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Sample records for rho gtpases cdc42

  1. Rho GTPase protein Cdc42 is critical for postnatal cartilage development.

    PubMed

    Nagahama, Ryo; Yamada, Atsushi; Tanaka, Junichi; Aizawa, Ryo; Suzuki, Dai; Kassai, Hidetoshi; Yamamoto, Matsuo; Mishima, Kenji; Aiba, Atsu; Maki, Koutaro; Kamijo, Ryutaro

    2016-02-19

    Cdc42, a small Rho GTPase family member, has been shown to regulate multiple cellular functions in vitro, including actin cytoskeletal reorganization, cell migration, proliferation, and gene expression. However, its tissue-specific roles in vivo remain largely unknown, especially in postnatal cartilage development, as cartilage-specific Cdc42 inactivated mice die within a few days after birth. In this study, we investigated the physiological functions of Cdc42 during cartilage development after birth using tamoxifen-induced cartilage-specific inactivated Cdc42 conditional knockout (Cdc42 (fl/fl); Col2-CreERT) mice, which were generated by crossing Cdc42 flox mice (Cdc42 (fl/fl)) with tamoxifen-induced type II collagen (Col2) Cre transgenic mice using a Cre/loxP system. The gross morphology of the Cdc42 cKO mice was shorter limbs and body, as well as reduced body weight as compared with the controls. In addition, severe defects were found in growth plate chondrocytes of the long bones, characterized by a shorter proliferating zone (PZ), wider hypertrophic zone (HZ), and loss of columnar organization of proliferating chondrocytes, resulting in delayed endochondral bone formation associated with abnormal bone growth. Our findings demonstrate the importance of Cdc42 for cartilage development during both embryonic and postnatal stages.

  2. Rho GTPase protein Cdc42 is critical for postnatal cartilage development

    SciTech Connect

    Nagahama, Ryo; Yamada, Atsushi; Tanaka, Junichi; Aizawa, Ryo; Suzuki, Dai; Kassai, Hidetoshi; Yamamoto, Matsuo; Mishima, Kenji; Aiba, Atsu; Maki, Koutaro; Kamijo, Ryutaro

    2016-02-19

    Cdc42, a small Rho GTPase family member, has been shown to regulate multiple cellular functions in vitro, including actin cytoskeletal reorganization, cell migration, proliferation, and gene expression. However, its tissue-specific roles in vivo remain largely unknown, especially in postnatal cartilage development, as cartilage-specific Cdc42 inactivated mice die within a few days after birth. In this study, we investigated the physiological functions of Cdc42 during cartilage development after birth using tamoxifen-induced cartilage-specific inactivated Cdc42 conditional knockout (Cdc42 {sup fl/fl}; Col2-CreERT) mice, which were generated by crossing Cdc42 flox mice (Cdc42 {sup fl/fl}) with tamoxifen-induced type II collagen (Col2) Cre transgenic mice using a Cre/loxP system. The gross morphology of the Cdc42 cKO mice was shorter limbs and body, as well as reduced body weight as compared with the controls. In addition, severe defects were found in growth plate chondrocytes of the long bones, characterized by a shorter proliferating zone (PZ), wider hypertrophic zone (HZ), and loss of columnar organization of proliferating chondrocytes, resulting in delayed endochondral bone formation associated with abnormal bone growth. Our findings demonstrate the importance of Cdc42 for cartilage development during both embryonic and postnatal stages. - Highlights: • Tamoxifen-induced cartilage specific inactivated Cdc42 mutant mice were generated. • Cdc42 mutant mice were shorter limbs and body. • Severe defects were found in growth plate chondrocytes.

  3. Cdc42: An Essential Rho-Type GTPase Controlling Eukaryotic Cell Polarity

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Douglas I.

    1999-01-01

    Cdc42p is an essential GTPase that belongs to the Rho/Rac subfamily of Ras-like GTPases. These proteins act as molecular switches by responding to exogenous and/or endogenous signals and relaying those signals to activate downstream components of a biological pathway. The 11 current members ofthe Cdc42p family display between 75 and 100% amino acid identity and are functional as well as structural homologs. Cdc42p transduces signals to the actin cytoskeleton to initiate and maintain polarized gorwth and to mitogen-activated protein morphogenesis. In the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Cdc42p plays an important role in multiple actin-dependent morphogenetic events such as bud emergence, mating-projection formation, and pseudohyphal growth. In mammalian cells, Cdc42p regulates a variety of actin-dependent events and induces the JNK/SAPK protein kinase cascade, which leads to the activation of transcription factors within the nucleus. Cdc42p mediates these processes through interactions with a myriad of downstream effectors, whose number and regulation we are just starting to understand. In addition, Cdc42p has been implicated in a number of human diseases through interactions with its regulators and downstream effectors. While much is known about Cdc42p sturcture and functional interactions, little is known about the mechanism(s) by which it transduces signals within the cell. Future research sould focus on this question as well as on the detailed analysis of the interactions of Cdc42p with its regulators and downstream effectors. PMID:10066831

  4. Synapse Formation in Monosynaptic Sensory–Motor Connections Is Regulated by Presynaptic Rho GTPase Cdc42

    PubMed Central

    Imai, Fumiyasu; Ladle, David R.; Leslie, Jennifer R.; Duan, Xin; Rizvi, Tilat A.; Ciraolo, Georgianne M.; Zheng, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Spinal reflex circuit development requires the precise regulation of axon trajectories, synaptic specificity, and synapse formation. Of these three crucial steps, the molecular mechanisms underlying synapse formation between group Ia proprioceptive sensory neurons and motor neurons is the least understood. Here, we show that the Rho GTPase Cdc42 controls synapse formation in monosynaptic sensory–motor connections in presynaptic, but not postsynaptic, neurons. In mice lacking Cdc42 in presynaptic sensory neurons, proprioceptive sensory axons appropriately reach the ventral spinal cord, but significantly fewer synapses are formed with motor neurons compared with wild-type mice. Concordantly, electrophysiological analyses show diminished EPSP amplitudes in monosynaptic sensory–motor circuits in these mutants. Temporally targeted deletion of Cdc42 in sensory neurons after sensory–motor circuit establishment reveals that Cdc42 does not affect synaptic transmission. Furthermore, addition of the synaptic organizers, neuroligins, induces presynaptic differentiation of wild-type, but not Cdc42-deficient, proprioceptive sensory neurons in vitro. Together, our findings demonstrate that Cdc42 in presynaptic neurons is required for synapse formation in monosynaptic sensory–motor circuits. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Group Ia proprioceptive sensory neurons form direct synapses with motor neurons, but the molecular mechanisms underlying synapse formation in these monosynaptic sensory–motor connections are unknown. We show that deleting Cdc42 in sensory neurons does not affect proprioceptive sensory axon targeting because axons reach the ventral spinal cord appropriately, but these neurons form significantly fewer presynaptic terminals on motor neurons. Electrophysiological analysis further shows that EPSPs are decreased in these mice. Finally, we demonstrate that Cdc42 is involved in neuroligin-dependent presynaptic differentiation of proprioceptive sensory neurons in vitro

  5. Regulation of hematopoietic stem cell aging by the small RhoGTPase Cdc42

    PubMed Central

    Geiger, Hartmut; Zheng, Yi

    2015-01-01

    Summary Aging of stem cells might be the underlying cause of tissue aging in tissue that in the adult heavily rely on stem cell activity, like the blood forming system. Hematopoiesis, the generation of blood forming cells, is sustained by hematopoietic stem cells. In this review article, we introduce the canonical set of phenotypes associated with aged HSCs, focus on the novel aging-associated phenotype apolarity caused by elevated activity of the small RhoGTPase in aged HSCs, disuccs the role of Cdc42 in hematopoiesis and describe that pharmacological inhibition of Cdc42 activity in aged HSCs results in functionally young and thus rejuvenated HSCs. PMID:25220425

  6. The Rho GTPase Cdc42 regulates hair cell planar polarity and cellular patterning in the developing cochlea.

    PubMed

    Kirjavainen, Anna; Laos, Maarja; Anttonen, Tommi; Pirvola, Ulla

    2015-03-13

    Hair cells of the organ of Corti (OC) of the cochlea exhibit distinct planar polarity, both at the tissue and cellular level. Planar polarity at tissue level is manifested as uniform orientation of the hair cell stereociliary bundles. Hair cell intrinsic polarity is defined as structural hair bundle asymmetry; positioning of the kinocilium/basal body complex at the vertex of the V-shaped bundle. Consistent with strong apical polarity, the hair cell apex displays prominent actin and microtubule cytoskeletons. The Rho GTPase Cdc42 regulates cytoskeletal dynamics and polarization of various cell types, and, thus, serves as a candidate regulator of hair cell polarity. We have here induced Cdc42 inactivation in the late-embryonic OC. We show the role of Cdc42 in the establishment of planar polarity of hair cells and in cellular patterning. Abnormal planar polarity was displayed as disturbances in hair bundle orientation and morphology and in kinocilium/basal body positioning. These defects were accompanied by a disorganized cell-surface microtubule network. Atypical protein kinase C (aPKC), a putative Cdc42 effector, colocalized with Cdc42 at the hair cell apex, and aPKC expression was altered upon Cdc42 depletion. Our data suggest that Cdc42 together with aPKC is part of the machinery establishing hair cell planar polarity and that Cdc42 acts on polarity through the cell-surface microtubule network. The data also suggest that defects in apical polarization are influenced by disturbed cellular patterning in the OC. In addition, our data demonstrates that Cdc42 is required for stereociliogenesis in the immature cochlea.

  7. The BNIP-2 and Cdc42GAP Homology (BCH) Domain of p50RhoGAP/Cdc42GAP Sequesters RhoA from Inactivation by the Adjacent GTPase-activating Protein Domain

    PubMed Central

    Chew, Li Li; Lin, Sheng-cai

    2010-01-01

    The BNIP-2 and Cdc42GAP homology (BCH) domain is a novel regulator for Rho GTPases, but its impact on p50-Rho GTPase-activating protein (p50RhoGAP or Cdc42GAP) in cells remains elusive. Here we show that deletion of the BCH domain from p50RhoGAP enhanced its GAP activity and caused drastic cell rounding. Introducing constitutively active RhoA or inactivating GAP domain blocked such effect, whereas replacing the BCH domain with endosome-targeting SNX3 excluded requirement of endosomal localization in regulating the GAP activity. Substitution with homologous BCH domain from Schizosaccharomyces pombe, which does not bind mammalian RhoA, also led to complete loss of suppression. Interestingly, the p50RhoGAP BCH domain only targeted RhoA, but not Cdc42 or Rac1, and it was unable to distinguish between GDP and the GTP-bound form of RhoA. Further mutagenesis revealed a RhoA-binding motif (residues 85-120), which when deleted, significantly reduced BCH inhibition on GAP-mediated cell rounding, whereas its full suppression also required an intramolecular interaction motif (residues 169-197). Therefore, BCH domain serves as a local modulator in cis to sequester RhoA from inactivation by the adjacent GAP domain, adding to a new paradigm for regulating p50RhoGAP signaling. PMID:20660160

  8. GTPases of the Rho subfamily are required for Brucella abortus internalization in nonprofessional phagocytes: direct activation of Cdc42.

    PubMed

    Guzmán-Verri, C; Chaves-Olarte, E; von Eichel-Streiber, C; López-Goñi, I; Thelestam, M; Arvidson, S; Gorvel, J P; Moreno, E

    2001-11-30

    Members of the genus Brucella are intracellular alpha-Proteobacteria responsible for brucellosis, a chronic disease of humans and animals. Little is known about Brucella virulence mechanisms, but the abilities of these bacteria to invade and to survive within cells are decisive factors for causing disease. Transmission electron and fluorescence microscopy of infected nonprofessional phagocytic HeLa cells revealed minor membrane changes accompanied by discrete recruitment of F-actin at the site of Brucella abortus entry. Cell uptake of B. abortus was negatively affected to various degrees by actin, actin-myosin, and microtubule chemical inhibitors. Modulators of MAPKs and protein-tyrosine kinases hampered Brucella cell internalization. Inactivation of Rho small GTPases using clostridial toxins TcdB-10463, TcdB-1470, TcsL-1522, and TcdA significantly reduced the uptake of B. abortus by HeLa cells. In contrast, cytotoxic necrotizing factor from Escherichia coli, known to activate Rho, Rac, and Cdc42 small GTPases, increased the internalization of both virulent and non-virulent B. abortus. Expression of dominant-positive Rho, Rac, and Cdc42 forms in HeLa cells promoted the uptake of B. abortus, whereas expression of dominant-negative forms of these GTPases in HeLa cells hampered Brucella uptake. Cdc42 was activated upon cell contact by virulent B. abortus, but not by a noninvasive isogenic strain, as proven by affinity precipitation of active Rho, Rac, and Cdc42. The polyphasic approach used to discern the molecular events leading to Brucella internalization provides new alternatives for exploring the complexity of the signals required by intracellular pathogens for cell invasion.

  9. Role of Wasp and the small GTPases RhoA, RhoB, and Cdc42 during capacitation and acrosome reaction in spermatozoa of English guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Delgado-Buenrostro, Norma L; Mújica, Adela; Chiquete-Felix, Natalia; Déciga-Alcaraz, Alejandro; Medina-Reyes, Estefany I; Uribe-Carvajal, Salvador; Chirino, Yolanda I

    2016-10-01

    Cytoskeleton remodeling is necessary for capacitation and the acrosome reaction in spermatozoa. F-actin is located in the acrosome and equatorial region during capacitation, but is relocated in the post-acrosomal region during the acrosome reaction in spermatozoa from bull, rat, mice, and guinea pig. Actin polymerization and relocalization are generally regulated by small GTPases that activate Wasp protein, which coordinates with Arp2/3, profilin I, and profilin II to complete cytoskeletal remodeling. This sequence of events is not completely described in spermatozoa, though. Therefore, the aim of this study was to determine if Wasp interacts with small GTPases (RhoA, RhoB, and Cdc42) and proteins (Arp2/3, profilin I, and profilin II) that co-localize with F-actin during capacitation and the acrosome reaction in English guinea pig spermatozoa obtained from the vas deferens. The spermatozoa were capacitated in calcium-free medium, incubated with an activator or an inhibitor of GTPases, and then induced to acrosome react using calcium. The distribution patterns of F-actin were compared to the patterns of Wasp and its putative interaction partners: Wasp and RhoB, but not RhoA or Cdc42, localization overlap with F-actin during capacitation and the acrosome reaction. Activation of small GTPases localized RhoB to the post-acrosomal region whereas their inhibition prevented acrosome exocytosis. Arp2/3 and profilin II appear to interact with Wasp in the post-acrosomal region and flagellum, while profilin I and Wasp could be found in the equatorial region. Thus, Wasp and F-actin distribution overlap during capacitation and acrosome reaction, and small GTPases play an important role in cytoskeleton remodeling during these processes in spermatozoa. Mol. Reprod. Dev. 83: 927-937, 2016 © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Cdc42 GTPase dynamics control directional growth responses.

    PubMed

    Brand, Alexandra C; Morrison, Emma; Milne, Stephen; Gonia, Sara; Gale, Cheryl A; Gow, Neil A R

    2014-01-14

    Polarized cells reorient their direction of growth in response to environmental cues. In the fungus Candida albicans, the Rho-family small GTPase, Cdc42, is essential for polarized hyphal growth and Ca(2+) influx is required for the tropic responses of hyphae to environmental cues, but the regulatory link between these systems is unclear. In this study, the interaction between Ca(2+) influx and Cdc42 polarity-complex dynamics was investigated using hyphal galvanotropic and thigmotropic responses as reporter systems. During polarity establishment in an applied electric field, cathodal emergence of hyphae was lost when either of the two Cdc42 apical recycling pathways was disrupted by deletion of Rdi1, a guanine nucleotide dissociation inhibitor, or Bnr1, a formin, but was completely restored by extracellular Ca(2+). Loss of the Cdc42 GTPase activating proteins, Rga2 and Bem3, also abolished cathodal polarization, but this was not rescued by Ca(2+). Expression of GTP-locked Cdc42 reversed the polarity of hypha emergence from cathodal to anodal, an effect augmented by Ca(2+). The cathodal directional cue therefore requires Cdc42 GTP hydrolysis. Ca(2+) influx amplifies Cdc42-mediated directional growth signals, in part by augmenting Cdc42 apical trafficking. The Ca(2+)-binding EF-hand motif in Cdc24, the Cdc42 activator, was essential for growth in yeast cells but not in established hyphae. The Cdc24 EF-hand motif is therefore essential for polarity establishment but not for polarity maintenance.

  11. Cdc42 GTPase dynamics control directional growth responses

    PubMed Central

    Brand, Alexandra C.; Morrison, Emma; Milne, Stephen; Gonia, Sara; Gale, Cheryl A.; Gow, Neil A. R.

    2014-01-01

    Polarized cells reorient their direction of growth in response to environmental cues. In the fungus Candida albicans, the Rho-family small GTPase, Cdc42, is essential for polarized hyphal growth and Ca2+ influx is required for the tropic responses of hyphae to environmental cues, but the regulatory link between these systems is unclear. In this study, the interaction between Ca2+ influx and Cdc42 polarity-complex dynamics was investigated using hyphal galvanotropic and thigmotropic responses as reporter systems. During polarity establishment in an applied electric field, cathodal emergence of hyphae was lost when either of the two Cdc42 apical recycling pathways was disrupted by deletion of Rdi1, a guanine nucleotide dissociation inhibitor, or Bnr1, a formin, but was completely restored by extracellular Ca2+. Loss of the Cdc42 GTPase activating proteins, Rga2 and Bem3, also abolished cathodal polarization, but this was not rescued by Ca2+. Expression of GTP-locked Cdc42 reversed the polarity of hypha emergence from cathodal to anodal, an effect augmented by Ca2+. The cathodal directional cue therefore requires Cdc42 GTP hydrolysis. Ca2+ influx amplifies Cdc42-mediated directional growth signals, in part by augmenting Cdc42 apical trafficking. The Ca2+-binding EF-hand motif in Cdc24, the Cdc42 activator, was essential for growth in yeast cells but not in established hyphae. The Cdc24 EF-hand motif is therefore essential for polarity establishment but not for polarity maintenance. PMID:24385582

  12. Functions and Functional Domains of the GTPase Cdc42p

    PubMed Central

    Kozminski, Keith G.; Chen, Ann J.; Rodal, Avital A.; Drubin, David G.

    2000-01-01

    Cdc42p, a Rho family GTPase of the Ras superfamily, is a key regulator of cell polarity and morphogenesis in eukaryotes. Using 37 site-directed cdc42 mutants, we explored the functions and interactions of Cdc42p in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Cytological and genetic analyses of these cdc42 mutants revealed novel and diverse phenotypes, showing that Cdc42p possesses at least two distinct essential functions and acts as a nodal point of cell polarity regulation in vivo. In addition, mapping the functional data for each cdc42 mutation onto a structural model of the protein revealed as functionally important a surface of Cdc42p that is distinct from the canonical protein-interacting domains (switch I, switch II, and the C terminus) identified previously in members of the Ras superfamily. This region overlaps with a region (α5-helix) recently predicted by structural models to be a specificity determinant for Cdc42p-protein interactions. PMID:10637312

  13. Desmoglein 3 acting as an upstream regulator of Rho GTPases, Rac-1/Cdc42 in the regulation of actin organisation and dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Man Tsang, Siu; Brown, Louise; Gadmor, Hanan; Gammon, Luke; Fortune, Farida; Wheeler, Ann; Wan, Hong

    2012-01-01

    Desmoglein 3 (Dsg3), a member of the desmoglein sub-family, serves as an adhesion molecule in desmosomes. Our previous study showed that overexpression of human Dsg3 in several epithelial lines induces formation of membrane protrusions, a phenotype suggestive of Rho GTPase activation. Here we examined the interaction between Dsg3 and actin in detail and showed that endogenous Dsg3 colocalises and interacts with actin, particularly the junctional actin in a Rac1-dependent manner. Ablation of Rac1 activity by dominant negative Rac1 mutant (N17Rac1) or the Rac1 specific inhibitor (NSC23766) directly disrupts the interaction between Dsg3 and actin. Assembly of the junctional actin at the cell borders is accompanied with enhanced levels of Dsg3, while inhibition of Dsg3 by RNAi results in profound changes in the organisation of actin cytoskeleton. In accordance, overexpression of Dsg3 results in a remarkable increase of Rac1 and Cdc42 activities and to a lesser extent, RhoA. The enhancements in Rho GTPases are accompanied by the pronounced actin-based membrane structures such as lamellipodia and filopodia, enhanced rate of actin turnover and cell polarisation. Together, our results reveal an important novel function for Dsg3 in promoting actin dynamics through regulating Rac1 and Cdc42 activation in epithelial cells. PMID:22796473

  14. Rho GTPases

    PubMed Central

    Sadok, Amine; Marshall, Chris J

    2014-01-01

    Since their discovery in the late eighties, the role of Rho GTPases in the regulation of cell migration has been extensively studied and has mainly focused on the hallmark family members Rho, Rac, and Cdc42. Recent technological advances in cell biology, such as Rho-family GTPase activity biosensors, studies in 3D, and unbiased RNAi-based screens, have revealed an increasingly complex role for Rho GTPases during cell migration, with many inter-connected functions and a strong dependency on the physical and chemical properties of the surrounding environment. This review aims to give an overview of recent studies on the role of Rho-family GTPase members in the modulation of cell migration in different environments, and discuss future directions. PMID:24978113

  15. MDA-9/Syntenin (SDCBP) modulates small GTPases RhoA and Cdc42 via transforming growth factor β1 to enhance epithelial-mesenchymal transition in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Menezes, Mitchell E.; Shen, Xue-Ning; Das, Swadesh K.; Emdad, Luni; Sarkar, Devanand; Fisher, Paul B.

    2016-01-01

    Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is one of the decisive steps regulating cancer invasion and metastasis. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying this transition require further clarification. MDA-9/syntenin (SDCBP) expression is elevated in breast cancer patient samples as well as cultured breast cancer cells. Silencing expression of MDA-9 in mesenchymal metastatic breast cancer cells triggered a change in cell morphology in both 2D- and 3D-cultures to a more epithelial-like phenotype, along with changes in EMT markers, cytoskeletal rearrangement and decreased invasion. Conversely, over expressing MDA-9 in epithelial non-metastatic breast cancer cells instigated a change in morphology to a more mesenchymal phenotype with corresponding changes in EMT markers, cytoskeletal rearrangement and an increase in invasion. We also found that MDA-9 upregulated active levels of known modulators of EMT, the small GTPases RhoA and Cdc42, via TGFβ1. Reintroducing TGFβ1 in MDA-9 silenced cells restored active RhoA and cdc42 levels, modulated cytoskeletal rearrangement and increased invasion. We further determined that MDA-9 interacts with TGFβ1 via its PDZ1 domain. Finally, in vivo studies demonstrated that silencing the expression of MDA-9 resulted in decreased lung metastasis and TGFβ1 re-expression partially restored lung metastases. Our findings provide evidence for the relevance of MDA-9 in mediating EMT in breast cancer and support the potential of MDA-9 as a therapeutic target against metastatic disease. PMID:27863394

  16. Cloning, sequencing and phylogenetic analysis of the small GTPase gene cdc-42 from Ancylostoma caninum.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yurong; Zheng, Jing; Chen, Jiaxin

    2012-12-01

    CDC-42 is a member of the Rho GTPase subfamily that is involved in many signaling pathways, including mitosis, cell polarity, cell migration and cytoskeleton remodeling. Here, we present the first characterization of a full-length cDNA encoding the small GTPase cdc-42, designated as Accdc-42, isolated from the parasitic nematode Ancylostoma caninum. The encoded protein contains 191 amino acid residues with a predicted molecular weight of 21 kDa and displays a high level of identity with the Rho-family GTPase protein CDC-42. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that Accdc-42 was most closely related to Caenorhabditis briggsae cdc-42. Comparison with selected sequences from the free-living nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, Drosophila melanogaster, Xenopus laevis, Danio rerio, Mus musculus and human genomes showed that Accdc-42 is highly conserved. AcCDC-42 demonstrates the highest identity to CDC-42 from C. briggsae (94.2%), and it also exhibits 91.6% identity to CDC-42 from C. elegans and 91.1% from Brugia malayi. Additionally, the transcript of Accdc-42 was analyzed during the different developmental stages of the worm. Accdc-42 was expressed in the L1/L2 larvae, L3 larvae and female and male adults of A. caninum.

  17. You-Gui pills promote nerve regeneration by regulating netrin1, DCC and Rho family GTPases RhoA, Racl, Cdc42 in C57BL/6 mice with experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Ji, Xiaomin; Liu, Haolong; An, Chen; Wang, Yongqiang; Zhao, Hui; Zhang, Qiuxia; Li, Ming; Qi, Fang; Chen, Zhenzhen; Wang, Xiujuan; Wang, Lei

    2016-07-01

    You-Gui pills (YGPs) are an effective traditional Chinese formula being used clinically for the treatment of multiple sclerosis (MS). Previous studies demonstrated that YGPs exerted the potent neuroprotective effects in murine models of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), which is an equivalent animal model for multiple sclerosis (MS). However, the mechanism of YGPs functions remained unclear. The aim of this study was to evaluate the therapeutic effect of YGPs in MOG35-55-induced EAE mice and to further elucidate the underlying molecular mechanism. Female C57BL/6 mice were divided into six groups, including the non-treated EAE model, prednisone acetate- and 1.2, 2.4 or 4.8g/kg YGPs-treated EAE groups, and a normal control group. The EAE model was established by injecting the mice subcutaneously with MOG35-55 antigen. The body weights were measured and the neurological functions were scored in each group. The pathology and morphology of the brain and spinal cord was examined. The expression of MAP-2 was detected by immunofluorescent staining. The levels of netrin1, DCC, RhoA, Rac1, and Cdc42 were assayed by immunohistochemistry, qRT-PCR and Western blot on day 40 post-immunization (PI). YGPs treatments significantly reduced neurological function scores in EAE mice, where the inflammatory infiltration was reduced and the axon and myelin damage in both brain and spinal cord was alleviated. In the brain and spinal cord tissues, YGPs increased the expression of neuronal factors MAP-2, netrin1 and DCC. The expression of Rac1 and Cdc42 were increased, while RhoA was reduced following YGPs treatments. Our results demonstrated that YGPs exhibited a neuroprotective effect on promoting nerve regeneration at the brain and spinal cord in EAE mice induced by MOG35-55. Netrin1, DCC and the Rho family GTPases of RhoA, Racl, Cdc42 were involved in mediating the effects of YGPs on nerve regeneration. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Rho GTPases in embryonic development

    PubMed Central

    Duquette, Philippe M; Lamarche-Vane, Nathalie

    2014-01-01

    In the last decade, several mouse models for RhoA, Rac1, and Cdc42 have emerged and have contributed a great deal to understanding the precise functions of Rho GTPases at early stages of development. This review summarizes our current knowledge of various mouse models of tissue-specific ablation of Cdc42, Rac1, and RhoA with emphasis on early embryogenesis, epithelial and skin morphogenesis, tubulogenesis, development of the central nervous system, and limb development. PMID:25483305

  19. The small GTPase Cdc42 modulates the number of exocytosis-competent dense-core vesicles in PC12 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sato, Mai; Kitaguchi, Tetsuya; Ikematsu, Kazuya; Kakeyama, Masaki; Murata, Masayuki; Sato, Ken; Tsuboi, Takashi

    2012-04-06

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Regulation of exocytosis by Rho GTPase Cdc42. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cdc42 increases the number of fusion events from newly recruited vesicles. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cdc42 increases the number of exocytosis-competent dense-core vesicles. -- Abstract: Although the small GTPase Rho family Cdc42 has been shown to facilitate exocytosis through increasing the amount of hormones released, the precise mechanisms regulating the quantity of hormones released on exocytosis are not well understood. Here we show by live cell imaging analysis under TIRF microscope and immunocytochemical analysis under confocal microscope that Cdc42 modulated the number of fusion events and the number of dense-core vesicles produced in the cells. Overexpression of a wild-type or constitutively-active form of Cdc42 strongly facilitated high-KCl-induced exocytosis from the newly recruited plasma membrane vesicles in PC12 cells. By contrast, a dominant-negative form of Cdc42 inhibited exocytosis from both the newly recruited and previously docked plasma membrane vesicles. The number of intracellular dense-core vesicles was increased by the overexpression of both a wild-type and constitutively-active form of Cdc42. Consistently, activation of Cdc42 by overexpression of Tuba, a Golgi-associated guanine nucleotide exchange factor for Cdc42 increased the number of intracellular dense-core vesicles, whereas inhibition of Cdc42 by overexpression of the Cdc42/Rac interactive binding domain of neuronal Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein decreased the number of them. These findings suggest that Cdc42 facilitates exocytosis by modulating both the number of exocytosis-competent dense-core vesicles and the production of dense-core vesicles in PC12 cells.

  20. Regulation of cell-cell adhesion of MDCK cells by Cdc42 and Rac1 small GTPases.

    PubMed

    Kuroda, S; Fukata, M; Fujii, K; Nakamura, T; Izawa, I; Kaibuchi, K

    1997-11-17

    Rac1, a member of the Rho small GTPases family, has recently been shown to be involved in the regulation of cell-cell adhesion mediated by cadherin. Here we showed that Cdc42, another member of Rho family, accumulated at cell-cell contact sites. Microinjection of Rho GDI, a negative regulator of the Rho family members, into Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells resulted in perturbation of epithelial cell morphology and of cell-cell and cell-substratum adhesions, and comicroinjection of dominant active Cdc42 or Rac1 reversed the action of Rho GDI, suggesting that the active form of Cdc42 or Rac1 is required for maintaining the cell-cell and cell-substratum adhesions. These observations suggest that Cdc42, in addition to Rac1, can regulate the cell-cell adhesion.

  1. Regulation of the Cdc42/Cdc24 GTPase Module during Candida albicans Hyphal Growth

    PubMed Central

    Bassilana, Martine; Hopkins, Julie; Arkowitz, Robert A.

    2005-01-01

    The Rho G protein Cdc42 and its exchange factor Cdc24 are required for hyphal growth of the human fungal pathogen Candida albicans. Previously, we reported that strains ectopically expressing Cdc24 or Cdc42 are unable to form hyphae in response to serum. Here we investigated the role of these two proteins in hyphal growth, using quantitative real-time PCR to measure induction of hypha-specific genes together with time lapse microscopy. Expression of the hypha-specific genes examined depends on the cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase A pathway culminating in the Efg1 and Tec1 transcription factors. We show that strains with reduced levels of CDC24 or CDC42 transcripts induce hypha-specific genes yet cannot maintain their expression in response to serum. Furthermore, in serum these mutants form elongated buds compared to the wild type and mutant budding cells, as observed by time lapse microscopy. Using Cdc24 fused to green fluorescent protein, we also show that Cdc24 is recruited to and persists at the germ tube tip during hyphal growth. Altogether these data demonstrate that the Cdc24/Cdc42 GTPase module is required for maintenance of hyphal growth. In addition, overexpression studies indicate that specific levels of Cdc24 and Cdc42 are important for invasive hyphal growth. In response to serum, CDC24 transcript levels increase transiently in a Tec1-dependent fashion, as do the G-protein RHO3 and the Rho1 GTPase activating protein BEM2 transcript levels. These results suggest that a positive feedback loop between Cdc24 and Tec1 contributes to an increase in active Cdc42 at the tip of the germ tube which is important for hypha formation. PMID:15755921

  2. Concentric zones of active RhoA and Cdc42 around single cell wounds

    PubMed Central

    Benink, Hélène A.; Bement, William M.

    2005-01-01

    Rho GTPases control many cytoskeleton-dependent processes, but how they regulate spatially distinct features of cytoskeletal function within a single cell is poorly understood. Here, we studied active RhoA and Cdc42 in wounded Xenopus oocytes, which assemble and close a dynamic ring of actin filaments (F-actin) and myosin-2 around wound sites. RhoA and Cdc42 are rapidly activated around wound sites in a calcium-dependent manner and segregate into distinct, concentric zones around the wound, with active Cdc42 in the approximate middle of the F-actin array and active RhoA on the interior of the array. These zones form before F-actin accumulation, and then move in concert with the closing array. Microtubules and F-actin are required for normal zone organization and dynamics, as is crosstalk between RhoA and Cdc42. Each of the zones makes distinct contributions to the organization and function of the actomyosin wound array. We propose that similar rho activity zones control related processes such as cytokinesis. PMID:15684032

  3. CDC42 Gtpase Activation Affects Hela Cell DNA Repair and Proliferation Following UV Radiation-Induced Genotoxic Stress.

    PubMed

    Ascer, Liv G; Magalhaes, Yuli T; Espinha, Gisele; Osaki, Juliana H; Souza, Renan C; Forti, Fabio L

    2015-09-01

    Cell division control protein 42 (CDC42) homolog is a small Rho GTPase enzyme that participates in such processes as cell cycle progression, migration, polarity, adhesion, and transcription. Recent studies suggest that CDC42 is a potent tumor suppressor in different tissues and is related to aging processes. Although DNA damage is crucial in aging, a potential role for CDC42 in genotoxic stress remains to be explored. Migration, survival/proliferation and DNA damage/repair experiments were performed to demonstrate CDC42 involvement in the recovery of HeLa cells exposed to ultraviolet radiation-induced stress. Sub-lines of HeLa cells ectopically expressing the constitutively active CDC42-V12 mutant were generated to examine whether different CDC42-GTP backgrounds might reflect different sensitivities to UV radiation. Our results show that CDC42 constitutive activation does not interfere with HeLa cell migration after UV radiation. However, the minor DNA damage exhibited by the CDC42-V12 mutant exposed to UV radiation most likely results in cell cycle arrest at the G2/M checkpoint and reduced proliferation and survival. HeLa cells and Mock clones, which express endogenous wild-type CDC42 and show normal activity, are more resistant to UV radiation. None of these effects are altered by pharmacological CDC42 inhibition. Finally, the phosphorylation status of the DNA damage response proteins γ-H2AX and p-Chk1 was found to be delayed and attenuated, respectively, in CDC42-V12 clones. In conclusion, the sensitivity of HeLa cells to ultraviolet radiation increases with CDC42 over-activation due to inadequate DNA repair signaling, culminating in G2/M cell accumulation, which is translated into reduced cellular proliferation and survival.

  4. Novel Activities of Select NSAID R-Enantiomers against Rac1 and Cdc42 GTPases

    PubMed Central

    Oprea, Tudor I.; Sklar, Larry A.; Agola, Jacob O.; Guo, Yuna; Silberberg, Melina; Roxby, Joshua; Vestling, Anna; Romero, Elsa; Surviladze, Zurab; Murray-Krezan, Cristina; Waller, Anna; Ursu, Oleg; Hudson, Laurie G.; Wandinger-Ness, Angela

    2015-01-01

    Rho family GTPases (including Rac, Rho and Cdc42) collectively control cell proliferation, adhesion and migration and are of interest as functional therapeutic targets in numerous epithelial cancers. Based on high throughput screening of the Prestwick Chemical Library® and cheminformatics we identified the R-enantiomers of two approved drugs (naproxen and ketorolac) as inhibitors of Rac1 and Cdc42. The corresponding S-enantiomers are considered the active component in racemic drug formulations, acting as non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) with selective activity against cyclooxygenases. Here, we show that the S-enantiomers of naproxen and ketorolac are inactive against the GTPases. Additionally, more than twenty other NSAIDs lacked inhibitory action against the GTPases, establishing the selectivity of the two identified NSAIDs. R-naproxen was first identified as a lead compound and tested in parallel with its S-enantiomer and the non-chiral 6-methoxy-naphthalene acetic acid (active metabolite of nabumetone, another NSAID) as a structural series. Cheminformatics-based substructure analyses—using the rotationally constrained carboxylate in R-naproxen—led to identification of racemic [R/S] ketorolac as a suitable FDA-approved candidate. Cell based measurement of GTPase activity (in animal and human cell lines) demonstrated that the R-enantiomers specifically inhibit epidermal growth factor stimulated Rac1 and Cdc42 activation. The GTPase inhibitory effects of the R-enantiomers in cells largely mimic those of established Rac1 (NSC23766) and Cdc42 (CID2950007/ML141) specific inhibitors. Docking predicts that rotational constraints position the carboxylate moieties of the R-enantiomers to preferentially coordinate the magnesium ion, thereby destabilizing nucleotide binding to Rac1 and Cdc42. The S-enantiomers can be docked but are less favorably positioned in proximity to the magnesium. R-naproxen and R-ketorolac have potential for rapid translation and

  5. Control of local Rho GTPase crosstalk by Abr

    PubMed Central

    Vaughan, Emily M.; Miller, Ann L.; Yu, Hoi-Ying E.; Bement, William M.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Background The RhoGTPases—Rho, Rac and Cdc42—regulate the dynamics of F-actin (filamentous actin) and myosin-2 with considerable subcellular precision. Consistent with this ability, active Rho and Cdc42 occupy mutually exclusive zones during single cell wound repair and asymmetric cytokinesis, suggesting the existence of mechanisms for local crosstalk, but how local Rho GTPase crosstalk is controlled is unknown. Results Using a candidate screen approach for Rho GTPase activators (Guanine nucleotide exchange factors; GEFs) and Rho GTPase inactivators (GTPase activating proteins; GAPs), we find that Abr, a protein with both GEF and GAP activity, regulates Rho and Cdc42 during single cell wound repair. Abr is targeted to the Rho activity zone via active Rho. Within the Rho zone Abr promotes local Rho activation via its GEF domain and controls local crosstalk via its GAP domain, which limits Cdc42 activity within the Rho zone. Depletion of Abr attenuates Rho activity and wound repair. Conclusions Abr is the first identified Rho GTPase regulator of single cell wound healing. Its novel mode of targeting by interaction with active Rho allows Abr to rapidly amplify local increases in Rho activity using its GEF domain while its ability to inactivate Cdc42 using its GAP domain results in sharp segregation of the Rho and Cdc42 zones. Similar mechanisms of local Rho GTPase activation and segregation enforcement may be employed in other processes that exhibit local Rho GTPase crosstalk. PMID:21295482

  6. Small GTPase CDC-42 promotes apoptotic cell corpse clearance in response to PAT-2 and CED-1 in C. elegans.

    PubMed

    Neukomm, L J; Zeng, S; Frei, A P; Huegli, P A; Hengartner, M O

    2014-06-01

    The rapid clearance of dying cells is important for the well-being of multicellular organisms. In C. elegans, cell corpse removal is mainly mediated by three parallel engulfment signaling cascades. These pathways include two small GTPases, MIG-2/RhoG and CED-10/Rac1. Here we present the identification and characterization of CDC-42 as a third GTPase involved in the regulation of cell corpse clearance. Genetic analyses performed by both loss of cdc-42 function and cdc-42 overexpression place cdc-42 in parallel to the ced-2/5/12 signaling module, in parallel to or upstream of the ced-10 module, and downstream of the ced-1/6/7 module. CDC-42 accumulates in engulfing cells at membranes surrounding apoptotic corpses. The formation of such halos depends on the integrins PAT-2/PAT-3, UNC-112 and the GEF protein UIG-1, but not on the canonical ced-1/6/7 or ced-2/5/12 signaling modules. Together, our results suggest that the small GTPase CDC-42 regulates apoptotic cell engulfment possibly upstream of the canonical Rac GTPase CED-10, by polarizing the engulfing cell toward the apoptotic corpse in response to integrin signaling and ced-1/6/7 signaling in C. elegans.

  7. A Cdc42/RhoA regulatory circuit downstream of glycoprotein Ib guides transendothelial platelet biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Dütting, Sebastian; Gaits-Iacovoni, Frederique; Stegner, David; Popp, Michael; Antkowiak, Adrien; van Eeuwijk, Judith M.M.; Nurden, Paquita; Stritt, Simon; Heib, Tobias; Aurbach, Katja; Angay, Oguzhan; Cherpokova, Deya; Heinz, Niels; Baig, Ayesha A.; Gorelashvili, Maximilian G.; Gerner, Frank; Heinze, Katrin G.; Ware, Jerry; Krohne, Georg; Ruggeri, Zaverio M.; Nurden, Alan T.; Schulze, Harald; Modlich, Ute; Pleines, Irina; Brakebusch, Cord; Nieswandt, Bernhard

    2017-01-01

    Blood platelets are produced by large bone marrow (BM) precursor cells, megakaryocytes (MKs), which extend cytoplasmic protrusions (proplatelets) into BM sinusoids. The molecular cues that control MK polarization towards sinusoids and limit transendothelial crossing to proplatelets remain unknown. Here, we show that the small GTPases Cdc42 and RhoA act as a regulatory circuit downstream of the MK-specific mechanoreceptor GPIb to coordinate polarized transendothelial platelet biogenesis. Functional deficiency of either GPIb or Cdc42 impairs transendothelial proplatelet formation. In the absence of RhoA, increased Cdc42 activity and MK hyperpolarization triggers GPIb-dependent transmigration of entire MKs into BM sinusoids. These findings position Cdc42 (go-signal) and RhoA (stop-signal) at the centre of a molecular checkpoint downstream of GPIb that controls transendothelial platelet biogenesis. Our results may open new avenues for the treatment of platelet production disorders and help to explain the thrombocytopenia in patients with Bernard–Soulier syndrome, a bleeding disorder caused by defects in GPIb-IX-V. PMID:28643773

  8. The nucleotide switch in Cdc42 modulates coupling between the GTPase-binding and allosteric equilibria of Wiskott–Aldrich syndrome protein

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Daisy W.; Rosen, Michael K.

    2005-01-01

    The GTP/GDP nucleotide switch in Ras superfamily GTPases generally involves differential affinity toward downstream effectors, with the GTP-bound state having a higher affinity for effector than the GDP-bound state. We have developed a quantitative model of allosteric regulation of the Wiskott–Aldrich syndrome protein (WASP) by the Rho GTPase Cdc42 to better understand how GTPase binding is coupled to effector activation. The model accurately predicts WASP affinity for Cdc42, activity toward Arp2/3 complex, and activation by Cdc42 as functions of a two-state allosteric equilibrium in WASP. The ratio of GTPase affinities for the inactive and active states of WASP is appreciably larger for Cdc42–GTP than for Cdc42–GDP. The greater ability to distinguish between the two states of WASP makes Cdc42–GTP a full WASP agonist, whereas Cdc42–GDP is only a partial agonist. Thus, the nucleotide switch controls not only the affinity of Cdc42 for its effector but also the efficiency of coupling between the Cdc42-binding and allosteric equilibria in WASP. This effect can ensure high fidelity and specificity in Cdc42 signaling in crowded membrane environments. PMID:15821030

  9. Rho GTPases in platelet function.

    PubMed

    Aslan, J E; McCarty, O J T

    2013-01-01

    The Rho family of GTP binding proteins, also commonly referred to as the Rho GTPases, are master regulators of the platelet cytoskeleton and platelet function. These low-molecular-weight or 'small' GTPases act as signaling switches in the spatial and temporal transduction, and amplification of signals from platelet cell surface receptors to the intracellular signaling pathways that drive platelet function. The Rho GTPase family members RhoA, Cdc42 and Rac1 have emerged as key regulators in the dynamics of the actin cytoskeleton in platelets and play key roles in platelet aggregation, secretion, spreading and thrombus formation. Rho GTPase regulators, including GEFs and GAPs and downstream effectors, such as the WASPs, formins and PAKs, may also regulate platelet activation and function. In this review, we provide an overview of Rho GTPase signaling in platelet physiology. Previous studies of Rho GTPases and platelets have had a shared history, as platelets have served as an ideal, non-transformed cellular model to characterize Rho function. Likewise, recent studies of the cell biology of Rho GTPase family members have helped to build an understanding of the molecular regulation of platelet function and will continue to do so through the further characterization of Rho GTPases as well as Rho GAPs, GEFs, RhoGDIs and Rho effectors in actin reorganization and other Rho-driven cellular processes. © 2012 International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis.

  10. Interaction of the Small GTPase Cdc42 with Arginine Kinase Restricts White Spot Syndrome Virus in Shrimp.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ji-Dong; Jiang, Hai-Shan; Wei, Tian-Di; Zhang, Ke-Yi; Wang, Xian-Wei; Zhao, Xiao-Fan; Wang, Jin-Xing

    2017-03-01

    Many types of small GTPases are widely expressed in eukaryotes and have different functions. As a crucial member of the Rho GTPase family, Cdc42 serves a number of functions, such as regulating cell growth, migration, and cell movement. Several RNA viruses employ Cdc42-hijacking tactics in their target cell entry processes. However, the function of Cdc42 in shrimp antiviral immunity is not clear. In this study, we identified a Cdc42 protein in the kuruma shrimp (Marsupenaeus japonicus) and named it MjCdc42. MjCdc42 was upregulated in shrimp challenged by white spot syndrome virus (WSSV). The knockdown of MjCdc42 and injection of Cdc42 inhibitors increased the proliferation of WSSV. Further experiments determined that MjCdc42 interacted with an arginine kinase (MjAK). By analyzing the binding activity and enzyme activity of MjAK and its mutant, ΔMjAK, we found that MjAK could enhance the replication of WSSV in shrimp. MjAK interacted with the envelope protein VP26 of WSSV. An inhibitor of AK activity, quercetin, could impair the function of MjAK in WSSV replication. Further study demonstrated that the binding of MjCdc42 and MjAK depends on Cys(271) of MjAK and suppresses the WSSV replication-promoting effect of MjAK. By interacting with the active site of MjAK and suppressing its enzyme activity, MjCdc42 inhibits WSSV replication in shrimp. Our results demonstrate a new function of Cdc42 in the cellular defense against viral infection in addition to the regulation of actin and phagocytosis, which has been reported in previous studies. IMPORTANCE The interaction of Cdc42 with arginine kinase plays a crucial role in the host defense against WSSV infection. This study identifies a new mechanism of Cdc42 in innate immunity and enriches the knowledge of the antiviral innate immunity of invertebrates. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  11. Interaction of the Small GTPase Cdc42 with Arginine Kinase Restricts White Spot Syndrome Virus in Shrimp

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Ji-Dong; Jiang, Hai-Shan; Wei, Tian-Di; Zhang, Ke-Yi; Wang, Xian-Wei; Zhao, Xiao-Fan

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Many types of small GTPases are widely expressed in eukaryotes and have different functions. As a crucial member of the Rho GTPase family, Cdc42 serves a number of functions, such as regulating cell growth, migration, and cell movement. Several RNA viruses employ Cdc42-hijacking tactics in their target cell entry processes. However, the function of Cdc42 in shrimp antiviral immunity is not clear. In this study, we identified a Cdc42 protein in the kuruma shrimp (Marsupenaeus japonicus) and named it MjCdc42. MjCdc42 was upregulated in shrimp challenged by white spot syndrome virus (WSSV). The knockdown of MjCdc42 and injection of Cdc42 inhibitors increased the proliferation of WSSV. Further experiments determined that MjCdc42 interacted with an arginine kinase (MjAK). By analyzing the binding activity and enzyme activity of MjAK and its mutant, ΔMjAK, we found that MjAK could enhance the replication of WSSV in shrimp. MjAK interacted with the envelope protein VP26 of WSSV. An inhibitor of AK activity, quercetin, could impair the function of MjAK in WSSV replication. Further study demonstrated that the binding of MjCdc42 and MjAK depends on Cys271 of MjAK and suppresses the WSSV replication-promoting effect of MjAK. By interacting with the active site of MjAK and suppressing its enzyme activity, MjCdc42 inhibits WSSV replication in shrimp. Our results demonstrate a new function of Cdc42 in the cellular defense against viral infection in addition to the regulation of actin and phagocytosis, which has been reported in previous studies. IMPORTANCE The interaction of Cdc42 with arginine kinase plays a crucial role in the host defense against WSSV infection. This study identifies a new mechanism of Cdc42 in innate immunity and enriches the knowledge of the antiviral innate immunity of invertebrates. PMID:28031362

  12. Cdc42 and Rac family GTPases regulate mode and speed but not direction of primary fibroblast migration during platelet-derived growth factor-dependent chemotaxis.

    PubMed

    Monypenny, James; Zicha, Daniel; Higashida, Chiharu; Oceguera-Yanez, Fabian; Narumiya, Shuh; Watanabe, Naoki

    2009-05-01

    Cdc42 and Rac family GTPases are important regulators of morphology, motility, and polarity in a variety of mammalian cell types. However, comprehensive analysis of their roles in the morphological and behavioral aspects of chemotaxis within a single experimental system is still lacking. Here we demonstrate using a direct viewing chemotaxis assay that of all of the Cdc42/Rac1-related GTPases expressed in primary fibroblasts, Cdc42, Rac1, and RhoG are required for efficient migration towards platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF). During migration, Cdc42-, Rac1-, and RhoG-deficient cells show aberrant morphology characterized as cell elongation and cell body rounding, loss of lamellipodia, and formation of thick membrane extensions, respectively. Analysis of individual cell trajectories reveals that cell speed is significantly reduced, as well as persistence, but to a smaller degree, while the directional response to the gradient of PDGF is not affected. Combined knockdown of Cdc42, Rac1, and RhoG results in greater inhibition of cell speed than when each protein is knocked down alone, but the cells are still capable of migrating toward PDGF. We conclude that, Cdc42, Rac1, and RhoG function cooperatively during cell migration and that, while each GTPase is implicated in the control of morphology and cell speed, these and other Cdc42/Rac-related GTPases are not essential for the directional response toward PDGF.

  13. Regulation of Cdc42 polarization by the Rsr1 GTPase and Rga1, a Cdc42 GTPase-activating protein, in budding yeast

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Mid Eum; Lo, Wing-Cheong; Miller, Kristi E.; Chou, Ching-Shan; Park, Hay-Oak

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cdc42 plays a central role in establishing polarity in yeast and animals, yet how polarization of Cdc42 is achieved in response to spatial cues is poorly understood. Using live-cell imaging, we found distinct dynamics of Cdc42 polarization in haploid budding yeast in correlation with two temporal steps of the G1 phase. The position at which the Cdc42–GTP cluster develops changes rapidly around the division site during the first step but becomes stabilized in the second step, suggesting that an axis of polarized growth is determined in mid G1. Cdc42 polarization in the first step and its proper positioning depend on Rsr1 and its GTPase-activating protein (GAP) Bud2. Interestingly, Rga1, a Cdc42 GAP, exhibits transient localization to a site near the bud neck and to the division site during cytokinesis and G1, and this temporal change of Rga1 distribution is necessary for determination of a proper growth site. Mathematical modeling suggests that a proper axis of Cdc42 polarization in haploid cells might be established through a biphasic mechanism involving sequential positive feedback and transient negative feedback. PMID:25908844

  14. Rac1 and Cdc42 GTPases regulate shear stress-driven β-catenin signaling in osteoblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Wan, Qiaoqiao; Cho, Eunhye; Yokota, Hiroki; Na, Sungsoo

    2013-04-19

    Highlights: •Shear stress increased TCF/LEF activity and stimulated β-catenin nuclear localization. •Rac1, Cdc42, and RhoA displayed distinct dynamic activity patterns under flow. •Rac1 and Cdc42, but not RhoA, regulate shear stress-driven TCF/LEF activation. •Cytoskeleton did not significantly affect shear stress-induced TCF/LEF activation. -- Abstract: Beta-catenin-dependent TCF/LEF (T-cell factor/lymphocyte enhancing factor) is known to be mechanosensitive and an important regulator for promoting bone formation. However, the functional connection between TCF/LEF activity and Rho family GTPases is not well understood in osteoblasts. Herein we investigated the molecular mechanisms underlying oscillatory shear stress-induced TCF/LEF activity in MC3T3-E1 osteoblast cells using live cell imaging. We employed fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based and green fluorescent protein (GFP)-based biosensors, which allowed us to monitor signal transduction in living cells in real time. Oscillatory (1 Hz) shear stress (10 dynes/cm{sup 2}) increased TCF/LEF activity and stimulated translocation of β-catenin to the nucleus with the distinct activity patterns of Rac1 and Cdc42. The shear stress-induced TCF/LEF activity was blocked by the inhibition of Rac1 and Cdc42 with their dominant negative mutants or selective drugs, but not by a dominant negative mutant of RhoA. In contrast, constitutively active Rac1 and Cdc42 mutants caused a significant enhancement of TCF/LEF activity. Moreover, activation of Rac1 and Cdc42 increased the basal level of TCF/LEF activity, while their inhibition decreased the basal level. Interestingly, disruption of cytoskeletal structures or inhibition of myosin activity did not significantly affect shear stress-induced TCF/LEF activity. Although Rac1 is reported to be involved in β-catenin in cancer cells, the involvement of Cdc42 in β-catenin signaling in osteoblasts has not been identified. Our findings in this study demonstrate

  15. RhoGDI-binding-defective mutant of Cdc42Hs targets to membranes and activates filopodia formation but does not cycle with the cytosol of mammalian cells.

    PubMed Central

    Gibson, R M; Wilson-Delfosse, A L

    2001-01-01

    We have identified a mutant of the human G-protein Cdc42Hs, R66E, that fails to form a detectable complex with the GDP-dissociation inhibitor RhoGDI in cell-free systems or in intact cells. This point mutant is prenylated, binds guanine nucleotide and interacts with GTPase-activating protein in a manner indistinguishable from wild-type Cdc42Hs. Immunofluorescence localization studies revealed that this RhoGDI-binding-defective mutant is found predominantly in the Golgi apparatus, with a staining pattern similar to that of the wild-type protein. However, unlike wild-type Cdc42Hs, which is distributed in both the microsomal membrane and cytosolic fractions, studies using differential centrifugation show that prenylated R66E Cdc42Hs is found exclusively in association with lipid bilayers. Additionally, whereas the overexpression of RhoGDI results in an apparent translocation of wild-type Cdc42Hs from the Golgi apparatus into the cytosol, identical RhoGDI-overexpression conditions do not alter the Golgi localization of the R66E mutant. Furthermore, overexpression of this RhoGDI-binding-defective mutant of Cdc42Hs seems to activate redistribution of the actin cytoskeleton and filopodia formation in fibroblasts in a manner indistinguishable from the wild-type protein. Taken together, these results suggest that the interaction of Cdc42Hs with RhoGDI is not essential for proper membrane targeting of nascent prenylated Cdc42Hs in mammalian cells; neither is this interaction an essential part of the mechanism by which Cdc42Hs activates filopodia formation. However, it does seem that redistribution of Cdc42Hs to the cytosolic compartment is absolutely dependent on RhoGDI interaction. PMID:11583574

  16. Listeria monocytogenes antagonizes the human GTPase Cdc42 to promote bacterial spread

    PubMed Central

    Rigano, Luciano A.; Dowd, Georgina C.; Wang, Yi; Ireton, Keith

    2014-01-01

    Summary The bacterial pathogen Listeria monocytogenes uses actin-based motility to spread from infected human cells to surrounding healthy cells. Cell-cell spread involves the formation of thin extensions of the host plasma membrane (‘protrusions’) containing motile bacteria. In cultured enterocytes, the Listeria protein InlC promotes protrusion formation by binding and antagonizing the human scaffolding protein Tuba. Tuba is a known activator of the GTPase Cdc42. In this work, we demonstrate an important role for Cdc42 in controlling Listeria spread. Infection of the enterocyte cell line Caco-2 BBE1 induced a decrease in the level of Cdc42-GTP, indicating that Listeria downregulates this GTPase. Genetic data involving RNA interference indicated that bacterial impairment of Cdc42 may involve inhibition of Tuba. Experiments with dominant negative and constitutively activated alleles of Cdc42 demonstrated that the ability to inactivate Cdc42 is required for efficient protrusion formation by Listeria. Taken together, these findings indicate a novel mechanism of bacterial spread involving pathogen-induced downregulation of host Cdc42. PMID:24405483

  17. Listeria monocytogenes antagonizes the human GTPase Cdc42 to promote bacterial spread.

    PubMed

    Rigano, Luciano A; Dowd, Georgina C; Wang, Yi; Ireton, Keith

    2014-07-01

    The bacterial pathogen Listeria monocytogenes uses actin-based motility to spread from infected human cells to surrounding healthy cells. Cell-cell spread involves the formation of thin extensions of the host plasma membrane ('protrusions') containing motile bacteria. In cultured enterocytes, the Listeria protein InlC promotes protrusion formation by binding and antagonizing the human scaffolding protein Tuba. Tuba is a known activator of the GTPase Cdc42. In this work, we demonstrate an important role for Cdc42 in controlling Listeria spread. Infection of the enterocyte cell line Caco-2 BBE1 induced a decrease in the level of Cdc42-GTP, indicating that Listeria downregulates this GTPase. Genetic data involving RNA interference indicated that bacterial impairment of Cdc42 may involve inhibition of Tuba. Experiments with dominant negative and constitutively activated alleles of Cdc42 demonstrated that the ability to inactivate Cdc42 is required for efficient protrusion formation by Listeria. Taken together, these findings indicate a novel mechanism of bacterial spread involving pathogen-induced downregulation of host Cdc42.

  18. Temporally and spatially coordinated roles for Rho, Rac, Cdc42 and their effectors in growth cone guidance by a physiological electric field.

    PubMed

    Rajnicek, Ann M; Foubister, Louise E; McCaig, Colin D

    2006-05-01

    Although it is known that neuronal growth cones migrate towards the cathode of an applied direct current (DC) electric field (EF), resembling the EF present in the developing nervous system, the underlying mechanism remains unclear. Here, we demonstrate temporally and spatially coordinated roles for the GTPases Rac, Cdc42 and Rho and their effectors. Growth cones of cultured Xenopus embryonic spinal neurons turned towards the cathode but collective inhibition of Rho, Rac and Cdc42 attenuated turning. Selective inhibition of Rho, Cdc42 or Rac signalling revealed temporally distinct roles in steering by an electrical gradient. Rho, Rac and Cdc42 are each essential for turning within the initial 2 hours (early phase). Later, Rho and Cdc42 signals remain important but Rac signalling dominates. The EF increased Rho immunofluorescence anodally. This correlated spatially with collapsed growth cone morphology and reduced anodal migration rates, which were restored by Rho inhibition. These data suggest that anodally increased Rho activity induces local cytoskeletal collapse, biasing growth cone advance cathodally. Collapse might be mediated by the Rho effectors p160 Rho kinase and myosin light chain kinase since their inhibition attenuated early turning. Inhibitors of phosphoinositide 3-kinase, MEK1/2 or p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) did not affect turning behaviour, eliminating them mechanistically. We propose a mechanism whereby Rac and Cdc42 activities dominate cathodally and Rho activity dominates anodally to steer growth cones towards the cathode. The interaction between Rho GTPases, the cytoskeleton and growth cone dynamics is explored in the companion paper published in this issue. Our results complement studies of growth cone guidance by diffusible chemical gradients and suggest that growth cones might interpret these co-existing guidance cues selectively.

  19. The small GTPase Cdc42 is necessary for primary ciliogenesis in renal tubular epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Xiaofeng; Fogelgren, Ben; Lipschutz, Joshua H

    2011-06-24

    Primary cilia are found on many epithelial cell types, including renal tubular epithelial cells, where they participate in flow sensing. Disruption of cilia function has been linked to the pathogenesis of polycystic kidney disease. We demonstrated previously that the exocyst, a highly conserved eight-protein membrane trafficking complex, localizes to primary cilia of renal tubular epithelial cells, is required for ciliogenesis, biochemically and genetically interacts with polycystin-2 (the protein product of the polycystic kidney disease 2 gene), and, when disrupted, results in MAPK pathway activation both in vitro and in vivo. The small GTPase Cdc42 is a candidate for regulation of the exocyst at the primary cilium. Here, we demonstrate that Cdc42 biochemically interacts with Sec10, a crucial component of the exocyst complex, and that Cdc42 colocalizes with Sec10 at the primary cilium. Expression of dominant negative Cdc42 and shRNA-mediated knockdown of both Cdc42 and Tuba, a Cdc42 guanine nucleotide exchange factor, inhibit ciliogenesis in Madin-Darby canine kidney cells. Furthermore, exocyst Sec8 and polycystin-2 no longer localize to primary cilia or the ciliary region following Cdc42 and Tuba knockdown. We also show that Sec10 directly interacts with Par6, a member of the Par complex that itself directly interacts with Cdc42. Finally, we show that Cdc42 knockdown results in activation of the MAPK pathway, something observed in cells with dysfunctional primary cilia. These data support a model in which Cdc42 localizes the exocyst to the primary cilium, whereupon the exocyst then targets and docks vesicles carrying proteins necessary for ciliogenesis.

  20. The Small GTPase Cdc42 Is Necessary for Primary Ciliogenesis in Renal Tubular Epithelial Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Zuo, Xiaofeng; Fogelgren, Ben; Lipschutz, Joshua H.

    2011-01-01

    Primary cilia are found on many epithelial cell types, including renal tubular epithelial cells, where they participate in flow sensing. Disruption of cilia function has been linked to the pathogenesis of polycystic kidney disease. We demonstrated previously that the exocyst, a highly conserved eight-protein membrane trafficking complex, localizes to primary cilia of renal tubular epithelial cells, is required for ciliogenesis, biochemically and genetically interacts with polycystin-2 (the protein product of the polycystic kidney disease 2 gene), and, when disrupted, results in MAPK pathway activation both in vitro and in vivo. The small GTPase Cdc42 is a candidate for regulation of the exocyst at the primary cilium. Here, we demonstrate that Cdc42 biochemically interacts with Sec10, a crucial component of the exocyst complex, and that Cdc42 colocalizes with Sec10 at the primary cilium. Expression of dominant negative Cdc42 and shRNA-mediated knockdown of both Cdc42 and Tuba, a Cdc42 guanine nucleotide exchange factor, inhibit ciliogenesis in Madin-Darby canine kidney cells. Furthermore, exocyst Sec8 and polycystin-2 no longer localize to primary cilia or the ciliary region following Cdc42 and Tuba knockdown. We also show that Sec10 directly interacts with Par6, a member of the Par complex that itself directly interacts with Cdc42. Finally, we show that Cdc42 knockdown results in activation of the MAPK pathway, something observed in cells with dysfunctional primary cilia. These data support a model in which Cdc42 localizes the exocyst to the primary cilium, whereupon the exocyst then targets and docks vesicles carrying proteins necessary for ciliogenesis. PMID:21543338

  1. Identification of a novel prenyl and palmitoyl modification at the CaaX motif of Cdc42 that regulates RhoGDI binding.

    PubMed

    Nishimura, Akiyuki; Linder, Maurine E

    2013-04-01

    Membrane localization of Rho GTPases is essential for their biological functions and is dictated in part by a series of posttranslational modifications at a carboxyl-terminal CaaX motif: prenylation at cysteine, proteolysis of the aaX tripeptide, and carboxymethylation. The fidelity and variability of these CaaX processing steps are uncertain. The brain-specific splice variant of Cdc42 (bCdc42) terminates in a CCIF sequence. Here we show that brain Cdc42 undergoes two different types of posttranslational modification: classical CaaX processing or novel tandem prenylation and palmitoylation at the CCaX cysteines. In the dual lipidation pathway, bCdc42 was prenylated, but it bypassed proteolysis and carboxymethylation to undergo modification with palmitate at the second cysteine. The alternative postprenylation processing fates were conserved in the GTPases RalA and RalB and the phosphatase PRL-3, proteins terminating in a CCaX motif. The differentially modified forms of bCdc42 displayed functional differences. Prenylated and palmitoylated brain Cdc42 did not interact with RhoGDIα and was enriched in the plasma membrane relative to the classically processed form. The alternative processing of prenylated CCaX motif proteins by palmitoylation or by endoproteolysis and methylation expands the diversity of signaling GTPases and enables another level of regulation through reversible modification with palmitate.

  2. Pattern formation of Rho GTPases in single cell wound healing

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Cory M.; Vaughan, Emily M.; Bement, William M.; Edelstein-Keshet, Leah

    2013-01-01

    The Rho GTPases—Rho, Rac, and Cdc42—control an enormous variety of processes, many of which reflect activation of these GTPases in spatially confined and mutually exclusive zones. By using mathematical models and experimental results to establish model parameters, we analyze the formation and segregation of Rho and Cdc42 zones during Xenopus oocyte wound repair and the role played by Abr, a dual guanine nucleotide exchange factor–GTPase-activating protein, in this process. The Rho and Cdc42 zones are found to be best represented as manifestations of spatially modulated bistability, and local positive feedback between Abr and Rho can account for the maintenance and dynamic properties of the Rho zone. In contrast, the invocation of an Abr-independent positive feedback loop is required to account for Cdc42 spatial bistability. In addition, the model replicates the results of previous in vivo experiments in which Abr activity is manipulated. Further, simulating the model with two closely spaced wounds made nonintuitive predictions about the Rho and Cdc42 patterns; these predictions were confirmed by experiment. We conclude that the model is a useful tool for analysis of Rho GTPase signaling and that the Rho GTPases can be fruitfully considered as components of intracellular pattern formation systems. PMID:23264464

  3. Polar body emission requires a rhoA contractile ring and Cdc42-mediated membrane protrusion

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xuan; Ma, Chunqi; Miller, Ann L.; Katbi, Hadia Arabi; Bement, William M.; Liu, X. Johné

    2009-01-01

    Vertebrate oocyte maturation is an extreme form of asymmetric cell division, producing a mature egg alongside a diminutive polar body. Critical to this process is the attachment of one spindle pole to the oocyte cortex prior to anaphase. We report here that asymmetric spindle pole attachment and anaphase initiation are required for localized cortical activation of Cdc42, which in turn defines the surface of the impending polar body. The Cdc42 activity zone overlaps with dynamic F-actin, and is circumscribed by a RhoA-based actomyosin contractile ring. During cytokinesis, constriction of the RhoA contractile ring is accompanied by Cdc42-mediated membrane outpocketing such that one spindle pole and one set of chromosomes are pulled into the Cdc42 enclosure. Unexpectedly, the guanine nucleotide exchange factor Ect2, which is necessary for contractile ring formation, does not co-localize with active RhoA. Polar body emission thus requires a classical RhoA contractile ring and Cdc42-mediated membrane protrusion. PMID:18804436

  4. Polar body emission requires a RhoA contractile ring and Cdc42-mediated membrane protrusion.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xuan; Ma, Chunqi; Miller, Ann L; Katbi, Hadia Arabi; Bement, William M; Liu, X Johné

    2008-09-01

    Vertebrate oocyte maturation is an extreme form of asymmetric cell division, producing a mature egg alongside a diminutive polar body. Critical to this process is the attachment of one spindle pole to the oocyte cortex prior to anaphase. We report here that asymmetric spindle pole attachment and anaphase initiation are required for localized cortical activation of Cdc42, which in turn defines the surface of the impending polar body. The Cdc42 activity zone overlaps with dynamic F-actin and is circumscribed by a RhoA-based actomyosin contractile ring. During cytokinesis, constriction of the RhoA contractile ring is accompanied by Cdc42-mediated membrane outpocketing such that one spindle pole and one set of chromosomes are pulled into the Cdc42 enclosure. Unexpectedly, the guanine nucleotide exchange factor Ect2, which is necessary for contractile ring formation, does not colocalize with active RhoA. Polar body emission thus requires a classical RhoA contractile ring and Cdc42-mediated membrane protrusion.

  5. Spatio-temporal co-ordination of RhoA, Rac1 and Cdc42 activation during prototypical edge protrusion and retraction dynamics.

    PubMed

    Martin, Katrin; Reimann, Andreas; Fritz, Rafael D; Ryu, Hyunryul; Jeon, Noo Li; Pertz, Olivier

    2016-02-25

    The three canonical Rho GTPases RhoA, Rac1 and Cdc42 co-ordinate cytoskeletal dynamics. Recent studies indicate that all three Rho GTPases are activated at the leading edge of motile fibroblasts, where their activity fluctuates at subminute time and micrometer length scales. Here, we use a microfluidic chip to acutely manipulate fibroblast edge dynamics by applying pulses of platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) or the Rho kinase inhibitor Y-27632 (which lowers contractility). This induces acute and robust membrane protrusion and retraction events, that exhibit stereotyped cytoskeletal dynamics, allowing us to fairly compare specific morphodynamic states across experiments. Using a novel Cdc42, as well as previously described, second generation RhoA and Rac1 biosensors, we observe distinct spatio-temporal signaling programs that involve all three Rho GTPases, during protrusion/retraction edge dynamics. Our results suggest that Rac1, Cdc42 and RhoA regulate different cytoskeletal and adhesion processes to fine tune the highly plastic edge protrusion/retraction dynamics that power cell motility.

  6. Spatio-temporal co-ordination of RhoA, Rac1 and Cdc42 activation during prototypical edge protrusion and retraction dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Katrin; Reimann, Andreas; Fritz, Rafael D.; Ryu, Hyunryul; Jeon, Noo Li; Pertz, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    The three canonical Rho GTPases RhoA, Rac1 and Cdc42 co-ordinate cytoskeletal dynamics. Recent studies indicate that all three Rho GTPases are activated at the leading edge of motile fibroblasts, where their activity fluctuates at subminute time and micrometer length scales. Here, we use a microfluidic chip to acutely manipulate fibroblast edge dynamics by applying pulses of platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) or the Rho kinase inhibitor Y-27632 (which lowers contractility). This induces acute and robust membrane protrusion and retraction events, that exhibit stereotyped cytoskeletal dynamics, allowing us to fairly compare specific morphodynamic states across experiments. Using a novel Cdc42, as well as previously described, second generation RhoA and Rac1 biosensors, we observe distinct spatio-temporal signaling programs that involve all three Rho GTPases, during protrusion/retraction edge dynamics. Our results suggest that Rac1, Cdc42 and RhoA regulate different cytoskeletal and adhesion processes to fine tune the highly plastic edge protrusion/retraction dynamics that power cell motility. PMID:26912264

  7. Neuroglobin Plays a Protective Role in Arsenite-Induced Cytotoxicity by Inhibition of Cdc42 and Rac1GTPases in Rat Cerebellar Granule Neurons.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaona; Gao, Yanhui; An, Yuan; Fu, Xiaoyan; Li, Yuanyuan; Sun, Dianjun; Wang, Jing

    2015-01-01

    We have previously shown that neuroglobin (Ngb) expression can be regulated by sodium arsenite (NaAsO2) exposure in rat cerebellar granule neurons (CGNs). However, the precise molecular mechanisms of Ngb action are largely unknown. Ras homolog (Rho) guanosine triphosphatases (Rho GTPases) are involved in the regulation of a number of cellular processes, including cell cytotoxicity. It has been reported that Ngb can act as a guanine nucleotide dissociation inhibitior (GDI) role to inactivate Rho GTPases. Therefore, we investigated Rho GTPases activation induced by NaAsO2 exposure in rat CGNs and effects of Rho GTPases activation on the cells. We also investigated the role of Ngb in this process. Primary cultures of CGNs were prepared from 7-day-old Wistar rat pups. The cytotoxic effects of NaAsO2 on CGNs were evaluated using the Cell Counting Kit-8 assay and TUNEL staining. RNA interference technology was used to silence Ngb, and the subsequent effects were evaluated by quantitative RT-PCR and Western blot. Cdc42 and Rac1 activation were measured by pull-down assay and Western blot. NaAsO2 induced cytotoxicity in rat CGNs, increased GTP-bound form of Cdc42 and Rac1 GTPases in the cells. Furthermore, inhibition of Cdc42 or Rac1 activity using the inhibitor ZCL278 or NSC23766 decreased apoptosis and increased cell viability in the cells exposed to NaAsO2. Using siRNA-mediated knockdown, we show that NaAsO2-induced cytotoxicity was exacerbated, activation of Cdc42 (GTP-Cdc42) and Rac1 (GTP-Rac1) was increased in Ngb RNA silencing cells. cytotoxic effects of NaAsO2 on rat CGNs is induced at least partly by Cdc42 and Rac1 activation, and Ngb can inhibit Cdc42 and Rac1 activation to play protective role in rat CGNs exposed to NaAsO2. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  8. Cdc42 regulates Cdc42EP3 function in cancer-associated fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Farrugia, Aaron J.; Calvo, Fernando

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Rho family GTPases such as Cdc42 are key regulators of essential cellular processes through their effects on cytoskeletal dynamics, signaling and gene expression. Rho GTPases modulate these functions by engaging a wide variety of downstream effectors. Among these effectors is the largely understudied Cdc42EP/BORG family of Cdc42 effectors. BORG proteins have been linked to actin and septin regulation, but their role in development and disease is only starting to emerge. Recently, Cdc42EP3/BORG2 was shown to coordinate actin and septin cytoskeleton rearrangements in cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs). Interestingly, Cdc42EP3 expression potentiated cellular responses to mechanical stimulation leading to signaling and transcriptional adaptations required for the emergence of a fully activated CAF phenotype. These findings uncover a novel role for the BORG/septin network in cancer. Here, we demonstrate that Cdc42EP3 function in CAFs relies on tight regulation by Cdc42. PMID:27248291

  9. Rho GTPases at the crossroad of signaling networks in mammals

    PubMed Central

    Wojnacki, José; Quassollo, Gonzalo; Marzolo, María-Paz; Cáceres, Alfredo

    2014-01-01

    Microtubule (MT) organization and dynamics downstream of external cues is crucial for maintaining cellular architecture and the generation of cell asymmetries. In interphase cells RhoA, Rac, and Cdc42, conspicuous members of the family of small Rho GTPases, have major roles in modulating MT stability, and hence polarized cell behaviors. However, MTs are not mere targets of Rho GTPases, but also serve as signaling platforms coupling MT dynamics to Rho GTPase activation in a variety of cellular conditions. In this article, we review some of the key studies describing the reciprocal relationship between small Rho-GTPases and MTs during migration and polarization. PMID:24691223

  10. The small GTPase Cdc42 initiates an apoptotic signaling pathway in Jurkat T lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Chuang, T H; Hahn, K M; Lee, J D; Danley, D E; Bokoch, G M

    1997-01-01

    Apoptosis plays an important role in regulating development and homeostasis of the immune system, yet the elements of the signaling pathways that control cell death have not been well defined. When expressed in Jurkat T cells, an activated form of the small GTPase Cdc42 induces cell death exhibiting the characteristics of apoptosis. The death response induced by Cdc42 is mediated by activation of a protein kinase cascade leading to stimulation of c-Jun amino terminal kinase (JNK). Apoptosis initiated by Cdc42 is inhibited by dominant negative components of the JNK cascade and by reagents that block activity of the ICE protease (caspase) family, suggesting that stimulation of the JNK kinase cascade can lead to caspase activation. The sequence of morphological events observed typically in apoptotic cells is modified in the presence of activated Cdc42, suggesting that this GTPase may account for some aspects of cytoskeletal regulation during the apoptotic program. These data suggest a means through which the biochemical and morphological events occurring during apoptosis may be coordinately regulated. Images PMID:9307966

  11. Tetrandrine inhibits migration and invasion of rheumatoid arthritis fibroblast-like synoviocytes through down-regulating the expressions of Rac1, Cdc42, and RhoA GTPases and activation of the PI3K/Akt and JNK signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Lv, Qi; Zhu, Xian-Yang; Xia, Yu-Feng; Dai, Yue; Wei, Zhi-Feng

    2015-11-01

    Tetrandrine (Tet), the main active constituent of Stephania tetrandra root, has been demonstrated to alleviate adjuvant-induced arthritis in rats. The present study was designed to investigate the effects of Tet on the migration and invasion of rheumatoid arthritis fibroblast-like synoviocytes (RA-FLS) and explore the underlying mechanisms. By using cultures of primary FLS isolated from synoviums of RA patients and cell line MH7A, Tet (0.3, 1 μmol·L(-1)) was proven to significantly impede migration and invasion of RA-FLS, but not cell proliferation. Tet also greatly reduced the activation and expressions of matrix degrading enzymes MMP-2/9, the expression of F-actin and the activation of FAK, which controlled the morphologic changes in migration process of FLS. To identify the key signaling pathways by which Tet exerts anti-migration effect, the specific inhibitors of multiple signaling pathways LY294002, Triciribine, SP600125, U0126, SB203580, and PDTC (against PI3K, Akt, JNK, ERK, p38 MAPK and NF-κB-p65, respectively) were used. Among them, LY294002, Triciribine, and SP600125 were shown to obviously inhibit the migration of MH7A cells. Consistently, Tet was able to down-regulate the activation of Akt and JNK as demonstrated by Western blotting assay. Moreover, Tet could reduce the expressions of migration-related proteins Rho GTPases Rac1, Cdc42, and RhoA in MH7A cells. In conclusion, Tet can impede the migration and invasion of RA-FLS, which provides a plausible explanation for its protective effect on RA. The underlying mechanisms involve the reduction of the expressions of Rac1, Cdc42, and RhoA, inhibition of the activation of Akt and JNK, and subsequent down-regulation of activation and/or expressions of MMP-2/9, F-actin, and FAK.

