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Sample records for rho-associated kinase ii

  1. Effect of electroacupuncture on the mRNA and protein expression of Rho-A and Rho-associated kinase II in spinal cord injury rats

    PubMed Central

    Min, You-jiang; Ding, Li-li-qiang; Cheng, Li-hong; Xiao, Wei-ping; He, Xing-wei; Zhang, Hui; Min, Zhi-yun; Pei, Jia

    2017-01-01

    Electroacupuncture is beneficial for the recovery of spinal cord injury, but the underlying mechanism is unclear. The Rho/Rho-associated kinase (ROCK) signaling pathway regulates the actin cytoskeleton by controlling the adhesive and migratory behaviors of cells that could inhibit neurite regrowth after neural injury and consequently hinder the recovery from spinal cord injury. Therefore, we hypothesized electroacupuncture could affect the Rho/ROCK signaling pathway to promote the recovery of spinal cord injury. In our experiments, the spinal cord injury in adult Sprague-Dawley rats was caused by an impact device. Those rats were subjected to electroacupuncture at Yaoyangguan (GV3), Dazhui (GV14), Zusanli (ST36) and Ciliao (BL32) and/or monosialoganglioside treatment. Behavioral scores revealed that the hindlimb motor functions improved with those treatments. Real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction, fluorescence in situ hybridization and western blot assay showed that electroacupuncture suppressed the mRNA and protein expression of Rho-A and Rho-associated kinase II (ROCKII) of injured spinal cord. Although monosialoganglioside promoted the recovery of hindlimb motor function, monosialoganglioside did not affect the expression of Rho-A and ROCKII. However, electroacupuncture combined with monosialoganglioside did not further improve the motor function or suppress the expression of Rho-A and ROCKII. Our data suggested that the electroacupuncture could specifically inhibit the activation of the Rho/ROCK signaling pathway thus partially contributing to the repair of injured spinal cord. Monosialoganglioside could promote the motor function but did not suppress expression of RhoA and ROCKII. There was no synergistic effect of electroacupuncture combined with monosialoganglioside.

  2. Rho-associated coiled-coil containing kinases (ROCK): structure, regulation, and functions.

    PubMed

    Julian, Linda; Olson, Michael F

    2014-01-01

    Rho-associated coiled-coil containing kinases (ROCK) were originally identified as effectors of the RhoA small GTPase. (1)(-) (5) They belong to the AGC family of serine/threonine kinases (6) and play vital roles in facilitating actomyosin cytoskeleton contractility downstream of RhoA and RhoC activation. Since their discovery, ROCK kinases have been extensively studied, unveiling their manifold functions in processes including cell contraction, migration, apoptosis, survival, and proliferation. Two mammalian ROCK homologs have been identified, ROCK1 (also called ROCK I, ROKβ, Rho-kinase β, or p160ROCK) and ROCK2 (also known as ROCK II, ROKα, or Rho kinase), hereafter collectively referred to as ROCK. In this review, we will focus on the structure, regulation, and functions of ROCK.

  3. Pathophysiological effects of RhoA and Rho-associated kinase on cardiovascular system.

    PubMed

    Cai, Anping; Li, Liwen; Zhou, Yingling

    2016-01-01

    In past decades, growing evidence from basic and clinical researches reveal that small guanosine triphosphate binding protein ras homolog gene family, member A (RhoA) and its main effector Rho-associated kinase (ROCK) play central and complex roles in cardiovascular systems, and increasing RhoA and ROCK activity is associated with a broad range of cardiovascular diseases such as congestive heart failure, atherosclerosis, and hypertension. Favorable outcomes have been observed with ROCK inhibitors treatment. In this review, we briefly summarize the pathophysiological roles of RhoA/ROCK signaling pathway on cardiovascular system, displaying the potential benefits in the cardiovascular system with controlling RhoA/ROCK signaling pathway.

  4. Rho-associated kinase (ROCK) inhibition reverses low cell activity on hydrophobic surfaces.

    PubMed

    Tian, Yu Shun; Kim, Hyun Jung; Kim, Hyun-Man

    2009-08-28

    Hydrophobic polymers do not offer an adequate scaffold surface for cells to attach, migrate, proliferate, and differentiate. Thus, hydrophobic scaffolds for tissue engineering have traditionally been physicochemically modified to enhance cellular activity. However, modifying the surface by chemical or physical treatment requires supplementary engineering procedures. In the present study, regulation of a cell signal transduction pathway reversed the low cellular activity on a hydrophobic surface without surface modification. Inhibition of Rho-associated kinase (ROCK) by Y-27632 markedly enhanced adhesion, migration, and proliferation of osteoblastic cells cultured on a hydrophobic polystyrene surface. ROCK inhibition regulated cell-cycle-related molecules on the hydrophobic surface. This inhibition also decreased expression of the inhibitors of cyclin-dependent kinases such as p21(cip1) and p27(kip1) and increased expression of cyclin A and D. These results indicate that defective cellular activity on the hydrophobic surface can be reversed by the control of a cell signal transduction pathway without physicochemical surface modification.

  5. Rho-associated kinase, a novel serine/threonine kinase, as a putative target for small GTP binding protein Rho.

    PubMed Central

    Matsui, T; Amano, M; Yamamoto, T; Chihara, K; Nakafuku, M; Ito, M; Nakano, T; Okawa, K; Iwamatsu, A; Kaibuchi, K

    1996-01-01

    The small GTP binding protein Rho is implicated in cytoskeletal responses to extracellular signals such as lysophosphatidic acid to form stress fibers and focal contacts. Here we have purified a Rho-interacting protein with a molecular mass of approximately 164 kDa (p164) from bovine brain. This protein bound to GTPgammaS (a non-hydrolyzable GTP analog).RhoA but not to GDP.RhoA or GTPgammaS.RhoA with a mutation in the effector domain (RhoAA37).p164 had a kinase activity which was specifically stimulated by GTPgammaS.RhoA. We obtained the cDNA encoding p164 on the basis of its partial amino acid sequences and named it Rho-associated kinase (Rho-kinase). Rho-kinase has a catalytic domain in the N-terminal portion, a coiled coil domain in the middle portion and a zinc finger-like motif in the C-terminal portion. The catalytic domain shares 72% sequence homology with that of myotonic dystrophy kinase and the coiled coil domain contains a Rho-interacting interface. When COS7 cells were cotransfected with Rho-kinase and activated RhoA, some Rho-kinase was recruited to membranes. Thus it is likely that Rho-kinase is a putative target serine/threonine kinase for Rho and serves as a mediator of the Rho-dependent signaling pathway. Images PMID:8641286

  6. Rho-Associated Kinase 2 Polymorphism in Patients With Vasospastic Angina

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Sang-Yong; Cheong, Sangsig; Shin, Dae-Hee; Jang, Jinkun; Lee, Changkun; Tahk, Seung-Jea; Shin, Joon-Han; Choi, So-Yeon; Yoon, Myeong-Ho

    2012-01-01

    Background and Objectives Recent studies indicate that in response to vasoconstrictor stimuli, the small GTPase RhoA and its down-stream effector, Rho-associated kinase 2 (ROCK)/Rho-kinase, are associated with hypercontraction of the vascular smooth muscle of coronary arteries through augmentation of myosin light chain phosphorylation and Ca2+ sensitization. Expression of ROCK/Rho-kinase mRNA was significantly increased and up-regulated in the spastic coronary artery in a porcine model, and a specific inhibitor of ROCK/Rho-kinase inhibited coronary artery spasm in humans. We therefore explored the role of ROCK2 polymorphisms in the pathogenesis of vasospastic angina (VA). Subjects and Methods We studied 106 patients with VA who exhibited spontaneous or provoked coronary spasm during coronary angiography and compared the prevalence of ROCK2 polymorphisms between this group of patients with VA and controls whose angiograms were normal, and in whom the ergonovine test did not cause spasm (n=107). Five single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of the ROCK2 gene were selected. SNPs were genotyped by high-resolution melting. Linkage disequilibrium and haplotype analyses were performed using the SHEsis program. Results The prevalence of genotypes of the 5 interesting SNPs in patients with VA was not different from that in the control group. In haplotype analysis, the haplotype G-T-C-T-G (in order of rs978906, rs2271621, rs2230774, rs1515210, and rs3771106) was significantly associated with a decreased risk of VA (p=0.007). Conclusion The haplotype G-T-C-T-G in the ROCK2 gene had a protective effect against VA, suggesting the involvement of ROCK2 in VA pathogenesis. PMID:22787471

  7. Rho-associated kinase (ROCK) function is essential for cell cycle progression, senescence and tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Kümper, Sandra; Mardakheh, Faraz K; McCarthy, Afshan; Yeo, Maggie; Stamp, Gordon W; Paul, Angela; Worboys, Jonathan; Sadok, Amine; Jørgensen, Claus; Guichard, Sabrina

    2016-01-01

    Rho-associated kinases 1 and 2 (ROCK1/2) are Rho-GTPase effectors that control key aspects of the actin cytoskeleton, but their role in proliferation and cancer initiation or progression is not known. Here, we provide evidence that ROCK1 and ROCK2 act redundantly to maintain actomyosin contractility and cell proliferation and that their loss leads to cell-cycle arrest and cellular senescence. This phenotype arises from down-regulation of the essential cell-cycle proteins CyclinA, CKS1 and CDK1. Accordingly, while the loss of either Rock1 or Rock2 had no negative impact on tumorigenesis in mouse models of non-small cell lung cancer and melanoma, loss of both blocked tumor formation, as no tumors arise in which both Rock1 and Rock2 have been genetically deleted. Our results reveal an indispensable role for ROCK, yet redundant role for isoforms 1 and 2, in cell cycle progression and tumorigenesis, possibly through the maintenance of cellular contractility. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.12203.001 PMID:26765561

  8. Rho-associated kinase (ROCK) function is essential for cell cycle progression, senescence and tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Kümper, Sandra; Mardakheh, Faraz K; McCarthy, Afshan; Yeo, Maggie; Stamp, Gordon W; Paul, Angela; Worboys, Jonathan; Sadok, Amine; Jørgensen, Claus; Guichard, Sabrina; Marshall, Christopher J

    2016-01-14

    Rho-associated kinases 1 and 2 (ROCK1/2) are Rho-GTPase effectors that control key aspects of the actin cytoskeleton, but their role in proliferation and cancer initiation or progression is not known. Here, we provide evidence that ROCK1 and ROCK2 act redundantly to maintain actomyosin contractility and cell proliferation and that their loss leads to cell-cycle arrest and cellular senescence. This phenotype arises from down-regulation of the essential cell-cycle proteins CyclinA, CKS1 and CDK1. Accordingly, while the loss of either Rock1 or Rock2 had no negative impact on tumorigenesis in mouse models of non-small cell lung cancer and melanoma, loss of both blocked tumor formation, as no tumors arise in which both Rock1 and Rock2 have been genetically deleted. Our results reveal an indispensable role for ROCK, yet redundant role for isoforms 1 and 2, in cell cycle progression and tumorigenesis, possibly through the maintenance of cellular contractility.

  9. Y-39983 downregulates RhoA/Rho-associated kinase expression during its promotion of axonal regeneration.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zijian; Wang, Jing; Liu, Xiaohong; Cheng, Yu; Deng, Lianfu; Zhong, Yisheng

    2013-03-01

    Y-39983, a selective Rho-associated kinase (ROCK) inhibitor, promotes axonal regeneration of damaged retinal ganglion cells (RGCs). The present study investigated the effects of Y-39983 on RhoA/ROCK expression during promotion of axonal regeneration using a rat optic nerve crush (ONC) model. Herein, we demonstrated that Y-39983 significantly enhanced the survival and axonal regeneration of RGCs after ONC. Using a pull‑down assay and affinity precipitation to examine the activity of RhoA, we detected the decreased expression of active-RhoA after using Y-39983. The expression of ROCK1 and ROCK2 was significantly decreased as demonstrated by RT-PCR, immunohistochemistry and western blot analysis. The downregulation of active-RhoA, ROCK1 and ROCK2 expression by Y-39983 coincided with the appearance of larger numbers of regenerating axons. In conclusion, Y-39983 downregulated the expression of active-RhoA, ROCK1 and ROCK2 during its promotion of axonal regeneration.

  10. Differential signalling by muscarinic receptors in smooth muscle: m2-mediated inactivation of myosin light chain kinase via Gi3, Cdc42/Rac1 and p21-activated kinase 1 pathway, and m3-mediated MLC20 (20 kDa regulatory light chain of myosin II) phosphorylation via Rho-associated kinase/myosin phosphatase targeting subunit 1 and protein kinase C/CPI-17 pathway.

    PubMed

    Murthy, Karnam S; Zhou, Huiping; Grider, John R; Brautigan, David L; Eto, Masumi; Makhlouf, Gabriel M

    2003-08-15

    Signalling via m3 and m2 receptors in smooth muscles involved activation of two G-protein-dependent pathways by each receptor. m2 receptors were coupled via Gbetagammai3 with activation of phospholipase C-beta3, phosphoinositide 3-kinase and Cdc42/Rac1 (where Cdc stands for cell division cycle) and p21-activated kinase 1 (PAK1), resulting in phosphorylation and inactivation of myosin light chain kinase (MLCK). Each step was inhibited by methoctramine and pertussis toxin. PAK1 activity was abolished in cells expressing both Cdc42-DN (where DN stands for dominant negative) and Rac1-DN. MLCK phosphorylation was inhibited by PAK1 antibody, and in cells expressing Cdc42-DN and Rac1-DN. m3 receptors were coupled via Galpha(q/11) with activation of phospholipase C-beta1 and via RhoA with activation of Rho-associated kinase (Rho kinase), phospholipase D and protein kinase C (PKC). Rho kinase and phospholipase D activities were inhibited by C3 exoenzyme and in cells expressing RhoA-DN. PKC activity was inhibited by bisindolylmaleimide, and in cells expressing RhoA-DN; PKC activity was also inhibited partly by Y27632 (44+/-5%). PKC-induced phosphorylation of PKC-activated 17 kDa inhibitor protein of type 1 phosphatase (CPI-17) at Thr38 was abolished by bisindolylmaleimide and inhibited partly by Y27632 (28+/-3%). Rho-kinase-induced phosphorylation of myosin phosphatase targeting subunit (MYPT1) and was abolished by Y27632. Sustained phosphorylation of 20 kDa regulatory light chain of myosin II (MLC20) and contraction were abolished by bisindolylmaleimide Y27632 and C3 exoenzyme and in cells expressing RhoA-DN. The results suggest that Rho-kinase-dependent phosphorylation of MYPT1 and PKC-dependent phosphorylation and enhancement of CPI-17 binding to the catalytic subunit of MLC phosphatase (MLCP) act co-operatively to inhibit MLCP activity, leading to sustained stimulation of MLC20 phosphorylation and contraction. Because Y27632 inhibited both Rho kinase and PKC activities

  11. Differential signalling by muscarinic receptors in smooth muscle: m2-mediated inactivation of myosin light chain kinase via Gi3, Cdc42/Rac1 and p21-activated kinase 1 pathway, and m3-mediated MLC20 (20 kDa regulatory light chain of myosin II) phosphorylation via Rho-associated kinase/myosin phosphatase targeting subunit 1 and protein kinase C/CPI-17 pathway.

    PubMed Central

    Murthy, Karnam S; Zhou, Huiping; Grider, John R; Brautigan, David L; Eto, Masumi; Makhlouf, Gabriel M

    2003-01-01

    Signalling via m3 and m2 receptors in smooth muscles involved activation of two G-protein-dependent pathways by each receptor. m2 receptors were coupled via Gbetagammai3 with activation of phospholipase C-beta3, phosphoinositide 3-kinase and Cdc42/Rac1 (where Cdc stands for cell division cycle) and p21-activated kinase 1 (PAK1), resulting in phosphorylation and inactivation of myosin light chain kinase (MLCK). Each step was inhibited by methoctramine and pertussis toxin. PAK1 activity was abolished in cells expressing both Cdc42-DN (where DN stands for dominant negative) and Rac1-DN. MLCK phosphorylation was inhibited by PAK1 antibody, and in cells expressing Cdc42-DN and Rac1-DN. m3 receptors were coupled via Galpha(q/11) with activation of phospholipase C-beta1 and via RhoA with activation of Rho-associated kinase (Rho kinase), phospholipase D and protein kinase C (PKC). Rho kinase and phospholipase D activities were inhibited by C3 exoenzyme and in cells expressing RhoA-DN. PKC activity was inhibited by bisindolylmaleimide, and in cells expressing RhoA-DN; PKC activity was also inhibited partly by Y27632 (44+/-5%). PKC-induced phosphorylation of PKC-activated 17 kDa inhibitor protein of type 1 phosphatase (CPI-17) at Thr38 was abolished by bisindolylmaleimide and inhibited partly by Y27632 (28+/-3%). Rho-kinase-induced phosphorylation of myosin phosphatase targeting subunit (MYPT1) and was abolished by Y27632. Sustained phosphorylation of 20 kDa regulatory light chain of myosin II (MLC20) and contraction were abolished by bisindolylmaleimide Y27632 and C3 exoenzyme and in cells expressing RhoA-DN. The results suggest that Rho-kinase-dependent phosphorylation of MYPT1 and PKC-dependent phosphorylation and enhancement of CPI-17 binding to the catalytic subunit of MLC phosphatase (MLCP) act co-operatively to inhibit MLCP activity, leading to sustained stimulation of MLC20 phosphorylation and contraction. Because Y27632 inhibited both Rho kinase and PKC activities

  12. Endothelial repair in stented arteries is accelerated by inhibition of Rho-associated protein kinase

    PubMed Central

    Hsiao, Sarah T.; Spencer, Tim; Boldock, Luke; Prosseda, Svenja Dannewitz; Xanthis, Ioannis; Tovar-Lopez, Francesco J.; Van Beusekom, Heleen M. M.; Khamis, Ramzi Y; Foin, Nicolas; Bowden, Neil; Hussain, Adil; Rothman, Alex; Ridger, Victoria; Halliday, Ian; Perrault, Cecile; Gunn, Julian; Evans, Paul C.

    2016-01-01

    Aims Stent deployment causes endothelial cells (EC) denudation, which promotes in-stent restenosis and thrombosis. Thus endothelial regrowth in stented arteries is an important therapeutic goal. Stent struts modify local hemodynamics, however the effects of flow perturbation on EC injury and repair are incompletely understood. By studying the effects of stent struts on flow and EC migration, we identified an intervention that promotes endothelial repair in stented arteries. Methods and Results In vitro and in vivo models were developed to monitor endothelialization under flow and the influence of stent struts. A 2D parallel-plate flow chamber with 100 μm ridges arranged perpendicular to the flow was used. Live cell imaging coupled to computational fluid dynamic simulations revealed that EC migrate in the direction of flow upstream from the ridges but subsequently accumulate downstream from ridges at sites of bidirectional flow. The mechanism of EC trapping by bidirectional flow involved reduced migratory polarity associated with altered actin dynamics. Inhibition of Rho-associated protein kinase (ROCK) enhanced endothelialization of ridged surfaces by promoting migratory polarity under bidirectional flow (P < 0.01). To more closely mimic the in vivo situation, we cultured EC on the inner surface of polydimethylsiloxane tubing containing Coroflex Blue stents (65 μm struts) and monitored migration. ROCK inhibition significantly enhanced EC accumulation downstream from struts under flow (P < 0.05). We investigated the effects of ROCK inhibition on re-endothelialization in vivo using a porcine model of EC denudation and stent placement. En face staining and confocal microscopy revealed that inhibition of ROCK using fasudil (30 mg/day via osmotic minipump) significantly increased re-endothelialization of stented carotid arteries (P < 0.05). Conclusions Stent struts delay endothelial repair by generating localized bidirectional flow which traps migrating EC. ROCK

  13. Ocular hypotensive effects of a Rho-associated protein kinase inhibitor in rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Kamaruddin, Muhammad Irfan; Nakamura-Shibasaki, Momoko; Mizuno, Yu; Kiuchi, Yoshiaki

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Ripasudil is a novel Rho-associated protein kinase inhibitor that is used to treat ocular hypertension. However, the comparison of the intraocular pressure (IOP)-lowering effects between ripasudil alone and other ocular hypotensive drugs has not been studied thoroughly. The purpose of this study is to examine the ocular hypotensive effects of 0.4% ripasudil, 2% pilocarpine, 0.5% timolol and 0.1% dorzolamide in rabbits. We also studied the IOP changes when 0.4% ripasudil was combined with 2% pilocarpine, 0.5% timolol or 0.1% dorzolamide. Methods One drop of saline solution, 0.4% ripasudil, 0.5% timolol, 2% pilocarpine or 1% dorzolamide or a combination of these agents was applied topically to the left eyes of eight healthy albino rabbits. Posttreatment changes in the IOP of albino rabbits were monitored using a rebound tonometer over a 5-h time course. Changes in IOP after application of saline served as the control. One-way analysis of variance and Dunnett’s post hoc tests were used for statistical analyses. Results After topical instillation, 0.4% ripasudil resulted in significant decreases in IOP at 0.5 and 1 h compared with the control group. Treatment with timolol, pilocarpine or dorzolamide had no significant effect on IOP. Treatment with timolol, pilocarpine or dorzolamide in combination with ripasudil resulted in significant reductions in IOP at 1 h. However, none of these agents enhanced the IOP-lowering effects of ripasudil. Conclusion Ripasudil has stronger IOP-lowering effects than timolol, pilocarpine or dorzolamide hypotensive agents in our rabbit model. Addition of timolol, pilocarpine or dorzolamide did not enhance the IOP-lowering effects of ripasudil alone.

  14. Melatonin decreases breast cancer metastasis by modulating Rho-associated kinase protein-1 expression.

    PubMed

    Borin, Thaiz Ferraz; Arbab, Ali Syed; Gelaleti, Gabriela Bottaro; Ferreira, Lívia Carvalho; Moschetta, Marina Gobbe; Jardim-Perassi, Bruna Victorasso; Iskander, A S M; Varma, Nadimpalli Ravi S; Shankar, Adarsh; Coimbra, Verena Benedick; Fabri, Vanessa Alves; de Oliveira, Juliana Garcia; Zuccari, Debora Aparecida Pires de Campos

    2016-01-01

    The occurrence of metastasis, an important breast cancer prognostic factor, depends on cell migration/invasion mechanisms, which can be controlled by regulatory and effector molecules such as Rho-associated kinase protein (ROCK-1). Increased expression of this protein promotes tumor growth and metastasis, which can be restricted by ROCK-1 inhibitors. Melatonin has shown oncostatic, antimetastatic, and anti-angiogenic effects and can modulate ROCK-1 expression. Metastatic and nonmetastatic breast cancer cell lines were treated with melatonin as well as with specific ROCK-1 inhibitor (Y27632). Cell viability, cell migration/invasion, and ROCK-1 gene expression and protein expression were determined in vitro. In vivo lung metastasis study was performed using female athymic nude mice treated with either melatonin or Y27832 for 2 and 5 wk. The metastases were evaluated by X-ray computed tomography and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and by immunohistochemistry for ROCK-1 and cytokeratin proteins. Melatonin and Y27632 treatments reduced cell viability and invasion/migration of both cell lines and decreased ROCK-1 gene expression in metastatic cells and protein expression in nonmetastatic cell line. The numbers of 'hot' spots (lung metastasis) identified by SPECT images were significantly lower in treated groups. ROCK-1 protein expression also was decreased in metastatic foci of treated groups. Melatonin has shown to be effective in controlling metastatic breast cancer in vitro and in vivo, not only via inhibition of the proliferation of tumor cells but also through direct antagonism of metastatic mechanism of cells rendered by ROCK-1 inhibition. When Y27632 was used, the effects were similar to those found with melatonin treatment.

  15. Melatonin decreases breast cancer metastasis by modulating Rho-associated kinase protein-1 expression

    PubMed Central

    Borin, Thaiz Ferraz; Arbab, Ali Syed; Gelaleti, Gabriela Bottaro; Ferreira, Lívia Carvalho; Moschetta, Marina Gobbe; Jardim-Perassi, Bruna Victorasso; Iskander, ASM; Varma, Nadimpalli Ravi S.; Shankar, Adarsh; Coimbra, Verena Benedick; Fabri, Vanessa Alves; de Oliveira, Juliana Garcia; de Campos Zuccari, Debora Aparecida Pires

    2016-01-01

    The occurrence of metastasis, an important breast cancer prognostic factor, depends on cell migration/invasion mechanisms, which can be controlled by regulatory and effector molecules such as Rho-associated kinase protein (ROCK-1). Increased expression of this protein promotes tumor growth and metastasis, which can be restricted by ROCK-1 inhibitors. Melatonin has shown oncostatic, antimetastatic, and anti-angiogenic effects and can modulate ROCK-1 expression. Metastatic and nonmetastatic breast cancer cell lines were treated with melatonin as well as with specific ROCK-1 inhibitor (Y27632). Cell viability, cell migration/invasion, and ROCK-1 gene expression and protein expression were determined in vitro. In vivo lung metastasis study was performed using female athymic nude mice treated with either melatonin or Y27832 for 2 and 5 wk. The metastases were evaluated by X-ray computed tomography and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and by immunohistochemistry for ROCK-1 and cytokeratin proteins. Melatonin and Y27632 treatments reduced cell viability and invasion/migration of both cell lines and decreased ROCK-1 gene expression in metastatic cells and protein expression in nonmetastatic cell line. The numbers of ‘hot’ spots (lung metastasis) identified by SPECT images were significantly lower in treated groups. ROCK-1 protein expression also was decreased in metastatic foci of treated groups. Melatonin has shown to be effective in controlling metastatic breast cancer in vitro and in vivo, not only via inhibition of the proliferation of tumor cells but also through direct antagonism of metastatic mechanism of cells rendered by ROCK-1 inhibition. When Y27632 was used, the effects were similar to those found with melatonin treatment. PMID:26292662

  16. Critical roles of Rho-associated kinase in membrane blebbing and mitochondrial pathway of apoptosis caused by 1-butanol.

    PubMed

    Noritake, Kanako; Aki, Toshihiko; Funakoshi, Takeshi; Unuma, Kana; Nara, Akina; Kato, Chizuru; Uemura, Koichi

    2012-09-01

    Alcohols are widely used as industrial solvents and chemical intermediates but can cause serious damage to human health. Nevertheless, few studies have addressed the molecular mechanisms underlying the cytotoxicity of industrial alcohols, with the notable exception of ethanol. The goal of our current study is to elucidate the molecular mechanism of cytotoxicity caused by primary alcohols containing longer carbon chains than ethanol. We find that 1-butanol induces morphological changes in H9c2 cardiomyoblastoma including nuclear condensation and membrane blebbing, both of which are features of apoptotic response. Moreover, a decrease in the mitochondrial membrane potential, the cytosolic release of cytochrome c, and the activation of caspase 9 and 3 was observed, thus revealing the activation of the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway by 1-butanol. The addition of Y-27632, a specific inhibitor of Rho-associated kinase (ROCK), suppressed the membrane blebbing and mitochondrial apoptotic pathway. In comparison z-VAD-fmk, a pan-caspase inhibitor, did not inhibit membrane blebbing but did prevent cell death following exposure to 1-butanol. These results indicate that mitochondrial pathway of apoptosis and membrane blebbing are parallel phenomena that occur downstream of ROCK. This kinase thus plays an essential role in 1-butanol cytotoxicity and subsequent cell death in H9c2 cells.

  17. The Function of Rho-Associated Kinases ROCK1 and ROCK2 in the Pathogenesis of Cardiovascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Hartmann, Svenja; Ridley, Anne J.; Lutz, Susanne

    2015-01-01

    Rho-associated kinases ROCK1 and ROCK2 are serine/threonine kinases that are downstream targets of the small GTPases RhoA, RhoB, and RhoC. ROCKs are involved in diverse cellular activities including actin cytoskeleton organization, cell adhesion and motility, proliferation and apoptosis, remodeling of the extracellular matrix and smooth muscle cell contraction. The role of ROCK1 and ROCK2 has long been considered to be similar; however, it is now clear that they do not always have the same functions. Moreover, depending on their subcellular localization, activation, and other environmental factors, ROCK signaling can have different effects on cellular function. With respect to the heart, findings in isoform-specific knockout mice argue for a role of ROCK1 and ROCK2 in the pathogenesis of cardiac fibrosis and cardiac hypertrophy, respectively. Increased ROCK activity could play a pivotal role in processes leading to cardiovascular diseases such as hypertension, pulmonary hypertension, angina pectoris, vasospastic angina, heart failure, and stroke, and thus ROCK activity is a potential new biomarker for heart disease. Pharmacological ROCK inhibition reduces the enhanced ROCK activity in patients, accompanied with a measurable improvement in medical condition. In this review, we focus on recent findings regarding ROCK signaling in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease, with a special focus on differences between ROCK1 and ROCK2 function. PMID:26635606

  18. Quantum dots impair macrophagic morphology and the ability of phagocytosis by inhibiting the Rho-associated kinase signaling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, Guangbo; Zhang, Changwen; Yuan, Lin; He, Jiuyang; Wang, Zhe; Wang, Lixin; Liu, Sijin; Jiang, Guibin

    2012-03-01

    Quantum dots (QDs) are fluorescent semiconductor nanoparticles that have broad excitation spectra, narrow emission peaks, long fluorescence lifetimes, and the ability to easily conjugate with bio-molecules. Due to these distinct characteristics, QDs represent promising substances in biological imaging and labelling. However, the side and adverse effects of QDs are also widely studied. Herein, we recognize macrophages as the pivotal cells in ingesting QDs, and that the accumulation of QDs inside macrophages leads to significant morphological alterations and a remarkable reduction of their ability to erythrophagocytize in vitro. In a mouse model with chronic exposure to QDs, red blood cell (RBC) retention in spleens and severe splenomegaly were observed, presumably due to attenuated macrophagic erythrophagocytosis in vivo. Importantly, we demonstrated that QDs greatly inhibited the Rho-associated kinase (ROCK) activity, resulting in impaired fidelity of the actin cytoskeleton and actin-rich structure (such as surface protrusions), which was assumed to be the molecular basis underlying the blunted macrophagic morphology and reduced ability to phagocytize. The combined data provide insights into QDs' intracellular trafficking, localization and biological fate in macrophages, and the resultant impairment to cytoskeleton coupled with inhibition on the ROCK signalling would decrease the macrophagic ability to erythrophagocytize with diminished RBC recycling and splenic RBC retention in animals.

  19. Blockade of Rho-associated protein kinase (ROCK) inhibits the contractility and invasion potential of cancer stem like cells.

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, Srisathya; Ashok, Vandhana; Mohanty, Sagarajit; Das, Alakesh; Das, Sreya; Kumar, Sushant; Sen, Shamik; Purwar, Rahul

    2017-02-10

    Recent studies have implicated the roles of cancer stem like cells (CSCs) in cancer metastasis. However, very limited knowledge exists at the molecular and cellular level to target CSCs for prevention of cancer metastasis. In this study, we examined the roles of contractile dynamics of CSCs in cell invasion and delineated the underlying molecular mechanisms of their distinct cell invasion potential. Using de-adhesion assay and atomic force microscopy, we show that CSCs derived from melanoma and breast cancer cell lines exhibit increased contractility compared to non-CSCs across all tumor types. In addition, CSCs possess increased ECM remodeling capacity as quantified by collagen degradation assay. More importantly, pharmacological blockade of Rho-associated protein kinase completely abolished the contractility and collagen degradation capacity of both CSCs and non-CSCs. In conclusion, our study demonstrates the importance of cell contractility in regulating invasiveness of CSCs and suggests that pharmacological targeting of ROCK pathway represents a novel strategy for targeting both CSCs and bulk population for the treatment of cancer metastasis.

  20. Y-27632, a Rho-associated protein kinase inhibitor, inhibits systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuanyuan; Lu, Yang; Chai, Jixia; Sun, Meiqun; Hu, Xiaodong; He, Wenxin; Ge, Min; Xie, Changhao

    2017-04-01

    The purpose of the present study was to evaluate whether Rho-kinase inhibition (Y-27632) modulated the expressions of nuclear factor kappaB (NF-κB) in systemic lupus erythematosus. 20 wild type mice and 20 MRL/lpr mice were applied for the research. The animals were randomly assigned to wild type, wild type+Y-27632 group, MRL/lpr group and MRL/lpr+Y-27632 group. 5mg/kg Y-27632 was intravenously injected to inhibit the ROCK expressions.Y-27632 significantly decreased the serum levels of interleukin-6 (IL-6), IL-1β, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and increased IL-10 level in serum of MRL/lpr mice. Flow cytometry (FCM) studies also showed that Y-27632 remarkably increased Regulatory cells(Treg) cell percentage in spleen cells. Western blot analysis demonstrated Y-27632 downregulated the expressions of ROCK1, ROCK2, upregulated the expression of forkhead/winged helix transcription factor(Foxp3), and inhibited the phosphorylations of NF-κBp65 and IκBα. The findings showed that the inhibition of ROCK was beneficial for the prevention of systemic lupus erythematosus, which possibly by suppressing NF-κB activation.

  1. The protective effect of Rho-associated kinase inhibitor on aluminum-induced neurotoxicity in rat cortical neurons.

    PubMed

    Chen, Tsan-Ju; Hung, Hui-Shan; Wang, Dean-Chuan; Chen, Shun-Sheng

    2010-07-01

    Aluminum (Al) is a neurotoxicant and is implicated in several neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer's disease (AD). In AD brains, one of the pathological hallmarks is the extracellular deposition of senile plaques, which are mainly composed of aggregated amyloid-beta (Abeta). Endoproteolysis of the amyloid-beta precursor protein (AbetaPP) by the beta-secretase and the gamma-secretase generates Abeta. AbetaPP can also be cleaved by the alpha-secretase within the Abeta region, which releases a soluble fragment sAPPalpha and precludes the formation of Abeta. Al has been reported to increase the level of Abeta, promote Abeta aggregation, and increase Abeta neurotoxicity. In contrast, small G protein Rho and its effector, Rho-associated kinase (ROCK), are known to negatively regulate the amount of Abeta. Inhibition of the Rho-ROCK pathway may underlie the ability of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and statins to reduce Abeta production. Whether the Rho-ROCK pathway is involved in Al-induced elevation and aggregation of Abeta is unknown. In the present study, cultured rat cortical neurons were treated with Al(malt)(3) in the absence or presence of ROCK inhibitor Y-27632. After the treatment of Al(malt)(3), the cell viability and the level of sAPPalpha were reduced, whereas the amyloid fibrils in the conditioned media were increased. Treatment with Y-27632 prevented these adverse effects of Al(malt)(3) and thus maintained neuronal survival. These results reveal that the activation of the Rho-ROCK signaling pathway was involved in Al-induced effects in terms of the cell viability, the production of sAPPalpha, and the formation of amyloid fibril, which provides a novel mechanism underlying Al-induced neurotoxicity.

  2. Exogenous nitric oxide inhibits Rho-associated kinase activity in patients with angina pectoris: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Maruhashi, Tatsuya; Noma, Kensuke; Fujimura, Noritaka; Kajikawa, Masato; Matsumoto, Takeshi; Hidaka, Takayuki; Nakashima, Ayumu; Kihara, Yasuki; Liao, James K; Higashi, Yukihito

    2015-07-01

    The RhoA/Rho-associated kinase (ROCK) pathway has a key physiological role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. Increased ROCK activity is associated with cardiovascular diseases. Endogenous nitric oxide (NO) has an anti-atherosclerotic effect, whereas the exogenous NO-mediated cardiovascular effect still remains controversial. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of exogenous NO on ROCK activity in patients with angina pectoris. This is a prospective, open-label, randomized, controlled study. A total of 30 patients with angina pectoris were randomly assigned to receive 40 mg day(-1) of isosorbide mononitrate (n=15, 12 men and 3 women, mean age of 63±12 years, isosorbide mononitrate group) or conventional treatment (n=15, 13 men and 2 women, mean age of 64±13 years, control group) for 12 weeks. ROCK activity in peripheral leukocytes was measured by western blot analysis. ROCK activities at 4 and 12 weeks after treatment were decreased in the isosorbide mononitrate group (0.82±0.33 at 0 week, 0.62±0.20 at 4 weeks, 0.61±0.19 at 12 weeks, n=15 in each group, P<0.05, respectively) but not altered in the control group. ROCK1 and ROCK2 expression levels were similar in all treatment periods in the two groups. These findings suggest that the administration of exogenous NO can inhibit ROCK activity, indicating that the usage of exogenous NO could have a protective effect in patients with angina pectoris.

  3. Effect of aldosterone-producing adenoma on endothelial function and Rho-associated kinase activity in patients with primary aldosteronism.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Takeshi; Oki, Kenji; Kajikawa, Masato; Nakashima, Ayumu; Maruhashi, Tatsuya; Iwamoto, Yumiko; Iwamoto, Akimichi; Oda, Nozomu; Hidaka, Takayuki; Kihara, Yasuki; Kohno, Nobuoki; Chayama, Kazuaki; Goto, Chikara; Aibara, Yoshiki; Noma, Kensuke; Liao, James K; Higashi, Yukihito

    2015-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate vascular function and activity of Rho-associated kinases (ROCKs) in patients with primary aldosteronism. Vascular function, including flow-mediated vasodilation (FMD) and nitroglycerine-induced vasodilation, and ROCK activity in peripheral leukocytes were evaluated in 21 patients with aldosterone-producing adenoma (APA), 23 patients with idiopathic hyperaldosteronism (IHA), and 40 age-, sex-, and blood pressure-matched patients with essential hypertension (EHT). FMD was significantly lower in the APA group than in the IHA and EHT groups (3.2±2.0% versus 4.6±2.3% and 4.4±2.2%; P<0.05, respectively), whereas there was no significant difference in FMD between the IHA and EHT groups. There was no significant difference in nitroglycerine-induced vasodilation in the 3 groups. ROCK activity was higher in the APA group than in the IHA and EHT groups (1.29±0.57 versus 1.00±0.46 and 0.81±0.36l; P<0.05, respectively), whereas there was no significant difference in ROCK activity between the IHA and EHT groups. FMD correlated with age (r=-0.31; P<0.01), plasma aldosterone concentration (r=-0.35; P<0.01), and aldosterone:renin ratio (r=-0.34; P<0.01). ROCK activity correlated with age (r=-0.24; P=0.04), plasma aldosterone concentration (r=0.33; P<0.01), and aldosterone:renin ratio (r=0.46; P<0.01). After adrenalectomy, FMD and ROCK activity were restored in patients with APA. APA was associated with both endothelial dysfunction and increased ROCK activity compared with those in IHA and EHT. APA may have a higher risk of future cardiovascular events.

  4. Rho-Associated Kinase Activity Is Required for Proper Morphogenesis of the Inner Cell Mass in the Mouse Blastocyst1

    PubMed Central

    Laeno, Arlene May A.; Tamashiro, Dana Ann A.; Alarcon, Vernadeth B.

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT The blastocyst consists of the outer layer of trophectoderm and pluripotent inner cell mass (ICM), the precursor of the placenta and fetus, respectively. During blastocyst expansion, the ICM adopts a compact, ovoidal shape, whose proper morphology is crucial for normal embryogenesis. Rho-associated kinase (ROCK), an effector of small GTPase RHO signaling, mediates the diverse cellular processes of morphogenesis, but its role in ICM morphogenesis is unclear. Here, we demonstrate that ROCK is required for cohesion of ICM cells and formation of segregated tissues called primitive endoderm (PrE) and epiblast (Epi) in the ICM of the mouse blastocyst. Blastocyst treatment with ROCK inhibitors Y-27632 and Fasudil caused widening or spreading of the ICM, and intermingling of PrE and Epi. Widening of ICM was independent of trophectoderm because isolated ICMs as well as colonies of mouse embryonic stem cells (mESC) also spread upon Y-27632 treatment. PrE, Epi, and trophectoderm cell numbers were similar between control and treated blastocysts, suggesting that ROCK inhibition affected ICM morphology but not lineage differentiation. Rock1 and Rock2 knockdown via RNA interference in mESC also induced spreading, supporting the conclusion that morphological defects caused by the pharmacological inhibitors were due to ROCK inactivation. When blastocysts were transferred into surrogates, implantation efficiencies were unaffected by ROCK inhibition, but treated blastocysts yielded greater fetal loss. These results show that proper ICM morphology is dependent on ROCK activity and is crucial for fetal development. Our studies have wider implication for improving efficiencies of human assisted reproductive technologies that diminish pregnancy loss and promote successful births. PMID:23946538

  5. Rho-associated kinase ROCK activates LIM-kinase 1 by phosphorylation at threonine 508 within the activation loop.

    PubMed

    Ohashi, K; Nagata, K; Maekawa, M; Ishizaki, T; Narumiya, S; Mizuno, K

    2000-02-04

    LIM-kinase 1 (LIMK1) phosphorylates cofilin, an actin-depolymerizing factor, and regulates actin cytoskeletal reorganization. LIMK1 is activated by the small GTPase Rho and its downstream protein kinase ROCK. We now report the site of phosphorylation of LIMK1 by ROCK. In vitro kinase reaction revealed that the active forms of ROCK phosphorylated LIMK1 on the threonine residue and markedly increased its cofilin-phosphorylating activity. A LIMK1 mutant (T508A) with replacement of Thr-508 within the activation loop of the kinase domain by alanine was neither phosphorylated nor activated by ROCK. Replacement of Thr-508 by serine changed the ROCK-catalyzed phosphorylation residue from threonine to serine. A LIMK1 mutant with replacement of Thr-508 by two glutamates increased the kinase activity about 2-fold but was not further activated by ROCK. In addition, wild-type LIMK1, but not its T508A mutant, was activated by co-expression with ROCK in cultured cells. These results suggest that ROCK activates LIMK1 in vitro and in vivo by phosphorylation at Thr-508. Together with the recent finding that PAK1, a downstream effector of Rac, also activates LIMK1 by phosphorylation at Thr-508, these results suggest that activation of LIMK1 is one of the common targets for Rho and Rac to reorganize the actin cytoskeleton.

  6. Lycopene Ameliorates Transplant Arteriosclerosis in Vascular Allograft Transplantation by Regulating the NO/cGMP Pathways and Rho-Associated Kinases Expression

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Peng; Jin, Hao; Zhang, Yan

    2016-01-01

    Objective. Transplant arteriosclerosis is considered one of the major factors affecting the survival time of grafts after organ transplantation. In this study, we proposed a hypothesis of whether lycopene can protect grafted vessels through regulating key proteins expression involved in arteriosclerosis. Methods. Allogeneic aortic transplantation was performed using Brow-Norway rats as donors and Lewis rats as recipients. After transplantation, the recipients were divided into two groups: the allograft group and the lycopene group. Negative control rats (isograft group) were also established. Histopathological staining was performed to observe the pathological changes, and the expression levels of Ki-67, caspase-3, Rho-associated kinases, intercellular adhesion molecules (ICAM-1), and eNOS were assessed. Western blotting analysis and real-time PCR were also performed for quantitative analysis. Results. The histopathological staining showed that vascular stenosis and intimal thickening were not evident after lycopene treatment. The Ki-67, ROCK1, ROCK2, and ICAM-1 expression levels were significantly decreased. However, eNOS expression in grafted arteries and plasma cGMP concentration were increased after lycopene treatment. Conclusions. Lycopene could alleviate vascular arteriosclerosis in allograft transplantation via downregulating Rho-associated kinases and regulating key factor expression through the NO/cGMP pathways, which may provide a potentially effective method for transplant arteriosclerosis in clinical organ transplantation. PMID:28050227

  7. Lycopene Ameliorates Transplant Arteriosclerosis in Vascular Allograft Transplantation by Regulating the NO/cGMP Pathways and Rho-Associated Kinases Expression.

    PubMed

    He, Yunqiang; Xia, Peng; Jin, Hao; Zhang, Yan; Chen, Bicheng; Xu, Ziqiang

    2016-01-01

    Objective. Transplant arteriosclerosis is considered one of the major factors affecting the survival time of grafts after organ transplantation. In this study, we proposed a hypothesis of whether lycopene can protect grafted vessels through regulating key proteins expression involved in arteriosclerosis. Methods. Allogeneic aortic transplantation was performed using Brow-Norway rats as donors and Lewis rats as recipients. After transplantation, the recipients were divided into two groups: the allograft group and the lycopene group. Negative control rats (isograft group) were also established. Histopathological staining was performed to observe the pathological changes, and the expression levels of Ki-67, caspase-3, Rho-associated kinases, intercellular adhesion molecules (ICAM-1), and eNOS were assessed. Western blotting analysis and real-time PCR were also performed for quantitative analysis. Results. The histopathological staining showed that vascular stenosis and intimal thickening were not evident after lycopene treatment. The Ki-67, ROCK1, ROCK2, and ICAM-1 expression levels were significantly decreased. However, eNOS expression in grafted arteries and plasma cGMP concentration were increased after lycopene treatment. Conclusions. Lycopene could alleviate vascular arteriosclerosis in allograft transplantation via downregulating Rho-associated kinases and regulating key factor expression through the NO/cGMP pathways, which may provide a potentially effective method for transplant arteriosclerosis in clinical organ transplantation.

  8. Rho-associated coiled-coil kinase (ROCK) protein controls microtubule dynamics in a novel signaling pathway that regulates cell migration.

    PubMed

    Schofield, Alice V; Steel, Rohan; Bernard, Ora

    2012-12-21

    The two members of the Rho-associated coiled-coil kinase (ROCK1 and 2) family are established regulators of actin dynamics that are involved in the regulation of the cell cycle as well as cell motility and invasion. Here, we discovered a novel signaling pathway whereby ROCK regulates microtubule (MT) acetylation via phosphorylation of the tubulin polymerization promoting protein 1 (TPPP1/p25). We show that ROCK phosphorylation of TPPP1 inhibits the interaction between TPPP1 and histone deacetylase 6 (HDAC6), which in turn results in increased HDAC6 activity followed by a decrease in MT acetylation. As a consequence, we show that TPPP1 phosphorylation by ROCK increases cell migration and invasion via modulation of cellular acetyl MT levels. We establish here that the ROCK-TPPP1-HDAC6 signaling pathway is important for the regulation of cell migration and invasion.

  9. Fasudil, an inhibitor of Rho-associated coiled-coil kinase, improves cognitive impairments induced by smoke exposure

    PubMed Central

    Chunhua, Ma; Kun, Hao

    2016-01-01

    The current study was designed to investigate the pathological changes in brain induced by smoke exposure, and explore whether fasudil could alleviate these impairments. Adult C57BL/6 mice were exposed to tobacco smoking for four months, and fasudil was treated from the third months. To investigate lung injuries, the immunohistochemistry of lung tissue, immune cell infiltrations, cytokine productions in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid, and seurm inflammatory cytokines were evaluated. To investigate cognitive impairments, Morris water maze test, hippocampal inflammatory cytokines and Rho associated signaling pathways were evaluated. Our findings showed fasudil administration inhibited the inflitration of inflammatory cells (macrophages, neutrophils, and lymphocytes), suppressed the production of inflammatory cytokines both in the BAL fluid, serum, and hippocampus. Further, fasudil significantly improved the spatial learning and memory impairments and reduced the elevation of hippocampal inflammatory cytokines induced by tobacco smoking. Of note, expressions of RhoA, ROCK1, ROCK2, caspase-3, caspase-9, bax and the phosphorylation of NF-κBp65 were increased accompanying the smoke exposure-induced cognitive impairments, which were significantly inhibited by fasudil treatment as indicted in western blot and immunohistochemistry analysis. Our results showed that fasudil exhibited protective effects on smoke exposure induced cognitive deficits which might involve with the regulation of Rho/ROCK/NF-κB pathways. Further studies are warranted before clinical application of fasudil. PMID:27791202

  10. Rho-Associated Protein Kinases Play an Important Role in the Differentiation of Rat Adipose-Derived Stromal Cells into Cardiomyocytes In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Lili; Yang, Gongshe; Zhao, Xin

    2014-01-01

    Adipose-derived stromal cells (ADSCs) represent a readily available abundant supply of mesenchymal stem cells and have the ability to differentiate into cardiomyocytes in mice and human, making ADSCs a promising source of cardiomyocytes for transplantation. However, there has been no report of differentiation of rat ADSCs into cardiomyocytes. In addition, signaling pathways in the differentiation process from ADSCs to cardiomyocytes are unknown. In this study, we first demonstrated that rat ADSCs spontaneously differentiated into cardiomyocytes in vitro, when cultured on a complete medium formulation MethoCult GF M3534. These differentiated cells possessed cardiomyocyte phenotype and expressed cardiac markers. Moreover, these cells showed open excitation-contracting coupling and Ca2+ transient and contracted spontaneously. The role of Rho-associated protein kinases (ROCKs) in the differentiation process was then studied by using ROCK-specific inhibitor Y-27632 and ROCK siRNAs. These agents changed the arrangement of cytoskeleton and diminished appearance of cardiomyocyte phenotype, accompanied by inhibition of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) phosphorylation and promotion of Akt phosphorylation. Collectively, this is the first study to demonstrate that rat ADSCs could spontaneously differentiate into cardiomyocytes in vitro and ROCKs play an important role in the differentiation of ADSCs into beating cardiomyocytes in conjunction of the PI3K/Akt pathway and the JNK pathway. PMID:25522345

  11. Hydrogen-Rich Medium Attenuated Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Monocyte-Endothelial Cell Adhesion and Vascular Endothelial Permeability via Rho-Associated Coiled-Coil Protein Kinase.

    PubMed

    Xie, Keliang; Wang, Weina; Chen, Hongguang; Han, Huanzhi; Liu, Daquan; Wang, Guolin; Yu, Yonghao

    2015-07-01

    Sepsis is the leading cause of death in critically ill patients. In recent years, molecular hydrogen, as an effective free radical scavenger, has been shown a selective antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effect, and it is beneficial in the treatment of sepsis. Rho-associated coiled-coil protein kinase (ROCK) participates in junction between normal cells, and regulates vascular endothelial permeability. In this study, we used lipopolysaccharide to stimulate vascular endothelial cells and explored the effects of hydrogen-rich medium on the regulation of adhesion of monocytes to endothelial cells and vascular endothelial permeability. We found that hydrogen-rich medium could inhibit adhesion of monocytes to endothelial cells and decrease levels of adhesion molecules, whereas the levels of transepithelial/endothelial electrical resistance values and the expression of vascular endothelial cadherin were increased after hydrogen-rich medium treatment. Moreover, hydrogen-rich medium could lessen the expression of ROCK, as a similar effect of its inhibitor Y-27632. In addition, hydrogen-rich medium could also inhibit adhesion of polymorphonuclear neutrophils to endothelial cells. In conclusion, hydrogen-rich medium could regulate adhesion of monocytes/polymorphonuclear neutrophils to endothelial cells and vascular endothelial permeability, and this effect might be related to the decreased expression of ROCK protein.

  12. Klotho gene delivery ameliorates renal hypertrophy and fibrosis in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats by suppressing the Rho-associated coiled-coil kinase signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Deng, Minghong; Luo, Yumei; Li, Yunkui; Yang, Qiuchen; Deng, Xiaoqin; Wu, Ping; Ma, Houxun

    2015-07-01

    The present study aimed to investigate whether klotho gene delivery attenuated renal hypertrophy and fibrosis in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. A recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) carrying mouse klotho full-length cDNA (rAAV.mKL), was constructed for in vivo investigation of klotho expression. Diabetes was induced in rats by a single tail vein injection of 60 mg/kg streptozotocin. Subsequently, the diabetic rats received an intravenous injection of rAAV.mKL, rAAV.green fluorescent protein (GFP) or phosphate-buffered saline (PBS). The Sprague-Dawley rat group received PBS and served as the control group. After 12 weeks, all the rats were sacrificed and ELISA, immunohistochemical and histological analyses, fluorescence microscopy, semi-quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and western blottin were performed. A single dose of rAAV.mKL was found to prevent the progression of renal hypertrophy and fibrosis for at least 12 weeks (duration of study). Klotho expression was suppressed in the diabetic rats, but was increased by rAAV.mKL delivery. rAAV.mKL significantly suppressed diabetes-induced renal hypertrophy and histopathological changes, reduced renal collagen fiber generation and decreased kidney hypertrophy index. In addition, rAAV.mKL decreased the protein expression levels of fibronectin and vimentin, while it downregulated the mRNA expression and activity of Rho-associated coiled-coil kinase (ROCK)I in the kidneys of the diabetic rats. These results indicated that klotho gene delivery ameliorated renal hypertrophy and fibrosis in diabetic rats, possibly by suppressing the ROCK signaling pathway. This may offer a novel approach for the long-term control and renoprotection of diabetes.

  13. Molecular Dissection of the Rho-associated Protein Kinase (p160ROCK)-regulated Neurite Remodeling in Neuroblastoma N1E-115 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hirose, Masaya; Ishizaki, Toshimasa; Watanabe, Naoki; Uehata, Masayoshi; Kranenburg, Onno; Moolenaar, Wouter H.; Matsumura, Fumio; Maekawa, Midori; Bito, Haruhiko; Narumiya, Shuh

    1998-01-01

    A critical role for the small GTPase Rho and one of its targets, p160ROCK (a Rho-associated coiled coil-forming protein kinase), in neurite remodeling was examined in neuroblastoma N1E-115 cells. Using wild-type and a dominant-negative form of p160ROCK and a p160ROCK-specific inhibitor, Y-27632, we show here that p160ROCK activation is necessary and sufficient for the agonist-induced neurite retraction and cell rounding. The neurite retraction was accompanied by elevated phosphorylation of myosin light chain and the disassembly of the intermediate filaments and microtubules. Y-27632 blocked both neurite retraction and the elevation of myosin light chain phosphorylation in a similar concentration-dependent manner. On the other hand, suppression of p160ROCK activity by expression of a dominant-negative form of p160ROCK induced neurites in the presence of serum by inducing the reassembly of the intermediate filaments and microtubules. The neurite outgrowth by the p160ROCK inhibition was blocked by coexpression of dominant-negative forms of Cdc42 and Rac, indicating that p160ROCK constitutively and negatively regulates neurite formation at least in part by inhibiting activation of Cdc42 and Rac. The assembly of microtubules and intermediate filaments to form extended processes by inhibitors of the Rho–ROCK pathway was also observed in Swiss 3T3 cells. These results indicate that Rho/ROCK-dependent tonic inhibition of cell process extension is exerted via activation of the actomysin-based contractility, in conjunction with a suppression of assembly of intermediate filaments and microtubules in many cell types including, but not exclusive to, neuronal cells. PMID:9647654

  14. Rho-associated protein kinase inhibitor, Y-27632, significantly enhances cell adhesion and induces a delay in G1 to S phase transition in rabbit corneal endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Diao, Yu-Mei; Hong, Jing

    2015-08-01

    Human corneal endothelial cells are a non-proliferative cell type. As a result of the increase in corneal endothelium disease, increasing numbers of studies have been conducted in order to promote corneal endothelial cell proliferation. The aim of the present study was to investigate the proliferative effects of Rho-associated protein kinase inhibitor, Y-27632, on rabbit corneal endothelial cells (rCECs). Y-27632 (1, 10 or 30 μM) was added at two different time points to two groups of rCECs. The first group received Y-27632 when rCECs were initially plated, and the second following 72 h of cell growth. Cell morphology and cell adhesion ratios were subsequently observed using light microscopy. A cell counting kit was used to measure the number of viable cells that adhered to culture plates. Cell cycle transitions and levels of Annexin V-positive apoptotic cells were detected using flow cytometry. Cells treated with 1 μM Y-27632 and 10 μM Y-27632 retained their cell shape. At a concentration of 30 μM Y-27632, the cell shape became irregular. Cell adhesion ratios, in 1 μM Y-27632 (36.84%), 10 μM Y-27632 (84.21%) and 30 μM Y-27632 (84.21%) were higher than the adhesion ratio in the control group (P<0.01). The optical densities of rCECs treated with 10 μM or 30 μM Y-27632 following 72 h of cell growth was less than that of the control cells (P<0.01), but higher than that of cells which received Y-27632 at the time of plating (P<0.01). Flow cytometry results also demonstrated that there was a delay in G1 to S phase cell cycle progression in rCECs following administration of 10 μM Y-27632 (P<0.01). Cell apoptosis was inhibited when 10 μM Y-27632 was added, at the time of cell plating, as well as when added following 72 h of cell growth (P<0.01). At a concentration of 10 μM Y-27632, there was an improvement in cell adhesion and an inhibition of the cell cycle in rabbit corneal endothelial cells. In conclusion, Y-27632 has different effects on rCECs when

  15. Tubulin polymerization promoting protein 1 (Tppp1) phosphorylation by Rho-associated coiled-coil kinase (rock) and cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (Cdk1) inhibits microtubule dynamics to increase cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Schofield, Alice V; Gamell, Cristina; Suryadinata, Randy; Sarcevic, Boris; Bernard, Ora

    2013-03-15

    Tubulin polymerization promoting protein 1 (Tppp1) regulates microtubule (MT) dynamics via promoting MT polymerization and inhibiting histone deacetylase 6 (Hdac6) activity to increase MT acetylation. Our results reveal that as a consequence, Tppp1 inhibits cell proliferation by delaying the G1/S-phase and the mitosis to G1-phase transitions. We show that phosphorylation of Tppp1 by Rho-associated coiled-coil kinase (Rock) prevents its Hdac6 inhibitory activity to enable cells to enter S-phase. Whereas, our analysis of the role of Tppp1 during mitosis revealed that inhibition of its MT polymerizing and Hdac6 regulatory activities were necessary for cells to re-enter the G1-phase. During this investigation, we also discovered that Tppp1 is a novel Cyclin B/Cdk1 (cyclin-dependent kinase) substrate and that Cdk phosphorylation of Tppp1 inhibits its MT polymerizing activity. Overall, our results show that dual Rock and Cdk phosphorylation of Tppp1 inhibits its regulation of the cell cycle to increase cell proliferation.

  16. Ginseng (Panax quinquefolius) attenuates leptin-induced cardiac hypertrophy through inhibition of p115Rho guanine nucleotide exchange factor-RhoA/Rho-associated, coiled-coil containing protein kinase-dependent mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway activation.

    PubMed

    Moey, Melissa; Rajapurohitam, Venkatesh; Zeidan, Asad; Karmazyn, Morris

    2011-12-01

    Leptin is a 16-kDa peptide primarily derived from white adipocytes and is typically elevated in plasma of obese individuals. Although leptin plays a critical role in appetite regulation, leptin receptors have been identified in numerous tissues including the heart and have been shown to directly mediate cardiac hypertrophy through RhoA/ROCK (Ras homolog gene family, member A/Rho-associated, coiled-coil containing protein kinase)-dependent p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) activation; however, the basis for RhoA stimulation is unknown. Rho guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) catalyze the exchange of GDP for GTP resulting in Rho activation and may be the potential upstream factors mediating leptin-induced RhoA activation and therefore a potential target for inhibition. We investigated the effects of North American ginseng (Panax quinquefolius), reported to reduce cardiac hypertrophy, on RhoA/ROCK and MAPK activation in ventricular cardiomyocytes exposed to leptin (50 ng/ml) and the possible role of p115RhoGEF and p63RhoGEF in these responses. Leptin produced a robust hypertrophic response that was associated with RhoA/ROCK activation resulting in a significant increase in cofilin-2 phosphorylation and actin polymerization, the latter evidenced by a reduction in the G/F actin ratio. These effects were prevented by ginseng (10 μg/ml). The stimulation of RhoA/ROCK by leptin was associated with significantly increased p115RhoGEF gene and protein expression and exchange activity, all of which were completely prevented by ginseng. The ability of ginseng to prevent leptin-induced activation of RhoA/ROCK was further associated with diminished p38 MAPK activation and nuclear translocation. These results demonstrate a potent inhibitory effect of ginseng against leptin-induced cardiac hypertrophy, an effect associated with prevention of p115RhoGEF-RhoA/ROCK-dependent p38 MAPK activation.

  17. The Neural Cell Adhesion Molecule (NCAM) Promotes Clustering and Activation of EphA3 Receptors in GABAergic Interneurons to Induce Ras Homolog Gene Family, Member A (RhoA)/Rho-associated protein kinase (ROCK)-mediated Growth Cone Collapse.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Chelsea S; Kümper, Maike; Temple, Brenda S; Maness, Patricia F

    2016-12-16

    Establishment of a proper balance of excitatory and inhibitory connectivity is achieved during development of cortical networks and adjusted through synaptic plasticity. The neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) and the receptor tyrosine kinase EphA3 regulate the perisomatic synapse density of inhibitory GABAergic interneurons in the mouse frontal cortex through ephrin-A5-induced growth cone collapse. In this study, it was demonstrated that binding of NCAM and EphA3 occurred between the NCAM Ig2 domain and EphA3 cysteine-rich domain (CRD). The binding interface was further refined through molecular modeling and mutagenesis and shown to be comprised of complementary charged residues in the NCAM Ig2 domain (Arg-156 and Lys-162) and the EphA3 CRD (Glu-248 and Glu-264). Ephrin-A5 induced co-clustering of surface-bound NCAM and EphA3 in GABAergic cortical interneurons in culture. Receptor clustering was impaired by a charge reversal mutation that disrupted NCAM/EphA3 association, emphasizing the importance of the NCAM/EphA3 binding interface for cluster formation. NCAM enhanced ephrin-A5-induced EphA3 autophosphorylation and activation of RhoA GTPase, indicating a role for NCAM in activating EphA3 signaling through clustering. NCAM-mediated clustering of EphA3 was essential for ephrin-A5-induced growth cone collapse in cortical GABAergic interneurons, and RhoA and a principal effector, Rho-associated protein kinase, mediated the collapse response. This study delineates a mechanism in which NCAM promotes ephrin-A5-dependent clustering of EphA3 through interaction of the NCAM Ig2 domain and the EphA3 CRD, stimulating EphA3 autophosphorylation and RhoA signaling necessary for growth cone repulsion in GABAergic interneurons in vitro, which may extend to remodeling of axonal terminals of interneurons in vivo.

  18. Phosphorylation of DNA topoisomerase II by casein kinase II: modulation of eukaryotic topoisomerase II activity in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Ackerman, P; Glover, C V; Osheroff, N

    1985-01-01

    The phosphorylation of Drosophila melanogaster DNA topoisomerase II by purified casein kinase II was characterized in vitro. Under the conditions used, the kinase incorporated a maximum of 2-3 molecules of phosphate per homodimer of topoisomerase II. No autophosphorylation of the topoisomerase was observed. The only amino acid residue modified by casein kinase II was serine. Apparent Km and Vmax values for the phosphorylation reaction were 0.4 microM topoisomerase II and 3.3 mumol of phosphate incorporated per min per mg of kinase, respectively. Phosphorylation stimulated the DNA relaxation activity of topoisomerase II by 3-fold over that of the dephosphorylated enzyme, and the effects of modification could be reversed by treatment with alkaline phosphatase. Therefore, this study demonstrates that post-translational enzymatic modifications can be used to modulate the interaction between topoisomerase II and DNA. Images PMID:2987912

  19. Phosphorylation of varicella-zoster virus glycoprotein gpI by mammalian casein kinase II and casein kinase I

    SciTech Connect

    Grose, C.; Jackson, W. ); Traugh, J.A. )

    1989-09-01

    Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) glycoprotein gpI is the predominant viral glycoprotein within the plasma membranes of infected cells. This viral glycoprotein is phosphorylated on its polypeptide backbone during biosynthesis. In this report, the authors investigated the protein kinases which participate in the phosphorylation events. Under in vivo conditions, VZV gpI was phosphorylated on its serine and threonine residues by protein kinases present within lysates of either VZV-infected or uninfected cells. Because this activity was diminished by heparin, a known inhibitor of casein kinase II, isolated gpI was incubated with purified casein kinase II and shown to be phosphorylated in an in vitro assay containing ({gamma}-{sup 32}P)ATP. The same glycoprotein was phosphorylated when ({sup 32}P)GTP was substituted for ({sup 32}P)ATP in the protein kinase assay. They also tested whether VZV gpI was phosphorylated by two other ubiquitous mammalian protein kinases--casein kinase I and cyclic AMP-dependent kinase--and found that only casein kinase I modified gpI. When the predicted 623-amino-acid sequence of gpI was examined, two phosphorylation sites known to be optimal for casein kinase II were observed. In summary, this study showed that VZV gpI was phosphorylated by each of two mammalian protein kinases (casein kinase I and casein kinase II) and that potential serine-threonine phosphorylation sites for each of these two kinases were present in the viral glycoprotein.

  20. Monoclonal antibodies against type II rat brain protein kinase

    SciTech Connect

    Nakabayashi, C.H.; Huang, K.P.

    1987-05-01

    Three monoclonal antibodies (8/1, 10/10, and 25/3) against rat brain type II protein kinase C (PKC) were used to carry out the immunochemical characterization of this kinase. These antibodies immunoprecipitated the type II PKC in a dose-dependent manner but did neither to type I nor type III isozyme. Purified type II PKC has a molecular weight of 82,000 and consists of heterogeneous isoelectric point species, all of which are cross reactive with these antibodies. Immunoblot analysis of the tryptic fragments from PKC revealed that all three antibodies recognized the 33-38-KDa fragments, the phospholipid/phorbol ester-binding domain, but not the 45-48-KDa fragments, the kinase catalytic domain. The immune complexes of the kinase and the antibodies retained the kinase activity which was dependent on Ca/sup 2 +/ and phosphatidylserine (PS) and further activated by diacylglycerol. With antibody 8/1, the apparent Km values of the kinase for Ca/sup 2 +/ and PS were not influenced. The initial rate and final extent of autophosphorylation were reduced. The concentration of PS required for half-maximal (/sup 3/H)phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate (PDBu) binding was increased and the total PDBu binding was reduced. In the presence of optimum concentrations of Ca/sup 2 +/ and PS, the Kd of PDBu was unaffected by the antibody but the total binding was reduced. These results demonstrate that the PS/PDBu-binding domain contains the major epitope for the antibodies and the antibody mainly influences the PS/PDBu binding to the kinase.

  1. A mechanism for regulation of chloroplast LHC II kinase by plastoquinol and thioredoxin.

    PubMed

    Puthiyaveetil, Sujith

    2011-06-23

    State transitions are acclimatory responses to changes in light quality in photosynthesis. They involve the redistribution of absorbed excitation energy between photosystems I and II. In plants and green algae, this redistribution is produced by reversible phosphorylation of the chloroplast light harvesting complex II (LHC II). The LHC II kinase is activated by reduced plastoquinone (PQ) in photosystem II-specific low light. In high light, when PQ is also reduced, LHC II kinase becomes inactivated by thioredoxin. Based on newly identified amino acid sequence features of LHC II kinase and other considerations, a mechanism is suggested for its redox regulation.

  2. Targeting of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II.

    PubMed Central

    Colbran, Roger J

    2004-01-01

    Calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) has diverse roles in virtually all cell types and it is regulated by a plethora of mechanisms. Local changes in Ca2+ concentration drive calmodulin binding and CaMKII activation. Activity is controlled further by autophosphorylation at multiple sites, which can generate an autonomously active form of the kinase (Thr286) or can block Ca2+/calmodulin binding (Thr305/306). The regulated actions of protein phosphatases at these sites also modulate downstream signalling from CaMKII. In addition, CaMKII targeting to specific subcellular microdomains appears to be necessary to account for the known signalling specificity, and targeting is regulated by Ca2+/calmodulin and autophosphorylation. The present review focuses on recent studies revealing the diversity of CaMKII interactions with proteins localized to neuronal dendrites. Interactions with various subunits of the NMDA (N-methyl-D-aspartate) subtype of glutamate receptor have attracted the most attention, but binding of CaMKII to cytoskeletal and several other regulatory proteins has also been reported. Recent reports describing the molecular basis of each interaction and their potential role in the normal regulation of synaptic transmission and in pathological situations are discussed. These studies have revealed fundamental regulatory mechanisms that are probably important for controlling CaMKII functions in many cell types. PMID:14653781

  3. Transient Receptor Potential Melastatin 7 Cation Channel Kinase: New Player in Angiotensin II-Induced Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Antunes, Tayze T; Callera, Glaucia E; He, Ying; Yogi, Alvaro; Ryazanov, Alexey G; Ryazanova, Lillia V; Zhai, Alexander; Stewart, Duncan J; Shrier, Alvin; Touyz, Rhian M

    2016-04-01

    Transient receptor potential melastatin 7 (TRPM7) is a bifunctional protein comprising a magnesium (Mg(2+))/cation channel and a kinase domain. We previously demonstrated that vasoactive agents regulate vascular TRPM7. Whether TRPM7 plays a role in the pathophysiology of hypertension and associated cardiovascular dysfunction is unknown. We studied TRPM7 kinase-deficient mice (TRPM7Δkinase; heterozygous for TRPM7 kinase) and wild-type (WT) mice infused with angiotensin II (Ang II; 400 ng/kg per minute, 4 weeks). TRPM7 kinase expression was lower in heart and aorta from TRPM7Δkinase versus WT mice, effects that were further reduced by Ang II infusion. Plasma Mg(2+) was lower in TRPM7Δkinase versus WT mice in basal and stimulated conditions. Ang II increased blood pressure in both strains with exaggerated responses in TRPM7Δkinase versus WT groups (P<0.05). Acetylcholine-induced vasorelaxation was reduced in Ang II-infused TRPM7Δkinase mice, an effect associated with Akt and endothelial nitric oxide synthase downregulation. Vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 expression was increased in Ang II-infused TRPM7 kinase-deficient mice. TRPM7 kinase targets, calpain, and annexin-1, were activated by Ang II in WT but not in TRPM7Δkinase mice. Echocardiographic and histopathologic analysis demonstrated cardiac hypertrophy and left ventricular dysfunction in Ang II-treated groups. In TRPM7 kinase-deficient mice, Ang II-induced cardiac functional and structural effects were amplified compared with WT counterparts. Our data demonstrate that in TRPM7Δkinase mice, Ang II-induced hypertension is exaggerated, cardiac remodeling and left ventricular dysfunction are amplified, and endothelial function is impaired. These processes are associated with hypomagnesemia, blunted TRPM7 kinase expression/signaling, endothelial nitric oxide synthase downregulation, and proinflammatory vascular responses. Our findings identify TRPM7 kinase as a novel player in Ang II-induced hypertension

  4. Group II p21-activated kinases as therapeutic targets in gastrointestinal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Yang-Guang; Ning, Ke; Li, Feng

    2016-01-01

    P21-activated kinases (PAKs) are central players in various oncogenic signaling pathways. The six PAK family members are classified into group I (PAK1-3) and group II (PAK4-6). Focus is currently shifting from group I PAKs to group II PAKs. Group II PAKs play important roles in many fundamental cellular processes, some of which have particular significance in the development and progression of cancer. Because of their important functions, group II PAKs have become popular potential drug target candidates. However, few group II PAKs inhibitors have been reported, and most do not exhibit satisfactory kinase selectivity and “drug-like” properties. Isoform- and kinase-selective PAK inhibitors remain to be developed. This review describes the biological activities of group II PAKs, the importance of group II PAKs in the development and progression of gastrointestinal cancer, and small-molecule inhibitors of group II PAKs for the treatment of cancer. PMID:26811660

  5. Association of protein kinase Cmu with type II phosphatidylinositol 4-kinase and type I phosphatidylinositol-4-phosphate 5-kinase.

    PubMed

    Nishikawa, K; Toker, A; Wong, K; Marignani, P A; Johannes, F J; Cantley, L C

    1998-09-04

    Protein kinase Cmu (PKCmu), also named protein kinase D, is an unusual member of the PKC family that has a putative transmembrane domain and pleckstrin homology domain. This enzyme has a substrate specificity distinct from other PKC isoforms (Nishikawa, K., Toker, A., Johannes, F. J., Songyang, Z., and Cantley, L. C. (1997) J. Biol. Chem. 272, 952-960), and its mechanism of regulation is not yet clear. Here we show that PKCmu forms a complex in vivo with a phosphatidylinositol 4-kinase and a phosphatidylinositol-4-phosphate 5-kinase. A region of PKCmu between the amino-terminal transmembrane domain and the pleckstrin homology domain is shown to be involved in the association with the lipid kinases. Interestingly, a kinase-dead point mutant of PKCmu failed to associate with either lipid kinase activity, indicating that autophosphorylation may be required to expose the lipid kinase interaction domain. Furthermore, the subcellular distribution of the PKCmu-associated lipid kinases to the particulate fraction depends on the presence of the amino-terminal region of PKCmu including the predicted transmembrane region. These results suggest a novel model in which the non-catalytic region of PKCmu acts as a scaffold for assembly of enzymes involved in phosphoinositide synthesis at specific membrane locations.

  6. Expression and phosphorylation of delta-CaM kinase II in cultured Alzheimer fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Cavazzin, Chiara; Bonvicini, Cristian; Nocera, Annachiara; Racchi, Marco; Kasahara, Jiro; Tardito, Daniela; Gennarelli, Massimo; Govoni, Stefano; Racagni, Giorgio; Popoli, Maurizio

    2004-10-01

    Dysregulation of calcium homeostasis is among the major cellular alterations in Alzheimer's disease (AD). We studied Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaM kinase II), one of the major effectors regulating neuronal responses to changes in calcium fluxes, in cultured skin fibroblasts from subjects with sporadic AD. We found, by using PCR and Western analysis, that human fibroblasts express the delta-isoform of this kinase, and that CaM kinase II is the major Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent kinase in these cells. Protein expression level of the kinase was not significantly different in AD fibroblasts. However, the total activity of the kinase (stimulated by Ca(2+)/calmodulin) was significantly reduced in AD cell lines, whereas Ca(2+)-independent activity was significantly enhanced. The percent autonomy of the kinase (%Ca(2+)-independent/Ca(2+)-dependent activity) in AD cell lines was 62.8%, three-fold the corresponding percentage in control fibroblasts. The abnormal calcium-independent activity was not due to enhanced basal autophosphorylation of Thr(287). The observed abnormalities, if present in brain tissue, may be implicated either in dysfunction of neuroplasticity and cognitive functions or in dysregulation of cell cycle.

  7. Effect of oxidative stress on Rho kinase II and smooth muscle contraction in rat stomach.

    PubMed

    Al-Shboul, Othman; Mustafa, Ayman

    2015-06-01

    Recent studies have shown that both Rho kinase signaling and oxidative stress are involved in the pathogenesis of a number of human diseases, such as diabetes mellitus, hypertension, and atherosclerosis. However, very little is known about the effect of oxidative stress on the gastrointestinal (GI) smooth muscle Rho kinase pathway. The aim of the current study was to investigate the effect of oxidative stress on Rho kinase II and muscle contraction in rat stomach. The peroxynitrite donor 3-morpholinosydnonimine (SIN-1), hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), and peroxynitrite were used to induce oxidative stress. Rho kinase II expression and ACh-induced activity were measured in control and oxidant-treated cells via specifically designed enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and activity assay kits, respectively. Single smooth muscle cell contraction was measured via scanning micrometry in the presence or absence of the Rho kinase blocker, Y-27632 dihydrochloride. All oxidant agents significantly increased ACh-induced Rho kinase II activity without affecting its expression level. Most important, oxidative stress induced by all three agents augmented ACh-stimulated muscle cell contraction, which was significantly inhibited by Y-27632. In conclusion, oxidative stress activates Rho kinase II and enhances contraction in rat gastric muscle, suggesting an important role in GI motility disorders associated with oxidative stress.

  8. Role of dihydroxyacetone kinases I and II in the dha regulon of Klebsiella pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Wei, Dong; Wang, Min; Jiang, Biao; Shi, Jiping; Hao, Jian

    2014-05-10

    Dha regulon is responsible for anaerobic glycerol metabolism and 1,3-propanediol production in Klebsiella pneumoniae. DhaK encodes an ATP-dependent dihydroxyacetone kinase I, whereas dhaK123 encodes a dihydroxyacetone kinase II that uses phosphoenolpyruvate as a phosphate donor. The functions of dihydroxyacetone kinases I and II in K. pneumoniae have not been discriminated. In this study, four individual genes of the two kinases were knocked out, and the metabolic characteristics of these mutants were investigated. DhaK1 or dhaK2 mutation inhibited dha regulon expression. DhaK3 mutation reduced glycerol utilization, and the growth was slower than the wild stain. However, dhaK mutation exerted no significant effects on glycerol metabolism. The metabolic characteristics of these mutants showed that the subunits of dihydroxyacetone kinase II were involved in the regulation of dha regulon expression, similar to the dha regulon of E. coli. Dihydroxyacetone kinase II catalyzed dihydroxyacetone conversion to dihydroxyacetone phosphate, whereas dihydroxyacetone kinase I showed no significant contribution to this reaction.

  9. Copurification of casein kinase II with transcription factor ATF/E4TF3.

    PubMed Central

    Wada, T; Takagi, T; Yamaguchi, Y; Kawase, H; Hiramoto, M; Ferdous, A; Takayama, M; Lee, K A; Hurst, H C; Handa, H

    1996-01-01

    We have developed a simple method to purify sequence-specific DNA-binding proteins directly from crude cell extracts by using DNA affinity latex beads. The method enabled us to purify not only DNA-binding proteins, but also their associated proteins. Using beads bearing the ATF/E4TF3 site from the adenovirus E4 gene promoter, a protein kinase activity was copurified with the ATF/E4TF3 family. We found that the kinase interacted with ATF1 in vitro efficiently. The kinase did not bind directly to DNA. The kinase mainly phosphorylated ATF1 on serine 36, which was one of target amino acids for casein kinase (CK) II. Biological features of the kinase were the same as those of CKII and an anti-CKII serum reacted with the kinase, indicating that the kinase was CKII. Moreover, it was clearly shown that one of CKII subunits, the CKII alpha protein bound to glutathione-S-transferase (GST) fusion ATF1 but not GST in vitro. It has been reported that a specific CKII inhibitor, 5,6-dichloro-1-beta-D-ribo-furanosylbenzimidazole (DRB) inhibits transcription by RNA polymerase II [Zandomeni et al., (1986) J. Biol. Chem. 261, 3414-3419]. Taken together, these results suggest that ATF/E4TF3 may recruit the CKII activity to a transcription initiation machinery and stimulate transcription. PMID:8600455

  10. Zn(II)-Coordinated Quantum Dot-FRET Nanosensors for the Detection of Protein Kinase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Butaek; Park, Ji-In; Lee, Kyung Jin; Lee, Jin-Won; Kim, Tae-Wuk; Kim, Young-Pil

    2015-01-01

    We report a simple detection of protein kinase activity using Zn(II)-mediated fluorescent resonance energy transfer (FRET) between quantum dots (QDs) and dye-tethered peptides. With neither complex chemical ligands nor surface modification of QDs, Zn(II) was the only metal ion that enabled the phosphorylated peptides to be strongly attached on the carboxyl groups of the QD surface via metal coordination, thus leading to a significant FRET efficiency. As a result, protein kinase activity in intermixed solution was efficiently detected by QD-FRET via Zn(II) coordination, especially when the peptide substrate was combined with affinity-based purification. We also found that mono- and di-phosphorylation in the peptide substrate could be discriminated by the Zn(II)-mediated QD-FRET. Our approach is expected to find applications for studying physiological function and signal transduction with respect to protein kinase activity. PMID:26213934

  11. Calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II expression in motor neurons: effect of axotomy.

    PubMed

    Lund, L M; McQuarrie, I G

    1997-11-20

    Although Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent (CaM) protein kinase II isoforms are present in the nervous system in high amounts, many aspects of in vivo expression, localization, and function remain unexplored. During development, CaM kinase IIalpha and IIbeta are differentially expressed. Here, we examined CaM kinase II isoforms in Sprague-Dawley rat sciatic motor neurons before and after axotomy. We cut the L4-5 spinal nerves unilaterally and exposed the proximal nerve stumps to a fluoroprobe, to retrogradely label the neurons of origin. Anti-CaM kinase IIbeta antibody showed immunoreactivity in motor neurons, which decreased to low levels by 4 days after axotomy. We found a similar response by in situ hybridization with riboprobes. The decrease in expression of mRNA and protein was confined to fluorescent motor neurons. For CaM kinase IIalpha, in situ hybridization showed that the mRNA was in sciatic motor neurons, with a density unaffected by axotomy. However, these neurons were also enlarged, suggesting an up-regulation of expression. Northern blots confirmed an mRNA increase. We were unable to find CaM kinase IIalpha immunoreactivity before or after axotomy in sciatic motor neuron cell bodies, suggesting that CaM kinase IIalpha is in the axons or dendrites, or otherwise unavailable to the antibody. Using rats with crush lesions, we radiolabeled axonal proteins being synthesized in the cell body and used two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis with Western blots to identify CaM kinase IIalpha as a component of slow axonal transport. This differential regulation and expression of kinase isoforms suggests separate and unique intracellular roles. Because we find CaM kinase IIbeta down-regulates during axonal regrowth, its role in these neurons may be related to synaptic transmission. CaM kinase IIalpha appears to support axonal regrowth.

  12. Casein kinase II protein kinase is bound to lamina-matrix and phosphorylates lamin-like protein in isolated pea nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, H.; Roux, S. J.

    1992-01-01

    A casein kinase II (CK II)-like protein kinase was identified and partially isolated from a purified envelope-matrix fraction of pea (Pisum sativum L.) nuclei. When [gamma-32P]ATP was directly added to the envelope-matrix preparation, the three most heavily labeled protein bands had molecular masses near 71, 48, and 46 kDa. Protein kinases were removed from the preparation by sequential extraction with Triton X-100, EGTA, 0.3 M NaCl, and a pH 10.5 buffer, but an active kinase still remained bound to the remaining lamina-matrix fraction after these treatments. This kinase had properties resembling CK II kinases previously characterized from animal and plant sources: it preferred casein as an artificial substrate, could use GTP as efficiently as ATP as the phosphoryl donor, was stimulated by spermine, was calcium independent, and had a catalytic subunit of 36 kDa. Some animal and plant CK II kinases have regulatory subunits near 29 kDa, and a lamina-matrix-bound protein of this molecular mass was recognized on immunoblot by anti-Drosophila CK II polyclonal antibodies. Also found associated with the envelope-matrix fraction of pea nuclei were p34cdc2-like and Ca(2+)-dependent protein kinases, but their properties could not account for the protein kinase activity bound to the lamina. The 71-kDa substrate of the CK II-like kinase was lamin A-like, both in its molecular mass and in its cross-reactivity with anti-intermediate filament antibodies. Lamin phosphorylation is considered a crucial early step in the entry of cells into mitosis, so lamina-bound CK II kinases may be important control points for cellular proliferation.

