal fungus Glomus intraradices and the role of the LysM-type Nod factor receptor PaNFP in the non-legume Parasponia andersonii provide novel understanding on the evolution of rhizobial Nod factor signaling. PMID:21904113

  20. Occurrence of polyamines in root nodules of Phaseolus vulgaris in symbiosis with Rhizobium tropici in response to salt stress.

    PubMed

    López-Gómez, Miguel; Cobos-Porras, Libertad; Hidalgo-Castellanos, Javier; Lluch, Carmen

    2014-11-01

    Polyamines (PAs) are low molecular weight aliphatic compounds that have been shown to be an important part of plant responses to salt stress. For that reason in this work we have investigated the involvement of PAs in the response to salt stress in root nodules of Phaseolus vulgaris in symbiosis with Rhizobium tropici. The level and variety of PAs was higher in nodules, compared to leaves and roots, and in addition to the common PAs (putrescine, spermidine and spermine) we found homospermidine (Homspd) as the most abundant polyamine in nodules. UPLC-mass spectrometry analysis revealed the presence of 4-aminobutylcadaverine (4-ABcad), only described in nodules of Vigna angularis before. Indeed, the analysis of different nodular fractions revealed higher level of 4-ABcad, as well as Homspd, in bacteroids which indicate the production of these PAs by the bacteria in symbiosis. The genes involved in PAs biosynthesis in nodules displayed an induction under salt stress conditions which was not consistent with the decline of free PAs levels, probably due to the nitrogen limitations provoked by the nitrogenase activity depletion and/or the conversion of free PAs to theirs soluble conjugated forms, that seems to be one of the mechanisms involved in the regulation of PAs levels. On the contrary, cadaverine (Cad) and 4-ABcad concentrations augmented by the salinity, which might be due to their involvement in the response of bacteroids to hyper-osmotic conditions. In conclusion, the results shown in this work suggest the alteration of the bacteroidal metabolism towards the production of uncommon PAs such as 4-ABcad in the response to salt stress in legume root nodules. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. hsp60 and 16S rRNA gene sequence relationships among species of the genus Bacteroides with the finding that Bacteroides suis and Bacteroides tectus are heterotypic synonyms of Bacteroides pyogenes.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Mitsuo; Suzuki, Natsuko; Benno, Yoshimi

    2010-12-01

    hsp60 gene sequences were determined for members of the genus Bacteroides and sequence similarities were compared with those obtained for the 16S rRNA gene. Among the 29 Bacteroides type strains, the mean sequence similarity of the hsp60 gene (84.5 %) was significantly less than that of the 16S rRNA gene (90.7 %), indicating a high discriminatory power of the hsp60 gene. Species of the genus Bacteroides were differentiated well by hsp60 gene sequence analysis, except for Bacteroides pyogenes JCM 6294(T), Bacteroides suis JCM 6292(T) and Bacteroides tectus JCM 10003(T). The hsp60 gene sequence analysis and the levels of DNA-DNA relatedness observed demonstrated that these three type strains are a single species. Consequently, B. suis and B. tectus are heterotypic synonyms of B. pyogenes. This study suggests that the hsp60 gene is an alternative phylogenetic marker for the classification of species of the genus Bacteroides.

  2. Patient-Specific Bacteroides Genome Variants in Pouchitis

    PubMed Central

    Vineis, Joseph H.; Ringus, Daina L.; Morrison, Hilary G.; Delmont, Tom O.; Dalal, Sushila; Raffals, Laura H.; Antonopoulos, Dionysios A.; Rubin, David T.; Eren, A. Murat; Chang, Eugene B.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT A 2-year longitudinal microbiome study of 22 patients who underwent colectomy with an ileal pouch anal anastomosis detected significant increases in distinct populations of Bacteroides during 9 of 11 patient visits that coincided with inflammation (pouchitis). Oligotyping and metagenomic short-read annotation identified Bacteroides populations that occurred in early samples, bloomed during inflammation, and reappeared after antibiotic treatment. Targeted cultivation of Bacteroides isolates from the same individual at multiple time points and from several patients detected subtle genomic changes, including the identification of rapidly evolving genomic elements that differentiate isogenic strains of Bacteroides fragilis from the mucosa versus lumen. Each patient harbored Bacteroides spp. that are closely related to commonly occurring clinical isolates, including Bacteroides ovatus, B. thetaiotaomicron, B. vulgatus, and B. fragilis, which contained unique loci in different patients for synthesis of capsular polysaccharides. The presence of unique Bacteroides capsular polysaccharide loci within different hosts and between the lumen and mucosa may represent adaptations to stimulate, suppress, and evade host-specific immune responses at different microsites of the ileal pouch. PMID:27935837

  3. Control of ammonium assimilation in Rhizobium 32H1.

    PubMed Central

    Ludwig, R A

    1978-01-01

    The symbiotic, nitrogen-fixing bacterium Rhizobium sp. 32H1 is a specialized ammonium producer during symbiosis. However, during free-living growth, Rhizobium 32H1 assimilates ammonium very poorly. Two pathways of ammonium assimilation exist in enteric bacteria. One is mediated by glutamate dehydrogenase, and the other is mediated by glutamine synthetase-glutamate synthase. The former pathway is altogether inoperative in Rhizobium 32H1; the latter pathway operates at a slow rate and is under strict negative control by ammonium itself. Rhizobium 32H1 glutamine synthetase activity is modulated by both repression-derepression and reversible adenylylation. For a biochemical process lacking an alternative pathway, such a regulatory pattern exacerbates the very process. This suggests that Rhizobium 32H1 restricts its own ammonium assimilation to maximize the contribution of fixed nitrogen to the host plant during symbiosis. PMID:27498

  4. Rhizobium halotolerans sp. nov., Isolated from chloroethylenes contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Diange, Eboa Adolf; Lee, Sang-Seob

    2013-06-01

    The strain designated as AB21(T) was isolated from chloroethylenes contaminated soil. Cells are gram-negative, aerobic, non-spore-forming, and motile rods. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequence showed that it belonged to the genus Rhizobium, and was closely related to Rhizobium sullae IS 123(T) (97.4 %), Rhizobium yanglingense SH 22623(T) (97.2 %), Rhizobium gallicum R 602sp(T) (97.1 %), Rhizobium alamii GBV 016(T) (97.0 %), and Rhizobium monogolense USDA 1844(T) (97.0 %). It showed less than 97 % identity with the remaining Rhizobium species. This novel isolate grew optimally at 25-37 °C (optimum, 30 °C) and pH 6-9 (optimum, pH 8.0). It grew in the presence of 0-4 % (w/v) NaCl, tolerating a 4 % (w/v) NaCl. DNA-DNA hybridization experiment shows less than 53 % binding with closely related Rhizobium. Predominant quinone is ubiquinone (Q-10). The major fatty acids were summed feature 8 (composed of C(18:1) ω7c/C(18:1) ω6c), C(19:0) cyclo ω8c, and C(16:0). The G+C molar content is 62.5 mol%. Based on the polyphasic analysis, strain AB21(T) is referred to be a novel species of the genus Rhizobium for which the name Rhizobium halotolerans sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is AB21(T) (=KEMC 224-056(T) = JCM 17536(T)).

  5. Cellular immunity to Bacteroides fragilis capsular polysaccharide

    PubMed Central

    1982-01-01

    The polysaccharide capsule of Bacteroides fragilis has been shown to be important in the virulence of the organism. The capsular polysaccharide (CP) of B. fragilis has been extensively purified. Using a murine model of intraabdominal abscess formation, we have been able to demonstrate cellular immunity to the capsular polysaccharide of B. fragilis. Immunization of C57BL/10J mice with the CP over 5 wk prevents abscess formation when the mice are challenged with B. fragilis intraperitoneally. This immunity can be transferred to naive mice with spleen cells from immune animals. The immune cells bear Thy-1.2 and Ly- 2.2 antigens. The immune response has been shown to be antigen specific, but not H-2 restricted. The possibility that these immune cells are suppressor T cells is discussed. The experimental system presented provides a model for the examination of the cellular interactions responsible for abscess formation and the cellular response to bacterial pathogens. PMID:6174672

  6. [The first metronidazole-resistant Bacteroides species isolated at Marmara University Hospital: Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron].

    PubMed

    Toprak Ülger, Nurver; Sayın, Elvan; Soyad, Ad; Dane, Faysal; Söyletir, Güner

    2013-10-01

    Bacteroides species, the predominant constituents of the human intestinal microbiota can cause serious intraabdominal and postoperative wound infections and bacteremia. Moreover, these bacteria are more resistant to antimicrobial agents than the other anaerobes. The limited number of the antimicrobials, such as carbapenems, beta-lactam/beta-lactamase inhibitors and nitroimidazoles are highly effective in eliminating Bacteroides. However, a few metronidazole-resistant isolates have been reported from several countries recently. The nim genes (nim A-G) are suggested to be responsible for the majority of the metronidazole resistance. Here, we describe a metronidazole-resistant Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron isolated from a blood culture. A gram-negative obligate anaerobic rod was isolated from the postoperative 5th day blood culture of a 62-year-old male patient with adenocarcinoma of the pancreas head. The strain was identified as B.thetaiotaomicron by using a combination of conventional tests and commercially available biochemical kits. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing was performed by agar dilution method. The resistance genes were investigated by means of PCR using specific primer pairs for nim gene. The purified PCR product was sequenced and analyzed by comparison of the consensus sequences with GenBank sequences. The MIC for metronidazole was 16 mg/L. Although the strain was intermediate according the CLSI criteria, it was resistant (> 4 mg/L) according to EUCAST criteria. The isolate was nim gene positive, and nucleotide sequencing of the PCR product shared 100% similarity with nimE gene (emb |AM042593.1 |). On the other hand the isolate was susceptible to carbapenems and sulbactam-ampicillin. Following administration of ampicillin-sulbactam, the patient's fever disappeared after 24 hours. The clinical condition improved considerably and he was discharged at day 8. The patient was followed up at the medical oncology clinic; however he died due to disease

  7. cis-Encoded Small RNAs, a Conserved Mechanism for Repression of Polysaccharide Utilization in Bacteroides.

    PubMed

    Cao, Yanlu; Förstner, Konrad U; Vogel, Jörg; Smith, C Jeffrey

    2016-09-15

    Bacteroides is a major component of the human gut microbiota which has a broad impact on the development and physiology of its host and a potential role in a wide range of disease syndromes. The predominance of this genus is due in large part to expansion of paralogous gene clusters, termed polysaccharide utilization loci (PULs), dedicated to the uptake and catabolism of host-derived and dietary polysaccharides. The nutritive value and availability of polysaccharides in the gut vary greatly; thus, their utilization is hierarchical and strictly controlled. A typical PUL includes regulatory genes that induce PUL expression in response to the presence of specific glycan substrates. However, the existence of additional regulatory mechanisms has been predicted to explain phenomena such as hierarchical control and catabolite repression. In this report, a previously unknown layer of regulatory control was discovered in Bacteroides fragilis Exploratory transcriptome sequencing (RNA-seq) analysis revealed the presence of cis-encoded antisense small RNAs (sRNAs) associated with 15 (30%) of the B. fragilis PULs. A model system using the Don (degradation of N-glycans) PUL showed that the donS sRNA negatively regulated Don expression at the transcriptional level, resulting in a decrease in N-glycan utilization. Additional studies performed with other Bacteroides species indicated that this regulatory mechanism is highly conserved and, interestingly, that the regulated PULs appear to be closely linked to the utilization of host-derived glycans rather than dietary plant polysaccharides. The findings described here demonstrate a global control mechanism underlying known PUL regulatory circuits and provide insight into regulation of Bacteroides physiology. The human gut is colonized by a dense microbiota which is essential to the health and normal development of the host. A key to gut homeostasis is the preservation of a stable, diverse microbiota. Bacteroides is a dominant genus

  8. Role of GOGAT in carbon and nitrogen partitioning in Rhizobium etli.

    PubMed

    Castillo, A; Taboada, H; Mendoza, A; Valderrama, B; Encarnación, S; Mora, J

    2000-07-01

    The isolation and characterization of a Rhizobium etli glutamate auxotroph, TAD12, harbouring a single Tn5 insertion, is reported. This mutant produced no detectable glutamate synthase (GOGAT) activity. The cloning and physical characterization of a 7.2 kb fragment of R. etli DNA harbouring the structural genes gltB and gltD encoding the two GOGAT subunits GltB and GltD is also reported. In comparison with the wild-type strain (CFN42), the GOGAT mutant strain utilized less succinate and glutamate and grew less with this and other amino acids as nitrogen source. R. etli assimilates ammonium by the glutamine synthetase (GS)-GOGAT pathway and a GOGAT mutant prevents the cycling of glutamine by this pathway, something that impairs nitrogen and carbon metabolism and explains the decrease in the amino-nitrogen during exponential growth, with glutamate as nitrogen source. GOGAT activity also has a role in ammonium turnover and in the synthesis of amino acids and proteins, processes that are necessary to sustain cell viability in non-growing conditions. The assimilation of ammonium is important during symbiosis and glutamate constitutes 20-40% of the total amino-nitrogen. In symbiosis, the blockage of ammonium assimilation by a GOGAT mutation significantly decreases the amino-nitrogen pool of the bacteroids and may explain why more N(2) is fixed in ammonium, excreted to the plant cell, transported to the leaves and stored in the seeds.

  9. High lipid productivity of an Ankistrodesmus-Rhizobium artificial consortium.

    PubMed

    Do Nascimento, Mauro; Dublan, Maria de los Angeles; Ortiz-Marquez, Juan Cesar Federico; Curatti, Leonardo

    2013-10-01

    Microalgae have great potential as alternative productive platforms for sustainable production of bioenergy, food, feed and other commodities. Process optimization to realize the claimed potential often comprises strains selection and improvement and also developing of more efficient cultivation, harvesting and downstream processing technology. In this work we show that inoculation with the bacterium Rhizobium strain 10II resulted in increments of up to 30% in chlorophyll, biomass and lipids accumulation of the oleaginous microalgae Ankistrodesmus sp. strain SP2-15. Inoculated cultures have reached a high lipid productivity of up to 112 mg L(-1) d(-1) after optimization. The resulting biomass presented significant levels of Ω3 fatty acids including stearidonic acid, suggesting potential as an alternative land-based source of essential fatty acids.

  10. Rhizobium calliandrae sp. nov., Rhizobium mayense sp. nov. and Rhizobium jaguaris sp. nov., rhizobial species nodulating the medicinal legume Calliandra grandiflora.

    PubMed

    Rincón-Rosales, Reiner; Villalobos-Escobedo, José M; Rogel, Marco A; Martinez, Julio; Ormeño-Orrillo, Ernesto; Martínez-Romero, Esperanza

    2013-09-01

    Calliandra grandiflora has been used as a medicinal plant for thousands of years in Mexico. Rhizobial strains were obtained from root nodules of C. grandiflora collected from different geographical regions in Chiapas and characterized by BOX-PCR, amplified rDNA restriction analysis (ARDRA) and 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis. Most isolates corresponded to members of the genus Rhizobium and those not related to species with validly published names were further characterized by recA, atpD, rpoB and nifH gene phylogenies, phenotypic and DNA-DNA hybridization analyses. Three novel related species of the genus Rhizobium within the 'Rhizobium tropici group' share the same symbiovar that may be named sv. calliandrae. The names proposed for the three novel species are Rhizobium calliandrae sp. nov. (type strain, CCGE524(T) =ATCC BAA-2435(T) =CIP 110456(T) =LBP2-1(T)), Rhizobium mayense sp. nov. (type strain, CCGE526(T) =ATCC BAA-2446(T) = CIP 110454(T) =NSJP1-1(T)) and Rhizobium jaguaris sp. nov. (type strain, CCGE525(T) =ATCC BAA-2445(T) =CIP 110453(T) =SJP1-2(T)).

  11. (Analysis of the Rhizobium meliloti surface):

    SciTech Connect

    Signer, E.R.

    1988-03-03

    We have identified a number of genes in Rhizobium meliloti that affect outer membrane lipopolysaccharides (LPS). These include three genes defined by mutants with different patterns of resistance to a panel of bacteriophages, of which Class 2 and 3 are closely linked to each other but not to Class 1 or 4;another gene, closely linked to Class 2 and 3, defined only by its ability to suppress Class 1 defects;and three genes, unlinked to each other, defined by mutants with increased sensitivity to deoxycholate. Of the mutants that define these genes, only those in Class 2 have a clear effect on alfalfa symbiosis, having a Fix phenotype.

  12. Comparison of fructooligosaccharide utilization by Lactobacillus and Bacteroides species.

    PubMed

    Endo, Hiroya; Tamura, Kazuji; Fukasawa, Tomoyuki; Kanegae, Minoru; Koga, Jinichiro

    2012-01-01

    The utilization of 1-kestose (GF(2)) and nystose (GF(3)), the main components of fructooligosaccharides (FOS), by Lactobacillus and Bacteroides species was examined. Of seven Lactobacillus and five Bacteroides strains that utilized FOS, L. salivarius, L. rhamnosus, L. casei, and L. gasseri utilized only GF(2), whereas L. acidophilus and all the Bacteroides strains utilized both GF(2) and GF(3). Only the strains able to utilize both GF(2) and GF(3) had β-fructosidase activity in the culture supernatants. The culture supernatants of the Lactobacillus strains had higher β-fructosidase activity for GF(2) than for GF(3), whereas those of the Bacteroides strains had higher activity for GF(3) than for GF(2). Furthermore, β-fructosidase activity of the culture supernatants of the Lactobacillus cells grown in the GF(3) medium was much higher than that of the cells grown in the GF(2) medium, whereas the activity of the culture supernatants of the Bacteroides cells grown in the GF(3) medium was almost the same as that of the cells grown in the GF(2) medium. These results indicate that Lactobacillus species metabolize FOS in a different way from that of Bacteroides species.

  13. Mariner-based transposon mutagenesis for Bacteroides species.

    PubMed

    Ichimura, Minoru; Uchida, Keiko; Nakayama-Imaohji, Haruyuki; Hirakawa, Hideki; Tada, Tomoyo; Morita, Hidetoshi; Yasutomo, Koji; Okazaki, Katsuichiro; Kuwahara, Tomomi

    2014-06-01

    Bacteroides is one of the most predominant groups of human gut microbiota. Recent metagenomic analyses and studies on gnotobiotic mice demonstrated the tight association of Bacteroides with epithelial function, the gut immune system and systemic metabolism in the host. The mariner family transposon shows relatively low target site specificity and has hosts ranging from prokaryotes to eukaryotes. Thereby, random mutagenesis using the mariner family transposon is expected to identify key molecules for human-Bacteroides symbiosis. In this study, we constructed the plasmid pMI07 to deliver the gene cassette (ermF/ITR), which harbors the erythromycin resistant marker (ermF) and the inverted repeat sequences (ITRs) recognized by Himar1 transposase, to Bacteroides via electrotransformation. pMI07 successfully delivered ermF/ITR to the Bacteroides genomes and generated thousands of insertion mutants/μg of pMI07 in B. thetaiotaomicron, B. fragilis, B. ovatus, and also, although to a lesser extent, B. vulgatus. Analyses of the ermF/ITR insertion sites in B. thetaiotaomicron and B. vulgatus revealed that the cassette targeted the dinucleotide TA and integrated into the genomes in an unbiased manner. The data reported here will provide useful information for transposon mutagenesis in Bacteroides species, which will enable identification of the genes responsible for their unique phenotypes. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Variability among Rhizobium Strains Originating from Nodules of Vicia faba

    PubMed Central

    van Berkum, P.; Beyene, D.; Vera, F. T.; Keyser, H. H.

    1995-01-01

    Rhizobium strains from nodules of Vicia faba were diverse in plasmid content and serology. Results of multilocus gel electrophoresis and restriction fragment length polymorphism indicated several deep chromosomal lineages among the strains. Linkage disequilibrium among the chromosomal types was detected and may have reflected variation of Rhizobium strains in the different geographical locations from which the strains originated. An investigation of pea strains with antibodies prepared against fava bean strains and restriction fragment length polymorphism analyses, targeting DNA regions coding for rRNA and nodulation, indicated that Rhizobium strains from V. faba nodules were distinguishable from those from Pisum sativum, V. villosa, and Trifolium spp. PMID:16535075

  15. A Novel Tightly Regulated Gene Expression System for the Human Intestinal Symbiont Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron

    PubMed Central

    Horn, Nikki; Carvalho, Ana L.; Overweg, Karin; Wegmann, Udo; Carding, Simon R.; Stentz, Régis

    2016-01-01

    There is considerable interest in studying the function of Bacteroides species resident in the human gastrointestinal (GI)-tract and the contribution they make to host health. Reverse genetics and protein expression techniques, such as those developed for well-characterized Escherichia coli cannot be applied to Bacteroides species as they and other members of the Bacteriodetes phylum have unique promoter structures. The availability of useful Bacteroides-specific genetic tools is therefore limited. Here we describe the development of an effective mannan-controlled gene expression system for Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron containing the mannan-inducible promoter–region of an α-1,2-mannosidase gene (BT_3784), a ribosomal binding site designed to modulate expression, a multiple cloning site to facilitate the cloning of genes of interest, and a transcriptional terminator. Using the Lactobacillus pepI as a reporter gene, mannan induction resulted in an increase of reporter activity in a time- and concentration-dependent manner with a wide range of activity. The endogenous BtcepA cephalosporinase gene was used to demonstrate the suitability of this novel expression system, enabling the isolation of a His-tagged version of BtCepA. We have also shown with experiments performed in mice that the system can be induced in vivo in the presence of an exogenous source of mannan. By enabling the controlled expression of endogenous and exogenous genes in B. thetaiotaomicron this novel inducer-dependent expression system will aid in defining the physiological role of individual genes and the functional analyses of their products. PMID:27468280

  16. A Novel Tightly Regulated Gene Expression System for the Human Intestinal Symbiont Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron.

    PubMed

    Horn, Nikki; Carvalho, Ana L; Overweg, Karin; Wegmann, Udo; Carding, Simon R; Stentz, Régis

    2016-01-01

    There is considerable interest in studying the function of Bacteroides species resident in the human gastrointestinal (GI)-tract and the contribution they make to host health. Reverse genetics and protein expression techniques, such as those developed for well-characterized Escherichia coli cannot be applied to Bacteroides species as they and other members of the Bacteriodetes phylum have unique promoter structures. The availability of useful Bacteroides-specific genetic tools is therefore limited. Here we describe the development of an effective mannan-controlled gene expression system for Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron containing the mannan-inducible promoter-region of an α-1,2-mannosidase gene (BT_3784), a ribosomal binding site designed to modulate expression, a multiple cloning site to facilitate the cloning of genes of interest, and a transcriptional terminator. Using the Lactobacillus pepI as a reporter gene, mannan induction resulted in an increase of reporter activity in a time- and concentration-dependent manner with a wide range of activity. The endogenous BtcepA cephalosporinase gene was used to demonstrate the suitability of this novel expression system, enabling the isolation of a His-tagged version of BtCepA. We have also shown with experiments performed in mice that the system can be induced in vivo in the presence of an exogenous source of mannan. By enabling the controlled expression of endogenous and exogenous genes in B. thetaiotaomicron this novel inducer-dependent expression system will aid in defining the physiological role of individual genes and the functional analyses of their products.

  17. RbohB, a Phaseolus vulgaris NADPH oxidase gene, enhances symbiosome number, bacteroid size, and nitrogen fixation in nodules and impairs mycorrhizal colonization.

    PubMed

    Arthikala, Manoj-Kumar; Sánchez-López, Rosana; Nava, Noreide; Santana, Olivia; Cárdenas, Luis; Quinto, Carmen

    2014-05-01

    The reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated by respiratory burst oxidative homologs (Rbohs) are involved in numerous plant cell signaling processes, and have critical roles in the symbiosis between legumes and nitrogen-fixing bacteria. Previously, down-regulation of RbohB in Phaseolus vulgaris was shown to suppress ROS production and abolish Rhizobium infection thread (IT) progression, but also to enhance arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal (AMF) colonization. Thus, Rbohs function both as positive and negative regulators. Here, we assessed the effect of enhancing ROS concentrations, by overexpressing PvRbohB, on the P. vulgaris--rhizobia and P. vulgaris--AMF symbioses. We estimated superoxide concentrations in hairy roots overexpressing PvRbohB, determined the status of early and late events of both Rhizobium and AMF interactions in symbiont-inoculated roots, and analyzed the nodule ultrastructure of transgenic plants overexpressing PvRbohB. Overexpression of PvRbohB significantly enhanced ROS production, the formation of ITs, nodule biomass, and nitrogen-fixing activity, and increased the density of symbiosomes in nodules, and the density and size of bacteroides in symbiosomes. Furthermore, PvCAT, early nodulin, PvSS1, and PvGOGAT transcript abundances were elevated in these nodules. By contrast, mycorrhizal colonization was reduced in roots that overexpressed RbohB. Overexpression of PvRbohB augmented nodule efficiency by enhancing nitrogen fixation and delaying nodule senescence, but impaired AMF colonization. © 2014 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2014 New Phytologist Trust.

  18. Two Sinorhizobium meliloti glutaredoxins regulate iron metabolism and symbiotic bacteroid differentiation.

    PubMed

    Benyamina, Sofiane M; Baldacci-Cresp, Fabien; Couturier, Jérémy; Chibani, Kamel; Hopkins, Julie; Bekki, Abdelkader; de Lajudie, Philippe; Rouhier, Nicolas; Jacquot, Jean-Pierre; Alloing, Geneviève; Puppo, Alain; Frendo, Pierre

    2013-03-01

    Legumes interact symbiotically with bacteria of the Rhizobiaceae to form nitrogen-fixing root nodules. We investigated the contribution of the three glutaredoxin (Grx)-encoding genes present in the Sinorhizobium meliloti genome to this symbiosis. SmGRX1 (CGYC active site) and SmGRX3 (CPYG) recombinant proteins displayed deglutathionylation activity in the 2-hydroethyldisulfide assay, whereas SmGRX2 (CGFS) did not. Mutation of SmGRX3 did not affect S. meliloti growth or symbiotic capacities. In contrast, SmGRX1 and SmGRX2 mutations decreased the growth of free-living bacteria and the nitrogen fixation capacity of bacteroids. Mutation of SmGRX1 led to nodule abortion and an absence of bacteroid differentiation, whereas SmGRX2 mutation decreased nodule development without modifying bacteroid development. The higher sensitivity of the Smgrx1 mutant strain as compared with wild-type strain to oxidative stress was associated with larger amounts of glutathionylated proteins. The Smgrx2 mutant strain displayed significantly lower levels of activity than the wild type for two iron-sulfur-containing enzymes, aconitase and succinate dehydrogenase. This lower level of activity could be associated with deregulation of the transcriptional activity of the RirA iron regulator and higher intracellular iron content. Thus, two S. meliloti Grx proteins are essential for symbiotic nitrogen fixation, playing independent roles in bacterial differentiation and the regulation of iron metabolism.

  19. Growth of fast- and slow-growing rhizobia on ethanol. [Bradyrhizobium sp. ; Rhizobium meliloti; Rhizobium loti; Rhizobium leguminosarum; Rhizobium fredii; Bradyrhizobium japonicum

    SciTech Connect

    Sadowsky, M.J.; Bohlool, B.B.

    1986-10-01

    Free-living soybean rhizobia and Bradyrhizobium spp. (lupine) have the ability to catabolize ethanol. Of the 30 strains of rhizobia examined, only the fast- and slow-growing soybean rhizobia and the slow-growing Bradyrhizobium sp (lupine) were capable of using ethanol as a sole source of carbon and energy for growth. Two strains from each of the other Rhizobium species examined (R. meliloti, R. loti, and R. leguminosarum biovars phaseoli, trifolii, and viceae) failed to grow on ethanol. One Rhizobium fredii (fast-growing) strain, USDA 191, and one (slow-growing) Bradyrhizobium japonicum strain, USDA 110, grew in ethanol up to concentrations of 3.0 and 1.0%, respectively. While three of the R. fredii strains examined (USDA 192, USDA 194, and USDA 205) utilized 0.2% acetate, only USDA 192 utilized 0.1% n-propanol. None of the three strains utilized 0.1% methanol, formate, or n-butanol as the sole carbon source.

  20. Studying Plant-Rhizobium Mutualism in the Biology Classroom: Connecting the Big Ideas in Biology through Inquiry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suwa, Tomomi; Williamson, Brad

    2014-01-01

    We present a guided-inquiry biology lesson, using the plant-rhizobium symbiosis as a model system. This system provides a rich environment for developing connections between the big ideas in biology as outlined in the College Board's new AP Biology Curriculum. Students gain experience with the practice of scientific investigation, from…

  1. Studying Plant-Rhizobium Mutualism in the Biology Classroom: Connecting the Big Ideas in Biology through Inquiry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suwa, Tomomi; Williamson, Brad

    2014-01-01

    We present a guided-inquiry biology lesson, using the plant-rhizobium symbiosis as a model system. This system provides a rich environment for developing connections between the big ideas in biology as outlined in the College Board's new AP Biology Curriculum. Students gain experience with the practice of scientific investigation, from…

  2. Effects of nano-ZnO on the agronomically relevant Rhizobium-legume symbiosis.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yu Chu; Fan, Ruimei; Grusak, Michael A; Sherrier, Janine D; Huang, C P

    2014-11-01

    The impact of nano-ZnO (nZnO) on Rhizobium-legume symbiosis was studied with garden pea and its compatible bacterial partner Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. viciae 3841. Exposure of peas to nZnO had no impact on germination, but significantly affected root length. Chronic exposure of plant to nZnO impacted its development by decreasing the number of the first- and the second-order lateral roots, stem length, leaf surface area, and transpiration. The effect of nZnO dissolution on phytotoxicity was also examined. Results showed that Zn(2+) had negative impact on plant development. Exposure of R. leguminosarum bv. viciae 3841 to nZnO brought about morphological changes by rendering the microbial cells toward round shape and damaging the bacterial surface. Furthermore, the presence of nZnO in the rhizosphere affected root nodulation, delayed the onset of nitrogen fixation, and caused early senescence of nodules. Attachment of nanoparticles on the root surface and dissolution of Zn(2+) are important factors affecting the phytotocity of nZnO. Hence, the presence of nZnO in the environment is potentially hazardous to the Rhizobium-legume symbiosis system.

  3. Design and evaluation of Bacteroides DNA probes for the specific detection of human fecal pollution

    SciTech Connect

    Kreader, C.A.

    1995-04-01

    Because Bacteroides spp. are obligate anaerobes that dominate the human fecal flora, and because some species may live only in the human intestine, these bacteria might be useful to distinguish human from nonhuman sources of fecal pollution. To test this hypothesis, PCR primers specific for 16S rRNA gene sequences of Bacteroides distasonis, B. thetaiotaomicron, and B. vulgatus were designed. Hybridization with species-specific internal probes was used to detect the intended PCR products. Extracts from 66 known Bacteroides strains, representing 10 related species, were used to confirm the specificity of these PCR-hybridization assays. To test for specificity in feces, procedures were developed to prepare DNA of sufficient purity for PCR. Extracts of feces from 9 humans and 70 nonhumans (cats, dogs, cattle, hogs, horses, sheep, goats, and chickens) were each analyzed with and without an internal positive control to verify that PCR amplification was not inhibited by substances in the extract. In addition, serial dilutions from each extract that tested positive were assayed to estimate the relative abundance of target Bacteroides spp. in the sample. Depending on the primer-probe set used, either 78 or 67% of the human fecal extracts tested had high levels of target DNA. On the other hand, only 7 to 11% of the nonhuman extracts tested had similarly high levels of target DNA. An additional 12 to 20% of the nonhuman extracts had levels of target DNA that were 100- to 1,000-fold lower than those found in humans. Although the B. vulgatus probes detected high levels of their target DNA in most of the house pets, similarly high levels of target DNA were found only in a few individuals from other groups of nonhumans. Therefore, the results indicate that these probes can distinguish human from non human feces in many cases. 50 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. Rhizobium yantingense sp. nov., a mineral-weathering bacterium.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei; Sheng, Xia-Fang; He, Lin-Yan; Huang, Zhi

    2015-02-01

    A Gram-stain-negative, rod-shaped bacterial strain, H66(T), was isolated from the surfaces of weathered rock (purple siltstone) found in Yanting, Sichuan Province, PR China. Cells of strain H66(T) were motile with peritrichous flagella. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences indicated that strain H66(T) belongs to the genus Rhizobium. It is closely related to Rhizobium huautlense SO2(T) (98.1 %), Rhizobium alkalisoli CCBAU 01393(T) (98.0 %) and Rhizobium cellulosilyticum ALA10B2(T) (98.0 %). Analysis of the housekeeping genes, recA, glnII and atpD, showed low levels of sequence similarity (<92.0 %) between strain H66(T) and other recognized species of the genus Rhizobium. The predominant components of the cellular fatty acids were summed feature 8 (C18 : 1ω7c and/or C18 : 1ω6c) and C16 : 0. The G+C content of strain H66(T) was 60.3 mol%. Strain H66(T) is suggested to be a novel species of the genus Rhizobium based on the low levels of DNA-DNA relatedness (ranging from 14.3 % to 40.0 %) with type strains of species of the genus Rhizobium and on its unique phenotypic characteristics. The namehttp://dx.doi.org/10.1601/nm.1279Rhizobium yantingense sp. nov. is proposed for this novel species. The type strain is H66(T) ( = CCTCC AB 2014007(T) = LMG 28229(T)).

  5. Rhizobium-legume symbiosis shares an exocytotic pathway required for arbuscule formation.

    PubMed

    Ivanov, Sergey; Fedorova, Elena E; Limpens, Erik; De Mita, Stephane; Genre, Andrea; Bonfante, Paola; Bisseling, Ton

    2012-05-22

    Endosymbiotic interactions are characterized by the formation of specialized membrane compartments, by the host in which the microbes are hosted, in an intracellular manner. Two well-studied examples, which are of major agricultural and ecological importance, are the widespread arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis and the Rhizobium-legume symbiosis. In both symbioses, the specialized host membrane that surrounds the microbes forms a symbiotic interface, which facilitates the exchange of, for example, nutrients in a controlled manner and, therefore, forms the heart of endosymbiosis. Despite their key importance, the molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying the formation of these membrane interfaces are largely unknown. Recent studies strongly suggest that the Rhizobium-legume symbiosis coopted a signaling pathway, including receptor, from the more ancient arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis to form a symbiotic interface. Here, we show that two highly homologous exocytotic vesicle-associated membrane proteins (VAMPs) are required for formation of the symbiotic membrane interface in both interactions. Silencing of these Medicago VAMP72 genes has a minor effect on nonsymbiotic plant development and nodule formation. However, it blocks symbiosome as well as arbuscule formation, whereas root colonization by the microbes is not affected. Identification of these VAMP72s as common symbiotic regulators in exocytotic vesicle trafficking suggests that the ancient exocytotic pathway forming the periarbuscular membrane compartment has also been coopted in the Rhizobium-legume symbiosis.

  6. In Rhizobium etli symbiotic plasmid transfer, nodulation competitivity and cellular growth require interaction among different replicons.

    PubMed

    Brom, S; García-de los Santos, A; Cervantes, L; Palacios, R; Romero, D

    2000-07-01

    Bacteria belonging to the genus Rhizobium are able to develop two different lifestyles, in symbiotic association with plant roots or through saprophytic growth. The genome of Rhizobium strains is constituted by a chromosome and several large plasmids, one of them containing most of the genes involved in symbiosis (symbiotic plasmid or pSym). Our model strain Rhizobium etli CFN42 contains six plasmids. We have constructed multiple plasmid-cured derivatives of this strain and used them to analyze the contribution of these plasmids to free-living cellular viability, competitivity for nodulation, plasmid transfer, and utilization of diverse carbon sources. Our results show that the transfer of the pSym is strictly dependent on the presence of another plasmid; consequently under conditions where pSym transfer is required, nodulation relies on the presence of a plasmid devoid of nodulation genes. We also found a drastic decrease in competitivity for nodulation in multiple plasmid-cured derivatives when compared with single plasmid-cured strains. Cellular growth and viability were greatly diminished in some multiple plasmid-cured strains. The utilization of a number of carbon sources depends on the presence of specific plasmids. The results presented in this work indicate that functional interactions among sequences scattered in the different plasmids are required for successful completion of both lifestyles. Copyright 2000 Academic Press.

  7. Optimization of Dairy Sludge for Growth of Rhizobium Cells

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Ashok Kumar; Singh, Gauri; Gautam, Digvijay; Bedi, Manjinder Kaur

    2013-01-01

    In this study dairy sludge was evaluated as an alternative cultivation medium for Rhizobium. Growth of bacterial strains at different concentrations of Dairy sludge was monitored. Maximum growth of all strains was observed at 60% Dairy sludge concentration. At 60% optical density (OD) values are 0.804 for Rhizobium trifolii (MTCC905), 0.825 for Rhizobium trifolii (MTCC906), and 0.793 for Rhizobium meliloti (MTCC100). Growth pattern of strains was observed at 60% Dairy sludge along with different synthetic media (tryptone yeast, Rhizobium minimal medium and yeast extract mannitol). Growth in 60% Dairy sludge was found to be superior to standard media used for Rhizobium. Media were optimized using 60% dairy sludge along with different concentrations of yeast extract (1–7 g/L) and mannitol (7–13 g/L) in terms of optical density at different time intervals, that is, 24, 48 and 72 hours. Maximum growth was observed in 6 g/L of yeast extract and 12 g/L of mannitol at 48-hour incubation period in all strains. The important environmental parameters such as pH were optimized using 60% dairy sludge, 60% dairy sludge +6 g/L yeast extract, and 60% dairy sludge +12 g/L mannitol. The maximum growth of all strains was found at pH 7.0. The present study recommends the use of 60% dairy sludge as a suitable growth medum for inoculant production. PMID:24089690

  8. Optimization of dairy sludge for growth of Rhizobium cells.

    PubMed

    Singh, Ashok Kumar; Singh, Gauri; Gautam, Digvijay; Bedi, Manjinder Kaur

    2013-01-01

    In this study dairy sludge was evaluated as an alternative cultivation medium for Rhizobium. Growth of bacterial strains at different concentrations of Dairy sludge was monitored. Maximum growth of all strains was observed at 60% Dairy sludge concentration. At 60% optical density (OD) values are 0.804 for Rhizobium trifolii (MTCC905), 0.825 for Rhizobium trifolii (MTCC906), and 0.793 for Rhizobium meliloti (MTCC100). Growth pattern of strains was observed at 60% Dairy sludge along with different synthetic media (tryptone yeast, Rhizobium minimal medium and yeast extract mannitol). Growth in 60% Dairy sludge was found to be superior to standard media used for Rhizobium. Media were optimized using 60% dairy sludge along with different concentrations of yeast extract (1-7 g/L) and mannitol (7-13 g/L) in terms of optical density at different time intervals, that is, 24, 48 and 72 hours. Maximum growth was observed in 6 g/L of yeast extract and 12 g/L of mannitol at 48-hour incubation period in all strains. The important environmental parameters such as pH were optimized using 60% dairy sludge, 60% dairy sludge +6 g/L yeast extract, and 60% dairy sludge +12 g/L mannitol. The maximum growth of all strains was found at pH 7.0. The present study recommends the use of 60% dairy sludge as a suitable growth medum for inoculant production.

  9. Widespread fitness alignment in the legume-rhizobium symbiosis.

    PubMed

    Friesen, Maren L

    2012-06-01

    Although 'cheaters' potentially destabilize the legume-rhizobium mutualism, we lack a comprehensive review of host-symbiont fitness correlations. Studies measuring rhizobium relative or absolute fitness and host benefit are surveyed. Mutant studies are tallied for evidence of pleiotropy; studies of natural strains are analyzed with meta-analysis. Of 80 rhizobium mutations, 19 decrease both partners' fitness, four increase both, two increase host fitness but decrease symbiont fitness and none increase symbiont fitness at the host's expense. The pooled correlation between rhizobium nodulation competitiveness and plant aboveground biomass is 0.65 across five experiments that compete natural strains against a reference, whereas, across 14 experiments that compete rhizobia against soil populations or each other, the pooled correlation is 0.24. Pooled correlations between aboveground biomass and nodule number and nodule biomass are 0.76 and 0.83. Positive correlations between legume and rhizobium fitness imply that most ineffective rhizobia are 'defective' rather than 'defectors'; this extends to natural variants, with only one significant fitness conflict. Most studies involve non-coevolved associations, indicating that fitness alignment is the default state. Rhizobium mutations that increase both host and symbiont fitness suggest that some plants maladaptively restrict symbiosis with novel strains.

  10. Reiterated DNA sequences in Rhizobium and Agrobacterium spp.

    PubMed Central

    Flores, M; González, V; Brom, S; Martínez, E; Piñero, D; Romero, D; Dávila, G; Palacios, R

    1987-01-01

    Repeated DNA sequences are a general characteristic of eucaryotic genomes. Although several examples of DNA reiteration have been found in procaryotic organisms, only in the case of the archaebacteria Halobacterium halobium and Halobacterium volcanii [C. Sapienza and W. F. Doolittle, Nature (London) 295:384-389, 1982], has DNA reiteration been reported as a common genomic feature. The genomes of two Rhizobium phaseoli strains, one Rhizobium meliloti strain, and one Agrobacterium tumefaciens strain were analyzed for the presence of repetitive DNA. Rhizobium and Agrobacterium spp. are closely related soil bacteria that interact with plants and that belong to the taxonomical family Rhizobiaceae. Rhizobium species establish a nitrogen-fixing symbiosis in the roots of legumes, whereas Agrobacterium species is a pathogen in different plants. The four strains revealed a large number of repeated DNA sequences. The family size was usually small, from 2 to 5 elements, but some presented more than 10 elements. Rhizobium and Agrobacterium spp. contain large plasmids in addition to the chromosomes. Analysis of the two Rhizobium strains indicated that DNA reiteration is not confined to the chromosome or to some plasmids but is a property of the whole genome. Images PMID:3450286

  11. Rhizobium herbae sp. nov. and Rhizobium giardinii-related bacteria, minor microsymbionts of various wild legumes in China.

    PubMed

    Ren, Da Wei; Wang, En Tao; Chen, Wen Feng; Sui, Xin Hua; Zhang, Xiao Xia; Liu, Hong Can; Chen, Wen Xin

    2011-08-01

    Seven Rhizobium strains associated with various legume species grown in different geographical regions of China were defined into four genomic groups related to Rhizobium giardinii, based upon ribosomal intergenic spacer RFLP, phylogenies of 16S rRNA and housekeeping (atpD, recA and glnII) genes, and DNA relatedness. Three strains in group I were classified as R. giardinii, as they showed high gene sequence similarities (>97 %) and DNA relatedness (64.3-67.5 %) to R. giardinii H152(T). Groups II, III and IV differed from all defined Rhizobium species based upon the consensus of all analyses. As group II contained two strains that originated from two distinct populations, we propose this group as a novel species, Rhizobium herbae sp. nov., with strain CCBAU 83011(T) ( = LMG 25718(T) = HAMBI 3117(T)) as the type strain.

  12. Cytotoxic and immunostimulatory effects of Bacteroides cell products.

    PubMed

    Fotos, P G; Lewis, D M; Gerencser, V F; Gerencser, M A

    1990-09-01

    The etiologic role of Bacteroides in both periodontal and periapical infections has been well documented, with current interest focusing on the specific pathogenic mechanisms involved. The effects of cell fractions derived from Bacteroides gingivalis (BG), Bacteroides intermedius (BI), and Bacteroides asaccharolyticus (BA) have been studied in vitro through: an assessment of the direct cytotoxic effects on human gingival fibroblasts using a tetrazolium dye reduction assay, an evaluation of murine lymphocyte stimulation and interleukin-1 release, and the induction of human lymphocyte-mediated cytotoxicity. Both BG and BI stimulated interleukin-1 release (P less than 0.001), while BA, a nonoral organism, was not significantly active in this respect. Only BG sonicates were able to induce lymphocyte-mediated cytotoxicity (P less than 0.005). All three Bacteroides species demonstrated direct cytotoxic effects on cultured gingival fibroblasts, and these effects were related to the relative protein content and endotoxin activity of the sonicate preparations for each organism. These data show that BG and BI possess factors which may enhance their virulence through activities not shared with BA.

  13. Multiresistance genes of Rhizobium etli CFN42.

    PubMed

    González-Pasayo, R; Martínez-Romero, E

    2000-05-01

    Multidrug efflux pumps of bacteria are involved in the resistance to various antibiotics and toxic compounds. In Rhizobium etli, a mutualistic symbiont of Phaseolus vulgaris (bean), genes resembling multidrug efflux pump genes were identified and designated rmrA and rmrB. rmrA was obtained after the screening of transposon-generated fusions that are inducible by bean-root released flavonoids. The predicted gene products of rmrAB shared significant homology to membrane fusion and major facilitator proteins, respectively. Mutants of rmrA formed on average 40% less nodules in bean, while mutants of rmrA and rmrB had enhanced sensitivity to phytoalexins, flavonoids, and salicylic acid, compared with the wild-type strain. Multidrug resistance genes emrAB from Escherichia coli complemented an rmrA mutant from R. etli for resistance to high concentrations of naringenin.

  14. Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron in the gut: molecular aspects of their interaction.

    PubMed

    Zocco, M A; Ainora, M E; Gasbarrini, G; Gasbarrini, A

    2007-08-01

    The gut microflora can be considered a metabolically active organ composed of a vast and complex community of microorganisms that has an important role in the stability and functional activity of the intestinal ecosystem. Recently, thanks to microarray technology, a global screening of the microflora's regulated genes has allowed the analysis of the complex bacteria-host interplay. In particular, most of our knowledge comes from studies on Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron, a prominent member of the intestinal microflora of mice and humans. The results of published studies have revealed that Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron modulate the expression of a large quantity of genes implicated in different aspect of host physiology. This review aims to illustrate the specific contributions of this intestinal microorganism in three important aspects of host physiology: mucosal barrier reinforcement, immune system modulation and nutrients metabolism. In particular, we focus on recent insights about the molecular mechanisms by which Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron help the host in these important functions.

  15. Average nucleotide identity of genome sequences supports the description of Rhizobium lentis sp. nov., Rhizobium bangladeshense sp. nov. and Rhizobium binae sp. nov. from lentil (Lens culinaris) nodules.

    PubMed

    Rashid, M Harun-or; Young, J Peter W; Everall, Isobel; Clercx, Pia; Willems, Anne; Santhosh Braun, Markus; Wink, Michael

    2015-09-01

    Rhizobial strains isolated from effective root nodules of field-grown lentil (Lens culinaris) from different parts of Bangladesh were previously analysed using sequences of the 16S rRNA gene, three housekeeping genes (recA, atpD and glnII) and three nodulation genes (nodA, nodC and nodD), DNA fingerprinting and phenotypic characterization. Analysis of housekeeping gene sequences and DNA fingerprints indicated that the strains belonged to three novel clades in the genus Rhizobium. In present study, a representative strain from each clade was further characterized by determination of cellular fatty acid compositions, carbon substrate utilization patterns and DNA-DNA hybridization and average nucleotide identity (ANI) analyses from whole-genome sequences. DNA-DNA hybridization showed 50-62% relatedness to their closest relatives (the type strains of Rhizobium etli and Rhizobium phaseoli) and 50-60% relatedness to each other. These results were further supported by ANI values, based on genome sequencing, which were 87-92% with their close relatives and 88-89% with each other. On the basis of these results, three novel species, Rhizobium lentis sp. nov. (type strain BLR27(T) = LMG 28441(T) = DSM 29286(T)), Rhizobium bangladeshense sp. nov. (type strain BLR175(T) = LMG 28442(T) = DSM 29287(T)) and Rhizobium binae sp. nov. (type strain BLR195(T) = LMG 28443(T) = DSM 29288(T)), are proposed. These species share common nodulation genes (nodA, nodC and nodD) that are similar to those of the symbiovar viciae.

  16. Mutation of the Sensor Kinase chvG in Rhizobium leguminosarum Negatively Impacts Cellular Metabolism, Outer Membrane Stability, and Symbiosis

    PubMed Central

    Vanderlinde, Elizabeth M.

    2012-01-01

    Two-component signal transduction systems (TCS) are a main strategy used by bacteria to sense and adapt to changes in their environment. In the legume symbiont Rhizobium leguminosarum biovar viciae VF39, mutation of chvG, a histidine kinase, caused a number of pleiotropic phenotypes. ChvG mutants are unable to grow on proline, glutamate, histidine, or arginine as the sole carbon source. The chvG mutant secreted smaller amounts of acidic and neutral surface polysaccharides and accumulated abnormally large amounts of poly-ß-hydroxybutyrate. Mutation of chvG caused symbiotic defects on peas, lentils, and vetch; nodules formed by the chvG mutant were small and white and contained only a few cells that had failed to differentiate into bacteroids. Mutation of chvG also destabilized the outer membrane of R. leguminosarum, resulting in increased sensitivity to membrane stressors. Constitutive expression of ropB, the outer membrane protein-encoding gene, restored membrane stability and rescued the sensitivity phenotypes described above. Similar phenotypes have been described for mutations in other ChvG-regulated genes encoding a conserved operon of unknown function and in the fabXL genes required for synthesis of the lipid A very-long-chain fatty acid, suggesting that ChvG is a key component of the envelope stress response in Rhizobium leguminosarum. Collectively, the results of this study demonstrate the important and unique role the ChvG/ChvI TCS plays in the physiology, metabolism, and symbiotic competency of R. leguminosarum. PMID:22155778

  17. Rhizobium japonicum USDA 191 has two nodD genes that differ in primary structure and function.

    PubMed

    Appelbaum, E R; Thompson, D V; Idler, K; Chartrain, N

    1988-01-01

    Several Rhizobium genes (designated nod genes) are involved in early steps in nodule formation. Here we present the results of DNA sequence and functional analysis of two nodD genes from the symbiotic plasmid of USDA 191, a fast-growing strain that forms nitrogen-fixing nodules on soybeans. Both genes encoded full-length nodD-related polypeptides, which were 69% homologous to each other. One of these genes, nodD1, complemented a Rhizobium trifolii nodD::Tn5 mutant for clover nodulation; the other gene, nodD2, did not. The nodD1 coding region was preceded by a conserved DNA sequence previously noted in other rhizobia, but no such sequence was found in front of nodD2. Plants inoculated with a nodD1 insertion mutant appeared to be nitrogen starved and had a greatly reduced nodule number. Plants inoculated with a nodD2 mutant had a partially nitrogen-starved appearance and normal nodule number, were slightly delayed in nodule formation, and formed nodules that contained reduced levels of nodulin-35 and had fewer bacteroids per infected plant cell. Thus, both of these genes are involved in symbiosis. USDA 191 carrying extra copies of nodD2 on a plasmid vector had an altered colony morphology that suggested inhibition of exopolysaccharide synthesis. The predicted gene products of nodD1 and nodD2 both showed homology to LysR, an E. coli regulatory protein. We conclude that nodD1 probably has the same function as nodD in temperate rhizobia, namely, activation of nodABC transcription in the presence of plant signals. nodD2 may be involved in regulation of exopolysaccharide synthetic genes.

  18. Rhizobium japonicum USDA 191 has two nodD genes that differ in primary structure and function.

    PubMed Central

    Appelbaum, E R; Thompson, D V; Idler, K; Chartrain, N

    1988-01-01

    Several Rhizobium genes (designated nod genes) are involved in early steps in nodule formation. Here we present the results of DNA sequence and functional analysis of two nodD genes from the symbiotic plasmid of USDA 191, a fast-growing strain that forms nitrogen-fixing nodules on soybeans. Both genes encoded full-length nodD-related polypeptides, which were 69% homologous to each other. One of these genes, nodD1, complemented a Rhizobium trifolii nodD::Tn5 mutant for clover nodulation; the other gene, nodD2, did not. The nodD1 coding region was preceded by a conserved DNA sequence previously noted in other rhizobia, but no such sequence was found in front of nodD2. Plants inoculated with a nodD1 insertion mutant appeared to be nitrogen starved and had a greatly reduced nodule number. Plants inoculated with a nodD2 mutant had a partially nitrogen-starved appearance and normal nodule number, were slightly delayed in nodule formation, and formed nodules that contained reduced levels of nodulin-35 and had fewer bacteroids per infected plant cell. Thus, both of these genes are involved in symbiosis. USDA 191 carrying extra copies of nodD2 on a plasmid vector had an altered colony morphology that suggested inhibition of exopolysaccharide synthesis. The predicted gene products of nodD1 and nodD2 both showed homology to LysR, an E. coli regulatory protein. We conclude that nodD1 probably has the same function as nodD in temperate rhizobia, namely, activation of nodABC transcription in the presence of plant signals. nodD2 may be involved in regulation of exopolysaccharide synthetic genes. Images PMID:2826389

  19. Distribution of Different Species of the Bacteroides fragilis Group in Individuals with Japanese Cedar Pollinosis▿

    PubMed Central

    Odamaki, Toshitaka; Xiao, Jin-Zhong; Sakamoto, Mitsuo; Kondo, Shizuki; Yaeshima, Tomoko; Iwatsuki, Keiji; Togashi, Hideo; Enomoto, Tadao; Benno, Yoshimi

    2008-01-01

    We investigated associations of species of the Bacteroides fragilis group with Japanese cedar pollinosis (JCPsis). Cell numbers of Bacteroides fragilis and Bacteroides intestinalis were significantly higher in JCPsis subjects than in non-JCPsis subjects before the pollen season. They correlated positively with both symptom scores and JCPsis-specific immunoglobulin E levels. PMID:18791010

  20. Bacteroides fragilis septicaemia and meningitis in early infancy.

    PubMed Central

    Cooke, R W

    1975-01-01

    A case of recurrent Bacteroides fragilis septicaemia leading eventually to meningitis in a 6-week-old infant is reported. Perforation of the small bowel at the constriction ring of a strangulated inguinal hernia caused a faecal peritonitis and was the primary source of infection. Erythromycin, to which the isolate was fully sensitive in vitro, was only temporarily an effective treatment; the infection was finally eradicated with chloramphenicol, and the baby made a full recovery. Bacteroides infections in infancy and childhood are briefly reviewed. PMID:1147659

  1. Rhizobium helianthi sp. nov., isolated from the rhizosphere of sunflower.

    PubMed

    Wei, Xuexin; Yan, Shouwei; Li, Dai; Pang, Huancheng; Li, Yuyi; Zhang, Jianli

    2015-12-01

    A Gram-stain-negative, non-spore-forming, rod-shaped and aerobic bacterium, designated Xi19T, was isolated from a soil sample collected from the rhizosphere of sunflower (Helianthus annuus) in Wuyuan county of Inner Mongolia, China and was characterized taxonomically by using a polyphasic approach. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences indicated that the novel isolate was related to species of the genus Rhizobium, sharing the greatest 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity with Rhizobium rhizoryzae J3-AN59T (98.4 %), followed by Rhizobium pseudoryzae J3-A127T (97.4 %). There were low similarities ( < 91 %) between the atpD, recA and glnII gene sequences of the novel strain and those of members of the genus Rhizobium. DNA-DNA hybridization values between strain Xi19T and the most related strain Rhizobium rhizoryzae J3-AN59T were low. The major cellular fatty acids of strain Xi19T were C16 : 0, summed feature 8 (C18 : 1ω7c and/or C18 : 1ω6c) and C19 : 0 cyclo ω8c. Q-10 was identified as the predominant ubiquinone and the major polar lipids were diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylethanolamine and phosphatidylcholine. The DNA G+C content of strain Xi19T was 60.2 mol%. On the basis of physiological and biochemical characteristics, coupled with genotypic data obtained in this work, strain Xi19T represents a novel species of the genus Rhizobium, for which the name Rhizobium helianthi is proposed. The type strain is Xi19T ( = CGMCC 1.12192T = KCTC 23879T).

  2. Rhizobium oryziradicis sp. nov., isolated from rice roots.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Juan-Juan; Zhang, Jun; Sun, Lei; Zhang, Rui-Jie; Zhang, Cai-Wen; Yin, Hua-Qun; Zhang, Xiao-Xia

    2017-04-01

    Two Gram-stain-negative, aerobic, rod-shaped endophytic bacterial strains, N19T and N11-2, were isolated from fresh rice (Oryza sativa) roots during investigation of the rice endophytic bacterial diversity. The 16S rRNA gene sequence results indicated that the similarity between strains N19T and N11-2 was 100 %. Both of them belong to the genus Rhizobium, with close similarity to Rhizobium taibaishanense CCNWSX 0483T (97.7 %), followed by Rhizobium vitis NCPPB 3554T (97.5 %). The sequence similarities of the housekeeping genes recA, gyrB and glnA between the novel isolates and members of the established species of the genus Rhizobium were less than 87 %. The DNA-DNA hybridization rates between strains N19T and N11-2 were 87.9 % using the initial renaturation rate method. Based on draft genome sequences, strain N19T showed 18.2 % and 19.6 % DNA-DNA hybridization values to R. taibaishanense CCNWSX 0483T and R. vitis S4, which demonstrated that these new isolates represent a novel species in the genus Rhizobium. The main cellular fatty acids were summed feature 8 (C18 : 1ω7c and/or C18 : 1ω6c). The DNA G+C content of strain N19T was 58.7 mol% (Tm). The polar lipid profile of N19T consisted of phosphatidylglycerol, diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylcholine, an unknown lipid, two unknown aminolipids and an unidentified aminophospholipid. According to physiological and biochemical characteristics and genotypic data, strains N19T and N11-2 are considered to represent a novel species of the genus Rhizobium, for which the name Rhizobium oryziradicis sp. nov. is proposed, with N19T (=ACCC 19962T=KCTC 52413T) as the type strain.