  12. Rho GTPases at the crossroad of signaling networks in mammals: impact of Rho-GTPases on microtubule organization and dynamics.

    PubMed

    Wojnacki, José; Quassollo, Gonzalo; Marzolo, María-Paz; Cáceres, Alfredo

    2014-01-01

    Microtubule (MT) organization and dynamics downstream of external cues is crucial for maintaining cellular architecture and the generation of cell asymmetries. In interphase cells RhoA, Rac, and Cdc42, conspicuous members of the family of small Rho GTPases, have major roles in modulating MT stability, and hence polarized cell behaviors. However, MTs are not mere targets of Rho GTPases, but also serve as signaling platforms coupling MT dynamics to Rho GTPase activation in a variety of cellular conditions. In this article, we review some of the key studies describing the reciprocal relationship between small Rho-GTPases and MTs during migration and polarization.

  13. Rho GTPase signalling in cell migration

    PubMed Central

    Ridley, Anne J

    2015-01-01

    Cells migrate in multiple different ways depending on their environment, which includes the extracellular matrix composition, interactions with other cells, and chemical stimuli. For all types of cell migration, Rho GTPases play a central role, although the relative contribution of each Rho GTPase depends on the environment and cell type. Here, I review recent advances in our understanding of how Rho GTPases contribute to different types of migration, comparing lamellipodium-driven versus bleb-driven migration modes. I also describe how cells migrate across the endothelium. In addition to Rho, Rac and Cdc42, which are well known to regulate migration, I discuss the roles of other less-well characterized members of the Rho family. PMID:26363959

  14. Phosphorylation-dependent inhibition of Cdc42 GEF Gef1 by 14-3-3 protein Rad24 spatially regulates Cdc42 GTPase activity and oscillatory dynamics during cell morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Das, Maitreyi; Nuñez, Illyce; Rodriguez, Marbelys; Wiley, David J; Rodriguez, Juan; Sarkeshik, Ali; Yates, John R; Buchwald, Peter; Verde, Fulvia

    2015-10-01

    Active Cdc42 GTPase, a key regulator of cell polarity, displays oscillatory dynamics that are anticorrelated at the two cell tips in fission yeast. Anticorrelation suggests competition for active Cdc42 or for its effectors. Here we show how 14-3-3 protein Rad24 associates with Cdc42 guanine exchange factor (GEF) Gef1, limiting Gef1 availability to promote Cdc42 activation. Phosphorylation of Gef1 by conserved NDR kinase Orb6 promotes Gef1 binding to Rad24. Loss of Rad24-Gef1 interaction increases Gef1 protein localization and Cdc42 activation at the cell tips and reduces the anticorrelation of active Cdc42 oscillations. Increased Cdc42 activation promotes precocious bipolar growth activation, bypassing the normal requirement for an intact microtubule cytoskeleton and for microtubule-dependent polarity landmark Tea4-PP1. Further, increased Cdc42 activation by Gef1 widens cell diameter and alters tip curvature, countering the effects of Cdc42 GTPase-activating protein Rga4. The respective levels of Gef1 and Rga4 proteins at the membrane define dynamically the growing area at each cell tip. Our findings show how the 14-3-3 protein Rad24 modulates the availability of Cdc42 GEF Gef1, a homologue of mammalian Cdc42 GEF DNMBP/TUBA, to spatially control Cdc42 GTPase activity and promote cell polarization and cell shape emergence.

  15. Phosphorylation-dependent inhibition of Cdc42 GEF Gef1 by 14-3-3 protein Rad24 spatially regulates Cdc42 GTPase activity and oscillatory dynamics during cell morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Das, Maitreyi; Nuñez, Illyce; Rodriguez, Marbelys; Wiley, David J.; Rodriguez, Juan; Sarkeshik, Ali; Yates, John R.; Buchwald, Peter; Verde, Fulvia

    2015-01-01

    Active Cdc42 GTPase, a key regulator of cell polarity, displays oscillatory dynamics that are anticorrelated at the two cell tips in fission yeast. Anticorrelation suggests competition for active Cdc42 or for its effectors. Here we show how 14-3-3 protein Rad24 associates with Cdc42 guanine exchange factor (GEF) Gef1, limiting Gef1 availability to promote Cdc42 activation. Phosphorylation of Gef1 by conserved NDR kinase Orb6 promotes Gef1 binding to Rad24. Loss of Rad24–Gef1 interaction increases Gef1 protein localization and Cdc42 activation at the cell tips and reduces the anticorrelation of active Cdc42 oscillations. Increased Cdc42 activation promotes precocious bipolar growth activation, bypassing the normal requirement for an intact microtubule cytoskeleton and for microtubule-dependent polarity landmark Tea4-PP1. Further, increased Cdc42 activation by Gef1 widens cell diameter and alters tip curvature, countering the effects of Cdc42 GTPase-activating protein Rga4. The respective levels of Gef1 and Rga4 proteins at the membrane define dynamically the growing area at each cell tip. Our findings show how the 14-3-3 protein Rad24 modulates the availability of Cdc42 GEF Gef1, a homologue of mammalian Cdc42 GEF DNMBP/TUBA, to spatially control Cdc42 GTPase activity and promote cell polarization and cell shape emergence. PMID:26246599

  16. The Cdc42 GTPase-associated proteins Gic1 and Gic2 are required for polarized cell growth in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Guang-Chao; Kim, Yung-Jin; Chan, Clarence S.M.

    1997-01-01

    BEM2 of Saccharomyces cerevisiae encodes a Rho-type GTPase-activating protein that is required for proper bud site selection at 26°C and for bud emergence at elevated temperatures. We show here that the temperature-sensitive growth phenotype of bem2 mutant cells can be suppressed by increased dosage of the GIC1 gene. The Gic1 protein, together with its structural homolog Gic2, are required for cell size and shape control, bud site selection, bud emergence, actin cytoskeletal organization, mitotic spindle orientation/positioning, and mating projection formation in response to mating pheromone. Each protein contains a CRIB (Cdc42/Rac-interactive binding) motif and each interacts in the two-hybrid assay with the GTP-bound form of the Rho-type Cdc42 GTPase, a key regulator of polarized growth in yeast. The CRIB motif of Gic1 and the effector domain of Cdc42 are required for this association. Genetic experiments indicate that Gic1 and Gic2 play positive roles in the Cdc42 signal transduction pathway, probably as effectors of Cdc42. Subcellular localization studies with a functional green fluorescent protein–Gic1 fusion protein indicate that this protein is concentrated at the incipient bud site of unbudded cells, at the bud tip and mother-bud neck of budded cells, and at cortical sites on large-budded cells that may delimit future bud sites in the two progeny cells. The ability of Gic1 to associate with Cdc42 is important for its function but is apparently not essential for its subcellular localization. PMID:9367979

  17. A Rho GTPase signal treadmill backs a contractile array

    PubMed Central

    Burkel, Brian M.; Benink, Helene A.; Vaughan, Emily M.; von Dassow, George; Bement, William M.

    2012-01-01

    Contractile arrays of actin filaments (F-actin) and myosin-2 power diverse biological processes. Contractile array formation is stimulated by the Rho GTPases Rho and Cdc42; after assembly, array movement is thought to result from contraction itself. Contractile array movement and GTPase activity were analyzed during cellular wound repair, in which arrays close in association with zones of Rho and Cdc42 activity. Remarkably, contraction suppression prevents translocation of F-actin and myosin-2 without preventing array or zone closure. Closure is driven by an underlying “signal treadmill” in which the GTPases are preferentially activated at the leading edges and preferentially lost from the trailing edges of their zones. Treadmill organization requires myosin-2 powered contraction and F-actin turnover. Thus, directional gradients in Rho GTPase turnover impart directional information to contractile arrays and proper functioning of these gradients is dependent on both contraction and F-actin turnover. PMID:22819338

  18. Rho family and Rap GTPase activation assays.

    PubMed

    Jennings, Richard T; Knaus, Ulla G

    2014-01-01

    The detection of Ras superfamily GTPase activity in innate immune cells is important when studying signaling events elicited by various ligands and cellular processes. The development of high-affinity probes detecting the activated, GTP-bound form of small GTPases has significantly enhanced our understanding of initiation and termination of GTPase-regulated signaling pathways. These probes are created by fusing a high-affinity GTPase-binding domain derived from a specific downstream effector protein to glutathione S-transferase (GST). Such domains bind preferentially to the GTP-bound form of the upstream Rho or Ras GTPase. Coupling these probes to beads enables extraction of the complex and subsequent quantification of the active GTP-binding protein by immunoblotting. Although effector domains that discriminate efficiently between GDP- and GTP-bound states and highly specific antibodies are not yet available for every small GTPase, analysis of certain members of the Rho and Ras GTPase family is now routinely performed. Here, we describe affinity-based pulldown assays for detection of Rho GTPase (Rac1/2, Cdc42, RhoA/B) and Rap1/2 activity in stimulated neutrophils or macrophages.

  19. Rho GTPases in collective cell migration.

    PubMed

    Zegers, Mirjam M; Friedl, Peter

    2014-01-01

    The family of Rho GTPases are intracellular signal transducers that link cell surface signals to multiple intracellular responses. They are best known for their role in regulating actin dynamics required for cell migration, but in addition control cell-cell adhesion, polarization, vesicle trafficking, and the cell cycle. The roles of Rho GTPases in single mesenchymal cell migration are well established and rely on Cdc42- and Rac-dependent cell protrusion of a leading edge, coupled to Rho-dependent contractility required to move the cell body forward. In cells migrating collectively, cell-cell junctions are maintained, and migrating leader cells are mechanically coupled to, and coordinate, migration with follower cells. Recent evidence suggests that Rho GTPases provide multifunctional input to collective cell polarization, cell-cell interaction, and migration. Here, we discuss the role of Rho GTPases in initiating and maintaining front-rear, apical-basal cell polarization, mechanotransduction, and cell-cell junction stability between leader and follower cells, and how these roles are integrated in collective migration. Thereby, spatiotemporal fine-tuning of Rho GTPases within the same cell and among cells in the cell group are crucial in controlling potentially conflicting, divergent cell adhesion and cytoskeletal functions to achieve supracellular coordination and mechanocoupling.

  20. Rho GTPases in collective cell migration

    PubMed Central

    Zegers, Mirjam M; Friedl, Peter

    2014-01-01

    The family of Rho GTPases are intracellular signal transducers that link cell surface signals to multiple intracellular responses. They are best known for their role in regulating actin dynamics required for cell migration, but in addition control cell-cell adhesion, polarization, vesicle trafficking, and the cell cycle. The roles of Rho GTPases in single mesenchymal cell migration are well established and rely on Cdc42- and Rac-dependent cell protrusion of a leading edge, coupled to Rho-dependent contractility required to move the cell body forward. In cells migrating collectively, cell-cell junctions are maintained, and migrating leader cells are mechanically coupled to, and coordinate, migration with follower cells. Recent evidence suggests that Rho GTPases provide multifunctional input to collective cell polarization, cell-cell interaction, and migration. Here, we discuss the role of Rho GTPases in initiating and maintaining front-rear, apical-basal cell polarization, mechanotransduction, and cell-cell junction stability between leader and follower cells, and how these roles are integrated in collective migration. Thereby, spatiotemporal fine-tuning of Rho GTPases within the same cell and among cells in the cell group are crucial in controlling potentially conflicting, divergent cell adhesion and cytoskeletal functions to achieve supracellular coordination and mechanocoupling. PMID:25054920

  1. Differential Localization of Rho Gtpases in Live Cells

    PubMed Central

    Michaelson, David; Silletti, Joseph; Murphy, Gretchen; D'Eustachio, Peter; Rush, Mark; Philips, Mark R.

    2001-01-01

    Determinants of membrane targeting of Rho proteins were investigated in live cells with green fluorescent fusion proteins expressed with or without Rho-guanine nucleotide dissociation inhibitor (GDI)α. The hypervariable region determined to which membrane compartment each protein was targeted. Targeting was regulated by binding to RhoGDIα in the case of RhoA, Rac1, Rac2, and Cdc42hs but not RhoB or TC10. Although RhoB localized to the plasma membrane (PM), Golgi, and motile peri-Golgi vesicles, TC10 localized to PMs and endosomes. Inhibition of palmitoylation mislocalized H-Ras, RhoB, and TC10 to the endoplasmic reticulum. Although overexpressed Cdc42hs and Rac2 were observed predominantly on endomembrane, Rac1 was predominantly at the PM. RhoA was cytosolic even when expressed at levels in vast excess of RhoGDIα. Oncogenic Dbl stimulated translocation of green fluorescent protein (GFP)-Rac1, GFP-Cdc42hs, and GFP-RhoA to lamellipodia. RhoGDI binding to GFP-Cdc42hs was not affected by substituting farnesylation for geranylgeranylation. A palmitoylation site inserted into RhoA blocked RhoGDIα binding. Mutations that render RhoA, Cdc42hs, or Rac1, either constitutively active or dominant negative abrogated binding to RhoGDIα and redirected expression to both PMs and internal membranes. Thus, despite the common essential feature of the CAAX (prenylation, AAX tripeptide proteolysis, and carboxyl methylation) motif, the subcellular localizations of Rho GTPases, like their functions, are diverse and dynamic. PMID:11149925

  2. Gain-of-Function Mutations of ARHGAP31, a Cdc42/Rac1 GTPase Regulator, Cause Syndromic Cutis Aplasia and Limb Anomalies

    PubMed Central

    Southgate, Laura; Machado, Rajiv D.; Snape, Katie M.; Primeau, Martin; Dafou, Dimitra; Ruddy, Deborah M.; Branney, Peter A.; Fisher, Malcolm; Lee, Grace J.; Simpson, Michael A.; He, Yi; Bradshaw, Teisha Y.; Blaumeiser, Bettina; Winship, William S.; Reardon, Willie; Maher, Eamonn R.; FitzPatrick, David R.; Wuyts, Wim; Zenker, Martin; Lamarche-Vane, Nathalie; Trembath, Richard C.

    2011-01-01

    Regulation of cell proliferation and motility is essential for normal development. The Rho family of GTPases plays a critical role in the control of cell polarity and migration by effecting the cytoskeleton, membrane trafficking, and cell adhesion. We investigated a recognized developmental disorder, Adams-Oliver syndrome (AOS), characterized by the combination of aplasia cutis congenita (ACC) and terminal transverse limb defects (TTLD). Through a genome-wide linkage analysis, we detected a locus for autosomal-dominant ACC-TTLD on 3q generating a maximum LOD score of 4.93 at marker rs1464311. Candidate-gene- and exome-based sequencing led to the identification of independent premature truncating mutations in the terminal exon of the Rho GTPase-activating protein 31 gene, ARHGAP31, which encodes a Cdc42/Rac1 regulatory protein. Mutant transcripts are stable and increase ARHGAP31 activity in vitro through a gain-of-function mechanism. Constitutively active ARHGAP31 mutations result in a loss of available active Cdc42 and consequently disrupt actin cytoskeletal structures. Arhgap31 expression in the mouse is substantially restricted to the terminal limb buds and craniofacial processes during early development; these locations closely mirror the sites of impaired organogenesis that characterize this syndrome. These data identify the requirement for regulated Cdc42 and/or Rac1 signaling processes during early human development. PMID:21565291

  3. Botulinum Toxin A Upregulates Rac1, Cdc42, and RhoA Gene Expression in a Dose-Dependent Manner: In Vivo and in Vitro Study.

    PubMed

    Park, Tae Hwan; Park, Ji Hae; Chang, Choong Hyun; Rah, Dong Kyun

    2016-03-01

    Angiogenesis is the development of new capillaries from existing blood vessels and is a prerequisite for the wound-healing process. Many lines of scientific evidences have shown that complicated roles of small guanosine triphosphatases (GTPases) (ras-related C3 botulinum toxin substrate 1 [Rac1], cell division control protein 42 [Cdc42], and ras homolog gene family, member A [RhoA]) in regulation of signal transduction pathways exist to transmit distinct cellular effects on the modulation of actin cytoskeleton remodeling such as cell cycle progression, cell survival, and cell motility. In addition, these small GTPases activate mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinases (MAP3Ks) leading to activated mitogen-activated protein kinase kinases (MAPKK), mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), and various transcription factors such as vascular endothelial growth factor with involvement of MAPK signaling pathways.In this study, the authors hypothesized that botulinum toxin A increases angiogenesis via the expression of small GTPases in vivo and in vitro studies.In vivo experiment, 24 Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into 2 groups: a control group and a botulinum toxin A group. Five days prior to superiorly based transverse rectus abdominis myocutaneous flap elevation, the botulinum toxin A (BoTA) group was pretreated with BoTA, while the control group was pretreated with normal saline. quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction was performed to evaluate the expression of Rac1, RhoA, and Cdc42.The angiogenic effects of botulinum toxin A on human dermal fibroblasts were measured in vitro experiment. To understand the mechanism of botulinum toxin A on small GTPases production of fibroblasts, Rac1, Cdc42, and RhoA were measured using qRT-PCR.The relative messenger ribonucleic acid expression of Rac1, RhoA, and Cdc42 was significantly higher in the BoTA group than in the control group, in every zone and pedicle muscle, on postoperative days 1, 3, and 5

  4. The GTPase-activating protein n-chimaerin cooperates with Rac1 and Cdc42Hs to induce the formation of lamellipodia and filopodia.

    PubMed Central

    Kozma, R; Ahmed, S; Best, A; Lim, L

    1996-01-01

    n-Chimaerin is a GTPase-activating protein (GAP) mainly for Rac1 and less so for Cdc42Hs in vitro. The GAP activity of n-chimaerin is regulated by phospholipids and phorbol esters. Microinjection of Rac1 and Cdc42Hs into mammalian cells induces formation of the actin-based structures lamellipodia and filopodia, respectively, with the former being prevented by coinjection of the chimaerin GAP domain. Strikingly, microinjection of the full-length n-chimaerin into fibroblasts and neuroblastoma cells induces the simultaneous formation of lamellipodia and filopodia. These structures undergo cycles of dissolution and formation, resembling natural morphological events occurring at the leading edge of fibroblasts and neuronal growth cones. The effects of n-chimaerin on formation of lamellipodia and filopodia were inhibited by dominant negative Rac1(T17N) and Cdc42Hs(T17N), respectively. n-Chimaerin's effects were also inhibited by coinjection with Rho GDP dissociation inhibitor or by treatment with phorbol ester. A mutant n-chimaerin with no GAP activity and impaired p21 binding was ineffective in inducing morphological changes, while a mutant lacking GAP activity alone was effective. Microinjected n-chimaerin colocalized in situ with F-actin. Taken together, these results suggest that n-chimaerin acts synergistically with Rac1 and Cdc42Hs to induce actin-based morphological changes and that this action involves Rac1 and Cdc42Hs binding but not GAP activity. Thus, GAPs may have morphological functions in addition to downregulation of GTPases. PMID:8756665

  5. The balance between Gαi-Cdc42/Rac and Gα12/13-RhoA pathways determines endothelial barrier regulation by Sphingosine-1-Phosphate.

    PubMed

    Reinhard, Nathalie R; Mastop, Marieke; Yin, Taofei; Wu, Yi; Bosma, Esmeralda K; Gadella, Theodorus W J; Goedhart, Joachim; Hordijk, Peter L

    2017-09-27

    The bioactive sphingolipid S1P is present in plasma, bound to carrier proteins, and is involved in many physiological processes, including angiogenesis, inflammatory responses and vascular stabilization. S1P can bind to several G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) activating a number of different signalling networks. At present, the dynamics and relative importance of signalling events activated immediately downstream of GPCR activation are unclear. To examine this, we used a set of FRET-based biosensors for different RhoGTPases (Rac1, RhoA/B/C, Cdc42) as well as for heterotrimeric G-proteins in a series of live-cell imaging experiments in primary human endothelial cells. These experiments were accompanied by biochemical GTPase activity assays and transendothelial resistance measurements. We show that S1P promotes cell spreading and endothelial barrier function through S1PR1-Gαi-Rac1 and S1PR1-Gαi-Cdc42 pathways. In parallel, a S1PR2-Gα12/13-RhoA pathway is activated which can induce cell contraction and loss of barrier function, but only if Gαi-mediated signalling is suppressed. Our results suggest that Gαq activity is not involved in S1P-mediated regulation of barrier integrity. Moreover, we show that early activation of RhoA by S1P inactivates Rac1, but not Cdc42, and vice versa. Together, our data show that the rapid S1P-induced increase in endothelial integrity is mediated by a S1PR1-Gαi-Cdc42 pathway. © 2017 by The American Society for Cell Biology.

  6. RHO GTPase in plants

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Plants possess a single subfamily of Rho GTPases, ROP, which does usual things as do Rho-family GTPases in animal and fungal systems, namely participating in the spatial control of cellular processes by signaling to the cytoskeleton and vesicular trafficking. As one would expect, ROPs are modulated by conserved regulators such as DHR2-type GEFs, RhoGAPs and Rho GDIs. What is surprising is that plants have invented new regulators such as PRONE-type GEFs (known as RopGEFs) and effectors such as RICs and ICRs/RIPs in the regulation of the cytoskeleton and vesicular trafficking. This review will discuss recent work on characterizing ROP regulators and effectors as well as addressing why and how a mixture of conserved and novel Rho signaling mechanisms is utilized to modulate fundamental cellular processes such as cytoskeletal dynamics/reorganization and vesicular trafficking. PMID:21686259

  7. Imaging Dynamic Molecular Signaling by the Cdc42 GTPase within the Developing CNS

    PubMed Central

    Kamiyama, Daichi; Deng, Tzyy-Chyn; Boulina, Maria; Chiba, Akira

    2014-01-01

    Protein interactions underlie the complexity of neuronal function. Potential interactions between specific proteins in the brain are predicted from assays based on genetic interaction and/or biochemistry. Genetic interaction reveals endogenous, but not necessarily direct, interactions between the proteins. Biochemistry-based assays, on the other hand, demonstrate direct interactions between proteins, but often outside their native environment or without a subcellular context. We aimed to achieve the best of both approaches by visualizing protein interaction directly within the brain of a live animal. Here, we show a proof-of-principle experiment in which the Cdc42 GTPase associates with its alleged partner WASp within neurons during the time and space that coincide with the newly developing CNS. PMID:24586421

  8. RhoGTPase Regulators Orchestrate Distinct Stages of Synaptic Development

    PubMed Central

    Martin-Vilchez, Samuel; Whitmore, Leanna; Asmussen, Hannelore; Zareno, Jessica; Horwitz, Rick; Newell-Litwa, Karen

    2017-01-01

    Small RhoGTPases regulate changes in post-synaptic spine morphology and density that support learning and memory. They are also major targets of synaptic disorders, including Autism. Here we sought to determine whether upstream RhoGTPase regulators, including GEFs, GAPs, and GDIs, sculpt specific stages of synaptic development. The majority of examined molecules uniquely regulate either early spine precursor formation or later maturation. Specifically, an activator of actin polymerization, the Rac1 GEF β-PIX, drives spine precursor formation, whereas both FRABIN, a Cdc42 GEF, and OLIGOPHRENIN-1, a RhoA GAP, regulate spine precursor elongation. However, in later development, a novel Rac1 GAP, ARHGAP23, and RhoGDIs inactivate actomyosin dynamics to stabilize mature synapses. Our observations demonstrate that specific combinations of RhoGTPase regulatory proteins temporally balance RhoGTPase activity during post-synaptic spine development. PMID:28114311

  9. Rac1 and Cdc42 but not RhoA or Rho kinase activities are required for neurite outgrowth induced by the Netrin-1 receptor DCC (deleted in colorectal cancer) in N1E-115 neuroblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaodong; Saint-Cyr-Proulx, Etienne; Aktories, Klaus; Lamarche-Vane, Nathalie

    2002-04-26

    Netrins are chemotropic guidance cues that attract or repel growing axons during development. DCC (deleted in colorectal cancer), a transmembrane protein that is a receptor for netrin-1, is implicated in mediating both responses. However, the mechanism by which this is achieved remains unclear. Here we report that Rho GTPases are required for embryonic spinal commissural axon outgrowth induced by netrin-1. Using N1E-115 neuroblastoma cells, we found that both Rac1 and Cdc42 activities are required for DCC-induced neurite outgrowth. In contrast, down-regulation of RhoA and its effector Rho kinase stimulates the ability of DCC to induce neurite outgrowth. In Swiss 3T3 fibroblasts, DCC was found to trigger actin reorganization through activation of Rac1 but not Cdc42 or RhoA. We detected that stimulation of DCC receptors with netrin-1 resulted in a 4-fold increase in Rac1 activation. These results implicate the small GTPases Rac1, Cdc42, and RhoA as essential components that participate in signaling the response of axons to netrin-1 during neural development.

  10. Computational Analysis of Rho GTPase Cycling

    PubMed Central

    Falkenberg, Cibele Vieira; Loew, Leslie M.

    2013-01-01

    The Rho family of GTPases control actin organization during diverse cellular responses (migration, cytokinesis and endocytosis). Although the primary members of this family (RhoA, Rac and Cdc42) have different downstream effects on actin remodeling, the basic mechanism involves targeting to the plasma membrane and activation by GTP binding. Our hypothesis is that the details of GTPase cycling between membrane and cytosol are key to the differential upstream regulation of these biochemical switches. Accordingly, we developed a modeling framework to analyze experimental data for these systems. This analysis can reveal details of GDI-mediated cycling and help distinguish between GDI-dependent and -independent mechanisms, including vesicle trafficking and direct association-dissociation of GTPase with membrane molecules. Analysis of experimental data for Rac membrane cycling reveals that the lower apparent affinity of GDI for RacGTP compared to RacGDP can be fully explained by the faster dissociation of the latter from the membrane. Non-dimensional steady-state solutions for membrane fraction of GTPase are presented in multidimensional charts. This methodology is then used to analyze glucose stimulated Rac cycling in pancreatic β-cells. The charts are used to illustrate the effects of GEFs/GAPs and regulated affinities between GTPases and membrane and/or GDI on the amount of membrane bound GTPase. In a similar fashion, the charts can be used as a guide in assessing how targeted modifications may compensate for altered GTPase-GDI balance in disease scenarios. PMID:23326220

  11. Peripheral Nerve Demyelination Caused by a Mutant Rho GTPase Guanine Nucleotide Exchange Factor, Frabin/FGD4

    PubMed Central

    Stendel, Claudia ; Roos, Andreas ; Deconinck, Tine ; Pereira, Jorge ; Castagner, François ; Niemann, Axel ; Kirschner, Janbernd ; Korinthenberg, Rudolf ; Ketelsen, Uwe-Peter ; Battaloglu, Esra ; Parman, Yesim ; Nicholson, Garth ; Ouvrier, Robert ; Seeger, Jürgen ; Jonghe, Peter De ; Weis, Joachim ; Krüttgen, Alexander ; Rudnik-Schöneborn, Sabine ; Bergmann, Carsten ; Suter, Ueli ; Zerres, Klaus ; Timmerman, Vincent ; Relvas, João B. ; Senderek, Jan 

    2007-01-01

    GTPases of the Rho subfamily are widely involved in the myelination of the vertebrate nervous system. Rho GTPase activity is temporally and spatially regulated by a set of specific guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs). Here, we report that disruption of frabin/FGD4, a GEF for the Rho GTPase cell-division cycle 42 (Cdc42), causes peripheral nerve demyelination in patients with autosomal recessive Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) neuropathy. These data, together with the ability of frabin to induce Cdc42-mediated cell-shape changes in transfected Schwann cells, suggest that Rho GTPase signaling is essential for proper myelination of the peripheral nervous system. PMID:17564972

  12. Peripheral nerve demyelination caused by a mutant Rho GTPase guanine nucleotide exchange factor, frabin/FGD4.

    PubMed

    Stendel, Claudia; Roos, Andreas; Deconinck, Tine; Pereira, Jorge; Castagner, Francois; Niemann, Axel; Kirschner, Janbernd; Korinthenberg, Rudolf; Ketelsen, Uwe-Peter; Battaloglu, Esra; Parman, Yesim; Nicholson, Garth; Ouvrier, Robert; Seeger, Jürgen; De Jonghe, Peter; Weis, Joachim; Krüttgen, Alexander; Rudnik-Schöneborn, Sabine; Bergmann, Carsten; Suter, Ueli; Zerres, Klaus; Timmerman, Vincent; Relvas, João B; Senderek, Jan

    2007-07-01

    GTPases of the Rho subfamily are widely involved in the myelination of the vertebrate nervous system. Rho GTPase activity is temporally and spatially regulated by a set of specific guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs). Here, we report that disruption of frabin/FGD4, a GEF for the Rho GTPase cell-division cycle 42 (Cdc42), causes peripheral nerve demyelination in patients with autosomal recessive Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) neuropathy. These data, together with the ability of frabin to induce Cdc42-mediated cell-shape changes in transfected Schwann cells, suggest that Rho GTPase signaling is essential for proper myelination of the peripheral nervous system.

  13. Ang II-AT2R increases mesenchymal stem cell migration by signaling through the FAK and RhoA/Cdc42 pathways in vitro.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiu-Ping; He, Hong-Li; Hu, Shu-Ling; Han, Ji-Bin; Huang, Li-Li; Xu, Jing-Yuan; Xie, Jian-Feng; Liu, Ai-Ran; Yang, Yi; Qiu, Hai-Bo

    2017-07-12

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) migrate via the bloodstream to sites of injury and are possibly attracted by inflammatory factors. As a proinflammatory mediator, angiotensin II (Ang II) reportedly enhances the migration of various cell types by signaling via the Ang II receptor in vitro. However, few studies have focused on the effects of Ang II on MSC migration and the underlying mechanisms. Human bone marrow MSCs migration was measured using wound healing and Boyden chamber migration assays after treatments with different concentrations of Ang II, an AT1R antagonist (Losartan), and/or an AT2R antagonist (PD-123319). To exclude the effect of proliferation on MSC migration, we measured MSC proliferation after stimulation with the same concentration of Ang II. Additionally, we employed the focal adhesion kinase (FAK) inhibitor PF-573228, RhoA inhibitor C3 transferase, Rac1 inhibitor NSC23766, or Cdc42 inhibitor ML141 to investigate the role of cell adhesion proteins and the Rho-GTPase protein family (RhoA, Rac1, and Cdc42) in Ang II-mediated MSC migration. Cell adhesion proteins (FAK, Talin, and Vinculin) were detected by western blot analysis. The Rho-GTPase family protein activities were assessed by G-LISA and F-actin levels, which reflect actin cytoskeletal organization, were detected by using immunofluorescence. Human bone marrow MSCs constitutively expressed AT1R and AT2R. Additionally, Ang II increased MSC migration in an AT2R-dependent manner. Notably, Ang II-enhanced migration was not mediated by Ang II-mediated cell proliferation. Interestingly, Ang II-enhanced migration was mediated by FAK activation, which was critical for the formation of focal contacts, as evidenced by increased Talin and Vinculin expression. Moreover, RhoA and Cdc42 were activated by FAK to increase cytoskeletal organization, thus promoting cell contraction. Furthermore, FAK, Talin, and Vinculin activation and F-actin reorganization in response to Ang II were prevented by PD-123319 but

  14. Phosphoinositide 3-kinase enables phagocytosis of large particles by terminating actin assembly through Rac/Cdc42 GTPase-activating proteins

    PubMed Central

    Schlam, Daniel; Bagshaw, Richard D.; Freeman, Spencer A.; Collins, Richard F.; Pawson, Tony; Fairn, Gregory D.; Grinstein, Sergio

    2015-01-01

    Phagocytosis is responsible for the elimination of particles of widely disparate sizes, from large fungi or effete cells to small bacteria. Though superficially similar, the molecular mechanisms involved differ: engulfment of large targets requires phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K), while that of small ones does not. Here, we report that inactivation of Rac and Cdc42 at phagocytic cups is essential to complete internalization of large particles. Through a screen of 62 RhoGAP-family members, we demonstrate that ARHGAP12, ARHGAP25 and SH3BP1 are responsible for GTPase inactivation. Silencing these RhoGAPs impairs phagocytosis of large targets. The GAPs are recruited to large—but not small—phagocytic cups by products of PI3K, where they synergistically inactivate Rac and Cdc42. Remarkably, the prominent accumulation of phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-trisphosphate characteristic of large-phagosome formation is less evident during phagocytosis of small targets, accounting for the contrasting RhoGAP distribution and the differential requirement for PI3K during phagocytosis of dissimilarly sized particles. PMID:26465210

  15. Regulation of the polarization of T cells toward antigen-presenting cells by Ras-related GTPase CDC42.

    PubMed Central

    Stowers, L; Yelon, D; Berg, L J; Chant, J

    1995-01-01

    The mechanisms by which cells rapidly polarize in the direction of external signals are not understood. Helper T cells, when contacted by an antigen-presenting cell, polarize their cytoskeletons toward the antigen-presenting cell within minutes. Here we show that, in T cells, the mammalian Ras-related GTPase CDC42 (the homologue of yeast CDC42, a protein involved in budding polarity) can regulate the polarization of both actin and microtubules toward antigen-presenting cells but is not involved in other T-cell signaling processes such as those which culminate in interleukin 2 production. Although T-cell polarization appears dispensable for signaling leading to interleukin 2 production, polarization may direct lymphokine secretion towards the correct antigen-presenting cell in a crowded cellular environment. Inhibitor experiments suggest that phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase is required for cytoskeletal polarization but that calcineurin activity, known to be important for other aspects of signaling, is not. Apparent conservation of CDC42 function between yeast and T cells suggests that this GTPase is a general regulator of cytoskeletal polarity in many cell types. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:7761442

  16. The Small Rho GTPase TC10 Modulates B Cell Immune Responses

    PubMed Central

    Keppler, Selina J.

    2017-01-01

    Rho family GTPases regulate diverse cellular events, such as cell motility, polarity, and vesicle traffic. Although a wealth of data exists on the canonical Rho GTPases RhoA, Rac1, and Cdc42, several other family members remain poorly studied. In B cells, we recently demonstrated a critical role for Cdc42 in plasma cell differentiation. In this study, we focus on a close homolog of Cdc42, TC10 (also known as RhoQ), and investigate its physiological role in B cells. By generating a TC10-deficient mouse model, we show that despite reduced total B cell numbers, B cell development in these mice occurs normally through distinct developmental stages. Upon immunization, IgM levels were reduced and, upon viral infection, germinal center responses were defective in TC10-deficient mice. BCR signaling was mildly affected, whereas cell migration remained normal in TC10-deficient B cells. Furthermore, by generating a TC10/Cdc42 double knockout mouse model, we found that TC10 can compensate for the lack of Cdc42 in TLR-induced cell activation and proliferation, so the two proteins play partly redundant roles. Taken together, by combining in vivo and in vitro analysis using TC10-deficient mice, we define the poorly studied Rho GTPase TC10 as an immunomodulatory molecule playing a role in physiological B cell responses. PMID:28747344

  17. Bacterial Cytotoxins Target Rho GTPases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Gudula; Aktories, Klaus

    1998-06-01

    Low molecular mass GTPases of the Rho family, which are involved in the regulation of the actin cytoskeleton and in various signal transduction processes, are the eukaryotic targets of bacterial protein toxins. The toxins covalently modify Rho proteins by ADP ribosylation, glucosylation, and deamidation, thereby inactivating and activating the GTPases.

  18. Daphnetin inhibits invasion and migration of LM8 murine osteosarcoma cells by decreasing RhoA and Cdc42 expression

    SciTech Connect

    Fukuda, Hiroki; Nakamura, Seikou; Chisaki, Yugo; Takada, Tetsuya; Toda, Yuki; Murata, Hiroaki; Itoh, Kazuyuki; Yano, Yoshitaka; Takata, Kazuyuki; Ashihara, Eishi

    2016-02-26

    Daphnetin, 7,8-dihydroxycoumarin, present in main constituents of Daphne odora var. marginatai, has multiple pharmacological activities including anti-proliferative effects in cancer cells. In this study, using a Transwell system, we showed that daphnetin inhibited invasion and migration of highly metastatic murine osteosarcoma LM8 cells in a dose-dependent manner. Following treatment by daphnetin, cells that penetrated the Transwell membrane were rounder than non-treated cells. Immunofluorescence analysis revealed that daphnetin decreased the numbers of intracellular stress fibers and filopodia. Moreover, daphnetin treatment dramatically decreased the expression levels of RhoA and Cdc42. In summary, the dihydroxycoumarin derivative daphnetin inhibits the invasion and migration of LM8 cells, and therefore represents a promising agent for use against metastatic cancer. - Highlights: • Daphnetin, a coumarin-derivative, inhibited invasion and migration of LM8 cells. • Stress fibers and filopodia were decreased by daphnetin treatment. • Daphnetin decreased RhoA and Cdc42 protein expression.

  19. Piezoelectric ceramic (PZT) modulates axonal guidance growth of rat cortical neurons via RhoA, Rac1, and Cdc42 pathways.

    PubMed

    Wen, Jianqiang; Liu, Meili

    2014-03-01

    Electrical stimulation is critical for axonal connection, which can stimulate axonal migration and deformation to promote axonal growth in the nervous system. Netrin-1, an axonal guidance cue, can also promote axonal guidance growth, but the molecular mechanism of axonal guidance growth under indirect electric stimulation is still unknown. We investigated the molecular mechanism of axonal guidance growth under piezoelectric ceramic lead zirconate titanate (PZT) stimulation in the primary cultured cortical neurons. PZT induced marked axonal elongation. Moreover, PZT activated the excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs) by increasing the frequency and amplitude of EPSCs of the cortical neurons in patch clamp assay. PZT downregulated the expression of Netrin-1 and its receptor Deleted in Colorectal Cancer (DCC). Rho GTPase signaling is involved in interactions of Netrin-1 and DCC. PZT activated RhoA. Dramatic decrease of Cdc42 and Rac1 was also observed after PZT treatment. RhoA inhibitor Clostridium botulinum C3 exoenzyme (C3-Exo) prevented the PZT-induced downregulation of Netrin-1 and DCC. We suggest that PZT can promote axonal guidance growth by downregulation of Netrin-1 and DCC to mediate axonal repulsive responses via the Rho GTPase signaling pathway. Obviously, piezoelectric materials may provide a new approach for axonal recovery and be beneficial for clinical therapy in the future.

  20. A role for activated Cdc42 in glioblastoma multiforme invasion

    PubMed Central

    Okura, Hidehiro; Golbourn, Brian J.; Shahzad, Uswa; Agnihotri, Sameer; Sabha, Nesrin; Krieger, Jonathan R.; Figueiredo, Carlyn A.; Chalil, Alan; Landon-Brace, Natalie; Riemenschneider, Alexandra; Arai, Hajime; Smith, Christian A.; Xu, Songli; Kaluz, Stefan; Marcus, Adam I.; Van Meir, Erwin G.; Rutka, James T.

    2016-01-01

    Cdc42 is a Rho-GTPase which plays a major role in regulating cell polarity and migration by specifying the localization of filopodia. However, the role of Cdc42 in GBM invasion has not been thoroughly investigated. We generated stable doxycycline-inducible clones expressing wild type (WT)-, constitutively active (CA)-, and dominant negative (DN)-Cdc42 in three different human glioma cell lines. Expression of CA-Cdc42 significantly increased the migration and invasive properties of malignant glioma cells compared to WT and DN-Cdc42 cell clones, and this was accompanied by a greater number of filopodia and focal adhesion structures which co-localize with phosphorylated focal adhesion kinase (FAK). By mass spectrometry and immunoprecipitation studies, we demonstrated that activated Cdc42 binds to IQGAP1. When implanted orthotopically in mice, the CA-Cdc42 expressing glioma cells exhibited enhanced local migration and invasion, and led to larger tumors, which significantly reduced survival. Using the Cancer Genome Atlas dataset, we determined that high Cdc42 expression is associated with poorer progression free survival, and that Cdc42 expression is highest in the proneural and neural subgroups of GBM. In summary, our studies demonstrate that activated Cdc42 is a critical determinant of the migratory and invasive phenotype of malignant gliomas, and that its effect may be mediated, at least in part, through its interaction with IQGAP1 and phosphorylated FAK. PMID:27486972

  1. Multiplex Imaging of Rho Family GTPase Activities in Living Cells

    PubMed Central

    Spiering, Désirée; Hodgson, Louis

    2011-01-01

    Here, we provide procedures for imaging the Rho GTPase biosensors in both single and multiplex acquisition modes. The multiplex approach enables the direct visualization of two biosensor readouts from a single living cell. Here, we take as an example a combination of the RhoA biosensor based on a CFP/YFP FRET modality and the Cdc42 biosensor based on organic dyes that change fluorescence as a function of the local solvent polarity. We list the required optical components as well as cellular manipulation techniques necessary to successfully image these two ratiometric biosensors in a single living cell. PMID:22144278

  2. Binding of Cdc42 to phospholipase D1 is important in neurite outgrowth of neural stem cells

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, Mee-Sup; Cho, Chan Ho; Lee, Ki Sung; Han, Joong-Soo . E-mail: jshan@hanyang.ac.kr

    2006-09-01

    We previously demonstrated that phospholipase D (PLD) expression and PLD activity are upregulated during neuronal differentiation. In the present study, employing neural stem cells from the brain cortex of E14 rat embryos, we investigated the role of Rho family GTPases in PLD activation and in neurite outgrowth of neural stem cells during differentiation. As neuronal differentiation progressed, the expression levels of Cdc42 and RhoA increased. Furthermore, Cdc42 and PLD1 were mainly localized in neurite, whereas RhoA was localized in cytosol. Co-immunoprecipitation revealed that Cdc42 was bound to PLD1 during differentiation, whereas RhoA was associated with PLD1 during both proliferation and differentiation. These results indicate that the association between Cdc42 and PLD1 is related to neuronal differentiation. To examine the effect of Cdc42 on PLD activation and neurite outgrowth, we transfected dominant negative Cdc42 (Cdc42N17) and constitutively active Cdc42 (Cdc42V12) into neural stem cells, respectively. Overexpression of Cdc42N17 decreased both PLD activity and neurite outgrowth, whereas co-transfection with Cdc42N17 and PLD1 restored them. On the other hand, Cdc42V12 increased both PLD activity and neurite outgrowth, suggesting that active state of Cdc42 is important in upregulation of PLD activity which is responsible for the increase of neurite outgrowth.

  3. Clinical relevance of the transcriptional signature regulated by CDC42 in colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Valdés-Mora, Fatima; Locke, Warwick J.; Bandrés, Eva; Gallego-Ortega, David; Cejas, Paloma; García-Cabezas, Miguel Angel; Colino-Sanguino, Yolanda; Feliú, Jaime; del Pulgar, Teresa Gómez; Lacal, Juan Carlos

    2017-01-01

    CDC42 is an oncogenic Rho GTPase overexpressed in colorectal cancer (CRC). Although CDC42 has been shown to regulate gene transcription, the specific molecular mechanisms regulating the oncogenic ability of CDC42 remain unknown. Here, we have characterized the transcriptional networks governed by CDC42 in the CRC SW620 cell line using gene expression analysis. Our results establish that several cancer-related signaling pathways, including cell migration and cell proliferation, are regulated by CDC42. This transcriptional signature was validated in two large cohorts of CRC patients and its clinical relevance was also studied. We demonstrate that three CDC42-regulated genes offered a better prognostic value when combined with CDC42 compared to CDC42 alone. In particular, the concordant overexpression of CDC42 and silencing of the putative tumor suppressor gene CACNA2D2 dramatically improved the prognostic value. The CACNA2D2/CDC42 prognostic classifier was further validated in a third CRC cohort as well as in vitro and in vivo CRC models. Altogether, we show that CDC42 has an active oncogenic role in CRC via the transcriptional regulation of multiple cancer-related pathways and that CDC42-mediated silencing of CACNA2D2 is clinically relevant. Our results further support the use of CDC42 specific inhibitors for the treatment of the most aggressive types of CRC. PMID:28460460

  4. ARHGDIA mutations cause nephrotic syndrome via defective RHO GTPase signaling

    PubMed Central

    Gee, Heon Yung; Saisawat, Pawaree; Ashraf, Shazia; Hurd, Toby W.; Vega-Warner, Virginia; Fang, Humphrey; Beck, Bodo B.; Gribouval, Olivier; Zhou, Weibin; Diaz, Katrina A.; Natarajan, Sivakumar; Wiggins, Roger C.; Lovric, Svjetlana; Chernin, Gil; Schoeb, Dominik S.; Ovunc, Bugsu; Frishberg, Yaacov; Soliman, Neveen A.; Fathy, Hanan M.; Goebel, Heike; Hoefele, Julia; Weber, Lutz T.; Innis, Jeffrey W.; Faul, Christian; Han, Zhe; Washburn, Joseph; Antignac, Corinne; Levy, Shawn; Otto, Edgar A.; Hildebrandt, Friedhelm

    2013-01-01

    Nephrotic syndrome (NS) is divided into steroid-sensitive (SSNS) and -resistant (SRNS) variants. SRNS causes end-stage kidney disease, which cannot be cured. While the disease mechanisms of NS are not well understood, genetic mapping studies suggest a multitude of unknown single-gene causes. We combined homozygosity mapping with whole-exome resequencing and identified an ARHGDIA mutation that causes SRNS. We demonstrated that ARHGDIA is in a complex with RHO GTPases and is prominently expressed in podocytes of rat glomeruli. ARHGDIA mutations (R120X and G173V) from individuals with SRNS abrogated interaction with RHO GTPases and increased active GTP-bound RAC1 and CDC42, but not RHOA, indicating that RAC1 and CDC42 are more relevant to the pathogenesis of this SRNS variant than RHOA. Moreover, the mutations enhanced migration of cultured human podocytes; however, enhanced migration was reversed by treatment with RAC1 inhibitors. The nephrotic phenotype was recapitulated in arhgdia-deficient zebrafish. RAC1 inhibitors were partially effective in ameliorating arhgdia-associated defects. These findings identify a single-gene cause of NS and reveal that RHO GTPase signaling is a pathogenic mediator of SRNS. PMID:23867502

  5. Cdc42 regulates branching in angiogenic sprouting in vitro.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Duc-Huy T; Gao, Lin; Wong, Alec; Chen, Christopher S

    2017-07-01

    The morphogenetic events that occur during angiogenic sprouting involve several members of the Rho family of GTPases, including Cdc42. However, the precise roles of Cdc42 in angiogenic sprouting have been difficult to elucidate owing to the lack of models to study these events in vitro. Here, we aim to identify the roles of Cdc42 in branching morphogenesis in angiogenesis. Using a 3D biomimetic model of angiogenesis in vitro, where endothelial cells were seeded inside a cylindrical channel within collagen gel and sprouted from the channel in response to a defined biochemical gradient of angiogenic factors, we inhibited Cdc42 activity with a small molecule inhibitor ML141 and examined the effects of Cdc42 on the morphogenetic processes of angiogenic sprouting. We find that partial inhibition of Cdc42 had minimal effects on directional migration of endothelial cells, but led to fewer branching events without affecting the length of these branches. We also observed that antagonizing Cdc42 reduced collective migration in favor of single cell migration. Additionally, Cdc42 also regulated the initiation of filopodial extensions in endothelial tip cells. Our findings suggest that Cdc42 can affect multiple morphogenetic processes during angiogenic sprouting and ultimately impact the architecture of the vasculature. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Rho GTPases, phosphoinositides, and actin

    PubMed Central

    Croisé, Pauline; Estay-Ahumada, Catherine; Gasman, Stéphane; Ory, Stéphane

    2014-01-01

    Rho GTPases are well known regulators of the actin cytoskeleton that act by binding and activating actin nucleators. They are therefore involved in many actin-based processes, including cell migration, cell polarity, and membrane trafficking. With the identification of phosphoinositide kinases and phosphatases as potential binding partners or effectors, Rho GTPases also appear to participate in the regulation of phosphoinositide metabolism. Since both actin dynamics and phosphoinositide turnover affect the efficiency and the fidelity of vesicle transport between cell compartments, Rho GTPases have emerged as critical players in membrane trafficking. Rho GTPase activity, actin remodeling, and phosphoinositide metabolism need to be coordinated in both space and time to ensure the progression of vesicles along membrane trafficking pathways. Although most molecular pathways are still unclear, in this review, we will highlight recent advances made in our understanding of how Rho-dependent signaling pathways organize actin dynamics and phosphoinositides and how phosphoinositides potentially provide negative feedback to Rho GTPases during endocytosis, exocytosis and membrane exchange between intracellular compartments. PMID:24914539

  7. Mechanisms for spatiotemporal regulation of Rho-GTPase signaling at synapses

    PubMed Central

    Duman, Joseph G.; Mulherkar, Shalaka; Tu, Yen-Kuei; Cheng, Jinxuan; Tolias, Kimberley F.

    2015-01-01

    Synapses mediate information flow between neurons and undergo plastic changes in response to experience, which is critical for learning and memory. Conversely, synaptic defects impair information processing and underlie many brain pathologies. Rho-family GTPases control synaptogenesis by transducing signals from extracellular stimuli to the cytoskeleton and nucleus. The Rho-GTPases Rac1 and Cdc42 promote synapse development and the growth of axons and dendrites, while RhoA antagonizes these processes. Despite its significance, many aspects of Rho-GTPase signaling remain relatively unknown. Rho-GTPases are activated by guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) and inhibited by GTPase-activating proteins (GAPs). Though the number of both GEFs and GAPs greatly exceeds that of Rho-GTPases, loss of even a single GEF or GAP often has profound effects on cognition and behavior. Here, we explore how the actions of specific GEFs and GAPs give rise to the precise spatiotemporal activation patterns of Rho-GTPases in neurons. We consider the effects of coupling GEFs and GAPs targeting the same Rho-GTPase and the modular pathways that connect specific cellular stimuli with a given Rho-GTPase via different GEFs. We discuss how the creation of sharp borders between Rho-GTPase activation zones is achieved by pairing a GEF for one Rho-GTPase with a GAP for another and the extensive crosstalk between different Rho-GTPases. Given the importance of synapses for cognition and the fundamental roles that Rho-GTPases play in regulating them, a detailed understanding of Rho-GTPase signaling is essential to the progress of neuroscience. PMID:26003445

  8. Molecular pathways: targeting the kinase effectors of RHO-family GTPases.

    PubMed

    Prudnikova, Tatiana Y; Rawat, Sonali J; Chernoff, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    RHO GTPases, members of the RAS superfamily of small GTPases, are adhesion and growth factor-activated molecular switches that play important roles in tumor development and progression. When activated, RHO-family GTPases such as RAC1, CDC42, and RHOA, transmit signals by recruiting a variety of effector proteins, including the protein kinases PAK, ACK, MLK, MRCK, and ROCK. Genetically induced loss of RHO function impedes transformation by a number of oncogenic stimuli, leading to an interest in developing small-molecule inhibitors that either target RHO GTPases directly, or that target their downstream protein kinase effectors. Although inhibitors of RHO GTPases and their downstream signaling kinases have not yet been widely adopted for clinical use, their potential value as cancer therapeutics continues to facilitate pharmaceutical research and development and is a promising therapeutic strategy.

  9. Rho family GTPases: key players in neuronal development, neuronal survival, and neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Stankiewicz, Trisha R.; Linseman, Daniel A.

    2014-01-01

    The Rho family of GTPases belongs to the Ras superfamily of low molecular weight (∼21 kDa) guanine nucleotide binding proteins. The most extensively studied members are RhoA, Rac1, and Cdc42. In the last few decades, studies have demonstrated that Rho family GTPases are important regulatory molecules that link surface receptors to the organization of the actin and microtubule cytoskeletons. Indeed, Rho GTPases mediate many diverse critical cellular processes, such as gene transcription, cell–cell adhesion, and cell cycle progression. However, Rho GTPases also play an essential role in regulating neuronal morphology. In particular, Rho GTPases regulate dendritic arborization, spine morphogenesis, growth cone development, and axon guidance. In addition, more recent efforts have underscored an important function for Rho GTPases in regulating neuronal survival and death. Interestingly, Rho GTPases can exert either a pro-survival or pro-death signal in neurons depending upon both the cell type and neurotoxic insult involved. This review summarizes key findings delineating the involvement of Rho GTPases and their effectors in the regulation of neuronal survival and death. Collectively, these results suggest that dysregulation of Rho family GTPases may potentially underscore the etiology of some forms of neurodegenerative disease such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. PMID:25339865

  10. Nitric oxide promotes epidermal stem cell migration via cGMP-Rho GTPase signalling

    PubMed Central

    Zhan, Rixing; He, Weifeng; Wang, Fan; Yao, Zhihui; Tan, Jianglin; Xu, Rui; Zhou, Junyi; Wang, Yuzhen; Li, Haisheng; Wu, Jun; LUO, Gaoxing

    2016-01-01

    The migration and reepithelization of epidermal stem cells (ESCs) are the most critical processes in wound healing. The gaseous messenger nitric oxide (NO) has multiple biological effects, but its actions on ESCs are poorly understood. In this study, an NO donor, S-nitroso-N-acetylpenicillamine (SNAP), was found to facilitate the in vitro migration of human ESCs (huESCs) in both live-imaging and scratch models. In addition, pull-down assays demonstrated that SNAP could activate the small GTPases RhoA and Rac1 of the Rho family, but not Cdc42. Moreover, the effects of SNAP on the migration and F-actin polymerization of ESCs could be blocked by inhibitors of cGMP, PKG, RhoA or Rac1, and by a specific siRNA of RhoA or Rac1, but not by a Cdc42 inhibitor or siRNA. Furthermore, the roles of NO in ESC migration via cGMP-Rho GTPase signalling in vivo were confirmed by tracing 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine (BrdU)-labelled cells in a superficial, partial-thickness scald mouse model. Thus, the present study demonstrated that the NO donor SNAP could promote huESC migration in vitro. Furthermore, NO was found to induce ESC migration via cGMP-Rho GTPase RhoA and Rac1 signalling, but not Cdc42 signalling, both in vivo and in vitro. PMID:27469024

  11. Low Gene Dosage of Cdc42 Is Not Associated with Protein Dysfunction in Patients with Colorectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    González-Quiroz, Matías; Calderón, Ximena; Oyarzún, Ingrid; Hoepfner, Claudia; Azócar, Andrés; Aguirre, Adam; Álvarez, Karin; Quera, Rodrigo; López-Köstner, Francisco; Meléndez, Jaime

    2016-12-01

    High incidence of Rho Cdc42-GTPase overexpression has been found in Colorectal Cancer (CRC) samples, suggesting its potential role in tumor development. However, no conclusive studies have shown the lack of mutations and/or copy number of Cdc42 gene in this type of samples. To understand mutation/deletion and copy number status of Cdc42 gene, CRC patients were evaluated for both parameters. More than Cdc42 mutants, single-nucleotide variants were found. Analysis of regions flanking the Cdc42 gene showed allelic imbalance; 58.7% were loss of heterozygosity (LOH) positive and 14.8% presented microsatellite instability. The highest LOH percentage was located between microsatellite markers D1S199 and D1S2674, where the Cdc42 gene is located. No association between gender, age, and tumor stage was found. LOH validation through gene dosage analysis showed most CRC patients with allelic imbalance also presented a low gene dosage of Cdc42, although equal amounts of Cdc42 mRNA were detected in all samples. Although changes in Cdc42 expression were not found in any condition, Cdc42 activation was different between high and normal gene dosage samples, but not between samples with normal and low copy number. Low dosage of Cdc42 was also not related to changes in methylation status at the Cdc42 promoter region. Results suggest that low copy of Cdc42 gene is not associated with Cdc42 protein dysfunction in CRC patients.

  12. [The GIT-PIX protein complex: a hub to ARF and Rac/Cdc42 GTPases].

    PubMed

    Zeniou-Meyer, Maria; Borg, Jean-Paul; Vitale, Nicolas

    2005-10-01

    We recently described that the tumor suppressor factor Scribble anchors the PIX exchange factor for Rac/Cdc42 and the ARF-GAP GIT proteins at the plasma membrane. Because it has been postulated that the GIT-PIX proteins dimerize and tightly self-assemble to form a high molecular weight complex, this nexus may be capable of linking together important signalling molecules to control cytosqueleton polymerization and membrane dynamics. To date, most studies that have tempted to unravel the function of these proteins have found their implication in a great variety of cellular functions (receptor recycling, endo-exocytosis, cell migration, synapse formation...) but have mostly neglected to consider the multimeric organization of this hub. There is no doubt that our comprehension of physiopathological disorders such as cancers will be improved when the nature of the complex pathways integrated by the GIT-PIX nodule will be understood.

  13. The interdependence of the Rho GTPases and apicobasal cell polarity

    PubMed Central

    Mack, Natalie Ann; Georgiou, Marios

    2014-01-01

    Signaling via the Rho GTPases provides crucial regulation of numerous cell polarization events, including apicobasal (AB) polarity, polarized cell migration, polarized cell division and neuronal polarity. Here we review the relationships between the Rho family GTPases and epithelial AB polarization events, focusing on the 3 best-characterized members: Rho, Rac and Cdc42. We discuss a multitude of processes that are important for AB polarization, including lumen formation, apical membrane specification, cell-cell junction assembly and maintenance, as well as tissue polarity. Our discussions aim to highlight the immensely complex regulatory mechanisms that encompass Rho GTPase signaling during AB polarization. More specifically, in this review we discuss several emerging common themes, that include: 1) the need for Rho GTPase activities to be carefully balanced in both a spatial and temporal manner through a multitude of mechanisms; 2) the existence of signaling feedback loops and crosstalk to create robust cellular responses; and 3) the frequent multifunctionality that exists among AB polarity regulators. Regarding this latter theme, we provide further discussion of the potential plasticity of the cell polarity machinery and as a result the possible implications for human disease. PMID:25469537

  14. Parallel Actin-Independent Recycling Pathways Polarize Cdc42 in Budding Yeast.

    PubMed

    Woods, Benjamin; Lai, Helen; Wu, Chi-Fang; Zyla, Trevin R; Savage, Natasha S; Lew, Daniel J

    2016-08-22

    The highly conserved Rho-family GTPase Cdc42 is an essential regulator of polarity in many different cell types. During polarity establishment, Cdc42 becomes concentrated at a cortical site, where it interacts with downstream effectors to orient the cytoskeleton along the front-back axis. To concentrate Cdc42, loss of Cdc42 by diffusion must be balanced by recycling to the front. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the guanine nucleotide dissociation inhibitor (GDI) Rdi1 recycles Cdc42 through the cytoplasm. Loss of Rdi1 slowed but did not eliminate Cdc42 accumulation at the front, suggesting the existence of other recycling pathways. One proposed pathway involves actin-directed trafficking of vesicles carrying Cdc42 to the front. However, we found no role for F-actin in Cdc42 concentration, even in rdi1Δ cells. Instead, Cdc42 was still able to exchange between the membrane and cytoplasm in rdi1Δ cells, albeit at a reduced rate. Membrane-cytoplasm exchange of GDP-Cdc42 was faster than that of GTP-Cdc42, and computational modeling indicated that such exchange would suffice to promote polarization. We also uncovered a novel role for the Cdc42-directed GTPase-activating protein (GAP) Bem2 in Cdc42 polarization. Bem2 was known to act in series with Rdi1 to promote recycling of Cdc42, but we found that rdi1Δ bem2Δ mutants were synthetically lethal, suggesting that they also act in parallel. We suggest that GAP activity cooperates with the GDI to counteract the dissipative effect of a previously unappreciated pathway whereby GTP-Cdc42 escapes from the polarity site through the cytoplasm. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. c-Jun kinase mediates expression of VEGF induced at transcriptional level by Rac1 and Cdc42Hs but not by RhoA.

    PubMed

    Saníger, M Luisa; Oya, Ricardo; Macías, David; Domínguez, Jorge N; Aránega, Amelia; Luque, Francisco

    2006-06-01

    Tumour angiogenesis is mediated by increased levels of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). We have studied the mechanism by which endogenous activation of Rho oncoproteins regulates VEGF expression in COS-7 and NIH3T3 cells. We carried out transient and stable transfection with constitutively activated rhoA, rac1, and cdc42 mutants in COS-7 and NIH3T3 cells, respectively in the absence of external stimuli. Western blot and inmunohistochemistry assays of those cells revealed increased VEGF protein expression. Cotransfection with constitutively activated rhoA, rac1, and cdc42 mutants and a VEGF promoter-reporter construct showed an increase in VEGF promoter transcriptional activity induced by Rho oncoproteins in COS-7 and NIH3T3. c-Jun kinase had been described as a MAPK involved in Rho oncoproteins pathways. Interestingly, we found that c-Jun kinase chemical inhibition as well as transient transactivation assays using dominant negative c-Jun kinase mutant abolished the VEGF promoter transcriptional induction by Rac1 and Cdc42 but not by RhoA. These findings indicate that Rho oncoprotein endogenously activated regulates VEGF expression through a transcriptional mechanism, and that the c-Jun kinase activity is a mediator in the expression of VEGF induced by Rac1 and Cdc42 oncoproteins, but not of that induced by RhoA.

  16. The Rho GTPase Family Genes in Bivalvia Genomes: Sequence, Evolution and Expression Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xue; Wang, Ruijia; Xun, Xiaogang; Jiao, Wenqian; Zhang, Mengran; Wang, Shuyue; Wang, Shi; Zhang, Lingling; Huang, Xiaoting; Hu, Xiaoli; Bao, Zhenmin

    2015-01-01

    Background Rho GTPases are important members of the Ras superfamily, which represents the largest signaling protein family in eukaryotes, and function as key molecular switches in converting and amplifying external signals into cellular responses. Although numerous analyses of Rho family genes have been reported, including their functions and evolution, a systematic analysis of this family has not been performed in Mollusca or in Bivalvia, one of the most important classes of Mollusca. Results In this study, we systematically identified and characterized a total set (Rho, Rac, Mig, Cdc42, Tc10, Rnd, RhoU, RhoBTB and Miro) of thirty Rho GTPase genes in three bivalve species, including nine in the Yesso scallop Patinopecten yessoensis, nine in the Zhikong scallop Chlamys farreri, and twelve in the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas. Phylogenetic analysis and interspecies comparison indicated that bivalves might possess the most complete types of Rho genes in invertebrates. A multiple RNA-seq dataset was used to investigate the expression profiles of bivalve Rho genes, revealing that the examined scallops share more similar Rho expression patterns than the oyster, whereas more Rho mRNAs are expressed in C. farreri and C. gigas than in P. yessoensis. Additionally, Rho, Rac and Cdc42 were found to be duplicated in the oyster but not in the scallops. Among the expanded Rho genes of C. gigas, duplication pairs with high synonymous substitution rates (Ks) displayed greater differences in expression. Conclusion A comprehensive analysis of bivalve Rho GTPase family genes was performed in scallop and oyster species, and Rho genes in bivalves exhibit greater conservation than those in any other invertebrate. This is the first study focusing on a genome-wide characterization of Rho GTPase genes in bivalves, and the findings will provide a valuable resource for a better understanding of Rho evolution and Rho GTPase function in Bivalvia. PMID:26633655

  17. The Rho GTPase Family Genes in Bivalvia Genomes: Sequence, Evolution and Expression Analysis.

    PubMed

    Li, Xue; Wang, Ruijia; Xun, Xiaogang; Jiao, Wenqian; Zhang, Mengran; Wang, Shuyue; Wang, Shi; Zhang, Lingling; Huang, Xiaoting; Hu, Xiaoli; Bao, Zhenmin

    2015-01-01

    Rho GTPases are important members of the Ras superfamily, which represents the largest signaling protein family in eukaryotes, and function as key molecular switches in converting and amplifying external signals into cellular responses. Although numerous analyses of Rho family genes have been reported, including their functions and evolution, a systematic analysis of this family has not been performed in Mollusca or in Bivalvia, one of the most important classes of Mollusca. In this study, we systematically identified and characterized a total set (Rho, Rac, Mig, Cdc42, Tc10, Rnd, RhoU, RhoBTB and Miro) of thirty Rho GTPase genes in three bivalve species, including nine in the Yesso scallop Patinopecten yessoensis, nine in the Zhikong scallop Chlamys farreri, and twelve in the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas. Phylogenetic analysis and interspecies comparison indicated that bivalves might possess the most complete types of Rho genes in invertebrates. A multiple RNA-seq dataset was used to investigate the expression profiles of bivalve Rho genes, revealing that the examined scallops share more similar Rho expression patterns than the oyster, whereas more Rho mRNAs are expressed in C. farreri and C. gigas than in P. yessoensis. Additionally, Rho, Rac and Cdc42 were found to be duplicated in the oyster but not in the scallops. Among the expanded Rho genes of C. gigas, duplication pairs with high synonymous substitution rates (Ks) displayed greater differences in expression. A comprehensive analysis of bivalve Rho GTPase family genes was performed in scallop and oyster species, and Rho genes in bivalves exhibit greater conservation than those in any other invertebrate. This is the first study focusing on a genome-wide characterization of Rho GTPase genes in bivalves, and the findings will provide a valuable resource for a better understanding of Rho evolution and Rho GTPase function in Bivalvia.

  18. Control of Polarized Growth by the Rho Family GTPase Rho4 in Budding Yeast: Requirement of the N-Terminal Extension of Rho4 and Regulation by the Rho GTPase-Activating Protein Bem2

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Ting; Liao, Yuan; He, Fei; Yang, Yang; Yang, Dan-Dan; Chen, Xiang-Dong

    2013-01-01

    In the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Rho4 GTPase partially plays a redundant role with Rho3 in the control of polarized growth, as deletion of RHO4 and RHO3 together, but not RHO4 alone, caused lethality and a loss of cell polarity at 30°C. Here, we show that overexpression of the constitutively active rho4Q131L mutant in an rdi1Δ strain caused a severe growth defect and generated large, round, unbudded cells, suggesting that an excess of Rho4 activity could block bud emergence. We also generated four temperature-sensitive rho4-Ts alleles in a rhorho4Δ strain. These mutants showed growth and morphological defects at 37°C. Interestingly, two rho4-Ts alleles contain mutations that cause amino acid substitutions in the N-terminal region of Rho4. Rho4 possesses a long N-terminal extension that is unique among the six Rho GTPases in the budding yeast but is common in Rho4 homologs in other yeasts and filamentous fungi. We show that the N-terminal extension plays an important role in Rho4 function since rhorho4Δ61 cells expressing truncated Rho4 lacking amino acids (aa) 1 to 61 exhibited morphological defects at 24°C and a growth defect at 37°C. Furthermore, we show that Rho4 interacts with Bem2, a Rho GTPase-activating protein (RhoGAP) for Cdc42 and Rho1, by yeast two-hybrid, bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC), and glutathione S-transferase (GST) pulldown assays. Bem2 specifically interacts with the GTP-bound form of Rho4, and the interaction is mediated by its RhoGAP domain. Overexpression of BEM2 aggravates the defects of rhorho4 mutants. These results suggest that Bem2 might be a novel GAP for Rho4. PMID:23264647

  19. Rho GTPases, oxidation, and cell redox control

    PubMed Central

    Hobbs, G Aaron; Zhou, Bingying; Cox, Adrienne D; Campbell, Sharon L

    2014-01-01

    While numerous studies support regulation of Ras GTPases by reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, the Rho subfamily has received considerably less attention. Over the last few years, increasing evidence is emerging that supports the redox sensitivity of Rho GTPases. Moreover, as Rho GTPases regulate the cellular redox state by controlling enzymes that generate and convert reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, redox feedback loops likely exist. Here, we provide an overview of cellular oxidants, Rho GTPases, and their inter-dependence. PMID:24809833

  20. Structural Mechanisms and Drug Discovery Prospects of Rho GTPases

    PubMed Central

    Smithers, Cameron C.; Overduin, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Rho GTPases regulate cellular morphology and dynamics, and some are key drivers of cancer progression. This superfamily offers attractive potential targets for therapeutic intervention, with RhoA, Rac1 and Cdc42 being prime examples. The challenges in developing agents that act on these signaling enzymes include the lack of obvious druggable pockets and their membrane-bound activities. However, progress in targeting the similar Ras protein is illuminating new strategies for specifically inhibiting oncogenic GTPases. The structures of multiple signaling and regulatory states of Rho proteins have been determined, and the post-translational modifications including acylation and phosphorylation points have been mapped and their functional effects examined. The development of inhibitors to probe the significance of overexpression and mutational hyperactivation of these GTPases underscores their importance in cancer progression. The ability to integrate in silico, in vitro, and in vivo investigations of drug-like molecules indicates the growing tractability of GTPase systems for lead optimization. Although no Rho-targeted drug molecules have yet been clinically approved, this family is clearly showing increasing promise for the development of precision medicine and combination cancer therapies. PMID:27304967

  1. Epithelial junctions and Rho family GTPases: the zonular signalosome

    PubMed Central

    Citi, Sandra; Guerrera, Diego; Spadaro, Domenica; Shah, Jimit

    2014-01-01

    The establishment and maintenance of epithelial cell-cell junctions is crucially important to regulate adhesion, apico-basal polarity and motility of epithelial cells, and ultimately controls the architecture and physiology of epithelial organs. Junctions are supported, shaped and regulated by cytoskeletal filaments, whose dynamic organization and contractility are finely tuned by GTPases of the Rho family, primarily RhoA, Rac1 and Cdc42. Recent research has identified new molecular mechanisms underlying the cross-talk between these GTPases and epithelial junctions. Here we briefly summarize the current knowledge about the organization, molecular evolution and cytoskeletal anchoring of cell-cell junctions, and we comment on the most recent advances in the characterization of the interactions between Rho GTPases and junctional proteins, and their consequences with regards to junction assembly and regulation of cell behavior in vertebrate model systems. The concept of “zonular signalosome” is proposed, which highlights the close functional relationship between proteins of zonular junctions (zonulae occludentes and adhaerentes) and the control of cytoskeletal organization and signaling through Rho GTPases, transcription factors, and their effectors. PMID:25483301

  2. Mechanisms of CDC-42 activation during contact-induced cell polarization.

    PubMed

    Chan, Emily; Nance, Jeremy

    2013-04-01

    Polarization of early embryos provides a foundation to execute essential patterning and morphogenetic events. In Caenorhabditis elegans, cell contacts polarize early embryos along their radial axis by excluding the cortical polarity protein PAR-6 from sites of cell contact, thereby restricting PAR-6 to contact-free cell surfaces. Radial polarization requires the cortically enriched Rho GTPase CDC-42, which in its active form recruits PAR-6 through direct binding. The Rho GTPase activating protein (RhoGAP) PAC-1, which localizes specifically to cell contacts, triggers radial polarization by inactivating CDC-42 at these sites. The mechanisms responsible for activating CDC-42 at contact-free surfaces are unknown. Here, in an overexpression screen of Rho guanine nucleotide exchange factors (RhoGEFs), which can activate Rho GTPases, we identify CGEF-1 and ECT-2 as RhoGEFs that act through CDC-42 to recruit PAR-6 to the cortex. We show that ECT-2 and CGEF-1 localize to the cell surface and that removing their activity causes a reduction in levels of cortical PAR-6. Through a structure-function analysis, we show that the tandem DH-PH domains of CGEF-1 and ECT-2 are sufficient for GEF activity, but that regions outside of these domains target each protein to the cell surface. Finally, we provide evidence suggesting that the N-terminal region of ECT-2 may direct its in vivo preference for CDC-42 over another known target, the Rho GTPase RHO-1. We propose that radial polarization results from a competition between RhoGEFs, which activate CDC-42 throughout the cortex, and the RhoGAP PAC-1, which inactivates CDC-42 at cell contacts.