  13. "Addition" and "Subtraction": Selectivity Design for Type II Maternal Embryonic Leucine Zipper Kinase Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xin; Giraldes, John; Sprague, Elizabeth R; Shakya, Subarna; Chen, Zhuoliang; Wang, Yaping; Joud, Carol; Mathieu, Simon; Chen, Christine Hiu-Tung; Straub, Christopher; Duca, Jose; Hurov, Kristen; Yuan, Yanqiu; Shao, Wenlin; Touré, B Barry

    2017-03-09

    While adding the structural features that are more favored by on-target activity is the more common strategy in selectivity optimization, the opposite strategy of subtracting the structural features that contribute more to off-target activity can also be very effective. Reported here is our successful effort of improving the kinase selectivity of type II maternal embryonic leucine zipper kinase inhibitors by applying these two complementary approaches together, which clearly demonstrates the powerful synergy between them.

  14. Signaling, Regulation, and Specificity of the Type II p21-activated Kinases*

    PubMed Central

    Ha, Byung Hak; Morse, Elizabeth M.; Turk, Benjamin E.; Boggon, Titus J.

    2015-01-01

    The p21-activated kinases (PAKs) are a family of six serine/threonine kinases that act as key effectors of RHO family GTPases in mammalian cells. PAKs are subdivided into two groups: type I PAKs (PAK1, PAK2, and PAK3) and type II PAKs (PAK4, PAK5, and PAK6). Although these groups are involved in common signaling pathways, recent work indicates that the two groups have distinct modes of regulation and have both unique and common substrates. Here, we review recent insights into the molecular level details that govern regulation of type II PAK signaling. We also consider mechanisms by which signal transduction is regulated at the level of substrate specificity. Finally, we discuss the implications of these studies for clinical targeting of these kinases. PMID:25855792

  15. Inhibition of dihydroceramide desaturase activity by the sphingosine kinase inhibitor SKI II.

    PubMed

    Cingolani, Francesca; Casasampere, Mireia; Sanllehí, Pol; Casas, Josefina; Bujons, Jordi; Fabrias, Gemma

    2014-08-01

    Sphingosine kinase inhibitor (SKI) II has been reported as a dual inhibitor of sphingosine kinases (SKs) 1 and 2 and has been extensively used to prove the involvement of SKs and sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) in cellular processes. Dihydroceramide desaturase (Des1), the last enzyme in the de novo synthesis of ceramide (Cer), regulates the balance between dihydroceramides (dhCers) and Cers. Both SKs and Des1 have interest as therapeutic targets. Here we show that SKI II is a noncompetitive inhibitor (Ki = 0.3 μM) of Des1 activity with effect also in intact cells without modifying Des1 protein levels. Molecular modeling studies support that the SKI II-induced decrease in Des1 activity could result from inhibition of NADH-cytochrome b5 reductase. SKI II, but not the SK1-specific inhibitor PF-543, provoked a remarkable accumulation of dhCers and their metabolites, while both SKI II and PF-543 reduced S1P to almost undetectable levels. SKI II, but not PF543, reduced cell proliferation with accumulation of cells in the G0/G1 phase. SKI II, but not PF543, induced autophagy. These overall findings should be taken into account when using SKI II as a pharmacological tool, as some of the effects attributed to decreased S1P may actually be caused by augmented dhCers and/or their metabolites.

  16. Protein kinase that phosphorylates light-harvesting complex is autophosphorylated and is associated with photosystem II

    SciTech Connect

    Coughlan, S.J.; Hind, G.

    1987-10-06

    Thylakoid membranes were phosphorylated with (..gamma..-/sup 32/P)ATP and extracted with octyl glucoside and cholate. Among the radiolabeled phosphoproteins in the extract was a previously characterized protein kinase of 64-kDa apparent mass. The ability of this enzyme to undergo autophosphorylation in situ was used to monitor its distribution in the membrane. Fractionation studies showed that the kinase is confined to granal regions of the thylakoid, where it appears to be associated with the light-harvesting chlorophyll-protein complex of photosystem II. The kinetics of kinase autophosphorylation were investigated both in situ and in extracted, purified enzyme. In the membrane, autophosphorylation saturated within 20-30 min and was reversed with a half-time of 7-8 min upon removal of ATP or oxidative inactivation of the kinase; the accompanying dephosphorylation of light-harvesting complex was slower and kinetically complex. Fluoride (10 mM) inhibited these dephosphorylations. Autophosphorylation of the isolated kinase was independent of enzyme concentration, indicative of an intramolecular mechanism. A maximum of one serine residue per mole of kinase was esterified. Autophosphorylation was more rapid in the presence of histone IIIs, an exogenous substrate. Dephosphorylation of the isolated enzyme was not observed.

  17. Inactivation of Smad-Transforming Growth Factor β Signaling by Ca2+-Calmodulin-Dependent Protein Kinase II

    PubMed Central

    Wicks, Stephen J.; Lui, Stephen; Abdel-Wahab, Nadia; Mason, Roger M.; Chantry, Andrew

    2000-01-01

    Members of the transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) family transduce signals through Smad proteins. Smad signaling can be regulated by the Ras/Erk/mitogen-activated protein pathway in response to receptor tyrosine kinase activation and the gamma interferon pathway and also by the functional interaction of Smad2 with Ca2+-calmodulin. Here we report that Smad–TGF-β-dependent transcriptional responses are prevented by expression of a constitutively activated Ca2+-calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (Cam kinase II). Smad2 is a target substrate for Cam kinase II in vitro at serine-110, -240, and -260. Cam kinase II induces in vivo phosphorylation of Smad2 and Smad4 and, to a lesser extent, Smad3. A phosphopeptide antiserum raised against Smad2 phosphoserine-240 reacted with Smad2 in vivo when coexpressed with Cam kinase II and by activation of the platelet-derived growth factor receptor, the epidermal growth factor receptor, HER2 (c-erbB2), and the TGF-β receptor. Furthermore, Cam kinase II blocked nuclear accumulation of a Smad2 and induced Smad2-Smad4 hetero-oligomerization independently of TGF-β receptor activation, while preventing TGF-β-dependent Smad2-Smad3 interactions. These findings provide a novel cross-talk mechanism by which Ca2+-dependent kinases activated downstream of multiple growth factor receptors antagonize cell responses to TGF-β. PMID:11027280

  18. A negative modulatory role for rho and rho-associated kinase signaling in delamination of neural crest cells

    PubMed Central

    Groysman, Maya; Shoval, Irit; Kalcheim, Chaya

    2008-01-01

    Background Neural crest progenitors arise as epithelial cells and then undergo a process of epithelial to mesenchymal transition that precedes the generation of cellular motility and subsequent migration. We aim at understanding the underlying molecular network. Along this line, possible roles of Rho GTPases that act as molecular switches to control a variety of signal transduction pathways remain virtually unexplored, as are putative interactions between Rho proteins and additional known components of this cascade. Results We investigated the role of Rho/Rock signaling in neural crest delamination. Active RhoA and RhoB are expressed in the membrane of epithelial progenitors and are downregulated upon delamination. In vivo loss-of-function of RhoA or RhoB or of overall Rho signaling by C3 transferase enhanced and/or triggered premature crest delamination yet had no effect on cell specification. Consistently, treatment of explanted neural primordia with membrane-permeable C3 or with the Rock inhibitor Y27632 both accelerated and enhanced crest emigration without affecting cell proliferation. These treatments altered neural crest morphology by reducing stress fibers, focal adhesions and downregulating membrane-bound N-cadherin. Reciprocally, activation of endogenous Rho by lysophosphatidic acid inhibited emigration while enhancing the above. Since delamination is triggered by BMP and requires G1/S transition, we examined their relationship with Rho. Blocking Rho/Rock function rescued crest emigration upon treatment with noggin or with the G1/S inhibitor mimosine. In the latter condition, cells emigrated while arrested at G1. Conversely, BMP4 was unable to rescue cell emigration when endogenous Rho activity was enhanced by lysophosphatidic acid. Conclusion Rho-GTPases, through Rock, act downstream of BMP and of G1/S transition to negatively regulate crest delamination by modifying cytoskeleton assembly and intercellular adhesion. PMID:18945340

  19. TGFβ2-induced outflow alterations in a bioengineered trabecular meshwork are offset by a rho-associated kinase inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Torrejon, Karen Y.; Papke, Ellen L.; Halman, Justin R.; Bergkvist, Magnus; Danias, John; Sharfstein, Susan T.; Xie, Yubing

    2016-01-01

    Members of the transforming growth factor beta (TGFβ) cytokine family have long been associated with affecting several cellular functions, including cell proliferation, differentiation and extracellular matrix (ECM) turnover. Of particular interest to this work, TGFβ2 has been linked to most types of glaucomas as a potential fibrotic agent that can cause elevation of intraocular pressure (IOP). Given that the trabecular meshwork (TM) provides most of aqueous humor outflow resistance in the eye, an in vitro bioengineered human TM (HTM) model has been created and validated by analyzing effects of TGFβ2 on transcellular pressure changes and outflow facility. These changes were correlated with several biological alterations induced by this cytokine, including ECM production and overexpression of HTM-marker myocillin. Furthermore, this TM model has been used to extend current knowledge of gene expression of cytokines involved in TGFβ-induced ECM turnover over time. In particular, the ability for a ROCK-inhibitor to diminish the effect of TGFβ on TM was demonstrated. This work supports the notion that anti-fibrotic activities of ROCK-inhibitors could counteract the elevation of IOP and increased strain observed in glaucomatous TM. PMID:27924833

  20. Angiotensin II-Activated Protein Kinase D Mediates Acute Aldosterone Secretion

    PubMed Central

    Shapiro, Brian A.; Olala, Lawrence; Arun, Senthil Nathan; Parker, Peter M.; George, Mariya V.; Bollag, Wendy B.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Dysregulation of the renin-angiotensin II (AngII)-aldosterone system can contribute to cardiovascular disease, such that an understanding of this system is critical. Diacylglycerol-sensitive serine/threonine protein kinase D (PKD) is activated by AngII in several systems, including the human adrenocortical carcinoma cell line NCI H295R, where this enzyme enhances chronic (24 hours) AngII-evoked aldosterone secretion. However, the role of PKD in acute AngII-elicited aldosterone secretion has not been previously examined. In primary cultures of bovine adrenal glomerulosa cells, which secrete detectable quantities of aldosterone in response to secretagogues within minutes, PKD was activated in response to AngII, but not an elevated potassium concentration or adrenocorticotrophic hormone. This activation was time- and dose-dependent and occurred through the AT1, but not the AT2, receptor. Adenovirus-mediated overexpression of constitutively-active PKD resulted in enhanced AngII-induced aldosterone secretion; whereas overexpression of a dominant-negative PKD construct decreased AngII-stimulated aldosterone secretion. Thus, we demonstrate for the first time that PKD mediates acute AngII-induced aldosterone secretion. PMID:19961896

  1. Antimicrobial Activity of Pantothenol against Staphylococci Possessing a Prokaryotic Type II Pantothenate Kinase

    PubMed Central

    Chohnan, Shigeru; Murase, Misa; Kurikawa, Kota; Higashi, Kodai; Ogata, Yuta

    2014-01-01

    Pantothenol is a provitamin of pantothenic acid (vitamin B5) that is widely used in healthcare and cosmetic products. This analog of pantothenate has been shown to markedly inhibit the phosphorylation activity of the prokaryotic type II pantothenate kinase of Staphylococcus aureus, which catalyzes the first step of the coenzyme A biosynthetic pathway. Since type II enzymes are found exclusively in staphylococci, pantothenol suppresses the growth of S. aureus, S. epidermidis, and S. saprophyticus, which inhabit the skin of humans. Therefore, the addition of this provitamin to ointment and skincare products may be highly effective in preventing infections by opportunistic pathogens. PMID:24759689

  2. Phosphorylation by casein kinase II affects the interaction of caldesmon with smooth muscle myosin and tropomyosin.

    PubMed Central

    Bogatcheva, N V; Vorotnikov, A V; Birukov, K G; Shirinsky, V P; Gusev, N B

    1993-01-01

    Smooth muscle caldesmon was phosphorylated by casein kinase II, and the effects of phosphorylation on the interaction of caldesmon and its chymotryptic peptides with myosin and tropomyosin were investigated. The N-terminal chymotryptic peptide of caldesmon of molecular mass 27 kDa interacted with myosin. Phosphorylation of Ser-73 catalysed by casein kinase II resulted in a 2-fold decrease in the affinity of the native caldesmon (or its 27 kDa N-terminal peptide) for smooth muscle myosin. At low ionic strength, caldesmon and its N-terminal peptides of molecular masses 25 and 27 kDa were retarded on a column of immobilized tropomyosin. Phosphorylation of Ser-73 led to a 2-4-fold decrease in the affinity of caldesmon (or its N-terminal peptides) for tropomyosin. Thus phosphorylation of Ser-73 catalysed by casein kinase II affects the interaction of caldesmon with both smooth muscle myosin and tropomyosin. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:8452532

  3. Cross-Linking Proteins To Show Complex Formation: A Laboratory That Visually Demonstrates Calmodulin Binding to Calmodulin Kinase II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porta, Angela R.

    2003-01-01

    Presents a laboratory experiment demonstrating the binding of calcium/calmodulin to calmodulin kinase II, which is important in the metabolic and physiological activities of the cell. Uses SDS polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE). (YDS)

  4. Protein kinase C beta II suppresses colorectal cancer by regulating IGF-1 mediated cell survival

    PubMed Central

    Dowling, Catríona M.; Phelan, James; Callender, Julia A.; Cathcart, Mary Clare; Mehigan, Brian; McCormick, Paul; Dalton, Tara; Coffey, John C.; Newton, Alexandra C.; O'sullivan, Jacintha; Kiely, Patrick A.

    2016-01-01

    Despite extensive efforts, cancer therapies directed at the Protein Kinase C (PKC) family of serine/threonine kinases have failed in clinical trials. These therapies have been directed at inhibiting PKC and have, in some cases, worsened disease outcome. Here we examine colon cancer patients and show not only that PKC Beta II is a tumour suppressor, but patients with low levels of this isozyme have significantly decreased disease free survival. Specifically, analysis of gene expression levels of all PKC genes in matched normal and cancer tissue samples from colon cancer patients revealed a striking down-regulation of the gene coding PKC Beta in the cancer tissue (n = 21). Tissue microarray analysis revealed a dramatic down-regulation of PKC Beta II protein levels in both the epithelial and stromal diseased tissue (n = 166). Of clinical significance, low levels of the protein in the normal tissue of patients is associated with a low (10%) 10 year survival compared with a much higher (60%) survival in patients with relatively high levels of the protein. Consistent with PKC Beta II levels protecting against colon cancer, overexpression of PKC Beta II in colon cancer cell lines reveals that PKC Beta II reverses transformation in cell based assays. Further to this, activation of PKC Beta II results in a dramatic downregulation of IGF-I-induced AKT, indicating a role for PKCs in regulating IGF-1 mediated cell survival. Thus, PKC Beta II is a tumour suppressor in colon cancer and low levels serve as a predictor for poor survival outcome. PMID:26989024

  5. Long-term soluble Abeta1-40 activates CaM kinase II in organotypic hippocampal cultures.

    PubMed

    Tardito, Daniela; Gennarelli, Massimo; Musazzi, Laura; Gesuete, Raffaella; Chiarini, Stefania; Barbiero, Valentina Sara; Rydel, Russell E; Racagni, Giorgio; Popoli, Maurizio

    2007-09-01

    Recent findings suggested a role for soluble amyloid-beta (Abeta) peptides in Alzheimer's disease associated cognitive decline. We investigated the action of soluble, monomeric Abeta(1-40) on CaM kinase II, a kinase involved in neuroplasticity and cognition. We treated organotypic hippocampal cultures short-term (up to 4h) and long-term (5 days) with Abeta(1-40) (1nM-5microM). Abeta did not induce cell damage, apoptosis or synaptic loss. Short-term treatment down-regulated enzymatic activity of the kinase, by reducing its Thr(286) phosphorylation. In contrast, long-term treatment (1nM-microM) markedly and significantly up-regulated enzymatic activity, with peak stimulation at 10nM (three-fold). Up-regulation of activity was associated with increased expression of the alpha-isoform of CaM kinase II, increased phosphorylation at Thr(286) (activator residue) and decreased phosphorylation at Thr(305-306) (inhibitory residues). We investigated the effect of glutamate on CaM kinase II following exposure to 1 or 10nM Abeta(1-40). As previously reported, glutamate increased CaM kinase II activity. However, the glutamate effect was not altered by pretreatment of slices with Abeta. Short- and long-term Abeta treatment showed opposite effects on CaM kinase II, suggesting that long-term changes are an adaptation to the kinase early down-regulation. The marked effect of Abeta(1-40) on the kinase suggests that semi-physiological and slowly raising peptide concentrations may have a significant impact on synaptic plasticity in the absence of synaptic loss or neuronal cell death.

  6. Mitogen-activated protein kinase-activated protein kinase 2 in angiotensin II-induced inflammation and hypertension: regulation of oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Ebrahimian, Talin; Li, Melissa Wei; Lemarié, Catherine A; Simeone, Stefania M C; Pagano, Patrick J; Gaestel, Matthias; Paradis, Pierre; Wassmann, Sven; Schiffrin, Ernesto L

    2011-02-01

    Vascular oxidative stress and inflammation play an important role in angiotensin II-induced hypertension, and mitogen-activated protein kinases participate in these processes. We questioned whether mitogen-activated protein kinase-activated protein kinase 2 (MK2), a downstream target of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase, is involved in angiotensin II-induced vascular responses. In vivo experiments were performed in wild-type and Mk2 knockout mice infused intravenously with angiotensin II. Angiotensin II induced a 30 mm Hg increase in mean blood pressure in wild-type that was delayed in Mk2 knockout mice. Angiotensin II increased superoxide production and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 in blood vessels of wild-type but not in Mk2 knockout mice. Mk2 knockdown by small interfering RNA in mouse mesenteric vascular smooth muscle cells caused a 42% reduction in MK2 protein and blunted the angiotensin II-induced 40% increase of MK2 expression. Mk2 knockdown blunted angiotensin II-induced doubling of intracellular adhesion molecule-1 expression, 2.4-fold increase of nuclear p65, and 1.4-fold increase in Ets-1. Mk2 knockdown abrogated the angiotensin II-induced 4.7-fold and 1.3-fold increase of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 mRNA and protein. Angiotensin II enhanced reactive oxygen species levels (by 29%) and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase activity (by 48%), both abolished by Mk2 knockdown. Reduction of MK2 blocked angiotensin II-induced p47phox translocation to the membrane, associated with a 53% enhanced catalase expression. Angiotensin II-induced increase of MK2 was prevented by the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase inhibitor Nox2ds-tat. Mk2 small interfering RNA prevented the angiotensin II-induced 30% increase of proliferation. In conclusion, MK2 plays a critical role in angiotensin II signaling, leading to hypertension, oxidative stress via activation of p47phox and inhibition of antioxidants, and vascular inflammation

  7. Rictor regulates phosphorylation of the novel protein kinase C Apl II in Aplysia sensory neurons.

    PubMed

    Labban, Margaret; Dyer, John R; Sossin, Wayne S

    2012-09-01

    Rapamycin-insensitive companion of TOR (Rictor) is a conserved component of target of rapamycin complex 2 (TORC2), a complex implicated in phosphorylation of a number of signal transduction-related kinases, including protein kinase Cs (PKCs) at their 'hydrophobic' site in the carboxy-terminal extension domain. In the marine mollusk, Aplysia californica, an increase in phosphorylation of the novel PKC, Apl II, at the hydrophobic site is associated with a protein synthesis-dependent increase in synaptic strength seen after continuous application of serotonin. To determine if Rictor plays a role in this increase, we cloned the Aplysia ortholog of Rictor (ApRictor). An siRNA-mediated decrease in ApRictor levels in Aplysia sensory neurons led to a decrease in the phosphorylation of PKC Apl II at the hydrophobic site suggesting a role for ApRictor in hydrophobic site phosphorylation. However, over-expression of ApRictor was not sufficient to increase phosphorylation of PKC Apl II. Continuous application of serotonin increased phosphorylation of PKC Apl II at the hydrophobic site in cultured sensory neurons, and this was blocked by Torin, which inhibits both TORC1 and TORC2. Over-expression of ApRictor did not lead to change in the magnitude of serotonin-mediated phosphorylation, but did lead to a small increase in the membrane localization of phosphorylated PKC Apl II. In conclusion, these studies implicate Rictor in phosphorylation of a novel PKC during synaptic plasticity and suggest an additional role for Rictor in regulating the localization of PKCs.

  8. CREB phosphorylation and melatonin biosynthesis in the rat pineal gland: involvement of cyclic AMP dependent protein kinase type II.

    PubMed

    Maronde, E; Wicht, H; Taskén, K; Genieser, H G; Dehghani, F; Olcese, J; Korf, H W

    1999-10-01

    Phosphorylation of cyclic AMP response element binding protein (CREB) at amino acid serine 133 appears as an important link between the norepinephrine (NE)-induced activation of second messenger systems and the stimulation of melatonin biosynthesis. Here we investigated in the rat pineal gland: 1) the type of protein kinase that mediates CREB phosphorylation: and 2) its impact on melatonin biosynthesis. Immunochemical or immunocytochemical demonstration of serine133-phosphorylated cyclic AMP regulated element binding protein (pCREB) and radioimmunological detection of melatonin revealed that only cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) inhibitors suppressed NE-induced CREB phosphorylation and stimulation of melatonin biosynthesis, whereas inhibitors of cyclic GMP-dependent protein kinase (PKG), mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase, protein kinase C, or calcium-calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CaMK) were ineffective. Investigations with cyclic AMP-agonist pairs that selectively activate either PKA type I or II link NE-induced CREB phosphorylation and stimulation of melatonin biosynthesis to the activation of PKA type II. Our data suggest that PKA type II plays an important role in the transcriptional control of melatonin biosynthesis in the rat pineal organ.

  9. Roles of an unconventional protein kinase and myosin II in amoeba osmotic shock responses.

    PubMed

    Betapudi, Venkaiah; Egelhoff, Thomas T

    2009-12-01

    The contractile vacuole (CV) is a dynamic organelle that enables Dictyostelium amoeba and other protist to maintain osmotic homeostasis by expelling excess water. In the present study, we have uncovered a mechanism that coordinates the mechanics of the CV with myosin II, regulated by VwkA, an unconventional protein kinase that is conserved in an array of protozoa. Green fluorescent protein (GFP)-VwkA fusion proteins localize persistently to the CV during both filling and expulsion phases of water. In vwkA null cells, the established CV marker dajumin still localizes to the CV, but these structures are large, spherical and severely impaired for discharge. Furthermore, myosin II cortical localization and assembly are abnormal in vwkA null cells. Parallel analysis of wild-type cells treated with myosin II inhibitors or of myosin II null cells also results in enlarged CVs with impaired dynamics. We suggest that the myosin II cortical cytoskeleton, regulated by VwkA, serves a critical conserved role in the periodic contractions of the CV, as part of the osmotic protective mechanism of protozoa.

  10. Chronic antidepressants induce redistribution and differential activation of alphaCaM kinase II between presynaptic compartments.

    PubMed

    Barbiero, Valentina S; Giambelli, Roberto; Musazzi, Laura; Tiraboschi, Ettore; Tardito, Daniela; Perez, Jorge; Drago, Filippo; Racagni, Giorgio; Popoli, Maurizio

    2007-12-01

    Changes in synaptic plasticity are involved in pathophysiology of depression and in the mechanism of antidepressants. Ca(2+)/calmodulin (CaM) kinase II, a protein kinase involved in synaptic plasticity, has been previously shown to be a target of antidepressants. We previously found that antidepressants activate the kinase in hippocampal neuronal cell bodies by increasing phosphorylation at Thr(286), reduce the kinase phosphorylation in synaptic membranes, and in turn its phosphorylation-dependent interaction with syntaxin-1 and the release of glutamate from hippocampal synaptosomes. Here, we investigated the chronic effect of different antidepressants (fluoxetine, desipramine, and reboxetine) on the expression and function of the kinase in distinct subcellular compartments in order to dissect the different kinase pools affected. Acute treatments did not induce any change in the kinase. In total tissue extracts chronic drug treatments induced activation of the kinase; in hippocampus (HC), but not in prefrontal/frontal cortex, this was partially accounted for by increased Thr(286) phosphorylation, suggesting the involvement of different mechanisms of activation. In synaptosomes, all drugs reduced the kinase phosphorylation, particularly in HC where, upon fractionation of the synaptosomal particulate into synaptic vesicles and membranes, we found that the drugs induced a redistribution and differential activation of the kinase between membranes and vesicles. Furthermore, a large decrease in the level and phosphorylation of synapsin I located at synaptic membranes was consistent with the observed decrease of CaM kinase II. Overall, antidepressants induce a complex pattern of modifications in distinct subcellular compartments; at presynaptic level, these changes are in line with a dampening of glutamate release.

  11. Group II metabotropic glutamate receptors modify N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors via Src kinase

    PubMed Central

    Trepanier, Catherine; Lei, Gang; Xie, Yu-Feng; MacDonald, John F.

    2013-01-01

    Group II metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluR2/3) have emerged as important targets for the treatment of schizophrenia. Since hypofunction of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDARs) has also been implicated in the etiology of schizophrenia, we examined whether postsynaptic mGluR2/3 regulate NMDAR function. Activation of mGluR2/3 significantly decreased the ratio of AMPA-to-NMDA excitatory postsynaptic currents at Schaffer Collateral-CA1 synapses and enhanced the peak of NMDA-evoked currents in acutely isolated CA1 neurons. The mGluR2/3-mediated potentiation of NMDAR currents was selective for GluN2A-containing NMDARs and was mediated by the Src family kinase Src. Activation of mGluR2/3 inhibited the adenylyl cyclase-cAMP-PKA pathway and thereby activated Src by inhibiting its regulatory C-terminal Src kinase (Csk). We suggest a novel model of regulation of NMDARs by Gi/o-coupled receptors whereby inhibition of the cAMP-PKA pathway via mGluR2/3 activates Src kinase and potentiates GluN2A-containing NMDAR currents. This represents a potentially novel mechanism to correct the hypoglutamatergic state found in schizophrenia. PMID:23378895

  12. The anticancer multi-kinase inhibitor dovitinib also targets topoisomerase I and topoisomerase II.

    PubMed

    Hasinoff, Brian B; Wu, Xing; Nitiss, John L; Kanagasabai, Ragu; Yalowich, Jack C

    2012-12-15

    Dovitinib (TKI258/CHIR258) is a multi-kinase inhibitor in phase III development for the treatment of several cancers. Dovitinib is a benzimidazole-quinolinone compound that structurally resembles the bisbenzimidazole minor groove binding dye Hoechst 33258. Dovitinib bound to DNA as shown by its ability to increase the DNA melting temperature and by increases in its fluorescence spectrum that occurred upon the addition of DNA. Molecular modeling studies of the docking of dovitinib into an X-ray structure of a Hoechst 33258-DNA complex showed that dovitinib could reasonably be accommodated in the DNA minor groove. Because DNA binders are often topoisomerase I (EC 5.99.1.2) and topoisomerase II (EC 5.99.1.3) inhibitors, the ability of dovitinib to inhibit these DNA processing enzymes was also investigated. Dovitinib inhibited the catalytic decatenation activity of topoisomerase IIα. It also inhibited the DNA-independent ATPase activity of yeast topoisomerase II which suggested that it interacted with the ATP binding site. Using isolated human topoisomerase IIα, dovitinib stabilized the enzyme-cleavage complex and acted as a topoisomerase IIα poison. Dovitinib was also found to be a cellular topoisomerase II poison in human leukemia K562 cells and induced double-strand DNA breaks in K562 cells as evidenced by increased phosphorylation of H2AX. Finally, dovitinib inhibited the topoisomerase I-catalyzed relaxation of plasmid DNA and acted as a cellular topoisomerase I poison. In conclusion, the cell growth inhibitory activity and the anticancer activity of dovitinib may result not only from its ability to inhibit multiple kinases, but also, in part, from its ability to target topoisomerase I and topoisomerase II.

  13. Inflammatory Signaling by NOD-RIPK2 Is Inhibited by Clinically Relevant Type II Kinase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Canning, Peter; Ruan, Qui; Schwerd, Tobias; Hrdinka, Matous; Maki, Jenny L.; Saleh, Danish; Suebsuwong, Chalada; Ray, Soumya; Brennan, Paul E.; Cuny, Gregory D.; Uhlig, Holm H.; Gyrd-Hansen, Mads; Degterev, Alexei; Bullock, Alex N.

    2015-01-01

    Summary RIPK2 mediates pro-inflammatory signaling from the bacterial sensors NOD1 and NOD2, and is an emerging therapeutic target in autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. We observed that cellular RIPK2 can be potently inhibited by type II inhibitors that displace the kinase activation segment, whereas ATP-competitive type I inhibition was only poorly effective. The most potent RIPK2 inhibitors were the US Food and Drug Administration-approved drugs ponatinib and regorafenib. Their mechanism of action was independent of NOD2 interaction and involved loss of downstream kinase activation as evidenced by lack of RIPK2 autophosphorylation. Notably, these molecules also blocked RIPK2 ubiquitination and, consequently, inflammatory nuclear factor κB signaling. In monocytes, the inhibitors selectively blocked NOD-dependent tumor necrosis factor production without affecting lipopolysaccharide-dependent pathways. We also determined the first crystal structure of RIPK2 bound to ponatinib, and identified an allosteric site for inhibitor development. These results highlight the potential for type II inhibitors to treat indications of RIPK2 activation as well as inflammation-associated cancers. PMID:26320862

  14. Inflammatory Signaling by NOD-RIPK2 Is Inhibited by Clinically Relevant Type II Kinase Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Canning, Peter; Ruan, Qui; Schwerd, Tobias; Hrdinka, Matous; Maki, Jenny L; Saleh, Danish; Suebsuwong, Chalada; Ray, Soumya; Brennan, Paul E; Cuny, Gregory D; Uhlig, Holm H; Gyrd-Hansen, Mads; Degterev, Alexei; Bullock, Alex N

    2015-09-17

    RIPK2 mediates pro-inflammatory signaling from the bacterial sensors NOD1 and NOD2, and is an emerging therapeutic target in autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. We observed that cellular RIPK2 can be potently inhibited by type II inhibitors that displace the kinase activation segment, whereas ATP-competitive type I inhibition was only poorly effective. The most potent RIPK2 inhibitors were the US Food and Drug Administration-approved drugs ponatinib and regorafenib. Their mechanism of action was independent of NOD2 interaction and involved loss of downstream kinase activation as evidenced by lack of RIPK2 autophosphorylation. Notably, these molecules also blocked RIPK2 ubiquitination and, consequently, inflammatory nuclear factor κB signaling. In monocytes, the inhibitors selectively blocked NOD-dependent tumor necrosis factor production without affecting lipopolysaccharide-dependent pathways. We also determined the first crystal structure of RIPK2 bound to ponatinib, and identified an allosteric site for inhibitor development. These results highlight the potential for type II inhibitors to treat indications of RIPK2 activation as well as inflammation-associated cancers.

  15. Rho/Rho-dependent kinase affects locomotion and actin-myosin II activity of Amoeba proteus.

    PubMed

    Kłopocka, W; Redowicz, M J

    2004-10-01

    The highly motile free-living unicellular organism Amoeba proteus has been widely used as a model to study cell motility. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying its unique locomotion are still scarcely known. Recently, we have shown that blocking the amoebae's endogenous Rac- and Rho-like proteins led to distinct and irreversible changes in the appearance of these large migrating cells as well as to a significant inhibition of their locomotion. In order to elucidate the mechanism of the Rho pathway, we tested the effects of blocking the endogenous Rho-dependent kinase (ROCK) by anti-ROCK antibodies and Y-27632, (+)-(R)-trans-4-(1-aminoethyl)-N-(4-pyridyl)cyclohexanecarboxamide dihydrochloride, a specific inhibitor of ROCK, on migrating amoebae and the effect of the Rho and ROCK inhibition on the actin-activated Mg-ATPase of the cytosolic fraction of the amoebae. Amoebae microinjected with anti-ROCK inhibitors remained contracted and strongly attached to the glass surface and exhibited an atypical locomotion. Despite protruding many pseudopodia that were advancing in various directions, the amoebae could not effectively move. Immunofluorescence studies showed that ROCK-like protein was dispersed throughout the cytoplasm and was also found in the regions of actin-myosin II interaction during both isotonic and isometric contraction. The Mg-ATPase activity was about two- to threefold enhanced, indicating that blocking the Rho/Rho-dependent kinase activated myosin. It is possible then that in contrast to the vertebrate cells, the inactivation of Rho/Rho-dependent kinase in amoebae leads to the activation of myosin II and to the observed hypercontracted cells which cannot exert effective locomotion.

  16. Substrate and Inhibitor Specificity of the Type II p21-Activated Kinase, PAK6

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Jia; Ha, Byung Hak; Lou, Hua Jane; Morse, Elizabeth M.; Zhang, Rong; Calderwood, David A.; Turk, Benjamin E.; Boggon, Titus J.

    2013-01-01

    The p21-activated kinases (PAKs) are important effectors of Rho-family small GTPases. The PAK family consists of two groups, type I and type II, which have different modes of regulation and signaling. PAK6, a type II PAK, influences behavior and locomotor function in mice and has an ascribed role in androgen receptor signaling. Here we show that PAK6 has a peptide substrate specificity very similar to the other type II PAKs, PAK4 and PAK5 (PAK7). We find that PAK6 catalytic activity is inhibited by a peptide corresponding to its N-terminal pseudosubstrate. Introduction of a melanoma-associated mutation, P52L, into this peptide reduces pseudosubstrate autoinhibition of PAK6, and increases phosphorylation of its substrate PACSIN1 (Syndapin I) in cells. Finally we determine two co-crystal structures of PAK6 catalytic domain in complex with ATP-competitive inhibitors. We determined the 1.4 Å co-crystal structure of PAK6 with the type II PAK inhibitor PF-3758309, and the 1.95 Å co-crystal structure of PAK6 with sunitinib. These findings provide new insights into the structure-function relationships of PAK6 and may facilitate development of PAK6 targeted therapies. PMID:24204982

  17. Characterization of the Catalytic and Nucleotide Binding Properties of the α-Kinase Domain of Dictyostelium Myosin-II Heavy Chain Kinase A*

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yidai; Ye, Qilu; Jia, Zongchao; Côté, Graham P.

    2015-01-01

    The α-kinases are a widely expressed family of serine/threonine protein kinases that exhibit no sequence identity with conventional eukaryotic protein kinases. In this report, we provide new information on the catalytic properties of the α-kinase domain of Dictyostelium myosin-II heavy chain kinase-A (termed A-CAT). Crystallization of A-CAT in the presence of MgATP yielded structures with AMP or adenosine in the catalytic cleft together with a phosphorylated Asp-766 residue. The results show that the β- and α-phosphoryl groups are transferred either directly or indirectly to the catalytically essential Asp-766. Biochemical assays confirmed that A-CAT hydrolyzed ATP, ADP, and AMP with kcat values of 1.9, 0.6, and 0.32 min−1, respectively, and showed that A-CAT can use ADP to phosphorylate peptides and proteins. Binding assays using fluorescent 2′/3′-O-(N-methylanthraniloyl) analogs of ATP and ADP yielded Kd values for ATP, ADP, AMP, and adenosine of 20 ± 3, 60 ± 20, 160 ± 60, and 45 ± 15 μm, respectively. Site-directed mutagenesis showed that Glu-713, Leu-716, and Lys-645, all of which interact with the adenine base, were critical for nucleotide binding. Mutation of the highly conserved Gln-758, which chelates a nucleotide-associated Mg2+ ion, eliminated catalytic activity, whereas loss of the highly conserved Lys-722 and Arg-592 decreased kcat values for kinase and ATPase activities by 3–6-fold. Mutation of Asp-663 impaired kinase activity to a much greater extent than ATPase, indicating a specific role in peptide substrate binding, whereas mutation of Gln-768 doubled ATPase activity, suggesting that it may act to exclude water from the active site. PMID:26260792

  18. Virtual screening filters for the design of type II p38 MAP kinase inhibitors: a fragment based library generation approach.

    PubMed

    Badrinarayan, Preethi; Sastry, G Narahari

    2012-04-01

    In this work, we introduce the development and application of a three-step scoring and filtering procedure for the design of type II p38 MAP kinase leads using allosteric fragments extracted from virtual screening hits. The design of the virtual screening filters is based on a thorough evaluation of docking methods, DFG-loop conformation, binding interactions and chemotype specificity of the 138 p38 MAP kinase inhibitors from Protein Data Bank bound to DFG-in and DFG-out conformations using Glide, GOLD and CDOCKER. A 40 ns molecular dynamics simulation with the apo, type I with DFG-in and type II with DFG-out forms was carried out to delineate the effects of structural variations on inhibitor binding. The designed docking-score and sub-structure filters were first tested on a dataset of 249 potent p38 MAP kinase inhibitors from seven diverse series and 18,842 kinase inhibitors from PDB, to gauge their capacity to discriminate between kinase and non-kinase inhibitors and likewise to selectively filter-in target-specific inhibitors. The designed filters were then applied in the virtual screening of a database of ten million (10⁷) compounds resulting in the identification of 100 hits. Based on their binding modes, 98 allosteric fragments were extracted from the hits and a fragment library was generated. New type II p38 MAP kinase leads were designed by tailoring the existing type I ATP site binders with allosteric fragments using a common urea linker. Target specific virtual screening filters can thus be easily developed for other kinases based on this strategy to retrieve target selective compounds.

  19. Soluble fms-like tyrosine kinase 1 promotes angiotensin II sensitivity in preeclampsia

    PubMed Central

    Burke, Suzanne D.; Zsengellér, Zsuzsanna K.; Khankin, Eliyahu V.; Lo, Agnes S.; Rajakumar, Augustine; DuPont, Jennifer J.; McCurley, Amy; Moss, Mary E.; Zhang, Dongsheng; Clark, Christopher D.; Seely, Ellen W.; Kang, Peter M.; Stillman, Isaac E.; Jaffe, Iris Z.

    2016-01-01

    Preeclampsia is a hypertensive disorder of pregnancy in which patients develop profound sensitivity to vasopressors, such as angiotensin II, and is associated with substantial morbidity for the mother and fetus. Enhanced vasoconstrictor sensitivity and elevations in soluble fms-like tyrosine kinase 1 (sFLT1), a circulating antiangiogenic protein, precede clinical signs and symptoms of preeclampsia. Here, we report that overexpression of sFlt1 in pregnant mice induced angiotensin II sensitivity and hypertension by impairing endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) phosphorylation and promoting oxidative stress in the vasculature. Administration of the NOS inhibitor l-NAME to pregnant mice recapitulated the angiotensin sensitivity and oxidative stress observed with sFlt1 overexpression. Sildenafil, an FDA-approved phosphodiesterase 5 inhibitor that enhances NO signaling, reversed sFlt1-induced hypertension and angiotensin II sensitivity in the preeclampsia mouse model. Sildenafil treatment also improved uterine blood flow, decreased uterine vascular resistance, and improved fetal weights in comparison with untreated sFlt1-expressing mice. Finally, sFLT1 protein expression inversely correlated with reductions in eNOS phosphorylation in placental tissue of human preeclampsia patients. These data support the concept that endothelial dysfunction due to high circulating sFLT1 may be the primary event leading to enhanced vasoconstrictor sensitivity that is characteristic of preeclampsia and suggest that targeting sFLT1-induced pathways may be an avenue for treating preeclampsia and improving fetal outcomes. PMID:27270170

  20. AKAP-independent localization of type-II protein kinase A to dynamic actin microspikes.

    PubMed

    Rivard, Robert L; Birger, Monique; Gaston, Kara J; Howe, Alan K

    2009-09-01

    Regulation of the cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) in subcellular space is required for cytoskeletal dynamics and chemotaxis. Currently, spatial regulation of PKA is thought to require the association of PKA regulatory (R) subunits with A-kinase anchoring proteins (AKAPs). Here, we show that the regulatory RIIalpha subunit of PKA associates with dynamic actin microspikes in an AKAP-independent manner. Both endogenous RIIalpha and a GFP-RIIalpha fusion protein co-localize with F-actin in microspikes within hippocampal neuron growth cones and the leading edge lamellae of NG108-15 cells. Live-cell imaging demonstrates that RIIalpha-associated microspikes are highly dynamic and that the coupling of RIIalpha to actin is tight, as the movement of both actin and RIIalpha are immediately and coincidently stopped by low-dose cytochalasin D. Importantly, co-localization of RIIalpha and actin in these structures is resistant to displacement by a cell-permeable disrupter of PKA-AKAP interactions. Biochemical fractionation confirms that a substantial pool of PKA RIIalpha is associated with the detergent-insoluble cytoskeleton and is resistant to extraction by a peptide inhibitor of AKAP interactions. Finally, mutation of the AKAP-binding domain of RIIalpha fails to disrupt its association with actin microspikes. These data provide the first demonstration of the physical association of a kinase with such dynamic actin structures, as well as the first demonstration of the ability of type-II PKA to localize to discrete subcellular structures independently of canonical AKAP function. This association is likely to be important for microfilament dynamics and cell migration and may prime the investigation of novel mechanisms for localizing PKA activity.

  1. AKAP-Independent Localization of Type-II Protein Kinase A to Dynamic Actin Microspikes

    PubMed Central

    Rivard, Robert L.; Birger, Monique; Gaston, Kara J.; Howe, Alan K.

    2010-01-01

    Regulation of the cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) in subcellular space is required for cytoskeletal dynamics and chemotaxis. Currently, spatial regulation of PKA is thought to require the association of PKA regulatory (R) subunits with A-kinase anchoring proteins (AKAPs). Here, we show that the regulatory RIIα subunit of PKA associates with dynamic actin microspikes in an AKAP-independent manner. Both endogenous RIIα and a GFP-RIIα fusion protein co-localize with F-actin in microspikes within hippocampal neuron growth cones and the leading edge lamellae of NG108-15 cells. Live-cell imaging demonstrates that RIIα-associated microspikes are highly dynamic and that the coupling of RIIα to actin is tight, as the movement of both actin and RIIα are immediately and coincidently stopped by low-dose cytochalasin D. Importantly, co-localization of RIIα and actin in these structures is resistant to displacement by a cell-permeable disrupter of PKA-AKAP interactions. Biochemical fractionation confirms that a substantial pool of PKA RIIα is associated with the detergent-insoluble cytoskeleton and is resistant to extraction by a peptide inhibitor of AKAP interactions. Finally, mutation of the AKAP-binding domain of RIIα fails to disrupt its association with actin microspikes. These data provide the first demonstration of the physical association of a kinase with such dynamic actin structures, as well as the first demonstration of the ability of type-II PKA to localize to discrete subcellular structures independently of canonical AKAP function. This association is likely to be important for microfilament dynamics and cell migration and may prime the investigation of novel mechanisms for localizing PKA activity. PMID:19536823

  2. Bcl10 is phosphorylated on Ser138 by Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II.

    PubMed

    Ishiguro, Kazuhiro; Ando, Takafumi; Goto, Hidemi; Xavier, Ramnik

    2007-03-01

    Ordered assembly of scaffold proteins Carma1-Bcl10-Malt1 determines NF-kappaB activation following T cell receptor (TCR) engagement. Carma1-Bcl10 interaction and the signaling pathway are controlled by Carma1 phosphorylation, which are induced by PKCtheta and Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII). In addition to Carma1 phosphorylation, previous studies have demonstrated that Bcl10 is phosphorylated in the C-terminal Ser/Thr rich region following TCR engagement. However the kinases that phosphorylate Bcl10 are incompletely understood. Here we show that CaMKII phosphorylates Bcl10 on Ser138. Furthermore, a CaMKII inhibitor, KN93, and CaMKII siRNA substantially reduce Bcl10 phosphorylation induced by phorbol myristate acetate/ionomycin. S138A mutation prolongs Bcl10-induced NF-kappaB activation, suggesting that Bcl10 phosphorylation is involved in attenuation of NF-kappaB activation. These findings suggest that CaMKII modulates NF-kappaB activation via phosphorylating Bcl10 as well as Carma1.

  3. ROS-triggered phosphorylation of complex II by Fgr kinase regulates cellular adaptation to fuel use.

    PubMed

    Acín-Pérez, Rebeca; Carrascoso, Isabel; Baixauli, Francesc; Roche-Molina, Marta; Latorre-Pellicer, Ana; Fernández-Silva, Patricio; Mittelbrunn, María; Sanchez-Madrid, Francisco; Pérez-Martos, Acisclo; Lowell, Clifford A; Manfredi, Giovanni; Enríquez, José Antonio

    2014-06-03

    Electron flux in the mitochondrial electron transport chain is determined by the superassembly of mitochondrial respiratory complexes. Different superassemblies are dedicated to receive electrons derived from NADH or FADH2, allowing cells to adapt to the particular NADH/FADH2 ratio generated from available fuel sources. When several fuels are available, cells adapt to the fuel best suited to their type or functional status (e.g., quiescent versus proliferative). We show that an appropriate proportion of superassemblies can be achieved by increasing CII activity through phosphorylation of the complex II catalytic subunit FpSDH. This phosphorylation is mediated by the tyrosine-kinase Fgr, which is activated by hydrogen peroxide. Ablation of Fgr or mutation of the FpSDH target tyrosine abolishes the capacity of mitochondria to adjust metabolism upon nutrient restriction, hypoxia/reoxygenation, and T cell activation, demonstrating the physiological relevance of this adaptive response.

  4. Kinetics of inhibition by 5,6-dichloro-1-beta-D-ribofuranosylbenzimidazole on calf thymus casein kinase II.

    PubMed

    Zandomeni, R O

    1989-09-01

    The adenosine analogue 5,6-dichloro-1-beta-D-ribofuranosylbenzimidazole (DRB) is a specific inhibitor for RNA polymerase II transcription in vivo and in vitro [Tamm + Sehgal (1978) Adv. Virus Res. 22, 187-258; Zandomeni & Weinmann (1984) J. Biol. Chem. 259, 14804-14811]. The effect on RNA polymerase II-specific transcription seems to be mediated by its inhibition of nuclear casein kinase II [Zandomeni, Carrera-Zandomeni, Shugar & Weinmann (1986) J. Biol. Chem. 261, 3414-3419]. Inhibition studies indicated that DRB acted as a mixed-type inhibitor with respect to casein and as a competitive inhibitor with respect to the nucleotide phosphate donor substrates. The DRB inhibition constant is 7 microM for the calf thymus casein kinase II, with regard to both ATP and GTP.

  5. Regional distribution and subcellular associations of Type II calcium and calmodulin-dependent protein kinase in rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Erondu, N.E.

    1986-01-01

    Four monoclonal antibodies generated against the Type II CaM kinase have been characterized. Two of these antibodies were used to confirm that both alpha and beta subunits were part of the holoenzyme complex. I also developed liquid phase and solid phase radioimmunoassays for the kinase. With the solid phase radioimmunoassay, the distribution of the kinase in rat brain was examined. This study revealed that the concentration of the kinase varies markedly in different brain regions. It is most highly concentrated in the telencephalon where it comprises approximately 2% of total hippocampal protein, 1.3% of cortical protein and 0.7% of striatal protein. It is less concentrated in lower brain regions ranging from 0.3% of hypothalamic protein to 0.1% of protein in the pons/medulla.

  6. Brain Region-Specific Effects of cGMP-Dependent Kinase II Knockout on AMPA Receptor Trafficking and Animal Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Seonil; Pick, Joseph E.; Abera, Sinedu; Khatri, Latika; Ferreira, Danielle D. P.; Sathler, Matheus F.; Morison, Sage L.; Hofmann, Franz; Ziff, Edward B.

    2016-01-01

    Phosphorylation of GluA1, a subunit of AMPA receptors (AMPARs), is critical for AMPAR synaptic trafficking and control of synaptic transmission. cGMP-dependent protein kinase II (cGKII) mediates this phosphorylation, and cGKII knockout (KO) affects GluA1 phosphorylation and alters animal behavior. Notably, GluA1 phosphorylation in the KO…

  7. Phosphorylation of Alzheimer disease amyloid precursor peptide by protein kinase C and Ca sup 2+ /calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II

    SciTech Connect

    Gandy, S.; Czernik, A.J.; Greengard, P. )

    1988-08-01

    The amino acid sequence of the Alzheimer disease amyloid precursor (ADAP) has been deduced from the corresponding cDNA, and hydropathy analysis of the sequence suggest a receptor-like structure with a single transmembrane domain. The putative cytoplasmic domain of ADAP contains potential sites for serine and threonine phosphorylation. In the present study, synthetic peptides derived from this domain were used as model substrates for various purified protein kinases. Protein kinase C rapidly catalyzed the phosphorylation of a peptide corresponding to amino acid residues 645-661 of ADAP. Ca{sup 2+}/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II phosphorylated ADAP peptide (645-661) on Thr-654 and Ser-655. Using rat cerebral cortex synaptosomes prelabeled with {sup 32}P{sub i}, a {sup 32}P-labeled phosphoprotein of {approx}135 kDa was immunoprecipitated by using antisera prepared against ADAP peptide(597-624), consistent with the possibility that the holoform of ADAP in rat brain is a phosphoprotein. Based on analogy with the effect of phosphorylation by protein kinase C of juxtamembrane residues in the cytoplasmic domain of the epidermal growth factor receptor and the interleukin 2 receptor, phosphorylation of ADAP may target it for internalization.

  8. A high-content EMT screen identifies multiple receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors with activity on TGFβ receptor.

    PubMed

    Lotz-Jenne, Carina; Lüthi, Urs; Ackerknecht, Sabine; Lehembre, François; Fink, Tobias; Stritt, Manuel; Wirth, Matthias; Pavan, Simona; Bill, Ruben; Regenass, Urs; Christofori, Gerhard; Meyer-Schaller, Nathalie

    2016-05-03

    An epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) enables epithelial tumor cells to break out of the primary tumor mass and to metastasize. Understanding the molecular mechanisms driving EMT in more detail will provide important tools to interfere with the metastatic process. To identify pharmacological modulators and druggable targets of EMT, we have established a novel multi-parameter, high-content, microscopy-based assay and screened chemical compounds with activities against known targets. Out of 3423 compounds, we have identified 19 drugs that block transforming growth factor beta (TGFβ)-induced EMT in normal murine mammary gland epithelial cells (NMuMG). The active compounds include inhibitors against TGFβ receptors (TGFBR), Rho-associated protein kinases (ROCK), myosin II, SRC kinase and uridine analogues. Among the EMT-repressing compounds, we identified a group of inhibitors targeting multiple receptor tyrosine kinases, and biochemical profiling of these multi-kinase inhibitors reveals TGFBR as a thus far unknown target of their inhibitory spectrum. These findings demonstrate the feasibility of a multi-parameter, high-content microscopy screen to identify modulators and druggable targets of EMT. Moreover, the newly discovered "off-target" effects of several receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors have important consequences for in vitro and in vivo studies and might beneficially contribute to the therapeutic effects observed in vivo.

  9. Type II cyclic guanosine monophosphate-dependent protein kinase inhibits Rac1 activation in gastric cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    WANG, YING; CHEN, YONGCHANG; WU, MIN; LAN, TING; WU, YAN; LI, YUEYING; QIAN, HAI

    2015-01-01

    Enhanced motility of cancer cells is a critical step in promoting tumor metastasis, which remains the major cause of gastric cancer-associated mortality. The small GTPase Rac1 is a key signaling component in the regulation of cell migration. Previous studies have demonstrated that Rac1 activity may be regulated by protein kinase G (PKG); however, the underlying mechanism is not yet clear. The current study aimed to investigate the effect of type II cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP)-dependent protein kinase (PKG II) on Rac1 activity. The human gastric cancer cell line AGS was infected with adenoviral constructs encoding PKG II to increase the expression of this enzyme, and treated with a cGMP analog (8-pCPT-cGMP) to induce its activation. A Transwell assay was employed to measure cell migration, and the activity of Rac1 was assessed using a pull-down assay. Immunoprecipitation was used to isolate the Rac1 protein. Phosphorylation of phosphatidylinositol 4,5 bisphosphate 3 kinase (PI3K) and its downstream effecter protein kinase B (Akt) are associated with lysophosphatidic acid (LPA)-induced motility/migration of cancer cells. Extracellular signal regulated kinase (ERK) is the major signaling molecule of the Mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) mediated signaling pathway. ERK and its upstream activator MAPK kinase (MEK) are also involved in LPA-induced motility/migration of cancer cells. Phosphorylation of PI3K/Akt, MEK/ERK and enriched Rac1 were detected by western blotting. The results revealed that blocking the activation of Rac1 by ectopically expressing an inactive Rac1 mutant (T17N) impeded LPA-induced cell migration. Increased PKG II activity inhibited LPA-induced migration and LPA-induced activation of Rac1; however, it had no effect on the phosphorylation of Rac1. PKG II also inhibited the activation of PI3K/Akt and MEK/ERK mediated signaling, which is important for LPA-induced Rac1 activation. These results suggest that PKG II affects LPA

  10. Novel roles for class II Phosphoinositide 3-Kinase C2β in signalling pathways involved in prostate cancer cell invasion

    PubMed Central

    Mavrommati, Ioanna; Cisse, Ouma; Falasca, Marco; Maffucci, Tania

    2016-01-01

    Phosphoinositide 3-kinases (PI3Ks) regulate several cellular functions such as proliferation, growth, survival and migration. The eight PI3K isoforms are grouped into three classes and the three enzymes belonging to the class II subfamily (PI3K-C2α, β and γ) are the least investigated amongst all PI3Ks. Interest on these isoforms has been recently fuelled by the identification of specific physiological roles for class II PI3Ks and by accumulating evidence indicating their involvement in human diseases. While it is now established that these isoforms can regulate distinct cellular functions compared to other PI3Ks, there is still a limited understanding of the signalling pathways that can be specifically regulated by class II PI3Ks. Here we show that PI3K-C2β regulates mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MEK1/2) and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK1/2) activation in prostate cancer (PCa) cells. We further demonstrate that MEK/ERK and PI3K-C2β are required for PCa cell invasion but not proliferation. In addition we show that PI3K-C2β but not MEK/ERK regulates PCa cell migration as well as expression of the transcription factor Slug. These data identify novel signalling pathways specifically regulated by PI3K-C2β and they further identify this enzyme as a key regulator of PCa cell migration and invasion. PMID:26983806

  11. Autophosphorylation of the C2 domain inhibits translocation of the novel protein kinase C (nPKC) Apl II.

    PubMed

    Farah, Carole A; Lindeman, Amanda A; Siu, Vincent; Gupta, Micaela Das; Sossin, Wayne S

    2012-11-01

    Protein kinase Cs (PKCs) are critical signaling molecules controlled by complex regulatory pathways. Herein, we describe an important regulatory role for C2 domain phosphorylation. Novel PKCs (nPKCs) contain an N-terminal C2 domain that cannot bind to calcium. Previously, we described an autophosphorylation site in the Aplysia novel PKC Apl II that increased the binding of the C2 domain to lipids. In this study, we show that the function of this phosphorylation is to inhibit PKC translocation. Indeed, a phosphomimetic serine-glutamic acid mutation reduced translocation of PKC Apl II while blocking phosphorylation with a serine-alanine mutation enhanced translocation and led to the persistence of the kinase at the membrane longer after the end of the stimulation. Consistent with a role for autophosphorylation in regulating kinase translocation, inhibiting PKC activity using bisindolymaleimide 1 increased physiological translocation of PKC Apl II, whereas inhibiting phosphatase activity using calyculin A inhibited physiological translocation of PKC Apl II in neurons. Our results suggest a major role for autophosphorylation-dependent regulation of translocation.

  12. Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent kinase II contributes to inhibitor of nuclear factor-kappa B kinase complex activation in Helicobacter pylori infection.

    PubMed

    Maubach, Gunter; Sokolova, Olga; Wolfien, Markus; Rothkötter, Hermann-Josef; Naumann, Michael

    2013-09-15

    Helicobacter pylori, a class I carcinogen, induces a proinflammatory response by activating the transcription factor nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) in gastric epithelial cells. This inflammatory condition could lead to chronic gastritis, which is epidemiologically and biologically linked to the development of gastric cancer. So far, there exists no clear knowledge on how H. pylori induces the NF-κB-mediated inflammatory response. In our study, we investigated the role of Ca(2+) /calmodulin-dependent kinase II (CAMKII), calmodulin, protein kinases C (PKCs) and the CARMA3-Bcl10-MALT1 (CBM) complex in conjunction with H. pylori-induced activation of NF-κB via the inhibitor of nuclear factor-kappa B kinase (IKK) complex. We use specific inhibitors and/or RNA interference to assess the contribution of these components. Our results show that CAMKII and calmodulin contribute to IKK complex activation and thus to the induction of NF-κB in response to H. pylori infection, but not in response to TNF-α. Thus, our findings are specific for H. pylori infected cells. Neither the PKCs α, δ, θ, nor the CBM complex itself is involved in the activation of NF-κB by H. pylori. The contribution of CAMKII and calmodulin, but not PKCs/CBM to the induction of an inflammatory response by H. pylori infection augment the understanding of the molecular mechanism involved and provide potential new disease markers for the diagnosis of gastric inflammatory diseases including gastric cancer.

  13. Diacylglycerol kinase theta is translocated and phosphoinositide 3-kinase-dependently activated by noradrenaline but not angiotensin II in intact small arteries.

    PubMed Central

    Walker, A J; Draeger, A; Houssa, B; van Blitterswijk , W J; Ohanian, V; Ohanian, J

    2001-01-01

    Diacylglycerol (DG) kinase (DGK) phosphorylates the lipid second messenger DG to phosphatidic acid. We reported previously that noradrenaline (NA), but not angiotensin II (AII), increases membrane-associated DGK activity in rat small arteries [Ohanian and Heagerty (1994) Biochem. J. 300, 51-56]. Here, we have identified this DGK activity as DGKtheta, present in both smooth muscle and endothelial cells of these small vessels. Subcellular fractionation of artery homogenates revealed that DGKtheta was present in nuclear, plasma membrane (and/or Golgi) and cytosolic fractions. Upon NA stimulation, DGKtheta translocated towards the membrane and cytosol (155 and 153% increases relative to the control, respectively) at 30 s, followed by a return to near-basal levels at 5 min; AII was without effect. Translocation to the membrane was to both Triton-soluble and -insoluble fractions. NA, but not AII, transiently increased DGKtheta activity in immunoprecipitates (126% at 60 s). Membrane translocation and DGKtheta activation were regulated differently: NA-induced DGKtheta activation, but not translocation, was dependent on transient activation of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI 3-K). In addition, DGK activity co-immunoprecipitated with protein kinase B, a downstream effector of PI 3-K, and was increased greatly by NA stimulation. The rapid and agonist-specific activation of DGKtheta suggests that this pathway may have a physiological role in vascular smooth-muscle responses. PMID:11115406

  14. In vivo creatine kinase reaction kinetics at rest and stress in type II diabetic rat heart

    PubMed Central

    Bashir, Adil; Coggan, Andrew R.; Gropler, Robert J.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The effects of type II diabetes on cardiac creatine kinase (CK) enzyme activity and/or flux are unknown. We therefore measured steady‐state phosphocreatine (PCr) and adenosine triphosphate (ATP) content and forward CK reaction kinetic parameters in Zucker Diabetic Fatty (ZDF) rat hearts, a type II diabetes research model. At baseline the PCr to ATP ratio (PCr/ATP) was significantly lower in diabetic heart when compared with matched controls (1.71 ± 0.21 vs. 2.26 ± 0.24, P < 0.01). Furthermore, the forward CK reaction rate constant (kf) was higher in diabetic animals (0.52 ± 0.09 s−1 vs. 0.35 ± 0.06 s−1, P < 0.01) and CK flux calculated as a product of PCr concentration ([PCr]) and kf was similar between two groups (4.32 ± 1.05 μmol/g/s vs. 4.94 ± 1.23 μmol/g/s, P = 0.20). Dobutamine administration resulted in similar increases in heart rate (~38%) and kf (~0.12 s−1) in both groups. No significant change in PCr and ATP content was observed with dobutamine. In summary, our data showed reduced PCr/ATP in diabetic myocardium as an indicator of cardiac energy deficit. The forward CK reaction rate constant is elevated at baseline which might reflect a compensatory mechanics to support energy flux through the CK shuttle and maintain constant ATP supply. When hearts were stimulated similar increase in kf was observed in both groups thus it seems that CK shuttle does not limit ATP supply for the range of workload studied. PMID:25626865

  15. Increased calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II activity by morphine-sensitization in rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Kadivar, Mehdi; Farahmandfar, Maryam; Ranjbar, Faezeh Esmaeli; Zarrindast, Mohammad-Reza

    2014-07-01

    Repeated exposure to drugs of abuse, such as morphine, elicits a progressive enhancement of drug-induced behavioral responses, a phenomenon termed behavioral sensitization. These changes in behavior may reflect long-lasting changes in some of the important molecules involved in memory processing such as calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII). In the present study, we investigated the effect of morphine sensitization on mRNA expression of α and β isoforms and activity of CaMKII in the hippocampus of male rats. Animals were treated for 3 days with saline or morphine (20mg/kg) and following a washout period of 5 days, a challenge dose of morphine (5mg/kg) were administered. The results indicate that morphine administration in pre-treated animals produces behavioral sensitization, as determined by significant increase in locomotion and oral stereotypy behavior. In addition, repeated morphine treatment increased mRNA expression of both α and β isoforms of CaMKII in the hippocampus. The present study also showed that induction of morphine sensitization significantly increased both Ca2+/calmodulin-independent and Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent activities of CaMK II in the rat hippocampus. However, acute administration of morphine (5mg/kg) did not alter either α and β CaMKII mRNA expression or CaMKII activity in the hippocampus. The stimulation effects of morphine sensitization on mRNA expression and activity of CaMKII were completely abolished by administration of naloxone, 30min prior to s.c. injections of morphine (20mg/kg/day×3 days). Our data demonstrated that induction of morphine sensitization could effectively modulate the activity and the mRNA expression of CaMKII in the hippocampus and this effect of morphine was exerted by the activation of opioid receptors.

  16. Physiological Role for Phosphatidic Acid in the Translocation of the Novel Protein Kinase C Apl II in Aplysia Neurons▿

    PubMed Central

    Farah, Carole A.; Nagakura, Ikue; Weatherill, Daniel; Fan, Xiaotang; Sossin, Wayne S.

    2008-01-01

    In Aplysia californica, the serotonin-mediated translocation of protein kinase C (PKC) Apl II to neuronal membranes is important for synaptic plasticity. The orthologue of PKC Apl II, PKCɛ, has been reported to require phosphatidic acid (PA) in conjunction with diacylglycerol (DAG) for translocation. We find that PKC Apl II can be synergistically translocated to membranes by the combination of DAG and PA. We identify a mutation in the C1b domain (arginine 273 to histidine; PKC Apl II-R273H) that removes the effects of exogenous PA. In Aplysia neurons, the inhibition of endogenous PA production by 1-butanol inhibited the physiological translocation of PKC Apl II by serotonin in the cell body and at the synapse but not the translocation of PKC Apl II-R273H. The translocation of PKC Apl II-R273H in the absence of PA was explained by two additional effects of this mutation: (i) the mutation removed C2 domain-mediated inhibition, and (ii) the mutation decreased the concentration of DAG required for PKC Apl II translocation. We present a model in which, under physiological conditions, PA is important to activate the novel PKC Apl II both by synergizing with DAG and removing C2 domain-mediated inhibition. PMID:18505819

  17. Phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase, MEK-1 and p38 mediate leptin/interferon-gamma synergistic NOS type II induction in chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Otero, Miguel; Lago, Rocío; Gómez, Rodolfo; Lago, Francisca; Gomez-Reino, Juan Jesús; Gualillo, Oreste

    2007-10-27

    In a previous study, we established that leptin acts synergistically with interferon-gamma in inducing nitric oxide synthase type II in cultured chondrocytes via Janus kinase-2 activation. However, the exact molecular mechanism that accounts for this synergism is not completely understood. The aim of the present study was to further delineate the signalling pathway used by leptin/interferon-gamma in the nitric oxide synthase type II induction in chondrocytes. Consequently, the roles of PI-3 kinase, MEK1 and p38 kinase were investigated using specific pharmacological inhibitors (Wortmannin, LY 294002, PD 098,059 and SB 203580). For this purpose, the amount of stable nitrite, the end product of NO generation by activated chondrocytes, has been evaluated by Griess colorimetric reaction in culture medium of human primary chondrocytes and in the murine ATDC5 cell line stimulated with leptin (400 nM) and interferon-gamma (1 ng/ml), alone or in combination. Specific inhibitors for PI-3K, MEK1 and p38 were added 1 h before stimulation. Nitric oxide synthase type II mRNA was investigated by real-time RT-PCR and NOS type II protein expression has been evaluated by western blot analysis. Our results showed that, as expected, leptin synergizes with IFN-gamma in inducing NO accumulation in the supernatant of co-stimulated cells. Pre-treatment with Wortmannin, LY 294002, PD 098,059 and SB 203580 caused a significant decrease in nitrite production, NOS type II protein expression and NOS type II mRNA expression induced by leptin and interferon-gamma co-stimulation. These findings were confirmed in 15 and 21-day differentiated ATDC5 cells, and in normal human primary chondrocytes. This is the first report showing that NOS type II induction triggered by co-stimulation with leptin and interferon-gamma is mediated by a signaling pathway involving PI-3K, MEK1 and p38.

  18. Role of rho kinase in the functional and dysfunctional tonic smooth muscles.

    PubMed

    de Godoy, Márcio A F; Rattan, Satish

    2011-07-01

    Tonic smooth muscles play pivotal roles in the pathophysiology of debilitating diseases of the gastrointestinal and cardiovascular systems. Tonic smooth muscles differ from phasic smooth muscles in the ability to spontaneously develop myogenic tone. This ability has been primarily attributed to the local production of specific neurohumoral substances that can work in conjunction with calcium sensitization via signal transduction events associated with the Ras homolog gene family, member A (RhoA)/Rho-associated, coiled-coil containing protein kinase 2 (ROCK II) pathways. In this article, we discuss the molecular pathways involved in the myogenic properties of tonic smooth muscles, particularly the contribution of protein kinase C vs the RhoA/ROCK II pathway in the genesis of basal tone, pathophysiology and novel therapeutic approaches for certain gastrointestinal and cardiovascular diseases. Emerging evidence suggests that manipulation of RhoA/ROCK II activity through inhibitors or silencing of RNA interface techniques could represent a new therapeutic approach for various gastrointestinal and cardiovascular diseases.

  19. Role of EGFR transactivation in angiotensin II signaling to extracellular regulated kinase in preglomerular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Andresen, Bradley T; Linnoila, Jenny J; Jackson, Edwin K; Romero, Guillermo G

    2003-03-01

    Angiotensin (Ang) II promotes the phosphorylation of extracellular regulated kinase (ERK); however, the mechanisms leading to Ang II-induced ERK phosphorylation are debated. The currently accepted theory involves transactivation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). We have shown that generation of phosphatidic acid (PA) is required for the recruitment of Raf to membranes and the activation of ERK by multiple agonists, including Ang II. In the present report, we confirm that phospholipase D-dependent generation of PA is required for Ang II-mediated phosphorylation of ERK in Wistar-Kyoto and spontaneously hypertensive rat preglomerular smooth muscle cells (PGSMCs). However, EGF stimulation does not activate phospholipase D or generate PA. These observations indicate that EGF recruits Raf to membranes via a mechanism that does not involve PA, and thus, Ang II-mediated phosphorylation of ERK is partially independent of EGFR-mediated signaling cascades. We hypothesized that phosphoinositide-3-kinase (PI3K) can also act to recruit Raf to membranes; therefore, inhibition of PI3K should inhibit EGF signaling to ERK. Wortmannin, a PI3K inhibitor, inhibited EGF-mediated phosphorylation of ERK (IC50, approximately 14 nmol/L). To examine the role of the EGFR in Ang II-mediated phosphorylation of ERK we utilized 100 nmol/L wortmannin to inhibit EGFR signaling to ERK and T19N RhoA to block Ang II-mediated ERK phosphorylation. Wortmannin treatment inhibited EGF-mediated but not Ang II-mediated phosphorylation of ERK. Furthermore, T19N RhoA inhibited Ang II-mediated ERK phosphorylation, whereas T19N RhoA had significantly less effect on EGF-mediated ERK phosphorylation. We conclude that transactivation of the EGFR is not primarily responsible for Ang II-mediated activation of ERK in PGSMCs.

  20. Calmodulin-dependent kinase II regulates osteoblast differentiation through regulation of Osterix.

    PubMed

    Choi, You Hee; Choi, Jun-Ha; Oh, Jae-Wook; Lee, Kwang-Youl

    2013-03-08

    Osterix (Osx), a zinc-finger transcription factor, is required for osteoblast differentiation and new bone formation during embryonic development. Calmodulin-dependent kinase II (CaMKII) acts as a key regulator of osteoblast differentiation. However, the precise molecular signaling mechanisms between Osterix and CaMKII are not known. In this study, we focused on the relationship between Osterix and CaMKII during osteoblast differentiation. We examined the role of the CaMKII pathway in the regulation of protein levels and its transcriptional activity on Osterix. We showed that CaMKII interacts with Osterix by increasing the protein levels and enhancing the transcriptional activity of Osterix. Conversely, CaMKII inhibitor KN-93 decreases the protein levels and increases the stability of Osterix. The siRNA-mediated knockdown of CaMKII decreased the protein levels and transcriptional activity of Osterix. These results suggest that Osterix is a novel target of CaMKII and the activity of Osterix can be modulated by a novel mechanism involving CaMKII during osteoblast differentiation.

  1. Hunting increases phosphorylation of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase type II in adult barn owls.

    PubMed

    Nichols, Grant S; DeBello, William M

    2015-01-01

    Juvenile barn owls readily adapt to prismatic spectacles, whereas adult owls living under standard aviary conditions do not. We previously demonstrated that phosphorylation of the cyclic-AMP response element-binding protein (CREB) provides a readout of the instructive signals that guide plasticity in juveniles. Here we investigated phosphorylation of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (pCaMKII) in both juveniles and adults. In contrast to CREB, we found no differences in pCaMKII expression between prism-wearing and control juveniles within the external nucleus of the inferior colliculus (ICX), the major site of plasticity. For prism-wearing adults that hunted live mice and are capable of adaptation, expression of pCaMKII was increased relative to prism-wearing adults that fed passively on dead mice and are not capable of adaptation. This effect did not bear the hallmarks of instructive information: it was not localized to rostral ICX and did not exhibit a patchy distribution reflecting discrete bimodal stimuli. These data are consistent with a role for CaMKII as a permissive rather than an instructive factor. In addition, the paucity of pCaMKII expression in passively fed adults suggests that the permissive default setting is "off" in adults.

  2. Regulation of gastrointestinal motility by Ca2+/calmodulin-stimulated protein kinase II.

    PubMed

    Perrino, Brian A

    2011-06-15

    Gastrointestinal (GI) motility ultimately depends upon the contractile activity of the smooth muscle cells of the tunica muscularis. Integrated functioning of multiple tissues and cell types, including enteric neurons and interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC) is necessary to generate coordinated patterns of motor activity that control the movement of material through the digestive tract. The neurogenic mechanisms that govern GI motility patterns are superimposed upon intrinsic myogenic mechanisms regulating smooth muscle cell excitability. Several mechanisms regulate smooth muscle cell responses to neurogenic inputs, including the multifunctional Ca(2+)/calmodulin-stimulated protein kinase II (CaMKII). CaMKII can be activated by Ca(2+) transients from both extracellular and intracellular sources. Prolonging the activities of Ca(2+)-sensitive K(+) channels in the plasma membrane of GI smooth muscle cells is an important regulatory mechanism carried out by CaMKII. Phospholamban (PLN) phosphorylation by CaMKII activates the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca(2+)-ATPase (SERCA), increasing both the rate of Ca(2+) clearance from the myoplasm and the frequency of localized Ca(2+) release events from intracellular stores. Overall, CaMKII appears to moderate GI smooth muscle cell excitability. Finally, transcription factor activities may be facilitated by the neutralization of HDAC4 by CaMKII phosphorylation, which may contribute to the phenotypic plasticity of GI smooth muscle cells.

  3. Calcium/calmodulin kinase II activity of hippocampus in kainate-induced epilepsy.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, M. C.; Ban, S. S.; Woo, Y. J.; Kim, S. U.

    2001-01-01

    This study investigated calcium/calmodulin kinase II (CaMKII) activity related to long-standing neuronal injury of the hippocampus in kainate (KA)-induced experimental temporal lobe epilepsy. Epileptic seizure was induced by injection of KA (1 microg/microL) dissolved in phosphate buffer (0.1 M, pH 7.4) into the left amygdala. Clinical seizures, histopathologic changes and CaMKII activity of the hippocampus were evaluated. Characteristic early limbic and late seizures were developed. Hippocampal CaMKII activity increased significantly 4 and 8 weeks after intra-amygdaloid injection of KA, when late seizures developed. The histopathologic changes of the hippocampus included swelling of neuronal cytoplasm with nuclear pyknosis and loss of neurons in CA3 during this period. The increased activity of CaMKII may correlate with appearance of distant damage in the hippocampus. The above results indicate that intra-amygdaloid injection of KA produces excitatory signals for ipsilateral CA3 neurons in the hippocampus and that subsequently increased levels of CaMKII in postsynaptic neurons induce neuronal injury via phosphorylation of N-methyl-D-aspartate type glutamate receptor. PMID:11641537

  4. Syndecan-2 regulates melanin synthesis via protein kinase C βII-mediated tyrosinase activation.

    PubMed

    Jung, Hyejung; Chung, Heesung; Chang, Sung Eun; Choi, Sora; Han, Inn-Oc; Kang, Duk-Hee; Oh, Eok-Soo

    2014-05-01

    Syndecan-2, a transmembrane heparan sulfate proteoglycan that is highly expressed in melanoma cells, regulates melanoma cell functions (e.g. migration). Since melanoma is a malignant tumor of melanocytes, which largely function to synthesize melanin, we investigated the possible involvement of syndecan-2 in melanogenesis. Syndecan-2 expression was increased in human skin melanoma tissues compared with normal skin. In both mouse and human melanoma cells, siRNA-mediated knockdown of syndecan-2 was associated with reduced melanin synthesis, whereas overexpression of syndecan-2 increased melanin synthesis. Similar effects were also detected in human primary epidermal melanocytes. Syndecan-2 expression did not affect the expression of tyrosinase, a key enzyme in melanin synthesis, but instead enhanced the enzymatic activity of tyrosinase by increasing the membrane and melanosome localization of its regulator, protein kinaseII. Furthermore, UVB caused increased syndecan-2 expression, and this up-regulation of syndecan-2 was required for UVB-induced melanin synthesis. Taken together, these data suggest that syndecan-2 regulates melanin synthesis and could be a potential therapeutic target for treating melanin-associated diseases.

  5. C-terminal Src Kinase Gates Homeostatic Synaptic Plasticity and Regulates Fasciclin II Expression at the Drosophila Neuromuscular Junction

    PubMed Central

    Spring, Ashlyn M.; Brusich, Douglas J.; Frank, C. Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Forms of homeostatic plasticity stabilize neuronal outputs and promote physiologically favorable synapse function. A well-studied homeostatic system operates at the Drosophila melanogaster larval neuromuscular junction (NMJ). At the NMJ, impairment of postsynaptic glutamate receptor activity is offset by a compensatory increase in presynaptic neurotransmitter release. We aim to elucidate how this process operates on a molecular level and is preserved throughout development. In this study, we identified a tyrosine kinase-driven signaling system that sustains homeostatic control of NMJ function. We identified C-terminal Src Kinase (Csk) as a potential regulator of synaptic homeostasis through an RNAi- and electrophysiology-based genetic screen. We found that Csk loss-of-function mutations impaired the sustained expression of homeostatic plasticity at the NMJ, without drastically altering synapse growth or baseline neurotransmission. Muscle-specific overexpression of Src Family Kinase (SFK) substrates that are negatively regulated by Csk also impaired NMJ homeostasis. Surprisingly, we found that transgenic Csk-YFP can support homeostatic plasticity at the NMJ when expressed either in the muscle or in the nerve. However, only muscle-expressed Csk-YFP was able to localize to NMJ structures. By immunostaining, we found that Csk mutant NMJs had dysregulated expression of the Neural Cell Adhesion Molecule homolog Fasciclin II (FasII). By immunoblotting, we found that levels of a specific isoform of FasII were decreased in homeostatically challenged GluRIIA mutant animals–but markedly increased in Csk mutant animals. Additionally, we found that postsynaptic overexpression of FasII from its endogenous locus was sufficient to impair synaptic homeostasis, and genetically reducing FasII levels in Csk mutants fully restored synaptic homeostasis. Based on these data, we propose that Csk and its SFK substrates impinge upon homeostatic control of NMJ function by regulating

  6. Theileria-mediated constitutive expression of the casein kinase II-alpha subunit in bovine lymphoblastoid cells.

    PubMed

    Shayan, P; Ahmed, J S

    1997-01-01

    Theileria-infected cells are induced to undergo a transformation that is reversible, since their proliferation is inhibited after elimination of the schizonts by the theilericidal drug buparvaquone. The molecular mechanisms of the transformation remain unknown. The experiments described in the present report deal with the role of casein kinase (CK) II, a serine/threonine protein kinase, in the permanent proliferation of the parasitized cells and show that the CK II-alpha subunit is expressed in both T. annulata- and T. parva-infected cells and that its expression is closely related to the presence of the parasites in the host-cell cytoplasm. Thus, elimination of the schizonts by buparvaquone leads to the inhibition of CK II-alpha subunit mRNA expression without affecting the expression of actin. Cells treated with 5,6-dichloro-1-beta-D-ribofuranosylbenzimidazole (DRB) are inhibited in a dose-dependent manner from under-going DNA synthesis as measured by [3H]-thymidine incorporation and from expressing CK II. Furthermore, a host-cell-specific CK II-alpha antisense inhibits DNA synthesis in a dose-dependent manner. In the present study, 6 microM antisense reduced [3H]-thymidine incorporation by Theileria-infected bovine cells to about 50%. Using a primer derived from T. parva CK II, we detected a parasite-specific CK II mRNA in T. parva-infected cell lines. Interestingly. DRB also inhibited the expression of the parasite-specific CK II. However, to date we have not detected a target sequence for this primer in T. annulata schizonts.

  7. Identification of peptides in wheat germ hydrolysate that demonstrate calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II inhibitory activity.

    PubMed

    Kumrungsee, Thanutchaporn; Akiyama, Sayaka; Guo, Jian; Tanaka, Mitsuru; Matsui, Toshiro

    2016-12-15

    Hydrolysis of wheat germ by proteases resulted in bioactive peptides that demonstrated an inhibitory effect against the vasoconstrictive Ca(2+)-calmodulin (CaM)-dependent protein kinase II (CaMK II). The hydrolysate by thermolysin (1.0wt%, 5h) showed a particularly potent CaMK II inhibition. As a result of mixed mode high-performance liquid chromatography of thermolysin hydrolysate with pH elution gradient ranging between 4.8 and 8.9, the fraction eluted at pH 8.9 was the most potent CaMK II inhibitor. From this fraction, Trp-Val and Trp-Ile were identified as CaMK II inhibitors. In Sprague-Dawley rats, an enhanced aortic CaMK II activity by 1μM phenylephrine was significantly (p<0.05) suppressed by 15-min incubation with 300μM Trp-Val or Trp-Ile. On the basis of Ca(2+)-chelating fluorescence and CaMK II activity assays, it was concluded that Trp-Val and Trp-Ile competed with Ca(2+)-CaM complex to bind to CaMK II with Ki values of 5.4 and 3.6μM, respectively.

  8. Angiotensin II stimulates renal proximal tubule Na(+)-ATPase activity through the activation of protein kinase C.

    PubMed

    Rangel, L B A; Caruso-Neves, C; Lara, L S; Lopes, A G

    2002-08-31

    Recently, our group described an AT(1)-mediated direct stimulatory effect of angiotensin II (Ang II) on the Na(+)-ATPase activity of proximal tubules basolateral membranes (BLM) [Am. J. Physiol. 248 (1985) F621]. Data in the present report suggest the participation of a protein kinase C (PKC) in the molecular mechanism of Ang II-mediated stimulation of the Na(+)-ATPase activity due to the following observations: (i) the stimulation of protein phosphorylation in BLM, induced by Ang II, is mimicked by the PKC activator TPA, and is completely reversed by the specific PKC inhibitor, calphostin C; (ii) the Na(+)-ATPase activity is stimulated by Ang II and TPA in the same magnitude, being these effects abolished by the use of the PKC inhibitors, calphostin C and sphingosine; (iii) the Na(+)-ATPase activity is activated by catalytic subunit of PKC (PKC-M), in a similar and nonadditive manner to Ang II; and (iv) Ang II stimulates the phosphorylation of MARCKS, a specific substrate for PKC.