  3. Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. viciae 3841 Adapts to 2,4-Dichlorophenoxyacetic Acid with “Auxin-Like” Morphological Changes, Cell Envelope Remodeling and Upregulation of Central Metabolic Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Bhat, Supriya V.; Booth, Sean C.; McGrath, Seamus G. K.; Dahms, Tanya E. S.

    2015-01-01

    There is a growing need to characterize the effects of environmental stressors at the molecular level on model organisms with the ever increasing number and variety of anthropogenic chemical pollutants. The herbicide 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D), as one of the most widely applied pesticides in the world, is one such example. This herbicide is known to have non-targeted undesirable effects on humans, animals and soil microbes, but specific molecular targets at sublethal levels are unknown. In this study, we have used Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. viciae 3841 (Rlv) as a nitrogen fixing, beneficial model soil organism to characterize the effects of 2,4-D. Using metabolomics and advanced microscopy we determined specific target pathways in the Rlv metabolic network and consequent changes to its phenotype, surface ultrastructure, and physical properties during sublethal 2,4-D exposure. Auxin and 2,4-D, its structural analogue, showed common morphological changes in vitro which were similar to bacteroids isolated from plant nodules, implying that these changes are related to bacteroid differentiation required for nitrogen fixation. Rlv showed remarkable adaptation capabilities in response to the herbicide, with changes to integral pathways of cellular metabolism and the potential to assimilate 2,4-D with consequent changes to its physical and structural properties. This study identifies biomarkers of 2,4-D in Rlv and offers valuable insights into the mode-of-action of 2,4-D in soil bacteria. PMID:25919284

  4. Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. viciae 3841 Adapts to 2,4-Dichlorophenoxyacetic Acid with "Auxin-Like" Morphological Changes, Cell Envelope Remodeling and Upregulation of Central Metabolic Pathways.

    PubMed

    Bhat, Supriya V; Booth, Sean C; McGrath, Seamus G K; Dahms, Tanya E S

    2014-01-01

    There is a growing need to characterize the effects of environmental stressors at the molecular level on model organisms with the ever increasing number and variety of anthropogenic chemical pollutants. The herbicide 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D), as one of the most widely applied pesticides in the world, is one such example. This herbicide is known to have non-targeted undesirable effects on humans, animals and soil microbes, but specific molecular targets at sublethal levels are unknown. In this study, we have used Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. viciae 3841 (Rlv) as a nitrogen fixing, beneficial model soil organism to characterize the effects of 2,4-D. Using metabolomics and advanced microscopy we determined specific target pathways in the Rlv metabolic network and consequent changes to its phenotype, surface ultrastructure, and physical properties during sublethal 2,4-D exposure. Auxin and 2,4-D, its structural analogue, showed common morphological changes in vitro which were similar to bacteroids isolated from plant nodules, implying that these changes are related to bacteroid differentiation required for nitrogen fixation. Rlv showed remarkable adaptation capabilities in response to the herbicide, with changes to integral pathways of cellular metabolism and the potential to assimilate 2,4-D with consequent changes to its physical and structural properties. This study identifies biomarkers of 2,4-D in Rlv and offers valuable insights into the mode-of-action of 2,4-D in soil bacteria.

  5. Chromosomal DNA probes for the identification of Bacteroides tectum and Bacteroides fragilis from the oral cavity of cats.

    PubMed

    Love, D N; Bailey, G D

    1993-01-01

    A dot-blot hybridisation assay using high molecular weight DNA as whole chromosomal probes was used to differentiate Bacteroides tectum from Bacteroides fragilis. 32P-labelled probes were compared with digoxigenin (DIG)-labelled probes. The whole chromosomal probes were specific--differentiating B. tectum from B. fragilis and both from a variety of other species (including other members of the genera Bacteroides, Fusobacterium, Eubacterium, and Prevotella) found in normal and abnormal mouths of cats and horses. However, even at very high stringencies, B. tectum homology groups I, II and III were not distinguishable from one another using either 32P-labelled or DIG-labelled probes. Thus, DIG-labelled whole chromosome probes directed against cellular DNA released directly onto nitrocellulose membranes is considered a useful method for diagnostic veterinary laboratories wishing to identify B. tectum and distinguish it from B. fragilis and other oral anaerobic flora of cats.

  6. Accumulation of Norfloxacin by Bacteroides fragilis

    PubMed Central

    Ricci, Vito; Piddock, Laura J. V.

    2000-01-01

    The accumulation of norfloxacin by Bacteroides fragilis NCTC 9343 was determined by the modified fluorescence method. The time required to achieve a steady-state concentration (SSC) after allowing B. fragilis to accumulate norfloxacin in an aerobic or an anaerobic environment was ∼2 min; the SSC achieved in air was 90.28 ± 9.32 ng of norfloxacin/mg (dry weight) of cells, and that achieved anaerobically was 98.45 ± 3.7 ng of norfloxacin/mg (dry weight) of cells. Initial rates of accumulation were determined with a range of external concentrations, as up to 8 μg/ml the concentration of norfloxacin accumulated increased proportionally to the external concentration, 12.13 ng/mg (dry weight) of cells per μg of exogenous norfloxacin per ml. At concentrations above 10 μg/ml no increase in the rate of norfloxacin accumulation was observed. From the kinetic data, a Lineweaver-Burk plot calculated a Km of 5.03 μg/ml and a Vmax of 25.1 ng of norfloxacin/s. With an increase in temperature of between 0 and 30°C, the concentration of norfloxacin accumulated also increased proportionally at 4.722 ng of norfloxacin/mg (dry weight) of cells/°C. At low concentrations of glucose (<0.2%; 11 mM), the concentration of norfloxacin accumulated was decreased. With the addition of 100 μM carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone (CCCP) the mean SSC of norfloxacin was increased to 116 ± 7.01 ng of norfloxacin/mg (dry weight) of cells; glucose had no significant effect in the presence of CCCP. Magnesium chloride (20 mM) decreased the SSC of norfloxacin to 40.5 ± 3.76 ng of norfloxacin per mg (dry weight) of cells. These data suggest that the mechanism of accumulation of norfloxacin by B. fragilis is similar to that of aerobic bacteria and that the fluoresence procedure is suitable for use with an anaerobic bacterium. PMID:10952580

  7. Role of O2 in the Growth of Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. viciae 3841 on Glucose and Succinate.

    PubMed

    Wheatley, Rachel M; Ramachandran, Vinoy K; Geddes, Barney A; Perry, Benjamin J; Yost, Chris K; Poole, Philip S

    2017-01-01

    Insertion sequencing (INSeq) analysis of Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. viciae 3841 (Rlv3841) grown on glucose or succinate at both 21% and 1% O2 was used to understand how O2 concentration alters metabolism. Two transcriptional regulators were required for growth on glucose (pRL120207 [eryD] and RL0547 [phoB]), five were required on succinate (pRL100388, RL1641, RL1642, RL3427, and RL4524 [ecfL]), and three were required on 1% O2 (pRL110072, RL0545 [phoU], and RL4042). A novel toxin-antitoxin system was identified that could be important for generation of new plasmidless rhizobial strains. Rlv3841 appears to use the methylglyoxal pathway alongside the Entner-Doudoroff (ED) pathway and tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle for optimal growth on glucose. Surprisingly, the ED pathway was required for growth on succinate, suggesting that sugars made by gluconeogenesis must undergo recycling. Altered amino acid metabolism was specifically needed for growth on glucose, including RL2082 (gatB) and pRL120419 (opaA, encoding omega-amino acid:pyruvate transaminase). Growth on succinate specifically required enzymes of nucleobase synthesis, including ribose-phosphate pyrophosphokinase (RL3468 [prs]) and a cytosine deaminase (pRL90208 [codA]). Succinate growth was particularly dependent on cell surface factors, including the PrsD-PrsE type I secretion system and UDP-galactose production. Only RL2393 (glnB, encoding nitrogen regulatory protein PII) was specifically essential for growth on succinate at 1% O2, conditions similar to those experienced by N2-fixing bacteroids. Glutamate synthesis is constitutively activated in glnB mutants, suggesting that consumption of 2-ketoglutarate may increase flux through the TCA cycle, leading to excess reductant that cannot be reoxidized at 1% O2 and cell death. Rhizobium leguminosarum, a soil bacterium that forms N2-fixing symbioses with several agriculturally important leguminous plants (including pea, vetch, and lentil), has been widely utilized

  8. Characteristics of bacteroids in indeterminate nodules of the leguminous tree Leucaena glauca.

    PubMed

    Ishihara, Hironobu; Koriyama, Hiroki; Osawa, Atsushi; Zehirov, Grigor; Yamaura, Masatoshi; Kucho, Ken-ichi; Abe, Mikiko; Higashi, Shiro; Kondorosi, Eva; Mergaert, Peter; Uchiumi, Toshiki

    2011-01-01

    Rhizobia establish symbiosis with legumes. Bacteroids in indeterminate nodules of Inverted Repeat Lacking Clade (IRLC) legumes undergo terminal differentiation caused by Nodule-specific Cysteine-Rich peptides (NCRs). Microscopic observations of bacteroids and the detection of NCRs in indeterminate nodules of the non-IRLC legume Leucaena glauca were performed. A portion of the bacteroids showed moderate cell elongation, loss of membrane integrity, and multiple nucleoids. The symbiosome contained multiple bacteroids and NCR-like peptides were not detectable. These results indicate that bacteroid differentiation in L. glauca is different from that in IRLC legumes although both hosts form indeterminate nodules.

  9. Analysis of synonymous codon usage patterns in the genus Rhizobium.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xinxin; Wu, Liang; Zhou, Ping; Zhu, Shengfeng; An, Wei; Chen, Yu; Zhao, Lin

    2013-11-01

    The codon usage patterns of rhizobia have received increasing attention. However, little information is available regarding the conserved features of the codon usage patterns in a typical rhizobial genus. The codon usage patterns of six completely sequenced strains belonging to the genus Rhizobium were analysed as model rhizobia in the present study. The relative neutrality plot showed that selection pressure played a role in codon usage in the genus Rhizobium. Spearman's rank correlation analysis combined with correspondence analysis (COA) showed that the codon adaptation index and the effective number of codons (ENC) had strong correlation with the first axis of the COA, which indicated the important role of gene expression level and the ENC in the codon usage patterns in this genus. The relative synonymous codon usage of Cys codons had the strongest correlation with the second axis of the COA. Accordingly, the usage of Cys codons was another important factor that shaped the codon usage patterns in Rhizobium genomes and was a conserved feature of the genus. Moreover, the comparison of codon usage between highly and lowly expressed genes showed that 20 unique preferred codons were shared among Rhizobium genomes, revealing another conserved feature of the genus. This is the first report of the codon usage patterns in the genus Rhizobium.

  10. Nodules are induced on alfalfa roots by Agrobacterium tumefaciens and Rhizobium trifolii containing small segments of the Rhizobium meliloti nodulation region

    SciTech Connect

    Hirsch, A.M.; Drake, D.; Jacobs, T.W.; Long, S.R.

    1985-01-01

    Regions of the Rhizobium meliloti nodulation genes from the symbiotic plasmid were transferred to Agrobacterium tumefaciens and Rhizobium trifolii by conjugation. The A. tumefaciens and R. trifolii trans-conjugants were unable to elicit curling of alfalfa root hairs, but were able to induce nodule development at a low frequency. These were judged to be genuine nodules on the basis of cytological and developmental criteria. Like genuine alfalfa nodules, the nodules were initiated from divisions of the inner root cortical cells. They developed a distally positioned meristem and several peripheral vascular bundles. An endodermis separated the inner tissues of the nodule from the surrounding cortex. No infection threads were found to penetrate either root hairs or the nodule cells. Bacteria were found only in intercellular spaces. Thus, alfalfa nodules induced by A. tumefaciens and R. trifolii transconjugants carrying small nodulation clones of R. meliloti were completely devoid of intracellular bacteria. When these strains were inoculated onto white clover roots, small nodule-like protrusions developed that, when examined cytologically, were found to more closely resemble roots than nodules. Although the meristem was broadened and lacked a root cap, the protrusions had a central vascular bundle and other rootlike features. The results suggest that morphogenesis of alfalfa root nodules can be uncoupled from infection thread formation. The genes encoded in the 8.7-kilobase nodulation fragment are sufficient in A. tumefaciens or R. trifolii backgrounds for nodule morphogenesis.

  11. RNA-Seq and Microarrays Analyses Reveal Global Differential Transcriptomes of Mesorhizobium huakuii 7653R between Bacteroids and Free-Living Cells

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Jieli; Hao, Baohai; Liu, Liu; Wang, Shanming; Ma, Binguang; Yang, Yi; Xie, Fuli; Li, Youguo

    2014-01-01

    Mesorhizobium huakuii 7653R occurs either in nitrogen-fixing symbiosis with its host plant, Astragalus sinicus, or free-living in the soil. The M. huakuii 7653R genome has recently been sequenced. To better understand the complex biochemical and developmental changes that occur in 7653R during bacteroid development, RNA-Seq and Microarrays were used to investigate the differential transcriptomes of 7653R bacteroids and free-living cells. The two approaches identified several thousand differentially expressed genes. The most prominent up-regulation occurred in the symbiosis plasmids, meanwhile gene expression is concentrated to a set of genes (clusters) in bacteroids to fulfill corresponding functional requirements. The results suggested that the main energy metabolism is active while fatty acid metabolism is inactive in bacteroid and that most of genes relevant to cell cycle are down-regulated accordingly. For a global analysis, we reconstructed a protein-protein interaction (PPI) network for 7653R and integrated gene expression data into the network using Cytoscape. A highly inter-connected subnetwork, with function enrichment for nitrogen fixation, was found, and a set of hubs and previously uncharacterized genes participating in nitrogen fixation were identified. The results described here provide a broader biological landscape and novel insights that elucidate rhizobial bacteroid differentiation, nitrogen fixation and related novel gene functions. PMID:24695521

  12. A study on Nim expression in Bacteroides fragilis

    PubMed Central

    Leitsch, David; Sóki, József; Kolarich, Daniel; Urbán, Edit; Nagy, Elisabeth

    2016-01-01

    Summary Members of the genus Bacteroides, mainly Bacteroides fragilis, can cause severe disease in man, especially after intestinal perforation in the course of abdominal surgery. Treatment is based on a small number of antibiotics, including metronidazole which has proved to be highly reliable throughout the last 40 to 50 years. Nevertheless, metronidazole resistance does occur in Bacteroides and has been mainly attributed to Nim proteins, a class of proteins with suggested nitroreductase function. Despite the potentially high importance of Nim proteins for human health, information on the expression of nim genes in Bacteroides fragilis is still lacking. It was the aim of this study to demonstrate expression of nim genes in B. fragilis at the protein level and, further, to correlate the level of Nim levels with the level of metronidazole resistance. By application of two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, Nim proteins could be readily identified in nim-positive strains but their levels were not elevated to a relevant extent after induction of resistance to high doses of metronidazole. Thus, the presented data do not provide evidence for Nim proteins acting as nitroreductases using metronidazole as a substrate because no correlation of Nim levels and level of resistance could be observed. Further, no evidence was found that Nim proteins protect B. fragilis from metronidazole by sequestering activated metronidazole. PMID:24448511

  13. Putative porin of Bradyrhizobium sp. (Lupinus) bacteroids induced by glyphosate.

    PubMed

    de María, Nuria; Guevara, Angeles; Serra, M Teresa; García-Luque, Isabel; González-Sama, Alfonso; García de Lacoba, Mario; de Felipe, M Rosario; Fernández-Pascual, Mercedes

    2007-08-01

    Application of glyphosate (N-[phosphonomethyl] glycine) to Bradyrhizobium sp. (Lupinus)-nodulated lupin plants caused modifications in the protein pattern of bacteroids. The most significant change was the presence of a 44-kDa polypeptide in bacteroids from plants treated with the higher doses of glyphosate employed (5 and 10 mM). The polypeptide has been characterized by the amino acid sequencing of its N terminus and the isolation and nucleic acid sequencing of its encoding gene. It is putatively encoded by a single gene, and the protein has been identified as a putative porin. Protein modeling revealed the existence of several domains sharing similarity to different porins, such as a transmembrane beta-barrel. The protein has been designated BLpp, for Bradyrhizobium sp. (Lupinus) putative porin, and would be the first porin described in Bradyrhizobium sp. (Lupinus). In addition, a putative conserved domain of porins has been identified which consists of 87 amino acids, located in the BLpp sequence 30 amino acids downstream of the N-terminal region. In bacteroids, mRNA of the BLpp gene shows a basal constitutive expression that increases under glyphosate treatment, and the expression of the gene is seemingly regulated at the transcriptional level. By contrast, in free-living bacteria glyphosate treatment leads to an inhibition of BLpp mRNA accumulation, indicating a different effect of glyphosate on BLpp gene expression in bacteroids and free-living bacteria. The possible role of BLpp in a metabolite interchange between Bradyrhizobium and lupin is discussed.

  14. Differential Decay of Human Faecal Bacteroides in Marine and Freshwater

    EPA Science Inventory

    Gene sequences from Bacteroides and relatives are being considered for the enumeration of aquatic fecal contamination and estimation of public health risk. To interpret these data, it is necessary to understand the decay of molecular and cultivated indicators and pathogens in en...

  15. Simple Method for Detecting Bacteroides spp. Bacteriocin Production

    PubMed Central

    Riley, Thomas V.; Mee, Brian J.

    1981-01-01

    Bacteroides isolates were grown anaerobically on a 0.22-μm membrane filter on an agar plate for 48 h. Cultures of an indicator strain were grown as a lawn on the agar after removal of the filter, and bacteriocin sensitivity was detected by zones of inhibition. PMID:7016904

  16. Differential Decay of Human Faecal Bacteroides in Marine and Freshwater

    EPA Science Inventory

    Gene sequences from Bacteroides and relatives are being considered for the enumeration of aquatic fecal contamination and estimation of public health risk. To interpret these data, it is necessary to understand the decay of molecular and cultivated indicators and pathogens in en...

  17. Clinical and Microbiological Characteristics of Bacteroides Prosthetic Joint Infections.

    PubMed

    Shah, Neel; Osmon, Douglas; Tande, Aaron J; Steckelberg, James; Sierra, Rafael; Walker, Randall; Berbari, Elie F

    2017-01-01

    Clinical and microbiological characteristics of patients with Bacteroides prosthetic joint infection (PJI) have not been well described in the literature. The aim of this retrospective cohort study was to assess the outcome of patients with Bacteroides PJI and to review risk factors associated with failure of therapy. Between 1/1969 and 12/2012, 20 episodes of Bacteroides PJI in 17 patients were identified at our institution. The mean age of the patients in this cohort at the time of diagnosis was 55.6 years; 59% (n=10) had knee involvement. Twenty four percent (n=4) had diabetes mellitus, and 24% had a history of either gastrointestinal (GI) or genitourinary (GU) pathology prior to the diagnosis of PJI. Thirty five percent (n=6) were immunosuppressed. The initial medical/surgical strategy was resection arthroplasty (n=9, 50%) or debridement and implant retention (n=5, 28%). Thirty seven percent (n=7) were treated with metronidazole. Eighty percent (n=4) of patients that failed therapy had undergone debridement and retention of their prosthesis, as compared to none of those treated with resection arthroplasty. Seventy percent (n=14) of patient episodes were infection free at their last date of follow up. In conclusion, a significant proportion of patients with Bacteroides PJI are immunosuppressed and have an underlying GI or GU tract pathology. Retention and debridement of the prosthesis is associated with a higher risk of treatment failure.

  18. Complete Genome Sequence of Bacteroides ovatus V975

    PubMed Central

    Goesmann, Alexander; Carding, Simon R.

    2016-01-01

    The complete genome sequence of Bacteroides ovatus V975 was determined. The genome consists of a single circular chromosome of 6,475,296 bp containing five rRNA operons, 68 tRNA genes, and 4,959 coding genes. PMID:27908995

  19. Complete Genome Sequence of Bacteroides ovatus V975.

    PubMed

    Wegmann, Udo; Goesmann, Alexander; Carding, Simon R

    2016-12-01

    The complete genome sequence of Bacteroides ovatus V975 was determined. The genome consists of a single circular chromosome of 6,475,296 bp containing five rRNA operons, 68 tRNA genes, and 4,959 coding genes. Copyright © 2016 Wegmann et al.

  20. Detection of Bacteroides fragilis, Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron, and Bacteroides ovatus in clinical specimens by immunofluorescence with a monoclonal antibody to B. fragilis lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed Central

    Viljanen, M K; Linko, L; Lehtonen, O P

    1988-01-01

    A total of 1,897 clinical specimens (1,019 aspirates and 876 swabs) were studied by indirect immunofluorescence (IF) with a mouse monoclonal antibody (MAb) against a D-galactose oligomer of Bacteroides fragilis lipopolysaccharide. The MAb has been shown to react with 96% of clinical B. fragilis isolates and with about 50% of Bacteroides ovatus and Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron isolates but not with other aerobic or anaerobic organisms tested. The sensitivity of IF in comparison with culturing was 78.9% for all three species. Of the 32 strains originating from culture-positive, IF-negative specimens, 13 lacked the target determinant for the MAb. Sensitivity was highest with specimens taken from the perineal area (87.1%) and lowest with those taken from undefined sites (56.6%). Sensitivity was better with aspirates (86.8%) than with swabs (72.6%). The specificity of IF was 95.6% for all of the material. Positive and negative predictive values were 51.1 and 98.0%, respectively. Neither long transportation times of specimens nor antimicrobial therapy seemed to correlate with the occurrence of IF-positive, culture-negative specimens. This study shows that a single MAb can be used to establish an IF assay that can complement isolation in the detection of these three members of the B. fragilis group. Images PMID:3281973

  1. Interpreting Prevotella and Bacteroides as biomarkers of diet and lifestyle.

    PubMed

    Gorvitovskaia, Anastassia; Holmes, Susan P; Huse, Susan M

    2016-04-12

    In a series of studies of the gut microbiome, "enterotypes" have been used to classify gut microbiome samples that cluster together in ordination analyses. Initially, three distinct enterotypes were described, although later studies reduced this to two clusters, one dominated by Bacteroides or Clostridiales species found more commonly in Western (American and Western European) subjects and the other dominated by Prevotella more often associated with non-Western subjects. The two taxa, Bacteroides and Prevotella, have been presumed to represent consistent underlying microbial communities, but no one has demonstrated the presence of additional microbial taxa across studies that can define these communities. We analyzed the combined microbiome data from five previous studies with samples across five continents. We clearly demonstrate that there are no consistent bacterial taxa associated with either Bacteroides- or Prevotella-dominated communities across the studies. By increasing the number and diversity of samples, we found gradients of both Bacteroides and Prevotella and a lack of the distinct clusters in the principal coordinate plots originally proposed in the "enterotypes" hypothesis. The apparent segregation of the samples seen in many ordination plots is due to the differences in the samples' Prevotella and Bacteroides abundances and does not represent consistent microbial communities within the "enterotypes" and is not associated with other taxa across studies. The projections we see are consistent with a continuum of values created from a simple mixture of Bacteroides and Prevotella; these two biomarkers are significantly correlated to the projection axes. We suggest that previous findings citing Bacteroides- and Prevotella-dominated clusters are the result of an artifact caused by the greater relative abundance of these two taxa over other taxa in the human gut and the sparsity of Prevotella abundant samples. We believe that the term "enterotypes" is

  2. Conservation of Plasmid-Encoded Traits among Bean-Nodulating Rhizobium Species

    PubMed Central

    Brom, Susana; Girard, Lourdes; García-de los Santos, Alejandro; Sanjuan-Pinilla, Julio M.; Olivares, José; Sanjuan, Juan

    2002-01-01

    Rhizobium etli type strain CFN42 contains six plasmids. We analyzed the distribution of genetic markers from some of these plasmids in bean-nodulating strains belonging to different species (Rhizobium etli, Rhizobium gallicum, Rhizobium giardinii, Rhizobium leguminosarum, and Sinorhizobium fredii). Our results indicate that independent of geographic origin, R. etli strains usually share not only the pSym plasmid but also other plasmids containing symbiosis-related genes, with a similar organization. In contrast, strains belonging to other bean-nodulating species seem to have acquired only the pSym plasmid from R. etli. PMID:11976134

  3. Conservation of plasmid-encoded traits among bean-nodulating Rhizobium species.

    PubMed

    Brom, Susana; Girard, Lourdes; García-de los Santos, Alejandro; Sanjuan-Pinilla, Julio M; Olivares, José; Sanjuan, Juan

    2002-05-01

    Rhizobium etli type strain CFN42 contains six plasmids. We analyzed the distribution of genetic markers from some of these plasmids in bean-nodulating strains belonging to different species (Rhizobium etli, Rhizobium gallicum, Rhizobium giardinii, Rhizobium leguminosarum, and Sinorhizobium fredii). Our results indicate that independent of geographic origin, R. etli strains usually share not only the pSym plasmid but also other plasmids containing symbiosis-related genes, with a similar organization. In contrast, strains belonging to other bean-nodulating species seem to have acquired only the pSym plasmid from R. etli.

  4. Interference between Rhizobium meliloti and Rhizobium trifolii nodulation genes: genetic basis of R. meliloti dominance.

    PubMed Central

    Debellé, F; Maillet, F; Vasse, J; Rosenberg, C; de Billy, F; Truchet, G; Dénarié, J; Ausubel, F M

    1988-01-01

    Transfer of an IncP plasmid carrying the Rhizobium meliloti nodFE, nodG, and nodH genes to Rhizobium trifolii enabled R. trifolii to nodulate alfalfa (Medicago sativa), the normal host of R. meliloti. Using transposon Tn5-linked mutations and in vitro-constructed deletions of the R. meliloti nodFE, nodG, and nodH genes, we showed that R. meliloti nodH was required for R. trifolii to elicit both root hair curling and nodule initiation on alfalfa and that nodH, nodFE, and nodG were required for R. trifolii to elicit infection threads in alfalfa root hairs. Interestingly, the transfer of the R. meliloti nodFE, nodG, and nodH genes to R. trifolii prevented R. trifolii from infecting and nodulating its normal host, white clover (Trifolium repens). Experiments with the mutated R. meliloti nodH, nodF, nodE, and nodG genes demonstrated that nodH, nodF, nodE, and possibly nodG have an additive effect in blocking infection and nodulation of clover. Images PMID:2848012

  5. Variations in exopolysaccharide production by Rhizobium tropici.

    PubMed

    Staudt, Ann K; Wolfe, Lawrence G; Shrout, Joshua D

    2012-03-01

    Rhizobium tropici, a legume-symbiont soil bacterium, is known for its copious production of exopolysaccharide (EPS). Many aspects of this organism's growth and EPS production, however, remain uncharacterized, including the influence of environment and culturing conditions upon EPS. Here, we demonstrate that R. tropici EPS chemical composition and yield differ when grown with different substrates in a defined minimal medium in batch culture. Exopolysaccharide was quantified from R. tropici grown using arabinose, glucose, sucrose, mannitol, fructose, or glutamate as a sole carbon source. All tested substrates produced plenteous amounts of exopolysaccharide material. Variations in pH and carbon-to-nitrogen (C/N) ratio also resulted in assorted cell growth and exopolysaccharide production differences. We found that optimizing the C/N ratio has a greater impact upon R. tropici EPS production than upon R. tropici growth. A maximum EPS yield of 4.08 g/L was realized under optimized conditions, which is large even in comparison with other known rhizobia. We provide evidence that the chemical composition of R. tropici EPS can vary with changes to the growth environment. The composition of glucose-grown EPS contained rhamnose-linked residues that were not present in arabinose-grown EPS.

  6. Synergism between Penicillin, Clindamycin, or Metronidazole and Gentamicin against Species of the Bacteroides melaninogenicus and Bacteroides fragilis Groups

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-01-01

    with other antibiotics, such as clinda- In this study. 30 strains of Bacreroides spp. were tested for mycin (4. 18) and spiramycin (111). which proved to...BACTEROIDES SPP. 77 This work was supported in panr by grant 68011 from the Upjohn -netronidazole- spiramycine : conlcenltrationls et syflergic in situ Co

  7. Rhizobium petrolearium sp. nov., isolated from oil-contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaoxia; Li, Baoming; Wang, Haisheng; Sui, Xinhua; Ma, Xiaotong; Hong, Qing; Jiang, Ruibo

    2012-08-01

    Two Gram-negative, aerobic, rod-shaped bacteria, designated strains SL-1(T) and F11, which had the ability to decompose polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), were isolated from soil samples contaminated by oil. The cells were motile by polar or lateral flagella. According to comparison of 16S rRNA gene sequences, strains SL-1(T) and F11 were identical and showed the greatest degree of similarity (96.8%) to both Rhizobium oryzae Alt505(T) and Rhizobium mesosinicum CCBAU 25010(T); however, only Rhizobium oryzae with SL-1(T) and F11 formed a separate clade. There were low similarities (<90%) between the atpD and recA sequences of the two strains and those of the genus of Rhizobium. The bacteria grew at temperatures of 10-40 °C with an optimum of 30 °C. The pH range for growth was 6.0-10.0 and optimum pH was 7.0-8.0. Growth occurred at NaCl concentrations up to 3.0% (w/v). They were catalase- and oxidase-positive. The main cellular fatty acids were summed feature 8 (18:1ω7c and/or 18:1ω6c) and 16:0. The DNA G+C content was 62.2 mol%. Strain SL-1(T) showed 29 and 0% DNA-DNA relatedness, respectively, with the most related strains R. oryzae Alt505(T) and R. mesosinicum CCBAU 25010(T) according to phylogenic analysis of the 16S rRNA gene. According to physiological and biochemical characteristics and genotypic data obtained in this work, the bacteria represent a novel species of the genus Rhizobium, and the name Rhizobium petrolearium is proposed. The type strain is SL-1(T) ( = ACCC 11238(T) = KCTC 23288(T)) and it could nodulate Medicago sativa in nodulation tests.

  8. Safety Evaluation of a Novel Strain of Bacteroides fragilis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ye; Deng, Huimin; Li, Zhengchao; Tan, Yafang; Han, Yanping; Wang, Xiaoyi; Du, Zongmin; Liu, Yangyang; Yang, Ruifu; Bai, Yang; Bi, Yujing; Zhi, Fachao

    2017-01-01

    Commensal non-toxigenic Bacteroides fragilis confers powerful health benefits to the host, and has recently been identified as a promising probiotic candidate. We previously isolated B. fragilis strain ZY-312 and identified it as a novel strain based on 16S rRNA sequencing and morphological analyses. We also determined that ZY-312 displayed desirable probiotic properties, including tolerance to simulated digestive fluid, adherence, and in vitro safety. In this study, we aim to investigate whether ZY-312 meets the safety criteria required for probiotic bacteria through comprehensive and systematic evaluation. Consequently, the fatty acid profile, metabolite production, and biochemical activity of strain ZY-312 were found to closely resemble descriptions of B. fragilis in Bergey's manual. Taxonomic identification of strain ZY-312 based on whole genome sequencing indicated that ZY-312 and ATCC 25285 showed 99.99% similarity. The 33 putative virulence-associated factors identified in ZY-312 mainly encoded structural proteins and proteins with physiological activity, while the lack of bft indicated that ZY-312 was non-toxigenic. In vivo safety was proven in both normal and immune-deficient mice. The 11 identified antibiotic resistance genes were located on the chromosome rather than on a plasmid, ruling out the risk of plasmid-mediated transfer of antibiotic resistance. In vitro, ZY-312 showed resistance to cefepime, kanamycin, and streptomycin. Finally, and notably, ZY-312 exhibited high genetic stability after 100 passages in vitro. This study supplements the foundation work on the safety evaluation of ZY-312, and contributes to the development of the first probiotic representative from the dominant Bacteroidetes phylum.

  9. Safety Evaluation of a Novel Strain of Bacteroides fragilis

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Huimin; Li, Zhengchao; Tan, Yafang; Han, Yanping; Wang, Xiaoyi; Du, Zongmin; Liu, Yangyang; Yang, Ruifu; Bai, Yang; Bi, Yujing; Zhi, Fachao

    2017-01-01

    Commensal non-toxigenic Bacteroides fragilis confers powerful health benefits to the host, and has recently been identified as a promising probiotic candidate. We previously isolated B. fragilis strain ZY-312 and identified it as a novel strain based on 16S rRNA sequencing and morphological analyses. We also determined that ZY-312 displayed desirable probiotic properties, including tolerance to simulated digestive fluid, adherence, and in vitro safety. In this study, we aim to investigate whether ZY-312 meets the safety criteria required for probiotic bacteria through comprehensive and systematic evaluation. Consequently, the fatty acid profile, metabolite production, and biochemical activity of strain ZY-312 were found to closely resemble descriptions of B. fragilis in Bergey’s manual. Taxonomic identification of strain ZY-312 based on whole genome sequencing indicated that ZY-312 and ATCC 25285 showed 99.99% similarity. The 33 putative virulence-associated factors identified in ZY-312 mainly encoded structural proteins and proteins with physiological activity, while the lack of bft indicated that ZY-312 was non-toxigenic. In vivo safety was proven in both normal and immune-deficient mice. The 11 identified antibiotic resistance genes were located on the chromosome rather than on a plasmid, ruling out the risk of plasmid-mediated transfer of antibiotic resistance. In vitro, ZY-312 showed resistance to cefepime, kanamycin, and streptomycin. Finally, and notably, ZY-312 exhibited high genetic stability after 100 passages in vitro. This study supplements the foundation work on the safety evaluation of ZY-312, and contributes to the development of the first probiotic representative from the dominant Bacteroidetes phylum. PMID:28367145

  10. Characterisation of SalRAB a Salicylic Acid Inducible Positively Regulated Efflux System of Rhizobium leguminosarum bv viciae 3841

    PubMed Central

    Tett, Adrian J.; Karunakaran, Ramakrishnan; Poole, Philip S.

    2014-01-01

    Salicylic acid is an important signalling molecule in plant-microbe defence and symbiosis. We analysed the transcriptional responses of the nitrogen fixing plant symbiont, Rhizobium leguminosarum bv viciae 3841 to salicylic acid. Two MFS-type multicomponent efflux systems were induced in response to salicylic acid, rmrAB and the hitherto undescribed system salRAB. Based on sequence similarity salA and salB encode a membrane fusion and inner membrane protein respectively. salAB are positively regulated by the LysR regulator SalR. Disruption of salA significantly increased the sensitivity of the mutant to salicylic acid, while disruption of rmrA did not. A salA/rmrA double mutation did not have increased sensitivity relative to the salA mutant. Pea plants nodulated by salA or rmrA strains did not have altered nodule number or nitrogen fixation rates, consistent with weak expression of salA in the rhizosphere and in nodule bacteria. However, BLAST analysis revealed seventeen putative efflux systems in Rlv3841 and several of these were highly differentially expressed during rhizosphere colonisation, host infection and bacteroid differentiation. This suggests they have an integral role in symbiosis with host plants. PMID:25133394

  11. Characterisation of SalRAB a salicylic acid inducible positively regulated efflux system of Rhizobium leguminosarum bv viciae 3841.

    PubMed

    Tett, Adrian J; Karunakaran, Ramakrishnan; Poole, Philip S

    2014-01-01

    Salicylic acid is an important signalling molecule in plant-microbe defence and symbiosis. We analysed the transcriptional responses of the nitrogen fixing plant symbiont, Rhizobium leguminosarum bv viciae 3841 to salicylic acid. Two MFS-type multicomponent efflux systems were induced in response to salicylic acid, rmrAB and the hitherto undescribed system salRAB. Based on sequence similarity salA and salB encode a membrane fusion and inner membrane protein respectively. salAB are positively regulated by the LysR regulator SalR. Disruption of salA significantly increased the sensitivity of the mutant to salicylic acid, while disruption of rmrA did not. A salA/rmrA double mutation did not have increased sensitivity relative to the salA mutant. Pea plants nodulated by salA or rmrA strains did not have altered nodule number or nitrogen fixation rates, consistent with weak expression of salA in the rhizosphere and in nodule bacteria. However, BLAST analysis revealed seventeen putative efflux systems in Rlv3841 and several of these were highly differentially expressed during rhizosphere colonisation, host infection and bacteroid differentiation. This suggests they have an integral role in symbiosis with host plants.

  12. Light regulates attachment, exopolysaccharide production, and nodulation in Rhizobium leguminosarum through a LOV-histidine kinase photoreceptor.

    PubMed

    Bonomi, Hernán R; Posadas, Diana M; Paris, Gastón; Carrica, Mariela del Carmen; Frederickson, Marcus; Pietrasanta, Lía Isabel; Bogomolni, Roberto A; Zorreguieta, Angeles; Goldbaum, Fernando A

    2012-07-24

    Rhizobium leguminosarum is a soil bacterium that infects root hairs and induces the formation of nitrogen-fixing nodules on leguminous plants. Light, oxygen, and voltage (LOV)-domain proteins are blue-light receptors found in higher plants and many algae, fungi, and bacteria. The genome of R. leguminosarum bv. viciae 3841, a pea-nodulating endosymbiont, encodes a sensor histidine kinase containing a LOV domain at the N-terminal end (R-LOV-HK). R-LOV-HK has a typical LOV domain absorption spectrum with broad bands in the blue and UV-A regions and shows a truncated photocycle. Here we show that the R-LOV-HK protein regulates attachment to an abiotic surface and production of flagellar proteins and exopolysaccharide in response to light. Also, illumination of bacterial cultures before inoculation of pea roots increases the number of nodules per plant and the number of intranodular bacteroids. The effects of light on nodulation are dependent on a functional lov gene. The results presented in this work suggest that light, sensed by R-LOV-HK, is an important environmental factor that controls adaptive responses and the symbiotic efficiency of R. leguminosarum.

  13. Light regulates attachment, exopolysaccharide production, and nodulation in Rhizobium leguminosarum through a LOV-histidine kinase photoreceptor

    PubMed Central

    Bonomi, Hernán R.; Posadas, Diana M.; Paris, Gastón; Carrica, Mariela del Carmen; Frederickson, Marcus; Pietrasanta, Lía Isabel; Bogomolni, Roberto A.; Zorreguieta, Angeles; Goldbaum, Fernando A.

    2012-01-01

    Rhizobium leguminosarum is a soil bacterium that infects root hairs and induces the formation of nitrogen-fixing nodules on leguminous plants. Light, oxygen, and voltage (LOV)-domain proteins are blue-light receptors found in higher plants and many algae, fungi, and bacteria. The genome of R. leguminosarum bv. viciae 3841, a pea-nodulating endosymbiont, encodes a sensor histidine kinase containing a LOV domain at the N-terminal end (R-LOV-HK). R-LOV-HK has a typical LOV domain absorption spectrum with broad bands in the blue and UV-A regions and shows a truncated photocycle. Here we show that the R-LOV-HK protein regulates attachment to an abiotic surface and production of flagellar proteins and exopolysaccharide in response to light. Also, illumination of bacterial cultures before inoculation of pea roots increases the number of nodules per plant and the number of intranodular bacteroids. The effects of light on nodulation are dependent on a functional lov gene. The results presented in this work suggest that light, sensed by R-LOV-HK, is an important environmental factor that controls adaptive responses and the symbiotic efficiency of R. leguminosarum. PMID:22773814

  14. Rhizobium-legume symbioses: the crucial role of plant immunity.

    PubMed

    Gourion, Benjamin; Berrabah, Fathi; Ratet, Pascal; Stacey, Gary

    2015-03-01

    New research results have significantly revised our understanding of the rhizobium-legume infection process. For example, Nod factors (NFs), previously thought to be absolutely essential for this symbiosis, were shown to be dispensable under particular conditions. Similarly, an NF receptor, previously considered to be solely involved in symbiosis, was shown to function during plant pathogen infections. Indeed, there is a growing realization that plant innate immunity is a crucial component in the establishment and maintenance of symbiosis. We review here the factors involved in the suppression of plant immunity during rhizobium-legume symbiosis, and we attempt to place this information into context with the most recent and sometimes surprising research results.

  15. [LEGUME-RHIZOBIUM SYMBIOSIS PROTEOMICS: ACHIEVEMENTS AND PERSPECTIVES].

    PubMed

    Kondratiuk, Iu Iu; Mamenko, P M; Kots, S Ya

    2015-01-01

    The present review contains results of proteomic researches of legume-rhizobium symbiosis. The technical difficulties associated with the methods of obtaining protein extracts from symbiotic structures and ways of overcoming them were discussed. The changes of protein synthesis under formation and functioning of symbiotic structures were shown. Special attention has been given to the importance of proteomic studies of plant-microbe structures in the formation of adaptation strategies under adverse environmental conditions. The technical and conceptual perspectives of legume-rhizobium symbiosis proteomics were shown.

  16. Heme compounds as iron sources for nonpathogenic Rhizobium bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Noya, F; Arias, A; Fabiano, E

    1997-01-01

    Many animal-pathogenic bacteria can use heme compounds as iron sources. Like these microorganisms, rhizobium strains interact with host organisms where heme compounds are available. Results presented in this paper indicate that the use of hemoglobin as an iron source is not restricted to animal-pathogenic microorganisms. We also demonstrate that heme, hemoglobin, and leghemoglobin can act as iron sources under iron-depleted conditions for Rhizobium meliloti 242. Analysis of iron acquisition mutant strains indicates that siderophore-, heme-, hemoglobin-, and leghemoglobin-mediated iron transport systems expressed by R. meliloti 242 share at least one component. PMID:9139934

  17. [Chemotaxis of Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. viciae to organic substances].

    PubMed

    Stambul's'ka, U Ia; Lushchak, V I

    2009-01-01

    The chemotaxis of nodule bacteria cultures of pea Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. vicia RRL1, RRL3, RRL6 i RRL7 isolated from the plants of Ivano-Frankivsk district to different organic substances was investigated. Saccharose, pyruvate and tartaric acid were the most active attractants among carbohydrates and organic acids studied for all used nodule bacteria strains. Serine, alanine, glycine, tyrosine and cysteine were the most active attractants of amino acids. Dependence of pea nodule bacteria chemotaxic activity on time of growth and attractant concentrations was revealed. The isolate specificity towards organic substances for different strains of Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. vicia was found.

  18. Rhizobium sophorae sp. nov. and Rhizobium sophoriradicis sp. nov., nitrogen-fixing rhizobial symbionts of the medicinal legume Sophora flavescens.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Yin Shan; Yan, Hui; Ji, Zhao Jun; Liu, Yuan Hui; Sui, Xin Hua; Wang, En Tao; Guo, Bao Lin; Chen, Wen Xin; Chen, Wen Feng

    2015-02-01

    Five bacterial strains representing 45 isolates originated from root nodules of the medicinal legume Sophora flavescens were defined as two novel groups in the genus Rhizobium based on their phylogenetic relationships estimated from 16S rRNA genes and the housekeeping genes recA, glnII and atpD. These groups were distantly related to Rhizobium leguminosarum USDA 2370(T) (95.6 % similarity for group I) and Rhizobium phaseoli ATCC 14482(T) (93.4 % similarity for group II) in multilocus sequence analysis. In DNA-DNA hybridization experiments, the reference strains CCBAU 03386(T) (group I) and CCBAU 03470(T) (group II) showed levels of relatedness of 17.9-57.8 and 11.0-42.9 %, respectively, with the type strains of related species. Both strains CCBAU 03386(T) and CCBAU 03470(T) contained ubiquinone 10 (Q-10) as the major respiratory quinone and possessed 16 : 0, 18 : 0, 19 : 0 cyclo ω8c, summed feature 8 and summed feature 2 as major fatty acids, but did not contain 20 : 3 ω6,8,12c. Phenotypic features distinguishing both groups from all closely related species of the genus Rhizobium were found. Therefore, two novel species, Rhizobium sophorae sp. nov. for group I (type strain CCBAU 03386(T) = E5(T) = LMG 27901(T) = HAMBI 3615(T)) and Rhizobium sophoriradicis sp. nov. for group II (type strain CCBAU 03470(T) = C-5-1(T) = LMG 27898(T) = HAMBI 3510(T)), are proposed. Both groups were able to nodulate Phaseolus vulgaris and their hosts of origin (Sophora flavescens) effectively and their nodulation gene nodC was phylogenetically located in the symbiovar phaseoli.

  19. Rhizobium (Agrobacterium) radiobacter identified as a cause of chronic endophthalmitis subsequent to cataract extraction.

    PubMed

    Namdari, Hassan; Hamzavi, Sirus; Peairs, Randall R

    2003-08-01

    Herein, we report a case of chronic endophthalmitis caused by a ceftazidime-resistant Rhizobium radiobacter strain in a 62-year-old male. The patient underwent an uneventful cataract extraction of the right eye a week prior to the appearance of symptoms (pain, redness, and blurring vision) which developed following a golf outing. Upon admission the patient received an emergency vitrectomy. The patient remained symptomatic, and R. radiobacter was isolated repeatedly from vitreous fluid cultures over a 5-month period. Ultimately, the infection responded to intravitreal gentamicin, oral ciprofloxacin, and removal of the lens implant.

  20. Distinct Mineral Weathering Behaviors of the Novel Mineral-Weathering Strains Rhizobium yantingense H66 and Rhizobium etli CFN42.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei; Luo, Long; He, Lin-Yan; Wang, Qi; Sheng, Xia-Fang

    2016-07-15

    Bacteria play important roles in mineral weathering, soil formation, and element cycling. However, little is known about the interaction between silicate minerals and rhizobia. In this study, Rhizobium yantingense H66 (a novel mineral-weathering rhizobium) and Rhizobium etli CFN42 were compared with respect to potash feldspar weathering, mineral surface adsorption, and metabolic activity during the mineral weathering process. Strain H66 showed significantly higher Si, Al, and K mobilization from the mineral and higher ratios of cell numbers on the mineral surface to total cell numbers than strain CFN42. Although the two strains produced gluconic acid, strain H66 also produced acetic, malic, and succinic acids during mineral weathering in low- and high-glucose media. Notably, higher Si, Al, and K releases, higher ratios of cell numbers on the mineral surface to total cell numbers, and a higher production of organic acids by strain H66 were observed in the low-glucose medium than in the high-glucose medium. Scanning electron microscope analyses of the mineral surfaces and redundancy analysis showed stronger positive correlations between the mineral surface cell adsorption and mineral weathering, indicated by the dissolved Al and K concentrations. The results showed that the two rhizobia behaved differently with respect to mineral weathering. The results suggested that Rhizobium yantingense H66 promoted potash feldspar weathering through increased adsorption of cells to the mineral surface and through differences in glucose metabolism at low and high nutrient concentrations, especially at low nutrient concentrations. This study reported the potash feldspar weathering, the cell adsorption capacity of the mineral surfaces, and the metabolic differences between the novel mineral-weathering Rhizobium yantingense H66 and Rhizobium etli CFN42 under different nutritional conditions. The results showed that Rhizobium yantingense H66 had a greater ability to weather the

  1. Distinct Mineral Weathering Behaviors of the Novel Mineral-Weathering Strains Rhizobium yantingense H66 and Rhizobium etli CFN42

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wei; Luo, Long; He, Lin-Yan; Wang, Qi

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Bacteria play important roles in mineral weathering, soil formation, and element cycling. However, little is known about the interaction between silicate minerals and rhizobia. In this study, Rhizobium yantingense H66 (a novel mineral-weathering rhizobium) and Rhizobium etli CFN42 were compared with respect to potash feldspar weathering, mineral surface adsorption, and metabolic activity during the mineral weathering process. Strain H66 showed significantly higher Si, Al, and K mobilization from the mineral and higher ratios of cell numbers on the mineral surface to total cell numbers than strain CFN42. Although the two strains produced gluconic acid, strain H66 also produced acetic, malic, and succinic acids during mineral weathering in low- and high-glucose media. Notably, higher Si, Al, and K releases, higher ratios of cell numbers on the mineral surface to total cell numbers, and a higher production of organic acids by strain H66 were observed in the low-glucose medium than in the high-glucose medium. Scanning electron microscope analyses of the mineral surfaces and redundancy analysis showed stronger positive correlations between the mineral surface cell adsorption and mineral weathering, indicated by the dissolved Al and K concentrations. The results showed that the two rhizobia behaved differently with respect to mineral weathering. The results suggested that Rhizobium yantingense H66 promoted potash feldspar weathering through increased adsorption of cells to the mineral surface and through differences in glucose metabolism at low and high nutrient concentrations, especially at low nutrient concentrations. IMPORTANCE This study reported the potash feldspar weathering, the cell adsorption capacity of the mineral surfaces, and the metabolic differences between the novel mineral-weathering Rhizobium yantingense H66 and Rhizobium etli CFN42 under different nutritional conditions. The results showed that Rhizobium yantingense H66 had a greater ability

  2. Site-specific bacterial chromosome engineering mediated by IntA integrase from Rhizobium etli.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Tamayo, Rogelio; Torres-Tejerizo, Gonzalo; Brom, Susana; Romero, David

    2016-06-29

    The bacterial chromosome may be used to stably maintain foreign DNA in the mega-base range. Integration into the chromosome circumvents issues such as plasmid replication, stability, incompatibility, and copy number variance. The site-specific integrase IntA from Rhizobium etli CFN42 catalyzes a direct recombination between two specific DNA sites: attA and attD (23 bp). This recombination is stable. The aim of this work was to develop a R. etli derivative that may be used as recipient for the integration of foreign DNA in the chromosome, adapting the IntA catalyzed site-specific recombination system. To fulfill our aim, we designed a Rhizobium etli CFN42 derivative, containing a "landing pad" (LP) integrated into the chromosome. The LP sector consists of a green fluorescent protein gene under the control of the lacZ promoter and a spectinomycin resistance gene. Between the lacZ promoter and the GFP gene we inserted an IntA attachment site, which does not affect transcription from the lac promoter. Also, a mobilizable donor vector was generated, containing an attA site and a kanamycin resistance gene; to facilitate insertion of foreign DNA, this vector also contains a multicloning site. There are no promoters flanking the multicloning site. A biparental mating protocol was used to transfer the donor vector into the landing pad strain; insertion of the donor vector into the landing pad sector via IntA-mediated attA X attA recombination thereby interrupted the expression of the green fluorescent protein, generating site-specific cointegrants. Cointegrants were easily recognized by screening for antibiotic sensitivity and lack of GFP expression, and were obtained with an efficiency of 6.18 %. Integration of foreign DNA in Rhizobium, lacking any similarity with the genome, can be easily achieved by IntA-mediated recombination. This protocol contains the mating and selection procedures for creating and isolating integrants.

  3. Bacteriophages active against Bacteroides fragilis in sewage-polluted waters.

    PubMed Central

    Tartera, C; Jofre, J

    1987-01-01

    Twelve strains of different Bacteroides species were tested for their efficiency of detection of bacteriophages from sewage. The host range of several isolated phages was investigated. The results indicated that there was a high degree of strain specificity. Then, by using Bacteroides fragilis HSP 40 as the host, which proved to be the most efficient for the detection of phages, feces from humans and several animal species and raw sewage, river water, water from lagoons, seawater, groundwater, and sediments were tested for the presence of bacteriophages that were active against B. fragilis HSP 40. Phages were detected in feces of 10% of the human fecal samples tested and was never detected in feces of the other animal species studied. Moreover, bacteriophages were always recovered from sewage and sewage-polluted samples of waters and sediments, but not from nonpolluted samples. The titers recovered were dependent on the degree of pollution in analyzed waters and sediments. PMID:3662510

  4. A novel capsular polysaccharide from Rhizobium rubi strain DSM 30149.

    PubMed

    De Castro, Cristina; Fregolino, Eleonora; Gargiulo, Valentina; Lanzetta, Rosa; Parrilli, Michelangelo

    2008-07-07

    Rhizobium rubi, strain DSM 30149, is a Gram negative phytopathogenic bacterium which produces a linear polysaccharide with the following repeating unit: This new structure was determined by spectroscopical and chemical methods. It presents similar lipophilic features reported for another strain of R. rubi. These contrast with features already known for capsular polysaccharide species from symbiontic members of the Rhizobiaceae family, namely highly anionic polymers.

  5. Reclassification of Arthrobacter viscosus as Rhizobium viscosum comb. nov.

    PubMed

    Flores-Félix, José David; Ramírez-Bahena, Martha Helena; Salazar, Sergio; Peix, Alvaro; Velázquez, Encarna

    2017-06-01

    The species Arthrobacter viscosus was isolated from soil from Guatemala and it was classified into the genus Arthrobacter on the basis of phenotypic traits. Nevertheless, the results of16S rRNA gene analysis indicated that this species is a member of the genus Rhizobium, with Rhizobium alamii GBV016T and Rhizobium mesosinicum CCBAU 25010T as the most closely related species with 99.64 and 99.48 % similarity, respectively. The similarity values for the recA gene are 92.2 and 94.4 % with respect to R. alamii GBV016T and R. mesosinicum CCBAU 25010T, respectively, and those for the atpD gene are 92.9 and 98.7 %, respectively. Results of DNA-DNA hybridization analysis yield averages of 46 and 41 % relatedness with respect to the type strains of R. alamii and R. mesosinicum, respectively. Phenotypic characteristics also differed from those of the most closely related species of the genus Rhizobium. Therefore, based on the data obtained in this study, we propose to classify strain LMG 16473T as representing a novel species named Rhizobiumviscosum comb. nov. (type strain LMG 16473T=CECT 908T).

  6. Infection and nodulation of clover by nonmotile Rhizobium trifolii

    SciTech Connect

    Napoli, C.; Albersheim, P.

    1980-02-01

    Nonmotile mutants of Rhizobium trifolii were isolated to determine whether bacterial motility is required for the infection and nodulation of clover. The nonmotile mutants were screened for their ability to infect and nodulate clover seedlings in Fahraeus glass slide assemblies, plastic growth pouches, and vermiculite-sand-filled clay pots. In each system, the nonmotile mutants were able to infect and nodulate clover.

  7. A rhizobium selenitireducens protein showing selenite reductase activity

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Biobarriers remove, via precipitation, the metalloid selenite (SeO3–2) from groundwater; a process that involves the biological reduction of soluble SeO3–2 to insoluble elemental red selenium (Se0). The enzymes associated with this reduction process are poorly understood. In Rhizobium selenitiredu...

  8. Diversity of Rhizobium leguminosarum from pea fields in Washington State

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Rhizobia-mediated biological nitrogen (N) fixation in legumes contributes to yield potential in these crops and also provides residual fertilizer to subsequent cereals. Our objectives were to collect isolates of Rhizobium leguminosarum from several pea fields in Washington, examine genetic diversity...

  9. Rhizobium laguerreae sp. nov. nodulates Vicia faba on several continents.

    PubMed

    Saïdi, Sabrine; Ramírez-Bahena, Martha-Helena; Santillana, Nery; Zúñiga, Doris; Álvarez-Martínez, Estela; Peix, Alvaro; Mhamdi, Ridha; Velázquez, Encarna

    2014-01-01

    Several fast-growing strains nodulating Vicia faba in Peru, Spain and Tunisia formed a cluster related to Rhizobium leguminosarum. The 16S rRNA gene sequences were identical to that of R. leguminosarum USDA 2370(T), whereas rpoB, recA and atpD gene sequences were phylogenetically distant, with sequence similarities of less than 96 %, 97 % and 94 %, respectively. DNA-DNA hybridization analysis showed a mean relatedness value of 43 % between strain FB206(T) and R. leguminosarum USDA 2370(T). Phenotypic characteristics of the novel strains also differed from those of the closest related species of the genus Rhizobium. Therefore, based on genotypic and phenotypic data obtained in this study, we propose to classify this group of strains nodulating Vicia faba as a novel species of the genus Rhizobium named Rhizobium laguerreae sp. nov. The type strain is FB206(T) ( = LMG 27434(T) = CECT 8280(T)).

  10. Infection and nodulation of clover by nonmotile Rhizobium trifolii.

    PubMed

    Napoli, C; Albersheim, P

    1980-02-01

    Nonmotile mutants of Rhizobium trifolii were isolated to determine whether bacterial motility is required for the infection and nodulation of clover. The nonmotile mutants were screened for their ability to infect and nodulate clover seedlings in Fahraeus glass slide assemblies, plastic growth pouches, and vermiculite-sand-filled clay pots. In each system, the nonmotile mutants were able to infect and nodulate clover.

  11. Infection of soybean and pea nodules by Rhizobium spp. purine auxotrophs in the presence of 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide riboside.

