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Sample records for rhizoctonia solani sclerotia

  1. Proteomic analysis of Rhizoctonia solani AG-1 sclerotia maturation.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Young Sang; Kim, Sang Gon; Chung, Woo Sik; Bae, Hanhong; Jeong, Sung Woo; Shin, Sung Chul; Jeong, Mi-Jeong; Park, Soo-Chul; Kwak, Youn-Sig; Bae, Dong-Won; Lee, Yong Bok

    2014-01-01

    Rhizoctonia solani (R. solani), a soil-borne necrotrophic pathogen, causes various plant diseases. Rhizoctonia solani is a mitosporic fungus, the sclerotium of which is the primary inoculum and ensures survival of the fungus during the offseason of the host crop. Since the fungus does not produce any asexual or sexual spores, understanding the biology of sclerotia is important to examine pathogen ecology and develop more efficient methods for crop protection. Here, one- and two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (1-DE and 2-DE, respectively) were used to examine protein regulation during the maturation of fungal sclerotia. A total of 75 proteins (20 proteins from 1-DE using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI)-time of flight (TOF) mass spectrometry (MS) and 55 proteins from 2-DE using MALDI-TOF MS or MALDI-TOF/TOF MS) were differentially expressed during sclerotial maturation. The identified proteins were classified into ten categories based on their biological functions, including genetic information processing, carbohydrate metabolism, cell defense, amino acid metabolism, nucleotide metabolism, cellular processes, pathogenicity and mycotoxin production, and hypothetical or unknown functions. Interestingly, two vacuole function-related proteins were highly up-regulated throughout sclerotial maturation, which was confirmed at the transcript level by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis. These findings contribute to our understanding of the biology of R. solani sclerotia.

  2. Impact of biotic and a-biotic parameters on structure and function of microbial communities living on sclerotia of the soil-borne pathogenic fungus Rhizoctonia solani

    PubMed Central

    Zachow, Christin; Grosch, Rita; Berg, Gabriele

    2011-01-01

    The plant pathogen Rhizoctonia solani is very difficult to control due to its persistent, long-living sclerotial structures in soil. Sclerotia are the main source of infection for Rhizoctonia diseases, which cause high yield losses on a broad host range world-wide. Little is known about micro-organisms associated with sclerotia in soil. Therefore, microbial communities of greenhouse and field incubated Rhizoctonia sclerotia were analysed by a multiphasic approach. Using microbial fingerprints performed by PCR-SSCP, sclerotia-associated bacterial communities showed a high diversity, whereas only a few fungi could be detected. Statistical analysis of fingerprints revealed the influence of soil types, incubation conditions (greenhouse, field), and incubation time (5 and 12 weeks) on the bacterial as well as fungal community. No significant differences were found for the microbial community associated with different Rhizoctonia anastomosis sub-groups (AG 1-IB and AG 1-IC). Rhizoctonia sclerotia are an interesting bio-resource: high proportions of fungal cell-wall degrading isolates as well as those with antagonistic activity towards R. solani were found. While a fraction of 28.4% of sclerotia-associated bacteria (=40 isolates) with antagonistic properties was determined, only 4.4% (=6 isolates) of the fungal isolates were antagonistic. We identified strong antagonists of the genera Bacillus, Enterobacter, Pseudomonas, and Stenotrophomonas, which can be used as biological control agents incorporated in soil or applied to Rhizoctonia host plants. PMID:26109749

  3. Pseudomonas fluorescens DR54 Reduces Sclerotia Formation, Biomass Development, and Disease Incidence of Rhizoctonia solani Causing Damping-Off in Sugar Beet.

    PubMed

    Thrane, C.; Nielsen, M.N.; Sørensen, J.; Olsson, S.

    2001-10-01

    Effects of the biocontrol strain, Pseudomonas fluorescens DR54, on growth and disease development by Rhizoctonia solani causing damping-off in sugar beet were studied in soil microcosms and in pot experiments with natural, clay-type soil. In pot experiments with P. fluorescens DR54-treated seeds, significantly fewer Rhizoctonia-challenged seedlings showed damping-off symptoms than when not inoculated with the biocontrol agent. In the rhizosphere of P. fluorescens DR54 inoculated seeds, the bacterial inoculant was present in high numbers as shown by dilution plating and immunoblotting. By the ELISA antibody technique and direct microscopy of the fungal pathogen grown in soil microcosms, it was shown that the presence of P. fluorescens DR54 on the inoculated seeds had a strong inhibitory effect on development of both mycelium biomass and sclerotia formation by R. solani. In the field experiment, plant emergence was increased by treatment with P. fluorescens DR54 and the inoculant was found to be the dominating rhizosphere colonizing pseudomonad immediately after seedling emergence.

  4. Rhizoctonia solani: Understanding the Terminology

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rhizoctonia solani can cause seedling damping-off and root rot in dry bean and a number of other major crops including sugarbeet, soybean, cotton, potato, etc. There appears to be an increase in reported incidence in both temperate regions and in tropical areas. As well as a root rot, some stains ca...

  5. [Evaluation of Trichoderma spp. as antagonist of Rhizoctonia solani in vitro and as biocontrol of greenhouse tomato plants].

    PubMed

    Durman, S; Menendez, A; Godeas, A

    1999-01-01

    Five Trichoderma isolates were compared in their ability for controlling Rhizoctonia solani attack to tomato plants in greenhouse and as antagonists of this pathogen in three independent laboratory assays. Four out of five isolates showed biocontrol ability and decreased pathogen growth and survival of its sclerotia in soil. Results suggest that dual cultures in Petri dishes and mycoparasitism assays against R. solani sclerotia may be useful for detecting isolates effective as biological control agents against this pathogen in tomato plants. PMID:10327455

  6. Solid formulations of binucleate Rhizoctonia isolates suppress Rhizoctonia solani and Pythium ultimum in potting medium.

    PubMed

    Harris, A R

    2000-03-01

    Two isolates of binucleate Rhizoctonia spp., previously selected for efficacy in suppression of Rhizoctonia solani and Pythium spp., as well as plant growth promotion, were incorporated into various solid substrate formulations. These formulated products were assayed at three doses in three glass-house experiments for biocontrol of damping-off diseases in Capsicum annuum. R. solani anastomosis group 4 or Pythium ultimum var. sporangiiferum were incorporated into pasteurized potting medium with each formulated binucleate Rhizoctonia product. All formulations were effective against both pathogens in at least two experiments, but some formulations of one isolate of binucleate Rhizoctonia did not give consistent control of R. solani in one experiment. The most consistent formulation, which provided control of both pathogens at all doses of binucleate Rhizoctonia, was the simple substrate of rice hulls. The implications for commercialization of a biocontrol product are discussed.

  7. Soil suppressiveness to Rhizoctonia solani and microbial diversity.

    PubMed

    Bakker, Y; Van Loon, F M J; Schneider, J H M

    2005-01-01

    Rhizoctonia solani anastomosis group 2-2IIIB causes damping-off, black root rot and crown rot in sugar beet (Beta vulgaris). Based on experiences of growers and field experiments, soils can become suppressive to R. solani. The fungus may be present in the soil, but the plant does not show symptoms. Understanding the mechanisms causing soil suppressiveness to R. solani is essential for the development of environmentally friendly control strategies of rhizoctonia root rot in sugar beet. A bioassay that discriminates soils in their level of disease suppressiveness was developed. Results of bioassays were in accordance with field observations. Preliminary results indicate an active role of microbial communities. Our research is focused on the disentanglement of biological mechanisms causing soil suppressiveness to R. solani in sugar beet. Therefore, we are handling a multidisciplinary approach through experimental fields, bioassays, several in vitro techniques and molecular techniques (PCR-DGGE).

  8. Diversity of Rhizoctonia solani associated with pulse crops in different agro-ecological regions of India.

    PubMed

    Dubey, Sunil C; Tripathi, Aradhika; Upadhyay, Balendu K; Deka, Utpal K

    2014-06-01

    Four hundred seventy Rhizoctonia solani isolates from different leguminous hosts originating from 16 agro-ecological regions of India covering 21 states and 72 districts were collected. The disease incidence caused by R. solani varied from 6.8 to 22.2 % in the areas surveyed. Deccan plateau and central highlands, hot sub-humid ecoregion followed by northern plain and central highlands and hot semi-arid ecoregion showed the highest disease incidence. R. solani isolates were highly variable in growth diameter, number, size and pattern of sclerotia formation as well as hyphal width. The isolates obtained from aerial part of the infected plants showing web blight symptoms produced sclerotia of 1-2 mm in size whereas, the isolates obtained from infected root of the plants showing wet root rot symptoms produced microsclerotia (<1 mm). Majority of R. solani isolates showed <8 μm hyphal diameter. Based on morphological characters the isolates were categorized into 49 groups. Seven anastomosis groups (AGs) were identified among the populations of R. solani associated with the pulse crops. The frequency (25.6 %) of AG3 was the highest followed by AG2-3 (20.9 %) and AG5 (17.4 %). The cropping sequence of rice/sorghum/wheat-chickpea/mungbean/urdbean/cowpea/ricebean influenced the dominance of AG1 (16.3 %). Phylogenetic analysis utilizing ITS-5.8S rDNA gene sequences indicated high level of genetic similarity among isolates representing different AGs, crops and regions. ITS groups did not correspond to the morphological characters. The sequence data from this article has been deposited with NCBI data libraries with JF701707 to JF701795 accession numbers.

  9. The prevalence of different strains of Rhizoctonia solani associated with Rhizoctonia crown and root rot symptoms in Ontario sugarbeet fields

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rhizoctonia crown and root rot (RCRR) [Rhizoctonia solani Kühn] is an important disease of sugarbeets in southwestern Ontario, Canada. A survey of commercial sugarbeet fields was completed in 2010 and 2011 to determine the range of R. solani anastomosis groups (AGs) and inter-specific groups (ISGs) ...

  10. Rhizoctonia belly rot in cucumber fruit using Rhizoctonia solani isolated from sugar beet

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cucumbers are grown in rotation with sugar beets in some areas in Michigan but their interaction with important diseases affecting sugar beets is not well known. Cucumbers are known to be primarily susceptible to Rhizoctonia solani AG-4, but little is known about their susceptibility to AG 2-2 isola...

  11. Genetic structure of populations of Rhizoctonia solani anastomosis group-1 IA from soybean in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Ciampi, M B; Meyer, M C; Costa, M J N; Zala, M; McDonald, B A; Ceresini, P C

    2008-08-01

    The Basidiomycete fungus Rhizoctonia solani anastomosis group (AG)-1 IA is a major pathogen of soybean in Brazil, where the average yield losses have reached 30 to 60% in some states in Northern Brazil. No information is currently available concerning levels of genetic diversity and population structure for this pathogen in Brazil. A total of 232 isolates of R. solani AG1 IA were collected from five soybean fields in the most important soybean production areas in central-western, northern, and northeastern Brazil. These isolates were genotyped using 10 microsatellite loci. Most of the multilocus genotypes (MLGTs) were site-specific, with few MLGTs shared among populations. Significant population subdivision was evident. High levels of admixture were observed for populations from Mato Grosso and Tocantins. After removing admixed genotypes, three out of five field populations (Maranhao, Mato Grosso, and Tocantins), were in Hardy-Weinberg (HW) equilibrium, consistent with sexual recombination. HW and gametic disequilibrium were found for the remaining soybean-infecting populations. The findings of low genotypic diversity, departures from HW equilibrium, gametic disequilibrium, and high degree of population subdivision in these R. solani AG-1 IA populations from Brazil are consistent with predominantly asexual reproduction, short-distance dispersal of vegetative propagules (mycelium or sclerotia), and limited long-distance dispersal, possibly via contaminated seed. None of the soybean-infecting populations showed a reduction in population size (bottleneck effect). We detected asymmetric historical migration among the soybean-infecting populations, which could explain the observed levels of subdivision.

  12. Optimized protein extraction methods for proteomic analysis of Rhizoctonia solani.

    PubMed

    Lakshman, Dilip K; Natarajan, Savithiry S; Lakshman, Sukla; Garrett, Wesley M; Dhar, Arun K

    2008-01-01

    Rhizoctonia solani (Teleomorph: Thanatephorus cucumeris, T. praticola) is a basidiomycetous fungus and a major cause of root diseases of economically important plants. Various isolates of this fungus are also beneficially associated with orchids, may serve as biocontrol agents or remain as saprophytes with roles in decaying and recycling of soil organic matter. R. solani displays several hyphal anastomosis groups (AG) with distinct host and pathogenic specializations. Even though there are reports on the physiological and histological basis of Rhizoctonia-host interactions, very little is known about the molecular biology and control of gene expression early during infection by this pathogen. Proteamic technologies are powerful tools for examining alterations in protein profiles. To aid studies on its biology and host pathogen interactions, a two-dimensional (2-D) gel-based global proteomic study has been initiated. To develop an optimized protein extraction protocol for R. solani, we compared two previously reported protein extraction protocols for 2-D gel analysis of R. solani (AG-4) isolate Rs23. Both TCA-acetone precipitation and phosphate solubilization before TCA-acetone precipitation worked well for R. solani protein extraction, although selective enrichment of some proteins was noted with either method. About 450 spots could be detected with the densitiometric tracing of Coomassie blue-stained 2-D PAGE gels covering pH 4-7 and 6.5-205 kDa. Selected protein spots were subjected to mass spectrometric analysis with matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS). Eleven protein spots were positively identified based on peptide mass fingerprinting match with fungal proteins in public databases with the Mascot search engine. These results testify to the suitability of the two optimized protein extraction protocols for 2-D proteomic studies of R. solani.

  13. Leuconostoc spp. associated with root rot in sugar beet and their interaction with rhizoctonia solani

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rhizoctonia root and crown is an important disease problem in sugar beet caused by Rhizoctonia solani and also shown to be associated with Leuconostoc. Since, the initial Leuconostoc studies were conducted with only a few isolates and the relationship of Leuconostoc with R. solani is poorly underst...

  14. Integrated options for the management of black root rot of strawberry caused by Rhizoctonia solani Kuhn.

    PubMed

    Asad-Uz-Zaman, Md; Bhuiyan, Mohammad Rejwan; Khan, Mohammad Ashik Iqbal; Alam Bhuiyan, Md Khurshed; Latif, Mohammad Abdul

    2015-02-01

    An investigation was made to manage strawberry black root rot caused by Rhizoctonia solani (R. solani) through the integration of Trichoderma harzianum (T. harzianum) isolate STA7, mustard oil cake and Provax 200. A series of preliminary experiments were conducted to select a virulent isolate of R. solani, an effective isolate of T. harzianum, a suitable organic amendment, and a suitable fungicide before setting the experiment for integration. The pathogenicity of the selected four isolates of R. solani was evaluated against strawberry and isolate SR1 was selected as the test pathogen due to its highest virulent (95.47% mortality) characteristics. Among the 20 isolates of T. harzianum, isolate STA7 showed maximum inhibition (71.97%) against the test pathogen (R. solani). Among the fungicides, Provax-200 was found to be more effective at lowest concentration (100 ppm) and highly compatible with Trichoderma isolates STA7. In the case of organic amendments, maximum inhibition (59.66%) of R. solani was obtained through mustard oil cake at the highest concentration (3%), which was significantly superior to other amendments. Minimum percentages of diseased roots were obtained with pathogen (R. solani)+Trichoderma+mustard oil cake+Provax-200 treatment, while the highest was observed with healthy seedlings with a pathogen-inoculated soil. In the case of leaf and fruit rot diseases, significantly lowest infected leaves as well as fruit rot were observed with a pathogen+Trichoderma+mustard oil cake+Provax-200 treatment in comparison with the control. A similar trend of high effectiveness was observed by the integration of Trichoderma, fungicide and organic amendments in controlling root rot and fruit diseases of strawberry. Single application of Trichoderma isolate STA7, Provax 200 or mustard oil cake did not show satisfactory performance in terms of disease-free plants, but when they were applied in combination, the number of healthy plants increased significantly. The

  15. Integrated options for the management of black root rot of strawberry caused by Rhizoctonia solani Kuhn.

    PubMed

    Asad-Uz-Zaman, Md; Bhuiyan, Mohammad Rejwan; Khan, Mohammad Ashik Iqbal; Alam Bhuiyan, Md Khurshed; Latif, Mohammad Abdul

    2015-02-01

    An investigation was made to manage strawberry black root rot caused by Rhizoctonia solani (R. solani) through the integration of Trichoderma harzianum (T. harzianum) isolate STA7, mustard oil cake and Provax 200. A series of preliminary experiments were conducted to select a virulent isolate of R. solani, an effective isolate of T. harzianum, a suitable organic amendment, and a suitable fungicide before setting the experiment for integration. The pathogenicity of the selected four isolates of R. solani was evaluated against strawberry and isolate SR1 was selected as the test pathogen due to its highest virulent (95.47% mortality) characteristics. Among the 20 isolates of T. harzianum, isolate STA7 showed maximum inhibition (71.97%) against the test pathogen (R. solani). Among the fungicides, Provax-200 was found to be more effective at lowest concentration (100 ppm) and highly compatible with Trichoderma isolates STA7. In the case of organic amendments, maximum inhibition (59.66%) of R. solani was obtained through mustard oil cake at the highest concentration (3%), which was significantly superior to other amendments. Minimum percentages of diseased roots were obtained with pathogen (R. solani)+Trichoderma+mustard oil cake+Provax-200 treatment, while the highest was observed with healthy seedlings with a pathogen-inoculated soil. In the case of leaf and fruit rot diseases, significantly lowest infected leaves as well as fruit rot were observed with a pathogen+Trichoderma+mustard oil cake+Provax-200 treatment in comparison with the control. A similar trend of high effectiveness was observed by the integration of Trichoderma, fungicide and organic amendments in controlling root rot and fruit diseases of strawberry. Single application of Trichoderma isolate STA7, Provax 200 or mustard oil cake did not show satisfactory performance in terms of disease-free plants, but when they were applied in combination, the number of healthy plants increased significantly. The

  16. Metabolome profiling to understand the defense response to sugar beet (Beta vulgaris) to Rhizoctonia solani AG 2-2 IIIB

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rhizoctonia crown and root rot, caused by Rhizoctonia solani Kühn AG 2-2 IIIB, is an important disease of sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L.). The molecular processes that mediate sugar beet resistance to R. solani are largely unknown and identifying the metabolites associated with R. solani infection ma...

  17. Interaction between Meloidogyne incognita and Rhizoctonia solani on green beans

    PubMed Central

    Al-Hazmi, A.S.; Al-Nadary, S.N.

    2015-01-01

    The interaction between Meloidogyne incognita (race 2) and Rhizoctonia solani (AG 4) in a root rot disease complex of green beans (Phaseolus vulgaris) was examined in a greenhouse pot experiment. Three week-old seedlings (cv. Contender) were inoculated with the nematode and/or the fungus in different combinations and sequences. Two months after last nematode inoculation, the test was terminated and data were recorded. The synchronized inoculation by both pathogens (N + F) increased the index of Rhizoctonia root rot and the number of root galls; and suppressed plant growth, compared to controls. However, the severity of root rot and suppression of plant growth were greater and more evident when inoculation by the nematode preceded the fungus (N → F) by two weeks. Nematode reproduction (eggs/g root) was adversely affected by the presence of the fungus except by the synchronized inoculation. When inoculation by nematode preceded the fungus, plant growth was severely suppressed and roots were highly damaged and rotted leading to a decrease of root galls and eggs. PMID:26288560

  18. Evaluation of Onion Genotypes for Resistance to Stunting Caused by Rhizoctonia solani AG 8

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A total of 35 onion genotypes was evaluated for resistance to onion stunting caused by Rhizoctonia solani anastomosis group 8 (AG-8) under temperature-controlled greenhouse conditions (15 ± 1oC) in 2013. Each onion genotype was planted in a cone-tainer with and without inoculation with R. solani AG ...

  19. Evaluation of Brassica species for resistance to Rhizoctonia solani and binucleate Rhizoctonia (Ceratobasidium spp.) under controlled environment conditions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Isolates of R. solani AG 2-1, AG 8, AG 10 and binucleate Rhizoctonia (Ceratobasidium spp.) were tested for virulence on Brassica crops in growth chamber experiments. Isolate virulence and genotype resistance were determined based on percent of seedling survival, shoot length, and shoot fresh weight....

  20. Potential for the integration of biological and chemical control of sheath blight disease caused by Rhizoctonia solani on rice.

    PubMed

    Boukaew, Sawai; Klinmanee, Chanasirin; Prasertsan, Poonsuk

    2013-10-01

    Biological control using antagonistic microbes to minimize the use of chemical pesticides has recently become more prevalent. In an attempt to find an integrated control system for sheath blight, caused by Rhizoctonia solani in rice, Streptomyces philanthi RM-1-138, commercial formulations of Bacillus subtilis as Larminar® and B. subtilis strain NSRS 89-24+MK-007 as Biobest® and chemical fungicides including carbendazim®, validamycin®, propiconazole® and mancozeb® were applied alone and in combination with S. philanthi RM-1-138. In vitro experiments showed that all treatments tested did provide some control against mycelial growth and sclerotia production by R. solani PTRRS-9. In addition, the four chemical fungicides had no detrimental effects on S. philanthi RM-1-138 even at high concentrations (up to 100 μg/ml). The efficacy of S. philanthi RM-1-138, the commercial formulations of B. subtilis, chemical fungicides alone or in combination with S. philanthi RM-1-138 was also tested in a greenhouse experiment against sheath blight disease on rice plants. All treatments showed some protection of rice for sheath blight by 47-60 % when carbendazim® was applied alone and up to 74 % when combined with S. philanthi RM-1-138. PMID:23653261

  1. Extrachromosomal plasmids in the plant pathogenic fungus Rhizoctonia solani.

    PubMed

    Jabaji-Hare, S H; Burger, G; Forget, L; Lang, B F

    1994-05-01

    Extrachromosomal DNA elements were found in field isolates of Rhizoctonia solani belonging to anastomosis groups (AG) 1-5. An isolate of AG-5 (Rh41) contains a 3.6-kbp plasmid (pRS188) which has a similar A+T content to mitochondrial DNA. pRS188 is linear and has knob structures at its ends, as revealed by electron microscopy. Exonuclease digestions show that the linear ends of pRS188 are protected, and remain protected even after proteinase K digestion. pRS188 does not hybridise to nuclear or mitochondrial DNAs of its host isolate (Rh41), to total DNAs of other plasmid-less AG-5 isolates, or to total DNA of plasmid-harbouring isolates belonging to different AGs. Cellular-fractionation experiments suggest that pRS188 is associated with mitochondria, but it remains undecided whether this occurs inside or outside of the organelles. The nucleotide sequence of about 60% of the plasmid has been determined, revealing no open reading frame longer than 91 amino acids, and no known gene or genetic element is detected in the sequence contigs of 300-1572 bp length. Similar studies were performed with the plasmid pRS104 present in an isolate of AG-4 (Rh36), the sequence of which exhibits essentially the same features as pRS188 except that its A+T content resembles that of nuclear DNA. Pathogenicity tests reveal that the isolates Rh41 and R36 are as virulent as the plasmid-less isolates of AG-4 and -5, indicating that the plasmids do not play any role in pathogenicity.

  2. Screening of pea genotypes for resistance to root rot caused by Rhizoctonia solani AG 8, 2012.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rhizoctonia solani AG 8 is one of the major pathogens that causes pea root rot and stunting in the Columbia Basin of Oregon and Washington. The disease is most severe in fields where wheat has been mono-cropped for a number of years or where cereal cover crops are incorporated just before pea seedin...

  3. Comparative analysis of putative pathogenesis-related gene expression in two Rhizoctonia solani pathosystems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rhizoctonia solani, teleomorph Thanatephoris cucumeris, is a polyphagous nectrotrophic plant pathogen of the Basidiomycete order that is split into fourteen different anastomosis groups (AGs) based on hyphal interactions and host range. Currently, little is known about the methods by which R. solan...

  4. Biocontrol of Rhizoctonia solani and Pythium ultimum on Capsicum by Trichoderma koningii in potting medium.

    PubMed

    Harris, A R

    1999-09-01

    Two isolates of Trichoderma koningii were evaluated for efficacy in control of damping-off diseases in seedlings of Capsicum annuum grown in pasteurized potting medium in a glasshouse. A selected isolate of binucleate Rhizoctonia and two fungicides were also included as standards for control of Rhizoctonia solani and Pythium ultimum var. sporangiiferum. Both isolates of T. koningii reduced seedling death caused by R. solani in one of two experiments, and by P. u. sporangii-ferum in two of three experiments. Neither isolate of T. koningii suppressed damping-off caused by either pathogen as consistently as the binucleate Rhizoctonia or fungicides. The implications of these results for commercial disease management are discussed.

  5. Two distinct classes of protein related to GTB and RRM are critical in the sclerotial metamorphosis process of Rhizoctonia solani AG-1 IA.

    PubMed

    Shu, Canwei; Chen, Jieling; Sun, Si; Zhang, Meiling; Wang, Chenjiaozi; Zhou, Erxun

    2015-07-01

    Sheath blight of rice, caused by Rhizoctonia solani Kühn AG-1 IA [teleomorph: Thanatephorus cucumeris (Frank) Donk], is one of the major diseases of rice (Oryza sativa L.) worldwide. Sclerotia produced by R. solani AG-1 IA are crucial for their survival in adverse environments and further dissemination when environmental conditions become conducive. Differentially expressed genes during three stages of sclerotial metamorphosis of R. solani AG-1 IA were investigated by utilizing complementary DNA amplified fragment length polymorphism (cDNA-AFLP) technique. A total of 258 transcript derived fragments (TDFs) were obtained and sequenced, among which 253 TDFs were annotated with known functions through BLASTX by searching the GenBank database and 19 annotated TDFs were assigned into 19 secondary metabolic pathways through searching the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) PATHWAY database. Moreover, the results of quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) analysis showed that the expression patterns of eight representative annotated TDFs were positively correlated with sclerotial metamorphosis. Sequence annotation of TDFs showed homology similarities to several genes encoding for proteins belonging to the glycosyltransferases B (GTB) and RNA recognition motif (RRM) superfamily and to other development-related proteins. Taken together, it is concluded that the members of the GTB and RRM superfamilies and several new genes involved in proteolytic process identified in this study might serve as the scavengers of free radicals and reactive oxygen species (ROS) and thus play an important role in the sclerotial metamorphosis process of R. solani AG-1 IA.

  6. Effect of Sugar Beet Variety and Nonhost Plant on Rhizoctonia solani AG2-2IIIB Soil Inoculum Potential Measured in Soil DNA Extracts.

    PubMed

    Schulze, Sascha; Koch, Heinz-Josef; Märländer, Bernward; Varrelmann, Mark

    2016-09-01

    A direct soil DNA extraction method from soil samples (250 g) was applied for detection of the soilborne sugar-beet-infecting pathogen Rhizoctonia solani anastomosis group (AG) 2-2IIIB using a newly developed real-time polymerase chain reaction assay that showed specificity to AG2-2IIIB when tested against various R. solani AG. The assay showed a good relation between cycle threshold and amount of AG2-2IIIB sclerotia detected in three spiked field soils and was also able to detect the pathogen in naturally infested field soil samples. A field trial was conducted to quantify R. solani AG2-2IIIB soil inoculum potential (IP) before and after growing a susceptible and a resistant sugar beet variety as well as after subsequent growth of an expected nonhost winter rye. Plants of the susceptible sugar beet variety displayed a higher disease severity. A more than sixfold increase of the R. solani AG2-2IIIB soil IP was observed in contrast to the resistant variety that resulted in a constant IP. Growing winter rye significantly reduced soil IP to the initial level at sowing. Further research is required to better understand the interaction between disease occurrence and soil IP as well as the environmental influence on IP development.

  7. Effect of Sugar Beet Variety and Nonhost Plant on Rhizoctonia solani AG2-2IIIB Soil Inoculum Potential Measured in Soil DNA Extracts.

    PubMed

    Schulze, Sascha; Koch, Heinz-Josef; Märländer, Bernward; Varrelmann, Mark

    2016-09-01

    A direct soil DNA extraction method from soil samples (250 g) was applied for detection of the soilborne sugar-beet-infecting pathogen Rhizoctonia solani anastomosis group (AG) 2-2IIIB using a newly developed real-time polymerase chain reaction assay that showed specificity to AG2-2IIIB when tested against various R. solani AG. The assay showed a good relation between cycle threshold and amount of AG2-2IIIB sclerotia detected in three spiked field soils and was also able to detect the pathogen in naturally infested field soil samples. A field trial was conducted to quantify R. solani AG2-2IIIB soil inoculum potential (IP) before and after growing a susceptible and a resistant sugar beet variety as well as after subsequent growth of an expected nonhost winter rye. Plants of the susceptible sugar beet variety displayed a higher disease severity. A more than sixfold increase of the R. solani AG2-2IIIB soil IP was observed in contrast to the resistant variety that resulted in a constant IP. Growing winter rye significantly reduced soil IP to the initial level at sowing. Further research is required to better understand the interaction between disease occurrence and soil IP as well as the environmental influence on IP development. PMID:27143412

  8. Intraspecific variation of Rhizoctonia solani AG 3 isolates recovered from potato fields in Central Iran and South Australia.

    PubMed

    Balali, G R; Neate, S M; Kasalkheh, A M; Stodart, B J; Melanson, D L; Scott, E S

    2007-02-01

    Pectic zymogram, RFLP and PCR analyses were used to characterize Rhizoctonia solani AG 3 isolates collected from diseased potatoes in South Australia. The pectic zymogram data were compared with those obtained for isolates collected from central Iran. Analyses of bands corresponding to pectin esterase and polygalacturonase revealed three zymogram subgroups (ZG) in AG 3. In addition to the previously reported ZG7 (here renamed ZG7-1), two new zymogram subgroups, ZG7-2 and ZG7-3, were identified. Of the 446 isolates tested, 50% of the South Australian and 46% of the Iranian isolates were ZG7-1. The majority of the isolates originating from stem and root cankers were ZG7-1, whereas most of the isolates designated ZG7-2 and ZG7-3 originated from tuber-borne sclerotia. Pathogenicity tests revealed that ZG7-1 generally produced fewer sclerotia and more severe cankers of underground parts of the potato plants than the other two ZGs. Two random DNA clones, one originating from an AG 3 isolate and the other from an AG 4 isolate, were used as probes for RFLP analyses of Australian isolates. The AG 3 probe, previously identified to be specific to this group, detected a high level of genetic diversity, with 11 genotypes identified amongst 50 isolates analysed. The low-copy AG 4 probe resolved three genotypes amongst 24 isolates. For 23 isolates analysed with both markers, the combined data distinguished a total of six genotypes and similarity analysis resolved the isolates into two main groups with 50% homology. PCR, using primers for the plant intron splice junction region (R1), also revealed variation. No obvious relationship among pectic zymogram groups, RFLP and PCR genotypes was observed.

  9. Maple Bark Biochar Affects Rhizoctonia solani Metabolism and Increases Damping-Off Severity.

    PubMed

    Copley, Tanya R; Aliferis, Konstantinos A; Jabaji, Suha

    2015-10-01

    Many studies have investigated the effect of biochar on plant yield, nutrient uptake, and soil microbial populations; however, little work has been done on its effect on soilborne plant diseases. To determine the effect of maple bark biochar on Rhizoctonia damping-off, 11 plant species were grown in a soilless potting substrate amended with different concentrations of biochar and inoculated or not with Rhizoctonia solani anastomosis group 4. Additionally, the effect of biochar amendment on R. solani growth and metabolism in vitro was evaluated. Increasing concentrations of maple bark biochar increased Rhizoctonia damping-off of all 11 plant species. Using multivariate analyses, we observed positive correlations between biochar amendments, disease severity and incidence, abundance of culturable bacterial communities, and physicochemical parameters. Additionally, biochar amendment significantly increased R. solani growth and hyphal extension in vitro, and altered its primary metabolism, notably the mannitol and tricarboxylic acid cycles and the glycolysis pathway. One or several organic compounds present in the biochar, as identified by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis, may be metabolized by R. solani. Taken together, these results indicate that future studies on biochar should focus on the effect of its use as an amendment on soilborne plant pathogens before applying it to soils. PMID:25938176

  10. Maple Bark Biochar Affects Rhizoctonia solani Metabolism and Increases Damping-Off Severity.

    PubMed

    Copley, Tanya R; Aliferis, Konstantinos A; Jabaji, Suha

    2015-10-01

    Many studies have investigated the effect of biochar on plant yield, nutrient uptake, and soil microbial populations; however, little work has been done on its effect on soilborne plant diseases. To determine the effect of maple bark biochar on Rhizoctonia damping-off, 11 plant species were grown in a soilless potting substrate amended with different concentrations of biochar and inoculated or not with Rhizoctonia solani anastomosis group 4. Additionally, the effect of biochar amendment on R. solani growth and metabolism in vitro was evaluated. Increasing concentrations of maple bark biochar increased Rhizoctonia damping-off of all 11 plant species. Using multivariate analyses, we observed positive correlations between biochar amendments, disease severity and incidence, abundance of culturable bacterial communities, and physicochemical parameters. Additionally, biochar amendment significantly increased R. solani growth and hyphal extension in vitro, and altered its primary metabolism, notably the mannitol and tricarboxylic acid cycles and the glycolysis pathway. One or several organic compounds present in the biochar, as identified by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis, may be metabolized by R. solani. Taken together, these results indicate that future studies on biochar should focus on the effect of its use as an amendment on soilborne plant pathogens before applying it to soils.

  11. Development of a difenoconazole/propiconazole microemulsion and its antifungal activities against Rhizoctonia solani AG1-IA.

    PubMed

    Leng, Pengfei; Zhang, Zhiming; Li, Qian; Zhang, Yunsong; Zhao, Maojun; Pan, Guangtang

    2012-06-01

    According to its physical and chemical properties, the composition of difenoconazole/propiconazole microemulsion was as follows: xylene as solvent, emulsifier HSH as surfactant and methanol as cosurfactant. The optimal formulation of difenoconazole/propiconazole microemulsion was oil/SAA/water = 1/2/5 (w/w), in which the SAA consisted of emulsifier HSH and methanol with ratio of 3/2 (w/w). The cloud point of difenoconazole/propiconazole microemulsion was 70 degrees C and its effective ingredient content was 2.5% measured by High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC). Its heat storage stability was studied according to the standards. The decomposition rates of the difenoconazole/propiconazole microemulsion were merely 2.45%, 2.63% respectively and met the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) standards of pesticide microemulsion. Investigated by Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) the particle size of difenoconazole/propiconazole microemulsion was 90-140 nm and its antifungal activities against Rhizoctonia solani AG1-IA were tested and compared with that of Meiyu. We found that the inhibition rates in the difenoconazole/propiconazole microemulsion treatment group were significantly higher than that of the emulsion group with the same content of effective ingredients and the study also revealed that its inhibiting ability on the formation and germination of sclerotia was significant.

  12. Bioactive saponin from tea seed pomace with inhibitory effects against Rhizoctonia solani.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Ping-Chung; Lin, Tsung-Chun; Yang, Cheng-Wei; Lin, Chih-Lung; Chen, Guo-Feng; Huang, Jenn-Wen

    2010-08-11

    The present study was aimed to characterize the antifungal principles in methanol extract of tea ( Camellia oleifera ) seed pomace. Totally, two flavonoids, camelliasides A (1) and B (2), and one saponin mixture composed of camelliasaponin B(1) (3) were identified from the methanol extract. These constituents were tested for their ability to reduce the infection of cabbage seedlings by Rhizoctonia solani Kuhn AG-4 and to inhibit growth of the pathogen on potato dextrose agar plates. The saponin mixture is a potential candidate as a new plant-derived pesticide to control Rhizoctonia damping-off of vegetable seedlings.

  13. Screening different Brassica spp. germplasm for resistance to Rhizoctonia solani AG-2-1 and AG-8

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Poor stands of canola seedlings in Pacific Northwest (PNW) have been associated with Rhizoctonia solani AG-2-1 and AG-8. A total of eighty five genotypes of Brassica napus, B. rapa, B. carinata, B. juncea and Sinapsis alba were evaluated in the growth chamber for their resistance to both R. solani A...

  14. A fungal growth model fitted to carbon-limited dynamics of Rhizoctonia solani.

    PubMed

    Jeger, M J; Lamour, A; Gilligan, C A; Otten, W

    2008-01-01

    Here, a quasi-steady-state approximation was used to simplify a mathematical model for fungal growth in carbon-limiting systems, and this was fitted to growth dynamics of the soil-borne plant pathogen and saprotroph Rhizoctonia solani. The model identified a criterion for invasion into carbon-limited environments with two characteristics driving fungal growth, namely the carbon decomposition rate and a measure of carbon use efficiency. The dynamics of fungal spread through a population of sites with either low (0.0074 mg) or high (0.016 mg) carbon content were well described by the simplified model with faster colonization for the carbon-rich environment. Rhizoctonia solani responded to a lower carbon availability by increasing the carbon use efficiency and the carbon decomposition rate following colonization. The results are discussed in relation to fungal invasion thresholds in terms of carbon nutrition. PMID:18312538

  15. Stem Rot on Adzuki Bean (Vigna angularis) Caused by Rhizoctonia solani AG 4 HGI in China.

    PubMed

    Sun, Suli; Xia, Changjian; Zhang, Jiqing; Duan, Canxing; Wang, Xiaoming; Wu, Xiaofei; Lee, Suk-Ha; Zhu, Zhendong

    2015-03-01

    During late August and early September 2011, stem rot symptoms were observed on adzuki bean plants (Vigna angularis) growing in fields located in Beijing and Hebei Province, China, respectively. In this study, four isolates were obtained from infected stems of adzuki bean plants. Based on their morphology, and sequence and polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) analyses of the ribosomal DNA internal transcribed spacers (rDNA-ITS) region, the four isolates were identified as Rhizoctonia solani in anastomosis group (AG) 4 HGI. Pathogenicity tests showed that all isolates were strongly pathogenic to adzuki bean and resulted in serious wilt symptoms which was similar to observations in the fields. Additionally, the isolates infected several other crops and induced related rot on the roots and basal stems. To our knowledge, this is the first report of Rhizoctonia solani AG 4 HGI causing stem rot on adzuki bean.

  16. A fungal growth model fitted to carbon-limited dynamics of Rhizoctonia solani.

    PubMed

    Jeger, M J; Lamour, A; Gilligan, C A; Otten, W

    2008-01-01

    Here, a quasi-steady-state approximation was used to simplify a mathematical model for fungal growth in carbon-limiting systems, and this was fitted to growth dynamics of the soil-borne plant pathogen and saprotroph Rhizoctonia solani. The model identified a criterion for invasion into carbon-limited environments with two characteristics driving fungal growth, namely the carbon decomposition rate and a measure of carbon use efficiency. The dynamics of fungal spread through a population of sites with either low (0.0074 mg) or high (0.016 mg) carbon content were well described by the simplified model with faster colonization for the carbon-rich environment. Rhizoctonia solani responded to a lower carbon availability by increasing the carbon use efficiency and the carbon decomposition rate following colonization. The results are discussed in relation to fungal invasion thresholds in terms of carbon nutrition.

  17. Fungichromin: a substance from Streptomyces padanus with inhibitory effects on Rhizoctonia solani.

    PubMed

    Shih, Hsin-Der; Liu, Yung-Chuan; Hsu, Fen-Lin; Mulabagal, Vanisree; Dodda, Rajasekhar; Huang, Jenn-Wen

    2003-01-01

    Streptomyces padanus strain PMS-702 is an antagonist of Rhizoctonia solani AG-4, the causal agent of damping-off of cabbage. Treatment of cabbage seeds with the culture filtrate of S. padanus strain PMS-702 was effective in reducing the incidence of damping-off of cabbage. The major active ingredient from the culture filtrate of S. padanus strain PMS-702 was purified by silica gel column chromatography and identified as the polyene macrolide, fungichromin, by NMR and mass spectral data. Bioassay studies showed that fungichromin had a strong antifungal activity against R. solani AG-4, and its minimum inhibitory concentration (over 90% inhibition) was found to be 72 microg/mL. This is the first report of fungichromin from S. padanus as an active ingredient for the control of Rhizoctonia damping-off of cabbage.

  18. Stem Rot on Adzuki Bean (Vigna angularis) Caused by Rhizoctonia solani AG 4 HGI in China

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Suli; Xia, Changjian; Zhang, Jiqing; Duan, Canxing; Wang, Xiaoming; Wu, Xiaofei; Lee, Suk-Ha; Zhu, Zhendong

    2015-01-01

    During late August and early September 2011, stem rot symptoms were observed on adzuki bean plants (Vigna angularis) growing in fields located in Beijing and Hebei Province, China, respectively. In this study, four isolates were obtained from infected stems of adzuki bean plants. Based on their morphology, and sequence and polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) analyses of the ribosomal DNA internal transcribed spacers (rDNA-ITS) region, the four isolates were identified as Rhizoctonia solani in anastomosis group (AG) 4 HGI. Pathogenicity tests showed that all isolates were strongly pathogenic to adzuki bean and resulted in serious wilt symptoms which was similar to observations in the fields. Additionally, the isolates infected several other crops and induced related rot on the roots and basal stems. To our knowledge, this is the first report of Rhizoctonia solani AG 4 HGI causing stem rot on adzuki bean. PMID:25774112

  19. Transgenic Plants with Enhanced Resistance to the Fungal Pathogen Rhizoctonia solani.

    PubMed

    Brogue, K; Chet, I; Holliday, M; Cressman, R; Biddle, P; Knowlton, S; Mauvais, C J; Broglie, R

    1991-11-22

    The production of enzymes capable of degrading the cell walls of invading phytopathogenic fungi is an important component of the defense response of plants. The timing of this natural host defense mechanism was modified to produce fungal-resistant plants. Transgenic tobacco seedlings constitutively expressing a bean chitinase gene under control of the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter showed an increased ability to survive in soil infested with the fungal pathogen Rhizoctonia solani and delayed development of disease symptoms.

  20. Leuconostoc spp. Associated with Root Rot in Sugar Beet and Their Interaction with Rhizoctonia solani.

    PubMed

    Strausbaugh, Carl A

    2016-05-01

    Rhizoctonia root and crown rot is an important disease problem in sugar beet caused by Rhizoctonia solani and also shown to be associated with Leuconostoc spp. Initial Leuconostoc studies were conducted with only a few isolates and the relationship of Leuconostoc with R. solani is poorly understood; therefore, a more thorough investigation was conducted. In total, 203 Leuconostoc isolates were collected from recently harvested sugar beet roots in southern Idaho and southeastern Oregon during 2010 and 2012: 88 and 85% Leuconostoc mesenteroides, 6 and 15% L. pseudomesenteroides, 2 and 0% L. kimchi, and 4 and 0% unrecognized Leuconostoc spp., respectively. Based on 16S ribosomal RNA sequencing, haplotype 11 (L. mesenteroides isolates) comprised 68 to 70% of the isolates in both years. In pathogenicity field studies with commercial sugar beet 'B-7', all Leuconostoc isolates caused more rot (P < 0.0001; α = 0.05) when combined with R. solani than when inoculated alone in both years. Also, 46 of the 52 combination treatments over the 2 years had significantly more rot (P < 0.0001; α = 0.05) than the fungal check. The data support the conclusion that a synergistic interaction leads to more rot when both Leuconostoc spp. and R. solani are present in sugar beet roots. PMID:26735061

  1. Amendment with peony root bark improves the biocontrol efficacy of Trichoderma harzianum against Rhizoctonia solani.

    PubMed

    Lee, Tae Ok; Khan, Zakaullah; Kim, Sang Gyu; Kim, Young Ho

    2008-09-01

    We tested Trichoderma harzianum as a biocontrol agent for Rhizoctonia solani AG2-1, using six natural antifungal materials to improve its efficacy. Among the six materials tested, peony (Paeonia suffruticosa) root bark (PRB) showed the strongest antifungal activity against R. solani AG2-1, and was not antagonistic to T. harzianum. Scanning electron microscopy showed that treatment with PRB extract resulted in shortened and deformed R. solani AG2-1 hyphal cells. The control of radish damping-off caused by R. solani AG2-1 was greatly increased by combined treatments of T. harzianum and PRB, as compared with either of the two treatments alone, with the control effect increased from 42.3-51.5% to 71.4-87.6%. The antifungal compound in PRB, which was isolated in chloroform and identified as paeonol by mass spectrometry, 1H NMR, and 13C NMR analyses, inhibited the growth of R. solani AG2-1 but not that of T. harzianum. Thus, PRB powder or extract may be used as a safe additive to T. harzianum to improve the control of the soil borne diseases caused by R. solani AG2-1.

  2. RSIADB, a collective resource for genome and transcriptome analyses in Rhizoctonia solani AG1 IA

    PubMed Central

    Ai, Peng; Zhang, Jinfeng; Deng, Qiming; Wang, Shiquan; Li, Shuangcheng; Zhu, Jun; Li, Ping; Zheng, Aiping

    2016-01-01

    Rice [Oryza sativa (L.)] feeds more than half of the world’s population. Rhizoctonia solani is a major fungal pathogen of rice causing extreme crop losses in all rice-growing regions of the world. R. solani AG1 IA is a major cause of sheath blight in rice. In this study, we constructed a comprehensive and user-friendly web-based database, RSIADB, to analyse its draft genome and transcriptome. The database was built using the genome sequence (10 489 genes) and annotation information for R. solani AG1 IA. A total of six RNAseq samples of R. solani AG1 IA were also analysed, corresponding to 10, 18, 24, 32, 48 and 72 h after infection of rice leaves. The RSIADB database enables users to search, browse, and download gene sequences for R. solani AG1 IA, and mine the data using BLAST, Sequence Extractor, Browse and Construction Diagram tools that were integrated into the database. RSIADB is an important genomic resource for scientists working with R. solani AG1 IA and will assist researchers in analysing the annotated genome and transcriptome of this pathogen. This resource will facilitate studies on gene function, pathogenesis factors and secreted proteins, as well as provide an avenue for comparative analyses of genes expressed during different stages of infection. Database URL: http://genedenovoweb.ticp.net:81/rsia/index.php PMID:27022158

  3. The influence of soil moisture and Rhizoctonia solani anastomosis and intraspecific group on the incidence of damping-off and the incidence and severity of Rhizoctonia crown and root rot in sugar beet

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rhizoctonia crown and root rot (Rhizoctonia solani) reduces plant stands, sugar quality and yield in sugar beet. To evaluate the influence of R. solani anastomosis (AG) and intraspecific groups and soil moisture on disease incidence and severity, a field trial was established in Ridgetown, Ontario, ...

  4. RSIADB, a collective resource for genome and transcriptome analyses in Rhizoctonia solani AG1 IA.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lei; Ai, Peng; Zhang, Jinfeng; Deng, Qiming; Wang, Shiquan; Li, Shuangcheng; Zhu, Jun; Li, Ping; Zheng, Aiping

    2016-01-01

    Rice [Oryza sativa (L.)] feeds more than half of the world's population. Rhizoctonia solaniis a major fungal pathogen of rice causing extreme crop losses in all rice-growing regions of the world. R. solani AG1 IA is a major cause of sheath blight in rice. In this study, we constructed a comprehensive and user-friendly web-based database, RSIADB, to analyse its draft genome and transcriptome. The database was built using the genome sequence (10,489 genes) and annotation information for R. solani AG1 IA. A total of six RNAseq samples of R. solani AG1 IA were also analysed, corresponding to 10, 18, 24, 32, 48 and 72 h after infection of rice leaves. The RSIADB database enables users to search, browse, and download gene sequences for R. solani AG1 IA, and mine the data using BLAST, Sequence Extractor, Browse and Construction Diagram tools that were integrated into the database. RSIADB is an important genomic resource for scientists working with R. solani AG1 IA and will assist researchers in analysing the annotated genome and transcriptome of this pathogen. This resource will facilitate studies on gene function, pathogenesis factors and secreted proteins, as well as provide an avenue for comparative analyses of genes expressed during different stages of infection. Database URL:http://genedenovoweb.ticp.net:81/rsia/index.php.

  5. Divergence between sympatric rice- and soybean-infecting populations of Rhizoctonia solani anastomosis group-1 IA.

    PubMed

    Bernardes de Assis, Joana; Peyer, Patrik; Rush, Milton C; Zala, Marcello; McDonald, Bruce A; Ceresini, Paulo C

    2008-12-01

    Rhizoctonia solani anastomosis group (AG)-1 IA causes soybean foliar blighting (aerial blight) and rice sheath blight diseases. Although taxonomically related within the AG-1 complex, sister populations of R. solani AG-1 IA infecting Poaceae (rice) and Fabaceae (soybean) are genetically distinct based on internal transcribed spacer rDNA. However, there is currently no information available regarding the extent of genetic differentiation and host specialization between rice- and soybean-infecting populations of R. solani AG-1 IA. We used 10 microsatellite loci to compare sympatric R. solani AG-1 IA populations infecting rice and soybeans in Louisiana and one allopatric rice-infecting population from Texas. None of the 154 multilocus genotypes found among the 223 isolates were shared among the three populations. Partitioning of genetic diversity showed significant differentiation among sympatric populations from different host species (Phi(ST) = 0.39 to 0.41). Historical migration patterns between sympatric rice- and soybean-infecting populations from Louisiana were asymmetrical. Rice- and soybean-derived isolates of R. solani AG-1 IA were able to infect both rice and soybean, but were significantly more aggressive on their host of origin, consistent with host specialization. The soybean-infecting population from Louisiana was more clonal than the sympatric rice-infecting population. Most of the loci in the soybean-infecting populations were out of Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (HWE), but the sympatric rice-infecting population from Louisiana was mainly in HWE. All populations presented evidence for a mixed reproductive system.

  6. Population genetic structure of Rhizoctonia solani AG 3-PT from potatoes in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Muzhinji, Norman; Woodhall, James W; Truter, Mariette; van der Waals, Jacquie E

    2016-05-01

    Rhizoctonia solani AG 3-PT is an important potato pathogen causing significant yield and quality losses in potato production. However, little is known about the levels of genetic diversity and structure of this pathogen in South Africa. A total of 114 R. solani AG 3-PT isolates collected from four geographic regions were analysed for genetic diversity and structure using eight microsatellite loci. Microsatellite analysis found high intra-population genetic diversity, population differentiation and evidence of recombination. A total of 78 multilocus genotypes were identified with few shared among populations. Low levels of clonality (13-39 %) and high levels of population differentiation were observed among populations. Most of the loci were in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium and all four populations showed evidence of a mixed reproductive mode of both clonality and recombination. The PCoA clustering method revealed genetically distinct geographic populations of R. solani AG 3-PT in South Africa. This study showed that populations of R. solani AG 3-PT in South Africa are genetically differentiated and disease management strategies should be applied accordingly. This is the first study of the population genetics of R. solani AG 3-PT in South Africa and results may help to develop knowledge-based disease management strategies.

  7. Biological control of Rhizoctonia solani on potato by using indigenous Trichoderma spp.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durak, Emre Demirer

    2016-04-01

    At this study, it was aimed to determine the effect of Trichoderma isolates that was isolated from the soil samples taken from the different regions on black scurf and stem canker disease caused by Rhizoctonia solani Kühn that has been one of the biggest problems of the potato cultivation. At the end of the soil isolations, totally 81 Trichoderma isolates were obtained and their species were identified. Of these isolates, T. harzianum (42%), T. virens (31%), T. asperellum (15%) and T. viride (12%). All of the isolates were tested in vitro for their antagonistic activity against the R. solani isolate. The isolates that show high inhibition rate was selected and tested against R. solani in vitro. Potato plants were grown in a greenhouse for about 10 weeks. Then the plants were evaluated according to the scale, plant height, shoot fresh and dry weights, root fresh and dry weights were noted. The experiment was conducted two times in three replications. At the in vitro tests, generally, it was determined that Trichoderma isolates have inhibited to R. solani and in vivo, they were reduced the effects of the disease and they were raised the development of the plant. In particular, it was determined that some isolates of the T. harzianum and T. virens have reduced the severity of the disease. It was determined that both in vitro and in vivo isolates have shown different efficiency against R. solani.

  8. RSIADB, a collective resource for genome and transcriptome analyses in Rhizoctonia solani AG1 IA.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lei; Ai, Peng; Zhang, Jinfeng; Deng, Qiming; Wang, Shiquan; Li, Shuangcheng; Zhu, Jun; Li, Ping; Zheng, Aiping

    2016-01-01

    Rice [Oryza sativa (L.)] feeds more than half of the world's population. Rhizoctonia solaniis a major fungal pathogen of rice causing extreme crop losses in all rice-growing regions of the world. R. solani AG1 IA is a major cause of sheath blight in rice. In this study, we constructed a comprehensive and user-friendly web-based database, RSIADB, to analyse its draft genome and transcriptome. The database was built using the genome sequence (10,489 genes) and annotation information for R. solani AG1 IA. A total of six RNAseq samples of R. solani AG1 IA were also analysed, corresponding to 10, 18, 24, 32, 48 and 72 h after infection of rice leaves. The RSIADB database enables users to search, browse, and download gene sequences for R. solani AG1 IA, and mine the data using BLAST, Sequence Extractor, Browse and Construction Diagram tools that were integrated into the database. RSIADB is an important genomic resource for scientists working with R. solani AG1 IA and will assist researchers in analysing the annotated genome and transcriptome of this pathogen. This resource will facilitate studies on gene function, pathogenesis factors and secreted proteins, as well as provide an avenue for comparative analyses of genes expressed during different stages of infection. Database URL:http://genedenovoweb.ticp.net:81/rsia/index.php. PMID:27022158

  9. Antifungal characteristics of a fluorescent Pseudomonas strain involved in the biological control of Rhizoctonia solani.

    PubMed

    Pal, K K; Tilak, K V; Saxena, A K; Dey, R; Singh, C S

    2000-09-01

    A plant growth-promoting isolate of a fluorescent Pseudomonas spp. EM85 was found strongly antagonistic to Rhizoctonia solani, a causal agent of damping-off of cotton. The isolate produced HCN (HCN+), siderophore (Sid+), fluorescent pigments (Flu+) and antifungal antibiotics (Afa+). Tn5::lacZ mutagenesis of isolate EM85 resulted in the production of a series of mutants with altered production of HCN, siderophore, fluorescent pigments and antifungal antibiotics. Characterisation of these mutants revealed that the fluorescent pigment produced in PDA and the siderophore produced in CAS agar were not the same. Afa- and Flu- mutants had a smaller inhibition zone when grown with Rhizoctonia solani than the EM85 wild type. Sid- and HCN mutants failed to inhibit the pathogen in vitro. In a pot experiment, mutants deficient in HCN and siderophore production could suppress the damping-off disease by 52%. However, mutants deficient in fluorescent pigments and antifungal antibiotics failed to reduce the disease severity. Treatments with mutants that produced enhanced amounts of fluorescent pigments and antibiotics compared with EM85 wild type, exhibited an increase in biocontrol efficiency. Monitoring of the mutants in the rhizosphere using the lacZ marker showed identical proliferation of mutants and wild type. Purified antifungal compounds (fluorescent pigment and antibiotic) also inhibited the fungus appreciably in a TLC bioassay. Thus, the results indicate that fluorescent pigment and antifungal antibiotic of the fluorescent Pseudomonas spp. EM85 might be involved in the biological suppression of Rhizoctonia-induced damping-off of cotton.

  10. Induction of Soil Suppressiveness Against Rhizoctonia solani by Incorporation of Dried Plant Residues into Soil.

    PubMed

    Kasuya, Masahiro; Olivier, Andriantsoa R; Ota, Yoko; Tojo, Motoaki; Honjo, Hitoshi; Fukui, Ryo

    2006-12-01

    ABSTRACT Suppressive effects of soil amendment with residues of 12 cultivars of Brassica rapa on damping-off of sugar beet were evaluated in soils infested with Rhizoctonia solani. Residues of clover and peanut were tested as noncruciferous controls. The incidence of damping-off was significantly and consistently suppressed in the soils amended with residues of clover, peanut, and B. rapa subsp. rapifera 'Saori', but only the volatile substance produced from water-imbibed residue of cv. Saori exhibited a distinct inhibitory effect on mycelial growth of R. solani. Nonetheless, disease suppression in such residue-amended soils was diminished or nullified when antibacterial antibiotics were applied to the soils, suggesting that proliferation of antagonistic bacteria resident to the soils were responsible for disease suppression. When the seed (pericarps) colonized by R. solani in the infested soil without residues were replanted into the soils amended with such residues, damping-off was suppressed in all cases. In contrast, when seed that had been colonized by microorganisms in the soils containing the residues were replanted into the infested soil, damping-off was not suppressed. The evidence indicates that the laimosphere, but not the spermosphere, is the site for the antagonistic microbial interaction, which is the chief principle of soil suppressiveness against Rhizoctonia damping-off.

  11. Genetic diversity of Rhizoctonia solani associated with potato tubers in France.

    PubMed

    Fiers, Marie; Edel-Hermann, Véronique; Héraud, Cécile; Gautheron, Nadine; Chatot, Catherine; Le Hingrat, Yves; Bouchek-Mechiche, Karima; Steinberg, Christian

    2011-01-01

    The soilborne fungus Rhizoctonia solani is a pathogen of many plants and causes severe damage in crops around the world. Strains of R. solani from the anastomosis group (AG) 3 attack potatoes, leading to great yield losses and to the downgrading of production. The study of the genetic diversity of the strains of R. solani in France allows the structure of the populations to be determined and adapted control strategies against this pathogen to be established. The diversity of 73 French strains isolated from tubers grown in the main potato seed production areas and 31 strains isolated in nine other countries was assessed by phylogenetic analyses of (i) the internal transcribed spacer sequences (ITS1 and ITS2) of ribosomal RNA (rRNA), (ii) a part of the gene tef-1α and (iii) the total DNA fingerprints of each strain established by amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP). The determination of the AGs of R. solani based on the sequencing of the ITS region showed three different AGs among our collection (60 AG 3 PT, 8 AG 2-1 and 5 AG 5). Grouping of the strains belonging to the same AG was confirmed by sequencing of the gene tef-1α used for the first time to study the genetic diversity of R. solani. About 42% of ITS sequences and 72% of tef-1α sequences contained polymorphic sites, suggesting that the cells of R. solani strains contain several copies of ITS and the tef-1α gene within the same nucleus or between different nuclei. Phylogenetic trees showed a greater genetic diversity within AGs in tef-1α sequences than in ITS sequences. The AFLP analyses showed an even greater diversity among the strains demonstrating that the French strains of R. solani isolated from potatoes were not a clonal population. Moreover there was no relationship between the geographical origins of the strains or the variety from which they were isolated and their genetic diversity.

  12. Genetic diversity of Rhizoctonia solani associated with potato tubers in France.

    PubMed

    Fiers, Marie; Edel-Hermann, Véronique; Héraud, Cécile; Gautheron, Nadine; Chatot, Catherine; Le Hingrat, Yves; Bouchek-Mechiche, Karima; Steinberg, Christian

    2011-01-01

    The soilborne fungus Rhizoctonia solani is a pathogen of many plants and causes severe damage in crops around the world. Strains of R. solani from the anastomosis group (AG) 3 attack potatoes, leading to great yield losses and to the downgrading of production. The study of the genetic diversity of the strains of R. solani in France allows the structure of the populations to be determined and adapted control strategies against this pathogen to be established. The diversity of 73 French strains isolated from tubers grown in the main potato seed production areas and 31 strains isolated in nine other countries was assessed by phylogenetic analyses of (i) the internal transcribed spacer sequences (ITS1 and ITS2) of ribosomal RNA (rRNA), (ii) a part of the gene tef-1α and (iii) the total DNA fingerprints of each strain established by amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP). The determination of the AGs of R. solani based on the sequencing of the ITS region showed three different AGs among our collection (60 AG 3 PT, 8 AG 2-1 and 5 AG 5). Grouping of the strains belonging to the same AG was confirmed by sequencing of the gene tef-1α used for the first time to study the genetic diversity of R. solani. About 42% of ITS sequences and 72% of tef-1α sequences contained polymorphic sites, suggesting that the cells of R. solani strains contain several copies of ITS and the tef-1α gene within the same nucleus or between different nuclei. Phylogenetic trees showed a greater genetic diversity within AGs in tef-1α sequences than in ITS sequences. The AFLP analyses showed an even greater diversity among the strains demonstrating that the French strains of R. solani isolated from potatoes were not a clonal population. Moreover there was no relationship between the geographical origins of the strains or the variety from which they were isolated and their genetic diversity. PMID:21642342

  13. Genetic structure of populations of the rice-infecting pathogen Rhizoctonia solani AG-1 IA from China.

    PubMed

    Bernardes-de-Assis, Joana; Storari, Michelangelo; Zala, Marcello; Wang, Wenxiang; Jiang, Daohong; Shidong, Li; Jin, Meisong; McDonald, Bruce A; Ceresini, Paulo C

    2009-09-01

    ABSTRACT Sheath blight disease (SBD) on rice, caused by Rhizoctonia solani AG-1 IA, is one of the most devastating rice diseases on a global basis, including China (in Eastern Asia), the world's largest rice-growing country. We analyzed the population genetics of nine rice-infecting populations from China using nine microsatellite loci. One allopatric population from India (Southern Asia) was included in the analyses. In total, 300 different multilocus genotypes were found among 572 fungal isolates. Clonal fractions within rice fields were 16 to 95%, suggesting that sclerotia were a major source of primary inoculum in some fields. Global Phi(ST) statistics (Phi(ST) = 42.49; P

  14. Soil Pseudomonas community structure and its antagonism towards Rhizoctonia solani under the stress of acetochlor.

    PubMed

    Wu, Minna; Zhang, Xiaoli; Zhang, Huiwen; Zhang, Yan; Li, Xinyu; Zhou, Qixing; Zhang, Chenggang

    2009-09-01

    In a microcosm experiment, the amplified ribosomal DNA restriction analysis was adopted to investigate the Pseudomonas community structure in soils applied with different concentrations (0, 50, 150, and 250 mg/kg) of acetochlor, and an in vitro assay was made to examine the antagonistic activity of isolated Pseudomonas strains acting on soil-borne pathogen Rhizoctonia solani. The results showed that acetochlor application changed the community structure of Pseudomonas in aquic brown soil. The diversity of Pseudomonas and the amount of isolated Pseudomonas strains with antagonistic activity decreased with an increasing acetochlor concentration, and the toxic effect of acetochlor reached to a steady level at 150-250 mg/kg.

  15. Seed disinfection effect of atmospheric pressure plasma and low pressure plasma on Rhizoctonia solani.

    PubMed

    Nishioka, Terumi; Takai, Yuichiro; Kawaradani, Mitsuo; Okada, Kiyotsugu; Tanimoto, Hideo; Misawa, Tatsuya; Kusakari, Shinichi

    2014-01-01

    Gas plasma generated and applied under two different systems, atmospheric pressure plasma and low pressure plasma, was used to investigate the inactivation efficacy on the seedborne pathogenic fungus, Rhizoctonia solani, which had been artificially introduced to brassicaceous seeds. Treatment with atmospheric plasma for 10 min markedly reduced the R. solani survival rate from 100% to 3% but delayed seed germination. The low pressure plasma treatment reduced the fungal survival rate from 83% to 1.7% after 10 min and the inactivation effect was dependent on the treatment time. The seed germination rate after treatment with the low pressure plasma was not significantly different from that of untreated seeds. The air temperature around the seeds in the low pressure system was lower than that of the atmospheric system. These results suggested that gas plasma treatment under low pressure could be effective in disinfecting the seeds without damaging them.

  16. Mass-spectrometry data for Rhizoctonia solani proteins produced during infection of wheat and vegetative growth.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Jonathan P; Hane, James K; Stoll, Thomas; Pain, Nicholas; Hastie, Marcus L; Kaur, Parwinder; Hoogland, Christine; Gorman, Jeffrey J; Singh, Karam B

    2016-09-01

    Rhizoctonia solani is an important root infecting pathogen of a range of food staples worldwide including wheat, rice, maize, soybean, potato, legumes and others. Conventional resistance breeding strategies are hindered by the absence of tractable genetic resistance in any crop host. Understanding the biology and pathogenicity mechanisms of this fungus is important for addressing these disease issues, however, little is known about how R. solani causes disease. The data described in this article is derived from applying mass spectrometry based proteomics to identify soluble, membrane-bound and culture filtrate proteins produced under wheat infection and vegetative growth conditions. Comparisons of the data for sample types in this set will be useful to identify metabolic pathway changes as the fungus switches from saprophytic to a pathogenic lifestyle or pathogenicity related proteins contributing to the ability to cause disease on wheat. The data set is deposited in the PRIDE archive under identifier PRIDE: PXD002806.

  17. Mass-spectrometry data for Rhizoctonia solani proteins produced during infection of wheat and vegetative growth.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Jonathan P; Hane, James K; Stoll, Thomas; Pain, Nicholas; Hastie, Marcus L; Kaur, Parwinder; Hoogland, Christine; Gorman, Jeffrey J; Singh, Karam B

    2016-09-01

    Rhizoctonia solani is an important root infecting pathogen of a range of food staples worldwide including wheat, rice, maize, soybean, potato, legumes and others. Conventional resistance breeding strategies are hindered by the absence of tractable genetic resistance in any crop host. Understanding the biology and pathogenicity mechanisms of this fungus is important for addressing these disease issues, however, little is known about how R. solani causes disease. The data described in this article is derived from applying mass spectrometry based proteomics to identify soluble, membrane-bound and culture filtrate proteins produced under wheat infection and vegetative growth conditions. Comparisons of the data for sample types in this set will be useful to identify metabolic pathway changes as the fungus switches from saprophytic to a pathogenic lifestyle or pathogenicity related proteins contributing to the ability to cause disease on wheat. The data set is deposited in the PRIDE archive under identifier PRIDE: PXD002806. PMID:27331100

  18. Expression of Dm-AMP1 in rice confers resistance to Magnaporthe oryzae and Rhizoctonia solani.

    PubMed

    Jha, Sanjay; Tank, Harsukh G; Prasad, Bishun Deo; Chattoo, Bharat B

    2009-02-01

    Magnaporthe oryzae and Rhizoctonia solani, are among the most important pathogens of rice, severely limiting its productivity. Dm-AMP1, an antifungal plant defensin from Dahlia merckii, was expressed in rice (Oryza sativa L. sp. indica cv. Pusa basmati 1) using Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation. Expression levels of Dm-AMP1 ranged from 0.43% to 0.57% of total soluble protein in transgenic plants. It was observed that constitutive expression of Dm-AMP1 suppresses the growth of M. oryzae and R. solani by 84% and 72%, respectively. Transgenic expression of Dm-AMP1 was not accompanied by an induction of pathogenesis-related (PR) gene expression, indicating that the expression of DmAMP1 directly inhibits the pathogen. The results of in vitro, in planta and microscopic analyses suggest that Dm-AMP1 expression has the potential to provide broad-spectrum disease resistance in rice. PMID:18618285

  19. Effect of Population Dynamics of Pseudomonas cepacia and Paecilomyces lilacinus on Colonization of Polyfoam Rooting Cubes by Rhizoctonia solani

    PubMed Central

    Cartwright, D. Kelly; Benson, D. M.

    1994-01-01

    Suspensions of Pseudomonas cepacia (strain 5.5B) and Paecilomyces lilacinus (isolate 6.2F) were applied to polyfoam rooting cubes for control of stem rot of poinsettia caused by Rhizoctonia solani. The populations of antagonists and colonization of rooting cubes by R. solani were monitored during a 3-week period. Colonization of cubes by R. solani was reduced in cubes treated with P. cepacia, but the population of P. cepacia decreased by as much as 97% during the test period. Increased colonization by R. solani was correlated with a decline in population of P. cepacia. P. lilacinus was more persistent than P. cepacia in cubes, with only a 21% reduction observed during the 3-week period. Colonization of the P. lilacinus-treated cubes by R. solani was significantly less than colonization of infested controls. No correlation existed between population of P. lilacinus and colonization of cubes by R. solani. PMID:16349353

  20. Over-expression of a protein kinase gene enhances the defense of tobacco against Rhizoctonia solani.

    PubMed

    Chacón, Osmany; González, Marleny; López, Yunior; Portieles, Roxana; Pujol, Merardo; González, Ernesto; Schoonbeek, Henk-Jan; Métraux, Jean-Pierre; Borrás-Hidalgo, Orlando

    2010-03-01

    To identify Nicotiana tabacum genes involved in resistance and susceptibility to Rhizoctonia solani, suppression subtractive hybridization was used to generate a cDNA library from transcripts that are differentially expressed during a compatible and incompatible interaction. This allowed the isolation of a protein kinase cDNA that was down-regulated during a compatible and up-regulated during an incompatible interaction. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis of this gene confirmed the differential expression patterns between the compatible and incompatible interactions. Over-expression of this gene in tobacco enhanced the resistance to damping-off produced by an aggressive R. solani strain. Furthermore, silencing of this protein kinase gene reduced the resistance to a non-aggressive R. solani strain. A set of reported tobacco-resistant genes were also evaluated in tobacco plants over-expressing and silencing the protein kinase cDNA. Several genes previously associated with resistance in tobacco, like manganese superoxide dismutase, Hsr203J, chitinases and phenylalanine ammonia-lyase, were up-regulated in tobacco plants over-expressing the protein kinase cDNA. Potentially, the protein kinase gene could be used to engineer resistance to R. solani in tobacco cultivars susceptible to this important pathogen.

  1. The supernatant of Bacillus pumilus SQR-N43 has antifungal activity towards Rhizoctonia solani.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xinqi; Yong, Xiaoyu; Zhang, Ruifu; Shen, Qirong; Yang, Xingming

    2013-08-01

    For clarification of the antagonistic mechanism of Bacillus pumilus SQR-N43 (N43) against Rhizoctonia solani Q1, production of antibiotics by N43 was determined, and the effect of the antibiotics on the pathogen mycelium was microscopically observed. Further more, the control efficiencies of the antifungal compounds on damping-off disease were investigated. The results obtained are listed as follows: N43 produced antibiotic substances towards R. solani Q1 at logarithmic growth phase. The antibiotics caused hyphal deformation and enlargement of cytoplasmic vacuoles in R. solani Q1 mycelia. 70% saturation of ammonium sulfate made a complete precipitation of the antibiotics in culture broth. When treated with protease K and trypsase, the activities of antibiotics were decreased by 79% and 53%, respectively, compared with control. The antibiotics were sensitive to high temperature and were alkaline stable. The molecular weights of the substances were about 500-1000 Da. The bio-control efficiencies of the antibiotics had no significant difference with that of N43 cell suspension. It is a first report that B. pumilus strain produced oligopeptides which had inhibitory effect on R. solani Q1 at logarithmic growth phase.

  2. Suppression of Rhizoctonia solani in Potting Mixtures Amended with Compost Made from Organic Household Waste.

    PubMed

    Tuitert, G; Szczech, M; Bollen, G J

    1998-08-01

    ABSTRACT Compost made from organic household and garden waste was used to substitute part of the peat in potting mixtures used for growing woody ornamental nursery stock. The effects of amendment with compost on the colonization of potting mixture by Rhizoctonia solani (AG1) were studied in greenhouse experiments. A bioassay was developed using cucumber as a sensitive herbaceous test plant as a substitute for woody ornamental cuttings. Pathogen growth in the potting mixture was estimated by measuring the distance over which damping-off of seedlings occurred. Compost from two commercial composting facilities suppressed growth of R. solani in potting mixtures with 20% of the product when the compost was fresh (directly after delivery) or long matured (after 5 to 7 months of additional curing). In contrast, short-matured compost (1 month of additional curing) from the same batches stimulated pathogen growth. In vitro mycelial growth of R. solani on mixtures with mature compost was inhibited by microbial antagonism. Compost-amended potting mixtures responded differentially to the addition of cellulose powder; the effect on suppressiveness depended on curing time and origin of the compost. In long-matured compost, suppressiveness to R. solani was associated with high population densities of cellulolytic and oligotrophic actinomycetes. The ratio of the population density of actinomycetes to that of other bacteria was around 200-fold higher in mature suppressive compost than in conducive compost.

  3. Pseudomonas aeruginosa inducing rice resistance against Rhizoctonia solani: production of salicylic acid and peroxidases.

    PubMed

    Saikia, R; Kumar, R; Arora, D K; Gogoi, D K; Azad, P

    2006-01-01

    Three isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa were used for seed treatment of rice; all showed plant growth promoting activity and induced systemic resistance in rice against Rhizoctonia solani G5 and increased seed yield. Production of salicylic acid (Sal) by P. aeruginosa both in vitro and in vivo was quantified with high performance liquid chromatography. All three isolates produced more Sal in King's B broth than in induced roots. Using a split root system, more Sal accumulated in root tissues of bacterized site than in distant roots on the opposite site of the root system after 1 d, but this difference decreased after 3 d. Sal concentration 0-200 g/L showed no inhibition of mycelial growth of R. solani in vitro, while at > or =300 g/L it inhibited it. P. aeruginosa-pretreated rice plants challenged inoculation with R. solani (as pathogen), an additional increase in the accumulation of peroxidase was observed. Three pathogenesis-related peroxidases in induced rice plants were detected; molar mass of these purified peroxidases was 28, 36 and 47 kDa. Purified peroxidase showed antifungal activity against phytopathogenic fungi R. solani, Pyricularia oryzae and Helminthosporium oryzae. PMID:17176755

  4. Effects of Meloidogyne spp. and Rhizoctonia solani on the Growth of Grapevine Rootings.

    PubMed

    Walker, G E

    1997-06-01

    A disease complex involving Meloidogyne incognita and Rhizoctonia solani was associated with stunting of grapevines in a field nursery. Nematode reproduction was occurring on both susceptible and resistant cultivars, and pot experiments were conducted to determine the virulence of this M. incognita population, and of M. javanica and M. hapla populations, to V. vinifera cv. Colombard (susceptible) and to V. champinii cv. Ramsey (regarded locally as highly resistant). The virulence of R. solani isolates obtained from roots of diseased grapevines also was determined both alone and in combination with M. incognita. Ramsey was susceptible to M. incognita (reproduction ratio 9.8 to 18.4 in a shadehouse and heated glasshouse, respectively) but was resistant to M. javanica and M. hapla. Colombard was susceptible to M. incognita (reproduction ratio 24.3 and 41.3, respectively) and M. javanica. Shoot growth was suppressed (by 35%) by M. incognita and, to a lesser extent, by M. hapla. Colombard roots were more severely galled than Ramsey roots by all three species, and nematode reproduction was higher on Colombard. Isolates of R. solani assigned to putative anastomosis groups 2-1 and 4, and an unidentified isolate, colonized and induced rotting of grapevine roots. Ramsey was more susceptible to root rotting than Colombard. Shoot growth was inhibited by up to 15% by several AG 4 isolates and by 20% by the AG 2-1 isolate. AG 4 isolates varied in their virulence. Root rotting was higher when grapevines were inoculated with both M. incognita and R. solani and was highest when nematode inoculation preceded the fungus. Shoot weights were lower when vines were inoculated with the nematode 13 days before the fungus compared with inoculation with both the nematode and the fungus on the same day. It was concluded that both the M. incognita population and some R. solani isolates were virulent against both Colombard and Ramsey, and that measures to prevent spread in nursery stock were

  5. Isolates of Rhizoctonia solani can produce both web blight and root rot symptoms in common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rhizoctonia solani Kühn (Rs) is an important pathogen in the tropics, causing web blight (WB), and a widespread soil-borne root rot (RR) pathogen of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) worldwide. This pathogen is a species complex classified into 14 anastomosis groups (AG). Some AGs have been report...

  6. The population genetic structure of Rhizoctonia solani AG-3PT from potato in the Colombian Andes.

    PubMed

    Ferrucho, Rosa L; Ceresini, Paulo C; Ramirez-Escobar, Ursula M; McDonald, Bruce A; Cubeta, Marc A; García-Domínguez, Celsa

    2013-08-01

    The soilborne fungus Rhizoctonia solani anastomosis group 3 (AG-3PT) is a globally important potato pathogen. However, little is known about the population genetic processes affecting field populations of R. solani AG-3PT, especially in the South American Colombian Andes, which is near the center of diversity of the two most common groups of cultivated potato, Solanum tuberosum and S. phureja. We analyzed the genetic structure of 15 populations of R. solani AG-3PT infecting potato in Colombia using 11 simple-sequence repeat (SSR) markers. In total, 288 different multilocus genotypes were identified among 349 fungal isolates. Clonal fractions within field populations were 7 to 33%. RST statistics indicated a very low level of population differentiation overall, consistent with high contemporary gene flow, though moderate differentiation was found for the most distant southern populations. Genotype flow was also detected, with the most common genotype found widely distributed among field populations. All populations showed evidence of a mixed reproductive mode, including both asexual and sexual reproduction, but two populations displayed evidence of inbreeding.

  7. Unraveling Aspects of Bacillus amyloliquefaciens Mediated Enhanced Production of Rice under Biotic Stress of Rhizoctonia solani

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, Suchi; Bist, Vidisha; Srivastava, Sonal; Singh, Poonam C.; Trivedi, Prabodh K.; Asif, Mehar H.; Chauhan, Puneet S.; Nautiyal, Chandra S.

    2016-01-01

    Rhizoctonia solani is a necrotrophic fungi causing sheath blight in rice leading to substantial loss in yield. Excessive and persistent use of preventive chemicals raises human health and environment safety concerns. As an alternative, use of biocontrol agents is highly recommended. In the present study, an abiotic stress tolerant, plant growth promoting rhizobacteria Bacillus amyloliquefaciens (SN13) is demonstrated to act as a biocontrol agent and enhance immune response against R. solani in rice by modulating various physiological, metabolic, and molecular functions. A sustained tolerance by SN13 primed plant over a longer period of time, post R. solani infection may be attributed to several unconventional aspects of the plants’ physiological status. The prolonged stress tolerance observed in presence of SN13 is characterized by (a) involvement of bacterial mycolytic enzymes, (b) sustained maintenance of elicitors to keep the immune system induced involving non-metabolizable sugars such as turanose besides the known elicitors, (c) a delicate balance of ROS and ROS scavengers through production of proline, mannitol, and arabitol and rare sugars like fructopyranose, β-D-glucopyranose and myoinositol and expression of ferric reductases and hypoxia induced proteins, (d) production of metabolites like quinazoline and expression of terpene synthase, and (e) hormonal cross talk. As the novel aspect of biological control this study highlights the role of rare sugars, maintenance of hypoxic conditions, and sucrose and starch metabolism in B. amyloliquefaciens (SN13) mediated sustained biotic stress tolerance in rice. PMID:27200058

  8. Unraveling Aspects of Bacillus amyloliquefaciens Mediated Enhanced Production of Rice under Biotic Stress of Rhizoctonia solani.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Suchi; Bist, Vidisha; Srivastava, Sonal; Singh, Poonam C; Trivedi, Prabodh K; Asif, Mehar H; Chauhan, Puneet S; Nautiyal, Chandra S

    2016-01-01

    Rhizoctonia solani is a necrotrophic fungi causing sheath blight in rice leading to substantial loss in yield. Excessive and persistent use of preventive chemicals raises human health and environment safety concerns. As an alternative, use of biocontrol agents is highly recommended. In the present study, an abiotic stress tolerant, plant growth promoting rhizobacteria Bacillus amyloliquefaciens (SN13) is demonstrated to act as a biocontrol agent and enhance immune response against R. solani in rice by modulating various physiological, metabolic, and molecular functions. A sustained tolerance by SN13 primed plant over a longer period of time, post R. solani infection may be attributed to several unconventional aspects of the plants' physiological status. The prolonged stress tolerance observed in presence of SN13 is characterized by (a) involvement of bacterial mycolytic enzymes, (b) sustained maintenance of elicitors to keep the immune system induced involving non-metabolizable sugars such as turanose besides the known elicitors, (c) a delicate balance of ROS and ROS scavengers through production of proline, mannitol, and arabitol and rare sugars like fructopyranose, β-D-glucopyranose and myoinositol and expression of ferric reductases and hypoxia induced proteins, (d) production of metabolites like quinazoline and expression of terpene synthase, and (e) hormonal cross talk. As the novel aspect of biological control this study highlights the role of rare sugars, maintenance of hypoxic conditions, and sucrose and starch metabolism in B. amyloliquefaciens (SN13) mediated sustained biotic stress tolerance in rice. PMID:27200058

  9. High levels of gene flow and heterozygote excess characterize Rhizoctonia solani AG-1 IA (Thanatephorus cucumeris) from Texas.