  9. Calmodulin kinase II is required for fight or flight sinoatrial node physiology.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yuejin; Gao, Zhan; Chen, Biyi; Koval, Olha M; Singh, Madhu V; Guan, Xiaoqun; Hund, Thomas J; Kutschke, William; Sarma, Satyam; Grumbach, Isabella M; Wehrens, Xander H T; Mohler, Peter J; Song, Long-Sheng; Anderson, Mark E

    2009-04-07

    The best understood "fight or flight" mechanism for increasing heart rate (HR) involves activation of a cyclic nucleotide-gated ion channel (HCN4) by beta-adrenergic receptor (betaAR) agonist stimulation. HCN4 conducts an inward "pacemaker" current (I(f)) that increases the sinoatrial nodal (SAN) cell membrane diastolic depolarization rate (DDR), leading to faster SAN action potential generation. Surprisingly, HCN4 knockout mice were recently shown to retain physiological HR increases with isoproterenol (ISO), suggesting that other I(f)-independent pathways are critical to SAN fight or flight responses. The multifunctional Ca(2+) and calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) is a downstream signal in the betaAR pathway that activates Ca(2+) homeostatic proteins in ventricular myocardium. Mice with genetic, myocardial and SAN cell CaMKII inhibition have significantly slower HRs than controls during stress, leading us to hypothesize that CaMKII actions on SAN Ca(2+) homeostasis are critical for betaAR agonist responses in SAN. Here we show that CaMKII mediates ISO HR increases by targeting SAN cell Ca(2+) homeostasis. CaMKII inhibition prevents ISO effects on SAN Ca(2+) uptake and release from intracellular sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) stores that are necessary for increasing DDR. CaMKII inhibition has no effect on the ISO response in SAN cells when SR Ca(2+) release is disabled and CaMKII inhibition is only effective at slowing HRs during betaAR stimulation. These studies show the tightly coupled, but previously unanticipated, relationship of CaMKII to the betaAR pathway in fight or flight physiology and establish CaMKII as a critical signaling molecule for physiological HR responses to catecholamines.

  10. Reduced Arrhythmia Inducibility with Calcium/Calmodulin-Dependent Protein Kinase II Inhibition in Heart Failure Rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Hoeker, Gregory S.; Hanafy, Mohamed A.; Oster, Robert A.; Bers, Donald M.; Pogwizd, Steven M.

    2015-01-01

    Rationale Calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) is activated in heart failure (HF) and can contribute to arrhythmias induced by β-adrenergic receptor-mediated sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium leak. Objective To evaluate the effect of CaMKII inhibition on ventricular tachycardia (VT) induction in conscious HF and naïve rabbits. Methods and Results Nonischemic HF was induced by aortic insufficiency and constriction. Electrocardiograms were recorded in rabbits pretreated with vehicle (saline) or the CaMKII inhibitor KN-93 (300 μg/kg); VT was induced by infusion of increasing doses of norepinephrine (NE, 1.56-25 μg/kg/min) in naïve (n = 8) and HF (n = 7) rabbits. With saline, median VT dose threshold in HF was 6.25 versus 12.5 μg/kg/min NE in naïve rabbits (p = 0.06). Pretreatment with KN-93 significantly increased VT threshold in HF and naïve rabbits (median = 25 μg/kg/min, p < 0.05 versus saline for both groups). Mean cycle length of VT initiation was shorter in HF (221 ± 20 ms) than naïve (296 ± 23 ms, p < 0.05) rabbits with saline; this difference was not significant after treatment with KN-93. Conclusions KN-93 significantly reduced arrhythmia inducibility and slowed initiation of VT, suggesting that CaMKII inhibition may have antiarrhythmic effects in the failing human heart. PMID:26650851

  11. Function of cGMP-dependent protein kinase II in volume load-induced diuresis.

    PubMed

    Schramm, Andrea; Schinner, Elisabeth; Huettner, Johannes P; Kees, Frieder; Tauber, Philipp; Hofmann, Franz; Schlossmann, Jens

    2014-10-01

    Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP)/cGMPs cause diuresis and natriuresis. Their downstream effectors beyond cGMP remain unclear. To elucidate a probable function of cGMP-dependent protein kinase II (cGKII), we investigated renal parameters in different conditions (basal, salt diets, starving, water load) using a genetically modified mouse model (cGKII-KO), but did not detect any striking differences between WT and cGKII-KO. Thus, cGKII is proposed to play only a marginal role in the adjustment of renal concentration ability to varying salt loads without water restriction or starving conditions. When WT mice were subjected to a volume load (performed by application of a 10-mM glucose solution (3% of BW) via feeding needle), they exhibited a potent diuresis. In contrast, urine volume was decreased significantly in cGKII-KO. We showed that AQP2 plasma membrane (PM) abundance was reduced for about 50% in WT upon volume load, therefore, this might be a main cause for the enhanced diuresis. In contrast, cGKII-KO mice almost completely failed to decrease AQP2-PM distribution. This significant difference between both genotypes is not induced by an altered p-Ser256-AQP2 phosphorylation, as phosphorylation at this site decreases similarly in WT and KO. Furthermore, sodium excretion was lowered in cGKII-KO mice during volume load. In summary, cGKII is only involved to a minor extent in the regulation of basal renal concentration ability. By contrast, cGKII-KO mice are not able to handle an acute volume load. Our results suggest that membrane insertion of AQP2 is inhibited by cGMP/cGKII.

  12. Behavioral modulation of neuronal calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II activity: differential effects on nicotine-induced spinal and supraspinal antinociception in mice.

    PubMed

    Damaj, M Imad

    2007-10-15

    Recent studies have implicated the involvement of Ca(2+)-dependent mechanisms, in particular calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaM kinase II) in nicotine-induced antinociception using the tail-flick test. The spinal cord was suggested as a possible site of this involvement. The present study was undertaken to investigate the hypothesis that similar mechanisms exist for nicotine-induced antinociception in the hot-plate test, a response thought to be centrally mediated. In order to assess these mechanisms, i.c.v. administered CaM kinase II inhibitors were evaluated for their effects on antinociception produced by either i.c.v. or s.c. administration of nicotine in both tests. In addition, nicotine's analgesic effects were tested in mice lacking half of their CaM kinase II (CaM kinase II heterozygous) and compare it to their wild-type counterparts. Our results showed that although structurally unrelated CaM kinase II inhibitors blocked nicotine's effects in the tail-flick test in a dose-related manner, they failed to block the hot-plate responses. In addition, the antinociceptive effects of systemic nicotine in the tail-flick but not the hot-plate test were significantly reduced in CaM kinase II heterozygous mice. These observations indicate that in contrast to the tail-flick response, the mechanism of nicotine-induced antinociception in the hot-plate test is not mediated primarily via CaM kinase II-dependent mechanisms at the supraspinal level.

  13. Rho-kinase inhibitor reduces hypersensitivity to ANG II in human mesenteric arteries retrieved and conserved under the same conditions as transplanted organs.

    PubMed

    Szadujkis-Szadurski, Rafal; Slupski, Maciej; Szadujkis-Szadurska, Katarzyna; Szadujkis-Szadurski, Leszek; Jasinski, Milosz; Grzesk, Grzegorz; Grzesk, Elżbieta; Woderska, Aleksandra; Wlodarczyk, Zbigniew

    2014-08-22

    Rho-kinase and GTP-ase Rho are important regulators of vascular tone and blood pressure. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of Rho-kinase in artery reactions induced by angiotensin II (ANG II) and the effects of ischemia-reperfusion injury as well as the function of intra- and extracellular calcium in these reactions. Experiments were performed on mesenteric superior arteries procured from cadaveric organ donors and conserved under the same conditions as transplanted kidneys. The vascular contraction in reaction to ANG II was measured in the presence of Rho-kinase inhibitor Y-27632, after ischemia and reperfusion, in Ca2+ and Ca2+-free solution. The maximal response to ANG II was reduced after ischemia, while an increase was observed after reperfusion. Vascular contraction induced by ANG II was decreased by Y-27632. Y-27632 reduced vascular contraction after reperfusion, both in Ca2+ and Ca2+-free solution. Reperfusion augments vascular contraction in reaction to ANG II. The Rho-kinase inhibitor Y-27632 reduces the hypersensitivity to ANG II after reperfusion mediated by both intra- and extracellular calcium. These results confirm the role of Rho-kinase in receptor-independent function of ANG II and in reperfusion-induced hypersensitivity.

  14. 2,5-hexanedione (HD) treatment alters calmodulin, Ca{sup 2+}/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II, and protein kinase C in rats' nerve tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Qingshan Hou Liyan; Zhang Cuili; Zhao Xiulan; Yu Sufang; Xie, Ke-Qin

    2008-10-01

    Calcium-dependent mechanisms, particularly those mediated by Ca{sup 2+}/calmodulin (CaM)-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII), have been implicated in neurotoxicant-induced neuropathy. However, it is unknown whether similar mechanisms exist in 2,5-hexanedione (HD)-induced neuropathy. For that, we investigated the changes of CaM, CaMKII, protein kinase C (PKC) and polymerization ratios (PRs) of NF-L, NF-M and NF-H in cerebral cortex (CC, including total cortex and some gray), spinal cord (SC) and sciatic nerve (SN) of rats treated with HD at a dosage of 1.75 or 3.50 mmol/kg for 8 weeks (five times per week). The results showed that CaM contents in CC, SC and SN were significantly increased, which indicated elevation of Ca{sup 2+} concentrations in nerve tissues. CaMKII contents and activities were also increased in CC and were positively correlated with gait abnormality, but it could not be found in SC and SN. The increases of PKC contents and activities were also observed in SN and were positively correlated with gait abnormality. Except for that of NF-M in CC, the PRs of NF-L, NF-M and NF-H were also elevated in nerve tissues, which was consistent with the activation of protein kinases. The results suggested that CaMKII might be partly (in CC but not in SC and SN) involved in HD-induced neuropathy. CaMKII and PKC might mediate the HD neurotoxicity by altering the NF phosphorylation status and PRs.

  15. Myristoylated alanine-rich C kinase substrate, but not Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II, is the mediator in cortical granules exocytosis.

    PubMed

    Tsaadon, Lina; Kaplan-Kraicer, Ruth; Shalgi, Ruth

    2008-05-01

    Sperm-egg fusion induces cortical granules exocytosis (CGE), a process that ensures the block to polyspermy. CGE can be induced independently by either a rise in intracellular calcium concentration or protein kinase C (PKC) activation. We have previously shown that myristoylated alanine-rich C kinase substrate (MARCKS) cross-links filamentous actin (F-actin) and regulates its reorganization. This activity is reduced either by PKC-induced MARCKS phosphorylation (PKC pathway) or by its direct binding to calmodulin (CaM; CaM pathway), both inducing MARCKS translocation, F-actin reorganization, and CGE. Currently, we examine the involvement of Ca(2)(+)/CaM-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) and MARCKS in promoting CGE and show that PKC pathway can compensate for lack of Ca(2)(+)/CaM pathway. Microinjecting eggs with either overexpressed protein or complementary RNA of constitutively active alphaCaMKII triggered resumption of second meiotic division, but induced CGE of an insignificant magnitude compared with CGE induced by wt alphaCaMKII. Microinjecting eggs with mutant-unphosphorylatable MARCKS reduced the intensity of 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate or ionomycin-induced CGE by 50%, indicating that phosphorylation of MARCKS by novel and/or conventional PKCs (n/cPKCs) is a pivotal event associated with CGE. Moreover, we were able to demonstrate cPKCs involvement in ionomycin-induced MARCKS translocation and CGE. These results led us to propose that MARCKS, rather than CaMKII, as a key mediator of CGE.

  16. Targeting of a novel Ca+2/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II is essential for extracellular signal-regulated kinase-mediated signaling in differentiated smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Marganski, William A; Gangopadhyay, Samudra S; Je, Hyun-Dong; Gallant, Cynthia; Morgan, Kathleen G

    2005-09-16

    Subcellular targeting of kinases controls their activation and access to substrates. Although Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) is known to regulate differentiated smooth muscle cell (dSMC) contractility, the importance of targeting in this regulation is not clear. The present study investigated the function in dSMCs of a novel variant of the gamma isoform of CaMKII that contains a potential targeting sequence in its association domain (CaMKIIgamma G-2). Antisense knockdown of CaMKIIgamma G-2 inhibited extracellular signal-related kinase (ERK) activation, myosin phosphorylation, and contractile force in dSMCs. Confocal colocalization analysis revealed that in unstimulated dSMCs CaMKIIgamma G-2 is bound to a cytoskeletal scaffold consisting of interconnected vimentin intermediate filaments and cytosolic dense bodies. On activation with a depolarizing stimulus, CaMKIIgamma G-2 is released into the cytosol and subsequently targeted to cortical dense plaques. Comparison of phosphorylation and translocation time courses indicates that, after CaMKIIgamma G-2 activation, and before CaMKIIgamma G-2 translocation, vimentin is phosphorylated at a CaMKII-specific site. Differential centrifugation demonstrated that phosphorylation of vimentin in dSMCs is not sufficient to cause its disassembly, in contrast to results in cultured cells. Loading dSMCs with a decoy peptide containing the polyproline sequence within the association domain of CaMKIIgamma G-2 inhibited targeting. Furthermore, prevention of CaMKIIgamma G-2 targeting led to significant inhibition of ERK activation as well as contractility. Thus, for the first time, this study demonstrates the importance of CaMKII targeting in dSMC signaling and identifies a novel targeting function for the association domain in addition to its known role in oligomerization.

  17. Protein kinase A type II-α regulatory subunit regulates the response of prostate cancer cells to taxane treatment

    PubMed Central

    Zynda, Evan R; Matveev, Vitaliy; Makhanov, Michael; Chenchik, Alexander; Kandel, Eugene S

    2014-01-01

    In the last decade taxane-based therapy has emerged as a standard of care for hormone-refractory prostate cancer. Nevertheless, a significant fraction of tumors show no appreciable response to the treatment, while the others develop resistance and recur. Despite years of intense research, the mechanisms of taxane resistance in prostate cancer and other malignancies are poorly understood and remain a topic of intense investigation. We have used improved mutagenesis via random insertion of a strong promoter to search for events, which enable survival of prostate cancer cells after Taxol exposure. High-throughput mapping of the integration sites pointed to the PRKAR2A gene, which codes for a type II-α regulatory subunit of protein kinase A, as a candidate modulator of drug response. Both full-length and N-terminally truncated forms of the PRKAR2A gene product markedly increased survival of prostate cancer cells lines treated with Taxol and Taxotere. Suppression of protein kinase A enzymatic activity is the likely mechanism of action of the overexpressed proteins. Accordingly, protein kinase A inhibitor PKI (6–22) amide reduced toxicity of Taxol to prostate cancer cells. Our findings support the role of protein kinase A and its constituent proteins in cell response to chemotherapy. PMID:25485509

  18. Role of Calmodulin-Calmodulin Kinase II, cAMP/Protein Kinase A and ERK 1/2 on Aeromonas hydrophila-Induced Apoptosis of Head Kidney Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Chaitali; Khatri, Preeti; Raman, Rajagopal; Bhatia, Himanshi; Datta, Malabika; Mazumder, Shibnath

    2014-01-01

    The role of calcium (Ca2+) and its dependent protease calpain in Aeromonas hydrophila-induced head kidney macrophage (HKM) apoptosis has been reported. Here, we report the pro-apoptotic involvement of calmodulin (CaM) and calmodulin kinase II gamma (CaMKIIg) in the process. We observed significant increase in CaM levels in A. hydrophila-infected HKM and the inhibitory role of BAPTA/AM, EGTA, nifedipine and verapamil suggested CaM elevation to be Ca2+-dependent. Our studies with CaM-specific siRNA and the CaM inhibitor calmidazolium chloride demonstrated CaM to be pro-apoptotic that initiated the downstream expression of CaMKIIg. Using the CaMKIIg-targeted siRNA, specific inhibitor KN-93 and its inactive structural analogue KN-92 we report CaM-CaMKIIg signalling to be critical for apoptosis of A. hydrophila-infected HKM. Inhibitor studies further suggested the role of calpain-2 in CaMKIIg expression. CaMK Kinase (CaMKK), the other CaM dependent kinase exhibited no role in A. hydrophila-induced HKM apoptosis. We report increased production of intracellular cAMP in infected HKM and our results with KN-93 or KN-92 implicate the role of CaMKIIg in cAMP production. Using siRNA to PKACA, the catalytic subunit of PKA, anti-PKACA antibody and H-89, the specific inhibitor for PKA we prove the pro-apoptotic involvement of cAMP/PKA pathway in the pathogenicity of A. hydrophila. Our inhibitor studies coupled with siRNA approach further implicated the role of cAMP/PKA in activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1 and 2 (ERK 1/2). We conclude that the alteration in intracellular Ca2+ levels initiated by A. hydrophila activates CaM and calpain-2; both pathways converge on CaMKIIg which in turn induces cAMP/PKA mediated ERK 1/2 phosphorylation leading to caspase-3 mediated apoptosis of infected HKM. PMID:24763432

  19. Calcium/calmodulin dependent protein kinase II regulates the phosphorylation of cyclic AMP-responsive element-binding protein of spinal cord in rats following noxious stimulation.

    PubMed

    Fang, Li; Wu, Jing; Zhang, Xuan; Lin, Qing; Willis, William D

    2005-02-01

    We have previously reported that intradermal capsaicin injection causes the phosphorylation of cyclic adenosine monophosphate-responsive element-binding protein (CREB) in the spinal cord of rats. The present study was designed to investigate the role of calcium/camodulin protein dependent protein kinase II (CaM kinase II) in the regulation of phosphorylation of CREB after capsaicin injection. We found that capsaicin injection produces a significant upregulation of phosphorylated CREB in the spinal cord of rat. Intrathecal treatment with a CaM kinase II inhibitor, KN-93, significantly blocked the increased phosphorylation of CREB, but did not affect the CREB protein itself. These results suggest that increased phosphorylation of CREB protein may contribute to central sensitization following acute peripheral noxious stimuli, and the effect may be regulated through the activation of CaM kinase cascades.

  20. Protein kinase C phosphorylates topoisomerase II: topoisomerase activation and its possible role in phorbol ester-induced differentiation of HL-60 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sahyoun, N.; Wolf, M.; Besterman, J.; Hsieh, T.S.; Sander, M.; LeVine H. III; Chang, K.J.; Cuatrecasas, P.

    1986-03-01

    DNA topoisomerase II from Drosophila was phosphorylated effectively by protein kinase C. With a K/sub m/ of about 100 nM, the reaction was rapid, occurring at 4/sup 0/C as well as at 30/sup 0/C and requiring as little as 0.6 ng of the protein kinase per 170 ng of topoisomerase. About 0.85 mol of phosphate could be incorporated per mol of topoisomerase II, with phosphoserine as the only phospho amino acid produced. The reaction was dependent on Ca/sup 2 +/ and phosphatidylserine and was stimulated by phorbol esters. Calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II, but not cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase, was also able to phosphorylate the topoisomerase. Phosphorylation of topoisomerase II by protein kinase C resulted in appreciable activation of the topoisomerase, suggesting that it may represent a possible target for the regulation of nuclear events by protein kinase C. This possibility is supported by the finding that the phorbol ester-induced differentiation of HL-60 cells was blocked by the topoisomerase II inhibitors novobiocin and 4'-(9-acridinylamino)methanesulfon-m-anisidide (m-AMSA), but not by the inactive analog o-AMSA.

  1. Particulate air pollution induces arrhythmia via oxidative stress and calcium calmodulin kinase II activation

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Jin-Bae; Kim, Changsoo; Choi, Eunmi; Park, Sanghoon; Park, Hyelim; Pak, Hui-Nam; Lee, Moon-Hyoung; Shin, Dong Chun; Hwang, Ki-Chul; Joung, Boyoung

    2012-02-15

    Ambient particulate matter (PM) can increase the incidence of arrhythmia. However, the arrhythmogenic mechanism of PM is poorly understood. This study investigated the arrhythmogenic mechanism of PM. In Sprague–Dawley rats, QT interval was increased from 115.0 ± 14.0 to 142.1 ± 18.4 ms (p = 0.02) after endotracheal exposure of DEP (200 μg/ml for 30 min, n = 5). Ventricular premature contractions were more frequently observed after DEP exposure (100%) than baseline (20%, p = 0.04). These effects were prevented by pretreatment of N-acetylcysteine (NAC, 5 mmol/L, n = 3). In 12 Langendorff-perfused rat hearts, DEP infusion of 12.5 μg/ml for 20 min prolonged action potential duration (APD) at only left ventricular base increasing apicobasal repolarization gradients. Spontaneous early afterdepolarization (EAD) and ventricular tachycardia (VT) were observed in 8 (67%) and 6 (50%) hearts, respectively, versus no spontaneous triggered activity or VT in any hearts before DEP infusion. DEP-induced APD prolongation, EAD and VT were successfully prevented with NAC (5 mmol/L, n = 5), nifedipine (10 μmol/L, n = 5), and active Ca{sup 2+}/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) blockade, KN 93 (1 μmol/L, n = 5), but not by thapsigargin (200 nmol/L) plus ryanodine (10 μmol/L, n = 5) and inactive CaMKII blockade, KN 92 (1 μmol/L, n = 5). In neonatal rat cardiomyocytes, DEP provoked ROS generation in dose dependant manner. DEP (12.5 μg/ml) induced apoptosis, and this effect was prevented by NAC and KN 93. Thus, this study shows that in vivo and vitro exposure of PM induced APD prolongation, EAD and ventricular arrhythmia. These effects might be caused by oxidative stress and CaMKII activation. -- Highlights: ► The ambient PM consistently prolonged repolarization. ► The ambient PM induced triggered activity and ventricular arrhythmia. ► These effects were prevented by antioxidants, I{sub CaL} blockade and CaMKII blockade. ► The ambient PM can induce

  2. Molecular determinants for cardiovascular TRPC6 channel regulation by Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent kinase II

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Juan; Geshi, Naomi; Takahashi, Shinichi; Kiyonaka, Shigeki; Ichikawa, Jun; Hu, Yaopeng; Mori, Yasuo; Ito, Yushi; Inoue, Ryuji

    2013-01-01

    The molecular mechanism underlying Ca2+/calmodulin (CaM)-dependent kinase II (CaMKII)-mediated regulation of the mouse transient receptor potential channel TRPC6 was explored by chimera, deletion and site-directed mutagenesis approaches. Induction of currents (ICCh) in TRPC6-expressing HEK293 cells by a muscarinic agonist carbachol (CCh; 100 μm) was strongly attenuated by a CaMKII-specific peptide, autocamtide-2-related inhibitory peptide (AIP; 10 μm). TRPC6/C7 chimera experiments showed that the TRPC6 C-terminal sequence is indispensable for ICCh to be sensitive to AIP-induced CaMKII inhibition. Further, deletion of a distal region (Gln855–Glu877) of the C-terminal CaM/inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor binding domain (CIRB) of TRPC6 was sufficient to abolish ICCh. Systematic alanine scanning for potential CaMKII phosphorylation sites revealed that Thr487 was solely responsible for the activation of the TRPC6 channel by receptor stimulation. The abrogating effect of the alanine mutation of Thr487 (T487A) was reproduced with other non-polar amino acids, namely glutamine or asparagine, while being partially rescued by phosphomimetic mutations with glutamate or aspartate. The cellular expression and distribution of TRPC6 channels did not significantly change with these mutations. Electrophysiological and immunocytochemical data with the Myc-tagged TRPC6 channel indicated that Thr487 is most likely located at the intracellular side of the cell membrane. Overexpression of T487A caused significant reduction of endogenous TRPC6-like current induced by Arg8-vasopressin in A7r5 aortic myocytes. Based on these results, we propose that the optimal spatial arrangement of a C-terminal domain (presumably the distal CIRB region) around a single CaMKII phosphorylation site Thr487 may be essential for CaMKII-mediated regulation of TRPC6 channels. This mechanism may be of physiological significance in a native environment such as in vascular smooth muscle cells. PMID

  3. Sigma-1 receptor stimulation by dehydroepiandrosterone ameliorates cognitive impairment through activation of CaM kinase II, protein kinase C and extracellular signal-regulated kinase in olfactory bulbectomized mice.

    PubMed

    Moriguchi, Shigeki; Yamamoto, Yui; Ikuno, Tatsuya; Fukunaga, Kohji

    2011-06-01

    Dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) is one of the most abundant neurosteroids synthesized de novo in the CNS. We here found that sigma-1 receptor stimulation by DHEA improves cognitive function through phosphorylation of synaptic proteins in olfactory bulbectomized (OBX) mouse hippocampus. We have previously reported that calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII), protein kinase C (PKC) and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) were impaired in OBX mouse hippocampus. OBX mice were administered once a day for 7-8 days with DHEA (30 or 60 mg/kg p.o.) 10 days after operation. The spatial, cognitive and conditioned fear memories in OBX mice were significantly improved as assessed by Y-maze, novel object recognition and passive avoidance task, respectively. DHEA also improved impaired hippocampal long-term potentiation in OBX mice. Notably, DHEA treatment restored PKCα (Ser-657) autophosphorylation and NR1 (Ser-896) and myristoylated alanine-rich protein kinase C substrate (Ser-152/156) phosphorylation to the control levels in the hippocampal CA1 region. Likewise, DHEA treatment improved CaMKIIα (Thr-286) autophosphorylation and GluR1 (Ser-831) phosphorylation to the control levels in the CA1 region. Furthermore, DHEA treatment improved ERK and cAMP-responsive element-binding protein (Ser-133) phosphorylation to the control levels. Finally, NE-100, sigma-1 receptor antagonist, significantly inhibited the DHEA-induced improvement of memory-related behaviors and CaMKII, PKC and ERK phosphorylation in CA1 region. Taken together, sigma-1 receptor stimulation by DHEA ameliorates OBX-induced impairment in memory-related behaviors and long-term potentiation in the hippocampal CA1 region through activation of CaMKII, PKC and ERK.

  4. Metabolic switch and hypertrophy of cardiomyocytes following treatment with angiotensin II are prevented by AMP-activated protein kinase.

    PubMed

    Stuck, Bettina Johanna; Lenski, Matthias; Böhm, Michael; Laufs, Ulrich

    2008-11-21

    Angiotensin II induces cardiomyocyte hypertrophy, but its consequences on cardiomyocyte metabolism and energy supply are not completely understood. Here we investigate the effect of angiotensin II on glucose and fatty acid utilization and the modifying role of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), a key regulator of metabolism and proliferation. Treatment of H9C2 cardiomyocytes with angiotensin II (Ang II, 1 microm, 4 h) increased [(3)H]leucine incorporation, up-regulated the mRNA expression of the hypertrophy marker genes MLC, ANF, BNP, and beta-MHC, and decreased the phosphorylation of the negative mTOR-regulator tuberin (TSC-2). Rat neonatal cardiomyocytes showed similar results. Western blot analysis revealed a time- and concentration-dependent down-regulation of AMPK-phosphorylation in the presence of angiotensin II, whereas the protein expression of the catalytic alpha-subunit remained unchanged. This was paralleled by membrane translocation of glucose-transporter type 4 (GLUT4), increased uptake of [(3)H]glucose and transient down-regulation of phosphorylation of acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC), whereas fatty acid uptake remained unchanged. Similarly, short-term transaortic constriction in mice resulted in down-regulation of P-AMPK and P-ACC but up-regulation of GLUT4 membrane translocation in the heart. Preincubation of cardiomyocytes with the AMPK stimulator 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide-1-beta-D-ribofuranoside (AICAR; 1 mM, 4 h) completely prevented the angiotensin II-induced cardiomyocytes hypertrophy. In addition, AICAR reversed the metabolic effects of angiotensin II: GLUT4 translocation was reduced, but ACC phosphorylation and TSC phosphorylation were elevated. In summary, angiotensin II-induced hypertrophy of cardiomyocytes is accompanied by decreased activation of AMPK, increased glucose uptake, and decreased mTOR inhibition. Stimulation with the AMPK activator AICAR reverses these metabolic changes, increases fatty acid utilization, and inhibits

  5. MiR-31 Regulates Rho-Associated Kinase-Myosin Light Chain (ROCK-MLC) Pathway and Inhibits Gastric Cancer Invasion: Roles of RhoA

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhuo; Liu, Shengnan; Xia, Yuan; Wu, Kejian

    2016-01-01

    Background This study evaluated how the expression of miR-31 can be used to detect gastric cancer (GC) to help illuminate the role of miR-31 and RhoA in GC cells. Material/Methods We carried out our experiments using tissue specimens from 70 GC patients. The relative expression of miR-31 and RhoA mRNA in tissues and cells was detected by RT-PCR. The expression level of RhoA protein was detected by immunohistochemistry. GC cell line BGC-823 was transfected with six groups of vectors: blank group, NC (negative control) group, miR-31 mimics group, miR-31 mimics + RhoA group, miR-31 mimics + ROCK group, and miR-31 mimics + MLCK agonist group. AGS cells were also transfected with six groups of vectors: blank group, NC group, miR-31 inhibitor group, miR-31 inhibitor + RhoA siRNA group, miR-31 inhibitor + ROCK siRNA group, and miR-31 inhibitor + MLCK inhibitor group. Transwell assay was performed to detect the invasion and migration of cells. The protein expression in different transfected groups was detected using Western blotting. Results GC tissues exhibited significantly lower levels of miR-31 expression compared to pericarcinous tissues (p<0.01). Moreover, a significantly higher expression of RhoA in GC tissues was observed (p<0.05). MiR-31 inhibited RhoA expression by binding to 3′UTR of mRNA, whereas miR-31 mimics significantly decreased the number of invaded and migrated cells (p<0.05). The activation of RhoA, ROCK, and phosphorylation of MLC remarkably exacerbate the invasion and migration ability of GC cells (p<0.05). Conclusions We found miR-31 could downregulate the ROCK/MLC pathway by inhibiting the expression of RhoA in order to suppress the invasion and migration of GC cells. PMID:27904131

  6. MiR-31 Regulates Rho-Associated Kinase-Myosin Light Chain (ROCK-MLC) Pathway and Inhibits Gastric Cancer Invasion: Roles of RhoA.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhuo; Liu, Shengnan; Xia, Yuan; Wu, Kejian

    2016-12-01

    BACKGROUND This study evaluated how the expression of miR-31 can be used to detect gastric cancer (GC) to help illuminate the role of miR-31 and RhoA in GC cells. MATERIAL AND METHODS We carried out our experiments using tissue specimens from 70 GC patients. The relative expression of miR-31 and RhoA mRNA in tissues and cells was detected by RT-PCR. The expression level of RhoA protein was detected by immunohistochemistry. GC cell line BGC-823 was transfected with six groups of vectors: blank group, NC (negative control) group, miR-31 mimics group, miR-31 mimics + RhoA group, miR-31 mimics + ROCK group, and miR-31 mimics + MLCK agonist group. AGS cells were also transfected with six groups of vectors: blank group, NC group, miR-31 inhibitor group, miR-31 inhibitor + RhoA siRNA group, miR-31 inhibitor + ROCK siRNA group, and miR-31 inhibitor + MLCK inhibitor group. Transwell assay was performed to detect the invasion and migration of cells. The protein expression in different transfected groups was detected using Western blotting. RESULTS GC tissues exhibited significantly lower levels of miR-31 expression compared to pericarcinous tissues (p<0.01). Moreover, a significantly higher expression of RhoA in GC tissues was observed (p<0.05). MiR-31 inhibited RhoA expression by binding to 3'UTR of mRNA, whereas miR-31 mimics significantly decreased the number of invaded and migrated cells (p<0.05). The activation of RhoA, ROCK, and phosphorylation of MLC remarkably exacerbate the invasion and migration ability of GC cells (p<0.05). CONCLUSIONS We found miR-31 could downregulate the ROCK/MLC pathway by inhibiting the expression of RhoA in order to suppress the invasion and migration of GC cells.

  7. Mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 1/2 inhibition and angiotensin II converting inhibition in mice with cardiomyopathy caused by lamin A/C gene mutation

    SciTech Connect

    Muchir, Antoine; Wu, Wei; Sera, Fusako; Homma, Shunichi; Worman, Howard J.

    2014-10-03

    Highlights: • Both ACE and MEK1/2 inhibition are beneficial on cardiac function in Lmna cardiomyopathy. • MEK1/2 inhibitor has beneficial effects beyond ACE inhibition for Lmna cardiomyopathy. • These results provide further preclinical rationale for a clinical trial of a MEK1/2 inhibitor. - Abstract: Background: Mutations in the LMNA gene encoding A-type nuclear lamins can cause dilated cardiomyopathy with or without skeletal muscular dystrophy. Previous studies have shown abnormally increased extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 activity in hearts of Lmna{sup H222P/H222P} mice, a small animal model. Inhibition of this abnormal signaling activity with a mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 1/2 (MEK1/2) inhibitor has beneficial effects on heart function and survival in these mice. However, such treatment has not been examined relative to any standard of care intervention for dilated cardiomyopathy or heart failure. We therefore examined the effects of an angiotensin II converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor on left ventricular function in Lmna{sup H222P/H222P} mice and assessed if adding a MEK1/2 inhibitor would provide added benefit. Methods: Male Lmna{sup H222P/H222P} mice were treated with the ACE inhibitor benazepril, the MEK1/2 inhibitor selumetinib or both. Transthoracic echocardiography was used to measure left ventricular diameters and fractional shortening was calculated. Results: Treatment of Lmna{sup H222P/H222P} mice with either benazepril or selumetinib started at 8 weeks of age, before the onset of detectable left ventricular dysfunction, lead to statistically significantly increased fractional shortening compared to placebo at 16 weeks of age. There was a trend towards a great value for fractional shortening in the selumetinib-treated mice. When treatment was started at 16 weeks of age, after the onset of left ventricular dysfunction, the addition of selumetinib treatment to benazepril lead to a statistically significant increase in left

  8. Type II PI4-kinases control Weibel-Palade body biogenesis and von Willebrand factor structure in human endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Lopes da Silva, Mafalda; O'Connor, Marie N.; Kriston-Vizi, Janos; White, Ian J.; Al-Shawi, Raya; Simons, J. Paul; Mössinger, Julia; Haucke, Volker

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Weibel-Palade bodies (WPBs) are endothelial storage organelles that mediate the release of molecules involved in thrombosis, inflammation and angiogenesis, including the pro-thrombotic glycoprotein von Willebrand factor (VWF). Although many protein components required for WPB formation and function have been identified, the role of lipids is almost unknown. We examined two key phosphatidylinositol kinases that control phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate levels at the trans-Golgi network, the site of WPB biogenesis. RNA interference of the type II phosphatidylinositol 4-kinases PI4KIIα and PI4KIIβ in primary human endothelial cells leads to formation of an increased proportion of short WPB with perturbed packing of VWF, as exemplified by increased exposure of antibody-binding sites. When stimulated with histamine, these cells release normal levels of VWF yet, under flow, form very few platelet-catching VWF strings. In PI4KIIα-deficient mice, immuno-microscopy revealed that VWF packaging is also perturbed and these mice exhibit increased blood loss after tail cut compared to controls. This is the first demonstration that lipid kinases can control the biosynthesis of VWF and the formation of WPBs that are capable of full haemostatic function. PMID:27068535

  9. Type II PI4-kinases control Weibel-Palade body biogenesis and von Willebrand factor structure in human endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Lopes da Silva, Mafalda; O'Connor, Marie N; Kriston-Vizi, Janos; White, Ian J; Al-Shawi, Raya; Simons, J Paul; Mössinger, Julia; Haucke, Volker; Cutler, Daniel F

    2016-05-15

    Weibel-Palade bodies (WPBs) are endothelial storage organelles that mediate the release of molecules involved in thrombosis, inflammation and angiogenesis, including the pro-thrombotic glycoprotein von Willebrand factor (VWF). Although many protein components required for WPB formation and function have been identified, the role of lipids is almost unknown. We examined two key phosphatidylinositol kinases that control phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate levels at the trans-Golgi network, the site of WPB biogenesis. RNA interference of the type II phosphatidylinositol 4-kinases PI4KIIα and PI4KIIβ in primary human endothelial cells leads to formation of an increased proportion of short WPB with perturbed packing of VWF, as exemplified by increased exposure of antibody-binding sites. When stimulated with histamine, these cells release normal levels of VWF yet, under flow, form very few platelet-catching VWF strings. In PI4KIIα-deficient mice, immuno-microscopy revealed that VWF packaging is also perturbed and these mice exhibit increased blood loss after tail cut compared to controls. This is the first demonstration that lipid kinases can control the biosynthesis of VWF and the formation of WPBs that are capable of full haemostatic function.

  10. Vascular transcriptome profiling identifies Sphingosine kinase 1 as a modulator of angiotensin II-induced vascular dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Siedlinski, Mateusz; Nosalski, Ryszard; Szczepaniak, Piotr; Ludwig-Gałęzowska, Agnieszka H.; Mikołajczyk, Tomasz; Filip, Magdalena; Osmenda, Grzegorz; Wilk, Grzegorz; Nowak, Michał; Wołkow, Paweł; Guzik, Tomasz J.

    2017-01-01

    Vascular dysfunction is an important phenomenon in hypertension. We hypothesized that angiotensin II (AngII) affects transcriptome in the vasculature in a region-specific manner, which may help to identify genes related to vascular dysfunction in AngII-induced hypertension. Mesenteric artery and aortic transcriptome was profiled using Illumina WG-6v2.0 chip in control and AngII infused (490 ng/kg/min) hypertensive mice. Gene set enrichment and leading edge analyses identified Sphingosine kinase 1 (Sphk1) in the highest number of pathways affected by AngII. Sphk1 mRNA, protein and activity were up-regulated in the hypertensive vasculature. Chronic sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) infusion resulted in a development of significantly increased vasoconstriction and endothelial dysfunction. AngII-induced hypertension was blunted in Sphk1−/− mice (systolic BP 167 ± 4.2 vs. 180 ± 3.3 mmHg, p < 0.05), which was associated with decreased aortic and mesenteric vasoconstriction in hypertensive Sphk1−/− mice. Pharmacological inhibition of S1P synthesis reduced vasoconstriction of mesenteric arteries. While Sphk1 is important in mediating vasoconstriction in hypertension, Sphk1−/− mice were characterized by enhanced endothelial dysfunction, suggesting a local protective role of Sphk1 in the endothelium. S1P serum level in humans was correlated with endothelial function (arterial tonometry). Thus, vascular transcriptome analysis shows that S1P pathway is critical in the regulation of vascular function in AngII-induced hypertension, although Sphk1 may have opposing roles in the regulation of vasoconstriction and endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation. PMID:28276483

  11. The octopamine receptor OAMB mediates ovulation via Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II in the Drosophila oviduct epithelium.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyun-Gwan; Rohila, Suman; Han, Kyung-An

    2009-01-01

    Ovulation is an essential physiological process in sexual reproduction; however, the underlying cellular mechanisms are poorly understood. We have previously shown that OAMB, a Drosophila G-protein-coupled receptor for octopamine (the insect counterpart of mammalian norepinephrine), is required for ovulation induced upon mating. OAMB is expressed in the nervous and reproductive systems and has two isoforms (OAMB-AS and OAMB-K3) with distinct capacities to increase intracellular Ca2+ or intracellular Ca2+ and cAMP in vitro. Here, we investigated tissue specificity and intracellular signals required for OAMB's function in ovulation. Restricted OAMB expression in the adult oviduct epithelium, but not the nervous system, reinstated ovulation in oamb mutant females, in which either OAMB isoform was sufficient for the rescue. Consistently, strong immunoreactivities for both isoforms were observed in the wild-type oviduct epithelium. To delineate the cellular mechanism by which OAMB regulates ovulation, we explored protein kinases functionally interacting with OAMB by employing a new GAL4 driver with restricted expression in the oviduct epithelium. Conditional inhibition of Ca2+/Calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII), but not protein kinase A or C, in the oviduct epithelium inhibited ovulation. Moreover, constitutively active CaMKII, but not protein kinase A, expressed only in the adult oviduct epithelium fully rescued the oamb female's phenotype, demonstrating CaMKII as a major downstream molecule conveying the OAMB's ovulation signal. This is consistent with the ability of both OAMB isoforms, whose common intracellular signal in vitro is Ca2+, to reinstate ovulation in oamb females. These observations reveal the critical roles of the oviduct epithelium and its cellular components OAMB and CaMKII in ovulation. It is conceivable that the OAMB-mediated cellular activities stimulated upon mating are crucial for secretory activities suitable for egg transfer from

  12. The Octopamine Receptor OAMB Mediates Ovulation via Ca2+/Calmodulin-Dependent Protein Kinase II in the Drosophila Oviduct Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyun-Gwan; Rohila, Suman; Han, Kyung-An

    2009-01-01

    Ovulation is an essential physiological process in sexual reproduction; however, the underlying cellular mechanisms are poorly understood. We have previously shown that OAMB, a Drosophila G-protein-coupled receptor for octopamine (the insect counterpart of mammalian norepinephrine), is required for ovulation induced upon mating. OAMB is expressed in the nervous and reproductive systems and has two isoforms (OAMB-AS and OAMB-K3) with distinct capacities to increase intracellular Ca2+ or intracellular Ca2+ and cAMP in vitro. Here, we investigated tissue specificity and intracellular signals required for OAMB's function in ovulation. Restricted OAMB expression in the adult oviduct epithelium, but not the nervous system, reinstated ovulation in oamb mutant females, in which either OAMB isoform was sufficient for the rescue. Consistently, strong immunoreactivities for both isoforms were observed in the wild-type oviduct epithelium. To delineate the cellular mechanism by which OAMB regulates ovulation, we explored protein kinases functionally interacting with OAMB by employing a new GAL4 driver with restricted expression in the oviduct epithelium. Conditional inhibition of Ca2+/Calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII), but not protein kinase A or C, in the oviduct epithelium inhibited ovulation. Moreover, constitutively active CaMKII, but not protein kinase A, expressed only in the adult oviduct epithelium fully rescued the oamb female's phenotype, demonstrating CaMKII as a major downstream molecule conveying the OAMB's ovulation signal. This is consistent with the ability of both OAMB isoforms, whose common intracellular signal in vitro is Ca2+, to reinstate ovulation in oamb females. These observations reveal the critical roles of the oviduct epithelium and its cellular components OAMB and CaMKII in ovulation. It is conceivable that the OAMB-mediated cellular activities stimulated upon mating are crucial for secretory activities suitable for egg transfer from

  13. Role of integrin-linked kinase in vascular smooth muscle cells: Regulation by statins and angiotensin II

    SciTech Connect

    Friedrich, Erik B. . E-mail: efriedrich@med-in.uni-sb.de; Clever, Yvonne P.; Wassmann, Sven; Werner, Nikos; Boehm, Michael; Nickenig, Georg

    2006-10-27

    Our goal was to characterize the role of integrin-linked kinase (ILK) in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC), which play a crucial role in atherogenesis. Transfection of VSMC with wild-type and dominant-negative ILK cDNA constructs revealed that ILK mediates migration and proliferation of VSMC but has no effect on VSMC survival. The pro-atherogenic mediator angiotensin II increases ILK protein expression and kinase activity while statin treatment down-regulates ILK in VSMC. Functionally, ILK is necessary for angiotensin II-mediated VSMC migration and proliferation. In VSMC transduced with dominant-negative ILK, statins mediate an additive inhibition of VSMC migration and proliferation, while transfection with wild-type ILK is sufficient to overcome the inhibitory effects of statin treatment on VSMC migration and proliferation. In vivo, ILK is expressed in VSMC of aortic sections from wild-type mice where it is down-regulated following statin treatment and up-regulated following induction of atherosclerosis in apoE-/- mice. These data identify ILK as a novel target in VSMC for anti-atherosclerotic therapy.

  14. Myosin II regulatory light chain as a novel substrate for AIM-1, an aurora/Ipl1p-related kinase from rat.

    PubMed

    Murata-Hori, M; Fumoto, K; Fukuta, Y; Iwasaki, T; Kikuchi, A; Tatsuka, M; Hosoya, H

    2000-12-01

    Previous studies demonstrated that the phosphorylated myosin II regulatory light chain (MRLC) is localized at the cleavage furrow of dividing cells, suggesting that phosphorylation of MRLC plays an important role in cytokinesis. However, it remains unclear which kinase(s) phosphorylate MRLC during cytokinesis. AIM-1, an Aurora/Ipl1p-related kinase from rat, is known as a serine/threonine kinase that is required for cytokinesis. Here we examined the possibility that AIM-1 is a candidate for a kinase that phosphorylates MRLC during cytokinesis. As a result, we showed that AIM-1 monophosphorylated MRLC at Ser19 using two-dimensional phosphopeptide mapping analysis and several MRLC mutants. Furthermore, AIM-1 was colocalized with monophosphorylated MRLC at the cleavage furrow of dividing cells. We propose here that AIM-1 may participate in monophosphorylation of MRLC during cytokinesis.

  15. Stereochemical control over Mn(II)-Thio versus Mn(II)-Oxy coordination in adenosine 5 prime -O-(1-thiodiphosphate) complexes at the active site of creatine kinase

    SciTech Connect

    Smithers, G.W.; Sammons, R.D.; Goodhart, P.J.; LoBrutto, R.; Reed, G.H. )

    1989-02-21

    The stereochemical configurations of the Mn(II) complexes with the resolved epimers of adenosine 5{prime}-O-(1-thiodiphosphate) (ADP{alpha}S), bound at the active site of creatine kinase, have been determined in order to assess the relative strengths of enzymic stereoselectivity versus Lewis acid/base preferences in metal-ligand binding. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) data have been obtained for Mn(II) in anion-stabilized, dead-end (transition-state analogue) complexes, in ternary enzyme-Mn{sup II}ADP{alpha}S complexes, and in the central complexes of the equilibrium mixture. The modes of coordination of Mn(II) at P{sub alpha} in the nitrate-stabilized, dead-end complexes with each epimer of ADP{alpha}S were ascertained by EPR measurements with (R{sub p})-({alpha}-{sup 17}O)ADP{alpha}S and (S{sub p})-({alpha}-{sup 17}O)ADP{alpha}S. A reduction in the magnitude of the {sup 55}Mn hyperfine coupling constant in the spectrum for the complex containing (S{sub p})-ADP{alpha}S is indicative of Mn(II)-thio coordination at P{sub alpha}. The results indicate that a strict discrimination for a unique configuration of the metal-nucleotide substrate is expressed upon binding of all of the substrates to form the active complex (or an analogue thereof). This enzymic stereoselectivity provides sufficient binding energy to overcome an intrinsic preference for the hard Lewis acid Mn(II) to coordinate to the hard Lewis base oxygen.

  16. Switch control pocket inhibitors of p38-MAP kinase. Durable type II inhibitors that do not require binding into the canonical ATP hinge region

    SciTech Connect

    Ahn, Yu Mi; Clare, Michael; Ensinger, Carol L.; Hood, Molly M.; Lord, John W.; Lu, Wei-Ping; Miller, David F.; Patt, William C.; Smith, Bryan D.; Vogeti, Lakshminarayana; Kaufman, Michael D.; Petillo, Peter A.; Wise, Scott C.; Abendroth, Jan; Chun, Lawrence; Clark, Robin; Feese, Michael; Kim, Hidong; Stewart, Lance; Flynn, Daniel L.

    2012-01-20

    Switch control pocket inhibitors of p38-alpha kinase are described. Durable type II inhibitors were designed which bind to arginines (Arg67 or Arg70) that function as key residues for mediating phospho-threonine 180 dependant conformational fluxing of p38-alpha from an inactive type II state to an active type I state. Binding to Arg70 in particular led to potent inhibitors, exemplified by DP-802, which also exhibited high kinase selectivity. Binding to Arg70 obviated the requirement for binding into the ATP Hinge region. X-ray crystallography revealed that DP-802 and analogs induce an enhanced type II conformation upon binding to either the unphosphorylated or the doubly phosphorylated form of p38-alpha kinase.

  17. Heme-induced Trypanosoma cruzi proliferation is mediated by CaM kinase II

    SciTech Connect

    Souza, C.F.; Carneiro, A.B.; Silveira, A.B.; Laranja, G.A.T.; Silva-Neto, M.A.C.; Costa, S.C. Goncalves da; Paes, M.C.

    2009-12-18

    Trypanosoma cruzi, the etiologic agent of Chagas disease, is transmitted through triatomine vectors during their blood-meal on vertebrate hosts. These hematophagous insects usually ingest approximately 10 mM of heme bound to hemoglobin in a single meal. Blood forms of the parasite are transformed into epimastigotes in the crop which initiates a few hours after parasite ingestion. In a previous work, we investigated the role of heme in parasite cell proliferation and showed that the addition of heme significantly increased parasite proliferation in a dose-dependent manner . To investigate whether the heme effect is mediated by protein kinase signalling pathways, parasite proliferation was evaluated in the presence of several protein kinase (PK) inhibitors. We found that only KN-93, a classical inhibitor of calcium-calmodulin-dependent kinases (CaMKs), blocked heme-induced cell proliferation. KN-92, an inactive analogue of KN-93, was not able to block this effect. A T. cruzi CaMKII homologue is most likely the main enzyme involved in this process since parasite proliferation was also blocked when Myr-AIP, an inhibitory peptide for mammalian CaMKII, was included in the cell proliferation assay. Moreover, CaMK activity increased in parasite cells with the addition of heme as shown by immunological and biochemical assays. In conclusion, the present results are the first strong indications that CaMKII is involved in the heme-induced cell signalling pathway that mediates parasite proliferation.

  18. Role of protein kinase C delta in angiotensin II induced cardiac fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Chintalgattu, Vishnu; Katwa, Laxmansa C

    2009-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated a role for angiotensin II (AngII) and myofibroblasts (myoFb) in cardiac fibrosis. However, the role of PKC-δ in AngII mediated cardiac fibrosis is unclear. Therefore, the present study was designed to investigate the role of PKC-δ in AngII induced cardiac collagen expression and fibrosis. AngII treatment significantly (p<0.05) increased myoFb collagen expression, whereas PKC-δ siRNA treatment or rottlerin, a PKC-δ inhibitor abrogated (p<0.05) AngII induced collagen expression. MyoFb transfected with PKC-δ over expression vector showed significant increase (p<0.05) in the collagen expression as compared to control. Two-weeks of chronic AngII infused rats showed significant (p<0.05) increase in collagen expression compared to sham operated rats. This increase in cardiac collagen expression was abrogated by rottlerin treatment. In conclusion, both in vitro and in vivo data strongly suggest a role for PKC-δ in AngII induced cardiac fibrosis. PMID:19540196

  19. Rac2 GTPase activation by angiotensin II is modulated by Ca2+/calcineurin and mitogen-activated protein kinases in human neutrophils.

    PubMed

    El Bekay, Rajaa; Alba, Gonzalo; Reyes, M Edith; Chacón, Pedro; Vega, Antonio; Martín-Nieto, José; Jiménez, Juan; Ramos, Eladio; Oliván, Josefina; Pintado, Elízabeth; Sobrino, Francisco

    2007-11-01

    Angiotensin II (Ang II) highly stimulates superoxide anion production by neutrophils. The G-protein Rac2 modulates the activity of NADPH oxidase in response to various stimuli. Here, we describe that Ang II induced both Rac2 translocation from the cytosol to the plasma membrane and Rac2 GTP-binding activity. Furthermore, Clostridium difficile toxin A, an inhibitor of the Rho-GTPases family Rho, Rac and Cdc42, prevented Ang II-elicited O2-/ROS production, phosphorylation of the mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) p38, extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) and c-Jun N-terminal kinase 1/2, and Rac2 activation. Rac2 GTPase inhibition by C. difficile toxin A was accompanied by a robust reduction of the cytosolic Ca(2)(+) elevation induced by Ang II in human neutrophils. Furthermore, SB203580 and PD098059 act as inhibitors of p38MAPK and ERK1/2 respectively, wortmannin, an inhibitor of phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase, and cyclosporin A, a calcineurin inhibitor, hindered both translocation of Rac2 from the cytosol to the plasma membrane and enhancement of Rac2 GTP-binding elicited by Ang II. These results provide evidence that the activation of Rac2 by Ang II is exerted through multiple signalling pathways, involving Ca(2)(+)/calcineurin and protein kinases, the elucidation of which should be insightful in the design of new therapies aimed at reversing the inflammation of vessel walls found in a number of cardiovascular diseases.

  20. Hydrophobic motif site-phosphorylated protein kinaseII between mTORC2 and Akt regulates high glucose-induced mesangial cell hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Das, Falguni; Ghosh-Choudhury, Nandini; Mariappan, Meenalakshmi M; Kasinath, Balakuntalam S; Choudhury, Goutam Ghosh

    2016-04-01

    PKCβII controls the pathologic features of diabetic nephropathy, including glomerular mesangial cell hypertrophy. PKCβII contains the COOH-terminal hydrophobic motif site Ser-660. Whether this hydrophobic motif phosphorylation contributes to high glucose-induced mesangial cell hypertrophy has not been determined. Here we show that, in mesangial cells, high glucose increased phosphorylation of PKCβII at Ser-660 in a phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3-kinase)-dependent manner. Using siRNAs to downregulate PKCβII, dominant negative PKCβII, and PKCβII hydrophobic motif phosphorylation-deficient mutant, we found that PKCβII regulates activation of mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) and mesangial cell hypertrophy by high glucose. PKCβII via its phosphorylation at Ser-660 regulated phosphorylation of Akt at both catalytic loop and hydrophobic motif sites, resulting in phosphorylation and inactivation of its substrate PRAS40. Specific inhibition of mTORC2 increased mTORC1 activity and induced mesangial cell hypertrophy. In contrast, inhibition of mTORC2 decreased the phosphorylation of PKCβII and Akt, leading to inhibition of PRAS40 phosphorylation and mTORC1 activity and prevented mesangial cell hypertrophy in response to high glucose; expression of constitutively active Akt or mTORC1 restored mesangial cell hypertrophy. Moreover, constitutively active PKCβII reversed the inhibition of high glucose-stimulated Akt phosphorylation and mesangial cell hypertrophy induced by suppression of mTORC2. Finally, using renal cortexes from type 1 diabetic mice, we found that increased phosphorylation of PKCβII at Ser-660 was associated with enhanced Akt phosphorylation and mTORC1 activation. Collectively, our findings identify a signaling route connecting PI3-kinase to mTORC2 to phosphorylate PKCβII at the hydrophobic motif site necessary for Akt phosphorylation and mTORC1 activation, leading to mesangial cell hypertrophy.

  1. Differential energetic metabolism during Trypanosoma cruzi differentiation. II. Hexokinase, phosphofructokinase and pyruvate kinase.

    PubMed

    Adroher, F J; Osuna, A; Lupiáñez, J A

    1990-04-18

    The activities of hexokinase (ATP:hexose-6-phosphate transferase, E.C. 2.7.1.1), phosphofructokinase (ATP:fructose-6-phosphate 1-phosphotransferase, E.C.2.7.1.11) and pyruvate kinase (ATP:pyruvate transferase, E.C. 2.7.1.40), and their kinetic behaviour in two morphological forms of Trypanosoma cruzi (epimastigotes and metacyclic trypomastigotes) have been studied. The kinetic responses of the three enzymes to their respective substrates were normalized to hyperbolic forms on a velocity versus substrate concentration plots. Hexokinase and phosphofructokinase showed a higher activity in epimastigotes than in metacyclics, whereas pyruvate kinase had similar activity in both forms of the parasite. The specific activity of hexokinase from epimastigotes was 102.00 mUnits/mg of protein and the apparent Km value for glucose was 35.4 microM. Metacyclic forms showed a specific activity of 55.25 mUnits/mg and a Km value of 46.3 microM. The kinetic parameters (specific activity and Km for fructose 6-phosphate) of phosphofructokinase for epimastigotes were 42.60 mUnits/mg and 0.31 mM and for metacyclics 13.97 mUnits/mg and 0.16 mM, respectively. On the contrary, pyruvate kinase in both forms of T. cruzi did not show significant differences in its kinetic parameters. The specific activity in epimastigotes was 37.00 mUnits/mg and the Km for phosphoenolpyruvate was 0.47 mM, whereas in metacyclics these values were 42.94 mUnits/mg and 0.46 mM, respectively. The results presented in this work, clearly demonstrate a quantitative change in the glycolytic pathway of both culture forms of T. cruzi.

  2. Inhibitory effects of KN-93, an inhibitor of Ca2+ calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II, on light-regulated root gravitropism in maize.

    PubMed

    Lu Y-T; Feldman, L J; Hidaka, H

    1993-01-01

    Light is essential for root gravitropism in Zea mays L., cultivar Merit. It is hypothesized that calcium mediates this light-regulated response. KN-93, an inhibitor of calcium/calmodulin kinase II (CaMK II), inhibits light-regulated root gravitropism but does not affect light perception. We hypothesize that CaMK II, or a homologue, operates late in the light/gravity signal transduction chain. Here we provide evidence suggesting a possible physiological involvement of CaMK II in root gravitropism in plants.

  3. Inhibitory effects of KN-93, an inhibitor of Ca2+ calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II, on light-regulated root gravitropism in maize

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feldman, L. J.; Hidaka, H.

    1993-01-01

    Light is essential for root gravitropism in Zea mays L., cultivar Merit. It is hypothesized that calcium mediates this light-regulated response. KN-93, an inhibitor of calcium/calmodulin kinase II (CaMK II), inhibits light-regulated root gravitropism but does not affect light perception. We hypothesize that CaMK II, or a homologue, operates late in the light/gravity signal transduction chain. Here we provide evidence suggesting a possible physiological involvement of CaMK II in root gravitropism in plants.

  4. Limbic epilepsy in transgenic mice carrying a Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent kinase II alpha-subunit mutation.

    PubMed Central

    Butler, L S; Silva, A J; Abeliovich, A; Watanabe, Y; Tonegawa, S; McNamara, J O

    1995-01-01

    Multifunctional Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMK) phosphorylates proteins pivotally involved in diverse neuronal processes and thereby coordinates cellular responses to external stimuli that regulate intracellular Ca2+ [Hanson, P. I. & Schulman, H. (1992) Annu. Rev. Biochem. 61, 559-664]. Despite extensive study, the impact of this enzyme on control of the excitability of neuron populations in the mammalian nervous system in situ is unknown. To address this question, we studied transgenic mice carrying a null mutation (-/-) for the alpha subunit of CaMK. In contrast to wild-type littermates, null mutants exhibit profound hyperexcitability, evident in epileptic seizures involving limbic structures including the hippocampus. No evidence of increased excitability was detected in mice carrying null mutations of the gamma isoform of protein kinase C, underscoring the specificity of the effect of CaMK. CaMK plays a powerful and previously underappreciated role in control of neuronal excitability in the mammalian nervous system. These insights have important implications for analyses of mechanisms of epilepsy and, perhaps, learning and memory. Images Fig. 2 PMID:7624331

  5. Protein kinase A-mediated CREB phosphorylation is an oxidant-induced survival pathway in alveolar type II cells

    PubMed Central

    Barlow, Christy A.; Kitiphongspattana, Kajorn; Siddiqui, Nazli; Roe, Michael W.; Mossman, Brooke T.

    2008-01-01

    Oxidant stress plays a role in the pathogenesis of pulmonary diseases, including fibrotic lung disease and cancer. We previously found that hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) initiates an increase in Ca2+/cAMP-response element binding protein (CREB) phosphorylation in C10 alveolar type II cells that requires activation of extracellular regulated kinases 1/2 (ERK1/2). Here, we investigated the role of crosstalk between protein kinase A (PKA) and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) in oxidant-induced signaling to ERK1/2 and CREB in C10 cells. Application of H2O2 increased nuclear accumulation of PKA, and inhibition of PKA with H89 reduced oxidant-mediated phosphorylation of both CREB and ERK1/2. Single cell measurements of cAMP and redox status, using a FRET-based biosensor and a redox-sensitive GFP, respectively, indicated that H2O2 increases production of cAMP that correlates with redox state. Inhibition of EGFR activity decreased both H2O2-induced CREB phosphorylation and translocation of PKA to the nucleus, suggesting that crosstalk between PKA and EGFR underlies the oxidant-induced CREB response. Furthermore, knockdown of CREB expression using siRNA led to a decrease in bcl-2 and an increase in oxidant-induced apoptosis. Together these data reveal a novel role for crosstalk between PKA, ERK1/2 and CREB that mediates cell survival during oxidant stress. PMID:18392938

  6. Molecular mechanism of activation-triggered subunit exchange in Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharyya, Moitrayee; Stratton, Margaret M; Going, Catherine C; McSpadden, Ethan D; Huang, Yongjian; Susa, Anna C; Elleman, Anna; Cao, Yumeng Melody; Pappireddi, Nishant; Burkhardt, Pawel; Gee, Christine L; Barros, Tiago; Schulman, Howard; Williams, Evan R; Kuriyan, John

    2016-01-01

    Activation triggers the exchange of subunits in Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII), an oligomeric enzyme that is critical for learning, memory, and cardiac function. The mechanism by which subunit exchange occurs remains elusive. We show that the human CaMKII holoenzyme exists in dodecameric and tetradecameric forms, and that the calmodulin (CaM)-binding element of CaMKII can bind to the hub of the holoenzyme and destabilize it to release dimers. The structures of CaMKII from two distantly diverged organisms suggest that the CaM-binding element of activated CaMKII acts as a wedge by docking at intersubunit interfaces in the hub. This converts the hub into a spiral form that can release or gain CaMKII dimers. Our data reveal a three-way competition for the CaM-binding element, whereby phosphorylation biases it towards the hub interface, away from the kinase domain and calmodulin, thus unlocking the ability of activated CaMKII holoenzymes to exchange dimers with unactivated ones. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.13405.001 PMID:26949248

  7. Neuronal calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II mediates nicotine reward in the conditioned place preference test in mice.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Kia J; Muldoon, Pretal P; Walters, Carrie; Damaj, Mohamad Imad

    2016-02-01

    Several recent studies have indicated the involvement of calcium-dependent mechanisms, in particular the abundant calcium-activated kinase, calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase II (CaMKII), in behaviors associated with nicotine dependence in mice. Behavioral and biochemical studies have shown that CaMKII is involved in acute and chronic nicotine behaviors and nicotine withdrawal; however, evidence of a role for CaMKII in nicotine reward is lacking. Thus, the goal of the current study was to examine the role of CaMKII in nicotine reward. Using pharmacological and genetic tools, we tested nicotine conditioned place preference (CPP) in C57Bl/6 mice after administration of CaMKII antagonists and in α-CaMKII wild-type (+/+) and heterozygote (±) mice. CaMKII antagonists blocked expression of nicotine CPP, and the preference score was significantly reduced in α-CaMKII ± mice compared with their +/+ counterparts. Further, we assessed CaMKII activity in the ventral tegmental area (VTA), nucleus accumbens (NAc), prefrontal cortex, and hippocampus after nicotine CPP and found significant increases in CaMKII activity in the mouse VTA and NAc that were blocked by CaMKII antagonists. The findings from this study show that CaMKII mediates nicotine reward and suggest that increases in CaMKII activity in the VTA and NAc are relevant to nicotine reward behaviors.

  8. Functional identification of the promoter for the gene encoding the alpha subunit of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II.

    PubMed Central

    Olson, N J; Massé, T; Suzuki, T; Chen, J; Alam, D; Kelly, P T

    1995-01-01

    To examine the expression of the alpha subunit of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II, various 5' flanking genomic sequences were inserted into a chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) reporter plasmid and CAT enzyme activities were analyzed in transfected NB2a neuroblastoma cells and mRNA transcription was analyzed by nuclease protection assays. A core promoter was identified which contained an essential TATA element located 162 nt 5' to the transcription start site. Sequences 3' to the transcription start site, as well as 5' to the TATA element, increased levels of CAT activity in transfected cells. The alpha-subunit gene promoter displayed higher CAT activities, relative to a simian virus 40 promoter, in transfected neuronal cell lines than in nonneuronal cell lines. Results also suggested that sequence surrounding the natural alpha-gene transcription initiation site may be important for targeting transcription initiation 162 nt downstream of its TATA element. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 3 PMID:7878035

  9. Casein kinase II is required for the spindle assembly checkpoint by regulating Mad2p in fission yeast

    SciTech Connect

    Shimada, Midori; Yamamoto, Ayumu; Murakami-Tonami, Yuko; Nakanishi, Makoto; Yoshida, Takashi; Aiba, Hirofumi; Murakami, Hiroshi

    2009-10-23

    The spindle checkpoint is a surveillance mechanism that ensures the fidelity of chromosome segregation in mitosis. Here we show that fission yeast casein kinase II (CK2) is required for this checkpoint function. In the CK2 mutants mitosis occurs in the presence of a spindle defect, and the spindle checkpoint protein Mad2p fails to localize to unattached kinetochores. The CK2 mutants are sensitive to the microtubule depolymerising drug thiabendazole, which is counteracted by ectopic expression of mad2{sup +}. The level of Mad2p is low in the CK2 mutants. These results suggest that CK2 has a role in the spindle checkpoint by regulating Mad2p.

  10. Functional role of RNA polymerase II and P70 S6 kinase in KCl withdrawal-induced cerebellar granule neuron apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Padmanabhan, Jaya; Brown, Kristy R; Padilla, Amelia; Shelanski, Michael L

    2015-02-27

    KCl withdrawal-induced apoptosis in cerebellar granule neurons is associated with aberrant cell cycle activation, and treatment with cyclin-dependent kinase (Cdk) inhibitors protects cells from undergoing apoptosis. Because the Cdk inhibitor flavopiridol is known to inhibit RNA polymerase II (Pol II)-dependent transcription elongation by inhibiting the positive transcription elongation factor b (P-TEFb, a complex of CDK9 and cyclin T), we examined whether inhibition of RNA Pol II protects neurons from apoptosis. Treatment of neurons with 5, 6-dichloro-1-β-D-ribobenzimidazole (DRB), an RNA Pol II-dependent transcription elongation inhibitor, and flavopiridol inhibited phosphorylation and activation of Pol II and protected neurons from undergoing apoptosis. In addition to Pol II, neurons subjected to KCl withdrawal showed increased phosphorylation and activation of p70 S6 kinase, which was inhibited by both DRB and flavopiridol. Immunostaining analysis of the neurons deprived of KCl showed increased nuclear levels of phospho-p70 S6 kinase, and neurons protected with DRB and flavopiridol showed accumulation of the kinase into large spliceosome assembly factor-positive speckle domains within the nuclei. The formation of these foci corresponded with cell survival, and removal of the inhibitors resulted in dispersal of the speckles into smaller foci with subsequent apoptosis induction. Because p70 S6 kinase is known to induce translation of mRNAs containing a 5'-terminal oligopyrimidine tract, our data suggest that transcription and translation of this subset of mRNAs may contribute to KCl withdrawal-induced apoptosis in neurons.

  11. Alpha B-Crystallin Protects Rat Articular Chondrocytes against Casein Kinase II Inhibition-Induced Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Rho, Jee Hyun; Lee, Sang Yeob; Yoo, Seung Hee; Kim, Hye Young; Chung, Won Tae; Yoo, Young Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Although alpha (α)B-crystallin is expressed in articular chondrocytes, little is known about its role in these cells. Protein kinase casein kinase 2 (CK2) inhibition induces articular chondrocyte death. The present study examines whether αB-crystallin exerts anti-apoptotic activity in articular chondrocytes. Primary rat articular chondrocytes were isolated from knee joint slices. Cells were treated with CK2 inhibitors with or without αB-crystallin siRNA. To examine whether the silencing of αB-crystallin sensitizes rat articular chondrocytes to CK2 inhibition-induced apoptosis, we assessed apoptosis by performing viability assays, mitochondrial membrane potential measurements, flow cytometry, nuclear morphology observations, and western blot analysis. To investigate the mechanism by which αB-crystallin modulates the extent of CK2 inhibition-mediated chondrocyte death, we utilized confocal microscopy to observe the subcellular location of αB-crystallin and its phosphorylated forms and performed a co-immunoprecipitation assay to observe the interaction between αB-crystallin and CK2. Immunochemistry was employed to examine αB-crystallin expression in cartilage obtained from rats with experimentally induced osteoarthritis (OA). Our results demonstrated that silencing of αB-crystallin sensitized rat articular chondrocytes to CK2 inhibitor-induced apoptosis. Furthermore, CK2 inhibition modulated the expression and subcellular localization of αB-crystallin and its phosphorylated forms and dissociated αB-crystallin from CK2. The population of rat articular chondrocytes expressing αB-crystallin and its phosphorylated forms was reduced in an experimentally induced rat model of OA. In summary, αB-crystallin protects rat articular chondrocytes against CK2 inhibition-induced apoptosis. αB-crystallin may represent a suitable target for pharmacological interventions to prevent OA. PMID:27851782

  12. Sex differences in the enhanced responsiveness to acute angiotensin II in growth-restricted rats: role of fasudil, a Rho kinase inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Ojeda, Norma B.; Royals, Thomas P.

    2013-01-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that Rho kinase contributes to the enhanced pressor response to acute angiotensin II in intact male growth-restricted and gonadectomized female growth-restricted rats. Mean arterial pressure (MAP) and renal function were determined in conscious animals pretreated with enalapril (250 mg/l in drinking water) for 1 wk to block the endogenous renin-angiotensin system and normalize blood pressure (baseline). Blood pressure and renal hemodynamics did not differ at baseline. Acute Ang II (100 ng·kg−1·min−1) induced a greater increase in MAP and renal vascular resistance and enhanced reduction in glomerular filtration rate in intact male growth-restricted rats compared with intact male controls (P < 0.05). Cotreatment with the Rho kinase inhibitor fasudil (33 μg·kg−1·min−1) significantly attenuated these hemodynamic changes (P < 0.05), but it did not abolish the differential increase in blood pressure above baseline, suggesting that the impact of intrauterine growth restriction on blood pressure in intact male growth-restricted rats is independent of Rho kinase. Gonadectomy in conjunction with fasudil returned blood pressure back to baseline in male growth-restricted rats, and yet glomerular filtration rate remained significantly reduced (P < 0.05). Thus, these data suggest a role for enhanced renal sensitivity to acute Ang II in the developmental programming of hypertension in male growth-restricted rats. However, inhibition of Rho kinase had no effect on the basal or enhanced increase in blood pressure induced by acute Ang II in the gonadectomized female growth-restricted rat. Therefore, these studies suggest that Rho kinase inhibition exerts a sex-specific effect on blood pressure sensitivity to acute Ang II in growth-restricted rats. PMID:23344570

  13. Activation of Casein Kinase II and Inhibition of Phosphatase and Tensin Homologue Deleted on Chromosome 10 Phosphatase by Nerve Growth Factor/p75NTR Inhibit Glycogen Synthase Kinase-3β and Stimulate Axonal Growth

    PubMed Central

    Arevalo, María-Angeles

    2006-01-01

    Axonal elongation and guidance are controlled by extracellular factors such as the neurotrophins. Indeed, nerve growth factor (NGF) seems to promote axon growth through binding to its p75NTR receptor and inactivating RhoA. Furthermore, the local inhibition of glycogen synthase kinase (GSK)-3β by NGF also favors microtubule polymerization and axon extension. Inactivation of GSK-3β may be due to the NGF/TrkA-mediated activation of phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase (PI-3 kinase), which increases the levels of phosphatydilinositol 3-phosphate [PI(3)P]. However, we show here that NGF may inactivate GSK-3β through an alternative mechanism. In cultured hippocampal neurons, the capacity of NGF to promote axon elongation is mostly mediated by p75NTR, and the activation of this pathway leads to the inactivation of GSK-3β. However, the signaling pathway triggered by NGF/p75NTR acts through casein kinase II (CK2). NGF/p75NTR-activated CK2 phosphorylates the phosphatase and tensin homologue deleted on chromosome 10 (PTEN), thus rendering this phosphatase inactive. Like activation of the PI-3 kinase, PTEN inactivation allows PI(3)P levels to increase, thus favoring GSK-3β inactivation and axon outgrowth. This newly disclosed mechanism may help to extend the repertoire of pharmacological agents that activate CK2 or that inhibit PTEN to stimulate axon regeneration after trauma or disease. PMID:16723502

  14. Immobilization of His-tagged kinase JAK2 onto the surface of a plasmon resonance gold disc modified with different copper (II) complexes.

    PubMed

    Kurzątkowska, Katarzyna; Mielecki, Marcin; Grzelak, Krystyna; Verwilst, Peter; Dehaen, Wim; Radecki, Jerzy; Radecka, Hanna

    2014-12-01

    New surface plasmon resonance (SPR) sensing platforms which consists of copper (II) complexes of a pentetic acid thiol ligand (DPTA-Cu(II)) and of a thiol derivative of dipyrromethene (DPM-Cu(II) created on the surface of gold SPR disc were applied to oriented immobilization of His-tagged Janus kinase 2 (GST-His6-JAK2). This method is based on the covalent bond formation between histidine from a His-tag chain of a protein and Cu(II) centres from the complexes. The kinetic and thermodynamic parameters of the oriented immobilization of GST-His6-JAK2 protein to DPTA-Cu(II) and DPM-Cu(II) complexes attached to the Au surface of a SPR disc were discussed.

  15. Dual Inhibition of Topoisomerase II and Tyrosine Kinases by the Novel Bis-Fluoroquinolone Chalcone-Like Derivative HMNE3 in Human Pancreatic Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yan-Xin; Hu, Guo-Qiang; Cui, Dong-Tao; Wang, Jiang-Shuan; Wang, Min; Wang, Fu-Qing; Zhao, Zhi-Jun

    2016-01-01

    Both tyrosine kinase and topoisomerase II (TopII) are important anticancer targets, and their respective inhibitors are widely used in cancer therapy. However, some combinations of anticancer drugs could exhibit mutually antagonistic actions and drug resistance, which further limit their therapeutic efficacy. Here, we report that HMNE3, a novel bis-fluoroquinolone chalcone-like derivative that targets both tyrosine kinase and TopII, induces tumor cell proliferation and growth inhibition. The viabilities of 6 different cancer cell lines treated with a range of HMNE3 doses were detected using the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. Cellular apoptosis was determined using Hoechst 33258 fluorescence staining and the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase (TdT) dUTP nick-end labeling (TUNEL) assay. The expression of activated Caspase-3 was examined by immunocytochemistry. The tyrosine kinase activity was measured with a human receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) detection kit using a horseradish peroxidase (HRP)-conjugated phosphotyrosine (pY20) antibody as the substrate. The topoisomerase II activity was measured using agarose gel electrophoresis with the DNA plasmid pBR322 as the substrate. The expression levels of the P53, Bax, Bcl-2, Caspase-3, -8, -9, p-cSrc, c-Src and topoisomerase II proteins were detected by western blot analysis. The proliferation of five of the six cancer cell lines was significantly inhibited by HMNE3 at 0.312 to 10 μmol/L in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Treatment of the Capan-1 and Panc-1 cells with 1.6 to 3.2 μM HMNE3 for 48 h significantly increased the percentage of apoptotic cells (P<0.05), and this effect was accompanied by a decrease in tyrosine kinase activity. HMNE3 potentially inhibited tyrosine kinase activity in vitro with an IC50 value of 0.64±0.34 μmol/L in Capan-1 cells and 3.1±0.86 μmol/L in Panc-1 cells. The activity of c-Src was significantly inhibited by HMNE3 in a dose- and time

  16. Akt activation enhances ribosomal RNA synthesis through casein kinase II and TIF-IA.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Le Xuan Truong; Mitchell, Beverly S

    2013-12-17

    Transcription initiation factor I (TIF-IA) plays an essential role in regulating ribosomal RNA (rRNA) synthesis by tethering RNA polymerase I (Pol I) to the rDNA promoter. We have found that activated Akt enhances rRNA synthesis through the phosphorylation of casein kinase IIα (CK2α) on a threonine residue near its N terminus. CK2 in turn phosphorylates TIF-IA, thereby increasing rDNA transcription. Activated Akt also stabilizes TIF-IA, induces its translocation to the nucleolus, and enhances its interaction with Pol I. Treatment with AZD8055, an inhibitor of both Akt and mammalian target of rapamycin phosphorylation, but not with rapamycin, disrupts Akt-mediated TIF-IA stability, translocation, and activity. These data support a model in which activated Akt enhances rRNA synthesis both by preventing TIF-IA degradation and phosphorylating CK2α, which in turn phosphorylates TIF-IA. This model provides an explanation for the ability of activated Akt to promote cell proliferation and, potentially, transformation.

  17. A nonsense mutation in cGMP-dependent type II protein kinase (PRKG2) causes dwarfism in American Angus cattle.

    PubMed

    Koltes, James E; Mishra, Bishnu P; Kumar, Dinesh; Kataria, Ranjit S; Totir, Liviu R; Fernando, Rohan L; Cobbold, Rowland; Steffen, David; Coppieters, Wouter; Georges, Michel; Reecy, James M

    2009-11-17

    Historically, dwarfism was the major genetic defect in U.S. beef cattle. Aggressive culling and sire testing were used to minimize its prevalence; however, neither of these practices can eliminate a recessive genetic defect. We assembled a 4-generation pedigree to identify the mutation underlying dwarfism in American Angus cattle. An adaptation of the Elston-Steward algorithm was used to overcome small pedigree size and missing genotypes. The dwarfism locus was fine-mapped to BTA6 between markers AFR227 and BM4311. Four candidate genes were sequenced, revealing a nonsense mutation in exon 15 of cGMP-dependant type II protein kinase (PRKG2). This C/T transition introduced a stop codon (R678X) that truncated 85 C-terminal amino acids, including a large portion of the kinase domain. Of the 75 mutations discovered in this region, only this mutation was 100% concordant with the recessive pattern of inheritance in affected and carrier individuals (log of odds score = 6.63). Previous research has shown that PRKG2 regulates SRY (sex-determining region Y) box 9 (SOX9)-mediated transcription of collagen 2 (COL2). We evaluated the ability of wild-type (WT) or R678X PRKG2 to regulate COL2 expression in cell culture. Real-time PCR results confirmed that COL2 is overexpressed in cells that overexpressed R678X PRKG2 as compared with WT PRKG2. Furthermore, COL2 and COL10 mRNA expression was increased in dwarf cattle compared with unaffected cattle. These experiments indicate that the R678X mutation is functional, resulting in a loss of PRKG2 regulation of COL2 and COL10 mRNA expression. Therefore, we present PRKG2 R678X as a causative mutation for dwarfism cattle.

  18. Resveratrol Inhibits Neuronal Apoptosis and Elevated Ca2+/Calmodulin-Dependent Protein Kinase II Activity in Diabetic Mouse Retina

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Young-Hee; Kim, Yoon-Sook; Kang, Sang-Soo; Cho, Gyeong-Jae; Choi, Wan-Sung

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE This study investigated the effects of resveratrol, a natural polyphenol with neuroprotective properties, on retinal neuronal cell death mediated by diabetes-induced activation of Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII). RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Diabetes was induced in C57BL/6 mice by five consecutive intraperitoneal injections of 55 mg/kg streptozotocin (STZ). Control mice received buffer. All mice were killed 2 months after the injections, and the extent of neuronal cell death, CaMKII, and phospho-CaMKII protein expression levels and CaMKII kinase activity were examined in the retinas. To assess the role of CaMKII in the death of retinal neurons, a small-interfering RNA (siRNA) or specific inhibitor of CaMKII was injected into the right vitreous humor, and vehicle only was injected into the left vitreous humor, 2 days before death. Resveratrol (20 mg/kg) was administered by oral gavage daily for 4 weeks, beginning 1 month after the fifth injection of either STZ or buffer. RESULTS The death of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs), CaMKII, phospho-CaMKII protein levels, and CaMKII activity were all greatly increased in the retinas of diabetic mice compared with controls, 2 months after induction of diabetes. Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase (TdT)-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling (TUNEL)-positive signals co-localized with CaMKII- and phospho-CaMKII immunoreactive RGCs. However, in addition to CaMKII knockdown and inhibition by siRNA or a specific inhibitor, respectively, resveratrol provided complete protection from diabetes-induced retinal cell death. CONCLUSIONS In the present study, resveratrol prevented diabetes-induced RGC death via CaMKII downregulation, implying that resveratrol may have potential therapeutic applications for prevention of diabetes-induced visual dysfunction. PMID:20424226

  19. Kinase-interacting substrate screening is a novel method to identify kinase substrates

    PubMed Central

    Amano, Mutsuki; Hamaguchi, Tomonari; Shohag, Md. Hasanuzzaman; Kozawa, Kei; Kato, Katsuhiro; Zhang, Xinjian; Yura, Yoshimitsu; Matsuura, Yoshiharu; Kataoka, Chikako; Nishioka, Tomoki

    2015-01-01

    Protein kinases play pivotal roles in numerous cellular functions; however, the specific substrates of each protein kinase have not been fully elucidated. We have developed a novel method called kinase-interacting substrate screening (KISS). Using this method, 356 phosphorylation sites of 140 proteins were identified as candidate substrates for Rho-associated kinase (Rho-kinase/ROCK2), including known substrates. The KISS method was also applied to additional kinases, including PKA, MAPK1, CDK5, CaMK1, PAK7, PKN, LYN, and FYN, and a lot of candidate substrates and their phosphorylation sites were determined, most of which have not been reported previously. Among the candidate substrates for Rho-kinase, several functional clusters were identified, including the polarity-associated proteins, such as Scrib. We found that Scrib plays a crucial role in the regulation of subcellular contractility by assembling into a ternary complex with Rho-kinase and Shroom2 in a phosphorylation-dependent manner. We propose that the KISS method is a comprehensive and useful substrate screen for various kinases. PMID:26101221

  20. Myosin II ATPase activity mediates the long-term potentiation-induced exodus of stable F-actin bound by drebrin A from dendritic spines.

