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Sample records for rho-associated kinase ii

  1. Rho-Associated Kinase Activity Is an Independent Predictor of Cardiovascular Events in Acute Coronary Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kajikawa, Masato; Noma, Kensuke; Nakashima, Ayumu; Maruhashi, Tatsuya; Iwamoto, Yumiko; Matsumoto, Takeshi; Iwamoto, Akimichi; Oda, Nozomu; Hidaka, Takayuki; Kihara, Yasuki; Aibara, Yoshiki; Chayama, Kazuaki; Sasaki, Shota; Kato, Masaya; Dote, Keigo; Goto, Chikara; Liao, James K.; Higashi, Yukihito

    2016-01-01

    Rho-associated kinases play an important role in a variety of cellular functions. Although Rho-associated kinase activity has been shown to be an independent predictor for future cardiovascular events in a general population, there is no information on Rho-associated kinase activity in patients with acute coronary syndrome. We evaluated leukocyte Rho-associated kinase activity by Western blot analysis in 73 patients with acute coronary syndrome and 73 age- and gender-matched control subjects. Rho-associated kinase activity within 2 hours of acute coronary syndrome onset was higher in patients with acute coronary syndrome than in the control subjects (0.95±0.55 versus 0.69±0.31; P<0.001). Rho-associated kinase activity promptly increased from 0.95±0.55 to 1.11±0.81 after 3 hours and reached a peak of 1.21±0.76 after 1 day (P=0.03 and P=0.03, respectively) and then gradually decreased to 0.83±0.52 after 7 days, 0.78±0.42 after 14 days, and 0.72±0.30 after 6 months (P=0.22, P=0.29, and P=0.12, respectively). During a median follow-up period of 50.8 months, 31 first major cardiovascular events (death from cardiovascular causes, myocardial infarction, ischemic stroke, and coronary revascularization) occurred. After adjustment for age, sex, cardiovascular risk factors, and concomitant treatment with statins, increased Rho-associated kinase activity was associated with increasing risk of first major cardiovascular events (hazard ratio, 4.56; 95% confidence interval, 1.98–11.34; P<0.001). These findings suggest that Rho-associated kinase activity is dramatically changed after acute coronary syndrome and that Rho-associated kinase activity could be a useful biomarker to predict cardiovascular events in Japanese patients with acute coronary syndrome. PMID:26283039

  2. Pharmacological properties of Y-27632, a specific inhibitor of rho-associated kinases.

    PubMed

    Ishizaki, T; Uehata, M; Tamechika, I; Keel, J; Nonomura, K; Maekawa, M; Narumiya, S

    2000-05-01

    Y-27632 [(+)-(R)-trans-4-(1-aminoethyl)-N-(4-pyridyl)cyclohexanecarboxamide++ + dihydrochloride] is widely used as a specific inhibitor of the Rho-associated coiled-coil forming protein serine/threonine kinase (ROCK) family of protein kinases. This study examined the inhibition mechanism and profile of actions of Y-27632 and a related compound, Y-30141 [(+)-(R)-trans- 4-(1-aminoethyl)-N-(1H-pyrrolo[2, 3-b]pyridin-4-yl)cyclohexan-ecarboxamide dihydrochloride]. Y-27632 and Y-30141 inhibited the kinase activity of both ROCK-I and ROCK-II in vitro, and this inhibition was reversed by ATP in a competitive manner. This suggests that these compounds inhibit the kinases by binding to the catalytic site. Their affinities for ROCK kinases as determined by K(i) values were at least 20 to 30 times higher than those for two other Rho effector kinases, citron kinase and protein kinase PKN. [(3)H]Y-30141 was taken up by cells in a temperature- and time-dependent and saturable manner, and this uptake was competed with unlabeled Y-27632. No concentrated accumulation was found, suggesting that the uptake is a carrier-mediated facilitated diffusion. Y-27632 abolished stress fibers in Swiss 3T3 cells at 10 microM, but the G(1)-S phase transition of the cell cycle and cytokinesis were little affected at this concentration. Y-30141 was 10 times more potent than Y-27632 in inhibiting the kinase activity and stress fiber formation, and it caused significant delay in the G(1)-S transition and inhibition of cytokinesis at 10 microM.

  3. PAK and other Rho-associated kinases – effectors with surprisingly diverse mechanisms of regulation

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    The Rho GTPases are a family of molecular switches that are critical regulators of signal transduction pathways in eukaryotic cells. They are known principally for their role in regulating the cytoskeleton, and do so by recruiting a variety of downstream effector proteins. Kinases form an important class of Rho effector, and part of the biological complexity brought about by switching on a single GTPase results from downstream phosphorylation cascades. Here we focus on our current understanding of the way in which different Rho-associated serine/threonine kinases, denoted PAK (p21-activated kinase), MLK (mixed-lineage kinase), ROK (Rho-kinase), MRCK (myotonin-related Cdc42-binding kinase), CRIK (citron kinase) and PKN (protein kinase novel), interact with and are regulated by their partner GTPases. All of these kinases have in common an ability to dimerize, and in most cases interact with a variety of other proteins that are important for their function. A diversity of known structures underpin the Rho GTPase–kinase interaction, but only in the case of PAK do we have a good molecular understanding of kinase regulation. The ability of Rho GTPases to co-ordinate spatial and temporal phosphorylation events explains in part their prominent role in eukaryotic cell biology. PMID:15548136

  4. Pathophysiological effects of RhoA and Rho-associated kinase on cardiovascular system.

    PubMed

    Cai, Anping; Li, Liwen; Zhou, Yingling

    2016-01-01

    In past decades, growing evidence from basic and clinical researches reveal that small guanosine triphosphate binding protein ras homolog gene family, member A (RhoA) and its main effector Rho-associated kinase (ROCK) play central and complex roles in cardiovascular systems, and increasing RhoA and ROCK activity is associated with a broad range of cardiovascular diseases such as congestive heart failure, atherosclerosis, and hypertension. Favorable outcomes have been observed with ROCK inhibitors treatment. In this review, we briefly summarize the pathophysiological roles of RhoA/ROCK signaling pathway on cardiovascular system, displaying the potential benefits in the cardiovascular system with controlling RhoA/ROCK signaling pathway.

  5. Rho-associated kinases play an essential role in cardiac morphogenesis and cardiomyocyte proliferation.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zhiyong; Rivkees, Scott A

    2003-01-01

    Rho-associated coiled-coil kinases (ROCKs), initially identified as effectors for Rho GTPases, play a role in cardiac cell physiology and are also expressed in the developing heart. However, their role in cardiac development is not known. To investigate the role of these kinases in cardiac development, we examined cardiac development in cultured murine embryos treated with the ROCK inhibitor Y27632. After inhibition of ROCK activity, we found disturbed cardiac chamber formation and trabeculation. To further examine the mechanisms by which ROCK blockade causes cardiac hypoplasia, we assessed programmed cell death and cell proliferation in the hearts. We found decreased cell proliferation in the Y27632-treated hearts, but no changes in programmed cell death. We further observed that ROCK inhibition decreased cardiac myocyte proliferation, suggesting that ROCK kinases regulate cardiomyocyte division. To identify factors involved in ROCK action in regulation of cardiac cell division, we examined expression of cell cycle proteins by using Western blot analysis. We found that ROCK blockade decreased expression of cell cycle proteins, cyclin D3, CDK6, and p27(KIP1) in the hearts and cardiomyocytes, which are required for initiation of cell cycle and G1/S phase transition. These observations show that ROCK kinases play a role in cardiac development and that ROCK kinases regulate cardiac cell proliferation and cell cycle protein expression.

  6. Diabetes Causes Bone Marrow Endothelial Barrier Dysfunction by Activation of the RhoA–Rho-Associated Kinase Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Mangialardi, Giuseppe; Katare, Rajesh; Oikawa, Atsuhiko; Meloni, Marco; Reni, Carlotta; Emanueli, Costanza; Madeddu, Paolo

    2013-01-01

    Objective Diabetes mellitus causes bone marrow (BM) microangiopathy. This study aimed to investigate the mechanisms responsible for BM endothelial dysfunction in diabetes mellitus. Methods and Results The analysis of differentially expressed transcripts in BM endothelial cells (BMECs) from type-1 diabetic and nondiabetic mice showed an effect of diabetes mellitus on signaling pathways controlling cell death, migration, and cytoskeletal rearrangement. Type-1 diabetic-BMECs displayed high reactive oxygen species levels, increased expression and activity of RhoA and its associated protein kinases Rho-associated kinase 1/Rho-associated kinase 2, and reduced Akt phosphorylation/activity. Likewise, diabetes mellitus impaired Akt-related BMEC functions, such as migration, network formation, and angiocrine factor-releasing activity, and increased vascular permeability. Moreover, high glucose disrupted BMEC contacts through Src tyrosine kinase phosphorylation of vascular endothelial cadherin. These alterations were prevented by constitutively active Akt (myristoylated Akt), Rho-associated kinase inhibitor Y-27632, and Src inhibitors. Insulin replacement restored BMEC abundance, as assessed by flow cytometry analysis of the endothelial marker MECA32, and endothelial barrier function in BM of type-1 diabetic mice. Conclusion Redox-dependent activation of RhoA/Rho-associated kinase and Src/vascular endothelial cadherin signaling pathways, together with Akt inactivation, contribute to endothelial dysfunction in diabetic BM. Metabolic control is crucial for maintenance of endothelial cell homeostasis and endothelial barrier function in BM of diabetic mice. PMID:23307872

  7. Rho-associated kinase (ROCK) inhibition reverses low cell activity on hydrophobic surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Tian, Yu Shun; Kim, Hyun Jung; Kim, Hyun-Man

    2009-08-28

    Hydrophobic polymers do not offer an adequate scaffold surface for cells to attach, migrate, proliferate, and differentiate. Thus, hydrophobic scaffolds for tissue engineering have traditionally been physicochemically modified to enhance cellular activity. However, modifying the surface by chemical or physical treatment requires supplementary engineering procedures. In the present study, regulation of a cell signal transduction pathway reversed the low cellular activity on a hydrophobic surface without surface modification. Inhibition of Rho-associated kinase (ROCK) by Y-27632 markedly enhanced adhesion, migration, and proliferation of osteoblastic cells cultured on a hydrophobic polystyrene surface. ROCK inhibition regulated cell-cycle-related molecules on the hydrophobic surface. This inhibition also decreased expression of the inhibitors of cyclin-dependent kinases such as p21{sup cip1} and p27{sup kip1} and increased expression of cyclin A and D. These results indicate that defective cellular activity on the hydrophobic surface can be reversed by the control of a cell signal transduction pathway without physicochemical surface modification.

  8. Rho-associated kinase (ROCK) inhibition reverses low cell activity on hydrophobic surfaces.

    PubMed

    Tian, Yu Shun; Kim, Hyun Jung; Kim, Hyun-Man

    2009-08-28

    Hydrophobic polymers do not offer an adequate scaffold surface for cells to attach, migrate, proliferate, and differentiate. Thus, hydrophobic scaffolds for tissue engineering have traditionally been physicochemically modified to enhance cellular activity. However, modifying the surface by chemical or physical treatment requires supplementary engineering procedures. In the present study, regulation of a cell signal transduction pathway reversed the low cellular activity on a hydrophobic surface without surface modification. Inhibition of Rho-associated kinase (ROCK) by Y-27632 markedly enhanced adhesion, migration, and proliferation of osteoblastic cells cultured on a hydrophobic polystyrene surface. ROCK inhibition regulated cell-cycle-related molecules on the hydrophobic surface. This inhibition also decreased expression of the inhibitors of cyclin-dependent kinases such as p21(cip1) and p27(kip1) and increased expression of cyclin A and D. These results indicate that defective cellular activity on the hydrophobic surface can be reversed by the control of a cell signal transduction pathway without physicochemical surface modification.

  9. Rho-associated kinase, a novel serine/threonine kinase, as a putative target for small GTP binding protein Rho.

    PubMed Central

    Matsui, T; Amano, M; Yamamoto, T; Chihara, K; Nakafuku, M; Ito, M; Nakano, T; Okawa, K; Iwamatsu, A; Kaibuchi, K

    1996-01-01

    The small GTP binding protein Rho is implicated in cytoskeletal responses to extracellular signals such as lysophosphatidic acid to form stress fibers and focal contacts. Here we have purified a Rho-interacting protein with a molecular mass of approximately 164 kDa (p164) from bovine brain. This protein bound to GTPgammaS (a non-hydrolyzable GTP analog).RhoA but not to GDP.RhoA or GTPgammaS.RhoA with a mutation in the effector domain (RhoAA37).p164 had a kinase activity which was specifically stimulated by GTPgammaS.RhoA. We obtained the cDNA encoding p164 on the basis of its partial amino acid sequences and named it Rho-associated kinase (Rho-kinase). Rho-kinase has a catalytic domain in the N-terminal portion, a coiled coil domain in the middle portion and a zinc finger-like motif in the C-terminal portion. The catalytic domain shares 72% sequence homology with that of myotonic dystrophy kinase and the coiled coil domain contains a Rho-interacting interface. When COS7 cells were cotransfected with Rho-kinase and activated RhoA, some Rho-kinase was recruited to membranes. Thus it is likely that Rho-kinase is a putative target serine/threonine kinase for Rho and serves as a mediator of the Rho-dependent signaling pathway. Images PMID:8641286

  10. Rho-associated kinase (ROCK) function is essential for cell cycle progression, senescence and tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Kümper, Sandra; Mardakheh, Faraz K; McCarthy, Afshan; Yeo, Maggie; Stamp, Gordon W; Paul, Angela; Worboys, Jonathan; Sadok, Amine; Jørgensen, Claus; Guichard, Sabrina; Marshall, Christopher J

    2016-01-01

    Rho-associated kinases 1 and 2 (ROCK1/2) are Rho-GTPase effectors that control key aspects of the actin cytoskeleton, but their role in proliferation and cancer initiation or progression is not known. Here, we provide evidence that ROCK1 and ROCK2 act redundantly to maintain actomyosin contractility and cell proliferation and that their loss leads to cell-cycle arrest and cellular senescence. This phenotype arises from down-regulation of the essential cell-cycle proteins CyclinA, CKS1 and CDK1. Accordingly, while the loss of either Rock1 or Rock2 had no negative impact on tumorigenesis in mouse models of non-small cell lung cancer and melanoma, loss of both blocked tumor formation, as no tumors arise in which both Rock1 and Rock2 have been genetically deleted. Our results reveal an indispensable role for ROCK, yet redundant role for isoforms 1 and 2, in cell cycle progression and tumorigenesis, possibly through the maintenance of cellular contractility. PMID:26765561

  11. Rho-associated kinase (ROCK) function is essential for cell cycle progression, senescence and tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Kümper, Sandra; Mardakheh, Faraz K; McCarthy, Afshan; Yeo, Maggie; Stamp, Gordon W; Paul, Angela; Worboys, Jonathan; Sadok, Amine; Jørgensen, Claus; Guichard, Sabrina; Marshall, Christopher J

    2016-01-14

    Rho-associated kinases 1 and 2 (ROCK1/2) are Rho-GTPase effectors that control key aspects of the actin cytoskeleton, but their role in proliferation and cancer initiation or progression is not known. Here, we provide evidence that ROCK1 and ROCK2 act redundantly to maintain actomyosin contractility and cell proliferation and that their loss leads to cell-cycle arrest and cellular senescence. This phenotype arises from down-regulation of the essential cell-cycle proteins CyclinA, CKS1 and CDK1. Accordingly, while the loss of either Rock1 or Rock2 had no negative impact on tumorigenesis in mouse models of non-small cell lung cancer and melanoma, loss of both blocked tumor formation, as no tumors arise in which both Rock1 and Rock2 have been genetically deleted. Our results reveal an indispensable role for ROCK, yet redundant role for isoforms 1 and 2, in cell cycle progression and tumorigenesis, possibly through the maintenance of cellular contractility.

  12. Inhibition of Rho-Associated Kinase 1/2 Attenuates Tumor Growth in Murine Gastric Cancer.

    PubMed

    Hinsenkamp, Isabel; Schulz, Sandra; Roscher, Mareike; Suhr, Anne-Maria; Meyer, Björn; Munteanu, Bogdan; Fuchser, Jens; Schoenberg, Stefan O; Ebert, Matthias P A; Wängler, Björn; Hopf, Carsten; Burgermeister, Elke

    2016-08-01

    Gastric cancer (GC) remains a malignant disease with high mortality. Patients are frequently diagnosed in advanced stages where survival prognosis is poor. Thus, there is high medical need to find novel drug targets and treatment strategies. Recently, the comprehensive molecular characterization of GC subtypes revealed mutations in the small GTPase RHOA as a hallmark of diffuse-type GC. RHOA activates RHO-associated protein kinases (ROCK1/2) which regulate cell contractility, migration and growth and thus may play a role in cancer. However, therapeutic benefit of RHO-pathway inhibition in GC has not been shown so far. The ROCK1/2 inhibitor 1-(5-isoquinoline sulfonyl)-homopiperazine (HA-1077, fasudil) is approved for cerebrovascular bleeding in patients. We therefore investigated whether fasudil (i.p., 10 mg/kg per day, 4 times per week, 4 weeks) inhibits tumor growth in a preclinical model of GC. Fasudil evoked cell death in human GC cells and reduced the tumor size in the stomach of CEA424-SV40 TAg transgenic mice. Small animal PET/CT confirmed preclinical efficacy. Mass spectrometry imaging identified a translatable biomarker for mouse GC and suggested rapid but incomplete in situ distribution of the drug to gastric tumor tissue. RHOA expression was increased in the neoplastic murine stomach compared with normal non-malignant gastric tissue, and fasudil reduced (auto) phosphorylation of ROCK2 at THR249 in vivo and in human GC cells in vitro. In sum, our data suggest that RHO-pathway inhibition may constitute a novel strategy for treatment of GC and that enhanced distribution of future ROCK inhibitors into tumor tissue may further improve efficacy. PMID:27566106

  13. Melatonin decreases breast cancer metastasis by modulating Rho-associated kinase protein-1 expression

    PubMed Central

    Borin, Thaiz Ferraz; Arbab, Ali Syed; Gelaleti, Gabriela Bottaro; Ferreira, Lívia Carvalho; Moschetta, Marina Gobbe; Jardim-Perassi, Bruna Victorasso; Iskander, ASM; Varma, Nadimpalli Ravi S.; Shankar, Adarsh; Coimbra, Verena Benedick; Fabri, Vanessa Alves; de Oliveira, Juliana Garcia; de Campos Zuccari, Debora Aparecida Pires

    2016-01-01

    The occurrence of metastasis, an important breast cancer prognostic factor, depends on cell migration/invasion mechanisms, which can be controlled by regulatory and effector molecules such as Rho-associated kinase protein (ROCK-1). Increased expression of this protein promotes tumor growth and metastasis, which can be restricted by ROCK-1 inhibitors. Melatonin has shown oncostatic, antimetastatic, and anti-angiogenic effects and can modulate ROCK-1 expression. Metastatic and nonmetastatic breast cancer cell lines were treated with melatonin as well as with specific ROCK-1 inhibitor (Y27632). Cell viability, cell migration/invasion, and ROCK-1 gene expression and protein expression were determined in vitro. In vivo lung metastasis study was performed using female athymic nude mice treated with either melatonin or Y27832 for 2 and 5 wk. The metastases were evaluated by X-ray computed tomography and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and by immunohistochemistry for ROCK-1 and cytokeratin proteins. Melatonin and Y27632 treatments reduced cell viability and invasion/migration of both cell lines and decreased ROCK-1 gene expression in metastatic cells and protein expression in nonmetastatic cell line. The numbers of ‘hot’ spots (lung metastasis) identified by SPECT images were significantly lower in treated groups. ROCK-1 protein expression also was decreased in metastatic foci of treated groups. Melatonin has shown to be effective in controlling metastatic breast cancer in vitro and in vivo, not only via inhibition of the proliferation of tumor cells but also through direct antagonism of metastatic mechanism of cells rendered by ROCK-1 inhibition. When Y27632 was used, the effects were similar to those found with melatonin treatment. PMID:26292662

  14. Melatonin decreases breast cancer metastasis by modulating Rho-associated kinase protein-1 expression.

    PubMed

    Borin, Thaiz Ferraz; Arbab, Ali Syed; Gelaleti, Gabriela Bottaro; Ferreira, Lívia Carvalho; Moschetta, Marina Gobbe; Jardim-Perassi, Bruna Victorasso; Iskander, A S M; Varma, Nadimpalli Ravi S; Shankar, Adarsh; Coimbra, Verena Benedick; Fabri, Vanessa Alves; de Oliveira, Juliana Garcia; Zuccari, Debora Aparecida Pires de Campos

    2016-01-01

    The occurrence of metastasis, an important breast cancer prognostic factor, depends on cell migration/invasion mechanisms, which can be controlled by regulatory and effector molecules such as Rho-associated kinase protein (ROCK-1). Increased expression of this protein promotes tumor growth and metastasis, which can be restricted by ROCK-1 inhibitors. Melatonin has shown oncostatic, antimetastatic, and anti-angiogenic effects and can modulate ROCK-1 expression. Metastatic and nonmetastatic breast cancer cell lines were treated with melatonin as well as with specific ROCK-1 inhibitor (Y27632). Cell viability, cell migration/invasion, and ROCK-1 gene expression and protein expression were determined in vitro. In vivo lung metastasis study was performed using female athymic nude mice treated with either melatonin or Y27832 for 2 and 5 wk. The metastases were evaluated by X-ray computed tomography and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and by immunohistochemistry for ROCK-1 and cytokeratin proteins. Melatonin and Y27632 treatments reduced cell viability and invasion/migration of both cell lines and decreased ROCK-1 gene expression in metastatic cells and protein expression in nonmetastatic cell line. The numbers of 'hot' spots (lung metastasis) identified by SPECT images were significantly lower in treated groups. ROCK-1 protein expression also was decreased in metastatic foci of treated groups. Melatonin has shown to be effective in controlling metastatic breast cancer in vitro and in vivo, not only via inhibition of the proliferation of tumor cells but also through direct antagonism of metastatic mechanism of cells rendered by ROCK-1 inhibition. When Y27632 was used, the effects were similar to those found with melatonin treatment. PMID:26292662

  15. The Function of Rho-Associated Kinases ROCK1 and ROCK2 in the Pathogenesis of Cardiovascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Hartmann, Svenja; Ridley, Anne J.; Lutz, Susanne

    2015-01-01

    Rho-associated kinases ROCK1 and ROCK2 are serine/threonine kinases that are downstream targets of the small GTPases RhoA, RhoB, and RhoC. ROCKs are involved in diverse cellular activities including actin cytoskeleton organization, cell adhesion and motility, proliferation and apoptosis, remodeling of the extracellular matrix and smooth muscle cell contraction. The role of ROCK1 and ROCK2 has long been considered to be similar; however, it is now clear that they do not always have the same functions. Moreover, depending on their subcellular localization, activation, and other environmental factors, ROCK signaling can have different effects on cellular function. With respect to the heart, findings in isoform-specific knockout mice argue for a role of ROCK1 and ROCK2 in the pathogenesis of cardiac fibrosis and cardiac hypertrophy, respectively. Increased ROCK activity could play a pivotal role in processes leading to cardiovascular diseases such as hypertension, pulmonary hypertension, angina pectoris, vasospastic angina, heart failure, and stroke, and thus ROCK activity is a potential new biomarker for heart disease. Pharmacological ROCK inhibition reduces the enhanced ROCK activity in patients, accompanied with a measurable improvement in medical condition. In this review, we focus on recent findings regarding ROCK signaling in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease, with a special focus on differences between ROCK1 and ROCK2 function. PMID:26635606

  16. Rho-associated kinase connects a cell cycle-controlling anchorage signal to the mammalian target of rapamycin pathway.

    PubMed

    Park, Jung-ha; Arakawa-Takeuchi, Shiho; Jinno, Shigeki; Okayama, Hiroto

    2011-07-01

    When deprived of anchorage to the extracellular matrix, fibroblasts arrest in G(1) phase at least in part due to inactivation of G(1) cyclin-dependent kinases. Despite great effort, how anchorage signals control the G(1)-S transition of fibroblasts remains highly elusive. We recently found that the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) cascade might convey an anchorage signal that regulates S phase entry. Here, we show that Rho-associated kinase connects this signal to the TSC1/TSC2-RHEB-mTOR pathway. Expression of a constitutively active form of ROCK1 suppressed all of the anchorage deprivation effects suppressible by tsc2 mutation in rat embryonic fibroblasts. TSC2 contains one evolutionarily conserved ROCK target-like sequence, and an alanine substitution for Thr(1203) in this sequence severely impaired the ability of ROCK1 to counteract the anchorage loss-imposed down-regulation of both G(1) cell cycle factors and mTORC1 activity. Moreover, TSC2 Thr(1203) underwent ROCK-dependent phosphorylation in vivo and could be phosphorylated by bacterially expressed active ROCK1 in vitro, providing biochemical evidence for a direct physical interaction between ROCK and TSC2.

  17. Rho-associated protein kinase regulates subcellular localisation of Angiomotin and Hippo-signalling during preimplantation mouse embryo development.

    PubMed

    Mihajlović, Aleksandar I; Bruce, Alexander W

    2016-09-01

    The differential activity of the Hippo-signalling pathway between the outer- and inner-cell populations of the developing preimplantation mouse embryo directs appropriate formation of trophectoderm and inner cell mass (ICM) lineages. Such distinct signalling activity is under control of intracellular polarization, whereby Hippo-signalling is either supressed in polarized outer cells or activated in apolar inner cells. The central role of apical-basolateral polarization to such differential Hippo-signalling regulation prompted us to reinvestigate the role of potential upstream molecular regulators affecting apical-basolateral polarity. This study reports that the chemical inhibition of Rho-associated kinase (Rock) is associated with failure to form morphologically distinct blastocysts, indicative of compromised trophectoderm differentiation, and defects in the localization of both apical and basolateral polarity factors associated with malformation of tight junctions. Moreover, Rock-inhibition mediates mislocalization of the Hippo-signalling activator Angiomotin (Amot), to the basolateral regions of outer cells and is concomitant with aberrant activation of the pathway. The Rock-inhibition phenotype is mediated by Amot, as RNAi-based Amot knockdown totally rescues the normal suppression of Hippo-signalling in outer cells. In conclusion, Rock, via regulating appropriate apical-basolateral polarization in outer cells, regulates the appropriate activity of the Hippo-signalling pathway, by ensuring correct subcellular localization of Amot protein in outer cells. PMID:27430121

  18. Quantum dots impair macrophagic morphology and the ability of phagocytosis by inhibiting the Rho-associated kinase signaling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, Guangbo; Zhang, Changwen; Yuan, Lin; He, Jiuyang; Wang, Zhe; Wang, Lixin; Liu, Sijin; Jiang, Guibin

    2012-03-01

    Quantum dots (QDs) are fluorescent semiconductor nanoparticles that have broad excitation spectra, narrow emission peaks, long fluorescence lifetimes, and the ability to easily conjugate with bio-molecules. Due to these distinct characteristics, QDs represent promising substances in biological imaging and labelling. However, the side and adverse effects of QDs are also widely studied. Herein, we recognize macrophages as the pivotal cells in ingesting QDs, and that the accumulation of QDs inside macrophages leads to significant morphological alterations and a remarkable reduction of their ability to erythrophagocytize in vitro. In a mouse model with chronic exposure to QDs, red blood cell (RBC) retention in spleens and severe splenomegaly were observed, presumably due to attenuated macrophagic erythrophagocytosis in vivo. Importantly, we demonstrated that QDs greatly inhibited the Rho-associated kinase (ROCK) activity, resulting in impaired fidelity of the actin cytoskeleton and actin-rich structure (such as surface protrusions), which was assumed to be the molecular basis underlying the blunted macrophagic morphology and reduced ability to phagocytize. The combined data provide insights into QDs' intracellular trafficking, localization and biological fate in macrophages, and the resultant impairment to cytoskeleton coupled with inhibition on the ROCK signalling would decrease the macrophagic ability to erythrophagocytize with diminished RBC recycling and splenic RBC retention in animals.

  19. The nondigestible disaccharide epilactose increases paracellular Ca absorption via rho-associated kinase- and myosin light chain kinase-dependent mechanisms in rat small intestines.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Takuya; Nishimukai, Megumi; Takechi, Maki; Taguchi, Hidenori; Hamada, Shigeki; Yokota, Atsushi; Ito, Susumu; Hara, Hiroshi; Matsui, Hirokazu

    2010-02-10

    We previously showed that epilactose, a nondigestible disaccharide, increased calcium (Ca) absorption in the small intestines of rats. Here, we explored the mechanism(s) underlying the epilactose-mediated promotion of Ca absorption in a ligated intestinal segment of anesthetized rats. The addition of epilactose to the luminal solution increased Ca absorption and chromium (Cr)-EDTA permeability, a paracellular indicator, with a strong correlation (R = 0.93) between these changes. Epilactose induced the phosphorylation of myosin regulatory light chains (MLCs), which is known to activate the paracellular route, without any change in the association of tight junction proteins with the actin cytoskeleton. The epilactose-mediated promotion of the Ca absorption was suppressed by specific inhibitors of myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) and Rho-associated kinase (ROCK). These results indicate that epilactose increases paracellular Ca absorption in the small intestine of rats through the induction of MLC phosphorylation via MLCK- and ROCK-dependent mechanisms.

  20. Exogenous nitric oxide inhibits Rho-associated kinase activity in patients with angina pectoris: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Maruhashi, Tatsuya; Noma, Kensuke; Fujimura, Noritaka; Kajikawa, Masato; Matsumoto, Takeshi; Hidaka, Takayuki; Nakashima, Ayumu; Kihara, Yasuki; Liao, James K; Higashi, Yukihito

    2015-07-01

    The RhoA/Rho-associated kinase (ROCK) pathway has a key physiological role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. Increased ROCK activity is associated with cardiovascular diseases. Endogenous nitric oxide (NO) has an anti-atherosclerotic effect, whereas the exogenous NO-mediated cardiovascular effect still remains controversial. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of exogenous NO on ROCK activity in patients with angina pectoris. This is a prospective, open-label, randomized, controlled study. A total of 30 patients with angina pectoris were randomly assigned to receive 40 mg day(-1) of isosorbide mononitrate (n=15, 12 men and 3 women, mean age of 63±12 years, isosorbide mononitrate group) or conventional treatment (n=15, 13 men and 2 women, mean age of 64±13 years, control group) for 12 weeks. ROCK activity in peripheral leukocytes was measured by western blot analysis. ROCK activities at 4 and 12 weeks after treatment were decreased in the isosorbide mononitrate group (0.82±0.33 at 0 week, 0.62±0.20 at 4 weeks, 0.61±0.19 at 12 weeks, n=15 in each group, P<0.05, respectively) but not altered in the control group. ROCK1 and ROCK2 expression levels were similar in all treatment periods in the two groups. These findings suggest that the administration of exogenous NO can inhibit ROCK activity, indicating that the usage of exogenous NO could have a protective effect in patients with angina pectoris.

  1. The effects of knockdown of rho-associated kinase 1 and zipper-interacting protein kinase on gene expression and function in cultured human arterial smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Deng, Jing-Ti; Wang, Xiu-Ling; Chen, Yong-Xiang; O'Brien, Edward R; Gui, Yu; Walsh, Michael P

    2015-01-01

    Rho-associated kinase (ROCK) and zipper-interacting protein kinase (ZIPK) have been implicated in diverse physiological functions. ROCK1 phosphorylates and activates ZIPK suggesting that at least some of these physiological functions may require both enzymes. To test the hypothesis that sequential activation of ROCK1 and ZIPK is commonly involved in regulatory pathways, we utilized siRNA to knock down ROCK1 and ZIPK in cultured human arterial smooth muscle cells (SMC). Microarray analysis using a whole-transcript expression chip identified changes in gene expression induced by ROCK1 and ZIPK knockdown. ROCK1 knockdown affected the expression of 553 genes, while ZIPK knockdown affected the expression of 390 genes. A high incidence of regulation of transcription regulator genes was observed in both knockdowns. Other affected groups included transporters, kinases, peptidases, transmembrane and G protein-coupled receptors, growth factors, phosphatases and ion channels. Only 76 differentially expressed genes were common to ROCK1 and ZIPK knockdown. Ingenuity Pathway Analysis identified five pathways shared between the two knockdowns. We focused on cytokine signaling pathways since ROCK1 knockdown up-regulated 5 and down-regulated 4 cytokine genes, in contrast to ZIPK knockdown, which affected the expression of only two cytokine genes (both down-regulated). IL-6 gene expression and secretion of IL-6 protein were up-regulated by ROCK1 knockdown, whereas ZIPK knockdown reduced IL-6 mRNA expression and IL-6 protein secretion and increased ROCK1 protein expression, suggesting that ROCK1 may inhibit IL-6 secretion. IL-1β mRNA and protein levels were increased in response to ROCK1 knockdown. Differences in the effects of ROCK1 and ZIPK knockdown on cell cycle regulatory genes suggested that ROCK1 and ZIPK regulate the cell cycle by different mechanisms. ROCK1, but not ZIPK knockdown reduced the viability and inhibited proliferation of vascular SMC. We conclude that ROCK1 and

  2. The effects of knockdown of rho-associated kinase 1 and zipper-interacting protein kinase on gene expression and function in cultured human arterial smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Deng, Jing-Ti; Wang, Xiu-Ling; Chen, Yong-Xiang; O'Brien, Edward R; Gui, Yu; Walsh, Michael P

    2015-01-01

    Rho-associated kinase (ROCK) and zipper-interacting protein kinase (ZIPK) have been implicated in diverse physiological functions. ROCK1 phosphorylates and activates ZIPK suggesting that at least some of these physiological functions may require both enzymes. To test the hypothesis that sequential activation of ROCK1 and ZIPK is commonly involved in regulatory pathways, we utilized siRNA to knock down ROCK1 and ZIPK in cultured human arterial smooth muscle cells (SMC). Microarray analysis using a whole-transcript expression chip identified changes in gene expression induced by ROCK1 and ZIPK knockdown. ROCK1 knockdown affected the expression of 553 genes, while ZIPK knockdown affected the expression of 390 genes. A high incidence of regulation of transcription regulator genes was observed in both knockdowns. Other affected groups included transporters, kinases, peptidases, transmembrane and G protein-coupled receptors, growth factors, phosphatases and ion channels. Only 76 differentially expressed genes were common to ROCK1 and ZIPK knockdown. Ingenuity Pathway Analysis identified five pathways shared between the two knockdowns. We focused on cytokine signaling pathways since ROCK1 knockdown up-regulated 5 and down-regulated 4 cytokine genes, in contrast to ZIPK knockdown, which affected the expression of only two cytokine genes (both down-regulated). IL-6 gene expression and secretion of IL-6 protein were up-regulated by ROCK1 knockdown, whereas ZIPK knockdown reduced IL-6 mRNA expression and IL-6 protein secretion and increased ROCK1 protein expression, suggesting that ROCK1 may inhibit IL-6 secretion. IL-1β mRNA and protein levels were increased in response to ROCK1 knockdown. Differences in the effects of ROCK1 and ZIPK knockdown on cell cycle regulatory genes suggested that ROCK1 and ZIPK regulate the cell cycle by different mechanisms. ROCK1, but not ZIPK knockdown reduced the viability and inhibited proliferation of vascular SMC. We conclude that ROCK1 and

  3. Rho-associated coiled-coil kinase (ROCK) protein controls microtubule dynamics in a novel signaling pathway that regulates cell migration.

    PubMed

    Schofield, Alice V; Steel, Rohan; Bernard, Ora

    2012-12-21

    The two members of the Rho-associated coiled-coil kinase (ROCK1 and 2) family are established regulators of actin dynamics that are involved in the regulation of the cell cycle as well as cell motility and invasion. Here, we discovered a novel signaling pathway whereby ROCK regulates microtubule (MT) acetylation via phosphorylation of the tubulin polymerization promoting protein 1 (TPPP1/p25). We show that ROCK phosphorylation of TPPP1 inhibits the interaction between TPPP1 and histone deacetylase 6 (HDAC6), which in turn results in increased HDAC6 activity followed by a decrease in MT acetylation. As a consequence, we show that TPPP1 phosphorylation by ROCK increases cell migration and invasion via modulation of cellular acetyl MT levels. We establish here that the ROCK-TPPP1-HDAC6 signaling pathway is important for the regulation of cell migration and invasion.

  4. Inhibition of Rho-associated kinase blocks agonist-induced Ca2+ sensitization of myosin phosphorylation and force in guinea-pig ileum

    PubMed Central

    Swärd, Karl; Dreja, Karl; Susnjar, Marija; Hellstrand, Per; Hartshorne, David J; Walsh, Michael P

    2000-01-01

    Ca2+ sensitization of smooth muscle contraction involves the small GTPase RhoA, inhibition of myosin light chain phosphatase (MLCP) and enhanced myosin regulatory light chain (LC20) phosphorylation. A potential effector of RhoA is Rho-associated kinase (ROK).The role of ROK in Ca2+ sensitization was investigated in guinea-pig ileum.Contraction of permeabilized muscle strips induced by GTPγS at pCa 6.5 was inhibited by the kinase inhibitors Y-27632, HA1077 and H-7 with IC50 values that correlated with the known Ki values for inhibition of ROK. GTPγS also increased LC20 phosphorylation and this was prevented by HA1077. Contraction and LC20 phosphorylation elicited at pCa 5.75 were, however, unaffected by HA1077.Pre-treatment of intact tissue strips with HA1077 abolished the tonic component of carbachol-induced contraction and the sustained elevation of LC20 phosphorylation, but had no effect on the transient or sustained increase in [Ca2+]i induced by carbachol.LC20 phosphorylation and contraction dynamics suggest that the ROK-mediated increase in LC20 phosphorylation is due to MLCP inhibition, not myosin light chain kinase activation.In the absence of Ca2+, GTPγS stimulated 35S incorporation from [35S]ATPγS into the myosin targeting subunit of MLCP (MYPT). The enhanced thiophosphorylation was inhibited by HA1077. No thiophosphorylation of LC20 was detected.These results indicate that ROK mediates agonist-induced increases in myosin phosphorylation and force by inhibiting MLCP activity through phosphorylation of MYPT. Under Ca2+-free conditions, ROK does not appear to phosphorylate LC20in situ, in contrast to its ability to phosphorylate myosin in vitro. In particular, ROK activation is essential for the tonic phase of agonist-induced contraction. PMID:10618150

  5. Mechano-reciprocity is maintained between physiological boundaries by tuning signal flux through the Rho-associated protein kinase.

    PubMed

    Boyle, Sarah T; Samuel, Michael S

    2016-07-01

    The mechanical properties of the ECM strongly influence the behavior of all cell types within a given tissue. Increased matrix tension promotes epithelial cell proliferation by engaging mitogenic mechanotransduction signaling including the Salvador/Warts/Hippo, PI 3-kinase, Rho, Wnt and MAP kinase pathways. The Rho signaling pathways in particular are capable of increasing intra-cellular tension by elevating the production and contractility of the actomyosin cytoskeleton, which counteracts tension changes within the matrix in a process termed mechano-reciprocity. We have discovered that Rho-ROCK signaling increases the production of ECM through paracrine signaling between the epithelium and fibroblasts and also the remodeling of the ECM by regulating focal adhesion dynamics in fibroblasts. These two phenomena together cause increased ECM tension. Enhanced mechano-reciprocity results in ever-increasing intra- and extra-cellular tension in a vicious cycle that promotes cell proliferation and tumor progression. These insights reveal that inhibiting mechano-reciprocity, reducing ECM tension and targeting cancer-associated fibroblasts in a coordinated fashion has potential as cancer therapy. PMID:27168253

  6. Mechano-reciprocity is maintained between physiological boundaries by tuning signal flux through the Rho-associated protein kinase.

    PubMed

    Boyle, Sarah T; Samuel, Michael S

    2016-07-01

    The mechanical properties of the ECM strongly influence the behavior of all cell types within a given tissue. Increased matrix tension promotes epithelial cell proliferation by engaging mitogenic mechanotransduction signaling including the Salvador/Warts/Hippo, PI 3-kinase, Rho, Wnt and MAP kinase pathways. The Rho signaling pathways in particular are capable of increasing intra-cellular tension by elevating the production and contractility of the actomyosin cytoskeleton, which counteracts tension changes within the matrix in a process termed mechano-reciprocity. We have discovered that Rho-ROCK signaling increases the production of ECM through paracrine signaling between the epithelium and fibroblasts and also the remodeling of the ECM by regulating focal adhesion dynamics in fibroblasts. These two phenomena together cause increased ECM tension. Enhanced mechano-reciprocity results in ever-increasing intra- and extra-cellular tension in a vicious cycle that promotes cell proliferation and tumor progression. These insights reveal that inhibiting mechano-reciprocity, reducing ECM tension and targeting cancer-associated fibroblasts in a coordinated fashion has potential as cancer therapy.

  7. Hydrogen-Rich Medium Attenuated Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Monocyte-Endothelial Cell Adhesion and Vascular Endothelial Permeability via Rho-Associated Coiled-Coil Protein Kinase.

    PubMed

    Xie, Keliang; Wang, Weina; Chen, Hongguang; Han, Huanzhi; Liu, Daquan; Wang, Guolin; Yu, Yonghao

    2015-07-01

    Sepsis is the leading cause of death in critically ill patients. In recent years, molecular hydrogen, as an effective free radical scavenger, has been shown a selective antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effect, and it is beneficial in the treatment of sepsis. Rho-associated coiled-coil protein kinase (ROCK) participates in junction between normal cells, and regulates vascular endothelial permeability. In this study, we used lipopolysaccharide to stimulate vascular endothelial cells and explored the effects of hydrogen-rich medium on the regulation of adhesion of monocytes to endothelial cells and vascular endothelial permeability. We found that hydrogen-rich medium could inhibit adhesion of monocytes to endothelial cells and decrease levels of adhesion molecules, whereas the levels of transepithelial/endothelial electrical resistance values and the expression of vascular endothelial cadherin were increased after hydrogen-rich medium treatment. Moreover, hydrogen-rich medium could lessen the expression of ROCK, as a similar effect of its inhibitor Y-27632. In addition, hydrogen-rich medium could also inhibit adhesion of polymorphonuclear neutrophils to endothelial cells. In conclusion, hydrogen-rich medium could regulate adhesion of monocytes/polymorphonuclear neutrophils to endothelial cells and vascular endothelial permeability, and this effect might be related to the decreased expression of ROCK protein.

  8. Rho-associated protein kinase 1 (ROCK1) is increased in Alzheimer's disease and ROCK1 depletion reduces amyloid-β levels in brain.

    PubMed

    Henderson, Benjamin W; Gentry, Erik G; Rush, Travis; Troncoso, Juan C; Thambisetty, Madhav; Montine, Thomas J; Herskowitz, Jeremy H

    2016-08-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the leading cause of dementia and mitigating amyloid-β (Aβ) levels may serve as a rational therapeutic avenue to slow AD progression. Pharmacologic inhibition of the Rho-associated protein kinases (ROCK1 and ROCK2) is proposed to curb Aβ levels, and mechanisms that underlie ROCK2's effects on Aβ production are defined. How ROCK1 affects Aβ generation remains a critical barrier. Here, we report that ROCK1 protein levels were elevated in mild cognitive impairment due to AD (MCI) and AD brains compared to controls. Aβ42 oligomers marginally increased ROCK1 and ROCK2 protein levels in neurons but strongly induced phosphorylation of Lim kinase 1 (LIMK1), suggesting that Aβ42 activates ROCKs. RNAi depletion of ROCK1 or ROCK2 suppressed endogenous Aβ40 production in neurons, and Aβ40 levels were reduced in brains of ROCK1 heterozygous knock-out mice compared to wild-type littermate controls. ROCK1 knockdown decreased amyloid precursor protein (APP), and treatment with bafilomycin accumulated APP levels in neurons depleted of ROCK1. These observations suggest that reduction of ROCK1 diminishes Aβ levels by enhancing APP protein degradation. Collectively, these findings support the hypothesis that both ROCK1 and ROCK2 are therapeutic targets to combat Aβ production in AD. Mitigating amyloid-β (Aβ) levels is a rational strategy for Alzheimer's disease (AD) treatment, however, therapeutic targets with clinically available drugs are lacking. We hypothesize that Aβ accumulation in mild cognitive impairment because of AD (MCI) and AD activates the RhoA/ROCK pathway which in turn fuels production of Aβ. Escalation of this cycle over the course of many years may contribute to the buildup of amyloid pathology in MCI and/or AD. PMID:27246255

  9. Rho-associated protein kinase 1 (ROCK1) is increased in Alzheimer's disease and ROCK1 depletion reduces amyloid-β levels in brain.

    PubMed

    Henderson, Benjamin W; Gentry, Erik G; Rush, Travis; Troncoso, Juan C; Thambisetty, Madhav; Montine, Thomas J; Herskowitz, Jeremy H

    2016-08-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the leading cause of dementia and mitigating amyloid-β (Aβ) levels may serve as a rational therapeutic avenue to slow AD progression. Pharmacologic inhibition of the Rho-associated protein kinases (ROCK1 and ROCK2) is proposed to curb Aβ levels, and mechanisms that underlie ROCK2's effects on Aβ production are defined. How ROCK1 affects Aβ generation remains a critical barrier. Here, we report that ROCK1 protein levels were elevated in mild cognitive impairment due to AD (MCI) and AD brains compared to controls. Aβ42 oligomers marginally increased ROCK1 and ROCK2 protein levels in neurons but strongly induced phosphorylation of Lim kinase 1 (LIMK1), suggesting that Aβ42 activates ROCKs. RNAi depletion of ROCK1 or ROCK2 suppressed endogenous Aβ40 production in neurons, and Aβ40 levels were reduced in brains of ROCK1 heterozygous knock-out mice compared to wild-type littermate controls. ROCK1 knockdown decreased amyloid precursor protein (APP), and treatment with bafilomycin accumulated APP levels in neurons depleted of ROCK1. These observations suggest that reduction of ROCK1 diminishes Aβ levels by enhancing APP protein degradation. Collectively, these findings support the hypothesis that both ROCK1 and ROCK2 are therapeutic targets to combat Aβ production in AD. Mitigating amyloid-β (Aβ) levels is a rational strategy for Alzheimer's disease (AD) treatment, however, therapeutic targets with clinically available drugs are lacking. We hypothesize that Aβ accumulation in mild cognitive impairment because of AD (MCI) and AD activates the RhoA/ROCK pathway which in turn fuels production of Aβ. Escalation of this cycle over the course of many years may contribute to the buildup of amyloid pathology in MCI and/or AD.

  10. Tubulin polymerization promoting protein 1 (Tppp1) phosphorylation by Rho-associated coiled-coil kinase (rock) and cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (Cdk1) inhibits microtubule dynamics to increase cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Schofield, Alice V; Gamell, Cristina; Suryadinata, Randy; Sarcevic, Boris; Bernard, Ora

    2013-03-15

    Tubulin polymerization promoting protein 1 (Tppp1) regulates microtubule (MT) dynamics via promoting MT polymerization and inhibiting histone deacetylase 6 (Hdac6) activity to increase MT acetylation. Our results reveal that as a consequence, Tppp1 inhibits cell proliferation by delaying the G1/S-phase and the mitosis to G1-phase transitions. We show that phosphorylation of Tppp1 by Rho-associated coiled-coil kinase (Rock) prevents its Hdac6 inhibitory activity to enable cells to enter S-phase. Whereas, our analysis of the role of Tppp1 during mitosis revealed that inhibition of its MT polymerizing and Hdac6 regulatory activities were necessary for cells to re-enter the G1-phase. During this investigation, we also discovered that Tppp1 is a novel Cyclin B/Cdk1 (cyclin-dependent kinase) substrate and that Cdk phosphorylation of Tppp1 inhibits its MT polymerizing activity. Overall, our results show that dual Rock and Cdk phosphorylation of Tppp1 inhibits its regulation of the cell cycle to increase cell proliferation.

  11. The Synergistic Enhancement of Cloning Efficiency in Individualized Human Pluripotent Stem Cells by Peroxisome Proliferative-activated Receptor-γ (PPARγ) Activation and Rho-associated Kinase (ROCK) Inhibition.

    PubMed

    Kajabadi, Nasim-Sadat; Ghoochani, Ali; Peymani, Maryam; Ghaedi, Kamran; Kiani-Esfahani, Abbas; Hashemi, Motahareh-Sadat; Nasr-Esfahani, Mohammad Hossein; Baharvand, Hossein

    2015-10-23

    Although human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) provide valuable sources for regenerative medicine, their applicability is dependent on obtaining both suitable up-scaled and cost effective cultures. The Rho-associated kinase (ROCK) inhibitor Y-27632 permits hPSC survival upon dissociation; however, cloning efficiency is often still low. Here we have shown that pioglitazone, a selective peroxisome proliferative-activated receptor-γ agonist, along with Y-27632 synergistically diminished dissociation-induced apoptosis and increased cloning efficiency (2-3-fold versus Y-27632) without affecting pluripotency of hPSCs. Pioglitazone exerted its positive effect by inhibition of glycogen synthase kinase (GSK3) activity and enhancement of membranous β-catenin and E-cadherin proteins. These effects were reversed by GW-9662, an irreversible peroxisome proliferative-activated receptor-γ antagonist. This novel setting provided a step toward hPSC manipulation and its biomedical applications.

  12. Cytosolic retention of phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase and a Rho-associated kinase-mediated signal impair expression of p21(Cip1/Waf1) in phorbol 12-myristate-13- acetate-induced apoptotic cells.

    PubMed

    Lai, Jin-Mei; Wu, Sulin; Huang, Duen-Yi; Chang, Zee-Fen

    2002-11-01

    In response to treatment with phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA), the half-population of erythromyeloblast D2 cells, a cytokine-independent variant of TF-1 cells, displayed adhesion and differentiated into a monocyte/macrophage-like morphology, while the other half-population remained in suspension and underwent apoptosis. Expression of the cell cycle inhibitor p21(Cip1/Waf1) was induced after PMA treatment in the adherent cells but not in the proapoptotic cells. We investigated the mechanism responsible for the impairment of p21(Cip1/Waf1) induction in PMA-induced proapoptotic cells. We demonstrated that in PMA-induced adherent cells, upregulation of p21(Cip1/Waf1) requires the activation and nuclear translocation of phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (phospho-ERK). Although ERK was phosphorylated to comparable levels in PMA-induced proapoptotic and adherent cells, nuclear distribution of phospho-ERK was seen only in the adherent, not in the proapoptotic cells. We also found that only PMA-induced proapoptotic cells contained the phosphorylated form of myosin light chain, which is dependent on Rho-associated kinase (ROCK) activation, and that expression of a dominant-active form of ROCK suppressed activation of the p21(Cip1/Waf1) promoter during PMA induction. Finally, we demonstrated that inhibition of ROCK restores nuclear distribution of phospho-ERK and activation of p21(Cip1/Waf1) expression. Based on these findings, we propose that a ROCK-mediated signal is involved in interfering with the process of ERK-mediated p21(Cip1/Waf1) induction in PMA-induced proapoptotic TF-1 and D2 cells.

  13. Protein kinase C activation disrupts epithelial apical junctions via ROCK-II dependent stimulation of actomyosin contractility

    PubMed Central

    Ivanov, Andrei I; Samarin, Stanislav N; Bachar, Moshe; Parkos, Charles A; Nusrat, Asma

    2009-01-01

    Background Disruption of epithelial cell-cell adhesions represents an early and important stage in tumor metastasis. This process can be modeled in vitro by exposing cells to chemical tumor promoters, phorbol esters and octylindolactam-V (OI-V), known to activate protein kinase C (PKC). However, molecular events mediating PKC-dependent disruption of epithelial cell-cell contact remain poorly understood. In the present study we investigate mechanisms by which PKC activation induces disassembly of tight junctions (TJs) and adherens junctions (AJs) in a model pancreatic epithelium. Results Exposure of HPAF-II human pancreatic adenocarcinoma cell monolayers to either OI-V or 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate caused rapid disruption and internalization of AJs and TJs. Activity of classical PKC isoenzymes was responsible for the loss of cell-cell contacts which was accompanied by cell rounding, phosphorylation and relocalization of the F-actin motor nonmuscle myosin (NM) II. The OI-V-induced disruption of AJs and TJs was prevented by either pharmacological inhibition of NM II with blebbistatin or by siRNA-mediated downregulation of NM IIA. Furthermore, AJ/TJ disassembly was attenuated by inhibition of Rho-associated kinase (ROCK) II, but was insensitive to blockage of MLCK, calmodulin, ERK1/2, caspases and RhoA GTPase. Conclusion Our data suggest that stimulation of PKC disrupts epithelial apical junctions via ROCK-II dependent activation of NM II, which increases contractility of perijunctional actin filaments. This mechanism is likely to be important for cancer cell dissociation and tumor metastasis. PMID:19422706

  14. Phosphorylation of varicella-zoster virus glycoprotein gpI by mammalian casein kinase II and casein kinase I

    SciTech Connect

    Grose, C.; Jackson, W. ); Traugh, J.A. )

    1989-09-01

    Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) glycoprotein gpI is the predominant viral glycoprotein within the plasma membranes of infected cells. This viral glycoprotein is phosphorylated on its polypeptide backbone during biosynthesis. In this report, the authors investigated the protein kinases which participate in the phosphorylation events. Under in vivo conditions, VZV gpI was phosphorylated on its serine and threonine residues by protein kinases present within lysates of either VZV-infected or uninfected cells. Because this activity was diminished by heparin, a known inhibitor of casein kinase II, isolated gpI was incubated with purified casein kinase II and shown to be phosphorylated in an in vitro assay containing ({gamma}-{sup 32}P)ATP. The same glycoprotein was phosphorylated when ({sup 32}P)GTP was substituted for ({sup 32}P)ATP in the protein kinase assay. They also tested whether VZV gpI was phosphorylated by two other ubiquitous mammalian protein kinases--casein kinase I and cyclic AMP-dependent kinase--and found that only casein kinase I modified gpI. When the predicted 623-amino-acid sequence of gpI was examined, two phosphorylation sites known to be optimal for casein kinase II were observed. In summary, this study showed that VZV gpI was phosphorylated by each of two mammalian protein kinases (casein kinase I and casein kinase II) and that potential serine-threonine phosphorylation sites for each of these two kinases were present in the viral glycoprotein.

  15. Monoclonal antibodies against type II rat brain protein kinase

    SciTech Connect

    Nakabayashi, C.H.; Huang, K.P.

    1987-05-01

    Three monoclonal antibodies (8/1, 10/10, and 25/3) against rat brain type II protein kinase C (PKC) were used to carry out the immunochemical characterization of this kinase. These antibodies immunoprecipitated the type II PKC in a dose-dependent manner but did neither to type I nor type III isozyme. Purified type II PKC has a molecular weight of 82,000 and consists of heterogeneous isoelectric point species, all of which are cross reactive with these antibodies. Immunoblot analysis of the tryptic fragments from PKC revealed that all three antibodies recognized the 33-38-KDa fragments, the phospholipid/phorbol ester-binding domain, but not the 45-48-KDa fragments, the kinase catalytic domain. The immune complexes of the kinase and the antibodies retained the kinase activity which was dependent on Ca/sup 2 +/ and phosphatidylserine (PS) and further activated by diacylglycerol. With antibody 8/1, the apparent Km values of the kinase for Ca/sup 2 +/ and PS were not influenced. The initial rate and final extent of autophosphorylation were reduced. The concentration of PS required for half-maximal (/sup 3/H)phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate (PDBu) binding was increased and the total PDBu binding was reduced. In the presence of optimum concentrations of Ca/sup 2 +/ and PS, the Kd of PDBu was unaffected by the antibody but the total binding was reduced. These results demonstrate that the PS/PDBu-binding domain contains the major epitope for the antibodies and the antibody mainly influences the PS/PDBu binding to the kinase.

  16. Purification and characterization of echinoderm casein kinase II. Regulation by protein kinase C.

    PubMed Central

    Sanghera, J S; Charlton, L A; Paddon, H B; Pelech, S L

    1992-01-01

    Casein kinase II (CKII) is one of several protein kinases that become activated before germinal-vesicle breakdown in maturing sea-star oocytes. Echinoderm CKII was purified over 11,000-fold with a recovery of approximately 10% by sequential fractionation of the oocyte cytosol on tyrosine-agarose, heparin-agarose, casein-agarose and MonoQ. The purified enzyme contained 45, 38 and 28 kDa polypeptides, which corresponded to its alpha, alpha' and beta subunits respectively. The beta-subunit was autophosphorylated on one major tryptic peptide on serine residues, whereas the alpha'-subunit incorporated phosphate into at least two tryptic peptides primarily on threonine residues. Western-blotting analysis of sea-star oocyte extracts with two different anti-peptide antibodies that recognized conserved regions of the alpha-subunit indicated that the protein levels of the alpha- and alpha'-subunits of CKII were unchanged during oocyte maturation. The purified CKII was partly inactivated (by 25%) by preincubation with protein-serine/threonine phosphatase 2A, but protein-tyrosine phosphatases had no effect. The beta-subunit of CKII was phosphorylated on a serine residue(s) up to 0.54 mol of P/mol of beta-subunit by purified protein kinase C, and this correlated with a 1.5-fold enhancement of its phosphotransferase activity with phosvitin as a substrate. CKII was not a substrate for the maturation-activated myelin basic protein kinase p44mpk from sea-star oocytes, nor for cyclic-AMP-dependent protein kinase. These studies point to possible regulation of CKII by protein phosphorylation. Images Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 6. Fig. 7. PMID:1590772

  17. A mechanism for regulation of chloroplast LHC II kinase by plastoquinol and thioredoxin.

    PubMed

    Puthiyaveetil, Sujith

    2011-06-23

    State transitions are acclimatory responses to changes in light quality in photosynthesis. They involve the redistribution of absorbed excitation energy between photosystems I and II. In plants and green algae, this redistribution is produced by reversible phosphorylation of the chloroplast light harvesting complex II (LHC II). The LHC II kinase is activated by reduced plastoquinone (PQ) in photosystem II-specific low light. In high light, when PQ is also reduced, LHC II kinase becomes inactivated by thioredoxin. Based on newly identified amino acid sequence features of LHC II kinase and other considerations, a mechanism is suggested for its redox regulation.

  18. Casein kinase II stimulates rat liver mitochondrial glycerophosphate acyltransferase activity.

    PubMed

    Onorato, Thomas M; Haldar, Dipak

    2002-09-01

    Rat liver mitochondrial glycerophosphate acyltransferase (mtGAT) possesses 14 consensus sites for casein kinase II (CKII) phosphorylation. To study the functional relevance of phosphorylation to the activity of mtGAT, we treated isolated rat liver mitochondria with CKII and found that CKII stimulated mtGAT activity approximately 2-fold. Protein phosphatase-lambda treatment reversed the stimulation of mtGAT by CKII. Labeling of both solubilized and non-solubilized mitochondria with CKII and [gamma-32P]ATP resulted in a 32P-labeled protein of 85kDa, the molecular weight of mtGAT. Our findings suggest that CKII stimulates mtGAT activity by phosphorylation of the acyltransferase. The significance of this observation with respect to hormonal control of the enzyme is discussed.

  19. Transient Receptor Potential Melastatin 7 Cation Channel Kinase: New Player in Angiotensin II-Induced Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Antunes, Tayze T; Callera, Glaucia E; He, Ying; Yogi, Alvaro; Ryazanov, Alexey G; Ryazanova, Lillia V; Zhai, Alexander; Stewart, Duncan J; Shrier, Alvin; Touyz, Rhian M

    2016-04-01

    Transient receptor potential melastatin 7 (TRPM7) is a bifunctional protein comprising a magnesium (Mg(2+))/cation channel and a kinase domain. We previously demonstrated that vasoactive agents regulate vascular TRPM7. Whether TRPM7 plays a role in the pathophysiology of hypertension and associated cardiovascular dysfunction is unknown. We studied TRPM7 kinase-deficient mice (TRPM7Δkinase; heterozygous for TRPM7 kinase) and wild-type (WT) mice infused with angiotensin II (Ang II; 400 ng/kg per minute, 4 weeks). TRPM7 kinase expression was lower in heart and aorta from TRPM7Δkinase versus WT mice, effects that were further reduced by Ang II infusion. Plasma Mg(2+) was lower in TRPM7Δkinase versus WT mice in basal and stimulated conditions. Ang II increased blood pressure in both strains with exaggerated responses in TRPM7Δkinase versus WT groups (P<0.05). Acetylcholine-induced vasorelaxation was reduced in Ang II-infused TRPM7Δkinase mice, an effect associated with Akt and endothelial nitric oxide synthase downregulation. Vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 expression was increased in Ang II-infused TRPM7 kinase-deficient mice. TRPM7 kinase targets, calpain, and annexin-1, were activated by Ang II in WT but not in TRPM7Δkinase mice. Echocardiographic and histopathologic analysis demonstrated cardiac hypertrophy and left ventricular dysfunction in Ang II-treated groups. In TRPM7 kinase-deficient mice, Ang II-induced cardiac functional and structural effects were amplified compared with WT counterparts. Our data demonstrate that in TRPM7Δkinase mice, Ang II-induced hypertension is exaggerated, cardiac remodeling and left ventricular dysfunction are amplified, and endothelial function is impaired. These processes are associated with hypomagnesemia, blunted TRPM7 kinase expression/signaling, endothelial nitric oxide synthase downregulation, and proinflammatory vascular responses. Our findings identify TRPM7 kinase as a novel player in Ang II-induced hypertension

  20. Transient Receptor Potential Melastatin 7 Cation Channel Kinase: New Player in Angiotensin II-Induced Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Antunes, Tayze T; Callera, Glaucia E; He, Ying; Yogi, Alvaro; Ryazanov, Alexey G; Ryazanova, Lillia V; Zhai, Alexander; Stewart, Duncan J; Shrier, Alvin; Touyz, Rhian M

    2016-04-01

    Transient receptor potential melastatin 7 (TRPM7) is a bifunctional protein comprising a magnesium (Mg(2+))/cation channel and a kinase domain. We previously demonstrated that vasoactive agents regulate vascular TRPM7. Whether TRPM7 plays a role in the pathophysiology of hypertension and associated cardiovascular dysfunction is unknown. We studied TRPM7 kinase-deficient mice (TRPM7Δkinase; heterozygous for TRPM7 kinase) and wild-type (WT) mice infused with angiotensin II (Ang II; 400 ng/kg per minute, 4 weeks). TRPM7 kinase expression was lower in heart and aorta from TRPM7Δkinase versus WT mice, effects that were further reduced by Ang II infusion. Plasma Mg(2+) was lower in TRPM7Δkinase versus WT mice in basal and stimulated conditions. Ang II increased blood pressure in both strains with exaggerated responses in TRPM7Δkinase versus WT groups (P<0.05). Acetylcholine-induced vasorelaxation was reduced in Ang II-infused TRPM7Δkinase mice, an effect associated with Akt and endothelial nitric oxide synthase downregulation. Vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 expression was increased in Ang II-infused TRPM7 kinase-deficient mice. TRPM7 kinase targets, calpain, and annexin-1, were activated by Ang II in WT but not in TRPM7Δkinase mice. Echocardiographic and histopathologic analysis demonstrated cardiac hypertrophy and left ventricular dysfunction in Ang II-treated groups. In TRPM7 kinase-deficient mice, Ang II-induced cardiac functional and structural effects were amplified compared with WT counterparts. Our data demonstrate that in TRPM7Δkinase mice, Ang II-induced hypertension is exaggerated, cardiac remodeling and left ventricular dysfunction are amplified, and endothelial function is impaired. These processes are associated with hypomagnesemia, blunted TRPM7 kinase expression/signaling, endothelial nitric oxide synthase downregulation, and proinflammatory vascular responses. Our findings identify TRPM7 kinase as a novel player in Ang II-induced hypertension

  1. Citron rho-interacting kinase, a novel tissue-specific ser/thr kinase encompassing the Rho-Rac-binding protein Citron.

    PubMed

    Di Cunto, F; Calautti, E; Hsiao, J; Ong, L; Topley, G; Turco, E; Dotto, G P

    1998-11-01

    We have identified a novel serine/threonine kinase belonging to the myotonic dystrophy kinase family. The kinase can be produced in at least two different isoforms: a approximately 240-kDa protein (Citron Rho-interacting kinase, CRIK), in which the kinase domain is followed by the sequence of Citron, a previously identified Rho/Rac binding protein; a approximately 54-kDa protein (CRIK-short kinase (SK)), which consists mostly of the kinase domain. CRIK and CRIK-SK proteins are capable of phosphorylating exogenous substrates as well as of autophosphorylation, when tested by in vitro kinase assays after expression into COS7 cells. CRIK kinase activity is increased severalfold by coexpression of costitutively active Rho, while active Rac has more limited effects. Kinase activity of endogenous CRIK is indicated by in vitro kinase assays after immunoprecipitation with antibodies recognizing the Citron moiety of the protein. When expressed in keratinocytes, full-length CRIK, but not CRIK-SK, localizes into corpuscular cytoplasmic structures and elicits recruitment of actin into these structures. The previously reported Rho-associated kinases ROCK I and II are ubiquitously expressed. In contrast, CRIK exhibits a restricted pattern of expression, suggesting that this kinase may fulfill a more specialized function in specific cell types.

  2. Group II p21-activated kinases as therapeutic targets in gastrointestinal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Yang-Guang; Ning, Ke; Li, Feng

    2016-01-01

    P21-activated kinases (PAKs) are central players in various oncogenic signaling pathways. The six PAK family members are classified into group I (PAK1-3) and group II (PAK4-6). Focus is currently shifting from group I PAKs to group II PAKs. Group II PAKs play important roles in many fundamental cellular processes, some of which have particular significance in the development and progression of cancer. Because of their important functions, group II PAKs have become popular potential drug target candidates. However, few group II PAKs inhibitors have been reported, and most do not exhibit satisfactory kinase selectivity and “drug-like” properties. Isoform- and kinase-selective PAK inhibitors remain to be developed. This review describes the biological activities of group II PAKs, the importance of group II PAKs in the development and progression of gastrointestinal cancer, and small-molecule inhibitors of group II PAKs for the treatment of cancer. PMID:26811660

  3. Calmodulin kinase II inhibition protects against structural heart disease.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Rong; Khoo, Michelle S C; Wu, Yuejin; Yang, Yingbo; Grueter, Chad E; Ni, Gemin; Price, Edward E; Thiel, William; Guatimosim, Silvia; Song, Long-Sheng; Madu, Ernest C; Shah, Anisha N; Vishnivetskaya, Tatiana A; Atkinson, James B; Gurevich, Vsevolod V; Salama, Guy; Lederer, W J; Colbran, Roger J; Anderson, Mark E

    2005-04-01

    Beta-adrenergic receptor (betaAR) stimulation increases cytosolic Ca(2+) to physiologically augment cardiac contraction, whereas excessive betaAR activation causes adverse cardiac remodeling, including myocardial hypertrophy, dilation and dysfunction, in individuals with myocardial infarction. The Ca(2+)-calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) is a recently identified downstream element of the betaAR-initiated signaling cascade that is linked to pathological myocardial remodeling and to regulation of key proteins involved in cardiac excitation-contraction coupling. We developed a genetic mouse model of cardiac CaMKII inhibition to test the role of CaMKII in betaAR signaling in vivo. Here we show CaMKII inhibition substantially prevented maladaptive remodeling from excessive betaAR stimulation and myocardial infarction, and induced balanced changes in excitation-contraction coupling that preserved baseline and betaAR-stimulated physiological increases in cardiac function. These findings mark CaMKII as a determinant of clinically important heart disease phenotypes, and suggest CaMKII inhibition can be a highly selective approach for targeting adverse myocardial remodeling linked to betaAR signaling.

  4. Pharmacophore modeling studies of type I and type II kinase inhibitors of Tie2.

    PubMed

    Xie, Qing-Qing; Xie, Huan-Zhang; Ren, Ji-Xia; Li, Lin-Li; Yang, Sheng-Yong

    2009-02-01

    In this study, chemical feature based pharmacophore models of type I and type II kinase inhibitors of Tie2 have been developed with the aid of HipHop and HypoRefine modules within Catalyst program package. The best HipHop pharmacophore model Hypo1_I for type I kinase inhibitors contains one hydrogen-bond acceptor, one hydrogen-bond donor, one general hydrophobic, one hydrophobic aromatic, and one ring aromatic feature. And the best HypoRefine model Hypo1_II for type II kinase inhibitors, which was characterized by the best correlation coefficient (0.976032) and the lowest RMSD (0.74204), consists of two hydrogen-bond donors, one hydrophobic aromatic, and two general hydrophobic features, as well as two excluded volumes. These pharmacophore models have been validated by using either or both test set and cross validation methods, which shows that both the Hypo1_I and Hypo1_II have a good predictive ability. The space arrangements of the pharmacophore features in Hypo1_II are consistent with the locations of the three portions making up a typical type II kinase inhibitor, namely, the portion occupying the ATP binding region (ATP-binding-region portion, AP), that occupying the hydrophobic region (hydrophobic-region portion, HP), and that linking AP and HP (bridge portion, BP). Our study also reveals that the ATP-binding-region portion of the type II kinase inhibitors plays an important role to the bioactivity of the type II kinase inhibitors. Structural modifications on this portion should be helpful to further improve the inhibitory potency of type II kinase inhibitors. PMID:19138543

  5. Pharmacophore modeling studies of type I and type II kinase inhibitors of Tie2.

    PubMed

    Xie, Qing-Qing; Xie, Huan-Zhang; Ren, Ji-Xia; Li, Lin-Li; Yang, Sheng-Yong

    2009-02-01

    In this study, chemical feature based pharmacophore models of type I and type II kinase inhibitors of Tie2 have been developed with the aid of HipHop and HypoRefine modules within Catalyst program package. The best HipHop pharmacophore model Hypo1_I for type I kinase inhibitors contains one hydrogen-bond acceptor, one hydrogen-bond donor, one general hydrophobic, one hydrophobic aromatic, and one ring aromatic feature. And the best HypoRefine model Hypo1_II for type II kinase inhibitors, which was characterized by the best correlation coefficient (0.976032) and the lowest RMSD (0.74204), consists of two hydrogen-bond donors, one hydrophobic aromatic, and two general hydrophobic features, as well as two excluded volumes. These pharmacophore models have been validated by using either or both test set and cross validation methods, which shows that both the Hypo1_I and Hypo1_II have a good predictive ability. The space arrangements of the pharmacophore features in Hypo1_II are consistent with the locations of the three portions making up a typical type II kinase inhibitor, namely, the portion occupying the ATP binding region (ATP-binding-region portion, AP), that occupying the hydrophobic region (hydrophobic-region portion, HP), and that linking AP and HP (bridge portion, BP). Our study also reveals that the ATP-binding-region portion of the type II kinase inhibitors plays an important role to the bioactivity of the type II kinase inhibitors. Structural modifications on this portion should be helpful to further improve the inhibitory potency of type II kinase inhibitors.

  6. Effect of oxidative stress on Rho kinase II and smooth muscle contraction in rat stomach.

    PubMed

    Al-Shboul, Othman; Mustafa, Ayman

    2015-06-01

    Recent studies have shown that both Rho kinase signaling and oxidative stress are involved in the pathogenesis of a number of human diseases, such as diabetes mellitus, hypertension, and atherosclerosis. However, very little is known about the effect of oxidative stress on the gastrointestinal (GI) smooth muscle Rho kinase pathway. The aim of the current study was to investigate the effect of oxidative stress on Rho kinase II and muscle contraction in rat stomach. The peroxynitrite donor 3-morpholinosydnonimine (SIN-1), hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), and peroxynitrite were used to induce oxidative stress. Rho kinase II expression and ACh-induced activity were measured in control and oxidant-treated cells via specifically designed enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and activity assay kits, respectively. Single smooth muscle cell contraction was measured via scanning micrometry in the presence or absence of the Rho kinase blocker, Y-27632 dihydrochloride. All oxidant agents significantly increased ACh-induced Rho kinase II activity without affecting its expression level. Most important, oxidative stress induced by all three agents augmented ACh-stimulated muscle cell contraction, which was significantly inhibited by Y-27632. In conclusion, oxidative stress activates Rho kinase II and enhances contraction in rat gastric muscle, suggesting an important role in GI motility disorders associated with oxidative stress.

  7. Stimulation of casein kinase II by epidermal growth factor: Relationship between the physiological activity of the kinase and the phosphorylation state of its beta subunit

    SciTech Connect

    Ackerman, P.; Osheroff, N. ); Glover, C.V.C. )

    1990-01-01

    To determine relationships between the hormonal activation of casein kinase II and its phosphorylation state, epidermal growth factor (EGF)-treated and EGF-naive human A-431 carcinoma cells were cultured in the presence of ({sup 32}P)orthophosphate. Immunoprecipitation experiments indicated that casein kinase II in the cytosol of EGF-treated cells contained approximately 3-fold more incorporated ({sup 32}P)phosphate than did its counterpart in untreated cells. Levels of kinase phosphorylation paralleled levels of kinase activity over a wide range of EGF concentrations as well as over a time course of hormone action. Approximately 97% of the incorporated ({sup 32}P)phosphate was found in the {beta} subunit of casein kinase II. Both activated and hormone-naive kinase contained radioactive phosphoserine and phosphothreonine but no phosphotyronsine. On the basis of proteolytic mapping experiments, EGF treatment of A-431 cells led to an increase in the average ({sup 32}P)phosphate content (i.e., hyperphosphorylation) of casein kinase II {beta} subunit peptides which were modified prior to hormone treatment. Finally, the effect of alkaline phosphatase on the reaction kinetics of activated casein kinase II indicated that hormonal stimulation of the kinase resulted from the increase in its phosphorylation state.

  8. Casein kinase II protein kinase is bound to lamina-matrix and phosphorylates lamin-like protein in isolated pea nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, H.; Roux, S. J.

    1992-01-01

    A casein kinase II (CK II)-like protein kinase was identified and partially isolated from a purified envelope-matrix fraction of pea (Pisum sativum L.) nuclei. When [gamma-32P]ATP was directly added to the envelope-matrix preparation, the three most heavily labeled protein bands had molecular masses near 71, 48, and 46 kDa. Protein kinases were removed from the preparation by sequential extraction with Triton X-100, EGTA, 0.3 M NaCl, and a pH 10.5 buffer, but an active kinase still remained bound to the remaining lamina-matrix fraction after these treatments. This kinase had properties resembling CK II kinases previously characterized from animal and plant sources: it preferred casein as an artificial substrate, could use GTP as efficiently as ATP as the phosphoryl donor, was stimulated by spermine, was calcium independent, and had a catalytic subunit of 36 kDa. Some animal and plant CK II kinases have regulatory subunits near 29 kDa, and a lamina-matrix-bound protein of this molecular mass was recognized on immunoblot by anti-Drosophila CK II polyclonal antibodies. Also found associated with the envelope-matrix fraction of pea nuclei were p34cdc2-like and Ca(2+)-dependent protein kinases, but their properties could not account for the protein kinase activity bound to the lamina. The 71-kDa substrate of the CK II-like kinase was lamin A-like, both in its molecular mass and in its cross-reactivity with anti-intermediate filament antibodies. Lamin phosphorylation is considered a crucial early step in the entry of cells into mitosis, so lamina-bound CK II kinases may be important control points for cellular proliferation.