    PubMed

    Rosewich, U L; Pettway, R E; McDonald, B A; Kistler, H C

    1999-12-01

    To date, much of the genetics of the basidiomycete Thanatephorus cucumeris (anamorph = Rhizoctonia solani) remains unknown. Here, we present a population genetics study using codominant markers to augment laboratory analyses. Seven single-copy nuclear RFLP markers were used to examine 182 isolates of Rhizoctonia solani AG-1 IA collected from six commercial rice fields in Texas. Thirty-six multilocus RFLP genotypes were identified. Population subdivision analyses indicated a high degree of gene flow/migration between the six geographic populations. Tests for Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (HWE) among the 36 multilocus RFLP genotypes revealed that four of the seven loci did not significantly differ from HWE. Subsequent analysis demonstrated that departures from HWE at the three remaining loci were due to an excess of heterozygotes. Data presented here suggest that R. solani AG-1 IA is actively outbreeding (heterothallic). Possible explanations for heterozygote excess, which was observed at all seven RFLP loci, are discussed.

  10. Reactive Oxygen Species Play a Role in the Infection of the Necrotrophic Fungi, Rhizoctonia solani in Wheat

    PubMed Central

    Foley, Rhonda C.; Kidd, Brendan N.; Hane, James K.; Anderson, Jonathan P.; Singh, Karam B.

    2016-01-01

    Rhizoctonia solani is a nectrotrophic fungal pathogen that causes billions of dollars of damage to agriculture worldwide and infects a broad host range including wheat, rice, potato and legumes. In this study we identify wheat genes that are differentially expressed in response to the R. solani isolate, AG8, using microarray technology. A significant number of wheat genes identified in this screen were involved in reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and redox regulation. Levels of ROS species were increased in wheat root tissue following R. solani infection as determined by Nitro Blue Tetrazolium (NBT), 3,3'-diaminobenzidine (DAB) and titanium sulphate measurements. Pathogen/ROS related genes from R. solani were also tested for expression patterns upon wheat infection. TmpL, a R. solani gene homologous to a gene associated with ROS regulation in Alternaria brassicicola, and OAH, a R. solani gene homologous to oxaloacetate acetylhydrolase which has been shown to produce oxalic acid in Sclerotinia sclerotiorum, were highly induced in R. solani when infecting wheat. We speculate that the interplay between the wheat and R. solani ROS generating proteins may be important for determining the outcome of the wheat/R. solani interaction. PMID:27031952

  11. Reactive Oxygen Species Play a Role in the Infection of the Necrotrophic Fungi, Rhizoctonia solani in Wheat.

    PubMed

    Foley, Rhonda C; Kidd, Brendan N; Hane, James K; Anderson, Jonathan P; Singh, Karam B

    2016-01-01

    Rhizoctonia solani is a nectrotrophic fungal pathogen that causes billions of dollars of damage to agriculture worldwide and infects a broad host range including wheat, rice, potato and legumes. In this study we identify wheat genes that are differentially expressed in response to the R. solani isolate, AG8, using microarray technology. A significant number of wheat genes identified in this screen were involved in reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and redox regulation. Levels of ROS species were increased in wheat root tissue following R. solani infection as determined by Nitro Blue Tetrazolium (NBT), 3,3'-diaminobenzidine (DAB) and titanium sulphate measurements. Pathogen/ROS related genes from R. solani were also tested for expression patterns upon wheat infection. TmpL, a R. solani gene homologous to a gene associated with ROS regulation in Alternaria brassicicola, and OAH, a R. solani gene homologous to oxaloacetate acetylhydrolase which has been shown to produce oxalic acid in Sclerotinia sclerotiorum, were highly induced in R. solani when infecting wheat. We speculate that the interplay between the wheat and R. solani ROS generating proteins may be important for determining the outcome of the wheat/R. solani interaction. PMID:27031952

  12. Genetic diversity of Rhizoctonia solani AG-3 from potato and tobacco in North Carolina.

    PubMed

    Ceresini, Paulo C; Shew, H David; Vilgalys, Rytas J; Cubeta, Marc A

    2002-01-01

    Anastomosis group 3 (AG-3) of Rhizoctonia solani (teleomorph = Thanatephorus cucumeris) is frequently associated with diseases of potato (AG-3 PT) and tobacco (AG-3 TB). Although isolates of R. solani AG-3 from these two Solanaceous hosts are somatically related based on anastomosis reaction and taxonomically related based on fatty acid, isozyme and DNA characters, considerable differences are evident in their biology, ecology, and epidemiology. However, genetic diversity among field populations of R. solani AG-3 PT and TB has not been documented. In this study, the genetic diversity of field populations of R. solani AG-3 PT and AG-3 TB in North Carolina was examined using somatic compatibility and amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) criteria. A sample of 32 isolates from potato and 36 isolates from tobacco were paired in all possible combinations on PDA plus activated charcoal and examined for their resulting somatic interactions. Twenty-eight and eight distinct somatic compatibility groups (SCG) were identified in the AG-3 PT and AG-3 TB samples, respectively. AFLP analyses indicated that each of the 32 AG-3 PT isolates had a distinct AFLP phenotype, whereas 28 AFLP phenotypes were found among the 36 isolates of AG-3 TB. None of the AG-3 PT isolates were somatically compatible or shared a common AFLP phenotype with any AG-3 TB isolate. Clones (i.e., cases where two or more isolates were somatically compatible and shared the same AFLP phenotype) were identified only in the AG-3 TB population. Four clones from tobacco represented 22% of the total population. All eight SCG from tobacco were associated with more than one AFLP phenotype. Compatible somatic interactions between AG-3 PT isolates occurred only between certain isolates from the same field (two isolates in each of four different fields), and when this occurred AFLP phenotypes were similar but not identical.

  13. Biocontrol of Rhizoctonia solani, the causal agent of bean damping-off by fluorescent pseudomonads.

    PubMed

    Afsharmanesh, H; Ahmadzadeh, M; Sharifi-Tehrani, A

    2006-01-01

    Rhizosphere bacteria belonging to the fluorescent pseudomonads are receiving increasing attention for the protection of plants against soil-borne fungal pathogens. Among these pathogens, Rhizoctonia solani, the causal agent of bean damping- off is very important in bean fields of Iran. In this study, the antagonistic activity of 46 isolates of fluorescent pseudomonads (isolated from different area of Iran) and Pseudomonas fluorescens strain CHA0 investigated against one isolate of R. solani. About 64% of isolates revealed antagonistic activity against R. solani. Production of antifungal metabolites such as HCN, siderophore and protease was evaluated. The results showed that 97.8%, 17% and 78% of isolates produced siderophore, HCN and protease respectively. There was no significant correlation between antagonistic activity and production of these metabolites. Isolates P-5, P-10 and P-32 with strain CHA0 were selected in order to investigate involvement of siderophore, volatile metabolites (HCN), and non-volatile metabolites in reducing mycelial growth of R. olani. Isolate P-5 showed much more inhibitory effect by production of volatile metabolites and siderophore. Non-volatile metabolites in isolates P-32 and P-5 completely inhibited mycelial growth of the fungus. After the primary labrotory tests, isolates P-14, P-35, P-30, P-5 and strain CHA0 were selected for in vivo experiments. These selected isolates with benomyl fungicide were used as seed coating and soil drenching in sterile soil under greenhouse condition. The result indicated that in seed treatment method, isolates P-30 by 66% had the most effect in disease reduction while in soil treatment method, strain CHAO by 60% had the most effect, such that this two isolates showed significant differences in comparison with plants inoculated with R. solani inoculums.

  14. Double-stranded RNAs in Korean isolates of Rhizoctonia solani AG4.

    PubMed

    Kim, S O; Chung, H S; Lee, Y H

    1996-08-01

    Eighty-one isolates of Rhizoctonia solani AG4 were obtained from soil samples with diverse geographic origins in Korea. Forty-five out of 81 isolates (56%) contained at least one dsRNA molecule with their sizes ranging from 2.3 to > 23.1 kb. Nine different sizes of dsRNA molecules were found and extensive variation in banding patterns was observed among isolates. By comparing the sizes and combinations of dsRNAs, 21 distinct banding patterns were observed. Cytoplasmic fractions from 3 isolates showed the same dsRNA band patterns as those from the total cell extracts. The dsRNAs were stable through 10 successive hyphal tip cultures and serial transfers onto the potato dextrose agar supplemented with cycloheximide or emetine. The presence or absence of dsRNAs was not apparently correlated with disease severity, phenol oxidase activity, and geographic origin.

  15. Identification and functional analysis of AG1-IA specific genes of Rhizoctonia solani.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Srayan; Gupta, Santosh Kumar; Jha, Gopaljee

    2014-11-01

    Rhizoctonia solani is an important necrotrophic fungal pathogen which causes disease on diverse plant species. It has been classified into 14 genetically distinct anastomosis groups (AGs), however, very little is known about their genomic diversity. AG1-IA causes sheath blight disease in rice and controlling this disease remains a challenge for sustainable rice cultivation. Recently the draft genome sequences of AG1-IA (rice isolate) and AG1-IB (lettuce isolate) had become publicly available. In this study, using comparative genomics, we report identification of 3,942 R. solani genes that are uniquely present in AG1-IA. Many of these genes encode important biological, molecular functions and exhibit dynamic expression during in-planta growth of the pathogen in rice. Based upon sequence similarity with genes that are required for plant and human/zoonotic diseases, we identified several putative virulence/pathogenicity determinants amongst AG1-IA specific genes. While studying the expression of 19 randomly selected genes, we identified three genes highly up-regulated during in-planta growth. The detailed in silico characterization of these genes and extent of their up-regulation in different rice genotypes, having variable degree of disease susceptibility, suggests their importance in rice-Rhizoctonia interactions. In summary, the present study reports identification, functional characterization of AG1-IA specific genes and predicts important virulence determinants that might enable the pathogen to grow inside hostile plant environment. Further characterization of these genes would shed useful insights about the pathogenicity mechanism of AG1-IA on rice.

  16. Phylogenetic utility of indels within ribosomal DNA and beta-tubulin sequences from fungi in the Rhizoctonia solani species complex.

    PubMed

    González, Dolores; Cubeta, Marc A; Vilgalys, Rytas

    2006-08-01

    The genus Rhizoctonia consists of a diverse assemblage of anamorphic fungi frequently associated with plants and soil throughout the world. Some anamorphs are related with teleomorphs (sexual stage) in different taxonomic classes, orders, and families. The fungus may exist as pathogen, saprophyte, or mycorrhizal symbiont and shows extensive variation in characteristics such as geographic location, morphology, host specificity, and pathogenicity. In this study, phylogenetic analyses were performed in the Rhizoctonia solani species complex with individual and combined data sets from three gene partitions (ITS, LSU rDNA, and beta-tubulin). To explore whether indels were a source of phylogenetically informative characters, single-site indels were treated as a new state, while indels greater than one contiguous nucleotide were analyzed by including them as ambiguous data (Coding A); excluding them from the analyses (Coding B), and with three distinct codes: multistate for different sequence (Coding C); multistate for different length (Coding D) and different characters for each distinct sequence (Coding E). Results suggest that indels in noncoding regions contain phylogenetic information and support the fact that the R. solani species complex is not monophyletic. Six clades within R. solani (teleomorph=Thanatephorus) representing distinct anastomosis groups and five clades within binucleate Rhizoctonia (teleomorph=Ceratobasidium) were well supported in all analyses. The data suggest that clades with representatives of R. solani fungi belonging to anastomosis groups 1, 4, 6, and 8 should be recognized as phylogenetic species.

  17. Identification of signatory secondary metabolites during mycoparasitism of Rhizoctonia solani by Stachybotrys elegans.

    PubMed

    Chamoun, Rony; Aliferis, Konstantinos A; Jabaji, Suha

    2015-01-01

    Stachybotrys elegans is able to parasitize the fungal plant pathogen Rhizoctonia solani AG-3 following a complex and intimate interaction, which, among others, includes the production of cell wall-degrading enzymes, intracellular colonization, and expression of pathogenic process encoding genes. However, information on the metabolome level is non-existent during mycoparasitism. Here, we performed a direct-infusion mass spectrometry (DIMS) metabolomics analysis using an LTQ Orbitrap analyzer in order to detect changes in the profiles of induced secondary metabolites of both partners during this mycoparasitic interaction 4 and 5 days following its establishment. The diketopiperazine(s) (DKPs) cyclo(S-Pro-S-Leu)/cyclo(S-Pro-S-Ile), ethyl 2-phenylacetate, and 3-nitro-4-hydroxybenzoic acid were detected as the primary response of Rhizoctonia 4 days following dual-culturing with Stachybotrys, whereas only the latter metabolite was up-regulated 1 day later. On the other hand, trichothecenes and atranones were mycoparasite-derived metabolites identified during mycoparasitism 4 and 5 days following dual-culturing. All the above secondary metabolites are known to exhibit bioactivity, including fungitoxicity, and represent key elements that determine the outcome of the interaction being studied. Results could be further exploited in programs for the evaluation of the bioactivity of these metabolites per se or their chemical analogs, and/or genetic engineering programs to obtain more efficient mycoparasite strains with improved efficacy and toxicological profiles.

  18. Identification of signatory secondary metabolites during mycoparasitism of Rhizoctonia solani by Stachybotrys elegans

    PubMed Central

    Chamoun, Rony; Aliferis, Konstantinos A.; Jabaji, Suha

    2015-01-01

    Stachybotrys elegans is able to parasitize the fungal plant pathogen Rhizoctonia solani AG-3 following a complex and intimate interaction, which, among others, includes the production of cell wall-degrading enzymes, intracellular colonization, and expression of pathogenic process encoding genes. However, information on the metabolome level is non-existent during mycoparasitism. Here, we performed a direct-infusion mass spectrometry (DIMS) metabolomics analysis using an LTQ Orbitrap analyzer in order to detect changes in the profiles of induced secondary metabolites of both partners during this mycoparasitic interaction 4 and 5 days following its establishment. The diketopiperazine(s) (DKPs) cyclo(S-Pro-S-Leu)/cyclo(S-Pro-S-Ile), ethyl 2-phenylacetate, and 3-nitro-4-hydroxybenzoic acid were detected as the primary response of Rhizoctonia 4 days following dual-culturing with Stachybotrys, whereas only the latter metabolite was up-regulated 1 day later. On the other hand, trichothecenes and atranones were mycoparasite-derived metabolites identified during mycoparasitism 4 and 5 days following dual-culturing. All the above secondary metabolites are known to exhibit bioactivity, including fungitoxicity, and represent key elements that determine the outcome of the interaction being studied. Results could be further exploited in programs for the evaluation of the bioactivity of these metabolites per se or their chemical analogs, and/or genetic engineering programs to obtain more efficient mycoparasite strains with improved efficacy and toxicological profiles. PMID:25972848

  19. Sensitivity to a Phytotoxin from Rhizoctonia solani Correlates with Sheath Blight Susceptibility in Rice.

    PubMed

    Brooks, Steven A

    2007-10-01

    ABSTRACT Sheath blight is one of the most important and intractable diseases of rice (Oryza sativa) where limited control has been achieved using traditional approaches. Quantitative inheritance, extraneous traits, and environmental factors confound genetic analysis of host resistance. A method was developed to isolate and utilize a phytotoxin from Rhizoctonia solani to investigate the genetics of sheath blight susceptibility. Infiltration of the toxin preparation into plant leaves induced necrosis in rice, maize, and tomato. Using 17 rice cultivars known to vary in sheath blight resistance, genotypes were identified that were sensitive (tox-S) and insensitive (tox-I) to the toxin, and a correlation (r = 0.66) between toxin sensitivity and disease susceptibility was observed. Given the broad host range of R. solani, genotypes of host species may be both tox-S and tox-I. A total of 154 F(2) progeny from a cross between Cypress (tox-S) and Jasmine 85 (tox-I) segregated in a 9:7 ratio for tox-S/tox-I, indicating an epistatic interaction between two genes controls sensitivity to the toxin in rice. This work provides the means to genetically map toxin sensitivity genes and eliminate susceptible genotypes when developing sheath blight-resistant rice cultivars.

  20. Genetic structure of populations of Rhizoctonia solani AG-3 on potato in eastern North Carolina.

    PubMed

    Ceresini, Paulo C; Shew, H David; Vilgalys, Rytas J; Rosewich, U Liane; Cubeta, Marc A

    2002-01-01

    A polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) method was developed to identify and differentiate genotypes of Rhizoctonia solani anastomosis group 3 subgroup PT (AG-3 PT), a fungal pathogen of potato. Polymorphic co-dominant single-locus PCR-RFLP markers were identified after sequencing of clones from a genomic library and digestion with restriction enzymes. Multilocus genotypes were determined by a combination of PCR product and digestion with a specific restriction enzyme for each of seven loci. A sample of 104 isolates from one commercial field in each of five counties in eastern North Carolina was analyzed, and evidence for high levels of gene flow between populations was revealed. When data were clone-corrected and samples pooled into one single North Carolina population, random associations of alleles were found for all loci or pairs of loci, indicating random mating. However, when all genotypes were analyzed, the observed genotypic diversity deviated from panmixia and alleles within and between loci were not randomly associated. These findings support a model of population structure for R. solani AG-3 PT on potato that includes both recombination and clonality.

  1. Transcriptional responses of the bacterial antagonist Serratia plymuthica to the fungal phytopathogen Rhizoctonia solani.

    PubMed

    Neupane, Saraswoti; Finlay, Roger D; Alström, Sadhna; Elfstrand, Malin; Högberg, Nils

    2015-02-01

    Rhizobacteria with biocontrol ability exploit a range of mechanisms to compete successfully with other microorganisms and to ensure their growth and survival in the rhizosphere, ultimately promoting plant growth. The rhizobacterium Serratia plymuthica AS13 is able to promote oilseed rape growth and improve seedling survival in the presence of the fungal pathogen, Rhizoctonia solani AG 2-1; however, our understanding of the mechanisms underlying the antagonism of Serratia is limited. To elucidate possible mechanisms, genome-wide gene expression profiling of S. plymuthica AS13 was carried out in the presence or absence of R. solani. We used RNA sequencing methodology to obtain a comprehensive overview of Serratia gene expression in response to R. solani. The differential gene expression profiles of S. plymuthica AS13 revealed significantly increased expression of genes related to the biosynthesis of the antibiotic pyrrolnitrin (prnABCD), protease production and transporters. The results presented here provide evidence that antibiosis is a major functional mechanism underlying the antagonistic behaviour of S. plymuthica AS13.

  2. The identification and characterization of four laccases from the plant pathogenic fungus Rhizoctonia solani.

    PubMed

    Wahleithner, J A; Xu, F; Brown, K M; Brown, S H; Golightly, E J; Halkier, T; Kauppinen, S; Pederson, A; Schneider, P

    1996-03-01

    Four distinct laccase genes, lcc1, lcc2, lcc3 and lcc4, have been identified in the fungus Rhizoctonia solani. Both cDNA and genomic copies of these genes were isolated and characterized. Hybridization analyses indicate that each of the four laccase genes is present in a single copy in the genome. The R. solani laccases can be divided into two groups based on their protein size, intron/exon organization, and transcriptional regulation. Three of these enzymes have been expressed in the fungus Aspergillus oryzae. Two of the recombinant laccases, r-lcc1 and r-lcc4, as well as the native lcc4 enzyme were purified and characterized. The purified proteins are homodimeric, comprised of two subunits of approximately 66kDa for lcc4 and 50-100kDa for the recombinant lcc1 protein. These laccases have spectral properties that are consistent with other blue copper proteins. With syringaldazine as a substrate, lcc4 has optimal activity at pH7, whereas lcc1 has optimal activity at pH6.

  3. Isolation and characterization of siderophore producing antagonistic rhizobacteria against Rhizoctonia solani.

    PubMed

    Solanki, Manoj Kumar; Singh, Rajesh Kumar; Srivastava, Supriya; Kumar, Sudheer; Kashyap, Prem Lal; Srivastava, Alok K; Arora, Dilip K

    2014-06-01

    Plant protection through siderophore producing rhizobacteria (SPR) has emerged as a sustainable approach for crop health management. In present study, 220 bacteria isolated from tomato rhizosphere were screened for in vitro antagonistic activity against Rhizoctonia solani AG-4. Nine potent antagonistic strains viz., Alcaligenes sp. (MUN1, MB21, and MPF37), Enterobacter sp. (MPM1), Pseudomonas sp. (M10A and MB65), P. aeruginosa (MPF14 and MB123) and P. fluorescens (MPF47) were identified on the basis of physiological characters and 16S rDNA sequencing. These strains were able to produce hydrolytic enzymes, hydrogen cyanide, indole acetic acid, although, only few strains were able to solubilize phosphate. Two strains (MB123 and MPF47) showed significant disease reduction in glasshouse conditions were further evaluated under field conditions using three different application methods. Application of P. fluorescens (MPF47) in nursery as soil mix + seedling root treatments prior to transplantation resulted in significant disease reduction compared to control. Total chlorophyll and available iron were significantly higher in the MPF47 treated plants in contrast to infected control. In conclusion, siderophore producing bacteria MPF47 have strong biocontrol abilities and its application as soil mix + seedling root treatments provided strong shield to plant roots against R. solani and could be used for effective bio-management of pathogen. PMID:23686438

  4. Biocontrol of Rhizoctonia solani Damping-Off of Tomato with Bacillus subtilis RB14.

    PubMed

    Asaka, O; Shoda, M

    1996-11-01

    Bacillus subtilis RB14, which showed antibiotic activities against several phytopathogens in vitro by producing the antibiotics iturin A and surfactin, was subjected to a pot test to investigate its ability to suppress damping-off of tomato seedlings caused by Rhizoctonia solani. To facilitate recovery from soil, B. subtilis RB14-C, a spontaneous streptomycin-resistant mutant of RB14, was used. Damping-off was suppressed when the culture broth, cell suspension, or cell-free culture broth of RB14-C was inoculated into soil. Iturin A and surfactin were recovered from the soils inoculated with the cell suspension of RB14-C, confirming that RB14-C produced them in soil. The gene lpa-14, which was cloned from RB14 and required for the production of both antibiotics, was mutated in RB14-C, and a mutant, R(Delta)1, was constructed. The level of disease suppressibility of R(Delta)1 was low, but R(Delta)1(pC115), a transformant of R(Delta)1 with the plasmid pC115 carrying lpa-14, was restored in suppressibility. These results show that the antibiotics iturin A and surfactin produced by RB14 play a major role in the suppression of damping-off caused by R. solani. RB14-C, R(Delta)1, and R(Delta)1(pC115) persisted in soil during the experimental period and were recovered from the soil, mostly as spores.

  5. The influence of Bacillus subtilis RB14-C on the development of Rhizoctonia solani and indigenous microorganisms in the soil.

    PubMed

    Szczech, Magdalena; Shoda, Makoto

    2005-05-01

    The effect of soil inoculation with an antagonistic strain Bacillus subtilis RB14-C on the development of Rhizoctonia solani and changes occurring in soil and rhizosphere microbial communities were studied. RB14-C was added to the soil as a water suspension of the cells or as a broth culture. Application of cell suspensions to non-planted soil reduced the number of culturable bacteria. The density of R. solani and the number of filamentous fungi were not significantly affected by RB14-C. A similar effect was observed in the rhizosphere of tomato plants growns in bacterized soil. Broth cultures of RB14-C suppressed R. solani 1 d after inoculation, but after 3 d there was no difference in the pathogen density between soil amended with broth culture and control soil. In microcosm studies, cell suspensions of RB14-C also did not inhibit growth of R. solani on filters buried in soil. However, an inhibitory effect was obtained when a broth culture of the bacterium was used. The effect of RB14-C on fungal biomass was also estimated by measurement of ergosterol concentration in soil. It was found that ergosterol was mostly derived from R. solani and that there were no significant differences in its content between untreated soil and soil treated with RB14-C. The results suggest that suppression of Rhizoctonia damping-off by B. subtilis RB14-C probably is not related to the reduction of the pathogen population in the soil.

  6. Proteomic investigation of Rhizoctonia solani AG 4 identifies secretome and mycelial proteins with roles in plant cell wall degradation and virulence

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rhizoctonia solani AG 4 is a soilborne necrotrophic fungal plant pathogen that causes economically important diseases on agronomic crops worldwide. Our long-term goal is to elucidate the molecular basis of pathogenesis of isolates of R. solani AG 4 in an effort to develop more effective control meth...

  7. High-resolution mapping of Rsn1, a locus controlling sensitivity of rice to a necrosis-inducing phytotoxin from Rhizoctonia solani AG1-IA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rhizoctonia solani is a necrotrophic fungal pathogen that causes disease on all major crop-plant species. Anastomosis group 1-IA is the causal agent of sheath blight of rice (Oryza sativa), one of the most important rice diseases worldwide. R. solani AG-IA produces a necrosis-inducing phytotoxin a...

  8. Genome Sequencing and Comparative Genomics of the Broad Host-Range Pathogen Rhizoctonia solani AG8

    PubMed Central

    Hane, James K.; Anderson, Jonathan P.; Williams, Angela H.; Sperschneider, Jana; Singh, Karam B.

    2014-01-01

    Rhizoctonia solani is a soil-borne basidiomycete fungus with a necrotrophic lifestyle which is classified into fourteen reproductively incompatible anastomosis groups (AGs). One of these, AG8, is a devastating pathogen causing bare patch of cereals, brassicas and legumes. R. solani is a multinucleate heterokaryon containing significant heterozygosity within a single cell. This complexity posed significant challenges for the assembly of its genome. We present a high quality genome assembly of R. solani AG8 and a manually curated set of 13,964 genes supported by RNA-seq. The AG8 genome assembly used novel methods to produce a haploid representation of its heterokaryotic state. The whole-genomes of AG8, the rice pathogen AG1-IA and the potato pathogen AG3 were observed to be syntenic and co-linear. Genes and functions putatively relevant to pathogenicity were highlighted by comparing AG8 to known pathogenicity genes, orthology databases spanning 197 phytopathogenic taxa and AG1-IA. We also observed SNP-level “hypermutation” of CpG dinucleotides to TpG between AG8 nuclei, with similarities to repeat-induced point mutation (RIP). Interestingly, gene-coding regions were widely affected along with repetitive DNA, which has not been previously observed for RIP in mononuclear fungi of the Pezizomycotina. The rate of heterozygous SNP mutations within this single isolate of AG8 was observed to be higher than SNP mutation rates observed across populations of most fungal species compared. Comparative analyses were combined to predict biological processes relevant to AG8 and 308 proteins with effector-like characteristics, forming a valuable resource for further study of this pathosystem. Predicted effector-like proteins had elevated levels of non-synonymous point mutations relative to synonymous mutations (dN/dS), suggesting that they may be under diversifying selection pressures. In addition, the distant relationship to sequenced necrotrophs of the Ascomycota suggests the

  9. Effects of Pseudomonas aureofaciens 63-28 on defense responses in soybean plants infected by Rhizoctonia solani.

    PubMed

    Jung, Woo-Jin; Park, Ro-Dong; Mabood, Fazli; Souleimanov, Alfred; L Smith, Donald

    2011-04-01

    The objective of this work was to investigate the ability of the plant growth-promoting rhizobacterium Pseudomonas aureofaciens 63-28 to induce plant defense systems, including defense-related enzyme levels and expression of defense-related isoenzymes, and isoflavone production, leading to improved resistance to the phytopathogen Rhizoctonia solani AG-4 in soybean seedlings. Seven-dayold soybean seedlings were inoculated with P. aureofaciens 63-28, R. solani AG-4, or P. aureofaciens 63-28 plus R. solani AG-4 (P+R), or not inoculated (control). After 7 days of incubation, roots treated with R. solani AG-4 had obvious damping-off symptoms, but P+R-treated soybean plants had less disease development, indicating suppression of R. solani AG-4 in soybean seedlings. Superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) activities of R. solani AG-4-treated roots increased by 24.6% and 54.0%, respectively, compared with control roots. Ascorbate peroxidase (APX) and phenylalanine ammonia lyase (PAL) activities of R. solani AG-4-treated roots were increased by 75.1% and 23.6%, respectively. Polyphenol oxidase (PPO) activity in soybean roots challenged with P. aureofaciens 63-28 and P+R increased by 25.0% and 11.6%, respectively. Mn-SOD (S1 band on gel) and Fe-SOD (S2) were strongly induced in P+R-treated roots, whereas one CAT (C1) and one APX (A3) were strongly induced in R. solani AG-4- treated roots. The total isoflavone concentration in P+Rtreated shoots was 27.2% greater than the control treatment. The isoflavone yield of R. solani AG-4-treated shoots was 60.9% less than the control.

  10. In vitro and in silico antifungal efficacy of nitrogen-doped carbon nanohorn (NCNH) against Rhizoctonia solani.

    PubMed

    Dharni, Seema; Sanchita; Unni, SreeKuttan M; Kurungot, Sreekumar; Samad, Abdul; Sharma, Ashok; Patra, Dharani Dhar

    2016-01-01

    We have investigated in vitro antifungal efficiency of nitrogen-doped carbon nanohorn (NCNH) against Rhizoctonia solani (R. solani) plant pathogenic fungi. NCNH with size of 50-60 nm and concentrations of 10, 50, 100, and 150 μg mL(-1) were used. The results showed that growth of fungi in the presence of NCNH was significantly (p > .05) inhibited at 150 μg mL(-1) (85.13 ± .97) after 72 h. The results were validated through computational approaches. Molecular docking analysis of NCNH with endochitinase protein of R. solani was performed to validate the potential of antifungal activity of NCNH. Docking results showed different conformations of interaction of NCNH with endochitinase enzyme. The conformation with least binding energy -13.54 kcal/mol was considered further. It is likely that NCNH interacts with the pathogens by mechanically wrapping, which may be one of the major toxicity actions of NCNH against R. solani. The analysis showed that NCNH might interwinds to endochitinase of R. solani leading to the deactivation of the enzyme. To best of our knowledge, this is the first report of antifungal efficacy of NCNH against R. solani and provides useful information about the application of NCNH in resisting crop disease.

  11. Comparative proteomic analysis reveals intracellular targets for bacillomycin L to induce Rhizoctonia solani Kühn hyphal cell death.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bao; Qin, Yuxuan; Han, Yuzhu; Dong, Chunjuan; Li, Pinglan; Shang, Qingmao

    2016-09-01

    Bacillomycin L, a natural iturinic lipopeptide produced by Bacillus amyloliquefaciens, is characterized by strong antifungal activity against a variety of agronomically important filamentous fungi including Rhizoctonia solani Kühn. To further understand its antifungal actions, proteomes were comparatively studied within R. solani hyphal cells treated with or without bacillomycin L. The results show that 39 proteins were alternatively expressed within cells in response to this lipopeptide, which are involved in stress response, carbohydrate, amino acid and nucleotide metabolism, cellular component organization, calcium homeostasis, protein degradation, RNA processing, gene transcription, and others, suggesting that, in addition to inducing cell membrane permeabilization, iturin exhibits antibiotic activities by targeting intracellular molecules. Based on these results, a model of action of bacillomycin L against R. solani hyphal cells was proposed. Our study provides new insight into the antibiotic mechanisms of iturins.

  12. First Report of Web Blight of Rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis) Caused by Rhizoctonia solani AG-1-IB in Korea.

    PubMed

    Aktaruzzaman, Md; Kim, Joon-Young; Afroz, Tania; Kim, Byung-Sup

    2015-06-01

    Herein, we report the first occurrence of web blight of rosemary caused by Rhizoctonia solani AG-1-IB in Gangneung, Gangwon Province, Korea, in August 2014. The leaf tissues of infected rosemary plants were blighted and white mycelial growth was seen on the stems. The fungus was isolated from diseased leaf tissue and cultured on potato dextrose agar for identification. The young hyphae had acute angular branching near the distal septum of the multinucleate cells and mature hyphal branches formed at an approximately 90° angle. This is morphologically identical to R. solani AG-1-IB, as per previous reports. rDNA-ITS sequences of the fungus were homologous to those of R. solani AG-1-IB isolates in the GenBank database with a similarity percentage of 99%, thereby confirming the identity of the causative agent of the disease. Pathogenicity of the fungus in rosemary plants was also confirmed by Koch's postulates.

  13. First Report of Web Blight of Rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis) Caused by Rhizoctonia solani AG-1-IB in Korea.

    PubMed

    Aktaruzzaman, Md; Kim, Joon-Young; Afroz, Tania; Kim, Byung-Sup

    2015-06-01

    Herein, we report the first occurrence of web blight of rosemary caused by Rhizoctonia solani AG-1-IB in Gangneung, Gangwon Province, Korea, in August 2014. The leaf tissues of infected rosemary plants were blighted and white mycelial growth was seen on the stems. The fungus was isolated from diseased leaf tissue and cultured on potato dextrose agar for identification. The young hyphae had acute angular branching near the distal septum of the multinucleate cells and mature hyphal branches formed at an approximately 90° angle. This is morphologically identical to R. solani AG-1-IB, as per previous reports. rDNA-ITS sequences of the fungus were homologous to those of R. solani AG-1-IB isolates in the GenBank database with a similarity percentage of 99%, thereby confirming the identity of the causative agent of the disease. Pathogenicity of the fungus in rosemary plants was also confirmed by Koch's postulates. PMID:26190926

  14. First Report of Web Blight of Rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis) Caused by Rhizoctonia solani AG-1-IB in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Aktaruzzaman, Md.; Kim, Joon-Young; Afroz, Tania

    2015-01-01

    Herein, we report the first occurrence of web blight of rosemary caused by Rhizoctonia solani AG-1-IB in Gangneung, Gangwon Province, Korea, in August 2014. The leaf tissues of infected rosemary plants were blighted and white mycelial growth was seen on the stems. The fungus was isolated from diseased leaf tissue and cultured on potato dextrose agar for identification. The young hyphae had acute angular branching near the distal septum of the multinucleate cells and mature hyphal branches formed at an approximately 90° angle. This is morphologically identical to R. solani AG-1-IB, as per previous reports. rDNA-ITS sequences of the fungus were homologous to those of R. solani AG-1-IB isolates in the GenBank database with a similarity percentage of 99%, thereby confirming the identity of the causative agent of the disease. Pathogenicity of the fungus in rosemary plants was also confirmed by Koch's postulates. PMID:26190926

  15. Susceptibility to Enzymatic Degradation of Cell Walls From Bean Plants Resistant and Susceptible to Rhizoctonia solani Kuhn.

    PubMed

    Bateman, D F; Van Etten, H D

    1969-05-01

    Enzymes in culture filtrates of Rhizoctonia solani Kuhn grown using 4-day old or 20-day old bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) hypocotyl cell walls as a carbon source degraded xylan, galactan, galactomannan, araban, polygalacturonic acid, and carboxymethylcellulose. Extracts of lesions from R. solani infected plants, but not healthy plants, contained similar enzymatic activities. These enzyme sources readily solubilized cell wall constituents containing arabinose, galactose, and glucose from 4-day old, but not from 20-day old, bean cell walls. Analysis of cell walls prepared from infected plants revealed that the alterations in cell wall composition in the diseased host were limited largely to the immediate lesion areas and occurred during the early phases of pathogenesis. The cell walls of young susceptible bean seedlings could be degraded by R. solani enzymes, but the cell walls of older plants which are resistant to this pathogen were not susceptible to enzymatic destruction by the same enzyme preparation.

  16. Mobile elements and mitochondrial genome expansion in the soil fungus and potato pathogen Rhizoctonia solani AG-3.

    PubMed

    Losada, Liliana; Pakala, Suman B; Fedorova, Natalie D; Joardar, Vinita; Shabalina, Svetlana A; Hostetler, Jessica; Pakala, Suchitra M; Zafar, Nikhat; Thomas, Elizabeth; Rodriguez-Carres, Marianela; Dean, Ralph; Vilgalys, Rytas; Nierman, William C; Cubeta, Marc A

    2014-03-01

    The soil fungus Rhizoctonia solani is an economically important pathogen of agricultural and forestry crops. Here, we present the complete sequence and analysis of the mitochondrial genome of R. solani, field isolate Rhs1AP. The genome (235 849 bp) is the largest mitochondrial genome of a filamentous fungus sequenced to date and exhibits a rich accumulation of introns, novel repeat sequences, homing endonuclease genes, and hypothetical genes. Stable secondary structures exhibited by repeat sequences suggest that they comprise functional, possibly catalytic RNA elements. RNA-Seq expression profiling confirmed that the majority of homing endonuclease genes and hypothetical genes are transcriptionally active. Comparative analysis suggests that the mitochondrial genome of R. solani is an example of a dynamic history of expansion in filamentous fungi. PMID:24461055

  17. Comparative proteomic analysis reveals intracellular targets for bacillomycin L to induce Rhizoctonia solani Kühn hyphal cell death.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bao; Qin, Yuxuan; Han, Yuzhu; Dong, Chunjuan; Li, Pinglan; Shang, Qingmao

    2016-09-01

    Bacillomycin L, a natural iturinic lipopeptide produced by Bacillus amyloliquefaciens, is characterized by strong antifungal activity against a variety of agronomically important filamentous fungi including Rhizoctonia solani Kühn. To further understand its antifungal actions, proteomes were comparatively studied within R. solani hyphal cells treated with or without bacillomycin L. The results show that 39 proteins were alternatively expressed within cells in response to this lipopeptide, which are involved in stress response, carbohydrate, amino acid and nucleotide metabolism, cellular component organization, calcium homeostasis, protein degradation, RNA processing, gene transcription, and others, suggesting that, in addition to inducing cell membrane permeabilization, iturin exhibits antibiotic activities by targeting intracellular molecules. Based on these results, a model of action of bacillomycin L against R. solani hyphal cells was proposed. Our study provides new insight into the antibiotic mechanisms of iturins. PMID:27267622

  18. Mechanism of the generation of new somatic compatibility groups within Thanatephorus cucumeris (Rhizoctonia solani).

    PubMed

    Qu, Ping; Saldajeno, Mary Grace B; Hyakumachi, Mitsuro

    2013-01-01

    Single-basidiospore isolates (SBIs) were obtained from field isolates of Thanatephorus cucumeris (Rhizoctonia solani) AG-1 IC and AG-2-2 IV. Formation of distinctive tufts, a recognized feature of heterokaryon synthesis, was observed, and isolates derived from hyphal-tipped tuft hyphae were obtained following pairings between various strains. Three distinctive types of tufts were formed: the fibrous type of mating-compatible homokaryon-homokaryon (Hom-Hom) pairings, the sparse type between heterokaryon-homokaryon (Het-Hom) pairings originating from one parent, and the compact type between Het-Hom pairings originating from different parents. Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphism (AFLP) profile of fingerprints of these tuft isolates verified that they were all heterokaryotic. Because of heterokaryotic vigor, the growth and pathogenicity of the majority of tuft isolates increased compared with their contributing SBIs. New somatic compatibility groups (SCGs) that were different from parental field isolates occurred following heterokaryon formation within T. cucumeris. Tuft isolates produced by Hom-Hom and Het-Hom pairings among isolates of different parents yielded no somatic compatibility with the original parent isolates and a high frequency of new SCGs (62-100%). This was in contrast to those produced by Hom-Hom and Het-Hom pairings among isolates with a common parent that yielded only 12-37% new SCGs. The SCG diversity of R. solani in the field may be attributed to new fitter heterokaryons formed between a heterokaryon of one pair of parents and a homokaryon of another parent pair. This mechanism greatly contributes to genetic diversity in the field and accounts for the failure to recover the expected distribution of SCGs from a field population.

  19. Effects of water potential on mycelial growth, sclerotial production, and germination of Rhizoctonia solani from potato.

    PubMed

    Ritchie, Faye; McQuilken, Mark P; Bain, Ruairidh A

    2006-06-01

    The effects of osmotic and matric potential on mycelial growth, sclerotial production and germination of isolates of Rhizoctonia solani [anastomosis groups (AGs) 2-1 and 3] from potato were studied on potato dextrose agar (PDA) adjusted osmotically with sodium chloride, potassium chloride, glycerol, and matrically with polyethylene glycol (PEG) 6000. All isolates from AGs 2-1 and AG-3 exhibited fastest mycelial growth on unamended PDA (-0.4MPa), and growth generally declined with decreasing osmotic and matric potentials. Growth ceased between -3.5 and -4.0MPa on osmotically adjusted media, and at -2.0MPa on matrically adjusted media, with slight differences between isolates and osmotica. Sclerotium yield declined with decreasing osmotic potential, and formation by AG 2-1 and AG-3 isolates ceased between -1.5 and -3.0MPa and -2.5 and -3.5MPa, respectively. On matrically adjusted media, sclerotial formation by AG 2-1 isolates ceased at -0.8MPa, whereas formation by AG-3 isolates ceased at the lower matric potential of -1.5MPa. Sclerotial germination also declined with decreasing osmotic and matric potential, with total inhibition occurring over the range -3.0 to -4.0MPa on osmotically adjusted media, and at -2.0MPa on matrically adjusted media. In soil, mycelial growth and sclerotial germination of AG-3 isolates declined with decreasing total water potential, with a minimum potential of -6.3MPa permitting both growth and germination. The relevance of these results to the behaviour of R. solani AGs in soil and their pathogenicity on potato is discussed.

  20. Do fungicides used to control Rhizoctonia solani impact the non-target arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus Rhizophagus irregularis?

    PubMed

    Buysens, Catherine; Dupré de Boulois, Hervé; Declerck, Stéphane

    2015-05-01

    There is growing evidence that the application of biocontrol organisms (e.g., Pseudomonas and Bacillus spp., arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi-AMF) is a feasible option to reduce incidence of plant pathogens in an integrated control strategy. However, the utilization of these microorganisms, in particular AMF, may be threatened by the application of fungicides, a widely-used measure to control Rhizoctonia solani in various crops among which potato. Prior to their application, it is thus important to determine the impact of fungicides on AMF. The present study investigated, under in vitro controlled conditions, the impact of azoxystrobin (a systemic broad-spectrum fungicide), flutolanil (a systemic Basidiomycota-specific fungicide), and pencycuron (a contact Rhizoctonia-specific fungicide) and their respective formulations (Amistar, Monarch, and Monceren) on the growth and development of the AMF Rhizophagus irregularis MUCL 41833 (spore germination, root colonization, extraradical mycelium development, and spore production) at doses used to control R. solani. Results demonstrated that azoxystrobin and its formulation Amistar, at threshold values for R. solani control (estimated by the half maximal inhibitory concentration, IC50, on a dry weight basis), did not affect spore germination and potato root colonization by R. irregularis, while the development of extra-radical mycelium and spore production was reduced at 10 times the threshold value. Flutolanil and its formulation Monarch at threshold value did not affect spore germination or extra-radical development but decreased root colonization and arbuscule formation. At threshold value, pencycuron and its formulation Monceren, did not affect spore germination and intra- or extraradical development of R. irregularis. These results suggest that azoxystrobin and pencycuron do not affect the AMF at threshold concentrations to control R. solani in vitro, while flutolanil (as formulation) impacts the intraradical phase of the

  1. Detection of rDNA ITS polymorphism in Rhizoctonia solani AG 2-1 isolates.

    PubMed

    Pannecoucque, Joke; Höfte, Monica

    2009-01-01

    The sequence variability of the ribosomal internal transcribed spacer regions ITS1 and ITS2, including the 5.8S gene, was investigated for Rhizoctonia solani isolates of anastomosis group (AG) 2-1. During PCR RFLP analysis of eight isolates, the restriction patterns of four isolates showed an excess of bands after restriction with the enzymes AvaII and/or HincII, which suggested the presence of more than one ITS region. By cloning the ITS region of six isolates sequence heterogeneity was detected in the isolates that showed an excess of bands in the PCR RFLP analysis; up to nine different ITS regions were identified within one isolate. The same level of diversity was found within the same isolate as among isolates. In the phylogenetic tree based on the rDNA ITS sequences of several AG 2-1 isolates, sequences derived from the same isolate did not form distinct clusters, questioning the relevance of further subdivision of heterogeneous AG 2-1 isolates based on the ITS region.

  2. Genetic variation and pathogenicity of anastomosis group 2 isolates of Rhizoctonia solani in Australia.

    PubMed

    Stodart, Benjamin J; Harvey, Paul R; Neate, Stephen M; Melanson, Dara L; Scott, Eileen S

    2007-08-01

    A collection of isolates of Rhizoctonia solani anastomosis group (AG) 2 was examined for genetic diversity and pathogenicity. Anastomosis reactions classified the majority of isolates into the known subgroups of AG 2-1 and AG 2-2 but the classification of several isolates was ambiguous. Morphological characters were consistent with the species, with no discriminating characters existing between subgroups. Vertical PAGE of pectic enzymes enabled the separation of zymogram group (ZG) 5 and 6 within AG 2-1, but not the separation of ZG 4 and 10 within AG 2-2. PCR analysis using inter-simple sequence repeats (ISSR) and the intron-splice junction (ISJ) region supported the separation of ZG 5 and 6, while the AG 2-2 isolates were separated by geographic region. A comparison of distance matrices produced by the zymogram analysis and PCR indicated a strong correlation between the marker types. Pathogenicity studies suggested canola (Brassica napus) cultivars were most severely affected by AG 2-1, while cultivars of two species of medic (Medicago truncatula cv. Caliph and M. littoralis cv. Herald) were susceptible to both AG 2-1 and 2-2. The results indicate that AG 2 is a polyphyletic group in which the classification of subtypes is sometimes difficult. Further investigation of the population structure within Australia is required to determine the extent and origin of the observed diversity.

  3. Trichoderma harzianum genes induced during growth on Rhizoctonia solani cell walls.

    PubMed

    Vasseur, V; Van Montagu, M; Goldman, G H

    1995-04-01

    Trichoderma harzianum is a biocontrol agent that attacks a range of economically important phytopathogenic fungi. In an attempt to identify genes specifically expressed by T. harzianum during growth on cell walls of Rhizoctonia solani, we carried out differential screening of an induced cDNA library. In this paper we report the analysis of the sequence and expression of two cDNA clones that encode putative mycoparasitism-related proteins of T. harzianum. One of these clones corresponds to a gene, inda1, that encodes a protein of 570 amino acids with a predicted molecular mass of 62,853 Da. The predicted amino acid sequence of inda1 showed a high degree of similarity with amino acid permeases from several other organisms. The other cDNA clone corresponds to a gene, indc11, that encodes a novel protein of 340 amino acids with a predicted molecular mass of 37,010 Da. The use of this methodology should provide specific genetic markers to follow mycoparasitism by Trichoderma spp.

  4. Volatiles of bacterial antagonists inhibit mycelial growth of the plant pathogen Rhizoctonia solani.

    PubMed

    Kai, Marco; Effmert, Uta; Berg, Gabriele; Piechulla, Birgit

    2007-05-01

    Bacterial antagonists are bacteria that negatively affect the growth of other organisms. Many antagonists inhibit the growth of fungi by various mechanisms, e.g., secretion of lytic enzymes, siderophores and antibiotics. Such inhibition of fungal growth may indirectly support plant growth. Here, we demonstrate that small organic volatile compounds (VOCs) emitted from bacterial antagonists negatively influence the mycelial growth of the soil-borne phytopathogenic fungus Rhizoctonia solani Kühn. Strong inhibitions (99-80%) under the test conditions were observed with Stenotrophomonas maltophilia R3089, Serratia plymuthica HRO-C48, Stenotrophomonas rhizophila P69, Serratia odorifera 4Rx13, Pseudomonas trivialis 3Re2-7, S. plymuthica 3Re4-18 and Bacillus subtilis B2g. Pseudomonas fluorescens L13-6-12 and Burkholderia cepacia 1S18 achieved 30% growth reduction. The VOC profiles of these antagonists, obtained through headspace collection and analysis on GC-MS, show different compositions and complexities ranging from 1 to almost 30 compounds. Most volatiles are species-specific, but overlapping volatile patterns were found for Serratia spp. and Pseudomonas spp. Many of the bacterial VOCs could not be identified for lack of match with mass-spectra of volatiles in the databases. PMID:17180381

  5. Linear plasmid DNAs of the plant pathogenic fungus Rhizoctonia solani with unique terminal structures.

    PubMed

    Miyashita, S; Hirochika, H; Ikeda, J E; Hashiba, T

    1990-01-01

    Three linear DNA plasmids were found in isolate RI-64 of anastomosis group 4 (AG-4) of Rhizoctonia solani. These plasmids, designated pRS64-1, -2, and -3, possessed the same size of 2.7 kb. Restriction mapping and Southern hybridization analysis of pRS64-1, -2, and -3 revealed the presence of homologous regions at both termini. The plasmid DNAs were resistant to both 3'-exonuclease and 5'-exonuclease even after treatment with proteinase K or alkali. The length of both terminal fragments that were generated by restriction endonuclease digestion was doubled under the denaturation condition, indicating that the linear plasmid DNAs have hairpin loops at both termini. Southern blotting analysis of total DNA showed the presence of two types of dimeric forms of pRS64 DNA. One is a head-to-head dimer and the other is a tail-to-tail dimer. The role of these unique DNA structures in replication of the plasmids is discussed.

  6. Expression of a chitinase gene from Metarhizium anisopliae in tobacco plants confers resistance against Rhizoctonia solani.

    PubMed

    Kern, Marcelo Fernando; Maraschin, Simone de Faria; Vom Endt, Débora; Schrank, Augusto; Vainstein, Marilene Henning; Pasquali, Giancarlo

    2010-04-01

    The chit1 gene from the entomopathogenic fungus Metarhizium anisopliae, encoding the endochitinase CHIT42, was placed under the control of the CaMV 35S promoter, and the resulting construct was transferred to tobacco. Seventeen kanamycin-resistant transgenic lines were recovered, and the presence of the transgene was confirmed by polymerase chain reactions and Southern blot hybridization. The number of chit1 copies was determined to be varying from one to four. Copy number had observable effects neither on plant growth nor development. Substantial heterogeneity concerning production of the recombinant chitinase, and both general and specific chitinolytic activities were detected in leaf extracts from primary transformants. The highest chitinase activities were found in plants harboring two copies of chit1 inserts at different loci. Progeny derived from self-pollination of the primary transgenics revealed a stable inheritance pattern, with transgene segregation following a mendelian dihybrid ratio. Two selected plants expressing high levels of CHIT42 were consistently resistant to the soilborne pathogen Rhizoctonia solani, suggesting a direct relationship between enzyme activity and reduction of foliar area affected by fungal lesions. To date, this is the first report of resistance to fungal attack in plants mediated by a recombinant chitinase from an entomopathogenic and acaricide fungus.

  7. Role of Bacterial Communities in the Natural Suppression of Rhizoctonia solani Bare Patch Disease of Wheat (Triticum aestivum L.)

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Chuntao; Hulbert, Scot H.; Schroeder, Kurtis L.; Mavrodi, Olga; Mavrodi, Dmitri; Dhingra, Amit; Schillinger, William F.

    2013-01-01

    Rhizoctonia bare patch and root rot disease of wheat, caused by Rhizoctonia solani AG-8, develops as distinct patches of stunted plants and limits the yield of direct-seeded (no-till) wheat in the Pacific Northwest of the United States. At the site of a long-term cropping systems study near Ritzville, WA, a decline in Rhizoctonia patch disease was observed over an 11-year period. Bacterial communities from bulk and rhizosphere soil of plants from inside the patches, outside the patches, and recovered patches were analyzed by using pyrosequencing with primers designed for 16S rRNA. Taxa in the class Acidobacteria and the genus Gemmatimonas were found at higher frequencies in the rhizosphere of healthy plants outside the patches than in that of diseased plants from inside the patches. Dyella and Acidobacteria subgroup Gp7 were found at higher frequencies in recovered patches. Chitinophaga, Pedobacter, Oxalobacteriaceae (Duganella and Massilia), and Chyseobacterium were found at higher frequencies in the rhizosphere of diseased plants from inside the patches. For selected taxa, trends were validated by quantitative PCR (qPCR), and observed shifts of frequencies in the rhizosphere over time were duplicated in cycling experiments in the greenhouse that involved successive plantings of wheat in Rhizoctonia-inoculated soil. Chryseobacterium soldanellicola was isolated from the rhizosphere inside the patches and exhibited significant antagonism against R. solani AG-8 in vitro and in greenhouse tests. In conclusion, we identified novel bacterial taxa that respond to conditions affecting bare patch disease symptoms and that may be involved in suppression of Rhizoctonia root rot and bare batch disease. PMID:24056471

  8. Genetic and genomic analysis of Rhizoctonia solani interactions with Arabidopsis; evidence of resistance mediated through NADPH oxidases.

    PubMed

    Foley, Rhonda C; Gleason, Cynthia A; Anderson, Jonathan P; Hamann, Thorsten; Singh, Karam B

    2013-01-01

    Rhizoctonia solani is an important soil-borne necrotrophic fungal pathogen, with a broad host range and little effective resistance in crop plants. Arabidopsis is resistant to R. solani AG8 but susceptible to R. solani AG2-1. A screen of 36 Arabidopsis ecotypes and mutants affected in the auxin, camalexin, salicylic acid, abscisic acid and ethylene/jasmonic acid pathways did not reveal any variation in response to R. solani and demonstrated that resistance to AG8 was independent of these defense pathways. The Arabidopsis Affymetrix ATH1 Genome array was used to assess global gene expression changes in plants infected with AG8 and AG2-1 at seven days post-infection. While there was considerable overlap in the response, some gene families were differentially affected by AG8 or AG2-1 and included those involved in oxidative stress, cell wall associated proteins, transcription factors and heat shock protein genes. Since a substantial proportion of the gene expression changes were associated with oxidative stress responses, we analysed the role of NADPH oxidases in resistance. While single NADPH oxidase mutants had no effect, a NADPH oxidase double mutant atrbohf atrbohd resulted in an almost complete loss of resistance to AG8, suggesting that reactive oxidative species play an important role in Arabidopsis's resistance to R. solani.

  9. Mungbean plants expressing BjNPR1 exhibit enhanced resistance against the seedling rot pathogen, Rhizoctonia solani.

    PubMed

    Vijayan, S; Kirti, P B

    2012-02-01

    Mungbean, Vigna radiata (L.) Wilczek is an important pulse crop that is widely cultivated in semi- arid tropics. The crop is attacked by various soil-borne pathogens like Rhizoctonia solani, which causes dry rot disease and seriously affects its productivity. Earlier we characterized the non-expressor of pathogenesis related gene-1(BjNPR1) of mustard, Brassica juncea, the counterpart of AtNPR1 of Arabidopsis thaliana. Here, we transformed mungbean with BjNPR1 via Agrobacterium tumefaciens. Because of the recalcitrant nature of mungbean, the effect of some factors like Agrobacterium tumefaciens strains (GV2260 and LBA4404), pH, L: -cysteine and tobacco leaf extract was tested in transformation. The transgenic status of 15 plants was confirmed by PCR using primers for nptII. The independent integration of T-DNA in transgenic plants was analyzed by Southern hybridization with an nptII probe and the expression of BjNPR1 was confirmed by RT-PCR. Some of the T(0) plants were selected for detached leaf anti-fungal bioassay using the fungus Rhizoctonia solani, which showed moderate to high level of resistance depending on the level of expression of BjNPR1. The seedling bioassay of transgenic T(2) plants indicated resistance against dry rot disease caused by R. solani.

  10. AFLP fingerprinting for identification of infra-species groups of Rhizoctonia solani and Waitea circinata

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Patch diseases caused by Thanatephorus cucumeris and Waitea circinata varieties (anamorphs: Rhizoctonia species) pose a serious threat to successful maintenance of several important turfgrass species. Reliance on field symptoms to identify Rhizoctonia causal agents can be difficult and misleading. D...

  11. The role of an extracellular chitinase from Trichoderma virens Gv29-8 in the biocontrol of Rhizoctonia solani.

    PubMed

    Baek, J M; Howell, C R; Kenerley, C M

    1999-02-01

    The role of extracellular chitinase in the biocontrol activity of Trichoderma virens was examined using genetically manipulated strains of this fungus. The T. virens strains in which the chitinase gene (cht42) was disrupted (KO) or constitutively over-expressed (COE) were constructed through genetic transformation. The resulting transformants were stable and showed patterns similar to the wild-type (WT) strain with respect to growth rate, sporulation, antibiotic production, colonization efficiency on cotton roots and growth/survival in soil. Biocontrol activity of the KO and COE strains were significantly decreased and enhanced, respectively against cotton seedling disease incited by Rhizoctonia solani when compared with the WT strain.

  12. Characterization of quantitative trait loci (QTLs) in cultivated rice contributing to field resistance to sheath blight (Rhizoctonia solani).

    PubMed

    Li, Z; Pinson, S R; Marchetti, M A; Stansel, J W; Park, W D

    1995-07-01

    Sheath blight, caused by Rhizoctonia solani, is one of the most important diseases of rice. Despite extensive searches of the rice germ plasm, the major gene(s) which give complete resistance to the fungus have not been identified. However, there is much variation in quantitatively inherited resistance to R. solani, and this type of resistance can offer adequate protection against the pathogen under field conditions. Using 255 F4 bulked populations from a cross between the susceptible variety 'Lemont' and the resistant variety 'Teqing', 2 years of field disease evaluation and 113 well-distributed RFLP markers, we identified six quantitative trait loci (QTLs) contributing to resistance to R. solani. These QTLs are located on 6 of the 12 rice chromosomes and collectively explain approximately 60% of the genotypic variation or 47% of the phenotypic variation in the 'Lemont'x'Teqing' cross. One of these resistance QTLs (QSbr4a), which accounted for 6% of the genotypic variation in resistance to R. solani, appeared to be independent of associated morphological traits. The remaining five putative resistance loci (QSbr2a, QSbr3a, QSbr8a, QSbr9a and QSbr12a) all mapped to chromosomal regions also associated with increased plant height, three of which were also associated with QTLs causing later heading. This was consistent with the observation that heading date and plant height accounted for 47% of the genotypic variation in resistance to R. solani in this population. There were also weak associations between resistance to R. solani and leaf width, which were likely due to linkage with a QTL for this trait rather than to a physiological relationship.

  13. Detecting Migrants in Populations of Rhizoctonia solani Anastomosis Group 3 from Potato in North Carolina Using Multilocus Genotype Probabilities.

    PubMed

    Ceresini, Paulo C; Shew, H David; Vilgalys, Rytas J; Gale, Liane Rosewich; Cubeta, Marc A

    2003-05-01

    ABSTRACT The relative contribution of migration of Rhizoctonia solani anastomosis group 3 (AG-3) on infested potato seed tubers originating from production areas in Canada, Maine, and Wisconsin (source population) to the genetic diversity and structure of populations of R. solani AG-3 in North Carolina (NC) soil (recipient population) was examined. The frequency of alleles detected by multilocus polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphisms, heterozygosity at individual loci, and gametic phase disequilibrium between all pairs of loci were determined for subpopulations of R. solani AG-3 from eight sources of potato seed tubers and from five soils in NC. Analysis of molecular variation revealed little variation between seed source and NC recipient soil populations or between subpopulations within each region. Analysis of population data with a Bayesian-based statistical method previously developed for detecting migration in human populations suggested that six multilocus genotypes from the NC soil population had a statistically significant probability of being migrants from the northern source population. The one-way (unidirectional) migration of genotypes of R. solani AG-3 into NC on infested potato seed tubers from Canada, Maine, and Wisconsin provides a plausible explanation for the lack of genetic subdivision (differentiation) between populations of the pathogen in NC soils or between the northern source and the NC recipient soil populations.

  14. Evidence from mycelial studies for differences in the sterol biosynthetic pathway of Rhizoctonia solani and Phytophthora cinnamomi.

    PubMed Central

    Wood, S G; Gottlieb, D

    1978-01-01

    Phytophthora cinnamomi, a member of the Pythiacease, does not synthesize sterols. Small amounts of squalene, but no squalene epoxide or sterol, were isolated from the dried mycelium of this fungus after growth in sterol-free medium. The dried mycelium of Rhizoctonia solani, a sterol-synthesizing fungus grown under the same conditions, contained small amounts of squalene and squalene epoxide and large amounts of ergosterol. When the two organisms were grown in the presence of [14C]acetate, only labelled geraniol, farnesol and squalene were recovered from the P. cinnamomi mycelium, whereas labelled geraniol, farnesol, squalene, squalene epoxide and ergosterol were recovered from the R. solani mycelium. Similar results were obtained when the organisms were incubated in the presence of [2(-14)C]mevalonate; in this case, labelled lanosterol was also detected in the R. solani mycelium. Both organisms, when incubated in the presence of unlabelled squalene, squalene epoxide or lanosterol, incorporated these compounds into their mycelia; however, only the R. solani mycelium was able to convert these substrates into products further along the sterol pathway. It appears that squalene is the terminal compound in the sterol biosynthetic pathway of P. cinnamomi. PMID:637849

  15. Biocontrol of Rhizoctonia solani AG-2, the causal agent of damping-off by Muscodor cinnamomi CMU-Cib 461.

    PubMed

    Suwannarach, Nakarin; Kumla, Jaturong; Bussaban, Boonsom; Lumyong, Saisamorn

    2012-11-01

    Rhizoctonia solani is a damping-off pathogen that causes significant crop loss worldwide. In this study, the potential of Muscodor cinnamomi, a new species of endophytic fungus for controlling R. solani AG-2 damping-off disease of plant seedlings by biological fumigation was investigated. In vitro tests showed that M. cinnamomi volatile compounds inhibited mycelial growth of pathogens. Among nine solid media tested, rye grain was the best grain for inoculum production. An in vivo experiment of four seedlings, bird pepper, bush bean, garden pea and tomato were conducted. The results indicated that treatment with 30 g of M. cinnamomi inoculum was the minimum dose that caused complete control of damping-off symptoms of all seedlings after one month of planting. The R. solani-infested soil showed the lowest percentage of seed germination. In addition, M. cinnamomi did not cause any disease symptoms. From the results it is clear that M. cinnamomi is effective in controlling R. solani AG-2 both in vitro and in vivo.

  16. Evaluation of soil microorganisms with inhibitory activity against Rhizoctonia solani causal agent of the damping-off of canola.

    PubMed

    Ciampi, L; Tewari, J P

    1990-10-01

    Pre- and post-emergence damping-off of canola seedlings caused by Rhizoctonia solani is a serious disease in Western Canada. Other fungi such as Fusarium spp. and Pythium spp. are also related to seedling damping-off. To-day, the search of soil bacteria is becoming a tool to use microorganisms as potential biocontrol agents for several plant diseases. The purpose of this research was to detect bacteria to biologically control R. solani, Pythium spp., and Fusarium spp. Soil samples were collected throughout Alberta during 1987 to isolate bacteria. Canola seedlings were also used to obtain bacteria from the same samples. Plant pathogenic fungi were tested to detect the antagonistic activity of the isolates. Tests were made with coated canola seeds, amendments and fresh of freeze-dried cells. Three hundred forty-one bacterial cultures were isolated. Only 16 inhibited fungal growth: 7 showed the same effects against R. solani and 9 showed uneven effects. Some isolates showed a weak action to Pythium spp. and Fusarium spp. Three isolates showed inhibitory effect on R. solani and Pythium spp. Isolate F1 improved by about 50% the germination of canola seeds in inoculated pots when compared with the inoculated control. Coated seeds had low germination and emergence was below the inoculated control. The emergence of canola seedlings was very much improved when isolate 147 was delivered as an amendment in inoculated pots. Identification showed that 3 bacterial belonged to Bacillus spp., 4 to green fluorescent Pseudomonas spp. and 2 were Streptomyces spp.

  17. A gene for plant protection: expression of a bean polygalacturonase inhibitor in tobacco confers a strong resistance against Rhizoctonia solani and two oomycetes.

    PubMed

    Borras-Hidalgo, Orlando; Caprari, Claudio; Hernandez-Estevez, Ingrid; Lorenzo, Giulia De; Cervone, Felice

    2012-01-01

    We have tested whether a gene encoding a polygalacturonase-inhibiting protein (PGIP) protects tobacco against a fungal pathogen (Rhizoctonia solani) and two oomycetes (Phytophthora parasitica var. nicotianae and Peronospora hyoscyami f. sp. tabacina). The trials were performed in greenhouse conditions for R. solani and P. parasitica and in the field for P. hyoscyami. Our results show that expression of PGIP is a powerful way of engineering a broad-spectrum disease resistance.

  18. Transmission of the M2 double-stranded RNA in Rhizoctonia solani anastomosis group 3 (AG-3).

    PubMed

    Charlton, Nikki D; Cubeta, Marc A

    2007-01-01

    Horizontal transmission of the 3.57 kb M2 double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) between mycelia of somatically incompatible isolates of Rhizoctonia solani anastomosis group 3 (AG-3), an economically important pathogen of cultivated plants in the family Solanaceae, was investigated. Nine donor isolates of R. solani AG-3 containing the M2 dsRNA were paired on potato-dextrose agar with each of three different recipient isolates where the M2 dsRNA was absent. Reverse-transcription PCR (RT-PCR) was used to detect horizontal transmission of the M2 dsRNA via hyphal anastomosis from donor to recipient isolates by examining hyphal explants taken 3 cm from the hyphal interaction zone. PCR-RFLP genetic-based markers of two nuclear loci and one mitochondrial locus were used to confirm identity and transmission between donor and recipient isolates of R. solani AG-3. The frequency of transmission observed between 72 pairings of the eight donor and three recipient isolates was approximately 4% of the total pairings, and differences in the phenotype of the recipient isolates after acquisition of the M2 dsRNA via horizontal transmission were observed. To our knowledge this represents the first demonstration of transmission of dsRNA between genetically different individuals of R. solani confirmed with nuclear and mitochondrial markers. These results suggest that transmission can occur between somatically incompatible isolates of R. solani AG-3 but that maintenance of the dsRNA in the recipient isolates was not stable after repeated subculturing on nutrient medium.

  19. Biocontrol of Rhizoctonia solani damping-off disease in cucumber with Bacillus pumilus SQR-N43.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xinqi; Zhang, Nan; Yong, Xiaoyu; Yang, Xingming; Shen, Qirong

    2012-03-20

    Biological control is an efficient and environmentally friendly way to prevent damping-off disease. Micrographs were used to investigate the ability of Bacillus pumilus (B. pumilus) SQR-N43 to control Rhizoctonia solani (R. solani) Q1 in cucumbers. The root colonization ability of B. pumilus SQR-N43 was analyzed in vivo with a green fluorescent protein (GFP) tag. A pot experiment was performed to assess the in vivo disease-control efficiency of B. pumilus SQR-N43 and its bio-organic fertilizer. Results indicate that B. pumilus SQR-N43 induced hyphal deformation, enlargement of cytoplasmic vacuoles and cytoplasmic leakage in R. solani Q1 mycelia. A biofilm on the root surface was formed when the roots were inoculated with 10(7)-10(8)cells g(-1) of soil of GFP-tagged B. pumilus SQR-N43. In the pot experiment, the biocontrol reduced the concentration of R. solani. In contrast to applications of only B. pumilus SQR-N43 (N treatment), which produced control efficiencies of 23%, control efficiencies of 68% were obtained with applications of a fermented organic fertilizer inoculated with B. pumilus SQR-N43 (BIO treatment). After twenty days of incubation, significant differences in the number of CFUs and the percentage of spores of B. pumilus SQR-N43 were recorded between the N treatment (2.20×10(7)CFU g(-1) of soil and 79%, respectively) and the BIO treatment (1.67×10(8)CFU g(-1) of soil and 52%, respectively). The results indicate that B. pumilus SQR-N43 is a potent antagonist against R. solani Q1. The BIO treatment was more effective than the N treatment because it stabilized the population and increased the active form of the antagonist.

  20. Mid-infared (MidIR) and near-infared (NIR) dection of rhizoctonia solani AG 2-2 IIIB on barley based artificial inoculum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The amount of Rhizoctonia solani in the soil and how much is needed to cause disease in sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L.) is relatively unknown. This is mostly because of the usually low inoculum densities natually found in soil, and the low sensitivity of traditional serial dilution assays. We invest...

  1. Mid-infared and near-infared detection of Rhizoctonia solani AG 2-2IIIB on barley based artifical inoculum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The amount of Rhizoctonia solani in the soil and how much is needed to cause disease in sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L.) is relatively unknown. This is mostly because of the usually low inoculum densities natually found in soil, and the low sensitivity of traditional serial dilution assays. We invest...

  2. Carbon source-dependent effects of anaerobic soil disinfestation on soil microbiome and suppression of rhizoctonia solani AG-5 and pratylenchus penetrans

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effect of carbon source on efficacy of anaerobic soil disinfestation (ASD) toward suppression of apple root infection by Rhizoctonia solani AG-5 and Pratylenchus penetrans was examined. Orchard grass (GR), rice bran (RB), ethanol (ET), composted steer manure (CM) and Brassica juncea seed meal (S...

  3. Evolutionary diversification indicated by compensatory base changes in ITS2 secondary structures in a complex fungal species, Rhizoctonia solani.

    PubMed

    Ahvenniemi, Paavo; Wolf, Matthias; Lehtonen, Mari J; Wilson, Paula; German-Kinnari, Malgorzata; Valkonen, Jari P T

    2009-08-01

    The rRNA cistron (18S-ITS1-5.8S-ITS2-28S) is used widely for phylogenetic analyses. Recent studies show that compensatory base changes (CBC) in the secondary structure of ITS2 correlate with genetic incompatibility between organisms. Rhizoctonia solani consists of genetically incompatible strain groups (anastomosis groups, AG) distinguished by lack of anastomosis between hyphae of strains. Phylogenetic analysis of internal transcribed spacer (ITS) sequences shows a strong correlation with AG determination. In this study, ITS sequences were reannotated according to the flanking 5.8S and 28S regions which interact during ribogenesis. One or two CBCs were detected between the ITS2 secondary structure of AG-3 potato strains as compared to AG-3 tobacco strains, and between these two strains and all other AGs. When a binucleate Rhizoctonia species related to Ceratobasidiaceae was compared to the AGs of R. solani, which were multinucleate (3-21 nuclei per cell), 1-3 CBCs were detected. The CBCs in potato strains of AG-3 distinguish them from AG-3 tobacco strains and other AGs yielding further evidence that the potato strains of AG-3 originally described as R. solani are a species distinct from other AGs. The ITS1-5.8S-ITS2 sequences were analyzed by direct sequencing of PCR products from 497 strains of AG-3 isolated from potato. The same 10 and 4 positions in ITS1 and ITS2, respectively, contained variability in 425 strains (86%). Nine different unambiguous ITS sequences (haplotypes) could be detected in a single strain by sequencing cloned PCR products indicating that concerted evolution had not homogenized the rRNA cistrons in many AG-3 strains. Importantly, the sequence variability did not affect the secondary structure of ITS2 and CBCs in AG-3.

  4. Suppression of Rhizoctonia solani on Impatiens by Enhanced Microbial Activity in Composted Swine Waste-Amended Potting Mixes.

    PubMed

    Diab, H G; Hu, S; Benson, D M

    2003-09-01

    ABSTRACT Peat moss-based potting mix was amended with either of two composted swine wastes, CSW1 and CSW2, at rates from 4 to 20% (vol/vol) to evaluate suppression of pre-emergence damping-off of impatiens (Impatiens balsamina) caused by Rhizoctonia solani (anastomosis group-4). A cucumber bioassay was used prior to each impatiens experiment to monitor maturity of compost as the compost aged in a curing pile by evaluating disease suppression toward both Pythium ultimum and R. solani. At 16, 24, 32, and 37 weeks after composting, plug trays filled with compost-amended potting mix were seeded with impatiens and infested with R. solani to determine suppression of damping-off. Pre-emergence damping-off was lower for impatiens grown in potting mix amended with 20% CSW1 than in CSW2-amended and nonamended mixes. To identify relationships between disease suppression and microbial parameters, samples of mixes were collected to determine microbial activity, biomass carbon and nitrogen, functional diversity, and population density. Higher rates of microbial activity were observed with increasing rates of CSW1 amendment than with CSW2 amendments. Microbial biomass carbon and nitrogen also were higher in CSW1-amended mixes than in CSW2-amended potting mixes 1 day prior to seeding and 5 weeks after seeding. Principal component analysis of Biolog-GN2 profiles showed different functional diversities between CSW1- and CSW2-amended mixes. Furthermore, mixes amended with CSW1 had higher colony forming units of fungi, endospore-forming bacteria, and oligotrophic bacteria. Our results suggest that enhanced microbial activity, functional and population diversity of stable compost-amended mix were associated with suppressiveness to Rhizoctonia damping-off in impatiens. PMID:18944095

  5. Suppression of Rhizoctonia solani on Impatiens by Enhanced Microbial Activity in Composted Swine Waste-Amended Potting Mixes.

    PubMed

    Diab, H G; Hu, S; Benson, D M

    2003-09-01

    ABSTRACT Peat moss-based potting mix was amended with either of two composted swine wastes, CSW1 and CSW2, at rates from 4 to 20% (vol/vol) to evaluate suppression of pre-emergence damping-off of impatiens (Impatiens balsamina) caused by Rhizoctonia solani (anastomosis group-4). A cucumber bioassay was used prior to each impatiens experiment to monitor maturity of compost as the compost aged in a curing pile by evaluating disease suppression toward both Pythium ultimum and R. solani. At 16, 24, 32, and 37 weeks after composting, plug trays filled with compost-amended potting mix were seeded with impatiens and infested with R. solani to determine suppression of damping-off. Pre-emergence damping-off was lower for impatiens grown in potting mix amended with 20% CSW1 than in CSW2-amended and nonamended mixes. To identify relationships between disease suppression and microbial parameters, samples of mixes were collected to determine microbial activity, biomass carbon and nitrogen, functional diversity, and population density. Higher rates of microbial activity were observed with increasing rates of CSW1 amendment than with CSW2 amendments. Microbial biomass carbon and nitrogen also were higher in CSW1-amended mixes than in CSW2-amended potting mixes 1 day prior to seeding and 5 weeks after seeding. Principal component analysis of Biolog-GN2 profiles showed different functional diversities between CSW1- and CSW2-amended mixes. Furthermore, mixes amended with CSW1 had higher colony forming units of fungi, endospore-forming bacteria, and oligotrophic bacteria. Our results suggest that enhanced microbial activity, functional and population diversity of stable compost-amended mix were associated with suppressiveness to Rhizoctonia damping-off in impatiens.

  6. Chitosan-cinnamon beads enhance suppressive activity against Rhizoctonia solani and Meloidogyne incognita in vitro.

    PubMed

    Seo, Dong-Jun; Nguyen, Dang-Minh-Chanh; Park, Ro-Dong; Jung, Woo-Jin

    2014-01-01

    A novel chitosan-cinnamon bead carrier was prepared in this study. Chitosan was mixed with cinnamon powder (CP) and cinnamon extract (CE) to obtain chitosan-cinnamon powder (CCP) beads and chitosan-cinnamon extracted (CCE) beads, respectively. The potential antifungal and nematicidal activities of CCP and CCE were investigated against Rhizoctonia solani and Meloidogyne incognita in vitro. Relative antifungal activity of the CCP (5% CP) bead-treated R. solani was 30.9 and 23.9% after 1 and 2 day incubations, respectively. Relative antifungal activity of the CCE (0.5% CE) bead-treated R. solani was 4.3, 3.0 and 4.2% after 1, 2 and 3 days of incubation. Inhibition of hatch by CCP beads with CP of 5% was 78.8%. Inhibition of hatch by CCE beads with CE of 0.5% was 82.0%. J2 mortality following the CCP (5% CP) and CCE (0.5% CE) bead treatments was 85.0 and 95.8%, respectively against M. incognita after 48 h incubations.

  7. Proteomic Analysis of Rhizoctonia solani Identifies Infection-specific, Redox Associated Proteins and Insight into Adaptation to Different Plant Hosts*

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Jonathan P.; Hane, James K.; Stoll, Thomas; Pain, Nicholas; Hastie, Marcus L.; Kaur, Parwinder; Hoogland, Christine; Gorman, Jeffrey J.; Singh, Karam B.

    2016-01-01

    Rhizoctonia solani is an important root infecting pathogen of a range of food staples worldwide including wheat, rice, maize, soybean, potato and others. Conventional resistance breeding strategies are hindered by the absence of tractable genetic resistance in any crop host. Understanding the biology and pathogenicity mechanisms of this fungus is important for addressing these disease issues, however, little is known about how R. solani causes disease. This study capitalizes on recent genomic studies by applying mass spectrometry based proteomics to identify soluble, membrane-bound and culture filtrate proteins produced under wheat infection and vegetative growth conditions. Many of the proteins found in the culture filtrate had predicted functions relating to modification of the plant cell wall, a major activity required for pathogenesis on the plant host, including a number found only under infection conditions. Other infection related proteins included a high proportion of proteins with redox associated functions and many novel proteins without functional classification. The majority of infection only proteins tested were confirmed to show transcript up-regulation during infection including a thaumatin which increased susceptibility to R. solani when expressed in Nicotiana benthamiana. In addition, analysis of expression during infection of different plant hosts highlighted how the infection strategy of this broad host range pathogen can be adapted to the particular host being encountered. Data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD002806. PMID:26811357

  8. Analysis of Phaseolus vulgaris Response to Its Association with Trichoderma harzianum (ALL-42) in the Presence or Absence of the Phytopathogenic Fungi Rhizoctonia solani and Fusarium solani

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Jackeline L.; Queiroz, Rayner M. L.; Charneau, Sébastien O.; Felix, Carlos R.; Ricart, Carlos A. O.; da Silva, Francilene Lopes; Steindorff, Andrei Stecca; Ulhoa, Cirano J.; Noronha, Eliane F.