    PubMed Central

    Newman, J D; Diebold, R J; Schultz, B W; Noel, K D

    1994-01-01

    Purine auxotrophs of various Rhizobium species are symbiotically defective, usually unable to initiate or complete the infection process. Earlier studies demonstrated that, in the Rhizobium etli-bean symbiosis, infection by purine auxotrophs is partially restored by supplementation of the plant medium with 5-amino-imidazole-4-carboxamide (AICA) riboside, the unphosphorylated form of the purine biosynthetic intermediate AICAR. The addition of purine to the root environment does not have this effect. In this study, purine auxotrophs of Rhizobium fredii HH303 and Rhizobium leguminosarum 128C56 (bv. viciae) were examined. Nutritional and genetic characterization indicated that each mutant was blocked in purine biosynthesis prior to the production of AICAR. R. fredii HH303 and R. leguminosarum 128C56 appeared to be deficient in AICA riboside transport and/or conversion into AICAR, and the auxotrophs derived from them grew very poorly with AICA riboside as a purine source. All of the auxotrophs elicited poorly developed, uninfected nodules on their appropriate hosts. On peas, addition of AICA riboside or purine to the root environment led to enhanced nodulation; however, infection threads were observed only in the presence of AICA riboside. On soybeans, only AICA riboside was effective in enhancing nodulation and promoting infection. Although AICA riboside supplementation of the auxotrophs led to infection thread development on both hosts, the numbers of bacteria recovered from the nodules were still 2 or more orders of magnitude lower than in fully developed nodules populated by wild-type bacteria. The ability to AICA riboside to promote infection by purine auxotrophs, despite serving as a very poor purine source for these strains, supports the hypothesis that AICAR plays a role in infection other than merely promoting bacterial growth. Images PMID:8195084

  12. Determinants of nodulation competitiveness in Rhizobium etli. Final report for period September 30, 1996--September 29, 1999

    SciTech Connect

    Handelsman, Jo

    2000-01-04

    Nitrogen is a major limiting nutrient in crop production. Chemical fertilizers, which are used extensively to meet crop nitrogen requirements, contribute to the high energy inputs of modern agriculture and cause human health and environmental problems. Legumes and their bacterial associates have long been used in crop rotations to replenish soil nitrogen, but effective and reliable biological nitrogen fixation for beans is prevented by the lack of nodulation competitiveness of many Rhizobium strains used as inoculants. The result is that the inoculant strains will not occupy the host's nodules and no benefit will be derived from inoculation. Many indigenous soil strains of Rhizobium etli bv. phaseoli, the symbiont of bean, nodulate but fix little or no nitrogen, and therefore the nodulation competitiveness problem is significant for achieving maximum nitrogen benefit from bean crops. This project was directed toward developing an understanding of the basis of nodulation competitiveness.

  13. Putative Porin of Bradyrhizobium sp. (Lupinus) Bacteroids Induced by Glyphosate▿

    PubMed Central

    de María, Nuria; Guevara, Ángeles; Serra, M. Teresa; García-Luque, Isabel; González-Sama, Alfonso; de Lacoba, Mario García; de Felipe, M. Rosario; Fernández-Pascual, Mercedes

    2007-01-01

    Application of glyphosate (N-[phosphonomethyl] glycine) to Bradyrhizobium sp. (Lupinus)-nodulated lupin plants caused modifications in the protein pattern of bacteroids. The most significant change was the presence of a 44-kDa polypeptide in bacteroids from plants treated with the higher doses of glyphosate employed (5 and 10 mM). The polypeptide has been characterized by the amino acid sequencing of its N terminus and the isolation and nucleic acid sequencing of its encoding gene. It is putatively encoded by a single gene, and the protein has been identified as a putative porin. Protein modeling revealed the existence of several domains sharing similarity to different porins, such as a transmembrane beta-barrel. The protein has been designated BLpp, for Bradyrhizobium sp. (Lupinus) putative porin, and would be the first porin described in Bradyrhizobium sp. (Lupinus). In addition, a putative conserved domain of porins has been identified which consists of 87 amino acids, located in the BLpp sequence 30 amino acids downstream of the N-terminal region. In bacteroids, mRNA of the BLpp gene shows a basal constitutive expression that increases under glyphosate treatment, and the expression of the gene is seemingly regulated at the transcriptional level. By contrast, in free-living bacteria glyphosate treatment leads to an inhibition of BLpp mRNA accumulation, indicating a different effect of glyphosate on BLpp gene expression in bacteroids and free-living bacteria. The possible role of BLpp in a metabolite interchange between Bradyrhizobium and lupin is discussed. PMID:17557843

  14. A case of Bacteroides pyogenes bacteremia secondary to liver abscess.

    PubMed

    Park, Jong Eun; Park, So-Young; Song, Dong Joon; Huh, Hee Jae; Ki, Chang-Seok; Peck, Kyong Ran; Lee, Nam Yong

    2016-12-01

    Bacteroides pyogenes, a non-spore-forming, anaerobic, gram-negative rod, is a component of the oral flora of animals and has, on occasion, been reported to cause human infection through dog or cat bites. We report the first case of B. pyogenes bacteremia secondary to liver abscess with no history of an animal bite. The microorganism was identified by 16S rRNA sequencing. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Specificity of a Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron marker for human feces

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carson, C.A.; Christiansen, J.M.; Yampara-Iquise, H.; Benson, V.W.; Baffaut, C.; Davis, J.V.; Broz, R.R.; Kurtz, W.B.; Rogers, W.M.; Fales, W.H.

    2005-01-01

    A bacterial primer set, known to produce a 542-bp amplicon specific for Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron, generated this product in PCR with 1 ng of extracted DNA from 92% of 25 human fecal samples, 100% of 20 sewage samples, and 16% of 31 dog fecal samples. The marker was not detected in 1 ng of fecal DNA from 61 cows, 35 horses, 44 pigs, 24 chickens, 29 turkeys, and 17 geese. Copyright ?? 2005, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  16. Rhizobium paknamense sp. nov., isolated from lesser duckweeds (Lemna aequinoctialis).

    PubMed

    Kittiwongwattana, Chokchai; Thawai, Chitti

    2013-10-01

    A Gram-stain-negative, rod-shaped bacterium was isolated and designated strain L6-8(T) during a study of endophytic bacterial communities in lesser duckweed (Lemna aequinoctialis). Cells of strain L6-8(T) were motile with peritrichous flagella. The analysis of the nearly complete 16S rRNA gene sequence indicated that strain L6-8(T) was phylogenetically related to species of the genus Rhizobium. Its closest relatives were Rhizobium borbori DN316(T) (97.6 %), Rhizobium oryzae Alt 505(T) (97.3 %) and Rhizobium pseudoryzae J3-A127(T) (97.0 %). The sequence similarity analysis of housekeeping genes recA, glnII, atpD and gyrB showed low levels of sequence similarity (<91.5 %) between strain L6-8(T) and other species of the genus Rhizobium with validly published names. The pH range for growth was 4.0-9.0 (optimum 6.0-7.0), and the temperature range for growth was 20-45 °C (optimum 30 °C). Strain L6-8(T) tolerated NaCl up to 2 % (w/v) (optimum 1 % NaCl). The predominant components of cellular fatty acids were C19 : 0 cyclo ω8c (31.32 %), summed feature 8 (C18 : 1ω7c and/or C18 : 1ω6c; 25.39 %) and C16 : 0 (12.03 %). The DNA G+C content of strain L6-8(T) was 60.4 mol% (Tm). nodC and nifH were not amplified in strain L6-8(T). DNA-DNA relatedness between strain L6-8(T) and R. borbori DN316(T), R. oryzae Alt505(T) and R. pseudoryzae J3-A127(T) was between 11.2 and 18.3 %. Based on the sequence similarity analyses, phenotypic, biochemical and physiological characteristics and DNA-DNA hybridization, strain L6-8(T) could be readily distinguished from its closest relatives and represents a novel species of the genus Rhizobium, for which the name Rhizobium paknamense sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is L6-8(T) ( = NBRC 109338(T) = BCC 55142(T)).

  17. Rhizobium lemnae sp. nov., a bacterial endophyte of Lemna aequinoctialis.

    PubMed

    Kittiwongwattana, Chokchai; Thawai, Chitti

    2014-07-01

    Bacterial strain L6-16(T) was isolated from Lemna aequinoctialis. Cells were Gram-stain-negative, rod-shaped and motile with monopolar flagella. The phylogenetic analysis of its nearly complete 16S rRNA gene sequence revealed that strain L6-16(T) was a member of the genus Rhizobium. Its closest relative was Rhizobium tarimense PL-41(T) with a 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity value of 98.3%. Sequence similarity analysis of the housekeeping recA and atpD genes showed low levels of sequence similarity (<93.9%) between strain L6-16(T) and other species of the genus Rhizobium. Strain L6-16(T) was able to grow between pH 5 and 11 (optimum 7.0) and at temperatures ranging from 20 to 41 °C (optimum 30 °C). It tolerated NaCl up to 1 % (w/v) (optimum 0.5%). C18 : 1ω7c and/or C18 :  1ω6c (summed feature 8; 79.5%) were found as predominant cellular fatty acids. The DNA G+C content of strain L6-16(T) was 58.1 mol% (Tm). Based on low levels of DNA-DNA relatedness, strain L6-16(T) was distinct from members of phylogenetically related species including R. tarimense PL-41(T) (38.3 ± 0.8%), Rhizobium rosettiformans W3(T) (6.9 ± 0.4%) and Rhizobium pseudoryzae J3-A127(T) (12.3 ± 0.6 %). Strain L6-16(T) was unable to nodulate the roots of Phaseolus vulgaris, and nodC and nifH genes were not detected. The results obtained from phylogenetic analyses, phenotypic characterization and DNA-DNA hybridization indicated that strain L6-16(T) represents a novel species of the genus Rhizobium, for which the name Rhizobium lemnae sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is L6-16(T) ( = NBRC 109339(T) = BCC 55143(T)).

  18. Rhizobium gei sp. nov., a bacterial endophyte of Geum aleppicum.

    PubMed

    Shi, Xu; Li, Changfu; Zhao, Liang; Si, Meiru; Zhu, Lingfang; Xin, Kaiyun; Chen, Chaoqiong; Wang, Yao; Shen, Xihui; Zhang, Lei

    2016-10-01

    A bacterial strain, designated as ZFJT-2T, was isolated from the stem of Geum aleppicum Jacq. collected from Taibai Mountain in Shaanxi Province, north-west China. Cells of strain ZFJT-2T were Gram-stain-negative, strictly aerobic, rod-shaped and motile by means of a single polar flagellum. The major fatty acids were summed feature 8 (comprising C18 : 1ω7c and/or C18 : 1ω6c), C16 : 0, 11-methyl C18 : 1ω7c and summed feature 3 (comprising C16 : 1ω7c and/or C16 : 1ω6c), and the DNA G+C content was 58.3 mol% (HPLC). Phylogenetic analyses based on 16S rRNA gene sequences showed that strain ZFJT-2T was a member of the genus Rhizobium and was most closely related to Rhizobium giardinii KACC 10720T (98.6 % similarity) and Rhizobium herbae CCBAU 83011T (98.5 %). The low levels of sequence similarity found between the atpD, recA and glnII gene sequences of strain ZFJT-2T and those of recognized species of the genus Rhizobium (no more than 94.4, 87.2 and 89.5 %, respectively) indicated that it may represent a separate species of the genus Rhizobium. The DNA-DNA relatedness values for strain ZFJT-2T with respect to R. giardinii KACC 10720T and R. herbae CCBAU 83011T were 17.6 and 41.9 %, respectively. On the basis of phenotypic, phylogenetic and genotypic data, strain ZFJT-2T is considered to represent a novel species of the genus Rhizobium, for which the name Rhizobium gei sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is ZFJT-2T (=CCTCC AB 2013015T=KCTC 32301T=LMG 27603T).

  19. Rhizobium alvei sp. nov., isolated from a freshwater river.

    PubMed

    Sheu, Shih-Yi; Huang, Hsing-Wei; Young, Chiu-Chung; Chen, Wen-Ming

    2015-02-01

    A bacterial strain designated TNR-22(T) was isolated from a freshwater river in Taiwan and characterized using a polyphasic taxonomic approach. Cells of strain TNR-22(T) were facultatively anaerobic, Gram-stain-negative, rod-shaped, motile by a single polar flagellum and formed cream-coloured colonies. Growth occurred at 4-45 °C (optimum, 25-30 °C), with 0-1.0 % (w/v) NaCl (optimum, 0.5 %) and at pH 7.0-8.0 (optimum, pH 7.0). Strain TNR-22(T) did not form nodules on Macroptilium atropurpureum. The nifH gene encoding denitrogenase reductase was not detected by PCR. The major fatty acids (>10 %) of strain TNR-22(T) were C18 : 1ω7c and C16 : 0. The DNA G+C content was 60.3 mol%. The polar lipid profile consisted of a mixture of phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylcholine, diphosphatidylglycerol, an uncharacterized aminoglycolipid and an uncharacterized phospholipid. Comparative analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences showed that strain TNR-22(T) constituted a distinct branch within the genus Rhizobium, showing the highest level of sequence similarity with Rhizobium rosettiformans W3(T) (96.3 %). Phenotypic characteristics of the novel strain also differed from those of the most closely related species of the genus Rhizobium. On the basis of the genotypic, chemotaxonomic and phenotypic data, strain TNR-22(T) represents a novel species in the genus Rhizobium, for which the name Rhizobium alvei sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is TNR-22(T) ( = BCRC 80408(T) = LMG 26895(T) = KCTC 23919(T)).

  20. Rhizobium rhizoryzae sp. nov., isolated from rice roots.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiao-Xia; Tang, Xue; Sheirdil, Rizwan Ali; Sun, Lei; Ma, Xiao-Tong

    2014-04-01

    Two strains (J3-AN59(T) and J3-N84) of Gram-stain-negative, aerobic and rod-shaped bacteria were isolated from the roots of fresh rice plants. The 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity results showed that the similarity between strains J3-AN59(T) and J3-N84 was 100 %. Both strains were phylogenetically related to members of the genus Rhizobium, and they were most closely related to Rhizobium tarimense ACCC 06128(T) (97.43 %). Similarities in the sequences of housekeeping genes between strains J3-AN59(T) and J3-N84 and those of recognized species of the genus Rhizobium were less than 90 %. The polar lipid profiles of both strains were predominantly composed of phosphatidylglycerol, diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylcholine and an unknown aminophospholipid. The major cellular fatty acids were summed feature 8 (C18 : 1ω7c and/or C18 : 1ω6c) and C16 : 0. The DNA G+C contents of J3-AN59(T) and J3-N84 were 55.7 and 57.1 mol%, respectively. The DNA-DNA relatedness value between J3-AN59(T) and J3-N84 was 89 %, and strain J3-AN59(T) showed 9 % DNA-DNA relatedness to R. tarimense ACCC 06128(T), the most closely related strain. Based on this evidence, we found that J3-AN59(T) and J3-N84 represent a novel species in the genus Rhizobium and we propose the name Rhizobium rhizoryzae sp. nov. The type strain is J3-AN59(T) ( = ACCC 05916(T) = KCTC 23652(T)).

  1. Rhizobium phaseoli symbiotic mutants with transposon Tn5 insertions.

    PubMed Central

    Noel, K D; Sanchez, A; Fernandez, L; Leemans, J; Cevallos, M A

    1984-01-01

    Rhizobium phaseoli CFN42 DNA was mutated by random insertion of Tn5 from suicide plasmid pJB4JI to obtain independently arising strains that were defective in symbiosis with Phaseolus vulgaris but grew normally outside the plant. When these mutants were incubated with the plant, one did not initiate visible nodule tissue (Nod-), seven led to slow nodule development (Ndv), and two led to superficially normal early nodule development but lacked symbiotic nitrogenase activity (Sna-). The Nod- mutant lacked the large transmissible indigenous plasmid pCFN42d that has homology to Klebsiella pneumoniae nitrogenase (nif) genes. The other mutants had normal plasmid content. In the two Sna- mutants and one Ndv mutant, Tn5 had inserted into plasmid pCFN42d outside the region of nif homology. The insertions of the other Ndv mutants were apparently in the chromosome. They were not in plasmids detected on agarose gels, and, in contrast to insertions on indigenous plasmids, they were transmitted in crosses to wild-type strain CFN42 at the same frequency as auxotrophic markers and with the same enhancement of transmission by conjugation plasmid R68.45. In these Ndv mutants the Tn5 insertions were the same as or very closely linked to mutations causing the Ndv phenotype. However, in two mutants with Tn5 insertions on plasmid pCFN42d, an additional mutation on the same plasmid, rather than Tn5, was responsible for the Sna- or Ndv phenotype. When plasmid pJB4JI was transferred to two other R. phaseoli strains, analysis of symbiotic mutants was complicated by Tn5-containing deleted forms of pJB4JI that were stably maintained. Images PMID:6325385

  2. Tn4351 transposes in Bacteroides spp. and mediates the integration of plasmid R751 into the Bacteroides chromosome

    SciTech Connect

    Shoemaker, N.B.; Getty, C.; Gardner, J.F.; Salyers, A.A.

    1986-03-01

    The gene for resistance to erythromycin and clindamycin, which is carried on the conjugative Bacteroides plasmid, pBF4, has been shown previously to be part of an element (Tn4351) that transposes in Escherichia coli. The authors have now introduced Tn4351 into Bacteroides uniformis 0061 on the following two suicide vectors: (i) the broad-host-range IncP plasmid R751 (R751::Tn4351) and (ii) pSS-2, a chimeric plasmid which contains 33 kilobases of pBF4 (including Tn4351) cloned into the IncQ plasmid RSF1010 and which is mobilized by R751. When E. coli HB101, carrying either R751::Tn4351 or R751 and pSS-2, was mated with B. uniformis under aerobic conditions, Em/sup r/ transconjugants were detected at a frequency of 10 /sup -6/ to 10/sup -5/ (R751::Tn4351) or 10/sup -8/ to 10/sup -6/ (R751 and pSS-2). In matings involving pSS-2, all Em/sup r/ transconjugants contained simple insertions of Tn4351 in the chromosome, whereas in matings involving R751::Tn4351, about half of the Em/sup r/ transconjugants had R751 cointegrated with Tn4351 in the chromosome. Of the Em/sup r/ transconjugants, 13% were auxotrophs. Bacteroides spp. which had R751 cointegrated with Tn4351 in the chromosome did not transfer R751 or Tn4351 to E. coli HB101 or to isogenic B. uniformis, nor did the integrated R751 mobilize pE5-2, an E. coli-Bacteroides shuttle vector that contains a transfer origin that is recognized by R751.

  3. Clinical features of Bacteroides bacteremia and their association with colorectal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Yoshino, Y; Kitazawa, T; Ikeda, M; Tatsuno, K; Yanagimoto, S; Okugawa, S; Ota, Y; Yotsuyanagi, H

    2012-02-01

    We investigated the clinical features of Bacteroides bacteremia for 5 years to determine the risk factors for mortality and to ascertain whether bacteremia due to Bacteroides spp. is associated with colorectal carcinoma. This study comprised a review of all patients with Bacteroides bacteremia at a teaching hospital in Tokyo from April 2003 to March 2008. We also conducted a case-control study between Bacteroides bacteremia and bacteremia due to other pathogens. During the study period, 25 cases of bacteremia were due to Bacteroides spp. Bacteroides bacteremia was associated with a high mortality rate (24%). Malignancy (76%) was the major comorbidity, followed by a history of surgery (40%). Colorectal carcinoma was the most frequent (n = 8, 32%) of the comorbid malignancies and was recognized as the primary infection site in six cases. Prevalence of colorectal carcinoma as comorbidity was significantly higher in Bacteroides bacteremia than in other bacteremia. In the Bacteroides bacteremia cases of this study, colorectal carcinoma was the major comorbidity and primary infection site. Colorectal carcinoma screening in Bacteroides bacteremia patients is potentially an important diagnostic marker for the early detection of this infection in the future.

  4. Survival of Rhizobium in Acid Soils

    PubMed Central

    Lowendorf, Henry S.; Baya, Ana Maria; Alexander, Martin

    1981-01-01

    A Rhizobium strain nodulating cowpeas did not decline in abundance after it was added to sterile soils at pH 6.9 and 4.4, and the numbers fell slowly in nonsterile soils at pH 5.5 and 4.1. A strain of R. phaseoli grew when added to sterile soils at pH 6.7 and 6.9; it maintained large, stable populations in soils of pH 4.4, 5.5, and 6.0, but the numbers fell markedly and then reached a stable population size in sterile soils at pH 4.3 and 4.4. The abundance of R. phaseoli added to nonsterile soils with pH values of 4.3 to 6.7 decreased similarly with time regardless of soil acidity, and the final numbers were less than in the comparable sterile soils. The minimum pH values for the growth of strains of R. meliloti in liquid media ranged from 5.3 to 5.9. Two R. meliloti strains, which differed in acid tolerance for growth in culture, did not differ in numbers or decline when added to sterile soils at pH 4.8, 5.2, and 6.3. The population size of these two strains was reduced after they were introduced into nonsterile soils at pH 4.8, 5.4, and 6.4, and the number of survivors was related to the soil pH. The R. meliloti strain that was more acid sensitive in culture declined more readily in sterile soil at pH 4.6 than did the less sensitive strain, and only the former strain was eliminated from nonsterile soil at pH 4.8; however, the less sensitive strain also survived better in limed soil. The cell density of the two R. meliloti strains was increased in pH 6.4 soil in the presence of growing alfalfa. The decline and elimination of the tolerant, but not the sensitive, strain was delayed in soil at pH 4.6 by roots of growing alfalfa. PMID:16345909

  5. Influence of environmental and genetic factors linked to celiac disease risk on infant gut colonization by Bacteroides species.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, Ester; De Palma, Giada; Capilla, Amalia; Nova, Esther; Pozo, Tamara; Castillejo, Gemma; Varea, Vicente; Marcos, Ascensión; Garrote, José Antonio; Polanco, Isabel; López, Ana; Ribes-Koninckx, Carmen; García-Novo, Maria Dolores; Calvo, Carmen; Ortigosa, Luis; Palau, Francesc; Sanz, Yolanda

    2011-08-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is an immune-mediated enteropathy involving genetic and environmental factors whose interaction might influence disease risk. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of milk-feeding practices and the HLA-DQ genotype on intestinal colonization of Bacteroides species in infants at risk of CD development. This study included 75 full-term newborns with at least one first-degree relative suffering from CD. Infants were classified according to milk-feeding practice (breast-feeding or formula feeding) and HLA-DQ genotype (high or low genetic risk). Stools were analyzed at 7 days, 1 month, and 4 months by PCR and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE). The Bacteroides species diversity index was higher in formula-fed infants than in breast-fed infants. Breast-fed infants showed a higher prevalence of Bacteroides uniformis at 1 and 4 months of age, while formula-fed infants had a higher prevalence of B. intestinalis at all sampling times, of B. caccae at 7 days and 4 months, and of B. plebeius at 4 months. Infants with high genetic risk showed a higher prevalence of B. vulgatus, while those with low genetic risk showed a higher prevalence of B. ovatus, B. plebeius, and B. uniformis. Among breast-fed infants, the prevalence of B. uniformis was higher in those with low genetic risk than in those with high genetic risk. Among formula-fed infants, the prevalence of B. ovatus and B. plebeius was increased in those with low genetic risk, while the prevalence of B. vulgatus was higher in those with high genetic risk. The results indicate that both the type of milk feeding and the HLA-DQ genotype influence the colonization process of Bacteroides species, and possibly the disease risk.

  6. Influence of Environmental and Genetic Factors Linked to Celiac Disease Risk on Infant Gut Colonization by Bacteroides Species▿

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez, Ester; De Palma, Giada; Capilla, Amalia; Nova, Esther; Pozo, Tamara; Castillejo, Gemma; Varea, Vicente; Marcos, Ascensión; Garrote, José Antonio; Polanco, Isabel; López, Ana; Ribes-Koninckx, Carmen; García-Novo, Maria Dolores; Calvo, Carmen; Ortigosa, Luis; Palau, Francesc; Sanz, Yolanda

    2011-01-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is an immune-mediated enteropathy involving genetic and environmental factors whose interaction might influence disease risk. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of milk-feeding practices and the HLA-DQ genotype on intestinal colonization of Bacteroides species in infants at risk of CD development. This study included 75 full-term newborns with at least one first-degree relative suffering from CD. Infants were classified according to milk-feeding practice (breast-feeding or formula feeding) and HLA-DQ genotype (high or low genetic risk). Stools were analyzed at 7 days, 1 month, and 4 months by PCR and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE). The Bacteroides species diversity index was higher in formula-fed infants than in breast-fed infants. Breast-fed infants showed a higher prevalence of Bacteroides uniformis at 1 and 4 months of age, while formula-fed infants had a higher prevalence of B. intestinalis at all sampling times, of B. caccae at 7 days and 4 months, and of B. plebeius at 4 months. Infants with high genetic risk showed a higher prevalence of B. vulgatus, while those with low genetic risk showed a higher prevalence of B. ovatus, B. plebeius, and B. uniformis. Among breast-fed infants, the prevalence of B. uniformis was higher in those with low genetic risk than in those with high genetic risk. Among formula-fed infants, the prevalence of B. ovatus and B. plebeius was increased in those with low genetic risk, while the prevalence of B. vulgatus was higher in those with high genetic risk. The results indicate that both the type of milk feeding and the HLA-DQ genotype influence the colonization process of Bacteroides species, and possibly the disease risk. PMID:21642397

  7. Rhizobium meliloti exopolysaccharide mutants elicit feedback regulation of nodule formation in alfalfa

    SciTech Connect

    Caetano-Anolles, G.; Lagares, A.; Bauer, W.D. )

    1990-02-01

    Nodule formation by wild-type Rhizobium meliloti is strongly suppressed in younger parts of alfalfa (Medicago sativum L.) root systems as a feedback response to development of the first nodules. Mutants of R. meliloti deficient in exopolysaccharide synthesis can induce the formation of organized nodular structures (pseudonodules) on alfalfa roots but are defective in their ability to invade and multiply within host tissues. The formation of empty pseudonodules by exo mutants was found to elicit a feedback suppression of nodule formation similar to that elicited by the wild-type bacteria. Inoculation of an exo mutant onto one side of a split-root system 24 hours before inoculation of the second side with wild-type cells suppressed wild-type nodule formation on the second side in proportion to the extent of pseudonodule formation by the exo mutants. The formation of pseudonodules is thus sufficient to elicit systemic feedback control of nodulation in the host root system: infection thread development and internal proliferation of the bacteria are not required for elicitation of feedback. Pseudonodule formation by the exo mutants was found to be strongly suppressed in split-root systems by prior inoculation on the opposite side with the wild type. Thus, feedback control elicited by the wild-type inhibits Rhizobium-induced redifferentiation of host root cells.

  8. Gene transfer into Solanum tuberosum via Rhizobium spp.

    PubMed

    Wendt, Toni; Doohan, Fiona; Winckelmann, Dominik; Mullins, Ewen

    2011-04-01

    Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation (ATMT) is the preferred technique for gene transfer into crops. A major disadvantage of the technology remains the complexity of the patent landscape that surrounds ATMT which restricts its use for commercial applications. An alternative system has been described (Broothaerts et al. in Nature 433:629-633, 2005) detailing the propensity of three rhizobia to transform the model crop Arabidopsis thaliana, the non-food crop Nicotiana tabacum and, at a very low frequency, the monocotyledonous crop Oryza sativa. In this report we describe for the first time the genetic transformation of Solanum tuberosum using the non-Agrobacterium species Sinorhizobium meliloti, Rhizobium sp. NGR234 and Mesorhizobium loti. This was achieved by combining an optimal bacterium and host co-cultivation period with a low antibiotic regime during the callus and shoot induction stages. Using this optimized protocol the transformation frequency (calculated as % of shoots equipped with root systems with the ability to grow in rooting media supplemented with 25 μg/ml hygromycin) of the rhizobia strains was calculated at 4.72, 5.85 and 1.86% for S. meliloti, R. sp. NGR234 and M. loti respectively, compared to 47.6% for the A. tumefaciens control. Stable transgene integration and expression was confirmed via southern hybridisation, quantitative PCR analysis and histochemical screening of both leaf and/or tuber tissue. In light of the rapid advances in potato genomics, combined with the sequencing of the potato genome, the ability of alternative bacteria species to genetically transform this major food crop will provide a novel resource to the Solanaceae community as it continues to develop potato as both a food and non-food crop.

  9. Gene fusion vehicles for the analysis of gene expression in Rhizobium meliloti.

    PubMed Central

    Kahn, M L; Timblin, C R

    1984-01-01

    A set of plasmid cloning vehicles was developed to facilitate the construction of gene or operon fusions in Rhizobium meliloti. The vehicles also contain a broad-host-range replicon and could be introduced into bacteria either by transformation or by transduction, using bacteriophage P2. Insertion of foreign DNA into a unique restriction endonuclease cleavage site promotes the synthesis of either the Escherichia coli lactose operon or the kanamycin phosphotransferase gene from transposon Tn5. Expression of the lactose operon could be detected by observing the color of Rhizobium colonies on medium that contained a chromogenic indicator. We also determined the growth conditions that make it possible to select either for or against the expression of the E. coli lactose operon in R. meliloti. Recombinant plasmids were constructed by inserting MboI restriction fragments of R. meliloti DNA into one of the vehicles, pMK353 . Expression of beta-galactosidase by a number of these recombinants was measured in both R. meliloti and E. coli. PMID:6327625

  10. Basis for the competitiveness of rhizobium japonicum in nodulation of soybean. Final progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Bauer, W.D.; Evans, W.R.

    1984-07-30

    These studies were concerned with the determination of the characteristics of the soybean symbiont R. japonicum that are crucial to the inoculum competitiveness of one strain of the bacterium over other strains with respect to nodule formation. Our work has been focused on the initial infection events, such as attachment, which precede the development of a fully functional nodule because it is these primary events which determine the success or failure of a particular rhizobia to initiate infections. Experiments concerned with the attachment of R. japonicum to soybean roots have indicated that both soybean symbiotic and non-symbiotic species of rhizobia attach comparably well to soybean roots. There was no evidence of attachment mediated by soybean lectin, as previously claimed, but evidence was obtained for attachment mediated by pili on the Rhizobium cells. It was also found that the efficiency of infection varied substantially with culture age for certain strains while with other strains the efficiency of infection remained approximately constant during growth. We have utilized these observations to investigate the relationship between the efficiency of infection and competitiveness. An unexpected outcome of these studies was the finding that R. japonicum, and other slow-growing Rhizobium species, maintain both viability and symbiotic infectivity over prolonged periods of storage at ambient temperatures when suspended in water. The simplicity and cost-effectiveness of this storage procedure may provide an alternative method to the current practices employed in inoculum preparation. 2 figures, 3 tables.

  11. Growth of a leguminous tree (Centrolobium tomentosum Guill. ex Benth.) inoculated with Rhizobium and mycorrhizal fungi.

    PubMed

    Marques, M S; Gonçalves, L M; Lemos-Filho, J P; Rocha, D; Vale, M T; Scotti, M R

    1997-01-01

    Leguminous trees are being suggested for revegetation programs due to their ability to develop associations with rhizobia and mycorrhizal fungi. The growth of a native species of the Tropical Atlantic Forest, Centrolobium tomentosum, was evaluated in a native forest soil and in a Eucalyptus forest soil under different treatments of inoculation. C. tomentosum produced more biomass under nursery conditions after inoculation with Rhizobium BHICB-Ab1 associated with arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM). This treatment improved shoot and root growth and nodule weight under forest soil condition, while in eucalyptus soil only shoot biomass and nodule weight were significantly modified. In another experiment, using forest soil, height and stem diameter were also increased by dual inoculation procedures. The height and diameter growth promoting effect was observed when BHICB-Ab1 was used as inoculant associated with AM, but not with BHICB-Ab1 alone. In contrast, plants inoculated with BHICB-Ab3 alone were similar in height and diameter growth, to those which were inoculated with BHICB-Ab3 associated with AM. These results suggest that benefits of dual inoculation depend on triparty symbiosis and especially on the choice of Rhizobium strain.

  12. Method for Isolation of Bacteroides Bacteriophage Host Strains Suitable for Tracking Sources of Fecal Pollution in Water

    PubMed Central

    Payan, Andrey; Ebdon, James; Taylor, Huw; Gantzer, Christophe; Ottoson, Jakob; Papageorgiou, Georgos T.; Blanch, Anicet R.; Lucena, Francisco; Jofre, Juan; Muniesa, Maite

    2005-01-01

    Bacteriophages infecting Bacteroides are potentially a good tool for fecal source tracking, but different Bacteroides host strains are needed for different geographic areas. A feasible method for isolating Bacteroides host strains for phages present in human fecal material is described. Useful strains were identified for application in Spain and the United Kingdom. One strain, GA-17, identified as Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron, was tested in several locations in Europe with excellent performance in Southern Europe. PMID:16151173

  13. Bacteriophages infecting Bacteroides as a marker for microbial source tracking.

    PubMed

    Jofre, Joan; Blanch, Anicet R; Lucena, Francisco; Muniesa, Maite

    2014-05-15

    Bacteriophages infecting certain strains of Bacteroides are amid the numerous procedures proposed for tracking the source of faecal pollution. These bacteriophages fulfil reasonably well most of the requirements identified as appropriate for a suitable marker of faecal sources. Thus, different host strains are available that detect bacteriophages preferably in water contaminated with faecal wastes corresponding to different animal species. For phages found preferably in human faecal wastes, which are the ones that have been more extensively studied, the amounts of phages found in waters contaminated with human fecal samples is reasonably high; these amounts are invariable through the time; their resistance to natural and anthropogenic stressors is comparable to that of other relatively resistant indicator of faecal pollution such us coliphages; the abundance ratios of somatic coliphages and bacteriophages infecting Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron GA17 are unvarying in recent and aged contamination; and standardised detection methods exist. These methods are easy, cost effective and provide data susceptible of numerical analysis. In contrast, there are some uncertainties regarding their geographical stability, and consequently suitable hosts need to be isolated for different geographical areas. However, a feasible method has been described to isolate suitable hosts in a given geographical area. In summary, phages infecting Bacteroides are a marker of faecal sources that in our opinion merits being included in the "toolbox" for microbial source tracking. However, further research is still needed in order to make clear some uncertainties regarding some of their characteristics and behaviour, to compare their suitability to the one of emerging methods such us targeting Bacteroidetes by qPCR assays; or settling molecular methods for their determination. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Screening for enterotoxigenic Bacteroides fragilis in stool samples.

    PubMed

    Keenan, Jacqueline I; Aitchison, Alan; Purcell, Rachel V; Greenlees, Rosie; Pearson, John F; Frizelle, Frank A

    2016-08-01

    Bacteroides fragilis is a commensal bacterium found in the gut of most humans, however enterotoxigenic B. fragilis strains (ETBF) have been associated with diarrhoea and colorectal cancer (CRC). The purpose of this study was to establish a method of screening for the Bacteroides fragilis toxin (bft) gene in stool samples, as a means of determining if carriage of ETBF is detected more often in CRC patients than in age-matched healthy controls. Stool samples from 71 patients recently diagnosed with CRC, and 71 age-matched controls, were screened by standard and quantitative PCR using primers specific for the detection of the bft gene. Bacterial template DNA from stool samples was prepared by two methods: a sweep, where all colonies growing on Bacteroides Bile Esculin agar following stool culture for 48 h at 37 °C in an anaerobic environment were swept into sterile water and heat treated; and a direct DNA extraction from each stool sample. The bft gene was detected more frequently from DNA isolated from bacterial sweeps than from matched direct DNA extractions. qPCR was found to be more sensitive than standard PCR in detecting bft. The cumulative total of positive qPCR assays from both sample types revealed that 19 of the CRC patients had evidence of the toxin gene in their stool sample (27%), compared to seven of the age-matched controls (10%). This difference was significant (P = 0.016). Overall, ETBF carriage was detected more often in CRC patient stool samples compared to controls, but disparate findings from the different DNA preparations and testing methods suggests that poor sensitivity may limit molecular detection of ETBF in stool samples. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Regulation of phenolic catabolism in Rhizobium leguminosarum biovar trifolii

    SciTech Connect

    Parke, D. ); Rynne, F.; Glenn, A. )

    1991-09-01

    In members of the family Rhizobiaceae, many phenolic compounds are degraded by the protocatechuate branch of the {beta}-ketoadipate pathway, In this paper the authors describe a novel pattern of induction of protocatechuate (pca) genes in Rhizobium leguminosarum biovar trifolii. Isolation of pca mutant strains revealed that 4-hydroxybenzoate, quinate, and 4-coumarate are degraded via the protocatechuate pathway. At least three inducers govern catabolism of 4-hydroxybenzoate to succinyl coenzyme A and acetyl coenzyme A. The enzyme that catalyzes the initial step is induced by its substrate, whereas the catabolite {beta}-carboxy-cis, cis-muconate induces enzymes for the upper protocatechuate pathway, and {beta}-ketoadipate elicits expression of the enzyme for a subsequent step, {beta}-ketoadipate succinyl-coenzyme A transferase. Elucidation of the induction pattern relied in part on complementation of mutant Rhizobium strains by known subclones of Acinetobacter genes expressed off the lac promoter in a broad-host-range vector.

  16. Impact of heavy metals on an arctic rhizobium

    SciTech Connect

    Appanna, V.D. )

    1991-03-01

    Bacteria belonging to the genus Rhizobium, when residing in the root nodules of leguminous plants, fix nitrogen and thus contribute very significantly to the global nitrogen and thus contribute very significantly to the global nitrogen budget. Although there is paucity of data concerning the effects of metal pollutants on these agronomically important organisms, their negative impact on the nitrogen fixing ability of these microbes is evident. As rhizobia from root nodules of arctic legumes have been demonstrated to contribute significantly to the ecological balance in this region, the impact of some metals, found in elevated amounts in acidic surroundings on this unique Rhizobium has been assessed. In this paper the ability of the microbe to tolerate abnormal levels of manganese and aluminum is reported and the effectiveness of iron in reversing cadmium toxicity is also discussed.

  17. Clustering of nitrogen fixation (nif) genes in Rhizobium meliloti.

    PubMed Central

    Corbin, D; Ditta, G; Helinski, D R

    1982-01-01

    A cloned 17.3-kilobase region of the Rhizobium meliloti genome with homology to the Klebsiella pneumoniae nitrogenase structural genes was studied. Limits on the extent of homology were determined. Transposon mutagenesis of this region of the genome verified that it contained functional nif genes, Some transposon insertions resulted in a defective symbiotic phenotype, whereas others had no noticeable effect on symbiotic competence. The relative position of insertions yielding these two phenotypic classes suggested that at least three distinct units of gene expression are present in this region. Hybridization of RNA from alfalfa root nodules and from vegetatively grown Rhizobium to this cloned DNA showed that at least 11.1 kilobases of the region was transcribed actively and that transcription was specific for the symbiotic state. Images PMID:6274844

  18. Bacteroids Are Stable during Dark-Induced Senescence of Soybean Root Nodules 12

    PubMed Central

    Sarath, Gautam; Pfeiffer, Nancy E.; Sodhi, C. S.; Wagner, Fred W.

    1986-01-01

    Physiological and biochemical markers of metabolic competence were assayed in bacteroids isolated from root nodules of control, dark-stressed, and recovered plants of Glycine max Merr. cv `Woodworth.' Nitrogenase-dependent acetylene reduction by the whole plant decreased to 8% of control rates after 4 days of dark stress and could not be detected in plants dark stressed for 8 days. However, in bacteroids isolated anaerobically, almost 50% of initial acetylene reduction activity remained after 4 days of dark stress but was totally lost after 8 days of dark stress. Bacteroid acetylene reduction activity recovered faster than whole plant acetylene reduction activity when plants were dark stressed for 8 days and returned to a normal light regimen. Significant changes were not measured in bacteroid respiration, protein content, sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis protein profiles, or in bacteroid proteolytic activity throughout the experiment. Immunoblots of bacteroid extracts revealed the presence of nitrogenase component II in control, 4-day dark-stressed, and 8-day dark-stressed plants that were allowed to recover under a normal light regimen, but not in 8-day dark-stressed plants. Our data indicate that dark stress does not greatly affect bacteroid metabolism or induce bacteroid senescence. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:16665033

  19. Bacteroides pyogenes causing serious human wound infection from animal bites.

    PubMed

    Lau, Jillian S Y; Korman, Tony M; Yeung, Alex; Streitberg, Richard; Francis, Michelle J; Graham, Maryza

    2016-12-01

    Bacteroides pyogenes is part of the normal oral flora of domestic animals. There is one previous report of human infection, with B. pyogenes bacteremia following a cat bite (Madsen 2011). We report seven severe human infections where B. pyogenes was identified by Bruker matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDTI-TOF MS), but not by VITEK MS and was misidentified by VITEK ANC card. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Nitrogen fixation (nif) genes and large plasmids of Rhizobium japonicum.

    PubMed Central

    Masterson, R V; Russell, P R; Atherly, A G

    1982-01-01

    The location of structural nitrogen-fixation genes was determined for the slow- and fast-growing types of Rhizobium japonicum. Slow-growing R. japonicum strains do not harbor structural nif genes, homologous to nifD and nifH, on large plasmids (100 to 200 megadaltons). In contrast, all fast-growing R. japonicum strains, except PRC194, contain structural nif genes on large plasmids. Images PMID:7130134

  1. Metabolism of Tryptophan and Tryptophan Analogs by Rhizobium meliloti1

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Myron N. V.; Signer, Ethan R.

    1990-01-01

    The alfalfa symbiont Rhizobium meliloti Rm1021 produces indole-3-acetic acid in a regulated manner when supplied with exogenous tryptophan. Mutants with altered response to tryptophan analogs still produce indole-3-acetic acid, but are Fix− because bacteria do not fully differentiate into the nitrogen-fixing bacteriod form. These mutations are in apparently essential genes tightly linked to a dominant streptomycin resistance locus. Images Figure 2 PMID:16667364

  2. Competition Among Rhizobium leguminosarum Strains for Nodulation of Lentils (Lens esculenta)

    PubMed Central

    May, Sheila N.; Bohlool, B. Ben

    1983-01-01

    Thirty-one cultures of Rhizobium leguminosarum were screened for effectiveness (C2H2 reduction) on lentils (Lens esculenta). Fluorescent antibodies prepared against three of the most effective strains (Hawaii 5-0, Nitragin 92A3, and Nitragin 128A12) exhibited a high degree of strain specificity; the antibodies reacted strongly with their homologous rhizobia in culture and with bacteroids in nodules. They did not cross-react with one another, and only weakly with 5 of the 47 other R. leguminosarum cultures tested. In competition studies in the growth chamber, whenever strain Nitragin 92A3 was included in the inoculum mixture, it consistently (but not always significantly, P = 0.05) occupied the majority of nodules on all four cultivars used. However, some degree of strain X cultivar interaction was apparent: Hawaii 5-0 was of equal competitiveness (P = 0.05) with Nitragin 92A3 on three of the varieties (Commercial, Tekoa, and Benewah), but inferior (P = 0.01) on the Chilean variety; Nitragin 92A3 completely dominated (P = 0.01) Nitragin 128A12 on all cultivars; and Hawaii 5-0 was of equal competitiveness (P = 0.05) to Nitragin 128A12 on the Chilean variety and more competitive (P = 0.01) on the commercial variety and less so on the other two varieties. In field experiments, Hawaii 5-0 proved of equal competitiveness (P = 0.01) with Nitragin 92A3 in one soil (an Inceptisol) and superior (P ≤ 0.05) to it in another (an Oxisol). Incidence of double-strain occupancy of nodules varied from 0 to 36% in vermiculite, depending on the strains in the mixture and the host variety, and from 0 to 38% in the field, depending on the strains in the mixture and the soil type. The results suggest a close relationship between the competitiveness of a strain and its occurrence in doubly infected nodules. Images PMID:16346257

  3. Rhizobium pongamiae sp. nov. from root nodules of Pongamia pinnata.

    PubMed

    Kesari, Vigya; Ramesh, Aadi Moolam; Rangan, Latha

    2013-01-01

    Pongamia pinnata has an added advantage of N2-fixing ability and tolerance to stress conditions as compared with other biodiesel crops. It harbours "rhizobia" as an endophytic bacterial community on its root nodules. A gram-negative, nonmotile, fast-growing, rod-shaped, bacterial strain VKLR-01(T) was isolated from root nodules of Pongamia that grew optimal at 28°C, pH 7.0 in presence of 2% NaCl. Isolate VKLR-01 exhibits higher tolerance to the prevailing adverse conditions, for example, salt stress, elevated temperatures and alkalinity. Strain VKLR-01(T) has the major cellular fatty acid as C(18:1) ω7c (65.92%). Strain VKLR-01(T) was found to be a nitrogen fixer using the acetylene reduction assay and PCR detection of a nifH gene. On the basis of phenotypic, phylogenetic distinctiveness and molecular data (16S rRNA, recA, and atpD gene sequences, G + C content, DNA-DNA hybridization etc.), strain VKLR-01(T) = (MTCC 10513(T) = MSCL 1015(T)) is considered to represent a novel species of the genus Rhizobium for which the name Rhizobium pongamiae sp. nov. is proposed. Rhizobium pongamiae may possess specific traits that can be transferred to other rhizobia through biotechnological tools and can be directly used as inoculants for reclamation of wasteland; hence, they are very important from both economic and environmental prospects.

  4. Rhizobium pongamiae sp. nov. from Root Nodules of Pongamia pinnata

    PubMed Central

    Kesari, Vigya; Ramesh, Aadi Moolam; Rangan, Latha

    2013-01-01

    Pongamia pinnata has an added advantage of N2-fixing ability and tolerance to stress conditions as compared with other biodiesel crops. It harbours “rhizobia” as an endophytic bacterial community on its root nodules. A gram-negative, nonmotile, fast-growing, rod-shaped, bacterial strain VKLR-01T was isolated from root nodules of Pongamia that grew optimal at 28°C, pH 7.0 in presence of 2% NaCl. Isolate VKLR-01 exhibits higher tolerance to the prevailing adverse conditions, for example, salt stress, elevated temperatures and alkalinity. Strain VKLR-01T has the major cellular fatty acid as C18:1  ω7c (65.92%). Strain VKLR-01T was found to be a nitrogen fixer using the acetylene reduction assay and PCR detection of a nifH gene. On the basis of phenotypic, phylogenetic distinctiveness and molecular data (16S rRNA, recA, and atpD gene sequences, G + C content, DNA-DNA hybridization etc.), strain VKLR-01T = (MTCC 10513T = MSCL 1015T) is considered to represent a novel species of the genus Rhizobium for which the name Rhizobium pongamiae sp. nov. is proposed. Rhizobium pongamiae may possess specific traits that can be transferred to other rhizobia through biotechnological tools and can be directly used as inoculants for reclamation of wasteland; hence, they are very important from both economic and environmental prospects. PMID:24078904

  5. Serological identification of oral Bacteroides spp. by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay.

    PubMed Central

    Ebersole, J L; Frey, D E; Taubman, M A; Smith, D J; Socransky, S S; Tanner, A C

    1984-01-01

    A rapid method for identifying black-pigmented oral Bacteroides spp. is described. Species-specific rabbit antisera to Bacteroides gingivalis, B. intermedius, and B. melaninogenicus were used in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay to identify clinical isolates of black-pigmented Bacteroides spp. from humans. The results showed excellent agreement with biochemical identification of B. gingivalis and B. intermedius. Only 36% of the B. melaninogenicus isolates were identified with the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, suggesting that this group of black-pigmented Bacteroides spp. is made up of more than one serotype. The serological enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay should enable rapid identification of black-pigmented Bacteroides spp. isolated from sites of oral diseases and may also be used to identify the presence of these organisms in complex bacterial mixtures from oral sites. PMID:6736225

  6. Rhizobium rosettiformans sp. nov., isolated from a hexachlorocyclohexane dump site, and reclassification of Blastobacter aggregatus Hirsch and Muller 1986 as Rhizobium aggregatum comb. nov.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Jaspreet; Verma, Mansi; Lal, Rup

    2011-05-01

    A Gram-negative, rod-shaped, motile, aerobic bacterial strain, W3(T), was isolated from hexachlorocyclohexane (HCH)-contaminated groundwater from Lucknow, India, and its taxonomic position was determined using a polyphasic approach. Strain W3(T) shared highest 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity of 97.8 % with Rhizobium selenitireducens B1(T), followed by Rhizobium daejeonense L61(T) (97.7 %), Rhizobium radiobacter ATCC 19358(T) (97.5 %) and Blastobacter aggregatus IFAM 1003(T) (97.2 %). Strain W3(T) formed a monophyletic clade with Blastobacter aggregatus IFAM 1003(T) ( = DSM 1111(T)) in the cluster of species of the genus Rhizobium. Phylogenetic analyses of strain W3(T) using atpD and recA gene sequences confirmed the phylogenetic arrangements obtained by using 16S rRNA gene sequences. Hence, the taxonomic characterization of B. aggregatus DSM 1111(T) was also undertaken. Strains W3(T) and B. aggregatus DSM 1111(T) contained summed feature 8 (18 : 1ω7c and/or 18 : 1ω6c; 65.4 and 70.8 %, respectively) as the major fatty acid, characteristic of the genus Rhizobium. DNA-DNA relatedness of strain W3(T) with Rhizobium selenitireducens LMG 24075(T), Rhizobium daejeonense DSM 17795(T), Rhizobium radiobacter DSM 30147(T) and B. aggregatus DSM 1111(T) was 42, 34, 30 and 34 %, respectively. The DNA G+C contents of strain W3(T) and B. aggregatus DSM 1111(T) were 62.3 and 62.7 mol%, respectively. A nifH gene encoding dinitrogenase reductase was detected in strain W3(T) but not in B. aggregatus DSM 1111(T). Based on the results obtained by phylogenetic and chemotaxonomic analyses, phenotypic characterization and DNA-DNA hybridization, it is concluded that strain W3(T) represents a novel species of the genus Rhizobium, for which the name Rhizobium rosettiformans sp. nov. is proposed (type strain W3(T)  = CCM 7583(T)  = MTCC 9454(T)). It is also proposed that Blastobacter aggregatus Hirsch and Müller 1986 be transferred to the genus Rhizobium as Rhizobium

  7. Identification of fast-growing rhizobia nodulating tropical legumes from Puerto Rico as Rhizobium gallicum and Rhizobium tropici.

    PubMed

    Zurdo-Piñeiro, José Luis; Velázquez, Encarna; Lorite, María José; Brelles-Mariño, Graciela; Schröder, Eduardo C; Bedmar, Eulogio J; Mateos, Pedro F; Martínez-Molina, Eustoquio

    2004-08-01

    Fifteen isolates from several nodulated tropical legumes from Puerto Rico (USA) were characterised by their phenotypic, molecular and symbiotic features. The identification of isolates was based on a polyphasic approach, including phenotypic characteristics, 16S rRNA sequencing, Low molecular weight (LMW) RNA profiles, Two Primers-RAPD patterns, and restriction patterns from 16S rDNA molecules. Despite of the variety of hosts included in this study the 15 isolates were separated into only two groups that corresponded to Rhizobium gallicum and Rhizobium tropici. This work shows that R. gallicum and R. tropici nodulate legume plants, such as Sesbania, Caliandra, Poitea, Piptadenia, Neptunia and Mimosa species, that were not previously considered as hosts for these rhizobia. Moreover, some of these host plants can be nodulated by both species. The results confirm the great promiscuity of R. tropici and also support the hypothesis that the species R. gallicum may be native from America or cosmopolitan and worldwide spread.

  8. Investigation of the prevalence of tetQ, tetX and tetX1 genes in Bacteroides strains with elevated tigecycline minimum inhibitory concentrations.

    PubMed

    Bartha, Noémi Anikó; Sóki, József; Urbán, Edit; Nagy, Elisabeth

    2011-12-01

    In this study, the antibiotic susceptibilities to tigecycline and tetracycline of 35 selected Bacteroides fragilis group strains were determined by Etest, and the presence of tetQ, tetX, tetX1 and ermF genes was investigated by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). tetQ was detected in all 12 B. fragilis group isolates (100%) exhibiting elevated tigecycline minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) (≥ 8 μg/mL) as well as the 8 strains (100%) with a tigecycline MIC of 4 μg/mL, whilst tetX and tetX1 were present in 15% and 75% of these strains, respectively. All of these strains were fully resistant to tetracycline (MIC ≥ 16 μg/mL). On the other hand, amongst the group of strains with tigecycline MICs< 4 μg/mL (15 isolates), tetQ, tetX and tetX1 were found less frequently (73.3%, 13.3% and 46.7%, respectively). All but two strains harbouring the tetQ gene in this group were non-susceptible to tetracycline, with a MIC> 4 μg/mL. These data suggest that in most cases tigecycline overcomes the tetracycline resistance mechanisms frequently observed in Bacteroides strains. However, the presence of tetX and tetX1 genes in some of the strains exhibiting elevated MICs for tigecycline draws attention to the possible development and spread of resistance to this antibiotic agent amongst Bacteroides strains. The common occurrence of ermF, tetX, tetX1 and tetQ genes together predicted the presence of the CTnDOT-like Bacteroides conjugative transposon in this collection of Bacteroides strains. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. and the International Society of Chemotherapy. All rights reserved.

  9. Rhizobium lusitanum sp. nov. a bacterium that nodulates Phaseolus vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Valverde, Angel; Igual, José M; Peix, Alvaro; Cervantes, Emilio; Velázquez, Encarna

    2006-11-01

    The species Phaseolus vulgaris is a promiscuous legume nodulated by several species of the family Rhizobiaceae. During a study of rhizobia nodulating this legume in Portugal, we isolated several strains that nodulate P. vulgaris effectively and also Macroptilium atropurpureum and Leucaena leucocephala, but they form ineffective nodules in Medicago sativa. According to phylogenetic analysis of the 16S rRNA gene sequence, the strains from this study belong to the genus Rhizobium, with Rhizobium rhizogenes and Rhizobium tropici as the closest related species, with 99.9 and 99.2% similarity, respectively, between the type strains of these species and strain P1-7T. The nodD and nifH genes carried by strain P1-7T are phylogenetically related to those of other species nodulating Phaseolus. This strain does not carry virulence genes present in the type strain of R. rhizogenes, ATCC 11325T. Analysis of the recA and atpD genes confirms this phylogenetic arrangement, showing low similarity with respect to those of R. rhizogenes ATCC 11325T (91.9 and 94.1% similarity, respectively) and R. tropici IIB CIAT 899T (90.6% and 91.8% similarity, respectively). The intergenic spacer (ITS) of the strains from this study is phylogenetically divergent from those of R. rhizogenes ATCC 11235T and R. tropici CIAT 899T, with 85.9 and 82.8% similarity, respectively, with respect to strain P1-7T. The tRNA profile and two-primer random amplified polymorphic DNA pattern of strain P1-7T are also different from those of R. rhizogenes ATCC 11235T and R. tropici CIAT 899T. The strains isolated in this study can be also differentiated from R. rhizogenes and R. tropici by several phenotypic characteristics. The results of DNA-DNA hybridization showed means of 28 and 25% similarity between strain P1-7T and R. rhizogenes ATCC 11235T and R. tropici CIAT 899T, respectively. All these data showed that the strains isolated in this study belong to a novel species of the genus Rhizobium, for which we propose

  10. Rhizobium ipomoeae sp. nov., isolated from a water convolvulus field.

    PubMed

    Sheu, Shih-Yi; Chen, Zih-Han; Young, Chiu-Chung; Chen, Wen-Ming

    2016-04-01

    A bacterial strain, designated shin9-1T, was isolated from a water sample taken from a water convolvulus field in Taiwan and characterized using a polyphasic taxonomical approach. Cells of strain shin9-1T were aerobic, Gram-stain-negative, rod-shaped and surrounded by a thick capsule and formed cream-coloured colonies. Growth occurred at 10-45 °C (optimum, 30 °C), with 0-3.0% NaCl (optimum, 0.5%) and at pH 7.0-9.0 (optimum, pH 7.0). Strain shin9-1T did not form nodules on a legume plant, Macroptilium atropurpureum, and the nodulation genes nodA, nodC and the nitrogenase reductase gene nifH were not detected by PCR. Phylogenetic analyses based on 16S rRNA and three housekeeping gene sequences (recA, atpD and rpoB) showed that strain shin9-1T belonged to the genus Rhizobium. Strain shin9-1T had the highest level of 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity with respect to Rhizobium daejeonense L61T (97.6 %). The major fatty acid of strain shin9-1T was C18:1ω7c. The polar lipid profile consisted of phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylcholine, diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylmonomethylethanolamine and several uncharacterized lipids. The DNA G+C content was 58.3 mol%. The DNA-DNA relatedness of strain shin9-1T with respect to recognized species of the genus Rhizobium was less than 70%. Phenotypic characteristics of the novel strain also differed from those of the most closely related species of the genus Rhizobium. On the basis of the phylogenetic inference and phenotypic data, strain shin9-1T should be classified as a representative of a novel species, for which the name Rhizobium ipomoeae sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is shin9-1T (=LMG 27163T=KCTC 32148T).