  9. New isoforms of Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II in smooth muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Z L; Ikebe, M

    1994-01-01

    Four novel isoforms of Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaM kinase II) were found in rat aorta smooth muscle. Two of them were related to gamma-isoform of brain CaM kinase II (gamma-a). Differences in the primary structure of these isoforms were located in the variable region. One of them (gamma-b) contained 23 unique amino acid residues, whereas the other (gamma-c) did not contain this sequence. Both isoforms lacked the two segments (Val-316 to Gln-337 and Lys-353 to Leu-362) present in gamma-a. The DNA sequence of these gamma-isoforms except the variable region was exactly the same, suggesting that they are produced by alternative splicing. Another two isoforms were related to the delta-isoform of brain CaM kinase II (delta-a). delta-b contained a unique 11-residue sequence in the variable region whereas delta-c did not. As found for gamma-isoforms, the sequence analysis suggested that the three delta-isoforms are also produced by alternative splicing. Analysis of RNA by reverse transcription PCR confirmed the existence of specific messages for gamma-b, delta-a and delta-b. The variety of isoforms of CaM kinase II suggest that each isoform may play a specialized role in cell regulation. Images Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:8172610

  10. Thymidylate kinase from Acetabularia. II. Regulation during the life cycle.

    PubMed

    de Groot, E J; Schweiger, H G

    1983-11-01

    The activity of dTMP kinase (EC 2.7.4.9) was estimated during the development of Acetabularia. Enzyme activity was increased at the beginning of the generative phase. Regulation of the dTMP kinase activity was observed even in the absence of the nucleus. More than 30 days after enucleation the enzyme activity increased two- to threefold. The increase in activity was inhibited by puromycin and cycloheximide but not by rifampicin and chloramphenicol. These results indicate that the enzyme is coded by the nuclear genome and translated on 80 S ribosomes. From mixing experiments with low-activity and high-activity cell extracts it is concluded that the regulation is due to de novo synthesis of the enzyme.

  11. Structure-Based Design of Type II Inhibitors Applied to Maternal Embryonic Leucine Zipper Kinase

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    A novel Type II kinase inhibitor chemotype has been identified for maternal embryonic leucine zipper kinase (MELK) using structure-based ligand design. The strategy involved structural characterization of an induced DFG-out pocket by protein–ligand X-ray crystallography and incorporation of a slender linkage capable of bypassing a large gate-keeper residue, thus enabling design of molecules accessing both hinge and induced pocket regions. Optimization of an initial hit led to the identification of a low-nanomolar, cell-penetrant Type II inhibitor suitable for use as a chemical probe for MELK. PMID:25589926

  12. Neurite outgrowth of neuroblastoma cells overexpressing alpha and beta isoforms of Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II-effects of protein kinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Yamauchi, T; Yoshimura, Y; Nomura, T; Fujii, M; Sugiura, H

    1998-06-01

    Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaM kinase II) is one of the most abundant protein kinases in the brain and has a broad substrate specificity [M.K. Bennett, N.E. Erondu, M.B. Kennedy, Purification and characterization of a calmodulin-dependent protein kinase that is highly concentrated in brain, J. Biol. Chem. 258 (1983) 12735-12744 [1]; J.R. Goldenring, B. Gonzalez, J.S. McGuire, Jr., R.J. DeLorenzo, Purification and characterization of a calmodulin-dependent kinase from rat brain cytosol able to phosphorylate tubulin and microtubule-associated proteins, J. Biol. Chem. 258 (1983) 12632-12640 [4]; M.B. Kennedy, P. Greengard, Two calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinases, which are highly concentrated in brain, phosphorylate protein I at distinct sites, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 78 (1981) 1293-1297 [10]; T. Yamauchi, H. Fujisawa, Evidence for three distinct forms of calmodulin-dependent protein kinases from rat brain, FEBS Lett. 116 (1980) 141-144 [20]; T. Yamauchi, H. Fujisawa, Purification and characterization of the brain calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (kinase II), which is involved in the activation of tryptophan 5-monooxygenase, Eur. J. Biochem. 132 (1983) 15-21 [21

  13. Signaling, Regulation, and Specificity of the Type II p21-activated Kinases*

    PubMed Central

    Ha, Byung Hak; Morse, Elizabeth M.; Turk, Benjamin E.; Boggon, Titus J.

    2015-01-01

    The p21-activated kinases (PAKs) are a family of six serine/threonine kinases that act as key effectors of RHO family GTPases in mammalian cells. PAKs are subdivided into two groups: type I PAKs (PAK1, PAK2, and PAK3) and type II PAKs (PAK4, PAK5, and PAK6). Although these groups are involved in common signaling pathways, recent work indicates that the two groups have distinct modes of regulation and have both unique and common substrates. Here, we review recent insights into the molecular level details that govern regulation of type II PAK signaling. We also consider mechanisms by which signal transduction is regulated at the level of substrate specificity. Finally, we discuss the implications of these studies for clinical targeting of these kinases. PMID:25855792

  14. Inhibition of dihydroceramide desaturase activity by the sphingosine kinase inhibitor SKI II.

    PubMed

    Cingolani, Francesca; Casasampere, Mireia; Sanllehí, Pol; Casas, Josefina; Bujons, Jordi; Fabrias, Gemma

    2014-08-01

    Sphingosine kinase inhibitor (SKI) II has been reported as a dual inhibitor of sphingosine kinases (SKs) 1 and 2 and has been extensively used to prove the involvement of SKs and sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) in cellular processes. Dihydroceramide desaturase (Des1), the last enzyme in the de novo synthesis of ceramide (Cer), regulates the balance between dihydroceramides (dhCers) and Cers. Both SKs and Des1 have interest as therapeutic targets. Here we show that SKI II is a noncompetitive inhibitor (Ki = 0.3 μM) of Des1 activity with effect also in intact cells without modifying Des1 protein levels. Molecular modeling studies support that the SKI II-induced decrease in Des1 activity could result from inhibition of NADH-cytochrome b5 reductase. SKI II, but not the SK1-specific inhibitor PF-543, provoked a remarkable accumulation of dhCers and their metabolites, while both SKI II and PF-543 reduced S1P to almost undetectable levels. SKI II, but not PF543, reduced cell proliferation with accumulation of cells in the G0/G1 phase. SKI II, but not PF543, induced autophagy. These overall findings should be taken into account when using SKI II as a pharmacological tool, as some of the effects attributed to decreased S1P may actually be caused by augmented dhCers and/or their metabolites.

  15. Protein kinase that phosphorylates light-harvesting complex is autophosphorylated and is associated with photosystem II

    SciTech Connect

    Coughlan, S.J.; Hind, G.

    1987-10-06

    Thylakoid membranes were phosphorylated with (..gamma..-/sup 32/P)ATP and extracted with octyl glucoside and cholate. Among the radiolabeled phosphoproteins in the extract was a previously characterized protein kinase of 64-kDa apparent mass. The ability of this enzyme to undergo autophosphorylation in situ was used to monitor its distribution in the membrane. Fractionation studies showed that the kinase is confined to granal regions of the thylakoid, where it appears to be associated with the light-harvesting chlorophyll-protein complex of photosystem II. The kinetics of kinase autophosphorylation were investigated both in situ and in extracted, purified enzyme. In the membrane, autophosphorylation saturated within 20-30 min and was reversed with a half-time of 7-8 min upon removal of ATP or oxidative inactivation of the kinase; the accompanying dephosphorylation of light-harvesting complex was slower and kinetically complex. Fluoride (10 mM) inhibited these dephosphorylations. Autophosphorylation of the isolated kinase was independent of enzyme concentration, indicative of an intramolecular mechanism. A maximum of one serine residue per mole of kinase was esterified. Autophosphorylation was more rapid in the presence of histone IIIs, an exogenous substrate. Dephosphorylation of the isolated enzyme was not observed.

  16. A protein kinase from wheat germ that phosphorylates the largest subunit of RNA polymerase II.

    PubMed Central

    Guilfoyle, T J

    1989-01-01

    A protein kinase from wheat germ that phosphorylates the largest subunit of RNA polymerase IIA has been partially purified and characterized. The kinase has a native molecular weight of about 200 kilodaltons. This kinase utilizes Mg2+ and ATP and transfers about 20 phosphates to the heptapeptide repeats Pro-Thr-Ser-Pro-Ser-Tyr-Ser in the carboxyl-terminal domain of the 220-kilodalton subunit of soybean RNA polymerase II. This phosphorylation results in a mobility shift of the 220-kilodalton subunits of a variety of eukaryotic RNA polymerases to polypeptides ranging in size from greater than 220 kilodaltons to 240 kilodaltons on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gels. The phosphorylation is highly specific to the heptapeptide repeats since a degraded subunit polypeptide of 180 kilodaltons that lacks the heptapeptide repeats is poorly phosphorylated. Synthetic heptapeptide repeat multimers inhibit the phosphorylation of the 220-kilodalton subunit. PMID:2535525

  17. Identification and characterization of chloroplast casein kinase II from Oryza sativa (rice).

    PubMed

    Lu, Qingtao; Ding, Shunhua; Reiland, Sonja; Rödiger, Anja; Roschitzki, Bernd; Xue, Peng; Gruissem, Wilhelm; Lu, Congming; Baginsky, Sacha

    2015-01-01

    Plastid casein kinase II is an important regulator of transcription, posttranscriptional processes, and, most likely, different metabolic functions in dicotyledonous species. Here we report the identification and characterization of pCKII from the monocotyledonous species Oryza sativa. OspCKII activity was enriched from isolated rice chloroplasts using heparin-Sepharose chromatography, in which it co-elutes with the transcriptionally active chromosome (TAC) and several ribosomal proteins. Inclusion mass scanning of the kinase-active fraction identified the gene model for OspCKII. Transient expression of GFP fused to the 184 N-terminal amino acids of the OspCKII sequence in rice confirmed the chloroplastic localization of the kinase. OspCKII activity shows the characteristic features of casein kinase II, such as the utilization of GTP as phosphate donor, inhibition by low concentrations of heparin and poly-lysine, and utilization of the canonical pCKII motif E-S-E-G-E in the model substrate RNP29. Phosphoproteome analysis of a protein extract from rice leaves combined with a meta-analysis with published phosphoproteomics data revealed differences in the target protein spectrum between rice and Arabidopsis. Consistently, several pCKII phosphorylation sites in dicotyledonous plants are not conserved in monocots and algae, suggesting that details of pCKII regulation in plastids have changed during evolution. PMID:25316064

  18. Mitogen-activated protein kinase is required for the behavioural desensitization that occurs after repeated injections of angiotensin II.

    PubMed

    Vento, Peter J; Daniels, Derek

    2012-12-01

    Angiotensin II (Ang II) acts on central angiotensin type 1 (AT(1)) receptors to increase water and saline intake. Prolonged exposure to Ang II in cell culture models results in a desensitization of the AT(1) receptor that is thought to involve receptor internalization, and a behavioural correlate of this desensitization has been shown in rats after repeated central injections of Ang II. Specifically, rats given repeated injections of Ang II drink less water than control animals after a subsequent test injection of Ang II. In the same conditions, however, repeated injections of Ang II have no effect on Ang II-induced saline intake. Given earlier studies indicating that separate intracellular signalling pathways mediate Ang II-induced water and saline intake, we hypothesized that the desensitization observed in rats may be incomplete, leaving the receptor able to activate mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinases (ERK1/2), which play a role in Ang II-induced saline intake without affecting water intake. In support of this hypothesis, we found no difference in MAP kinase phosphorylation after an Ang II test injection in rats given prior treatment with repeated injections of vehicle, Ang II or Sar(1),Ile(4),Ile(8)-Ang II (SII), an Ang II analogue that activates MAP kinase without G protein coupling. In addition, we found that pretreatment with the MAP kinase inhibitor U0126 completely blocked the desensitizing effect of repeated Ang II injections on water intake. Furthermore, Ang II-induced water intake was reduced to a similar extent by repeated injections of Ang II or SII. The results suggest that G protein-independent signalling is sufficient to produce behavioural desensitization of the angiotensin system and that the desensitization requires MAP kinase activation.

  19. The casein kinase II beta subunit binds to Mos and inhibits Mos activity.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, M; Li, D; Krebs, E G; Cooper, J A

    1997-01-01

    Mos is a germ cell-specific serine/threonine kinase and is required for Xenopus oocyte maturation. Active Mos stimulates a mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) by directly phosphorylating and activating MAPK kinase (MKK). We report here that the Xenopus homolog of the beta subunit of casein kinase II (CKII beta) binds to and regulates Mos. The Mos-interacting region of CKII beta was mapped to the C terminus. Mos bound to CKII beta in somatic cells ectopically expressing Mos and CKII beta as well as in unfertilized Xenopus eggs. CKII beta inhibited Mos-mediated MAPK activation in rabbit reticulocyte lysates and repressed MKK activation by v-Mos in a coupled kinase assay. In addition, microinjection of CKII beta mRNA into Xenopus oocytes inhibited progesterone-induced meiotic maturation and MAPK activation, presumably by binding of CKII beta to Mos and thereby inhibiting MAPK activation. Moreover, this inhibitory phenotype could be rescued by another protein that binds to CKII beta, CKII alpha. The ability of ectopic CKII beta to inhibit meiotic maturation and the detection of a complex between endogenous Mos and CKII beta suggest that CKII beta may act as an inhibitor of Mos during oocyte maturation, perhaps setting a threshold beyond which Mos protein must accumulate before it can activate the MAPK pathway. PMID:9121438

  20. Three Ways to Die Suddenly: Do They All Require Calcium Calmodulin-Dependent Protein Kinase II?

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Mark E.

    2014-01-01

    Sudden cardiac death occurs due to a limited number of pathological events. The heart can beat too fast or too slow to maintain adequate cardiac output or the heart can rupture. Here we survey recent evidence that excessive activation of calcium calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II by three core neurohumoral pathways or by oxidant stress can lead to sudden cardiac death due to sinus node dysfunction and bradycardia, ventricular tachycardia or fibrillation, and cardiac rupture. PMID:25125731

  1. Antimicrobial activity of pantothenol against staphylococci possessing a prokaryotic type II pantothenate kinase.

    PubMed

    Chohnan, Shigeru; Murase, Misa; Kurikawa, Kota; Higashi, Kodai; Ogata, Yuta

    2014-01-01

    Pantothenol is a provitamin of pantothenic acid (vitamin B5) that is widely used in healthcare and cosmetic products. This analog of pantothenate has been shown to markedly inhibit the phosphorylation activity of the prokaryotic type II pantothenate kinase of Staphylococcus aureus, which catalyzes the first step of the coenzyme A biosynthetic pathway. Since type II enzymes are found exclusively in staphylococci, pantothenol suppresses the growth of S. aureus, S. epidermidis, and S. saprophyticus, which inhabit the skin of humans. Therefore, the addition of this provitamin to ointment and skincare products may be highly effective in preventing infections by opportunistic pathogens. PMID:24759689

  2. Cross-Linking Proteins To Show Complex Formation: A Laboratory That Visually Demonstrates Calmodulin Binding to Calmodulin Kinase II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porta, Angela R.

    2003-01-01

    Presents a laboratory experiment demonstrating the binding of calcium/calmodulin to calmodulin kinase II, which is important in the metabolic and physiological activities of the cell. Uses SDS polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE). (YDS)

  3. DFGmodel: Predicting Protein Kinase Structures in Inactive States for Structure-Based Discovery of Type-II Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Protein kinases exist in equilibrium of active and inactive states, in which the aspartate-phenylalanine-glycine motif in the catalytic domain undergoes conformational changes that are required for function. Drugs targeting protein kinases typically bind the primary ATP-binding site of an active state (type-I inhibitors) or utilize an allosteric pocket adjacent to the ATP-binding site in the inactive state (type-II inhibitors). Limited crystallographic data of protein kinases in the inactive state hampers the application of rational drug discovery methods for developing type-II inhibitors. Here, we present a computational approach to generate structural models of protein kinases in the inactive conformation. We first perform a comprehensive analysis of all protein kinase structures deposited in the Protein Data Bank. We then develop DFGmodel, a method that takes either a known structure of a kinase in the active conformation or a sequence of a kinase without a structure, to generate kinase models in the inactive conformation. Evaluation of DFGmodel’s performance using various measures indicates that the inactive kinase models are accurate, exhibiting RMSD of 1.5 Å or lower. The kinase models also accurately distinguish type-II kinase inhibitors from likely nonbinders (AUC > 0.70), suggesting that they are useful for virtual screening. Finally, we demonstrate the applicability of our approach with three case studies. For example, the models are able to capture inhibitors with unintended off-target activity. Our computational approach provides a structural framework for chemical biologists to characterize kinases in the inactive state and to explore new chemical spaces with structure-based drug design. PMID:25420233

  4. Protein kinase C beta II suppresses colorectal cancer by regulating IGF-1 mediated cell survival

    PubMed Central

    Dowling, Catríona M.; Phelan, James; Callender, Julia A.; Cathcart, Mary Clare; Mehigan, Brian; McCormick, Paul; Dalton, Tara; Coffey, John C.; Newton, Alexandra C.; O'sullivan, Jacintha; Kiely, Patrick A.

    2016-01-01

    Despite extensive efforts, cancer therapies directed at the Protein Kinase C (PKC) family of serine/threonine kinases have failed in clinical trials. These therapies have been directed at inhibiting PKC and have, in some cases, worsened disease outcome. Here we examine colon cancer patients and show not only that PKC Beta II is a tumour suppressor, but patients with low levels of this isozyme have significantly decreased disease free survival. Specifically, analysis of gene expression levels of all PKC genes in matched normal and cancer tissue samples from colon cancer patients revealed a striking down-regulation of the gene coding PKC Beta in the cancer tissue (n = 21). Tissue microarray analysis revealed a dramatic down-regulation of PKC Beta II protein levels in both the epithelial and stromal diseased tissue (n = 166). Of clinical significance, low levels of the protein in the normal tissue of patients is associated with a low (10%) 10 year survival compared with a much higher (60%) survival in patients with relatively high levels of the protein. Consistent with PKC Beta II levels protecting against colon cancer, overexpression of PKC Beta II in colon cancer cell lines reveals that PKC Beta II reverses transformation in cell based assays. Further to this, activation of PKC Beta II results in a dramatic downregulation of IGF-I-induced AKT, indicating a role for PKCs in regulating IGF-1 mediated cell survival. Thus, PKC Beta II is a tumour suppressor in colon cancer and low levels serve as a predictor for poor survival outcome. PMID:26989024

  5. Anti-immunoglobulin M activates nuclear calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II in human B lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    We and others have previously shown that the nuclear protein, Ets-1, is phosphorylated in a calcium-dependent manner after ligation of immunoglobulin (Ig) M on B lymphocytes. As this phosphorylation was independent of protein kinase C activity, we tested whether a calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CaM kinase) might phosphorylate the Ets-1 protein after elevation of intracellular free calcium concentrations. The dephosphorylated form of Ets-1 has been shown to bind to chromatin, suggesting that the operative kinase should be detectable in the nucleus. We prepared nuclear extracts from two human B cell lines in which increased intracellular free calcium levels correlated with increased phosphorylation of the Ets-1 protein. Activity of the CaM kinases was determined using a synthetic peptide substrate both in the absence and presence of an inhibitor specific for the CaM kinase family, KN-62. Stimulation of cells with anti-IgM led to increased activity of a nuclear kinase that could phosphorylate the peptide, and this activity was reduced by 10 microM KN-62. Kinase activity was reduced in lysates preadsorbed using an antibody specific for CaM kinase II. Two-dimensional phosphopeptide maps of the Ets-1 protein from cells incubated with ionomycin or anti-IgM contained two unique phosphopeptides that were absent in untreated cells. Incubation of isolated Ets-1 protein with purified CaM kinase II produced phosphorylation of peptides that migrated identically to those found in cells incubated with either anti-IgM or ionomycin. These data suggest a model of signal transduction by the antigen receptor on B lymphocytes in which increased intracellular free calcium can rapidly activate nuclear CaM kinase II, potentially resulting in phosphorylation and regulation of DNA-binding proteins. PMID:7500040

  6. Alpha-isoform of Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent kinase II autophosphorylation is required for memory consolidation-specific transcription.

    PubMed

    von Hertzen, Laura S J; Giese, K Peter

    2005-08-22

    Autophosphorylation of the alpha-isoform of Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent kinase II switches the kinase into an autonomous activity mode. This molecular switch is important for hippocampal long-term memory formation, which requires de novo gene transcription and protein synthesis. Here, we have studied whether auto-phosphorylation of the alpha-isoform of Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent kinase II is required for gene transcription induced in the hippocampus by contextual fear conditioning. We have shown that upregulation of a nonassociative transcript, the serum and glucocorticoid-induced kinase-1 messenger RNA, is normal in alpha-isoform of Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent kinase II autophosphorylation-deficient mutant mice, whereas upregulation of an associative transcript, the nerve growth factor-inducible gene B messenger RNA, is impaired. Thus, we suggest that autophosphorylation of the alpha-isoform of Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent kinase II is a biochemical switch that regulates association-specific consolidation processes. PMID:16056150

  7. Structure of the Dictyostelium Myosin-II Heavy Chain Kinase A (MHCK-A) α-kinase domain apoenzyme reveals a novel autoinhibited conformation

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Qilu; Yang, Yidai; van Staalduinen, Laura; Crawley, Scott William; Liu, Linda; Brennan, Stephanie; Côté, Graham P.; Jia, Zongchao

    2016-01-01

    The α-kinases are a family of a typical protein kinases present in organisms ranging from protozoa to mammals. Here we report an autoinhibited conformation for the α-kinase domain of Dictyostelium myosin-II heavy chain kinase A (MHCK-A) in which nucleotide binding to the catalytic cleft, located at the interface between an N-terminal and C-terminal lobe, is sterically blocked by the side chain of a conserved arginine residue (Arg592). Previous α-kinase structures have shown that an invariant catalytic aspartic acid residue (Asp766) is phosphorylated. Unexpectedly, in the autoinhibited conformation the phosphoryl group is transferred to the adjacent Asp663, creating an interaction network that stabilizes the autoinhibited state. The results suggest that Asp766 phosphorylation may play both catalytic and regulatory roles. The autoinhibited structure also provides the first view of a phosphothreonine residue docked into the phospho-specific allosteric binding site (Pi-pocket) in the C-lobe of the α-kinase domain. PMID:27211275

  8. Roles of an unconventional protein kinase and myosin II in amoeba osmotic shock responses.

    PubMed

    Betapudi, Venkaiah; Egelhoff, Thomas T

    2009-12-01

    The contractile vacuole (CV) is a dynamic organelle that enables Dictyostelium amoeba and other protist to maintain osmotic homeostasis by expelling excess water. In the present study, we have uncovered a mechanism that coordinates the mechanics of the CV with myosin II, regulated by VwkA, an unconventional protein kinase that is conserved in an array of protozoa. Green fluorescent protein (GFP)-VwkA fusion proteins localize persistently to the CV during both filling and expulsion phases of water. In vwkA null cells, the established CV marker dajumin still localizes to the CV, but these structures are large, spherical and severely impaired for discharge. Furthermore, myosin II cortical localization and assembly are abnormal in vwkA null cells. Parallel analysis of wild-type cells treated with myosin II inhibitors or of myosin II null cells also results in enlarged CVs with impaired dynamics. We suggest that the myosin II cortical cytoskeleton, regulated by VwkA, serves a critical conserved role in the periodic contractions of the CV, as part of the osmotic protective mechanism of protozoa.

  9. Creatine kinase activity in patients with diabetes mellitus type I and type II.

    PubMed

    Jevrić-Causević, Adlija; Malenica, Maja; Dujić, Tanja

    2006-08-01

    Diabetes mellitus can be looked upon as an array of diseases, all of which exhibit common symptoms. While pathogenesis of IDDM (insulin dependant diabetes mellitus) is well understood, the same is not true for diabetes mellitus type II. In the latter case, relative contribution of the two factors (insulin resistance or decreased insulin secretion) varies individually, being highly increased in peripheral tissues and strictly dependant on insulin for glucose uptake. Moreover, in patients with diabetes mellitus type II, disbalance at the level of regulation of glucose metabolism as well as lipid metabolism has been noted in skeletal muscles. It is normal to assume that in this type of diabetes, these changes are reflected at the level of total activity of enzyme creatine kinase. This experimental work was performed on a group of 80 regular patients of Sarajevo General Hospital. Forty of those patients were classified as patients with diabetes type I and forty as patients with diabetes type II. Each group of patients was carefully chosen and constituted of equal number of males and females. The same was applied for adequate controls. Concentration of glucose was determined for each patient with GOD method, while activity of creatine kinase was determined with CK-NAC activated kit. Statistical analysis of the results was performed with SPSS software for Windows. Obtained results point out highly expressed differences in enzyme activity between two populations examined. Changes in enzyme activity are more expressed in patients with diabetes type II. Positive correlation between concentration of glucose and serum activity of the enzyme is seen in both categories of diabetic patients which is not the case for the patients in control group. At the same time, correlation between age and type of diabetes does exist . This is not followed at the level of enzyme activity or concentration of glucose.

  10. Inflammatory Signaling by NOD-RIPK2 Is Inhibited by Clinically Relevant Type II Kinase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Canning, Peter; Ruan, Qui; Schwerd, Tobias; Hrdinka, Matous; Maki, Jenny L.; Saleh, Danish; Suebsuwong, Chalada; Ray, Soumya; Brennan, Paul E.; Cuny, Gregory D.; Uhlig, Holm H.; Gyrd-Hansen, Mads; Degterev, Alexei; Bullock, Alex N.

    2015-01-01

    Summary RIPK2 mediates pro-inflammatory signaling from the bacterial sensors NOD1 and NOD2, and is an emerging therapeutic target in autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. We observed that cellular RIPK2 can be potently inhibited by type II inhibitors that displace the kinase activation segment, whereas ATP-competitive type I inhibition was only poorly effective. The most potent RIPK2 inhibitors were the US Food and Drug Administration-approved drugs ponatinib and regorafenib. Their mechanism of action was independent of NOD2 interaction and involved loss of downstream kinase activation as evidenced by lack of RIPK2 autophosphorylation. Notably, these molecules also blocked RIPK2 ubiquitination and, consequently, inflammatory nuclear factor κB signaling. In monocytes, the inhibitors selectively blocked NOD-dependent tumor necrosis factor production without affecting lipopolysaccharide-dependent pathways. We also determined the first crystal structure of RIPK2 bound to ponatinib, and identified an allosteric site for inhibitor development. These results highlight the potential for type II inhibitors to treat indications of RIPK2 activation as well as inflammation-associated cancers. PMID:26320862

  11. Inflammatory Signaling by NOD-RIPK2 Is Inhibited by Clinically Relevant Type II Kinase Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Canning, Peter; Ruan, Qui; Schwerd, Tobias; Hrdinka, Matous; Maki, Jenny L; Saleh, Danish; Suebsuwong, Chalada; Ray, Soumya; Brennan, Paul E; Cuny, Gregory D; Uhlig, Holm H; Gyrd-Hansen, Mads; Degterev, Alexei; Bullock, Alex N

    2015-09-17

    RIPK2 mediates pro-inflammatory signaling from the bacterial sensors NOD1 and NOD2, and is an emerging therapeutic target in autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. We observed that cellular RIPK2 can be potently inhibited by type II inhibitors that displace the kinase activation segment, whereas ATP-competitive type I inhibition was only poorly effective. The most potent RIPK2 inhibitors were the US Food and Drug Administration-approved drugs ponatinib and regorafenib. Their mechanism of action was independent of NOD2 interaction and involved loss of downstream kinase activation as evidenced by lack of RIPK2 autophosphorylation. Notably, these molecules also blocked RIPK2 ubiquitination and, consequently, inflammatory nuclear factor κB signaling. In monocytes, the inhibitors selectively blocked NOD-dependent tumor necrosis factor production without affecting lipopolysaccharide-dependent pathways. We also determined the first crystal structure of RIPK2 bound to ponatinib, and identified an allosteric site for inhibitor development. These results highlight the potential for type II inhibitors to treat indications of RIPK2 activation as well as inflammation-associated cancers. PMID:26320862

  12. Rho/Rho-dependent kinase affects locomotion and actin-myosin II activity of Amoeba proteus.

    PubMed

    Kłopocka, W; Redowicz, M J

    2004-10-01

    The highly motile free-living unicellular organism Amoeba proteus has been widely used as a model to study cell motility. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying its unique locomotion are still scarcely known. Recently, we have shown that blocking the amoebae's endogenous Rac- and Rho-like proteins led to distinct and irreversible changes in the appearance of these large migrating cells as well as to a significant inhibition of their locomotion. In order to elucidate the mechanism of the Rho pathway, we tested the effects of blocking the endogenous Rho-dependent kinase (ROCK) by anti-ROCK antibodies and Y-27632, (+)-(R)-trans-4-(1-aminoethyl)-N-(4-pyridyl)cyclohexanecarboxamide dihydrochloride, a specific inhibitor of ROCK, on migrating amoebae and the effect of the Rho and ROCK inhibition on the actin-activated Mg-ATPase of the cytosolic fraction of the amoebae. Amoebae microinjected with anti-ROCK inhibitors remained contracted and strongly attached to the glass surface and exhibited an atypical locomotion. Despite protruding many pseudopodia that were advancing in various directions, the amoebae could not effectively move. Immunofluorescence studies showed that ROCK-like protein was dispersed throughout the cytoplasm and was also found in the regions of actin-myosin II interaction during both isotonic and isometric contraction. The Mg-ATPase activity was about two- to threefold enhanced, indicating that blocking the Rho/Rho-dependent kinase activated myosin. It is possible then that in contrast to the vertebrate cells, the inactivation of Rho/Rho-dependent kinase in amoebae leads to the activation of myosin II and to the observed hypercontracted cells which cannot exert effective locomotion. PMID:15726816

  13. Virtual screening filters for the design of type II p38 MAP kinase inhibitors: a fragment based library generation approach.

    PubMed

    Badrinarayan, Preethi; Sastry, G Narahari

    2012-04-01

    In this work, we introduce the development and application of a three-step scoring and filtering procedure for the design of type II p38 MAP kinase leads using allosteric fragments extracted from virtual screening hits. The design of the virtual screening filters is based on a thorough evaluation of docking methods, DFG-loop conformation, binding interactions and chemotype specificity of the 138 p38 MAP kinase inhibitors from Protein Data Bank bound to DFG-in and DFG-out conformations using Glide, GOLD and CDOCKER. A 40 ns molecular dynamics simulation with the apo, type I with DFG-in and type II with DFG-out forms was carried out to delineate the effects of structural variations on inhibitor binding. The designed docking-score and sub-structure filters were first tested on a dataset of 249 potent p38 MAP kinase inhibitors from seven diverse series and 18,842 kinase inhibitors from PDB, to gauge their capacity to discriminate between kinase and non-kinase inhibitors and likewise to selectively filter-in target-specific inhibitors. The designed filters were then applied in the virtual screening of a database of ten million (10⁷) compounds resulting in the identification of 100 hits. Based on their binding modes, 98 allosteric fragments were extracted from the hits and a fragment library was generated. New type II p38 MAP kinase leads were designed by tailoring the existing type I ATP site binders with allosteric fragments using a common urea linker. Target specific virtual screening filters can thus be easily developed for other kinases based on this strategy to retrieve target selective compounds. PMID:22306417

  14. Structure-function of the multifunctional Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II.

    PubMed

    Hudmon, Andy; Schulman, Howard

    2002-06-15

    Ca2+/calmodulin (CaM)-dependent protein kinase (CaMKII) is a ubiquitous mediator of Ca2+-linked signalling that phosphorylates a wide range of substrates to co-ordinate and regulate Ca2+-mediated alterations in cellular function. The transmission of information by the kinase from extracellular stimuli and the intracellular Ca2+ rise is not passive. Rather, its multimeric structure and autoregulation enable this enzyme to participate actively in the sensitivity, timing and location of its action. CaMKII can: (i) be activated in a Ca2+-spike frequency-dependent manner; (ii) become independent of its initial Ca2+/CaM activators; and (iii) undergo a 'molecular switch-like' behaviour, which is crucial for certain forms of learning and memory. CaMKII is derived from a family of four homologous but distinct genes, with over 30 alternatively spliced isoforms described at present. These isoforms possess diverse developmental and anatomical expression patterns, as well as subcellular localization. Six independent catalytic/autoregulatory domains are connected by a narrow stalk-like appendage to each hexameric ring within the dodecameric structure. Ca2+/CaM binding activates the enzyme by disinhibiting the autoregulatory domain; this process initiates an intra-holoenzyme autophosphorylation reaction that induces complex changes in the enzyme's sensitivity to Ca2+/CaM, including the generation of Ca2+/CaM-independent (autonomous) activity and marked increase in affinity for CaM. The role of CaMKII in Ca2+ signal transduction is shaped by its autoregulation, isoenzymic type and subcellular localization. The molecular determinants and mechanisms producing these processes are discussed as they relate to the structure-function of this multifunctional protein kinase. PMID:11931644

  15. AKAP-Independent Localization of Type-II Protein Kinase A to Dynamic Actin Microspikes

    PubMed Central

    Rivard, Robert L.; Birger, Monique; Gaston, Kara J.; Howe, Alan K.

    2010-01-01

    Regulation of the cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) in subcellular space is required for cytoskeletal dynamics and chemotaxis. Currently, spatial regulation of PKA is thought to require the association of PKA regulatory (R) subunits with A-kinase anchoring proteins (AKAPs). Here, we show that the regulatory RIIα subunit of PKA associates with dynamic actin microspikes in an AKAP-independent manner. Both endogenous RIIα and a GFP-RIIα fusion protein co-localize with F-actin in microspikes within hippocampal neuron growth cones and the leading edge lamellae of NG108-15 cells. Live-cell imaging demonstrates that RIIα-associated microspikes are highly dynamic and that the coupling of RIIα to actin is tight, as the movement of both actin and RIIα are immediately and coincidently stopped by low-dose cytochalasin D. Importantly, co-localization of RIIα and actin in these structures is resistant to displacement by a cell-permeable disrupter of PKA-AKAP interactions. Biochemical fractionation confirms that a substantial pool of PKA RIIα is associated with the detergent-insoluble cytoskeleton and is resistant to extraction by a peptide inhibitor of AKAP interactions. Finally, mutation of the AKAP-binding domain of RIIα fails to disrupt its association with actin microspikes. These data provide the first demonstration of the physical association of a kinase with such dynamic actin structures, as well as the first demonstration of the ability of type-II PKA to localize to discrete subcellular structures independently of canonical AKAP function. This association is likely to be important for microfilament dynamics and cell migration and may prime the investigation of novel mechanisms for localizing PKA activity. PMID:19536823

  16. Soluble fms-like tyrosine kinase 1 promotes angiotensin II sensitivity in preeclampsia.

    PubMed

    Burke, Suzanne D; Zsengellér, Zsuzsanna K; Khankin, Eliyahu V; Lo, Agnes S; Rajakumar, Augustine; DuPont, Jennifer J; McCurley, Amy; Moss, Mary E; Zhang, Dongsheng; Clark, Christopher D; Wang, Alice; Seely, Ellen W; Kang, Peter M; Stillman, Isaac E; Jaffe, Iris Z; Karumanchi, S Ananth

    2016-07-01

    Preeclampsia is a hypertensive disorder of pregnancy in which patients develop profound sensitivity to vasopressors, such as angiotensin II, and is associated with substantial morbidity for the mother and fetus. Enhanced vasoconstrictor sensitivity and elevations in soluble fms-like tyrosine kinase 1 (sFLT1), a circulating antiangiogenic protein, precede clinical signs and symptoms of preeclampsia. Here, we report that overexpression of sFlt1 in pregnant mice induced angiotensin II sensitivity and hypertension by impairing endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) phosphorylation and promoting oxidative stress in the vasculature. Administration of the NOS inhibitor l-NAME to pregnant mice recapitulated the angiotensin sensitivity and oxidative stress observed with sFlt1 overexpression. Sildenafil, an FDA-approved phosphodiesterase 5 inhibitor that enhances NO signaling, reversed sFlt1-induced hypertension and angiotensin II sensitivity in the preeclampsia mouse model. Sildenafil treatment also improved uterine blood flow, decreased uterine vascular resistance, and improved fetal weights in comparison with untreated sFlt1-expressing mice. Finally, sFLT1 protein expression inversely correlated with reductions in eNOS phosphorylation in placental tissue of human preeclampsia patients. These data support the concept that endothelial dysfunction due to high circulating sFLT1 may be the primary event leading to enhanced vasoconstrictor sensitivity that is characteristic of preeclampsia and suggest that targeting sFLT1-induced pathways may be an avenue for treating preeclampsia and improving fetal outcomes. PMID:27270170

  17. Ablation of phosphoinositide-3-kinase class II alpha suppresses hepatoma cell proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, Stanley K.L.; Neo, Soek-Ying; Yap, Yann-Wan; Karuturi, R. Krishna Murthy; Loh, Evelyn S.L.; Liau, Kui-Hin; Ren, Ee-Chee

    2009-09-18

    Cancer such as hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is characterized by complex perturbations in multiple signaling pathways, including the phosphoinositide-3-kinase (PI3K/AKT) pathways. Herein we investigated the role of PI3K catalytic isoforms, particularly class II isoforms in HCC proliferation. Among the siRNAs tested against the eight known catalytic PI3K isoforms, specific ablation of class II PI3K alpha (PIK3C2{alpha}) was the most effective in impairing cell growth and this was accompanied by concomitant decrease in PIK3C2{alpha} mRNA and protein levels. Colony formation ability of cells deficient for PIK3C2{alpha} was markedly reduced and growth arrest was associated with increased caspase 3 levels. A small but significant difference in gene dosage and expression levels was detected between tumor and non-tumor tissues in a cohort of 19 HCC patients. Taken together, these data suggest for the first time that in addition to class I PI3Ks in cancer, class II PIK3C2{alpha} can modulate HCC cell growth.

  18. ROS-triggered phosphorylation of complex II by Fgr kinase regulates cellular adaptation to fuel use.

    PubMed

    Acín-Pérez, Rebeca; Carrascoso, Isabel; Baixauli, Francesc; Roche-Molina, Marta; Latorre-Pellicer, Ana; Fernández-Silva, Patricio; Mittelbrunn, María; Sanchez-Madrid, Francisco; Pérez-Martos, Acisclo; Lowell, Clifford A; Manfredi, Giovanni; Enríquez, José Antonio

    2014-06-01

    Electron flux in the mitochondrial electron transport chain is determined by the superassembly of mitochondrial respiratory complexes. Different superassemblies are dedicated to receive electrons derived from NADH or FADH2, allowing cells to adapt to the particular NADH/FADH2 ratio generated from available fuel sources. When several fuels are available, cells adapt to the fuel best suited to their type or functional status (e.g., quiescent versus proliferative). We show that an appropriate proportion of superassemblies can be achieved by increasing CII activity through phosphorylation of the complex II catalytic subunit FpSDH. This phosphorylation is mediated by the tyrosine-kinase Fgr, which is activated by hydrogen peroxide. Ablation of Fgr or mutation of the FpSDH target tyrosine abolishes the capacity of mitochondria to adjust metabolism upon nutrient restriction, hypoxia/reoxygenation, and T cell activation, demonstrating the physiological relevance of this adaptive response.

  19. A double origin electrophoretic method for the simultaneous separation of adenosine deaminase, adenylate kinase, and carbonic anhydrase II.

    PubMed

    Murch, R S; Gambel, A M; Kearney, J J

    1986-10-01

    A rapid, reliable method for the simultaneous separation of adenosine deaminase, adenylate kinase, and carbonic anhydrase II by agarose gel electrophoresis is presented. This method uses a double origin sample application system. Unreduced sample extracts for adenylate kinase analysis are applied 13.0 cm from the anode. Reduced sample extracts for the remaining proteins of interest are applied 7.0 cm from the anode. The use of applicator foils and an increased voltage gradient result in superior resolution, linearity, and band sharpness of the allozyme patterns. Further, there is no masking of the adenylate kinase 2 band as a result of the use of a reducing agent, and carbonic anhydrase II is resolved without interference from hemoglobin as has been observed with other multisystem methods.

  20. Type II cGMP-dependent Protein Kinase Mediates Osteoblast Mechanotransduction*S⃞

    PubMed Central

    Rangaswami, Hema; Marathe, Nisha; Zhuang, Shunhui; Chen, Yongchang; Yeh, Jiunn-Chern; Frangos, John A.; Boss, Gerry R.; Pilz, Renate B.

    2009-01-01

    Continuous bone remodeling in response to mechanical loading is critical for skeletal integrity, and interstitial fluid flow is an important stimulus for osteoblast/osteocyte growth and differentiation. However, the biochemical signals mediating osteoblast anabolic responses to mechanical stimulation are incompletely understood. In primary human osteoblasts and murine MC3T3-E1 cells, we found that fluid shear stress induced rapid expression of c-fos, fra-1, fra-2, and fosB/ΔfosB mRNAs; these genes encode transcriptional regulators that maintain skeletal integrity. Fluid shear stress increased osteoblast nitric oxide (NO) synthesis, leading to activation of cGMP-dependent protein kinase (PKG). Pharmacological inhibition of the NO/cGMP/PKG signaling pathway blocked shear-induced expression of all four fos family genes. Induction of these genes required signaling through MEK/Erk, and Erk activation was NO/cGMP/PKG-dependent. Treating cells with a membrane-permeable cGMP analog partly mimicked the effects of fluid shear stress on Erk activity and fos family gene expression. In cells transfected with small interfering RNAs (siRNA) specific for membrane-bound PKG II, shear- and cGMP-induced Erk activation and fos family gene expression was nearly abolished and could be restored by transducing cells with a virus encoding an siRNA-resistant form of PKG II; in contrast, siRNA-mediated repression of the more abundant cytosolic PKG I isoform was without effect. Thus, we report a novel function for PKG II in osteoblast mechanotransduction, and we propose a model whereby NO/cGMP/PKG II-mediated Erk activation and induction of c-fos, fra-1, fra-2, and fosB/ΔfosB play a key role in the osteoblast anabolic response to mechanical stimulation. PMID:19282289

  1. Brain Region-Specific Effects of cGMP-Dependent Kinase II Knockout on AMPA Receptor Trafficking and Animal Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Seonil; Pick, Joseph E.; Abera, Sinedu; Khatri, Latika; Ferreira, Danielle D. P.; Sathler, Matheus F.; Morison, Sage L.; Hofmann, Franz; Ziff, Edward B.

    2016-01-01

    Phosphorylation of GluA1, a subunit of AMPA receptors (AMPARs), is critical for AMPAR synaptic trafficking and control of synaptic transmission. cGMP-dependent protein kinase II (cGKII) mediates this phosphorylation, and cGKII knockout (KO) affects GluA1 phosphorylation and alters animal behavior. Notably, GluA1 phosphorylation in the KO…

  2. Phosphorylation of Alzheimer disease amyloid precursor peptide by protein kinase C and Ca sup 2+ /calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II

    SciTech Connect

    Gandy, S.; Czernik, A.J.; Greengard, P. )

    1988-08-01

    The amino acid sequence of the Alzheimer disease amyloid precursor (ADAP) has been deduced from the corresponding cDNA, and hydropathy analysis of the sequence suggest a receptor-like structure with a single transmembrane domain. The putative cytoplasmic domain of ADAP contains potential sites for serine and threonine phosphorylation. In the present study, synthetic peptides derived from this domain were used as model substrates for various purified protein kinases. Protein kinase C rapidly catalyzed the phosphorylation of a peptide corresponding to amino acid residues 645-661 of ADAP. Ca{sup 2+}/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II phosphorylated ADAP peptide (645-661) on Thr-654 and Ser-655. Using rat cerebral cortex synaptosomes prelabeled with {sup 32}P{sub i}, a {sup 32}P-labeled phosphoprotein of {approx}135 kDa was immunoprecipitated by using antisera prepared against ADAP peptide(597-624), consistent with the possibility that the holoform of ADAP in rat brain is a phosphoprotein. Based on analogy with the effect of phosphorylation by protein kinase C of juxtamembrane residues in the cytoplasmic domain of the epidermal growth factor receptor and the interleukin 2 receptor, phosphorylation of ADAP may target it for internalization.

  3. Protein kinase G II-mediated proliferative effects in human cultured prostatic stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Cook, Anna-Louise M; Haynes, John M

    2004-02-01

    This study investigates the effect of protein kinase G (PKG) activation upon proliferation of human cultured prostatic stromal cells. The PKG II activator (8-pCPT-cGMP; IC50 of 113+/-42 nM) and the phosphodiesterase inhibitor, zaprinast (up to 50 microM), but not the PKG I isoform activators (APT-cGMP and PET-cGMP), reduced foetal calf serum-stimulated proliferation. The effect of 8-pCPT-cGMP (30 microM) was blocked by Rp-8-Br-cGMPS (5 microM) and Rp-8-pCPT-cGMP (5 microM), but not Rp-cAMPS (5 microM). 8-pCPT-cGMP (30 microM) and zaprinast (50 microM), but not PET-cGMP (30 microM), caused a significant increase in atypical nuclei and an increase in annexin-V staining. These data indicate that activation of PKG II induces apoptosis of human cultured prostatic stromal cells. PMID:14636895

  4. A high-content EMT screen identifies multiple receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors with activity on TGFβ receptor.

    PubMed

    Lotz-Jenne, Carina; Lüthi, Urs; Ackerknecht, Sabine; Lehembre, François; Fink, Tobias; Stritt, Manuel; Wirth, Matthias; Pavan, Simona; Bill, Ruben; Regenass, Urs; Christofori, Gerhard; Meyer-Schaller, Nathalie

    2016-05-01

    An epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) enables epithelial tumor cells to break out of the primary tumor mass and to metastasize. Understanding the molecular mechanisms driving EMT in more detail will provide important tools to interfere with the metastatic process. To identify pharmacological modulators and druggable targets of EMT, we have established a novel multi-parameter, high-content, microscopy-based assay and screened chemical compounds with activities against known targets. Out of 3423 compounds, we have identified 19 drugs that block transforming growth factor beta (TGFβ)-induced EMT in normal murine mammary gland epithelial cells (NMuMG). The active compounds include inhibitors against TGFβ receptors (TGFBR), Rho-associated protein kinases (ROCK), myosin II, SRC kinase and uridine analogues. Among the EMT-repressing compounds, we identified a group of inhibitors targeting multiple receptor tyrosine kinases, and biochemical profiling of these multi-kinase inhibitors reveals TGFBR as a thus far unknown target of their inhibitory spectrum. These findings demonstrate the feasibility of a multi-parameter, high-content microscopy screen to identify modulators and druggable targets of EMT. Moreover, the newly discovered "off-target" effects of several receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors have important consequences for in vitro and in vivo studies and might beneficially contribute to the therapeutic effects observed in vivo. PMID:27036020

  5. A high-content EMT screen identifies multiple receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors with activity on TGFβ receptor

    PubMed Central

    Ackerknecht, Sabine; Lehembre, François; Fink, Tobias; Stritt, Manuel; Wirth, Matthias; Pavan, Simona; Bill, Ruben; Regenass, Urs; Christofori, Gerhard; Meyer-Schaller, Nathalie

    2016-01-01

    An epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) enables epithelial tumor cells to break out of the primary tumor mass and to metastasize. Understanding the molecular mechanisms driving EMT in more detail will provide important tools to interfere with the metastatic process. To identify pharmacological modulators and druggable targets of EMT, we have established a novel multi-parameter, high-content, microscopy-based assay and screened chemical compounds with activities against known targets. Out of 3423 compounds, we have identified 19 drugs that block transforming growth factor beta (TGFβ)-induced EMT in normal murine mammary gland epithelial cells (NMuMG). The active compounds include inhibitors against TGFβ receptors (TGFBR), Rho-associated protein kinases (ROCK), myosin II, SRC kinase and uridine analogues. Among the EMT-repressing compounds, we identified a group of inhibitors targeting multiple receptor tyrosine kinases, and biochemical profiling of these multi-kinase inhibitors reveals TGFBR as a thus far unknown target of their inhibitory spectrum. These findings demonstrate the feasibility of a multi-parameter, high-content microscopy screen to identify modulators and druggable targets of EMT. Moreover, the newly discovered “off-target” effects of several receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors have important consequences for in vitro and in vivo studies and might beneficially contribute to the therapeutic effects observed in vivo. PMID:27036020

  6. A continuous spectrophotometric assay for the activation of plant NAD kinase by calmodulin, calcium(II), and europium(III) ions.

    PubMed

    Amann, B T; Mulqueen, P; Horrocks, W D

    1992-12-01

    A continuous spectrophotometric assay has been developed to quantify the calmodulin, calcium(II) ion, and europium(III) ion dependence of the activation of NAD kinase from pea seedlings. Experimental enzyme activation data are compared with the theoretical curves for the binding of calcium(II) ions to the individual calcium binding sites of calmodulin. These results indicate that the binding of three calcium(II) ions is necessary for activation of plant NAD kinase. Further studies demonstrate that europium(III) ions can replace calcium(II) ions in calmodulin with retention of its ability to activate NAD kinase.

  7. Alpha and beta subunits of CaM-kinase II are localized in different neurons in chick ciliary ganglion.

    PubMed

    Lengyel, I; Nichol, K A; Bennett, M R; Heath, J W; Little, G J; Rostas, J A

    1998-08-24

    The ciliary ganglion of the chicken contains only two types of neurons. Using monoclonal antibodies against the alpha and the beta subunits of Ca2+/calmodulin-stimulated protein kinase II (CaMPK-II) we found that the alpha-subunit was localized to the choroid neurons while beta subunit was associated with the ciliary neurons. As both neurons receive their inputs from the oculomotor nerve, while their postganglionic axons leave via different nerves, the ciliary ganglion of the chicken is a neuronal system in which the functional differences between alpha and beta CaMPK-II homopolymers in the regulation of synaptic transmission can be investigated.

  8. A protein kinase that phosphorylates the C-terminal repeat domain of the largest subunit of RNA polymerase II.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, J M; Greenleaf, A L

    1989-01-01

    The unique C-terminal repeat domain (CTD) of the largest subunit (IIa) of eukaryotic RNA polymerase II consists of multiple repeats of the heptapeptide consensus sequence Tyr-Ser-Pro-Thr-Ser-Pro-Ser. The number of repeats ranges from 26 in yeast to 42 in Drosophila to 52 in mouse. The CTD is essential in vivo, but its structure and function are not yet understood. The CTD can be phosphorylated at multiple serine and threonine residues, generating a form of the largest subunit (II0) with markedly reduced mobility in NaDodSO4/polyacrylamide gels. To investigate this extensive phosphorylation, which presumably modulates functional properties of RNA polymerase II, we began efforts to purify a specific CTD kinase. Using CTD-containing fusion proteins as substrates, we have purified a CTD kinase from the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The enzyme extensively phosphorylates the CTD portion of both the fusion proteins and intact subunit IIa, producing products with reduced electrophoretic mobilities. The properties of the CTD kinase suggest that it is distinct from previously described protein kinases. Analogous activities were also detected in Drosophila and HeLa cell extracts. Images PMID:2657724

  9. Diacylglycerol kinase theta is translocated and phosphoinositide 3-kinase-dependently activated by noradrenaline but not angiotensin II in intact small arteries.

    PubMed Central

    Walker, A J; Draeger, A; Houssa, B; van Blitterswijk , W J; Ohanian, V; Ohanian, J

    2001-01-01

    Diacylglycerol (DG) kinase (DGK) phosphorylates the lipid second messenger DG to phosphatidic acid. We reported previously that noradrenaline (NA), but not angiotensin II (AII), increases membrane-associated DGK activity in rat small arteries [Ohanian and Heagerty (1994) Biochem. J. 300, 51-56]. Here, we have identified this DGK activity as DGKtheta, present in both smooth muscle and endothelial cells of these small vessels. Subcellular fractionation of artery homogenates revealed that DGKtheta was present in nuclear, plasma membrane (and/or Golgi) and cytosolic fractions. Upon NA stimulation, DGKtheta translocated towards the membrane and cytosol (155 and 153% increases relative to the control, respectively) at 30 s, followed by a return to near-basal levels at 5 min; AII was without effect. Translocation to the membrane was to both Triton-soluble and -insoluble fractions. NA, but not AII, transiently increased DGKtheta activity in immunoprecipitates (126% at 60 s). Membrane translocation and DGKtheta activation were regulated differently: NA-induced DGKtheta activation, but not translocation, was dependent on transient activation of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI 3-K). In addition, DGK activity co-immunoprecipitated with protein kinase B, a downstream effector of PI 3-K, and was increased greatly by NA stimulation. The rapid and agonist-specific activation of DGKtheta suggests that this pathway may have a physiological role in vascular smooth-muscle responses. PMID:11115406

  10. Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent kinase II contributes to inhibitor of nuclear factor-kappa B kinase complex activation in Helicobacter pylori infection.

    PubMed

    Maubach, Gunter; Sokolova, Olga; Wolfien, Markus; Rothkötter, Hermann-Josef; Naumann, Michael

    2013-09-15

    Helicobacter pylori, a class I carcinogen, induces a proinflammatory response by activating the transcription factor nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) in gastric epithelial cells. This inflammatory condition could lead to chronic gastritis, which is epidemiologically and biologically linked to the development of gastric cancer. So far, there exists no clear knowledge on how H. pylori induces the NF-κB-mediated inflammatory response. In our study, we investigated the role of Ca(2+) /calmodulin-dependent kinase II (CAMKII), calmodulin, protein kinases C (PKCs) and the CARMA3-Bcl10-MALT1 (CBM) complex in conjunction with H. pylori-induced activation of NF-κB via the inhibitor of nuclear factor-kappa B kinase (IKK) complex. We use specific inhibitors and/or RNA interference to assess the contribution of these components. Our results show that CAMKII and calmodulin contribute to IKK complex activation and thus to the induction of NF-κB in response to H. pylori infection, but not in response to TNF-α. Thus, our findings are specific for H. pylori infected cells. Neither the PKCs α, δ, θ, nor the CBM complex itself is involved in the activation of NF-κB by H. pylori. The contribution of CAMKII and calmodulin, but not PKCs/CBM to the induction of an inflammatory response by H. pylori infection augment the understanding of the molecular mechanism involved and provide potential new disease markers for the diagnosis of gastric inflammatory diseases including gastric cancer.

  11. Differential gene expression for glutamic acid decarboxylase and type II calcium-calmodulin-dependent protein kinase in basal ganglia, thalamus, and hypothalamus of the monkey

    SciTech Connect

    Benson, D.L.; Isackson, P.J.; Hendry, S.H.; Jones, E.G. )

    1991-06-01

    In situ hybridization histochemistry, using cRNA probes, revealed a complementarity in the distributions of cells in the basal ganglia, basal nucleus of Meynert, thalamus, hypothalamus, and rostral part of the midbrain that showed gene expression for glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) or the alpha-subunit of type II calcium-calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CAM II kinase-alpha). Cells in certain nuclei such as the thalamic reticular nucleus, globus pallidus, and pars reticulata of the substantia nigra show GAD gene expression only; others in nuclei such as the basal nucleus of Meynert, medial mamillary nuclei, and ventromedial hypothalamic nuclei show CAM II kinase-alpha gene expression only. A few nuclei, for example, the pars compacta of the substantia nigra and the greater part of the subthalamic nucleus, display gene expression for neither GAD nor CAM II kinase-alpha. In other nuclei, notably those of the dorsal thalamus, and possibly in the striatum, GAD- and CAM II kinase-expressing cells appear to form two separate populations that, in most thalamic nuclei, together account for the total cell population. In situ hybridization reveals large amounts of CAM II kinase-alpha mRNA in the neuropil of most nuclei containing CAM II kinase-alpha-positive cells, suggesting its association with dendritic polyribosomes. The message may thus be translated at those sites, close to the synapses with which the protein is associated. The in situ hybridization results, coupled with those from immunocytochemical staining for CAM II kinase-alpha protein, indicate that CAM II kinase-alpha is commonly found in certain non-GABAergic afferent fiber systems but is not necessarily present in the postsynaptic cells on which they terminate. It appears to be absent from most GABAergic fiber systems but can be present in the cells on which they terminate.

  12. Role of EGFR transactivation in angiotensin II signaling to extracellular regulated kinase in preglomerular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Andresen, Bradley T; Linnoila, Jenny J; Jackson, Edwin K; Romero, Guillermo G

    2003-03-01

    Angiotensin (Ang) II promotes the phosphorylation of extracellular regulated kinase (ERK); however, the mechanisms leading to Ang II-induced ERK phosphorylation are debated. The currently accepted theory involves transactivation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). We have shown that generation of phosphatidic acid (PA) is required for the recruitment of Raf to membranes and the activation of ERK by multiple agonists, including Ang II. In the present report, we confirm that phospholipase D-dependent generation of PA is required for Ang II-mediated phosphorylation of ERK in Wistar-Kyoto and spontaneously hypertensive rat preglomerular smooth muscle cells (PGSMCs). However, EGF stimulation does not activate phospholipase D or generate PA. These observations indicate that EGF recruits Raf to membranes via a mechanism that does not involve PA, and thus, Ang II-mediated phosphorylation of ERK is partially independent of EGFR-mediated signaling cascades. We hypothesized that phosphoinositide-3-kinase (PI3K) can also act to recruit Raf to membranes; therefore, inhibition of PI3K should inhibit EGF signaling to ERK. Wortmannin, a PI3K inhibitor, inhibited EGF-mediated phosphorylation of ERK (IC50, approximately 14 nmol/L). To examine the role of the EGFR in Ang II-mediated phosphorylation of ERK we utilized 100 nmol/L wortmannin to inhibit EGFR signaling to ERK and T19N RhoA to block Ang II-mediated ERK phosphorylation. Wortmannin treatment inhibited EGF-mediated but not Ang II-mediated phosphorylation of ERK. Furthermore, T19N RhoA inhibited Ang II-mediated ERK phosphorylation, whereas T19N RhoA had significantly less effect on EGF-mediated ERK phosphorylation. We conclude that transactivation of the EGFR is not primarily responsible for Ang II-mediated activation of ERK in PGSMCs.

  13. Hunting Increases Phosphorylation of Calcium/Calmodulin-Dependent Protein Kinase Type II in Adult Barn Owls

    PubMed Central

    Nichols, Grant S.; DeBello, William M.

    2015-01-01

    Juvenile barn owls readily adapt to prismatic spectacles, whereas adult owls living under standard aviary conditions do not. We previously demonstrated that phosphorylation of the cyclic-AMP response element-binding protein (CREB) provides a readout of the instructive signals that guide plasticity in juveniles. Here we investigated phosphorylation of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (pCaMKII) in both juveniles and adults. In contrast to CREB, we found no differences in pCaMKII expression between prism-wearing and control juveniles within the external nucleus of the inferior colliculus (ICX), the major site of plasticity. For prism-wearing adults that hunted live mice and are capable of adaptation, expression of pCaMKII was increased relative to prism-wearing adults that fed passively on dead mice and are not capable of adaptation. This effect did not bear the hallmarks of instructive information: it was not localized to rostral ICX and did not exhibit a patchy distribution reflecting discrete bimodal stimuli. These data are consistent with a role for CaMKII as a permissive rather than an instructive factor. In addition, the paucity of pCaMKII expression in passively fed adults suggests that the permissive default setting is “off” in adults. PMID:25789177

  14. Syndecan-2 regulates melanin synthesis via protein kinase C βII-mediated tyrosinase activation.

    PubMed

    Jung, Hyejung; Chung, Heesung; Chang, Sung Eun; Choi, Sora; Han, Inn-Oc; Kang, Duk-Hee; Oh, Eok-Soo

    2014-05-01

    Syndecan-2, a transmembrane heparan sulfate proteoglycan that is highly expressed in melanoma cells, regulates melanoma cell functions (e.g. migration). Since melanoma is a malignant tumor of melanocytes, which largely function to synthesize melanin, we investigated the possible involvement of syndecan-2 in melanogenesis. Syndecan-2 expression was increased in human skin melanoma tissues compared with normal skin. In both mouse and human melanoma cells, siRNA-mediated knockdown of syndecan-2 was associated with reduced melanin synthesis, whereas overexpression of syndecan-2 increased melanin synthesis. Similar effects were also detected in human primary epidermal melanocytes. Syndecan-2 expression did not affect the expression of tyrosinase, a key enzyme in melanin synthesis, but instead enhanced the enzymatic activity of tyrosinase by increasing the membrane and melanosome localization of its regulator, protein kinaseII. Furthermore, UVB caused increased syndecan-2 expression, and this up-regulation of syndecan-2 was required for UVB-induced melanin synthesis. Taken together, these data suggest that syndecan-2 regulates melanin synthesis and could be a potential therapeutic target for treating melanin-associated diseases.

  15. Involvement of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II in methamphetamine-induced neural damage.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xufeng; Xing, Jingjing; Jiang, Lei; Qian, Wenyi; Wang, Yixin; Sun, Hao; Wang, Yu; Xiao, Hang; Wang, Jun; Zhang, Jinsong

    2016-11-01

    Methamphetamine (METH), an illicit drug, is widely abused in many parts of the world. Mounting evidence shows that METH exposure contributes to neurotoxicity, particularly for the monoaminergic neurons. However, to date, only a few studies have tried to unravel the mechanisms involved in METH-induced non-monoaminergic neural damage. Therefore, in the present study, we tried to explore the mechanisms for METH-induced neural damage in cortical neurons. Our results showed that METH significantly increased intracellular [Ca(2) (+) ]i in Ca(2) (+) -containing solution rather than Ca(2) (+) -free solution. Moreover, METH also upregulated calmodulin (CaM) expression and activated CaM-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII). Significantly, METH-induced neural damage can be partially retarded by CaM antagonist W7 as well as CaMKII blocker KN93. In addition, L-type Ca(2) (+) channel was also proved to be involved in METH-induced cell damage, as nifedipine, the L-type Ca(2) (+) channel-specific inhibitor, markedly attenuated METH-induced neural damage. Collectively, our results suggest that Ca(2) (+) -CaM-CaMKII is involved in METH-mediated neurotoxicity, and it might suggest a potential target for the development of therapeutic strategies for METH abuse. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Insulin-Stimulated Degradation of Apolipoprotein B100: Roles of Class II Phosphatidylinositol-3-Kinase and Autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Chirieac, Doru V.; Tuyama, Ana C.; Montenont, Emilie; Brodsky, Jeffrey L.; Fisher, Edward A.

    2013-01-01

    Both in humans and animal models, an acute increase in plasma insulin levels, typically following meals, leads to transient depression of hepatic secretion of very low density lipoproteins (VLDL). One contributing mechanism for the decrease in VLDL secretion is enhanced degradation of apolipoprotein B100 (apoB100), which is required for VLDL formation. Unlike the degradation of nascent apoB100, which occurs in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), insulin-stimulated apoB100 degradation occurs post-ER and is inhibited by pan-phosphatidylinositol (PI)3-kinase inhibitors. It is unclear, however, which of the three classes of PI3-kinases is required for insulin-stimulated apoB100 degradation, as well as the proteolytic machinery underlying this response. Class III PI3-kinase is not activated by insulin, but the other two classes are. By using a class I-specific inhibitor and siRNA to the major class II isoform in liver, we now show that it is class II PI3-kinase that is required for insulin-stimulated apoB100 degradation in primary mouse hepatocytes. Because the insulin-stimulated process resembles other examples of apoB100 post-ER proteolysis mediated by autophagy, we hypothesized that the effects of insulin in autophagy-deficient mouse primary hepatocytes would be attenuated. Indeed, apoB100 degradation in response to insulin was significantly impaired in two types of autophagy-deficient hepatocytes. Together, our data demonstrate that insulin-stimulated apoB100 degradation in the liver requires both class II PI3-kinase activity and autophagy. PMID:23516411

  17. Cytoplasmic polyadenylation element binding protein-dependent protein synthesis is regulated by calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II.

    PubMed

    Atkins, Coleen M; Nozaki, Naohito; Shigeri, Yasushi; Soderling, Thomas R

    2004-06-01

    Phosphorylation of cytoplasmic polyadenylation element binding protein (CPEB) regulates protein synthesis in hippocampal dendrites. CPEB binds the 3' untranslated region (UTR) of cytoplasmic mRNAs and, when phosphorylated, initiates mRNA polyadenylation and translation. We report that, of the protein kinases activated in the hippocampus during synaptic plasticity, calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) robustly phosphorylated the regulatory site (threonine 171) in CPEB in vitro. In postsynaptic density fractions or hippocampal neurons, CPEB phosphorylation increased when CaMKII was activated. These increases in CPEB phosphorylation were attenuated by a specific peptide inhibitor of CaMKII and by the general CaM-kinase inhibitor KN-93. Inhibitors of protein phosphatase 1 increased basal CPEB phosphorylation in neurons; this was also attenuated by a CaM-kinase inhibitor. To determine whether CaM-kinase activity regulates CPEB-dependent mRNA translation, hippocampal neurons were transfected with luciferase fused to a 3' UTR containing CPE-binding elements. Depolarization of neurons stimulated synthesis of luciferase; this was abrogated by inhibitors of protein synthesis, mRNA polyadenylation, and CaMKII. These results demonstrate that CPEB phosphorylation and translation are regulated by CaMKII activity and provide a possible mechanism for how dendritic protein synthesis in the hippocampus may be stimulated during synaptic plasticity.

  18. Mutant activin-like kinase 2 in fibrodysplasia ossificans progressiva are activated via T203 by BMP type II receptors.

    PubMed

    Fujimoto, Mai; Ohte, Satoshi; Osawa, Kenji; Miyamoto, Arei; Tsukamoto, Sho; Mizuta, Takato; Kokabu, Shoichiro; Suda, Naoto; Katagiri, Takenobu

    2015-01-01

    Fibrodysplasia ossificans progressiva (FOP) is a genetic disorder characterized by progressive heterotopic ossification in soft tissues, such as the skeletal muscles. FOP has been shown to be caused by gain-of-function mutations in activin receptor-like kinase (ALK)-2, which is a type I receptor for bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs). In the present study, we examined the molecular mechanisms that underlie the activation of intracellular signaling by mutant ALK2. Mutant ALK2 from FOP patients enhanced the activation of intracellular signaling by type II BMP receptors, such as BMPR-II and activin receptor, type II B, whereas that from heart disease patients did not. This enhancement was dependent on the kinase activity of the type II receptors. Substitution mutations at all nine serine and threonine residues in the ALK2 glycine- and serine-rich domain simultaneously inhibited this enhancement by the type II receptors. Of the nine serine and threonine residues in ALK2, T203 was found to be critical for the enhancement by type II receptors. The T203 residue was conserved in all of the BMP type I receptors, and these residues were essential for intracellular signal transduction in response to ligand stimulation. The phosphorylation levels of the mutant ALK2 related to FOP were higher than those of wild-type ALK2 and were further increased by the presence of type II receptors. The phosphorylation levels of ALK2 were greatly reduced in mutants carrying a mutation at T203, even in the presence of type II receptors. These findings suggest that the mutant ALK2 related to FOP is enhanced by BMP type II receptors via the T203-regulated phosphorylation of ALK2.

  19. C-terminal Src Kinase Gates Homeostatic Synaptic Plasticity and Regulates Fasciclin II Expression at the Drosophila Neuromuscular Junction

    PubMed Central

    Spring, Ashlyn M.; Brusich, Douglas J.; Frank, C. Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Forms of homeostatic plasticity stabilize neuronal outputs and promote physiologically favorable synapse function. A well-studied homeostatic system operates at the Drosophila melanogaster larval neuromuscular junction (NMJ). At the NMJ, impairment of postsynaptic glutamate receptor activity is offset by a compensatory increase in presynaptic neurotransmitter release. We aim to elucidate how this process operates on a molecular level and is preserved throughout development. In this study, we identified a tyrosine kinase-driven signaling system that sustains homeostatic control of NMJ function. We identified C-terminal Src Kinase (Csk) as a potential regulator of synaptic homeostasis through an RNAi- and electrophysiology-based genetic screen. We found that Csk loss-of-function mutations impaired the sustained expression of homeostatic plasticity at the NMJ, without drastically altering synapse growth or baseline neurotransmission. Muscle-specific overexpression of Src Family Kinase (SFK) substrates that are negatively regulated by Csk also impaired NMJ homeostasis. Surprisingly, we found that transgenic Csk-YFP can support homeostatic plasticity at the NMJ when expressed either in the muscle or in the nerve. However, only muscle-expressed Csk-YFP was able to localize to NMJ structures. By immunostaining, we found that Csk mutant NMJs had dysregulated expression of the Neural Cell Adhesion Molecule homolog Fasciclin II (FasII). By immunoblotting, we found that levels of a specific isoform of FasII were decreased in homeostatically challenged GluRIIA mutant animals–but markedly increased in Csk mutant animals. Additionally, we found that postsynaptic overexpression of FasII from its endogenous locus was sufficient to impair synaptic homeostasis, and genetically reducing FasII levels in Csk mutants fully restored synaptic homeostasis. Based on these data, we propose that Csk and its SFK substrates impinge upon homeostatic control of NMJ function by regulating

  20. Phosphorylation of connexin 32, a hepatocyte gap-junction protein, by cAMP-dependent protein kinase, protein kinase C and Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II.

    PubMed

    Sáez, J C; Nairn, A C; Czernik, A J; Spray, D C; Hertzberg, E L; Greengard, P; Bennett, M V

    1990-09-11

    Phosphorylation of connexin 32, the major liver gap-junction protein, was studied in purified liver gap junctions and in hepatocytes. In isolated gap junctions, connexin 32 was phosphorylated by cAMP-dependent protein kinase (cAMP-PK), by protein kinase C (PKC) and by Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (Ca2+/CaM-PK II). Connexin 26 was not phosphorylated by these three protein kinases. Phosphopeptide mapping of connexin 32 demonstrated that cAMP-PK and PKC primarily phosphorylated a seryl residue in a peptide termed peptide 1. PKC also phosphorylated seryl residues in additional peptides. CA2+/CaM-PK II phosphorylated serine and to a lesser extent, threonine, at sites different from those phosphorylated by the other two protein kinases. A synthetic peptide PSRKGSGFGHRL-amine (residues 228-239 based on the deduced amino acid sequence of rat connexin 32) was phosphorylated by cAMP-PK and by PKC, with kinetic properties being similar to those for other physiological substrates phosphorylated by these enzymes. Ca2+/CaM-PK II did not phosphorylate the peptide. Phosphopeptide mapping and amino acid sequencing of the phosphorylated synthetic peptide indicated that Ser233 of connexin 32 was present in peptide 1 and was phosphorylated by cAMP-PK or by PKC. In hepatocytes labeled with [32P]orthophosphoric acid, treatment with forskolin or 20-deoxy-20-oxophorbol 12,13-dibutyrate (PDBt) resulted in increased 32P-incorporation into connexin 32. Phosphopeptide mapping and phosphoamino acid analysis showed that a seryl residue in peptide 1 was most prominently phosphorylated under basal conditions. Treatment with forskolin or PDBt stimulated the phosphorylation of peptide 1. PDBt treatment also increased the phosphorylation of seryl residues in several other peptides. PDBt did not affect the cAMP-PK activity in hepatocytes. It has previously been shown that phorbol ester reduces dye coupling in several cell types, however in rat hepatocytes, dye coupling was not reduced

  1. Type II cGMP-dependent protein kinase directly inhibits HER2 activation of gastric cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Miaolin; Yao, Xiaoyuan; Wu, Min; Qian, Hai; Wu, Yan; Chen, Yongchang

    2016-02-01

    Our previous study demonstrated that type II cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP)-dependent protein kinase (PKG II) inhibited epidermal growth factor (EGF)-induced phosphorylation/activation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). Since human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) has a similar molecular structure to EGFR, the present study was designed to investigate whether PKG II also inhibits HER2 activation. The human gastric cancer cell line HGC‑27 was infected with an adenoviral construct encoding cDNA of PKG II (Ad‑PKG II) to increase the expression of PKG II and treated with 8‑(4‑chlorophenylthio)guanosine‑3',5'‑cyclic monophosphate (8‑pCPT‑cGMP) to activate the kinase. Western blotting was performed to detect the tyrosine and serine/threonine phosphorylation of HER2. Co‑immunoprecipitation was performed in order to determine the binding between PKG II and HER2. In addition, a QuikChange Lightning Site‑Directed Mutagenesis kit was used to mutate threonine 686 of HER2 to glutamic acid or alanine. The results demonstrated that EGF treatment increased the tyrosine phosphorylation (activation) of HER2. Increasing the PKG II activity of HGC‑27 cells through infection with Ad‑PKG II and stimulation with 8‑pCPT‑cGMP inhibited the EGF‑induced tyrosine phosphorylation/activation of HER2. PKG II bound directly with HER2 and caused phosphorylation of threonine 686. When threonine 686 of HER2 was mutated to alanine, which could not be phosphorylated by PKG II, the inhibitory effect of PKG II on the activation of HER2 was eradicated. When threonine 686 of HER2 was mutated to glutamic acid, which mimicked the phosphorylation of this site, treatment with EGF had no stimulating effect on tyrosine phosphorylation/activation of the mutant HER2. The results suggested that PKG II inhibits EGF‑induced activation of HER2 through binding with and causing threonine 686 phosphorylation of this oncogenic protein. PMID:26676300

  2. Function of cGMP-dependent protein kinase II in volume load-induced diuresis.

    PubMed

    Schramm, Andrea; Schinner, Elisabeth; Huettner, Johannes P; Kees, Frieder; Tauber, Philipp; Hofmann, Franz; Schlossmann, Jens

    2014-10-01

    Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP)/cGMPs cause diuresis and natriuresis. Their downstream effectors beyond cGMP remain unclear. To elucidate a probable function of cGMP-dependent protein kinase II (cGKII), we investigated renal parameters in different conditions (basal, salt diets, starving, water load) using a genetically modified mouse model (cGKII-KO), but did not detect any striking differences between WT and cGKII-KO. Thus, cGKII is proposed to play only a marginal role in the adjustment of renal concentration ability to varying salt loads without water restriction or starving conditions. When WT mice were subjected to a volume load (performed by application of a 10-mM glucose solution (3% of BW) via feeding needle), they exhibited a potent diuresis. In contrast, urine volume was decreased significantly in cGKII-KO. We showed that AQP2 plasma membrane (PM) abundance was reduced for about 50% in WT upon volume load, therefore, this might be a main cause for the enhanced diuresis. In contrast, cGKII-KO mice almost completely failed to decrease AQP2-PM distribution. This significant difference between both genotypes is not induced by an altered p-Ser256-AQP2 phosphorylation, as phosphorylation at this site decreases similarly in WT and KO. Furthermore, sodium excretion was lowered in cGKII-KO mice during volume load. In summary, cGKII is only involved to a minor extent in the regulation of basal renal concentration ability. By contrast, cGKII-KO mice are not able to handle an acute volume load. Our results suggest that membrane insertion of AQP2 is inhibited by cGMP/cGKII.