    PubMed

    Mizui, Toshiyuki; Sekino, Yuko; Yamazaki, Hiroyuki; Ishizuka, Yuta; Takahashi, Hideto; Kojima, Nobuhiko; Kojima, Masami; Shirao, Tomoaki

    2014-01-01

    The neuronal actin-binding protein drebrin A forms a stable structure with F-actin in dendritic spines. NMDA receptor activation causes an exodus of F-actin bound by drebrin A (DA-actin) from dendritic spines, suggesting a pivotal role for DA-actin exodus in synaptic plasticity. We quantitatively assessed the extent of DA-actin localization to spines using the spine-dendrite ratio of drebrin A in cultured hippocampal neurons, and found that (1) chemical long-term potentiation (LTP) stimulation induces rapid DA-actin exodus and subsequent DA-actin re-entry in dendritic spines, (2) Ca(2+) influx through NMDA receptors regulates the exodus and the basal accumulation of DA-actin, and (3) the DA-actin exodus is blocked by myosin II ATPase inhibitor, but is not blocked by myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) or Rho-associated kinase (ROCK) inhibitors. These results indicate that myosin II mediates the interaction between NMDA receptor activation and DA-actin exodus in LTP induction. Furthermore, myosin II seems to be activated by a rapid actin-linked mechanism rather than slow MLC phosphorylation. Thus the myosin-II mediated DA-actin exodus might be an initial event in LTP induction, triggering actin polymerization and spine enlargement.

  1. Neuronal angiotensin II type 1 receptor upregulation in heart failure: activation of activator protein 1 and Jun N-terminal kinase.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dongmei; Gao, Lie; Roy, Shyamal K; Cornish, Kurtis G; Zucker, Irving H

    2006-10-27

    Chronic heart failure (CHF) is a leading cause of mortality in developed countries. Angiotensin II (Ang II) plays an important role in the development and progression of CHF. Many of the important functions of Ang II are mediated by the Ang II type 1 receptor (AT(1)R), including the increase in sympathetic nerve activity in CHF. However, the central regulation of the AT(1)R in the setting of CHF is not well understood. This study investigated the AT(1)R in the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM) of rabbits with CHF, its downstream pathway, and its gene regulation by the transcription factor activator protein 1 (AP-1). Studies were performed in 5 groups of rabbits: sham (n=5), pacing-induced (3 to 4 weeks) CHF (n=5), CHF with intracerebroventricular (ICV) losartan treatment (n=5), normal with ICV Ang II treatment (n=5), and normal with ICV Ang II plus losartan treatment (n=5). AT(1)R mRNA and protein expressions, plasma Ang II, and AP-1-DNA binding activity were significantly higher in RVLM of CHF compared with Sham rabbits (240.4+/-30.2%, P<0.01; 206.6+/-25.8%, P<0.01; 280+/-36.5%, P<0.05; 207+/-16.4%, P<0.01, respectively). Analysis of the stress-activated protein kinase/Jun N-terminal kinase (SAPK/JNK) pathway showed that phosphorylated c-Jun proteins, phosphorylated JNK proteins, and JNK activity increased significantly in RVLM of CHF compared with sham (262.9+/-48.1%, 213.8+/-27.7%, 148.2+/-10.1% of control, respectively). Importantly, ICV losartan in CHF rabbits attenuated these increases. ICV Ang II in normal rabbits simulated the molecular changes seen in CHF. This effect was blocked by concomitant ICV losartan. In addition, Ang II-induced AT(1)R expression was blocked by losartan and a JNK inhibitor, but not by extracellular signal-regulated kinase or p38 MAP kinase inhibitors in a neuronal cell culture. These data suggest that central Ang II activates the AT(1)R, SAPK/JNK pathway. AP-1 may further regulate gene expression in RVLM in the CHF state.

  2. Early interference with p44/42 mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling in hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus attenuates angiotensin II-induced hypertension.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yang; Xue, Bao-Jian; Zhang, Zhi-Hua; Wei, Shun-Guang; Beltz, Terry G; Guo, Fang; Johnson, Alan Kim; Felder, Robert B

    2013-04-01

    Blood-borne angiotensin II (ANG II) can upregulate p44/42 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling and ANG II type-1 receptors in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN), a critical cardiovascular and autonomic center. We tested the hypothesis that brain p44/42 MAPK signaling contributes to the development of ANG II-induced hypertension. The ANG II infusion (120 ng/kg per min, subcutaneously) induced increases in phosphorylated p44/42 MAPK and ANG II type-1 receptors in the PVN after 1 week, before the onset of hypertension, that were sustained as hypertension developed during a 2- or 3-week infusion protocol. Bilateral PVN microinjections of small interfering RNAs for p44/42 MAPK, at the onset of the ANG II infusion or 1 week later, prevented the early increase in p44/42 MAPK activity. The early treatment normalized ANG II type-1 receptor expression in the PVN and attenuated the hypertensive response to the 2-week infusion of ANG II. The later small interfering RNA microinjections had a transient effect on ANG II type-1 receptor expression in PVN and no effect on the hypertensive response to the 3-week infusion of ANG II. The early treatment also normalized the pressure response to ganglionic blockade. The ANG II infusion induced increases in mRNA for proinflammatory cytokines that were not affected by either small interfering RNA treatment. These results suggest that the full expression of ANG II-induced hypertension depends on p44/42 MAPK-mediated effects. A potential role for p44/42 MAPK in modulating the ANG II-induced central inflammatory response might also be considered. MAPK signaling in PVN may be a novel target for early intervention in the progression of ANG II-dependent hypertension.

  3. MAP kinase-signaling controls nuclear translocation of tripeptidyl-peptidase II in response to DNA damage and oxidative stress

    SciTech Connect

    Preta, Giulio; Klark, Rainier de; Chakraborti, Shankhamala; Glas, Rickard

    2010-08-27

    Research highlights: {yields} Nuclear translocation of TPPII occurs in response to different DNA damage inducers. {yields} Nuclear accumulation of TPPII is linked to ROS and anti-oxidant enzyme levels. {yields} MAPKs control nuclear accumulation of TPPII. {yields} Inhibited nuclear accumulation of TPPII decreases DNA damage-induced {gamma}-H2AX expression. -- Abstract: Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are a continuous hazard in eukaroytic cells by their ability to cause damage to biomolecules, in particular to DNA. Previous data indicated that the cytosolic serine peptidase tripeptidyl-peptidase II (TPPII) translocates into the nucleus of most tumor cell lines in response to {gamma}-irradiation and ROS production; an event that promoted p53 expression as well as caspase-activation. We here observed that nuclear translocation of TPPII was dependent on signaling by MAP kinases, including p38MAPK. Further, this was caused by several types of DNA-damaging drugs, a DNA cross-linker (cisplatinum), an inhibitor of topoisomerase II (etoposide), and to some extent also by nucleoside-analogues (5-fluorouracil, hydroxyurea). In the minority of tumor cell lines where TPPII was not translocated into the nucleus in response to DNA damage we observed reduced intracellular ROS levels, and the expression levels of redox defense systems were increased. Further, treatment with the ROS-inducer {gamma}-hexa-chloro-cyclohexane ({gamma}-HCH, lindane), an inhibitor of GAP junctions, restored nuclear translocation of TPPII in these cell lines upon {gamma}-irradiation. Moreover, blocking nuclear translocation of TPPII in etoposide-treated cells, by using a peptide-derived inhibitor (Z-Gly-Leu-Ala-OH), attenuated expression of {gamma}-H2AX in {gamma}-irradiated melanoma cells. Our results indicated a role for TPPII in MAPK-dependent DNA damage signaling.

  4. Identification of a BET family Bromodomain / Casein Kinase II / TAF-containing complex as a regulator of mitotic condensin function

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyun-Soo; Mukhopadhyay, Rituparna; Rothbart, Scott B.; Silva, Andrea C.; Vanoosthuyse, Vincent; Radovani, Ernest; Kislinger, Thomas; Roguev, Assen; Ryan, Colm J.; Xu, Jiewei; Jahari, Harlizawati; Hardwick, Kevin G.; Greenblatt, Jack F.; Krogan, Nevan J.; Fillingham, Jeffrey S.; Strahl, Brian D.; Bouhassira, Eric E.; Edelmann, Winfried; Keogh, Michael-Christopher

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Condensin is a central regulator of mitotic genome structure, with mutants showing poorly condensed chromosomes and profound segregation defects. Here we identify NCT complex, comprising the Nrc1 BET-family tandem bromodomain protein (SPAC631.02), Casein Kinase II (CKII) and several TAFs, as a regulator of condensin function. We show that NCT and condensin bind similar genomic regions, but only briefly co-localize during the periods of chromosome condensation and decondensation. This pattern of NCT binding at the core centromere, the region of maximal condensin enrichment, tracks the abundance of acetylated histone H4, as regulated by the Hat1-Mis16 acetyltransferase complex and recognized by the first Nrc1 bromodomain. Strikingly, mutants in NCT or Hat1-Mis16 restore the formation of segregation-competent chromosomes in cells containing defective condensin. These results are consistent with a model where NCT targets CKII to chromatin in a cell cycle-directed manner to modulate the activity of condensin during chromosome condensation and decondensation. PMID:24565511

  5. Intracellular Ca2+ and Ca2+/Calmodulin-Dependent Kinase II Mediate Acute Potentiation of Neurotransmitter Release by Neurotrophin-3

    PubMed Central

    He, Xiang-ping; Yang, Feng; Xie, Zuo-ping; Lu, Bai

    2000-01-01

    Neurotrophins have been shown to acutely modulate synaptic transmission in a variety of systems, but the underlying signaling mechanisms remain unclear. Here we provide evidence for an unusual mechanism that mediates synaptic potentiation at the neuromuscular junction (NMJ) induced by neurotrophin-3 (NT3), using Xenopus nerve–muscle co-culture. Unlike brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), which requires Ca2+ influx for its acute effect, NT3 rapidly enhances spontaneous transmitter release at the developing NMJ even when Ca2+ influx is completely blocked, suggesting that the NT3 effect is independent of extracellular Ca2+. Depletion of intracellular Ca2+ stores, or blockade of inositol 1, 4, 5-trisphosphate (IP3) or ryanodine receptors, prevents the NT3-induced synaptic potentiation. Blockade of IP3 receptors can not prevent BDNF-induced potentiation, suggesting that BDNF and NT3 use different mechanisms to potentiate transmitter release. Inhibition of Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent kinase II (CaMKII) completely blocks the acute effect of NT3. Furthermore, the NT3-induced potentiation requires a continuous activation of CaMKII, because application of the CaMKII inhibitor KN62 reverses the previously established NT3 effect. Thus, NT3 potentiates neurotransmitter secretion by stimulating Ca2+ release from intracellular stores through IP3 and/or ryanodine receptors, leading to an activation of CaMKII. PMID:10811820

  6. Structural Properties of Human CaMKII Ca2+ /Calmodulin-Dependent Protein Kinase II using X-ray Crystallography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Yumeng Melody; McSpadden, Ethan; Kuriyan, John; Department of Molecular; Cell Biology; Department of Chemistry Team

    To this day, human memory storage remains a mystery as we can at most describe the process vaguely on a cellular level. Switch-like properties of Calcium/Calmodulin-Dependent Protein Kinase II make it a leading candidate in understanding the molecular basis of human memory. The protein crystal was placed in the beam of a synchrotron source and the x-ray crystallography data was collected as reflections on a diffraction pattern that undergo Fourier transform to obtain the electron density. We observed two drastic differences from our solved structure at 2.75Å to a similar construct of the mouse CaMKII association domain. Firstly, our structure is a 6-fold symmetric dodecamer, whereas the previously published construct was a 7-fold symmetric tetradecamer. This suggests the association domain of human CaMKII is a dynamic structure that is triggered subunit exchange process. Secondly, in our structure the N-terminal tag is docked as an additional beta-strand on an uncapped beta-sheet present in each association domain protomer. This is concrete evidence of the involvement of the polypeptide docking site in the molecular mechanism underlining subunit exchange. In the future, we would like to selectively inhibit the exchange process while not disrupting the other functionalities of CaMKII.

  7. Ocular dominance plasticity is stably maintained in the absence of alpha calcium calmodulin kinase II (alphaCaMKII) autophosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Taha, Sharif A; Stryker, Michael P

    2005-11-08

    The molecule alpha calcium calmodulin kinase II (alphaCaMKII) is known to play a fundamental role in the induction of many forms of synaptic plasticity. A major theory of alphaCaMKII function proposes that autophosphorylation of the molecule mediates not only the induction but also the maintenance of synaptic plasticity. To test this hypothesis, we assessed ocular dominance plasticity in genetically engineered mice that carry a mutation preventing autophosphorylation of alphaCaMKII. These mutant mice are deficient in plasticity after monocular deprivation, but a sufficiently long period of monocular deprivation will induce ocular dominance plasticity. After induction of ocular dominance plasticity, the stability of the induced changes was assayed after binocular deprivation. Plasticity in homozygous mutant animals was as stable as that measured in WT littermates; also, response characteristics did not differ between the two groups. Our results suggest that alphaCaMKII autophosphorylation is required for the induction of ocular dominance plasticity but is not needed for its stable maintenance thereafter.

  8. Melatonin synthesis in the bovine pineal gland is regulated by type II cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase.

    PubMed

    Maronde, E; Middendorff, R; Telgmann, R; Müller, D; Hemmings, B; Taskén, K; Olcese, J

    1997-02-01

    We investigated the expression of regulatory (R) and catalytic (C) subunits of cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase (cAK; ATP:protein phosphotransferase; EC 2.7.1.37) in the bovine pineal gland. In total RNA extracts of bovine pineal glands moderate levels of RI alpha/RII beta and high levels of C alpha and C beta mRNA were found. We were able to detect a strong signal for RII and C subunit at the protein level, whereas RI was apparently absent. Probing sections of the intact bovine pineal gland with RI and RII antibodies stained only RII in pinealocytes. Pairs of cyclic AMP analogues complementing each other in activation of type II cAK, but not cAKI-directed analogue pairs, showed synergistic stimulation of melatonin synthesis. Moreover, melatonin synthesis stimulated by the physiological activator norepinephrine in pineal cell cultures was inhibited by cAK antagonists. Taken together these results show the presence of RII regulatory and both C alpha and C beta catalytic subunits and thus cAKII holoenzyme in the bovine pineal gland. The almost complete inhibition of norepinephrine-mediated melatonin synthesis by the cAK antagonists emphasizes the dominant role of cyclic AMP as the second messenger and cAK as the transducer in bovine pineal signal transduction.

  9. A novel endogenous PP2C-like phosphatase dephosphorylates casein kinase II-phosphorylated Physarum fragmin.

    PubMed

    Waelkens, E; de Corte, V; Merlevede, W; Vandekerckhove, J; Gettemans, J

    2000-12-20

    Plasmodial fragmin, a Physarum polycephalum F-actin severing and capping protein, is phosphorylated by casein kinase II at Ser(266) (De Corte, V., Gettemans, J., De Ville, Y., Waelkens, E., and Vandekerckchove, J. (1996), Biochemistry 35, 5472-5480). In this study, we report the purification and characterization of the corresponding fragmin phosphatases. One of the enzymes was purified to near homogeneity from a cytosolic extract; it dephosphorylates CKII-phosphorylated fragmin, a peptide encompassing the CKII phosphorylation site of fragmin as well as histone 2A, CKII-phosphorylated casein and the CKII model-peptide substrate: R(3)E(3)S(P)E(3). Its activity was highly stimulated by Mn(2+) and Mg(2+), and based on its lack of sensitivity toward phosphatase effectors we could exclude similarities with PP1, PP2A and PP2B phosphatases. All biochemical properties of the phosphatase point to a PP2C-like enzyme. A second phosphatase dephosphorylating fragmin was identified as a Physarum alkaline phosphatase.

  10. Transcriptional mechanism of vascular endothelial growth factor-induced expression of protein kinaseII in chronic lymphocytic leukaemia cells

    PubMed Central

    Al-Sanabra, Ola; Duckworth, Andrew D.; Glenn, Mark A.; Brown, Benjamin R. B.; Angelillo, Piera; Lee, Kelvin; Herbert, John; Falciani, Francesco; Kalakonda, Nagesh; Slupsky, Joseph R.

    2017-01-01

    A key feature of chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL) cells is overexpressed protein kinaseII (PKCβII), an S/T kinase important in the pathogenesis of this and other B cell malignancies. The mechanisms contributing to enhanced transcription of the gene coding for PKCβII, PRKCB, in CLL cells remain poorly described, but could be important because of potential insight into how the phenotype of these cells is regulated. Here, we show that SP1 is the major driver of PKCβII expression in CLL cells where enhanced association of this transcription factor with the PRKCB promoter is likely because of the presence of histone marks permissive of gene activation. We also show how vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) regulates PRKCB promoter function in CLL cells, stimulating PKCβ gene transcription via increased association of SP1 and decreased association of STAT3. Taken together, these results are the first to demonstrate a clear role for SP1 in the up regulation of PKCβII expression in CLL cells, and the first to link SP1 with the pathogenesis of this and potentially other B cell malignancies where PKCβII is overexpressed. PMID:28233872

  11. Mechanism of IFN-γ-induced Endocytosis of Tight Junction Proteins: Myosin II-dependent Vacuolarization of the Apical Plasma Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Utech, Markus; Ivanov, Andrei I.; Samarin, Stanislav N.; Bruewer, Matthias; Turner, Jerrold R.; Mrsny, Randall J.; Parkos, Charles A.; Nusrat, Asma

    2005-01-01

    Disruption of epithelial barrier by proinflammatory cytokines such as IFN-γ represents a major pathophysiological consequence of intestinal inflammation. We have previously shown that IFN-γ increases paracellular permeability in model T84 epithelial cells by inducing endocytosis of tight junction (TJ) proteins occludin, JAM-A, and claudin-1. The present study was designed to dissect mechanisms of IFN-γ-induced endocytosis of epithelial TJ proteins. IFN-γ treatment of T84 cells resulted in internalization of TJ proteins into large actin-coated vacuoles that originated from the apical plasma membrane and resembled the vacuolar apical compartment (VAC) previously observed in epithelial cells that lose cell polarity. The IFN-γ dependent formation of VACs required ATPase activity of a myosin II motor but was not dependent on rapid turnover of F-actin. In addition, activated myosin II was observed to colocalize with VACs after IFN-γ exposure. Pharmacological analyses revealed that formation of VACs and endocytosis of TJ proteins was mediated by Rho-associated kinase (ROCK) but not myosin light chain kinase (MLCK). Furthermore, IFN-γ treatment resulted in activation of Rho GTPase and induced expressional up-regulation of ROCK. These results, for the first time, suggest that IFN-γ induces endocytosis of epithelial TJ proteins via RhoA/ROCK-mediated, myosin II-dependent formation of VACs. PMID:16055505

  12. Production of superoxide from photosystem II-light harvesting complex II supercomplex in STN8 kinase knock-out rice mutants under photoinhibitory illumination.

    PubMed

    Poudyal, Roshan Sharma; Nath, Krishna; Zulfugarov, Ismayil S; Lee, Choon-Hwan

    2016-09-01

    When phosphorylation of Photosystem (PS) II core proteins is blocked in STN8 knock-out mutants of rice (Oryza sativa) under photoinhibitory illumination, the mobilization of PSII supercomplex is prevented. We have previously proposed that more superoxide (O2(-)) is produced from PSII in the mutant (Nath et al., 2013, Plant J. 76, 675-686). Here, we clarify the type and site for the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Using both histochemical and fluorescence probes, we observed that, compared with wild-type (WT) leaves, levels of ROS, including O2(-) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), were increased when leaves from mutant plants were illuminated with excess light. However, singlet oxygen production was not enhanced under such conditions. When superoxide dismutase was inhibited, O2(-) production was increased, indicating that it is the initial event prior to H2O2 production. In thylakoids isolated from WT leaves, kinase was active in the presence of ATP, and spectrophotometric analysis of nitrobluetetrazolium absorbance for O2(-) confirmed that PSII-driven superoxide production was greater in the mutant thylakoids than in the WT. This contrast in levels of PSII-driven superoxide production between the mutants and the WT plants was confirmed by conducting protein oxidation assays of PSII particles from osstn8 leaves under strong illumination. Those assays also demonstrated that PSII-LHCII supercomplex proteins were oxidized more in the mutant, thereby implying that PSII particles incur greater damage even though D1 degradation during PSII-supercomplex mobilization is partially blocked in the mutant. These results suggest that O2(-) is the major form of ROS produced in the mutant, and that the damaged PSII in the supercomplex is the primary source of O2(-).

  13. Activation of mTOR/p70S6 kinase by ANG II inhibits insulin-stimulated endothelial nitric oxide synthase and vasodilation

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Hyun-Ju; Martinez-Lemus, Luis A.; Sowers, James R.

    2012-01-01

    Elevated tissue levels of angiotensin II (ANG II) are associated with impairment of insulin actions in metabolic and cardiovascular tissues. ANG II-stimulated activation of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR)/p70 S6 kinase (p70S6K) in cardiovascular tissues is implicated in cardiac hypertrophy and vascular remodeling. However, the role of ANG II-stimulated mTOR/p70S6K in vascular endothelium is poorly understood. In the present study, we observed that ANG II stimulated p70S6K in bovine aortic endothelial cells. ANG II increased phosphorylation of insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS-1) at Ser636/639 and inhibited the insulin-stimulated phosphorylation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS). An inhibitor of mTOR, rapamycin, attenuated the ANG II-stimulated phosphorylation of p70S6K and phosphorylation of IRS-1 (Ser636/639) and blocked the ability of ANG II to impair insulin-stimulated phosphorylation of eNOS, nitric oxide production, and mesenteric-arteriole vasodilation. Moreover, point mutations of IRS-1 at Ser636/639 to Ala prevented the ANG II-mediated inhibition of insulin signaling. From these results, we conclude that activation of mTOR/p70S6K by ANG II in vascular endothelium may contribute to impairment of insulin-stimulated vasodilation through phosphorylation of IRS-1 at Ser636/639. This ANG II-mediated impairment of vascular actions of insulin may help explain the role of ANG II as a link between insulin resistance and hypertension. PMID:22028412

  14. Extracellular signal-regulated kinase mediates expression of arginase II but not inducible nitric-oxide synthase in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated macrophages.

    PubMed

    Jin, Yi; Liu, Yusen; Nelin, Leif D

    2015-01-23

    The mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) have been shown to participate in iNOS induction following lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulation, while the role of MAPKs in the regulation of arginase remains unclear. We hypothesized that different MAPK family members are involved in iNOS and arginase expression following LPS stimulation. LPS-stimulated RAW 264.7 cells exhibited increased protein and mRNA levels for iNOS, arginase I, and arginase II; although the induction of arginase II was more robust than that for arginase I. A p38 inhibitor completely prevented iNOS expression while it only attenuated arginase II induction. In contrast, a MEK1/2 inhibitor (ERK pathway) completely abolished arginase II expression while actually enhancing iNOS induction in LPS-stimulated cells. Arginase II promoter activity was increased by ∼4-fold following LPS-stimulation, which was prevented by the ERK pathway inhibitor. Arginase II promoter activity was unaffected by a p38 inhibitor or JNK pathway interference. Transfection with a construct expressing a constitutively active RAS mutant increased LPS-induced arginase II promoter activity, while transfection with a vector expressing a dominant negative ERK2 mutant or a vector expressing MKP-3 inhibited the arginase II promoter activity. LPS-stimulated nitric oxide (NO) production was increased following siRNA-mediated knockdown of arginase II and decreased when arginase II was overexpressed. Our results demonstrate that while both the ERK and p38 pathways regulate arginase II induction in LPS-stimulated macrophages, iNOS induction by LPS is dependent on p38 activation. These results suggest that differential inhibition of the MAPK pathway may be a potential therapeutic strategy to regulate macrophage phenotype.

  15. Sulfur Dioxide Inhibits Extracellular Signal-regulated Kinase Signaling to Attenuate Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Proliferation in Angiotensin II-induced Hypertensive Mice

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Hui-Juan; Huang, Ya-Qian; Chen, Qing-Hua; Tian, Xiao-Yu; Liu, Jia; Tang, Chao-Shu; Jin, Hong-Fang; Du, Jun-Bao

    2016-01-01

    Background: Clarifying the mechanisms underlying vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) proliferation is important for the prevention and treatment of vascular remodeling and the reverse of hyperplastic lesions. Previous research has shown that the gaseous signaling molecule sulfur dioxide (SO2) inhibits VSMC proliferation, but the mechanism for the inhibition of the angiotensin II (AngII)-induced VSMC proliferation by SO2 has not been fully elucidated. This study was designed to investigate if SO2 inhibited VSMC proliferation in mice with hypertension induced by AngII. Methods: Thirty-six male C57 mice were randomly divided into control, AngII, and AngII + SO2 groups. Mice in AngII group and AngII + SO2 group received a capsule-type AngII pump implanted under the skin of the back at a slow-release dose of 1000 ng·kg−1·min−1. In addition, mice in AngII + SO2 received intraperitoneal injections of SO2 donor. Arterial blood pressure of tail artery was determined. The thickness of the aorta was measured by elastic fiber staining, and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) and phosphorylated-extracellular signal-regulated kinase (P-ERK) were detected in aortic tissues. The concentration of SO2 in serum and aortic tissue homogenate supernatant was measured using high-performance liquid chromatography with fluorescence determination. In the in vitro study, VSMC of A7R5 cell lines was divided into six groups: control, AngII, AngII + SO2, PD98059 (an inhibitor of ERK phosphorylation), AngII + PD98059, and AngII + SO2 + PD98059. Expression of PCNA, ERK, and P-ERK was determined by Western blotting. Results: In animal experiment, compared with the control group, AngII markedly increased blood pressure (P < 0.01) and thickened the aortic wall in mice (P < 0.05) with an increase in the expression of PCNA (P < 0.05). SO2, however, reduced the systemic hypertension and the wall thickness induced by AngII (P < 0.05). It inhibited the increased expression of PCNA and P

  16. Renoprotective and blood pressure-lowering effect of dietary soy protein via protein kinase C beta II inhibition in a rat model of metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Palanisamy, Nallasamy; Viswanathan, Periyasamy; Ravichandran, Mambakkam Katchapeswaran; Anuradha, Carani Venkataraman

    2010-01-01

    We studied whether substitution of soy protein for casein can improve insulin sensitivity, lower blood pressure (BP), and inhibit protein kinase C betaII (PKCbetaII) activation in kidney in an acquired model of metabolic syndrome. Adult male rats were fed 4 different diets: (i) starch (60%) and casein (20%) (CCD), (ii) fructose (60%) and casein (20%) (FCD), (iii) fructose (60%) and soy protein (20%) (FSD), and (iv) starch (60%) and soy protein (20%) (CSD). Renal function parameters, BP, pressor mechanisms, PKCbetaII expression, oxidative stress, and renal histology were evaluated after 60 days. FCD rats displayed insulin resistance and significant changes in body weight, kidney weight, urine volume, plasma and urine electrolytes accompanied by significant changes in renal function parameters compared with CCD rats. Elevated BP, plasma angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) activity, renal oxidative stress, and reduced nitrite (NO) and kallikrein activity were observed. Western blot analysis revealed enhanced renal expression of membrane-associated PKCbetaII in the FCD group. Histology showed fatty infiltration and thickening of glomeruli while urinary protein profile revealed a 5-fold increase in albumin. Substitution of soy protein for casein improved insulin sensitivity, lowered BP and PKCbetaII activation and restored renal function. Antioxidant action, inhibitory effect on ACE and PKCbetaII activation, and increased availability of kinins and NO could be contributing mechanisms for the benefits of dietary soy protein.

  17. Catalytic unit-independent phosphorylation and dephosphorylation of type II regulatory subunit of cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase in rat liver plasma membranes.

    PubMed Central

    Kiss, Z; Luo, Y; Vereb, G

    1986-01-01

    Rat liver plasma membranes contain a 55 kDa protein which proved to be identical with type II regulatory subunit (RII) of the cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase (kinase A) by several criteria (gel electrophoretic behaviour, peptide map, position of the autophosphorylated site). Analysis of phosphopeptide maps revealed that the membrane-bound RII was phosphorylated by a kinase which is unrelated to the catalytic unit (C) of kinase A. Dephosphorylation of the membrane-bound RII by an endogenous phosphatase was stimulated by both cyclic AMP and fluoride. Addition of C did not stimulate dephosphorylation even in the presence of ADP; moreover, protein inhibitor of C did not modify the effects of cyclic AMP or fluoride. The effects of both cyclic AMP and fluoride were, however, inhibited by C. Results indicate that rat liver plasma membranes contain a phosphorylation-dephosphorylation system for which RII is a relatively specific substrate. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. PMID:3010951

  18. G protein-coupled receptor kinase and beta-arrestin-mediated desensitization of the angiotensin II type 1A receptor elucidated by diacylglycerol dynamics.

    PubMed

    Violin, Jonathan D; Dewire, Scott M; Barnes, William G; Lefkowitz, Robert J

    2006-11-24

    Receptor desensitization progressively limits responsiveness of cells to chronically applied stimuli. Desensitization in the continuous presence of agonist has been difficult to study with available assay methods. Here, we used a fluorescence resonance energy transfer-based live cell assay for the second messenger diacylglycerol to measure desensitization of a model seven-transmembrane receptor, the Gq-coupled angiotensin II type 1(A) receptor, expressed in human embryonic kidney 293 cells. In response to angiotensin II, we observed a transient diacylglycerol response reflecting activation and complete desensitization of the receptor within 2-5 min. By utilizing a variety of approaches including graded tetracycline-inducible receptor expression, mutated receptors, and overexpression or short interfering RNA-mediated silencing of putative components of the cellular desensitization machinery, we conclude that the rate and extent of receptor desensitization are critically determined by the following: receptor concentration in the plasma membrane; the presence of phosphorylation sites on the carboxyl terminus of the receptor; kinase activity of G protein-coupled receptor kinase 2, but not of G protein-coupled receptor kinases 3, 5, or 6; and stoichiometric expression of beta-arrestin. The findings introduce the use of the biosensor diacylglycerol reporter as a powerful means for studying Gq-coupled receptor desensitization and document that, at the levels of receptor overexpression commonly used in such studies, the properties of the desensitization process are markedly perturbed and do not reflect normal cellular physiology.

  19. Sevoflurane Stimulates MAP Kinase Signal transduction through the Activation of PKC α and βII in Fetal Rat Cerebral Cortex Cultured Neuron

    PubMed Central

    Hasegawa, Jun; Takekoshi, Susumu; Nagata, Hidetaka; Osamura, R. Yoshiyuki; Suzuki, Toshiyasu

    2006-01-01

    Protein kinase C (PKC) is a key enzyme that participates in various neuronal functions. PKC has also been identified as a target molecule for general anesthetic actions. Raf, mitogen-activated protein kinase (MEK) and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK1/2) have been thought to be target effectors of PKC. In the present study, we attempted to evaluate the effect of sevoflurane on PKC/MAPK cascade signaling in cultured fetal rat cerebral ­cortex neurons, prepared from embryonic day 18 fetuses. The effects of sevoflurane on the translocation of 7 PKC isoforms (α, βI, βII, γ, δ, ɛ and ζ) were observed by immunoblotting using isoform-selective antibodies to PKCs. The treatment of neurons with sevoflurane induced the translocation of PKC α and PKC βII species from the cytosol to the membrane fraction, which indicated the activation of these PKC isoforms. In contrast, there was no clear change in the distribution of other PKC isoforms. We next examined whether the specific activation of PKC α and βII by sevoflurane could stimulate the MAP kinase signaling pathway in cultured neurons. Raf phosphorylation was increased by the administration of 0.25 mM sevoflurane. The phosphorylation of Raf proteins reached a maximum at 5–10 min. Subsequently, the phosphorylation of MEK proteins was increased at 10–15 min after sevoflurane treatments. That of ERK proteins was induced at 15–60 min. Moreover, the phosphorylation of ERK induced by sevoflurane was significantly decreased by the treatment of PKC inhibitor (staurosporine) and MEK inhibitor (PD98059). On the other hand, the contents of total Raf, MEK and ERK proteins were relatively constant at all times examined. To examine the ­localization of phosphorylated-ERK protein, immunohistochemical staining of sevoflurane-treated cultured neurons was performed. The phosphorylated-ERK proteins were markedly accumulated in both the cytosol of the cell body and the neurites in the neuronal cells with time after 0

  20. TRPM8 downregulation by angiotensin II in vascular smooth muscle cells is involved in hypertension.

    PubMed

    Huang, Fang; Ni, Min; Zhang, Jing-Ming; Li, Dong-Jie; Shen, Fu-Ming

    2017-04-01

    Angiotensin II (Ang II)-induced injury of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) serves an important role in hypertension and other cardiovascular disorders. Transient receptor potential melastatin 8 (TRPM8) is a thermally‑regulated Ca2+‑permeable channel that is activated by reduced body temperature. Although several recent studies have revealed the regulatory effect of TRPM8 in vascular tone and hypertension, the precise role of TRPM8 in dysfunction of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) induced by Ang II remains elusive. In the present study, the possible function of TRPM8 in Ang II‑induced VSMCs malfunction in vivo and in vitro was investigated. In the aortae from rats that had undergone a two‑kidney one‑clip operation, which is a widely‑used renovascular hypertension model, the mRNA and protein levels of TRPM8 were reduced. In addition, exogenous Ang II treatment decreased TRPM8 mRNA and protein expression levels in primary cultures of rat VSMCs. TRPM8 activation by menthol, a pharmacological agonist, in VSMCs, significantly attenuated the Ang II‑induced increase in reactive oxygen species and H2O2 production. In addition, TRPM8 activation reduced the Ang II‑induced upregulation of NADPH oxidase (NOX) 1 and NOX4 in VSMCs. Furthermore, TRPM8 activation relieved the Ang II‑induced activation of ras homolog gene family, member A‑rho associated protein kinase 2 and janus kinase 2 signaling pathways in VSMCs. In conclusion, the results presented in the current study indicated that TRPM8 downregulation by Ang II in VSMCs may be involved in hypertension.

  1. Inhibition of protein kinase C α/βII and activation of c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase mediate glycyrrhetinic acid induced apoptosis in non-small cell lung cancer NCI-H460 cells.

    PubMed

    Song, Junho; Ko, Hyun-suk; Sohn, Eun Jung; Kim, Bonglee; Kim, Jung Hyo; Kim, Hee Jeong; Kim, Chulwoo; Kim, Jai-eun; Kim, Sung-Hoon

    2014-02-15

    Though glycyrrhetinic acid (GA) from Glycyrrhiza glabra was known to exert antioxidant, antifilarial, hepatoprotective, anti-inflammatory and anti-tumor effects, the antitumor mechanism of GA was not clearly elucidated in non-small cell lung cancer cells (NSCLCCs). Thus, in the present study, the underlying apoptotic mechanism of GA was examined in NCI-H460 NSCLCCs. GA significantly suppressed the viability of NCI-H460 and A549 non-small lung cancer cells. Also, GA significantly increased the sub G1 population by cell cycle analysis and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) positive cells in a concentration dependent manner in NCI-H460 non-small lung cancer cells. Consistently, GA cleaved poly (ADP-ribosyl) polymerase (PARP), caspase 9/3, attenuated the expression of Bcl-XL, Bcl-2, Cyclin D1 and Cyclin E in NCI-H460 cells. Interestingly, GA attenuated the phosphorylation of protein kinase C (PKC) α/βII and extracellular activated protein kinase (ERK) as well as activated the phosphorylation of PKC δ and c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase in NCI-H460 cells. Conversely, PKC promoter phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) and JNK inhibitor SP600125 reversed the cleavages of caspase 3 and PARP induced by GA in NCI-H460 cells. Overall, our findings suggest that GA induces apoptosis via inhibition of PKC α/βII and activation of JNK in NCI-H460 non-small lung cancer cells as a potent anticancer candidate for lung cancer treatment.

  2. Class II phosphoinositide 3-kinase C2β regulates a novel signaling pathway involved in breast cancer progression

    PubMed Central

    Abbott, Jonathan J.; Piñeiro, Roberto; Buus, Richard; Iezzi, Manuela; Ricci, Francesca; Bergamaschi, Daniele; Ostano, Paola; Chiorino, Giovanna; Lattanzio, Rossano; Broggini, Massimo; Piantelli, Mauro; Maffucci, Tania; Falasca, Marco

    2016-01-01

    It is now well established that the enzymes phosphoinositide 3-kinases (PI3Ks) have a key role in the development and progression of many cancer types and indeed PI3Ks inhibitors are currently being tested in clinical trials. Although eight distinct PI3K isoforms exist, grouped into three classes, most of the evidence currently available are focused on one specific isoform with very little known about the potential role of the other members of this family in cancer. Here we demonstrate that the class II enzyme PI3K-C2β is overexpressed in several human breast cancer cell lines and in human breast cancer specimens. Our data indicate that PI3K-C2β regulates breast cancer cell growth in vitro and in vivo and that PI3K-C2β expression in breast tissues is correlated with the proliferative status of the tumor. Specifically we show that downregulation of PI3K-C2β in breast cancer cell lines reduces colony formation, induces cell cycle arrest and inhibits tumor growth, in particular in an estrogen-dependent in vivo xenograft. Investigation of the mechanism of the PI3K-C2β-dependent regulation of cell cycle progression and cell growth revealed that PI3K-C2β regulates cyclin B1 protein levels through modulation of microRNA miR-449a levels. Our data further demonstrate that downregulation of PI3K-C2β inhibits breast cancer cell invasion in vitro and breast cancer metastasis in vivo. Consistent with this, PI3K-C2β is highly expressed in lymph-nodes metastases compared to matching primary tumors. These data demonstrate that PI3K-C2β plays a pivotal role in breast cancer progression and in metastasis development. Our data indicate that PI3K-C2β may represent a key molecular switch that regulates a rate-limiting step in breast tumor progression and therefore it may be targeted to limit breast cancer spread. PMID:26934321

  3. Regulation of the multifunctional Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II by the PP2C phosphatase PPM1F in fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Harvey, Bohdan P; Banga, Satnam S; Ozer, Harvey L

    2004-06-04

    The regulation of the multifunctional calcium/calmodulin dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) by serine/threonine protein phosphatases has been extensively studied in neuronal cells; however, this regulation has not been investigated previously in fibroblasts. We cloned a cDNA from SV40-transformed human fibroblasts that shares 80% homology to a rat calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase phosphatase that encodes a PPM1F protein. By using extracts from transfected cells, PPM1F, but not a mutant (R326A) in the conserved catalytic domain, was found to dephosphorylate in vitro a peptide corresponding to the auto-inhibitory region of CaMKII. Further analyses demonstrated that PPM1F specifically dephosphorylates the phospho-Thr-286 in autophosphorylated CaMKII substrate and thus deactivates the CaMKII in vitro. Coimmunoprecipitation of CaMKII with PPM1F indicates that the two proteins can interact intracellularly. Binding of PPM1F to CaMKII involves multiple regions and is not dependent on intact phosphatase activity. Furthermore, overexpression of PPM1F in fibroblasts caused a reduction in the CaMKII-specific phosphorylation of the known substrate vimentin(Ser-82) following induction of the endogenous CaM kinase. These results identify PPM1F as a CaM kinase phosphatase within fibroblasts, although it may have additional functions intracellularly since it has been presented elsewhere as POPX2 and hFEM-2. We conclude that PPM1F, possibly together with the other previously described protein phosphatases PP1 and PP2A, can regulate the activity of CaMKII. Moreover, because PPM1F dephosphorylates the critical autophosphorylation site of CaMKII, we propose that this phosphatase plays a key role in the regulation of the kinase intracellularly.

  4. Identification of the In Vivo Casein Kinase II Phosphorylation Site within the Homeodomain of the Cardiac Tisue-Specifying Homeobox Gene Product Csx/Nkx2.5

    PubMed Central

    Kasahara, Hideko; Izumo, Seigo

    1999-01-01

    Csx/Nkx2.5, a member of the homeodomain-containing transcription factors, serves critical developmental functions in heart formation in vertebrates and nonvertebrates. In this study the putative nuclear localization signal (NLS) of Csx/Nkx2.5 was identified by site-directed mutagenesis to the amino terminus of the homeodomain, which is conserved in almost all homeodomain proteins. When the putative NLS of Csx/Nkx2.5 was mutated a significant amount of the cytoplasmically localized Csx/Nkx2.5 was unphosphorylated, in contrast to the nuclearly localized Csx/Nkx2.5, which is serine- and threonine-phosphorylated, suggesting that Csx/Nkx2.5 phosphorylation is regulated, at least in part, by intracellular localization. Tryptic phosphopeptide mapping indicated that Csx/Nkx2.5 has at least five phosphorylation sites. Using in-gel kinase assays, we detected a Csx/Nkx2.5 kinase whose molecular mass is approximately 40 kDa in both cytoplasmic and nuclear extracts. Mutational analysis and in vitro kinase assays suggested that this 40-kDa Csx/Nkx2.5 kinase is a catalytic subunit of casein kinase II (CKII) that phosphorylates the serine residue between the first and second helix of the homeodomain. This CKII site is phosphorylated in vivo. CKII-dependent phosphorylation of the homeodomain increased Csx/Nkx2.5 DNA binding. Serine-to-alanine mutation at the CKII phosphorylation site reduced transcriptional activity when the carboxyl-terminal repressor domain was deleted. Although the precise biological function of Csx/Nkx2.5 phosphorylation by CKII remains to be determined, it may play an important role, as this CKII phosphorylation site within the homeodomain is fully conserved in all known members of the NK2 family of the homeobox genes. PMID:9858576

  5. DL0805-2, a novel indazole derivative, relaxes angiotensin II-induced contractions of rat aortic rings by inhibiting Rho kinase and calcium fluxes

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Tian-yi; Chen, Yu-cai; Zhang, Hui-fang; Li, Li; Jiao, Xiao-zhen; Xie, Ping; Fang, Lian-hua; Du, Guan-hua

    2016-01-01

    Aim: DL0805-2 [N-(1H-indazol-5-yl)-1-(4-methylbenzyl) pyrrolidine-3-carboxamide] is a DL0805 derivative with more potent vasorelaxant activity and lower toxicity. This study was conducted to investigate the vasorelaxant mechanisms of DL0805-2 on angiotensin II (Ang II)-induced contractions of rat thoracic aortic rings in vitro. Methods: Rat thoracic aortic rings and rat aortic vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) were pretreated with DL0805-2, and then stimulated with Ang II. The tension of the aortic rings was measured through an isometric force transducer. Ang II-induced protein phosphorylation, ROS production and F-actin formation were assessed with Western blotting and immunofluorescence assays. Intracellular free Ca2+ concentrations were detected with Fluo-3 AM. Results: Pretreatment with DL0805-2 (1–100 μmol/L) dose-dependently inhibited the constrictions of the aortic rings induced by a single dose of Ang II (10−7 mol/L) or accumulative addition of Ang II (10−10–10−7 mol/L). The vasodilatory effect of DL0805-2 was independent of endothelium. In the aortic rings, pretreatment with DL0805-2 (1, 3, and 10 μmol/L) suppressed Ang II-induced Ca2+ influx and intracellular Ca2+ mobilization, and Ang II-induced phosphorylation of two substrates of Rho kinase (MLC and MYPT1). In VSMCs, pretreatment with DL0805-2 (1, 3, and 10 μmol/L) also suppressed Ang II-induced Ca2+ fluxes and phosphorylation of MLC and MYPT1. In addition, pretreatment with DL0805-2 attenuated ROS production and F-actin formation in the cells. Conclusion: DL0805-2 exerts a vasodilatory action in rat aortic rings through inhibiting the Rho/ROCK pathway and calcium fluxes. PMID:27041459

  6. Endogenous expression of type II cGMP-dependent protein kinase mRNA and protein in rat intestine. Implications for cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator.

    PubMed Central

    Markert, T; Vaandrager, A B; Gambaryan, S; Pöhler, D; Häusler, C; Walter, U; De Jonge, H R; Jarchau, T; Lohmann, S M

    1995-01-01

    Certain pathogenic bacteria produce a family of heat stable enterotoxins (STa) which activate intestinal guanylyl cyclases, increase cGMP, and elicit life-threatening secretory diarrhea. The intracellular effector of cGMP actions has not been clarified. Recently we cloned the cDNA for a rat intestinal type II cGMP dependent protein kinase (cGK II) which is highly enriched in intestinal mucosa. Here we show that cGK II mRNA and protein are restricted to the intestinal segments from the duodenum to the proximal colon, with the highest amounts of cGK II protein in duodenum and jejunum. cGK II mRNA and protein decreased along the villus to crypt axis in the small intestine, whereas substantial amounts of both were found in the crypts of cecum. In intestinal epithelia, cGK II was specifically localized in the apical membrane, a major site of ion transport regulation. In contrast to cGK II, cGK I was localized in smooth muscle cells of the villus lamina propria. Short circuit current (ISC), a measure of Cl- secretion, was increased to a similar extent by STa and by 8-Br-cGMP, a selective activator of cGK, except in distal colon and in monolayers of T84 human colon carcinoma cells in which cGK II was not detected. In human and mouse intestine, the cyclic nucleotide-regulated Cl- conductance can be exclusively accounted for by the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) Cl- channel. Viewed collectively, the data suggest that cGK II is the mediator of STa and cGMP effects on Cl- transport in intestinal-epithelia. Images PMID:7543493

  7. Casein kinase II is required for proper cell division and acts as a negative regulator of centrosome duplication in Caenorhabditis elegans embryos

    PubMed Central

    Medley, Jeffrey C.; Kabara, Megan M.; Stubenvoll, Michael D.; DeMeyer, Lauren E.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Centrosomes are the primary microtubule-organizing centers that orchestrate microtubule dynamics during the cell cycle. The correct number of centrosomes is pivotal for establishing bipolar mitotic spindles that ensure accurate segregation of chromosomes. Thus, centrioles must duplicate once per cell cycle, one daughter per mother centriole, the process of which requires highly coordinated actions among core factors and modulators. Protein phosphorylation is shown to regulate the stability, localization and activity of centrosome proteins. Here, we report the function of Casein kinase II (CK2) in early Caenorhabditis elegans embryos. The catalytic subunit (KIN-3/CK2α) of CK2 localizes to nuclei, centrosomes and midbodies. Inactivating CK2 leads to cell division defects, including chromosome missegregation, cytokinesis failure and aberrant centrosome behavior. Furthermore, depletion or inhibiting kinase activity of CK2 results in elevated ZYG-1 levels at centrosomes, restoring centrosome duplication and embryonic viability to zyg-1 mutants. Our data suggest that CK2 functions in cell division and negatively regulates centrosome duplication in a kinase-dependent manner. PMID:27881437

  8. High-Throughput Small Interfering RNA Screening Identifies Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinase Class II Alpha as Important for Production of Human Cytomegalovirus Virions

    PubMed Central

    Polachek, William S.; Moshrif, Hanan F.; Franti, Michael; Coen, Donald M.; Sreenu, Vattipally B.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT High-throughput small interfering RNA (siRNA) screening is a useful methodology to identify cellular factors required for virus replication. Here we utilized a high-throughput siRNA screen based on detection of a viral antigen by microscopy to interrogate cellular protein kinases and phosphatases for their importance during human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) replication and identified the class II phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase class II alpha (PI3K-C2A) as being involved in HCMV replication. Confirming this observation, infected cells treated with either pooled or individual siRNAs targeting PI3K-C2A mRNA produced approximately 10-fold less infectious virus than the controls. Western blotting and quantitative PCR analysis of infected cells treated with siRNAs indicated that depletion of PI3K-C2A slightly reduced the accumulation of late but not immediate early or early viral antigens and had no appreciable effect on viral DNA synthesis. Analysis of siRNA-treated cells by electron microscopy and Western blotting indicated that PI3K-C2A was not required for the production of viral capsids but did lead to increased numbers of enveloped capsids in the cytoplasm that had undergone secondary envelopment and a reduction in the amount of viral particles exiting the cell. Therefore, PI3K-C2A is a factor important for HCMV replication and has a role in the production of HCMV virions. IMPORTANCE There is limited information about the cellular factors required for human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) replication. Therefore, to identify proteins involved in HCMV replication, we developed a methodology to conduct a high-throughput siRNA screen of HCMV-infected cells. From our screening data, we focused our studies on the top hit from our screen, the lipid kinase phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase class II alpha (PI3K-C2A), as its role in HCMV replication was unknown. Interestingly, we found that PI3K-C2A is important for the production of HCMV virions and is involved in virion production

  9. Angiotensin II-induced protein kinase D activates the ATF/CREB family of transcription factors and promotes StAR mRNA expression.

    PubMed

    Olala, Lawrence O; Choudhary, Vivek; Johnson, Maribeth H; Bollag, Wendy B

    2014-07-01

    Aldosterone synthesis is initiated upon the transport of cholesterol from the outer to the inner mitochondrial membrane, where the cholesterol is hydrolyzed to pregnenolone. This process is the rate-limiting step in acute aldosterone production and is mediated by the steroidogenic acute regulatory (StAR) protein. We have previously shown that angiotensin II (AngII) activation of the serine/threonine protein kinase D (PKD) promotes acute aldosterone production in bovine adrenal glomerulosa cells, but the mechanism remains unclear. Thus, the purpose of this study was to determine the downstream signaling effectors of AngII-stimulated PKD activity. Our results demonstrate that overexpression of the constitutively active serine-to-glutamate PKD mutant enhances, whereas the dominant-negative serine-to-alanine PKD mutant inhibits, AngII-induced StAR mRNA expression relative to the vector control. PKD has been shown to phosphorylate members of the activating transcription factor (ATF)/cAMP response element binding protein (CREB) family of leucine zipper transcription factors, which have been shown previously to bind the StAR proximal promoter and induce StAR mRNA expression. In primary glomerulosa cells, AngII induces ATF-2 and CREB phosphorylation in a time-dependent manner. Furthermore, overexpression of the constitutively active PKD mutant enhances the AngII-elicited phosphorylation of ATF-2 and CREB, and the dominant-negative mutant inhibits this response. Furthermore, the constitutively active PKD mutant increases the binding of phosphorylated CREB to the StAR promoter. Thus, these data provide insight into the previously reported role of PKD in AngII-induced acute aldosterone production, providing a mechanism by which PKD may be mediating steroidogenesis in primary bovine adrenal glomerulosa cells.

  10. Gating of long-term depression by Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II through enhanced cGMP signalling in cerebellar Purkinje cells

    PubMed Central

    Kawaguchi, Shin-ya; Hirano, Tomoo

    2013-01-01

    Long-term depression (LTD) at parallel fibre synapses on a cerebellar Purkinje cell has been regarded as a cellular basis for motor learning. Although Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) has been implicated in the LTD induction as an important Ca2+-sensing molecule, the underlying signalling mechanism remains unclear. Here, we attempted to explore the potential signalling pathway underlying the CaMKII involvement in LTD using a systems biology approach, combined with validation by electrophysiological and FRET imaging experiments on a rat cultured Purkinje cell. Model simulation predicted the following cascade as a candidate mechanism for the CaMKII contribution to LTD: CaMKII negatively regulates phosphodiesterase 1 (PDE1), subsequently facilitates the cGMP/protein kinase G (PKG) signalling pathway and down-regulates protein phosphatase 2A (PP-2A), thus supporting the LTD-inducing positive feedback loop consisting of mutual activation of protein kinase C (PKC) and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK). This model suggestion was corroborated by whole-cell patch clamp recording experiments. In addition, FRET measurement of intracellular cGMP concentration revealed that CaMKII activation causes sustained increase of cGMP, supporting the signalling mechanism of LTD induction by CaMKII. Furthermore, we found that activation of the cGMP/PKG pathway by nitric oxide (NO) can support LTD induction without activation of CaMKII. Thus, this study clarified interaction between NO and Ca2+/CaMKII, two important factors required for LTD. PMID:23297306

  11. Structure of Ctk3, a subunit of the RNA polymerase II CTD kinase complex, reveals a noncanonical CTD-interacting domain fold.

    PubMed

    Mühlbacher, Wolfgang; Mayer, Andreas; Sun, Mai; Remmert, Michael; Cheung, Alan C M; Niesser, Jürgen; Soeding, Johannes; Cramer, Patrick

    2015-10-01

    CTDK-I is a yeast kinase complex that phosphorylates the C-terminal repeat domain (CTD) of RNA polymerase II (Pol II) to promote transcription elongation. CTDK-I contains the cyclin-dependent kinase Ctk1 (homologous to human CDK9/CDK12), the cyclin Ctk2 (human cyclin K), and the yeast-specific subunit Ctk3, which is required for CTDK-I stability and activity. Here we predict that Ctk3 consists of a N-terminal CTD-interacting domain (CID) and a C-terminal three-helix bundle domain. We determine the X-ray crystal structure of the N-terminal domain of the Ctk3 homologue Lsg1 from the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe at 2.0 Å resolution. The structure reveals eight helices arranged into a right-handed superhelical fold that resembles the CID domain present in transcription termination factors Pcf11, Nrd1, and Rtt103. Ctk3 however shows different surface properties and no binding to CTD peptides. Together with the known structure of Ctk1 and Ctk2 homologues, our results lead to a molecular framework for analyzing the structure and function of the CTDK-I complex.

  12. Probing the cyclic nucleotide binding sites of cAMP-dependent protein kinases I and II with analogs of adenosine 3',5'-cyclic phosphorothioates.

    PubMed

    Dostmann, W R; Taylor, S S; Genieser, H G; Jastorff, B; Døskeland, S O; Ogreid, D

    1990-06-25

    A set of cAMP analogs were synthesized that combined exocyclic sulfur substitutions in the equatorial (Rp) or the axial (Sp) position of the cyclophosphate ring with modifications in the adenine base of cAMP. The potency of these compounds to inhibit the binding of [3H]cAMP to sites A and B from type I (rabbit skeletal muscle) and type II (bovine myocardium) cAMP-dependent protein kinase was determined quantitatively. On the average, the Sp isomers had a 5-fold lower affinity for site A and a 30-fold lower affinity for site B of isozyme I than their cyclophosphate homolog. The mean reduction in affinities for the equivalent sites of isozyme II were 20- and 4-fold, respectively. The Rp isomers showed a decrease in affinity of approximately 400-fold and 200-fold for site A and B, respectively, of isozyme I, against 200-fold and 45-fold for site A and B of isozyme II. The Sp substitutions therefore increased the relative preference for site A of isozyme I and site B of isozyme II. The Rp substitution, on the other hand, increased the relative preference for site B of both isozymes. These data show that the Rp and Sp substitutions are tolerated differently by the two intrachain sites of isozymes I and II. They also support the hypothesis that it is the axial, and not the previously proposed equatorial oxygen that contributes the negative charge for the ionic interaction with an invariant arginine in all four binding sites. In addition, they demonstrate that combined modifications in the adenine ring and the cyclic phosphate ring of cAMP can enhance the ability to discriminate between site A and B of one isozyme as well as to discriminate between isozyme I and II. Since Rp analogs of cAMP are known to inhibit activation of cAMP-dependent protein kinases, the findings of the present study have implications for the synthesis of analogs having a very high selectivity for isozyme I or II.

  13. MAPKAP kinase-2; a novel protein kinase activated by mitogen-activated protein kinase.

    PubMed Central

    Stokoe, D; Campbell, D G; Nakielny, S; Hidaka, H; Leevers, S J; Marshall, C; Cohen, P

    1992-01-01

    A novel protein kinase, which was only active when phosphorylated by the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAP kinase), has been purified 85,000-fold to homogeneity from rabbit skeletal muscle. This MAP kinase activated protein kinase, termed MAPKAP kinase-2, was distinguished from S6 kinase-II (MAPKAP kinase-1) by its response to inhibitors, lack of phosphorylation of S6 peptides and amino acid sequence. MAPKAP kinase-2 phosphorylated glycogen synthase at Ser7 and the equivalent serine (*) in the peptide KKPLNRTLS*VASLPGLamide whose sequence is similar to the N terminus of glycogen synthase. MAPKAP kinase-2 was resolved into two monomeric species of apparent molecular mass 60 and 53 kDa that had similar specific activities and substrate specificities. Peptide sequences of the 60 and 53 kDa species were identical, indicating that they are either closely related isoforms or derived from the same gene. MAP kinase activated the 60 and 53 kDa forms of MAPKAP kinase-2 by phosphorylating the first threonine residue in the sequence VPQTPLHTSR. Furthermore, Mono Q chromatography of extracts from rat phaeochromocytoma and skeletal muscle demonstrated that two MAP kinase isoforms (p42mapk and p44mapk) were the only enzymes in these cells that were capable of reactivating MAPKAP kinase-2. These results indicate that MAP kinase activates at least two distinct protein kinases, suggesting that it represents a point at which the growth factor-stimulated protein kinase cascade bifurcates. Images PMID:1327754

  14. Enterovirus 71 VP1 activates calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II and results in the rearrangement of vimentin in human astrocyte cells.

    PubMed

    Haolong, Cong; Du, Ning; Hongchao, Tian; Yang, Yang; Wei, Zhang; Hua, Zhang; Wenliang, Zhang; Lei, Song; Po, Tien

    2013-01-01

    Enterovirus 71 (EV71) is one of the main causative agents of foot, hand and mouth disease. Its infection usually causes severe central nervous system diseases and complications in infected infants and young children. In the present study, we demonstrated that EV71 infection caused the rearrangement of vimentin in human astrocytoma cells. The rearranged vimentin, together with various EV71 components, formed aggresomes-like structures in the perinuclear region. Electron microscopy and viral RNA labeling indicated that the aggresomes were virus replication sites since most of the EV71 particles and the newly synthesized viral RNA were concentrated here. Further analysis revealed that the vimentin in the virus factories was serine-82 phosphorylated. More importantly, EV71 VP1 protein is responsible for the activation of calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMK-II) which phosphorylated the N-terminal domain of vimentin on serine 82. Phosphorylation of vimentin and the formation of aggresomes were required for the replication of EV71 since the latter was decreased markedly after phosphorylation was blocked by KN93, a CaMK-II inhibitor. Thus, as one of the consequences of CaMK-II activation, vimentin phosphorylation and rearrangement may support virus replication by playing a structural role for the formation of the replication factories. Collectively, this study identified the replication centers of EV71 in human astrocyte cells. This may help us understand the replication mechanism and pathogenesis of EV71 in human.

  15. Threonine-4 of mammalian RNA polymerase II CTD is targeted by Polo-like kinase 3 and required for transcriptional elongation

    PubMed Central

    Hintermair, Corinna; Heidemann, Martin; Koch, Frederic; Descostes, Nicolas; Gut, Marta; Gut, Ivo; Fenouil, Romain; Ferrier, Pierre; Flatley, Andrew; Kremmer, Elisabeth; Chapman, Rob D; Andrau, Jean-Christophe; Eick, Dirk

    2012-01-01

    Eukaryotic RNA polymerase II (Pol II) has evolved an array of heptad repeats with the consensus sequence Tyr1-Ser2-Pro3-Thr4-Ser5-Pro6-Ser7 at the carboxy-terminal domain (CTD) of the large subunit (Rpb1). Differential phosphorylation of Ser2, Ser5, and Ser7 in the 5′ and 3′ regions of genes coordinates the binding of transcription and RNA processing factors to the initiating and elongating polymerase complexes. Here, we report phosphorylation of Thr4 by Polo-like kinase 3 in mammalian cells. ChIPseq analyses indicate an increase of Thr4-P levels in the 3′ region of genes occurring subsequently to an increase of Ser2-P levels. A Thr4/Ala mutant of Pol II displays a lethal phenotype. This mutant reveals a global defect in RNA elongation, while initiation is largely unaffected. Since Thr4 replacement mutants are viable in yeast we conclude that this amino acid has evolved an essential function(s) in the CTD of Pol II for gene transcription in mammalian cells. PMID:22549466

  16. Theoretical investigation, biological evaluation and VEGFR2 kinase studies of metal(II) complexes derived from hydrotris(methimazolyl)borate.

    PubMed

    Jayakumar, S; Mahendiran, D; Srinivasan, T; Mohanraj, G; Kalilur Rahiman, A

    2016-02-01

    The reaction of soft tripodal scorpionate ligand, sodium hydrotris(methimazolyl)borate with M(ClO4)2·6H2O [MMn(II), Ni(II), Cu(II) or Zn(II)] in methanol leads to the cleavage of B-N bond followed by the formation of complexes of the type [M(MeimzH)4](ClO4)2·H2O (1-4), where MeimzH=methimazole. All the complexes were fully characterized by spectro-analytical techniques. The molecular structure of the zinc(II) complex (4) was determined by X-ray crystallography, which supports the observed deboronation reaction in the scorpionate ligand with tetrahedral geometry around zinc(II) ion. The electronic spectra of complexes suggested tetrahedral geometry for manganese(II) and nickel(II) complexes, and square-planar geometry for copper(II) complex. Frontier molecular orbital analysis (HOMO-LUMO) was carried out by B3LYP/6-31G(d) to understand the charge transfer occurring in the molecules. All the complexes exhibit significant antimicrobial activity against Gram (-ve) and Gram (+ve) bacterial as well as fungal strains, which are quite comparable to standard drugs streptomycin and clotrimazole. The copper(II) complex (3) showed excellent free radical scavenging activity against DPPH in all concentration with IC50 value of 30μg/mL, when compared to the other complexes. In the molecular docking studies, all the complexes showed hydrophobic, π-π and hydrogen bonding interactions with BSA. The cytotoxic activity of the complexes against human hepatocellular liver carcinoma (HepG2) cells was assessed by MTT assay, which showed exponential responses toward increasing concentration of complexes.

  17. sup 31 P and sup 1 H NMR studies of the structure of enzyme-bound substrate complexes of lobster muscle arginine kinase: Relaxation measurements with Mn(II) and Co(II)

    SciTech Connect

    Jarori, G.K.; Ray, B.D.; Rao, B.D.N. )

    1989-11-28

    The paramagnetic effects of Mn(II) and Co(II) on the spin-lattice relaxation rates of {sup 31}P nuclei of ATP and ADP and of Mn(II) on the spin-lattice relaxation rate of the {delta} protons of arginine bound to arginine kinase from lobster tail muscle have been measured. Temperature variation of {sup 31}P relaxation rates in E-MnADP and E-MnATP yields activation energies ({Delta}E) in the range 6-10 kcal/mol. Thus, the {sup 31}P relaxation rates in these complexes are exchange limited and cannot provide structural information. However, the relaxation rates in E-CoADP and E-CoATP exhibit frequency dependence and {Delta}E values in the range 1-2 kcal/mol; i.e., these rates depend upon {sup 31}P-Co(II) distances. These distances were calculated to be in the range 3.2-4.5 {angstrom}, appropriate for direct coordination between Co(II) and the phosphoryl groups. The paramagnetic effect of Mn(II) on the {sup 1}H spin-lattice relaxation rate of the {delta} protons of arginine in the E-MnADP-Arg complex was also measured at three frequencies. From the frequency dependence of the relaxation rate an effective {tau}{sub C} of 0.6 ns has also been calculated, which is most likely to be the electron spin relaxation rate ({tau}{sub S1}) for Mn(II) in this complex. The distance estimated on the basis of the reciprocal sixth root of the average relaxation rate of the {delta} protons was 10.9 {plus minus} 0.3 {angstrom}.

  18. Protein Kinases and Addiction

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Anna M.; Messing, Robert O.

    2011-01-01

    Although drugs of abuse have different chemical structures and interact with different protein targets, all appear to usurp common neuronal systems that regulate reward and motivation. Addiction is a complex disease that is thought to involve drug-induced changes in synaptic plasticity due to alterations in cell signaling, gene transcription, and protein synthesis. Recent evidence suggests that drugs of abuse interact with and change a common network of signaling pathways that include a subset of specific protein kinases. The best studied of these kinases are reviewed here and include extracellular signal-regulated kinase, cAMP-dependent protein kinase, cyclin-dependent protein kinase 5, protein kinase C, calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II, and Fyn tyrosine kinase. These kinases have been implicated in various aspects of drug addiction including acute drug effects, drug self-administration, withdrawal, reinforcement, sensitization, and tolerance. Identifying protein kinase substrates and signaling pathways that contribute to the addicted state may provide novel approaches for new pharma-cotherapies to treat drug addiction. PMID:18991950

  19. The rate of nuclear cytoplasmic protein transport is determined by the casein kinase II site flanking the nuclear localization sequence of the SV40 T-antigen.

    PubMed Central

    Rihs, H P; Jans, D A; Fan, H; Peters, R

    1991-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated [Rihs, H.-P. and Peters, R. (1989) EMBO J., 8, 1479-1484] that the nuclear transport of recombinant proteins in which short fragments of the SV40 T-antigen are fused to the amino terminus of Escherichia coli beta-galactosidase is dependent on both the nuclear localization sequence (NLS, T-antigen residues 126-132) and a phosphorylation-site-containing sequence (T-antigen residues 111-125). While the NLS determines the specificity, the rate of transport is controlled by the phosphorylation-site-containing sequence. The present study furthers this observation and examines the role of the various phosphorylation sites. Purified, fluorescently labeled recombinant proteins were injected into the cytoplasm of Vero or hepatoma (HTC) cells and the kinetics of nuclear transport measured by laser microfluorimetry. By replacing serine and threonine residues known to be phosphorylated in vivo, we identified the casein kinase II (CK-II) site S111/S112 to be the determining factor in the enhancement of the transport. Either of the residues 111 or 112 was sufficient to elicit the maximum transport enhancement. The other phosphorylation sites (S120, S123, T124) had no influence on the transport rate. Examination of the literature suggested that many proteins harboring a nuclear localization sequence also contain putative CK-II sites at a distance of approximately 10-30 amino acid residues from the NLS. CK-II has been previously implicated in the transmission of growth signals to the nucleus. Our results suggest that CK-II may exert this role by controlling the rate of nuclear protein transport. Images PMID:1848177

  20. Specific activity of cyclin-dependent kinase I is a new potential predictor of tumour recurrence in stage II colon cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zeestraten, E C M; Maak, M; Shibayama, M; Schuster, T; Nitsche, U; Matsushima, T; Nakayama, S; Gohda, K; Friess, H; van de Velde, C J H; Ishihara, H; Rosenberg, R; Kuppen, P J K; Janssen, K-P

    2012-01-01

    Background: There are no established biomarkers to identify tumour recurrence in stage II colon cancer. As shown previously, the enzymatic activity of the cyclin-dependent kinases 1 and 2 (CDK1 and CDK2) predicts outcome in breast cancer. Therefore, we investigated whether CDK activity identifies tumour recurrence in colon cancer. Methods: In all, 254 patients with completely resected (R0) UICC stage II colon cancer were analysed retrospectively from two independent cohorts from Munich (Germany) and Leiden (Netherlands). None of the patients received adjuvant treatment. Development of distant metastasis was observed in 27 patients (median follow-up: 86 months). Protein expression and activity of CDKs were measured on fresh-frozen tumour samples. Results: Specific activity (SA) of CDK1 (CDK1SA), but not CDK2, significantly predicted distant metastasis (concordance index=0.69, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.55–0.79, P=0.036). Cutoff derivation by maximum log-rank statistics yielded a threshold of CDK1SA at 11 (SA units, P=0.029). Accordingly, 59% of patients were classified as high-risk (CDK1SA ⩾11). Cox proportional hazard analysis revealed CDK1SA as independent prognostic variable (hazard ratio=6.2, 95% CI: 1.44–26.9, P=0.012). Moreover, CKD1SA was significantly elevated in microsatellite-stable tumours. Conclusion: Specific activity of CDK1 is a promising biomarker for metastasis risk in stage II colon cancer. PMID:22108518

  1. AMP-activated protein kinase inhibits TGF-β-, angiotensin II-, aldosterone-, high glucose-, and albumin-induced epithelial-mesenchymal transition.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jang Han; Kim, Ji Hyun; Kim, Ja Seon; Chang, Jai Won; Kim, Soon Bae; Park, Jung Sik; Lee, Sang Koo

    2013-03-15

    The epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a novel mechanism that promotes renal fibrosis. Transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β), angiotensin II, aldosterone, high glucose, and urinary albumin are well-known causes of EMT and renal fibrosis. We examined whether and how activation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) suppressed EMT induced by the above agents in tubular epithelial cells. All experiments were performed using HK-2 cells. Protein expression was measured by Western blot analysis. Intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) were analyzed by flow cytometry. Exposure of tubular cells to TGF-β (10 ng/ml), angiotensin II (1 μM), aldosterone (100 nM), high glucose (30 mM), and albumin (5 mg/ml) for 5 days induced EMT, as shown by upregulation of α-smooth muscle actin and downregulation of E-cadherin. ROS and NADPH oxidase 4 (Nox4) expression were increased, and antioxidants such as tiron and N-acetylcysteine inhibited EMT induction. Metformin (the best known clinical activator of AMPK) suppressed EMT induction through inhibition of ROS via induction of heme oxygenase-1 and endogenous antioxidant thioredoxin. An AMPK inhibitor (compound C) and AMPK small interfering RNA blocked the effect of metformin, and another AMPK activator [5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide-1β riboside (AICAR)] exerted the same effects as metformin. In conclusion, AMPK activation might be beneficial in attenuating the tubulointerstitial fibrosis induced by TGF-β, angiotensin II, aldosterone, high glucose, and urinary albumin.

  2. Prevention of RhoA activation and cofilin-mediated actin polymerization mediates the antihypertrophic effect of adenosine receptor agonists in angiotensin II- and endothelin-1-treated cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Zeidan, Asad; Gan, Xiaohong Tracey; Thomas, Ashley; Karmazyn, Morris

    2014-01-01

    Adenosine receptor activation has been shown to be associated with diminution of cardiac hypertrophy and it has been suggested that endogenously produced adenosine may serve to blunt pro-hypertrophic processes. In the present study, we determined the effects of two pro-hypertrophic stimuli, angiotensin II (Ang II, 100 nM) and endothelin-1 (ET-1, 10 nM) on Ras homolog gene family, member A (RhoA)/Rho-associated, coiled-coil containing protein kinase (ROCK) activation in cultured neonatal rat ventricular myocytes and whether the latter serves as a target for the anti-hypertrophic effect of adenosine receptor activation. Both hypertrophic stimuli potently increased RhoA activity with peak activation occurring 15-30 min following agonist addition. These effects were associated with significantly increased phosphorylation (inactivation) of cofilin, a downstream mediator of RhoA, an increase in actin polymerization, and increased activation and nuclear import of p38 mitogen activated protein kinase. The ability of both Ang II and ET-1 to activate the RhoA pathway was completely prevented by the adenosine A1 receptor agonist N (6)-cyclopentyladenosine, the A2a receptor agonist 2-p-(2-carboxyethyl)-phenethylamino-5'-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine, the A3 receptor agonist N (6)-(3-iodobenzyl)adenosine-5'-methyluronamide as well as the nonspecific adenosine analog 2-chloro adenosine. All effects of specific receptor agonists were prevented by their respective receptor antagonists. Moreover, all adenosine agonists prevented either Ang II- or ET-1-induced hypertrophy, a property shared by the RhoA inhibitor Clostridium botulinum C3 exoenzyme, the ROCK inhibitor Y-27632 or the actin depolymerizing agent latrunculin B. Our study therefore demonstrates that both Ang II and ET-1 can activate the RhoA pathway and that prevention of the hypertrophic response to both agonists by adenosine receptor activation is mediated by prevention of RhoA stimulation and actin polymerization.

  3. Phosphorylation at Ser²⁶ in the ATP-binding site of Ca²⁺/calmodulin-dependent kinase II as a mechanism for switching off the kinase activity.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, Mehtap; Gangopadhyay, Samudra S; Leavis, Paul; Grabarek, Zenon; Morgan, Kathleen G

    2013-02-07

    CaMKII (Ca²⁺/calmodulin-dependent kinase II) is a serine/threonine phosphotransferase that is capable of long-term retention of activity due to autophosphorylation at a specific threonine residue within each subunit of its oligomeric structure. The γ isoform of CaMKII is a significant regulator of vascular contractility. Here, we show that phosphorylation of CaMKII γ at Ser²⁶, a residue located within the ATP-binding site, terminates the sustained activity of the enzyme. To test the physiological importance of phosphorylation at Ser²⁶, we generated a phosphospecific Ser²⁶ antibody and demonstrated an increase in Ser²⁶ phosphorylation upon depolarization and contraction of blood vessels. To determine if the phosphorylation of Ser²⁶ affects the kinase activity, we mutated Ser²⁶ to alanine or aspartic acid. The S26D mutation mimicking the phosphorylated state of CaMKII causes a dramatic decrease in Thr²⁸⁷ autophosphorylation levels and greatly reduces the catalytic activity towards an exogenous substrate (autocamtide-3), whereas the S26A mutation has no effect. These data combined with molecular modelling indicate that a negative charge at Ser²⁶ of CaMKII γ inhibits the catalytic activity of the enzyme towards its autophosphorylation site at Thr²⁸⁷ most probably by blocking ATP binding. We propose that Ser²⁶ phosphorylation constitutes an important mechanism for switching off CaMKII activity.

  4. The cyclin-dependent kinase 5 activators p35 and p39 interact with the alpha-subunit of Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II and alpha-actinin-1 in a calcium-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Dhavan, Rani; Greer, Paul L; Morabito, Maria A; Orlando, Lianna R; Tsai, Li-Huei

    2002-09-15

    Cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5) is a critical regulator of neuronal migration in the developing CNS, and recent studies have revealed a role for Cdk5 in synaptogenesis and regulation of synaptic transmission. Deregulation of Cdk5 has been linked to the pathology of neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease. Activation of Cdk5 requires its association with a regulatory subunit, and two Cdk5 activators, p35 and p39, have been identified. To gain further insight into the functions of Cdk5, we identified proteins that interact with p39 in a yeast two-hybrid screen. In this study we report that alpha-actinin-1 and the alpha-subunit of Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKIIalpha), two proteins localized at the postsynaptic density, interact with Cdk5 via their association with p35 and p39. CaMKIIalpha and alpha-actinin-1 bind to distinct regions of p35 and p39 and also can interact with each other. The association of CaMKIIalpha and alpha-actinin-1 to the Cdk5 activators, as well as to each other, is stimulated by calcium. Further, the activation of glutamate receptors increases the association of p35 and p39 with CaMKIIalpha, and the inhibition of CaMKII activation diminishes this effect. The glutamate-mediated increase in association of p35 and CaMKIIalpha is mediated in large part by NMDA receptors, suggesting that cross talk between the Cdk5 and CaMKII signal transduction pathways may be a component of the complex molecular mechanisms contributing to synaptic plasticity, memory, and learning.

  5. The Class II Phosphatidylinositol 3-Phosphate Kinase PIK3C2A Promotes Shigella flexneri Dissemination through Formation of Vacuole-Like Protrusions

    PubMed Central

    Dragoi, Ana-Maria

    2015-01-01

    Intracellular pathogens such as Shigella flexneri and Listeria monocytogenes achieve dissemination in the intestinal epithelium by displaying actin-based motility in the cytosol of infected cells. As they reach the cell periphery, motile bacteria form plasma membrane protrusions that resolve into vacuoles in adjacent cells, through a poorly understood mechanism. Here, we report on the role of the class II phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate kinase PIK3C2A in S. flexneri dissemination. Time-lapse microscopy revealed that PIK3C2A was required for the resolution of protrusions into vacuoles through the formation of an intermediate membrane-bound compartment that we refer to as a vacuole-like protrusion (VLP). Genetic rescue of PIK3C2A depletion with RNA interference (RNAi)-resistant cDNA constructs demonstrated that VLP formation required the activity of PIK3C2A in primary infected cells. PIK3C2A expression was required for production of phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate [PtdIns(3)P] at the plasma membrane surrounding protrusions. PtdIns(3)P production was not observed in the protrusions formed by L. monocytogenes, whose dissemination did not rely on PIK3C2A. PIK3C2A-mediated PtdIns(3)P production in S. flexneri protrusions was regulated by host cell tyrosine kinase signaling and relied on the integrity of the S. flexneri type 3 secretion system (T3SS). We suggest a model of S. flexneri dissemination in which the formation of VLPs is mediated by the PIK3C2A-dependent production of the signaling lipid PtdIns(3)P in the protrusion membrane, which relies on the T3SS-dependent activation of tyrosine kinase signaling in protrusions. PMID:25667265

  6. L-type calcium channels and calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase II differentially mediate behaviors associated with nicotine withdrawal in mice.

    PubMed

    Jackson, K J; Damaj, M I

    2009-07-01

    Smoking is a widespread health problem. Because the nicotine withdrawal syndrome is a major contributor to continued smoking and relapse, it is important to understand the molecular and behavioral mechanisms of nicotine withdrawal to generate more effective smoking cessation therapies. Studies suggest a role for calcium-dependent mechanisms, such as L-type calcium channels and calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII), in the effects of nicotine dependence; however, the role of these mechanisms in nicotine-mediated behaviors is unclear. Thus, the goal of this study was to elucidate the role of L-type calcium channels and CaMKII in nicotine withdrawal behaviors. Using both pharmacological and genetic methods, our results show that L-type calcium channels are involved in physical, but not affective, nicotine withdrawal behaviors. Although our data do provide evidence of a role for CaMKII in nicotine withdrawal behaviors, our pharmacological and genetic assessments yielded different results concerning the specific role of the kinase. Pharmacological data suggest that CaMKII is involved in somatic signs and affective nicotine withdrawal, and activity level is decreased after nicotine withdrawal, whereas the genetic assessments yielded results suggesting that CaMKII is involved only in the anxiety-related response, yet the kinase activity may be increased after nicotine withdrawal; thus, future studies are necessary to clarify the precise behavioral specifics of the relevance of CaMKII in nicotine withdrawal behaviors. Overall, our data show that L-type calcium channels and CaMKII are relevant in nicotine withdrawal and differentially mediate nicotine withdrawal behaviors.

  7. c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase-related Na+/H+ exchanger isoform 1 activation controls hexokinase II expression in benzo(a)pyrene-induced apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Huc, Laurence; Tekpli, Xavier; Holme, Jørn A; Rissel, Mary; Solhaug, Anita; Gardyn, Claire; Le Moigne, Gwénaelle; Gorria, Morgane; Dimanche-Boitrel, Marie-Thérèse; Lagadic-Gossmann, Dominique

    2007-02-15

    Regulation of the balance between survival, proliferation, and apoptosis on carcinogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) exposure is still poorly understood and more particularly the role of physiologic variables, including intracellular pH (pH(i)). Although the involvement of the ubiquitous pH(i) regulator Na(+)/H(+) exchanger isoform 1 (NHE1) in tumorigenesis is well documented, less is known about its role and regulation during apoptosis. Our previous works have shown the primordial role of NHE1 in carcinogenic PAH-induced apoptosis. This alkalinizing transporter was activated by an early CYP1-dependent H(2)O(2) production, subsequently promoting mitochondrial dysfunction leading to apoptosis. The aim of this study was to further elucidate how NHE1 was activated by benzo(a)pyrene (BaP) and what the downstream events were in the context of apoptosis. Our results indicate that the mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 4/c-Jun NH(2)-terminal kinase (MKK4/JNK) pathway was a link between BaP-induced H(2)O(2) production and NHE1 activation. This activation, in combination with BaP-induced phosphorylated p53, promoted mitochondrial superoxide anion production, supporting the existence of a common target for NHE1 and p53. Furthermore, we showed that the mitochondrial expression of glycolytic enzyme hexokinase II (HKII) was decreased following a combined action of NHE1 and p53 pathways, thereby enhancing the BaP-induced apoptosis. Taken together, our findings suggest that, on BaP exposure, MKK4/JNK targets NHE1 with consequences on HKII protein, which might thus be a key protein during carcinogenic PAH apoptosis.

  8. PKC-dependent extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 pathway is involved in the inhibition of Ib on AngiotensinII-induced proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Yu; Yan Tianhua; Wang Qiujuan Wang Wei; Xu Jinyi; Wu Xiaoming; Ji Hui

    2008-10-10

    AngiotensinII (AngII) induces vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) proliferation, which plays an important role in the development and progression of hypertension. AngII-induced cellular events have been implicated, in part, in the activation of protein kinase C (PKC) and extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2 (ERK1/2). In the present study, we investigated the effect of Ib, a novel nonpeptide AngII receptor type 1 (AT{sub 1}) antagonist, on the activation of PKC and ERK1/2 in VSMC proliferation induced by AngII. MTT, and [{sup 3}H]thymidine incorporation assay showed that AngII-induced VSMC proliferation was inhibited significantly by Ib. The specific binding of [{sup 125}I]AngII to AT{sub 1} receptors was blocked by Ib in a concentration-dependent manner with IC{sub 50} value of 0.96 nM. PKC activity assay and Western blot analysis demonstrated that Ib significantly inhibited the activation of PKC and phosphorylation of ERK1/2 induced by AngII, respectively. Furthermore, AngII-induced ERK1/2 activation was obviously blocked by GF109203X, a PKC inhibitor. These findings suggest that the suppression of Ib on AngII-induced VSMC proliferation may be attributed to its inhibitory effect on PKC-dependent ERK1/2 pathway.

  9. Intra-nucleus accumbens administration of the calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II inhibitor AIP induced antinociception in rats with mononeuropathy.

    PubMed

    Bian, Hui; Yu, Long-Chuan

    2015-07-10

    Calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) is a serine/threonine- dependent protein kinase, which has been implicated in pain modulation at different levels of the central nervous system. The present study was performed in rats with mononeuropathy induced by left common sciatic nerve ligation. Unilateral sciatic nerve loose ligation produced decreases in the hindpaw withdrawal latency (HWL) to noxious thermal and mechanical stimulation. Intra-nucleus accumbens (NAc) injection of 3 μg, 6 μg and 12 μg of myristoylated autocamtide-2-inhibitory peptide (AIP), the CaMKII inhibitor, dose-dependently increased the HWL to noxious thermal and mechanical stimulation in rats with mononeuropathy. Furthermore, intra-NAc administration of morphine, the HWL to noxious thermal and mechanical stimulation increased markedly, and there were no significant differences between morphine group and AIP group. Taken together, the results showed that intra-NAc injection of AIP induced significant antinociceptive effects in rats with mononeuropathy, indicating that CaMKII may play an important role in the transmission and/or modulation of nociceptive information in the NAc in rats with mononeuropathy.