  11. Rhizobium pseudoryzae sp. nov., isolated from the rhizosphere of rice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaoxia; Sun, Lei; Ma, Xiaotong; Sui, Xin Hua; Jiang, Ruibo

    2011-10-01

    A Gram-stain-negative, aerobic, rod-shaped bacterium, designated strain J3-A127(T), was isolated from the roots of fresh rice plants (Oryza sativa). Cells were non-motile and no flagellum was detected. Comparison of 16S rRNA gene sequences indicated that the strain was phylogenetically related to species of the genus Rhizobium, with closest similarity to Rhizobium oryzae Alt 505(T) (96.4 %). The low levels of 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity (<90 %) found between the gyrB, atpD, recA and glnII gene sequences of strain J3-A127(T) and the type strains of recognized species of the genus Rhizobium also indicated that it represented a separate species. The temperature range for growth was 10-40 °C (optimum around 28 °C) and the pH range was 6.0-11.0 (optimum pH 7.0-8.0). Strain J3-A127(T) tolerated NaCl concentrations up to 5.0 % (w/v). The strain was catalase- and oxidase-positive. The main cellular fatty acids were summed feature 8 (C(18 : 1)ω7c and/or C(18 : 1)ω6; 46.7 %). The DNA G+C content of strain J3-A127(T) was 59.5 mol%. Strain J3-A127(T) did not form any nodules on four different legumes and the nodD and nifH genes were not detected by PCR. According to physiological and biochemical characteristics and genotypic data, strain J3-A127(T) is considered to represent a novel species of the genus Rhizobium, for which the name Rhizobium pseudoryzae sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is J3-A127(T) ( = ACCC 10380(T) = KCTC 23294(T)).

  12. Preliminary Safety Evaluation of a New Bacteroides xylanisolvens Isolate

    PubMed Central

    Toutounian, Kawe; Schmidt, Jens; Karsten, Uwe; Goletz, Steffen

    2012-01-01

    Besides conferring some health benefit to the host, a bacterial strain must present an unambiguous safety status to be considered a probiotic. We here present the preliminary safety evaluation of a new Bacteroides xylanisolvens strain (DSM 23964) isolated from human feces. First results suggest that it may be able to provide probiotic health benefits. Its identity was confirmed by biochemical analysis, by sequencing of its 16S rRNA genes, and by DNA-DNA hybridization. Virulence determinants known to occur in the genus Bacteroides, such the bft enterotoxin and other enzymatic activities involved in the degradation of the extracellular matrix and the capsular polysaccharide PS A, were absent in this strain. The investigation of the antibiotic susceptibility indicated that strain DSM 23964 was sensitive to metronidazole, meropenem agents, and clindamycin. Resistance to penicillin and ampicillin was identified to be conferred by the β-lactamase cepA gene and could therefore be restored by adding β-lactamase inhibitors. The localization of the cepA gene in the genome of strain DSM 23964 and the absence of detectable plasmids further suggest that a transfer of β-lactamase activity or the acquisition of other antibiotic resistances are highly improbable. Taken together, the presented data indicate that the strain B. xylanisolvens DSM 23964 has no virulence potential. Since it also resists the action of gastric enzymes and low-pH conditions, this strain is an interesting candidate for further investigation of its safety and potential health-promoting properties. PMID:22101046

  13. Conservation of nodulation genes between Rhizobium meliloti and a slow-growing Rhizobium strain that nodulates a nonlegume host

    PubMed Central

    Marvel, Deborah J.; Kuldau, Gretchen; Hirsch, Ann; Richards, Eric; Torrey, John G.; Ausubel, Frederick M.

    1985-01-01

    Parasponia, a woody member of the elm family, is the only nonlegume genus whose members are known to form an effective nitrogen-fixing symbiosis with a Rhizobium species. The bacterial strain RP501 is a slow-growing strain of Rhizobium isolated from Parasponia nodules. Strain RP501 also nodulates the legumes siratro (Macroptilium atropurpureum) and cowpea (Vigna unguiculata). Using a cosmid clone bank of RP501 DNA, we isolated a 13.4-kilobase (kb) EcoRI fragment that complemented insertion and point mutations in three contiguous nodulation genes (nodABC) of Rhizobium meliloti, the endosymbiont of alfalfa (Medicago sativa). The complemented R. meliloti nod mutants induced effective nitrogen-fixing nodules on alfalfa seedlings but not on siratro, cowpeas, or Parasponia. The cloned RP501 nodulation locus hybridized to DNA fragments carrying the R. meliloti nodABC genes. A 3-kb cluster of Tn5 insertion mutations on the RP501 13.4-kb EcoRI fragment prevented complementation of R. meliloti nodABC mutations. Images PMID:16593600

  14. Effects of nano-TiO2 on the agronomically-relevant Rhizobium-legume symbiosis

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The impact of nano-TiO2 on Rhizobium-legume symbiosis was studied using garden peas and the compatible bacterial partner Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. viciae 3841. Exposure to nano-TiO2 did not affect the germination of peas grown aseptically, nor did it impact the gross root structure. However, nano-...

  15. Nodulation ability of the common bean genotypes composing the BASE 120 trial after inoculation with Rhizobium

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This study examined the nodulation characteristics of the BASE 120 genotypes in a trial of 118 common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) and two tepary bean (Phaseolus acutifolius) lines. Inoculation with Rhizobium tropici strain CIAT 899 and Rhizobium etli strain CIAT 632 was carried out in a screenhouse...

  16. Effects of nano-ZnO on the agronomically relevant Rhizobium-legume symbiosis

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The impact of nano-ZnO (nZnO) on Rhizobium-legume symbiosis was studied with garden pea and its compatible bacterial partner Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. viciae 3841. Exposure of peas to nZnO had no impact on germination, but significantly affected root length. Chronic exposure of plant to nZnO impac...

  17. Draft Genome Sequence of Rhizobium sp. GHKF11, Isolated from Farmland Soil in Pecan Grove, Texas

    PubMed Central

    Damania, Ashish

    2016-01-01

    Rhizobium sp. GHKF11 is an organophosphate-degrading bacterial strain that was isolated from farmland soil in Pecan Grove, Texas, USA. In addition to a capacity for pesticide degradation, GHKF11 shares conserved traits with other Rhizobium spp., including heavy metal resistance and transport genes that may have significant agricultural biotechnology applications. PMID:27445376

  18. Expression of symbiotic genes of Rhizobium japonicum USDA 191 in other rhizobia.

    PubMed Central

    Appelbaum, E R; McLoughlin, T J; O'Connell, M; Chartrain, N

    1985-01-01

    A 200-megadalton plasmid was mobilized from Rhizobium japonicum USDA 191 to other Rhizobium strains either that cannot nodulate soybeans or that form Fix- nodules on certain cultivars. The symbiotic properties of the transconjugants indicate that both soybean specificity for nodulation and cultivar specificity for nitrogen fixation are plasmid encoded. Images PMID:2989250

  19. 5S ribosomal ribonucleic acid sequences in Bacteroides and Fusobacterium: evolutionary relationships within these genera and among eubacteria in general

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van den Eynde, H.; De Baere, R.; Shah, H. N.; Gharbia, S. E.; Fox, G. E.; Michalik, J.; Van de Peer, Y.; De Wachter, R.

    1989-01-01

    The 5S ribosomal ribonucleic acid (rRNA) sequences were determined for Bacteroides fragilis, Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron, Bacteroides capillosus, Bacteroides veroralis, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Anaerorhabdus furcosus, Fusobacterium nucleatum, Fusobacterium mortiferum, and Fusobacterium varium. A dendrogram constructed by a clustering algorithm from these sequences, which were aligned with all other hitherto known eubacterial 5S rRNA sequences, showed differences as well as similarities with respect to results derived from 16S rRNA analyses. In the 5S rRNA dendrogram, Bacteroides clustered together with Cytophaga and Fusobacterium, as in 16S rRNA analyses. Intraphylum relationships deduced from 5S rRNAs suggested that Bacteroides is specifically related to Cytophaga rather than to Fusobacterium, as was suggested by 16S rRNA analyses. Previous taxonomic considerations concerning the genus Bacteroides, based on biochemical and physiological data, were confirmed by the 5S rRNA sequence analysis.

  20. 5S ribosomal ribonucleic acid sequences in Bacteroides and Fusobacterium: evolutionary relationships within these genera and among eubacteria in general

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van den Eynde, H.; De Baere, R.; Shah, H. N.; Gharbia, S. E.; Fox, G. E.; Michalik, J.; Van de Peer, Y.; De Wachter, R.

    1989-01-01

    The 5S ribosomal ribonucleic acid (rRNA) sequences were determined for Bacteroides fragilis, Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron, Bacteroides capillosus, Bacteroides veroralis, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Anaerorhabdus furcosus, Fusobacterium nucleatum, Fusobacterium mortiferum, and Fusobacterium varium. A dendrogram constructed by a clustering algorithm from these sequences, which were aligned with all other hitherto known eubacterial 5S rRNA sequences, showed differences as well as similarities with respect to results derived from 16S rRNA analyses. In the 5S rRNA dendrogram, Bacteroides clustered together with Cytophaga and Fusobacterium, as in 16S rRNA analyses. Intraphylum relationships deduced from 5S rRNAs suggested that Bacteroides is specifically related to Cytophaga rather than to Fusobacterium, as was suggested by 16S rRNA analyses. Previous taxonomic considerations concerning the genus Bacteroides, based on biochemical and physiological data, were confirmed by the 5S rRNA sequence analysis.

  1. Peribacteroid space acidification: a marker of mature bacteroid functioning in Medicago truncatula nodules.

    PubMed

    Pierre, Olivier; Engler, Gilbert; Hopkins, Julie; Brau, Frédéric; Boncompagni, Eric; Hérouart, Didier

    2013-11-01

    Legumes form a symbiotic interaction with Rhizobiaceae bacteria, which differentiate into nitrogen-fixing bacteroids within nodules. Here, we investigated in vivo the pH of the peribacteroid space (PBS) surrounding the bacteroid and pH variation throughout symbiosis. In vivo confocal microscopy investigations, using acidotropic probes, demonstrated the acidic state of the PBS. In planta analysis of nodule senescence induced by distinct biological processes drastically increased PBS pH in the N2 -fixing zone (zone III). Therefore, the PBS acidification observed in mature bacteroids can be considered as a marker of bacteroid N2 fixation. Using a pH-sensitive ratiometric probe, PBS pH was measured in vivo during the whole symbiotic process. We showed a progressive acidification of the PBS from the bacteroid release up to the onset of N2 fixation. Genetic and pharmacological approaches were conducted and led to disruption of the PBS acidification. Altogether, our findings shed light on the role of PBS pH of mature bacteroids in nodule functioning, providing new tools to monitor in vivo bacteroid physiology.

  2. Metronidazole and spiramycin therapy of mixed Bacteroides spp. and Neisseria gonorrhoeae infection in mice.

    PubMed

    Brook, I

    1989-01-01

    The in vitro and in vivo activity of metronidazole and spiramycin, used singly or in combination, was tested in the eradication of infection caused by Bacteroides spp. and Neisseria gonorrhoeae alone or in combination. The in vitro tests consisted of determinations of the minimal inhibitory concentrations (MIC), carried out with or without the addition of a constant amount of the other antimicrobials. The MIC of both Bacteroides bivius and Bacteroides fragilis for metronidazole were significantly reduced by the addition of spiramycin (from 0.5 to 0.125 micrograms/ml). The in vivo tests were carried out in mice and consisted of measurements of the effects of the antimicrobial agents on the bacterial contents of abscesses induced by subcutaneous injection of bacterial suspension. Synergism between metronidazole and spiramycin was noted against Bacteroides spp. in abscesses caused by either Bacteroides spp. alone, or in combination with N. gonorrhoeae. Furthermore, an additional reduction in the number of N gonorrhoeae was noted in mixed infection with Bacteroides that was treated with metronidazole alone. This study demonstrates the in vitro and in vivo efficacy of the combination of metronidazole and spiramycin in the treatment of infections caused by either Bacteroides spp. alone or in combination with N. gonorrhoeae.

  3. A Phase-Variable Surface Layer from the Gut Symbiont Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron.

    PubMed

    Taketani, Mao; Donia, Mohamed S; Jacobson, Amy N; Lambris, John D; Fischbach, Michael A

    2015-09-29

    The capsule from Bacteroides, a common gut symbiont, has long been a model system for studying the molecular mechanisms of host-symbiont interactions. The Bacteroides capsule is thought to consist of an array of phase-variable polysaccharides that give rise to subpopulations with distinct cell surface structures. Here, we report the serendipitous discovery of a previously unknown surface structure in Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron: a surface layer composed of a protein of unknown function, BT1927. BT1927, which is expressed in a phase-variable manner by ~1:1,000 cells in a wild-type culture, forms a hexagonally tessellated surface layer. The BT1927-expressing subpopulation is profoundly resistant to complement-mediated killing, due in part to the BT1927-mediated blockade of C3b deposition. Our results show that the Bacteroides surface structure is capable of a far greater degree of structural variation than previously known, and they suggest that structural variation within a Bacteroides species is important for productive gut colonization. Many bacterial species elaborate a capsule, a structure that resides outside the cell wall and mediates microbe-microbe and microbe-host interactions. Species of Bacteroides, the most abundant genus in the human gut, produce a capsule that consists of an array of polysaccharides, some of which are known to mediate interactions with the host immune system. Here, we report the discovery of a previously unknown surface structure in Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron. We show that this protein-based structure is expressed by a subset of cells in a population and protects Bacteroides from killing by complement, a component of the innate immune system. This novel surface layer protein is conserved across many species of the genus Bacteroides, suggesting an important role in colonization and host immune modulation. Copyright © 2015 Taketani et al.

  4. Carbohydrate, Organic Acid, and Amino Acid Composition of Bacteroids and Cytosol from Soybean Nodules 1

    PubMed Central

    Streeter, John G.

    1987-01-01

    Metabolites in Bradyrhizobium japonicum bacteroids and in Glycine max (L.) Merr. cytosol from root nodules were analyzed using an isolation technique which makes it possible to estimate and correct for changes in concentration which may occur during bacteroid isolation. Bacteroid and cytosol extracts were fractionated on ion-exchange columns and were analyzed for carbohydrate composition using gas-liquid chromatography and for organic acid and amino acid composition using high performance liquid chromatography. Analysis of organic acids in plant tissues as the phenacyl derivatives is reported for the first time and this approach revealed the presence of several unknown organic acids in nodules. The time required for separation of bacteroids and cytosol was varied, and significant change in concentration of individual compounds during the separation of the two fractions was estimated by calculating the regression of concentration on time. When a statistically significant slope was found, the true concentration was estimated by extrapolating the regression line to time zero. Of 78 concentration estimates made, there was a statistically significant (5% level) change in concentration during sample preparation for only five metabolites: glucose, sucrose, and succinate in the cytosol and d-pinitol and serine in bacteroids. On a mass basis, the major compounds in bacteroids were (descending order of concentration): myo-inositol, d-chiro-inositol, α,α-trehalose, sucrose, aspartate, glutamate, d-pinitol, arginine, malonate, and glucose. On a proportional basis (concentration in bacteroid as percent of concentration in bacteroid + cytosol fractions), the major compounds were: α-aminoadipate (94), trehalose (66), lysine (58), and arginine (46). The results indicate that metabolite concentrations in bacteroids can be reliably determined. PMID:16665774

  5. Identification of a gene linked to Rhizobium meliloti ntrA whose product is homologous to a family to ATP-binding proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Albright, L M; Ronson, C W; Nixon, B T; Ausubel, F M

    1989-01-01

    The ntrA gene of Rhizobium meliloti has recently been identified and shown to be required for a diverse set of metabolic functions (C. W. Ronson, B. T. Nixon, L. M. Albright, and F. M. Ausubel, J. Bacteriol. 169:2424-2431, 1987). As a result of sequencing the ntrA gene and its flanking regions from R. meliloti, we identified an open reading frame directly upstream of ntrA, ORF1, whose predicted product is homologous to a superfamily of ATP-binding proteins involved in transport, cell division, nodulation, and DNA repair. The homology of ORF1 to this superfamily and its proximity to ntrA led us to investigate its role in symbiosis by mutagenesis and expression studies. We were unable to isolate an insertion mutation in ORF1, suggesting that ORF1 may code for an essential function. We identified the start of transcription for the ntrA gene in vegetative cells and bacteroids and showed that ORF1 and ntrA are transcriptionally unlinked. ORF1 appears to be in an operon with one or more upstream genes. Images PMID:2703463

  6. Functional characterization of aroA from Rhizobium leguminosarum with significant glyphosate tolerance in transgenic Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Han, Jing; Tian, Yong-Sheng; Xu, Jing; Wang, Li-Juan; Wang, Bo; Peng, Ri-He; Yao, Quan-Hong

    2014-09-01

    Glyphosate is the active component of the top-selling herbicide, the phytotoxicity of which is due to its inhibition of the shikimic acid pathway. 5-Enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase (EPSPS) is a key enzyme in the shikimic acid pathway. Glyphosate tolerance in plants can be achieved by the expression of a glyphosate-insensitive aroA gene (EPSPS). In this study, we used a PCR-based two-step DNA synthesis method to synthesize a new aroA gene (aroAR. leguminosarum) from Rhizobium leguminosarum. In vitro glyphosate sensitivity assays showed that aroAR. leguminosarum is glyphosate tolerant. The new gene was then expressed in E. coli and key kinetic values of the purified enzyme were determined. Furthermore, we transformed the aroA gene into Arabidopsis thaliana by the floral dip method. Transgenic Arabidopsis with the aroAR. leguminosarum gene was obtained to prove its potential use in developing glyphosate-resistant crops.

  7. Antibacterial action of natural honey on anaerobic bacteroides.

    PubMed

    Elbagoury, E F; Rasmy, S

    1993-01-01

    Two samples of natural Honey were tested for their antibacterial effect on Bacteroides, mainly the pathogenic black pigmented B. melaninogenicus isolated from ten cases of dental infections (dental abscesses and chronic osteomyelitis). These organisms were subjected to the effect of natural and diluted honey (50%), in broth and solid cultures. The results were compared with those of the same organisms incubated with saturated glucose solution, which showed less inhibition, indicating that the inhibitory effect of honey was not due to its high sugar content nor to its acidic PH, when using Schaedler's broth adjusted to the same PH as control. The local therapeutic value of natural honey was illustrated with an attempt to correlate between the microbial findings and the clinical implications.

  8. Characterization of black-pigmented Bacteroides strains isolated from animals.

    PubMed

    Laliberté, M; Mayrand, D

    1983-10-01

    The aims of the study were: the isolation of strains of black-pigmented Bacteroides from the gingival sulcus of different animals, their biochemical and immunological characterization and comparison of their properties for classification within the genus. A total of 104 strains, isolated from cats, dogs, racoons and a jaguar, were characterized on the basis of fermentation of carbohydrates, metabolic end products, haemagglutination studies, enzymatic activities, catalase production and indirect immunofluorescence. No differences were observed between the strains regardless of their animal origin. The strains did not ferment carbohydrates, produce phenylacetic acid, show an array of enzyme activities or agglutinate sheep red blood cells. They were catalase-positive and so differed from the human oral strains of Bact. gingivalis. Immunofluorescence microscopy revealed that the animal strains shared at least one major antigen with Bact. gingivalis but none with Bact. asaccharolyticus. Apart from their catalase activity, the animal strains isolated were similar to those of human Bact. gingivalis strains.

  9. Persistence of Bacteroides ovatus under simulated sunlight irradiation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Bacteroides ovatus, a member of the genus Bacteroides, is considered for use in molecular-based methods as a general fecal indicator. However, knowledge on its fate and persistence after a fecal contamination event remains limited. In this study, the persistence of B. ovatus was evaluated under simulated sunlight exposure and in conditions similar to freshwater and seawater. By combining propidium monoazide (PMA) treatment and quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) detection, the decay rates of B. ovatus were determined in the presence and absence of exogenous photosensitizers and in salinity up to 39.5 parts per thousand at 27°C. Results UVB was found to be important for B. ovatus decay, averaging a 4 log10 of decay over 6 h of exposure without the presence of extracellular photosensitizers. The addition of NaNO2, an exogenous sensitizer producing hydroxyl radicals, did not significantly change the decay rate of B. ovatus in both low and high salinity water, while the exogenous sensitizer algae organic matter (AOM) slowed down the decay of B. ovatus in low salinity water. At seawater salinity, the decay rate of B. ovatus was slower than that in low salinity water, except when both NaNO2 and AOM were present. Conclusion The results of laboratory experiments suggest that if B. ovatus is released into either freshwater or seawater environment in the evening, 50% of it may be intact by the next morning; if it is released at noon, only 50% may be intact after a mere 5 min of full spectrum irradiation on a clear day. This study provides a mechanistic understanding to some of the important environmental relevant factors that influenced the inactivation kinetics of B. ovatus in the presence of sunlight irradiation, and would facilitate the use of B. ovatus to indicate the occurrence of fecal contamination. PMID:24993443

  10. Specificity of immunoglobulin M antibodies in normal human serum that participate in opsonophagocytosis and intracellular killing of Bacteroides fragilis and Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron by by human polymorphonuclear leukocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Bjornson, A B; Bjornson, H S; Kitko, B P

    1980-01-01

    Studies were performed to determine the specificity of immunoglobulin M (IgM) antibodies in normal human serum that participate in opsonophagocytosis and intracellular killing of Bacteroides fragilis 1365 and Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron 1343 by human polymorphonuclear leukocytes. Purified normal human IgM was adsorbed with washed heat-killed cells of the homologous strains and heterologous strains of B. fragilis, B. thetaiotaomicron, Bacteroides vulgatus, Bacteroides distasonis, and Bacteroides asaccharolyticus and with erythrocytes coated with outer membrane complex prepared from the homologous strains. Hypogammaglobulinemic serum was supplemented with the adsorbed IgM preparations, and the ability of the supplemented sera to support opsonophagocytosis and killing of B. fragilis 1365 and B. thetaiotaomicron 1343 by human polymorphonuclear leukocytes was measured in vitro under anaerobic conditions. Normal IgM adsorbed with heat-killed cells of B. fragilis 1365 and B. thetaiotaomicron 1343 or with erythrocytes coated with outer membrane complex prepared from these strains failed to restore the ability of hypogammaglobulinemic serum to support opsonophagocytosis and intracellular killing of the homologous strain. In contrast, adsorption of normal IgM with heat-killed cells of the heterologous strains did not alter its opsonophagocytosis-promoting activity for either test strain. These results indicated that the IgM antibodies in normal human serum that participate in opsonophagocytosis and intracellular killing of B. fragilis 1365 and B. thetaiotaomicron 1343 are directed against strain-specific antigenic determinants contained in the outer membrane complex. Images Fig. 5 Fig. 6 PMID:6160104

  11. Genetic snapshots of the Rhizobium species NGR234 genome

    PubMed Central

    Viprey, Virginie; Rosenthal, André; Broughton, William J; Perret, Xavier

    2000-01-01

    Background: In nitrate-poor soils, many leguminous plants form nitrogen-fixing symbioses with members of the bacterial family Rhizobiaceae. We selected Rhizobium sp. NGR234 for its exceptionally broad host range, which includes more than I 12 genera of legumes. Unlike the genome of Bradyrhizobium japonicum, which is composed of a single 8.7 Mb chromosome, that of NGR234 is partitioned into three replicons: a chromosome of about 3.5 Mb, a megaplasmid of more than 2 Mb (pNGR234b) and pNGR234a, a 536,165 bp plasmid that carries most of the genes required for symbioses with legumes. Symbiotic loci represent only a small portion of all the genes coded by rhizobial genomes, however. To rapidly characterize the two largest replicons of NGR234, the genome of strain ANU265 (a derivative strain cured of pNGR234a) was analyzed by shotgun sequencing. Results: Homology searches of public databases with 2,275 random sequences of strain ANU265 resulted in the identification of 1,130 putative protein-coding sequences, of which 922 (41%) could be classified into functional groups. In contrast to the 18% of insertion-like sequences (ISs) found on the symbiotic plasmid pNGR234a, only 2.2% of the shotgun sequences represent known ISs, suggesting that pNGR234a is enriched in such elements. Hybridization data also indicate that the density of known transposable elements is higher in pNGR234b (the megaplasmid) than on the chromosome. Rhizobium-specific intergenic mosaic elements (RIMEs) were found in 35 shotgun sequences, 6 of which carry RIME2 repeats previously thought to be present only in Rhizobium meliloti. As non-overlapping shotgun sequences together represent approximately 10% of ANU265 genome, the chromosome and megaplasmid may carry a total of over 200 RIMEs. Conclusions: 'Skimming' the genome of Rhizobium sp. NGR234 sheds new light on the fine structure and evolution of its replicons, as well as on the integration of symbiotic functions in the genome of a soil bacterium

  12. Method for Testing Degree of Infectivity of Rhizobium meliloti Strains

    PubMed Central

    Olivares, José; Casadesús, Josep; Bedmar, Eulogio J.

    1980-01-01

    The infectiveness of different strains of Rhizobium meliloti was tested with a technique that uses the addition of tetracycline to the root medium. To stop the infection, the antibiotic was added some time after the inoculation of Medicago sativa plants. A coefficient of infectivity for each strain was calculated according to the number of nodules that appeared with and without the addition of the antibiotic. This method seems useful in infectivity studies and is simpler and easier to perform than the test of competence between strains. PMID:16345574

  13. Effect of Salinity on Rhizobium Growth and Survival †

    PubMed Central

    Singleton, P. W.; El Swaify, S. A.; Bohlool, B. B.

    1982-01-01

    This study examines the effect of salinity on the growth and survival of Rhizobium spp. in culture media and soil. Eleven isolates from saline and nonsaline environments were compared. The growth (mean doubling time) of all strains and species tested decreased when the electrical conductivity of the culture medium (yeast extract-mannitol) was raised from 1.2 mS cm−1 to 6.7 mS cm−1 (15% seawater equivalent) or to 13.1 mS cm−1 (28% seawater equivalent). Three of eleven strains failed to grow at 13.1 mS cm−1. Although growth was affected by salinity, four strains selected from the growth rate study could survive in extremely high concentrations of salt. Two strains with growth rates sensitive to salt and two strains with growth rates relatively unaffected by salt were inoculated into solutions with electrical conductivities of up to 43.0 mS cm−1 (92% seawater equivalent). Not only did all four strains survive the initial osmotic shock (at 5 h after inoculation), but it was not until 27 days after inoculation that the sensitive strains exhibited a significant reduction in viable numbers. The salt-tolerant strains survived for more than 65 days with no reduction in viable counts. The interaction between soil moisture tension and soil salinity in relation to Rhizobium survival in gamma-irradiated soil was also examined. Six treatment combinations were used, ranging from −0.1 bars and 0.2 mS cm−1 to −15 bars and 12 mS cm−1. Sensitive strains declined from 107 to 105 organisms per g of soil after 84 days of incubation at −15 bars and 12 mS cm−1. Tolerant strains survived for the same period with no loss in viable numbers. The results of these experiments indicate that many strains of Rhizobium can grow and survive at salt concentrations which are inhibitory to most agricultural legumes. The emphasis of research concerning the effects of salinity on symbiotic nitrogen fixation should, therefore, be directed to aspects of the symbiosis other than the

  14. Method for Testing Degree of Infectivity of Rhizobium meliloti Strains.

    PubMed

    Olivares, J; Casadesús, J; Bedmar, E J

    1980-05-01

    The infectiveness of different strains of Rhizobium meliloti was tested with a technique that uses the addition of tetracycline to the root medium. To stop the infection, the antibiotic was added some time after the inoculation of Medicago sativa plants. A coefficient of infectivity for each strain was calculated according to the number of nodules that appeared with and without the addition of the antibiotic. This method seems useful in infectivity studies and is simpler and easier to perform than the test of competence between strains.

  15. Phenotypic and genotypic characterization of multidrug-resistant Bacteroides, Parabacteroides spp., and Pseudoflavonifractor from a Costa Rican hospital.

    PubMed

    Molina, José; Barrantes, Gloriana; Quesada-Gómez, Carlos; Rodríguez, César; Rodríguez-Cavallini, Evelyn

    2014-10-01

    Multidrug resistance in Bacteroides spp. and related genera is uncommon and has not been described in Latin America until now. We studied phenotypically and genotypically the multidrug resistance of 10 clinical strains of Bacteroides, two of Parabacteroides distasonis, and one of Pseudoflavonifractor capillosus recovered in a national hospital between 2006 and 2010. To this end, we determined minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of amoxicillin, amoxicillin-clavulanic acid, cefotaxime, imipenem, clindamycin, ciprofloxacin, tetracycline, and metronidazole using E-tests, evaluated the isolates for β-lactamases with nitrocefin hydrolysis tests, performed a polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based screening of erm, tet, and nim genes, obtained partial gyrA sequences, and studied the effect of tazobactam and efflux pump inhibitors (EPI) on the MIC of cefotaxime, clindamycin, and ciprofloxacin. Three isolates were resistant to four different classes of antibiotics and 10 were resistant to three. β-lactam resistance was in most cases due to β-lactamases susceptible of partial inhibition by tazobactam. Ten isolates were cfxA-positive and two isolates had cepA. Twelve isolates were highly resistant to clindamycin and nine were highly resistant to ciprofloxacin. However, these phenotypes were not linked to ermA, ermB, ermF, and ermG or mutations in gyrA. Addition of EPI lowered the MICs of clindamycin and ciprofloxacin of one and four isolates, respectively. Twelve isolates had tetQ and four were positive for tetM. In both cases, genes of the two-component system RteAB accompanied tet genes. Although metronidazole susceptibility was universal, nim genes were not present. To our knowledge, this is the first report of multidrug resistance due to less commonly identified or alternative mechanisms in strains of Bacteroides and related species from a developing country.

  16. Rhizobium pakistanensis sp. nov., isolated from groundnut (Arachis hypogaea) nodules grown in rainfed Pothwar, Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Khalid, Rabia; Zhang, Yu Jing; Ali, Safdar; Sui, Xin Hua; Zhang, Xiao Xia; Amara, Ummay; Chen, Wen Xin; Hayat, Rifat

    2015-01-01

    A Gram-negative, white, non-motile, rod shaped bacterial strain BN-19(T) was isolated from a root nodule of groundnut (Arachis hypogaea) in Pakistan. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequence revealed that strain BN-19(T) formed a subclade in the genus Rhizobium together with Rhizobium alkalisoli CCBAU 01393(T), Rhizobium vignae CCBAU 05176(T), Rhizobium huautlense SO2(T) and Rhizobium tarimense PL-41(T) with sequence similarities of 97.5, 97.3, 97.2 and 97.1 % respectively. Sequence analysis of housekeeping genes atpD, glnII and recA (with sequence similarities of ≤92 %) confirmed the unique position of BN-19(T) in the genus Rhizobium. DNA-DNA relatedness between the strain BN-19(T) and R. alkalisoli CCBAU 01393(T), R. vignae CCBAU 05176(T), R. huautlense SO2(T) and R. tarimense PL-41(T) were 20.6, 22.5, 15.9 and 20.5 % respectively, further confirming that BN-19(T) represents a novel species in the genus Rhizobium. The DNA G + C content was 60.1 mol%. The dominant fatty acids of strain BN-19(T) were C19:0 cyclo ω8c, summed feature 2 (C14:0 3OH and/or C16:1 iso I) and summed feature 8 (C18:1 ω7c). Some phenotypic features also differentiate the strain BN-19(T) from the related species. On the basis of these results, strain BN-19(T) is considered to represent a novel species in the genus Rhizobium, for which the name Rhizobium pakistanensis sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is BN-19(T) (=LMG 27895(T) = CCBAU 101086(T)).

  17. Non-contiguous finished genome sequence of Bacteroides coprosuis type strain (PC 139T)

    SciTech Connect

    Land, Miriam L; Held, Brittany; Gronow, Sabine; Abt, Birte; Lucas, Susan; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Nolan, Matt; Tice, Hope; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Pitluck, Sam; Liolios, Konstantinos; Pagani, Ioanna; Ivanova, N; Mavromatis, K; Pati, Amrita; Tapia, Roxanne; Han, Cliff; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Hauser, Loren John; Brambilla, Evelyne-Marie; Rohde, Manfred; Goker, Markus; Detter, J. Chris; Woyke, Tanja; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Lapidus, Alla L.

    2011-01-01

    Bacteroides coprosuis Whitehead et al. 2005 belongs to the genus Bacteroides, which is a member of the family Bacteroidaceae. Members of the genus Bacteroides in general are known as beneficial protectors of animal guts against pathogenic microorganisms, and as contributors to the degradation of complex molecules such as polysaccharides. B. coprosuis itself was isolated from a manure storage pit of a swine facility, but has not yet been found in an animal host. The species is of interest solely because of its isolated phylogenetic location. The genome of B. coprosuis is already the 5th sequenced type strain genome from the genus Bacteroides. The 2,991,798 bp long genome with its 2,461 protein-coding and 78 RNA genes and is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  18. Non-contiguous finished genome sequence of Bacteroides coprosuis type strain (PC139T)

    PubMed Central

    Land, Miriam; Held, Brittany; Gronow, Sabine; Abt, Birte; Lucas, Susan; Del Rio, Tijana Glavina; Nolan, Matt; Tice, Hope; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Pitluck, Sam; Liolios, Konstantinos; Pagani, Ioanna; Ivanova, Natalia; Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Mikhailova, Natalia; Pati, Amrita; Tapia, Roxane; Han, Cliff; Goodwin, Lynne; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Hauser, Loren; Brambilla, Evelyne-Marie; Rohde, Manfred; Göker, Markus; Detter, John C.; Woyke, Tanja; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan A.; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Lapidus, Alla

    2011-01-01

    Bacteroides coprosuis Whitehead et al. 2005 belongs to the genus Bacteroides, which is a member of the family Bacteroidaceae. Members of the genus Bacteroides in general are known as beneficial protectors of animal guts against pathogenic microorganisms, and as contributors to the degradation of complex molecules such as polysaccharides. B. coprosuis itself was isolated from a manure storage pit of a swine facility, but has not yet been found in an animal host. The species is of interest solely because of its isolated phylogenetic location. The genome of B. coprosuis is already the 5th sequenced type strain genome from the genus Bacteroides. The 2,991,798 bp long genome with its 2,461 protein-coding and 78 RNA genes and is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project. PMID:21677860

  19. NolL of Rhizobium sp. Strain NGR234 Is Required for O-Acetyltransferase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Berck, S.; Perret, X.; Quesada-Vincens, D.; Promé, J.-C.; Broughton, W. J.; Jabbouri, S.

    1999-01-01

    Following (iso)flavonoid induction, nodulation genes of the symbiotic nitrogen-fixing bacterium Rhizobium sp. strain NGR234 elaborate a large family of lipooligosaccharidic Nod factors (NodNGR factors). When secreted into the rhizosphere of compatible legumes, these signal molecules initiate root hair deformation and nodule development. The nonreducing glucosamine residue of NodNGR factors are N acylated, N methylated, and mono- or biscarbamoylated, while position C-6 of the reducing extremity is fucosylated. This fucose residue is normally 2-O methylated and either sulfated or acetylated. Here we present an analysis of all acetylated NodNGR factors, which clearly shows that the acetate group may occupy position C-3 or C-4 of the fucose moiety. Disruption of the flavonoid-inducible nolL gene, which is preceded by a nod box, results in the synthesis of NodNGR factors that lack the 3-O- or 4-O-acetate groups. Interestingly, the nodulation capacity of the mutant NGRΩnolL is not impaired, whereas introduction of the nod box::nolL construct into the related strain Rhizobium fredii USDA257 extends the host range of this bacterium to Calopogonium caeruleum, Leucaena leucocephala, and Lotus halophilus. Nod factors produced by a USDA257(pnolL) transconjugant were also acetylated. The nod box::nolL construct was also introduced into ANU265 (NGR234 cured of its symbiotic plasmid), along with extra copies of the nodD1 gene. When permeabilized, these cells possessed acetyltransferase activity, although crude extracts did not. PMID:9922261

  20. Studies on glucose-metabolizing enzymes in cytosolic and bacteroidal fractions of mungbean (Vigna radiata L.) and lentil (Lens culinaris L.) nodules.

    PubMed

    Munjral, N; Gupta, A K; Kaur, N

    2007-06-01

    Nitrogen is exported in the form of ureides or amides from the nodules in pulse crops. In order to understand the carbon metabolism in ureide and amide exporting nodules, activities of enzymes involved in glucose metabolism were compared in cytosolic and bacteroidal fractions of mungbean (ureide exporter) and lentil (amide exporter) nodules during development. Activities of hexokinase, fructokinase, phosphoglucomutase, fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase, phosphohexose isomerase and UDP-glucose pyrophosphorylase were detected in cytosolic fraction of nodules of both the crops during development. Out of these enzymes, specific activity of phosphohexose isomerase was the highest in nodules of both the crops, in comparison with other enzymes. In comparison with mungbean, activities of various enzymes were less in cytosolic fraction of lentil. Activities of hexokinase, fructokinase, phosphoglucomutase were present only in cytosolic fraction of mungbean (Vigna radiata L.), however, low activity of these enzymes was also observed in lentil (Lens culinaris L.) bacteroids. Activities of phosphohexose isomerase and fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase were higher in bacteroids of lentil, as compared to mungbean during early nodule development, but this pattern was reversed with progress of crop development. Higher activities of phosphoglucomutase and fructose-1,6-phosphatase in mungbean cytosolic fraction could lead to increased flow of carbon towards pentose phosphate pathway.

  1. [Preliminary study on bacteroides as the potential fecal contamination indicator bacteria].

    PubMed

    Yang, Jing-yan; Chen, Zhi-jin; Ding, Xiao-bei; Huang, Wei; Yang, Rui-jia; Pei, Xiao-fang

    2011-03-01

    To explore the possibility of Bacteroides spp. as fecal contamination indicator bacteria with real-time quantitative PCR (RT-PCR) assay through analyzing the correlation between Bacteroides spp. and coliform group in external environment. Quantity of coliform group and Bacteroides in water samples were detected by most-probable-number method (MPN) and RT-PCR, respectively, and their detection correlation was evaluated with linear correlation analysis. Both methods were also applied to detect the contaminated time limits and river water samples collected at four sampling sites in three different times. Seventy two hours were needed for the numeration of coliform group with MPN method, while RT-PCR could detect Bacteroides within 3 hours. The contaminated time limit of indoor and outdoor water samples of coliform group was more than 40 days and 9 days, and Bacteroides 13 days and 5 days, respectively. Also, the positive correlation between the quantity of Bacteroides and coliform group in outdoor water samples was obtained, the quantity of Bacteroides was from 8.3 × 10(6) copies/ml to less than 10(4) copies/ml during the first day to the fifth day, while coliform group was 4.3 × 10(6) MPN/100 ml to 2.4 × 10(3) MPN/100 ml. A 100% coincidence rate of the detection results with both methods was also observed. These results indicated that the detection results of both methods had perfect consistency. Bacteroides spp. can be potentially used as fecal contamination indicator bacteria with RT-PCR rapid detection.

  2. Bacteroides Fragilis OmpA: Utility as a Live Vaccine Vector for Biodefense Agents

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-01-01

    AD_________________ Award Number: W81XWH-05-1-0145 TITLE: Bacteroides fragilis OmpA: Utility...29 DEC 2007 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Bacteroides fragilis OmpA: Utility as a live vaccine vector for Biodefense Agents 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b...negative anaerobe that normally resides in the gut . There are four homologs for ompA in the genome. The purpose of this study was to construct a B. fragilis

  3. Bacteroides Fragilis OMP A: Utility as a Live Vaccine Vector for Biodefense Agents

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-01-01

    AD_________________ Award Number: W81XWH-05-1-0145 TITLE: Bacteroides Fragilis OMP A: Utility... Bacteroides Fragilis OMP A: Utility as a Live Vaccine Vector for Biodefense Agents 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-05-1-0145 5c...the gut . There are four homologs for ompA in the genome. The purpose of this study was to construct a B. fragilisompA deletant and to begin to

  4. Bacteroides Fragilis OMP A: Utility as a Live Vaccine Vector for Biodefense Agents

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-01-01

    1-0145 TITLE: Bacteroides Fragilis OMP A: Utility as a Live Vaccine Vector for Biodefense Agents...From - To) 30 DEC 2004 - 29 DEC 2005 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Bacteroides Fragilis OMP A: Utility as a Live Vaccine Vector for Biodefense Agents 5a...negative anaerobe that normally resides in the gut . There are four homologs for ompA in the genome. The purpose of this study was to construct a B

  5. Biodegradation of phenanthrene by Rhizobium petrolearium SL-1.

    PubMed

    Huang, X; Shi, J; Cui, C; Yin, H; Zhang, R; Ma, X; Zhang, X

    2016-12-01

    We aimed to investigate the phenanthrene degradation characteristics and possible phenanthrene degradation pathways of Rhizobium petrolearium SL-1. Using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), UV-visible and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis, the phenanthrene-degrading properties and metabolites of Rh. petrolearium SL-1 were analysed, and then combined with genome-based analysis to elucidate the possible biodegradation pathway of phenanthrene in Rh. petrolearium SL-1. The results of the analyses showed that phenanthrene (100 mg l(-1) ) was completely degraded by strain SL-1 at 35°C, 0·02% salinity and pH 9·0 within 3 days. A wide range of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, including naphthalene, fluorene, anthracene and pyrene, could also be degraded by this strain. Based on the identified metabolites, the utilization of probable intermediates and the presence of putative phenanthrene catabolic genes, we concluded that phenanthrene was degraded via two different routes, namely the 'naphthalene' and the 'phthalic acid' routes. For the first time, this study shows the degradation pathway of phenanthrene by a Rhizobium strain. Because of its excellent stress resistance, metabolic versatility, high degradation efficiency and potential application in phytoremediation, Rh. petrolearium SL-1 is a potential candidate for the bioremediation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons-contaminated areas. © 2016 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  6. Dynamics of genome architecture in Rhizobium sp. strain NGR234.

    PubMed

    Mavingui, Patrick; Flores, Margarita; Guo, Xianwu; Dávila, Guillermo; Perret, Xavier; Broughton, William J; Palacios, Rafael

    2002-01-01

    Bacterial genomes are usually partitioned in several replicons, which are dynamic structures prone to mutation and genomic rearrangements, thus contributing to genome evolution. Nevertheless, much remains to be learned about the origins and dynamics of the formation of bacterial alternative genomic states and their possible biological consequences. To address these issues, we have studied the dynamics of the genome architecture in Rhizobium sp. strain NGR234 and analyzed its biological significance. NGR234 genome consists of three replicons: the symbiotic plasmid pNGR234a (536,165 bp), the megaplasmid pNGR234b (>2,000 kb), and the chromosome (>3,700 kb). Here we report that genome analyses of cell siblings showed the occurrence of large-scale DNA rearrangements consisting of cointegrations and excisions between the three replicons. As a result, four new genomic architectures have emerged. Three consisted of the cointegrates between two replicons: chromosome-pNGR234a, chromosome-pNGR234b, and pNGR234a-pNGR234b. The other consisted of a cointegrate of the three replicons (chromosome-pNGR234a-pNGR234b). Cointegration and excision of pNGR234a with either the chromosome or pNGR234b were studied and found to proceed via a Campbell-type mechanism, mediated by insertion sequence elements. We provide evidence showing that changes in the genome architecture did not alter the growth and symbiotic proficiency of Rhizobium derivatives.

  7. Bacteroides mobilizable and conjugative genetic elements: antibiotic resistance among clinical isolates.

    PubMed

    Quesada-Gómez, Carlos

    2011-12-01

    The conjugation is one of the most important mechanisms of horizontal gene transfer in prokaryotes, leading to genetic variation within a species and the acquisition of new traits, such as antibiotic resistance. Bacteroides is an obligate anaerobe of the colon and a significant opportunistic pathogen. Antibiotic resistance among Bacteroides spp. is rapidly increasing, largely due to the dissemination of DNA transfer factors (plasmids and transposons) harbored by members of this genus. Transfer factors can be divided into two classes, conjugative and mobilizable. Species of the intestinal Bacteroides have yielded different resistance plasmids, all of which have been intensely studied, the plasmids encode high-level MLS resistance conferred by a conserved erm gene. It has been reported an interesting observation associated with the transfer of several of these types of elements, all of which conferred Tcr and displayed greatly increased transfer efficiency following exposure to tetracycline. Many of the conjugative transposons (CTns) in Bacteroides are related to various genetic elements (such as CTnDOT, CTnERL, NBU and others). CTnDOT carries a tetracycline resistance gene, tetQ, and an erythromycin resistance gene, ermF. Resistance to drugs used to treat Bacteroides infections, such as clindamycin, has also been increasing. These conjugal elements have been found in Bacteroides clinical isolates. Thus, horizontal gene transfer could conceivably have played a role in the rising incidence of resistance in this bacterial group.

  8. Evidence for free-living Bacteroides in Cladophora along the shores of the Great Lakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Whitman, Richard L.; Byappanahalli, Muruleedhara; Spoljaric, Ashley; Przybyla-Kelly, Katarzyna; Shively, Dawn A.; Nevers, Meredith

    2014-01-01

    Bacteroides is assumed to be restricted to the alimentary canal of animals and humans and is considered to be non-viable in ambient environments. We hypothesized that Bacteroides could persist and replicate within beach-stranded Cladophora glomerata mats in southern Lake Michigan, USA. Mean Bacteroides concentration (per GenBac3 Taqman quantitative PCR assay) during summer 2012 at Jeorse Park Beach was 5.2 log calibrator cell equivalents (CCE) g-1 dry weight (dw), ranging from 3.7 to 6.7. We monitored a single beach-stranded mat for 3 wk; bacterial concentrations increased by 1.6 log CCE g-1 dw and correlated significantly with ambient temperature (p = 0.003). Clonal growth was evident, as observed by >99% nucleotide sequence similarity among clones. In in vitro studies, Bacteroides concentrations increased by 5.5 log CCE g-1 after 7 d (27°C) in fresh Cladophora collected from rocks. Partial sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene of 36 clones from the incubation experiment showed highly similar genotypes (≥97% sequence overlap). The closest enteric Bacteroides spp. from the National Center for Biotechnology Information database were only 87 to 91% similar. Genomic similarity, clonality, growth, and persistence collectively suggest that putative, free-living Bacteroides inhabit Cladophora mats of southern Lake Michigan. These findings may have important biological, medical, regulatory, microbial source tracking, and public health implications.

  9. Complete Genome Sequences of Three Rhizobium gallicum Symbionts Associated with Common Bean (Phaseolus vulgaris)

    PubMed Central

    Bustos, Patricia; Santamaría, Rosa Isela; Pérez-Carrascal, Olga María; Acosta, José Luis; Lozano, Luis; Juárez, Soledad; Martínez-Romero, Esperanza; Cevallos, Miguel Ángel; Romero, David; Dávila, Guillermo; Vinuesa, Pablo; Miranda, Fabiola; Ormeño, Ernesto

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT The whole-genome sequences of three strains of Rhizobium gallicum reported here support the concept that the distinct nodulation host ranges displayed by the symbiovars gallicum and phaseoli can be largely explained by different symbiotic plasmids. PMID:28302777

  10. (Basis for the competitiveness of Rhizobium japonicum in nodulation of soybean). Progress report, 1984

    SciTech Connect

    Bauer, W.D.; Evans, W.R.

    1984-01-01

    Those characteristics of Rhizobium cells that are most crucial in determining their competitive success when inoculated onto seed in the field are sought. Initial studies of Rhizobium attachment to root surfaces revealed that only a small subpopulation of the cells in an R. japonicum culture are capable of firmly attaching to soybean roots. The size of the attachment-competent subpopulation depends on strain and culture age. Attachment of rhizobia to roots was found to be linearly proportional to the bacterial concentration. The rate of attachment is constant under our conditions for approximately 60 min, then rapidly levels off to approximately zero. Once attached to the root surface, Rhizobium cells seldom spontaneously detach. Rhizobia of several different species all attached comparably well to soybean roots. Attachment of various Rhizobium species to the root hairs of soybean seedlings likewise showed no evidence of host specificity or selectivity. 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  11. Survival of Rhizobium phaseoli in coal-based legume inoculants applied to seeds

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, S.L.; Berryhill, D.L.

    1983-02-01

    Eight coals used as carriers in legume inoculants promoted the survival of Rhizobium phaseoli on pinto bean seeds. Although peat was more protective, most coal-based inoculants provided >10/sup 4/ viable rhizobia per seed after 4 weeks.

  12. Rhizobium favelukesii sp. nov., isolated from the root nodules of alfalfa (Medicago sativa L).

    PubMed

    Torres Tejerizo, Gonzalo; Rogel, Marco Antonio; Ormeño-Orrillo, Ernesto; Althabegoiti, María Julia; Nilsson, Juliet Fernanda; Niehaus, Karsten; Schlüter, Andreas; Pühler, Alfred; Del Papa, María Florencia; Lagares, Antonio; Martínez-Romero, Esperanza; Pistorio, Mariano

    2016-11-01

    Strains LPU83T and Or191 of the genus Rhizobium were isolated from the root nodules of alfalfa, grown in acid soils from Argentina and the USA. These two strains, which shared the same plasmid pattern, lipopolysaccharide profile, insertion-sequence fingerprint, 16S rRNA gene sequence and PCR-fingerprinting pattern, were different from reference strains representing species of the genus Rhizobium with validly published names. On the basis of previously reported data and from new DNA-DNA hybridization results, phenotypic characterization and phylogenetic analyses, strains LPU83T and Or191 can be considered to be representatives of a novel species of the genus Rhizobium, for which the name Rhizobium favelukesii sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain of this species is LPU83T (=CECT 9014T=LMG 29160T), for which an improved draft-genome sequence is available.

  13. Characterization of a Bacteroides Mobilizable Transposon, NBU2, Which Carries a Functional Lincomycin Resistance Gene

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jun; Shoemaker, Nadja B.; Wang, Gui-Rong; Salyers, Abigail A.

    2000-01-01

    The mobilizable Bacteroides element NBU2 (11 kbp) was found originally in two Bacteroides clinical isolates, Bacteroides fragilis ERL and B. thetaiotaomicron DOT. At first, NBU2 appeared to be very similar to another mobilizable Bacteroides element, NBU1, in a 2.5-kbp internal region, but further examination of the full DNA sequence of NBU2 now reveals that the region of near identity between NBU1 and NBU2 is limited to this small region and that, outside this region, there is little sequence similarity between the two elements. The integrase gene of NBU2, intN2, was located at one end of the element. This gene was necessary and sufficient for the integration of NBU2. The integrase of NBU2 has the conserved amino acids (R-H-R-Y) in the C-terminal end that are found in members of the lambda family of site-specific integrases. This was also the only region in which the NBU1 and NBU2 integrases shared any similarity (28% amino acid sequence identity and 49% sequence similarity). Integration of NBU2 was site specific in Bacteroides species. Integration occurred in two primary sites in B. thetaiotaomicron. Both of these sites were located in the 3′ end of a serine-tRNA gene NBU2 also integrated in Escherichia coli, but integration was much less site specific than in B. thetaiotaomicron. Analysis of the sequence of NBU2 revealed two potential antibiotic resistance genes. The amino acid sequences of the putative proteins encoded by these genes had similarity to resistances found in gram-positive bacteria. Only one of these genes was expressed in B. thetaiotaomicron, the homolog of linA, a lincomycin resistance gene from Staphylococcus aureus. To determine how widespread elements related to NBU1 and NBU2 are in Bacteroides species, we screened 291 Bacteroides strains. Elements with some sequence similarity to NBU2 and NBU1 were widespread in Bacteroides strains, and the presence of linAN in Bacteroides strains was highly correlated with the presence of NBU2, suggesting

  14. Potential for plant growth promotion in groundnut (Arachis hypogaea L.) cv. ALR-2 by co-inoculation of sulfur-oxidizing bacteria and Rhizobium.

    PubMed

    Anandham, R; Sridar, R; Nalayini, P; Poonguzhali, S; Madhaiyan, M; Sa, Tongmin

    2007-01-01

    The use of Rhizobium inoculant for groundnut is a common practice in India. Also, co-inoculation of Rhizobium with other plant growth-promoting bacteria received considerable attention in legume growth promotion. Hence, in the present study we investigated effects of co-inoculating the sulfur (S)-oxidizing bacterial strains with Rhizobium, a strain that had no S-oxidizing potential in groundnut. Chemolithotrophic S-oxidizing bacterial isolates from different sources by enrichment isolation technique included three autotrophic (LCH, SWA5 and SWA4) and one heterotrophic (SGA6) strains. All the four isolates decreased the pH of the growth medium through oxidation of elemental S to sulfuric acid. Characterization revealed that these isolates tentatively placed into the genus Thiobacillus. Clay-based pellet formulation (2.5 x 10(7) cf ug(-1) pellet) of the Thiobacillus strains were developed and their efficiency to promote plant growth was tested in groundnut under pot culture and field conditions with S-deficit soil. Experiments in pot culture yielded promising results on groundnut increasing the plant biomass, nodule number and dry weight, and pod yield. Co-inoculation of Thiobacillus sp. strain LCH (applied at 60 kg ha(-1)) with Rhizobium under field condition recorded significantly higher nodule number, nodule dry weight and plant biomass 136.9 plant(-1), 740.0mg plant(-1) and 15.0 g plant(-1), respectively, on 80 days after sowing and enhanced the pod yield by 18%. Also inoculation of S-oxidizing bacteria increased the soil available S from 7.4 to 8.43 kg ha(-1). These results suggest that inoculation of S-oxidizing bacteria along with rhizobia results in synergistic interactions promoting the yield and oil content of groundnut, in S-deficit soils.

  15. Permanent draft genome of the malachite-green-tolerant bacterium Rhizobium sp. MGL06.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang; Wang, Runping; Zeng, Runying

    2014-12-01

    Rhizobium sp. MGL06, the first Rhizobium isolate from a marine environment, is a malachite-green-tolerant bacterium with a broader salinity tolerance (range: 0.5% to 9%) than other rhizobia. This study sequences and annotates the draft genome sequence of this strain. Genome sequence information provides a basis for analyzing the malachite green tolerance, broad salinity adaptation, nitrogen fixation properties, and taxonomic classification of the isolate.

  16. Genome sequence of the acid-tolerant strain Rhizobium sp. LPU83.

    PubMed

    Wibberg, Daniel; Tejerizo, Gonzalo Torres; Del Papa, María Florencia; Martini, Carla; Pühler, Alfred; Lagares, Antonio; Schlüter, Andreas; Pistorio, Mariano

    2014-04-20

    Rhizobia are important members of the soil microbiome since they enter into nitrogen-fixing symbiosis with different legume host plants. Rhizobium sp. LPU83 is an acid-tolerant Rhizobium strain featuring a broad-host-range. However, it is ineffective in nitrogen fixation. Here, the improved draft genome sequence of this strain is reported. Genome sequence information provides the basis for analysis of its acid tolerance, symbiotic properties and taxonomic classification.

  17. Expression of Rhizobium leguminosarum CFN42 genes for lipopolysaccharide in strains derived from different R. leguminosarum soil isolates

    SciTech Connect

    Brink, B.A.; Noel, K.D. ); Miller, J.; Carlson, R.W. )

    1990-02-01

    Two mutant derivatives of Rhizobium leguminosarum ANU843 defective in lipopolysaccharide (LPS) were isolated. The LPSs of both mutants lacked O antigen and some sugar residues of the LPS core oligosaccharides. Genetic regions previously cloned from another Rhizobium leguminosarum wild-type isolate, strain CFN42, were used to complement these mutants. One mutant was complemented to give LPS that was apparently identical to the LPS of strain ANU843 in antigenicity, electrophoretic mobility, and sugar composition. The other mutant was complemented by a second CFN42lps genetic region. In this case the resulting LPS contained O-antigen sugars characteristic of donor strain CFN42 and reacted weakly with antiserum against CFN42 cells, but did not react detectably with antiserum against ANU843 cells. Therefore, one of the CFN42 lps genetic regions specifies a function that is conserved between the two R. leguminosarum wild-type isolates, whereas the other region, at least in part, specifies a strain-specific LPS structure. Transfer of these two genetic regions into wild-type strains derived from R. leguminosarum ANU843 and 128C53 gave results consistent with this conclusion. The mutants derived from strain ANU843 elicited incompletely developed clover nodules that exhibited low bacterial populations and very low nitrogenase activity. Both mutants elicited normally developed, nitrogen-fixing clover nodules when they carried CFN42 lps DNA that permitted synthesis of O-antigen-containing LPS, regardless of whether the O antigen was the one originally made by strain ANU843.

  18. The underappreciated in vitro activity of tedizolid against Bacteroides fragilis species, including strains resistant to metronidazole and carbapenems.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, Ellie J C; Citron, Diane M; Tyrrell, Kerin L; Leoncio, Elisa S; Merriam, C Vreni

    2017-02-01

    Because Bacteroides fragilis has the ability to develop mechanisms of resistance to almost all antibiotics, we studied the comparative in vitro activity of tedizolid against 124 Bacteroides group species clinical isolates, including carbapenem, metronidazole and piperacillin-tazobactam resistant strains. Tedizolid had an MIC90 of 2 μg/ml (range, 0.5-4 μg/ml) and was 1-4 times more active than linezolid that had an MIC90 of 8 μg/ml (range, 2-16 μg/ml). It was also active (MICs 0.5-2 μg/ml) against the 27 ertapenem, 2 metronidazole and 12 piperacillin-tazobactam resistant strains tested. This suggests that tedizolid may be useful treating infections, including bacteremias, due to resistant B. fragilis group species, as well as, mixed skin and soft tissue infections such as diabetic foot infections caused by Gram-positive aerobes and B. fragilis group species. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Brain abscess due to Aggregatibacter aphrophilus and Bacteroides uniformis.