  3. Calmodulin kinase II is required for fight or flight sinoatrial node physiology.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yuejin; Gao, Zhan; Chen, Biyi; Koval, Olha M; Singh, Madhu V; Guan, Xiaoqun; Hund, Thomas J; Kutschke, William; Sarma, Satyam; Grumbach, Isabella M; Wehrens, Xander H T; Mohler, Peter J; Song, Long-Sheng; Anderson, Mark E

    2009-04-01

    The best understood "fight or flight" mechanism for increasing heart rate (HR) involves activation of a cyclic nucleotide-gated ion channel (HCN4) by beta-adrenergic receptor (betaAR) agonist stimulation. HCN4 conducts an inward "pacemaker" current (I(f)) that increases the sinoatrial nodal (SAN) cell membrane diastolic depolarization rate (DDR), leading to faster SAN action potential generation. Surprisingly, HCN4 knockout mice were recently shown to retain physiological HR increases with isoproterenol (ISO), suggesting that other I(f)-independent pathways are critical to SAN fight or flight responses. The multifunctional Ca(2+) and calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) is a downstream signal in the betaAR pathway that activates Ca(2+) homeostatic proteins in ventricular myocardium. Mice with genetic, myocardial and SAN cell CaMKII inhibition have significantly slower HRs than controls during stress, leading us to hypothesize that CaMKII actions on SAN Ca(2+) homeostasis are critical for betaAR agonist responses in SAN. Here we show that CaMKII mediates ISO HR increases by targeting SAN cell Ca(2+) homeostasis. CaMKII inhibition prevents ISO effects on SAN Ca(2+) uptake and release from intracellular sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) stores that are necessary for increasing DDR. CaMKII inhibition has no effect on the ISO response in SAN cells when SR Ca(2+) release is disabled and CaMKII inhibition is only effective at slowing HRs during betaAR stimulation. These studies show the tightly coupled, but previously unanticipated, relationship of CaMKII to the betaAR pathway in fight or flight physiology and establish CaMKII as a critical signaling molecule for physiological HR responses to catecholamines.

  4. Phosphorylation of Yeast Pah1 Phosphatidate Phosphatase by Casein Kinase II Regulates Its Function in Lipid Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Lu-Sheng; Su, Wen-Min; Han, Gil-Soo; Carman, George M

    2016-05-01

    Pah1 phosphatidate phosphatase in Saccharomyces cerevisiae catalyzes the penultimate step in the synthesis of triacylglycerol (i.e. the production of diacylglycerol by dephosphorylation of phosphatidate). The enzyme playing a major role in lipid metabolism is subject to phosphorylation (e.g. by Pho85-Pho80, Cdc28-cyclin B, and protein kinases A and C) and dephosphorylation (e.g. by Nem1-Spo7) that regulate its cellular location, catalytic activity, and stability/degradation. In this work, we show that Pah1 is a substrate for casein kinase II (CKII); its phosphorylation was time- and dose-dependent and was dependent on the concentrations of Pah1 (Km = 0.23 μm) and ATP (Km = 5.5 μm). By mass spectrometry, truncation analysis, site-directed mutagenesis, phosphopeptide mapping, and phosphoamino acid analysis, we identified that >90% of its phosphorylation occurs on Thr-170, Ser-250, Ser-313, Ser-705, Ser-814, and Ser-818. The CKII-phosphorylated Pah1 was a substrate for the Nem1-Spo7 protein phosphatase and was degraded by the 20S proteasome. The prephosphorylation of Pah1 by protein kinase A or protein kinase C reduced its subsequent phosphorylation by CKII. The prephosphorylation of Pah1 by CKII reduced its subsequent phosphorylation by protein kinase A but not by protein kinase C. The expression of Pah1 with combined mutations of S705D and 7A, which mimic its phosphorylation by CKII and lack of phosphorylation by Pho85-Pho80, caused an increase in triacylglycerol content and lipid droplet number in cells expressing the Nem1-Spo7 phosphatase complex. PMID:27044741

  5. Glucagon-like peptide-1 inhibits angiotensin II-induced mesangial cell damage via protein kinase A.

    PubMed

    Ishibashi, Yuji; Matsui, Takanori; Ojima, Ayako; Nishino, Yuri; Nakashima, Sae; Maeda, Sayaka; Yamagishi, Sho-ichi

    2012-11-01

    There is a growing body of evidence that renin-angiotensin system plays a role in diabetic nephropathy. Recently, we have found that glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), one of the incretins, a gut hormone secreted from L cells in the intestine in response to food intake, inhibits advanced glycation end product-induced monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 gene expression in mesangial cells thorugh the interaction with the receptor of GLP-1. However, effects of GLP-1 on angiotensin II-exposed mesangial cells are unknown. This study investigated whether and how GLP-1 blocked the angiotensin II-induced mesangial cell damage in vitro. GLP-1 completely blocked the angiotensin II-induced superoxide generation, NF-κB activation, up-regulation of mRNA levels of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 in mesangial cells, all of which were prevented by the treatments with H-89, an inhibitor of protein kinase A. The present results demonstrated for the first time that GLP-1 blocked the angiotensin II-induced mesangial cell injury by inhibiting superoxide-mediated NF-κB activation via protein kinase C pathway. Our present study suggests that strategies to enhance the biological actions of GLP-1 may be a promising strategy for the treatment of diabetic nephropathy.

  6. A carboxyl-terminal-domain kinase associated with RNA polymerase II transcription factor delta from rat liver.

    PubMed Central

    Serizawa, H; Conaway, R C; Conaway, J W

    1992-01-01

    We previously purified RNA polymerase II transcription factor delta from rat liver and found that it has an associated DNA-dependent ATPase (dATPase) activity. In this report, we show that delta is also closely associated with a protein kinase activity that catalyzes phosphorylation of the largest subunit of RNA polymerase II. Kinase activity copurifies with transcription and DNA-dependent ATPase (dATPase) activities when delta is analyzed by anion- and cation-exchange HPLC as well as by sucrose gradient sedimentation, arguing that delta possesses all three activities. Phosphorylation of the largest subunits of both rat and yeast RNA polymerase II is stimulated by DNA, whereas phosphorylation of a synthetic peptide containing multiple copies of the carboxyl-terminal heptapeptide repeat is not. Although both ATP and GTP appear to function as phosphate donors, GTP is utilized less than 10% as well as ATP. These findings suggest that delta may exert its action in transcription at least in part through a mechanism involving phosphorylation of the largest subunit of RNA polymerase II. Images PMID:1386928

  7. Protein kinase A type II-α regulatory subunit regulates the response of prostate cancer cells to taxane treatment

    PubMed Central

    Zynda, Evan R; Matveev, Vitaliy; Makhanov, Michael; Chenchik, Alexander; Kandel, Eugene S

    2014-01-01

    In the last decade taxane-based therapy has emerged as a standard of care for hormone-refractory prostate cancer. Nevertheless, a significant fraction of tumors show no appreciable response to the treatment, while the others develop resistance and recur. Despite years of intense research, the mechanisms of taxane resistance in prostate cancer and other malignancies are poorly understood and remain a topic of intense investigation. We have used improved mutagenesis via random insertion of a strong promoter to search for events, which enable survival of prostate cancer cells after Taxol exposure. High-throughput mapping of the integration sites pointed to the PRKAR2A gene, which codes for a type II-α regulatory subunit of protein kinase A, as a candidate modulator of drug response. Both full-length and N-terminally truncated forms of the PRKAR2A gene product markedly increased survival of prostate cancer cells lines treated with Taxol and Taxotere. Suppression of protein kinase A enzymatic activity is the likely mechanism of action of the overexpressed proteins. Accordingly, protein kinase A inhibitor PKI (6–22) amide reduced toxicity of Taxol to prostate cancer cells. Our findings support the role of protein kinase A and its constituent proteins in cell response to chemotherapy. PMID:25485509

  8. Quantitative model of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mihalas, Stefan

    Calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) is a key element in the calcium second messenger cascades that lead to long term potentiation (LTP) of synaptic strength. In this thesis, I have constructed kinetic models of activation of CaMKII and measured some of the unknown parameters of the model. I used the models to elucidate mechanisms of activation of CaMKII and to study the kinetics of its activation under conditions similar to those in dendritic spines.In chapter 2, I developed a new experimental method to rapidly stop the autophosphorylation reaction. I used this method to measure the catalytic turnover number of CaMKII. To quantitatively characterize CaMKII atophosphorylation in nonsaturating calcium, I also measured the autophosphorylation turnover number when CaMKII is activated by calmodulin mutants that can bind calcium ions only in either the amino or the carboxyl lobes.Previous models of CaMKII activation assumed that binding of calmodulins to individual CaMKII subunits is independent and that autophosphorylation occurs within a ring of 6 subunits. However, a recent structure of CaMKII suggests that pairs of subunits cooperate in binding calmodulin and raises the possibility that the autophosphorylation occurs within pairs of subunits. In chapter 3, I constructed a model in which CaMKII subunits cooperate in binding calmodulin. This model reconciled previous experimental results from the literature that appeared contradictory. In chapter 4, I constructed two models for CaMKII autophosphorylation, in which autophosphorylation can occur either in rings or pairs, and used them to design experiments aimed at differentiating between these possibilities. Previously published measurements and the measurements that I performed are more consistent with autophosphorylation occurring within pairs.In chapter 5, I constructed a model for simultaneous interactions among calcium, calmodulin, and CaMKII, and I used an automatic parameter search algorithm

  9. Particulate air pollution induces arrhythmia via oxidative stress and calcium calmodulin kinase II activation

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Jin-Bae; Kim, Changsoo; Choi, Eunmi; Park, Sanghoon; Park, Hyelim; Pak, Hui-Nam; Lee, Moon-Hyoung; Shin, Dong Chun; Hwang, Ki-Chul; Joung, Boyoung

    2012-02-15

    Ambient particulate matter (PM) can increase the incidence of arrhythmia. However, the arrhythmogenic mechanism of PM is poorly understood. This study investigated the arrhythmogenic mechanism of PM. In Sprague–Dawley rats, QT interval was increased from 115.0 ± 14.0 to 142.1 ± 18.4 ms (p = 0.02) after endotracheal exposure of DEP (200 μg/ml for 30 min, n = 5). Ventricular premature contractions were more frequently observed after DEP exposure (100%) than baseline (20%, p = 0.04). These effects were prevented by pretreatment of N-acetylcysteine (NAC, 5 mmol/L, n = 3). In 12 Langendorff-perfused rat hearts, DEP infusion of 12.5 μg/ml for 20 min prolonged action potential duration (APD) at only left ventricular base increasing apicobasal repolarization gradients. Spontaneous early afterdepolarization (EAD) and ventricular tachycardia (VT) were observed in 8 (67%) and 6 (50%) hearts, respectively, versus no spontaneous triggered activity or VT in any hearts before DEP infusion. DEP-induced APD prolongation, EAD and VT were successfully prevented with NAC (5 mmol/L, n = 5), nifedipine (10 μmol/L, n = 5), and active Ca{sup 2+}/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) blockade, KN 93 (1 μmol/L, n = 5), but not by thapsigargin (200 nmol/L) plus ryanodine (10 μmol/L, n = 5) and inactive CaMKII blockade, KN 92 (1 μmol/L, n = 5). In neonatal rat cardiomyocytes, DEP provoked ROS generation in dose dependant manner. DEP (12.5 μg/ml) induced apoptosis, and this effect was prevented by NAC and KN 93. Thus, this study shows that in vivo and vitro exposure of PM induced APD prolongation, EAD and ventricular arrhythmia. These effects might be caused by oxidative stress and CaMKII activation. -- Highlights: ► The ambient PM consistently prolonged repolarization. ► The ambient PM induced triggered activity and ventricular arrhythmia. ► These effects were prevented by antioxidants, I{sub CaL} blockade and CaMKII blockade. ► The ambient PM can induce

  10. A Novel CaM Kinase II Pathway Controls the Location of Neuropeptide Release from Caenorhabditis elegans Motor Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Hoover, Christopher M.; Edwards, Stacey L.; Yu, Szi-chieh; Kittelmann, Maike; Richmond, Janet E.; Eimer, Stefan; Yorks, Rosalina M.; Miller, Kenneth G.

    2014-01-01

    Neurons release neuropeptides via the regulated exocytosis of dense core vesicles (DCVs) to evoke or modulate behaviors. We found that Caenorhabditis elegans motor neurons send most of their DCVs to axons, leaving very few in the cell somas. How neurons maintain this skewed distribution and the extent to which it can be altered to control DCV numbers in axons or to drive release from somas for different behavioral impacts is unknown. Using a forward genetic screen, we identified loss-of-function mutations in UNC-43 (CaM kinase II) that reduce axonal DCV levels by ∼90% and cell soma/dendrite DCV levels by ∼80%, leaving small synaptic vesicles largely unaffected. Blocking regulated secretion in unc-43 mutants restored near wild-type axonal levels of DCVs. Time-lapse video microscopy showed no role for CaM kinase II in the transport of DCVs from cell somas to axons. In vivo secretion assays revealed that much of the missing neuropeptide in unc-43 mutants is secreted via a regulated secretory pathway requiring UNC-31 (CAPS) and UNC-18 (nSec1). DCV cargo levels in unc-43 mutants are similarly low in cell somas and the axon initial segment, indicating that the secretion occurs prior to axonal transport. Genetic pathway analysis suggests that abnormal neuropeptide function contributes to the sluggish basal locomotion rate of unc-43 mutants. These results reveal a novel pathway controlling the location of DCV exocytosis and describe a major new function for CaM kinase II. PMID:24653209

  11. Effective Rho-associated protein kinase inhibitor treatment to dissociate human iPS cells for suspension culture to form embryoid body-like cell aggregates.

    PubMed

    Horiguchi, Ayumi; Yazaki, Koyuki; Aoyagi, Mami; Ohnuki, Yoshitsugu; Kurosawa, Hiroshi

    2014-11-01

    Treatment conditions using Y-27632 in the preparation of cell suspension of dissociated human pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) were investigated in the context of embryoid body (EB)-like cell aggregates. The effectiveness of a pretreatment with Y-27632 before cell dissociation and that of a Y-27632 treatment during cell dissociation were investigated from the viewpoint of simplicity and robustness. The duration of Y-27632 treatment in the preparation process affected the circularity and agglomeration of dissociated hiPSCs. A single application of pretreatment failed to prevent the onset of blebbing. However, a pretreatment promoted the agglomeration of dissociated hiPSCs when combined with the addition of Y-27632 to cell suspension. Our results indicate that pretreatment enhances the agglomeration potential of dissociated hiPSCs. When cell dissociation was performed in the presence of Y-27632, dissociated hiPSCs possessed the highest circularity and significant agglomerating property. It was shown that treatment with Y-27632 during cell dissociation is a simple and robust method to prepare dissociated hiPSCs for suspension culture to form EB-like cell aggregates.

  12. Concentrated expression of Ca2+/ calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II and protein kinase C in the mushroom bodies of the brain of the honeybee Apis mellifera L.

    PubMed

    Kamikouchi, A; Takeuchi, H; Sawata, M; Natori, S; Kubo, T

    2000-02-21

    We have previously used the differential display method to identify a gene that is expressed preferentially in the mushroom bodies of worker honeybees and to show that it encodes a putative inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor (IP3R) homologue (Kamikouchi et al. [1998] Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun. 242:181-186). In the present study, we examined whether the expression of some of the genes for proteins involved in the intracellular Ca2+ signal transduction is also concentrated in the mushroom bodies of the honeybee by isolating cDNA fragments that encode the Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) and protein kinase C (PKC) homologues of the honeybee. In situ hybridization analysis revealed that the expression of these genes was also concentrated in the mushroom bodies of the honeybee brain: The CaMKII gene was expressed preferentially in the large-type Kenyon cells of the mushroom bodies, whereas that for PKC was expressed in both the large and small types of Kenyon cells. The expression of the genes for IP3R and CaMKII was concentrated in the mushroom bodies of the queen and drone as well as in those of the worker bee. Furthermore, the enzymatic activities of CaMKII and PKC were found to be higher in the mushroom bodies/central bodies than in the optic and antennal lobes of the worker bee brain. These results suggest that the function of the intracellular Ca2+ signal transduction is enhanced in Kenyon cells in comparison to other neuronal cell types in the honeybee brain.

  13. Mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 1/2 inhibition and angiotensin II converting inhibition in mice with cardiomyopathy caused by lamin A/C gene mutation

    SciTech Connect

    Muchir, Antoine; Wu, Wei; Sera, Fusako; Homma, Shunichi; Worman, Howard J.

    2014-10-03

    Highlights: • Both ACE and MEK1/2 inhibition are beneficial on cardiac function in Lmna cardiomyopathy. • MEK1/2 inhibitor has beneficial effects beyond ACE inhibition for Lmna cardiomyopathy. • These results provide further preclinical rationale for a clinical trial of a MEK1/2 inhibitor. - Abstract: Background: Mutations in the LMNA gene encoding A-type nuclear lamins can cause dilated cardiomyopathy with or without skeletal muscular dystrophy. Previous studies have shown abnormally increased extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 activity in hearts of Lmna{sup H222P/H222P} mice, a small animal model. Inhibition of this abnormal signaling activity with a mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 1/2 (MEK1/2) inhibitor has beneficial effects on heart function and survival in these mice. However, such treatment has not been examined relative to any standard of care intervention for dilated cardiomyopathy or heart failure. We therefore examined the effects of an angiotensin II converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor on left ventricular function in Lmna{sup H222P/H222P} mice and assessed if adding a MEK1/2 inhibitor would provide added benefit. Methods: Male Lmna{sup H222P/H222P} mice were treated with the ACE inhibitor benazepril, the MEK1/2 inhibitor selumetinib or both. Transthoracic echocardiography was used to measure left ventricular diameters and fractional shortening was calculated. Results: Treatment of Lmna{sup H222P/H222P} mice with either benazepril or selumetinib started at 8 weeks of age, before the onset of detectable left ventricular dysfunction, lead to statistically significantly increased fractional shortening compared to placebo at 16 weeks of age. There was a trend towards a great value for fractional shortening in the selumetinib-treated mice. When treatment was started at 16 weeks of age, after the onset of left ventricular dysfunction, the addition of selumetinib treatment to benazepril lead to a statistically significant increase in left

  14. S-Nitrosylation Induces Both Autonomous Activation and Inhibition of Calcium/Calmodulin-dependent Protein Kinase II δ*

    PubMed Central

    Erickson, Jeffrey R.; Nichols, C. Blake; Uchinoumi, Hitoshi; Stein, Matthew L.; Bossuyt, Julie; Bers, Donald M.

    2015-01-01

    NO is known to modulate calcium handling and cellular signaling in the myocardium, but key targets for NO in the heart remain unidentified. Recent reports have implied that NO can activate calcium/calmodulin (Ca2+/CaM)-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) in neurons and the heart. Here we use our novel sensor of CaMKII activation, Camui, to monitor changes in the conformation and activation of cardiac CaMKII (CaMKIIδ) activity after treatment with the NO donor S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO). We demonstrate that exposure to NO after Ca2+/CaM binding to CaMKIIδ results in autonomous kinase activation, which is abolished by mutation of the Cys-290 site. However, exposure of CaMKIIδ to GSNO prior to Ca2+/CaM exposure strongly suppresses kinase activation and conformational change by Ca2+/CaM. This NO-induced inhibition was ablated by mutation of the Cys-273 site. We found parallel effects of GSNO on CaM/CaMKIIδ binding and CaMKIIδ-dependent ryanodine receptor activation in adult cardiac myocytes. We conclude that NO can play a dual role in regulating cardiac CaMKIIδ activity. PMID:26316536

  15. Type II PI4-kinases control Weibel-Palade body biogenesis and von Willebrand factor structure in human endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Lopes da Silva, Mafalda; O'Connor, Marie N.; Kriston-Vizi, Janos; White, Ian J.; Al-Shawi, Raya; Simons, J. Paul; Mössinger, Julia; Haucke, Volker

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Weibel-Palade bodies (WPBs) are endothelial storage organelles that mediate the release of molecules involved in thrombosis, inflammation and angiogenesis, including the pro-thrombotic glycoprotein von Willebrand factor (VWF). Although many protein components required for WPB formation and function have been identified, the role of lipids is almost unknown. We examined two key phosphatidylinositol kinases that control phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate levels at the trans-Golgi network, the site of WPB biogenesis. RNA interference of the type II phosphatidylinositol 4-kinases PI4KIIα and PI4KIIβ in primary human endothelial cells leads to formation of an increased proportion of short WPB with perturbed packing of VWF, as exemplified by increased exposure of antibody-binding sites. When stimulated with histamine, these cells release normal levels of VWF yet, under flow, form very few platelet-catching VWF strings. In PI4KIIα-deficient mice, immuno-microscopy revealed that VWF packaging is also perturbed and these mice exhibit increased blood loss after tail cut compared to controls. This is the first demonstration that lipid kinases can control the biosynthesis of VWF and the formation of WPBs that are capable of full haemostatic function. PMID:27068535

  16. Type II PI4-kinases control Weibel-Palade body biogenesis and von Willebrand factor structure in human endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Lopes da Silva, Mafalda; O'Connor, Marie N; Kriston-Vizi, Janos; White, Ian J; Al-Shawi, Raya; Simons, J Paul; Mössinger, Julia; Haucke, Volker; Cutler, Daniel F

    2016-05-15

    Weibel-Palade bodies (WPBs) are endothelial storage organelles that mediate the release of molecules involved in thrombosis, inflammation and angiogenesis, including the pro-thrombotic glycoprotein von Willebrand factor (VWF). Although many protein components required for WPB formation and function have been identified, the role of lipids is almost unknown. We examined two key phosphatidylinositol kinases that control phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate levels at the trans-Golgi network, the site of WPB biogenesis. RNA interference of the type II phosphatidylinositol 4-kinases PI4KIIα and PI4KIIβ in primary human endothelial cells leads to formation of an increased proportion of short WPB with perturbed packing of VWF, as exemplified by increased exposure of antibody-binding sites. When stimulated with histamine, these cells release normal levels of VWF yet, under flow, form very few platelet-catching VWF strings. In PI4KIIα-deficient mice, immuno-microscopy revealed that VWF packaging is also perturbed and these mice exhibit increased blood loss after tail cut compared to controls. This is the first demonstration that lipid kinases can control the biosynthesis of VWF and the formation of WPBs that are capable of full haemostatic function. PMID:27068535

  17. Role of integrin-linked kinase in vascular smooth muscle cells: Regulation by statins and angiotensin II

    SciTech Connect

    Friedrich, Erik B. . E-mail: efriedrich@med-in.uni-sb.de; Clever, Yvonne P.; Wassmann, Sven; Werner, Nikos; Boehm, Michael; Nickenig, Georg

    2006-10-27

    Our goal was to characterize the role of integrin-linked kinase (ILK) in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC), which play a crucial role in atherogenesis. Transfection of VSMC with wild-type and dominant-negative ILK cDNA constructs revealed that ILK mediates migration and proliferation of VSMC but has no effect on VSMC survival. The pro-atherogenic mediator angiotensin II increases ILK protein expression and kinase activity while statin treatment down-regulates ILK in VSMC. Functionally, ILK is necessary for angiotensin II-mediated VSMC migration and proliferation. In VSMC transduced with dominant-negative ILK, statins mediate an additive inhibition of VSMC migration and proliferation, while transfection with wild-type ILK is sufficient to overcome the inhibitory effects of statin treatment on VSMC migration and proliferation. In vivo, ILK is expressed in VSMC of aortic sections from wild-type mice where it is down-regulated following statin treatment and up-regulated following induction of atherosclerosis in apoE-/- mice. These data identify ILK as a novel target in VSMC for anti-atherosclerotic therapy.

  18. Myosin light chain kinase steady-state kinetics: comparison of smooth muscle myosin II and nonmuscle myosin IIB as substrates

    PubMed Central

    Alcala, Diego B.; Haldeman, Brian D.; Brizendine, Richard K.; Krenc, Agata K.; Baker, Josh E.; Rock, Ronald S.; Cremo, Christine R.

    2016-01-01

    Myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) phosphorylates S19 of the myosin regulatory light chain (RLC), which is required to activate myosin's ATPase activity and contraction. Smooth muscles are known to display plasticity in response to factors such as inflammation, developmental stage, or stress, which lead to differential expression of nonmuscle and smooth muscle isoforms. Here, we compare steady-state kinetics parameters for phosphorylation of different MLCK substrates: (1) nonmuscle RLC, (2) smooth muscle RLC, and heavy meromyosin subfragments of (3) nonmuscle myosin IIB, and (4) smooth muscle myosin II. We show that MLCK has a ~2-fold higher kcat for both smooth muscle myosin II substrates compared with nonmuscle myosin IIB substrates, whereas Km values were very similar. Myosin light chain kinase has a 1.6-fold and 1.5-fold higher specificity (kcat/Km) for smooth versus nonmuscle-free RLC and heavy meromyosin, respectively, suggesting that differences in specificity are dictated by RLC sequences. Of the 10 non-identical RLC residues, we ruled out 7 as possible underlying causes of different MLCK kinetics. The remaining 3 residues were found to be surface exposed in the N-terminal half of the RLC, consistent with their importance in substrate recognition. These data are consistent with prior deletion/chimera studies and significantly add to understanding of MLCK myosin interactions. PMID:27528075

  19. Protein kinase C betaII peptide inhibitor exerts cardioprotective effects in rat cardiac ischemia/reperfusion injury.

    PubMed

    Omiyi, Didi; Brue, Richard J; Taormina, Philip; Harvey, Margaret; Atkinson, Norrell; Young, Lindon H

    2005-08-01

    Ischemia followed by reperfusion (I/R) in the presence of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) results in a marked cardiac contractile dysfunction. A cell-permeable protein kinase C (PKC) betaII peptide inhibitor was used to test the hypothesis that PKC betaII inhibition could attenuate PMN-induced cardiac dysfunction by suppression of superoxide production from PMNs and increase NO release from vascular endothelium. The effects of the PKC betaII peptide inhibitor were examined in isolated ischemic (20 min) and reperfused (45 min) rat hearts with PMNs. The PKC betaII inhibitor (10 microM; n = 7) significantly attenuated PMN-induced cardiac dysfunction compared with I/R hearts (n = 9) receiving PMNs alone in left ventricular developed pressure (LVDP) and the maximal rate of LVDP (+dP/dt(max)) cardiac function indices (p < 0.01). The PKC betaII inhibitor at 10 microM significantly increased endothelial NO release from a basal value of 1.85 +/- 0.18 pmol NO/mg tissue to 3.49 +/- 0.62 pmol NO/mg tissue from rat aorta. It also significantly inhibited superoxide release (i.e., absorbance) from N-formyl-L-methionyl-L-leucyl-L-phenylalanine-stimulated rat PMNs from 0.13 +/- 0.01 to 0.02 +/- 0.004 (p < 0.01) at 10 microM. Histological analysis of the left ventricle of representative rat hearts from each group showed that the PKC betaII peptide inhibitor-treated hearts experienced a marked reduction in PMN vascular adherence and infiltration into the postreperfused cardiac tissue compared with I/R + PMN hearts (p < 0.01). These results suggest that the PKC betaII peptide inhibitor attenuates PMN-induced post-I/R cardiac contractile dysfunction by increasing endothelial NO release and by inhibiting superoxide release from PMNs. PMID:15878997

  20. Protein kinase C betaII regulates Akt phosphorylation on Ser-473 in a cell type- and stimulus-specific fashion.

    PubMed

    Kawakami, Yuko; Nishimoto, Hajime; Kitaura, Jiro; Maeda-Yamamoto, Mari; Kato, Roberta M; Littman, Dan R; Leitges, Michael; Rawlings, David J; Kawakami, Toshiaki

    2004-11-12

    Akt (= protein kinase B), a subfamily of the AGC serine/threonine kinases, plays critical roles in survival, proliferation, glucose metabolism, and other cellular functions. Akt activation requires the recruitment of the enzyme to the plasma membrane by interacting with membrane-bound lipid products of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase. Membrane-bound Akt is then phosphorylated at two sites for its full activation; Thr-308 in the activation loop of the kinase domain is phosphorylated by 3-phosphoinositide-dependent kinase-1 (PDK1) and Ser-473 in the C-terminal hydrophobic motif by a putative kinase PDK2. The identity of PDK2 has been elusive. Here we present evidence that conventional isoforms of protein kinase C (PKC), particularly PKCbetaII, can regulate Akt activity by directly phosphorylating Ser-473 in vitro and in IgE/antigen-stimulated mast cells. By contrast, PKCbeta is not required for Ser-473 phosphorylation in mast cells stimulated with stem cell factor or interleukin-3, in serum-stimulated fibroblasts, or in antigen receptor-stimulated T or B lymphocytes. Therefore, PKCbetaII appears to work as a cell type- and stimulus-specific PDK2. PMID:15364915

  1. Intraterminal injection of synapsin I or calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II alters neurotransmitter release at the squid giant synapse.

    PubMed Central

    Llinás, R; McGuinness, T L; Leonard, C S; Sugimori, M; Greengard, P

    1985-01-01

    Synapsin I and calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II were pressure-injected into the preterminal digit of the squid giant synapse to test directly the possible regulation of neurotransmitter release by these substances. Neurotransmitter release was determined by measuring the amplitude, rate of rise, and latency of the postsynaptic potential generated in response to presynaptic depolarizing steps under voltage clamp conditions. Injection of dephosphosynapsin I decreased the amplitude and rate of rise of the postsynaptic potential, whereas injection of either phosphosynapsin I or heat-treated dephosphosynapsin I was without effect. Conversely, injection of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II, which phosphorylates synapsin I on site II, increased the rate of rise and amplitude and decreased the latency of the postsynaptic potential. The effects of these proteins were observed without any detectable change in the initial phase of the presynaptic calcium current. A synapsin I-like protein and calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II were demonstrated by biochemical and immunochemical techniques to be present in squid nervous tissue. The data support the hypothesis that synapsin I regulates the availability of synaptic vesicles for release; we propose that calcium entry into the nerve terminal activates calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II, which phosphorylates synapsin I on site II, dissociating it from the vesicles and thereby removing a constraint in the release process. Images PMID:2859595

  2. Stereochemical control over Mn(II)-Thio versus Mn(II)-Oxy coordination in adenosine 5 prime -O-(1-thiodiphosphate) complexes at the active site of creatine kinase

    SciTech Connect

    Smithers, G.W.; Sammons, R.D.; Goodhart, P.J.; LoBrutto, R.; Reed, G.H. )

    1989-02-21

    The stereochemical configurations of the Mn(II) complexes with the resolved epimers of adenosine 5{prime}-O-(1-thiodiphosphate) (ADP{alpha}S), bound at the active site of creatine kinase, have been determined in order to assess the relative strengths of enzymic stereoselectivity versus Lewis acid/base preferences in metal-ligand binding. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) data have been obtained for Mn(II) in anion-stabilized, dead-end (transition-state analogue) complexes, in ternary enzyme-Mn{sup II}ADP{alpha}S complexes, and in the central complexes of the equilibrium mixture. The modes of coordination of Mn(II) at P{sub alpha} in the nitrate-stabilized, dead-end complexes with each epimer of ADP{alpha}S were ascertained by EPR measurements with (R{sub p})-({alpha}-{sup 17}O)ADP{alpha}S and (S{sub p})-({alpha}-{sup 17}O)ADP{alpha}S. A reduction in the magnitude of the {sup 55}Mn hyperfine coupling constant in the spectrum for the complex containing (S{sub p})-ADP{alpha}S is indicative of Mn(II)-thio coordination at P{sub alpha}. The results indicate that a strict discrimination for a unique configuration of the metal-nucleotide substrate is expressed upon binding of all of the substrates to form the active complex (or an analogue thereof). This enzymic stereoselectivity provides sufficient binding energy to overcome an intrinsic preference for the hard Lewis acid Mn(II) to coordinate to the hard Lewis base oxygen.

  3. Switch control pocket inhibitors of p38-MAP kinase. Durable type II inhibitors that do not require binding into the canonical ATP hinge region

    SciTech Connect

    Ahn, Yu Mi; Clare, Michael; Ensinger, Carol L.; Hood, Molly M.; Lord, John W.; Lu, Wei-Ping; Miller, David F.; Patt, William C.; Smith, Bryan D.; Vogeti, Lakshminarayana; Kaufman, Michael D.; Petillo, Peter A.; Wise, Scott C.; Abendroth, Jan; Chun, Lawrence; Clark, Robin; Feese, Michael; Kim, Hidong; Stewart, Lance; Flynn, Daniel L.

    2012-01-20

    Switch control pocket inhibitors of p38-alpha kinase are described. Durable type II inhibitors were designed which bind to arginines (Arg67 or Arg70) that function as key residues for mediating phospho-threonine 180 dependant conformational fluxing of p38-alpha from an inactive type II state to an active type I state. Binding to Arg70 in particular led to potent inhibitors, exemplified by DP-802, which also exhibited high kinase selectivity. Binding to Arg70 obviated the requirement for binding into the ATP Hinge region. X-ray crystallography revealed that DP-802 and analogs induce an enhanced type II conformation upon binding to either the unphosphorylated or the doubly phosphorylated form of p38-alpha kinase.

  4. Switch control pocket inhibitors of p38-MAP kinase. Durable type II inhibitors that do not require binding into the canonical ATP hinge region.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Yu Mi; Clare, Michael; Ensinger, Carol L; Hood, Molly M; Lord, John W; Lu, Wei-Ping; Miller, David F; Patt, William C; Smith, Bryan D; Vogeti, Lakshminarayana; Kaufman, Michael D; Petillo, Peter A; Wise, Scott C; Abendroth, Jan; Chun, Lawrence; Clark, Robin; Feese, Michael; Kim, Hidong; Stewart, Lance; Flynn, Daniel L

    2010-10-01

    Switch control pocket inhibitors of p38-alpha kinase are described. Durable type II inhibitors were designed which bind to arginines (Arg67 or Arg70) that function as key residues for mediating phospho-threonine 180 dependant conformational fluxing of p38-alpha from an inactive type II state to an active type I state. Binding to Arg70 in particular led to potent inhibitors, exemplified by DP-802, which also exhibited high kinase selectivity. Binding to Arg70 obviated the requirement for binding into the ATP Hinge region. X-ray crystallography revealed that DP-802 and analogs induce an enhanced type II conformation upon binding to either the unphosphorylated or the doubly phosphorylated form of p38-alpha kinase.

  5. Heme-induced Trypanosoma cruzi proliferation is mediated by CaM kinase II

    SciTech Connect

    Souza, C.F.; Carneiro, A.B.; Silveira, A.B.; Laranja, G.A.T.; Silva-Neto, M.A.C.; Costa, S.C. Goncalves da; Paes, M.C.

    2009-12-18

    Trypanosoma cruzi, the etiologic agent of Chagas disease, is transmitted through triatomine vectors during their blood-meal on vertebrate hosts. These hematophagous insects usually ingest approximately 10 mM of heme bound to hemoglobin in a single meal. Blood forms of the parasite are transformed into epimastigotes in the crop which initiates a few hours after parasite ingestion. In a previous work, we investigated the role of heme in parasite cell proliferation and showed that the addition of heme significantly increased parasite proliferation in a dose-dependent manner . To investigate whether the heme effect is mediated by protein kinase signalling pathways, parasite proliferation was evaluated in the presence of several protein kinase (PK) inhibitors. We found that only KN-93, a classical inhibitor of calcium-calmodulin-dependent kinases (CaMKs), blocked heme-induced cell proliferation. KN-92, an inactive analogue of KN-93, was not able to block this effect. A T. cruzi CaMKII homologue is most likely the main enzyme involved in this process since parasite proliferation was also blocked when Myr-AIP, an inhibitory peptide for mammalian CaMKII, was included in the cell proliferation assay. Moreover, CaMK activity increased in parasite cells with the addition of heme as shown by immunological and biochemical assays. In conclusion, the present results are the first strong indications that CaMKII is involved in the heme-induced cell signalling pathway that mediates parasite proliferation.

  6. Involvement of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) in meiotic maturation and activation of pig oocytes.

    PubMed

    Fan, Heng-Yu; Huo, Li-Jun; Meng, Xiao-Qian; Zhong, Zhi-Sheng; Hou, Yi; Chen, Da-Yuan; Sun, Qing-Yuan

    2003-11-01

    Calcium signal is important for the regulation of meiotic cell cycle in oocytes, but its downstream mechanism is not well known. The functional roles of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) in meiotic maturation and activation of pig oocytes were studied by drug treatment, Western blot analysis, kinase activity assay, indirect immunostaining, and confocal microscopy. The results indicated that meiotic resumption of both cumulus-enclosed and denuded oocytes was prevented by CaMKII inhibitor KN-93, Ant-AIP-II, or CaM antagonist W7 in a dose-dependent manner, but only germinal vesicle breakdown (GVBD) of denuded oocytes was inhibited by membrane permeable Ca2+ chelator BAPTA-AM. When the oocytes were treated with KN-93, W7, or BAPTA-AM after GVBD, the first polar body emission was inhibited. A quick elevation of CaMKII activity was detected after electrical activation of mature pig oocytes, which could be prevented by the pretreatment of CaMKII inhibitors. Treatment of oocytes with KN-93 or W7 resulted in the inhibition of pronuclear formation. The possible regulation of CaMKII on maturation promoting factor (MPF), mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), and ribosome S6 protein kinase (p90rsk) during meiotic cell cycles of pig oocytes was also studied. KN-93 and W7 prevented the accumulation of cyclin B and the full phosphorylation of MAPK and p90rsk during meiotic maturation. When CaMKII activity was inhibited during parthenogenetic activation, cyclin B, the regulatory subunit of MPF, failed to be degraded, but MAPK and p90rsk were quickly dephosphorylated and degraded. Confocal microscopy revealed that CaM and CaMKII were localized to the nucleus and the periphery of the GV stage oocytes. Both proteins were concentrated to the condensed chromosomes after GVBD. In oocytes at the meiotic metaphase MI or MII stage, CaM distributed on the whole spindle, but CaMKII was localized only on the spindle poles. After transition into anaphase, both proteins

  7. Calmodulin kinase II is involved in voltage-dependent facilitation of the L-type Cav1.2 calcium channel: Identification of the phosphorylation sites.

    PubMed

    Lee, Tae-Seong; Karl, Rosi; Moosmang, Sven; Lenhardt, Peter; Klugbauer, Norbert; Hofmann, Franz; Kleppisch, Thomas; Welling, Andrea

    2006-09-01

    Calcium-dependent facilitation of L-type calcium channels has been reported to depend on the function of calmodulin kinase II. In contrast, the mechanism for voltage-dependent facilitation is not clear. In HEK 293 cells expressing Ca(v)1.2, Ca(v)beta2a, and calmodulin kinase II, the calcium current measured at +30 mV was facilitated up to 1.5-fold by a 200-ms-long prepulse to +160 mV. This voltage-dependent facilitation was prevented by the calmodulin kinase II inhibitors KN93 and the autocamtide-2-related peptide. In cells expressing the Ca(v)1.2 mutation I1649E, a residue critical for the binding of Ca2+-bound calmodulin, facilitation was also abolished. Calmodulin kinase II was coimmunoprecipitated with the Ca(v)1.2 channel from murine heart and HEK 293 cells expressing Ca(v)1.2 and calmodulinkinase II. The precipitated Ca(v)1.2 channel was phosphorylated in the presence of calmodulin and Ca2+. Fifteen putative calmodulin kinase II phosphorylation sites were identified mostly in the carboxyl-terminal tail of Ca(v)1.2. Neither truncation at amino acid 1728 nor changing the II-III loop serines 808 and 888 to alanines affected facilitation of the calcium current. In contrast, facilitation was decreased by the single mutations S1512A and S1570A and abolished by the double mutation S1512A/S1570A. These serines flank the carboxyl-terminal EF-hand motif. Immunoprecipitation of calmodulin kinase II with the Ca(v)1.2 channel was not affected by the mutation S1512A/S1570A. The phosphorylation of the Ca(v)1.2 protein was strongly decreased in the S1512A/S1570A double mutant. These results suggest that voltage-dependent facilitation of the Ca(v)1.2 channel depends on the phosphorylation of Ser1512/Ser1570 by calmodulin kinase II. PMID:16820363

  8. Dynamics of glucose-induced membrane recruitment of protein kinase C beta II in living pancreatic islet beta-cells.

    PubMed

    Pinton, Paolo; Tsuboi, Takashi; Ainscow, Edward K; Pozzan, Tullio; Rizzuto, Rosario; Rutter, Guy A

    2002-10-01

    The mechanisms by which glucose may affect protein kinase C (PKC) activity in the pancreatic islet beta-cell are presently unclear. By developing adenovirally expressed chimeras encoding fusion proteins between green fluorescent protein and conventional (betaII), novel (delta), or atypical (zeta) PKCs, we show that glucose selectively alters the subcellular localization of these enzymes dynamically in primary islet and MIN6 beta-cells. Examined by laser scanning confocal or total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy, elevated glucose concentrations induced oscillatory translocations of PKCbetaII to spatially confined regions of the plasma membrane. Suggesting that increases in free cytosolic Ca(2+) concentrations ([Ca(2+)](c)) were primarily responsible, prevention of [Ca(2+)](c) increases with EGTA or diazoxide completely eliminated membrane recruitment, whereas elevation of cytosolic [Ca(2+)](c) with KCl or tolbutamide was highly effective in redistributing PKCbetaII both to the plasma membrane and to the surface of dense core secretory vesicles. By contrast, the distribution of PKCdelta.EGFP, which binds diacylglycerol but not Ca(2+), was unaffected by glucose. Measurement of [Ca(2+)](c) immediately beneath the plasma membrane with a ratiometric "pericam," fused to synaptic vesicle-associated protein-25, revealed that depolarization induced significantly larger increases in [Ca(2+)](c) in this domain. These data demonstrate that nutrient stimulation of beta-cells causes spatially and temporally complex changes in the subcellular localization of PKCbetaII, possibly resulting from the generation of Ca(2+) microdomains. Localized changes in PKCbetaII activity may thus have a role in the spatial control of insulin exocytosis.

  9. Tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factor-6 and ribosomal S6 kinase intracellular pathways link the angiotensin II AT1 receptor to the phosphorylation and activation of the IkappaB kinase complex in vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Doyon, Priscilla; Servant, Marc J

    2010-10-01

    Activation of NF-κB transcription factors by locally produced angiotensin II (Ang II) is proposed to be involved in chronic inflammatory reactions leading to atherosclerosis development. However, a clear understanding of the signaling cascades coupling the Ang II AT1 receptors to the activation of NF-κB transcription factors is still lacking. Using primary cultured aortic vascular smooth muscle cells, we show that activation of the IKK complex and NF-κB transcription factors by Ang II is regulated by phosphorylation of the catalytic subunit IKKβ on serine residues 177 and 181 in the activation T-loop. The use of pharmacological inhibitors against conventional protein kinases C (PKCs), mitogen-activated/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (MEK) 1/2, ribosomal S6 kinase (RSK), and silencing RNA technology targeting PKCα, IKKβ subunit, tumor growth factor β-activating kinase-1 (TAK1), the E3 ubiquitin ligase tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factor-6 (TRAF6), and RSK isoforms, demonstrates the requirement of two distinct signaling pathway for the phosphorylation of IKKβ and the activation of the IKK complex by Ang II. Rapid phosphorylation of IKKβ requires a second messenger-dependent pathway composed of PKCα-TRAF6-TAK1, whereas sustained phosphorylation and activation of IKKβ requires the MEK1/2-ERK1/2-RSK pathway. Importantly, simultaneously targeting components of these two pathways completely blunts the phosphorylation of IKKβ and the proinflammatory effect of the octapeptide. This is the first report demonstrating activation of TAK1 by the AT1R. We propose a model whereby TRAF6-TAK1 and ERK-RSK intracellular pathways independently and sequentially converge to the T-loop phosphorylation for full activation of IKKβ, which is an essential step in the proinflammatory activity of Ang II.

  10. Expression and localization of type II diacylglycerol kinase isozymes δ and η in the developing mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Usuki, Takako; Sakai, Hiromichi; Shionoya, Takao; Sato, Naruki; Sakane, Fumio

    2015-01-01

    The functions of type II diacylglycerol kinase (DGK) δ and -η in the brain are still unclear. As a first step, we investigated the spatial and temporal expression of DGKδ and -η in the brains of mice. DGKδ2, but not DGKδ1, was highly expressed in layers II-VI of the cerebral cortex; CA-CA3 regions and dentate gyrus of hippocampus; mitral cell, glomerular and granule cell layers of the olfactory bulb; and the granule cell layer in the cerebellum in 1- to 32-week-old mice. DGKδ2 was expressed just after birth, and its expression levels dramatically increased from weeks 1 to 4. A substantial amount of DGKη (η1/η2) was detected in layers II-VI of the cerebral cortex, CA1 and CA2 regions and dentate gyrus of the hippocampus, mitral cell and glomerular layers of the olfactory bulb, and Purkinje cells in the cerebellum of 1- to 32-week-old mice. DGKη2 expression reached maximum levels at P5 and decreased by 4 weeks, whereas DGKη1 increased over the same time frame. These results indicate that the expression patterns of DGK isozymes differ from each other and also from other isozymes, and this suggests that DGKδ and -η play distinct and specific roles in the brain.

  11. Discovery and optimization of indole and 7-azaindoles as Rho kinase (ROCK) inhibitors (part-II).

    PubMed

    Sessions, E Hampton; Chowdhury, Sarwat; Yin, Yan; Pocas, Jennifer R; Grant, Wayne; Schröter, Thomas; Lin, Li; Ruiz, Claudia; Cameron, Michael D; LoGrasso, Philip; Bannister, Thomas D; Feng, Yangbo

    2011-12-01

    Therapeutic interventions with Rho kinase (ROCK) inhibitors may effectively treat several disorders such as hypertension, stroke, cancer, and glaucoma. Herein we disclose the optimization and biological evaluation of potent novel ROCK inhibitors based on substituted indole and 7-azaindole core scaffolds. Substitutions on the indole C3 position and on the indole NH and/or amide NH positions all yielded potent and selective ROCK inhibitors (25, 42, and 50). Improvement of aqueous solubility and tailoring of in vitro and in vivo DMPK properties could be achieved through these substitutions.

  12. Inhibitory effects of KN-93, an inhibitor of Ca2+ calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II, on light-regulated root gravitropism in maize.

    PubMed

    Lu Y-T; Feldman, L J; Hidaka, H

    1993-01-01

    Light is essential for root gravitropism in Zea mays L., cultivar Merit. It is hypothesized that calcium mediates this light-regulated response. KN-93, an inhibitor of calcium/calmodulin kinase II (CaMK II), inhibits light-regulated root gravitropism but does not affect light perception. We hypothesize that CaMK II, or a homologue, operates late in the light/gravity signal transduction chain. Here we provide evidence suggesting a possible physiological involvement of CaMK II in root gravitropism in plants. PMID:11540083

  13. Inhibitory effects of KN-93, an inhibitor of Ca2+ calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II, on light-regulated root gravitropism in maize

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feldman, L. J.; Hidaka, H.

    1993-01-01

    Light is essential for root gravitropism in Zea mays L., cultivar Merit. It is hypothesized that calcium mediates this light-regulated response. KN-93, an inhibitor of calcium/calmodulin kinase II (CaMK II), inhibits light-regulated root gravitropism but does not affect light perception. We hypothesize that CaMK II, or a homologue, operates late in the light/gravity signal transduction chain. Here we provide evidence suggesting a possible physiological involvement of CaMK II in root gravitropism in plants.

  14. Molecular mechanism of activation-triggered subunit exchange in Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharyya, Moitrayee; Stratton, Margaret M; Going, Catherine C; McSpadden, Ethan D; Huang, Yongjian; Susa, Anna C; Elleman, Anna; Cao, Yumeng Melody; Pappireddi, Nishant; Burkhardt, Pawel; Gee, Christine L; Barros, Tiago; Schulman, Howard; Williams, Evan R; Kuriyan, John

    2016-01-01

    Activation triggers the exchange of subunits in Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII), an oligomeric enzyme that is critical for learning, memory, and cardiac function. The mechanism by which subunit exchange occurs remains elusive. We show that the human CaMKII holoenzyme exists in dodecameric and tetradecameric forms, and that the calmodulin (CaM)-binding element of CaMKII can bind to the hub of the holoenzyme and destabilize it to release dimers. The structures of CaMKII from two distantly diverged organisms suggest that the CaM-binding element of activated CaMKII acts as a wedge by docking at intersubunit interfaces in the hub. This converts the hub into a spiral form that can release or gain CaMKII dimers. Our data reveal a three-way competition for the CaM-binding element, whereby phosphorylation biases it towards the hub interface, away from the kinase domain and calmodulin, thus unlocking the ability of activated CaMKII holoenzymes to exchange dimers with unactivated ones. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.13405.001 PMID:26949248

  15. Protein signaling and regulation of gene transcription in leukemia: role of the Casein Kinase II-Ikaros axis.

    PubMed

    Gowda, Chandrika S; Song, Chunhua; Ding, Yali; Kapadia, Malika; Dovat, Sinisa

    2016-03-01

    Protein signaling and regulation of gene expression are the two major mechanisms that regulate cellular proliferation in leukemia. Discerning the function of these processes is essential for understanding the pathogenesis of leukemia and for developing the targeted therapies. Here, we provide an overview of one of the mechanisms that regulates gene transcription in leukemia. This mechanism involves the direct interaction between Casein Kinase II (CK2) and the Ikaros transcription factor. Ikaros (IKZF1) functions as a master regulator of hematopoiesis and a tumor suppressor in acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Impaired Ikaros function results in the development of high-risk leukemia. Ikaros binds to the upstream regulatory elements of its target genes and regulates their transcription via chromatin remodeling. In vivo, Ikaros is a target for CK2, a pro-oncogenic kinase. CK2 directly phosphorylates Ikaros at multiple amino acids. Functional experiments showed that CK2-mediated phosphorylation of Ikaros, regulates Ikaros' DNA binding affinity, subcellular localization and protein stability. Recent studies revealed that phosphorylation of Ikaros by CK2 regulates Ikaros binding and repression of the terminal deoxytransferase (TdT) gene in normal thymocytes and in T-cell ALL. Available data suggest that the oncogenic activity of CK2 in leukemia involves functional inactivation of Ikaros and provide a rationale for CK2 inhibitors as a potential treatment for ALL. PMID:26912004

  16. Molecular mechanism of activation-triggered subunit exchange in Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharyya, Moitrayee; Stratton, Margaret M; Going, Catherine C; McSpadden, Ethan D; Huang, Yongjian; Susa, Anna C; Elleman, Anna; Cao, Yumeng Melody; Pappireddi, Nishant; Burkhardt, Pawel; Gee, Christine L; Barros, Tiago; Schulman, Howard; Williams, Evan R; Kuriyan, John

    2016-01-01

    Activation triggers the exchange of subunits in Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII), an oligomeric enzyme that is critical for learning, memory, and cardiac function. The mechanism by which subunit exchange occurs remains elusive. We show that the human CaMKII holoenzyme exists in dodecameric and tetradecameric forms, and that the calmodulin (CaM)-binding element of CaMKII can bind to the hub of the holoenzyme and destabilize it to release dimers. The structures of CaMKII from two distantly diverged organisms suggest that the CaM-binding element of activated CaMKII acts as a wedge by docking at intersubunit interfaces in the hub. This converts the hub into a spiral form that can release or gain CaMKII dimers. Our data reveal a three-way competition for the CaM-binding element, whereby phosphorylation biases it towards the hub interface, away from the kinase domain and calmodulin, thus unlocking the ability of activated CaMKII holoenzymes to exchange dimers with unactivated ones. PMID:26949248

  17. Phosphorylation of vanilloid receptor 1 by Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent kinase II regulates its vanilloid binding.

    PubMed

    Jung, Jooyoung; Shin, Jae Soo; Lee, Soon-Youl; Hwang, Sun Wook; Koo, Jaeyeon; Cho, Hawon; Oh, Uhtaek

    2004-02-20

    Vanilloid receptor 1 (VR1), a capsaicin receptor, is known to play a major role in mediating inflammatory thermal nociception. Although the physiological role and biophysical properties of VR1 are known, the mechanism of its activation by ligands is poorly understood. Here we show that VR1 must be phosphorylated by Ca2+-calmodulin dependent kinase II (CaMKII) before its activation by capsaicin. In contrast, the dephosphorylation of VR1 by calcineurin leads to a desensitization of the receptor. Moreover, point mutations in VR1 at two putative consensus sites for CaMKII failed to elicit capsaicin-sensitive currents and caused a concomitant reduction in VR1 phosphorylation in vivo. Such mutants also lost their high affinity binding with [3H]resiniferatoxin, a potent capsaicin receptor agonist. We conclude that the dynamic balance between the phosphorylation and dephosphorylation of the VR1 channel by CaMKII and calcineurin, respectively, controls the activation/desensitization states by regulating VR1 binding. Furthermore, because sensitization by protein kinase A and C converge at these sites, phosphorylation stress in the cell appears to control a wide range of excitabilities in response to various adverse stimuli.

  18. Neuronal calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II mediates nicotine reward in the conditioned place preference test in mice.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Kia J; Muldoon, Pretal P; Walters, Carrie; Damaj, Mohamad Imad

    2016-02-01

    Several recent studies have indicated the involvement of calcium-dependent mechanisms, in particular the abundant calcium-activated kinase, calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase II (CaMKII), in behaviors associated with nicotine dependence in mice. Behavioral and biochemical studies have shown that CaMKII is involved in acute and chronic nicotine behaviors and nicotine withdrawal; however, evidence of a role for CaMKII in nicotine reward is lacking. Thus, the goal of the current study was to examine the role of CaMKII in nicotine reward. Using pharmacological and genetic tools, we tested nicotine conditioned place preference (CPP) in C57Bl/6 mice after administration of CaMKII antagonists and in α-CaMKII wild-type (+/+) and heterozygote (±) mice. CaMKII antagonists blocked expression of nicotine CPP, and the preference score was significantly reduced in α-CaMKII ± mice compared with their +/+ counterparts. Further, we assessed CaMKII activity in the ventral tegmental area (VTA), nucleus accumbens (NAc), prefrontal cortex, and hippocampus after nicotine CPP and found significant increases in CaMKII activity in the mouse VTA and NAc that were blocked by CaMKII antagonists. The findings from this study show that CaMKII mediates nicotine reward and suggest that increases in CaMKII activity in the VTA and NAc are relevant to nicotine reward behaviors.

  19. Autophosphorylation and dephosphorylation of type II cAMP-dependent protein kinase in intact tissue and cells

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, C.W.

    1988-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies were used to quantitate changes in the extent of autophosphorylation of the type II regulatory subunit of cAMP-dependent protein kinase in intact bovine tracheal smooth muscle and rat hepatocytes. The autophosphorylated and dephosphorylated forms of the regulatory subunit (RII) were separated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, and identified by immunoblot analysis. Incubating smooth muscle strips with agents which stimulate cAMP production caused a rapid and reversible dephosphorylation of phospho RII. In contrast, phospho RII levels in rat hepatocytes were unaffected by elevations in cAMP concentration. Insulin was capable of inhibiting cAMP-dependent protein kinase in hepatocytes. Tissue extracts were tested to identify the basis for the lack of RII dephosphorylation in intact hepatocytes. Rat liver extract contained 4 fold less RII and had an 80 fold slower rate of dephosphorylation of endogenous RII compared to bovine smooth muscle extract. The different rates were not observed using purified, /sup 32/P-labelled RII and tissue extracts suggesting the decreased RII dephosphorylation rate in liver was due to a difference in the availability of endogenous RII rather than a difference in measurable phosphatase activity.

  20. Casein kinase II is required for the spindle assembly checkpoint by regulating Mad2p in fission yeast

    SciTech Connect

    Shimada, Midori; Yamamoto, Ayumu; Murakami-Tonami, Yuko; Nakanishi, Makoto; Yoshida, Takashi; Aiba, Hirofumi; Murakami, Hiroshi

    2009-10-23

    The spindle checkpoint is a surveillance mechanism that ensures the fidelity of chromosome segregation in mitosis. Here we show that fission yeast casein kinase II (CK2) is required for this checkpoint function. In the CK2 mutants mitosis occurs in the presence of a spindle defect, and the spindle checkpoint protein Mad2p fails to localize to unattached kinetochores. The CK2 mutants are sensitive to the microtubule depolymerising drug thiabendazole, which is counteracted by ectopic expression of mad2{sup +}. The level of Mad2p is low in the CK2 mutants. These results suggest that CK2 has a role in the spindle checkpoint by regulating Mad2p.

  1. Citron-N is a neuronal Rho-associated protein involved in Golgi organization through actin cytoskeleton regulation.

    PubMed

    Camera, Paola; da Silva, Jorge Santos; Griffiths, Gareth; Giuffrida, Maria Gabriella; Ferrara, Luciana; Schubert, Vanessa; Imarisio, Sara; Silengo, Lorenzo; Dotti, Carlos G; Di Cunto, Ferdinando

    2003-12-01

    The actin cytoskeleton is best known for its role during cellular morphogenesis. However, other evidence suggests that actin is also crucial for the organization and dynamics of membrane organelles such as endosomes and the Golgi complex. As in morphogenesis, the Rho family of small GTPases are key mediators of organelle actin-driven events, although it is unclear how these ubiquitously distributed proteins are activated to regulate actin dynamics in an organelle-specific manner. Here we show that the brain-specific Rho-binding protein Citron-N is enriched at, and associates with, the Golgi apparatus of hippocampal neurons in culture. Suppression of the whole protein or expression of a mutant form lacking the Rho-binding activity results in dispersion of the Golgi apparatus. In contrast, high intracellular levels induce localized accumulation of RhoA and filamentous actin, protecting the Golgi from the rupture normally produced by actin depolymerization. Biochemical and functional analyses indicate that Citron-N controls actin locally by assembling together the Rho effector ROCK-II and the actin-binding, neuron-specific, protein Profilin-IIa (PIIa). Together with recent data on endosomal dynamics, our results highlight the importance of organelle-specific Rho modulators for actin-dependent organelle organization and dynamics.

  2. Regulation of Mammalian Autophagy by Class II and III PI 3-Kinases through PI3P Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Devereaux, Kelly; Ogasawara, Yuta; Zhou, Xiang; Wang, Fan; Yamamoto, Akitsugu; De Camilli, Pietro; Di Paolo, Gilbert

    2013-01-01

    Synthesis of phosphatidylinositol-3-phosphate (PI3P) by Vps34, a class III phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K), is critical for the initial steps of autophagosome (AP) biogenesis. Although Vps34 is the sole source of PI3P in budding yeast, mammalian cells can produce PI3P through alternate pathways, including direct synthesis by the class II PI3Ks; however, the physiological relevance of these alternate pathways in the context of autophagy is unknown. Here we generated Vps34 knockout mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) and using a higher affinity 4x-FYVE finger PI3P-binding probe found a Vps34-independent pool of PI3P accounting for ~35% of the total amount of this lipid species by biochemical analysis. Importantly, WIPI-1, an autophagy-relevant PI3P probe, still formed some puncta upon starvation-induced autophagy in Vps34 knockout MEFs. Additional characterization of autophagy by electron microscopy as well as protein degradation assays showed that while Vps34 is important for starvation-induced autophagy there is a significant component of functional autophagy occurring in the absence of Vps34. Given these findings, class II PI3Ks (α and β isoforms) were examined as potential positive regulators of autophagy. Depletion of class II PI3Ks reduced recruitment of WIPI-1 and LC3 to AP nucleation sites and caused an accumulation of the autophagy substrate, p62, which was exacerbated upon the concomitant ablation of Vps34. Our studies indicate that while Vps34 is the main PI3P source during autophagy, class II PI3Ks also significantly contribute to PI3P generation and regulate AP biogenesis. PMID:24098492

  3. Effects of synapsin I and calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II on spontaneous neurotransmitter release in the squid giant synapse.

    PubMed Central

    Lin, J W; Sugimori, M; Llinás, R R; McGuinness, T L; Greengard, P

    1990-01-01

    The molecular events that control synaptic vesicle availability in chemical synaptic junctions have not been fully clarified. Among the protein molecules specifically located in presynaptic terminals, synapsin I and calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaM kinase II) have been shown to modulate evoked transmitter release in the squid giant synapse. In the present study, analysis of synaptic noise in this chemical junction was used to determine whether these proteins also play a role in the control of spontaneous and enhanced spontaneous transmitter release. Injections of dephosphorylated synapsin I into the presynaptic terminal reduced the rate of spontaneous and enhanced quantal release, whereas injection of phosphorylated synapsin I did not modify such release. By contrast CaM kinase II injection increased enhanced miniature release without affecting spontaneous miniature frequency. These results support the view that dephosphorylated synapsin I "cages" synaptic vesicles while CaM kinase II, by phosphorylating synapsin I, "decages" these organelles and increases their availability for release without affecting the release mechanism itself. Images PMID:1978321

  4. Regulation by synapsin I and Ca(2+)-calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II of the transmitter release in squid giant synapse.

    PubMed Central

    Llinás, R; Gruner, J A; Sugimori, M; McGuinness, T L; Greengard, P

    1991-01-01

    1. Presynaptic or simultaneous pre- and postsynaptic voltage-clamp protocols were implemented in the squid giant synapse in order to determine the magnitude and time course of the presynaptic calcium current (ICa) and its relation to transmitter release before and after presynaptic injection of proteins. These included several forms of synapsin I, calcium-calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaM kinase II) and avidin. 2. The quantities and location of these proteins were monitored by fluorescence video-enhanced microscopy during the electrophysiological measurements. 3. Presynaptic injection of dephosphorylated synapsin I inhibited synaptic transmission with a time course consistent with diffusion of the protein through the terminal and action at the active release zone. A mathematical model relating the diffusion of synapsin I into the terminal with transmitter release was developed to aid in the interpretation of these results. 4. Synapsin I inhibition of transmitter release was reversible. 5. The action of synapsin I was highly specific, as phosphorylation of the tail region only or head and tail regions prevented synapsin I from inhibiting release. 6. Injections of heat-treated synapsin I or of avidin, a protein with a size and isoelectric point similar to those of synapsin I, had no effect on transmitter release. 7. CaM kinase II injected presynaptically was found to facilitate transmitter release. This facilitation, which could be as large as 700% of the control response, was related to the level of penetration of the enzyme along the length of the preterminal A mathematical model of this facilitation indicates a reasonable fit between the distribution of CaM kinase II within the terminal and the degree of facilitation. 8. The overall shape of the postsynaptic response was not modified by either synapsin I or CaM kinase II injection. 9. The data suggest that, in addition to releasing transmitter, calcium also penetrates the presynaptic cytosol and

  5. Isolation and characterization of human cDNA clones encoding the. alpha. and the. alpha. prime subunits of casein kinase II

    SciTech Connect

    Lozeman, F.J.; Litchfield, D.W.; Piening, C.; Takio, Koji; Walsh, K.A.; Krebs E.G. )

    1990-09-11

    Casein kinase II is a widely distributed protein serine/threonine kinase. The holoenzyme appears to be a tetramer, containing two {alpha} or {alpha}{prime} subunits (or one of each) and two {beta} subunits. Complementary DNA clones encoding the subunits of casein kinase II were isolated from a human T-cell {lambda}gt 10 library using cDNA clones isolated from Drosophila melanogasten. One of the human cDNA clones (hT4.1) was 2.2 kb long, including a coding region of 1176 bp preceded by 156 bp (5{prime} untranslated region) and followed by 871 bp (3{prime} untranslated region). The hT4.1 close was nearly identical in size and sequence with a cDNA clone from HepG2 human hepatoma cultured cells. Another of the human T-cell cDNA clones (hT9.1) was 1.8 kb long, containing a coding region of 1053 bp preceded by 171 by (5{prime} untranslated region) and followed by 550 bp (3{prime} untranslated region). Amino acid sequences deduced from these two cDNA clones were about 85% identical. Most of the difference between the two encoded polypeptides was in the carboxy-terminal region, but heterogeneity was distributed throughout the molecules. Partial amino acid sequence was determined in a mixture of {alpha} and {alpha}{prime} subunits from bovine lung casein kinase II. The bovine sequences aligned with the 2 human cDNA-encoded polypeptides with only 2 discrepancies out of 535 amino acid positions. This confirmed that the two human T-cell cDNA clones encoded the {alpha} and {alpha}{prime} subunits of casein kinase II. These studies show that there are two distinct catalytic subunits for casein II ({alpha} and {alpha}{prime}) and that the sequence of these subunits is largely conserved between the bovine and the human.

  6. Neural crest specification by inhibition of the ROCK/Myosin II pathway

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kyeongmi; Ossipova, Olga; Sokol, Sergei Y.

    2015-01-01

    Neural crest is a population of multipotent progenitor cells that form at the border of neural and non-neural ectoderm in vertebrate embryos, and undergo epithelialmesenchymal transition and migration. According to the traditional view, the neural crest is specified in early embryos by signaling molecules including BMP, FGF and Wnt proteins. Here we identify a novel signaling pathway leading to neural crest specification, which involves Rho-associated kinase (ROCK) and its downstream target non-muscle Myosin II. We show that ROCK inhibitors promote differentiation of human embryonic stem cells into neural crest-like progenitors (NCPs) that are characterized by specific molecular markers and ability to differentiate into multiple cell types, including neurons, chondrocytes, osteocytes and smooth muscle cells. Moreover, inhibition of Myosin II was sufficient for generating NCPs at high efficiency. Whereas Myosin II has been previously implicated in the self-renewal and survival of human pluripotent ES cells, we demonstrate its role in neural crest development during ES cell differentiation. Inhibition of this pathway in Xenopus embryos expanded neural crest in vivo, further indicating that neural crest specification is controlled by ROCK-dependent Myosin II activity. We propose that changes in cell morphology in response to ROCK and Myosin II inhibition initiate mechanical signaling leading to neural crest fates. PMID:25346532

  7. Dual Inhibition of Topoisomerase II and Tyrosine Kinases by the Novel Bis-Fluoroquinolone Chalcone-Like Derivative HMNE3 in Human Pancreatic Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yan-Xin; Hu, Guo-Qiang; Cui, Dong-Tao; Wang, Jiang-Shuan; Wang, Min; Wang, Fu-Qing; Zhao, Zhi-Jun

    2016-01-01

    Both tyrosine kinase and topoisomerase II (TopII) are important anticancer targets, and their respective inhibitors are widely used in cancer therapy. However, some combinations of anticancer drugs could exhibit mutually antagonistic actions and drug resistance, which further limit their therapeutic efficacy. Here, we report that HMNE3, a novel bis-fluoroquinolone chalcone-like derivative that targets both tyrosine kinase and TopII, induces tumor cell proliferation and growth inhibition. The viabilities of 6 different cancer cell lines treated with a range of HMNE3 doses were detected using the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. Cellular apoptosis was determined using Hoechst 33258 fluorescence staining and the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase (TdT) dUTP nick-end labeling (TUNEL) assay. The expression of activated Caspase-3 was examined by immunocytochemistry. The tyrosine kinase activity was measured with a human receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) detection kit using a horseradish peroxidase (HRP)-conjugated phosphotyrosine (pY20) antibody as the substrate. The topoisomerase II activity was measured using agarose gel electrophoresis with the DNA plasmid pBR322 as the substrate. The expression levels of the P53, Bax, Bcl-2, Caspase-3, -8, -9, p-cSrc, c-Src and topoisomerase II proteins were detected by western blot analysis. The proliferation of five of the six cancer cell lines was significantly inhibited by HMNE3 at 0.312 to 10 μmol/L in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Treatment of the Capan-1 and Panc-1 cells with 1.6 to 3.2 μM HMNE3 for 48 h significantly increased the percentage of apoptotic cells (P<0.05), and this effect was accompanied by a decrease in tyrosine kinase activity. HMNE3 potentially inhibited tyrosine kinase activity in vitro with an IC50 value of 0.64±0.34 μmol/L in Capan-1 cells and 3.1±0.86 μmol/L in Panc-1 cells. The activity of c-Src was significantly inhibited by HMNE3 in a dose- and time

  8. Kinase-interacting substrate screening is a novel method to identify kinase substrates

    PubMed Central

    Amano, Mutsuki; Hamaguchi, Tomonari; Shohag, Md. Hasanuzzaman; Kozawa, Kei; Kato, Katsuhiro; Zhang, Xinjian; Yura, Yoshimitsu; Matsuura, Yoshiharu; Kataoka, Chikako; Nishioka, Tomoki

    2015-01-01

    Protein kinases play pivotal roles in numerous cellular functions; however, the specific substrates of each protein kinase have not been fully elucidated. We have developed a novel method called kinase-interacting substrate screening (KISS). Using this method, 356 phosphorylation sites of 140 proteins were identified as candidate substrates for Rho-associated kinase (Rho-kinase/ROCK2), including known substrates. The KISS method was also applied to additional kinases, including PKA, MAPK1, CDK5, CaMK1, PAK7, PKN, LYN, and FYN, and a lot of candidate substrates and their phosphorylation sites were determined, most of which have not been reported previously. Among the candidate substrates for Rho-kinase, several functional clusters were identified, including the polarity-associated proteins, such as Scrib. We found that Scrib plays a crucial role in the regulation of subcellular contractility by assembling into a ternary complex with Rho-kinase and Shroom2 in a phosphorylation-dependent manner. We propose that the KISS method is a comprehensive and useful substrate screen for various kinases. PMID:26101221

  9. A nonsense mutation in cGMP-dependent type II protein kinase (PRKG2) causes dwarfism in American Angus cattle

    PubMed Central

    Koltes, James E.; Mishra, Bishnu P.; Kumar, Dinesh; Kataria, Ranjit S.; Totir, Liviu R.; Fernando, Rohan L.; Cobbold, Rowland; Steffen, David; Coppieters, Wouter; Georges, Michel; Reecy, James M.

    2009-01-01

    Historically, dwarfism was the major genetic defect in U.S. beef cattle. Aggressive culling and sire testing were used to minimize its prevalence; however, neither of these practices can eliminate a recessive genetic defect. We assembled a 4-generation pedigree to identify the mutation underlying dwarfism in American Angus cattle. An adaptation of the Elston-Steward algorithm was used to overcome small pedigree size and missing genotypes. The dwarfism locus was fine-mapped to BTA6 between markers AFR227 and BM4311. Four candidate genes were sequenced, revealing a nonsense mutation in exon 15 of cGMP-dependant type II protein kinase (PRKG2). This C/T transition introduced a stop codon (R678X) that truncated 85 C-terminal amino acids, including a large portion of the kinase domain. Of the 75 mutations discovered in this region, only this mutation was 100% concordant with the recessive pattern of inheritance in affected and carrier individuals (log of odds score = 6.63). Previous research has shown that PRKG2 regulates SRY (sex-determining region Y) box 9 (SOX9)-mediated transcription of collagen 2 (COL2). We evaluated the ability of wild-type (WT) or R678X PRKG2 to regulate COL2 expression in cell culture. Real-time PCR results confirmed that COL2 is overexpressed in cells that overexpressed R678X PRKG2 as compared with WT PRKG2. Furthermore, COL2 and COL10 mRNA expression was increased in dwarf cattle compared with unaffected cattle. These experiments indicate that the R678X mutation is functional, resulting in a loss of PRKG2 regulation of COL2 and COL10 mRNA expression. Therefore, we present PRKG2 R678X as a causative mutation for dwarfism cattle. PMID:19887637

  10. Sequence, structure, and active site analyses of p38 MAP kinase: exploiting DFG-out conformation as a strategy to design new type II leads.

    PubMed

    Badrinarayan, Preethi; Sastry, G Narahari

    2011-01-24

    A new knowledge, structure, and sequence based strategy involving the effective exploitation of the DFG-out conformation is delineated. A comprehensive analysis of the structure, sequence, cocrystals, and active sites of p38 MAP kinase crystal structures present in Protein Data Bank (PDB) and the FDA approved MAP kinase drugs has been done, and the information is used for the design of type II leads. The 98 crystal structures, 138 cocrystals, and 31 FDA drugs comprise of 7 different sequences of 2 organisms viz., Homo sapiens and Mus musculus differing in sequence length, constituting both homo- and heterochains. Multiple sequence alignment with ClustalW showed >95% sequence similarity with highly conserved domains and a high propensity for mutations in the activation loop. The bound ligands were extracted, and their interactions with DFG in and out conformations were studied. These cocrystals and FDA drugs were fragmented on the basis of their binding interactions and their affinity to ATP and allosteric sites. The fragment library thus generated contains 106 fragments with overlapping drug fragments. A blue print constituting three main parts viz., head (ATP region), linker (DFG region), and tail (allosteric region) has thus been formulated and used to design 64 type II p38 MAP kinase inhibitors. The above strategy has been employed to design potent type II p38 MAP kinase inhibitors, which are shown to be very promising. PMID:21141877

  11. The heterotrimeric G q protein-coupled angiotensin II receptor activates p21 ras via the tyrosine kinase-Shc-Grb2-Sos pathway in cardiac myocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Sadoshima, J; Izumo, S

    1996-01-01

    p21 ras plays as important role in cell proliferation, transformation and differentiation. Recently, the requirement of p21 ras has been suggested for cellular responses induced by stimulation of heterotrimeric G protein-coupled receptors. However, it remains to be determined how agonists for G protein-coupled receptors activate p21 ras in metazoans. We show here that stimulation of the G q protein-coupled angiotensin II (Ang II) receptor causes activation of p21 ras in cardiac myocytes. The p21 ras activation by Ang II is mediated by an increase in the guanine nucleotide exchange activity, but not by an inhibition of the GTPase-activating protein. Ang II causes rapid tyrosine phosphorylation of Shc and its association with Grb2 and mSos-1, a guanine nucleotide exchange factor of p21 ras. This leads to translocation of mSos-1 to the membrane fraction. Shc associates with the SH3 domain of Fyn whose tyrosine kinase activity is activated by Ang II with a similar time course as that of tyrosine phosphorylation of Shc. Ang II-induced increase in the guanine nucleotide exchange activity was inhibited by a peptide ligand specific to the SH3 domain of the Src family tyrosine kinases. These results suggest that an agonist for a pertussis toxin-insensitive G protein-coupled receptor may initiate the cross-talk with non-receptor-type tyrosine kinases, thereby activating p21 ras using a similar mechanism as receptor tyrosine kinase-induced p21 ras activation. Images PMID:8631299

  12. Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II. Identification of a regulatory autophosphorylation site adjacent to the inhibitory and calmodulin-binding domains.