  3. A novel role for RhoA GTPase in the regulation of airway smooth muscle contraction.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wenwu; Huang, Youliang; Wu, Yidi; Gunst, Susan J

    2015-02-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated a novel molecular mechanism for the regulation of airway smooth muscle (ASM) contraction by RhoA GTPase. In ASM tissues, both myosin light chain (MLC) phosphorylation and actin polymerization are required for active tension generation. RhoA inactivation dramatically suppresses agonist-induced tension development and completely inhibits agonist-induced actin polymerization, but only slightly reduces MLC phosphorylation. The inhibition of MLC phosphatase does not reverse the effects of RhoA inactivation on contraction or actin polymerization. Thus, RhoA regulates ASM contraction through its effects on actin polymerization rather than MLC phosphorylation. Contractile stimulation of ASM induces the recruitment and assembly of paxillin, vinculin, and focal adhesion kinase (FAK) into membrane adhesion complexes (adhesomes) that regulate actin polymerization by catalyzing the activation of cdc42 GTPase by the G-protein-coupled receptor kinase-interacting target (GIT) - p21-activated kinase (PAK) - PAK-interacting exchange factor (PIX) complex. Cdc42 is a necessary and specific activator of the actin filament nucleation activator, N-WASp. The recruitment and activation of paxillin, vinculin, and FAK is prevented by RhoA inactivation, thus preventing cdc42 and N-WASp activation. We conclude that RhoA regulates ASM contraction by catalyzing the assembly and activation of membrane adhesome signaling modules that regulate actin polymerization, and that the RhoA-mediated assembly of adhesome complexes is a fundamental step in the signal transduction process in response to a contractile agonist.

  4. Altered cortical CDC42 signaling pathways in schizophrenia: Implications for dendritic spine deficits

    PubMed Central

    Ide, Masayuki; Lewis, David A.

    2010-01-01

    Background Spine density on the basilar dendrites of pyramidal neurons is lower in layer 3, but not in layers 5-6, in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) of subjects with schizophrenia. The expression of CDC42 (cell division cycle 42), a RhoGTPase which regulates the outgrowth of the actin cytoskeleton and promotes spine formation, is also lower in schizophrenia; however, CDC42 mRNA is lower across layers 3-6, suggesting that other lamina-specific molecular alterations are critical for the spine deficits in the illness. The CDC42 effector proteins 3 and 4 (CDC42EP3, CDC42EP4) are preferentially expressed in DLPFC layers 2 and 3, and CDC42EP3 appears to assemble septin filaments in spine necks. Therefore, alterations in CDC42EP3 could contribute to the lamina-specific spine deficits in schizophrenia. Methods We measured transcript levels of CDC42, CDC42EP3, CDC42EP4, their interacting proteins [septins (SEPT2, 3, 5, 6, 7, 8 and 11), anillin], and other spine-specific proteins (spinophilin, PSD-95 and synaptopodin) in the DLPFC from 31 subjects with schizophrenia and matched normal comparison subjects. Results The expression of CDC42EP3 mRNA was significantly increased by 19.7%, and SEPT7 mRNA was significantly decreased by 6.9% in subjects with schizophrenia. Cortical levels of CDC42EP3 and SEPT7 mRNAs were not altered in monkeys chronically exposed to antipsychotic medications. Conclusions Activated CDC42 is thought to transiently disrupt septin filaments in spine necks, allowing the molecular translocations required for synaptic potentiation. Thus, altered CDC42 signaling via CDC42EP3 may perturb synaptic plasticity, and contribute to the spine deficits observed in layer 3 pyramidal neurons in schizophrenia. PMID:20385374

  5. Unique structural and nucleotide exchange features of the Rho1 GTPase of Entamoeba histolytica.

    PubMed

    Bosch, Dustin E; Wittchen, Erika S; Qiu, Connie; Burridge, Keith; Siderovski, David P

    2011-11-11

    The single-celled human parasite Entamoeba histolytica possesses a dynamic actin cytoskeleton vital for its intestinal and systemic pathogenicity. The E. histolytica genome encodes several Rho family GTPases known to regulate cytoskeletal dynamics. EhRho1, the first family member identified, was reported to be insensitive to the Rho GTPase-specific Clostridium botulinum C3 exoenzyme, raising the possibility that it may be a misclassified Ras family member. Here, we report the crystal structures of EhRho1 in both active and inactive states. EhRho1 is activated by a conserved switch mechanism, but diverges from mammalian Rho GTPases in lacking a signature Rho insert helix. EhRho1 engages a homolog of mDia, EhFormin1, suggesting a role in mediating serum-stimulated actin reorganization and microtubule formation during mitosis. EhRho1, but not a constitutively active mutant, interacts with a newly identified EhRhoGDI in a prenylation-dependent manner. Furthermore, constitutively active EhRho1 induces actin stress fiber formation in mammalian fibroblasts, thereby identifying it as a functional Rho family GTPase. EhRho1 exhibits a fast rate of nucleotide exchange relative to mammalian Rho GTPases due to a distinctive switch one isoleucine residue reminiscent of the constitutively active F28L mutation in human Cdc42, which for the latter protein, is sufficient for cellular transformation. Nonconserved, nucleotide-interacting residues within EhRho1, revealed by the crystal structure models, were observed to contribute a moderating influence on fast spontaneous nucleotide exchange. Collectively, these observations indicate that EhRho1 is a bona fide member of the Rho GTPase family, albeit with unique structural and functional aspects compared with mammalian Rho GTPases.

  6. Unique Structural and Nucleotide Exchange Features of the Rho1 GTPase of Entamoeba histolytica*

    PubMed Central

    Bosch, Dustin E.; Wittchen, Erika S.; Qiu, Connie; Burridge, Keith; Siderovski, David P.

    2011-01-01

    The single-celled human parasite Entamoeba histolytica possesses a dynamic actin cytoskeleton vital for its intestinal and systemic pathogenicity. The E. histolytica genome encodes several Rho family GTPases known to regulate cytoskeletal dynamics. EhRho1, the first family member identified, was reported to be insensitive to the Rho GTPase-specific Clostridium botulinum C3 exoenzyme, raising the possibility that it may be a misclassified Ras family member. Here, we report the crystal structures of EhRho1 in both active and inactive states. EhRho1 is activated by a conserved switch mechanism, but diverges from mammalian Rho GTPases in lacking a signature Rho insert helix. EhRho1 engages a homolog of mDia, EhFormin1, suggesting a role in mediating serum-stimulated actin reorganization and microtubule formation during mitosis. EhRho1, but not a constitutively active mutant, interacts with a newly identified EhRhoGDI in a prenylation-dependent manner. Furthermore, constitutively active EhRho1 induces actin stress fiber formation in mammalian fibroblasts, thereby identifying it as a functional Rho family GTPase. EhRho1 exhibits a fast rate of nucleotide exchange relative to mammalian Rho GTPases due to a distinctive switch one isoleucine residue reminiscent of the constitutively active F28L mutation in human Cdc42, which for the latter protein, is sufficient for cellular transformation. Nonconserved, nucleotide-interacting residues within EhRho1, revealed by the crystal structure models, were observed to contribute a moderating influence on fast spontaneous nucleotide exchange. Collectively, these observations indicate that EhRho1 is a bona fide member of the Rho GTPase family, albeit with unique structural and functional aspects compared with mammalian Rho GTPases. PMID:21930699

  7. Unique Structural and Nucleotide Exchange Features of the Rho1 GTPase of Entamoeba histolytica

    SciTech Connect

    Bosch, Dustin E.; Wittchen, Erika S.; Qiu, Connie; Burridge, Keith; Siderovski, David P.

    2012-08-10

    The single-celled human parasite Entamoeba histolytica possesses a dynamic actin cytoskeleton vital for its intestinal and systemic pathogenicity. The E. histolytica genome encodes several Rho family GTPases known to regulate cytoskeletal dynamics. EhRho1, the first family member identified, was reported to be insensitive to the Rho GTPase-specific Clostridium botulinum C3 exoenzyme, raising the possibility that it may be a misclassified Ras family member. Here, we report the crystal structures of EhRho1 in both active and inactive states. EhRho1 is activated by a conserved switch mechanism, but diverges from mammalian Rho GTPases in lacking a signature Rho insert helix. EhRho1 engages a homolog of mDia, EhFormin1, suggesting a role in mediating serum-stimulated actin reorganization and microtubule formation during mitosis. EhRho1, but not a constitutively active mutant, interacts with a newly identified EhRhoGDI in a prenylation-dependent manner. Furthermore, constitutively active EhRho1 induces actin stress fiber formation in mammalian fibroblasts, thereby identifying it as a functional Rho family GTPase. EhRho1 exhibits a fast rate of nucleotide exchange relative to mammalian Rho GTPases due to a distinctive switch one isoleucine residue reminiscent of the constitutively active F28L mutation in human Cdc42, which for the latter protein, is sufficient for cellular transformation. Nonconserved, nucleotide-interacting residues within EhRho1, revealed by the crystal structure models, were observed to contribute a moderating influence on fast spontaneous nucleotide exchange. Collectively, these observations indicate that EhRho1 is a bona fide member of the Rho GTPase family, albeit with unique structural and functional aspects compared with mammalian Rho GTPases.

  8. TC10β/CDC42 GTPase activating protein is required for the growth of cortical neuron dendrites.

    PubMed

    Shen, P-C; Xu, D-F; Liu, J-W; Li, K; Lin, M; Wang, H-T; Wang, R; Zheng, J

    2011-12-29

    Neuronal morphogenesis plays an important role in neuronal development. TC10β/CDC42 GTPase-activating protein (TCGAP) is known to be a brain-enriched multiple domain protein, but its role in neuronal development process remains poorly understood. In the present study, we showed that TCGAP positively regulated dendritic outgrowth and spine formation in developing cortical neurons. Knocking down TCGAP by RNA interference led to a decrease in the overall length of dendrite arbors and the number of dendrite branches both in vitro and in vivo. Overexpressing TCGAP in cultured cortical neurons increased dendritic outgrowth and branching. Moreover, overexpressing TCGAP lead to an increase of spine density while knocking-down TCGAP decreased spine density in vivo. The defect by downregulating TCGAP could be rescued by expressing a knock-down resistant form of TCGAP both in vivo and in vitro. In contrast, neither downregulating nor overexpressing TCGAP had any effect on axonal morphogenesis in primary cortical neuron cultures. Together, our findings suggest that TCGAP regulates neuronal morphogenesis in developing cortical neurons at both early and late stage.

  9. Coordination of Rho family GTPase activities to orchestrate cytoskeleton responses during cell wound repair

    PubMed Central

    Abreu-Blanco, Maria Teresa; Verboon, Jeffrey M.; Parkhurst, Susan M.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background Cells heal disruptions in their plasma membrane using a sophisticated, efficient, and conserved response involving the formation of a membrane plug and assembly of an actomyosin ring. Here we describe how Rho family GTPases modulate the cytoskeleton machinery during single cell wound repair in the genetically amenable Drosophila embryo model. Results We find that Rho, Rac and Cdc42 rapidly accumulate around the wound and segregate into dynamic, partially overlapping, zones. Genetic and pharmacological assays show that each GTPase makes specific contributions to the repair process. Rho1 is necessary for myosin II activation leading to its association with actin. Rho1, along with Cdc42, are necessary for actin filament formation and subsequent actomyosin ring stabilization. Rac is necessary for actin mobilization towards the wound. These GTPase contributions are subject to crosstalk among the GTPases themselves and with the cytoskeleton. We find Rho1 GTPase uses several downstream effectors, including Diaphanous, Rok, and Pkn, simultaneously to mediate its functions. Conclusions Our results reveal that the three Rho GTPases are necessary to control and coordinate actin and myosin dynamics during single cell wound repair in the Drosophila embryo. Wounding triggers the formation of Rho GTPases arrays that act as signaling centers that modulate the cytoskeleton. In turn, coordinated crosstalk among the Rho GTPases themselves, as well as with the cytoskeleton, are required for assembly/disassembly and translocation of the actomyosin ring. The cell wound repair response is an example of how specific pathways can be activated locally in response to the cell’s needs. PMID:24388847

  10. Rho GTPases in animal cell cytokinesis: An occupation by the one percent

    PubMed Central

    Jordan, Shawn N.; Canman, Julie C.

    2014-01-01

    Rho GTPases are molecular switches that elicit distinct effects on the actomyosin cytoskeleton to accurately promote cytokinesis. Although they represent less than 1% of the human genome, Rho GTPases exert disproportionate control over cell division. Crucial to this master regulatory role is their localized occupation of specific domains of the cell to ensure the assembly of a contractile ring at the proper time and place. RhoA occupies the division plane and is the central positive Rho family regulator of cytokinesis. Rac1 is a negative regulator of cytokinesis and is inactivated within the division plane while active Rac1 occupies the cell poles. Cdc42 regulation during cytokinesis is less studied, but thus far a clear role has only been shown during polar body emission. Here we review what is known about the function of Rho family GTPases during cell division, as well as their upstream regulators and known downstream cytokinetic effectors. PMID:23047851

  11. Multiple sequence elements facilitate Chp Rho GTPase subcellular location, membrane association, and transforming activity.

    PubMed

    Chenette, Emily J; Mitin, Natalia Y; Der, Channing J

    2006-07-01

    Cdc42 homologous protein (Chp) is a member of the Rho family of small GTPases and shares significant sequence and functional similarity with Cdc42. However, unlike classical Rho GTPases, we recently found that Chp depends on palmitoylation, rather than prenylation, for association with cellular membranes. Because palmitoylation alone is typically not sufficient to promote membrane association, we evaluated the possibility that other carboxy-terminal residues facilitate Chp subcellular association with membranes. We found that Chp membrane association and transforming activity was dependent on the integrity of a stretch of basic amino acids in the carboxy terminus of Chp and that the basic amino acids were not simply part of a palmitoyl acyltransferase recognition motif. We also determined that the 11 carboxy-terminal residues alone were sufficient to promote Chp plasma and endomembrane association. Interestingly, stimulation with tumor necrosis factor-alpha activated only endomembrane-associated Chp. Finally, we found that Chp membrane association was not disrupted by Rho guanine nucleotide dissociation inhibitory proteins, which are negative regulators of Cdc42 membrane association and biological activity. In summary, the unique carboxy-terminal sequence elements that promote Chp subcellular location and function expand the complexity of mechanisms by which the cellular functions of Rho GTPases are regulated.

  12. Multiple Sequence Elements Facilitate Chp Rho GTPase Subcellular Location, Membrane Association, and Transforming Activity

    PubMed Central

    Chenette, Emily J.; Mitin, Natalia Y.

    2006-01-01

    Cdc42 homologous protein (Chp) is a member of the Rho family of small GTPases and shares significant sequence and functional similarity with Cdc42. However, unlike classical Rho GTPases, we recently found that Chp depends on palmitoylation, rather than prenylation, for association with cellular membranes. Because palmitoylation alone is typically not sufficient to promote membrane association, we evaluated the possibility that other carboxy-terminal residues facilitate Chp subcellular association with membranes. We found that Chp membrane association and transforming activity was dependent on the integrity of a stretch of basic amino acids in the carboxy terminus of Chp and that the basic amino acids were not simply part of a palmitoyl acyltransferase recognition motif. We also determined that the 11 carboxy-terminal residues alone were sufficient to promote Chp plasma and endomembrane association. Interestingly, stimulation with tumor necrosis factor-α activated only endomembrane-associated Chp. Finally, we found that Chp membrane association was not disrupted by Rho guanine nucleotide dissociation inhibitory proteins, which are negative regulators of Cdc42 membrane association and biological activity. In summary, the unique carboxy-terminal sequence elements that promote Chp subcellular location and function expand the complexity of mechanisms by which the cellular functions of Rho GTPases are regulated. PMID:16641371

  13. The dock-and-coalesce mechanism for the association of a WASP disordered region with the Cdc42 GTPase.

    PubMed

    Ou, Li; Matthews, Megan; Pang, Xiaodong; Zhou, Huan-Xiang

    2017-08-14

    Intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) play key roles in signaling and regulation. Many IDPs undergo folding upon binding to their targets. We have proposed that coupled folding and binding of IDPs generally follow a dock-and-coalesce mechanism, whereby a segment of the IDP, through diffusion, docks to its cognate subsite and, subsequently, the remaining segments coalesce around their subsites. Here, by a combination of experiment and computation, we determined the precise form of dock-and-coalesce operating in the association between the intrinsically disordered GTPase-binding domain (GBD) of the Wiskott-Aldrich Syndrome protein and the Cdc42 GTPase. The association rate constants (ka ) were measured by stopped-flow fluorescence under various solvent conditions. ka reached 10(7) m(-1) ·s(-1) at physiological ionic strength and had a strong salt dependence, suggesting that an electrostatically enhanced, diffusion-controlled docking step may be rate limiting. Our computation, based on the transient-complex theory, identified the N-terminal basic region of the GBD as the docking segment. However, several other changes in solvent conditions provided strong evidence that the coalescing step also contributed to determining the magnitude of ka . Addition of glucose and trifluoroethanol and an increase in temperature all produced experimental ka values much higher than expected from the effects on the docking rate alone. Conversely, addition of urea led to ka values much lower than expected if only the docking rate was affected. These results all pointed to ka being approximately two-thirds of the docking rate constant under physiological solvent conditions. © 2017 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  14. Deregulation of Rho GTPases in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Porter, Andrew P.; Papaioannou, Alexandra; Malliri, Angeliki

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT In vitro and in vivo studies and evidence from human tumors have long implicated Rho GTPase signaling in the formation and dissemination of a range of cancers. Recently next generation sequencing has identified direct mutations of Rho GTPases in human cancers. Moreover, the effects of ablating genes encoding Rho GTPases and their regulators in mouse models, or through pharmacological inhibition, strongly suggests that targeting Rho GTPase signaling could constitute an effective treatment. In this review we will explore the various ways in which Rho signaling can be deregulated in human cancers. PMID:27104658

  15. Activating Transcription Factor 4 (ATF4) modulates Rho GTPase levels and function via regulation of RhoGDIα

    PubMed Central

    Pasini, Silvia; Liu, Jin; Corona, Carlo; Peze-Heidsieck, Eugenie; Shelanski, Michael; Greene, Lloyd A.

    2016-01-01

    In earlier studies, we showed that ATF4 down-regulation affects post-synaptic development and dendritic spine morphology in neurons through increased turnover of the Rho GTPase Cell Division Cycle 42 (Cdc42) protein. Here, we find that ATF4 down-regulation in both hippocampal and cortical neuron cultures reduces protein and message levels of RhoGDIα, a stabilizer of the Rho GTPases including Cdc42. This effect is rescued by an shATF4-resistant active form of ATF4, but not by a mutant that lacks transcriptional activity. This is, at least in part, due to the fact that Arhgdia, the gene encoding RhoGDIα, is a direct transcriptional target of ATF4 as is shown in ChIP assays. This pathway is not restricted to neurons. This is seen in an impairment of cell migration on ATF4 reduction in non-neuronal cells. In conclusion, we have identified a new cellular pathway in which ATF4 regulates the expression of RhoGDIα that in turn affects Rho GTPase protein levels, and thereby, controls cellular functions as diverse as memory and cell motility. PMID:27841340

  16. Functional characterization and cellular dynamics of the CDC-42 - RAC - CDC-24 module in Neurospora crassa.

    PubMed

    Araujo-Palomares, Cynthia L; Richthammer, Corinna; Seiler, Stephan; Castro-Longoria, Ernestina

    2011-01-01

    Rho-type GTPases are key regulators that control eukaryotic cell polarity, but their role in fungal morphogenesis is only beginning to emerge. In this study, we investigate the role of the CDC-42 - RAC - CDC-24 module in Neurospora crassa. rac and cdc-42 deletion mutants are viable, but generate highly compact colonies with severe morphological defects. Double mutants carrying conditional and loss of function alleles of rac and cdc-42 are lethal, indicating that both GTPases share at least one common essential function. The defects of the GTPase mutants are phenocopied by deletion and conditional alleles of the guanine exchange factor (GEF) cdc-24, and in vitro GDP-GTP exchange assays identify CDC-24 as specific GEF for both CDC-42 and RAC. In vivo confocal microscopy shows that this module is organized as membrane-associated cap that covers the hyphal apex. However, the specific localization patterns of the three proteins are distinct, indicating different functions of RAC and CDC-42 within the hyphal tip. CDC-42 localized as confined apical membrane-associated crescent, while RAC labeled a membrane-associated ring excluding the region labeled by CDC42. The GEF CDC-24 occupied a strategic position, localizing as broad apical membrane-associated crescent and in the apical cytosol excluding the Spitzenkörper. RAC and CDC-42 also display distinct localization patterns during branch initiation and germ tube formation, with CDC-42 accumulating at the plasma membrane before RAC. Together with the distinct cellular defects of rac and cdc-42 mutants, these localizations suggest that CDC-42 is more important for polarity establishment, while the primary function of RAC may be maintaining polarity. In summary, this study identifies CDC-24 as essential regulator for RAC and CDC-42 that have common and distinct functions during polarity establishment and maintenance of cell polarity in N. crassa.

  17. Redundant and nonredundant roles for Cdc42 and Rac1 in lymphomas developed in NPM-ALK transgenic mice

    PubMed Central

    Choudhari, Ramesh; Minero, Valerio Giacomo; Menotti, Matteo; Pulito, Roberta; Brakebusch, Cord; Compagno, Mara; Voena, Claudia; Ambrogio, Chiara

    2016-01-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that Rho family GTPases could have a critical role in the biology of T-cell lymphoma. In ALK-rearranged anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL), a specific subtype of T-cell lymphoma, the Rho family GTPases Cdc42 and Rac1 are activated by the ALK oncogenic activity. In vitro studies have shown that Cdc42 and Rac1 control rather similar phenotypes of ALCL biology such as the proliferation, survival, and migration of lymphoma cells. However, their role and possible redundancy in ALK-driven lymphoma development in vivo are still undetermined. We genetically deleted Cdc42 or Rac1 in a mouse model of ALK-rearranged ALCL to show that either Cdc42 or Rac1 deletion impaired lymphoma development, modified lymphoma morphology, actin filament distribution, and migration properties of lymphoma cells. Cdc42 or Rac1 deletion primarily affected survival rather than proliferation of lymphoma cells. Apoptosis of lymphoma cells was equally induced following Cdc42 or Rac1 deletion, was associated with upregulation of the proapoptotic molecule Bid, and was blocked by Bcl2 overexpression. Remarkably, Cdc42/Rac1 double deletion, but not Cdc42 or Rac1 single deletions, completely prevented NPM-ALK lymphoma dissemination in vivo. Thus, Cdc42 and Rac1 have nonredundant roles in controlling ALK-rearranged lymphoma survival and morphology but are redundant for lymphoma dissemination, suggesting that targeting both GTPases could represent a preferable therapeutic option for ALCL treatment. PMID:26747246

  18. Autophosphorylation-dependent degradation of Pak1, triggered by the Rho-family GTPase, Chp

    PubMed Central

    Weisz Hubsman, Monika; Volinsky, Natalia; Manser, Edward; Yablonski, Deborah; Aronheim, Ami

    2007-01-01

    The Paks (p21-activated kinases) Pak1, Pak2 and Pak3 are among the most studied effectors of the Rho-family GTPases, Rac, Cdc42 (cell division cycle 42) and Chp (Cdc42 homologous protein). Pak kinases influence a variety of cellular functions, but the process of Pak down-regulation, following activation, is poorly understood. In the present study, we describe for the first time a negative-inhibitory loop generated by the small Rho-GTPases Cdc42 and Chp, resulting in Pak1 inhibition. Upon overexpression of Chp, we unexpectedly observed a T-cell migration phenotype consistent with Paks inhibition. In line with this observation, overexpression of either Chp or Cdc42 caused a marked reduction in the level of Pak1 protein in a number of different cell lines. Chp-induced degradation was accompanied by ubiquitination of Pak1, and was dependent on the proteasome. The susceptibility of Pak1 to Chp-induced degradation depended on its p21-binding domain, kinase activity and a number of Pak1 autophosphorylation sites, whereas the PIX- (Pak-interacting exchange factor) and Nck-binding sites were not required. Together, these results implicate Chp-induced kinase autophosphorylation in the degradation of Pak1. The N-terminal domain of Chp was found to be required for Chp-induced degradation, although not for Pak1 activation, suggesting that Chp provides a second function, distinct from kinase activation, to trigger Pak degradation. Collectively, our results demonstrate a novel mechanism of signal termination mediated by the Rho-family GTPases Chp and Cdc42, which results in ubiquitin-mediated degradation of one of their direct effectors, Pak1. PMID:17355222

  19. Autophosphorylation-dependent degradation of Pak1, triggered by the Rho-family GTPase, Chp.

    PubMed

    Weisz Hubsman, Monika; Volinsky, Natalia; Manser, Edward; Yablonski, Deborah; Aronheim, Ami

    2007-06-15

    The Paks (p21-activated kinases) Pak1, Pak2 and Pak3 are among the most studied effectors of the Rho-family GTPases, Rac, Cdc42 (cell division cycle 42) and Chp (Cdc42 homologous protein). Pak kinases influence a variety of cellular functions, but the process of Pak down-regulation, following activation, is poorly understood. In the present study, we describe for the first time a negative-inhibitory loop generated by the small Rho-GTPases Cdc42 and Chp, resulting in Pak1 inhibition. Upon overexpression of Chp, we unexpectedly observed a T-cell migration phenotype consistent with Paks inhibition. In line with this observation, overexpression of either Chp or Cdc42 caused a marked reduction in the level of Pak1 protein in a number of different cell lines. Chp-induced degradation was accompanied by ubiquitination of Pak1, and was dependent on the proteasome. The susceptibility of Pak1 to Chp-induced degradation depended on its p21-binding domain, kinase activity and a number of Pak1 autophosphorylation sites, whereas the PIX- (Pak-interacting exchange factor) and Nck-binding sites were not required. Together, these results implicate Chp-induced kinase autophosphorylation in the degradation of Pak1. The N-terminal domain of Chp was found to be required for Chp-induced degradation, although not for Pak1 activation, suggesting that Chp provides a second function, distinct from kinase activation, to trigger Pak degradation. Collectively, our results demonstrate a novel mechanism of signal termination mediated by the Rho-family GTPases Chp and Cdc42, which results in ubiquitin-mediated degradation of one of their direct effectors, Pak1.

  20. Podocyte-specific loss of Cdc42 leads to congenital nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Scott, Rizaldy P; Hawley, Steve P; Ruston, Julie; Du, Jianmei; Brakebusch, Cord; Jones, Nina; Pawson, Tony

    2012-07-01

    Rho family GTPases are molecular switches best known for their pivotal role in dynamic regulation of the actin cytoskeleton. The prototypic members of this family are Cdc42, Rac1, and RhoA; these GTPases contribute to the breakdown of glomerular filtration and the resultant proteinuria, but their functions in normal podocyte physiology remain poorly understood. Here, mice lacking Cdc42 in podocytes developed congenital nephropathy and died as a result of renal failure within 2 weeks after birth. In contrast, mice lacking Rac1 or RhoA in podocytes were overtly normal and lived to adulthood. Kidneys from Cdc42-mutant mice exhibited protein-filled microcysts with hallmarks of collapsing glomerulopathy, as well as extensive effacement of podocyte foot processes with abnormal junctional complexes. Furthermore, we observed aberrant expression of several podocyte markers and cell polarity proteins in the absence of Cdc42, indicating a disruption of the slit diaphragm. Kidneys from Rac1- and RhoA-mutant mice, however, had normal glomerular morphology and intact foot processes. A nephrin clustering assay suggested that Cdc42 deficiency, but not Rac1 or RhoA deficiency, impairs the polymerization of actin at sites of nephrin aggregates. Taken together, these data highlight the physiological importance of Cdc42, but not Rac1 or RhoA, in establishing podocyte architecture and glomerular function.

  1. The Bacterial Virulence Factor Lymphostatin Compromises Intestinal Epithelial Barrier Function by Modulating Rho GTPases

    PubMed Central

    Babbin, Brian A.; Sasaki, Maiko; Gerner-Schmidt, Kirsten W.; Nusrat, Asma; Klapproth, Jan-Michael A.

    2009-01-01

    Lymphocyte inhibitory factor A (lifA) in Citrobacter rodentium encodes the large toxin lymphostatin, which contains two enzymatic motifs associated with bacterial pathogenesis, a glucosyltransferase and a protease. Our aim was to determine the effects of each lymphostatin motif on intestinal epithelial-barrier function. In-frame mutations of C. rodentium lifA glucosyltransferase (CrGlM21) and protease (CrPrM5) were generated by homologous recombination. Infection of both model intestinal epithelial monolayers and mice with C. rodentium wild type resulted in compromised epithelial barrier function and mislocalization of key intercellular junction proteins in the tight junction and adherens junction. In contrast, CrGlM21 was impaired in its ability to reduce barrier function and influenced the tight junction proteins ZO-1 and occludin. CrPrM5 demonstrated decreased effects on the adherens junction proteins β-catenin and E-cadherin. Analysis of the mechanisms revealed that C. rodentium wild type differentially influenced Rho GTPase activation, suppressed Cdc42 activation, and induced Rho GTPase activation. CrGlM21 lost its suppressive effects on Cdc42 activation, whereas CrPrM5 was unable to activate Rho signaling. Rescue experiments using constitutively active Cdc42 or C3 exotoxin to inhibit Rho GTPase supported a role of Rho GTPases in the epithelial barrier compromise induced by C. rodentium. Taken together, our results suggest that lymphostatin is a bacterial virulence factor that contributes to the disruption of intestinal epithelial-barrier function via the modulation of Rho GTPase activities. PMID:19286565

  2. RhoGAP18B Isoforms Act on Distinct Rho-Family GTPases and Regulate Behavioral Responses to Alcohol via Cofilin

    PubMed Central

    Kalahasti, Geetha; Rodan, Aylin R.; Rothenfluh, Adrian

    2015-01-01

    Responses to the effects of ethanol are highly conserved across organisms, with reduced responses to the sedating effects of ethanol being predictive of increased risk for human alcohol dependence. Previously, we described that regulators of actin dynamics, such as the Rho-family GTPases Rac1, Rho1, and Cdc42, alter Drosophila’s sensitivity to ethanol-induced sedation. The GTPase activating protein RhoGAP18B also affects sensitivity to ethanol. To better understand how different RhoGAP18B isoforms affect ethanol sedation, we examined them for their effects on cell shape, GTP-loading of Rho-family GTPase, activation of the actin-severing cofilin, and actin filamentation. Our results suggest that the RhoGAP18B-PA isoform acts on Cdc42, while PC and PD act via Rac1 and Rho1 to activate cofilin. In vivo, a loss-of-function mutation in the cofilin-encoding gene twinstar leads to reduced ethanol-sensitivity and acts in concert with RhoGAP18B. Different RhoGAP18B isoforms, therefore, act on distinct subsets of Rho-family GTPases to modulate cofilin activity, actin dynamics, and ethanol-induced behaviors. PMID:26366560

  3. Rho family GTPase Chp/RhoV induces PC12 apoptotic cell death via JNK activation

    PubMed Central

    Chernoff, Jonathan; Korobko, Igor V

    2011-01-01

    Rho GTPases regulate numerous cellular processes including apoptosis. Chp/RhoV is an atypical Rho GTPase which functions are poorly understood. Here we investigated the role of Chp in regulation of cell viability using PC12 cells with inducible expression of Chp as a model. We found that expression of Chp results in apoptosis in PC12 cells. Chp-induced apoptosis was accompanied by activation of JNK signaling and both death receptor-mediated and mitochondrial apoptotic pathways as justified by caspase-8 and caspase-9 activation, respectively. Moreover, inhibition of JNK by SP600125 rescued PC12 cells from Chp-triggered cell death and attenuated activation of caspases-9 and -3/7 suggesting that activation of JNK mediates pro-apoptotic effect of Chp. Expression of Chp resulted in increased phosphorylation of c-Jun in PC12 cells, and Chp expression in HE K293 cells upregulated AP-1-dependent transcription in a JNK-dependent manner. Together results of our study reveal the role of Chp GTPase as a putative regulator of JNK-dependent apoptotic death in PC12 cells, similarly to previously described pro-apoptotic activity of the related Cdc42 and Rac1 GTPases. PMID:21686277

  4. Rho family GTPase Chp/RhoV induces PC12 apoptotic cell death via JNK activation.

    PubMed

    Shepelev, Mikhail V; Chernoff, Jonathan; Korobko, Igor V

    2011-01-01

    Rho GTPases regulate numerous cellular processes including apoptosis. Chp/RhoV is an atypical Rho GTPase which functions are poorly understood. Here we investigated the role of Chp in regulation of cell viability using PC12 cells with inducible expression of Chp as a model. We found that expression of Chp results in apoptosis in PC12 cells. Chp-induced apoptosis was accompanied by activation of JNK signaling and both death receptor-mediated and mitochondrial apoptotic pathways as justified by caspase-8 and caspase-9 activation, respectively. Moreover, inhibition of JNK by SP600125 rescued PC12 cells from Chp-triggered cell death and attenuated activation of caspases-9 and -3/7 suggesting that activation of JNK mediates pro-apoptotic effect of Chp. Expression of Chp resulted in increased phosphorylation of c-Jun in PC12 cells, and Chp expression in HE K293 cells upregulated AP-1-dependent transcription in a JNK-dependent manner. Together results of our study reveal the role of Chp GTPase as a putative regulator of JNK-dependent apoptotic death in PC12 cells, similarly to previously described pro-apoptotic activity of the related Cdc42 and Rac1 GTPases.

  5. Control of developmental networks by Rac/Rho small GTPases: How cytoskeletal changes during embryogenesis are orchestrated.

    PubMed

    Sáenz-Narciso, Beatriz; Gómez-Orte, Eva; Zheleva, Angelina; Gastaca, Irene; Cabello, Juan

    2016-12-01

    Small GTPases in the Rho family act as major nodes with functions beyond cytoskeletal rearrangements shaping the Caenorhabditis elegans embryo during development. These small GTPases are key signal transducers that integrate diverse developmental signals to produce a coordinated response in the cell. In C. elegans, the best studied members of these highly conserved Rho family small GTPases, RHO-1/RhoA, CED-10/Rac, and CDC-42, are crucial in several cellular processes dealing with cytoskeletal reorganization. In this review, we update the functions described for the Rho family small GTPases in spindle orientation and cell division, engulfment, and cellular movements during C. elegans embryogenesis, focusing on the Rho subfamily Rac. Please also see the video abstract here. © 2016 The Authors BioEssays Published by WILEY Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Evolution of the Rho family of ras-like GTPases in eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    Boureux, Anthony; Vignal, Emmanuel; Faure, Sandrine; Fort, Philippe

    2007-01-01

    GTPases of the Rho family are molecular switches that play important roles in converting and amplifying external signals into cellular effects. Originally demonstrated to control the dynamics of the F-actin cytoskeleton, Rho GTPases have been implicated in many basic cellular processes that influence cell proliferation, differentiation, motility, adhesion, survival, or secretion. To elucidate the evolutionary history of the Rho family, we have analyzed over 20 species covering major eukaryotic clades from unicellular organisms to mammals, including platypus and opossum, and have reconstructed the ontogeny and the chronology of emergence of the different subfamilies. Our data establish that the 20 mammalian Rho members are structured into 8 subfamilies, among which Rac is the founder of the whole family. Rho, Cdc42, RhoUV, and RhoBTB subfamilies appeared before Coelomates and RhoJQ, Cdc42 isoforms, RhoDF, and Rnd emerged in chordates. In vertebrates, gene duplications and retrotranspositions increased the size of each chordate Rho subfamily, whereas RhoH, the last subfamily, arose probably by horizontal gene transfer. Rac1b, a Rac1 isoform generated by alternative splicing, emerged in amniotes, and RhoD, only in therians. Analysis of Rho mRNA expression patterns in mouse tissues shows that recent subfamilies have tissue-specific and low-level expression that supports their implication only in narrow time windows or in differentiated metabolic functions. These findings give a comprehensive view of the evolutionary canvas of the Rho family and provide guides for future structure and evolution studies of other components of Rho signaling pathways, in particular regulators of the RhoGEF family.

  7. Cdc42 is required for cytoskeletal support of endothelial cell adhesion during blood vessel formation in mice

    PubMed Central

    Barry, David M.; Xu, Ke; Meadows, Stryder M.; Zheng, Yi; Norden, Pieter R.; Davis, George E.; Cleaver, Ondine

    2015-01-01

    The Rho family of small GTPases has been shown to be required in endothelial cells (ECs) during blood vessel formation. However, the underlying cellular events controlled by different GTPases remain unclear. Here, we assess the cellular mechanisms by which Cdc42 regulates mammalian vascular morphogenesis and maintenance. In vivo deletion of Cdc42 in embryonic ECs (Cdc42Tie2KO) results in blocked lumen formation and endothelial tearing, leading to lethality of mutant embryos by E9-10 due to failed blood circulation. Similarly, inducible deletion of Cdc42 (Cdc42Cad5KO) at mid-gestation blocks angiogenic tubulogenesis. By contrast, deletion of Cdc42 in postnatal retinal vessels leads to aberrant vascular remodeling and sprouting, as well as markedly reduced filopodia formation. We find that Cdc42 is essential for organization of EC adhesion, as its loss results in disorganized cell-cell junctions and reduced focal adhesions. Endothelial polarity is also rapidly lost upon Cdc42 deletion, as seen by failed localization of apical podocalyxin (PODXL) and basal actin. We link observed failures to a defect in F-actin organization, both in vitro and in vivo, which secondarily impairs EC adhesion and polarity. We also identify Cdc42 effectors Pak2/4 and N-WASP, as well as the actomyosin machinery, to be crucial for EC actin organization. This work supports the notion of Cdc42 as a central regulator of the cellular machinery in ECs that drives blood vessel formation. PMID:26253403

  8. Rho GTPase isoforms in cell motility: Don't fret, we have FRET

    PubMed Central

    Donnelly, Sara K; Bravo-Cordero, Jose Javier; Hodgson, Louis

    2014-01-01

    The Rho-family of p21 small GTPases are directly linked to the regulation of actin-based motile machinery and play a key role in the control of cell migration. Aside from the original and most well-characterized canonical Rho GTPases RhoA, Rac1, and Cdc42, numerous isoforms of these key proteins have been identified and shown to have specific roles in regulating various cellular motility processes. The major difficulty in addressing these isoform-specific effects is that isoforms typically contain highly similar primary amino acid sequences and thus are able to interact with the same upstream regulators and the downstream effector targets. Here, we will introduce the major members of each GTPase subfamily and discuss recent advances in the design and application of fluorescent resonance energy transfer-based probes, which are at the forefront of the technologies available to directly probe the differential, spatiotemporal activation dynamics of these proteins in live single cells. Currently, it is possible to specifically detect the activation status of RhoA vs. RhoC isoforms, as well as Cdc42 vs. TC-10 isoforms in living cells. Clearly, additional efforts are still required to produce biosensor systems capable of detecting other isoforms of Rho GTPases including RhoB, Rac2/3, RhoG, etc. Through such efforts, we will uncover the isoform-specific roles of these near-identical proteins in living cells, clearly an important area of the Rho GTPase biology that is not yet fully appreciated. PMID:25482645

  9. The Rho family of small GTPases is involved in epithelial cystogenesis and tubulogenesis.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Katherine K; Jou, Tzuu-Shuh; Guo, Wei; Lipschutz, Joshua H

    2003-05-01

    Epithelial cyst and tubule formation represent critical processes for the development of many mammalian organs and involve transient, highly choreographed changes in cell polarity. The Rho family of small GTPases, whose prototypes are RhoA, Rac1, and Cdc42, regulate many biologic processes, including cell polarization and morphogenesis. The exocyst is a conserved eight-subunit protein complex involved in the biogenesis of polarity; in yeast, it is a downstream effector for several Rho family proteins, and, in mammals, plays a central role in cystogenesis and tubulogenesis. Inducible cell lines expressing mutant forms of RhoA, Rac1, and Cdc42 and an in vitro model of cystogenesis and tubulogenesis were used to examine the effects of Rho family proteins on cyst and tubule formation. A series of pulse-chase assays, using basolateral, apical, and secretory proteins, were performed to examine the synthesis and membrane trafficking profile of the various Rho family mutant proteins. We show that expression of mutant RhoA, Rac1, and Cdc42 proteins all result in abnormal cyst and tubule formation. Furthermore, with respect to cystogenesis and tubulogenesis, the phenotypic effects of expressing each mutant Rho family protein are different. Specifically, cyst and, therefore, tubule formation is completely inhibited in the presence of constitutively active RhoA and tubulogenesis is inhibited in the presence of dominant negative Rac1. Reversal of cyst polarity is seen in the presence of dominant negative RhoA, dominant negative Rac1, and both dominant negative and constitutively active Cdc42. The series of synthesis and delivery assays, using basolateral, apical, and secretory proteins, revealed that Rho family mutant proteins display an exocyst-like trafficking profile. The differential effects suggest that RhoA, Rac1, and Cdc42 all act to control cyst and tubule formation and may act in concert to control these higher-order processes. The exocyst-like membrane trafficking

  10. Associations among PH and SH3 domain-containing proteins and Rho-type GTPases in Yeast

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    The src homology region 3 (SH3) domain-bearing protein Bem1p and the Rho-type GTPase Cdc42p are important for bud emergence in Saccharomyces cervisiae. Here, we present evidence that through its second SH3 domain, Bem1p binds to the structurally and functionally similar proteins Boi1p and Boi2p, each of which contain an SH3 and pleckstrin homology (PH) domain. Deletion of BOI1 and BO12 together leads to impaired morphogenesis and poor ability. A PH domain-bearing segment of Boi1p that lacks the Bem1p-binding site is necessary and sufficient for function. This segment of Boi1p displays a two-hybrid interaction with Cdc42p, suggesting that Boi1p either binds directly to or is part of a larger complex that contains Cdc42p. Consistent with these possibilities, overexpression of Boi1p inhibits bud emergence, but this inhibition is counteracted by cooverexpression of Cdc42p. Increased expression of the Rho-type GTPase Rho3p, which is implicated in bud growth defects of boil boi2 mutants, suggesting that Boi1p and Boi2p may also play roles in the activation or function of Rho3p. These findings provide an example of a tight coupling in function between PH domain-bearing proteins and both Rho-type GTPases and SH3 domain- containing proteins, and they raise the possibility that Boi1p and Boi2 play a role in linking the actions of Cdc42p and Rho3p. PMID:8666672

  11. Cdc42 is critical for cartilage development during endochondral ossification.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Wataru; Yamada, Atsushi; Aizawa, Ryo; Suzuki, Dai; Kassai, Hidetoshi; Harada, Takeshi; Nakayama, Mutsuko; Nagahama, Ryo; Maki, Koutaro; Takeda, Shu; Yamamoto, Matsuo; Aiba, Atsu; Baba, Kazuyoshi; Kamijo, Ryutaro

    2015-01-01

    Cdc42 is a widely expressed protein that belongs to the family of Rho GTPases and controls a broad variety of signal transduction pathways in a variety of cell types. To investigate the physiological functions of Cdc42 during cartilage development, we generated chondrocyte-specific inactivated Cdc42 mutant mice (Cdc42(fl/fl); Col2-Cre). The gross morphology of mutant neonates showed shorter limbs and body as compared with the control mice (Cdc42(fl/fl)). Skeletal preparations stained with alcian blue and alizarin red also revealed that the body and the long bone length of the mutants were shorter than those of the control mice. Furthermore, severe defects were found in growth plate chondrocytes in the femur sections of mutant mice, characterized by a reduced proliferating zone height, wider hypertrophic zone, and loss of columnar organization in proliferating chondrocytes. The expression levels of chondrocyte marker genes, such as Col2, Col10, and Mmp13, in mutant mice were decreased as compared with the control mice. Mineralization of trabecular bones in the femur sections was also decreased in the mutants as compared with control mice, whereas osteoid volume was increased. Together these results suggested that chondrocyte proliferation and differentiation in growth plates in the present mutant mice were not normally organized, which contributed to abnormal bone formation. We concluded that Cdc42 is essential for cartilage development during endochondral bone formation.

  12. CDC42 inhibition suppresses progression of incipient intestinal tumors

    PubMed Central

    Sakamori, Ryotaro; Yu, Shiyan; Zhang, Xiao; Hoffman, Andrew; Sun, Jiaxin; Das, Soumyashree; Vedula, Pavan; Li, Guangxun; Fu, Jiang; Walker, Francesca; Yang, Chung S.; Yi, Zheng; Hsu, Wei; Yu, Da-Hai; Shen, Lanlan; Rodriguez, Alexis J.; Taketo, Makoto M.; Bonder, Edward M.; Verzi, Michael P.; Gao, Nan

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in the APC or β-catenin genes are well established initiators of colorectal cancer (CRC), yet modifiers that facilitate the survival and progression of nascent tumor cells are not well defined. Using genetic and pharmacological approaches in mouse CRC and human CRC xenograft models, we show that incipient intestinal tumor cells activate CDC42, an APC-interacting small GTPase, as a crucial step in malignant progression. In the mouse, Cdc42 ablation attenuated the tumorigenicity of mutant intestinal cells carrying single APC or β-catenin mutations. Similarly, human CRC with relatively higher levels of CDC42 activity were particularly sensitive to CDC42 blockade. Mechanistic studies suggested that Cdc42 may be activated at different levels, including at the level of transcriptional activation of the stem-cell-enriched Rho family exchange factor Arhgef4. Our results suggest that early-stage mutant intestinal epithelial cells must recruit the pleiotropic functions of Cdc42 for malignant progression, suggesting its relevance as a biomarker and therapeutic target for selective CRC intervention. PMID:25113996

  13. Critical and distinct roles of amino- and carboxyl-terminal sequences in regulation of the biological activity of the Chp atypical Rho GTPase.

    PubMed

    Chenette, Emily J; Abo, Arie; Der, Channing J

    2005-04-08

    Chp (Cdc42 homologous protein) shares significant sequence and functional identity with the human Cdc42 small GTPase, and like Cdc42, promotes formation of filopodia and activates the p21-activated kinase serine/threonine kinase. However, unlike Cdc42, Chp contains unique amino- and carboxyl-terminal extensions. Here we determined whether Chp, like Cdc42, can promote growth transformation and evaluated the role of the amino- and carboxyl-terminal sequences in Chp function. Surprisingly, we found that a GTPase-deficient mutant of Chp exhibited low transforming activity but that deletion of the amino terminus of Chp greatly enhanced its transforming activity. Thus, the amino terminus may serve as a negative regulator of Chp function. The carboxyl terminus of Cdc42 contains a CAAX (where C is cysteine, A is aliphatic amino acid, X is terminal amino acid) tetrapeptide sequence that signals for the posttranslational modification critical for Cdc42 membrane association and biological function. Although Chp lacks aCAAXmotif, we found that Chp showed carboxyl terminus-dependent localization to the plasma membrane and to endosomes. Furthermore, an intact carboxyl terminus was required for Chp transforming activity. However, treatment with inhibitors of protein palmitoylation, but not prenylation, caused Chp to mislocalize to the cytoplasm. Thus, Chp depends on palmitoylation, rather than isoprenylation, for membrane association and function. In summary, Chp is implicated in cell transformation, and the unique amino and carboxyl termini of Chp represent atypical mechanisms of regulation of Rho GTPase function.

  14. Essential role of Cdc42 in cardiomyocyte proliferation and cell-cell adhesion during heart development.

    PubMed

    Li, Jieli; Liu, Yang; Jin, Yixin; Wang, Rui; Wang, Jian; Lu, Sarah; VanBuren, Vincent; Dostal, David E; Zhang, Shenyuan L; Peng, Xu

    2017-01-15

    Cdc42 is a member of the Rho GTPase family and functions as a molecular switch in regulating cell migration, proliferation, differentiation and survival. However, the role of Cdc42 in heart development remains largely unknown. To determine the function of Cdc42 in heart formation, we have generated a Cdc42 cardiomyocyte knockout (CCKO) mouse line by crossing Cdc42 flox mice with myosin light chain (MLC) 2a-Cre mice. The inactivation of Cdc42 in embryonic cardiomyocytes induced lethality after embryonic day 12.5. Histological analysis of CCKO embryos showed cardiac developmental defects that included thin ventricular walls and ventricular septum defects. Microarray and real-time PCR data also revealed that the expression level of p21 was significantly increased and cyclin B1 was dramatically decreased, suggesting that Cdc42 is required for cardiomyocyte proliferation. Phosphorylated Histone H3 staining confirmed that the inactivation of Cdc42 inhibited cardiomyocytes proliferation. In addition, transmission electron microscope studies showed disorganized sarcomere structure and disruption of cell-cell contact among cardiomyocytes in CCKO hearts. Accordingly, we found that the distribution of N-cadherin/β-Catenin in CCKO cardiomyocytes was impaired. Taken together, our data indicate that Cdc42 is essential for cardiomyocyte proliferation, sarcomere organization and cell-cell adhesion during heart development. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. MiR-199a Inhibits Secondary Envelopment of Herpes Simplex Virus-1 Through the Downregulation of Cdc42-specific GTPase Activating Protein Localized in Golgi Apparatus.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Kyousuke; Suemasa, Fumiko; Sagara, Hiroshi; Nakamura, Shinya; Ino, Yasushi; Kobayashi, Kazuyoshi; Hiramatsu, Hiroaki; Haraguchi, Takeshi; Kurokawa, Kazuo; Todo, Tomoki; Nakano, Akihiko; Iba, Hideo

    2017-07-27

    Because several studies have shown that exogenous miR-199a has antiviral effects against various viruses, including herpesviruses, we examined how miR-199a exerts its antiviral effects using epithelial tumour cell lines infected with herpes simplex virus-1 (HSV-1). We found that both miR-199a-5p and -3p impair the secondary envelopment of HSV-1 by suppressing their common target, ARHGAP21, a Golgi-localized GTPase-activating protein for Cdc42. We further found that the trans-cisternae of the Golgi apparatus are a potential membrane compartment for secondary envelopment. Exogenous expression of either pre-miR-199a or sh-ARHGAP21 exhibited shared phenotypes i.e. alteration of Golgi function in uninfected cells, inhibition of HSV-1 secondary envelopment, and reduction of trans-Golgi proteins upon HSV-1 infection. A constitutively active form of Cdc42 also inhibited HSV-1 secondary envelopment. Endogenous levels of miR-199a in epithelial tumour cell lines were negatively correlated with the efficiency of HSV-1 secondary envelopment within these cells. These results suggest that miR-199a is a crucial regulator of Cdc42 activity on Golgi membranes, which is important for the maintenance of Golgi function and for the secondary envelopment of HSV-1 upon its infection.

  16. Metformin impairs Rho GTPase signaling to induce apoptosis in neuroblastoma cells and inhibits growth of tumors in the xenograft mouse model of neuroblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Ambrish; Al-Sammarraie, Nadia; DiPette, Donald J.; Singh, Ugra S.

    2014-01-01

    Metformin has been shown to inhibit tumor growth in xenograft rodent models of adult cancers, and various human clinical trials are in progress. However, the precise molecular mechanisms of metformin action are largely unknown. In the present study we examined the anti-tumor activity of metformin against neuroblastoma, and determined the underlying signaling mechanisms. Using human neuroblastoma xenograft mice, we demonstrated that oral administration of metformin (100 and 250 mg/kg body weight) significantly inhibited the growth of tumors. The interference of metformin in spheroid formation further confirmed the anti-tumor activity of metformin. In tumors, the activation of Rac1 (GTP-Rac1) and Cdc42 (GTP-Cdc42) was increased while RhoA activation (GTP-RhoA) was decreased by metformin. It also induced phosphorylation of JNK and inhibited the phosphorylation of ERK1/2 without affecting p38 MAP Kinase. Infection of cells by adenoviruses expressing dominant negative Rac1 (Rac1-N17), Cdc42 (Cdc42-N17) or constitutively active RhoA (RhoA-V14), or incubation of cells with pharmacological inhibitors of Rac1 (NSC23766) or Cdc42 (ML141) significantly protected neuroblastoma cells from metformin-induced apoptosis. Additionally, inhibition of JNK activity along with Rac1 or Cdc42 attenuated cytotoxic effects of metformin. These studies demonstrated that metformin impairs Rho GTPases signaling to induce apoptosis via JNK pathway. PMID:25365944

  17. Signaling through rho gtpases in microgravity (rho signaling) on iss (soyuz tma-1) belgian soyuz mission "odissea"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nusgens, B.; Lambert, Ch.; Lapière, C. M.

    2007-09-01

    Rho GTPases, RhoA, Rac1 and Cdc42, are molecular switches in the intracellular signaling pathways, that relay the information collected by receptors to soluble mediators and insoluble extracellular matrix environment. The objective of this experiment was to investigate the impact of microgravity on cellular processes depending on Rho GTPases activity, i.e.cytoskeleton and focal adhesions organization, GTPases translocation to the membrane, nuclear translocation of signaling molecules and gene expression. WI26 fibroblasts were stably transfected by the constitutively active form of each of the Rho GTPase. Selected clone of the engineered cells and the wild-type cells were used during the belgian ODISSEA Soyuz mission to investigate the alterations of the mechanical and phenotypic expression of the cells induced by microgravity and their rescue by the engineered Rho GTPases. A failure in the time schedule, a disconnection of the experiment containers before the automatic activation of the fixation procedure, was responsible for the loss of the biological samples.

  18. Rho GTPases and cancer cell transendothelial migration.

    PubMed

    Reymond, Nicolas; Riou, Philippe; Ridley, Anne J

    2012-01-01

    Small Rho GTPases are major regulators of actin cytoskeleton dynamics and influence cell shape and migration. The expression of several Rho GTPases is often up-regulated in tumors and this frequently correlates with a poor prognosis for patients. Migration of cancer cells through endothelial cells that line the blood vessels, called transendothelial migration or extravasation, is a critical step during the metastasis process. The use of siRNA technology to target specifically each Rho family member coupled with imaging techniques allows the roles of individual Rho GTPases to be investigated. In this chapter we describe methods to assess how Rho GTPases affect the different steps of cancer cell transendothelial cell migration in vitro.

  19. An extracellular-matrix-specific GEF-GAP interaction regulates Rho GTPase crosstalk for 3D collagen migration.

    PubMed

    Kutys, Matthew L; Yamada, Kenneth M

    2014-09-01

    Rho-family GTPases govern distinct types of cell migration on different extracellular matrix proteins in tissue culture or three-dimensional (3D) matrices. We searched for mechanisms selectively regulating 3D cell migration in different matrix environments and discovered a form of Cdc42-RhoA crosstalk governing cell migration through a specific pair of GTPase activator and inhibitor molecules. We first identified βPix, a guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF), as a specific regulator of migration in 3D collagen using an affinity-precipitation-based GEF screen. Knockdown of βPix specifically blocks cell migration in fibrillar collagen microenvironments, leading to hyperactive cellular protrusion accompanied by increased collagen matrix contraction. Live FRET imaging and RNAi knockdown linked this βPix knockdown phenotype to loss of polarized Cdc42 but not Rac1 activity, accompanied by enhanced, de-localized RhoA activity. Mechanistically, collagen phospho-regulates βPix, leading to its association with srGAP1, a GTPase-activating protein (GAP), needed to suppress RhoA activity. Our results reveal a matrix-specific pathway controlling migration involving a GEF-GAP interaction of βPix with srGAP1 that is critical for maintaining suppressive crosstalk between Cdc42 and RhoA during 3D collagen migration.

  20. miR-330 regulates the proliferation of colorectal cancer cells by targeting Cdc42

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yuefeng; Zhu, Xiaolan; Xu, Wenlin; Wang, Dongqing; Yan, Jinchuan

    2013-02-15

    Highlights: ► miR-330 was inversely correlated with Cdc42 in colorectal cancer cells. ► Elevated miR-330 suppressed cell proliferation in vivo and in vitro. ► Elevated miR-330 mimicked the effect of Cdc42 knockdown. ► Restoration of Cdc42 could partially attenuate the effects of miR-330. -- Abstract: MicroRNAs are small non-coding RNA molecules that play important roles in the multistep process of colorectal carcinoma (CRC) development. However, the miRNA–mRNA regulatory network is far from being fully understood. The objective of this study was to investigate the expression and the biological roles of miR-330 in colorectal cancer cells. Cdc42, one of the best characterized members of the Rho GTPase family, was found to be up-regulated in several types of human tumors including CRC and has been implicated in cancer initiation and progression. In the present study, we identified miR-330, as a potential regulator of Cdc42, was found to be inversely correlated with Cdc42 expression in colorectal cancer cell lines. Ectopic expression of miR-330 down-regulated Cdc42 expression at both protein and mRNA level, mimicked the effect of Cdc42 knockdown in inhibiting proliferation, inducing G1 cell cycle arrest and apoptosis of the colorectal cancer cells, whereas restoration of Cdc42 could partially attenuate the effects of miR-330. In addition, elevated expression of miR-330 could suppress the immediate downstream effectors of Cdc42 and inhibit the growth of colorectal cancer cells in vivo. To sum up, our results establish a role of miR-330 in negatively regulating Cdc42 expression and colorectal cancer cell proliferation. They suggest that manipulating the expression level of Cdc42 by miR-330 has the potential to influence colorectal cancer progression.

  1. Cdc42p regulation of the yeast formin Bni1p mediated by the effector Gic2p

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hsin; Kuo, Chun-Chen; Kang, Hui; Howell, Audrey S.; Zyla, Trevin R.; Jin, Michelle; Lew, Daniel J.

    2012-01-01

    Actin filaments are dynamically reorganized to accommodate ever-changing cellular needs for intracellular transport, morphogenesis, and migration. Formins, a major family of actin nucleators, are believed to function as direct effectors of Rho GTPases, such as the polarity regulator Cdc42p. However, the presence of extensive redundancy has made it difficult to assess the in vivo significance of the low-affinity Rho GTPase–formin interaction and specifically whether Cdc42p polarizes the actin cytoskeleton via direct formin binding. Here we exploit a synthetically rewired budding yeast strain to eliminate the redundancy, making regulation of the formin Bni1p by Cdc42p essential for viability. Surprisingly, we find that direct Cdc42p–Bni1p interaction is dispensable for Bni1p regulation. Alternative paths linking Cdc42p and Bni1p via “polarisome” components Spa2p and Bud6p are also collectively dispensable. We identify a novel regulatory input to Bni1p acting through the Cdc42p effector, Gic2p. This pathway is sufficient to localize Bni1p to the sites of Cdc42p action and promotes a polarized actin organization in both rewired and wild-type contexts. We suggest that an indirect mechanism linking Rho GTPases and formins via Rho effectors may provide finer spatiotemporal control for the formin-nucleated actin cytoskeleton. PMID:22918946

  2. Cdc42 regulates bone modeling and remodeling in mice by modulating RANKL/M-CSF signaling and osteoclast polarization

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Yuji; Teitelbaum, Steven L.; Zou, Wei; Zheng, Yi; Johnson, James F.; Chappel, Jean; Ross, F. Patrick; Zhao, Haibo

    2010-01-01

    The modeling and remodeling of bone requires activation and polarization of osteoclasts, achieved by reorganization of the cytoskeleton. Members of the Rho subfamily of small GTPases, including Cdc42, are known regulators of cytoskeletal components, but the role of these proteins in bone physiology and pathophysiology remains unclear. Here, we examined loss-of-function mice in which Cdc42 was selectively ablated in differentiated osteoclasts and gain-of-function animals wherein Cdc42Gap, a protein that inactivates the small GTPase, was deleted globally. Cdc42 loss-of-function mice were osteopetrotic and resistant to ovariectomy-induced bone loss, while gain-of-function animals were osteoporotic. Isolated Cdc42-deficient osteoclasts displayed suppressed bone resorption, while osteoclasts with increased Cdc42 activity had enhanced resorptive capacity. We further demonstrated that Cdc42 modulated M-CSF–stimulated cyclin D expression and phosphorylation of Rb and induced caspase 3 and Bim, thus contributing to osteoclast proliferation and apoptosis rates. Furthermore, Cdc42 was required for multiple M-CSF– and RANKL-induced osteoclastogenic signals including activation and expression of the differentiation factors MITF and NFATc1 and was a component of the Par3/Par6/atypical PKC polarization complex in osteoclasts. These data suggest that Cdc42 regulates osteoclast formation and function and may represent a promising therapeutic target for prevention of pathological bone loss. PMID:20501942

  3. The Borg family of Cdc42 effector proteins Cdc42EP1–5

    PubMed Central

    Farrugia, Aaron J.; Calvo, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    Despite being discovered more than 15 years ago, the Borg (binder of Rho GTPases) family of Cdc42 effector proteins (Cdc42EP1–5) remains largely uncharacterised and relatively little is known about their structure, regulation and role in development and disease. Recent studies are starting to unravel some of the key functional and mechanistic aspects of the Borg proteins, including their role in cytoskeletal remodelling and signalling. In addition, the participation of Borg proteins in important cellular processes such as cell shape, directed migration and differentiation is slowly emerging, directly linking Borgs with important physiological and pathological processes such as angiogenesis, neurotransmission and cancer-associated desmoplasia. Here, we review some of these findings and discuss future prospects. PMID:27913681

  4. Adjacent positioning of cellular structures enabled by a Cdc42 GTPase-activating protein-mediated zone of inhibition.

    PubMed

    Tong, Zongtian; Gao, Xiang-Dong; Howell, Audrey S; Bose, Indrani; Lew, Daniel J; Bi, Erfei

    2007-12-31

    Cells of the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae are born carrying localized transmembrane landmark proteins that guide the subsequent establishment of a polarity axis and hence polarized growth to form a bud in the next cell cycle. In haploid cells, the relevant landmark proteins are concentrated at the site of the preceding cell division, to which they recruit Cdc24, the guanine nucleotide exchange factor for the conserved polarity regulator Cdc42. However, instead of polarizing at the division site, the new polarity axis is directed next to but not overlapping that site. Here, we show that the Cdc42 guanosine triphosphatase-activating protein (GAP) Rga1 establishes an exclusion zone at the division site that blocks subsequent polarization within that site. In the absence of localized Rga1 GAP activity, new buds do in fact form within the old division site. Thus, Cdc42 activators and GAPs establish concentric zones of action such that polarization is directed to occur adjacent to but not within the previous cell division site.

  5. A GAL4-inducible transgenic tool kit for the in vivo modulation of Rho GTPase activity in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Hanovice, Nicholas J; McMains, Emily; Gross, Jeffrey M

    2016-08-01

    Rho GTPases are small monomeric G-proteins that play key roles in many cellular processes. Due to Rho GTPases' widespread expression and broad functions, analyses of their function during late development require tissue-specific modulation of activity. The GAL4/UAS system provides an excellent tool for investigating the function of Rho GTPases in vivo. With this in mind, we created a transgenic tool kit enabling spatial and temporal modulation of Rho GTPase activity in zebrafish. Transgenic constructs were assembled driving dominant-negative, constitutively active, and wild-type versions of Cdc42, RhoA, and Rac1 under 10XUAS control. The self-cleaving viral peptide F2A was utilized to allow bicistronic expression of a fluorescent reporter and Rho GTPase. Global heat shock of hsp70l:gal4(+) transgenic embryos confirmed GAL4-specific construct expression. Western blot analysis indicated myc-tagged Rho GTPases were expressed only in the presence of GAL4. Construct expression was confined to proper cells when combined with pou4f3:gal4 or ptf1a:gal4. Finally, transgene expression resulted in reproducible defects in lens formation, indicating that the transgenes are functional in vivo. We generated and validated 10 transgenic lines, creating a versatile tool kit for the temporal-spatial modulation of Cdc42, RhoA, and Rac1 activity in vivo. These lines will enable systematic analysis of Rho GTPase function in any tissue of interest. Developmental Dynamics 245:844-853, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Cdc42 promotes transendothelial migration of cancer cells through β1 integrin.

    PubMed

    Reymond, Nicolas; Im, Jae Hong; Garg, Ritu; Vega, Francisco M; Borda d'Agua, Barbara; Riou, Philippe; Cox, Susan; Valderrama, Ferran; Muschel, Ruth J; Ridley, Anne J

    2012-11-12

    Cancer cells interact with endothelial cells during the process of metastatic spreading. Here, we use a small interfering RNA screen targeting Rho GTPases in cancer cells to identify Cdc42 as a critical regulator of cancer cell-endothelial cell interactions and transendothelial migration. We find that Cdc42 regulates β1 integrin expression at the transcriptional level via the transcription factor serum response factor (SRF). β1 integrin is the main target for Cdc42-mediating interaction of cancer cells with endothelial cells and the underlying extracellular matrix, as exogenous β1 integrin expression was sufficient to rescue the Cdc42-silencing phenotype. We show that Cdc42 was required in vivo for cancer cell spreading and protrusion extension along blood vessels and retention in the lungs. Interestingly, transient Cdc42 depletion was sufficient to decrease experimental lung metastases, which suggests that its role in endothelial attachment is important for metastasis. By identifying β1 integrin as a transcriptional target of Cdc42, our results provide new insight into Cdc42 function.

  7. Cdc42 is required for chondrogenesis and interdigital programmed cell death during limb development.

    PubMed

    Aizawa, Ryo; Yamada, Atsushi; Suzuki, Dai; Iimura, Tadahiro; Kassai, Hidetoshi; Harada, Takeshi; Tsukasaki, Masayuki; Yamamoto, Gou; Tachikawa, Tetsuhiko; Nakao, Kazuki; Yamamoto, Matsuo; Yamaguchi, Akira; Aiba, Atsu; Kamijo, Ryutaro

    2012-01-01

    Cdc42, a member of the Rho subfamily of small GTPases, is known to be a regulator of multiple cellular functions, including cytoskeletal organization, cell migration, proliferation, and apoptosis. However, its tissue-specific roles, especially in mammalian limb development, remain unclear. To investigate the physiological function of Cdc42 during limb development, we generated limb bud mesenchyme-specific inactivated Cdc42 (Cdc42(fl/fl); Prx1-Cre) mice. Cdc42(fl/fl); Prx1-Cre mice demonstrated short limbs and body, abnormal calcification of the cranium, cleft palate, disruption of the xiphoid process, and syndactyly. Severe defects were also found in long bone growth plate cartilage, characterized by loss of columnar organization of chondrocytes, and thickening and massive accumulation of hypertrophic chondrocytes, resulting in delayed endochondral bone formation associated with reduced bone growth. In situ hybridization analysis revealed that expressions of Col10 and Mmp13 were reduced in non-resorbed hypertrophic cartilage, indicating that deletion of Cdc42 inhibited their terminal differentiation. Syndactyly in Cdc42(fl/fl); Prx1-Cre mice was caused by fusion of metacarpals and a failure of interdigital programmed cell death (ID-PCD). Whole mount in situ hybridization analysis of limb buds showed that the expression patterns of Sox9 were ectopic, while those of Bmp2, Msx1, and Msx2, known to promote apoptosis in the interdigital mesenchyme, were down-regulated. These results demonstrate that Cdc42 is essential for chondrogenesis and ID-PCD during limb development.

  8. Rho 1 GTPase activates the (1-3)beta-D-glucan synthase and is involved in Schizosaccharomyces pombe morphogenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Arellano, M; Durán, A; Pérez, P

    1996-01-01

    The Schizosaccharomyces pombe Cdc42 and Rho1 GTPases were tested for their ability to complement the cwg2-1 mutant phenotype of a decrease in (1-3)beta-D-glucan synthase activity when grown at the non-permissive temperature. Only Rho1 is able to partly complement the defect in glucan synthase associated with the cwg2-1 mutation. Moreover, overexpression of the rho1 gene in wild-type S.pombe cells causes aberrant morphology with loss of polarity and cells with several septa. Under this condition (1-3)beta-D-glucan synthase activity is increased four times, but is still dependent on GTP. When S.pombe is transformed with constitutively active rho1 mutant alleles (rho1-G15V or rho1-Q64L), cells stop growing and show a very thick cell wall with hardly any septum. Under this condition the level of (1-3)beta-D-glucan synthase activity is at least 20 times higher than wild-type and is independent of GTP. Neither cdc42+ nor the cdc42-V12G or cdc42-Q61L constitutively active mutant alleles affect (1-3)beta-D-glucan synthase activity when overexpressed in S.pombe. Cells overproducing Rho1 are hypersensitive to inhibitors of cell wall biosynthesis or to cell wall degrading enzymes. We conclude that Rho1 GTPase directly activates (1-3)beta-D-glucan synthase and regulates S.pombe morphogenesis. Images PMID:8887550

  9. GRP75 upregulates clathrin-independent endocytosis through actin cytoskeleton reorganization mediated by the concurrent activation of Cdc42 and RhoA.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hang; Gao, Zhihui; He, Changzheng; Xiang, Rong; van Kuppevelt, Toin H; Belting, Mattias; Zhang, Sihe

    2016-05-01

    Therapeutic macromolecules are internalized into the cell by either clathrin-mediated endocytosis (CME) or clathrin-independent endocytosis (CIE). Although some chaperone proteins play an essential role in CME (e.g. Hsc70 in clathrin uncoating), relatively few of these proteins are functionally involved in CIE. We previously revealed a role for the mitochondrial chaperone protein GRP75 in heparan sulfate proteoglycan (HSPG)-mediated, membrane raft-associated macromolecule endocytosis. However, the mechanism underlying this process remains unclear. In this study, using a mitochondrial signal peptide-directed protein trafficking expression strategy, we demonstrate that wild-type GRP75 expression enhanced the uptakes of HSPG and CIE marker cholera toxin B subunit but impaired the uptake of CME marker transferrin. The endocytosis regulation function of GRP75 is largely mediated by its subcellular location in mitochondria and is essentially determined by its ATPase domain. Interestingly, the mitochondrial expression of GRP75 or its ATPase domain significantly stimulates increases in both RhoA and Cdc42 activation, remarkably induces stress fibers and enhances filopodia formation, which collectively results in the promotion of CIE, but the inhibition of CME. Furthermore, silencing of Cdc42 or RhoA impaired the ability of GRP75 overexpression to increase CIE. Therefore, these results suggest that endocytosis vesicle enrichment of GRP75 by mitochondria trafficking upregulates CIE through an actin cytoskeleton reorganization mechanism mediated by the concurrent activation of Cdc42 and RhoA. This finding provides novel insight into organelle-derived chaperone signaling and the regulation of different endocytosis pathways in cells. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. A targeted siRNA screen identifies regulators of Cdc42 activity at the natural killer cell immunological synapse.

    PubMed

    Carlin, Leo M; Evans, Rachel; Milewicz, Hanna; Fernandes, Luis; Matthews, Daniel R; Perani, Michela; Levitt, James; Keppler, Melanie D; Monypenny, James; Coolen, Ton; Barber, Paul R; Vojnovic, Borivoj; Suhling, Klaus; Fraternali, Franca; Ameer-Beg, Simon; Parker, Peter J; Thomas, N Shaun B; Ng, Tony

    2011-11-29

    Natural killer (NK) cells kill tumor cells and virally infected cells, and an effective NK cell response requires processes, such as motility, recognition, and directional secretion, that rely on cytoskeletal rearrangement. The Rho guanosine triphosphatase (GTPase) Cdc42 coordinates cytoskeletal reorganization downstream of many receptors. The Rho-related GTPase from plants 1 (ROP1) exhibits oscillatory activation behavior at the apical plasma membrane of growing pollen tubes; however, a similar oscillation in Rho GTPase activity has so far not been demonstrated in mammalian cells. We hypothesized that oscillations in Cdc42 activity might occur within NK cells as they interact with target cells. Through fluorescence lifetime imaging of a Cdc42 biosensor, we observed that in live NK cells forming immunological synapses with target cells, Cdc42 activity oscillated after exhibiting an initial increase. We used protein-protein interaction networks and structural databases to identify candidate proteins that controlled Cdc42 activity, leading to the design of a targeted short interfering RNA screen. The guanine nucleotide exchange factors RhoGEF6 and RhoGEF7 were necessary for Cdc42 activation within the NK cell immunological synapse. In addition, the kinase Akt and the p85α subunit of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) were required for Cdc42 activation, the periodicity of the oscillation in Cdc42 activity, and the subsequent polarization of cytotoxic vesicles toward target cells. Given that PI3Ks are targets of tumor therapies, our findings suggest the need to monitor innate immune function during the course of targeted therapy against these enzymes.

  11. Rho GTPases as regulators of mitosis and cytokinesis in mammalian cells

    PubMed Central

    Chircop, Megan

    2014-01-01

    Rho GTPases regulate a diverse range of cellular functions primarily through their ability to modulate microtubule dynamics and the actin-myosin cytoskeleton. Both of these cytoskeletal structures are crucial for a mitotic cell division. Specifically, their assembly and disassembly is tightly regulated in a temporal manner to ensure that each mitotic stage occurs in the correct sequential order and not prematurely until the previous stage is completed. Thus, it is not surprising that the Rho GTPases, RhoA, and Cdc42, have reported roles in several stages of mitosis: cell cortex stiffening during cell rounding, mitotic spindle formation, and bi-orient attachment of the spindle microtubules to the kinetochore and during cytokinesis play multiple roles in establishing the division plane, assembly, and activation of the contractile ring, membrane ingression, and abscission. Here, I review the molecular mechanisms regulating the spatial and temporal activation of RhoA and Cdc42 during mitosis, and how this is critical for mitotic progression and completion. PMID:24988197

  12. Regulation of cytokinesis by Rho GTPase flux.

    PubMed

    Miller, Ann L; Bement, William M

    2009-01-01

    In animal cells, cytokinesis is powered by a contractile ring of actin filaments (F-actin) and myosin-2. Formation of the contractile ring is dependent on the small GTPase RhoA, which is activated in a precise zone at the cell equator. It has long been assumed that cytokinesis and other Rho-dependent processes are controlled in a sequential manner, whereby Rho activation by guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) initiates a particular event, and Rho inactivation by GTPase activating proteins (GAPs) terminates that event. MgcRacGAP is a conserved cytokinesis regulator thought to be required only at the end of cytokinesis. Here we show that GAP activity of MgcRacGAP is necessary early during cytokinesis for the formation and maintenance of the Rho activity zone. Disruption of GAP activity by point mutation results in poorly focused Rho activity zones, whereas complete removal of the GAP domain results in unfocused zones that show lateral instability and/or rapid side-to-side oscillations. We propose that the GAP domain of MgcRacGAP has two unexpected roles throughout cytokinesis: first, it transiently anchors active Rho, and second, it promotes local Rho inactivation, resulting in the constant flux of Rho through the GTPase cycle.