    PubMed

    Bogdan, Maja; Zujić Atalić, Vlasta; Hećimović, Ivan; Vuković, Dubravka

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this report was to describe the occurrence of a bacterial brain abscess in a healthy individual, without any predisposing condition. A thirteen-year old boy was admitted to the Department of Neurosurgery after the onset of vomiting, headache and dizziness. A neurological deficit was detected during the physical examination so urgent magnetic resonance imaging of the brain was performed, revealing an intrahemispheric, right positioned solitary expansive mass with ring enhancement. Purulent material was obtained during osteoplastic craniotomy with total extirpation of the brain abscess. Aggregatibacter aphrophilus and Bacteroides uniformis were isolated. The patient's general condition improved and the neurological deficit subsided as a result of the prompt recognition and treatment of this life threatening condition. To achieve a favourable clinical outcome, prompt recognition and surgical treatment of a brain abscess are of primary importance,followed by administration of appropriate antimicrobial therapy. To our best knowledge, this is the first report of this combination of microorganisms as the cause of a brain abscess. Copyright © 2015 by Academy of Sciences and Arts of Bosnia and Herzegovina.

  20. DNA Inversion Regulates Outer Membrane Vesicle Production in Bacteroides fragilis

    PubMed Central

    Nakayama-Imaohji, Haruyuki; Hirota, Katsuhiko; Yamasaki, Hisashi; Yoneda, Saori; Nariya, Hirofumi; Suzuki, Motoo; Secher, Thomas; Miyake, Yoichiro; Oswald, Eric; Hayashi, Tetsuya; Kuwahara, Tomomi

    2016-01-01

    Phase changes in Bacteroides fragilis, a member of the human colonic microbiota, mediate variations in a vast array of cell surface molecules, such as capsular polysaccharides and outer membrane proteins through DNA inversion. The results of the present study show that outer membrane vesicle (OMV) formation in this anaerobe is also controlled by DNA inversions at two distantly localized promoters, IVp-I and IVp-II that are associated with extracellular polysaccharide biosynthesis and the expression of outer membrane proteins. These promoter inversions are mediated by a single tyrosine recombinase encoded by BF2766 (orthologous to tsr19 in strain NCTC9343) in B. fragilis YCH46, which is located near IVp-I. A series of BF2766 mutants were constructed in which the two promoters were locked in different configurations (IVp-I/IVp-II = ON/ON, OFF/OFF, ON/OFF or OFF/ON). ON/ON B. fragilis mutants exhibited hypervesiculating, whereas the other mutants formed only a trace amount of OMVs. The hypervesiculating ON/ON mutants showed higher resistance to treatment with bile, LL-37, and human β-defensin 2. Incubation of wild-type cells with 5% bile increased the population of cells with the ON/ON genotype. These results indicate that B. fragilis regulates the formation of OMVs through DNA inversions at two distantly related promoter regions in response to membrane stress, although the mechanism underlying the interplay between the two regions controlled by the invertible promoters remains unknown. PMID:26859882

  1. DNA Inversion Regulates Outer Membrane Vesicle Production in Bacteroides fragilis.

    PubMed

    Nakayama-Imaohji, Haruyuki; Hirota, Katsuhiko; Yamasaki, Hisashi; Yoneda, Saori; Nariya, Hirofumi; Suzuki, Motoo; Secher, Thomas; Miyake, Yoichiro; Oswald, Eric; Hayashi, Tetsuya; Kuwahara, Tomomi

    2016-01-01

    Phase changes in Bacteroides fragilis, a member of the human colonic microbiota, mediate variations in a vast array of cell surface molecules, such as capsular polysaccharides and outer membrane proteins through DNA inversion. The results of the present study show that outer membrane vesicle (OMV) formation in this anaerobe is also controlled by DNA inversions at two distantly localized promoters, IVp-I and IVp-II that are associated with extracellular polysaccharide biosynthesis and the expression of outer membrane proteins. These promoter inversions are mediated by a single tyrosine recombinase encoded by BF2766 (orthologous to tsr19 in strain NCTC9343) in B. fragilis YCH46, which is located near IVp-I. A series of BF2766 mutants were constructed in which the two promoters were locked in different configurations (IVp-I/IVp-II = ON/ON, OFF/OFF, ON/OFF or OFF/ON). ON/ON B. fragilis mutants exhibited hypervesiculating, whereas the other mutants formed only a trace amount of OMVs. The hypervesiculating ON/ON mutants showed higher resistance to treatment with bile, LL-37, and human β-defensin 2. Incubation of wild-type cells with 5% bile increased the population of cells with the ON/ON genotype. These results indicate that B. fragilis regulates the formation of OMVs through DNA inversions at two distantly related promoter regions in response to membrane stress, although the mechanism underlying the interplay between the two regions controlled by the invertible promoters remains unknown.

  2. Pyogenic arthritis of native joints due to Bacteroides fragilis

    PubMed Central

    Nolla, Joan M.; Murillo, Oscar; Narvaez, Javier; Vaquero, Carmen Gómez; Lora-Tamayo, Jaime; Pedrero, Salvador; Cabo, Javier; Ariza, Javier

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Pyogenic arthritis of native joints due to Bacteroides fragilis seems to be an infrequent disease. We analyzed the cases diagnosed in a tertiary hospital during a 22-year period and reviewed the literature to summarize the experience with this infectious entity. In our institution, of 308 patients with pyogenic arthritis of native joints, B fragilis was the causative organism in 2 (0.6%) cases. A MEDLINE search (1981–2015) identified 19 additional cases. Of the 21 patients available for review (13 men and 8 women, with a mean age, of 54.4 ± 17 years), 19 (90%) presented a systemic predisposing factor for infection; the most common associated illness was rheumatoid arthritis (8 patients). Bacteremia was documented in 65% (13/20) of cases. In 5 patients (24%), 1 or more concomitant infectious process was found. Metronidazole was the most frequently used antibiotic. Surgical drainage was performed in 11 cases (52%). The overall mortality rate was 5%. Pyogenic arthritis of native joints due to B fragilis is an infrequent disease that mainly affects elderly patients with underlying medical illnesses and in whom bacteremia and the presence of a concomitant infectious process are frequent conditions. PMID:27336895

  3. Metabolism and growth yields in Bacteroides ruminicola strain b14.

    PubMed Central

    Howlett, M R; Mountfort, D O; Turner, K W; Roberton, A M

    1976-01-01

    Metabolism of D-glucose by Bacteroides ruminicola subsp. brevis, strain B14, has been examined. Growth yield studies gave molar growth yields, corrected for storage polysaccharide, of approximately 66 g (dry weight)/mol of glucose fermented. The storage polysaccharide amounted to about 14% of the total dry weight, or 55% of the total cellular carbohydrate, at full growth. After correcting glucose utilization for incorporation into cellular carbohydrate, measurement of product formation showed that 1.1 succinate, 0.8 acetate, and 0.35 formate are produced and 0.5 CO2 net is taken up during the fermentation of 1 glucose under the conditions used. The implication of these results with respect to adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) molar growth yield calculations is discussed. If substrate-level phosphorylation reactions alone are responsible for ATP generation, then the ATP molar growth yield must be about 23 g (dry weight)/mol of ATP. Alternatively, if anaerobic electron transfer-linked phosphorylation also occurs, the ATP molar growth yield will be lower. Images PMID:970946

  4. Superoxide dismutase and O2 lethality in Bacteroides fragilis.

    PubMed Central

    Privalle, C T; Gregory, E M

    1979-01-01

    Exposure of midlog Bacteroides fragils (VPI 2393) to 2% O2-98% N2 caused a three- to fivefold increase in superoxide dismutase specific activity within the cells. The increase in specific activity was completed within 90 min after exposure to oxygen and was dependent upon protein synthesis. Cells containing the higher superoxide dismutase level were more resistant to the effects of 5 atm of oxygen tension than were cells containing the lower level of superoxide dismutase but were equally resistant to 5 atm of nitrogen tension. Similar results were observed upon comparing viability experiments with B. fragilis and B. vulgatus. Superoxide dismutase activity in sonic extracts of B. fragilis was rapidly inactivated by exposure to 5 mM H2O2 and was inhibited by 1 mM NaN3 but not 5 mM NaCN. The inhibition pattern is identical to the pattern demonstrated for the purified iron-containing enzyme from Escherichia coli B and suggests that the superoxide dismutase in B. fragilis is an iron enzyme. PMID:438129

  5. Humoral immune response to Bacteroides gingivalis fimbrial antigen in mice.

    PubMed Central

    Ogawa, T; Shimauchi, H; Kusumoto, Y; Hamada, S

    1990-01-01

    Bacteroides gingivalis fimbrial antigen incorporated into liposomes, but not in Tris-HCl buffer, significantly raised the levels of anti-fimbriae antibodies in serum, particularly of the IgG class, after oral primary and booster immunizations in BALB/c mice. An approximately linear relationship was observed between the dose of fimbrial antigen and the level of fimbriae-specific antibodies produced; antibody production reached its maximum at an immunization dosage of 500 micrograms of fimbriae per mouse. Fimbriae-specific antibody production was enhanced by use of a semi-synthetic adjuvant, a stearoyl derivative of sodium beta-N-acetylglucosaminyl-(1----4)-N-acetylmuramyl-L-alanyl-D-isoglutaminyl-(L) - stearoyl-(D)-meso-diamino-pimelic acid-(D)-amide-D-alanine (GM)-53) in liposomes. High anti-fimbriae antibody levels in serum and saliva were maintained for several months in the mice that had received two orally administered boosters of fimbrial antigen with GM-53 in liposomes. Salivary anti-fimbriae antibody levels, particularly of the IgA class, were markedly raised. PMID:1968885

  6. Protective immunization against experimental Bacteroides (Porphyromonas) gingivalis infection.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, P B; Davern, L B; Schifferle, R; Zambon, J J

    1990-01-01

    The effects of immunization in modulating the pathogenesis of Bacteroides (Porphyromonas) gingivalis infection in a murine model system were examined. BALB/c mice were immunized by intraperitoneal injection with B. gingivalis ATCC 53977 (one injection per week for 3 weeks), or with a lithium diiodosalicylate (LIS) extract (one injection per week for 3 weeks), or with lipopolysaccharide (LPS; one intravenous or intraperitoneal injection) from this same strain. Two weeks after the final immunization, the mice were challenged by subcutaneous injection of B. gingivalis ATCC 53977. Mice immunized with bacteria had no secondary lesions and no septicemia, whereas mice immunized with LIS extract had few secondary lesions and no septicemia. Mice immunized with LPS and nonimmunized mice demonstrated secondary abdominal lesions and septicemia after challenge. Bacterial cells and LIS extract, but not LPS, induced serum antibody and antigen reactive lymphocytes, as measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, immunoblot, Western immunoblot transfer, and in vitro lymphoproliferative responses. The present study suggests that immunization with a LIS extract or whole cells may induce a protective response against experimental B. gingivalis infection. Images PMID:2401568

  7. In vitro utilization of mucin by Bacteroides fragilis.

    PubMed Central

    Roberton, A M; Stanley, R A

    1982-01-01

    A method for isolating pig colon mucin in a soluble high-molecular-weight form, suitable for addition to bacterial growth media, is described. This preparation was utilized as a sole carbohydrate energy source by two strains of Bacteroides fragilis. The extent of degradation was compared with that of commercial pig gastric mucin by the same strains. Gas-liquid chromatographic analysis of the mucin carbohydrates and gel chromatography of the preparations were carried out before and after in vitro degradation. The mucin carbohydrates were utilized only to a very limited extent, colon mucin being more resistant to degradation than gastric mucin. Both mucins chromatographed at or near the excluded volume on Sepharose 4B, and only in the case of ATCC 25285 grown on gastric mucin was a significant degradation peak detected. If mucins are degraded in vivo by the sequential action of several bacteria, a pure culture in vitro might be expected to degrade mucins to a limited extent only. Techniques previously used to examine mucin utilization by pure cultures may have overlooked limited mucin degradation demonstrated by the methods used in this work. PMID:6174077

  8. Rhizobium helanshanense sp. nov., a bacterium that nodulates Sphaerophysa salsula (Pall.) DC. in China.

    PubMed

    Qin, Wei; Deng, Zhen Shan; Xu, Lin; Wang, Na Na; Wei, Ge Hong

    2012-05-01

    Studying rhizobia in the root nodules of Sphaerophysa salsula (Pall.) DC in the northwest of China, we obtained five strains classified as genus Rhizobium on the basis of their 16S rRNA gene sequences. The sequence similarity of strain CCNWQTX14(T) with the most related species was 99.0%. Further phylogenetic analysis of housekeeping genes (recA and atpD) suggested the five strains comprised a novel lineage within Rhizobium. The nifH and nodD gene sequences of CCNWQTX14(T) were phylogenetically closely related with those of Sinorhizobium kummerowiae and R. sphaerophysae, respectively. The five strains isolated from different places were also distinct from related Rhizobium species using ERIC fingerprint profiles. The DNA-DNA hybridization value was 41.8% between CCNWQTX14(T) and Rhizobium sphaerophysae CCNWGS0238(T). Our novel strains were only able to form effective nodules on its original host Sphaerophysa salsula. Our data showed that the five Rhizobium strains formed a unique genomic species, for which a novel species Rhizobium helanshanense sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is CCNWQTX14(T) (=ACCC 16237(T) =HAMBI 3083(T)).

  9. Rhizobium vallis sp. nov., isolated from nodules of three leguminous species.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fang; Wang, En Tao; Wu, Li Juan; Sui, Xin Hua; Li, Ying; Chen, Wen Xin

    2011-11-01

    Four bacterial strains isolated from root nodules of Phaseolus vulgaris, Mimosa pudica and Indigofera spicata plants grown in the Yunnan province of China were identified as a lineage within the genus Rhizobium according to the analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences, sharing most similarity with Rhizobium lusitanum P1-7(T) (99.1 % sequence similarity) and Rhizobium rhizogenes IAM 13570(T) (99.0 %). These strains also formed a distinctive group from the reference strains for defined species of the genus Rhizobium in a polyphasic approach, including the phylogenetic analyses of the 16S rRNA gene and housekeeping genes (recA, atpD, glnII), DNA-DNA hybridization, BOX-PCR fingerprinting, phenotypic characterization, SDS-PAGE of whole-cell proteins, and cellular fatty acid profiles. All the data obtained in this study suggested that these strains represent a novel species of the genus Rhizobium, for which the name Rhizobium vallis sp. nov. is proposed. The DNA G+C content (mol%) of this species varied between 60.9 and 61.2 (T(m)). The type strain of R. vallis sp. nov. is CCBAU 65647(T) ( = LMG 25295(T) =HAMBI 3073(T)), which has a DNA G+C content of 60.9 mol% and forms effective nodules on Phaseolus vulgaris.

  10. Rhizobium vignae sp. nov., a symbiotic bacterium isolated from multiple legume species.

    PubMed

    Ren, Da Wei; Chen, Wen Feng; Sui, Xin Hua; Wang, En Tao; Chen, Wen Xin

    2011-03-01

    A group of rhizobial strains isolated from nodules of multiple legume species grown in different geographical regions of China had identical 16S rRNA genes. Phylogenetic analysis based on the 16S rRNA gene sequences showed that the novel strains formed a subclade in the genus Rhizobium together with Rhizobium galegae, Rhizobium huautlense and Rhizobium alkalisoli, with 99.8  % gene sequence similarity between the strains. The DNA-DNA relatedness values between the representative strain CCBAU 05176(T) and R. galegae ATCC 43677(T), R. huautlense S02(T) and R. alkalisoli CCBAU 01393(T) were 22.6  %, 8.9  % and 15.9  %, respectively. The novel strains were distinguished from recognized species of the genus Rhizobium by using a polyphasic approach, including PCR-based restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis (RFLP) of the 16S-23S intergenic spacer (IGS), phenotypic and physiological tests, sequence comparisons of housekeeping genes and cellular fatty acid profiles. Therefore, it is suggested that this group of strains represents a novel species for which the name Rhizobium vignae sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is CCBAU 05176(T) (=HAMBI 3039(T)=LMG 25447(T)).

  11. The celC gene, a new phylogenetic marker useful for taxonomic studies in Rhizobium.

    PubMed

    Robledo, Marta; Velázquez, Encarna; Ramírez-Bahena, Martha Helena; García-Fraile, Paula; Pérez-Alonso, Ana; Rivas, Raúl; Martínez-Molina, Eustoquio; Mateos, Pedro F

    2011-09-01

    The celC gene codifies for a cellulase that fulfils a very significant role in the infection process of clover by Rhizobium leguminosarum. This gene is located in the celABC operon present in the chromosome of strains representing R. leguminosarum, Rhizobium etli and Rhizobium radiobacter whose genomes have been completely sequenced. Nevertheless, the existence of this gene in other species of the genus Rhizobium had not been investigated to date. In this study, the celC gene was analysed for the first time in several species of this genus isolated from legume nodules and plant tumours, in order to compare the celC phylogeny to those of other chromosomal and plasmidic genes. The results obtained showed that phylogenies of celC and chromosomal genes, such as rrs, recA and atpD, were completely congruent, whereas no relation was found with symbiotic or virulence genes. Therefore, the suitability and usefulness of the celC gene to differentiate species of the genus Rhizobium, especially those with closely related rrs genes, was highlighted. Consequently, the taxonomic status of several strains of the genus Rhizobium with completely sequenced genomes is also discussed.

  12. Rhizobium tubonense sp. nov., isolated from root nodules of Oxytropis glabra.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Rong Juan; Hou, Bao Chao; Wang, En Tao; Li, Ying; Zhang, Xiao Xia; Chen, Wen Xin

    2011-03-01

    Four rhizobial strains, designated CCBAU 85046(T), CCBAU 85051, CCBAU 85048 and CCBAU 85049, isolated from root nodules of Oxytropis glabra grown in Tibet, China, were previously defined, using amplified 16S rRNA gene restriction analysis, as a novel group within the genus Rhizobium. To clarify their taxonomic position, these strains were further analysed and compared with reference strains of related bacteria using a polyphasic approach. The 16S rRNA gene analysis showed that the four isolates formed a distinct phylogenetic lineage in the genus Rhizobium. The isolates showed highest sequence similarity (97.8  %) to Rhizobium indigoferae CCBAU 71042(T). Phenotypic and physiological tests, DNA-DNA hybridization, phylogenetic analyses of housekeeping genes recA, atpD and glnII and fatty acid profiles also indicated that these four strains constitute a novel group distinct from recognized species of the genus Rhizobium. Based on this evidence, strains CCBAU 85046(T), CCBAU 85051, CCBAU 85048 and CCBAU 85049 represent a novel species in the genus Rhizobium, for which the name Rhizobium tubonense sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is CCBAU 85046(T) (=LMG 25225(T) =HAMBI 3066(T)) and its DNA G+C content is 59.52 % (T(m)). Strain CCBAU 85046(T) could form effective nodules on plant species Vigna unguiculata and Medicago sativa but not on its host of origin Oxytropis glabra.

  13. Diversity of rhizobia from nodules of the leguminous tree Gliricidia sepium, a natural host of Rhizobium tropici.

    PubMed

    Acosta-Durán, Carlos; Martínez-Romero, Esperanza

    2002-08-01

    The Rhizobium species that nodulate the legume tree Gliricidia sepium were analyzed by phenotypic characteristics (including nodule formation in different hosts), PCR-RFLP patterns and sequences of 16S rRNA genes, multilocus enzyme electrophoresis, and plasmid patterns. Strains of Rhizobium tropici type A and B, Sinorhizobium spp., and Rhizobium etli bv. phaseoli were encountered in G. sepium nodules and their presence depended on the site sampled.

  14. The Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron Protein Bacteroides Host Factor A Participates in Integration of the Integrative Conjugative Element CTnDOT into the Chromosome

    PubMed Central

    Ringwald, Kenneth

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT CTnDOT is a conjugative transposon found in Bacteroides species. It encodes multiple antibiotic resistances and is stimulated to transfer by exposure to tetracycline. CTnDOT integration into the host chromosome requires IntDOT and a previously unknown host factor. We have identified a protein, designated BHFa (Bacteroides host factor A), that participates in integrative recombination. BHFa is the first host factor identified for a site-specific recombination reaction in the CTnDOT family of integrative and conjugative elements. Based on the amino acid sequence of BHFa, the ability to bind specifically to 4 sites in the attDOT DNA, and its activity in the integration reaction, BHFa is a member of the IHF/HU family of nucleoid-associated proteins. Other DNA bending proteins that bind DNA nonspecifically can substitute for BHFa in the integration reaction. IMPORTANCE Bacteroides species are normal members of the human colonic microbiota. These species can harbor and spread self-transmissible genetic elements (integrative conjugative elements [ICEs]) that contain antibiotic resistance genes. This work describes the role of a protein, BHFa, and its importance in the integration reaction required for the element CTnDOT to persist in Bacteroides host cells. PMID:25645562

  15. Production of AI-2 is mediated by the S-ribosylhomocystein lyase gene luxS in Bacteroides fragilis and Bacteroides vulgatus.

    PubMed

    Peixoto, Rafael José Marques; Miranda, Karla Rodrigues; Ferreira, Eliane Oliveira; de Paula, Geraldo Renato; Rocha, Edson Ribeiro; Lobo, Leandro Araujo; Domingues, Regina Maria Cavalcanti Pilotto

    2014-07-01

    Quorum sensing is a cell-cell signaling mechanism based on cell density and that involves the production of hormone-like molecules called autoinducers (AI). One of the most studied AIs has been termed AI-2, and its biosynthesis requires the enzyme encoded by luxS. We have previously described for the first time that Bacteroides species can produce molecules with AI-2 activity. In this study, we focus on the detection of luxS and its activity as the AI-2 synthase in Bacteroides species. The strains Bacteroides fragilis B3b and Bacteroides vulgatus ATCC 8482 were selected based on a positive phenotype for AI-2 production and the presence of a putative luxS in the genome, respectively. In order to identify the luxS gene, cloning and heterologous expression strategies were utilized. We demonstrate that both strains contain functional luxS orthologs that can complement AI-2 production in Escherichia coli. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. The Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron protein Bacteroides host factor A participates in integration of the integrative conjugative element CTnDOT into the chromosome.

    PubMed

    Ringwald, Kenneth; Gardner, Jeffrey

    2015-04-01

    CTnDOT is a conjugative transposon found in Bacteroides species. It encodes multiple antibiotic resistances and is stimulated to transfer by exposure to tetracycline. CTnDOT integration into the host chromosome requires IntDOT and a previously unknown host factor. We have identified a protein, designated BHFa (Bacteroides host factor A), that participates in integrative recombination. BHFa is the first host factor identified for a site-specific recombination reaction in the CTnDOT family of integrative and conjugative elements. Based on the amino acid sequence of BHFa, the ability to bind specifically to 4 sites in the attDOT DNA, and its activity in the integration reaction, BHFa is a member of the IHF/HU family of nucleoid-associated proteins. Other DNA bending proteins that bind DNA nonspecifically can substitute for BHFa in the integration reaction. Bacteroides species are normal members of the human colonic microbiota. These species can harbor and spread self-transmissible genetic elements (integrative conjugative elements [ICEs]) that contain antibiotic resistance genes. This work describes the role of a protein, BHFa, and its importance in the integration reaction required for the element CTnDOT to persist in Bacteroides host cells. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  17. Identification and classification of the genus Bacteroides by multilocus sequence analysis.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Mitsuo; Ohkuma, Moriya

    2011-12-01

    Multilocus sequence analysis (MLSA) was performed on representative species of the genus Bacteroides. Internal fragments of the genes selected, dnaJ, gyrB, hsp60, recA, rpoB and 16S rRNA, were amplified by direct PCR and then sequenced from 38 Bacteroides strains representing 35 species. Neighbour-joining (NJ), maximum-likelihood (ML) and maximum-parsimony (MP) phylogenies of the individual genes were compared. The data confirm that the potential for discrimination of Bacteroides species is greater using MLSA of housekeeping genes than 16S rRNA genes. Among the housekeeping genes analysed, gyrB was the most informative, followed by dnaJ. Analyses of concatenated sequences (4816 bp) of all six genes revealed robust phylogenetic relationships among different Bacteroides species when compared with the single-gene trees. The NJ, ML and MP trees were very similar, and almost fully resolved relationships of Bacteroides species were obtained, to our knowledge for the first time. In addition, analysis of a concatenation (2457 bp) of the dnaJ, gyrB and hsp60 genes produced essentially the same result. Ten distinct clades were recognized using the SplitsTree4 program. For the genus Bacteroides, we can define species as a group of strains that share at least 97.5% gene sequence similarity based on the fragments of five protein-coding housekeeping genes and the 16S rRNA gene. This study demonstrates that MLSA of housekeeping genes is a valuable alternative technique for the identification and classification of species of the genus Bacteroides.

  18. Bacteroides reticulotermitis sp. nov., isolated from the gut of a subterranean termite (Reticulitermes speratus).

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Mitsuo; Ohkuma, Moriya

    2013-02-01

    An obligately anaerobic, non-pigmented, non-spore-forming, Gram-staining-negative, rod-shaped bacterium, designated strain Rs-03(T), was isolated from the gut of the subterranean termite Reticulitermes speratus. The taxonomic position of the novel strain was determined by following a polyphasic approach. Phylogenetic analyses based on 16S rRNA gene sequences showed that strain Rs-03(T) was a member of the genus Bacteroides and was most closely related to Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron JCM 5827(T) (95.0 % sequence similarity), Bacteroides faecis JCM 16478(T) (94.8 %) and Bacteroides xylanisolvens JCM 15633(T) (94.3 %). The results of hsp60 gene sequence analysis indicated that the novel strain was different from established members of the genus Bacteroides. Strain Rs-03(T) was saccharolytic and produced succinic and acetic acids, with small amounts of propionic acid, as metabolic end products. The major cellular fatty acids of strain Rs-03(T) were anteiso-C(15 : 0), C(18 : 1)ω9c and iso-C(17 : 0) 3-OH. The major menaquinones were MK-10 and MK-9 and the genomic DNA G+C content was 44.9 mol%. Based on these data, strain Rs-03(T) represents a novel species in the genus Bacteroides, for which the name Bacteroides reticulotermitis sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is Rs-03(T) ( = JCM 10512(T) = CCUG 62153(T)).

  19. Suppurative otitis and ascending meningoencephalitis associated with Bacteroides tectus and Porphyromonas gulae in a captive Parma wallaby (Macropus parma) with toxoplasmosis.

    PubMed

    Giannitti, Federico; Schapira, Andrea; Anderson, Mark; Clothier, Kristin

    2014-09-01

    A 6-year-old female Parma wallaby (Macropus parma) at a zoo in California developed acute ataxia and left-sided circling. Despite intensive care, clinical signs progressed to incoordination and prostration, and the animal was euthanized. At necropsy, the left tympanic cavity was filled with homogeneous suppurative exudate that extended into the cranium expanding the meninges and neuroparenchyma in the lateral and ventral aspect of the caudal ipsilateral brainstem and medulla oblongata. Microscopically, the brainstem showed regional severe suppurative meningoencephalitis with large numbers of neutrophils, fewer macrophages, and lymphocytes admixed with fibrin, necrotic cellular debris, hemorrhage, and mineralization, with numerous intralesional Gram-negative bacilli. Bacteroides spp. and Porphyromonas spp. were isolated on anaerobic culture from the meninges, and the bacteria were further characterized by partial 16S ribosomal RNA gene sequencing as Bacteroides tectus and Porphyromonas gulae. Bacterial aerobic culture from the meninges yielded very low numbers of mixed flora and Proteus spp., which were considered contaminants. Culture of Mycoplasma spp. from middle ear and meninges was negative. Additionally, Toxoplasma gondii cysts were detected by immunohistochemistry in the heart and brain, and anti-Toxoplasma antibodies were detected in serum. The genera Bacteroides and Porphyromonas have been associated with oral disease in marsupials; but not with otitis and meningoencephalitis. The results of the present work highlight the importance of performing anaerobic cultures in the diagnostic investigation of cases of suppurative otitis and meningoencephalitis in macropods. © 2014 The Author(s).

  20. Engineering of the gut commensal bacterium Bacteroides ovatus to produce and secrete biologically active murine interleukin-2 in response to xylan.

    PubMed

    Farrar, M D; Whitehead, T R; Lan, J; Dilger, P; Thorpe, R; Holland, K T; Carding, S R

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this work was to engineer a gut commensal bacterium, Bacteroidesovatus, to produce and secrete a biologically active cytokine in a regulated manner as a basis for novel immunotherapies for chronic gut disorders. Bacteroides ovatus was engineered to produce murine interleukin-2 (MuIL2) intracellularly in response to xylan in culture media by inserting the MuIL2 gene into the xylanase operon of the organism. A second strain was engineered to secrete MuIL2 by adding Bacteroides fragilis enterotoxin secretion signal sequence to the protein. The recombinant strains produced MuIL2 only in the presence of xylan as determined by ELISA of cell lysates and culture supernatants. The IL2-dependent cell line CTLL-2 was used to demonstrate that MuIL2 produced by both B. ovatus strains was biologically active. This activity could be blocked by an anti-IL2 neutralizing antibody. The xylan-inducible nature of this system was demonstrated by RT-PCR. Bacteroides ovatus was successfully engineered to produce and secrete biologically active MuIL2 in a xylan-inducible manner. The production and secretion of a biologically active mammalian protein by a member of the gut microflora could lead to the development of new long-term immunotherapies for inflammatory gut diseases.

  1. A rhamnose-deficient lipopolysaccharide mutant of Rhizobium sp. IRBG74 is defective in root colonization and beneficial interactions with its flooding-tolerant hosts Sesbania cannabina and wetland rice.

    PubMed

    Mitra, Shubhajit; Mukherjee, Arijit; Wiley-Kalil, Audrey; Das, Seema; Owen, Heather; Reddy, Pallavolu M; Ané, Jean-Michel; James, Euan K; Gyaneshwar, Prasad

    2016-10-01

    Rhizobium sp. IRBG74 develops a classical nitrogen-fixing symbiosis with the aquatic legume Sesbania cannabina (Retz.). It also promotes the growth of wetland rice (Oryza sativa L.), but little is known about the rhizobial determinants important for these interactions. In this study, we analyzed the colonization of S. cannabina and rice using a strain of Rhizobium sp. IRBG74 dually marked with β-glucuronidase and the green fluorescent protein. This bacterium colonized S. cannabina by crack entry and through root hair infection under flooded and non-flooded conditions, respectively. Rhizobium sp. IRBG74 colonized the surfaces of wetland rice roots, but also entered them at the base of lateral roots. It became endophytically established within intercellular spaces in the rice cortex, and intracellularly within epidermal and hypodermal cells. A mutant of Rhizobium sp. IRBG74 altered in the synthesis of the rhamnose-containing O-antigen exhibited significant defects, not only in nodulation and symbiotic nitrogen fixation with S. cannabina, but also in rice colonization and plant growth promotion. Supplementation with purified lipopolysaccharides from the wild-type strain, but not from the mutant, restored the beneficial colonization of rice roots, but not fully effective nodulation of S. cannabina Commonalities and differences in the rhizobial colonization of the roots of wetland legume and rice hosts are discussed.

  2. Lipopolysaccharide mutants of Rhizobium meliloti are not defective in symbiosis

    SciTech Connect

    Clover, R.H.; Kieber, J.; Signer, E.R. )

    1989-07-01

    Mutants of Rhizobium meliloti selected primarily for bacteriophage resistance fall into 13 groups. Mutants in the four best-characterized groups (class A, lpsB, lpsC, and class D), which map to the rhizobial chromosome, appear to affect lipopolysaccharide (LPS) as judged by the reactivity with monoclonal antibodies and behavior on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gels of extracted LPS. Mutations in all 13 groups, in an otherwise wild-type genetic background, are Fix{sup +} on alfalfa. This suggests that LPS does not play a major role in symbiosis. Mutations in lpsB, however, are Fix{sup {minus}} in one particular genetic background, evidently because of the cumulative effect of several independent background mutations. In addition, an auxotrophic mutation evidently equivalent to Escherichia coli carAB is Fix{sup {minus}} on alfalfa.

  3. Symbiotic implications of type III protein secretion machinery in Rhizobium.

    PubMed

    Viprey, V; Del Greco, A; Golinowski, W; Broughton, W J; Perret, X

    1998-06-01

    The symbiotic plasmid of Rhizobium sp. NGR234 carries a cluster of genes that encodes components of a bacterial type III secretion system (TTSS). In both animal and plant pathogens, the TTSS is an essential component of pathogenicity. Here, we show that secretion of at least two proteins (y4xL and NolX) is controlled by the TTSS of NGR234 and occurs after the induction with flavonoids. Polar mutations in two TTSS genes, rhcN and the nod-box controlled regulator of transcription y4xl, block the secretion of both proteins and strongly affect the ability of NGR234 to nodulate a variety of tropical legumes including Pachyrhizus tuberosus and Tephrosia vogelii.

  4. Biodegradation of dibenzothiophene by a nodulating isolate of Rhizobium meliloti.

    PubMed

    Frassinetti, S; Setti, L; Corti, A; Farrinelli, P; Montevecchi, P; Vallini, G

    1998-03-01

    Rhizobium meliloti Orange 1 was isolated from aerobic sediments of a drainage ditch receiving oil refinery leakage. This bacterium has been shown to be capable of growing on dibenzothiophene as the sole carbon and energy source. This strain can also efficaciously nodulate alfalfa plants. In cultures with dibenzothiophene, Orange 1 produces six degradation intermediates. By means of analyses with UV-visible and GC-MS spectrometry, as well as nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, three of these products were identified as 3-hydroxy-2-formyl-benzothiophene (product A), benzothienopyran-2-one (product B'), and dibenzothiophene-5-oxide (product D). This suggests that R. meliloti Orange 1 metabolizes dibenzothiophene via oxidative cleavage of the aromatic ring with a mechanism analogous to that described for naphthalene degradation.

  5. Rhizobium etli maize populations and their competitiveness for root colonization.

    PubMed

    Rosenblueth, Mónica; Martínez-Romero, Esperanza

    2004-05-01

    Rhizobium etli, which normally forms nitrogen-fixing nodules on Phaseolus vulgaris (common bean), is a natural maize endophyte. The genetic diversity of R. etli strains from bulk soil, bean nodules, the maize rhizosphere, the maize root, and inside stem tissue in traditional fields where maize is intercropped with P. vulgaris-beans was analyzed. Based on plasmid profiles and alloenzymes, it was determined that several R. etli types were preferentially encountered as putative maize endophytes. Some of these strains from maize were more competitive maize-root colonizers than other R. etli strains from the rhizosphere or from bean nodules. The dominant and highly competitive strain Ch24-10 was the most tolerant to 6-methoxy-2-benzoxazolinone (MBOA), a maize antimicrobial compound that is inhibitory to some bacteria and fungi. The R. tropici strain CIAT899, successfully used as inoculant of P. vulgaris, was also found to be a competitive maize endophyte in inoculation experiments.

  6. Transport and catabolism of D-mannose in Rhizobium meliloti.

    PubMed Central

    Arias, A; Gardiol, A; Martínez-Drets, G

    1982-01-01

    Rhizobium meliloti L5-30 grows on D-mannose as the sole carbon source. The catabolic pathway of D-mannose was characterized. The following activities were present: mannose transport system, mannokinase, and mannosephosphate isomerase. Several mannose-negative mutants were selected; they were classified into three functional groups: group I, mannokinase and mannosephosphate isomerase defective: group II, mannokinase defective; and group III, mannosephosphate isomerase defective. Mannose uptake was an active process, since it was inhibited by azide, dinitrophenol, and cyanide, but not by fluoride or arsenate. Growth on succinate repressed mannose uptake activity. The mannose transport system was present in all the mutants. Uptake studies showed that mannose-negative mutants did not metabolize this sugar. PMID:6286588

  7. Acid tolerance of rhizobium trifolii in culture media

    SciTech Connect

    Thornton, F.C.; Davey, C.B.

    1983-01-01

    Tolerance to acidity (pH 4.2 to 4.6), low P (1 to 6 ..mu..M) and high Al (15 to 40..mu..M) for 100 strains of Rhizobium trifolii was assessed in liquid culture media in the laboratory. Response to acidity and Al varied among strains as evidenced by lower maximum cell densities and reduced growth rates, most preceded by a lag phase. Tolerance to acidity did not imply tolerance to Al in all cases. Strains were capable of tolerating higher levels of Al if acidity was reduced. Limitations in rhizobial growth due to low P concentrations were not as severe a stress as high acidity or high Al concentration.

  8. Biosynthesis of Rhizobium meliloti lipooligosaccharide Nod factors: NodA is required for an N-acyltransferase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Atkinson, E.M.; Long, S.R. ); Palcic, M.M.; Hindsgaul, O. )

    1994-08-30

    Rhizobium bacteria synthesize N-acylated [beta]-1,4-N-acetylglucosamine lipooligosaccharides, called Nod factors, which act as morphogenic signal molecules to legume roots during development of nitrogen-fixing nodules. The biosynthesis of Nod factors is genetically dependent upon the nodulation (nod) genes, including the common nod genes nodABC. We used the Rhizobium meliloti NodH sulfotransferase to prepare [sup 35]S-labeled oligosaccharides which served as metabolic tracers for Nod enzyme activities. This approach provides a general method for following chitooligosaccharide modifications. We found nodAB-dependent conversion of N-acetylchitotetraose (chitotetraose) monosulfate into hydrophobic compounds which by chromatographic and chemical tests were equivalent to acylated Nod factors. Sequential incubation of labeled intermediates with Escherichia coli containing either NodA or NodB showed that NodB was required before NodA during Nod factor biosynthesis. The acylation activity was sensitive to oligosaccharide chain length, with chitotetraose serving as a better substrate than chitobiose or chitotriose. We constructed a putative Nod factor intermediate, GlcN-[beta]1,4-(GlcNac)[sub 3], by enzymatic synthesis and labeled it by NodH-mediated sulfation to create a specific metabolic probe. Acylation of this oligosaccharide required only NodA. These results confirm previous reports that NodB is an N-deacetylase and suggest that NodA is an N-acyltransferase. 31 refs., 6 figs.

  9. Isolation, characterization, and complementation of Rhizobium meliloti 104A14 mutants that lack glutamine synthetase II activity.

    PubMed Central

    Somerville, J E; Shatters, R G; Kahn, M L

    1989-01-01

    The glutamine synthetase (GS)-glutamate synthase pathway is the primary route used by members of the family Rhizobiaceae to assimilate ammonia. Two forms of glutamine synthetase, GSI and GSII, are found in Rhizobium and Bradyrhizobium species. These are encoded by the glnA and glnII genes, respectively. Starting with a Rhizobium meliloti glnA mutant as the parent strain, we isolated mutants unable to grow on minimal medium with ammonia as the sole nitrogen source. For two auxotrophs that lacked any detectable GS activity, R. meliloti DNA of the mutated region was cloned and partially characterized. Lack of cross-hybridization indicated that the cloned regions were not closely linked to each other or to glnA; they therefore contain two independent genes needed for GSII synthesis or activity. One of the cloned regions was identified as glnII. An R. meliloti glnII mutant and an R. meliloti glnA glnII double mutant were constructed. Both formed effective nodules on alfalfa. This is unlike the B. japonicum-soybean symbiosis, in which at least one of these GS enzymes must be present for nitrogen-fixing nodules to develop. However, the R. meliloti double mutant was not a strict glutamine auxotroph, since it could grow on media that contained glutamate and ammonia, an observation that suggests that a third GS may be active in this species. PMID:2570058

  10. Host Plant Cultivar Effects on Hydrogen Evolution by Rhizobium leguminosarum.

    PubMed

    Bedmar, E J; Edie, S A; Phillips, D A

    1983-08-01

    The effect of host plant cultivar on H(2) evolution by root nodules was examined in symbioses between Pisum sativum L. and selected strains of Rhizobium leguminosarum. Hydrogen evolution from root nodules containing Rhizobium represents the sum of H(2) produced by the nitrogenase enzyme complex and H(2) oxidized by any uptake hydrogenase present in those bacterial cells. Relative efficiency (RE) calculated as RE = 1 - (H(2) evolved in air/C(2) H(2) reduced) did not vary significantly among ;Feltham First,' ;Alaska,' and ;JI1205' peas inoculated with R. leguminosarum strain 300, which lacks uptake hydrogenase activity (Hup(-)). That observation suggests that the three host cultivars had no effect on H(2) production by nitrogenase. However, RE of strain 128C53 was significantly (P

  11. Rhizobium halophytocola sp. nov., isolated from the root of a coastal dune plant.

    PubMed

    Bibi, Fehmida; Chung, Eu Jin; Khan, Ajmal; Jeon, Che Ok; Chung, Young Ryun

    2012-08-01

    During a study of endophytic bacteria from coastal dune plants, a bacterial strain, designated YC6881(T), was isolated from the root of Rosa rugosa collected from the coastal dune areas of Namhae Island, Korea. The bacterium was found to be Gram-staining-negative, motile, halophilic and heterotrophic with a single polar flagellum. Strain YC6881(T) grew at temperatures of 4-37 °C (optimum, 28-32 °C), at pH 6.0-9.0 (optimum, pH 7.0-8.0), and at NaCl concentrations in the range of 0-7.5% (w/v) (optimum, 4-5% NaCl). Strain YC6881(T) was catalase- and oxidase-positive and negative for nitrate reduction. According to phylogenetic analysis using 16S rRNA gene sequences, strain YC6881(T) belonged to the genus Rhizobium and showed the highest 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity of 96.9% to Rhizobium rosettiformans, followed by Rhizobium borbori (96.3%), Rhizobium radiobacter (96.1%), Rhizobium daejeonense (95.9%), Rhizobium larrymoorei (95.6%) and Rhizobium giardinii (95.4%). Phylogenetic analysis of strain YC6881(T) by recA, atpD, glnII and 16S-23S intergenic spacer (IGS) sequences all confirmed the phylogenetic arrangements obtained by using 16S rRNA gene sequences. Cross-nodulation tests showed that strain YC6881(T) was a symbiotic bacterium that nodulated Vigna unguiculata and Pisum sativum. The major components of the cellular fatty acids were C(18:1)ω7c (53.7%), C(19:0) cyclo ω8c (12.6%) and C(12:0) (8.1%). The DNA G+C content was 52.8 mol%. Phenotypic and physiological tests with respect to carbon source utilization, antibiotic resistance, growth conditions, phylogenetic analyses of housekeeping genes recA, atpD and glnII, and fatty acid composition could be used to discriminate strain YC6881(T) from other species of the genus Rhizobium in the same sublineage. Based on the results obtained in this study, strain YC6881(T) is considered to represent a novel species of the genus Rhizobium, for which the name Rhizobium halophytocola sp. nov. is proposed. The type

  12. Bacteroides species from the oral cavity and oral-associated diseases of cats.

    PubMed

    Love, D N; Johnson, J L; Moore, L V

    1989-03-01

    One hundred and sixty-seven strains of Bacteroides were isolated from 71 subcutaneous fight-wound abscesses of cats, 21 cases of feline pyothorax, normal gingival margins from 10 cats and 6 cases of feline gingivitis. Bacteroides species constituted (as a proportion of all anaerobic isolates examined) 44.5% from subcutaneous abscesses, 33.7% from pyothoraxes, 37.5% from normal gingiva and 27.7% from diseased gingiva. Bacteroides tectum comprised 43.7% or 73 of 167 strains, followed by the black- or brown-pigmented asaccharolytic feline species of B. gingivalis, B. salivosus and Group B, comprising 32.3% or 54 of 167 strains. B. heparinolyticus (some 10% or 17 of 167 strains) was the next most common species described. The remainder consisted of two strains of B. fragilis and 21 unspeciated strains. Bacteroides tectum was frequently isolated from subcutaneous abscesses (43.7%) and pyothoraxes (46.6%), and it constituted some 33% of anaerobic isolated from normal gingiva. Bacteroides heparinolyticus was more commonly encountered in purulent lesions (abscesses and pyothoraxes) than in the oral cavity.

  13. A sensitive bacterial-growth-based test reveals how intestinal Bacteroides meet their porphyrin requirement.

    PubMed

    Halpern, David; Gruss, Alexandra

    2015-12-29

    Bacteroides sp. are dominant constituents of the human and animal intestinal microbiota require porphyrins (i.e., protoporphyrin IX or iron-charged heme) for normal growth. The highly stimulatory effect of porphyrins on Bacteroides growth lead us to propose their use as a potential determinant of bacterial colonization. However, showing a role for porphryins would require sensitive detection methods that work in complex samples such as feces. We devised a highly sensitive semi-quantitative porphyrin detection method (detection limit 1-4 ng heme or PPIX) that can be used to assay pure or complex biological samples, based on Bacteroides growth stimulation. The test revealed that healthy colonized or non-colonized murine and human hosts provide porphyrins in feces, which stimulate Bacteroides growth. In addition, a common microbiota constituent, Escherichia coli, is shown to be a porphyrin donor, suggesting a novel basis for intestinal bacterial interactions. A highly sensitive method to detect porphyrins based on bacterial growth is devised and is functional in complex biological samples. Host feces, independently of their microbiota, and E. coli, which are present in the intestine, are shown to be porphryin donors. The role of porphyrins as key bioactive molecules can now be assessed for their impact on Bacteroides and other bacterial populations in the gut.

  14. A Phase-Variable Surface Layer from the Gut Symbiont Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron

    PubMed Central

    Taketani, Mao; Donia, Mohamed S.; Jacobson, Amy N.; Lambris, John D.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The capsule from Bacteroides, a common gut symbiont, has long been a model system for studying the molecular mechanisms of host-symbiont interactions. The Bacteroides capsule is thought to consist of an array of phase-variable polysaccharides that give rise to subpopulations with distinct cell surface structures. Here, we report the serendipitous discovery of a previously unknown surface structure in Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron: a surface layer composed of a protein of unknown function, BT1927. BT1927, which is expressed in a phase-variable manner by ~1:1,000 cells in a wild-type culture, forms a hexagonally tessellated surface layer. The BT1927-expressing subpopulation is profoundly resistant to complement-mediated killing, due in part to the BT1927-mediated blockade of C3b deposition. Our results show that the Bacteroides surface structure is capable of a far greater degree of structural variation than previously known, and they suggest that structural variation within a Bacteroides species is important for productive gut colonization. PMID:26419879

  15. Rapid synthesis and metabolism of glutamate in N/sub 2/-fixing bacteroids. [Bradyrhizobium japonicum

    SciTech Connect

    Salminen, S.O.; Streeter, J.G.

    1987-04-01

    Symbiotic nodule bacteroids are thought to support N/sub 2/ fixation mainly by metabolizing dicarboxylic acids to CO/sub 2/, generating reductant and ATP required by nitrogenase. Bradyrhizobium japonicum bacteroids were isolated anaerobically and incubated at 2% O/sub 2/ with /sup 14/C-labeled succinate, malate, glutamate, or aspartate. /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ was collected, and the bacteroid contents separated into neutral, organic acid, and amino acid fractions. The respiration of substrates, relative to their uptake, was malate > glutamate > succinate > aspartate. Analysis of the fractions revealed that will all substrates the radioactivity was found mostly in the amino acid fraction. The labeling of the neutral fraction was negligible and only a small amount of label was found in the organic acid fraction indicating a small pool size. TLC of the amino acid fraction showed the label to be principally in glutamate. Glutamate contained 67, 80, 97, and 88% of the /sup 14/C in the amino acid fraction in bacteroids fed with succinate, malate, glutamate and aspartate, respectively. The data suggest that glutamate may play an important role in the bacteroid function.

  16. Induction of host defences by Rhizobium during ineffective nodulation of pea (Pisum sativum L.) carrying symbiotically defective mutations sym40 (PsEFD), sym33 (PsIPD3/PsCYCLOPS) and sym42.

    PubMed

    Ivanova, Kira A; Tsyganova, Anna V; Brewin, Nicholas J; Tikhonovich, Igor A; Tsyganov, Viktor E

    2015-11-01

    Rhizobia are able to establish a beneficial interaction with legumes by forming a new organ, called the symbiotic root nodule, which is a unique ecological niche for rhizobial nitrogen fixation. Rhizobial infection has many similarities with pathogenic infection and induction of defence responses accompanies both interactions, but defence responses are induced to a lesser extent during rhizobial infection. However, strong defence responses may result from incompatible interactions between legumes and rhizobia due to a mutation in either macro- or microsymbiont. The aim of this research was to analyse different plant defence reactions in response to Rhizobium infection for several pea (Pisum sativum) mutants that result in ineffective symbiosis. Pea mutants were examined by histochemical and immunocytochemical analyses, light, fluorescence and transmission electron microscopy and quantitative real-time PCR gene expression analysis. It was observed that mutations in pea symbiotic genes sym33 (PsIPD3/PsCYCLOPS encoding a transcriptional factor) and sym40 (PsEFD encoding a putative negative regulator of the cytokinin response) led to suberin depositions in ineffective nodules, and in the sym42 there were callose depositions in infection thread (IT) and host cell walls. The increase in deposition of unesterified pectin in IT walls was observed for mutants in the sym33 and sym42; for mutant in the sym42, unesterified pectin was also found around degrading bacteroids. In mutants in the genes sym33 and sym40, an increase in the expression level of a gene encoding peroxidase was observed. In the genes sym40 and sym42, an increase in the expression levels of genes encoding a marker of hypersensitive reaction and PR10 protein was demonstrated. Thus, a range of plant defence responses like suberisation, callose and unesterified pectin deposition as well as activation of defence genes can be triggered by different pea single mutations that cause perception of an otherwise

  17. Alfalfa yield response to inoculation with recombinant strains of Rhizobium meliloti with an extra copy of dctABD and/or modified nifA expression.

    PubMed Central

    Bosworth, A H; Williams, M K; Albrecht, K A; Kwiatkowski, R; Beynon, J; Hankinson, T R; Ronson, C W; Cannon, F; Wacek, T J; Triplett, E W

    1994-01-01

    The construction of rhizobial strains which increase plant biomass under controlled conditions has been previously reported. However, there is no evidence that these newly constructed strains increase legume yield under agricultural conditions. This work tested the hypothesis that carefully manipulating expression of additional copies of nifA and dctABD in strains of Rhizobium meliloti would increase alfalfa yield in the field. The rationale for this hypothesis is based on the positive regulatory role that nifA plays in the expression of the nif regulon and the fact that a supply of dicarboxylic acids from the plant is required as a carbon and energy source for nitrogen fixation by the Rhizobium bacteroids in the nodule. These recombinant strains, as well as the wild-type strains from which they were derived, are ideal tools to examine the effects of modifying or increasing the expression of these genes on alfalfa biomass. The experimental design comprised seven recombinant strains, two wild-type strains, and an uninoculated control. Each treatment was replicated eight times and was conducted at four field sites in Wisconsin. Recombinant strain RMBPC-2, which has an additional copy of both nifA and dctABD, increased alfalfa biomass by 12.9% compared with the yield with the wild-type strain RMBPC and 17.9% over that in the uninoculated control plot at the site where soil nitrogen and organic matter content was lowest. These increases were statistically significant at the 5% confidence interval for each of the three harvests made during the growing season. Strain RMBPC-2 did increase alfalfa biomass at the Hancock site; however, no other significant increases or decreases in alfalfa biomass were observed with the seven other recombinant strains at that site. At three sites where this experiment was conducted, either native rhizobial populations or soil nitrogen concentrations were high. At these sites, none of the recombinant strains affected yield. We conclude that

  18. Introduction of a novel pathway for IAA biosynthesis to rhizobia alters vetch root nodule development.

    PubMed

    Camerini, Serena; Senatore, Beatrice; Lonardo, Enza; Imperlini, Esther; Bianco, Carmen; Moschetti, Giancarlo; Rotino, Giuseppe L; Campion, Bruno; Defez, Roberto

    2008-07-01

    We introduced into Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. viciae LPR1105 a new pathway for the biosynthesis of the auxin, indole-3-acetic acid (IAA), under the control of a stationary phase-activated promoter active both in free-living bacteria and bacteroids. The newly introduced genes are the iaaM gene from Pseudomonas savastanoi and the tms2 gene from Agrobacterium tumefaciens. Free-living bacteria harbouring the promoter-iaaMtms2 construct release into the growth medium 14-fold more IAA than the wild-type parental strain. This IAA overproducing R. l. viciae, the RD20 strain, elicits the development of vetch root nodules containing up to 60-fold more IAA than nodules infected by the wild-type strain LPR1105. Vetch root nodules derived from RD20 are fewer in number per plant, heavier in terms of dry weight and show an enlarged and more active meristem. A significant increase in acetylene reduction activity was measured in nodules elicited in vetch by RD20.

  19. Identification of a Collagen Type I Adhesin of Bacteroides fragilis

    PubMed Central

    Galvão, Bruna P. G. V.; Weber, Brandon W.; Rafudeen, Mohamed S.; Ferreira, Eliane O.; Patrick, Sheila; Abratt, Valerie R.

    2014-01-01

    Bacteroides fragilis is an opportunistic pathogen which can cause life threatening infections in humans and animals. The ability to adhere to components of the extracellular matrix, including collagen, is related to bacterial host colonisation. Collagen Far Western analysis of the B. fragilis outer membrane protein (OMP) fraction revealed the presence two collagen adhesin bands of ∼31 and ∼34 kDa. The collagen adhesins in the OMP fraction were separated and isolated by two-dimensional SDS-PAGE and also purified by collagen affinity chromatography. The collagen binding proteins isolated by both these independent methods were subjected to tandem mass spectroscopy for peptide identification and matched to a single hypothetical protein encoded by B. fragilis NCTC 9343 (BF0586), conserved in YCH46 (BF0662) and 638R (BF0633) and which is designated in this study as cbp1 (collagen binding protein). Functionality of the protein was confirmed by targeted insertional mutagenesis of the cbp1 gene in B. fragilis GSH18 which resulted in the specific loss of both the ∼31 kDa and the ∼34 kDa adhesin bands. Purified his-tagged Cbp1, expressed in a B. fragilis wild-type and a glycosylation deficient mutant, confirmed that the cbp1 gene encoded the observed collagen adhesin, and showed that the 34 kDa band represents a glycosylated version of the ∼31 kDa protein. Glycosylation did not appear to be required for binding collagen. This study is the first to report the presence of collagen type I adhesin proteins in B. fragilis and to functionally identify a gene encoding a collagen binding protein. PMID:24618940

  20. The enterotoxin of Bacteroides fragilis is a metalloprotease.

    PubMed Central

    Moncrief, J S; Obiso, R; Barroso, L A; Kling, J J; Wright, R L; Van Tassell, R L; Lyerly, D M; Wilkins, T D

    1995-01-01

    During the past decade, strains of Bacteroides fragilis that produce an enterotoxin have been implicated in diarrheal disease in animals and humans. The extracellular enterotoxin has been purified and characterized as a single polypeptide (M(r), approximately 20,000). Single specific primer-PCR was used to clone a portion of the B. fragilis enterotoxin gene. The recombinant protein expressed by the cloned gene fragment reacted with monospecific antibodies to B. fragilis enterotoxin by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and immunoblot analysis. The deduced amino acid sequence revealed a signature zinc-binding consensus motif (HEXXHXXGXXH/Met-turn) characteristic of metalloproteases termed metzincins. Sequence comparisons showed close identity to matrix metalloproteases (e.g., human fibroblast collagenase) within the zinc-binding and Met-turn region. Purified enterotoxin contained 1 g-atom of Zn2+ per molecule and hydrolyzed gelatin, azocoll, actin, tropomyosin, and fibrinogen. The enterotoxin also underwent autodigestion. The N-terminal amino acid sequences of two autodigestion products were identical to the deduced amino acid sequence of the recombinant enterotoxin and revealed cleavage at Cys-Leu and Ser-Leu peptide bonds. Gelatinase (type IV collagenase) activity comigrated with the toxin when analyzed by gel fractionation and zymography, indicating that protease activity is due to the enterotoxin and not to a contaminating protease(s). Optimal proteolytic activity occurred at 37 degrees C and pH 6.5. Primary proteolytic cleavage sites in actin were identified, revealing cleavage at Gly-Met and Thr-Leu peptide bonds. Enzymatic activity was inhibited by metal chelators but not by inhibitors of other classes of proteases. Additionally, cytotoxic activity of the enterotoxin on human carcinoma HT-29 cells was inhibited by acetoxymethyl ester EDTA. The metalloprotease activity of the enterotoxin suggests a possible mechanism for enterotoxicity and may have additional

  1. Bacteroides dorei dominates gut microbiome prior to autoimmunity in Finnish children at high risk for type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Davis-Richardson, Austin G; Ardissone, Alexandria N; Dias, Raquel; Simell, Ville; Leonard, Michael T; Kemppainen, Kaisa M; Drew, Jennifer C; Schatz, Desmond; Atkinson, Mark A; Kolaczkowski, Bryan; Ilonen, Jorma; Knip, Mikael; Toppari, Jorma; Nurminen, Noora; Hyöty, Heikki; Veijola, Riitta; Simell, Tuula; Mykkänen, Juha; Simell, Olli; Triplett, Eric W

    2014-01-01

    The incidence of the autoimmune disease, type 1 diabetes (T1D), has increased dramatically over the last half century in many developed countries and is particularly high in Finland and other Nordic countries. Along with genetic predisposition, environmental factors are thought to play a critical role in this increase. As with other autoimmune diseases, the gut microbiome is thought to play a potential role in controlling progression to T1D in children with high genetic risk, but we know little about how the gut microbiome develops in children with high genetic risk for T1D. In this study, the early development of the gut microbiomes of 76 children at high genetic risk for T1D was determined using high-throughput 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Stool samples from children born in the same hospital in Turku, Finland were collected at monthly intervals beginning at 4-6 months after birth until 2.2 years of age. Of those 76 children, 29 seroconverted to T1D-related autoimmunity (cases) including 22 who later developed T1D, the remaining 47 subjects remained healthy (controls). While several significant compositional differences in low abundant species prior to seroconversion were found, one highly abundant group composed of two closely related species, Bacteroides dorei and Bacteroides vulgatus, was significantly higher in cases compared to controls prior to seroconversion. Metagenomic sequencing of samples high in the abundance of the B. dorei/vulgatus group before seroconversion, as well as longer 16S rRNA sequencing identified this group as Bacteroides dorei. The abundance of B. dorei peaked at 7.6 months in cases, over 8 months prior to the appearance of the first islet autoantibody, suggesting that early changes in the microbiome may be useful for predicting T1D autoimmunity in genetically susceptible infants. The cause of increased B. dorei abundance in cases is not known but its timing appears to coincide with the introduction of solid food.