    PubMed

    Schworer, C M; Colbran, R J; Keefer, J R; Soderling, T R

    1988-09-25

    Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaM-kinase II) autophosphorylated under limiting conditions (7 microM [gamma-32P]ATP, 500 microM magnesium acetate, 4 degrees C) was analyzed by CNBr cleavage and peptide mapping to determine the site of autophosphorylation that brings about transition of the kinase to the Ca2+-independent form. Reverse phase high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) (C3) revealed one major CN-Br 32P-peptide (CB1) that eluted at about 6% propanol. This peptide contained [32P]threonine, but almost no [32P]serine, and migrated as a single band (Mr = 3000-3500) in polyacrylamide gels run in the presence of urea and sodium dodecyl sulfate. The properties of CB1 were compared to the properties of a 26-residue synthetic peptide containing the CaM-binding and inhibitory domains as well as a consensus phosphorylation sequence (-Arg-Gln-Glu-Thr-) of rat brain CaM-kinase II (residues 282-307 and 283-308 of the alpha and beta subunits, respectively). CB1 and the synthetic peptide comigrated in urea/sodium dodecyl sulfate gels, co-eluted from reverse phase HPLC (C3 and C18) and from Sephadex G-50, and exhibited Ca2+-dependent calmodulin-binding properties. When the two peptides were subjected to automated Edman sequence analysis, both exhibited a burst of 32P release at cycle 5, which is consistent with the expected amino-terminal sequence of the two peptides, i.e. His-Arg-Gln-Glu-Thr(PO4)-. These findings indicate that autophosphorylation of Thr286 (alpha subunit) and Thr287 (beta subunit) is responsible for transition of CaM-kinase II to the Ca2+-independent form. PMID:3417668

  13. Myosin II ATPase activity mediates the long-term potentiation-induced exodus of stable F-actin bound by drebrin A from dendritic spines.

    PubMed

    Mizui, Toshiyuki; Sekino, Yuko; Yamazaki, Hiroyuki; Ishizuka, Yuta; Takahashi, Hideto; Kojima, Nobuhiko; Kojima, Masami; Shirao, Tomoaki

    2014-01-01

    The neuronal actin-binding protein drebrin A forms a stable structure with F-actin in dendritic spines. NMDA receptor activation causes an exodus of F-actin bound by drebrin A (DA-actin) from dendritic spines, suggesting a pivotal role for DA-actin exodus in synaptic plasticity. We quantitatively assessed the extent of DA-actin localization to spines using the spine-dendrite ratio of drebrin A in cultured hippocampal neurons, and found that (1) chemical long-term potentiation (LTP) stimulation induces rapid DA-actin exodus and subsequent DA-actin re-entry in dendritic spines, (2) Ca(2+) influx through NMDA receptors regulates the exodus and the basal accumulation of DA-actin, and (3) the DA-actin exodus is blocked by myosin II ATPase inhibitor, but is not blocked by myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) or Rho-associated kinase (ROCK) inhibitors. These results indicate that myosin II mediates the interaction between NMDA receptor activation and DA-actin exodus in LTP induction. Furthermore, myosin II seems to be activated by a rapid actin-linked mechanism rather than slow MLC phosphorylation. Thus the myosin-II mediated DA-actin exodus might be an initial event in LTP induction, triggering actin polymerization and spine enlargement.

  14. Myosin II ATPase Activity Mediates the Long-Term Potentiation-Induced Exodus of Stable F-Actin Bound by Drebrin A from Dendritic Spines

    PubMed Central

    Mizui, Toshiyuki; Sekino, Yuko; Yamazaki, Hiroyuki; Ishizuka, Yuta; Takahashi, Hideto; Kojima, Nobuhiko; Kojima, Masami; Shirao, Tomoaki

    2014-01-01

    The neuronal actin-binding protein drebrin A forms a stable structure with F-actin in dendritic spines. NMDA receptor activation causes an exodus of F-actin bound by drebrin A (DA-actin) from dendritic spines, suggesting a pivotal role for DA-actin exodus in synaptic plasticity. We quantitatively assessed the extent of DA-actin localization to spines using the spine-dendrite ratio of drebrin A in cultured hippocampal neurons, and found that (1) chemical long-term potentiation (LTP) stimulation induces rapid DA-actin exodus and subsequent DA-actin re-entry in dendritic spines, (2) Ca2+ influx through NMDA receptors regulates the exodus and the basal accumulation of DA-actin, and (3) the DA-actin exodus is blocked by myosin II ATPase inhibitor, but is not blocked by myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) or Rho-associated kinase (ROCK) inhibitors. These results indicate that myosin II mediates the interaction between NMDA receptor activation and DA-actin exodus in LTP induction. Furthermore, myosin II seems to be activated by a rapid actin-linked mechanism rather than slow MLC phosphorylation. Thus the myosin-II mediated DA-actin exodus might be an initial event in LTP induction, triggering actin polymerization and spine enlargement. PMID:24465547

  15. Activation of Na+/H+ exchanger NHE3 by angiotensin II is mediated by inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate (IP3) receptor-binding protein released with IP3 (IRBIT) and Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II.

    PubMed

    He, Peijian; Klein, Janet; Yun, C Chris

    2010-09-01

    Angiotensin II (ANG II) stimulates renal tubular reabsorption of NaCl by targeting Na(+)/H(+) exchanger NHE3. We have shown previously that inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate receptor-binding protein released with inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate (IRBIT) plays a critical role in stimulation of NHE3 in response to elevated intracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)](i)). In this study, we investigated the role of IRBIT in mediating NHE3 activation by ANG II. IRBIT is abundantly expressed in the proximal tubules where NHE3 is located. ANG II at physiological concentrations stimulates NHE3 transport activity in a model proximal tubule cell line. ANG II-induced activation of NHE3 was abrogated by knockdown of IRBIT, whereas overexpression of IRBIT enhanced the effect of ANG II on NHE3. ANG II transiently increased binding of IRBIT to NHE3 at 5 min but became dissociated by 45 min. In comparison, it took at least 15 min of ANG II treatment for an increase in NHE3 activity and NHE3 surface expression. The stimulation of NHE3 by ANG II was dependent on changes in [Ca(2+)](i) and Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinases II. Inhibition of CaMKII completely blocked the ANG II-induced binding of IRBIT to NHE3 and the increase in NHE3 surface abundance. Several serine residues of IRBIT are thought to be important for IRBIT binding. Mutations of Ser-68, Ser-71, and Ser-74 of IRBIT decreased binding of IRBIT to NHE3 and its effect on NHE3 activity. In conclusion, our current findings demonstrate that IRBIT is critically involved in mediating activation of NHE3 by ANG II via a Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinases II-dependent pathway.

  16. Lithium-induced activation of Akt and CaM kinase II contributes to its neuroprotective action in a rat microsphere embolism model.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Takuya; Han, Feng; Shioda, Norifumi; Moriguchi, Shigeki; Kasahara, Jiro; Ishiguro, Koichi; Fukunaga, Kohji

    2006-09-01

    Lithium used in bipolar mood disorder therapy protects neurons from brain ischemic cell death. Here, we documented that lithium administration under microsphere-embolism (ME)-induced brain ischemia restored decreased protein kinase B (Akt) and Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) activities 24 h after ischemia in rat brain. Akt activation was associated with increased phosphorylation of its potential targets forkhead transcription factor (FKHR) and glycogen synthase kinase-3beta (GSK-3beta). In parallel with decreased CaMKII autophosphorylation, we also found marked dephosphorylation of tau proteins 24-72 h after ME. Increased protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) activity was found 24 h after ME. Inhibition of increased PP2A activity by lithium treatment apparently mediated restored tau phosphorylation. Taken together, activation of Akt and CaMKII by lithium was associated with neuroprotective activity in ME-induced neuronal injury.

  17. MAP kinase-signaling controls nuclear translocation of tripeptidyl-peptidase II in response to DNA damage and oxidative stress

    SciTech Connect

    Preta, Giulio; Klark, Rainier de; Chakraborti, Shankhamala; Glas, Rickard

    2010-08-27

    Research highlights: {yields} Nuclear translocation of TPPII occurs in response to different DNA damage inducers. {yields} Nuclear accumulation of TPPII is linked to ROS and anti-oxidant enzyme levels. {yields} MAPKs control nuclear accumulation of TPPII. {yields} Inhibited nuclear accumulation of TPPII decreases DNA damage-induced {gamma}-H2AX expression. -- Abstract: Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are a continuous hazard in eukaroytic cells by their ability to cause damage to biomolecules, in particular to DNA. Previous data indicated that the cytosolic serine peptidase tripeptidyl-peptidase II (TPPII) translocates into the nucleus of most tumor cell lines in response to {gamma}-irradiation and ROS production; an event that promoted p53 expression as well as caspase-activation. We here observed that nuclear translocation of TPPII was dependent on signaling by MAP kinases, including p38MAPK. Further, this was caused by several types of DNA-damaging drugs, a DNA cross-linker (cisplatinum), an inhibitor of topoisomerase II (etoposide), and to some extent also by nucleoside-analogues (5-fluorouracil, hydroxyurea). In the minority of tumor cell lines where TPPII was not translocated into the nucleus in response to DNA damage we observed reduced intracellular ROS levels, and the expression levels of redox defense systems were increased. Further, treatment with the ROS-inducer {gamma}-hexa-chloro-cyclohexane ({gamma}-HCH, lindane), an inhibitor of GAP junctions, restored nuclear translocation of TPPII in these cell lines upon {gamma}-irradiation. Moreover, blocking nuclear translocation of TPPII in etoposide-treated cells, by using a peptide-derived inhibitor (Z-Gly-Leu-Ala-OH), attenuated expression of {gamma}-H2AX in {gamma}-irradiated melanoma cells. Our results indicated a role for TPPII in MAPK-dependent DNA damage signaling.

  18. Molecular basis for the modulation of native T-type Ca2+ channels in vivo by Ca2+ /calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Junlan; Davies, Lucinda A.; Howard, Jason D.; Adney, Scott K.; Welsby, Philip J.; Howell, Nancy; Carey, Robert M.; Colbran, Roger J.; Barrett, Paula Q.

    2006-01-01

    Ang II receptor activation increases cytosolic Ca2+ levels to enhance the synthesis and secretion of aldosterone, a recently identified early pathogenic stimulus that adversely influences cardiovascular homeostasis. Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) is a downstream effector of the Ang II–elicited signaling cascade that serves as a key intracellular Ca2+ sensor to feedback-regulate Ca2+ entry through voltage-gated Ca2+ channels. However, the molecular mechanism(s) by which CaMKII regulates these important physiological targets to increase Ca2+ entry remain unresolved. We show here that CaMKII forms a signaling complex with α1H T-type Ca2+ channels, directly interacting with the intracellular loop connecting domains II and III of the channel pore (II-III loop). Activation of the kinase mediated the phosphorylation of Ser1198 in the II-III loop and the positive feedback regulation of channel gating both in intact cells in situ and in cells of the native adrenal zona glomerulosa stimulated by Ang II in vivo. These data define the molecular basis for the in vivo modulation of native T-type Ca2+ channels by CaMKII and suggest that the disruption of this signaling complex in the zona glomerulosa may provide a new therapeutic approach to limit aldosterone production and cardiovascular disease progression. PMID:16917542

  19. Calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II/cAMP response element-binding protein/Wnt/β-catenin signaling cascade regulates angiotensin II-induced podocyte injury and albuminuria.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Lei; Xu, Lingling; Song, Yuxian; Li, Jianzhong; Mao, Junhua; Zhao, Allan Zijian; He, Weichun; Yang, Junwei; Dai, Chunsun

    2013-08-01

    Angiotensin II (Ang II) plays a pivotal role in promoting podocyte dysfunction and albuminuria, however, the underlying mechanisms have not been fully delineated. In this study, we found that Ang II induced Wnt1 expression and β-catenin nuclear translocation in cultured mouse podocytes. Blocking Wnt signaling with Dickkopf-1 (Dkk1) or β-catenin siRNA attenuated Ang II-induced podocyte injury. Ang II could also induce the phosphorylation of calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CaMK) II and cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) in cultured podocytes. Blockade of this pathway with CK59 or CREB siRNA could significantly inhibit Ang II-induced Wnt/β-catenin signaling and podocyte injury. In in vivo studies, administration of Ang II promoted Wnt/β-catenin signaling, aggregated podocyte damage, and albuminuria in mice. CK59 could remarkably ameliorate Ang II-induced podocyte injury and albuminuria. Furthermore, ectopic expression of exogenous Dkk1 also attenuated Ang II-induced podocytopathy in mice. Taken together, this study demonstrates that the CaMK II/CREB/Wnt/β-catenin signaling cascade plays an important role in regulating Ang II-induced podocytopathy. Targeting this signaling pathway may offer renal protection against the development of proteinuric kidney diseases. PMID:23803607

  20. Rat vas deferens SERCA2 is modulated by Ca2+/calmodulin protein kinase II-mediated phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, J.B.R.; Muzi-Filho, H.; Valverde, R.H.F.; Quintas, L.E.M.; Noel, F.; Einicker-Lamas, M.; Cunha, V.M.N.

    2013-01-01

    Ca2+ pumps are important players in smooth muscle contraction. Nevertheless, little information is available about these pumps in the vas deferens. We have determined which subtype of sarco(endo)plasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase isoform (SERCA) is expressed in rat vas deferens (RVD) and its modulation by calmodulin (CaM)-dependent mechanisms. The thapsigargin-sensitive Ca2+-ATPase from a membrane fraction containing the highest SERCA levels in the RVD homogenate has the same molecular mass (∼115 kDa) as that of SERCA2 from the rat cerebellum. It has a very high affinity for Ca2+ (Ca0.5 = 780 nM) and a low sensitivity to vanadate (IC50 = 41 µM). These facts indicate that SERCA2 is present in the RVD. Immunoblotting for CaM and Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) showed the expression of these two regulatory proteins. Ca2+ and CaM increased serine-phosphorylated residues of the 115-kDa protein, indicating the involvement of CaMKII in the regulatory phosphorylation of SERCA2. Phosphorylation is accompanied by an 8-fold increase of thapsigargin-sensitive Ca2+ accumulation in the lumen of vesicles derived from these membranes. These data establish that SERCA2 in the RVD is modulated by Ca2+ and CaM, possibly via CaMKII, in a process that results in stimulation of Ca2+ pumping activity. PMID:23558856

  1. Pavlovian fear conditioning regulates Thr286 autophosphorylation of Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II at lateral amygdala synapses.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Sarina M; Farb, Claudia R; Bauer, Elizabeth P; LeDoux, Joseph E; Schafe, Glenn E

    2004-03-31

    Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) plays a critical role in synaptic plasticity and memory formation in a variety of learning systems and species. The present experiments examined the role of CaMKII in the circuitry underlying pavlovian fear conditioning. First, we reveal by immunocytochemical and tract-tracing methods that alphaCaMKII is postsynaptic to auditory thalamic inputs and colocalized with the NR2B subunit of the NMDA receptor. Furthermore, we show that fear conditioning results in an increase of the autophosphorylated (active) form of alphaCaMKII in lateral amygdala (LA) spines. Next, we demonstrate that intra-amygdala infusion of a CaMK inhibitor, 1-[NO-bis-1,5-isoquinolinesulfonyl]-N-methyl-l-tyrosyl-4-phenylpiperazine, KN-62, dose-dependently impairs the acquisition, but not the expression, of auditory and contextual fear conditioning. Finally, in electrophysiological experiments, we demonstrate that an NMDA receptor-dependent form of long-term potentiation at thalamic input synapses to the LA is impaired by bath application of KN-62 in vitro. Together, the results of these experiments provide the first comprehensive view of the role of CaMKII in the amygdala during fear conditioning.

  2. Inhibition of Shikimate Kinase and Type II Dehydroquinase for Antibiotic Discovery: Structure-Based Design and Simulation Studies.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Bello, Concepcion

    2016-01-01

    The loss of effectiveness of current antibiotics caused by the development of drug resistance has become a severe threat to public health. Current widely used antibiotics are surprisingly targeted at a few bacterial functions - cell wall, DNA, RNA, and protein biosynthesis - and resistance to them is widespread and well identified. There is therefore great interest in the discovery of novel drugs and therapies to tackle antimicrobial resistance, in particular drugs that target other essential processes for bacterial survival. In the past few years a great deal of effort has been focused on the discovery of new inhibitors of the enzymes involved in the biosynthesis of aromatic amino acids, also known as the shikimic acid pathway, in which chorismic acid is synthesized. The latter compound is the synthetic precursor of L-Phe, L-Tyr, L-Phe, and other important aromatic metabolites. These enzymes are recognized as attractive targets for the development of new antibacterial agents because they are essential in important pathogenic bacteria, such as Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Helicobacter pylori, but do not have any counterpart in human cells. This review is focused on two key enzymes of this pathway, shikimate kinase and type II dehydroquinase. An overview of the use of structure-based design and computational studies for the discovery of selective inhibitors of these enzymes will be provided. A detailed view of the structural changes caused by these inhibitors in the catalytic arrangement of these enzymes, which are responsible for the inhibition of their activity, is described. PMID:26303426

  3. Requirement for Class II Phosphoinositide 3-Kinase C2α in Maintenance of Glomerular Structure and Function▿

    PubMed Central

    Harris, David P.; Vogel, Peter; Wims, Marie; Moberg, Karen; Humphries, Juliane; Jhaver, Kanchan G.; DaCosta, Christopher M.; Shadoan, Melanie K.; Xu, Nianhua; Hansen, Gwenn M.; Balakrishnan, Sanjeevi; Domin, Jan; Powell, David R.; Oravecz, Tamas

    2011-01-01

    An early lesion in many kidney diseases is damage to podocytes, which are critical components of the glomerular filtration barrier. A number of proteins are essential for podocyte filtration function, but the signaling events contributing to development of nephrotic syndrome are not well defined. Here we show that class II phosphoinositide 3-kinase C2α (PI3KC2α) is expressed in podocytes and plays a critical role in maintaining normal renal homeostasis. PI3KC2α-deficient mice developed chronic renal failure and exhibited a range of kidney lesions, including glomerular crescent formation and renal tubule defects in early disease, which progressed to diffuse mesangial sclerosis, with reduced podocytes, widespread effacement of foot processes, and modest proteinuria. These findings were associated with altered expression of nephrin, synaptopodin, WT-1, and desmin, indicating that PI3KC2α deficiency specifically impacts podocyte morphology and function. Deposition of glomerular IgA was observed in knockout mice; importantly, however, the development of severe glomerulonephropathy preceded IgA production, indicating that nephropathy was not directly IgA mediated. PI3KC2α deficiency did not affect immune responses, and bone marrow transplantation studies also indicated that the glomerulonephropathy was not the direct consequence of an immune-mediated disease. Thus, PI3KC2α is critical for maintenance of normal glomerular structure and function by supporting normal podocyte function. PMID:20974805

  4. Requirement for class II phosphoinositide 3-kinase C2alpha in maintenance of glomerular structure and function.

    PubMed

    Harris, David P; Vogel, Peter; Wims, Marie; Moberg, Karen; Humphries, Juliane; Jhaver, Kanchan G; DaCosta, Christopher M; Shadoan, Melanie K; Xu, Nianhua; Hansen, Gwenn M; Balakrishnan, Sanjeevi; Domin, Jan; Powell, David R; Oravecz, Tamas

    2011-01-01

    An early lesion in many kidney diseases is damage to podocytes, which are critical components of the glomerular filtration barrier. A number of proteins are essential for podocyte filtration function, but the signaling events contributing to development of nephrotic syndrome are not well defined. Here we show that class II phosphoinositide 3-kinase C2α (PI3KC2α) is expressed in podocytes and plays a critical role in maintaining normal renal homeostasis. PI3KC2α-deficient mice developed chronic renal failure and exhibited a range of kidney lesions, including glomerular crescent formation and renal tubule defects in early disease, which progressed to diffuse mesangial sclerosis, with reduced podocytes, widespread effacement of foot processes, and modest proteinuria. These findings were associated with altered expression of nephrin, synaptopodin, WT-1, and desmin, indicating that PI3KC2α deficiency specifically impacts podocyte morphology and function. Deposition of glomerular IgA was observed in knockout mice; importantly, however, the development of severe glomerulonephropathy preceded IgA production, indicating that nephropathy was not directly IgA mediated. PI3KC2α deficiency did not affect immune responses, and bone marrow transplantation studies also indicated that the glomerulonephropathy was not the direct consequence of an immune-mediated disease. Thus, PI3KC2α is critical for maintenance of normal glomerular structure and function by supporting normal podocyte function.

  5. Spatial memory deficits and motor coordination facilitation in cGMP-dependent protein kinase type II-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Wincott, Charlotte M; Kim, Seonil; Titcombe, Roseann F; Tukey, David S; Girma, Hiwot K; Pick, Joseph E; Devito, Loren M; Hofmann, Franz; Hoeffer, Charles; Ziff, Edward B

    2013-01-01

    Activity-dependent trafficking of AMPA receptors to synapses regulates synaptic strength. Activation of the NMDA receptor induces several second messenger pathways that contribute to receptor trafficking-dependent plasticity, including the NO pathway, which elevates cGMP. In turn, cGMP activates the cGMP-dependent protein kinase type II (cGKII), which phosphorylates the AMPA receptor subunit GluA1 at serine 845, a critical step facilitating synaptic delivery in the mechanism of activity-dependent synaptic potentiation. Since cGKII is expressed in the striatum, amygdala, cerebral cortex, and hippocampus, it has been proposed that mice lacking cGKII may present phenotypic differences compared to their wild-type littermates in emotion-dependent tasks, learning and memory, and drug reward salience. Previous studies have shown that cGKII KO mice ingest higher amounts of ethanol as well as exhibit elevated anxiety levels compared to wild-type (WT) littermates. Here, we show that cGKII KO mice are significantly deficient in spatial learning while exhibiting facilitated motor coordination, demonstrating a clear dependence of memory-based tasks on cGKII. We also show diminished GluA1 phosphorylation in the postsynaptic density (PSD) of cGKII KO prefrontal cortex while in hippocampal PSD fractions, phosphorylation was not significantly altered. These data suggest that the role of cGKII may be more robust in particular brain regions, thereby impacting complex behaviors dependent on these regions differently.

  6. Diabetes mellitus affects activity of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II alpha in rat trigeminal ganglia.

    PubMed

    Jerić, Milka; Vuica, Ana; Borić, Matija; Puljak, Livia; Jeličić Kadić, Antonia; Grković, Ivica; Filipović, Natalija

    2015-01-01

    The activity of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II alpha (CaMKIIα) may play a critical role in the modulation of nociceptor activity and plasticity of primary sensory trigeminal neurons. The aim of this study was to investigate the immunoreactivity of phosphorylated CaMKIIα (pCaMKIIα) in subpopulations of trigeminal ganglion (TG) neurons in rat models of early diabetes type 1 (dm1) and 2 (dm2). DM1 model was induced with intraperitoneally (i.p.) injected streptozotocin (STZ) (55mg/kg). DM2 rats were fed with the high fat diet (HFD) for 2 weeks and then received 35mg/kg of STZ i.p. Two weeks and 2 months after the STZ-diabetes induction, rats were sacrificed and immunohistochemical analysis for detection of pCaMKIIα immunoreactivity and double immunofluorescence labelling with isolectin (IB4) was performed. Increased intensity of pCaMKIIα immunofluorescence, restricted to IB4-negative small-diameter neurons, was seen in TG neurons two months after STZ-DM1 induction. DM1 model, as well as the obesity (control dm2 groups) resulted in neuronal impaired growth while dm2 model led to neuron hypertrophy in TG. Observed changes may play a critical role in the modulation of nociceptor activity and plasticity of primary sensory trigeminal neurons. In future, innovative strategies for modulation of CaMKIIα activity in specific subpopulations of neurons could be a novel approach in therapy of diabetic trigeminal neuropathy.

  7. Structural Properties of Human CaMKII Ca2+ /Calmodulin-Dependent Protein Kinase II using X-ray Crystallography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Yumeng Melody; McSpadden, Ethan; Kuriyan, John; Department of Molecular; Cell Biology; Department of Chemistry Team

    To this day, human memory storage remains a mystery as we can at most describe the process vaguely on a cellular level. Switch-like properties of Calcium/Calmodulin-Dependent Protein Kinase II make it a leading candidate in understanding the molecular basis of human memory. The protein crystal was placed in the beam of a synchrotron source and the x-ray crystallography data was collected as reflections on a diffraction pattern that undergo Fourier transform to obtain the electron density. We observed two drastic differences from our solved structure at 2.75Å to a similar construct of the mouse CaMKII association domain. Firstly, our structure is a 6-fold symmetric dodecamer, whereas the previously published construct was a 7-fold symmetric tetradecamer. This suggests the association domain of human CaMKII is a dynamic structure that is triggered subunit exchange process. Secondly, in our structure the N-terminal tag is docked as an additional beta-strand on an uncapped beta-sheet present in each association domain protomer. This is concrete evidence of the involvement of the polypeptide docking site in the molecular mechanism underlining subunit exchange. In the future, we would like to selectively inhibit the exchange process while not disrupting the other functionalities of CaMKII.

  8. Extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2 control claudin-2 expression in Madin-Darby canine kidney strain I and II cells.

    PubMed

    Lipschutz, Joshua H; Li, Shixiong; Arisco, Amy; Balkovetz, Daniel F

    2005-02-01

    The tight junction of the epithelial cell determines the characteristics of paracellular permeability across epithelium. Recent work points toward the claudin family of tight junction proteins as leading candidates for the molecular components that regulate paracellular permeability properties in epithelial tissues. Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) strain I and II cells are models for the study of tight junctions and based on transepithelial electrical resistance (TER) contain "tight" and "leaky" tight junctions, respectively. Overexpression studies suggest that tight junction leakiness in these two strains of MDCK cells is conferred by expression of the tight junction protein claudin-2. Extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2 activation by hepatocyte growth factor treatment of MDCK strain II cells inhibited claudin-2 expression and transiently increased TER. This process was blocked by the ERK 1/2 inhibitor U0126. Transfection of constitutively active mitogen-activated protein kinase/extracellular signal-regulated kinase kinase into MDCK strain II cells also inhibited claudin-2 expression and increased TER. MDCK strain I cells have higher levels of active ERK 1/2 than do MDCK strain II cells. U0126 treatment of MDCK strain I cells decreased active ERK 1/2 levels, induced expression of claudin-2 protein, and decreased TER by approximately 20-fold. U0126 treatment also induced claudin-2 expression and decreased TER in a high resistance mouse cortical collecting duct cell line (94D). These data show for the first time that the ERK 1/2 signaling pathway negatively controls claudin-2 expression in mammalian renal epithelial cells and provide evidence for regulation of tight junction paracellular transport by alterations in claudin composition within tight junction complexes.

  9. Trypanosome cdc2-related kinase 9 controls spliced leader RNA cap4 methylation and phosphorylation of RNA polymerase II subunit RPB1.

    PubMed

    Badjatia, Nitika; Ambrósio, Daniela L; Lee, Ju Huck; Günzl, Arthur

    2013-05-01

    Conserved from yeast to mammals, phosphorylation of the heptad repeat sequence Tyr(1)-Ser(2)-Pro(3)-Thr(4)-Ser(5)-Pro(6)-Ser(7) in the carboxy-terminal domain (CTD) of the largest RNA polymerase II (RNA Pol II) subunit, RPB1, mediates the enzyme's promoter escape and binding of RNA-processing factors, such as the m(7)G capping enzymes. The first critical step, Ser(5) phosphorylation, is carried out by cyclin-dependent kinase 7 (CDK7), a subunit of the basal transcription factor TFIIH. Many early-diverged protists, such as the lethal human parasite Trypanosoma brucei, however, lack the heptad repeats and, apparently, a CDK7 ortholog. Accordingly, characterization of trypanosome TFIIH did not identify a kinase component. The T. brucei CTD, however, is phosphorylated and essential for transcription. Here we show that silencing the expression of T. brucei cdc2-related kinase 9 (CRK9) leads to a loss of RPB1 phosphorylation. Surprisingly, this event did not impair RNA Pol II transcription or cotranscriptional m(7)G capping. Instead, we observed that CRK9 silencing led to a block of spliced leader (SL) trans splicing, an essential step in trypanosome mRNA maturation, that was caused by hypomethylation of the SL RNA's unique cap4.

  10. Production of superoxide from photosystem II-light harvesting complex II supercomplex in STN8 kinase knock-out rice mutants under photoinhibitory illumination.

    PubMed

    Poudyal, Roshan Sharma; Nath, Krishna; Zulfugarov, Ismayil S; Lee, Choon-Hwan

    2016-09-01

    When phosphorylation of Photosystem (PS) II core proteins is blocked in STN8 knock-out mutants of rice (Oryza sativa) under photoinhibitory illumination, the mobilization of PSII supercomplex is prevented. We have previously proposed that more superoxide (O2(-)) is produced from PSII in the mutant (Nath et al., 2013, Plant J. 76, 675-686). Here, we clarify the type and site for the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Using both histochemical and fluorescence probes, we observed that, compared with wild-type (WT) leaves, levels of ROS, including O2(-) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), were increased when leaves from mutant plants were illuminated with excess light. However, singlet oxygen production was not enhanced under such conditions. When superoxide dismutase was inhibited, O2(-) production was increased, indicating that it is the initial event prior to H2O2 production. In thylakoids isolated from WT leaves, kinase was active in the presence of ATP, and spectrophotometric analysis of nitrobluetetrazolium absorbance for O2(-) confirmed that PSII-driven superoxide production was greater in the mutant thylakoids than in the WT. This contrast in levels of PSII-driven superoxide production between the mutants and the WT plants was confirmed by conducting protein oxidation assays of PSII particles from osstn8 leaves under strong illumination. Those assays also demonstrated that PSII-LHCII supercomplex proteins were oxidized more in the mutant, thereby implying that PSII particles incur greater damage even though D1 degradation during PSII-supercomplex mobilization is partially blocked in the mutant. These results suggest that O2(-) is the major form of ROS produced in the mutant, and that the damaged PSII in the supercomplex is the primary source of O2(-). PMID:27390892

  11. Depression of Ca2+/Calmodulin-Dependent Protein Kinase II in Dorsal Root Ganglion Neurons after Spinal Nerve Ligation

    PubMed Central

    Kojundzic, Sanja Lovric; Puljak, Livia; Hogan, Quinn; Sapunar, Damir

    2014-01-01

    The enzyme calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) is associated with memory and its α isoform is critical for development of activity-induced synaptic changes. Therefore, we hypothesized that CaMKII is involved in altered function of dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons after neuronal injury. To test this hypothesis, Sprague–Dawley rats were made hyperalgesic by L5 and L6 spinal nerve ligation (SNL), and changes in total phosphorylated and unphosphorylated CaMKII (tCaMKII) and phosphorylated form of its α isoform (pCaMKIIα) were analyzed using immunochemistry in different subpopulations of DRG. SNL did not induce any changes in tCaMKII between experimental groups, while the overall percentage of pCaMKIIα-positive neurons in injured L5 DRG SNL (24.8%) decreased significantly when compared to control (41.7%). SNL did not change the percentage of pCaMKIIα/N52 colabeled neurons but decreased the percentage of N52-negative nonmyelinated neurons that expressed pCaMKIIα from 27% in control animals to 11% after axotomy. We also observed a significant decrease in the percentage of small nonpeptidergic neurons labeled with IB4 (37.6% in control vs. 4.0% in L5 SNL DRG), as well as a decrease in the percentage of pCaMKIIα/IB4 colabeled neurons in injured L5 DRGs (27% in control vs. 1% in L5 DRG of SNL group). Our results show that reduction in pCaMKIIα levels following peripheral injury is due to the loss of IB4-positive neurons. These results indicate that diminished afferent activity after axotomy may lead to decreased phosphorylation of CaMKIIα. PMID:19882720

  12. Sulfur Dioxide Inhibits Extracellular Signal-regulated Kinase Signaling to Attenuate Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Proliferation in Angiotensin II-induced Hypertensive Mice

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Hui-Juan; Huang, Ya-Qian; Chen, Qing-Hua; Tian, Xiao-Yu; Liu, Jia; Tang, Chao-Shu; Jin, Hong-Fang; Du, Jun-Bao

    2016-01-01

    Background: Clarifying the mechanisms underlying vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) proliferation is important for the prevention and treatment of vascular remodeling and the reverse of hyperplastic lesions. Previous research has shown that the gaseous signaling molecule sulfur dioxide (SO2) inhibits VSMC proliferation, but the mechanism for the inhibition of the angiotensin II (AngII)-induced VSMC proliferation by SO2 has not been fully elucidated. This study was designed to investigate if SO2 inhibited VSMC proliferation in mice with hypertension induced by AngII. Methods: Thirty-six male C57 mice were randomly divided into control, AngII, and AngII + SO2 groups. Mice in AngII group and AngII + SO2 group received a capsule-type AngII pump implanted under the skin of the back at a slow-release dose of 1000 ng·kg−1·min−1. In addition, mice in AngII + SO2 received intraperitoneal injections of SO2 donor. Arterial blood pressure of tail artery was determined. The thickness of the aorta was measured by elastic fiber staining, and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) and phosphorylated-extracellular signal-regulated kinase (P-ERK) were detected in aortic tissues. The concentration of SO2 in serum and aortic tissue homogenate supernatant was measured using high-performance liquid chromatography with fluorescence determination. In the in vitro study, VSMC of A7R5 cell lines was divided into six groups: control, AngII, AngII + SO2, PD98059 (an inhibitor of ERK phosphorylation), AngII + PD98059, and AngII + SO2 + PD98059. Expression of PCNA, ERK, and P-ERK was determined by Western blotting. Results: In animal experiment, compared with the control group, AngII markedly increased blood pressure (P < 0.01) and thickened the aortic wall in mice (P < 0.05) with an increase in the expression of PCNA (P < 0.05). SO2, however, reduced the systemic hypertension and the wall thickness induced by AngII (P < 0.05). It inhibited the increased expression of PCNA and P

  13. Sevoflurane Stimulates MAP Kinase Signal transduction through the Activation of PKC α and βII in Fetal Rat Cerebral Cortex Cultured Neuron

    PubMed Central

    Hasegawa, Jun; Takekoshi, Susumu; Nagata, Hidetaka; Osamura, R. Yoshiyuki; Suzuki, Toshiyasu

    2006-01-01

    Protein kinase C (PKC) is a key enzyme that participates in various neuronal functions. PKC has also been identified as a target molecule for general anesthetic actions. Raf, mitogen-activated protein kinase (MEK) and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK1/2) have been thought to be target effectors of PKC. In the present study, we attempted to evaluate the effect of sevoflurane on PKC/MAPK cascade signaling in cultured fetal rat cerebral ­cortex neurons, prepared from embryonic day 18 fetuses. The effects of sevoflurane on the translocation of 7 PKC isoforms (α, βI, βII, γ, δ, ɛ and ζ) were observed by immunoblotting using isoform-selective antibodies to PKCs. The treatment of neurons with sevoflurane induced the translocation of PKC α and PKC βII species from the cytosol to the membrane fraction, which indicated the activation of these PKC isoforms. In contrast, there was no clear change in the distribution of other PKC isoforms. We next examined whether the specific activation of PKC α and βII by sevoflurane could stimulate the MAP kinase signaling pathway in cultured neurons. Raf phosphorylation was increased by the administration of 0.25 mM sevoflurane. The phosphorylation of Raf proteins reached a maximum at 5–10 min. Subsequently, the phosphorylation of MEK proteins was increased at 10–15 min after sevoflurane treatments. That of ERK proteins was induced at 15–60 min. Moreover, the phosphorylation of ERK induced by sevoflurane was significantly decreased by the treatment of PKC inhibitor (staurosporine) and MEK inhibitor (PD98059). On the other hand, the contents of total Raf, MEK and ERK proteins were relatively constant at all times examined. To examine the ­localization of phosphorylated-ERK protein, immunohistochemical staining of sevoflurane-treated cultured neurons was performed. The phosphorylated-ERK proteins were markedly accumulated in both the cytosol of the cell body and the neurites in the neuronal cells with time after 0

  14. Angiotensin II promotes differentiation of mouse embryonic stem cells to smooth muscle cells through PI3-kinase signaling pathway and NF-κB.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xiaoye; Wu, Yutao; Zhu, Liangfeng; Chen, Qishan; Zhou, Yijiang; Yan, Hui; Chen, Ting; Xiao, Qingzhong; Zhu, Jianhua; Zhang, Li

    2013-01-01

    Embryonic stem cells (ES cells), the pluripotent derivatives of the inner cell mass from blastocysts, have the capacity for unlimited growth, self-renewal and differentiation toward all types of somatic cells. Angiotensin II (Ang II), the most important effector peptide of the renin-angiotensin system, is also an angiogenesis factor. However, the potential impact of Ang II on ES cell differentiation is still unknown. In the present study, we have successfully induced the differentiation of ES cells into smooth muscle cells (SMCs) on collagen IV. Interestingly, incubation of ES cells with Ang II further promoted SMC differentiation from ES cells, which was abolished by prior treatment with Ang II type 1 (AT1) receptor antagonist losartan, but not Ang II type 2 (AT2) receptor antagonist PD123319. Moreover, we found that, in parallel with SMC specific-marker induction, the expression levels of phosphoAkt and NF-Kappa B (NF-κB) p50 were up-regulated by Ang II. Importantly, addition of phosphoinositide-3 kinase (PI3K) inhibitor LY294002 led to a marked inhibition of Ang II induced SMC specific markers, phosphoAkt and NF-κB p50 expression. Furthermore, NF-κB inhibitor BAY11-7082 can inhibit Ang II induced expression of SMC specific markers. Thus, we demonstrate for the first time that Ang II plays a promotive role in the stage of ES cell differentiation to SMCs through AT1 receptor. We further confirmed that PI3K/Akt signaling pathway and NF-κB play key roles in this process.

  15. Independent characterization of thymidine transport and subsequent metabolism in Hymenolepis diminuta--II. Purification and preliminary analysis of thymidine kinase.

    PubMed

    Insler, G D; Halikias, F J

    1991-01-01

    1. An affinity column for the purification of thymidine kinase (TK) from the cestode Hymenolepis diminuta is described. Using an epoxy-activated Sepharose 6B affinity column containing thymidine as a ligand, a 698-fold purification of thymidine kinase was obtained. 2. Thymidine kinase eluted from this affinity column was partially characterized as having an apparent Km value of 3.94 microM thymidine. This value is very similar to those observed in mammalian systems. 3. Thymidine kinase appears to be an extremely active and ubiquitous enzyme, whose primary function is to rapidly phosphorylate incoming thymidine and thus "trap" it for the cell's use, reducing efflux to a minimum. 4. The apparent Km for TK is two orders of magnitude lower than the Kt for thymidine transport. Thus, theories postulating that long-term (2 min) uptake kinetics for thymidine actually represent subsequent metabolism must look further along the thymidine phosphorylating pathway, beyond TK and its very active role.

  16. Identification of an essential signaling cascade for mitogen-activated protein kinase activation by angiotensin II in cultured rat vascular smooth muscle cells. Possible requirement of Gq-mediated p21ras activation coupled to a Ca2+/calmodulin-sensitive tyrosine kinase.

    PubMed

    Eguchi, S; Matsumoto, T; Motley, E D; Utsunomiya, H; Inagami, T

    1996-06-14

    In cultured rat vascular smooth muscle cells, angiotensin II (Ang II) induced a rapid increase in mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) activity through the Ang II type 1 receptor, which was insensitive to pertussis toxin but was abolished by the phospholipase C inhibitor, U73122. The Ang II-induced MAPK activation was not affected by the protein kinase C inhibitor, GF109203X, and was only partially impaired by pretreatment with a phorbol ester, whereas both treatments completely prevented MAPK activation by the phorbol ester. Intracellular Ca2+ chelation by TMB-8, but not extracellular Ca2+ chelation or inhibition of Ca2+ influx, abolished Ang II-induced MAPK activation. The calmodulin inhibitor, calmidazolium, and the tyrosine kinase inhibitor, genistein, completely blocked MAPK activation by Ang II as well as by the Ca2+ ionophore A23187. Ang II caused a rapid increase in the binding of GTP to p21(ras), and this was inhibited by genistein, TMB-8, and calmidazolium but not by pertussis toxin or GF109203X. These data suggest that Ang II-induced MAPK activation through the Ang II type 1 receptor could be mediated by p21(ras)activation through a currently unidentified tyrosine kinase that lies downstream of Gq-coupled Ca2+/calmodulin signals.

  17. Class II phosphoinositide 3-kinase C2β regulates a novel signaling pathway involved in breast cancer progression

    PubMed Central

    Abbott, Jonathan J.; Piñeiro, Roberto; Buus, Richard; Iezzi, Manuela; Ricci, Francesca; Bergamaschi, Daniele; Ostano, Paola; Chiorino, Giovanna; Lattanzio, Rossano; Broggini, Massimo; Piantelli, Mauro; Maffucci, Tania; Falasca, Marco

    2016-01-01

    It is now well established that the enzymes phosphoinositide 3-kinases (PI3Ks) have a key role in the development and progression of many cancer types and indeed PI3Ks inhibitors are currently being tested in clinical trials. Although eight distinct PI3K isoforms exist, grouped into three classes, most of the evidence currently available are focused on one specific isoform with very little known about the potential role of the other members of this family in cancer. Here we demonstrate that the class II enzyme PI3K-C2β is overexpressed in several human breast cancer cell lines and in human breast cancer specimens. Our data indicate that PI3K-C2β regulates breast cancer cell growth in vitro and in vivo and that PI3K-C2β expression in breast tissues is correlated with the proliferative status of the tumor. Specifically we show that downregulation of PI3K-C2β in breast cancer cell lines reduces colony formation, induces cell cycle arrest and inhibits tumor growth, in particular in an estrogen-dependent in vivo xenograft. Investigation of the mechanism of the PI3K-C2β-dependent regulation of cell cycle progression and cell growth revealed that PI3K-C2β regulates cyclin B1 protein levels through modulation of microRNA miR-449a levels. Our data further demonstrate that downregulation of PI3K-C2β inhibits breast cancer cell invasion in vitro and breast cancer metastasis in vivo. Consistent with this, PI3K-C2β is highly expressed in lymph-nodes metastases compared to matching primary tumors. These data demonstrate that PI3K-C2β plays a pivotal role in breast cancer progression and in metastasis development. Our data indicate that PI3K-C2β may represent a key molecular switch that regulates a rate-limiting step in breast tumor progression and therefore it may be targeted to limit breast cancer spread. PMID:26934321

  18. Phospholipase C/protein kinase C pathway mediates angiotensin II-dependent apoptosis in neonatal rat cardiac fibroblasts expressing AT1 receptor.

    PubMed

    Vivar, Raul; Soto, Cristian; Copaja, Miguel; Mateluna, Francisca; Aranguiz, Pablo; Muñoz, Juan Pablo; Chiong, Mario; Garcia, Lorena; Letelier, Alan; Thomas, Walter G; Lavandero, Sergio; Díaz-Araya, Guillermo

    2008-08-01

    Cardiac fibroblasts are the major non-myocyte cell constituent in the myocardium, and they are involved in heart remodeling. Angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R) mediates the established actions of angiotensin II (Ang II), and changes in its expression have been reported in cardiac fibroblasts after myocardial infarction. However, the AT1R-dependent signaling pathways involved in cardiac fibroblast death remain unknown. Using adenovirus, we ectopically expressed AT1R in cultured neonatal rat cardiac fibroblasts and investigated the role of the phospholipase (PLC)/protein kinase C (PKC) pathway on Ang II-dependent death. Ang II induced cardiac fibroblast death characterized by an early loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, increased Bax/Bcl-2 ratio, caspase-3 activation, and DNA fragmentation. All these effects were prevented by the AT1R antagonist losartan, PLC inhibitor U73122, and PKC inhibitor Gö6976. We conclude that Ang II stimulates the intrinsic apoptotic pathway in cultured cardiac fibroblasts by the AT1R/PLC/PKC signaling pathway. PMID:18670360

  19. The role of water molecules in the binding of class I and II peptides to the SH3 domain of the Fyn tyrosine kinase.

    PubMed

    Camara-Artigas, Ana; Ortiz-Salmeron, Emilia; Andujar-Sánchez, Montserrrat; Bacarizo, Julio; Martin-Garcia, Jose Manuel

    2016-09-01

    Interactions of proline-rich motifs with SH3 domains are present in signal transduction and other important cell processes. Analysis of structural and thermodynamic data suggest a relevant role of water molecules in these protein-protein interactions. To determine whether or not the SH3 domain of the Fyn tyrosine kinase shows the same behaviour, the crystal structures of its complexes with two high-affinity synthetic peptides, VSL12 and APP12, which are class I and II peptides, respectively, have been solved. In the class I complexes two water molecules were found at the binding interface that were not present in the class II complexes. The structures suggest a role of these water molecules in facilitating conformational changes in the SH3 domain to allow the binding of the class I or II peptides. In the third binding pocket these changes modify the cation-π and salt-bridge interactions that determine the affinity of the binding. Comparison of the water molecules involved in the binding of the peptides with previous reported hydration spots suggests a different pattern for the SH3 domains of the Src tyrosine kinase family. PMID:27599862

  20. DL0805-2, a novel indazole derivative, relaxes angiotensin II-induced contractions of rat aortic rings by inhibiting Rho kinase and calcium fluxes

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Tian-yi; Chen, Yu-cai; Zhang, Hui-fang; Li, Li; Jiao, Xiao-zhen; Xie, Ping; Fang, Lian-hua; Du, Guan-hua

    2016-01-01

    Aim: DL0805-2 [N-(1H-indazol-5-yl)-1-(4-methylbenzyl) pyrrolidine-3-carboxamide] is a DL0805 derivative with more potent vasorelaxant activity and lower toxicity. This study was conducted to investigate the vasorelaxant mechanisms of DL0805-2 on angiotensin II (Ang II)-induced contractions of rat thoracic aortic rings in vitro. Methods: Rat thoracic aortic rings and rat aortic vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) were pretreated with DL0805-2, and then stimulated with Ang II. The tension of the aortic rings was measured through an isometric force transducer. Ang II-induced protein phosphorylation, ROS production and F-actin formation were assessed with Western blotting and immunofluorescence assays. Intracellular free Ca2+ concentrations were detected with Fluo-3 AM. Results: Pretreatment with DL0805-2 (1–100 μmol/L) dose-dependently inhibited the constrictions of the aortic rings induced by a single dose of Ang II (10−7 mol/L) or accumulative addition of Ang II (10−10–10−7 mol/L). The vasodilatory effect of DL0805-2 was independent of endothelium. In the aortic rings, pretreatment with DL0805-2 (1, 3, and 10 μmol/L) suppressed Ang II-induced Ca2+ influx and intracellular Ca2+ mobilization, and Ang II-induced phosphorylation of two substrates of Rho kinase (MLC and MYPT1). In VSMCs, pretreatment with DL0805-2 (1, 3, and 10 μmol/L) also suppressed Ang II-induced Ca2+ fluxes and phosphorylation of MLC and MYPT1. In addition, pretreatment with DL0805-2 attenuated ROS production and F-actin formation in the cells. Conclusion: DL0805-2 exerts a vasodilatory action in rat aortic rings through inhibiting the Rho/ROCK pathway and calcium fluxes. PMID:27041459

  1. Endogenous expression of type II cGMP-dependent protein kinase mRNA and protein in rat intestine. Implications for cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator.

    PubMed Central

    Markert, T; Vaandrager, A B; Gambaryan, S; Pöhler, D; Häusler, C; Walter, U; De Jonge, H R; Jarchau, T; Lohmann, S M

    1995-01-01

    Certain pathogenic bacteria produce a family of heat stable enterotoxins (STa) which activate intestinal guanylyl cyclases, increase cGMP, and elicit life-threatening secretory diarrhea. The intracellular effector of cGMP actions has not been clarified. Recently we cloned the cDNA for a rat intestinal type II cGMP dependent protein kinase (cGK II) which is highly enriched in intestinal mucosa. Here we show that cGK II mRNA and protein are restricted to the intestinal segments from the duodenum to the proximal colon, with the highest amounts of cGK II protein in duodenum and jejunum. cGK II mRNA and protein decreased along the villus to crypt axis in the small intestine, whereas substantial amounts of both were found in the crypts of cecum. In intestinal epithelia, cGK II was specifically localized in the apical membrane, a major site of ion transport regulation. In contrast to cGK II, cGK I was localized in smooth muscle cells of the villus lamina propria. Short circuit current (ISC), a measure of Cl- secretion, was increased to a similar extent by STa and by 8-Br-cGMP, a selective activator of cGK, except in distal colon and in monolayers of T84 human colon carcinoma cells in which cGK II was not detected. In human and mouse intestine, the cyclic nucleotide-regulated Cl- conductance can be exclusively accounted for by the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) Cl- channel. Viewed collectively, the data suggest that cGK II is the mediator of STa and cGMP effects on Cl- transport in intestinal-epithelia. Images PMID:7543493

  2. p38 Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase (MAPK) Increases Arginase Activity and Contributes to Endothelial Dysfunction in Corpora Cavernosa from Angiotensin-II Treated Mice

    PubMed Central

    Toque, Haroldo A.; Romero, Maritza J.; Tostes, Rita C.; Shatanawi, Alia; Chandra, Surabhi; Carneiro, Zidonia N.; Inscho, Edward W.; Webb, R. Clinton; Caldwell, Ruth B.; Caldwell, R. William

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Angiotensin II (AngII) activates p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and elevates arginase activity in endothelial cells. Upregulation of arginase activity has been implicated in endothelial dysfunction by reducing NO bioavailability. However, signaling pathways activated by AngII in the penis are largely unknown. Aim We hypothesized that activation of p38 MAPK increases arginase activity and thus impairs penile vascular function in AngII-treated mice. Methods Male C57BL/6 mice were implanted with osmotic minipumps containing saline or AngII (42 μg/kg/h) for 14 days and co-treated with p38 MAPK inhibitor, SB 203580 (5 μg/kg/day), beginning 2 days before minipump implantation. Systolic blood pressure (SBP) was measured. Corpus cavernosum (CC) tissue was used for vascular functional studies and protein expression levels of p38 MAPK, arginase and constitutive NOS, and arginase activity. Main Outcome Measures Arginase expression and activity; expression of phospho-p38 MAPK, -eNOS and nNOS proteins; endothelium-dependent and nitrergic nerve-mediated relaxations were determined in CC from control and AngII-infused mice. Results AngII increased SBP (22%) and increased CC arginase activity and expression (~2-fold), and phosphorylated P38 MAPK levels (30%) over control. Treatment with SB 203580 prevented these effects. Endothelium-dependent NO-mediated relaxation to acetylcholine was significantly reduced by AngII and this effect was prevented by SB 203580 (P<0.01). AngII (2-week) did not alter nitrergic function. However, SB 203580 significantly increased nitrergic relaxation in both control and AngII tissue at lower frequencies. Maximum contractile responses for phenylephrine and electrical field stimulation were increased by AngII (56% and 171%, respectively), and attenuated by SB 203580 treated. AngII treatment also decreased eNOS phosphorylation at Ser-1177 compared to control. Treatment with SB 203580 prevented all these changes. Conclusion p38

  3. Cortical F-actin, the exocytic mode, and neuropeptide release in mouse chromaffin cells is regulated by myristoylated alanine-rich C-kinase substrate and myosin II.

    PubMed

    Doreian, Bryan W; Fulop, Tiberiu G; Meklemburg, Robert L; Smith, Corey B

    2009-07-01

    Adrenal medullary chromaffin cells are innervated by the sympathetic splanchnic nerve and translate graded sympathetic firing into a differential hormonal exocytosis. Basal sympathetic firing elicits a transient kiss-and-run mode of exocytosis and modest catecholamine release, whereas elevated firing under the sympathetic stress response results in full granule collapse to release catecholamine and peptide transmitters into the circulation. Previous studies have shown that rearrangement of the cell actin cortex regulates the mode of exocytosis. An intact cortex favors kiss-and-run exocytosis, whereas disrupting the cortex favors the full granule collapse mode. Here, we investigate the specific roles of two actin-associated proteins, myosin II and myristoylated alanine-rich C-kinase substrate (MARCKS) in this process. Our data demonstrate that MARCKS phosphorylation under elevated cell firing is required for cortical actin disruption but is not sufficient to elicit peptide transmitter exocytosis. Our data also demonstrate that myosin II is phospho-activated under high stimulation conditions. Inhibiting myosin II activity prevented disruption of the actin cortex, full granule collapse, and peptide transmitter release. These results suggest that phosphorylation of both MARCKS and myosin II lead to disruption of the actin cortex. However, myosin II, but not MARCKS, is required for the activity-dependent exocytosis of the peptide transmitters.

  4. Myosin II regulation during C. elegans embryonic elongation: LET-502/ROCK, MRCK-1 and PAK-1, three kinases with different roles.

    PubMed

    Gally, Christelle; Wissler, Frédéric; Zahreddine, Hala; Quintin, Sophie; Landmann, Frédéric; Labouesse, Michel

    2009-09-01

    Myosin II plays a central role in epithelial morphogenesis; however, its role has mainly been examined in processes involving a single cell type. Here we analyze the structure, spatial requirement and regulation of myosin II during C. elegans embryonic elongation, a process that involves distinct epidermal cells and muscles. We developed novel GFP probes to visualize the dynamics of actomyosin remodeling, and found that the assembly of myosin II filaments, but not actin microfilaments, depends on the myosin regulatory light chain (MLC-4) and essential light chain (MLC-5, which we identified herein). To determine how myosin II regulates embryonic elongation, we rescued mlc-4 mutants with various constructs and found that MLC-4 is essential in a subset of epidermal cells. We show that phosphorylation of two evolutionary conserved MLC-4 serine and threonine residues is important for myosin II activity and organization. Finally, in an RNAi screen for potential myosin regulatory light chain kinases, we found that the ROCK, PAK and MRCK homologs act redundantly. The combined loss of ROCK and PAK, or ROCK and MRCK, completely prevented embryonic elongation, but a constitutively active form of MLC-4 could only rescue a lack of MRCK. This result, together with systematic genetic epistasis tests with a myosin phosphatase mutation, suggests that ROCK and MRCK regulate MLC-4 and the myosin phosphatase. Moreover, we suggest that ROCK and PAK regulate at least one other target essential for elongation, in addition to MLC-4. PMID:19675126

  5. Chromatin-wide profiling of DYRK1A reveals a role as a gene-specific RNA polymerase II CTD kinase.

    PubMed

    Di Vona, Chiara; Bezdan, Daniela; Islam, Abul B M M K; Salichs, Eulàlia; López-Bigas, Nuria; Ossowski, Stephan; de la Luna, Susana

    2015-02-01

    DYRK1A is a dosage-sensitive protein kinase that fulfills key roles during development and in tissue homeostasis, and its dysregulation results in human pathologies. DYRK1A is present in both the nucleus and cytoplasm of mammalian cells, although its nuclear function remains unclear. Genome-wide analysis of DYRK1A-associated loci reveals that the kinase is recruited preferentially to promoters of genes actively transcribed by RNA polymerase II (RNAPII), which are functionally associated with translation, RNA processing, and cell cycle. DYRK1A-bound promoter sequences are highly enriched in a conserved palindromic motif, which is necessary to drive DYRK1A-dependent transcriptional activation. DYRK1A phosphorylates the C-terminal domain (CTD) of RNAPII at Ser2 and Ser5. Depletion of DYRK1A results in reduced association of RNAPII at the target promoters as well as hypophosphorylation of the RNAPII CTD along the target gene bodies. These results are consistent with DYRK1A being a transcriptional regulator by acting as a CTD kinase. PMID:25620562

  6. Importance of NO/cGMP signalling via cGMP-dependent protein kinase II for controlling emotionality and neurobehavioural effects of alcohol.

    PubMed

    Werner, Claudia; Raivich, Gennadij; Cowen, Michael; Strekalova, Tatyana; Sillaber, Inge; Buters, Jeroen T; Spanagel, Rainer; Hofmann, Franz

    2004-12-01

    Cyclic GMP is a second messenger for nitric oxide (NO) that acts as a mediator for many different physiological functions. The cGMP-dependent protein kinases (cGKs) mediate cellular signalling induced by NO and cGMP. Here, we explored the localization of cGMP-dependent protein kinase type II (cGKII) in the mouse brain. In situ hybridization revealed high levels of cGKII mRNA in cerebral cortex, thalamic nuclei, hypothalamic nuclei, and in several basal forebrain regions including medial septum, striatum and amygdala. The close link to NO and the distribution pattern of cGKII suggested that this enzyme might be involved in emotional reactions and responses to drugs of abuse. Therefore, cGKII knockout animals (cGKII-/-) were compared with littermate controls in behavioural tests (i) for emotion-linked and (ii) for acute and chronic ethanol responses. Deletion of cGKII did not influence aggressive behaviour but led to enhanced anxiety-like behaviour. In terms of acute responses to ethanol, cGKII-/- mice were hyposensitive to hypnotic doses of ethanol as measured by the loss of righting reflex, without an alteration in their blood alcohol elimination. In a two-bottle free choice test, cGKII-/- mice showed elevated alcohol consumption. No taste differences to sweet solutions were observed compared to control animals. In summary, our data show that cGKII activity modulates anxiety-like behaviour and neurobehavioural effects of alcohol.

  7. Natural variation in phosphorylation of photosystem II proteins in Arabidopsis thaliana: is it caused by genetic variation in the STN kinases?

    PubMed Central

    Flood, Pádraic J.; Yin, Lan; Herdean, Andrei; Harbinson, Jeremy; Aarts, Mark G. M.; Spetea, Cornelia

    2014-01-01

    Reversible phosphorylation of photosystem II (PSII) proteins is an important regulatory mechanism that can protect plants from changes in ambient light intensity and quality. We hypothesized that there is natural variation in this process in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), and that this results from genetic variation in the STN7 and STN8 kinase genes. To test this, Arabidopsis accessions of diverse geographical origins were exposed to two light regimes, and the levels of phospho-D1 and phospho-light harvesting complex II (LHCII) proteins were quantified by western blotting with anti-phosphothreonine antibodies. Accessions were classified as having high, moderate or low phosphorylation relative to Col-0. This variation could not be explained by the abundance of the substrates in thylakoid membranes. In genotypes with atrazine-resistant forms of the D1 protein, low D1 and LHCII protein phosphorylation was observed, which may be due to low PSII efficiency, resulting in reduced activation of the STN kinases. In the remaining genotypes, phospho-D1 levels correlated with STN8 protein abundance in high-light conditions. In growth light, D1 and LHCII phosphorylation correlated with longitude and in the case of LHCII phosphorylation also with temperature variability. This suggests a possible role of natural variation in PSII protein phosphorylation in the adaptation of Arabidopsis to diverse environments. PMID:24591726

  8. Identification of the site on calcineurin phosphorylated by Ca sup + /CaM-dependent kinase II: Modification of the CaM-binding domain

    SciTech Connect

    Martensen, T.M.; Kincaid, R.L. ); Martin, B.M. )

    1989-11-28

    The catalytic subunit of the Ca{sup 2+}/calmodulin- (CaM) dependent phosphoprotein phosphatase calcineurin (CN) was phosphorylated by an activated form of Ca{sup 2+}/CaM-dependent protein kinase II (CaM-kinase II) incorporating approximately 1 mol of phosphoryl group/mol of catalytic subunit, in agreement with a value previously reported. Cyanogen bromide cleavage of radiolabeled CN followed by peptide fractionation using reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography yielded a single labeled peptide that contained a phosphoserine residue. Microsequencing of the peptide allowed both the determination of the cleavage cycle that released ({sup 32}P)phosphoserine and the identity of amino acids adjacent to it. Comparison of this sequence with the sequences of methionyl peptides deduced from the cDNA structure of CN allowed the phosphorylated serine to be uniquely identified. Interestingly, the phosphoserine exists in the sequence Met-Ala-Arg-Val-Phe-Ser(P)-Val-Leu-Arg-Glu, part of which lies within the putative CaM-binding sites. The phosphorylated serine residue was resistant to autocatalytic dephosphorylation, yet the slow rate of hydrolysis could be powerfully stimulated by effectors of CN phosphatase activity. The mechanism of dephosphorylation may be intramolecular since the initial rate was the same at phosphoCN concentrations of 2.5-250 nM.

  9. Phosphatidylinositol kinase from rabbit reticulocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Tuazon, P.T.; Heng, A.B.W.; Traugh, J.A.

    1986-05-01

    Phosphatidylinositol (PI) kinase was isolated from the postribosomal supernatant of rabbit reticulocytes. This activity was identified by the formation of a product that comigrated with phosphatidylinositol-4-phosphate (PIP) when purified PI was phosphorylated in the presence of (/sup 32/P)ATP and Mg/sup 2 +/. Three major peaks of PI kinase activity were resolved by chromatography on DEAE-cellulose. The first peak eluted at 50-100 mM NaCl together with several serine protein kinases, casein kinase (CK) I and protease activated kinase (PAK) I and II. The PI kinase was subsequently separated from the protein kinases by chromatography on phosphocellulose. The second peak eluted at 125-160 mM NaCl and contained another lipid kinase activity that produced a product which comigrated with phosphatidic acid on thin layer chromatography. The third peak, which eluted at 165-200 mM NaCl, partly comigrated with casein kinase (CK) II and an active protein kinase(s) which phosphorylated mixed histone and histone I. CK II and the histone kinase activities were also separated by chromatography on phosphocelluslose. The different forms of PI kinase were characterized and compared with respect to substrate and salt requirements.

  10. Mangiferin, a Natural Xanthone, Protects Murine Liver in Pb(II) Induced Hepatic Damage and Cell Death via MAP Kinase, NF-κB and Mitochondria Dependent Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Pal, Pabitra Bikash; Sinha, Krishnendu; Sil, Parames C.

    2013-01-01

    One of the most well-known naturally occurring environmental heavy metals, lead (Pb) has been reported to cause liver injury and cellular apoptosis by disturbing the prooxidant-antioxidant balance via oxidative stress. Several studies, on the other hand, reported that mangiferin, a naturally occurring xanthone, has been used for a broad range of therapeutic purposes. In the present study, we, therefore, investigated the molecular mechanisms of the protective action of mangiferin against lead-induced hepatic pathophysiology. Lead [Pb(II)] in the form of Pb(NO3)2 (at a dose of 5 mg/kg body weight, 6 days, orally) induced oxidative stress, hepatic dysfunction and cell death in murine liver. Post treatment of mangiferin at a dose of 100 mg/kg body weight (6 days, orally), on the other hand, diminished the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reduced the levels of serum marker enzymes [alanine aminotranferase (ALT) and alkaline phosphatase (ALP)]. Mangiferin also reduced Pb(II) induced alterations in antioxidant machineries, restored the mitochondrial membrane potential as well as mutual regulation of Bcl-2/Bax. Furthermore, mangiferin inhibited Pb(II)-induced activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) (phospho-ERK 1/2, phosphor-JNK phospho- p38), nuclear translocation of NF-κB and apoptotic cell death as was evidenced by DNA fragmentation, FACS analysis and histological assessment. In vitro studies using hepatocytes as the working model also showed the protective effect of mangiferin in Pb(II) induced cytotoxicity. All these beneficial effects of mangiferin contributes to the considerable reduction of apoptotic hepatic cell death induced by Pb(II). Overall results demonstrate that mangiferin exhibit both antioxidative and antiapoptotic properties and protects the organ in Pb(II) induced hepatic dysfunction. PMID:23451106

  11. Two distinct myosin II populations coordinate ovulatory contraction of the myoepithelial sheath in the Caenorhabditis elegans somatic gonad

    PubMed Central

    Ono, Kanako; Ono, Shoichiro

    2016-01-01

    The myoepithelial sheath in the somatic gonad of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans has nonstriated contractile actomyosin networks that produce highly coordinated contractility for ovulation of mature oocytes. Two myosin heavy chains are expressed in the myoepithelial sheath, which are also expressed in the body-wall striated muscle. The troponin/tropomyosin system is also present and essential for ovulation. Therefore, although the myoepithelial sheath has smooth muscle–like contractile apparatuses, it has a striated muscle–like regulatory mechanism through troponin/tropomyosin. Here we report that the myoepithelial sheath has a distinct myosin population containing nonmuscle myosin II isoforms, which is regulated by phosphorylation and essential for ovulation. MLC-4, a nonmuscle myosin regulatory light chain, localizes to small punctate structures and does not colocalize with large, needle-like myosin filaments containing MYO-3, a striated-muscle myosin isoform. RNA interference of MLC-4, as well as of its upstream regulators, LET-502 (Rho-associated coiled-coil forming kinase) and MEL-11 (a myosin-binding subunit of myosin phosphatase), impairs ovulation. Expression of a phosphomimetic MLC-4 mutant mimicking a constitutively active state also impairs ovulation. A striated-muscle myosin (UNC-54) appears to provide partially compensatory contractility. Thus the results indicate that the two spatially distinct myosin II populations coordinately regulate ovulatory contraction of the myoepithelial sheath. PMID:26864628

  12. Theoretical investigation, biological evaluation and VEGFR2 kinase studies of metal(II) complexes derived from hydrotris(methimazolyl)borate.

    PubMed

    Jayakumar, S; Mahendiran, D; Srinivasan, T; Mohanraj, G; Kalilur Rahiman, A

    2016-02-01

    The reaction of soft tripodal scorpionate ligand, sodium hydrotris(methimazolyl)borate with M(ClO4)2·6H2O [MMn(II), Ni(II), Cu(II) or Zn(II)] in methanol leads to the cleavage of B-N bond followed by the formation of complexes of the type [M(MeimzH)4](ClO4)2·H2O (1-4), where MeimzH=methimazole. All the complexes were fully characterized by spectro-analytical techniques. The molecular structure of the zinc(II) complex (4) was determined by X-ray crystallography, which supports the observed deboronation reaction in the scorpionate ligand with tetrahedral geometry around zinc(II) ion. The electronic spectra of complexes suggested tetrahedral geometry for manganese(II) and nickel(II) complexes, and square-planar geometry for copper(II) complex. Frontier molecular orbital analysis (HOMO-LUMO) was carried out by B3LYP/6-31G(d) to understand the charge transfer occurring in the molecules. All the complexes exhibit significant antimicrobial activity against Gram (-ve) and Gram (+ve) bacterial as well as fungal strains, which are quite comparable to standard drugs streptomycin and clotrimazole. The copper(II) complex (3) showed excellent free radical scavenging activity against DPPH in all concentration with IC50 value of 30μg/mL, when compared to the other complexes. In the molecular docking studies, all the complexes showed hydrophobic, π-π and hydrogen bonding interactions with BSA. The cytotoxic activity of the complexes against human hepatocellular liver carcinoma (HepG2) cells was assessed by MTT assay, which showed exponential responses toward increasing concentration of complexes.

  13. sup 31 P and sup 1 H NMR studies of the structure of enzyme-bound substrate complexes of lobster muscle arginine kinase: Relaxation measurements with Mn(II) and Co(II)

    SciTech Connect

    Jarori, G.K.; Ray, B.D.; Rao, B.D.N. )

    1989-11-28

    The paramagnetic effects of Mn(II) and Co(II) on the spin-lattice relaxation rates of {sup 31}P nuclei of ATP and ADP and of Mn(II) on the spin-lattice relaxation rate of the {delta} protons of arginine bound to arginine kinase from lobster tail muscle have been measured. Temperature variation of {sup 31}P relaxation rates in E-MnADP and E-MnATP yields activation energies ({Delta}E) in the range 6-10 kcal/mol. Thus, the {sup 31}P relaxation rates in these complexes are exchange limited and cannot provide structural information. However, the relaxation rates in E-CoADP and E-CoATP exhibit frequency dependence and {Delta}E values in the range 1-2 kcal/mol; i.e., these rates depend upon {sup 31}P-Co(II) distances. These distances were calculated to be in the range 3.2-4.5 {angstrom}, appropriate for direct coordination between Co(II) and the phosphoryl groups. The paramagnetic effect of Mn(II) on the {sup 1}H spin-lattice relaxation rate of the {delta} protons of arginine in the E-MnADP-Arg complex was also measured at three frequencies. From the frequency dependence of the relaxation rate an effective {tau}{sub C} of 0.6 ns has also been calculated, which is most likely to be the electron spin relaxation rate ({tau}{sub S1}) for Mn(II) in this complex. The distance estimated on the basis of the reciprocal sixth root of the average relaxation rate of the {delta} protons was 10.9 {plus minus} 0.3 {angstrom}.

  14. Effect of Anacyclus pyrethrum on pentylenetetrazole-induced kindling, spatial memory, oxidative stress and rho-kinase II expression in mice.

    PubMed

    Pahuja, Monika; Mehla, Jogender; Reeta, K H; Tripathi, Manjari; Gupta, Yogendra Kumar

    2013-03-01

    Anacyclus pyrethrum (A. pyrethrum) has been reported to exhibit anticonvulsant activity. In the present study, the effect of hydro-alcoholic extract of A. pyrethrum root (HEAP) on pentylenetetrazole (PTZ) induced kindling, spatial memory, oxidative stress and rho kinase (ROCK II) was assessed. Male albino mice (25-30 g) were used in the study. PTZ (35 mg/kg, i.p. on alternate days) was injected to induce kindling and PTZ (70 mg/kg, i.p) challenge was given 7 days post-kindling. HEAP was administered orally daily in the doses of 100, 250 and 500 mg/kg along with PTZ injections during the kindling process and continued till PTZ challenge post kindling. Spatial memory was assessed using Morris water maze test. Oxidative stress parameters [malondialdehyde (MDA) and reduced glutathione (GSH)] and ROCK II expression were estimated in whole brain at the end of the study. Pre-treatment with HEAP (250 and 500 mg/kg) showed significant increase in the myoclonic jerk latency and delay in the development of kindling. A significant decrease in mortality was observed at higher doses of HEAP (250 and 500 mg/kg). Pre-treatment with HEAP significantly increased the number of platform crossings and decreased the escape latency, as opposed to the PTZ group, thus showing protection against memory deficit. HEAP pre-treatment also attenuated the oxidative stress induced by PTZ kindling. PTZ induced kindling increased the ROCK II expression whereas, HEAP pre-treatment attenuated the increase in ROCK II expression. To conclude, HEAP pre-treatment showed antiepileptic effect and also showed protection against cognitive impairment by decreasing oxidative stress and ROCK II expression in PTZ kindled mice.

  15. Role of protein kinase A and class II phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase C2β in the downregulation of KCa3.1 channel synthesis and membrane surface expression by lyso-globotriaosylceramide.

    PubMed

    Choi, Ju Yeon; Park, Seonghee

    2016-02-19

    The intermediate conductance calcium-activated potassium channel (KCa3.1) mediates proliferation of many cell types including fibroblasts, and is a molecular target for intervention in various cell proliferative diseases. Our previous study showed that reduction of KCa3.1 channel expression by lyso-globotriaosylceramide (lyso-Gb3) inhibits differentiation into myofibroblasts and collagen synthesis, which might lead to development of ascending thoracic aortic aneurysm secondary to Fabry disease. However, how lyso-Gb3 downregulates KCa3.1 channel expression is unknown. Therefore, we aimed to investigate the underlying mechanisms of lyso-Gb3-mediated KCa3.1 channel downregulation, focusing on the cAMP signaling pathway. We found that lyso-Gb3 increased the intracellular cAMP concentration by upregulation of adenylyl cyclase 6 and inhibited ERK 1/2 phosphorylation through the protein kinase A (PKA) pathway, leading to the inhibition of KCa3.1 channel synthesis, not the exchange protein directly activated by cAMP (Epac) pathway. Moreover, lyso-Gb3 suppressed expression of class II phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase C2β (PI3KC2β) by PKA activation, which reduces the production of phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate [PI(3)P], and the reduced membrane surface expression of KCa3.1 channel was recovered by increasing the intracellular levels of PI(3)P. Consequently, our findings that lyso-Gb3 inhibited both KCa3.1 channel synthesis and surface expression by increasing intracellular cAMP, and controlled surface expression through changes in PI3KC2β-mediated PI(3)P production, suggest that modulation of PKA and PI3KC2β activity to control of KCa3.1 channel expression can be an alternative important target to attenuate ascending thoracic aortic aneurysms in Fabry disease. PMID:26820527

  16. The Ca2+-calmodulin-dependent kinase II is activated in papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) and mediates cell proliferation stimulated by RET/PTC.

    PubMed

    Rusciano, Maria Rosaria; Salzano, Marcella; Monaco, Sara; Sapio, Maria Rosaria; Illario, Maddalena; De Falco, Valentina; Santoro, Massimo; Campiglia, Pietro; Pastore, Lucio; Fenzi, Gianfranco; Rossi, Guido; Vitale, Mario

    2010-03-01

    RET/papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC), TRK-T, or activating mutations of Ras and BRaf are frequent genetic alterations in PTC, all leading to the activation of the extracellular-regulated kinase (Erk) cascade. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of calmodulin-dependent kinase II (CaMKII) in the signal transduction leading to Erk activation in PTC cells. In normal thyroid cells, CaMKII and Erk were in the inactive form in the absence of stimulation. In primary PTC cultures and in PTC cell lines harboring the oncogenes RET/PTC-1 or BRaf(V600E), CaMKII was active also in the absence of any stimulation. Inhibition of calmodulin or phospholipase C (PLC) attenuated the level of CaMKII activation. Expression of recombinant RET/PTC-3, BRaf(V600E), or Ras(V12) induced CaMKII activation. Inhibition of CaMKII attenuated Erk activation and DNA synthesis in thyroid papillary carcinoma (TPC-1), a cell line harboring RET/PTC-1, suggesting that CaMKII is a component of the Erk signal cascade in this cell line. In conclusion, PTCs contain an active PLC/Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent signal inducing constitutive activation of CaMKII. This kinase is activated by BRaf(V600E), oncogenic Ras, and by RET/PTC. CaMKII participates to the activation of the Erk pathway by oncogenic Ras and RET/PTC and contributes to their signal output, thus modulating tumor cell proliferation.

  17. The class II phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate kinase PIK3C2A promotes Shigella flexneri dissemination through formation of vacuole-like protrusions.

    PubMed

    Dragoi, Ana-Maria; Agaisse, Hervé

    2015-04-01

    Intracellular pathogens such as Shigella flexneri and Listeria monocytogenes achieve dissemination in the intestinal epithelium by displaying actin-based motility in the cytosol of infected cells. As they reach the cell periphery, motile bacteria form plasma membrane protrusions that resolve into vacuoles in adjacent cells, through a poorly understood mechanism. Here, we report on the role of the class II phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate kinase PIK3C2A in S. flexneri dissemination. Time-lapse microscopy revealed that PIK3C2A was required for the resolution of protrusions into vacuoles through the formation of an intermediate membrane-bound compartment that we refer to as a vacuole-like protrusion (VLP). Genetic rescue of PIK3C2A depletion with RNA interference (RNAi)-resistant cDNA constructs demonstrated that VLP formation required the activity of PIK3C2A in primary infected cells. PIK3C2A expression was required for production of phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate [PtdIns(3)P] at the plasma membrane surrounding protrusions. PtdIns(3)P production was not observed in the protrusions formed by L. monocytogenes, whose dissemination did not rely on PIK3C2A. PIK3C2A-mediated PtdIns(3)P production in S. flexneri protrusions was regulated by host cell tyrosine kinase signaling and relied on the integrity of the S. flexneri type 3 secretion system (T3SS). We suggest a model of S. flexneri dissemination in which the formation of VLPs is mediated by the PIK3C2A-dependent production of the signaling lipid PtdIns(3)P in the protrusion membrane, which relies on the T3SS-dependent activation of tyrosine kinase signaling in protrusions.

  18. Activation of Histidine Kinase SpaK Is Mediated by the N-Terminal Portion of Subtilin-Like Lantibiotics and Is Independent of Lipid II.