  13. The small GTPase RhoH is an atypical regulator of haematopoietic cells

    PubMed Central

    Fueller, Florian; Kubatzky, Katharina F

    2008-01-01

    Rho GTPases are a distinct subfamily of the superfamily of Ras GTPases. The best-characterised members are RhoA, Rac and Cdc42 that regulate many diverse actions such as actin cytoskeleton reorganisation, adhesion, motility as well as cell proliferation, differentiation and gene transcription. Among the 20 members of that family, only Rac2 and RhoH show an expression restricted to the haematopoietic lineage. RhoH was first discovered in 1995 as a fusion transcript with the transcriptional repressor LAZ3/BCL6. It was therefore initially named translation three four (TTF) but later on renamed RhoH due to its close relationship to the Ras/Rho family of GTPases. Since then, RhoH has been implicated in human cancer as the gene is subject to somatic hypermutation and by the detection of RHOH as a translocation partner for LAZ3/BCL6 or other genes in human lymphomas. Underexpression of RhoH is found in hairy cell leukaemia and acute myeloid leukaemia. Some of the amino acids that are crucial for GTPase activity are mutated in RhoH so that the protein is a GTPase-deficient, so-called atypical Rho GTPase. Therefore other mechanisms of regulating RhoH activity have been described. These include regulation at the mRNA level and tyrosine phosphorylation of the protein's unique ITAM-like motif. The C-terminal CaaX box of RhoH is mainly a target for farnesyl-transferase but can also be modified by geranylgeranyl-transferase. Isoprenylation of RhoH and changes in subcellular localisation may be an additional factor to fine-tune signalling. Little is currently known about its signalling, regulation or interaction partners. Recent studies have shown that RhoH negatively influences the proliferation and homing of murine haematopoietic progenitor cells, presumably by acting as an antagonist for Rac1. In leukocytes, RhoH is needed to keep the cells in a resting, non-adhesive state, but the exact mechanism has yet to be elucidated. RhoH has also been implicated as a regulatory molecule

  14. Spatial control of active CDC-42 during collective migration of hypodermal cells in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Ouellette, Marie-Hélène; Martin, Emmanuel; Lacoste-Caron, Germain; Hamiche, Karim; Jenna, Sarah

    2016-08-01

    Collective epithelial cell migration requires the maintenance of cell-cell junctions while enabling the generation of actin-rich protrusions at the leading edge of migrating cells. Ventral enclosure of Caenorhabditis elegans embryos depends on the collective migration of anterior-positioned leading hypodermal cells towards the ventral midline where they form new junctions with their contralateral neighbours. In this study, we characterized the zygotic function of RGA-7/SPV-1, a CDC-42/Cdc42 and RHO-1/RhoA-specific Rho GTPase-activating protein, which controls the formation of actin-rich protrusions at the leading edge of leading hypodermal cells and the formation of new junctions between contralateral cells. We show that RGA-7 controls these processes in an antagonistic manner with the CDC-42's effector WSP-1/N-WASP and the CDC-42-binding proteins TOCA-1/2/TOCA1. RGA-7 is recruited to spatially distinct locations at junctions between adjacent leading cells, where it promotes the accumulation of clusters of activated CDC-42. It also inhibits the spreading of these clusters towards the leading edge of the junctions and regulates their accumulation and distribution at new junctions formed between contralateral leading cells. Our study suggests that RGA-7 controls collective migration and junction formation between epithelial cells by spatially restricting active CDC-42 within cell-cell junctions.

  15. Spatial control of active CDC-42 during collective migration of hypodermal cells in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Ouellette, Marie-Hélène; Martin, Emmanuel; Lacoste-Caron, Germain; Hamiche, Karim; Jenna, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    Collective epithelial cell migration requires the maintenance of cell–cell junctions while enabling the generation of actin-rich protrusions at the leading edge of migrating cells. Ventral enclosure of Caenorhabditis elegans embryos depends on the collective migration of anterior-positioned leading hypodermal cells towards the ventral midline where they form new junctions with their contralateral neighbours. In this study, we characterized the zygotic function of RGA-7/SPV-1, a CDC-42/Cdc42 and RHO-1/RhoA-specific Rho GTPase-activating protein, which controls the formation of actin-rich protrusions at the leading edge of leading hypodermal cells and the formation of new junctions between contralateral cells. We show that RGA-7 controls these processes in an antagonistic manner with the CDC-42′s effector WSP-1/N-WASP and the CDC-42-binding proteins TOCA-1/2/TOCA1. RGA-7 is recruited to spatially distinct locations at junctions between adjacent leading cells, where it promotes the accumulation of clusters of activated CDC-42. It also inhibits the spreading of these clusters towards the leading edge of the junctions and regulates their accumulation and distribution at new junctions formed between contralateral leading cells. Our study suggests that RGA-7 controls collective migration and junction formation between epithelial cells by spatially restricting active CDC-42 within cell–cell junctions. PMID:26578656

  16. Evolution of the Rho family of ras-like GTPases in eukaryotes

    PubMed Central

    Boureux, Anthony; Vignal, Emmanuel; Faure, Sandrine; Fort, Philippe

    2007-01-01

    GTPases of the Rho family are molecular switches that play important roles in converting and amplifying external signals into cellular effects. Originally demonstrated to control the dynamics of the F-actin cytoskeleton, Rho GTPases have been implicated in many basic cellular processes that influence cell proliferation, differentiation, motility, adhesion, survival or secretion. To elucidate the evolutionary history of the Rho family, we have analyzed over twenty species covering major eukaryotic clades from unicellular organisms to mammals, including platypus and opossum, and have reconstructed the ontogeny and the chronology of emergence of the different subfamilies. Our data establish that the 20 mammalian Rho members are structured into eight subfamilies, among which Rac is the founder of the whole family. Rho, Cdc42, RhoUV and RhoBTB subfamilies appeared before Coelomates, and RhoJQ, RhoDF and Rnd emerged in Chordates. In Vertebrates, gene duplications and retrotranspositions increased the size of each chordate Rho subfamily, while RhoH, the last subfamily, arose probably by horizontal gene transfer. Rac1b, a Rac1 isoform generated by alternative splicing, emerged in amniotes, and RhoD, only in therians. Analysis of Rho mRNA expression patterns in mouse tissues shows that recent subfamilies have tissue-specific specific and low level expression, which supports their implication only in narrow time windows or in differentiated metabolic functions. These findings give a comprehensive view of the evolutionary canvas of the Rho family and provide guides for future structure and evolution studies of other components of Rho signaling pathways, in particular regulators of the RhoGEF family. PMID:17035353

  17. Rga4 modulates the activity of the fission yeast cell integrity MAPK pathway by acting as a Rho2 GTPase-activating protein.

    PubMed

    Soto, Teresa; Villar-Tajadura, Maria Antonia; Madrid, Marisa; Vicente, Jero; Gacto, Mariano; Pérez, Pilar; Cansado, José

    2010-04-09

    Rho GTPase-activating proteins (GAPs) are responsible for the inactivation of Rho GTPases, which are involved in the regulation of critical biological responses in eukaryotic cells, ranging from cell cycle control to cellular morphogenesis. The genome of fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe contains six genes coding for putative Rho GTPases, whereas nine genes code for predicted Rho GAPs (Rga1 to Rga9). One of them, Rga4, has been recently described as a Cdc42 GAP, involved in the control of cell diameter and symmetry in fission yeast. In this work we show that Rga4 is also a Rho2 GAP that negatively modulates the activity of the cell integrity pathway and its main effector, MAPK Pmk1. The DYRK-type protein kinase Pom1, which regulates both the localization and phosphorylation state of Rga4, is also a negative regulator of the Pmk1 pathway, but this control is not dependent upon the Rga4 role as a Rho2-GAP. Hence, two subsets of Rga4 negatively regulate Cdc42 and Rho2 functions in a specific and unrelated way. Finally, we show that Rga7, another Rho2 GAP, down-regulates the Pmk1 pathway in addition to Rga4. These results reinforce the notion of the existence of complex mechanisms determining the selectivity of Rho GAPs toward Rho GTPases and their functions.

  18. Bem3, a Cdc42 GTPase-activating protein, traffics to an intracellular compartment and recruits the secretory Rab GTPase Sec4 to endomembranes

    PubMed Central

    Mukherjee, Debarati; Sen, Arpita; Boettner, Douglas R.; Fairn, Gregory D.; Schlam, Daniel; Bonilla Valentin, Fernando J.; Michael McCaffery, J.; Hazbun, Tony; Staiger, Chris J.; Grinstein, Sergio; Lemmon, Sandra K.; Claudio Aguilar, R.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Cell polarity is essential for many cellular functions including division and cell-fate determination. Although RhoGTPase signaling and vesicle trafficking are both required for the establishment of cell polarity, the mechanisms by which they are coordinated are unclear. Here, we demonstrate that the yeast RhoGAP (GTPase activating protein), Bem3, is targeted to sites of polarized growth by the endocytic and recycling pathways. Specifically, deletion of SLA2 or RCY1 led to mislocalization of Bem3 to depolarized puncta and accumulation in intracellular compartments, respectively. Bem3 partitioned between the plasma membrane and an intracellular membrane-bound compartment. These Bem3-positive structures were polarized towards sites of bud emergence and were mostly observed during the pre-mitotic phase of apical growth. Cell biological and biochemical approaches demonstrated that this intracellular Bem3 compartment contained markers for both the endocytic and secretory pathways, which were reminiscent of the Spitzenkörper present in the hyphal tips of growing fungi. Importantly, Bem3 was not a passive cargo, but recruited the secretory Rab protein, Sec4, to the Bem3-containing compartments. Moreover, Bem3 deletion resulted in less efficient localization of Sec4 to bud tips during early stages of bud emergence. Surprisingly, these effects of Bem3 on Sec4 were independent of its GAP activity, but depended on its ability to efficiently bind endomembranes. This work unveils unsuspected and important details of the relationship between vesicle traffic and elements of the cell polarity machinery: (1) Bem3, a cell polarity and peripherally associated membrane protein, relies on vesicle trafficking to maintain its proper localization; and (2) in turn, Bem3 influences secretory vesicle trafficking. PMID:23943876

  19. Hyphal tip-associated localization of Cdc42 is F-actin dependent in Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Hazan, Idit; Liu, Haoping

    2002-12-01

    The rho-type GTPase Cdc42 is important for the establishment and maintenance of eukaryotic cell polarity. To examine whether Cdc42 is regulated during the yeast-to-hypha transition in Candida albicans, we constructed a green fluorescence protein (GFP)-Cdc42 fusion under the ACT1 promoter and observed its localization in live C. albicans cells. As in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, GFP-Cdc42 was observed around the entire periphery of the cell. In yeast-form cells of C. albicans, it clustered to the tips and sides of small buds as well as to the mother-daughter neck region of large-budded cells. Upon hyphal induction, GFP-Cdc42 clustered to the site of hyphal evagination and remained at the tips of the hyphae. This temporal and spatial localization of Cdc42 suggests that its activity is regulated during the yeast-to-hypha transition. In addition to the accumulation at the hyphal tip, GFP-Cdc42 was also seen as a band within the hyphal tube in cells that had undergone nuclear separation. With the F-actin-assembly inhibitor latrunculin A, we found that GFP-Cdc42 accumulation at the bud site in yeast-form cells is F-actin independent, whereas GFP-Cdc42 accumulation at the hyphal tip requires F-actin. Furthermore, disruption of the F-actin cytoskeleton impaired the transcriptional induction of hypha-specific genes. Therefore, hypha formation resembles mating in Saccharomyces cerevisiae in that both require F-actin for GFP-Cdc42 localization and efficient signaling.

  20. Recognition and activation of Rho GTPases by Vav1 and Vav2 guanine nucleotide exchange factors.

    PubMed

    Heo, Jongyun; Thapar, Roopa; Campbell, Sharon L

    2005-05-03

    Vav proteins are Rho GTPase-specific guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) that are distinguished by the tandem arrangement of Dbl homology (DH), Pleckstrin homology (PH), and cysteine rich domains (CRD). Whereas the tandem DH-PH arrangement is conserved among Rho GEFs, the presence of the CRD is unique to Vav family members and is required for efficient nucleotide exchange. We provide evidence that Vav2-mediated nucleotide exchange of Rho GTPases follows the Theorell-Chance mechanism in which the Vav2.Rho GTPase complex is the major species during the exchange process and the Vav2.GDP-Mg(2+).Rho GTPase ternary complex is present only transiently. The GTPase specificity for the DH-PH-CRD Vav2 in vitro follows this order: Rac1 > Cdc42 > RhoA. Results obtained from fluorescence anisotropy and NMR chemical shift mapping experiments indicate that the isolated Vav1 CRD is capable of directly associating with Rac1, and residues K116 and S83 that are in the proximity of the P-loop and the guanine base either are part of this binding interface or undergo a conformational change in response to CRD binding. The NMR studies are supported by kinetic measurements on Rac1 mutants S83A, K116A, and K116Q and Vav2 CRD mutant K533A in that these mutants affect both the initial binding event of Vav2 with Rac1 (k(on)) and the rate-limiting dissociation of Vav2 from the Vav2.Rac1 binary complex (thereby influencing the enzyme turnover number, k(cat)). The results suggest that the CRD domain in Vav proteins plays an active role, affecting both the k(on) and the k(cat) for Vav-mediated nucleotide exchange on Rho GTPases.

  1. Rho protein GTPases and their interactions with NFκB: crossroads of inflammation and matrix biology

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Louis; Tergaonkar, Vinay

    2014-01-01

    The RhoGTPases, with RhoA, Cdc42 and Rac being major members, are a group of key ubiquitous proteins present in all eukaryotic organisms that subserve such important functions as cell migration, adhesion and differentiation. The NFκB (nuclear factor κB) is a family of constitutive and inducible transcription factors that through their diverse target genes, play a major role in processes such as cytokine expression, stress regulation, cell division and transformation. Research over the past decade has uncovered new molecular links between the RhoGTPases and the NFκB pathway, with the RhoGTPases playing a positive or negative regulatory role on NFκB activation depending on the context. The RhoA–NFκB interaction has been shown to be important in cytokine-activated NFκB processes, such as those induced by TNFα (tumour necrosis factor α). On the other hand, Rac is important for activating the NFκB response downstream of integrin activation, such as after phagocytosis. Specific residues of Rac1 are important for triggering NFκB activation, and mutations do obliterate this response. Other upstream triggers of the RhoGTPase–NFκB interactions include the suppressive p120 catenin, with implications for skin inflammation. The networks described here are not only important areas for further research, but are also significant for discovery of targets for translational medicine. PMID:24877606

  2. CDC-42 Orients Cell Migration during Epithelial Intercalation in the Caenorhabditis elegans Epidermis

    PubMed Central

    Lucas, Bethany; Chin-Sang, Ian; Reiner, David; Kumfer, Kraig

    2016-01-01

    Cell intercalation is a highly directed cell rearrangement that is essential for animal morphogenesis. As such, intercalation requires orchestration of cell polarity across the plane of the tissue. CDC-42 is a Rho family GTPase with key functions in cell polarity, yet its role during epithelial intercalation has not been established because its roles early in embryogenesis have historically made it difficult to study. To circumvent these early requirements, in this paper we use tissue-specific and conditional loss-of-function approaches to identify a role for CDC-42 during intercalation of the Caenorhabditis elegans dorsal embryonic epidermis. CDC-42 activity is enriched in the medial tips of intercalating cells, which extend as cells migrate past one another. Moreover, CDC-42 is involved in both the efficient formation and orientation of cell tips during cell rearrangement. Using conditional loss-of-function we also show that the PAR complex functions in tip formation and orientation. Additionally, we find that the sole C. elegans Eph receptor, VAB-1, functions during this process in an Ephrin-independent manner. Using epistasis analysis, we find that vab-1 lies in the same genetic pathway as cdc-42 and is responsible for polarizing CDC-42 activity to the medial tip. Together, these data establish a previously uncharacterized role for polarized CDC-42, in conjunction with PAR-6, PAR-3 and an Eph receptor, during epithelial intercalation. PMID:27861585

  3. CDC-42 Orients Cell Migration during Epithelial Intercalation in the Caenorhabditis elegans Epidermis.

    PubMed

    Walck-Shannon, Elise; Lucas, Bethany; Chin-Sang, Ian; Reiner, David; Kumfer, Kraig; Cochran, Hunter; Bothfeld, William; Hardin, Jeff

    2016-11-01

    Cell intercalation is a highly directed cell rearrangement that is essential for animal morphogenesis. As such, intercalation requires orchestration of cell polarity across the plane of the tissue. CDC-42 is a Rho family GTPase with key functions in cell polarity, yet its role during epithelial intercalation has not been established because its roles early in embryogenesis have historically made it difficult to study. To circumvent these early requirements, in this paper we use tissue-specific and conditional loss-of-function approaches to identify a role for CDC-42 during intercalation of the Caenorhabditis elegans dorsal embryonic epidermis. CDC-42 activity is enriched in the medial tips of intercalating cells, which extend as cells migrate past one another. Moreover, CDC-42 is involved in both the efficient formation and orientation of cell tips during cell rearrangement. Using conditional loss-of-function we also show that the PAR complex functions in tip formation and orientation. Additionally, we find that the sole C. elegans Eph receptor, VAB-1, functions during this process in an Ephrin-independent manner. Using epistasis analysis, we find that vab-1 lies in the same genetic pathway as cdc-42 and is responsible for polarizing CDC-42 activity to the medial tip. Together, these data establish a previously uncharacterized role for polarized CDC-42, in conjunction with PAR-6, PAR-3 and an Eph receptor, during epithelial intercalation.

  4. Two CDC42 paralogs modulate C. neoformans thermotolerance and morphogenesis under host physiological conditions

    PubMed Central

    Ballou, Elizabeth R.; Nichols, Connie B.; Miglia, Kathleen J; Kozubowski, Lukasz; Alspaugh, J. Andrew

    2013-01-01

    The precise regulation of morphogenesis is a key mechanism by which cells respond to a variety of stresses, including those encountered by microbial pathogens in the host. The polarity protein Cdc42 regulates cellular morphogenesis throughout eukaryotes, and we explore the role of Cdc42 proteins in the host survival of the human fungal pathogen Cryptococcus neoformans. Uniquely, C. neoformans has two functional Cdc42 paralogs, Cdc42 and Cdc420. Here we investigate the contribution of each paralog to resistance to host stress. In contrast to non-pathogenic model organisms, C. neoformans Cdc42 proteins are not required for viability under non-stress conditions. In the presence of cell stress, strains deleted for either paralog show defects in thermotolerance and morphogenesis, likely as a result of their roles in the organization of actin and septin structures during bud growth and cytokinesis. These proteins act downstream of C. neoformans Ras1 to regulate its morphogenesis subpathway, but not its effects on mating. Cdc42, and not Cdc420, is required for virulence in a murine model of cryptococcosis. The C. neoformans Cdc42 proteins likely perform complementary functions with other Rho-like GTPases to control cell polarity, septin organization, and hyphal transitions that allow survival in the environment and in the host. PMID:20025659

  5. Endocytic membrane turnover at the leading edge is driven by a transient interaction between Cdc42 and GRAF1

    PubMed Central

    Francis, Monika K.; Holst, Mikkel R.; Vidal-Quadras, Maite; Henriksson, Sara; Santarella-Mellwig, Rachel; Sandblad, Linda; Lundmark, Richard

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Changes in cell morphology require coordination of plasma membrane turnover and cytoskeleton dynamics, processes that are regulated by Rho GTPases. Here, we describe how a direct interaction between the Rho GTPase Cdc42 and the GTPase-activating protein (GAP) GRAF1 (also known as ARHGAP26), facilitates rapid cell surface turnover at the leading edge. Both Cdc42 and GRAF1 were required for fluid-phase uptake and regulated the generation of transient GRAF1-coated endocytic carriers, which were distinct from clathrin-coated vesicles. GRAF1 was found to transiently assemble at discrete Cdc42-enriched punctae at the plasma membrane, resulting in a corresponding decrease in the microdomain association of Cdc42. However, Cdc42 captured in its active state was, through a GAP-domain-mediated interaction, localised together with GRAF1 on accumulated internal structures derived from the cell surface. Correlative fluorescence and electron tomography microscopy revealed that these structures were clusters of small membrane carriers with defective endosomal processing. We conclude that a transient interaction between Cdc42 and GRAF1 drives endocytic turnover and controls the transition essential for endosomal maturation of plasma membrane internalised by this mechanism. PMID:26446261

  6. Non-autonomous role of Cdc42 in cell-cell communication during collective migration.

    PubMed

    Colombié, Nathalie; Choesmel-Cadamuro, Valérie; Series, Jennifer; Emery, Gregory; Wang, Xiaobo; Ramel, Damien

    2017-03-01

    Collective cell migration is involved in numerous processes both physiological, such as embryonic development, and pathological such as metastasis. Compared to single cell migration, collective motion requires cell behaviour coordination through an as-yet poorly understood but critical cell-cell communication mechanism. Using Drosophila border cell migration, we show here that the small Rho GTPase Cdc42 regulates cell-cell communication. Indeed, we demonstrate that Cdc42 controls protrusion formation in a cell non-autonomous manner. Moreover, we found that the endocytic small GTPase Rab11, controls Cdc42 localisation to the periphery of migrating border cell clusters. Accordingly, over-expression of Cdc42 in border cells rescues the loss of Rab11 function. In addition, we showed that Cdc42 acts upstream of Moesin, a cytoskeletal regulator known to function downstream of rab11. Thus, our study positions Cdc42 as a new key player in cell-cell communication, acting downstream of Rab11. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. The integrin cytoplasmic domain-associated protein ICAP-1 binds and regulates Rho family GTPases during cell spreading

    PubMed Central

    Degani, Simona; Balzac, Fiorella; Brancaccio, Mara; Guazzone, Simona; Retta, Saverio Francesco; Silengo, Lorenzo; Eva, Alessandra; Tarone, Guido

    2002-01-01

    Using two-hybrid screening, we isolated the integrin cytoplasmic domain-associated protein (ICAP-1), an interactor for the COOH terminal region of the β1A integrin cytoplasmic domain. To investigate the role of ICAP-1 in integrin-mediated adhesive function, we expressed the full-length molecule in NIH3T3 cells. ICAP-1 expression strongly prevents NIH3T3 cell spreading on extracellular matrix. This inhibition is transient and can be counteracted by coexpression of a constitutively activated mutant of Cdc42, suggesting that ICAP-1 acts upstream of this GTPase. In addition, we found that ICAP-1 binds both to Cdc42 and Rac1 in vitro, and its expression markedly inhibits activation of these GTPases during integrin-mediated cell adhesion to fibronectin as detected by PAK binding assay. In the attempt to define the molecular mechanism of this inhibition, we show that ICAP-1 reduces both the intrinsic and the exchange factor–induced dissociation of GDP from Cdc42; moreover, purified ICAP-1 displaces this GTPase from cellular membranes. Together, these data show for the first time that ICAP-1 regulates Rho family GTPases during integrin-mediated cell matrix adhesion, acting as guanine dissociation inhibitor. PMID:11807099

  8. The integrin cytoplasmic domain-associated protein ICAP-1 binds and regulates Rho family GTPases during cell spreading.

    PubMed

    Degani, Simona; Balzac, Fiorella; Brancaccio, Mara; Guazzone, Simona; Retta, Saverio Francesco; Silengo, Lorenzo; Eva, Alessandra; Tarone, Guido

    2002-01-21

    Using two-hybrid screening, we isolated the integrin cytoplasmic domain-associated protein (ICAP-1), an interactor for the COOH terminal region of the beta1A integrin cytoplasmic domain. To investigate the role of ICAP-1 in integrin-mediated adhesive function, we expressed the full-length molecule in NIH3T3 cells. ICAP-1 expression strongly prevents NIH3T3 cell spreading on extracellular matrix. This inhibition is transient and can be counteracted by coexpression of a constitutively activated mutant of Cdc42, suggesting that ICAP-1 acts upstream of this GTPase. In addition, we found that ICAP-1 binds both to Cdc42 and Rac1 in vitro, and its expression markedly inhibits activation of these GTPases during integrin-mediated cell adhesion to fibronectin as detected by PAK binding assay. In the attempt to define the molecular mechanism of this inhibition, we show that ICAP-1 reduces both the intrinsic and the exchange factor-induced dissociation of GDP from Cdc42; moreover, purified ICAP-1 displaces this GTPase from cellular membranes. Together, these data show for the first time that ICAP-1 regulates Rho family GTPases during integrin-mediated cell matrix adhesion, acting as guanine dissociation inhibitor.

  9. Multiple factors confer specific Cdc42 and Rac protein activation by dedicator of cytokinesis (DOCK) nucleotide exchange factors.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Kiran; Yang, Jing; Zhang, Ziguo; Barford, David

    2011-07-15

    DOCK (dedicator of cytokinesis) guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) activate the Rho-family GTPases Rac and Cdc42 to control cell migration, morphogenesis, and phagocytosis. The DOCK A and B subfamilies activate Rac, whereas the DOCK D subfamily activates Cdc42. Nucleotide exchange is catalyzed by a conserved DHR2 domain (DOCK(DHR2)). Although the molecular basis for DOCK(DHR2)-mediated GTPase activation has been elucidated through structures of a DOCK9(DHR2)-Cdc42 complex, the factors determining recognition of specific GTPases are unknown. To understand the molecular basis for DOCK-GTPase specificity, we have determined the crystal structure of DOCK2(DHR2) in complex with Rac1. DOCK2(DHR2) and DOCK9(DHR2) exhibit similar tertiary structures and homodimer interfaces and share a conserved GTPase-activating mechanism. Multiple structural differences between DOCK2(DHR2) and DOCK9(DHR2) account for their selectivity toward Rac1 and Cdc42. Key determinants of selectivity of Cdc42 and Rac for their cognate DOCK(DHR2) are a Phe or Trp residue within β3 (residue 56) and the ability of DOCK proteins to exploit differences in the GEF-induced conformational changes of switch 1 dependent on a divergent residue at position 27. DOCK proteins, therefore, differ from DH-PH GEFs that select their cognate GTPases through recognition of structural differences within the β2/β3 strands.

  10. Rho GTPases, Statins, and Nitric Oxide

    PubMed Central

    Rikitake, Yoshiyuki; Liao, James K.

    2009-01-01

    The lipid-lowering drugs, 3-hydroxy-3-methylgulutaryl-coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase inhibitors or statins, are used in the prevention and treatment of cardiovascular diseases. Recent experimental and clinical studies suggest that statins may exert vascular protective effects beyond cholesterol reduction. For example, statins improve endothelial function by cholesterol-dependent and -independent mechanisms. The cholesterol-independent or “pleiotropic” effects of statins include the upregulation and activation of endothelial NO synthase (eNOS). Because statins inhibit an early step in the cholesterol biosynthetic pathway, they also inhibit the synthesis of isoprenoids such as farnesylpyrophosphate and geranylgeranylpyrophosphate, which are important posttranslational lipid attachments for intracellular signaling molecules such as the Rho GTPases. Indeed, decrease in Rho GTPase responses as a consequence of statin treatment increases the production and bioavailability of endothelium-derived NO. The mechanism involves, in part, Rho/Rho-kinase (ROCK)-mediated changes in the actin cytoskeleton, which leads to decreases in eNOS mRNA stability. The regulation of eNOS by Rho GTPases, therefore, may be an important mechanism underlying the cardiovascular protective effect of statins. PMID:16339495

  11. Dock6, a Dock-C subfamily guanine nucleotide exchanger, has the dual specificity for Rac1 and Cdc42 and regulates neurite outgrowth.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, Yuki; Yamauchi, Junji; Sanbe, Atsushi; Tanoue, Akito

    2007-02-15

    Small GTPases of the Rho family, Rho, Rac, and Cdc42, are critical regulators of the changes in the actin cytoskeleton. Rho GTPases are typically activated by Dbl-homology (DH)-domain-containing guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs). Recent genetic and biochemical studies revealed a new type of GEF for the Rho GTPases. This family is composed of 11 genes, designated as Dock1 to Dock11, and is structurally divided into four classes Dock-A, -B, -C, and -D. Dock-A and -B subfamilies are typically GEFs specific for Rac1, while the Dock-D subfamily is specific for Cdc42. Here we show that Dock6, a member of the Dock-C subfamily, exchanges GDP for GTP for Rac1 and Cdc42 in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, we find that, in mouse N1E-115 neuroblastoma cells, expression of Dock6 is increased following differentiation. Transfection of the catalytic Dock Homology Region-2 (DHR-2) domain of Dock6 promotes neurite outgrowth mediated by Rac1 and Cdc42. Conversely, knockdown of endogenous Dock6 by small interference RNA reduces activation of Rac1 and Cdc42 and neurite outgrowth. Taken together, these results suggest that Dock6 differs from all of the identified Dock180-related proteins, in that it is the GEF specific for both Rac1 and Cdc42 and may be one of physiological regulators of neurite outgrowth.

  12. Reelin modulates cytoskeletal organization by regulating Rho GTPases

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The correct positioning of postmitotic neurons in the developing neocortex and other laminated brain structures requires the activation of a Reelin-lipoprotein receptor-Dab1 signaling cascade. The large glycoprotein Reelin is secreted by Cajal-Retzius pioneer neurons and bound by the apolipoprotein E receptor family members Apoer2 and Vldl receptor on responsive neurons and radial glia. This leads to the tyrosine phosphorylation of the cytoplasmic protein Disabled-1 (Dab1) by non-receptor tyrosine kinases of the Src family. Various signaling pathways downstream of Dab1 connect Reelin to the actin and microtubule cytoskeleton. Despite this knowledge, a comprehensive view linking the different cell-biological and biochemical actions of Reelin to its diverse physiological roles not only during neurodevelopment but also in the maintenance and functioning of the adult brain is still lacking. In this review, we discuss our finding that Reelin activates Rho GTPases in neurons in the light of other recent studies, which demonstrate a role of Reelin in Golgi organization, and suggest additional roles of Cdc42 activation by Reelin in radial glial cells of the developing cortex. PMID:21980553

  13. Rho GTPase activity modulates paramyxovirus fusion protein-mediated cell-cell fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Schowalter, Rachel M.; Wurth, Mark A.; Aguilar, Hector C.; Lee, Benhur; Moncman, Carole L.; McCann, Richard O.; Dutch, Rebecca Ellis . E-mail: rdutc2@uky.edu

    2006-07-05

    The paramyxovirus fusion protein (F) promotes fusion of the viral envelope with the plasma membrane of target cells as well as cell-cell fusion. The plasma membrane is closely associated with the actin cytoskeleton, but the role of actin dynamics in paramyxovirus F-mediated membrane fusion is unclear. We examined cell-cell fusion promoted by two different paramyxovirus F proteins in three cell types in the presence of constitutively active Rho family GTPases, major cellular coordinators of actin dynamics. Reporter gene and syncytia assays demonstrated that expression of either Rac1{sup V12} or Cdc42{sup V12} could increase cell-cell fusion promoted by the Hendra or SV5 glycoproteins, though the effect was dependent on the cell type expressing the viral glycoproteins. In contrast, RhoA{sup L63} decreased cell-cell fusion promoted by Hendra glycoproteins but had little affect on SV5 F-mediated fusion. Also, data suggested that GTPase activation in the viral glycoprotein-containing cell was primarily responsible for changes in fusion. Additionally, we found that activated Cdc42 promoted nuclear rearrangement in syncytia.

  14. Pak6 protein kinase is a novel effector of an atypical Rho family GTPase Chp/RhoV.

    PubMed

    Shepelev, M V; Korobko, I V

    2012-01-01

    Chp/RhoV is an atypical Rho GTPase whose functions are far from being fully understood. To date several effector proteins of Chp have been identified, including p21-activated kinases Pak1, Pak2, and Pak4. Using a yeast two-hybrid system and co-immunoprecipitation, here we show that another p21-activated kinase, Pak6, is a novel Chp-binding protein. Interaction between Chp and Pak6 depends on the activation state of the GTPase, suggesting that Pak6 is an effector protein for Chp. Point mutations in the effector domain of Chp or in the CRIB motif of Pak6 significantly impair the interaction between Chp and Pak6 upon co-immunoprecipitation, suggesting that the binding interface involves the effector domain of Chp and the CRIB motif in Pak6. We found that Chp does not affect the phosphorylation status of the S560 residue in the catalytic domain of Pak6 when Chp and Pak6 are co-expressed in HEK293 cells. Therefore, similarly to Cdc42, Chp is not likely to activate Pak6. In NCI-H1299 cells, Chp co-localizes with Pak6 on vesicular structures in activation state-dependent manner. Taking the data together, we report here the identification of p21-activated kinase Pak6 as a novel effector of the atypical Rho GTPase Chp. Our data suggest further directions in elucidating biological functions of these proteins.

  15. Dock10, a Cdc42 and Rac1 GEF, induces loss of elongation, filopodia, and ruffles in cervical cancer epithelial HeLa cells

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz-Lafuente, Natalia; Alcaraz-García, María-José; García-Serna, Azahara-María; Sebastián-Ruiz, Silvia; Moya-Quiles, María-Rosa; García-Alonso, Ana-María; Parrado, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Dock10 is one of the three members of the Dock-D family of Dock proteins, a class of guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) for Rho GTPases. Its homologs Dock9 and Dock11 are Cdc42 GEFs. Dock10 is required for maintenance of rounded morphology and amoeboid-type movement. Full-length isoforms of Dock10 have been recently cloned. Here, we address GTPase specificity and GEF activity of Dock10. In order of decreasing intensity, Dock10 interacted with nucleotide-free Rac1, Cdc42, and Rac3, and more weakly with Rac2, RhoF, and RhoG. Inducible expression of Dock10 in HeLa epithelial cells promoted GEF activity on Cdc42 and Rac1, and a morphologic change in two-dimensional culture consisting in loss of cell elongation, increase of filopodia, and ruffles. Area in contact with the substrate of cells that spread with non-elongated morphology was larger in cells expressing Dock10. Inducible expression of constitutively active mutants of Cdc42 and Rac1 in HeLa cells also induced loss of elongation. However, Cdc42 induced filopodia and contraction, and Rac1 induced membrane ruffles and flattening. When co-expressed with Dock10, Cdc42 potentiated filopodia, and Rac1 potentiated ruffles. These results suggest that Dock10 functions as a dual GEF for Cdc42 and Rac1, affecting cell morphology, spreading and actin cytoskeleton protrusions of adherent HeLa cells. PMID:25862245

  16. Intrinsic GTP hydrolysis is observed for a switch 1 variant of Cdc42 in the presence of a specific GTPase inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Morris, Kyla M; Henderson, Rory; Suresh Kumar, Thallapuranam Krishnaswamy; Heyes, Colin D; Adams, Paul D

    2016-01-01

    The Ras-related protein Cell division cycle 42 (Cdc42) is important in cell-signaling processes. Protein interactions involving Cdc42 occur primarily in flexible "Switch" regions that help regulate effector binding. We studied the kinetics of intrinsic GTP hydrolysis reaction in the absence and presence of a biologically active peptide derivative of a p21-activated kinase effector (PBD46) for wt Cdc42 and compared it to the Switch 1 variant Cdc42(T35A). While the binding of PBD46 to wt Cdc42 results in complete inhibition of GTP hydrolysis, this interaction in Cdc42(T35A) does not. Comparison of the crystal structure of wt Cdc42 in the absence of effector (1AN0.pdb), as well as the NMR structure of wt Cdc42 bound to an effector in the Switch 1 region (1CF4.pdb) ( www.rcsb.org ) suggests that the orientation of T(35) with bound Mg(2+) changes in the presence of effector, resulting in movement of GTP away from the catalytic box leading to the inhibition of GTP hydrolysis. For Cdc42(T35A), molecular dynamics simulations and structural analyses suggest that the nucleotide does not undergo the conformational shift observed for the wt Cdc42-effector interaction. Our data suggest that change in dynamics in the Switch 1 region of Cdc42 caused by the T35A mutation (Chandrashekar, et al. 2011, Biochemistry, 50, p. 6196) fosters a conformation for this Cdc42 variant that allows hydrolysis of GTP in the presence of PBD46, and that alteration of the conformational dynamics could potentially modulate Ras-related over-activity.

  17. Intrinsic GTP hydrolysis is observed for a switch 1 variant of Cdc42 in the presence of a specific GTPase inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Kyla M.; Henderson, Rory; Suresh Kumar, Thallapuranam Krishnaswamy; Heyes, Colin D.; Adams, Paul D.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The Ras-related protein Cell division cycle 42 (Cdc42) is important in cell-signaling processes. Protein interactions involving Cdc42 occur primarily in flexible “Switch” regions that help regulate effector binding. We studied the kinetics of intrinsic GTP hydrolysis reaction in the absence and presence of a biologically active peptide derivative of a p21-activated kinase effector (PBD46) for wt Cdc42 and compared it to the Switch 1 variant Cdc42(T35A). While the binding of PBD46 to wt Cdc42 results in complete inhibition of GTP hydrolysis, this interaction in Cdc42(T35A) does not. Comparison of the crystal structure of wt Cdc42 in the absence of effector (1AN0.pdb), as well as the NMR structure of wt Cdc42 bound to an effector in the Switch 1 region (1CF4.pdb) (www.rcsb.org) suggests that the orientation of T35 with bound Mg2+ changes in the presence of effector, resulting in movement of GTP away from the catalytic box leading to the inhibition of GTP hydrolysis. For Cdc42(T35A), molecular dynamics simulations and structural analyses suggest that the nucleotide does not undergo the conformational shift observed for the wt Cdc42-effector interaction. Our data suggest that change in dynamics in the Switch 1 region of Cdc42 caused by the T35A mutation (Chandrashekar, et al. 2011, Biochemistry, 50, p. 6196) fosters a conformation for this Cdc42 variant that allows hydrolysis of GTP in the presence of PBD46, and that alteration of the conformational dynamics could potentially modulate Ras-related over-activity. PMID:26828437

  18. C-terminal domain (CTD) phosphatase links Rho GTPase signaling to Pol II CTD phosphorylation in Arabidopsis and yeast.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bo; Yang, Guohua; Chen, Yu; Zhao, Yihong; Gao, Peng; Liu, Bo; Wang, Haiyang; Zheng, Zhi-Liang

    2016-12-13

    Rho GTPases, including the Rho, Cdc42, Rac, and ROP subfamilies, act as pivotal signaling switches in various growth and developmental processes. Compared with the well-defined role of cytoskeletal organization in Rho signaling, much less is known regarding transcriptional regulation. In a mutant screen for phenotypic enhancers of transgenic Arabidopsis plants expressing a constitutively active form of ROP2 (designated CA1-1), we identified RNA polymerase II (Pol II) C-terminal domain (CTD) phosphatase-like 1 (CPL1) as a transcriptional regulator of ROP2 signaling. We show that ROP2 activation inhibits CPL1 activity by promoting its degradation, leading to an increase in CTD Ser5 and Ser2 phosphorylation. We also observed similar modulation of CTD phosphorylation by yeast Cdc42 GTPase and enhanced degradation of the yeast CTD phosphatase Fcp1 by activated ROP2 signaling. Taken together, our results suggest that modulation of the Pol II CTD code by Rho GTPase signaling represents an evolutionarily conserved mechanism in both unicellular and multicellular eukaryotes.

  19. SNX9 promotes metastasis by enhancing cancer cell invasion via differential regulation of RhoGTPases

    PubMed Central

    Bendris, Nawal; Williams, Karla C.; Reis, Carlos R.; Welf, Erik S.; Chen, Ping-Hung; Lemmers, Bénédicte; Hahne, Michael; Leong, Hon Sing; Schmid, Sandra L.

    2016-01-01

    Despite current advances in cancer research, metastasis remains the leading factor in cancer-related deaths. Here we identify sorting nexin 9 (SNX9) as a new regulator of breast cancer metastasis. We detect an increase in SNX9 expression in human breast cancer metastases compared with primary tumors and demonstrate that SNX9 expression in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells is necessary to maintain their ability to metastasize in a chick embryo model. Conversely, SNX9 knockdown impairs this process. In vitro studies using several cancer cell lines derived from a variety of human tumors reveal a role for SNX9 in cell invasion and identify mechanisms responsible for this novel function. We show that SNX9 controls the activation of RhoA and Cdc42 GTPases and also regulates cell motility via the modulation of well-known molecules involved in metastasis, namely RhoA-ROCK and N-WASP. In addition, we find that SNX9 is required for RhoGTPase-dependent, clathrin-independent endocytosis, and in this capacity can functionally substitute to the bona fide Rho GAP, GTPase regulator associated with focal adhesion kinase (GRAF1). Taken together, our data establish novel roles for SNX9 as a multifunctional protein scaffold that regulates, and potentially coordinates, several cellular processes that together can enhance cancer cell metastasis. PMID:26960793

  20. The GIT/PIX complex: an oligomeric assembly of GIT family ARF GTPase-activating proteins and PIX family Rac1/Cdc42 guanine nucleotide exchange factors.

    PubMed

    Premont, Richard T; Perry, Stephen J; Schmalzigaug, Robert; Roseman, J Tyler; Xing, Yanghui; Claing, Audrey

    2004-09-01

    GIT proteins are GTPase-activating proteins (GAPs) for ADP-ribosylation factor (ARF) small GTP-binding proteins, and interact with the PIX family of Rac1/Cdc42 guanine nucleotide exchange factors. GIT and PIX transiently localize p21-activated protein kinases (PAKs) to remodeling focal adhesions through binding to paxillin. To understand the role of these interactions, the association of GIT and PIX proteins was examined in detail. Two separable binding interactions link GIT and PIX proteins, GIT and PIX proteins each dimerize and a beta-PIX fragment containing the GIT-binding region failed to inhibit the association of the GIT and PIX proteins. Endogenous GIT and PIX co-fractionate at a very high molecular size. Purified 6xHis-tagged beta-PIX from Sf9 cells co-expressing untagged GIT1 yields recombinant GIT1/beta-PIX complexes that have equal amounts of beta-PIX and GIT1 and co-fractionate at the same large size as native GIT/PIX complexes. Thus, GIT and PIX proteins are tightly associated as a multimeric nexus capable of linking together important signaling molecules, including PAKs.

  1. CdGAP/ARHGAP31, a Cdc42/Rac1 GTPase regulator, is critical for vascular development and VEGF-mediated angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Caron, Christine; DeGeer, Jonathan; Fournier, Patrick; Duquette, Philippe M.; Luangrath, Vilayphone; Ishii, Hidetaka; Karimzadeh, Fereshteh; Lamarche-Vane, Nathalie; Royal, Isabelle

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in the CdGAP/ARHGAP31 gene, which encodes a GTPase-activating protein for Rac1 and Cdc42, have been reported causative in the Adams-Oliver developmental syndrome often associated with vascular defects. However, despite its abundant expression in endothelial cells, CdGAP function in the vasculature remains unknown. Here, we show that vascular development is impaired in CdGAP-deficient mouse embryos at E15.5. This is associated with superficial vessel defects and subcutaneous edema, resulting in 44% embryonic/perinatal lethality. VEGF-driven angiogenesis is defective in CdGAP−/− mice, showing reduced capillary sprouting from aortic ring explants. Similarly, VEGF-dependent endothelial cell migration and capillary formation are inhibited upon CdGAP knockdown. Mechanistically, CdGAP associates with VEGF receptor-2 and controls VEGF-dependent signaling. Consequently, CdGAP depletion results in impaired VEGF-mediated Rac1 activation and reduced phosphorylation of critical intracellular mediators including Gab1, Akt, PLCγ and SHP2. These findings are the first to demonstrate the importance of CdGAP in embryonic vascular development and VEGF-induced signaling, and highlight CdGAP as a potential therapeutic target to treat pathological angiogenesis and vascular dysfunction. PMID:27270835

  2. Small Rho-GTPases and cortical malformations

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Rho-GTPases have been found to be crucial for cytoskeleton remodelling and cell polarity, as well as key players in directed cell migration in various tissues and organs, therefore becoming good candidates for involvement in neuronal migration disorders. We recently found that genetic deletion of the small GTPase RhoA in the developing mouse cerebral cortex results in three distinct cortical malformations: a defect in the proliferation of progenitor cells during development that leads to a bigger cerebral cortex in the adult mouse, a change in the morphology of radial glial cells that results in the formation of a subcortical band heterotopia (SBH, also called Double Cortex) and an increase in the speed of migrating newborn neurons. The latter, together with the aberrant radial glial shape, is likely to be the cause of cobblestone lissencephaly, where neurons protrude beyond layer I at the pial surface of the brain. PMID:23524873

  3. BAR domain proteins regulate Rho GTPase signaling

    PubMed Central

    Aspenström, Pontus

    2014-01-01

    BAR proteins comprise a heterogeneous group of multi-domain proteins with diverse biological functions. The common denominator is the Bin-Amphiphysin-Rvs (BAR) domain that not only confers targeting to lipid bilayers, but also provides scaffolding to mold lipid membranes into concave or convex surfaces. This function of BAR proteins is an important determinant in the dynamic reconstruction of membrane vesicles, as well as of the plasma membrane. Several BAR proteins function as linkers between cytoskeletal regulation and membrane dynamics. These links are provided by direct interactions between BAR proteins and actin-nucleation-promoting factors of the Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein family and the Diaphanous-related formins. The Rho GTPases are key factors for orchestration of this intricate interplay. This review describes how BAR proteins regulate the activity of Rho GTPases, as well as how Rho GTPases regulate the function of BAR proteins. This mutual collaboration is a central factor in the regulation of vital cellular processes, such as cell migration, cytokinesis, intracellular transport, endocytosis, and exocytosis. PMID:25483303

  4. HIV signaling through CD4 and CCR5 activates Rho family GTPases that are required for optimal infection of primary CD4+ T cells.

    PubMed

    Lucera, Mark B; Fleissner, Zach; Tabler, Caroline O; Schlatzer, Daniela M; Troyer, Zach; Tilton, John C

    2017-01-24

    HIV-1 hijacks host cell machinery to ensure successful replication, including cytoskeletal components for intracellular trafficking, nucleoproteins for pre-integration complex import, and the ESCRT pathway for assembly and budding. It is widely appreciated that cellular post-translational modifications (PTMs) regulate protein activity within cells; however, little is known about how PTMs influence HIV replication. Previously, we reported that blocking deacetylation of tubulin using histone deacetylase inhibitors promoted the kinetics and efficiency of early post-entry viral events. To uncover additional PTMs that modulate entry and early post-entry stages in HIV infection, we employed a flow cytometric approach to assess a panel of small molecule inhibitors on viral fusion and LTR promoter-driven gene expression. While viral fusion was not significantly affected, early post-entry viral events were modulated by drugs targeting multiple processes including histone deacetylation, methylation, and bromodomain inhibition. Most notably, we observed that inhibitors of the Rho GTPase family of cytoskeletal regulators-including RhoA, Cdc42, and Rho-associated kinase signaling pathways-significantly reduced viral infection. Using phosphoproteomics and a biochemical GTPase activation assay, we found that virion-induced signaling via CD4 and CCR5 activated Rho family GTPases including Rac1 and Cdc42 and led to widespread modification of GTPase signaling-associated factors. Together, these data demonstrate that HIV signaling activates members of the Rho GTPase family of cytoskeletal regulators that are required for optimal HIV infection of primary CD4+ T cells.

  5. Defective Dendrite Elongation but Normal Fertility in Mice Lacking the Rho-Like GTPase Activator Dbl

    PubMed Central

    Hirsch, Emilio; Pozzato, Michela; Vercelli, Alessandro; Barberis, Laura; Azzolino, Ornella; Russo, Chiara; Vanni, Cristina; Silengo, Lorenzo; Eva, Alessandra; Altruda, Fiorella

    2002-01-01

    Dbl is the prototype of a large family of GDP-GTP exchange factors for small GTPases of the Rho family. In vitro, Dbl is known to activate Rho and Cdc42 and to induce a transformed phenotype. Dbl is specifically expressed in brain and gonads, but its in vivo functions are largely unknown. To assess its role in neurogenesis and gametogenesis, targeted deletion of the murine Dbl gene was accomplished in embryonic stem cells. Dbl-null mice are viable and did not show either decreased reproductive performances or obvious neurological defects. Histological analysis of mutant testis showed normal morphology and unaltered proliferation and survival of spermatogonia. Dbl-null brains indicated a correct disposition of the major neural structures. Analysis of cortical stratification indicated that Dbl is not crucial for neuronal migration. However, in distinct populations of Dbl-null cortical pyramidal neurons, the length of dendrites was significantly reduced, suggesting a role for Dbl in dendrite elongation. PMID:11940671

  6. Swiprosin-1 stimulates cancer invasion and metastasis by increasing the Rho family of GTPase signaling

    PubMed Central

    Huh, Yun Hyun; Oh, Sena; Yeo, Yu Ra; Chae, In Hee; Kim, So Hee; Lee, Ji Shin; Yun, Sook Jung; Choi, Kyu Yeong; Ryu, Je-Hwang; Jun, Chang-Duk; Song, Woo Keun

    2015-01-01

    Ectopic expression of Swiprosin-1, an actin-binding protein (also known as EF hand domain containing 2; EFHD2), enhanced motile protrusions associated with actin, such as lamellipodia and membrane ruffles. Swiprosin-1 levels were increased in various human cancer tissues, particularly at highly invasive stages of malignant melanoma. Expression of Swiprosin-1 was correlated with that of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and induced by EGF. In a mouse metastasis model, Swiprosin-1 overexpression induced pulmonary metastasis whereas its knockdown led to marked inhibition of metastasis of highly invasive melanoma cells. Swiprosin-1 at the lamellipodia and membrane ruffles controlled the direction of cell protrusion and enhanced migration velocity through activating the Rho family of small GTPases, including Rac1, Cdc42 and RhoA. Our collective findings support the potential utility of Swiprosin-1 as a therapeutic target to prevent cancer invasion and metastasis. PMID:26079945

  7. Swiprosin-1 stimulates cancer invasion and metastasis by increasing the Rho family of GTPase signaling.

    PubMed

    Huh, Yun Hyun; Oh, Sena; Yeo, Yu Ra; Chae, In Hee; Kim, So Hee; Lee, Ji Shin; Yun, Sook Jung; Choi, Kyu Yeong; Ryu, Je-Hwang; Jun, Chang-Duk; Song, Woo Keun

    2015-05-30

    Ectopic expression of Swiprosin-1, an actin-binding protein (also known as EF hand domain containing 2; EFHD2), enhanced motile protrusions associated with actin, such as lamellipodia and membrane ruffles. Swiprosin-1 levels were increased in various human cancer tissues, particularly at highly invasive stages of malignant melanoma. Expression of Swiprosin-1 was correlated with that of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and induced by EGF. In a mouse metastasis model, Swiprosin-1 overexpression induced pulmonary metastasis whereas its knockdown led to marked inhibition of metastasis of highly invasive melanoma cells. Swiprosin-1 at the lamellipodia and membrane ruffles controlled the direction of cell protrusion and enhanced migration velocity through activating the Rho family of small GTPases, including Rac1, Cdc42 and RhoA. Our collective findings support the potential utility of Swiprosin-1 as a therapeutic target to prevent cancer invasion and metastasis.

  8. The polybasic region of Rho GTPases defines the cleavage by Yersinia enterocolitica outer protein T (YopT).

    PubMed

    Fueller, Florian; Schmidt, Gudula

    2008-08-01

    Pathogenic Yersinia strains evade the innate immune responses of the host by producing effector proteins ( Yersinia outer proteins [Yops]), which are directly injected into mammalian cells by a type III secretion system (TTSS). One of these effector proteins (YopT) disrupts the actin cytoskeleton of the host cell resulting in cell rounding. YopT is a cysteine protease that cleaves Rho proteins directly upstream of the post-translationally modified cysteine. Thereby, it releases the GTPases from the membrane leading to inactivation. Small GTPases are modified by isoprenylation of the cysteine of the CAAX box, cleavage of the -AAX tripeptide, and methylation of the cysteine. We have shown that isoprenylation and the endoproteolytic cleavage of the tripeptide of Rho GTPases are essential for YopT-induced cleavage, whereas carboxyl methylation is not required. In the present study, we post-translationally modified RhoA, Rac, Cdc42, and several mutants in vitro and characterized the YopT-induced cleavage with recombinant YopT. We show that farnesylated RhoA is a preferred substrate of YopT compared with the geranylgeranylated GTPase. Geranylgeranylated RhoA, however, is the preferred substrate for YopT-catalyzed cleavage with a threefold faster turnover rate over Rac and Cdc42. Moreover, our data indicate that the composition of the polybasic region of the GTPases defines the specificity and efficiency of the YopT-induced cleavage, and that a space between the polybasic stretch of amino acids at the C terminus and the CAAX box enhances the turnover rate of YopT-catalyzed cleavage.

  9. Activation of Dbl restores migration in polyamine-depleted intestinal epithelial cells via Rho-GTPases

    PubMed Central

    Bavaria, Mitulkumar N.; Bhattacharya, Sujoy; Johnson, Leonard R.

    2011-01-01

    Integrin binding to the extracellular matrix (ECM) activated Rho GTPases, Src, and focal adhesion kinase in intestinal epithelial cells (IEC)-6. Polyamine depletion inhibited activities of Rac1, RhoA, and Cdc42 and thereby migration. However, constitutively active (CA) Rac1 expression abolished the inhibitory effect of polyamine depletion, indicating that polyamines are involved in a process upstream of Rac1. In the present study, we examined the role of polyamines in the regulation of the guanine nucleotide exchange factor, diffuse B-cell lymphoma (Dbl), for Rho GTPases. Polyamine depletion decreased the level as well as the activation of Dbl protein. Dbl knockdown by siRNA altered cytoskeletal structure and decreased Rac1 activity and migration. Cells expressing CA-Dbl increased migration, Rac1 activity, and proliferation. CA-Dbl restored migration in polyamine-depleted cells by activating RhoA, Rac1, and Cdc42. CA-Dbl caused extensive reorganization of the F-actin cortex into stress fibers. Inhibition of Rac1 by NSC23766 significantly decreased migration of vector-transfected cells and CA-Dbl-transfected cells. However, the inhibition of migration was significantly higher in the vector-transfected cells compared with that seen in the CA-Dbl-transfected cells. Dbl localized in the perinuclear region in polyamine-depleted cells, whereas it localized with the stress fibers in control cells. CA-Dbl localized with stress fibers in both the control and polyamine-depleted cells. These results suggest that polyamines regulate the activation of Dbl, a membrane-proximal process upstream of Rac1. PMID:21372162

  10. START-GAP3/DLC3 is a GAP for RhoA and Cdc42 and is localized in focal adhesions regulating cell morphology

    SciTech Connect

    Kawai, Katsuhisa; Kiyota, Minoru; Seike, Junichi; Deki, Yuko; Yagisawa, Hitoshi

    2007-12-28

    In the human genome there are three genes encoding RhoGAPs that contain the START (steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR)-related lipid transfer)-domain. START-GAP3/DLC3 is a tumor suppressor gene similar to two other human START-GAPs known as DLC1 or DLC2. Although expression of START-GAP3/DLC3 inhibits the proliferation of cancer cells, its molecular function is not well understood. In this study we carried out biochemical characterization of START-GAP3/DLC3, and explored the effects of its expression on cell morphology and intracellular localization. We found that START-GAP3/DLC3 serves as a stimulator of PLC{delta}1 and as a GAP for both RhoA and Cdc42 in vitro. Moreover, we found that the GAP activity is responsible for morphological changes. The intracellular localization of endogenous START-GAP3/DLC3 was explored by immunocytochemistry and was revealed in focal adhesions. These results indicate that START-GAP3/DLC3 has characteristics similar to other START-GAPs and the START-GAP family seems to share common characteristics.

  11. Regulation of dendrite growth by the Cdc42 activator Zizimin1/Dock9 in hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Kuramoto, Kazuya; Negishi, Manabu; Katoh, Hironori

    2009-06-01

    Rho family small GTPases are key regulators of morphological changes in neurons. Cdc42, one of the most characterized members of the Rho family of proteins, is involved in axon and dendrite outgrowth through cytoskeletal reorganization. Recent studies have identified Zizimin1, a member of the Dock180-related family of proteins [also called CDM (Ced-5/Dock180/Myoblast city)-zizimin homology (CZH) proteins], as a specific guanine-nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) for Cdc42. However, the physiological function of Zizimin1 is totally unknown. In this study, we investigated the role of Zizimin1 in dendrite development in rat hippocampal neurons. In situ hybridization and Western blot analysis showed that Zizimin1 is strongly expressed in the developing brain including in the hippocampus and cerebral cortex in late developmental stages. Overexpression of wild-type Zizimin1 promoted dendrite growth, whereas knockdown of Zizimin1 by short hairpin RNA or expression of a mutant Zizimin1 lacking Cdc42 GEF activity suppressed dendrite growth in primary cultured rat hippocampal neurons. Both the N-terminal CZH1 domain, which is conserved among CZH proteins, and the Pleckstrin homology domain of Zizimin1 are involved in membrane localization, Cdc42 activation, and regulation of dendrite growth. Thus, these results suggest that Zizimin1 plays an important role in dendrite growth in hippocampal neurons through activation of Cdc42.

  12. Co-regulation of Caveolar and Cdc42-dependent Fluid Phase Endocytosis by Phosphocaveolin-1*

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Zhi-Jie; Singh, Raman Deep; Holicky, Eileen L.; Wheatley, Christine L.; Marks, David L.; Pagano, Richard E.

    2010-01-01

    Several clathrin-independent endocytosis mechanisms have been identified that can be distinguished by specific requirements for certain proteins, such as caveolin-1 (Cav1) and the Rho GTPases, RhoA and Cdc42, as well as by specific cargo. Some endocytic pathways may be co-regulated such that disruption of one pathway leads to the up-regulation of another; however, the underlying mechanisms for this are unclear. Cav1 has been reported to function as a guanine nucleotide dissociation inhibitor (GDI), which inhibits Cdc42 activation. We tested the hypothesis that Cav1 can regulate Cdc42-dependent, fluid phase endocytosis. We demonstrate that Cav1 overexpression decreases fluid phase endocytosis, whereas silencing of Cav1 enhances this pathway. Enhancement of Cav1 phosphorylation using a phosphatase inhibitor reduces Cdc42-regulated pinocytosis while stimulating caveolar endocytosis. Fluid phase endocytosis was inhibited by expression of a putative phosphomimetic mutant, Cav1-Y14E, but not by the phospho-deficient mutant, Cav1-Y14F. Overexpression of Cav2, or a Cav1 mutant in which the GDI region was altered to the corresponding sequence in Cav2, did not suppress fluid phase endocytosis. These results suggest that the Cav1 expression level and phosphorylation state regulates fluid phase endocytosis via the interaction between the Cav1 GDI region and Cdc42. These data define a novel molecular mechanism for co-regulation of two distinct clathrin-independent endocytic pathways. PMID:20228056

  13. Coxiella burnetii Phagocytosis Is Regulated by GTPases of the Rho Family and the RhoA Effectors mDia1 and ROCK

    PubMed Central

    Distel, Jesús S.; Aguilera, Milton O.; Colombo, María I.; Berón, Walter

    2015-01-01

    The GTPases belonging to the Rho family control the actin cytoskeleton rearrangements needed for particle internalization during phagocytosis. ROCK and mDia1 are downstream effectors of RhoA, a GTPase involved in that process. Coxiella burnetii, the etiologic agent of Q fever, is internalized by the host´s cells in an actin-dependent manner. Nevertheless, the molecular mechanism involved in this process has been poorly characterized. This work analyzes the role of different GTPases of the Rho family and some downstream effectors in the internalization of C. burnetii by phagocytic and non-phagocytic cells. The internalization of C. burnetii into HeLa and RAW cells was significantly inhibited when the cells were treated with Clostridium difficile Toxin B which irreversibly inactivates members of the Rho family. In addition, the internalization was reduced in HeLa cells that overexpressed the dominant negative mutants of RhoA, Rac1 or Cdc42 or that were knocked down for the Rho GTPases. The pharmacological inhibition or the knocking down of ROCK diminished bacterium internalization. Moreover, C. burnetii was less efficiently internalized in HeLa cells overexpressing mDia1-N1, a dominant negative mutant of mDia1, while the overexpression of the constitutively active mutant mDia1-ΔN3 increased bacteria uptake. Interestingly, when HeLa and RAW cells were infected, RhoA, Rac1 and mDia1 were recruited to membrane cell fractions. Our results suggest that the GTPases of the Rho family play an important role in C. burnetii phagocytosis in both HeLa and RAW cells. Additionally, we present evidence that ROCK and mDia1, which are downstream effectors of RhoA, are involved in that process. PMID:26674774

  14. Mechanisms of Cdc42-mediated rat MSC differentiation on micro/nano-textured topography.

    PubMed

    Li, Guangwen; Song, Yanyan; Shi, Mengqi; Du, Yuanhong; Wang, Wei; Zhang, Yumei

    2017-02-01

    Micro/nano-textured titanium surface topography promotes osteoblast differentiation and the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway. However, the response of rat bone mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) to micro/nano-textured topography, and the underlying mechanisms of its effects, are not well understood. We hypothesized that cell division cycle 42 protein (Cdc42), a key member of the Rho GTPases family, may regulate rat MSCs morphology and osteogenic differentiation by micro/nano-textured topography, and that crosstalk between Cdc42 and Wnt/β-catenin is the underlying mechanism. To confirm the hypothesis, we first tested rat MSCs' morphology, cytoskeleton, and osteogenic differentiation on micro/nano-textured topography. We then examined the cells' Wnt pathway and Cdc42 signaling activity. The results show that micro/nano-textured topography enhances MSCs' osteogenic differentiation. In addition, the cells' morphology and cytoskeletal reorganization were dramatically different on smooth surfaces and micropitted/nanotubular topography. Ligands of the canonical Wnt pathway, as well as accumulation of β-catenin in the nucleus, were up-regulated by micro/nano-textured topography. Cdc42 protein expression was markedly increased under these conditions; conversely, Cdc42 silencing significantly depressed the enhancement of MSCs osteogenic differentiation by micro/nano-textured topography. Moreover, Cdc42si attenuated p-GSK3β activation and resulted in β-catenin cytoplasmic degradation on the micro/nano-textured topography. Our results indicate that Cdc42 is a key modulator of rat MSCs morphology and cytoskeletal reorganization, and that crosstalk between Cdc42 and Wnt/β-catenin signaling though GSK3β regulates MSCs osteogenic differentiation by implant topographical cues.

  15. Posttranslational lipid modification of Rho family small GTPases.

    PubMed

    Mitin, Natalia; Roberts, Patrick J; Chenette, Emily J; Der, Channing J

    2012-01-01

    The Rho family comprises a major branch of the Ras superfamily of small GTPases. A majority of Rho GTPases are synthesized as inactive, cytosolic proteins. They then undergo posttranslational modification by isoprenoid or fatty acid lipids, and together with additional carboxyl-terminal sequences target Rho GTPases to specific membrane and subcellular compartments essential for function. We summarize the use of biochemical and cellular assays and pharmacologic inhibitors instrumental for the study of the role of posttranslational lipid modifications and processing in Rho GTPase biology.

  16. Signaling through the small G-protein Cdc42 is involved in insulin-like growth factor-I resistance in aging articular chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Fortier, Lisa A; Miller, Brian J

    2006-08-01

    During aging, chondrocytes become unresponsive to insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I). This study examined the role of Cdc42 (cell-division-cycle 42) in IGF-I signaling during aging. Experiments were performed using cartilage and chondrocytes isolated from horses ages 1 day-25 years. Northern analysis was used to examine expression of the small GTPases Cdc42, Rac, and RhoA. Western analysis was utilized to assess total Cdc42 (GTP + GDP-bound); active, GTP-Cdc42 was assessed using a pulldown assay with Western analysis. GTP-Cdc42 was also measured following IGF-I treatment. Gene expression for Cdc42 and Rac were decreased in mature samples, but there was no difference in total Cdc42 (GTP + GDP-bound) protein expression due to age. GTP-Cdc42 was significantly greater in prepubescent samples compared to other age groups. IGF-I diminished the GTP-bound state of Cdc42 in prepubescent chondrocytes; however, this effect was lost during aging. No differences in results were observed due to sample type; that is, cartilage tissues versus isolated chondrocytes. These studies suggest that loss of IGF-I-mediated regulation of Cdc42 activation may be a mechanism for the chondrocyte unresponsive state during aging. Further, the activation state of Cdc42, measured in native and IGF-I-treated cartilage tissue for the first time, is similar to that of isolated chondrocytes, indicating that the activation state of small G-proteins is not affected by isolation of chondrocytes from the extracellular matrix. Continued studies will identify the upstream regulators of Cdc42, which will further elucidate the molecular mechanism of IGF-I resistance during aging thereby providing insight into targeted strategies for age-related osteoarthritis.

  17. TDP-43 depletion induces neuronal cell damage through dysregulation of Rho family GTPases.

    PubMed

    Iguchi, Yohei; Katsuno, Masahisa; Niwa, Jun-ichi; Yamada, Shin-ichi; Sone, Jun; Waza, Masahiro; Adachi, Hiroaki; Tanaka, Fumiaki; Nagata, Koh-ichi; Arimura, Nariko; Watanabe, Takashi; Kaibuchi, Kozo; Sobue, Gen

    2009-08-14

    The 43-kDa TAR DNA-binding protein (TDP-43) is known to be a major component of the ubiquitinated inclusions characteristic of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and frontotemporal lobar degeneration with ubiquitin-positive inclusions. Although TDP-43 is a nuclear protein, it disappears from the nucleus of affected neurons and glial cells, implicating TDP-43 loss of function in the pathogenesis of neurodegeneration. Here we show that the knockdown of TDP-43 in differentiated Neuro-2a cells inhibited neurite outgrowth and induced cell death. In knockdown cells, the Rho family members RhoA, Rac1, and Cdc42 GTPases were inactivated, and membrane localization of these molecules was reduced. In addition, TDP-43 depletion significantly suppressed protein geranylgeranylation, a key regulating factor of Rho family activity and intracellular localization. In contrast, overexpression of TDP-43 mitigated the cellular damage caused by pharmacological inhibition of geranylgeranylation. Furthermore administration of geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate partially restored cell viability and neurite outgrowth in TDP-43 knockdown cells. In summary, our data suggest that TDP-43 plays a key role in the maintenance of neuronal cell morphology and survival possibly through protein geranylgeranylation of Rho family GTPases.

  18. Epithelial junction formation requires confinement of Cdc42 activity by a novel SH3BP1 complex

    PubMed Central

    Elbediwy, Ahmed; Zihni, Ceniz; Terry, Stephen J.; Clark, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Epithelial cell–cell adhesion and morphogenesis require dynamic control of actin-driven membrane remodeling. The Rho guanosine triphosphatase (GTPase) Cdc42 regulates sequential molecular processes during cell–cell junction formation; hence, mechanisms must exist that inactivate Cdc42 in a temporally and spatially controlled manner. In this paper, we identify SH3BP1, a GTPase-activating protein for Cdc42 and Rac, as a regulator of junction assembly and epithelial morphogenesis using a functional small interfering ribonucleic acid screen. Depletion of SH3BP1 resulted in loss of spatial control of Cdc42 activity, stalled membrane remodeling, and enhanced growth of filopodia. SH3BP1 formed a complex with JACOP/paracingulin, a junctional adaptor, and CD2AP, a scaffolding protein; both were required for normal Cdc42 signaling and junction formation. The filamentous actin–capping protein CapZ also associated with the SH3BP1 complex and was required for control of actin remodeling. Epithelial junction formation and morphogenesis thus require a dual activity complex, containing SH3BP1 and CapZ, that is recruited to sites of active membrane remodeling to guide Cdc42 signaling and cytoskeletal dynamics. PMID:22891260

  19. [Fret-based single-molecule probes for monitoring induced activation of Rac, Cdc42 signaling pathways in living cells].

    PubMed

    Sun, Bin; Ren, Dao Quan; Zhang, Qing Yan; Qiu, Yi Lan; Liu, Ru Shi; Guo, Xiang Rong

    2008-10-01

    Rho GTPases, including Rac1, Cdc42, play a critical role in the regulation of a variety of cellular processes such as cell morphology, cell migration, transcriptional activation and gene expression. We constructed several FRET-based single-molecule probes containing red fluorescent protein dsRed1, cyan fluorescent protein ECFP, the GTPase binding domain of the effector, Pak1 or N-WASP, and Rac1 or Cdc42. Rac1 and Cdc42 signaling pathways were activated in transfected cells by the inducer, insulin or bradykinin respectively. In vitro fluorescent spectroscopy assays showed that FRET phenomena were observed in transfected NIH3T3 and Hela cells. For all 3 signaling pathways in NIH3T3 cells, the values of FRET efficiency reached the highest after induction for 5 min, but the increasing extents of the values of FRET efficiency varied in 3 signaling pathways. The values of FRET efficiency decreased with the extention of the induction time, but differed significantly in the decreasing speed for the signaling pathways. Rac1 and Cdc42 activation assays indicated that Rac1 and Cdc42 were in the activated state (GTP-bound) in the induced cells. Their relative activated activities in the cells induced for different time were consistent with the values of FRET efficiency. The activated Rac1, Cdc42 signaling pathways led to the formation of lamelliopodia and filopodia in the transfected cells respectively. The results showed that these single-molecule probes could be used to directly monitor the spatial and temporal imaging of the induced activation of the signaling pathways in living cells. With these single-molecule probes, the GEF or GAP activities of putative regulatory proteins for Rac1 and Cdc42 were analyzed and judged, thus greatly simplifying the currently-used methods for identifying the regulatory proteins for Rho GTPases.

  20. Mechanism of IRSp53 inhibition and combinatorial activation by Cdc42 and downstream effectors

    PubMed Central

    Kast, David J; Yang, Changsong; Disanza, Andrea; Boczkowska, Malgorzata; Madasu, Yadaiah; Scita, Giorgio; Svitkina, Tatyana; Dominguez, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    The Rho family GTPase effector IRSp53 has essential roles in filopodia formation and neuronal development, but its regulatory mechanism is poorly understood. IRSp53 contains a membrane-binding BAR domain followed by an unconventional CRIB motif that overlaps with a proline-rich region (CRIB–PR) and an SH3 domain that recruits actin cytoskeleton effectors. Using a fluorescence reporter assay, we show that human IRSp53 adopts a closed inactive conformation that opens synergistically with the binding of human Cdc42 to the CRIB–PR and effector proteins, such as the tumor-promoting factor Eps8, to the SH3 domain. The crystal structure of Cdc42 bound to the CRIB–PR reveals a new mode of effector binding to Rho family GTPases. Structure-inspired mutations disrupt autoinhibition and Cdc42 binding in vitro and decouple Cdc42- and IRSp53-dependent filopodia formation in cells. The data support a combinatorial mechanism of IRSp53 activation. PMID:24584464

  1. GTPase regulation: getting aRnd Rock and Rho inhibition.

    PubMed

    Chardin, Pierre

    2003-09-16

    Rnd proteins are atypical members of the Rho small G protein family that inhibit the formation of actomyosin contractile fibers via activation of RhoGAPs and inhibition of a Rho effector, the Ser/Thr kinase Rock. These mechanisms might be used to fine-tune Rho GTPase inhibition locally at sites where particular actin structures need to be made.

  2. Integrin-linked kinase activity regulates Rac- and Cdc42-mediated actin cytoskeleton reorganization via alpha-PIX.

    PubMed

    Filipenko, Nolan R; Attwell, Sarah; Roskelley, Calvin; Dedhar, Shoukat

    2005-09-01

    Cell spreading and migration are regulated in a Rho family GTPase-dependent manner by growth factors and integrin-mediated cell-extracellular matrix (ECM) interactions. The molecular mechanisms involved in the ECM- and growth factor-mediated activation of these small GTPases remain unclear. In the present study, we demonstrate that integrin-linked kinase (ILK), which is a focal adhesion protein activated by both ECM and growth factors, is required for the activation of Rac and Cdc42 in epithelial cells. Ectopic expression of active ILK in mammary epithelial cells induces dramatic reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton and promotes rapid cell spreading on fibronectin. These effects are associated with constitutive activation of both Rac and Cdc42, but not Rho. The use of ILK siRNA or small molecule inhibitors to inhibit ILK expression and kinase activity, respectively, results in diminished cell spreading and actin cytoskeleton reorganization, concomitant with a reduction in Rac and Cdc42 activation. Studies into the mechanism of ILK-mediated Rac activation suggest an important role for the ILK-beta-parvin interaction and the activity of the Rac/Cdc42-specific guanine nucleotide exchange factor alpha-PIX downstream of ILK. Taken together, these data demonstrate an essential role of ILK kinase activity in Rac- and Cdc42-mediated actin cytoskeleton reorganization in epithelial cells, further solidifying a role for ILK in the regulation of cancer cell motility and invasiveness.

  3. The structure of FMNL2-Cdc42 yields insights into the mechanism of lamellipodia and filopodia formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kühn, Sonja; Erdmann, Constanze; Kage, Frieda; Block, Jennifer; Schwenkmezger, Lisa; Steffen, Anika; Rottner, Klemens; Geyer, Matthias

    2015-05-01

    Formins are actin polymerization factors that elongate unbranched actin filaments at the barbed end. Rho family GTPases activate Diaphanous-related formins through the relief of an autoregulatory interaction. The crystal structures of the N-terminal domains of human FMNL1 and FMNL2 in complex with active Cdc42 show that Cdc42 mediates contacts with all five armadillo repeats of the formin with specific interactions formed by the Rho-GTPase insert helix. Mutation of three residues within Rac1 results in a gain-of-function mutation for FMNL2 binding and reconstitution of the Cdc42 phenotype in vivo. Dimerization of FMNL1 through a parallel coiled coil segment leads to formation of an umbrella-shaped structure that--together with Cdc42--spans more than 15 nm in diameter. The two interacting FMNL-Cdc42 heterodimers expose six membrane interaction motifs on a convex protein surface, the assembly of which may facilitate actin filament elongation at the leading edge of lamellipodia and filopodia.