  2. Bacteroides dorei dominates gut microbiome prior to autoimmunity in Finnish children at high risk for type 1 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Davis-Richardson, Austin G.; Ardissone, Alexandria N.; Dias, Raquel; Simell, Ville; Leonard, Michael T.; Kemppainen, Kaisa M.; Drew, Jennifer C.; Schatz, Desmond; Atkinson, Mark A.; Kolaczkowski, Bryan; Ilonen, Jorma; Knip, Mikael; Toppari, Jorma; Nurminen, Noora; Hyöty, Heikki; Veijola, Riitta; Simell, Tuula; Mykkänen, Juha; Simell, Olli; Triplett, Eric W.

    2014-01-01

    The incidence of the autoimmune disease, type 1 diabetes (T1D), has increased dramatically over the last half century in many developed countries and is particularly high in Finland and other Nordic countries. Along with genetic predisposition, environmental factors are thought to play a critical role in this increase. As with other autoimmune diseases, the gut microbiome is thought to play a potential role in controlling progression to T1D in children with high genetic risk, but we know little about how the gut microbiome develops in children with high genetic risk for T1D. In this study, the early development of the gut microbiomes of 76 children at high genetic risk for T1D was determined using high-throughput 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Stool samples from children born in the same hospital in Turku, Finland were collected at monthly intervals beginning at 4–6 months after birth until 2.2 years of age. Of those 76 children, 29 seroconverted to T1D-related autoimmunity (cases) including 22 who later developed T1D, the remaining 47 subjects remained healthy (controls). While several significant compositional differences in low abundant species prior to seroconversion were found, one highly abundant group composed of two closely related species, Bacteroides dorei and Bacteroides vulgatus, was significantly higher in cases compared to controls prior to seroconversion. Metagenomic sequencing of samples high in the abundance of the B. dorei/vulgatus group before seroconversion, as well as longer 16S rRNA sequencing identified this group as Bacteroides dorei. The abundance of B. dorei peaked at 7.6 months in cases, over 8 months prior to the appearance of the first islet autoantibody, suggesting that early changes in the microbiome may be useful for predicting T1D autoimmunity in genetically susceptible infants. The cause of increased B. dorei abundance in cases is not known but its timing appears to coincide with the introduction of solid food. PMID:25540641

  3. The Regulatory Protein RosR Affects Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. trifolii Protein Profiles, Cell Surface Properties, and Symbiosis with Clover

    PubMed Central

    Rachwał, Kamila; Boguszewska, Aleksandra; Kopcińska, Joanna; Karaś, Magdalena; Tchórzewski, Marek; Janczarek, Monika

    2016-01-01

    Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. trifolii is capable of establishing a symbiotic relationship with plants from the genus Trifolium. Previously, a regulatory protein encoded by rosR was identified and characterized in this bacterium. RosR possesses a Cys2-His2-type zinc finger motif and belongs to Ros/MucR family of rhizobial transcriptional regulators. Transcriptome profiling of the rosR mutant revealed a role of this protein in several cellular processes, including the synthesis of cell-surface components and polysaccharides, motility, and bacterial metabolism. Here, we show that a mutation in rosR resulted in considerable changes in R. leguminosarum bv. trifolii protein profiles. Extracellular, membrane, and periplasmic protein profiles of R. leguminosarum bv. trifolii wild type and the rosR mutant were examined, and proteins with substantially different abundances between these strains were identified. Compared with the wild type, extracellular fraction of the rosR mutant contained greater amounts of several proteins, including Ca2+-binding cadherin-like proteins, a RTX-like protein, autoaggregation protein RapA1, and flagellins FlaA and FlaB. In contrast, several proteins involved in the uptake of various substrates were less abundant in the mutant strain (DppA, BraC, and SfuA). In addition, differences were observed in membrane proteins of the mutant and wild-type strains, which mainly concerned various transport system components. Using atomic force microscopy (AFM) imaging, we characterized the topography and surface properties of the rosR mutant and wild-type cells. We found that the mutation in rosR gene also affected surface properties of R. leguminosarum bv. trifolii. The mutant cells were significantly more hydrophobic than the wild-type cells, and their outer membrane was three times more permeable to the hydrophobic dye N-phenyl-1-naphthylamine. The mutation of rosR also caused defects in bacterial symbiotic interaction with clover plants. Compared with

  4. Y4lO of Rhizobium sp. Strain NGR234 Is a Symbiotic Determinant Required for Symbiosome Differentiation▿

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Feng-Juan; Cheng, Li-Li; Zhang, Ling; Dai, Wei-Jun; Liu, Zhe; Yao, Nan; Xie, Zhi-Ping; Staehelin, Christian

    2009-01-01

    Type 3 (T3) effector proteins, secreted by nitrogen-fixing rhizobia with a bacterial T3 secretion system, affect the nodulation of certain host legumes. The open reading frame y4lO of Rhizobium sp. strain NGR234 encodes a protein with sequence similarities to T3 effectors from pathogenic bacteria (the YopJ effector family). Transcription studies showed that the promoter activity of y4lO depended on the transcriptional activator TtsI. Recombinant Y4lO protein expressed in Escherichia coli did not acetylate two representative mitogen-activated protein kinase kinases (human MKK6 and MKK1 from Medicago truncatula), indicating that YopJ-like proteins differ with respect to their substrate specificities. The y4lO gene was mutated in NGR234 (strain NGRΩy4lO) and in NGRΩnopL, a mutant that does not produce the T3 effector NopL (strain NGRΩnopLΩy4lO). When used as inoculants, the symbiotic properties of the mutants differed. Tephrosia vogelii, Phaseolus vulgaris cv. Yudou No. 1, and Vigna unguiculata cv. Sui Qing Dou Jiao formed pink effective nodules with NGR234 and NGRΩnopLΩy4lO. Nodules induced by NGRΩy4lO were first pink but rapidly turned greenish (ineffective nodules), indicating premature senescence. An ultrastructural analysis of the nodules induced by NGRΩy4lO revealed abnormal formation of enlarged infection droplets in ineffective nodules, whereas symbiosomes harboring a single bacteroid were frequently observed in effective nodules induced by NGR234 or NGRΩnopLΩy4lO. It is concluded that Y4lO is a symbiotic determinant involved in the differentiation of symbiosomes. Y4lO mitigated senescence-inducing effects caused by the T3 effector NopL, suggesting synergistic effects for Y4lO and NopL in nitrogen-fixing nodules. PMID:19060155

  5. Differential Regulation of Rhizobium etli rpoN2 Gene Expression during Symbiosis and Free-Living Growth

    PubMed Central

    Michiels, Jan; Moris, Martine; Dombrecht, Bruno; Verreth, Christel; Vanderleyden, Jos

    1998-01-01

    The Rhizobium etli rpoN1 gene, encoding the alternative sigma factor ς54 (RpoN), was recently characterized and shown to be involved in the assimilation of several nitrogen and carbon sources during free-living aerobic growth (J. Michiels, T. Van Soom, I. D’hooghe, B. Dombrecht, T. Benhassine, P. de Wilde, and J. Vanderleyden, J. Bacteriol. 180:1729–1740, 1998). We identified a second rpoN gene copy in R. etli, rpoN2, encoding a 54.0-kDa protein which displays 59% amino acid identity with the R. etli RpoN1 protein. The rpoN2 gene is cotranscribed with a short open reading frame, orf180, which codes for a protein with a size of 20.1 kDa that is homologous to several prokaryotic and eukaryotic proteins of similar size. In contrast to the R. etli rpoN1 mutant strain, inactivation of the rpoN2 gene did not produce any phenotypic defects during free-living growth. However, symbiotic nitrogen fixation was reduced by approximately 90% in the rpoN2 mutant, whereas wild-type levels of nitrogen fixation were observed in the rpoN1 mutant strain. Nitrogen fixation was completely abolished in the rpoN1 rpoN2 double mutant. Expression of rpoN1 was negatively autoregulated during aerobic growth and was reduced during microaerobiosis and symbiosis. In contrast, rpoN2-gusA and orf180-gusA fusions were not expressed aerobically but were strongly induced at low oxygen tensions or in bacteroids. Expression of rpoN2 and orf180 was abolished in R. etli rpoN1 rpoN2 and nifA mutants under all conditions tested. Under free-living microaerobic conditions, transcription of rpoN2 and orf180 required the RpoN1 protein. In symbiosis, expression of rpoN2 and orf180 occurred independently of the rpoN1 gene, suggesting the existence of an alternative symbiosis-specific mechanism of transcription activation. PMID:9658006

  6. Y4lO of Rhizobium sp. strain NGR234 is a symbiotic determinant required for symbiosome differentiation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Feng-Juan; Cheng, Li-Li; Zhang, Ling; Dai, Wei-Jun; Liu, Zhe; Yao, Nan; Xie, Zhi-Ping; Staehelin, Christian

    2009-02-01

    Type 3 (T3) effector proteins, secreted by nitrogen-fixing rhizobia with a bacterial T3 secretion system, affect the nodulation of certain host legumes. The open reading frame y4lO of Rhizobium sp. strain NGR234 encodes a protein with sequence similarities to T3 effectors from pathogenic bacteria (the YopJ effector family). Transcription studies showed that the promoter activity of y4lO depended on the transcriptional activator TtsI. Recombinant Y4lO protein expressed in Escherichia coli did not acetylate two representative mitogen-activated protein kinase kinases (human MKK6 and MKK1 from Medicago truncatula), indicating that YopJ-like proteins differ with respect to their substrate specificities. The y4lO gene was mutated in NGR234 (strain NGROmegay4lO) and in NGR Omega nopL, a mutant that does not produce the T3 effector NopL (strain NGR Omega nopLOmegay4lO). When used as inoculants, the symbiotic properties of the mutants differed. Tephrosia vogelii, Phaseolus vulgaris cv. Yudou No. 1, and Vigna unguiculata cv. Sui Qing Dou Jiao formed pink effective nodules with NGR234 and NGR Omega nopL Omega y4lO. Nodules induced by NGR Omega y4lO were first pink but rapidly turned greenish (ineffective nodules), indicating premature senescence. An ultrastructural analysis of the nodules induced by NGR Omega y4lO revealed abnormal formation of enlarged infection droplets in ineffective nodules, whereas symbiosomes harboring a single bacteroid were frequently observed in effective nodules induced by NGR234 or NGR Omega nopL Omega y4lO. It is concluded that Y4lO is a symbiotic determinant involved in the differentiation of symbiosomes. Y4lO mitigated senescence-inducing effects caused by the T3 effector NopL, suggesting synergistic effects for Y4lO and NopL in nitrogen-fixing nodules.

  7. The Regulatory Protein RosR Affects Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. trifolii Protein Profiles, Cell Surface Properties, and Symbiosis with Clover.

    PubMed

    Rachwał, Kamila; Boguszewska, Aleksandra; Kopcińska, Joanna; Karaś, Magdalena; Tchórzewski, Marek; Janczarek, Monika

    2016-01-01

    Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. trifolii is capable of establishing a symbiotic relationship with plants from the genus Trifolium. Previously, a regulatory protein encoded by rosR was identified and characterized in this bacterium. RosR possesses a Cys2-His2-type zinc finger motif and belongs to Ros/MucR family of rhizobial transcriptional regulators. Transcriptome profiling of the rosR mutant revealed a role of this protein in several cellular processes, including the synthesis of cell-surface components and polysaccharides, motility, and bacterial metabolism. Here, we show that a mutation in rosR resulted in considerable changes in R. leguminosarum bv. trifolii protein profiles. Extracellular, membrane, and periplasmic protein profiles of R. leguminosarum bv. trifolii wild type and the rosR mutant were examined, and proteins with substantially different abundances between these strains were identified. Compared with the wild type, extracellular fraction of the rosR mutant contained greater amounts of several proteins, including Ca(2+)-binding cadherin-like proteins, a RTX-like protein, autoaggregation protein RapA1, and flagellins FlaA and FlaB. In contrast, several proteins involved in the uptake of various substrates were less abundant in the mutant strain (DppA, BraC, and SfuA). In addition, differences were observed in membrane proteins of the mutant and wild-type strains, which mainly concerned various transport system components. Using atomic force microscopy (AFM) imaging, we characterized the topography and surface properties of the rosR mutant and wild-type cells. We found that the mutation in rosR gene also affected surface properties of R. leguminosarum bv. trifolii. The mutant cells were significantly more hydrophobic than the wild-type cells, and their outer membrane was three times more permeable to the hydrophobic dye N-phenyl-1-naphthylamine. The mutation of rosR also caused defects in bacterial symbiotic interaction with clover plants. Compared with

  8. Rhizobium taibaishanense sp. nov., isolated from a root nodule of Kummerowia striata.

    PubMed

    Yao, Li Juan; Shen, Yao Yao; Zhan, Jun Peng; Xu, Wei; Cui, Guang Ling; Wei, Ge Hong

    2012-02-01

    During a study of the diversity and phylogeny of rhizobia in the root nodules of Kummerowia striata grown in north-western China, four strains were classified in the genus Rhizobium on the basis of their 16S rRNA gene sequences. The 16S rRNA gene sequences of three of these strains were identical and that of the other strain, which was the only one isolated in Yangling, differed from the others by just 1 bp. The16S rRNA gene sequences of the four strains showed a mean similarity of 99.3 % with the most closely related, recognized species, Rhizobium vitis. The corresponding recA and glnA gene sequences showed similarities with established species of Rhizobium of less than 86.5 % and less than 89.6 %, respectively. These low similarities indicated that the four strains represented a novel species of the genus Rhizobium. The strains were also found to be distinguishable from the closest related, established species (R. vitis) by rep-PCR DNA fingerprinting, analysis of cellular fatty acid profiles and from the results of a series of phenotypic tests. The level of DNA-DNA relatedness between the representative strain CCNWSX 0483(T) and Rhizobium vitis IAM 14140(T) was only 40.13 %. Therefore, a novel species, Rhizobium taibaishanense sp. nov., is proposed, with strain CCNWSX 0483(T) ( = ACCC 14971(T) = HAMBI 3214(T)) as the type strain. In nodulation and pathogenicity tests, none of the four strains of Rhizobium taibaishanense sp. nov. was able to induce any nodule or tumour formation on plants. As no amplicons were detected when DNA from the strains was run in PCR with primers for the detection of nodA, nifH and virC gene sequences, the strains probably do not carry sym or vir genes.

  9. Comparison of standard, quantitative and digital PCR in the detection of enterotoxigenic Bacteroides fragilis.

    PubMed

    Purcell, Rachel V; Pearson, John; Frizelle, Frank A; Keenan, Jacqueline I

    2016-09-30

    Gut colonization with enterotoxigenic Bacteroides fragilis (ETBF) appears to be associated with the development of colorectal cancer. However, differences in carriage rates are seen with various testing methods and sampling sites. We compared standard PCR, SYBR green and TaqMan quantitative PCR (qPCR) and digital PCR (dPCR) in detecting the B. fragilis toxin (bft) gene from cultured ETBF, and from matched luminal and faecal stool samples from 19 colorectal cancer patients. Bland-Altman analysis found that all three quantitative methods performed comparably in detecting bft from purified bacterial DNA, with the same limits of detection (<1 copy/μl). However, SYBR qPCR under-performed compared to TaqMan qPCR and dPCR in detecting bft in clinical stool samples; 13/38 samples were reported positive by SYBR, compared to 35 and 36 samples by TaqMan and dPCR, respectively. TaqMan qPCR and dPCR gave bft copy numbers that were 48-fold and 75-fold higher for the same samples than SYBR qPCR, respectively (p < 0.001). For samples that were bft-positive in both fecal and luminal stools, there was no difference in relative abundance between the sites, by any method tested. From our findings, we recommend the use of TaqMan qPCR as the preferred method to detect ETBF from clinical stool samples.

  10. Monoculture parameters successfully predict coculture growth kinetics of Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron and two Bifidobacterium strains.

    PubMed

    Van Wey, A S; Cookson, A L; Roy, N C; McNabb, W C; Soboleva, T K; Shorten, P R

    2014-11-17

    Microorganisms rarely live in isolation but are most often found in a consortium. This provides the potential for cross-feeding and nutrient competition among the microbial species, which make it challenging to predict the growth kinetics in coculture. In this paper we developed a mathematical model to describe substrate consumption and subsequent microbial growth and metabolite production for bacteria grown in monoculture. The model characterized substrate utilization kinetics of 18 Bifidobacterium strains. Some bifidobacterial strains demonstrated preferential degradation of oligofructose in that sugars with low degree of polymerization (DP) (DP≤3 or 4) were metabolized before sugars of higher DP, or vice versa. Thus, we expanded the model to describe the preferential degradation of oligofructose. In addition, we adapted the model to describe the competition between human colonic bacteria Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron LMG 11262 and Bifidobacterium longum LMG 11047 or Bifidobacterium breve Yakult for inulin as well as cross-feeding of breakdown products from the extracellular hydrolysis of inulin by B. thetaiotaomicron LMG 11262. We found that the coculture growth kinetics could be predicted based on the respective monoculture growth kinetics. Using growth kinetics from monoculture experiments to predict coculture dynamics will reduce the number of in vitro experiments required to parameterize multi-culture models.

  11. Colonization with enterotoxigenic Bacteroides fragilis is associated with early-stage colorectal neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Pearson, John; Aitchison, Alan; Dixon, Liane; Frizelle, Frank A.; Keenan, Jacqueline I.

    2017-01-01

    Background Enterotoxigenic Bacteroides fragilis (ETBF) is a toxin-producing bacteria thought to possibly promote colorectal carcinogenesis by modulating the mucosal immune response and inducing epithelial cell changes. Here, we aim to examine the association of colonic mucosal colonization with ETBF and the presence of a range of lesions on the colonic neoplastic spectrum. Methods Mucosal tissue from up to four different colonic sites was obtained from a consecutive series of 150 patients referred for colonoscopy. The presence and relative abundance of the B. fragilis toxin gene (bft) in each tissue sample was determined using quantitative PCR, and associations with clinicopathological characteristics were analysed. Findings We found a high concordance of ETBF between different colonic sites (86%). Univariate analysis showed statistically significant associations between ETBF positivity and the presence of low-grade dysplasia (LGD), tubular adenomas (TA), and serrated polyps (P-values of 0.007, 0.027, and 0.007, respectively). A higher relative abundance of ETBF was significantly associated with LGD and TA (P-values of < 0.0001 and 0.025, respectively). Increased ETBF positivity and abundance was also associated with left-sided biopsies, compared to those from the right side of the colon. Conclusion Our results showing association of ETBF positivity and increased abundance with early-stage carcinogenic lesions underlines its importance in the development of colorectal cancer, and we suggest that detection of ETBF may be a potential marker of early colorectal carcinogenesis. PMID:28151975

  12. Role of T Lymphocytes in Liver Abscess Formation by Bacteroides fragilis in Mice ▿

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Doo Ryeon; Park, Hye-Rim; Park, Chung-Gyu; Hwang, Eung-Soo; Cha, Chang-Yong

    2011-01-01

    The underlying mechanisms of liver abscess formation have not been fully elucidated with regard to the interaction between bacterial virulence factors and the immune response. The objective of this study was to determine the role of the host T cells in liver abscess formation caused by Bacteroides fragilis. We developed a liver abscess mouse model with inoculation of B. fragilis through the hepatic portal vein and examined the role of T cells by studying T cell-deficient mice, as well as conducting adoptive T cell transfer experiments. No microabscess was formed in the αβ T cell receptor-positive (αβTCR+) T cell-depleted mice, in contrast to the results for the control mice. In addition, the αβTCR knockout (KO) mice showed significantly lower numbers of microabscesses, and the abscesses were smaller in size than those in the wild-type mice. Adoptive transfer of T cells purified from the wild-type mice into the αβTCR KO mice resulted in liver abscess formation in those mice. These findings suggest that T cells play an essential role in liver abscess formation caused by B. fragilis in mice. PMID:21444668

  13. Cephalosporinases associated with outer membrane vesicles released by Bacteroides spp. protect gut pathogens and commensals against β-lactam antibiotics

    PubMed Central

    Stentz, Régis; Horn, Nikki; Cross, Kathryn; Salt, Louise; Brearley, Charles; Livermore, David M.; Carding, Simon R.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To identify β-lactamase genes in gut commensal Bacteroides species and to assess the impact of these enzymes, when carried by outer membrane vesicles (OMVs), in protecting enteric pathogens and commensals. Methods A deletion mutant of the putative class A β-lactamase gene (locus tag BT_4507) found in the genome of the human commensal Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron was constructed and a phenotypic analysis performed. A phylogenetic tree was built from an alignment of nine Bacteroides cephalosporinase protein sequences, using the maximum likelihood method. The rate of cefotaxime degradation after incubation with OMVs produced by different Bacteroides species was quantified using a disc susceptibility test. The resistance of Salmonella Typhimurium and Bifidobacterium breve to cefotaxime in liquid culture in the presence of B. thetaiotaomicron OMVs was evaluated by measuring bacterial growth. Results The B. thetaiotaomicron BT_4507 gene encodes a β-lactamase related to the CepA cephalosporinase of Bacteroides fragilis. OMVs produced by B. thetaiotaomicron and several other Bacteroides species, except Bacteroides ovatus, carried surface-associated β-lactamases that could degrade cefotaxime. β-Lactamase-harbouring OMVs from B. thetaiotaomicron protected Salmonella Typhimurium and B. breve from an otherwise lethal dose of cefotaxime. Conclusions The production of membrane vesicles carrying surface-associated β-lactamases by Bacteroides species, which constitute a major part of the human colonic microbiota, may protect commensal bacteria and enteric pathogens, such as Salmonella Typhimurium, against β-lactam antibiotics. PMID:25433011

  14. Cephalosporinases associated with outer membrane vesicles released by Bacteroides spp. protect gut pathogens and commensals against β-lactam antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Stentz, Régis; Horn, Nikki; Cross, Kathryn; Salt, Louise; Brearley, Charles; Livermore, David M; Carding, Simon R

    2015-03-01

    To identify β-lactamase genes in gut commensal Bacteroides species and to assess the impact of these enzymes, when carried by outer membrane vesicles (OMVs), in protecting enteric pathogens and commensals. A deletion mutant of the putative class A β-lactamase gene (locus tag BT_4507) found in the genome of the human commensal Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron was constructed and a phenotypic analysis performed. A phylogenetic tree was built from an alignment of nine Bacteroides cephalosporinase protein sequences, using the maximum likelihood method. The rate of cefotaxime degradation after incubation with OMVs produced by different Bacteroides species was quantified using a disc susceptibility test. The resistance of Salmonella Typhimurium and Bifidobacterium breve to cefotaxime in liquid culture in the presence of B. thetaiotaomicron OMVs was evaluated by measuring bacterial growth. The B. thetaiotaomicron BT_4507 gene encodes a β-lactamase related to the CepA cephalosporinase of Bacteroides fragilis. OMVs produced by B. thetaiotaomicron and several other Bacteroides species, except Bacteroides ovatus, carried surface-associated β-lactamases that could degrade cefotaxime. β-Lactamase-harbouring OMVs from B. thetaiotaomicron protected Salmonella Typhimurium and B. breve from an otherwise lethal dose of cefotaxime. The production of membrane vesicles carrying surface-associated β-lactamases by Bacteroides species, which constitute a major part of the human colonic microbiota, may protect commensal bacteria and enteric pathogens, such as Salmonella Typhimurium, against β-lactam antibiotics. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy.

  15. Migration and chemiluminescence of polymorphonuclear cells and monocytes to Bacteroides sonicates.

    PubMed

    Fotos, P G; Lewis, D M; Gerencser, V F; Gerencser, M A; Snyder, I S

    1992-01-01

    Recent investigations have demonstrated that various preparations obtained from representatives of the genus Bacteroides are poorly phagocytized by polymorphonuclear cells (PMN) and macrophages. Crude cell sonicates derived from Bacteroides have been examined for their ability to inhibit migration of PMN and monocytes using a modified migration under agarose in vitro assay. B. gingivalis and B. intermedius were found to be inhibitors of such migration while B. asaccharolyticus did not share this property (P less than 0.005). In addition, B. intermedius sonicates were found to inhibit PMN chemiluminescence to known stimulants (P less than 0.001). These data were not found to result from direct sonicate cytotoxicity and therefore lend additional support to the etiologic importance of specific Bacteroides strains in the pathogenesis of acute and chronic dentoalveolar infections.

  16. Novel Bacteroides host strains for detection of human- and animal-specific bacteriophages in water.

    PubMed

    Wicki, Melanie; Auckenthaler, Adrian; Felleisen, Richard; Tanner, Marcel; Baumgartner, Andreas

    2011-03-01

    Bacteriophages active against specific Bacteroides host strains were shown to be suitable for detection of human faecal pollution. However, the practical application of this finding is limited because some specific host strains were restricted to certain geographic regions. In this study, novel Bacteroides host strains were isolated that discriminate human and animal faecal pollution in Switzerland. Two strains specific for bacteriophages present in human faecal contamination and three strains specific for bacteriophages indicating animal faecal contamination were evaluated. Bacteriophages infecting human strains were exclusively found in human wastewater, whereas animal strains detected bacteriophages only in animal waste. The newly isolated host strains could be used to determine the source of surface and spring water faecal contamination in field situations. Applying the newly isolated host Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron ARABA 84 for detection of bacteriophages allowed the detection of human faecal contamination in spring water.

  17. A partial phylogenetic analysis of the "flavobacter-bacteroides" phylum: basis for taxonomic restructuring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gherna, R.; Woese, C. R.

    1992-01-01

    On the basis of small subunit rRNA sequence analyses five major subgroups within the flavobacteria-bacteroides phylum have been defined. These are tentatively designated the cytophaga subgroup (comprising largely Cytophaga species), the flavobacter subgroup (comprising the true flavobacteria and the polyphyletic genus Weeksella), the bacteroides subgroup (comprising the bacteroides and certain cytophaga-like bacteria), the sphingobacter subgroup (which contains the known sphingolipid-producing members of the phylum), and the saprospira subgroup (comprising particular species of Flexibacter, Flavobacterium, Haliscomenobacter, and, of course, the genus Saprospira). These groupings are given not only by evolutionary distance analysis, but can be defined and distinguished on the basis of a simple small subunit rRNA signatures.

  18. Navigating the Gut Buffet: Control of Polysaccharide Utilization in Bacteroides spp.

    PubMed

    Schwalm, Nathan D; Groisman, Eduardo A

    2017-07-18

    Bacteroides spp. are members of the human gut microbiota that confer myriad benefits on their hosts. Among them is the provision of energy from otherwise indigestible polysaccharides comprising part of the host diet, lining the intestinal mucosal layer, and decorating the surface of other microbes. Bacteroides spp. devote ∼20% of their genomes to the transport and breakdown of a wide variety of polysaccharides, and to the regulation of these processes. Bacteroides spp. rely on different families of transcriptional regulators to ensure that carbohydrate utilization genes are expressed under specific conditions. The regulators and mechanisms controlling carbohydrate utilization are often unique to these gut-dwelling bacteria, and do not conform to those of model organisms. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Differential growth of bowel commensal Bacteroides species on plant xylans of differing structural complexity.

    PubMed

    Centanni, Manuela; Hutchison, Jennifer C; Carnachan, Susan M; Daines, Alison M; Kelly, William J; Tannock, Gerald W; Sims, Ian M

    2017-02-10

    Alterations to the composition of the bowel microbiota (dysbioses) are associated with particular diseases and conditions of humans. There is a need to discover new, indigestible polysaccharides which are selective growth substrates for commensal bowel bacteria. These substrates (prebiotics) could be added to food in intervention studies to correct bowel dysbiosis. A collection of commensal bacteria was screened for growth in culture using a highly-branched xylan produced by New Zealand flax. Two, Bacteroides ovatus ATCC 8483 and Bacteroides xylanisolvens DSM 18836 grew well on this substrate. The utilisation of the xylan was studied chromatographically and by constituent sugar analysis. The two closely related species utilised the xylan in different ways, and differently from their use of wheat arabinoxylan. The growth of Bacteroides species on other plant xylans having differing chemical structures was also investigated. Novel xylans expand the choice of potential prebiotics that could be used to correct bowel dysbioses.

  20. A partial phylogenetic analysis of the "flavobacter-bacteroides" phylum: basis for taxonomic restructuring.

    PubMed

    Gherna, R; Woese, C R

    1992-12-01

    On the basis of small subunit rRNA sequence analyses five major subgroups within the flavobacteria-bacteroides phylum have been defined. These are tentatively designated the cytophaga subgroup (comprising largely Cytophaga species), the flavobacter subgroup (comprising the true flavobacteria and the polyphyletic genus Weeksella), the bacteroides subgroup (comprising the bacteroides and certain cytophaga-like bacteria), the sphingobacter subgroup (which contains the known sphingolipid-producing members of the phylum), and the saprospira subgroup (comprising particular species of Flexibacter, Flavobacterium, Haliscomenobacter, and, of course, the genus Saprospira). These groupings are given not only by evolutionary distance analysis, but can be defined and distinguished on the basis of a simple small subunit rRNA signatures.

  1. A partial phylogenetic analysis of the "flavobacter-bacteroides" phylum: basis for taxonomic restructuring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gherna, R.; Woese, C. R.

    1992-01-01

    On the basis of small subunit rRNA sequence analyses five major subgroups within the flavobacteria-bacteroides phylum have been defined. These are tentatively designated the cytophaga subgroup (comprising largely Cytophaga species), the flavobacter subgroup (comprising the true flavobacteria and the polyphyletic genus Weeksella), the bacteroides subgroup (comprising the bacteroides and certain cytophaga-like bacteria), the sphingobacter subgroup (which contains the known sphingolipid-producing members of the phylum), and the saprospira subgroup (comprising particular species of Flexibacter, Flavobacterium, Haliscomenobacter, and, of course, the genus Saprospira). These groupings are given not only by evolutionary distance analysis, but can be defined and distinguished on the basis of a simple small subunit rRNA signatures.

  2. Bacteremia due to Bacteroides fragilis after elective appendectomy in renal transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Fisher, M C; Baluarte, H J; Long, S S

    1981-05-01

    Bacteremia caused by Bacteroides fragilis occurred in four of 75 children after renal transplantation, and B. fragilis was the most common cause of postoperative bacteremia. Bacteroides bacteremia was significantly associated with performance of elective appendectomy at the time of transplantation (P less than 0.01) and with profound lymphocytopenia (P = 0.01). No patient received antibiotics at the time of surgery or prior to the first positive blood culture, yet B. fragilis was the single organism isolated from blood and abscesses in these patients. A role for lymphocytes in containment of B. fragilis has not been suggested previously, although unexplained occurrence of bacteroides bacteremia in immunocompromised patients has occasionally been reported. Lymphocytes themselves may be important in this host-bacterium interaction, or lymphocytopenia may be the marker for a more generalized deficiency in host defenses.

  3. Evidence for T Cell-dependent Immunity to Bacteroides fragilis in an Intraabdominal Abscess Model

    PubMed Central

    Onderdonk, Andrew B.; Markham, Richard B.; Zaleznik, Dori F.; Cisneros, Ronald L.; Kasper, Dennis L.

    1982-01-01

    It has been shown that active immunization of rats with the capsular polysaccharide of Bacteroides fragilis protects these animals against abscess development following intraperitoneal challenge with this species. Passive transfer of hyperimmune globulin from immunized animals to nonimmune recipients provided protection against B. fragilis bacteremia in challenged animals, but did not confer protection against abscess development. On the other hand, adoptive transfer of spleen cells from immunized animals to nonimmunized recipients resulted in protection against abscesses following challenge with B. fragilis. These data suggested that a T cell-dependent immune response was involved in protection against abscess development after immunization with B. fragilis capsular antigen. To determine the possible role of cell-mediated immunity prompted by the capsular antigen, inbred congenitally athymic OLA/Rnu rats and their phenotypically normal littermates were actively immunized. Despite the development of high titers of anti-B. fragilis capsular antibody, 100% of actively immunized athymic rats developed abscesses, as did 100% of unimmunized athymic control rats. However, no phenotypically normal littermate control rats that were actively immunized developed abscesses, while 100% of phenotypically normal unimmunized rats developed abscesses. Additional studies showed that adoptive transfer of T cell-enriched spleen cell preparations from Wistar/Lewis rats immunized with the capsular polysaccharide to nonimmune recipients also resulted in protection against B. fragilis-induced abscesses. We conclude that the protection afforded by immunization with B. fragilis capsule against intraabdominal abscesses caused by that organism is T cell-mediated and does not require the presence of serum antibody. PMID:6976357

  4. Bacteroides sp. strain D8, the first cholesterol-reducing bacterium isolated from human feces.

    PubMed

    Gérard, Philippe; Lepercq, Pascale; Leclerc, Marion; Gavini, Françoise; Raibaud, Pierre; Juste, Catherine

    2007-09-01

    The microbial community in the human colon contains bacteria that reduce cholesterol to coprostanol, but the species responsible for this conversion are still unknown. We describe here the first isolation and characterization of a cholesterol-reducing bacterium of human intestinal origin. Strain D8 was isolated from a 10(-8) dilution of a fresh stool sample provided by a senior male volunteer with a high capacity to reduce luminal cholesterol to coprostanol. Cholesterol-to-coprostanol conversion by strain D8 started on the third day, while cells were in stationary phase, and was almost complete after 7 days. Intermediate products (4-cholesten-3-one and coprostanone) were occasionally observed, suggesting an indirect pathway for cholesterol-to-coprostanol conversion. Resting-cell assays showed that strain D8 could reduce 1.5 mumol of cholesterol/mg bacterial protein/h. Strain D8 was a gram-negative, non-spore-forming, rod-shaped organism identified as a member of the genus Bacteroides closely related to Bacteroides vulgatus, based on its morphological and biochemical characteristics. The 16S rRNA gene sequence of strain D8 was most similar (>99.5%) to those of two isolates of the recently described species Bacteroides dorei. Phylogenetic tree construction confirmed that Bacteroides sp. strain D8 clustered within an independent clade together with these B. dorei strains. Nevertheless, no cholesterol-reducing activity could be detected in cultures of the B. dorei type strain. Based on Bacteroides group-specific PCR-temporal temperature gradient gel electrophoresis, there was no correlation between the presence of a band comigrating with the band of Bacteroides sp. strain D8 and cholesterol conversion in 11 human fecal samples, indicating that this strain is unlikely to be mainly responsible for cholesterol conversion in the human population.

  5. Rhizobium cellulase CelC2 is essential for primary symbiotic infection of legume host roots

    PubMed Central

    Robledo, M.; Jiménez-Zurdo, J. I.; Velázquez, E.; Trujillo, M. E.; Zurdo-Piñeiro, J. L.; Ramírez-Bahena, M. H.; Ramos, B.; Díaz-Mínguez, J. M.; Dazzo, F.; Martínez-Molina, E.; Mateos, P. F.

    2008-01-01

    The rhizobia–legume, root-nodule symbiosis provides the most efficient source of biologically fixed ammonia fertilizer for agricultural crops. Its development involves pathways of specificity, infectivity, and effectivity resulting from expressed traits of the bacterium and host plant. A key event of the infection process required for development of this root-nodule symbiosis is a highly localized, complete erosion of the plant cell wall through which the bacterial symbiont penetrates to establish a nitrogen-fixing, intracellular endosymbiotic state within the host. This process of wall degradation must be delicately balanced to avoid lysis and destruction of the host cell. Here, we describe the purification, biochemical characterization, molecular genetic analysis, biological activity, and symbiotic function of a cell-bound bacterial cellulase (CelC2) enzyme from Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. trifolii, the clover-nodulating endosymbiont. The purified enzyme can erode the noncrystalline tip of the white clover host root hair wall, making a localized hole of sufficient size to allow wild-type microsymbiont penetration. This CelC2 enzyme is not active on root hairs of the nonhost legume alfalfa. Microscopy analysis of the symbiotic phenotypes of the ANU843 wild type and CelC2 knockout mutant derivative revealed that this enzyme fulfils an essential role in the primary infection process required for development of the canonical nitrogen-fixing R. leguminosarum bv. trifolii-white clover symbiosis. PMID:18458328

  6. Nodules Initiated by Rhizobium meliloti Exopolysaccharide Mutants Lack a Discrete, Persistent Nodule Meristem 1

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Cheng; Signer, Ethan R.; Hirsch, Ann M.

    1992-01-01

    Infection of alfalfa with Rhizobium meliloti exo mutants deficient in exopolysaccharide results in abnormal root nodules that are devoid of bacteria and fail to fix nitrogen. Here we report further characterization of these abnormal nodules. Tightly curled root hairs or shepherd's crooks were found after inoculation with Rm 1021-derived exo mutants, but curling was delayed compared with wild-type Rm 1021. Infection threads were initiated in curled root hairs by mutants as well as by wild-type R. meliloti, but the exo mutant-induced threads aborted within the peripheral cells of the developing nodule. Also, nodules elicited by Rm 1021-derived exo mutants were more likely to develop on secondary roots than on the primary root. In contrast with wild-type R. meliloti-induced nodules, the exo mutant-induced nodules lacked a well defined apical meristem, presumably due to the abortion of the infection threads. The relationship of these findings to the physiology of nodule development is discussed. ImagesFigure 3Figure 1Figure 2Figure 4 PMID:16668605

  7. Complete genome sequence of Bacteroides salanitronis type strain (BL78T)

    PubMed Central

    Gronow, Sabine; Held, Brittany; Lucas, Susan; Lapidus, Alla; Del Rio, Tijana Glavina; Nolan, Matt; Tice, Hope; Deshpande, Shweta; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Pitluck, Sam; Liolios, Konstantinos; Pagani, Ioanna; Ivanova, Natalia; Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Pati, Amrita; Tapia, Roxane; Han, Cliff; Goodwin, Lynne; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Land, Miriam; Hauser, Loren; Chang, Yun-Juan; Jeffries, Cynthia D.; Brambilla, Evelyne-Marie; Rohde, Manfred; Göker, Markus; Detter, John C.; Woyke, Tanja; Bristow, James; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Eisen, Jonathan A.

    2011-01-01

    Bacteroides salanitronis Lan et al. 2006 is a species of the genus Bacteroides, which belongs to the family Bacteroidaceae. The species is of interest because it was isolated from the gut of a chicken and the growing awareness that the anaerobic microflora of the cecum is of benefit for the host and may impact poultry farming. The 4,308,663 bp long genome consists of a 4.24 Mbp chromosome and three plasmids (6 kbp, 19 kbp, 40 kbp) containing 3,737 protein-coding and 101 RNA genes and is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project. PMID:21677856

  8. Small RNAs Repress Expression of Polysaccharide Utilization Loci of Gut Bacteroides Species.

    PubMed

    Comstock, Laurie E

    2016-09-15

    Bacteroides species can metabolize numerous plant polysaccharides and host glycans present in the mammalian gut. The regulatory systems governing the induction of particular polysaccharide utilization loci when the cognate glycan is present are known, but how expression is repressed when a higher-priority glycan is present is largely unknown. In this issue of the Journal of Bacteriology, Cao et al. (J. Bacteriol. 198:2410-2418, 2016, http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/JB.00381-16) reveal a conserved mechanism in Bacteroides whereby antisense small RNAs (sRNA) repress expression of genes involved in utilization of host glycans. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  9. Mobile genetic elements in the genus Bacteroides, and their mechanism(s) of dissemination

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Mai

    2011-01-01

    Bacteroides spp organisms, the predominant commensal bacteria in the human gut have become increasingly resistant to many antibiotics. They are now also considered to be reservoirs of antibiotic resistance genes due to their capacity to harbor and disseminate these genes via mobile transmissible elements that occur in bewildering variety. Gene dissemination occurs within and from Bacteroides spp primarily by conjugation, the molecular mechanisms of which are still poorly understood in the genus, even though the need to prevent this dissemination is urgent. One current avenue of research is thus focused on interventions that use non-antibiotic methodologies to prevent conjugation-based DNA transfer. PMID:22479685

  10. Complete genome sequence of Bacteroides salanitronis type strain (BL78T)

    SciTech Connect

    Gronow, Sabine; Held, Brittany; Lucas, Susan; Lapidus, Alla L.; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Nolan, Matt; Tice, Hope; Deshpande, Shweta; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Pitluck, Sam; Liolios, Konstantinos; Pagani, Ioanna; Ivanova, N; Mavromatis, K; Pati, Amrita; Tapia, Roxanne; Han, Cliff; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Land, Miriam L; Hauser, Loren John; Chang, Yun-Juan; Jeffries, Cynthia; Brambilla, Evelyne-Marie; Rohde, Manfred; Goker, Markus; Detter, J. Chris; Woyke, Tanja; Bristow, James; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Eisen, Jonathan

    2011-01-01

    Bacteroides salanitronis Lan et al. 2006 is a species of the genus Bacteroides, which belongs to the family Bacteroidaceae. The species is of interest because it was isolated from the gut of a chicken and the growing awareness that the anaerobic microflora of the cecum is of benefit for the host and may impact poultry farming. The 4,308,663 bp long genome consists of a 4.24 Mbp chromosome and three plasmids (6 kbp, 19 kbp, 40 kbp) containing 3,737 protein-coding and 101 RNA genes and is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  11. Rhizobium grahamii sp. nov., from nodules of Dalea leporina, Leucaena leucocephala and Clitoria ternatea, and Rhizobium mesoamericanum sp. nov., from nodules of Phaseolus vulgaris, siratro, cowpea and Mimosa pudica.

    PubMed

    López-López, Aline; Rogel-Hernández, Marco A; Barois, Isabelle; Ortiz Ceballos, Angel I; Martínez, Julio; Ormeño-Orrillo, Ernesto; Martínez-Romero, Esperanza

    2012-09-01

    Two novel related Rhizobium species, Rhizobium grahamii sp. nov. and Rhizobium mesoamericanum sp. nov., were identified by a polyphasic approach using DNA-DNA hybridization, whole-genome sequencing and phylogenetic and phenotypic characterization including nodulation of Leucaena leucocephala and Phaseolus vulgaris (bean). As similar bacteria were found in the Los Tuxtlas rainforest in Mexico and in Central America, we suggest the existence of a Mesoamerican microbiological corridor. The type strain of Rhizobium grahamii sp. nov. is CCGE 502(T) (= ATCC BAA-2124(T) = CFN 242(T) = Dal4(T) = HAMBI 3152(T)) and that of Rhizobium mesoamericanum sp. nov. is CCGE 501(T) (= ATCC BAA-2123(T) = HAMBI 3151(T) = CIP 110148(T) = 1847(T)).

  12. Rhizobium tarimense sp. nov., isolated from soil in the ancient Khiyik River.

    PubMed

    Turdahon, Maripat; Osman, Ghenijan; Hamdun, Maryam; Yusuf, Khayir; Abdurehim, Zumret; Abaydulla, Gulsumay; Abdukerim, Muhtar; Fang, Chengxiang; Rahman, Erkin

    2013-07-01

    A Gram-negative, non-motile, pale-yellow, rod-shaped bacterial strain, PL-41(T), was isolated from Populus euphratica forest soil at the ancient Khiyik River valley in Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region, People's Republic of China. Strain PL-41(T) grew optimally at 30 °C and pH 7.0-8.0. The major quinone was Q-10. The predominant cellular fatty acids of strain PL-41(T) were summed feature 8 (comprising C18 : 1ω7c and C18 : 1ω6c), C16 : 0 and C19 : 0 cyclo ω8c. Polar lipids of strain PL-41(T) include two unidentified aminophospholipids (APL1, 2), two unidentified phospholipids (PL1, 2), phosphatidylcholine and three unidentified lipids (L1-3). Strain PL-41(T) showed 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity of 97.0-97.5 % to the type strains of recognized species of the genus Rhizobium. Phylogenetic analysis of strain PL-41(T) based on the sequences of housekeeping genes recA and atpD confirmed (similarities are less than 90 %) its position as a distinct species of the genus Rhizobium. The DNA G+C content was 57.8 mol%. DNA-DNA relatedness between strain PL-41(T) and the type strains of Rhizobium huautlense S02(T), Rhizobium alkalisoli CCBAU 01393(T), Rhizobium vignae CCBAU 05176(T) and Rhizobium loessense CCBAU 7190B(T) were 33.4, 22.6, 25.5 and 45.1 %, respectively, indicating that strain PL-41(T) was distinct from them genetically. Strain PL-41(T) also can be differentiated from these four phylogenetically related species of the genus Rhizobium by various phenotypic properties. On the basis of phenotypic properties, phylogenetic distinctiveness and genetic data, strain PL-41(T) is considered to represent a novel species of the genus Rhizobium, for which the name Rhizobium tarimense sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is PL-41(T) ( = CCTCC AB 2011011(T) = NRRL B-59556(T)).

  13. A closer look at bacteroides: phylogenetic relationship and genomic implications of a life in the human gut.

    PubMed

    Karlsson, Fredrik H; Ussery, David W; Nielsen, Jens; Nookaew, Intawat

    2011-04-01

    The human gut is extremely densely inhabited by bacteria mainly from two phyla, Bacteroidetes and Firmicutes, and there is a great interest in analyzing whole-genome sequences for these species because of their relation to human health and disease. Here, we do whole-genome comparison of 105 Bacteroidetes/Chlorobi genomes to elucidate their phylogenetic relationship and to gain insight into what is separating the gut living Bacteroides and Parabacteroides genera from other Bacteroidetes/Chlorobi species. A comprehensive analysis shows that Bacteroides species have a higher number of extracytoplasmic function σ factors (ECF σ factors) and two component systems for extracellular signal transduction compared to other Bacteroidetes/Chlorobi species. A whole-genome phylogenetic analysis shows a very little difference between the Parabacteroides and Bacteroides genera. Further analysis shows that Bacteroides and Parabacteroides species share a large common core of 1,085 protein families. Genome atlases illustrate that there are few and only small unique areas on the chromosomes of four Bacteroides/Parabacteroides genomes. Functional classification to clusters of othologus groups show that Bacteroides species are enriched in carbohydrate transport and metabolism proteins. Classification of proteins in KEGG metabolic pathways gives a detailed view of the genome's metabolic capabilities that can be linked to its habitat. Bacteroides pectinophilus and Bacteroides capillosus do not cluster together with other Bacteroides species, based on analysis of 16S rRNA sequence, whole-genome protein families and functional content, 16S rRNA sequences of the two species suggest that they belong to the Firmicutes phylum. We have presented a more detailed and precise description of the phylogenetic relationships of members of the Bacteroidetes/Chlorobi phylum by whole genome comparison. Gut living Bacteroides have an enriched set of glycan, vitamin, and cofactor enzymes important for

  14. Novel Rhizobium lineages isolated from root nodules of the common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) in Andean and Mesoamerican areas.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Renan Augusto; Ormeño-Orrillo, Ernesto; Dall'Agnol, Rebeca Fuzinatto; Graham, Peter H; Martinez-Romero, Esperanza; Hungria, Mariangela

    2013-09-01

    The taxonomic affiliations of nineteen root-nodule bacteria isolated from the common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) in Mexico, Ecuador and Brazil were investigated by analyses of 16S rRNA and of four protein-coding housekeeping genes. One strain from Mexico could be assigned to Rhizobium etli and two from Brazil to Rhizobium leucaenae, whereas another from Mexico corresponded to a recently described bean-nodulating species-level lineage related to R. etli and Rhizobium phaseoli. Ten strains isolated in Ecuador and Mexico corresponded to three novel Rhizobium lineages that fall into the R. phaseoli/R. etli/Rhizobium leguminosarum clade. One of those lineages, with representatives isolated mostly from Ecuador, seems to be dominant in beans from that Andean region. Only one of the Mexican strains clustered within the Rhizobium tropici clade, but as an independent lineage. Interestingly, four strains were affiliated with species within the Rhizobium radiobacter clade. The existence of yet non-described native Rhizobium lineages in both the Andean and Mesoamerican areas is discussed in relation to common-bean diversity and environmental conditions.

  15. Two host-inducible genes of Rhizobium fredii and characterization of the inducing compound.

    PubMed Central

    Sadowsky, M J; Olson, E R; Foster, V E; Kosslak, R M; Verma, D P

    1988-01-01

    Random transcription fusions with Mu d1(Kan lac) generated three mutants in Rhizobium fredii (strain USDA 201) which showed induction of beta-galactosidase when grown in root exudate of the host plants Glycine max, Phaseolus vulgaris, and Vigna ungliculata. Two genes were isolated from a library of total plasmid DNA of one of the mutants, 3F1. These genes, present in tandem on a 4.2-kilobase HindIII fragment, appear in one copy each on the symbiotic plasmid and do not hybridize to the Rhizobium meliloti common nodulation region. They comprise two separate transcriptional units coding for about 450 and 950 nucleotides, both of which are transcribed in the same direction. The two open reading frames are separated by 586 base pairs, and the 5H regions of the two genes show a common sequence. No similarity was found with the promoter areas of Rhizobium trifolii, R. meliloti, or Bradyrhizobium japonicum nif genes and with any known nodulation genes. Regions homologous to both sequences were detected in EcoRI digests of genomic DNAs from B. japonicum USDA 110, USDA 122, and 61A76, but not in genomic DNA from R. trifolii, Rhizobium leguminosarum, or Rhizobium phaseoli. Mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance analysis indicated that the inducing compound has properties of 4',7-dihydroxyisoflavone, daidzein. These results suggest that, in addition to common nodulation genes, several other genes appear to be specifically induced by compounds in the root exudate of the host plants. Images PMID:2447061

  16. Characterization of the N2O-producing soil bacterium Rhizobium azooxidifex sp. nov.

    PubMed

    Behrendt, Undine; Kämpfer, Peter; Glaeser, Stefanie P; Augustin, Jürgen; Ulrich, Andreas

    2016-06-01

    In the context of studying the bacterial community involved in nitrogen transformation processes in arable soils exposed to different extents of erosion and sedimentation in a long-term experiment (CarboZALF), a strain was isolated that reduced nitrate to nitrous oxide without formation of molecular nitrogen. The presence of the functional gene nirK, encoding the respiratory copper-containing nitrite reductase, and the absence of the nitrous oxide reductase gene nosZ indicated a truncated denitrification pathway and that this bacterium may contribute significantly to the formation of the important greenhouse gas N2O. Phylogenetic analysis based on the 16S rRNA gene sequence and the housekeeping genes recA and atpD demonstrated that the investigated soil isolate belongs to the genus Rhizobium. The closest phylogenetic neighbours were the type strains of Rhizobium. subbaraonis and Rhizobium. halophytocola. The close relationship with R. subbaraonis was reflected by similarity analysis of the recA and atpD genes and their amino acid positions. DNA-DNA hybridization studies revealed genetic differences at the species level, which were substantiated by analysis of the whole-cell fatty acid profile and several distinct physiological characteristics. Based on these results, it was concluded that the soil isolate represents a novel species of the genus Rhizobium, for which the name Rhizobium azooxidifex sp. nov. (type strain Po 20/26T=DSM 100211T=LMG 28788T) is proposed.

  17. Rhizobium oryzicola sp. nov., potential plant-growth-promoting endophytic bacteria isolated from rice roots.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiao-Xia; Gao, Ju-Sheng; Cao, Yan-Hua; Sheirdil, Rizwan Ali; Wang, Xiu-Cheng; Zhang, Lei

    2015-09-01

    Bacterial strains ZYY136(T) and ZYY9 were isolated from surface-sterilized rice roots from a long-term experiment of rice-rice--Astragalus sinicus rotation. The 16S rRNA gene sequences of strains ZYY136(T) and ZYY9 showed the highest similarity, of 97.0%, to Rhizobium tarimense PL-41(T). Sequence analysis of the housekeeping genes recA, thrC and atpD clearly differentiated the isolates from currently described species of the genus Rhizobium. The DNA-DNA relatedness value between ZYY136(T) and ZYY9 was 82.3%, and ZYY136(T) showed 34.0% DNA-DNA relatedness with the most closely related type strain, R. tarimense PL-41(T). The DNA G+C content of strain ZYY136(T) was 58.1 mol%. The major cellular fatty acids were summed feature 8 (C18 : 1ω7c and/or C18 : 1ω6c), C16 : 0 and C16 : 0 3-OH. Strains ZYY136(T) and ZYY9 could be differentiated from the previously defined species of the genus Rhizobium by several phenotypic characteristics. Therefore, we conclude that strains ZYY136(T) and ZYY9 represent a novel species of the genus Rhizobium, for which the name Rhizobium oryzicola sp. nov. is proposed (type strain ZYY136(T) = ACCC 05753(T) = KCTC 32088(T)).

  18. Mapping the genetic basis of symbiotic variation in legume-rhizobium interactions in Medicago truncatula.

    PubMed

    Gorton, Amanda J; Heath, Katy D; Pilet-Nayel, Marie-Laure; Baranger, Alain; Stinchcombe, John R

    2012-11-01

    Mutualisms are known to be genetically variable, where the genotypes differ in the fitness benefits they gain from the interaction. To date, little is known about the loci that underlie such genetic variation in fitness or whether the loci influencing fitness are partner specific, and depend on the genotype of the interaction partner. In the legume-rhizobium mutualism, one set of potential candidate genes that may influence the fitness benefits of the symbiosis are the plant genes involved in the initiation of the signaling pathway between the two partners. Here we performed quantitative trait loci (QTL) mapping in Medicago truncatula in two different rhizobium strain treatments to locate regions of the genome influencing plant traits, assess whether such regions are dependent on the genotype of the rhizobial mutualist (QTL × rhizobium strain), and evaluate the contribution of sequence variation at known symbiosis signaling genes. Two of the symbiotic signaling genes, NFP and DMI3, colocalized with two QTL affecting average fruit weight and leaf number, suggesting that natural variation in nodulation genes may potentially influence plant fitness. In both rhizobium strain treatments, there were QTL that influenced multiple traits, indicative of either tight linkage between loci or pleiotropy, including one QTL with opposing effects on growth and reproduction. There was no evidence for QTL × rhizobium strain or genotype × genotype interactions, suggesting either that such interactions are due to small-effect loci or that more genotype-genotype combinations need to be tested in future mapping studies.

  19. The structure of legume-rhizobium interaction networks and their response to tree invasions.

    PubMed

    Le Roux, Johannes J; Mavengere, Natasha R; Ellis, Allan G

    2016-01-01

    Establishing mutualistic interactions in novel environments is important for the successful establishment of some non-native plant species. These associations may, in turn, impact native species interaction networks as non-natives become dominant in their new environments. Using phylogenetic and ecological interaction network approaches we provide the first report of the structure of belowground legume-rhizobium interaction networks and how they change along a gradient of invasion (uninvaded, semi invaded and heavily invaded sites) by Australian Acacia species in South Africa's Cape Floristic Region. We found that native and invasive legumes interact with distinct rhizobial lineages, most likely due to phylogenetic uniqueness of native and invasive host plants. Moreover, legume-rhizobium interaction networks are not nested, but significantly modular with high levels of specialization possibly as a result of legume-rhizobium co-evolution. Although network topology remained constant across the invasion gradient, composition of bacterial communities associated with native legumes changed dramatically as acacias increasingly dominated the landscape. In stark contrast to aboveground interaction networks (e.g. pollination and seed dispersal) we show that invasive legumes do not infiltrate existing native legume-rhizobium networks but rather form novel modules. This absence of mutualist overlap between native and invasive legumes suggests the importance of co-invading rhizobium-acacia species complexes for Acacia invasion success, and argues against a ubiquitous role for the formation and evolutionary refinement of novel interactions.