    PubMed

    Spieß, Tobias; Korn, Sophie Marianne; Kötter, Peter; Entian, Karl-Dieter

    2015-08-15

    The biosynthesis of the lantibiotic subtilin is autoinduced in a quorum-sensing mechanism via histidine kinase SpaK. Subtilin-like lantibiotics, such as entianin, ericin S, and subtilin, specifically activated SpaK in a comparable manner, whereas the structurally similar nisin did not provide the signal for SpaK activation at nontoxic concentrations. Surprisingly, nevertheless, nisin if applied together with entianin partly quenched SpaK activation. The N-terminal entianin1-20 fragment (comprising N-terminal amino acids 1 to 20) was sufficient for SpaK activation, although higher concentrations were needed. The N-terminal nisin1-20 fragment also interfered with entianin-mediated activation of SpaK and, remarkably, at extremely high concentrations also activated SpaK. Our data show that the N-terminal entianin1-20 fragment is sufficient for SpaK activation. However, if present, the C-terminal part of the molecule further strongly enhances the activation, possibly by its interference with the cellular membrane. As shown by using lipid II-interfering substances and a lipid II-deficient mutant strain, lipid II is not needed for the sensing mechanism. PMID:26025904

  19. Activation of Histidine Kinase SpaK Is Mediated by the N-Terminal Portion of Subtilin-Like Lantibiotics and Is Independent of Lipid II

    PubMed Central

    Spieß, Tobias; Korn, Sophie Marianne

    2015-01-01

    The biosynthesis of the lantibiotic subtilin is autoinduced in a quorum-sensing mechanism via histidine kinase SpaK. Subtilin-like lantibiotics, such as entianin, ericin S, and subtilin, specifically activated SpaK in a comparable manner, whereas the structurally similar nisin did not provide the signal for SpaK activation at nontoxic concentrations. Surprisingly, nevertheless, nisin if applied together with entianin partly quenched SpaK activation. The N-terminal entianin1–20 fragment (comprising N-terminal amino acids 1 to 20) was sufficient for SpaK activation, although higher concentrations were needed. The N-terminal nisin1–20 fragment also interfered with entianin-mediated activation of SpaK and, remarkably, at extremely high concentrations also activated SpaK. Our data show that the N-terminal entianin1–20 fragment is sufficient for SpaK activation. However, if present, the C-terminal part of the molecule further strongly enhances the activation, possibly by its interference with the cellular membrane. As shown by using lipid II-interfering substances and a lipid II-deficient mutant strain, lipid II is not needed for the sensing mechanism. PMID:26025904

  20. PKC-dependent extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 pathway is involved in the inhibition of Ib on AngiotensinII-induced proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Yu; Yan Tianhua; Wang Qiujuan Wang Wei; Xu Jinyi; Wu Xiaoming; Ji Hui

    2008-10-10

    AngiotensinII (AngII) induces vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) proliferation, which plays an important role in the development and progression of hypertension. AngII-induced cellular events have been implicated, in part, in the activation of protein kinase C (PKC) and extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2 (ERK1/2). In the present study, we investigated the effect of Ib, a novel nonpeptide AngII receptor type 1 (AT{sub 1}) antagonist, on the activation of PKC and ERK1/2 in VSMC proliferation induced by AngII. MTT, and [{sup 3}H]thymidine incorporation assay showed that AngII-induced VSMC proliferation was inhibited significantly by Ib. The specific binding of [{sup 125}I]AngII to AT{sub 1} receptors was blocked by Ib in a concentration-dependent manner with IC{sub 50} value of 0.96 nM. PKC activity assay and Western blot analysis demonstrated that Ib significantly inhibited the activation of PKC and phosphorylation of ERK1/2 induced by AngII, respectively. Furthermore, AngII-induced ERK1/2 activation was obviously blocked by GF109203X, a PKC inhibitor. These findings suggest that the suppression of Ib on AngII-induced VSMC proliferation may be attributed to its inhibitory effect on PKC-dependent ERK1/2 pathway.

  1. Casein kinase II promotes target silencing by miRISC through direct phosphorylation of the DEAD-box RNA helicase CGH-1

    PubMed Central

    Alessi, Amelia F.; Khivansara, Vishal; Han, Ting; Freeberg, Mallory A.; Moresco, James J.; Tu, Patricia G.; Montoye, Eric; Yates, John R.; Karp, Xantha; Kim, John K.

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play essential, conserved roles in diverse developmental processes through association with the miRNA-induced silencing complex (miRISC). Whereas fundamental insights into the mechanistic framework of miRNA biogenesis and target gene silencing have been established, posttranslational modifications that affect miRISC function are less well understood. Here we report that the conserved serine/threonine kinase, casein kinase II (CK2), promotes miRISC function in Caenorhabditis elegans. CK2 inactivation results in developmental defects that phenocopy loss of miRISC cofactors and enhances the loss of miRNA function in diverse cellular contexts. Whereas CK2 is dispensable for miRNA biogenesis and the stability of miRISC cofactors, it is required for efficient miRISC target mRNA binding and silencing. Importantly, we identify the conserved DEAD-box RNA helicase, CGH-1/DDX6, as a key CK2 substrate within miRISC and demonstrate phosphorylation of a conserved N-terminal serine is required for CGH-1 function in the miRNA pathway. PMID:26669440

  2. Dopamine D4 receptor transmission in the prefrontal cortex controls the salience of emotional memory via modulation of calcium calmodulin-dependent kinase II.

    PubMed

    Lauzon, Nicole M; Ahmad, Tasha; Laviolette, Steven R

    2012-11-01

    Dopamine (DA) signaling in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) plays a critical role in the processing of emotional information and memory encoding. Activation of DA D4 receptors within the prelimbic (PLC) division of the mPFC bidirectionally modulates emotional memory by strongly potentiating the salience of normally nonsalient emotional memories but blocking the acquisition of suprathreshold emotionally salient fear memories. Previous in vitro studies have shown that activation of cortical DA D4 receptors can bidirectionally modulate levels of α-calcium calmodulin-dependent kinase II (α-CaMKII), a molecule essential for learning and memory. Using an olfactory fear conditioning procedure in rats combined with microinfusions into the mPFC, we examined the potential role of D4 receptor-mediated control of emotional memory salience through signaling via CaMKII, cAMP/protein kinase A (PKA), and protein phosphatase-1 (PP1) signaling. We report that CaMKII blockade prevents the ability of intra-mPFC DA D4 receptor activation to potentiate the salience of subthreshold fear memory. In contrast, blockade of either cAMP/PKA or PP1 signaling pathways rescued the blockade of suprathreshold fear memory via intra-mPFC D4 receptor activation. Our results demonstrate that modulation of emotional memory salience via intra-mPFC DA D4 receptor transmission depends upon downstream signaling via CaMKII, cAMP/PKA, and PP1 substrates. PMID:22120417

  3. Phosphorylation of calcium/calmodulin-stimulated protein kinase II at T286 enhances invasion and migration of human breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Chi, Mengna; Evans, Hamish; Gilchrist, Jackson; Mayhew, Jack; Hoffman, Alexander; Pearsall, Elizabeth Ann; Jankowski, Helen; Brzozowski, Joshua Stephen; Skelding, Kathryn Anne

    2016-01-01

    Calcium/calmodulin-stimulated protein kinase II (CaMKII) is a multi-functional kinase that controls a range of cellular functions, including proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis. The biological properties of CaMKII are regulated by multi-site phosphorylation. However, the role that CaMKII phosphorylation plays in cancer cell metastasis has not been examined. We demonstrate herein that CaMKII expression and phosphorylation at T286 is increased in breast cancer when compared to normal breast tissue, and that increased CAMK2 mRNA is associated with poor breast cancer patient prognosis (worse overall and distant metastasis free survival). Additionally, we show that overexpression of WT, T286D and T286V forms of CaMKII in MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7 breast cancer cells increases invasion, migration and anchorage independent growth, and that overexpression of the T286D phosphomimic leads to a further increase in the invasive, migratory and anchorage independent growth capacity of these cells. Pharmacological inhibition of CaMKII decreases MDA-MB-231 migration and invasion. Furthermore, we demonstrate that overexpression of T286D, but not WT or T286V-CaMKII, leads to phosphorylation of FAK, STAT5a, and Akt. These results demonstrate a novel function for phosphorylation of CaMKII at T286 in the control of breast cancer metastasis, offering a promising target for the development of therapeutics to prevent breast cancer metastasis. PMID:27605043

  4. Phosphorylation of calcium/calmodulin-stimulated protein kinase II at T286 enhances invasion and migration of human breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Chi, Mengna; Evans, Hamish; Gilchrist, Jackson; Mayhew, Jack; Hoffman, Alexander; Pearsall, Elizabeth Ann; Jankowski, Helen; Brzozowski, Joshua Stephen; Skelding, Kathryn Anne

    2016-01-01

    Calcium/calmodulin-stimulated protein kinase II (CaMKII) is a multi-functional kinase that controls a range of cellular functions, including proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis. The biological properties of CaMKII are regulated by multi-site phosphorylation. However, the role that CaMKII phosphorylation plays in cancer cell metastasis has not been examined. We demonstrate herein that CaMKII expression and phosphorylation at T286 is increased in breast cancer when compared to normal breast tissue, and that increased CAMK2 mRNA is associated with poor breast cancer patient prognosis (worse overall and distant metastasis free survival). Additionally, we show that overexpression of WT, T286D and T286V forms of CaMKII in MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7 breast cancer cells increases invasion, migration and anchorage independent growth, and that overexpression of the T286D phosphomimic leads to a further increase in the invasive, migratory and anchorage independent growth capacity of these cells. Pharmacological inhibition of CaMKII decreases MDA-MB-231 migration and invasion. Furthermore, we demonstrate that overexpression of T286D, but not WT or T286V-CaMKII, leads to phosphorylation of FAK, STAT5a, and Akt. These results demonstrate a novel function for phosphorylation of CaMKII at T286 in the control of breast cancer metastasis, offering a promising target for the development of therapeutics to prevent breast cancer metastasis. PMID:27605043

  5. Calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II regulates Caenorhabditis elegans locomotion in concert with a G(o)/G(q) signaling network.

    PubMed Central

    Robatzek, M; Thomas, J H

    2000-01-01

    Caenorhabditis elegans locomotion is a complex behavior generated by a defined set of motor neurons and interneurons. Genetic analysis shows that UNC-43, the C. elegans Ca(2+)/calmodulin protein kinase II (CaMKII), controls locomotion rate. Elevated UNC-43 activity, from a gain-of-function mutation, causes severely lethargic locomotion, presumably by inappropriate phosphorylation of targets. In a genetic screen for suppressors of this phenotype, we identified multiple alleles of four genes in a G(o)/G(q) G-protein signaling network, which has been shown to regulate synaptic activity via diacylglycerol. Mutations in goa-1, dgk-1, eat-16, or eat-11 strongly or completely suppressed unc-43(gf) lethargy, but affected other mutants with reduced locomotion only weakly. We conclude that CaMKII and G(o)/G(q) pathways act in concert to regulate synaptic activity, perhaps through a direct interaction between CaMKII and G(o). PMID:11063685

  6. The human gene (CSNK2A1) coding for the casein kinase II subunit [alpha] is located on chromosome 20 and contains tandemly arranged Alu repeats

    SciTech Connect

    Wirkner, U.; Lichter, P.; Pyerin, W. ); Voss, H.; Ansorge, W. )

    1994-01-15

    The authors have isolated and characterized an 18.9-kb genomic clone representing a central portion of the human casein kinase II (CKII) subunit [alpha] gene (CSNK2A1). Using the whole clone as a probe, the gene was localized on chromosome 20p13. The clone contains eight exons whose sequences comprise bases 102 to 824 of the coding region of the human CKII[alpha]. The exon/intron splice junctions conform to the gt/ag rule. Three of the nine introns are located at positions corresponding to those in the CKII[alpha] gene of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. The introns contain eight complete and eight incomplete Alu repeats. Some of the Alu sequences are arranged in tandems of two or three, which seem to originate from insertions of younger Alu sequences into the poly(A) region of previously integrated Alu sequences, as indicated by flanking direct repeats. 50 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Multiplexed Dendritic Targeting of α Calcium Calmodulin-dependent Protein Kinase II, Neurogranin, and Activity-regulated Cytoskeleton-associated Protein RNAs by the A2 Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Yuanzheng; Tatavarty, Vedakumar; Korza, George; Levin, Mikhail K.

    2008-01-01

    In neurons, many different RNAs are targeted to dendrites where local expression of the encoded proteins mediates synaptic plasticity during learning and memory. It is not known whether each RNA follows a separate trafficking pathway or whether multiple RNAs are targeted to dendrites by the same pathway. Here, we show that RNAs encoding α calcium calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II, neurogranin, and activity-regulated cytoskeleton-associated protein are coassembled into the same RNA granules and targeted to dendrites by the same cis/trans-determinants (heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein [hnRNP] A2 response element and hnRNP A2) that mediate dendritic targeting of myelin basic protein RNA by the A2 pathway in oligodendrocytes. Multiplexed dendritic targeting of different RNAs by the same pathway represents a new organizing principle for coordinating gene expression at the synapse. PMID:18305102

  8. Lewis acid catalysis of phosphoryl transfer from a copper(II)-NTP complex in a kinase ribozyme

    PubMed Central

    Biondi, Elisa; Poudyal, Raghav R.; Forgy, Joshua C.; Sawyer, Andrew W.; Maxwell, Adam W. R.; Burke, Donald H.

    2013-01-01

    The chemical strategies used by ribozymes to enhance reaction rates are revealed in part from their metal ion and pH requirements. We find that kinase ribozyme K28(1-77)C, in contrast with previously characterized kinase ribozymes, requires Cu2+ for optimal catalysis of thiophosphoryl transfer from GTPγS. Phosphoryl transfer from GTP is greatly reduced in the absence of Cu2+, indicating a specific catalytic role independent of any potential interactions with the GTPγS thiophosphoryl group. In-line probing and ATPγS competition both argue against direct Cu2+ binding by RNA; rather, these data establish that Cu2+ enters the active site within a Cu2+•GTPγS or Cu2+•GTP chelation complex, and that Cu2+•nucleobase interactions further enforce Cu2+ selectivity and position the metal ion for Lewis acid catalysis. Replacing Mg2+ with [Co(NH3)6]3+ significantly reduced product yield, but not kobs, indicating that the role of inner-sphere Mg2+ coordination is structural rather than catalytic. Replacing Mg2+ with alkaline earths of increasing ionic radii (Ca2+, Sr2+ and Ba2+) gave lower yields and approximately linear rates of product accumulation. Finally, we observe that reaction rates increased with pH in log-linear fashion with an apparent pKa = 8.0 ± 0.1, indicating deprotonation in the rate-limiting step. PMID:23358821

  9. Outgrowth of drug-resistant carcinomas expressing markers of tumor aggression after long term TβRI/II kinase inhibition with LY2109761

    PubMed Central

    Connolly, Erin C.; Saunier, Elise F.; Quigley, David; Luu, Minh Thu; Sapio, Angela De; Hann, Byron; Yingling, Jonathan M.; Akhurst, Rosemary J.

    2011-01-01

    Transforming Growth Factor β (TGF-β) is produced excessively by many solid tumors and can drive malignant progression through multiple effects on the tumor cell and microenvironment. TGF-β signaling pathway inhibitors have shown efficacy in pre-clinical models of metastatic cancer. Here we investigated the effect of systemic LY2109761, a type I /II receptor (TβRI/TβRII) kinase inhibitor, in both a tumor allograft model and in the mouse skin model of de novo chemically-induced carcinogenesis in vivo. Systemic LY2109761 administration disrupted tumor vascular architecture and reduced myofibroblast differentiation of E4 skin carcinoma cells in a tumor allograft. In the 7,12 dimethyl-benzanthracene plus phorbol-myristate-acetate -induced skin chemical carcinogenesis model, acute dosing of established naïve primary carcinomas with LY2109761 (100mg/Kg) every eight hours for ten days (100mg/kg) diminished P-Smad2 levels and marginally decreased the expression of inflammatory and invasive markers. Sustained exposure to LY2109761 (100mg/kg/day) throughout the tumor outgrowth phase had no effect on carcinoma latency or incidence. However, molecular analysis of resultant carcinomas by microarray gene expression, Western blot and immunohistochemistry suggests that long term LY2109761 exposure leads to the outgrowth of carcinomas with elevated P-Smad2 levels that do not respond to drug. This is the first description of acquired resistance to a small molecule inhibitor of the TGF-βRI/II kinase. Resultant carcinomas were more aggressive and inflammatory in nature, with delocalized E-Cadherin and elevated expression of Il23a, laminin V and MMPs. Therefore, TGF-β inhibitors might be clinically useful for applications requiring acute administration, but chronic patient exposure to such drugs should be undertaken with caution. PMID:21282335

  10. Digoxin and ouabain induce P-glycoprotein by activating calmodulin kinase II and hypoxia-inducible factor-1alpha in human colon cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Riganti, Chiara

    2009-11-01

    Digoxin and ouabain are cardioactive glycosides, which inhibit the Na{sup +}/K{sup +}-ATPase pump and in this way they increase the intracellular concentration of cytosolic calcium ([Ca{sup ++}]{sub i}). They are also strong inducers of the P-glycoprotein (Pgp), a transmembrane transporter which extrudes several drugs, including anticancer agents like doxorubicin. An increased amount of Pgp limits the absorption of drugs through epithelial cells, thus inducing resistance to chemotherapy. The mechanism by which cardioactive glycosides increase Pgp is not known and in this work we investigated whether digoxin and ouabain elicited the expression of Pgp with a calcium-driven mechanism. In human colon cancer HT29 cells both glycosides increased the [Ca{sup ++}]{sub i} and this event was dependent on the calcium influx via the Na{sup +}/Ca{sup ++} exchanger. The increased [Ca{sup ++}]{sub i} enhanced the activity of the calmodulin kinase II enzyme, which in turn activated the transcription factor hypoxia-inducible factor-1alpha. This one was responsible for the increased expression of Pgp, which actively extruded doxorubicin from the cells and significantly reduced the pro-apoptotic effect of the drug. All the effects of glycosides were prevented by inhibiting the Na{sup +}/Ca{sup ++} exchanger or the calmodulin kinase II. This work clarified the molecular mechanisms by which digoxin and oubain induce Pgp and pointed out that the administration of cardioactive glycosides may widely affect the absorption of drugs in colon epithelia. Moreover, our results suggest that the efficacy of chemotherapeutic agent substrates of Pgp may be strongly reduced in patients taking digoxin.

  11. Interactions between protein kinase C and arachidonic acid in the gonadotropin response to salmon and chicken gonadotropin-releasing hormone-II in goldfish.

    PubMed

    Chang, J P; Van Goor, F; Neumann, C M

    1994-03-01

    Previous studies have shown that, in goldfish, the gonadotropin (GTH) response to salmon GTH-releasing hormone (sGnRH) is partly mediated by arachidonic acid (AA) metabolism via the lipoxygenase enzyme system, whereas protein kinase C (PKC) participates in both sGnRH- and chicken (c)GnRH-II-induced GTH secretion. In this study, the interactions between AA- and PKC-dependent pathways in mediating the long-term GnRH stimulation of GTH release were further investigated using dispersed goldfish pituitary cell cultures in static incubation. Treatments with AA or the PKC activator tetradecanoylphorbol acetate (TPA) increased GTH release. The GTH responses to AA and TPA were additive. The lipoxygenase inhibitor nordihydroguairetic acid (NDGA) and the PKC inhibitor H7 selectively reduced AA- and TPA-stimulated GTH release, respectively. These findings suggest that the GTH responses to stimulation by AA- and PKC-dependent signaling pathways are independent of one another. In other experiments, the GTH response to cGnRH-II was unaffected by NDGA but was abolished by H7. In contrast, sGnRH-induced GTH release was attenuated by NDGA and H7. Furthermore, in the presence of both NDGA and H7, the GTH response to sGnRH was abolished. These data suggest that sGnRH stimulation of GTH secretion involves both AA- and PKC-dependent mechanisms; in contrast, cGnRH-II action is not dependent on AA metabolism. The pathway by which AA might be mobilized in response to a GnRH challenge was also investigated by pharmacological manipulations. The diacylglcerol (DG) lipase inhibitor, U-57908, did not decrease sGnRH- and cGnRH-II-induced GTH secretion. On the other hand, the phospholipase A2 (PLA2) inhibitors, bromophenacyl bromide (BPB), chloroquine, and quinacrine, reduced sGnRH-elicited, but not cGnRH-II-stimulated GTH release. The addition of AA reversed the inhibitory action of BPB on sGnRH-elicited GTH release. In addition, the GTH response to AA was additive to the cGnRH-II-induced, but

  12. Haploinsufficiency for either one of the type-II regulatory subunits of protein kinase A improves the bone phenotype of Prkar1a+/- mice.

    PubMed

    Liu, Sisi; Saloustros, Emmanouil; Mertz, Edward L; Tsang, Kitman; Starost, Matthew F; Salpea, Paraskevi; Faucz, Fabio R; Szarek, Eva; Nesterova, Maria; Leikin, Sergey; Stratakis, Constantine A

    2015-11-01

    Carney Complex (CNC), a human genetic syndrome predisposing to multiple neoplasias, is associated with bone lesions such as osteochondromyxomas (OMX). The most frequent cause for CNC is PRKAR1A deficiency; PRKAR1A codes for type-I regulatory subunit of protein kinase A (PKA). Prkar1a(+/-) mice developed OMX, fibrous dysplasia-like lesions (FDL) and other tumors. Tumor tissues in these animals had increased PKA activity due to an unregulated PKA catalytic subunit and increased PKA type II (PKA-II) activity mediated by the PRKAR2A and PRKAR2B subunits. To better understand the effect of altered PKA activity on bone, we studied Prkar2a and Prkar2b knock out (KO) and heterozygous mice; none of these mice developed bone lesions. When Prkar2a(+/-) and Prkar2b(+/-) mice were used to generate Prkar1a(+/-)Prkar2a(+/-) and Prkar1a(+/-)Prkar2b(+/-) animals, bone lesions formed that looked like those of the Prkar1a(+/-) mice. However, better overall bone organization and mineralization and fewer FDL lesions were found in both double heterozygote groups, indicating a partial restoration of the immature bone structure observed in Prkar1a(+/-) mice. Further investigation indicated increased osteogenesis and higher new bone formation rates in both Prkar1a(+/-)Prkar2a(+/-) and Prkar1a(+/-)Prkar2b(+/-) mice with some minor differences between them. The observations were confirmed with a variety of markers and studies. PKA activity measurements showed the expected PKA-II decrease in both double heterozygote groups. Thus, haploinsufficiency for either of PKA-II regulatory subunits improved bone phenotype of mice haploinsufficient for Prkar1a, in support of the hypothesis that the PRKAR2A and PRKAR2B regulatory subunits were in part responsible for the bone phenotype of Prkar1a(+/-) mice. PMID:26246497

  13. Effects of acute and chronic sunitinib treatment on cardiac function and calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II

    PubMed Central

    Mooney, L; Skinner, M; Coker, S J; Currie, S

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase IIδ (CaMKIIδ) is an important regulator of cardiac contractile function and dysfunction and may be an unwanted secondary target for anti-cancer drugs such as sunitinib and imatinib that have been reported to alter cardiac performance. This study aimed to determine whether anti-cancer kinase inhibitors may affect CaMKII activity and expression when administered in vivo. Experimental Approach Cardiovascular haemodynamics in response to acute and chronic sunitinib treatment, and chronic imatinib treatment, were assessed in guinea pigs and the effects compared with those of the known positive and negative inotropes, isoprenaline and verapamil. Parallel studies from the same animals assessed CaMKIIδ expression and CaMKII activity following drug treatments. Key Results Acute administration of sunitinib decreased left ventricular (LV) dP/dtmax. Acute administration of isoprenaline increased LVdP/dtmax dose-dependently, while LVdP/dtmax was decreased by verapamil. CaMKII activity was decreased by acute administration of sunitinib and was increased by acute administration of isoprenaline, and decreased by acute administration of verapamil. CaMKIIδ expression following all acute treatments remained unchanged. Chronic imatinib and sunitinib treatments did not alter fractional shortening; however, both CaMKIIδ expression and CaMKII activity were significantly increased. Chronic administration of isoprenaline and verapamil decreased LV fractional shortening with parallel increases in CaMKIIδ expression and CaMKII activity. Conclusions and Implications Chronic sunitinib and imatinib treatment increased CaMKIIδ expression and CaMKII activity. As these compounds are associated with cardiac dysfunction, increased CaMKII expression could be an early indication of cellular cardiotoxicity marking potential progression of cardiac contractile dysfunction. PMID:26040813

  14. Conformational Differences Among Solution Structures of the Type I[alpha], II[alpha], and II[beta] Protein Kinase A Regulatory Subunit Homodimers: Role of the Linker Regions

    SciTech Connect

    Vigil, D.; Blumenthal, D.K.; Heller, W.T.; Brown, S.; Canaves, J.M.; Taylor, S.S.; Trewhella, J.

    2010-11-16

    The regulatory (R) subunits of the cAMP-dependent protein kinase (protein kinase A or PKA) are multi-domain proteins responsible for conferring cAMP-dependence and localizing PKA to specific subcellular locations. There are four isoforms of the R subunit in mammals that are similar in molecular mass and domain organization, but clearly serve different biological functions. Although high-resolution structures are available for the cAMP-binding domains and dimerization/docking domains of two isoforms, there are no high-resolution structures of any of the intact R subunit homodimer isoforms. The results of small-angle X-ray scattering studies presented here indicate that the RI{alpha}, RII{alpha}, and RII{beta} homodimers differ markedly in overall shape, despite extensive sequence homology and similar molecular masses. The RII{alpha} and RII{beta} homodimers have very extended, rod-like shapes, whereas the RI{alpha} homodimer likely has a compact Y-shape. Based on a comparison of the R subunit sequences, we predict that the linker regions are the likely cause of these large differences in shape among the isoforms. In addition, we show that cAMP binding does not cause large conformational changes in type I{alpha} or II{alpha} R subunit homodimers, suggesting that the activation of PKA by cAMP involves only local conformational changes in the R subunits.

  15. Made to measure – keeping Rho kinase at a distance

    PubMed Central

    Truebestein, Linda; Elsner, Daniel J.; Leonard, Thomas A.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The Rho-associated coiled-coil containing kinases (ROCK) were first identified as effectors of the small GTPase RhoA, hence their nomenclature. Since their discovery, two decades ago, scientists have sought to unravel the structure, regulation, and function of these essential kinases. During that time, a consensus model has formed, in which ROCK activity is regulated via both Rho-dependent and independent mechanisms. However, recent findings have raised significant questions regarding this model. In their recent publication in Nature Communications, Truebestein and colleagues present the structure of a full-length Rho kinase for the first time. In contrast to previous reports, the authors could find no evidence for autoinhibition, RhoA binding, or regulation of kinase activity by phosphorylation. Instead, they propose that ROCK functions as a molecular ruler, in which the central coiled-coil bridges the membrane-binding regulatory domains to the kinase domains at a fixed distance from the plasma membrane. Here, we explore the consequences of the new findings, re-examine old data in the context of this model, and emphasize outstanding questions in the field. PMID:27070834

  16. Retinotopic map plasticity in adult cat visual cortex is accompanied by changes in Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II alpha autophosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Van den Bergh, G; Eysel, U T; Vandenbussche, E; Vandesande, F; Arckens, L

    2003-01-01

    In adult cats, the induction of homonymous binocular central retinal lesions causes a dramatic reorganization of the topographic map in the sensory-deprived region of the primary visual cortex. To investigate the possible involvement of the alpha-subunit of the calcium/calmodulin dependent protein kinase type II (alphaCaMKII) in this form of brain plasticity, we performed in situ hybridization and Western blotting experiments to analyze mRNA, protein and autophosphorylation levels of this multifunctional kinase. No differences in the mRNA or protein levels were observed between the central, sensory-deprived and the peripheral, non-deprived regions of area 17 of retinal lesion animals or between corresponding cortical regions of normal control animals. Western blotting with an alphaCaMKII threonine-286 phosphorylation-state specific antiserum consistently showed a small, albeit not significant, increase of alphaCaMKII autophosphorylation in the central versus the peripheral region of cortical area 17, and this both in normal subjects as well as in retinal lesion animals with a 3-day post-lesion survival time. In contrast, a post-lesion survival time of 14 days resulted in a alphaCaMKII autophosphorylation level that was four times higher in visually-deprived area 17 than in the non-deprived cortical region. This increased phosphorylation state is not a direct consequence of the decrease in visual activity in these neurons, because we would have expected to see a similar change at shorter or longer post-lesion survival times or in the visually deprived visual cortex of animals in which the left optic tract and the corpus callosum were surgically cut. No such changes were observed, leading to the conclusion that the phosphorylation changes observed at 14 days are related to a delayed reorganization of the retinotopic map of the striate cortex. PMID:12849747

  17. Phosphorylation and activation of hamster carbamyl phosphate synthetase II by cAMP-dependent protein kinase. A novel mechanism for regulation of pyrimidine nucleotide biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Carrey, E A; Campbell, D G; Hardie, D G

    1985-12-30

    The trifunctional protein CAD, which contains the first three enzyme activities of pyrimidine nucleotide biosynthesis (carbamyl phosphate synthetase II, aspartate transcarbamylase and dihydro-orotase), is phosphorylated stoichiometrically by cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase. Phosphorylation activates the ammonia-dependent carbamyl phosphate synthetase activity of the complex by reducing the apparent Km for ATP. This effect is particularly marked in the presence of the allosteric feedback inhibitor, UTP, when the apparent Km is reduced by greater than 4-fold. Inhibition by physiological concentrations of UTP is substantially relieved by phosphorylation. Cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase phosphorylates two serine residues on the protein termed sites 1 and 2, and the primary structures of tryptic peptides containing these sites have been determined: Site 1: Arg-Leu-Ser(P)-Ser-Phe-Val-Thr-Lys Site 2: Ile-His-Arg-Ala-Ser(P)-Asp-Pro-Gly-Leu-Pro-Ala-Glu-Glu-Pro-Lys During the phosphorylation reaction, activation of the carbamyl phosphate synthetase shows a better correlation with occupancy of site 1 rather than site 2. Both phosphorylation and activation can be reversed using purified preparations of the catalytic subunits of protein phosphatases 1- and -2A, and inactivation also correlates better with dephosphorylation of site 1 rather than site 2. We believe this to be the first report that a key enzyme in nucleotide biosynthesis is regulated in a significant manner by reversible covalent modification. The physiological role of this phosphorylation in the stimulation of cell proliferation by growth factors and other mitogens is discussed. PMID:4092695

  18. Calcium/Calmodulin-dependent Protein Kinase II is a Ubiquitous Molecule in Human Long-term Memory Synaptic Plasticity: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Ataei, Negar; Sabzghabaee, Ali Mohammad; Movahedian, Ahmad

    2015-01-01

    Background: Long-term memory is based on synaptic plasticity, a series of biochemical mechanisms include changes in structure and proteins of brain's neurons. In this article, we systematically reviewed the studies that indicate calcium/calmodulin kinase II (CaMKII) is a ubiquitous molecule among different enzymes involved in human long-term memory and the main downstream signaling pathway of long-term memory. Methods: All of the observational, case–control and review studies were considered and evaluated by the search engines PubMed, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials and ScienceDirect Scopus between 1990 and February 2015. We did not carry out meta-analysis. Results: At the first search, it was fined 1015 articles which included “synaptic plasticity” OR “neuronal plasticity” OR “synaptic density” AND memory AND “molecular mechanism” AND “calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II” OR CaMKII as the keywords. A total of 335 articles were duplicates in the databases and eliminated. A total of 680 title articles were evaluated. Finally, 40 articles were selected as reference. Conclusions: The studies have shown the most important intracellular signal of long-term memory is calcium-dependent signals. Calcium linked calmodulin can activate CaMKII. After receiving information for learning and memory, CaMKII is activated by Glutamate, the most important neurotransmitter for memory-related plasticity. Glutamate activates CaMKII and it plays some important roles in synaptic plasticity modification and long-term memory. PMID:26445635

  19. Calmodulin and calmodulin kinase II mediate emergent bursting activity in the brainstem respiratory network (preBötzinger complex).

    PubMed

    Mironov, S L

    2013-04-01

    Emergence of persistent activity in networks can be controlled by intracellular signalling pathways but the mechanisms involved and their role are not yet fully explored. Using calcium imaging and patch-clamp we examined the rhythmic activity in the preBötzinger complex (preBötC) in the lower brainstem that generates the respiratory motor output. In functionally intact acute slices brief hypoxia, electrical stimulation and activation of AMPA receptors transiently depressed bursting activity which then recovered with augmentation. The effects were abrogated after chelation of intracellular calcium, blockade of L-type calcium channels and inhibition of calmodulin (CaM) and CaM kinase (CaMKII). Rhythmic calcium transients and synaptic drive currents in preBötC neurons in the organotypic slices showed similar CaM- and CaMKII-dependent responses. The stimuli increased the amplitude of spontaneous and miniature excitatory synaptic currents indicating postsynaptic changes at glutamatergic synapses. In the acute and organotypic slices, CaM stimulated and ADP inhibited calcium-dependent TRPM4 channels and CaMKII augmented synaptic drive currents. Experimental data and simulations show the role of ADP and CaMKII in the control of bursting activity and its relation to intracellular signalling. I propose that CaMKII-mediated facilitation of glutamatergic transmission strengthens emergent synchronous activity within preBötC that is then maintained by periodic surges of calcium during the bursts. This may find implications in restoration and consolidation of autonomous activity in the respiratory disorders. PMID:23207595

  20. Phosphatidylinositol 5-phosphate 4-kinase type II beta is required for vitamin D receptor-dependent E-cadherin expression in SW480 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kouchi, Zen; Fujiwara, Yuki; Yamaguchi, Hideki; Nakamura, Yoshikazu; Fukami, Kiyoko

    2011-05-20

    Highlights: {yields} We analyzed Phosphatidylinositol 5-phosphate kinase II{beta} (PIPKII{beta}) function in cancer. {yields} PIPKII{beta} is required for vitamin D receptor-mediated E-cadherin upregulation in SW480. {yields} PIPKII{beta} suppresses cellular motility through E-cadherin induction in SW480 cells. {yields} Nuclear PIP{sub 2} but not plasma membrane-localized PIP{sub 2} mediates E-cadherin upregulation. -- Abstract: Numerous epidemiological data indicate that vitamin D receptor (VDR) signaling induced by its ligand or active metabolite 1{alpha},25-dihydroxyvitamin D{sub 3} (1{alpha},25(OH){sub 2}D{sub 3}) has anti-cancer activity in several colon cancers. 1{alpha},25(OH){sub 2}D{sub 3} induces the epithelial differentiation of SW480 colon cancer cells expressing VDR (SW480-ADH) by upregulating E-cadherin expression; however, its precise mechanism remains unknown. We found that phosphatidylinositol-5-phosphate 4-kinase type II beta (PIPKII{beta}) but not PIPKII{alpha} is required for VDR-mediated E-cadherin induction in SW480-ADH cells. The syntenin-2 postsynaptic density protein/disc large/zona occludens (PDZ) domain and pleckstrin homology domain of phospholipase C-delta1 (PLC{delta}1 PHD) possess high affinity for phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate (PI(4,5)P{sub 2}) mainly localized to the nucleus and plasma membrane, respectively. The expression of syntenin-2 PDZ but not PLC{delta}1 PHD inhibited 1{alpha},25(OH){sub 2}D{sub 3}-induced E-cadherin upregulation, suggesting that nuclear PI(4,5)P{sub 2} production mediates E-cadherin expression through PIPKII{beta} in a VDR-dependent manner. PIPKII{beta} is also involved in the suppression of the cell motility induced by 1{alpha},25(OH){sub 2}D{sub 3}. These results indicate that PIPKII{beta}-mediated PI(4,5)P{sub 2} signaling is important for E-cadherin upregulation and inhibition of cellular motility induced by VDR activation.

  1. Understanding and targeting the Rho kinase pathway in erectile dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Sopko, Nikolai A.; Hannan, Johanna L.; Bivalacqua, Trinity J.

    2015-01-01

    Erectile dysfunction (ED) is a common disorder that affects a quarter of US men, and has many causes, including endothelial impairment, low testosterone levels, prior surgical manipulation, and/or psychogenic components. Penile erection is a complex process requiring neurally mediated relaxation of arteriolar smooth muscle and engorgement of cavernosal tissues, mediated by nitric oxide (NO). Current medical therapies for ED largely seek to maximize endogenous NO signalling. Certain aetiologies, including diabetes, are difficult to treat with current modalities, emphasizing the need for new molecular targets. Research has demonstrated the importance of RhoA–Rho-associated protein kinase (ROCK) signalling in maintaining a flaccid penile state, and inhibition of RhoA–ROCK signalling potentiates smooth-muscle relaxation in an NO-independent manner. The mechanisms and effects of RhoA–ROCK signalling and inhibition suggest that the RhoA–ROCK pathway could prove to be a new therapeutic target for the treatment of ED. PMID:25311680

  2. Restricted growth of U-type infectious haematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) in rainbow trout cells may be linked to casein kinase II activity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Park, J.-W.; Moon, C.H.; Harmache, A.; Wargo, A.R.; Purcell, M.K.; Bremont, M.; Kurath, G.

    2011-01-01

    casein kinase II (CKII) inhibitor, 5,6-dichloro-1-β-d-ribofuranosylbenzimidazole (DRB), reduced the titre of the U type 8.3-fold at 24 h post-infection. In contrast, 100 μm of the CKII inhibitor reduced the titre of the M type only 1.3-fold at 48 h post-infection. Our data suggest that the different growth of U- and M-type IHNV in RTG-2 cells may be linked to a differential requirement for cellular protein kinases such as CKII for their growth.

  3. Theoretical calculations, DNA interaction, topoisomerase I and phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase studies of water soluble mixed-ligand nickel(II) complexes.

    PubMed

    Gurumoorthy, Perumal; Mahendiran, Dharmasivam; Kalilur Rahiman, Aziz

    2016-03-25

    Eight water soluble mixed-ligand nickel(II) complexes of the type [NiL(1-4)(diimine)H2O]·(ClO4)2, (1-8) where L(1-4) = 2-((2-(piperazin-1-yl)ethylimino)methyl)-4-substituted phenols, and diimine = 2,2'-bipyridyl (bpy) or 1,10-phenanthroline (phen) were synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis and spectroscopic methods. The uncoordinated perchlorate anions was ascertained form IR spectra of the complexes, and the absorption spectra reveal the octahedron geometry around nickel(II) ion with tridentate Schiff base ligand, diimine and a coordinated water molecule. Cyclic voltammograms of the complexes indicate the one-electron irreversible processes in the cathodic and anodic region. In vitro antioxidant activity proved the significant radical scavenging activity of the complexes against DPPH radical. The groove/electrostatic binding nature of complexes with CT-DNA (calf thymus deoxyribonucleic acid) were affirmed by absorption, hydrodynamic and voltammetric titration experiments and docking analysis. All the complexes exhibit significant cleavage activity on plasmid DNA via hydrolytic and oxidatively, in which the oxidative mechanism involves hydroxyl radicals and supports the possibility of minor-groove binding. The complex 4 shows significant topoisomerase I (Topo-I) inhibitory activity. The molecular modeling analysis of complexes with phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K) receptor indicate the hydrogen bonding with Met1039, Asp837 and Leu1027, and hydrophobic interactions with Ser488, Asn498, Asp500, Gln662, Lys668, Ile844, Ile847, Ile850, Val941, Leu942, Leu1020, Met1034, Leu1035, Thr1037, Met1039, Gln1041 and Ile1051 of subdomain IIA of BSA. The complexes show σ-π interaction between diimines and amino groups of Leu1030 and Arg839.

  4. Localization of eight additional genes in the human major histocompatibility complex, including the gene encoding the casein kinase II {beta} subunit (CSNK2B)

    SciTech Connect

    Albertella, M.R.; Jones, H.; Thomson, W.

    1996-09-01

    A wide range of autoimmune and other diseases are known to be associated with the major histocompatibility complex. Many of these diseases are linked to the genes encoding the polymorphic histocompatibility complex. Many of these diseases are linked to the genes encoding the polymorphic histocompatibility antigens in the class I and class II regions, but some appear to be more strongly associated with genes in the central 1100-kb class III region, making it important to characterize this region fully for the presence of novel genes. An {approximately}220-kb segment of DNA in the class III region separating the Hsp70 (HSPA1L) and BAT1 (D6S8IE) genes, which was previously known to contain 14 genes. Genomic DNA fragments spanning the gaps between the known genes were used as probes to isolate cDNAs corresponding to five new genes within this region. Evidence from Northern blot analysis and exon trapping experiments that suggested the presence of at least two more new genes was also obtained. Partial cDNA and complete exonic genomic sequencing of one of the new genes has identified it as the casein kinase II{beta} subunit (CSNK2B). Two of the other novel genes lie within a region syntenic to that implicated in susceptibility to experimental allergic orchitis in the mouse, an autoimmune disease of the testis, and represent additional candidates for the Orch-1 locus associated with this disease. In addition, characterization of the 13-kb intergenic gap separating the RD (D6545) and G11 (D6S60E) genes has revealed the presence of a gene encoding a 1246-amino-acid polypeptide that shows significant sequence similarity to the yeast anti-viral Ski2p gene product. 49 refs., 8 figs.

  5. Theoretical calculations, DNA interaction, topoisomerase I and phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase studies of water soluble mixed-ligand nickel(II) complexes.

    PubMed

    Gurumoorthy, Perumal; Mahendiran, Dharmasivam; Kalilur Rahiman, Aziz

    2016-03-25

    Eight water soluble mixed-ligand nickel(II) complexes of the type [NiL(1-4)(diimine)H2O]·(ClO4)2, (1-8) where L(1-4) = 2-((2-(piperazin-1-yl)ethylimino)methyl)-4-substituted phenols, and diimine = 2,2'-bipyridyl (bpy) or 1,10-phenanthroline (phen) were synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis and spectroscopic methods. The uncoordinated perchlorate anions was ascertained form IR spectra of the complexes, and the absorption spectra reveal the octahedron geometry around nickel(II) ion with tridentate Schiff base ligand, diimine and a coordinated water molecule. Cyclic voltammograms of the complexes indicate the one-electron irreversible processes in the cathodic and anodic region. In vitro antioxidant activity proved the significant radical scavenging activity of the complexes against DPPH radical. The groove/electrostatic binding nature of complexes with CT-DNA (calf thymus deoxyribonucleic acid) were affirmed by absorption, hydrodynamic and voltammetric titration experiments and docking analysis. All the complexes exhibit significant cleavage activity on plasmid DNA via hydrolytic and oxidatively, in which the oxidative mechanism involves hydroxyl radicals and supports the possibility of minor-groove binding. The complex 4 shows significant topoisomerase I (Topo-I) inhibitory activity. The molecular modeling analysis of complexes with phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K) receptor indicate the hydrogen bonding with Met1039, Asp837 and Leu1027, and hydrophobic interactions with Ser488, Asn498, Asp500, Gln662, Lys668, Ile844, Ile847, Ile850, Val941, Leu942, Leu1020, Met1034, Leu1035, Thr1037, Met1039, Gln1041 and Ile1051 of subdomain IIA of BSA. The complexes show σ-π interaction between diimines and amino groups of Leu1030 and Arg839. PMID:26874211

  6. cGMP-dependent protein kinase type II knockout mice exhibit working memory impairments, decreased repetitive behavior, and increased anxiety-like traits.

    PubMed

    Wincott, Charlotte M; Abera, Sinedu; Vunck, Sarah A; Tirko, Natasha; Choi, Yoon; Titcombe, Roseann F; Antoine, Shannon O; Tukey, David S; DeVito, Loren M; Hofmann, Franz; Hoeffer, Charles A; Ziff, Edward B

    2014-10-01

    Neuronal activity regulates AMPA receptor trafficking, a process that mediates changes in synaptic strength, a key component of learning and memory. This form of plasticity may be induced by stimulation of the NMDA receptor which, among its activities, increases cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) through the nitric oxide synthase pathway. cGMP-dependent protein kinase type II (cGKII) is ultimately activated via this mechanism and AMPA receptor subunit GluA1 is phosphorylated at serine 845. This phosphorylation contributes to the delivery of GluA1 to the synapse, a step that increases synaptic strength. Previous studies have shown that cGKII-deficient mice display striking spatial learning deficits in the Morris Water Maze compared to wild-type littermates as well as lowered GluA1 phosphorylation in the postsynaptic density of the prefrontal cortex (Serulle et al., 2007; Wincott et al., 2013). In the current study, we show that cGKII knockout mice exhibit impaired working memory as determined using the prefrontal cortex-dependent Radial Arm Maze (RAM). Additionally, we report reduced repetitive behavior in the Marble Burying task (MB), and heightened anxiety-like traits in the Novelty Suppressed Feeding Test (NSFT). These data suggest that cGKII may play a role in the integration of information that conveys both anxiety-provoking stimuli as well as the spatial and environmental cues that facilitate functional memory processes and appropriate behavioral response. PMID:24752151

  7. Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II alpha is required for the initiation and maintenance of opioid-induced hyperalgesia.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yan; Yang, Cheng; Wang, Zaijie Jim

    2010-01-01

    Repeated administration of opioids not only leads to tolerance and dependence, but also results in nociceptive enhancement called opioid-induced hyperalgesia (OIH). Nociceptive mediators involved in OIH generation remain poorly understood. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that Ca(2+)/calmodulin-depent protein kinase II (CaMKIIalpha) is critical for OIH. Opioid-induced hyperalgesia was produced by repeated morphine administration or pellet implantation in mice. Correlating with the development of tactile allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia, spinal CaMKIIalpha activity was significantly increased in OIH. KN93, a CaMKII inhibitor, dose- and time-dependently reversed OIH and CaMKII activation without impairing locomotor coordination. To elucidate the specific CaMKII isoform involved, we targeted CaMKIIalpha by using small interfering RNA and demonstrated that knockdown of spinal CaMKIIalpha attenuated OIH. Furthermore, morphine failed to induce OIH in CaMKIIalpha(T286A) point mutant mice, although wild-type littermate mice developed robust OIH after repeated treatments with morphine. These data implicate, for the first time, an essential role of CaMKIIalpha as a cellular mechanism leading to and maintaining opioid-induced hyperalgesia.

  8. Ca2+-dependent facilitation of Cav1.3 Ca2+ channels by densin and Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II

    PubMed Central

    Jenkins, Meagan A.; Christel, Carl J.; Jiao, Yuxia; Abiria, Sunday; Kim, Kristin Y.; Usachev, Yuriy M.; Obermair, Gerald J.; Colbran, Roger J.; Lee, Amy

    2010-01-01

    Cav1 (L-type) channels and calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) are key regulators of Ca2+ signaling in neurons. CaMKII directly potentiates the activity of Cav1.2 and Cav1.3 channels, but the underlying molecular mechanisms are incompletely understood. Here, we report that the CaMKII-associated protein, densin, is required for Ca2+-dependent facilitation of Cav1.3 channels. While neither CaMKII nor densin independently affect Cav1.3 properties in transfected HEK293T cells, the two together augment Cav1.3 Ca2+ currents during repetitive, but not sustained, depolarizing stimuli. Facilitation requires Ca2+, CaMKII activation and its association with densin, as well as densin binding to the Cav1.3 α1 subunit C-terminal domain. Cav1.3 channels and densin are targeted to dendritic spines in neurons and form a complex with CaMKII in the brain. Our results demonstrate a novel mechanism for Ca2+-dependent facilitation that may intensify postsynaptic Ca2+ signals during high-frequency stimulation. PMID:20392935

  9. A role for the CaM Kinase II related anchoring protein (αkap) in maintaining the stability of nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Mouslim, Chakib; Aittaleb, Mohamed; Hume, Richard I.; Akaaboune, Mohammed

    2012-01-01

    αkap, a muscle specific anchoring protein encoded within the Camk2a gene is thought to play a role in targeting multiple calcium/calmodulin kinase II isoforms to specific subcellular locations. Here we demonstrate a novel function of αkap in stabilizing nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (AChR). Knockdown of αkap expression with shRNA significantly enhanced the degradation of AChR α-subunits (AChRα), leading to fewer and smaller AChR clusters on the surface of differentiated C2C12 myotubes. Mutagenesis and biochemical studies in HEK293T cells revealed that αkap promoted AChRα stability by a ubiquitin-dependent mechanism. In the absence of αkap, AChRα was heavily ubiquitinated and the number of AChRα was increased by proteasome inhibitors. However, in the presence of αkap, AChRα was less ubiquitinated and proteasome inhibitors had almost no effect on AChRα accumulation. The major sites of AChRα ubiquitination reside within the large intracellular loop and mutations of critical lysine residues in this loop to arginine increased AChRα stability in the absence of αkap. These results provide an unexpected mechanism by which αkap controls receptor trafficking onto the surface of muscle cells, and thus the maintenance of postsynaptic receptor density and synaptic function. PMID:22496563

  10. Rho Kinase Inhibition as a Therapeutic for Progressive Supranuclear Palsy and Corticobasal Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Gentry, Erik G.; Henderson, Benjamin W.; Arrant, Andrew E.; Gearing, Marla; Feng, Yangbo; Riddle, Nicole C.

    2016-01-01

    Progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) and corticobasal degeneration (CBD) are neurodegenerative four-repeat tauopathies with no cure. Mitigating pathogenic tau levels is a rational strategy for tauopathy treatment, but therapeutic targets with clinically available drugs are lacking. Here, we report that protein levels of the Rho-associated protein kinases (ROCK1 and ROCK2), p70 S6 kinase (S6K), and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) were increased in PSP and CBD brains. RNAi depletion of ROCK1 or ROCK2 reduced tau mRNA and protein level in human neuroblastoma cells. However, additional phenotypes were observed under ROCK2 knockdown, including decreased S6K and phosphorylated mTOR levels. Pharmacologic inhibition of Rho kinases in neurons diminished detergent-soluble and -insoluble tau through a combination of autophagy enhancement and tau mRNA reduction. Fasudil, a clinically approved ROCK inhibitor, suppressed rough eye phenotype and mitigated pathogenic tau levels by inducing autophagic pathways in a Drosophila model of tauopathy. Collectively, these findings highlight the Rho kinases as rational therapeutic targets to combat tau accumulation in PSP and CBD. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Studies of progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) and corticobasal degeneration (CBD) suggest that mitigating pathogenic tau levels is a rational strategy for tauopathy treatment. In this report, the Rho-associated protein kinases (ROCK1 and ROCK2) are identified as novel drug targets for PSP and CBD. We show that elevated insoluble tau levels are associated with increased ROCK1 and ROCK2 in PSP and CBD brains, whereas experiments in cellular and animal models identify pharmacologic inhibition of ROCKs as a mechanism-based approach to reduce tau levels. Our study correlates bona fide changes in PSP and CBD brains with cellular models, identifies drug targets, and tests the therapeutic in vivo. PMID:26818518

  11. A monoclonal antibody distinguishes two types of phosphatidylinositol 4-kinase.

    PubMed Central

    Endemann, G C; Graziani, A; Cantley, L C

    1991-01-01

    A monoclonal antibody has been developed against the type II PtdIns 4-kinase from bovine brain. This antibody, 4C5G, causes greater than 90% inhibition of the type II PtdIns 4-kinase from bovine brain, rat brain and human erythrocytes. However, it fails to inhibit type III PtdIns 4-kinase from bovine brain or PtdIns 3-kinase from rat liver. These results suggest that type II and type III PtdIns 4-kinases are distinct gene products, and that 4C5G will be useful in studying the function of the type II PtdIns 4-kinase. PMID:1846531

  12. A molecular ruler regulates cytoskeletal remodelling by the Rho kinases

    PubMed Central

    Truebestein, Linda; Elsner, Daniel J.; Fuchs, Elisabeth; Leonard, Thomas A.

    2015-01-01

    The Rho-associated coiled-coil kinases (ROCK) are essential regulators of the actin cytoskeleton; however, the structure of a full-length ROCK is unknown and the mechanisms by which its kinase activity is controlled are not well understood. Here we determine the low-resolution structure of human ROCK2 using electron microscopy, revealing it to be a constitutive dimer, 120 nm in length, with a long coiled-coil tether linking the kinase and membrane-binding domains. We find, in contrast to previous reports, that ROCK2 activity does not appear to be directly regulated by binding to membranes, RhoA, or by phosphorylation. Instead, we show that changing the length of the tether modulates ROCK2 function in cells, suggesting that it acts as a molecular ruler. We present a model in which ROCK activity is restricted to a discrete region of the actin cytoskeleton, governed by the length of its coiled-coil. This represents a new type of spatial control, and hence a new paradigm for kinase regulation. PMID:26620183

  13. Arabidopsis Type II Phosphatidylinositol 4-Kinase PI4Kγ5 Regulates Auxin Biosynthesis and Leaf Margin Development through Interacting with Membrane-Bound Transcription Factor ANAC078.

    PubMed

    Tang, Yong; Zhao, Chun-Yan; Tan, Shu-Tang; Xue, Hong-Wei

    2016-08-01

    Normal leaf margin development is important for leaf morphogenesis and contributes to diverse leaf shapes in higher plants. We here show the crucial roles of an atypical type II phosphatidylinositol 4-kinase, PI4Kγ5, in Arabidopsis leaf margin development. PI4Kγ5 presents a dynamics expression pattern along with leaf development and a T-DNA mutant lacking PI4Kγ5, pi4kγ5-1, presents serrated leaves, which is resulted from the accelerated cell division and increased auxin concentration at serration tips. Studies revealed that PI4Kγ5 interacts with and phosphorylates a membrane-bound NAC transcription factor, ANAC078. Previous studies demonstrated that membrane-bound transcription factors regulate gene transcription by undergoing proteolytic process to translocate into nucleus, and ANAC078 undergoes proteolysis by cleaving off the transmembrane region and carboxyl terminal. Western blot analysis indeed showed that ANAC078 deleting of carboxyl terminal is significantly reduced in pi4kγ5-1, indicating that PI4Kγ5 is important for the cleavage of ANAC078. This is consistent with the subcellular localization observation showing that fluorescence by GFP-ANAC078 is detected at plasma membrane but not nucleus in pi4kγ5-1 mutant and that expression of ANAC078 deleting of carboxyl terminal, driven by PI4Kγ5 promoter, could rescue the leaf serration defects of pi4kγ5-1. Further analysis showed that ANAC078 suppresses the auxin synthesis by directly binding and regulating the expression of auxin synthesis-related genes. These results indicate that PI4Kγ5 interacts with ANAC078 to negatively regulate auxin synthesis and hence influences cell proliferation and leaf development, providing informative clues for the regulation of in situ auxin synthesis and cell division, as well as the cleavage and functional mechanism of membrane-bound transcription factors. PMID:27529511

  14. Possible interaction of hippocampal nitric oxide and calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II on reversal of spatial memory impairment induced by morphine.

    PubMed

    Farahmandfar, Maryam; Kadivar, Mehdi; Naghdi, Nasser

    2015-03-15

    The opioid system plays an important role in learning and memory by modulation of different molecules in the brain. The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of hippocampal nitric oxide and calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) on the morphine-induced modulation of spatial memory consolidation in male rats. Spatial memory was assessed in Morris water maze task by a single training session of eight trials followed by a probe trial and visible test 24h later. Our data indicated that post-training administration of L-arginine, a nitric oxide precursor (6 and 9 µg/rat, intra-CA1) significantly decreased amnesia induced by morphine (10 mg/kg) in spatial memory consolidation. A reversal effect of L-arginine on morphine-induced amnesia prevented by KN-93 (N-[2-(N-(4-chlorocinnamyl)-N-methylaminomethyl) phenyl]-N-[2-hydroxyethyl] methoxybenzenesulfnamide), CaMKII inhibitor, (10 nmol/0.5 µl/site). In addition, post-training injection of L-NAME, (NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester), a nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitor (10 and 15 µg/rat) or KN-93 (10 nmol/0.5 µl/site) with lower dose of morphine (2.5 mg/kg), which did not induce amnesia by itself, caused inhibition of memory consolidation. We also showed that co-administration of L-arginine (9 µg/rat) and morphine (10 mg/kg) significantly increased CaMKII activity in the rat hippocampus. On the other hand, administration of L-NAME (10 µg/rat) led to a decrease in the haippocampal activity of CaMKII in morphine-treated (2.5mg/kg) animals. These results indicate that acute single exposure to morphine can modulate consolidation of spatial memory, which may be mediated by a hippocampal nitrergic system and CaMKII activity.

  15. Alpha-Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II contributes to the developmental programming of anxiety in serotonin receptor 1A knock-out mice.

    PubMed

    Lo Iacono, Luisa; Gross, Cornelius

    2008-06-11

    Mice lacking the serotonin receptor 1A [Htr1aknock-out (Htr1a(KO))] display increased innate and conditioned anxiety-related behavior. Expression of the receptor in the mouse forebrain during development is sufficient to restore normal anxiety-related behavior to knock-out mice, demonstrating a role for serotonin in the developmental programming of anxiety circuits. However, the precise developmental period as well as the signaling pathways and neural substrates involved in this phenomenon are unknown. Here, we show that pharmacological blockade of the receptor from postnatal day 13 (P13)-P34 is sufficient to reproduce the knock-out phenotype in adulthood, thus defining a role for serotonin in the maturation and refinement of anxiety circuits during a limited postnatal period. Furthermore, we identify increases in the phosphorylation of alpha-Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (alphaCaMKII) at threonine 286 in the hippocampus of young Htr1a(KO) mice under anxiety-provoking conditions. Increases in alphaCaMKII phosphorylation were most pronounced in the CA1 region of the hippocampus and were localized to the extrasynaptic compartment, consistent with a tissue-specific effect of the receptor. No changes in alphaCaMKII phosphorylation were found in adult knock-out mice, suggesting a transient role of alphaCaMKII as a downstream target of the receptor. Finally, the anxiety phenotype was abolished when knock-out mice were crossed to mice in which alphaCaMKII phosphorylation was compromised by the heterozygous mutation of threonine 286 into alanine. These findings suggest that modulation of alphaCaMKII function by serotonin during a restricted postnatal period contributes to the developmental programming of anxiety-related behavior. PMID:18550767

  16. Atlas of transgenic Tet-Off Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II and prion protein promoter activity in the mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Odeh, Francis; Leergaard, Trygve B; Boy, Jana; Schmidt, Thorsten; Riess, Olaf; Bjaalie, Jan G

    2011-02-14

    Conditional transgenic mouse models are important tools for investigations of neurodegenerative diseases and evaluation of potential therapeutic interventions. A popular conditional transgenic system is the binary tetracycline-responsive gene (Tet-Off) system, in which the expression of the gene of interest depends on a tetracycline-regulatable transactivator (tTA) under the control of a specific promoter construct. The most frequently used Tet-Off promoter mouse lines are the Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CamKII) and prion protein (PrP) promoter lines, respectively. To target the regulated gene of interest to relevant brain regions, a priori knowledge about the spatial distribution of the regulated gene expression in the brain is important. Such distribution patterns can be investigated using double transgenic mice in which the promoter construct regulates a LacZ reporter gene encoding the marker β-galactosidase which can be histologically detected using its substrate X-gal. We have previously published an atlas showing the brain-wide expression mediated by the Tet-Off PrP promoter mouse line, but the distribution of activity in the Tet-Off CamKII promoter mouse line is less well known. To compare promoter activity distributions in these two Tet-Off mouse lines, we have developed an online digital atlas tailored for side-by-side comparison of histological section images. The atlas provides a comprehensive list of brain regions containing X-gal labeling and an interactive dual image viewer tool for panning and zooming of corresponding section images. Comparison of spatial expression patterns between the two lines show considerable regional and cellular differences, relevant in context of generation and analysis of inducible models based on these two tetracycline responsive promoter mouse lines.

  17. VEGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor II (VRI) induced vascular insufficiency in zebrafish as a model for studying vascular toxicity and vascular preservation

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Shang; Dang, Yuan Ye; Oi Lam Che, Ginny; Kwan, Yiu Wa; Chan, Shun Wan; Leung, George Pak Heng; Lee, Simon Ming Yuen; Hoi, Maggie Pui Man

    2014-11-01

    In ischemic disorders such as chronic wounds and myocardial ischemia, there is inadequate tissue perfusion due to vascular insufficiency. Besides, it has been observed that prolonged use of anti-angiogenic agents in cancer therapy produces cardiovascular toxicity caused by impaired vessel integrity and regeneration. In the present study, we used VEGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor II (VRI) to chemically induce vascular insufficiency in zebrafish in vivo and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) in vitro to further study the mechanisms of vascular morphogenesis in these pathological conditions. We also explored the possibility of treating vascular insufficiency by enhancing vascular regeneration and repair with pharmacological intervention. We observed that pretreatment of VRI induced blood vessel loss in developing zebrafish by inhibiting angiogenesis and increasing endothelial cell apoptosis, accompanied by down-regulation of kdr, kdrl and flt-1 genes expression. The VRI-induced blood vessel loss in zebrafish could be restored by post-treatment of calycosin, a cardiovascular protective isoflavone. Similarly, VRI induced cytotoxicity and apoptosis in HUVEC which could be rescued by calycosin post-treatment. Further investigation of the underlying mechanisms showed that the PI3K/AKT/Bad cell survival pathway was a main contributor of the vascular regenerative effect of calycosin. These findings indicated that the cardiovascular toxicity in anti-angiogenic therapy was mainly caused by insufficient endothelial cell survival, suggesting its essential role in vascular integrity, repair and regeneration. In addition, we showed that VRI-induced blood vessel loss in zebrafish represented a simple and effective in vivo model for studying vascular insufficiency and evaluating cancer drug vascular toxicities. - Highlights: • In vivo VRI model • Rescue effects of calycosin • Calycosin EC survival pathways.

  18. Arabidopsis Type II Phosphatidylinositol 4-Kinase PI4Kγ5 Regulates Auxin Biosynthesis and Leaf Margin Development through Interacting with Membrane-Bound Transcription Factor ANAC078

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Shu-Tang; Xue, Hong-Wei

    2016-01-01

    Normal leaf margin development is important for leaf morphogenesis and contributes to diverse leaf shapes in higher plants. We here show the crucial roles of an atypical type II phosphatidylinositol 4-kinase, PI4Kγ5, in Arabidopsis leaf margin development. PI4Kγ5 presents a dynamics expression pattern along with leaf development and a T-DNA mutant lacking PI4Kγ5, pi4kγ5–1, presents serrated leaves, which is resulted from the accelerated cell division and increased auxin concentration at serration tips. Studies revealed that PI4Kγ5 interacts with and phosphorylates a membrane-bound NAC transcription factor, ANAC078. Previous studies demonstrated that membrane-bound transcription factors regulate gene transcription by undergoing proteolytic process to translocate into nucleus, and ANAC078 undergoes proteolysis by cleaving off the transmembrane region and carboxyl terminal. Western blot analysis indeed showed that ANAC078 deleting of carboxyl terminal is significantly reduced in pi4kγ5–1, indicating that PI4Kγ5 is important for the cleavage of ANAC078. This is consistent with the subcellular localization observation showing that fluorescence by GFP-ANAC078 is detected at plasma membrane but not nucleus in pi4kγ5–1 mutant and that expression of ANAC078 deleting of carboxyl terminal, driven by PI4Kγ5 promoter, could rescue the leaf serration defects of pi4kγ5–1. Further analysis showed that ANAC078 suppresses the auxin synthesis by directly binding and regulating the expression of auxin synthesis-related genes. These results indicate that PI4Kγ5 interacts with ANAC078 to negatively regulate auxin synthesis and hence influences cell proliferation and leaf development, providing informative clues for the regulation of in situ auxin synthesis and cell division, as well as the cleavage and functional mechanism of membrane-bound transcription factors. PMID:27529511

  19. Axodendritic contacts onto calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase type II-expressing neurons in the barn owl auditory space map.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Contreras, Adrian; Liu, Xiao-Bo; DeBello, William M

    2005-06-01

    In the owl midbrain, a map of auditory space is synthesized in the inferior colliculus (IC) and conveyed to the optic tectum (OT). Ascending auditory information courses through these structures via topographic axonal projections. Little is known about the molecular composition of projection neurons or their postsynaptic targets. To visualize axodendritic contacts between identified cell types, we used double-label immunohistochemistry, in vivo retrograde tracing, in vitro anterograde tracing, high-resolution confocal microscopy, three-dimensional reconstruction and fly-through visualization. We discovered a major class of IC neurons that strongly expressed calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase type II, alpha subunit (CaMKII). The distribution of these cells within the IC was mostly restricted to the external nucleus of the IC (ICX), in which the auditory space map is assembled. A large proportion of ICX-OT projection neurons were CaMKII positive. In addition to being the principal outputs, CaMKII cells were in direct contact with axonal boutons emanating from the main source of input to ICX, the lateral shell of the central nucleus of the inferior colliculus (ICCls). Numerous sites of putative synaptic contact were found on the somata, proximal dendrites, and distal dendrites. Double-label immunoelectron microscopy confirmed the existence of synapses between ICCls axons and the dendrites of CaMKII cells. Collectively, our data indicate that CaMKII ICX neurons are a cellular locus for the computation of auditory space-specific responses. Because the ICCls-ICX projection is physically altered during experience-dependent plasticity, these results lay the groundwork for probing microanatomical rearrangements that may underlie plasticity and learning. PMID:15944389

  20. Phase II Study of Alisertib, a Selective Aurora A Kinase Inhibitor, in Relapsed and Refractory Aggressive B- and T-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphomas

    PubMed Central

    Friedberg, Jonathan W.; Mahadevan, Daruka; Cebula, Erin; Persky, Daniel; Lossos, Izidore; Agarwal, Amit B.; Jung, JungAh; Burack, Richard; Zhou, Xiaofei; Leonard, E. Jane; Fingert, Howard; Danaee, Hadi; Bernstein, Steven H.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Aurora A kinase (AAK) is overexpressed in aggressive lymphomas and can correlate with more histologically aggressive forms of disease. We therefore designed a phase II study of alisertib, a selective AAK inhibitor, in patients with relapsed and refractory aggressive non-Hodgkin lymphomas. Patients and Methods Patients age ≥ 18 years were eligible if they had relapsed or refractory diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL), mantle-cell lymphoma (MCL), transformed follicular lymphoma, Burkitt's lymphoma, or noncutaneous T-cell lymphoma. Alisertib was administered orally at 50 mg twice daily for 7 days in 21-day cycles. Results We enrolled 48 patients. Histologies included DLBCL (n = 21), MCL (n = 13), peripheral T-cell lymphoma (n = 8), transformed follicular lymphoma (n = 5), and Burkitt's (n = 1). Most common grade 3 to 4 adverse events were neutropenia (63%), leukopenia (54%), anemia (35%), thrombocytopenia (33%), stomatitis (15%), febrile neutropenia (13%), and fatigue (6%). Four deaths during the study were attributed to progressive non-Hodgkin lymphoma (n = 2), treatment-related sepsis (n = 1), and unknown cause (n = 1). The overall response rate was 27%, including responses in three of 21 patients with DLBCL, three of 13 with MCL, one of one with Burkitt's lymphoma, two of five with transformed follicular lymphoma, and four of eight with noncutaneous T-cell lymphoma. The alisertib steady-state trough concentration (n = 25) revealed the expected pharmacokinetic variability, with a trend for higher incidence of adverse event–related dose reductions at higher trough concentrations. Analysis for AAK gene amplification and total AAK protein revealed no differences between histologies or correlation with clinical response. Conclusion The novel AAK inhibitor alisertib seems clinically active in both B- and T-cell aggressive lymphomas. On the basis of these results, confirmatory single-agent and combination studies have been initiated. PMID:24043741

  1. Targeting of DNA molecules, BSA/c-Met tyrosine kinase receptors and anti-proliferative activity of bis(terpyridine)copper(ii) complexes.

    PubMed

    Mahendiran, Dharmasivam; Kumar, Raju Senthil; Viswanathan, Vijayan; Velmurugan, Devadasan; Rahiman, Aziz Kalilur

    2016-05-01

    A series of homoleptic bis(terpyridine)copper(ii) complexes of the type [Cu(L(1-5))2]Cl2 (), where L(1-5) = 4'-(4-substituted)-2,2':6',2''-terpyridines, have been synthesized and characterized. The molecular structure of complex was confirmed by the single crystal XRD technique, and the geometry of the complexes is best described as distorted octahedral. Structural parameters from the crystallographic and DFT studies are in good agreement with each other. The small HOMO-LUMO energy gap supports bioefficacy of the complexes. DNA binding studies show high intrinsic binding constant values 1.53 ± 0.15, 1.62 ± 0.08 and 3.09 ± 0.12 × 10(5) M(-1) for complexes , and , respectively, with intercalative mode of binding to CT-DNA. The binding results were further supported by molecular docking studies. The experimental results indicate that the interaction between the complexes and BSA protein involves a static quenching mechanism. The molecular docking studies with c-Met tyrosine kinase receptors show hydrophobic and π-π interactions. All the complexes bring about hydroxyl radical mediated DNA cleavage in the presence of H2O2. In vitro cytotoxicities of the complexes () were tested against three cancerous cell lines, namely human breast adenocarcinoma (MCF-7), epithelioma (Hep-2) and cervical (HeLa) cell lines, and one non-tumorigenic human dermal fibroblast (NHDF) cell line by MTT reduction assay. The morphological assessment data obtained using Hoechst 33258 staining revealed that complex induces apoptosis much more effectively than the other complexes. PMID:27063595

  2. Intracellular translocation of calmodulin and Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II during the development of hypertrophy in neonatal cardiomyocytes

    PubMed Central

    Gangopadhyay, Jaya Pal; Ikemoto, Noriaki

    2010-01-01

    We have recently shown that stimulation of cultured neonatal cardiomyocytes with endothelin-1 (ET-1) first produces conformational disorder within the ryanodine receptor (RyR2) and diastolic Ca2+ leak from the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR), then develops hypertrophy (HT) in the cardiomyocytes [Hamada et al., 2009]. The present paper addresses the following question. By what mechanism does crosstalk between defective operation of RyR2 and activation of the HT gene program occur? Here we show that the immuno-stain of calmodulin (CaM) is localized chiefly in the cytoplasmic area in the control cells; whereas, in the ET-1-treated/hypertrophied cells, major immuno-staining is localized in the nuclear region. In addition, fluorescently labeled CaM that has been introduced into the cardiomyocytes using the BioPORTER system moves from the cytoplasm to the nucleus with the development of HT. The immuno-confocal imaging of Ca2+/CaM-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) also shows cytoplasm-to-nucleus shift of the immuno-staining pattern in the hypertrophied cells. In an early phase of hypertrophic growth, the frequency of spontaneous Ca2+ transients increases, which accompanies with cytoplasm-to-nucleus translocation of CaM. In a later phase of hypertrophic growth, further increase in the frequency of spontaneous Ca2+ transients results in the appearance of trains of Ca2+ spikes, which accompanies with nuclear translocation of CaMKII. The cardio-protective reagent dantrolene (the reagent that corrects the de-stabilized inter-domain interaction within the RyR2 to a normal mode) ameliorates aberrant intracellular Ca2+ events and prevents nuclear translocation of both CaM and CaMKII, then prevents the development of HT. These results suggest that translocation of CaM and CaMKII from the cytoplasm to the nucleus serves as messengers to transmit the pathogenic signal elicited in the surface membrane and in the RyR2 to the nuclear transcriptional sites to activate HT program. PMID

  3. Intracellular translocation of calmodulin and Ca{sup 2+}/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II during the development of hypertrophy in neonatal cardiomyocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Gangopadhyay, Jaya Pal; Ikemoto, Noriaki

    2010-05-28

    We have recently shown that stimulation of cultured neonatal cardiomyocytes with endothelin-1 (ET-1) first produces conformational disorder within the ryanodine receptor (RyR2) and diastolic Ca{sup 2+} leak from the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR), then develops hypertrophy (HT) in the cardiomyocytes (Hamada et al., 2009 ). The present paper addresses the following question. By what mechanism does crosstalk between defective operation of RyR2 and activation of the HT gene program occur? Here we show that the immuno-stain of calmodulin (CaM) is localized chiefly in the cytoplasmic area in the control cells; whereas, in the ET-1-treated/hypertrophied cells, major immuno-staining is localized in the nuclear region. In addition, fluorescently labeled CaM that has been introduced into the cardiomyocytes using the BioPORTER system moves from the cytoplasm to the nucleus with the development of HT. The immuno-confocal imaging of Ca{sup 2+}/CaM-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) also shows cytoplasm-to-nucleus shift of the immuno-staining pattern in the hypertrophied cells. In an early phase of hypertrophic growth, the frequency of spontaneous Ca{sup 2+} transients increases, which accompanies with cytoplasm-to-nucleus translocation of CaM. In a later phase of hypertrophic growth, further increase in the frequency of spontaneous Ca{sup 2+} transients results in the appearance of trains of Ca{sup 2+} spikes, which accompanies with nuclear translocation of CaMKII. The cardio-protective reagent dantrolene (the reagent that corrects the de-stabilized inter-domain interaction within the RyR2 to a normal mode) ameliorates aberrant intracellular Ca{sup 2+} events and prevents nuclear translocation of both CaM and CaMKII, then prevents the development of HT. These results suggest that translocation of CaM and CaMKII from the cytoplasm to the nucleus serves as messengers to transmit the pathogenic signal elicited in the surface membrane and in the RyR2 to the nuclear transcriptional

  4. Ca2+/calmodulin kinase II increases ryanodine binding and Ca2+-induced sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ release kinetics during β-adrenergic stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Ferrero, Paola; Said, Matilde; Sánchez, Gina; Vittone, Leticia; Valverde, Carlos; Donoso, Paulina; Mattiazzi, Alicia; Mundiña-Weilenmann, Cecilia

    2007-01-01

    We aimed to define the relative contribution of both PKA and Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) cascades to the phosphorylation of RyR2 and the activity of the channel during β-adrenergic receptor (βAR) stimulation. Rat hearts were perfused with increasing concentrations of the β-agonist isoproterenol in the absence and the presence of CaMKII inhibition. CaMKII was inhibited either by preventing the Ca2+ influx to the cell by low [Ca]o plus nifedipine or by the specific inhibitor KN-93. We immunodetected RyR2 phosphorylated at Ser2809 (PKA and putative CaMKII site) and at Ser2815 (CaMKII site) and measured [3H]-ryanodine binding and fast Ca2+ release kinetics in sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) vesicles. SR vesicles were isolated in conditions that preserved the phosphorylation levels achieved in the intact heart and were actively and equally loaded with Ca2+. Our results demonstrated that Ser2809 and Ser2815 of RyR2 were dose-dependently phosphorylated under βAR stimulation by PKA and CaMKII, respectively. The isoproterenol-induced increase in the phosphorylation of Ser2815 site was prevented by the PKA inhibitor H-89 and mimicked by forskolin. CaMKII-dependent phosphorylation of RyR2 (but not PKA-dependent phosphorylation) was responsible for the β-induced increase in the channel activity as indicated by the enhancement of the [3H]-ryanodine binding and the velocity of fast SR Ca2+ release. The present results show for the first time a dose-dependent increase in the phosphorylation of Ser2815 of RyR2 through the PKA-dependent activation of CaMKII and a predominant role of CaMKII-dependent phosphorylation of RyR2, over that of PKA-dependent phosphorylation, on SR-Ca2+ release during βAR stimulation. PMID:17643448

  5. Rosuvastatin intensifies the beneficial effects of rho-kinase inhibitor in reversal of monocrotaline-induced pulmonary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Owczarek, Jacek; Sołtysiak, Urszula; Orszulak-Michalak, Daria

    2015-01-01

    Introduction It remains controversial whether statins have a beneficial effect on pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). This study is intended to evaluate whether statin, co-administered with Rho-kinase inhibitor, could enhance its efficacy. Although Rho-kinase inhibitors, including fasudil, have been reported to improve pulmonary hypertension in experimental and clinical studies, the combination of these agents has not been tested in the treatment of pulmonary hypertension (PH). Material and methods The effects of such a regimen on hemodynamics, right ventricle hypertrophy, and Rho-associated protein kinase (ROCK) activity in experimental monocrotaline (MCT)-induced pulmonary hypertension were examined. Fourteen days after monocrotaline injection (60 mg/kg), male rats were treated orally for another 14 days with fasudil (15 mg/kg per day), or with a combination of fasudil + rosuvastatin (10 mg/kg per day). Results The drug combination reversed the MCT-induced increase in right ventricle pressure (RVP) and reduced right ventricular hypertrophy (RV/LV + S ratio) more than Rho kinase inhibitor alone. The simultaneous administration of fasudil and rosuvastatin caused a further decrease of RhoA kinase activity in isolated lung tissues as compared to fasudil alone. Conclusions The results indicate that rosuvastatin intensifies the beneficial effects of Rho-kinase inhibitor on the Rho/Rho-kinase pathway and such a combination may represent an option for the treatment of pulmonary arterial hypertension. PMID:27478473

  6. Genetic interactions with C-terminal domain (CTD) kinases and the CTD of RNA Pol II suggest a role for ESS1 in transcription initiation and elongation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Wilcox, Cathy B; Rossettini, Anne; Hanes, Steven D

    2004-01-01

    Ess1 is an essential prolyl isomerase that binds the C-terminal domain (CTD) of Rpb1, the large subunit of RNA polymerase II. Ess1 is proposed to control transcription by isomerizing phospho-Ser-Pro peptide bonds within the CTD repeat. To determine which step(s) in the transcription cycle might require Ess1, we examined genetic interactions between ESS1 and genes encoding the known CTD kinases (KIN28, CTK1, BUR1, and SRB10). Although genetic interactions were identified between ESS1 and all four kinases, the clearest interactions were with CTK1 and SRB10. Reduced dosage of CTK1 rescued the growth defect of ess1(ts) mutants, while overexpression of CTK1 enhanced the growth defects of ess1(ts) mutants. Deletion of SRB10 suppressed ess1(ts) and ess1Delta mutants. The interactions suggest that Ess1 opposes the functions of these kinases, which are thought to function in preinitiation and elongation. Using a series of CTD substitution alleles, we also identified Ser5-Pro6 as a potential target for Ess1 isomerization within the first "half" of the CTD repeats. On the basis of the results, we suggest a model in which Ess1-directed conformational changes promote dephosphorylation of Ser5 to stimulate preinitiation complex formation and, later, to inhibit elongation. PMID:15166139

  7. Dopamine receptors and groups I and II mGluRs cooperate for long-term depression induction in rat prefrontal cortex through converging postsynaptic activation of MAP kinases.