    2014-01-01

    The present study was carried out to evaluate the ability of Trichoderma harzianum (ALL 42-isolated from Brazilian Cerrado soil) to promote common bean growth and to modulate its metabolism and defense response in the presence or absence of the phytopathogenic fungi Rhizoctonia solani and Fusarium solani using a proteomic approach. T. harzianum was able to promote common bean plants growth as shown by the increase in root/foliar areas and by size in comparison to plants grown in its absence. The interaction was shown to modulate the expression of defense-related genes (Glu1, pod3 and lox1) in roots of P. vulgaris. Proteomic maps constructed using roots and leaves of plants challenged or unchallenged by T. harzianum and phytopathogenic fungi showed differences. Reference gels presented differences in spot distribution (absence/presence) and relative volumes of common spots (up or down-regulation). Differential spots were identified by peptide fingerprinting MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry. A total of 48 identified spots (19 for leaves and 29 for roots) were grouped into protein functional classes. For leaves, 33%, 22% and 11% of the identified proteins were categorized as pertaining to the groups: metabolism, defense response and oxidative stress response, respectively. For roots, 17.2%, 24.1% and 10.3% of the identified proteins were categorized as pertaining to the groups: metabolism, defense response and oxidative stress response, respectively. PMID:24878929

  9. Analysis of Phaseolus vulgaris response to its association with Trichoderma harzianum (ALL-42) in the presence or absence of the phytopathogenic fungi Rhizoctonia solani and Fusarium solani.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Jackeline L; Queiroz, Rayner M L; Charneau, Sébastien O; Felix, Carlos R; Ricart, Carlos A O; da Silva, Francilene Lopes; Steindorff, Andrei Stecca; Ulhoa, Cirano J; Noronha, Eliane F

    2014-01-01

    The present study was carried out to evaluate the ability of Trichoderma harzianum (ALL 42-isolated from Brazilian Cerrado soil) to promote common bean growth and to modulate its metabolism and defense response in the presence or absence of the phytopathogenic fungi Rhizoctonia solani and Fusarium solani using a proteomic approach. T. harzianum was able to promote common bean plants growth as shown by the increase in root/foliar areas and by size in comparison to plants grown in its absence. The interaction was shown to modulate the expression of defense-related genes (Glu1, pod3 and lox1) in roots of P. vulgaris. Proteomic maps constructed using roots and leaves of plants challenged or unchallenged by T. harzianum and phytopathogenic fungi showed differences. Reference gels presented differences in spot distribution (absence/presence) and relative volumes of common spots (up or down-regulation). Differential spots were identified by peptide fingerprinting MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry. A total of 48 identified spots (19 for leaves and 29 for roots) were grouped into protein functional classes. For leaves, 33%, 22% and 11% of the identified proteins were categorized as pertaining to the groups: metabolism, defense response and oxidative stress response, respectively. For roots, 17.2%, 24.1% and 10.3% of the identified proteins were categorized as pertaining to the groups: metabolism, defense response and oxidative stress response, respectively.

  10. De novo Transcriptome Analysis of Rhizoctonia solani AG1 IA Strain Early Invasion in Zoysia japonica Root.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Chen; Ai, Lin; Wang, Li; Yin, Pingping; Liu, Chenglan; Li, Shanshan; Zeng, Huiming

    2016-01-01

    Zoysia japonica brown spot was caused by necrotrophic fungus Rhizoctonia solani invasion, which led to severe financial loss in city lawn and golf ground maintenance. However, little was known about the molecular mechanism of R. solani pathogenicity in Z. japonica. In this study we examined early stage interaction between R. solani AG1 IA strain and Z. japonica cultivar "Zenith" root by cell ultra-structure analysis, pathogenesis-related proteins assay and transcriptome analysis to explore molecular clues for AG1 IA strain pathogenicity in Z. japonica. No obvious cell structure damage was found in infected roots and most pathogenesis-related protein activities showedg a downward trend especially in 36 h post inoculation, which exhibits AG1 IA strain stealthy invasion characteristic. According to Gene Ontology (GO) and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) database classification, most DEGs in infected "Zenith" roots dynamically changed especially in three aspects, signal transduction, gene translation, and protein synthesis. Total 3422 unigenes of "Zenith" root were predicted into 14 kinds of resistance (R) gene class. Potential fungal resistance related unigenes of "Zenith" root were involved in ligin biosynthesis, phytoalexin synthesis, oxidative burst, wax biosynthesis, while two down-regulated unigenes encoding leucine-rich repeat receptor protein kinase and subtilisin-like protease might be important for host-derived signal perception to AG1 IA strain invasion. According to Pathogen Host Interaction (PHI) database annotation, 1508 unigenes of AG1 IA strain were predicted and classified into 37 known pathogen species, in addition, unigenes encoding virulence, signaling, host stress tolerance, and potential effector were also predicted. This research uncovered transcriptional profiling during the early phase interaction between R. solani AG1 IA strain and Z. japonica, and will greatly help identify key pathogenicity of AG1 IA strain. PMID:27242730

  11. De novo Transcriptome Analysis of Rhizoctonia solani AG1 IA Strain Early Invasion in Zoysia japonica Root

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Chen; Ai, Lin; Wang, Li; Yin, Pingping; Liu, Chenglan; Li, Shanshan; Zeng, Huiming

    2016-01-01

    Zoysia japonica brown spot was caused by necrotrophic fungus Rhizoctonia solani invasion, which led to severe financial loss in city lawn and golf ground maintenance. However, little was known about the molecular mechanism of R. solani pathogenicity in Z. japonica. In this study we examined early stage interaction between R. solani AG1 IA strain and Z. japonica cultivar “Zenith” root by cell ultra-structure analysis, pathogenesis-related proteins assay and transcriptome analysis to explore molecular clues for AG1 IA strain pathogenicity in Z. japonica. No obvious cell structure damage was found in infected roots and most pathogenesis-related protein activities showedg a downward trend especially in 36 h post inoculation, which exhibits AG1 IA strain stealthy invasion characteristic. According to Gene Ontology (GO) and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) database classification, most DEGs in infected “Zenith” roots dynamically changed especially in three aspects, signal transduction, gene translation, and protein synthesis. Total 3422 unigenes of “Zenith” root were predicted into 14 kinds of resistance (R) gene class. Potential fungal resistance related unigenes of “Zenith” root were involved in ligin biosynthesis, phytoalexin synthesis, oxidative burst, wax biosynthesis, while two down-regulated unigenes encoding leucine-rich repeat receptor protein kinase and subtilisin-like protease might be important for host-derived signal perception to AG1 IA strain invasion. According to Pathogen Host Interaction (PHI) database annotation, 1508 unigenes of AG1 IA strain were predicted and classified into 37 known pathogen species, in addition, unigenes encoding virulence, signaling, host stress tolerance, and potential effector were also predicted. This research uncovered transcriptional profiling during the early phase interaction between R. solani AG1 IA strain and Z. japonica, and will greatly help identify key pathogenicity of AG1 IA strain

  12. Proteomic and genetic approaches to identifying defence-related proteins in rice challenged with the fungal pathogen Rhizoctonia solani.

    PubMed

    Lee, Joohyun; Bricker, Terry M; Lefevre, Michael; Pinson, Shannon R M; Oard, James H

    2006-09-01

    SUMMARY Sheath blight, caused by the fungus Rhizoctonia solani, is a major disease of rice world-wide, but little is known about the host response to infection. The objective of this study was to identify proteins and DNA markers in resistant and susceptible rice associated with response to infection by R. solani. Replicated two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis experiments were conducted to detect proteins differentially expressed under inoculated and non-inoculated conditions. Tandem mass spectra analysis using electrospray ionization quadrupole-time of flight mass spectrometry (ESI Q-TOF MS) was carried out for protein identification with the NCBI non-redundant protein database. Seven proteins were increased after inoculation in both susceptible and resistant plants. Six of the seven proteins were identified with presumed antifungal, photosynthetic and proteolytic activities. An additional 14 proteins were detected in the response of the resistant line. Eleven of the 14 proteins were identified with presumed functions relating to antifungal activity, signal transduction, energy metabolism, photosynthesis, molecular chaperone, proteolysis and antioxidation. The induction of 3-beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase/isomerase was detected for the first time in resistant rice plants after pathogen challenge, suggesting a defensive role of this enzyme in rice against attack by R. solani. The chromosomal locations of four induced proteins were found to be in close physical proximity to genetic markers for sheath blight resistance in two genetic mapping populations. The proteomic and genetic results from this study indicate a complex response of rice to challenge by R. solani that involves simultaneous induction of proteins from multiple defence pathways.

  13. De novo Transcriptome Analysis of Rhizoctonia solani AG1 IA Strain Early Invasion in Zoysia japonica Root.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Chen; Ai, Lin; Wang, Li; Yin, Pingping; Liu, Chenglan; Li, Shanshan; Zeng, Huiming

    2016-01-01

    Zoysia japonica brown spot was caused by necrotrophic fungus Rhizoctonia solani invasion, which led to severe financial loss in city lawn and golf ground maintenance. However, little was known about the molecular mechanism of R. solani pathogenicity in Z. japonica. In this study we examined early stage interaction between R. solani AG1 IA strain and Z. japonica cultivar "Zenith" root by cell ultra-structure analysis, pathogenesis-related proteins assay and transcriptome analysis to explore molecular clues for AG1 IA strain pathogenicity in Z. japonica. No obvious cell structure damage was found in infected roots and most pathogenesis-related protein activities showedg a downward trend especially in 36 h post inoculation, which exhibits AG1 IA strain stealthy invasion characteristic. According to Gene Ontology (GO) and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) database classification, most DEGs in infected "Zenith" roots dynamically changed especially in three aspects, signal transduction, gene translation, and protein synthesis. Total 3422 unigenes of "Zenith" root were predicted into 14 kinds of resistance (R) gene class. Potential fungal resistance related unigenes of "Zenith" root were involved in ligin biosynthesis, phytoalexin synthesis, oxidative burst, wax biosynthesis, while two down-regulated unigenes encoding leucine-rich repeat receptor protein kinase and subtilisin-like protease might be important for host-derived signal perception to AG1 IA strain invasion. According to Pathogen Host Interaction (PHI) database annotation, 1508 unigenes of AG1 IA strain were predicted and classified into 37 known pathogen species, in addition, unigenes encoding virulence, signaling, host stress tolerance, and potential effector were also predicted. This research uncovered transcriptional profiling during the early phase interaction between R. solani AG1 IA strain and Z. japonica, and will greatly help identify key pathogenicity of AG1 IA strain.

  14. Gene expression profiling of the plant pathogenic basidiomycetous fungus Rhizoctonia solani AG 4 reveals putative virulence factors.

    PubMed

    Lakshman, Dilip K; Alkharouf, Nadim; Roberts, Daniel P; Natarajan, Savithiry S; Mitra, Amitava

    2012-01-01

    Rhizoctonia solani is a ubiquitous basidiomycetous soilborne fungal pathogen causing damping-off of seedlings, aerial blights and postharvest diseases. To gain insight into the molecular mechanisms of pathogenesis a global approach based on analysis of expressed sequence tags (ESTs) was undertaken. To get broad gene-expression coverage, two normalized EST libraries were developed from mycelia grown under high nitrogen-induced virulent and low nitrogen/methylglucose-induced hypovirulent conditions. A pilot-scale assessment of gene diversity was made from the sequence analyses of the two libraries. A total of 2280 cDNA clones was sequenced that corresponded to 220 unique sequence sets or clusters (contigs) and 805 singlets, making up a total of 1025 unique genes identified from the two virulence-differentiated cDNA libraries. From the total sequences, 295 genes (38.7%) exhibited strong similarities with genes in public databases and were categorized into 11 functional groups. Approximately 61.3% of the R. solani ESTs have no apparent homologs in publicly available fungal genome databases and are considered unique genes. We have identified several cDNAs with potential roles in fungal pathogenicity, virulence, signal transduction, vegetative incompatibility and mating, drug resistance, lignin degradation, bioremediation and morphological differentiation. A codon-usage table has been formulated based on 14694 R. solani EST codons. Further analysis of ESTs might provide insights into virulence mechanisms of R. solani AG 4 as well as roles of these genes in development, saprophytic colonization and ecological adaptation of this important fungal plant pathogen.

  15. Induction of Terpenoid Synthesis in Cotton Roots and Control of Rhizoctonia solani by Seed Treatment with Trichoderma virens.

    PubMed

    Howell, C R; Hanson, L E; Stipanovic, R D; Puckhaber, L S

    2000-03-01

    ABSTRACT Research on the mechanisms employed by the biocontrol agent Trichoderma virens to suppress cotton (Gossypium hirsutum) seedling disease incited by Rhizoctonia solani has shown that mycoparasitism and antibiotic production are not major contributors to successful biological control. In this study, we examined the possibility that seed treatment with T. virens stimulates defense responses, as indicated by the synthesis of terpenoids in cotton roots. We also examined the role of these terpenoid compounds in disease control. Analysis of extracts of cotton roots and hypocotyls grown from T. virens-treated seed showed that terpenoid synthesis and peroxidase activity were increased in the roots of treated plants, but not in the hypocotyls of these plants or in the untreated controls. Bioassay of the terpenoids for toxicity to R. solani showed that the pathway intermediates desoxyhemigossypol (dHG) and hemigossypol (HG) were strongly inhibitory to the pathogen, while the final product gossypol (G) was toxic only at a much higher concentration. Strains of T. virens and T. koningii were much more resistant to HG than was R. solani, and they thoroughly colonized the cotton roots. A comparison of biocontrol efficacy and induction of terpenoid synthesis in cotton roots by strains of T. virens, T. koningii, T. harzianum, and protoplast fusants indicated that there was a strong correlation (+0.89) between these two phenomena. It, therefore, appears that induction of defense response, particularly terpenoid synthesis, in cotton roots by T. virens may be an important mechanism in the biological control by this fungus of R. solani-incited cotton seedling disease.

  16. In field survival of Rhizoctonia solani in soil and in diseased sugarbeets.

    PubMed

    Herr, L J

    1976-07-01

    Persistence of Rhizotonia solani in the field was investigated by ascertaining survival (competitive saprophytic activity) in soil and survival in diseased plants. Except for one instance, low levels of R. solani survived overwinter in artificially and naturally infested soils. In a sandy loam soil, cropped to sugarbeets, inoculum density increased throughout the growing season from low early spring levels to high levels in July and August. In a silty clay soil, cropped to sugarbeets, inoculum density remained low with only a slight increase throughout the growing season. Survival of R. solani in diseased sugarbeets placed on the soil surface was greater than survival in diseased beets buried in soil. Little reduction in percentages of beets yeilding R. SOLANI COLONIES TOOK PLACE FROM November to April in either buried or unburied beets. The major reduction in survival of R. solani in buried beets occurred during the 6-week interval from April to June.

  17. Enhanced iturin A production by Bacillus subtilis and its effect on suppression of the plant pathogen Rhizoctonia solani.

    PubMed

    Mizumoto, S; Hirai, M; Shoda, M

    2007-07-01

    Enhanced production of the antibiotic iturin A by Bacillus subtilis RB14-CS reached 4.4 g L(-1) in SM medium containing soybean meal and maltose, which was 16-fold and 2.2-fold higher than that in original and modified number 3S media, respectively. When various volumes of RB14-CS cultures grown in SM medium were applied to pot tests of tomato damping-off caused by Rhizoctonia solani, damping-off was dose-dependently suppressed by the cultures. Suppression by SM-grown cultures was significantly more effective than that by cultures grown in original or modified number 3S media. The iturin A concentrations in soil decreased to undetectable levels after 17 days of cultivation in pot tests, indicating that iturin A has a low persistence in soil.

  18. Scarlet-Rz1, an EMS-generated hexaploid wheat with tolerance to the soilborne necrotrophic pathogens Rhizoctonia solani AG-8 and R. oryzae.

    PubMed

    Okubara, Patricia Ann; Steber, Camille M; Demacon, Victor L; Walter, Nathalie L; Paulitz, Timothy C; Kidwell, Kimberlee K

    2009-07-01

    The necrotrophic root pathogens Rhizoctonia solani AG-8 and R. oryzae cause Rhizoctonia root rot and damping-off, yield-limiting diseases that pose barriers to the adoption of conservation tillage in wheat production systems. Existing control practices are only partially effective, and natural genetic resistance to Rhizoctonia has not been identified in wheat or its close relatives. We report the first genetic resistance/tolerance to R. solani AG-8 and R. oryzae in wheat (Triticum aestivum L. em Thell) germplasm 'Scarlet-Rz1'. Scarlet-Rz1 was derived from the allohexaploid spring wheat cultivar Scarlet using EMS mutagenesis. Tolerant seedlings displayed substantial root and shoot growth after 14 days in the presence of 100-400 propagules per gram soil of R. solani AG-8 and R. oryzae in greenhouse assays. BC(2)F(4) individuals of Scarlet-Rz1 showed a high and consistent degree of tolerance. Seedling tolerance was transmissible and appeared to be dominant or co-dominant. Scarlet-Rz1 is a promising genetic resource for developing Rhizoctonia-tolerant wheat cultivars because the tolerance trait immediately can be deployed into wheat breeding germplasm through cross-hybridization, thereby avoiding difficulties with transfer from secondary or tertiary relatives as well as constraints associated with genetically modified plants. Our findings also demonstrate the utility of chemical mutagenesis for generating tolerance to necrotrophic pathogens in allohexaploid wheat.

  19. Molecular characterization of soil bacteria antagonistic to Rhizoctonia solani, sheath blight of rice.

    PubMed

    Padaria, Jasdeep C; Singh, Aqbal

    2009-05-01

    Bacillus pumillus MTCC7615 has been identified as a potent isolate against Rhizocotonia solani, the fungal pathogen causing sheath blight in rice. The study aimed at probing the role of a 23kb size plasmid pJCP07 of Bacillus pumillus MTCC7615 in its fungal antagonism towards Rhizocotonia solani. Plasmid pJCP07 was found to be involved in production of a fungal antagonistic compound as demonstrated by plasmid curing and conjugational transfer experiments. Tn5 insertional studies further confirmed that the plasmid pJCP07 of Bacillus pumillus MTCC7615 carries some of the gene(s) involved in production of compound antagonistic to Rhizocotonia solani. The plasmid pJCP07 is thus a mobilizable medium-sized plasmid carrying genes responsible for antagonism of Bacillus pumillus MTCC7615 towards Rhizocotonia solani.

  20. The impact of the pathogen Rhizoctonia solani and its beneficial counterpart Bacillus amyloliquefaciens on the indigenous lettuce microbiome.

    PubMed

    Erlacher, Armin; Cardinale, Massimiliano; Grosch, Rita; Grube, Martin; Berg, Gabriele

    2014-01-01

    Lettuce belongs to the most commonly raw eaten food worldwide and its microbiome plays an important role for both human and plant health. Yet, little is known about the impact of potentially occurring pathogens and beneficial inoculants of the indigenous microorganisms associated with lettuce. To address this question we studied the impact of the phytopathogenic fungus Rhizoctonia solani and the biological control agent Bacillus amyloliquefaciens FZB42 on the indigenous rhizosphere and phyllosphere community of greenhouse-grown lettuce at two plant stages. The rhizosphere and phyllosphere gammaproteobacterial microbiomes of lettuce plants showed clear differences in their overall and core microbiome composition as well as in corresponding diversity indices. The rhizosphere was dominated by Xanthomonadaceae (48%) and Pseudomonadaceae (37%) with Rhodanobacter, Pseudoxanthomonas, Dokdonella, Luteimonas, Steroidobacter, Thermomonas as core inhabitants, while the dominating taxa associated to phyllosphere were Pseudomonadaceae (54%), Moraxellaceae (16%) and Enterobacteriaceae (25%) with Alkanindiges, Pantoea and a group of Enterobacteriaceae unclassified at genus level. The preferential occurrence of enterics in the phyllosphere was the most significant difference between both habitats. Additional enhancement of enterics on the phyllosphere was observed in bottom rot diseased lettuce plants, while Acinetobacter and Alkanindiges were identified as indicators of healthy plants. Interestingly, the microbial diversity was enhanced by treatment with both the pathogen, and the co-inoculated biological control agent. The highest impact and bacterial diversity was found by Rhizoctonia inoculation, but FZB42 lowered the impact of Rhizoctonia on the microbiome. This study shows that the indigenous microbiome shifts as a consequence to pathogen attack but FZB42 can compensate these effects, which supports their role as biocontrol agent and suggests a novel mode of action. PMID

  1. Sequence variation of the rDNA ITS regions within and between anastomosis groups in Rhizoctonia solani.

    PubMed

    Kuninaga, S; Natsuaki, T; Takeuchi, T; Yokosawa, R

    1997-09-01

    Sequence analysis of the rDNA region containing the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions and the 5.8s rDNA coding sequence was used to evaluate the genetic diversity of 45 isolates within and between anastomosis groups (AGs) in Rhizoctonia solani. The 5.8s rDNA sequence was completely conserved across all the AGs examined, whereas the ITS rDNA sequence was found to be highly variable among isolates. The sequence homology in the ITS regions was above 96% for isolates of the same subgroup, 66-100% for isolates of different subgroups within an AG, and 55-96% for isolates of different AGs. In neighbor-joining trees based on distances derived from ITS-5.8s rDNA sequences, subgroups IA, IB and IC within AG-1 and subgroups HG-I and HG-II within AG-4 were placed on statistically significant branches as assessed by bootstrap analysis. These results suggest that sequence analysis of ITS rDNA regions of R. solani may be a valuable tool for identifying AG subgroups of biological significance.

  2. Overexpression of snakin-1 gene enhances resistance to Rhizoctonia solani and Erwinia carotovora in transgenic potato plants.

    PubMed

    Almasia, Natalia I; Bazzini, Ariel A; Hopp, H Esteban; Vazquez-Rovere, Cecilia

    2008-05-01

    Snakin-1 (SN1), a cysteine-rich peptide with broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity in vitro, was evaluated for its ability to confer resistance to pathogens in transgenic potatoes. Genetic variants of this gene were cloned from wild and cultivated Solanum species. Nucleotide sequences revealed highly evolutionary conservation with 91-98% identity values. Potato plants (S. tuberosum subsp. tuberosum cv. Kennebec) were transformed via Agrobacterium tumefaciens with a construct encoding the S. chacoense SN1 gene under the regulation of the ubiquitous CaMV 35S promoter. Transgenic lines were molecularly characterized and challenged with either Rhizoctonia solani or Erwinia carotovora to analyse whether constitutive in vivo overexpression of the SN1 gene may lead to disease resistance. Only transgenic lines that accumulated high levels of SN1 mRNA exhibited significant symptom reductions of R. solani infection such as stem cankers and damping-off. Furthermore, these overexpressing lines showed significantly higher survival rates throughout the fungal resistance bioassays. In addition, the same lines showed significant protection against E. carotovora measured as: a reduction of lesion areas (from 46.5 to 88.1% with respect to the wild-type), number of fallen leaves and thickened or necrotic stems. Enhanced resistance to these two important potato pathogens suggests in vivo antifungal and antibacterial activity of SN1 and thus its possible biotechnological application.

  3. The adaptive potential of a plant pathogenic fungus, Rhizoctonia solani AG-3, under heat and fungicide stress.

    PubMed

    Willi, Yvonne; Frank, Aline; Heinzelmann, Renate; Kälin, Andrea; Spalinger, Lena; Ceresini, Paulo C

    2011-07-01

    The ability to improve fitness via adaptive evolution may be affected by environmental change. We tested this hypothesis in an in vitro experiment with the plant pathogen Rhizoctonia solani Anastomosis Group 3 (AG-3), assessing genetic and environmental variances under two temperatures (optimal and higher than optimal) and three fungicide concentrations (no fungicide, low and high concentration of a copper-based fungicide). We measured the mean daily growth rate, the coefficient of variation for genotypic (I (G)) and environmental variance (I (E)) in growth, and broad-sense heritability in growth. Both higher temperature and increased fungicide concentration caused a decline in growth, confirming their potential as stressors for the pathogen. All types of standardized variances in growth-I (G), phenotypic variance, and I (E) as a trend-increased with elevated stress. However, heritability was not significantly higher under enhanced stress because the increase in I (G) was counterbalanced by somewhat increased I (E). The results illustrate that predictions for adaptation under environmental stress may depend on the type of short-term evolvability measure. Because mycelial growth is linked to fitness, I (G) reflects short-term evolvability better than heritability, and it indicates that the evolutionary potential of R. solani is positively affected by stress.

  4. A survey on basal resistance and riboflavin-induced defense responses of sugar beet against Rhizoctonia solani.

    PubMed

    Taheri, Parissa; Tarighi, Saeed

    2011-07-01

    We examined basal defense responses and cytomolecular aspects of riboflavin-induced resistance (IR) in sugar beet-Rhizoctonia solani pathsystem by investigating H(2)O(2) burst, phenolics accumulation and analyzing the expression of phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL) and peroxidase (cprx1) genes. Riboflavin was capable of priming plant defense responses via timely induction of H(2)O(2) production and phenolics accumulation. A correlation was found between induction of resistance by riboflavin and upregulation of PAL and cprx1 which are involved in phenylpropanoid signaling and phenolics metabolism. Application of peroxidase and PAL inhibitors suppressed not only basal resistance, but also riboflavin-IR of sugar beet to the pathogen. Treatment of the leaves with each inhibitor alone or together with riboflavin reduced phenolics accumulation which was correlated with higher level of disease progress. Together, these results demonstrate the indispensability of rapid H(2)O(2) accumulation, phenylpropanoid pathway and phenolics metabolism in basal defense and riboflavin-IR of sugar beet against R. solani.

  5. Investigating the roles of MicroRNAs in biotic stress response induced by Rhizoctonia solani in rice

    SciTech Connect

    Syuhada, O. Nurfarahana; Kalaivani, N.

    2014-09-03

    Sheath blight disease, caused by Rhizoctonia solani 1802/KB was screened on two rice varieties, Oryza sativaindica cultivar MR219 and Oryza sativa indica cultivar UKMRC9. The disease symptom was severe in MR219 compared to UKMRC9. Total RNA from R. solani 1802/KB, infected rice leaves of MR219 and infected rice leaves of UKMRC9 were extracted using TRIzol reagent, purified and sent for small RNA sequencing. Three miRNA libraries were generated and analyzed. The libraries generated 65 805, 78 512 and 81 325 known miRNAs respectively. The structure of miRNA of these samples was predicted. The up-regulated and down-regulated of miRNAs target gene prediction and its target functions were discovered and were mainly related to the growth and development of metabolism, protein transport, transcriptional regulation, stress response, and hormone signaling and electron transfer. Sheath blight-induced differential expression of known miRNAs tends to targetMYB transcription factor, F-box proteins, NBS-LRR, leucine-rich repeat receptor protein kinases and zinc finger proteins. Detecting new miRNAs and measuring the expression profiles of known miRNAs is an important tasks required for a better understanding of various biological conditions. Therefore, further analysis using Gene Ontology Slim will be conducted to deduce some biological information from the datasets obtained.

  6. Investigating the roles of MicroRNAs in biotic stress response induced by Rhizoctonia solani in rice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Syuhada, O. Nurfarahana; Kalaivani, N.

    2014-09-01

    Sheath blight disease, caused by Rhizoctonia solani 1802/KB was screened on two rice varieties, Oryza sativaindica cultivar MR219 and Oryza sativa indica cultivar UKMRC9. The disease symptom was severe in MR219 compared to UKMRC9. Total RNA from R. solani 1802/KB, infected rice leaves of MR219 and infected rice leaves of UKMRC9 were extracted using TRIzol reagent, purified and sent for small RNA sequencing. Three miRNA libraries were generated and analyzed. The libraries generated 65 805, 78 512 and 81 325 known miRNAs respectively. The structure of miRNA of these samples was predicted. The up-regulated and down-regulated of miRNAs target gene prediction and its target functions were discovered and were mainly related to the growth and development of metabolism, protein transport, transcriptional regulation, stress response, and hormone signaling and electron transfer. Sheath blight-induced differential expression of known miRNAs tends to targetMYB transcription factor, F-box proteins, NBS-LRR, leucine-rich repeat receptor protein kinases and zinc finger proteins. Detecting new miRNAs and measuring the expression profiles of known miRNAs is an important tasks required for a better understanding of various biological conditions. Therefore, further analysis using Gene Ontology Slim will be conducted to deduce some biological information from the datasets obtained.

  7. Molecular diversity analysis of Rhizoctonia solani isolates infecting various pulse crops in different agro-ecological regions of India.

    PubMed

    Dubey, Sunil C; Tripathi, Aradhika; Upadhyay, B K

    2012-11-01

    Genetic diversity of 89 isolates of Rhizoctonia solani isolated from different pulse crops representing 21 states from 16 agro-ecological regions of India, 49 morphological, and 7 anastomosis groups (AGs) was analyzed using 12 universal rice primers (URPs), 22 random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD), and 23 inter-simple sequence repeats (ISSR) markers. Both URPs and RAPD markers provided 100 % polymorphism with the bands ranging from 0.1 to 5 kb in size, whereas ISSR markers gave 99.7 % polymorphism with the bands sizes ranging from 0.1 to 3 kb. The marker URP 38F followed by URP13R, URP25F, and URP30F, RAPD marker R1 followed by OPM6, A3 and OPA12 and ISSR3 followed by ISSR1, ISSR4, and ISSR20 produced the highest number of amplicons. R. solani isolates showed a high level of genetic diversity. Unweighted pair group method with an arithmetic average (UPGMA) analysis grouped the isolates into 7 major clusters at 35 % genetic similarity using the three sets of markers evaluated. In spite of using three different types of markers, about 95 % isolates shared common grouping patterns. The majority of the isolates representing various AGs were grouped together into different sub-clusters using all three types of markers. Molecular groups of the isolates did not correspond to agro-ecological regions or states and crops of the origin. An attempt was made for the first time in the present study to determine the genetic diversity of R. solani populations isolated from different pulse crops representing various AGs and agro-ecological regions.

  8. Highly polymorphic in silico-derived microsatellite loci in the potato-infecting fungal pathogen Rhizoctonia solani anastomosis group 3 from the Colombian Andes.

    PubMed

    Ferrucho, R L; Zala, M; Zhang, Z; Cubeta, M A; Garcia-Dominguez, C; Ceresini, P C

    2009-05-01

    Fourteen polymorphic microsatellite DNA markers derived from the draft genome sequence of Rhizoctonia solani anastomosis group 3 (AG-3), strain Rhs 1AP, were designed and characterized from the potato-infecting soil fungus R. solani AG-3. All loci were polymorphic in two field populations collected from Solanum tuberosum and S. phureja in the Colombian Andes. The total number of alleles per locus ranged from two to seven, while gene diversity (expected heterozygosity) varied from 0.11 to 0.81. Considering the variable levels of genetic diversity observed, these markers should be useful for population genetic analyses of this important dikaryotic fungal pathogen on a global scale.

  9. The Interaction Pattern between a Homology Model of 40S Ribosomal S9 Protein of Rhizoctonia solani and 1-Hydroxyphenaize by Docking Study

    PubMed Central

    Dharni, Seema; Sanchita; Sharma, Ashok; Patra, Dharani Dhar

    2014-01-01

    1-Hydroxyphenazine (1-OH-PHZ), a natural product from Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain SD12, was earlier reported to have potent antifungal activity against Rhizoctonia solani. In the present work, the antifungal activity of 1-OH-PHZ on 40S ribosomal S9 protein was validated by molecular docking approach. 1-OH-PHZ showed interaction with two polar contacts with residues, Arg69 and Phe19, which inhibits the synthesis of fungal protein. Our study reveals that 1-OH-PHZ can be a potent inhibitor of 40S ribosomal S9 protein of R. solani that may be a promising approach for the management of fungal diseases. PMID:24864254

  10. Molecular identification, genetic diversity, population genetics, and genomics of Rhizoctonia solani

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The basidiomycetous soilborne fungus Rhizoctonia (sensu lato) is an economically important pathogen of worldwide distribution and it is known to attack at least 188 species of higher plants, including agronomic crops, vegetables, ornamentals, forest trees and turfgrasses. The pathogenic isolates may...

  11. Integrated effect of microbial antagonist, organic amendment and fungicide in controlling seedling mortality (Rhizoctonia solani) and improving yield in pea (Pisum sativum L.).

    PubMed

    Akhter, Wasira; Bhuiyan, Mohamed Khurshed Alam; Sultana, Farjana; Hossain, Mohamed Motaher

    2015-01-01

    The study evaluated the comparative performance of a few microbial antagonists, organic amendments and fungicides and their integration for the management of seedling mortality (Rhizoctonia solani Kühn) and yield improvement in pea (Pisum sativum L.). Before setting the experiment in field microplots, a series of in vitro and in vivo experiments were conducted to select a virulent isolate of R. solani, an effective antagonistic isolate of Trichoderma harzianum, a fungitoxic organic amendment and an appropriate fungicide. A greenhouse pathogenicity test compared differences in seedling mortality in pea inoculated by four isolates of R. solani and identified the isolate RS10 as the most virulent one. Among the 20 isolates screened in dual culture assay on PDA, T. harzianum isolate T-3 was found to show the highest (77.22%) inhibition of the radial growth of R. solani. A complete inhibition (100.00%) of colony growth of R. solani was observed when fungicide Bavistin 50 WP and Provax-200 at the rate of 100 and 250 ppm, respectively, were used, while Provax-200 was found to be highly compatible with T. harzianum. Mustard oilcake gave maximum inhibition (60.28%) of the radial growth of R. solani at all ratios, followed by sesame oilcake and tea waste. Integration of soil treatment with T. harzianum isolate T-3 and mustard oilcake and seed treatment with Provax-200 appeared to be significantly superior in reducing seedling mortality and improving seed yield in pea in comparison to any single or dual application of them in the experimental field. The research results will help growers develop integrated disease management strategies for the control of Rhizoctonia disease in pea. The research results show the need for an integrating selective microbial antagonist, organic amendment and fungicide to achieve appropriate management of seedling mortality (R. solani) and increase of seed yield in pea. PMID:25528673

  12. Integrated effect of microbial antagonist, organic amendment and fungicide in controlling seedling mortality (Rhizoctonia solani) and improving yield in pea (Pisum sativum L.).

    PubMed

    Akhter, Wasira; Bhuiyan, Mohamed Khurshed Alam; Sultana, Farjana; Hossain, Mohamed Motaher

    2015-01-01

    The study evaluated the comparative performance of a few microbial antagonists, organic amendments and fungicides and their integration for the management of seedling mortality (Rhizoctonia solani Kühn) and yield improvement in pea (Pisum sativum L.). Before setting the experiment in field microplots, a series of in vitro and in vivo experiments were conducted to select a virulent isolate of R. solani, an effective antagonistic isolate of Trichoderma harzianum, a fungitoxic organic amendment and an appropriate fungicide. A greenhouse pathogenicity test compared differences in seedling mortality in pea inoculated by four isolates of R. solani and identified the isolate RS10 as the most virulent one. Among the 20 isolates screened in dual culture assay on PDA, T. harzianum isolate T-3 was found to show the highest (77.22%) inhibition of the radial growth of R. solani. A complete inhibition (100.00%) of colony growth of R. solani was observed when fungicide Bavistin 50 WP and Provax-200 at the rate of 100 and 250 ppm, respectively, were used, while Provax-200 was found to be highly compatible with T. harzianum. Mustard oilcake gave maximum inhibition (60.28%) of the radial growth of R. solani at all ratios, followed by sesame oilcake and tea waste. Integration of soil treatment with T. harzianum isolate T-3 and mustard oilcake and seed treatment with Provax-200 appeared to be significantly superior in reducing seedling mortality and improving seed yield in pea in comparison to any single or dual application of them in the experimental field. The research results will help growers develop integrated disease management strategies for the control of Rhizoctonia disease in pea. The research results show the need for an integrating selective microbial antagonist, organic amendment and fungicide to achieve appropriate management of seedling mortality (R. solani) and increase of seed yield in pea.

  13. Suppression of Seedling Damping-Off Caused by Pythium ultimum, P. irregulare, and Rhizoctonia solani in Container Media Amended with a Diverse Range of Pacific Northwest Compost Sources.

    PubMed

    Scheuerell, Steven J; Sullivan, Dan M; Mahaffee, Walter F

    2005-03-01

    ABSTRACT Suppression of seedling damping-off disease caused by Pythium spp. and Rhizoctonia solani is a potential benefit of formulating soilless container media with compost. Thirty-six compost samples from Pacific Northwest commercial composting facilities were analyzed for a number of physical, chemical, and biological properties, including suppression of damping-off caused by Pythium ultimum, P. irregulare, and R. solani. The samples were produced from diverse feedstocks and composting technol ogies; this was reflected in a large degree of variability in the measured properties. When mixed with sphagnum peat moss and inorganic aggregates, 67% of the compost samples significantly suppressed P. irregulare damping-off of cucumber, 64% suppressed P. ultimum damping-off of cucumber, and 17% suppressed damping-off of cabbage caused by R. solani. Suppression of Pythium damping-off was related to the potential of compost to support microbial activity and a qualitative index of ammonia volatilization. Suppression of Rhizoctonia damping-off was not related to any one compost factor. Currently available compost products potentially could provide commercially acceptable control of damping-off caused by Pythium spp., but it is necessary to fortify composts with microbial antagonists for the control of R. solani.

  14. Involvement of secondary metabolites and extracellular lytic enzymes produced by Pseudomonas fluorescens in inhibition of Rhizoctonia solani, the rice sheath blight pathogen.

    PubMed

    Nagarajkumar, M; Bhaskaran, R; Velazhahan, R

    2004-01-01

    Fourteen strains of Pseudomonas fluorescens isolated from rhizosphere soil of rice were tested for their antagonistic effect towards Rhizoctonia solani, the rice sheath blight fungus. Among them, PfMDU2 was the most effective in inhibiting mycelial growth of R. solani in vitro. Production of chitinase, beta-1,3-glucanase, siderophores, salicylic acid (SA) and hydrogen cyanide (HCN) by P. fluorescens strains was evaluated. The highest beta-1,3-glucanase activity, siderophore production, SA production and HCN production were recorded with PfMDU2. A significant relationship between the antagonistic potential of P. fluorescens against R. solani and its level of beta-1,3-glucanase, SA and HCN was observed. PMID:15160609

  15. 3-Methylthiopropionic Acid of Rhizoctonia solani AG-3 and Its Role in the Pathogenicity of the Fungus

    PubMed Central

    Kankam, Frederick; Long, Hai-Tao; He, Jing; Zhang, Chun-hong; Zhang, Hui-Xiu; Pu, Lumei; Qiu, Huizhen

    2016-01-01

    Studies were conducted to determine the role of 3-methylthioproprionic acid (MTPA) in the pathogenicity of potato stem canker, Rhizoctonia solani, and the concentrations required to inhibit growth of R. solani under laboratory and plant house-based conditions. The experiments were laid out in a completely randomized design with five treatments and five replications. The treatments were 0, 1, 2, 4, and 8 mM concentrations of MTPA. The purified toxin exhibited maximal activity at pH 2.5 and 30°C. MTPA at 1, 2, 4, and 8 mM levels reduced plant height, chlorophyll content, haulm fresh weight, number of stolons, canopy development, and tuber weight of potato plants, as compared to the control. MTPA significantly affected mycelial growth with 8 mM causing the highest infection. The potato seedlings treated with MTPA concentrations of 1.0–8.0 mM induced necrosis of up to 80% of root system area. Cankers were resulted from the injection of potato seedling stems with 8.0 mM MTPA. The results showed the disappearance of cell membrane, rough mitochondrial and cell walls, change of the shape of chloroplasts, and swollen endoplasmic reticulum. Seventy-six (76) hours after toxin treatment, cell contents were completely broken, cytoplasm dissolved, and more chromatin were seen in the nucleus. The results suggested that high levels of the toxin concentration caused cell membrane and cytoplasm fracture. The integrity of cellular structure was destroyed by the phytotoxin. The concentrations of the phytotoxin were significantly correlated with pathogenicity and caused damage to the cell membrane of potato stem base tissue. PMID:27147928

  16. Divergence between sympatric rice- and maize-infecting populations of Rhizoctonia solani AG-1 IA from Latin America.

    PubMed

    González-Vera, A D; Bernardes-de-Assis, J; Zala, M; McDonald, B A; Correa-Victoria, F; Graterol-Matute, E J; Ceresini, P C

    2010-02-01

    ABSTRACT The basidiomycetous fungus Rhizoctonia solani anastomosis group (AG)-1 IA is a major pathogen in Latin America causing sheath blight (SB) of rice. Particularly in Venezuela, the fungus also causes banded leaf and sheath blight (BLSB) on maize, which is considered an emerging disease problem where maize replaced traditional rice-cropping areas or is now planted in adjacent fields. Our goals in this study were to elucidate (i) the effects of host specialization on gene flow between sympatric and allopatric rice and maize-infecting fungal populations and (ii) the reproductive mode of the fungus, looking for evidence of recombination. In total, 375 isolates of R. solani AG1 IA sampled from three sympatric rice and maize fields in Venezuela (Portuguesa State) and two allopatric rice fields from Colombia (Meta State) and Panama (Chiriquí State) were genotyped using 10 microsatellite loci. Allopatric populations from Venezuela, Colombia, and Panama were significantly differentiated (Phi(ST) of 0.16 to 0.34). Partitioning of the genetic diversity indicated differentiation between sympatric populations from different host species, with 17% of the total genetic variation distributed between hosts while only 3 to 6% was distributed geographically among the sympatric Venezuelan fields. We detected symmetrical historical migration between the rice- and the maize-infecting populations from Venezuela. Rice- and maize-derived isolates were able to infect both rice and maize but were more aggressive on their original hosts, consistent with host specialization. Because the maize- and rice-infecting populations are still cross-pathogenic, we postulate that the genetic differentiation was relatively recent and mediated via a host shift. An isolation with migration analysis indicated that the maize-infecting population diverged from the rice-infecting population between 40 and 240 years ago. Our findings also suggest that maize-infecting populations have a mainly recombining

  17. Mycorrhizal fungi and Trichoderma harzianum as biocontrol agents for suppression of Rhizoctonia solani damping-off disease of tomato.

    PubMed

    Amer, M A; Abou-El-Seoud, I I

    2008-01-01

    The objective of the present work was to examine the interaction between arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus (AMF) Glomus intraradices and Trichoderma harzianum in soil. Soil application with T. harzianum or/and G. intraradices significantly reduced tomato seedlings damping-off incited by Rhizoctonia solani. Moreover, more pronounced disease suppression was obtained when both bioagents were applied together. Application of T. harzianum to healthy or inoculated seedlings significantly increased phosphorous supply, which resulted in higher yield, associated with the accumulation of high phosphorus levels in tissues of tomato plants (4.7- 6.5-fold), compared with low P supply. Inoculation with both bioagents in the presence or absence of the pathogen gave significant rise (2.1 - 2.2-fold), compared with low P levels. Root length of inoculated plants treated with T. harzianum or G. intraradices appeared longer than those of inoculated untreated plants at all P levels. Phosphorus uptake (mg P/plant) of tomato plant increased in all treatments with increasing of P levels with R. solani, T. harzianum or their combination and untreated plants have vigorous response to phosphorus fertilization. At low P levels, there was a significant difference between treatments, P uptake of tomato plants inoculated with AMF, T. harzianum or in combination, either in absence or in the presence of the tested pathogen showed highly significant increase, compared to untreated plant, infected plants with pathogen, T. harzianum, and their mixture. At high P levels, there was no significant difference between control and both AMF and T. harzianum, either individually in health plants or in combination with the pathogen. Eventually, results presented here substantiate other studies reporting enhanced biocontrol performance.

  18. Induction of defense response against Rhizoctonia solani in cucumber plants by endophytic bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis GS1.

    PubMed

    Seo, Dong-Jun; Nguyen, Dang-Minh-Chanh; Song, Yong-Su; Jung, Woo-Jin

    2012-03-01

    An endophytic bacterium, Bacillus thuringiensis GS1, was isolated from bracken (Pteridium aquilinum) and found to have maximal production of chitinase (4.3 units/ml) at 5 days after culture. This study investigated the ability of B. thuringiensis GS1 to induce resistance to Rhizoctonia solani KACC 40111 (RS) in cucumber plants. Chitinase activity was greatest in RS-treated plants at 4 days. beta-1,3- Glucanase activity was highest in GS1-treated plants at 5 days. Guaiacol peroxidase (GPOD) activity increased continuously in all treated plants for 5 days. Ascorbate peroxidase (APX) activity in RS-treated plants was increased 1.5-fold compared with the control at 4 days. Polyphenol oxidase (PPO) activity in RS-treated plants was increased 1.5-fold compared with the control at 3 days. At 5 days after treatment, activity staining revealed three bands with chitinase activity (Ch1, Ch2, and Ch3) on SDSPAGE of cucumber plants treated with GS1+RS, whereas only one band was observed for RS-treated plants (Ch2). One GPOD isozyme (Gp1) was also observed in response to treatment with RS and GS1+RS at 4 days. One APX band (Ap2) was present on the native-PAGE gel of the control, and GS1- and GS1+RS-treated plants at 1 day. PPO bands (Po1 and Po2) from RS- and GS1+RS-treated plants were stronger than in the control and GS1-treated plants upon native-PAGE at 5 days. Taken together, these results indicate that the induction of PR proteins and defense-related enzymes by B. thuringiensis GS1 might have suppressed the damping-off caused by R. solani KACC 40111 in cucumber plants.

  19. 3-Methylthiopropionic Acid of Rhizoctonia solani AG-3 and Its Role in the Pathogenicity of the Fungus.

    PubMed

    Kankam, Frederick; Long, Hai-Tao; He, Jing; Zhang, Chun-Hong; Zhang, Hui-Xiu; Pu, Lumei; Qiu, Huizhen

    2016-04-01

    Studies were conducted to determine the role of 3-methylthioproprionic acid (MTPA) in the pathogenicity of potato stem canker, Rhizoctonia solani, and the concentrations required to inhibit growth of R. solani under laboratory and plant house-based conditions. The experiments were laid out in a completely randomized design with five treatments and five replications. The treatments were 0, 1, 2, 4, and 8 mM concentrations of MTPA. The purified toxin exhibited maximal activity at pH 2.5 and 30°C. MTPA at 1, 2, 4, and 8 mM levels reduced plant height, chlorophyll content, haulm fresh weight, number of stolons, canopy development, and tuber weight of potato plants, as compared to the control. MTPA significantly affected mycelial growth with 8 mM causing the highest infection. The potato seedlings treated with MTPA concentrations of 1.0-8.0 mM induced necrosis of up to 80% of root system area. Cankers were resulted from the injection of potato seedling stems with 8.0 mM MTPA. The results showed the disappearance of cell membrane, rough mitochondrial and cell walls, change of the shape of chloroplasts, and swollen endoplasmic reticulum. Seventy-six (76) hours after toxin treatment, cell contents were completely broken, cytoplasm dissolved, and more chromatin were seen in the nucleus. The results suggested that high levels of the toxin concentration caused cell membrane and cytoplasm fracture. The integrity of cellular structure was destroyed by the phytotoxin. The concentrations of the phytotoxin were significantly correlated with pathogenicity and caused damage to the cell membrane of potato stem base tissue. PMID:27147928

  20. Development of a Rhizoctonia solani AG1-IB Specific Gene Model Enables Comparative Genome Analyses between Phytopathogenic R. solani AG1-IA, AG1-IB, AG3 and AG8 Isolates.

    PubMed

    Wibberg, Daniel; Rupp, Oliver; Blom, Jochen; Jelonek, Lukas; Kröber, Magdalena; Verwaaijen, Bart; Goesmann, Alexander; Albaum, Stefan; Grosch, Rita; Pühler, Alfred; Schlüter, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Rhizoctonia solani, a soil-born plant pathogenic basidiomycetous fungus, affects various economically important agricultural and horticultural crops. The draft genome sequence for the R. solani AG1-IB isolate 7/3/14 as well as a corresponding transcriptome dataset (Expressed Sequence Tags--ESTs) were established previously. Development of a specific R. solani AG1-IB gene model based on GMAP transcript mapping within the eukaryotic gene prediction platform AUGUSTUS allowed detection of new genes and provided insights into the gene structure of this fungus. In total, 12,616 genes were recognized in the genome of the AG1-IB isolate. Analysis of predicted genes by means of different bioinformatics tools revealed new genes whose products potentially are involved in degradation of plant cell wall components, melanin formation and synthesis of secondary metabolites. Comparative genome analyses between members of different R. solani anastomosis groups, namely AG1-IA, AG3 and AG8 and the newly annotated R. solani AG1-IB genome were performed within the comparative genomics platform EDGAR. It appeared that only 21 to 28% of all genes encoded in the draft genomes of the different strains were identified as core genes. Based on Average Nucleotide Identity (ANI) and Average Amino-acid Identity (AAI) analyses, considerable sequence differences between isolates representing different anastomosis groups were identified. However, R. solani isolates form a distinct cluster in relation to other fungi of the phylum Basidiomycota. The isolate representing AG1-IB encodes significant more genes featuring predictable functions in secondary metabolite production compared to other completely sequenced R. solani strains. The newly established R. solani AG1-IB 7/3/14 gene layout now provides a reliable basis for post-genomics studies.

  1. Interplay between parasitism and host ontogenic resistance in the epidemiology of the soil-borne plant pathogen Rhizoctonia solani.

    PubMed

    Simon, Thomas E; Le Cointe, Ronan; Delarue, Patrick; Morlière, Stéphanie; Montfort, Françoise; Hervé, Maxime R; Poggi, Sylvain

    2014-01-01

    Spread of soil-borne fungal plant pathogens is mainly driven by the amount of resources the pathogen is able to capture and exploit should it behave either as a saprotroph or a parasite. Despite their importance in understanding the fungal spread in agricultural ecosystems, experimental data related to exploitation of infected host plants by the pathogen remain scarce. Using Rhizoctonia solani / Raphanus sativus as a model pathosystem, we have obtained evidence on the link between ontogenic resistance of a tuberizing host and (i) its susceptibility to the pathogen and (ii) after infection, the ability of the fungus to spread in soil. Based on a highly replicable experimental system, we first show that infection success strongly depends on the host phenological stage. The nature of the disease symptoms abruptly changes depending on whether infection occurred before or after host tuberization, switching from damping-off to necrosis respectively. Our investigations also demonstrate that fungal spread in soil still depends on the host phenological stage at the moment of infection. High, medium, or low spread occurred when infection was respectively before, during, or after the tuberization process. Implications for crop protection are discussed. PMID:25127238

  2. Assessment of the diversity, and antagonism towards Rhizoctonia solani AG3, of Pseudomonas species in soil from different agricultural regimes.

    PubMed

    Garbeva, Paolina; Veen, Johannes Antonie; Elsas, Jan Dirk

    2004-01-01

    The genus Pseudomonas is one of the best-studied bacterial groups in soil, and includes numerous species of environmental interest. Pseudomonas species play key roles in soil, for instance in biological control of soil-borne plant pathogens and in bioremediation of pollutants. A polymerase chain reaction-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis system that specifically describes the diversity of Pseudomonas spp. in soil was developed. On the basis of this molecular method as well as cultivation-based approaches, the diversity of Pseudomonas species in soil under different agricultural regimes (permanent grassland, arable land either under rotation or under monoculture of maize) was studied. Both types of approaches revealed differences in the composition of Pseudomonas populations between the treatments. Differences between the treatments were also found based on the frequency of isolation of Pseudomonas strains with antagonistic properties against the soil-borne pathogen Rhizoctonia solani AG3. Higher relative numbers of isolates either with antagonistic activity toward this pathogen or with chitinolytic activity were obtained from permanent grassland or from the short-term arable land than from the arable land. The results obtained in this study strongly indicate that agricultural regimes influence the structure of Pseudomonas populations in soil, with specific antagonistic subpopulations being stimulated in grassland as compared to arable land.

  3. Characterization of the arom gene in Rhizoctonia solani, and transcription patterns under stable and induced hypovirulence conditions.

    PubMed

    Lakshman, Dilip K; Liu, Chunyu; Mishra, Prashant K; Tavantzis, Stellos

    2006-03-01

    The quinate pathway is induced by quinate in the wild-type virulent Rhizoctonia solani isolate Rhs 1AP but is constitutive in the hypovirulent, M2 dsRNA-containing isolate Rhs 1A1. Constitutive expression of the quinate pathway results in downregulation of the shikimate pathway, which includes the pentafunctional arom gene in Rhs 1A1. The arom gene has 5,323 bp including five introns as opposed to a single intron found in arom in ascomycetes. A 199-bp upstream sequence has a GC box, no TATAA box, but two GTATTAGA repeats. The largest arom transcript is 5,108 nucleotides long, excluding the poly(A) tail. It contains an open reading frame of 4,857 bases, coding for a putative 1,618-residue pentafunctional AROM protein. A Kozak sequence (GCGCCATGG) is present between +127 and +135. The 5'-end of the arom mRNA includes two nucleotides (UA) that are not found in the genomic sequence, and are probably added post-transcriptionally. Size and sequence heterogeneity were observed at both 5'- and 3'-end of the mRNA. Northern blot and suppression subtractive hybridization analyses showed that presence of a low amount of quinate, inducer of the quinate pathway, resulted in increased levels of arom mRNA, consistent with the compensation effect observed in ascomycetes.

  4. Interplay between parasitism and host ontogenic resistance in the epidemiology of the soil-borne plant pathogen Rhizoctonia solani.

    PubMed

    Simon, Thomas E; Le Cointe, Ronan; Delarue, Patrick; Morlière, Stéphanie; Montfort, Françoise; Hervé, Maxime R; Poggi, Sylvain

    2014-01-01

    Spread of soil-borne fungal plant pathogens is mainly driven by the amount of resources the pathogen is able to capture and exploit should it behave either as a saprotroph or a parasite. Despite their importance in understanding the fungal spread in agricultural ecosystems, experimental data related to exploitation of infected host plants by the pathogen remain scarce. Using Rhizoctonia solani / Raphanus sativus as a model pathosystem, we have obtained evidence on the link between ontogenic resistance of a tuberizing host and (i) its susceptibility to the pathogen and (ii) after infection, the ability of the fungus to spread in soil. Based on a highly replicable experimental system, we first show that infection success strongly depends on the host phenological stage. The nature of the disease symptoms abruptly changes depending on whether infection occurred before or after host tuberization, switching from damping-off to necrosis respectively. Our investigations also demonstrate that fungal spread in soil still depends on the host phenological stage at the moment of infection. High, medium, or low spread occurred when infection was respectively before, during, or after the tuberization process. Implications for crop protection are discussed.

  5. Interplay between Parasitism and Host Ontogenic Resistance in the Epidemiology of the Soil-Borne Plant Pathogen Rhizoctonia solani

    PubMed Central

    Delarue, Patrick; Morlière, Stéphanie; Montfort, Françoise; Hervé, Maxime R.; Poggi, Sylvain

    2014-01-01

    Spread of soil-borne fungal plant pathogens is mainly driven by the amount of resources the pathogen is able to capture and exploit should it behave either as a saprotroph or a parasite. Despite their importance in understanding the fungal spread in agricultural ecosystems, experimental data related to exploitation of infected host plants by the pathogen remain scarce. Using Rhizoctonia solani / Raphanus sativus as a model pathosystem, we have obtained evidence on the link between ontogenic resistance of a tuberizing host and (i) its susceptibility to the pathogen and (ii) after infection, the ability of the fungus to spread in soil. Based on a highly replicable experimental system, we first show that infection success strongly depends on the host phenological stage. The nature of the disease symptoms abruptly changes depending on whether infection occurred before or after host tuberization, switching from damping-off to necrosis respectively. Our investigations also demonstrate that fungal spread in soil still depends on the host phenological stage at the moment of infection. High, medium, or low spread occurred when infection was respectively before, during, or after the tuberization process. Implications for crop protection are discussed. PMID:25127238

  6. FT-ICR/MS and GC-EI/MS Metabolomics Networking Unravels Global Potato Sprout's Responses to Rhizoctonia solani Infection

    PubMed Central

    Aliferis, Konstantinos A.; Jabaji, Suha

    2012-01-01

    The complexity of plant-pathogen interactions makes their dissection a challenging task for metabolomics studies. Here we are reporting on an integrated metabolomics networking approach combining gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) with Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance/mass spectrometry (FT-ICR/MS) and bioinformatics analyses for the study of interactions in the potato sprout-Rhizoctonia solani pathosystem and the fluctuations in the global metabolome of sprouts. The developed bioanalytical and bioinformatics protocols provided a snapshot of the sprout's global metabolic network and its perturbations as a result of pathogen invasion. Mevalonic acid and deoxy-xylulose pathways were substantially up-regulated leading to the biosynthesis of sesquiterpene alkaloids such as the phytoalexins phytuberin, rishitin, and solavetivone, and steroidal alkaloids having solasodine and solanidine as their common aglycons. Additionally, the perturbation of the sprout's metabolism was depicted in fluctuations of the content of their amino acids pool and that of carboxylic and fatty acids. Components of the systemic acquired resistance (SAR) and hypersensitive reaction (HR) such as azelaic and oxalic acids were detected in increased levels in infected sprouts and strategies of the pathogen to overcome plant defense were proposed. Our metabolic approach has not only greatly expanded the multitude of metabolites previously reported in potato in response to pathogen invasion, but also enabled the identification of bioactive plant-derived metabolites providing valuable information that could be exploited in biotechnology, biomarker-assisted plant breeding, and crop protection for the development of new crop protection agents. PMID:22880040

  7. Powder formulations of two strains of Bacillus subtilis for control of rape seed damping-off caused by Rhizoctonia solani.

    PubMed

    Sharifi-Tehrani, A; Ahmadzadeh, M; Farzaneh, M; Sarani, S

    2006-01-01

    Talc-based formulations of Bacillus subtilis strains B1 and B2 were tested as seed and soil treatments separately for their ability to control Rhizoctonia solani, the causal agent of rape seed damping-off, in greenhouse and field trials. In general, the formulated bacteria was more effective to suppress the disease than the suspension of bacterial cells in carboxymethylcellulose solution (1%, w/v), in both greenhouse and field trials. The formulations of strain B1 as soil treatment and strain B2 as seed treatment in greenhouse, and the formulations of strain B2 as seed and soil treatments in field trials had the greatest effect on reducing the rape seed damping-off (66.7%, 73.3%, 41.3%, and 42.4%, respectively). The formulations of strain B1 as soil treatment and strain B2 as seed treatment were the most effective treatments to increase the root dry weights in the infected soil in greenhouse. The formulation of strain B2 as soil treatment had the greatest effect on enhancement of the fresh weight of roots and stem fresh and dry weights. The formulations of strains B1 and B2 stored at 4 degrees C exhibited better shelf life and efficacy in vitro than their counterparts stored at 25 degrees C. Long-term stability of the formulation of strain B1 was found to be better.

  8. Identification of potential marker genes for Trichoderma harzianum strains with high antagonistic potential against Rhizoctonia solani by a rapid subtraction hybridization approach.

    PubMed

    Scherm, Barbara; Schmoll, Monika; Balmas, Virgilio; Kubicek, Christian P; Migheli, Quirico

    2009-02-01

    A rapid subtraction hybridization approach was used to isolate genes differentially expressed during mycelial contact between Trichoderma harzianum (Hypocrea lixii) and Rhizoctonia solani, and could serve as marker genes for selection of superior biocontrol strains. Putatively positive clones were evaluated by transcription analysis during mycelial contact with R. solani versus growth on glucose, and for their differential transcription between two strains with either strong or poor biocontrol capability before, at, and after contact with R. solani. Besides four clones, which had similarity to putative but as yet uncharacterized proteins, they comprised ribosomal proteins, proteins involved in transcriptional switch and regulation, amino acid and energy catabolism, multidrug resistance, and degradation of proteins and glucans. Transcription of three clones was evaluated in five T. harzianum strains under confrontation conditions with R. solani. Two clones-acetyl-xylane esterase AXE1 and endoglucanase Cel61b-showed significant upregulation during in vivo confrontation of a T. harzianum strain that successively demonstrated a very high antagonistic capability towards R. solani, while expression was progressively lower in a series of T. harzianum strains with intermediate to poor antagonistic activity. These clones are promising candidates for use as markers in the screening of improved T. harzianum biocontrol strains.

  9. Solanioic Acid, an Antibacterial Degraded Steroid Produced in Culture by the Fungus Rhizoctonia solani Isolated from Tubers of the Medicinal Plant Cyperus rotundus.

    PubMed

    Ratnaweera, Pamoda B; Williams, David E; Patrick, Brian O; de Silva, E Dilip; Andersen, Raymond J

    2015-05-01

    Solanioic acid (1), a degraded and rearranged steroid that exhibits in vitro antibacterial activity against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), has been isolated from laboratory cultures of the fungus Rhizoctonia solani obtained from tubers of the plant Cyperus rotundus collected in Sri Lanka. The structure of solanioic acid (1) was elucidated by detailed analysis of NMR data, a single crystal X-ray diffraction analysis of a reduction product 2, and Mosher ester analysis on a derivative of the natural product. Solanioic acid (1) has an unprecedented carbon skeleton. PMID:25860081

  10. Solanioic Acid, an Antibacterial Degraded Steroid Produced in Culture by the Fungus Rhizoctonia solani Isolated from Tubers of the Medicinal Plant Cyperus rotundus.

    PubMed

    Ratnaweera, Pamoda B; Williams, David E; Patrick, Brian O; de Silva, E Dilip; Andersen, Raymond J

    2015-05-01

    Solanioic acid (1), a degraded and rearranged steroid that exhibits in vitro antibacterial activity against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), has been isolated from laboratory cultures of the fungus Rhizoctonia solani obtained from tubers of the plant Cyperus rotundus collected in Sri Lanka. The structure of solanioic acid (1) was elucidated by detailed analysis of NMR data, a single crystal X-ray diffraction analysis of a reduction product 2, and Mosher ester analysis on a derivative of the natural product. Solanioic acid (1) has an unprecedented carbon skeleton.

  11. Real-Time Quantitative RT-PCR of Defense-Associated Gene Transcripts of Rhizoctonia solani-Infected Bean Seedlings in Response to Inoculation with a Nonpathogenic Binucleate Rhizoctonia Isolate.

    PubMed

    Wen, Kui; Seguin, Philippe; St-Arnaud, Marc; Jabaji-Hare, Suha

    2005-04-01

    ABSTRACT Certain isolates of nonpathogenic binucleate Rhizoctonia spp. (np-BNR) are effective biocontrol agents against seedling root rot and damping-off. Inoculation of bean seed with np-BNR strain 232-CG at sowing reduced disease symptoms in bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) seedlings caused by R. solani. Molecular analyses of the spatial expression of three defense-associated genes were carried out using real-time quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (QRT-PCR) assays. This method allowed accurate quantitative evaluation of transcript levels of pG101 encoding for 1,3-beta-D-glucanase, gPAL1 encoding for phenylalanine ammonia lyase, and CHS17 encoding for chalcone synthase in 1- and 2-week-old bean seedlings that were inoculated simultaneously with np-BNR and infected with R. solani, and in seedlings that were singly inoculated with either fungi or not inoculated. In the seedlings that were infected with R. solani only, results revealed that, following infection, activation of all defense-associated gene transcripts was achieved with significant increases ranging from 7- to 40-fold greater than the control, depending on the defense gene and tissue analyzed. Seedlings that were treated with np-BNR and infected with R. solani had expression similar to those that were treated with np-BNR only, but the levels were significantly down-regulated compared with those that were infected with R. solani only. These findings indicate that disease suppression by np-BNR isolate is not correlated to pG101, gPAL1, and CHS17 gene activation.

  12. Development of a qPCR Strategy to Select Bean Genes Involved in Plant Defense Response and Regulated by the Trichoderma velutinum – Rhizoctonia solani Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Mayo, Sara; Cominelli, Eleonora; Sparvoli, Francesca; González-López, Oscar; Rodríguez-González, Alvaro; Gutiérrez, Santiago; Casquero, Pedro A.

    2016-01-01

    Bean production is affected by a wide diversity of fungal pathogens, among them Rhizoctonia solani is one of the most important. A strategy to control bean infectious diseases, mainly those caused by fungi, is based on the use of biocontrol agents (BCAs) that can reduce the negative effects of plant pathogens and also can promote positive responses in the plant. Trichoderma is a fungal genus that is able to induce the expression of genes involved in plant defense response and also to promote plant growth, root development and nutrient uptake. In this article, a strategy that combines in silico analysis and real time PCR to detect additional bean defense-related genes, regulated by the presence of Trichoderma velutinum and/or R. solani has been applied. Based in this strategy, from the 48 bean genes initially analyzed, 14 were selected, and only WRKY33, CH5b and hGS showed an up-regulatory response in the presence of T. velutinum. The other genes were or not affected (OSM34) or down-regulated by the presence of this fungus. R. solani infection resulted in a down-regulation of most of the genes analyzed, except PR1, OSM34 and CNGC2 that were not affected, and the presence of both, T. velutinum and R. solani, up-regulates hGS and down-regulates all the other genes analyzed, except CH5b which was not significantly affected. As conclusion, the strategy described in the present work has been shown to be effective to detect genes involved in plant defense, which respond to the presence of a BCA or to a pathogen and also to the presence of both. The selected genes show significant homology with previously described plant defense genes and they are expressed in bean leaves of plants treated with T. velutinum and/or infected with R. solani. PMID:27540382

  13. Development of a qPCR Strategy to Select Bean Genes Involved in Plant Defense Response and Regulated by the Trichoderma velutinum - Rhizoctonia solani Interaction.

    PubMed

    Mayo, Sara; Cominelli, Eleonora; Sparvoli, Francesca; González-López, Oscar; Rodríguez-González, Alvaro; Gutiérrez, Santiago; Casquero, Pedro A

    2016-01-01

    Bean production is affected by a wide diversity of fungal pathogens, among them Rhizoctonia solani is one of the most important. A strategy to control bean infectious diseases, mainly those caused by fungi, is based on the use of biocontrol agents (BCAs) that can reduce the negative effects of plant pathogens and also can promote positive responses in the plant. Trichoderma is a fungal genus that is able to induce the expression of genes involved in plant defense response and also to promote plant growth, root development and nutrient uptake. In this article, a strategy that combines in silico analysis and real time PCR to detect additional bean defense-related genes, regulated by the presence of Trichoderma velutinum and/or R. solani has been applied. Based in this strategy, from the 48 bean genes initially analyzed, 14 were selected, and only WRKY33, CH5b and hGS showed an up-regulatory response in the presence of T. velutinum. The other genes were or not affected (OSM34) or down-regulated by the presence of this fungus. R. solani infection resulted in a down-regulation of most of the genes analyzed, except PR1, OSM34 and CNGC2 that were not affected, and the presence of both, T. velutinum and R. solani, up-regulates hGS and down-regulates all the other genes analyzed, except CH5b which was not significantly affected. As conclusion, the strategy described in the present work has been shown to be effective to detect genes involved in plant defense, which respond to the presence of a BCA or to a pathogen and also to the presence of both. The selected genes show significant homology with previously described plant defense genes and they are expressed in bean leaves of plants treated with T. velutinum and/or infected with R. solani.

  14. Development of a qPCR Strategy to Select Bean Genes Involved in Plant Defense Response and Regulated by the Trichoderma velutinum - Rhizoctonia solani Interaction.

    PubMed

    Mayo, Sara; Cominelli, Eleonora; Sparvoli, Francesca; González-López, Oscar; Rodríguez-González, Alvaro; Gutiérrez, Santiago; Casquero, Pedro A

    2016-01-01

    Bean production is affected by a wide diversity of fungal pathogens, among them Rhizoctonia solani is one of the most important. A strategy to control bean infectious diseases, mainly those caused by fungi, is based on the use of biocontrol agents (BCAs) that can reduce the negative effects of plant pathogens and also can promote positive responses in the plant. Trichoderma is a fungal genus that is able to induce the expression of genes involved in plant defense response and also to promote plant growth, root development and nutrient uptake. In this article, a strategy that combines in silico analysis and real time PCR to detect additional bean defense-related genes, regulated by the presence of Trichoderma velutinum and/or R. solani has been applied. Based in this strategy, from the 48 bean genes initially analyzed, 14 were selected, and only WRKY33, CH5b and hGS showed an up-regulatory response in the presence of T. velutinum. The other genes were or not affected (OSM34) or down-regulated by the presence of this fungus. R. solani infection resulted in a down-regulation of most of the genes analyzed, except PR1, OSM34 and CNGC2 that were not affected, and the presence of both, T. velutinum and R. solani, up-regulates hGS and down-regulates all the other genes analyzed, except CH5b which was not significantly affected. As conclusion, the strategy described in the present work has been shown to be effective to detect genes involved in plant defense, which respond to the presence of a BCA or to a pathogen and also to the presence of both. The selected genes show significant homology with previously described plant defense genes and they are expressed in bean leaves of plants treated with T. velutinum and/or infected with R. solani. PMID:27540382

  15. High entomotoxicity and mechanism of the fungal GalNAc/Gal-specific Rhizoctonia solani lectin in pest insects.

    PubMed

    Hamshou, Mohamad; Van Damme, Els J M; Caccia, Silvia; Cappelle, Kaat; Vandenborre, Gianni; Ghesquière, Bart; Gevaert, Kris; Smagghe, Guy

    2013-03-01

    Whole insect assays where Rhizoctonia solani agglutinin (RSA) was fed to larval stages of the cotton leaf-worm Spodoptera littoralis and the pea aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum demonstrated a high concentration-dependent entomotoxicity, suggesting that this GalNAc/Gal-specific fungal lectin might be a good control agent for different pest insects. RSA at 10 mg/g in the solid diet of 2nd-instar caterpillars caused 84% weight reduction after 8 days with none of the caterpillars reaching the 4th-instar stage. In sucking aphids, 50% mortality was achieved after 3 days with 9 μM of RSA in the liquid diet. Feeding of FITC-labeled RSA to both insect pest species revealed strong lectin binding at the apical/luminal side of the midgut epithelium with the brush border zone, suggesting the insect midgut as a primary insecticide target tissue for RSA. This was also confirmed with cell cultures in vitro, where there was high fluorescence binding at the microvillar zone with primary cultures of larval midgut columnar cells of S. littoralis, and also at the surface with the insect midgut CF-203 cell line without lectin uptake in the midgut cells. In vitro assays using insect midgut CF-203 cells, revealed that RSA was highly toxic with an EC50 of 0.3 μM. Preincubation with GalNAc and saponin indicated that this action of RSA was carbohydrate-binding dependent and happened at the surface of the cells. Intoxicated CF-203 cells showed symptoms of apoptosis as nuclear condensation and DNA fragmentation, and this concurred with an increase of caspase-3/7, -8 and -9 activities. Finally, RSA affinity chromatography of membrane extracts of CF-203 cells followed by LC-MS/MS allowed the identification of 5747 unique peptides, among which four putatively glycosylated membrane proteins that are associated with apoptosis induction, namely Fas-associated factor, Apoptosis-linked gene-2, Neuroglian and CG2076, as potential binding targets for RSA. These data are discussed in relation to the

  16. Rice oxalate oxidase gene driven by green tissue-specific promoter increases tolerance to sheath blight pathogen (Rhizoctonia solani) in transgenic rice.

    PubMed

    Molla, Kutubuddin A; Karmakar, Subhasis; Chanda, Palas K; Ghosh, Satabdi; Sarkar, Sailendra N; Datta, Swapan K; Datta, Karabi

    2013-12-01

    Rice sheath blight, caused by the necrotrophic fungus Rhizoctonia solani, is one of the most devastating and intractable diseases of rice, leading to a significant reduction in rice productivity worldwide. In this article, in order to examine sheath blight resistance, we report the generation of transgenic rice lines overexpressing the rice oxalate oxidase 4 (Osoxo4) gene in a green tissue-specific manner which breaks down oxalic acid (OA), the pathogenesis factor secreted by R. solani. Transgenic plants showed higher enzyme activity of oxalate oxidase (OxO) than nontransgenic control plants, which was visualized by histochemical assays and sodium dodecylsulphate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). Transgenic rice leaves were more tolerant than control rice leaves to exogenous OA. Transgenic plants showed a higher level of expression of other defence-related genes in response to pathogen infection. More importantly, transgenic plants exhibited significantly enhanced durable resistance to R. solani. The overexpression of Osoxo4 in rice did not show any detrimental phenotypic or agronomic effect. Our findings indicate that rice OxO can be utilized effectively in plant genetic manipulation for sheath blight resistance, and possibly for resistance to other diseases caused by necrotrophic fungi, especially those that secrete OA. This is the first report of the expression of defence genes in rice in a green tissue-specific manner for sheath blight resistance.

  17. The Urochloa Foliar Blight and Collar Rot Pathogen Rhizoctonia solani AG-1 IA Emerged in South America Via a Host Shift from Rice.

    PubMed

    Chavarro Mesa, Edisson; Ceresini, Paulo C; Ramos Molina, Lina M; Pereira, Danilo A S; Schurt, Daniel A; Vieira, José R; Poloni, Nadia M; McDonald, Bruce A

    2015-11-01

    The fungus Rhizoctonia solani anastomosis group (AG)-1 IA emerged in the early 1990s as an important pathogen causing foliar blight and collar rot on pastures of the genus Urochloa (signalgrass) in South America. We tested the hypothesis that this pathogen emerged following a host shift or jump as a result of geographical overlapping of host species. The genetic structure of host and regional populations of R. solani AG-1 IA infecting signalgrass, rice, and soybean in Colombia and Brazil was analyzed using nine microsatellite loci in 350 isolates to measure population differentiation and infer the pathogen reproductive system. Phylogeographical analyses based on the microsatellite loci and on three DNA sequence loci were used to infer historical migration patterns and test hypotheses about the origin of the current pathogen populations. Cross pathogenicity assays were conducted to measure the degree of host specialization in populations sampled from different hosts. The combined analyses indicate that the pathogen populations currently infecting Urochloa in Colombia and Brazil most likely originated from a population that originally infected rice. R. solani AG-1 IA populations infecting Urochloa exhibit a mixed reproductive system including both sexual reproduction and long-distance dispersal of adapted clones, most likely on infected seed. The pathogen population on Urochloa has a genetic structure consistent with a high evolutionary potential and showed evidence for host specialization.

  18. Plant-mediated green synthesis of silver nanoparticles using Trifolium resupinatum seed exudate and their antifungal efficacy on Neofusicoccum parvum and Rhizoctonia solani.

    PubMed

    Khatami, Mehrdad; Nejad, Meysam Soltani; Salari, Samira; Almani, Pooya Ghasemi Nejad

    2016-08-01

    In recent years, biosynthesis and the utilisation of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) has become an interesting subject. In this study, the authors investigated the biosynthesis of AgNPs using Trifolium resupinatum (Persian clover) seed exudates. The characterisation of AgNPs were analysed using ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and Fourier transform infra-red spectroscopy. Also, antifungal efficacy of biogenic AgNPs against two important plant-pathogenic fungi (Rhizoctonia solani and Neofusicoccum Parvum) in vitro condition was evaluated. The XRD analysis showed that the AgNPs are crystalline in nature and have face-centred cubic geometry. TEM images revealed the spherical shape of the AgNPs with an average size of 17 nm. The synthesised AgNPs were formed at room temperature and kept stable for 4 months. The maximum distributions of the synthesised AgNPs were seen to range in size from 5 to 10 nm. The highest inhibition effect was observed against R. solani at 40 ppm concentration of AgNPs (94.1%) followed by N. parvum (84%). The results showed that the antifungal activity of AgNPs was dependent on the amounts of AgNPs. In conclusion, the AgNPs obtained from T. resupinatum seed exudate exhibit good antifungal activity against the pathogenic fungi R. solani and N. Parvum. PMID:27463795

  19. An immunological approach to quantifying the saprotrophic growth dynamics of Trichoderma species during antagonistic interactions with Rhizoctonia solani in a soil-less mix.

    PubMed

    Thornton, Christopher R

    2004-04-01

    Studies of the saprotrophic growth dynamics of Trichoderma species and their fungal hosts during antagonistic interactions are severely hampered by the absence of methods that allow the unambiguous identification and quantification of individual genera in complex environments such as soil or compost containing mixed populations of fungi. Furthermore, methods are required that allow discrimination between active hyphal growth and other components of fungal biomass such as quiescent spores that are produced in large numbers by Trichoderma species. This study details the use of monoclonal antibodies to quantify the saprotrophic growth dynamics of the soil-borne plant pathogen Rhizoctonia solani and biological control strains of Trichoderma asperellum and Trichoderma harzianum during antagonistic interactions in peat-based microcosms. Quantification was based on the immunological detection of constitutive, extracellular antigens that are secreted from the growing tip of Rhizoctonia and Trichoderma mycelium and, in the case of Trichoderma harzianum, from quiescent phialoconidia also. The Trichoderma-specific monoclonal antibody (MF2) binds to a protein epitope of the enzyme glucoamylase, which was shown by immunofluorescence and immunogold electron gold microscopy studies of Trichoderma virens in vitro to be produced at the origin of germ tube emergence in phialoconidia and from the growing tip of germ tubes. In addition, a non-destructive immunoblotting technique showed that the enzyme was secreted during active growth of Trichoderma asperellum mycelium in peat. The Rhizoctonia solani-specific monoclonal antibody (EH2) similarly binds to a protein epitope of a glycoprotein that is secreted during active mycelial growth. Extracts derived from lyophilized mycelium were used as a quantifiable and repeatable source of antigens for construction of calibration curves. These curves were used to convert the absorbance values obtained in ELISA tests of peat extracts to biomass

  20. Carbon Source-Dependent Effects of Anaerobic Soil Disinfestation on Soil Microbiome and Suppression of Rhizoctonia solani AG-5 and Pratylenchus penetrans.

    PubMed

    Hewavitharana, Shashika S; Mazzola, Mark

    2016-09-01

    The effect of carbon source on efficacy of anaerobic soil disinfestation (ASD) toward suppression of apple root infection by Rhizoctonia solani AG-5 and Pratylenchus penetrans was examined. Orchard grass (GR), rice bran (RB), ethanol (ET), composted steer manure (CM), and Brassica juncea seed meal (SM) were used as ASD carbon inputs, with plant assays conducted in natural and pasteurized orchard soils. Subsequent studies investigated the effect of GR application rate used in ASD on control of these pathogens. In general, apple root infection by R. solani AG-5 was significantly lower in ET, GR, RB, and SM ASD treatments compared with the control. Among different ASD treatments, apple seedling growth was significantly greater when GR or SM was used as the carbon input relative to all other ASD treatments. R. solani AG-5 DNA abundance was significantly reduced in all ASD treatments, regardless of amendment type, compared with the control. In independent experiments, ASD-GR was consistently superior to ASD-CM for limiting pathogen activity in soils. ASD treatment with a grass input rate of 20 t ha(-1) provided superior suppression of P. penetrans but grass application rate did not affect ASD efficacy in control of R. solani AG-5. The soil microbiome from ASD-GR-treated soils was clearly distinct from the control and ASD-CM-treated soils. In contrast, composition of the microbiome from control and ASD-CM-treated soils could not be differentiated. Comparative results from pasteurized and nonpasteurized soils suggest that there is potential for GR based ASD treatment to recruit microbial elements that persist over the anaerobic phase of soil incubation, which may functionally contribute to disease suppression. When ASD was conducted with GR, microbial diversity was markedly reduced relative to the control or ASD-CM soil suggesting that this parameter, typically associated with system resilience, was not instrumental to the function of ASD-induced soil suppressiveness.