  4. The structure of FMNL2–Cdc42 yields insights into the mechanism of lamellipodia and filopodia formation

    PubMed Central

    Kühn, Sonja; Erdmann, Constanze; Kage, Frieda; Block, Jennifer; Schwenkmezger, Lisa; Steffen, Anika; Rottner, Klemens; Geyer, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    Formins are actin polymerization factors that elongate unbranched actin filaments at the barbed end. Rho family GTPases activate Diaphanous-related formins through the relief of an autoregulatory interaction. The crystal structures of the N-terminal domains of human FMNL1 and FMNL2 in complex with active Cdc42 show that Cdc42 mediates contacts with all five armadillo repeats of the formin with specific interactions formed by the Rho-GTPase insert helix. Mutation of three residues within Rac1 results in a gain-of-function mutation for FMNL2 binding and reconstitution of the Cdc42 phenotype in vivo. Dimerization of FMNL1 through a parallel coiled coil segment leads to formation of an umbrella-shaped structure that—together with Cdc42—spans more than 15 nm in diameter. The two interacting FMNL–Cdc42 heterodimers expose six membrane interaction motifs on a convex protein surface, the assembly of which may facilitate actin filament elongation at the leading edge of lamellipodia and filopodia. PMID:25963737

  5. Regulation of phagocytosis by Rho GTPases.

    PubMed

    Mao, Yingyu; Finnemann, Silvia C

    2015-01-01

    Phagocytosis is defined as a cellular uptake pathway for particles of greater than 0.5 μm in diameter. Particle clearance by phagocytosis is of critical importance for tissue health and homeostasis. The ultimate goal of anti-pathogen phagocytosis is to destroy engulfed bacteria or fungi and to stimulate cell-cell signaling that mount an efficient immune defense. In contrast, clearance phagocytosis of apoptotic cells and cell debris is anti-inflammatory. High capacity clearance phagocytosis pathways are available to professional phagocytes of the immune system and the retina. Additionally, a low capacity, so-called bystander phagocytic pathway is available to most other cell types. Different phagocytic pathways are stimulated by particle ligation of distinct surface receptors but all forms of phagocytosis require F-actin recruitment beneath tethered particles and F-actin re-arrangement promoting engulfment, which are controlled by Rho family GTPases. The specificity of Rho GTPase activity during the different forms of phagocytosis by mammalian cells is the subject of this review.

  6. Rho GTPases and Regulation of Cell Migration and Polarization in Human Corneal Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Aihua; Toh, Li Xian; Gan, Kah Hui; Lee, Khee Jin Ryan; Manser, Edward; Tong, Louis

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Epithelial cell migration is required for regeneration of tissues and can be defective in a number of ocular surface diseases. This study aimed to determine the expression pattern of Rho family small G-proteins in human corneal epithelial cells to test their requirement in directional cell migration. Methods Rho family small G-protein expression was assessed by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Dominant-inhibitory constructs encoding Rho proteins or Rho protein targeting small interfering RNA were transfected into human corneal epithelial large T antigen cells, and wound closure rate were evaluated by scratch wounding assay, and a complementary non-traumatic cell migration assay. Immunofluorescence staining was performed to study cell polarization and to assess Cdc42 downstream effector. Results Cdc42, Chp, Rac1, RhoA, TC10 and TCL were expressed in human corneal epithelial cells. Among them, Cdc42 and TCL were found to significantly affect cell migration in monolayer scratch assays. These results were confirmed through the use of validated siRNAs directed to Cdc42 and TCL. Scramble siRNA transfected cells had high percentage of polarized cells than Cdc42 or TCL siRNA transfected cells at the wound edge. We showed that the Cdc42-specific effector p21-activated kinase 4 localized predominantly to cell-cell junctions in cell monolayers, but failed to translocate to the leading edge in Cdc42 siRNA transfected cells after monolayer wounding. Conclusion Rho proteins expressed in cultured human corneal epithelial cells, and Cdc42, TCL facilitate two-dimensional cell migration in-vitro. Although silencing of Cdc42 and TCL did not noticeably affect the appearance of cell adhesions at the leading edge, the slower migration of these cells indicates both GTP-binding proteins play important roles in promoting cell movement of human corneal epithelial cells. PMID:24130842

  7. Determination of in vivo dissociation constant, KD, of Cdc42-effector complexes in live mammalian cells using single wavelength fluorescence cross-correlation spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Sudhaharan, Thankiah; Liu, Ping; Foo, Yong Hwee; Bu, Wenyu; Lim, Kim Buay; Wohland, Thorsten; Ahmed, Sohail

    2009-05-15

    The RhoGTPase Cdc42 coordinates cell morphogenesis, cell cycle, and cell polarity decisions downstream of membrane-bound receptors through distinct effector pathways. Cdc42-effector protein interactions represent important elements of cell signaling pathways that regulate cell biology in systems as diverse as yeast and humans. To derive mechanistic insights into cell signaling pathways, it is vital that we generate quantitative data from in vivo systems. We need to be able to measure parameters such as protein concentrations, rates of diffusion, and dissociation constants (K(D)) of protein-protein interactions in vivo. Here we show how single wavelength fluorescence cross-correlation spectroscopy in combination with Förster resonance energy transfer analysis can be used to determine K(D) of Cdc42-effector interactions in live mammalian cells. Constructs encoding green fluorescent protein or monomeric red fluorescent protein fusion proteins of Cdc42, an effector domain (CRIB), and two effectors, neural Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein (N-WASP) and insulin receptor substrate protein (IRSp53), were expressed as pairs in Chinese hamster ovary cells, and concentrations of free protein as well as complexed protein were determined. The measured K(D) for Cdc42V12-N-WASP, Cdc42V12-CRIB, and Cdc42V12-IRSp53 was 27, 250, and 391 nm, respectively. The determination of K(D) for Cdc42-effector interactions opens the way to describe cell signaling pathways quantitatively in vivo in mammalian cells.

  8. Tinman/Nkx2-5 acts via miR-1 and upstream of Cdc42 to regulate heart function across species

    PubMed Central

    Wythe, Joshua D.; Liu, Jiandong; Cartry, Jerome; Vogler, Georg; Mohapatra, Bhagyalaxmi; Otway, Robyn T.; Huang, Yu; King, Isabelle N.; Maillet, Marjorie; Zheng, Yi; Crawley, Timothy; Taghli-Lamallem, Ouarda; Semsarian, Christopher; Dunwoodie, Sally; Winlaw, David; Harvey, Richard P.; Fatkin, Diane; Towbin, Jeffrey A.; Molkentin, Jeffery D.; Srivastava, Deepak; Ocorr, Karen; Bruneau, Benoit G.

    2011-01-01

    Unraveling the gene regulatory networks that govern development and function of the mammalian heart is critical for the rational design of therapeutic interventions in human heart disease. Using the Drosophila heart as a platform for identifying novel gene interactions leading to heart disease, we found that the Rho-GTPase Cdc42 cooperates with the cardiac transcription factor Tinman/Nkx2-5. Compound Cdc42, tinman heterozygous mutant flies exhibited impaired cardiac output and altered myofibrillar architecture, and adult heart–specific interference with Cdc42 function is sufficient to cause these same defects. We also identified K+ channels, encoded by dSUR and slowpoke, as potential effectors of the Cdc42–Tinman interaction. To determine whether a Cdc42–Nkx2-5 interaction is conserved in the mammalian heart, we examined compound heterozygous mutant mice and found conduction system and cardiac output defects. In exploring the mechanism of Nkx2-5 interaction with Cdc42, we demonstrated that mouse Cdc42 was a target of, and negatively regulated by miR-1, which itself was negatively regulated by Nkx2-5 in the mouse heart and by Tinman in the fly heart. We conclude that Cdc42 plays a conserved role in regulating heart function and is an indirect target of Tinman/Nkx2-5 via miR-1. PMID:21690310

  9. Hepatitis B Virus X Protein Stimulates Proliferation, Wound Closure and Inhibits Apoptosis of HuH-7 Cells via CDC42.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yongru; Qi, Yingzi; Luo, Jing; Yang, Jing; Xie, Qi; Deng, Chen; Su, Na; Wei, Wei; Shi, Deshun; Xu, Feng; Li, Xiangping; Xu, Ping

    2017-03-08

    Chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection has been considered as the major cause of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Hepatitis B virus X protein (HBx) has been reported to be oncogenic. The underlying mechanisms of HBV-related HCC are not fully understood, and the role played by the HBx protein in HBV induced carcinogenesis remains controversial. CDC42, a member of the Rho GTPase family, has been reported to be overexpressed in several different cancers, including HBV-related HCC. However, the specific role of CDC42 in HCC development remains unclear. Here, we investigated the cellular mechanisms by which CDC42 was responsible for the higher proliferation of HuH-7 cells mediated by HBx. We found that the expression level of CDC42 and its activity were significantly increased in HuH-7-HBx cells. The deficiency of CDC42 using the CRISPR/Cas9 system and inhibition by specific inhibitor CASIN led to the reduction of HBx-mediated proliferation. Furthermore, we observed that IQ Motif Containing GTPase Activating Protein 1 (IQGAP1), the downstream mediator of the CDC42 pathway, might be involved in the carcinogenesis induced by HBx. Therefore, the HBx/CDC42/IQGAP1 signaling pathway may potentially play an important role in HBx-mediated carcinogenesis.

  10. Hepatitis B Virus X Protein Stimulates Proliferation, Wound Closure and Inhibits Apoptosis of HuH-7 Cells via CDC42

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yongru; Qi, Yingzi; Luo, Jing; Yang, Jing; Xie, Qi; Deng, Chen; Su, Na; Wei, Wei; Shi, Deshun; Xu, Feng; Li, Xiangping; Xu, Ping

    2017-01-01

    Chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection has been considered as the major cause of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Hepatitis B virus X protein (HBx) has been reported to be oncogenic. The underlying mechanisms of HBV-related HCC are not fully understood, and the role played by the HBx protein in HBV induced carcinogenesis remains controversial. CDC42, a member of the Rho GTPase family, has been reported to be overexpressed in several different cancers, including HBV-related HCC. However, the specific role of CDC42 in HCC development remains unclear. Here, we investigated the cellular mechanisms by which CDC42 was responsible for the higher proliferation of HuH-7 cells mediated by HBx. We found that the expression level of CDC42 and its activity were significantly increased in HuH-7-HBx cells. The deficiency of CDC42 using the CRISPR/Cas9 system and inhibition by specific inhibitor CASIN led to the reduction of HBx-mediated proliferation. Furthermore, we observed that IQ Motif Containing GTPase Activating Protein 1 (IQGAP1), the downstream mediator of the CDC42 pathway, might be involved in the carcinogenesis induced by HBx. Therefore, the HBx/CDC42/IQGAP1 signaling pathway may potentially play an important role in HBx-mediated carcinogenesis. PMID:28282856

  11. Inhibition of Cdc42 is essential for Mig-6 suppression of cell migration induced by EGF.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xinni; Niu, MengMeng; Chen, Deshi; Chen, Jing; Cao, Yang; Li, Xiaorong; Ying, Haoqiang; Bergholz, Johann; Zhang, Yujun; Xiao, Zhi-Xiong

    2016-08-02

    The adaptor protein Mig-6 is a negative regulator of EGF signaling. It is shown that Mig-6 inhibits cell migration via direct interaction with the ErbB receptors, thereby inhibiting cross-phosphorylation or targeting the receptors for degradation. Mig-6 has also been shown to bind to and inhibit the Rho GTPase Cdc42 to suppress cytoskeletal rearrangement. However, the molecular mechanism(s) by which Mig-6 inhibits cell migration via Cdc42 is still not entirely clear. Here, we show that Mig-6 binding to Cdc42 is necessary and sufficient to inhibit EGF-induced filopodia formation and migration. This binding, mediated by four specific residues (I11, R12, M26, R30) in the Mig-6 CRIB domain, is essential for Mig-6 function. In addition, ectopic expression of Cdc42 reverses Mig-6 inhibition of cell migration. Mig-6 CRIB domain, alone, is sufficient to inhibit cell migration. Conversely, Mig-6 binding to EGFR is dispensable for Mig-6-mediated inhibition of cell migration. Moreover, we found that decreased Mig-6 expression correlates with cancer progression in breast and prostate cancers. Together, our results demonstrate that Mig-6 inhibition of Cdc42 signaling is critical in Mig-6 function to suppress cell migration and that dysregulation of this pathway may play a critical role in cancer development.

  12. Inhibition of Cdc42 is essential for Mig-6 suppression of cell migration induced by EGF

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Deshi; Chen, Jing; Cao, Yang; Ying, Haoqiang; Bergholz, Johann; Zhang, Yujun; Xiao, Zhi-Xiong

    2016-01-01

    The adaptor protein Mig-6 is a negative regulator of EGF signaling. It is shown that Mig-6 inhibits cell migration via direct interaction with the ErbB receptors, thereby inhibiting cross-phosphorylation or targeting the receptors for degradation. Mig-6 has also been shown to bind to and inhibit the Rho GTPase Cdc42 to suppress cytoskeletal rearrangement. However, the molecular mechanism(s) by which Mig-6 inhibits cell migration via Cdc42 is still not entirely clear. Here, we show that Mig-6 binding to Cdc42 is necessary and sufficient to inhibit EGF-induced filopodia formation and migration. This binding, mediated by four specific residues (I11, R12, M26, R30) in the Mig-6 CRIB domain, is essential for Mig-6 function. In addition, ectopic expression of Cdc42 reverses Mig-6 inhibition of cell migration. Mig-6 CRIB domain, alone, is sufficient to inhibit cell migration. Conversely, Mig-6 binding to EGFR is dispensable for Mig-6-mediated inhibition of cell migration. Moreover, we found that decreased Mig-6 expression correlates with cancer progression in breast and prostate cancers. Together, our results demonstrate that Mig-6 inhibition of Cdc42 signaling is critical in Mig-6 function to suppress cell migration and that dysregulation of this pathway may play a critical role in cancer development. PMID:27341132

  13. Dendritic spine geometry can localize GTPase signaling in neurons

    PubMed Central

    Ramirez, Samuel A.; Raghavachari, Sridhar; Lew, Daniel J.

    2015-01-01

    Dendritic spines are the postsynaptic terminals of most excitatory synapses in the mammalian brain. Learning and memory are associated with long-lasting structural remodeling of dendritic spines through an actin-mediated process regulated by the Rho-family GTPases RhoA, Rac, and Cdc42. These GTPases undergo sustained activation after synaptic stimulation, but whereas Rho activity can spread from the stimulated spine, Cdc42 activity remains localized to the stimulated spine. Because Cdc42 itself diffuses rapidly in and out of the spine, the basis for the retention of Cdc42 activity in the stimulated spine long after synaptic stimulation has ceased is unclear. Here we model the spread of Cdc42 activation at dendritic spines by means of reaction-diffusion equations solved on spine-like geometries. Excitable behavior arising from positive feedback in Cdc42 activation leads to spreading waves of Cdc42 activity. However, because of the very narrow neck of the dendritic spine, wave propagation is halted through a phenomenon we term geometrical wave-pinning. We show that this can account for the localization of Cdc42 activity in the stimulated spine, and, of interest, retention is enhanced by high diffusivity of Cdc42. Our findings are broadly applicable to other instances of signaling in extreme geometries, including filopodia and primary cilia. PMID:26337387

  14. Myristoylated Alanine-Rich Protein Kinase Substrate (MARCKS) Regulates Small GTPase Rac1 and Cdc42 Activity and Is a Critical Mediator of Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Migration in Intimal Hyperplasia Formation.

    PubMed

    Yu, Dan; Makkar, George; Strickland, Dudley K; Blanpied, Thomas A; Stumpo, Deborah J; Blackshear, Perry J; Sarkar, Rajabrata; Monahan, Thomas S

    2015-10-08

    Transcription of the myristoylated alanine-rich C kinase substrate (MARCKS) is upregulated in animal models of intimal hyperplasia. MARCKS knockdown inhibits vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) migration in vitro; however, the mechanism is as yet unknown. We sought to elucidate the mechanism of MARCKS-mediated motility and determine whether MARCKS knockdown reduces intimal hyperplasia formation in vivo. MARCKS knockdown blocked platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-induced translocation of cortactin to the cell cortex, impaired both lamellipodia and filopodia formation, and attenuated motility of human coronary artery smooth muscle cells (CASMCs). Activation of the small GTPases, Rac1 and Cdc42, was prevented by MARCKS knockdown. Phosphorylation of MARCKS resulted in a transient shift of MARCKS from the plasma membrane to the cytosol. MARCKS knockdown significantly decreased membrane-associated phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2) levels. Cotransfection with an intact, unphosphorylated MARCKS, which has a high binding affinity for PIP2, restored membrane-associated PIP2 levels and was indispensable for activation of Rac1 and Cdc42 and, ultimately, VSMC migration. Overexpression of MARCKS in differentiated VSMCs increased membrane PIP2 abundance, Rac1 and Cdc42 activity, and cell motility. MARCKS protein was upregulated early in the development of intimal hyperplasia in the murine carotid ligation model. Decreased MARKCS expression, but not total knockdown, attenuated intimal hyperplasia formation. MARCKS upregulation increases VSMC motility by activation of Rac1 and Cdc42. These effects are mediated by MARCKS sequestering PIP2 at the plasma membrane. This study delineates a novel mechanism for MARCKS-mediated VSMC migration and supports the rational for MARCKS knockdown to prevent intimal hyperplasia. © 2015 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley Blackwell.

  15. Cytoskeletal remodeling via Rho GTPases during oxidative and thermal stress in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Patel, Rahul; Sriramoji, Sindhu; Marucci, Marena; Aziz, Ibrahim; Shah, Sejal; Sesti, Federico

    2017-10-21

    Biological systems are highly sensitive to changes in their environment. Indeed, the molecular basis of the environmental stress response suggests that the specialized stress responses share more commonalities than previously believed. Here, we used the nematode C. elegans to gain insight into the role of Rho signaling during two common environmental challenges, oxidative and thermal stress. In response to heat shock (HS), wild type (N2) worms demonstrated reduced viability which was rescued by genetic suppression of CDC42 and RHO-1. Visualization of F-actin by phalloidin-rhodamine underscored a strict correlation between the levels of F-actin following GTPase suppression and survival. Additionally, genetic ablation of OSG-1, a Guanine Nucleotide Exchange Factor (GEF) previously implicated in oxidative stress, was associated with constitutively lower levels of F-actin and increased mortality. However, upon an oxidative insult F-actin stability decreased in N2 worms, a rescue of this affect was observed in OSG-1 null worms, consistent with the resistance exhibited by these worms to oxidative stress (OS). Together these data suggest that during conditions of thermal or oxidative stress Rho signaling promotes vulnerability by altering actin dynamics. Thus, the stability of the actin cytoskeleton, in part through a conserved mechanism mediated by Rho signaling, is a crucial factor for the cell's survival to environmental challenges. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Multiple cytoskeletal pathways and PI3K signaling mediate CDC-42-induced neuronal protrusion in C. elegans.

    PubMed

    Alan, Jamie K; Struckhoff, Eric C; Lundquist, Erik A

    2013-01-01

    Rho GTPases are key regulators of cellular protrusion and are involved in many developmental events including axon guidance during nervous system development. Rho GTPase pathways display functional redundancy in developmental events, including axon guidance. Therefore, their roles can often be masked when using simple loss-of-function genetic approaches. As a complement to loss-of-function genetics, we constructed a constitutively activated CDC-42(G12V) expressed in C. elegans neurons. CDC-42(G12V) drove the formation of ectopic lamellipodial and filopodial protrusions in the PDE neurons, which resembled protrusions normally found on migrating growth cones of axons. We then used a candidate gene approach to identify molecules that mediate CDC-42(G12V)-induced ectopic protrusions by determining if loss of function of the genes could suppress CDC-42(G12V). Using this approach, we identified 3 cytoskeletal pathways previously implicated in axon guidance, the Arp2/3 complex, UNC-115/abLIM, and UNC-43/Ena. We also identified the Nck-interacting kinase MIG-15/NIK and p21-activated kinases (PAKs), also implicated in axon guidance. Finally, PI3K signaling was required, specifically the Rictor/mTORC2 branch but not the mTORC1 branch that has been implicated in other aspects of PI3K signaling including stress and aging. Our results indicate that multiple pathways can mediate CDC-42-induced neuronal protrusions that might be relevant to growth cone protrusions during axon pathfinding. Each of these pathways involves Rac GTPases, which might serve to integrate the pathways and coordinate the multiple CDC-42 pathways. These pathways might be relevant to developmental events such as axon pathfinding as well as disease states such as metastatic melanoma.

  17. Cdc42p-Interacting Protein Bem4p Regulates the Filamentous-Growth Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Pitoniak, Andrew; Chavel, Colin A.; Chow, Jacky; Smith, Jeremy; Camara, Diawoye; Karunanithi, Sheelarani; Li, Boyang; Wolfe, Kennith H.

    2014-01-01

    The ubiquitous Rho (Ras homology) GTPase Cdc42p can function in different settings to regulate cell polarity and cellular signaling. How Cdc42p and other proteins are directed to function in a particular context remains unclear. We show that the Cdc42p-interacting protein Bem4p regulates the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway that controls filamentous growth in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Bem4p controlled the filamentous-growth pathway but not other MAPK pathways (mating or high-osmolarity glycerol response [HOG]) that also require Cdc42p and other shared components. Bem4p associated with the plasma membrane (PM) protein, Sho1p, to regulate MAPK activity and cell polarization under nutrient-limiting conditions that favor filamentous growth. Bem4p also interacted with the major activator of Cdc42p, the guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) Cdc24p, which we show also regulates the filamentous-growth pathway. Bem4p interacted with the pleckstrin homology (PH) domain of Cdc24p, which functions in an autoinhibitory capacity, and was required, along with other pathway regulators, to maintain Cdc24p at polarized sites during filamentous growth. Bem4p also interacted with the MAPK kinase kinase (MAPKKK) Ste11p. Thus, Bem4p is a new regulator of the filamentous-growth MAPK pathway and binds to general proteins, like Cdc42p and Ste11p, to promote a pathway-specific response. PMID:25384973

  18. ZDS1 and ZDS2, genes whose products may regulate Cdc42p in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Bi, E; Pringle, J R

    1996-01-01

    A genetic screen for GTPase-activating proteins (GAPs) or other negative regulators of the Rac/Rho family GTPase Cdc42p in Saccharomyces cerevisiae identified ZDS1, a gene encoding a protein of 915 amino acids. Sequence from the yeast genome project identified a homolog, ZDS2, whose predicted product of 942 amino acids is 38% identical in sequence to Zds1p. Zds1p and Zds2p have no detectable homology to known Rho-GAPs or to other known proteins. However, by several assays, it appears that overexpression of either Zds1p or Zds2p decreases the level of Cdc42p activity. Deletion analysis also suggests that Zds1p and Zds2p are at least partially overlapping in function. Deletion of ZDS2 produced no obvious phenotype, and deletion of ZDS1 produced no obvious phenotype other than a mild effect on cell shape. However, the zds1 zds2 double mutant grew slowly with an apparent mitotic delay and produced elongated cells and buds with other evidence of abnormal morphogenesis. A glutathione S-transferase-Zds1p fusion protein that fully complemented the double mutant localized to presumptive bud sites and the tips of small buds. The similarity of this localization to that of Cdc42p suggests that Zds1p may interact directly with Cdc42p. As ZDS1 and ZDS2 have recently been identified also by numerous other groups studying a wide range of biological phenomena, the roles of Cdc42p in intracellular signaling may be more diverse than has previously been appreciated. PMID:8816439

  19. RAS and RHO Families of GTPases Directly Regulate Distinct Phosphoinositide 3-Kinase Isoforms

    PubMed Central

    Fritsch, Ralph; de Krijger, Inge; Fritsch, Kornelia; George, Roger; Reason, Beth; Kumar, Madhu S.; Diefenbacher, Markus; Stamp, Gordon; Downward, Julian

    2013-01-01

    Summary RAS proteins are important direct activators of p110α, p110γ, and p110δ type I phosphoinositide 3-kinases (PI3Ks), interacting via an amino-terminal RAS-binding domain (RBD). Here, we investigate the regulation of the ubiquitous p110β isoform of PI3K, implicated in G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) signaling, PTEN-loss-driven cancers, and thrombocyte function. Unexpectedly, RAS is unable to interact with p110β, but instead RAC1 and CDC42 from the RHO subfamily of small GTPases bind and activate p110β via its RBD. In fibroblasts, GPCRs couple to PI3K through Dock180/Elmo1-mediated RAC activation and subsequent interaction with p110β. Cells from mice carrying mutations in the p110β RBD show reduced PI3K activity and defective chemotaxis, and these mice are resistant to experimental lung fibrosis. These findings revise our understanding of the regulation of type I PI3K by showing that both RAS and RHO family GTPases directly regulate distinct ubiquitous PI3K isoforms and that RAC activates p110β downstream of GPCRs. PMID:23706742

  20. The Role of Rho-GTPases and actin polymerization during Macrophage Tunneling Nanotube Biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Hanna, Samer J; McCoy-Simandle, Kessler; Miskolci, Veronika; Guo, Peng; Cammer, Michael; Hodgson, Louis; Cox, Dianne

    2017-08-17

    Macrophage interactions with other cells, either locally or at distances, are imperative in both normal and pathological conditions. While soluble means of communication can transmit signals between different cells, it does not account for all long distance macrophage interactions. Recently described tunneling nanotubes (TNTs) are membranous channels that connect cells together and allow for transfer of signals, vesicles, and organelles. However, very little is known about the mechanism by which these structures are formed. Here we investigated the signaling pathways involved in TNT formation by macrophages using multiple imaging techniques including super-resolution microscopy (3D-SIM) and live-cell imaging including the use of FRET-based Rho GTPase biosensors. We found that formation of TNTs required the activity and differential localization of Cdc42 and Rac1. The downstream Rho GTPase effectors mediating actin polymerization through Arp2/3 nucleation, Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein (WASP) and WASP family verprolin-homologous 2 (WAVE2) proteins are also important, and both pathways act together during TNT biogenesis. Finally, TNT function as measured by transfer of cellular material between cells was reduced following depletion of a single factor demonstrating the importance of these factors in TNTs. Given that the characterization of TNT formation is still unclear in the field; this study provides new insights and would enhance the understanding of TNT formation towards investigating new markers.

  1. Remodeling of the Fission Yeast Cdc42 Cell-Polarity Module via the Sty1 p38 Stress-Activated Protein Kinase Pathway.

    PubMed

    Mutavchiev, Delyan R; Leda, Marcin; Sawin, Kenneth E

    2016-11-07

    The Rho family GTPase Cdc42 is a key regulator of eukaryotic cellular organization and cell polarity [1]. In the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, active Cdc42 and associated effectors and regulators (the "Cdc42 polarity module") coordinate polarized growth at cell tips by controlling the actin cytoskeleton and exocytosis [2-4]. Localization of the Cdc42 polarity module to cell tips is thus critical for its function. Here we show that the fission yeast stress-activated protein kinase Sty1, a homolog of mammalian p38 MAP kinase, regulates localization of the Cdc42 polarity module. In wild-type cells, treatment with latrunculin A, a drug that leads to actin depolymerization, induces dispersal of the Cdc42 module from cell tips and cessation of polarized growth [5, 6]. We show that latrunculin A treatment also activates the Sty1 MAP kinase pathway and, strikingly, we find that loss of Sty1 MAP kinase signaling prevents latrunculin A-induced dispersal of the Cdc42 module, allowing polarized growth even in complete absence of the actin cytoskeleton. Regulation of the Cdc42 module by Sty1 is independent of Sty1's role in stress-induced gene expression. We also describe a system for activation of Sty1 kinase "on demand" in the absence of any external stress, and use this to show that Sty1 activation alone is sufficient to disperse the Cdc42 module from cell tips in otherwise unperturbed cells. During nitrogen-starvation-induced quiescence, inhibition of Sty1 converts non-growing, depolarized cells into growing, polarized cells. Our results place MAP kinase Sty1 as an important physiological regulator of the Cdc42 polarity module.

  2. Rho-GTPases as key regulators of T lymphocyte biology.

    PubMed

    Saoudi, Abdelhadi; Kassem, Sahar; Dejean, Anne; Gaud, Guillaume

    2014-01-01

    Rho-GTPases belong to the Ras superfamily and are crucial signal transducing proteins downstream of many receptors. In general, the Rho-GTPases function as molecular switches, cycling between inactive (GDP-bound) and active (GTP-bound) states. The activated GTP bound Rho-GTPases interact with a broad spectrum of effectors to regulate a plethora of biological pathways including cytoskeletal dynamics, motility, cytokinesis, cell growth, apoptosis, transcriptional activity and nuclear signaling. Recently, gene targeting in mice allowed the selective inactivation of different Rho-GTPases and has advanced our understanding of the physiological role of these proteins, particularly in the immune system. Particularly, these proteins are key signaling molecules in T lymphocytes, which are generated in the thymus and are major players in the immune system. The scope of this review is to discuss recent data obtained in Rho-GTPases deficient mice by focusing on the role-played by Rho-GTPases in T-lymphocyte development, migration, activation and differentiation.

  3. Cdc42 Deficiency Causes Ciliary Abnormalities and Cystic Kidneys

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Soo Young; Chacon-Heszele, Maria F.; Huang, Liwei; McKenna, Sarah; Wilson, F. Perry; Zuo, Xiaofeng

    2013-01-01

    Ciliogenesis and cystogenesis require the exocyst, a conserved eight-protein trafficking complex that traffics ciliary proteins. In culture, the small GTPase Cdc42 co-localizes with the exocyst at primary cilia and interacts with the exocyst component Sec10. The role of Cdc42 in vivo, however, is not well understood. Here, knockdown of cdc42 in zebrafish produced a phenotype similar to sec10 knockdown, including tail curvature, glomerular expansion, and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) activation, suggesting that cdc42 and sec10 cooperate in ciliogenesis. In addition, cdc42 knockdown led to hydrocephalus and loss of photoreceptor cilia. Furthermore, there was a synergistic genetic interaction between zebrafish cdc42 and sec10, suggesting that cdc42 and sec10 function in the same pathway. Mice lacking Cdc42 specifically in kidney tubular epithelial cells died of renal failure within weeks of birth. Histology revealed cystogenesis in distal tubules and collecting ducts, decreased ciliogenesis in cyst cells, increased tubular cell proliferation, increased apoptosis, increased fibrosis, and led to MAPK activation, all of which are features of polycystic kidney disease, especially nephronophthisis. Taken together, these results suggest that Cdc42 localizes the exocyst to primary cilia, whereupon the exocyst targets and docks vesicles carrying ciliary proteins. Abnormalities in this pathway result in deranged ciliogenesis and polycystic kidney disease. PMID:23766535

  4. Cdc42 deficiency causes ciliary abnormalities and cystic kidneys.

    PubMed

    Choi, Soo Young; Chacon-Heszele, Maria F; Huang, Liwei; McKenna, Sarah; Wilson, F Perry; Zuo, Xiaofeng; Lipschutz, Joshua H

    2013-09-01

    Ciliogenesis and cystogenesis require the exocyst, a conserved eight-protein trafficking complex that traffics ciliary proteins. In culture, the small GTPase Cdc42 co-localizes with the exocyst at primary cilia and interacts with the exocyst component Sec10. The role of Cdc42 in vivo, however, is not well understood. Here, knockdown of cdc42 in zebrafish produced a phenotype similar to sec10 knockdown, including tail curvature, glomerular expansion, and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) activation, suggesting that cdc42 and sec10 cooperate in ciliogenesis. In addition, cdc42 knockdown led to hydrocephalus and loss of photoreceptor cilia. Furthermore, there was a synergistic genetic interaction between zebrafish cdc42 and sec10, suggesting that cdc42 and sec10 function in the same pathway. Mice lacking Cdc42 specifically in kidney tubular epithelial cells died of renal failure within weeks of birth. Histology revealed cystogenesis in distal tubules and collecting ducts, decreased ciliogenesis in cyst cells, increased tubular cell proliferation, increased apoptosis, increased fibrosis, and led to MAPK activation, all of which are features of polycystic kidney disease, especially nephronophthisis. Taken together, these results suggest that Cdc42 localizes the exocyst to primary cilia, whereupon the exocyst targets and docks vesicles carrying ciliary proteins. Abnormalities in this pathway result in deranged ciliogenesis and polycystic kidney disease.

  5. Myosin II directly binds and inhibits Dbl family guanine nucleotide exchange factors: a possible link to Rho family GTPases

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chan-Soo; Choi, Chang-Ki; Schwartz, Martin Alexander

    2010-01-01

    Cell migration requires the coordinated spatiotemporal regulation of actomyosin contraction and cell protrusion/adhesion. Nonmuscle myosin II (MII) controls Rac1 and Cdc42 activation, and cell protrusion and focal complex formation in migrating cells. However, these mechanisms are poorly understood. Here, we show that MII interacts specifically with multiple Dbl family guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs). Binding is mediated by the conserved tandem Dbl homology–pleckstrin homology module, the catalytic site of these GEFs, with dissociation constants of ∼0.3 µM. Binding to the GEFs required assembly of the MII into filaments and actin-stimulated ATPase activity. Binding of MII suppressed GEF activity. Accordingly, inhibition of MII ATPase activity caused release of GEFs and activation of Rho GTPases. Depletion of βPIX GEF in migrating NIH3T3 fibroblasts suppressed lamellipodial protrusions and focal complex formation induced by MII inhibition. The results elucidate a functional link between MII and Rac1/Cdc42 GTPases, which may regulate protrusion/adhesion dynamics in migrating cells. PMID:20713598

  6. Filamin C promotes lymphatic invasion and lymphatic metastasis and increases cell motility by regulating Rho GTPase in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Furukawa, Tatsuhiko; Kita, Yoshiaki; Hatanaka, Kazuhito; Minami, Kentaro; Kawahara, Kohichi; Yamamoto, Masatatsu; Baba, Kenji; Mori, Shinichiro; Uchikado, Yasuto; Maemura, Kosei; Tanimoto, Akihide; Natsugoe, Shoji

    2017-01-01

    To establish treatments to improve the prognosis of cancer patients, it is necessary to find new targets to control metastasis. We found that expression of FilaminC (FLNC), a member of the actin binding and cross-linking filamin protein family is correlated with lymphatic invasion and lymphatic metastasis in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) by increasing cell motility through activation of Rho GTPase. Immunohistochemistry analysis showed that FLNC expression in ESCC is associated with lymphatic invasion, metastasis, and prognosis. FLNC knockdown in esophageal cancer cell lines decreased cell migration in wound healing and transwell migration assays, and invasion in transwell migration assays. Furthermore, FLNC knockdown reduced the amount of activated Rac-1 (GTP-Rac1) and activated Cdc42 (GTP-Cdc42). Our results suggest that FLNC expression is a useful biomarker of ESCC metastatic tendency and that inhibiting FLNC function may be useful to control the metastasis of ESCC. PMID:28031525

  7. Morelloflavone, a biflavonoid, inhibits tumor angiogenesis by targeting Rho GTPases and ERK signaling pathways

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Xiufeng; Yi, Tingfang; Yi, Zhengfang; Cho, Sung Gook; Qu, Weijing; Pinkaew, Decha; Fujise, Ken; Liu, Mingyao

    2009-01-01

    Morelloflavone, a biflavonoid extracted from Garcinia dulcis, has shown anti-oxidative, antiviral, and anti-inflammatory properties. However, the function and the mechanism of this compound in cancer treatment and tumor angiogenesis have not been elucidated to date. In this study, we postulated that morelloflavone might have the ability to inhibit angiogenesis, the pivotal step in tumor growth, invasiveness and metastasis. We demonstrated that morelloflavone could inhibit vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-induced cell proliferation, migration, invasion, and capillary-like tube formation of primary cultured human umbilical endothelial cells (HUVECs) in a dose-dependent manner. Morelloflavone effectively inhibited microvessel sprouting of endothelial cells in the rat aortic ring assay and the formation of new blood microvessels induced by VEGF in the mouse Matrigel plug assay. Furthermore, morelloflavone inhibited tumor growth and tumor angiogenesis of prostate cancer cells (PC-3) in xenograft mouse tumor model in vivo, suggesting that morelloflavone inhibited tumorigenesis by targeting angiogenesis. To understand the underlying mechanism of morelloflavone on the inhibitory effect of tumor growth and angiogenesis, we demonstrated that morelloflavone could inhibit the activation of both RhoA and Rac1 GTPases, but have little effect on the activation of Cdc42 GTPase. Additionally, morelloflavone inhibited the phosphorylation and activation of Raf/MEK/ERK pathway kinases without affecting VEGFR2 activity. Together, our results indicate that morelloflavone exerts anti-angiogenic action by targeting the activation of Rho-GTPases and ERK signaling pathways. These findings are the first to reveal the novel functions of morelloflavone in tumor angiogenesis and its molecular basis for the anticancer action. PMID:19147565

  8. RhoA GTPase inhibition organizes contraction during epithelial morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Mason, Frank M.; Xie, Shicong; Vasquez, Claudia G.; Tworoger, Michael

    2016-01-01

    During morphogenesis, contraction of the actomyosin cytoskeleton within individual cells drives cell shape changes that fold tissues. Coordination of cytoskeletal contractility is mediated by regulating RhoA GTPase activity. Guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) activate and GTPase-activating proteins (GAPs) inhibit RhoA activity. Most studies of tissue folding, including apical constriction, have focused on how RhoA is activated by GEFs to promote cell contractility, with little investigation as to how GAPs may be important. Here, we identify a critical role for a RhoA GAP, Cumberland GAP (C-GAP), which coordinates with a RhoA GEF, RhoGEF2, to organize spatiotemporal contractility during Drosophila melanogaster apical constriction. C-GAP spatially restricts RhoA pathway activity to a central position in the apical cortex. RhoGEF2 pulses precede myosin, and C-GAP is required for pulsation, suggesting that contractile pulses result from RhoA activity cycling. Finally, C-GAP expression level influences the transition from reversible to irreversible cell shape change, which defines the onset of tissue shape change. Our data demonstrate that RhoA activity cycling and modulating the ratio of RhoGEF2 to C-GAP are required for tissue folding. PMID:27551058

  9. Cdc42 and aging of hematopoietic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Geiger, Hartmut; Zheng, Yi

    2013-07-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) continuously provide mature blood cells during the lifespan of a mammal. The functional decline in hematopoiesis in the elderly, which involves a progressive reduction in the immune response and an increased incidence of myeloid malignancy, is partly linked to HSC aging. Molecular mechanisms of HSC aging remain unclear, hindering rational approaches to slow or reverse the decline of HSC function with age. Identifying conditions under which aged HSCs become equivalent to young stem cells might result in treatments for age-associated imbalances in lymphopoiesis and myelopoiesis and in blood regeneration. Aging of HSCs has been for a long time thought to be an irreversible process imprinted in stem cells due to the intrinsic nature of HSC aging. Mouse model studies have found that aging is associated with elevated activity of the Rho GTPase Cdc42 in HSCs that is causative for loss of polarity, altered epigenetic modifications and functional deficits of aged HSCs. The work suggests that inhibition of Cdc42 activity in aged HSCs may reverse a number of phenotypes associated with HSC aging. Maintaining the regenerative capacity of organs or organ systems may be a useful way to ensure healthy aging. A defined set of features phenotypically separate young from aged HSCs. Aging of HSCs has been thought to be irreversible. Recent findings support the hypothesis that functional decline of aged HSCs may be reversible by pharmacological intervention of age altered signaling pathways and epigenetic modifications.

  10. Rac and Rho GTPases in cancer cell motility control

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Rho GTPases represent a family of small GTP-binding proteins involved in cell cytoskeleton organization, migration, transcription, and proliferation. A common theme of these processes is a dynamic reorganization of actin cytoskeleton which has now emerged as a major switch control mainly carried out by Rho and Rac GTPase subfamilies, playing an acknowledged role in adaptation of cell motility to the microenvironment. Cells exhibit three distinct modes of migration when invading the 3 D environment. Collective motility leads to movement of cohorts of cells which maintain the adherens junctions and move by photolytic degradation of matrix barriers. Single cell mesenchymal-type movement is characterized by an elongated cellular shape and again requires extracellular proteolysis and integrin engagement. In addition it depends on Rac1-mediated cell polarization and lamellipodia formation. Conversely, in amoeboid movement cells have a rounded morphology, the movement is independent from proteases but requires high Rho GTPase to drive elevated levels of actomyosin contractility. These two modes of cell movement are interconvertible and several moving cells, including tumor cells, show an high degree of plasticity in motility styles shifting ad hoc between mesenchymal or amoeboid movements. This review will focus on the role of Rac and Rho small GTPases in cell motility and in the complex relationship driving the reciprocal control between Rac and Rho granting for the opportunistic motile behaviour of aggressive cancer cells. In addition we analyse the role of these GTPases in cancer progression and metastatic dissemination. PMID:20822528

  11. Rac and Rho GTPases in cancer cell motility control.

    PubMed

    Parri, Matteo; Chiarugi, Paola

    2010-09-07

    Rho GTPases represent a family of small GTP-binding proteins involved in cell cytoskeleton organization, migration, transcription, and proliferation. A common theme of these processes is a dynamic reorganization of actin cytoskeleton which has now emerged as a major switch control mainly carried out by Rho and Rac GTPase subfamilies, playing an acknowledged role in adaptation of cell motility to the microenvironment. Cells exhibit three distinct modes of migration when invading the 3 D environment. Collective motility leads to movement of cohorts of cells which maintain the adherens junctions and move by photolytic degradation of matrix barriers. Single cell mesenchymal-type movement is characterized by an elongated cellular shape and again requires extracellular proteolysis and integrin engagement. In addition it depends on Rac1-mediated cell polarization and lamellipodia formation. Conversely, in amoeboid movement cells have a rounded morphology, the movement is independent from proteases but requires high Rho GTPase to drive elevated levels of actomyosin contractility. These two modes of cell movement are interconvertible and several moving cells, including tumor cells, show an high degree of plasticity in motility styles shifting ad hoc between mesenchymal or amoeboid movements. This review will focus on the role of Rac and Rho small GTPases in cell motility and in the complex relationship driving the reciprocal control between Rac and Rho granting for the opportunistic motile behaviour of aggressive cancer cells. In addition we analyse the role of these GTPases in cancer progression and metastatic dissemination.

  12. Kindlin-1 Is required for RhoGTPase-mediated lamellipodia formation in keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Has, Cristina; Herz, Corinna; Zimina, Elena; Qu, Hai-Yan; He, Yinghong; Zhang, Zhi-Gang; Wen, Ting-Ting; Gache, Yannick; Aumailley, Monique; Bruckner-Tuderman, Leena

    2009-10-01

    Kindlin-1 is an epithelial-specific member of the novel kindlin protein family, which are regulators of integrin functions. Mutations in the gene that encodes Kindlin-1, FERMT1 (KIND1), cause the Kindler syndrome (KS), a human disorder characterized by mucocutaneous fragility, progressive skin atrophy, ulcerative colitis, photosensitivity, and propensity to skin cancer. Our previous studies indicated that loss of kindlin-1 resulted in abnormalities associated with integrin functions, such as adhesion, proliferation, polarization, and motility of epidermal cells. Here, we disclosed novel FERMT1 mutations in KS and used them, in combination with small-interfering RNA, protein, and imaging studies, to uncover new functions for kindlin-1 in keratinocytes and to discern the molecular pathology of KS. We show that kindlin-1 forms molecular complexes with beta1 integrin, alpha-actinin, migfilin, and focal adhesion kinase and regulates cell shape and migration by controlling lamellipodia formation. Kindlin-1 governs these processes by signaling via Rho family GTPases, and it is required to maintain the pool of GTP-bound, active Rac1, RhoA and Cdc42, and the phosphorylation of their downstream effectors p21-activated kinase 1, LIM kinase, and cofilin. Loss of these kindlin-1 functions forms the biological basis for the epithelial cell fragility and atrophy in the pathology of KS.

  13. Kindlin-1 Is Required for RhoGTPase-Mediated Lamellipodia Formation in Keratinocytes

    PubMed Central

    Has, Cristina; Herz, Corinna; Zimina, Elena; Qu, Hai-Yan; He, Yinghong; Zhang, Zhi-Gang; Wen, Ting-Ting; Gache, Yannick; Aumailley, Monique; Bruckner-Tuderman, Leena

    2009-01-01

    Kindlin-1 is an epithelial-specific member of the novel kindlin protein family, which are regulators of integrin functions. Mutations in the gene that encodes Kindlin-1, FERMT1 (KIND1), cause the Kindler syndrome (KS), a human disorder characterized by mucocutaneous fragility, progressive skin atrophy, ulcerative colitis, photosensitivity, and propensity to skin cancer. Our previous studies indicated that loss of kindlin-1 resulted in abnormalities associated with integrin functions, such as adhesion, proliferation, polarization, and motility of epidermal cells. Here, we disclosed novel FERMT1 mutations in KS and used them, in combination with small-interfering RNA, protein, and imaging studies, to uncover new functions for kindlin-1 in keratinocytes and to discern the molecular pathology of KS. We show that kindlin-1 forms molecular complexes with β1 integrin, α-actinin, migfilin, and focal adhesion kinase and regulates cell shape and migration by controlling lamellipodia formation. Kindlin-1 governs these processes by signaling via Rho family GTPases, and it is required to maintain the pool of GTP-bound, active Rac1, RhoA and Cdc42, and the phosphorylation of their downstream effectors p21-activated kinase 1, LIM kinase, and cofilin. Loss of these kindlin-1 functions forms the biological basis for the epithelial cell fragility and atrophy in the pathology of KS. PMID:19762715

  14. Controlling the switches: Rho GTPase regulation during animal cell mitosis.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Yan; Oh, Wonkyung; Frost, Jeffrey A

    2014-12-01

    Animal cell division is a fundamental process that requires complex changes in cytoskeletal organization and function. Aberrant cell division often has disastrous consequences for the cell and can lead to cell senescence, neoplastic transformation or death. As important regulators of the actin cytoskeleton, Rho GTPases play major roles in regulating many aspects of mitosis and cytokinesis. These include centrosome duplication and separation, generation of cortical rigidity, microtubule-kinetochore stabilization, cleavage furrow formation, contractile ring formation and constriction, and abscission. The ability of Rho proteins to function as regulators of cell division depends on their ability to cycle between their active, GTP-bound and inactive, GDP-bound states. However, Rho proteins are inherently inefficient at fulfilling this cycle and require the actions of regulatory proteins that enhance GTP binding (RhoGEFs), stimulate GTPase activity (RhoGAPs), and sequester inactive Rho proteins in the cytosol (RhoGDIs). The roles of these regulatory proteins in controlling cell division are an area of active investigation. In this review we will delineate the current state of knowledge of how specific RhoGEFs, RhoGAPs and RhoGDIs control mitosis and cytokinesis, and highlight the mechanisms by which their functions are controlled. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Epstein-Barr virus-encoded LMP1 interacts with FGD4 to activate Cdc42 and thereby promote migration of nasopharyngeal carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hao-Ping; Chen, Chia-Chun; Wu, Chih-Ching; Huang, Yi-Chuan; Liu, Shu-Chen; Liang, Ying; Chang, Kai-Ping; Chang, Yu-Sun

    2012-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is closely associated with nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC), a human malignancy notorious for its highly metastatic nature. Among EBV-encoded genes, latent membrane protein 1 (LMP1) is expressed in most NPC tissues and exerts oncogenicity by engaging multiple signaling pathways in a ligand-independent manner. LMP1 expression also results in actin cytoskeleton reorganization, which modulates cell morphology and cell motility- cellular process regulated by RhoGTPases, such as Cdc42. Despite the prominent association of Cdc42 activation with tumorigenesis, the molecular basis of Cdc42 activation by LMP1 in NPC cells remains to be elucidated. Here using GST-CBD (active Cdc42-binding domain) as bait in GST pull-down assays to precipitate active Cdc42 from cell lysates, we demonstrated that LMP1 acts through its transmembrane domains to preferentially induce Cdc42 activation in various types of epithelial cells, including NPC cells. Using RNA interference combined with re-introduction experiments, we identified FGD4 (FYVE, RhoGEF and PH domain containing 4) as the GEF (guanine nucleotide exchange factor) responsible for the activation of Cdc42 by LMP1. Serial deletion experiments and co-immunoprecipitation assays further revealed that ectopically expressed FGD4 modulated LMP1-mediated Cdc42 activation by interacting with LMP1. Moreover, LMP1, through its transmembrane domains, directly bound FGD4 and enhanced FGD4 activity toward Cdc42, leading to actin cytoskeleton rearrangement and increased motility of NPC cells. Depletion of FGD4 or Cdc42 significantly reduced (∼50%) the LMP1-stimulated cell motility, an effect that was partially reversed by expression of a constitutively active mutant of Cdc42. Finally, quantitative RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry analyses showed that FGD4 and LMP1 were expressed in NPC tissues, supporting the potential physiologically relevance of this mechanism in NPC. Collectively, our results not only uncover a novel

  16. Epstein-Barr Virus-Encoded LMP1 Interacts with FGD4 to Activate Cdc42 and Thereby Promote Migration of Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hao-Ping; Chen, Chia-Chun; Wu, Chih-Ching; Huang, Yi-Chuan; Liu, Shu-Chen; Liang, Ying; Chang, Kai-Ping; Chang, Yu-Sun

    2012-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is closely associated with nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC), a human malignancy notorious for its highly metastatic nature. Among EBV-encoded genes, latent membrane protein 1 (LMP1) is expressed in most NPC tissues and exerts oncogenicity by engaging multiple signaling pathways in a ligand-independent manner. LMP1 expression also results in actin cytoskeleton reorganization, which modulates cell morphology and cell motility— cellular process regulated by RhoGTPases, such as Cdc42. Despite the prominent association of Cdc42 activation with tumorigenesis, the molecular basis of Cdc42 activation by LMP1 in NPC cells remains to be elucidated. Here using GST-CBD (active Cdc42-binding domain) as bait in GST pull-down assays to precipitate active Cdc42 from cell lysates, we demonstrated that LMP1 acts through its transmembrane domains to preferentially induce Cdc42 activation in various types of epithelial cells, including NPC cells. Using RNA interference combined with re-introduction experiments, we identified FGD4 (FYVE, RhoGEF and PH domain containing 4) as the GEF (guanine nucleotide exchange factor) responsible for the activation of Cdc42 by LMP1. Serial deletion experiments and co-immunoprecipitation assays further revealed that ectopically expressed FGD4 modulated LMP1-mediated Cdc42 activation by interacting with LMP1. Moreover, LMP1, through its transmembrane domains, directly bound FGD4 and enhanced FGD4 activity toward Cdc42, leading to actin cytoskeleton rearrangement and increased motility of NPC cells. Depletion of FGD4 or Cdc42 significantly reduced (∼50%) the LMP1-stimulated cell motility, an effect that was partially reversed by expression of a constitutively active mutant of Cdc42. Finally, quantitative RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry analyses showed that FGD4 and LMP1 were expressed in NPC tissues, supporting the potential physiologically relevance of this mechanism in NPC. Collectively, our results not only uncover a novel

  17. Control of T lymphocyte morphology by the GTPase Rho

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodside, Darren G.; Wooten, David K.; Teague, T. Kent; Miyamoto, Yuko J.; Caudell, Eva G.; Udagawa, Taturo; Andruss, Bernard F.; McIntyre, Bradley W.

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Rho family GTPase regulation of the actin cytoskeleton governs a variety of cell responses. In this report, we have analyzed the role of the GTPase Rho in maintenance of the T lymphocyte actin cytoskeleton. RESULTS: Inactivation of the GTPase Rho in the human T lymphocytic cell line HPB-ALL does not inhibit constitutively high adhesion to the integrin beta1 substrate fibronectin. It did however result in the aberrant extension of finger-like dendritic processes on the substrates VCAM-1, Fn, and mAb specific to beta1 integrins. Time-lapse video microscopy demonstrated that C3 induced extensions were primarily the result of an altered pseudopod elongation rather than retraction. Once the stellate pseudopodia extended, none retracted, and cells became completely immobile. Filipodial structures were absent and the dendritic-like processes in C3 treated cells were rich in filamentous actin. Immunolocalization of RhoA in untreated HPB-ALL cells spreading on fibronectin demonstrated a diffuse staining pattern within the pseudopodia. In C3 treated cells, clusters of RhoA were pronounced and localized within the altered extensions. CONCLUSIONS: GTPase Rho is actively involved in the regulation of T lymphocyte morphology and motility.

  18. Control of T lymphocyte morphology by the GTPase Rho

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodside, Darren G.; Wooten, David K.; Teague, T. Kent; Miyamoto, Yuko J.; Caudell, Eva G.; Udagawa, Taturo; Andruss, Bernard F.; McIntyre, Bradley W.

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Rho family GTPase regulation of the actin cytoskeleton governs a variety of cell responses. In this report, we have analyzed the role of the GTPase Rho in maintenance of the T lymphocyte actin cytoskeleton. RESULTS: Inactivation of the GTPase Rho in the human T lymphocytic cell line HPB-ALL does not inhibit constitutively high adhesion to the integrin beta1 substrate fibronectin. It did however result in the aberrant extension of finger-like dendritic processes on the substrates VCAM-1, Fn, and mAb specific to beta1 integrins. Time-lapse video microscopy demonstrated that C3 induced extensions were primarily the result of an altered pseudopod elongation rather than retraction. Once the stellate pseudopodia extended, none retracted, and cells became completely immobile. Filipodial structures were absent and the dendritic-like processes in C3 treated cells were rich in filamentous actin. Immunolocalization of RhoA in untreated HPB-ALL cells spreading on fibronectin demonstrated a diffuse staining pattern within the pseudopodia. In C3 treated cells, clusters of RhoA were pronounced and localized within the altered extensions. CONCLUSIONS: GTPase Rho is actively involved in the regulation of T lymphocyte morphology and motility.

  19. Interactions between the bud emergence proteins Bem1p and Bem2p and Rho- type GTPases in yeast

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    The SH3 domain-containing protein Bem1p is needed for normal bud emergence and mating projection formation, two processes that require asymmetric reorganizations of the cortical cytoskeleton in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. To identify proteins that functionally and/or physically interact with Bem1p, we screened for mutations that display synthetic lethality with a mutant allele of the BEM1 gene and for genes whose products display two-hybrid interactions with the Bem1 protein. CDC24, which is required for bud emergence and encodes a GEF (guanine- nucleotide exchange factor) for the essential Rho-type GTPase Cdc42p, was identified during both screens. The COOH-terminal 75 amino acids of Cdc24p, outside of the GEF domain, can interact with a portion of Bem1p that lacks both SH3 domains. Bacterially expressed Cdc24p and Bem1p bind to each other in vitro, indicating that no other yeast proteins are required for this interaction. The most frequently identified gene that arose from the bem1 synthetic-lethal screen was the bud-emergence gene BEM2 (Bender and Pringle. 1991. Mol. Cell Biol. 11:1295-1395), which is allelic with IPL2 (increase in ploidy; Chan and Botstein, 1993. Genetics. 135:677-691). Here we show that Bem2p contains a GAP (GTPase-activating protein) domain for Rho-type GTPases, and that this portion of Bem2p can stimulate in vitro the GTPase activity of Rho1p, a second essential yeast Rho-type GTPase. Cells deleted for BEM2 become large and multinucleate. These and other genetic, two-hybrid, biochemical, and phenotypic data suggest that multiple Rho-type GTPases control the reorganization of the cortical cytoskeleton in yeast and that the functions of these GTPases are tightly coupled. Also, these findings raise the possibility that Bem1p may regulate or be a target of action of one or more of these GTPases. PMID:7962098

  20. Interactions between the bud emergence proteins Bem1p and Bem2p and Rho-type GTPases in yeast.

    PubMed

    Peterson, J; Zheng, Y; Bender, L; Myers, A; Cerione, R; Bender, A

    1994-12-01

    The SH3 domain-containing protein Bem1p is needed for normal bud emergence and mating projection formation, two processes that require asymmetric reorganizations of the cortical cytoskeleton in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. To identify proteins that functionally and/or physically interact with Bem1p, we screened for mutations that display synthetic lethality with a mutant allele of the BEM1 gene and for genes whose products display two-hybrid interactions with the Bem1 protein. CDC24, which is required for bud emergence and encodes a GEF (guanine-nucleotide exchange factor) for the essential Rho-type GTPase Cdc42p, was identified during both screens. The COOH-terminal 75 amino acids of Cdc24p, outside of the GEF domain, can interact with a portion of Bem1p that lacks both SH3 domains. Bacterially expressed Cdc24p and Bem1p bind to each other in vitro, indicating that no other yeast proteins are required for this interaction. The most frequently identified gene that arose from the bem1 synthetic-lethal screen was the bud-emergence gene BEM2 (Bender and Pringle. 1991. Mol. Cell Biol. 11:1295-1395), which is allelic with IPL2 (increase in ploidy; Chan and Botstein, 1993. Genetics. 135:677-691). Here we show that Bem2p contains a GAP (GTPase-activating protein) domain for Rho-type GTPases, and that this portion of Bem2p can stimulate in vitro the GTPase activity of Rho1p, a second essential yeast Rho-type GTPase. Cells deleted for BEM2 become large and multinucleate. These and other genetic, two-hybrid, biochemical, and phenotypic data suggest that multiple Rho-type GTPases control the reorganization of the cortical cytoskeleton in yeast and that the functions of these GTPases are tightly coupled. Also, these findings raise the possibility that Bem1p may regulate or be a target of action of one or more of these GTPases.

  1. Unique spatiotemporal activation pattern of Cdc42 by Gef1 and Scd1 promotes different events during cytokinesis

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Bin; Hercyk, Brian S.; Mattson, Nicholas; Mohammadi, Ahmad; Rich, Julie; DeBruyne, Erica; Clark, Mikayla M.; Das, Maitreyi

    2016-01-01

    The Rho-family GTPase Cdc42 regulates cell polarity and localizes to the cell division site. Cdc42 is activated by guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs). We report that Cdc42 promotes cytokinesis via a unique spatiotemporal activation pattern due to the distinct action of its GEFs, Gef1 and Scd1, in fission yeast. Before cytokinetic ring constriction, Cdc42 activation, is Gef1 dependent, and after ring constriction, it is Scd1 dependent. Gef1 localizes to the actomyosin ring immediately after ring assembly and promotes timely onset of ring constriction. Gef1 is required for proper actin organization during cytokinesis, distribution of type V myosin Myo52 to the division site, and timely recruitment of septum protein Bgs1. In contrast, Scd1 localizes to the broader region of ingressing membrane during cytokinetic furrowing. Scd1 promotes normal septum formation, and scd1Δ cells display aberrant septa with reduced Bgs1 localization. Thus we define unique roles of the GEFs Gef1 and Scd1 in the regulation of distinct events during cytokinesis. Gef1 localizes first to the cytokinetic ring and promotes timely constriction, whereas Scd1 localizes later to the ingressing membrane and promotes septum formation. Our findings are consistent with reports that complexity in GTPase signaling patterns enables exquisite precision over the control of cellular processes. PMID:26941334

  2. Rac1 and Cdc42 differentially modulate cigarette smoke-induced airway cell migration through p120-catenin-dependent and -independent pathways.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lili; Gallup, Marianne; Zlock, Lorna; Finkbeiner, Walter E; McNamara, Nancy A

    2013-06-01

    The adherens junction protein p120-catenin (p120ctn) shuttles between E-cadherin-bound and cytoplasmic pools to regulate E-cadherin/catenin complex stability and cell migration, respectively. When released from the adherens junction, p120ctn promotes cell migration through modulation of the Rho GTPases Rac1, Cdc42, and RhoA. Accordingly, the down-regulation and cytoplasmic mislocalization of p120ctn has been reported in all subtypes of lung cancers and is associated with grave prognosis. Previously, we reported that cigarette smoke induced cytoplasmic translocation of p120ctn and cell migration, but the underlying mechanism was unclear. Using primary human bronchial epithelial cells exposed to smoke-concentrated medium (Smk), we observed the translocation of Rac1 and Cdc42, but not RhoA, to the leading edge of polarized and migrating human bronchial epithelial cells. Rac1 and Cdc42 were robustly activated by smoke, whereas RhoA was inhibited. Accordingly, siRNA knockdown of Rac1 or Cdc42 completely abolished Smk-induced cell migration, whereas knockdown of RhoA had no effect. p120ctn/Rac1 double knockdown completely abolished Smk-induced cell migration, whereas p120ctn/Cdc42 double knockdown did not. These data suggested that Rac1 and Cdc42 coactivation was essential to smoke-promoted cell migration in the presence of p120ctn, whereas migration proceeded via Rac1 alone in the absence of p120ctn. Thus, Rac1 may provide an omnipotent therapeutic target in reversing cell migration during the early (intact p120ctn) and late (loss of p120ctn) stages of lung carcinogenesis.

  3. Activation of Rho GTPases by Cytotoxic Necrotizing Factor 1 Induces Macropinocytosis and Scavenging Activity in Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Fiorentini, Carla; Falzano, Loredana; Fabbri, Alessia; Stringaro, Annarita; Logozzi, Mariaantonia; Travaglione, Sara; Contamin, Stéphanette; Arancia, Giuseppe; Malorni, Walter; Fais, Stefano

    2001-01-01

    Macropinocytosis, a ruffling-driven process that allows the capture of large material, is an essential aspect of normal cell function. It can be either constitutive, as in professional phagocytes where it ends with the digestion of captured material, or induced, as in epithelial cells stimulated by growth factors. In this case, the internalized material recycles back to the cell surface. We herein show that activation of Rho GTPases by a bacterial protein toxin, the Escherichia coli cytotoxic necrotizing factor 1 (CNF1), allowed epithelial cells to engulf and digest apoptotic cells in a manner similar to that of professional phagocytes. In particular, we have demonstrated that 1) the activation of all Rho, Rac, and Cdc42 by CNF1 was essential for the capture and internalization of apoptotic cells; and 2) such activation allowed the discharge of macropinosomal content into Rab7 and lysosomal associated membrane protein-1 acidic lysosomal vesicles where the ingested particles underwent degradation. Taken together, these findings indicate that CNF1-induced “switching on” of Rho GTPases may induce in epithelial cells a scavenging activity, comparable to that exerted by professional phagocytes. The activation of such activity in epithelial cells may be relevant, in mucosal tissues, in supporting or integrating the scavenging activity of resident macrophages. PMID:11452003

  4. Cryptococcus neoformans activates RhoGTPase proteins followed by protein kinase C, focal adhesion kinase, and ezrin to promote traversal across the blood-brain barrier.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jong-Chul; Crary, Benjamin; Chang, Yun C; Kwon-Chung, Kyung J; Kim, Kee J

    2012-10-19

    Cryptococcus neoformans is an opportunistic fungal pathogen that causes meningoencephalitis. Previous studies have demonstrated that Cryptococcus binding and invasion of human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMEC) is a prerequisite for transmigration across the blood-brain barrier. However, the molecular mechanism involved in the cryptococcal blood-brain barrier traversal is poorly understood. In this study we examined the signaling events in HBMEC during interaction with C. neoformans. Analysis with inhibitors revealed that cryptococcal association, invasion, and transmigration require host actin cytoskeleton rearrangement. Rho pulldown assays revealed that Cryptococcus induces activation of three members of RhoGTPases, e.g. RhoA, Rac1, and Cdc42, and their activations are required for cryptococcal transmigration across the HBMEC monolayer. Western blot analysis showed that Cryptococcus also induces phosphorylation of focal adhesion kinase (FAK), ezrin, and protein kinase C α (PKCα), all of which are involved in the rearrangement of host actin cytoskeleton. Down-regulation of FAK, ezrin, or PKCα by shRNA knockdown, dominant-negative transfection, or inhibitors significantly reduces cryptococcal ability to traverse the HBMEC monolayer, indicating their positive role in cryptococcal transmigration. In addition, activation of RhoGTPases is the upstream event for phosphorylation of FAK, ezrin, and PKCα during C. neoformans-HBMEC interaction. Taken together, our findings demonstrate that C. neoformans activates RhoGTPases and subsequently FAK, ezrin, and PKCα to promote their traversal across the HBMEC monolayer, which is the critical step for cryptococcal brain infection and development of meningitis.

  5. Disruption of the Diaphanous-related formin Drf1 gene encoding mDia1 reveals a role for Drf3 as an effector for Cdc42.

    PubMed

    Peng, Jun; Wallar, Bradley J; Flanders, Akiko; Swiatek, Pamela J; Alberts, Arthur S

    2003-04-01

    Mammalian Diaphanous-related formins (Drfs) act as Rho small GTPase effectors during growth factor-induced cytoskeletal remodeling and cell division. While both p140 mDia1 (herein called Drf1) and p134 mDia2 (Drf3) have been shown to bind in vitro to activated RhoA-C, and Drf3 has also been shown to bind to Cdc42, little is known about the cellular function of these GTPase effector pairs. Thus, we have begun targeting the murine Drf genes to address their various contributions to small GTPase signaling in cytoskeletal remodeling and development. Drf1 +/+, +/-, and -/- cell lines were derived from embryonic stem cells. While some Drf1 +/- lines had fewer actin stress fibers, several Drf1 +/- and -/- cells were more motile and had more abundant lamella and filopodia. Because the apparent "gain-of-function" corresponded with elevated levels of Drf3 protein expression, we hypothesized that the effects on the actin cytoskeleton were due to Cdc42 utilization of Drf3 as an effector. In this study, we found that inactive Drf3 variants and microinjected Drf3 antibodies interfered with Cdc42-induced filopodia. In addition, we observed that Drf3 contains a previously unidentified CRIB-like motif within its GTPase binding domain (GBD). By fluorescent resonance energy transfer (FRET) analysis, we demonstrate that this motif is required for Cdc42 binding and Drf3 recruitment to the leading edge and, surprisingly, to the microtubule organizing center (MTOC) of migrating fibroblasts. Our observations extend the role of the mammalian Drfs in cell signaling and demonstrate that Cdc42 not only activates Drf3, but guides the effector to sites at the cell cortex where it remodels the actin cytoskeleton.

  6. The anticancer phytochemical rocaglamide inhibits Rho GTPase activity and cancer cell migration

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Michael S.; Müller, Paul M.; Bajorat, Jörg; Schroeder, Anne; Giaisi, Marco; Amin, Ehsan; Ahmadian, Mohammad R.; Rocks, Oliver; Köhler, Rebecca; Krammer, Peter H.; Li-Weber, Min

    2016-01-01

    Chemotherapy is one of the pillars of anti-cancer therapy. Although chemotherapeutics cause regression of the primary tumor, many chemotherapeutics are often shown to induce or accelerate metastasis formation. Moreover, metastatic tumors are largely resistant against chemotherapy. As more than 90% of cancer patients die due to metastases and not due to primary tumor formation, novel drugs are needed to overcome these shortcomings. In this study, we identified the anticancer phytochemical Rocaglamide (Roc-A) to be an inhibitor of cancer cell migration, a crucial event in metastasis formation. We show that Roc-A inhibits cellular migration and invasion independently of its anti-proliferative and cytotoxic effects in different types of human cancer cells. Mechanistically, Roc-A treatment induces F-actin-based morphological changes in membrane protrusions. Further investigation of the molecular mechanisms revealed that Roc-A inhibits the activities of the small GTPases RhoA, Rac1 and Cdc42, the master regulators of cellular migration. Taken together, our results provide evidence that Roc-A may be a lead candidate for a new class of anticancer drugs that inhibit metastasis formation. PMID:27340868

  7. BRAF and RAS oncogenes regulate Rho GTPase pathways to mediate migration and invasion properties in human colon cancer cells: a comparative study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Colorectal cancer is a common disease that involves genetic alterations, such as inactivation of tumour suppressor genes and activation of oncogenes. Among them are RAS and BRAF mutations, which rarely coexist in the same tumour. Individual members of the Rho (Ras homology) GTPases contribute with distinct roles in tumour cell morphology, invasion and metastasis. The aim of this study is to dissect cell migration and invasion pathways that are utilised by BRAFV600E as compared to KRASG12V and HRASG12V oncoproteins. In particular, the role of RhoA (Ras homolog gene family, member A), Rac1 (Ras-related C3 botulinum toxin substrate 1) and Cdc42 (cell division cycle 42) in cancer progression induced by each of the three oncogenes is described. Methods Colon adenocarcinoma cells with endogenous as well as ectopically expressed or silenced oncogenic mutations of BRAFV600E, KRASG12V and HRASG12V were employed. Signalling pathways and Rho GTPases were inhibited with specific kinase inhibitors and siRNAs. Cell motility and invasion properties were correlated with cytoskeletal properties and Rho GTPase activities. Results Evidence presented here indicate that BRAFV600E significantly induces cell migration and invasion properties in vitro in colon cancer cells, at least in part through activation of RhoA GTPase. The relationship established between BRAFV600E and RhoA activation is mediated by the MEK-ERK pathway. In parallel, KRASG12V enhances the ability of colon adenocarcinoma cells Caco-2 to migrate and invade through filopodia formation and PI3K-dependent Cdc42 activation. Ultimately increased cell migration and invasion, mediated by Rac1, along with the mesenchymal morphology obtained through the Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition (EMT) were the main characteristics rendered by HRASG12V in Caco-2 cells. Moreover, BRAF and KRAS oncogenes are shown to cooperate with the TGFβ-1 pathway to provide cells with additional transforming properties. Conclusion This

  8. Discoidin domain receptor 1 controls linear invadosome formation via a Cdc42–Tuba pathway

    PubMed Central

    Juin, Amélie; Di Martino, Julie; Leitinger, Birgit; Henriet, Elodie; Gary, Anne-Sophie; Paysan, Lisa; Bomo, Jeremy; Baffet, Georges; Gauthier-Rouvière, Cécile; Rosenbaum, Jean

    2014-01-01

    Accumulation of type I collagen fibrils in tumors is associated with an increased risk of metastasis. Invadosomes are F-actin structures able to degrade the extracellular matrix. We previously found that collagen I fibrils induced the formation of peculiar linear invadosomes in an unexpected integrin-independent manner. Here, we show that Discoidin Domain Receptor 1 (DDR1), a collagen receptor overexpressed in cancer, colocalizes with linear invadosomes in tumor cells and is required for their formation and matrix degradation ability. Unexpectedly, DDR1 kinase activity is not required for invadosome formation or activity, nor is Src tyrosine kinase. We show that the RhoGTPase Cdc42 is activated on collagen in a DDR1-dependent manner. Cdc42 and its specific guanine nucleotide-exchange factor (GEF), Tuba, localize to linear invadosomes, and both are required for linear invadosome formation. Finally, DDR1 depletion blocked cell invasion in a collagen gel. Altogether, our data uncover an important role for DDR1, acting through Tuba and Cdc42, in proteolysis-based cell invasion in a collagen-rich environment. PMID:25422375

  9. The 'invisible hand': regulation of RHO GTPases by RHOGDIs.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Mata, Rafael; Boulter, Etienne; Burridge, Keith

    2011-07-22

    The 'invisible hand' is a term originally coined by Adam Smith in The Theory of Moral Sentiments to describe the forces of self-interest, competition and supply and demand that regulate the resources in society. This metaphor continues to be used by economists to describe the self-regulating nature of a market economy. The same metaphor can be used to describe the RHO-specific guanine nucleotide dissociation inhibitor (RHOGDI) family, which operates in the background, as an invisible hand, using similar forces to regulate the RHO GTPase cycle.

  10. A RHOse by any other name: a comparative analysis of animal and plant Rho GTPases.

    PubMed

    Brembu, Tore; Winge, Per; Bones, Atle Magnar; Yang, Zhenbiao

    2006-05-01

    Rho GTPases are molecular switches that act as key regulators of a many cellular processes, including cell movement, morphogenesis, host defense, cell division and gene expression. Rho GTPases are found in all eukaryotic kingdoms. Plants lack clear homologs to conventional Rho GTPases found in yeast and animals; instead, they have over time developed a unique subfamily, ROPs, also known as RAC. The origin of ROP-like proteins appears to precede the appearance of land plants. This review aims to discuss the evolution of ROP/RAC and to compare plant ROP and animal Rho GTPases, focusing on similarities and differences in regulation of the GTPases and their downstream effectors.

  11. Rho and Ras GTPases in Axon Growth, Guidance, and Branching

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Alan; Lalli, Giovanna

    2010-01-01

    The establishment of precise neuronal cell morphology provides the foundation for all aspects of neurobiology. During development, axons emerge from cell bodies after an initial polarization stage, elongate, and navigate towards target regions guided by a range of environmental cues. The Rho and Ras families of small GTPases have emerged as critical players at all stages of axonogenesis. Their ability to coordinately direct multiple signal transduction pathways with precise spatial control drives many of the activities that underlie this morphogenetic program: the dynamic assembly, disassembly, and reorganization of the actin and microtubule cytoskeletons, the interaction of the growing axon with other cells and extracellular matrix, the delivery of lipids and proteins to the axon through the exocytic machinery, and the internalization of membrane and proteins at the leading edge of the growth cone through endocytosis. This article highlights the contribution of Rho and Ras GTPases to axonogenesis. PMID:20182621

  12. Role of Rho GTPases in desmosomal adhesion and pemphigus pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Spindler, Volker; Waschke, Jens

    2011-05-01

    Desmosomes are distinct intercellular contacts essential to the integrity of epithelial tissues and the heart muscle. This function is impaired in the disease pemphigus, in which patients develop autoantibodies against the cadherin-type desmosomal core proteins desmogleins. Autoantibody binding induces loss of cell-cell adhesion leading to blisters within the epidermis and mucous membranes. Despite the relevance of desmosomes for integrity of such essential organs as the skin, data on the regulation of desmosome assembly and maintenance and desmosome-mediated adhesion are only slowly emerging. Small guanosine triphosphatases (GTPases) of the Rho family have long been established as regulators of other cell junctions such as adherens junctions, but also have been implicated in participating in the formation of desmosomes. In this short review we summarize two papers from our group dealing with the role of Rho family GTPases for desmosomal adhesion and pemphigus and discuss these data integrating novel work recently published.