    PubMed

    Otani, S; Auclair, N; Desce, J M; Roisin, M P; Crépel, F

    1999-11-15

    Tetanic stimuli to layer I-II afferents in rat prefrontal cortex induced long-term depression (LTD) of layer I-II to layer V pyramidal neuron glutamatergic synapses when tetani were coupled to bath application of dopamine. This LTD was blocked by the following metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR) antagonists coapplied with dopamine: (S)-alpha-methyl-4-carboxyphenylglycine (MCPG; group I and II antagonist), (RS)-1-aminoindan-1,5-dicarboxylic acid (AIDA; group I antagonist), or (RS)-alpha-methylserine-O-phosphate monophenyl ester (MSOPPE; group II antagonist). This suggests that the dopamine-facilitated LTD requires synaptic activation of groups I and II mGluRs during tetanus. LTD could also be induced by coupling tetani to bath application of groups I and II mGluR agonist (1S, 3R)-1-aminocyclopentane-1,3-dicarboxylic acid (1S,3R-ACPD). In the next series of experiments, coapplication of dopamine and 1S,3R-ACPD, but not application of either drug alone, consistently induced LTD without tetani or even single test stimuli during drug application, suggesting that coactivation of dopamine receptors and the mGluRs is sufficient for LTD induction. Immunoblot analyses with anti-active mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAP-Ks) revealed that D1 receptors, D2 receptors, group I mGluRs, and group II mGluRs all contribute to MAP-K activation in prefrontal cortex, and that combined activation of dopamine receptors and mGluRs synergistically or additively activate MAP-Ks. Consistently, LTD by dopamine + 1S, 3R-ACPD coapplication, as well as the two other forms of LTD (LTD by dopamine + tetani and LTD by 1S,3R-ACPD + tetani), was blocked by bath application of MAP-K kinase inhibitor PD98059. LTD by dopamine + 1S,3R-ACPD coapplication was also blocked by postsynaptic injection of synthetic MAP-K substrate peptide. Our results suggest that dopamine receptors and groups I and II mGluRs cooperate to induce LTD through converging postsynaptic activation of MAP-Ks.

  8. From Sphingosine Kinase to Dihydroceramide Desaturase: A Structure-Activity Relationship (SAR) Study of the Enzyme Inhibitory and Anticancer Activity of 4-((4-(4-Chlorophenyl)thiazol-2-yl)amino)phenol (SKI-II).

    PubMed

    Aurelio, Luigi; Scullino, Carmen V; Pitman, Melissa R; Sexton, Anna; Oliver, Victoria; Davies, Lorena; Rebello, Richard J; Furic, Luc; Creek, Darren J; Pitson, Stuart M; Flynn, Bernard L

    2016-02-11

    The sphingosine kinase (SK) inhibitor, SKI-II, has been employed extensively in biological investigations of the role of SK1 and SK2 in disease and has demonstrated impressive anticancer activity in vitro and in vivo. However, interpretations of results using this pharmacological agent are complicated by several factors: poor SK1/2 selectivity, additional activity as an inducer of SK1-degradation, and off-target effects, including its recently identified capacity to inhibit dihydroceramide desaturase-1 (Des1). In this study, we have delineated the structure-activity relationship (SAR) for these different targets and correlated them to that required for anticancer activity and determined that Des1 inhibition is primarily responsible for the antiproliferative effects of SKI-II and its analogues. In the course of these efforts, a series of novel SK1, SK2, and Des1 inhibitors have been generated, including compounds with significantly greater anticancer activity.

  9. Phosphorylation of synaptic GTPase-activating protein (synGAP) by Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) and cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (CDK5) alters the ratio of its GAP activity toward Ras and Rap GTPases.

    PubMed

    Walkup, Ward G; Washburn, Lorraine; Sweredoski, Michael J; Carlisle, Holly J; Graham, Robert L; Hess, Sonja; Kennedy, Mary B

    2015-02-20

    synGAP is a neuron-specific Ras and Rap GTPase-activating protein (GAP) found in high concentrations in the postsynaptic density (PSD) fraction from the mammalian forebrain. We have previously shown that, in situ in the PSD fraction or in recombinant form in Sf9 cell membranes, synGAP is phosphorylated by Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII), another prominent component of the PSD. Here, we show that recombinant synGAP (r-synGAP), lacking 102 residues at the N terminus, can be purified in soluble form and is phosphorylated by cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (CDK5) as well as by CaMKII. Phosphorylation of r-synGAP by CaMKII increases its HRas GAP activity by 25% and its Rap1 GAP activity by 76%. Conversely, phosphorylation by CDK5 increases r-synGAP's HRas GAP activity by 98% and its Rap1 GAP activity by 20%. Thus, phosphorylation by both kinases increases synGAP activity; CaMKII shifts the relative GAP activity toward inactivation of Rap1, and CDK5 shifts the relative activity toward inactivation of HRas. GAP activity toward Rap2 is not altered by phosphorylation by either kinase. CDK5 phosphorylates synGAP primarily at two sites, Ser-773 and Ser-802. Phosphorylation at Ser-773 inhibits r-synGAP activity, and phosphorylation at Ser-802 increases it. However, the net effect of concurrent phosphorylation of both sites, Ser-773 and Ser-802, is an increase in GAP activity. synGAP is phosphorylated at Ser-773 and Ser-802 in the PSD fraction, and its phosphorylation by CDK5 and CaMKII is differentially regulated by activation of NMDA-type glutamate receptors in cultured neurons.

  10. Correction of the X-linked immunodeficiency phenotype by transgenic expression of human Bruton tyrosine kinase under the control of the class II major histocompatibility complex Ea locus control region

    PubMed Central

    Drabek, Dubravka; Raguz, Selina; De Wit, Ton P. M.; Dingjan, Gemma M.; Savelkoul, Huub F. J.; Grosveld, Frank; Hendriks, Rudolf W.

    1997-01-01

    Bruton tyrosine kinase (Btk) is essential for the development of pre-B cells to mature B cell stages. Btk-deficient mice manifest an X-linked immunodeficiency (xid) defect characterized by a reduction of peripheral IgMlow IgDhigh B cells, a lack of peritoneal CD5+ B cells, low serum levels of IgM and IgG3, and impaired responses to T cell independent type II (TI-II) antigens. We have generated transgenic mice in which expression of the human Btk gene is driven by the murine class II major histocompatibility complex Ea gene locus control region, which provides gene expression from the pre-B cell stage onwards. When these transgenic mice were mated onto a Btk− background, correction of the xid B cell defects was observed: B cells differentiated to mature IgMlowIgDhigh stages, peritoneal CD5+ B cells were present, and serum Ig levels and in vivo responses to TI-II antigens were in the normal ranges. A comparable rescue by transgenic Btk expression was also observed in heterozygous Btk+/− female mice in those B-lineage cells that were Btk-deficient as a result of X chromosome inactivation. These findings indicate that the Btk− phenotype in the mouse can be corrected by expression of human Btk from the pre-B cell stage onwards. PMID:9012832

  11. Posttranslational Modification of the AU-Rich Element Binding Protein HuR by Protein Kinase Cδ Elicits Angiotensin II-Induced Stabilization and Nuclear Export of Cyclooxygenase 2 mRNA▿

    PubMed Central

    Doller, Anke; Akool, El-Sayed; Huwiler, Andrea; Müller, Roswitha; Radeke, Heinfried H.; Pfeilschifter, Josef; Eberhardt, Wolfgang

    2008-01-01

    The mRNA stabilizing factor HuR is involved in the posttranscriptional regulation of many genes, including that coding for cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2). Employing RNA interference technology and actinomycin D experiments, we demonstrate that in human mesangial cells (hMC) the amplification of cytokine-induced COX-2 by angiotensin II (AngII) occurs via a HuR-mediated increase of mRNA stability. Using COX-2 promoter constructs with different portions of the 3′ untranslated region of COX-2, we found that the increase in COX-2 mRNA stability is attributable to a distal class III type of AU-rich element (ARE). Likewise, the RNA immunoprecipitation assay showed AngII-induced binding of HuR to this ARE. Using the RNA pulldown assay, we demonstrate that the AngII-caused HuR assembly with COX-2 mRNA is found in free and cytoskeleton-bound polysomes indicative of an active RNP complex. Mechanistically, the increased HuR binding to COX-2-ARE by AngII is accompanied by increased nucleocytoplasmic HuR shuttling and depends on protein kinase Cδ (PKCδ), which physically interacts with nuclear HuR, thereby promoting its phosphorylation. Mapping of phosphorylation sites identified serines 221 and 318 as critical target sites for PKCδ-triggered HuR phosphorylation and AngII-induced HuR export to the cytoplasm. Posttranslational modification of HuR by PKCδ represents an important novel mode of HuR activation implied in renal COX-2 regulation. PMID:18285462

  12. Synthesis and evaluation of the antiproliferative activity of novel pyrrolo[1,2-a]quinoxaline derivatives, potential inhibitors of Akt kinase. Part II.

    PubMed

    Desplat, Vanessa; Moreau, Stephane; Gay, Aurore; Fabre, Solene Belisle; Thiolat, Denis; Massip, Stephane; Macky, Gregory; Godde, Frederic; Mossalayi, Djavad; Jarry, Christian; Guillon, Jean

    2010-04-01

    Attenuation of protein kinases by selective inhibitors is an extremely active field of activity in anticancer drug development. Therefore, Akt, a serine/threonine protein kinase, also known as protein kinase B (PKB), represents an attractive potential target for therapeutic intervention. Recent efforts in the development and biological evaluation of small molecule inhibitors of Akt have led to the identification of novel inhibitors with various heterocycle scaffolds. Based on previous results obtained on the antiproliferative activities of new pyrrolo[1,2-a]quinoxalines, a novel series was designed and synthesized from various substituted phenyl-1H-pyrrole-2-carboxylic acid alkyl esters via a multistep heterocyclization process. These new compounds were tested for their in vitro ability to inhibit the proliferation of the human leukemic cell lines K562, U937, and HL60, and the breast cancer cell line MCF7. The first biological evaluation of our new substituted pyrrolo[1,2-a]quinoxalines showed antiproliferative activity against the tested cell lines. From a general SAR point of view, these preliminary biological results highlight the importance of substitution at the C-4 position of the pyrroloquinoxaline scaffold by a benzylpiperidinyl fluorobenzimidazole group, and also the need for a functionalization on the pyrrole ring.

  13. Characterization of protein kinases from Blepharisma intermedium.

    PubMed

    Beyer, J

    1975-12-01

    Three protein kinases (EC 2.7.1.37) were detected in Blepharisma and partially purified. The enzymes were most active with histone as substrate protein. The stability of the bond between phosphate and protein acceptor showed the characteristics of seryl- or threonylphosphate. Protein kinase I was solubilized by ultrasonication or freezing and thawing, while the enzymes II and III were readily solubilized by mild homogenization. Protein II and III were noticeably activated by cAMP and cGMP, while protein kinase I was inhibited by cAMP. Associated with protein kinase II and III activity was the ability to bind labeled cAMP. The following molecular weights were determined: 90000 for enzyme I, 280000 for enzyme II, and 95000 for enzyme III. Various apparent Michaelis constants were estimated.

  14. Lack of protein kinase C-α leads to impaired urine concentrating ability and decreased aquaporin-2 in angiotensin II-induced hypertension.

    PubMed

    Thai, Tiffany L; Blount, Mitsi A; Klein, Janet D; Sands, Jeff M

    2012-07-01

    Regulation of water and urea transport in the inner medullary collecting duct is essential for urine concentration. Aquaporin (AQP)2 water channels and urea transporter (UT)-A1 are inserted into the apical membrane upon phosphorylation of the channels to allow the transcellular movement of water and urea. Since ANG II activates PKC in many cell types, we tested the hypothesis that ANG II-induced regulation of water and urea transport is mediated by PKC. Osmotic minipumps delivered ANG II to wild-type (WT) or PKC-α(-/-) mice for 7 days. Inner medullas were harvested, and protein abundance was determined by immunoblot. ANG II increased systolic blood pressure to a similar degree in WT and PKC-α(-/-) mice. ANG II had no effect on the urine output of WT mice but increased that of PKC-α(-/-) mice. In accordance with observed differences in urine output, AQP2 abundance was unchanged in ANG II-treated WT animals but was decreased in PKC-α(-/-) mice. No change in membrane accumulation was seen. Phosphorylation of the cAMP-induced transcription factor CREB was decreased in PKC-α(-/-) mice in response to ANG II with no change in overall CREB abundance. ANG II did not alter the abundance of UT-A1 protein in WT or PKC-α(-/-) mice. Phosphorylation and overall abundance of tonicity-responsive enhancer-binding protein, a transcription factor that regulates UT-A1, were also unaltered by ANG II in either group. We conclude that PKC-α protects against ANG II-induced decreases in urine concentrating ability by maintaining AQP2 levels through CREB phosphorylation. PMID:22492943

  15. Signals from the AT2 (angiotensin type 2) receptor of angiotensin II inhibit p21ras and activate MAPK (mitogen-activated protein kinase) to induce morphological neuronal differentiation in NG108-15 cells.

    PubMed

    Gendron, L; Laflamme, L; Rivard, N; Asselin, C; Payet, M D; Gallo-Payet, N

    1999-09-01

    In a previous study, we had shown that activation of the AT2 (angiotensin type 2) receptor of angiotensin II (Ang II) induced morphological differentiation of the neuronal cell line NG108-15. In the present study, we investigated the nature of the possible intracellular mediators involved in the AT2 effect. We found that stimulation of AT2 receptors in NG108-15 cells resulted in time-dependent modulation of tyrosine phosphorylation of a number of cytoplasmic proteins. Stimulation of NG108-15 cells with Ang II induced a decrease in GTP-bound p21ras but a sustained increase in the activity of p42mapk and p44mapk as well as neurite outgrowth. Similarly, neurite elongation, increased polymerized tubulin levels, and increased mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) activity were also observed in a stably transfected NG108-15 cell line expressing the dominant-negative mutant of p21ras, RasN17. These results support the observation that inhibition of p21ras did not impair the effect of Ang II on its ability to stimulate MAPK activity. While 10 microM of the MEK inhibitor, PD98059, only moderately affected elongation, 50 microM PD98059 completely blocked the Ang II- and the RasN17-mediated induction of neurite outgrowth. These results demonstrate that some of the events associated with the AT2 receptor-induced neuronal morphological differentiation of NG108-15 cells not only include inhibition of p21ras but an increase in MAPK activity as well, which is essential for neurite outgrowth.

  16. Regulation of group II metabotropic glutamate receptors by G protein-coupled receptor kinases: mGlu2 receptors are resistant to homologous desensitization.

    PubMed

    Iacovelli, L; Molinaro, G; Battaglia, G; Motolese, M; Di Menna, L; Alfiero, M; Blahos, J; Matrisciano, F; Corsi, M; Corti, C; Bruno, V; De Blasi, A; Nicoletti, F

    2009-04-01

    We examined the regulation of mGlu2 and mGlu3 metabotropic glutamate receptor signaling prompted by the emerging role of these receptor subtypes as therapeutic targets for psychiatric disorders, such as anxiety and schizophrenia. In transfected human embryonic kidney 293 cells, G-protein-coupled receptor kinase (GRK) 2 and GRK3 fully desensitized the agonist-dependent inhibition of cAMP formation mediated by mGlu3 receptors. In contrast, GRK2 or other GRKs did not desensitize the cAMP response to mGlu2 receptor activation. Desensitization of mGlu3 receptors by GRK2 required an intact kinase activity, as shown by the use of the kinase-dead mutant GRK2-K220R or the recombinant GRK2 C-terminal domain. Overexpression of beta-arrestin1 also desensitized mGlu3 receptors and did not affect the cAMP signaling mediated by mGlu2 receptors. The difference in the regulation of mGlu2 and mGlu3 receptors was signal-dependent because GRK2 desensitized the activation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway mediated by both mGlu2 and mGlu3 receptors. In vivo studies confirmed the resistance of mGlu2 receptor-mediated cAMP signaling to homologous desensitization. Wild-type, mGlu2(-/-), or mGlu3(-/-) mice were treated intraperitoneally with saline or the mixed mGlu2/3 receptor agonist (-)-2-oxa-4-aminobicyclo[3.1.0]-exhane-4,6-dicarboxylic acid (LY379268; 1 mg/kg) once daily for 7 days. Inhibition of forskolin-stimulated cAMP formation by LY379268 was measured in cortical slices prepared 24 h after the last injection. Agonist pretreatment fully desensitized the cAMP response in wild-type and mGlu2(-/-) mice but had no effect in mGlu3(-/-) mice, in which LY379268 could only activate the mGlu2 receptor. We predict the lack of tolerance when mixed mGlu2/3 receptor agonists or selective mGlu2 enhancers are used continually in patients. PMID:19164443

  17. Oncoprotein kinase

    DOEpatents

    Karin, Michael; Hibi, Masahiko; Lin, Anning

    2001-02-27

    An isolated polypeptide (JNK) characterized by having a molecular weight of 46 kD or 55 kD as determined by reducing SDS-PAGE, having serine and theonine kinase activity, phosphorylating the c-Jun N-terminal activation domain and polynucleotide sequences and method of detection of JNK are provided herein. JNK phosphorylates c-Jun N-terminal activation domain which affects gene expression from AP-1 sites.

  18. Role of myosin light chain and myosin light chain kinase in advanced glycation end product-induced endothelial hyperpermeability in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Wu, Fan; Guo, Xiaohua; Xu, Jing; Wang, Weiju; Li, Bingling; Huang, Qiaobing; Su, Lei; Xu, Qiulin

    2016-03-01

    We have previously reported that advanced glycation end products activated Rho-associated protein kinase and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase, causing endothelial hyperpermeability. However, the mechanisms involved were not fully clarified. Here, we explored the role of myosin light chain kinase in advanced glycation end product-induced endothelial hyperpermeability. Myosin light chain phosphorylation significantly increased by advanced glycation end products in endothelial cells in a time- and dose-dependent manner, indicating that myosin light chain phosphorylation is involved in the advanced glycation end product pathway. Advanced glycation end products also induced myosin phosphatase-targeting subunit 1 phosphorylation, and small interfering RNA knockdown of the receptor for advanced glycation end products, or blocking myosin light chain kinase with its inhibitor, ML-7, or small interfering RNA abated advanced glycation end product-induced myosin light chain phosphorylation. Advanced glycation end product-induced F-actin rearrangement and endothelial hyperpermeability were also diminished by inhibition of receptor for advanced glycation end product or myosin light chain kinase signalling. Moreover, inhibiting myosin light chain kinase with ML-7 or blocking receptor for advanced glycation end product with its neutralizing antibody attenuated advanced glycation end product-induced microvascular hyperpermeability. Our findings suggest a novel role for myosin light chain and myosin light chain kinase in advanced glycation end product-induced endothelial hyperpermeability.

  19. Nuclear Rho kinase, ROCK2, targets p300 acetyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Toru; Nishimura, Dai; Wu, Ray-Chang; Amano, Mutsuki; Iso, Tatsuya; Kedes, Larry; Nishida, Hiroshi; Kaibuchi, Kozo; Hamamori, Yasuo

    2006-06-01

    Rho-associated coiled-coil protein kinase (ROCK) is an effector for the small GTPase Rho and plays a pivotal role in diverse cellular activities, including cell adhesion, cytokinesis, and gene expression, primarily through an alteration of actin cytoskeleton dynamics. Here, we show that ROCK2 is localized in the nucleus and associates with p300 acetyltransferase both in vitro and in cells. Nuclear ROCK2 is present in a large protein complex and partially cofractionates with p300 by gel filtration analysis. By immunofluorescence, ROCK2 partially colocalizes with p300 in distinct insoluble nuclear structures. ROCK2 phosphorylates p300 in vitro, and nuclear-restricted expression of constitutively active ROCK2 induces p300 phosphorylation in cells. p300 acetyltransferase activity is dependent on its phosphorylation status in cells, and p300 phosphorylation by ROCK2 results in an increase in its acetyltransferase activity in vitro. These observations suggest that nucleus-localized ROCK2 targets p300 for phosphorylation to regulate its acetyltransferase activity.

  20. Myotonic dystrophy protein kinase (DMPK) induces actin cytoskeletal reorganization and apoptotic-like blebbing in lens cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jin, S.; Shimizu, M.; Balasubramanyam, A.; Epstein, H. F.

    2000-01-01

    DMPK, the product of the DM locus, is a member of the same family of serine-threonine protein kinases as the Rho-associated enzymes. In DM, membrane inclusions accumulate in lens fiber cells producing cataracts. Overexpression of DMPK in cultured lens epithelial cells led to apoptotic-like blebbing of the plasma membrane and reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton. Enzymatically active DMPK was necessary for both effects; inactive mutant DMPK protein did not produce either effect. Active RhoA but not constitutive GDP-state mutant protein produced similar effects as DMPK. The similar actions of DMPK and RhoA suggest that they may function in the same regulatory network. The observed effects of DMPK may be relevant to the removal of membrane organelles during normal lens differentiation and the retention of intracellular membranes in DM lenses. Copyright 2000 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  1. Calcium/calmodulin‐dependent kinase II and nitric oxide synthase 1‐dependent modulation of ryanodine receptors during β‐adrenergic stimulation is restricted to the dyadic cleft

    PubMed Central

    Dries, Eef; Santiago, Demetrio J.; Johnson, Daniel M.; Gilbert, Guillaume; Holemans, Patricia; Korte, Sanne M.; Roderick, H. Llewelyn

    2016-01-01

    Key points The dyadic cleft, where coupled ryanodine receptors (RyRs) reside, is thought to serve as a microdomain for local signalling, as supported by distinct modulation of coupled RyRs dependent on Ca2+/calmodulin‐dependent kinase II (CaMKII) activation during high‐frequency stimulation.Sympathetic stimulation through β‐adrenergic receptors activates an integrated signalling cascade, enhancing Ca2+ cycling and is at least partially mediated through CaMKII.Here we report that CaMKII activation during β‐adrenergic signalling is restricted to the dyadic cleft, where it enhances activity of coupled RyRs thereby contributing to the increase in diastolic events. Nitric oxide synthase 1 equally participates in the local modulation of coupled RyRs.In contrast, the increase in the Ca2+ content of the sarcoplasmic reticulum and related increase in the amplitude of the Ca2+ transient are primarily protein kinase A‐dependent.The present data extend the concept of microdomain signalling in the dyadic cleft and give perspectives for selective modulation of RyR subpopulations and diastolic events. Abstract In cardiac myocytes, β‐adrenergic stimulation enhances Ca2+ cycling through an integrated signalling cascade modulating L‐type Ca2+ channels (LTCCs), phospholamban and ryanodine receptors (RyRs). Ca2+/calmodulin‐dependent kinase II (CaMKII) and nitric oxide synthase 1 (NOS1) are proposed as prime mediators for increasing RyR open probability. We investigate whether this pathway is confined to the high Ca2+ microdomain of the dyadic cleft and thus to coupled RyRs. Pig ventricular myocytes are studied under whole‐cell voltage‐clamp and confocal line‐scan imaging with Fluo‐4 as a [Ca2+]i indicator. Following conditioning depolarizing pulses, spontaneous RyR activity is recorded as Ca2+ sparks, which are assigned to coupled and non‐coupled RyR clusters. Isoproterenol (ISO) (10 nm) increases Ca2+ spark frequency in both populations of RyRs. However

  2. Mammalian Target of Rapamycin (mTOR) Tagging Promotes Dendritic Branch Variability through the Capture of Ca2+/Calmodulin-dependent Protein Kinase II α (CaMKIIα) mRNAs by the RNA-binding Protein HuD*

    PubMed Central

    Sosanya, Natasha M.; Cacheaux, Luisa P.; Workman, Emily R.; Niere, Farr; Perrone-Bizzozero, Nora I.; Raab-Graham, Kimberly F.

    2015-01-01

    The fate of a memory, whether stored or forgotten, is determined by the ability of an active or tagged synapse to undergo changes in synaptic efficacy requiring protein synthesis of plasticity-related proteins. A synapse can be tagged, but without the “capture” of plasticity-related proteins, it will not undergo long lasting forms of plasticity (synaptic tagging and capture hypothesis). What the “tag” is and how plasticity-related proteins are captured at tagged synapses are unknown. Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II α (CaMKIIα) is critical in learning and memory and is synthesized locally in neuronal dendrites. The mechanistic (mammalian) target of rapamycin (mTOR) is a protein kinase that increases CaMKIIα protein expression; however, the mechanism and site of dendritic expression are unknown. Herein, we show that mTOR activity mediates the branch-specific expression of CaMKIIα, favoring one secondary, daughter branch over the other in a single neuron. mTOR inhibition decreased the dendritic levels of CaMKIIα protein and mRNA by shortening its poly(A) tail. Overexpression of the RNA-stabilizing protein HuD increased CaMKIIα protein levels and preserved its selective expression in one daughter branch over the other when mTOR was inhibited. Unexpectedly, deleting the third RNA recognition motif of HuD, the domain that binds the poly(A) tail, eliminated the branch-specific expression of CaMKIIα when mTOR was active. These results provide a model for one molecular mechanism that may underlie the synaptic tagging and capture hypothesis where mTOR is the tag, preventing deadenylation of CaMKIIα mRNA, whereas HuD captures and promotes its expression in a branch-specific manner. PMID:25944900

  3. Far-infrared radiation acutely increases nitric oxide production by increasing Ca(2+) mobilization and Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II-mediated phosphorylation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase at serine 1179.

    PubMed

    Park, Jung-Hyun; Lee, Sangmi; Cho, Du-Hyong; Park, Young Mi; Kang, Duk-Hee; Jo, Inho

    2013-07-12

    Repeated thermal therapy manifested by far-infrared (FIR) radiation improves vascular function in both patients and mouse model with coronary heart disease, but its underlying mechanism is not fully understood. Using FIR as a thermal therapy agent, we investigate the molecular mechanism of its effect on endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) activity and NO production. FIR increased the phosphorylation of eNOS at serine 1179 (eNOS-Ser(1179)) in a time-dependent manner (up to 40min of FIR radiation) in bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAEC) without alterations in eNOS expression. This increase was accompanied by increases in NO production and intracellular Ca(2+) levels. Treatment with KN-93, a selective inhibitor of Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) and H-89, a protein kinase A inhibitor, inhibited FIR radiation-stimulated eNOS-Ser(1179) phosphorylation. FIR radiation itself also increased the temperature of culture medium. As transient receptors potential vanilloid (TRPV) ion channels are known to be temperature-sensitive calcium channels, we explore whether TRPV channels mediate these observed effects. Reverse transcription-PCR assay revealed two TRPV isoforms in BAEC, TRPV2 and TRPV4. Although ruthenium red, a pan-TRPV inhibitor, completely reversed the observed effect of FIR radiation, a partial attenuation (∼20%) was found in cells treated with Tranilast, TRPV2 inhibitor. However, ectopic expression of siRNA of TRPV2 showed no significant alteration in FIR radiation-stimulated eNOS-Ser(1179) phosphorylation. This study suggests that FIR radiation increases NO production via increasing CaMKII-mediated eNOS-Ser(1179) phosphorylation but TRPV channels may not be involved in this pathway. Our results may provide the molecular mechanism by which FIR radiation improves endothelial function.

  4. Development and implementation of a miniaturized high-throughput time-resolved fluorescence energy transfer assay to identify small molecule inhibitors of polo-like kinase 1.

    PubMed

    Sharlow, Elizabeth R; Leimgruber, Stephanie; Shun, Tong Ying; Lazo, John S

    2007-12-01

    Polo-like kinase (Plk) 1 is a key enzyme involved in regulating the mammalian cell cycle that is also a validated anticancer drug target. Nonetheless, there are relatively few readily available potent and selective small molecule inhibitors of Plk1. To increase the availability of pharmacologically valuable Plk1 inhibitors, we describe herein the development, variability assessment, validation, and implementation of a 384-well automated, miniaturized high-throughput time-resolved fluorescence energy transfer screening assay designed to identify Plk1 kinase inhibitors. Using a small molecule library of pharmaceutically active compounds to gauge high-throughput assay robustness and reproducibility, we found nine general kinase inhibitors, including H-89, which was selected as the minimum control. We then interrogated a 97,101 compound library from the National Institutes of Health repository for small molecule inhibitors of Plk1 kinase activity. The initial primary hit rate in a single 10 microM concentration format was 0.21%. Hit compounds were subjected to concentration-response confirmation and interference assays. Identified in the screen were seven compounds with 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) values below 1 microM, 20 compounds with IC50 values between 1 microM and 5 microM, and eight compounds with IC50 values between 5 and 10 microM, which could be assigned to seven distinct chemotype classes. Hit compounds were also examined for their ability to inhibit other kinases such as protein kinase D, focal adhesion kinase, rho-associated coiled coil protein kinase 2, c-jun NH2-terminal kinase 3, and protein kinase A via experimentation or data-mining. These compounds should be useful as probes for the biological activity of Plk1 and as leads for the development of new selective inhibitors of Plk1. PMID:18181689

  5. A tyrosine-based motif and a casein kinase II phosphorylation site regulate the intracellular trafficking of the varicella-zoster virus glycoprotein I, a protein localized in the trans-Golgi network.

    PubMed Central

    Alconada, A; Bauer, U; Hoflack, B

    1996-01-01

    We have studied the intracellular trafficking of the envelope glycoprotein I (gpI) of the varicella-zoster virus, a human herpes virus whose assembly is believed to occur in the trans-Golgi network (TGN) and/or in endocytic compartments. When expressed in HeLa cells in the absence of additional virally encoded factors, this type-I membrane protein localizes to the TGN and cycles between this compartment and the cell surface. The expression of gpI promotes the recruitment of the AP-1 Golgi-specific assembly proteins onto TGN membranes, strongly suggesting that gpI, like the mannose 6-phosphate receptors, can leave the TGN in clathrin-coated vesicles for subsequent transport to endosomes. Its return from the cell surface to the TGN also occurs through endosomes. The transfer of the gpI cytoplasmic domain onto a reporter molecule shows that this domain is sufficient to confer TGN localization. Mutational analysis of this domain indicates that proper subcellular localization and cycling of gpI depend on two different determinants, a tyrosine-containing tetrapeptide related to endocytosis sorting signals and a cluster of acidic amino acids containing casein kinase II phosphorylatable residues. Thus, the VZV gpI and the mannose 6-phosphate receptors, albeit localized in different intracellular compartments at steady-state, follow similar trafficking pathways and share similar sorting mechanisms. Images PMID:8947032

  6. Metabolic Control of Ca2+/Calmodulin-dependent Protein Kinase II (CaMKII)-mediated Caspase-2 Suppression by the B55β/Protein Phosphatase 2A (PP2A)*

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Bofu; Yang, Chih-Sheng; Wojton, Jeffrey; Huang, Nai-Jia; Chen, Chen; Soderblom, Erik J.; Zhang, Liguo; Kornbluth, Sally

    2014-01-01

    High levels of metabolic activity confer resistance to apoptosis. Caspase-2, an apoptotic initiator, can be suppressed by high levels of nutrient flux through the pentose phosphate pathway. This metabolic control is exerted via inhibitory phosphorylation of the caspase-2 prodomain by activated Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII). We show here that this activation of CaMKII depends, in part, on dephosphorylation of CaMKII at novel sites (Thr393/Ser395) and that this is mediated by metabolic activation of protein phosphatase 2A in complex with the B55β targeting subunit. This represents a novel locus of CaMKII control and also provides a mechanism contributing to metabolic control of apoptosis. These findings may have implications for metabolic control of the many CaMKII-controlled and protein phosphatase 2A-regulated physiological processes, because both enzymes appear to be responsive to alterations in glucose metabolized via the pentose phosphate pathway. PMID:25378403

  7. Far-infrared radiation acutely increases nitric oxide production by increasing Ca{sup 2+} mobilization and Ca{sup 2+}/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II-mediated phosphorylation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase at serine 1179

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Jung-Hyun; Lee, Sangmi; Cho, Du-Hyong; Park, Young Mi; Kang, Duk-Hee; Jo, Inho

    2013-07-12

    Highlights: •Far-infrared (FIR) radiation increases eNOS-Ser{sup 1179} phosphorylation and NO production in BAEC. •CaMKII and PKA mediate FIR-stimulated increases in eNOS-Ser{sup 1179} phosphorylation. •FIR increases intracellular Ca{sup 2+} levels. •Thermo-sensitive TRPV Ca{sup 2+} channels are unlikely to be involved in the FIR-mediated eNOS-Ser{sup 1179} phosphorylation pathway. -- Abstract: Repeated thermal therapy manifested by far-infrared (FIR) radiation improves vascular function in both patients and mouse model with coronary heart disease, but its underlying mechanism is not fully understood. Using FIR as a thermal therapy agent, we investigate the molecular mechanism of its effect on endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) activity and NO production. FIR increased the phosphorylation of eNOS at serine 1179 (eNOS-Ser{sup 1179}) in a time-dependent manner (up to 40 min of FIR radiation) in bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAEC) without alterations in eNOS expression. This increase was accompanied by increases in NO production and intracellular Ca{sup 2+} levels. Treatment with KN-93, a selective inhibitor of Ca{sup 2+}/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) and H-89, a protein kinase A inhibitor, inhibited FIR radiation-stimulated eNOS-Ser{sup 1179} phosphorylation. FIR radiation itself also increased the temperature of culture medium. As transient receptors potential vanilloid (TRPV) ion channels are known to be temperature-sensitive calcium channels, we explore whether TRPV channels mediate these observed effects. Reverse transcription-PCR assay revealed two TRPV isoforms in BAEC, TRPV2 and TRPV4. Although ruthenium red, a pan-TRPV inhibitor, completely reversed the observed effect of FIR radiation, a partial attenuation (∼20%) was found in cells treated with Tranilast, TRPV2 inhibitor. However, ectopic expression of siRNA of TRPV2 showed no significant alteration in FIR radiation-stimulated eNOS-Ser{sup 1179} phosphorylation. This

  8. Crystal structure of pyridoxal kinase from the Escherichia coli pdxK gene: implications for the classification of pyridoxal kinases.

    PubMed

    Safo, Martin K; Musayev, Faik N; di Salvo, Martino L; Hunt, Sharyn; Claude, Jean-Baptiste; Schirch, Verne

    2006-06-01

    The pdxK and pdxY genes have been found to code for pyridoxal kinases, enzymes involved in the pyridoxal phosphate salvage pathway. Two pyridoxal kinase structures have recently been published, including Escherichia coli pyridoxal kinase 2 (ePL kinase 2) and sheep pyridoxal kinase, products of the pdxY and pdxK genes, respectively. We now report the crystal structure of E. coli pyridoxal kinase 1 (ePL kinase 1), encoded by a pdxK gene, and an isoform of ePL kinase 2. The structures were determined in the unliganded and binary complexes with either MgATP or pyridoxal to 2.1-, 2.6-, and 3.2-A resolutions, respectively. The active site of ePL kinase 1 does not show significant conformational change upon binding of either pyridoxal or MgATP. Like sheep PL kinase, ePL kinase 1 exhibits a sequential random mechanism. Unlike sheep pyridoxal kinase, ePL kinase 1 may not tolerate wide variation in the size and chemical nature of the 4' substituent on the substrate. This is the result of differences in a key residue at position 59 on a loop (loop II) that partially forms the active site. Residue 59, which is His in ePL kinase 1, interacts with the formyl group at C-4' of pyridoxal and may also determine if residues from another loop (loop I) can fill the active site in the absence of the substrate. Both loop I and loop II are suggested to play significant roles in the functions of PL kinases.

  9. Endogenous Rho-kinase signaling maintains synaptic strength by stabilizing the size of the readily releasable pool of synaptic vesicles.

    PubMed

    González-Forero, David; Montero, Fernando; García-Morales, Victoria; Domínguez, Germán; Gómez-Pérez, Laura; García-Verdugo, José Manuel; Moreno-López, Bernardo

    2012-01-01

    Rho-associated kinase (ROCK) regulates neural cell migration, proliferation and survival, dendritic spine morphology, and axon guidance and regeneration. There is, however, little information about whether ROCK modulates the electrical activity and information processing of neuronal circuits. At neonatal stage, ROCKα is expressed in hypoglossal motoneurons (HMNs) and in their afferent inputs, whereas ROCKβ is found in synaptic terminals on HMNs, but not in their somata. Inhibition of endogenous ROCK activity in neonatal rat brainstem slices failed to modulate intrinsic excitability of HMNs, but strongly attenuated the strength of their glutamatergic and GABAergic synaptic inputs. The mechanism acts presynaptically to reduce evoked neurotransmitter release. ROCK inhibition increased myosin light chain (MLC) phosphorylation, which is known to trigger actomyosin contraction, and reduced the number of synaptic vesicles docked to active zones in excitatory boutons. Functional and ultrastructural changes induced by ROCK inhibition were fully prevented/reverted by MLC kinase (MLCK) inhibition. Furthermore, ROCK inhibition drastically reduced the phosphorylated form of p21-associated kinase (PAK), which directly inhibits MLCK. We conclude that endogenous ROCK activity is necessary for the normal performance of motor output commands, because it maintains afferent synaptic strength, by stabilizing the size of the readily releasable pool of synaptic vesicles. The mechanism of action involves a tonic inhibition of MLCK, presumably through PAK phosphorylation. This mechanism might be present in adults since unilateral microinjection of ROCK or MLCK inhibitors into the hypoglossal nucleus reduced or increased, respectively, whole XIIth nerve activity.

  10. Phosphorylation of Simian Cytomegalovirus Assembly Protein Precursor (pAPNG.5) and Proteinase Precursor (pAPNG1): Multiple Attachment Sites Identified, Including Two Adjacent Serines in a Casein Kinase II Consensus Sequence

    PubMed Central

    Plafker, Scott M.; Woods, Amina S.; Gibson, Wade

    1999-01-01

    The assembly protein precursor (pAP) of cytomegalovirus (CMV), and its homologs in other herpesviruses, functions at several key steps during the process of capsid formation. This protein, and the genetically related maturational proteinase, is distinguished from the other capsid proteins by posttranslational modifications, including phosphorylation. The objective of this study was to identify sites at which pAP is phosphorylated so that the functional significance of this modification and the enzyme(s) responsible for it can be determined. In the work reported here, we used peptide mapping, mass spectrometry, and site-directed mutagenesis to identify two sets of pAP phosphorylation sites. One is a casein kinase II (CKII) consensus sequence that contains two adjacent serines, both of which are phosphorylated. The other site(s) is in a different domain of the protein, is phosphorylated less frequently than the CKII site, does not require preceding CKII-site phosphorylation, and causes an electrophoretic mobility shift when phosphorylated. Transfection/expression assays for proteolytic activity showed no gross effect of CKII-site phosphorylation on the enzymatic activity of the proteinase or on the substrate behavior of pAP. Evidence is presented that both the CKII sites and the secondary sites are phosphorylated in virus-infected cells and plasmid-transfected cells, indicating that these modifications can be made by a cellular enzyme(s). Apparent compartmental differences in phosphorylation of the CKII-site (cytoplasmic) and secondary-site (nuclear) serines suggest the involvement of more that one enzyme in these modifications. PMID:10516011

  11. Activation of ROS/NF-{kappa}B and Ca{sup 2+}/CaM kinase II are necessary for VCAM-1 induction in IL-1{beta}-treated human tracheal smooth muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, S.-F.; Chang, C.-C.; Lee, I-T.; Lee, C.-W.; Lin, W.-N.; Lin, C.-C.; Yang, C.-M.

    2009-05-15

    Histone acetylation regulated by histone acetyltransferases (HATs) and histone deacetylases (HDACs) plays a critical role in the expression of inflammatory genes, such as vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1). Oxidative processes have been shown to induce VCAM-1 expression. Here, we investigated the mechanisms underlying IL-1{beta}-induced VCAM-1 expression in human tracheal smooth muscle cells (HTSMCs). Our results showed that IL-1{beta} enhanced HTSMCs-monocyte adhesion through up-regulation of VCAM-1, which was inhibited by pretreatment with selective inhibitors of PKC{alpha} (Goe6976), c-Src (PP1), NADPH oxidase [diphenylene iodonium (DPI) and apocynin (APO)], intracellular calcium chelator (BAPTA/AM), PI-PLC (U73122), CaM (calmidazolium chloride), CaM kinase II (KN62), p300 (garcinol), NF-{kappa}B (Bay11-7082), HDAC (trichostatin A), and ROS scavenger [N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC)] or transfection with siRNAs of MyD88, PKC{alpha}, Src, p47{sup phox}, p300, and HDAC4. Moreover, IL-1{beta} stimulated NF-{kappa}B and CaMKII phosphorylation through MyD88-dependent PI-PLC/PKC{alpha}/c-Src/ROS and PI-PLC/Ca{sup 2+}/CaM pathways, respectively. Activation of NF-{kappa}B and CaMKII may eventually lead to the acetylation of histone residues and phosphorylation of histone deacetylases. These findings suggested that IL-1{beta} induced VCAM-1 expression via these multiple signaling pathways in HTSMCs. Blockade of these pathways may reduce monocyte adhesion via VCAM-1 suppression and attenuation of the inflammatory responses in airway diseases.

  12. ET-1-induced growth promoting responses involving ERK1/2 and PKB signaling and Egr-1 expression are mediated by Ca2+/CaM-dependent protein kinase-II in vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Bouallegue, Ali; Simo Cheyou, Estelle R; Anand-Srivastava, Madhu B; Srivastava, Ashok K

    2013-12-01

    Endothelin-1 (ET-1), a potent vasoactive peptide with a pathogenic role in vascular diseases, has been shown to induce the activation of ERK1/2, PKB and the expression of a transcriptional regulator, the early growth response 1 (Egr-1), key mediators of hypertrophic and proliferative responses in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC). We have demonstrated earlier that ET-1 requires H2O2 generation to activate these signaling pathways and Ca2+, calmodulin (CaM) and Ca2+/CaM-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII), play a critical role to trigger H2O2-induced effects in VSMC. However, an involvement of CaMKII in mediating ET-1-induced responses in VSMC remains unknown. Therefore, by utilizing pharmacological inhibitors of CaM, CaMKII, a CaMKII inhibitor peptide and CaMKII knockdown techniques, we have investigated the contribution of CaM and CaMKII in ET-1-induced ERK1/2 and PKB signaling, Egr-1 expression and hypertrophic and proliferative responses in VSMC. W-7 and calmidazolium, antagonists of CaM, as well as KN-93, an inhibitor of CaMKII activity, attenuated ET-1-induced ERK1/2 and PKB phosphorylation. In addition, transfection of VSMC with a CaMKII inhibitory peptide suppressed ET-1-evoked ERK1/2 and PKB phosphorylation. Similarly, siRNA-mediated CaMKII silencing reduced ET-1-produced ERK1/2 and PKB phosphorylation. CaM and CaMKII blockade also significantly lowered the ET-1-induced protein and DNA synthesis as well as Egr-1 expression. These findings demonstrate that CaMKII plays a critical role in ET-1-induced growth promoting signaling pathways as well as hypertrophic and proliferative responses in VSMC.

  13. Targeting HER2 aberrations as actionable drivers in lung cancers: phase II trial of the pan-HER tyrosine kinase inhibitor dacomitinib in patients with HER2-mutant or amplified tumors

    PubMed Central

    Kris, M. G.; Camidge, D. R.; Giaccone, G.; Hida, T.; Li, B. T.; O'Connell, J.; Taylor, I.; Zhang, H.; Arcila, M. E.; Goldberg, Z.; Jänne, P. A.

    2015-01-01

    Background HER2 mutations and amplifications have been identified as oncogenic drivers in lung cancers. Dacomitinib, an irreversible inhibitor of HER2, EGFR (HER1), and HER4 tyrosine kinases, has demonstrated activity in cell-line models with HER2 exon 20 insertions or amplifications. Here, we studied dacomitinib in patients with HER2-mutant or amplified lung cancers. Patients and methods As a prespecified cohort of a phase II study, we included patients with stage IIIB/IV lung cancers with HER2 mutations or amplification. We gave oral dacomitinib at 30–45 mg daily in 28-day cycles. End points included partial response rate, overall survival, and toxicity. Results We enrolled 30 patients with HER2-mutant (n = 26, all in exon 20 including 25 insertions and 1 missense mutation) or HER2-amplified lung cancers (n = 4). Three of 26 patients with tumors harboring HER2 exon 20 mutations [12%; 95% confidence interval (CI) 2% to 30%] had partial responses lasting 3+, 11, and 14 months. No partial responses occurred in four patients with tumors with HER2 amplifications. The median overall survival was 9 months from the start of dacomitinib (95% CI 7–21 months) for patients with HER2 mutations and ranged from 5 to 22 months with amplifications. Treatment-related toxicities included diarrhea (90%; grade 3/4: 20%/3%), dermatitis (73%; grade 3/4: 3%/0%), and fatigue (57%; grade 3/4: 3%/0%). One patient died on study likely due to an interaction of dacomitinib with mirtazapine. Conclusions Dacomitinib produced objective responses in patients with lung cancers with specific HER2 exon 20 insertions. This observation validates HER2 exon 20 insertions as actionable targets and justifies further study of HER2-targeted agents in specific HER2-driven lung cancers. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00818441. PMID:25899785

  14. Structure, expression, and chromosome location of the gene for the beta subunit of brain-specific Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II identified by transgene integration in an embryonic lethal mouse mutant.

    PubMed Central

    Karls, U; Müller, U; Gilbert, D J; Copeland, N G; Jenkins, N A; Harbers, K

    1992-01-01

    The transgenic mouse strain CAT40 carries in its germ line one copy of a DNA construct consisting of the chloramphenicol acetyltransferase gene and the immunoglobulin heavy-chain enhancer. We show that transgene integration has resulted in a recessive lethal mutation that leads to death of homozygous CAT40 embryos shortly after implantation. The transgene has integrated adjacent to the 3' end of the gene coding for the beta subunit of the brain-specific Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (Camk-2). The complete cDNA sequence of the Camk-2 gene and most of its exon/intron structure was determined. The deduced amino acid sequence is highly homologous to the previously described rat protein. The chromosomal location of the Camk-2 locus was mapped by interspecific backcross analysis to the proximal region of mouse chromosome 11. This region lacks previously identified recessive embryonic lethal mutations. During embryonic development, Camk-2-specific transcripts are first seen in the head section of 12.5-day-old embryos, and in adult mice the gene is expressed almost exclusively in the brain. Although transcription of the Camk-2 gene in heterozygous CAT40 mice is affected by transgene integration, it is unlikely that this gene is responsible for the mutant phenotype, since it is not expressed in blastocysts and the first transcripts during normal development are detected after the death of homozygous CAT40 embryos. Transgene integration is accompanied by a large deletion of cellular DNA; death is therefore most likely caused by the loss of a gene or genes that are important for early postimplantation development. Images PMID:1321343

  15. Antioxidant, DNA interaction, VEGFR2 kinase, topoisomerase I and in vitro cytotoxic activities of heteroleptic copper(II) complexes of tetrazolo[1,5-a]pyrimidines and diimines.

    PubMed

    Haleel, A; Mahendiran, D; Veena, V; Sakthivel, N; Rahiman, A Kalilur

    2016-11-01

    A series of heteroleptic mononuclear copper(II) complexes of the type [Cu(L(1-3))(diimine)]ClO4 (1-6) containing three tetrazolo[1,5-a]pyrimidine core ligands, ethyl 5-methyl-7-(2-hydroxyphenyl)-4,7-dihydrotetrazolo[1,5-a]pyrimidine-6-carboxylate (HL(1)), ethyl 5-methyl-7-(4-diethylamino-2-hydroxyphenyl)-4,7-dihydrotetrazolo[1,5-a]pyrimidine-6-carboxylate (HL(2)) or ethyl 5-methyl-7-(2-hydroxy-4-nitrophenyl)-4,7-dihydrotetrazolo[1,5-a]pyrimidine-6-carboxylate (HL(3)), and two diimine coligands, 2,2'-bipyridyl (bpy) or 1,10-phenanthroline (phen) have been synthesized and characterized by spectral methods. The geometry of complexes have been determined with the help of electronic absorption and EPR splitting patterns, which suggest four coordinated square planar geometry around copper(II) ion. The lowering of HOMO-LUMO band gap value of complex 4 implies its higher biological activity compared to other complexes. Antioxidant studies revealed that the complexes possess considerable radical scavenging potency against DPPH. The binding studies of the complexes with calf thymus DNA (CT-DNA) revealed groove mode of binding, which was further supported by docking simulation. The complexes 3 and 4 strongly inhibit the topoisomerase I, and also strongly interact with VEGFR2 kinase receptor via π-π, σ-π and hydrogen bonding interaction. Gel electrophoresis experiments demonstrated the ability of the complexes to cleave plasmid DNA in the absence of activators. In vitro cytotoxic activities of the complexes were examined on three cancerous cell lines such as human lung (A549), cervical (HeLa) and colon (HCT-15), and two normal cells such as human embryonic kidney (HEK) and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). The live cell and fluorescent imaging of cancer cells were observed with acridine orange/ethidium bromide staining assay. All encouraging chemical and biological findings indicate that the complex 4 is a suitable candidate for drug target. PMID:27524032

  16. Antioxidant, DNA interaction, VEGFR2 kinase, topoisomerase I and in vitro cytotoxic activities of heteroleptic copper(II) complexes of tetrazolo[1,5-a]pyrimidines and diimines.

    PubMed

    Haleel, A; Mahendiran, D; Veena, V; Sakthivel, N; Rahiman, A Kalilur

    2016-11-01

    A series of heteroleptic mononuclear copper(II) complexes of the type [Cu(L(1-3))(diimine)]ClO4 (1-6) containing three tetrazolo[1,5-a]pyrimidine core ligands, ethyl 5-methyl-7-(2-hydroxyphenyl)-4,7-dihydrotetrazolo[1,5-a]pyrimidine-6-carboxylate (HL(1)), ethyl 5-methyl-7-(4-diethylamino-2-hydroxyphenyl)-4,7-dihydrotetrazolo[1,5-a]pyrimidine-6-carboxylate (HL(2)) or ethyl 5-methyl-7-(2-hydroxy-4-nitrophenyl)-4,7-dihydrotetrazolo[1,5-a]pyrimidine-6-carboxylate (HL(3)), and two diimine coligands, 2,2'-bipyridyl (bpy) or 1,10-phenanthroline (phen) have been synthesized and characterized by spectral methods. The geometry of complexes have been determined with the help of electronic absorption and EPR splitting patterns, which suggest four coordinated square planar geometry around copper(II) ion. The lowering of HOMO-LUMO band gap value of complex 4 implies its higher biological activity compared to other complexes. Antioxidant studies revealed that the complexes possess considerable radical scavenging potency against DPPH. The binding studies of the complexes with calf thymus DNA (CT-DNA) revealed groove mode of binding, which was further supported by docking simulation. The complexes 3 and 4 strongly inhibit the topoisomerase I, and also strongly interact with VEGFR2 kinase receptor via π-π, σ-π and hydrogen bonding interaction. Gel electrophoresis experiments demonstrated the ability of the complexes to cleave plasmid DNA in the absence of activators. In vitro cytotoxic activities of the complexes were examined on three cancerous cell lines such as human lung (A549), cervical (HeLa) and colon (HCT-15), and two normal cells such as human embryonic kidney (HEK) and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). The live cell and fluorescent imaging of cancer cells were observed with acridine orange/ethidium bromide staining assay. All encouraging chemical and biological findings indicate that the complex 4 is a suitable candidate for drug target.

  17. Two Kinase Family Dramas

    PubMed Central

    Leonard, Thomas A.; Hurley, James H.

    2007-01-01

    In this issue, Lietha and colleagues (2007) report the structure of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and reveal how FAK maintains an autoinhibited state. Together with the structure of another tyrosine kinase, ZAP-70 (Deindl et al., 2007), this work highlights the diversity of mechanisms that nature has evolved within the kinase superfamily to regulate their activity through autoinhibition. PMID:17574014

  18. Mediator kinase module and human tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Alison D.; Oldenbroek, Marieke; Boyer, Thomas G.

    2016-01-01

    Mediator is a conserved multi-subunit signal processor through which regulatory informatiosn conveyed by gene-specific transcription factors is transduced to RNA Polymerase II (Pol II). In humans, MED13, MED12, CDK8 and Cyclin C (CycC) comprise a four-subunit “kinase” module that exists in variable association with a 26-subunit Mediator core. Genetic and biochemical studies have established the Mediator kinase module as a major ingress of developmental and oncogenic signaling through Mediator, and much of its function in signal-dependent gene regulation derives from its resident CDK8 kinase activity. For example, CDK8-targeted substrate phosphorylation impacts transcription factor half-life, Pol II activity and chromatin chemistry and functional status. Recent structural and biochemical studies have revealed a precise network of physical and functional subunit interactions required for proper kinase module activity. Accordingly, pathologic change in this activity through altered expression or mutation of constituent kinase module subunits can have profound consequences for altered signaling and tumor formation. Herein, we review the structural organization, biological function and oncogenic potential of the Mediator kinase module. We focus principally on tumor-associated alterations in kinase module subunits for which mechanistic relationships as opposed to strictly correlative associations are established. These considerations point to an emerging picture of the Mediator kinase module as an oncogenic unit, one in which pathogenic activation/deactivation through component change drives tumor formation through perturbation of signal-dependent gene regulation. It follows that therapeutic strategies to combat CDK8-driven tumors will involve targeted modulation of CDK8 activity or pharmacologic manipulation of dysregulated CDK8-dependent signaling pathways. PMID:26182352

  19. Discovery of N-((1-(4-(3-(3-((6,7-Dimethoxyquinolin-3-yl)oxy)phenyl)ureido)-2-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl)piperidin-4-yl)methyl)propionamide (CHMFL-KIT-8140) as a Highly Potent Type II Inhibitor Capable of Inhibiting the T670I "Gatekeeper" Mutant of cKIT Kinase.

    PubMed

    Li, Binhua; Wang, Aoli; Liu, Juan; Qi, Ziping; Liu, Xiaochuan; Yu, Kailin; Wu, Hong; Chen, Cheng; Hu, Chen; Wang, Wenchao; Wu, Jiaxin; Hu, Zhenquan; Ye, Ling; Zou, Fengming; Liu, Feiyang; Wang, Beilei; Wang, Li; Ren, Tao; Zhang, Shaojuan; Bai, Mingfeng; Zhang, Shanchun; Liu, Jing; Liu, Qingsong

    2016-09-22

    cKIT kinase inhibitors, e.g., imatinib, could induce drug-acquired mutations such as cKIT T670I that rendered drug resistance after chronic treatment. Through a type II kinase inhibitor design approach we discovered a highly potent type II cKIT kinase inhibitor compound 35 (CHMFL-KIT-8140), which potently inhibited both cKIT wt (IC50 = 33 nM) and cKIT gatekeeper T670I mutant (IC50 = 99 nM). Compound 35 displayed strong antiproliferative effect against GISTs cancer cell lines GIST-T1 (cKIT wt, GI50 = 4 nM) and GIST-5R (cKIT T670I, GI50 = 26 nM). In the cellular context it strongly inhibited c-KIT mediated signaling pathways and induced apoptosis. In the BaF3-TEL-cKIT-T670I isogenic cell inoculated xenograft mouse model, 35 exhibited dose dependent tumor growth suppression efficacy and 100 mg/kg dosage provided 47.7% tumor growth inhibition (TGI) without obvious toxicity. We believe compound 35 would be a good pharmacological tool for exploration of the cKIT-T670I mutant mediated pathology in GISTs. PMID:27545040

  20. Prokaryotic Diacylglycerol Kinase and Undecaprenol Kinase

    PubMed Central

    Van Horn, Wade D.; Sanders, Charles R.

    2013-01-01

    Prokaryotic diacylglycerol kinase (DAGK) and undecaprenol kinase (UDPK) are the lone members of a family of multispan membrane enzymes that are very small, lack relationships to any other family of proteins—including water soluble kinases, and that exhibit an unusual structure and active site architecture. Escherichia coli DAGK plays an important role in recycling diacylglycerol produced as a byproduct of biosynthesis of molecules located in the periplasmic space. UDPK seems to play an analogous role in Gram-positive bacteria, where its importance is evident by the fact that UDPK is essential for biofilm formation by the oral pathogen Streptococcus mutans. DAGK has also long served as a model system for studies of membrane protein biocatalysis, folding, stability, and structure. This review explores our current understanding of the microbial physiology, enzymology, structural biology, and folding of the prokaryotic diacylglycerol kinase family, which is based on over 40 years of studies. PMID:22224599

  1. Non-ATP competitive protein kinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Garuti, L; Roberti, M; Bottegoni, G

    2010-01-01

    Protein kinases represent an attractive target in oncology drug discovery. Most of kinase inhibitors are ATP-competitive and are called type I inhibitors. The ATP-binding pocket is highly conserved among members of the kinase family and it is difficult to find selective agents. Moreover, the ATP-competitive inhibitors must compete with high intracellular ATP levels leading to a discrepancy between IC50s measured by biochemical versus cellular assays. The non-ATP competitive inhibitors, called type II and type III inhibitors, offer the possibility to overcome these problems. These inhibitors act by inducing a conformational shift in the target enzyme such that the kinase is no longer able to function. In the DFG-out form, the phenylalanine side chain moves to a new position. This movement creates a hydrophobic pocket available for occupation by the inhibitor. Some common features are present in these inhibitors. They contain a heterocyclic system that forms one or two hydrogen bonds with the kinase hinge residue. They also contain a hydrophobic moiety that occupies the pocket formed by the shift of phenylalanine from the DFG motif. Moreover, all the inhibitors bear a hydrogen bond donor-acceptor pair, usually urea or amide, that links the hinge-binding portion to the hydrophobic moiety and interacts with the allosteric site. Examples of non ATP-competitive inhibitors are available for various kinases. In this review small molecules capable of inducing the DFG-out conformation are reported, especially focusing on structural feature, SAR and biological properties.

  2. Identification and Structure-Function Analysis of Subfamily Selective G Protein-Coupled Receptor Kinase Inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Homan, Kristoff T.; Larimore, Kelly M.; Elkins, Jonathan M.; Szklarz, Marta; Knapp, Stefan; Tesmer, John J.G.

    2015-02-13

    Selective inhibitors of individual subfamilies of G protein-coupled receptor kinases (GRKs) would serve as useful chemical probes as well as leads for therapeutic applications ranging from heart failure to Parkinson’s disease. To identify such inhibitors, differential scanning fluorimetry was used to screen a collection of known protein kinase inhibitors that could increase the melting points of the two most ubiquitously expressed GRKs: GRK2 and GRK5. Enzymatic assays on 14 of the most stabilizing hits revealed that three exhibit nanomolar potency of inhibition for individual GRKs, some of which exhibiting orders of magnitude selectivity. Most of the identified compounds can be clustered into two chemical classes: indazole/dihydropyrimidine-containing compounds that are selective for GRK2 and pyrrolopyrimidine-containing compounds that potently inhibit GRK1 and GRK5 but with more modest selectivity. The two most potent inhibitors representing each class, GSK180736A and GSK2163632A, were cocrystallized with GRK2 and GRK1, and their atomic structures were determined to 2.6 and 1.85 Å spacings, respectively. GSK180736A, developed as a Rho-associated, coiled-coil-containing protein kinase inhibitor, binds to GRK2 in a manner analogous to that of paroxetine, whereas GSK2163632A, developed as an insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor inhibitor, occupies a novel region of the GRK active site cleft that could likely be exploited to achieve more selectivity. However, neither compound inhibits GRKs more potently than their initial targets. This data provides the foundation for future efforts to rationally design even more potent and selective GRK inhibitors.

  3. Identification and structure-function analysis of subfamily selective G protein-coupled receptor kinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Homan, Kristoff T; Larimore, Kelly M; Elkins, Jonathan M; Szklarz, Marta; Knapp, Stefan; Tesmer, John J G

    2015-01-16

    Selective inhibitors of individual subfamilies of G protein-coupled receptor kinases (GRKs) would serve as useful chemical probes as well as leads for therapeutic applications ranging from heart failure to Parkinson's disease. To identify such inhibitors, differential scanning fluorimetry was used to screen a collection of known protein kinase inhibitors that could increase the melting points of the two most ubiquitously expressed GRKs: GRK2 and GRK5. Enzymatic assays on 14 of the most stabilizing hits revealed that three exhibit nanomolar potency of inhibition for individual GRKs, some of which exhibiting orders of magnitude selectivity. Most of the identified compounds can be clustered into two chemical classes: indazole/dihydropyrimidine-containing compounds that are selective for GRK2 and pyrrolopyrimidine-containing compounds that potently inhibit GRK1 and GRK5 but with more modest selectivity. The two most potent inhibitors representing each class, GSK180736A and GSK2163632A, were cocrystallized with GRK2 and GRK1, and their atomic structures were determined to 2.6 and 1.85 Å spacings, respectively. GSK180736A, developed as a Rho-associated, coiled-coil-containing protein kinase inhibitor, binds to GRK2 in a manner analogous to that of paroxetine, whereas GSK2163632A, developed as an insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor inhibitor, occupies a novel region of the GRK active site cleft that could likely be exploited to achieve more selectivity. However, neither compound inhibits GRKs more potently than their initial targets. This data provides the foundation for future efforts to rationally design even more potent and selective GRK inhibitors.

  4. The Secretory Pathway Kinases

    PubMed Central

    Sreelatha, Anju; Kinch, Lisa N.; Tagliabracci, Vincent S.

    2015-01-01

    Protein phosphorylation is a nearly universal post-translation modification involved in a plethora of cellular events. Even though phosphorylation of extracellular proteins had been observed, the identity of the kinases that phosphorylate secreted proteins remained a mystery until recently. Advances in genome sequencing and genetic studies have paved the way for the discovery of a new class of kinases that localize within the endoplasmic reticulum, Golgi apparatus and the extracellular space. These novel kinases phosphorylate proteins and proteoglycans in the secretory pathway and appear to regulate various extracellular processes. Mutations in these kinases cause human disease, thus underscoring the biological importance of phosphorylation within the secretory pathway. PMID:25862977

  5. Discovery of N-(3-((1-Isonicotinoylpiperidin-4-yl)oxy)-4-methylphenyl)-3-(trifluoromethyl)benzamide (CHMFL-KIT-110) as a Selective, Potent, and Orally Available Type II c-KIT Kinase Inhibitor for Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors (GISTs).

    PubMed

    Wang, Qiang; Liu, Feiyang; Wang, Beilei; Zou, Fengming; Chen, Cheng; Liu, Xiaochuan; Wang, Aoli; Qi, Shuang; Wang, Wenchao; Qi, Ziping; Zhao, Zheng; Hu, Zhenquan; Wang, Wei; Wang, Li; Zhang, Shanchun; Wang, Yuexiang; Liu, Jing; Liu, Qingsong

    2016-04-28

    c-KIT kinase is a validated drug discovery target for gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs). Clinically used c-KIT kinase inhibitors, i.e., Imatinib and Sunitinib, bear other important targets such as ABL or FLT3 kinases. Here we report our discovery of a more selective c-KIT inhibitor, compound 13 (CHMFL-KIT-110), which completely abolished ABL and FLT3 kinase activity. KinomeScan selectivity profiling (468 kinases) of 13 exhibited a high selectivity (S score (1) = 0.01). 13 displayed great antiproliferative efficacy against GISTs cell lines GIST-T1 and GIST-882 (GI50: 0.021 and 0.043 μM, respectively). In the cellular context, it effectively affected c-KIT-mediated signaling pathways and induced apoptosis as well as cell cycle arrest. In addition, 13 possessed acceptable bioavailability (36%) and effectively suppressed the tumor growth in GIST-T1 cell inoculated xenograft model without apparent toxicity. 13 currently is undergoing extensive preclinical evaluation and might be a potential drug candidate for GISTs. PMID:27077705

  6. TNF causes changes in glomerular endothelial permeability and morphology through a Rho and myosin light chain kinase-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Xu, Chang; Wu, Xiaoyan; Hack, Bradley K; Bao, Lihua; Cunningham, Patrick N

    2015-12-01

    A key function of the endothelium is to serve as a regulated barrier between tissue compartments. We have previously shown that tumor necrosis factor (TNF) plays a crucial role in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute kidney injury, in part by causing injury to the renal endothelium through its receptor TNFR1. Here, we report that TNF increased permeability to albumin in primary culture mouse renal endothelial cells, as well as human glomerular endothelial cells. This process occurred in association with changes in the actin cytoskeleton and was associated with gaps between previously confluent cells in culture and decreases in the tight junction protein occludin. This process was dependent on myosin light chain activation, as seen by its prevention with Rho-associated kinase and myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) inhibitors. Surprisingly, permeability was not blocked by inhibition of apoptosis with caspase inhibitors. Additionally, we found that the renal glycocalyx, which plays an important role in barrier function, was also degraded by TNF in a Rho and MLCK dependent fashion. TNF treatment caused a decrease in the size of endothelial fenestrae, dependent on Rho and MLCK, although the relevance of this to changes in permeability is uncertain. In summary, TNF-induced barrier dysfunction in renal endothelial cells is crucially dependent upon the Rho/MLCK signaling pathway.

  7. TNF causes changes in glomerular endothelial permeability and morphology through a Rho and myosin light chain kinase-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Xu, Chang; Wu, Xiaoyan; Hack, Bradley K; Bao, Lihua; Cunningham, Patrick N

    2015-12-01

    A key function of the endothelium is to serve as a regulated barrier between tissue compartments. We have previously shown that tumor necrosis factor (TNF) plays a crucial role in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute kidney injury, in part by causing injury to the renal endothelium through its receptor TNFR1. Here, we report that TNF increased permeability to albumin in primary culture mouse renal endothelial cells, as well as human glomerular endothelial cells. This process occurred in association with changes in the actin cytoskeleton and was associated with gaps between previously confluent cells in culture and decreases in the tight junction protein occludin. This process was dependent on myosin light chain activation, as seen by its prevention with Rho-associated kinase and myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) inhibitors. Surprisingly, permeability was not blocked by inhibition of apoptosis with caspase inhibitors. Additionally, we found that the renal glycocalyx, which plays an important role in barrier function, was also degraded by TNF in a Rho and MLCK dependent fashion. TNF treatment caused a decrease in the size of endothelial fenestrae, dependent on Rho and MLCK, although the relevance of this to changes in permeability is uncertain. In summary, TNF-induced barrier dysfunction in renal endothelial cells is crucially dependent upon the Rho/MLCK signaling pathway. PMID:26634902

  8. Rho Kinases in Health and Disease: From Basic Science to Translational Research.

    PubMed

    Loirand, Gervaise

    2015-10-01

    Rho-associated kinases ROCK1 and ROCK2 are key regulators of actin cytoskeleton dynamics downstream of Rho GTPases that participate in the control of important physiologic functions, S including cell contraction, migration, proliferation, adhesion, and inflammation. Several excellent review articles dealing with ROCK function and regulation have been published over the past few years. Although a brief overview of general molecular, biochemical, and functional properties of ROCKs is included, an effort has been made to produce an original work by collecting and synthesizing recent studies aimed at translating basic discoveries from cell and experimental models into knowledge of human physiology, pathophysiological mechanisms, and medical therapeutics. This review points out the specificity and distinct roles of ROCK1 and ROCK2 isoforms highlighted in the last few years. Results obtained from genetically modified mice and genetic analysis in humans are discussed. This review also addresses the involvement of ROCKs in human diseases and the potential use of ROCK activity as a biomarker or a pharmacological target for specific inhibitors. PMID:26419448

  9. Towards axonal regeneration and neuroprotection in glaucoma: Rho kinase inhibitors as promising therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Van de Velde, Sarah; De Groef, Lies; Stalmans, Ingeborg; Moons, Lieve; Van Hove, Inge

    2015-08-01

    Due to a prolonged life expectancy worldwide, the incidence of age-related neurodegenerative disorders such as glaucoma is increasing. Glaucoma is the second cause of blindness, resulting from a slow and progressive loss of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) and their axons. Up to now, intraocular pressure (IOP) reduction is the only treatment modality by which ophthalmologists attempt to control disease progression. However, not all patients benefit from this therapy, and the pathophysiology of glaucoma is not always associated with an elevated IOP. These limitations, together with the multifactorial etiology of glaucoma, urge the pressing medical need for novel and alternative treatment strategies. Such new therapies should focus on preventing or retarding RGC death, but also on repair of injured axons, to ultimately preserve or improve structural and functional connectivity. In this respect, Rho-associated coiled-coil forming protein kinase (ROCK) inhibitors hold a promising potential to become very prominent drugs for future glaucoma treatment. Their field of action in the eye does not seem to be restricted to IOP reduction by targeting the trabecular meshwork or improving filtration surgery outcome. Indeed, over the past years, important progress has been made in elucidating their ability to improve ocular blood flow, to prevent RGC death/increase RGC survival and to retard axonal degeneration or induce proper axonal regeneration. Within this review, we aim to highlight the currently known capacity of ROCK inhibition to promote neuroprotection and regeneration in several in vitro, ex vivo and in vivo experimental glaucoma models.

  10. Long-term culture of human odontoma-derived cells with a Rho kinase inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Uzawa, Katsuhiro; Kasamatsu, Atsushi; Saito, Tomoaki; Takahara, Toshikazu; Minakawa, Yasuyuki; Koike, Kazuyuki; Yamatoji, Masanobu; Nakashima, Dai; Higo, Morihiro; Sakamoto, Yosuke; Shiiba, Masashi; Tanzawa, Hideki

    2016-09-10

    Because of cellular senescence/apoptosis, no effective culture systems are available to maintain replication of cells from odontogenic tumors especially for odontoma, and, thus, the ability to isolate human odontoma-derived cells (hODCs) for functional studies is needed. The current study was undertaken to develop an approach to isolate hODCs and fully characterize the cells in vitro. The hODCs were cultured successfully with a Rho-associated protein kinase inhibitor (Y-27632) for an extended period with stabilized lengths of the telomeres to sustain a similar phenotype/property as the primary tumoral cells. While the hODCs showed stable long-term expansion with expression of major dental epithelial markers including dentin sialophosphoprotein (DSPP) even in the three-dimensional microenvironment, they lack the specific markers for the characteristics of stem cells. Moreover, cells from dental pulp showed significant up-regulation of DSPP when co-cultured with the hODCs, while control fibroblasts with the hODCs did not. Taken together, we propose that the hODCs can be isolated and expanded over the long term with Y-27632 to investigate not only the development of the hODCs but also other types of benign human tumors.

  11. Long-term culture of human odontoma-derived cells with a Rho kinase inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Uzawa, Katsuhiro; Kasamatsu, Atsushi; Saito, Tomoaki; Takahara, Toshikazu; Minakawa, Yasuyuki; Koike, Kazuyuki; Yamatoji, Masanobu; Nakashima, Dai; Higo, Morihiro; Sakamoto, Yosuke; Shiiba, Masashi; Tanzawa, Hideki

    2016-09-10

    Because of cellular senescence/apoptosis, no effective culture systems are available to maintain replication of cells from odontogenic tumors especially for odontoma, and, thus, the ability to isolate human odontoma-derived cells (hODCs) for functional studies is needed. The current study was undertaken to develop an approach to isolate hODCs and fully characterize the cells in vitro. The hODCs were cultured successfully with a Rho-associated protein kinase inhibitor (Y-27632) for an extended period with stabilized lengths of the telomeres to sustain a similar phenotype/property as the primary tumoral cells. While the hODCs showed stable long-term expansion with expression of major dental epithelial markers including dentin sialophosphoprotein (DSPP) even in the three-dimensional microenvironment, they lack the specific markers for the characteristics of stem cells. Moreover, cells from dental pulp showed significant up-regulation of DSPP when co-cultured with the hODCs, while control fibroblasts with the hODCs did not. Taken together, we propose that the hODCs can be isolated and expanded over the long term with Y-27632 to investigate not only the development of the hODCs but also other types of benign human tumors. PMID:27514999

  12. Purification and characterization of a casein kinase 2-type protein kinase from pea nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, H.; Roux, S. J.