  1. Genes of the de novo and Salvage Biosynthesis Pathways of Vitamin B6 are Regulated under Oxidative Stress in the Plant Pathogen Rhizoctonia solani.

    PubMed

    Samsatly, Jamil; Chamoun, Rony; Gluck-Thaler, Emile; Jabaji, Suha

    2015-01-01

    Vitamin B6 is recognized as an important cofactor required for numerous metabolic enzymes, and has been shown to act as an antioxidant and play a role in stress responses. It can be synthesized through two different routes: salvage and de novo pathways. However, little is known about the possible function of the vitamin B6 pathways in the fungal plant pathogen Rhizoctonia solani. Using genome walking, the de novo biosynthetic pathway genes; RsolPDX1 and RsolPDX2 and the salvage biosynthetic pathway gene, RsolPLR were sequenced. The predicted amino acid sequences of the three genes had high degrees of similarity to other fungal PDX1, PDX2, and PLR proteins and are closely related to other R. solani anastomosis groups. We also examined their regulation when subjected to reactive oxygen species (ROS) stress inducers, the superoxide generator paraquat, or H2O2, and compared it to the well-known antioxidant genes, catalase and glutathione-S-transferase (GST). The genes were differentially regulated with transcript levels as high as 33 fold depending on the gene and type of stress reflecting differences in the type of damage induced by ROS. Exogenous addition of the vitamers PN or PLP in culture medium significantly induced the transcription of the vitamin B6 de novo encoding genes as early as 0.5 hour post treatment (HPT). On the other hand, transcription of RsolPLR was vitamer-specific; a down regulation upon supplementation of PN and upregulation with PLP. Our results suggest that accumulation of ROS in R. solani mycelia is linked to transcriptional regulation of the three genes and implicate the vitamin B6 biosynthesis machinery in R. solani, similar to catalases and GST, as an antioxidant stress protector against oxidative stress.

  2. Suppression subtractive hybridization and comparative expression of a pore-forming toxin and glycosyl hydrolase genes in Rhizoctonia solani during potato sprout infection.

    PubMed

    Chamoun, Rony; Samsatly, Jamil; Pakala, Suman B; Cubeta, Marc A; Jabaji, Suha

    2015-06-01

    Rhizoctonia solani is a plant pathogenic fungus that causes black scurf on tubers and stem and stolon canker on underground parts of potato plant. Early in the season, the fungus attacks germinating sprouts underground before they emerge from the soil. Damage at this stage results in delayed emergence of weakened plants with poor and uneven stands. The mechanism underlying this phenomenon has been investigated in this study by coupling a cDNA-suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) library to differential screening to identify transcripts of R. solani that are down-regulated during infection of potato sprouts. We report on the identification of 33 unique genes with functions related to carbohydrate binding, vitamin synthesis, pathogenicity, translation, ATP and nucleic acid binding and other categories. RACE-PCR was used to clone and characterize the first full-length cDNA clones, RSENDO1 and RSGLYC1 that encode for an eukaryotic delta-endotoxin CytB protein and an intracellular glycosyl hydrolase, respectively. Quantitative real-time PCR revealed the down-regulation of RSENDO1 during infection of potato sprouts and the up-regulation of RSGLYC1 when the fungus was grown on a cellulose-based nutrient medium. In contrast, additional experiments have highlighted the down-regulation of RSENDO1 when R. solani was co-cultured with the mycoparasite Stachybotrys elegans and the bacterial antagonist Bacillus subtilis B26. These results advance our understanding of R. solani-potato interaction in subterranean parts of the plant. Such approaches could be considered in building an efficient integrated potato disease management program. PMID:25472038

  3. Genes of the de novo and Salvage Biosynthesis Pathways of Vitamin B6 are Regulated under Oxidative Stress in the Plant Pathogen Rhizoctonia solani

    PubMed Central

    Samsatly, Jamil; Chamoun, Rony; Gluck-Thaler, Emile; Jabaji, Suha

    2016-01-01

    Vitamin B6 is recognized as an important cofactor required for numerous metabolic enzymes, and has been shown to act as an antioxidant and play a role in stress responses. It can be synthesized through two different routes: salvage and de novo pathways. However, little is known about the possible function of the vitamin B6 pathways in the fungal plant pathogen Rhizoctonia solani. Using genome walking, the de novo biosynthetic pathway genes; RsolPDX1 and RsolPDX2 and the salvage biosynthetic pathway gene, RsolPLR were sequenced. The predicted amino acid sequences of the three genes had high degrees of similarity to other fungal PDX1, PDX2, and PLR proteins and are closely related to other R. solani anastomosis groups. We also examined their regulation when subjected to reactive oxygen species (ROS) stress inducers, the superoxide generator paraquat, or H2O2, and compared it to the well-known antioxidant genes, catalase and glutathione-S-transferase (GST). The genes were differentially regulated with transcript levels as high as 33 fold depending on the gene and type of stress reflecting differences in the type of damage induced by ROS. Exogenous addition of the vitamers PN or PLP in culture medium significantly induced the transcription of the vitamin B6 de novo encoding genes as early as 0.5 hour post treatment (HPT). On the other hand, transcription of RsolPLR was vitamer-specific; a down regulation upon supplementation of PN and upregulation with PLP. Our results suggest that accumulation of ROS in R. solani mycelia is linked to transcriptional regulation of the three genes and implicate the vitamin B6 biosynthesis machinery in R. solani, similar to catalases and GST, as an antioxidant stress protector against oxidative stress. PMID:26779127

  4. Trichoderma harzianum strain SQR-T37 and its bio-organic fertilizer could control Rhizoctonia solani damping-off disease in cucumber seedlings mainly by the mycoparasitism.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xinqi; Chen, Lihua; Ran, Wei; Shen, Qirong; Yang, Xingming

    2011-08-01

    Damping-off disease is caused by Rhizoctonia solani and leads to serious loss in many crops. Biological control is an efficient and environmentally friendly way to prevent damping-off disease. Optical micrographs, scanning electron micrographs, and the determination of hydrolytic enzymes were used to investigate the antagonism of Trichoderma harzianum SQR-T37 (SQR-T37) against R. solani. Experiments were performed in pots to assess the in vivo disease-control efficiency of SQR-T37 and bio-organic fertilizer. The results indicate that the mycoparasitism was the main mechanism accounting for the antagonistic activity of SQR-T37. In one experiment, the population of R. solani was decreased from 10(6) internal transcribed spacer (ITS) copies per gram soil to 10(4) ITS copies per gram soil by the presence of the antagonist. In this experiment, 45% of the control efficiency was obtained when 8 g of SQR-T37 hyphae per gram soil was applied. In a second experiment, as much as 81.82% of the control efficiency was obtained when bio-organic fertilizer (SQR-T37 fermented organic fertilizer, BIO) was applied compared to only 27.27% of the control efficiency when only 4 g of SQR-T37 hyphae per gram soil was applied. Twenty days after incubation, the population of T. harzianum was 4.12 × 10(7) ITS copies per gram soil in the BIO treatment, which was much higher than that in the previous treatment (8.77 × 10(5) ITS copies per gram soil), where only SQR-T37 was applied. The results indicated that SQR-T37 was a potent antagonist against R. solani in a mycoparasitic way that decreased the population of the pathogen. Applying BIO was more efficient than SQR-T37 application alone because it stabilized the population of the antagonist.

  5. Carbon Source-Dependent Effects of Anaerobic Soil Disinfestation on Soil Microbiome and Suppression of Rhizoctonia solani AG-5 and Pratylenchus penetrans.

    PubMed

    Hewavitharana, Shashika S; Mazzola, Mark

    2016-09-01

    The effect of carbon source on efficacy of anaerobic soil disinfestation (ASD) toward suppression of apple root infection by Rhizoctonia solani AG-5 and Pratylenchus penetrans was examined. Orchard grass (GR), rice bran (RB), ethanol (ET), composted steer manure (CM), and Brassica juncea seed meal (SM) were used as ASD carbon inputs, with plant assays conducted in natural and pasteurized orchard soils. Subsequent studies investigated the effect of GR application rate used in ASD on control of these pathogens. In general, apple root infection by R. solani AG-5 was significantly lower in ET, GR, RB, and SM ASD treatments compared with the control. Among different ASD treatments, apple seedling growth was significantly greater when GR or SM was used as the carbon input relative to all other ASD treatments. R. solani AG-5 DNA abundance was significantly reduced in all ASD treatments, regardless of amendment type, compared with the control. In independent experiments, ASD-GR was consistently superior to ASD-CM for limiting pathogen activity in soils. ASD treatment with a grass input rate of 20 t ha(-1) provided superior suppression of P. penetrans but grass application rate did not affect ASD efficacy in control of R. solani AG-5. The soil microbiome from ASD-GR-treated soils was clearly distinct from the control and ASD-CM-treated soils. In contrast, composition of the microbiome from control and ASD-CM-treated soils could not be differentiated. Comparative results from pasteurized and nonpasteurized soils suggest that there is potential for GR based ASD treatment to recruit microbial elements that persist over the anaerobic phase of soil incubation, which may functionally contribute to disease suppression. When ASD was conducted with GR, microbial diversity was markedly reduced relative to the control or ASD-CM soil suggesting that this parameter, typically associated with system resilience, was not instrumental to the function of ASD-induced soil suppressiveness

  6. Cyclic Lipopeptides of Bacillus amyloliquefaciens subsp. plantarum Colonizing the Lettuce Rhizosphere Enhance Plant Defense Responses Toward the Bottom Rot Pathogen Rhizoctonia solani.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, Soumitra Paul; Uhl, Jenny; Grosch, Rita; Alquéres, Sylvia; Pittroff, Sabrina; Dietel, Kristin; Schmitt-Kopplin, Philippe; Borriss, Rainer; Hartmann, Anton

    2015-09-01

    The commercially available inoculant Bacillus amyloliquefaciens FZB42 is able to considerably reduce lettuce bottom rot caused by Rhizoctonia solani. To understand the interaction between FZB42 and R. solani in the rhizosphere of lettuce, we used an axenic system with lettuce bacterized with FZB42 and inoculated with R. solani. Confocal laser scanning microscopy showed that FZB42 could delay the initial establishment of R. solani on the plants. To show which secondary metabolites of FZB42 are produced under these in-situ conditions, we developed an ultra-high performance liquid chromatography coupled to time of flight mass spectrometry-based method and identified surfactin, fengycin, and bacillomycin D in the lettuce rhizosphere. We hypothesized that lipopeptides and polyketides play a role in enhancing the plant defense responses in addition to the direct antagonistic effect toward R. solani and used a quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction-based assay for marker genes involved in defense signaling pathways in lettuce. A significant higher expression of PDF 1.2 observed in the bacterized plants in response to subsequent pathogen challenge showed that FZB42 could enhance the lettuce defense response toward the fungal pathogen. To identify if surfactin or other nonribosomally synthesized secondary metabolites could elicit the observed enhanced defense gene expression, we examined two mutants of FZB42 deficient in production of surfactin and the lipopetides and polyketides, by expression analysis and pot experiments. In the absence of surfactin and other nonribosomally synthesized secondary metabolites, there was no enhanced PDF 1.2-mediated response to the pathogen challenge. Pot experiment results showed that the mutants failed to reduce disease incidence in lettuce as compared with the FZB42 wild type, indicating, that surfactin as well as other nonribosomally synthesized secondary metabolites play a role in the actual disease suppression and on lettuce

  7. Mating type-correlated molecular markers and demonstration of heterokaryosis in the phytopathogenic fungus Thanatephorus cucumeris (Rhizoctonia solani) AG 1-IC by AFLP DNA fingerprinting analysis.

    PubMed

    Julián, M C; Acero, J; Salazar, O; Keijer, J; Rubio, V

    1999-01-01

    The destructive soil-borne plant pathogenic basidiomycetous fungus Thanatephorus cucumeris (Frank) Donk [anamorph: Rhizoctonia solani Kühn] is not a homogeneous species, but is composed of at least twelve anastomosis groups (AG), which seem to be genetically isolated. The genetics of several T. cucumeris anastomosis groups has been studied by analysis of heterokaryotic tuft formation in the area of contact between homokaryotic single-spore isolates, revealing that AG 1 is heterokaryotic and bipolar. To prove that tuft formation is due to heterokaryosis, AFLP DNA fingerprinting has been applied to a heterokaryotic T. cucumeris AG 1-IC isolate, its homokaryotic single spore-derived progeny, and newly formed heterokaryons. By means of AFLP markers, it is demonstrated that fluffy tufts formed upon pairing of homokaryons from different mating types are newly formed heterokaryons. Mating type-correlated markers have also been found, which will be useful for future studies of the genetics of this fungal species complex.

  8. Integrated biological and chemical control of damping-off caused by Rhizoctonia solani using Bacillus subtilis RB14-C and flutolanil.

    PubMed

    Kondoh, M; Hirai, M; Shoda, M

    2001-01-01

    Bacillus subtilis RB14-C was isolated as a potential biological agent to control the occurrence of various plant diseases. Integrated control of damping-off in tomato plants caused by Rhizoctonia solani was carried out in pots using B. subtilis RB14-C and chemical pesticide, flutolanil. The growth of RB14-C was the same in both the flutolanil-containing and the flutolanil-free media, indicating the resistance of RB14-C to flutolanil. Although the productivity of surfactin decreased to one-third in the flutolanil-containing medium, compared with that in the flutolanil-free medium, the productivity of iturin A which is mainly associated with the suppressive ability of RB14-C against plant pathogens was unaffected. The integration of RB14-C and flutolanil reduced the amount of flutolanil used to one-fourth of that of the single use of flutolanil, with the same efficacy of reducing disease occurrence.

  9. High-resolution mapping of Rsn1, a locus controlling sensitivity of rice to a necrosis-inducing phytotoxin from Rhizoctonia solani AG1-IA.

    PubMed

    Costanzo, Stefano; Jackson, Aaron K; Brooks, Steven A

    2011-06-01

    Rhizoctonia solani is a necrotrophic fungal pathogen that causes disease on many crop-plant species. Anastomosis group 1-IA is the causal agent of sheath blight of rice (Oryza sativa L.), one of the most important rice diseases worldwide. R. solani AG1-IA produces a necrosis-inducing phytotoxin and rice cultivar's sensitivity to the toxin correlates with disease susceptibility. Unlike genetic analyses of sheath blight resistance where resistance loci have been reported as quantitative trait loci, phytotoxin sensitivity is inherited as a Mendelian trait that permits high-resolution mapping of the sensitivity genes. An F(2) mapping population derived from parent cultivars 'Cypress' (toxin sensitive) and 'Jasmine 85' (toxin insensitive) was used to map Rsn1, the necrosis-inducing locus. Initial mapping based on 176 F(2) progeny and 69 simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers located Rsn1 on the long arm of chromosome 7, with tight linkage to SSR marker RM418. A high-resolution genetic map of the region was subsequently developed using a total of 1,043 F(2) progeny, and Rsn1 was mapped to a 0.7 cM interval flanked by markers NM590 and RM418. Analysis of the corresponding 29 Kb genomic sequences from reference cultivars 'Nipponbare' and '93-11' revealed the presence of four putative genes within the interval. Two are expressed cytokinin-O-glucosyltransferases, which fit an apoptotic pathway model of toxin activity, and are individually being investigated further as potential candidates for Rsn1.

  10. Molecular characterization of the pathogenic plant fungus Rhizoctonia solani (Ceratobasidiaceae) isolated from Egypt based on protein and PCR-RAPD profiles.

    PubMed

    Mahmoud, M A; Al-Sohaibani, S A; Abdelbacki, A M M; Al-Othman, M R; Abd El-Aziz, A R M; Kasem, K K; Mikhail, M S; Sabet, K K; Omar, M R; Hussein, E M

    2012-10-04

    Twenty-one isolates of Rhizoctonia solani were categorized into three anastomosis groups consisting of AG-4-HG-I (eight isolates), AG-2-2 (nine isolates) and AG-5 (four isolates). Their pathogenic capacities were tested on cotton cultivar Giza 86. Pre-emergence damping-off varied in response to the different isolates; however, the differences were not significant. Soluble proteins of the fungal isolates were electrophoresed using SDS-PAGE and gel electrophoreses. A dendrogram of the protein banding patterns by the UPGMA of arithmetic means placed the fungal isolates into distinct groups. There was no evidence of a relationship between protein dendrogram, anastomosis grouping or level of virulence or geographic origin. The dendrogram generated from these isolates based on PCR analysis with five RAPD-PCR primers showed high levels of genetic similarity among the isolates from the same geographical locations. There was partially relationship between the genetic similarity and AGs or level of virulence or geographic origin based on RAPD dendrogram. These results demonstrate that RAPD technique is a useful tool in determining the genetic characterization among isolates of R. solani.

  11. Transgenic rice with inducible ethylene production exhibits broad-spectrum disease resistance to the fungal pathogens Magnaporthe oryzae and Rhizoctonia solani.

    PubMed

    Helliwell, Emily E; Wang, Qin; Yang, Yinong

    2013-01-01

    Rice blast (Magnaporthe oryzae) and sheath blight (Rhizoctonia solani) are the two most devastating diseases of rice (Oryza sativa), and have severe impacts on crop yield and grain quality. Recent evidence suggests that ethylene (ET) may play a more prominent role than salicylic acid and jasmonic acid in mediating rice disease resistance. In this study, we attempt to genetically manipulate endogenous ET levels in rice for enhancing resistance to rice blast and sheath blight diseases. Transgenic lines with inducible production of ET were generated by expressing the rice ACS2 (1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid synthase, a key enzyme of ET biosynthesis) transgene under control of a strong pathogen-inducible promoter. In comparison with the wild-type plant, the OsACS2-overexpression lines showed significantly increased levels of the OsACS2 transcripts, endogenous ET and defence gene expression, especially in response to pathogen infection. More importantly, the transgenic lines exhibited increased resistance to a field isolate of R. solani, as well as different races of M. oryzae. Assessment of the growth rate, generational time and seed production revealed little or no differences between wild type and transgenic lines. These results suggest that pathogen-inducible production of ET in transgenic rice can enhance resistance to necrotrophic and hemibiotrophic fungal pathogens without negatively impacting crop productivity.

  12. Complete nucleotide sequence of the linear DNA plasmid pRS224 with hairpin loops from Rhizoctonia solani and its unique transcriptional form.

    PubMed

    Katsura, K; Sasaki, A; Nagasaka, A; Fuji, M; Miyake, Y; Hashiba, T

    2001-10-01

    The complete nucleotide sequence of the linear DNA plasmid (pRS224-1) from the plant-pathogenic fungus Rhizoctonia solani isolate H-16 was determined; and its unique RNA transcripts were characterized. The pRS224-1 DNA consists of 4,986 nucleotides. A computer-based study of the folding of pRS224-1 at both termini predicted hairpin-loop structures. The hairpin loops consisted of the left and right termini of 236 and 264 nucleotides, respectively, and share no sequence homology. Unique poly(A) RNAs, 4.7 kb and 7.4 kb in length and hybridizing with the pRS224 DNA, were found in mycelial cells of R. solani H-16. Transcript product-mapping allowed the prediction of the locations of different expression signals. The 7.4-kb transcript is generated from the left terminal region of the complementary strand, via the full-length sense-strand, to the right terminal region of the complementary strand. The 4.7-kb transcript is generated from the center region of the sense strand to the right terminal region of the complementary strand. One open reading frame (ORF) found in pRS224-1 is 887 amino acids long and has a potential coding capacity of 102 kDa. The ORF contains the highly conserved domains characteristic of reverse transcriptase sequences, including the highly conserved YXDD sequence.

  13. Compositional variability and antifungal potentials of ocimum basilicum, O. tenuiflorum, O. gratissimum and O. kilimandscharicum essential oils against Rhizoctonia solani and Choanephora cucurbitarum.

    PubMed

    Padalia, Rajendra C; Verma, Ram S; Chauhan, Amit; Goswami, Prakash; Chanotiya, Chandan S; Saroj, Arvind; Samad, Abdul; Khaliq, Abdul

    2014-10-01

    The composition of hydrodistilled essential oils of Ocimum basilicum L. (four chemovariants), O. tenuiflorum L., O. gratissimum L., and O. kilimandscharicum Guerke were analyzed and compared by using capillary gas chromatography (GC/FID) and GC-mass spectrometry (GC/MS). Phenyl propanoids (upto 87.0%) and monoterpenoids (upto 83.3%) were prevalent constituents distributed in the studied Ocimum taxa. The major constituents of the four distinct chemovariants of O. basilicum were methyl chavicol (86.3%), methyl chavicol (61.5%)/linalool (28.6%), citral (65.9%); and linalool (36.1%)/citral (28.8%). Eugenol (66.5% and 78.0%) was the major constituent of O. tenuiflorum and O. gratissimum. Eugenol (34.0%), β-bisabolene (15.4%), (E)-α-bisabolene (10.9%), methyl chavicol (10.2%) and 1,8-cineole (8.2%) were the major constituents of O. kilimandscharicum. In order to explore the potential for industrial use, the extracted essential oils were assessed for their antifungal potential through poison food technique against two phytopathogens, Rhizoctonia solani and Choanephora cucurbitarum, which cause root and wet rot diseases in various crops. O. tenuiflorum, O. gratissimum, and O. kilimandscharicum exhibited complete growth inhibition against R. solani and C. cucurbitarum after 24 and 48 h of treatment. O. basilicum chemotypes showed variable levels of growth inhibition (63.0%-100%) against these two phytopathogens.

  14. Distinctively variable sequence-based nuclear DNA markers for multilocus phylogeography of the soybean- and rice-infecting fungal pathogen Rhizoctonia solani AG-1 IA

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    A series of multilocus sequence-based nuclear DNA markers was developed to infer the phylogeographical history of the Basidiomycetous fungal pathogen Rhizoctonia solani AG-1 IA infecting rice and soybean worldwide. The strategy was based on sequencing of cloned genomic DNA fragments (previously used as RFLP probes) and subsequent screening of fungal isolates to detect single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Ten primer pairs were designed based on these sequences, which resulted in PCR amplification of 200-320 bp size products and polymorphic sequences in all markers analyzed. By direct sequencing we identified both homokaryon and heterokaryon (i.e. dikaryon) isolates at each marker. Cloning the PCR products effectively estimated the allelic phase from heterokaryotic isolates. Information content varied among markers from 0.5 to 5.9 mutations per 100 bp. Thus, the former RFLP codominant probes were successfully converted into six distinctively variable sequence-based nuclear DNA markers. Rather than discarding low polymorphism loci, the combination of these distinctively variable anonymous nuclear markers would constitute an asset for the unbiased estimate of the phylogeographical parameters such as population sizes and divergent times, providing a more reliable species history that shaped the current population structure of R. solani AG-1 IA. PMID:21637462

  15. Distribution and efficacy of drip-applied metam-sodium against the survival of Rhizoctonia solani and yellow nutsedge in plastic-mulched sandy soil beds.

    PubMed

    Candole, Byron L; Csinos, Alexander S; Wang, Dong

    2007-05-01

    The effects of metam-sodium application rate on soil residence time, spatial and temporal distributions of methyl isothiocyanate and pest control efficacy were studied in a Georgia sandy soil. Metam-sodium 420 g L(-1) SL was drip applied at rates of 147 and 295 L ha(-1) in plastic-mulched raised beds. Methyl isothiocyanate concentrations in soil air space were monitored from four preselected sites: 10 and 20 cm below the emitter, and 20 and 30 cm laterally away from the emitter at 3, 12, 24, 48, 72, 120 and 240 h after chemigation. A higher rate of metam-sodium application resulted in higher methyl isothiocyanate concentrations in the soil. Highest methyl isothiocyanate concentrations were found at 20 cm below the emitter, and lowest at 30 cm laterally away from the emitter. Methyl isothiocyanate concentrations decreased with time and distance from the emitter. Lower methyl isothiocyanate concentration x time product values at 20 and 30 cm away from the emitter resulted in lower mortalities of Rhizoctonia solani Kühn and yellow nutsedge (Cyperus esculentus L.). The results demonstrated that methyl isothiocyanate can be delivered at lethal doses with drip-applied water downward within the beds. Lateral diffusion of methyl isothiocyanate from the point of application did not reach biologically active concentrations to affect the survival of R. solani or yellow nutsedge. Further studies on the lateral distribution of methyl isothiocyanate in sandy soils are needed to circumvent this limitation. PMID:17397113

  16. Biocontrol of Rhizoctonia solani damping-off and promotion of tomato plant growth by endophytic actinomycetes isolated from native plants of Algerian Sahara.

    PubMed

    Goudjal, Yacine; Toumatia, Omrane; Yekkour, Amine; Sabaou, Nasserdine; Mathieu, Florence; Zitouni, Abdelghani

    2014-01-20

    Thirty-four endophytic actinomycetes were isolated from the roots of native plants of the Algerian Sahara. Morphological and chemical studies showed that twenty-nine isolates belonged to the Streptomyces genus and five were non-Streptomyces. All isolates were screened for their in vitro antifungal activity against Rhizoctonia solani. The six that had the greatest pathogen inhibitory capacities were subsequently tested for their in vivo biocontrol potential on R. solani damping-off in sterilized and non-sterilized soils, and for their plant-growth promoting activities on tomato seedlings. In both soils, coating tomato seeds with antagonistic isolates significantly reduced (P<0.05) the severity of damping-off of tomato seedlings. Among the isolates tested, the strains CA-2 and AA-2 exhibited the same disease incidence reduction as thioperoxydicarbonic diamide, tetramethylthiram (TMTD) and no significant differences (P<0.05) were observed. Furthermore, they resulted in a significant increase in the seedling fresh weight, the seedling length and the root length of the seed-treated seedlings compared to the control. The taxonomic position based on 16S rDNA sequence analysis and phylogenetic studies indicated that the strains CA-2 and AA-2 were related to Streptomyces mutabilis NBRC 12800(T) (100% of similarity) and Streptomyces cyaneofuscatus JCM 4364(T) (100% of similarity), respectively.

  17. Identification of anastomosis group of Rhizoctonia solani, the causal agent of seed rot and damping-off of bean in Iran.

    PubMed

    Bohlooli, A; Okhowat, S M; Javan-Nikkhah, M

    2005-01-01

    Bean is one of the major crops in Iran. Seed rot and damping-off caused by Rhizoctonia solani is the most important disease of bean. In this research, infected roots and seedlings of beans were collected from different fields of Tehran Province. The samples were sterilized with 10% sodium hypochloride (5% stock) and incubated on PDA surface in petri-dishes. The purified fungi kept on filter paper and identified, pathogenicity test of R. solani was carried out on 2 cultivars of bean (red bean cv. Naz and white bean cv. Dehghan) and it determined. For identification of the anastomosis groups, the discs of cultured media with 5 mm. diameter of standard AG placed on one side of microscopic slides covered with water agar (2%) of 1 mm. thick and the isolates of the fungus on another side of slide about 2 cm away from each other. Experiment carried out in 4 replications. The cultures were incubated in 25 +/- 1 degrees C incubator for 24 hours, then the mycelial contact stained with lactophenol, cotton blue and hyphal anastomosis looked for under the light microscope with 10 x 40 and 10 x 100 magnifications. As a result, anastomosis groups: AG4, AG4HGII, AG2-2-2B and AG6 determined, frequency of these groups were 64, 18, 2, 16%, respectively. The group AG6 and subgroups AG4HGII and AG2-2-2B are introduced as new anastomosis groups on bean in Iran.

  18. Identification of phenazine-1-carboxylic acid gene (phc CD) from Bacillus pumilus MTCC7615 and its role in antagonism against Rhizoctonia solani.

    PubMed

    Padaria, Jasdeep Chatrath; Tarafdar, Avijit; Raipuria, Rajkumar; Lone, Showkat Ahmad; Gahlot, Pallavi; Shakil, Najam A; Kumar, Jitendra

    2016-09-01

    Bacillus pumilus MTCC7615, a biocontrol agent isolated from rice rhizosphere was characterized to be antagonistic to Rhizoctonia solani, the pathogen causing sheath blight disease of rice. The phenazine-1-carboxylic acid gene (phc CD) of this bacterium was PCR amplified (1400 bp), cloned, and sequenced. The sequence analysis revealed the presence of two ORFs of phc CD gene commonly found in Pseudomonas species. The sequence showed 98% similarity to phc CD gene of the Pseudomonas isolate LBUM223 (DQ788993). The crude antibiotic extract from B. pumilus MTCC7615 was observed to inhibit mycelial growth of R. solani under in vitro conditions. The HPLC analysis of crude antibiotic extract from B. pumilus MTCC7615 confirmed the presence of phenazine. The study has also reported the presence of phc CD gene which is responsible for the synthesis of phenazine-1-carboxylic acid in B. pumilus. The ability of the bacterial isolate to control sheath blight disease in rice seedlings under in vivo conditions was confirmed by the pot culture experiment. The structural and functional genomics of phc C and phc D genes would lead to a better understanding of phenazine biosynthesis in B. pumilus for its efficient utilization in plant protection strategies. PMID:27106067

  19. Overexpression of GhWRKY27a reduces tolerance to drought stress and resistance to Rhizoctonia solani infection in transgenic Nicotiana benthamiana

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Yan; Jia, Haihong; Wang, Fang; Wang, Chen; Liu, Shuchang; Guo, Xingqi

    2015-01-01

    WRKY proteins constitute transcriptional regulators involved in various biological processes, especially in coping with diverse biotic and abiotic stresses. However, in contrast to other well-characterized WRKY groups, the functions of group III WRKY transcription factors are poorly understood in the economically important crop cotton (Gossypium hirsutum). In this study, a group III WRKY gene from cotton, GhWRKY27a, was isolated and characterized. Our data indicated that GhWRKY27a localized to the nucleus and that GhWRKY27a expression could be strongly induced by abiotic stresses, pathogen infection, and multiple defense-related signaling molecules. Virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) of GhWRKY27a enhanced tolerance to drought stress in cotton. In contrast, GhWRKY27a overexpression in Nicotiana benthamiana markedly reduced plant tolerance to drought stress, as determined through physiological analyses of leaf water loss, survival rates, and the stomatal aperture. This susceptibility was coupled with reduced stomatal closure in response to abscisic acid and decreased expression of stress-related genes. In addition, GhWRKY27a-overexpressing plants exhibited reduced resistance to Rhizoctonia solani infection, mainly demonstrated by the transgenic lines exhibiting more severe disease symptoms, accompanied by attenuated expression of defense-related genes in N. benthamiana. Taken together, these findings indicated that GhWRKY27a functions in negative responses to drought tolerance and in resistance to R. solani infection. PMID:26483697

  20. Polymorphism of genes coding for nuclear 18S rRNA indicates genetic distinctiveness of anastomosis group 10 from other groups in the Rhizoctonia solani species complex.

    PubMed

    Liu, Z L; Domier, L L; Sinclair, J B

    1995-07-01

    DNA polymorphism in the 18S nuclear rRNA gene region was investigated by using 11 restriction endonucleases for 161 isolates of 25 intraspecific groups (ISGs) representing 11 reported anastomosis groups (AGs) of Rhizoctonia solani. A PCR-based restriction mapping method in which enzymatically amplified DNA fragments and subfragments were digested with one or two restriction enzymes was employed. Four types of DNA restriction maps of this region were constructed for these 25 ISGs. Map type I of the 18S rDNA region was represented by isolates of a majority of R. solani ISGs. Map types II and III, represented by ISG 2E and 9 isolates and 5C isolates, respectively, differed from map I by the absence of one (map type II) or two (map type III) restriction sites. Map type IV, represented by ISG 10A and B (or AG 10) isolates, showed significant restriction site variations, with five enzymes in this region compared with those of the remaining ISGs or AGs. Ten of the 25 restriction sites in the 18S rRNA gene region were informative and selected for analysis. Previously reported restriction maps of the 5.8S rRNA gene region, including the internal transcribed spacers, were aligned with each other, and 12 informative restriction sites were identified. These data were used alone and in combination to evaluate group relationships. Analyses derived from these data sets by maximum parsimony and likelihood methods showed that AG 10 isolates were distinct and distantly related to the majority isolates of the other AGs of this species complex.

  1. Changes in the contents of metabolites and enzyme activities in rice plants responding to Rhizoctonia solani Kuhn infection: activation of glycolysis and connection to phenylpropanoid pathway.

    PubMed

    Mutuku, J Musembi; Nose, Akihiro

    2012-06-01

    Rhizoctonia solani Kuhn causes sheath blight disease in rice, and genetic resistance against it is the most desirable characteristic. Current improvement efforts are based on analysis of polygenic quantitative trait loci (QTLs), but interpretation is limited by the lack of information on the changes in metabolic pathways. Our previous studies linked activation of the glycolytic pathway to enhanced generation of lignin in the phenylpropanoid pathway. The current studies investigated the regulation of glycolysis by examining the time course of changes in enzymatic activities and metabolite contents. The results showed that the activities of all glycolytic enzymes as well as fructose-6-phosphate (F-6-P), fructose-1,6-bisphosphate (F-1,6-P(2)), dihydroxyacetone phosphate (DHAP), glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate (GAP), 3-phosphoglycerate (3-PG), phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) and pyruvate contents increased. These results combined with our previous findings that the expression of phosphoglucomutase (PGM), triosephosphate isomerase (TPI), glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), enolase and pyruvate kinase (PK) increased after infection suggested that the additional establishment of glycolysis in the cytosol compartment occurred after infection. Further evidence for this was our recent findings that the increase in expression of the 6-phosphofructokinase (PFK) plastid isozyme Os06g05860 was accompanied by an increase in expression of three cytosolic PFK isozymes, i.e. Os01g09570, Os01g53680 and Os04g39420, as well as pyrophosphate-dependent phosphofrucokinase (PFP) isozymes Os08g25720 (α-subunit) and Os06g13810 (β-subunit) in infected rice plants of the resistant line. The results also showed that the reactions catalysed by PFK/PFP, aldolase, GAPDH + phosphoglycerate kinase (PGK) and PK in leaf sheaths of R. solani-infected rice plants were non-equilibrium reactions in vivo. This study showed that PGM, phosphoglucose isomerase (PGI), TPI and phosphoglycerate mutase (PGmu

  2. Pelargonium graveolens L'Her. and Artemisia arborescens L. essential oils: chemical composition, antifungal activity against Rhizoctonia solani and insecticidal activity against Rhysopertha dominica.

    PubMed

    Bouzenna, Hafsia; Krichen, Lamia

    2013-01-01

    The chemical composition of the Pelargonium graveolens essential oil allowed the identification of 15 compounds (93.86% of the total essential oil). The major fractions were citronellol (35%) and geraniol (28.8%). The chemical composition of the Artemisia arborescens essential oil revealed twenty-one compounds representing 93.57% of the total essential oil. The main compounds were chamazulene (31.9%) and camphor (25.8%). The insecticidal effects were tested towards the insect Rhysopertha dominica. Results revealed that these two essential oils were highly effective against R. dominica at the dose of 50 µL on Petri dish of 8.5 cm of diameter. The antifungal activity was evaluated against Rhizoctonia solani and results showed that both of the essential oils were highly active at a dose of 12.5 µL/20 mL of PDA. Moreover, the inhibitory effect of P. graveolens essential oil was evidenced as stronger than that of the A. arborescens oil for all the tested doses.

  3. Liquid culture production of microsclerotia and submerged conidia by Trichoderma harzianum active against damping-off disease caused by Rhizoctonia solani.

    PubMed

    Kobori, Nilce N; Mascarin, Gabriel M; Jackson, Mark A; Schisler, David A

    2015-04-01

    Media and culturing protocols were identified that supported the formation of submerged conidia and microsclerotia (MS) by Trichoderma harzianum Rifai strain T-22 using liquid culture fermentation. Liquid media with a higher carbon concentration (36 g L(-1)) promoted MS formation at all C:N ratios tested. Hyphae aggregated to form MS after 2 d growth and after 7 d MS were fully melanized. This is the first report of MS formation by T. harzianum or any species of Trichoderma. Furthermore, submerged conidia formation was induced by liquid culture media, but yields, desiccation tolerance, and storage stability varied with C:N ratio and carbon rate. Air-dried MS granules (<4% moisture) retained excellent shelf life under cool and unrefrigerated storage conditions with no loss in conidial production. A low-cost complex nitrogen source based on cottonseed flour effectively supported high MS yields. Amending potting mix with dried MS formulations reduced or eliminated damping-off of melon seedlings caused by Rhizoctonia solani. Together, the results provide insights into the liquid culture production, stabilization process, and bioefficacy of the hitherto unreported MS of T. harzianum as a potential biofungicide for use in integrated management programs against soilborne diseases. PMID:25813507

  4. Characterization of genes involved in biosynthesis of a novel antibiotic from Burkholderia cepacia BC11 and their role in biological control of Rhizoctonia solani

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Y.; Carlson, R.; Tharpe, W.; Schell, M.A.

    1998-10-01

    Genetic manipulation of fluorescent pseudomonads has provided major insight into their production of antifungal molecules and their role in biological control of plant disease. Burkholderia cepacia also produces antifungal activities, but its biological control activity is much less well characterized, in part due to difficulties in applying genetic tools. Here the authors report genetic and biochemical characterization of a soil isolate of B. cepacia relating to its production of an unusual antibiotic that is very active against a variety of soil fungi. Purification and preliminary structural analyses suggest that this antibiotic (called AFC-BC11) is a novel lipopeptide associated largely with the cell membrane. Analysis of conditions for optimal production of AFC-BC11 indicated stringent environmental regulation of its synthesis. Furthermore, the authors show that production of AFC-BC11 is largely responsible for the ability of B. cepacia BC11 to effectively control the damping-Off of cotton caused by the fungal pathogen Rhizoctonia solani in a gnotobiotic system. Using Tn5 mutagenesis, they identified, cloned, and characterized a region of the genome of strain BC11 that is required for production of this antifungal metabolite. DNA sequence analysis suggested that this region encodes proteins directly involved in the production of a nonribosomally synthesized lipopeptide.

  5. Co-expression of RCH10 and AGLU1 confers rice resistance to fungal sheath blight Rhizoctonia solani and blast Magnorpathe oryzae and reveals impact on seed germination.

    PubMed

    Mao, Bizeng; Liu, Xuehui; Hu, Dongwei; Li, Debao

    2014-04-01

    Rice sheath blight and blast caused by Rhizoctonia solani Kühn and Magnorpathe oryzae respectively, are the two most destructive fungal diseases in rice. With no genetic natural traits conferring resistance to sheath blight, transgenic manipulation provides an obvious approach. In this study, the rice basic chitinase gene (RCH10) and the alfalfa β-1,3-glucanase gene (AGLU1) were tandemly inserted into transformation vector pBI101 under the control of 35S promoter with its enhancer sequence to generate a double-defense gene expression cassette pZ100. The pZ100 cassette was transformed into rice (cv. Taipei 309) by Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. More than 160 independent transformants were obtained and confirmed by PCR. Northern analysis of inheritable progenies revealed similar levels of both RCH10 and AGLU1 transcripts in the same individuals. Disease resistance to both sheath blight and blast was challenged in open field inoculation. Immunogold detection revealed that RCH10 and AGLU1 proteins were initially located mainly in the chloroplasts and were delivered to the vacuole and cell wall upon infection, suggesting that these subcellular compartments act as the gathering and execution site for these anti-fungal proteins. We also observed that transgenic seeds display lower germination rate and seedling vigor, indicating that defense enhancement might be achieved at the expense of development.

  6. Characterization of genes involved in biosynthesis of a novel antibiotic from Burkholderia cepacia BC11 and their role in biological control of Rhizoctonia solani.

    PubMed

    Kang, Y; Carlson, R; Tharpe, W; Schell, M A

    1998-10-01

    Genetic manipulation of fluorescent pseudomonads has provided major insight into their production of antifungal molecules and their role in biological control of plant disease. Burkholderia cepacia also produces antifungal activities, but its biological control activity is much less well characterized, in part due to difficulties in applying genetic tools. Here we report genetic and biochemical characterization of a soil isolate of B. cepacia relating to its production of an unusual antibiotic that is very active against a variety of soil fungi. Purification and preliminary structural analyses suggest that this antibiotic (called AFC-BC11) is a novel lipopeptide associated largely with the cell membrane. Analysis of conditions for optimal production of AFC-BC11 indicated stringent environmental regulation of its synthesis. Furthermore, we show that production of AFC-BC11 is largely responsible for the ability of B. cepacia BC11 to effectively control the damping-off of cotton caused by the fungal pathogen Rhizoctonia solani in a gnotobiotic system. Using Tn5 mutagenesis, we identified, cloned, and characterized a region of the genome of strain BC11 that is required for production of this antifungal metabolite. DNA sequence analysis suggested that this region encodes proteins directly involved in the production of a nonribosomally synthesized lipopeptide.

  7. Chitinase gene transformation through Agrobacteriumand its explanation in soybean in order to induce resistance to root rot caused by Rhizoctonia solani.

    PubMed

    Salehi, A; Mohammadi, M; Okhovvat, S M; Omidi, M

    2005-01-01

    Chitinase gene (chi) of bean which has been cloned in recombinant binary plasmid vector, pBI121 with 35s promoter of Cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV), were used for transformation of soybean using strain LBA4404 of Agrobacterium. The plasmid contained nptII gene that is a resistant gene to kanomycin as selector marker and Gus gene as reporter. Cotyledon explants of Williams and Clark cultivars were inoculated by Agrobacterium suspension with pBI121 and were cultured in regeneration medium. After complete regeneration of explants to seedling in B5 medium amended with kanomycin, polymerase chain reaction analysis were conducted to ensure conjugation of nptII, Gus, CHN genes in transformants seedling of soybean. Results showed that some lines of soybean contained Gus and CHN genes. More ever, chitinase activity in leaf extract of transformed soybean lines was significantly more than untransformed soybean, exception one sample. Bioassay of chitinase activity of transgenic lines on in vitro condition prevented mycelial growth of Rhizoctonia solani in comparison with untransformed control leaf extract.

  8. Isolation, Identification and Optimal Culture Conditions of Streptomyces albidoflavus C247 Producing Antifungal Agents against Rhizoctonia solani AG2-2

    PubMed Central

    Islam, Md. Rezuanul; Jeong, Yong Tae; Ryu, Yeon Ju; Song, Chi Hyun

    2009-01-01

    Streptomyces albidoflavus C247 was isolated from the soil of the Gyeongsan golf course in Korea. Physiological, biochemical and 16S rDNA gene sequence analysis strongly suggested that the isolate belonged to Streptomyces albidoflavus. Preliminary screening revealed that the isolate was active against fungi and bacteria. Self-directing optimization was employed to determine the best combination of parameters such as carbon and nitrogen source, pH and temperature. Nutritional and culture conditions for the production of antibiotics by this organism under shake-flask conditions were also optimized. Maltose (5%) and soytone (5%) were found to be the best carbon and nitrogen sources for the production of antibiotics by S. albidoflavus C247. Additionally, 62.89% mycelial growth inhibition was achieved when the organism was cultured at 30℃ and pH 6.5. Ethyl acetate (EtOAc) was the best extraction solvent for the isolation of the antibiotics, and 100 µg/ml of EtOAc extract was found to inhibit 60.27% of the mycelial growth of Rhizoctonia solani AG2-2(IV) when the poison plate diffusion method was conducted. PMID:23983519

  9. Liquid culture production of microsclerotia and submerged conidia by Trichoderma harzianum active against damping-off disease caused by Rhizoctonia solani.

    PubMed

    Kobori, Nilce N; Mascarin, Gabriel M; Jackson, Mark A; Schisler, David A

    2015-04-01

    Media and culturing protocols were identified that supported the formation of submerged conidia and microsclerotia (MS) by Trichoderma harzianum Rifai strain T-22 using liquid culture fermentation. Liquid media with a higher carbon concentration (36 g L(-1)) promoted MS formation at all C:N ratios tested. Hyphae aggregated to form MS after 2 d growth and after 7 d MS were fully melanized. This is the first report of MS formation by T. harzianum or any species of Trichoderma. Furthermore, submerged conidia formation was induced by liquid culture media, but yields, desiccation tolerance, and storage stability varied with C:N ratio and carbon rate. Air-dried MS granules (<4% moisture) retained excellent shelf life under cool and unrefrigerated storage conditions with no loss in conidial production. A low-cost complex nitrogen source based on cottonseed flour effectively supported high MS yields. Amending potting mix with dried MS formulations reduced or eliminated damping-off of melon seedlings caused by Rhizoctonia solani. Together, the results provide insights into the liquid culture production, stabilization process, and bioefficacy of the hitherto unreported MS of T. harzianum as a potential biofungicide for use in integrated management programs against soilborne diseases.

  10. Pelargonium graveolens L'Her. and Artemisia arborescens L. essential oils: chemical composition, antifungal activity against Rhizoctonia solani and insecticidal activity against Rhysopertha dominica.

    PubMed

    Bouzenna, Hafsia; Krichen, Lamia

    2013-01-01

    The chemical composition of the Pelargonium graveolens essential oil allowed the identification of 15 compounds (93.86% of the total essential oil). The major fractions were citronellol (35%) and geraniol (28.8%). The chemical composition of the Artemisia arborescens essential oil revealed twenty-one compounds representing 93.57% of the total essential oil. The main compounds were chamazulene (31.9%) and camphor (25.8%). The insecticidal effects were tested towards the insect Rhysopertha dominica. Results revealed that these two essential oils were highly effective against R. dominica at the dose of 50 µL on Petri dish of 8.5 cm of diameter. The antifungal activity was evaluated against Rhizoctonia solani and results showed that both of the essential oils were highly active at a dose of 12.5 µL/20 mL of PDA. Moreover, the inhibitory effect of P. graveolens essential oil was evidenced as stronger than that of the A. arborescens oil for all the tested doses. PMID:22840199

  11. A simple method based on laboratory inoculum and field inoculum for evaluating potato resistance to black scurf caused by Rhizoctonia solani.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiao-Yu; Yu, Xiao-Xia; Yu, Zhuo; Xue, Yu-Feng; Qi, Li-Peng

    2014-06-01

    A two-step method was developed to evaluate potato resistance to black scurf caused by Rhizoctonia solani. Tuber piece inoculum was first conducted in the laboratory, which was also first reported in this study. After inoculation with pathogen discs and culture for 48 h, the necrotic spots on the inoculated potato pieces were generated and measured by the crossing method. Further evaluation was conducted through field experiments using a wheat bran inoculum method. The wheat bran inoculum was placed into the pit dispersedly and surrounded seed tubers. Each cultivar or line was subjected to five treatments of 0-, 2-, 3-, 4-, and 5-g soil inoculum. The results showed that 2-4 g of wheat bran inoculum was the optimum for identifying tuber black scurf resistance. The laboratory scores positively correlated with the incidence and severity of black scurf in the field. According to the results in the laboratory, relatively resistant cultivars could be selected for further estimation of tuber black scurf resistance in field experiments. It is a practical and effective screening method for rapid identification of resistant potato germplasm, which can reduce workload in the field, shorten time required for identification.

  12. Sugar Beet Resistance to Rhizoctonia Root and Crown Rot: Where does it fit in?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L.), Rhizoctonia root- or crown-rot is caused by Rhizoctonia solani (AG-2-2). Seedling damping-off in sugar beet is caused by R. solani of both anastomosis groups, AG-2-2 and AG-4. Rhizoctonia solani subgroup AG-2-2 IV had been considered to be the primary cause of Rhi...

  13. Proteomic Analysis of Rhizoctonia solani Identifies Infection-specific, Redox Associated Proteins and Insight into Adaptation to Different Plant Hosts.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Jonathan P; Hane, James K; Stoll, Thomas; Pain, Nicholas; Hastie, Marcus L; Kaur, Parwinder; Hoogland, Christine; Gorman, Jeffrey J; Singh, Karam B

    2016-04-01

    Rhizoctonia solaniis an important root infecting pathogen of a range of food staples worldwide including wheat, rice, maize, soybean, potato and others. Conventional resistance breeding strategies are hindered by the absence of tractable genetic resistance in any crop host. Understanding the biology and pathogenicity mechanisms of this fungus is important for addressing these disease issues, however, little is known about howR. solanicauses disease. This study capitalizes on recent genomic studies by applying mass spectrometry based proteomics to identify soluble, membrane-bound and culture filtrate proteins produced under wheat infection and vegetative growth conditions. Many of the proteins found in the culture filtrate had predicted functions relating to modification of the plant cell wall, a major activity required for pathogenesis on the plant host, including a number found only under infection conditions. Other infection related proteins included a high proportion of proteins with redox associated functions and many novel proteins without functional classification. The majority of infection only proteins tested were confirmed to show transcript up-regulation during infection including a thaumatin which increased susceptibility toR. solaniwhen expressed inNicotiana benthamiana In addition, analysis of expression during infection of different plant hosts highlighted how the infection strategy of this broad host range pathogen can be adapted to the particular host being encountered. Data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD002806.

  14. Proteomic Analysis of Rhizoctonia solani Identifies Infection-specific, Redox Associated Proteins and Insight into Adaptation to Different Plant Hosts.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Jonathan P; Hane, James K; Stoll, Thomas; Pain, Nicholas; Hastie, Marcus L; Kaur, Parwinder; Hoogland, Christine; Gorman, Jeffrey J; Singh, Karam B

    2016-04-01

    Rhizoctonia solaniis an important root infecting pathogen of a range of food staples worldwide including wheat, rice, maize, soybean, potato and others. Conventional resistance breeding strategies are hindered by the absence of tractable genetic resistance in any crop host. Understanding the biology and pathogenicity mechanisms of this fungus is important for addressing these disease issues, however, little is known about howR. solanicauses disease. This study capitalizes on recent genomic studies by applying mass spectrometry based proteomics to identify soluble, membrane-bound and culture filtrate proteins produced under wheat infection and vegetative growth conditions. Many of the proteins found in the culture filtrate had predicted functions relating to modification of the plant cell wall, a major activity required for pathogenesis on the plant host, including a number found only under infection conditions. Other infection related proteins included a high proportion of proteins with redox associated functions and many novel proteins without functional classification. The majority of infection only proteins tested were confirmed to show transcript up-regulation during infection including a thaumatin which increased susceptibility toR. solaniwhen expressed inNicotiana benthamiana In addition, analysis of expression during infection of different plant hosts highlighted how the infection strategy of this broad host range pathogen can be adapted to the particular host being encountered. Data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD002806. PMID:26811357

  15. Powder formulation of Burkholderia cepacia for control of rape seed damping-off caused by Rhizoctonia solani.

    PubMed

    Sharifi-Tehrani, A; Ahmadzadeh, M; Sarani, S; Farzaneh, M

    2007-01-01

    Talc-based formulation of Burkholderia cepaci strain Bu1 was tested as seed and soil drenchs separately for its ability to control Rhizoctonia soloni the causal agent of rape seed damping-off in greenhouse and field trials. In general, the formulated bacteria was more effective to suppress the disease than the suspension of bacteria cells in carboxymethylcellulose solution (1% w/v), in both greenhouse and field trials. The formulation of strain Bul as soil and seed treatments had the greatest effect on reducing the rape seed damping-off in greenhouse and field trials (66.7, 53.3, 64.4 and 40% respectively). The formulation of strain Bu1 as soil and seed treatments were the most effective treatments to increase the root dry weights in the infected soil in greenhouse. The formulation of strain Bul as soil drench had the greatest effect on enhancement of the fresh weight of roots and stem fresh and dry weights. The formulation of strain Bu1 stored at 4 degrees C exhibited better shelf Life and efficacy in vitro than it's counterpart stored at 25 degrees C.

  16. Effects of damping-off caused by Rhizoctonia solani anastomosis group 2-1 on roots of wheat and oil seed rape quantified using X-ray Computed Tomography and real-time PCR.

    PubMed

    Sturrock, Craig J; Woodhall, James; Brown, Matthew; Walker, Catherine; Mooney, Sacha J; Ray, Rumiana V

    2015-01-01

    Rhizoctonia solani is a plant pathogenic fungus that causes significant establishment and yield losses to several important food crops globally. This is the first application of high resolution X-ray micro Computed Tomography (X-ray μCT) and real-time PCR to study host-pathogen interactions in situ and elucidate the mechanism of Rhizoctonia damping-off disease over a 6-day period caused by R. solani, anastomosis group (AG) 2-1 in wheat (Triticum aestivum cv. Gallant) and oil seed rape (OSR, Brassica napus cv. Marinka). Temporal, non-destructive analysis of root system architectures was performed using RooTrak and validated by the destructive method of root washing. Disease was assessed visually and related to pathogen DNA quantification in soil using real-time PCR. R. solani AG2-1 at similar initial DNA concentrations in soil was capable of causing significant damage to the developing root systems of both wheat and OSR. Disease caused reductions in primary root number, root volume, root surface area, and convex hull which were affected less in the monocotyledonous host. Wheat was more tolerant to the pathogen, exhibited fewer symptoms and developed more complex root systems. In contrast, R. solani caused earlier damage and maceration of the taproot of the dicot, OSR. Disease severity was related to pathogen DNA accumulation in soil only for OSR, however, reductions in root traits were significantly associated with both disease and pathogen DNA. The method offers the first steps in advancing current understanding of soil-borne pathogen behavior in situ at the pore scale, which may lead to the development of mitigation measures to combat disease influence in the field. PMID:26157449

  17. Effects of damping-off caused by Rhizoctonia solani anastomosis group 2-1 on roots of wheat and oil seed rape quantified using X-ray Computed Tomography and real-time PCR

    PubMed Central

    Sturrock, Craig J.; Woodhall, James; Brown, Matthew; Walker, Catherine; Mooney, Sacha J.; Ray, Rumiana V.

    2015-01-01

    Rhizoctonia solani is a plant pathogenic fungus that causes significant establishment and yield losses to several important food crops globally. This is the first application of high resolution X-ray micro Computed Tomography (X-ray μCT) and real-time PCR to study host–pathogen interactions in situ and elucidate the mechanism of Rhizoctonia damping-off disease over a 6-day period caused by R. solani, anastomosis group (AG) 2-1 in wheat (Triticum aestivum cv. Gallant) and oil seed rape (OSR, Brassica napus cv. Marinka). Temporal, non-destructive analysis of root system architectures was performed using RooTrak and validated by the destructive method of root washing. Disease was assessed visually and related to pathogen DNA quantification in soil using real-time PCR. R. solani AG2-1 at similar initial DNA concentrations in soil was capable of causing significant damage to the developing root systems of both wheat and OSR. Disease caused reductions in primary root number, root volume, root surface area, and convex hull which were affected less in the monocotyledonous host. Wheat was more tolerant to the pathogen, exhibited fewer symptoms and developed more complex root systems. In contrast, R. solani caused earlier damage and maceration of the taproot of the dicot, OSR. Disease severity was related to pathogen DNA accumulation in soil only for OSR, however, reductions in root traits were significantly associated with both disease and pathogen DNA. The method offers the first steps in advancing current understanding of soil-borne pathogen behavior in situ at the pore scale, which may lead to the development of mitigation measures to combat disease influence in the field. PMID:26157449

  18. Effects of damping-off caused by Rhizoctonia solani anastomosis group 2-1 on roots of wheat and oil seed rape quantified using X-ray Computed Tomography and real-time PCR.

    PubMed

    Sturrock, Craig J; Woodhall, James; Brown, Matthew; Walker, Catherine; Mooney, Sacha J; Ray, Rumiana V

    2015-01-01

    Rhizoctonia solani is a plant pathogenic fungus that causes significant establishment and yield losses to several important food crops globally. This is the first application of high resolution X-ray micro Computed Tomography (X-ray μCT) and real-time PCR to study host-pathogen interactions in situ and elucidate the mechanism of Rhizoctonia damping-off disease over a 6-day period caused by R. solani, anastomosis group (AG) 2-1 in wheat (Triticum aestivum cv. Gallant) and oil seed rape (OSR, Brassica napus cv. Marinka). Temporal, non-destructive analysis of root system architectures was performed using RooTrak and validated by the destructive method of root washing. Disease was assessed visually and related to pathogen DNA quantification in soil using real-time PCR. R. solani AG2-1 at similar initial DNA concentrations in soil was capable of causing significant damage to the developing root systems of both wheat and OSR. Disease caused reductions in primary root number, root volume, root surface area, and convex hull which were affected less in the monocotyledonous host. Wheat was more tolerant to the pathogen, exhibited fewer symptoms and developed more complex root systems. In contrast, R. solani caused earlier damage and maceration of the taproot of the dicot, OSR. Disease severity was related to pathogen DNA accumulation in soil only for OSR, however, reductions in root traits were significantly associated with both disease and pathogen DNA. The method offers the first steps in advancing current understanding of soil-borne pathogen behavior in situ at the pore scale, which may lead to the development of mitigation measures to combat disease influence in the field.

  19. Effect of carbon and nitrogen sources on growth and biological efficacy of Pseudomonas fluorescens and Bacillus subtilis against Rhizoctonia solani, the causal agent of bean damping-off.

    PubMed

    Peighamy-Ashnaei, S; Sharifi-Tehrani, A; Ahmadzadeh, M; Behboudi, K

    2007-01-01

    One of the most important environmental factors that regulate the growth and antagonistic efficacy of biocontrol agents is the medium. The aim of this paper was to find the nitrogen and carbon sources that provide maximum biomass production of strains P-5 and P-6 (Pseudomonas fluorescens), B-3 and B-16 (Bacillus subtilis) and minimum cost of media, whilst maintaining biocontrol efficacy. All of the strains were grown in seven liquid media (pH=6.9) including: sucrose + yeast extract, molasses of sugar beet + yeast extract in 2:1 and 1:1 w/w ratios, molasses of sugar beet + urea, nutrient broth, molasses and malt extract, at an initial inoculation of 1 x 10(5) CFU ml(-1). Cells from over night cultures used to inoculate soil at 1 x 10(9) CFU cm(-3) soil. At the same time, fungal inoculum (infected millet seed with Rhizoctonia solani) was added to soil at the rate of 2 g kg(-1) soil. Results indicated that growth of P-6, B-3 and B-16 in molasses + yeast extract (1:1 w/w) medium was significantly higher than in the other media. Molasses + yeast extract (1:1 and 2:1 w/w) media supported rapid growth and high cell yields in P-5. In greenhouse condition, results indicated that the influence of the media on the biocontrol efficacy of P-5, P-6, B-3 and B-16 was the same and Pseudomonas fluorescens P-5 in molasses and malt extract media reduced the severity of disease up to 72.8 percent. On the other hand, there were observed significant differences on bean growth after one month in greenhouse. P-5 in molasses + yeast extract (1:1 w/w) medium had the most effects on bean growth promotion. In this study molasses media showed good yield efficacy in all of the strains. The high sucrose concentration in molasses justifies the high biomass in all of the strains. Also, the low cost of molasses allows its concentration to be increased in media. On the other hand, yeast extract was the best organic nitrogen source for antagonist bacteria but it is expensive for an industrial process

  20. Management of Rhizoctonia Damping-off of Brassica Oilseed Crops in the PNW

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rhizoctonia solani can cause pre and post-emergence damping off of Brassica oilseed species with adverse effects on stand establishment. In greenhouse experiments, we have examined resistance to two groups (AGs) of Rhizoctonia solani among various Brassica species and varieties. R. solani AG 2-1 is ...

  1. Management of Rhizoctonia root and crown rot of subarbeet

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rhizoctonia root and crown rot is caused by the fungus Rhizoctonia solani and is one of the most severe soil-borne diseases of sugarbeet in Minnesota and North Dakota. Rhizoctonia root and crown rot may reduce yield significantly, and diseased beets may cause problems in storage piles. Fields with...

  2. Rhizoctonia seedling disease on sugar beet

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rhizoctonia seedling damping-off can cause losses in sugar beet as well as providing inoculum for later root rot. The disease is caused by Rhizoctonia solani. The pathogen has several subgroups, anastomosis groups (AG), of which AG-4 has historically been associated with damping-off, while AG-2-2 is...

  3. Influence of Rhizoctonia solani and Trichoderma spp. in growth of bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) and in the induction of plant defense-related genes.

    PubMed

    Mayo, Sara; Gutiérrez, Santiago; Malmierca, Monica G; Lorenzana, Alicia; Campelo, M Piedad; Hermosa, Rosa; Casquero, Pedro A

    2015-01-01

    Many Trichoderma species are well-known for their ability to promote plant growth and defense. We study how the interaction of bean plants with R. solani and/or Trichoderma affect the plants growth and the level of expression of defense-related genes. Trichoderma isolates were evaluated in vitro for their potential to antagonize R. solani. Bioassays were performed in climatic chambers and development of the plants was evaluated. The effect of Trichoderma treatment and/or R. solani infection on the expression of bean defense-related genes was analyzed by real-time PCR and the production of ergosterol and squalene was quantified. In vitro growth inhibition of R. solani was between 86 and 58%. In in vivo assays, the bean plants treated with Trichoderma harzianum T019 always had an increased size respect to control and the plants treated with this isolate did not decrease their size in presence of R. solani. The interaction of plants with R. solani and/or Trichoderma affects the level of expression of seven defense-related genes. Squalene and ergosterol production differences were found among the Trichoderma isolates, T019 showing the highest values for both compounds. T. harzianum T019 shows a positive effect on the level of resistance of bean plants to R. solani. This strain induces the expression of plant defense-related genes and produces a higher level of ergosterol, indicating its ability to grow at a higher rate in the soil, which would explain its positive effects on plant growth and defense in the presence of the pathogen.

  4. Influence of Rhizoctonia solani and Trichoderma spp. in growth of bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) and in the induction of plant defense-related genes.

    PubMed

    Mayo, Sara; Gutiérrez, Santiago; Malmierca, Monica G; Lorenzana, Alicia; Campelo, M Piedad; Hermosa, Rosa; Casquero, Pedro A

    2015-01-01

    Many Trichoderma species are well-known for their ability to promote plant growth and defense. We study how the interaction of bean plants with R. solani and/or Trichoderma affect the plants growth and the level of expression of defense-related genes. Trichoderma isolates were evaluated in vitro for their potential to antagonize R. solani. Bioassays were performed in climatic chambers and development of the plants was evaluated. The effect of Trichoderma treatment and/or R. solani infection on the expression of bean defense-related genes was analyzed by real-time PCR and the production of ergosterol and squalene was quantified. In vitro growth inhibition of R. solani was between 86 and 58%. In in vivo assays, the bean plants treated with Trichoderma harzianum T019 always had an increased size respect to control and the plants treated with this isolate did not decrease their size in presence of R. solani. The interaction of plants with R. solani and/or Trichoderma affects the level of expression of seven defense-related genes. Squalene and ergosterol production differences were found among the Trichoderma isolates, T019 showing the highest values for both compounds. T. harzianum T019 shows a positive effect on the level of resistance of bean plants to R. solani. This strain induces the expression of plant defense-related genes and produces a higher level of ergosterol, indicating its ability to grow at a higher rate in the soil, which would explain its positive effects on plant growth and defense in the presence of the pathogen. PMID:26442006

  5. Influence of Rhizoctonia solani and Trichoderma spp. in growth of bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) and in the induction of plant defense-related genes

    PubMed Central

    Mayo, Sara; Gutiérrez, Santiago; Malmierca, Monica G.; Lorenzana, Alicia; Campelo, M. Piedad; Hermosa, Rosa; Casquero, Pedro A.

    2015-01-01

    Many Trichoderma species are well-known for their ability to promote plant growth and defense. We study how the interaction of bean plants with R. solani and/or Trichoderma affect the plants growth and the level of expression of defense-related genes. Trichoderma isolates were evaluated in vitro for their potential to antagonize R. solani. Bioassays were performed in climatic chambers and development of the plants was evaluated. The effect of Trichoderma treatment and/or R. solani infection on the expression of bean defense-related genes was analyzed by real-time PCR and the production of ergosterol and squalene was quantified. In vitro growth inhibition of R. solani was between 86 and 58%. In in vivo assays, the bean plants treated with Trichoderma harzianum T019 always had an increased size respect to control and the plants treated with this isolate did not decrease their size in presence of R. solani. The interaction of plants with R. solani and/or Trichoderma affects the level of expression of seven defense-related genes. Squalene and ergosterol production differences were found among the Trichoderma isolates, T019 showing the highest values for both compounds. T. harzianum T019 shows a positive effect on the level of resistance of bean plants to R. solani. This strain induces the expression of plant defense-related genes and produces a higher level of ergosterol, indicating its ability to grow at a higher rate in the soil, which would explain its positive effects on plant growth and defense in the presence of the pathogen. PMID:26442006

  6. Strain-specific SCAR markers for the detection of Trichoderma harzianum AS12-2, a biological control agent against Rhizoctonia solani, the causal agent of rice sheath blight.

    PubMed

    Naeimi, S; Kocsubé, S; Antal, Zsuzsanna; Okhovvat, S M; Javan-Nikkhah, M; Vágvölgyi, C; Kredics, L

    2011-03-01

    In order to identify a specific marker for T. harzianum AS12-2, a strain capable of controlling rice sheath blight caused by Rhizoctonia solani, UP-PCR was performed using five universal primers (UP) both separately and in pairwise combinations. The application of two UP primers resulted in the amplification of unique fragments from the genomic DNA of T. harzianum AS12-2, clearly distinguishing it from other Trichoderma strains. The unique fragments had no significant sequence homology with any other known sequence available in databases. Based on the sequences of the unique fragments, 14 oligonucleotide primers were designed. Two primer sets amplified a fragment of expected size from the DNA of strain T. harzianum AS12-2 but not from any other examined strains belonging to T. harzianum, to other Trichoderma species assayed, or to other common fungi present in paddy fields of Mazandaran province, Iran. In conclusion, SCAR (sequence characterized amplified regions) markers were successfully identified and rapid, reliable tools were provided for the detection of an effective biocontrol Trichoderma strain, which can facilitate studies of its population dynamics and establishment after release into the natural environment.

  7. Optimum Timing of Pre-Plant Applications of Glyphosate to Manage Rhizoctonia Root Rot in Barley

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rhizoctonia root rot, caused by Rhizoctonia solani AG-8 and R. oryzae, is considered one of the main deterrents for farmers to adopt reduced tillage systems in the Pacific Northwest. Because of the wide host range of Rhizoctonia spp., herbicide application before planting to control weeds and volunt...

  8. Reducing the Use of Pesticides with Site-Specific Application: The Chemical Control of Rhizoctonia solani as a Case of Study for the Management of Soil-Borne Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Le Cointe, Ronan; Simon, Thomas E.; Delarue, Patrick; Hervé, Maxime; Leclerc, Melen; Poggi, Sylvain

    2016-01-01

    Reducing our reliance on pesticides is an essential step towards the sustainability of agricultural production. One approach involves the rational use of pesticides combined with innovative crop management. Most control strategies currently focus on the temporal aspect of epidemics, e.g. determining the optimal date for spraying, regardless of the spatial mechanics and ecology of disease spread. Designing innovative pest management strategies incorporating the spatial aspect of epidemics involves thorough knowledge on how disease control affects the life-history traits of the pathogen. In this study, using Rhizoctonia solani/Raphanus sativus as an example of a soil-borne pathosystem, we investigated the effects of a chemical control currently used by growers, Monceren® L, on key epidemiological components (saprotrophic spread and infectivity). We tested the potential “shield effect” of Monceren® L on pathogenic spread in a site-specific application context, i.e. the efficiency of this chemical to contain the spread of the fungus from an infected host when application is spatially localized, in our case, a strip placed between the infected host and a recipient bait. Our results showed that Monceren® L mainly inhibits the saprotrophic spread of the fungus in soil and may prevent the fungus from reaching its host plant. However, perhaps surprisingly we did not detect any significant effect of the fungicide on the pathogen infectivity. Finally, highly localized application of the fungicide—a narrow strip of soil (12.5 mm wide) sprayed with Monceren® L—significantly decreased local transmission of the pathogen, suggesting lowered risk of occurrence of invasive epidemics. Our results highlight that detailed knowledge on epidemiological processes could contribute to the design of innovative management strategies based on precision agriculture tools to improve the efficacy of disease control and reduce pesticide use. PMID:27668731

  9. A double-stranded RNA element from a hypovirulent strain of Rhizoctonia solani occurs in DNA form and is genetically related to the pentafunctional AROM protein of the shikimate pathway.

    PubMed

    Lakshman, D K; Jian, J; Tavantzis, S M

    1998-05-26

    M2 is a double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) element occurring in the hypovirulent isolate Rhs 1A1 of the plant pathogenic basidiomycete Rhizoctonia solani. Rhs 1A1 originated as a sector of the virulent field isolate Rhs 1AP, which contains no detectable amount of the M2 dsRNA. The complete sequence (3,570 bp) of the M2 dsRNA has been determined. A 6.9-kbp segment of total DNA from either Rhs 1A1 or Rhs 1AP hybridizes with an M2-specific cDNA probe. The sequences of M2 dsRNA and of PCR products generated from Rhs 1A1 total DNA were found to be identical. Thus this report describes a fungal host containing full-length DNA copies of a dsRNA element. A major portion of the M2 dsRNA is located in the cytoplasm, whereas a smaller amount is found in mitochondria. Based on either the universal or the mitochondrial genetic code of filamentous fungi, one strand of M2 encodes a putative protein of 754 amino acids. The resulting polypeptide has all four motifs of a dsRNA viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RDRP) and is phylogenetically related to the RDRP of a mitochondrial dsRNA associated with hypovirulence in strain NB631 of Cryphonectria parasitica, incitant of chestnut blight. This polypeptide also has significant sequence similarity with two domains of a pentafunctional polypeptide, which catalyzes the five central steps of the shikimate pathway in yeast and filamentous fungi.

  10. Development of SCAR markers and UP-PCR cross-hybridization method for specific detection of four major subgroups of Rhizoctonia from infected turfgrasses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Several species and hyphal anastomosis groups (AG) of Rhizoctonia solani (sensu lato) cause brown patch diseases of turfgrasses. Conventional methods of identification of Rhizoctonia pathogens are time consuming and often inaccurate. A rapid identification assay for Waitea circinata (anamorph: Rhizo...

  11. Rapid quantitative assessment of Rhizoctonia tolerance in roots of wheat and barley

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rhizoctonia solani AG8, causal agent of Rhizoctonia root rot and bare patch in dryland cereal production systems of the Pacific Northwest, USA and Australia, reduces yields in a wide range of crops. Disease is not consistently controlled by available management practices, and genetic resistance is d...

  12. Temperature, Moisture, and Fungicide Effects in Managing Rhizoctonia Root and Crown Rot of Sugar Beet

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rhizoctonia solani AG-2-2 is the causal agent of Rhizoctonia root and crown rot in sugar beet. To assess the capacity at which other anastomosis groups (AGs) are able to infect sugar beet, 15 AGs and subgroups were tested for pathogenicity on resistant (FC708 CMS) and susceptible (Monohikari) seedl...

  13. Rhizoctonia seedling damping-off in sugar beet in Michigan

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rhizoctonia solani is an important seedling pathogen of sugar beet, causing damping-off following seedling emergence. Anastomosis group (AG)-4 has been the primary seedling pathogen reported on sugar beet, however, recent screening has found high incidence of infection by AG-2-2. Isolations of R. so...

  14. DNA fingerprinting and anastomosis grouping reveal similar genetic diversity in Rhizoctonia species infecting turfgrasses in the transition zone of USA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rhizoctonia blight (sensu lato) is a common and serious disease of many turfgrass species. The most widespread causal agent, R. solani, consists of several genetically different subpopulations. Though hyphal anastomosis reactions have been used to group Rhizoctonia species, they are time consuming a...

  15. Screening a dry bean Andean diversity panel for potential sources of resistance to Rhizoctonia root rot and damping-off

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rhizoctonia root rot and damping-off, caused by Rhizoctonia solani, are among the most economically important root and hypocotyl diseases in the world and affect a wide range of hosts including the common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris). To identify potential sources of resistance, screening material was ...

  16. Rhizoctonia web blight

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rhizoctonia web blight, caused by several Rhizoctonia spp., is an important disease of evergreen azaleas and other ornamental plants in nurseries. The primary pathogens causing web blight are binucleate Rhizoctonia anastomosis groups (AG) (= Ceratobasidium D.P. Rogers, teleomorph). In southern AL an...

  17. Genetic diversity and virulence of Rhizoctonia species associated with plantings of Lotus corniculatus.

    PubMed

    Emery, Keith M; Beuselinck, Paul R; English, James T

    2003-02-01

    Species of Rhizoctonia cause a blight of Lotus corniculatus, a perennial forage legume. We characterized genetic variation and virulence in populations of R. solani and binucleate Rhizoctonia's associated with diseased L. corniculatus in field plantings over several years. Isolates of anastomosis groups AG-1 and AG-4 accounted for the R. solani recovered from diseased leaf and shoot tissues. Isolates of binucleate Rhizoctonia were recovered predominantly from soil and associated plant debris. Isolates of R. solani were more virulent on leaves and shoots of L. corniculatus than were binucleate Rhizoctonia isolates. Numerous unique DNA restriction patterns were observed among binucleate isolates and anastomosis groups of R. solani. Variation in restriction patterns was greater among isolates of AG-1 from the lower plant canopy than from the upper canopy. No restriction pattern was shared by any isolate from AG-1 and AG-4. Allelic and genotypic heterogeneity of AG-1 isolates were also greater in the lower plant canopy. Binucleate isolates exhibited greater heterogeneity than AG-1 isolates from either canopy region. L. corniculatus offers significant opportunities for investigating temporal and spatial dynamics of genetic structure of Rhizoctonia populations in perennial plant systems.

  18. Biological control of take-all and Rhizoctonia root rot of wheat by the cyclic lipopeptide-producing strain Pseudomonas fluorescens HC1-07

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pseudomonas fluorescens HC1-07, isolated from the phyllosphere of wheat grown in Hebei province, China, inhibited a broad range of plant pathogens, including Gaeumannomyces graminis var. tritici and Rhizoctonia solani AG-8, and suppressed the soilborne diseases of wheat, take-all and Rhizoctonia roo...

  19. Characterization, Genetic Structure, and Pathogenicity of Rhizoctonia spp. Associated with Rice Sheath Diseases in India.

    PubMed

    Taheri, Parissa; Gnanamanickam, Sam; Höfte, Monica

    2007-03-01

    ABSTRACT Isolates of Rhizoctonia spp. were obtained from rice in India during 2000-2003. Characterization by conventional techniques and polymerase chain reaction showed that from 110 isolates, 99 were R. solani and 11 were R. oryzae-sativae. Of 99 isolates identified as R. solani, 96 were AG1-IA, 1 was AG1-IB, and 2 were AG1-IC. Amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) analyzes were used to determine genetic relationships in Rhizoctonia pathogen populations collected from different geographic regions. Cluster analysis based on the AFLP data separated isolates belonging to the three different intraspecific groups of R. solani AG1 and differentiated R. solani from R. oryzae-sativae. Analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA) revealed that geographic region was the dominant factor determining population structure of R. solani AG1-1A; host cultivar had no significant effect. Pathogenicity tests on Oryza sativa cv. Zenith revealed that isolates of R. solani AG1-1A and AG1-1B were more virulent than R. solani AG1-IC and R. oryzae-sativae isolates.

  20. Influence of weed species and time of glyphosate application on Rhizoctonia root rot of barley

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rhizoctonia solani AG-8 causes root disease in wheat, barley, canola and other small grains in the dryland inland Pacific Northwest. The pathogen survives between crops on roots of volunteers and grassy weeds. Destroying this green bridge with herbicides such as glyphosate is a common tactic to cont...

  1. Postharvest respiration rate and sucrose content of Rhizoctonia-infected sugarbeet roots

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rhizotonia crown and root rot of sugarbeet, caused by Rhizoctonia solani AG 2-2, is increasing in Minnesota and North Dakota. As the disease increases in prevalence and severity, more diseased roots are being stored in piles where they affect storability and postharvest quality. The objective of th...

  2. Postharvest respiration rate and sucrose content of Rhizoctonia-infected sugarbeet roots

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rhizotonia crown and root rot of sugarbeet (Beta vulgaris L), caused by Rhizoctonia solani AG 2-2, is increasing in Minnesota and North Dakota. As the disease increases in prevalence and severity, more diseased roots are being stored in piles where they affect storability and postharvest quality. T...

  3. Molecular characterization, morphological characteristics, virulence and geographic distribution of Rhizoctonia spp. in Washington State

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rhizoctonia root rot and bare patch, caused by R. solani AG-8 and R. oryzae, are chronic and important yield-limiting diseases of wheat and barley in the Inland Pacific Northwest (PNW) of the USA. Major gaps remain in our understanding of the epidemiology of these diseases, and because multiple Rhiz...

  4. Molecular and genetic aspects of controlling the soilborne necrotrophic pathogens Rhizoctonia and Pythium.

    PubMed

    Okubara, Patricia A; Dickman, Martin B; Blechl, Ann E

    2014-11-01

    The soilborne necrotrophic pathogens Rhizoctonia and Pythium infect a wide range of crops in the US and worldwide. These pathogens pose challenges to growers because the diseases they cause are not adequately controlled by fungicides, rotation or, for many hosts, natural genetic resistance. Although a combination of management practices are likely to be required for control of Rhizoctonia and Pythium, genetic resistance remains a key missing component. This review discusses the recent deployment of introduced genes and genome-based information for control of Rhizoctonia, with emphasis on three pathosystems: Rhizoctonia solani AG8 and wheat, R. solani AG1-IA and rice, and R. solani AG3 or AG4 and potato. Molecular mechanisms underlying disease suppression will be addressed, if appropriate. Although less is known about genes and factors suppressive to Pythium, pathogen genomics and biological control studies are providing useful leads to effectors and antifungal factors. Prospects for resistance to Rhizoctonia and Pythium spp. will continue to improve with growing knowledge of pathogenicity strategies, host defense gene action relative to the pathogen infection process, and the role of environmental factors on pathogen-host interactions.