  10. Casein kinase II promotes target silencing by miRISC through direct phosphorylation of the DEAD-box RNA helicase CGH-1

    PubMed Central

    Alessi, Amelia F.; Khivansara, Vishal; Han, Ting; Freeberg, Mallory A.; Moresco, James J.; Tu, Patricia G.; Montoye, Eric; Yates, John R.; Karp, Xantha; Kim, John K.

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play essential, conserved roles in diverse developmental processes through association with the miRNA-induced silencing complex (miRISC). Whereas fundamental insights into the mechanistic framework of miRNA biogenesis and target gene silencing have been established, posttranslational modifications that affect miRISC function are less well understood. Here we report that the conserved serine/threonine kinase, casein kinase II (CK2), promotes miRISC function in Caenorhabditis elegans. CK2 inactivation results in developmental defects that phenocopy loss of miRISC cofactors and enhances the loss of miRNA function in diverse cellular contexts. Whereas CK2 is dispensable for miRNA biogenesis and the stability of miRISC cofactors, it is required for efficient miRISC target mRNA binding and silencing. Importantly, we identify the conserved DEAD-box RNA helicase, CGH-1/DDX6, as a key CK2 substrate within miRISC and demonstrate phosphorylation of a conserved N-terminal serine is required for CGH-1 function in the miRNA pathway. PMID:26669440

  11. Ca²⁺/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II in the cockroach Periplaneta americana: identification of five isoforms and their tissues distribution.

    PubMed

    Taillebois, Emiliane; Heuland, Emilie; Bourdin, Céline M; Griveau, Audrey; Quinchard, Sophie; Tricoire-Leignel, Helene; Legros, Christian; Thany, Steeve H

    2013-07-01

    Calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) is a key kinase that transduces Ca²⁺ signals into downstream effects acting on a range of cellular processes in nervous system and muscular tissues. In insects, different CaMKII isoforms have been reported in Drosophila melanogaster, Apis florae, Bombus terrestris, and Bombus impatiens but little is known on the organization and tissue-specific expression of these isoforms with the exception of Drosophila. The present study reports the cloning of five CaMKII splice variants issued from a single gene and their tissue-specific expression in the cockroach Periplaneta americana. Each CaMKII isoform shared 82-90% identity with Drosophila CaMKII isoforms and accordingly were named PaCaMKII-A, PaCaMKII-B,PaCaMKII-C,PaCaMKII-D, and PaCaMKII-E. PaCaMKII-A and PaCaMKII-D isoforms are ubiquitously expressed in all tissues, but some such as PaCaMKII-B andPaCaMKII-C are preferentially expressed in the nerve cord and muscle. In addition, using single-cell reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), we found a tissue-specific expression of PaCaMKII-E in the dorsal unpaired median neurons. Alternative splicing of PaCaMKII transcripts is likely a common mechanism in insects to control the pattern of isoform expression in the different tissues.

  12. Phosphorylation of calcium/calmodulin-stimulated protein kinase II at T286 enhances invasion and migration of human breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Chi, Mengna; Evans, Hamish; Gilchrist, Jackson; Mayhew, Jack; Hoffman, Alexander; Pearsall, Elizabeth Ann; Jankowski, Helen; Brzozowski, Joshua Stephen; Skelding, Kathryn Anne

    2016-01-01

    Calcium/calmodulin-stimulated protein kinase II (CaMKII) is a multi-functional kinase that controls a range of cellular functions, including proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis. The biological properties of CaMKII are regulated by multi-site phosphorylation. However, the role that CaMKII phosphorylation plays in cancer cell metastasis has not been examined. We demonstrate herein that CaMKII expression and phosphorylation at T286 is increased in breast cancer when compared to normal breast tissue, and that increased CAMK2 mRNA is associated with poor breast cancer patient prognosis (worse overall and distant metastasis free survival). Additionally, we show that overexpression of WT, T286D and T286V forms of CaMKII in MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7 breast cancer cells increases invasion, migration and anchorage independent growth, and that overexpression of the T286D phosphomimic leads to a further increase in the invasive, migratory and anchorage independent growth capacity of these cells. Pharmacological inhibition of CaMKII decreases MDA-MB-231 migration and invasion. Furthermore, we demonstrate that overexpression of T286D, but not WT or T286V-CaMKII, leads to phosphorylation of FAK, STAT5a, and Akt. These results demonstrate a novel function for phosphorylation of CaMKII at T286 in the control of breast cancer metastasis, offering a promising target for the development of therapeutics to prevent breast cancer metastasis. PMID:27605043

  13. Genetic analysis of cell morphogenesis in fission yeast--a role for casein kinase II in the establishment of polarized growth.

    PubMed Central

    Snell, V; Nurse, P

    1994-01-01

    We have initiated a study to identify genes regulating cell morphogenesis in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Five genes have been identified, orb1-orb5, whose mutation gives rise to spherical cells, indicative of an inability to polarize growth. Two further genes have been identified, tea1 and ban1, whose mutant alleles have disturbed patterns of tip growth, leading to T-shaped and curved cells. In fission yeast, sites of cell wall deposition are defined by actin localization, with actin distributions and therefore growth patterns undergoing cell cycle stage-specific reorganization. Studies of double mutants constructed between orb5-19 and various cdc mutants blocked before and after cell division show that orb5 is required for the re-establishment of polar growth following cytokinesis. This indicates that the mutant allele orb5-19 is defective in the reinitiation of polarized growth, even though actin reorganization to the cell tips occurs normally. orb5 encodes a fission yeast homologue of casein kinase II alpha. We propose that this kinase plays a role in the translation of cell polarity into polarized growth, but not in the establishment of polarity itself. Images PMID:8187760

  14. A Casein Kinase II Phosphorylation Site in AtYY1 Affects Its Activity, Stability, and Function in the ABA Response

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xiu-Yun; Li, Tian

    2017-01-01

    The phosphorylation and dephosphorylation of proteins are crucial in the regulation of protein activity and stability in various signaling pathways. In this study, we identified an ABA repressor, Arabidopsis Ying Yang 1 (AtYY1) as a potential target of casein kinase II (CKII). AtYY1 physically interacts with two regulatory subunits of CKII, CKB3, and CKB4. Moreover, AtYY1 can be phosphorylated by CKII in vitro, and the S284 site is the major CKII phosphorylation site. Further analyses indicated that S284 phosphorylation can enhance the transcriptional activity and protein stability of AtYY1 and hence strengthen the effect of AtYY1 as a negative regulator in the ABA response. Our study provides novel insights into the regulatory mechanism of AtYY1 mediated by CKII phosphorylation. PMID:28348572

  15. Pyrrolo[3,2-d]pyrimidine derivatives as type II kinase insert domain receptor (KDR) inhibitors: CoMFA and CoMSIA studies.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiao-Yun; Chen, Wen-Hua; Wu, Shu-Guang; Tian, Yuan-Xin; Zhang, Jia-Jie

    2012-01-01

    Kinase insert domain receptor (KDR) inhibitors have been proved to be very effective anticancer agents. Molecular docking, 3D-QSAR methods, CoMFA and CoMSIA were performed on pyrrolo[3,2-d]pyrimidine derivatives as non-ATP competitive KDR inhibitors (type II). The bioactive conformation was explored by docking one potent compound 20 into the active site of KDR in its DFG-out inactive conformation. The constructed CoMFA and CoMSIA models produced statistically significant results with the cross-validated correlation coefficients q(2) of 0.542 and 0.552, non-cross-validated correlation coefficients r(2) of 0.912 and 0.955, and predicted correction coefficients r(2) (pred) of 0.913 and 0.897, respectively. These results ensure the CoMFA and CoMSIA models as a tool to guide the design of a series of new potent KDR inhibitors.

  16. Lewis acid catalysis of phosphoryl transfer from a copper(II)-NTP complex in a kinase ribozyme

    PubMed Central

    Biondi, Elisa; Poudyal, Raghav R.; Forgy, Joshua C.; Sawyer, Andrew W.; Maxwell, Adam W. R.; Burke, Donald H.

    2013-01-01

    The chemical strategies used by ribozymes to enhance reaction rates are revealed in part from their metal ion and pH requirements. We find that kinase ribozyme K28(1-77)C, in contrast with previously characterized kinase ribozymes, requires Cu2+ for optimal catalysis of thiophosphoryl transfer from GTPγS. Phosphoryl transfer from GTP is greatly reduced in the absence of Cu2+, indicating a specific catalytic role independent of any potential interactions with the GTPγS thiophosphoryl group. In-line probing and ATPγS competition both argue against direct Cu2+ binding by RNA; rather, these data establish that Cu2+ enters the active site within a Cu2+•GTPγS or Cu2+•GTP chelation complex, and that Cu2+•nucleobase interactions further enforce Cu2+ selectivity and position the metal ion for Lewis acid catalysis. Replacing Mg2+ with [Co(NH3)6]3+ significantly reduced product yield, but not kobs, indicating that the role of inner-sphere Mg2+ coordination is structural rather than catalytic. Replacing Mg2+ with alkaline earths of increasing ionic radii (Ca2+, Sr2+ and Ba2+) gave lower yields and approximately linear rates of product accumulation. Finally, we observe that reaction rates increased with pH in log-linear fashion with an apparent pKa = 8.0 ± 0.1, indicating deprotonation in the rate-limiting step. PMID:23358821

  17. Digoxin and ouabain induce P-glycoprotein by activating calmodulin kinase II and hypoxia-inducible factor-1alpha in human colon cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Riganti, Chiara

    2009-11-01

    Digoxin and ouabain are cardioactive glycosides, which inhibit the Na{sup +}/K{sup +}-ATPase pump and in this way they increase the intracellular concentration of cytosolic calcium ([Ca{sup ++}]{sub i}). They are also strong inducers of the P-glycoprotein (Pgp), a transmembrane transporter which extrudes several drugs, including anticancer agents like doxorubicin. An increased amount of Pgp limits the absorption of drugs through epithelial cells, thus inducing resistance to chemotherapy. The mechanism by which cardioactive glycosides increase Pgp is not known and in this work we investigated whether digoxin and ouabain elicited the expression of Pgp with a calcium-driven mechanism. In human colon cancer HT29 cells both glycosides increased the [Ca{sup ++}]{sub i} and this event was dependent on the calcium influx via the Na{sup +}/Ca{sup ++} exchanger. The increased [Ca{sup ++}]{sub i} enhanced the activity of the calmodulin kinase II enzyme, which in turn activated the transcription factor hypoxia-inducible factor-1alpha. This one was responsible for the increased expression of Pgp, which actively extruded doxorubicin from the cells and significantly reduced the pro-apoptotic effect of the drug. All the effects of glycosides were prevented by inhibiting the Na{sup +}/Ca{sup ++} exchanger or the calmodulin kinase II. This work clarified the molecular mechanisms by which digoxin and oubain induce Pgp and pointed out that the administration of cardioactive glycosides may widely affect the absorption of drugs in colon epithelia. Moreover, our results suggest that the efficacy of chemotherapeutic agent substrates of Pgp may be strongly reduced in patients taking digoxin.

  18. Expanding the Functional Repertoire of CTD Kinase I and RNA Polymerase II: Novel PhosphoCTD-Associating Proteins in the Yeast Proteome†

    PubMed Central

    Phatnani, Hemali P.; Jones, Janice C.; Greenleaf, Arno L.

    2009-01-01

    CTD kinase I (CTDK-I) of Saccharomyces cerevisiae is required for normal phosphorylation of the C-terminal repeat domain (CTD) on elongating RNA polymerase II. To elucidate cellular roles played by this kinase and the hyperphosphorylated CTD (phosphoCTD) it generates, we systematically searched yeast extracts for proteins that bound to the phosphoCTD made by CTDK-I in vitro. Initially, using a combination of far-western blotting and phosphoCTD affinity chromatography, we discovered a set of novel phosphoCTD-associating proteins (PCAPs) implicated in a variety of nuclear functions. We identified the phosphoCTD-interacting domains of a number of these PCAPs, and in several test cases (namely, Set2, Ssd1, and Hrr25) adduced evidence that phosphoCTD binding is functionally important in vivo. Employing surface plasmon resonance (BIACORE) analysis, we found that recombinant versions of these and other PCAPs bind preferentially to CTD repeat peptides carrying SerPO4 residues at positions 2 and 5 of each seven amino acid repeat, consistent with the positional specificity of CTDK-I in vitro [Jones, J. C., et al. (2004) J. Biol. Chem. 279, 24957–24964]. Subsequently, we used a synthetic CTD peptide with three doubly phosphorylated repeats (2,5P) as an affinity matrix, greatly expanding our search for PCAPs. This resulted in identification of approximately 100 PCAPs and associated proteins representing a wide range of functions (e.g., transcription, RNA processing, chromatin structure, DNA metabolism, protein synthesis and turnover, RNA degradation, snRNA modification, and snoRNP biogenesis). The varied nature of these PCAPs and associated proteins points to an unexpectedly diverse set of connections between Pol II elongation and other processes, conceptually expanding the role played by CTD phosphorylation in functional organization of the nucleus. PMID:15595826

  19. Intracellular cytarabine triphosphate production correlates to deoxycytidine kinase/cytosolic 5'-nucleotidase II expression ratio in primary acute myeloid leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Yamauchi, Takahiro; Negoro, Eiju; Kishi, Shinji; Takagi, Kazutaka; Yoshida, Akira; Urasaki, Yoshimasa; Iwasaki, Hiromichi; Ueda, Takanori

    2009-06-15

    Cytarabine (ara-C) is the key agent for treating acute myeloid leukemia (AML). After being transported into leukemic cells by human equilibrative nucleoside transporter 1 (hENT1), ara-C is phosphorylated to ara-C triphosphate (ara-CTP), an active metabolite, and then incorporated into DNA, thereby inhibiting DNA synthesis. Deoxycytidine kinase (dCK) and cytosolic 5'-nucleotidase II (cN-II) are associated with the production of ara-CTP. Because ara-C's cytotoxicity depends on ara-CTP production, parameters that are most related to ara-CTP formation would predict ara-C sensitivity and the clinical outcome of ara-C therapy. The present study focused on finding any correlation between the capacity to produce ara-CTP and ara-C-metabolizing factors. In vitro ara-CTP production, mRNA levels of hENT1, dCK, and cN-II, and ara-C sensitivity were evaluated in 34 blast samples from 33 leukemic patients including 26 with AML. A large degree of heterogeneity was seen in the capacity to produce ara-CTP and in mRNA levels of hENT1, dCK, and cN-II. Despite the lack of any association between each of the transcript levels and ara-CTP production, the ratio of dCK/cN-II transcript levels correlated significantly with the amount of ara-CTP among AML samples. The HL-60 cultured leukemia cell line and its three ara-C-resistant variants (HL-60/R1, HL-60/R2, HL-60/R3), which were 8-, 10-, and 500-fold more resistant than HL-60, respectively, were evaluated similarly. The dCK/cN-II ratio was again proportional to ara-CTP production and to ara-C sensitivity. The dCK/cN-II ratio may thus predict the capacity for ara-CTP production and ultimately, ara-C sensitivity in AML.

  20. Beta 2 subunit-containing nicotinic receptors mediate acute nicotine-induced activation of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II-dependent pathways in vivo.

    PubMed

    Jackson, K J; Walters, C L; Damaj, M I

    2009-08-01

    Nicotine is the addictive component of tobacco, and successful smoking cessation therapies must address the various processes that contribute to nicotine addiction. Thus, understanding the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) subtypes and subsequent molecular cascades activated after nicotine exposure is of the utmost importance in understanding the progression of nicotine dependence. One possible candidate is the calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) pathway. Substrates of this kinase include the vesicle-associated protein synapsin I and the transcription factor cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB). The goal of these studies was to examine these postreceptor mechanisms after acute nicotine treatment in vivo. We first show that administration of nicotine increases CaMKII activity in the ventral tegmental area (VTA), nucleus accumbens (NAc), and amygdala. In beta2 nAChR knockout (KO) mice, nicotine does not induce an increase in kinase activity, phosphorylated (p)Synapsin I, or pCREB. In contrast, alpha7 nAChR KO mice show nicotine-induced increases in CaMKII activity and pCREB, similar to their wild-type littermates. Moreover, we show that when animals are pretreated with the CaMKII inhibitors 4-[(2S)-2-[(5-isoquinolinylsulfonyl) methylamino]-3-oxo-3-(4-phenyl-1-piperazinyl)propyl]phenyl isoquinolinesulfonic acid ester (KN-62) and N-[2-[[[3-(4-chlorophenyl)-2 propenyl]methylamino]methyl]phenyl]-N-(2-hydroxyethyl)-4-methoxybenzenesulphonamide (KN-93), nicotine-induced increase in the kinase activity and pCREB was attenuated in the VTA and NAc, whereas pretreatment with (2-[N-(4-methoxybenzenesulfonyl)]amino-N-(4-chlorocinnamyl)-N-methylbenzylamine, phosphate) (KN-92), the inactive analog, did not alter the nicotine-induced increase in pCREB. Taken together, these data suggest that the nicotine-induced increase in CaMKII activity may correlate with the nicotine-induced increase in pSynapsin I and pCREB in the VTA and NAc via beta2

  1. Central SDF-1/CXCL12 expression and its cardiovascular and sympathetic effects: the role of angiotensin II, TNF-α, and MAP kinase signaling.

    PubMed

    Wei, Shun-Guang; Zhang, Zhi-Hua; Yu, Yang; Felder, Robert B

    2014-12-01

    The chemokine stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-1/CXCL12) and its receptors are expressed by neurons and glial cells in cardiovascular autonomic regions of the brain, including the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN), and contribute to neurohumoral excitation in rats with ischemia-induced heart failure. The present study examined factors regulating the expression of SDF-1 in the PVN and mechanisms mediating its sympatho-excitatory effects. In urethane anesthetized rats, a 4-h intracerebroventricular (ICV) infusion of angiotensin II (ANG II) or tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) in doses that increase mean blood pressure (MBP) and sympathetic drive increased the expression of SDF-1 in PVN. ICV administration of SDF-1 increased the phosphorylation of p44/42 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), JNK, and p38 MAPK in PVN, along with MBP, heart rate (HR), and renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA), but did not affect total p44/42 MAPK, JNK, and p38 MAPK levels. ICV pretreatment with the selective p44/42 MAPK inhibitor PD98059 prevented the SDF-1-induced increases in MBP, HR, and RSNA; ICV pretreatment with the selective JNK and p38 MAPK inhibitors attenuated but did not block these SDF-1-induced excitatory responses. ICV PD98059 also prevented the sympatho-excitatory response to bilateral PVN microinjections of SDF-1. ICV pretreatment with SDF-1 short-hairpin RNA significantly reduced ANG II- and TNF-α-induced phosphorylation of p44/42 MAPK in PVN. These findings identify TNF-α and ANG II as drivers of SDF-1 expression in PVN and suggest that the full expression of their cardiovascular and sympathetic effects depends upon SDF-1-mediated activation of p44/42 MAPK signaling.

  2. Drosophila Casein Kinase I Alpha Regulates Homolog Pairing and Genome Organization by Modulating Condensin II Subunit Cap-H2 Levels

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Huy Q.; Nye, Jonathan; Buster, Daniel W.; Klebba, Joseph E.; Rogers, Gregory C.; Bosco, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    The spatial organization of chromosomes within interphase nuclei is important for gene expression and epigenetic inheritance. Although the extent of physical interaction between chromosomes and their degree of compaction varies during development and between different cell-types, it is unclear how regulation of chromosome interactions and compaction relate to spatial organization of genomes. Drosophila is an excellent model system for studying chromosomal interactions including homolog pairing. Recent work has shown that condensin II governs both interphase chromosome compaction and homolog pairing and condensin II activity is controlled by the turnover of its regulatory subunit Cap-H2. Specifically, Cap-H2 is a target of the SCFSlimb E3 ubiquitin-ligase which down-regulates Cap-H2 in order to maintain homologous chromosome pairing, chromosome length and proper nuclear organization. Here, we identify Casein Kinase I alpha (CK1α) as an additional negative-regulator of Cap-H2. CK1α-depletion stabilizes Cap-H2 protein and results in an accumulation of Cap-H2 on chromosomes. Similar to Slimb mutation, CK1α depletion in cultured cells, larval salivary gland, and nurse cells results in several condensin II-dependent phenotypes including dispersal of centromeres, interphase chromosome compaction, and chromosome unpairing. Moreover, CK1α loss-of-function mutations dominantly suppress condensin II mutant phenotypes in vivo. Thus, CK1α facilitates Cap-H2 destruction and modulates nuclear organization by attenuating chromatin localized Cap-H2 protein. PMID:25723539

  3. Phosphorylation and activation of hamster carbamyl phosphate synthetase II by cAMP-dependent protein kinase. A novel mechanism for regulation of pyrimidine nucleotide biosynthesis.

    PubMed Central

    Carrey, E A; Campbell, D G; Hardie, D G

    1985-01-01

    The trifunctional protein CAD, which contains the first three enzyme activities of pyrimidine nucleotide biosynthesis (carbamyl phosphate synthetase II, aspartate transcarbamylase and dihydro-orotase), is phosphorylated stoichiometrically by cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase. Phosphorylation activates the ammonia-dependent carbamyl phosphate synthetase activity of the complex by reducing the apparent Km for ATP. This effect is particularly marked in the presence of the allosteric feedback inhibitor, UTP, when the apparent Km is reduced by greater than 4-fold. Inhibition by physiological concentrations of UTP is substantially relieved by phosphorylation. Cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase phosphorylates two serine residues on the protein termed sites 1 and 2, and the primary structures of tryptic peptides containing these sites have been determined: Site 1: Arg-Leu-Ser(P)-Ser-Phe-Val-Thr-Lys Site 2: Ile-His-Arg-Ala-Ser(P)-Asp-Pro-Gly-Leu-Pro-Ala-Glu-Glu-Pro-Lys During the phosphorylation reaction, activation of the carbamyl phosphate synthetase shows a better correlation with occupancy of site 1 rather than site 2. Both phosphorylation and activation can be reversed using purified preparations of the catalytic subunits of protein phosphatases 1- and -2A, and inactivation also correlates better with dephosphorylation of site 1 rather than site 2. We believe this to be the first report that a key enzyme in nucleotide biosynthesis is regulated in a significant manner by reversible covalent modification. The physiological role of this phosphorylation in the stimulation of cell proliferation by growth factors and other mitogens is discussed. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 5. PMID:4092695

  4. Phosphatidylinositol 5-phosphate 4-kinase type II beta is required for vitamin D receptor-dependent E-cadherin expression in SW480 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kouchi, Zen; Fujiwara, Yuki; Yamaguchi, Hideki; Nakamura, Yoshikazu; Fukami, Kiyoko

    2011-05-20

    Highlights: {yields} We analyzed Phosphatidylinositol 5-phosphate kinase II{beta} (PIPKII{beta}) function in cancer. {yields} PIPKII{beta} is required for vitamin D receptor-mediated E-cadherin upregulation in SW480. {yields} PIPKII{beta} suppresses cellular motility through E-cadherin induction in SW480 cells. {yields} Nuclear PIP{sub 2} but not plasma membrane-localized PIP{sub 2} mediates E-cadherin upregulation. -- Abstract: Numerous epidemiological data indicate that vitamin D receptor (VDR) signaling induced by its ligand or active metabolite 1{alpha},25-dihydroxyvitamin D{sub 3} (1{alpha},25(OH){sub 2}D{sub 3}) has anti-cancer activity in several colon cancers. 1{alpha},25(OH){sub 2}D{sub 3} induces the epithelial differentiation of SW480 colon cancer cells expressing VDR (SW480-ADH) by upregulating E-cadherin expression; however, its precise mechanism remains unknown. We found that phosphatidylinositol-5-phosphate 4-kinase type II beta (PIPKII{beta}) but not PIPKII{alpha} is required for VDR-mediated E-cadherin induction in SW480-ADH cells. The syntenin-2 postsynaptic density protein/disc large/zona occludens (PDZ) domain and pleckstrin homology domain of phospholipase C-delta1 (PLC{delta}1 PHD) possess high affinity for phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate (PI(4,5)P{sub 2}) mainly localized to the nucleus and plasma membrane, respectively. The expression of syntenin-2 PDZ but not PLC{delta}1 PHD inhibited 1{alpha},25(OH){sub 2}D{sub 3}-induced E-cadherin upregulation, suggesting that nuclear PI(4,5)P{sub 2} production mediates E-cadherin expression through PIPKII{beta} in a VDR-dependent manner. PIPKII{beta} is also involved in the suppression of the cell motility induced by 1{alpha},25(OH){sub 2}D{sub 3}. These results indicate that PIPKII{beta}-mediated PI(4,5)P{sub 2} signaling is important for E-cadherin upregulation and inhibition of cellular motility induced by VDR activation.

  5. CGK733-induced LC3 II formation is positively associated with the expression of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21Waf1/Cip1 through modulation of the AMPK and PERK/CHOP signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yufeng; Kuramitsu, Yasuhiro; Baron, Byron; Kitagawa, Takao; Tokuda, Kazuhiro; Akada, Junko; Nakamura, Kazuyuki

    2015-11-24

    Microtubule-associated protein 1A/1B-light chain 3 (LC3)-II is essential for autophagosome formation and is widely used to monitor autophagic activity. We show that CGK733 induces LC3 II and LC3-puncta accumulation, which are not involved in the activation of autophagy. The treatment of CGK733 did not alter the autophagic flux and was unrelated to p62 degradation. Treatment with CGK733 activated the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and protein kinase RNA-like endoplasmic reticulum kinase/CCAAT-enhancer-binding protein homologous protein (PERK/CHOP) pathways and elevated the expression of p21Waf1/Cip1. Inhibition of both AMPK and PERK/CHOP pathways by siRNA or chemical inhibitor could block CGK733-induced p21Waf1/Cip1 expression as well as caspase-3 cleavage. Knockdown of LC3 B (but not LC3 A) abolished CGK733-triggered LC3 II accumulation and consequently diminished AMPK and PERK/CHOP activity as well as p21Waf1/Cip1 expression. Our results demonstrate that CGK733-triggered LC3 II formation is an initial event upstream of the AMPK and PERK/CHOP pathways, both of which control p21Waf1/Cip1 expression.

  6. Restricted growth of U-type infectious haematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) in rainbow trout cells may be linked to casein kinase II activity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Park, J.-W.; Moon, C.H.; Harmache, A.; Wargo, A.R.; Purcell, M.K.; Bremont, M.; Kurath, G.

    2011-01-01

    casein kinase II (CKII) inhibitor, 5,6-dichloro-1-β-d-ribofuranosylbenzimidazole (DRB), reduced the titre of the U type 8.3-fold at 24 h post-infection. In contrast, 100 μm of the CKII inhibitor reduced the titre of the M type only 1.3-fold at 48 h post-infection. Our data suggest that the different growth of U- and M-type IHNV in RTG-2 cells may be linked to a differential requirement for cellular protein kinases such as CKII for their growth.

  7. Restricted growth of U-type infectious haematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) in rainbow trout cells may be linked to casein kinase II activity.

    PubMed

    Park, J W; Moon, C H; Harmache, A; Wargo, A R; Purcell, M K; Bremont, M; Kurath, G

    2011-02-01

    casein kinase II (CKII) inhibitor, 5,6-dichloro-1-β-d-ribofuranosylbenzimidazole (DRB), reduced the titre of the U type 8.3-fold at 24 h post-infection. In contrast, 100 μm of the CKII inhibitor reduced the titre of the M type only 1.3-fold at 48 h post-infection. Our data suggest that the different growth of U- and M-type IHNV in RTG-2 cells may be linked to a differential requirement for cellular protein kinases such as CKII for their growth.

  8. Localization of eight additional genes in the human major histocompatibility complex, including the gene encoding the casein kinase II {beta} subunit (CSNK2B)

    SciTech Connect

    Albertella, M.R.; Jones, H.; Thomson, W.

    1996-09-01

    A wide range of autoimmune and other diseases are known to be associated with the major histocompatibility complex. Many of these diseases are linked to the genes encoding the polymorphic histocompatibility complex. Many of these diseases are linked to the genes encoding the polymorphic histocompatibility antigens in the class I and class II regions, but some appear to be more strongly associated with genes in the central 1100-kb class III region, making it important to characterize this region fully for the presence of novel genes. An {approximately}220-kb segment of DNA in the class III region separating the Hsp70 (HSPA1L) and BAT1 (D6S8IE) genes, which was previously known to contain 14 genes. Genomic DNA fragments spanning the gaps between the known genes were used as probes to isolate cDNAs corresponding to five new genes within this region. Evidence from Northern blot analysis and exon trapping experiments that suggested the presence of at least two more new genes was also obtained. Partial cDNA and complete exonic genomic sequencing of one of the new genes has identified it as the casein kinase II{beta} subunit (CSNK2B). Two of the other novel genes lie within a region syntenic to that implicated in susceptibility to experimental allergic orchitis in the mouse, an autoimmune disease of the testis, and represent additional candidates for the Orch-1 locus associated with this disease. In addition, characterization of the 13-kb intergenic gap separating the RD (D6545) and G11 (D6S60E) genes has revealed the presence of a gene encoding a 1246-amino-acid polypeptide that shows significant sequence similarity to the yeast anti-viral Ski2p gene product. 49 refs., 8 figs.

  9. A novel role of G protein-coupled receptor kinase 5 in urotensin II-stimulated cellular hypertrophy in H9c2UT cells.

    PubMed

    Park, Cheon Ho; Lee, Ju Hee; Lee, Mi Young; Lee, Jeong Hyun; Lee, Byung Ho; Oh, Kwang-Seok

    2016-11-01

    Urotensin II (UII) is a neural hormone that induces cardiac hypertrophy and may be involved in the pathogenesis of cardiac remodeling and heart failure. Hypertrophy has been linked to histone deacetylase 5 (HDAC5) phosphorylation and nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) translocation, both of which are predominantly mediated by G protein-coupled receptor kinase 5 (GRK5). In the present study, we found that UII rapidly and strongly stimulated nuclear export of HDAC5 and nuclear import of NF-κB in H9c2 cells overexpressing the urotensin II receptor (H9c2UT). Hence, we hypothesized that GRK5 and its signaling pathway may play a role in UII-mediated cellular hypertrophy. H9c2UT cells were transduced with a GRK5 small hairpin RNA interference recombinant lentivirus, resulting in the down-regulation of GRK5. Under UII stimulation, reduced levels of GRK5 in H9c2UT cells led to suppression of UII-mediated HDAC5 phosphorylation and activation of the NF-κB signaling pathway. In contrast, UII-mediated activations of ERK1/2 and GSK3α/β were not affected by down-regulation of GRK5. In a cellular hypertrophy assay, down-regulation of GRK5 significantly suppressed UII-mediated hypertrophy of H9c2UT cells. Furthermore, UII-mediated cellular hypertrophy was inhibited by amlexanox, a selective GRK5 inhibitor, in H9c2UT cells and neonatal cardiomyocytes. Our results suggest that GRK5 may be involved in a UII-mediated hypertrophic response via activation of NF-κB and HDAC5 at least in part by ERK1/2 and GSK3α/β-independent pathways.

  10. Mutation of serum response factor phosphorylation sites and the mechanism by which its DNA-binding activity is increased by casein kinase II.

    PubMed Central

    Manak, J R; Prywes, R

    1991-01-01

    Casein kinase II (CKII) phosphorylates the mammalian transcription factor serum response factor (SRF) on a serine residue(s) located within a region of the protein spanning amino acids 70 to 92, thereby enhancing its DNA-binding activity in vitro. We report here that serine 83 appears to be the residue phosphorylated by CKII but that three other serines in this region can also be involved in phosphorylation and the enhancement of DNA-binding activity. A mutant that contained glutamate residues in place of these serines had only low-level binding activity; however, when the serines were replaced with glutamates and further mutations were made that increased the negative charge of the region, the resulting mutant showed a constitutively high level of binding equal to that achieved by phosphorylation of wild-type SRF. We have investigated the mechanism by which phosphorylation of SRF increases its DNA-binding activity. We have ruled out the possibilities that phosphorylation affects SRF dimerization or relieves inhibition due to masking of the DNA-binding domain by an amino-terminal region of the protein. Rather, using partial proteolysis to probe SRF's structure, we find that the conformation of SRF's DNA-binding domain is altered by phosphorylation. Images PMID:2046671

  11. The type II cGMP dependent protein kinase regulates GluA1 levels at the plasma membrane of developing cerebellar granule cells

    PubMed Central

    Incontro, Salvatore; Ciruela, Francisco; Ziff, Edward; Hofmann, Franz; Sánchez-Prieto, José; Torres, Magdalena

    2014-01-01

    Trafficking of α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid receptors (AMPARs) is regulated by specific interactions with other proteins and by post-translational mechanisms, such as phosphorylation. We have found that the type II cGMP-dependent protein kinase (cGKII) phosphorylates GluA1 (formerly GluR1) at S845, augmenting the surface expression of AMPARs at both synaptic and extrasynaptic sites. Activation of cGKII by 8-Br-cGMP enhances the surface expression of GluA1, whereas its inhibition or suppression effectively diminished the expression of this protein at the cell surface. In granule cells, NMDA receptor activation (NMDAR) stimulates nitric oxide and cGMP production, which in turn activates cGKII and induces the phosphorylation of GluA1, promoting its accumulation in the plasma membrane. GluA1 is mainly incorporated into calcium permeable AMPARs as exposure to 8-Br-cGMP or NMDA activation enhanced AMPA-elicited calcium responses that are sensitive to NASPM inhibition. We summarize evidence for an increase of calcium permeable AMPA receptors downstream of NMDA receptor activation that might be relevant for granule cell development and plasticity. PMID:23545413

  12. Wenxin-Keli Regulates the Calcium/Calmodulin-Dependent Protein Kinase II Signal Transduction Pathway and Inhibits Cardiac Arrhythmia in Rats with Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Xing, Yanwei; Gao, Yonghong; Chen, Jianxin; Zhu, Haiyan; Wu, Aiming; Yang, Qing; Teng, Fei; Zhang, Dong-mei; Xing, Yanhui; Gao, Kuo; He, Qingyong; Zhang, Zhenpeng; Wang, Jie; Shang, Hongcai

    2013-01-01

    Wenxin-Keli (WXKL) is a Chinese herbal compound reported to be of benefit in the treatment of cardiac arrhythmia, cardiac inflammation, and heart failure. Amiodarone is a noncompetitive inhibitor of the α- and β-adrenergic receptors and prevents calcium influx in the slow-response cells of the sinoatrial and atrioventricular nodes. Overexpression of Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) in transgenic mice results in heart failure and arrhythmias. We hypothesised that administration of WXKL and amiodarone can reduce the incidence of arrhythmias by regulating CaMKII signal transduction. A total of 100 healthy Sprague Dawley rats were used in the study. The rats were randomly divided into four groups (a sham group, a myocardial infarction (MI) group, a WXKL-treated group, and an amiodarone-treated group). A myocardial infarction model was established in these rats by ligating the left anterior descending coronary artery for 4 weeks. Western blotting was used to assess CaMKII, p-CaMKII (Thr-286), PLB, p-PLB (Thr-17), RYR2, and FK binding protein 12.6 (FKBP12.6) levels. The Ca2+ content in the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) and the calcium transient amplitude were studied by confocal imaging using the fluorescent indicator Fura-4. In conclusion, WXKL may inhibit heart failure and cardiac arrhythmias by regulating the CaMKII signal transduction pathway similar to amiodarone. PMID:23781262

  13. Wenxin-Keli Regulates the Calcium/Calmodulin-Dependent Protein Kinase II Signal Transduction Pathway and Inhibits Cardiac Arrhythmia in Rats with Myocardial Infarction.

    PubMed

    Xing, Yanwei; Gao, Yonghong; Chen, Jianxin; Zhu, Haiyan; Wu, Aiming; Yang, Qing; Teng, Fei; Zhang, Dong-Mei; Xing, Yanhui; Gao, Kuo; He, Qingyong; Zhang, Zhenpeng; Wang, Jie; Shang, Hongcai

    2013-01-01

    Wenxin-Keli (WXKL) is a Chinese herbal compound reported to be of benefit in the treatment of cardiac arrhythmia, cardiac inflammation, and heart failure. Amiodarone is a noncompetitive inhibitor of the α - and β -adrenergic receptors and prevents calcium influx in the slow-response cells of the sinoatrial and atrioventricular nodes. Overexpression of Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) in transgenic mice results in heart failure and arrhythmias. We hypothesised that administration of WXKL and amiodarone can reduce the incidence of arrhythmias by regulating CaMKII signal transduction. A total of 100 healthy Sprague Dawley rats were used in the study. The rats were randomly divided into four groups (a sham group, a myocardial infarction (MI) group, a WXKL-treated group, and an amiodarone-treated group). A myocardial infarction model was established in these rats by ligating the left anterior descending coronary artery for 4 weeks. Western blotting was used to assess CaMKII, p-CaMKII (Thr-286), PLB, p-PLB (Thr-17), RYR2, and FK binding protein 12.6 (FKBP12.6) levels. The Ca(2+) content in the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) and the calcium transient amplitude were studied by confocal imaging using the fluorescent indicator Fura-4. In conclusion, WXKL may inhibit heart failure and cardiac arrhythmias by regulating the CaMKII signal transduction pathway similar to amiodarone.

  14. The type II cGMP dependent protein kinase regulates GluA1 levels at the plasma membrane of developing cerebellar granule cells.

    PubMed

    Incontro, Salvatore; Ciruela, Francisco; Ziff, Edward; Hofmann, Franz; Sánchez-Prieto, José; Torres, Magdalena

    2013-08-01

    Trafficking of α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid receptors (AMPARs) is regulated by specific interactions with other proteins and by post-translational mechanisms, such as phosphorylation. We have found that the type II cGMP-dependent protein kinase (cGKII) phosphorylates GluA1 (formerly GluR1) at S845, augmenting the surface expression of AMPARs at both synaptic and extrasynaptic sites. Activation of cGKII by 8-Br-cGMP enhances the surface expression of GluA1, whereas its inhibition or suppression effectively diminished the expression of this protein at the cell surface. In granule cells, NMDA receptor activation (NMDAR) stimulates nitric oxide and cGMP production, which in turn activates cGKII and induces the phosphorylation of GluA1, promoting its accumulation in the plasma membrane. GluA1 is mainly incorporated into calcium permeable AMPARs as exposure to 8-Br-cGMP or NMDA activation enhanced AMPA-elicited calcium responses that are sensitive to NASPM inhibition. We summarize evidence for an increase of calcium permeable AMPA receptors downstream of NMDA receptor activation that might be relevant for granule cell development and plasticity.

  15. Ca2+/calmodulin protein kinase II and memory: learning-related changes in a localized region of the domestic chick brain.

    PubMed

    Solomonia, Revaz O; Kotorashvili, Adam; Kiguradze, Tamar; McCabe, Brian J; Horn, Gabriel

    2005-12-01

    The role of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) in the recognition memory of visual imprinting was investigated. Domestic chicks were exposed to a training stimulus and learning strength measured. Trained chicks, together with untrained chicks, were killed either 1 h or 24 h after training. The intermediate and medial hyperstriatum ventrale/mesopallium (IMHV/IMM), a forebrain memory storage site, was removed together with a control brain region, the posterior pole of the neostriatum/nidopallium (PPN). Amounts of membrane total alphaCaMKII (tCaMKII) and Thr286-autophosphorylated alphaCaMKII (apCAMKII) were measured. For the IMHV/IMM 1 h group, apCaMKII amount and apCAMKII/tCaMKII increased as chicks learned. The magnitude of the molecular changes were positively correlated with learning strength. No learning-related effects were observed in PPN, or in either region at 24 h. These results suggest that CaMKII is involved in the formation of memory but not in its maintenance.

  16. Curcumin Inhibits Neuronal Loss in the Retina and Elevates Ca2+/Calmodulin-Dependent Protein Kinase II Activity in Diabetic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Peipei; Zhu, Yanxia; Chen, Zhen; Shi, Tianyan; Lei, Wensheng

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Purpose: To determine whether curcumin offers neuroprotection to minimize the apoptosis of neural cells in the retina of diabetic rats. Methods: Streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rats and control rats were used in this study. A subgroup of STZ-induced diabetic rats were treated with curcumin for 12 weeks. Retinal histology, apoptosis of neural cells in the retina, electroretinograms, and retinal glutamate content were evaluated after 12 weeks. Retinal levels of Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII), phospho-CaMKII (p-CaMKII), and cleaved caspase-3 were determined by Western blot analysis. Results: The amplitudes a-wave, b-wave, and oscillatory potential were reduced by diabetes, but curcumin treatment suppressed this reduction of amplitudes. Curcumin also prevented cell loss from the outer nuclear, inner nuclear, and ganglion cell layers. Apoptosis of retinal neurons was detected in diabetic rats. The concentration of glutamate in the retina was higher in diabetic rats, but was significantly reduced in the curcumin-treated group. Furthermore, p-CaMKII and cleaved caspase-3 expression were upregulated in the diabetic retina, but reduced in curcumin-treated rats. Conclusions: Curcumin attenuated diabetes-induced apoptosis in retinal neurons by reducing the glutamate level and downregulating CaMKII. Thus, curcumin might be used to prevent neuronal damage in the retina of patients with diabetes mellitus. PMID:26207889

  17. A molecular ruler regulates cytoskeletal remodelling by the Rho kinases

    PubMed Central

    Truebestein, Linda; Elsner, Daniel J.; Fuchs, Elisabeth; Leonard, Thomas A.

    2015-01-01

    The Rho-associated coiled-coil kinases (ROCK) are essential regulators of the actin cytoskeleton; however, the structure of a full-length ROCK is unknown and the mechanisms by which its kinase activity is controlled are not well understood. Here we determine the low-resolution structure of human ROCK2 using electron microscopy, revealing it to be a constitutive dimer, 120 nm in length, with a long coiled-coil tether linking the kinase and membrane-binding domains. We find, in contrast to previous reports, that ROCK2 activity does not appear to be directly regulated by binding to membranes, RhoA, or by phosphorylation. Instead, we show that changing the length of the tether modulates ROCK2 function in cells, suggesting that it acts as a molecular ruler. We present a model in which ROCK activity is restricted to a discrete region of the actin cytoskeleton, governed by the length of its coiled-coil. This represents a new type of spatial control, and hence a new paradigm for kinase regulation. PMID:26620183

  18. DNA-dependent protein kinase interacts functionally with the RNA polymerase II complex recruited at the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) long terminal repeat and plays an important role in HIV gene expression.

    PubMed

    Tyagi, Shilpi; Ochem, Alex; Tyagi, Mudit

    2011-07-01

    DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK), a nuclear protein kinase that specifically requires association with DNA for its kinase activity, plays important roles in the regulation of different DNA transactions, including transcription, replication and DNA repair, as well as in the maintenance of telomeres. Due to its large size, DNA-PK is also known to facilitate the activities of other factors by providing the docking platform at their site of action. In this study, by running several chromatin immunoprecipitation assays, we demonstrate the parallel distribution of DNA-PK with RNA polymerase II (RNAP II) along the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) provirus before and after activation with tumour necrosis factor alpha. The association between DNA-PK and RNAP II is also long-lasting, at least for up to 4 h (the duration analysed in this study). Knockdown of endogenous DNA-PK using specific small hairpin RNAs expressed from lentiviral vectors resulted in significant reduction in HIV gene expression and replication, demonstrating the importance of DNA-PK for HIV gene expression. Sequence analysis of the HIV-1 Tat protein revealed three potential target sites for phosphorylation by DNA-PK and, by using kinase assays, we confirmed that Tat is an effective substrate of DNA-PK. Through peptide mapping, we found that two of these three potential phosphorylation sites are recognized and phosphorylated by DNA-PK. Mutational studies on the DNA-PK target sites of Tat further demonstrated the functional significance of the Tat-DNA-PK interaction. Thus, overall our results clearly demonstrate the functional interaction between DNA-PK and RNAP II during HIV transcription.

  19. Calcium-calmodulin-dependent kinase II modulates Kv4.2 channel expression and upregulates neuronal A-type potassium currents.

    PubMed

    Varga, Andrew W; Yuan, Li-Lian; Anderson, Anne E; Schrader, Laura A; Wu, Gang-Yi; Gatchel, Jennifer R; Johnston, Daniel; Sweatt, J David

    2004-04-07

    Calcium-calmodulin-dependent kinase II (CaMKII) has a long history of involvement in synaptic plasticity, yet little focus has been given to potassium channels as CaMKII targets despite their importance in repolarizing EPSPs and action potentials and regulating neuronal membrane excitability. We now show that Kv4.2 acts as a substrate for CaMKII in vitro and have identified CaMKII phosphorylation sites as Ser438 and Ser459. To test whether CaMKII phosphorylation of Kv4.2 affects channel biophysics, we expressed wild-type or mutant Kv4.2 and the K(+) channel interacting protein, KChIP3, with or without a constitutively active form of CaMKII in Xenopus oocytes and measured the voltage dependence of activation and inactivation in each of these conditions. CaMKII phosphorylation had no effect on channel biophysical properties. However, we found that levels of Kv4.2 protein are increased with CaMKII phosphorylation in transfected COS cells, an effect attributable to direct channel phosphorylation based on site-directed mutagenesis studies. We also obtained corroborating physiological data showing increased surface A-type channel expression as revealed by increases in peak K(+) current amplitudes with CaMKII phosphorylation. Furthermore, endogenous A-currents in hippocampal pyramidal neurons were increased in amplitude after introduction of constitutively active CaMKII, which results in a decrease in neuronal excitability in response to current injections. Thus CaMKII can directly modulate neuronal excitability by increasing cell-surface expression of A-type K(+) channels.

  20. Arabidopsis Type II Phosphatidylinositol 4-Kinase PI4Kγ5 Regulates Auxin Biosynthesis and Leaf Margin Development through Interacting with Membrane-Bound Transcription Factor ANAC078

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Shu-Tang; Xue, Hong-Wei

    2016-01-01

    Normal leaf margin development is important for leaf morphogenesis and contributes to diverse leaf shapes in higher plants. We here show the crucial roles of an atypical type II phosphatidylinositol 4-kinase, PI4Kγ5, in Arabidopsis leaf margin development. PI4Kγ5 presents a dynamics expression pattern along with leaf development and a T-DNA mutant lacking PI4Kγ5, pi4kγ5–1, presents serrated leaves, which is resulted from the accelerated cell division and increased auxin concentration at serration tips. Studies revealed that PI4Kγ5 interacts with and phosphorylates a membrane-bound NAC transcription factor, ANAC078. Previous studies demonstrated that membrane-bound transcription factors regulate gene transcription by undergoing proteolytic process to translocate into nucleus, and ANAC078 undergoes proteolysis by cleaving off the transmembrane region and carboxyl terminal. Western blot analysis indeed showed that ANAC078 deleting of carboxyl terminal is significantly reduced in pi4kγ5–1, indicating that PI4Kγ5 is important for the cleavage of ANAC078. This is consistent with the subcellular localization observation showing that fluorescence by GFP-ANAC078 is detected at plasma membrane but not nucleus in pi4kγ5–1 mutant and that expression of ANAC078 deleting of carboxyl terminal, driven by PI4Kγ5 promoter, could rescue the leaf serration defects of pi4kγ5–1. Further analysis showed that ANAC078 suppresses the auxin synthesis by directly binding and regulating the expression of auxin synthesis-related genes. These results indicate that PI4Kγ5 interacts with ANAC078 to negatively regulate auxin synthesis and hence influences cell proliferation and leaf development, providing informative clues for the regulation of in situ auxin synthesis and cell division, as well as the cleavage and functional mechanism of membrane-bound transcription factors. PMID:27529511

  1. Regulation of voltage-gated Ca(2+) currents by Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II in resting sensory neurons.

    PubMed

    Kostic, Sandra; Pan, Bin; Guo, Yuan; Yu, Hongwei; Sapunar, Damir; Kwok, Wai-Meng; Hudmon, Andy; Wu, Hsiang-En; Hogan, Quinn H

    2014-09-01

    Calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) is recognized as a key element in encoding depolarization activity of excitable cells into facilitated voltage-gated Ca(2+) channel (VGCC) function. Less is known about the participation of CaMKII in regulating VGCCs in resting cells. We examined constitutive CaMKII control of Ca(2+) currents in peripheral sensory neurons acutely isolated from dorsal root ganglia (DRGs) of adult rats. The small molecule CaMKII inhibitor KN-93 (1.0μM) reduced depolarization-induced ICa by 16-30% in excess of the effects produced by the inactive homolog KN-92. The specificity of CaMKII inhibition on VGCC function was shown by the efficacy of the selective CaMKII blocking peptide autocamtide-2-related inhibitory peptide in a membrane-permeable myristoylated form, which also reduced VGCC current in resting neurons. Loss of VGCC currents is primarily due to reduced N-type current, as application of mAIP selectively reduced N-type current by approximately 30%, and prior N-type current inhibition eliminated the effect of mAIP on VGCCs, while prior block of L-type channels did not reduce the effect of mAIP on total ICa. T-type currents were not affected by mAIP in resting DRG neurons. Transduction of sensory neurons in vivo by DRG injection of an adeno-associated virus expressing AIP also resulted in a loss of N-type currents. Together, these findings reveal a novel molecular adaptation whereby sensory neurons retain CaMKII support of VGCCs despite remaining quiescent.

  2. Hermansky-Pudlak Syndrome Protein Complexes Associate with Phosphatidylinositol 4-Kinase Type II α in Neuronal and Non-neuronal Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Salazar, Gloria; Zlatic, Stephanie; Craige, Branch; Peden, Andrew A.; Pohl, Jan; Faundez, Victor

    2009-01-01

    The Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome is a disorder affecting endosome sorting. Disease is triggered by defects in any of 15 mouse gene products, which are part of five distinct cytosolic molecular complexes: AP-3, homotypic fusion and vacuole protein sorting, and BLOC-1, -2, and -3. To identify molecular associations of these complexes, we used in vivo cross-linking followed by purification of cross-linked AP-3 complexes and mass spectrometric identification of associated proteins. AP-3 was co-isolated with BLOC-1, BLOC-2, and homotypic fusion and vacuole protein sorting complex subunits; clathrin; and phosphatidylinositol-4-kinase type II α (PI4KIIα). We previously reported that this membrane-anchored enzyme is a regulator of AP-3 recruitment to membranes and a cargo of AP-3 (Craige, B., Salazar, G., and Faundez, V. (2008) Mol. Biol. Cell 19,1415 -142618256276). Using cells deficient in different Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome complexes, we identified that BLOC-1, but not BLOC-2 or BLOC-3, deficiencies affect PI4KIIα inclusion into AP-3 complexes. BLOC-1, PI4KIIα, and AP-3 belong to a tripartite complex, and down-regulation of either PI4KIIα, BLOC-1, or AP-3 complexes led to similar LAMP1 phenotypes. Our analysis indicates that BLOC-1 complex modulates the association of PI4KIIα with AP-3. These results suggest that AP-3 and BLOC-1 act, either in concert or sequentially, to specify sorting of PI4KIIα along the endocytic route. PMID:19010779

  3. Cardiac CaM Kinase II Genes δ and γ Contribute to Adverse Remodeling but Redundantly Inhibit Calcineurin-Induced Myocardial Hypertrophy

    PubMed Central

    Kreusser, Michael M.; Lehmann, Lorenz H.; Keranov, Stanislav; Hoting, Marc-Oscar; Oehl, Ulrike; Kohlhaas, Michael; Reil, Jan-Christian; Neumann, Kay; Schneider, Michael D.; Hill, Joseph A.; Dobrev, Dobromir; Maack, Christoph; Maier, Lars S.; Gröne, Hermann-Josef; Katus, Hugo A.; Olson, Eric N.; Backs, Johannes

    2014-01-01

    Background Ca2+-dependent signaling through CaM Kinase II (CaMKII) and calcineurin was suggested to contribute to adverse cardiac remodeling. However, the relative importance of CaMKII versus calcineurin for adverse cardiac remodeling remained unclear. Methods and Results We generated double-knockout mice (DKO) lacking the 2 cardiac CaMKII genes δ and γ specifically in cardiomyocytes. We show that both CaMKII isoforms contribute redundantly to phosphorylation not only of phospholamban, ryanodine receptor 2, and histone deacetylase 4, but also calcineurin. Under baseline conditions, DKO mice are viable and display neither abnormal Ca2+ handling nor functional and structural changes. On pathological pressure overload and β-adrenergic stimulation, DKO mice are protected against cardiac dysfunction and interstitial fibrosis. But surprisingly and paradoxically, DKO mice develop cardiac hypertrophy driven by excessive activation of endogenous calcineurin, which is associated with a lack of phosphorylation at the auto-inhibitory calcineurin A site Ser411. Likewise, calcineurin inhibition prevents cardiac hypertrophy in DKO. On exercise performance, DKO mice show an exaggeration of cardiac hypertrophy with increased expression of the calcineurin target gene RCAN1-4 but no signs of adverse cardiac remodeling. Conclusions We established a mouse model in which CaMKII’s activity is specifically and completely abolished. By the use of this model we show that CaMKII induces maladaptive cardiac remodeling while it inhibits calcineurin-dependent hypertrophy. These data suggest inhibition of CaMKII but not calcineurin as a promising approach to attenuate the progression of heart failure. PMID:25124496

  4. The regulation of synaptic vesicle recycling by cGMP-dependent protein kinase type II in cerebellar granule cells under strong and sustained stimulation.

    PubMed

    Collado-Alsina, Andrea; Ramírez-Franco, Jorge; Sánchez-Prieto, José; Torres, Magdalena

    2014-06-25

    From the early periods of neurogenesis and migration, up until synaptogenesis, both nitric oxide (NO) and its downstream messenger, cGMP, are thought to influence the development of neurons. The NO/cGMP/cGMP-dependent protein kinase (cGK) pathway regulates the clustering and recruitment of synaptic proteins and vesicles to the synapse, adjusting the exoendocytic cycle to the intensity of activity and accelerating endocytosis following large-scale exocytosis. Here, we show that blockage of the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor impairs the cycling of synaptic vesicles in a subset of boutons on cerebellar granule cells, an effect that was reversed by increasing cGMP. Furthermore, we demonstrate that presynaptic cGK type II (cGKII) plays a major role in this process. Using the FM1-43 dye to track vesicle recycling, we found that knockdown of cGKII and/or the application of a cGK inhibitor reduced the efficiency of synaptic vesicle recycling to a similar extent. Likewise, in cerebellar granule cells transfected with vGlut1-pHluorin to follow the exoendocytotic cycle, application of a cGK inhibitor slowed vesicle endocytosis when exocytosis was accelerated through strong and sustained stimulation. Additionally, ultrastructural analysis showed that cGKII knockdown or inhibition favored the formation of endosomal-like structures after strong and sustained stimulation. We conclude that cGKII controls the homeostatic balance of vesicle exocytosis and endocytosis in synaptic boutons of rat cerebellar granule cells.

  5. VEGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor II (VRI) induced vascular insufficiency in zebrafish as a model for studying vascular toxicity and vascular preservation

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Shang; Dang, Yuan Ye; Oi Lam Che, Ginny; Kwan, Yiu Wa; Chan, Shun Wan; Leung, George Pak Heng; Lee, Simon Ming Yuen; Hoi, Maggie Pui Man

    2014-11-01

    In ischemic disorders such as chronic wounds and myocardial ischemia, there is inadequate tissue perfusion due to vascular insufficiency. Besides, it has been observed that prolonged use of anti-angiogenic agents in cancer therapy produces cardiovascular toxicity caused by impaired vessel integrity and regeneration. In the present study, we used VEGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor II (VRI) to chemically induce vascular insufficiency in zebrafish in vivo and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) in vitro to further study the mechanisms of vascular morphogenesis in these pathological conditions. We also explored the possibility of treating vascular insufficiency by enhancing vascular regeneration and repair with pharmacological intervention. We observed that pretreatment of VRI induced blood vessel loss in developing zebrafish by inhibiting angiogenesis and increasing endothelial cell apoptosis, accompanied by down-regulation of kdr, kdrl and flt-1 genes expression. The VRI-induced blood vessel loss in zebrafish could be restored by post-treatment of calycosin, a cardiovascular protective isoflavone. Similarly, VRI induced cytotoxicity and apoptosis in HUVEC which could be rescued by calycosin post-treatment. Further investigation of the underlying mechanisms showed that the PI3K/AKT/Bad cell survival pathway was a main contributor of the vascular regenerative effect of calycosin. These findings indicated that the cardiovascular toxicity in anti-angiogenic therapy was mainly caused by insufficient endothelial cell survival, suggesting its essential role in vascular integrity, repair and regeneration. In addition, we showed that VRI-induced blood vessel loss in zebrafish represented a simple and effective in vivo model for studying vascular insufficiency and evaluating cancer drug vascular toxicities. - Highlights: • In vivo VRI model • Rescue effects of calycosin • Calycosin EC survival pathways.

  6. The inhibitor of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II KN93 attenuates bone cancer pain via inhibition of KIF17/NR2B trafficking in mice.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yue; Liang, Ying; Hou, Bailing; Liu, Ming; Yang, Xuli; Liu, Chenglong; Zhang, Juan; Zhang, Wei; Ma, Zhengliang; Gu, Xiaoping

    2014-09-01

    The N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) containing subunit 2B (NR2B) is critical for the regulation of nociception in bone cancer pain, although the precise molecular mechanisms remain unclear. KIF17, a kinesin motor, plays a key role in the dendritic transport of NR2B. The up-regulation of NR2B and KIF17 transcription results from an increase in phosphorylated cAMP-response element-binding protein (CREB), which is activated by calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII). In this study, we hypothesized that CaMKII-mediated KIF17/NR2B trafficking may contribute to bone cancer pain. Osteosarcoma cells were implanted into the intramedullary space of the right femurs of C3H/HeJ mice to induce progressive bone cancer-related pain behaviors. The expression of spinal t-CaMKII, p-CaMKII, NR2B and KIF17 after inoculation was also evaluated. These results showed that inoculation of osteosarcoma cells induced progressive bone cancer pain and resulted in a significant up-regulation of p-CaMKII, NR2B and KIF17 expression after inoculation. Intrathecal administration of KN93, a CaMKII inhibitor, down-regulated these three proteins and attenuated bone cancer pain in a dose- and time-dependent manner. These findings indicated that CaMKII-mediated KIF17/NR2B trafficking may contribute to bone cancer pain, and inhibition of CaMKII may be a useful alternative or adjunct therapy for relieving cancer pain.

  7. Possible interaction of hippocampal nitric oxide and calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II on reversal of spatial memory impairment induced by morphine.

    PubMed

    Farahmandfar, Maryam; Kadivar, Mehdi; Naghdi, Nasser

    2015-03-15

    The opioid system plays an important role in learning and memory by modulation of different molecules in the brain. The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of hippocampal nitric oxide and calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) on the morphine-induced modulation of spatial memory consolidation in male rats. Spatial memory was assessed in Morris water maze task by a single training session of eight trials followed by a probe trial and visible test 24h later. Our data indicated that post-training administration of L-arginine, a nitric oxide precursor (6 and 9 µg/rat, intra-CA1) significantly decreased amnesia induced by morphine (10 mg/kg) in spatial memory consolidation. A reversal effect of L-arginine on morphine-induced amnesia prevented by KN-93 (N-[2-(N-(4-chlorocinnamyl)-N-methylaminomethyl) phenyl]-N-[2-hydroxyethyl] methoxybenzenesulfnamide), CaMKII inhibitor, (10 nmol/0.5 µl/site). In addition, post-training injection of L-NAME, (NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester), a nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitor (10 and 15 µg/rat) or KN-93 (10 nmol/0.5 µl/site) with lower dose of morphine (2.5 mg/kg), which did not induce amnesia by itself, caused inhibition of memory consolidation. We also showed that co-administration of L-arginine (9 µg/rat) and morphine (10 mg/kg) significantly increased CaMKII activity in the rat hippocampus. On the other hand, administration of L-NAME (10 µg/rat) led to a decrease in the haippocampal activity of CaMKII in morphine-treated (2.5mg/kg) animals. These results indicate that acute single exposure to morphine can modulate consolidation of spatial memory, which may be mediated by a hippocampal nitrergic system and CaMKII activity.

  8. Central Rho kinase inhibition restores baroreflex sensitivity and angiotensin II type 1 receptor protein imbalance in conscious rabbits with chronic heart failure.

    PubMed

    Haack, Karla K V; Gao, Lie; Schiller, Alicia M; Curry, Pamela L; Pellegrino, Peter R; Zucker, Irving H

    2013-03-01

    The small GTPase RhoA and its associated kinase ROCKII are involved in vascular smooth muscle cell contraction and endothelial NO synthase mRNA destabilization. Overactivation of the RhoA/ROCKII pathway is implicated in several pathologies, including chronic heart failure (CHF), and may contribute to the enhanced sympathetic outflow seen in CHF as a result of decreased NO availability. Thus, we hypothesized that central ROCKII blockade would improve the sympathovagal imbalance in a pacing rabbit model of CHF in an NO-dependent manner. CHF was induced by rapid ventricular pacing and characterized by an ejection fraction of ≤45%. Animals were implanted with an intracerbroventricular cannula and osmotic minipump (rate, 1 μL/h) containing sterile saline, 1.5 µg/kg per day fasudil (Fas, a ROCKII inhibitor) for 4 days or Fas+100 µg/kg per day Nω-Nitro-l-arginine methyl ester hydrochloride, a NO synthase inhibitor. Arterial baroreflex control was assessed by intravenous infusion of sodium nitroprusside and phenylephrine. Fas infusion significantly lowered resting heart rate by decreasing sympathetic and increasing vagal tone. Furthermore, Fas improved baroreflex gain in CHF in an NO-dependent manner. In CHF Fas animals, the decrease in heart rate in response to intravenous metoprolol was similar to Sham and was reversed by Nω-Nitro-l-arginine methyl ester hydrochloride. Fas decreased angiotensin II type 1 receptor and phospho-ERM protein expression and increased endothelial NO synthase expression in the brain stem of CHF animals. These data strongly suggest that central ROCKII activation contributes to cardiac sympathoexcitation in the setting of CHF and that central Fas restores vagal and sympathetic tone in an NO-dependent manner. ROCKII may be a new central therapeutic target in the setting of CHF.

  9. Midostaurin, a Novel Protein Kinase Inhibitor for the Treatment of Acute Myelogenous Leukemia: Insights from Human Absorption, Metabolism and Excretion Studies of a BDDCS II Drug.

    PubMed

    He, Handan; Tran, Phi; Gu, Helen; Tedesco, Vivienne; Zhang, Jin; Lin, Wen; Gatlik, Ewa; Klein, Kai; Heimbach, Tycho

    2017-03-07

    The absorption, metabolism and excretion of midostaurin, a potent class III tyrosine protein kinase inhibitor for acute myelogenous leukemia, were evaluated in healthy subjects. A microemulsion formulation was chosen to optimize absorption. After a 50 mg [14C]midostaurin dose, oral absorption was high (> 90%) and relatively rapid. In plasma, the major circulating components were midostaurin (22%), CGP52421 (32.7%), and CGP62221 (27.7%). Long plasma half-lives were observed for midostaurin (20.3 h), CGP52421 (495 h), and CGP62221 (33.4 h). Through careful mass-balance study design, the recovery achieved was good (81.6%), despite the long radioactivity half-lives. Most of the radioactive dose was recovered in feces (77.6%) mainly as metabolites; as only 3.43% was unchanged, suggesting mainly hepatic metabolism. Renal elimination was minor (4%). Midostaurin metabolism pathways involved hydroxylation, O demethylation, amide hydrolysis and N demethylation. High plasma CGP52421 and CGP62221 exposures in humans, along with relatively potent cell-based IC50 for FLT3-ITD inhibition, suggested that the antileukemic activity in AML patients may also be maintained by the metabolites. Very high plasma protein binding (>99%) required equilibrium gel filtration to identify differences between humans and animals. As midostaurin, CGP52421 and CGP62221 are metabolized mainly by CYP3A4 and are inhibitors/inducers for CYP3A, potential drug-drug interactions with mainly CYP3A4 modulators/CYP3A substrates could be expected. Given its low aqueous solubility, high oral absorption and extensive metabolism (> 90%), midostaurin is a BCS/BDDCS class II drug in human, consistent with rat BDDCS in vivo data showing high absorption (>90%) and extensive metabolism (>90%).

  10. Expression of a Truncated, Kinase-Defective TGF-β Type II Receptor in Mouse Skeletal Tissue Promotes Terminal Chondrocyte Differentiation and Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Serra, Rosa; Johnson, Mahlon; Filvaroff, Ellen H.; LaBorde, James; Sheehan, Daniel M.; Derynck, Rik; Moses, Harold L.

    1997-01-01

    Members of the TGF-β superfamily are important regulators of skeletal development. TGF-βs signal through heteromeric type I and type II receptor serine/threonine kinases. When over-expressed, a cytoplasmically truncated type II receptor can compete with the endogenous receptors for complex formation, thereby acting as a dominant-negative mutant (DNIIR). To determine the role of TGF-βs in the development and maintenance of the skeleton, we have generated transgenic mice (MT-DNIIR-4 and -27) that express the DNIIR in skeletal tissue. DNIIR mRNA expression was localized to the periosteum/perichondrium, syno-vium, and articular cartilage. Lower levels of DNIIR mRNA were detected in growth plate cartilage. Transgenic mice frequently showed bifurcation of the xiphoid process and sternum. They also developed progressive skeletal degeneration, resulting by 4 to 8 mo of age in kyphoscoliosis and stiff and torqued joints. The histology of affected joints strongly resembled human osteo-arthritis. The articular surface was replaced by bone or hypertrophic cartilage as judged by the expression of type X collagen, a marker of hypertrophic cartilage normally absent from articular cartilage. The synovium was hyperplastic, and cartilaginous metaplasia was observed in the joint space. We then tested the hypothesis that TGF-β is required for normal differentiation of cartilage in vivo. By 4 and 8 wk of age, the level of type X collagen was increased in growth plate cartilage of transgenic mice relative to wild-type controls. Less proteoglycan staining was detected in the growth plate and articular cartilage matrix of transgenic mice. Mice that express DNIIR in skeletal tissue also demonstrated increased Indian hedgehog (IHH) expression. IHH is a secreted protein that is expressed in chondrocytes that are committed to becoming hypertrophic. It is thought to be involved in a feedback loop that signals through the periosteum/ perichondrium to inhibit cartilage differentiation. The

  11. Gonadotropin regulation of testosterone production by primary cultured theca and granulosa cells of Atlantic croaker: II. Involvement of a mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway.

    PubMed

    Benninghoff, Abby D; Thomas, Peter

    2006-07-01

    Previous investigations in Atlantic croaker ovaries and primary co-cultured theca and granulosa cells have identified multiple signal transduction pathways involved in the control of gonadotropin-induced steroidogenesis, including adenylyl cyclase- and calcium-dependent signaling pathways. In the present study, evidence was obtained for an involvement of a third signal transduction pathway, a mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAP kinase) signaling cascade, in the regulation of gonadal steroidogenesis in this lower vertebrate teleost model. Gonadotropin-stimulated testosterone synthesis was markedly attenuated by two antagonists of mitogen-activated protein kinase kinases 1/2 (MEK1/2, also known as Map2k1/Map2k2). Moreover, treatment with gonadotropin-induced MEK1/2-dependent phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated protein kinases 1/2 (ERK1/2, also known as Mapk3/Mapk1) in a concentration- and time-dependent manner in co-cultured croaker theca and granulosa cells. Active MEK1/2 was required for a complete steroidogenic response to activators of the adenylyl cyclase pathway, including forskolin and dbcAMP, suggesting that the target(s) of MAP kinase signaling are distal to cAMP generation and activation of cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA). Interestingly, dbcAMP caused a similar increase of ERK1/2 phosphorylation as was observed with gonadotropin treatment, although an inhibitor of PKA did not attenuate this response. Finally, there was no evidence of cross-talk between calcium-dependent signaling pathways and this MAP kinase cascade. While drugs that block calcium-dependent signal transduction, including inhibitors of voltage-sensitive calcium channels, calmodulin, and calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinases, significantly reduced gonadotropin-induced testosterone accumulation, these drugs had no apparent effect on hCG-induced ERK1/2 phosphorylation.

  12. Rho kinase inhibition in diabetic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Komers, Radko

    2013-10-01

    Small GTPases of the Rho family and their down-stream effectors Rho associated kinases (ROCKs) are the molecules that converge a spectrum of pathophysiological signals triggered by the diabetic milieu and represent promising molecular targets for nephroprotective treatment in diabetes. The review discusses recent studies exploring the consequences of diabetes-induced Rho-ROCK activation in the kidney and the effects of ROCK inhibition (ROCKi) in experimental diabetic kidney disease (DKD). Studies in models of type 1 and type 2 diabetes have indicated blood pressure-independent nephroprotective actions of ROCKi in DKD. The underlying mechanisms include attenuation of diabetes-induced increases in renal expression of prosclerotic cytokines and extracellular matrix, anti-oxidant effects and protection of mitochondrial function, resulting in slower development of glomerulosclerosis and interstitial fibrosis. The studies have also shown antiproteinuric effects of ROCKi that could be related to reductions in permeability of the glomerular barrier and beneficial effects on podocytes. Glomerular haemodynamic mechanisms might also be involved. Despite remaining questions in this field, such as the effects in podocytes later in the course of DKD, specificity of currently available ROCKi, or the roles of individual ROCK isoforms, recent evidence in experimental diabetes suggests that ROCKi might in future broaden the spectrum of treatments available for patients with DKD. This is supported by the evidence generated in models of non-diabetic kidney disease and in clinical studies in patients with various cardiovascular disorders.

  13. PAK family kinases

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Zhuo-shen; Manser, Ed

    2012-01-01

    The p21-activated kinases (PAKs) are a family of Ser/Thr protein kinases that are represented by six genes in humans (PAK 1–6), and are found in all eukaryotes sequenced to date. Genetic and knockdown experiments in frogs, fish and mice indicate group I PAKs are widely expressed, required for multiple tissue development, and particularly important for immune and nervous system function in the adult. The group II PAKs (human PAKs 4–6) are more enigmatic, but their restriction to metazoans and presence at cell-cell junctions suggests these kinases emerged to regulate junctional signaling. Studies of protozoa and fungal PAKs show that they regulate cell shape and polarity through phosphorylation of multiple cytoskeletal proteins, including microtubule binding proteins, myosins and septins. This chapter discusses what we know about the regulation of PAKs and their physiological role in different model organisms, based primarily on gene knockout studies. PMID:23162738

  14. Transforming growth factor-β1 induces type II collagen and aggrecan expression via activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 and Smad2/3 signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yanhui; Tao, Hairong; Jin, Chen; Liu, Yonzhang; Lu, Xiongwei; Hu, Xiaopeng; Wang, Xiang

    2015-10-01

    Transforming growth factor (TGF)‑β regulates the anabolic metabolism of articular cartilage and prevents cartilage degradation. TGF‑β1 influences cellular proliferation, differentiation and the extracellular matrix through activation of the extracellular signal‑regulated kinase (ERK)1/2 and Smad2/3 signaling pathways. However, it has remained to be fully elucidated precisely how the ERK1/2 and Smad2/3 signaling pathways mediate anabolic processes of articular cartilage. The present study investigated how ERK1/2 and Smad2/3 signaling mediate TGF‑β1‑stimulated type II collagen and aggrecan expression in rat chondrocytes. The results confirmed that TGF‑β1 stimulates type II collagen and aggrecan expression in rat chondrocytes, and furthermore, that the ERK1/2 and Smad2/3 signaling pathways were activated by TGF‑β1. Conversely, the TGF‑β receptor I (ALK5) kinase inhibitor SB525334 significantly impaired TGF‑β1‑induced type II collagen and aggrecan expression, coinciding with a reduction of ERK1/2 and Smad3 phosphorylation. In addition, TGF‑β1‑induced type II collagen and aggrecan expression were significantly suppressed by ERK1/2 inhibitor PD98059. Similarly, TGF‑β1‑stimulated type II collagen and aggrecan expression were decreased in the presence of a Smad3 phosphorylation inhibitor SIS3. Therefore, the present study demonstrated that the ERK1/2 and Smad2/3 signaling pathways regulate type II collagen and aggrecan expression in rat chondrocytes.

  15. Insulin receptors mediate growth effects in cultured fetal neurons. II. Activation of a protein kinase that phosphorylates ribosomal protein S6

    SciTech Connect

    Heidenreich, K.A.; Toledo, S.P. )

    1989-09-01

    As an initial attempt to identify early steps in insulin action that may be involved in the growth responses of neurons to insulin, we investigated whether insulin receptor activation increases the phosphorylation of ribosomal protein S6 in cultured fetal neurons and whether activation of a protein kinase is involved in this process. When neurons were incubated for 2 h with 32Pi, the addition of insulin (100 ng/ml) for the final 30 min increased the incorporation of 32Pi into a 32K microsomal protein. The incorporation of 32Pi into the majority of other neuronal proteins was unaltered by the 30-min exposure to insulin. Cytosolic extracts from insulin-treated neurons incubated in the presence of exogenous rat liver 40S ribosomes and (gamma-32P)ATP displayed a 3- to 8-fold increase in the phosphorylation of ribosomal protein S6 compared to extracts from untreated cells. Inclusion of cycloheximide during exposure of the neurons to insulin did not inhibit the increased cytosolic kinase activity. Activation of S6 kinase activity by insulin was dose dependent (seen at insulin concentration as low as 0.1 ng/ml) and reached a maximum after 20 min of incubation. Addition of phosphatidylserine, diolein, and Ca2+ to the in vitro kinase reaction had no effect on the phosphorylation of ribosomal protein S6. Likewise, treatment of neurons with (Bu)2cAMP did not alter the phosphorylation of ribosomal protein S6 by neuronal cytosolic extracts. We conclude that insulin activates a cytosolic protein kinase that phosphorylates ribosomal S6 in neurons and is distinct from protein kinase-C and cAMP-dependent protein kinase. Stimulation of this kinase may play a role in insulin signal transduction in neurons.

  16. Role of citron kinase as a target of the small GTPase Rho in cytokinesis.

    PubMed

    Madaule, P; Eda, M; Watanabe, N; Fujisawa, K; Matsuoka, T; Bito, H; Ishizaki, T; Narumiya, S

    1998-07-30

    During mitosis, a ring containing actin and myosin appears beneath the equatorial surface of animal cells. This ring then contracts, forms a cleavage furrow and divides the cell, a step known as cytokinesis. The two daughter cells often remain connected by an intercellular bridge which contains a refringent structure known as the midbody. How the appearance of this ring is regulated is unclear, although the small GTPase Rho, which controls the formation of actin structures, is known to be essential. Protein kinases are also thought to participate in cytokinesis. We now show that a splice variant of a Rho target protein, named citron, contains a protein kinase domain that is related to the Rho-associated kinases ROCK14 and ROK, which regulate myosin-based contractility. Citron kinase localizes to the cleavage furrow and midbody of HeLa cells; Rho is also localized in the midbody. We find that overexpression of citron mutants results in the production of multinucleate cells and that a kinase-active mutant causes abnormal contraction during cytokinesis. We propose that citron kinase regulates cytokinesis at a step after Rho in the contractile process.

  17. Intracellular translocation of calmodulin and Ca{sup 2+}/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II during the development of hypertrophy in neonatal cardiomyocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Gangopadhyay, Jaya Pal; Ikemoto, Noriaki

    2010-05-28

    We have recently shown that stimulation of cultured neonatal cardiomyocytes with endothelin-1 (ET-1) first produces conformational disorder within the ryanodine receptor (RyR2) and diastolic Ca{sup 2+} leak from the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR), then develops hypertrophy (HT) in the cardiomyocytes (Hamada et al., 2009 ). The present paper addresses the following question. By what mechanism does crosstalk between defective operation of RyR2 and activation of the HT gene program occur? Here we show that the immuno-stain of calmodulin (CaM) is localized chiefly in the cytoplasmic area in the control cells; whereas, in the ET-1-treated/hypertrophied cells, major immuno-staining is localized in the nuclear region. In addition, fluorescently labeled CaM that has been introduced into the cardiomyocytes using the BioPORTER system moves from the cytoplasm to the nucleus with the development of HT. The immuno-confocal imaging of Ca{sup 2+}/CaM-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) also shows cytoplasm-to-nucleus shift of the immuno-staining pattern in the hypertrophied cells. In an early phase of hypertrophic growth, the frequency of spontaneous Ca{sup 2+} transients increases, which accompanies with cytoplasm-to-nucleus translocation of CaM. In a later phase of hypertrophic growth, further increase in the frequency of spontaneous Ca{sup 2+} transients results in the appearance of trains of Ca{sup 2+} spikes, which accompanies with nuclear translocation of CaMKII. The cardio-protective reagent dantrolene (the reagent that corrects the de-stabilized inter-domain interaction within the RyR2 to a normal mode) ameliorates aberrant intracellular Ca{sup 2+} events and prevents nuclear translocation of both CaM and CaMKII, then prevents the development of HT. These results suggest that translocation of CaM and CaMKII from the cytoplasm to the nucleus serves as messengers to transmit the pathogenic signal elicited in the surface membrane and in the RyR2 to the nuclear transcriptional

  18. Multivalent interactions of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II with the postsynaptic density proteins NR2B, densin-180, and alpha-actinin-2.

    PubMed

    Robison, A J; Bass, Martha A; Jiao, Yuxia; MacMillan, Leigh B; Carmody, Leigh C; Bartlett, Ryan K; Colbran, Roger J

    2005-10-21

    Dendritic calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) is dynamically targeted to the synapse. We show that CaMKIIalpha is associated with the CaMKII-binding proteins densin-180, the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor NR2B subunit, and alpha-actinin in postsynaptic density-enriched rat brain fractions. Residues 819-894 within the C-terminal domain of alpha-actinin-2 constitute the minimal CaMKII-binding domain. Similar amounts of Thr286-autophosphorylated CaMKIIalpha holoenzyme [P-T286]CaMKII bind to alpha-actinin-2 as bind to NR2B (residues 1260-1339) or to densin-180 (residues 1247-1495) in glutathione-agarose cosedimentation assays, even though the CaMKII-binding domains share no amino acid sequence similarity. Like NR2B, alpha-actinin-2 binds to representative splice variants of each CaMKII gene (alpha, beta, gamma, and delta), whereas densin-180 binds selectively to CaMKIIalpha. In addition, C-terminal truncated CaMKIIalpha monomers can interact with NR2B and alpha-actinin-2, but not with densin-180. Soluble alpha-actinin-2 does not compete for [P-T286]CaMKII binding to immobilized densin-180 or NR2B. However, soluble densin-180, but not soluble NR2B, increases CaMKII binding to immobilized alpha-actinin-2 by approximately 10-fold in a PDZ domain-dependent manner. A His6-tagged NR2B fragment associates with GST-densin or GST-actinin but only in the presence of [P-T286]CaMKII. Similarly, His6-tagged densin-180 or alpha-actinin fragments associate with GST-NR2B in a [P-T286]CaMKII-dependent manner. In addition, GST-NR2B and His6-tagged alpha-actinin can bind simultaneously to monomeric CaMKII subunits. In combination, these data support a model in which [P-T286]CaMKIIalpha can simultaneously interact with multiple dendritic spine proteins, possibly stabilizing the synaptic localization of CaMKII and/or nucleating a multiprotein synaptic signaling complex.

  19. Cyclic-GMP-dependent protein kinase inhibits the Ras/Mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway.

    PubMed

    Suhasini, M; Li, H; Lohmann, S M; Boss, G R; Pilz, R B

    1998-12-01

    phosphorylating c-Raf kinase on Ser43 and thereby inhibiting its activation and (ii) by inducing MAP kinase phosphatase 1 expression.

  20. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha enhances neutrophil adhesiveness: induction of vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 via activation of Akt and CaM kinase II and modifications of histone acetyltransferase and histone deacetylase 4 in human tracheal smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chiang-Wen; Lin, Chih-Chung; Luo, Shue-Fen; Lee, Hui-Chun; Lee, I-Ta; Aird, William C; Hwang, Tsong-Long; Yang, Chuen-Mao

    2008-05-01

    Up-regulation of vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) involves adhesions between both circulating and resident leukocytes and the human tracheal smooth muscle cells (HTSMCs) during airway inflammatory reaction. We have demonstrated previously that tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha-induced VCAM-1 expression is regulated by mitogen-activated protein kinases, nuclear factor-kappaB, and p300 activation in HTSMCs. In addition to this pathway, phosphorylation of Akt and CaM kinase II has been implicated in histone acetyltransferase and histone deacetylase 4 (HDAC4) activation. Here, we investigated whether these different mechanisms participated in TNF-alpha-induced VCAM-1 expression and enhanced neutrophil adhesion. TNF-alpha significantly increased HTSMC-neutrophil adhesions, and this effect was associated with increased expression of VCAM-1 on the HTSMCs and was blocked by the selective inhibitors of Src [4-amino-5-(4-methylphenyl)-7-(t-butyl)pyrazolo[3,4-d]-pyrimidine (PP1)], epidermal growth factor receptor [EGFR; 4-(3'-chloroanilino)-6,7-dimethoxy-quinazoline, (AG1478)], phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) [2-(4-morpholinyl)-8-phenyl-1(4H)-benzopyran-4-one hydrochloride(LY294002) and wortmannin],calcium[1,2-bis(2-aminophenoxy) ethane-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid-acetoxymethyl ester; BAPTA-AM], phosphatidylinositol-phospholipase C (PLC) [1-[6-[[17beta-methoxyestra-1,3,5(10)-trien-17-yl]amino]hexyl]-1H-pyrrole-2,5-dione (U73122)], protein kinase C (PKC) [12-(2-cyanoethyl)-6,7,12, 13-tetrahydro-13-methyl-5-oxo-5H-indolo(2,3-a)pyrrolo(3,4-c)-carbazole (Gö6976), rottlerin, and 3-1-[3-(amidinothio)propyl-1H-indol-3-yl]-3-(1-methyl-1H-indol-3-yl) maleimide (bisindolylmaleimide IX) (Ro 31-8220)], CaM (calmidazolium chloride), CaM kinase II [(8R(*),9S(*),11S(*))-(-)-9-hydroxy-9-methoxycarbonyl-8-methyl-14-n-propoxy-2,3,9, 10-tetrahydro-8,11-epoxy, 1H,8H, 11H-2,7b,11a-triazadibenzo[a,g]cycloocta[cde]trinden-1-one (KT5926) and 1-[N,O-bis(5-isoquinolinesulfonyl

  1. Affinity-purified CCAAT-box-binding protein (YEBP) functionally regulates expression of a human class II major histocompatibility complex gene and the herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase gene

    SciTech Connect

    Zeleznik-Le, N.J.; Azizkhan, J.C.; Ting, J.P.Y. )

    1991-03-01

    Efficient major histocompatibility complex class II gene expression requires conseved protein-binding promoter elements, including X and Y elements. The authors affinity purified an HLA-DRA Y-element (CCAAT)-binding protein (YEBP) and used it to reconstitute Y-depleted HLA-DRA in vitro transcription. This directly demonstrates a positive functional role for YEBP in HLA-DRA transcription. The ability of YEBP to regulate divergent CCAAT elements was also assessed; YEBP was found to partially activate the thymidine kinase promoter. This functional analysis of YEBP shows that this protein plays an important role in the regulation of multiple genes.