    1992-01-01

    Almost all the polyamine-stimulated protein kinase activity associated with the chromatin fraction of nuclei purified from etiolated pea (Pisum sativum L.) plumules is present in a single enzyme that can be extracted from chromatin by 0.35 molar NaCl. This protein kinase can be further purified over 2000-fold by salt fractionation and anion-exchange and casein-agarose column chromatography, after which it is more than 90% pure. The purified kinase has a specific activity of about 650 nanomoles per minute per milligram protein in the absence of polyamines, with either ATP or GTP as phosphoryl donor. Spermidine can stimulate its activity fourfold, with half-maximal activation at about 2 millimolar. Spermine and putrescine also stimulate activity, although somewhat less effectively. This kinase has a tetrameric alpha 2 beta 2 structure with a native molecular weight of 130,000, and subunit molecular weights of 36,000 for the catalytic subunit (alpha) and 29,000 for the regulatory subunit (beta). In western blot analyses, only the alpha subunit reacts strongly with polyclonal antibodies to a Drosophila casein kinase II. The pea kinase can use casein and phosvitin as artificial substrates, phosphorylating both the serine and threonine residues of casein. It has a pH optimum near 8.0, a Vmax of 1.5 micromoles per minute per milligram protein, and a Km for ATP of approximately 75 micromolar. Its activity can be almost completely inhibited by heparin at 5 micrograms per milliliter, but is relatively insensitive to concentrations of staurosporine, K252a, and chlorpromazine that strongly antagonize Ca(2+) -regulated protein kinases. These results are discussed in relation to recent findings that casein kinase 2-type kinases may phosphorylate trans-acting factors that bind to light-regulated promoters in plants.

  13. Receptor Tyrosine Kinase and Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Mirshafiey, Abbas; Ghalamfarsa, Ghasem; Asghari, Babak

    2014-01-01

    Receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) are essential components of signal transduction pathways that mediate cell-to-cell communication and their function as relay points for signaling pathways. They have a key role in numerous processes that control cellular proliferation and differentiation, regulate cell growth and cellular metabolism, and promote cell survival and apoptosis. Recently, the role of RTKs including TCR, FLT-3, c-Kit, c-Fms, PDGFR, ephrin, neurotrophin receptor, and TAM receptor in autoimmune disorder, especially rheumatoid arthritis and multiple sclerosis has been suggested. In multiple sclerosis pathogenesis, RTKs and their tyrosine kinase enzymes are selective important targets for tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) agents. TKIs, compete with the ATP binding site of the catalytic domain of several tyrosine kinases, and act as small molecules that have a favorable safety profile in disease treatment. Up to now, the efficacy of TKIs in numerous animal models of MS has been demonstrated, but application of these drugs in human diseases should be tested in future clinical trials. PMID:25337443

  14. Phosphatidylinositol 4-kinases: Function, structure, and inhibition

    SciTech Connect

    Boura, Evzen Nencka, Radim

    2015-10-01

    The phosphatidylinositol 4-kinases (PI4Ks) synthesize phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate (PI4P), a key member of the phosphoinositide family. PI4P defines the membranes of Golgi and trans-Golgi network (TGN) and regulates trafficking to and from the Golgi. Humans have two type II PI4Ks (α and β) and two type III enzymes (α and β). Recently, the crystal structures were solved for both type II and type III kinase revealing atomic details of their function. Importantly, the type III PI4Ks are hijacked by +RNA viruses to create so-called membranous web, an extensively phosphorylated and modified membrane system dedicated to their replication. Therefore, selective and potent inhibitors of PI4Ks have been developed as potential antiviral agents. Here we focus on the structure and function of PI4Ks and their potential in human medicine.

  15. Phosphodiesterase 5 Inhibition Limits Doxorubicin-induced Heart Failure by Attenuating Protein Kinase G Iα Oxidation.

    PubMed

    Prysyazhna, Oleksandra; Burgoyne, Joseph Robert; Scotcher, Jenna; Grover, Steven; Kass, David; Eaton, Philip

    2016-08-12

    Phosphodiesterase 5 (PDE5) inhibitors limit myocardial injury caused by stresses, including doxorubicin chemotherapy. cGMP binding to PKG Iα attenuates oxidant-induced disulfide formation. Because PDE5 inhibition elevates cGMP and protects from doxorubicin-induced injury, we reasoned that this may be because it limits PKG Iα disulfide formation. To investigate the role of PKG Iα disulfide dimerization in the development of apoptosis, doxorubicin-induced cardiomyopathy was compared in male wild type (WT) or disulfide-resistant C42S PKG Iα knock-in (KI) mice. Echocardiography showed that doxorubicin treatment caused loss of myocardial tissue and depressed left ventricular function in WT mice. Doxorubicin also reduced pro-survival signaling and increased apoptosis in WT hearts. In contrast, KI mice were markedly resistant to the dysfunction induced by doxorubicin in WTs. In follow-on experiments the influence of the PDE5 inhibitor tadalafil on the development of doxorubicin-induced cardiomyopathy in WT and KI mice was investigated. In WT mice, co-administration of tadalafil with doxorubicin reduced PKG Iα oxidation caused by doxorubicin and also protected against cardiac injury and loss of function. KI mice were again innately resistant to doxorubicin-induced cardiotoxicity, and therefore tadalafil afforded no additional protection. Doxorubicin decreased phosphorylation of RhoA (Ser-188), stimulating its GTPase activity to activate Rho-associated protein kinase (ROCK) in WTs. These pro-apoptotic events were absent in KI mice and were attenuated in WTs co-administered tadalafil. PKG Iα disulfide formation triggers cardiac injury, and this initiation of maladaptive signaling can be blocked by pharmacological therapies that elevate cGMP, which binds kinase to limit its oxidation. PMID:27342776

  16. Regulation of carbamoyl phosphate synthetase by MAP kinase.

    PubMed

    Graves, L M; Guy, H I; Kozlowski, P; Huang, M; Lazarowski, E; Pope, R M; Collins, M A; Dahlstrand, E N; Earp, H S; Evans, D R

    2000-01-20

    The de novo synthesis of pyrimidine nucleotides is required for mammalian cells to proliferate. The rate-limiting step in this pathway is catalysed by carbamoyl phosphate synthetase (CPS II), part of the multifunctional enzyme CAD. Here we describe the regulation of CAD by the mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase cascade. When phosphorylated by MAP kinase in vitro or activated by epidermal growth factor in vivo, CAD lost its feedback inhibition (which is dependent on uridine triphosphate) and became more sensitive to activation (which depends upon phosphoribosyl pyrophosphate). Both these allosteric regulatory changes favour biosynthesis of pyrimidines for growth. They were accompanied by increased epidermal growth factor-dependent phosphorylation of CAD in vivo and were prevented by inhibition of MAP kinase. Mutation of a consensus MAP kinase phosphorylation site abolished the changes in CAD allosteric regulation that were stimulated by growth factors. Finally, consistent with an effect of MAP kinase signalling on CPS II activity, epidermal growth factor increased cellular uridine triphosphate and this increase was reversed by inhibition of MAP kinase. Hence these studies may indicate a direct link between activation of the MAP kinase cascade and de novo biosynthesis of pyrimidine nucleotides. PMID:10659854

  17. Phosphorylation of the mRNA cap binding protein and eIF-4A by different protein kinases

    SciTech Connect

    Hagedorn, C.H.

    1987-05-01

    These studies were done to determine the identity of a protein kinase that phosphorylates the mRNA cap binding protein (CBP). Two chromatographic steps (dye and ligand and ion exchange HPLC) produced a 500x purification of an enzyme activity in rabbit reticulocytes that phosphorylated CBP at serine residues. Isoelectric focusing analysis of kinase treated CBP demonstrated 5 isoelectric species of which the 2 most anodic species were phosphorylated (contained /sup 32/P). This kinase activity phosphorylated CBP when it was isolated or in the eIF-4F complex. Purified protein kinase C, cAMP or cGMP dependent protein kinase, casein kinase I or II, myosin light chain kinase or insulin receptor kinase did not significantly phosphorylate isolated CBP or CBP in the eIF-4F complex. However, cAMP and cGMP dependent protein kinases and casein kinase II phosphorylated eIF-4A but did not phosphorylate the 46 kDa component of eIF-4F. cAMP dependent protein kinase phosphorylated a approx. 220 kDa protein doublet in eIF-4F preparations. These studies indicate that CBP kinase activity probably represents a previously unidentified protein kinase. In addition, eIF-4A appears to be phosphorylated by several protein kinases whereas the 46 kDa component of the eIF-4F complex was not.

  18. β-Arrestin-kinase scaffolds: turn them on or turn them off?

    PubMed

    Lin, Alice; DeFea, Kathryn A

    2013-01-01

    G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) can signal through heterotrimeric G-proteins or through β-arrestins to elicit responses to a plethora of extracellular stimuli. While the mechanisms underlying G-protein signaling is relatively well understood, the mechanisms by which β-arrestins regulate the diverse set of proteins with which they associate remain unclear. Multi-protein complexes are a common feature of β-arrestin-dependent signaling. The first two such complexes discovered were the mitogen-activated kinases modules associated with extracellular regulated kinases (ERK1/2) and Jnk3. Subsequently a number of other kinases have been shown to undergo β-arrestin-dependent regulation, including Akt, phosphatidylinositol-3kinase (PI3K), Lim-domain-containing kinase (LIMK), calcium calmodulin kinase II (CAMKII), and calcium calmodulin kinase kinase β (CAMKKβ). Some are positively and some negatively regulated by β-arrestin association. One of the missing links to understanding these pathways is the molecular mechanisms by which the activity of these kinases is regulated. Do β-arrestins merely serve as scaffolds to bring enzyme and substrate together or do they have a direct effect on the enzymatic activities of target kinases? Recent evidence suggests that both mechanisms are involved and that the mechanisms by which β-arrestins regulate kinase activity varies with the target kinase. This review discusses recent advances in the field focusing on 5 kinases for which considerable mechanistic detail and specific sites of interaction have been elucidated.

  19. p38 MAP kinase inhibitor suppresses transforming growth factor-β2-induced type 1 collagen production in trabecular meshwork cells.

    PubMed

    Inoue-Mochita, Miyuki; Inoue, Toshihiro; Fujimoto, Tomokazu; Kameda, Takanori; Awai-Kasaoka, Nanako; Ohtsu, Naoki; Kimoto, Kenichi; Tanihara, Hidenobu

    2015-01-01

    Glaucoma is an age-related neurodegenerative disease of retinal ganglion cells, and appropriate turnover of the extracellular matrix in the trabecular meshwork is important in its pathology. Here, we report the effects of Rho-associated kinase (ROCK) and p38 MAP kinase on transforming growth factor (TGF)-β2-induced type I collagen production in human trabecular meshwork cells. TGF-β2 increased RhoA activity, actin polymerization, and myosin light chain 2 phosphorylation. These effects were significantly inhibited by Y-27632, but not SB203580. TGF-β2 also increased promoter activity, mRNA synthesis, and protein expression of COL1A2. These effects were significantly inhibited by SB203580, but not Y-27632. Additionally, Y-27632 did not significantly inhibit TGF-β2-induced promoter activation, or phosphorylation or nuclear translocation of Smad2/3, whereas SB203580 partially suppressed these processes. Collectively, TGF-β2-induced production of type 1 collagen is suppressed by p38 inhibition and accompanied by partial inactivation of Smad2/3, in human trabecular meshwork cells.

  20. Designing novel kinases using evolutionary sequence analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mody, Areez; Weiner, Joan; Iyer, Lakshman; Ramanathan, Sharad

    2006-03-01

    Cellular pathways with new functions are thought to arise from the duplication and divergence of proteins in existing pathways. The MAP kinase pathways in eukaryotes provide one example of this. These pathways consist of the MAP kinase proteins which are responsible for evoking the correct response to external stimuli. In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae these pathways detect pheromones, osmolar stresses and nutrient levels, leading the cell into dramatic changes of morphology. Despite being homologous to each other, the MAP kinase proteins show specificity of function. We investigate the nature of the amino acid sequences conferring this specificity. To this end, we i) search the sequences of similar proteins in other Eukaryote species, ii) make a study of simple theoretical models exploring the constraints felt by these protein segments and iii) experimentally construct, a large suite of hybrid proteins made of segments taken from the homologous proteins. These are then expressed in Yeast cells to see what function they are able to perform. Particularly we also ask whether it is possible to design a new kinase protein possessing new function and specificity.

  1. The Rho-kinase (ROCK) inhibitor Y-27632 protects against excitotoxicity-induced neuronal death in vivo and in vitro.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Byeong Tak; Jeong, Eun Ae; Park, Sun-Young; Son, Hyeonwi; Shin, Hyun Joo; Lee, Dong Hoon; Kim, Hyun Joon; Kang, Sang Soo; Cho, Gyeong Jae; Choi, Wan Sung; Roh, Gu Seob

    2013-04-01

    Rho-associated coil kinase (ROCK) inhibitors reportedly prevent neurodegeneration, and abnormal ROCK activation in the central nervous system induces neurite collapse and retraction. However, it is unclear whether the ROCK inhibitor Y-27632 directly protects hippocampal neurons from excitotoxicity. Here, we determined the effects of Y-27632 on neuroprotection following kainic acid (KA)-induced seizures in mice and during glutamate-induced excitotoxicity in HT22 cells. One day after Y-27632 injection, mice were treated with KA and killed 1-2 days later. Fluoro-Jade B and rapid Golgi staining showed that Y-27632 protected against KA-induced neurodegeneration and neurite dystrophy. Y-27632 inhibited increases in hippocampal RhoA and ROCK2 in KA-treated mice as determined by western blot analysis. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed ROCK2-positive neurons and astrocytes in the KA-treated hippocampus. In HT22 cells, Y-27632 also protected neurons and neurite formation during glutamate-induced excitotoxicity in vitro. These results indicate that ROCK inhibition modulates neurite growth and protects neurons from excitotoxicity-induced cell death.

  2. Atorvastatin ameliorates contrast medium-induced renal tubular cell apoptosis in diabetic rats via suppression of Rho-kinase pathway.

    PubMed

    Su, Jinzi; Zou, Wenbo; Cai, Wenqin; Chen, Xiuping; Wang, Fangbing; Li, Shuizhu; Ma, Wenwen; Cao, Yangming

    2014-01-15

    Contrast medium-induced acute kidney injury (CI-AKI) remains a leading cause of iatrogenic, drug-induced acute renal failure. This study aimed to investigate the protective effects of atorvastatin against renal tubular cell apoptosis in diabetic rats and the related mechanisms. CI-AKI was induced by intravenous administration of iopromide (12ml/kg) in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. Atorvastatin (ATO) was administered intragastrically at the dose of 5, 10 and 30mg/kg/d in different groups, respectively, for 5 days before iopromide injection. Renal function parameters, kidney histology, renal tubular cell apoptosis, the expression of apoptosis regulatory proteins, caspase-3 and Rho-associated protein kinase 1 (ROCK-1), and the phosphorylation of myosin phosphatase target subunit -1 (MYPT-1), were determined. Atorvastatin was shown to notably ameliorate contrast medium induced medullary damage, restore renal function, and suppress renal tubular apoptosis. Meanwhile, atorvastatin up-regulated the expression of Bcl-2, down-regulated the expression of Bax, caspase-3 and ROCK-1, restored the ratio of Bcl-2/Bax, and suppressed the phosphorylation of MYPT-1 in a dose-dependent manner. Thus, atorvastatin pretreatment could dose-dependently ameliorate the development of CI-AKI, which was partly attributed to its suppression of renal tubular cell apoptosis by inhibiting the Rho/ROCK pathway.

  3. Microbial Protein-tyrosine Kinases*

    PubMed Central

    Chao, Joseph D.; Wong, Dennis; Av-Gay, Yossef

    2014-01-01

    Microbial ester kinases identified in the past 3 decades came as a surprise, as protein phosphorylation on Ser, Thr, and Tyr amino acids was thought to be unique to eukaryotes. Current analysis of available microbial genomes reveals that “eukaryote-like” protein kinases are prevalent in prokaryotes and can converge in the same signaling pathway with the classical microbial “two-component” systems. Most microbial tyrosine kinases lack the “eukaryotic” Hanks domain signature and are designated tyrosine kinases based upon their biochemical activity. These include the tyrosine kinases termed bacterial tyrosine kinases (BY-kinases), which are responsible for the majority of known bacterial tyrosine phosphorylation events. Although termed generally as bacterial tyrosine kinases, BY-kinases can be considered as one family belonging to the superfamily of prokaryotic protein-tyrosine kinases in bacteria. Other members of this superfamily include atypical “odd” tyrosine kinases with diverse mechanisms of protein phosphorylation and the “eukaryote-like” Hanks-type tyrosine kinases. Here, we discuss the distribution, phylogeny, and function of the various prokaryotic protein-tyrosine kinases, focusing on the recently discovered Mycobacterium tuberculosis PtkA and its relationship with other members of this diverse family of proteins. PMID:24554699

  4. Update on Aurora Kinase Targeted Therapeutics in Oncology

    PubMed Central

    Green, Myke R.; Woolery, Joseph E.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Mammalian cells contain three distinct serine/threonine protein kinases with highly conserved catalytic domains, including aurora A and B kinases that are essential regulators of mitotic entry and progression. Overexpression of aurora A and/or B kinase is associated with high proliferation rates and poor prognosis, making them ideal targets for anti-cancer therapy. Disruption of mitotic machinery is a proven anti-cancer strategy employed by multiple chemotherapeutic agents. Numerous small molecule inhibitors of the aurora kinases have been discovered and tested in vivo and in vitro, with a few currently in phase II testing. Areas covered This review provides the reader with updated results from both preclinical and human studies for each of the aurora kinase inhibitors (AKI) that are currently being investigated. The paper also covers in detail the late breaking and phase I data presented for AKIs thereby allowing the reader to compare and contrast individual and classrelated effects of AKIs. Expert opinion While the successful development and approval of an AKI for anti-cancer therapy remains unresolved, pre-clinical identification of resistant mechanisms would help design better early phase clinical trials where relevant combinations may be evaluated prior to phase II testing. The authors believe that aurora kinases are important anti-cancer targets that operate in collaboration with other oncogenes intimately involved in uncontrolled tumor proliferation and by providing a unique, targeted and complimentary anti-cancer mechanism, expand the available armamentarium against cancer. PMID:21556291

  5. Visualizing autophosphorylation in histidine kinases.

    PubMed

    Casino, Patricia; Miguel-Romero, Laura; Marina, Alberto

    2014-01-01

    Reversible protein phosphorylation is the most widespread regulatory mechanism in signal transduction. Autophosphorylation in a dimeric sensor histidine kinase is the first step in two-component signalling, the predominant signal-transduction device in bacteria. Despite being the most abundant sensor kinases in nature, the molecular bases of the histidine kinase autophosphorylation mechanism are still unknown. Furthermore, it has been demonstrated that autophosphorylation can occur in two directions, cis (intrasubunit) or trans (intersubunit) within the dimeric histidine kinase. Here, we present the crystal structure of the complete catalytic machinery of a chimeric histidine kinase. The structure shows an asymmetric histidine kinase dimer where one subunit is caught performing the autophosphorylation reaction. A structure-guided functional analysis on HK853 and EnvZ, two prototypical cis- and trans-phosphorylating histidine kinases, has allowed us to decipher the catalytic mechanism of histidine kinase autophosphorylation, which seems to be common independently of the reaction directionality.

  6. Oncoprotein protein kinase

    DOEpatents

    Karin, Michael; Hibi, Masahiko; Linn, Anning

    1996-01-01

    An isolated polypeptide (JNK) characterized by having a molecular weight of 46kD as determined by reducing SDS-PAGE, having serine and threonine kinase activity, phosphorylating the c-Jun N-terminal activation domain and polynucleotide sequences and method of detection of JNK.

  7. Plant 5-Methylthioribose Kinase

    PubMed Central

    Guranowski, Andrzej

    1983-01-01

    Activity of 5-methylthioribose kinase, the enzyme which catalyzes the ATP-dependent formation of 1-phospho-5-methylthioribose, has been revealed in the extracts from various higher plant species. Almost 2,000-fold-purified enzyme has been obtained from yellow lupin (Lupinus luteus L. cv Topaz) seed extract. Molecular weight of the native enzyme is 70,000 as judged by gel filtration. The lupin 5-methylthioribose kinase exhibits a strict requirement for divalent metal ions. Among the ions tested, only Mg2+ and Mn2+ acted as cofactors. The curve of kinase initial velocity versus pH reaches plateau at pH 10 to 10.5. The Km values calculated for 5-methylthioribose and ATP are 4.3 and 8.3 micromolar, respectively. Among nucleoside triphosphates tested as potential phosphate donors, only dATP could substitute in the reaction for ATP. 5-Isobutylthioribose, an analog of 5-methylthioribose, proved to be the γ-ATP-phosphate acceptor, too. The compound inhibits competitively synthesis of 1-phospho-5-methylthioribose (Ki = 1.4 micromolar). Lupin 5-methylthioribose kinase is completely and irreversibly inhibited by the antisulfhydryl reagent, p-hydroxymercuribenzoate. As in bacteria (Ferro, Barrett, Shapiro 1978 J Biol Chem 253: 6021-6025), the enzyme may be involved in a new, alternative pathway of methionine synthesis in plant tissues. PMID:16662931

  8. Resolution of thylakoid polyphenol oxidase and a protein kinase

    SciTech Connect

    Race, H.L.; Davenport, J.W.; Hind, G.

    1995-12-31

    The predominant protein kinase activity in octylglucoside (OG) extracts of spinach thylakoids has been attributed to a 64-kDa protein, tp64. Recent work calls into question the relation between tp64 and protein kinase activity, which were fractionated apart using fluid phase IEF and hydroxylapatite chromatography. Hind et al. sequenced tp64 from the cDNA and showed it to be a polyphenol oxidase (PPO) homolog. Its transit peptide indicates a location for the mature protein within the thylakoid lumen, where there is presumably no ATP and where it is remote from the presumed kinase substrates: the stromally exposed regions of integral PS-II membrane proteins. Here the authors suggest that the kinase is a 64-kDa protein distinct from tp64.

  9. Oncoprotein protein kinase

    DOEpatents

    Karin, M.; Hibi, M.; Lin, A.

    1997-02-25

    An isolated polypeptide (JNK) characterized by having a molecular weight of 46 kD as determined by reducing SDS-PAGE is disclosed. The polypeptide has serine and threonine kinase activity, phosphorylating the c-Jun N-terminal activation domain and polynucleotide sequences. The method of detection of JNK is also provided. JNK phosphorylates c-Jun N-terminal activation domain which affects gene expression from AP-1 sites. 44 figs.

  10. Oncoprotein protein kinase

    DOEpatents

    Karin, Michael; Hibi, Masahiko; Lin, Anning

    2004-03-16

    An isolated polypeptide (JNK) characterized by having a molecular weight of 46 kD as determined by reducing SDS-PAGE, having serine and threonine kinase activity, phosphorylating the c-Jun N-terminal activation domain and polynucleotide sequences and method of detection of JNK are provided herein. JNK phosphorylates c-Jun N-terminal activation domain which affects gene expression from AP-1 sites.

  11. Oncoprotein protein kinase

    DOEpatents

    Karin, Michael; Hibi, Masahiko; Lin, Anning; Davis, Roger; Derijard, Benoit

    2003-02-04

    An isolated polypeptide (JNK) characterized by having a molecular weight of 46kD as determined by reducing SDS-PAGE, having serine and threonine kinase activity, phosphorylating the c-Jun N-terminal activation domain and polynucleotide sequences and method of detection of JNK are provided herein. JNK phosphorylates c-Jun N-terminal activation domain which affects gene expression from AP-1 sites.

  12. Oncoprotein protein kinase

    DOEpatents

    Karin, Michael; Hibi, Masahiko; Lin, Anning

    1998-01-01

    An isolated polypeptide (JNK) characterized by having a molecular weight of 46 kD as determined by reducing SDS-PAGE, having serine and threonine kinase activity, phosphorylating the c-Jun N-terminal activation domain and polynucleotide sequences and method of detection of JNK are provided herein. JNK phosphorylates c-Jun N-terminal activation domain which affects gene expression from AP-1 sites.

  13. Oncoprotein protein kinase

    DOEpatents

    Karin, Michael; Hibi, Masahiko; Lin, Anning

    1999-01-01

    An isolated polypeptide (JNK) characterized by having a molecular weight of 46 kD or 55 kD as determined by reducing SDS-PAGE, having serine and theonine kinase activity, phosphorylating the c-Jun N-terminal activation domain and polynucleotide sequences and method of detection of JNK are provided herein. JNK phosphorylates c-Jun N-terminal activation domain which affects gene expression from AP-1 sites.

  14. Oncoprotein protein kinase

    DOEpatents

    Karin, Michael; Hibi, Masahiko; Lin, Anning; Davis, Roger; Derijard, Benoit

    2005-03-08

    An isolated polypeptide (JNK) characterized by having a molecular weight of 46 kD as determined by reducing SDS-PAGE, having serine and threonine kinase activity, phosphorylating the c-Jun N-terminal activation domain and polynucleotide sequences and method of detection of JNK are provided herein. JNK phosphorylates c-Jun N-terminal activation domain which affects gene expression from AP-1 sites.

  15. Oncoprotein protein kinase

    DOEpatents

    Karin, Michael; Hibi, Masahiko; Lin, Anning

    1997-01-01

    An isolated polypeptide (JNK) characterized by having a molecular weight of 46kD as determined by reducing SDS-PAGE, having serine and threonine kinase activity, phosphorylating the c-Jun N-terminal activation domain and polynucleotide sequences and method of detection of JNK are provided herein. JNK phosphorylates c-Jun N-terminal activation domain which affects gene expression from AP-1 sites.

  16. Oncoprotein protein kinase

    DOEpatents

    Karin, Michael; Hibi, Masahiko; Lin, Anning

    1997-01-01

    An isolated polypeptide (JNK) characterized by having a molecular weight of 46 kD as determined by reducing SDS-PAGE, having serine and threonine kinase activity, phosphorylating the c-Jun N-terminal activation domain and polynucleotide sequences and method of detection of JNK are provided herein. JNK phosphorylates c-Jun N-terminal activation domain which affects gene expression from AP-1 sites.

  17. Oncoprotein protein kinase

    DOEpatents

    Davis, Roger; Derijard, Benoit; Karin, Michael; Hibi, Masahiko; Lin, Anning

    2005-01-25

    An isolated polypeptide (JNK) characterized by having a molecular weight of 46 kD as determined by reducing SDS-PAGE, having serine and threonine kinase activity, phosphorylating the c-Jun N-terminal activation domain and polynucleotide sequences and method of detection of JNK are provided herein. JNK phosphorylates c-Jun N-terminal activation domain which affects gene expression from AP-1 sites.

  18. Oncoprotein protein kinase

    DOEpatents

    Karin, Michael; Lin, Anning

    1999-11-30

    An isolated polypeptide (JNK) characterized by having a molecular weight of 46 kD or 55 kD as determined by reducing SDS-PAGE, having serine and theonine kinase activity, phosphorylating the c-Jun N-terminal activation domain and polynucleotide sequences and method of detection of JNK are provided herein. JNK phosphorylates c-Jun N-terminal activation domain which affects gene expression from AP-1 sites.

  19. Cyclin-dependent kinases.

    PubMed

    Malumbres, Marcos

    2014-01-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) are protein kinases characterized by needing a separate subunit - a cyclin - that provides domains essential for enzymatic activity. CDKs play important roles in the control of cell division and modulate transcription in response to several extra- and intracellular cues. The evolutionary expansion of the CDK family in mammals led to the division of CDKs into three cell-cycle-related subfamilies (Cdk1, Cdk4 and Cdk5) and five transcriptional subfamilies (Cdk7, Cdk8, Cdk9, Cdk11 and Cdk20). Unlike the prototypical Cdc28 kinase of budding yeast, most of these CDKs bind one or a few cyclins, consistent with functional specialization during evolution. This review summarizes how, although CDKs are traditionally separated into cell-cycle or transcriptional CDKs, these activities are frequently combined in many family members. Not surprisingly, deregulation of this family of proteins is a hallmark of several diseases, including cancer, and drug-targeted inhibition of specific members has generated very encouraging results in clinical trials. PMID:25180339

  20. The Rho Kinases: Critical Mediators of Multiple Profibrotic Processes and Rational Targets for New Therapies for Pulmonary Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Knipe, Rachel S.; Tager, Andrew M.

    2015-01-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is characterized by progressive lung scarring, short median survival, and limited therapeutic options, creating great need for new pharmacologic therapies. IPF is thought to result from repetitive environmental injury to the lung epithelium, in the context of aberrant host wound healing responses. Tissue responses to injury fundamentally involve reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton of participating cells, including epithelial cells, fibroblasts, endothelial cells, and macrophages. Actin filament assembly and actomyosin contraction are directed by the Rho-associated coiled-coil forming protein kinase (ROCK) family of serine/threonine kinases (ROCK1 and ROCK2). As would therefore be expected, lung ROCK activation has been demonstrated in humans with IPF and in animal models of this disease. ROCK inhibitors can prevent fibrosis in these models, and more importantly, induce the regression of already established fibrosis. Here we review ROCK structure and function, upstream activators and downstream targets of ROCKs in pulmonary fibrosis, contributions of ROCKs to profibrotic cellular responses to lung injury, ROCK inhibitors and their efficacy in animal models of pulmonary fibrosis, and potential toxicities of ROCK inhibitors in humans, as well as involvement of ROCKs in fibrosis in other organs. As we discuss, ROCK activation is required for multiple profibrotic responses, in the lung and multiple other organs, suggesting ROCK participation in fundamental pathways that contribute to the pathogenesis of a broad array of fibrotic diseases. Multiple lines of evidence therefore indicate that ROCK inhibition has great potential to be a powerful therapeutic tool in the treatment of fibrosis, both in the lung and beyond. PMID:25395505

  1. Cyclic nucleotide–gated channels, calmodulin, adenylyl cyclase, and calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II are required for late, but not early, long-term memory formation in the honeybee

    PubMed Central

    Matsumoto, Yukihisa; Sandoz, Jean-Christophe; Devaud, Jean-Marc; Lormant, Flore; Mizunami, Makoto; Giurfa, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Memory is a dynamic process that allows encoding, storage, and retrieval of information acquired through individual experience. In the honeybee Apis mellifera, olfactory conditioning of the proboscis extension response (PER) has shown that besides short-term memory (STM) and mid-term memory (MTM), two phases of long-term memory (LTM) are formed upon multiple-trial conditioning: an early phase (e-LTM) which depends on translation from already available mRNA, and a late phase (l-LTM) which requires de novo transcription and translation. Here we combined olfactory PER conditioning and neuropharmacological inhibition and studied the involvement of the NO–cGMP pathway, and of specific molecules, such as cyclic nucleotide-gated channels (CNG), calmodulin (CaM), adenylyl cyclase (AC), and Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CaMKII), in the formation of olfactory LTM in bees. We show that in addition to NO–cGMP and cAMP–PKA, CNG channels, CaM, AC, and CaMKII also participate in the formation of a l-LTM (72-h post-conditioning) that is specific for the learned odor. Importantly, the same molecules are dispensable for olfactory learning and for the formation of both MTM (in the minute and hour range) and e-LTM (24-h post-conditioning), thus suggesting that the signaling pathways leading to l-LTM or e-LTM involve different molecular actors. PMID:24741108

  2. Redox Regulation of Protein Kinases

    PubMed Central

    Truong, Thu H.; Carroll, Kate S.

    2015-01-01

    Protein kinases represent one of the largest families of genes found in eukaryotes. Kinases mediate distinct cellular processes ranging from proliferation, differentiation, survival, and apoptosis. Ligand-mediated activation of receptor kinases can lead to the production of endogenous H2O2 by membrane-bound NADPH oxidases. In turn, H2O2 can be utilized as a secondary messenger in signal transduction pathways. This review presents an overview of the molecular mechanisms involved in redox regulation of protein kinases and its effects on signaling cascades. In the first half, we will focus primarily on receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs), whereas the latter will concentrate on downstream non-receptor kinases involved in relaying stimulant response. Select examples from the literature are used to highlight the functional role of H2O2 regarding kinase activity, as well as the components involved in H2O2 production and regulation during cellular signaling. In addition, studies demonstrating direct modulation of protein kinases by H2O2 through cysteine oxidation will be emphasized. Identification of these redox-sensitive residues may help uncover signaling mechanisms conserved within kinase subfamilies. In some cases, these residues can even be exploited as targets for the development of new therapeutics. Continued efforts in this field will further basic understanding of kinase redox regulation, and delineate the mechanisms involved in physiologic and pathological H2O2 responses. PMID:23639002

  3. Diacylglycerol Kinase Inhibition and Vascular Function.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hyehun; Allahdadi, Kyan J; Tostes, Rita C A; Webb, R Clinton

    2009-01-01

    Diacylglycerol kinases (DGKs), a family of lipid kinases, convert diacylglycerol (DG) to phosphatidic acid (PA). Acting as a second messenger, DG activates protein kinase C (PKC). PA, a signaling lipid, regulates diverse functions involved in physiological responses. Since DGK modulates two lipid second messengers, DG and PA, regulation of DGK could induce related cellular responses. Currently, there are 10 mammalian isoforms of DGK that are categorized into five groups based on their structural features. These diverse isoforms of DGK are considered to activate distinct cellular functions according to extracellular stimuli. Each DGK isoform is thought to play various roles inside the cell, depending on its subcellular localization (nuclear, ER, Golgi complex or cytoplasm). In vascular smooth muscle, vasoconstrictors such as angiotensin II, endothelin-1 and norepinephrine stimulate contraction by increasing inositol trisphosphate (IP(3)), calcium, DG and PKC activity. Inhibition of DGK could increase DG availability and decrease PA levels, as well as alter intracellular responses, including calcium-mediated and PKC-mediated vascular contraction. The purpose of this review is to demonstrate a role of DGK in vascular function. Selective inhibition of DGK isoforms may represent a novel therapeutic approach in vascular dysfunction. PMID:21547002

  4. Small-molecule inhibitors of the c-Fes protein-tyrosine kinase.

    PubMed

    Hellwig, Sabine; Miduturu, Chandra V; Kanda, Shigeru; Zhang, Jianming; Filippakopoulos, Panagis; Salah, Eidarus; Deng, Xianming; Choi, Hwan Geun; Zhou, Wenjun; Hur, Wooyoung; Knapp, Stefan; Gray, Nathanael S; Smithgall, Thomas E

    2012-04-20

    The c-Fes protein-tyrosine kinase modulates cellular signaling pathways governing differentiation, the innate immune response, and vasculogenesis. Here, we report the identification of types I and II kinase inhibitors with potent activity against c-Fes both in vitro and in cell-based assays. One of the most potent inhibitors is the previously described anaplastic lymphoma kinase inhibitor TAE684. The crystal structure of TAE684 in complex with the c-Fes SH2-kinase domain showed excellent shape complementarity with the ATP-binding pocket and a key role for the gatekeeper methionine in the inhibitory mechanism. TAE684 and two pyrazolopyrimidines with nanomolar potency against c-Fes in vitro were used to establish a role for this kinase in osteoclastogenesis, illustrating the value of these inhibitors as tool compounds to probe the diverse biological functions associated with this unique kinase.

  5. Targeting Tyrosine Kinases and Autophagy in Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    . Excessive autophagy, sometimes, could lead to type II programmed cell death. We demonstrated that autophagy blockade sensitizes prostate cancer cells toward Src tyrosine kinase inhibitor. Thus, a combination therapy based on Src tyrosine kinase inhibitor and autophagy modulator deserves further attention as a potential treatment for relapsed prostate cancer. PMID:21350583

  6. Map kinases in fungal pathogens.

    PubMed

    Xu, J R

    2000-12-01

    MAP kinases in eukaryotic cells are well known for transducing a variety of extracellular signals to regulate cell growth and differentiation. Recently, MAP kinases homologous to the yeast Fus3/Kss1 MAP kinases have been identified in several fungal pathogens and found to be important for appressorium formation, invasive hyphal growth, and fungal pathogenesis. This MAP kinase pathway also controls diverse growth or differentiation processes, including conidiation, conidial germination, and female fertility. MAP kinases homologous to yeast Slt2 and Hog1 have also been characterized in Candida albicans and Magnaporthe grisea. Mutants disrupted of the Slt2 homologues have weak cell walls, altered hyphal growth, and reduced virulence. The Hog1 homologues are dispensable for growth but are essential for regulating responses to hyperosmotic stress in C. albicans and M. grisea. Overall, recent studies have indicated that MAP kinase pathways may play important roles in regulating growth, differentiation, survival, and pathogenesis in fungal pathogens. PMID:11273677

  7. Sphingosine Kinase 1 is a Critical Component of the Copper-Dependent FGF1 Export Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Soldi, Raffaella; Mandinova, Anna; Venkataraman, Krishnan; Hla, Timoty; Vadas, Mathew; Pitson, Stuart; Duarte, Maria; Graziani, Irene; Kolev, Vihren; Kacer, Doreen; Kirov, Aleksandr; Maciag, Thomas; Prudovsky, Igor

    2007-01-01

    Sphingosine kinase 1 catalyzes the formation of sphingosine-1-phosphate, a lipid mediator involved in the regulation of angiogenesis. Sphingosine kinase 1 is constitutively released from cells, even though it lacks a classical signal peptide sequence. Because copper-dependent non-classical stress-induced release of FGF1 also regulates angiogenesis, we questioned whether sphingosine kinase 1 is involved in the FGF1 release pathway. We report that (i) the coexpression of sphingosine kinase 1 with FGF1 inhibited the release of sphingosine kinase 1 at 37°C; (ii) sphingosine kinase 1 was released at 42°C in complex with FGF1; (iii) sphingosine kinase 1 null cells failed to release FGF1 at stress; (iv) sphingosine kinase 1 is a high affinity copper-binding protein which formed a complex with FGF1 in a cell-free system, and (v) sphingosine kinase 1 over expression rescued the release of FGF1 from inhibition by the copper chelator, tetrathiomolybdate. We propose that sphingosine kinase 1 is a component of the copper-dependent FGF1 release pathway. PMID:17643421

  8. TGF-β activates Erk MAP kinase signalling through direct phosphorylation of ShcA

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Matt K; Pardoux, Cécile; Hall, Marie C; Lee, Pierre S; Warburton, David; Qing, Jing; Smith, Susan M; Derynck, Rik

    2007-01-01

    Erk1/Erk2 MAP kinases are key regulators of cell behaviour and their activation is generally associated with tyrosine kinase signalling. However, TGF-β stimulation also activates Erk MAP kinases through an undefined mechanism, albeit to a much lower level than receptor tyrosine kinase stimulation. We report that upon TGF-β stimulation, the activated TGF-β type I receptor (TβRI) recruits and directly phosphorylates ShcA proteins on tyrosine and serine. This dual phosphorylation results from an intrinsic TβRI tyrosine kinase activity that complements its well-defined serine-threonine kinase function. TGF-β-induced ShcA phosphorylation induces ShcA association with Grb2 and Sos, thereby initiating the well-characterised pathway linking receptor tyrosine kinases with Erk MAP kinases. We also found that TβRI is tyrosine phosphorylated in response to TGF-β. Thus, TβRI, like the TGF-β type II receptor, is a dual-specificity kinase. Recruitment of tyrosine kinase signalling pathways may account for aspects of TGF-β biology that are independent of Smad signalling. PMID:17673906

  9. Cucurbitacin I elicits the formation of actin/phospho-myosin II co-aggregates by stimulation of the RhoA/ROCK pathway and inhibition of LIM-kinase.

    PubMed

    Sari-Hassoun, Meryem; Clement, Marie-Jeanne; Hamdi, Imane; Bollot, Guillaume; Bauvais, Cyril; Joshi, Vandana; Toma, Flavio; Burgo, Andrea; Cailleret, Michel; Rosales-Hernández, Martha Cecilia; Macias Pérez, Martha Edith; Chabane-Sari, Daoudi; Curmi, Patrick A

    2016-02-15

    Cucurbitacins are cytotoxic triterpenoid sterols isolated from plants. One of their earliest cellular effect is the aggregation of actin associated with blockage of cell migration and division that eventually lead to apoptosis. We unravel here that cucurbitacin I actually induces the co-aggregation of actin with phospho-myosin II. This co-aggregation most probably results from the stimulation of the Rho/ROCK pathway and the direct inhibition of the LIMKinase. We further provide data that suggest that the formation of these co-aggregates is independent of a putative pro-oxidant status of cucurbitacin I. The results help to understand the impact of cucurbitacins on signal transduction and actin dynamics and open novel perspectives to use it as drug candidates for cancer research. PMID:26707799

  10. Adenylate kinase complements nucleoside diphosphate kinase deficiency in nucleotide metabolism.

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Q; Inouye, M

    1996-01-01

    Nucleoside diphosphate (NDP) kinase is a ubiquitous nonspecific enzyme that evidently is designed to catalyze in vivo ATP-dependent synthesis of ribo- and deoxyribonucleoside triphosphates from the corresponding diphosphates. Because Escherichia coli contains only one copy of ndk, the structural gene for this enzyme, we were surprised to find that ndk disruption yields bacteria that are still viable. These mutant cells contain a protein with a small amount NDP kinase activity. The protein responsible for this activity was purified and identified as adenylate kinase. This enzyme, also called myokinase, catalyzes the reversible ATP-dependent synthesis of ADP from AMP. We found that this enzyme from E. coli as well as from higher eukaryotes has a broad substrate specificity displaying dual enzymatic functions. Among the nucleoside monophosphate kinases tested, only adenylate kinase was found to have NDP kinase activity. To our knowledge, this is the first report of NDP kinase activity associated with adenylate kinase. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 PMID:8650159

  11. Rho kinase inhibitor Y-27632 prolongs the life span of adult human keratinocytes, enhances skin equivalent development, and facilitates lentiviral transduction.

    PubMed

    van den Bogaard, Ellen H; Rodijk-Olthuis, Diana; Jansen, Patrick A M; van Vlijmen-Willems, Ivonne M J J; van Erp, Piet E; Joosten, Irma; Zeeuwen, Patrick L J M; Schalkwijk, Joost

    2012-09-01

    The use of tissue-engineered human skin equivalents (HSE) for fundamental research and industrial application requires the expansion of keratinocytes from a limited number of skin biopsies donated by adult healthy volunteers or patients. A pharmacological inhibitor of Rho-associated protein kinases, Y-27632, was recently reported to immortalize neonatal human foreskin keratinocytes. Here, we investigated the potential use of Y-27632 to expand human adult keratinocytes and evaluated its effects on HSE development and in vitro gene delivery assays. Y-27632 was found to significantly increase the life span of human adult keratinocytes (up to five to eight passages). The epidermal morphology of HSEs generated from high-passage, Y-27632-treated keratinocytes resembled the native epidermis and was improved by supplementing Y-27632 during the submerged phase of HSE development. In addition, Y-27632-treated keratinocytes responded normally to inflammatory stimuli, and could be used to generate HSEs with a psoriatic phenotype, upon stimulation with relevant cytokines. Furthermore, Y-27632 significantly enhanced both lentiviral transduction efficiency of primary adult keratinocytes and epidermal morphology of HSEs generated thereof. Our study indicates that Y-27632 is a potentially powerful tool that is used for a variety of applications of adult human keratinocytes. PMID:22519508

  12. Involvement of mitogen-activated protein kinase activation in the signal-transduction pathways of the soya bean oxidative burst.

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, A T; Kim, J; Low, P S

    2001-01-01

    The oxidative burst constitutes one of the most rapid defence responses characterized in the Plant Kingdom. We have observed that four distinct elicitors of the soya bean oxidative burst activate kinases of masses approximately 44 kDa and approximately 47 kDa. Evidence that these kinases regulate production of reactive oxygen species include: (i) their rapid activation by oxidative burst elicitors, (ii) their tight temporal correlation between activation/deactivation of the kinases and activation/deactivation of the oxidative burst, (iii) the identical pharmacological profile of kinase activation and oxidant production for 13 commonly used inhibitors, and (iv) the autologous activation of both kinases and oxidant production by calyculin A and cantharidin, two phosphatase inhibitors. Immunological and biochemical studies reveal that the activated 44 kDa and 47 kDa kinases are mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase family members. The kinases prefer myelin basic protein as a substrate, and they phosphorylate primarily on threonine residues. The kinases are themselves phosphorylated on tyrosine residues, and this phosphorylation is required for activity. Finally, both kinases are recognized by an antibody against activated MAP kinase immediately after (but not before) cell stimulation by elicitors. Based on these and other observations, a preliminary sequence of signalling steps linking elicitor stimulation, kinase activation and Ca(2+) entry, to initiation of oxidant production, is proposed. PMID:11311144

  13. Design of substrate-based BCR-ABL kinase inhibitors using the cyclotide scaffold

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yen-Hua; Henriques, Sónia T.; Wang, Conan K.; Thorstholm, Louise; Daly, Norelle L.; Kaas, Quentin; Craik, David J.

    2015-01-01

    The constitutively active tyrosine kinase BCR-ABL is the underlying cause of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). Current CML treatments rely on the long-term use of tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs), which target the ATP binding site of BCR-ABL. Over the course of treatment, 20–30% of CML patients develop TKI resistance, which is commonly attributed to point mutations in the drug-binding region. We design a new class of peptide inhibitors that target the substrate-binding site of BCR-ABL by grafting sequences derived from abltide, the optimal substrate of Abl kinase, onto a cell-penetrating cyclotide MCoTI-II. Three grafted cyclotides show significant Abl kinase inhibition in vitro in the low micromolar range using a novel kinase inhibition assay. Our work also demonstrates that a reengineered MCoTI-II with abltide sequences grafted in both loop 1 and 6 inhibits the activity of [T315I]Abl in vitro, a mutant Abl kinase harboring the “gatekeeper” mutation which is notorious for being multidrug resistant. Results from serum stability and cell internalization studies confirm that the MCoTI-II scaffold provides enzymatic stability and cell-penetrating properties to the lead molecules. Taken together, our study highlights that reengineered cyclotides incorporating abltide-derived sequences are promising substrate-competitive inhibitors for Abl kinase and the T315I mutant. PMID:26264857

  14. Phase II Evaluation of Dalantercept, a Soluble Recombinant Activin Receptor-Like Kinase 1 (ALK1) Receptor Fusion Protein, for the Treatment of Recurrent or Persistent Endometrial Cancer: An NRG Oncology/Gynecologic Oncology Group Study 0229N

    PubMed Central

    Makker, Vicky; Filiaci, Virginia L.; Chen, Lee-may; Darus, Christopher J.; Kendrick, James E.; Sutton, Gregory; Moxley, Katherine; Aghajanian, Carol

    2015-01-01

    Objective This two-stage phase II study assessed activity of single agent dalantercept in patients with recurrent/persistent endometrial carcinoma (EMC). Methods Eligible patients had persistent/recurrent EMC after 1–2 prior cytotoxic regimens, measurable disease (RECIST 1.1), and GOG performance ≤ 2. Dalantercept 1.2 mg/kg subcutaneous was administered once every 3 weeks until disease progression (PD)/development of prohibitory toxicity. Primary objectives were to estimate the proportion of patients with persistent/recurrent EMC, who survive progression-free without receiving non-protocol therapy (TPFS) for at least 6 months and to estimate the proportion having objective tumor response. Results All 28 enrolled patients were eligible and evaluable. Median age: 62 years. Most common histologies: 32% Grade 1/2 endometrioid and 54% serous tumors. Prior treatment: 1 or 2 regimens in 82% and 18% of patients, respectively. Eighteen patients received prior radiation therapy. Patients received 1–12 cycles of dalantercept, and 46% of patients received ≤2 cycles. The most common adverse events (AE) were fatigue, anemia, constipation and peripheral edema. Grade 3/4 AEs occurred in 39% and 4% of patients. One grade 5 gastric hemorrhage in a patient with a history of radiation fibrosis/small bowel obstruction was deemed possibly dalantercept-related. All patients are off study: 86% for PD. No ORs were observed; 57% had stable disease and 11% had TPFS ≥ 6 mos. Median progression-free and overall survival: 2.1 months (90% CI: 1.4–3.2) and 14.5 months (90% CI: 7.0–17.5), respectively. Conclusions Dalantercept has insufficient single agent activity in recurrent EMC to warrant further investigation at this dose level and schedule. PMID:25888978

  15. Focal adhesion kinase

    PubMed Central

    Stone, Rebecca L; Baggerly, Keith A; Armaiz-Pena, Guillermo N; Kang, Yu; Sanguino, Angela M; Thanapprapasr, Duangmani; Dalton, Heather J; Bottsford-Miller, Justin; Zand, Behrouz; Akbani, Rehan; Diao, Lixia; Nick, Alpa M; DeGeest, Koen; Lopez-Berestein, Gabriel; Coleman, Robert L; Lutgendorf, Susan; Sood, Anil K

    2014-01-01

    This investigation describes the clinical significance of phosphorylated focal adhesion kinase (FAK) at the major activating tyrosine site (Y397) in epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) cells and tumor-associated endothelial cells. FAK gene amplification as a mechanism for FAK overexpression and the effects of FAK tyrosine kinase inhibitor VS-6062 on tumor growth, metastasis, and angiogenesis were examined. FAK and phospho-FAKY397 were quantified in tumor (FAK-T; pFAK-T) and tumor-associated endothelial (FAK-endo; pFAK-endo) cell compartments of EOCs using immunostaining and qRT-PCR. Associations between expression levels and clinical variables were evaluated. Data from The Cancer Genome Atlas were used to correlate FAK gene copy number and expression levels in EOC specimens. The in vitro and in vivo effects of VS-6062 were assayed in preclinical models. FAK-T and pFAK-T overexpression was significantly associated with advanced stage disease and increased microvessel density (MVD). High MVD was observed in tumors with elevated endothelial cell FAK (59%) and pFAK (44%). Survival was adversely affected by FAK-T overexpression (3.03 vs 2.06 y, P = 0.004), pFAK-T (2.83 vs 1.78 y, P < 0.001), and pFAK-endo (2.33 vs 2.17 y, P = 0.005). FAK gene copy number was increased in 34% of tumors and correlated with expression levels (P < 0.001). VS-6062 significantly blocked EOC and endothelial cell migration as well as endothelial cell tube formation in vitro. VS-6062 reduced mean tumor weight by 56% (P = 0.005), tumor MVD by 40% (P = 0.0001), and extraovarian metastasis (P < 0.01) in orthotopic EOC mouse models. FAK may be a unique therapeutic target in EOC given the dual anti-angiogenic and anti-metastatic potential of FAK inhibitors. PMID:24755674

  16. Integrin-linked kinase: a new member of the kinases involved in hypertensive end-organ damage?

    PubMed

    Obama, Takashi; Eguchi, Satoru

    2014-07-01

    Integrin-linked kinase predominantly localizes at focal adhesions to regulate actin cytoskeletal dynamics, including cell migration and matrix remodelling. Although recent studies have suggested both physiological and pathophysiological roles of integrin-linked kinase in the cardiovascular and renal system, its involvement in hypertensive organ dysfunctions, such as those that occur in kidney, has not been investigated. In the present issue of Clinical Science, Alique and co-workers have demonstrated that angiotensin II-induced renal inflammatory responses were attenuated in mice with conditional deficiency of integrin-linked kinase, which were associated with suppression of nuclear factor κB activation and reactive oxygen species generation but not hypertension. The significance, potential mechanisms and future direction are presented and discussed in this Commentary.

  17. Myotonic dystrophy kinase-related Cdc42-binding kinases (MRCK), the ROCK-like effectors of Cdc42 and Rac1

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Zhuoshen; Manser, Ed

    2015-01-01

    Cdc42 is a member of the Rho GTPase protein family that plays key roles in local F-actin organization through a number of kinase and non-kinase effector proteins. The myotonic dystrophy kinase-related Cdc42-binding kinases (MRCKs), and the RhoA binding coiled-coil containing kinases (ROCKs) are widely expressed members of the Dystrophia myotonica protein kinase (DMPK) family. The MRCK proteins are ∼190 kDa multi-domain proteins expressed in all cells and coordinate certain acto-myosin networks. Notably MRCK is a key regulator of myosin18A and myosin IIA/B, and through phosphorylation of their common regulatory light chains (MYL9 or MLC2) to promote actin stress fiber contractility. The MRCK kinases are regulated by Cdc42, which is required for cell polarity and directional migration; MRCK links to the acto-myosin complex through interaction with a coiled-coil containing adaptor proteins LRAP35a/b. The biological activities of MRCK in model organisms such as worms and flies confirm it as a myosin II activator. In mammalian cell culture MRCK can be critical for cancer cell migration and neurite outgrowth. We review the current literatures regarding MRCK and highlight the similarities and differences between MRCK and ROCK kinases. PMID:26090570

  18. KLIFS: a structural kinase-ligand interaction database

    PubMed Central

    Kooistra, Albert J.; Kanev, Georgi K.; van Linden, Oscar P.J.; Leurs, Rob; de Esch, Iwan J.P.; de Graaf, Chris

    2016-01-01

    Protein kinases play a crucial role in cell signaling and are important drug targets in several therapeutic areas. The KLIFS database contains detailed structural kinase-ligand interaction information derived from all (>2900) structures of catalytic domains of human and mouse protein kinases deposited in the Protein Data Bank in order to provide insights into the structural determinants of kinase-ligand binding and selectivity. The kinase structures have been processed in a consistent manner by systematically analyzing the structural features and molecular interaction fingerprints (IFPs) of a predefined set of 85 binding site residues with bound ligands. KLIFS has been completely rebuilt and extended (>65% more structures) since its first release as a data set, including: novel automated annotation methods for (i) the assessment of ligand-targeted subpockets and the analysis of (ii) DFG and (iii) αC-helix conformations; improved and automated protocols for (iv) the generation of sequence/structure alignments, (v) the curation of ligand atom and bond typing for accurate IFP analysis and (vi) weekly database updates. KLIFS is now accessible via a website (http://klifs.vu-compmedchem.nl) that provides a comprehensive visual presentation of different types of chemical, biological and structural chemogenomics data, and allows the user to easily access, compare, search and download the data. PMID:26496949

  19. Cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase activity in Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed Central

    Ulloa, R M; Mesri, E; Esteva, M; Torres, H N; Téllez-Iñón, M T

    1988-01-01

    A cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase activity from epimastigote forms of Trypanosoma cruzi was characterized. Cytosolic extracts were chromatographed on DEAE-cellulose columns, giving two peaks of kinase activity, which were eluted at 0.15 M- and 0.32 M-NaCl respectively. The second activity peak was stimulated by nanomolar concentrations of cyclic AMP. In addition, a cyclic AMP-binding protein co-eluted with the second kinase activity peak. Cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase activity was further purified by gel filtration, affinity chromatography on histone-agarose and cyclic AMP-agarose, as well as by chromatography on CM-Sephadex. The enzyme ('holoenzyme') could be partially dissociated into two different components: 'catalytic' and 'regulatory'. The 'regulatory' component had specific binding for cyclic AMP, and it inhibited phosphotransferase activity of the homologous 'catalytic component' or of the 'catalytic subunit' from bovine heart. Cyclic AMP reversed these inhibitions. A 'holoenzyme preparation' was phosphorylated in the absence of exogenous phosphate acceptor and analysed by polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis. A 56 kDa band was phosphorylated. The same preparation was analysed by Western blotting, by using polyclonal antibodies to the regulatory subunits of protein kinases type I or II. Both antibodies reacted with the 56 kDa band. Images Fig. 7. Fig. 8. PMID:2848508

  20. Bivalent Inhibitors of Protein Kinases

    PubMed Central

    Gower, Carrie M.; Chang, Matthew E. K.; Maly, Dustin J.

    2015-01-01

    Protein kinases are key players in a large number of cellular signaling pathways. Dysregulated kinase activity has been implicated in a number of diseases, and members of this enzyme family are of therapeutic interest. However, due to the fact that most inhibitors interact with the highly conserved ATP-binding sites of kinases, it is a significant challenge to develop pharmacological agents that target only one of the greater than 500 kinases present in humans. A potential solution to this problem is the development of bisubstrate and bivalent kinase inhibitors, in which an active site-directed moiety is tethered to another ligand that targets a location outside of the ATP-binding cleft. Because kinase signaling specificity is modulated by regions outside of the ATP-binding site, strategies that exploit these interactions have the potential to provide reagents with high target selectivity. This review highlights examples of kinase interaction sites that can potentially be exploited by bisubstrate and bivalent inhibitors. Furthermore, an overview of efforts to target these interactions with bisubstrate and bivalent inhibitors is provided. Finally, several examples of the successful application of these reagents in a cellular setting are described. PMID:24564382

  1. Identification of human cyclin-dependent kinase 8, a putative protein kinase partner for cyclin C.

    PubMed

    Tassan, J P; Jaquenoud, M; Léopold, P; Schultz, S J; Nigg, E A

    1995-09-12

    Metazoan cyclin C was originally isolated by virtue of its ability to rescue Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells deficient in G1 cyclin function. This suggested that cyclin C might play a role in cell cycle control, but progress toward understanding the function of this cyclin has been hampered by the lack of information on a potential kinase partner. Here we report the identification of a human protein kinase, K35 [cyclin-dependent kinase 8 (CDK8)], that is likely to be a physiological partner of cyclin C. A specific interaction between K35 and cyclin C could be demonstrated after translation of CDKs and cyclins in vitro. Furthermore, cyclin C could be detected in K35 immunoprecipitates prepared from HeLa cells, indicating that the two proteins form a complex also in vivo. The K35-cyclin C complex is structurally related to SRB10-SRB11, a CDK-cyclin pair recently shown to be part of the RNA polymerase II holoenzyme of S. cerevisiae. Hence, we propose that human K35(CDK8)-cyclin C might be functionally associated with the mammalian transcription apparatus, perhaps involved in relaying growth-regulatory signals.

  2. Activity of protein kinase C-α within the subfornical organ is necessary for fluid intake in response to brain angiotensin.

    PubMed

    Coble, Jeffrey P; Johnson, Ralph F; Cassell, Martin D; Johnson, Alan Kim; Grobe, Justin L; Sigmund, Curt D

    2014-07-01

    Angiotensin-II production in the subfornical organ acting through angiotensin-II type-1 receptors is necessary for polydipsia, resulting from elevated renin-angiotensin system activity. Protein kinase C and mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways have been shown to mediate effects of angiotensin-II in the brain. We investigated mechanisms that mediate brain angiotensin-II-induced polydipsia. We used double-transgenic sRA mice, consisting of human renin controlled by the neuron-specific synapsin promoter crossed with human angiotensinogen controlled by its endogenous promoter, which results in brain-specific overexpression of angiotensin-II, particularly in the subfornical organ. We also used the deoxycorticosterone acetate-salt model of hypertension, which exhibits polydipsia. Inhibition of protein kinase C, but not extracellular signal-regulated kinases, protein kinase A, or vasopressin V₁A and V₂ receptors, corrected the elevated water intake of sRA mice. Using an isoform selective inhibitor and an adenovirus expressing dominant negative protein kinase C-α revealed that protein kinase C-α in the subfornical organ was necessary to mediate elevated fluid and sodium intake in sRA mice. Inhibition of protein kinase C activity also attenuated polydipsia in the deoxycorticosterone acetate-salt model. We provide evidence that inducing protein kinase C activity centrally is sufficient to induce water intake in water-replete wild-type mice, and that cell surface localization of protein kinase C-α can be induced in cultured cells from the subfornical organ. These experimental findings demonstrate a role for central protein kinase C activity in fluid balance, and further mechanistically demonstrate the importance of protein kinase C-α signaling in the subfornical organ in fluid intake stimulated by angiotensin-II in the brain.

  3. Conservation of structural fluctuations in homologous protein kinases and its implications on functional sites.

    PubMed

    Kalaivani, Raju; de Brevern, Alexandre G; Srinivasan, Narayanaswamy

    2016-07-01

    Our aim is to explore the similarities in structural fluctuations of homologous kinases. Gaussian Network Model based Normal Mode Analysis was performed on 73 active conformation structures in Ser/Thr/Tyr kinase superfamily. Categories of kinases with progressive evolutionary divergence, viz. (i) Same kinase with many crystal structures, (ii) Within-Subfamily, (iii) Within-Family, (iv) Within-Group, and (v) Across-Group, were analyzed. We identified a flexibility signature conserved in all kinases involving residues in and around the catalytic loop with consistent low-magnitude fluctuations. However, the overall structural fluctuation profiles are conserved better in closely related kinases (Within-Subfamily and Within-family) than in distant ones (Within-Group and Across-Group). A substantial 65.4% of variation in flexibility was not accounted by variation in sequences or structures. Interestingly, we identified substructural residue-wise fluctuation patterns characteristic of kinases of different categories. Specifically, we recognized statistically significant fluctuations unique to families of protein kinase A, cyclin-dependent kinases, and nonreceptor tyrosine kinases. These fluctuation signatures localized to sites known to participate in protein-protein interactions typical of these kinase families. We report for the first time that residues characterized by fluctuations unique to the group/family are involved in interactions specific to the group/family. As highlighted for Src family, local regions with differential fluctuations are proposed as attractive targets for drug design. Overall, our study underscores the importance of consideration of fluctuations, over and above sequence and structural features, in understanding the roles of sites characteristic of kinases. Proteins 2016; 84:957-978. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27028938

  4. The yeast carboxyl-terminal repeat domain kinase CTDK-I is a divergent cyclin-cyclin-dependent kinase complex.

    PubMed Central

    Sterner, D E; Lee, J M; Hardin, S E; Greenleaf, A L

    1995-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae CTDK-I is a protein kinase complex that specifically and efficiently hyperphosphorylates the carboxyl-terminal repeat domain (CTD) of RNA polymerase II and is composed of three subunits of 58, 38, and 32 kDa. The kinase is essential in vivo for normal phosphorylation of the CTD and for normal growth and differentiation. We have now cloned the genes for the two smaller kinase subunits, CTK2 and CTK3, and found that they form a unique, divergent cyclin-cyclin-dependent kinase complex with the previously characterized largest subunit protein CTK1, a cyclin-dependent kinase homolog. The CTK2 gene encodes a cyclin-related protein with limited homology to cyclin C, while CTK3 shows no similarity to other known proteins. Copurification of the three gene products with each other and CTDK-I activity by means of conventional chromatography and antibody affinity columns has verified their participation in the complex in vitro. In addition, null mutations of each of the genes and all combinations thereof conferred very similar growth-impaired, cold-sensitive phenotypes, consistent with their involvement in the same function in vivo. These characterizations and the availability of all of the genes encoding CTDK-I and reagents derivable from them will facilitate investigations into CTD phosphorylation and its functional consequences both in vivo and in vitro. PMID:7565723

  5. Endothelial Bmx tyrosine kinase activity is essential for myocardial hypertrophy and remodeling.

    PubMed

    Holopainen, Tanja; Räsänen, Markus; Anisimov, Andrey; Tuomainen, Tomi; Zheng, Wei; Tvorogov, Denis; Hulmi, Juha J; Andersson, Leif C; Cenni, Bruno; Tavi, Pasi; Mervaala, Eero; Kivelä, Riikka; Alitalo, Kari

    2015-10-20

    Cardiac hypertrophy accompanies many forms of heart disease, including ischemic disease, hypertension, heart failure, and valvular disease, and it is a strong predictor of increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Deletion of bone marrow kinase in chromosome X (Bmx), an arterial nonreceptor tyrosine kinase, has been shown to inhibit cardiac hypertrophy in mice. This finding raised the possibility of therapeutic use of Bmx tyrosine kinase inhibitors, which we have addressed here by analyzing cardiac hypertrophy in gene-targeted mice deficient in Bmx tyrosine kinase activity. We found that angiotensin II (Ang II)-induced cardiac hypertrophy is significantly reduced in mice deficient in Bmx and in mice with inactivated Bmx tyrosine kinase compared with WT mice. Genome-wide transcriptomic profiling showed that Bmx inactivation suppresses myocardial expression of genes related to Ang II-induced inflammatory and extracellular matrix responses whereas expression of RNAs encoding mitochondrial proteins after Ang II administration was maintained in Bmx-inactivated hearts. Very little or no Bmx mRNA was expressed in human cardiomyocytes whereas human cardiac endothelial cells expressed abundant amounts. Ang II stimulation of endothelial cells increased Bmx phosphorylation, and Bmx gene silencing inhibited downstream STAT3 signaling, which has been implicated in cardiac hypertrophy. Furthermore, activation of the mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 pathway by Ang II treatment was decreased in the Bmx-deficient hearts. Our results demonstrate that inhibition of the cross-talk between endothelial cells and cardiomyocytes by Bmx inactivation suppresses Ang II-induced signals for cardiac hypertrophy. These results suggest that the endothelial Bmx tyrosine kinase could provide a target to attenuate the development of cardiac hypertrophy. PMID:26430242

  6. Endothelial Bmx tyrosine kinase activity is essential for myocardial hypertrophy and remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Holopainen, Tanja; Räsänen, Markus; Anisimov, Andrey; Tuomainen, Tomi; Zheng, Wei; Tvorogov, Denis; Hulmi, Juha J.; Andersson, Leif C.; Cenni, Bruno; Tavi, Pasi; Mervaala, Eero; Kivelä, Riikka; Alitalo, Kari

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac hypertrophy accompanies many forms of heart disease, including ischemic disease, hypertension, heart failure, and valvular disease, and it is a strong predictor of increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Deletion of bone marrow kinase in chromosome X (Bmx), an arterial nonreceptor tyrosine kinase, has been shown to inhibit cardiac hypertrophy in mice. This finding raised the possibility of therapeutic use of Bmx tyrosine kinase inhibitors, which we have addressed here by analyzing cardiac hypertrophy in gene-targeted mice deficient in Bmx tyrosine kinase activity. We found that angiotensin II (Ang II)-induced cardiac hypertrophy is significantly reduced in mice deficient in Bmx and in mice with inactivated Bmx tyrosine kinase compared with WT mice. Genome-wide transcriptomic profiling showed that Bmx inactivation suppresses myocardial expression of genes related to Ang II-induced inflammatory and extracellular matrix responses whereas expression of RNAs encoding mitochondrial proteins after Ang II administration was maintained in Bmx-inactivated hearts. Very little or no Bmx mRNA was expressed in human cardiomyocytes whereas human cardiac endothelial cells expressed abundant amounts. Ang II stimulation of endothelial cells increased Bmx phosphorylation, and Bmx gene silencing inhibited downstream STAT3 signaling, which has been implicated in cardiac hypertrophy. Furthermore, activation of the mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 pathway by Ang II treatment was decreased in the Bmx-deficient hearts. Our results demonstrate that inhibition of the cross-talk between endothelial cells and cardiomyocytes by Bmx inactivation suppresses Ang II-induced signals for cardiac hypertrophy. These results suggest that the endothelial Bmx tyrosine kinase could provide a target to attenuate the development of cardiac hypertrophy. PMID:26430242

  7. A chemically defined culture medium containing Rho kinase inhibitor Y-27632 for the fabrication of stratified squamous epithelial cell grafts.

    PubMed

    Aslanova, Afag; Takagi, Ryo; Yamato, Masayuki; Okano, Teruo; Yamamoto, Masakazu

    2015-05-01

    With the development of a culture method for stratified squamous epithelial cells, tissue-engineered epithelial cell sheets have been successfully applied as clinical cell grafts. However, the implementation of these cell sheets without the use of any animal-derived materials is highly desirable. In this study, Rho-associated protein kinase inhibitor Y-27632 was used to develop a chemically defined culture medium for the fabrication of stratified epithelial cell grafts consisting of human epidermal and oral keratinocytes, and the proliferation activity, cell morphology, and gene expressions of the keratinocytes were analyzed. The results of a colorimetric assay indicated that Y-27632 significantly promoted the proliferation of the keratinocytes in culture media both with and without fetal bovine serum (FBS), although there were no indications of Y-27632 efficacy on cell morphology and stratification of the keratinocytes in culture medium without any animal-derived materials. The results of quantitative RT-PCR revealed that gene expressions correlated with cell adhesion, cell-cell junction, proliferation markers, and stem/progenitor markers in cultured keratinocytes were not strongly affected by the addition of Y-27632 to the culture medium. Moreover, gene expressions of differentiation markers in stratified keratinocytes cultured in medium without FBS were nearly identical to those of keratinocytes co-cultured with 3T3 feeder cells. Interestingly, the expressions of differentiation markers in cultured stratified keratinocytes were suppressed by FBS, whereas they were reconstructed by either co-culture of a 3T3 feeder layer or addition of Y-27632 into the culture medium containing FBS. These findings indicate that Y-27632 is a useful supplement for the development of a chemically defined culture medium for fabrication of stratified epithelial cell grafts for clinical applications for the purpose of developing the culture medium with a lower risk of pathogen

  8. Isolation of chloroplastic phosphoglycerate kinase

    SciTech Connect

    Macioszek, J.; Anderson, L.E. ); Anderson, J.B. )

    1990-09-01

    We report here a method for the isolation of high specific activity phosphoglycerate kinase (EC 2.7.2.3) from chloroplasts. The enzyme has been purified over 200-fold from pea (Pisum sativum L.) stromal extracts to apparent homogeneity with 23% recovery. Negative cooperativity is observed with the two enzyme phosphoglycerate kinase/glyceraldehyde-3-P dehydrogenase (EC 1.2.1.13) couple restored from the purified enzymes when NADPH is the reducing pyridine nucleotide, consistent with earlier results obtained with crude chloroplastic extracts. Michaelis Menten kinetics are observed when 3-phosphoglycerate is held constant and phosphoglycerate kinase is varied, which suggests that phosphoglycerate kinase-bound 1,3-bisphosphoglycerate may be the preferred substrate for glyceraldehyde-3-P dehydrogenase in the chloroplast.

  9. Protein Crystals of Raf Kinase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    This image shows crystals of the protein raf kinase grown on Earth (photo a) and on USML-2 (photo b). The space-grown crystals are an order of magnitude larger. Principal Investigator: Dan Carter of New Century Pharmaceuticals

  10. Tyrosine kinase gene rearrangements in epithelial malignancies.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Alice T; Hsu, Peggy P; Awad, Mark M; Engelman, Jeffrey A

    2013-11-01

    Chromosomal rearrangements that lead to oncogenic kinase activation are observed in many epithelial cancers. These cancers express activated fusion kinases that drive the initiation and progression of malignancy, and often have a considerable response to small-molecule kinase inhibitors, which validates these fusion kinases as 'druggable' targets. In this Review, we examine the aetiologic, pathogenic and clinical features that are associated with cancers harbouring oncogenic fusion kinases, including anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK), ROS1 and RET. We discuss the clinical outcomes with targeted therapies and explore strategies to discover additional kinases that are activated by chromosomal rearrangements in solid tumours.

  11. Tyrosine kinase gene rearrangements in epithelial malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, Alice T.; Hsu, Peggy P.; Awad, Mark M.; Engelman, Jeffrey A.

    2014-01-01

    Chromosomal rearrangements that lead to oncogenic kinase activation are observed in many epithelial cancers. These cancers express activated fusion kinases that drive the initiation and progression of malignancy, and often have a considerable response to small-molecule kinase inhibitors, which validates these fusion kinases as ‘druggable’ targets. In this Review, we examine the aetiologic, pathogenic and clinical features that are associated with cancers harbouring oncogenic fusion kinases, including anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK), ROS1 and RET. We discuss the clinical outcomes with targeted therapies and explore strategies to discover additional kinases that are activated by chromosomal rearrangements in solid tumours. PMID:24132104

  12. Identification of Novel Small Molecule Inhibitors of Oncogenic RET Kinase.

    PubMed

    Moccia, Marialuisa; Liu, Qingsong; Guida, Teresa; Federico, Giorgia; Brescia, Annalisa; Zhao, Zheng; Choi, Hwan Geun; Deng, Xianming; Tan, Li; Wang, Jinhua; Billaud, Marc; Gray, Nathanael S; Carlomagno, Francesca; Santoro, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    Oncogenic mutation of the RET receptor tyrosine kinase is observed in several human malignancies. Here, we describe three novel type II RET tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI), ALW-II-41-27, XMD15-44 and HG-6-63-01, that inhibit the cellular activity of oncogenic RET mutants at two digit nanomolar concentration. These three compounds shared a 3-trifluoromethyl-4-methylpiperazinephenyl pharmacophore that stabilizes the 'DFG-out' inactive conformation of RET activation loop. They blocked RET-mediated signaling and proliferation with an IC50 in the nM range in fibroblasts transformed by the RET/C634R and RET/M918T oncogenes. They also inhibited autophosphorylation of several additional oncogenic RET-derived point mutants and chimeric oncogenes. At a concentration of 10 nM, ALW-II-41-27, XMD15-44 and HG-6-63-01 inhibited RET kinase and signaling in human thyroid cancer cell lines carrying oncogenic RET alleles; they also inhibited proliferation of cancer, but not non-tumoral Nthy-ori-3-1, thyroid cells, with an IC50 in the nM range. The three compounds were capable of inhibiting the 'gatekeeper' V804M mutant which confers substantial resistance to established RET inhibitors. In conclusion, we have identified a type II TKI scaffold, shared by ALW-II-41-27, XMD15-44 and HG-6-63-01, that may be used as novel lead for the development of novel agents for the treatment of cancers harboring oncogenic activation of RET.