  13. Modelling Rho GTPase biochemistry to predict collective cell migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merchant, Brian; Feng, James

    The collective migration of cells, due to individual cell polarization and intercellular contact inhibition of locomotion, features prominently in embryogenesis and metastatic cancers. Existing methods for modelling collectively migrating cells tend to rely either on highly abstracted agent-based models, or on continuum approximations of the group. Both of these frameworks represent intercellular interactions such as contact inhibition of locomotion as hard-coded rules defining model cells. In contrast, we present a vertex-dynamics framework which predicts polarization and contact inhibition of locomotion naturally from an underlying model of Rho GTPase biochemistry and cortical mechanics. We simulate the interaction between many such model cells, and study how modulating Rho GTPases affects migratory characteristics of the group, in the context of long-distance collective migration of neural crest cells during embryogenesis.

  14. How to analyze bacterial toxins targeting Rho GTPases.

    PubMed

    Bielek, Heike; Schmidt, Gudula

    2012-01-01

    Bacterial pathogens developed several strategies to overcome defense systems of eukaryotic hosts. Within the infection process, they need to attach to and cross through epithelial layers, escape from the innate and adaptive immune response, and find a physiological niche to survive. One target to modulate the host-pathogen interaction in order to deceit pathogen resistance is the actin cytoskeleton and its regulators: the family of Rho GTPases. Some bacterial toxins catalyze a covalent modification of Rho GTPases to keep these molecular switches in a constitutive active or inactive state. This leads to rearrangement of the actin cytoskeleton. Toxin-treated cells show typical morphological changes depending on substrate specificity and action of the toxins. In this chapter, we discuss the classes of bacterial toxins based on their mode of action, their recombinant expression (specifically CNF1), intoxication and subsequent morphological changes of the actin cytoskeleton, and cell shape.

  15. Targeting Rho-GTPases in immune cell migration and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Biro, Maté; Munoz, Marcia A; Weninger, Wolfgang

    2014-12-01

    Leukocytes are unmatched migrators capable of traversing barriers and tissues of remarkably varied structural composition. An effective immune response relies on the ability of its constituent cells to infiltrate target sites. Yet, unwarranted mobilization of immune cells can lead to inflammatory diseases and tissue damage ranging in severity from mild to life-threatening. The efficacy and plasticity of leukocyte migration is driven by the precise spatiotemporal regulation of the actin cytoskeleton. The small GTPases of the Rho family (Rho-GTPases), and their immediate downstream effector kinases, are key regulators of cellular actomyosin dynamics and are therefore considered prime pharmacological targets for stemming leukocyte motility in inflammatory disorders. This review describes advances in the development of small-molecule inhibitors aimed at modulating the Rho-GTPase-centric regulatory pathways governing motility, many of which stem from studies of cancer invasiveness. These inhibitors promise the advent of novel treatment options with high selectivity and potency against immune-mediated pathologies. This article is part of a themed section on Cytoskeleton, Extracellular Matrix, Cell Migration, Wound Healing and Related Topics. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2014.171.issue-24. © 2014 The Authors. British Journal of Pharmacology published by John Wiley &. Sons Ltd on behalf of The British Pharmacological Society.

  16. Cdc42 and Rac stimulate exocytosis of secretory granules by activating the IP(3)/calcium pathway in RBL-2H3 mast cells.

    PubMed

    Hong-Geller, E; Cerione, R A

    2000-02-07

    We have expressed dominant-active and dominant-negative forms of the Rho GTPases, Cdc42 and Rac, using vaccinia virus to evaluate the effects of these mutants on the signaling pathway leading to the degranulation of secretory granules in RBL-2H3 cells. Dominant-active Cdc42 and Rac enhance antigen-stimulated secretion by about twofold, whereas the dominant-negative mutants significantly inhibit secretion. Interestingly, treatment with the calcium ionophore, A23187, and the PKC activator, PMA, rescues the inhibited levels of secretion in cells expressing the dominant-negative mutants, implying that Cdc42 and Rac act upstream of the calcium influx pathway. Furthermore, cells expressing the dominant-active mutants exhibit elevated levels of antigen-stimulated IP(3) production, an amplified antigen-stimulated calcium response consisting of both calcium release from internal stores and influx from the extracellular medium, and an increase in aggregate formation of the IP(3) receptor. In contrast, cells expressing the dominant-negative mutants display the opposite phenotypes. Finally, we are able to detect an in vitro interaction between Cdc42 and PLCgamma1, the enzyme immediately upstream of IP(3) formation. Taken together, these findings implicate Cdc42 and Rac in regulating the exocytosis of secretory granules by stimulation of IP(3) formation and calcium mobilization upon antigen stimulation.

  17. Rho family GTPase Rnd2 interacts and co-localizes with MgcRacGAP in male germ cells.

    PubMed

    Naud, Nathalie; Touré, Aminata; Liu, Jianfeng; Pineau, Charles; Morin, Laurence; Dorseuil, Olivier; Escalier, Denise; Chardin, Pierre; Gacon, Gérard

    2003-05-15

    The male-germ-cell Rac GTPase-activating protein gene (MgcRacGAP) was initially described as a human RhoGAP gene highly expressed in male germ cells at spermatocyte stage, but exhibits significant levels of expression in most cell types. In somatic cells, MgcRacGAP protein was found to both concentrate in the midzone/midbody and be required for cytokinesis. As a RhoGAP, MgcRacGAP has been proposed to down-regulate RhoA, which is localized to the cleavage furrow and midbody during cytokinesis. Due to embryonic lethality in MgcRacGAP -null mutant mice and to the lack of an in vitro model of spermatogenesis, nothing is known regarding the role and mode of action of MgcRacGAP in male germ cells. We have analysed the expression, subcellular localization and molecular interactions of MgcRacGAP in male germ cells. Whereas MgcRacGAP was found only in spermatocytes and early spermatids, the widespread RhoGTPases RhoA, Rac1 and Cdc42 (which are, to various extents, in vitro substrates for MgcRacGAP activity) were, surprisingly, not detected at these stages. In contrast, Rnd2, a Rho family GTPase-deficient G-protein was found to be co-expressed with MgcRacGAP in spermatocytes and spermatids. MgcRacGAP was detected in the midzone of meiotic cells, but also, unexpectedly, in the Golgi-derived pro-acrosomal vesicle, co-localizing with Rnd2. In addition, a stable Rnd2-MgcRacGAP molecular complex could be evidenced by glutathione S-transferase pull-down and co-immunoprecipitation experiments. We conclude that Rnd2 is a probable physiological partner of MgcRacGAP in male germ cells and we propose that MgcRacGAP, and, quite possibly, other RhoGAPs, may participate in signalling pathways involving Rnd family proteins.

  18. MIF inhibits monocytic movement through a non-canonical receptor and disruption of temporal Rho GTPase activities in U-937 cells.

    PubMed

    DiCosmo-Ponticello, Crystal J; Hoover, Daniel; Coffman, Frederick D; Cohen, Stanley; Cohen, Marion C

    2014-09-01

    Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) is a pro-inflammatory cytokine that was initially identified by its ability to inhibit the movement of macrophages. Cell migration is a highly complex process involving changes to the cytoskeleton and cell adhesion molecules, and is regulated by the Rho GTPases. A simple model using human monocytic U-937 cells to elicit the classic MIF response was implemented to examine the mechanism of MIF-induced migration inhibition. Our results demonstrate that MIF inhibits migration of these U-937 cells through a non-canonical receptor, CXCR4, in the absence of the putative primary MIF receptor CD74. Migration inhibition is dependent upon a series of temporal perturbations of the activities of the Rho GTPases: initial activation followed by subsequent inactivation of RhoA, inactivation of Rac1, and cyclic activation of Cdc42. MIF-mediated changes in the activities of the Rho GTPases jointly contributed to migration inhibition in these cells. Collectively, these data suggest that the MIF-mediated migration inhibition is mediated by the outcome of G-protein signaling, and in less adherent cells such as those of the monocyte/macrophage lineage, RhoA directly affects net translocation through its ability to induce cell body contraction. These findings demonstrate that CXCR4 can mediate MIF signaling in the absence of CD74 in addition to serving as a MIF co-receptor along with CD74. These results correlate MIF activity to specific and sequential Rho GTPase activity perturbations, and given that CXCR4 functions in numerous processes, suggests potential roles for the modulation of cell movement in those events including development, cell survival and viral infection.

  19. Dynamic expression patterns of RhoV/Chp and RhoU/Wrch during chicken embryonic development.

    PubMed

    Notarnicola, Cécile; Le Guen, Ludovic; Fort, Philippe; Faure, Sandrine; de Santa Barbara, Pascal

    2008-04-01

    Rho GTPases play central roles in the control of cell adhesion and migration, cell cycle progression, growth, and differentiation. However, although most of our knowledge of Rho GTPase function comes from the study of the three classic Rho GTPases RhoA, Rac1, and Cdc42, recent studies have begun to explore the expression, regulation, and function of some of the lesser-known members of the Rho GTPase family. In the present study, we cloned the avian orthologues of RhoV (or Chp for Cdc42 homologous protein) and RhoU (or Wrch-1 for Wnt-regulated Cdc42 homolog-1) and examined their expression patterns by in situ hybridization analysis both during early chick embryogenesis and later on, during gastrointestinal tract development. Our data show that both GTPases are detected in the primitive streak, the somites, the neural crest cells, and the gastrointestinal tract with distinct territories and/or temporal expression windows. Although both proteins are 90% identical, our results indicate that cRhoV and cRhoU are distinctly expressed during chicken embryonic development. (c) 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  20. Inter-kingdom Signaling by the Legionella Quorum Sensing Molecule LAI-1 Modulates Cell Migration through an IQGAP1-Cdc42-ARHGEF9-Dependent Pathway.

    PubMed

    Simon, Sylvia; Schell, Ursula; Heuer, Natalie; Hager, Dominik; Albers, Michael F; Matthias, Jan; Fahrnbauer, Felix; Trauner, Dirk; Eichinger, Ludwig; Hedberg, Christian; Hilbi, Hubert

    2015-12-01

    Small molecule signaling promotes the communication between bacteria as well as between bacteria and eukaryotes. The opportunistic pathogenic bacterium Legionella pneumophila employs LAI-1 (3-hydroxypentadecane-4-one) for bacterial cell-cell communication. LAI-1 is produced and detected by the Lqs (Legionella quorum sensing) system, which regulates a variety of processes including natural competence for DNA uptake and pathogen-host cell interactions. In this study, we analyze the role of LAI-1 in inter-kingdom signaling. L. pneumophila lacking the autoinducer synthase LqsA no longer impeded the migration of infected cells, and the defect was complemented by plasmid-borne lqsA. Synthetic LAI-1 dose-dependently inhibited cell migration, without affecting bacterial uptake or cytotoxicity. The forward migration index but not the velocity of LAI-1-treated cells was reduced, and the cell cytoskeleton appeared destabilized. LAI-1-dependent inhibition of cell migration involved the scaffold protein IQGAP1, the small GTPase Cdc42 as well as the Cdc42-specific guanine nucleotide exchange factor ARHGEF9, but not other modulators of Cdc42, or RhoA, Rac1 or Ran GTPase. Upon treatment with LAI-1, Cdc42 was inactivated and IQGAP1 redistributed to the cell cortex regardless of whether Cdc42 was present or not. Furthermore, LAI-1 reversed the inhibition of cell migration by L. pneumophila, suggesting that the compound and the bacteria antagonistically target host signaling pathway(s). Collectively, the results indicate that the L. pneumophila quorum sensing compound LAI-1 modulates migration of eukaryotic cells through a signaling pathway involving IQGAP1, Cdc42 and ARHGEF9.

  1. Inter-kingdom Signaling by the Legionella Quorum Sensing Molecule LAI-1 Modulates Cell Migration through an IQGAP1-Cdc42-ARHGEF9-Dependent Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Sylvia; Schell, Ursula; Heuer, Natalie; Hager, Dominik; Albers, Michael F.; Matthias, Jan; Fahrnbauer, Felix; Trauner, Dirk; Eichinger, Ludwig; Hedberg, Christian; Hilbi, Hubert

    2015-01-01

    Small molecule signaling promotes the communication between bacteria as well as between bacteria and eukaryotes. The opportunistic pathogenic bacterium Legionella pneumophila employs LAI-1 (3-hydroxypentadecane-4-one) for bacterial cell-cell communication. LAI-1 is produced and detected by the Lqs (Legionella quorum sensing) system, which regulates a variety of processes including natural competence for DNA uptake and pathogen-host cell interactions. In this study, we analyze the role of LAI-1 in inter-kingdom signaling. L. pneumophila lacking the autoinducer synthase LqsA no longer impeded the migration of infected cells, and the defect was complemented by plasmid-borne lqsA. Synthetic LAI-1 dose-dependently inhibited cell migration, without affecting bacterial uptake or cytotoxicity. The forward migration index but not the velocity of LAI-1-treated cells was reduced, and the cell cytoskeleton appeared destabilized. LAI-1-dependent inhibition of cell migration involved the scaffold protein IQGAP1, the small GTPase Cdc42 as well as the Cdc42-specific guanine nucleotide exchange factor ARHGEF9, but not other modulators of Cdc42, or RhoA, Rac1 or Ran GTPase. Upon treatment with LAI-1, Cdc42 was inactivated and IQGAP1 redistributed to the cell cortex regardless of whether Cdc42 was present or not. Furthermore, LAI-1 reversed the inhibition of cell migration by L. pneumophila, suggesting that the compound and the bacteria antagonistically target host signaling pathway(s). Collectively, the results indicate that the L. pneumophila quorum sensing compound LAI-1 modulates migration of eukaryotic cells through a signaling pathway involving IQGAP1, Cdc42 and ARHGEF9. PMID:26633832

  2. Defective homing is associated with altered Cdc42 activity in cells from patients with Fanconi anemia group A

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaoling; Shang, Xun; Guo, Fukun; Murphy, Kim; Kirby, Michelle; Kelly, Patrick; Reeves, Lilith; Smith, Franklin O.; Williams, David A.

    2008-01-01

    Previous studies showed that Fanconi anemia (FA) murine stem cells have defective reconstitution after bone marrow (BM) transplantation. The mechanism underlying this defect is not known. Here, we report defective homing of FA patient BM progenitors transplanted into mouse models. Using cells from patients carrying mutations in FA complementation group A (FA-A), we show that when transplanted into nonobese diabetic/severe combined immunodeficiency (NOD/SCID) recipient mice, FA-A BM cells exhibited impaired homing activity. FA-A cells also showed defects in both cell-cell and cell-matrix adhesion. Complementation of FA-A deficiency by reexpression of FANCA readily restored adhesion of FA-A cells. A significant decrease in the activity of the Rho GTPase Cdc42 was found associated with these defective functions in patient-derived cells, and expression of a constitutively active Cdc42 mutant was able to rescue the adhesion defect of FA-A cells. These results provide the first evidence that FA proteins influence human BM progenitor homing and adhesion via the small GTPase Cdc42-regulated signaling pathway. PMID:18565850

  3. Genetically encoded photoswitching of actin assembly through the Cdc42-WASP-Arp2/3 complex pathway.

    PubMed

    Leung, Daisy W; Otomo, Chinatsu; Chory, Joanne; Rosen, Michael K

    2008-09-02

    General methods to engineer genetically encoded, reversible, light-mediated control over protein function would be useful in many areas of biomedical research and technology. We describe a system that yields such photo-control over actin assembly. We fused the Rho family GTPase Cdc42 in its GDP-bound form to the photosensory domain of phytochrome B (PhyB) and fused the Cdc42 effector, the Wiskott-Aldrich Syndrome Protein (WASP), to the light-dependent PhyB-binding domain of phytochrome interacting factor 3 (Pif3). Upon red light illumination, the fusion proteins bind each other, activating WASP, and consequently stimulating actin assembly by the WASP target, the Arp2/3 complex. Binding and WASP activation are reversed by far-red illumination. Our approach, in which the biochemical specificity of the nucleotide switch in Cdc42 is overridden by the light-dependent PhyB-Pif3 interaction, should be generally applicable to other GTPase-effector pairs.

  4. Genetically encoded photoswitching of actin assembly through the Cdc42-WASP-Arp2/3 complex pathway

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Daisy W.; Otomo, Chinatsu; Chory, Joanne; Rosen, Michael K.

    2008-01-01

    General methods to engineer genetically encoded, reversible, light-mediated control over protein function would be useful in many areas of biomedical research and technology. We describe a system that yields such photo-control over actin assembly. We fused the Rho family GTPase Cdc42 in its GDP-bound form to the photosensory domain of phytochrome B (PhyB) and fused the Cdc42 effector, the Wiskott-Aldrich Syndrome Protein (WASP), to the light-dependent PhyB-binding domain of phytochrome interacting factor 3 (Pif3). Upon red light illumination, the fusion proteins bind each other, activating WASP, and consequently stimulating actin assembly by the WASP target, the Arp2/3 complex. Binding and WASP activation are reversed by far-red illumination. Our approach, in which the biochemical specificity of the nucleotide switch in Cdc42 is overridden by the light-dependent PhyB-Pif3 interaction, should be generally applicable to other GTPase-effector pairs. PMID:18728185

  5. Rho GTPases regulate rhabdom morphology in octopus photoreceptors.

    PubMed

    Miller, Aria M; Ramirez, Teresa; Zuniga, Freddi I; Ochoa, Gina H; Gray, Shaunte; Kelly, Shannon D; Matsumoto, Brian; Robles, Laura J

    2005-01-01

    In the cephalopod retina, light/dark adaptation is accompanied by a decrease/increase in rhabdom size and redistribution of rhodopsin and retinochrome. Rearrangements in the actin cytoskeleton probably govern changes in rhabdom size by regulating the degradation/formation of rhabdomere microvilli. Photopigment movements may be directed by microtubules present in the outer segment core cytoplasm. We believe that rhodopsin activation by light stimulates Rho and Rac signaling pathways, affecting these cytoskeletal systems and their possible functions in controlling rhabdom morphology and protein movements. In this study, we localized cytoskeletal and signaling proteins in octopus photoreceptors to determine their concurrence between the lighting conditions. We used toxin B from Clostridium difficile to inhibit the activity of Rho/Rac and observed its effect on the location of signaling proteins and actin and tubulin. In both lighting conditions, we found Rho in specific sets of juxtaposed rhabdomeres in embryonic and adult retinas. In the light, Rho and actin were localized along the length of the rhabdomere, but, in the dark, both proteins were absent from a space beneath the inner limiting membrane. Rac colocalized with tubulin in the outer segment core cytoplasm and, like Rho, the two proteins were also absent beneath the inner limiting membrane in the dark. The distribution of actin and Rho was affected by toxin B and, in dark-adapted retinas, actin and Rho distribution was similar to that observed in the light. Our results suggest that the Rho/Rac GTPases are candidates for the regulation of rhabdomere size and protein movements in light-dark-adapted octopus photoreceptors.

  6. [Rho GTPases as therapeutic targets in cancer and other human diseases].

    PubMed

    Lorenzano Menna, Pablo; Cardama, Georgina A; Comin, María J; Alonso, Daniel F; Gómez, Daniel E

    2010-01-01

    Rho GTPases are a key protein family controlling the transduction of external signals to cytoplasmatic and nuclear effectors. In the last few years, the development of genetic and pharmacological tools has allowed a more precise definition of the specific roles of Rho GTPases. The aim of this review is to describe the cellular functions regulated by these proteins with focus on the molecular mechanism involved. We also address the role of Rho GTPases in the development of different human diseases such as cancer. Finally, we describe different experimental therapeutic strategies with Rho GTPases as molecular targets.

  7. Hyaluronan-mediated CD44 activation of RhoGTPase signaling and cytoskeleton function promotes tumor progression.

    PubMed

    Bourguignon, Lilly Y W

    2008-08-01

    Hyaluronan (HA), a major component of the extracellular matrix (ECM), is enriched in many types of tumors. In cancer patients HA concentrations are usually higher in malignant tumors than in corresponding benign or normal tissues, and in some tumor types the level of HA is predictive of malignancy. HA is often bound to CD44 isoforms which are ubiquitous, abundant, and functionally important cell surface receptors. This article reviews the current evidence for HA/CD44-mediated activation of the ankyrin-based cytoskeleton and RhoGTPase signaling during tumor progression. A special focus is placed on the role of HA-mediated CD44 interaction with unique downstream effectors (e.g., the cytoskeletal protein, ankyrin and/or various GTPases (e.g., RhoA, Rac1 and Cdc42)) in coordinating intracellular signaling pathways (e.g., Ca(2+) mobilization, Rho signaling, PI3 kinase-AKT activation, NHE1-mediated cellular acidification, transcriptional upregulation and cytoskeletal function) and generating the concomitant onset of tumor cell activities (e.g., tumor cell adhesion, growth, survival, migration and invasion) and tumor progression. I believe this information will provide valuable new insights into poorly understood aspects of solid tumor malignancy. Furthermore, the new knowledge concerning HA/CD44-mediated oncogenic signaling events will have potentially important clinical utility, and could establish CD44 and its associated signaling molecules as important tumor markers for the early detection and evaluation of oncogenic potential. It could also serve as ground work for the future development of new drug targets to inhibit HA/CD44-mediated tumor metastasis and cancer progression.

  8. Molecular characterization of a novel RhoGAP, RRC-1 of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans

    SciTech Connect

    Delawary, Mina; Nakazawa, Takanobu; Tezuka, Tohru; Sawa, Mariko; Iino, Yuichi; Takenawa, Tadaomi; Yamamoto, Tadashi . E-mail: tyamamot@ims.u-tokyo.ac.jp

    2007-06-01

    The GTPase-activating proteins for Rho family GTPases (RhoGAP) transduce diverse intracellular signals by negatively regulating Rho family GTPase-mediated pathways. In this study, we have cloned and characterized a novel RhoGAP for Rac1 and Cdc42, termed RRC-1, from Caenorhabditis elegans. RRC-1 was highly homologous to mammalian p250GAP and promoted GTP hydrolysis of Rac1 and Cdc42 in cells. The rrc-1 mRNA was expressed in all life stages. Using an RRC-1::GFP fusion protein, we found that RRC-1 was localized to the coelomocytes, excretory cell, GLR cells, and uterine-seam cell in adult worms. These data contribute toward understanding the roles of Rho family GTPases in C. elegans.

  9. Rho GTPases in insulin-stimulated glucose uptake

    PubMed Central

    Satoh, Takaya

    2014-01-01

    Insulin is secreted into blood vessels from β cells of pancreatic islets in response to high blood glucose levels. Insulin stimulates an array of physiological responses in target tissues, including liver, skeletal muscle, and adipose tissue, thereby reducing the blood glucose level. Insulin-dependent glucose uptake in skeletal muscle and adipose tissue is primarily mediated by the redistribution of the glucose transporter type 4 from intracellular storage sites to the plasma membrane. Evidence for the participation of the Rho family GTPase Rac1 in glucose uptake signaling in skeletal muscle has emerged from studies using cell cultures and genetically engineered mice. Herein, recent progress in understanding the function and regulation of Rac1, especially the cross-talk with the protein kinase Akt2, is highlighted. In addition, the role for another Rho family member TC10 and its regulatory mechanism in adipocyte insulin signaling are described. PMID:24613967

  10. Rho-GTPase-regulated vesicle trafficking in plant cell polarity.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xu; Friml, Jiří

    2014-02-01

    ROPs (Rho of plants) belong to a large family of plant-specific Rho-like small GTPases that function as essential molecular switches to control diverse cellular processes including cytoskeleton organization, cell polarization, cytokinesis, cell differentiation and vesicle trafficking. Although the machineries of vesicle trafficking and cell polarity in plants have been individually well addressed, how ROPs co-ordinate those processes is still largely unclear. Recent progress has been made towards an understanding of the co-ordination of ROP signalling and trafficking of PIN (PINFORMED) transporters for the plant hormone auxin in both root and leaf pavement cells. PIN transporters constantly shuttle between the endosomal compartments and the polar plasma membrane domains, therefore the modulation of PIN-dependent auxin transport between cells is a main developmental output of ROP-regulated vesicle trafficking. The present review focuses on these cellular mechanisms, especially the integration of ROP-based vesicle trafficking and plant cell polarity.

  11. A Quantitative Fluorometric Approach for Measuring the Interaction of RhoGDI with Membranes and Rho GTPases

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Jared; Cerione, Richard A.; Erickson, Jon W.

    2013-01-01

    Tight regulation of Rho GTPase-signaling functions requires the proper localization of proteins to the membrane and cytosolic compartments, which can themselves undergo reconfiguration in response to signaling events. The importance of lipid-mediated membrane signal transduction continues to emerge as a critical event in many Rho GTPase-signaling pathways. Here we describe methods for the reconstitution of lipid-modified Rho GTPases with defined lipid vesicles and how this system can be used as a real-time assay for monitoring protein–membrane interactions. PMID:22144271

  12. The Role of Rho GTPase Proteins in CNS Neuronal Migration

    PubMed Central

    Govek, Eve-Ellen; Hatten, Mary E.; Van Aelst, Linda

    2011-01-01

    The architectonics of the mammalian brain arise from a remarkable range of directed cell migrations, which orchestrate the emergence of cortical neuronal layers and pattern brain circuitry. At different stages of cortical histogenesis, specific modes of cell motility are essential to the stepwise formation of cortical architecture. These movements range from interkinetic nuclear movements at the ventricular zone (VZ), to migrations of early-born, postmitotic polymorphic cells into the preplate, to the radial migration of precursors of cortical output neurons across the thickening cortical wall, and the vast, tangential migrations of interneurons from the basal forebrain into the emerging cortical layers. In all cases, acto-myosin motors act in concert with cell adhesion receptor systems to provide the force and traction needed for forward movement. As key regulators of actin and microtubule cytoskeletons, cell polarity, and adhesion, the Rho GTPases play a critical role in CNS neuronal migration. This review will focus on the different types of migration in the developing neocortex and cerebellar cortex, and the role of the Rho GTPases, their regulators and effectors in these CNS migrations, with particular emphasis on their involvement in radial migration. PMID:21557504

  13. Scaffold-mediated gating of Cdc42 signalling flux

    PubMed Central

    Rapali, Péter; Mitteau, Romain; Braun, Craig; Massoni-Laporte, Aurèlie; Ünlü, Caner; Bataille, Laure; Arramon, Floriane Saint; Gygi, Steven P; McCusker, Derek

    2017-01-01

    Scaffold proteins modulate signalling pathway activity spatially and temporally. In budding yeast, the scaffold Bem1 contributes to polarity axis establishment by regulating the GTPase Cdc42. Although different models have been proposed for Bem1 function, there is little direct evidence for an underlying mechanism. Here, we find that Bem1 directly augments the guanine exchange factor (GEF) activity of Cdc24. Bem1 also increases GEF phosphorylation by the p21-activated kinase (PAK), Cla4. Phosphorylation abrogates the scaffold-dependent stimulation of GEF activity, rendering Cdc24 insensitive to additional Bem1. Thus, Bem1 stimulates GEF activity in a reversible fashion, contributing to signalling flux through Cdc42. The contribution of Bem1 to GTPase dynamics was borne-out by in vivo imaging: active Cdc42 was enriched at the cell pole in hypophosphorylated cdc24 mutants, while hyperphosphorylated cdc24 mutants that were resistant to scaffold stimulation displayed a deficit in active Cdc42 at the pole. These findings illustrate the self-regulatory properties that scaffold proteins confer on signalling pathways. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.25257.001 PMID:28304276

  14. Rho family-associated kinases PAK1 and rock.

    PubMed

    Maruta, Hiroshi; Nheu, Thao V; He, Hong; Hirokawa, Yumiko

    2003-01-01

    Rho family GTPases (Rho, Rac and CDC42) share around 30% sequence identity with RAS family GTPases, and are essential for RAS-induced malignant transformation, i.e., aberrant serum/anchorage-independent growth and actin cytoskeleton-linked morphological changes. Oncogenic RAS mutants such as v-Ha-RAS trigger cell cycle entry (G0-G1 transition) mainly by up-regulating cyclin D1, an activator of cyclin-dependent kinases (CDK), and down-regulating p27, a CDK inhibitor. Although both Rac and CDC42 are clearly activated by RAS, there is so far no evidence that RAS activates Rho. In this chapter, we will discuss the role of these Rho family GTPases and their effectors, in particular the Ser/Thr kinases PAK1 and Rock, in RAS-induced serum/anchorage-independent cell cycling, and discuss several potential therapeutics, peptides or chemical compounds, that could block this oncogenic cell cycle signalling pathway.

  15. The cell polarity determinant CDC42 controls division symmetry to block leukemia cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Mizukawa, Benjamin; O'Brien, Eric; Moreira, Daniel C; Wunderlich, Mark; Hochstetler, Cindy L; Duan, Xin; Liu, Wei; Orr, Emily; Grimes, H Leighton; Mulloy, James C; Zheng, Yi

    2017-09-14

    As a central regulator of cell polarity, the activity of CDC42 GTPase is tightly controlled in maintaining normal hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell (HSC/P) functions. We found that transformation of HSC/P to acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is associated with increased CDC42 expression and activity in leukemia cells. In a mouse model of AML, the loss of Cdc42 abrogates MLL-AF9-induced AML development. Furthermore, genetic ablation of CDC42 in both murine and human MLL-AF9 (MA9) cells decreased survival and induced differentiation of the clonogenic leukemia-initiating cells. We show that MLL-AF9 leukemia cells maintain cell polarity in the context of elevated Cdc42-guanosine triphosphate activity, similar to nonmalignant, young HSC/Ps. The loss of Cdc42 resulted in a shift to depolarized AML cells that is associated with a decrease in the frequency of symmetric and asymmetric cell divisions producing daughter cells capable of self-renewal. Importantly, we demonstrate that inducible CDC42 suppression in primary human AML cells blocks leukemia progression in a xenograft model. Thus, CDC42 loss suppresses AML cell polarity and division asymmetry, and CDC42 constitutes a useful target to alter leukemia-initiating cell fate for differentiation therapy. © 2017 by The American Society of Hematology.

  16. Minireview: Mouse Models of Rho GTPase Function in Mammary Gland Development, Tumorigenesis, and Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Zuo, Yan; Oh, Wonkyung; Ulu, Arzu

    2016-01-01

    Ras homolog (Rho) family small GTPases are critical regulators of actin cytoskeletal organization, cell motility, proliferation, and survival. Surprisingly, the large majority of the studies underlying our knowledge of Rho protein function have been carried out in cultured cells, and it is only recently that researchers have begun to assess Rho GTPase regulation and function in vivo. The purpose of this review is to evaluate our current knowledge of Rho GTPase function in mouse mammary gland development, tumorigenesis and metastasis. Although our knowledge is still incomplete, these studies are already uncovering important themes as to the physiological roles of Rho GTPase signaling in normal mammary gland development and function. Essential contributions of Rho proteins to breast cancer initiation, tumor progression, and metastatic dissemination have also been identified. PMID:26677753

  17. Guanine nucleotide exchange factors for RhoGTPases: good therapeutic targets for cancer therapy?

    PubMed

    Lazer, Galit; Katzav, Shulamit

    2011-06-01

    Rho guanosine triphosphatases (GTPases) are a family of small proteins which function as molecular switches in a variety of signaling pathways following stimulation of cell surface receptors. RhoGTPases regulate numerous cellular processes including cytoskeleton organization, gene transcription, cell proliferation, migration, growth and cell survival. Because of their central role in regulating processes that are dysregulated in cancer, it seems reasonable that defects in the RhoGTPase pathway may be involved in the development of cancer. RhoGTPase activity is regulated by a number of protein families: guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs), GTPase activating proteins (GAPs) and guanine nucleotide-dissociation inhibitors (GDIs). This review discusses the participation of RhoGTPases and their regulators, especially GEFs in human cancers. In particular, we focus on the involvement of the RhoGTPase GEF, Vav1, a hematopoietic specific signal transducer which is involved in human neuroblastoma, pancreatic ductal carcinoma and lung cancer. Finally, we summarize recent advances in the design and application of a number of molecules that specifically target individual RhoGTPases or their regulators or effectors, and discuss their potential for cancer therapy.

  18. A Rac/Cdc42 exchange factor complex promotes formation of lateral filopodia and blood vessel lumen morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Abraham, Sabu; Scarcia, Margherita; Bagshaw, Richard D; McMahon, Kathryn; Grant, Gary; Harvey, Tracey; Yeo, Maggie; Esteves, Filomena O G; Thygesen, Helene H; Jones, Pamela F; Speirs, Valerie; Hanby, Andrew M; Selby, Peter J; Lorger, Mihaela; Dear, T Neil; Pawson, Tony; Marshall, Christopher J; Mavria, Georgia

    2015-07-01

    During angiogenesis, Rho-GTPases influence endothelial cell migration and cell-cell adhesion; however it is not known whether they control formation of vessel lumens, which are essential for blood flow. Here, using an organotypic system that recapitulates distinct stages of VEGF-dependent angiogenesis, we show that lumen formation requires early cytoskeletal remodelling and lateral cell-cell contacts, mediated through the RAC1 guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) DOCK4 (dedicator of cytokinesis 4). DOCK4 signalling is necessary for lateral filopodial protrusions and tubule remodelling prior to lumen formation, whereas proximal, tip filopodia persist in the absence of DOCK4. VEGF-dependent Rac activation via DOCK4 is necessary for CDC42 activation to signal filopodia formation and depends on the activation of RHOG through the RHOG GEF, SGEF. VEGF promotes interaction of DOCK4 with the CDC42 GEF DOCK9. These studies identify a novel Rho-family GTPase activation cascade for the formation of endothelial cell filopodial protrusions necessary for tubule remodelling, thereby influencing subsequent stages of lumen morphogenesis.

  19. A Rac/Cdc42 exchange factor complex promotes formation of lateral filopodia and blood vessel lumen morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Abraham, Sabu; Scarcia, Margherita; Bagshaw, Richard D.; McMahon, Kathryn; Grant, Gary; Harvey, Tracey; Yeo, Maggie; Esteves, Filomena O.G.; Thygesen, Helene H.; Jones, Pamela F.; Speirs, Valerie; Hanby, Andrew M.; Selby, Peter J.; Lorger, Mihaela; Dear, T. Neil; Pawson, Tony; Marshall, Christopher J.; Mavria, Georgia

    2015-01-01

    During angiogenesis, Rho-GTPases influence endothelial cell migration and cell–cell adhesion; however it is not known whether they control formation of vessel lumens, which are essential for blood flow. Here, using an organotypic system that recapitulates distinct stages of VEGF-dependent angiogenesis, we show that lumen formation requires early cytoskeletal remodelling and lateral cell–cell contacts, mediated through the RAC1 guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) DOCK4 (dedicator of cytokinesis 4). DOCK4 signalling is necessary for lateral filopodial protrusions and tubule remodelling prior to lumen formation, whereas proximal, tip filopodia persist in the absence of DOCK4. VEGF-dependent Rac activation via DOCK4 is necessary for CDC42 activation to signal filopodia formation and depends on the activation of RHOG through the RHOG GEF, SGEF. VEGF promotes interaction of DOCK4 with the CDC42 GEF DOCK9. These studies identify a novel Rho-family GTPase activation cascade for the formation of endothelial cell filopodial protrusions necessary for tubule remodelling, thereby influencing subsequent stages of lumen morphogenesis. PMID:26129894

  20. Cdc24, the GDP-GTP exchange factor for Cdc42, is required for invasive hyphal growth of Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Bassilana, Martine; Blyth, James; Arkowitz, Robert A

    2003-02-01

    Candida albicans, the most common human fungal pathogen, is particularly problematic for immunocompromised individuals. The reversible transition of this fungal pathogen to a filamentous form that invades host tissue is important for its virulence. Although different signaling pathways such as a mitogen-activated protein kinase and a protein kinase A cascade are critical for this morphological transition, the function of polarity establishment proteins in this process has not been determined. We examined the role of four different polarity establishment proteins in C. albicans invasive growth and virulence by using strains in which one copy of each gene was deleted and the other copy expressed behind the regulatable promoter MET3. Strikingly, mutants with ectopic expression of either the Rho G-protein Cdc42 or its exchange factor Cdc24 are unable to form invasive hyphal filaments and germ tubes in response to serum or elevated temperature and yet grow normally as a budding yeast. Furthermore, these mutants are avirulent in a mouse model for systemic infection. This function of the Cdc42 GTPase module is not simply a general feature of polarity establishment proteins. Mutants with ectopic expression of the SH3 domain containing protein Bem1 or the Ras-like G-protein Bud1 can grow in an invasive fashion and are virulent in mice, albeit with reduced efficiency. These results indicate that a specific regulation of Cdc24/Cdc42 activity is required for invasive hyphal growth and suggest that these proteins are required for pathogenicity of C. albicans.

  1. The Crystal Structure of Cdc42 in Complex with Collybisin II, a Gephyrin-Interacting Guanine Nucleotide Exchange Factor

    SciTech Connect

    Xiang,S.; Kim, E.; Connelly, J.; Nassar, N.; Kirsch, J.; WinkingSchwartz, G.; Schindelin, H.

    2006-01-01

    The synaptic localization of ion channel receptors is essential for efficient synaptic transmission and the precise regulation of diverse neuronal functions. In the central nervous system, ion channel receptors reside in the postsynaptic membrane where they are juxtaposed to presynaptic terminals. For proper function, these ion channels have to be anchored to the cytoskeleton, and in the case of the inhibitory glycine and {gamma}-amino-butyric acid type A (GABA{sub A}) receptors this interaction is mediated by a gephyrin centered scaffold. Highlighting its central role in this receptor anchoring scaffold, gephyrin interacts with a number of proteins, including the neurospecific guanine nucleotide exchange factor collybistin. Collybistin belongs to the Dbl family of guanine nucleotide exchange factors, occurs in multiple splice variants, and is specific for Cdc42, a small GTPase belonging to the Rho family. The 2.3 Angstroms resolution crystal structure of the Cdc42--collybistin II complex reveals a novel conformation of the switch I region of Cdc42. It also provides the first direct observation of structural changes in the relative orientation of the Dbl-homology domain and the pleckstrin-homology domain in the same Dbl family protein. Biochemical data indicate that gephyrin negatively regulates collybistin activity.

  2. Small interfering RNAs as a tool to assign Rho GTPase exchange-factor function in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Gampel, Alexandra; Mellor, Harry

    2002-01-01

    Rho GTPases control a complex network of intracellular signalling pathways. Whereas progress has been made in identifying downstream signalling partners for these proteins, the characterization of Rho upstream regulatory guanine-nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) has been hampered by a lack of suitable research tools. Here we use small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) to examine the cellular regulation of the RhoB GTPase, and show that RhoB is activated downstream of the epidermal-growth-factor receptor through the Vav2 exchange factor. These studies demonstrate that siRNAs are an ideal research tool for the assignment of Rho GEF function in vivo. PMID:12113653

  3. Expanding functions of GIT Arf GTPase-activating proteins, PIX Rho guanine nucleotide exchange factors and GIT-PIX complexes.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Wu; Li, Xiaobo; Premont, Richard T

    2016-05-15

    The GIT proteins, GIT1 and GIT2, are GTPase-activating proteins (inactivators) for the ADP-ribosylation factor (Arf) small GTP-binding proteins, and function to limit the activity of Arf proteins. The PIX proteins, α-PIX and β-PIX (also known as ARHGEF6 and ARHGEF7, respectively), are guanine nucleotide exchange factors (activators) for the Rho family small GTP-binding protein family members Rac1 and Cdc42. Through their multi-domain structures, GIT and PIX proteins can also function as signaling scaffolds by binding to numerous protein partners. Importantly, the constitutive association of GIT and PIX proteins into oligomeric GIT-PIX complexes allows these two proteins to function together as subunits of a larger structure that coordinates two distinct small GTP-binding protein pathways and serves as multivalent scaffold for the partners of both constituent subunits. Studies have revealed the involvement of GIT and PIX proteins, and of the GIT-PIX complex, in numerous fundamental cellular processes through a wide variety of mechanisms, pathways and signaling partners. In this Commentary, we discuss recent findings in key physiological systems that exemplify current understanding of the function of this important regulatory complex. Further, we draw attention to gaps in crucial information that remain to be filled to allow a better understanding of the many roles of the GIT-PIX complex in health and disease. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  4. Polarity establishment by Cdc42: Key roles for positive feedback and differential mobility.

    PubMed

    Woods, Benjamin; Lew, Daniel J

    2017-03-28

    Cell polarity is fundamental to the function of most cells. The evolutionarily conserved molecular machinery that controls cell polarity is centered on a family of GTPases related to Cdc42. Cdc42 becomes activated and concentrated at polarity sites, but studies in yeast model systems led to controversy on the mechanisms of polarization. Here we review recent studies that have clarified how Cdc42 becomes polarized in yeast. On one hand, findings that appeared to support a key role for the actin cytoskeleton and vesicle traffic in polarity establishment now appear to reflect the action of stress response pathways induced by cytoskeletal perturbations. On the other hand, new findings strongly support hypotheses on the polarization mechanism whose origins date back to the mathematician Alan Turing. The key features of the polarity establishment mechanism in yeasts include a positive feedback pathway in which active Cdc42 recruits a Cdc42 activator to polarity sites, and differential mobility of polarity "activators" and "substrates."

  5. MYC-nick promotes cell migration by inducing fascin expression and Cdc42 activation

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Sarah; Poudel, Kumud Raj; Roh-Johnson, Minna; Brabletz, Thomas; Yu, Ming; Borenstein-Auerbach, Nofit; Grady, William N.; Bai, Jihong; Moens, Cecilia B.; Eisenman, Robert N.; Conacci-Sorrell, Maralice

    2016-01-01

    MYC-nick is a cytoplasmic, transcriptionally inactive member of the MYC oncoprotein family, generated by a proteolytic cleavage of full-length MYC. MYC-nick promotes migration and survival of cells in response to chemotherapeutic agents or withdrawal of glucose. Here we report that MYC-nick is abundant in colonic and intestinal tumors derived from mouse models with mutations in the Wnt, TGF-β, and PI3K pathways. Moreover, MYC-nick is elevated in colon cancer cells deleted for FBWX7, which encodes the major E3 ligase of full-length MYC frequently mutated in colorectal cancers. MYC-nick promotes the migration of colon cancer cells assayed in 3D cultures or grown as xenografts in a zebrafish metastasis model. MYC-nick accelerates migration by activating the Rho GTPase Cdc42 and inducing fascin expression. MYC-nick, fascin, and Cdc42 are frequently up-regulated in cells present at the invasive front of human colorectal tumors, suggesting a coordinated role for these proteins in tumor migration. PMID:27566402

  6. MAP1B Regulates Axonal Development by Modulating Rho-GTPase Rac1 Activity

    PubMed Central

    Montenegro-Venegas, Carolina; Tortosa, Elena; Rosso, Silvana; Peretti, Diego; Bollati, Flavia; Bisbal, Mariano; Jausoro, Ignacio; Avila, Jesus; Cáceres, Alfredo

    2010-01-01

    Cultured neurons obtained from MAP1B-deficient mice have a delay in axon outgrowth and a reduced rate of axonal elongation compared with neurons from wild-type mice. Here we show that MAP1B deficiency results in a significant decrease in Rac1 and cdc42 activity and a significant increase in Rho activity. We found that MAP1B interacted with Tiam1, a guanosine nucleotide exchange factor for Rac1. The decrease in Rac1/cdc42 activity was paralleled by decreases in the phosphorylation of the downstream effectors of these proteins, such as LIMK-1 and cofilin. The expression of a constitutively active form of Rac1, cdc42, or Tiam1 rescued the axon growth defect of MAP1B-deficient neurons. Taken together, these observations define a new and crucial function of MAP1B that we show to be required for efficient cross-talk between microtubules and the actin cytoskeleton during neuronal polarization. PMID:20719958

  7. EhRho1, a RhoA-like GTPase of Entamoeba histolytica, is modified by clostridial glucosylating cytotoxins.

    PubMed

    Majumder, Shubhra; Schmidt, Gudula; Lohia, Anuradha; Aktories, Klaus

    2006-12-01

    Clostridial glucosylating cytotoxins inactivate mammalian Rho GTPases by mono-O glucosylation of a conserved threonine residue located in the switch 1 region of the target protein. Here we report that EhRho1, a RhoA-like GTPase from the protozoan parasite Entamoeba histolytica, is glucosylated by clostridial cytotoxins. Recombinant glutathione S-transferase-EhRho1 and EhRho1 from cell lysate of Entamoeba histolytica were glucosylated by Clostridium difficile toxin B and Clostridium novyi alpha-toxin. In contrast, Clostridium difficile toxin A, which shares the same mammalian protein substrates with toxin B, did not modify EhRho1. Change of threonine 52 of EhRho1 to alanine prevented glucosylation by toxin B from Clostridium difficile and by alpha-toxin from Clostridium novyi, which suggests that the equivalent threonine residues are glucosylated in mammalian and Entamoeba Rho GTPases. Lethal toxin from Clostridium sordellii did not glucosylate EhRho1 but labeled several other substrate proteins in lysates from Entamoeba histolytica in the presence of UDP-[14C]glucose.

  8. EhRho1, a RhoA-Like GTPase of Entamoeba histolytica, Is Modified by Clostridial Glucosylating Cytotoxins▿

    PubMed Central

    Majumder, Shubhra; Schmidt, Gudula; Lohia, Anuradha; Aktories, Klaus

    2006-01-01

    Clostridial glucosylating cytotoxins inactivate mammalian Rho GTPases by mono-O glucosylation of a conserved threonine residue located in the switch 1 region of the target protein. Here we report that EhRho1, a RhoA-like GTPase from the protozoan parasite Entamoeba histolytica, is glucosylated by clostridial cytotoxins. Recombinant glutathione S-transferase-EhRho1 and EhRho1 from cell lysate of Entamoeba histolytica were glucosylated by Clostridium difficile toxin B and Clostridium novyi alpha-toxin. In contrast, Clostridium difficile toxin A, which shares the same mammalian protein substrates with toxin B, did not modify EhRho1. Change of threonine 52 of EhRho1 to alanine prevented glucosylation by toxin B from Clostridium difficile and by alpha-toxin from Clostridium novyi, which suggests that the equivalent threonine residues are glucosylated in mammalian and Entamoeba Rho GTPases. Lethal toxin from Clostridium sordellii did not glucosylate EhRho1 but labeled several other substrate proteins in lysates from Entamoeba histolytica in the presence of UDP-[14C]glucose. PMID:17056697

  9. Cannabinoid Receptor Type 1 (CB1) Activation Inhibits Small GTPase RhoA Activity and Regulates Motility of Prostate Carcinoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Gomez-Granados, Ana Doris; Tang, Alan T.; Pfeiffer, Adam W.; Williams, Carol L.; Campbell, William B.

    2012-01-01

    The cannabinoid receptor type 1 (CB1) is a G protein-coupled receptor that is activated in an autocrine fashion by the endocannabinoids (EC), N-arachidonoylethanolamine (AEA) and 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG). The CB1 and its endogenous and synthetic agonists are emerging as therapeutic targets in several cancers due to their ability to suppress carcinoma cell invasion and migration. However, the mechanisms that the CB1 regulates cell motility are not well understood. In this study, we examined the molecular mechanisms that diminish cell migration upon the CB1 activation in prostate carcinoma cells. The CB1 activation with the agonist WIN55212 significantly diminishes the small GTPase RhoA activity but modestly increases the Rac1 and Cdc42 activity. The diminished RhoA activity is accompanied by the loss of actin/myosin microfilaments, cell spreading, and cell migration. Interestingly, the CB1 inactivation with the selective CB1 antagonist AM251 significantly increases RhoA activity, enhances microfilament formation and cell spreading, and promotes cell migration. This finding suggests that endogenously produced EC activate the CB1, resulting in chronic repression of RhoA activity and cell migration. Consistent with this possibility, RhoA activity is significantly diminished by the exogenous application of AEA but not by 2-AG in PC-3 cells (cells with very low AEA hydrolysis). Pretreatment of cells with a monoacylglycerol lipase inhibitor, JZL184, which blocks 2-AG hydrolysis, decreases the RhoA activity. These results indicate the unique CB1 signaling and support the model that EC, through their autocrine activation of CB1 and subsequent repression of RhoA activity, suppress migration in prostate carcinoma cells. PMID:22087025

  10. High Throughput Flow Cytometry Bead-based Multiplex Assay for Identification of Rho GTPase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Surviladze, Zurab; Young, Susan M; Sklar, Larry A

    2015-01-01

    Summary Rho family GTPases and their effector proteins regulate a wide range of cell signaling pathways. In normal physiological conditions their activity is tightly controlled and it is not surprising that their aberrant activation contributes to tumorigenesis or other diseases. For this reason, the identification of small, cell permeable molecules capable of inhibition of Rho GTPases can be extraordinarily useful, particularly if they are specific and act reversibly. Herein we describe a flow cytometric assay, which allows us to measure the activity of six small GTPases simultaneously. GST-tagged small GTPases are bound to six glutathione bead sets each set having a different intensity of red fluorescence at a fixed wavelength. The coated bead sets were washed, combined, and dispensed into 384-well plates with test compounds, and fluorescent-GTP binding was used as the read-out. This multiplex bead-based assay was successfully used for to identify both general and selective inhibitors of Rho family GTPases. PMID:22144280

  11. The role of RhoJ in endothelial cell biology and angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Leszczynska, Katarzyna; Kaur, Sukhbir; Wilson, Eleanor; Bicknell, Roy; Heath, Victoria L

    2011-12-01

    RhoJ is an endothelially expressed member of the Cdc42 (cell division cycle 42) subfamily of small Rho GTPases. It is expressed in both the developing mammalian vasculature and the vascular beds of a number of adult tissues, with its expression regulated by the endothelial transcription factor ERG (ETS-related gene). RhoJ has been shown to regulate endothelial motility, tubulogenesis and lumen formation in vitro, and modulates the vascularization of Matrigel plugs in vivo. Both vascular endothelial growth factor and semaphorin 3E have been found to affect its activation. RhoJ has been shown to be a focal-adhesion-localized Rho GTPase which can modulate focal adhesion number, actomyosin contractility and activity of Cdc42 and Rac1. The present review discusses the biology of RhoJ with a focus on recent reports of its role in endothelial cells and angiogenesis.

  12. Xenopus Cdc42 regulates convergent extension movements during gastrulation through Wnt/Ca2+ signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Choi, Sun-Cheol; Han, Jin-Kwan

    2002-04-15

    Rho GTPases are molecular switches that regulate many essential cellular processes, including actin dynamics, cell adhesion, cell-cycle progression, and transcription. We have isolated the Xenopus homolog of Rho GTPase Cdc42 and examined its potential role during gastrulation movements in early Xenopus embryos. XCdc42 is expressed in tissues undergoing extensive morphogenetic changes, such as the deep layers of involuting mesoderm and posterior neuroectoderm during gastrulation, and somitic mesoderm at neurula stages. Overexpression of either wild-type (WT) or dominant-negative (DN) XCdc42 interferes with convergent extension movements in intact embryos, activin-stimulated animal caps, and dorsal marginal zone explants. These effects occur without affecting mesodermal specification. Overexpression of WT or DN XCdc42 leads to the decrease and increase of cell adhesiveness of blastomeres, respectively, as demonstrated by the cell adhesion assay. In addition, when overexpressed, PKC-alpha, XWnt-5a, and Mfz-3 inhibit activin-induced convergent extension in animal cap explants. This inhibition can be rescued by coexpression of DN XCdc42, implying that XCdc42 acts downstream of the Wnt/Ca2+ signaling pathway involving PKC activation. XCdc42 also lies downstream of XWnt-5a in the regulation of Ca2+-dependent cell adhesion. Taken together, our results suggest that XCdc42 plays a role in the regulation of convergent extension movements during gastrulation through the protein kinase C-mediated Wnt/Ca2+ pathway.

  13. Inhibition of the Rho GTPase, Rac1, decreases estrogen receptor levels and is a novel therapeutic strategy in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Rosenblatt, Adena E; Garcia, Maria Ines; Lyons, Leah; Xie, Yingqiu; Maiorino, Carol; Désiré, Laurent; Slingerland, Joyce; Burnstein, Kerry L

    2011-04-01

    Rac1, a Rho GTPase, modulates diverse cellular processes and is hyperactive in some cancers. Estrogen receptor-alpha (ERα) in concert with intracellular signaling pathways regulates genes associated with cell proliferation, tumor development, and breast cancer cell survival. Therefore, we examined the possibility of Rac1 and ERα crosstalk in breast cancer cells. We found that Rac1 enhanced ERα transcriptional activity in breast cancer cells. Vav3, a Rho guanine nucleotide exchange factor that activates Rac1, was an upstream mediator, and P21/Cdc42/Rac1 activating kinase-1 (Pak-1) was a downstream effector of Rac1 enhancement of ERα activity. These results suggest that Rac1 may prove to be a therapeutic target. To test this hypothesis, we used a small molecule Rac inhibitor, EHT 1864, and found that EHT 1864 inhibited ERα transcriptional activity. Furthermore, EHT 1864 inhibited estrogen-induced cell proliferation in breast cancer cells and decreased tamoxifen-resistant breast cancer cell growth. EHT 1864 decreased activity of the promoter of the ERα gene resulting in down-regulation of ERα mRNA and protein levels. Therefore, ERα down-regulation by EHT 1864 is the likely mechanism of EHT 1864-mediated inhibition of ERα activity and estrogen-stimulated breast cancer cell proliferation. Since ERα plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of breast cancer and the Rac inhibitor EHT 1864 down-regulates ERα expression and breast cancer cell proliferation, further investigation of the therapeutic potential of Rac1 targeting in the treatment of breast cancer is warranted.

  14. RhoA GTPase oxidation stimulates cell proliferation via nuclear factor-κB activation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jae-Gyu; Kwon, Hyung-Joo; Wu, Guang; Park, Yohan; Lee, Jae-Yong; Kim, Jaebong; Kim, Sung-Chan; Choe, Myoen; Kang, Seung Goo; Seo, Goo-Young; Kim, Pyeung-Hyeun; Park, Jae-Bong

    2017-02-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) produced by many kinds of stimuli are essential for cellular signaling including cell proliferation. The dysregulation of ROS, therefore, is related to a variety of diseases including cancer. However, it was not clearly elucidated how ROS regulate cell proliferation and tumorigenesis. In this study, we investigated a mechanism by which the oxidation of RhoA GTPase regulates nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) and cell proliferation. Hydrogen peroxide activated NF-κB and RhoA GTPase, but did not activate RhoA C16/20A mutant, an oxidation-resistant form. Remarkably, the oxidation of RhoA reduced its affinity towards RhoGDI, leading to the dissociation of RhoA-RhoGDI complex. Si-Vav2, a guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF), inhibited RhoA activation upon hydrogen peroxide. The oxidized RhoA (oxRhoA)-GTP was readily bound to IκB kinase γ (IKKγ), whereas oxidized RhoGDI did not bind to IKKγ. The oxRhoA-GTP bound to IKKγ activated IKKβ, leading to IκB phosphorylation and degradation, consequently NF-κB activation. Hydrogen peroxide induced cell proliferation, but RhoA C16/20A mutant suppressed cell proliferation and tumorigenesis. Conclusively, RhoA oxidation at Cys16/20 is critically involved in cell proliferation and tumorigenesis through NF-κB activation in response to ROS.

  15. Rho GTPase-independent regulation of mitotic progression by the RhoGEF Net1.

    PubMed

    Menon, Sarita; Oh, Wonkyung; Carr, Heather S; Frost, Jeffrey A

    2013-09-01

    Neuroepithelial transforming gene 1 (Net1) is a RhoA-subfamily-specific guanine nucleotide exchange factor that is overexpressed in multiple human cancers and is required for proliferation. Molecular mechanisms underlying its role in cell proliferation are unknown. Here we show that overexpression or knockdown of Net1 causes mitotic defects. Net1 is required for chromosome congression during metaphase and generation of stable kinetochore microtubule attachments. Accordingly, inhibition of Net1 expression results in spindle assembly checkpoint activation. The ability of Net1 to control mitosis is independent of RhoA or RhoB activation, as knockdown of either GTPase does not phenocopy effects of Net1 knockdown on nuclear morphology, and effects of Net1 knockdown are effectively rescued by expression of catalytically inactive Net1. We also observe that Net1 expression is required for centrosomal activation of p21-activated kinase and its downstream kinase Aurora A, which are critical regulators of centrosome maturation and spindle assembly. These results identify Net1 as a novel regulator of mitosis and indicate that altered expression of Net1, as occurs in human cancers, may adversely affect genomic stability.

  16. YES, a Src family kinase, is a proximal glucose-specific activator of cell division cycle control protein 42 (Cdc42) in pancreatic islet β cells.

    PubMed

    Yoder, Stephanie M; Dineen, Stacey L; Wang, Zhanxiang; Thurmond, Debbie C

    2014-04-18

    Second-phase insulin secretion sustains insulin release in the face of hyperglycemia associated with insulin resistance, requiring the continued mobilization of insulin secretory granules to the plasma membrane. Cdc42, the small Rho family GTPase recognized as the proximal glucose-specific trigger to elicit second-phase insulin secretion, signals downstream to activate the p21-activated kinase (PAK1), which then signals to Raf-1/MEK/ERK to induce filamentous actin (F-actin) remodeling, to ultimately mobilize insulin granules to the plasma membrane. However, the steps required to initiate Cdc42 activation in a glucose-specific manner in β cells have remained elusive. Toward this, we identified the involvement of the Src family kinases (SFKs), based upon the ability of SFK inhibitors to block glucose-stimulated Cdc42 and PAK1 activation events as well as the amplifying pathway of glucose-stimulated insulin release, in MIN6 β cells. Indeed, subsequent studies performed in human islets revealed that SFK phosphorylation was induced only by glucose and within 1 min of stimulation before the activation of Cdc42 at 3 min. Furthermore, pervanadate treatment validated the phosphorylation event to be tyrosine-specific. Although RT-PCR showed β cells to express five different SFK proteins, only two of these, YES and Fyn kinases, were found localized to the plasma membrane, and of these two, only YES kinase underwent glucose-stimulated tyrosine phosphorylation. Immunodetection and RNAi analyses further established YES kinase as a proximal glucose-specific signal in the Cdc42-signaling cascade. Identification of YES kinase provides new insight into the mechanisms underlying the sustainment of insulin secretion via granule mobilization/replenishment and F-actin remodeling.

  17. YES, a Src Family Kinase, Is a Proximal Glucose-specific Activator of Cell Division Cycle Control Protein 42 (Cdc42) in Pancreatic Islet β Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Yoder, Stephanie M.; Dineen, Stacey L.; Wang, Zhanxiang; Thurmond, Debbie C.

    2014-01-01

    Second-phase insulin secretion sustains insulin release in the face of hyperglycemia associated with insulin resistance, requiring the continued mobilization of insulin secretory granules to the plasma membrane. Cdc42, the small Rho family GTPase recognized as the proximal glucose-specific trigger to elicit second-phase insulin secretion, signals downstream to activate the p21-activated kinase (PAK1), which then signals to Raf-1/MEK/ERK to induce filamentous actin (F-actin) remodeling, to ultimately mobilize insulin granules to the plasma membrane. However, the steps required to initiate Cdc42 activation in a glucose-specific manner in β cells have remained elusive. Toward this, we identified the involvement of the Src family kinases (SFKs), based upon the ability of SFK inhibitors to block glucose-stimulated Cdc42 and PAK1 activation events as well as the amplifying pathway of glucose-stimulated insulin release, in MIN6 β cells. Indeed, subsequent studies performed in human islets revealed that SFK phosphorylation was induced only by glucose and within 1 min of stimulation before the activation of Cdc42 at 3 min. Furthermore, pervanadate treatment validated the phosphorylation event to be tyrosine-specific. Although RT-PCR showed β cells to express five different SFK proteins, only two of these, YES and Fyn kinases, were found localized to the plasma membrane, and of these two, only YES kinase underwent glucose-stimulated tyrosine phosphorylation. Immunodetection and RNAi analyses further established YES kinase as a proximal glucose-specific signal in the Cdc42-signaling cascade. Identification of YES kinase provides new insight into the mechanisms underlying the sustainment of insulin secretion via granule mobilization/replenishment and F-actin remodeling. PMID:24610809

  18. A Sensitized Screen for Genes Promoting Invadopodia Function In Vivo: CDC-42 and Rab GDI-1 Direct Distinct Aspects of Invadopodia Formation.

    PubMed

    Lohmer, Lauren L; Clay, Matthew R; Naegeli, Kaleb M; Chi, Qiuyi; Ziel, Joshua W; Hagedorn, Elliott J; Park, Jieun E; Jayadev, Ranjay; Sherwood, David R

    2016-01-01

    Invadopodia are specialized membrane protrusions composed of F-actin, actin regulators, signaling proteins, and a dynamically trafficked invadopodial membrane that drive cell invasion through basement membrane (BM) barriers in development and cancer. Due to the challenges of studying invasion in vivo, mechanisms controlling invadopodia formation in their native environments remain poorly understood. We performed a sensitized genome-wide RNAi screen and identified 13 potential regulators of invadopodia during anchor cell (AC) invasion into the vulval epithelium in C. elegans. Confirming the specificity of this screen, we identified the Rho GTPase cdc-42, which mediates invadopodia formation in many cancer cell lines. Using live-cell imaging, we show that CDC-42 localizes to the AC-BM interface and is activated by an unidentified vulval signal(s) that induces invasion. CDC-42 is required for the invasive membrane localization of WSP-1 (N-WASP), a CDC-42 effector that promotes polymerization of F-actin. Loss of CDC-42 or WSP-1 resulted in fewer invadopodia and delayed BM breaching. We also characterized a novel invadopodia regulator, gdi-1 (Rab GDP dissociation inhibitor), which mediates membrane trafficking. We show that GDI-1 functions in the AC to promote invadopodia formation. In the absence of GDI-1, the specialized invadopodial membrane was no longer trafficked normally to the invasive membrane, and instead was distributed to plasma membrane throughout the cell. Surprisingly, the pro-invasive signal(s) from the vulval cells also controls GDI-1 activity and invadopodial membrane trafficking. These studies represent the first in vivo screen for genes regulating invadopodia and demonstrate that invadopodia formation requires the integration of distinct cellular processes that are coordinated by an extracellular cue.

  19. A Sensitized Screen for Genes Promoting Invadopodia Function In Vivo: CDC-42 and Rab GDI-1 Direct Distinct Aspects of Invadopodia Formation

    PubMed Central

    Naegeli, Kaleb M.; Chi, Qiuyi; Ziel, Joshua W.; Hagedorn, Elliott J.; Park, Jieun E.; Jayadev, Ranjay; Sherwood, David R.

    2016-01-01

    Invadopodia are specialized membrane protrusions composed of F-actin, actin regulators, signaling proteins, and a dynamically trafficked invadopodial membrane that drive cell invasion through basement membrane (BM) barriers in development and cancer. Due to the challenges of studying invasion in vivo, mechanisms controlling invadopodia formation in their native environments remain poorly understood. We performed a sensitized genome-wide RNAi screen and identified 13 potential regulators of invadopodia during anchor cell (AC) invasion into the vulval epithelium in C. elegans. Confirming the specificity of this screen, we identified the Rho GTPase cdc-42, which mediates invadopodia formation in many cancer cell lines. Using live-cell imaging, we show that CDC-42 localizes to the AC-BM interface and is activated by an unidentified vulval signal(s) that induces invasion. CDC-42 is required for the invasive membrane localization of WSP-1 (N-WASP), a CDC-42 effector that promotes polymerization of F-actin. Loss of CDC-42 or WSP-1 resulted in fewer invadopodia and delayed BM breaching. We also characterized a novel invadopodia regulator, gdi-1 (Rab GDP dissociation inhibitor), which mediates membrane trafficking. We show that GDI-1 functions in the AC to promote invadopodia formation. In the absence of GDI-1, the specialized invadopodial membrane was no longer trafficked normally to the invasive membrane, and instead was distributed to plasma membrane throughout the cell. Surprisingly, the pro-invasive signal(s) from the vulval cells also controls GDI-1 activity and invadopodial membrane trafficking. These studies represent the first in vivo screen for genes regulating invadopodia and demonstrate that invadopodia formation requires the integration of distinct cellular processes that are coordinated by an extracellular cue. PMID:26765257

  20. Thiol-modifying phenylarsine oxide inhibits guanine nucleotide binding of Rho but not of Rac GTPases.

    PubMed

    Gerhard, Ralf; John, Harald; Aktories, Klaus; Just, Ingo

    2003-06-01

    Phenylarsine oxide (PAO) is a phosphotyrosine phosphatase inhibitor that cross-links vicinal thiol groups, thereby inactivating phosphatases possessing XCysXXCysX motifs. The RhoA-GTPase, but not the Rac1-GTPase, also possesses vicinal cysteines within the guanine nucleotide-binding region (aa 13-20) and the phosphohydrolase activity site. Treatment of Caco-2 cells with PAO showed a dose-dependent reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton, indicating involvement of Rho GTPases. As tested by pull-down experiments, RhoA, but not Rac1, from cell lysates was inactivated by PAO in a concentration-dependent manner. Modification of RhoA by PAO resulted in altered mobility on SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, and PAO-modified RhoA was no longer substrate for C3-catalyzed ADP-ribosylation. Furthermore, RhoA treated with PAO, but not Rac1 treated with PAO, lost its property to bind to guanine nucleotides. Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-mass analysis of PAO-modified RhoA showed a mass shift according to an adduction of a single PAO molecule per molecule RhoA. Further analysis of Glu-C-generated RhoA peptides confirmed binding of PAO to a peptide harboring the guanine nucleotide binding region. Thus, PAO does not exclusively inhibit phosphotyrosine phosphatases but also inactivates RhoA by alteration of nucleotide binding.

  1. Further genetic evidence suggesting a role for the RhoGTPase-RhoGEF pathway in osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Mullin, Ben H; Prince, Richard L; Mamotte, Cyril; Spector, Tim D; Hart, Deborah J; Dudbridge, Frank; Wilson, Scott G

    2009-08-01

    Osteoporosis is a highly heritable trait that appears to be influenced by multiple genes. Genome-wide linkage studies have highlighted the chromosomal region 3p14-p21 as a quantitative trait locus for BMD. We have previously published evidence suggesting that the ARHGEF3 gene from this region is associated with BMD in women. The product of this gene activates the RHOA GTPase, the gene for which is also located within this region. The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of genetic polymorphism in RHOA on bone density in women. Sequence variation within the RHOA gene region was determined using 9 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in a discovery cohort of 769 female sibs. Of the 9 SNPs, one was found to be monomorphic with the others representing 3 distinct linkage disequilibrium (LD) blocks. Using FBAT software, significant associations were found between two of these LD blocks and BMD Z-score of the spine and hip (P=0.001-0.036). The LD block tagged by the SNP rs17595772 showed maximal association, with the more common G allele at rs17595772 associated with decreased BMD Z-score. Genotyping for rs17595772 in a replication cohort of 780 postmenopausal women confirmed an association with BMD Z-score (P=0.002-0.036). Again, the G allele was found to be associated with a reduced hip and spine BMD Z-score. These results support the implication of the RhoGTPase-RhoGEF pathway in osteoporosis, and suggest that one or more genes in this pathway may be responsible for the linkage observed between 3p14-p21 and BMD.

  2. Bacterial factors exploit eukaryotic Rho GTPase signaling cascades to promote invasion and proliferation within their host

    PubMed Central

    Popoff, Michel R

    2014-01-01

    Actin cytoskeleton is a main target of many bacterial pathogens. Among the multiple regulation steps of the actin cytoskeleton, bacterial factors interact preferentially with RhoGTPases. Pathogens secrete either toxins which diffuse in the surrounding environment, or directly inject virulence factors into target cells. Bacterial toxins, which interfere with RhoGTPases, and to some extent with RasGTPases, catalyze a covalent modification (ADPribosylation, glucosylation, deamidation, adenylation, proteolysis) blocking these molecules in their active or inactive state, resulting in alteration of epithelial and/or endothelial barriers, which contributes to dissemination of bacteria in the host. Injected bacterial virulence factors preferentially manipulate the RhoGTPase signaling cascade by mimicry of eukaryotic regulatory proteins leading to local actin cytoskeleton rearrangement, which mediates bacterial entry into host cells or in contrast escape to phagocytosis and immune defense. Invasive bacteria can also manipulate RhoGTPase signaling through recognition and stimulation of cell surface receptor(s). Changes in RhoGTPase activation state is sensed by the innate immunity pathways and allows the host cell to adapt an appropriate defense response. PMID:25203748

  3. The Regulation of Cellular Responses to Mechanical Cues by Rho GTPases

    PubMed Central

    Hoon, Jing Ling; Tan, Mei Hua; Koh, Cheng-Gee

    2016-01-01

    The Rho GTPases regulate many cellular signaling cascades that modulate cell motility, migration, morphology and cell division. A large body of work has now delineated the biochemical cues and pathways, which stimulate the GTPases and their downstream effectors. However, cells also respond exquisitely to biophysical and mechanical cues such as stiffness and topography of the extracellular matrix that profoundly influence cell migration, proliferation and differentiation. As these cellular responses are mediated by the actin cytoskeleton, an involvement of Rho GTPases in the transduction of such cues is not unexpected. In this review, we discuss an emerging role of Rho GTPase proteins in the regulation of the responses elicited by biophysical and mechanical stimuli. PMID:27058559

  4. Cdc42 activation couples spindle positioning to first polar body formation in oocyte maturation.

    PubMed

    Ma, Chunqi; Benink, Héléne A; Cheng, Daye; Montplaisir, Véronique; Wang, Ling; Xi, Yanwei; Zheng, Pei-Pei; Bement, William M; Liu, X Johné

    2006-01-24

    During vertebrate egg maturation, cytokinesis initiates after one pole of the bipolar metaphase I spindle attaches to the oocyte cortex, resulting in the formation of a polar body and the mature egg. It is not known what signal couples the spindle pole positioning to polar body formation. We approached this question by drawing an analogy to mitotic exit in budding yeast, as asymmetric spindle attachment to the appropriate cortical region is the common regulatory cue. In budding yeast, the small G protein Cdc42 plays an important role in mitotic exit following the spindle pole attachment . We show here that inhibition of Cdc42 activation blocks polar body formation. The oocytes initiate anaphase but fail to properly form and direct a contractile ring. Endogenous Cdc42 is activated at the spindle pole-cortical contact site immediately prior to polar body formation. The cortical Cdc42 activity zone, which directly overlays the spindle pole, is circumscribed by a cortical RhoA activity zone; the latter defines the cytokinetic contractile furrow . As the RhoA ring contracts during cytokinesis, the Cdc42 zone expands, maintaining its complementary relationship with the RhoA ring. Cdc42 signaling may thus be an evolutionarily conserved mechanism that couples spindle positioning to asymmetric cytokinesis.

  5. Computer vision profiling of neurite outgrowth dynamics reveals spatiotemporal modularity of Rho GTPase signaling

    PubMed Central

    Fusco, Ludovico; Lefort, Riwal; Smith, Kevin; Benmansour, Fethallah; Gonzalez, German; Barillari, Caterina; Rinn, Bernd; Fleuret, Francois; Fua, Pascal

    2016-01-01

    Rho guanosine triphosphatases (GTPases) control the cytoskeletal dynamics that power neurite outgrowth. This process consists of dynamic neurite initiation, elongation, retraction, and branching cycles that are likely to be regulated by specific spatiotemporal signaling networks, which cannot be resolved with static, steady-state assays. We present NeuriteTracker, a computer-vision approach to automatically segment and track neuronal morphodynamics in time-lapse datasets. Feature extraction then quantifies dynamic neurite outgrowth phenotypes. We identify a set of stereotypic neurite outgrowth morphodynamic behaviors in a cultured neuronal cell system. Systematic RNA interference perturbation of a Rho GTPase interactome consisting of 219 proteins reveals a limited set of morphodynamic phenotypes. As proof of concept, we show that loss of function of two distinct RhoA-specific GTPase-activating proteins (GAPs) leads to opposite neurite outgrowth phenotypes. Imaging of RhoA activation dynamics indicates that both GAPs regulate different spatiotemporal Rho GTPase pools, with distinct functions. Our results provide a starting point to dissect spatiotemporal Rho GTPase signaling networks that regulate neurite outgrowth. PMID:26728857

  6. Elevated Intraocular Pressure Induces Rho GTPase Mediated Contractile Signaling in the Trabecular Meshwork

    PubMed Central

    Pattabiraman, Padmanabhan P; Inoue, Toshihiro; Rao, P. Vasantha

    2015-01-01

    Rho GTPase regulated contractile signaling in the trabecular meshwork (TM) has been shown to modulate aqueous humor (AH) outflow and intraocular pressure (IOP). To explore whether elevated IOP, a major risk factor for primary open angle glaucoma (POAG) influences Rho GTPase signaling in the TM, we recorded AH outflow in enucleated contralateral porcine eyes perfused for 4–5 hours at either 15 mm or 50 mm Hg pressure. After perfusion, TM tissue extracted from perfused eyes was evaluated for the activation status of Rho GTPase, myosin light chain (MLC), myosin phosphatase target substrate 1 (MYPT1), myristoylated alanine-rich C-kinase substrate (MARCKS) and paxillin. Eyes perfused at 50 mm Hg exhibited a significant decrease in AH outflow facility compared with those perfused at 15 mm Hg. Additionally, TM tissue from eyes perfused at 50 mm Hg revealed significantly increased levels of activated RhoA and phosphorylated MLC, MYPT1, MARCKS and paxillin compared to TM tissue derived from eyes perfused at 15 mm Hg. Taken together, these observations indicate that elevated IOP-induced activation of Rho GTPase-dependent contractile signaling in the TM is associated with increased resistance to AH outflow through the trabecular pathway, and demonstrate the sensitivity of Rho GTPase signaling to mechanical force in the AH outflow pathway. PMID:25956210

  7. ATP8B1-mediated spatial organization of Cdc42 signaling maintains singularity during enterocyte polarization

    PubMed Central

    Bruurs, Lucas J.M.; Donker, Lisa; Zwakenberg, Susan; Zwartkruis, Fried J.; Begthel, Harry; Knisely, A.S.; Posthuma, George; van de Graaf, Stan F.J.; Paulusma, Coen C.