  5. Molecular and genetic aspects of controlling the soilborne necrotrophic pathogens Rhizoctonia and Pythium.

    PubMed

    Okubara, Patricia A; Dickman, Martin B; Blechl, Ann E

    2014-11-01

    The soilborne necrotrophic pathogens Rhizoctonia and Pythium infect a wide range of crops in the US and worldwide. These pathogens pose challenges to growers because the diseases they cause are not adequately controlled by fungicides, rotation or, for many hosts, natural genetic resistance. Although a combination of management practices are likely to be required for control of Rhizoctonia and Pythium, genetic resistance remains a key missing component. This review discusses the recent deployment of introduced genes and genome-based information for control of Rhizoctonia, with emphasis on three pathosystems: Rhizoctonia solani AG8 and wheat, R. solani AG1-IA and rice, and R. solani AG3 or AG4 and potato. Molecular mechanisms underlying disease suppression will be addressed, if appropriate. Although less is known about genes and factors suppressive to Pythium, pathogen genomics and biological control studies are providing useful leads to effectors and antifungal factors. Prospects for resistance to Rhizoctonia and Pythium spp. will continue to improve with growing knowledge of pathogenicity strategies, host defense gene action relative to the pathogen infection process, and the role of environmental factors on pathogen-host interactions. PMID:25438786

  6. Culturable fungal assemblages growing within Cenococcum sclerotia in forest soils.

    PubMed

    Obase, Keisuke; Douhan, Greg W; Matsuda, Yosuke; Smith, Matthew E

    2014-12-01

    The ectomycorrhizal fungus Cenococcum geophilum (Ascomycota, Dothideomycetes) forms black, round to irregular sclerotia in forest soils. Fungi that colonize the sclerotia appear to affect sclerotia viability and may play an important role in the life history of Cenococcum. Some of the fungi could also affect nutrient cycling by decomposing Cenococcum sclerotia, which are melanized and recalcitrant to decay. We used a culture-based method to document the fungal communities growing inside surface-sterilized sclerotia that were collected from forest soils. Cenococcum was successfully isolated from 297 of 971 sclerotia whereas 427 sclerotia hosted fungi other than Cenococcum. DNA barcoding of the internal transcribed spacer rDNA followed by grouping at 97% sequence similarity yielded 85 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) that consisted primarily of Ascomycota (e.g. Chaetothyriales, Eurotiales, Helotiales, Pleosporales) and a few Basidiomycota and Mucoromycotina. Although most fungal OTUs were infrequently cultured, several OTUs such as members of Asterostroma, Cladophialophora, Oidiodendron, and Pleosporales were common and found across many sites. Our results suggest that Cenococcum sclerotia act as a substrate for diverse fungi. The occurrence of several OTUs in sclerotia across many sites suggests that these fungi may be active parasites of Cenococcum sclerotia or may preferentially use sclerotia as a nutrient source. PMID:25229424

  7. Determination of the anastomosis grouping and virulence of Rhizoctonia spp. associated with potato tubers grown in Lincoln, New Zealand.

    PubMed

    Farrokhi-Nejad, Reza; Cromey, Matthew G; Moosawi-Jorf, S Ali

    2007-11-01

    A total of 58 isolates of Rhizoctonia spp. (46 R. solani and 12 binucleate Rhizoctonia) were recovered from potato tubers showing black scurf disease symptom during the 2004 growing season in Lincoln, New Zealand. The isolates were assigned to 5 Anastomosis Groups (AG) ofR. solani AG-3 (54.34%), AG-5 (28.26%), AG-8 (8.69%), AG-4 (6.52%) and AG-2-2 IIIB (2.17%) and six anastomosis groups ofbinucleate Rhizoctonia, AG-K (25%), AG-Bi (25%), AG-Ba (8.33%), AG-C (8.33%), AG-D (8.33%) and AG-E (8.33%). Two isolates of BNR did not anastomose with any of the tester strains and remain unidentified. In pathogenicity tests that were carried out on radish, carrot, lettuce, onion, tomato and hemp, it was found that all the isolates of both R. solani and binucleate Rhizoctonia to be virulent at varying degrees to these 6 plants species from different families. In these tests, isolates of AG-3 and AG-8 from R. solani population caused the highest and lowest disease severity on all 6 plant species, respectively. In population of binucleate Rhizoctonia, on the other hand, the highest and lowest disease severities were caused by the isolates of AG-D and AG-Ba on all test plants, respectively. When the results of the pathogenicity tests were examined in terms of the susceptibility levels of the plants, the most resistant plant was tomato against different AGs of R. solani and BNR. On the other hand, radish was the most susceptible plant species tested in this study against both R. solani and BNR isolates.

  8. DNA fingerprinting and anastomosis grouping reveal similar genetic diversity in Rhizoctonia species infecting turfgrasses in the transition zone of USA.

    PubMed

    Amaradasa, B S; Horvath, B J; Lakshman, D K; Warnke, S E

    2013-01-01

    Rhizoctonia blight is a common and serious disease of many turfgrass species. The most widespread causal agent, Thanatephorus cucumeris (anamorph: R. solani), consists of several genetically different subpopulations. In addition, Waitea circinata varieties zeae, oryzae and circinata (anamorph: Rhizoctonia spp.) also can cause the disease. Accurate identification of the causal pathogen is important for effective management of the disease. It is challenging to distinguish the specific causal pathogen based on disease symptoms or macroscopic and microscopic morphology. Traditional methods such as anastomosis reactions with tester isolates are time consuming and sometimes difficult to interpret. In the present study universally primed PCR (UP-PCR) fingerprinting was used to assess genetic diversity of Rhizoctonia spp. infecting turfgrasses. Eighty-four Rhizoctonia isolates were sampled from diseased turfgrass leaves from seven distinct geographic areas in Virginia and Maryland. Rhizoctonia isolates were characterized by ribosomal DNA internal transcribed spacer (rDNA-ITS) region and UP-PCR. The isolates formed seven clusters based on ITS sequences analysis and unweighted pair group method with arithmetic mean (UPGMA) clustering of UP-PCR markers, which corresponded well with anastomosis groups (AGs) of the isolates. Isolates of R. solani AG 1-IB (n = 18), AG 2-2IIIB (n = 30) and AG 5 (n = 1) clustered separately. Waitea circinata var. zeae (n = 9) and var. circinata (n = 4) grouped separately. A cluster of six isolates of Waitea (UWC) did not fall into any known Waitea variety. The binucleate Rhizoctonia-like fungi (BNR) (n = 16) clustered into two groups. Rhizoctonia solani AG 2-2IIIB was the most dominant pathogen in this study, followed by AG 1-IB. There was no relationship between the geographic origin of the isolates and clustering of isolates based on the genetic associations. To our knowledge this is the first time UP-PCR was used to characterize Rhizoctonia

  9. Heterokaryon formation in Thanatephorus cucumeris (Rhizoctonia solani) AG-1 IC.

    PubMed

    Qu, Ping; Yamashita, Koji; Toda, Takeshi; Priyatmojo, Achmadi; Kubota, Mayumi; Hyakumachi, Mitsuro

    2008-09-01

    Approximately 50 single-basidiospore isolates (SBIs) obtained from each of 16 field isolates of Thanatephorus cucumeris AG-1 IC were examined for heterokaryon formation. All SBIs obtained from each field isolate were divided into two mating groups (SBIs-M1 and SBIs-M2), and tufts of mycelia were formed in the contact zone between colonies of paired SBIs-M1 and -M2 based on 0.5 % charcoal agar medium. Tufts were produced from all possible pairing between SBIs from non-parental field isolates. Hyphal anastomosis reactions indicated no cell death and random cell death at the contact cell, and was not related to tuft formation. AFLP phenotypes of SBIs from each field isolate were not identical to each other and were different from their parental field isolate. AFLP phenotypes of the tuft isolates formed from SBIs-M1 and SBIs-M2 from each field isolate were heterokaryotic. Moreover, several SBIs also formed tufts with their parental and non-parental field isolates. AFLP phenotypes of these tuft isolates suggested that they were all heterokaryotic. Results of these experiments suggest that T. cucumeris AG-1 IC is heterothallic and bipolar, and that genetic exchange can occur between homokaryotic and heterokaryotic isolates (Buller phenomenon).

  10. Effect of inoculum density and soil tillage on the development and severity of rhizoctonia root rot.

    PubMed

    Schroeder, K L; Paulitz, T C

    2008-03-01

    Rhizoctonia spp. cause substantial yield losses in direct-seeded cereal crops compared with conventional tillage. To investigate the mechanisms behind this increased disease, soils from tilled or direct-seeded fields were inoculated with Rhizoctonia spp. at population densities from 0.8 to 250 propagules per gram and planted with barley (Hordeum vulgare). The incidence and severity of disease did not differ between soils with different tillage histories. Both R. solani AG-8 and R. oryzae stunted plants at high inoculum densities, with the latter causing pre-emergence damping-off. High inoculum densities of both species stimulated early production of crown roots in barley seedlings. Intact soil cores from these same tilled and direct-seeded fields were used to evaluate the growth of Rhizoctonia spp. from colonized oat seeds. Growth of R. oryzae was not affected by previous tillage history. However, R. solani AG-8 grew more rapidly through soil from a long-term direct-seeded field compared to tilled soils. The differential response between these two experiments (mixed, homogenized soil versus intact soil) suggests that soil structure plays a major role in the proliferation of R. solani AG-8 through soils with different tillage histories.

  11. Role of essential oils in control of Rhizoctonia damping-off in tomato with bioactive Monarda herbage.

    PubMed

    Gwinn, Kimberly D; Ownley, Bonnie H; Greene, Sharon E; Clark, Miranda M; Taylor, Chelsea L; Springfield, Tiffany N; Trently, David J; Green, James F; Reed, A; Hamilton, Susan L

    2010-05-01

    Plants in the genus Monarda produce complex essential oils that contain antifungal compounds. The objectives of this research were to identify selections of monarda that reduce Rhizoctonia damping-off of tomato, and to determine relationships between essential oil composition of 13 monarda herbages (dried and ground leaves) and disease suppression. Herbages were grouped into five chemotypes, based on essential oil composition and effective concentrations for reducing growth by 50% for Rhizoctonia solani. Replicated and repeated disease control assays were conducted with monarda herbages in greenhouse medium, with or without Rhizoctonia. Percent survival, seedling height, and stem diameter were evaluated at 8 weeks. Survival, seedling height, and stem diameter in herbage-only treatments were not different from the control (no-herbage, no-pathogen) for most herbage treatments. In the pathogen control (no-herbage + Rhizoctonia), seedling survival was 10% that of the control. In pathogen-infested media, seedling survival ranged from 65 to 80% for treatments with thymol chemotypes and 55 to 65% for carvacrol chemotypes. Effective control of Rhizoctonia damping-off was correlated with phenolic monoterpenes; herbages classified as carvacrol chemotypes effectively protected tomato seedlings from Rhizoctonia damping-off disease without phytotoxicity. This study provides evidence that monarda herbages have potential as growing media amendments for control of Rhizoctonia damping-off disease.

  12. Nonpathogenic Binucleate Rhizoctonia spp. and Benzothiadiazole Protect Cotton Seedlings Against Rhizoctonia Damping-Off and Alternaria Leaf Spot in Cotton.

    PubMed

    Jabaji-Hare, Suha; Neate, Stephen M

    2005-09-01

    ABSTRACT Recent reports have shown induction of resistance to Rhizoctonia root rot using nonpathogenic strains of binucleate Rhizoctonia spp. (np-BNR). This study evaluates the biocontrol ability of several np-BNR isolates against root and foliar diseases of cotton in greenhouse trials, provides evidence for induced systemic resistance (ISR) as a mechanism in this biocontrol, and compares the disease control provided by np-BNR with that provided by the chemical inducer benzothiadiazole (BTH). Pretreatment of cotton seedlings with np-BNR isolates provided good protection against pre- and post-emergence damping-off caused by a virulent strain of Rhizoctonia solani (AG-4). Seedling stand of protected cotton was significantly higher (P < 0.05) than that of nonprotected seedlings. Several np-BNR isolates significantly reduced disease severity. The combination of BTH and np-BNR provided significant protection against seedling rot and leaf spot in cotton; however, the degree of disease reduction was comparable to that obtained with np-BNR treatment alone. Significant reduction in leaf spot symptoms caused by Alternaria macrospora occurred on cotyledons pretreated with np-BNR or sprayed with BTH, and the np- BNR-treated seedlings had significantly less leaf spot than BTH-treated seedlings. The results demonstrate that np-BNR isolates can protect cotton from infections caused by both root and leaf pathogens and that disease control was superior to that observed with a chemical inducer.

  13. Multistate evaluation of Brassica cover crop, biocontrol agent, and fungicide for integrated management of sheath blight

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sheath blight, caused by Rhizoctonia solani, is one of the most important diseases limiting rice production in the southern rice-producing states. The fungus survives between crops as sclerotia and mycelia in infected plant debris and serves as the primary inoculum. Infection starts when sclerotia a...

  14. Fusarium solani breast abscess.

    PubMed

    Anandi, V; Vishwanathan, P; Sasikala, S; Rangarajan, M; Subramaniyan, C S; Chidambaram, N

    2005-07-01

    An unusual manifestation of breast fusariosis was encountered in a 55-year-old female diabetic patient. Two fine needle aspirates (FNA) from the abscess were done at three days interval and they showed hyaline, septate, branched, fungal hyphae in 10% potassium hydroxide mount. Fungal infection was confirmed by demonstrating the fungal hyphae in the midst of lymphocytes, macrophages and neutrophils in Leishman stained smears. Culture of both FNAs yielded a heavy and pure growth of Fusarium solani. The patient responded to oral ketoconazole 200 mg once daily for 3 weeks. The breast fusariosis reported here is presumably the first case in India. PMID:16100431

  15. Molecular Characterization, Morphological Characteristics, Virulence, and Geographic Distribution of Rhizoctonia spp. in Washington State.

    PubMed

    Jaaffar, Ahmad Kamil Mohd; Paulitz, Timothy C; Schroeder, Kurtis L; Thomashow, Linda S; Weller, David M

    2016-05-01

    Rhizoctonia root rot and bare patch, caused by Rhizoctonia solani anastomosis group (AG)-8 and R. oryzae, are chronic and important yield-limiting diseases of wheat and barley in the Inland Pacific Northwest (PNW) of the United States. Major gaps remain in our understanding of the epidemiology of these diseases, in part because multiple Rhizoctonia AGs and species can be isolated from the same cereal roots from the field, contributing to the challenge of identifying the causal agents correctly. In this study, a collection totaling 498 isolates of Rhizoctonia was assembled from surveys conducted from 2000 to 2009, 2010, and 2011 over a wide range of cereal production fields throughout Washington State in the PNW. To determine the identity of the isolates, PCR with AG- or species-specific primers and/or DNA sequence analysis of the internal transcribed spacers was performed. R. solani AG-2-1, AG-8, AG-10, AG-3, AG-4, and AG-11 comprised 157 (32%), 70 (14%), 21 (4%), 20 (4%), 1 (0.2%), and 1 (0.2%), respectively, of the total isolates. AG-I-like binucleate Rhizoctonia sp. comprised 44 (9%) of the total; and 53 (11%), 80 (16%), and 51 (10%) were identified as R. oryzae genotypes I, II, and III, respectively. Isolates of AG-2-1, the dominant Rhizoctonia, occurred in all six agronomic zones defined by annual precipitation and temperature within the region sampled. Isolates of AG-8 also were cosmopolitan in their distribution but the frequency of isolation varied among years, and they were most abundant in zones of low and moderate precipitation. R. oryzae was cosmopolitan, and collectively the three genotypes comprised 37% of the isolates. Only isolates of R. solani AG-8 and R. oryzae genotypes II and III (but not genotype I) caused symptoms typically associated with Rhizoctonia root rot and bare patch of wheat. Isolates of AG-2-1 caused only mild root rot and AG-I-like binucleate isolates and members of groups AG-3, AG-4, and AG-11 showed only slight or no discoloration

  16. Two new steroids from sclerotia of the fungus Omphalia lapidescens.

    PubMed

    Yan, He; Rong, Xu; Chen, Pi-Ting; Zhang, Xing; Ma, Zhi-Qing

    2014-01-01

    Two new steroids, leiwansterols A and B, along with three known ones (3-5), were isolated from the sclerotia of the fungus Omphalia lapidescen. Their structures were elucidated on the basis of spectral data. The isolated compounds showed weak anti-tobacco mosaic virus activity. PMID:24392639

  17. Chitinase production by Bacillus subtilis ATCC 11774 and its effect on biocontrol of Rhizoctonia diseases of potato.

    PubMed

    Saber, Wesam I A; Ghoneem, Khalid M; Al-Askar, Abdulaziz A; Rashad, Younes M; Ali, Abeer A; Rashad, Ehsan M

    2015-12-01

    Stem canker and black scurf of potato, caused by Rhizoctonia solani, can be serious diseases causing an economically significant damage. Biocontrol activity of Bacillus subtilis ATCC 11774 against the Rhizoctonia diseases of potato was investigated in this study. Chitinase enzyme was optimally produced by B. subtilis under batch fermentation conditions similar to those of the potato-growing soil. The maximum chitinase was obtained at initial pH 8 and 30 °C. In vitro, the lytic action of the B. subtilis chitinase was detected releasing 355 μg GlcNAc ml⁻¹ from the cell wall extract of R. solani and suggesting the presence of various chitinase enzymes in the bacterial filtrate. In dual culture test, the antagonistic behavior of B. subtilis resulted in the inhibition of the radial growth of R. solani by 48.1% after 4 days. Moreover, the extracted B. subtilis chitinase reduced the growth of R. solani by 42.3% when incorporated with the PDA plates. Under greenhouse conditions, application of a bacterial suspension of B. subtilis at 109 cell mL⁻¹ significantly reduced the disease incidence of stem canker and black scurf to 22.3 and 30%, respectively. In addition, it significantly improved some biochemical parameters, growth and tubers yield. Our findings indicate two points; firstly, B. subtilis possesses a good biocontrol activity against Rhizoctonia diseases of potato, secondly, the harmonization and suitability of the soil conditions to the growth and activity of B. subtilis guaranteed a high controlling capacity against the target pathogen. PMID:26616375

  18. The structure and histochemistry of sclerotia of Ophiocordyceps sinensis.

    PubMed

    Xing, X K; Guo, S X

    2008-01-01

    The structure and histochemistry of sclerotia of Ophiocordyceps sinensis (synonym: Cordyceps sinensis) are described. The remains of the caterpillar epidermis and sometimes setae of the caterpillar were attached to the pigmented layer that is external to the rind of the sclerotium. The outer aerial hyphae and hyphae of the inner medulla were densely interwoven around the epidermis of the caterpillar; these eventually differentiated into the rind of the sclerotium. The medulla of the sclerotium consisted of three intergrading regions of hyphal density: high, low and a region of intermediate hyphal density. All hyphae of the medulla contained large quantities of protein, polysaccharide and polyphosphate; only the region of high hyphal density was rich in beta-1,3 glucans; the center of the sclerotium was almost devoid of hyphae and contained what are most likely the remains of caterpillar tissue. These features are compared with those of sclerotia of other fungi, and their possible significance is discussed. PMID:18833754

  19. Analysis of Sclerotia-Associated Fungal Communities in Cool-Temperate Forest Soils in North Japan

    PubMed Central

    Amasya, Anzilni F.; Narisawa, Kazuhiko; Watanabe, Makiko

    2015-01-01

    We herein investigated sclerotia that were obtained from cool-temperate forests in Mt. Chokai and Mt. Iwaki in north Japan and tentatively identified as the resting bodies of Cenococcum geophilum. The profiles of sclerotia-associated fungal communities were obtained through T-RFLP combined with clone library techniques. Our results showed that sclerotia in Mt. Chokai and Mt. Iwaki were predominated by Arthrinium arundinis and Inonotus sp., respectively. The results of the present study suggested that these sclerotia-associated species were responsible for the formation of sclerotia or sclerotia were originally formed by C. geophilum, but were subsequently occupied by these species after C. geophilum germinated or failed to survive due to competition. PMID:25740175

  20. Analysis of sclerotia-associated fungal communities in cool-temperate forest soils in north Japan.

    PubMed

    Amasya, Anzilni F; Narisawa, Kazuhiko; Watanabe, Makiko

    2015-01-01

    We herein investigated sclerotia that were obtained from cool-temperate forests in Mt. Chokai and Mt. Iwaki in north Japan and tentatively identified as the resting bodies of Cenococcum geophilum. The profiles of sclerotia-associated fungal communities were obtained through T-RFLP combined with clone library techniques. Our results showed that sclerotia in Mt. Chokai and Mt. Iwaki were predominated by Arthrinium arundinis and Inonotus sp., respectively. The results of the present study suggested that these sclerotia-associated species were responsible for the formation of sclerotia or sclerotia were originally formed by C. geophilum, but were subsequently occupied by these species after C. geophilum germinated or failed to survive due to competition. PMID:25740175

  1. Rhizoctonia wilt suppression of brinjal (Solanum melongena L) and plant growth activity by Bacillus BS2.

    PubMed

    Boruah, H P Deka; Kumar, B S Dileep

    2003-06-01

    An antibiotic-producing and hydrogen-cyanide-producing rhizobacteria strain Bacillus BS2 showed a wide range of antifungal activity against many Fusarium sp. and brinjal wilt disease pathogen Rhizoctonia solani. Seed bacterization with the strain BS2 promoted seed germination and plant growth in leguminous plants Phaseolus vulgaris and non-leguminous plants Solanum melongena L, Brassica oleracea var. capitata, B. oleraceae var. gongylodes and Lycopersicon esculentum Mill in terms of relative growth rate, shoot height, root length, total biomass production and total chlorophyll content of leaves. Yield of bacterized plants were increased by 10 to 49% compared to uninoculated control plants. Brinjal sapling raised through seed bacterization by the strain BS2 showed a significantly reduced wilt syndrome of brinjal caused by Rhizoctonia solani. Control of wilt disease by the bacterium was clue to the production of antibiotic-like substances, whereas plant growth-promotion was due to the activity of hydrogen cyanide. Root colonization study confirmed that the introduced bacteria colonized the roots and occupied 23-25% of total aerobic bacteria, which was confirmed using dual antibiotic (nalidixic acid and streptomycin sulphate) resistant mutant strain. The results obtained through this investigation suggested the potentiality of the strain BS2 to be used as a plant growth promoter and suppressor of wilt pathogen.

  2. Identification, molecular characterization, and evolution of group I introns at the expansion segment D11 of 28S rDNA in Rhizoctonia species.

    PubMed

    González, Dolores

    2013-09-01

    The nuclear ribosomal DNA of Rhizoctonia species is polymorphic in terms of the nucleotide composition and length. Insertions of 349-410 nucleotides in length with characteristics of group I introns were detected at a single insertion point at the expansion segment D11 of 28S rDNA in 12 out of 64 isolates. Eleven corresponded to Rhizoctonia solani (teleomorph: Thanatephorous) and one (AG-Q) to Rhizoctonia spp. (teleomorph: Ceratobasidium). Sequence data showed that all but AG-Q contained conserved DNA catalytic core regions (P, Q, R, and S) essential for selfsplicing. The predicted secondary structure revealed that base-paired helices corresponded to subgroup IC1. Isolates from same anastomosis group and even subgroups within R. solani were variable with regard to possession of introns. Phylogenetic analyses indicated that introns were vertically transmitted. Unfortunately, sequence data from the conserved region from all 64 isolates were not useful for delimiting species. Analyses with IC1 introns at same insertion point, of both Ascomycota and Basidiomycota indicated the possibility of horizontal transfer at this site. The present study uncovered new questions on evolutionary pattern of change of these introns within Rhizoctonia species.

  3. Bacterial community in sclerotia of Cenococcum species and soil in sub-alpine forest, central Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nonoyama, Y.; Narisawa, K.; Ohta, H.; Watanabe, M.

    2009-04-01

    Species of Cenococcum, ectomycorrhizal fungi, may be particularly abundant in cold- or nutrient-stressed habitats. The fungus is easily recognized by its jet-black hyphae, and distinct compact masses of fungal mycelium called sclerotia. They are hard, black, comparatively smooth and mostly spherical. Sclerotia are formed in rhizosphere and can provide sufficient inoculums for several years. The purpose of this study is to investigate bacterial community inside sclerotia, with an interest on contribution of sclerotia to microbial diversity in rhizosphere. To investigate bacterial community inside of the fungal sclerotia by 16S rDNA gene clone library, several hundred of sclerotia (ca. 1g) were collected from sub-alpine forest soil in central Japan. Furthermore, three sclerotium grains were applied to investigate internal bacteria community by culture method. The isolated bacterial strains were then proceeded to determine their 16S rDNA partial sequences. The predominant group determined by clone library analysis of 16S ribosomal RNA genes with DNA from the sclerotia was Acidobacteria in both sclerotia and soil. Bacterial community of sclerotia showed higher diversity compared to soil. On the contrary, bacterial flora isolated from single sclerotium differed each other. Additionally, the bacterial community was composed by limited species of related genus.

  4. Bacillus amyloliquefaciens subsp. plantarum GR53, a potent biocontrol agent resists Rhizoctonia disease on Chinese cabbage through hormonal and antioxidants regulation.

    PubMed

    Kang, Sang-Mo; Radhakrishnan, Ramalingam; Lee, In-Jung

    2015-10-01

    The fungus Rhizoctonia solani is one of the causal agents of numerous diseases that affect crop growth and yield. The aim of this present investigation was to identify a biocontrol agent that acts against R. solani and to determine the agent's protective effect through phytohormones and antioxidant regulation in experimentally infected Chinese cabbage plants. Four rhizospheric soil bacterial isolates GR53, GR169, GR786, and GR320 were tested for their antagonistic activity against R. solani. Among these isolates, GR53 significantly suppressed fungal growth. GR53 was identified as Bacillus amyloliquefaciens subsp. plantarum by phylogenetic analysis of the 16S rDNA sequence. The biocontrol activity of B. amyloliquefaciens subsp. plantarum GR53 was tested in Chinese cabbage plants under controlled conditions. Results showed that R. solani inhibited plant growth (length, width, fresh and dry weight of leaves) by reducing chlorophyll and total phenolic content, as well as by increasing the levels of salicylic acid, jasmonic acid, abscisic acid, and DPPH scavenging activity. By regulating the levels of these compounds, the co-inoculation of B. amyloliquefaciens subsp. plantarum GR53 heightened induced systemic resistance in infected Chinese cabbage, effectively mitigating R. solani-induced damaging effects and improving plant growth. The results obtained from this study suggest that B. amyloliquefaciens subsp. plantarum GR53 is an effective biocontrol agent to prevent the damage caused by R. solani in Chinese cabbage plants.

  5. Bacillus amyloliquefaciens subsp. plantarum GR53, a potent biocontrol agent resists Rhizoctonia disease on Chinese cabbage through hormonal and antioxidants regulation.

    PubMed

    Kang, Sang-Mo; Radhakrishnan, Ramalingam; Lee, In-Jung

    2015-10-01

    The fungus Rhizoctonia solani is one of the causal agents of numerous diseases that affect crop growth and yield. The aim of this present investigation was to identify a biocontrol agent that acts against R. solani and to determine the agent's protective effect through phytohormones and antioxidant regulation in experimentally infected Chinese cabbage plants. Four rhizospheric soil bacterial isolates GR53, GR169, GR786, and GR320 were tested for their antagonistic activity against R. solani. Among these isolates, GR53 significantly suppressed fungal growth. GR53 was identified as Bacillus amyloliquefaciens subsp. plantarum by phylogenetic analysis of the 16S rDNA sequence. The biocontrol activity of B. amyloliquefaciens subsp. plantarum GR53 was tested in Chinese cabbage plants under controlled conditions. Results showed that R. solani inhibited plant growth (length, width, fresh and dry weight of leaves) by reducing chlorophyll and total phenolic content, as well as by increasing the levels of salicylic acid, jasmonic acid, abscisic acid, and DPPH scavenging activity. By regulating the levels of these compounds, the co-inoculation of B. amyloliquefaciens subsp. plantarum GR53 heightened induced systemic resistance in infected Chinese cabbage, effectively mitigating R. solani-induced damaging effects and improving plant growth. The results obtained from this study suggest that B. amyloliquefaciens subsp. plantarum GR53 is an effective biocontrol agent to prevent the damage caused by R. solani in Chinese cabbage plants. PMID:26160009

  6. Influence of glyphosate on Rhizoctonia and Fusarium root rot in sugar beet.

    PubMed

    Larson, Rebecca L; Hill, Amy L; Fenwick, Ann; Kniss, Andrew R; Hanson, Linda E; Miller, Stephen D

    2006-12-01

    This study tests the effect of glyphosate application on disease severity in glyphosate-resistant sugar beet, and examines whether the increase in disease is fungal or plant mediated. In greenhouse studies of glyphosate-resistant sugar beet, increased disease severity was observed following glyphosate application and inoculation with certain isolates of Rhizoctonia solani Kuhn and Fusarium oxysporum Schlecht. f. sp. betae Snyd. & Hans. Significant increases in disease severity were noted for R. solani AG-2-2 isolate R-9 and moderately virulent F. oxysporum isolate FOB13 on both cultivars tested, regardless of the duration between glyphosate application and pathogen challenge, but not with highly virulent F. oxysporum isolate F-19 or an isolate of R. solani AG-4. The increase in disease does not appear to be fungal mediated, since in vitro studies showed no positive impact of glyphosate on fungal growth or overwintering structure production or germination for either pathogen. Studies of glyphosate impact on sugar beet physiology showed that shikimic acid accumulation is tissue specific and the rate of accumulation is greatly reduced in resistant cultivars when compared with a susceptible cultivar. The results indicate that precautions need to be taken when certain soil-borne diseases are present if weed management for sugar beet is to include post-emergence glyphosate treatments.

  7. Lumi-ergometrine--structural identification and occurrence in sclerotia.

    PubMed

    Merkel, Stefan; Köppen, Robert; Koch, Matthias; Emmerling, Franziska; Nehls, Irene

    2012-02-01

    The fungus Claviceps purpurea grows on grasses and cereal grains and produces six predominant ergot alkaloids. These toxic substances undergo different transformation reactions during storage and cereal processing. One of these reactions is the addition of water to a double bond in the ergoline skeleton. Since light is required for this process, the substances formed were named lumi-ergot alkaloids. From these, a new asymmetric carbon and consequently two epimers with different polarities are formed. For investigations of lumi-ergot alkaloids, ergometrine was used exemplarily as it represents one of the six ergot alkaloids predominantly formed by Claviceps purpurea. The main reaction product, the less polar compound of the two lumi-ergometrine epimers, was separated by HPLC and unambiguously identified as 10-(S)-lumi-ergometrine using X-ray structural analysis. A HPLC-MS/MS method was developed for the detection of this substance in sclerotia extracts. Using this method, the existence of both epimeric forms of lumi-ergometrine could be proved in the sclerotia. This is the first time that the existence of a lumi-transformation product of ergot alkaloids was proved in naturally grown samples. PMID:23605983

  8. Interplay between orfamides, sessilins and phenazines in the control of Rhizoctonia diseases by Pseudomonas sp. CMR12a.

    PubMed

    Olorunleke, Feyisara Eyiwumi; Hua, Gia Khuong Hoang; Kieu, Nam Phuong; Ma, Zongwang; Höfte, Monica

    2015-10-01

    We investigated the role of phenazines and cyclic lipopeptides (CLPs) (orfamides and sessilins), antagonistic metabolites produced by Pseudomonas sp. CMR12a, in the biological control of damping-off disease on Chinese cabbage (Brassica chinensis) caused by Rhizoctonia solani AG 2-1 and root rot disease on bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) caused by R. solani AG 4-HGI. A Pseudomonas mutant that only produced phenazines suppressed damping-off disease on Chinese cabbage to the same extent as CMR12a, while its efficacy to reduce root rot on bean was strongly impaired. In both pathosystems, the phenazine mutant that produced both CLPs was equally effective, but mutants that produced only one CLP lost biocontrol activity. In vitro microscopic assays revealed that mutants that only produced sessilins or orfamides inhibited mycelial growth of R. solani when applied together, while they were ineffective on their own. Phenazine-1-carboxamide suppressed mycelial growth of R. solani AG 2-1 but had no effect on AG 4-HGI. Orfamide B suppressed mycelial growth of both R. solani anastomosis groups in a dose-dependent way. Our results point to an additive interaction between both CLPs. Moreover, phenazines alone are sufficient to suppress Rhizoctonia disease on Chinese cabbage, while they need to work in tandem with the CLPs on bean.

  9. In vitro fungicide sensitivity of Rhizoctonia isolates collected from turfgrasses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Different Rhizoctonia species and anastomosis groups (AGs) have been reported to show variable sensitivity to various commercial fungicides. Thirty–six isolates of Rhizoctonia collected from turfgrasses were tested in vitro for sensitivity to commercial formulations of iprodione, triticonazole, and ...

  10. Fungal community in sclerotia of Japanese Beech forest soils in north eastern Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fathia Amasya, Anzilni; Narisawa, Kazuhiko; Watanabe, Makiko

    2014-05-01

    Sclerotia are resting structures of ectomycorrhizal fungi and appear as a response to unfavorable environmental conditions such as desiccation. They are hard, black, comparatively smooth and mostly spherical. Sclerotia are formed in rhizosphere and the 14C ages of sclerotia from A horizons of volcanic ash soils may range from modern until ca. 100~1,200 yr B.P. Most sclerotia-forming fungal species are known to be host-specific plant pathogens and therefore their abundance may indicate the presence of their host plants. The purpose of this study was to investigate fungal communities in sclerotia with an interest in describing the existing or may have previously existed host plant community. To investigate fungal community inside of sclerotia by 16S rDNA gene clone library, several hundred of sclerotia (ca. 1g) were collected from Fagus crenata forest soil in north eastern Japan. The rDNA ITS regions were then amplified by the PCR using primer pair ITS-1F/ITS-4. Aliquots of the amplified DNA were digested with restriction endonucleases AluI, Hae III, and HhaI to obtain ITS-RFLPs. To obtain the fungal community profiles a quenching fluorescence primer was used for real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) assay to monitor the PCR amplification and then used for T-RFLP. The predominant group determined by clone library analysis from the sclerotia was Ascomycota: Arthrinium arundinis, which has been reported to be one of the soil fungal species responsible for bamboo degradation and a pathogen for many species belonging to Poaceae family.

  11. Effect of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi on onion growth and onion stunting caused by Rhizoctonia solani, 2013.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A preliminary study was conducted in a greenhouse (15 ± 1oC, with supplemental lights for 12 h/day) to determine the role of AMF on onion growth and for reducing the severity of onion stunting, using a commercial AMF inoculant, BioTerra Plus, that contains 104 propagules/g (ppg) of Glomus intraradic...

  12. Influence of sclerotia formation on ligninolytic enzyme production in Morchella crassipes.

    PubMed

    Kanwal, Harpreet Kaur; Reddy, M Sudhakara

    2014-07-01

    Morels are wild edible ascomycetous mushrooms that are highly prized because of their medicinal and nutritional qualities. Ligninolytic enzymes are considered as one of the most important enzymes in fungi due to their involvement in fruiting body formation during artificial cultivation on different substrates. In the life cycle of morels, sclerotia are the intermediate stage to form a fruiting body from mycelia. We have studied the production of ligninolytic enzymes by Morchella crassipes MR8 growing on different substrates and during sclerotia formation. This fungus is able to produce ligninolytic enzymes such as laccase (Lac), lignin peroxidase (LiP), and manganese-dependent peroxidase (MnP) when grown on different substrates. Maximum Lac activity was observed when grown in wheat grains whereas maximum activities of MnP and LiP were observed when grown in rice straw. Laccase enzyme was produced in high titers during sclerotia formation and maturation when grown in combinations of soil and substrates. A large number of sclerotia was observed in soil and wheat grains, along with high titers of laccase. Cellulase activity was observed to be constant during sclerotia formation and maturation. The present study results suggest that laccase enzyme might play an important role in sclerotia formation in morels. PMID:23712903

  13. Interactions between the mycoparasite Pythium oligandrum and two types of sclerotia of plant-pathogenic fungi.

    PubMed

    Rey, Patrice; Le Floch, Gaétan; Benhamou, Nicole; Salerno, Maria-Isabel; Thuillier, Estelle; Tirilly, Yves

    2005-07-01

    The interactions between Pythium oligandrum hyphae and two types of sclerotia, i.e. the plano-convexoid sclerotium of Botrytis cinerea and the tuberoid sclerotium of Sclerotinia minor, were investigated by ultrastructural and cytochemical experiments. In the mycoparasitism of P. oligandrum, some differences in relation to sclerotium anatomy and the role of the rind layer in preventing invasion are documented. Both types of sclerotia showed neither alterations of the heavily melanised rind walls, nor direct rind wall penetration by P. oligandrum. This oomycete successfully entered B. cinerea sclerotia only through breaches at the junction of rind cells and corresponding to gaps in melanin deposits. On the other hand, none of these breaches was observed in the small sclerotia of S. minor, and P. oligandrum ingress in the sclerotia stopped at the inner rind layer. After the penetration of B. cinerea sclerotia by the mycoparasite, it extensively colonised the cortical and medulla areas by intercellular growth. The invaded tissues displayed pronounced alterations as well as some disorganisation of tissue in places. Colonisation was associated with severe chitin degradations of all host walls, which occurred even at some distance from P. oligandrum hyphae. The observation of wall thickenings in some P. oligandrum-hyphae suggests that the sclerotial cells constitute a harsh environment unsuitable for survival of the mycoparasite. These wall thickenings could be interpreted as P. oligandrum defence-like reactions. PMID:16121563

  14. Cropping Systems and Cultural Practices Determine the Rhizoctonia Anastomosis Groups Associated with Brassica spp. in Vietnam

    PubMed Central

    Soltaninejad, Saman; Höfte, Monica

    2014-01-01

    Ninety seven Rhizoctonia isolates were collected from different Brassica species with typical Rhizoctonia symptoms in different provinces of Vietnam. The isolates were identified using staining of nuclei and sequencing of the rDNA-ITS barcoding gene. The majority of the isolates were multinucleate R. solani and four isolates were binucleate Rhizoctonia belonging to anastomosis groups (AGs) AG-A and a new subgroup of A-F that we introduce here as AG-Fc on the basis of differences in rDNA-ITS sequence. The most prevalent multinucleate AG was AG 1-IA (45.4% of isolates), followed by AG 1-ID (17.5%), AG 1-IB (13.4%), AG 4-HGI (12.4%), AG 2-2 (5.2%), AG 7 (1.0%) and an unknown AG related to AG 1-IA and AG 1-IE that we introduce here as AG 1-IG (1.0%) on the basis of differences in rDNA-ITS sequence. AG 1-IA and AG 1-ID have not been reported before on Brassica spp. Pathogenicity tests revealed that isolates from all AGs, except AG-A, induced symptoms on detached leaves of several cabbage species. In in vitro tests on white cabbage and Chinese cabbage, both hosts were severely infected by AG 1-IB, AG 2-2, AG 4-HGI, AG 1-IG and AG-Fc isolates, while under greenhouse conditions, only AG 4-HGI, AG 2-2 and AG-Fc isolates could cause severe disease symptoms. The occurrence of the different AGs seems to be correlated with the cropping systems and cultural practices in different sampling areas suggesting that agricultural practices determine the AGs associated with Brassica plants in Vietnam. PMID:25372406

  15. Sexual Reproduction in Aspergillus flavus Sclerotia: Acquisition of Novel Alleles from Soil Populations and Uniparental Mitochondrial Inheritance

    PubMed Central

    Horn, Bruce W.; Gell, Richard M.; Singh, Rakhi; Sorensen, Ronald B.; Carbone, Ignazio

    2016-01-01

    Aspergillus flavus colonizes agricultural commodities worldwide and contaminates them with carcinogenic aflatoxins. The high genetic diversity of A. flavus populations is largely due to sexual reproduction characterized by the formation of ascospore-bearing ascocarps embedded within sclerotia. A. flavus is heterothallic and laboratory crosses between strains of the opposite mating type produce progeny showing genetic recombination. Sclerotia formed in crops are dispersed onto the soil surface at harvest and are predominantly produced by single strains of one mating type. Less commonly, sclerotia may be fertilized during co-infection of crops with sexually compatible strains. In this study, laboratory and field experiments were performed to examine sexual reproduction in single-strain and fertilized sclerotia following exposure of sclerotia to natural fungal populations in soil. Female and male roles and mitochondrial inheritance in A. flavus were also examined through reciprocal crosses between sclerotia and conidia. Single-strain sclerotia produced ascospores on soil and progeny showed biparental inheritance that included novel alleles originating from fertilization by native soil strains. Sclerotia fertilized in the laboratory and applied to soil before ascocarp formation also produced ascospores with evidence of recombination in progeny, but only known parental alleles were detected. In reciprocal crosses, sclerotia and conidia from both strains functioned as female and male, respectively, indicating A. flavus is hermaphroditic, although the degree of fertility depended upon the parental sources of sclerotia and conidia. All progeny showed maternal inheritance of mitochondria from the sclerotia. Compared to A. flavus populations in crops, soil populations would provide a higher likelihood of exposure of sclerotia to sexually compatible strains and a more diverse source of genetic material for outcrossing. PMID:26731416

  16. Sexual Reproduction in Aspergillus flavus Sclerotia: Acquisition of Novel Alleles from Soil Populations and Uniparental Mitochondrial Inheritance.

    PubMed

    Horn, Bruce W; Gell, Richard M; Singh, Rakhi; Sorensen, Ronald B; Carbone, Ignazio

    2016-01-01

    Aspergillus flavus colonizes agricultural commodities worldwide and contaminates them with carcinogenic aflatoxins. The high genetic diversity of A. flavus populations is largely due to sexual reproduction characterized by the formation of ascospore-bearing ascocarps embedded within sclerotia. A. flavus is heterothallic and laboratory crosses between strains of the opposite mating type produce progeny showing genetic recombination. Sclerotia formed in crops are dispersed onto the soil surface at harvest and are predominantly produced by single strains of one mating type. Less commonly, sclerotia may be fertilized during co-infection of crops with sexually compatible strains. In this study, laboratory and field experiments were performed to examine sexual reproduction in single-strain and fertilized sclerotia following exposure of sclerotia to natural fungal populations in soil. Female and male roles and mitochondrial inheritance in A. flavus were also examined through reciprocal crosses between sclerotia and conidia. Single-strain sclerotia produced ascospores on soil and progeny showed biparental inheritance that included novel alleles originating from fertilization by native soil strains. Sclerotia fertilized in the laboratory and applied to soil before ascocarp formation also produced ascospores with evidence of recombination in progeny, but only known parental alleles were detected. In reciprocal crosses, sclerotia and conidia from both strains functioned as female and male, respectively, indicating A. flavus is hermaphroditic, although the degree of fertility depended upon the parental sources of sclerotia and conidia. All progeny showed maternal inheritance of mitochondria from the sclerotia. Compared to A. flavus populations in crops, soil populations would provide a higher likelihood of exposure of sclerotia to sexually compatible strains and a more diverse source of genetic material for outcrossing.

  17. Baseline sensitivity and resistance risk assessmemt of Rhizoctonia cerealis to thifluzamide, a succinate dehydrogenase inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu; Lu, Jingle; Wang, Jianxin; Zhou, MingGuo; Chen, Changjun

    2015-10-01

    During 2010-2012, a total of 120 isolates of Rhizoctonia cerealis were collected from wheat with symptoms of sharp eyespot in four provinces (Henan, Shandong, Anhui and Jiangsu) in China. All the isolates were determined for baseline sensitivity to thifluzamide, a succinate dehydrogenase inhibitor (SDHI) with strong antifungal activity. The sampled pathogenic populations, never exposed to SDHIs, had similar sensitivity to trifluzamide (0.025-0.359 µg/ml) in the four regions and over the two years. The baseline sensitivity was distributed as a skewed unimodal curve with a mean EC50 value (effective concentrations for 50% inhibiting mycelial growth) of 0.064 ± 0.013 µg/ml. The resistance risk of R. cerealis to thifluzamide was further evaluated in vitro. Two thifluzamide-resistant mutants of R. cerealis were obtained by culturing on thifluzamide-amended plates. The resistance factors (RF = EC50 value of a mutant/EC50 value of the wild type progenitor of the mutant) were 120 and 40 for two R. cerealis mutants, respectively. All the mutants exhibited similar fitness after 10 successive transfers when compared to their wild-type parents in mycelial growth, sclerotia production, and virulence. However, the two thifluzamide-resistant mutants differed significantly in sensitivity to boscalid and flutolanil. Therefore, a low-to-moderate risk of resistance development was recommended for thifluzamide. PMID:26453237

  18. Differential identification of mushrooms sclerotia by IR macro-fingerprint method.

    PubMed

    Choong, Yew Keong; Lan, Jin; Lee, Han Lim; Chen, Xiang-Dong; Wang, Xiao-Guang; Yang, Yu-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Many macrofungus sclerotia are well-known medicinal herbs, health food and nutritional supplements. However, the prevalent adulterant commercial products are major hindrances to their incorporation into mainstream medical use in many countries. The mushroom sclerotia of Lignosus rhinocerotis, Poria cocos, Polyporus umbellatus, Pleurotus tuber-regium and Omphalia lapidescens are commonly used in traditional Chinese medicine. In this study, IR macro-fingerprint method was used in the identification of these sclerotia. The results showed that the spectrum of L. rhinocerotis (LR) was comparable with P. cocos with 94.4% correlation, except that the peak at 1543cm(-1) of LR appeared in lower intensity. The spectrum of P. umbellatus and P. tuber-regium was also correlated (91.5%), as both spectra could be clearly discriminated in that P. umbellatus spectrum has small base peaks located at the range of 1680-1500cm(-1). O. lapidescens was not comparable with all the other sclerotia as its spectrum was totally different. Its base peak was broad and derivated equally along the range. The first IR has revealed the dissimilarity among five mushrooms sclerotia. The second derivative and 2DIR further enhanced the identification in detail.

  19. Differential identification of mushrooms sclerotia by IR macro-fingerprint method.

    PubMed

    Choong, Yew Keong; Lan, Jin; Lee, Han Lim; Chen, Xiang-Dong; Wang, Xiao-Guang; Yang, Yu-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Many macrofungus sclerotia are well-known medicinal herbs, health food and nutritional supplements. However, the prevalent adulterant commercial products are major hindrances to their incorporation into mainstream medical use in many countries. The mushroom sclerotia of Lignosus rhinocerotis, Poria cocos, Polyporus umbellatus, Pleurotus tuber-regium and Omphalia lapidescens are commonly used in traditional Chinese medicine. In this study, IR macro-fingerprint method was used in the identification of these sclerotia. The results showed that the spectrum of L. rhinocerotis (LR) was comparable with P. cocos with 94.4% correlation, except that the peak at 1543cm(-1) of LR appeared in lower intensity. The spectrum of P. umbellatus and P. tuber-regium was also correlated (91.5%), as both spectra could be clearly discriminated in that P. umbellatus spectrum has small base peaks located at the range of 1680-1500cm(-1). O. lapidescens was not comparable with all the other sclerotia as its spectrum was totally different. Its base peak was broad and derivated equally along the range. The first IR has revealed the dissimilarity among five mushrooms sclerotia. The second derivative and 2DIR further enhanced the identification in detail. PMID:26186395

  20. Arsenic, cadmium and lead in sclerotia of Wolfiporia extensa of Yunnan, China.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jing; Zhang, Ji; Zhao, Yan-Li; Wang, Yuan-Zhong; Li, Wan-Yi

    2016-06-01

    Considering the environmental pollution, edible mushroom safety is of great concern to consumers. This study aimed at providing and evaluating data on As, Cd and Pb content of sclerotia of Wolfiporia extensa collected across Yunnan in China. For the presented survey As, Cd, and Pb concentration in sclerotia of wild and cultivated W. extensa was determined by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. The results showed that As, Cd, and Pb content were below the limit promulgated by WHO, with the ranges 5.27-161, 1.51-42.1 and < 1-634 ng g(-1) dry matter. Calculated hazard quotient (HQ) and hazard index (HI) were used to evaluate the non-carcinogenic health risk from individual and combined metals via daily consumption of 50 g sclerotia. Both HQ and HI through consumption of sclerotia were below 1, indicating that weekly consumption of sclerotia at the indicated doses poses no significant health risk to an adult consumer. PMID:26883402

  1. Differential identification of mushrooms sclerotia by IR macro-fingerprint method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choong, Yew Keong; Lan, Jin; Lee, Han Lim; Chen, Xiang-dong; Wang, Xiao-guang; Yang, Yu-ping

    2016-01-01

    Many macrofungus sclerotia are well-known medicinal herbs, health food and nutritional supplements. However, the prevalent adulterant commercial products are major hindrances to their incorporation into mainstream medical use in many countries. The mushroom sclerotia of Lignosus rhinocerotis, Poria cocos, Polyporus umbellatus, Pleurotus tuber-regium and Omphalia lapidescens are commonly used in traditional Chinese medicine. In this study, IR macro-fingerprint method was used in the identification of these sclerotia. The results showed that the spectrum of L. rhinocerotis (LR) was comparable with P. cocos with 94.4% correlation, except that the peak at 1543 cm-1 of LR appeared in lower intensity. The spectrum of P. umbellatus and P. tuber-regium was also correlated (91.5%), as both spectra could be clearly discriminated in that P. umbellatus spectrum has small base peaks located at the range of 1680-1500 cm-1. O. lapidescens was not comparable with all the other sclerotia as its spectrum was totally different. Its base peak was broad and derivated equally along the range. The first IR has revealed the dissimilarity among five mushrooms sclerotia. The second derivative and 2DIR further enhanced the identification in detail.

  2. Histopathological studies of sclerotia of phytopathogenic fungi parasitized by a GFP transformed Trichoderma virens antagonistic strain.

    PubMed

    Sarrocco, Sabrina; Mikkelsen, Lisbeth; Vergara, Mariarosaria; Jensen, Dan Funck; Lübeck, Mette; Vannacci, Giovanni

    2006-02-01

    The gfp gene from the jellyfish Aequorea victoria, coding for the Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP), was used as a reporter gene to transform a Trichoderma virens strain I10, characterized as having a promising biocontrol activity against a large number of phytopathogenic fungi. On the basis of molecular and biological results, a stable GFP transformant was selected for further experiments. In order to evaluate the effects of GFP transformation on mycoparasitic ability of T. virens I10, sclerotia of Sclerotium rolfsii, Sclerotinia sclerotiorum and S. minor were inoculated with the T. virens strain I10 GFP transformant or the wild type strain. Statistical analysis of percentages of decayed sclerotia showed that the transformation of the antagonistic isolate with the GFP reporter gene did not modify mycoparasitic activity against sclerotia. Sclerotium colonization was followed by fluorescent microscopy revealing intracellular growth of the antagonist in the cortex (S. rolfsii) and inter-cellular growth in the medulla (S. rolfsii, and S. sclerotiorum). The uniformly distributed mycelium of T. virens just beneath the rind of sclerotia of both S. rolfsii and S. sclerotiorum suggests that the sclerotia became infected at numerous randomly distributed locations without any preferential point of entry. PMID:16388938

  3. Formation of Aspergillus flavus sclerotia on corn grown under different drought stress conditions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aspergillus flavus is a major producer of carcinogenic aflatoxins worldwide in corn, peanuts, tree nuts, cottonseed, spices and other crops. Many countries have strict limits on the amount of aflatoxins permitted in human commodities and animal feed. Sclerotia produced by A. flavus serve several f...

  4. A reevaluation of myceliogenic germination of sclerotia for Sclerotinia sclerotiorum strain Sun-87

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Basal stalk rot of sunflower is an economically important, and rather unique disease, among crops that are susceptible to Sclerotinia sclerotiorum. This disease is the result of myceliogenic germination of sclerotia whereby the vegetative hyphae infect the sunflower below the soil level. In contrast...

  5. Carpogenic germination of sclerotia of Sclerotinia minor and ascosporic infection of pyrethrum flowers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Evidence for carpogenic germination of sclerotia and infection of flowers by ascospores of Sclerotinia minor is rare. During 2007 to 2009, isolates with morphological characteristics consistent with S. minor were obtained from surface-sterilized pyrethrum flowers collected from fields in Tasmania, ...

  6. The heterogeneity of the rDNA-ITS sequence and its phylogeny in Rhizoctonia cerealis, the cause of sharp eyespot in wheat.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Sun, Haiyan; Deng, Yuanyu; Zhang, Aixiang; Chen, Huaigu

    2014-02-01

    The sequence heterogeneity of the ribosomal internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region was investigated for Rhizoctonia cerealis isolates from the anastomosis group AG-DI. Although sequence variability of the ITS has been reported in a few multinucleate R. solani isolates, it has very rarely been reported in binucleate Rhizoctonia spp. isolates and has never been described in R. cerealis, the pathogen of wheat sharp eyespot. In this study, the ITS regions of 15 R. cerealis isolates were cloned and sequenced. The results revealed more than one different ITS sequence within each isolate. This is the first evidence of ITS sequence heterogeneity in R. cerealis. Based on these ITS sequences, different sequences of one isolate did not cluster in one clade, but all of the sequences of the 15 isolates were clustered in the anastomosis subgroup AG-DI, suggesting that the heterogeneity of the ITS did not affect the molecular identification of their anastomosis group. Haplotype analyses indicated that there might be three evolutionary origins of R. cerealis, or a recombination event could be the cause of different ITS sequences in one genome. This study demonstrates the variability and the evolution of Rhizoctonia, especially binucleate R. cerealis. These findings will help design disease control strategies.

  7. Temperature, moisture, and fungicide effects in managing Rhizoctonia root and crown rot of sugar beet.

    PubMed

    Bolton, Melvin D; Panella, Lee; Campbell, Larry; Khan, Mohamed F R

    2010-07-01

    Rhizoctonia solani AG-2-2 is the causal agent of Rhizoctonia root and crown rot in sugar beet; however, recent increases in disease incidence and severity were grounds to reevaluate this pathosystem. To assess the capacity at which other anastomosis groups (AGs) are able to infect sugar beet, 15 AGs and intraspecific groups (ISGs) were tested for pathogenicity on resistant ('FC708 CMS') and susceptible ('Monohikari') seedlings and 10-week-old plants. Several AGs and ISGs were pathogenic on seedlings regardless of host resistance but only AG-2-2 IIIB and AG-2-2 IV caused significant disease on 10-week-old plants. Because fungicides need to be applied prior to infection for effective disease control, temperature and moisture parameters were assessed to identify potential thresholds that limit infection. Root and leaf disease indices were used to evaluate disease progression of AG-2-2 IIIB- and AG-2-2 IV-inoculated plants in controlled climate conditions of 7 to 22 growing degree days (GDDs) per day. Root disease ratings were positively correlated with increasing temperature of both ISGs, with maximum disease symptoms occurring at 22 GDDs/day. No disease symptoms were evident from either ISG at 10 GDDs/day but disease symptoms did occur in plants grown in growth chambers set to 11 GDDs/day. Using growth chambers adjusted to 22 GDDs/day, disease was evaluated at 25, 50, 75, and 100% moisture-holding capacity (MHC). Disease symptoms for each ISG were highest in soils with 75 and 100% MHC but disease still occurred at 25% MHC. Isolates were tested for their ability to cause disease at 1, 4, and 8 cm from the plant hypocotyl. Only AG-2-2 IIIB was able to cause disease symptoms at 8 cm during the evaluation period. In all experiments, isolates of AG-2-2 IIIB were found to be more aggressive than AG-2-2 IV. Using environmental parameters that we identified as the most conducive to disease development, azoxystrobin, prothioconazole, pyraclostrobin, difenoconazole

  8. Reaction of selected soybean cultivars to Rhizoctonia root rot and other damping-off disease agents.

    PubMed

    Amer, M A

    2005-01-01

    Eight soybean cultivars; Giza 21. Giza 22, Giza 35, Giza 82, Giza 83, Crawford, Holladay and Toamo were evaluated to Rhizoctonia root rot using agar plate and potted plant techniques. Data cleared that, in agar plate assay all soybean cultivars were moderately susceptible (MS), although the differences between them were significant (P=0.05). Generally, in potted assay, the reactions were resistant (R) or moderately resistant (MR) to root rots. Also, the differences between cultivars were significant (P=0.05). These cultivars were inoculated under greenhouse conditions with Fusarium solani, Macrophomina phaseolina, Rhizoctonia solani and Sclerotium rolfsii Generally, G21 had the least pre-emergence damping-off followed by Giza 35, Crawford and Giza 83 with averages of 19.0, 20.0, 20.5 and 21.5%, respectively. In case of post-emergence, Giza 35 had the least values, followed by Giza 21, Crawford and Giza 82 with averages 3.95, 4.10, 4.10 and 4.25%, respectively. Under naturally infested soil in the field conditions the reactions of the same cultivars to damping-off were evaluated in two successive seasons. In 2002 season, G35 had the least pre-emergence damping-off % followed by Giza 21 and Giza 22 with averages of 22.61, 24.33 and 29.33%, respectively. Also, G35 had the least post-emergence damping-off % followed by Toamo and Giza 21 with averages of 9.40, 10.33 and 10.41%, respectively. In 2003 season, the same trend was appeared with light grade where Giza 35 had the least pre-emergence damping of % followed by Giza 22 and Giza 21 with averages of 30.67, 31.00 and 36.67%, respectively and Giza 35 was the most resistant cultivar against post-emergence damping-off, followed by Giza 21 and Giza 22 with averages of 10.91, 11.32 and 11.80%, respectively. Generally, Giza 21 significantly surpassed the other cultivars in plant height, number of pods per plant and 100-seed weight. Moreover, also it had second grade with the other traits.

  9. Temperature, moisture, and fungicide effects in managing Rhizoctonia root and crown rot of sugar beet.

    PubMed

    Bolton, Melvin D; Panella, Lee; Campbell, Larry; Khan, Mohamed F R

    2010-07-01

    Rhizoctonia solani AG-2-2 is the causal agent of Rhizoctonia root and crown rot in sugar beet; however, recent increases in disease incidence and severity were grounds to reevaluate this pathosystem. To assess the capacity at which other anastomosis groups (AGs) are able to infect sugar beet, 15 AGs and intraspecific groups (ISGs) were tested for pathogenicity on resistant ('FC708 CMS') and susceptible ('Monohikari') seedlings and 10-week-old plants. Several AGs and ISGs were pathogenic on seedlings regardless of host resistance but only AG-2-2 IIIB and AG-2-2 IV caused significant disease on 10-week-old plants. Because fungicides need to be applied prior to infection for effective disease control, temperature and moisture parameters were assessed to identify potential thresholds that limit infection. Root and leaf disease indices were used to evaluate disease progression of AG-2-2 IIIB- and AG-2-2 IV-inoculated plants in controlled climate conditions of 7 to 22 growing degree days (GDDs) per day. Root disease ratings were positively correlated with increasing temperature of both ISGs, with maximum disease symptoms occurring at 22 GDDs/day. No disease symptoms were evident from either ISG at 10 GDDs/day but disease symptoms did occur in plants grown in growth chambers set to 11 GDDs/day. Using growth chambers adjusted to 22 GDDs/day, disease was evaluated at 25, 50, 75, and 100% moisture-holding capacity (MHC). Disease symptoms for each ISG were highest in soils with 75 and 100% MHC but disease still occurred at 25% MHC. Isolates were tested for their ability to cause disease at 1, 4, and 8 cm from the plant hypocotyl. Only AG-2-2 IIIB was able to cause disease symptoms at 8 cm during the evaluation period. In all experiments, isolates of AG-2-2 IIIB were found to be more aggressive than AG-2-2 IV. Using environmental parameters that we identified as the most conducive to disease development, azoxystrobin, prothioconazole, pyraclostrobin, difenoconazole

  10. Sexual reproduction in Aspergillus flavus sclerotia: acquisition of novel alleles from soil populations and uniparental mitochondrial inheritance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aspergillus flavus colonizes agricultural commodities worldwide and contaminates them with carcinogenic aflatoxins. The high genetic diversity of A. flavus populations is largely due to sexual reproduction characterized by the formation of ascospore-bearing ascocarps embedded within sclerotia. A. ...

  11. Pathogenicity of some Rhizoctonia solaniz isolates associated with root/collar rots on the cultivars of bean in greenhouse.

    PubMed

    Bohlooli, A; Okhovvat, S M; Javan-Nikkhah, M

    2006-01-01

    One hundred and eighteen isolates of Rhizoctonia solani were gathered from infected roots and hypocotyls of bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) grown in the fields of Tehran Province, Iran. Two isolates of the collected samples belonged to binucleate and 81 isolates to multinucleate of R. solani. The multinucleate isolates showed different anastomosis groups as AG-4 (subg. AG-4 HGI, AG-4HGII), AG-6 and AG-2. In greenhouse, pathogenicity tests carried out on bean cv. Naz in randomized design with 4 replications and each replication (pots) with 5 seeds of bean. Infection was done with seeds of wheat which were infected to the fungus with pasteurized soil. Results showed that the highest disease severity was caused by AG-4 (Rs21) isolates, whereas AG-4 (Rs74) isolates were weakly pathogenic with 90% and 21% infection, respectively. In this test the major pathogenic isolates belonged to AG-4 and they caused seed rot and damping-off of bean and AG-6 isolates were non-pathogenic. Five isolates of the fungus with major pathogenicity (Rs7, Rs18, Rs21, Rs62 and Rs71) selected and used for the reaction with different cultivars of bean. In this test, the cultivars and lines of bean (Pinto, red, white, green) studied in factorial experiment as randomized block design with 4 replications (pots). Results showed that none of the cultivars was completely resistant, however green bean cv. Sanry and pinto cv. Shad with number 4.8 disease severities had the highest susceptibility to seed rot and damping-off and red bean cv. Goli with 2.58 had the lowest susceptibility to the infection. Reaction of the cultivars and lines to the isolates of R. solani was significantly different at 1% level. Isolates of the fungus, Rs7, Rs21 with 84%, 90% pathogenicity was more virulent than the others.

  12. The ectomycorrhizal morphotype Pinirhiza sclerotia is formed by Acephala macrosclerotiorum sp. nov., a close relative of Phialocephala fortinii.

    PubMed

    Münzenberger, Babette; Bubner, Ben; Wöllecke, Jens; Sieber, Thomas N; Bauer, Robert; Fladung, Matthias; Hüttl, Reinhard F

    2009-09-01

    Relatively few ectomycorrhizal fungal species are known to form sclerotia. Usually, sclerotia are initiated at the extraradical mycelium. In this study, we present anatomical and ultrastructural evidence for the formation of sclerotia directly in the hyphal mantle of the mycorrhizal morphotype Pinirhiza sclerotia. A dark-pigmented fungal strain was isolated from Pinirhiza sclerotia and identified by molecular tools as Acephala macrosclerotiorum sp. nov., a close relative of Phialocephala fortinii s.l. As dark septate fungi are known to be mostly endophytic, resyntheses with Pinus sylvestris and A. macrosclerotiorum as well as Populus tremula x Populus tremuloides and A. macrosclerotiorum or P. fortinii s.l. were performed under axenic conditions. No mycorrhizas were found when hybrid aspen was inoculated with A. macrosclerotiorum or P. fortinii. However, A. macrosclerotiorum formed true ectomycorrhizas in vitro with P. sylvestris. Anatomical and ultrastructural features of this ectomycorrhiza are presented. The natural and synthesized ectomycorrhizal morphotypes were identical and characterized by a thin hyphal mantle that bore sclerotia in a later ontogenetic stage. The Hartig net was well-developed and grew up to the endodermis. To our knowledge, this is the first evidence at the anatomical and ultrastructural level that a close relative of P. fortinii s.l. forms true ectomycorrhizas with a coniferous host. PMID:19415343

  13. Strain-specific colonization pattern of Rhizoctonia antagonists in the root system of sugar beet.

    PubMed

    Zachow, Christin; Fatehi, Jamshid; Cardinale, Massimiliano; Tilcher, Ralf; Berg, Gabriele

    2010-10-01

    To develop effective biocontrol strategies, basic knowledge of plant growth promotion (PGP) and root colonization by antagonists is essential. The survival and colonization patterns of five different biocontrol agents against Rhizoctonia solani AG2-2IIIB in the rhizosphere of greenhouse-grown sugar beet plants were analysed in single and combined treatments. The study included bacteria (Pseudomonas fluorescens L13-6-12, Pseudomonas trivialis RE(*) 1-1-14, Serratia plymuthica 3Re4-18) as well as fungi (Trichoderma gamsii AT1-2-4, Trichoderma velutinum G1/8). Microscopic analysis by confocal laser scanning microscopy revealed different colonization patterns for each DsRed2/green fluorescent protein-labelled strain. Bacteria and T. velutinum G1/8 colonized the root surface and the endorhiza in single and co-culture, while for T. gamsii AT1-2-4, only the transfer of spores was observed. Whereas Pseudomonas strains formed large microcolonies consisting of hundreds of cells, S. plymuthica was arranged in small endophytic clusters or clouds around the entire root system. In co-culture, each strain showed its typical pattern and occupied specific niches on the root, without clear evidence of morphological interactions. PGP was only observed for four strains with rhizosphere competence and not for T. gamsii AT1-2-4. The results provide useful information on which combination of strains to test in larger biocontrol experiments directed to applications.

  14. Evaluation of strategies for the control of canola and lupin seedling diseases caused by Rhizoctonia anastomosis groups

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Several methods with potential for the management of Rhizoctonia diseases of canola and lupin including several methods with potential for the management of Rhizoctonia plant resistance, fungicide seed treatment and biological control using binucleate Rhizoctonia anastomosis groups (AGs) were evalua...

  15. Characterization of Natural Antisense Transcript, Sclerotia Development and Secondary Metabolism by Strand-Specific RNA Sequencing of Aspergillus flavus

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Chao; Guo, Yong; Lin, Ying; Pan, Li; Wang, Bin

    2014-01-01

    Aspergillus flavus has received much attention owing to its severe impact on agriculture and fermented products induced by aflatoxin. Sclerotia morphogenesis is an important process related to A. flavus reproduction and aflatoxin biosynthesis. In order to obtain an extensive transcriptome profile of A. flavus and provide a comprehensive understanding of these physiological processes, the isolated mRNA of A. flavus CA43 cultures was subjected to high-throughput strand-specific RNA sequencing (ssRNA-seq). Our ssRNA-seq data profiled widespread transcription across the A. flavus genome, quantified vast transcripts (73% of total genes) and annotated precise transcript structures, including untranslated regions, upstream open reading frames (ORFs), alternative splicing variants and novel transcripts. We propose natural antisense transcripts in A. flavus might regulate gene expression mainly on the post-transcriptional level. This regulation might be relevant to tune biological processes such as aflatoxin biosynthesis and sclerotia development. Gene Ontology annotation of differentially expressed genes between the mycelia and sclerotia cultures indicated sclerotia development was related closely to A. flavus reproduction. Additionally, we have established the transcriptional profile of aflatoxin biosynthesis and its regulation model. We identified potential genes linking sclerotia development and aflatoxin biosynthesis. These genes could be used as targets for controlled regulation of aflatoxigenic strains of A. flavus. PMID:24849659

  16. A study on measurement of radiation resistance of Pyronema domesticum sclerotia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aoshuang, Y. Y.; Ailian, W. W.; Ying, Z. Z.

    2000-03-01

    Measurements of radiation resistance have been carried out using two strains of Pyronema domesticum which were isolated from Chinese cotton swab gauze. A "sand-washing" technique was developed to overcome the difficulties when harvesting sclerotia spores from cultured plates and preparing spore suspensions for further use. Three types of microbial preparations, spore suspension, inoculated cotton and spore dot, were exposed to gamma radiation. A dose-survival curve method and a fraction positive method were employed to determine radiation resistance. D 10 values derived from this study are within the range of 2.0-3.0 kGy. Concerns associated with the current study indicate that further work is needed.

  17. Development of SCAR markers and UP-PCR cross-hybridization method for specific detection of four major subgroups of Rhizoctonia from infected turfgrasses.

    PubMed

    Amaradasa, Bimal S; Lakshman, Dilip; Horvath, Brandon J; Amundsen, Keenan L

    2014-01-01

    A rapid identification assay for Waitea circinata (anamorph: Rhizoctonia spp.) varieties zeae and circinata causing patch diseases on turfgrasses was developed based on the universally primed PCR (UP-PCR) products cross-blot hybridization. Tester isolates belonging to the two varieties of W. circinata were amplified with a single UP primer L21, which generated multiple DNA fragments for each variety. Probes were prepared with UP-PCR products of each tester isolate by labeling with digoxigenin. Fieldcollected W. circinata isolates and representative isolates of different R. solani anastomosis groups (AG) and AG subgroups were amplified with L21, immobilized on nylon membrane and cross hybridized with the two probes. Isolates within a W. circinata variety cross-hybridized strongly, while non-homologous isolates did not cross-hybridize or did so weakly. Closely related W. circinata varieties zeae and circinata were clearly distinguished with this assay. Sequence-characterized amplified region (SCAR) markers also were developed from UP-PCR products to identify isolates of Thanatephorus cucumeris (anamorph: R. solani) AG 1-IB and AG 2-2IIIB. These two AGs are commonly isolated from diseased, cool-season turfgrasses. The specific SCAR markers that were developed could differentiate isolates of AG 1-IB or AG 2-2IIIB groups. These SCAR markers did not amplify a product from genomic DNA of nontarget isolates of Rhizoctonia. The specificities and sensitivities of the SCAR primers were tested on total DNA extracted from several field-grown, cool-season turf species having severe brown-patch symptoms. First, the leaf samples from diseased turf species were tested for the anastomosis groups of the causal pathogen, and thereafter the total DNA was amplified with the specific primers. The specific primers were sensitive and unique enough to produce a band from total DNA of diseased turfgrasses infected with either AG 1-IB or AG 2-2IIIB.

  18. A direct observation technique for evaluating sclerotium germination by Macrophomina phaseolina and effects of biocontrol materials on survival of sclerotia in soil.

    PubMed

    Pratt, Robert G

    2006-08-01

    Germination of sclerotia of Macrophomina phaseolina was quantified by direct microscopic observation following application of experimental treatments in vitro and incubation of sclerotia in soil. To assay germination, pieces of agar containing sclerotia were macerated in dilute, liquid cornmeal agar on glass slides; thinly spread; and incubated in a saturated atmosphere for 18-22 h. Germinated sclerotia then were identified by morphological features of germ hyphae. Frequencies of germination were similar in three dilute agar media. Germination was not affected by air-drying sclerotia for 2 weeks, but it was significantly reduced after 4 weeks and greatly reduced or eliminated after 6 or 8 weeks. Survival of sclerotia for 14 days in soil was greatest at 50, 75, and 100% moisture-holding capacity, less at 0 and 25%, and least at 125% (flooded soil). Incorporation of ground poultry litter into soil at 5% by weight reduced survival of sclerotia after 13 days, and incorporation of litter at 10% nearly eliminated it. These results indicate that the direct-observation technique may be used to evaluate animal wastes and other agricultural byproducts for biocontrol activity against sclerotia of M. phaseolina in soil. PMID:16897591

  19. In vitro evaluation of Pseudomonas bacterial isolates from rice phylloplane for biocontrol of Rhizoctonia solani and plant growth promoting traits.

    PubMed

    Akter, Shamima; Kadir, Jugah; Juraimi, Abdul Shukor; Saud, Halimi Mohd

    2016-07-01

    The ability for biocontrol and plant growth promotion of three Pseudomonas bacterial isolates namely Pseudomonas fluorescens (UMB20), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (KMB25) and Pseudomonas asplenii (BMB42) obtained from rice plants was investigated. Fungal growth inhibition by the isolates ranged from 86.85 to 93.15% in volatile and 100% in diffusible metabolites test. Among the isolates, BMB42 showed fungal growth inhibition significantly in the volatile metabolite test. Isolates UMB20 and BMB42 were able to synthesis chitinase with chitinolytic indices of 13.66 and 13.50, respectively. In case of -1,3-glucanase, all the isolates showed activity to produce this enzyme at varied levels and isolate KMB25 showed significantly highest activity (53.53 ppm). Among the three isolates, KMB25 showed positive response to protease production and all of them were negative to pectinase and lipase and positive to the production of siderophore, and HCN, and were able to solubilize tricalcium phosphate. All the three bacterial isolates were capable of forming biofilm at different levels. Above results suggest that phylloplane Pseudomonas bacterial isolates have potential for antifungal activities and plant growth promotion. PMID:27498507

  20. Dietary fibers from mushroom sclerotia: 1. Preparation and physicochemical and functional properties.

    PubMed

    Wong, Ka-Hing; Cheung, Peter C K

    2005-11-30

    Preparation of three novel dietary fibers (DFs) from mushroom sclerotia, namely, Pleurotus tuberregium, Polyporous rhinocerus, and Wolfiporia cocos, by a scale-up modified AOAC procedure using industrial enzymes was investigated. A remarkably high level of total dietary fiber (TDF) ranging from 81.7 to 96.3% sample dry matter (DM), in which a content of nonstarch polysaccharide (NSP) ranging from 86.6 to 94.3% sclerotial TDF DM, was obtained from the three sclerotia. All sclerotial DFs were rich in beta-glucan (the glucose residue ranged from 89.7 to 94.5% NSP DM) with a very low level of resistant glycogen (ranged from 3.77 to 3.94% sclerotial TDF DM). All three novel sclerotial DFs also exhibited similar, if not better, physicochemical and functional properties (pH, color, water binding capacity, oil holding capacity, and emulsifying properties) as those of barely DF control and commercial DF-rich ingredients. The potential use of the three mushroom sclerotial DFs as a new beta-glucan type DF-rich ingredient in the food industry was discussed.

  1. Rapid Screening of Ergot Alkaloids in Sclerotia by MALDI-TOF Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Sivagnanam, Kumaran; Komatsu, Emy; Patrick, Susan; Rampitsch, Christoph; Perreault, Hélène; Gräfenhan, Tom

    2016-07-01

    Ergot is a common disease of wheat and other cereal grains that is predominantly caused by Claviceps purpurea in the field, often affecting crop yield in addition to the environment. Infected grain can be contaminated with dark sclerotia, which contain fungal metabolites such as ergot alkaloids. The occurrence of ergot alkaloids in cereal grain is a major health concern for humans and livestock. Effective and rapid screening of these mycotoxins is crucial for producers, processors, and consumers of cereal-based food and feed grain. Established methods of ergot alkaloid screening based on LC-MS or GC-MS require laborious processes. A novel method using matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI)-time-of-flight (TOF) MS was developed to identify four ergot alkaloids. Using dihydroxybenzoic acid as the matrix, ergosine, ergocornine, ergocryptine, and ergocristine were readily detected in individual sclerotia of C. purpurea. The accuracy of the identified ergot alkaloids was further confirmed by tandem MS analysis. MALDI-TOF MS is suitable for high-throughput screening of ergot alkaloids because it permits rapid and accurate identification, simple sample preparation, and no derivatization or chromatographic separation. PMID:27455930

  2. Volatile compounds emitted by sclerotia of Sclerotinia minor, Sclerotinia sclerotiorum, and Sclerotium rolfsii.

    PubMed

    Fravel, Deborah R; Connick, William J; Grimm, Casey C; Lloyd, Steven W

    2002-06-19

    Volatile compounds emitted by sclerotia of Sclerotinia minor, Sclerotinia sclerotiorum, and Sclerotium rolfsii were identified by solid phase microextraction followed by gas chromatography and mass spectometry. Both S. minor and S. sclerotiorum emitted 2-methylenebornane and 2-methylisoborneol. In addition, S. minor emitted mesityl oxide, gamma-butyrolactone, cis- and trans-linalool oxide, linalool, and trans-nerolidol. S. sclerotiorum emitted 2-methyl-2-bornene, 1-methylcamphene, and a diterpene with a molecular weight of 272. Sclerotium rolfsii did not emit any of these compounds but did emit delta-cadinene and cis-calamenene. Chemicals emitted by S. minor and S. sclerotiorum were tested to determine if they could stimulate germination of conidia of Sporidesmium sclerotivorum, a mycoparasite on sclerotia of Sclerotinia spp. Chemicals were tested at 1 part per billion to 100 parts per million, both in direct contact with conidia and near, but not in, physical contact. None of the chemicals alone nor a combination of all chemicals induced germination of conidia of S. sclerotivorum. PMID:12059156

  3. Epitypification of Fusisporium (Fusarium) solani and its assignment to a common phylogenetic species in the Fusarium solani species complex.

    PubMed

    Schroers, Hans-Josef; Samuels, Gary J; Zhang, Ning; Short, Dylan P G; Juba, Jean; Geiser, David M

    2016-01-01

    Fusisporium solani was described as the causal agent of a dry rot of potato in Germany in the mid 19th century. As Fusarium solani, the species became known as a plurivorous plant pathogen, endophyte, decomposer, and opportunistic pathogen of humans and nutritional symbiont of insects. In parallel, it became evident that the morphologically defined species F. solani represents a phylogenetically and biologically complex group of often morphologically cryptic species that has come to be known in part as the F. solani species complex (FSSC), accommodating several formae speciales and mating populations/biological species. The FSSC currently includes more than 60 phylogenetic species. Several of these have been named, but the majority remains unnamed and the identity of F. solani sensu stricto is unclear. To promote further taxonomic developments in the FSSC, lectoand epitypification is proposed for Fusisporium solani Although no type material for F. solani is known to exist, the species was abundantly illustrated in the protologue. Thus, a relevant illustration provided by von Martius is selected as the lectotype. The epitype selected here originates from a rotting potato collected in a field in Slovenia. This strain causes a dry rot of artificially inoculated potatoes. It groups in the heretofore unnamed phylogenetic species 5, which is nested within clade 3 of the FSSC (FSSC 5). Members of this phylogenetic species have a wide geographic distribution and include soil saprotrophs and plant and opportunistic human pathogens. This typification is consistent with the original description of Fusisporium solani and the concept of F. solani as a widely distributed soil inhabitant and pathogen.