  2. Food restriction increases NMDA receptor-mediated calcium-calmodulin kinase II and NMDA receptor/extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2-mediated cyclic amp response element-binding protein phosphorylation in nucleus accumbens upon D-1 dopamine receptor stimulation in rats.

    PubMed

    Haberny, S L; Carr, K D

    2005-01-01

    Biological drive states exert homeostatic control in part by increasing the reinforcing effects of environmental incentive stimuli. An apparent by-product of this adaptive response is the enhanced acquisition of drug self-administration behavior in food-restricted (FR) animals. While previous research has demonstrated increased central sensitivity to rewarding effects of abused drugs and direct dopamine (DA) receptor agonists in FR subjects, the underlying neurobiology is not well understood. Recently, it was demonstrated that intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) injection of the D-1 DA receptor agonist, SKF-82958 produces a stronger activation of striatal extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2 and cyclic AMP response element-binding protein (CREB) in FR relative to ad libitum (AL) fed rats. The main purpose of the present study was to characterize the involvement and mechanisms of interaction between NMDA receptor function and the augmented cellular responses to D-1 DA receptor stimulation in nucleus accumbens (NAc) of FR rats. In experiment 1, Western immunoblotting was used to demonstrate that i.c.v. injection of SKF-82958 (20 microg) produces greater phosphorylation of the NMDA NR1 subunit and calcium-calmodulin kinase II (CaMK II) in NAc of FR as compared with AL rats. In experiment 2, pretreatment of subjects with the NMDA antagonist, MK-801 (1.0 mg/kg, i.p.) decreased SKF-82958-induced activation of CaMK II, ERK1/2 and CREB, and reversed the augmenting effect of FR on activation of all three proteins. In experiment 3, pretreatment with the mitogen-activated protein kinase/ERK kinase inhibitor SL-327 (60 mg/kg, i.p.) suppressed SKF-82958- induced activation of ERK1/2 and reversed the augmenting effect of FR on CREB activation. These results point to specific neuroadaptations in the NAc of FR rats whereby D-1 DA receptor stimulation leads to increased NMDA NR1 subunit phosphorylation and consequent increases in NMDA receptor-dependent CaMK II and ERK1

  3. Release of Nonmuscle Myosin II from the Cytosolic Domain of Tumor Necrosis Factor Receptor 2 Is Required for Target Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Chandrasekharan, Unni M.; Dechert, Lisa; Davidson, Uchechukwu I.; Waitkus, Matthew; Mavrakis, Lori; Lyons, Katherine; Beach, Jordan R.; Li, Xiaoxia; Egelhoff, Thomas T.; Fox, Paul L.; DiCorleto, Paul E.

    2013-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) elicits its biological activities through activation of TNF receptor 1 (TNFR1, also known as p55) and TNFR2 (also known as p75). The activities of both receptors are required for the TNF-α–induced proinflammatory response. The adaptor protein TNFR-associated factor 2 (TRAF2) is critical for either p55- or p75-mediated activation of nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling, as well as for target gene expression. Here, we identified nonmuscle myosin II (myosin) as a binding partner of p75. TNF-α–dependent signaling by p75 and induction of target gene expression persisted for substantially longer in cells deficient in myosin regulatory light chain (MRLC, a component of myosin) than in cells replete in myosin. In resting endothelial cells, myosin was bound constitutively to the intracellular region of p75, a region that overlaps with the TRAF2-binding domain, and TNF-α caused the rapid dissociation of myosin from p75. At early time points after exposure to TNF-α, p75 activated Rho-associated kinase 1 (ROCK1). Inhibition of ROCK1 activity blocked TNF-α–dependent phosphorylation of MRLC and the dissociation of myosin from p75. ROCK1-dependent release of myosin was necessary for the TNF-α–dependent recruitment of TRAF2 to p75 and for p75-specific activation of NF-κB and MAPK signaling. Thus, our findings have revealed a previously uncharacterized, noncanonical regulatory function of myosin in cytokine signaling. PMID:23861542

  4. Genetic interactions with C-terminal domain (CTD) kinases and the CTD of RNA Pol II suggest a role for ESS1 in transcription initiation and elongation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Wilcox, Cathy B; Rossettini, Anne; Hanes, Steven D

    2004-01-01

    Ess1 is an essential prolyl isomerase that binds the C-terminal domain (CTD) of Rpb1, the large subunit of RNA polymerase II. Ess1 is proposed to control transcription by isomerizing phospho-Ser-Pro peptide bonds within the CTD repeat. To determine which step(s) in the transcription cycle might require Ess1, we examined genetic interactions between ESS1 and genes encoding the known CTD kinases (KIN28, CTK1, BUR1, and SRB10). Although genetic interactions were identified between ESS1 and all four kinases, the clearest interactions were with CTK1 and SRB10. Reduced dosage of CTK1 rescued the growth defect of ess1(ts) mutants, while overexpression of CTK1 enhanced the growth defects of ess1(ts) mutants. Deletion of SRB10 suppressed ess1(ts) and ess1Delta mutants. The interactions suggest that Ess1 opposes the functions of these kinases, which are thought to function in preinitiation and elongation. Using a series of CTD substitution alleles, we also identified Ser5-Pro6 as a potential target for Ess1 isomerization within the first "half" of the CTD repeats. On the basis of the results, we suggest a model in which Ess1-directed conformational changes promote dephosphorylation of Ser5 to stimulate preinitiation complex formation and, later, to inhibit elongation. PMID:15166139

  5. Phosphorylation of myosin-binding subunit (MBS) of myosin phosphatase by Rho-kinase in vivo.

    PubMed

    Kawano, Y; Fukata, Y; Oshiro, N; Amano, M; Nakamura, T; Ito, M; Matsumura, F; Inagaki, M; Kaibuchi, K

    1999-11-29

    Rho-associated kinase (Rho-kinase), which is activated by the small GTPase Rho, phosphorylates myosin-binding subunit (MBS) of myosin phosphatase and thereby inactivates the phosphatase activity in vitro. Rho-kinase is thought to regulate the phosphorylation state of the substrates including myosin light chain (MLC), ERM (ezrin/radixin/moesin) family proteins and adducin by their direct phosphorylation and by the inactivation of myosin phosphatase. Here we identified the sites of phosphorylation of MBS by Rho-kinase as Thr-697, Ser-854 and several residues, and prepared antibody that specifically recognized MBS phosphorylated at Ser-854. We found by use of this antibody that the stimulation of MDCK epithelial cells with tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) or hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) induced the phosphorylation of MBS at Ser-854 under the conditions in which membrane ruffling and cell migration were induced. Pretreatment of the cells with Botulinum C3 ADP-ribosyltransferase (C3), which is thought to interfere with Rho functions, or Rho-kinase inhibitors inhibited the TPA- or HGF-induced MBS phosphorylation. The TPA stimulation enhanced the immunoreactivity of phosphorylated MBS in the cytoplasm and membrane ruffling area of MDCK cells. In migrating MDCK cells, phosphorylated MBS as well as phosphorylated MLC at Ser-19 were localized in the leading edge and posterior region. Phosphorylated MBS was localized on actin stress fibers in REF52 fibroblasts. The microinjection of C3 or dominant negative Rho-kinase disrupted stress fibers and weakened the accumulation of phosphorylated MBS in REF52 cells. During cytokinesis, phosphorylated MBS, MLC and ERM family proteins accumulated at the cleavage furrow, and the phosphorylation level of MBS at Ser-854 was increased. Taken together, these results indicate that MBS is phosphorylated by Rho-kinase downstream of Rho in vivo, and suggest that myosin phosphatase and Rho-kinase spatiotemporally regulate the

  6. Phosphorylation of synaptic GTPase-activating protein (synGAP) by Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) and cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (CDK5) alters the ratio of its GAP activity toward Ras and Rap GTPases.

    PubMed

    Walkup, Ward G; Washburn, Lorraine; Sweredoski, Michael J; Carlisle, Holly J; Graham, Robert L; Hess, Sonja; Kennedy, Mary B

    2015-02-20

    synGAP is a neuron-specific Ras and Rap GTPase-activating protein (GAP) found in high concentrations in the postsynaptic density (PSD) fraction from the mammalian forebrain. We have previously shown that, in situ in the PSD fraction or in recombinant form in Sf9 cell membranes, synGAP is phosphorylated by Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII), another prominent component of the PSD. Here, we show that recombinant synGAP (r-synGAP), lacking 102 residues at the N terminus, can be purified in soluble form and is phosphorylated by cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (CDK5) as well as by CaMKII. Phosphorylation of r-synGAP by CaMKII increases its HRas GAP activity by 25% and its Rap1 GAP activity by 76%. Conversely, phosphorylation by CDK5 increases r-synGAP's HRas GAP activity by 98% and its Rap1 GAP activity by 20%. Thus, phosphorylation by both kinases increases synGAP activity; CaMKII shifts the relative GAP activity toward inactivation of Rap1, and CDK5 shifts the relative activity toward inactivation of HRas. GAP activity toward Rap2 is not altered by phosphorylation by either kinase. CDK5 phosphorylates synGAP primarily at two sites, Ser-773 and Ser-802. Phosphorylation at Ser-773 inhibits r-synGAP activity, and phosphorylation at Ser-802 increases it. However, the net effect of concurrent phosphorylation of both sites, Ser-773 and Ser-802, is an increase in GAP activity. synGAP is phosphorylated at Ser-773 and Ser-802 in the PSD fraction, and its phosphorylation by CDK5 and CaMKII is differentially regulated by activation of NMDA-type glutamate receptors in cultured neurons.

  7. Phosphorylation of Synaptic GTPase-activating Protein (synGAP) by Ca2+/Calmodulin-dependent Protein Kinase II (CaMKII) and Cyclin-dependent Kinase 5 (CDK5) Alters the Ratio of Its GAP Activity toward Ras and Rap GTPases*

    PubMed Central

    Walkup, Ward G.; Washburn, Lorraine; Sweredoski, Michael J.; Carlisle, Holly J.; Graham, Robert L.; Hess, Sonja; Kennedy, Mary B.

    2015-01-01

    synGAP is a neuron-specific Ras and Rap GTPase-activating protein (GAP) found in high concentrations in the postsynaptic density (PSD) fraction from the mammalian forebrain. We have previously shown that, in situ in the PSD fraction or in recombinant form in Sf9 cell membranes, synGAP is phosphorylated by Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII), another prominent component of the PSD. Here, we show that recombinant synGAP (r-synGAP), lacking 102 residues at the N terminus, can be purified in soluble form and is phosphorylated by cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (CDK5) as well as by CaMKII. Phosphorylation of r-synGAP by CaMKII increases its HRas GAP activity by 25% and its Rap1 GAP activity by 76%. Conversely, phosphorylation by CDK5 increases r-synGAP's HRas GAP activity by 98% and its Rap1 GAP activity by 20%. Thus, phosphorylation by both kinases increases synGAP activity; CaMKII shifts the relative GAP activity toward inactivation of Rap1, and CDK5 shifts the relative activity toward inactivation of HRas. GAP activity toward Rap2 is not altered by phosphorylation by either kinase. CDK5 phosphorylates synGAP primarily at two sites, Ser-773 and Ser-802. Phosphorylation at Ser-773 inhibits r-synGAP activity, and phosphorylation at Ser-802 increases it. However, the net effect of concurrent phosphorylation of both sites, Ser-773 and Ser-802, is an increase in GAP activity. synGAP is phosphorylated at Ser-773 and Ser-802 in the PSD fraction, and its phosphorylation by CDK5 and CaMKII is differentially regulated by activation of NMDA-type glutamate receptors in cultured neurons. PMID:25533468

  8. Tetrahydroindazoles as Interleukin-2 Inducible T-Cell Kinase Inhibitors. Part II. Second-Generation Analogues with Enhanced Potency, Selectivity, and Pharmacodynamic Modulation in Vivo.

    PubMed

    Burch, Jason D; Barrett, Kathy; Chen, Yuan; DeVoss, Jason; Eigenbrot, Charles; Goldsmith, Richard; Ismaili, M Hicham A; Lau, Kevin; Lin, Zhonghua; Ortwine, Daniel F; Zarrin, Ali A; McEwan, Paul A; Barker, John J; Ellebrandt, Claire; Kordt, Daniel; Stein, Daniel B; Wang, Xiaolu; Chen, Yong; Hu, Baihua; Xu, Xiaofeng; Yuen, Po-Wai; Zhang, Yamin; Pei, Zhonghua

    2015-05-14

    The medicinal chemistry community has directed considerable efforts toward the discovery of selective inhibitors of interleukin-2 inducible T-cell kinase (ITK), given its role in T-cell signaling downstream of the T-cell receptor (TCR) and the implications of this target for inflammatory disorders such as asthma. We have previously disclosed a structure- and property-guided lead optimization effort which resulted in the discovery of a new series of tetrahydroindazole-containing selective ITK inhibitors. Herein we disclose further optimization of this series that resulted in further potency improvements, reduced off-target receptor binding liabilities, and reduced cytotoxicity. Specifically, we have identified a correlation between the basicity of solubilizing elements in the ITK inhibitors and off-target antiproliferative effects, which was exploited to reduce cytotoxicity while maintaining kinase selectivity. Optimized analogues were shown to reduce IL-2 and IL-13 production in vivo following oral or intraperitoneal dosing in mice.

  9. Direct cytochemical localization of catalytic subunits dissociated from cAMP-dependent protein kinase in Reuber H-35 hepatoma cells. II. Temporal and spatial kinetics

    PubMed Central

    1982-01-01

    The activation of cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase has been found to be the predominant mode by which cyclic AMP (cAMP) leads to alterations of a large variety of cellular functions. The activation of the kinase results in the release of the catalytic subunit which as the free enzyme possesses phosphotransferase activity for a variety of specific protein substrates. Using a sensitive and specific cytofluorometric technique we monitored the appearance of free catalytic subunit in Reuber H35 hepatoma cells in culture after incubation with N6-1'-O- dibutyryl-cyclic AMP (DBcAMP), 8-bromoadenosine-3':5'-cyclic monophosphate (8-BrcAMP), and glucagon. The cytochemical method employs the heat-stable inhibitor of the free catalytic subunit which has been conjugated to fluorescein isothiocyanate (F:PKI) and was validated as described in the companion paper (Fletcher and Byus. 1982. J. Cell Biol. 93:719-726). Here we studied the temporal and spatial kinetics of the free catalytic subunit following activation of cAMP-dependent protein kinase by increasing concentrations of DBcAMP,8-BrcAMP, and glucagon. Under similar conditions protein kinase activation was also assessed biochemically in H35 cell supernatants by assaying the protein kinase activity ratio. Incubation of the hepatoma cells with DBcAMP (0.1 mM) led to an increase in the activity ratio from 0.2 in control cultures to a value of nearly 1.0 within a 1- to 2-h period. During this same period using the F:PKI probe, a significant increase in cytoplasmic and nucleolar fluorescence indicative of the release of the free catalytic subunit was coincidentally observed. In contrast to the rapid appearance of catalytic subunit in the cytoplasm and nucleolus of the cell within 5-15 min of the addition of DBcAMP, discernible nucleoplasmic fluorescence did not occur until after 1 h. H35 cell cultures incubated with 8-BrcAMP (0.01-1.0 mM) exhibited a more rapid activation of the protein kinase measured cytochemically compared

  10. Oncoprotein kinase

    DOEpatents

    Karin, Michael; Hibi, Masahiko; Lin, Anning

    2001-02-27

    An isolated polypeptide (JNK) characterized by having a molecular weight of 46 kD or 55 kD as determined by reducing SDS-PAGE, having serine and theonine kinase activity, phosphorylating the c-Jun N-terminal activation domain and polynucleotide sequences and method of detection of JNK are provided herein. JNK phosphorylates c-Jun N-terminal activation domain which affects gene expression from AP-1 sites.

  11. Angiotensin-(1-7) has a dual role on growth-promoting signalling pathways in rat heart in vivo by stimulating STAT3 and STAT5a/b phosphorylation and inhibiting angiotensin II-stimulated ERK1/2 and Rho kinase activity.

    PubMed

    Giani, Jorge F; Gironacci, Mariela M; Muñoz, Marina C; Turyn, Daniel; Dominici, Fernando P

    2008-05-01

    Angiotensin (ANG) II contributes to cardiac remodelling by inducing the activation of several signalling molecules, including ERK1/2, Rho kinase and members of the STAT family of proteins. Angiotensin-(1-7) is produced in the heart and inhibits the proliferative actions of ANG II, although the mechanisms of this inhibition are poorly understood. Accordingly, in the present study we examined whether ANG-(1-7) affects the ANG II-mediated activation of ERK1/2 and Rho kinase, STAT3 and STAT5a/b in rat heart in vivo. We hypothesized that ANG-(1-7) inhibits these growth-promoting pathways, counterbalancing the trophic action of ANG II. Solutions of normal saline (0.9% NaCl) containing ANG II (8 pmol kg(-1)) plus ANG-(1-7) in increasing doses (from 0.08 to 800 pmol kg(-1)) were administered via the inferior vena cava to anaesthetized male Sprague-Dawley rats. After 5 min, hearts were removed and ERK1/2, Rho kinase, STAT3 and STAT5a/b phosphorylation was determined by Western blotting using phosphospecific antibodies. Angiotensin II stimulated ERK1/2 and Rho kinase phosphorylation (2.3 +/- 0.2- and 2.1 +/- 0.2-fold increase over basal values, respectively), while ANG-(1-7) was without effect. The ANG II-mediated phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and Rho kinase was prevented in a dose-dependent manner by ANG-(1-7) and disappeared in the presence of the Mas receptor antagonist d-Ala7-ANG-(1-7). Both ANG II and ANG-(1-7) increased STAT3 and STAT5a/b phosphorylation to a similar extent (130-140% increase). The ANG-(1-7)-stimulated STAT phosphorylation was blocked by the AT(1) receptor antagonist losartan and not by d-Ala7-ANG-(1-7). Our results show a dual action of ANG-(1-7), that is, a stimulatory effect on STAT3 and 5a/b phosphorylation through AT(1) receptors and a blocking action on ANG II-stimulated ERK1/2 and Rho kinase phosphorylation through Mas receptor activation. The latter effect could be representative of a mechanism for a protective role of ANG-(1-7) in the heart by

  12. Involvement of c-Src tyrosine kinase in SHP-1 phosphatase activation by Ang II AT2 receptors in rat fetal tissues.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, Sergio E; Seguin, Leonardo R; Villarreal, Rodrigo S; Nahmias, Clara; Ciuffo, Gladys M

    2008-10-15

    Angiotensin II (Ang II) AT(2) receptors are abundantly expressed in rat fetal tissues where they probably contribute to development. In the present study we examine the effects of Ang II type 2 receptor stimulation on SHP-1 activation. Ang II (10(-7) M) elicits a rapid and transient tyrosine phosphorylation of SHP-1, maximal at 1 min, in a dose-dependent form, blocked by the AT(2) antagonist, PD123319. SHP-1 phosphorylation is followed in time by tyrosine dephosphorylation of different proteins, suggesting a sequence of events. Ang II induces association of SHP-1 to AT(2) receptors as shown by co-immunoprecipitation, Western blot and binding assays. SHP-1 activity was determined in immunocomplexes obtained with either anti-AT(2) or anti-SHP-1 antibodies, after Ang II stimulation (1 min), in correlation with the maximal level of SHP-1 phosphorylation. Interestingly, following receptor stimulation (1 min) c-Src was associated to AT(2) or SHP-1 immunocomplexes. Preincubation with the c-Src inhibitor PP2 inhibited SHP-1 activation and c-Src association, thus confirming the participation of c-Src in this pathway. We demonstrated here for the first time the involvement of c-Src in SHP-1 activation via AT(2) receptors present in an ex vivo model expressing both receptor subtypes. In this model, AT(2) receptors are not constitutively associated to SHP-1 and SHP-1 is not constitutively activated. Thus, we clearly establish that SHP-1 activation, mediated by the AT(2) subtype, involves c-Src and precedes protein tyrosine dephosphorylation, in rat fetal membranes.

  13. Enzymatic analysis of isomeric trithymidylates containing ultraviolet light-induced cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers. II. Phosphorylation by phage T4 polynucleotide kinase

    SciTech Connect

    Weinfeld, M.; Liuzzi, M.; Paterson, M.C.

    1989-04-15

    Phage T4 polynucleotide kinase proved incapable of catalyzing the phosphorylation of thymidylyl-(3'----5')-thymidine containing either a cis-syn-cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer (d-T less than p greater than T) or a 6-4'-(pyrimidin-2'-one)pyrimidine photoproduct (d-T(p)-T), and similarly the UV-modified compounds of (dT)3 bearing either photoproduct at their 5'-end (d-T less than p greater than TpT and d-T(p)TpT). In contrast, the 3'-structural isomers of these trinucleotides (d-TpT less than p greater than T and d-TpT(p)T) were phosphorylated at the same rate as the parent compound. These phosphorylatable lesion-containing oligonucleotides are quantitatively released from UV-irradiated poly(dA):poly(dT) by enzymatic hydrolysis with snake venom phosphodiesterase and alkaline phosphatase. By combining this digestion regimen with phosphorylation by polynucleotide kinase and (gamma-/sup 32/P)ATP, pyrimidine dimers were quantitated at the fmol level following exposure of poly(dA):poly(dT) and herring sperm DNA to biologically relevant UV fluences. The rate of dimer induction in the synthetic polymer, approximately 10 dimers/10(6) nucleotides/Jm-2, was in close agreement with that obtained by conventional methods. Dimers were induced at one-fourth of this rate in the natural DNA. Further treatment of the phosphorylated oligonucleotides derived from irradiated herring sperm DNA with nuclease P1 released the labeled 5'-nucleotide, thus permitting analysis of the nearest-neighbor bases 5' to the lesions. We observed a ratio for pyrimidine-to-purine bases of almost 6:1, implicating tripyrimidine stretches as hotspots for UV-induced DNA damage.

  14. Serine/Threonine Kinase 3-Phosphoinositide-Dependent Protein Kinase-1 (PDK1) as a Key Regulator of Cell Migration and Cancer Dissemination

    PubMed Central

    Di Blasio, Laura; Gagliardi, Paolo A.; Puliafito, Alberto; Primo, Luca

    2017-01-01

    Dissecting the cellular signaling that governs the motility of eukaryotic cells is one of the fundamental tasks of modern cell biology, not only because of the large number of physiological processes in which cell migration is crucial, but even more so because of the pathological ones, in particular tumor invasion and metastasis. Cell migration requires the coordination of at least four major processes: polarization of intracellular signaling, regulation of the actin cytoskeleton and membrane extension, focal adhesion and integrin signaling and contractile forces generation and rear retraction. Among the molecular components involved in the regulation of locomotion, the phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K) pathway has been shown to exert fundamental role. A pivotal node of such pathway is represented by the serine/threonine kinase 3-phosphoinositide-dependent protein kinase-1 (PDPK1 or PDK1). PDK1, and the majority of its substrates, belong to the AGC family of kinases (related to cAMP-dependent protein kinase 1, cyclic Guanosine monophosphate-dependent protein kinase and protein kinase C), and control a plethora of cellular processes, downstream either to PI3K or to other pathways, such as RAS GTPase-MAPK (mitogen-activated protein kinase). Interestingly, PDK1 has been demonstrated to be crucial for the regulation of each step of cell migration, by activating several proteins such as protein kinase B/Akt (PKB/Akt), myotonic dystrophy-related CDC42-binding kinases alpha (MRCKα), Rho associated coiled-coil containing protein kinase 1 (ROCK1), phospholipase C gamma 1 (PLCγ1) and β3 integrin. Moreover, PDK1 regulates cancer cell invasion as well, thus representing a possible target to prevent cancer metastasis in human patients. The aim of this review is to summarize the various mechanisms by which PDK1 controls the cell migration process, from cell polarization to actin cytoskeleton and focal adhesion regulation, and finally, to discuss the evidence supporting a

  15. A Dibasic Amino Acid Pair Conserved in the Activation Loop Directs Plasma Membrane Localization and Is Necessary for Activity of Plant Type I/II Phosphatidylinositol Phosphate Kinase1[W

    PubMed Central

    Mikami, Koji; Saavedra, Laura; Hiwatashi, Yuji; Uji, Toshiki; Hasebe, Mitsuyasu; Sommarin, Marianne

    2010-01-01

    Phosphatidylinositol phosphate kinase (PIPK) is an enzyme involved in the regulation of cellular levels of phosphoinositides involved in various physiological processes, such as cytoskeletal organization, ion channel activation, and vesicle trafficking. In animals, research has focused on the modes of activation and function of PIPKs, providing an understanding of the importance of plasma membrane localization. However, it still remains unclear how this issue is regulated in plant PIPKs. Here, we demonstrate that the carboxyl-terminal catalytic domain, which contains the activation loop, is sufficient for plasma membrane localization of PpPIPK1, a type I/II B PIPK from the moss Physcomitrella patens. The importance of the carboxyl-terminal catalytic domain for plasma membrane localization was confirmed with Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) AtPIP5K1. Our findings, in which substitution of a conserved dibasic amino acid pair in the activation loop of PpPIPK1 completely prevented plasma membrane targeting and abolished enzymatic activity, demonstrate its critical role in these processes. Placing our results in the context of studies of eukaryotic PIPKs led us to conclude that the function of the dibasic amino acid pair in the activation loop in type I/II PIPKs is plant specific. PMID:20427464

  16. Aurora kinase inhibitors as anticancer molecules.

    PubMed

    Katayama, Hiroshi; Sen, Subrata

    2010-01-01

    Aurora kinase family of serine/threonine kinases are important regulators of mitosis that are frequently over expressed in human cancers and have been implicated in oncogenic transformation including development of chromosomal instability in cancer cells. In humans, among the three members of the kinase family, Aurora-A, -B and -C, only Aurora-A and -B are expressed at detectable levels in all somatic cells undergoing mitotic cell division and have been characterized in greater detail for their involvement in cellular pathways relevant to the development of cancer associated phenotypes. Aurora-A and -B are being investigated as potential targets for anticancer therapy. Development of inhibitors against Aurora kinases as anticancer molecules gained attention because of the facts that aberrant expression of these kinases leads to chromosomal instability and derangement of multiple tumor suppressor and oncoprotein regulated pathways. Preclinical studies and early phase I and II clinical trials of multiple Aurora kinase inhibitors as targeted anticancer drugs have provided encouraging results. This article discusses functional involvement of Aurora kinase-A and -B in the regulation of cancer relevant cellular phenotypes together with findings on some of the better characterized Aurora kinase inhibitors in modulating the functional interactions of Aurora kinases. Future possibilities about developing next generation Aurora kinase inhibitors and their clinical utility as anticancer therapeutic drugs are also discussed.

  17. Aurora Kinase inhibitors as Anticancer Molecules

    PubMed Central

    Katayama, Hiroshi; Sen, Subrata

    2015-01-01

    Aurora kinase family of serine/threonine kinases are important regulators of mitosis that are frequently over expressed in human cancers and have been implicated in oncogenic transformation including development of chromosomal instability in cancer cells. In humans, among the three members of the kinase family, Aurora-A, -B and -C, only Aurora-A and -B are expressed in detectable levels in somatic cells undergoing mitotic cell division and have been characterized in greater detail for their involvement in cellular pathways relevant to the development of cancer associated phenotypes. Aurora-A and -B are being investigated as potential targets for anticancer therapy. Development of inhibitors against Aurora kinases as anticancer molecules gained attention because of the facts that aberrant expression of these kinases lead to chromosomal instability and derangement of multiple tumor suppressor and oncoprotein regulated pathways. Pre-clinical studies and early phase I and II clinical trials of multiple Aurora kinase inhibitors as targeted anticancer drugs have provided encouraging results. This article discusses functional involvement of Aurora kinase-A and -B in the regulation of cancer relevant cellular phenotypes together with findings on some of the better characterized Aurora kinase inhibitors in modulating the functional interactions of Aurora kinases. Future possibilities about developing next generation Aurora kinase inhibitors and their clinical utility as anticancer therapeutic drugs are also discussed. PMID:20863917

  18. Myotonic dystrophy protein kinase (DMPK) induces actin cytoskeletal reorganization and apoptotic-like blebbing in lens cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jin, S.; Shimizu, M.; Balasubramanyam, A.; Epstein, H. F.

    2000-01-01

    DMPK, the product of the DM locus, is a member of the same family of serine-threonine protein kinases as the Rho-associated enzymes. In DM, membrane inclusions accumulate in lens fiber cells producing cataracts. Overexpression of DMPK in cultured lens epithelial cells led to apoptotic-like blebbing of the plasma membrane and reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton. Enzymatically active DMPK was necessary for both effects; inactive mutant DMPK protein did not produce either effect. Active RhoA but not constitutive GDP-state mutant protein produced similar effects as DMPK. The similar actions of DMPK and RhoA suggest that they may function in the same regulatory network. The observed effects of DMPK may be relevant to the removal of membrane organelles during normal lens differentiation and the retention of intracellular membranes in DM lenses. Copyright 2000 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  19. Calcium/calmodulin‐dependent kinase II and nitric oxide synthase 1‐dependent modulation of ryanodine receptors during β‐adrenergic stimulation is restricted to the dyadic cleft

    PubMed Central

    Dries, Eef; Santiago, Demetrio J.; Johnson, Daniel M.; Gilbert, Guillaume; Holemans, Patricia; Korte, Sanne M.; Roderick, H. Llewelyn

    2016-01-01

    Key points The dyadic cleft, where coupled ryanodine receptors (RyRs) reside, is thought to serve as a microdomain for local signalling, as supported by distinct modulation of coupled RyRs dependent on Ca2+/calmodulin‐dependent kinase II (CaMKII) activation during high‐frequency stimulation.Sympathetic stimulation through β‐adrenergic receptors activates an integrated signalling cascade, enhancing Ca2+ cycling and is at least partially mediated through CaMKII.Here we report that CaMKII activation during β‐adrenergic signalling is restricted to the dyadic cleft, where it enhances activity of coupled RyRs thereby contributing to the increase in diastolic events. Nitric oxide synthase 1 equally participates in the local modulation of coupled RyRs.In contrast, the increase in the Ca2+ content of the sarcoplasmic reticulum and related increase in the amplitude of the Ca2+ transient are primarily protein kinase A‐dependent.The present data extend the concept of microdomain signalling in the dyadic cleft and give perspectives for selective modulation of RyR subpopulations and diastolic events. Abstract In cardiac myocytes, β‐adrenergic stimulation enhances Ca2+ cycling through an integrated signalling cascade modulating L‐type Ca2+ channels (LTCCs), phospholamban and ryanodine receptors (RyRs). Ca2+/calmodulin‐dependent kinase II (CaMKII) and nitric oxide synthase 1 (NOS1) are proposed as prime mediators for increasing RyR open probability. We investigate whether this pathway is confined to the high Ca2+ microdomain of the dyadic cleft and thus to coupled RyRs. Pig ventricular myocytes are studied under whole‐cell voltage‐clamp and confocal line‐scan imaging with Fluo‐4 as a [Ca2+]i indicator. Following conditioning depolarizing pulses, spontaneous RyR activity is recorded as Ca2+ sparks, which are assigned to coupled and non‐coupled RyR clusters. Isoproterenol (ISO) (10 nm) increases Ca2+ spark frequency in both populations of RyRs. However

  20. Far-infrared radiation acutely increases nitric oxide production by increasing Ca(2+) mobilization and Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II-mediated phosphorylation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase at serine 1179.

    PubMed

    Park, Jung-Hyun; Lee, Sangmi; Cho, Du-Hyong; Park, Young Mi; Kang, Duk-Hee; Jo, Inho

    2013-07-12

    Repeated thermal therapy manifested by far-infrared (FIR) radiation improves vascular function in both patients and mouse model with coronary heart disease, but its underlying mechanism is not fully understood. Using FIR as a thermal therapy agent, we investigate the molecular mechanism of its effect on endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) activity and NO production. FIR increased the phosphorylation of eNOS at serine 1179 (eNOS-Ser(1179)) in a time-dependent manner (up to 40min of FIR radiation) in bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAEC) without alterations in eNOS expression. This increase was accompanied by increases in NO production and intracellular Ca(2+) levels. Treatment with KN-93, a selective inhibitor of Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) and H-89, a protein kinase A inhibitor, inhibited FIR radiation-stimulated eNOS-Ser(1179) phosphorylation. FIR radiation itself also increased the temperature of culture medium. As transient receptors potential vanilloid (TRPV) ion channels are known to be temperature-sensitive calcium channels, we explore whether TRPV channels mediate these observed effects. Reverse transcription-PCR assay revealed two TRPV isoforms in BAEC, TRPV2 and TRPV4. Although ruthenium red, a pan-TRPV inhibitor, completely reversed the observed effect of FIR radiation, a partial attenuation (∼20%) was found in cells treated with Tranilast, TRPV2 inhibitor. However, ectopic expression of siRNA of TRPV2 showed no significant alteration in FIR radiation-stimulated eNOS-Ser(1179) phosphorylation. This study suggests that FIR radiation increases NO production via increasing CaMKII-mediated eNOS-Ser(1179) phosphorylation but TRPV channels may not be involved in this pathway. Our results may provide the molecular mechanism by which FIR radiation improves endothelial function.

  1. Isoenzyme-specific regulation of cardiac Kv1.5/Kvβ1.2 ion channel complex by protein kinase C: central role of PKCβII.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Fathima; Vonderlin, Nadine; Seyler, Claudia; Zitron, Edgar; Korkmaz, Sevil; Szabó, Gábor; Thomas, Dierk; Katus, Hugo A; Scholz, Eberhard P

    2014-05-01

    The ultrarapidly activating delayed rectifier current, I(Kur), is a main determinant of atrial repolarization in humans. I(Kur) and the underlying ion channel complex Kv1.5/Kvβ1.2 are negatively regulated by protein kinase C. However, the exact mode of action is only incompletely understood. We therefore analyzed isoenzyme-specific regulation of the Kv1.5/Kvβ1.2 ion channel complex by PKC. Cloned ion channel subunits were heterologously expressed in Xenopus oocytes, and measurements were performed using the double-electrode voltage-clamp technique. Activation of PKC with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) resulted in a strong reduction of Kv1.5/Kvβ1.2 current. This effect could be prevented using the PKC inhibitor staurosporine. Using the bisindolylmaleimide Ro-31-8220 as an inhibitor and ingenol as an activator of the conventional PKC isoforms, we were able to show that the Kv1.5/Kvβ1.2 ion channel complex is mainly regulated by conventional isoforms. Whereas pharmacological inhibition of PKCα with HBDDE did not attenuate the PMA-induced effect, current reduction could be prevented using inhibitors of PKCβ. Here, we show the isoform βII plays a central role in the PKC-dependent regulation of Kv1.5/Kvβ1.2 channels. These results add to the current understanding of isoenzyme-selective regulation of cardiac ion channels by protein kinases.

  2. Cooperativity in the two-domain arginine kinase from the sea anemone Anthopleura japonicus. II. Evidence from site-directed mutagenesis studies.

    PubMed

    Tada, Hiroshi; Suzuki, Tomohiko

    2010-08-01

    The arginine kinase (AK) from the sea anemone Anthopleura japonicus has an unusual two-domain structure (contiguous dimer; denoted by D1-D2). In a previous report, we suggested cooperativity in the contiguous dimer, which may be a result of domain-domain interactions, using MBP-fused enzymes. To further understand this observation, we inserted six-Lys residues into the linker region of the two-domain AK (D1-K6-D2 mutant) using His-tagged enzyme. The dissociation constants, K(a) and K(ia), of the mutant were similar to those of the wild-type enzyme but the catalytic constant, k(cat), was decreased to 28% that of the wild-type, indicating that some of the domain-domain interactions are lost due to the six-Lys insertion. Y68 plays a major role in arginine binding in the catalytic pocket in Limulus AK, and introduction of mutation at the Y68 position virtually abolishes catalytic activity. Thus, the constructed D1(Y68G)-D2 and D1-D2(Y68G) mutants mimic the D1(inactive)-D2(active) and D1(active)-D2(inactive) enzymes, respectively. The k(cat) values of both Y68 mutants were decreased to 13-18% that of the wild-type enzyme, which is much less than the 50% level of the two-domain enzyme. Thus, it is clear that substrate-binding to both domains is necessary for full expression of activity. In other words, substrate-binding appears to act as the trigger of the functional cooperativity in two-domain AK.

  3. Inhibition of endogenous heat shock protein 70 attenuates inducible nitric oxide synthase induction via disruption of heat shock protein 70/Na(+) /H(+) exchanger 1-Ca(2+) -calcium-calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II/transforming growth factor β-activated kinase 1-nuclear factor-κB signals in BV-2 microglia.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chao; Lu, Xu; Wang, Jia; Tong, Lijuan; Jiang, Bo; Zhang, Wei

    2015-08-01

    Inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) critically contributes to inflammation and host defense. The inhibition of heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) prevents iNOS induction in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated macrophages. However, the role and mechanism of endogenous Hsp70 in iNOS induction in microglia remains unclear. This study addresses this issue in BV-2 microglia, showing that Hsp70 inhibition or knockdown prevents LPS-induced iNOS protein expression and nitric oxide production. Real-time PCR experiments showed that LPS-induced iNOS mRNA transcription was blocked by Hsp70 inhibition. Further studies revealed that the inhibition of Hsp70 attenuated LPS-stimulated nuclear translocation and phosphorylation of nuclear factor (NF)-κB as well as the degradation of inhibitor of κB (IκB)-α and phosphorylation of IκB kinase β (IKKβ). This prevention effect of Hsp70 inhibition on IKKβ-NF-κB activation was found to be dependent on the Ca(2+) /calcium-calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII)/transforming growth factor β-activated kinase 1 (TAK1) signals based on the following observations: 1) chelation of intracellular Ca(2+) or inhibition of CaMKII reduced LPS-induced increases in TAK1 phosphorylation and 2) Hsp70 inhibition reduced LPS-induced increases in CaMKII/TAK1 phosphorylation, intracellular pH value, [Ca(2+) ]i , and CaMKII/TAK1 association. Mechanistic studies showed that Hsp70 inhibition disrupted the association between Hsp70 and Na(+) /H(+) exchanger 1 (NHE1), which is an important exchanger responsible for Ca(2+) influx in LPS-stimulated cells. These studies demonstrate that the inhibition of endogenous Hsp70 attenuates the induction of iNOS, which likely occurs through the disruption of NHE1/Hsp70-Ca(2+) -CaMKII/TAK1-NF-κB signals in BV-2 microglia, providing further insight into the functions of Hsp70 in the CNS.

  4. Spatial gradients in kinase cascade regulation.

    PubMed

    Kazmierczak, B; Lipniacki, T

    2010-11-01

    The spatiotemporal kinetics of proteins and other substrates regulate cell fate and signaling. In this study, we consider a reaction-diffusion model of interaction of membrane receptors with a two-step kinase cascade. The receptors activate the 'up-stream' kinase, which may diffuse over cell volume and activate the 'down-stream' kinase, which is also diffusing. Both kinase species and receptors are inactivated by uniformly distributed phosphatases. The positive feedback, key to the considered dynamics, arises since the up-stream kinase activates the receptors. Such a mutual interaction is characteristic for immune cell receptors. Based on the proposed model, we demonstrated that cell sensitivity (measured as a critical value of phosphatase activity at which cell maybe activated) increases with decreasing motility of receptor-interacting kinases and with increasing polarity of receptors distribution. These two effects are cooperating, the effect of receptors localisation close to one pole of the cell grows with the decreasing kinase diffusion and vanishes in the infinite diffusion limit. As the cell sensitivity increases with decreasing diffusion of receptor-interacting kinase, the overall activity of the down-stream kinase increases with its diffusion. In conclusion, the analysis of the proposed model shows that, for the fixed substrate interaction rates, spatial distribution of the surface receptors together with the motility of intracellular kinases control cell signalling and sensitivity to extracellular signals. The increase of the cell sensitivity can be achieved by (i) localisation of receptors in a small subdomain of the cell membrane, (ii) lowering the motility of receptor-interacting kinase, (iii) increasing the motility of down-stream kinases which distribute the signal over the whole cell.

  5. Inhibition of P-TEFb (CDK9/Cyclin T) kinase and RNA polymerase II transcription by the coordinated actions of HEXIM1 and 7SK snRNA.

    PubMed

    Yik, Jasper H N; Chen, Ruichuan; Nishimura, Rieko; Jennings, Jennifer L; Link, Andrew J; Zhou, Qiang

    2003-10-01

    The positive transcriptional elongation factor b (P-TEFb), consisting of CDK9 and cyclin T, stimulates transcription by phosphorylating RNA polymerase II. It becomes inactivated when associated with the abundant 7SK snRNA. Here, we show that the 7SK binding alone was not sufficient to inhibit P-TEFb. P-TEFb was inhibited by the HEXIM1 protein in a process that specifically required 7SK for mediating the HEXIM1:P-TEFb interaction. This allowed HEXIM1 to inhibit transcription both in vivo and in vitro. P-TEFb dissociated from HEXIM1 and 7SK in cells undergoing stress response, increasing the level of active P-TEFb for stress-induced transcription. P-TEFb was the predominant HEXIM1-associated protein factor, and thus likely to be the principal target of inhibition coordinated by HEXIM1 and 7SK. Since HEXIM1 expression is induced in cells treated with hexamethylene bisacetamide, a potent inducer of cell differentiation, targeting the general transcription factor P-TEFb by HEXIM1/7SK may contribute to the global control of cell growth and differentiation.

  6. Members of the nuclear factor 1 family and hepatocyte nuclear factor 4 bind to overlapping sequences of the L-II element on the rat pyruvate kinase L gene promoter and regulate its expression.

    PubMed

    Yamada, K; Tanaka, T; Noguchi, T

    1997-06-15

    The L-II element (-149 to -126 bp) in the enhancer unit of the rat pyruvate kinase L (PKL) gene is required for cell-type-specific transcription and induction by carbohydrates. This element was found to bind multiple nuclear proteins with different heat stabilities. A heat-labile factor was shown to be hepatocyte nuclear factor (HNF) 4 by the electrophoretic mobility-shift assay (EMSA) using various competitor DNAs and anti-HNF4 serum. A heat-stable factor was purified from rat liver nuclear extract and was resolved as two protein bands migrating at about 33 kDa on SDS/polyacrylamide gels. Peptide sequence analysis revealed that these proteins were nuclear factor (NF) 1-L and NF1/Red1. The heat-stable factor was also identified as a member of the NF1 family by using various competitor DNAs and anti-NF1 serum in an EMSA. In addition, we found that a factor bound to the accessory site of the rat S14 gene, which is necessary for carbohydrate responsiveness of this gene, was also a member of the NF1 family, raising the possibility that the NF1 family is involved in the carbohydrate regulation of gene transcription by interactions with other proteins. The NF1 family members and HNF4 interacted with overlapping sequences of the L-II element, wherein the 5' half-site was more critical for NF1 binding, and the 3' site was more important for HNF4 binding. Co-transfection of a vector expressing either NF1-L or NF1/Red1 repressed the transcription of the PKL enhancer unit-chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) fusion gene in HepG2 cells, whereas co-transfection of a vector expressing HNF4 activated the transcription of the same reporter gene. Furthermore NF1 family members antagonized the effect of HNF4 on PKL enhancer unit-CAT fusion gene expression when both expression plasmids were co-transfected. We conclude that NF1 family members and HNF4 regulate transcription of the PKL gene in an opposing manner by binding overlapping sequences of the L-II element.

  7. 1-[N, O-bis-(5-isoquinolinesulphonyl)-N-methyl-L-tyrosyl]-4- phenylpiperazine (KN-62), an inhibitor of calcium-dependent camodulin protein kinase II, inhibits both insulin- and hypoxia-stimulated glucose transport in skeletal muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Brozinick, J T; Reynolds, T H; Dean, D; Cartee, G; Cushman, S W

    1999-01-01

    Previous studies have indicated a role for calmodulin in hypoxia-and insulin-stimulated glucose transport. However, since calmodulin interacts with multiple protein targets, it is unknown which of these targets is involved in the regulation of glucose transport. In the present study, we have used the calcium-dependent calmodulin protein kinase II (CAMKII) inhibitor 1-[N, O-bis-(5-isoquinolinesulphonyl) -N-methyl-L-tyrosyl]-4-phenylpiperazine (KN-62) to investigate the possible role of this enzyme in the regulation of glucose transport in isolated rat soleus and epitrochlearis muscles. KN-62 did not affect basal 2-deoxyglucose transport, but it did inhibit both insulin- and hypoxia-stimulated glucose transport activity by 46 and 40% respectively. 1-[N,O-Bis-(1, 5-isoquinolinesulphonyl)-N-methyl-l-tyrosyl]-4-phenylpiperazine (KN-04), a structural analogue of KN-62 that does not inhibit CAMKII, had no effect on hypoxia-or insulin-stimulated glucose transport. Accordingly, KN-62 decreased the stimulated cell-surface GLUT4 labelling by a similar extent as the inhibition of glucose transport (insulin, 49% and hypoxia, 54%). Additional experiments showed that KN-62 also inhibited insulin- and hypoxia-stimulated transport by 37 and 40% respectively in isolated rat epitrochlearis (a fast-twitch muscle), indicating that the effect of KN-62 was not limited to the slow-twitch fibres of the soleus. The inhibitory effect of KN-62 on hypoxia-stimulated glucose transport appears to be specific to CAMKII, since KN-62 did not inhibit hypoxia-stimulated 45Ca efflux from muscles pre-loaded with 45Ca, or hypoxia-stimulated glycogen breakdown. Additionally, KN-62 affected neither insulin-stimulated phosphoinositide 3-kinase nor Akt activity, suggesting that the effects of KN-62 are not due to non-specific effects of this inhibitor on these regions of the insulin-signalling cascade. The results of the present study suggest that CAMKII might have a distinct role in insulin- and hypoxia

  8. Far-infrared radiation acutely increases nitric oxide production by increasing Ca{sup 2+} mobilization and Ca{sup 2+}/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II-mediated phosphorylation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase at serine 1179

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Jung-Hyun; Lee, Sangmi; Cho, Du-Hyong; Park, Young Mi; Kang, Duk-Hee; Jo, Inho

    2013-07-12

    Highlights: •Far-infrared (FIR) radiation increases eNOS-Ser{sup 1179} phosphorylation and NO production in BAEC. •CaMKII and PKA mediate FIR-stimulated increases in eNOS-Ser{sup 1179} phosphorylation. •FIR increases intracellular Ca{sup 2+} levels. •Thermo-sensitive TRPV Ca{sup 2+} channels are unlikely to be involved in the FIR-mediated eNOS-Ser{sup 1179} phosphorylation pathway. -- Abstract: Repeated thermal therapy manifested by far-infrared (FIR) radiation improves vascular function in both patients and mouse model with coronary heart disease, but its underlying mechanism is not fully understood. Using FIR as a thermal therapy agent, we investigate the molecular mechanism of its effect on endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) activity and NO production. FIR increased the phosphorylation of eNOS at serine 1179 (eNOS-Ser{sup 1179}) in a time-dependent manner (up to 40 min of FIR radiation) in bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAEC) without alterations in eNOS expression. This increase was accompanied by increases in NO production and intracellular Ca{sup 2+} levels. Treatment with KN-93, a selective inhibitor of Ca{sup 2+}/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) and H-89, a protein kinase A inhibitor, inhibited FIR radiation-stimulated eNOS-Ser{sup 1179} phosphorylation. FIR radiation itself also increased the temperature of culture medium. As transient receptors potential vanilloid (TRPV) ion channels are known to be temperature-sensitive calcium channels, we explore whether TRPV channels mediate these observed effects. Reverse transcription-PCR assay revealed two TRPV isoforms in BAEC, TRPV2 and TRPV4. Although ruthenium red, a pan-TRPV inhibitor, completely reversed the observed effect of FIR radiation, a partial attenuation (∼20%) was found in cells treated with Tranilast, TRPV2 inhibitor. However, ectopic expression of siRNA of TRPV2 showed no significant alteration in FIR radiation-stimulated eNOS-Ser{sup 1179} phosphorylation. This

  9. Ca2+–calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II represses cardiac transcription of the L-type calcium channel α1C-subunit gene (Cacna1c) by DREAM translocation

    PubMed Central

    Ronkainen, Jarkko J; Hänninen, Sandra L; Korhonen, Topi; Koivumäki, Jussi T; Skoumal, Reka; Rautio, Sini; Ronkainen, Veli-Pekka; Tavi, Pasi

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Recent studies have demonstrated that changes in the activity of calcium–calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) induce a unique cardiomyocyte phenotype through the regulation of specific genes involved in excitation–contraction (E–C)-coupling. To explain the transcriptional effects of CaMKII we identified a novel CaMKII-dependent pathway for controlling the expression of the pore-forming α-subunit (Cav1.2) of the L-type calcium channel (LTCC) in cardiac myocytes. We show that overexpression of either cytosolic (δC) or nuclear (δB) CaMKII isoforms selectively downregulate the expression of the Cav1.2. Pharmacological inhibition of CaMKII activity induced measurable changes in LTCC current density and subsequent changes in cardiomyocyte calcium signalling in less than 24 h. The effect of CaMKII on the α1C-subunit gene (Cacna1c) promoter was abolished by deletion of the downstream regulatory element (DRE), which binds transcriptional repressor DREAM/calsenilin/KChIP3. Imaging DREAM–GFP (green fluorescent protein)-expressing cardiomyocytes showed that CaMKII potentiates the calcium-induced nuclear translocation of DREAM. Thereby CaMKII increases DREAM binding to the DRE consensus sequence of the endogenous Cacna1c gene. By mathematical modelling we demonstrate that the LTCC downregulation through the Ca2+–CaMKII–DREAM cascade constitutes a physiological feedback mechanism enabling cardiomyocytes to adjust the calcium intrusion through LTCCs to the amount of intracellular calcium detected by CaMKII. PMID:21486818

  10. Differential modulation of Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II activity by regulated interactions with N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor NR2B subunits and alpha-actinin.

    PubMed

    Robison, A J; Bartlett, Ryan K; Bass, Martha A; Colbran, Roger J

    2005-11-25

    Neuronal Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) interacts with several prominent dendritic spine proteins, which have been termed CaMKII-associated proteins. The NR2B subunit of N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA)-type glutamate receptor, densin-180, and alpha-actinin bind comparable, approximately stoichiometric amounts of Thr(286)-autophosphorylated CaMKIIalpha, forming a ternary complex (Robison, A. J., Bass, M. A., Jiao, Y., Macmillan, L. B., Carmody, L. C., Bartlett, R. K., and Colbran, R. J. (2005) J. Biol. Chem. 280, 35329-35336), but their impacts on CaMKII function are poorly understood. Here we show that these interactions are differentially regulated and exert distinct effects on CaMKII activity. Nonphosphorylated and Thr(286)-autophosphorylated CaMKII bind to alpha-actinin with similar efficacy, but autophosphorylation at Thr(305/306) or Ca(2+)/calmodulin binding significantly reduce this binding. Moreover, alpha-actinin antagonizes CaMKII activation by Ca(2+)/calmodulin, as assessed by autophosphorylation and phosphorylation of a peptide substrate. CaMKII binding to densin (1247-1542) is partially independent of Thr(286) autophosphorylation and is unaffected by Ca(2+)-independent autophosphorylation or Ca(2+)/calmodulin. In addition, the CaMKII binding domain of densin-180 has little effect on CaMKII activity. In contrast, the interaction of CaMKIIalpha with NR2B requires either Thr(286) autophosphorylation or the binding of both Ca(2+)/calmodulin and adenine nucleotides. NR2B inhibits both the Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent and autonomous activities of CaMKII by a mechanism that is competitive with autocamtide-2 substrate, non-competitive with syntide-2 substrate, and uncompetitive with respect to ATP. In combination, these data suggest that dynamically regulated interactions with CaMKII-associated proteins could play pleiotropic roles in finetuning CaMKII signaling in defined subcellular compartments.

  11. Targeting HER2 aberrations as actionable drivers in lung cancers: phase II trial of the pan-HER tyrosine kinase inhibitor dacomitinib in patients with HER2-mutant or amplified tumors

    PubMed Central

    Kris, M. G.; Camidge, D. R.; Giaccone, G.; Hida, T.; Li, B. T.; O'Connell, J.; Taylor, I.; Zhang, H.; Arcila, M. E.; Goldberg, Z.; Jänne, P. A.

    2015-01-01

    Background HER2 mutations and amplifications have been identified as oncogenic drivers in lung cancers. Dacomitinib, an irreversible inhibitor of HER2, EGFR (HER1), and HER4 tyrosine kinases, has demonstrated activity in cell-line models with HER2 exon 20 insertions or amplifications. Here, we studied dacomitinib in patients with HER2-mutant or amplified lung cancers. Patients and methods As a prespecified cohort of a phase II study, we included patients with stage IIIB/IV lung cancers with HER2 mutations or amplification. We gave oral dacomitinib at 30–45 mg daily in 28-day cycles. End points included partial response rate, overall survival, and toxicity. Results We enrolled 30 patients with HER2-mutant (n = 26, all in exon 20 including 25 insertions and 1 missense mutation) or HER2-amplified lung cancers (n = 4). Three of 26 patients with tumors harboring HER2 exon 20 mutations [12%; 95% confidence interval (CI) 2% to 30%] had partial responses lasting 3+, 11, and 14 months. No partial responses occurred in four patients with tumors with HER2 amplifications. The median overall survival was 9 months from the start of dacomitinib (95% CI 7–21 months) for patients with HER2 mutations and ranged from 5 to 22 months with amplifications. Treatment-related toxicities included diarrhea (90%; grade 3/4: 20%/3%), dermatitis (73%; grade 3/4: 3%/0%), and fatigue (57%; grade 3/4: 3%/0%). One patient died on study likely due to an interaction of dacomitinib with mirtazapine. Conclusions Dacomitinib produced objective responses in patients with lung cancers with specific HER2 exon 20 insertions. This observation validates HER2 exon 20 insertions as actionable targets and justifies further study of HER2-targeted agents in specific HER2-driven lung cancers. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00818441. PMID:25899785

  12. Low Dose Ultraviolet B Irradiation Increases Hyaluronan Synthesis in Epidermal Keratinocytes via Sequential Induction of Hyaluronan Synthases Has1–3 Mediated by p38 and Ca2+/Calmodulin-dependent Protein Kinase II (CaMKII) Signaling*

    PubMed Central

    Rauhala, Leena; Hämäläinen, Lasse; Salonen, Pauliina; Bart, Geneviève; Tammi, Markku; Pasonen-Seppänen, Sanna; Tammi, Raija

    2013-01-01

    Hyaluronan, a major epidermal extracellular matrix component, responds strongly to different kinds of injuries. This also occurs by UV radiation, but the mechanisms involved are poorly understood. The effects of a single ultraviolet B (UVB) exposure on hyaluronan content and molecular mass, and expression of genes involved in hyaluronan metabolism were defined in monolayer and differentiated, organotypic three-dimensional cultures of rat epidermal keratinocytes. The signals regulating the response were characterized using specific inhibitors and Western blotting. In monolayer cultures, UVB increased hyaluronan synthase Has1 mRNA already 4 h postexposure, with a return to control level by 24 h. In contrast, Has2 and Has3 were persistently elevated from 8 h onward. Silencing of Has2 and especially Has3 decreased the UVB-induced accumulation of hyaluronan. p38 and Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II pathways were found to be involved in the UVB-induced up-regulation of Has2 and Has3 expression, respectively, and their inhibition reduced hyaluronan deposition. However, the expressions of the hyaluronan-degrading enzymes Hyal1 and Hyal2 and the hyaluronan receptor Cd44 were also up-regulated by UVB. In organotypic cultures, UVB treatment also resulted in increased expression of both Has and Hyal genes and shifted hyaluronan toward a smaller size range. Histochemical stainings indicated localized losses of hyaluronan in the epidermis. The data show that exposure of keratinocytes to acute, low dose UVB increases hyaluronan synthesis via up-regulation of Has2 and Has3. The simultaneously enhanced catabolism of hyaluronan demonstrates the complexity of the UVB-induced changes. Nevertheless, enhanced hyaluronan metabolism is an important part of the adaptation of keratinocytes to radiation injury. PMID:23645665

  13. Activation of ROS/NF-{kappa}B and Ca{sup 2+}/CaM kinase II are necessary for VCAM-1 induction in IL-1{beta}-treated human tracheal smooth muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, S.-F.; Chang, C.-C.; Lee, I-T.; Lee, C.-W.; Lin, W.-N.; Lin, C.-C.; Yang, C.-M.

    2009-05-15

    Histone acetylation regulated by histone acetyltransferases (HATs) and histone deacetylases (HDACs) plays a critical role in the expression of inflammatory genes, such as vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1). Oxidative processes have been shown to induce VCAM-1 expression. Here, we investigated the mechanisms underlying IL-1{beta}-induced VCAM-1 expression in human tracheal smooth muscle cells (HTSMCs). Our results showed that IL-1{beta} enhanced HTSMCs-monocyte adhesion through up-regulation of VCAM-1, which was inhibited by pretreatment with selective inhibitors of PKC{alpha} (Goe6976), c-Src (PP1), NADPH oxidase [diphenylene iodonium (DPI) and apocynin (APO)], intracellular calcium chelator (BAPTA/AM), PI-PLC (U73122), CaM (calmidazolium chloride), CaM kinase II (KN62), p300 (garcinol), NF-{kappa}B (Bay11-7082), HDAC (trichostatin A), and ROS scavenger [N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC)] or transfection with siRNAs of MyD88, PKC{alpha}, Src, p47{sup phox}, p300, and HDAC4. Moreover, IL-1{beta} stimulated NF-{kappa}B and CaMKII phosphorylation through MyD88-dependent PI-PLC/PKC{alpha}/c-Src/ROS and PI-PLC/Ca{sup 2+}/CaM pathways, respectively. Activation of NF-{kappa}B and CaMKII may eventually lead to the acetylation of histone residues and phosphorylation of histone deacetylases. These findings suggested that IL-1{beta} induced VCAM-1 expression via these multiple signaling pathways in HTSMCs. Blockade of these pathways may reduce monocyte adhesion via VCAM-1 suppression and attenuation of the inflammatory responses in airway diseases.

  14. Beta2-containing nicotinic acetylcholine receptors mediate calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase-II and synapsin I protein levels in the nucleus accumbens after nicotine withdrawal in mice.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Kia J; Imad Damaj, M

    2013-02-15

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors are calcium-permeable and the initial targets for nicotine. Studies suggest that calcium-dependent mechanisms mediate some behavioral responses to nicotine; however, the post-receptor calcium-dependent mechanisms associated with chronic nicotine and nicotine withdrawal remain unclear. The proteins calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) and synapsin I are essential for neurotransmitter release and were shown to be involved in drug dependence. In the current study, using pharmacological techniques, we sought to (a) complement previously published behavioral findings from our lab indicating a role for calcium-dependent signaling in nicotine dependence and (b) expand on previously published acute biochemical and pharmacological findings indicating the relevance of calcium-dependent mechanisms in acute nicotine responses by evaluating the function of CaMKII and synapsin I after chronic nicotine and withdrawal in the nucleus accumbens, a brain region implicated in drug dependence. Male mice were chronically infused with nicotine for 14 days, and treated with the β2-selective antagonist dihydro-β-erythroidine (DHβE), or the α7 antagonist, methyllycaconitine citrate (MLA) 20min prior to dissection of the nucleus accumbens. Results show that phosphorylated and total CaMKII and synapsin I protein levels were significantly increased in the nucleus accumbens after chronic nicotine infusion, and reduced after treatment with DHβE, but not MLA. A spontaneous nicotine withdrawal assessment also revealed significant reductions in phosphorylated CaMKII and synapsin I levels 24h after cessation of nicotine treatment. Our findings suggest that post-receptor calcium-dependent mechanisms associated with nicotine withdrawal are mediated through β2-containing nicotinic receptors.

  15. Antioxidant, DNA interaction, VEGFR2 kinase, topoisomerase I and in vitro cytotoxic activities of heteroleptic copper(II) complexes of tetrazolo[1,5-a]pyrimidines and diimines.

    PubMed

    Haleel, A; Mahendiran, D; Veena, V; Sakthivel, N; Rahiman, A Kalilur

    2016-11-01

    A series of heteroleptic mononuclear copper(II) complexes of the type [Cu(L(1-3))(diimine)]ClO4 (1-6) containing three tetrazolo[1,5-a]pyrimidine core ligands, ethyl 5-methyl-7-(2-hydroxyphenyl)-4,7-dihydrotetrazolo[1,5-a]pyrimidine-6-carboxylate (HL(1)), ethyl 5-methyl-7-(4-diethylamino-2-hydroxyphenyl)-4,7-dihydrotetrazolo[1,5-a]pyrimidine-6-carboxylate (HL(2)) or ethyl 5-methyl-7-(2-hydroxy-4-nitrophenyl)-4,7-dihydrotetrazolo[1,5-a]pyrimidine-6-carboxylate (HL(3)), and two diimine coligands, 2,2'-bipyridyl (bpy) or 1,10-phenanthroline (phen) have been synthesized and characterized by spectral methods. The geometry of complexes have been determined with the help of electronic absorption and EPR splitting patterns, which suggest four coordinated square planar geometry around copper(II) ion. The lowering of HOMO-LUMO band gap value of complex 4 implies its higher biological activity compared to other complexes. Antioxidant studies revealed that the complexes possess considerable radical scavenging potency against DPPH. The binding studies of the complexes with calf thymus DNA (CT-DNA) revealed groove mode of binding, which was further supported by docking simulation. The complexes 3 and 4 strongly inhibit the topoisomerase I, and also strongly interact with VEGFR2 kinase receptor via π-π, σ-π and hydrogen bonding interaction. Gel electrophoresis experiments demonstrated the ability of the complexes to cleave plasmid DNA in the absence of activators. In vitro cytotoxic activities of the complexes were examined on three cancerous cell lines such as human lung (A549), cervical (HeLa) and colon (HCT-15), and two normal cells such as human embryonic kidney (HEK) and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). The live cell and fluorescent imaging of cancer cells were observed with acridine orange/ethidium bromide staining assay. All encouraging chemical and biological findings indicate that the complex 4 is a suitable candidate for drug target.

  16. Teaching resources. Protein kinases.

    PubMed

    Caplan, Avrom

    2005-02-22

    This Teaching Resource provides lecture notes and slides for a class covering the structure and function of protein kinases and is part of the course "Cell Signaling Systems: A Course for Graduate Students." The lecture begins with a discussion of the genomics and evolutionary relationships among kinases and then proceeds to describe the structure-function relationships of specific kinases, the molecular mechanisms underlying substrate specificity, and selected issues in regulation of kinase activity.

  17. Two Kinase Family Dramas

    PubMed Central

    Leonard, Thomas A.; Hurley, James H.

    2007-01-01

    In this issue, Lietha and colleagues (2007) report the structure of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and reveal how FAK maintains an autoinhibited state. Together with the structure of another tyrosine kinase, ZAP-70 (Deindl et al., 2007), this work highlights the diversity of mechanisms that nature has evolved within the kinase superfamily to regulate their activity through autoinhibition. PMID:17574014

  18. Mediator kinase module and human tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Alison D.; Oldenbroek, Marieke; Boyer, Thomas G.

    2016-01-01

    Mediator is a conserved multi-subunit signal processor through which regulatory informatiosn conveyed by gene-specific transcription factors is transduced to RNA Polymerase II (Pol II). In humans, MED13, MED12, CDK8 and Cyclin C (CycC) comprise a four-subunit “kinase” module that exists in variable association with a 26-subunit Mediator core. Genetic and biochemical studies have established the Mediator kinase module as a major ingress of developmental and oncogenic signaling through Mediator, and much of its function in signal-dependent gene regulation derives from its resident CDK8 kinase activity. For example, CDK8-targeted substrate phosphorylation impacts transcription factor half-life, Pol II activity and chromatin chemistry and functional status. Recent structural and biochemical studies have revealed a precise network of physical and functional subunit interactions required for proper kinase module activity. Accordingly, pathologic change in this activity through altered expression or mutation of constituent kinase module subunits can have profound consequences for altered signaling and tumor formation. Herein, we review the structural organization, biological function and oncogenic potential of the Mediator kinase module. We focus principally on tumor-associated alterations in kinase module subunits for which mechanistic relationships as opposed to strictly correlative associations are established. These considerations point to an emerging picture of the Mediator kinase module as an oncogenic unit, one in which pathogenic activation/deactivation through component change drives tumor formation through perturbation of signal-dependent gene regulation. It follows that therapeutic strategies to combat CDK8-driven tumors will involve targeted modulation of CDK8 activity or pharmacologic manipulation of dysregulated CDK8-dependent signaling pathways. PMID:26182352

  19. Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinase Class II α-Isoform PI3K-C2α Is Required for Transforming Growth Factor β-induced Smad Signaling in Endothelial Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Aki, Sho; Yoshioka, Kazuaki; Okamoto, Yasuo; Takuwa, Noriko; Takuwa, Yoh

    2015-01-01

    We have recently demonstrated that the PI3K class II-α isoform (PI3K-C2α), which generates phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate and phosphatidylinositol 3,4-bisphosphates, plays crucial roles in angiogenesis, by analyzing PI3K-C2α knock-out mice. The PI3K-C2α actions are mediated at least in part through its participation in the internalization of VEGF receptor-2 and sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor S1P1 and thereby their signaling on endosomes. TGFβ, which is also an essential angiogenic factor, signals via the serine/threonine kinase receptor complex to induce phosphorylation of Smad2 and Smad3 (Smad2/3). SARA (Smad anchor for receptor activation) protein, which is localized in early endosomes through its FYVE domain, is required for Smad2/3 signaling. In the present study, we showed that PI3K-C2α knockdown nearly completely abolished TGFβ1-induced phosphorylation and nuclear translocation of Smad2/3 in vascular endothelial cells (ECs). PI3K-C2α was necessary for TGFβ-induced increase in phosphatidylinositol 3,4-bisphosphates in the plasma membrane and TGFβ receptor internalization into the SARA-containing early endosomes, but not for phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate enrichment or localization of SARA in the early endosomes. PI3K-C2α was also required for TGFβ receptor-mediated formation of SARA-Smad2/3 complex. Inhibition of dynamin, which is required for the clathrin-dependent receptor endocytosis, suppressed both TGFβ receptor internalization and Smad2/3 phosphorylation. TGFβ1 stimulated Smad-dependent VEGF-A expression, VEGF receptor-mediated EC migration, and capillary-like tube formation, which were all abolished by either PI3K-C2α knockdown or a dynamin inhibitor. Finally, TGFβ1-induced microvessel formation in Matrigel plugs was greatly attenuated in EC-specific PI3K-C2α-deleted mice. These observations indicate that PI3K-C2α plays the pivotal role in TGFβ receptor endocytosis and thereby Smad2/3 signaling, participating in angiogenic

  20. Non-selective cation channel-mediated Ca2+-entry and activation of Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent kinase II contribute to G2/M cell cycle arrest and survival of irradiated leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Heise, Nicole; Palme, Daniela; Misovic, Milan; Koka, Saisudha; Rudner, Justine; Lang, Florian; Salih, Helmut R; Huber, Stephan M; Henke, Guido

    2010-01-01

    Genotoxic stress induces cell cycle arrest and DNA repair which may enable tumor cells to survive radiation therapy. Here, we defined the role of Ca(2+) signaling in the cell cycle control and survival of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) cells subjected to ionizing radiation (IR). To this end, K562 erythroid leukemia cells were irradiated (0-10 Gy). Tumor survival was analyzed by clonogenic survival assay and cell cycle progression via flow cytometry. Plasma membrane cation conductance was assessed by patch-clamp whole-cell recording and the cytosolic free Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)](i)) was measured by fura-2 Ca(2+) imaging. Nuclear activity of Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent kinase II (CaMKII) was defined by Western blotting. In addition, the effect of IR (5 Gy) on the cation conductance of primary CML cells was determined. The results indicated that IR (10 Gy) induced a G(2)/M cell cycle arrest of K562 cells within 24 h post-irradiation (p.i.) and decreased the clonogenic survival to 0.5 % of that of the control cells. In K562 cells, G(2)/M cell cycle arrest was preceded by activation of TRPV5/6-like nonselective cation channels in the plasma membrane 1-5 h p.i., resulting in an elevated Ca(2+) entry as evident from fura-2 Ca(2+) imaging. Similarly, IR stimulated a Ca(2+)-permeable nonselective cation conductance in primary CML cells within 2-4 h p.i.. Ca(2+) entry, into K562 cells was paralleled by an IR-induced activation of nuclear CaMKII. The IR-stimulated accumulation in G(2) phase was delayed upon buffering [Ca(2+)](i) with the Ca(2+) chelator BAPTA-AM or inhibiting CaMKII with KN93 (1 nM). In addition, KN93 decreased the clonogenic survival of irradiated cells but not of control cells. In conclusion, the data suggest that IR-stimulated cation channel activation, Ca(2+) entry and CaMKII activity participate in control of cell cycle progression and survival of irradiated CML cells.

  1. Linoleic acid-induced expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase and cyclooxygenase II via p42/44 mitogen-activated protein kinase and nuclear factor-kappaB pathway in retinal pigment epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Fang, I-Mo; Yang, Chang-Hao; Yang, Chung-May; Chen, Muh-Shy

    2007-11-01

    High linoleic acid (LA) intake is known to correlate with age-related macular degeneration (AMD), but the molecular mechanisms remain unclear. This study was conducted to investigate the effects of LA on expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase II (COX-2) and their associated signaling pathways in human retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells. ARPE-19 cells were treated with different concentrations of LA. Expressions of iNOS and COX-2 were examined using semiquantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and Western blot analysis. Concentrations of nitric oxide (NO) and prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)) in the culture medium were determined by enzyme-link immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Activation of p42/44, p38, JNK mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and nuclear factors (NF)-kappaB were evaluated by Western blot analysis and electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA). We found that LA induced expression of iNOS and COX-2 in RPE cells at the mRNA and protein levels in a time-and dose-dependent manner. Upregulation of iNOS and COX-2 resulted in increased production of NO and PGE(2). Moreover, LA caused degradation of IkappaB and increased NF-kappaB DNA binding activity. Effects of LA-induced iNOS and COX-2 expression were inhibited by a NF-kappaB inhibitor, pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PDTC). LA activated p42/44, but not p38 or JNK MAPK. Inhibition of p42/44 activity by PD98059 significantly reduced LA-induced activation of NF-kappaB. Linoleic acid-induced expression of iNOS and COX-2 as well as PGE(2) and NO release in RPE cells were sequentially mediated through activation of p42/p44, MAPK, then NF-kappaB. These results may provide new insights into both mechanisms of LA action on RPE cells and pathogenesis of age-related macular degeneration.

  2. Identification and Structure-Function Analysis of Subfamily Selective G Protein-Coupled Receptor Kinase Inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Homan, Kristoff T.; Larimore, Kelly M.; Elkins, Jonathan M.; Szklarz, Marta; Knapp, Stefan; Tesmer, John J.G.

    2015-02-13

    Selective inhibitors of individual subfamilies of G protein-coupled receptor kinases (GRKs) would serve as useful chemical probes as well as leads for therapeutic applications ranging from heart failure to Parkinson’s disease. To identify such inhibitors, differential scanning fluorimetry was used to screen a collection of known protein kinase inhibitors that could increase the melting points of the two most ubiquitously expressed GRKs: GRK2 and GRK5. Enzymatic assays on 14 of the most stabilizing hits revealed that three exhibit nanomolar potency of inhibition for individual GRKs, some of which exhibiting orders of magnitude selectivity. Most of the identified compounds can be clustered into two chemical classes: indazole/dihydropyrimidine-containing compounds that are selective for GRK2 and pyrrolopyrimidine-containing compounds that potently inhibit GRK1 and GRK5 but with more modest selectivity. The two most potent inhibitors representing each class, GSK180736A and GSK2163632A, were cocrystallized with GRK2 and GRK1, and their atomic structures were determined to 2.6 and 1.85 Å spacings, respectively. GSK180736A, developed as a Rho-associated, coiled-coil-containing protein kinase inhibitor, binds to GRK2 in a manner analogous to that of paroxetine, whereas GSK2163632A, developed as an insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor inhibitor, occupies a novel region of the GRK active site cleft that could likely be exploited to achieve more selectivity. However, neither compound inhibits GRKs more potently than their initial targets. This data provides the foundation for future efforts to rationally design even more potent and selective GRK inhibitors.

  3. A novel tau-tubulin kinase from bovine brain.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, M; Tomizawa, K; Sato, K; Ohtake, A; Omori, A

    1995-09-18

    During purification of tau protein kinase I and II from the bovine brain extract, a new tau protein kinase was detected and purified with phosphocellulose, gel filtration, S-Sepharose and AF-Heparin column chromatography. The molecular mass of the enzyme was determined to be 32 kDa by gel filtration and activity staining on SDS-PAGE. The enzyme is a Ser/Thr protein kinase phosphorylating tau, beta-tubulin, MAP2 and alpha-casein. Employing many synthetic peptides, the recognition site of this enzyme appears to be -SR-. The enzyme requires no second messenger and is inhibited with high concentration of heparin, but not by inhibitors of CKI. These results indicate that this enzyme, tau-tubulin kinase is novel and distinct from TPKI, II and CKI, II.

  4. Isozymic forms of rat brain CA/sup 2 +/-activated and phospholipid-dependent protein kinase

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, K.P.; Huang, F.L.

    1986-05-01

    Three forms of Ca/sup 2 +/-activated and phospholipid-dependent protein kinase (protein kinase C) were purified from the cytosolic fraction of rat brain. These enzymes, designated as type I, II, and III protein kinase C, all have the similar molecular weight of 80 Kd, bind (/sup 3/H)-phorbol dibutyrate in the presence of Ca/sup 2 +/, and undergo autophosphorylation in the presence of Ca/sup 2 +/, phosphatidylserine, and diolein. Autophosphorylation of these kinases resulted in an incorporation of 1- 1.5 mol /sup 32/P/mol of enzyme. Analysis of the /sup 32/P-labeled tryptic peptides derived from the autophosphorylated protein kinase C by two-dimensional peptide mapping revealed that these kinases had different sites of autophosphorylation. Phosphoamino acid analysis revealed that the type I and type III protein kinase C mainly phosphorylated at Ser residue while the type II kinase phosphorylated at both Ser and Thr residues. In addition, polyclonal antibodies previously prepared against a mixed enzyme fraction preferentially inhibited the type I and type II enzymes but less effectively toward the type III enzyme. Monoclonal antibody specifically against the type II protein kinase C did not inhibit the type I or type III enzymes. These kinases also had different susceptibility to limited proteolysis by trypsin and upon proteolytic degradation they generate distinct fragments. These results demonstrate the presence of isozymic forms of protein kinase C in rat brain.

  5. Towards axonal regeneration and neuroprotection in glaucoma: Rho kinase inhibitors as promising therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Van de Velde, Sarah; De Groef, Lies; Stalmans, Ingeborg; Moons, Lieve; Van Hove, Inge

    2015-08-01

    Due to a prolonged life expectancy worldwide, the incidence of age-related neurodegenerative disorders such as glaucoma is increasing. Glaucoma is the second cause of blindness, resulting from a slow and progressive loss of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) and their axons. Up to now, intraocular pressure (IOP) reduction is the only treatment modality by which ophthalmologists attempt to control disease progression. However, not all patients benefit from this therapy, and the pathophysiology of glaucoma is not always associated with an elevated IOP. These limitations, together with the multifactorial etiology of glaucoma, urge the pressing medical need for novel and alternative treatment strategies. Such new therapies should focus on preventing or retarding RGC death, but also on repair of injured axons, to ultimately preserve or improve structural and functional connectivity. In this respect, Rho-associated coiled-coil forming protein kinase (ROCK) inhibitors hold a promising potential to become very prominent drugs for future glaucoma treatment. Their field of action in the eye does not seem to be restricted to IOP reduction by targeting the trabecular meshwork or improving filtration surgery outcome. Indeed, over the past years, important progress has been made in elucidating their ability to improve ocular blood flow, to prevent RGC death/increase RGC survival and to retard axonal degeneration or induce proper axonal regeneration. Within this review, we aim to highlight the currently known capacity of ROCK inhibition to promote neuroprotection and regeneration in several in vitro, ex vivo and in vivo experimental glaucoma models.

  6. Purification and characterization of a casein kinase 2-type protein kinase from pea nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, H.; Roux, S. J.

    1992-01-01

    Almost all the polyamine-stimulated protein kinase activity associated with the chromatin fraction of nuclei purified from etiolated pea (Pisum sativum L.) plumules is present in a single enzyme that can be extracted from chromatin by 0.35 molar NaCl. This protein kinase can be further purified over 2000-fold by salt fractionation and anion-exchange and casein-agarose column chromatography, after which it is more than 90% pure. The purified kinase has a specific activity of about 650 nanomoles per minute per milligram protein in the absence of polyamines, with either ATP or GTP as phosphoryl donor. Spermidine can stimulate its activity fourfold, with half-maximal activation at about 2 millimolar. Spermine and putrescine also stimulate activity, although somewhat less effectively. This kinase has a tetrameric alpha 2 beta 2 structure with a native molecular weight of 130,000, and subunit molecular weights of 36,000 for the catalytic subunit (alpha) and 29,000 for the regulatory subunit (beta). In western blot analyses, only the alpha subunit reacts strongly with polyclonal antibodies to a Drosophila casein kinase II. The pea kinase can use casein and phosvitin as artificial substrates, phosphorylating both the serine and threonine residues of casein. It has a pH optimum near 8.0, a Vmax of 1.5 micromoles per minute per milligram protein, and a Km for ATP of approximately 75 micromolar. Its activity can be almost completely inhibited by heparin at 5 micrograms per milliliter, but is relatively insensitive to concentrations of staurosporine, K252a, and chlorpromazine that strongly antagonize Ca(2+) -regulated protein kinases. These results are discussed in relation to recent findings that casein kinase 2-type kinases may phosphorylate trans-acting factors that bind to light-regulated promoters in plants.

  7. Using Bacteria to Determine Protein Kinase Specificity and Predict Target Substrates

    PubMed Central

    Lubner, Joshua M.; Church, George M.; Husson, Robert N.; Schwartz, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    The identification of protein kinase targets remains a significant bottleneck for our understanding of signal transduction in normal and diseased cellular states. Kinases recognize their substrates in part through sequence motifs on substrate proteins, which, to date, have most effectively been elucidated using combinatorial peptide library approaches. Here, we present and demonstrate the ProPeL method for easy and accurate discovery of kinase specificity motifs through the use of native bacterial proteomes that serve as in vivo libraries for thousands of simultaneous phosphorylation reactions. Using recombinant kinases expressed in E. coli followed by mass spectrometry, the approach accurately recapitulated the well-established motif preferences of human basophilic (Protein Kinase A) and acidophilic (Casein Kinase II) kinases. These motifs, derived for PKA and CK II using only bacterial sequence data, were then further validated by utilizing them in conjunction with the scan-x software program to computationally predict known human phosphorylation sites with high confidence. PMID:23300758

  8. [Tyrosine kinase inhibitors].

    PubMed

    Robert, Jacques

    2011-11-01

    Membrane receptors with tyrosine kinase activity and cytoplasmic tyrosine kinases have emerged as important potential targets in oncology. Starting from basic structures such as anilino-quinazoline, numerous compounds have been synthesised, with the help of tyrosine kinase crystallography, which has allowed to optimise protein-ligand interactions. The catalytic domains of all kinases present similar three-dimensional structures, which explains that it may be difficult to identify molecules having a high specificity for a given tyrosine kinase. Some tyrosine kinase inhibitors are relatively specific for epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) such as géfitinib and erlotinib; other are mainly active against platelet-derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR) and the receptor KIT, such as imatinib or nilotinib, and other against vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) receptors involved in angiogenesis, such as sunitinib and sorafenib. The oral formulation of tyrosine kinase inhibitors is well accepted by the patients but may generate sometimes compliance problems requiring pharmacokinetic monitoring. This chemical family is in full expansion and several dozens of compounds have entered clinical trials.

  9. Phosphatidylinositol 4-kinases: Function, structure, and inhibition

    SciTech Connect

    Boura, Evzen Nencka, Radim

    2015-10-01

    The phosphatidylinositol 4-kinases (PI4Ks) synthesize phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate (PI4P), a key member of the phosphoinositide family. PI4P defines the membranes of Golgi and trans-Golgi network (TGN) and regulates trafficking to and from the Golgi. Humans have two type II PI4Ks (α and β) and two type III enzymes (α and β). Recently, the crystal structures were solved for both type II and type III kinase revealing atomic details of their function. Importantly, the type III PI4Ks are hijacked by +RNA viruses to create so-called membranous web, an extensively phosphorylated and modified membrane system dedicated to their replication. Therefore, selective and potent inhibitors of PI4Ks have been developed as potential antiviral agents. Here we focus on the structure and function of PI4Ks and their potential in human medicine.