  20. Mapping the Genetic Basis of Symbiotic Variation in Legume-Rhizobium Interactions in Medicago truncatula

    PubMed Central

    Gorton, Amanda J.; Heath, Katy D.; Pilet-Nayel, Marie-Laure; Baranger, Alain

    2012-01-01

    Mutualisms are known to be genetically variable, where the genotypes differ in the fitness benefits they gain from the interaction. To date, little is known about the loci that underlie such genetic variation in fitness or whether the loci influencing fitness are partner specific, and depend on the genotype of the interaction partner. In the legume-rhizobium mutualism, one set of potential candidate genes that may influence the fitness benefits of the symbiosis are the plant genes involved in the initiation of the signaling pathway between the two partners. Here we performed quantitative trait loci (QTL) mapping in Medicago truncatula in two different rhizobium strain treatments to locate regions of the genome influencing plant traits, assess whether such regions are dependent on the genotype of the rhizobial mutualist (QTL × rhizobium strain), and evaluate the contribution of sequence variation at known symbiosis signaling genes. Two of the symbiotic signaling genes, NFP and DMI3, colocalized with two QTL affecting average fruit weight and leaf number, suggesting that natural variation in nodulation genes may potentially influence plant fitness. In both rhizobium strain treatments, there were QTL that influenced multiple traits, indicative of either tight linkage between loci or pleiotropy, including one QTL with opposing effects on growth and reproduction. There was no evidence for QTL × rhizobium strain or genotype × genotype interactions, suggesting either that such interactions are due to small-effect loci or that more genotype-genotype combinations need to be tested in future mapping studies. PMID:23173081

  1. Transcriptional activation of virulence genes of Rhizobium etli.

    PubMed

    Wang, Luyao; Lacroix, Benoît; Guo, Jianhua; Citovsky, Vitaly

    2017-01-09

    Recently, Rhizobium etli has emerged, in addition to Agrobacterium spp., as a prokaryotic species that encodes a functional machinery for DNA transfer to plant cells. To understand this R. etli-mediated genetic transformation, it would be useful to define how its vir genes respond to the host plants. Here, we explored the transcriptional activation of the vir genes contained on the R. etli p42a plasmid. Using a reporter construct harboring lacZ under the control of the R. etli virE promoter, we showed that the signal phenolic molecule acetosyringone (AS) induced R. etli vir gene expression both in R. etli and in A. tumefaciens background. Furthermore, in both bacterial backgrounds, the p42a plasmid also promoted plant genetic transformation with a reporter T-DNA. Importantly, the R. etli vir genes were transcriptionally activated by AS in a bacterial species-specific fashion in regard to the VirA/VirG signal sensor system, and this activation was induced by signals from the natural host species of this bacterium, but not from non-host plants. Early kinetics of transcriptional activation of the major vir genes of R. etli also revealed several features distinct from those known for A. tumefaciens: the expression of the virG gene reached saturation relatively quickly, and virB2, which in R. etli is located outside of the virB operon, was expressed only at low levels and did not respond to AS. These differences in vir gene transcription may contribute to the lower efficiency of T-DNA transfer of R. etli p42a versus pTiC58 of A. tumefaciens IMPORTANCE: The region encoding homologs of Agrobacterium tumefaciens virulence genes in the Rhizobium etli CE3 p42a plasmid was the first endogenous virulence system encoded by a non-Agrobacterium species demonstrated to be functional in DNA transfer and stable integration into plant cell genome. In this study, we explore the transcriptional regulation and induction of virulence genes in R. etli and show similarities and differences

  2. Intragenomic diversity of Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. trifolii clover nodule isolates

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Soil bacteria from the genus Rhizobium are characterized by a complex genomic architecture comprising chromosome and large plasmids. Genes responsible for symbiotic interactions with legumes are usually located on one of the plasmids, named the symbiotic plasmid (pSym). The plasmids have a great impact not only on the metabolic potential of rhizobia but also underlie genome rearrangements and plasticity. Results Here, we analyzed the distribution and sequence variability of markers located on chromosomes and extrachromosomal replicons of Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. trifolii strains originating from nodules of clover grown in the same site in cultivated soil. First, on the basis of sequence similarity of repA and repC replication genes to the respective counterparts of chromids reported in R. leguminosarum bv. viciae 3841 and R. etli CFN42, chromid-like replicons were distinguished from the pool of plasmids of the nodule isolates studied. Next, variability of the gene content was analyzed in the different genome compartments, i.e., the chromosome, chromid-like and 'other plasmids'. The stable and unstable chromosomal and plasmid genes were detected on the basis of hybridization data. Displacement of a few unstable genes between the chromosome, chromid-like and 'other plasmids', as well as loss of some markers was observed in the sampled strains. Analyses of chosen gene sequences allowed estimation of the degree of their adaptation to the three genome compartments as well as to the host. Conclusions Our results showed that differences in distribution and sequence divergence of plasmid and chromosomal genes can be detected even within a small group of clover nodule isolates recovered from clovers grown at the same site. Substantial divergence of genome organization could be detected especially taking into account the content of extrachromosomal DNA. Despite the high variability concerning the number and size of plasmids among the studied strains

  3. Only one catalase, katG, is detectable in Rhizobium etli, and is encoded along with the regulator OxyR on a plasmid replicon.

    PubMed

    Vargas, María del Carmen; Encarnación, Sergio; Dávalos, Araceli; Reyes-Pérez, Agustín; Mora, Yolanda; García-de los Santos, Alejandro; Brom, Susana; Mora, Jaime

    2003-05-01

    The plasmid-borne Rhizobium etli katG gene encodes a dual-function catalase-peroxidase (KatG) (EC 1.11.1.7) that is inducible and heat-labile. In contrast to other rhizobia, katG was shown to be solely responsible for catalase and peroxidase activity in R. etli. An R. etli mutant that did not express catalase activity exhibited increased sensitivity to hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)). Pre-exposure to a sublethal concentration of H(2)O(2) allowed R. etli to adapt and survive subsequent exposure to higher concentrations of H(2)O(2). Based on a multiple sequence alignment with other catalase-peroxidases, it was found that the catalytic domains of the R. etli KatG protein had three large insertions, two of which were typical of KatG proteins. Like the katG gene of Escherichia coli, the R. etli katG gene was induced by H(2)O(2) and was important in sustaining the exponential growth rate. In R. etli, KatG catalase-peroxidase activity is induced eightfold in minimal medium during stationary phase. It was shown that KatG catalase-peroxidase is not essential for nodulation and nitrogen fixation in symbiosis with Phaseolus vulgaris, although bacteroid proteome analysis indicated an alternative compensatory mechanism for the oxidative protection of R. etli in symbiosis. Next to, and divergently transcribed from the catalase promoter, an ORF encoding the regulator OxyR was found; this is the first plasmid-encoded oxyR gene described so far. Additionally, the katG promoter region contained sequence motifs characteristic of OxyR binding sites, suggesting a possible regulatory mechanism for katG expression.

  4. Enhanced nitrogen fixation in a Rhizobium etli ntrC mutant that overproduces the Bradyrhizobium japonicum symbiotic terminal oxidase cbb{sub 3}

    SciTech Connect

    Soberon, M.; Lopez, O.; Morera, C.; Girard, M.L.; Tabche, M.L.; Miranda, J.

    1999-05-01

    The ntrC gene codes for a transcriptional activator protein that modulates gene expression in response to nitrogen. The cytochrome production pattern of a Rhizobium etli ntrC mutant (CFN2012) was studied. CO difference spectral analysis of membranes showed that CFN2012 produced a terminal oxidase similar to the symbiotic terminal oxidase of bacteroids in free-living cells under aerobic conditions, with a characteristic trough at 553 nm. CFN2012 produced two c-type cytochromes with molecular masses of 27 and 32 kDa in contrast with the wild-type strain, which produced only a 32-kDa c-tye cytochrome. The expression levels of the R. etli fix/NOQP operon, which codes for terminal oxidase cbb{sub 3}, were not affected by the ntrC mutation. However, the production levels of the two c-type cytochromes (27 and 32 kDa) were enhanced at least eightfold when the Bradyrhizobium japonicum fixNOQP operon was expressed in CFN2012 from the nptII promoter (pMSfix{sup c}), suggesting that these proteins are subunits FixO (27 kDa) and FixP (32 kDa) of cbb{sub 3} and that CFN2012/pMSfix{sup c} overproduced this terminal oxidase. CFN2012/pMSfix{sup c} showed a significant increase in its symbiotic performance as judged by the determination of nitrogenase activities of plants inoculated with this strain, suggesting that the overproduction of cbb{sub 3} terminal oxidase correlates with an enhancement in symbiotic nitrogen fixation.

  5. Nitrogen-fixing Rhizobium-legume symbiosis: are polyploidy and host peptide-governed symbiont differentiation general principles of endosymbiosis?

    PubMed Central

    Maróti, Gergely; Kondorosi, Éva

    2014-01-01

    The symbiosis between rhizobia soil bacteria and legumes is facultative and initiated by nitrogen starvation of the host plant. Exchange of signal molecules between the partners leads to the formation of root nodules where bacteria are converted to nitrogen-fixing bacteroids. In this mutualistic symbiosis, the bacteria provide nitrogen sources for plant growth in return for photosynthates from the host. Depending on the host plant the symbiotic fate of bacteria can either be reversible or irreversible. In Medicago plants the bacteria undergo a host-directed multistep differentiation process culminating in the formation of elongated and branched polyploid bacteria with definitive loss of cell division ability. The plant factors are nodule-specific symbiotic peptides. About 500 of them are cysteine-rich NCR peptides produced in the infected plant cells. NCRs are targeted to the endosymbionts and the concerted action of different sets of peptides governs different stages of endosymbiont maturation. This review focuses on symbiotic plant cell development and terminal bacteroid differentiation and demonstrates the crucial roles of symbiotic peptides by showing an example of multi-target mechanism exerted by one of these symbiotic peptides. PMID:25071739

  6. Nitrogen-fixing Rhizobium-legume symbiosis: are polyploidy and host peptide-governed symbiont differentiation general principles of endosymbiosis?

    PubMed

    Maróti, Gergely; Kondorosi, Eva

    2014-01-01

    The symbiosis between rhizobia soil bacteria and legumes is facultative and initiated by nitrogen starvation of the host plant. Exchange of signal molecules between the partners leads to the formation of root nodules where bacteria are converted to nitrogen-fixing bacteroids. In this mutualistic symbiosis, the bacteria provide nitrogen sources for plant growth in return for photosynthates from the host. Depending on the host plant the symbiotic fate of bacteria can either be reversible or irreversible. In Medicago plants the bacteria undergo a host-directed multistep differentiation process culminating in the formation of elongated and branched polyploid bacteria with definitive loss of cell division ability. The plant factors are nodule-specific symbiotic peptides. About 500 of them are cysteine-rich NCR peptides produced in the infected plant cells. NCRs are targeted to the endosymbionts and the concerted action of different sets of peptides governs different stages of endosymbiont maturation. This review focuses on symbiotic plant cell development and terminal bacteroid differentiation and demonstrates the crucial roles of symbiotic peptides by showing an example of multi-target mechanism exerted by one of these symbiotic peptides.

  7. Herbivores alter the fitness benefits of a plant-rhizobium mutualism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heath, Katy D.; Lau, Jennifer A.

    2011-03-01

    Mutualisms are best understood from a community perspective, since third-party species have the potential to shift the costs and benefits in interspecific interactions. We manipulated plant genotypes, the presence of rhizobium mutualists, and the presence of a generalist herbivore and assessed the performance of all players in order to test whether antagonists might alter the fitness benefits of plant-rhizobium mutualism, and vice versa how mutualists might alter the fitness consequences of plant-herbivore antagonism. We found that plants in our experiment formed more associations with rhizobia (root nodules) in the presence of herbivores, thereby increasing the fitness benefits of mutualism for rhizobia. In contrast, the effects of rhizobia on herbivores were weak. Our data support a community-dependent view of these ecological interactions, and suggest that consideration of the aboveground herbivore community can inform ecological and evolutionary studies of legume-rhizobium interactions.

  8. Physiology of Ex Planta Nitrogenase Activity in Rhizobium japonicum†

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Arun K.; Keister, Donald L.

    1983-01-01

    Thirty-nine wild-type strains of Rhizobium japonicum have been studied for their ability to synthesize nitrogenase ex planta in defined liquid media under microaerobic conditions. Twenty-one produced more than trace amounts of acetylene reduction activity, but only a few of these yielded high activity. The oxygen response curves were similar for most of the nitrogenase-positive strains. The strains derepressible for activity had several phenotypic characteristics different from non-derepressible strains. These included slower growth and lower oxygen consumption under microaerobic conditions and lower extracellular polysaccharide production. Extracellular polysaccharide production during growth on gluconate in every nitrogenase-positive strain assayed was lower under both aerobic and microaerobic conditions than the non-derepressible strains. These phenotypic characteristics may be representative of a genotype of a subspecies of R. japonicum. These studies were done in part to enlarge the base number of strains available for studies on the physiology, biochemistry, and genetics of nitrogen fixation. PMID:16346295

  9. Physiology of ex planta nitrogenase activity in Rhizobium japonicum

    SciTech Connect

    Agarwal, A.K.; Keister, D.L.

    1983-05-01

    Thirty-nine wild-type strains of Rhizobium japonicum have been studied for their ability to synthesize nitrogenase ex planta in defined liquid media under microaerobic conditions. Twenty-one produced more than trace amounts of acetylene reduction activity, but only a few of these yielded high activity. The oxygen response curves were similar for most of the nitrogenase-positive strains. The strains derepressible for activity had several phenotypic characteristics different from non-derepressible strains. These included slower growth and lower oxygen consumption under microaerobic conditions and lower extracellular polysaccharide production. Extracellular polysaccharide production during growth on gluconate in every nitrogenase-positive strain assayed was lower under both aerobic and microaerobic conditions than the non-depressible strains. These phenotypic characteristics may be representative of a genotype of a subspecies of R. japonicum. These studies were done in part to enlarge the base number of strains available for studies on the physiology, biochemistry, and genetics of nitrogen fixation. (35 Refs.)

  10. Recombination enhancement by replication (RER) in Rhizobium etli.

    PubMed Central

    Valencia-Morales, E; Romero, D

    2000-01-01

    Studies in several organisms show that recombination and replication interact closely. Recombinational repair usually requires associated replication at some stage; moreover, additional replication can induce recombination through either homologous or illegitimate events. In prokaryotes, stimulation of recombination by replication is more dramatic when rolling circle replication is employed. In contrast, theta-type replication induces only a modest increase in recombination frequency. In this article, we show that induction of theta-type replication from a supernumerary origin in the symbiotic plasmid (pSym) of Rhizobium etli leads to a 1000-fold increase in deletion formation on this plasmid. These deletions span 120 kb (the symbiotic region) and have as endpoints the reiterated nitrogenase operons. We have named this phenomenon RER, for recombination enhancement by replication. RER is not affected by the position of the replication origin in the pSym, the direction of advance of the replication fork, or the distance from the origin to the recombining repeats. On the other hand, RER is dependent on an active recA allele, indicating that it is due to homologous recombination. RER displays a strong regionality restricted to the symbiotic region. The similarities and differences of RER with the recombination process observed at the terminus of replication of the Escherichia coli chromosome are discussed. PMID:10757747

  11. Recombination enhancement by replication (RER) in Rhizobium etli.

    PubMed

    Valencia-Morales, E; Romero, D

    2000-03-01

    Studies in several organisms show that recombination and replication interact closely. Recombinational repair usually requires associated replication at some stage; moreover, additional replication can induce recombination through either homologous or illegitimate events. In prokaryotes, stimulation of recombination by replication is more dramatic when rolling circle replication is employed. In contrast, theta-type replication induces only a modest increase in recombination frequency. In this article, we show that induction of theta-type replication from a supernumerary origin in the symbiotic plasmid (pSym) of Rhizobium etli leads to a 1000-fold increase in deletion formation on this plasmid. These deletions span 120 kb (the symbiotic region) and have as endpoints the reiterated nitrogenase operons. We have named this phenomenon RER, for recombination enhancement by replication. RER is not affected by the position of the replication origin in the pSym, the direction of advance of the replication fork, or the distance from the origin to the recombining repeats. On the other hand, RER is dependent on an active recA allele, indicating that it is due to homologous recombination. RER displays a strong regionality restricted to the symbiotic region. The similarities and differences of RER with the recombination process observed at the terminus of replication of the Escherichia coli chromosome are discussed.

  12. Succinate transport by free-living forms of Rhizobium japonicum.

    PubMed Central

    McAllister, C F; Lepo, J E

    1983-01-01

    We have demonstrated that the transport of succinate into the cells of Rhizobium japonicum strains USDA 110 and USDA 217 is severely inhibited by cyanide, azide, and 2,4-dinitrophenol, but not by arsenate. These results suggest an active mechanism of transport that is dependent on an energized membrane, but does not directly utilize ATP. The apparent Km for succinate was 3.8 microM for strain USDA 110 and 1.8 microM for strain USDA 217; maximal transport velocities were 1.5 and 3.3 nmol of succinate per min per mg of protein, respectively. The expression of the succinate uptake activity was inducible rather than constitutive, with succinate and structurally related compounds being the most effective inducers. The mechanism showed some specificity for succinate and similar organic acids; fumarate and L-malate were classical competitive inhibitors of the system. In general, the best competing compounds were also the best carbon substrates for induction of succinate uptake activity. EDTA inhibited the transport of succinate, implying a role for divalent cations in the system. When various divalent cations were used to reconstitute EDTA-inhibited activity, Ca2+ was most effective, followed by Mg2+, which restored activity at about half the efficiency of Ca2+. Growth media that were supplemented with increased Ca2+ concentration supported more rapid growth with succinate as the carbon substrate, and cells from such media showed higher specific activities of succinate transport. PMID:6402487

  13. High catalase production by Rhizobium radiobacter strain 2-1.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Mami; Nakajima-Kambe, Toshiaki; Katayama, Hideki; Higuchi, Kazuhiko; Kawasaki, Yoshio; Fuji, Ryujiro

    2008-12-01

    To promote the application of catalase for treating wastewater containing hydrogen peroxide, bacteria exhibiting high catalase activity were screened. A bacterium, designated strain 2-1, with high catalase activity was isolated from the wastewater of a beverage factory that uses hydrogen peroxide. Strain 2-1 was identified as Rhizobium radiobacter (formerly known as Agrobacterium tumefaciens) on the basis of both phenotypic and genotypic characterizations. Although some strains of R. radiobacter are known plant pathogens, polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis showed that strain 2-1 has no phytopathogenic factor. Compared with a type strain of R. radiobacter, the specific catalase activity of strain 2-1 was approximately 1000-fold. Moreover, Strain 2-1 grew faster and exhibited considerably higher catalase activity than other microorganisms that have been used for industrial catalase production. Strain 2-1 is harmless to humans and the environment and produces catalase efficiently, suggesting that strain 2-1 is a good resource for the mass production of catalase for the treatment of hydrogen peroxide-containing wastewater.

  14. Processing parameters matching effects upon Rhizobium tropici biopolymers' rheological properties.

    PubMed

    Pimenta, Flávia Duta; Lopes, Léa Maria de Almeida; de França, Francisca Pessôa

    2008-07-01

    The combined effects of the processing parameters upon rheological properties of biopolymers produced by Rhizobium tropici were studied as a function of the Ca(+2) ions' concentration variation, yeast extract concentration added to the medium, aeration, and agitation, maintaining the mannitol concentration in 10 g/L. The experiments were carried out using a fermenter with 20-L capacity as a reactor. All processing parameters were monitored online. The temperature [(30 +/- 1) degrees C] and pH values (7.0) were kept constant throughout the experimental time. As a statistical tool, a complete 2(3) factorial design with central point and response surface was used to investigate the interactions between relevant variables of the fermentation process: calcium carbonate concentration, yeast extract concentration, aeration, and agitation. The processing parameter setup for reaching the maximum response for rheological propriety production was obtained when applying mannitol concentration of 10.0 g/L, calcium carbonate concentration 1.0 g/L, yeast extract concentration 1.0 g/L, aeration 1.30 vvm, and agitation 800 rpm. The viscosimetric investigation of polysaccharide solutions exposed their shear-thinning behavior and polyelectrolytic feature.

  15. Response of Rhizobium to Cd exposure: A volatile perspective.

    PubMed

    Cardoso, Paulo; Santos, Magda; Freitas, Rosa; Rocha, Sílvia M; Figueira, Etelvina

    2017-08-30

    The volatile metabolome of Rhizobium sp. strain E20-8 exposed to three concentrations of cadmium (2.5, 5.0 and 7.5 μM) was screened using comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography coupled to time of flight mass spectrometry (GC × GC-ToFMS), combined with headspace solid phase microextraction (HS-SPME). Cd exposure induced a global increase in the concentration of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) both intra and extracellularly. Peak areas of several linear alkanes, ketones, aldehydes, alcohols, terpenic and volatile sulfur compounds, and one ester (ethyl acetate), were especially increased when compared with the control condition (no Cd). These compounds might originate from the metabolization of toxic membrane peroxidation products, the proteolysis of oxidized proteins or the alteration of metabolic pathways, resulting from the oxidative stress imposed by Cd. Several VOCs are related to oxidative damage, but the production of VOCs involved in antioxidant response (menthol, α-pinene, dimethyl sulfide, disulfide and trisulfide, 1-butanol and 2-butanone) and in cell aggregation (2,3-butanedione, 3-methyl-1-butanol and 2-butanone) is also observed. These results bring new information that highlights the role of VOCs on bacteria response to Cd stress, identify a novel set of biomarkers related with metal stress and provide information to be applied in biotechnological and remediation contexts. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. alpha-Ketoglutarate dehydrogenase mutant of Rhizobium meliloti.

    PubMed Central

    Duncan, M J; Fraenkel, D G

    1979-01-01

    A mutant of Rhizobium meliloti selected as unable to grow on L-arabinose also failed to grow on acetate or pyruvate. It grew, but slower than the parental strain, on many other carbon sources. Assay showed it to lack alpha-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase (kgd) activity, and revertants of normal growth phenotype contained the activity again. Other enzymes of the tricarboxylic acid cycle and of the glyoxylate cycle were present in both mutant and parent strains. Enzymes of pyruvate metabolism were also assayed. L-Arabinose degradation in R. meliloti was found to differ from the known pathway in R. japonicum, since the former strain lacked 2-keto-o-deoxy-L-arabonate aldolase but contained alpha-ketoglutarate semialdehyde dehydrogenase; thus, it is likely that R. meliloti has the L-arabinose pathway leading to alpha-ketoglutarate rather than the one to glycolaldehyde and pyruvate. This finding accounts for the L-arabinose negativity of the mutant. Resting cells of the mutant were able to metabolize the three substrates which did not allow growth. PMID:762018

  17. Measurements of carbon utilization by single bacterial species in sterile soil: insights into Rhizobium spp.

    PubMed

    Wigley, K; Wakelin, S A; Moot, D J; Hammond, S; Ridgway, H J

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this work was to develop a tool to investigate the influence of soil factors on carbon utilization activity of single micro-organisms. The assay for Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. trifolii in γ-irradiated soil, using the MicroResp(™) system, was optimized for sterility, incubation time, and moisture level. The optimized method was validated with experiments that assessed (i) differences in C utilization of different rhizobia strains and (ii) how this was affected by soil type. Carbon utilization differed among strains of the same species (and symbiovar), but some strains were more responsive to the soil environment than others. This novel modification of the MicroResp(™) has enabled the scope of carbon-utilization patterns of single strains of bacteria, such as Rh. leguminosarum bv. trifolii, to be studied in soil. The system is a new tool with applications in microbial ecology adaptable to the study of many culturable bacterial and fungal soil-borne taxa. It will allow measurement of a micro-organism's ability to utilize common C sources released in rhizosphere exudates to be measured in a physical soil background. This knowledge may improve selection efficiency and deployment of commercial microbial inoculants. © 2016 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  18. TtsI regulates symbiotic genes in Rhizobium species NGR234 by binding to tts boxes.

    PubMed

    Wassem, Roseli; Kobayashi, Hajime; Kambara, Kumiko; Le Quéré, Antoine; Walker, Graham C; Broughton, William J; Deakin, William J

    2008-05-01

    Infection of legumes by Rhizobium sp. NGR234 and subsequent development of nitrogen-fixing nodules are dependent on the coordinated actions of Nod factors, proteins secreted by a type III secretion system (T3SS) and modifications to surface polysaccharides. The production of these signal molecules is dependent on plant flavonoids which trigger a regulatory cascade controlled by the transcriptional activators NodD1, NodD2, SyrM2 and TtsI. TtsI is known to control the genes responsible for T3SS function and synthesis of a symbiotically important rhamnose-rich lipo-polysaccharide, most probably by binding to cis elements termed tts boxes. Eleven tts boxes were identified in the promoter regions of target genes on the symbiotic plasmid of NGR234. Expression profiles of lacZ fusions to these tts boxes showed that they are part of a TtsI-dependent regulon induced by plant-derived flavonoids. TtsI was purified and demonstrated to bind directly to two of these tts boxes. DNase I footprinting revealed that TtsI occupied not only the tts box consensus sequence, but also upstream and downstream regions in a concentration-dependent manner. Highly conserved bases of the consensus tts box were mutated and, although TtsI binding was still observed in vitro, gfp fusions were no longer transcribed in vivo. Random mutagenesis of a tts box-containing promoter revealed more nucleotides critical for transcriptional activity outside of the consensus.

  19. Production of Rhizobium Inoculants for Lupinus nootkatensis on Nutrient-Supplemented Pumice

    PubMed Central

    Einarsson, Sigurbjorn; Gudmundsson, Jon; Sverrisson, Halldor; Kristjansson, Jakob K.; Runolfsson, Sveinn

    1993-01-01

    The use of the legume Lupinus nootkatensis as a pioneer plant to fight soil erosion and to reclaim eroded soils in Iceland has been under development for a few years. Production of a robust, low-cost bacterial inoculant was therefore a prerequisite for the extended use of this plant. Volcanic pumice is a naturally expanded mineral which is available in vast amounts in Iceland. It was tested as a carrier for solid fermentation of Rhizobium lupini. Nutrient-supplemented pumice containing a small percentage of peat and diatomaceous earth and kept in sterile plastic bags promoted good growth of the bacteria. Viable-colony counts remained stable at 108 to 109/g for at least 35 weeks when the carrier was stored at 22°C. The pumice-based inoculant had good storage and handling properties and could be mixed directly with the seeds during the sowing process. When seeds of L. nootkatensis were sown manually into nutrient-poor eroded sandy soils, about 56% of the first-year plants were successfully nodulated. PMID:16349083

  20. Role of nickel in membrane-bound hydrogenase and nickel metabolism in Rhizobium japonicum

    SciTech Connect

    Stults, L.W.

    1986-01-01

    The membrane-bound hydrogenase of Rhizobium japonicum requires nickel for activity. Radioactive /sup 63/Ni co-migrates with hydrogenase activity in native gel systems and co-elutes with purified hydrogenase form an affinity matrix column. A simplified scheme for the purification of hydrogenase has been developed and constitutes the first report of the aerobic purification of this enzyme from R. japonicum. The aerobic purification utilizes the general affinity matrix. Reactive Red 120-agarose and results in higher specific activity and yield of enzyme than previously reported. The stability of aerobically purified hydrogenase to oxygen is substantially greater than that reported for anaerobically isolated enzyme. Reduction of the aerobically purified enzyme in the presence of oxygen, however, results in the rapid loss of activity. R. japonicum cells accumulate nickel during heterotrophic growth and as non-growing cells. The hydrogenase constitutive mutant SR470 accumulates substantially greater amounts of nickel under both conditions. Kinetic studies indicate that the nickel uptake system in the hydrogenase constitutive mutant SR470 is upregulated relative to SRwt cells. The uptake system is specific for nickel, although a 10-fold excess (relative to nickel) of copper or zinc inhibits nickel uptake. The nickel uptake system appears to require energy. Under nickel-free conditions hydrogenase protein is not synthesized as determined by cross-reactivity with antibodies directed against hydrogenase, indicating that nickel regulates the formation of the enzyme as well as being a constituent of the active protein.

  1. The RPG gene of Medicago truncatula controls Rhizobium-directed polar growth during infection

    PubMed Central

    Arrighi, Jean-François; Godfroy, Olivier; de Billy, Françoise; Saurat, Olivier; Jauneau, Alain; Gough, Clare

    2008-01-01

    Rhizobia can infect roots of host legume plants and induce new organs called nodules, in which they fix atmospheric nitrogen. Infection generally starts with root hair curling, then proceeds inside newly formed, intracellular tubular structures called infection threads. A successful symbiotic interaction relies on infection threads advancing rapidly at their tips by polar growth through successive cell layers of the root toward developing nodule primordia. To identify a plant component that controls this tip growth process, we characterized a symbiotic mutant of Medicago truncatula, called rpg for rhizobium-directed polar growth. In this mutant, nitrogen-fixing nodules were rarely formed due to abnormally thick and slowly progressing infection threads. Root hair curling was also abnormal, indicating that the RPG gene fulfils an essential function in the process whereby rhizobia manage to dominate the process of induced tip growth for root hair infection. Map-based cloning of RPG revealed a member of a previously unknown plant-specific gene family encoding putative long coiled-coil proteins we have called RRPs (RPG-related proteins) and characterized by an “RRP domain” specific to this family. RPG expression was strongly associated with rhizobial infection, and the RPG protein showed a nuclear localization, indicating that this symbiotic gene constitutes an important component of symbiotic signaling. PMID:18621693

  2. The RPG gene of Medicago truncatula controls Rhizobium-directed polar growth during infection.

    PubMed

    Arrighi, Jean-François; Godfroy, Olivier; de Billy, Françoise; Saurat, Olivier; Jauneau, Alain; Gough, Clare

    2008-07-15

    Rhizobia can infect roots of host legume plants and induce new organs called nodules, in which they fix atmospheric nitrogen. Infection generally starts with root hair curling, then proceeds inside newly formed, intracellular tubular structures called infection threads. A successful symbiotic interaction relies on infection threads advancing rapidly at their tips by polar growth through successive cell layers of the root toward developing nodule primordia. To identify a plant component that controls this tip growth process, we characterized a symbiotic mutant of Medicago truncatula, called rpg for rhizobium-directed polar growth. In this mutant, nitrogen-fixing nodules were rarely formed due to abnormally thick and slowly progressing infection threads. Root hair curling was also abnormal, indicating that the RPG gene fulfils an essential function in the process whereby rhizobia manage to dominate the process of induced tip growth for root hair infection. Map-based cloning of RPG revealed a member of a previously unknown plant-specific gene family encoding putative long coiled-coil proteins we have called RRPs (RPG-related proteins) and characterized by an "RRP domain" specific to this family. RPG expression was strongly associated with rhizobial infection, and the RPG protein showed a nuclear localization, indicating that this symbiotic gene constitutes an important component of symbiotic signaling.

  3. Policing the legume-Rhizobium symbiosis: a critical test of partner choice.

    PubMed

    Westhoek, Annet; Field, Elsa; Rehling, Finn; Mulley, Geraldine; Webb, Isabel; Poole, Philip S; Turnbull, Lindsay A

    2017-05-03

    In legume-Rhizobium symbioses, specialised soil bacteria fix atmospheric nitrogen in return for carbon. However, ineffective strains can arise, making discrimination essential. Discrimination can occur via partner choice, where legumes prevent ineffective strains from entering, or via sanctioning, where plants provide fewer resources. Several studies have inferred that legumes exercise partner choice, but the rhizobia compared were not otherwise isogenic. To test when and how plants discriminate ineffective strains we developed sets of fixing and non-fixing strains that differed only in the expression of nifH - essential for nitrogen fixation - and could be visualised using marker genes. We show that the plant is unable to select against the non-fixing strain at the point of entry, but that non-fixing nodules are sanctioned. We also used the technique to characterise mixed nodules (containing both a fixing and a non-fixing strain), whose frequency could be predicted using a simple diffusion model. We discuss that sanctioning is likely to evolve in preference to partner choice in any symbiosis where partner quality cannot be adequately assessed until goods or services are actively exchanged.

  4. Rhizobium etli mutant modulates carbon and nitrogen metabolism in Phaseolus vulgaris nodules.

    PubMed

    Silvente, Sonia; Blanco, Lourdes; Camas, Alberto; Ortega, José-Luis; Ramírez, Mario; Lara-Flores, Miguel

    2002-07-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the biochemical events in root nodules which lead to increased yield when bean is inoculated with a Rhizobium etli mutant (CFN037) having increased respiratory capacity. CFN037-inoculated plants had 22% more nitrogen (N) than did wild-type (CE3)-inoculated plants. Root nodule enzymes involved in nodule carbon and nitrogen assimilation as well as in ureides and amides synthesis were assessed in plants inoculated with CFN037 and the CE3. Our results show that the xylem ureides content was lower while that of amino acids was higher in CFN037- compared with CE3-inoculated plants. Supporting these results, enzymes involved in ureide synthesis were reduced while activity of aspartate aminotransferase, glutamate synthase, sucrose synthase, and glucose-6-P dehydrogenase were increased in CFN037-induced nodules. Glutamate synthase and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase transcripts were detected early in the development of nodules induced by CFN037 compared with CE3. However, plants inoculated with strain CE3-vhb, which express the Vitreoscilla sp. hemoglobin and also displays increased respiratory capacity, did not have altered ureide transport in N2-fixing plants. The data suggest that inoculation with special selected mutant strains of R. etli can modulate nodule N assimilation and N transport compounds.

  5. Stable Tagging of Rhizobium meliloti with the Firefly Luciferase Gene for Environmental Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Cebolla, Angel; Ruiz-Berraquero, Francisco; Palomares, Antonio Jose

    1993-01-01

    A system for stable tagging of gram-negative bacteria with the firefly luciferase gene, luc, is described. A previously constructed fusion constitutively expressing luc from the λpR promoter was used. Stable integration into the bacterial genome was achieved by use of mini-Tn5 delivery vectors. The procedure developed was applied for tagging of representative gram-negative bacteria, such as Escherichia coli, Rhizobium meliloti, Pseudomonas putida, and Agrobacterium tumefaciens. The system permitted the detection of tagged R. meliloti in the presence of more than 105 CFU per plate without the use of any selective markers (such as antibiotic resistance genes). No significant differences in growth rates or soil survival were found between the marked strain and the wild-type strain. Studies of bioluminescent R. meliloti also revealed a good correlation between cell biomass and bioluminescence. The firefly luciferase tagging system is an easy, safe, and sensitive method for the detection and enumeration of bacteria in the environment. Images PMID:16349015

  6. Genome sequence of the Bacteroides fragilis phage ATCC 51477-B1

    PubMed Central

    Hawkins, Shawn A; Layton, Alice C; Ripp, Steven; Williams, Dan; Sayler, Gary S

    2008-01-01

    The genome of a fecal pollution indicator phage, Bacteroides fragilis ATCC 51477-B1, was sequenced and consisted of 44,929 bases with a G+C content of 38.7%. Forty-six putative open reading frames were identified and genes were organized into functional clusters for host specificity, lysis, replication and regulation, and packaging and structural proteins. PMID:18710568

  7. Growth inhibitory effects of endotoxins from Bacteroides gingivalis and intermedius on human gingival fibroblasts in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Layman, D.L.; Diedrich, D.L.

    1987-06-01

    Purified endotoxin or lipopolysaccharide from Bacteroides gingivalis and Bacteroides intermedius caused a similar dose-dependent inhibition of growth of cultured human gingival fibroblasts as determined by /sup 3/H-thymidine incorporation and direct cell count. Approximately 200 micrograms/ml endotoxin caused a 50% reduction in /sup 3/H-thymidine uptake of logarithmically growing cells. Inhibition of growth was similar in cultures of fibroblasts derived from either healthy or diseased human gingiva. When examining the change in cell number with time of exposure in culture, the rate of proliferation was significantly suppressed during the logarithmic phase of growth. However, the cells recovered so that the rate of proliferation, although reduced, was sufficient to produce a cell density similar to the control cells with prolonged culture. The endotoxins were characterized by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The profiles of the Bacteroides endotoxins were different. B. gingivalis endotoxin showed a wide range of distinct bands indicating a heterogeneous distribution of molecular species. Endotoxin from B. intermedius exhibited a few discrete low molecular weight bands, but the majority of the lipopolysaccharides electrophoresed as a diffuse band of high molecular weight material. The apparent heterogeneity of the two Bacteroides endotoxins and the similarity in growth inhibitory capacity suggest that growth inhibitory effects of these substances cannot be attributed to any polysaccharide species of endotoxin.

  8. DESIGN AND EVALUATION OF BACTEROIDES DNA PROBES FOR THE SPECIFIC DETECTION OF HUMAN FECAL POLLUTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Because Bacteroides spp. are obligate anaerobes that dominate the human fecal flora, and because some species may live only in the human intestine, these bacteria might be useful to distinguish human from nonhuman sources of fecal pollution. To test this hypothesis, PCR primers s...

  9. Near-complete genome sequence of the cellulolytic Bacterium Bacteroides (Pseudobacteroides) cellulosolvens ATCC 35603

    DOE PAGES

    Dassa, Bareket; Utturkar, Sagar M.; Hurt, Richard A.; ...

    2015-09-24

    We report the single-contig genome sequence of the anaerobic, mesophilic, cellulolytic bacterium, Bacteroides cellulosolvens. The bacterium produces a particularly elaborate cellulosome system, whereas the types of cohesin-dockerin interactions are opposite of other known cellulosome systems: cell-surface attachment is thus mediated via type-I interactions whereas enzymes are integrated via type-II interactions.

  10. Bacteroides isolated from four mammalian hosts lack host specific patterns in carbon and nitrogen metabolism

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Within the distal gut of mammals are found trillions of microbes that utilize nutrients from diet, intestinal mucosa, and other gut microbes. 402 isolates of Bacteroides ovatus, B. thetaiotaomicron, and B. xylanisolvens were recovered from cow, goat, human, and pig fecal enrichments with cellulose o...

  11. Specificity of polysaccharide use in intestinal Bacteroides species determines diet-induced microbiota alterations

    PubMed Central

    Sonnenburg, Erica D.; Zheng, Hongjun; Joglekar, Payal; Higginbottom, Steven; Firbank, Susan J.; Bolam, David N.; Sonnenburg, Justin L.

    2010-01-01

    Summary The intestinal microbiota impacts many facets of human health and is associated with human diseases. Diet impacts microbiota composition, yet mechanisms that link dietary changes to microbiota alterations remain ill-defined. Here we elucidate the basis of Bacteroides proliferation in response to fructans, a class of fructose-based dietary polysaccharides. Structural and genetic analysis disclosed a fructose-binding, hybrid-two-component signaling sensor that controls the fructan utilization locus in Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron. Gene content of this locus differs among Bacteroides species and dictates the specificity and breadth of utilizable fructans. BT1760, an extracellular β2-6 endo-fructanase, distinguishes B. thetaiotaomicron genetically and functionally, and enables the use of the β2-6-linked fructan levan. The genetic and functional differences between Bacteroides species are predictive of in vivo competitiveness in the presence of dietary fructans. Genes that differentiate function serve as potential biomarkers in microbiomic datasets to enable rational manipulation of the microbiota via diet. PMID:20603004

  12. In vitro susceptibility of Gardnerella vaginalis and Bacteroides organisms, associated with nonspecific vaginitis, to sulfonamide preparations.

    PubMed Central

    Jones, B M; Kinghorn, G R; Geary, I

    1982-01-01

    Recent reports suggest that anaerobic Bacteroides organisms are frequently found with Gardnerella vaginalis in nonspecific vaginitis. Specimens taken from 96 women with vaginal discharge were tested simultaneously for these organisms. G. vaginalis was found in 73% of the specimens, Bacteroides was found in 53%, and both organisms were found in 47%. Sulfonamides have been widely used in the successful treatment of vaginitis. Paradoxically, G. vaginalis is reported to be resistant, and it has been suggested that it could be the vehicle of the drugs which effects the cure. Little is known of the susceptibility of vaginal anaerobes to the sulfonamides. G. vaginalis and Bacteroides isolates were therefore tested in vitro against the individual excipients of sulfonamide tablets, and minimal inhibitory concentration tests were also performed against the three active drugs. The excipients had no effect on G. vaginalis, but Bacteroides strains were susceptible to the urea component. All strains of both organisms were susceptible to at least two of the three sulfonamides at high concentrations. PMID:6981374

  13. An unusual case of hip septic arthritis due to Bacteroides fragilis in an alcoholic patient.

    PubMed

    Merle-Melet, M; Mainard, D; Regent, D; Dopff, C; Tamisier, J N; Ross, P; Delagoutte, J P; Gerard, A

    1994-01-01

    We describe a 53-year-old alcoholic man who presented with hip septic arthritis due to Bacteroides fragilis. This arthritis involved a severe destruction of the femoral head, which was completely devitalized. Recovery was achieved after 4 months of antimicrobial therapy with imipenem/cilastatin plus metronidazole, surgical debridement of the necrotic tissues and four sessions of hyperbaric oxygen.

  14. Specificity of polysaccharide use in intestinal bacteroides species determines diet-induced microbiota alterations.

    PubMed

    Sonnenburg, Erica D; Zheng, Hongjun; Joglekar, Payal; Higginbottom, Steven K; Firbank, Susan J; Bolam, David N; Sonnenburg, Justin L

    2010-06-25

    The intestinal microbiota impacts many facets of human health and is associated with human diseases. Diet impacts microbiota composition, yet mechanisms that link dietary changes to microbiota alterations remain ill-defined. Here we elucidate the basis of Bacteroides proliferation in response to fructans, a class of fructose-based dietary polysaccharides. Structural and genetic analysis disclosed a fructose-binding, hybrid two-component signaling sensor that controls the fructan utilization locus in Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron. Gene content of this locus differs among Bacteroides species and dictates the specificity and breadth of utilizable fructans. BT1760, an extracellular beta2-6 endo-fructanase, distinguishes B. thetaiotaomicron genetically and functionally, and enables the use of the beta2-6-linked fructan levan. The genetic and functional differences between Bacteroides species are predictive of in vivo competitiveness in the presence of dietary fructans. Gene sequences that distinguish species' metabolic capacity serve as potential biomarkers in microbiomic datasets to enable rational manipulation of the microbiota via diet.

  15. Unusual sub-genus associations of faecal Prevotella and Bacteroides with specific dietary patterns.

    PubMed

    De Filippis, Francesca; Pellegrini, Nicoletta; Laghi, Luca; Gobbetti, Marco; Ercolini, Danilo

    2016-10-21

    Diet has a recognized effect in shaping gut microbiota. Many studies link an increase in Prevotella to high-fibre diet, while Bacteroides abundance is usually associated with the consumption of animal fat and protein-rich diets. Nevertheless, closely related species and strains may harbour different genetic pools; therefore, further studies should aim to understand whether species of the same genus are consistently linked to dietary patterns or equally responsive to diet variations. Here, we used oligotyping of 16S rRNA gene sequencing data to exploit the diversity within Prevotella and Bacteroides genera in faecal samples of omnivore and non-omnivore subjects from a previously studied cohort. A great heterogeneity was found in oligotype composition. Nevertheless, different oligotypes within the same genus showed distinctive correlation patterns with dietary components and metabolome. We found that some Prevotella oligotypes are significantly associated with the plant-based diet but some are associated with animal-based nutrients, and the same applies to Bacteroides. Therefore, an indiscriminate association of Bacteroidetes genera with specific dietary patterns may lead to an oversimplified vision that does not take into account sub-genus diversity and the different possible responses to dietary components. We demonstrated that Prevotella and Bacteroides oligotypes show distinctive correlation patterns with dietary components and metabolome. These results substantiate a current oversimplification of diet-dependent microbe-host associations and highlighted that sub-genus differences must be taken into account when planning gut microbiota modulation for health benefits.

  16. Extensive Mobilome-Driven Genome Diversification in Mouse Gut-Associated Bacteroides vulgatus mpk.

    PubMed

    Lange, Anna; Beier, Sina; Steimle, Alex; Autenrieth, Ingo B; Huson, Daniel H; Frick, Julia-Stefanie

    2016-04-25

    Like many other Bacteroides species, Bacteroides vulgatus strain mpk, a mouse fecal isolate which was shown to promote intestinal homeostasis, utilizes a variety of mobile elements for genome evolution. Based on sequences collected by Pacific Biosciences SMRT sequencing technology, we discuss the challenges of assembling and studying a bacterial genome of high plasticity. Additionally, we conducted comparative genomics comparing this commensal strain with the B. vulgatus type strain ATCC 8482 as well as multiple other Bacteroides and Parabacteroides strains to reveal the most important differences and identify the unique features of B. vulgatus mpk. The genome of B. vulgatus mpk harbors a large and diverse set of mobile element proteins compared with other sequenced Bacteroides strains. We found evidence of a number of different horizontal gene transfer events and a genome landscape that has been extensively altered by different mobilization events. A CRISPR/Cas system could be identified that provides a possible mechanism for preventing the integration of invading external DNA. We propose that the high genome plasticity and the introduced genome instabilities of B. vulgatus mpk arising from the various mobilization events might play an important role not only in its adaptation to the challenging intestinal environment in general, but also in its ability to interact with the gut microbiota. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  17. A proteomic approach towards understanding the cross talk between Bacteroides fragilis and Bifidobacterium longum in coculture.

    PubMed

    Rios-Covián, David; Sánchez, Borja; Martínez, Noelia; Cuesta, Isabel; Hernández-Barranco, Ana M; de Los Reyes-Gavilán, Clara G; Gueimonde, Miguel

    2016-07-01

    A better understanding of the interactions among intestinal microbes is needed to decipher the complex cross talk that takes place within the human gut. Bacteroides and Bifidobacterium genera are among the most relevant intestinal bacteria, and it has been previously reported that coculturing of these 2 microorganisms affects their survival. Therefore, coculturing of Bifidobacterium longum NB667 and Bacteroides fragilis DSMZ2151 was performed with the aim of unravelling the mechanisms involved in their interaction. To this end, we applied proteomic (2D-DIGE) analyses, and by chromatographic techniques we quantified the bacterial metabolites produced during coincubation. Coculture stimulated the growth of B. longum, retarding that of B. fragilis, with concomitant changes in the production of some proteins and metabolites of both bacteria. The combined culture promoted upregulation of the bifidobacterial pyruvate kinase and downregulation of the Bacteroides phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase - 2 enzymes involved in the catabolism of carbohydrates. Moreover, B. fragilis FKBP-type peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerase, a protein with chaperone-like activity, was found to be overproduced in coculture, suggesting the induction of a stress response in this microorganism. This study provides mechanistic data to deepen our understanding of the interaction between Bacteroides and Bifidobacterium intestinal populations.

  18. Bacteroides cellulosilyticus sp. nov., a cellulolytic bacterium from the human gut microbial community.

    PubMed

    Robert, Céline; Chassard, Christophe; Lawson, Paul A; Bernalier-Donadille, Annick

    2007-07-01

    A strictly anaerobic cellulolytic bacterium, strain CRE21(T), was isolated from a human faecal sample. Cells were Gram-negative non-motile rods that were about 1.7 microm in length and 0.9 microm in width. Strain CRE21(T) degraded different types of cellulose and was able to grow on a variety of carbohydrates. Cellulose and sugars were mainly converted to acetate, propionate and succinate. The G+C content of the DNA was 41.1 mol%. 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis revealed that the isolate belonged to the genus Bacteroides with highest sequence similarity to the type strain of Bacteroides intestinalis (98 %). DNA-DNA hybridization results revealed that strain CRE21(T) was distinct from B. intestinalis (40 % DNA-DNA relatedness). Strain CRE21(T) also showed several characteristics distinct from B. intestinalis. In particular, it exhibited different capacity to degrade polysaccharides such as cellulose. On the basis of phylogenetic analysis and the morphological, physiological and biochemical data presented in this study, strain CRE21(T) can be readily differentiated from recognized species of the genus Bacteroides. The name Bacteroides cellulosilyticus sp. nov. is proposed to accommodate this organism. The type strain is CRE21(T) (=DSM 14838(T)=CCUG 44979(T)).

  19. Extensive Mobilome-Driven Genome Diversification in Mouse Gut-Associated Bacteroides vulgatus mpk

    PubMed Central

    Lange, Anna; Beier, Sina; Steimle, Alex; Autenrieth, Ingo B.; Huson, Daniel H.; Frick, Julia-Stefanie

    2016-01-01

    Like many other Bacteroides species, Bacteroides vulgatus strain mpk, a mouse fecal isolate which was shown to promote intestinal homeostasis, utilizes a variety of mobile elements for genome evolution. Based on sequences collected by Pacific Biosciences SMRT sequencing technology, we discuss the challenges of assembling and studying a bacterial genome of high plasticity. Additionally, we conducted comparative genomics comparing this commensal strain with the B. vulgatus type strain ATCC 8482 as well as multiple other Bacteroides and Parabacteroides strains to reveal the most important differences and identify the unique features of B. vulgatus mpk. The genome of B. vulgatus mpk harbors a large and diverse set of mobile element proteins compared with other sequenced Bacteroides strains. We found evidence of a number of different horizontal gene transfer events and a genome landscape that has been extensively altered by different mobilization events. A CRISPR/Cas system could be identified that provides a possible mechanism for preventing the integration of invading external DNA. We propose that the high genome plasticity and the introduced genome instabilities of B. vulgatus mpk arising from the various mobilization events might play an important role not only in its adaptation to the challenging intestinal environment in general, but also in its ability to interact with the gut microbiota. PMID:27071651

  20. DESIGN AND EVALUATION OF BACTEROIDES DNA PROBES FOR THE SPECIFIC DETECTION OF HUMAN FECAL POLLUTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Because Bacteroides spp. are obligate anaerobes that dominate the human fecal flora, and because some species may live only in the human intestine, these bacteria might be useful to distinguish human from nonhuman sources of fecal pollution. To test this hypothesis, PCR primers s...

  1. Induction of interleukin-1 and -6 in human gingival fibroblast cultures stimulated with Bacteroides lipopolysaccharides.

    PubMed Central

    Takada, H; Mihara, J; Morisaki, I; Hamada, S

    1991-01-01

    Normal human gingival fibroblasts stimulated in vitro by lipopolysaccharides (LPS) from oral Bacteroides species produced cell-free and cell-associated thymocyte-activating factors (TAF). Neutralization assays using antisera to human interleukin-1 alpha (HuIL-1 alpha), HuIL-1 beta, and HuIL-6 revealed that cell-free TAF was attributable mainly to IL-1 beta and that IL-6 augmented the TAF activity of IL-1 beta in the culture supernatant. Another factor(s), however, may also be involved in cell-free TAF. By contrast, the active entity of cell-associated TAF was ascribed to IL-1 alpha alone. Furthermore, IL-6 was detected mainly in the supernatant of fibroblast cultures stimulated with Bacteroides LPS. Fibroblasts pretreated with natural human beta or gamma interferon, but not those pretreated with alpha interferon, synthesized higher levels of cell-associated IL-1 alpha in response to stimulation by Bacteroides LPS; however, no interferons exhibited direct IL-1-inducing activity or synergistic IL-1-inducing activity with LPS. Endogenously induced beta interferon was suggested to be necessary for fibroblasts to produce cell-associated IL-1 alpha in response to Bacteroides LPS. PMID:1702762

  2. Cellulase and Sugar Formation by Bacteroides cellulosolvens, a Newly Isolated Cellulolytic Anaerobe †

    PubMed Central

    Giuliano, Christine; Khan, A. W.

    1984-01-01

    A newly isolated mesophilic anaerobe, Bacteroides cellulosolvens, has the ability to produce cellulase and to degrade cellulose to cellobiose and glucose. It does not utilize glucose, and it lacks β-glucosidase activity. This anaerobe appears to degrade cellulose to cellobiose by cellulase action, and the presence of cells appears necessary for the formation of glucose. PMID:16346612

  3. Immune response to Bacteroides ureolyticus in a patient with brain abscess.

    PubMed Central

    Lalitha, M K; Mathai, K V; Koshi, G

    1983-01-01

    A high titer (1:256) of agglutinating antibodies against Bacteroides ureolyticus was demonstrated in a 35-year-old woman with brain abscess, using a microagglutination test. Tests done with B. ureolyticus and heterologous sera as well as with heterologous strains and the patient's serum were negative. Circulating antibody to B. ureolyticus has not been reported previously. PMID:6619293

  4. In vitro kinetic analysis of oligofructose consumption by Bacteroides and Bifidobacterium spp. indicates different degradation mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Van der Meulen, Roel; Makras, Lefteris; Verbrugghe, Kristof; Adriany, Tom; De Vuyst, Luc

    2006-02-01

    The growth of pure cultures of Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron LMG 11262 and Bacteroides fragilis LMG 10263 on fructose and oligofructose was examined and compared to that of Bifidobacterium longum BB536 through in vitro laboratory fermentations. Gas chromatography (GC) analysis was used to determine the different fractions of oligofructose and their degradation during the fermentation process. Both B. thetaiotaomicron LMG 11262 and B. fragilis LMG 10263 were able to grow on oligofructose as fast as on fructose, succinic acid being the major metabolite produced by both strains. B. longum BB536 grew slower on oligofructose than on fructose. Acetic acid and lactic acid were the main metabolites produced when fructose was used as the sole energy source. Increased amounts of formic acid and ethanol were produced when oligofructose was used as an energy source at the cost of lactic acid. Detailed kinetic analysis revealed a preferential metabolism of the short oligofructose fractions (e.g., F2 and F3) for B. longum BB536. After depletion of the short fractions, the larger oligofructose fractions (e.g., F4, GF4, F5, GF5, and F6) were metabolized, too. Both Bacteroides strains did not display such a preferential metabolism and degraded all oligofructose fractions simultaneously, transiently increasing the fructose concentration in the medium. This suggests a different mechanism for oligofructose breakdown between the strain of Bifidobacterium and both strains of Bacteroides, which helps to explain the bifidogenic nature of inulin-type fructans.

  5. Draft Genome Sequence of Bacteroides vulgatus PC510, a Strain Isolated from Human Feces ▿

    PubMed Central

    Cuív, Páraic Ó; Klaassens, Eline S.; Durkin, A. Scott; Harkins, Derek M.; Foster, Les; McCorrison, Jamison; Torralba, Manolito; Nelson, Karen E.; Morrison, Mark

    2011-01-01

    Although Bacteroides vulgatus is one of the most prevalent microorganisms in the human gastrointestinal tract, little is known about the genetic potential of this species. Here, we describe the annotated draft genome sequence of B. vulgatus PC510 isolated from human feces. PMID:21622758

  6. Effect of salt stress on glycine betaine biosynthesis and catabolism by Medicago sativa bacteroids

    SciTech Connect

    Fougere, F.; Poggi, M.-C.; Le Rudulier, D. )

    1990-05-01

    Previous works have shown that glycine betaine (GB) and choline (Cho) are actively taken up by Medicago sativa bacteroids isolated from 4-week-old nodules. Here, we have investigated the effects of NaCl on the fte of Cho and GB. Bacteroids were incubated in low- or high-salt-medium (0.4 M NaCl) and supplemented with {sup 14}C 1,2-Cho or {sup 14}C 1,2-GB. After 3 hours, radioactivity was measured in CO{sub 2} released, in ethanol-soluble and insoluble fractions. In absence of salt, a low proportion of the labelling was found in soluble fraction: 47 and 19% after Cho or GB supply, respectively. On the contrary, in high-salt-medium, the soluble fraction still contained 85% of the radioactivity with GB corresponding to 92-98%. Both enzymes involved in GB biosynthesis from Cho were studied. Choline oxidase activity was enhanced by 59%, while betainal dehydrogenase activity remained unchanged after bacteroid incubation in high-salt-medium. Thus, GB accumulation in salt-stressed bacteroids would be likely a consequence of a decrease of its catabolism rather than an increase of its biosynthesis.

  7. Rhizobium nepotum sp. nov. isolated from tumors on different plant species.

    PubMed

    Puławska, Joanna; Willems, Anne; De Meyer, Sofie E; Süle, Sandor

    2012-06-01

    Five Gram-negative, rod-shaped, non-spore-forming bacteria were isolated from galls on different plant species in Hungary: strain 39/7(T) from Prunus cerasifera Myrobalan, strain 0 from grapevine var. Ezerjó, strain 7/1 from raspberry var. Findus and in Poland, strain C3.4.1 from Colt rootstock (Prunus avium × Prunus pseudocerasus) and strain CP17.2.2 from Prunus avium. Only one of these isolates, strain 0, is able to cause crown gall on different plant species. On the basis of 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity, the strains cluster together and belong to the genus Rhizobium and their closest relative is Rhizobium radiobacter (99.1%). Phylogenetic analysis of the novel strains using housekeeping genes atpD, glnA, gyrB, recA and rpoB revealed their distinct position separate from other known Rhizobium species and confirmed their relation to Rhizobium radiobacter. The major cellular fatty acids are 18:1 w7c, 16:0, 16:0 3OH, summed feature 2 (comprising 12:0 aldehyde, 16:1 iso I and/or 14:0 3OH) and summed feature 3 (comprising 16:1 w7c and/or 15 iso 2OH). DNA-DNA hybridization of strain 39/7(T) with the type strain of R. radiobacter LMG 140(T) revealed 45% DNA-DNA hybridization. Phenotypic and physiological properties differentiate the novel isolates from other closely related species. On the basis of the results obtained, the five isolates are considered to represent a novel species of the genus Rhizobium, for which the name Rhizobium nepotum sp. nov. (type strain 39/7(T)=LMG 26435(T)=CFBP 7436(T)) is proposed.