  4. Antibiosis functions during interactions of Trichoderma afroharzianum and Trichoderma gamsii with plant pathogenic Rhizoctonia and Pythium.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xinjian; Harvey, Paul R; Stummer, Belinda E; Warren, Rosemary A; Zhang, Guangzhi; Guo, Kai; Li, Jishun; Yang, Hetong

    2015-09-01

    Trichoderma afroharzianum is one of the best characterized Trichoderma species, and strains have been utilized as plant disease suppressive inoculants. In contrast, Trichoderma gamsii has only recently been described, and there is limited knowledge of its disease suppressive efficacies. Comparative studies of changes in gene expression during interactions of these species with their target plant pathogens will provide fundamental information on pathogen antibiosis functions. In the present study, we used complementary DNA amplified fragment length polymorphism (cDNA-AFLP) analysis to investigate changes in transcript profiling of T. afroharzianum strain LTR-2 and T. gamsii strain Tk7a during in vitro interactions with plant pathogenic Rhizoctonia solani and Pythium irregulare. Considerable differences were resolved in the overall expression profiles of strains LTR-2 and Tk7a when challenged with either plant pathogen. In strain LTR-2, previously reported mycoparasitism-related genes such as chitinase, polyketide synthase, and non-ribosomal peptide synthetase were found to be differentially expressed. This was not so for strain Tk7a, with the only previously reported antibiosis-associated genes being small secreted cysteine-rich proteins. Although only one differentially expressed gene was common to both strains LTR-2 and Tk7a, numerous genes reportedly associated with pathogen antibiosis processes were differentially expressed in both strains, including degradative enzymes and membrane transport proteins. A number of novel potential antibiosis-related transcripts were found from strains LTR-2 and Tk7a and remain to be identified. The expression kinetics of 20 Trichoderma (10 from strain LTR-2, 10 from strain Tk7a) transcript-derived fragments (TDFs) were quantified by quantitative reverse transcription PCR (RT-qPCR) at pre- and post-mycelia contact stages of Trichoderma-prey interactions, thereby confirming differential gene expression. Collectively, this research

  5. The MADS-Box transcription factor Bcmads1 is required for growth, sclerotia production and pathogenicity of Botrytis cinerea

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhanquan; Li, Hua; Qin, Guozheng; He, Chang; Li, Boqiang; Tian, Shiping

    2016-01-01

    MADS-box transcription factors are highly conserved in eukaryotic species and involved in a variety of biological processes. Little is known, however, regarding the function of MADS-box genes in Botrytis cinerea, a fungal pathogen with a wide host range. Here, the functional role of the B. cinerea MADS-box gene, Bcmads1, was characterized in relation to the development, pathogenicity and production of sclerotia. The latter are formed upon incubation in darkness and serve as survival structures during winter and as the female parent in sexual reproduction. Bcmads1 is indispensable for sclerotia production. RT-qPCR analysis suggested that Bcmads1 modulated sclerotia formation by regulating the expression of light-responsive genes. Bcmads1 is required for the full virulence potential of B. cinerea on apple fruit. A comparative proteomic analysis identified 63 proteins, representing 55 individual genes that are potential targets of Bcmads1. Among them, Bcsec14 and Bcsec31 are associated with vesicle transport. Deletion of Bcsec14 and Bcsec31 resulted in a reduction in the virulence and protein secretion of B. cinerea. These results suggest that Bcmads1 may influence sclerotia formation by modulating light responsive gene expression and regulate pathogenicity by its effect on the protein secretion process. PMID:27658442

  6. Effect of revulsive cultivation on the yield and quality of newly formed sclerotia in medicinal Wolfiporia cocos.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhangyi; Tang, Wenrui; Xiong, Bin; Wang, Keqin; Bian, Yinbing

    2014-07-01

    Wolfiporia cocos is a well-known medicinal mushroom widely used in China, Japan and other Asiatic countries for its various therapeutic effects. 'Revulsive cultivation' is a newly developed method for promoting sclerotia growth in W. cocos field cultivation in China. In this report, we have systematically examined the effects of 'revulsive cultivation' on the yield and quality of newly formed sclerotia. The results showed that the genetic differences between the cultivated strain and the revulsive strain of T1 used in this study did not affect the formation process of new, large sclerotia in which the mycelia of the cultivated strain grew on pine logs directionally assembled on the revulsive strain. Additionally, 'revulsive cultivation', in which the cultivated strain and the revulsive strain used had the same or different genotypes, could remarkably increase the yield, lower the water content, and increase the water-soluble polysaccharide content of the newly formed sclerotia. Moreover, we observed that the changes in the values of the tested economic traits obtained from different genotype combinations through 'revulsive cultivation' were dissimilar. The correlations of these changes with the original sclerotium-forming ability of the cultivated strains and the genetic differences between the cultivated strain and the revulsive strain were not significant. These results will broaden our knowledge regarding the field cultivation of this medical fungus, stimulate new thinking on the study of sclerotium formation in some sclerotium-forming fungi, and promote further studies on the mechanism of sclerotium formation in W. cocos.

  7. Transcriptomic profiles of Aspergillus flavus CA42, a strain that produces small sclerotia, by decanal treatment and after recovery

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aspergillus flavus is a ubiquitous saprophyte and is capable of producing many secondary metabolites including the carcinogenic aflatoxins. The A. flavus population that produces small sclerotia (S strain) has been implicated as the culprit for persistent aflatoxin contamination of crops in fields. ...

  8. Water potential affects Coniothyrium minitans growth, germination and parasitism of Sclerotinia sclerotiorum sclerotia.

    PubMed

    Jones, E Eirian; Stewart, Alison; Whipps, John M

    2011-09-01

    Water availability is an important environmental factor which has major effects on fungal activity. The effects of osmotic (KCl amended agar) and matric Polyethylene glycol ((PEG) 8000 amended agar) potentials over the range -0.1 to -5.0MPa on mycelial growth and conidial germination of eight isolates of the sclerotial parasite Coniothyrium minitans was assessed. The influence of soil water potential on the ability of three selected isolates (LU112, LU545, and T5R42i) to parasitise sclerotia of the plant pathogen Sclerotinia sclerotiorum was determined. For all eight C. minitans isolates, decreasing osmotic and matric potentials caused a reduction in mycelial growth and conidial germination. Isolates were more sensitive to decreasing matric potential than osmotic potential. Across the isolates, growth at an osmotic potential of -5.0MPa was 30-70% of the growth seen in the control, whereas less than 20% of the control growth was seen at the corresponding matric potential. Across all isolates no conidial germination was seen at matric potential of -5.0MPa. The C. minitans isolates varied in their sensitivity to decreasing water potentials. Mycelial growth and conidial germination of three isolates (LU112, Conio, and CH1) were more tolerant of low osmotic potential and matric potential with respect to mycelial growth. Isolates T5R42i and LU430 were least tolerant. In contrast, conidial germination of isolates Conio, LU545, and T5R42i were less sensitive to decreasing matric potential. Soil water potential was seen to affect infection and viability of sclerotia by the three C. minitans isolates. Isolate LU545 reduced sclerotial viability over a wider water potential range (-0.01 to -1.5MPa) compared with LU112 (-0.01 to -1.0MPa), with isolate T5R42i being intermediate. Indigenous soil fungi (Trichoderma spp. and Clonostachys rosea) were recovered from sclerotia but did not result in reduction in sclerotial viability. The relevance of these results in relation to

  9. Water potential affects Coniothyrium minitans growth, germination and parasitism of Sclerotinia sclerotiorum sclerotia.

    PubMed

    Jones, E Eirian; Stewart, Alison; Whipps, John M

    2011-09-01

    Water availability is an important environmental factor which has major effects on fungal activity. The effects of osmotic (KCl amended agar) and matric Polyethylene glycol ((PEG) 8000 amended agar) potentials over the range -0.1 to -5.0MPa on mycelial growth and conidial germination of eight isolates of the sclerotial parasite Coniothyrium minitans was assessed. The influence of soil water potential on the ability of three selected isolates (LU112, LU545, and T5R42i) to parasitise sclerotia of the plant pathogen Sclerotinia sclerotiorum was determined. For all eight C. minitans isolates, decreasing osmotic and matric potentials caused a reduction in mycelial growth and conidial germination. Isolates were more sensitive to decreasing matric potential than osmotic potential. Across the isolates, growth at an osmotic potential of -5.0MPa was 30-70% of the growth seen in the control, whereas less than 20% of the control growth was seen at the corresponding matric potential. Across all isolates no conidial germination was seen at matric potential of -5.0MPa. The C. minitans isolates varied in their sensitivity to decreasing water potentials. Mycelial growth and conidial germination of three isolates (LU112, Conio, and CH1) were more tolerant of low osmotic potential and matric potential with respect to mycelial growth. Isolates T5R42i and LU430 were least tolerant. In contrast, conidial germination of isolates Conio, LU545, and T5R42i were less sensitive to decreasing matric potential. Soil water potential was seen to affect infection and viability of sclerotia by the three C. minitans isolates. Isolate LU545 reduced sclerotial viability over a wider water potential range (-0.01 to -1.5MPa) compared with LU112 (-0.01 to -1.0MPa), with isolate T5R42i being intermediate. Indigenous soil fungi (Trichoderma spp. and Clonostachys rosea) were recovered from sclerotia but did not result in reduction in sclerotial viability. The relevance of these results in relation to

  10. Influence of He-Ne laser irradiation of soybean seeds on seed mycoflora, growth, nodulation, and resistance to Fusarium solani.

    PubMed

    Ouf, S A; abdel-Hady, N F

    1999-01-01

    Laser irradiation of soybean seeds for 3 min caused a clear reduction in the number of seed-borne fungi which became more pronounced as the irradiation time was extended. Pretreatment of the seeds with methylene blue, methyl red and carmine enhanced the effect of laser. Rhizoctonia solani, Alternaria tenuissima, Cercospora kikuchii and Colletotrichum truncatum were completely eliminated when the seeds were pretreated with a dye and irradiated for 10 min. Seed germination was stimulated on exposure of the seed to 1-min irradiation. At such dose, most of the dyes were accelerators while the higher doses were inhibitory to seed germination. Chlorophyll a, chlorophyll b and carotenoid content of developed plants differed, depending on the irradiation dose and dye treatment of the seeds. In seeds irradiated for 1 or 3 min, chlorophyll a formation was less affected than chlorophyll b formation. In seeds irradiated for 10 min, both the chlorophyll contents were decreased especially in the presence of some applied dyes. On the other hand, there was an increase in carotenoid content of soybean leaves when the laser dose increased. The number and dry mass of nodules were mostly greater (as compared to the corresponding control), when the seeds irradiated for 1 or 3 min were pretreated with methyl red, chlorophenol red, crystal violet and methylene blue. Irradiation of pre-sowing seeds greatly protected soybean stands against F. solani. The disease incidence differed somewhat when the irradiated seeds were pretreated with dyes. The reduction in disease incidence was accompanied by accumulation of high proline and phenol levels in the infected root tissues of soybean, suggesting that these compounds have a certain role in the prevention of disease development.

  11. Characterization and pathogenicity of Rhizoctonia and Rhizoctonia-like spp. from pea crops in the Columbia Basin of Oregon and Washington

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A total of 179 isolates of Rhizoctonia and Rhizoctonia-like species were obtained from soil and plant samples collected from irrigated pea crops in the semi-arid Columbia Basin of Oregon and Washington from 2011 to 2013, and characterized to species, subspecies, and anastomosis groups (AG) based on ...

  12. Abscisic acid enhances resistance to Alternaria solani in tomato seedlings.

    PubMed

    Song, Weiwei; Ma, Xinrong; Tan, Hong; Zhou, Jinyan

    2011-07-01

    The plant hormone abscisic acid (ABA) is an important regulator in many aspects of plant growth and development, as well as stress resistance. Here, we investigated the effects of exogenous ABA application on the interaction between tomato (Solanum lycopersicon L.) and Alternaria solani (early blight). Foliar spraying of 7.58 μM ABA was effective in reducing disease severity in tomato plants. Previously, increased activities of phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL), polyphenol oxidase (PPO) and peroxidase (POD) were observed in exogenous ABA-treated tomato leaves. Moreover, these enzyme activities were maintained at higher levels in ABA-pretreated and A. solani challenged tomato plants. Tomato defense genes, such as PR1, β-1, 3-glucanase (GLU), PPO, POD, and superoxide dismutase (SOD), were rapidly and significantly up-regulated by exogenous ABA treatment. Furthermore, a subsequent challenge of ABA-pretreated plants with the pathogen A. solani resulted in higher expression of defense genes, compared to water-treated or A. solani inoculated plants. Therefore, our results suggest that exogenous ABA could enhance disease resistance against A. solani infection in tomato through the activation of defense genes and via the enhancement of defense-related enzymatic activities.

  13. Structure elucidation and antioxidant activity of a novel polysaccharide from Polyporus umbellatus sclerotia.

    PubMed

    He, Peng-Fei; Zhang, An-Qiang; Wang, Xing-Li; Qu, Liang; Li, Guang-Lin; Li, Yan-Ping; Sun, Pei-Long

    2016-01-01

    A novel water-soluble polysaccharide PUP60S2, with a molecular weight of 1.44×10(4)Da, was obtained from the sclerotia of Polyporus umbellatus by hot water extraction, ethanol precipitation, anion-exchange and size-exclusion chromatography. PUP60S2 was a polysaccharide comprised of about 22.3% glucuronic acid. Monosaccharide composition analysis showed that PUP60S2 was only comprised of glucose and glucuronic acid. Reduction of carboxyl groups, sugar analysis, methylation analysis, together with one and two dimension NMR spectra disclosed that the backbone of PUP60S2 consisted of (1→6)-β-d-glucopyranosyl, every second of which was substituted at O-3 by side chains consisting of terminal β-d-Glcp, (1→3)-β-d-Glcp, (1→3)-β-d-GlcpA, (1→4)-β-d-Glcp and (1→4)-β-d-GlcpA units. The antioxidant activity assay in vitro showed that PUP60S2 exerted a significant scavenging effect on DPPH, hydroxyl radical and superoxide radical in a dose-dependent manner.

  14. Structure and bioactivity of a polysaccharide containing uronic acid from Polyporus umbellatus sclerotia.

    PubMed

    He, Pengfei; Zhang, Anqiang; Zhang, Fuming; Linhardt, Robert J; Sun, Peilong

    2016-11-01

    Polyporus umbellatus is a medicinal fungus, has been used in traditional Chinese medicine for thousands years for treatment of edema, scanty urine, vaginal discharge, jaundice and diarrhea. The structure of a soluble polysaccharide (named PUP80S1), purified from the sclerotia of Polyporus umbellatus was elucidated by gas chromatography (GC), GC-mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. PUP80S1 is a branched polysaccharide containing approximately 8.5% uronic acid and having an average molecular weight of 8.8kDa. Atomic force microscopy of PUP80S1 reveals a globular chain conformation in water. Antioxidant tests, Oxygen radical absorption capacity and 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl radical scavenging assays indicate that PUP80S1 possesses significant antioxidant activity. But the related polysaccharide, PUP60S2, which contains more uronic acid residues and a higher level of branching, shows better antioxidant activity. These results suggest that structure features of polysaccharides play an important role in their physiological functions. PMID:27516268

  15. Characterization of Rhizoctonia isolates associated with damping-off and crown rot of rooibos seedlings

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rhizoctonia species were reported to be an important component of the complex involved in damping-off of rooibos (Aspalathus linearis) seedlings and cause severe crown rot of seedlings in nurseries. However, no information is available on the anastomosis groups (AGs) of Rhizoctonia associated with d...

  16. Potential of spreading binucleate Rhizoctonia from nursery propagation floors to trays containing azalea stem cuttings

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Binucleate Rhizoctonia fungi cause web blight on azaleas and other woody ornamental plants. This research focused on one aspect of how the pathogen may spread from contaminated floors of propagation houses into trays containing clean azalea stem cuttings that generate new root systems. Rhizoctonia w...

  17. The Antiproliferative Activity of Sclerotia of Lignosus rhinocerus (Tiger Milk Mushroom).

    PubMed

    Lee, M L; Tan, N H; Fung, S Y; Tan, C S; Ng, S T

    2012-01-01

    Lignosus rhinocerus, the tiger milk mushroom, is one of the most important medicinal mushrooms used by the indigenous people of Southeast Asia and China. It has been used to treat breast cancer. A cold water extract (LR-CW) prepared from the sclerotia of L. rhinocerus cultivar was found to exhibit antiproliferative activity against human breast carcinoma (MCF-7) and human lung carcinoma (A549), with IC(50) of 96.7 μg/mL and 466.7 μg/mL, respectively. In comparison, LR-CW did not show significant cytotoxicity against the two corresponding human normal cells, 184B5 (human breast cell) and NL 20 (human lung cell). DNA fragmentation studies suggested that the cytotoxic action of LR-CW against cancer cells is mediated by apoptosis. Sephadex G-50 gel filtration fractionation of LR-CW yielded a high-molecular-weight and a low-molecular-weight fraction. The high-molecular-weight fraction contains mainly carbohydrate (68.7%) and small amount of protein (3.6%), whereas the low-molecular-weight fraction contains 31% carbohydrate and was devoid of protein. Only the high-molecular-weight fraction exhibited antiproliferative activity against cancer cells, with IC(50) of 70.0 μg/mL and 76.7 μg/mL, respectively. Thus, the cytotoxic action of the LR-CW is due to the high-molecular-weight fraction, either the proteins or protein-carbohydrate complex. PMID:22454675

  18. The Antiproliferative Activity of Sclerotia of Lignosus rhinocerus (Tiger Milk Mushroom)

    PubMed Central

    Lee, M. L.; Tan, N. H.; Fung, S. Y.; Tan, C. S.; Ng, S. T.

    2012-01-01

    Lignosus rhinocerus, the tiger milk mushroom, is one of the most important medicinal mushrooms used by the indigenous people of Southeast Asia and China. It has been used to treat breast cancer. A cold water extract (LR-CW) prepared from the sclerotia of L. rhinocerus cultivar was found to exhibit antiproliferative activity against human breast carcinoma (MCF-7) and human lung carcinoma (A549), with IC50 of 96.7 μg/mL and 466.7 μg/mL, respectively. In comparison, LR-CW did not show significant cytotoxicity against the two corresponding human normal cells, 184B5 (human breast cell) and NL 20 (human lung cell). DNA fragmentation studies suggested that the cytotoxic action of LR-CW against cancer cells is mediated by apoptosis. Sephadex G-50 gel filtration fractionation of LR-CW yielded a high-molecular-weight and a low-molecular-weight fraction. The high-molecular-weight fraction contains mainly carbohydrate (68.7%) and small amount of protein (3.6%), whereas the low-molecular-weight fraction contains 31% carbohydrate and was devoid of protein. Only the high-molecular-weight fraction exhibited antiproliferative activity against cancer cells, with IC50 of 70.0 μg/mL and 76.7 μg/mL, respectively. Thus, the cytotoxic action of the LR-CW is due to the high-molecular-weight fraction, either the proteins or protein-carbohydrate complex. PMID:22454675

  19. Use of a non-homologous end-joining-deficient strain (delta-ku70) of the biocontrol fungus Trichoderma virens to investigate the function of the laccase gene lcc1 in sclerotia degradation

    PubMed Central

    Catalano, Valentina; Vergara, Mariarosaria; Hauzenberger, Jasmin R.; Seiboth, Bernhard; Sarrocco, Sabrina; Vannacci, Giovanni; Kubicek, Christian P.

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to apply a generated Δtku70 strain with increased homologous recombination efficiency from the mycoparasitic fungus Trichoderma virens for studying the involvement of laccases in the degradation of sclerotia of plant pathogenic fungi. Inactivation of the non-homologous end-joining pathway has become a successful tool in filamentous fungi to overcome poor targeting efficiencies for genetic engineering. Here, we applied this principle to the biocontrol fungus T. virens, strain I10, by deleting its tku70 gene. This strain was subsequently used to delete the laccase gene lcc1, which we found to be expressed after interaction of T. virens with sclerotia of the plant pathogenic fungi Botrytis cinerea and Sclerotinia sclerotiorum. Lcc1 was strongly upregulated at early colonization of B. cinerea sclerotia and steadily induced during colonization of S. sclerotiorum sclerotia. The Δtku70Δlcc1 mutant was altered in its ability to degrade the sclerotia of B. cinerea and S. sclerotiorum. Interestingly, while the decaying ability for B. cinerea sclerotia was significantly decreased, that to degrade S. sclerotiorum sclerotia was even enhanced, suggesting the operation of different mechanisms in the mycoparasitism of these two types of sclerotia by the laccase LCC1. PMID:20872221

  20. Use of a non-homologous end-joining-deficient strain (delta-ku70) of the biocontrol fungus Trichoderma virens to investigate the function of the laccase gene lcc1 in sclerotia degradation.

    PubMed

    Catalano, Valentina; Vergara, Mariarosaria; Hauzenberger, Jasmin R; Seiboth, Bernhard; Sarrocco, Sabrina; Vannacci, Giovanni; Kubicek, Christian P; Seidl-Seiboth, Verena

    2011-02-01

    The aim of this study was to apply a generated Δtku70 strain with increased homologous recombination efficiency from the mycoparasitic fungus Trichoderma virens for studying the involvement of laccases in the degradation of sclerotia of plant pathogenic fungi. Inactivation of the non-homologous end-joining pathway has become a successful tool in filamentous fungi to overcome poor targeting efficiencies for genetic engineering. Here, we applied this principle to the biocontrol fungus T. virens, strain I10, by deleting its tku70 gene. This strain was subsequently used to delete the laccase gene lcc1, which we found to be expressed after interaction of T. virens with sclerotia of the plant pathogenic fungi Botrytis cinerea and Sclerotinia sclerotiorum. Lcc1 was strongly upregulated at early colonization of B. cinerea sclerotia and steadily induced during colonization of S. sclerotiorum sclerotia. The Δtku70Δlcc1 mutant was altered in its ability to degrade the sclerotia of B. cinerea and S. sclerotiorum. Interestingly, while the decaying ability for B. cinerea sclerotia was significantly decreased, that to degrade S. sclerotiorum sclerotia was even enhanced, suggesting the operation of different mechanisms in the mycoparasitism of these two types of sclerotia by the laccase LCC1. PMID:20872221

  1. Arbuscular mycorrhiza reduces susceptibility of tomato to Alternaria solani.

    PubMed

    Fritz, Maendy; Jakobsen, Iver; Lyngkjaer, Michael Foged; Thordal-Christensen, Hans; Pons-Kühnemann, Jörn

    2006-09-01

    Mycorrhiza frequently leads to the control of root pathogens, but appears to have the opposite effect on leaf pathogens. In this study, we studied mycorrhizal effects on the development of early blight in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) caused by the necrotrophic fungus Alternaria solani. Alternaria-induced necrosis and chlorosis of all leaves were studied in mycorrhizal and non-mycorrhizal plants over time course and at different soil P levels. Mycorrhizal tomato plants had significantly less A. solani symptoms than non-mycorrhizal plants, but neither plant growth nor phosphate uptake was enhanced by mycorrhizas. An increased P supply had no effect on disease severity in non-mycorrhizal plants, but led to a higher disease severity in mycorrhizal plants. This was parallel to a P-supply-induced reduction in mycorrhiza formation. The protective effect of mycorrhizas towards development of A. solani has some parallels to induced systemic resistance, mediated by rhizobacteria: both biocontrol agents are root-associated organisms and both are effective against necrotrophic pathogens. The possible mechanisms involved are discussed.

  2. Extracellular mycosynthesis of gold nanoparticles using Fusarium solani

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gopinath, K.; Arumugam, A.

    2014-08-01

    The development of eco-friendly methods for the synthesis of nanomaterial shape and size is an important area of research in the field of nanotechnology. The present investigation deals with the extracellular rapid biosynthesis of gold nanoparticles using Fusarium solani culture filtrate. The UV-vis spectra of the fungal culture filtrate medium containing gold ion showed peak at 527 nm corresponding to the plasmon absorbance of gold nanoparticles. FTIR spectra provide an evidence for the presence of heterocyclic compound in the culture filtrate, which increases the stability of the synthesized gold nanoparticles. The X-ray analysis respects the Bragg's law and confirmed the crystalline nature of the gold nanoparticles. AFM analysis showed the results of particle sizes (41 nm). Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) showed that the gold nanoparticles are spherical in shape with the size range from 20 to 50 nm. The use of F. solani will offer several advantages since it is considered as a non-human pathogenic organism. The fungus F. solani has a fast growth rate, rapid capacity of metallic ions reduction, NPs stabilization and facile and economical biomass handling. Extracellular biosynthesis of gold nanoparticles could be highly advantageous from the point of view of synthesis in large quantities, time consumption, eco-friendly, non-toxic and easy downstream processing.

  3. Chitosan as a Component of Pea-Fusarium solani Interactions 12

    PubMed Central

    Hadwiger, Lee A.; Beckman, Jean M.

    1980-01-01

    Chitosan, a polymer of β-1,4-linked glucosamine residues with a strong affinity for DNA, was implicated in the pea pod-Fusarium solani interaction as an elicitor of phytoalexin production, an inhibitor of fungal growth and a chemical which can protect pea tissue from infection by F. solani f. sp. pisi. Purified Fusarium fungal cell walls can elicit phytoalexin production in pea pod tissue. Enzymes from acetone powders of pea tissue release eliciting components from the F. solani f. sp. phaseoli cell walls. Hydrochloric acid-hydrolyzed F. solani cell walls are about 20% glucosamine. The actual chitosan content of F. solani cell walls is about 1%. However, chitosan assays and histochemical observations indicate that chitosan content of F. solani spores and adjacent pea cells increases following inoculation. Dormant F. solani spores also accumulate chitosan. Concentrations of nitrous acid-cleaved chitosan as low as 0.9 microgram per milliliter and 3 micrograms per milliliter elicit phytoalexin induction and inhibit germination of F. solani macroconidia, respectively. When chitosan is applied to pea pod tissue with or prior to F. solani f. sp. pisi, the tissue is protected from infection. Images PMID:16661405

  4. Lysine catabolism in Rhizoctonia leguminicola and related fungi.

    PubMed Central

    Guengerich, F P; Broquist, H P

    1976-01-01

    The catabolism of lysine was studied in several yeasts and fungi. Results with cell-free extracts of Rhizoctonia leguminicola support a proposed pathway involving (D- and L-) EPSILON-N-acetyllysine, alpha-keto-epsilon-acetamidohexanoic acid, delta-acetamidovaleric acid, and delta-aminovaleric acid in the conversion of L-lysine to shortchain organic acids. Label from radioactive L-lysine was found to accumulate in D- and L-epsilon-N-acetyllysine, delta-acetamidovaleric acid, delta-aminovaleric acid, and glutaric acid in cultures of R. leguminicola, Neurospora crassa, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and Hansenula saturnus, suggesting that the proposed omega-acetyl pathway of lysine catabolism is generalized among yeasts and fungi. In N. crassa, as is the case in R. leguminicola, the major precursor of L-pipecolic acid was the L-isomer of lysine; 15N experiments were consistent with delta1-piperideine-2-carboxylic acid as an intermediate in the transformation. PMID:131119

  5. Screening a core collection of citrus genetic resources for resistance to Fusarium solani (Mart) Sacc

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A causal agent for Dry root rot (DRR) of citrus has not been definitively identified, but the organism most consistently associated with DRR is Fusarium solani (Mart.) Sacc. To efficiently screen a citrus germplasm collection for resistance to F. solani, a core subset of the collection was evaluated...

  6. Biochemical Evaluation of Resistance Responses of Potato to Different Isolates of Alternaria Solani

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The resistance phenotypes of nine potato cultivars to five isolates of Alternaria solani, causal agent of early blight, were studied after inoculation and growth under greenhouse conditions. We identified potato cultivars with both susceptible and resistant phenotypes as well as A. solani isolates ...

  7. Analysis of genetic and pathogenic variation among Alternaria solani in a potato production region

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A two-year survey was conducted in a potato production region to investigate the genetic variability within naturally infecting populations of Alternaria solani, the cause of early blight in potato, and between species A. solani and A. dauci. Genetic diversity among 151 isolates was assessed using s...

  8. Two new zinniol-related phytotoxins from Alternaria solani.

    PubMed

    Moreno-Escobar, Jorge; Puc-Carrillo, Alejandra; Cáceres-Farfán, Mirbella; Peña-Rodríguez, Luis M; Gamboa-Angulo, M Marcela

    2005-09-01

    Bioassay-guided purification of the organic crude extract of Alternaria solani resulted in the isolation of three metabolites responsible for causing necrosis on potato leaves. These phytotoxins were identified as 2-(2",3"-dimethyl-but-1-enyl)-zinniol (1), 8-zinniol methyl ether (2). and 8-zinniol methyl ether based on their spectroscopic data (IR, MS, 1H and 13CNMR). Metabolites 1 and 2 have been identified as new phytotoxins structurally related to zinniol (4). Additionally, 5-(3',3'-dimethylallyloxy)-7-methoxy-6-methyl-phthalide and 8-zinniol-2-(phenyl)-ethyl ether (3) were also isolated during the purification process.

  9. First Report of Aerial Blight of Ruth’s Golden Aster (Pityopsis ruthii) caused by Rhizoctonia solani in the United States

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ruth's golden aster (Pityopsis ruthii) is an endangered, herbaceous perennial that occurs only at a few sites along small reaches of the Hiwassee and Ocoee rivers in Polk County, Tennessee. This species has ornamental potential. In 2012, we vegetatively propagated various genotypes and established p...

  10. Cutinase of Fusarium solani F. sp. pisi: mechanism of induction and relatedness to other Fusarium species

    SciTech Connect

    Woloshuk, C.P.

    1986-01-01

    Three studies were made on the extracellular cutinase of the phytopathogenic fungus Fusarium solani f. sp. pisi. I. The production of cutinase was found to be induced in spores of F. solani f. sp. pisi, strain T-8, by cutin and cutin hydrolysate. Fractionation and analysis of the cutin hydrolysate indicated that dihydroxy-C/sub 16/ acid and trihydroxy-C/sub 18/ acid were the cutin monomers most active for inducing cutinase. Measurement of cutinase-specific RNA levels by dot-blot hybridization with a (/sup 32/P)-labeled cutinase cDNA showed that the cutinase gene transcripts could be detected within 15 min after addition of the inducers. The results indicated that the fungal spores have the capacity to recognize the unique monomer components of the plant cuticle and rapidly respond by the synthesis of cutinase. II. Analysis of the genomic DNA's of seven strains of F. solani f. sp. pisi indicated that both high and low cutinase-producing strains contain at least one copy of the cutinase structural gene and a homologous promoter region. The data suggest a different promoter sequence exists in these additional copies. III. Relatedness of five phytopathogenic Fusarium species to F. solani f. sp. pisi was determined by their cutinase antigenic properties and gene homologies of cutinase cDNA from F. solani f. sp. pisi. The results suggest that formae specialis of F. solani are phylogenetically identical and that F. solani is quite distinct from the other Fusarium species tested.

  11. Phylogenetic Analysis of Fusarium solani Associated with the Asian Longhorned Beetle, Anoplophora glabripennis

    PubMed Central

    Geib, Scott M.; Scully, Erin D.; Jimenez-Gasco, Maria del Mar; Carlson, John E.; Tien, Ming; Hoover, Kelli

    2012-01-01

    Culture-independent analysis of the gut of a wood-boring insect, Anoplophora glabripennis (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae), revealed a consistent association between members of the fungal Fusarium solani species complex and the larval stage of both colony-derived and wild A. glabripennis populations. Using the translation elongation factor 1-alpha region for culture-independent phylogenetic and operational taxonomic unit (OTU)-based analyses, only two OTUs were detected, suggesting that genetic variance at this locus was low among A. glabripennis-associated isolates. To better survey the genetic variation of F. solani associated with A. glabripennis, and establish its phylogenetic relationship with other members of the F. solani species complex, single spore isolates were created from different populations and multi-locus phylogenetic analysis was performed using a combination of the translation elongation factor alpha-1, internal transcribed spacer, and large subunit rDNA regions. These analyses revealed that colony-derived larvae reared in three different tree species or on artificial diet, as well as larvae from wild populations collected from three additional tree species in New York City and from a single tree species in Worcester, MA, consistently harbored F. solani within their guts. While there is some genetic variation in the F. solani carried between populations, within-population variation is low. We speculate that F. solani is able to fill a broad niche in the A. glabripennis gut, providing it with fungal lignocellulases to allow the larvae to grow and develop on woody tissue. However, it is likely that many F. solani genotypes could potentially fill this niche, so the relationship may not be limited to a single member of the F. solani species complex. While little is known about the role of filamentous fungi and their symbiotic associations with insects, this report suggests that larval A. glabripennis has developed an intimate relationship with F. solani

  12. Rhizoctonia anastomosis groups associated with diseased rooibos seedlings and the potential of compost as soil amendment for disease suppression

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rhizoctonia spp. associated with rooibos in the Western Cape province of South Africa were recovered during the 2008 season by planting seedlings in rhizosphere soils collected from 14 rooibos nurseries. Seventy five Rhizoctonia isolates were obtained and 67 were multinucleate and 8 binucleate Rhiz...

  13. Fusarium Solani: a causative agent of skin and nail infections.

    PubMed

    Kuruvilla, Thomas S; Dias, Meena

    2012-07-01

    Fusarium spp are non-dermatophytic hyaline moulds found as saprophytes and plant pathogens. Human infections are probably a result of various precipitating predisposing factors of impaired immune status. Immunocompetent individuals of late are also vulnerable to various unassuming saprophytic and plant pathogens. To stress the need to identify correctly and institute appropriate antifungal therapy in newly emerging human fungal infectious agents. Repeated mycological sampling of the skin and nails of the suspected fungal infection were processed as per the standard format including direct microscopy and fungal culture on Sabouraud's dextrose agar. The fungus was isolated as Fusarium solani. Fusarium is an important plant pathogen and soil saprophyte. Infection is acquired by direct inoculation or inhalation of spores. It is associated with a variety of diseases like keratitis, onychomycosis, eumycetoma, skin lesions and disseminated diseases.

  14. Sclerotinia sclerotiorum γ-glutamyl transpeptidase (Ss-Ggt1) is required for regulating glutathione accumulation and development of sclerotia and compound appressoria.

    PubMed

    Li, Moyi; Liang, Xiaofei; Rollins, Jeffrey A

    2012-03-01

    Transcripts encoding Sclerotinia sclerotiorum γ-glutamyl transpeptidase (Ss-Ggt1) were found to accumulate specifically during sclerotium, apothecium, and compound appressorium development in S. sclerotiorum. To determine the requirement of this protein in these developmental processes, gene deletion mutants of Ss-ggt1 were generated and five independent homokaryotic ΔSs-ggt1 mutants were characterized. All deletion mutants overproduced sclerotial initials that were arrested in further development or eventually produced sclerotia with aberrant rind layers. During incubation for carpogenic germination, these sclerotia decayed and failed to produce apothecia. Total glutathione accumulation was approximately 10-fold higher and H(2)O(2) hyperaccumulated in ΔSs-ggt1 sclerotia compared with the wild type. Production of compound appressoria was also negatively affected. On host plants, these mutants exhibited a defect in infection efficiency and a delay in initial symptom development unless the host tissue was wounded prior to inoculation. These results suggest that Ss-Ggt1 is the primary enzyme involved in glutathione recycling during these key developmental stages of the S. sclerotiorum life cycle but Ss-Ggt1 is not required for host colonization and symptom development. The accumulation of oxidized glutathione is hypothesized to negatively impact these developmental processes by disrupting the dynamic redox environment associated with multicellular development. PMID:22046959

  15. Draft Genome Sequence of a Highly Virulent Strain of the Plant Pathogen Dickeya solani, IFB0099

    PubMed Central

    Golanowska, M.; Galardini, M.; Bazzicalupo, M.; Hugouvieux-Cotte-Pattat, N.; Mengoni, A.; Potrykus, M.; Slawiak, M.

    2015-01-01

    Dickeya solani is an important bacterial pathogen of potato cultivars in Europe. Here, we present the draft genome of D. solani strain IFB0099 isolated from potato in Poland that shows a high level of pectinolytic activity and a high virulence. This genome sequence is 5,094,121 bp and contains 4,365 protein-coding sequences. PMID:25792047

  16. Effect of potting mix microbial carrying capacity on biological control of rhizoctonia damping-off of radish and rhizoctonia crown and root rot of poinsettia.

    PubMed

    Krause, M S; Madden, L V; Hoitink, H A

    2001-11-01

    ABSTRACT Potting mixes prepared with dark, highly decomposed Sphagnum peat, with light, less decomposed Sphagnum peat, or with composted pine bark, all three of which were colonized by indigenous microorganisms, failed to consistently suppress Rhizoctonia damping-off of radish or Rhizoctonia crown and root rot of poinsettia. Inoculation of these mixes with Chryseobacterium gleum (C(299)R(2)) and Trichoderma hamatum 382 (T(382)) significantly reduced the severity of both diseases in the composted pine bark mix in which both biocontrol agents maintained high populations over 90 days. These microorganisms were less effective against damping-off in the light and dark peat mixes, respectively, in which populations of C(299)R(2) declined. In contrast, crown and root rot, a disease that is severe late in the crop, was suppressed in all three types of mixes. High populations of T(382) in all three mixes late during the cropping cycle may have contributed to control of this disease. PMID:18943449

  17. Effect of potting mix microbial carrying capacity on biological control of rhizoctonia damping-off of radish and rhizoctonia crown and root rot of poinsettia.

    PubMed

    Krause, M S; Madden, L V; Hoitink, H A

    2001-11-01

    ABSTRACT Potting mixes prepared with dark, highly decomposed Sphagnum peat, with light, less decomposed Sphagnum peat, or with composted pine bark, all three of which were colonized by indigenous microorganisms, failed to consistently suppress Rhizoctonia damping-off of radish or Rhizoctonia crown and root rot of poinsettia. Inoculation of these mixes with Chryseobacterium gleum (C(299)R(2)) and Trichoderma hamatum 382 (T(382)) significantly reduced the severity of both diseases in the composted pine bark mix in which both biocontrol agents maintained high populations over 90 days. These microorganisms were less effective against damping-off in the light and dark peat mixes, respectively, in which populations of C(299)R(2) declined. In contrast, crown and root rot, a disease that is severe late in the crop, was suppressed in all three types of mixes. High populations of T(382) in all three mixes late during the cropping cycle may have contributed to control of this disease.

  18. Rhizoctonia Resistant Wheat -- Potential New Resources for Control for Soilborne Pathogens.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pacific Northwest (PNW) wheat, barley, legume and canola varieties are susceptible to the broad host-range soilborne pathogens that cause Rhizoctonia root rot and Pythium root rot. Effective control of these diseases will likely require additional approaches and resources. We have identified promisi...

  19. Postharvet losses associated with Rhizoctonia crown and root rot of sugarbeet

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    As the prevalence of Rhizoctonia crown and root rot (RCRR) increases, more diseased sugarbeet (Beta vulgaris L.) roots are destined for storage piles. To investigate the effect of RCRR on storage properties, roots with similar symptoms were grouped and extractable sucrose, invert sugar, and respirat...

  20. Rhizoctonia web blight development on azalea in relation to leaf wetness duration in the glasshouse

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In field trials done in nurseries, temperature was identified as the primary variable for predicting web blight development, caused by binucleate Rhizoctonia spp., on container-grown azaleas (Rhododendron spp.). Moisture, in the form of very low vapor pressure deficits, provided only a minor predict...

  1. Rhizoctonia crown and root rot resistance evaluation of Beta PIs in Fort Collins, CO, 2014

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Thirty-six sugar beet (Beta vulgaris subsp. vulgaris) germplasm from the USDA-Agricultural Research Service pre-breeding program at Fort Collins, Colorado were screened for resistance to Rhizoctonia crown and root rot (RCRR) at the Colorado State University ARDEC facility in Fort Collins, CO. There...

  2. Rhizoctonia root rot resistance of Beta PIs from the USDA-ARS NPGS, 2007.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Thirty-two plant introductions (PI) from the USDA-ARS National Plant Germplasm System (NPGS) (including garden beet, sugar beet, leaf beet, fodder beet, and wild beet) were evaluated for resistance to Rhizoctonia root rot. The trial was a randomized complete-block design with five replications in ...

  3. Spread potential of binucleate Rhizoctonia from propagation floors to trays containing stem cuttings

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Binucelate Rhizoctonia spp. (BNR), the cause of web blight, are present all year on container-grown azaleas in the southern U.S. BNR can be eliminated during vegetative propagation by submerging stem cuttings in 50°C water for 21 minutes. The objective was to evaluate risk of rooting trays bein...

  4. Rhizoctonia crown and root rot resistance evaluation of Beta PIs in Fort Collins, CO, 2015

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Thirty beet accessions of either cultivated beet or sea beet (Beta vulgaris subsp. vulgaris or Beta vulgaris subsp. maritima (L.) Arcang) from the Beta collection of the USDA-Agricultural Research Service National Plant Germplasm System were screened for resistance to Rhizoctonia crown and root rot ...

  5. The galactolipase activity of Fusarium solani (phospho)lipase.

    PubMed

    Jallouli, Raida; Othman, Houcemeddine; Amara, Sawsan; Parsiegla, Goetz; Carriere, Frédéric; Srairi-Abid, Najet; Gargouri, Youssef; Bezzine, Sofiane

    2015-03-01

    The purified (phospho)lipase of Fusarium solani (FSL), was known to be active on both triglycerides and phospholipids. This study aimed at assessing the potential of this enzyme in hydrolyzing galactolipids. FSL was found to hydrolyze at high rates of synthetic medium chains monogalactosyldiacylglycerol (4658±146U/mg on DiC8-MGDG) and digalactosyldiacylglycerol (3785±83U/mg on DiC8-DGDG) and natural long chain monogalactosyldiacylglycerol extracted from leek leaves (991±85U/mg). It is the microbial enzyme with the highest activity on galactolipids identified so far with a level of activity comparable to that of pancreatic lipase-related protein 2. FSL maximum activity on galactolipids was measured at pH8. The analysis of the hydrolysis product of natural MGDG from leek showed that FSL hydrolyzes preferentially the ester bond at the sn-1 position of galactolipids. To investigate the structure-activity relationships of FSL, a 3D model of this enzyme was built. In silico docking of medium chains MGDG and DGDG and phospholipid in the active site of FSL reveals structural solutions which are in concordance with in vitro tests.

  6. Alternatively spliced, spliceosomal twin introns in Helminthosporium solani.

    PubMed

    Ág, Norbert; Flipphi, Michel; Karaffa, Levente; Scazzocchio, Claudio; Fekete, Erzsébet

    2015-12-01

    Spliceosomal twin introns, "stwintrons", have been defined as complex intervening sequences that carry a second intron ("internal intron") interrupting one of the conserved sequence domains necessary for their correct splicing via consecutive excision events. Previously, we have described and experimentally verified stwintrons in species of Sordariomycetes, where an "internal intron" interrupted the donor sequence of an "external intron". Here we describe and experimentally verify two novel stwintrons of the potato pathogen Helminthosporium solani. One instance involves alternative splicing of an internal intron interrupting the donor domain of an external intron and a second one interrupting the acceptor domain of an overlapping external intron, both events leading to identical mature mRNAs. In the second case, an internal intron interrupts the donor domain of the external intron, while an alternatively spliced intron leads to an mRNA carrying a premature chain termination codon. We thus extend the stwintron concept to the acceptor domain and establish a link of the occurrence of stwintrons with that of alternative splicing.

  7. The galactolipase activity of Fusarium solani (phospho)lipase.

    PubMed

    Jallouli, Raida; Othman, Houcemeddine; Amara, Sawsan; Parsiegla, Goetz; Carriere, Frédéric; Srairi-Abid, Najet; Gargouri, Youssef; Bezzine, Sofiane

    2015-03-01

    The purified (phospho)lipase of Fusarium solani (FSL), was known to be active on both triglycerides and phospholipids. This study aimed at assessing the potential of this enzyme in hydrolyzing galactolipids. FSL was found to hydrolyze at high rates of synthetic medium chains monogalactosyldiacylglycerol (4658±146U/mg on DiC8-MGDG) and digalactosyldiacylglycerol (3785±83U/mg on DiC8-DGDG) and natural long chain monogalactosyldiacylglycerol extracted from leek leaves (991±85U/mg). It is the microbial enzyme with the highest activity on galactolipids identified so far with a level of activity comparable to that of pancreatic lipase-related protein 2. FSL maximum activity on galactolipids was measured at pH8. The analysis of the hydrolysis product of natural MGDG from leek showed that FSL hydrolyzes preferentially the ester bond at the sn-1 position of galactolipids. To investigate the structure-activity relationships of FSL, a 3D model of this enzyme was built. In silico docking of medium chains MGDG and DGDG and phospholipid in the active site of FSL reveals structural solutions which are in concordance with in vitro tests. PMID:25529980

  8. Alternatively spliced, spliceosomal twin introns in Helminthosporium solani.

    PubMed

    Ág, Norbert; Flipphi, Michel; Karaffa, Levente; Scazzocchio, Claudio; Fekete, Erzsébet

    2015-12-01

    Spliceosomal twin introns, "stwintrons", have been defined as complex intervening sequences that carry a second intron ("internal intron") interrupting one of the conserved sequence domains necessary for their correct splicing via consecutive excision events. Previously, we have described and experimentally verified stwintrons in species of Sordariomycetes, where an "internal intron" interrupted the donor sequence of an "external intron". Here we describe and experimentally verify two novel stwintrons of the potato pathogen Helminthosporium solani. One instance involves alternative splicing of an internal intron interrupting the donor domain of an external intron and a second one interrupting the acceptor domain of an overlapping external intron, both events leading to identical mature mRNAs. In the second case, an internal intron interrupts the donor domain of the external intron, while an alternatively spliced intron leads to an mRNA carrying a premature chain termination codon. We thus extend the stwintron concept to the acceptor domain and establish a link of the occurrence of stwintrons with that of alternative splicing. PMID:26514742

  9. Genome Sequence of the Emerging Plant Pathogen Dickeya solani Strain RNS 08.23.3.1A

    PubMed Central

    Khayi, Slimane; Mondy, Samuel; Beury-Cirou, Amélie; Moumni, Mohieddine; Hélias, Valérie

    2014-01-01

    Here we present the genome sequence of Dickeya solani strain RNS 08.23.3.1A (PRI3337), isolated from Solanum tuberosum. Dickeya solani, recently described on potato cultures in Europe, is a proposed new taxon closely related to the Dickeya dianthicola and Dickeya dadantii species. PMID:24482527

  10. Are Phenacoccus solani Ferris and P. defectus Ferris (Hemiptera: Pseudococcidae) distinct species?

    PubMed

    Chatzidimitriou, Evangelia; Simonato, Mauro; Watson, Gillian W; Martinez-Sañudo, Isabel; Tanaka, Hirotaka; Zhao, Jing; Pellizzari, Giuseppina

    2016-01-01

    Among the Nearctic species of Phenacoccus (Hemiptera: Pseudococcidae), Phenacoccus solani Ferris and P. defectus Ferris are morphologically similar and it can be difficult to separate them on the basis of microscopic morphological characters of the adult female alone. In order to resolve their identity, a canonical variates morphological analysis of 199 specimens from different geographical origins and host plants and a molecular analysis of the COI and 28S genes were performed. The morphological analysis supported synonymy of the two species, as although the type specimens of the "species" are widely separated from each other in the canonical variates plot, they are all part of a continuous range of variation. The molecular analysis showed that P. solani and P. defectus are grouped in the same clade. On the basis of the morphological and molecular analyses, P. defectus is synonymized under the senior name P. solani, syn. n. PMID:27394512

  11. Are Phenacoccus solani Ferris and P. defectus Ferris (Hemiptera: Pseudococcidae) distinct species?

    PubMed

    Chatzidimitriou, Evangelia; Simonato, Mauro; Watson, Gillian W; Martinez-Sañudo, Isabel; Tanaka, Hirotaka; Zhao, Jing; Pellizzari, Giuseppina

    2016-03-24

    Among the Nearctic species of Phenacoccus (Hemiptera: Pseudococcidae), Phenacoccus solani Ferris and P. defectus Ferris are morphologically similar and it can be difficult to separate them on the basis of microscopic morphological characters of the adult female alone. In order to resolve their identity, a canonical variates morphological analysis of 199 specimens from different geographical origins and host plants and a molecular analysis of the COI and 28S genes were performed. The morphological analysis supported synonymy of the two species, as although the type specimens of the "species" are widely separated from each other in the canonical variates plot, they are all part of a continuous range of variation. The molecular analysis showed that P. solani and P. defectus are grouped in the same clade. On the basis of the morphological and molecular analyses, P. defectus is synonymized under the senior name P. solani, syn. n.

  12. Optimum Timing for Spraying Out Greenbridge with Roundup to Control Rhizoctonia in Barley

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A field experiment was conducted in 2007 in a field at the ARS Palouse Conservation Farm with a high level of both R. solani and R. oryzae. Volunteer and weeds were allowed to grow over the winter, and plots were sprayed out with Roundup at 8 wks, 6 wks, 4 wks, 2 wks, 1 wk, and 2 days before plantin...

  13. The pathogen biology, identification and management of Rhizoctonia species with emphasis on isolates infecting turfgrasses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    R. solani is an economically important soilborne basidiomycetous pathogen of worldwide distribution and it is known to attack at least 188 species of higher plants, including crops, vegetables, ornamentals, forest trees and turfgrasses. The pathogenic isolates may belong to multiple genera and speci...

  14. Characterization of an extracellularly derived α-mannosidase from the liquid exudate of the sclerotia of Sclerotinia sclerotiorum (Lib.) de Bary.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhengli; Wei, Ran; He, Wen; Ruan, Ying; Liu, Chunlin

    2015-07-01

    Class I α-mannosidases play an important role in co- and post-translational N-glycosylation modification of proteins, and also in glycoprotein glycan hydrolysis. Herein, we investigated a protein named Man-41, from liquid exudate droplets secreted on the surface of developing sclerotia by Sclerotinia sclerotiorum. The protein was identified by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry to be a α-mannosidase. The full-length open reading frame of Man-41 consists of 1581 bp, encoding 526 amino acid residues and containing a putative signal peptide at amino acid residues 1-20, and a conserved sequence at residues 50-521. Man-41 was classified into glycoside hydrolase family 47 (GH47) by clustering analysis. The catalytic residues include Glu(125), Arg(129), Asp(270), Ser(271), Glu(274), Arg(420), Glu(422), Glu(425), Glu(485), Thr(514), and Glu(515), which are conserved in all Class I α-1,2-mannosidases. Recombinant Man-41 protein had 26.67 ± 2.18 U/mg of α-mannosidase activity, about one-half of intracellular mannosidase activity of sclerotia. In conclusion, this is the first time that mannosidase has been identified in an extracellular fluid and Man-41 is also a new member of GH47 with Ca(2+)-dependent characteristics. This work lays the foundation for further study of the function of Man-41 in sclerotial development. PMID:25952984

  15. Resistance to alternaria solani in hybrids between a Solanum tuberosum haploid and S. raphanifolium

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Early blight of potato (Solanum tuberosum L.), caused by the foliar fungal pathogen Alternaria solani is a major cause of economic loss in many potato growing regions. Genetic resistance offers an opportunity to decrease fungicide usage while maintaining yield and quality. In this study, an early bl...

  16. Effect of Alternaria solani exudates on resistant and susceptible potato cultivars from two different pathogen isolates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The resistance phenotypes of two potato cultivars to two isolates of Alternaria solani, causal agent of early blight, were studied under greenhouse conditions. The two isolates contain varying degrees of aggressiveness on both susceptible and resistant phenotypes of potatoes. A bioassay was used to ...

  17. Role of two G-protein alpha subunits, TgaA and TgaB, in the antagonism of plant pathogens by Trichoderma virens.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Prasun K; Latha, Jagannathan; Hadar, Ruthi; Horwitz, Benjamin A

    2004-01-01

    G-protein alpha subunits are involved in transmission of signals for development, pathogenicity, and secondary metabolism in plant pathogenic and saprophytic fungi. We cloned two G-protein alpha subunit genes, tgaA and tgaB, from the biocontrol fungus Trichoderma virens. tgaA belongs to the fungal Galphai class, while tgaB belongs to the class defined by gna-2 of Neurospora crassa. We compared loss-of-function mutants of tgaA and tgaB with the wild type for radial growth, conidiation, germination of conidia, the ability to overgrow colonies of Rhizoctonia solani and Sclerotium rolfsii in confrontation assays, and the ability to colonize the sclerotia of these pathogens in soil. Both mutants grew as well as the wild type, sporulated normally, did not sporulate in the dark, and responded to blue light by forming a conidial ring. The tgaA mutants germinated by straight unbranched germ tubes, while tgaB mutants, like the wild type, germinated by wavy and highly branched germ tubes. In confrontation assays, both tgaA and tgaB mutants and the wild type overgrew, coiled, and lysed the mycelia of R. solani, but tgaA mutants had reduced ability to colonize S. rolfsii colonies. In the soil plate assay, both mutants parasitized the sclerotia of R. solani, but tgaA mutants were unable to parasitize the sclerotia of S. rolfsii. Thus, tgaA is involved in antagonism against S. rolfsii, but neither G protein subunit is involved in antagonism against R. solani. T. virens, which has a wide host range, thus employs a G-protein pathway in a host-specific manner. PMID:14711686

  18. Rhizoctonia Crown and Root Rot Resistance of Beta Plant Introductions from the USDA, Agricultural Research Service's National Plant Germplasm System, 2010

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Thirty wild beet (Beta vulgaris subsp. maritima (L.) Arcang) plant introduction (PI) accessions from the Beta collection of the USDA-ARS National Plant Germplasm System were screened for resistance to Rhizoctonia root and crown rot, at the USDA-ARS Fort Collins, CO Research Farm. The Rhizoctonia sc...

  19. Fractionation and characterization of mushroom dietary fiber (nonstarch polysaccharides) as potential nutraceuticals from sclerotia of Pleurotus tuber-regium (Fries) singer.

    PubMed

    Cheung, P C; Lee, M Y

    2000-08-01

    The nonstarch polysaccharides (NSPs) in the total dietary fiber (TDF) from the sclerotia of Pleurotus tuber-regium (tiger milk mushroom) were fractionated by the sequential use of chemical solvents. About half of the TDF was solubilized and two major alkali-soluble fractions (1 and 4 N sodium hydroxide) that contained 126 and 293 g/kg TDF were obtained. Sugar analysis and infrared spectroscopy indicated that the NSPs in these alkali-soluble fractions were mainly beta-glucans and chitin. These alkali-soluble NSPs were further purified by anion-exchange chromatography followed by gel permeation chromatographic separation. Methylation analysis revealed that these purified glucans were highly branched and contained a mixture of sugar linkages of beta-1,3, beta-1,6, and beta-1,4. The potential use of these sclerotial beta-glucans as nutraceuticals was discussed. PMID:10956083

  20. Methyl tert-butyl ether and tert-butyl alcohol degradation by Fusarium solani.

    PubMed

    Magaña-Reyes, Miguel; Morales, Marcia; Revah, Sergio

    2005-11-01

    Fusarium solani degraded methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) and other oxygenated compounds from gasoline including tert-butyl alcohol (TBA). The maximum degradation rate of MTBE was 16 mg protein h and 46 mg/g protein h for TBA. The culture transformed 77% of the total carbon to 14CO2. The estimated yield for MTBE was 0.18 g dry wt/g MTBE. PMID:16314973

  1. Cutaneous hyalohyphomycosis caused by Fusarium solani in a loggerhead sea turtle (Caretta caretta L.).

    PubMed Central

    Cabañes, F J; Alonso, J M; Castellá, G; Alegre, F; Domingo, M; Pont, S

    1997-01-01

    Fusarium solani was reported as the agent of a cutaneous infection in an injured sea turtle collected in the Mediterranean Sea. The turtle was treated with both a topical 10% solution of iodine in alcohol and ketoconazole. The source of the causal agent was traced to the sand in the tank in which the turtle was maintained. The strain was only sensitive in vitro to amphotericin B and was resistant to 5-fluorocytosine, fluconazole, itraconazole, and ketoconazole. PMID:9399554

  2. Salicylic Acid Induces Resistance to Alternaria solani in Hydroponically Grown Tomato.

    PubMed

    Spletzer, M E; Enyedi, A J

    1999-09-01

    ABSTRACT Alternaria solani is the causal agent of early blight disease in tomato and is responsible for significant economic losses sustained by tomato producers each year. Because salicylic acid (SA) is an important signal molecule that plays a critical role in plant defense against pathogen invasion, we investigated if the exogenous application of SA would activate systemic acquired resistance (SAR) against A. solani in tomato leaves. The addition of 200 muM SA to the root system significantly increased the endogenous SA content of leaves. Free SA levels increased 65-fold over basal levels to 5.85 mug g(-1) fresh weight (FW) after 48 h. This level of SA had no visible phytotoxic effects. Total SA content (free SA + SA-glucose conjugate) increased to 108 mug g(-1) FW after 48 h. Concomitant with elevated SA levels, expression of the tomato pathogenesis-related (PR)-1B gene was strongly induced within 24 h of the addition of 200 muM SA. PR-1B expression was still evident after 48 h; however, PR-1B induction was not observed in plants not receiving SA treatment. Challenge inoculation of SA-treated tomato plants using conidia of A. solani resulted in 83% fewer lesions per leaf and a 77% reduction in blighted leaf area as compared with control plants not receiving SA. Our data indicate that root feeding 200 muM SA to tomato plants can (i) significantly elevate foliar SA levels, (ii) induce PR-1B gene expression, and (iii) activate SAR that is effective against A. solani.

  3. In silico analysis and prioritization of drug targets in Fusarium solani.

    PubMed

    Sivashanmugam, Muthukumaran; Nagarajan, Hemavathy; Vetrivel, Umashankar; Ramasubban, Gayathri; Therese, Kulandai Lily; Narahari, Madhavan Hajib

    2015-02-01

    Mycotic keratitis has emerged as a major ophthalmic problem and a leading cause of blindness, since its recognition in 1879. Filamentous fungi are major causative of mycotic keratitis. In India, the main etiological organism responsible for mycotic keratitis is Aspergillus species followed by Fusarium species. In South India, Fusarium based keratitis scales up to 43%. Nearly one-third of mycotic keratitis treatment results in failure, as fungal infections are highly resistant to antibiotic therapies. Therefore, there is need to determine novel and specific targets to constrain Fusarium infections in human eye. In this study, we implemented subtractive proteomics coupled with in silico functional annotation to prioritize potential and specific drug targets which can be used to modulate the virulence of Fusarium solani subsp.pisi (Nectria haematococca MPVI). The results infer that Thiamine thiazole synthase (Thi4), an intracellular membrane bound protein as the potential target, which is a core protein in biological and metabolic process of this pathogen. Moreover, this protein occurs in the thiamine thiazole biosynthesis pathway which is unique to F.solani and devoid in human. Hence, we predicted a plausible structure for this protein and also performed ligand-binding cavity analysis which can be for a strong base for drug designing studies. This study will pave way in better understanding of potential drug targets in F.solani and also leading to therapeutic interventions of fungal keratitis.

  4. Impact of water potential on growth and germination of Fusarium solani soilborne pathogen of peanut.

    PubMed

    Palacios, Sofia; Casasnovas, Francisco; Ramirez, María L; Reynoso, María M; Torres, Adriana M

    2014-01-01

    Studies were conducted to determine the effect of osmotic and matric stress on germination and growth of two Fusarium solani strains, the etiological agent responsible of peanut brown root rot. Both strains had similar osmotic and matric potential ranges that allowed growth, being the latter one narrower. F. solani showed the ability to grow down to -14 MPa at 25 °C in non-ionic modified osmotic medium, while under matric stress this was limited to -8.4 MPa at 25 °C. However, both strains were seen to respond differently to decreasing osmotic and matric potentials, during early stages of germination. One strain (RC 338) showed to be more sensitive to matric than osmotic (non ionic) and the other one (RC 386) showed to be more sensitive to osmotic than matric imposed water stress. After 24 h of incubation, both isolates behaved similarly. The minimum water potential for germination was -8.4 MPa on glycerol amended media and -5.6 MPa for NaCl and PEG amended media, respectively. The knowledge of the water potential range which allow mycelia growth and spore germination of F. solani provides an inside to the likely behaviour of this devastating soilborne plant pathogen in nature and has important practical implications.

  5. Impact of water potential on growth and germination of Fusarium solani soilborne pathogen of peanut

    PubMed Central

    Palacios, Sofia; Casasnovas, Francisco; Ramirez, María L.; Reynoso, María. M.; Torres, Adriana M.

    2014-01-01

    Studies were conducted to determine the effect of osmotic and matric stress on germination and growth of two Fusarium solani strains, the etiological agent responsible of peanut brown root rot. Both strains had similar osmotic and matric potential ranges that allowed growth, being the latter one narrower. F. solani showed the ability to grow down to −14 MPa at 25 °C in non-ionic modified osmotic medium, while under matric stress this was limited to −8.4 MPa at 25 °C. However, both strains were seen to respond differently to decreasing osmotic and matric potentials, during early stages of germination. One strain (RC 338) showed to be more sensitive to matric than osmotic (non ionic) and the other one (RC 386) showed to be more sensitive to osmotic than matric imposed water stress. After 24 h of incubation, both isolates behaved similarly. The minimum water potential for germination was −8.4 MPa on glycerol amended media and −5.6 MPa for NaCl and PEG amended media, respectively. The knowledge of the water potential range which allow mycelia growth and spore germination of F. solani provides an inside to the likely behaviour of this devastating soilborne plant pathogen in nature and has important practical implications. PMID:25477950

  6. Characterization, In Vitro Culture, and Molecular Analysis of Thecaphora solani, the Causal Agent of Potato Smut.

    PubMed

    Andrade, Orlando; Muñoz, Gastón; Galdames, Rafael; Durán, Paola; Honorato, Rodrigo

    2004-08-01

    ABSTRACT The fungus Thecaphora solani (syn.: Angiosorus solani), the causal agent of potato smut, was cultivated in vitro for the first time. Teliospores obtained from galls of infected potato plants were used to inoculate commonly used solid and liquid media. The teliospores produced two kinds of vegetative tissue depending on the nutrient status of the media. A very slow radial-growing, hyaline, and septate mycelium, as usually seen in most of the in vitro-cultivated filamentous fungi, was obtained in wateragar medium after 30 to 40 days. On the other hand, a white, sponge-like mycelial mass was obtained in HCM + 1% activated charcoal, and on common potato dextrose agar or malt-yeast-peptone solid or liquid media, after 40 to 50 days under lab conditions. The identity among teliospores and the sponge-like mycelial mass was corroborated by DNA fingerprinting and partial sequencing of the large subunit (LSU) rDNA region. The sexual cycle of the pathogen was completed under lab conditions based on the development of teliospores on the sponge-like mycelial mass. The first attempt to reproduce the disease under controlled conditions was successful, inducing a gall in a cv. Desirée potato explant cultivated in vitro inoculated with radial-growing mycelia. Phylogenetic analysis of LSU rDNA data of the genus Thecaphora and other smut fungi confirmed the initial classification of the pathogen as T. solani. PMID:18943109

  7. Impact of water potential on growth and germination of Fusarium solani soilborne pathogen of peanut.

    PubMed

    Palacios, Sofia; Casasnovas, Francisco; Ramirez, María L; Reynoso, María M; Torres, Adriana M

    2014-01-01

    Studies were conducted to determine the effect of osmotic and matric stress on germination and growth of two Fusarium solani strains, the etiological agent responsible of peanut brown root rot. Both strains had similar osmotic and matric potential ranges that allowed growth, being the latter one narrower. F. solani showed the ability to grow down to -14 MPa at 25 °C in non-ionic modified osmotic medium, while under matric stress this was limited to -8.4 MPa at 25 °C. However, both strains were seen to respond differently to decreasing osmotic and matric potentials, during early stages of germination. One strain (RC 338) showed to be more sensitive to matric than osmotic (non ionic) and the other one (RC 386) showed to be more sensitive to osmotic than matric imposed water stress. After 24 h of incubation, both isolates behaved similarly. The minimum water potential for germination was -8.4 MPa on glycerol amended media and -5.6 MPa for NaCl and PEG amended media, respectively. The knowledge of the water potential range which allow mycelia growth and spore germination of F. solani provides an inside to the likely behaviour of this devastating soilborne plant pathogen in nature and has important practical implications. PMID:25477950

  8. Use of the polymerase chain reaction to help determine the presence of blackpatch (Rhizoctonia leguminicola) in inoculated red clover leaves

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rhizoctonia leguminicola, the causal agent of blackpatch of red clover, produces alkaloids that cause livestock to salivate excessively. Its presence is generally confirmed by microscopy, disappearance of symptoms after removal of the suspect forage, and chromatographic analysis of slaframine in ext...

  9. Biological control of Rhizoctonia root rot on bean by phenazine- and cyclic lipopeptide-producing Pseudomonas CMR12a

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pseudomonas CMR12a was previously selected as an efficient biocontrol strain producing phenazines and cyclic lipopeptides (CLPs). In this study, biocontrol capacity of Pseudomonas CMR12a against Rhizoctonia root rot of bean and the involvement of phenazines and CLPs in this ability were tested. Two ...

  10. Pathogenicity, characterization and comparative virulence of Rhizoctonia spp. from insect-galled roots of Lepidium draba in Europe

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The association of Rhizoctonia spp. with insect-damaged and diseased tissue of the invasive perennial Lepidium draba was documented throughout the range of L. draba that was surveyed in Europe, including Hungary, Austria, Switzerland and France. Samples that could be both maintained under cooled con...

  11. USDA-ARS germplasm evaluated for resistance to Rhizoctonia crown and root rot in Fort Collins, CO, 2014

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Thirty-six sugar beet (Beta vulgaris subsp. vulgaris) germplasm from the USDA-Agricultural Research Service pre-breeding program at Fort Collins, Colorado were screened for resistance to Rhizoctonia crown and root rot (RCRR) at the Colorado State University ARDEC facility in Fort Collins, CO. There...

  12. Sugar beet breeding lines evaluated for resistance to Rhizoctonia crown and root rot in Fort Collins, CO, 2015

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Thirty-nine beet sugar beet breeding lines (Beta vulgaris subsp. vulgaris) from the USDA-Agricultural Research Service breeding program at Fort Collins, CO, were screened for resistance to Rhizoctonia crown and root rot (Rcrr) at the Colorado State University ARDEC facility in Fort Collins, CO. The...

  13. Spread potential of binucleate Rhizoctonia from nursery propagation floors to trays containing azalea stem cuttings and sanitary control options

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Binucelate Rhizoctonia sp. (BNR), the cause of web blight, can be spread on azalea stem cuttings into propagation houses, but can be eliminated from stems by submerging cuttings in 50°C water for 21 minutes. The overall objective was to evaluate risk of rooting cuttings in trays becoming contaminate...

  14. Characterization of fungi (Fusarium and Rhizoctonia) and oomycetes (Phytophthora and Pythium) associated with apple orchards in South Africa.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Several species of fungi and oomycetes including Fusarium, Rhizoctonia, Phytophthora and Pythium have been reported as root pathogens of apple where they contribute to a phenomenon known as apple replant disease. In South Africa, very little is known about the specific species in these genera and th...

  15. Bacillus amyloliquefaciens SB14 from rhizosphere alleviates Rhizoctonia damping-off disease on sugar beet.

    PubMed

    Karimi, Elham; Safaie, Naser; Shams-Baksh, Masoud; Mahmoudi, Bagher

    2016-11-01

    The use of biocontrol strains recently has become a popular alternative to conventional chemical treatments. A set of bacteria isolated from sugar beet rhizosphere and from roots and shoots of apple and walnut were evaluated for their potential to control sugar beet seedling damping-off caused by R. solani AG-4 and AG2-2.The results of in vitro assays concluded that three isolates, SB6, SB14, SB15, obtained from rhizosphere of sugar beet and five isolates, AP2, AP4, AP6, AP7, AP8, obtained from shoots and roots of apple were the most effective antagonists that inhibited the mycelial growth of both R. solani isolates. Combination of several biochemical tests and partial sequencing of 16S rRNA and gyrBgenes revealed that eight efficient bacterial isolates could be assigned to the genus Bacillus and all could tolerate high temperatures and salt concentrations in their vegetative growth. The potential biocontrol activity of the eight bacterial antagonists were tested in greenhouse condition. The results indicated that four strains,B. amyloliquefaciens SB14, B. pumilus SB6,B. siamensis AP2 and B. siamensisAP8 exerted a significant influence on controlling of seedling damping-off and performed significantly better than others.However, the treatment of the seeds with bacteria was most effective when the isolate SB14 was used, which significantly controlled damping-off disease by 58% caused by R. solani AG-4 and by 52.5% caused by R. solani AG-2-2. This indicates that the use of beneficial bacterial native to the host plant may increase the success rate in screening biocontrols, because these microbes are likely to be better adapted to their host and its associated environmental conditions than are strains isolated from other plant species grown in different environmental conditions. We can infer from the results reported here that sugar beet plantsmay recruitbeneficial microbes to the rhizosphere to help them solve context-specific challenges. PMID:27664740

  16. Bacillus amyloliquefaciens SB14 from rhizosphere alleviates Rhizoctonia damping-off disease on sugar beet.

    PubMed

    Karimi, Elham; Safaie, Naser; Shams-Baksh, Masoud; Mahmoudi, Bagher

    2016-11-01

    The use of biocontrol strains recently has become a popular alternative to conventional chemical treatments. A set of bacteria isolated from sugar beet rhizosphere and from roots and shoots of apple and walnut were evaluated for their potential to control sugar beet seedling damping-off caused by R. solani AG-4 and AG2-2.The results of in vitro assays concluded that three isolates, SB6, SB14, SB15, obtained from rhizosphere of sugar beet and five isolates, AP2, AP4, AP6, AP7, AP8, obtained from shoots and roots of apple were the most effective antagonists that inhibited the mycelial growth of both R. solani isolates. Combination of several biochemical tests and partial sequencing of 16S rRNA and gyrBgenes revealed that eight efficient bacterial isolates could be assigned to the genus Bacillus and all could tolerate high temperatures and salt concentrations in their vegetative growth. The potential biocontrol activity of the eight bacterial antagonists were tested in greenhouse condition. The results indicated that four strains,B. amyloliquefaciens SB14, B. pumilus SB6,B. siamensis AP2 and B. siamensisAP8 exerted a significant influence on controlling of seedling damping-off and performed significantly better than others.However, the treatment of the seeds with bacteria was most effective when the isolate SB14 was used, which significantly controlled damping-off disease by 58% caused by R. solani AG-4 and by 52.5% caused by R. solani AG-2-2. This indicates that the use of beneficial bacterial native to the host plant may increase the success rate in screening biocontrols, because these microbes are likely to be better adapted to their host and its associated environmental conditions than are strains isolated from other plant species grown in different environmental conditions. We can infer from the results reported here that sugar beet plantsmay recruitbeneficial microbes to the rhizosphere to help them solve context-specific challenges.

  17. Within-plant distribution of Aulacorthum solani (Hemiptera: Aphididae), on various greenhouse plants with implications for control.

    PubMed

    Jandricic, S E; Mattson, N S; Wraight, S P; Sanderson, J P

    2014-04-01

    Foxglove aphid, Aulacorthum solani (Kaltenbach) (Hemiptera: Aphididae), has recently undergone a status change from an occasional pest to a serious pest in greenhouses of North America and the United Kingdom. Little nonanecdotal information exists on the ecology of this insect in greenhouse crops. To help improve integrated pest management decisions for A. solani, the within-plant distribution of this pest was explored on a variety of common greenhouse plants in both the vegetative and flowering stage. This aphid generally was found on lower leaves of vegetative plants, but was found higher in the canopy on reproductive plants (on flowers, flower buds, or upper leaves). Aphid numbers were not consistently positively correlated with total leaf surface areas within plant strata across plant species. Thus, the observed differences in preferred feeding sites on vegetative versus flowering plants are possibly a response to differences in nutritional quality of the various host-plant tissues. Despite being anecdotally described as a "stem-feeding aphid," A. solani was rarely found feeding on stems at the population densities established in our tests, with the exception of racemes of scarlet sage (Salvia splendans). Although some previous reports suggested that A. solani prefers to feed on new growth of plants, our results indicate that mature leaves are preferred over growing tips and young leaves. The implications of the within-plant feeding preferences of A. solani populations with respect to both biological and chemical control are discussed.

  18. Detection of invasive infection caused by Fusarium solani and non-Fusarium solani species using a duplex quantitative PCR-based assay in a murine model of fusariosis.

    PubMed

    Bernal-Martínez, Leticia; Buitrago, Maria J; Castelli, Maria V; Rodríguez-Tudela, Juan L; Cuenca-Estrella, Manuel

    2012-04-01

    A duplex Real Time PCR (RT-PCR) assay for detecting DNA of members of the genus Fusarium has been developed and validated by using two mouse models of invasive infection. The duplex RT-PCR technique employed two specific molecular beacon probes targeting a highly conserved region of the fungal rDNA gene. This technique showed a detection limit of 10 fg DNA per μl of sample and a specificity of 100%. The sensitivity in a total of 48 samples from a murine model of Fusarium solani infection was 93.9% for lung tissues and 86.7% for serum samples. In comparison, the sensitivity in a total of 45 samples of a F. oxysporum murine model infection was 87% for lung tissues and 42.8% for serum samples. This molecular technique could be a reliable method for the quantification and the evaluation of the disease in animal models and for the clinical diagnosis of fusariosis.

  19. Energy and nutritional composition of Tiger milk mushroom (Lignosus tigris Chon S. Tan) sclerotia and the antioxidant activity of its extracts.

    PubMed

    Yap, Hui-Yeng Yeannie; Aziz, Azlina Abdul; Fung, Shin-Yee; Ng, Szu-Ting; Tan, Chon-Seng; Tan, Nget-Hong

    2014-01-01

    The Lignosus is a genus of fungi that have useful medicinal properties. In Southeast Asia, three species of Lignosus (locally known collectively as Tiger milk mushrooms) have been reported including L. tigris, L. rhinocerotis, and L. cameronensis. All three have been used as important medicinal mushrooms by the natives of Peninsular Malaysia. In this work, the nutritional composition and antioxidant activities of the wild type and a cultivated strain of L. tigris sclerotial extracts were investigated. The sclerotia are rich in carbohydrates with moderate amount of protein and low fat content. Free radical scavenging activities of L. tigris sclerotial extracts correlate with their phenolic content, which ranges from 6.25 to 45.42 mg GAE/g extract. The FRAP values ranged from 0.002 to 0.041 mmol/min/g extract, while the DPPH(•), ABTS(•+), and superoxide anion (SOA) scavenging activities ranged from 0.18 to 2.53, 0.01 to 0.36, and -4.53 to 10.05 mmol Trolox equivalents/g extract, respectively. L. tigris cultivar shows good prospect to be developed into functional food due to its good nutritional value and potent SOA scavenging activity. PMID:24782649

  20. Energy and Nutritional Composition of Tiger Milk Mushroom (Lignosus tigris Chon S. Tan) Sclerotia and the Antioxidant Activity of Its Extracts

    PubMed Central

    Yap, Hui-Yeng Yeannie; Aziz, Azlina Abdul; Fung, Shin-Yee; Ng, Szu-Ting; Tan, Chon-Seng; Tan, Nget-Hong

    2014-01-01

    The Lignosus is a genus of fungi that have useful medicinal properties. In Southeast Asia, three species of Lignosus (locally known collectively as Tiger milk mushrooms) have been reported including L. tigris, L. rhinocerotis, and L. cameronensis. All three have been used as important medicinal mushrooms by the natives of Peninsular Malaysia. In this work, the nutritional composition and antioxidant activities of the wild type and a cultivated strain of L. tigris sclerotial extracts were investigated. The sclerotia are rich in carbohydrates with moderate amount of protein and low fat content. Free radical scavenging activities of L. tigris sclerotial extracts correlate with their phenolic content, which ranges from 6.25 to 45.42 mg GAE/g extract. The FRAP values ranged from 0.002 to 0.041 mmol/min/g extract, while the DPPH•, ABTS•+, and superoxide anion (SOA) scavenging activities ranged from 0.18 to 2.53, 0.01 to 0.36, and -4.53 to 10.05 mmol Trolox equivalents/g extract, respectively. L. tigris cultivar shows good prospect to be developed into functional food due to its good nutritional value and potent SOA scavenging activity. PMID:24782649

  1. Tuberculina-Thanatophytum/Rhizoctonia crocorum-Helicobasidium: a unique mycoparasitic-phytoparasitic life strategy.

    PubMed

    Lutz, Matthias; Bauer, Robert; Begerow, Dominik; Oberwinkler, Franz

    2004-03-01

    Tuberculina species are mitosporic parasites of rust fungi. Phylogenetically they belong to the Urediniomycetidae, therefore being closely related to their rust fungal hosts. We reveal by means of molecular analyses, ultrastructural and morphological features, observations in the field, and infection experiments that species of the genus Tuberculina and the violet root rot (Helicobasidium/Rhizoctonia crocorum) are stages of the life-cycle of one holomorph. This opens up new perspectives on parasitic life strategies as the resulting life-cycle is based on interkingdom host jumping between rusts and spermatophytes. In addition, we point at the consequences for any practical application dealing with Helicobasidium as an economically important plant pathogen and Tuberculina as a biological agent in rust control.

  2. Characterization and taxonomic placement of Rhizoctonia-like endophytes from orchid roots.

    PubMed

    Shan, X C; Liew, E C Y; Weatherhead, M A; Hodgkiss, I J

    2002-01-01

    Twenty-one Rhizoctonia-like fungal strains were isolated from the roots of four terrestrial orchid species from various locations in Hong Kong. The cultural morphology, nuclear number of the hyphal cell, pore ultrastructure, and RAPD and CAPS analyses of rDNA fragments revealed that most of these isolates were associated with the genera Ceratorhiza and Epulorhiza. RAPD analysis showed the presence of genetic diversity between the isolates from different hosts and locations. The compatibility between a selection of these Ceratorhiza and Epulorhiza isolates and 14 orchid species was determined using a symbiotic germination method. The germination and development of three orchid species, Arundina chinensis, Spathoglottis pubescens, and Spiranthes hongkongensis, were strongly stimulated by the Epulorhiza isolates. Habenaria dentata was found to form symbionts successfully with a Ceratorhiza isolate.

  3. Synthesis of N-substituted phthalimides and their antifungal activity against Alternaria solani and Botrytis cinerea.

    PubMed

    Pan, Le; Li, Xiuzhuang; Gong, Chengwen; Jin, Hui; Qin, Bo

    2016-06-01

    As organosulfur and organophosphorus agents, phaltane and phosmet are facing great challenges for the environmental contamination, mammalian toxicity and increasing resistance with long term use. It is efficient and meaningful to develop phthalimide-based alternatives with non-sulfur and non-phosphorus groups. A series of N-substituted phthalimides were synthesized and their antifungal activity against two disastrous phytopathogenic fungi, Alternaria solani and Botrytis cinerea was evaluated in vitro. Most of them showed significant antifungal activity against both of fungi, or either of them selectively. N-vinylphthalimide (4) and 8-[4-(phthalimide-2-yl) butyloxy] quinoline (13) were identified as the most promising candidates against B. cinerea and A. solani with the IC50 values of 7.92 μg/mL and 10.85 μg/mL respectively. The brief structure-activity relationships have revealed that vinyl, quinolyl, bromide alkyl and benzyl substitutions were appropriate substituents and coupling functional moieties indirectly with optimum alkyl chain was efficient to prepare phthalimides related fungicides. PMID:27079471

  4. Antagonistic Activities of Novel Peptides from Bacillus amyloliquefaciens PT14 against Fusarium solani and Fusarium oxysporum.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young Gwon; Kang, Hee Kyoung; Kwon, Kee-Deok; Seo, Chang Ho; Lee, Hyang Burm; Park, Yoonkyung

    2015-12-01

    Bacillus species have recently drawn attention due to their potential use in the biological control of fungal diseases. This paper reports on the antifungal activity of novel peptides isolated from Bacillus amyloliquefaciens PT14. Reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography revealed that B. amyloliquefaciens PT14 produces five peptides (PT14-1, -2, -3, -4a, and -4b) that exhibit antifungal activity but are inactive against bacterial strains. In particular, PT14-3 and PT14-4a showed broad-spectrum antifungal activity against Fusarium solani and Fusarium oxysporum. The PT14-4a N-terminal amino acid sequence was identified through Edman degradation, and a BLAST homology analysis showed it not to be identical to any other protein or peptide. PT14-4a displayed strong fungicidal activity with minimal inhibitory concentrations of 3.12 mg/L (F. solani) and 6.25 mg/L (F. oxysporum), inducing severe morphological deformation in the conidia and hyphae. On the other hand, PT14-4a had no detectable hemolytic activity. This suggests PT14-4a has the potential to serve as an antifungal agent in clinical therapeutic and crop-protection applications.