  10. Inhibitory role of peroxiredoxin II (Prx II) on cellular senescence.

    PubMed

    Han, Ying-Hao; Kim, Hyun-Sun; Kim, Jin-Man; Kim, Sang-Keun; Yu, Dae-Yeul; Moon, Eun-Yi

    2005-08-29

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) were generated in all oxygen-utilizing organisms. Peroxiredoxin II (Prx II) as one of antioxidant enzymes may play a protective role against the oxidative damage caused by ROS. In order to define the role of Prx II in organismal aging, we evaluated cellular senescence in Prx II(-/-) mouse embryonic fibroblast (MEF). As compared to wild type MEF, cellular senescence was accelerated in Prx II(-/-) MEF. Senescence-associated (SA)-beta-galactosidase (Gal)-positive cell formation was about 30% higher in Prx II(-/-) MEF. N-Acetyl-l-cysteine (NAC) treatment attenuated SA-beta-Gal-positive cell formation. Prx II(-/-) MEF exhibited the higher G2/M (41%) and lower S (1.6%) phase cells as compared to 24% and 7.3% [corrected] in wild type MEF, respectively. A high increase in the p16 and a slight increase in the p21 and p53 levels were detected in PrxII(-/-) MEF cells. The cellular senescence of Prx II(-/-) MEF was correlated with the organismal aging of Prx II(-/-) mouse skin. While extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and p38 activation was detected in Prx II(-/-) MEF, ERK and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) activation was detected in Prx II(-/-) skin. These results suggest that Prx II may function as an enzymatic antioxidant to prevent cellular senescence and skin aging.

  11. In resting COS1 cells a dominant negative approach shows that specific, anchored PDE4 cAMP phosphodiesterase isoforms gate the activation, by basal cyclic AMP production, of AKAP-tethered protein kinase A type II located in the centrosomal region.

    PubMed

    McCahill, Angela; McSorley, Theresa; Huston, Elaine; Hill, Elaine V; Lynch, Martin J; Gall, Irene; Keryer, Guy; Lygren, Birgitte; Tasken, Kjetil; van Heeke, Gino; Houslay, Miles D

    2005-09-01

    We employ a novel, dominant negative approach to identify a key role for certain tethered cyclic AMP specific phosphodiesterase-4 (PDE4) isoforms in regulating cyclic AMP dependent protein kinase A (PKA) sub-populations in resting COS1 cells. A fraction of PKA is clearly active in resting COS1 cells and this activity increases when cells are treated with the selective PDE4 inhibitor, rolipram. Point mutation of a critical, conserved aspartate residue in the catalytic site of long PDE4A4, PDE4B1, PDE4C2 and PDE4D3 isoforms renders them catalytically inactive. Overexpressed in resting COS1 cells, catalytically inactive forms of PDE4C2 and PDE4D3, but not PDE4A4 and PDE4B1, are constitutively PKA phosphorylated while overexpressed active versions of all these isoforms are not. Inactive and active versions of all these isoforms are PKA phosphorylated in cells where protein kinase A is maximally activated with forskolin and IBMX. By contrast, rolipram challenge of COS1 cells selectively triggers the PKA phosphorylation of recombinant, active PDE4D3 and PDE4C2 but not recombinant, active PDE4A4 and PDE4B1. Purified, recombinant PDE4D3 and PDE4A4 show a similar dose-dependency for in vitro phosphorylation by PKA. Disruption of the tethering of PKA type-II to PKA anchor proteins (AKAPs), achieved using the peptide Ht31, prevents inactive forms of PDE4C2 and PDE4D3 being constitutively PKA phosphorylated in resting cells as does siRNA-mediated knockdown of PKA-RII, but not PKA-RI. PDE4C2 and PDE4D3 co-immunoprecipitate from COS1 cell lysates with 250 kDa and 450 kDa AKAPs that tether PKA type-II and not PKA type-I. PKA type-II co-localises with AKAP450 in the centrosomal region of COS1 cells. The perinuclear distribution of recombinant, inactive PDE4D3, but not inactive PDE4A4, overlaps with AKAP450 and PKA type-II. The distribution of PKA phosphorylated inactive PDE4D3 also overlaps with that of AKAP450 in the centrosomal region of COS1 cells. We propose that a novel role

  12. Phosphorylation of the mRNA cap binding protein and eIF-4A by different protein kinases

    SciTech Connect

    Hagedorn, C.H.

    1987-05-01

    These studies were done to determine the identity of a protein kinase that phosphorylates the mRNA cap binding protein (CBP). Two chromatographic steps (dye and ligand and ion exchange HPLC) produced a 500x purification of an enzyme activity in rabbit reticulocytes that phosphorylated CBP at serine residues. Isoelectric focusing analysis of kinase treated CBP demonstrated 5 isoelectric species of which the 2 most anodic species were phosphorylated (contained /sup 32/P). This kinase activity phosphorylated CBP when it was isolated or in the eIF-4F complex. Purified protein kinase C, cAMP or cGMP dependent protein kinase, casein kinase I or II, myosin light chain kinase or insulin receptor kinase did not significantly phosphorylate isolated CBP or CBP in the eIF-4F complex. However, cAMP and cGMP dependent protein kinases and casein kinase II phosphorylated eIF-4A but did not phosphorylate the 46 kDa component of eIF-4F. cAMP dependent protein kinase phosphorylated a approx. 220 kDa protein doublet in eIF-4F preparations. These studies indicate that CBP kinase activity probably represents a previously unidentified protein kinase. In addition, eIF-4A appears to be phosphorylated by several protein kinases whereas the 46 kDa component of the eIF-4F complex was not.

  13. Purification and characterization of a thylakoid protein kinase

    SciTech Connect

    Coughlan, S.J.; Hind, G.

    1986-01-01

    Control of state transitions in the thylakoid by reversible phosphorylation of the light-harvesting chlorophyll a/b protein complex of photosystem II (LHC-II) is modulated by a kinase. The kinase catalyzing this phosphorylation is associated with the thylakoid membrane, and is regulated by the redox state of the plastoquinone pool. The isolation and partial purification from spinach thylakoids of two protein kinases (CPK1, CPK2) of apparent molecular masses 25 kDa and 38 kDa has been reported. Neither enzyme utilizes isolated LHC-II as a substrate. The partial purification of a third protein kinase (LHCK) which can utilize both lysine-rich histones (IIIs and Vs) and isolated LHC-II as substrate has now been purified to homogeneity and characterized by SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis as a 64 kDa peptide. From a comparison of the two isolation procedures we have concluded that CPK1 is indeed a protein kinase, but has a lower specific activity than that of LHCK. 8 refs., 4 figs.

  14. Characterization of microtubule-associated protein 1-associated protein kinases from rat brain.

    PubMed

    Fujii, T; Watanabe, M; Nakamura, A

    1996-01-01

    The microtubule-associated protein (MAP) 1 preparation, MAP1A and 1B, obtained from rat brain microtubules was associated with protein kinases that were insensitive to cAMP, cGMP, calcium, calcium/calmodulin and calcium/phosphatidylserine. The fractionation of highly purified MAP1 by phosphocellulose chromatography revealed that protein kinase activity to phosphorylate phosvitin was separated into three major peaks (MAP1 kinases A, B and C). MAP1 was recovered in the MAP1 kinase A fraction and phosphorylated by the contained kinase. MAP1 kinase A is a novel protein kinase that is remarkably activated by poly-L-lysine and poly-L-arginine, but very insensitive to heparin among the kinases. Photoaffinity labeling using [alpha-32P]8-azido ATP indicated that the 65 kDa polypeptide is identified as an ATP-binding protein on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis in the highly purified MAP1 and MAP1 kinase A fractions. MAP1 kinases B and C may be identified as casein kinase I- and II-like kinases. The present results show that MAP1 is associated with at least three kinases and provide an insight for understanding thoroughly the MAP1-mediated microtubule functions.

  15. l-Carnitine ameliorates the oxidative stress response to angiotensin II by modulating NADPH oxidase through a reduction in protein kinase c activity and NF-κB translocation to the nucleus.

    PubMed

    Blanca, Antonio J; Ruiz-Armenta, María V; Zambrano, Sonia; Miguel-Carrasco, José L; González-Roncero, Francisco M; Fortuño, Ana; Revilla, Elisa; Mate, Alfonso; Vázquez, Carmen M

    2017-08-01

    l-Carnitine (LC) exerts beneficial effects in arterial hypertension due, in part, to its antioxidant capacity. We investigated the signalling pathways involved in the effect of LC on angiotensin II (Ang II)-induced NADPH oxidase activation in NRK-52E cells. Ang II increased the generation of superoxide anion from NADPH oxidase, as well as the amount of hydrogen peroxide and nitrotyrosine. Co-incubation with LC managed to prevent these alterations and also reverted the changes in NADPH oxidase expression triggered by Ang II. Cell signalling studies evidenced that LC did not modify Ang II-induced phosphorylation of Akt, p38 MAPK or ERK1/2. On the other hand, a significant decrease in PKC activity, and inhibition of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-kB) translocation, were attributable to LC incubation. In conclusion, LC counteracts the pro-oxidative response to Ang II by modulating NADPH oxidase enzyme via reducing the activity of PKC and the translocation of NF-kB to the nucleus.

  16. Conserved herpesvirus protein kinases

    PubMed Central

    Gershburg, Edward; Pagano, Joseph S.

    2008-01-01

    Conserved herpesviral protein kinases (CHPKs) are a group of enzymes conserved throughout all subfamilies of Herpesviridae. Members of this group are serine/threonine protein kinases that are likely to play a conserved role in viral infection by interacting with common host cellular and viral factors; however along with a conserved role, individual kinases may have unique functions in the context of viral infection in such a way that they are only partially replaceable even by close homologues. Recent studies demonstrated that CHPKs are crucial for viral infection and suggested their involvement in regulation of numerous processes at various infection steps (primary infection, nuclear egress, tegumentation), although the mechanisms of this regulation remain unknown. Notwithstanding, recent advances in discovery of new CHPK targets, and studies of CHPK knockout phenotypes have raised their attractiveness as targets for antiviral therapy. A number of compounds have been shown to inhibit the activity of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV)-encoded UL97 protein kinase and exhibit a pronounced antiviral effect, although the same compounds are inactive against Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV)-encoded protein kinase BGLF4, illustrating the fact that low homology between the members of this group complicates development of compounds targeting the whole group, and suggesting that individualized, structure-based inhibitor design will be more effective. Determination of CHPK structures will greatly facilitate this task. PMID:17881303

  17. Orphan kinases turn eccentric

    PubMed Central

    Mikolcevic, Petra; Rainer, Johannes; Geley, Stephan

    2012-01-01

    PCTAIRE kinases (PCTK) are a highly conserved, but poorly characterized, subgroup of cyclin-dependent kinases (CDK). They are characterized by a conserved catalytic domain flanked by N- and C-terminal extensions that are involved in cyclin binding. Vertebrate genomes contain three highly similar PCTAIRE kinases (PCTK1,2,3, a.k.a., CDK16,17,18), which are most abundant in post-mitotic cells in brain and testis. Consistent with this restricted expression pattern, PCTK1 (CDK16) has recently been shown to be essential for spermatogenesis. PCTAIREs are activated by cyclin Y (CCNY), a highly conserved single cyclin fold protein. By binding to N-myristoylated CCNY, CDK16 is targeted to the plasma membrane. Unlike conventional cyclin-CDK interactions, binding of CCNY to CDK16 not only requires the catalytic domain, but also domains within the N-terminal extension. Interestingly, phosphorylation within this domain blocks CCNY binding, providing a novel means of cyclin-CDK regulation. By using these functional characteristics, we analyzed “PCTAIRE” sequence containing protein kinase genes in genomes of various organisms and found that CCNY and CCNY-dependent kinases are restricted to eumetazoa and possibly evolved along with development of a central nervous system. Here, we focus on the structure and regulation of PCTAIREs and discuss their established functions. PMID:22895054

  18. Ca2+-independent contraction of longitudinal ileal smooth muscle is potentiated by a zipper-interacting protein kinase pseudosubstrate peptide.

    PubMed

    Ihara, Eikichi; Moffat, Lori; Borman, Meredith A; Amon, Jennifer E; Walsh, Michael P; MacDonald, Justin A

    2009-08-01

    As a regulator of smooth muscle contraction, zipper-interacting protein kinase (ZIPK) can directly phosphorylate the myosin regulatory light chains (LC20) and produce contractile force. Synthetic peptides (SM-1 and AV25) derived from the autoinhibitory region of smooth muscle myosin light chain kinase can inhibit ZIPK activity in vitro. Paradoxically, treatment of Triton-skinned ileal smooth muscle strips with AV25, but not SM-1, potentiated Ca2+-independent, microcystin- and ZIPK-induced contractions. The AV25-induced potentiation was limited to ileal and colonic smooth muscles and was not observed in rat caudal artery. Thus the potentiation of Ca2+-independent contractions by AV25 appeared to be mediated by a mechanism unique to intestinal smooth muscle. AV25 treatment elicited increased phosphorylation of LC20 (both Ser-19 and Thr-18) and myosin phosphatase-targeting subunit (MYPT1, inhibitory Thr-697 site), suggesting involvement of a Ca2+-independent LC20 kinase with coincident inhibition of myosin phosphatase. The phosphorylation of the inhibitor of myosin phosphatase, CPI-17, was not affected. The AV25-induced potentiation was abolished by pretreatment with staurosporine, a broad-specificity kinase inhibitor, but specific inhibitors of Rho-associated kinase, PKC, and MAPK pathways had no effect. When a dominant-negative ZIPK [kinase-dead ZIPK((1-320))-D161A] was added to skinned ileal smooth muscle, the potentiation of microcystin-induced contraction by AV25 was blocked. Furthermore, pretreatment of skinned ileal muscle with SM-1 abolished AV25-induced potentiation. We conclude, therefore, that, even though AV25 is an in vitro inhibitor of ZIPK, activation of the ZIPK pathway occurs following application of AV25 to permeabilized ileal smooth muscle. Finally, we propose a mechanism whereby conformational changes in the pseudosubstrate region of ZIPK permit augmentation of ZIPK activity toward LC(20) and MYPT1 in situ. AV25 or molecules based on its structure

  19. In the rostral ventrolateral medulla, the 70-kDa heat shock protein (HSP70), but not HSP90, confers neuroprotection against fatal endotoxemia via augmentation of nitric-oxide synthase I (NOS I)/protein kinase G signaling pathway and inhibition of NOS II/peroxynitrite cascade.

    PubMed

    Li, Faith C H; Chan, Julie Y H; Chan, Samuel H H; Chang, Alice Y W

    2005-07-01

    Heat shock proteins (HSPs) represent a group of highly conserved intracellular proteins that participate in protective adaptation against cellular stress. We evaluated the neuroprotective role of the 70-kDa HSP (HSP70) and the 90-kDa HSP (HSP90) at the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM), the medullary origin of sympathetic vasomotor tone, during fatal endotoxemia. In Sprague-Dawley rats maintained under propofol anesthesia, Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide (30 mg/kg, i.v.) induced a decrease (phase I), followed by an increase (phase II; "pro-life" phase) and a secondary decrease (phase III; "pro-death" phase) in the power density of the vasomotor component of systemic arterial pressure spectrum, along with progressive hypotension or bradycardia. Proteomic and Western blot analyses revealed that whereas HSP70 expression in the RVLM was significantly augmented during phases I and II and returned to baseline during phase III endotoxemia, HSP90 protein expression remained constant. The increase in HSP70 level was significantly blunted on pretreatment with microinjection of the transcription inhibitor actinomycin D or protein synthesis inhibitor cycloheximide into the bilateral RVLM. Functional blockade of HSP70 in the RVLM by an anti-HSP70 antiserum or prevention of synthesis by an antisense hsp70 oligonucleotide exacerbated mortality or potentiated the cardiovascular depression during experimental endotoxemia, alongside significantly reduced nitric-oxide synthase (NOS) I or protein kinase G (PKG) level or augmented NOS II or peroxynitrite level in the RVLM. We conclude that whereas HSP90 is ineffective, de novo synthesis of HSP70 in the RVLM may confer neuroprotection during fatal endotoxemia by preventing cardiovascular depression via enhancing the sympathoexcitatory NOS I/PKG signaling pathway and inhibiting the sympathoinhibitory NOS II/peroxynitrite cascade in the RVLM.

  20. The Predikin webserver: improved prediction of protein kinase peptide specificity using structural information

    PubMed Central

    Saunders, Neil F. W.

    2008-01-01

    The Predikin webserver allows users to predict substrates of protein kinases. The Predikin system is built from three components: a database of protein kinase substrates that links phosphorylation sites with specific protein kinase sequences; a perl module to analyse query protein kinases and a web interface through which users can submit protein kinases for analysis. The Predikin perl module provides methods to (i) locate protein kinase catalytic domains in a sequence, (ii) classify them by type or family, (iii) identify substrate-determining residues, (iv) generate weighted scoring matrices using three different methods, (v) extract putative phosphorylation sites in query substrate sequences and (vi) score phosphorylation sites for a given kinase, using optional filters. The web interface provides user-friendly access to each of these functions and allows users to obtain rapidly a set of predictions that they can export for further analysis. The server is available at http://predikin.biosci.uq.edu.au. PMID:18477637

  1. Multiple host kinases contribute to Akt activation during Salmonella infection.

    PubMed

    Roppenser, Bernhard; Kwon, Hyunwoo; Canadien, Veronica; Xu, Risheng; Devreotes, Peter N; Grinstein, Sergio; Brumell, John H

    2013-01-01

    SopB is a type 3 secreted effector with phosphatase activity that Salmonella employs to manipulate host cellular processes, allowing the bacteria to establish their intracellular niche. One important function of SopB is activation of the pro-survival kinase Akt/protein kinase B in the infected host cell. Here, we examine the mechanism of Akt activation by SopB during Salmonella infection. We show that SopB-mediated Akt activation is only partially sensitive to PI3-kinase inhibitors LY294002 and wortmannin in HeLa cells, suggesting that Class I PI3-kinases play only a minor role in this process. However, depletion of PI(3,4) P2/PI(3-5) P3 by expression of the phosphoinositide 3-phosphatase PTEN inhibits Akt activation during Salmonella invasion. Therefore, production of PI(3,4) P2/PI(3-5) P3 appears to be a necessary event for Akt activation by SopB and suggests that non-canonical kinases mediate production of these phosphoinositides during Salmonella infection. We report that Class II PI3-kinase beta isoform, IPMK and other kinases identified from a kinase screen all contribute to Akt activation during Salmonella infection. In addition, the kinases required for SopB-mediated activation of Akt vary depending on the type of infected host cell. Together, our data suggest that Salmonella has evolved to use a single effector, SopB, to manipulate a remarkably large repertoire of host kinases to activate Akt for the purpose of optimizing bacterial replication in its host.

  2. Visualizing autophosphorylation in histidine kinases.

    PubMed

    Casino, Patricia; Miguel-Romero, Laura; Marina, Alberto

    2014-01-01

    Reversible protein phosphorylation is the most widespread regulatory mechanism in signal transduction. Autophosphorylation in a dimeric sensor histidine kinase is the first step in two-component signalling, the predominant signal-transduction device in bacteria. Despite being the most abundant sensor kinases in nature, the molecular bases of the histidine kinase autophosphorylation mechanism are still unknown. Furthermore, it has been demonstrated that autophosphorylation can occur in two directions, cis (intrasubunit) or trans (intersubunit) within the dimeric histidine kinase. Here, we present the crystal structure of the complete catalytic machinery of a chimeric histidine kinase. The structure shows an asymmetric histidine kinase dimer where one subunit is caught performing the autophosphorylation reaction. A structure-guided functional analysis on HK853 and EnvZ, two prototypical cis- and trans-phosphorylating histidine kinases, has allowed us to decipher the catalytic mechanism of histidine kinase autophosphorylation, which seems to be common independently of the reaction directionality.

  3. Kinase Inhibitors from Marine Sponges

    PubMed Central

    Skropeta, Danielle; Pastro, Natalie; Zivanovic, Ana

    2011-01-01

    Protein kinases play a critical role in cell regulation and their deregulation is a contributing factor in an increasing list of diseases including cancer. Marine sponges have yielded over 70 novel compounds to date that exhibit significant inhibitory activity towards a range of protein kinases. These compounds, which belong to diverse structural classes, are reviewed herein, and ordered based upon the kinase that they inhibit. Relevant synthetic studies on the marine natural product kinase inhibitors have also been included. PMID:22073013

  4. Protein kinase CK2 in development and differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Götz, Claudia; Montenarh, Mathias

    2017-01-01

    Among the human kinomes, protein kinase CK2 (formerly termed casein kinase II) is considered to be essential, as it is implicated in the regulation of various cellular processes. Experiments with pharmacological inhibitors of the kinase activity of CK2 provide evidence that CK2 is essential for development and differentiation. Therefore, the present review addresses the role of CK2 during embryogenesis, neuronal, adipogenic, osteogenic and myogenic differentiation in established model cell lines, and in embryonic, neural and mesenchymal stem cells. CK2 kinase activity appears to be essential in the early stages of differentiation, as CK2 inhibition at early time points generally prevents differentiation. In addition, the present review reports on target proteins of CK2 in embryogenesis and differentiation. PMID:28357063

  5. Resolution of thylakoid polyphenol oxidase and a protein kinase

    SciTech Connect

    Race, H.L.; Davenport, J.W.; Hind, G.

    1995-12-31

    The predominant protein kinase activity in octylglucoside (OG) extracts of spinach thylakoids has been attributed to a 64-kDa protein, tp64. Recent work calls into question the relation between tp64 and protein kinase activity, which were fractionated apart using fluid phase IEF and hydroxylapatite chromatography. Hind et al. sequenced tp64 from the cDNA and showed it to be a polyphenol oxidase (PPO) homolog. Its transit peptide indicates a location for the mature protein within the thylakoid lumen, where there is presumably no ATP and where it is remote from the presumed kinase substrates: the stromally exposed regions of integral PS-II membrane proteins. Here the authors suggest that the kinase is a 64-kDa protein distinct from tp64.

  6. Mechanism of substrate specificity of phosphatidylinositol phosphate kinases

    PubMed Central

    Muftuoglu, Yagmur; Xue, Yi; Gao, Xiang; Wu, Dianqing; Ha, Ya

    2016-01-01

    The phosphatidylinositol phosphate kinase (PIPK) family of enzymes is primarily responsible for converting singly phosphorylated phosphatidylinositol derivatives to phosphatidylinositol bisphosphates. As such, these kinases are central to many signaling and membrane trafficking processes in the eukaryotic cell. The three types of phosphatidylinositol phosphate kinases are homologous in sequence but differ in catalytic activities and biological functions. Type I and type II kinases generate phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate from phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate and phosphatidylinositol 5-phosphate, respectively, whereas the type III kinase produces phosphatidylinositol 3,5-bisphosphate from phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate. Based on crystallographic analysis of the zebrafish type I kinase PIP5Kα, we identified a structural motif unique to the kinase family that serves to recognize the monophosphate on the substrate. Our data indicate that the complex pattern of substrate recognition and phosphorylation results from the interplay between the monophosphate binding site and the specificity loop: the specificity loop functions to recognize different orientations of the inositol ring, whereas residues flanking the phosphate binding Arg244 determine whether phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate is exclusively bound and phosphorylated at the 5-position. This work provides a thorough picture of how PIPKs achieve their exquisite substrate specificity. PMID:27439870

  7. Secondary kinase reactions catalyzed by yeast pyruvate kinase.

    PubMed

    Leblond, D J; Robinson, J L

    1976-06-07

    1. Yeast pyruvate kinase (EC 2.7.1.40) catalyzes, in addition to the primary, physiologically important reaction, three secondary kinase reactions, the ATP-dependent phosphorylations of fluoride (fluorokinase), hydroxylamine (hydroxylamine kinase) and glycolate (glycolate kinase). 2. These reactions are accelerated by fructose-1,6-bisphosphate, the allosteric activator of the primary reaction. Wth Mg2+ as the required divalent cation, none of these reactions are observed in the absence of fructose-biphosphate. With Mn2+, fructose-bisphosphate is required for the glycolate kinase reaction, but merely stimulates the other reactions. 3. The effect of other divalent cations and pH on three secondary kinase reactions was also examined. 4. Results are compared with those obtained from muscle pyruvate kinase and the implications of the results for the mechanism of the yeast enzyme are discussed.

  8. Wound Contraction is Attenuated by Fasudil Inhibition of Rho-Kinase

    PubMed Central

    Bond, Jennifer E.; Kokosis, George; Ren, Licheng; Selim, M. Angelica; Bergeron, Andrew; Levinson, Howard

    2011-01-01

    Background Dermal scarring and scar contracture result in restriction of movement. There are no effective drugs to prevent scarring. RhoA and Rho Associated kinase (ROCK) have emerged as regulators of fibrosis and contracture. Fasudil, a ROCK inhibitor, has been demonstrated to have anti-fibrotic effects in models of liver, renal and cardiac fibrosis. The role of fasudil in preventing dermal scarring and contractures has not been studied. We use a rat model of dermal wound healing to assess the effects of fasudil for preventing scarring. Methods Human scar tissue and surrounding normal skin were immunostained for RhoA and ROCK. Full-thickness wounds were created on Wistar-han rats and fasudil (30mg/kg/d) or saline were continuously delivered subcutaneously. Wound contraction was measured by gravitational planimetry. After 21d, tissue was harvested for Masson’s trichrome, H&E, Ki-67 and CD-31 staining. Fibroblast populated collagen lattices were utilized to assess the mechanistic effects of fasudil on contractility. Myofibroblast formation was assessed in the presence of fasudil. Results Human scar tissue in the remodeling phase of repair showed increased expression of RhoA and ROCK in scar tissue compared to surrounding normal tissue. Fasudil inhibited wound contraction as compared to controls. H&E and Masson’s were similar between groups. Fasudil did not alter angiogenesis or proliferation. Fasudil inhibited fibroblast contractility, and myofibroblast formation in vitro. Conclusions There is growing evidence that RhoA/ROCK pathway plays an important role in wound healing and scar contracture. We present data that inhibition of ROCK hinders fibroblast contractility and may be beneficial in preventing scar contracture. PMID:22030503

  9. Osteogenic differentiation regulated by Rho-kinase in periodontal ligament cells.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Tadashi; Ugawa, Yuki; Yamashiro, Keisuke; Shimoe, Masayuki; Tomikawa, Kazuya; Hongo, Shoichi; Kochi, Shinsuke; Ideguchi, Hidetaka; Maeda, Hiroshi; Takashiba, Shogo

    2014-01-01

    The periodontal ligament is a multifunctional soft connective tissue, which functions not only as a cushion supporting the teeth against occlusal force, but is also a source of osteogenic cells that can regenerate neighboring hard tissues. Periodontal ligament cells (PDL cells) contain heterogeneous cell populations, including osteogenic cell progenitors. However, the precise mechanism underlying the differentiation process remains elusive. Cell differentiation is regulated by the local biochemical and mechanical microenvironment that can modulate gene expression and cell morphology by altering actin cytoskeletal organization mediated by Rho-associated, coiled-coil containing protein kinase (ROCK). To determine its role in PDL cell differentiation, we examined the effects of ROCK on cytoskeletal changes and kinetics of gene expression during osteogenic differentiation. PDL cells were isolated from human periodontal ligament on extracted teeth and cultured in osteogenic medium for 14 days. Y-27632 was used for ROCK inhibition assay. Osteogenic phenotype was determined by monitoring alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity and calcium deposition by Alizarin Red staining. ROCK-induced cytoskeletal changes were examined by immunofluorescence analysis of F-actin and myosin light chain 2 (MLC2) expression. Real-time PCR was performed to examine the kinetics of osteogenic gene expression. F-actin and phospho-MLC2 were markedly induced during osteogenic differentiation, which coincided with upregulation of ALP activity and mineralization. Subsequent inhibition assay indicated that Y-27632 significantly inhibited F-actin and phospho-MLC2 expression in a dose-dependent manner with concomitant partial reversal of the PDL cell osteogenic phenotype. PCR array analysis of osteogenic gene expression indicated that extracellular matrix genes, such as fibronectin 1, collagen type I and III, and biglycan, were significantly downregulated by Y27632. These findings indicated crucial

  10. Cyclic nucleotide-gated channels, calmodulin, adenylyl cyclase, and calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II are required for late, but not early, long-term memory formation in the honeybee.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Yukihisa; Sandoz, Jean-Christophe; Devaud, Jean-Marc; Lormant, Flore; Mizunami, Makoto; Giurfa, Martin

    2014-04-16

    Memory is a dynamic process that allows encoding, storage, and retrieval of information acquired through individual experience. In the honeybee Apis mellifera, olfactory conditioning of the proboscis extension response (PER) has shown that besides short-term memory (STM) and mid-term memory (MTM), two phases of long-term memory (LTM) are formed upon multiple-trial conditioning: an early phase (e-LTM) which depends on translation from already available mRNA, and a late phase (l-LTM) which requires de novo transcription and translation. Here we combined olfactory PER conditioning and neuropharmacological inhibition and studied the involvement of the NO-cGMP pathway, and of specific molecules, such as cyclic nucleotide-gated channels (CNG), calmodulin (CaM), adenylyl cyclase (AC), and Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CaMKII), in the formation of olfactory LTM in bees. We show that in addition to NO-cGMP and cAMP-PKA, CNG channels, CaM, AC, and CaMKII also participate in the formation of a l-LTM (72-h post-conditioning) that is specific for the learned odor. Importantly, the same molecules are dispensable for olfactory learning and for the formation of both MTM (in the minute and hour range) and e-LTM (24-h post-conditioning), thus suggesting that the signaling pathways leading to l-LTM or e-LTM involve different molecular actors.

  11. Oncoprotein protein kinase

    DOEpatents

    Karin, Michael; Hibi, Masahiko; Lin, Anning

    1999-01-01

    An isolated polypeptide (JNK) characterized by having a molecular weight of 46 kD or 55 kD as determined by reducing SDS-PAGE, having serine and theonine kinase activity, phosphorylating the c-Jun N-terminal activation domain and polynucleotide sequences and method of detection of JNK are provided herein. JNK phosphorylates c-Jun N-terminal activation domain which affects gene expression from AP-1 sites.

  12. Oncoprotein protein kinase

    DOEpatents

    Karin, Michael; Hibi, Masahiko; Lin, Anning

    1997-01-01

    An isolated polypeptide (JNK) characterized by having a molecular weight of 46kD as determined by reducing SDS-PAGE, having serine and threonine kinase activity, phosphorylating the c-Jun N-terminal activation domain and polynucleotide sequences and method of detection of JNK are provided herein. JNK phosphorylates c-Jun N-terminal activation domain which affects gene expression from AP-1 sites.

  13. Oncoprotein protein kinase

    DOEpatents

    Karin, Michael; Lin, Anning

    1999-11-30

    An isolated polypeptide (JNK) characterized by having a molecular weight of 46 kD or 55 kD as determined by reducing SDS-PAGE, having serine and theonine kinase activity, phosphorylating the c-Jun N-terminal activation domain and polynucleotide sequences and method of detection of JNK are provided herein. JNK phosphorylates c-Jun N-terminal activation domain which affects gene expression from AP-1 sites.

  14. Oncoprotein protein kinase

    DOEpatents

    Karin, Michael; Hibi, Masahiko; Lin, Anning

    2004-03-16

    An isolated polypeptide (JNK) characterized by having a molecular weight of 46 kD as determined by reducing SDS-PAGE, having serine and threonine kinase activity, phosphorylating the c-Jun N-terminal activation domain and polynucleotide sequences and method of detection of JNK are provided herein. JNK phosphorylates c-Jun N-terminal activation domain which affects gene expression from AP-1 sites.

  15. Oncoprotein protein kinase

    DOEpatents

    Karin, Michael; Hibi, Masahiko; Lin, Anning; Davis, Roger; Derijard, Benoit

    2003-02-04

    An isolated polypeptide (JNK) characterized by having a molecular weight of 46kD as determined by reducing SDS-PAGE, having serine and threonine kinase activity, phosphorylating the c-Jun N-terminal activation domain and polynucleotide sequences and method of detection of JNK are provided herein. JNK phosphorylates c-Jun N-terminal activation domain which affects gene expression from AP-1 sites.

  16. Oncoprotein protein kinase

    DOEpatents

    Karin, Michael; Hibi, Masahiko; Lin, Anning; Davis, Roger; Derijard, Benoit

    2005-03-08

    An isolated polypeptide (JNK) characterized by having a molecular weight of 46 kD as determined by reducing SDS-PAGE, having serine and threonine kinase activity, phosphorylating the c-Jun N-terminal activation domain and polynucleotide sequences and method of detection of JNK are provided herein. JNK phosphorylates c-Jun N-terminal activation domain which affects gene expression from AP-1 sites.

  17. Oncoprotein protein kinase

    DOEpatents

    Karin, Michael; Hibi, Masahiko; Lin, Anning

    1997-01-01

    An isolated polypeptide (JNK) characterized by having a molecular weight of 46 kD as determined by reducing SDS-PAGE, having serine and threonine kinase activity, phosphorylating the c-Jun N-terminal activation domain and polynucleotide sequences and method of detection of JNK are provided herein. JNK phosphorylates c-Jun N-terminal activation domain which affects gene expression from AP-1 sites.

  18. Oncoprotein protein kinase

    DOEpatents

    Davis, Roger; Derijard, Benoit; Karin, Michael; Hibi, Masahiko; Lin, Anning

    2005-01-25

    An isolated polypeptide (JNK) characterized by having a molecular weight of 46 kD as determined by reducing SDS-PAGE, having serine and threonine kinase activity, phosphorylating the c-Jun N-terminal activation domain and polynucleotide sequences and method of detection of JNK are provided herein. JNK phosphorylates c-Jun N-terminal activation domain which affects gene expression from AP-1 sites.

  19. Oncoprotein protein kinase

    DOEpatents

    Karin, M.; Hibi, M.; Lin, A.

    1997-02-25

    An isolated polypeptide (JNK) characterized by having a molecular weight of 46 kD as determined by reducing SDS-PAGE is disclosed. The polypeptide has serine and threonine kinase activity, phosphorylating the c-Jun N-terminal activation domain and polynucleotide sequences. The method of detection of JNK is also provided. JNK phosphorylates c-Jun N-terminal activation domain which affects gene expression from AP-1 sites. 44 figs.

  20. Oncoprotein protein kinase

    DOEpatents

    Karin, Michael; Hibi, Masahiko; Lin, Anning

    1998-01-01

    An isolated polypeptide (JNK) characterized by having a molecular weight of 46 kD as determined by reducing SDS-PAGE, having serine and threonine kinase activity, phosphorylating the c-Jun N-terminal activation domain and polynucleotide sequences and method of detection of JNK are provided herein. JNK phosphorylates c-Jun N-terminal activation domain which affects gene expression from AP-1 sites.

  1. Identification and characterization of a mitogen-activated S6 kinase.

    PubMed Central

    Jenö, P; Ballou, L M; Novak-Hofer, I; Thomas, G

    1988-01-01

    Treatment of Swiss mouse 3T3 cells with epidermal growth factor, orthovanadate, or serum results in the activation of a kinase that phosphorylates protein S6 of the 40S ribosomal subunit in vitro. This kinase is eluted as a single peak of activity from either a Mono Q anion-exchange column at 0.34 M NaCl or a Mono S cation-exchange column at 0.20 M NaCl. Treatment of the peak fraction from the Mono S column with phosphatase 2A completely abolishes the activity of the enzyme. The kinase appears to be distinct from protein kinase C, cAMP-dependent protein kinase, and two protease-activated kinases, PAK II and H4P. The kinase has been purified to apparent homogeneity and migrates as a single band at Mr 70,000 in NaDodSO4/polyacrylamide gels. The kinase exhibits the ability to autophosphorylate, and this activity directly parallels S6 phosphorylation activity on the final step of purification. In vitro, the kinase incorporates up to 5 mol of phosphate into S6, and the tryptic phosphopeptide maps obtained are equivalent to those from S6 phosphorylated in vivo. Most important, treatment of the purified kinase with phosphatase 2A results in complete inactivation of the enzyme, arguing that the activity of the kinase is directly controlled by phosphorylation. Images PMID:3257566

  2. Cyclin-dependent kinases

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Summary Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) are protein kinases characterized by needing a separate subunit - a cyclin - that provides domains essential for enzymatic activity. CDKs play important roles in the control of cell division and modulate transcription in response to several extra- and intracellular cues. The evolutionary expansion of the CDK family in mammals led to the division of CDKs into three cell-cycle-related subfamilies (Cdk1, Cdk4 and Cdk5) and five transcriptional subfamilies (Cdk7, Cdk8, Cdk9, Cdk11 and Cdk20). Unlike the prototypical Cdc28 kinase of budding yeast, most of these CDKs bind one or a few cyclins, consistent with functional specialization during evolution. This review summarizes how, although CDKs are traditionally separated into cell-cycle or transcriptional CDKs, these activities are frequently combined in many family members. Not surprisingly, deregulation of this family of proteins is a hallmark of several diseases, including cancer, and drug-targeted inhibition of specific members has generated very encouraging results in clinical trials. PMID:25180339

  3. Metabolic oxidative stress elicited by the copper(II) complex [Cu(isaepy)2] triggers apoptosis in SH-SY5Y cells through the induction of the AMP-activated protein kinase/p38MAPK/p53 signalling axis: evidence for a combined use with 3-bromopyruvate in neuroblastoma treatment.

    PubMed

    Filomeni, Giuseppe; Cardaci, Simone; Da Costa Ferreira, Ana Maria; Rotilio, Giuseppe; Ciriolo, Maria Rosa

    2011-08-01

    We have demonstrated previously that the complex bis[(2-oxindol-3-ylimino)-2-(2-aminoethyl)pyridine-N,N']copper(II), named [Cu(isaepy)(2)], induces AMPK (AMP-activated protein kinase)-dependent/p53-mediated apoptosis in tumour cells by targeting mitochondria. In the present study, we found that p38(MAPK) (p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase) is the molecular link in the phosphorylation cascade connecting AMPK to p53. Transfection of SH-SY5Y cells with a dominant-negative mutant of AMPK resulted in a decrease in apoptosis and a significant reduction in phospho-active p38(MAPK) and p53. Similarly, reverse genetics of p38(MAPK) yielded a reduction in p53 and a decrease in the extent of apoptosis, confirming an exclusive hierarchy of activation that proceeds via AMPK/p38(MAPK)/p53. Fuel supplies counteracted [Cu(isaepy)(2)]-induced apoptosis and AMPK/p38(MAPK)/p53 activation, with glucose being the most effective, suggesting a role for energetic imbalance in [Cu(isaepy)(2)] toxicity. Co-administration of 3BrPA (3-bromopyruvate), a well-known inhibitor of glycolysis, and succinate dehydrogenase, enhanced apoptosis and AMPK/p38(MAPK)/p53 signalling pathway activation. Under these conditions, no toxic effect was observed in SOD (superoxide dismutase)-overexpressing SH-SY5Y cells or in PCNs (primary cortical neurons), which are, conversely, sensitized to the combined treatment with [Cu(isaepy)(2)] and 3BrPA only if grown in low-glucose medium or incubated with the glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase inhibitor dehydroepiandrosterone. Overall, the results suggest that NADPH deriving from the pentose phosphate pathway contributes to PCN resistance to [Cu(isaepy)(2)] toxicity and propose its employment in combination with 3BrPA as possible tool for cancer treatment.

  4. Protein Kinase Mitogen-activated Protein Kinase Kinase Kinase Kinase 4 (MAP4K4) Promotes Obesity-induced Hyperinsulinemia*

    PubMed Central

    Roth Flach, Rachel J.; Danai, Laura V.; DiStefano, Marina T.; Kelly, Mark; Menendez, Lorena Garcia; Jurczyk, Agata; Sharma, Rohit B.; Jung, Dae Young; Kim, Jong Hun; Kim, Jason K.; Bortell, Rita; Alonso, Laura C.; Czech, Michael P.

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies revealed a paradox whereby mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinase kinase 4 (Map4k4) acted as a negative regulator of insulin sensitivity in chronically obese mice, yet systemic deletion of Map4k4 did not improve glucose tolerance. Here, we report markedly reduced glucose-responsive plasma insulin and C-peptide levels in whole body Map4k4-depleted mice (M4K4 iKO) as well as an impaired first phase of insulin secretion from islets derived from M4K4 iKO mice ex vivo. After long-term high fat diet (HFD), M4K4 iKO mice pancreata also displayed reduced β cell mass, fewer proliferating β cells and reduced islet-specific gene mRNA expression compared with controls, although insulin content was normal. Interestingly, the reduced plasma insulin in M4K4 iKO mice exposed to chronic (16 weeks) HFD was not observed in response to acute HFD challenge or short term treatment with the insulin receptor antagonist S961. Furthermore, the improved insulin sensitivity in obese M4K4 iKO mice was abrogated by high exogenous insulin over the course of a euglycemic clamp study, indicating that hypoinsulinemia promotes insulin sensitivity in chronically obese M4K4 iKO mice. These results demonstrate that protein kinase Map4k4 drives obesity-induced hyperinsulinemia and insulin resistance in part by promoting insulin secretion from β cells in mice. PMID:27226575

  5. Redox Regulation of Protein Kinases

    PubMed Central

    Truong, Thu H.; Carroll, Kate S.

    2015-01-01

    Protein kinases represent one of the largest families of genes found in eukaryotes. Kinases mediate distinct cellular processes ranging from proliferation, differentiation, survival, and apoptosis. Ligand-mediated activation of receptor kinases can lead to the production of endogenous H2O2 by membrane-bound NADPH oxidases. In turn, H2O2 can be utilized as a secondary messenger in signal transduction pathways. This review presents an overview of the molecular mechanisms involved in redox regulation of protein kinases and its effects on signaling cascades. In the first half, we will focus primarily on receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs), whereas the latter will concentrate on downstream non-receptor kinases involved in relaying stimulant response. Select examples from the literature are used to highlight the functional role of H2O2 regarding kinase activity, as well as the components involved in H2O2 production and regulation during cellular signaling. In addition, studies demonstrating direct modulation of protein kinases by H2O2 through cysteine oxidation will be emphasized. Identification of these redox-sensitive residues may help uncover signaling mechanisms conserved within kinase subfamilies. In some cases, these residues can even be exploited as targets for the development of new therapeutics. Continued efforts in this field will further basic understanding of kinase redox regulation, and delineate the mechanisms involved in physiologic and pathological H2O2 responses. PMID:23639002

  6. A high-throughput radiometric kinase assay

    PubMed Central

    Duong-Ly, Krisna C.; Peterson, Jeffrey R.

    2016-01-01

    Aberrant kinase signaling has been implicated in a number of diseases. While kinases have become attractive drug targets, only a small fraction of human protein kinases have validated inhibitors. Screening libraries of compounds against a kinase or kinases of interest is routinely performed during kinase inhibitor development to identify promising scaffolds for a particular target and to identify kinase targets for compounds of interest. Screening of more focused compound libraries may also be conducted in the later stages of inhibitor development to improve potency and optimize selectivity. The dot blot kinase assay is a robust, high-throughput kinase assay that can be used to screen a number of small molecule compounds against one kinase of interest or several kinases. Here, a protocol for a dot blot kinase assay used for measuring insulin receptor kinase activity is presented. This protocol can be readily adapted for use with other protein kinases. PMID:26501904

  7. Fission yeast Cdk7 controls gene expression through both its CAK and C-terminal domain kinase activities.

    PubMed

    Devos, Maxime; Mommaerts, Elise; Migeot, Valerie; van Bakel, Harm; Hermand, Damien

    2015-05-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinase (Cdk) activation and RNA polymerase II transcription are linked by the Cdk7 kinase, which phosphorylates Cdks as a trimeric Cdk-activating kinase (CAK) complex, and serine 5 within the polymerase II (Pol II) C-terminal domain (CTD) as transcription factor TFIIH-bound CAK. However, the physiological importance of integrating these processes is not understood. Besides the Cdk7 ortholog Mcs6, fission yeast possesses a second CAK, Csk1. The two enzymes have been proposed to act redundantly to activate Cdc2. Using an improved analogue-sensitive Mcs6-as kinase, we show that Csk1 is not a relevant CAK for Cdc2. Further analyses revealed that Csk1 lacks a 20-amino-acid sequence required for its budding yeast counterpart, Cak1, to bind Cdc2. Transcriptome profiling of the Mcs6-as mutant in the presence or absence of the budding yeast Cak1 kinase, in order to uncouple the CTD kinase and CAK activities of Mcs6, revealed an unanticipated role of the CAK branch in the transcriptional control of the cluster of genes implicated in ribosome biogenesis and cell growth. The analysis of a Cdc2 CAK site mutant confirmed these data. Our data show that the Cdk7 kinase modulates transcription through its well-described RNA Pol II CTD kinase activity and also through the Cdc2-activating kinase activity.

  8. Fission Yeast Cdk7 Controls Gene Expression through both Its CAK and C-Terminal Domain Kinase Activities

    PubMed Central

    Devos, Maxime; Mommaerts, Elise; Migeot, Valerie; van Bakel, Harm

    2015-01-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinase (Cdk) activation and RNA polymerase II transcription are linked by the Cdk7 kinase, which phosphorylates Cdks as a trimeric Cdk-activating kinase (CAK) complex, and serine 5 within the polymerase II (Pol II) C-terminal domain (CTD) as transcription factor TFIIH-bound CAK. However, the physiological importance of integrating these processes is not understood. Besides the Cdk7 ortholog Mcs6, fission yeast possesses a second CAK, Csk1. The two enzymes have been proposed to act redundantly to activate Cdc2. Using an improved analogue-sensitive Mcs6-as kinase, we show that Csk1 is not a relevant CAK for Cdc2. Further analyses revealed that Csk1 lacks a 20-amino-acid sequence required for its budding yeast counterpart, Cak1, to bind Cdc2. Transcriptome profiling of the Mcs6-as mutant in the presence or absence of the budding yeast Cak1 kinase, in order to uncouple the CTD kinase and CAK activities of Mcs6, revealed an unanticipated role of the CAK branch in the transcriptional control of the cluster of genes implicated in ribosome biogenesis and cell growth. The analysis of a Cdc2 CAK site mutant confirmed these data. Our data show that the Cdk7 kinase modulates transcription through its well-described RNA Pol II CTD kinase activity and also through the Cdc2-activating kinase activity. PMID:25691663

  9. Aurora Kinases Throughout Plant Development.

    PubMed

    Weimer, Annika K; Demidov, Dmitri; Lermontova, Inna; Beeckman, Tom; Van Damme, Daniël

    2016-01-01

    Aurora kinases are evolutionarily conserved key mitotic determinants in all eukaryotes. Yeasts contain a single Aurora kinase, whereas multicellular eukaryotes have at least two functionally diverged members. The involvement of Aurora kinases in human cancers has provided an in-depth mechanistic understanding of their roles throughout cell division in animal and yeast models. By contrast, understanding Aurora kinase function in plants is only starting to emerge. Nevertheless, genetic, cell biological, and biochemical approaches have revealed functional diversification between the plant Aurora kinases and suggest a role in formative (asymmetric) divisions, chromatin modification, and genome stability. This review provides an overview of the accumulated knowledge on the function of plant Aurora kinases as well as some major challenges for the future.

  10. Cucurbitacin I elicits the formation of actin/phospho-myosin II co-aggregates by stimulation of the RhoA/ROCK pathway and inhibition of LIM-kinase.

    PubMed

    Sari-Hassoun, Meryem; Clement, Marie-Jeanne; Hamdi, Imane; Bollot, Guillaume; Bauvais, Cyril; Joshi, Vandana; Toma, Flavio; Burgo, Andrea; Cailleret, Michel; Rosales-Hernández, Martha Cecilia; Macias Pérez, Martha Edith; Chabane-Sari, Daoudi; Curmi, Patrick A

    2016-02-15

    Cucurbitacins are cytotoxic triterpenoid sterols isolated from plants. One of their earliest cellular effect is the aggregation of actin associated with blockage of cell migration and division that eventually lead to apoptosis. We unravel here that cucurbitacin I actually induces the co-aggregation of actin with phospho-myosin II. This co-aggregation most probably results from the stimulation of the Rho/ROCK pathway and the direct inhibition of the LIMKinase. We further provide data that suggest that the formation of these co-aggregates is independent of a putative pro-oxidant status of cucurbitacin I. The results help to understand the impact of cucurbitacins on signal transduction and actin dynamics and open novel perspectives to use it as drug candidates for cancer research.

  11. Purification and characterization of a cytosolic insulin-stimulated serine kinase from rat liver.

    PubMed

    Wolfe, L; Bradford, A P; Klarlund, J K; Czech, M P

    1992-05-15

    A cytosolic insulin-sensitive serine kinase has been purified to apparent homogeneity in parallel from livers of control or acutely insulin-treated rats. The kinase is labile and requires rapid purification for stability. The kinase migrates as a band of apparent Mr = 90,000 on denaturing gels and elutes as a monomer on Superose 12 gel filtration. After sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and renaturation, the 90-kDa band presumed to be the kinase shows kinase activity toward myelin basic protein in situ. Substrates of the kinase include Leu-Arg-Arg-Ala-Ser-Leu-Gly (Kemptide), ribosomal protein S6, S6 peptide, a proline-rich peptide substrate, microtubule-associated protein 2, and myelin basic protein. The kinase also phosphorylates histones H1 and H2B, but does not autophosphorylate to a significant stoichiometry. The activity of the kinase is inhibited by fluoride, glycerophosphate, p-nitrophenyl phosphate, p-nitrophenol, heparin, quercetin, poly-L-lysine, and potassium phosphate, but is unaffected by calcium, cAMP, spermine, protein kinase inhibitor peptide, phorbol myristate acetate, calcium plus phosphatidylserine, or vanadate. The kinase will utilize magnesium (10 mM) as well as manganese (1 mM) as a cofactor for maximal phosphotransferase activity. The kinase is not detected by immunoblotting with antibodies directed against protein kinase C or type II S6 kinase. Taken together, these properties distinguish this kinase from other insulin-sensitive kinases that have been described previously. The purified kinase from livers of insulin-treated rats shows a 5-20-fold higher specific activity compared to enzyme prepared from control rats, suggesting a covalent modification as the mechanism of activation. Incubation of purified, insulin-stimulated kinase with purified phosphatase 2A leads to deactivation of the kinase activity, and the phosphatase inhibitor nitrophenyl phosphate blocks this deactivation. The insulin-activated kinase fails to

  12. Specific interactions among transmembrane 4 superfamily (TM4SF) proteins and phosphoinositide 4-kinase.

    PubMed Central

    Yauch, R L; Hemler, M E

    2000-01-01

    In earlier work we established that phosphoinositide 4-kinase (PI 4-kinase) may associate with transmembrane 4 superfamily (TM4SF, tetraspanin) proteins, but critical specificity issues were not addressed. Here we demonstrate that at least five different TM4SF proteins (CD9, CD63, CD81, CD151 and A15/TALLA1) can associate with a similar or identical 55 kDa type II PI 4-kinase. These associations were specific, since we found no evidence for other phosphoinositide kinases (e.g. phosphoinositide 3-kinase and phosphoinositide-4-phosphate 5-kinase) associating with TM4SF proteins, and many other TM4SF proteins (including CD82 and CD53) did not associate with PI 4-kinase. CD63-PI 4-kinase complexes were almost entirely intracellular, and thus are distinct from other TM4SF-PI 4-kinase complexes (e.g. involving CD9), which are largely located in the plasma membrane. These results suggest that a specific subset of TM4SF proteins may recruit PI 4-kinase to specific membrane locations, and thereby influence phosphoinositide-dependent signalling. PMID:11042117

  13. Commitment to the CD4 lineage mediated by extracellular signal-related kinase mitogen-activated protein kinase and lck signaling.

    PubMed

    Sharp, L L; Hedrick, S M

    1999-12-15

    The development of T cells results in a concordance between the specificity of the TCR for MHC class I and class II molecules and the expression of CD8 and CD4 coreceptors. Based on analogy to simple metazoan models of organ development and lineage commitment, we sought to determine whether extracellular signal-related kinase (Erk) mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase pathway signaling acts as an inductive signal for the CD4 lineage. Here, we show that, by altering the intracellular signaling involving the Erk/MAP kinase pathway, T cells with specificity for MHC class I can be diverted to express CD4, and, conversely, T cells with specificity for MHC class II can be diverted to express CD8. Furthermore, we find that activation of the src-family tyrosine kinase, p56lck is an upstream mediator of lineage commitment. These results suggest a simple mechanism for lineage commitment in T cell development.

  14. Low-dose combination of Rho kinase and L-type Ca(2+) channel antagonists for selective inhibition of depolarization-induced sustained arterial contraction.

    PubMed

    Porras-González, Cristina; González-Rodríguez, Patricia; Calderón-Sánchez, Eva; López-Barneo, José; Ureña, Juan

    2014-06-05

    L-type Ca(2+) channels (LTCCs) are involved in the maintenance of tonic arterial contractions and regulate the RhoA/Rho-associated kinase (ROCK) sensitization cascade. We have tested effects of individual and combined low concentrations of LTCCs and ROCK inhibitors to produce arterial relaxation without the adverse side effects of LTCCs antagonists. We have also studied whether this pharmacological strategy alters Ca(2+)-dependent electrical properties of isolated arterial and cardiac myocytes as well as cardiac contractility. Rat basilar, human carotid and coronary arterial rings were mounted on a small-vessel myograph to measure isometric tension and cardiac contractility was measured in Langendorff-perfused rat heart. Simultaneous cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration and arterial diameter were measured in intact pressurized arteries loaded with Fura-2. Patch-clamp techniques were used to measure electrical properties in isolated cardiac and arterial myocytes. Low concentrations of LTCCs and ROCK inhibitors reduced the tonic component of moderate depolarization-evoked contraction, leaving the phasic component practically unaltered. This selective vasorelaxant effect was more marked when the LTCCs and ROCK inhibitors were applied together. In the concentration range used (nM), Ca(2+) currents in arterial myocytes, cardiac action potentials and heart contractility were unaffected by this pharmacological approach. In conclusion, low doses of LTCCs and ROCK inhibitors could be used to selectively relax precontracted arteries in pathologic conditions such as hypertension, and cerebral or coronary spasms with minor side effects on physiological contractile properties of vascular and cardiac myocytes.

  15. Rho kinase inhibitor Y-27632 prolongs the life span of adult human keratinocytes, enhances skin equivalent development, and facilitates lentiviral transduction.

    PubMed

    van den Bogaard, Ellen H; Rodijk-Olthuis, Diana; Jansen, Patrick A M; van Vlijmen-Willems, Ivonne M J J; van Erp, Piet E; Joosten, Irma; Zeeuwen, Patrick L J M; Schalkwijk, Joost

    2012-09-01

    The use of tissue-engineered human skin equivalents (HSE) for fundamental research and industrial application requires the expansion of keratinocytes from a limited number of skin biopsies donated by adult healthy volunteers or patients. A pharmacological inhibitor of Rho-associated protein kinases, Y-27632, was recently reported to immortalize neonatal human foreskin keratinocytes. Here, we investigated the potential use of Y-27632 to expand human adult keratinocytes and evaluated its effects on HSE development and in vitro gene delivery assays. Y-27632 was found to significantly increase the life span of human adult keratinocytes (up to five to eight passages). The epidermal morphology of HSEs generated from high-passage, Y-27632-treated keratinocytes resembled the native epidermis and was improved by supplementing Y-27632 during the submerged phase of HSE development. In addition, Y-27632-treated keratinocytes responded normally to inflammatory stimuli, and could be used to generate HSEs with a psoriatic phenotype, upon stimulation with relevant cytokines. Furthermore, Y-27632 significantly enhanced both lentiviral transduction efficiency of primary adult keratinocytes and epidermal morphology of HSEs generated thereof. Our study indicates that Y-27632 is a potentially powerful tool that is used for a variety of applications of adult human keratinocytes.

  16. Phosphatidylinositol 3'-kinase associates with an insulin receptor substrate-1 serine kinase distinct from its intrinsic serine kinase.

    PubMed Central

    Cengel, K A; Kason, R E; Freund, G G

    1998-01-01

    Serine phosphorylation of insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS-1) has been proposed as a counter-regulatory mechanism in insulin and cytokine signalling. Here we report that IRS-1 is phosphorylated by a wortmannin insensitive phosphatidylinositol 3'-kinase (PI 3-kinase)-associated serine kinase (PAS kinase) distinct from PI 3-kinase serine kinase. We found that PI 3-kinase immune complexes contain 5-fold more wortmannin-insensitive serine kinase activity than SH2-containing protein tyrosine phosphatase-2 (SHP2) and IRS-1 immune complexes. Affinity chromatography of cell lysates with a glutathione S-transferase fusion protein for the p85 subunit of PI 3-kinase showed that PAS kinase associated with the p85 subunit of PI 3-kinase. This interaction required unoccupied SH2 domain(s) but did not require the PI 3-kinase p110 subunit binding domain. In terms of function, PAS kinase phosphorylated IRS-1 and, after insulin stimulation, PAS kinase phosphorylated IRS-1 in PI 3-kinase-IRS-1 complexes. Phosphopeptide mapping showed that insulin-dependent in vivo sites of IRS-1 serine phosphorylation were comparable to those of PAS kinase phosphorylated IRS-1. More importantly, PAS kinase-dependent phosphorylation of IRS-1 reduced by 4-fold the ability of IRS-1 to act as an insulin receptor substrate. Taken together, these findings indicate that: (a) PAS kinase is distinct from the intrinsic serine kinase activity of PI 3-kinase, (b) PAS kinase associates with the p85 subunit of PI 3-kinase through SH2 domain interactions, and (c) PAS kinase is an IRS-1 serine kinase that can reduce the ability of IRS-1 to serve as an insulin receptor substrate. PMID:9761740

  17. Understanding the Polo Kinase machine.

    PubMed

    Archambault, V; Lépine, G; Kachaner, D

    2015-09-10

    The Polo Kinase is a central regulator of cell division required for several events of mitosis and cytokinesis. In addition to a kinase domain (KD), Polo-like kinases (Plks) comprise a Polo-Box domain (PBD), which mediates protein interactions with targets and regulators of Plks. In all organisms that contain Plks, one Plk family member fulfills several essential functions in the regulation of cell division, and here we refer to this conserved protein as Polo Kinase (Plk1 in humans). The PBD and the KD are capable of both cooperation and mutual inhibition in their functions. Crystal structures of the PBD, the KD and, recently, a PBD-KD complex have helped understanding the inner workings of the Polo Kinase. In parallel, an impressive array of molecular mechanisms has been found to mediate the regulation of the protein. Moreover, the targeting of Polo Kinase in the development of anti-cancer drugs has yielded several molecules with which to chemically modulate Polo Kinase to study its biological functions. Here we review our current understanding of the protein function and regulation of Polo Kinase as a fascinating molecular device in control of cell division.

  18. Phase II Evaluation of Dalantercept, a Soluble Recombinant Activin Receptor-Like Kinase 1 (ALK1) Receptor Fusion Protein, for the Treatment of Recurrent or Persistent Endometrial Cancer: An NRG Oncology/Gynecologic Oncology Group Study 0229N

    PubMed Central

    Makker, Vicky; Filiaci, Virginia L.; Chen, Lee-may; Darus, Christopher J.; Kendrick, James E.; Sutton, Gregory; Moxley, Katherine; Aghajanian, Carol

    2015-01-01

    Objective This two-stage phase II study assessed activity of single agent dalantercept in patients with recurrent/persistent endometrial carcinoma (EMC). Methods Eligible patients had persistent/recurrent EMC after 1–2 prior cytotoxic regimens, measurable disease (RECIST 1.1), and GOG performance ≤ 2. Dalantercept 1.2 mg/kg subcutaneous was administered once every 3 weeks until disease progression (PD)/development of prohibitory toxicity. Primary objectives were to estimate the proportion of patients with persistent/recurrent EMC, who survive progression-free without receiving non-protocol therapy (TPFS) for at least 6 months and to estimate the proportion having objective tumor response. Results All 28 enrolled patients were eligible and evaluable. Median age: 62 years. Most common histologies: 32% Grade 1/2 endometrioid and 54% serous tumors. Prior treatment: 1 or 2 regimens in 82% and 18% of patients, respectively. Eighteen patients received prior radiation therapy. Patients received 1–12 cycles of dalantercept, and 46% of patients received ≤2 cycles. The most common adverse events (AE) were fatigue, anemia, constipation and peripheral edema. Grade 3/4 AEs occurred in 39% and 4% of patients. One grade 5 gastric hemorrhage in a patient with a history of radiation fibrosis/small bowel obstruction was deemed possibly dalantercept-related. All patients are off study: 86% for PD. No ORs were observed; 57% had stable disease and 11% had TPFS ≥ 6 mos. Median progression-free and overall survival: 2.1 months (90% CI: 1.4–3.2) and 14.5 months (90% CI: 7.0–17.5), respectively. Conclusions Dalantercept has insufficient single agent activity in recurrent EMC to warrant further investigation at this dose level and schedule. PMID:25888978

  19. Phosphoryl transfer is not rate-limiting for the ROCK I-catalyzed kinase reaction.

    PubMed

    Futer, Olga; Saadat, Ahmad R; Doran, John D; Raybuck, Scott A; Pazhanisamy, S

    2006-06-27

    Rho-associated coiled-coil kinase, ROCK, is implicated in Rho-mediated cell adhesion and smooth muscle contraction. Animal models suggest that the inhibition of ROCK can ameliorate conditions, such as vasospasm, hypertension, and inflammation. As part of our effort to design novel inhibitors of ROCK, we investigated the kinetic mechanism of ROCK I. Steady-state bisubstrate kinetics, inhibition kinetics, isotope partition analysis, viscosity effects, and presteady-state kinetics were used to explore the kinetic mechanism. Plots of reciprocals of initial rates obtained in the presence of nonhydrolyzable ATP analogues and the small molecule inhibitor of ROCK, Y-27632, against the reciprocals of the peptide concentrations yielded parallel lines (uncompetitive pattern). This pattern is indicative of an ordered binding mechanism, with the peptide adding first. The staurosporine analogue K252a, however, gave a noncompetitive pattern. When a pulse of (33)P-gamma-ATP mixed with ROCK was chased with excess unlabeled ATP and peptide, 0.66 enzyme equivalent of (33)P-phosphate was incorporated into the product in the first turnover. The presence of ATPase activity coupled with the isotope partition data is a clear evidence for the existence of a viable [E-ATP] complex in the kinase reaction and implicates a random binding mechanism. The k(cat)/K(m) parameters were fully sensitive to viscosity (viscosity effects of 1.4 +/- 0.2 and 0.9 +/- 0.3 for ATP and peptide 5, respectively), and therefore, the barriers to dissociation of either substrate are higher than the barrier for the phosphoryl transfer step. As a consequence, not all the binding steps are at fast equilibrium. The observation of a burst in presteady-state kinetics (k(b) = 10.2 +/- 2.1 s(-)(1)) and the viscosity effect on k(cat) of 1.3 +/- 0.2 characterize the phosphoryl transfer step to be fast and the release of product and/or the enzyme isomerization step accompanying it as rate-limiting at V(max) conditions. From

  20. P21 activated kinases

    PubMed Central

    Rane, Chetan K; Minden, Audrey

    2014-01-01

    The p21 activated kinases (Paks) are well known effector proteins for the Rho GTPases Cdc42 and Rac. The Paks contain 6 members, which fall into 2 families of proteins. The first family consists of Paks 1, 2, and 3, and the second consists of Paks 4, 5, and 6. While some of the Paks are ubiquitously expressed, others have more restrictive tissue specificity. All of them are found in the nervous system. Studies using cell culture, transgenic mice, and knockout mice, have revealed important roles for the Paks in cytoskeletal organization and in many aspects of cell growth and development. This review discusses the basic structures of the Paks, and their roles in cell growth, development, and in cancer. PMID:24658305

  1. Integrin-linked kinase: a new member of the kinases involved in hypertensive end-organ damage?

    PubMed

    Obama, Takashi; Eguchi, Satoru

    2014-07-01

    Integrin-linked kinase predominantly localizes at focal adhesions to regulate actin cytoskeletal dynamics, including cell migration and matrix remodelling. Although recent studies have suggested both physiological and pathophysiological roles of integrin-linked kinase in the cardiovascular and renal system, its involvement in hypertensive organ dysfunctions, such as those that occur in kidney, has not been investigated. In the present issue of Clinical Science, Alique and co-workers have demonstrated that angiotensin II-induced renal inflammatory responses were attenuated in mice with conditional deficiency of integrin-linked kinase, which were associated with suppression of nuclear factor κB activation and reactive oxygen species generation but not hypertension. The significance, potential mechanisms and future direction are presented and discussed in this Commentary.

  2. ERK kinases modulate the activation of PI3 kinase related kinases (PIKKs) in DNA damage response.

    PubMed

    Lin, Xiaozeng; Yan, Judy; Tang, Damu

    2013-12-01

    DNA damage response (DDR) is the critical surveillance mechanism in maintaining genome integrity. The mechanism activates checkpoints to prevent cell cycle progression in the presence of DNA lesions, and mediates lesion repair. DDR is coordinated by three apical PI3 kinase related kinases (PIKKs), including ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM), ATM- and Rad3-related (ATR), and DNA-PKcs (the catalytic subunit of the DNA dependent protein kinase). These kinases are activated in response to specific DNA damage or lesions, resulting in checkpoint activation and DNA lesion repair. While it is clear that the pathways of ATM, ATR, and DNA-PK are the core components of DDR, there is accumulating evidence revealing the involvement of other cellular pathways in regulating DDR; this is in line with the concept that in addition to being a nuclear event DDR is also a cellular process. One of these pathways is the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) MAPK (mitogen-activated protein kinase) pathway. ERK is a converging point of multiple signal transduction pathways involved in cell proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis. Adding to this list of pathways is the recent development of ERK in DDR. The ERK kinases (ERK1 and ERK2) contribute to the proper execution of DDR in terms of checkpoint activation and the repair of DNA lesions. This review summarizes the contributions of ERK to DDR with emphasis on the relationship of ERK kinases with the activation of ATM, ATR, and DNA-PKcs.

  3. Cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase activity in Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed Central

    Ulloa, R M; Mesri, E; Esteva, M; Torres, H N; Téllez-Iñón, M T

    1988-01-01

    A cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase activity from epimastigote forms of Trypanosoma cruzi was characterized. Cytosolic extracts were chromatographed on DEAE-cellulose columns, giving two peaks of kinase activity, which were eluted at 0.15 M- and 0.32 M-NaCl respectively. The second activity peak was stimulated by nanomolar concentrations of cyclic AMP. In addition, a cyclic AMP-binding protein co-eluted with the second kinase activity peak. Cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase activity was further purified by gel filtration, affinity chromatography on histone-agarose and cyclic AMP-agarose, as well as by chromatography on CM-Sephadex. The enzyme ('holoenzyme') could be partially dissociated into two different components: 'catalytic' and 'regulatory'. The 'regulatory' component had specific binding for cyclic AMP, and it inhibited phosphotransferase activity of the homologous 'catalytic component' or of the 'catalytic subunit' from bovine heart. Cyclic AMP reversed these inhibitions. A 'holoenzyme preparation' was phosphorylated in the absence of exogenous phosphate acceptor and analysed by polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis. A 56 kDa band was phosphorylated. The same preparation was analysed by Western blotting, by using polyclonal antibodies to the regulatory subunits of protein kinases type I or II. Both antibodies reacted with the 56 kDa band. Images Fig. 7. Fig. 8. PMID:2848508

  4. KLIFS: a structural kinase-ligand interaction database

    PubMed Central

    Kooistra, Albert J.; Kanev, Georgi K.; van Linden, Oscar P.J.; Leurs, Rob; de Esch, Iwan J.P.; de Graaf, Chris

    2016-01-01

    Protein kinases play a crucial role in cell signaling and are important drug targets in several therapeutic areas. The KLIFS database contains detailed structural kinase-ligand interaction information derived from all (>2900) structures of catalytic domains of human and mouse protein kinases deposited in the Protein Data Bank in order to provide insights into the structural determinants of kinase-ligand binding and selectivity. The kinase structures have been processed in a consistent manner by systematically analyzing the structural features and molecular interaction fingerprints (IFPs) of a predefined set of 85 binding site residues with bound ligands. KLIFS has been completely rebuilt and extended (>65% more structures) since its first release as a data set, including: novel automated annotation methods for (i) the assessment of ligand-targeted subpockets and the analysis of (ii) DFG and (iii) αC-helix conformations; improved and automated protocols for (iv) the generation of sequence/structure alignments, (v) the curation of ligand atom and bond typing for accurate IFP analysis and (vi) weekly database updates. KLIFS is now accessible via a website (http://klifs.vu-compmedchem.nl) that provides a comprehensive visual presentation of different types of chemical, biological and structural chemogenomics data, and allows the user to easily access, compare, search and download the data. PMID:26496949

  5. Regulation of RNA polymerase II activity by CTD phosphorylation and cell cycle control.

    PubMed

    Oelgeschläger, Thomas

    2002-02-01

    The carboxyl-terminal domain (CTD) of the largest subunit of mammalian RNA polymerase II (RNAP II) consists of 52 repeats of a consensus heptapeptide and is subject to phosphorylation and dephosphorylation events during each round of transcription. RNAP II activity is regulated during the cell cycle and cell cycle-dependend changes in RNAP II activity correlate well with CTD phosphorylation. In addition, global changes in the CTD phosphorylation status are observed in response to mitogenic or cytostatic signals such as growth factors, mitogens and DNA-damaging agents. Several CTD kinases are members of the cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) superfamily and associate with transcription initiation complexes. Other CTD kinases implicated in cell cycle regulation include the mitogen-activated protein kinases ERK-1/2 and the c-Abl tyrosine kinase. These observations suggest that reversible RNAP II CTD phosphorylation may play a key role in linking cell cycle regulatory events to coordinated changes in transcription.

  6. Two Forms of d-Glycerate Kinase in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Ornston, M. K.; Ornston, L. N.

    1969-01-01

    Escherichia coli K-12 synthesizes two chromatographically distinct forms of glycerate kinase which differ both in their thermolability and in the dependence of their activity upon pH. One enzymatic form, GK I, is found in cells grown with glycerate, glucarate, or glycolate. Of these compounds, glycolate is the only carbon source that elicits the synthesis of the second enzymatic form, GK II. PMID:4887503

  7. Purification of catalytic domain of rat spleen p72syk kinase and its phosphorylation and activation by protein kinase C.

    PubMed Central

    Borowski, P; Heiland, M; Kornetzky, L; Medem, S; Laufs, R

    1998-01-01

    The catalytic domain of p72(syk) kinase (CDp72(syk)) was purified from a 30000 g particulate fraction of rat spleen. The purification procedure employed sequential chromatography on columns of DEAE-Sephacel and Superdex-200, and elution from HA-Ultrogel by chloride. The analysis of the final CDp72(syk) preparation by SDS/PAGE revealed a major silver-stained 40 kDa protein. The kinase was identified by covalent modification of its ATP-binding site with [14C]5'-fluorosulphonylbenzoyladenosine and by immunoblotting with a polyclonal antibody against the 'linker' region of p72(syk). By using poly(Glu4, Tyr1) as a substrate, the specific activity of the enzyme was determined as 18.5 nmol Pi/min per mg. Casein, histones H1 and H2B and myelin basic protein were efficiently phosphorylated by CDp72(syk). The kinase exhibited a limited ability to phosphorylate random polymers containing tyrosine residues. CDp72(syk) autophosphorylation activity was associated with an activation of the kinase towards exogenous substrates. The extent of activation was dependent on the substrates added. CDp72(syk) was phosphorylated by protein kinase C (PKC) on serine and threonine residues. With a newly developed assay method, we demonstrated that the PKC-mediated phosphorylation had a strong activating effect on the tyrosine kinase activity of CDp72(syk). Studies extended to conventional PKC isoforms revealed an isoform-dependent manner (alpha > betaI = betaII > gamma) of CDp72(syk) phosphorylation. The different phosphorylation efficiencies of the PKC isoforms closely correlated with the ability to enhance the tyrosine kinase activity. PMID:9531509

  8. A chemically defined culture medium containing Rho kinase inhibitor Y-27632 for the fabrication of stratified squamous epithelial cell grafts.

    PubMed

    Aslanova, Afag; Takagi, Ryo; Yamato, Masayuki; Okano, Teruo; Yamamoto, Masakazu

    2015-05-01

    With the development of a culture method for stratified squamous epithelial cells, tissue-engineered epithelial cell sheets have been successfully applied as clinical cell grafts. However, the implementation of these cell sheets without the use of any animal-derived materials is highly desirable. In this study, Rho-associated protein kinase inhibitor Y-27632 was used to develop a chemically defined culture medium for the fabrication of stratified epithelial cell grafts consisting of human epidermal and oral keratinocytes, and the proliferation activity, cell morphology, and gene expressions of the keratinocytes were analyzed. The results of a colorimetric assay indicated that Y-27632 significantly promoted the proliferation of the keratinocytes in culture media both with and without fetal bovine serum (FBS), although there were no indications of Y-27632 efficacy on cell morphology and stratification of the keratinocytes in culture medium without any animal-derived materials. The results of quantitative RT-PCR revealed that gene expressions correlated with cell adhesion, cell-cell junction, proliferation markers, and stem/progenitor markers in cultured keratinocytes were not strongly affected by the addition of Y-27632 to the culture medium. Moreover, gene expressions of differentiation markers in stratified keratinocytes cultured in medium without FBS were nearly identical to those of keratinocytes co-cultured with 3T3 feeder cells. Interestingly, the expressions of differentiation markers in cultured stratified keratinocytes were suppressed by FBS, whereas they were reconstructed by either co-culture of a 3T3 feeder layer or addition of Y-27632 into the culture medium containing FBS. These findings indicate that Y-27632 is a useful supplement for the development of a chemically defined culture medium for fabrication of stratified epithelial cell grafts for clinical applications for the purpose of developing the culture medium with a lower risk of pathogen

  9. Endothelial Bmx tyrosine kinase activity is essential for myocardial hypertrophy and remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Holopainen, Tanja; Räsänen, Markus; Anisimov, Andrey; Tuomainen, Tomi; Zheng, Wei; Tvorogov, Denis; Hulmi, Juha J.; Andersson, Leif C.; Cenni, Bruno; Tavi, Pasi; Mervaala, Eero; Kivelä, Riikka; Alitalo, Kari

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac hypertrophy accompanies many forms of heart disease, including ischemic disease, hypertension, heart failure, and valvular disease, and it is a strong predictor of increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Deletion of bone marrow kinase in chromosome X (Bmx), an arterial nonreceptor tyrosine kinase, has been shown to inhibit cardiac hypertrophy in mice. This finding raised the possibility of therapeutic use of Bmx tyrosine kinase inhibitors, which we have addressed here by analyzing cardiac hypertrophy in gene-targeted mice deficient in Bmx tyrosine kinase activity. We found that angiotensin II (Ang II)-induced cardiac hypertrophy is significantly reduced in mice deficient in Bmx and in mice with inactivated Bmx tyrosine kinase compared with WT mice. Genome-wide transcriptomic profiling showed that Bmx inactivation suppresses myocardial expression of genes related to Ang II-induced inflammatory and extracellular matrix responses whereas expression of RNAs encoding mitochondrial proteins after Ang II administration was maintained in Bmx-inactivated hearts. Very little or no Bmx mRNA was expressed in human cardiomyocytes whereas human cardiac endothelial cells expressed abundant amounts. Ang II stimulation of endothelial cells increased Bmx phosphorylation, and Bmx gene silencing inhibited downstream STAT3 signaling, which has been implicated in cardiac hypertrophy. Furthermore, activation of the mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 pathway by Ang II treatment was decreased in the Bmx-deficient hearts. Our results demonstrate that inhibition of the cross-talk between endothelial cells and cardiomyocytes by Bmx inactivation suppresses Ang II-induced signals for cardiac hypertrophy. These results suggest that the endothelial Bmx tyrosine kinase could provide a target to attenuate the development of cardiac hypertrophy. PMID:26430242

  10. Synthetic phosphorylation of p38α recapitulates protein kinase activity.

    PubMed

    Chooi, K Phin; Galan, Sébastien R G; Raj, Ritu; McCullagh, James; Mohammed, Shabaz; Jones, Lyn H; Davis, Benjamin G

    2014-02-05

    Through a "tag-and-modify" protein chemical modification strategy, we site-selectively phosphorylated the activation loop of protein kinase p38α. Phosphorylation at natural (180) and unnatural (172) sites created two pure phospho-forms. p38α bearing only a single phosphocysteine (pCys) as a mimic of pThr at 180 was sufficient to switch the kinase to an active state, capable of processing natural protein substrate ATF2; 172 site phosphorylation did not. In this way, we chemically recapitulated triggering of a relevant segment of the MAPK-signaling pathway in vitro. This allowed detailed kinetic analysis of global and stoichiometric phosphorylation events catalyzed by p38α and revealed that site 180 is a sufficient activator alone and engenders dominant mono-phosphorylation activity. Moreover, a survey of kinase inhibition using inhibitors with different (Type I/II) modes (including therapeutically relevant) revealed unambiguously that Type II inhibitors inhibit phosphorylated p38α and allowed discovery of a predictive kinetic analysis based on cooperativity to distinguish Type I vs II.

  11. Isolation of chloroplastic phosphoglycerate kinase

    SciTech Connect

    Macioszek, J.; Anderson, L.E. ); Anderson, J.B. )

    1990-09-01

    We report here a method for the isolation of high specific activity phosphoglycerate kinase (EC 2.7.2.3) from chloroplasts. The enzyme has been purified over 200-fold from pea (Pisum sativum L.) stromal extracts to apparent homogeneity with 23% recovery. Negative cooperativity is observed with the two enzyme phosphoglycerate kinase/glyceraldehyde-3-P dehydrogenase (EC 1.2.1.13) couple restored from the purified enzymes when NADPH is the reducing pyridine nucleotide, consistent with earlier results obtained with crude chloroplastic extracts. Michaelis Menten kinetics are observed when 3-phosphoglycerate is held constant and phosphoglycerate kinase is varied, which suggests that phosphoglycerate kinase-bound 1,3-bisphosphoglycerate may be the preferred substrate for glyceraldehyde-3-P dehydrogenase in the chloroplast.

  12. Neuronal migration and protein kinases

    PubMed Central

    Ohshima, Toshio

    2015-01-01

    The formation of the six-layered structure of the mammalian cortex via the inside-out pattern of neuronal migration is fundamental to neocortical functions. Extracellular cues such as Reelin induce intracellular signaling cascades through the protein phosphorylation. Migrating neurons also have intrinsic machineries to regulate cytoskeletal proteins and adhesion properties. Protein phosphorylation regulates these processes. Moreover, the balance between phosphorylation and dephosphorylation is modified by extracellular cues. Multipolar-bipolar transition, radial glia-guided locomotion and terminal translocation are critical steps of radial migration of cortical pyramidal neurons. Protein kinases such as Cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5) and c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNKs) involve these steps. In this review, I shall give an overview the roles of protein kinases in neuronal migration. PMID:25628530

  13. Angiotensin II induces MMP 2 activity via FAK/JNK pathway in human endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Jiménez, Eugenio; Pérez de la Blanca, Enrique; Urso, Loredana; González, Irene; Salas, Julián; Montiel, Mercedes

    2009-03-20

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) play an important role in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular diseases and are modified in response to a variety of stimuli such as bioactive peptides, cytokines and/or grown factors. In this study, we demonstrated that angiotensin II (Ang II) induces a time- and dose-dependent increase in the activity of metalloproteinase 2 (MMP 2) in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC). The effect of Ang II was markedly attenuated in cells pretreated with wortmannin and LY294002, two selective inhibitors of phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K), indicating that PI3K plays a key role in regulating MMP 2 activity. Similar results were observed when HUVEC were pretreated with genistein, a non-selective tyrosine kinases inhibitor, or with the specific Src-family tyrosine kinase inhibitor PP2, demonstrating the involvement of protein tyrosine kinases, and particularly Src-family tyrosine kinases on the downstream signaling pathway of Ang II receptors. Furthermore, Ang II-induced MMP 2 activation was markedly blocked by SP600125, a selective c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) inhibitor, or pre-treatment of cells with antisense oligonucleotide to focal adhesion kinase (FAK), indicating that both molecules were important for the activation of MMP 2 by Ang II receptor stimulation. In conclusion, these results suggest that Ang II mediates an increase in MMP 2 activity in macrovascular endothelial cells through signal transduction pathways dependent on PI3K and Src-family tyrosine kinases activation, as well as JNK and FAK phosphorylation.

  14. Benzimidazole derivatives as kinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Garuti, Laura; Roberti, Marinella; Bottegoni, Giovanni

    2014-01-01

    Benzimidazole is a common kinase inhibitor scaffold and benzimidazole-based compounds interact with enzymes by multiple binding modes. In some cases, the benzimidazole acts as part of the hinge-binding motif, in others it has a scaffolding role without evidence for direct hinge binding. Several of these compounds are ATP-competitive inhibitors and show high selectivity by exploiting unique structural properties that distinguish one kinase from the majority of other kinases. However, the high specificity for a single target is not always sufficient. Thus another approach, called multi-target therapy, has been developed over the last few years. The simultaneous inhibition of various kinases may be useful because the disease is attacked at several relevant targets. Moreover, if a kinase becomes drug-resistant, a multitargeted drug can act on the other kinases. Some benzimidazole derivatives are multi-target inhibitors. In this article benzimidazole inhibitors are reported with their mechanisms of action, structure-activity relationship (SAR) and biological properties.