  8. Rhizobium azibense sp. nov., a nitrogen fixing bacterium isolated from root-nodules of Phaseolus vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Mnasri, Bacem; Liu, Tian Yan; Saidi, Sabrine; Chen, Wen Feng; Chen, Wen Xin; Zhang, Xiao Xia; Mhamdi, Ridha

    2014-05-01

    Three microbial strains isolated from common beans, 23C2T (Tunisia), Gr42 (Spain) and IE4868 (Mexico), which have been identified previously as representing a genomic group closely related to Rhizobium gallicum, are further studied here. Their 16S rRNA genes showed 98.5-99% similarity with Rhizobium loessense CCBAU 7190BT, R. gallicum R602spT, Rhizobium mongolense USDA 1844T and Rhizobium yanglingense CCBAU 71623T. Phylogenetic analysis based on recA, atpD, dnaK and thrC sequences showed that the novel strains were closely related and could be distinguished from the four type strains of the closely related species. Strains 23C2T, Gr42 and IE4868 could be also differentiated from their closest phylogenetic neighbours by their phenotypic and physiological properties and their fatty acid contents. All three strains harboured symbiotic genes specific to biovar gallicum. Levels of DNA-DNA relatedness between strain 23C2T and the type strains of R. loessense, R. mongolense, R. gallicum and R. yanglingense ranged from 58.1 to 61.5%. The DNA G+C content of the genomic DNA of strain 23C2T was 59.52%. On the basis of these data, strains 23C2T, Gr42 and IE4868 were considered to represent a novel species of the genus Rhizobium for which the name Rhizobium azibense is proposed. Strain 23C2T (=CCBAU 101087T=HAMBI3541T) was designated as the type strain.

  9. Rhizobium pusense sp. nov., isolated from the rhizosphere of chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.).

    PubMed

    Panday, Digvijay; Schumann, Peter; Das, Subrata K

    2011-11-01

    A novel bacterial strain, designated NRCPB10(T), was isolated from rhizosphere soil of chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.) in Pusa, New Delhi, India. The 16S rRNA gene sequence of strain NRCPB10(T) showed highest similarity (98.9 %) to that of Rhizobium radiobacter NCPPB 2437(T), followed by Rhizobium larrymoorei AF3-10(T) (97.7 %) and Rhizobium rubi IFO 13261(T) (97.4 %). Phylogenetic analysis of strain NRCPB10(T) based on the housekeeping genes recA and atpD confirmed its position as distinct from recognized Rhizobium species. Levels of DNA-DNA relatedness between strain NRCPB10(T) and R. radiobacter ICMP 5785(T), R. larrymoorei LMG 21410(T) and R. rubi ICMP 6428(T) were 51.0, 32.6 and 27.3 %, respectively. Cellular fatty acids of strain NRCPB10(T) were C(18 : 1)ω7c (58.9 %), C(16 : 0) (15.5 %), C(19 : 0) cyclo ω8c (11.5 %), iso-C(16 : 1) (5.8 %), C(16 : 0) 3-OH (4.5 %), C(16 : 1)ω7c (2.1 %) and C(18 : 0) (1.3 %). The G+C content of the genomic DNA of strain NRCPB10(T) was 59.0 mol%. Strain NRCPB10(T) did not nodulate chickpea plants or induce tumours in tobacco plants. Phenotypic and physiological properties along with SDS-PAGE of whole-cell soluble proteins differentiated strain NRCPB10(T) from its closest phylogenetic neighbours. On the basis of data from the present polyphasic taxonomic study, strain NRCPB10(T) is considered to represent a novel species of the genus Rhizobium, for which the name Rhizobium pusense sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is NRCPB10(T) ( = LMG 25623(T) = JCM 16209(T) = NCIMB 14639(T)).

  10. Rhizobium skierniewicense sp. nov., isolated from tumours on chrysanthemum and cherry plum.

    PubMed

    Puławska, Joanna; Willems, Anne; Sobiczewski, Piotr

    2012-04-01

    Three isolates of Gram-negative, rod-shaped, non-spore-forming bacteria were recovered from galls on chrysanthemum (Chrysanthemum L.; Ch11T, Ch12) and cherry plum (Prunus cerasifera var. divaricata; AL9.3). All three isolates were able to cause crown galls on various plant species. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences indicated that the three isolates were probably identical (100% sequence similarity) and closely related to Rhizobium rubi (99.6 %), Rhizobium radiobacter (98.7 %) and Rhizobium larrymoorei (98.1 %). Similar analysis based on the housekeeping genes glnA, gyrB and rpoB also indicated that the novel isolates were identical and closely related to R. rubi. The major cellular fatty acids of strain Ch11T were C18:1ω7c (62.1 %), summed feature 2 (comprising C12:0 aldehyde, iso-C16:1 I and/or C14:0 3-OH; 10.8 %), summed feature 3 (comprising C16:1ω7c and/or iso-C15:0 2-OH; 7.7 %) and C10:0 3-OH (7.5 %). However, the DNA-DNA relatedness between Ch11T and R. rubi LMG 156T was only 48 % and, unlike phylogenetically related established Rhizobium species, the novel isolates were able to utilize β-hydroxybutyric acid but not L-fucose. Based on the phylogenetic and phenotypic evidence, the isolates are considered to represent a single novel species of the genus Rhizobium, for which the name Rhizobium skierniewicense sp. nov. is proposed; the type strain is Ch11T (=LMG 26191T=CFBP 7420T).

  11. Rhizobium wenxiniae sp. nov., an endophytic bacterium isolated from maize root.

    PubMed

    Gao, Jun-Lian; Sun, Pengbo; Wang, Xu-Ming; Lv, Fan-Yang; Mao, Xiao-Jie; Sun, Jian-Guang

    2017-08-01

    A novel Gram-stain-negative, aerobic, rod-shaped strain designated 166T was isolated from surface-sterilized root tissue of maize planted in the Fangshan District of Beijing, PR China. The 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis indicated that strain 166T belongs to the genus Rhizobium and is closely related to Rhizobium cellulosilyticum ALA10B2T and Rhizobium yantingense H66T with sequence similarities of 98.8 and 98.3 %, respectively. According to atpD and recA sequence analysis, the highest sequence similarity between strain 166T and R. cellulosilyticum ALA10B2T is 93.8 and 84.7 %, respectively. However, the new isolate exhibited relatively low levels of DNA-DNA relatedness with respect to R. cellulosilyticum DSM 18291T (20.8±2.3 %) and Rhizobium yantingense CCTCC AB 2014007T (47.2±1.4 %). The DNA G+C content of strain 166T was 59.8 mol%. The main polar lipids consisted of phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylcholine, diphosphatidylglycerol, an unidentified aminophospholipid and an unidentified aminolipid. The major fatty acids of strain 166T were summed feature 8 (C18 : 1ω7c and/or C18 : 1ω6c). The results of the physiological and biochemical tests and minor differences in the fatty acid profiles allowed a clear phenotypic differentiation of strain 166T from the type strains of closely related species, R. cellulosilyticum DSM 18291T and R. yantingense CCTCC AB 2014007T. Strain 166T represents a novel species within the genus Rhizobium, for which the name Rhizobium wenxiniae sp. nov. is proposed, with the type strain 166T (=CGMCC 1.15279T=DSM 100734T).

  12. Characterization of Rhizobium grahamii extrachromosomal replicons and their transfer among rhizobia.

    PubMed

    Althabegoiti, María Julia; Ormeño-Orrillo, Ernesto; Lozano, Luis; Torres Tejerizo, Gonzalo; Rogel, Marco Antonio; Mora, Jaime; Martínez-Romero, Esperanza

    2014-01-08

    Rhizobium grahamii belongs to a new phylogenetic group of rhizobia together with Rhizobium mesoamericanum and other species. R. grahamii has a broad-host-range that includes Leucaena leucocephala and Phaseolus vulgaris, although it is a poor competitor for P. vulgaris nodulation in the presence of Rhizobium etli or Rhizobium phaseoli strains. This work analyzed the genome sequence and transfer properties of R. grahamii plasmids. Genome sequence was obtained from R. grahamii CCGE502 type strain isolated from Dalea leporina in Mexico. The CCGE502 genome comprises one chromosome and two extrachromosomal replicons (ERs), pRgrCCGE502a and pRgrCCGE502b. Additionally, a plasmid integrated in the CCGE502 chromosome was found. The genomic comparison of ERs from this group showed that gene content is more variable than average nucleotide identity (ANI). Well conserved nod and nif genes were found in R. grahamii and R. mesoamericanum with some differences. R. phaseoli Ch24-10 genes expressed in bacterial cells in roots were found to be conserved in pRgrCCGE502b. Regarding conjugative transfer we were unable to transfer the R. grahamii CCGE502 symbiotic plasmid and its megaplasmid to other rhizobial hosts but we could transfer the symbiotic plasmid to Agrobacterium tumefaciens with transfer dependent on homoserine lactones. Variable degrees of nucleotide identity and gene content conservation were found among the different R. grahamii CCGE502 replicons in comparison to R. mesoamericanum genomes. The extrachromosomal replicons from R. grahamii were more similar to those found in phylogenetically related Rhizobium species. However, limited similarities of R. grahamii CCGE502 symbiotic plasmid and megaplasmid were observed in other more distant Rhizobium species. The set of conserved genes in R. grahamii comprises some of those that are highly expressed in R. phaseoli on plant roots, suggesting that they play an important role in root colonization.

  13. Characterization of Rhizobium grahamii extrachromosomal replicons and their transfer among rhizobia

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Rhizobium grahamii belongs to a new phylogenetic group of rhizobia together with Rhizobium mesoamericanum and other species. R. grahamii has a broad-host-range that includes Leucaena leucocephala and Phaseolus vulgaris, although it is a poor competitor for P. vulgaris nodulation in the presence of Rhizobium etli or Rhizobium phaseoli strains. This work analyzed the genome sequence and transfer properties of R. grahamii plasmids. Results Genome sequence was obtained from R. grahamii CCGE502 type strain isolated from Dalea leporina in Mexico. The CCGE502 genome comprises one chromosome and two extrachromosomal replicons (ERs), pRgrCCGE502a and pRgrCCGE502b. Additionally, a plasmid integrated in the CCGE502 chromosome was found. The genomic comparison of ERs from this group showed that gene content is more variable than average nucleotide identity (ANI). Well conserved nod and nif genes were found in R. grahamii and R. mesoamericanum with some differences. R. phaseoli Ch24-10 genes expressed in bacterial cells in roots were found to be conserved in pRgrCCGE502b. Regarding conjugative transfer we were unable to transfer the R. grahamii CCGE502 symbiotic plasmid and its megaplasmid to other rhizobial hosts but we could transfer the symbiotic plasmid to Agrobacterium tumefaciens with transfer dependent on homoserine lactones. Conclusion Variable degrees of nucleotide identity and gene content conservation were found among the different R. grahamii CCGE502 replicons in comparison to R. mesoamericanum genomes. The extrachromosomal replicons from R. grahamii were more similar to those found in phylogenetically related Rhizobium species. However, limited similarities of R. grahamii CCGE502 symbiotic plasmid and megaplasmid were observed in other more distant Rhizobium species. The set of conserved genes in R. grahamii comprises some of those that are highly expressed in R. phaseoli on plant roots, suggesting that they play an important role in root colonization

  14. Lower Level of Bacteroides in the Gut Microbiota Is Associated with Inflammatory Bowel Disease: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yingting

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims. Multiple studies have reported associations between inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and the flora disequilibrium of Bacteroides. We performed a meta-analysis of the available data to provide a more precise estimate of the association between Bacteroides level in the gut and IBD. Methods. We searched PubMed/MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane Library, Wiley Library, BIOSIS previews, Web of Science, CNKI, and ScienceDirect databases for published literature on IBD and gut microbiota from 1990 to 2016. Quality of all eligible studies was assessed using the Newcastle-Ottawa Quality Assessment Scale (NOS). We compared the level of Bacteroides in IBD patients with that in a control group without IBD, different types of IBD patients, and IBD patients with active phase and in remission. Results. We identified 63 articles, 9 of which contained sufficient data for evaluation. The mean level of Bacteroides was significantly lower in Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC) patients in active phase than in normal controls. The level of Bacteroides in remission CD and UC patients was much lower than patients in the control group. Bacteroides level was even lower in patients with CD and UC in active phase than in remission. Conclusions. This analysis suggests that lower levels of Bacteroides are associated with IBD, especially in active phase. PMID:27999802

  15. Lower Level of Bacteroides in the Gut Microbiota Is Associated with Inflammatory Bowel Disease: A Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yingting; Zhi, Fachao

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims. Multiple studies have reported associations between inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and the flora disequilibrium of Bacteroides. We performed a meta-analysis of the available data to provide a more precise estimate of the association between Bacteroides level in the gut and IBD. Methods. We searched PubMed/MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane Library, Wiley Library, BIOSIS previews, Web of Science, CNKI, and ScienceDirect databases for published literature on IBD and gut microbiota from 1990 to 2016. Quality of all eligible studies was assessed using the Newcastle-Ottawa Quality Assessment Scale (NOS). We compared the level of Bacteroides in IBD patients with that in a control group without IBD, different types of IBD patients, and IBD patients with active phase and in remission. Results. We identified 63 articles, 9 of which contained sufficient data for evaluation. The mean level of Bacteroides was significantly lower in Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC) patients in active phase than in normal controls. The level of Bacteroides in remission CD and UC patients was much lower than patients in the control group. Bacteroides level was even lower in patients with CD and UC in active phase than in remission. Conclusions. This analysis suggests that lower levels of Bacteroides are associated with IBD, especially in active phase.

  16. [Nitrogenase, hydrogenase and nitrate reductase activities, oxygen consumption, and ATP content in nodules formed by strains of Rhizobium leguminosarum 128C53 and 300 in symbiosis with pea plants].

    PubMed

    Bedmar, E J; Olivares, J

    1986-10-01

    The nitrogenase activity, nitrate reductase activity and oxygen uptake as well as the hydrogen incorporation and ATP content were examined in the root nodules and bacteroids, respectively, formed by Rhizobium leguminosarum strains 128C53 (hydrogenase positive) and 300 (hydrogenase negative) in symbiosis with Pisum sativum plants grown in the presence of 2 mM KNO3. The strain 128C53 showed the greatest values for all parameters analyzed, except for the nitrate reductase activity, which was higher for the strain 300. Similarly, nodule nitrate reductase activity in strain 300 was greater than that in strain 128C53 when plants grew in the absence of combined nitrogen. In general, the highest values were obtained when determinations were made after 7 hours of plant illumination. However, the hydrogenase activity of strain 128C53 and the nitrate reductase activities of both strains increased with the light period, reaching a maximum after 14 hours of illumination. These results suggest that the benefits derived from the superior symbiotic properties and from the presence of hydrogenase activity in strain 128C53 could be counteracted by the higher rates of the nodule nitrate reductase activity in strain 300.

  17. Rhizobium acidisoli sp. nov., isolated from root nodules of Phaseolus vulgaris in acid soils.

    PubMed

    Román-Ponce, Brenda; Jing Zhang, Yu; Soledad Vásquez-Murrieta, María; Hua Sui, Xin; Feng Chen, Wen; Carlos Alberto Padilla, Juan; Wu Guo, Xian; Lian Gao, Jun; Yan, Jun; Hong Wei, Ge; Tao Wang, En

    2016-01-01

    Two Gram-negative, aerobic, non-motile, rod-shaped bacterial strains, FH13T and FH23, representing a novel group of Rhizobium isolated from root nodules of Phaseolus vulgaris in Mexico, were studied by a polyphasic analysis. Phylogeny of 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed them to be members of the genus Rhizobium related most closely to 'Rhizobium anhuiense' CCBAU 23252 (99.7 % similarity), Rhizobium leguminosarum USDA 2370T (98.6 %), and Rhizobium sophorae CCBAU 03386T and others ( ≤ 98.3 %). In sequence analyses of the housekeeping genes recA, glnII and atpD, both strains formed a subclade distinct from all defined species of the genus Rhizobium at sequence similarities of 82.3-94.0 %, demonstrating that they represented a novel genomic species in the genus Rhizobium. Mean levels of DNA-DNA relatedness between the reference strain FH13T and the type strains of related species varied between 13.0 ± 2.0 and 52.1 ± 1.2 %. The DNA G+C content of strain FH13T was 63.5 mol% (Tm). The major cellular fatty acids were 16 : 0, 17 : 0 anteiso, 18 : 0, summed feature 2 (12 : 0 aldehyde/unknown 10.928) and summed feature 8 (18 : 1ω7c). The fatty acid 17 : 1ω5c was unique for this strain. Some phenotypic features, such as failure to utilize adonitol, l-arabinose, d-fructose and d-fucose, and ability to utilize d-galacturonic acid and itaconic acid as carbon source, could also be used to distinguish strain FH13T from the type strains of related species. Based upon these results, a novel species, Rhizobium acidisoli sp. nov., is proposed, with FH13T ( = CCBAU 101094T = HAMBI 3626T = LMG 28672T) as the type strain.

  18. Extracellular polysaccharides are involved in the attachment of Azospirillum brasilense and Rhizobium leguminosarum to arbuscular mycorrhizal structures.

    PubMed

    Bianciotto, V; Andreotti, S; Balestrini, R; Bonfante, P; Perotto, S

    2001-01-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi, one of the most important component of the soil microbial community, establish physical interactions with naturally occurring and genetically modified bacterial biofertilizers and biopesticides, commonly referred to as plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR). We have used a genetic approach to investigate the bacterial components possibly involved in the attachment of two PGPR (Azospirillum and Rhizobium) to AM roots and AM fungal structures. Mutants affected in extracellular polysaccharides (EPS) have been tested in in vitro adhesion assays and shown to be strongly impaired in the attachment to both types of surfaces as well as to quartz fibers. Anchoring of rhizobacteria to AM fungal structures may have special ecological and biotechnological significance because it may facilitate colonisation of new rhizospheres by the bacteria, and may be an essential trait for the development of mixed inocula.

  19. Generation of stable infectious clones of plant viruses by using Rhizobium radiobacter for both cloning and inoculation.

    PubMed

    Tuo, Decai; Fu, Lanlan; Shen, Wentao; Li, Xiaoying; Zhou, Peng; Yan, Pu

    2017-10-01

    A novel Rhizobium radiobacter (synonym Agrobacterium tumefaciens)-mediated approach was developed to generate stable infectious clones of plant viruses. This method uses R. radiobacter for both cloning and inoculation of infectious clones, bypassing the requirement of cloning in E. coli to avoid the instability. Only three steps are included in this method: (i) construct viral genome-encoding plasmids in vitro by one-step Gibson assembly; (ii) transform the assembled DNA products into R. radiobacter; (iii) inoculate plants with the R. radiobacter clones containing the viral genome. Stable infectious clones were obtained from two potyviruses papaya ringspot virus (PRSV) and papaya leaf distortion mosaic virus (PLDMV) using this method, whereas attempts utilizing "classical" E. coli cloning system failed repeatedly. This method is simple and efficient, and is promising for a wide application in generation of infectious clones of plant virus, especially for those which are instable in E. coli. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Evaluation of activity of temafloxacin against Bacteroides fragilis by an in vitro pharmacodynamic system.

    PubMed

    Zabinski, R A; Vance-Bryan, K; Krinke, A J; Walker, K J; Moody, J A; Rotschafer, J C

    1993-11-01

    An in vitro pharmacodynamic system has been successfully adapted to simulate in vivo antimicrobial pharmacokinetics under anaerobic conditions. This system was used to perform time-kill kinetic studies which were designed to compare the activity of temafloxacin to ciprofloxacin and cefotetan against two strains of Bacteroides fragilis (ATCC 25285 and ATCC 23745). All experiments were performed as single-dose, 24-h, duplicate runs. Starting bacterial inocula of 10(7) CFU/ml were exposed to starting antimicrobial concentrations of 5 micrograms of temafloxacin per ml, 5 micrograms of ciprofloxacin per ml, and 100 micrograms of cefotetan per ml. Terminal half-lives of 8, 4, and 4 h were simulated for each antimicrobial agent. Temafloxacin was rapidly bactericidal against B. fragilis. Ciprofloxacin was not bactericidal (< 3 log10 unit decline in bacterial numbers) to either strain of B. fragilis. Cefotetan was bactericidal (> or = 3 log10 unit decline in bacterial numbers) to each strain but killed at a slower rate than temafloxacin. Times to 3 log10 unit declines of strain ATCC 25285 were 2, 4, and > 24 h, whereas those of strain ATCC 23745 were 4, 4, and > 24 h for temafloxacin, cefotetan, and ciprofloxacin, respectively. Total logarithmic declines of strain ATCC 25285 were > 4.5, > 4.5, and 2.9 log10 CFU/ml, whereas those of strain ATCC 23745 were 4.1, > 4.5, and 1.2 log10 CFU/ml for each drug, respectively. These and other studies demonstrated that temafloxacin showed potential as an agent that could have been further developed for use in the treatment of anaerobic infections. However, the drug was removed from the market by its manufacturer because of toxicity issues. Although the release of newer fluoroquinolones that possess significant activity against anaerobic bacteria does not appear imminent, the time-kill studies performed in this study demonstrate that further research is warranted in the development of fluoroquinolones which possess significant

  1. Evaluation of activity of temafloxacin against Bacteroides fragilis by an in vitro pharmacodynamic system.

    PubMed Central

    Zabinski, R A; Vance-Bryan, K; Krinke, A J; Walker, K J; Moody, J A; Rotschafer, J C

    1993-01-01

    An in vitro pharmacodynamic system has been successfully adapted to simulate in vivo antimicrobial pharmacokinetics under anaerobic conditions. This system was used to perform time-kill kinetic studies which were designed to compare the activity of temafloxacin to ciprofloxacin and cefotetan against two strains of Bacteroides fragilis (ATCC 25285 and ATCC 23745). All experiments were performed as single-dose, 24-h, duplicate runs. Starting bacterial inocula of 10(7) CFU/ml were exposed to starting antimicrobial concentrations of 5 micrograms of temafloxacin per ml, 5 micrograms of ciprofloxacin per ml, and 100 micrograms of cefotetan per ml. Terminal half-lives of 8, 4, and 4 h were simulated for each antimicrobial agent. Temafloxacin was rapidly bactericidal against B. fragilis. Ciprofloxacin was not bactericidal (< 3 log10 unit decline in bacterial numbers) to either strain of B. fragilis. Cefotetan was bactericidal (> or = 3 log10 unit decline in bacterial numbers) to each strain but killed at a slower rate than temafloxacin. Times to 3 log10 unit declines of strain ATCC 25285 were 2, 4, and > 24 h, whereas those of strain ATCC 23745 were 4, 4, and > 24 h for temafloxacin, cefotetan, and ciprofloxacin, respectively. Total logarithmic declines of strain ATCC 25285 were > 4.5, > 4.5, and 2.9 log10 CFU/ml, whereas those of strain ATCC 23745 were 4.1, > 4.5, and 1.2 log10 CFU/ml for each drug, respectively. These and other studies demonstrated that temafloxacin showed potential as an agent that could have been further developed for use in the treatment of anaerobic infections. However, the drug was removed from the market by its manufacturer because of toxicity issues. Although the release of newer fluoroquinolones that possess significant activity against anaerobic bacteria does not appear imminent, the time-kill studies performed in this study demonstrate that further research is warranted in the development of fluoroquinolones which possess significant

  2. Bacteroides vulgatus protects against Escherichia coli-induced colitis in gnotobiotic interleukin-2-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Waidmann, Marc; Bechtold, Oliver; Frick, Julia-Stefanie; Lehr, Hans-Anton; Schubert, Sören; Dobrindt, Ulrich; Loeffler, Jürgen; Bohn, Erwin; Autenrieth, Ingo B

    2003-07-01

    The microflora plays a crucial role in inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs). Specific pathogen-free (SPF), but not germ-free, interleukin (IL)-2-deficient (IL-2-/-) mice develop colitis. The colitogenicity of commensal bacteria was determined. Gnotobiotic IL-2-/- and IL-2+/+ mice were colonized with Escherichia coli mpk, Bacteroides vulgatus mpk, or both bacterial strains, or with E. coli strain Nissle 1917. DNA arrays were used to characterize E. coli mpk. Colitis was analyzed by histology and real-time reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) for interferon (IFN)-gamma, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha, IL-10, and CD14 messenger RNA (mRNA) expression. Bacterial numbers in feces and bacterial localization in the colon was determined by culture and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). IL-2-/- but not IL-2+/+ mice monocolonized with E. coli mpk developed colitis, whereas mono-association with B. vulgatus mpk, or E. coli Nissle, or co-colonization with E. coli mpk and B. vulgatus mpk, did not induce colitis. DNA array experiments and cellular studies revealed that E. coli mpk is a nonpathogenic strain. FISH and culture methods revealed that the anticolitogenic effect of B. vulgatus mpk on E. coli mpk cannot be explained by a significant reduction in numbers of E. coli in the colon. E. coli mpk-induced colitis was associated with increased IFN-gamma, TNF-alpha, CD14, and IL-10 mRNA expression in the colon. In IL-2-/- mice, B. vulgatus mpk protects against E. coli mpk-triggered colitis by an unknown mechanism. E. coli Nissle does not induce colitis. Various bacterial species common to the microflora differ in their ability to trigger IBD.

  3. Polysaccharides utilization in human gut bacterium Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron: comparative genomics reconstruction of metabolic and regulatory networks

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron, a predominant member of the human gut microbiota, is characterized by its ability to utilize a wide variety of polysaccharides using the extensive saccharolytic machinery that is controlled by an expanded repertoire of transcription factors (TFs). The availability of genomic sequences for multiple Bacteroides species opens an opportunity for their comparative analysis to enable characterization of their metabolic and regulatory networks. Results A comparative genomics approach was applied for the reconstruction and functional annotation of the carbohydrate utilization regulatory networks in 11 Bacteroides genomes. Bioinformatics analysis of promoter regions revealed putative DNA-binding motifs and regulons for 31 orthologous TFs in the Bacteroides. Among the analyzed TFs there are 4 SusR-like regulators, 16 AraC-like hybrid two-component systems (HTCSs), and 11 regulators from other families. Novel DNA motifs of HTCSs and SusR-like regulators in the Bacteroides have the common structure of direct repeats with a long spacer between two conserved sites. Conclusions The inferred regulatory network in B. thetaiotaomicron contains 308 genes encoding polysaccharide and sugar catabolic enzymes, carbohydrate-binding and transport systems, and TFs. The analyzed TFs control pathways for utilization of host and dietary glycans to monosaccharides and their further interconversions to intermediates of the central metabolism. The reconstructed regulatory network allowed us to suggest and refine specific functional assignments for sugar catabolic enzymes and transporters, providing a substantial improvement to the existing metabolic models for B. thetaiotaomicron. The obtained collection of reconstructed TF regulons is available in the RegPrecise database (http://regprecise.lbl.gov). PMID:24330590

  4. Bacteroides paurosaccharolyticus sp. nov., isolated from a methanogenic reactor treating waste from cattle farms.

    PubMed

    Ueki, Atsuko; Abe, Kunihiro; Ohtaki, Yoshimi; Kaku, Nobuo; Watanabe, Kazuya; Ueki, Katsuji

    2011-02-01

    A strictly anaerobic bacterial strain (WK042(T)) was isolated from rice-straw residue in a methanogenic reactor treating waste from cattle farms in Japan. Cells were Gram-staining-negative, non-motile, non-spore-forming rods. Growth was stimulated well by haemin, and was enhanced by cobalamin (vitamin B(12)). Strain WK042(T) utilized arabinose, xylose, glucose, mannose and aesculin as preferred substrates. Maltose, dextrin, glycogen, starch and pectin were also utilized, although growth on these substrates was much slower. The strain produced acetate, propionate and succinate from these saccharides. The strain was slightly alkaliphilic, with optimum growth at pH 7.7. The temperature range for growth was 10-40 °C, the optimum being 35 °C. The strain was sensitive to bile. The major cellular fatty acids were anteiso-C(15 : 0), iso-C(17 : 0) 3-OH and C(15 : 0). Menaquinone 11 (MK-11) was the major respiratory quinone and the genomic DNA G+C content was 41.0 mol%. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences placed the strain in the phylum Bacteroidetes. Strain WK042(T) was related distantly to the type strains of species in the cluster including Bacteroides massiliensis, Bacteroides vulgatus and Bacteroides dorei (91-92 % 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity). Based on data from the present phylogenetic, physiological and chemotaxonomic analyses, strain WK042(T) is considered to represent a novel species of the genus Bacteroides, for which the name Bacteroides paurosaccharolyticus sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is WK042(T) (=JCM 15092(T) =DSM 21004(T)).

  5. Polysaccharides utilization in human gut bacterium Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron: comparative genomics reconstruction of metabolic and regulatory networks.

    PubMed

    Ravcheev, Dmitry A; Godzik, Adam; Osterman, Andrei L; Rodionov, Dmitry A

    2013-12-12

    Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron, a predominant member of the human gut microbiota, is characterized by its ability to utilize a wide variety of polysaccharides using the extensive saccharolytic machinery that is controlled by an expanded repertoire of transcription factors (TFs). The availability of genomic sequences for multiple Bacteroides species opens an opportunity for their comparative analysis to enable characterization of their metabolic and regulatory networks. A comparative genomics approach was applied for the reconstruction and functional annotation of the carbohydrate utilization regulatory networks in 11 Bacteroides genomes. Bioinformatics analysis of promoter regions revealed putative DNA-binding motifs and regulons for 31 orthologous TFs in the Bacteroides. Among the analyzed TFs there are 4 SusR-like regulators, 16 AraC-like hybrid two-component systems (HTCSs), and 11 regulators from other families. Novel DNA motifs of HTCSs and SusR-like regulators in the Bacteroides have the common structure of direct repeats with a long spacer between two conserved sites. The inferred regulatory network in B. thetaiotaomicron contains 308 genes encoding polysaccharide and sugar catabolic enzymes, carbohydrate-binding and transport systems, and TFs. The analyzed TFs control pathways for utilization of host and dietary glycans to monosaccharides and their further interconversions to intermediates of the central metabolism. The reconstructed regulatory network allowed us to suggest and refine specific functional assignments for sugar catabolic enzymes and transporters, providing a substantial improvement to the existing metabolic models for B. thetaiotaomicron. The obtained collection of reconstructed TF regulons is available in the RegPrecise database (http://regprecise.lbl.gov).

  6. Fluoroquinolone Resistance in Bacteroides fragilis following Sparfloxacin Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, M. L.; Hovde, L. B.; Wright, D. H.; Hoang, A. D.; Raddatz, J. K.; Boysen, P. J.; Rotschafer, J. C.

    1999-01-01

    In vitro pharmacodynamic studies investigating the antimicrobial properties of five fluoroquinolones, (trovafloxacin, sparfloxacin, clinafloxacin, levofloxacin, and ciprofloxacin) against Bacteroides fragilis ATCC 23745 were conducted. The times required to reduce the viable counts by 3 log units were as follows: clinafloxacin, 2.9 h; levofloxacin, 4.6 h; trovafloxacin, 6 h; and sparfloxacin, 10 h. Exposure to ciprofloxacin did not achieve a 3-log decrease in viable counts. The susceptibility of B. fragilis was determined both prior to exposure and following 24 h of exposure to each of the five fluoroquinolones tested. The MICs of clinafloxacin, levofloxacin, trovafloxacin, sparfloxacin, ciprofloxacin, metronidazole, cefoxitin, chloramphenicol, and clindamycin were determined by the broth microdilution method. The MICs for B. fragilis preexposure were as follows: clinafloxacin, 0.25 μg/ml; trovafloxacin, 0.5 μg/ml; sparfloxacin, 2 μg/ml; levofloxacin, 2 μg/ml; and ciprofloxacin, 8 μg/ml. Similar pre- and postexposure MICs were obtained for cultures exposed to trovafloxacin, clinafloxacin, levofloxacin, and ciprofloxacin. However, following 24 h of exposure to sparfloxacin, a fluoroquinolone-resistant strain emerged. The MICs for this strain were as follows: clinafloxacin, 1 μg/ml; trovafloxacin, 4 μg/ml; sparfloxacin, 16 μg/ml; levofloxacin, 16 μg/ml; and ciprofloxacin, 32 μg/ml. No changes in the susceptibility of B. fragilis pre- and postexposure to sparfloxacin were noted for metronidazole (MIC, 1 μg/ml), cefoxitin (MIC, 4 μg/ml), chloramphenicol (MIC, 4 μg/ml), and clindamycin (MIC, 0.06 μg/ml). Resistance remained stable as the organism was passaged on antibiotic-free agar for 10 consecutive days. Mutant B. fragilis strains with decreased susceptibility to clinafloxacin, trovafloxacin, sparfloxacin, levofloxacin, and ciprofloxacin were selected on brucella blood agar containing 8× the MIC of levofloxacin at a frequencies of 6.4 × 10−9, 4

  7. Metallo-β-lactamase-producing bacteroides species can shield other members of the gut microbiota from antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Stiefel, Usha; Tima, Mary Ann; Nerandzic, Michelle M

    2015-01-01

    Antibiotics disrupt the intestinal microbiota, rendering patients vulnerable to colonization by exogenous pathogens. Intermicrobial interactions may attenuate this effect. Incubation with ceftriaxone-resistant, ccrA-positive, β-lactamase-producing Bacteroides strains raised the minimum bactericidal concentration of ceftriaxone required to kill a susceptible Escherichia coli strain (mean change, <0.25 to 29 mg/liter; P = 0.009); incubation with ceftriaxone-resistant but non-β-lactamase-producing Bacteroides strains had no effect. The production of β-lactamase by common members of the intestinal microbiota (Bacteroides) can protect susceptible fellow commensals from β-lactams. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  8. Metallo-β-Lactamase-Producing Bacteroides Species Can Shield Other Members of the Gut Microbiota from Antibiotics

    PubMed Central

    Tima, Mary Ann; Nerandzic, Michelle M.

    2014-01-01

    Antibiotics disrupt the intestinal microbiota, rendering patients vulnerable to colonization by exogenous pathogens. Intermicrobial interactions may attenuate this effect. Incubation with ceftriaxone-resistant, ccrA-positive, β-lactamase-producing Bacteroides strains raised the minimum bactericidal concentration of ceftriaxone required to kill a susceptible Escherichia coli strain (mean change, <0.25 to 29 mg/liter; P = 0.009); incubation with ceftriaxone-resistant but non-β-lactamase-producing Bacteroides strains had no effect. The production of β-lactamase by common members of the intestinal microbiota (Bacteroides) can protect susceptible fellow commensals from β-lactams. PMID:25288080

  9. Atomic force microscopy of a ctpA mutant in Rhizobium leguminosarum reveals surface defects linking CtpA function to biofilm formation.

    PubMed

    Dong, Jun; Signo, Karla S L; Vanderlinde, Elizabeth M; Yost, Christopher K; Dahms, Tanya E S

    2011-11-01

    Atomic force microscopy was used to investigate the surface ultrastructure, adhesive properties and biofilm formation of Rhizobium leguminosarum and a ctpA mutant strain. The surface ultrastructure of wild-type R. leguminosarum consists of tightly packed surface subunits, whereas the ctpA mutant has much larger subunits with loose lateral packing. The ctpA mutant strain is not capable of developing fully mature biofilms, consistent with its altered surface ultrastructure, greater roughness and stronger adhesion to hydrophilic surfaces. For both strains, surface roughness and adhesive forces increased as a function of calcium ion concentration, and for each, biofilms were thicker at higher calcium concentrations.

  10. Specific Detection of Bradyrhizobium and Rhizobium Strains Colonizing Rice (Oryza sativa) Roots by 16S-23S Ribosomal DNA Intergenic Spacer-Targeted PCR

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Zhiyuan; Hurek, Thomas; Vinuesa, Pablo; Müller, Peter; Ladha, Jagdish K.; Reinhold-Hurek, Barbara

    2001-01-01

    In addition to forming symbiotic nodules on legumes, rhizobial strains are members of soil or rhizosphere communities or occur as endophytes, e.g., in rice. Two rhizobial strains which have been isolated from root nodules of the aquatic legumes Aeschynomene fluminensis (IRBG271) and Sesbania aculeata (IRBG74) were previously found to promote rice growth. In addition to analyzing their phylogenetic positions, we assessed the suitability of the 16S-23S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) intergenic spacer (IGS) sequences for the differentiation of closely related rhizobial taxa and for the development of PCR protocols allowing the specific detection of strains in the environment. 16S rDNA sequence analysis (sequence identity, 99%) and phylogenetic analysis of IGS sequences showed that strain IRBG271 was related to but distinct from Bradyrhizobium elkanii. Rhizobium sp. (Sesbania) strain IRBG74 was located in the Rhizobium-Agrobacterium cluster as a novel lineage according to phylogenetic 16S rDNA analysis (96.8 to 98.9% sequence identity with Agrobacterium tumefaciens; emended name, Rhizobium radiobacter). Strain IRBG74 harbored four copies of rRNA operons whose IGS sequences varied only slightly (2 to 9 nucleotides). The IGS sequence analyses allowed intraspecies differentiation, especially in the genus Bradyrhizobium, as illustrated here for strains of Bradyrhizobium japonicum, B. elkanii, Bradyrhizobium liaoningense, and Bradyrhizobium sp. (Chamaecytisus) strain BTA-1. It also clearly differentiated fast-growing rhizobial species and strains, albeit with lower statistical significance. Moreover, the high sequence variability allowed the development of highly specific IGS-targeted nested-PCR assays. Strains IRBG74 and IRBG271 were specifically detected in complex DNA mixtures of numerous related bacteria and in the DNA of roots of gnotobiotically cultured or even of soil-grown rice plants after inoculation. Thus, IGS sequence analysis is an attractive technique for both microbial

  11. Novel impacts of functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes in plants: promotion of nodulation and nitrogenase activity in the rhizobium-legume system.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Zhaodong; Zhang, Zhongming; Wang, Xiuping; Li, Li; Cai, Kai; Han, Heyou

    2017-07-20

    The rhizobium-legume symbiosis system is critical for nitrogen-cycle balance in agriculture. However, the potential effects of carbon nanomaterials (CNMs) on this system remain largely unknown. Herein, we studied the effects of four carbon-based materials (activated carbon (AC), single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs), multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and graphene oxide (GO)) on the rhizobium-legume symbiosis system consisting of Lotus japonicus and Mesorhizobium loti MAFF303099. Under non-symbiotic conditions, the bacterial growth and root development of plants were both clearly inhibited by SWCNTs and GO, while the elongation of plant stems was enhanced by MWCNTs to a certain degree. More importantly, only MWCNTs could increase the number of nodules and enhance the activity of nitrogenase in the rhizobium-plant interaction. Further analyses showed that the average number of nodules in plants treated with 100 μg mL(-1) MWCNTs was significantly increased by 39% at 14 days post inoculation (dpi) and by 41% at 28 dpi. Meanwhile, the biological nitrogen fixation of the nodules was promoted by more than 10% under 100 μg mL(-1) MWCNT treatment, which enhanced the above- and below-ground fresh biomass by 14% and 25% respectively at 28 dpi. Transmission electron microscopy images further indicated that MWCNTs penetrated the cell wall, and pierced through the cell membrane to be transmitted into the cytoplasm. In addition, gene expression analysis showed that the promotion of nodulation by MWCNTs was correlated with the up-regulation of certain genes involved in this signaling pathway. In particular, the expression of NIN, a crucial gene regulating the development of nodules, was significantly elevated 2-fold by MWCNTs at an early stage of nodulation. These findings are expected to facilitate the understanding and future utilization of MWCNTs in agriculture.

  12. Purification and some properties of an extracellular alpha-amylase from Bacteroides amylophilus.

    PubMed Central

    McWethy, S J; Hartman, P A

    1977-01-01

    A medium was developed to obtain maximum yields of extracellular amylase from Bacteroides amylophilus 70. Crude enzyme preparation, obtained by ammonium sulfate precipitation of cell-free broth, contained six amylolytic isoenzymes that were detected by isoelectric focusing and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. One of these amylases was purified by diethylaminoethyl-Sephadex A-50 ion-exchange chromatography and Sephadex G-200 gel filtration techniques. Some properties of the purified extracellular alpha-amylase were: optimum pH, 6.3; optimum temperature, 43 degrees C: PH stability range, 5.8 to 7.5; isoelectric point, pH 4.6; molecular weight, 92,000 (by sodium dodecyl sulfatedisc gel electrophoresis); and sugars causing inhibition, cyclomaltoheptaose, cyclomaltohexaose, and alpha-d-phenylglucoside. In addition, Ca2+ and Co2+ were strong activators,and Hg2+ was a strong inhibitior; all other cations were slightly stimulatory. Dialysis against 0.01 M ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid caused a 58% loss of activity that was restored to 92% of the original by the addition of 0.04 M Ca2+. The enzyme affected a blue-value-reducing-value curve characteristic of alpha-type amylases. The relative rates of hydrolysis of amylose, soluble starch, amylopectin, and dextrin were 100, 97, 92, and 60%, respectively; Michaelis constants for these substrates were 18.2, 18.7, 18.2, and 16.7 mumol of d-glucosidic bond/liter, respectively. The enzyme degraded maize (corn) starch granules to some extent and had relatively little activity on potato starch granules. Images PMID:14926

  13. Effect of environmental pH on enzyme activity and growth of Bacteroides gingivalis W50.

    PubMed Central

    McDermid, A S; McKee, A S; Marsh, P D

    1988-01-01

    Since the pH of the gingival crevice increases from below neutrality in health to above pH 8 in disease, we decided to investigate the effect of environmental pH on the growth and enzyme activity of Bacteroides gingivalis W50. Cells were grown in a chemostat under hemin-excess conditions over a range of pH values; stable growth was observed only between pH 6.7 and 8.3, with the maximum yields obtained between pH 7.0 and 8.0. The enzyme profile of cells varied markedly with pH. Enzymes with a specificity for gingival connective tissue (collagenase, hyaluronidase) were produced optimally at or below neutral pH, whereas trypsinlike activity increased with the growth pH and was maximal at pH 8.0. Chymotrypsinlike activity was generally low, although its activity was highest at the extremes of growth pH, i.e., at pH 6.7 and 8.3. Inhibitor studies provided evidence that the breakdown of collagen involved the concerted action of both a collagenase and the trypsinlike enzyme. The ratio of trypsin to collagenolytic activity rose from 1:1 during growth at neutral pH and below to almost 7:1 during growth at pH 8.3. Thus B. gingivalis appears to be uniquely adapted as a periodontopathic organism in that under environmental conditions likely to prevail during the initial stages of pocket development it produces maximally those enzymes with a tissue-damaging potential. Then, as the pH of the pocket rises during the host inflammatory response, the activity of the trypsinlike enzyme increases markedly, which may enable cells to inactivate key components of the host defenses such as immunoglobulins and complement. PMID:3281900

  14. Antigenic Variation in Bacteroides forsythus Detected by a Checkerboard Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay

    PubMed Central

    Sims, Tom J.; Mancl, Lloyd A.; Braham, Pamela H.; Page, Roy C.

    1998-01-01

    Evidence indicating that multiple serotypes of Bacteroides forsythus participate in rapidly progressing periodontal infections has not been reported previously. Our aim was to develop an assay for detecting subsets of B. forsythus clinical isolates which differ in serogroup membership and subsets of patients with immunoglobulin G (IgG) responses which differ in serogroup recognition. A checkerboard enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was used to assess variation in the IgG binding profiles of 22 clinical isolates in sera from 28 patients with early-onset rapidly progressive periodontitis. To accommodate the maximum number of isolates and sera in a given assay run, a multiplate assay grid with standard 96-well microtest plates was established. Single dilutions of individual sera were placed in rows crossing columns of isolate-coated wells, and antigen-specific IgG immobilized in the wells was measured as ELISA absorbance. Pooled sera and isolates were assayed in parallel to serve as negative controls for variation in IgG binding profiles. Correlation and hierarchical cluster analysis of the absorbance data matrix showed that the isolates could be sorted into at least four clusters based on variations in their IgG binding profiles across different sera. Furthermore, at least two patient clusters were defined by variations in their serum IgG antigen recognition profiles across different isolates. We conclude that multiple serogroups of B. forsythus exist and that different serogroups are dominant in the antibody response of different patients. The method applied here could be used to serologically classify clinical isolates of other species which evoke a serum antibody response in patients. PMID:9729543

  15. Rhizobium altiplani sp. nov., isolated from effective nodules on Mimosa pudica growing in untypically alkaline soil in central Brazil.

    PubMed

    Baraúna, Alexandre C; Rouws, Luc F M; Simoes-Araujo, Jean L; Dos Reis Junior, Fábio B; Iannetta, Pietro P M; Maluk, Marta; Goi, Silvia R; Reis, Veronica M; James, Euan K; Zilli, Jerri E

    2016-10-01

    Root nodule bacteria were isolated from nodules on Mimosa pudica L. growing in neutral-alkaline soils from the Distrito Federal in central Brazil. The 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis of 10 strains placed them into the genus Rhizobium with the closest neighbouring species (each with 99 % similarity) being Rhizobium grahamii, Rhizobium cauense, Rhizobium mesoamericanum and Rhizobium tibeticum. This high similarity, however, was not confirmed by multi-locus sequence analysis (MLSA) using three housekeeping genes (recA, glnII and rpoB), which revealed R. mesoamericanum CCGE 501T to be the closest type strain (92 % sequence similarity or less). Chemotaxonomic data, including fatty acid profiles [with majority being C19 : 0 cyclo ω8c and summed feature 8 (C18 : 1ω7c/C18 : 1ω6c)], DNA G+C content (57.6 mol%), and carbon compound utilization patterns supported the placement of the novel strains in the genus Rhizobium. Results of average nucleotide identity (ANI) differentiated the novel strains from the closest species of the genus Rhizobium, R. mesoamericanum, R. grahamii and R. tibeticum with 89.0, 88.1 and 87.8 % similarity, respectively. The symbiotic genes essential for nodulation (nodC) and nitrogen fixation (nifH) were most similar (99-100 %) to those of R. mesoamericanum, another Mimosa-nodulating species. Based on the current data, these 10 strains represent a novel species of the genus Rhizobium for which the name Rhizobium altiplani sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is BR 10423T (=HAMBI 3664T).

  16. Genetic regulation of nitrogen fixation in Rhizobium meliloti.

    PubMed

    Cebolla, A; Palomares, A J

    1994-12-01

    The soil bacterium Rhizobium meliloti fixes dinitrogen when associated with root nodules formed on its plant host, Medicago sativa (alfalfa). The expression of most of the known genes required for nitrogen fixation (nif and fix genes), including the structural genes for nitrogenase, is induced in response to a decrease in oxygen concentration. Induction of nif and fix gene expression by low oxygen is physiologically relevant because a low-oxygen environment is maintained in root nodules to prevent inactivation of the highly oxygen-sensitive nitrogenase enzyme. The genes responsible for sensing and transducing the low oxygen signal, fixL and fixJ, encode proteins (FixL and FixJ, respectively) that are homologous to a large family of bacterial proteins involved in signal transduction, the two component regulatory system proteins. The two components consist of a sensor protein, to which FixL is homologous, and a response regulator protein, to which FixJ is homologous. The sensor protein respond to an activating signal by autophosphorylating and then transferring the phosphate to its cognate response regulator protein. The phosphorylated response regulator, which is often a transcriptional activator, is then able to activate its target. A cascade model of nif and fix gene regulation in R. meliloti has been proposed, whereby FixL acts as an oxygen sensor as the initial event in the cascade and transmits this information to FixJ. FixJ, which possesses a putative helix-turn-helix DNA-binding motif, then activates transcription of the nifA and fixK genes. The nifA and fixK gene products, are transcriptional activators of at least 14 other nif and fix genes.

  17. Gene Conversion Tracts Associated with Crossovers in Rhizobium etli

    PubMed Central

    Santoyo, Gustavo; Martínez-Salazar, Jaime M.; Rodríguez, César; Romero, David

    2005-01-01

    Gene conversion has been defined as the nonreciprocal transfer of information between homologous sequences. Despite its broad interest for genome evolution, the occurrence of this mechanism in bacteria has been difficult to ascertain due to the possible occurrence of multiple crossover events that would mimic gene conversion. In this work, we employ a novel system, based on cointegrate formation, to isolate gene conversion events associated with crossovers in the nitrogen-fixing bacterium Rhizobium etli. In this system, selection is applied only for cointegrate formation, with gene conversions being detected as unselected events. This minimizes the likelihood of multiple crossovers. To track the extent and architecture of gene conversions, evenly spaced nucleotide changes were made in one of the nitrogenase structural genes (nifH), introducing unique sites for different restriction endonucleases. Our results show that (i) crossover events were almost invariably accompanied by a gene conversion event occurring nearby; (ii) gene conversion events ranged in size from 150 bp to 800 bp; (iii) gene conversion events displayed a strong bias, favoring the preservation of incoming sequences; (iv) even small amounts of sequence divergence had a strong effect on recombination frequency; and (v) the MutS mismatch repair system plays an important role in determining the length of gene conversion segments. A detailed analysis of the architecture of the conversion events suggests that multiple crossovers are an unlikely alternative for their generation. Our results are better explained as the product of true gene conversions occurring under the double-strand break repair model for recombination. PMID:15937174

  18. Sodium Stimulation of Uptake Hydrogenase Activity In Symbiotic Rhizobium1

    PubMed Central

    Kapulnik, Yoram; Phillips, Donald A.

    1986-01-01

    Initial observations showed a 100% increase in H2-uptake (Hup) activity of Rhizobium leguminosarum strain 3855 in pea root nodules (Pisum sativum L. cv Alaska) on plants growing in a baked clay substrate relative to those growing in vermiculite, and an investigation of nutrient factors responsible for the phenomenon was initiated. Significantly greater Hup activity was first measured in the clay-grown plants 24 days after germination, and higher activity was maintained relative to the vermiculite treatment until experiments were terminated at day 32. The increase in Hup activity was associated with a decrease in H2 evolution for plants with comparable rates of acetylene reduction. Analyses of the clay showed that it contained more Na+ (29 versus 9 milligrams per kilogram) and less K+ (6 versus 74 milligrams per kilogram) than the vermiculite. Analyses of plants, however, showed a large increase in Na+ concentration of clay-grown plants with a much smaller reduction in K+ concentration. In tests with the same organisms in a hydroponic system with controlled pH, 40 millimolar NaCl increased Hup activity more than 100% over plants grown in solutions lacking NaCl. Plants with increased Hup activity, however, did not have greater net carbon or total nitrogen assimilation. KCl treatments from 5 to 80 millimolar produced slight increased in Hup activity at 10 millimolar KCl, and tests with other salts in the hydroponic system indicated that only Na+ strongly promoted Hup activity. Treating vermiculite with 50 millimolar NaCl increased Na+ concentration in pea plant tissue and greatly promoted Hup activity of root nodules in a manner analogous to the original observation with the clay rooting medium. A wider generality of the phenomenon was suggested by demonstrating that exogenous Na+ increased Hup activity of other R. leguminosarum strains and promoted Hup activity of R. meliloti strain B300 in alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.). PMID:16665057

  19. Detection of Increased Plasma Interleukin-6 Levels and Prevalence of Prevotella copri and Bacteroides vulgatus in the Feces of Type 2 Diabetes Patients.

    PubMed

    Leite, Aline Zazeri; Rodrigues, Nathália de Campos; Gonzaga, Marina Ignácio; Paiolo, João Carlos Cicogna; de Souza, Carolina Arantes; Stefanutto, Nadine Aparecida Vicentini; Omori, Wellington Pine; Pinheiro, Daniel Guariz; Brisotti, João Luiz; Matheucci Junior, Euclides; Mariano, Vânia Sammartino; de Oliveira, Gislane Lelis Vilela

    2017-01-01

    Intestinal dysbiosis and metabolic endotoxemia have been associated with metabolic disorders, such as obesity, insulin resistance, and type 2 diabetes (T2D). The main goal of the present study was to evaluate the intestinal dysbiosis in Brazilian T2D patients and correlate these data with inflammatory cytokines and lipopolysaccharides (LPS) plasma concentrations. This study was approved by the Ethics Committees from Barretos Cancer Hospital and all individuals signed the informed consent form. Stool samples were required for DNA extraction, and the V3/V4 regions of bacterial 16S were sequenced using an Illumina platform. Peripheral blood was used to quantify inflammatory cytokines and plasma LPS concentrations, by CBA flex and ELISA, respectively. Statistical analyses were performed using Mann-Whitney and Spearman's tests. Analysis of variance, diversity indexes, and analysis of alpha- and beta-diversity were conducted using an annotated Operational Taxonomic Unit table. This study included 20 patients and 22 controls. We observed significant differences (P < 0.01) in the microbiota composition (beta-diversity) between patients and controls, suggesting intestinal dysbiosis in Brazilian T2D patients. The prevalent species found in patients' feces were the Gram-negatives Prevotella copri, Bacteroides vulgatus, Bacteroides rodentium, and Bacteroides xylanisolvens. The proinflammatory interleukin-6 (IL-6) was significantly increased (P < 0.05) in patients' plasma and LPS levels were decreased. We find correlations between the proinflammatory interferon-gamma with Gram-negatives Bacteroides and Prevotella species, and a positive correlation between the LPS levels and P. copri reads. The P. copri and B. vulgatus species were associated with insulin resistance in previous studies. In this study, we suggested that the prevalence of Gram-negative species in the gut and the increased plasma IL-6 in patients could be linked to low-grade inflammation and insulin

  20. Genome sequence of Rhizobium sp. strain CCGE510, a symbiont isolated from nodules of the endangered wild bean Phaseolus albescens.

    PubMed

    Servín-Garcidueñas, Luis E; Rogel, Marco A; Ormeño-Orrillo, Ernesto; Delgado-Salinas, Alfonso; Martínez-Romero, Julio; Sánchez, Federico; Martínez-Romero, Esperanza

    2012-11-01

    We present the genome sequence of Rhizobium sp. strain CCGE510, a nitrogen fixing bacterium taxonomically affiliated with the R. leguminosarum-R. etli group, isolated from wild Phaseolus albescens nodules grown in native pine forests in western Mexico. P. albescens is an endangered bean species phylogenetically related to P. vulgaris. In spite of the close host relatedness, Rhizobium sp. CCGE510 does not establish an efficient symbiosis with P. vulgaris. This is the first genome of a Rhizobium symbiont from a Phaseolus species other than P. vulgaris, and it will provide valuable new insights about symbiont-host specificity.

  1. Nitrogen fixation ability of exopolysaccharide synthesis mutants of Rhizobium sp. strain NGR234 and Rhizobium trifolii is restored by the addition of homologous exopolysaccharides.

    PubMed Central

    Djordjevic, S P; Chen, H; Batley, M; Redmond, J W; Rolfe, B G

    1987-01-01

    Several transposon Tn5-induced mutants of the broad-host-range Rhizobium sp. strain NGR234 produce little or no detectable acidic exopolysaccharide (EPS) and are unable to induce nitrogen-fixing nodules on Leucaena leucocephala var. Peru or siratro plants. The ability of these Exo- mutants to induce functioning nodules on Leucaena plants was restored by coinoculation with a Sym plasmid-cured (Nod- Exo+) derivative of parent strain NGR234, purified EPS from the parent strain, or the oligosaccharide from the EPS. Coinoculation with EPS or related oligosaccharide also resulted in formation of nitrogen-fixing nodules on siratro plants. In addition, an Exo- mutant (ANU437) of Rhizobium trifolii ANU794 was able to form nitrogen-fixing nodules on white clover in the presence of added EPS or related oligosaccharide from R. trifolii ANU843. These results demonstrate that the absence of Rhizobium EPSs can result in failure of effective symbiosis with both temperate and subtropical legumes. Images PMID:3025187

  2. Effect of Bacteroides fragilis grown in the presence of clindamycin, metronidazole and fusidic acid on opsonization and killing of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Namavar, F; Kaan, J A; Verweij-van Vught, A M; Vel, W A; Bal, M; Kester, A D; MacLaren, D M

    1986-06-01

    Bactericidal action of human polymorphonuclear leucocytes on Escherichia coli in the presence of Bacteroides fragilis grown in subinhibitory concentrations of clindamycin, metronidazole and fusidic acid was studied. Bacteroides fragilis grown in the absence of drugs significantly inhibited the killing of Escherichia coli. Bacteroides fragilis grown in the presence of the drugs had a reduced inhibitory effect on the killing of Escherichia coli but this reduction was only significant for Bacteroides fragilis grown in 1/2 MIC of clindamycin. The phagocytosis of Bacteroides fragilis grown with and without clindamycin, as measured by killing, was the same. Complement consumption of Bacteroides fragilis grown with and without clindamycin did not differ. Clindamycin-treated Bacteroides fragilis fixed C3 to a significant