  5. Rhizopus arrhizus and Fusarium solani Concomitant Infection in an Immunocompromised Host.

    PubMed

    de Almeida Júnior, João N; Ibrahim, Karim Y; Del Negro, Gilda M B; Bezerra, Evandro D; Duarte Neto, Amaro N; Batista, Marjorie V; Siciliano, Rinaldo F; Giudice, Mauro C; Motta, Adriana L; Rossi, Flávia; Pierrotti, Ligia C; Freire, Maristela P; Bellesso, Marcelo; Pereira, Juliana; Abdala, Edson; Benard, Gil

    2016-02-01

    Neutropenic patients are at risk of the development of hyalohyphomycosis and mucormycosis. Correct identification is essential for the initiation of the specific treatment, but concomitant mold infections are rarely reported. We report one unprecedented case of concomitant mucormycosis and fusariosis in a neutropenic patient with acute myeloid leukemia. The patient developed rhino-orbital infection by Rhizopus arrhizus and disseminated infection by Fusarium solani. The first culture from a sinus biopsy grew Rhizopus, which was consistent with the histopathology report of mucormycosis. A second sinus biopsy collected later during the patient's clinical deterioration was reported as hyalohyphomycosis, and the culture yielded F. solani. Due to the discordant reports, the second biopsy was reviewed and two hyphae types suggestive of both hyalohyphomycetes and mucormycetes were found. The dual mold infection was confirmed by PCR assays from paraffinized tissue sections. Increased awareness of the existence of dual mold infections in at-risk patients is necessary. PCR methods in tissue sections may increase the diagnosis of dual mold infections. In case of sequential biopsies showing discrepant results, mixed infections have to be suspected.

  6. Wide variation in virulence and genetic diversity of binucleate Rhizoctonia isolates associated with root rot of strawberry in Western Australia.

    PubMed

    Fang, Xiangling; Finnegan, Patrick M; Barbetti, Martin J

    2013-01-01

    Strawberry (Fragaria×ananassa) is one of the most important berry crops in the world. Root rot of strawberry caused by Rhizoctonia spp. is a serious threat to commercial strawberry production worldwide. However, there is no information on the genetic diversity and phylogenetic status of Rhizoctonia spp. associated with root rot of strawberry in Australia. To address this, a total of 96 Rhizoctonia spp. isolates recovered from diseased strawberry plants in Western Australia were characterized for their nuclear condition, virulence, genetic diversity and phylogenetic status. All the isolates were found to be binucleate Rhizoctonia (BNR). Sixty-five of the 96 BNR isolates were pathogenic on strawberry, but with wide variation in virulence, with 25 isolates having high virulence. Sequence analysis of the internal transcribed spacers of the ribosomal DNA separated the 65 pathogenic BNR isolates into six distinct clades. The sequence analysis also separated reference BNR isolates from strawberry or other crops across the world into clades that correspond to their respective anastomosis group (AG). Some of the pathogenic BNR isolates from this study were embedded in the clades for AG-A, AG-K and AG-I, while other isolates formed clades that were sister to the clades specific for AG-G, AG-B, AG-I and AG-C. There was no significant association between genetic diversity and virulence of these BNR isolates. This study demonstrates that pathogenic BNR isolates associated with root rot of strawberry in Western Australia have wide genetic diversity, and highlights new genetic groups not previously found to be associated with root rot of strawberry in the world (e.g., AG-B) or in Australia (e.g., AG-G). The wide variation in virulence and genetic diversity identified in this study will be of high value for strawberry breeding programs in selecting, developing and deploying new cultivars with resistance to these multi-genetic groups of BNR. PMID:23405226

  7. Wide variation in virulence and genetic diversity of binucleate Rhizoctonia isolates associated with root rot of strawberry in Western Australia.

    PubMed

    Fang, Xiangling; Finnegan, Patrick M; Barbetti, Martin J

    2013-01-01

    Strawberry (Fragaria×ananassa) is one of the most important berry crops in the world. Root rot of strawberry caused by Rhizoctonia spp. is a serious threat to commercial strawberry production worldwide. However, there is no information on the genetic diversity and phylogenetic status of Rhizoctonia spp. associated with root rot of strawberry in Australia. To address this, a total of 96 Rhizoctonia spp. isolates recovered from diseased strawberry plants in Western Australia were characterized for their nuclear condition, virulence, genetic diversity and phylogenetic status. All the isolates were found to be binucleate Rhizoctonia (BNR). Sixty-five of the 96 BNR isolates were pathogenic on strawberry, but with wide variation in virulence, with 25 isolates having high virulence. Sequence analysis of the internal transcribed spacers of the ribosomal DNA separated the 65 pathogenic BNR isolates into six distinct clades. The sequence analysis also separated reference BNR isolates from strawberry or other crops across the world into clades that correspond to their respective anastomosis group (AG). Some of the pathogenic BNR isolates from this study were embedded in the clades for AG-A, AG-K and AG-I, while other isolates formed clades that were sister to the clades specific for AG-G, AG-B, AG-I and AG-C. There was no significant association between genetic diversity and virulence of these BNR isolates. This study demonstrates that pathogenic BNR isolates associated with root rot of strawberry in Western Australia have wide genetic diversity, and highlights new genetic groups not previously found to be associated with root rot of strawberry in the world (e.g., AG-B) or in Australia (e.g., AG-G). The wide variation in virulence and genetic diversity identified in this study will be of high value for strawberry breeding programs in selecting, developing and deploying new cultivars with resistance to these multi-genetic groups of BNR.

  8. Influence of sub-lethal antioxidant doses, water potential and temperature on growth, sclerotia, aflatoxins and aflD (=nor-1) expression by Aspergillus flavus RCP08108.

    PubMed

    Passone, María Alejandra; Rosso, Laura Cristina; Etcheverry, Miriam

    2012-09-01

    Effects of interacting conditions of sub-lethal levels of antioxidants, water potential (Ψ) and temperature were evaluated on growth, sclerotial characteristics, aflatoxin B(1) (AFB(1)) production and aflD (=nor-1) gene expression by Aspergillus flavus strain RCP08108. These studies were carried out on peanut meal extract agar osmotically modified to -2.8,-7.1, -9.9 and -16.0 MPa and incubated at 28 and 20°C. The food grade antioxidants added were butylated hydroxyanisole (BHA) and butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT) at (1+1 mM-M1) and (5+5 mM-M2). To relate the aflD expression after toxigenic A. flavus grew under interacting stress conditions, real-time PCR was used. Antioxidant mixtures caused a higher and significant (p<0.001) reduction in growth rate. The major impact on size and volume sclerotia was produced by Ψ; followed by antioxidant mixtures. High AFB(1) levels were observed in response to the M1 applied at -7.1 MPa. Induction of the aflD gene was observed in response to the M1 treatment at -2.8, -7.1 and -9.9 MPa; but significant decreases of AFB(1) production and aflD transcripts were observed; when the fungus grew in the presence of the M2 treatment. These results showed that it is necessary to apply food-grade antioxidants into the peanut storage system at levels higher than 5 mM. This is an important tool to avoid sub-lethal antioxidant doses that can lead to fungal growth, increase resistance structures, and stimulate aflD gene expression and AFB(1) accumulation in this substrate.

  9. Nonhost-specific phytotoxicity of the polyketide-derived toxin solanapyrone A produced by Ascochyta rabiei and Alternaria solani

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Solanapyrone A is a polyketide-derived metabolite produced by Ascochyta rabiei and Alternaria solani, which are the most destructive necrotrophic pathogens of chickpea and potato/tomato, respectively. They belong to the Order Pleosporales within the Class Dothideomycetes, but are phylogenetically di...

  10. Molecular characterization and detection of mutations associated with resistance to succinate dehydrogenase inhibiting (SDHI) fungicides in Alternaria solani

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Early blight, caused by Alternaria solani, is an economically important foliar disease of potato in several production areas of the United States. Few potato cultivars possess resistance to early blight, therefore, the application of fungicides is a primary means of achieving disease control. Previo...

  11. Antifungal efficiency of a lipopeptide biosurfactant derived from Bacillus subtilis SPB1 versus the phytopathogenic fungus, Fusarium solani.

    PubMed

    Mnif, Ines; Hammami, Ines; Triki, Mohamed Ali; Azabou, Manel Cheffi; Ellouze-Chaabouni, Semia; Ghribi, Dhouha

    2015-11-01

    Bacillus subtilis SPB1 lipopeptides were evaluated as a natural antifungal agent against Fusarium solani infestation. In vitro antifungal assay showed a minimal inhibitory concentration of about 3 mg/ml with a fungicidal mode of action. In fact, treatment of F. solani by SPB1 lipopeptides generated excessive lyses of the mycelium and caused polynucleation and destruction of the related spores together with a total inhibition of spore production. Furthermore, an inhibition of germination potency accompanied with a high spore blowing was observed. Moreover, in order to be applied in agricultural field, in vivo antifungal activity was proved against the dry rot potato tubers caused by F. solani. Preventive treatment appeared as the most promising as after 20 days of fungi inoculation, rot invasion was reduced by almost 78%, in comparison to that of non-treated one. When treating infected tomato plants, disease symptoms were reduced by almost 100% when applying the curative method. Results of this study are very promising as it enables the use of the crude lipopeptide preparation of B. subtilis SPB1 as a potent natural fungicide that could effectively control the infection of F. solani in tomato and potato tubers at a concentration similar to the commercial fungicide hymexazol and therefore prevent the damage of olive tree. PMID:26178831

  12. Morphological and molecular characterization of Fusarium. solani and F. oxysporum associated with crown disease of oil palm.

    PubMed

    Hafizi, R; Salleh, B; Latiffah, Z

    2013-01-01

    Crown disease (CD) is infecting oil palm in the early stages of the crop development. Previous studies showed that Fusarium species were commonly associated with CD. However, the identity of the species has not been resolved. This study was carried out to identify and characterize through morphological approaches and to determine the genetic diversity of the Fusarium species. 51 isolates (39%) of Fusarium solani and 40 isolates (31%) of Fusarium oxysporum were recovered from oil palm with typical CD symptoms collected from nine states in Malaysia, together with samples from Padang and Medan, Indonesia. Based on morphological characteristics, isolates in both Fusarium species were classified into two distinct morphotypes; Morphotypes I and II. Molecular characterization based on IGS-RFLP analysis produced 27 haplotypes among the F. solani isolates and 33 haplotypes for F. oxysporum isolates, which indicated high levels of intraspecific variations. From UPGMA cluster analysis, the isolates in both Fusarium species were divided into two main clusters with the percentage of similarity from 87% to 100% for F. solani, and 89% to 100% for F. oxysporum isolates, which was in accordance with the Morphotypes I and II. The results of the present study indicated that F. solani and F. oxysporum associated with CD of oil palm in Malaysia and Indonesia were highly variable.

  13. Recurrent Colonization of Successively Implanted Tracheoesophageal Vocal Prostheses by a Member of the Fusarium solani Species Complex

    PubMed Central

    Honraet, K.; De Vos, M. M.; Summerbell, R. C.; van Kempen, I.; De Saeger, S.; Vermeersch, H.; Van Peteghem, C.; Nelis, H. J.

    2005-01-01

    Tracheoesophageal vocal prostheses (TVP) in laryngectomized patients commonly deteriorate due to overgrowth by yeasts, particularly Candida species. We describe the first case of colonization of such devices by a member of the Fusarium solani species complex in a patient with a history of glottal carcinoma. Three isolates, from three prostheses, were found morphologically consistent with the traditional picture of F. solani. Ribosomal sequence analysis showed that the isolates belonged to a distinct, as yet apparently unnamed phylogenetic species within the F. solani species complex. This species, one of two distinct genetic types (genotype 2) traditionally considered part of the plant-pathogenic subtaxon Fusarium solani f. sp. radicicola, has not previously been identified as an agent of human or animal disease, although it is closely related to a known etiologic agent of mycetoma, an Acremonium-like species recently renamed Fusarium falciforme. Sequence and multisatellite M13 polymorphism analysis revealed no distinctions among the case isolates. Production of cyclosporine was detected for all three case isolates. PMID:15695678

  14. Discovery of Fusarium solani as a naturally occurring pathogen of sugarbeet root maggot (Diptera: Ulidiidae) pupae: prevalence and baseline susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Majumdar, Ayanava; Boetel, Mark A; Jaronski, Stefan T

    2008-01-01

    The fungus Fusarium solani (Mart.) Sacc. was discovered as a native entomopathogen of the sugarbeet root maggot, Tetanops myopaeformis (Röder), in the Red River Valley of North Dakota during the 2004 sugarbeet production season. This is the first report of a native pathogen affecting the pupal stage of T. myopaeformis. Forty-four percent of larvae collected from a field site near St. Thomas (Pembina Co.) in northeastern North Dakota during May and June of 2004 were infected with the entomopathogen. The mean LC(50) of F. solani, assessed by multiple-dose bioassays with laboratory-reared pupae, was 1.8x10(6)conidia/ml. After isolation and confirmation of pathogenicity, a pure isolate of the fungus was deposited in the ARS Entomopathogenic Fungal Collection (ARSEF, Ithaca, NY) as ARSEF 7382. Symptoms of F. solani infection included rapid pupal tissue atrophy and failure of adults to emerge. Transverse dissections of infected pupae revealed dense hyphal growth inside puparia, thus suggesting fungal penetration and pathogenicity. Mycelia emerged from pupae after host tissues were depleted. Exposure of older pupae to lethal concentrations caused rapid mortality of developing adults inside puparia. A second, more extensive field survey was conducted during the 2005 cropping season, and F. solani infection was observed in root maggots at most locations, although at lower levels (1-10%) of prevalence than in 2004. Aberrant timing or amounts of rainfall received could have caused asynchrony between pathogen and host during the second year of the experiment. PMID:17662996

  15. Morphological and molecular characterization of Fusarium. solani and F. oxysporum associated with crown disease of oil palm.

    PubMed

    Hafizi, R; Salleh, B; Latiffah, Z

    2013-01-01

    Crown disease (CD) is infecting oil palm in the early stages of the crop development. Previous studies showed that Fusarium species were commonly associated with CD. However, the identity of the species has not been resolved. This study was carried out to identify and characterize through morphological approaches and to determine the genetic diversity of the Fusarium species. 51 isolates (39%) of Fusarium solani and 40 isolates (31%) of Fusarium oxysporum were recovered from oil palm with typical CD symptoms collected from nine states in Malaysia, together with samples from Padang and Medan, Indonesia. Based on morphological characteristics, isolates in both Fusarium species were classified into two distinct morphotypes; Morphotypes I and II. Molecular characterization based on IGS-RFLP analysis produced 27 haplotypes among the F. solani isolates and 33 haplotypes for F. oxysporum isolates, which indicated high levels of intraspecific variations. From UPGMA cluster analysis, the isolates in both Fusarium species were divided into two main clusters with the percentage of similarity from 87% to 100% for F. solani, and 89% to 100% for F. oxysporum isolates, which was in accordance with the Morphotypes I and II. The results of the present study indicated that F. solani and F. oxysporum associated with CD of oil palm in Malaysia and Indonesia were highly variable. PMID:24516465

  16. Phytotoxin solanapyrone A produced by Ascochyta rabiei and Alternaria solani is nonessential for pathogenicity, but likely plays ecological roles

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ascochyta rabiei and Alternaria solani, causal agents of chickpea and potato blights respectively, produce the same phytotoxin solanapyrone A (SolA).The toxicity of SolA to plants has been documented, but its role in pathogenicity has not been investigated. In this study, we generated solanapyrone-d...

  17. Evaluation of the in vitro antimicrobial properties of ultraviolet A/riboflavin mediated crosslinking on Candida albicans and Fusarium solani

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Bing; Li, Zhi-Wei; Yu, Hai-Qun; Tao, Xiang-Chen; Zhang, Yong; Mu, Guo-Ying

    2014-01-01

    AIM To evaluate the antimicrobial properties of ultraviolet A (UVA) (365 nm)/riboflavin against Candida albicans and Fusarium solani. METHODS Two fungus isolates were cultured in vitro and prepared with 10-fold serial PBS dilutions of cell concentration. For each dilution of fungus suspension, the concentration (colony-forming units/mL, CFU/mL) and the inactivation ratio of fungal cells were evaluated under 4 conditions: no treatment (control), UVA (365 nm)/riboflavin, riboflavin, and UVA (365 nm). RESULTS The cell concentration decreased in UVA (365 nm)/riboflavin group for Candida albicans at each dilution and Fusarium solani at dilutions of 104, 103, 102 CFU/mL, when compared with that in control, riboflavin, and UVA (365 nm) groups (P<0.01). No difference of cell concentration was detected amongst the culture of control, riboflavin, and UVA (365 nm) groups for the two fungus. There is a negative correlation between suspension concentration (log-transformed) and the inactivation ratio in UVA (365 nm)/riboflavin group for Candida albicans and Fusarium solani (P<0.01). CONCLUSION According to the standard protocol of corneal collagen cross-linking, UVA (365 nm)/riboflavin combination treatment is found to moderately inactivate the viability of Candida albicans and Fusarium solani in vitro. The inactivation ratio was found to increase with the decrease of cell concentration under UVA (365 nm)/riboflavin condition. PMID:24790859

  18. Antifungal efficiency of a lipopeptide biosurfactant derived from Bacillus subtilis SPB1 versus the phytopathogenic fungus, Fusarium solani.

    PubMed

    Mnif, Ines; Hammami, Ines; Triki, Mohamed Ali; Azabou, Manel Cheffi; Ellouze-Chaabouni, Semia; Ghribi, Dhouha

    2015-11-01

    Bacillus subtilis SPB1 lipopeptides were evaluated as a natural antifungal agent against Fusarium solani infestation. In vitro antifungal assay showed a minimal inhibitory concentration of about 3 mg/ml with a fungicidal mode of action. In fact, treatment of F. solani by SPB1 lipopeptides generated excessive lyses of the mycelium and caused polynucleation and destruction of the related spores together with a total inhibition of spore production. Furthermore, an inhibition of germination potency accompanied with a high spore blowing was observed. Moreover, in order to be applied in agricultural field, in vivo antifungal activity was proved against the dry rot potato tubers caused by F. solani. Preventive treatment appeared as the most promising as after 20 days of fungi inoculation, rot invasion was reduced by almost 78%, in comparison to that of non-treated one. When treating infected tomato plants, disease symptoms were reduced by almost 100% when applying the curative method. Results of this study are very promising as it enables the use of the crude lipopeptide preparation of B. subtilis SPB1 as a potent natural fungicide that could effectively control the infection of F. solani in tomato and potato tubers at a concentration similar to the commercial fungicide hymexazol and therefore prevent the damage of olive tree.

  19. Interactions Between the Soybean Cyst Nematode and Fusarium solani f. sp. glycines Based on Greenhouse Factorial Experiments.

    PubMed

    Gao, X; Jackson, T A; Hartman, G L; Niblack, T L

    2006-12-01

    ABSTRACT The soybean cyst nematode, Heterodera glycines, and the fungus that causes sudden death syndrome (SDS) of soybean, Fusarium solani f. sp. glycines, frequently co-infest soybean (Glycine max) fields. The interactions between H. glycines and F. solani f. sp. glycines were investigated in factorial greenhouse experiments with different inoculum levels of both organisms on a soybean cultivar susceptible to both pathogens. Measured responses included root and shoot dry weights, H. glycines reproduction, area under the SDS disease progress curve, and fungal colonization of roots. Both H. glycines and F. solani f. sp. glycines reduced the growth of soybeans. Reproduction of H. glycines was suppressed by high inoculum levels but not by low levels of F. solani f. sp. glycines. The infection of soybean roots by H. glycines did not affect root colonization by the fungus, as determined by real-time polymerase chain reaction. Although both pathogens reduced the growth of soybeans, H. glycines did not increase SDS foliar symptoms, and statistical interactions between the two pathogens were seldom significant. PMID:18943675

  20. Degradation of /sup 14/C-labeled lignins and /sup 14/C-labeled aromatic acids by fusarium solani

    SciTech Connect

    Norris, D.M.

    1980-08-01

    Abilities of isolate AF-W1 of Fusarium solani to degrade the side chain and the ring structure of synthetic dehydrogenative polymerizates, aromatic acids, or lignin in sound wood were investigated under several conditions of growth substrate or basal medium and pH. Significant transformations of lignins occurred in 50 days in both unextracted and extracted sound wood substrances with 3% malt as the growth substrate and the pH buffered initially at 4.0 with 2,2-dimethylsuccinate. Degradation of lignin in such woods also occurred under unbuffered pH conditions when a basal medium of either 3% malt or powdered cellulose in deionized water was present. Decomposition of the lignin in these woods did not occur in cultures where D-glucose was present as a growth substrate. F. solani significantly transformed, as measured as evolved /sup 14/CO/sub 2/, both synthetic side chain (beta, gamma)-/sup 14/C- and U-ring-/sup 14/C-labeled lignins in 30 days under liquid culture conditions of only distilled deionized water and no pH adjustment. Degradation of dehydrogenative polymerizates by F. solani was reduced drastically when D2 was the liquid medium. AF-W1 also cleaved the alpha-/sup 14/C from p- hydroxybenzoic acid and evolved /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ from the substrace, (3-/sup 14/C) cinnamic acid. Thus, the fungus cleaved side chain carbon from substrate that originally lacked hydroxyl substitution on the aromatic nucleus. Surprisingly, small amounts of /sup 14/C cleaved from aromatic acids by F. solani were incorporated into cell mass. Initial buffering of the culture medium to pH 4.0 or 5.0 with 0.1 M2,2-dimethylsuccinate significantly increased F. solani degradation of all lignins or aromatic acids. Results indicated that AF-W1 used lignin as a sole carbon source.

  1. Melanins and resistance of fungi to lysis.

    PubMed

    Bloomfield, B J; Alexander, M

    1967-04-01

    Hyphal walls of Aspergillus phoenicis and Sclerotium rolfsii are composed of large amounts of glucose- and N-acetylhexosamine-containing polysaccharides, and the walls are extensively digested by streptomycete culture filtrates or by a mixture of purified chitinase and beta-(1 --> 3) glucanase preparations with the release of the monomeric units. A. phoenicis conidial walls also contain polymers of glucose and N-acetylhexosamine, but these walls are resistant to digestion by microorganisms or the enzyme combination active on the hyphae. When the melanin-containing spicules were removed from the spore surface, however, the chitinase and glucanase partially digested the underlying structural components. Microorganisms decomposing hyphal walls of S. rolfsii did not attack the melanin-covered sclerotia produced by this fungus. No microorganism capable of lysing two fungi, Rhizoctonia solani and Cladosporium sp., producing hyphae containing abundant melanin was found. The ecological significance of these findings and possible mechanisms for the protective influence associated with melanins are discussed.

  2. The thermal stability of the Fusarium solani pisi cutinase as a function of pH

    PubMed Central

    2001-01-01

    We have investigated the thermal stability of the Fusarium solani pisi cutinase as a function of pH, in the range from pH 2–12. Its highest enzymatic activity coincides with the pH-range at which it displays its highest thermal stability. The unfolding of the enzyme as a function of pH was investigated by microcalorimetry. The ratio between the calorimetric enthalpy (ΔHcal) and the van't Hoff enthalpy (ΔHv) obtained, is far from unity, indicating that cutinase does not exhibit a simple two state unfolding behaviour. The role of pH on the electrostatic contribution to the thermal stability was assessed using TITRA. We propose a molecular interpretation for the pH-variation in enzymatic activity. PMID:12488611

  3. [Bilateral proximal cellulitis and onychomycosis in both big toes due to Fusarium solani].

    PubMed

    Torres-Rodríguez, Josep M; Sellart-Altisent, Maite

    2006-12-01

    We report a case of proximal fold cellulitis in both big toes, associated with a bilateral proximal onychomycosis and an intertrigo of the fourth space due to Fusarium solani. The infection occurred in an immunocompetent man with diabetes mellitus type II. Apparently, the infection was acquired in a tropical country and once the patient was in Spain the infection progressed causing nail detachment (onychomadesis). Seven months later a relapse that affected the left toenail occurred. The patient was treated topically with chemical toenail avulsion contained 40% urea associated with bifonazole followed by ciclopirox-olamine nail lacquer for 12 months. Complete cure without relapse was observed after 10 years of follow-up. In vitro antifungal susceptibility study demonstrated that two of the recovered isolates were both resistant to itraconazole and voriconazole.

  4. Optimization of culture conditions of Fusarium solani for the production of neoN-methylsansalvamide.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hee-Seok; Phat, Chanvorleak; Nam, Woo-Seon; Lee, Chan

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to optimize the culture conditions of Fusarium solani KCCM90040 on cereal grain for the production of neoN-methylsansalvamide, a novel low-molecular-weight cyclic pentadepsipeptide exhibiting cytotoxic and multidrug resistance reversal effects. From the analysis of variance results using response surface methodology, temperature, initial moisture content, and growth time were shown to be important parameters for the production of neoN-methylsansalvamide on cereal grain. A model was established in the present study to describe the relationship between environmental conditions and the production of neoN-methylsansalvamide on rice, the selected cereal grain. The optimal culture conditions were determined at 25.79 °C with the initial moisture content of 40.79%, and 16.19 days of growth time. This report will give important information concerning the optimization of environmental conditions using statistic methodology for the production of a new cyclic pentadepsipeptide from fungi.

  5. Pathogenic effects of Fusarium sulphureum, Fusarium solani Var. coeruleum and dry rot affected potatoes on the internal organs of rats.

    PubMed

    Rotkiewicz, T; Szarek, J; Tarkowian, S

    1993-01-01

    Rats of the Wistar race were used in toxicological experiments involving Fusarium sulphureum Schl., F. solani var. coeruleum (Sacc.) Booth and potatoes damaged by these fungi. The in vivo and postmortem studies revealed that both fungi and effected tubers had hepatotoxic and nephrotoxic effects on the animals. Morphological changes in the internal organs were mainly manifested by disturbances in blood circulation and regressive metamorphosis. These changes intensified proportionally to the dose of fungi and diseased potatoes in the feed used. Fusarium solani was more pathogenic than F. sulphureum. No teratogenic effect was observed, although addition of the fungi and infested potatoes into the feeds decreased the reproductive ability of rats and caused a decrease in foetal body weight as well as haematomae in foetuses.

  6. The role of chitosan in protection of soybean from sudden death syndrome caused by Fusarium solani f. sp. glycines.

    PubMed

    Prapagdee, Benjaphorn; Kotchadat, Kanignun; Kumsopa, Acharaporn; Visarathanonth, Niphon

    2007-05-01

    The in vitro antifungal properties of chitosan and its role in protection of soybean from a sudden death syndrome (SDS) were evaluated. Chitosan inhibited the radial and submerged growth of F. solani f. sp. glycines with a marked effect at concentrations up to 1mg/ml indicating antifungal property and at 3mg/ml was able to delay SDS symptoms expression on soybean leaves for over three days after fungal inoculation when applied preventively. Chitosan was able to induce the level of chitinase activity in soybean resulting in the retardation of SDS development in soybean leaves. However, the SDS symptoms gradually appeared and were associated with the reduction of chitinase activity level after five days of infection period. These results suggested the role of chitosan in partially protecting soybeans from F. solani f. sp. glycines infection. PMID:16828285

  7. Antifungal activity of Bacillus sp. isolated from compost.

    PubMed

    Czaczyk, K; Stachowiak, B; Trojanowska, K; Gulewicz, K

    2000-01-01

    Four strains of Bacillus isolated from lupine compost exhibited an antifungal activity against six plant fungal pathogens (Rhizoctonia solani, Bipolaris sorokiniana, Sclerotinia sclerotiorum, Trichothecium roseum, Fusarium solani, Fusarium oxysporum). It was significantly influenced by the composition of the cultivation media.

  8. Production, partial purification and characterization of protease from a phytopathogenic fungi Alternaria solani (Ell. and Mart.) Sorauer.

    PubMed

    Chandrasekaran, Murugesan; Sathiyabama, Muthukrishnan

    2014-08-01

    An alkaline serine protease producing strain Alternaria solani was optimized for its enzyme production under submerged conditions. The maximum production of protease by A. solani was achieved by using sodium nitrate at the optimum concentration of 0.2% w/v. A. solani produced higher quantities (3.75 [unit/mg of protein]) of an inducible extracellular proteases on day 9 after incubation in czapek's dox broth medium amended with 1% casein as an inducer at pH 8.5, temperature 27 °C and 3% sucrose as carbon source. Extracellular proteases were precipitated by ammonium sulphate saturation (80%) method and purified on Sephadex G-100 column chromatography. The molecular mass of SDS-PAGE and Sephadex G-100 Column Gel permeation chromatography purified protease was estimated to 42 kDa. In addition, trypsin digestion of 42 kDa protein band was carried out and analyzed by MALDI-TOF for the identification of protease. The sequence IKELATNGVVTNVK (378-391) segment of the alkaline serine protease was found by using MS/MS spectrum at 1485 m/z from the purified fraction. It showed optimal activity at 50 °C and pH 9-10 and broad pH stability between pH 6-12. The protease activity was inhibited by phenyl methyl sulfonyl fluoride (PMSF), all the results indicated that the presence of a serine residue in the active site and is thus most likely a member of the serine protease family. This may function as a virulence protein during pathogenesis by A. solani. The results suggested that the presence of appreciable extracellular proteolytic activity in filamentous fungi may serve as a marker of their phytopathogenicity.

  9. Ag doped hollow TiO2 nanoparticles as an effective green fungicide against Fusarium solani and Venturia inaequalis phytopathogens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sankar Boxi, Siddhartha; Mukherjee, Khushi; Paria, Santanu

    2016-02-01

    Chemical-based pesticides are widely used in agriculture to protect crops from insect infestation and diseases. However, the excessive use of highly toxic pesticides causes several human health (neurological, tumor, cancer) and environmental problems. Therefore nanoparticle-based green pesticides have become of special importance in recent years. The antifungal activities of pure and Ag doped (solid and hollow) TiO2 nanoparticles are studied against two potent phytopathogens, Fusarium solani (which causes Fusarium wilt disease in potato, tomato, etc) and Venturia inaequalis (which causes apple scab disease) and it is found that hollow nanoparticles are more effective than the other two. The antifungal activities of the nanoparticles were further enhanced against these two phytopathogens under visible light exposure. The fungicidal effect of the nanoparticles depends on different parameters, such as particle concentration and the intensity of visible light. The minimum inhibitory dose of the nanoparticles for V. inaequalis and F. solani are 0.75 and 0.43 mg/plate. The presence of Ag as a dopant helps in the formation of stable Ag-S and disulfide bonds (R-S-S-R) in cellular protein, which leads to cell damage. During photocatalysis generated •OH radicals loosen the cell wall structure and this finally leads to cell death. The mechanisms of the fungicidal effect of nanoparticles against these two phytopathogens are supported by biuret and triphenyl tetrazolium chloride analyses and field emission electron microscopy. Apart from the fungicidal effect, at a very low dose (0.015 mg/plate) the nanoparticles are successful in arresting production of toxic napthoquinone pigment for F. solani which is related to the fungal pathogenecity. The nanoparticles are found to be effective in protecting potatoes affected by F. solani or other fungi from spoiling.

  10. Ag doped hollow TiO2 nanoparticles as an effective green fungicide against Fusarium solani and Venturia inaequalis phytopathogens.

    PubMed

    Boxi, Siddhartha Sankar; Mukherjee, Khushi; Paria, Santanu

    2016-02-26

    Chemical-based pesticides are widely used in agriculture to protect crops from insect infestation and diseases. However, the excessive use of highly toxic pesticides causes several human health (neurological, tumor, cancer) and environmental problems. Therefore nanoparticle-based green pesticides have become of special importance in recent years. The antifungal activities of pure and Ag doped (solid and hollow) TiO2 nanoparticles are studied against two potent phytopathogens, Fusarium solani (which causes Fusarium wilt disease in potato, tomato, etc) and Venturia inaequalis (which causes apple scab disease) and it is found that hollow nanoparticles are more effective than the other two. The antifungal activities of the nanoparticles were further enhanced against these two phytopathogens under visible light exposure. The fungicidal effect of the nanoparticles depends on different parameters, such as particle concentration and the intensity of visible light. The minimum inhibitory dose of the nanoparticles for V. inaequalis and F. solani are 0.75 and 0.43 mg/plate. The presence of Ag as a dopant helps in the formation of stable Ag-S and disulfide bonds (R-S-S-R) in cellular protein, which leads to cell damage. During photocatalysis generated (•)OH radicals loosen the cell wall structure and this finally leads to cell death. The mechanisms of the fungicidal effect of nanoparticles against these two phytopathogens are supported by biuret and triphenyl tetrazolium chloride analyses and field emission electron microscopy. Apart from the fungicidal effect, at a very low dose (0.015 mg/plate) the nanoparticles are successful in arresting production of toxic napthoquinone pigment for F. solani which is related to the fungal pathogenecity. The nanoparticles are found to be effective in protecting potatoes affected by F. solani or other fungi from spoiling. PMID:26808118

  11. Ag doped hollow TiO2 nanoparticles as an effective green fungicide against Fusarium solani and Venturia inaequalis phytopathogens.

    PubMed

    Boxi, Siddhartha Sankar; Mukherjee, Khushi; Paria, Santanu

    2016-02-26

    Chemical-based pesticides are widely used in agriculture to protect crops from insect infestation and diseases. However, the excessive use of highly toxic pesticides causes several human health (neurological, tumor, cancer) and environmental problems. Therefore nanoparticle-based green pesticides have become of special importance in recent years. The antifungal activities of pure and Ag doped (solid and hollow) TiO2 nanoparticles are studied against two potent phytopathogens, Fusarium solani (which causes Fusarium wilt disease in potato, tomato, etc) and Venturia inaequalis (which causes apple scab disease) and it is found that hollow nanoparticles are more effective than the other two. The antifungal activities of the nanoparticles were further enhanced against these two phytopathogens under visible light exposure. The fungicidal effect of the nanoparticles depends on different parameters, such as particle concentration and the intensity of visible light. The minimum inhibitory dose of the nanoparticles for V. inaequalis and F. solani are 0.75 and 0.43 mg/plate. The presence of Ag as a dopant helps in the formation of stable Ag-S and disulfide bonds (R-S-S-R) in cellular protein, which leads to cell damage. During photocatalysis generated (•)OH radicals loosen the cell wall structure and this finally leads to cell death. The mechanisms of the fungicidal effect of nanoparticles against these two phytopathogens are supported by biuret and triphenyl tetrazolium chloride analyses and field emission electron microscopy. Apart from the fungicidal effect, at a very low dose (0.015 mg/plate) the nanoparticles are successful in arresting production of toxic napthoquinone pigment for F. solani which is related to the fungal pathogenecity. The nanoparticles are found to be effective in protecting potatoes affected by F. solani or other fungi from spoiling.

  12. Production of lignocellulose-degrading enzymes employing Fusarium solani F-552.

    PubMed

    Obruca, Stanislav; Marova, Ivana; Matouskova, Petra; Haronikova, Andrea; Lichnova, Andrea

    2012-05-01

    In this work, capability of Fusarium solani F-552 of producing lignocellulose-degrading enzymes in submerged fermentation was investigated. The enzyme cocktail includes hydrolases (cellulases, xylanases, and proteinases) as well as ligninolytic enzymes: manganese-dependent peroxidase (MnP), lignin peroxidase (LiP), and laccase (Lac). To our knowledge, this is the first report on production of MnP, LiP, and Lac together by one F. solani strain. The enzyme productions were significantly influenced by application of either lignocellulosic material or chemical inducers into the fermentation medium. Among them, corn bran significantly enhanced especially productions of cellulases and xylanases (248 and 170 U/mL, respectively) as compared to control culture (11.7 and 29.2 U/mL, respectively). High MnP activity (9.43 U/mL, control 0.45 U/mL) was observed when (+)-catechin was applied into the medium, the yield of LiP was maximal (33.06 U/mL, control 2.69 U/mL) in gallic acid, and Lac was efficiently induced by, 2,2'-azino-bis-[3-ethyltiazoline-6-sulfonate] (6.74 U/mL, not detected in control). Finally, in order to maximize the ligninolytic enzymes yields, a novel strategy of introduction of mild oxidative stress conditions caused by hydrogen peroxide into the fermentation broth was tested. Hydrogen peroxide significantly increased activities of MnP, LiP, and Lac which may indicate that these enzymes could be partially involved in stress response against H(2)O(2). The concentration of H(2)O(2) and the time of the stress application were optimized; hence, when 10 mmol/L H(2)O(2) was applied at the second and sixth day of cultivation, the MnP, LiP, and Lac yields reached 21.67, 77.42, and 12.04 U/mL, respectively.

  13. Blackpatch of Clover, Cause of Slobbers Syndrome: A Review of the Disease and the Pathogen, Rhizoctonia leguminicola

    PubMed Central

    Kagan, Isabelle A.

    2016-01-01

    Rhizoctonia leguminicola Gough and Elliott is a widely used name for the causal agent of blackpatch disease of red clover (Trifolium pratense L.). This fungal pathogen produces alkaloids (slaframine and swainsonine) that affect grazing mammals. Slaframine causes livestock to salivate profusely, and swainsonine causes neurological problems. Although the blackpatch fungus was classified as a Rhizoctonia species (phylum Basidiomycota), morphological studies have indicated that it is in the phylum Ascomycota, and sequencing data have indicated that it may be a new genus of ascomycete. The effects of the alkaloids on grazing mammals and their biosynthetic pathways have been extensively studied. In contrast, few studies have been done on management of the disease, which requires a greater understanding of the pathogen. Methods of disease management have included seed treatments and fungicides, but these have not been investigated since the 1950s. Searches for resistant cultivars have been limited. This review summarizes the biological effects and biosynthetic precursors of slaframine and swainsonine. Emphasis is placed on current knowledge about the epidemiology of blackpatch disease and the ecology and taxonomy of the pathogen. Possibilities for future research and disease management efforts are suggested. PMID:26858953

  14. Molecular characterization and detection of mutations associated with resistance to succinate dehydrogenase-inhibiting fungicides in Alternaria solani.

    PubMed

    Mallik, I; Arabiat, S; Pasche, J S; Bolton, M D; Patel, J S; Gudmestad, N C

    2014-01-01

    Early blight, caused by Alternaria solani, is an economically important foliar disease of potato in several production areas of the United States. Few potato cultivars possess resistance to early blight; therefore, the application of fungicides is the primary means of achieving disease control. Previous work in our laboratory reported resistance to the succinate dehydrogenase-inhibiting (SDHI) fungicide boscalid in this plant pathogen with a concomitant loss of disease control. Two phenotypes were detected, one in which A. solani isolates were moderately resistant to boscalid, the other in which isolates were highly resistant to the fungicide. Resistance in other fungal plant pathogens to SDHI fungicides is known to occur due to amino acid exchanges in the soluble subunit succinate dehydrogenase B (SdhB), C (SdhC), and D (SdhD) proteins. In this study, the AsSdhB, AsSdhC, and AsSdhD genes were analyzed and compared in sensitive (50% effective concentration [EC50] < 5 μg ml(-1)), moderately resistant (EC50 = 5.1 to 20 μg ml(-1)), highly resistant (EC50 = 20.1 to 100 μg ml(-1)), and very highly resistant (EC50 > 100 μg ml(-1)) A. solani isolates. In total, five mutations were detected, two in each of the AsSdhB and AsSdhD genes and one in the AsSdhC gene. The sequencing of AsSdhB elucidated point mutations cytosine (C) to thymine (T) at nucleotide 990 and adenine (A) to guanine (G) at nucleotide 991, leading to an exchange from histidine to tyrosine (H278Y) or arginine (H278R), respectively, at codon 278. The H278R exchange was detected in 4 of 10 A. solani isolates moderately resistant to boscalid, exhibiting EC50 values of 6 to 8 μg ml(-1). Further genetic analysis also confirmed this mutation in isolates with high and very high EC50 values for boscalid of 28 to 500 μg ml(-1). Subsequent sequencing of AsSdhC and AsSdhD genes confirmed the presence of additional mutations from A to G at nucleotide position 490 in AsSdhC and at nucleotide position 398 in the As

  15. Molecular characterization and detection of mutations associated with resistance to succinate dehydrogenase-inhibiting fungicides in Alternaria solani.

    PubMed

    Mallik, I; Arabiat, S; Pasche, J S; Bolton, M D; Patel, J S; Gudmestad, N C

    2014-01-01

    Early blight, caused by Alternaria solani, is an economically important foliar disease of potato in several production areas of the United States. Few potato cultivars possess resistance to early blight; therefore, the application of fungicides is the primary means of achieving disease control. Previous work in our laboratory reported resistance to the succinate dehydrogenase-inhibiting (SDHI) fungicide boscalid in this plant pathogen with a concomitant loss of disease control. Two phenotypes were detected, one in which A. solani isolates were moderately resistant to boscalid, the other in which isolates were highly resistant to the fungicide. Resistance in other fungal plant pathogens to SDHI fungicides is known to occur due to amino acid exchanges in the soluble subunit succinate dehydrogenase B (SdhB), C (SdhC), and D (SdhD) proteins. In this study, the AsSdhB, AsSdhC, and AsSdhD genes were analyzed and compared in sensitive (50% effective concentration [EC50] < 5 μg ml(-1)), moderately resistant (EC50 = 5.1 to 20 μg ml(-1)), highly resistant (EC50 = 20.1 to 100 μg ml(-1)), and very highly resistant (EC50 > 100 μg ml(-1)) A. solani isolates. In total, five mutations were detected, two in each of the AsSdhB and AsSdhD genes and one in the AsSdhC gene. The sequencing of AsSdhB elucidated point mutations cytosine (C) to thymine (T) at nucleotide 990 and adenine (A) to guanine (G) at nucleotide 991, leading to an exchange from histidine to tyrosine (H278Y) or arginine (H278R), respectively, at codon 278. The H278R exchange was detected in 4 of 10 A. solani isolates moderately resistant to boscalid, exhibiting EC50 values of 6 to 8 μg ml(-1). Further genetic analysis also confirmed this mutation in isolates with high and very high EC50 values for boscalid of 28 to 500 μg ml(-1). Subsequent sequencing of AsSdhC and AsSdhD genes confirmed the presence of additional mutations from A to G at nucleotide position 490 in AsSdhC and at nucleotide position 398 in the As

  16. Effect of cropping system on composition of the Rhizoctonia populations recovered from canola and lupin in a winter rainfall region of South Africa

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rhizoctonia spp. are important pathogens of a broad range of crop plants that are economically important to the farm economy of the Western Cape region of South Africa. However, there is little information concerning the identity and relative importance of these fungal pathogens, and the effect of ...

  17. Sanitation Can Be A Foundation Disease Management Tool: Potential Of Spreading Binucleate Rhizoctonia from Nursery Propagation Floors To Trays Containing Azalea Stem Cuttings

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Binucelate Rhizoctonia spp. (BNR), the cause of web blight, are present all year on container-grown azaleas in the southern U.S. BNR can be eliminated during vegetative propagation by submerging stem cuttings in 50°C water for 21 minutes. The objective was to evaluate risk of rooting trays being con...

  18. Removal of n-hexane by Fusarium solani with a gas-phase biofilter.

    PubMed

    Arriaga, Sonia; Revah, Sergio

    2005-12-01

    A gas-phase biofilter inoculated with the fungus Fusarium solani, isolated from a consortium grown on hexane vapors, was used to degrade this compound. The biofilter, packed with perlite and operated with an empty bed residence time of 60 s, was supplied with hexane concentrations between 0.5 gm(-3) and 11 gm(-3). Biofilter performance was evaluated over 100 days of operation. Several strategies for supplying the nutritive mineral medium were assayed to maintain favorable conditions for the fungal growth and activity. The Fusarium system was able to sustain an average elimination capacity of 90 gm(-3)(reactor) h(-1) with a maximum of 130 gm(-3)(reactor) h(-1) . The mass transfer limitations due to high biomass development in the biofilter were confirmed in batch experiments. Bacterial contamination was observed, but experiments in the biofilter and in batch reactors using selective inhibitors and controlled pH confirmed the predominant role of the fungus. Results indicate that fungal biofilters can be an effective alternative to conventional abatement technologies for treating hydrophobic compounds. PMID:15933872

  19. Removal of n-hexane by Fusarium solani with a gas-phase biofilter.

    PubMed

    Arriaga, Sonia; Revah, Sergio

    2005-12-01

    A gas-phase biofilter inoculated with the fungus Fusarium solani, isolated from a consortium grown on hexane vapors, was used to degrade this compound. The biofilter, packed with perlite and operated with an empty bed residence time of 60 s, was supplied with hexane concentrations between 0.5 gm(-3) and 11 gm(-3). Biofilter performance was evaluated over 100 days of operation. Several strategies for supplying the nutritive mineral medium were assayed to maintain favorable conditions for the fungal growth and activity. The Fusarium system was able to sustain an average elimination capacity of 90 gm(-3)(reactor) h(-1) with a maximum of 130 gm(-3)(reactor) h(-1) . The mass transfer limitations due to high biomass development in the biofilter were confirmed in batch experiments. Bacterial contamination was observed, but experiments in the biofilter and in batch reactors using selective inhibitors and controlled pH confirmed the predominant role of the fungus. Results indicate that fungal biofilters can be an effective alternative to conventional abatement technologies for treating hydrophobic compounds.

  20. Response Surface Optimization for Decaffeination and Theophylline Production by Fusarium solani.

    PubMed

    Nanjundaiah, Shwetha; Bhatt, Praveena; Rastogi, Navin Kumar; Thakur, Munna Singh

    2016-01-01

    Coffee processing industries generate caffeine-containing waste that needs to be treated and decaffeinated before being disposed. Five fungal isolates obtained on caffeine-containing mineral media were tested for their ability to utilize caffeine at high concentrations. An isolate identified as Fusarium solani could utilize caffeine as a sole source of carbon and nitrogen up to 5 g/l and could degrade it to an extent of 30-53 % in 120 h. Sucrose that was added as an auxiliary substrate (5 g/l) enhanced the biodecaffeination of caffeine to 88 % in 96 h. The addition of co- substrate (sucrose) not only resulted in higher biodecaffeination efficiency, but also reduced the incubation period from the initial 120 to 96 h. Theophylline and 3-methyl xanthine were obtained as the major metabolites of decaffeination at 96 and 120 h, respectively. Response surface methodology used to optimize the process parameters for maximum biodecaffeination as well as theophylline production showed that a pH of 5.8, temperature of 24 °C and inoculum size of 4.8 × 10(5) spores/ml have resulted in a complete biodecaffeination of caffeine as well as the production of theophylline with a yield of 33 % (w/w). Results thus show that a viable and sustainable process can be developed for the detoxification of caffeine along with the recovery of theophylline, a commercially important chemical.

  1. Geostatistical analysis of soil moisture distribution in a part of Solani River catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Kamal; Arora, M. K.; Hariprasad, K. S.

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this paper is to estimate soil moisture at spatial level by applying geostatistical techniques on the point observations of soil moisture in parts of Solani River catchment in Haridwar district of India. Undisturbed soil samples were collected at 69 locations with soil core sampler at a depth of 0-10 cm from the soil surface. Out of these, discrete soil moisture observations at 49 locations were used to generate a spatial soil moisture distribution map of the region. Two geostatistical techniques, namely, moving average and kriging, were adopted. Root mean square error (RMSE) between observed and estimated soil moisture at remaining 20 locations was determined to assess the accuracy of the estimated soil moisture. Both techniques resulted in low RMSE at small limiting distance, which increased with the increase in the limiting distance. The root mean square error varied from 7.42 to 9.77 in moving average method, while in case of kriging it varied from 7.33 to 9.99 indicating similar performance of the two techniques.

  2. Fusarium solani onychomycosis of the thumbnail coinfected with Pseudomonas aeruginosa: report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yun-Seok; Ahn, Jae-Jun; Shin, Min-Kyung; Lee, Mu-Hyoung

    2011-03-01

    Fusarium species are non-dermatophytic moulds, which are commonly known soil saprophytes and important plant pathogens, and have been frequently reported to be aetiological agents of opportunistic infections in humans. The prevalence of onychomycosis caused by Fusarium species varies in the literature because of geographical differences in mould distribution and diagnostic methods. Onychomycosis caused by Fusarium species is considered rare in Korea, and only four cases have been described to date. Pseudomonas aeruginosa also can infect nails and cause green nail syndrome, and recent research has shown that fungal infection may potentiate the colonisation or growth of P. aeruginosa within a nail. Furthermore, such coinfection with P. aeruginosa can prevent the isolation of the fungus because of bacterial overgrowth in culture. The authors report the cases of two immunocompetent patients with F. solani onychomycosis coinfected with P. aeruginosa. Both presented with a greenish/yellowish discolouration and thickening of a thumbnail, and were treated with systemic ciprofloxacin in combination with itraconazole or terbinafine.

  3. Response Surface Optimization for Decaffeination and Theophylline Production by Fusarium solani.

    PubMed

    Nanjundaiah, Shwetha; Bhatt, Praveena; Rastogi, Navin Kumar; Thakur, Munna Singh

    2016-01-01

    Coffee processing industries generate caffeine-containing waste that needs to be treated and decaffeinated before being disposed. Five fungal isolates obtained on caffeine-containing mineral media were tested for their ability to utilize caffeine at high concentrations. An isolate identified as Fusarium solani could utilize caffeine as a sole source of carbon and nitrogen up to 5 g/l and could degrade it to an extent of 30-53 % in 120 h. Sucrose that was added as an auxiliary substrate (5 g/l) enhanced the biodecaffeination of caffeine to 88 % in 96 h. The addition of co- substrate (sucrose) not only resulted in higher biodecaffeination efficiency, but also reduced the incubation period from the initial 120 to 96 h. Theophylline and 3-methyl xanthine were obtained as the major metabolites of decaffeination at 96 and 120 h, respectively. Response surface methodology used to optimize the process parameters for maximum biodecaffeination as well as theophylline production showed that a pH of 5.8, temperature of 24 °C and inoculum size of 4.8 × 10(5) spores/ml have resulted in a complete biodecaffeination of caffeine as well as the production of theophylline with a yield of 33 % (w/w). Results thus show that a viable and sustainable process can be developed for the detoxification of caffeine along with the recovery of theophylline, a commercially important chemical. PMID:26419659

  4. Nonomuraea solani sp. nov., an actinomycete isolated from eggplant root (Solanum melongena L.).

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiangjing; Zhao, Junwei; Liu, Chongxi; Wang, Jidong; Shen, Yue; Jia, Feiyu; Wang, Liang; Zhang, Ji; Yu, Chao; Xiang, Wensheng

    2013-07-01

    A novel actinomycete, designated strain NEAU-Z6(T), was isolated from eggplant (Solanum melongena L.) root. Phylogenetic analysis based on the 16S rRNA gene sequence showed that strain NEAU-Z6(T) belonged to the genus Nonomuraea, with highest sequence similarity to Nonomuraea monospora PT 708(T) (98.83 %), Nonomuraea rosea GW 12687(T) (98.55 %) and Nonomuraea rhizophila YIM 67092(T) (98.02 %). Sequence similarities between strain NEAU-Z6(T) and other species of the genus Nonomuraea ranged from 97.94 % (Nonomuraea candida HMC10(T)) to 96.30 % (Nonomuraea wenchangensis 210417(T)). Key morphological, physiological and chemotaxonomic characteristics of strain NEAU-Z6(T) were congruent with the description of the genus Nonomuraea. The G+C content of the genomic DNA was 64.51 mol%. DNA-DNA relatedness and comparative analysis of physiological, biochemical and chemotaxonomic data allowed genotypic and phenotypic differentiation of strain NEAU-Z6(T) from closely related species. Thus, strain NEAU-Z6(T) represents a novel species of the genus Nonomuraea, for which the name Nonomuraea solani sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is NEAU-Z6(T) ( = CGMCC 4.7037(T) = DSM 45729(T)).

  5. Optimization of a bioactive exopolysaccharide production from endophytic Fusarium solani SD5.

    PubMed

    Mahapatra, Subhadip; Banerjee, Debdulal

    2013-09-12

    Endophytic fungi were less investigated for exopolysaccharide production. In this study endophytic Fusarium solani SD5 was used for optimization of exopolysaccharide production. One variable at a time method and response surface methodology were employed to explore the optimum medium compositions and fermentation conditions. The organism produced maximum exopolysaccharide after 13.68 days of incubation at 28 °C in potato dextrose broth supplemented with (g%/l) glucose, 9.8; yeast extract, 0.69; KCl, 0.05; KH₂PO₄, 0.05 with medium pH 6.46. Use of 50 ml medium in 250 ml Erlenmeyer flask gives highest exopolysaccharide production. The organism produced more than two times higher exopolysaccharide (2.276 ± 0.032 g/l EPS) at optimized condition compared to pre-optimized condition (0.96 ± 0.021). In vivo toxicity test established nontoxic nature of the EPS (≤400 mg EPS/Kg of body weight). The EPS slightly altered intestinal indigenous bacteria and influenced the growth of beneficial Lactobacillus spp.

  6. Optimization of culture conditions of Fusarium solani for the production of neoN-methylsansalvamide.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hee-Seok; Phat, Chanvorleak; Nam, Woo-Seon; Lee, Chan

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to optimize the culture conditions of Fusarium solani KCCM90040 on cereal grain for the production of neoN-methylsansalvamide, a novel low-molecular-weight cyclic pentadepsipeptide exhibiting cytotoxic and multidrug resistance reversal effects. From the analysis of variance results using response surface methodology, temperature, initial moisture content, and growth time were shown to be important parameters for the production of neoN-methylsansalvamide on cereal grain. A model was established in the present study to describe the relationship between environmental conditions and the production of neoN-methylsansalvamide on rice, the selected cereal grain. The optimal culture conditions were determined at 25.79 °C with the initial moisture content of 40.79%, and 16.19 days of growth time. This report will give important information concerning the optimization of environmental conditions using statistic methodology for the production of a new cyclic pentadepsipeptide from fungi. PMID:25130748

  7. Kinetics of fungal extracellular alpha-amylase from Fusarium solani immobilized in calcium alginate beads.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Devendra; Muthukumar, M; Garg, Neelima

    2012-11-01

    Extracellular alpha-amylase mass produced by Fusarium solani using mango kernel as substrate was immobilized in calcium alginate beads through entrapment technique. Maximum enzyme immobilization efficiency was achieved in 2 mm size beads formed by 6.5% (w/v) of sodium alginate in 2% (w/v) calcium chloride. The catalytic properties of the immobilized alpha-amylase were compared with that of free enzyme (soluble). The activity yield of the immobilized enzyme was 81% of the free enzyme. The immobilized enzyme showed optimum activityat pH 4.5-6.0 and temperature 40 degrees C, in contrast to the free enzyme at 5.5 and 30 degrees C, respectively. Thermal stability of the immobilized enzyme was found to be more than the free enzyme over a longer time interval. The immobilized enzyme retained activity upto 20% of optimum even after 180 min. While the free enzyme lost its 80% activity after 60 min and lost total activity down to zero by 120 min. The kinetic constants, viz., K(M) (Michaelis constant), V(max) and activation energy were affected by immobilization. However, the immobilized alpha-amylase in calcium alginate beads supports its long-term storage which has immense industrial applications.

  8. Fontibacillus solani sp. nov. isolated from potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) root.

    PubMed

    Ramírez-Bahena, Martha-Helena; Flores-Félix, José David; Cuesta, Maria José; Tejedor Gil, Carmen; Palomo, Jose Luis; García Benavides, Pablo; Igual, Jose Mariano; Fernández Pascual, Mercedes; Velázquez, Encarna; Peix, Alvaro

    2015-05-01

    A bacterial strain designated A4STR04(T) was isolated from the inner root tissue of potatoes in Spain. Phylogenetic analysis based on the 16S rRNA gene sequence placed the isolate into the genus Fontibacillus, being most closely related to Fontibacillus panacisegetis KCTC 13564(T) with 99% identity. The isolate was observed to form Gram-positive, motile and sporulating rods. The catalase test was found to be negative and oxidase positive. Nitrate was found to be reduced to nitrite. β-Galactosidase and caseinase were observed to be produced but the production of gelatinase, urease, arginine dehydrolase, ornithine and lysine decarboxylase was negative. Aesculin hydrolysis was found to be positive and acetoin production was negative. Growth was found to be supported by many carbohydrates and organic acids as carbon source. MK-7 was the only menaquinone detected and the major fatty acid (61.5%) was identified as anteiso-C(15:0), as occurs in the other species of genus Fontibacillus. The strain A4STR04(T) was found to display a complex lipid profile consisting of diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylethanolamine, a glycolipid, two phospholipids, a lipid and two aminophospholipids. Mesodiaminopimelic acid was detected in the peptidoglycan. The G+C content was determined to be 50.5 mol% (Tm). Phylogenetic, chemotaxonomic and phenotypic analyses showed that strain A4STR04(T) (=LMG 28458 (T) = CECT 8693(T)) should be classified as representing a novel species of genus Fontibacillus, for which the name Fontibacillus solani sp. nov. is proposed.

  9. Chryseobacterium solani sp. nov., isolated from field-grown eggplant rhizosphere soil.

    PubMed

    Du, Juan; Ngo, Hien T T; Won, KyungHwa; Kim, Ki-Young; Jin, Feng-Xie; Yi, Tae-Hoo

    2015-08-01

    Strain THG-EP9T, a Gram-stain-negative, aerobic, motile, rod-shaped bacterium was isolated from field-grown eggplant (Solanum melongena) rhizosphere soil collected in Pyeongtaek, Gyeonggi-do, Republic of Korea. Based on 16S rRNA gene sequence comparisons, strain THG-EP9T had closest similarity with Chryseobacterium ginsenosidimutans THG 15T (97.3 % 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity), Chryseobacterium soldanellicola PSD1-4T (97.2%), Chryseobacterium zeae JM-1085T (97.2%) and Chryseobacterium indoltheticum LMG 4025T (96.8%). DNA-DNA hybridization showed 5.7% and 9.1% DNA reassociation with Chryseobacterium ginsenosidimutans KACC 14527T and Chryseobacterium soldanellicola KCTC 12382T, respectively. Chemotaxonomic data revealed that strain THG-EP9T possesses menaquinone-6 as the only respiratory quinone and iso-C15 : 0 (29.0%), C16 : 0 (12.5%) and iso-C17 : 0 3-OH (11.9 %) as the major fatty acids. The polar lipid profile consisted of phosphatidylethanolamine, an unidentified aminophospholipid, two unidentified glycolipids, six unidentified aminolipids and two unidentified polar lipids. The DNA G+C content was 35.3 mol%. These data corroborated the affiliation of strain THG-EP9T to the genus Chryseobacterium. Thus, the isolate represents a novel species of this genus, for which the name Chryseobacterium solani sp. nov. is proposed, with THG-EP9T ( = KACC 17652T = JCM 19456T) as the type strain.

  10. Isoflavonoid accumulation in soybean hairy roots upon treatment with Fusarium solani.

    PubMed

    Lozovaya, Vera V; Lygin, Anatoliy V; Zernova, Olga V; Li, Shuxian; Hartman, Glen L; Widholm, Jack M

    2004-01-01

    Hairy roots were initiated from two soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.] genotypes with different susceptibility (susceptible 'Spencer' and partially resistant 'PI567.374') to the disease sudden death syndrome (SDS) caused by the soil-borne fungal pathogen Fusarium solani f. sp. glycines (FSG) to study the role of isoflavonoids in the plant response to FSG infection. Hairy root cultures obtained by transformation with Agrobacterium rhizogenes allows normal root growth that can be visually monitored. The principal isoflavones (genistin, daidzin, glycitin and their malonyl conjugates and aglycones) and also isoflavonoid phytoalexins (coumestrol and glyceollin) were measured by HPLC in extracts of the FSG-inoculated and non-inoculated hairy roots. FSG mycelia grew more slowly on inoculated PI567.374 hairy roots than on Spencer hairy roots. The glyceollin content was higher in FSG-inoculated PI567.374 hairy roots than in Spencer hairy roots even though the glyceollin precursor, the isoflavone daidzein, was higher in Spencer. The de novo synthesis of isoflavones and glyceollin was confirmed by [(14)C]Phe incorporation into glyceollin, which was higher both in the FSG-inoculated roots and surrounding medium of the cv. PI567.374 than that of Spencer. Glyceollin was the most inhibitory to FSG growth among eight isoflavonoids tested. The levels of coumestrol, a putative phytoalexin, did not change upon FSG inoculation. The defense response was also elicited by FSG culture filtrates in hairy roots grown in liquid culture. The data obtained indicate that the ability of soybean roots to rapidly produce sufficient amounts of glyceollin in response to FSG infection might be important in providing partial resistance to this fungus. PMID:15331097

  11. An abundant 'Candidatus Phytoplasma solani' tuf b strain is associated with grapevine, stinging nettle and Hyalesthes obsoletus.

    PubMed

    Aryan, A; Brader, G; Mörtel, J; Pastar, M; Riedle-Bauer, M

    2014-10-01

    Bois noir (BN) associated with 'Candidatus Phytoplasma solani' (Stolbur) is regularly found in Austrian vine growing regions. Investigations between 2003 and 2008 indicated sporadic presence of the confirmed disease vector Hyalesthes obsoletus and frequent infections of bindweed and grapevine. Infections of nettles were rare. In contrast present investigations revealed a mass occurrence of H. obsoletus almost exclusively on stinging nettle. The high population densities of H. obsoletus on Urtica dioica were accompanied by frequent occurrence of 'Ca. P. solani' in nettles and planthoppers. Sequence analysis of the molecular markers secY, stamp, tuf and vmp1 of stolbur revealed a single genotype named CPsM4_At1 in stinging nettles and more than 64 and 90 % abundance in grapevine and H. obsoletus, respectively. Interestingly, this genotype showed tuf b type restriction pattern previously attributed to bindweed associated 'Ca. P. solani' strains, but a different sequence assigned as tuf b2 compared to reference tuf b strains. All other marker genes of CPsM4_At1 clustered with tuf a and nettle derived genotypes verifying distinct nettle phytoplasma genotypes. Transmission experiments with H. obsoletus and Anaceratagallia ribauti resulted in successful transmission of five different strains including the major genotype to Catharanthus roseus and in transmission of the major genotype to U. dioica. Altogether, five nettle and nine bindweed associated genotypes were described. Bindweed types were verified in 34 % of grapevine samples, in few positive Reptalus panzeri, rarely in bindweeds and occasionally in Catharanthus roseus infected by H. obsoletus or A. ribauti. 'Candidatus Phytoplasma convolvuli' (bindweed yellows) was ascertained in nettle and bindweed samples. PMID:25309042

  12. Oxidative stress in rat liver and lung induced by furanoterpenoids isolated from Fusarium solani infected sweet potatoes.

    PubMed

    Rajendran, S; Parasakthy, K; Deepalakshmi, P D; Devaraj, S N

    1996-01-01

    A crude extract containing some toxic furanoterpenoids was isolated from F. solani infected sweet potatoes. Chronic administration of the crude extract to male albino rats at a dosage of 1 mg/kg body weight/day for 21 days brought about a sharp increase in the thiobarbituric acid reactive substances and a depression of glutathione levels in the lung and liver homogenates. The antioxidant defense system was affected as evident from a significant fall in the activities of the enzymes, superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione peroxidase, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase and glutathione-S-transferase. Such an alteration could be the reason for the lung and liver damage caused by these toxic furanoterpenoids.

  13. Genomic and metabolic comparison with Dickeya dadantii 3937 reveals the emerging Dickeya solani potato pathogen to display distinctive metabolic activities and T5SS/T6SS-related toxin repertoire

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The pectinolytic enterobacteria of the Pectobacterium and Dickeya genera are causative agents of maceration-associated diseases affecting a wide variety of crops and ornamentals. For the past decade, the emergence of a novel species D. solani was observed in potato fields in Europe and the Mediterranean basin. The purpose of this study is to search by comparative genomics the genetic traits that could be distinctive to other Dickeya species and be involved in D. solani adaptation to the potato plant host. Results D. solani 3337 exhibits a 4.9 Mb circular genome that is characterized by a low content in mobile elements with the identification of only two full length insertion sequences. A genomic comparison with the deeply-annotated model D. dadantii 3937 strain was performed. While a large majority of Dickeya virulence genes are shared by both strains, a few hundreds genes of D. solani 3337, mostly regrouped in 25 genomic regions, are distinctive to D. dadantii 3937. These genomic regions are present in the other available draft genomes of D. solani strains and interestingly some of them were not found in the sequenced genomes of the other Dickeya species. These genomic regions regroup metabolic genes and are often accompanied by genes involved in transport systems. A metabolic analysis correlated some metabolic genes with distinctive functional traits of both D. solani 3337 and D. dadantii 3937. Three identified D. solani genomic regions also regroup NRPS/PKS encoding genes. In addition, D. solani encodes a distinctive arsenal of T5SS and T6SS-related toxin-antitoxin systems. These genes may contribute to bacteria-bacteria interactions and to the fitness of D. solani to the plant environment. Conclusions This study highlights the genomic specific traits of the emerging pathogen D. solani and will provide the basis for studying those that are involved in the successful adaptation of this emerging pathogen to the potato plant host. PMID:24735398

  14. 77 FR 18806 - Fluxapyroxad; Receipt of Application for Emergency Exemption for Use on Rice in Louisiana...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-28

    ... caused by the fungus, Rhizoctonia solani. The applicant proposes the use of a new chemical which has not... fluxapyroxad on rice to control sheath blight caused by the fungus Rhizoctonia solani. Information in... asserts that fluxapyroxad is needed to control sheath blight in rice caused by the fungus...

  15. Biocontrol of tomato plant diseases caused by Fusarium solani using a new isolated Aspergillus tubingensis CTM 507 glucose oxidase.

    PubMed

    Kriaa, Mouna; Hammami, Inès; Sahnoun, Mouna; Azebou, Manel Cheffi; Triki, Mohamed Ali; Kammoun, Radhouane

    2015-10-01

    The present study focuses on the potential of glucose oxidase (GOD) as a promising biocontrol agent for fungal plant pathogens. In fact, a new GOD producing fungus was isolated and identified as an Aspergillus tubingensis. GOD (125 AU) has been found to inhibit Fusarium solani growth and spore production. Indeed, GOD caused the reduction of spores, the formation of chlamydospores, the induction of mycelial cords and the vacuolization of mycelium. In vivo assays, GOD acted as a curative treatment capable of protecting the tomato plants against F. solani diseases. In fact, the incidence was null in the curative treatment with GOD and it is around 45% for the preventive treatment. The optimization of media composition and culture conditions led to a 2.6-fold enhancement in enzyme activity, reaching 81.48U/mL. This study has demonstrated that GOD is a potent antifungal agent that could be used as a new biofungicide to protect plants from diseases. PMID:26299190

  16. In vitro antifungal activity of four chemotypes of Lippia alba (Verbenaceae) essential oils against Alternaria solani (Pleosporeaceae) isolates.

    PubMed

    Tomazoni, Elisa Z; Pansera, Márcia R; Pauletti, Gabriel F; Moura, Sidnei; Ribeiro, Rute T S; Schwambach, Joséli

    2016-05-31

    Several volatile natural compounds produced by plant secondary metabolism have been proven to present antimicrobial action, enabling their use in phytopathogen control. They also present low environmental impact when compared to conventional pesticides. Essential oils contain these compounds and can be found in several plant species, such as Lippia alba (Mill.) N.E. Brown (Verbenaceae). Essential oils of four chemotypes of L. alba, characterized by their major compounds, namely camphor, citral, linalool and camphor/1,8-cineole, were tested against the phytopathogen Alternaria solani Sorauer (Pleosporaceae), which causes early blight on tomatoes and is responsible for great economic losses regarding production. Essential oils antifungal action was tested in vitro using potato dextrose agar medium with essential oil concentrations at 0.1, 0.5, 1.0, 1.5 and 2.0 µL mL-1. The chemotype that had the best performance was citral, showing significant inhibition compared to the others, starting at the 0.5 µL mL-1 concentration. The essential oil belonging to the linalool chemotype was efficient starting at the 1.5 µL mL-1 concentration. Conversely, the camphor chemotype did not show any action against the phytopathogen. Moreover, the essential oils had no remarkable effect on tomato germination and growth. In conclusion, these essential oils presented fungicidal action against A. solani. PMID:27254445

  17. Steady state and time resolved fluorescence quenching and chemical modification studies of a lectin from endophytic fungus Fusarium solani.

    PubMed

    Khan, Feroz; Ahmad, Absar; Khan, M Islam

    2010-01-01

    The solute quenching studies of a lectin from endophytic fungus Fusarium solani were carried out using different quenchers such as acrylamide, succinimide, potassium iodide and cesium chloride. The lectin showed emission maximum at 348 nm indicating relative exposure of tryptophan. The quenchable fraction of the fluorophore was 100% with acrylamide, whereas it was only 50% with succinimide. The ionic quenchers iodide and cesium showed opposite effects at different pH. In the case of cesium, raising the pH resulted in increased quenching and accessibility of typtophan residue, while the iodide showed just opposite effect. These studies showed that the single tryptophan residue of the lectin (per monomer) is relatively exposed, and might be in the vicinity of positively charged amino acid residues. Various amino acids of the F. solani lectin were modified using different reagents to obtain information about the hemagglutinating site. The chemical modification studies suggested tyrosine residues can be modified using N-acetylimidazole, which results in complete loss of hemagglutination activity of the lectin. Kinetics of chemical modification suggested involvement of only 2 tyrosine residues. Modification of arginine, cysteine, histidine, lysine, aspartate, glutamate and tryptophan did not result in loss of hemagglutinating activity of the lectin. PMID:19823920

  18. Purification and biochemical characterization of a novel alkaline (phospho)lipase from a newly isolated Fusarium solani strain.

    PubMed

    Jallouli, Raida; Khrouf, Fatma; Fendri, Ahmed; Mechichi, Tahar; Gargouri, Youssef; Bezzine, Sofiane

    2012-12-01

    An extracellular lipase from Fusarium solani strain (F. solani lipase (FSL)) was purified to homogeneity by ammonium sulphate precipitation, gel filtration and anion exchange chromatography. The purified enzyme has a molecular mass of 30 kDa as estimated by sodium dodecyl sulphate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The 12 NH(2)-terminal amino acid residues showed a high degree of homology with a putative lipase from the fungus Necteria heamatoccocae. It is a serine enzyme, like all known lipases from different origins. Interestingly, FSL has not only lipase activity but also a high phospholipase activity which requires the presence of Ca(2+) and bile salts. The specific activities of FSL were about 1,610 and 2,414 U/mg on olive oil emulsion and egg-yolk phosphatidylcholine as substrates, respectively, at pH 8.0 and 37 °C. The (phospho)lipase enzyme was stable in the pH range of 5-10 and at temperatures below 45 °C.

  19. The importance of associations with saprotrophic non-Rhizoctonia fungi among fully mycoheterotrophic orchids is currently under-estimated: novel evidence from sub-tropical Asia

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yung-I; Yang, Chih-Kai; Gebauer, Gerhard

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims Most fully mycoheterotrophic (MH) orchids investigated to date are mycorrhizal with fungi that simultaneously form ectomycorrhizas with forest trees. Only a few MH orchids are currently known to be mycorrhizal with saprotrophic, mostly wood-decomposing, fungi instead of ectomycorrhizal fungi. This study provides evidence that the importance of associations between MH orchids and saprotrophic non-Rhizoctonia fungi is currently under-estimated. Methods Using microscopic techniques and molecular approaches, mycorrhizal fungi were localized and identified for seven MH orchid species from four genera and two subfamilies, Vanilloideae and Epidendroideae, growing in four humid and warm sub-tropical forests in Taiwan. Carbon and nitrogen stable isotope natural abundances of MH orchids and autotrophic reference plants were used in order to elucidate the nutritional resources utilized by the orchids. Key Results Six out of the seven MH orchid species were mycorrhizal with either wood- or litter-decaying saprotrophic fungi. Only one orchid species was associated with ectomycorrhizal fungi. Stable isotope abundance patterns showed significant distinctions between orchids mycorrhizal with the three groups of fungal hosts. Conclusions Mycoheterotrophic orchids utilizing saprotrophic non-Rhizoctonia fungi as a carbon and nutrient source are clearly more frequent than hitherto assumed. On the basis of this kind of nutrition, orchids can thrive in deeply shaded, light-limiting forest understoreys even without support from ectomycorrhizal fungi. Sub-tropical East Asia appears to be a hotspot for orchids mycorrhizal with saprotrophic non-Rhizoctonia fungi. PMID:26113634

  20. Expression of ß-1,3-glucanase and ß-1,4-glucanase in two potato cultivars following challenge by the fungal pathogen Alternaria solani

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Early blight of potato, caused by Alternaria solani, is a ubiquitous disease in many countries around the world. We have previously found that variation in resistance phenotypes exist between two different Iranian cultivars of potato. Cultivar ‘Diamond’ is more resistant to multiple isolates of A. s...

  1. Functional analyses of the Diels-Alderase gene sol5 of Ascochyta rabiei and Alternaria solani indicate that the Solanapyrone phytotoxins are not required for pathogenicity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ascochyta rabiei and Alternaria solani, the causal agents of Ascochyta blight of chickpea (Cicer arietinum) and early blight of potato (Solanum tuberosum), respectively, produce a set of phytotoxic compounds incuding solanapyrones A, B, and C. Although both the phytotoxicity of solanopyrones and the...

  2. Phylogenetic relationships among members of the Fusarium solani species complex in human infections and the descriptions of F. keratoplasticum sp. nov. and F. petroliphilum stat. nov.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fusarium species are frequently associated with mycotic keratitis and, to a lesser extent, cases of localized and disseminated infections. The Fusarium solani species complex (FSSC) is the most common group of fusaria associated with human infectious diseases. Several studies to date have revealed d...

  3. Within-plant distribution of the Foxglove Aphid (Aulacorthum Solani Kaltenbach) (Hemiptera: Aphididae) on various greenhouse plants with implications for control

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Foxglove aphid (Aulacorthum solani Kaltenbach; Hemiptera: Aphididae) has recently undergone a status change from an occasional pest to a serious pest of greenhouse crops in North America and the UK. Consequently, little non-anecdotal information exists on the ecology of this insect in greenhouse cro...

  4. Phylogenetic relationships of the soybean sudden death syndrome pathogen Fusarium solani f. sp. phaseoli inferred from rDNA sequence data and PCR primers for its identification.

    PubMed

    O'Donnell, K; Gray, L E

    1995-01-01

    Phylogenetic relationships of several species within the Fusarium solani-complex were investigated using characters from the nuclear ribosomal DNA. Genetic variation within 24 isolates, including 5 soybean sudden death syndrome (SDS) strains, was assessed using rDNA sequence data and restriction fragment length polymorphic markers. By these techniques, the causal agent of soybean SDS was identified as F. solani f. sp. phaseoli. In separate cladistic analyses, Plectosphaerella cucumerina and Nectria cinnabarina or F. ventricosum were used for rooting purposes. Monophyly of the F. solani-complex was strongly supported by bootstrap and decay analyses. Parsimony analysis indicates that this complex is composed of a number of phylogenetically distinct species, including Neocosmospora vasinfecta, F. solani f. sp. phaseoli, and biological species designated as MPI, MPV, and MPVI of N. haematococca. The results demonstrate complete congruence between biological and phylogenetic species within the N. haematococca-complex. In addition, DNA sequence data were used to design a PCR primer pair which could specifically amplify DNA from isolates of the SDS pathogen from infected plants. PMID:7579615

  5. Microemulsion formulation of Carbendazim and its in vitro antifungal activities evaluation.

    PubMed

    Leng, Pengfei; Zhang, Zhiming; Li, Qian; Zhao, Maojun; Pan, Guangtang

    2014-01-01

    The fungus Rhizoctonia solani Kuhn is a widespread and destructive plant pathogen with a very broad host range. Although various pathogens, including R. solani, have been traditionally controlled using chemical pesticides, their use faces drawbacks such as environmental pollution, development of pesticide resistance, and other negative effects. Carbendazim is a well-known antifungal agent capable of controlling a broad range of plant diseases, but its use is hampered by its poor aqueous solubility. In this study, we describe an environmentally friendly pharmaceutical microemulsion system using carbendazim as the active ingredient, chloroform and acetic acid as solvents, and the surfactants HSH and 0204 as emulsifiers. This system increased the solubility of carbendazim to 30 g/L. The optimal microemulsion formulation was determined based on a pseudo-ternary phase diagram; its physicochemical characteristics were also tested. The cloud point was greater than 90°C and it was resistant to freezing down to -18°C, both of which are improvements over the temperature range in which pure carbendazim can be used. This microemulsion meets the standard for pesticide microemulsions and demonstrated better activity against R. solani AG1-IA, relative to an aqueous solution of pure carbendazim (0.2 g/L). The mechanism of activity was reflected in the inhibition of against R. solani AG1-IA including mycelium growth, and sclerotia formation and germination were significantly better than that of 0.2 g/L carbendazim water solution according to the results of t-test done by SPSS 19.

  6. Microemulsion Formulation of Carbendazim and Its In Vitro Antifungal Activities Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Leng, Pengfei; Zhang, Zhiming; Li, Qian; Zhao, Maojun; Pan, Guangtang

    2014-01-01

    The fungus Rhizoctonia solani Kuhn is a widespread and destructive plant pathogen with a very broad host range. Although various pathogens, including R. solani, have been traditionally controlled using chemical pesticides, their use faces drawbacks such as environmental pollution, development of pesticide resistance, and other negative effects. Carbendazim is a well-known antifungal agent capable of controlling a broad range of plant diseases, but its use is hampered by its poor aqueous solubility. In this study, we describe an environmentally friendly pharmaceutical microemulsion system using carbendazim as the active ingredient, chloroform and acetic acid as solvents, and the surfactants HSH and 0204 as emulsifiers. This system increased the solubility of carbendazim to 30 g/L. The optimal microemulsion formulation was determined based on a pseudo-ternary phase diagram; its physicochemical characteristics were also tested. The cloud point was greater than 90°C and it was resistant to freezing down to −18°C, both of which are improvements over the temperature range in which pure carbendazim can be used. This microemulsion meets the standard for pesticide microemulsions and demonstrated better activity against R. solani AG1-IA, relative to an aqueous solution of pure carbendazim (0.2 g/L). The mechanism of activity was reflected in the inhibition of against R. solani AG1-IA including mycelium growth, and sclerotia formation and germination were significantly better than that of 0.2 g/L carbendazim water solution according to the results of t-test done by SPSS 19. PMID:25310219

  7. Pressure Cycling Technology Sample Preparation System (PCT SPS) Improves Quantification of Pathogen DNA in Plants and Soil

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rhizoctonia root rot, bare patch, and damping-off of wheat are yield-limiting diseases caused by Rhizoctonia solani AG-8 and R. oryzae. Detection and quantification of Rhizoctonia spp. are essential for evaluating pathogen distribution and management, but extraction of DNA from these pathogens is ha...