    2015-01-01

    During yeast cell polarization localization of the small GTPase, cell division control protein 42 homologue (Cdc42) is clustered to ensure the formation of a single bud. Here we show that the disease-associated flippase ATPase class I type 8b member 1 (ATP8B1) enables Cdc42 clustering during enterocyte polarization. Loss of this regulation results in increased apical membrane size with scattered apical recycling endosomes and permits the formation of more than one apical domain, resembling the singularity defect observed in yeast. Mechanistically, we show that to become apically clustered, Cdc42 requires the interaction between its polybasic region and negatively charged membrane lipids provided by ATP8B1. Disturbing this interaction, either by ATP8B1 depletion or by introduction of a Cdc42 mutant defective in lipid binding, increases Cdc42 mobility and results in apical membrane enlargement. Re-establishing Cdc42 clustering, by tethering it to the apical membrane or lowering its diffusion, restores normal apical membrane size in ATP8B1-depleted cells. We therefore conclude that singularity regulation by Cdc42 is conserved between yeast and human and that this regulation is required to maintain healthy tissue architecture. PMID:26416959

  8. CDC42 Is Required for Tissue Lamination and Cell Survival in the Mouse Retina

    PubMed Central

    Heynen, Severin Reinhard; Meneau, Isabelle; Caprara, Christian; Samardzija, Marijana; Imsand, Cornelia; Levine, Edward M.; Grimm, Christian

    2013-01-01

    The small GTPase CDC42 has pleiotropic functions during development and in the adult. These functions include intra- as well as intercellular tasks such as organization of the cytoskeleton and, at least in epithelial cells, formation of adherens junctions. To investigate CDC42 in the neuronal retina, we generated retina-specific Cdc42-knockdown mice (Cdc42-KD) and analyzed the ensuing consequences for the developing and postnatal retina. Lack of CDC42 affected organization of the developing retina as early as E17.5, prevented correct tissue lamination, and resulted in progressive retinal degeneration and severely reduced retinal function of the postnatal retina. Despite the disorganization of the retina, formation of the primary vascular plexus was not strongly affected. However, both deeper vascular plexi developed abnormally with no clear layering of the vessels. Retinas of Cdc42-KD mice showed increased expression of pro-survival, but also of pro-apoptotic and pro-inflammatory genes and exhibited prolonged Müller glia hypertrophy. Thus, functional CDC42 is important for correct tissue organization already during retinal development. Its absence leads to severe destabilization of the postnatal retina with strong degeneration and loss of retinal function. PMID:23372671

  9. ATP8B1-mediated spatial organization of Cdc42 signaling maintains singularity during enterocyte polarization.

    PubMed

    Bruurs, Lucas J M; Donker, Lisa; Zwakenberg, Susan; Zwartkruis, Fried J; Begthel, Harry; Knisely, A S; Posthuma, George; van de Graaf, Stan F J; Paulusma, Coen C; Bos, Johannes L

    2015-09-28

    During yeast cell polarization localization of the small GTPase, cell division control protein 42 homologue (Cdc42) is clustered to ensure the formation of a single bud. Here we show that the disease-associated flippase ATPase class I type 8b member 1 (ATP8B1) enables Cdc42 clustering during enterocyte polarization. Loss of this regulation results in increased apical membrane size with scattered apical recycling endosomes and permits the formation of more than one apical domain, resembling the singularity defect observed in yeast. Mechanistically, we show that to become apically clustered, Cdc42 requires the interaction between its polybasic region and negatively charged membrane lipids provided by ATP8B1. Disturbing this interaction, either by ATP8B1 depletion or by introduction of a Cdc42 mutant defective in lipid binding, increases Cdc42 mobility and results in apical membrane enlargement. Re-establishing Cdc42 clustering, by tethering it to the apical membrane or lowering its diffusion, restores normal apical membrane size in ATP8B1-depleted cells. We therefore conclude that singularity regulation by Cdc42 is conserved between yeast and human and that this regulation is required to maintain healthy tissue architecture.

  10. Regulation of pancreatic cancer cell migration and invasion by RhoC GTPase and Caveolin-1

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Min; DiVito, Melinda M; Merajver, Sofia D; Boyanapalli, Madanamohan; van Golen, Kenneth L

    2005-01-01

    Background In the current study we investigated the role of caveolin-1 (cav-1) in pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PC) cell migration and invasion; initial steps in metastasis. Cav-1 is the major structural protein in caveolae; small Ω-shaped invaginations within the plasma membrane. Caveolae are involved in signal transduction, wherein cav-1 acts as a scaffolding protein to organize multiple molecular complexes regulating a variety of cellular events. Recent evidence suggests a role for cav-1 in promoting cancer cell migration, invasion and metastasis; however, the molecular mechanisms have not been described. The small monomeric GTPases are among several molecules which associate with cav-1. Classically, the Rho GTPases control actin cytoskeletal reorganization during cell migration and invasion. RhoC GTPase is overexpressed in aggressive cancers that metastasize and is the predominant GTPase in PC. Like several GTPases, RhoC contains a putative cav-1 binding motif. Results Analysis of 10 PC cell lines revealed high levels of cav-1 expression in lines derived from primary tumors and low expression in those derived from metastases. Comparison of the BxPC-3 (derived from a primary tumor) and HPAF-II (derived from a metastasis) demonstrates a reciprocal relationship between cav-1 expression and p42/p44 Erk activation with PC cell migration, invasion, RhoC GTPase and p38 MAPK activation. Furthermore, inhibition of RhoC or p38 activity in HPAF-II cells leads to partial restoration of cav-1 expression. Conclusion Cav-1 expression inhibits RhoC GTPase activation and subsequent activation of the p38 MAPK pathway in primary PC cells thus restricting migration and invasion. In contrast, loss of cav-1 expression leads to RhoC-mediated migration and invasion in metastatic PC cells. PMID:15969750

  11. The GTPase Rho has a critical regulatory role in thymus development.

    PubMed Central

    Henning, S W; Galandrini, R; Hall, A; Cantrell, D A

    1997-01-01

    The present study employs a genetic approach to explore the role of Rho GTPases in murine thymic development. Inactivation of Rho function in the thymus was achieved by thymic targeting of a transgene encoding C3 transferase from Clostridium botulinum which selectively ADP-ribosylates Rho within its effector domain and thereby abolishes its biological function. Thymi lacking functional Rho isolated from C3 transgenic mice were strikingly smaller and showed a marked (90%) decrease in cellularity compared with their normal litter mates. We also observed a similar decrease in levels of peripheral T cells in C3 transgenic mice. Analysis of the maturation status of thymocytes indicated that differentiation of progenitor cells to mature T cells can occur in the absence of Rho function, and both positive and negative selection of T cells appear to be intact. However, transgenic mice that lack Rho function in the thymus show maturational, proliferative and cell survival defects during T-cell development that severely impair the generation of normal numbers of thymocytes and mature peripheral T cells. The present study thus identifies a role for Rho-dependent signalling pathways in thymocyte development. The data show that the function of Rho GTPases is critical for the proliferative expansion of thymocytes. This defines a selective role for the GTPase Rho in early thymic development as a critical integrator of proliferation and cell survival signals. PMID:9171353

  12. Cdc42 controls the dilation of the exocytotic fusion pore by regulating membrane tension

    PubMed Central

    Bretou, Marine; Jouannot, Ouardane; Fanget, Isabelle; Pierobon, Paolo; Larochette, Nathanaël; Gestraud, Pierre; Guillon, Marc; Emiliani, Valentina; Gasman, Stéphane; Desnos, Claire; Lennon-Duménil, Ana-Maria; Darchen, François

    2014-01-01

    Membrane fusion underlies multiple processes, including exocytosis of hormones and neurotransmitters. Membrane fusion starts with the formation of a narrow fusion pore. Radial expansion of this pore completes the process and allows fast release of secretory compounds, but this step remains poorly understood. Here we show that inhibiting the expression of the small GTPase Cdc42 or preventing its activation with a dominant negative Cdc42 construct in human neuroendocrine cells impaired the release process by compromising fusion pore enlargement. Consequently the mode of vesicle exocytosis was shifted from full-collapse fusion to kiss-and-run. Remarkably, Cdc42-knockdown cells showed reduced membrane tension, and the artificial increase of membrane tension restored fusion pore enlargement. Moreover, inhibiting the motor protein myosin II by blebbistatin decreased membrane tension, as well as fusion pore dilation. We conclude that membrane tension is the driving force for fusion pore dilation and that Cdc42 is a key regulator of this force. PMID:25143404

  13. Rock `N' Rho in Outer Hair Cell Motility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, M.; Kalinec, G.; Kalinec, F.; Billadeau, D. D.; Urrutia, R.

    2003-02-01

    RhoA, Cdc42 and Rac1, small GTPases of the Rho family, are crucial regulators of the actin cytoskeleton and mediate different types of cell motility. They also help to maintain cellular homeostasis, actively regulating the structure and mechanical properties of the cells. We investigated the expression in the guinea-pig cochlea of the serine/threonine kinase ROCK, a well-known effector of RhoA, and measured electromotile amplitude in outer hair cells (OHCs) internally perfused with C3 and Y-27632, pharmacological inhibitors of RhoA and ROCK respectively, and dominant-negative mutants of Rac1 and Cdc42. We found that a RhoA/ROCK-mediated signaling pathway is important for mechanical homeostasis of cochlear OHCs, and identified ROCK as a potential target to selectively modulate outer hair cell electromotility.

  14. Saponins extracted from by-product of Asparagus officinalis L. suppress tumour cell migration and invasion through targeting Rho GTPase signalling pathway.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jieqiong; Liu, Yali; Zhao, Jingjing; Zhang, Wen; Pang, Xiufeng

    2013-04-01

    The inedible bottom part (~30-40%) of asparagus (Asparagus officinalis L.) spears is usually discarded as waste. However, since this by-product has been reported to be rich in many bioactive phytochemicals, it might be utilisable as a supplement in foods or natural drugs for its therapeutic effects. In this study it was identifed that saponins from old stems of asparagus (SSA) exerted potential inhibitory activity on tumour growth and metastasis. SSA suppressed cell viability of breast, colon and pancreatic cancers in a concentration-dependent manner, with half-maximum inhibitory concentrations ranging from 809.42 to 1829.96 µg mL(-1). However, SSA was more functional in blocking cell migration and invasion as compared with its cytotoxic effect, with an effective inhibitory concentration of 400 µg mL(-1). A mechanistic study showed that SSA markedly increased the activities of Cdc42 and Rac1 and decreased the activity of RhoA in cancer cells. SSA inhibits tumour cell motility through modulating the Rho GTPase signalling pathway, suggesting a promising use of SSA as a supplement in healthcare foods and natural drugs for cancer prevention and treatment. © 2012 Society of Chemical Industry.

  15. RhoA GTPase interacts with beta-catenin signaling in clinorotated osteoblasts

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Qiaoqiao; Cho, Eunhye; Yokota, Hiroki; Na, Sungsoo

    2014-01-01

    Bone is a dynamic tissue under constant remodeling in response to various signals including mechanical loading. A lack of proper mechanical loading induces disuse osteoporosis that reduces bone mass and structural integrity. β-catenin signaling together with a network of GTPases is known to play a primary role in load-driven bone formation, but little is known about potential interactions of β-catenin signaling and GTPases in bone loss. In this study, we addressed a question: Does unloading suppress an activation level of RhoA GTPase and β-catenin signaling in osteoblasts? If yes, what is the role of RhoA GTPase and actin filaments in osteoblasts in regulating β-catenin signaling? Using a fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) technique with a biosensor for RhoA together with a fluorescent T-cell factor/lymphoid enhancer factor (TCF/LEF) reporter, we examined the effects of clinostat-driven simulated unloading. The results revealed that both RhoA activity and TCF/LEF activity were downregulated by unloading. Reduction in RhoA activity was correlated to a decrease in cytoskeletal organization of actin filaments. Inhibition of β-catenin signaling blocked unloading-induced RhoA suppression, and dominant negative RhoA inhibited TCF/LEF suppression. On the other hand, a constitutively active RhoA enhanced unloading-induced reduction of TCF/LEF activity. The TCF/LEF suppression by unloading was enhanced by co-culture with osteocytes, but it was independent on organization of actin filaments, myosin II activity, or a myosin light chain kinase. Collectively, the results suggest that β-catenin signaling is required for unloading-driven regulation of RhoA, and RhoA, but not actin cytoskeleton or intracellular tension, mediates the responsiveness of β-catenin signaling to unloading. PMID:23529802

  16. Negative Functional Interaction Between Cell Integrity MAPK Pathway and Rho1 GTPase in Fission Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Viana, Raul A.; Pinar, Mario; Soto, Teresa; Coll, Pedro M.; Cansado, Jose; Pérez, Pilar

    2013-01-01

    Rho1 GTPase is the main activator of cell wall glucan biosynthesis and regulates actin cytoskeleton in fungi, including Schizosaccharomyces pombe. We have obtained a fission yeast thermosensitive mutant strain carrying the rho1-596 allele, which displays reduced Rho1 GTPase activity. This strain has severe cell wall defects and a thermosensitive growth, which is partially suppressed by osmotic stabilization. In a global screening for rho1-596 multicopy suppresors the pmp1+ gene was identified. Pmp1 is a dual specificity phosphatase that negatively regulates the Pmk1 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cell integrity pathway. Accordingly, elimination of Pmk1 MAPK partially rescued rho1-596 thermosensitivity, corroborating the unexpected antagonistic functional relationship of these genes. We found that rho1-596 cells displayed increased basal activation of the cell integrity MAPK pathway and therefore were hypersensitive to MgCl2 and FK506. Moreover, the absence of calcineurin was lethal for rho1-596. We found a higher level of calcineurin activity in rho1-596 than in wild-type cells, and overexpression of constitutively active calcineurin partially rescued rho1-596 thermosensitivity. All together our results suggest that loss of Rho1 function causes an increase in the cell integrity MAPK activity, which is detrimental to the cells and turns calcineurin activity essential. PMID:23934882

  17. Toward understanding RhoGTPase specificity: structure, function and local activation

    PubMed Central

    Schaefer, Antje; Reinhard, Nathalie R; Hordijk, Peter L

    2014-01-01

    Cell adhesion and migration are regulated through the concerted action of cytoskeletal dynamics and adhesion proteins, the activity of which is governed by RhoGTPases. Specific RhoGTPase signaling requires spatio-temporal activation and coordination of subsequent protein-protein and protein-lipid interactions. The nature, location and duration of these interactions are dependent on polarized extracellular triggers, such as cell-cell contact, and intracellular modifying events, such as phosphorylation. RhoA, RhoB, and RhoC are highly homologous GTPases that, however, succeed in generating specific intracellular responses. Here, we discuss the key features that contribute to this specificity. These not only include the well-studied switch regions, the conformation of which is nucleotide-dependent, but also additional regions and seemingly small differences in primary sequence that also contribute to specific interactions. These differences translate into differential surface charge distribution, local exposure of amino acid side-chains and isoform-specific post-translational modifications. The available evidence supports the notion that multiple regions in RhoA/B/C cooperate to provide specificity in binding to regulators and effectors. These specific interactions are highly regulated in time and space. We therefore subsequently discuss current approaches means to visualize and analyze localized GTPase activation using biosensors that allow imaging of isoform-specific, localized regulation. PMID:25483298

  18. The Role of Rho GTPases in Toxicity of Clostridium difficile Toxins.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shuyi; Sun, Chunli; Wang, Haiying; Wang, Jufang

    2015-12-02

    Clostridium difficile (C. difficile) is the main cause of antibiotic-associated diarrhea prevailing in hospital settings. In the past decade, the morbidity and mortality of C. difficile infection (CDI) has increased significantly due to the emergence of hypervirulent strains. Toxin A (TcdA) and toxin B (TcdB), the two exotoxins of C. difficile, are the major virulence factors of CDI. The common mode of action of TcdA and TcdB is elicited by specific glucosylation of Rho-GTPase proteins in the host cytosol using UDP-glucose as a co-substrate, resulting in the inactivation of Rho proteins. Rho proteins are the key members in many biological processes and signaling pathways, inactivation of which leads to cytopathic and cytotoxic effects and immune responses of the host cells. It is supposed that Rho GTPases play an important role in the toxicity of C. difficile toxins. This review focuses on recent progresses in the understanding of functional consequences of Rho GTPases glucosylation induced by C. difficile toxins and the role of Rho GTPases in the toxicity of TcdA and TcdB.

  19. The Role of Rho GTPases in Toxicity of Clostridium difficile Toxins

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Shuyi; Sun, Chunli; Wang, Haiying; Wang, Jufang

    2015-01-01

    Clostridium difficile (C. difficile) is the main cause of antibiotic-associated diarrhea prevailing in hospital settings. In the past decade, the morbidity and mortality of C. difficile infection (CDI) has increased significantly due to the emergence of hypervirulent strains. Toxin A (TcdA) and toxin B (TcdB), the two exotoxins of C. difficile, are the major virulence factors of CDI. The common mode of action of TcdA and TcdB is elicited by specific glucosylation of Rho-GTPase proteins in the host cytosol using UDP-glucose as a co-substrate, resulting in the inactivation of Rho proteins. Rho proteins are the key members in many biological processes and signaling pathways, inactivation of which leads to cytopathic and cytotoxic effects and immune responses of the host cells. It is supposed that Rho GTPases play an important role in the toxicity of C. difficile toxins. This review focuses on recent progresses in the understanding of functional consequences of Rho GTPases glucosylation induced by C. difficile toxins and the role of Rho GTPases in the toxicity of TcdA and TcdB. PMID:26633511

  20. Expression of Rho GTPases family in melanoma cells and its influence on cytoskeleton and migration.

    PubMed

    Wen, Si-Jian; Zhang, Wei; Ni, Na-Na; Wu, Qiong; Wang, Xiao-Po; Lin, You-Kun; Sun, Jian-Fang

    2017-05-02

    Rho GTPases family members influenced the filopodia, lamellipodia, stress fiber and adhesion plaque of melanoma cells through regulating cytoskeleton recombination. The role of Rho GTPases family in the migration and invasion of melanoma and its molecular mechanism were explored. The morphological difference between three types of melanoma cells (M14, A375 and MV3) and human melanocyte (MC) was observed by the Hoffman microscope. Cells were stained by phalloidin labeled by rhodamine. The differences between 4 types of cells in filopodia, lamellipodia, stress fiber and adhesion plaque (microfilament is the main constituent) were observed under the super-high resolution microscope. The migration ability of 4 types of cells was detected by Transwell migration assay. QPCR was used to detect the mRNA transcription level of Rho GTPases family. WB was adopted to detect the expression of RhoD and DIAPH2 proteins. There were significant differences in filopodia, lamellipodia, stress fiber and adhesion plaque between MC and 3 types of melanoma cells (M14, A375 and MV3). MC did not have stress fiber or adhesion plaque, while M14, A375 and MV3 had stress fiber and adhesion plaque. All 4 types of cells had thin and short filopodia. MV3 had fewer but thicker stress fibers than the latter two. Transwell migration test indicated the followings: M14 and A375 had a similar high migration rate; the migration rate of MV3 was slightly low; MC did not have the ability of transmembrane migration. QPCR results of Rho GTPases family in 4 types of cells showed the change corresponding to immunofluorescence. WB results showed that RhoD was barely expressed in M14, A375 or MV3. DIAPH2, the downstream effector molecule of RhoD, had the corresponding change. Rho GTPases influences the migration and invasion of melanoma cells through regulating filopodia, lamellipodia, stress fiber and adhesion plaque (microfilament is the main constituent).

  1. Analysis of a minimal Rho-GTPase circuit regulating cell shape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmes, William R.; Edelstein-Keshet, Leah

    2016-08-01

    Networks of Rho-family GTPases regulate eukaryotic cell polarization and motility by controlling assembly and contraction of the cytoskeleton. The mutually inhibitory Rac-Rho circuit is emerging as a central, regulatory hub that can affect the shape and motility phenotype of eukaryotic cells. Recent experimental manipulation of the amounts of Rac and Rho or their regulators (guanine nucleotide-exchange factors, GTPase-activating proteins, guanine nucleotide dissociation inhibitors) have been shown to bias the prevalence of these different states and promote transitions between them. Here we show that part of this data can be understood in terms of inherent Rac-Rho mutually inhibitory dynamics. We analyze a spatio-temporal mathematical model of Rac-Rho dynamics to produce a detailed set of predictions of how parameters such as GTPase rates of activation and total amounts affect cell decisions (such as Rho-dominated contraction, Rac-dominated spreading, and spatially segregated Rac-Rho polarization). We find that in some parameter regimes, a cell can take on any of these three fates depending on its environment or stimuli. We also predict how experimental manipulations (corresponding to parameter variations) can affect cell shapes observed. Our methods are based on local perturbation analysis (a kind of nonlinear stability analysis), and an approximation of nonlinear feedback by sharp switches. We compare the Rac-Rho model to an even simpler single-GTPase (‘wave-pinning’) model and demonstrate that the overall behavior is inherent to GTPase properties, rather than stemming solely from network topology.

  2. R-Ketorolac Targets Cdc42 and Rac1 and Alters Ovarian Cancer Cell Behaviors Critical for Invasion and Metastasis.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yuna; Kenney, S Ray; Muller, Carolyn Y; Adams, Sarah; Rutledge, Teresa; Romero, Elsa; Murray-Krezan, Cristina; Prekeris, Rytis; Sklar, Larry A; Hudson, Laurie G; Wandinger-Ness, Angela

    2015-10-01

    Cdc42 (cell division control protein 42) and Rac1 (Ras-related C3 botulinum toxin substrate 1) are attractive therapeutic targets in ovarian cancer based on established importance in tumor cell migration, adhesion, and invasion. Despite a predicted benefit, targeting GTPases has not yet been translated to clinical practice. We previously established that Cdc42 and constitutively active Rac1b are overexpressed in primary ovarian tumor tissues. Through high-throughput screening and computational shape homology approaches, we identified R-ketorolac as a Cdc42 and Rac1 inhibitor, distinct from the anti-inflammatory, cyclooxygenase inhibitory activity of S-ketorolac. In the present study, we establish R-ketorolac as an allosteric inhibitor of Cdc42 and Rac1. Cell-based assays validate R-ketorolac activity against Cdc42 and Rac1. Studies on immortalized human ovarian adenocarcinoma cells (SKOV3ip) and primary patient-derived ovarian cancer cells show that R-ketorolac is a robust inhibitor of growth factor or serum-dependent Cdc42 and Rac1 activation with a potency and cellular efficacy similar to small-molecule inhibitors of Cdc42 (CID2950007/ML141) and Rac1 (NSC23766). Furthermore, GTPase inhibition by R-ketorolac reduces downstream p21-activated kinases (PAK1/PAK2) effector activation by >80%. Multiple assays of cell behavior using SKOV3ip and primary patient-derived ovarian cancer cells show that R-ketorolac significantly inhibits cell adhesion, migration, and invasion. In summary, we provide evidence for R-ketorolac as a direct inhibitor of Cdc42 and Rac1 that is capable of modulating downstream GTPase-dependent, physiologic responses, which are critical to tumor metastasis. Our findings demonstrate the selective inhibition of Cdc42 and Rac1 GTPases by an FDA-approved drug, racemic ketorolac, that can be used in humans. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  3. R-ketorolac Targets Cdc42 and Rac1 and Alters Ovarian Cancer Cell Behaviors Critical for Invasion and Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Yuna; Kenney, Shelby Ray; Muller, Carolyn Y.; Adams, Sarah; Rutledge, Teresa; Romero, Elsa; Murray-Krezan, Cristina; Prekeris, Rytis; Sklar, Larry A.; Hudson, Laurie G.; Wandinger-Ness, Angela

    2015-01-01

    Cdc42 (cell division control protein 42) and Rac1 (Ras-related C3 botulinum toxin substrate 1) are attractive therapeutic targets in ovarian cancer based on established importance in tumor cell migration, adhesion and invasion. Despite a predicted benefit, targeting GTPases has not yet been translated to clinical practice. We previously established that Cdc42 and constitutively active Rac1b are overexpressed in primary ovarian tumor tissues. Through high throughput screening and computational shape homology approaches we identified R-ketorolac as a Cdc42 and Rac1 inhibitor; distinct from the anti-inflammatory, cyclooxygenase inhibitory activity of S-ketorolac. In the present study, we establish R-ketorolac as an allosteric inhibitor of Cdc42 and Rac1. Cell-based assays validate R-ketorolac activity against Cdc42 and Rac1. Studies on immortalized human ovarian adenocarcinoma cells (SKOV3ip), and primary, patient-derived ovarian cancer cells show R-ketorolac is a robust inhibitor of growth factor or serum dependent Cdc42 and Rac1 activation with a potency and cellular efficacy similar to small molecule inhibitors of Cdc42 (CID2950007/ML141) and Rac1 (NSC23766). Furthermore, GTPase inhibition by R-ketorolac reduces downstream p21-activated kinases (PAK1/PAK2) effector activation by >80%. Multiple assays of cell behavior using SKOV3ip and primary patient-derived ovarian cancer cells show that R-ketorolac significantly inhibits cell adhesion, migration and invasion. In sum, we provide evidence for R-ketorolac as direct inhibitor of Cdc42 and Rac1 that is capable of modulating downstream GTPase-dependent, physiological responses, which are critical to tumor metastasis. Our findings demonstrate the selective inhibition of Cdc42 and Rac1 GTPases by an FDA approved drug-racemic ketorolac that can be used in humans. PMID:26206334

  4. RhoA GTPase regulates radiation-induced alterations in endothelial cell adhesion and migration

    SciTech Connect

    Rousseau, Matthieu; Gaugler, Marie-Helene; Rodallec, Audrey; Bonnaud, Stephanie; Paris, Francois; Corre, Isabelle

    2011-11-04

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We explore the role of RhoA in endothelial cell response to ionizing radiation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer RhoA is rapidly activated by single high-dose of radiation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Radiation leads to RhoA/ROCK-dependent actin cytoskeleton remodeling. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Radiation-induced apoptosis does not require the RhoA/ROCK pathway. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Radiation-induced alteration of endothelial adhesion and migration requires RhoA/ROCK. -- Abstract: Endothelial cells of the microvasculature are major target of ionizing radiation, responsible of the radiation-induced vascular early dysfunctions. Molecular signaling pathways involved in endothelial responses to ionizing radiation, despite being increasingly investigated, still need precise characterization. Small GTPase RhoA and its effector ROCK are crucial signaling molecules involved in many endothelial cellular functions. Recent studies identified implication of RhoA/ROCK in radiation-induced increase in endothelial permeability but other endothelial functions altered by radiation might also require RhoA proteins. Human microvascular endothelial cells HMEC-1, either treated with Y-27632 (inhibitor of ROCK) or invalidated for RhoA by RNA interference were exposed to 15 Gy. We showed a rapid radiation-induced activation of RhoA, leading to a deep reorganisation of actin cytoskeleton with rapid formation of stress fibers. Endothelial early apoptosis induced by ionizing radiation was not affected by Y-27632 pre-treatment or RhoA depletion. Endothelial adhesion to fibronectin and formation of focal adhesions increased in response to radiation in a RhoA/ROCK-dependent manner. Consistent with its pro-adhesive role, ionizing radiation also decreased endothelial cells migration and RhoA was required for this inhibition. These results highlight the role of RhoA GTPase in ionizing radiation-induced deregulation of essential endothelial

  5. New Insights into Rho signaling from plant ROP/Rac GTPases

    PubMed Central

    Craddock, Christian; Lavagi, Irene; Yang, Zhenbiao

    2012-01-01

    In animal and plant cells, a wide range of key cellular processes that require the establishment of cell polarity are governed by Rho-GTPases. In contrast to animals and yeast, however, plants possess a single Rho-GTPase subfamily called ROP (Rho-like GTPases from plants). This raises the question of how plants achieve the high level of regulation required for polar cellular processes. It is becoming evident that plants have evolved specific regulators, including ROP-Guanine Exchange Factors (GEFs) and the Rop-interactive CRIB motif–containing proteins (RIC) effectors. Recent research shows that the spatiotemporal dynamics of ROPs, the cytoskeleton, endocytosis and exocytosis are intertwined. This review focuses on the proposed self-organizing nature of ROPs in plants and how ROP-mediated cellular mechanisms compare with those responsible for cell polarity in animals and yeast. PMID:22795444

  6. New insights into Rho signaling from plant ROP/Rac GTPases.

    PubMed

    Craddock, Christian; Lavagi, Irene; Yang, Zhenbiao

    2012-09-01

    In animal and plant cells, a wide range of key cellular processes that require the establishment of cell polarity are governed by Rho-GTPases. In contrast to animals and yeast, however, plants possess a single Rho-GTPase subfamily called Rho-like GTPases from plants (ROPs). This raises the question of how plants achieve the high level of regulation required for polar cellular processes. It is becoming evident that plants have evolved specific regulators, including ROP-Guanine Exchange Factors (GEFs) and the Rop-interactive CRIB motif-containing protein (RIC) effectors. Recent research shows that the spatiotemporal dynamics of ROPs, the cytoskeleton, endocytosis, and exocytosis are intertwined. This review focuses on the proposed self-organizing nature of ROPs in plants and how ROP-mediated cellular mechanisms compare with those responsible for cell polarity in animals and yeast.

  7. RhoGTPases, actomyosin signaling and regulation of the epithelial Apical Junctional Complex.

    PubMed

    Quiros, Miguel; Nusrat, Asma

    2014-12-01

    Epithelial cells form regulated and selective barriers between distinct tissue compartments. The Apical Junctional Complex (AJC) consisting of the tight junction (TJ) and adherens junction (AJ) control epithelial homeostasis, paracellular permeability and barrier properties. The AJC is composed of mutliprotein complexes consisting of transmembrane proteins that affiliate with an underlying perijunctional F-actin myosin ring through cytoplasmic scaffold proteins. AJC protein associations with the apical actin-myosin cytoskeleton are tightly controlled by a number of signaling proteins including the Rho family of GTPases that orchestrate junctional biology, epithelial homeostasis and barrier function. This review highlights the vital relationship of Rho GTPases and AJCs in controlling the epithelial barrier. The pathophysiologic relationship of Rho GTPases, AJC, apical actomyosin cytoskeleton and epithelial barrier function is discussed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. RhoGTPases as Key Players in Mammalian Cell Adaptation to Microgravity

    PubMed Central

    Deroanne, Christophe; Nusgens, Betty; Vico, Laurence; Guignandon, Alain

    2015-01-01

    A growing number of studies are revealing that cells reorganize their cytoskeleton when exposed to conditions of microgravity. Most, if not all, of the structural changes observed on flown cells can be explained by modulation of RhoGTPases, which are mechanosensitive switches responsible for cytoskeletal dynamics control. This review identifies general principles defining cell sensitivity to gravitational stresses. We discuss what is known about changes in cell shape, nucleus, and focal adhesions and try to establish the relationship with specific RhoGTPase activities. We conclude by considering the potential relevance of live imaging of RhoGTPase activity or cytoskeletal structures in order to enhance our understanding of cell adaptation to microgravity-related conditions. PMID:25649831

  9. Vilse, a conserved Rac/Cdc42 GAP mediating Robo repulsion in tracheal cells and axons.

    PubMed

    Lundström, Annika; Gallio, Marco; Englund, Camilla; Steneberg, Pär; Hemphälä, Johanna; Aspenström, Pontus; Keleman, Krystyna; Falileeva, Ludmilla; Dickson, Barry J; Samakovlis, Christos

    2004-09-01

    Slit proteins steer the migration of many cell types through their binding to Robo receptors, but how Robo controls cell motility is not clear. We describe the functional analysis of vilse, a Drosophila gene required for Robo repulsion in epithelial cells and axons. Vilse defines a conserved family of RhoGAPs (Rho GTPase-activating proteins), with representatives in flies and vertebrates. The phenotypes of vilse mutants resemble the tracheal and axonal phenotypes of Slit and Robo mutants at the CNS midline. Dosage-sensitive genetic interactions between vilse, slit, and robo mutants suggest that vilse is a component of robo signaling. Moreover, overexpression of Vilse in the trachea of robo mutants ameliorates the phenotypes of robo, indicating that Vilse acts downstream of Robo to mediate midline repulsion. Vilse and its human homolog bind directly to the intracellular domains of the corresponding Robo receptors and promote the hydrolysis of RacGTP and, less efficiently, of Cdc42GTP. These results together with genetic interaction experiments with robo, vilse, and rac mutants suggest a mechanism whereby Robo repulsion is mediated by the localized inactivation of Rac through Vilse.

  10. Rho GTPases control specific cytoskeleton-dependent functions of hematopoietic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Nayak, Ramesh C.; Chang, Kyung-Hee; Vaitinadin, Nataraja-Sarma; Cancelas, Jose A.

    2013-01-01

    Summary The Rho family of guanosine triphosphatases (GTPases) is composed of members of the Ras superfamily of proteins. They are GTP-bound molecules with a modest intrinsic GTPase activity that can be accelerated upon activation/localization of specialized guanine nucleotide exchange factors. Members of this family act as molecular switches and are required for coordinated cytoskeletal rearrangements that are crucial in a set of specialized functions of mammalian stem cells. These functions include self-renewal, adhesion, and migration. Mouse gene-targeting studies have provided convincing evidence of the indispensable and dispensable roles of individual members of the Rho GTPase family and the putative upstream and downstream mediators in stem cell-specific functions. The role of Rho GTPases and related signaling pathways previously seen in other cell types and organisms have been confirmed in mammalian hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), and new signaling pathways and unexpected functions unique to HSCs have been identified and dissected. This review summarizes our current understanding of the role of Rho family of GTPases on HSC and progenitor activity through cytoskeleton-mediated signaling pathways, providing insight on relevant signaling pathways that regulate mammalian stem cell self-renewal, adhesion, and migration. PMID:24117826

  11. Configuration of human dendritic cell cytoskeleton by Rho GTPases, the WAS protein, and differentiation.

    PubMed

    Burns, S; Thrasher, A J; Blundell, M P; Machesky, L; Jones, G E

    2001-08-15

    The cellular mechanisms that configure the cytoskeleton during migration of dendritic cells (DCs) are poorly understood. Immature DCs assemble specialized adhesion structures known as podosomes at their leading edge; these are associated with the localized recruitment of the Wiskott-Aldrich Syndrome protein (WASp) and the actin organizing actin-related protein 2/3 complex. In immature DCs lacking WASp, podosomes are absent, residual dysmorphic lamellipodia and filopodia are nonpolarized, and migration is severely compromised. Microinjection studies indicate that podosome assembly and polarization require concerted action of Cdc42, Rac, and Rho, thereby providing a link between sequential protrusive and adhesive activity. Formation of podosomes is restricted to cells with an immature phenotype, indicating a specific role for these structures during the early migratory phase. (Blood. 2001;98:1142-1149)

  12. RNAi screen of Salmonella invasion shows role of COPI in membrane targeting of cholesterol and Cdc42

    PubMed Central

    Misselwitz, Benjamin; Dilling, Sabrina; Vonaesch, Pascale; Sacher, Raphael; Snijder, Berend; Schlumberger, Markus; Rout, Samuel; Stark, Manuel; Mering, Christian von; Pelkmans, Lucas; Hardt, Wolf-Dietrich

    2011-01-01

    The pathogen Salmonella Typhimurium is a common cause of diarrhea and invades the gut tissue by injecting a cocktail of virulence factors into epithelial cells, triggering actin rearrangements, membrane ruffling and pathogen entry. One of these factors is SopE, a G-nucleotide exchange factor for the host cellular Rho GTPases Rac1 and Cdc42. How SopE mediates cellular invasion is incompletely understood. Using genome-scale RNAi screening we identified 72 known and novel host cell proteins affecting SopE-mediated entry. Follow-up assays assigned these ‘hits' to particular steps of the invasion process; i.e., binding, effector injection, membrane ruffling, membrane closure and maturation of the Salmonella-containing vacuole. Depletion of the COPI complex revealed a unique effect on virulence factor injection and membrane ruffling. Both effects are attributable to mislocalization of cholesterol, sphingolipids, Rac1 and Cdc42 away from the plasma membrane into a large intracellular compartment. Equivalent results were obtained with the vesicular stomatitis virus. Therefore, COPI-facilitated maintenance of lipids may represent a novel, unifying mechanism essential for a wide range of pathogens, offering opportunities for designing new drugs. PMID:21407211

  13. Cell cycle entry triggers a switch between two modes of Cdc42 activation during yeast polarization

    PubMed Central

    Witte, Kristen; Strickland, Devin; Glotzer, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Cell polarization underlies many cellular and organismal functions. The GTPase Cdc42 orchestrates polarization in many contexts. In budding yeast, polarization is associated with a focus of Cdc42•GTP which is thought to self sustain by recruiting a complex containing Cla4, a Cdc42-binding effector, Bem1, a scaffold, and Cdc24, a Cdc42 GEF. Using optogenetics, we probe yeast polarization and find that local recruitment of Cdc24 or Bem1 is sufficient to induce polarization by triggering self-sustaining Cdc42 activity. However, the response to these perturbations depends on the recruited molecule, the cell cycle stage, and existing polarization sites. Before cell cycle entry, recruitment of Cdc24, but not Bem1, induces a metastable pool of Cdc42 that is sustained by positive feedback. Upon Cdk1 activation, recruitment of either Cdc24 or Bem1 creates a stable site of polarization that induces budding and inhibits formation of competing sites. Local perturbations have therefore revealed unexpected features of polarity establishment. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.26722.001 PMID:28682236

  14. A CDC42EP4/septin-based perisynaptic glial scaffold facilitates glutamate clearance.

    PubMed

    Ageta-Ishihara, Natsumi; Yamazaki, Maya; Konno, Kohtarou; Nakayama, Hisako; Abe, Manabu; Hashimoto, Kenji; Nishioka, Tomoki; Kaibuchi, Kozo; Hattori, Satoko; Miyakawa, Tsuyoshi; Tanaka, Kohichi; Huda, Fathul; Hirai, Hirokazu; Hashimoto, Kouichi; Watanabe, Masahiko; Sakimura, Kenji; Kinoshita, Makoto

    2015-12-10

    The small GTPase-effector proteins CDC42EP1-5/BORG1-5 interact reciprocally with CDC42 or the septin cytoskeleton. Here we show that, in the cerebellum, CDC42EP4 is exclusively expressed in Bergmann glia and localizes beneath specific membrane domains enwrapping dendritic spines of Purkinje cells. CDC42EP4 forms complexes with septin hetero-oligomers, which interact with a subset of glutamate transporter GLAST/EAAT1. In Cdc42ep4(-/-) mice, GLAST is dissociated from septins and is delocalized away from the parallel fibre-Purkinje cell synapses. The excitatory postsynaptic current exhibits a protracted decay time constant, reduced sensitivity to a competitive inhibitor of the AMPA-type glutamate receptors (γDGG) and excessive baseline inward current in response to a subthreshold dose of a nonselective inhibitor of the glutamate transporters/EAAT1-5 (DL-TBOA). Insufficient glutamate-buffering/clearance capacity in these mice manifests as motor coordination/learning defects, which are aggravated with subthreshold DL-TBOA. We propose that the CDC42EP4/septin-based glial scaffold facilitates perisynaptic localization of GLAST and optimizes the efficiency of glutamate-buffering and clearance.

  15. Cdc42 and formin activity control non-muscle myosin dynamics during Drosophila heart morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Vogler, Georg; Liu, Jiandong; Iafe, Timothy W.; Migh, Ede; Mihály, József

    2014-01-01

    During heart formation, a network of transcription factors and signaling pathways guide cardiac cell fate and differentiation, but the genetic mechanisms orchestrating heart assembly and lumen formation remain unclear. Here, we show that the small GTPase Cdc42 is essential for Drosophila melanogaster heart morphogenesis and lumen formation. Cdc42 genetically interacts with the cardiogenic transcription factor tinman; with dDAAM which belongs to the family of actin organizing formins; and with zipper, which encodes nonmuscle myosin II. Zipper is required for heart lumen formation, and its spatiotemporal activity at the prospective luminal surface is controlled by Cdc42. Heart-specific expression of activated Cdc42, or the regulatory formins dDAAM and Diaphanous caused mislocalization of Zipper and induced ectopic heart lumina, as characterized by luminal markers such as the extracellular matrix protein Slit. Placement of Slit at the lumen surface depends on Cdc42 and formin function. Thus, Cdc42 and formins play pivotal roles in heart lumen formation through the spatiotemporal regulation of the actomyosin network. PMID:25267295

  16. A CDC42EP4/septin-based perisynaptic glial scaffold facilitates glutamate clearance

    PubMed Central

    Ageta-Ishihara, Natsumi; Yamazaki, Maya; Konno, Kohtarou; Nakayama, Hisako; Abe, Manabu; Hashimoto, Kenji; Nishioka, Tomoki; Kaibuchi, Kozo; Hattori, Satoko; Miyakawa, Tsuyoshi; Tanaka, Kohichi; Huda, Fathul; Hirai, Hirokazu; Hashimoto, Kouichi; Watanabe, Masahiko; Sakimura, Kenji; Kinoshita, Makoto

    2015-01-01

    The small GTPase-effector proteins CDC42EP1-5/BORG1–5 interact reciprocally with CDC42 or the septin cytoskeleton. Here we show that, in the cerebellum, CDC42EP4 is exclusively expressed in Bergmann glia and localizes beneath specific membrane domains enwrapping dendritic spines of Purkinje cells. CDC42EP4 forms complexes with septin hetero-oligomers, which interact with a subset of glutamate transporter GLAST/EAAT1. In Cdc42ep4−/− mice, GLAST is dissociated from septins and is delocalized away from the parallel fibre-Purkinje cell synapses. The excitatory postsynaptic current exhibits a protracted decay time constant, reduced sensitivity to a competitive inhibitor of the AMPA-type glutamate receptors (γDGG) and excessive baseline inward current in response to a subthreshold dose of a nonselective inhibitor of the glutamate transporters/EAAT1–5 (DL-TBOA). Insufficient glutamate-buffering/clearance capacity in these mice manifests as motor coordination/learning defects, which are aggravated with subthreshold DL-TBOA. We propose that the CDC42EP4/septin-based glial scaffold facilitates perisynaptic localization of GLAST and optimizes the efficiency of glutamate-buffering and clearance. PMID:26657011

  17. Proper regulation of Cdc42 activity is required for tight actin concentration at the equator during cytokinesis in adherent mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xiaodong; Wang, Junxia; Moriguchi, Kazuki; Liow, Lu Ting; Ahmed, Sohail; Kaverina, Irina; Murata-Hori, Maki

    2011-10-01

    Cytokinesis in mammalian cells requires actin assembly at the equatorial region. Although functions of RhoA in this process have been well established, additional mechanisms are likely involved. We have examined if Cdc42 is involved in actin assembly during cytokinesis. Depletion of Cdc42 had no apparent effects on the duration of cytokinesis, while overexpression of constitutively active Cdc42 (CACdc42) caused cytokinesis failure in normal rat kidney epithelial cells. Cells depleted of Cdc42 displayed abnormal cell morphology and caused a failure of tight accumulation of actin and RhoA at the equator. In contrast, in cells overexpressing CACdc42, actin formed abnormal bundles and RhoA was largely eliminated from the equator. Our results suggest that accurate regulation of Cdc42 activity is crucial for proper equatorial actin assembly and RhoA localization during cytokinesis. Notably, our observations also suggest that tight actin concentration is not essential for cytokinesis in adherent mammalian cells.

  18. Structural and functional regulation of tight junctions by RhoA and Rac1 small GTPases.

    PubMed

    Jou, T S; Schneeberger, E E; Nelson, W J

    1998-07-13

    Tight junctions (TJ) govern ion and solute diffusion through the paracellular space (gate function), and restrict mixing of membrane proteins and lipids between membrane domains (fence function) of polarized epithelial cells. We examined roles of the RhoA and Rac1 GTPases in regulating TJ structure and function in MDCK cells using the tetracycline repressible transactivator to regulate RhoAV14, RhoAN19, Rac1V12, and Rac1N17 expression. Both constitutively active and dominant negative RhoA or Rac1 perturbed TJ gate function (transepithelial electrical resistance, tracer diffusion) in a dose-dependent and reversible manner. Freeze-fracture EM and immunofluoresence microscopy revealed abnormal TJ strand morphology and protein (occludin, ZO-1) localization in RhoAV14 and Rac1V12 cells. However, TJ strand morphology and protein localization appeared normal in RhoAN19 and Rac1N17 cells. All mutant GTPases disrupted the fence function of the TJ (interdomain diffusion of a fluorescent lipid), but targeting and organization of a membrane protein in the apical membrane were unaffected. Expression levels and protein complexes of occludin and ZO-1 appeared normal in all mutant cells, although ZO-1 was more readily solubilized from RhoAV14-expressing cells with Triton X-100. These results show that RhoA and Rac1 regulate gate and fence functions of the TJ, and play a role in the spatial organization of TJ proteins at the apex of the lateral membrane.

  19. Rho GTPase activity in the honey bee mushroom bodies is correlated with age and foraging experience

    PubMed Central

    Dobrin, Scott E.; Fahrbach, Susan E.

    2011-01-01

    Foraging experience is correlated with structural plasticity of the mushroom bodies of the honey bee brain. While several neurotransmitter and intracellular signaling pathways have been previously implicated as mediators of these structural changes, none interact directly with the cytoskeleton, the ultimate effector of changes in neuronal morphology. The Rho family of GTPases are small, monomeric G proteins that, when activated, initiate a signaling cascade that reorganizes the neuronal cytoskeleton. In this study, we measured activity of two members of the Rho family of GTPases, Rac and RhoA, in the mushroom bodies of bees with different durations of foraging experience. A transient increase in Rac activity coupled with a transient decrease in RhoA activity was found in honey bees with 4 days foraging experience compared with same-aged new foragers. These observations are in accord with previous reports based on studies of other species of a growth supporting role for Rac and a growth opposing role for RhoA. This is the first report of Rho GTPase activation in the honey bee brain. PMID:22108023

  20. The Cool-2/alpha-Pix protein mediates a Cdc42-Rac signaling cascade.

    PubMed

    Baird, Dan; Feng, Qiyu; Cerione, Richard A

    2005-01-11

    Cloned-out of library-2 (Cool-2)/PAK-interactive exchange factor (alpha-Pix) was identified through its ability to bind the Cdc42/Rac target p21-activated kinase (PAK) and has been implicated in certain forms of X-linked mental retardation as well as in growth factor- and chemoattractant-coupled signaling pathways. We recently found that the dimeric form of Cool-2 is a specific guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) for Rac, whereas monomeric Cool-2 is a GEF for Cdc42 as well as Rac. However, unlike many GEFs, Cool-2 binds to activated forms of Cdc42 and Rac. Thus, we have investigated the functional consequences of these interactions. We show that the binding of activated Cdc42 to the Cool-2 dimer markedly enhances its ability to associate with GDP bound Rac1, resulting in a significant activation of Rac-GEF activity. While the Rac-specific GEF activity of Cool-2 is mediated through the Dbl homology (DH) domain from one monomer and the Pleckstrin homology domain from the other, activated Cdc42 interacts with the DH domain, most likely opposite the DH domain binding site for GDP bound Rac. Activated Rac also binds to Cool-2; however, it strongly inhibits the GEF activity of dimeric Cool-2. We provide evidence for novel mechanisms of allosteric regulation of the Rac-GEF activity of the Cool-2 dimer, involving stimulatory effects by Cdc42 and feedback inhibition by Rac. These findings demonstrate that by serving as a target for GTP bound Cdc42 and a GEF for Rac, Cool-2 mediates a GTPase cascade where the activation of Cdc42 is translated into the activation of Rac.

  1. Spatial control of Cdc42 activation determines cell width in fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Felice D; Nurse, Paul

    2011-10-01

    The fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe is a rod-shaped cell that grows by linear extension at the cell tips, with a nearly constant width throughout the cell cycle. This simple geometry makes it an ideal system for studying the control of cellular dimensions. In this study, we carried out a near-genome-wide screen for mutants wider than wild-type cells. We found 11 deletion mutants that were wider; seven of the deleted genes are implicated in the control of the small GTPase Cdc42, including the Cdc42 guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) Scd1 and the Cdc42 GTPase-activating protein (GAP) Rga4. Deletions of rga4 and scd1 had additive effects on cell width, and the proteins localized independently of one another, with Rga4 located at the cell sides and Scd1 at the cell tips. Activated Cdc42 localization is altered in rga4Δ, scd1Δ, and scd2Δ mutants. Delocalization and ectopic retargeting experiments showed that the localizations of Rga4 and Scd1 are crucial for their roles in determining cell width. We propose that the GAP Rga4 and the GEF Scd1 establish a gradient of activated Cdc42 within the cellular tip plasma membrane, and it is this gradient that determines cell growth-zone size and normal cell width.

  2. Assessment of roles for the Rho-specific guanine nucleotide dissociation inhibitor Ly-GDI in platelet function: a spatial systems approach.

    PubMed

    Ngo, Anh T P; Thierheimer, Marisa L D; Babur, Özgün; Rocheleau, Anne D; Huang, Tao; Pang, Jiaqing; Rigg, Rachel A; Mitrugno, Annachiara; Theodorescu, Dan; Burchard, Julja; Nan, Xiaolin; Demir, Emek; McCarty, Owen J T; Aslan, Joseph E

    2017-04-01

    On activation at sites of vascular injury, platelets undergo morphological alterations essential to hemostasis via cytoskeletal reorganizations driven by the Rho GTPases Rac1, Cdc42, and RhoA. Here we investigate roles for Rho-specific guanine nucleotide dissociation inhibitor proteins (RhoGDIs) in platelet function. We find that platelets express two RhoGDI family members, RhoGDI and Ly-GDI. Whereas RhoGDI localizes throughout platelets in a granule-like manner, Ly-GDI shows an asymmetric, polarized localization that largely overlaps with Rac1 and Cdc42 as well as microtubules and protein kinase C (PKC) in platelets adherent to fibrinogen. Antibody interference and platelet spreading experiments suggest a specific role for Ly-GDI in platelet function. Intracellular signaling studies based on interactome and pathways analyses also support a regulatory role for Ly-GDI, which is phosphorylated at PKC substrate motifs in a PKC-dependent manner in response to the platelet collagen receptor glycoprotein (GP) VI-specific agonist collagen-related peptide. Additionally, PKC inhibition diffuses the polarized organization of Ly-GDI in spread platelets relative to its colocalization with Rac1 and Cdc42. Together, our results suggest a role for Ly-GDI in the localized regulation of Rho GTPases in platelets and hypothesize a link between the PKC and Rho GTPase signaling systems in platelet function. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  3. Rho GTPase controls Drosophila salivary gland lumen size through regulation of the actin cytoskeleton and Moesin

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Na; Bagumian, Gaiana; Galiano, Michael; Myat, Monn Monn

    2011-01-01

    Generation and maintenance of proper lumen size is important for tubular organ function. We report on a novel role for the Drosophila Rho1 GTPase in control of salivary gland lumen size through regulation of cell rearrangement, apical domain elongation and cell shape change. We show that Rho1 controls cell rearrangement and apical domain elongation by promoting actin polymerization and regulating F-actin distribution at the apical and basolateral membranes through Rho kinase. Loss of Rho1 resulted in reduction of F-actin at the basolateral membrane and enrichment of apical F-actin, the latter accompanied by enrichment of apical phosphorylated Moesin. Reducing cofilin levels in Rho1 mutant salivary gland cells restored proper distribution of F-actin and phosphorylated Moesin and rescued the cell rearrangement and apical domain elongation defects of Rho1 mutant glands. In support of a role for Rho1-dependent actin polymerization in regulation of gland lumen size, loss of profilin phenocopied the Rho1 lumen size defects to a large extent. We also show that Ribbon, a BTB domain-containing transcription factor functions with Rho1 in limiting apical phosphorylated Moesin for apical domain elongation. Our studies reveal a novel mechanism for controlling salivary gland lumen size, namely through Rho1-dependent actin polymerization and distribution and downregulation of apical phosphorylated Moesin. PMID:22071107

  4. A dock and coalesce mechanism driven by hydrophobic interactions governs Cdc42 binding with its effector protein ACK.

    PubMed

    Tetley, George J N; Mott, Helen R; Cooley, R Neil; Owen, Darerca

    2017-07-07

    Cdc42 is a Rho-family small G protein that has been widely studied for its role in controlling the actin cytoskeleton and plays a part in several potentially oncogenic signaling networks. Similar to most other small G proteins, Cdc42 binds to many downstream effector proteins to elicit its cellular effects. These effector proteins all engage the same face of Cdc42, the conformation of which is governed by the activation state of the G protein. Previously, the importance of individual residues in conferring binding affinity has been explored for residues within Cdc42 for three of its Cdc42/Rac interactive binding (CRIB) effectors, activated Cdc42 kinase (ACK), p21-activated kinase (PAK), and Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein (WASP). Here, in a complementary study, we have used our structure of Cdc42 bound to ACK via an intrinsically disordered ACK region to guide an analysis of the Cdc42 interface on ACK, creating a panel of mutant proteins with which we can now describe the complete energetic landscape of the Cdc42-binding site on ACK. Our data suggest that the binding affinity of ACK relies on several conserved residues that are critical for stabilizing the quaternary structure. These residues are centered on the CRIB region, with the complete binding region anchored at each end by hydrophobic interactions. These findings suggest that ACK adopts a dock and coalesce binding mechanism with Cdc42. In contrast to other CRIB-family effectors and indeed other intrinsically disordered proteins, hydrophobic residues likely drive Cdc42-ACK binding. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  5. Effects of Rho1, a small GTPase on the production of recombinant glycoproteins in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Xu, Sha; Zhang, Ge-Yuan; Zhang, Huijie; Kitajima, Toshihiko; Nakanishi, Hideki; Gao, Xiao-Dong

    2016-10-21

    To humanize yeast N-glycosylation pathways, genes involved in yeast specific hyper-mannosylation must be disrupted followed by the introduction of genes catalyzing the synthesis, transport, and addition of human sugars. However, deletion of these genes, for instance, OCH1, which initiates hyper-mannosylation, could cause severe defects in cell growth, morphogenesis and response to environmental challenges. In this study, overexpression of RHO1, which encodes the Rho1p small GTPase, is confirmed to partially recover the growth defect of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Δalg3Δoch1 double mutant strain. In addition, transmission electron micrographs indicated that the cell wall structure of RHO1-expressed cells have an enhanced glucan layer and also a recovered mannoprotein layer, revealing the effect of Rho1p GTPase on cell wall biosynthesis. Similar complementation phenotypes have been confirmed by overexpression of the gene that encodes Fks2 protein, a catalytic subunit of a 1,3-β-glucan synthase. Besides the recovery of cell wall structure, the RHO1-overexpressed Δalg3Δoch1 strain also showed improved abilities in temperature tolerance, osmotic potential and drug sensitivity, which were not observed in the Δalg3Δoch1-FKS2 cells. Moreover, RHO1 overexpression could also increase N-glycan site occupancy and the amount of secreted glycoproteins. Overexpression of RHO1 in 'humanized' glycoprotein producing yeasts could significantly facilitate its future industrial applications for the production of therapeutic glycoproteins.

  6. The dynamics of Rho GTPase signaling and implications for targeting cancer and the tumor microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Pajic, Marina; Herrmann, David; Vennin, Claire; Conway, James RW; Chin, Venessa T; Johnsson, Anna-Karin E; Welch, Heidi CE; Timpson, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Numerous large scale genomics studies have demonstrated that cancer is a molecularly heterogeneous disease, characterized by acquired changes in the structure and DNA sequence of tumor genomes. More recently, the role of the equally complex tumor microenvironment in driving the aggressiveness of this disease is increasingly being realized. Tumor cells are surrounded by activated stroma, creating a dynamic environment that promotes cancer development, metastasis and chemoresistance. The Rho family of small GTPases plays an essential role in the regulation of cell shape, cytokinesis, cell adhesion, and cell motility. Importantly, these processes need to be considered in the context of a complex 3-dimensional (3D) environment, with reciprocal feedback and cross-talk taking place between the tumor cells and host environment. Here we discuss the role of molecular networks involving Rho GTPases in cancer, and the therapeutic implications of inhibiting Rho signaling in both cancer cells and the emerging concept of targeting the surrounding stroma. PMID:26103062

  7. RNAi screens for Rho GTPase regulators of cell shape and YAP/TAZ localisation in triple negative breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Pascual-Vargas, Patricia; Cooper, Samuel; Sero, Julia; Bousgouni, Vicky; Arias-Garcia, Mar; Bakal, Chris

    2017-03-01

    In order to metastasise, triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) must make dynamic changes in cell shape. The shape of all eukaryotic cells is regulated by Rho Guanine Nucleotide Exchange Factors (RhoGEFs), which activate Rho-family GTPases in response to mechanical and informational cues. In contrast, Rho GTPase-activating proteins (RhoGAPs) inhibit Rho GTPases. However, which RhoGEFs and RhoGAPS couple TNBC cell shape to changes in their environment is very poorly understood. Moreover, whether the activity of particular RhoGEFs and RhoGAPs become dysregulated as cells evolve the ability to metastasise is not clear. Towards the ultimate goal of identifying RhoGEFs and RhoGAPs that are essential for TNBC metastasis, we performed an RNAi screen to isolate RhoGEFs and RhoGAPs that contribute to the morphogenesis of the highly metastatic TNBC cell line LM2, and its less-metastatic parental cell line MDA-MB-231. For ~6 million cells from each cell line, we measured 127 different features following the depletion of 142 genes. Using a linear classifier scheme we also describe the morphological heterogeneity of each gene-depleted population.

  8. RNAi screens for Rho GTPase regulators of cell shape and YAP/TAZ localisation in triple negative breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Pascual-Vargas, Patricia; Cooper, Samuel; Sero, Julia; Bousgouni, Vicky; Arias-Garcia, Mar; Bakal, Chris

    2017-01-01

    In order to metastasise, triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) must make dynamic changes in cell shape. The shape of all eukaryotic cells is regulated by Rho Guanine Nucleotide Exchange Factors (RhoGEFs), which activate Rho-family GTPases in response to mechanical and informational cues. In contrast, Rho GTPase-activating proteins (RhoGAPs) inhibit Rho GTPases. However, which RhoGEFs and RhoGAPS couple TNBC cell shape to changes in their environment is very poorly understood. Moreover, whether the activity of particular RhoGEFs and RhoGAPs become dysregulated as cells evolve the ability to metastasise is not clear. Towards the ultimate goal of identifying RhoGEFs and RhoGAPs that are essential for TNBC metastasis, we performed an RNAi screen to isolate RhoGEFs and RhoGAPs that contribute to the morphogenesis of the highly metastatic TNBC cell line LM2, and its less-metastatic parental cell line MDA-MB-231. For ~6 million cells from each cell line, we measured 127 different features following the depletion of 142 genes. Using a linear classifier scheme we also describe the morphological heterogeneity of each gene-depleted population. PMID:28248929

  9. Control of developmental networks by Rac/Rho small GTPases: How cytoskeletal changes during embryogenesis are orchestrated

    PubMed Central

    Sáenz‐Narciso, Beatriz; Gómez‐Orte, Eva; Zheleva, Angelina; Gastaca, Irene

    2016-01-01

    Small GTPases in the Rho family act as major nodes with functions beyond cytoskeletal rearrangements shaping the Caenorhabditis elegans embryo during development. These small GTPases are key signal transducers that integrate diverse developmental signals to produce a coordinated response in the cell. In C. elegans, the best studied members of these highly conserved Rho family small GTPases, RHO‐1/RhoA, CED‐10/Rac, and CDC‐42, are crucial in several cellular processes dealing with cytoskeletal reorganization. In this review, we update the functions described for the Rho family small GTPases in spindle orientation and cell division, engulfment, and cellular movements during C. elegans embryogenesis, focusing on the Rho subfamily Rac. Please also see the video abstract here PMID:27790724

  10. MicroRNA-132 Interact with p250GAP/Cdc42 Pathway in the Hippocampal Neuronal Culture Model of Acquired Epilepsy and Associated with Epileptogenesis Process

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Hao; Zhou, Xin; Liu, Xi; Xu, Tao; Ma, Limin

    2016-01-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that epilepsy is the result of synaptic reorganization and pathological excitatory loop formation in the central nervous system; however, the mechanisms that regulate this process are not well understood. We proposed that microRNA-132 (miR-132) and p250GAP might play important roles in this process by activating the downstream Rho GTPase family. We tested this hypothesis using a magnesium-free medium-induced epileptic model of cultured hippocampal neurons. We investigated whether miR-132 regulates GTPase activity through p250GAP and found that Cdc42 was significantly activated in our experimental model. Silencing miR-132 inhibited the electrical excitability level of cultured epileptic neurons, whereas silencing p250GAP had an opposite effect. In addition, we verified the effect of miR-132 in vivo and found that silencing miR-132 inhibited the aberrant formation of dendritic spines and chronic spontaneous seizure in a lithium-pilocarpine-induced epileptic mouse model. Finally, we confirmed that silencing miR-132 has a neuroprotective effect on cultured epileptic neurons; however, this effect did not occur through the p250GAP pathway. Generally, silencing miR-132 may suppress spontaneous seizure activity through the miR-132/p250GAP/Cdc42 pathway by regulating the morphology and electrophysiology of dendritic spines; therefore, miR-132 may serve as a potential target for the development of antiepileptic drugs. PMID:27579184

  11. RhoA GTPase controls cytokinesis and programmed necrosis of hematopoietic progenitors

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xuan; Florian, Maria Carolina; Arumugam, Paritha; Chen, Xiaoyi; Cancelas, Jose A.; Lang, Richard; Malik, Punam; Geiger, Hartmut

    2013-01-01

    Hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs) are central to hematopoiesis as they provide large numbers of lineage-defined blood cells necessary to sustain blood homeostasis. They are one of the most actively cycling somatic cells, and their precise control is critical for hematopoietic homeostasis. The small GTPase RhoA is an intracellular molecular switch that integrates cytokine, chemokine, and adhesion signals to coordinate multiple context-dependent cellular processes. By using a RhoA conditional knockout mouse model, we show that RhoA deficiency causes a multilineage hematopoietic failure that is associated with defective multipotent HPCs. Interestingly, RhoA−/− hematopoietic stem cells retained long-term engraftment potential but failed to produce multipotent HPCs and lineage-defined blood cells. This multilineage hematopoietic failure was rescued by reconstituting wild-type RhoA into the RhoA−/− Lin−Sca-1+c-Kit+ compartment. Mechanistically, RhoA regulates actomyosin signaling, cytokinesis, and programmed necrosis of the HPCs, and loss of RhoA results in a cytokinesis failure of HPCs manifested by an accumulation of multinucleated cells caused by failed abscission of the cleavage furrow after telophase. Concomitantly, the HPCs show a drastically increased death associated with increased TNF–RIP-mediated necrosis. These results show that RhoA is a critical and specific regulator of multipotent HPCs during cytokinesis and thus essential for multilineage hematopoiesis. PMID:24101377

  12. Polarization of Diploid Daughter Cells Directed by Spatial Cues and GTP Hydrolysis of Cdc42 in Budding Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Narayan, Monisha; Chou, Ching-Shan; Park, Hay-Oak

    2013-01-01

    Cell polarization occurs along a single axis that is generally determined by a spatial cue. Cells of the budding yeast exhibit a characteristic pattern of budding, which depends on cell-type-specific cortical markers, reflecting a genetic programming for the site of cell polarization. The Cdc42 GTPase plays a key role in cell polarization in various cell types. Although previous studies in budding yeast suggested positive feedback loops whereby Cdc42 becomes polarized, these mechanisms do not include spatial cues, neglecting the normal patterns of budding. Here we combine live-cell imaging and mathematical modeling to understand how diploid daughter cells establish polarity preferentially at the pole distal to the previous division site. Live-cell imaging shows that daughter cells of diploids exhibit dynamic polarization of Cdc42-GTP, which localizes to the bud tip until the M phase, to the division site at cytokinesis, and then to the distal pole in the next G1 phase. The strong bias toward distal budding of daughter cells requires the distal-pole tag Bud8 and Rga1, a GTPase activating protein for Cdc42, which inhibits budding at the cytokinesis site. Unexpectedly, we also find that over 50% of daughter cells lacking Rga1 exhibit persistent Cdc42-GTP polarization at the bud tip and the distal pole, revealing an additional role of Rga1 in spatiotemporal regulation of Cdc42 and thus in the pattern of polarized growth. Mathematical modeling indeed reveals robust Cdc42-GTP clustering at the distal pole in diploid daughter cells despite random perturbation of the landmark cues. Moreover, modeling predicts different dynamics of Cdc42-GTP polarization when the landmark level and the initial level of Cdc42-GTP at the division site are perturbed by noise added in the model. PMID:23437206

  13. Extracting Diffusive States of Rho GTPase in Live Cells: Towards In Vivo Biochemistry.

    PubMed

    Koo, Peter K; Weitzman, Matthew; Sabanaygam, Chandran R; van Golen, Kenneth L; Mochrie, Simon G J

    2015-10-01

    Resolving distinct biochemical interaction states when analyzing the trajectories of diffusing proteins in live cells on an individual basis remains challenging because of the limited statistics provided by the relatively short trajectories available experimentally. Here, we introduce a novel, machine-learning based classification methodology, which we call perturbation expectation-maximization (pEM), that simultaneously analyzes a population of protein trajectories to uncover the system of diffusive behaviors which collectively result from distinct biochemical interactions. We validate the performance of pEM in silico and demonstrate that pEM is capable of uncovering the proper number of underlying diffusive states with an accurate characterization of their diffusion properties. We then apply pEM to experimental protein trajectories of Rho GTPases, an integral regulator of cytoskeletal dynamics and cellular homeostasis, in vivo via single particle tracking photo-activated localization microscopy. Remarkably, pEM uncovers 6 distinct diffusive states conserved across various Rho GTPase family members. The variability across family members in the propensities for each diffusive state reveals non-redundant roles in the activation states of RhoA and RhoC. In a resting cell, our results support a model where RhoA is constantly cycling between activation states, with an imbalance of rates favoring an inactive state. RhoC, on the other hand, remains predominantly inactive.

  14. Extracting Diffusive States of Rho GTPase in Live Cells: Towards In Vivo Biochemistry

    PubMed Central

    Sabanaygam, Chandran R.; van Golen, Kenneth L.; Mochrie, Simon G. J.

    2015-01-01

    Resolving distinct biochemical interaction states when analyzing the trajectories of diffusing proteins in live cells on an individual basis remains challenging because of the limited statistics provided by the relatively short trajectories available experimentally. Here, we introduce a novel, machine-learning based classification methodology, which we call perturbation expectation-maximization (pEM), that simultaneously analyzes a population of protein trajectories to uncover the system of diffusive behaviors which collectively result from distinct biochemical interactions. We validate the performance of pEM in silico and demonstrate that pEM is capable of uncovering the proper number of underlying diffusive states with an accurate characterization of their diffusion properties. We then apply pEM to experimental protein trajectories of Rho GTPases, an integral regulator of cytoskeletal dynamics and cellular homeostasis, in vivo via single particle tracking photo-activated localization microcopy. Remarkably, pEM uncovers 6 distinct diffusive states conserved across various Rho GTPase family members. The variability across family members in the propensities for each diffusive state reveals non-redundant roles in the activation states of RhoA and RhoC. In a resting cell, our results support a model where RhoA is constantly cycling between activation states, with an imbalance of rates favoring an inactive state. RhoC, on the other hand, remains predominantly inactive. PMID:26512894

  15. Nucleotide Dependent Switching in Rho GTPase: Conformational Heterogeneity and Competing Molecular Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumawat, Amit; Chakrabarty, Suman; Kulkarni, Kiran

    2017-04-01

    Ras superfamily of GTPases regulate myriad cellular processes through a conserved nucleotide (GTP/GDP) dependent switching mechanism. Unlike Ras family of GTPases, for the Rho GTPases, there is no clear evidence for the existence of “sub-states” such as state 1 & state 2 in the GTP bound form. To explore the nucleotide dependent conformational space of the Switch I loop and also to look for existence of state 1 like conformations in Rho GTPases, atomistic molecular dynamics and metadynamics simulations on RhoA were performed. These studies demonstrate that both the nucleotide-free state and the GDP bound “OFF” state have very similar conformations, whereas the GTP bound “ON” state has unique conformations with signatures of two intermediate states. The conformational free energy landscape for these systems suggests the presence of multiple intermediate states. Interestingly, the energetic penalty of exposing the non-polar residues in the GTP bound form is counter balanced by the favourable hydrogen bonded interactions between the γ-phosphate group of GTP with the highly conserved Tyr34 and Thr37 residues. These competing molecular interactions lead to a tuneable energy landscape of the Switch I conformation, which can undergo significant changes based on the local environment including changes upon binding to effectors.

  16. Nucleotide Dependent Switching in Rho GTPase: Conformational Heterogeneity and Competing Molecular Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Kumawat, Amit; Chakrabarty, Suman; Kulkarni, Kiran

    2017-01-01

    Ras superfamily of GTPases regulate myriad cellular processes through a conserved nucleotide (GTP/GDP) dependent switching mechanism. Unlike Ras family of GTPases, for the Rho GTPases, there is no clear evidence for the existence of “sub-states” such as state 1 & state 2 in the GTP bound form. To explore the nucleotide dependent conformational space of the Switch I loop and also to look for existence of state 1 like conformations in Rho GTPases, atomistic molecular dynamics and metadynamics simulations on RhoA were performed. These studies demonstrate that both the nucleotide-free state and the GDP bound “OFF” state have very similar conformations, whereas the GTP bound “ON” state has unique conformations with signatures of two intermediate states. The conformational free energy landscape for these systems suggests the presence of multiple intermediate states. Interestingly, the energetic penalty of exposing the non-polar residues in the GTP bound form is counter balanced by the favourable hydrogen bonded interactions between the γ-phosphate group of GTP with the highly conserved Tyr34 and Thr37 residues. These competing molecular interactions lead to a tuneable energy landscape of the Switch I conformation, which can undergo significant changes based on the local environment including changes upon binding to effectors. PMID:28374773

  17. A system of counteracting feedback loops regulates Cdc42p activity during spontaneous cell polarization.

    PubMed

    Ozbudak, Ertugrul M; Becskei, Attila; van Oudenaarden, Alexander

    2005-10-01

    Cellular polarization is often a response to distinct extracellular or intracellular cues, such as nutrient gradients or cortical landmarks. However, in the absence of such cues, some cells can still select a polarization axis at random. Positive feedback loops promoting localized activation of the GTPase Cdc42p are central to this process in budding yeast. Here, we explore spontaneous polarization during bud site selection in mutant yeast cells that lack functional landmarks. We find that these cells do not select a single random polarization axis, but continuously change this axis during the G1 phase of the cell cycle. This is reflected in traveling waves of activated Cdc42p which randomly explore the cell periphery. Our integrated computational and in vivo analyses of these waves reveal a negative feedback loop that competes with the aforementioned positive feedback loops to regulate Cdc42p activity and confer dynamic responsiveness on the robust initiation of cell polarization.

  18. Differential signalling by muscarinic receptors in smooth muscle: m2-mediated inactivation of myosin light chain kinase via Gi3, Cdc42/Rac1 and p21-activated kinase 1 pathway, and m3-mediated MLC20 (20 kDa regulatory light chain of myosin II) phosphorylation via Rho-associated kinase/myosin phosphatase targeting subunit 1 and protein kinase C/CPI-17 pathway.

    PubMed

    Murthy, Karnam S; Zhou, Huiping; Grider, John R; Brautigan, David L; Eto, Masumi; Makhlouf, Gabriel M

    2003-08-15

    Signalling via m3 and m2 receptors in smooth muscles involved activation of two G-protein-dependent pathways by each receptor. m2 receptors were coupled via Gbetagammai3 with activation of phospholipase C-beta3, phosphoinositide 3-kinase and Cdc42/Rac1 (where Cdc stands for cell division cycle) and p21-activated kinase 1 (PAK1), resulting in phosphorylation and inactivation of myosin light chain kinase (MLCK). Each step was inhibited by methoctramine and pertussis toxin. PAK1 activity was abolished in cells expressing both Cdc42-DN (where DN stands for dominant negative) and Rac1-DN. MLCK phosphorylation was inhibited by PAK1 antibody, and in cells expressing Cdc42-DN and Rac1-DN. m3 receptors were coupled via Galpha(q/11) with activation of phospholipase C-beta1 and via RhoA with activation of Rho-associated kinase (Rho kinase), phospholipase D and protein kinase C (PKC). Rho kinase and phospholipase D activities were inhibited by C3 exoenzyme and in cells expressing RhoA-DN. PKC activity was inhibited by bisindolylmaleimide, and in cells expressing RhoA-DN; PKC activity was also inhibited partly by Y27632 (44+/-5%). PKC-induced phosphorylation of PKC-activated 17 kDa inhibitor protein of type 1 phosphatase (CPI-17) at Thr38 was abolished by bisindolylmaleimide and inhibited partly by Y27632 (28+/-3%). Rho-kinase-induced phosphorylation of myosin phosphatase targeting subunit (MYPT1) and was abolished by Y27632. Sustained phosphorylation of 20 kDa regulatory light chain of myosin II (MLC20) and contraction were abolished by bisindolylmaleimide Y27632 and C3 exoenzyme and in cells expressing RhoA-DN. The results suggest that Rho-kinase-dependent phosphorylation of MYPT1 and PKC-dependent phosphorylation and enhancement of CPI-17 binding to the catalytic subunit of MLC phosphatase (MLCP) act co-operatively to inhibit MLCP activity, leading to sustained stimulation of MLC20 phosphorylation and contraction. Because Y27632 inhibited both Rho kinase and PKC activities

  19. Differential signalling by muscarinic receptors in smooth muscle: m2-mediated inactivation of myosin light chain kinase via Gi3, Cdc42/Rac1 and p21-activated kinase 1 pathway, and m3-mediated MLC20 (20 kDa regulatory light chain of myosin II) phosphorylation via Rho-associated kinase/myosin phosphatase targeting subunit 1 and protein kinase C/CPI-17 pathway.