  15. CUL3 and protein kinases

    PubMed Central

    Metzger, Thibaud; Kleiss, Charlotte; Sumara, Izabela

    2013-01-01

    Posttranslational mechanisms drive fidelity of cellular processes. Phosphorylation and ubiquitination of substrates represent very common, covalent, posttranslational modifications and are often co-regulated. Phosphorylation may play a critical role both by directly regulating E3-ubiquitin ligases and/or by ensuring specificity of the ubiquitination substrate. Importantly, many kinases are not only critical regulatory components of these pathways but also represent themselves the direct ubiquitination substrates. Recent data suggest the role of CUL3-based ligases in both proteolytic and non-proteolytic regulation of protein kinases. Our own recent study identified the mitotic kinase PLK1 as a direct target of the CUL3 E3-ligase complex containing BTB-KELCH adaptor protein KLHL22.1 In this study, we aim at gaining mechanistic insights into CUL3-mediated regulation of the substrates, in particular protein kinases, by analyzing mechanisms of interaction between KLHL22 and PLK1. We find that kinase activity of PLK1 is redundant for its targeting for CUL3-ubiquitination. Moreover, CUL3/KLHL22 may contact 2 distinct motifs within PLK1 protein, consistent with the bivalent mode of substrate targeting found in other CUL3-based complexes. We discuss these findings in the context of the existing knowledge on other protein kinases and substrates targeted by CUL3-based E3-ligases. PMID:24067371

  16. TNF and MAP kinase signaling pathways

    PubMed Central

    Sabio, Guadalupe; Davis, Roger J.

    2014-01-01

    The binding of tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα) to cell surface receptors engages multiple signal transduction pathways, including three groups of mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinases: extracellular-signal-regulated kinases (ERKs); the cJun NH2-terminal kinases (JNKs); and the p38 MAP kinases. These MAP kinase signalling pathways induce a secondary response by increasing the expression of several inflammatory cytokines (including TNFα) that contribute to the biological activity of TNFα. MAP kinases therefore function both upstream and down-stream of signalling by TNFα receptors. Here we review mechanisms that mediate these actions of MAP kinases during the response to TNFα. PMID:24647229

  17. Overcoming Resistance to Inhibitors of the Akt Protein Kinase by Modulation of the Pim Kinase Pathway

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    kinase . This grant proposal will explore the resistance to small molecule AKT protein kinase inhibitors mediated by the... molecule AKT protein kinase inhibitors is potentially mediated by the Pim-1 protein kinase , and that unique Pim protein kinase inhibitors that can in...application is essential for the development of this combined chemotherapeutic strategy. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Small Molecule AKT Inhibitors ,

  18. Identification of Novel Small Molecule Inhibitors of Oncogenic RET Kinase.

    PubMed

    Moccia, Marialuisa; Liu, Qingsong; Guida, Teresa; Federico, Giorgia; Brescia, Annalisa; Zhao, Zheng; Choi, Hwan Geun; Deng, Xianming; Tan, Li; Wang, Jinhua; Billaud, Marc; Gray, Nathanael S; Carlomagno, Francesca; Santoro, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    Oncogenic mutation of the RET receptor tyrosine kinase is observed in several human malignancies. Here, we describe three novel type II RET tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI), ALW-II-41-27, XMD15-44 and HG-6-63-01, that inhibit the cellular activity of oncogenic RET mutants at two digit nanomolar concentration. These three compounds shared a 3-trifluoromethyl-4-methylpiperazinephenyl pharmacophore that stabilizes the 'DFG-out' inactive conformation of RET activation loop. They blocked RET-mediated signaling and proliferation with an IC50 in the nM range in fibroblasts transformed by the RET/C634R and RET/M918T oncogenes. They also inhibited autophosphorylation of several additional oncogenic RET-derived point mutants and chimeric oncogenes. At a concentration of 10 nM, ALW-II-41-27, XMD15-44 and HG-6-63-01 inhibited RET kinase and signaling in human thyroid cancer cell lines carrying oncogenic RET alleles; they also inhibited proliferation of cancer, but not non-tumoral Nthy-ori-3-1, thyroid cells, with an IC50 in the nM range. The three compounds were capable of inhibiting the 'gatekeeper' V804M mutant which confers substantial resistance to established RET inhibitors. In conclusion, we have identified a type II TKI scaffold, shared by ALW-II-41-27, XMD15-44 and HG-6-63-01, that may be used as novel lead for the development of novel agents for the treatment of cancers harboring oncogenic activation of RET.

  19. Identification of Novel Small Molecule Inhibitors of Oncogenic RET Kinase

    PubMed Central

    Moccia, Marialuisa; Liu, Qingsong; Guida, Teresa; Federico, Giorgia; Brescia, Annalisa; Zhao, Zheng; Choi, Hwan Geun; Deng, Xianming; Tan, Li; Wang, Jinhua; Billaud, Marc; Gray, Nathanael S.

    2015-01-01

    Oncogenic mutation of the RET receptor tyrosine kinase is observed in several human malignancies. Here, we describe three novel type II RET tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI), ALW-II-41-27, XMD15-44 and HG-6-63-01, that inhibit the cellular activity of oncogenic RET mutants at two digit nanomolar concentration. These three compounds shared a 3-trifluoromethyl-4-methylpiperazinephenyl pharmacophore that stabilizes the ‘DFG-out’ inactive conformation of RET activation loop. They blocked RET-mediated signaling and proliferation with an IC50 in the nM range in fibroblasts transformed by the RET/C634R and RET/M918T oncogenes. They also inhibited autophosphorylation of several additional oncogenic RET-derived point mutants and chimeric oncogenes. At a concentration of 10 nM, ALW-II-41-27, XMD15-44 and HG-6-63-01 inhibited RET kinase and signaling in human thyroid cancer cell lines carrying oncogenic RET alleles; they also inhibited proliferation of cancer, but not non-tumoral Nthy-ori-3-1, thyroid cells, with an IC50 in the nM range. The three compounds were capable of inhibiting the ‘gatekeeper’ V804M mutant which confers substantial resistance to established RET inhibitors. In conclusion, we have identified a type II TKI scaffold, shared by ALW-II-41-27, XMD15-44 and HG-6-63-01, that may be used as novel lead for the development of novel agents for the treatment of cancers harboring oncogenic activation of RET. PMID:26046350

  20. In vitro phosphorylation of the movement protein of tomato mosaic tobamovirus by a cellular kinase.

    PubMed

    Matsushita, Y; Hanazawa, K; Yoshioka, K; Oguchi, T; Kawakami, S; Watanabe, Y; Nishiguchi, M; Nyunoya, H

    2000-08-01

    The movement protein (MP) of tomato mosaic virus (ToMV) was produced in E. coli as a soluble fusion protein with glutathione S-transferase. When immobilized on glutathione affinity beads, the recombinant protein was phosphorylated in vitro by incubating with cell extracts of Nicotiana tabacum and tobacco suspension culture cells (BY-2) in the presence of [gamma-(32)P]ATP. Phosphorylation occurred even after washing the beads with a detergent-containing buffer, indicating that the recombinant MP formed a stable complex with some protein kinase(s) during incubation with the cell extract. Phosphoamino acid analysis revealed that the MP was phosphorylated on serine and threonine residues. Phosphorylation of the MP was decreased by addition of kinase inhibitors such as heparin, suramin and quercetin, which are known to be effective for casein kinase II (CK II). The phosphorylation level was not changed by other types of inhibitor. In addition, as shown for animal and plant CK II, [gamma-(32)P]GTP was efficiently used as a phosphoryl donor. Phosphorylation was not affected by amino acid replacements at serine-37 and serine-238, but was completely inhibited by deletion of the carboxy-terminal 9 amino acids, including threonine-256, serine-257, serine-261 and serine-263. These results suggest that the MP of ToMV could be phosphorylated in plant cells by a host protein kinase that is closely related to CK II.

  1. Enzymatic synthesis of lipid II and analogues.

    PubMed

    Huang, Lin-Ya; Huang, Shih-Hsien; Chang, Ya-Chih; Cheng, Wei-Chieh; Cheng, Ting-Jen R; Wong, Chi-Huey

    2014-07-28

    The emergence of antibiotic resistance has prompted active research in the development of antibiotics with new modes of action. Among all essential bacterial proteins, transglycosylase polymerizes lipid II into peptidoglycan and is one of the most favorable targets because of its vital role in peptidoglycan synthesis. Described in this study is a practical enzymatic method for the synthesis of lipid II, coupled with cofactor regeneration, to give the product in a 50-70% yield. This development depends on two key steps: the overexpression of MraY for the synthesis of lipid I and the use of undecaprenol kinase for the preparation of polyprenol phosphates. This method was further applied to the synthesis of lipid II analogues. It was found that MraY and undecaprenol kinase can accept a wide range of lipids containing various lengths and configurations. The activity of lipid II analogues for bacterial transglycolase was also evaluated.

  2. Pharmacological modulation of protein kinases as a new approach to treat addiction to cocaine and opiates.

    PubMed

    García-Pardo, María Pilar; Roger-Sanchez, Concepción; Rodríguez-Arias, Marta; Miñarro, Jose; Aguilar, María Asunción

    2016-06-15

    Drug addiction shares brain mechanisms and molecular substrates with learning and memory processes, such as the stimulation of glutamate receptors and their downstream signalling pathways. In the present work we provide an up-to-date review of studies that have demonstrated the implication of the main memory-related calcium-dependent protein kinases in opiate and cocaine addiction. The effects of these drugs of abuse in different animal models of drug reward, dependence and addiction are altered by manipulation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) family, particularly extracellular signal regulated kinase (ERK), calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase II (CaMKII), the protein kinase C (PKC) family (including PKMζ), cAMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKA), cGMP-dependent protein kinase G (PKG), the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) pathway and its downstream target mammalian target of Rapamycin (mTOR), cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5), heat-shock proteins (Hsp) and other enzymes and proteins. Research suggests that drugs of abuse induce dependence and addiction by modifying the signalling pathways that involve these memory-related protein kinases, and supports the idea that drug addiction is an excessive aberrant learning disorder in which the maladaptive memory of drug-associated cues maintains compulsive drug use and contributes to relapse. Moreover, the studies we review offer new pharmacological strategies to treat opiate and cocaine dependence based on the manipulation of these protein kinases. In particular, disruption of reconsolidation of drug-related memories may have a high therapeutic value in the treatment of drug addiction.

  3. Protein Kinase Activity Decreases with Higher Braak Stages of Alzheimer’s Disease Pathology

    PubMed Central

    Rosenberger, Andrea F.N.; Hilhorst, Riet; Coart, Elisabeth; García Barrado, Leandro; Naji, Faris; Rozemuller, Annemieke J.M.; van der Flier, Wiesje M.; Scheltens, Philip; Hoozemans, Jeroen J.M.; van der Vies, Saskia M.

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is characterized by a long pre-clinical phase (20–30 years), during which significant brain pathology manifests itself. Disease mechanisms associated with pathological hallmarks remain elusive. Most processes associated with AD pathogenesis, such as inflammation, synaptic dysfunction, and hyper-phosphorylation of tau are dependent on protein kinase activity. The objective of this study was to determine the involvement of protein kinases in AD pathogenesis. Protein kinase activity was determined in postmortem hippocampal brain tissue of 60 patients at various stages of AD and 40 non-demented controls (Braak stages 0-VI) using a peptide-based microarray platform. We observed an overall decrease of protein kinase activity that correlated with disease progression. The phosphorylation of 96.7% of the serine/threonine peptides and 37.5% of the tyrosine peptides on the microarray decreased significantly with increased Braak stage (p-value <0.01). Decreased activity was evident at pre-clinical stages of AD pathology (Braak I-II). Increased phosphorylation was not observed for any peptide. STRING analysis in combination with pathway analysis and identification of kinases responsible for peptide phosphorylation showed the interactions between well-known proteins in AD pathology, including the Ephrin-receptor A1 (EphA1), a risk gene for AD, and sarcoma tyrosine kinase (Src), which is involved in memory formation. Additionally, kinases that have not previously been associated with AD were identified, e.g., protein tyrosine kinase 6 (PTK6/BRK), feline sarcoma oncogene kinase (FES), and fyn-associated tyrosine kinase (FRK). The identified protein kinases are new biomarkers and potential drug targets for early (pre-clinical) intervention. PMID:26519433

  4. Discovering the first tyrosine kinase.

    PubMed

    Hunter, Tony

    2015-06-30

    In the middle of the 20th century, animal tumor viruses were heralded as possible models for understanding human cancer. By the mid-1970s, the molecular basis by which tumor viruses transform cells into a malignant state was beginning to emerge as the first viral genomic sequences were reported and the proteins encoded by their transforming genes were identified and characterized. This was a time of great excitement and rapid progress. In 1978, prompted by the discovery from Ray Erikson's group that the Rous sarcoma virus (RSV) v-Src-transforming protein had an associated protein kinase activity specific for threonine, my group at the Salk Institute set out to determine whether the polyomavirus middle T-transforming protein had a similar kinase activity. Here, I describe the experiments that led to the identification of a kinase activity associated with middle T antigen and our serendipitous discovery that this activity was specific for tyrosine in vitro, and how this in turn led to the fortuitous observation that the v-Src-associated kinase activity was also specific for tyrosine. Our finding that v-Src increased the level of phosphotyrosine in cellular proteins in RSV-transformed cells confirmed that v-Src is a tyrosine kinase and transforms cells by phosphorylating proteins on tyrosine. My colleague Bart Sefton and I reported these findings in the March issue of PNAS in 1980. Remarkably, all of the experiments in this paper were accomplished in less than one month.

  5. Discovering the first tyrosine kinase

    PubMed Central

    Hunter, Tony

    2015-01-01

    In the middle of the 20th century, animal tumor viruses were heralded as possible models for understanding human cancer. By the mid-1970s, the molecular basis by which tumor viruses transform cells into a malignant state was beginning to emerge as the first viral genomic sequences were reported and the proteins encoded by their transforming genes were identified and characterized. This was a time of great excitement and rapid progress. In 1978, prompted by the discovery from Ray Erikson’s group that the Rous sarcoma virus (RSV) v-Src–transforming protein had an associated protein kinase activity specific for threonine, my group at the Salk Institute set out to determine whether the polyomavirus middle T-transforming protein had a similar kinase activity. Here, I describe the experiments that led to the identification of a kinase activity associated with middle T antigen and our serendipitous discovery that this activity was specific for tyrosine in vitro, and how this in turn led to the fortuitous observation that the v-Src–associated kinase activity was also specific for tyrosine. Our finding that v-Src increased the level of phosphotyrosine in cellular proteins in RSV-transformed cells confirmed that v-Src is a tyrosine kinase and transforms cells by phosphorylating proteins on tyrosine. My colleague Bart Sefton and I reported these findings in the March issue of PNAS in 1980. Remarkably, all of the experiments in this paper were accomplished in less than one month. PMID:26130799

  6. Endothelial Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Kinase Kinase Kinase 4 Is Critical for Lymphatic Vascular Development and Function

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Chang-An; Danai, Laura V.; Yawe, Joseph C.; Gujja, Sharvari; Edwards, Yvonne J. K.

    2016-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms underlying lymphatic vascular development and function are not well understood. Recent studies have suggested a role for endothelial cell (EC) mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinase kinase 4 (Map4k4) in developmental angiogenesis and atherosclerosis. Here, we show that constitutive loss of EC Map4k4 in mice causes postnatal lethality due to chylothorax, suggesting that Map4k4 is required for normal lymphatic vascular function. Mice constitutively lacking EC Map4k4 displayed dilated lymphatic capillaries, insufficient lymphatic valves, and impaired lymphatic flow; furthermore, primary ECs derived from these animals displayed enhanced proliferation compared with controls. Yeast 2-hybrid analyses identified the Ras GTPase-activating protein Rasa1, a known regulator of lymphatic development and lymphatic endothelial cell fate, as a direct interacting partner for Map4k4. Map4k4 silencing in ECs enhanced basal Ras and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (Erk) activities, and primary ECs lacking Map4k4 displayed enhanced lymphatic EC marker expression. Taken together, these results reveal that EC Map4k4 is critical for lymphatic vascular development by regulating EC quiescence and lymphatic EC fate. PMID:27044870

  7. Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors in Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Anish; Rajan, Arun; Giaccone, Giuseppe

    2012-01-01

    SYNOPSIS ‘Driver mutations’ are essential for carcinogenesis as well as tumor progression as they confer a selective growth advantage to cancer cells. Identification of driver mutations in growth related protein kinases, especially tyrosine kinases have led to clinical development of an array of tyrosine kinase inhibitors in various malignancies, including lung cancer. Inhibition of epidermal growth factor receptor and anaplastic lymphoma kinase tyrosine kinases have proven to be of meaningful clinical benefit, while inhibition of several other tyrosine kinases have been of limited clinical benefit, thus far. An improved understanding of tyrosine kinase biology has also led to faster drug development, identification of resistance mechanisms and ways to overcome resistance. In this review, we discuss the clinical data supporting the use and practical aspects of management of patients on epidermal growth factor receptor and anaplastic lymphoma kinase tyrosine kinase inhibitors. PMID:22520981

  8. Isolation of a glycogen synthase I kinase that is independent of adenosine 3':5'-monophosphate.

    PubMed Central

    Schlender, K K; Reimann, E M

    1975-01-01

    Three protein kinases (ATP:protein phosphotransferase, EC 2.7.1.37) were detected when the soluble fraction of rabbit kidney medulla was chromatographed on DEAE-cellulose with a linear NaC1 gradient. The first two kinases eluted (Peak 1 and Peak II) were cyclic-AMP-dependent, wheras Peak III was cyclic-AMP-independent. A procedure was developed to separate the catalytic subunit of Peak II cyclic-AMP-dependent protein kinase (representing the bulk of the histone kinase activity) from Peak III protein kinase. In contrast to the catalytic subunit, Peak III protein kinase phosphorylated casein more rapidly than histone. Peak III was insensitive to the heat-stable protein inhibitor of cyclic-AMP-dependent protein kinases and appeared to have a higher requirement for ATP than did the catalytic subunit. Peak III catalyzed the conversion of glycogen synthase (UDPglucose:glycogen alpha-4-glucosyltransferase, EC 2.4.1.11) from the I (glucose-6-phosphate-independent) to the D (glucose-6-phosphate-dependent) form. This conversion was dependent on Mg-2+ and ATP and was unaffected by cyclic AMP, cyclic GMP, or the protein inhibitor. Glycogen synthase I in the soluble fraction of kidney medulla could be converted to the D form by endogenous glycogen synthase I kinase if Mg-2+ and ATP were added. Most of this glycogen synthase I kinase activity was unaffected by cyclic AMP or by the protein inhibitor, suggesting that Peak III may be of major importance in the regulation of glycogen synthase in vivo. PMID:166380

  9. Pathophysiological roles of WNK kinases in the kidney.

    PubMed

    Uchida, Shinichi

    2010-09-01

    Since the discovery of mutations in the WNK1 and WNK4 genes in pseudohypoaldosteronism type II (PHAII), the pathophysiological role of WNK kinases in hypertension and renal ion transport has been a hot topic for investigation. Analyses from a mouse model carrying the same mutation as seen in PHAII patients, reveal a new signal cascade in the kidney that regulates NaCl and K balance in the body. WNK kinases phosphorylate and activate oxidative stress responsive kinase 1 (OSR1) and STE20-like proline and alanine-rich kinase (SPAK), and OSR1 and SPAK phosphorylate and activate the thiazide-sensitive Na-Cl cotransporter (NCC). Furthermore, this cascade is regulated by aldosterone, indicating that WNK-OSR1/SPAK-NCC cooperates with this system including the epithelial Na channel (ENaC) to conserve NaCl. With regard to K excretion, however, both systems work in opposite directions whereby PHAII and Liddle syndrome show hyperkalemia and hypokalemia, respectively. Thus, the identification of such aldosterone effecters other than ENaC, will reveal a novel regulatory mechanism of K excretion in the distal nephron, and also provides basic evidence for the therapeutic use of thiazide in various clinical situations.

  10. Photobilirubin II.

    PubMed Central

    Bonnett, R; Buckley, D G; Hamzetash, D; Hawkes, G E; Ioannou, S; Stoll, M S

    1984-01-01

    An improved preparation of photobilirubin II in ammoniacal methanol is described. Evidence is presented which distinguishes between the two structures proposed earlier for photobilirubin II in favour of the cycloheptadienyl structure. Nuclear-Overhauser-enhancement measurements with bilirubin IX alpha and photobilirubin II in dimethyl sulphoxide are complicated by the occurrence of negative and zero effects. The partition coefficient of photobilirubin II between chloroform and phosphate buffer (pH 7.4) is 0.67. PMID:6743241

  11. [Kinase inhibitors against hematological malignancies].

    PubMed

    Tojo, Arinobu

    2014-06-01

    Dysregulation of protein phosphorylation, especially on tyrosine residues, plays a crucial role in development and progression of hematological malignancies. Since remarkable success in imatinib therapy of CML and Ph+ALL, extensive efforts have made to explore candidate molecular targets and next breakthrough drugs. Now that next generation ABL kinase inhibitors are available for CML, the therapeutic algorithm has been revolutionized. As for AML and lymphoid malignancies, many kinase inhibitors targeting FLT3, BTK and aurora-A are on early and late clinical trials, and a number of promising drugs including ibrutinib are picked up for further evaluation.

  12. Abnormal changes in voltage-gated sodium channels Na(V)1.1, Na(V)1.2, Na(V)1.3, Na(V)1.6 and in calmodulin/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II, within the brains of spontaneously epileptic rats and tremor rats.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiaoxue; Guo, Feng; Lv, Xintong; Feng, Rui; Min, Dongyu; Ma, Lihua; Liu, Yajing; Zhao, Jinsheng; Wang, Lei; Chen, Tianbao; Shaw, Chris; Hao, Liying; Cai, Jiqun

    2013-07-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs) play a crucial role in epilepsy. The expressions of different VGSCs subtypes are varied in diverse animal models of epilepsy that may reflect their multiple phenotypes or the complexity of the mechanisms of epilepsy. In a previous study, we reported that NaV1.1 and NaV1.3 were up-regulated in the hippocampus of the spontaneously epileptic rat (SER). In this study, we further analyzed both the expression and distribution of the typical VGSC subtypes NaV1.1, NaV1.2, NaV1.3 and NaV1.6 in the hippocampus and in the cortex of the temporal lobe of two genetic epileptic animal models: the SER and the tremor rat (TRM). The expressions of calmodulin (CaM) and calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) were also analyzed with the purpose of assessing the effect of the CaM/CaMKII pathway in these two models of epilepsy. Increased expression of the four VGSC subtypes and CaM, accompanied by a decrease in CaMKII was observed in the hippocampus of both the SERs and the TRM rats. However, the changes observed in the expression of VGSC subtypes and CaM were decreased with an elevated CaMKII in the cortex of their temporal lobes. Double-labeled immunofluorescence data suggested that in SERs and TRM rats, the four subtypes of the VGSC proteins were present throughout the CA1, CA3 and dentate gyrus regions of the hippocampus and temporal lobe cortex and these were co-localized in neurons with CaM. These data represent the first evidence of abnormal changes in expression of four VGSC subtypes (NaV1.1, NaV1.2, NaV1.3 and NaV1.6) and CaM/CaMKII in the hippocampus and temporal lobe cortex of SERs and TRM rats. These changes may be involved in the generation of epileptiform activity and underlie the observed seizure phenotype in these rat models of genetic epilepsy.

  13. Evolutionary Ancestry of Eukaryotic Protein Kinases and Choline Kinases*

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Shenshen; Safaei, Javad

    2016-01-01

    The reversible phosphorylation of proteins catalyzed by protein kinases in eukaryotes supports an important role for eukaryotic protein kinases (ePKs) in the emergence of nucleated cells in the third superkingdom of life. Choline kinases (ChKs) could also be critical in the early evolution of eukaryotes, because of their function in the biosynthesis of phosphatidylcholine, which is unique to eukaryotic membranes. However, the genomic origins of ePKs and ChKs are unclear. The high degeneracy of protein sequences and broad expansion of ePK families have made this fundamental question difficult to answer. In this study, we identified two class-I aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases with high similarities to consensus amino acid sequences of human protein-serine/threonine kinases. Comparisons of primary and tertiary structures supported that ePKs and ChKs evolved from a common ancestor related to glutaminyl aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, which may have been one of the key factors in the successful of emergence of ancient eukaryotic cells from bacterial colonies. PMID:26742849

  14. Structure of the pseudokinase-kinase domains from protein kinase TYK2 reveals a mechanism for Janus kinase (JAK) autoinhibition.

    PubMed

    Lupardus, Patrick J; Ultsch, Mark; Wallweber, Heidi; Bir Kohli, Pawan; Johnson, Adam R; Eigenbrot, Charles

    2014-06-03

    Janus kinases (JAKs) are receptor-associated multidomain tyrosine kinases that act downstream of many cytokines and interferons. JAK kinase activity is regulated by the adjacent pseudokinase domain via an unknown mechanism. Here, we report the 2.8-Å structure of the two-domain pseudokinase-kinase module from the JAK family member TYK2 in its autoinhibited form. We find that the pseudokinase and kinase interact near the kinase active site and that most reported mutations in cancer-associated JAK alleles cluster in or near this interface. Mutation of residues near the TYK2 interface that are analogous to those in cancer-associated JAK alleles, including the V617F and "exon 12" JAK2 mutations, results in increased kinase activity in vitro. These data indicate that JAK pseudokinases are autoinhibitory domains that hold the kinase domain inactive until receptor dimerization stimulates transition to an active state.

  15. Cardiovascular effects of a novel selective Rho kinase inhibitor, 2-(1H-indazole-5-yl)amino-4-methoxy-6-piperazino triazine (DW1865).

    PubMed

    Oh, Kwang-Seok; Oh, Byung Koo; Park, Cheon Ho; Seo, Ho Won; Kang, Nam Sook; Lee, Jeong Hyun; Lee, Jin Soo; Ho Lee, Byung

    2013-02-28

    The arising critical implications of Rho kinase signaling in cardiovascular diseases have been attracting attention in the pharmacological potential of Rho kinase inhibitors. We identified a novel inhibitor of Rho kinase (2-(1H-indazole-5-yl)amino-4-methoxy-6-piperazino triazine; DW 1865) and characterized its effects in biochemical, cellular, tissue and animal based assays. DW 1865 potently inhibited the kinase activity of both Rho kinase 1 and Rho kinase 2 in vitro, and behaved as an ATP-competitive inhibitor. Interestingly, DW1865 was 10 times more potent in inhibiting Rho kinase activities than fasudil as a selective Rho kinase inhibitor. The activity of DW1865 was shown to be highly selective for Rho kinase in the panel assay of 13 other kinases. In the isolated vascular tissue study, DW1865 exerted vasorelaxation in phenylephrine- or 5-hydroxytriptamine-induced contraction in a concentration-dependent manner manner. In spontaneously hypertensive rats, administration of DW1865 caused a significant and dose-related reduction in blood pressure. Furthermore, DW1865 blocked angiotensin II-induced stress fiber formation and cellular hypertrophy in rat heart-derived H9c2 cells. Taken together, these results suggest that DW1865 is a highly selective and potent Rho kinase inhibitor that will alleviate the pathophysiological actions of Rho kinase such as stress fiber formation, cellular hypertrophy, and hypertension.

  16. Use of LC-MS/MS and Bayes' theorem to identify protein kinases that phosphorylate aquaporin-2 at Ser256.

    PubMed

    Bradford, Davis; Raghuram, Viswanathan; Wilson, Justin L L; Chou, Chung-Lin; Hoffert, Jason D; Knepper, Mark A; Pisitkun, Trairak

    2014-07-15

    In the renal collecting duct, binding of AVP to the V2 receptor triggers signaling changes that regulate osmotic water transport. Short-term regulation of water transport is dependent on vasopressin-induced phosphorylation of aquaporin-2 (AQP2) at Ser256. The protein kinase that phosphorylates this site is not known. We use Bayes' theorem to rank all 521 rat protein kinases with regard to the likelihood of a role in Ser256 phosphorylation on the basis of prior data and new experimental data. First, prior probabilities were estimated from previous transcriptomic and proteomic profiling data, kinase substrate specificity data, and evidence for kinase regulation by vasopressin. This ranking was updated using new experimental data describing the effects of several small-molecule kinase inhibitors with known inhibitory spectra (H-89, KN-62, KN-93, and GSK-650394) on AQP2 phosphorylation at Ser256 in inner medullary collecting duct suspensions. The top-ranked kinase was Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CAMK2), followed by protein kinase A (PKA) and protein kinase B (AKT). Liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS)-based in vitro phosphorylation studies compared the ability of three highly ranked kinases to phosphorylate AQP2 and other inner medullary collecting duct proteins, PKA, CAMK2, and serum/glucocorticoid-regulated kinase (SGK). All three proved capable of phosphorylating AQP2 at Ser256, although CAMK2 and PKA were more potent than SGK. The in vitro phosphorylation experiments also identified candidate protein kinases for several additional phosphoproteins with likely roles in collecting duct regulation, including Nedd4-2, Map4k4, and 3-phosphoinositide-dependent protein kinase 1. We conclude that Bayes' theorem is an effective means of integrating data from multiple data sets in physiology.

  17. Skeletal muscle Ca(2+)-independent kinase activity increases during either hypertrophy or running

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fluck, M.; Waxham, M. N.; Hamilton, M. T.; Booth, F. W.

    2000-01-01

    Spikes in free Ca(2+) initiate contractions in skeletal muscle cells, but whether and how they might signal to transcription factors in skeletal muscles of living animals is unknown. Since previous studies in non-muscle cells have shown that serum response factor (SRF) protein, a transcription factor, is phosphorylated rapidly by Ca(2+)/calmodulin (CaM)-dependent protein kinase after rises in intracellular Ca(2+), we measured enzymatic activity that phosphorylates SRF (designated SRF kinase activity). Homogenates from 7-day-hypertrophied anterior latissimus dorsi muscles of roosters had more Ca(2+)-independent SRF kinase activity than their respective control muscles. However, no differences were noted in Ca(2+)/CaM-dependent SRF kinase activity between control and trained muscles. To determine whether the Ca(2+)-independent and Ca(2+)/CaM-dependent forms of Ca(2+)/CaM-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) might contribute to some of the SRF kinase activity, autocamtide-3, a synthetic substrate that is specific for CaMKII, was employed. While the Ca(2+)-independent form of CaMKII was increased, like the Ca(2+)-independent form of SRF kinase, no alteration in CaMKII occurred at 7 days of stretch overload. These observations suggest that some of SRF phosphorylation by skeletal muscle extracts could be due to CaMKII. To determine whether this adaptation was specific to the exercise type (i.e., hypertrophy), similar measurements were made in the white vastus lateralis muscle of rats that had completed 2 wk of voluntary running. Although Ca(2+)-independent SRF kinase was increased, no alteration occurred in Ca(2+)/CaM-dependent SRF kinase activity. Thus any role of Ca(2+)-independent SRF kinase signaling has downstream modulators specific to the exercise phenotype.

  18. Genetics Home Reference: mevalonate kinase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... shape, leading to a reduction of mevalonate kinase enzyme activity. Despite this shortage (deficiency) of mevalonate kinase activity, ... who have less than 1 percent of normal enzyme activity usually develop MVA. Learn more about the gene ...

  19. Kinase signalling in Huntington's disease.

    PubMed

    Bowles, Kathryn R; Jones, Lesley

    2014-01-01

    Alterations in numerous signal transduction pathways and aberrant activity of specific kinases have been identified in multiple cell and mouse models of Huntington's disease (HD), as well as in human HD brain. The balance and integration of a network of kinase signalling pathways is paramount for the regulation of a wide range of cellular and physiological processes, such as proliferation, differentiation, inflammation, neuronal plasticity and apoptosis. Unbalanced activity within these pathways provides a potential mechanism for many of the pathological phenotypes associated with HD, such as transcriptional dysregulation, inflammation and ultimately neurodegeneration. The characterisation of aberrant kinase signalling regulation in HD has been inconsistent and may be a result of failure to consider integration between multiple signalling pathways, as well as alterations that may occur over time with both age and disease progression. Collating the information about the effect of mHTT on signalling pathways demonstrates that it has wide ranging effects on multiple pro- and anti-apoptotic kinases, resulting in the dysregulation of numerous complex interactions within a dynamic network.

  20. Case report: pyruvate kinase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Rothman, J M

    1995-09-01

    Pyruvate kinase deficiency is a rare cause of congenital hemolytic anemia. Despite a paucity of reports, splenectomy resulted in successful outcomes for two siblings with this disorder. The sisters were diagnosed at birth with profound jaundice and congenital nonspherocytic hemolytic anemia.

  1. Degradation of Activated Protein Kinases by Ubiquitination

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Zhimin; Hunter, Tony

    2009-01-01

    Protein kinases are important regulators of intracellular signal transduction pathways and play critical roles in diverse cellular functions. Once a protein kinase is activated, its activity is subsequently downregulated through a variety of mechanisms. Accumulating evidence indicates that the activation of protein kinases commonly initiates their downregulation via the ubiquitin/proteasome pathway. Failure to regulate protein kinase activity or expression levels can cause human diseases. PMID:19489726

  2. Recent advances in the development of Aurora kinases inhibitors in hematological malignancies.

    PubMed

    Choudary, Iqra; Barr, Paul M; Friedberg, Jonathan

    2015-12-01

    Over the last two decades, since the discovery of Drosophila mutants in 1995, much effort has been made to understand Aurora kinase biology. Three mammalian subtypes have been identified thus far which include the Aurora A, B and C kinases. These regulatory proteins specifically work at the cytoskeleton and chromosomal structures between the kinetochores and have vital functions in the early phases of the mitotic cell cycle. Today, there are multiple phase I and phase II clinical trials as well as numerous preclinical studies taking place looking at Aurora kinase inhibitors in both hematologic and solid malignancies. This review focuses on the preclinical and clinical development of Aurora kinase inhibitors in hematological malignancy and discusses their therapeutic potential.

  3. Recent advances in the development of Aurora kinases inhibitors in hematological malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Choudary, Iqra; Barr, Paul M.; Friedberg, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    Over the last two decades, since the discovery of Drosophila mutants in 1995, much effort has been made to understand Aurora kinase biology. Three mammalian subtypes have been identified thus far which include the Aurora A, B and C kinases. These regulatory proteins specifically work at the cytoskeleton and chromosomal structures between the kinetochores and have vital functions in the early phases of the mitotic cell cycle. Today, there are multiple phase I and phase II clinical trials as well as numerous preclinical studies taking place looking at Aurora kinase inhibitors in both hematologic and solid malignancies. This review focuses on the preclinical and clinical development of Aurora kinase inhibitors in hematological malignancy and discusses their therapeutic potential. PMID:26622997

  4. A Requirement for ZAK Kinase Activity in Canonical TGF-β Signaling.

    PubMed

    Nyati, Shyam; Chator, Areeb; Schinske, Katerina; Gregg, Brandon S; Ross, Brian Dale; Rehemtulla, Alnawaz

    2016-12-01

    The sterile alpha motif and leucine zipper containing kinase ZAK (AZK, MLT, MLK7), is a MAPK-kinase kinase (MKKK). Like most MAPKKKs which are known to activate the c-Jun. amino-terminal kinase (JNK) pathway, ZAK has been shown to participate in the transduction of Transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β)-mediated non-canonical signaling. A role for ZAK in SMAD-dependent, canonical TGF-β signaling has not been previously appreciated. Using a combination of functional genomics and biochemical techniques, we demonstrate that ZAK regulates canonical TGFβRI/II signaling in lung and breast cancer cell lines and may serve as a key node in the regulation of TGFBR kinase activity. Remarkably, we demonstrate that siRNA mediated depletion of ZAK strongly inhibited TGF-β dependent SMAD2/3 activation and subsequent promoter activation (SMAD binding element driven luciferase expression; SBE4-Luc). A ZAK specific inhibitor (DHP-2), dose-dependently activated the bioluminescent TGFBR-kinase activity reporter (BTR), blocked TGF-β induced SMAD2/3 phosphorylation and SBE4-Luc activation and cancer cell-invasion. In aggregate, these findings identify a novel role for the ZAK kinase in canonical TGF-β signaling and an invasive cancer cell phenotype thus providing a novel target for TGF-β inhibition.

  5. Investigation of potential glycogen synthase kinase 3 inhibitors using pharmacophore mapping and virtual screening.

    PubMed

    Dessalew, Nigus; Bharatam, Prasad V

    2006-09-01

    Glycogen synthase kinase-3 is a serine/threonine kinase that has attracted significant drug discovery attention in recent years. To investigate the identification of new potential glycogen synthase kinase-3 inhibitors, a pharmacophore mapping study was carried out using a set of 21 structurally diverse glycogen synthase kinase-3 inhibitors. A hypothesis containing four features: two hydrophobic, one hydrogen bond donor and another hydrogen bond acceptor was found to be the best from the 10 common feature hypotheses produced by HipHop module of Catalyst. The best hypothesis has a high cost of 156.592 and higher best fit values were obtained for the 21 inhibitors using this best hypothesis than the other HipHop hypotheses. The best hypothesis was then used to screen electronically the NCI2000 database. The hits obtained were docked into glycogen synthase kinase-3beta active site. A total of five novel potential leads were proposed after: (i) visual examination of how well they dock into the glycogen synthase kinase-3beta-binding site, (ii) comparative analysis of their FlexX, G-Score, PMF-Score, ChemScore and D-Scores values, (iii) comparison of their best fit value with the known inhibitors and (iv) examination of the how the hits retain interactions with the important amino acid residues of glycogen synthase kinase-3beta-binding site.

  6. Activation of G Protein-Coupled Receptor Kinase 1 Involves Interactions between Its N-Terminal Region and Its Kinase Domain

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Chih-chin; Orban, Tivadar; Jastrzebska, Beata; Palczewski, Krzysztof; Tesmer, John J.G.

    2012-03-16

    G protein-coupled receptor kinases (GRKs) phosphorylate activated G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) to initiate receptor desensitization. In addition to the canonical phosphoacceptor site of the kinase domain, activated receptors bind to a distinct docking site that confers higher affinity and activates GRKs allosterically. Recent mutagenesis and structural studies support a model in which receptor docking activates a GRK by stabilizing the interaction of its 20-amino acid N-terminal region with the kinase domain. This interaction in turn stabilizes a closed, more active conformation of the enzyme. To investigate the importance of this interaction for the process of GRK activation, we first validated the functionality of the N-terminal region in rhodopsin kinase (GRK1) by site-directed mutagenesis and then introduced a disulfide bond to cross-link the N-terminal region of GRK1 with its specific binding site on the kinase domain. Characterization of the kinetic and biophysical properties of the cross-linked protein showed that disulfide bond formation greatly enhances the catalytic efficiency of the peptide phosphorylation, but receptor-dependent phosphorylation, Meta II stabilization, and inhibition of transducin activation were unaffected. These data indicate that the interaction of the N-terminal region with the kinase domain is important for GRK activation but does not dictate the affinity of GRKs for activated receptors.

  7. Erythropoietin inhibits osmotic swelling of retinal glial cells by Janus kinase- and extracellular signal-regulated kinases1/2-mediated release of vascular endothelial growth factor.

    PubMed

    Krügel, K; Wurm, A; Linnertz, R; Pannicke, T; Wiedemann, P; Reichenbach, A; Bringmann, A

    2010-02-17

    The volume homeostasis of retinal glial cells is mediated by an autocrine purinergic mechanism of ion channel opening which is activated in response to a decrease in the extracellular osmolarity. Here, we show that erythropoietin (EPO) prevents the osmotic swelling of glial somata in retinal slices and of isolated glial cells from control and diabetic rats, with a half-maximal effect at approximately 0.01 nM. The downstream signaling evoked by EPO includes a release of vascular endothelial growth factor from the cells which was blocked by Janus kinase and extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK)1/2 inhibitors. Transactivation of kinase insert domain-containing receptor/fms-like tyrosine kinase 1 (KDR/flk-1) evokes a calcium-dependent, exocytotic release of glutamate, followed by activation of group I/II metabotropic glutamate receptors which results in calcium-independent release of ATP and adenosine from the cells. The final step in this cascade is the activation of adenosine A(1) receptors which results in protein kinase A- and phosphoinositide 3-kinase-mediated opening of potassium and chloride channels. EPO receptor protein was immunohistochemically localized to the inner retina and photoreceptor inner segments. In isolated glial cells, EPO receptor protein is selectively localized to fibers which traverse the inner nuclear layer in situ. Inhibition of glial swelling might contribute to the neuroprotective action of EPO in the retina under pathological conditions.

  8. Reconstitution of LHC phosphorylation by a protein kinase isolated from spinach thylakoids

    SciTech Connect

    Hind, G.; Coughlan, S.

    1986-01-01

    Protein kinase activity is responsible for phosphorylating the (LHC) light-harvesting chlorophyll a/b protein complex of photosystem II, leading to its migration in the thylakoid membrane, the fractional redistribution of excitation energy between photosystems II and I, and the phenomenon of state transition. Previous work from this laboratory described the purification to homogeneity of a thylakoid protein kinase which catalyzes the phosphorylation of isolated LHC at 1-10% of a rate estimated for this enzyme and substrate when resident together in the thylakoid membrane. In this communication, we report rates of LHC phosphorylation that are close to physiological, in a system comprised of isolated purified protein kinase (LHCK) and native LHC. 9 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  9. The receptor kinase family: primary structure of rhodopsin kinase reveals similarities to the beta-adrenergic receptor kinase.

    PubMed Central

    Lorenz, W; Inglese, J; Palczewski, K; Onorato, J J; Caron, M G; Lefkowitz, R J

    1991-01-01

    Light-dependent deactivation of rhodopsin as well as homologous desensitization of beta-adrenergic receptors involves receptor phosphorylation that is mediated by the highly specific protein kinases rhodopsin kinase (RK) and beta-adrenergic receptor kinase (beta ARK), respectively. We report here the cloning of a complementary DNA for RK. The deduced amino acid sequence shows a high degree of homology to beta ARK. In a phylogenetic tree constructed by comparing the catalytic domains of several protein kinases, RK and beta ARK are located on a branch close to, but separate from the cyclic nucleotide-dependent protein kinase and protein kinase C subfamilies. From the common structural features we conclude that both RK and beta ARK are members of a newly delineated gene family of guanine nucleotide-binding protein (G protein)-coupled receptor kinases that may function in diverse pathways to regulate the function of such receptors. Images PMID:1656454

  10. Arylphthalazines: identification of a new phthalazine chemotype as inhibitors of VEGFR kinase.

    PubMed

    Piatnitski, Evgueni L; Duncton, Matthew A J; Kiselyov, Alexander S; Katoch-Rouse, Reeti; Sherman, Dan; Milligan, Daniel L; Balagtas, Chris; Wong, Wai C; Kawakami, Joel; Doody, Jacqueline F

    2005-11-01

    A novel class of 4-arylamino-phthalazin-1-yl-benzamides is described as inhibitors of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor II (VEGFR-2). Several compounds display potent VEGFR-2 inhibitory activity with an IC50 as low as 0.078 microM in an HTRF enzymatic assay. These compounds are relatively selective against a small kinase panel.

  11. Protein Kinase A: A Master Kinase of Granulosa Cell Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Puri, Pawan; Little-Ihrig, Lynda; Chandran, Uma; Law, Nathan C.; Hunzicker-Dunn, Mary; Zeleznik, Anthony J.

    2016-01-01

    Activation of protein kinase A (PKA) by follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) transduces the signal that drives differentiation of ovarian granulosa cells (GCs). An unresolved question is whether PKA is sufficient to initiate the complex program of GC responses to FSH. We compared signaling pathways and gene expression profiles of GCs stimulated with FSH or expressing PKA-CQR, a constitutively active mutant of PKA. Both FSH and PKA-CQR stimulated the phosphorylation of proteins known to be involved in GC differentiation including CREB, ß-catenin, AKT, p42/44 MAPK, GAB2, GSK-3ß, FOXO1, and YAP. In contrast, FSH stimulated the phosphorylation of p38 MAP kinase but PKA-CQR did not. Microarray analysis revealed that 85% of transcripts that were up-regulated by FSH were increased to a comparable extent by PKA-CQR and of the transcripts that were down-regulated by FSH, 76% were also down-regulated by PKA-CQR. Transcripts regulated similarly by FSH and PKA-CQR are involved in steroidogenesis and differentiation, while transcripts more robustly up-regulated by PKA-CQR are involved in ovulation. Thus, PKA, under the conditions of our experimental approach appears to function as a master upstream kinase that is sufficient to initiate the complex pattern of intracellular signaling pathway and gene expression profiles that accompany GC differentiation. PMID:27324437

  12. Effects of selective inhibition of protein kinase C, cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase, and Ca(2+)-calmodulin-dependent protein kinase on neurite development in cultured rat hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Cabell, L; Audesirk, G

    1993-06-01

    A variety of experimental evidence suggests that calmodulin and protein kinases, especially protein kinase C, may participate in regulating neurite development in cultured neurons, particularly neurite initiation. However, the results are somewhat contradictory. Further, the roles of calmodulin and protein kinases on many aspects of neurite development, such as branching or elongation of axons vs dendrites, have not been extensively studied. Cultured embryonic rat hippocampal pyramidal neurons develop readily identifiable axons and dendrites. We used this culture system and the new generation of highly specific protein kinase inhibitors to investigate the roles of protein kinases and calmodulin in neurite development. Neurons were cultured for 2 days in the continuous presence of calphostin C (a specific inhibitor of protein kinase C), KT5720 (inhibitor of cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase), KN62 (inhibitor of Ca(2+)-calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II), or calmidazolium (inhibitor of calmodulin), each at concentrations from approximately 1 to 10 times the concentration reported in the literature to inhibit each kinase by 50%. The effects of phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (an activator of protein kinase C) and 4 alpha-phorbol 12,13-didecanoate (an inactive phorbol ester) were also tested. At concentrations that had no effect on neuronal viability, calphostin C reduced neurite initiation and axon branching without significantly affecting the number of dendrites per neuron, dendrite branching, dendrite length, or axon length. Phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate increased axon branching and the number of dendrites per cell, compared to the inactive 4 alpha-phorbol 12,13-didecanoate. KT5720 inhibited only axon branching. KN62 reduced axon length, the number of dendrites per neuron, and both axon and dendrite branching. At low concentrations, calmidazolium had no effect on any aspect of neurite development, but at high concentrations, calmidazolium inhibited every

  13. Aurora kinases: novel therapy targets in cancers.

    PubMed

    Tang, Anqun; Gao, Keyu; Chu, Laili; Zhang, Rui; Yang, Jing; Zheng, Junnian

    2017-01-29

    Aurora kinases, a family of serine/threonine kinases, consisting of Aurora A (AURKA), Aurora B (AURKB) and Aurora C (AURKC), are essential kinases for cell division via regulating mitosis especially the process of chromosomal segregation. Besides regulating mitosis, Aurora kinases have been implicated in regulating meiosis. The deletion of Aurora kinases could lead to failure of cell division and impair the embryonic development. Overexpression or gene amplification of Aurora kinases has been clarified in a number of cancers. And a growing number of studies have demonstrated that inhibition of Aurora kinases could potentiate the effect of chemotherapies. For the past decades, a series of Aurora kinases inhibitors (AKIs) developed effectively repress the progression and growth of many cancers both in vivo and in vitro, suggesting that Aurora kinases could be a novel therapeutic target. In this review, we'll first briefly present the structure, localization and physiological functions of Aurora kinases in mitosis, then describe the oncogenic role of Aurora kinases in tumorigenesis, we shall finally discuss the outcomes of AKIs combination with conventional therapy.

  14. Receptor tyrosine kinases in carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiao-Ying; Zhang, Pei-Ying

    2016-11-01

    Receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) are cell surface glycoproteins with enzymatic activity involved in the regulation of various important functions. In all-important physiological functions including differentiation, cell-cell interactions, survival, proliferation, metabolism, migration and signaling these receptors are the key players of regulation. Additionally, mutations of RTKs or their overexpression have been described in many human cancers and are being explored as a novel avenue for a new therapeutic approach. Some of the deregulated RTKs observed to be significantly affected in cancers included vascular endothelial growth factor receptor, epidermal growth factor receptor, fibroblast growth factor receptor, RTK-like orphan receptor 1 (ROR1) and the platelet-derived growth factor receptor. These deregulated RTKs offer attractive possibilities for the new anticancer therapeutic approach involving specific targeting by monoclonal antibodies as well as kinase. The present review aimed to highlight recent perspectives of RTK ROR1 in cancer.

  15. Oncoprotein protein kinase antibody kit

    DOEpatents

    Karin, Michael; Hibi, Masahiko; Lin, Anning

    2008-12-23

    An isolated polypeptide (JNK) characterized by having a molecular weight of 46 kD as determined by reducing SDS-PAGE, having serine and threonine kinase activity, phosphorylating the c-Jun N-terminal activation domain and polynucleotide sequences and method of detection of JNK are provided herein. JNK phosphorylates c-Jun N-terminal activation domain which affects gene expression from AP-1 sites.

  16. Use of 5'-γ-ferrocenyl adenosine triphosphate (Fc-ATP) bioconjugates having poly(ethylene glycol) spacers in kinase-catalyzed phosphorylations.

    PubMed

    Martić, Sanela; Rains, Meghan K; Freeman, Daniel; Kraatz, Heinz-Bernhard

    2011-08-17

    The 5'-γ-ferrocenyl adenosine triphosphate (Fc-ATP) bioconjugates (3 and 4), containing the poly(ethylene glycol) spacers, were synthesized and compared to a hydrophobic analogue as co-substrates for the following protein kinases: sarcoma related kinase (Src), cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK), casein kinase II (CK2α), and protein kinase A (PKA). Electrochemical kinase assays indicate that the hydrophobic Fc-ATP analogue was an optimal co-substrate for which K(M) values were determined to be in the 30-200 μM range, depending on the particular protein kinase. The luminescence kinase assay demonstrated the kinase utility for all Fc-ATP conjugates, which is in line with the electrochemical data. Moreover, Fc-ATP bioconjugates exhibit competitive behavior with respect to ATP. Relatively poor performance of the polar Fc-ATP bioconjugates as co-substrates for protein kinases was presumably due to the additional H-bonding and electrostatic interactions of the poly(ethylene glycol) linkers of Fc-ATP with the kinase catalytic site and the target peptides. Phosphorylation of the full-length protein, His-tagged pro-caspase-3, was demonstrated through Fc-phosphoamide transfer to the Ser residues of the surface-bound protein by electrochemical means. These results suggest that electrochemical detection of the peptide and protein Fc-phosphorylation via tailored Fc-ATP co-substrates may be useful for probing protein-protein interactions.

  17. Mevalonate kinase deficiency: current perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Favier, Leslie A; Schulert, Grant S

    2016-01-01

    Mevalonate kinase deficiency (MKD) is a recessively inherited autoinflammatory disorder with a spectrum of manifestations, including the well-defined clinical phenotypes of hyperimmunoglobulinemia D and periodic fever syndrome and mevalonic aciduria. Patients with MKD have recurrent attacks of hyperinflammation associated with fever, abdominal pain, arthralgias, and mucocutaneous lesions, and more severely affected patients also have dysmorphisms and central nervous system anomalies. MKD is caused by mutations in the gene encoding mevalonate kinase, with the degree of residual enzyme activity largely determining disease severity. Mevalonate kinase is essential for the biosynthesis of nonsterol isoprenoids, which mediate protein prenylation. Although the precise pathogenesis of MKD remains unclear, increasing evidence suggests that deficiency in protein prenylation leads to innate immune activation and systemic hyperinflammation. Given the emerging understanding of MKD as an autoinflammatory disorder, recent treatment approaches have largely focused on cytokine-directed biologic therapy. Herein, we review the current genetic and pathologic understanding of MKD, its various clinical phenotypes, and the evolving treatment approach for this multifaceted disorder. PMID:27499643

  18. Nucleotide selectivity of antibiotic kinases.

    PubMed

    Shakya, Tushar; Wright, Gerard D

    2010-05-01

    Antibiotic kinases, which include aminoglycoside and macrolide phosphotransferases (APHs and MPHs), pose a serious threat to currently used antimicrobial therapies. These enzymes show structural and functional homology with Ser/Thr/Tyr kinases, which is suggestive of a common ancestor. Surprisingly, recent in vitro studies using purified antibiotic kinase enzymes have revealed that a number are able to utilize GTP as the antibiotic phospho donor, either preferentially or exclusively compared to ATP, the canonical phosphate donor in most biochemical reactions. To further explore this phenomenon, we examined three enzymes, APH(3')-IIIa, APH(2'')-Ib, and MPH(2')-I, using a competitive assay that mimics in vivo nucleotide triphosphate (NTP) concentrations and usage by each enzyme. Downstream analysis of reaction products by high-performance liquid chromatography enabled the determination of partitioning of phosphate flux from NTP donors to antibiotics. Using this ratio along with support from kinetic analysis and inhibitor studies, we find that under physiologic concentrations of NTPs, APH(3')-IIIa exclusively uses ATP, MPH(2')-I exclusively uses GTP, and APH(2'')-Ib is able to use both species with a preference for GTP. These differences reveal likely different pathways in antibiotic resistance enzyme evolution and can be exploited in selective inhibitor design to counteract resistance.

  19. The Role of Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase-Activated Protein Kinases (MAPKAPKs) in Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Moens, Ugo; Kostenko, Sergiy; Sveinbjørnsson, Baldur

    2013-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways are implicated in several cellular processes including proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis, cell survival, cell motility, metabolism, stress response and inflammation. MAPK pathways transmit and convert a plethora of extracellular signals by three consecutive phosphorylation events involving a MAPK kinase kinase, a MAPK kinase, and a MAPK. In turn MAPKs phosphorylate substrates, including other protein kinases referred to as MAPK-activated protein kinases (MAPKAPKs). Eleven mammalian MAPKAPKs have been identified: ribosomal-S6-kinases (RSK1-4), mitogen- and stress-activated kinases (MSK1-2), MAPK-interacting kinases (MNK1-2), MAPKAPK-2 (MK2), MAPKAPK-3 (MK3), and MAPKAPK-5 (MK5). The role of these MAPKAPKs in inflammation will be reviewed. PMID:24705157

  20. The adenosine kinase hypothesis of epileptogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Boison, Detlev

    2008-01-01

    Current therapies for epilepsy are largely symptomatic and do not affect the underlying mechanisms of disease progression, i.e. epileptogenesis. Given the large percentage of pharmacoresistant chronic epilepsies, novel approaches are needed to understand and modify the underlying pathogenetic mechanisms. Although different types of brain injury (e.g. status epilepticus, traumatic brain injury, stroke) can trigger epileptogenesis, astrogliosis appears to be a homotypic response and hallmark of epilepsy. Indeed, recent findings indicate that epilepsy might be a disease of astrocyte dysfunction. This review focuses on the inhibitory neuromodulator and endogenous anticonvulsant adenosine, which is largely regulated by astrocytes and its key metabolic enzyme adenosine kinase (ADK). Recent findings support the “ADK hypothesis of epileptogenesis”: (i) Mouse models of epileptogenesis suggest a sequence of events leading from initial downregulation of ADK and elevation of ambient adenosine as an acute protective response, to changes in astrocytic adenosine receptor expression, to astrocyte proliferation and hypertrophy (i.e. astrogliosis), to consequential overexpression of ADK, reduced adenosine and – finally – to spontaneous focal seizure activity restricted to regions of astrogliotic overexpression of ADK. (ii) Transgenic mice overexpressing ADK display increased sensitivity to brain injury and seizures. (iii) Inhibition of ADK prevents seizures in a mouse model of pharmacoresistant epilepsy. (iv) Intrahippocampal implants of stem cells engineered to lack ADK prevent epileptogenesis. Thus, ADK emerges both as a diagnostic marker to predict, as well as a prime therapeutic target to prevent, epileptogenesis. PMID:18249058

  1. Structure, biochemistry, and biology of PAK kinases.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Rakesh; Sanawar, Rahul; Li, Xiaodong; Li, Feng

    2017-03-20

    PAKs, p21-activated kinases, play central roles and act as converging junctions for discrete signals elicited on the cell surface and for a number of intracellular signaling cascades. PAKs phosphorylate a vast number of substrates and act by remodeling cytoskeleton, employing scaffolding, and relocating to distinct subcellular compartments. PAKs affect wide range of processes that are crucial to the cell from regulation of cell motility, survival, redox, metabolism, cell cycle, proliferation, transformation, stress, inflammation, to gene expression. Understandably, their dysregulation disrupts cellular homeostasis and severely impacts key cell functions, and many of those are implicated in a number of human diseases including cancers, neurological disorders, and cardiac disorders. Here we provide an overview of the members of the PAK family and their current status. We give special emphasis to PAK1 and PAK4, the prototypes of groups I and II, for their profound roles in cancer, the nervous system, and the heart. We also highlight other family members. We provide our perspective on the current advancements, their growing importance as strategic therapeutic targets, and our vision on the future of PAKs.

  2. Secreted protein kinases regulate cyst burden during chronic toxoplasmosis.

    PubMed

    Jones, Nathaniel G; Wang, Qiuling; Sibley, L David

    2017-02-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is an apicomplexan parasite that secretes a large number of protein kinases and pseudokinases from its rhoptry organelles. Although some rhoptry kinases (ROPKs) act as virulence factors, many remain uncharacterized. In this study, predicted ROPKs were assessed for bradyzoite expression then prioritized for a reverse genetic analysis in the type II strain Pru that is amenable to targeted disruption. Using CRISPR/Cas9, we engineered C-terminally epitope tagged ROP21 and ROP27 and demonstrated their localization to the parasitophorous vacuole and cyst matrix. ROP21 and ROP27 were not secreted from microneme, rhoptry, or dense granule organelles, but rather were located in small vesicles consistent with a constitutive pathway. Using CRISPR/Cas9, the genes for ROP21, ROP27, ROP28, and ROP30 were deleted individually and in combination, and the mutant parasites were assessed for growth and their ability to form tissue cysts in mice. All knockouts lines were normal for in vitro growth and bradyzoite differentiation, but a combined ∆rop21/∆rop17 knockout led to a 50% reduction in cyst burden in vivo. Our findings question the existing annotation of ROPKs based solely on bioinformatic techniques and yet highlight the importance of secreted kinases in determining the severity of chronic toxoplasmosis.

  3. MAP kinase activator from insulin-stimulated skeletal muscle is a protein threonine/tyrosine kinase.

    PubMed Central

    Nakielny, S; Cohen, P; Wu, J; Sturgill, T

    1992-01-01

    A 'MAP kinase activator' was purified several thousand-fold from insulin-stimulated rabbit skeletal muscle, which resembled the 'activator' from nerve growth factor-stimulated PC12 cells in that it could be inactivated by incubation with protein phosphatase 2A, but not by protein tyrosine phosphatases and its apparent molecular mass was 45-50 kDa. In the presence of MgATP, 'MAP kinase activator' converted the normal 'wild-type' 42 kDa MAP kinase from an inactive dephosphorylated form to the fully active diphosphorylated species. Phosphorylation occurred on the same threonine and tyrosine residues which are phosphorylated in vivo in response to growth factors or phorbol esters. A mutant MAP kinase produced by changing a lysine at the active centre to arginine was phosphorylated in an identical manner by the 'MAP kinase activator', but no activity was generated. The results demonstrate that 'MAP kinase activator' is a protein kinase (MAP kinase kinase) and not a protein that stimulates the autophosphorylation of MAP kinase. MAP kinase kinase is the first established example of a protein kinase that can phosphorylate an exogenous protein on threonine as well as tyrosine residues. Images PMID:1318193

  4. Receptor Tyrosine Kinases in Drosophila Development

    PubMed Central

    Sopko, Richelle; Perrimon, Norbert

    2013-01-01

    Tyrosine phosphorylation plays a significant role in a wide range of cellular processes. The Drosophila genome encodes more than 20 receptor tyrosine kinases and extensive studies in the past 20 years have illustrated their diverse roles and complex signaling mechanisms. Although some receptor tyrosine kinases have highly specific functions, others strikingly are used in rather ubiquitous manners. Receptor tyrosine kinases regulate a broad expanse of processes, ranging from cell survival and proliferation to differentiation and patterning. Remarkably, different receptor tyrosine kinases share many of the same effectors and their hierarchical organization is retained in disparate biological contexts. In this comprehensive review, we summarize what is known regarding each receptor tyrosine kinase during Drosophila development. Astonishingly, very little is known for approximately half of all Drosophila receptor tyrosine kinases. PMID:23732470

  5. Pathway illuminated: visualizing protein kinase C signaling.

    PubMed

    Violin, Jonathan D; Newton, Alexandra C

    2003-12-01

    Protein kinase C has been at the center of cell signaling since the discovery 25 years ago that it transduces signals that promote phospholipid hydrolysis. In recent years, the use of genetically encoded fluorescent reporters has enabled studies of the regulation of protein kinase C signaling in living cells. Advances in imaging techniques have unveiled unprecedented detail of the signal processing mechanics of protein kinase C, from the second messengers calcium and diacylglycerol that regulate protein kinase C activity, to the locations and kinetics of different protein kinase C isozymes, to the spatial and temporal dynamics of substrate phosphorylation by this key enzyme. This review discusses how fluorescence imaging studies have illuminated the fidelity with which protein kinase C transduces rapidly changing extracellular information into intracellular phosphorylation signals.

  6. Genome-wide identification and expression analysis of WNK kinase gene family in rice.

    PubMed

    Manuka, Rakesh; Saddhe, Ankush Ashok; Kumar, Kundan

    2015-12-01

    Eukaryotic protein kinases represent one of the largest gene families involved in diverse regulatory functions. WNK (With No Lysine) kinases are members of ser/thr protein kinase family, which lack conserved catalytic lysine (K) residue at protein kinase subdomain II and is replaced by either asparagine, serine or glycine residues. They are involved in regulation of flowering time, circadian rhythms and abiotic stresses in Arabidopsis thaliana. In the present study, we have identified 9 members of WNK in rice, showed resemblance to Arabidopsis and human WNK and clustered into five main clades phylogenetically. The predicted genes structure, bonafide conserved signature motif and domains strongly support their identity, as members of WNK kinase family. We have analyzed their chromosomal distribution, physio-chemical properties, subcellular localizations and cis-elements in the promoter regions in silico. Further, transcript analysis of OsWNK by qRT-PCR revealed their differential regulation in tissue specific and abiotic stresses libraries. In conclusion, the identification of nine OsWNK and transcript level expression pattern under abiotic stress using qRT-PCR in rice will significantly contribute towards the understanding of WNK genes in monocots and thus provide a set up for functional genomics studies of WNK protein kinases.

  7. Photosystem II

    ScienceCinema

    James Barber

    2016-07-12

    James Barber, Ernst Chain Professor of Biochemistry at Imperial College, London, gives a BSA Distinguished Lecture titled, "The Structure and Function of Photosystem II: The Water-Splitting Enzyme of Photosynthesis."

  8. Dictyostelium discoideum has a single diacylglycerol kinase gene with similarity to mammalian theta isoforms.

    PubMed Central

    De La Roche, Marc A; Smith, Janet L; Rico, Maribel; Carrasco, Silvia; Merida, Isabel; Licate, Lucila; Côté, Graham P; Egelhoff, Thomas T

    2002-01-01

    Diacylglycerol kinases (DGKs) phosphorylate the neutral lipid diacylglycerol (DG) to produce phosphatidic acid (PA). In mammalian systems DGKs are a complex family of at least nine isoforms that are thought to participate in down-regulation of DG-based signalling pathways and perhaps activation of PA-stimulated signalling events. We report here that the simple protozoan amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum appears to contain a single gene encoding a DGK enzyme. This gene, dgkA, encodes a deduced protein that contains three C1-type cysteine-rich repeats, a DGK catalytic domain most closely related to the theta subtype of mammalian DGKs and a C-terminal segment containing a proline/glutamine-rich region and a large aspargine-repeat region. This gene corresponds to a previously reported myosin II heavy chain kinase designated myosin heavy chain-protein kinase C (MHC-PKC), but our analysis clearly demonstrates that this protein does not, as suggested by earlier data, contain a protein kinase catalytic domain. A FLAG-tagged version of DgkA expressed in Dictyostelium displayed robust DGK activity. Earlier studies indicating that disruption of this locus alters myosin II assembly levels in Dictyostelium raise the intriguing possibility that DG and/or PA metabolism may play a role in controlling myosin II assembly in this system. PMID:12296770

  9. Cellular response to low dose radiation: Role of phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase like kinases

    SciTech Connect

    Balajee, A.S.; Meador, J.A.; Su, Y.

    2011-03-24

    It is increasingly realized that human exposure either to an acute low dose or multiple chronic low doses of low LET radiation has the potential to cause different types of cancer. Therefore, the central theme of research for DOE and NASA is focused on understanding the molecular mechanisms and pathways responsible for the cellular response to low dose radiation which would not only improve the accuracy of estimating health risks but also help in the development of predictive assays for low dose radiation risks associated with tissue degeneration and cancer. The working hypothesis for this proposal is that the cellular mechanisms in terms of DNA damage signaling, repair and cell cycle checkpoint regulation are different for low and high doses of low LET radiation and that the mode of action of phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase like kinases (PIKK: ATM, ATR and DNA-PK) determines the dose dependent cellular responses. The hypothesis will be tested at two levels: (I) Evaluation of the role of ATM, ATR and DNA-PK in cellular response to low and high doses of low LET radiation in simple in vitro human cell systems and (II) Determination of radiation responses in complex cell microenvironments such as human EpiDerm tissue constructs. Cellular responses to low and high doses of low LET radiation will be assessed from the view points of DNA damage signaling, DNA double strand break repair and cell cycle checkpoint regulation by analyzing the activities (i.e. post-translational modifications and kinetics of protein-protein interactions) of the key target proteins for PI-3 kinase like kinases both at the intra-cellular and molecular levels. The proteins chosen for this proposal are placed under three categories: (I) sensors/initiators include ATM ser1981, ATR, 53BP1, gamma-H2AX, MDC1, MRE11, Rad50 and Nbs1; (II) signal transducers include Chk1, Chk2, FANCD2 and SMC1; and (III) effectors include p53, CDC25A and CDC25C. The primary goal of this proposal is to elucidate the

  10. The phosphoinositide 3-kinase pathway.

    PubMed

    Cantley, Lewis C

    2002-05-31

    Phosphorylated lipids are produced at cellular membranes during signaling events and contribute to the recruitment and activation of various signaling components. The role of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K), which catalyzes the production of phosphatidylinositol-3,4,5-trisphosphate, in cell survival pathways; the regulation of gene expression and cell metabolism; and cytoskeletal rearrangements are highlighted. The PI3K pathway is implicated in human diseases including diabetes and cancer, and understanding the intricacies of this pathway may provide new avenues for therapuetic intervention.

  11. Discovery of Small Molecule RIP1 Kinase Inhibitors for the Treatment of Pathologies Associated with Necroptosis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Potent inhibitors of RIP1 kinase from three distinct series, 1-aminoisoquinolines, pyrrolo[2,3-b]pyridines, and furo[2,3-d]pyrimidines, all of the type II class recognizing a DLG-out inactive conformation, were identified from screening of our in-house kinase focused sets. An exemplar from the furo[2,3-d]pyrimidine series showed a dose proportional response in protection from hypothermia in a mouse model of TNFα induced lethal shock. PMID:24900635

  12. Polo-like kinase Cdc5 controls the local activation of Rho1 to promote cytokinesis.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Satoshi; Kono, Keiko; Lowery, Drew M; Bartolini, Sara; Yaffe, Michael B; Ohya, Yoshikazu; Pellman, David

    2006-07-07

    The links between the cell cycle machinery and the cytoskeletal proteins controlling cytokinesis are poorly understood. The small guanine nucleotide triphosphate (GTP)-binding protein RhoA stimulates type II myosin contractility and formin-dependent assembly of the cytokinetic actin contractile ring. We found that budding yeast Polo-like kinase Cdc5 controls the targeting and activation of Rho1 (RhoA) at the division site via Rho1 guanine nucleotide exchange factors. This role of Cdc5 (Polo-like kinase) in regulating Rho1 is likely to be relevant to cytokinesis and asymmetric cell division in other organisms.

  13. Tyrosine kinases in inflammatory dermatologic disease

    PubMed Central

    Paniagua, Ricardo T.; Fiorentino, David; Chung, Lorinda; Robinson, William H.

    2010-01-01

    Tyrosine kinases are enzymes that catalyze the phosphorylation of tyrosine residues on protein substrates. They are key components of signaling pathways that drive an array of cellular responses including proliferation, differentiation, migration, and survival. Specific tyrosine kinases have recently been identified as critical to the pathogenesis of several autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. Small-molecule inhibitors of tyrosine kinases are emerging as a novel class of therapy that may provide benefit in certain patient subsets. In this review, we highlight tyrosine kinase signaling implicated in inflammatory dermatologic diseases, evaluate strategies aimed at inhibiting these aberrant signaling pathways, and discuss prospects for future drug development. PMID:20584561

  14. MST kinases in development and disease

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The mammalian MST kinase family, which is related to the Hippo kinase in Drosophila melanogaster, includes five related proteins: MST1 (also called STK4), MST2 (also called STK3), MST3 (also called STK24), MST4, and YSK1 (also called STK25 or SOK1). MST kinases are emerging as key signaling molecules that influence cell proliferation, organ size, cell migration, and cell polarity. Here we review the regulation and function of these kinases in normal physiology and pathologies, including cancer, endothelial malformations, and autoimmune disease. PMID:26370497

  15. Phosphorylation of inhibitor-2 and activation of MgATP-dependent protein phosphatase by rat skeletal muscle glycogen synthase kinase

    SciTech Connect

    Hegazy, M.G.; Reimann, E.M.; Thysseril, T.J.; Schlender, K.K.

    1986-05-01

    Rat skeletal muscle contains a glycogen synthase kinase (GSK-M) which is not stimulated by Ca/sup 2 +/ or cAMP. This kinase has an apparent Mr of 62,000 and uses ATP but not GTP as a phosphoryl donor. GSK-M phosphorylated glycogen synthase at sites 2 and 3. It phosphorylated ATP-citrate lyase and activated MgATP-dependent phosphatase in the presence of ATP but not GTP. As expected, the kinase also phosphorylated phosphatase inhibitor 2 (I-2). Phosphatase incorporation reached approximately 0.3 mol/mol of I-2. Phosphopeptide maps were obtained by digesting /sup 32/P-labeled I-2 with trypsin and separating the peptides by reversed phase HPLC. Two partially separated /sup 32/P-labeled peaks were obtained when I-2 was phosphorylated with either GSK-M or glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK-3) and these peptides were different from those obtained when I-2 was phosphorylated with the catalytic subunit of cAMP-dependent protein kinase (CSU) or casein kinase II (CK-II). When I-2 was phosphorylated with GSK-M or GSK-3 and cleaved by CNBr, a single radioactive peak was obtained. Phosphoamino acid analysis showed that I-2 was phosphorylated by GSK-M or GSK-3 predominately in Thr whereas CSU and CK-II phosphorylated I-2 exclusively in Ser. These results indicate that GSK-M is similar to GSK-3 and to ATP-citrate lyase kinase. However, it appears to differ in Mr from ATP-citrate lyase kinase and it differs from GSK-3 in that it phosphorylates glycogen synthase at site 2 and it does not use GTP as a phosphoryl donor.

  16. Ca2+/Calmodulin-Dependent Kinase Kinase α Is Expressed by Monocytic Cells and Regulates the Activation Profile

    PubMed Central

    Guest, Christopher B.; Deszo, Eric L.; Hartman, Matthew E.; York, Jason M.; Kelley, Keith W.; Freund, Gregory G.

    2008-01-01

    Macrophages are capable of assuming numerous phenotypes in order to adapt to endogenous and exogenous challenges but many of the factors that regulate this process are still unknown. We report that Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent kinase kinase α (CaMKKα) is expressed in human monocytic cells and demonstrate that its inhibition blocks type-II monocytic cell activation and promotes classical activation. Affinity chromatography with paramagnetic beads isolated an approximately 50 kDa protein from nuclear lysates of U937 human monocytic cells activated with phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA). This protein was identified as CaMKKα by mass spectrometry and Western analysis. The function of CaMKKα in monocyte activation was examined using the CaMKKα inhibitors (STO-609 and forskolin) and siRNA knockdown. Inhibition of CaMKKα, enhanced PMA-dependent CD86 expression and reduced CD11b expression. In addition, inhibition was associated with decreased translocation of CaMKKα to the nucleus. Finally, to further examine monocyte activation profiles, TNFα and IL-10 secretion were studied. CaMKKα inhibition attenuated PMA-dependent IL-10 production and enhanced TNFα production indicating a shift from type-II to classical monocyte activation. Taken together, these findings indicate an important new role for CaMKKα in the differentiation of monocytic cells. PMID:18270593

  17. Diacylglycerol kinases in membrane trafficking

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Shuwei; Naslavsky, Naava; Caplan, Steve

    2015-01-01

    Diacylglycerol kinases (DGKs) belong to a family of cytosolic kinases that regulate the phosphorylation of diacylglycerol (DAG), converting it into phosphatidic acid (PA). There are 10 known mammalian DGK isoforms, each with a different tissue distribution and substrate specificity. These differences allow regulation of cellular responses by fine-tuning the delicate balance of cellular DAG and PA. DGK isoforms are best characterized as mediators of signal transduction and immune function. However, since recent studies reveal that DAG and PA are also involved in the regulation of endocytic trafficking, it is therefore anticipated that DGKs also plays an important role in membrane trafficking. In this review, we summarize the literature discussing the role of DGK isoforms at different stages of endocytic trafficking, including endocytosis, exocytosis, endocytic recycling, and transport from/to the Golgi apparatus. Overall, these studies contribute to our understanding of the involvement of PA and DAG in endocytic trafficking, an area of research that is drawing increasing attention in recent years. PMID:27057419

  18. Receptor-like kinases from Arabidopsis form a monophyletic gene family related to animal receptor kinases

    PubMed Central

    Shiu, Shin-Han; Bleecker, Anthony B.

    2001-01-01

    Plant receptor-like kinases (RLKs) are proteins with a predicted signal sequence, single transmembrane region, and cytoplasmic kinase domain. Receptor-like kinases belong to a large gene family with at least 610 members that represent nearly 2.5% of Arabidopsis protein coding genes. We have categorized members of this family into subfamilies based on both the identity of the extracellular domains and the phylogenetic relationships between the kinase domains of subfamily members. Surprisingly, this structurally defined group of genes is monophyletic with respect to kinase domains when compared with the other eukaryotic kinase families. In an extended analysis, animal receptor kinases, Raf kinases, plant RLKs, and animal receptor tyrosine kinases form a well supported group sharing a common origin within the superfamily of serine/threonine/tyrosine kinases. Among animal kinase sequences, Drosophila Pelle and related cytoplasmic kinases fall within the plant RLK clade, which we now define as the RLK/Pelle family. A survey of expressed sequence tag records for land plants reveals that mosses, ferns, conifers, and flowering plants have similar percentages of expressed sequence tags representing RLK/Pelle homologs, suggesting that the size of this gene family may have been close to the present-day level before the diversification of land plant lineages. The distribution pattern of four RLK subfamilies on Arabidopsis chromosomes indicates that the expansion of this gene family is partly a consequence of duplication and reshuffling of the Arabidopsis genome and of the generation of tandem repeats. PMID:11526204

  19. A chemically defined culture medium containing Rho kinase inhibitor Y-27632 for the fabrication of stratified squamous epithelial cell grafts

    SciTech Connect

    Aslanova, Afag; Takagi, Ryo; Yamato, Masayuki; Okano, Teruo; Yamamoto, Masakazu

    2015-05-01

    With the development of a culture method for stratified squamous epithelial cells, tissue-engineered epithelial cell sheets have been successfully applied as clinical cell grafts. However, the implementation of these cell sheets without the use of any animal-derived materials is highly desirable. In this study, Rho-associated protein kinase inhibitor Y-27632 was used to develop a chemically defined culture medium for the fabrication of stratified epithelial cell grafts consisting of human epidermal and oral keratinocytes, and the proliferation activity, cell morphology, and gene expressions of the keratinocytes were analyzed. The results of a colorimetric assay indicated that Y-27632 significantly promoted the proliferation of the keratinocytes in culture media both with and without fetal bovine serum (FBS), although there were no indications of Y-27632 efficacy on cell morphology and stratification of the keratinocytes in culture medium without any animal-derived materials. The results of quantitative RT-PCR revealed that gene expressions correlated with cell adhesion, cell–cell junction, proliferation markers, and stem/progenitor markers in cultured keratinocytes were not strongly affected by the addition of Y-27632 to the culture medium. Moreover, gene expressions of differentiation markers in stratified keratinocytes cultured in medium without FBS were nearly identical to those of keratinocytes co-cultured with 3T3 feeder cells. Interestingly, the expressions of differentiation markers in cultured stratified keratinocytes were suppressed by FBS, whereas they were reconstructed by either co-culture of a 3T3 feeder layer or addition of Y-27632 into the culture medium containing FBS. These findings indicate that Y-27632 is a useful supplement for the development of a chemically defined culture medium for fabrication of stratified epithelial cell grafts for clinical applications for the purpose of developing the culture medium with a lower risk of pathogen

  20. Dominant Mutations of Drosophila Map Kinase Kinase and Their Activities in Drosophila and Yeast Map Kinase Cascades

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Y. M.; Tsuda, L.; Inoue, Y. H.; Irie, K.; Adachi-Yamada, T.; Hata, M.; Nishi, Y.; Matsumoto, K.; Nishida, Y.

    1997-01-01

    Eight alleles of Dsor1 encoding a Drosophila homologue of mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase kinase were obtained as dominant suppressors of the MAP kinase kinase kinase D-raf. These Dsor1 alleles themselves showed no obvious phenotypic consequences nor any effect on the viability of the flies, although they were highly sensitive to upstream signals and strongly interacted with gain-of-function mutations of upstream factors. They suppressed mutations for receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs); torso (tor), sevenless (sev) and to a lesser extent Drosophila EGF receptor (DER). Furthermore, the Dsor1 alleles showed no significant interaction with gain-of-function mutations of DER. The observed difference in activity of the Dsor1 alleles among the RTK pathways suggests Dsor1 is one of the components of the pathway that regulates signal specificity. Expression of Dsor1 in budding yeast demonstrated that Dsor1 can activate yeast MAP kinase homologues if a proper activator of Dsor1 is coexpressed. Nucleotide sequencing of the Dsor1 mutant genes revealed that most of the mutations are associated with amino acid changes at highly conserved residues in the kinase domain. The results suggest that they function as suppressors due to increased reactivity to upstream factors. PMID:9136016

  1. Ets-1 upregulation mediates angiotensin II-related cardiac fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Hao, Guanghua; Han, Zhenhua; Meng, Zhe; Wei, Jin; Gao, Dengfeng; Zhang, Hong; Wang, Nanping

    2015-01-01

    Ets-1, the prototypical member of the family of Ets transcription factors, has been shown to participate in tissue fibrotic remodeling. However, its role in cardiac fibrosis has not been established. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of Ets-1 in profibrotic actions of angiotensin II (Ang II) in cardiac fibroblasts (CFs) and in the in vivo heart. In growth-arrested CFs, Ang II induced Ets-1 expression in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. Pretreatment with Ang II type 1 receptor blocker losartan, protein kinase C inhibitor bisindolylmaleimide I, extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) inhibitor PD98059, or c-Jun NH(2)-terminal kinase (JNK) inhibitor SP600125 partly inhibited this induction accompanied with impaired cell proliferation and production of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) and connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) protein, the two downstream targets of Ets-1. Knockdown of Ets-1 by siRNA significantly inhibited the inductive effects of Ang II on cell proliferation and expression of CTGF and PAI-1. Moreover, the levels of Ets-1, PAI-1 and CTGF protein were simultaneously upregulated in left ventricle of Ang II-infused rats in parallel with an increase in the activation of ERK and JNK. Our data suggest that Ets-1 may mediate Ang II-induced cardiac fibrotic effects.

  2. Regulation of the activity of protein kinases by endogenous heat stable protein inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Szmigielski, A

    1985-01-01

    Protein kinase activities are regulated by endogenous thermostable protein inhibitors. Type I inhibitor is a protein of MW 22,000-24,000 which inhibits specifically cyclic AMP-(cAMP) dependent protein kinase (APK) as a competitive inhibitor of catalytic subunits of the enzyme. Type I inhibitor activity changes inversely according to the activation of adenylate cyclase and the changes in cAMP content in tissues. It seems that type I inhibitor serves as a factor preventing spontaneous cAMP-dependent phosphorylation in unstimulated cell. The other thermostable protein which inhibits APK activity has been found in Sertoli cell-enriched testis (testis inhibitor). Physiological role of the testis inhibitor is unknown. Type II inhibitor is a protein of MW 15,000 which blocks phosphorylation mediated by cAMP and cyclic GMP (cGMP) dependent (APK and GPK) and cyclic nucleotide independent protein kinases as a competitive inhibitor of substrate proteins. Activity of this inhibitor specifically changes in reciprocal manner to the changes in cGMP content. It seems that type II inhibitor serves as a factor preventing the phosphorylation catalyzed by GPK when cGMP content is low. Stimulation of guanylate cyclase and activation of GPK is followed by a decrease of type II inhibitor activity. This change in relationship between activities of GPK and type II inhibitor allows for effective phosphorylation catalyzed by this enzyme when cGMP content is increased.

  3. Measuring the Activity of Leucine-Rich Repeat Kinase 2: A Kinase Involved in Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Byoung Dae; Li, Xiaojie; Dawson, Ted M.; Dawson, Valina L.

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in the LRRK2 (Leucine-Rich Repeat Kinase 2) gene are the most common cause of autosomal dominant Parkinson's disease. LRRK2 has multiple functional domains including a kinase domain. The kinase<