  8. Role of gliotoxin in the symbiotic and pathogenic interactions of Trichoderma virens.

    PubMed

    Vargas, Walter A; Mukherjee, Prasun K; Laughlin, David; Wiest, Aric; Moran-Diez, Maria E; Kenerley, Charles M

    2014-10-01

    Using a gene disruption strategy, we generated mutants in the gliP locus of the plant-beneficial fungus Trichoderma virens that were no longer capable of producing gliotoxin. Phenotypic assays demonstrated that the gliP-disrupted mutants grew faster, were more sensitive to oxidative stress and exhibited a sparse colony edge compared with the WT strain. In a plate confrontation assay, the mutants deficient in gliotoxin production were ineffective as mycoparasites against the oomycete, Pythium ultimum, and the necrotrophic fungal pathogen, Sclerotinia sclerotiorum, but retained mycoparasitic ability against Rhizoctonia solani. Biocontrol assays in soil showed that the mutants were incapable of protecting cotton seedlings from attack by P. ultimum, against which the WT strain was highly effective. The mutants, however, were as effective as the WT strain in protecting cotton seedlings against R. solani. Loss of gliotoxin production also resulted in a reduced ability of the mutants to attack the sclerotia of S. sclerotiorum compared with the WT. The addition of exogenous gliotoxin to the sclerotia colonized by the mutants partially restored their degradative abilities. Interestingly, as in Aspergillus fumigatus, an opportunistic human pathogen, gliotoxin was found to be involved in pathogenicity of T. virens against larvae of the wax moth, Galleria mellonella. The loss of gliotoxin production in T. virens was restored by complementation with the gliP gene from A. fumigatus. We have, thus, demonstrated that the putative gliP cluster of T. virens is responsible for the biosynthesis of gliotoxin, and gliotoxin is involved in mycoparasitism and biocontrol properties of this plant-beneficial fungus.

  9. Role of gliotoxin in the symbiotic and pathogenic interactions of Trichoderma virens.

    PubMed

    Vargas, Walter A; Mukherjee, Prasun K; Laughlin, David; Wiest, Aric; Moran-Diez, Maria E; Kenerley, Charles M

    2014-10-01

    Using a gene disruption strategy, we generated mutants in the gliP locus of the plant-beneficial fungus Trichoderma virens that were no longer capable of producing gliotoxin. Phenotypic assays demonstrated that the gliP-disrupted mutants grew faster, were more sensitive to oxidative stress and exhibited a sparse colony edge compared with the WT strain. In a plate confrontation assay, the mutants deficient in gliotoxin production were ineffective as mycoparasites against the oomycete, Pythium ultimum, and the necrotrophic fungal pathogen, Sclerotinia sclerotiorum, but retained mycoparasitic ability against Rhizoctonia solani. Biocontrol assays in soil showed that the mutants were incapable of protecting cotton seedlings from attack by P. ultimum, against which the WT strain was highly effective. The mutants, however, were as effective as the WT strain in protecting cotton seedlings against R. solani. Loss of gliotoxin production also resulted in a reduced ability of the mutants to attack the sclerotia of S. sclerotiorum compared with the WT. The addition of exogenous gliotoxin to the sclerotia colonized by the mutants partially restored their degradative abilities. Interestingly, as in Aspergillus fumigatus, an opportunistic human pathogen, gliotoxin was found to be involved in pathogenicity of T. virens against larvae of the wax moth, Galleria mellonella. The loss of gliotoxin production in T. virens was restored by complementation with the gliP gene from A. fumigatus. We have, thus, demonstrated that the putative gliP cluster of T. virens is responsible for the biosynthesis of gliotoxin, and gliotoxin is involved in mycoparasitism and biocontrol properties of this plant-beneficial fungus. PMID:25082950

  10. Deep granulomatous dermatitis of the fin caused by Fusarium solani in a false killer whale (Pseudorca crassidens).

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Miyuu; Izawa, Takeshi; Kuwamura, Mitsuru; Nakao, Tatsuko; Maezono, Yuko; Ito, Shu; Murata, Michiko; Murakami, Masaru; Sano, Ayako; Yamate, Jyoji

    2012-06-01

    A 10-year-old female false killer whale (Pseudorca crassidens) developed skin lesions in the left breast fin. Histopathologically, the lesions consisted of multiple granulomas spread diffusely into the deep dermis and bone; characteristically, each granuloma had septate, branching fungal hyphae and chlamydospores surrounded by eosinophilic Splendore-Hoeppli materials. Macrophages, epithelioid cells and multinucleated giant cells in the granulomas reacted mainly to anti-SRA-E5 antibody against human macrophage scavenger receptor type I. Fusarium solani was isolated and its gene was detected from the skin samples. Mycotic skin lesions by Fusarium spp. reported so far in marine mammals were regarded as superficial dermatitis; therefore, the present case is very uncommon in that the lesions spread deeper into the skin.

  11. [Severe keratomycosis due to Fusarium solani induced by a telluric foreign body: About a case in moroccan Sahara].

    PubMed

    Er-Rami, M; Souhail, H; Lemkhente, Z; El Mellouki, W; Lmimouni, B

    2011-09-01

    We report a case of severe keratitis due to Fusarium solani in a young man in the Sahara in Morocco where the climate is arid. This patient reported had a grain of sand in his right eye for a week after a sandstorm. On admission he had a corneal abscess. Despite rapid diagnosis and initiation of treatment with available antifungal drugs: amphotericin B and natamycin eye drops, the prognosis worsened and led to the enucleation of the right eye. Faced with a suspected eye infection after a microtrauma caused by grains of sand carried by a sandstorm, it is important to take biological samples to search for fungal infections among other. It is also important to have new triazole antifungal drugs available to treat ocular mycosis rapidly and effectively. PMID:24451564

  12. Molecular and pathological characterization of Fusarium solani species complex infection in the head and lateral line system of Sphyrna lewini.

    PubMed

    Pirarat, Nopadon; Sahatrakul, Komsil; Lacharoje, Sitthichok; Lombardini, Eric; Chansue, Nantarika; Techangamsuwan, Somporn

    2016-08-01

    A severe fungal infection affecting the head and lateral line system was diagnosed in 7 captive scalloped hammerhead sharks Sphyrna lewini in an aquarium in Thailand. Extensive and severe necrotizing cellulitis was consistently observed microscopically along the cephalic and lateral line canals in conjunction with positive fungal cultures for Fusarium sp. Molecular phylogenetic analysis was performed from 3 isolates based on the nucleotide sequences containing internally transcribed spacer (ITS) and a portion of 5.8S and 28S rDNA. The fungus was highly homologous (100%) and closely related to F. solani species complex 2 (FSSC 2), which belongs to Clade 3 of the FSSC. Our results illustrate the histopathological findings and expand upon our knowledge of the prevalence of invasive fusariosis in the head and lateral line system of hammerhead sharks. PMID:27503915

  13. Overexpression of a tea flavanone 3-hydroxylase gene confers tolerance to salt stress and Alternaria solani in transgenic tobacco.

    PubMed

    Mahajan, Monika; Yadav, Sudesh Kumar

    2014-08-01

    Flavan-3-ols are the major flavonoids present in tea (Camellia sinensis) leaves. These are known to have antioxidant and free radical scavenging properties in vitro. Flavanone 3-hydroxylase is considered to be an important enzyme of flavonoid pathway leading to accumulation of flavan-3-ols in tea. Expression analysis revealed the upregulation in transcript levels of C. sinensis flavanone 3-hydroxylase (CsF3H) encoding gene under salt stress. In this study, the biotechnological potential of CsF3H was evaluated by gene overexpression in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum cv. Xanthi). Overexpression of CsF3H cDNA increased the content of flavan-3-ols in tobacco and conferred tolerance to salt stress and fungus Alternaria solani infection. Transgenic tobaccos were observed for increase in primary root length, number of lateral roots, chlorophyll content, antioxidant enzyme expression and their activities. Also, they showed lesser malondialdehyde content and electrolyte leakage compared to control tobacco plants. Further, transgenic plants produced higher degree of pectin methyl esterification via decreasing pectin methyl esterase (PME) activity in roots and leaves under unstressed and salt stressed conditions. The effect of flavan-3-ols on pectin methyl esterification under salt stressed conditions was further validated through in vitro experiments in which non-transgenic (wild) tobacco seedlings were exposed to salt stress in presence of flavan-3-ols, epicatechin and epigallocatechin. The in vitro exposed seedlings showed similar trend of increase in pectin methyl esterification through decreasing PME activity as observed in CsF3H transgenic lines. Taken together, overexpression of CsF3H provided tolerance to salt stress and fungus A. solani infection to transgenic tobacco through improved antioxidant system and enhanced pectin methyl esterification. PMID:24880475

  14. Overexpression of a tea flavanone 3-hydroxylase gene confers tolerance to salt stress and Alternaria solani in transgenic tobacco.

    PubMed

    Mahajan, Monika; Yadav, Sudesh Kumar

    2014-08-01

    Flavan-3-ols are the major flavonoids present in tea (Camellia sinensis) leaves. These are known to have antioxidant and free radical scavenging properties in vitro. Flavanone 3-hydroxylase is considered to be an important enzyme of flavonoid pathway leading to accumulation of flavan-3-ols in tea. Expression analysis revealed the upregulation in transcript levels of C. sinensis flavanone 3-hydroxylase (CsF3H) encoding gene under salt stress. In this study, the biotechnological potential of CsF3H was evaluated by gene overexpression in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum cv. Xanthi). Overexpression of CsF3H cDNA increased the content of flavan-3-ols in tobacco and conferred tolerance to salt stress and fungus Alternaria solani infection. Transgenic tobaccos were observed for increase in primary root length, number of lateral roots, chlorophyll content, antioxidant enzyme expression and their activities. Also, they showed lesser malondialdehyde content and electrolyte leakage compared to control tobacco plants. Further, transgenic plants produced higher degree of pectin methyl esterification via decreasing pectin methyl esterase (PME) activity in roots and leaves under unstressed and salt stressed conditions. The effect of flavan-3-ols on pectin methyl esterification under salt stressed conditions was further validated through in vitro experiments in which non-transgenic (wild) tobacco seedlings were exposed to salt stress in presence of flavan-3-ols, epicatechin and epigallocatechin. The in vitro exposed seedlings showed similar trend of increase in pectin methyl esterification through decreasing PME activity as observed in CsF3H transgenic lines. Taken together, overexpression of CsF3H provided tolerance to salt stress and fungus A. solani infection to transgenic tobacco through improved antioxidant system and enhanced pectin methyl esterification.

  15. Rhizoctonia bataticola lectin (RBL) induces phenotypic and functional characteristics of macrophages in THP-1 cells and human monocytes.

    PubMed

    Pujari, Radha; Kumar, Natesh; Ballal, Suhas; Eligar, Sachin M; Anupama, S; Bhat, Ganapati; Swamy, Bale M; Inamdar, Shashikala R; Shastry, Padma

    2015-02-01

    We have previously reported that a fungal lectin, Rhizoctonia bataticola lectin (RBL), stimulates proliferation and secretion of Th1/Th2 cytokines in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). In the present study, we evaluated the ability of RBL to differentiate human monocytes to macrophages. RBL induced morphological changes indicative of differentiation in primary monocytes and THP-1 cells. Stimulation with RBL resulted in significant up-regulation of differentiation markers - CD54, HLA-DR, CD11b and CD11c and secretion of proinflammatory cytokines - IL-1β, TNF-α and IL-6. Functionally, RBL profoundly increased phagocytic activity in monocytes. In THP-1 cells, RBL-induced phagocytosis was higher compared to the effect induced by combination of phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA) and lipopolysaccharide (LPS). RBL induced a significant increase in matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) activity in comparison with a combined treatment of PMA+LPS. Mechanistic studies revealed the involvement of the NF-κB pathway in RBL-induced differentiation of monocytes. The data suggest that RBL mimics the combined action of PMA and LPS to induce morphological and functional differentiation in human monocytes and monocytic cell line - THP-1 to macrophages. Human monocytes differentiated to macrophages with RBL have the potential as an in vitro model to study macrophage biology. PMID:25555439

  16. Rhizoctonia bataticola lectin (RBL) induces phenotypic and functional characteristics of macrophages in THP-1 cells and human monocytes.

    PubMed

    Pujari, Radha; Kumar, Natesh; Ballal, Suhas; Eligar, Sachin M; Anupama, S; Bhat, Ganapati; Swamy, Bale M; Inamdar, Shashikala R; Shastry, Padma

    2015-02-01

    We have previously reported that a fungal lectin, Rhizoctonia bataticola lectin (RBL), stimulates proliferation and secretion of Th1/Th2 cytokines in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). In the present study, we evaluated the ability of RBL to differentiate human monocytes to macrophages. RBL induced morphological changes indicative of differentiation in primary monocytes and THP-1 cells. Stimulation with RBL resulted in significant up-regulation of differentiation markers - CD54, HLA-DR, CD11b and CD11c and secretion of proinflammatory cytokines - IL-1β, TNF-α and IL-6. Functionally, RBL profoundly increased phagocytic activity in monocytes. In THP-1 cells, RBL-induced phagocytosis was higher compared to the effect induced by combination of phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA) and lipopolysaccharide (LPS). RBL induced a significant increase in matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) activity in comparison with a combined treatment of PMA+LPS. Mechanistic studies revealed the involvement of the NF-κB pathway in RBL-induced differentiation of monocytes. The data suggest that RBL mimics the combined action of PMA and LPS to induce morphological and functional differentiation in human monocytes and monocytic cell line - THP-1 to macrophages. Human monocytes differentiated to macrophages with RBL have the potential as an in vitro model to study macrophage biology.

  17. Isolation and characterization of a novel wheat cysteine-rich receptor-like kinase gene induced by Rhizoctonia cerealis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Kun; Rong, Wei; Qi, Lin; Li, Jiarui; Wei, Xuening; Zhang, Zengyan

    2013-10-01

    Cysteine-rich receptor kinases (CRKs) belong to the receptor-like kinase family. Little is known about CRK genes in wheat. We isolated a wheat CRK gene TaCRK1 from Rhizoctonia cerealis-resistant wheat CI12633 based on a differentially expressed sequence identified by RNA-Sequencing (RNA-Seq) analysis. TaCRK1 was more highly expressed in CI12633 than in susceptible Wenmai 6. Transcription of TaCRK1 in wheat was induced in CI12633 after R. cerealis infection and exogenous abscisic acid (ABA) treatment. The deduced TaCRK1 protein contained a signal peptide, two DUF26 domains, a transmembrane domain, and a serine/threonine protein kinase domain. Transient expression of a green fluorescence protein fused with TaCRK1 in wheat and onion indicated that TaCRK1 may localize to plasma membranes. Characterization of TaCRK1 silencing induced by virus-mediated method in CI12633 showed that the downregulation of TaCRK1 transcript did not obviously impair resistance to R. cerealis. This study paves the way to further CRK research in wheat.

  18. Fungal Peritonitis Due to Fusarium solani Species Complex Sequential Isolates Identified with DNA Sequencing in a Kidney Transplant Recipient in Brazil.

    PubMed

    da Silva-Rocha, Walicyranison Plinio; Zuza-Alves, Diana Luzia; Melo, Analy Salles de Azevedo; Chaves, Guilherme Maranhão

    2015-12-01

    Fungal peritonitis is a rare serious complication most commonly observed in immunocompromised patients under peritoneal dialysis. Nevertheless, this clinical condition is more difficult to treat than bacterial peritonitis. Bacterial peritonitis followed by the use of antibiotics is the main risk factor for developing fungal peritonitis. Candida spp. are more frequently isolated, and the isolation of filamentous fungi is only occasional. Here we describe a case of Fusarium solani species complex peritonitis associated with bacterial peritonitis in a female kidney transplant recipient with previous history of nephrotic syndrome. The patient has had Enterobacter sp. endocarditis and was hypertensive and diabetic. Two sequential isolates of F. solani were recovered from cultures and identified with different molecular techniques. She was successfully treated with 50 mg daily amphotericin B for 4 weeks.

  19. Functional Analyses of the Diels-Alderase Gene sol5 of Ascochyta rabiei and Alternaria solani Indicate that the Solanapyrone Phytotoxins Are Not Required for Pathogenicity.

    PubMed

    Kim, Wonyong; Park, Chung-Min; Park, Jeong-Jin; Akamatsu, Hajime O; Peever, Tobin L; Xian, Ming; Gang, David R; Vandemark, George; Chen, Weidong

    2015-04-01

    Ascochyta rabiei and Alternaria solani, the causal agents of Ascochyta blight of chickpea (Cicer arietinum) and early blight of potato (Solanum tuberosum), respectively, produce a set of phytotoxic compounds including solanapyrones A, B, and C. Although both the phytotoxicity of solanapyrones and their universal production among field isolates have been documented, the role of solanapyrones in pathogenicity is not well understood. Here, we report the functional characterization of the sol5 gene, which encodes a Diels-Alderase that catalyzes the final step of solanapyrone biosynthesis. Deletion of sol5 in both Ascochyta rabiei and Alternaria solani completely prevented production of solanapyrones and led to accumulation of the immediate precursor compound, prosolanapyrone II-diol, which is not toxic to plants. Deletion of sol5 did not negatively affect growth rate or spore production in vitro, and led to overexpression of the other solanapyrone biosynthesis genes, suggesting a possible feedback regulation mechanism. Phytotoxicity tests showed that solanapyrone A is highly toxic to several legume species and Arabidopsis thaliana. Despite the apparent phytotoxicity of solanapyrone A, pathogenicity tests showed that solanapyrone-minus mutants of Ascochyta rabiei and Alternaria solani were equally virulent as their corresponding wild-type progenitors, suggesting that solanapyrones are not required for pathogenicity.

  20. Functional Analyses of the Diels-Alderase Gene sol5 of Ascochyta rabiei and Alternaria solani Indicate that the Solanapyrone Phytotoxins Are Not Required for Pathogenicity.

    PubMed

    Kim, Wonyong; Park, Chung-Min; Park, Jeong-Jin; Akamatsu, Hajime O; Peever, Tobin L; Xian, Ming; Gang, David R; Vandemark, George; Chen, Weidong

    2015-04-01

    Ascochyta rabiei and Alternaria solani, the causal agents of Ascochyta blight of chickpea (Cicer arietinum) and early blight of potato (Solanum tuberosum), respectively, produce a set of phytotoxic compounds including solanapyrones A, B, and C. Although both the phytotoxicity of solanapyrones and their universal production among field isolates have been documented, the role of solanapyrones in pathogenicity is not well understood. Here, we report the functional characterization of the sol5 gene, which encodes a Diels-Alderase that catalyzes the final step of solanapyrone biosynthesis. Deletion of sol5 in both Ascochyta rabiei and Alternaria solani completely prevented production of solanapyrones and led to accumulation of the immediate precursor compound, prosolanapyrone II-diol, which is not toxic to plants. Deletion of sol5 did not negatively affect growth rate or spore production in vitro, and led to overexpression of the other solanapyrone biosynthesis genes, suggesting a possible feedback regulation mechanism. Phytotoxicity tests showed that solanapyrone A is highly toxic to several legume species and Arabidopsis thaliana. Despite the apparent phytotoxicity of solanapyrone A, pathogenicity tests showed that solanapyrone-minus mutants of Ascochyta rabiei and Alternaria solani were equally virulent as their corresponding wild-type progenitors, suggesting that solanapyrones are not required for pathogenicity. PMID:25372118

  1. Assessment of genetic diversity and distribution of endophytic fungal communities of Alternaria solani isolates associated with the dominant Karanja plants in Sanganer Region of Rajasthan.

    PubMed

    Tiwari, Kartikeya; Chittora, Manish

    2013-12-01

    Higher plants are ubiquitously colonized with fungal endophytes that often lack readily detectable structures. Current study examines the distribution of endophytic fungal communities within Karanja plants and diversity of novel fungal endophyte Alternaria solani isolates collected from different locations of Sanganer region of Rajasthan. Results confirmed that A. solani is a major fungal endophyte consortium associated with Karanja plants. PCR Amplified fragments using random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) primers were subjected to unweighted pair group method analysis (UPGMA), which clearly distinguished twelve ecologically diverse A. solani isolates. A total of 58 RAPD loci were amplified, out of which 35 (60.34%) were polymorphic and 23 were monomorphic (39.66%) in nature. These polymorphic loci were identified with an average of 2.92 bands per primer. The efficacy of RAPD markers proved as an efficient marker system with respect to detection of polymorphism and number of loci scored and can be used for the identification of a particular isolates, thereby defining core collections and strengthening their exploitation in acquiring novel products produced by them. PMID:23888281

  2. Induction of cutinolytic esterase activity during saprophytic growth of cucurbit pathogens, Fusarium solani f. sp. cucurbitae races one and two (Nectria haematococca MPI and MPV, respectively).

    PubMed

    Hawthorne, B T; Rees-George, J; Crowhurst, R N

    2001-01-15

    Cutins from fruit of Cucurbita maxima and Cucurbita moschata cultivars, apple and a C(16) alcohol (hexadecanol) were used to induce cutinolytic esterase activity during saprophytic growth of strains of the two cucurbit pathogens, Fusarium solani f. sp. cucurbitae, race 1 (Nectria haematococca mating population (MPI) and F. solani f. sp. cucurbitae, race 2 (MPV). Four strains of MPV and 11 strains of MPI were were included in the study. Although we were primarily interested in the two cucurbit pathogens (MPI and MPV), six strains of the pea pathogen F. solani f. sp. pisi (MPVI) were included to provide a comparison since most of the knowledge on cutinase activity in N. haematococca has come from a study of that group. Cutinolytic esterase was induced in all strains from both MPV and MPVI but was not detected in any of the 11 strains from MPI regardless of the induction conditions. The amount of cutinolytic esterase activity induced in the MPV strains differed according to the strain and both the source and the amount of cutin used in the induction medium. Information on the influence of cutin source and pH on the induction of cutinolytic esterase activity during saprophytic growth of strains from MPV demonstrates that the gene is regulated differently from that in MPVI.

  3. Characterization of bacteria that suppress rhizoctonia damping-off in bark compost media by analysis of Fatty Acid biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Tunlid, A; Hoitink, H A; Low, C; White, D C

    1989-06-01

    Examination of cucumber roots (Cucumis sativus L.) grown in bark compost media and of the surrounding edaphic substrate showed profiles of polar lipid fatty acids commonly found in bacteria. The composition of fatty acids in these profiles differed significantly between roots grown in a medium naturally suppressive to Rhizoctonia damping-off and roots from a conducive medium. Cucumber roots from the suppressive medium had higher proportions of cis-vaccenic acid (18:1 omega 7c) and the iso-branched monoenoic fatty acid i17:1 omega 8 but lower proportions of several iso- and anteiso-branched fatty acids compared with roots from the conducive medium. The concentrations of the bacterial fatty acids were significantly lower in the surrounding media. However, the suppressive and conducive growth substrates had differences in the composition of the bacterial fatty acids similar to those found between the cucumber roots proper. These results suggest major differences in bacterial community composition between suppressive and conducive systems. Fatty acid analyses were also utilized to examine the effects on bacterial community composition of root colonization by Flavobacterium balustinum 299, a biocontrol agent. The concentration of the most prominent fatty acid in this bacterium, i17:1 omega 8, was increased on roots produced from inoculated seeds in a medium rendered suppressive by the treatment. This change was concomitant with a significant increase in the concentration of 18:1 omega 7c, not present in the lipids of the antagonist, indicating a shift in the microflora from a conducive to a suppressive bacterial community.

  4. Serine protease identification (in vitro) and molecular structure predictions (in silico) from a phytopathogenic fungus, Alternaria solani.

    PubMed

    Chandrasekaran, Murugesan; Chandrasekar, Raman; Sa, Tongmin; Sathiyabama, Muthukrishnan

    2014-07-01

    Serine proteases are involved in an enormous number of biological processes. The present study aims at characterizing three-dimensional (3D) molecular architecture of serine proteases from early blight pathogen, Alternaria solani that are hypothesized to be markers of phytopathogenicity. A serine protease was purified to homogeneity and MALDI-TOF-MS/MS analysis revealed that protease produced by A. solani belongs to alkaline serine proteases (AsP). AsP is made up of 403 amino acid residues with molecular weight of 42.1 kDa (Isoelectric point - 6.51) and its molecular formula was C1859 H2930 N516 O595 S4 . AsP structure model was built based on its comparative homology with serine protease using the program, MODELER. AsP had 16 β-sheets and 10 α-helices, with Ser(350) (G347-G357), Asp(158) (D158-H169), and His(193) (H193-G203) in separate turn/coil structures. Biological metal binding region situated near 6th-helix and His(193) residue is responsible for metal binding site. Also, calcium ion (Ca(2+)) is coordinated by the carboxyl groups of Lys(84), Ile(85), Lys(86), Asp(87), Phe(88), Ala(89), Ala(90) (K84-A90) for first Ca(2+) binding site and carbonyl oxygen atom of Lys(244), Gly(245), Arg(246), Thr(247), Lys(248), Lys(249), and Ala(250) (K244-A250), for second Ca(2+) binding site. Moreover, Ramachandran plot analysis of protein residues falling into most favored secondary structures were determined (83.3%). The predicted molecular 3D structural model was further verified using PROCHECK, ERRAT, and VADAR servers to confirm the geometry and stereo-chemical parameters of the molecular structural design. The functional analysis of AsP 3D molecular structure predictions familiar in the current study may provide a new perspective in the understanding and identification of antifungal protease inhibitor designing. PMID:24122785

  5. Serine protease identification (in vitro) and molecular structure predictions (in silico) from a phytopathogenic fungus, Alternaria solani.

    PubMed

    Chandrasekaran, Murugesan; Chandrasekar, Raman; Sa, Tongmin; Sathiyabama, Muthukrishnan

    2014-07-01

    Serine proteases are involved in an enormous number of biological processes. The present study aims at characterizing three-dimensional (3D) molecular architecture of serine proteases from early blight pathogen, Alternaria solani that are hypothesized to be markers of phytopathogenicity. A serine protease was purified to homogeneity and MALDI-TOF-MS/MS analysis revealed that protease produced by A. solani belongs to alkaline serine proteases (AsP). AsP is made up of 403 amino acid residues with molecular weight of 42.1 kDa (Isoelectric point - 6.51) and its molecular formula was C1859 H2930 N516 O595 S4 . AsP structure model was built based on its comparative homology with serine protease using the program, MODELER. AsP had 16 β-sheets and 10 α-helices, with Ser(350) (G347-G357), Asp(158) (D158-H169), and His(193) (H193-G203) in separate turn/coil structures. Biological metal binding region situated near 6th-helix and His(193) residue is responsible for metal binding site. Also, calcium ion (Ca(2+)) is coordinated by the carboxyl groups of Lys(84), Ile(85), Lys(86), Asp(87), Phe(88), Ala(89), Ala(90) (K84-A90) for first Ca(2+) binding site and carbonyl oxygen atom of Lys(244), Gly(245), Arg(246), Thr(247), Lys(248), Lys(249), and Ala(250) (K244-A250), for second Ca(2+) binding site. Moreover, Ramachandran plot analysis of protein residues falling into most favored secondary structures were determined (83.3%). The predicted molecular 3D structural model was further verified using PROCHECK, ERRAT, and VADAR servers to confirm the geometry and stereo-chemical parameters of the molecular structural design. The functional analysis of AsP 3D molecular structure predictions familiar in the current study may provide a new perspective in the understanding and identification of antifungal protease inhibitor designing.

  6. Gaseous hexane biodegradation by Fusarium solani in two liquid phase packed-bed and stirred-tank bioreactors.

    PubMed

    Arriaga, Sonia; Muñoz, Raúl; Hernández, Sergio; Guieysse, Benoit; Revah, Sergio

    2006-04-01

    Biofiltration of hydrophobic volatile pollutants is intrinsically limited by poor transfer of the pollutants from the gaseous to the liquid biotic phase, where biodegradation occurs. This study was conducted to evaluate the potential of silicone oil for enhancing the transport and subsequent biodegradation of hexane by the fungus Fusarium solani in various bioreactor configurations. Silicone oil was first selected among various solvents for its biocompatibility, nonbiodegradability, and good partitioning properties toward hexane. In batch tests, the use of silicone oil improved hexane specific biodegradation by approximately 60%. Subsequent biodegradation experiments were conducted in stirred-tank (1.5 L) and packed-bed (2.5 L) bioreactors fed with a constant gaseous hexane load of 180 g x m(-3)(reactor) x h(-1) and operated for 12 and 40 days, respectively. In the stirred reactors, the maximum hexane elimination capacity (EC) increased from 50 g x m(-3)(reactor) x h(-1) (removal efficiency, RE of 28%) in the control not supplied with silicone oil to 120 g x m(-3)(reactor) x h(-1) in the biphasic system (67% RE). In the packed-bed bioreactors, the maximum EC ranged from 110 (50% RE) to 180 g x m(-3)(reactor) x h(-1) (> 90% RE) in the control and two-liquid-phase systems, respectively. These results represent, to the best of our knowledge, the first reported case of fungi use in a two-liquid-phase bioreactor and the highest hexane removal capacities so far reported in biofilters. PMID:16646479

  7. Fusarium paranaense sp. nov., a member of the Fusarium solani species complex causes root rot on soybean in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Costa, Sarah S; Matos, Kedma S; Tessmann, Dauri J; Seixas, Claudine D S; Pfenning, Ludwig H

    2016-01-01

    Isolates of Fusarium obtained from soybean plants showing symptoms of root rot collected in subtropical southern and tropical central Brazil were characterized based on phylogenetic analyses, sexual crossing, morphology, and pathogenicity tests. A novel species within the Fusarium solani species complex (FSSC) causing soybean root rot is formally described herein as Fusarium paranaense. This species can be distinguished from the other soybean root rot pathogens in the FSSC, which are commonly associated with soybean sudden death syndrome (SDS) based on analyses of the combined DNA sequences of translation elongation factor 1-α and the second largest subunit of RNA polymerase II and on interspecies mating compatibility. Bayesian and maximum parsimony phylogenetic analyses showed that isolates of F. paranaense formed a distinct group in clade 3 of the FSSC in contrast to the pathogens currently known to cause SDS, which are in clade 2. Female fertile tester strains were developed that can be used for the identification of this new species in the FSSC based on sexual crosses. All isolates were heterothallic and belonged to a distinct mating population. Fusarium tucumaniae, a known SDS pathogen, was found in the subtropical southern region of the country.

  8. Gaseous hexane biodegradation by Fusarium solani in two liquid phase packed-bed and stirred-tank bioreactors.

    PubMed

    Arriaga, Sonia; Muñoz, Raúl; Hernández, Sergio; Guieysse, Benoit; Revah, Sergio

    2006-04-01

    Biofiltration of hydrophobic volatile pollutants is intrinsically limited by poor transfer of the pollutants from the gaseous to the liquid biotic phase, where biodegradation occurs. This study was conducted to evaluate the potential of silicone oil for enhancing the transport and subsequent biodegradation of hexane by the fungus Fusarium solani in various bioreactor configurations. Silicone oil was first selected among various solvents for its biocompatibility, nonbiodegradability, and good partitioning properties toward hexane. In batch tests, the use of silicone oil improved hexane specific biodegradation by approximately 60%. Subsequent biodegradation experiments were conducted in stirred-tank (1.5 L) and packed-bed (2.5 L) bioreactors fed with a constant gaseous hexane load of 180 g x m(-3)(reactor) x h(-1) and operated for 12 and 40 days, respectively. In the stirred reactors, the maximum hexane elimination capacity (EC) increased from 50 g x m(-3)(reactor) x h(-1) (removal efficiency, RE of 28%) in the control not supplied with silicone oil to 120 g x m(-3)(reactor) x h(-1) in the biphasic system (67% RE). In the packed-bed bioreactors, the maximum EC ranged from 110 (50% RE) to 180 g x m(-3)(reactor) x h(-1) (> 90% RE) in the control and two-liquid-phase systems, respectively. These results represent, to the best of our knowledge, the first reported case of fungi use in a two-liquid-phase bioreactor and the highest hexane removal capacities so far reported in biofilters.

  9. Comparative metabolite profiling of foxglove aphids (Aulacorthum solani Kaltenbach) on leaves of resistant and susceptible soybean strains.

    PubMed

    Sato, Dan; Sugimoto, Masahiro; Akashi, Hiromichi; Tomita, Masaru; Soga, Tomoyoshi

    2014-04-01

    Aphid infestations can cause severe decreases in soybean (Glycine max [L.] Merr.) yield. Since planting aphid-resistant soybean strains is a promising approach for pest control, understanding the resistance mechanisms employed by aphids is of considerable importance. We compared aphid resistance in seven soybean strains and found that strain Tohoku149 was the most resistant to the foxglove aphid, Aulacorthum solani Kaltenbach. We subsequently analyzed the metabolite profiles of aphids cultured on the leaves of resistant and susceptible soybean strains using capillary electrophoresis-time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Our findings showed that the metabolite profiles of several amino acids, glucose 6-phosphate, and components of the tricarboxylic acid cycle were similar in aphids reared on Tohoku149 leaves and in aphids maintained under conditions of starvation, suggesting that Tohoku149 is more resistant to aphid feeding. Compared to susceptible strains, we also found that two methylated metabolites, S-methylmethionine and trigonelline, were either not detected or decreased in aphids reared on Tohoku149 plants. Since these metabolites function as important sulfur transporters in phloem sap and osmoprotectants involved in salt and drought stress, respectively, aphid-resistance is considered to be related to sulfur metabolism and methylation. These results contribute to an increase in our understanding of soybean aphid resistance mechanisms at the molecular level.

  10. Reprint of: Effect of fermentation parameters, elicitors and precursors on camptothecin production from the endophyte Fusarium solani.

    PubMed

    Venugopalan, Aarthi; Potunuru, Uma Rani; Dixit, Madhulika; Srivastava, Smita

    2016-08-01

    Volumetric productivity of camptothecin from the suspension culture of the endophyte Fusarium solani was enhanced up to ∼152 fold (from 0.19μgl(-1)d(-1) to 28.9μgl(-1)d(-1)) under optimized fermentation conditions including initial pH (6.0), temperature (32°C) and agitation speed (80rpm) with (5% (v/v)) ethanol as medium component. Among various elicitors and precursors studied, tryptamine (0.5mM) as precursor and bovine serum albumin (BSA) (0.075mM) as an elicitor added on day 6 of the cultivation period resulted in maximum enhancement of camptothecin concentration (up to 4.5 and 3.4-fold, respectively). These leads provide immense scope for further enhancement in camptothecin productivity at bioreactor level. The cytotoxicity analysis of the crude camptothecin extract from the fungal biomass revealed its high effectiveness against colon and mammary gland cancer cell lines. PMID:27189536

  11. Molecular phylogenetic and pathogenetic characterization of Fusarium solani species complex (FSSC), the cause of dry rot on potato in Iran.

    PubMed

    Chehri, Khosrow; Ghasempour, Hamid Reza; Karimi, Naser

    2014-01-01

    Members of Fusarium solani species complex (FSSC) are common pathogens of potato, causing dry rot in the west of Iran which involved Hamedan, Kermanshah, Eilam and Kurdistan provinces. Therefore, the objectives in this study were to isolate and identify disease-causing FSSC from infected potato tubers based on the morphological and molecular characteristics. Forty-five isolates of Fusarium were obtained from potato tubers collected from the wet market in different regions of the west of Iran and identified as FSSC through morphological characters. All of the isolates were evaluated for their pathogenicity on healthy potato tubers in the planthouse. The tubers rot symptoms were observed on the 21st day after inoculation of Fusarium isolates on the tubers tested. In the tubers inoculation tests, lesion sizes were quite variable; therefore, the measurement was done to compare the depth and width of lesion expansion among the isolates. Based on the sequence data from translation elongation factor (EF-lα) gene and internal transcript spacer (ITS) regions analysis, all of the selected FSSC isolates were divided into two major groups. This is the first report on molecular identification of FSSC strains isolated from potato tubers in Iran and Fusarium falciforme was reported for the first time in Iran.

  12. Spore Germination and Carbon Metabolism in Fusarium solani V. Changes in Anaerobic Metabolism and Related Enzyme Activities during Development 1

    PubMed Central

    Cochrane, Vincent W.; Cochrane, Jean C.

    1966-01-01

    Macroconidia of Fusarium solani f. phascoli have no detectable capacity to respire glucose anaerobically; germinated spores and mycelium, on the other hand, ferment glucose, although slowly. Extracts of ungerminated spores contain hexokinase, phosphohexoisomerase, phosphofructokinase, aldolase, triose phosphate dehydrogenase, triose phosphate isomerase, phosphoglyceric kinase, enolase, phosphoglyceric mutase, pyruvate kinase, and pyruvate decarboxylase. It follows, therefore, that the appearance of fermentative capacity during spore germination cannot be ascribed to the de novo synthesis of any of these enzymes. During germination and mycelial development the specific activity of all of the enzymes named except phosphohexoisomerase and aldolase increases 2- to 8-fold. Specific activity of all of the enzymes is substantially higher than the fermentative capacity of intact cells, i.e., none is limiting to anaerobic respiration. The enzymatic assay data are consistent with a conclusion reached earlier on the basis of studies of aerobic glucose metabolism, that the process of germination involves an acceleration of pre-existing metabolic systems rather than an appearance of new pathways. PMID:16656324

  13. [The effect of infection by Fusarium solani f. sp. batatas on endogenous hormone levels in sweet potato seedling].

    PubMed

    Chai, Yi-Qiu; Chen, Li-Feng; Wang, Jin-Sheng

    2007-08-01

    The endogenous hormone ABA concentrations increased in the leaves, shoots and roots of sweet potato plants infected with Fusarium solani f. sp. batatas (FSB) or treated by its culture filtrate. The accumulation of ABA occurred firstly in the roots, but the highest concentration was in the shoots. The endogenous GA(1/3) concentration of leaves, shoots and roots of infected sweet potato kept at markedly low levels during the period of experiments.The ABA concentration of sweet potato seedlings increased observably after 9 h treatment with FSB culture filtrate, but decreased significantly after 15 h, and the GA(1/3) concentration increased markedly after 15 h treatment with 10(1), 10(2) dilution of FSB culture filtrate (after 12 h treatment with 10(3) dilution). The disease symptoms may be induced by the changes in concentration of ABA and GA(1/3) in the plants. The root rot-infected sweet potatoes grew upright without tailing, having aerial roots in knots near the ground, and were in full bloom in autumn.

  14. Fusarium solani species complex associated with carapace lesions and branchitis in captive American horseshoe crabs Limulus polyphemus.

    PubMed

    Tuxbury, Kathryn A; Shaw, Gillian C; Montali, Richard J; Clayton, Leigh Ann; Kwiatkowski, Nicole P; Dykstra, Michael J; Mankowski, Joseph L

    2014-07-01

    Captive American horseshoe crabs Limulus polyphemus housed at the National Aquarium presented with a variety of shell and gill lesions over a 3 yr period. Carapace lesions were located on both the dorsal and ventral prosoma and opisthosoma and included multifocal circular areas of tan discoloration, ulcerations, and/or pitting lesions, extending from superficial to full thickness. Gill lesions involved both the book gill cover (operculum) and individual book gill leaflets and included multifocal circular areas of tan discoloration, tan to off-white opaque proliferative lesions, and/or areas of black discoloration. Histopathology revealed fungal hyphae, with variable morphology throughout the thickened and irregular cuticle of the carapace and occasionally penetrating into subcuticular tissues, with associated amebocytic inflammation. Book gill leaflets were infiltrated by fungal hyphae and contained necrotic debris and amebocytes. Thirty-eight of 39 animals (97%) evaluated via histopathological examination had intralesional fungal hyphae. Fungal cultures of carapace and gill lesions were attempted in 26 tissue samples from 15 individuals and were positive in 13 samples (50%), with 10 cultures (77%) yielding identification to genus. Fusarium sp. was identified in 8 of the 10 cultures (80%) via culture morphology. The Fusarium solani species complex was confirmed in 6 of these 8 (75%) via polymerase chain reaction amplification of 2 different ribosomal-specific sequences of isolated fungal DNA. Ante-mortem systemic and topical treatments were performed on some affected individuals, but no appreciable change in lesions was observed. Mycotic dermatitis and branchitis are serious health issues for captive American horseshoe crabs. PMID:24991848

  15. Fusarium solani species complex associated with carapace lesions and branchitis in captive American horseshoe crabs Limulus polyphemus.

    PubMed

    Tuxbury, Kathryn A; Shaw, Gillian C; Montali, Richard J; Clayton, Leigh Ann; Kwiatkowski, Nicole P; Dykstra, Michael J; Mankowski, Joseph L

    2014-07-01

    Captive American horseshoe crabs Limulus polyphemus housed at the National Aquarium presented with a variety of shell and gill lesions over a 3 yr period. Carapace lesions were located on both the dorsal and ventral prosoma and opisthosoma and included multifocal circular areas of tan discoloration, ulcerations, and/or pitting lesions, extending from superficial to full thickness. Gill lesions involved both the book gill cover (operculum) and individual book gill leaflets and included multifocal circular areas of tan discoloration, tan to off-white opaque proliferative lesions, and/or areas of black discoloration. Histopathology revealed fungal hyphae, with variable morphology throughout the thickened and irregular cuticle of the carapace and occasionally penetrating into subcuticular tissues, with associated amebocytic inflammation. Book gill leaflets were infiltrated by fungal hyphae and contained necrotic debris and amebocytes. Thirty-eight of 39 animals (97%) evaluated via histopathological examination had intralesional fungal hyphae. Fungal cultures of carapace and gill lesions were attempted in 26 tissue samples from 15 individuals and were positive in 13 samples (50%), with 10 cultures (77%) yielding identification to genus. Fusarium sp. was identified in 8 of the 10 cultures (80%) via culture morphology. The Fusarium solani species complex was confirmed in 6 of these 8 (75%) via polymerase chain reaction amplification of 2 different ribosomal-specific sequences of isolated fungal DNA. Ante-mortem systemic and topical treatments were performed on some affected individuals, but no appreciable change in lesions was observed. Mycotic dermatitis and branchitis are serious health issues for captive American horseshoe crabs.

  16. Mechanism by which contact with plant cuticle triggers cutinase gene expression in the spores of Fusarium solani f. sp. pisi

    SciTech Connect

    Woloshuk, C.P.; Kolattukudy, P.E.

    1986-03-01

    Spores of the phytopathogenic fungus Fusarium solani f. sp. pisi were shown to produce the extracellular enzyme, cutinase, only when cutin or cutin hydrolysate was added to the spore suspension. Dihydroxy-C/sub 16/ acid and trihydroxy-C/sub 18/ acid, which are unique cutin monomers, showed the greatest cutinase-inducing activity. Experiments with several compounds structurally related to these fatty acids suggested that both a omega-hydroxyl and a midchain hydroxyl are required for cutinase-inducing activity. Cutinase appeared in the medium 30-45 min after the addition of the inducers to the spore suspension, and the activity level increased for 6 hr. Addition of cycloheximide (5 ..mu..g/ml) completely inhibited cutinase production, suggesting that protein synthesis was involved in the increase of cutinase activity. Immunoblot analysis with rabbit antibodies prepared against cutinase showed that cutinase protein increased in parallel with the increase in enzyme activity. Measurement of cutinase-specific RNA levels by dot-blot hybridization with /sup 32/P-labeled cutinase cDNA showed that the cutinase gene transcripts could be detected within 15 min after addition of the inducers. Addition of exogenous cutinase greatly enhanced the level of cutinase gene transcripts induced by cutin. These results strongly suggest that the fungal spore senses that it is in contact with the plant by the production of small amounts of cutin monomers catalyzed by the low level of cutinase carried by the spore and that these monomers induce the synthesis of cutinase needed for penetration of the fungus into the plant.

  17. Hyperspectral remote sensing for advanced detection of early blight (Alternaria solani) disease in potato (Solanum tuberosum) plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atherton, Daniel

    Early detection of disease and insect infestation within crops and precise application of pesticides can help reduce potential production losses, reduce environmental risk, and reduce the cost of farming. The goal of this study was the advanced detection of early blight (Alternaria solani) in potato (Solanum tuberosum) plants using hyperspectral remote sensing data captured with a handheld spectroradiometer. Hyperspectral reflectance spectra were captured 10 times over five weeks from plants grown to the vegetative and tuber bulking growth stages. The spectra were analyzed using principal component analysis (PCA), spectral change (ratio) analysis, partial least squares (PLS), cluster analysis, and vegetative indices. PCA successfully distinguished more heavily diseased plants from healthy and minimally diseased plants using two principal components. Spectral change (ratio) analysis provided wavelengths (490-510, 640, 665-670, 690, 740-750, and 935 nm) most sensitive to early blight infection followed by ANOVA results indicating a highly significant difference (p < 0.0001) between disease rating group means. In the majority of the experiments, comparisons of diseased plants with healthy plants using Fisher's LSD revealed more heavily diseased plants were significantly different from healthy plants. PLS analysis demonstrated the feasibility of detecting early blight infected plants, finding four optimal factors for raw spectra with the predictor variation explained ranging from 93.4% to 94.6% and the response variation explained ranging from 42.7% to 64.7%. Cluster analysis successfully distinguished healthy plants from all diseased plants except for the most mildly diseased plants, showing clustering analysis was an effective method for detection of early blight. Analysis of the reflectance spectra using the simple ratio (SR) and the normalized difference vegetative index (NDVI) was effective at differentiating all diseased plants from healthy plants, except for the

  18. Root response to Fusarium solani f. sp . glycines: temporal accumulation of transcripts in partially resistant and susceptible soybean.

    PubMed

    Iqbal, M J; Yaegashi, Satsuki; Ahsan, Rubina; Shopinski, Kay L; Lightfoot, David A

    2005-05-01

    Sudden death syndrome (SDS) of soybean is a complex of root rot disease caused by the semi-biotrophic fungus Fusarium solani f. sp. glycines (Fsg) and a leaf scorch disease caused by toxins produced by the pathogen in the roots. Development of partial rate-reducing resistance in roots to SDS was studied. The recombinant inbred line 23 (RIL23) that carried resistance conferred by six quantitative trait loci (QTL) derived from cultivars 'Essex' x 'Forrest' was compared to the susceptible cultivar Essex. Roots of RIL23 and its susceptible parent Essex were inoculated with Fsg. Transcript abundance (TA) of 191 ESTs was studied at five time points after inoculation. For most of the genes, there was an initial decrease in TA in the inoculated roots of both genotypes. By days 7 and 10 the inoculated roots of Essex failed to increase expression of the transcripts of defense-related genes. In RIL23 inoculated roots, the TA of 81 genes was increased by at least two-fold at day 3 (P=0.004), 88 genes at day 7 (P=0.0023) and 129 genes at day 10 (P=0.0026). A set of 35 genes maintained at least a two-fold higher abundance at all three time points. The increase in TA in RIL23 was in contrast to that observed in Essex where most of the ESTs showed either no change or a decreased TA. The ESTs with an increased TA had homology to the genes involved in resistance (analogs), signal transduction, plant defense, cell wall synthesis and transport of metabolites. Pathways that responded included the protein phosphorylation cascade, the phospholipase cascade and the phenolic natural products pathways, including isoflavone and cell wall synthesis. PMID:15815926

  19. Isolation, characterization and molecular three-dimensional structural predictions of metalloprotease from a phytopathogenic fungus, Alternaria solani (Ell. and Mart.) Sor.

    PubMed

    Chandrasekaran, Murugesan; Chandrasekar, Raman; Chun, Se-Chul; Sathiyabama, Muthukrishnan

    2016-08-01

    The present study aims at isolation, identification, characterization and prediction of three-dimensional molecular architecture of a proteolytic enzyme from the early blight pathogen, Alternaria solani which are hypothesized to be a marker of phytopathogenicity. Maximum enzyme production by A. solani was observed in Czapex's Dox broth amended with 2% (w/v) casein than other inducer amendments. Results indicate that the enzyme remained highly active in a pH range of 7.0-10.0 and a temperature range of 45-50°C. The enzyme was strongly inhibited by EDTA, whereas phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride and monovalent cations (Na(+), K(+)) had little effect. Metal ions such as MgSO4, CaCl2, KCl at 10 mM concentration showed a stimulatory effect (>85%) on protease activity. Matrix-assisted laser desorption and ionization time of flight/mass spectrometry analysis of partially purified enzyme revealed the presence of protease belonging to a keratinolytic protein (metalloprotease) of exopeptidase nature. Putative A. solani keratinolytic enzyme (AsK) is made up of 216 amino acid residues with molecular weight (MW) 24.5 kDa, having a molecular formula of C1094H1704N290O342S4. Ramachandran plot analysis of the protein residues falling into the most favored secondary structures was observed at 84.2%. The major protein structural blocks, 2-β-sheets, and 9-α-helices have a greater tendency to be conserved during the evolutionary process than do mere sequences of amino acids. Besides, AsK, model prediction showed the presence of a Zinc atom at helix regions (Helix 3, 6, 7: His(57), His(130), His(169), and Cys(123)). Thus, it can be concluded that the major proteinases of AsK are divalent cation-requiring metalloproteinases and make them potential targets of protease inhibitors designing. PMID:26924427

  20. Effect of iron salt counter ion in dose-response curves for inactivation of Fusarium solani in water through solar driven Fenton-like processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aurioles-López, Verónica; Polo-López, M. Inmaculada; Fernández-Ibáñez, Pilar; López-Malo, Aurelio; Bandala, Erick R.

    2016-02-01

    The inactivation of Fusarium solani in water was assessed by solar driven Fenton-like processes using three different iron salts: ferric acetylacetonate (Fe(acac)3), ferric chloride (FeCl3) and ferrous sulfate (FeSO4). The experimental conditions tested were [Fe] ≈ 5 mg L-1, [H2O2] ≈ 10 mg L-1 and [Fe] ≈ 10 mg L-1; [H2O2] ≈ 20 mg L-1 mild and high, respectively, and pH 3.0 and 5.0, under solar radiation. The highest inactivation rates were observed at high reaction conditions for the three iron salts tested at pH 5.0 with less than 3.0 kJ L-1 of accumulate energy (QUV) to achieve over 99.9% of F. solani inactivation. Fe(acac)3 was the best iron salt to accomplishing F. solani inactivation. The modified Fermi equation was used to fix the experimental inactivation, data showed it was helpful for modeling the process, adequately describing dose-response curves. Inactivation process using FeSO4 at pH 3.0 was modeled fairly with r2 = 0.98 and 0.99 (mild and high concentration, respectively). Fe(acac)3, FeCl3 and FeSO4 at high concentration (i.e. [Fe] ≈ 10 mg L-1; [H2O2] ≈ 20 mg L-1) and pH 5.0 showed the highest fitting values (r2 = 0.99). Iron salt type showed a remarkable influence on the Fenton-like inactivation process.

  1. Effect of iron salt counter ion in dose-response curves for inactivation of Fusarium solani in water through solar driven Fenton-like processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aurioles-López, Verónica; Polo-López, M. Inmaculada; Fernández-Ibáñez, Pilar; López-Malo, Aurelio; Bandala, Erick R.

    2016-02-01

    The inactivation of Fusarium solani in water was assessed by solar driven Fenton-like processes using three different iron salts: ferric acetylacetonate (Fe(acac)3), ferric chloride (FeCl3) and ferrous sulfate (FeSO4). The experimental conditions tested were [Fe] ≈ 5 mg L-1, [H2O2] ≈ 10 mg L-1 and [Fe] ≈ 10 mg L-1; [H2O2] ≈ 20 mg L-1 mild and high, respectively, and pH 3.0 and 5.0, under solar radiation. The highest inactivation rates were observed at high reaction conditions for the three iron salts tested at pH 5.0 with less than 3.0 kJ L-1 of accumulate energy (QUV) to achieve over 99.9% of F. solani inactivation. Fe(acac)3 was the best iron salt to accomplishing F. solani inactivation. The modified Fermi equation was used to fix the experimental inactivation, data showed it was helpful for modeling the process, adequately describing dose-response curves. Inactivation process using FeSO4 at pH 3.0 was modeled fairly with r2 = 0.98 and 0.99 (mild and high concentration, respectively). Fe(acac)3, FeCl3 and FeSO4 at high concentration (i.e. [Fe] ≈ 10 mg L-1; [H2O2] ≈ 20 mg L-1) and pH 5.0 showed the highest fitting values (r2 = 0.99). Iron salt type showed a remarkable influence on the Fenton-like inactivation process.

  2. Production of naphthoquinones and phenolics by a novel isolate Fusarium solani PSC-R of Palk Bay and their industrial applications.

    PubMed

    Rathna, Janarthanam; Yazhini, Kumanan Bharathi; Ajilda, Antony Alex Kennedy; Prabu, Halliah Guru Mallesh; Pandian, Shunmugiah Karutha

    2016-08-01

    The present study was attempted to enhance the production of naphthoquinones and phenolics by Fusarium solani PSC-R of Palk Bay origin, which exhibited potent antibacterial, antioxidant and dyeing activity. Maximum productivity of naphthoquinones and phenolics was achieved in potato infusion medium supplemented with 2% sucrose. Addition of nitrogen sources to the medium adversely affected the production of both naphthoquinones and phenolics. An initial pH of 5 and incubation at 31°C for six days at 140rpm was found to increase the yield (123.65mg/g of DW), concentration (867.33mg/l) and total naphthoquinones (602.8μM/g DW) by 7.58, 10.44 and 3.68-fold respectively. Similarly, the antioxidant and antibacterial activity associated with the phenolics of PSC-R increased by 1.5-fold in the optimized medium. The obtained results document the effective means of enhanced production of naphthoquinones and phenolics in the suspension culture of F. solani PSC-R at bioreactor level.

  3. Molecular Phylogenetic Diversity, Multilocus Haplotype Nomenclature, and In Vitro Antifungal Resistance within the Fusarium solani Species Complex▿

    PubMed Central

    O'Donnell, Kerry; Sutton, Deanna A.; Fothergill, Annette; McCarthy, Dora; Rinaldi, Michael G.; Brandt, Mary E.; Zhang, Ning; Geiser, David M.

    2008-01-01

    Members of the species-rich Fusarium solani species complex (FSSC) are responsible for approximately two-thirds all fusarioses of humans and other animals. In addition, many economically important phytopathogenic species are nested within this complex. Due to their increasing clinical relevance and because most of the human pathogenic and plant pathogenic FSSC lack Latin binomials, we have extended the multilocus haplotype nomenclatural system introduced in a previous study (D. C. Chang, G. B. Grant, K. O'Donnell, K. A. Wannemuehler, J. Noble-Wang, C. Y. Rao, L. M. Jacobson, C. S. Crowell, R. S. Sneed, F. M. T. Lewis, J. K. Schaffzin, M. A. Kainer, C. A. Genese, E. C. Alfonso, D. B. Jones, A. Srinivasan, S. K. Fridkin, and B. J. Park, JAMA 296:953-963, 2006) to all 34 species within the medically important FSSC clade 3 to facilitate global epidemiological studies. The typing scheme is based on polymorphisms in portions of the following three genes: the internal transcribed spacer region and domains D1 plus D2 of the nuclear large-subunit rRNA, the translation elongation factor 1 alpha gene (EF-1α), and the second largest subunit of RNA polymerase II gene (RPB2). Of the 251 isolates subjected to multilocus DNA sequence typing, 191 sequence types were differentiated, and these were distributed among three strongly supported clades designated 1, 2, and 3. All of the mycosis-associated isolates were restricted to FSSC clade 3, as previously reported (N. Zhang, K. O'Donnell, D. A. Sutton, F. A Nalim, R. C. Summerbell, A. A. Padhye, and D. M. Geiser, J. Clin. Microbiol. 44:2186-2190, 2006), and these represent at least 20 phylogenetically distinct species. Analyses of the combined DNA sequence data by use of two separate phylogenetic methods yielded the most robust hypothesis of evolutionary relationships and genetic diversity within the FSSC to date. The in vitro activities of 10 antifungals tested against 19 isolates representing 18 species that span the breadth of

  4. Resistance locus pyramids alter transcript abundance in soybean roots inoculated with Fusarium solani f.sp. glycines.

    PubMed

    Iqbal, M J; Yaegashi, S; Njiti, V N; Ahsan, R; Cryder, K L; Lightfoot, D A

    2002-11-01

    Soybean Sudden Death Syndrome (SDS) is caused by Fusarium solani f.sp. glycines (Fsg). Six quantitative trait loci (QTLs), each conferring partial resistance to SDS, have been discovered in an Essex x Forrest recombinant inbred line (RIL) population, but their mode of action is not clear. This study aimed to identify genes (ESTs) whose mRNA transcripts were altered in abundance in soybean roots following inoculation of Fsg. Roots of the soybean variety Forrest (four resistance alleles) were inoculated with Fsg, and 14 days later RNA sequences that were differentially expressed relative to uninoculated roots were enriched using suppression subtraction and differential display. The abundance of these RNAs was quantified in inoculated and non-inoculated roots by macroarray hybridizations. A unigene set of 135 ESTs was identified and used in a further macroarray analysis. The abundance of 28 cDNA fragments was increased more than two-fold in inoculated compared to uninoculated roots of RIL 23 (six resistance alleles). In Forrest and Essex (two resistance alleles), the level of only one mRNA was increased two-fold in inoculated roots compared to the uninoculated roots. In Essex most of the mRNAs analyzed decreased in abundance (61/135 showed a two-fold decrease), while in Forrest most mRNA abundances did not change. Among the 28 cDNAs that revealed a two-fold or higher increase in mRNA abundance in RIL 23, 14% code for proteins known to be involved in plant defense, 21% in metabolism, 14% in cell structure and 4% in transport. Unannotated ESTs accounted for 43% of the genes, and 4% of the sequences were previously unknown. The plant defense-related genes that showed a differential response to Fsg inoculation suggested a role for the phenylproponoid pathway in soybean defense against Fsg. In Essex, genes involved in plant defense, cell wall synthesis, ethylene synthesis and metabolism were expressed at lower levels in inoculated roots. The difference in response between

  5. Antifungal effect of some spice hydrosols.

    PubMed

    Boyraz, Nuh; Ozcan, Musa

    2005-12-01

    The antifungal effects of rosemary, cumin, sater (savory), basil and pickling herb hydrosols were investigated against Rhizoctonia solani, Fusarium oxysporum f. sp tulipae, Botrytis cinerea and Alternaria citri. Hydrosols of sater and pickling herb showed the most relevant fungicidal activity.

  6. Biological control of soilborne diseases in organic potato production as affected by varying environmental conditions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soilborne diseases are persistent problems in potato production and alternative management practices are needed, particularly in organic production, where control options are limited. Selected biocontrol organisms, including two naturally-occurring hypovirulent strains of Rhizoctonia solani (Rhs1a1 ...

  7. Genetic diversity in potato field populations of Thanatephorus cucumeris AG-3, revealed by ITS polymorphism and RAPD markers.

    PubMed

    Justesen, Annemarie Fejer; Yohalem, David; Bay, Anne; Nicolaisen, Mogens

    2003-11-01

    DNA sequence analysis of the internal transcribed spacer region 1 (ITS1) and random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) markers were used to survey genetic variability in relation to agronomic and regional factors among 60 isolates of Thanatephorus cucumeris (anamorph Rhizoctonia solani) collected from lesions on potato stems or sclerotia of potato tubers. Based on comparative sequence analysis it was shown that all isolates belonged to anastomosis group 3 subgroup Potato Type (AG-3 PT). ITS1 sequence polymorphisms were found within 45 of the 60 isolates showing that different types of the ITS-region are present in individual isolates. Cloning and sequence analysis of the ITS1 region from three selected isolates with sequence polymorphism showed that two different ITS1-types were present in each isolate. RAPD analysis identified 51 RAPD-phenotypes among the 60 investigated isolates indicating a high level of diversity within the subgroup AG-3 PT. Putative clonal isolates with identical RAPD- and ITS1-types were identified within fields, and in one case the same phenotype was found in two different fields separated by several hundred kilometers. Population subdivision analysis based on phenotypic as well as genotypic diversities showed differentiation among populations from different fields when isolates were sampled from tubers, indicating restricted gene flow among soil populations. Low differentiation was seen among field populations sampled from stems, indicating that gene flow is taking place. The population structure was not influenced by the previous crop in the rotation nor by the two cultivars 'Sava' and 'Bintje'.

  8. Lipofuscins and sclerotial differentiation in phytopathogenic fungi.

    PubMed

    Georgiou, Christos D; Zees, Athanasios

    2002-01-01

    Lipofuscins of lipidic and proteinaceous origin were identified by their excitation and emission spectra in phytopathogenic fungal representatives of different sclerotial differentiation types. Lipofuscin pigments in Sclerotium rolfsii, Rhizoctonia solani, Sclerotinia minor and Sclerotinia sclerotiorum showed similar excitation and emission maxima (ex-em 330-450, 330-450, 330-470 and 330-470 nm, respectively). Sclerotial differentiation of these fungi was proceeded by a 4.2, 2.5, 2.7, 2.5 and 6, 2.9, 3.8, 3.1 fold increase of lipofuscin accumulation (per lipid and protein content), per respective fungus, as compared to their undifferentiated stage. Lipofuscin levels were higher in older than in younger mycelia and this phenomenon was more profound in S. rolfsii. Since lipofuscins are considered as indicators of oxidative stress, these data are in accordance with the hypothesis that suggests oxidative stress to be a common underlying factor in sclerotial differentiation of sclerotia-forming filamentous phytopathogenic fungi. PMID:12014481

  9. Identification of a putative Solanum tuberosum transcriptional coactivator up-regulated in potato tubers by Fusarium solani f. sp. eumartii infection and wounding.

    PubMed

    Godoy, Andrea V.; Zanetti, María Eugenia; San Segundo, Blanca; Casalongué, Claudia A.

    2001-06-01

    Coadaptors or coactivators are a new class of transcription factors capable of interconnecting a regulator DNA-binding protein with a component of the basal transcription machinery allowing transcriptional activation to proceed. We report the identification of a novel Solanum tuberosum ssp. tuberosum putative transcription coactivator, named StMBF1 (Solanum tuberosum multiprotein bridging factor 1). The StMBF1 cDNA was isolated from a Fusarium solani f. sp. eumartii-infected potato tuber cDNA library, using a differential screening approach. StMBF1 is up-regulated during fungal attack as well as on wounding. A Fusarium elicitor source and ethylene precursor and salicylic acid also regulate StMBF1 expression. The precise role of StMBF1 during the plant response against environmental stresses remains to be elucidated.

  10. Development of cycling probe-based real-time PCR system to detect Fusarium species and Fusarium solani species complex (FSSC).

    PubMed

    Muraosa, Yasunori; Schreiber, Angelica Zaninelli; Trabasso, Plínio; Matsuzawa, Tetsuhiro; Taguchi, Hideaki; Moretti, Maria Luiza; Mikami, Yuzuru; Kamei, Katsuhiko

    2014-05-01

    In the present study, we developed a new real-time PCR system based on the cycling probe technology (CPT), which is composed of two single tube real-time PCR assays: the Fusarium genus-specific assay and the Fusarium solani species complex (FSSC)-specific assay with primers targeting the 28s ribosomal RNA gene. The Fusarium genus-specific assay was shown to be highly specific, detecting all reference Fusarium strains with no cross-reaction with other reference fungal strains, such as Aspergillus spp. and human DNA. The FSSC-specific assay also reacted very specifically with FSSC, except for a cross-reaction with Fusarium lunatum. To validate the real-time PCR system, we tested 87 clinical isolates of Fusarium spp. Identification results from the real-time PCR system were found to be 100% concordant with those from DNA sequencing of EF-1α gene. The sensitivity testing also demonstrated high sensitivity, enabling detection of one copy of standard DNA with good reproducibility. Furthermore, both assays were shown to be extremely sensitive even when fungal cells were mixed with human cells, detecting 3 germinated conidia spiked in 3mL of human blood. To apply our new real-time PCR system to the molecular diagnosis of fusariosis, we evaluated its efficacy using a mouse model of invasive F. solani infection. Plasma and whole blood samples of infected mice were tested using the real-time PCR system. The sensitivity of the real-time PCR system was found to be 100% (n=4) in plasma samples. In contrast, no amplification signal was detected in whole blood samples. This system could provide a rapid and precise diagnostic tool for early diagnosis, which is necessary for appropriate treatment and improvement of prognosis of disseminated fusariosis.

  11. Inhibition of cancer cell proliferation and apoptosis-inducing activity of fungal taxol and its precursor baccatin III purified from endophytic Fusarium solani

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Taxol (generic name paclitaxel), a plant-derived antineoplastic agent, used widely against breast, ovarian and lung cancer, was originally isolated from the bark of the Pacific yew, Taxus brevifolia. The limited supply of the drug has prompted efforts to find alternative sources, such as chemical synthesis, tissue and cell cultures of the Taxus species both of which are expensive and yield low levels. Fermentation processes with microorganisms would be the methods of choice to lower the costs and increase yields. Previously we have reported that F. solani isolated from T. celebica produced taxol and its precursor baccatin III in liquid grown cultures J Biosci 33:259-67, 2008. This study was performed to evaluate the inhibition of proliferation and induction of apoptosis of cancer cell lines by the fungal taxol and fungal baccatin III of F. solani isolated from T. celebica. Methods Cell lines such as HeLa, HepG2, Jurkat, Ovcar3 and T47D were cultured individually and treated with fungal taxol, baccatin III with or without caspase inhibitors according to experimental requirements. Their efficacy on apoptotic induction was examined. Results Both fungal taxol and baccatin III inhibited cell proliferation of a number of cancer cell lines with IC50 ranging from 0.005 to 0.2 μM for fungal taxol and 2 to 5 μM for fungal baccatin III. They also induced apoptosis in JR4-Jurkat cells with a possible involvement of anti-apoptotic Bcl2 and loss in mitochondrial membrane potential, and was unaffected by inhibitors of caspase-9,-2 or -3 but was prevented in presence of caspase-10 inhibitor. DNA fragmentation was also observed in cells treated with fungal taxol and baccatin III. Conclusions The cytotoxic activity exhibited by fungal taxol and baccatin III involves the same mechanism, dependent on caspase-10 and membrane potential loss of mitochondria, with taxol having far greater cytotoxic potential. PMID:24152585

  12. Salicylic and jasmonic acid pathways are necessary for defence against Dickeya solani as revealed by a novel method for Blackleg disease screening of in vitro grown potato.

    PubMed

    Burra, D D; Mühlenbock, P; Andreasson, E

    2015-09-01

    Potato is major crop ensuring food security in Europe, and blackleg disease is increasingly causing losses in yield and during storage. Recently, one blackleg pathogen, Dickeya solani has been shown to be spreading in Northern Europe that causes aggressive disease development. Currently, identification of tolerant commercial potato varieties has been unsuccessful; this is confounded by the complicated etiology of the disease and a strong environmental influence on disease development. There is currently a lack of efficient testing systems. Here, we describe a system for quantification of blackleg symptoms on shoots of sterile in vitro potato plants, which saves time and space compared to greenhouse and existing field assays. We found no evidence for differences in infection between the described in vitro-based screening method and existing greenhouse assays. This system facilitates efficient screening of blackleg disease response of potato plants independent of other microorganisms and variable environmental conditions. We therefore used the in vitro screening method to increase understanding of plant mechanisms involved in blackleg disease development by analysing disease response of hormone- related (salicylic and jasmonic acid) transgenic potato plants. We show that both jasmonic (JA) and salicylic (SA) acid pathways regulate tolerance to blackleg disease in potato, a result unlike previous findings in Arabidopsis defence response to necrotrophic bacteria. We confirm this by showing induction of a SA marker, pathogenesis-related protein 1 (StPR1), and a JA marker, lipoxygenase (StLOX), in Dickeya solani infected in vitro potato plants. We also observed that tubers of transgenic potato plants were more susceptible to soft rot compared to wild type, suggesting a role for SA and JA pathways in general tolerance to Dickeya.

  13. Salicylic and jasmonic acid pathways are necessary for defence against Dickeya solani as revealed by a novel method for Blackleg disease screening of in vitro grown potato.

    PubMed

    Burra, D D; Mühlenbock, P; Andreasson, E

    2015-09-01

    Potato is major crop ensuring food security in Europe, and blackleg disease is increasingly causing losses in yield and during storage. Recently, one blackleg pathogen, Dickeya solani has been shown to be spreading in Northern Europe that causes aggressive disease development. Currently, identification of tolerant commercial potato varieties has been unsuccessful; this is confounded by the complicated etiology of the disease and a strong environmental influence on disease development. There is currently a lack of efficient testing systems. Here, we describe a system for quantification of blackleg symptoms on shoots of sterile in vitro potato plants, which saves time and space compared to greenhouse and existing field assays. We found no evidence for differences in infection between the described in vitro-based screening method and existing greenhouse assays. This system facilitates efficient screening of blackleg disease response of potato plants independent of other microorganisms and variable environmental conditions. We therefore used the in vitro screening method to increase understanding of plant mechanisms involved in blackleg disease development by analysing disease response of hormone- related (salicylic and jasmonic acid) transgenic potato plants. We show that both jasmonic (JA) and salicylic (SA) acid pathways regulate tolerance to blackleg disease in potato, a result unlike previous findings in Arabidopsis defence response to necrotrophic bacteria. We confirm this by showing induction of a SA marker, pathogenesis-related protein 1 (StPR1), and a JA marker, lipoxygenase (StLOX), in Dickeya solani infected in vitro potato plants. We also observed that tubers of transgenic potato plants were more susceptible to soft rot compared to wild type, suggesting a role for SA and JA pathways in general tolerance to Dickeya. PMID:25903921

  14. The wheat R2R3-MYB transcription factor TaRIM1 participates in resistance response against the pathogen Rhizoctonia cerealis infection through regulating defense genes

    PubMed Central

    Shan, Tianlei; Rong, Wei; Xu, Huijun; Du, Lipu; Liu, Xin; Zhang, Zengyan

    2016-01-01

    The necrotrophic fungus Rhizoctonia cerealis is a major pathogen of sharp eyespot that is a devastating disease of wheat (Triticum aestivum). Little is known about roles of MYB genes in wheat defense response to R. cerealis. In this study, TaRIM1, a R. cerealis-induced wheat MYB gene, was identified by transcriptome analysis, then cloned from resistant wheat CI12633, and its function and preliminary mechanism were studied. Sequence analysis showed that TaRIM1 encodes a R2R3-MYB transcription factor with transcription-activation activity. The molecular-biological assays revealed that the TaRIM1 protein localizes to nuclear and can bind to five MYB-binding site cis-elements. Functional dissection results showed that following R. cerealis inoculation, TaRIM1 silencing impaired the resistance of wheat CI12633, whereas TaRIM1 overexpression significantly increased resistance of transgenic wheat compared with susceptible recipient. TaRIM1 positively regulated the expression of five defense genes (Defensin, PR10, PR17c, nsLTP1, and chitinase1) possibly through binding to MYB-binding sites in their promoters. These results suggest that the R2R3-MYB transcription factor TaRIM1 positively regulates resistance response to R. cerealis infection through modulating the expression of a range of defense genes, and that TaRIM1 is a candidate gene to improve sharp eyespot resistance in wheat. PMID:27364458

  15. Analysis of rice PDR-like ABC transporter genes in sheath blight resistance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sheath blight caused by Rhizoctonia solani is one of the most damaging diseases of rice worldwide. To understand the molecular mechanism of resistance, we identified 450 differentially expressed genes in a resistant rice cultivar Jasmine 85 after R. solani infection with a combination of DNA microar...

  16. Isolation and structure elucidation of a new antifungal and antibacterial antibiotic produced by Streptomyces sp. 201.

    PubMed

    Bordoloi, G N; Kumari, B; Guha, A; Bordoloi, M; Yadav, R N; Roy, M K; Bora, T C

    2001-08-01

    An antibacterial and antifungal antibiotic was isolated from the culture filtrate of Streptomyces sp. 201, and its structure was determined as 2-methyl-heptyl isonicotinate by extensive use of NMR spectroscopy. The compound exhibited marked antimicrobial activity against Bacillus subtilis, Shigella sp., Klebsiella sp., E. coli, Proteus mirabilis, and the pathogenic fungi, Fusarium moniliforme, F. semitectum, F. oxysporum, F. solani and Rhizoctonia solani.

  17. The wheat AGC kinase TaAGC1 is a positive contributor to host resistance to the necrotrophic pathogen Rhizoctonia cerealis

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Xiuliang; Yang, Kun; Wei, Xuening; Zhang, Qiaofeng; Rong, Wei; Du, Lipu; Ye, Xingguo; Qi, Lin; Zhang, Zengyan

    2015-01-01

    Considerable progress has been made in understanding the roles of AGC kinases in mammalian systems. However, very little is known about the roles of AGC kinases in wheat (Triticum aestivum). The necrotrophic fungus Rhizoctonia cerealis is the major pathogen of the destructive disease sharp eyespot of wheat. In this study, the wheat AGC kinase gene TaAGC1, responding to R. cerealis infection, was isolated, and its properties and role in wheat defence were characterized. R. cerealis-resistant wheat lines expressed TaAGC1 at higher levels than susceptible wheat lines. Sequence and phylogenetic analyses showed that the TaAGC1 protein is a serine/threonine kinase belonging to the NDR (nuclear Dbf2-related) subgroup of AGC kinases. Kinase activity assays proved that TaAGC1 is a functional kinase and the Asp-239 residue located in the conserved serine/threonine kinase domain of TaAGC1 is required for the kinase activity. Subcellular localization assays indicated that TaAGC1 localized in the cytoplasm and nucleus. Virus-induced TaAGC1 silencing revealed that the down-regulation of TaAGC1 transcripts significantly impaired wheat resistance to R. cerealis. The molecular characterization and responses of TaAGC1 overexpressing transgenic wheat plants indicated that TaAGC1 overexpression significantly enhanced resistance to sharp eyespot and reduced the accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in wheat plants challenged with R. cerealis. Furthermore, ROS-scavenging and certain defence-associated genes were up-regulated in resistant plants overexpressing TaAGC1 but down-regulated in susceptible knock-down plants. These results suggested that the kinase TaAGC1 positively contributes to wheat immunity to R. cerealis through regulating expression of ROS-related and defence-associated genes. PMID:26220083

  18. Rhizoctonia Bataticola Lectin (RBL) Induces Caspase-8-Mediated Apoptosis in Human T-Cell Leukemia Cell Lines but Not in Normal CD3 and CD34 Positive Cells

    PubMed Central

    Pujari, Radha; Eligar, Sachin M.; Kumar, Natesh; Barkeer, Srikanth; Reddy, Vishwanath; Swamy, Bale M.; Inamdar, Shashikala R.; Shastry, Padma

    2013-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated immunostimulatory activity of a fungal lectin, Rhizoctonia bataticola lectin (RBL), towards normal human peripheral blood mononuclear cells. The present study aimed to explore the anticancer activities of RBL using human leukemic T-cell lines, Molt-4, Jurkat and HuT-78. RBL exhibited significant binding (>90%) to the cell membrane that was effectively inhibited by complex glycoproteins such as mucin (97% inhibition) and asialofetuin (94% inhibition) but not simple sugars such as N-acetyl-D-galactosamine, glucose and sucrose. RBL induced a dose and time dependent inhibition of proliferation and induced cytotoxicity in the cell lines. The percentage of apoptotic cells, as determined by hypodiploidy, was 33% and 42% in Molt-4 and Jurkat cells, respectively, compared to 3.11% and 2.92% in controls. This effect was associated with a concomitant decrease in the G0/G1 population. Though initiator caspase-8 and -9 were activated upon exposure to RBL, inhibition of caspase-8 but not caspase-9 rescued cells from RBL-induced apoptosis. Mechanistic studies revealed that RBL induced cleavage of Bid, loss of mitochondrial membrane potential and activation of caspase-3. The expression of the anti-apoptotic proteins Bcl-2 and Bcl-X was down regulated without altering the expression of pro-apoptotic proteins- Bad and Bax. In contrast to leukemic cells, RBL did not induce apoptosis in normal PBMC, isolated CD3+ve cells and undifferentiated CD34+ve hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs). The findings highlight the differential effects of RBL on transformed and normal hematopoietic cells and suggest that RBL may be explored for therapeutic applications in leukemia. PMID:24244478

  19. Lethal synergy of solar UV-radiation and H(2)O(2) on wild Fusarium solani spores in distilled and natural well water.

    PubMed

    Sichel, C; Fernández-Ibáñez, P; de Cara, M; Tello, J

    2009-04-01

    Environmentally-friendly disinfection methods are needed in many industrial applications. As a natural metabolite of many organisms, hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2))-based disinfection may be such a method as long as H(2)O(2) is used in non-toxic concentrations. Nevertheless, when applied alone as a disinfectant, H(2)O(2) concentrations need to be high enough to achieve significant pathogen reduction, and this may lead to phytotoxicity. This paper shows how H(2)O(2) disinfection concentrations could be significantly reduced by using the synergic lethality of H(2)O(2) and sunlight the first time for fungi and disinfection. Experiments were performed on spores of Fusarium solani, the ubiquitous, pytho- and human pathogenic fungus. Laboratory (250-mL bottles) and pilot plant solar reactors (2 x 14 L compound parabolic collectors, CPCs) were employed with distilled water and real well water under natural sunlight. This opens the way to applications for agricultural water resources, seed disinfection, curing of fungal skin infections, etc.

  20. Fatal Fusarium solani species complex infections in elasmobranchs: the first case report for black spotted stingray (Taeniura melanopsila) and a literature review.

    PubMed

    Fernando, Nimal; Hui, Suk-Wai; Tsang, Chi-Ching; Leung, Shui-Yee; Ngan, Antonio H Y; Leung, Raymond W W; Groff, Joseph M; Lau, Susanna K P; Woo, Patrick C Y

    2015-07-01

    Fusarium species are environmental saprophytic fungi. Among the many Fusarium species, members of the Fusarium solani species complex (FSSC) are the most prevalent and virulent in causing human and animal infections. In this study, we describe the first case of fatal FSSC infection in a black spotted stingray and three concomitant infections in scalloped hammerhead sharks. In the stingray, cutaneous lesions were characterised by ulcers and haemorrhage of the ventral pectoral fin, or 'ray', especially around the head; while cutaneous lesions in the sharks were characterised by ulcers, haemorrhage, as well as white and purulent exudates at the cephalic canals of the cephalofoil and lateral line. Histological sections of the cutaneous lesions revealed slender (1-4 μm in diameter), branching, septate fungal hyphae. Internal transcribed spacer region and 28S nrDNA sequencing of the fungal isolates from the fish showed two isolates were F. keratoplasticum (FSSC 2) and the other two were FSSC 12. Environmental investigation revealed the FSSC strains isolated from water and biofilms in tanks that housed the elasmobranchs were also F. keratoplasticum and FSSC 12. Fusarium is associated with major infections in elasmobranchs and FSSC 12 is an emerging cause of infections in marine animals. DNA sequencing is so far the most reliable method for accurate identification of Fusarium species.