    PubMed Central

    Murthy, Karnam S; Zhou, Huiping; Grider, John R; Brautigan, David L; Eto, Masumi; Makhlouf, Gabriel M

    2003-01-01

    Signalling via m3 and m2 receptors in smooth muscles involved activation of two G-protein-dependent pathways by each receptor. m2 receptors were coupled via Gbetagammai3 with activation of phospholipase C-beta3, phosphoinositide 3-kinase and Cdc42/Rac1 (where Cdc stands for cell division cycle) and p21-activated kinase 1 (PAK1), resulting in phosphorylation and inactivation of myosin light chain kinase (MLCK). Each step was inhibited by methoctramine and pertussis toxin. PAK1 activity was abolished in cells expressing both Cdc42-DN (where DN stands for dominant negative) and Rac1-DN. MLCK phosphorylation was inhibited by PAK1 antibody, and in cells expressing Cdc42-DN and Rac1-DN. m3 receptors were coupled via Galpha(q/11) with activation of phospholipase C-beta1 and via RhoA with activation of Rho-associated kinase (Rho kinase), phospholipase D and protein kinase C (PKC). Rho kinase and phospholipase D activities were inhibited by C3 exoenzyme and in cells expressing RhoA-DN. PKC activity was inhibited by bisindolylmaleimide, and in cells expressing RhoA-DN; PKC activity was also inhibited partly by Y27632 (44+/-5%). PKC-induced phosphorylation of PKC-activated 17 kDa inhibitor protein of type 1 phosphatase (CPI-17) at Thr38 was abolished by bisindolylmaleimide and inhibited partly by Y27632 (28+/-3%). Rho-kinase-induced phosphorylation of myosin phosphatase targeting subunit (MYPT1) and was abolished by Y27632. Sustained phosphorylation of 20 kDa regulatory light chain of myosin II (MLC20) and contraction were abolished by bisindolylmaleimide Y27632 and C3 exoenzyme and in cells expressing RhoA-DN. The results suggest that Rho-kinase-dependent phosphorylation of MYPT1 and PKC-dependent phosphorylation and enhancement of CPI-17 binding to the catalytic subunit of MLC phosphatase (MLCP) act co-operatively to inhibit MLCP activity, leading to sustained stimulation of MLC20 phosphorylation and contraction. Because Y27632 inhibited both Rho kinase and PKC activities

  20. A RAC/CDC-42-independent GIT/PIX/PAK signaling pathway mediates cell migration in C. elegans.

    PubMed

    Lucanic, Mark; Cheng, Hwai-Jong

    2008-11-01

    P21 activated kinase (PAK), PAK interacting exchange factor (PIX), and G protein coupled receptor kinase interactor (GIT) compose a highly conserved signaling module controlling cell migrations, immune system signaling, and the formation of the mammalian nervous system. Traditionally, this signaling module is thought to facilitate the function of RAC and CDC-42 GTPases by allowing for the recruitment of a GTPase effector (PAK), a GTPase activator (PIX), and a scaffolding protein (GIT) as a regulated signaling unit to specific subcellular locations. Instead, we report here that this signaling module functions independently of RAC/CDC-42 GTPases in vivo to control the cell shape and migration of the distal tip cells (DTCs) during morphogenesis of the Caenorhabditis elegans gonad. In addition, this RAC/CDC-42-independent PAK pathway functions in parallel to a classical GTPase/PAK pathway to control the guidance aspect of DTC migration. Among the C. elegans PAKs, only PAK-1 functions in the GIT/PIX/PAK pathway independently of RAC/CDC42 GTPases, while both PAK-1 and MAX-2 are redundantly utilized in the GTPase/PAK pathway. Both RAC/CDC42-dependent and -independent PAK pathways function with the integrin receptors, suggesting that signaling through integrins can control the morphology, movement, and guidance of DTC through discrete pathways. Collectively, our results define a new signaling capacity for the GIT/PIX/PAK module that is likely to be conserved in vertebrates and demonstrate that PAK family members, which are redundantly utilized as GTPase effectors, can act non-redundantly in pathways independent of these GTPases.

  1. Cdc42, Rac1, and Rac2 Display Distinct Patterns of Activation during PhagocytosisV⃞

    PubMed Central

    Hoppe, Adam D.; Swanson, Joel A.

    2004-01-01

    The small G proteins Cdc42, Rac1, and Rac2 regulate the rearrangements of actin and membrane necessary for Fcγ receptor-mediated phagocytosis by macrophages. Activated, GTP-bound Cdc42, Rac1, and Rac2 bind to the p21-binding domain (PBD) of PAK1, and this interaction provided a basis for microscopic methods to localize activation of these G proteins inside cells. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer-based stoichiometry of fluorescent chimeras of actin, PBD, Cdc42, Rac1, and Rac2 was used to quantify G protein activation relative to actin movements during phagocytosis of IgG-opsonized erythrocytes. The activation dynamics of endogenous G proteins, localized using yellow fluorescent protein-labeled PBD, was restricted to phagocytic cups, with a prominent spike of activation over an actin-poor region at the base of the cup. Refinements of fluorescence resonance energy transfer stoichiometry allowed calculation of the fractions of activated GTPases in forming phagosomes. Cdc42 activation was restricted to the leading margin of the cell, whereas Rac1 was active throughout the phagocytic cup. During phagosome closure, activation of Rac1 and Rac2 increased uniformly and transiently in the actin-poor region of phagosomal membrane. These distinct roles for Cdc42, Rac1, and Rac2 in the component activities of phagocytosis indicate mechanisms by which their differential regulation coordinates rearrangements of actin and membranes. PMID:15169870

  2. Structural and Functional Regulation of Tight Junctions by RhoA and Rac1 Small GTPases

    PubMed Central

    Jou, Tzuu-Shuh; Schneeberger, Eveline E.; James Nelson, W.

    1998-01-01

    Tight junctions (TJ) govern ion and solute diffusion through the paracellular space (gate function), and restrict mixing of membrane proteins and lipids between membrane domains (fence function) of polarized epithelial cells. We examined roles of the RhoA and Rac1 GTPases in regulating TJ structure and function in MDCK cells using the tetracycline repressible transactivator to regulate RhoAV14, RhoAN19, Rac1V12, and Rac1N17 expression. Both constitutively active and dominant negative RhoA or Rac1 perturbed TJ gate function (transepithelial electrical resistance, tracer diffusion) in a dose-dependent and reversible manner. Freeze-fracture EM and immunofluoresence microscopy revealed abnormal TJ strand morphology and protein (occludin, ZO-1) localization in RhoAV14 and Rac1V12 cells. However, TJ strand morphology and protein localization appeared normal in RhoAN19 and Rac1N17 cells. All mutant GTPases disrupted the fence function of the TJ (interdomain diffusion of a fluorescent lipid), but targeting and organization of a membrane protein in the apical membrane were unaffected. Expression levels and protein complexes of occludin and ZO-1 appeared normal in all mutant cells, although ZO-1 was more readily solubilized from RhoAV14-expressing cells with Triton X-100. These results show that RhoA and Rac1 regulate gate and fence functions of the TJ, and play a role in the spatial organization of TJ proteins at the apex of the lateral membrane. PMID:9660866

  3. Platelet Rho GTPases–a focus on novel players, roles and relationships

    PubMed Central

    Goggs, Robert; Williams, Christopher M.; Mellor, Harry; Poole, Alastair W.

    2015-01-01

    Rho GTPases are critical for platelet function. Although the roles of RhoA, Rac and Cdc42 are characterized, platelets express other Rho GTPases, whose activities are less well understood. This review summarizes our understanding of the roles of platelet Rho GTPases and focuses particularly on the functions of Rif and RhoG. In human platelets, Rif interacts with cytoskeleton regulators including formins mDia1 and mDia3, whereas RhoG binds SNARE-complex proteins and cytoskeletal regulators ELMO and DOCK1. Knockout mouse studies suggest that Rif plays no critical functions in platelets, likely due to functional overlap with other Rho GTPases. In contrast, RhoG is essential for normal granule secretion downstream of the collagen receptor GPVI. The central defect in RhoG−/− platelets is reduced dense granule secretion, which impedes integrin activation and aggregation and limits platelet recruitment to growing thrombi under shear, translating into reduced thrombus formation in vivo. Potential avenues for future work on Rho GTPases in platelets are also highlighted, including identification of the key regulator for platelet filopodia formation and investigation of the role of the many Rho GTPase regulators in platelet function in both health and disease. PMID:25748676

  4. cIAP1 regulates TNF-mediated cdc42 activation and filopodia formation.

    PubMed

    Marivin, A; Berthelet, J; Cartier, J; Paul, C; Gemble, S; Morizot, A; Boireau, W; Saleh, M; Bertoglio, J; Solary, E; Dubrez, L

    2014-11-27

    Tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF) is a cytokine endowed with multiple functions, depending on the cellular and environmental context. TNF receptor engagement induces the formation of a multimolecular complex including the TNFR-associated factor TRAF2, the receptor-interaction protein kinase RIP1 and the cellular inhibitor of apoptosis cIAP1, the latter being essential for NF-κB activation. Here, we show that cIAP1 also regulates TNF-induced actin cytoskeleton reorganization through a cdc42-dependent, NF-κB-independent pathway. Deletion of cIAP1 prevents TNF-induced filopodia and cdc42 activation. The expression of cIAP1 or its E3-ubiquitin ligase-defective mutant restores the ability of cIAP1(-/-) MEFs to produce filopodia, whereas a cIAP1 mutant unable to bind TRAF2 does not. Accordingly, the silencing of TRAF2 inhibits TNF-mediated filopodia formation, whereas silencing of RIP1 does not. cIAP1 directly binds cdc42 and promotes its RhoGDIα-mediated stabilization. TNF decreases cIAP1-cdc42 interaction, suggesting that TNF-induced recruitment of cIAP1/TRAF2 to the receptor releases cdc42, which in turn triggers actin remodeling. cIAP1 also regulates cdc42 activation in response to EGF and HRas-V12 expression. A downregulation of cIAP1 altered the cell polarization, the cell adhesion to endothelial cells and cell intercalation, which are cdc42-dependent processes. Finally, we demonstrated that the deletion of cIAP1 regulated the HRas-V12-mediated transformation process, including anchorage-dependent cell growth, tumour growth in a xenograft model and the development of experimental metastasis in the lung.

  5. The Rho guanine nucleotide exchange factors Intersectin 1L and β-Pix control calcium-regulated exocytosis in neuroendocrine PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    Momboisse, F; Ory, S; Ceridono, M; Calco, V; Vitale, N; Bader, M-F; Gasman, S

    2010-11-01

    GTPases of the Rho family are molecular switches that play an important role in a wide range of membrane-trafficking processes including neurotransmission and hormone release. We have previously demonstrated that RhoA and Cdc42 regulate calcium-dependent exocytosis in chromaffin cells by controlling actin dynamics, whereas Rac1 regulates lipid organisation. These findings raised the question of the upstream mechanism activating these GTPases during exocytosis. The guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) that catalyse the exchange of GDP for GTP are crucial elements regulating Rho signalling. Using an RNA interference approach, we have recently demonstrated that the GEFs Intersectin-1L and β-Pix, play essential roles in neuroendocrine exocytosis by controlling the activity of Cdc42 and Rac1, respectively. This review summarizes these results and discusses the functional importance of Rho GEFs in the exocytotic machinery in neuroendocrine cells.

  6. Genetic Analysis of the Saccharomyces Cerevisiae Rho3 Gene, Encoding a Rho-Type Small Gtpase, Provides Evidence for a Role in Bud Formation

    PubMed Central

    Imai, J.; Toh-e, A.; Matsui, Y.

    1996-01-01

    RHO3 encodes a Rho-type small GTPase of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We isolated temperature-sensitive alleles and a dominant active allele of RHO3. Ts(-) rho3 cells lost cell polarity during bud formation and grew more isotropically than wild-type cells at nonpermissive temperatures. In contrast, cells carrying a dominant active mutant RHO3 displayed cold sensitivity, and the cells became elongated and bent, often at the position where actin patches were concentrated. These phenotypes of the rho3 mutants strongly suggest that RHO3 is involved in directing the growing points during bud formation. In addition, we found that SRO6, previously isolated as a multicopy suppressor of rho3, is the same as SEC4. The sec4-2 mutation was synthetic lethal with temperature-sensitive rho3 mutations and suppressed the cold sensitivity caused by a dominant active mutant RHO3. The genetic interactions between RHO3 and SEC4, taken together with the fact that the Rab-type GTPase Sec4p is required to fuse secretory vesicles together with plasma membrane for exocytosis, support a model in which the Rho3p pathway modulates morphogenesis during bud growth via directing organization of the actin cytoskeleton and the position of the secretory machinery for exocytosis. PMID:8852836

  7. Regulation of cerebral cortex development by Rho GTPases: insights from in vivo studies

    PubMed Central

    Azzarelli, Roberta; Kerloch, Thomas; Pacary, Emilie

    2015-01-01

    The cerebral cortex is the site of higher human cognitive and motor functions. Histologically, it is organized into six horizontal layers, each containing unique populations of molecularly and functionally distinct excitatory projection neurons and inhibitory interneurons. The stereotyped cellular distribution of cortical neurons is crucial for the formation of functional neural circuits and it is predominantly established during embryonic development. Cortical neuron development is a multiphasic process characterized by sequential steps of neural progenitor proliferation, cell cycle exit, neuroblast migration and neuronal differentiation. This series of events requires an extensive and dynamic remodeling of the cell cytoskeleton at each step of the process. As major regulators of the cytoskeleton, the family of small Rho GTPases has been shown to play essential functions in cerebral cortex development. Here we review in vivo findings that support the contribution of Rho GTPases to cortical projection neuron development and we address their involvement in the etiology of cerebral cortex malformations. PMID:25610373

  8. Involvement of rho-gtpases in fibroblast adhesion and fibronectine fibrillogenesis under stretch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guignandon, A.; Lambert, C.; Rattner, A.; Servotte, S.; Lapiere, C.; Nusgens, B.; Vico, L.

    The Rho family small GTPases play a crucial role in mediating cellular adaptation to mechanical stimulation (MS), and possibly to microgravity (μg), through effects on the cytoskeleton and cell adhesion which is, in turn, mainly regulated by fibronectin fibrillogenesis (FnF). It remains unclear how mechanical stimulation is transduced to the Rho signaling pathways and how it impacts on fibronectin (fbn) fibrillogenesis (FnF). μg (2 days, mission STS-095) led to de-adhesion of fibroblasts and modification of the underlying extracellular matrix. To determine whether GTPases modulated FnF, we generated stable cell lines expressing high level of activated RhoA and Rac1 (QL) as compared to wild type (WI26-WT). After MS application [8% deformation, 1Hz, 15 min., 3 times/day for 1-2 days], we quantified focal adhesion (vinculin, paxillin, FAKY397), f-actin stress fibers (Sf) and FnF with home-developed softwares. We reported that after MS, Sf are more rapidly (30min) formed under the nucleus in Wi26-WT (+100%) and Rac1 (+200%) than in RhoA (+20%). Vinculin & paxillin were only restricted to the cell edge in static conditions and homogeneously distributed after MS in WT and Rac1. The relative area of contacts (vinculin & paxillin) was more dramatically enhanced by MS in Rac1 (+80%) than in WT (+40%) and RhoA (+25%) indicating that new focal contacts are formed under MS and supported the presence of Sf. MS Activation of FAK (FAKY397) was clear in WT and Rac1 and reduced in RhoA. FnF was restricted to cell-cell contacts zone without any change in the relative area of fbn after a 2-days MS. However we found more numerous spots of fbn at the cell center in Rac1 as compared with RhoA & WT suggesting that these fibrillar contacts will grow upon maturation and modulate FnF. The results indicate that MS induces formation of Sf and focal adhesions and enhances FF. RhoA has been shown to induce the formation of Sf and focal adhesions, and Rac1 activation decreases Rho activity in

  9. Involvement of Rho-type GTPase in control of cell size in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Kikuchi, Yo; Mizuuchi, Eri; Nogami, Satoru; Morishita, Shinichi; Ohya, Yoshikazu

    2007-06-01

    Maintaining specific cell size, which is important for many organisms, is achieved by coordinating cell growth and cell division. In the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the existence of two cell-size checkpoints is proposed: at the first checkpoint, cell size is monitored before budding at the G1/S transition, and at the second checkpoint, actin depolymerization occurring in the small bud is monitored before the G2/M transition. Morphological analyses have revealed that the small GTPase Rho1p participates in cell-size control at both the G1/S and the G2/M boundaries. One group of rho1 mutants (rho1A) underwent premature entry into mitosis, leading to the birth of abnormally small cells. In another group of rho1 mutants (rho1B), the mother cells failed to reach an appropriate size before budding, and expression of the G1 cyclin Cln2p began at an earlier phase of the cell cycle. Analyses of mutants defective in Rho1p effector proteins indicate that Skn7p, Fks1p and Mpk1p are involved in cell-size control. Thus, Rho1p and its downstream regulatory pathways are involved in controlling cell size in S. cerevisiae.

  10. Rho GTPase-activating bacterial toxins: from bacterial virulence regulation to eukaryotic cell biology.

    PubMed

    Lemonnier, Marc; Landraud, Luce; Lemichez, Emmanuel

    2007-09-01

    Studies on the interactions of bacterial pathogens with their host have provided an invaluable source of information on the major functions of eukaryotic and prokaryotic cell biology. In addition, this expanding field of research, known as cellular microbiology, has revealed fascinating examples of trans-kingdom functional interplay. Bacterial factors actually exploit eukaryotic cell machineries using refined molecular strategies to promote invasion and proliferation within their host. Here, we review a family of bacterial toxins that modulate their activity in eukaryotic cells by activating Rho GTPases and exploiting the ubiquitin/proteasome machineries. This family, found in human and animal pathogenic Gram-negative bacteria, encompasses the cytotoxic necrotizing factors (CNFs) from Escherichia coli and Yersinia species as well as dermonecrotic toxins from Bordetella species. We survey the genetics, biochemistry, molecular and cellular biology of these bacterial factors from the standpoint of the CNF1 toxin, the paradigm of Rho GTPase-activating toxins produced by urinary tract infections causing pathogenic Escherichia coli. Because it reveals important connections between bacterial invasion and the host inflammatory response, the mode of action of CNF1 and its related Rho GTPase-targetting toxins addresses major issues of basic and medical research and constitutes a privileged experimental model for host-pathogen interaction.

  11. miR-124-regulated RhoG

    PubMed Central

    Schumacher, Stefan; Franke, Kristin

    2013-01-01

    RhoG is a member of the Rho family of small GTPases sharing highest sequence similarity with Rac and Cdc42. Mig-2 and Mtl represent the functional equivalents of RhoG in Caenorhabditis elegans and Drosophila, respectively. RhoG has attracted great interest because it plays a central role in the regulation of cytoskeletal reorganization in various physiological and pathophysiological situations. For example, it is fundamental to phagocytotic processes, is able to regulate gene expression, cell survival and proliferation, and is involved in cell migration and in the invasion of pathogenic bacteria. The activation of Rac1 via an ELMO/Dock180 module has been elaborated to be important for RhoG signaling. Although a stimulatory role for neurite outgrowth in the pheochromocytoma PC12 cell line has been assigned to RhoG, the exact function of this GTPase for the development of the processes of primary neurons remains to be clarified. In this view, we discuss the impact of RhoG on axonal and dendritic differentiation, its role as a conductor of Rac1 and Cdc42 activity and the functional regulation of RhoG expression by the microRNA miR-124. PMID:23303397

  12. Suppression of Chemotaxis by SSeCKS via Scaffolding of Phosphoinositol Phosphates and the Recruitment of the Cdc42 GEF, Frabin, to the Leading Edge

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Hyun-Kyung; Guo, Li-wu; Su, Bing; Gao, Lingqiu; Gelman, Irwin H.

    2014-01-01

    Chemotaxis is controlled by interactions between receptors, Rho-family GTPases, phosphatidylinositol 3-kinases, and cytoskeleton remodeling proteins. We investigated how the metastasis suppressor, SSeCKS, attenuates chemotaxis. Chemotaxis activity inversely correlated with SSeCKS levels in mouse embryo fibroblasts (MEF), DU145 and MDA-MB-231 cancer cells. SSeCKS loss induced chemotactic velocity and linear directionality, correlating with replacement of leading edge lamellipodia with fascin-enriched filopodia-like extensions, the formation of thickened longitudinal F-actin stress fibers reaching to filopodial tips, relative enrichments at the leading edge of phosphatidylinositol (3,4,5)P3 (PIP3), Akt, PKC-ζ, Cdc42-GTP and active Src (SrcpoY416), and a loss of Rac1. Leading edge lamellipodia and chemotaxis inhibition in SSeCKS-null MEF could be restored by full-length SSeCKS or SSeCKS deleted of its Src-binding domain (ΔSrc), but not by SSeCKS deleted of its three MARCKS (myristylated alanine-rich C kinase substrate) polybasic domains (ΔPBD), which bind PIP2 and PIP3. The enrichment of activated Cdc42 in SSeCKS-null leading edge filopodia correlated with recruitment of the Cdc42-specific guanine nucleotide exchange factor, Frabin, likely recruited via multiple PIP2/3-binding domains. Frabin knockdown in SSeCKS-null MEF restores leading edge lamellipodia and chemotaxis inhibition. However, SSeCKS failed to co-immunoprecipitate with Rac1, Cdc42 or Frabin. Consistent with the notion that chemotaxis is controlled by SSeCKS-PIP (vs. -Src) scaffolding activity, constitutively-active phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase could override the ability of the Src inhibitor, SKI-606, to suppress chemotaxis and filopodial enrichment of Frabin in SSeCKS-null MEF. Our data suggest a role for SSeCKS in controlling Rac1 vs. Cdc42-induced cellular dynamics at the leading chemotactic edge through the scaffolding of phospholipids and signal mediators, and through the reorganization of the

  13. Suppression of chemotaxis by SSeCKS via scaffolding of phosphoinositol phosphates and the recruitment of the Cdc42 GEF, Frabin, to the leading edge.

    PubMed

    Ko, Hyun-Kyung; Guo, Li-wu; Su, Bing; Gao, Lingqiu; Gelman, Irwin H

    2014-01-01

    Chemotaxis is controlled by interactions between receptors, Rho-family GTPases, phosphatidylinositol 3-kinases, and cytoskeleton remodeling proteins. We investigated how the metastasis suppressor, SSeCKS, attenuates chemotaxis. Chemotaxis activity inversely correlated with SSeCKS levels in mouse embryo fibroblasts (MEF), DU145 and MDA-MB-231 cancer cells. SSeCKS loss induced chemotactic velocity and linear directionality, correlating with replacement of leading edge lamellipodia with fascin-enriched filopodia-like extensions, the formation of thickened longitudinal F-actin stress fibers reaching to filopodial tips, relative enrichments at the leading edge of phosphatidylinositol (3,4,5)P3 (PIP3), Akt, PKC-ζ, Cdc42-GTP and active Src (SrcpoY416), and a loss of Rac1. Leading edge lamellipodia and chemotaxis inhibition in SSeCKS-null MEF could be restored by full-length SSeCKS or SSeCKS deleted of its Src-binding domain (ΔSrc), but not by SSeCKS deleted of its three MARCKS (myristylated alanine-rich C kinase substrate) polybasic domains (ΔPBD), which bind PIP2 and PIP3. The enrichment of activated Cdc42 in SSeCKS-null leading edge filopodia correlated with recruitment of the Cdc42-specific guanine nucleotide exchange factor, Frabin, likely recruited via multiple PIP2/3-binding domains. Frabin knockdown in SSeCKS-null MEF restores leading edge lamellipodia and chemotaxis inhibition. However, SSeCKS failed to co-immunoprecipitate with Rac1, Cdc42 or Frabin. Consistent with the notion that chemotaxis is controlled by SSeCKS-PIP (vs. -Src) scaffolding activity, constitutively-active phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase could override the ability of the Src inhibitor, SKI-606, to suppress chemotaxis and filopodial enrichment of Frabin in SSeCKS-null MEF. Our data suggest a role for SSeCKS in controlling Rac1 vs. Cdc42-induced cellular dynamics at the leading chemotactic edge through the scaffolding of phospholipids and signal mediators, and through the reorganization of the

  14. IQGAP1 Interaction with RHO Family Proteins Revisited

    PubMed Central

    Nouri, Kazem; Fansa, Eyad K.; Amin, Ehsan; Dvorsky, Radovan; Gremer, Lothar; Willbold, Dieter; Schmitt, Lutz; Timson, David J.; Ahmadian, Mohammad R.

    2016-01-01

    IQ motif-containing GTPase activating protein 1 (IQGAP1) plays a central role in the physical assembly of relevant signaling networks that are responsible for various cellular processes, including cell adhesion, polarity, and transmigration. The RHO family proteins CDC42 and RAC1 have been shown to mainly interact with the GAP-related domain (GRD) of IQGAP1. However, the role of its RASGAP C-terminal (RGCT) and C-terminal domains in the interactions with RHO proteins has remained obscure. Here, we demonstrate that IQGAP1 interactions with RHO proteins underlie a multiple-step binding mechanism: (i) a high affinity, GTP-dependent binding of RGCT to the switch regions of CDC42 or RAC1 and (ii) a very low affinity binding of GRD and a C terminus adjacent to the switch regions. These data were confirmed by phosphomimetic mutation of serine 1443 to glutamate within RGCT, which led to a significant reduction of IQGAP1 affinity for CDC42 and RAC1, clearly disclosing the critical role of RGCT for these interactions. Unlike CDC42, an extremely low affinity was determined for the RAC1-GRD interaction, suggesting that the molecular nature of IQGAP1 interaction with CDC42 partially differs from that of RAC1. Our study provides new insights into the interaction characteristics of IQGAP1 with RHO family proteins and highlights the complementary importance of kinetic and equilibrium analyses. We propose that the ability of IQGAP1 to interact with RHO proteins is based on a multiple-step binding process, which is a prerequisite for the dynamic functions of IQGAP1 as a scaffolding protein and a critical mechanism in temporal regulation and integration of IQGAP1-mediated cellular responses. PMID:27815503

  15. Opposing roles for distinct LINC complexes in regulation of the small GTPase RhoA

    PubMed Central

    Thakar, Ketan; May, Christopher K.; Rogers, Anna; Carroll, Christopher W.

    2017-01-01

    Linker of Nucleoskeleton and Cytoskeleton (LINC) complexes span the nuclear envelope and transduce force from dynamic cytoskeletal networks to the nuclear lamina. Here we show that LINC complexes also signal from the nuclear envelope to critical regulators of the actin cytoskeleton. Specifically, we find that LINC complexes that contain the inner nuclear membrane protein Sun2 promote focal adhesion assembly by activating the small GTPase RhoA. A key effector in this process is the transcription factor/coactivator complex composed of SRF/Mkl1. A constitutively active form of SRF/Mkl1 was not sufficient to induce focal adhesion assembly in cells lacking Sun2, however, suggesting that LINC complexes support RhoA activity through a transcription-independent mechanism. Strikingly, we also find that the inner nuclear membrane protein Sun1 antagonizes Sun2 LINC complexes and inhibits RhoA activation and focal adhesion assembly. Thus different LINC complexes have opposing roles in the transcription-independent control of the actin cytoskeleton through the small GTPase RhoA. PMID:28035049

  16. Modelling GTPase dynamics to understand RhoA-driven cancer cell invasion

    PubMed Central

    Hetmanski, Joseph H.R.; Schwartz, Jean-Marc; Caswell, Patrick T.

    2016-01-01

    Metastasis, initially driven by cells migrating and invading through the local environment, leads to most cancer-associated deaths. Cells can use a variety of modes to move in vitro, all of which depend on Rho GTPases at some level. While traditionally it was thought that Rac1 activity drives protrusive lamellipodia at the leading edge of a polarised cell while RhoA drives rear retraction, more recent work in 3D microenvironments has revealed a much more complicated picture of GTPase dynamics. In particular, RhoA activity can dominate the leading edge polymerisation of actin to form filopodial actin-spike protrusions that drive more invasive cell migration. We recently described a potential mechanism to abrogate this pro-invasive localised leading edge Rac1 to RhoA switch via manipulation of a negative feedback loop that was revealed by adopting a logical modelling approach. Both challenging dogma and taking a formal, mathematical approach to understanding signalling involved in motility may be vital to harnessing harmful cell migration and preventing metastasis in future research. PMID:27913679

  17. Role of the Rho GTPase Rac in the activation of the phagocyte NADPH oxidase

    PubMed Central

    Pick, Edgar

    2014-01-01

    The superoxide-generating NADPH oxidase of phagocytes consists of the membrane-associated cytochrome b558 (a heterodimer of Nox2 and p22phox) and 4 cytosolic components: p47phox, p67phox, p40phox, and the small GTPase, Rac, in complex with RhoGDI. Superoxide is produced by the NADPH-driven reduction of molecular oxygen, via a redox gradient located in Nox2. Electron flow in Nox2 is initiated by interaction with cytosolic components, which translocate to the membrane, p67phox playing the central role. The participation of Rac is expressed in the following sequence: (1) Translocation of the RacGDP-RhoGDI complex to the membrane; (2) Dissociation of RacGDP from RhoGDI; (3) GDP to GTP exchange on Rac, mediated by a guanine nucleotide exchange factor; (4) Binding of RacGTP to p67phox; (5) Induction of a conformational change in p67phox, promoting interaction with Nox2. The particular involvement of Rac in NADPH oxidase assembly serves as a paradigm for signaling by Rho GTPases, in general. PMID:24598074

  18. Sialylation and glycosylation modulate cell adhesion and invasion to extracellular matrix in human malignant lymphoma: Dependency on integrin and the Rho GTPase family.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Osamu; Abe, Masafumi; Hashimoto, Yuko

    2015-12-01

    To determine the biological roles of cell surface glycosylation, we modified the surface glycosylation of human malignant lymphoma cell lines using glycosylation inhibitors. The O-glycosylation inhibitor, benzyl-α-GalNAc (BZ) enhanced the fibronectin adhesion of HBL-8 cells, a human Burkitt's lymphoma cell line, and of H-ALCL cells, a human anaplastic large cell lymphoma cell line, both of which were established in our laboratory. The N-glycosylation inhibitor, tunicamycin (TM) inhibited the surface expression of Phaseolus vulgaris leukoagglutinating (L-PHA) lectin- and Canavalia ensiformis (ConA) lectin-reactive oligosaccharides in the HBL-8 cell line. Assay of the adhesion of HBL-8 cells to fibronectin showed that fibronectin adhesion is mediated by the integrin very late antigen (VLA)-4 and that not only BZ but also TM treatment enhanced HBL-8 cell adhesion to fibronectin. Furthermore, although BZ treatment also enhanced H-ALCL cell adhesion to fibronectin, this effect was not mediated by VLA-5 or the RGD sequence of fibronectin. We also showed that H-ALCL cell adhesion to galectin-3 was enhanced by pre-treatment with neuraminidase, which cleaves cell surface sialic acid. Additionally, H-ALCL cell adhesion to galectin-3 was inhibited by pre‑treatment with the RGD peptide suggesting that cell adhesion to galectin-3 is mediated by integrin (VLA-5). Furthermore, H-ALCL cell invasion of galectin-1 and galectin-3 was inhibited by pre-treatment with the RGD peptide. Therefore, cell adhesion to and invasion of galectin-1 and galectin-3 are integrin-dependent. In addition to these findings, cell adhesion to galectin-3 was markedly inhibited by treatment with β-lactose compared to treatment with sucrose. Therefore, interactions between integrins and galectin-3 may be mediated through β-galactose that is linked to glycans of integrins. AZA1, an inhibitor of Ras homolog oncoprotein (Rho) GTPase family proteins, RAS-related C3 botulinus toxin substrate 1 (Rac 1) and

  19. The assembly of integrin adhesion complexes requires both extracellular matrix and intracellular rho/rac GTPases

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    Interaction of cells with extracellular matrix via integrin adhesion receptors plays an important role in a wide range of cellular: functions, for example cell growth, movement, and differentiation. Upon interaction with substrate, integrins cluster and associate with a variety of cytoplasmic proteins to form focal complexes and with the actin cytoskeleton. Although the intracellular signals induced by integrins are at present undefined, it is thought that they are mediated by proteins recruited to the focal complexes. It has been suggested, for example, that after recruitment to focal adhesions p125FAK can activate the ERK1/2 MAP kinase cascade. We have previously reported that members of the rho family of small GTPases can trigger the assembly of focal complexes when activated in cells. Using microinjection techniques, we have now examined the role of the extracellular matrix and of the two GTP-binding proteins, rac and rho, in the assembly of integrin complexes in both mouse and human fibroblasts. We find that the interaction of integrins with extracellular matrix alone is not sufficient to induce integrin clustering and focal complex formation. Similarly, activation of rho or rac by extracellular growth factors does not lead to focal complex formation in the absence of matrix. Focal complexes are only assembled in the presence of both matrix and functionally active members of the rho family. In agreement with this, the interaction of integrins with matrix in the absence of rho/rac activity is unable to activate the ERK1/2 kinases in Swiss 3T3 cells. In fact, ERK1/2 can be activated fully by growth factors in the absence of matrix and it seems unlikely, therefore, that the adhesion dependence of fibroblast growth is mediated through the ras/MAP kinase pathway. We conclude that extracellular matrix is not sufficient to trigger focal complex assembly and subsequent integrin-dependent signal transduction in the absence of functionally active members of the rho

  20. Distinct roles of Rac GTPases and the UNC-73/Trio and PIX-1 Rac GTP exchange factors in neuroblast protrusion and migration in C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Dyer, Jamie O; Demarco, Rafael S

    2010-01-01

    The Rac and Cdc42 GTPases as well as the multiple GTP exchange factors that regulate their activity have been implicated in the pathways that drive actin cytoskeleton reorganization, but the individual contributions of these molecules to cell migration remain unknown. Studies shown here examine the roles of CED-10/Rac, MIG-2/RhoG and CDC-42 in the migration of the QL and QR neuroblasts in C. elegans. CED-10/Rac was found to normally limit protrusion and migration, whereas MIG-2/RhoG was required for protrusion and migration. CED-10/Rac and MIG-2/RhoG also had redundant roles in Q protrusion and migration. Surprisingly, CDC-42 was found to have only weak effects on the protrusion and the migration. We found that a mutation of unc-73/Trio, which encodes a GEF for CED-10/Rac and MIG-2/RhoG, caused protrusions that were thin and filopodia-like, suggesting that UNC-73/Trio is required for robust lamellipodia-like protrusion. A screen of the 19 C. elegans Dbl homology Rho GEF genes revealed that PIX-1 was required for proper Q neuroblast protrusion and migration. Genetic analysis indicated that PIX-1 might act in the CED-10/Rac pathway in parallel to MIG-2/RhoG and that PIX-1 has redundant function with UNC-73/Trio in Q neuroblast protrusion and migration. These results indicate that Rho GTPases and GEFs have both unique and overlapping roles in neuronal migration. PMID:21686119

  1. Distinct roles of Rac GTPases and the UNC-73/Trio and PIX-1 Rac GTP exchange factors in neuroblast protrusion and migration in C. elegans.

    PubMed

    Dyer, Jamie O; Demarco, Rafael S; Lundquist, Erik A

    2010-07-01

    The Rac and Cdc42 GTPases as well as the multiple GTP exchange factors that regulate their activity have been implicated in the pathways that drive actin cytoskeleton reorganization, but the individual contributions of these molecules to cell migration remain unknown. Studies shown here examine the roles of CED-10/Rac, MIG-2/RhoG and CDC-42 in the migration of the QL and QR neuroblasts in C. elegans. CED-10/Rac was found to normally limit protrusion and migration, whereas MIG-2/RhoG was required for protrusion and migration. CED-10/Rac and MIG-2/RhoG also had redundant roles in Q protrusion and migration. Surprisingly, CDC-42 was found to have only weak effects on the protrusion and the migration. We found that a mutation of unc-73/Trio, which encodes a GEF for CED-10/Rac and MIG-2/RhoG, caused protrusions that were thin and filopodia-like, suggesting that UNC-73/Trio is required for robust lamellipodia-like protrusion. A screen of the 19 C. elegans Dbl homology Rho GEF genes revealed that PIX-1 was required for proper Q neuroblast protrusion and migration. Genetic analysis indicated that PIX-1 might act in the CED-10/Rac pathway in parallel to MIG-2/RhoG and that PIX-1 has redundant function with UNC-73/Trio in Q neuroblast protrusion and migration. These results indicate that Rho GTPases and GEFs have both unique and overlapping roles in neuronal migration.

  2. Role of citron kinase as a target of the small GTPase Rho in cytokinesis.

    PubMed

    Madaule, P; Eda, M; Watanabe, N; Fujisawa, K; Matsuoka, T; Bito, H; Ishizaki, T; Narumiya, S

    1998-07-30

    During mitosis, a ring containing actin and myosin appears beneath the equatorial surface of animal cells. This ring then contracts, forms a cleavage furrow and divides the cell, a step known as cytokinesis. The two daughter cells often remain connected by an intercellular bridge which contains a refringent structure known as the midbody. How the appearance of this ring is regulated is unclear, although the small GTPase Rho, which controls the formation of actin structures, is known to be essential. Protein kinases are also thought to participate in cytokinesis. We now show that a splice variant of a Rho target protein, named citron, contains a protein kinase domain that is related to the Rho-associated kinases ROCK14 and ROK, which regulate myosin-based contractility. Citron kinase localizes to the cleavage furrow and midbody of HeLa cells; Rho is also localized in the midbody. We find that overexpression of citron mutants results in the production of multinucleate cells and that a kinase-active mutant causes abnormal contraction during cytokinesis. We propose that citron kinase regulates cytokinesis at a step after Rho in the contractile process.

  3. Amphetamine activates Rho GTPase signaling to mediate dopamine transporter internalization and acute behavioral effects of amphetamine

    PubMed Central

    Wheeler, David S.; Underhill, Suzanne M.; Stolz, Donna B.; Murdoch, Geoffrey H.; Thiels, Edda; Romero, Guillermo; Amara, Susan G.

    2015-01-01

    Acute amphetamine (AMPH) exposure elevates extracellular dopamine through a variety of mechanisms that include inhibition of dopamine reuptake, depletion of vesicular stores, and facilitation of dopamine efflux across the plasma membrane. Recent work has shown that the DAT substrate AMPH, unlike cocaine and other nontransported blockers, can also stimulate endocytosis of the plasma membrane dopamine transporter (DAT). Here, we show that when AMPH enters the cytoplasm it rapidly stimulates DAT internalization through a dynamin-dependent, clathrin-independent process. This effect, which can be observed in transfected cells, cultured dopamine neurons, and midbrain slices, is mediated by activation of the small GTPase RhoA. Inhibition of RhoA activity with C3 exotoxin or a dominant-negative RhoA blocks AMPH-induced DAT internalization. These actions depend on AMPH entry into the cell and are blocked by the DAT inhibitor cocaine. AMPH also stimulates cAMP accumulation and PKA-dependent inactivation of RhoA, thus providing a mechanism whereby PKA- and RhoA-dependent signaling pathways can interact to regulate the timing and robustness of AMPH’s effects on DAT internalization. Consistent with this model, the activation of D1/D5 receptors that couple to PKA in dopamine neurons antagonizes RhoA activation, DAT internalization, and hyperlocomotion observed in mice after AMPH treatment. These observations support the existence of an unanticipated intracellular target that mediates the effects of AMPH on RhoA and cAMP signaling and suggest new pathways to target to disrupt AMPH action. PMID:26553986

  4. Secretory pathway-dependent localization of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Rho GTPase-activating protein Rgd1p at growth sites.

    PubMed

    Lefèbvre, Fabien; Prouzet-Mauléon, Valérie; Hugues, Michel; Crouzet, Marc; Vieillemard, Aurélie; McCusker, Derek; Thoraval, Didier; Doignon, François

    2012-05-01

    Establishment and maintenance of cell polarity in eukaryotes depends upon the regulation of Rho GTPases. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the Rho GTPase activating protein (RhoGAP) Rgd1p stimulates the GTPase activities of Rho3p and Rho4p, which are involved in bud growth and cytokinesis, respectively. Consistent with the distribution of Rho3p and Rho4p, Rgd1p is found mostly in areas of polarized growth during cell cycle progression. Rgd1p was mislocalized in mutants specifically altered for Golgi apparatus-based phosphatidylinositol 4-P [PtdIns(4)P] synthesis and for PtdIns(4,5)P(2) production at the plasma membrane. Analysis of Rgd1p distribution in different membrane-trafficking mutants suggested that Rgd1p was delivered to growth sites via the secretory pathway. Rgd1p may associate with post-Golgi vesicles by binding to PtdIns(4)P and then be transported by secretory vesicles to the plasma membrane. In agreement, we show that Rgd1p coimmunoprecipitated and localized with markers specific to secretory vesicles and cofractionated with a plasma membrane marker. Moreover, in vivo imaging revealed that Rgd1p was transported in an anterograde manner from the mother cell to the daughter cell in a vectoral manner. Our data indicate that secretory vesicles are involved in the delivery of RhoGAP Rgd1p to the bud tip and bud neck.

  5. Secretory Pathway-Dependent Localization of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Rho GTPase-Activating Protein Rgd1p at Growth Sites

    PubMed Central

    Lefèbvre, Fabien; Prouzet-Mauléon, Valérie; Hugues, Michel; Crouzet, Marc; Vieillemard, Aurélie; McCusker, Derek; Thoraval, Didier

    2012-01-01

    Establishment and maintenance of cell polarity in eukaryotes depends upon the regulation of Rho GTPases. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the Rho GTPase activating protein (RhoGAP) Rgd1p stimulates the GTPase activities of Rho3p and Rho4p, which are involved in bud growth and cytokinesis, respectively. Consistent with the distribution of Rho3p and Rho4p, Rgd1p is found mostly in areas of polarized growth during cell cycle progression. Rgd1p was mislocalized in mutants specifically altered for Golgi apparatus-based phosphatidylinositol 4-P [PtdIns(4)P] synthesis and for PtdIns(4,5)P2 production at the plasma membrane. Analysis of Rgd1p distribution in different membrane-trafficking mutants suggested that Rgd1p was delivered to growth sites via the secretory pathway. Rgd1p may associate with post-Golgi vesicles by binding to PtdIns(4)P and then be transported by secretory vesicles to the plasma membrane. In agreement, we show that Rgd1p coimmunoprecipitated and localized with markers specific to secretory vesicles and cofractionated with a plasma membrane marker. Moreover, in vivo imaging revealed that Rgd1p was transported in an anterograde manner from the mother cell to the daughter cell in a vectoral manner. Our data indicate that secretory vesicles are involved in the delivery of RhoGAP Rgd1p to the bud tip and bud neck. PMID:22447923

  6. Phosphatidylserine is polarized and required for proper Cdc42 localization and for development of cell polarity.

    PubMed

    Fairn, Gregory D; Hermansson, Martin; Somerharju, Pentti; Grinstein, Sergio

    2011-10-02

    Polarity is key to the function of eukaryotic cells. On the establishment of a polarity axis, cells can vectorially target secretion, generating an asymmetric distribution of plasma membrane proteins. From Saccharomyces cerevisiae to mammals, the small GTPase Cdc42 is a pivotal regulator of polarity. We used a fluorescent probe to visualize the distribution of phosphatidylserine in live S. cerevisiae. Remarkably, phosphatidylserine was polarized in the plasma membrane, accumulating in bud necks, the bud cortex and the tips of mating projections. Polarization required vectorial delivery of phosphatidylserine-containing secretory vesicles, and phosphatidylserine was largely excluded from endocytic vesicles, contributing to its polarized retention. Mutants lacking phosphatidylserine synthase had impaired polarization of the Cdc42 complex, leading to a delay in bud emergence, and defective mating. The addition of lysophosphatidylserine resulted in resynthesis and polarization of phosphatidylserine, as well as repolarization of Cdc42. The results indicate that phosphatidylserine--and presumably its polarization--are required for optimal Cdc42 targeting and activation during cell division and mating.

  7. Nervous Wreck and Cdc42 cooperate to regulate endocytic actin assembly during synaptic growth

    PubMed Central

    Rodal, Avital A.; Motola-Barnes, Rebecca N.; Littleton, J. Troy

    2008-01-01

    Regulation of synaptic morphology depends on endocytosis of activated growth signal receptors, but the mechanisms regulating this membrane trafficking event are unclear. Actin polymerization mediated by WASp (Wiskott-Aldrich Syndrome Protein) and the Arp2/3 (Actin related protein 2/3) complex generates forces at multiple stages of endocytosis. F-BAR/SH3 domain proteins play key roles in this process by coordinating membrane deformation with WASp-dependent actin polymerization. However, it is not known how other WASp ligands, such as the small GTPase Cdc42, coordinate with F-BAR/SH3 proteins to regulate actin polymerization at membranes. Nervous Wreck (Nwk) is a conserved neuronal F-BAR/SH3 protein that localizes to periactive zones at the Drosophila larval neuromuscular junction (NMJ) and is required for regulation of synaptic growth via BMP signaling. Here we show that Nwk interacts with the endocytic proteins dynamin and Dap160 and functions together with Cdc42 to promote WASp-mediated actin polymerization in vitro and to regulate synaptic growth in vivo. Cdc42 function is associated with Rab11-dependent recycling endosomes, and we show that Rab11 co-localizes with Nwk at the NMJ. Taken together, our results suggest that synaptic growth activated by growth factor signaling is controlled at an endosomal compartment via coordinated Nwk and Cdc42-dependent actin assembly. PMID:18701694

  8. Dual observation of the ATP-evoked small GTPase activation and Ca2+ transient in astrocytes using a dark red fluorescent protein

    PubMed Central

    Nakahata, Yoshihisa; Nabekura, Junichi; Murakoshi, Hideji

    2016-01-01

    Intracellular signal transduction involves a number of biochemical reactions, which largely consist of protein-protein interactions and protein conformational changes. Monitoring Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) by fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM), called FLIM-FRET, is one of the best ways to visualize such protein dynamics. Here, we attempted to apply dark red fluorescent proteins with significantly smaller quantum yields. Application of the dark mCherry mutants to single-molecule FRET sensors revealed that these dark mCherry mutants are a good acceptor in a pair with mRuby2. Because the FRET measurement between mRuby2 and dark mCherry requires only the red region of wavelengths, it facilitates dual observation with other signaling sensors such as genetically encoded Ca2+ sensors. Taking advantage of this approach, we attempted dual observation of Ca2+ and Rho GTPase (RhoA and Cdc42) activities in astrocytes and found that ATP triggers both RhoA and Cdc42 activation. In early phase, while Cdc42 activity is independent of Ca2+ transient evoked by ATP, RhoA activity is Ca2+ dependent. Moreover, the transient Ca2+ upregulation triggers long-lasting Cdc42 and RhoA activities, thereby converting short-term Ca2+ signaling to long-term signaling. Thus, the new FRET pair should be useful for dual observation of intracellular biochemical reactions. PMID:28004840

  9. Hob3p, the fission yeast ortholog of human BIN3, localizes Cdc42p to the division site and regulates cytokinesis

    PubMed Central

    Coll, Pedro M; Rincon, Sergio A; Izquierdo, Raul A; Perez, Pilar

    2007-01-01

    Cdc42 GTPase is required for polarization in eukaryotic cells, but its spatial regulation is poorly understood. In Schizosaccharomyces pombe, Cdc42p is activated by Scd1p and Gef1p, two guanine-nucleotide exchange factors. Two-hybrid screening identified Hob3p as a Gef1p binding partner. Hob3p is a BAR domain-containing protein ortholog of human Bin3. Hob3p also interacts directly with Cdc42p independently of Gef1p. Hob3p, Cdc42p and Gef1p form a complex, and Hob3p facilitates Gef1p–Cdc42p interaction and activation. Hob3p forms a ring in the division area, similar to that of Gef1p. This localization requires actin polymerization and Cdc15p but is independent of the septation initiation network. Hob3p is required for the concentration of Cdc42p to the division area. The actomyosin ring contraction is slower in hob3Δ than in wild-type cells, and this contributes to its cytokinesis defect. Moreover, this report extends previous evidence that human Bin3 suppresses the cytokinesis phenotype of hob3Δ cells, showing that Bin3 can partially recover the GTP-Cdc42p level and its localization. These results suggest that Hob3p is required to recruit and activate Cdc42p at the cell division site and that this function might be conserved in other eukaryotes. PMID:17363901

  10. PAK4, a novel effector for Cdc42Hs, is implicated in the reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton and in the formation of filopodia.

    PubMed Central

    Abo, A; Qu, J; Cammarano, M S; Dan, C; Fritsch, A; Baud, V; Belisle, B; Minden, A

    1998-01-01

    The GTPases Rac and Cdc42Hs control diverse cellular functions. In addition to being mediators of intracellular signaling cascades, they have important roles in cell morphogenesis and mitogenesis. We have identified a novel PAK-related kinase, PAK4, as a new effector molecule for Cdc42Hs. PAK4 interacts only with the activated form of Cdc42Hs through its GTPase-binding domain (GBD). Co-expression of PAK4 and the constitutively active Cdc42HsV12 causes the redistribution of PAK4 to the brefeldin A-sensitive compartment of the Golgi membrane and the subsequent induction of filopodia and actin polymerization. Importantly, the reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton is dependent on PAK4 kinase activity and on its interaction with Cdc42Hs. Thus, unlike other members of the PAK family, PAK4 provides a novel link between Cdc42Hs and the actin cytoskeleton. The cellular locations of PAK4 and Cdc42Hs suggest a role for the Golgi in cell morphogenesis. PMID:9822598

  11. P-cadherin-mediated Rho GTPase regulation during collective cell migration

    PubMed Central

    Plutoni, Cédric; Bazellières, Elsa; Gauthier-Rouvière, Cécile

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT This commentary addresses the role of P-cadherin in collective cell migration (CCM), a cooperative and coordinated migration mode, used by cells during normal and pathological migration processes. We discuss how cadherin-mediated cell-cell junctions (CCJs) play a critical role in CCM through their ability to regulate Rho GTPase-dependent pathways and how this leads to the generation and orientation of mechanical forces. We will also highlight the key function of P-cadherin (a poor prognostic marker in several tumors) in promoting collective cell movement in epithelial and mesenchymal cells. PMID:27152729

  12. The Role of Rho GTPases in Breast Cancer Migration and Invasion

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-04-01

    protein Tiam1 .[5-8] Both in vitro and in vivo approaches will be used to characterize how Tiam2 signals through Rho GTPases to control invasion and...mutational statuses in addition to normal breast cell lines. Tiam1 and Tiam2 expression levels were compared [Figure 1]. Notably, expression of...Expression patterns of Tiam1 and Tiam2 in a panel of Breast Cancer Cell Lines. C on tro l Ras Pathway Inhibitors and Tiam2 expression Tiam2 P-Erk P-AKT

  13. P-cadherin-mediated Rho GTPase regulation during collective cell migration.

    PubMed

    Plutoni, Cédric; Bazellières, Elsa; Gauthier-Rouvière, Cécile

    2016-07-02

    This commentary addresses the role of P-cadherin in collective cell migration (CCM), a cooperative and coordinated migration mode, used by cells during normal and pathological migration processes. We discuss how cadherin-mediated cell-cell junctions (CCJs) play a critical role in CCM through their ability to regulate Rho GTPase-dependent pathways and how this leads to the generation and orientation of mechanical forces. We will also highlight the key function of P-cadherin (a poor prognostic marker in several tumors) in promoting collective cell movement in epithelial and mesenchymal cells.

  14. Caveolin-1 mediates inflammatory breast cancer cell invasion via the Akt1 pathway and RhoC GTPase.

    PubMed

    Joglekar, Madhura; Elbazanti, Weam O; Weitzman, Matthew D; Lehman, Heather L; van Golen, Kenneth L

    2015-06-01

    With a propensity to invade the dermal lymphatic vessels of the skin overlying the breast and readily metastasize, inflammatory breast cancer (IBC) is arguably the deadliest form of breast cancer. We previously reported that caveolin-1 is overexpressed in IBC and that RhoC GTPase is a metastatic switch responsible for the invasive phenotype. RhoC-driven invasion requires phosphorylation by Akt1. Using a reliable IBC cell line we set out to determine if caveolin-1 expression affects RhoC-mediated IBC invasion. Caveolin-1 was down regulated by introduction of siRNA or a caveolin scaffolding domain. The ability of the cells to invade was tested and the status of Akt1 and RhoC GTPase examined. IBC cell invasion is significantly decreased when caveolin-1 is down regulated. Activation of Akt1 is decreased when caveolin-1 is down regulated, leading to decreased phosphorylation of RhoC GTPase. Thus, we report here that caveolin-1 overexpression mediates IBC cell invasion through activation Akt1, which phosphorylates RhoC GTPase.

  15. Modulation of Rho GTPases and the actin cytoskeleton by Yersinia outer proteins (Yops).

    PubMed

    Aepfelbacher, M; Heesemann, J

    2001-09-01

    Pathogenic species of the genus Yersinia employ a type III secretion apparatus to inject up to six effector proteins (Yersinia outer proteins; Yops) into host cells. Thereby yersiniae disarm the immune cell system of the host to proliferate extracellularly. At least four of the Yop effectors (YopE, YpkA/YopO, YopT and YopH) are involved in the rearrangement of the actin cytoskeleton: YopE, YopT and YpkA/YopO modulate the activity of actin-regulating Rho GTP-binding proteins, whereas YopH dephosphorylates phospho-tyrosine residues in focal adhesion proteins. In this review we will focus on recent evidence implicating Rho GTPases and the actin cytoskeleton as major targets of Yersinia Yops.

  16. Structural Basis of Rnd1 Binding to Plexin Rho GTPase Binding Domains (RBDs)

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Hui; Hota, Prasanta K.; Tong, Yufeng; Li, Buren; Shen, Limin; Nedyalkova, Lyudmila; Borthakur, Susmita; Kim, SoonJeung; Tempel, Wolfram; Buck, Matthias; Park, Hee-Won

    2011-09-20

    Plexin receptors regulate cell adhesion, migration, and guidance. The Rho GTPase binding domain (RBD) of plexin-A1 and -B1 can bind GTPases, including Rnd1. By contrast, plexin-C1 and -D1 reportedly bind Rnd2 but associate with Rnd1 only weakly. The structural basis of this differential Rnd1 GTPase binding to plexin RBDs remains unclear. Here, we solved the structure of the plexin-A2 RBD in complex with Rnd1 and the structures of the plexin-C1 and plexin-D1 RBDs alone, also compared with the previously determined plexin-B1 RBD.Rnd1 complex structure. The plexin-A2 RBD {center_dot} Rnd1 complex is a heterodimer, whereas plexin-B1 and -A2 RBDs homodimerize at high concentration in solution, consistent with a proposed model for plexin activation. Plexin-C1 and -D1 RBDs are monomeric, consistent with major residue changes in the homodimerization loop. In plexin-A2 and -B1, the RBD {beta}3-{beta}4 loop adjusts its conformation to allow Rnd1 binding, whereas minimal structural changes occur in Rnd1. The plexin-C1 and -D1 RBDs lack several key non-polar residues at the corresponding GTPase binding surface and do not significantly interact with Rnd1. Isothermal titration calorimetry measurements on plexin-C1 and -D1 mutants reveal that the introduction of non-polar residues in this loop generates affinity for Rnd1. Structure and sequence comparisons suggest a similar mode of Rnd1 binding to the RBDs, whereas mutagenesis suggests that the interface with the highly homologous Rnd2 GTPase is different in detail. Our results confirm, from a structural perspective, that Rnd1 does not play a role in the activation of plexin-C1 and -D1. Plexin functions appear to be regulated by subfamily-specific mechanisms, some of which involve different Rho family GTPases.

  17. Skeletal muscle differentiation and fusion are regulated by the BAR-containing Rho-GTPase-activating protein (Rho-GAP), GRAF1.

    PubMed

    Doherty, Jason T; Lenhart, Kaitlin C; Cameron, Morgan V; Mack, Christopher P; Conlon, Frank L; Taylor, Joan M

    2011-07-22

    Although RhoA activity is necessary for promoting myogenic mesenchymal stem cell fates, recent studies in cultured cells suggest that down-regulation of RhoA activity in specified myoblasts is required for subsequent differentiation and myotube formation. However, whether this phenomenon occurs in vivo and which Rho modifiers control these later events remain unclear. We found that expression of the Rho-GTPase-activating protein, GRAF1, was transiently up-regulated during myogenesis, and studies in C2C12 cells revealed that GRAF1 is necessary and sufficient for mediating RhoA down-regulation and inducing muscle differentiation. Moreover, forced expression of GRAF1 in pre-differentiated myoblasts drives robust muscle fusion by a process that requires GTPase-activating protein-dependent actin remodeling and BAR-dependent membrane binding or sculpting. Moreover, morpholino-based knockdown studies in Xenopus laevis determined that GRAF1 expression is critical for muscle development. GRAF1-depleted embryos exhibited elevated RhoA activity and defective myofibrillogenesis that resulted in progressive muscle degeneration, defective motility, and embryonic lethality. Our results are the first to identify a GTPase-activating protein that regulates muscle maturation and to highlight the functional importance of BAR domains in myotube formation.

  18. Absence of aryl hydrocarbon receptor alters CDC42 expression and prevents actin polymerization during capacitation.

    PubMed

    Angeles-Floriano, Tania; Roa-Espitia, Ana L; Baltiérrez-Hoyos, Rafael; Cordero-Martínez, Joaquin; Elizondo, Guillermo; Hernández-González, Enrique O

    2016-11-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) is a ligand-activated transcription factor that regulates the toxicity of a variety of environmental chemicals. The absence of this receptor causes serious reproductive complications. Ahr-knockout (Ahr-KO) male mice, for example, are considerably less fertile: Half of the few spermatozoa they produce exhibit morphological alterations, and those with typical morphology may have pathologic modifications. We therefore investigated the consequences of AHR loss on capacitation and the acrosome reaction, and asked if these effects are a consequence of changes to actin polymerization and the expression of Cdc42, which encodes Cell division control protein 42 (CDC42), a RHO protein that controls assembly of the actin cytoskeleton in somatic cells as well as during spermatogenesis. Nearly 50% of spermatozoa produced by Ahr-KO mice had alterations in the flagellum. Ahr-KO spermatozoa were frequently capacitated, but showed reduced spontaneous and progesterone-induced acrosome reaction-which is related to low CDC42 abundance and very limited actin polymerization during capacitation. Thus, the expression of CDC42 might be regulated by AHR, and both proteins are fundamental to the development of normal spermatozoa and the acrosome reaction. Mol. Reprod. Dev. 83: 1015-1026, 2016 © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. RhoA GTPase activation by TLR2 and TLR3 ligands: connecting via Src to NF-kappa B.

    PubMed

    Manukyan, Maria; Nalbant, Perihan; Luxen, Sylvia; Hahn, Klaus M; Knaus, Ulla G

    2009-03-15

    Rho GTPases are essential regulators of signaling networks emanating from many receptors involved in innate or adaptive immunity. The Rho family member RhoA controls cytoskeletal processes as well as the activity of transcription factors such as NF-kappaB, C/EBP, and serum response factor. The multifaceted host cell activation triggered by TLRs in response to soluble and particulate microbial structures includes rapid stimulation of RhoA activity. RhoA acts downstream of TLR2 in HEK-TLR2 and monocytic THP-1 cells, but the signaling pathway connecting TLR2 and RhoA is still unknown. It is also not clear if RhoA activation is dependent on a certain TLR adapter. Using lung epithelial cells, we demonstrate TLR2- and TLR3-triggered recruitment and activation of RhoA at receptor-proximal cellular compartments. RhoA activity was dependent on TLR-mediated stimulation of Src family kinases. Both Src family kinases and RhoA were required for NF-kappaB activation, whereas RhoA was dispensable for type I IFN generation. These results suggest that RhoA plays a role downstream of MyD88-dependent and -independent TLR signaling and acts as a molecular switch downstream of TLR-Src-initiated pathways.

  20. A large scale Huntingtin protein interaction network implicates Rho GTPase signaling pathways in Huntington disease.

    PubMed

    Tourette, Cendrine; Li, Biao; Bell, Russell; O'Hare, Shannon; Kaltenbach, Linda S; Mooney, Sean D; Hughes, Robert E

    2014-03-07

    Huntington disease (HD) is an inherited neurodegenerative disease caused by a CAG expansion in the HTT gene. Using yeast two-hybrid methods, we identified a large set of proteins that interact with huntingtin (HTT)-interacting proteins. This network, composed of HTT-interacting proteins (HIPs) and proteins interacting with these primary nodes, contains 3235 interactions among 2141 highly interconnected proteins. Analysis of functional annotations of these proteins indicates that primary and secondary HIPs are enriched in pathways implicated in HD, including mammalian target of rapamycin, Rho GTPase signaling, and oxidative stress response. To validate roles for HIPs in mutant HTT toxicity, we show that the Rho GTPase signaling components, BAIAP2, EZR, PIK3R1, PAK2, and RAC1, are modifiers of mutant HTT toxicity. We also demonstrate that Htt co-localizes with BAIAP2 in filopodia and that mutant HTT interferes with filopodial dynamics. These data indicate that HTT is involved directly in membrane dynamics, cell attachment, and motility. Furthermore, they implicate dysregulation in these pathways as pathological mechanisms in HD.

  1. A TOCA/CDC-42/PAR/WAVE functional module required for retrograde endocytic recycling

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Zhiyong; Grant, Barth D.

    2015-01-01

    Endosome-to-Golgi transport is required for the function of many key membrane proteins and lipids, including signaling receptors, small-molecule transporters, and adhesion proteins. The retromer complex is well-known for its role in cargo sorting and vesicle budding from early endosomes, in most cases leading to cargo fusion with the trans-Golgi network (TGN). Transport from recycling endosomes to the TGN has also been reported, but much less is understood about the molecules that mediate this transport step. Here we provide evidence that the F-BAR domain proteins TOCA-1 and TOCA-2 (Transducer of Cdc42 dependent actin assembly), the small GTPase CDC-42 (Cell division control protein 42), associated polarity proteins PAR-6 (Partitioning defective 6) and PKC-3/atypical protein kinase C, and the WAVE actin nucleation complex mediate the transport of MIG-14/Wls and TGN-38/TGN38 cargo proteins from the recycling endosome to the TGN in Caenorhabditis elegans. Our results indicate that CDC-42, the TOCA proteins, and the WAVE component WVE-1 are enriched on RME-1–positive recycling endosomes in the intestine, unlike retromer components that act on early endosomes. Furthermore, we find that retrograde cargo TGN-38 is trapped in early endosomes after depletion of SNX-3 (a retromer component) but is mainly trapped in recycling endosomes after depletion of CDC-42, indicating that the CDC-42–associated complex functions after retromer in a distinct organelle. Thus, we identify a group of interacting proteins that mediate retrograde recycling, and link these proteins to a poorly understood trafficking step, recycling endosome-to-Golgi transport. We also provide evidence for the physiological importance of this pathway in WNT signaling. PMID:25775511

  2. A TOCA/CDC-42/PAR/WAVE functional module required for retrograde endocytic recycling.

    PubMed

    Bai, Zhiyong; Grant, Barth D

    2015-03-24

    Endosome-to-Golgi transport is required for the function of many key membrane proteins and lipids, including signaling receptors, small-molecule transporters, and adhesion proteins. The retromer complex is well-known for its role in cargo sorting and vesicle budding from early endosomes, in most cases leading to cargo fusion with the trans-Golgi network (TGN). Transport from recycling endosomes to the TGN has also been reported, but much less is understood about the molecules that mediate this transport step. Here we provide evidence that the F-BAR domain proteins TOCA-1 and TOCA-2 (Transducer of Cdc42 dependent actin assembly), the small GTPase CDC-42 (Cell division control protein 42), associated polarity proteins PAR-6 (Partitioning defective 6) and PKC-3/atypical protein kinase C, and the WAVE actin nucleation complex mediate the transport of MIG-14/Wls and TGN-38/TGN38 cargo proteins from the recycling endosome to the TGN in Caenorhabditis elegans. Our results indicate that CDC-42, the TOCA proteins, and the WAVE component WVE-1 are enriched on RME-1-positive recycling endosomes in the intestine, unlike retromer components that act on early endosomes. Furthermore, we find that retrograde cargo TGN-38 is trapped in early endosomes after depletion of SNX-3 (a retromer component) but is mainly trapped in recycling endosomes after depletion of CDC-42, indicating that the CDC-42-associated complex functions after retromer in a distinct organelle. Thus, we identify a group of interacting proteins that mediate retrograde recycling, and link these proteins to a poorly understood trafficking step, recycling endosome-to-Golgi transport. We also provide evidence for the physiological importance of this pathway in WNT signaling.

  3. Rab14 specifies the apical membrane through Arf6-mediated regulation of lipid domains and Cdc42

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Ruifeng; Wilson, Jean M.

    2016-01-01

    The generation of cell polarity is essential for the development of multi-cellular organisms as well as for the function of epithelial organs in the mature animal. Small GTPases regulate the establishment and maintenance of polarity through effects on cytoskeleton, membrane trafficking, and signaling. Using short-term 3-dimensional culture of MDCK cells, we find that the small GTPase Rab14 is required for apical membrane specification. Rab14 knockdown results in disruption of polarized lipid domains and failure of the Par/aPKC/Cdc42 polarity complex to localize to the apical membrane. These effects are mediated through tight control of lipid localization, as overexpression of the phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate 5-kinase α [PtdIns(4)P5K] activator Arf6 or PtdIns(4)P5K alone, or treatment with the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PtdInsI3K) inhibitor wortmannin, rescued the multiple-apical domain phenotype observed after Rab14 knockdown. Rab14 also co-immunoprecipitates and colocalizes with the small GTPase Cdc42, and Rab14 knockdown results in increased Cdc42 activity. Furthermore, Rab14 regulates trafficking of vesicles to the apical domain, mitotic spindle orientation, and midbody position, consistent with Rab14’s reported localization to the midbody as well as its effects upon Cdc42. These results position Rab14 at the top of a molecular cascade that regulates the establishment of cell polarity. PMID:27901125

  4. Rac1 GTPase silencing counteracts microgravity-induced effects on osteoblastic cells.

    PubMed

    Guignandon, Alain; Faure, Céline; Neutelings, Thibaut; Rattner, Aline; Mineur, Pierre; Linossier, Marie-Thérèse; Laroche, Norbert; Lambert, Charles; Deroanne, Christophe; Nusgens, Betty; Demets, René; Colige, Alain; Vico, Laurence

    2014-09-01

    Bone cells exposed to real microgravity display alterations of their cytoskeleton and focal adhesions, two major mechanosensitive structures. These structures are controlled by small GTPases of the Ras homology (Rho) family. We investigated the effects of RhoA, Rac1, and Cdc42 modulation of osteoblastic cells under microgravity conditions. Human MG-63 osteoblast-like cells silenced for RhoGTPases were cultured in the automated Biobox bioreactor (European Space Agency) aboard the Foton M3 satellite and compared to replicate ground-based controls. The cells were fixed after 69 h of microgravity exposure for postflight analysis of focal contacts, F-actin polymerization, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression, and matrix targeting. We found that RhoA silencing did not affect sensitivity to microgravity but that Rac1 and, to a lesser extent, Cdc42 abrogation was particularly efficient in counteracting the spaceflight-related reduction of the number of focal contacts [-50% in silenced, scrambled (SiScr) controls vs. -15% for SiRac1], the number of F-actin fibers (-60% in SiScr controls vs. -10% for SiRac1), and the depletion of matrix-bound VEGF (-40% in SiScr controls vs. -8% for SiRac1). Collectively, these data point out the role of the VEGF/Rho GTPase axis in mechanosensing and validate Rac1-mediated signaling pathways as potential targets for counteracting microgravity effects. © FASEB.

  5. Inhibition of the RhoA GTPase Activity Increases Sensitivity of Melanoma Cells to UV Radiation Effects.

    PubMed

    Espinha, Gisele; Osaki, Juliana Harumi; Costa, Erico Tosoni; Forti, Fabio Luis

    2016-01-01

    Ultraviolet radiation is the main cause of DNA damage to melanocytes and development of melanoma, one of the most lethal human cancers, which leads to metastasis due to uncontrolled cell proliferation and migration. These phenotypes are mediated by RhoA, a GTPase overexpressed or overactivated in highly aggressive metastatic tumors that plays regulatory roles in cell cycle progression and cytoskeleton remodeling. This work explores whether the effects of UV on DNA damage, motility, proliferation, and survival of human metastatic melanoma cells are mediated by the RhoA pathway. Mutant cells expressing dominant-negative (MeWo-RhoA-N19) or constitutively active RhoA (MeWo-RhoA-V14) were generated and subjected to UV radiation. A slight reduction in migration and invasion was observed in MeWo and MeWo-RhoA-V14 cells but not in MeWo-RhoA-N19 cells, which presented inefficient motility and invasiveness associated with stress fibers fragmentation. Proliferation and survival of RhoA-deficient cells were drastically reduced by UV compared to cells displaying normal or high RhoA activity, suggesting increased sensitivity to UV. Loss of RhoA activity also caused less efficient DNA repair, with elevated levels of DNA lesions such as strand breaks and cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs). Thus, RhoA mediates genomic stability and represents a potential target for sensitizing metastatic tumors to genotoxic agents.

  6. Inhibition of the RhoA GTPase Activity Increases Sensitivity of Melanoma Cells to UV Radiation Effects

    PubMed Central

    Espinha, Gisele; Osaki, Juliana Harumi; Costa, Erico Tosoni; Forti, Fabio Luis

    2016-01-01

    Ultraviolet radiation is the main cause of DNA damage to melanocytes and development of melanoma, one of the most lethal human cancers, which leads to metastasis due to uncontrolled cell proliferation and migration. These phenotypes are mediated by RhoA, a GTPase overexpressed or overactivated in highly aggressive metastatic tumors that plays regulatory roles in cell cycle progression and cytoskeleton remodeling. This work explores whether the effects of UV on DNA damage, motility, proliferation, and survival of human metastatic melanoma cells are mediated by the RhoA pathway. Mutant cells expressing dominant-negative (MeWo-RhoA-N19) or constitutively active RhoA (MeWo-RhoA-V14) were generated and subjected to UV radiation. A slight reduction in migration and invasion was observed in MeWo and MeWo-RhoA-V14 cells but not in MeWo-RhoA-N19 cells, which presented inefficient motility and invasiveness associated with stress fibers fragmentation. Proliferation and survival of RhoA-deficient cells were drastically reduced by UV compared to cells displaying normal or high RhoA activity, suggesting increased sensitivity to UV. Loss of RhoA activity also caused less efficient DNA repair, with elevated levels of DNA lesions such as strand breaks and cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs). Thus, RhoA mediates genomic stability and represents a potential target for sensitizing metastatic tumors to genotoxic agents. PMID:26823948

  7. Mammalian target of rapamycin and Rictor control neutrophil chemotaxis by regulating Rac/Cdc42 activity and the actin cytoskeleton

    PubMed Central

    He, Yuan; Li, Dong; Cook, Sara L.; Yoon, Mee-Sup; Kapoor, Ashish; Rao, Christopher V.; Kenis, Paul J. A.; Chen, Jie; Wang, Fei

    2013-01-01

    Chemotaxis allows neutrophils to seek out sites of infection and inflammation. The asymmetric accumulation of filamentous actin (F-actin) at the leading edge provides the driving force for protrusion and is essential for the development and maintenance of neutrophil polarity. The mechanism that governs actin cytoskeleton dynamics and assembly in neutrophils has been extensively explored and is still not fully understood. By using neutrophil-like HL-60 cells, we describe a pivotal role for Rictor, a component of mammalian target of rapamycin complex 2 (mTORC2), in regulating assembly of the actin cytoskeleton during neutrophil chemotaxis. Depletion of mTOR and Rictor, but not Raptor, impairs actin polymerization, leading-edge establishment, and directional migration in neutrophils stimulated with chemoattractants. Of interest, depletion of mSin1, an integral component of mTORC2, causes no detectable defects in neutrophil polarity and chemotaxis. In addition, experiments with chemical inhibition and kinase-dead mutants indicate that mTOR kinase activity and AKT phosphorylation are dispensable for chemotaxis. Instead, our results suggest that the small Rho GTPases Rac and Cdc42 serve as downstream effectors of Rictor to regulate actin assembly and organization in neutrophils. Together our findings reveal an mTORC2- and mTOR kinase–independent function and mechanism of Rictor in the regulation of neutrophil chemotaxis. PMID:24006489

  8. Activation of 5-HT7 receptor stimulates neurite elongation through mTOR, Cdc42 and actin filaments dynamics.

    PubMed

    Speranza, Luisa; Giuliano, Teresa; Volpicelli, Floriana; De Stefano, M Egle; Lombardi, Loredana; Chambery, Angela; Lacivita, Enza; Leopoldo, Marcello; Bellenchi, Gian C; di Porzio, Umberto; Crispino, Marianna; Perrone-Capano, Carla

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies have indicated that the serotonin receptor subtype 7 (5-HT7R) plays a crucial role in shaping neuronal morphology during embryonic and early postnatal life. Here we show that pharmacological stimulation of 5-HT7R using a highly selective agonist, LP-211, enhances neurite outgrowth in neuronal primary cultures from the cortex, hippocampus and striatal complex of embryonic mouse brain, through multiple signal transduction pathways. All these signaling systems, involving mTOR, the Rh