  13. Rational approaches towards lead optimization of kinase inhibitors: the issue of specificity.

    PubMed

    Badrinarayan, Preethi; Sastry, G Narahari

    2013-01-01

    Kinases are one of the most popular classes of drug targets as they are involved in signal transduction pathways, which are wired through a phosphotransfer cascade and elicit a number of important and essential physiological responses. Kinase specificity has emerged as one of the major issues to be addressed in drug discovery approaches. In most kinases the active site is the ATP binding site and finding suitable hits which maximize the affinity of binding has been traditionally important to obtain the type I inhibitors. While type I inhibitors have effective binding affinity more often than not they encounter side-effects usually associated with specificity. Therefore in recent times it has become indispensable to optimize specificity for developing effective kinase inhibitors. The review presents an overview of kinase drug discovery and the different strategies used to date for the design of kinase leads accounting for their success and failure. A number of strategies exploiting different aspects of kinases like allosteric site, size of the gatekeeper residue, DFG-loop, chemotype selectivity, non-covalent interactions, salt-bridge, solvation, etc. have been explored to circumvent the specificity problem in kinases. The probable hot-spots in kinases having a propensity to bring in specificity have been delineated with special emphasis on the design of type II inhibitors with increased specificity from existing type I using fragment tailoring approach. In this review we illustrate the current strategies by taking p38 MAP kinase as a model and expect that such strategies are general and can be extended to the other members of the kinase family. PMID:23260022

  14. Pharmacological modulation of protein kinases as a new approach to treat addiction to cocaine and opiates.

    PubMed

    García-Pardo, María Pilar; Roger-Sanchez, Concepción; Rodríguez-Arias, Marta; Miñarro, Jose; Aguilar, María Asunción

    2016-06-15

    Drug addiction shares brain mechanisms and molecular substrates with learning and memory processes, such as the stimulation of glutamate receptors and their downstream signalling pathways. In the present work we provide an up-to-date review of studies that have demonstrated the implication of the main memory-related calcium-dependent protein kinases in opiate and cocaine addiction. The effects of these drugs of abuse in different animal models of drug reward, dependence and addiction are altered by manipulation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) family, particularly extracellular signal regulated kinase (ERK), calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase II (CaMKII), the protein kinase C (PKC) family (including PKMζ), cAMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKA), cGMP-dependent protein kinase G (PKG), the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) pathway and its downstream target mammalian target of Rapamycin (mTOR), cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5), heat-shock proteins (Hsp) and other enzymes and proteins. Research suggests that drugs of abuse induce dependence and addiction by modifying the signalling pathways that involve these memory-related protein kinases, and supports the idea that drug addiction is an excessive aberrant learning disorder in which the maladaptive memory of drug-associated cues maintains compulsive drug use and contributes to relapse. Moreover, the studies we review offer new pharmacological strategies to treat opiate and cocaine dependence based on the manipulation of these protein kinases. In particular, disruption of reconsolidation of drug-related memories may have a high therapeutic value in the treatment of drug addiction. PMID:27056740

  15. Pharmacological modulation of protein kinases as a new approach to treat addiction to cocaine and opiates.

    PubMed

    García-Pardo, María Pilar; Roger-Sanchez, Concepción; Rodríguez-Arias, Marta; Miñarro, Jose; Aguilar, María Asunción

    2016-06-15

    Drug addiction shares brain mechanisms and molecular substrates with learning and memory processes, such as the stimulation of glutamate receptors and their downstream signalling pathways. In the present work we provide an up-to-date review of studies that have demonstrated the implication of the main memory-related calcium-dependent protein kinases in opiate and cocaine addiction. The effects of these drugs of abuse in different animal models of drug reward, dependence and addiction are altered by manipulation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) family, particularly extracellular signal regulated kinase (ERK), calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase II (CaMKII), the protein kinase C (PKC) family (including PKMζ), cAMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKA), cGMP-dependent protein kinase G (PKG), the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) pathway and its downstream target mammalian target of Rapamycin (mTOR), cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5), heat-shock proteins (Hsp) and other enzymes and proteins. Research suggests that drugs of abuse induce dependence and addiction by modifying the signalling pathways that involve these memory-related protein kinases, and supports the idea that drug addiction is an excessive aberrant learning disorder in which the maladaptive memory of drug-associated cues maintains compulsive drug use and contributes to relapse. Moreover, the studies we review offer new pharmacological strategies to treat opiate and cocaine dependence based on the manipulation of these protein kinases. In particular, disruption of reconsolidation of drug-related memories may have a high therapeutic value in the treatment of drug addiction.

  16. Function of human cytomegalovirus UL97 kinase in viral infection and its inhibition by maribavir

    PubMed Central

    Prichard, Mark N.

    2013-01-01

    Summary The serine/threonine kinase expressed by human cytomegalovirus from gene UL97 phosphorylates the antiviral drug ganciclovir, but its biological function is the phosphorylation of its natural viral and cellular protein substrates which affect viral replication at many levels. The UL97 kinase null phenotype is therefore complex, as is the mechanism of action of maribavir, a highly specific inhibitor of its enzymatic activity. Studies that utilise the drug corroborate results from genetic approaches and together have elucidated many functions of the UL97 kinase that are critical for viral replication. The kinase phosphorylates eukaryotic elongation factor 1delta, the carboxyl terminal domain of the large subunit of RNA polymerase II, the retinoblastoma tumour suppressor and lamins A and C. Each of these is also phosphorylated and regulated by cdc2/cyclin-dependent kinase 1, suggesting that the viral kinase may perform a similar function. These and other activities of the UL97 kinase appear to stimulate the cell cycle to support viral DNA synthesis, enhance the expression of viral genes, promote virion morphogenesis and facilitate the egress of mature capsids from the nucleus. In the absence of UL97 kinase activity, viral DNA synthesis is inefficient and structural proteins are sequestered in nuclear aggresomes, reducing the efficiency of virion morphogenesis. Mature capsids that do form fail to egress the nucleus as the nuclear lamina are not dispersed by the kinase. The critical functions performed by the UL97 kinase illustrate its importance in viral replication and confirm that the kinase is a target for the development of antiviral therapies. PMID:19434630

  17. Protein Kinase Activity Decreases with Higher Braak Stages of Alzheimer’s Disease Pathology

    PubMed Central

    Rosenberger, Andrea F.N.; Hilhorst, Riet; Coart, Elisabeth; García Barrado, Leandro; Naji, Faris; Rozemuller, Annemieke J.M.; van der Flier, Wiesje M.; Scheltens, Philip; Hoozemans, Jeroen J.M.; van der Vies, Saskia M.

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is characterized by a long pre-clinical phase (20–30 years), during which significant brain pathology manifests itself. Disease mechanisms associated with pathological hallmarks remain elusive. Most processes associated with AD pathogenesis, such as inflammation, synaptic dysfunction, and hyper-phosphorylation of tau are dependent on protein kinase activity. The objective of this study was to determine the involvement of protein kinases in AD pathogenesis. Protein kinase activity was determined in postmortem hippocampal brain tissue of 60 patients at various stages of AD and 40 non-demented controls (Braak stages 0-VI) using a peptide-based microarray platform. We observed an overall decrease of protein kinase activity that correlated with disease progression. The phosphorylation of 96.7% of the serine/threonine peptides and 37.5% of the tyrosine peptides on the microarray decreased significantly with increased Braak stage (p-value <0.01). Decreased activity was evident at pre-clinical stages of AD pathology (Braak I-II). Increased phosphorylation was not observed for any peptide. STRING analysis in combination with pathway analysis and identification of kinases responsible for peptide phosphorylation showed the interactions between well-known proteins in AD pathology, including the Ephrin-receptor A1 (EphA1), a risk gene for AD, and sarcoma tyrosine kinase (Src), which is involved in memory formation. Additionally, kinases that have not previously been associated with AD were identified, e.g., protein tyrosine kinase 6 (PTK6/BRK), feline sarcoma oncogene kinase (FES), and fyn-associated tyrosine kinase (FRK). The identified protein kinases are new biomarkers and potential drug targets for early (pre-clinical) intervention. PMID:26519433

  18. Phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase, protein kinase B and ribosomal S6 kinases in the stimulation of thyroid epithelial cell proliferation by cAMP and growth factors in the presence of insulin.

    PubMed

    Coulonval, K; Vandeput, F; Stein, R C; Kozma, S C; Lamy, F; Dumont, J E

    2000-06-01

    The proliferation of most normal cells depends on the co-operation of several growth factors and hormones, each with a specific role, but the key events involved in the action of each necessary stimulant remain largely uncharacterized. In the present study, the pathways involved in the mechanism(s) of co-operation have been investigated in primary cultures of dog thyroid epithelial cells. In this physiologically relevant system, thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) acting through cAMP, epidermal growth factor (EGF) and phorbol esters (such as PMA) induce DNA synthesis. Their effect requires stimulation of the insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) receptor by either IGF-1 or insulin, which are not themselves mitogenic agents. In contrast, hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) is itself fully mitogenic. The results of the study demonstrate that cAMP, EGF, HGF and PMA stimulate p70 ribosomal S6 kinase (p70 S6 kinase). However, insulin/IGF-1 also stimulate p70 S6 kinase. Thus stimulation of p70 S6 kinase might be necessary, but is certainly not sufficient, for the induction of DNA synthesis and is not specific for any stimulated pathway. In contrast, phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI 3-kinase) and protein kinase B (PKB) activation by insulin and HGF is strong and sustained, whereas it is weak and transient with EGF and absent in the presence of TSH or PMA. These findings suggest that: (i) stimulation of PI 3-kinases and/or PKB is not involved in the cAMP-dependent pathways leading to thyrocyte proliferation, or in the action of PMA, (ii) the stimulation of the PI 3-kinase/PKB pathway may account for the permissive action of insulin/IGF-1 in the proliferation of these cells, and (iii) the stimulation of this pathway by HGF may explain why this agent does not require insulin or IGF-1 for its mitogenic action. PMID:10816429

  19. Discovering the first tyrosine kinase

    PubMed Central

    Hunter, Tony

    2015-01-01

    In the middle of the 20th century, animal tumor viruses were heralded as possible models for understanding human cancer. By the mid-1970s, the molecular basis by which tumor viruses transform cells into a malignant state was beginning to emerge as the first viral genomic sequences were reported and the proteins encoded by their transforming genes were identified and characterized. This was a time of great excitement and rapid progress. In 1978, prompted by the discovery from Ray Erikson’s group that the Rous sarcoma virus (RSV) v-Src–transforming protein had an associated protein kinase activity specific for threonine, my group at the Salk Institute set out to determine whether the polyomavirus middle T-transforming protein had a similar kinase activity. Here, I describe the experiments that led to the identification of a kinase activity associated with middle T antigen and our serendipitous discovery that this activity was specific for tyrosine in vitro, and how this in turn led to the fortuitous observation that the v-Src–associated kinase activity was also specific for tyrosine. Our finding that v-Src increased the level of phosphotyrosine in cellular proteins in RSV-transformed cells confirmed that v-Src is a tyrosine kinase and transforms cells by phosphorylating proteins on tyrosine. My colleague Bart Sefton and I reported these findings in the March issue of PNAS in 1980. Remarkably, all of the experiments in this paper were accomplished in less than one month. PMID:26130799

  20. Coordinate regulation of IkappaB kinases by mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinase 1 and NF-kappaB-inducing kinase.

    PubMed

    Nemoto, S; DiDonato, J A; Lin, A

    1998-12-01

    IkappaB kinases (IKKalpha and IKKbeta) are key components of the IKK complex that mediates activation of the transcription factor NF-kappaB in response to extracellular stimuli such as inflammatory cytokines, viral and bacterial infection, and UV irradiation. Although NF-kappaB-inducing kinase (NIK) interacts with and activates the IKKs, the upstream kinases for the IKKs still remain obscure. We identified mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinase 1 (MEKK1) as an immediate upstream kinase of the IKK complex. MEKK1 is activated by tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) and interleukin-1 and can potentiate the stimulatory effect of TNF-alpha on IKK and NF-kappaB activation. The dominant negative mutant of MEKK1, on the other hand, partially blocks activation of IKK by TNF-alpha. MEKK1 interacts with and stimulates the activities of both IKKalpha and IKKbeta in transfected HeLa and COS-1 cells and directly phosphorylates the IKKs in vitro. Furthermore, MEKK1 appears to act in parallel to NIK, leading to synergistic activation of the IKK complex. The formation of the MEKK1-IKK complex versus the NIK-IKK complex may provide a molecular basis for regulation of the IKK complex by various extracellular signals.

  1. Modelling the 2-kinase domain of 6-phosphofructo-2-kinase/fructose-2,6-bisphosphatase on adenylate kinase.

    PubMed Central

    Bertrand, L; Vertommen, D; Depiereux, E; Hue, L; Rider, M H; Feytmans, E

    1997-01-01

    Simultaneous multiple alignment of available sequences of the bifunctional enzyme 6-phosphofructo-2-kinase/fructose-2,6-bisphosphatase revealed several segments of conserved residues in the 2-kinase domain. The sequence of the kinase domain was also compared with proteins of known three-dimensional structure. No similarity was found between the kinase domain of 6-phosphofructo-2-kinase and 6-phosphofructo-1-kinase. This questions the modelling of the 2-kinase domain on bacterial 6-phosphofructo-1-kinase that has previously been proposed [Bazan, Fletterick and Pilkis (1989) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 86, 9642-9646]. However, sequence similarities were found between the 2-kinase domain and several nucleotide-binding proteins, the most similar being adenylate kinase. A structural model of the 2-kinase domain based on adenylate kinase is proposed. It accommodates all the results of site-directed mutagenesis studies carried out to date on residues in the 2-kinase domain. It also allows residues potentially involved in catalysis and/or substrate binding to be predicted. PMID:9032445

  2. Evolutionary Ancestry of Eukaryotic Protein Kinases and Choline Kinases.

    PubMed

    Lai, Shenshen; Safaei, Javad; Pelech, Steven

    2016-03-01

    The reversible phosphorylation of proteins catalyzed by protein kinases in eukaryotes supports an important role for eukaryotic protein kinases (ePKs) in the emergence of nucleated cells in the third superkingdom of life. Choline kinases (ChKs) could also be critical in the early evolution of eukaryotes, because of their function in the biosynthesis of phosphatidylcholine, which is unique to eukaryotic membranes. However, the genomic origins of ePKs and ChKs are unclear. The high degeneracy of protein sequences and broad expansion of ePK families have made this fundamental question difficult to answer. In this study, we identified two class-I aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases with high similarities to consensus amino acid sequences of human protein-serine/threonine kinases. Comparisons of primary and tertiary structures supported that ePKs and ChKs evolved from a common ancestor related to glutaminyl aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, which may have been one of the key factors in the successful of emergence of ancient eukaryotic cells from bacterial colonies.

  3. Cloning and expression of two human p70 S6 kinase polypeptides differing only at their amino termini

    SciTech Connect

    Grove, J.R.; Banerjee, P.; Balasubramanyam, A.; Price, D.J.; Avruch, J. ); Coffer, P.J.; Woodgett, J.R. )

    1991-11-01

    Two classes of human cDNA encoding the insulin/mitogen-activated p70 S6 kinase have been isolated; the two classes differ only in the 5{prime} region, such that the longer polypeptide consists of 525 amino acids, of which the last 502 longer residues are identical in sequence to the entire polypeptide encoded by the second cDNA. Both p70 S6 kinase polypeptides predicted by these cDNAs are present in p70 S6 kinase purified from rat liver, and each is thus expressed in vivo. Moreover, both polypeptides are expressed from a single mRNA transcribed from the (longer) p70 S6 kinase {alpha}I cDNA through the utilization of different translational start sites. Transient expression of p70 {alpha}I and {alpha}II S6 kinase cDNA in COA cells results in a 2.5- to 4-fold increase in overall S6 kinase activity. Transfection with the {alpha}II cDNA yields only the smaller set of bands, while transfection with the {alpha}I cDNA generates both sets of bands. Mutation of Met-24 in the {alpha}I cDNA to Leu or Thr suppresses synthesis of the {alpha}II polypeptides. Only the p70 {alpha}I and {alpha}II polypeptides of slowest mobility on SDS-PAGE comigrate with the 70-and 90-kDa proteins observed in purified rat liver S6 kinase. The recombinant p70 S6 kinase undergoes multiple phosphorylation and partial activation in COS cells. Acquisition of S6 protein kinase catalytic function, however, is apparently restricted to the most extensively phosphorylated recombinant polypeptides.

  4. Skeletal muscle Ca(2+)-independent kinase activity increases during either hypertrophy or running

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fluck, M.; Waxham, M. N.; Hamilton, M. T.; Booth, F. W.

    2000-01-01

    Spikes in free Ca(2+) initiate contractions in skeletal muscle cells, but whether and how they might signal to transcription factors in skeletal muscles of living animals is unknown. Since previous studies in non-muscle cells have shown that serum response factor (SRF) protein, a transcription factor, is phosphorylated rapidly by Ca(2+)/calmodulin (CaM)-dependent protein kinase after rises in intracellular Ca(2+), we measured enzymatic activity that phosphorylates SRF (designated SRF kinase activity). Homogenates from 7-day-hypertrophied anterior latissimus dorsi muscles of roosters had more Ca(2+)-independent SRF kinase activity than their respective control muscles. However, no differences were noted in Ca(2+)/CaM-dependent SRF kinase activity between control and trained muscles. To determine whether the Ca(2+)-independent and Ca(2+)/CaM-dependent forms of Ca(2+)/CaM-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) might contribute to some of the SRF kinase activity, autocamtide-3, a synthetic substrate that is specific for CaMKII, was employed. While the Ca(2+)-independent form of CaMKII was increased, like the Ca(2+)-independent form of SRF kinase, no alteration in CaMKII occurred at 7 days of stretch overload. These observations suggest that some of SRF phosphorylation by skeletal muscle extracts could be due to CaMKII. To determine whether this adaptation was specific to the exercise type (i.e., hypertrophy), similar measurements were made in the white vastus lateralis muscle of rats that had completed 2 wk of voluntary running. Although Ca(2+)-independent SRF kinase was increased, no alteration occurred in Ca(2+)/CaM-dependent SRF kinase activity. Thus any role of Ca(2+)-independent SRF kinase signaling has downstream modulators specific to the exercise phenotype.

  5. Electrogenerated Chemiluminescence Bioassay of Two Protein Kinases Incorporating Peptide Phosphorylation and Versatile Probe.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xia; Dong, Manman; Qi, Honglan; Gao, Qiang; Zhang, Chengxiao

    2016-09-01

    A sensitive electrogenerated chemiluminescence (ECL) bioassay was developed for the detection of two protein kinases incorporating the peptide phosphorylation and a versatile ECL probe. Cyclic adenosine monophosphate-dependent protein kinase (PKA) and casein kinase II (CK2) were used as proof-of-concept targets while a PKA-specific peptide (CLRRASLG) and a CK2-specific peptide (CRRRADDSDDDDD) were used as the recognition substrates. Taking advantage of the ability of protein A binding with the Fc region of a variety of antibodies with high affinity, a ruthenium derivative-labeled protein A was utilized as a versatile ECL probe for bioassay of multiple protein kinases. A specific peptide substrate toward target protein kinase was first self-assembled on the surface of gold electrode and then serine in the specific peptide on the electrode was phosphorylated by target protein kinase in the presence of adenosine-5'-triphosphate. After recognition of the phosphorylated peptide by monoclonal antiphosphoserine antibody, the versatile ECL probe was specifically bound to the antiphosphoserine antibody on the electrode surface. The ECL bioassay was developed successfully in the individual detection of PKA and CK2 with detection limit of 0.005 U/mL and 0.004 U/mL, respectively. In addition, the ECL bioassay was applied to quantitative analysis of the kinase inhibitors and monitoring drug-triggered kinase activation in cell lysates. Moreover, an ECL imaging bioassay using electron-multiplying charged coupled device as detector on the gold electrode array was developed for the simultaneous detection of PKA and CK2 activity from 0.01 U/mL to 0.4 U/mL, respectively, at one time. This work demonstrates that the ingenious design and use of a versatile ECL probe are promising to simultaneous detection of multiple protein kinases and screening of kinase inhibitor. PMID:27518533

  6. Distinct 1-monoacylglycerol and 2-monoacylglycerol kinase activities of diacylglycerol kinase isozymes.

    PubMed

    Sato, Yuriko; Murakami, Chiaki; Yamaki, Atsumi; Mizuno, Satoru; Sakai, Hiromichi; Sakane, Fumio

    2016-09-01

    Diacylglycerol kinase (DGK) consists of ten isozymes and is involved in a wide variety of patho-physiological events. However, the enzymological properties of DGKs have not been fully understood. In this study, we performed a comprehensive analysis on the 1-monoacylglycerol kinase (MGK) and 2-MGK activities of ten DGK isozymes. We revealed that type I (α, β and γ), type II (δ, η and κ) and type III (ε) DGKs have 7.9-19.2% 2-MGK activity compared to their DGK activities, whereas their 1-MGK activities were <3.0%. Both the 1-MGK and 2-MGK activities of the type IV DGKs (ζ and ι) were <1% relative to their DGK activities. Intriguingly, type V DGKθ has approximately 6% 1-MGK activity and <2% 2-MGK activity compared to its DGK activity. Purified DGKθ exhibited the same results, indicating that its 1-MGK activity is intrinsic. Therefore, DGK isozymes are categorized into three types with respect to their 1-MGK and 2-MGK activities: those having (1) 2-MGK activity relatively stronger than their 1-MGK activity (types I-III), (2) only negligible 1-MGK and 2-MGK activities (type IV), and (3) 1-MGK activity stronger than its 2-MGK activity (type V). The 1-MGK activity of DGKθ and the 2-MGK activity of DGKα were stronger than those of the acylglycerol kinase reported as 1-MGK and 2-MGK to date. The presence or absence of 1-MGK and 2-MGK activities may be essential to the patho-physiological functions of each DGK isozyme.

  7. Pressure-dependent contribution of Rho kinase-mediated calcium sensitization in serotonin-evoked vasoconstriction of rat cerebral arteries.

    PubMed

    El-Yazbi, Ahmed F; Johnson, Rosalyn P; Walsh, Emma J; Takeya, Kosuke; Walsh, Michael P; Cole, William C

    2010-05-15

    Our understanding of the cellular signalling mechanisms contributing to agonist-induced constriction is almost exclusively based on the study of conduit arteries. Resistance arteries/arterioles have received less attention as standard biochemical approaches lack the necessary sensitivity to permit quantification of phosphoprotein levels in these small vessels. Here, we have employed a novel, highly sensitive Western blotting method to assess: (1) the contribution of Ca(2+) sensitization mediated by phosphorylation of myosin light chain phosphatase targeting subunit 1 (MYPT1) and the 17 kDa PKC-potentiated protein phosphatase 1 inhibitor protein (CPI-17) to serotonin (5-HT)-induced constriction of rat middle cerebral arteries, and (2) whether there is any interplay between pressure-induced myogenic and agonist-induced mechanisms of vasoconstriction. Arterial diameter and levels of MYPT1 (T697 and T855), CPI-17 and 20 kDa myosin light chain subunit (LC(20)) phosphorylation were determined following treatment with 5-HT (1 micromol l(1)) at 10 or 60 mmHg in the absence and presence of H1152 or GF109203X to suppress the activity of Rho-associated kinase (ROK) and protein kinase C (PKC), respectively. Although H1152 and GF109203X suppressed 5-HT-induced constriction and reduced phospho-LC(20) content at 10 mmHg, we failed to detect any increase in MYPT1 or CPI-17 phosphorylation. In contrast, an increase in MYPT1-T697 and MYPT1-T855 phosphorylation, but not phospho-CPI-17 content, was apparent at 60 mmHg following exposure to 5-HT, and the phosphorylation of both MYPT1 sites was sensitive to H1152 inhibition of ROK. The involvement of MYPT1 phosphorylation in the response to 5-HT at 60 mmHg was not dependent on force generation per se, as inhibition of cross-bridge cycling with blebbistatin (10 micromol l(1)) did not affect phosphoprotein content. Taken together, the data indicate that Ca(2+) sensitization owing to ROK-mediated phosphorylation of MYPT1 contributes to 5

  8. KID, a Kinase Inhibitor Database project.

    PubMed

    Collin, O; Meijer, L

    1999-01-01

    The Kinase Inhibitor Database is a small specialized database dedicated to the gathering of information on protein kinase inhibitors. The database is accessible through the World Wide Web system and gives access to structural and bibliographic information on protein kinase inhibitors. The data in the database will be collected and submitted by researchers working in the kinase inhibitor field. The submitted data will be checked by the curator of the database before entry.

  9. Protein-tyrosine phosphatase activity of CD45 is activated by sequential phosphorylation by two kinases.

    PubMed Central

    Stover, D R; Walsh, K A

    1994-01-01

    We describe a potential regulatory mechanism for the transmembrane protein-tyrosine phosphatase CD45. Phosphorylation on both tyrosine and serine residues in vitro results in an activation of CD45 specifically toward one artificial substrate but not another. The activation of these kinases appears to be order dependent, as it is enhanced when phosphorylation of tyrosine precedes that of serine but phosphorylation in the reverse order yields no activation. Any of four protein-tyrosine kinases tested, in combination with the protein-serine/threonine kinase, casein kinase II, was capable of mediating this activation in vitro. The time course of phosphorylation of CD45 in response to T-cell activation is consistent with the possibility that this regulatory mechanism is utilized in vivo. Images PMID:7518565

  10. Recent advances in the development of Aurora kinases inhibitors in hematological malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Choudary, Iqra; Barr, Paul M.; Friedberg, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    Over the last two decades, since the discovery of Drosophila mutants in 1995, much effort has been made to understand Aurora kinase biology. Three mammalian subtypes have been identified thus far which include the Aurora A, B and C kinases. These regulatory proteins specifically work at the cytoskeleton and chromosomal structures between the kinetochores and have vital functions in the early phases of the mitotic cell cycle. Today, there are multiple phase I and phase II clinical trials as well as numerous preclinical studies taking place looking at Aurora kinase inhibitors in both hematologic and solid malignancies. This review focuses on the preclinical and clinical development of Aurora kinase inhibitors in hematological malignancy and discusses their therapeutic potential. PMID:26622997

  11. Investigation of potential glycogen synthase kinase 3 inhibitors using pharmacophore mapping and virtual screening.

    PubMed

    Dessalew, Nigus; Bharatam, Prasad V

    2006-09-01

    Glycogen synthase kinase-3 is a serine/threonine kinase that has attracted significant drug discovery attention in recent years. To investigate the identification of new potential glycogen synthase kinase-3 inhibitors, a pharmacophore mapping study was carried out using a set of 21 structurally diverse glycogen synthase kinase-3 inhibitors. A hypothesis containing four features: two hydrophobic, one hydrogen bond donor and another hydrogen bond acceptor was found to be the best from the 10 common feature hypotheses produced by HipHop module of Catalyst. The best hypothesis has a high cost of 156.592 and higher best fit values were obtained for the 21 inhibitors using this best hypothesis than the other HipHop hypotheses. The best hypothesis was then used to screen electronically the NCI2000 database. The hits obtained were docked into glycogen synthase kinase-3beta active site. A total of five novel potential leads were proposed after: (i) visual examination of how well they dock into the glycogen synthase kinase-3beta-binding site, (ii) comparative analysis of their FlexX, G-Score, PMF-Score, ChemScore and D-Scores values, (iii) comparison of their best fit value with the known inhibitors and (iv) examination of the how the hits retain interactions with the important amino acid residues of glycogen synthase kinase-3beta-binding site. PMID:17062013

  12. Detection of protein kinase activity by renaturation in sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gels

    SciTech Connect

    Anostario, M. Jr.; Harrison, M.L.; Geahlen, R.L.

    1986-05-01

    The authors have developed a procedure for identifying protein kinase activity in protein samples following electrophoresis on SDS-polyacrylamide gels. Proteins are allowed to renature directly in the gel by removal of detergent. The gel is then incubated with (..gamma..-/sup 32/P)ATP to allow renatured protein kinases to autophosphorylate or to phosphorylate various substrates which can be incorporated into the gel. The positions of the radiolabeled proteins can then be detected by autoradiography. With this technique, using purified catalytic subunit of cAMP-dependent protein kinase, enzyme concentrations as low as 0.01 ..mu..g can be detected on gels containing 1.0 mg/ml casein. The procedure is also applicable for the determination of active subunits of multisubunit protein kinases. For example, when the two subunits of casein kinase II are separated by SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and allowed to renature, only the larger ..cap alpha.. subunit shows activity. This procedure can also be used to detect and distinguish kinases present in heterogeneous mixtures. Starting with a particulate fraction from LSTRA, a murine T cell lymphoma, several distinct enzymes were detected, including a 30,000 Dalton protein with protein-tyrosine kinase activity. This same enzyme has also been detected in T lymphocytes and other T lymphoid cell lines.

  13. Investigation of potential glycogen synthase kinase 3 inhibitors using pharmacophore mapping and virtual screening.

    PubMed

    Dessalew, Nigus; Bharatam, Prasad V

    2006-09-01

    Glycogen synthase kinase-3 is a serine/threonine kinase that has attracted significant drug discovery attention in recent years. To investigate the identification of new potential glycogen synthase kinase-3 inhibitors, a pharmacophore mapping study was carried out using a set of 21 structurally diverse glycogen synthase kinase-3 inhibitors. A hypothesis containing four features: two hydrophobic, one hydrogen bond donor and another hydrogen bond acceptor was found to be the best from the 10 common feature hypotheses produced by HipHop module of Catalyst. The best hypothesis has a high cost of 156.592 and higher best fit values were obtained for the 21 inhibitors using this best hypothesis than the other HipHop hypotheses. The best hypothesis was then used to screen electronically the NCI2000 database. The hits obtained were docked into glycogen synthase kinase-3beta active site. A total of five novel potential leads were proposed after: (i) visual examination of how well they dock into the glycogen synthase kinase-3beta-binding site, (ii) comparative analysis of their FlexX, G-Score, PMF-Score, ChemScore and D-Scores values, (iii) comparison of their best fit value with the known inhibitors and (iv) examination of the how the hits retain interactions with the important amino acid residues of glycogen synthase kinase-3beta-binding site.

  14. Assessing Kinase Activity in Plants with In-Gel Kinase Assays.

    PubMed

    Wang, Pengcheng; Zhu, Jian-Kang

    2016-01-01

    The in-gel protein kinase assay is a powerful method to measure the protein phosphorylation activity of specific protein kinases. Any protein substrate can be embedded in polyacrylamide gels where they can be phosphorylated by protein kinases that are separated in the gel under denaturing conditions and then renatured. The kinase activity can be visualized in situ in the gels by autoradiography. This method has been used to compare the activities of protein kinases in parallel samples or to identify their potential substrates. Here, we describe in detail an in-gel kinase assay to measure the activity of some protein kinases in plants.

  15. Characterization of nuclear protein kinases of Xenopus laevis oocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Leiva, L.; Gonzalez, C.; Allende, C.; Allende, J.

    1986-05-01

    Xenopus laevis oocytes contain large nuclei (germinal vesicles) that can be isolated in very pure form and which permit the study of enzymatic activities present in these organelles. Incubation of pure oocyte nuclear homogenates with /sup 32/P in a buffered solution containing 5 mM MgCl/sub 2/ results in the phosphorylation of a large number of proteins by endogenous protein kinases. This phosphorylation is not affected by the addition of cyclic nucleotides or calcium ion and calmodulin. On the other hand the nuclear kinases are considerably stimulated by spermine and spermidine and strongly inhibited by heparin (10 ..mu..g/ml). Addition of exogenous protein substrates shows that the major oocyte kinases are very active with casein and phosvitin as substrates but do not phosphorylate histones or protamines. DEAE-Sephadex chromatography of the nuclear extract fractionates the casein phosphorylating activity in two main peaks. The first peak is not retained on the column equilibrated with 0.1 M NH/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ and uses exclusively ATP as phosphate donor and is insensitive to polyamines or heparin. The second peak which corresponds to 70% of the casein phosphorylation elutes at 0.27 M NH/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ and uses both ATP and GTP as phosphate donors and is greatly stimulated by polyamines and completely inhibited by 10 ..mu..g/ml heparin. On this evidence the authors conclude that the major protein kinase peak corresponds to casein kinase type II which has been found in mammalian nuclei.

  16. Lithium protection of phencyclidine-induced neurotoxicity in developing brain: the role of phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase/Akt and mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase/extracellular signal-regulated kinase signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Xia, Yan; Wang, Cheng Z; Liu, Jie; Anastasio, Noelle C; Johnson, Kenneth M

    2008-09-01

    Phencyclidine (PCP) and other N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonists have been shown to be neurotoxic to developing brains and to result in schizophrenia-like behaviors later in development. Prevention of both effects by antischizophrenic drugs suggests the validity of PCP neurodevelopmental toxicity as a heuristic model of schizophrenia. Lithium is used for the treatment of bipolar and schizoaffective disorders and has recently been shown to have neuroprotective properties. The present study used organotypic corticostriatal slices taken from postnatal day 2 rat pups to investigate the protective effect of lithium and the role of the phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase (PI-3K)/Akt and mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (MEK/ERK) pathways in PCP-induced cell death. Lithium pretreatment dose-dependently reduced PCP-induced caspase-3 activation and DNA fragmentation in layers II to IV of the cortex. PCP elicited time-dependent inhibition of the MEK/ERK and PI-3K/Akt pathways, as indicated by dephosphorylation of ERK1/2 and Akt. The proapoptotic factor glycogen synthase kinase (GSK)-3beta was also dephosphorylated at serine 9 and thus activated. Lithium prevented PCP-induced inhibition of the two pathways and activation of GSK-3beta. Furthermore, blocking either PI-3K/Akt or MEK/ERK pathway abolished the protective effect of lithium, whereas inhibiting GSK-3beta activity mimicked the protective effect of lithium. However, no cross-talk between the two pathways was found. Finally, specific GSK-3beta inhibition did not prevent PCP-induced dephosphorylation of Akt and ERK. These data strongly suggest that the protective effect of lithium against PCP-induced neuroapoptosis is mediated through independent stimulation of the PI-3K/Akt and ERK pathways and suppression of GSK-3beta activity.

  17. Neuronal Cell Shape and Neurite Initiation Are Regulated by the Ndr Kinase SAX-1, a Member of the Orb6/COT-1/Warts Serine/Threonine Kinase Family

    PubMed Central

    Zallen, Jennifer A.; Peckol, Erin L.; Tobin, David M.; Bargmann, Cornelia I.

    2000-01-01

    The Caenorhabditis elegans sax-1 gene regulates several aspects of neuronal cell shape. sax-1 mutants have expanded cell bodies and ectopic neurites in many classes of neurons, suggesting that SAX-1 functions to restrict cell and neurite growth. The ectopic neurites in sensory neurons of sax-1 mutants resemble the defects caused by decreased sensory activity. However, the activity-dependent pathway, mediated in part by the UNC-43 calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase II, functions in parallel with SAX-1 to suppress neurite initiation. sax-1 encodes a serine/threonine kinase in the Ndr family that is related to the Orb6 (Schizosaccharomyces pombe), Warts/Lats (Drosophila), and COT-1 (Neurospora) kinases that function in cell shape regulation. These kinases have similarity to Rho kinases but lack consensus Rho-binding domains. Dominant negative mutations in the C. elegans RhoA GTPase cause neuronal cell shape defects similar to those of sax-1 mutants, and genetic interactions between rhoA and sax-1 suggest shared functions. These results suggest that SAX-1/Ndr kinases are endogenous inhibitors of neurite initiation and cell spreading. PMID:10982409

  18. Activation of G Protein-Coupled Receptor Kinase 1 Involves Interactions between Its N-Terminal Region and Its Kinase Domain

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Chih-chin; Orban, Tivadar; Jastrzebska, Beata; Palczewski, Krzysztof; Tesmer, John J.G.

    2012-03-16

    G protein-coupled receptor kinases (GRKs) phosphorylate activated G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) to initiate receptor desensitization. In addition to the canonical phosphoacceptor site of the kinase domain, activated receptors bind to a distinct docking site that confers higher affinity and activates GRKs allosterically. Recent mutagenesis and structural studies support a model in which receptor docking activates a GRK by stabilizing the interaction of its 20-amino acid N-terminal region with the kinase domain. This interaction in turn stabilizes a closed, more active conformation of the enzyme. To investigate the importance of this interaction for the process of GRK activation, we first validated the functionality of the N-terminal region in rhodopsin kinase (GRK1) by site-directed mutagenesis and then introduced a disulfide bond to cross-link the N-terminal region of GRK1 with its specific binding site on the kinase domain. Characterization of the kinetic and biophysical properties of the cross-linked protein showed that disulfide bond formation greatly enhances the catalytic efficiency of the peptide phosphorylation, but receptor-dependent phosphorylation, Meta II stabilization, and inhibition of transducin activation were unaffected. These data indicate that the interaction of the N-terminal region with the kinase domain is important for GRK activation but does not dictate the affinity of GRKs for activated receptors.

  19. PTH stimulated growth and decreased Col-X deposition are phosphotidylinositol-3,4,5 triphosphate kinase and mitogen activating protein kinase dependent in avian sterna.

    PubMed

    Harrington, Erik Kern; Coon, David J; Kern, Matthew F; Svoboda, Kathy K H

    2010-02-01

    Type X collagen (Col-X) deposition is a marker of terminal differentiation during chondrogenesis, in addition to appositional growth and apoptosis. The parathyroid hormone/parathyroid hormone related peptide (PTH/PTHrP) receptor, or PPR, is a G-Protein coupled receptor (GPCR), which activates several downstream pathways, moderating chondrocyte differentiation, including suppression of Col-X deposition. An Avian sterna model was used to analyze the PPR GPCR downstream kinase role in growth rate and extracellular matrix (ECM) including Col-II, IX, and X. Phosphatidylinositol kinase (PI3K), mitogen activating protein kinase (MAPK) and protein kinase A (PKA) were inhibited with specific established inhibitors LY294002, PD98059, and H89, respectively to test the hypothesis that they could reverse/inhibit the PTH/PTHrP pathway. Excised E14 chick sterna were PTH treated with or without an inhibitor and compared to controls. Sternal length was measured every 24 hr. Cultured sterna were immuno-stained using specific antibodies for Col-II, IX, or X and examined via confocal microscopy. Increased growth in PTH-treated sterna was MAPK, PI3K, and PKA dose dependent, suggesting growth was regulated through multiple pathways. Col-X deposition was rescued in PTH-treated sterna in the presence of PI3K or MAPK inhibitors, but not with the PKA inhibitor. All three inhibitors moderately disrupted Col-II and Col-IX deposition. These results suggest that PTH can activate multiple pathways during chondrocyte differentiation.

  20. Src kinase regulation by phosphorylation and dephosphorylation

    SciTech Connect

    Roskoski, Robert . E-mail: biocrr@lsuhsc.edu

    2005-05-27

    Src and Src-family protein-tyrosine kinases are regulatory proteins that play key roles in cell differentiation, motility, proliferation, and survival. The initially described phosphorylation sites of Src include an activating phosphotyrosine 416 that results from autophosphorylation, and an inhibiting phosphotyrosine 527 that results from phosphorylation by C-terminal Src kinase (Csk) and Csk homologous kinase. Dephosphorylation of phosphotyrosine 527 increases Src kinase activity. Candidate phosphotyrosine 527 phosphatases include cytoplasmic PTP1B, Shp1 and Shp2, and transmembrane enzymes include CD45, PTP{alpha}, PTP{epsilon}, and PTP{lambda}. Dephosphorylation of phosphotyrosine 416 decreases Src kinase activity. Thus far PTP-BL, the mouse homologue of human PTP-BAS, has been shown to dephosphorylate phosphotyrosine 416 in a regulatory fashion. The platelet-derived growth factor receptor protein-tyrosine kinase mediates the phosphorylation of Src Tyr138; this phosphorylation has no direct effect on Src kinase activity. The platelet-derived growth factor receptor and the ErbB2/HER2 growth factor receptor protein-tyrosine kinases mediate the phosphorylation of Src Tyr213 and activation of Src kinase activity. Src kinase is also a substrate for protein-serine/threonine kinases including protein kinase C (Ser12), protein kinase A (Ser17), and CDK1/cdc2 (Thr34, Thr46, and Ser72). Of the three protein-serine/threonine kinases, only phosphorylation by CDK1/cdc2 has been demonstrated to increase Src kinase activity. Although considerable information on the phosphoprotein phosphatases that catalyze the hydrolysis of Src phosphotyrosine 527 is at hand, the nature of the phosphatases that mediate the hydrolysis of phosphotyrosine 138 and 213, and phosphoserine and phosphothreonine residues has not been determined.

  1. Protein Kinase A: A Master Kinase of Granulosa Cell Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Puri, Pawan; Little-Ihrig, Lynda; Chandran, Uma; Law, Nathan C.; Hunzicker-Dunn, Mary; Zeleznik, Anthony J.

    2016-01-01

    Activation of protein kinase A (PKA) by follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) transduces the signal that drives differentiation of ovarian granulosa cells (GCs). An unresolved question is whether PKA is sufficient to initiate the complex program of GC responses to FSH. We compared signaling pathways and gene expression profiles of GCs stimulated with FSH or expressing PKA-CQR, a constitutively active mutant of PKA. Both FSH and PKA-CQR stimulated the phosphorylation of proteins known to be involved in GC differentiation including CREB, ß-catenin, AKT, p42/44 MAPK, GAB2, GSK-3ß, FOXO1, and YAP. In contrast, FSH stimulated the phosphorylation of p38 MAP kinase but PKA-CQR did not. Microarray analysis revealed that 85% of transcripts that were up-regulated by FSH were increased to a comparable extent by PKA-CQR and of the transcripts that were down-regulated by FSH, 76% were also down-regulated by PKA-CQR. Transcripts regulated similarly by FSH and PKA-CQR are involved in steroidogenesis and differentiation, while transcripts more robustly up-regulated by PKA-CQR are involved in ovulation. Thus, PKA, under the conditions of our experimental approach appears to function as a master upstream kinase that is sufficient to initiate the complex pattern of intracellular signaling pathway and gene expression profiles that accompany GC differentiation. PMID:27324437

  2. Endocytosis of Receptor Tyrosine Kinases

    PubMed Central

    Goh, Lai Kuan

    2013-01-01

    Endocytosis is the major regulator of signaling from receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs). The canonical model of RTK endocytosis involves rapid internalization of an RTK activated by ligand binding at the cell surface and subsequent sorting of internalized ligand-RTK complexes to lysosomes for degradation. Activation of the intrinsic tyrosine kinase activity of RTKs results in autophosphorylation, which is mechanistically coupled to the recruitment of adaptor proteins and conjugation of ubiquitin to RTKs. Ubiquitination serves to mediate interactions of RTKs with sorting machineries both at the cell surface and on endosomes. The pathways and kinetics of RTK endocytic trafficking, molecular mechanisms underlying sorting processes, and examples of deviations from the standard trafficking itinerary in the RTK family are discussed in this work. PMID:23637288

  3. Structural Bioinformatics-Based Prediction of Exceptional Selectivity of p38 MAP Kinase Inhibitor PH-797804

    SciTech Connect

    Xing, Li; Shieh, Huey S.; Selness, Shaun R.; Devraj, Rajesh V.; Walker, John K.; Devadas, Balekudru; Hope, Heidi R.; Compton, Robert P.; Schindler, John F.; Hirsch, Jeffrey L.; Benson, Alan G.; Kurumbail, Ravi G.; Stegeman, Roderick A.; Williams, Jennifer M.; Broadus, Richard M.; Walden, Zara; Monahan, Joseph B.; Pfizer

    2009-07-24

    PH-797804 is a diarylpyridinone inhibitor of p38{alpha} mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase derived from a racemic mixture as the more potent atropisomer (aS), first proposed by molecular modeling and subsequently confirmed by experiments. On the basis of structural comparison with a different biaryl pyrazole template and supported by dozens of high-resolution crystal structures of p38{alpha} inhibitor complexes, PH-797804 is predicted to possess a high level of specificity across the broad human kinase genome. We used a structural bioinformatics approach to identify two selectivity elements encoded by the TXXXG sequence motif on the p38{alpha} kinase hinge: (i) Thr106 that serves as the gatekeeper to the buried hydrophobic pocket occupied by 2,4-difluorophenyl of PH-797804 and (ii) the bidentate hydrogen bonds formed by the pyridinone moiety with the kinase hinge requiring an induced 180{sup o} rotation of the Met109-Gly110 peptide bond. The peptide flip occurs in p38{alpha} kinase due to the critical glycine residue marked by its conformational flexibility. Kinome-wide sequence mining revealed rare presentation of the selectivity motif. Corroboratively, PH-797804 exhibited exceptionally high specificity against MAP kinases and the related kinases. No cross-reactivity was observed in large panels of kinase screens (selectivity ratio of >500-fold). In cellular assays, PH-797804 demonstrated superior potency and selectivity consistent with the biochemical measurements. PH-797804 has met safety criteria in human phase I studies and is under clinical development for several inflammatory conditions. Understanding the rationale for selectivity at the molecular level helps elucidate the biological function and design of specific p38{alpha} kinase inhibitors.

  4. Fasudil, a Rho-kinase inhibitor, prevents intima-media thickening in a partially ligated carotid artery mouse model: Effects of fasudil in flow-induced vascular remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiangyu; Zhang, Tao; Gao, Fu; Li, Qingle; Shen, Chenyang; Li, Yankui; Li, Wei; Zhang, Xiaoming

    2015-01-01

    Vascular remodeling in response to hemodynamic alterations is a physiological process that requires coordinated signaling between endothelial, inflammatory and vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). Extensive experimental and clinical studies have indicated the critical role of the Ras homolog gene family, member A/Rho-associated kinase (ROCK) signaling pathway in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease, where ROCK activation has been demonstrated to promote inflammation and remodeling through inducing the expression of proinflammatory cytokines and adhesion molecules in endothelial cells and VSMCs. However, the role of ROCK in flow-induced vascular remodeling has not been fully defined. The current study aimed to investigate the effect of the ROCK signaling pathway in flow-induced vascular remodeling by comparing the responses to partial carotid artery ligation in mice treated with fasudil (a ROCK inhibitor) and untreated mice. Intima-media thickness and neointima formation were evaluated by morphology. VSMC proliferation and inflammation of the vessel wall were assessed by immunohistochemistry. In addition, the expression levels of ROCK and the downstream effectors of ROCK, myosin light chain (MLC) and phosphorylated-MLC (p-MLC), were quantified by western blot analysis. Following a reduction in blood flow, ROCK1 and p-MLC expression increased in the untreated left common carotid arteries (LCA). Fasudil-treated mice developed a significantly smaller intima-media thickness compared with the untreated mice. Quantitative immunohistochemistry of the fasudil-treated LCA indicated that there was a reduction in proliferation when compared with untreated vessels. There were fewer CD45+ cells observed in the fasudil-treated LCA compared with the untreated LCA. In conclusion, the expression of ROCK was enhanced in flow-induced carotid artery remodeling and ROCK inhibition as a result of fasudil treatment may attenuate flow-induced carotid artery remodeling. PMID:26458725

  5. Oncoprotein protein kinase antibody kit

    DOEpatents

    Karin, Michael; Hibi, Masahiko; Lin, Anning

    2008-12-23

    An isolated polypeptide (JNK) characterized by having a molecular weight of 46 kD as determined by reducing SDS-PAGE, having serine and threonine kinase activity, phosphorylating the c-Jun N-terminal activation domain and polynucleotide sequences and method of detection of JNK are provided herein. JNK phosphorylates c-Jun N-terminal activation domain which affects gene expression from AP-1 sites.

  6. Mevalonate kinase deficiency: current perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Favier, Leslie A; Schulert, Grant S

    2016-01-01

    Mevalonate kinase deficiency (MKD) is a recessively inherited autoinflammatory disorder with a spectrum of manifestations, including the well-defined clinical phenotypes of hyperimmunoglobulinemia D and periodic fever syndrome and mevalonic aciduria. Patients with MKD have recurrent attacks of hyperinflammation associated with fever, abdominal pain, arthralgias, and mucocutaneous lesions, and more severely affected patients also have dysmorphisms and central nervous system anomalies. MKD is caused by mutations in the gene encoding mevalonate kinase, with the degree of residual enzyme activity largely determining disease severity. Mevalonate kinase is essential for the biosynthesis of nonsterol isoprenoids, which mediate protein prenylation. Although the precise pathogenesis of MKD remains unclear, increasing evidence suggests that deficiency in protein prenylation leads to innate immune activation and systemic hyperinflammation. Given the emerging understanding of MKD as an autoinflammatory disorder, recent treatment approaches have largely focused on cytokine-directed biologic therapy. Herein, we review the current genetic and pathologic understanding of MKD, its various clinical phenotypes, and the evolving treatment approach for this multifaceted disorder. PMID:27499643

  7. Kinase-SUMO networks in diabetes-mediated cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Chang, Eugene; Abe, Jun-Ichi

    2016-05-01

    Type II diabetes mellitus (DM) is a common comorbidity in patients with cardiovascular disease (CVD). Epidemiological studies including the Framingham, UKPDS, and MRFIT studies have shown diabetes to be an independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease associated with increased incidence of morbidity and mortality. However, major randomized controlled clinical trials including ADVANCE, VAD, and ACCORD have failed to demonstrate a significant reduction in CVD complications from longstanding DM with strict glycemic control. This suggests that despite the strong clinical correlation between DM and CVD, the precise mechanisms of DM-mediated CVD pathogenesis remain unclear. Signal transduction investigations have shed some light on this question with numerous studies demonstrating the role of kinase pathways in facilitating DM and CVD pathology. Abnormalities in endothelial, vascular smooth muscle, and myocardial function from the pathological insults of hyperglycemia and oxidative stress in diabetes are thought to accelerate the development of cardiovascular disease. Extensive interplay between kinase pathways that regulate the complex pathology of DM-mediated CVD is heavily regulated by a number of post-translational modifications (PTMs). In this review, we focus on the role of a dynamic PTM known as SUMOylation and its role in regulating these kinase networks to provide a mechanistic link between DM and CVD. PMID:27085771

  8. Extracellular Signal-Regulated Kinase Activates Topoisomerase IIα through a Mechanism Independent of Phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Shapiro, Paul S.; Whalen, Anne M.; Tolwinski, Nicholas S.; Wilsbacher, Julie; Froelich-Ammon, Stacie J.; Garcia, Marileila; Osheroff, Neil; Ahn, Natalie G.

    1999-01-01

    The mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinases, extracellular signal-related kinase 1 (ERK1) and ERK2, regulate cellular responses by mediating extracellular growth signals toward cytoplasmic and nuclear targets. A potential target for ERK is topoisomerase IIα, which becomes highly phosphorylated during mitosis and is required for several aspects of nucleic acid metabolism, including chromosome condensation and daughter chromosome separation. In this study, we demonstrated interactions between ERK2 and topoisomerase IIα proteins by coimmunoprecipitation from mixtures of purified enzymes and from nuclear extracts. In vitro, diphosphorylated active ERK2 phosphorylated topoisomerase IIα and enhanced its specific activity by sevenfold, as measured by DNA relaxation assays, whereas unphosphorylated ERK2 had no effect. However, activation of topoisomerase II was also observed with diphosphorylated inactive mutant ERK2, suggesting a mechanism of activation that depends on the phosphorylation state of ERK2 but not on its kinase activity. Nevertheless, activation of ERK by transient transfection of constitutively active mutant MAP kinase kinase 1 (MKK1) enhanced endogenous topoisomerase II activity by fourfold. Our findings indicate that ERK regulates topoisomerase IIα in vitro and in vivo, suggesting a potential target for the MKK/ERK pathway in the modulation of chromatin reorganization events during mitosis and in other phases of the cell cycle. PMID:10207078

  9. Mitogen-activated Protein Kinase Kinase Kinase 1 Protects against Nickel-induced Acute Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Mongan, Maureen; Tan, Zongqing; Chen, Liang; Peng, Zhimin; Dietsch, Maggie; Su, Bing; Leikauf, George; Xia, Ying

    2008-01-01

    Nickel compounds are environmental and occupational hazards that pose serious health problems and are causative factors of acute lung injury. The c-jun N-terminal kinases (JNKs) are regulated through a mitogen-activated protein (MAP) 3 kinase-MAP2 kinase cascade and have been implicated in nickel toxicity. In this study, we used genetically modified cells and mice to investigate the involvement of two upstream MAP3Ks, MAP3K1 and 2, in nickel-induced JNK activation and acute lung injury. In mouse embryonic fibroblasts, levels of JNK activation and cytotoxicity induced by nickel were similar in the Map3k2-null and wild-type cells but were much lower in the Map3k1/Map3k2 double-null cells. Conversely, the levels of JNK activation and cytotoxicity were unexpectedly much higher in the Map3k1-null cells. In adult mouse tissue, MAP3K1 was widely distributed but was abundantly expressed in the bronchiole epithelium of the lung. Accordingly, MAP3K1 ablation in mice resulted in severe nickel-induced acute lung injury and reduced survival. Based on these findings, we propose a role for MAP3K1 in reducing JNK activation and protecting the mice from nickel-induced acute lung injury. PMID:18467339

  10. Tyrosinaemia II.

    PubMed

    Colditz, P B; Yu, J S; Billson, F A; Rogers, M; Molloy, H F; O'Halloran, M; Wilcken, B

    1984-08-18

    Four cases of tyrosinaemia type II (Richner-Hanhart syndrome) are reported. This syndrome consists of corneal erosions, palmar and plantar hyperkeratoses, and sometimes mental retardation. Presentation with photophobia and dendritic corneal ulceration or circumscribed palmoplantar keratoderma should alert the physician to the possible diagnosis of tyrosinaemia II. Early diagnosis is important, as the clinical picture can be modified by dietary restriction.

  11. Glycogen Synthase Kinase 3 Protein Kinase Activity Is Frequently Elevated in Human Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma and Supports Tumour Cell Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    O′Flaherty, Linda; Pardo, Olivier E.; Dzien, Piotr; Phillips, Lois; Morgan, Carys; Pawade, Joya; May, Margaret T.; Sohail, Muhammad; Hetzel, Martin R.; Seckl, Michael J.; Tavaré, Jeremy M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK3) is a central regulator of cellular metabolism, development and growth. GSK3 activity was thought to oppose tumourigenesis, yet recent studies indicate that it may support tumour growth in some cancer types including in non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC). We examined the undefined role of GSK3 protein kinase activity in tissue from human NSCLC. Methods The expression and protein kinase activity of GSK3 was determined in 29 fresh frozen samples of human NSCLC and patient-matched normal lung tissue by quantitative immunoassay and western blotting for the phosphorylation of three distinct GSK3 substrates in situ (glycogen synthase, RelA and CRMP-2). The proliferation and sensitivity to the small-molecule GSK3 inhibitor; CHIR99021, of NSCLC cell lines (Hcc193, H1975, PC9 and A549) and non-neoplastic type II pneumocytes was further assessed in adherent culture. Results Expression and protein kinase activity of GSK3 was elevated in 41% of human NSCLC samples when compared to patient-matched control tissue. Phosphorylation of GSK3α/β at the inhibitory S21/9 residue was a poor biomarker for activity in tumour samples. The GSK3 inhibitor, CHIR99021 dose-dependently reduced the proliferation of three NSCLC cell lines yet was ineffective against type II pneumocytes. Conclusion NSCLC tumours with elevated GSK3 protein kinase activity may have evolved dependence on the kinase for sustained growth. Our results provide further important rationale for exploring the use of GSK3 inhibitors in treating NSCLC. PMID:25486534

  12. A chemiluminescent microtiter plate assay for sensitive detection of protein kinase activity.

    PubMed

    Lehel, C; Daniel-Issakani, S; Brasseur, M; Strulovici, B

    1997-01-15

    A chemiluminescent protein kinase assay using biotinylated substrate peptides captured on a streptavidin-coated microtiter plate and monoclonal antibodies to detect their phosphorylation is described. Assay conditions were optimized and validated for sensitive measurement of protein kinase A, protein kinase C, Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CAM-KII), receptor interacting protein, and src activities. The newly developed chemiluminescent assay has several advantages over currently used radioactive or colorimetric methods. It is highly sensitive at low enzyme and substrate concentrations and high, close to physiological ATP levels. It is fast, simple to perform and amenable to automation and high-throughput drug screening. The assay is also robust, exhibiting minimum interference from solvents and test substances from various sources. Overall, among the presently available methods for the detection of protein kinase activity, chemiluminescence was found to provide the highest sensitivity under conditions most closely mimicking the intracellular environment. This assay is expected to be useful in both academic and industrial laboratories, especially in identifying novel classes of protein kinase inhibitors.

  13. Receptor Tyrosine Kinases in Drosophila Development

    PubMed Central

    Sopko, Richelle; Perrimon, Norbert

    2013-01-01

    Tyrosine phosphorylation plays a significant role in a wide range of cellular processes. The Drosophila genome encodes more than 20 receptor tyrosine kinases and extensive studies in the past 20 years have illustrated their diverse roles and complex signaling mechanisms. Although some receptor tyrosine kinases have highly specific functions, others strikingly are used in rather ubiquitous manners. Receptor tyrosine kinases regulate a broad expanse of processes, ranging from cell survival and proliferation to differentiation and patterning. Remarkably, different receptor tyrosine kinases share many of the same effectors and their hierarchical organization is retained in disparate biological contexts. In this comprehensive review, we summarize what is known regarding each receptor tyrosine kinase during Drosophila development. Astonishingly, very little is known for approximately half of all Drosophila receptor tyrosine kinases. PMID:23732470

  14. Cellular response to low dose radiation: Role of phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase like kinases

    SciTech Connect

    Balajee, A.S.; Meador, J.A.; Su, Y.

    2011-03-24

    It is increasingly realized that human exposure either to an acute low dose or multiple chronic low doses of low LET radiation has the potential to cause different types of cancer. Therefore, the central theme of research for DOE and NASA is focused on understanding the molecular mechanisms and pathways responsible for the cellular response to low dose radiation which would not only improve the accuracy of estimating health risks but also help in the development of predictive assays for low dose radiation risks associated with tissue degeneration and cancer. The working hypothesis for this proposal is that the cellular mechanisms in terms of DNA damage signaling, repair and cell cycle checkpoint regulation are different for low and high doses of low LET radiation and that the mode of action of phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase like kinases (PIKK: ATM, ATR and DNA-PK) determines the dose dependent cellular responses. The hypothesis will be tested at two levels: (I) Evaluation of the role of ATM, ATR and DNA-PK in cellular response to low and high doses of low LET radiation in simple in vitro human cell systems and (II) Determination of radiation responses in complex cell microenvironments such as human EpiDerm tissue constructs. Cellular responses to low and high doses of low LET radiation will be assessed from the view points of DNA damage signaling, DNA double strand break repair and cell cycle checkpoint regulation by analyzing the activities (i.e. post-translational modifications and kinetics of protein-protein interactions) of the key target proteins for PI-3 kinase like kinases both at the intra-cellular and molecular levels. The proteins chosen for this proposal are placed under three categories: (I) sensors/initiators include ATM ser1981, ATR, 53BP1, gamma-H2AX, MDC1, MRE11, Rad50 and Nbs1; (II) signal transducers include Chk1, Chk2, FANCD2 and SMC1; and (III) effectors include p53, CDC25A and CDC25C. The primary goal of this proposal is to elucidate the

  15. Involvement of Rho-kinase in experimental vascular endothelial dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Shah, Dhvanit I; Singh, Manjeet

    2006-02-01

    The present study has been designed to investigate the effect of fasudil (Rho-kinase inhibitor) in diabetes mellitus (DM) and hyperhomocyteinemia (HHcy) induced vascular endothelial dysfunction (VED). Streptozotocin (55 mg kg(-1), i.v., once only) and methionine (1.7% w/w, p.o., daily for 4 weeks) were administered to rats to produce DM (serum glucose >140 mg dl(-1)) and HHcy (serum homocysteine >10 microM) respectively. VED was assessed using isolated aortic ring, electron microscopy of thoracic aorta, and serum concentration of nitrite/nitrate. Serum thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) concentration was estimated to assess oxidative stress. Atorvastatin has been employed in the present study as standard agent to improve vascular endothelial dysfunction. Fasudil (15 mg kg(-1) and 30 mg kg(-1), p.o., daily) and atorvastatin (30 mg kg(-1), p.o., daily) treatments significantly attenuated increase in serum glucose and homocysteine but their concentrations remained markedly higher than sham control value. Fasudil and atorvastatin treatments markedly prevented DM and HHcy-induced (i) attenuation of acetylcholine induced endothelium-dependent relaxation, (ii) impairment of vascular endothelial lining, (iii) decrease in serum nitrite/nitrate concentration, and (iv) increase in serum TBARS. It may be concluded that fasudil prevented DM and HHcy-induced VED partially by decreasing serum glucose and homocysteine concentration due to inhibition of Rho-kinase. Moreover, inhibition of Rho-kinase by fasudil and consequent prevention of oxidative stress may have directly improved VED in diabetic and hyperhomocysteinemic rats. The Rho-kinase appears to be a pivotal target site involved in DM and HHcy-induced VED. PMID:16444602

  16. Protein Kinase D family kinases: roads start to segregate.

    PubMed

    Wille, Christoph; Seufferlein, Thomas; Eiseler, Tim

    2014-01-01

    Highly invasive pancreatic tumors are often recognized in late stages due to a lack of clear symptoms and pose major challenges for treatment and disease management. Broad-band Protein Kinase D (PKD) inhibitors have recently been proposed as additional treatment option for this disease. PKDs are implicated in the control of cancer cell motility, angiogenesis, proliferation and metastasis. In particular, PKD2 expression is elevated in pancreatic cancer, whereas PKD1 expression is comparably lower. In our recent study we report that both kinases control PDAC cell invasive properties in an isoform-specific, but opposing manner. PKD1 selectively mediates anti-migratory/anti-invasive features by preferential regulation of the actin-regulatory Cofilin-phosphatase Slingshot1L (SSH1L). PKD2, on the other hand enhances invasion and angiogenesis of PDAC cells in 3D-ECM cultures and chorioallantois tumor models by stimulating expression and secretion of matrix-metalloproteinase 7 and 9 (MMP7/9). MMP9 also enhances PKD2-mediated tumor angiogenesis releasing extracellular matrix-bound VEGF-A. We thus suggest high PKD2 expression and loss of PKD1 may be beneficial for tumor cells to enhance their matrix-invading abilities. In our recent study we demonstrate for the first time PKD1 and 2 isoform-selective effects on pancreatic cancer cell invasion, in-vitro and in-vivo, defining isoform-specific regulation of PKDs as a major future issue. PMID:24847910

  17. Discovery of Small Molecule RIP1 Kinase Inhibitors for the Treatment of Pathologies Associated with Necroptosis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Potent inhibitors of RIP1 kinase from three distinct series, 1-aminoisoquinolines, pyrrolo[2,3-b]pyridines, and furo[2,3-d]pyrimidines, all of the type II class recognizing a DLG-out inactive conformation, were identified from screening of our in-house kinase focused sets. An exemplar from the furo[2,3-d]pyrimidine series showed a dose proportional response in protection from hypothermia in a mouse model of TNFα induced lethal shock. PMID:24900635

  18. Tec family kinases in inflammation and disease.

    PubMed

    Horwood, Nicole J; Urbaniak, Ania M; Danks, Lynett

    2012-04-01

    Over the last decade, the Tec family of nonreceptor tyrosine kinases (Btk, Tec, Bmx, Itk, and Rlk) have been shown to play a key role in inflammation and bone destruction. Bruton's tyrosine kinase (Btk) has been the most widely studied due to the critical role of this kinase in B-cell development and recent evidence showing that blocking Btk signaling is effective in ameliorating lymphoma progression and experimental arthritis. This review will examine the role of TFK in myeloid cell function and the potential of targeting these kinases as a therapeutic intervention in autoimmune disorders such as rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:22449071

  19. Protein kinase profiling assays: a technology review.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuren; Ma, Haiching

    2015-11-01

    Protein kinases have become one of the most intensively pursued classes of drug targets for many diseases such as cancers and inflammatory diseases. Kinase profiling work seeks to understand general selectivity trends of lead compounds across the kinome, which help with target selection, compound prioritization, and potential implications in toxicity. Under the current drug discovery process, screening of compounds against comprehensive panels of kinases and their mutants has become the standard approach. Many screening assays and technologies which are compatible for high-throughput screening (HTS) against kinases have been extensively pursued and developed.

  20. Angiotensin II stimulates water and NaCl intake through separate cell signalling pathways in rats.

    PubMed

    Daniels, Derek; Mietlicki, Elizabeth G; Nowak, Erica L; Fluharty, Steven J

    2009-01-01

    Angiotensin II (AngII) stimulation of water and NaCl intake is a classic model of the behavioural effects of hormones. In vitro studies indicate that the AngII type 1 (AT(1)) receptor stimulates intracellular pathways that include protein kinase C (PKC) and mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase activation. Previous studies support the hypotheses that PKC is involved in AngII-induced water, but not NaCl intake and that MAP kinase plays a role in NaCl consumption, but not water intake, after injection of AngII. The present experiments test these hypotheses in rats using central injections of AngII in the presence or absence of a PKC inhibitor or a MAP kinase inhibitor. Pretreatment with the PKC inhibitor chelerythrine attenuated AngII-induced water intake, but NaCl intake was unaffected. In contrast, pretreatment with U0126, a MAP kinase inhibitor, had no effect on AngII-induced water intake, but attenuated NaCl intake. These data support the working hypotheses and significantly extend our earlier findings and those of others. Perhaps more importantly, these experiments demonstrate the remarkable diversity of peptide receptor systems and add support for the surprising finding that intracellular signalling pathways can have divergent behavioural relevance.

  1. Phosphorylation of inhibitor-2 and activation of MgATP-dependent protein phosphatase by rat skeletal muscle glycogen synthase kinase

    SciTech Connect

    Hegazy, M.G.; Reimann, E.M.; Thysseril, T.J.; Schlender, K.K.

    1986-05-01

    Rat skeletal muscle contains a glycogen synthase kinase (GSK-M) which is not stimulated by Ca/sup 2 +/ or cAMP. This kinase has an apparent Mr of 62,000 and uses ATP but not GTP as a phosphoryl donor. GSK-M phosphorylated glycogen synthase at sites 2 and 3. It phosphorylated ATP-citrate lyase and activated MgATP-dependent phosphatase in the presence of ATP but not GTP. As expected, the kinase also phosphorylated phosphatase inhibitor 2 (I-2). Phosphatase incorporation reached approximately 0.3 mol/mol of I-2. Phosphopeptide maps were obtained by digesting /sup 32/P-labeled I-2 with trypsin and separating the peptides by reversed phase HPLC. Two partially separated /sup 32/P-labeled peaks were obtained when I-2 was phosphorylated with either GSK-M or glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK-3) and these peptides were different from those obtained when I-2 was phosphorylated with the catalytic subunit of cAMP-dependent protein kinase (CSU) or casein kinase II (CK-II). When I-2 was phosphorylated with GSK-M or GSK-3 and cleaved by CNBr, a single radioactive peak was obtained. Phosphoamino acid analysis showed that I-2 was phosphorylated by GSK-M or GSK-3 predominately in Thr whereas CSU and CK-II phosphorylated I-2 exclusively in Ser. These results indicate that GSK-M is similar to GSK-3 and to ATP-citrate lyase kinase. However, it appears to differ in Mr from ATP-citrate lyase kinase and it differs from GSK-3 in that it phosphorylates glycogen synthase at site 2 and it does not use GTP as a phosphoryl donor.

  2. Can Structural Features of Kinase Receptors Provide Clues on Selectivity and Inhibition?: A Molecular Modeling Study

    PubMed Central

    Ravichandran, Sarangan; Luke, Brian T.; Collins, Jack R.

    2015-01-01

    Cancer is a complex disease resulting from the uncontrolled proliferation of cell signaling events. Protein kinases have been identified as central molecules that participate overwhelmingly in oncogenic events, thus becoming key targets for anticancer drugs. A majority of studies converged on the idea that ligand-binding pockets of kinases retain clues to the inhibiting abilities and cross-reacting tendencies of inhibitor drugs. Even though these ideas are critical for drug discovery, validating them using experiments is not only difficult, but in some cases infeasible. To overcome these limitations and to test these ideas at the molecular level, we present here the results of receptor-focused in-silico docking of nine marketed drugs to 19 different wild-type and mutated kinases chosen from a wide range of families. This investigation highlights the need for using relevant models to explain the correct inhibition trends and the results are used to make predictions that might be able to influence future experiments. Our simulation studies are able to correctly predict the primary targets for each drug studied in majority of cases and our results agree with the existing findings. Our study shows that the conformations a given receptor acquires during kinase activation, and their micro-environment, defines the ligand partners. Type II drugs display high compatibility and selectivity for DFG-out kinase conformations. On the other hand Type I drugs are less selective and show binding preferences for both the open and closed forms of selected kinases. Using this receptor-focused approach, it is possible to capture the observed fold change in binding affinities between the wild-type and disease-centric mutations in ABL kinase for Imatinib and the second-generation ABL drugs. The effects of mutation are also investigated for two other systems, EGFR and B-Raf. Finally, by including pathway information in the design it is possible to model kinase inhibitors with potentially

  3. Sensitive kinase assay linked with phosphoproteomics for identifying direct kinase substrates.

    PubMed

    Xue, Liang; Wang, Wen-Horng; Iliuk, Anton; Hu, Lianghai; Galan, Jacob A; Yu, Shuai; Hans, Michael; Geahlen, Robert L; Tao, W Andy

    2012-04-10

    Our understanding of the molecular control of many disease pathologies requires the identification of direct substrates targeted by specific protein kinases. Here we describe an integrated proteomic strategy, termed kinase assay linked with phosphoproteomics, which combines a sensitive kinase reaction with endogenous kinase-dependent phosphoproteomics to identify direct substrates of protein kinases. The unique in vitro kinase reaction is carried out in a highly efficient manner using a pool of peptides derived directly from cellular kinase substrates and then dephosphorylated as substrate candidates. The resulting newly phosphorylated peptides are then isolated and identified by mass spectrometry. A further comparison of these in vitro phosphorylated peptides with phosphopeptides derived from endogenous proteins isolated from cells in which the kinase is either active or inhibited reveals new candidate protein substrates. The kinase assay linked with phosphoproteomics strategy was applied to identify unique substrates of spleen tyrosine kinase (Syk), a protein-tyrosine kinase with duel properties of an oncogene and a tumor suppressor in distinctive cell types. We identified 64 and 23 direct substrates of Syk specific to B cells and breast cancer cells, respectively. Both known and unique substrates, including multiple centrosomal substrates for Syk, were identified, supporting a unique mechanism that Syk negatively affects cell division through its centrosomal kinase activity. PMID:22451900

  4. Ca2+/Calmodulin-Dependent Kinase Kinase α Is Expressed by Monocytic Cells and Regulates the Activation Profile

    PubMed Central

    Guest, Christopher B.; Deszo, Eric L.; Hartman, Matthew E.; York, Jason M.; Kelley, Keith W.; Freund, Gregory G.

    2008-01-01

    Macrophages are capable of assuming numerous phenotypes in order to adapt to endogenous and exogenous challenges but many of the factors that regulate this process are still unknown. We report that Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent kinase kinase α (CaMKKα) is expressed in human monocytic cells and demonstrate that its inhibition blocks type-II monocytic cell activation and promotes classical activation. Affinity chromatography with paramagnetic beads isolated an approximately 50 kDa protein from nuclear lysates of U937 human monocytic cells activated with phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA). This protein was identified as CaMKKα by mass spectrometry and Western analysis. The function of CaMKKα in monocyte activation was examined using the CaMKKα inhibitors (STO-609 and forskolin) and siRNA knockdown. Inhibition of CaMKKα, enhanced PMA-dependent CD86 expression and reduced CD11b expression. In addition, inhibition was associated with decreased translocation of CaMKKα to the nucleus. Finally, to further examine monocyte activation profiles, TNFα and IL-10 secretion were studied. CaMKKα inhibition attenuated PMA-dependent IL-10 production and enhanced TNFα production indicating a shift from type-II to classical monocyte activation. Taken together, these findings indicate an important new role for CaMKKα in the differentiation of monocytic cells. PMID:18270593

  5. Photosystem II

    ScienceCinema

    James Barber

    2016-07-12

    James Barber, Ernst Chain Professor of Biochemistry at Imperial College, London, gives a BSA Distinguished Lecture titled, "The Structure and Function of Photosystem II: The Water-Splitting Enzyme of Photosynthesis."

  6. A chemically defined culture medium containing Rho kinase inhibitor Y-27632 for the fabrication of stratified squamous epithelial cell grafts

    SciTech Connect

    Aslanova, Afag; Takagi, Ryo; Yamato, Masayuki; Okano, Teruo; Yamamoto, Masakazu

    2015-05-01

    With the development of a culture method for stratified squamous epithelial cells, tissue-engineered epithelial cell sheets have been successfully applied as clinical cell grafts. However, the implementation of these cell sheets without the use of any animal-derived materials is highly desirable. In this study, Rho-associated protein kinase inhibitor Y-27632 was used to develop a chemically defined culture medium for the fabrication of stratified epithelial cell grafts consisting of human epidermal and oral keratinocytes, and the proliferation activity, cell morphology, and gene expressions of the keratinocytes were analyzed. The results of a colorimetric assay indicated that Y-27632 significantly promoted the proliferation of the keratinocytes in culture media both with and without fetal bovine serum (FBS), although there were no indications of Y-27632 efficacy on cell morphology and stratification of the keratinocytes in culture medium without any animal-derived materials. The results of quantitative RT-PCR revealed that gene expressions correlated with cell adhesion, cell–cell junction, proliferation markers, and stem/progenitor markers in cultured keratinocytes were not strongly affected by the addition of Y-27632 to the culture medium. Moreover, gene expressions of differentiation markers in stratified keratinocytes cultured in medium without FBS were nearly identical to those of keratinocytes co-cultured with 3T3 feeder cells. Interestingly, the expressions of differentiation markers in cultured stratified keratinocytes were suppressed by FBS, whereas they were reconstructed by either co-culture of a 3T3 feeder layer or addition of Y-27632 into the culture medium containing FBS. These findings indicate that Y-27632 is a useful supplement for the development of a chemically defined culture medium for fabrication of stratified epithelial cell grafts for clinical applications for the purpose of developing the culture medium with a lower risk of pathogen

  7. Proteinase-activated receptors 1 and 2 and the regulation of porcine coronary artery contractility: a role for distinct tyrosine kinase pathways

    PubMed Central

    El-Daly, Mahmoud; Saifeddine, Mahmoud; Mihara, Koichiro; Ramachandran, Rithwik; Triggle, Christopher R; Hollenberg, Morley D

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose Because angiotensin-II-mediated porcine coronary artery (PCA) vasoconstriction is blocked by protein tyrosine kinase (PYK) inhibitors, we hypothesized that proteinase-activated receptors (PARs), known to regulate vascular tension, like angiotensin-II, would also cause PCA contractions via PYK-dependent signalling pathways. Experimental Approach Contractions of intact and endothelium-free isolated PCA rings, stimulated by PAR1/PAR2-activating peptides, angiotensin-II, PGF2α, EGF, PDGF and KCl, were monitored with/without multiple signalling pathway inhibitors, including AG-tyrphostins AG18 (non-specific PYKs), AG1478 (EGF-receptor kinase), AG1296 (PDGF receptor kinase), PP1 (Src kinase), U0126 and PD98059 (MEK/MAPKinase kinase), indomethacin/SC-560/NS-398 (COX-1/2) and L-NAME (NOS). Key Results AG18 inhibited the contractions induced by all the agonists except KCl, whereas U0126 attenuated contractions induced by PAR1/PAR2 agonists, EGF and angiotensin-II, but not by PGF2α, the COX-produced metabolites of arachidonate and KCl. PP1 only affected the responses to PAR1/PAR2-activating peptides and angiotensin-II. The EGF-kinase inhibitor, AG1478, attenuated contractions initiated by the PARs (PAR2 >> PAR1) and EGF itself, but not by angiotensin-II, PGF2α or KCl. COX-1/2 inhibitors blocked the contractions induced by all the agonists, except KCl and PGF2α. Conclusion and Implications PAR1/2-mediated contractions of the PCA are dependent on Src and MAPKinase and, in part, involve EGF-receptor-kinase transactivation and the generation of a COX-derived contractile agonist. However, the PYK signalling pathways used by PARs are distinct from each other and from those triggered by angiotensin-II and EGF. These signalling pathways may be therapeutic targets for managing coagulation-proteinase-induced coronary vasospasm. PMID:24506284

  8. A novel viral thymidylate kinase with dual kinase activity.

    PubMed

    Guevara-Hernandez, Eduardo; Arvizu-Flores, Aldo A; Lugo-Sanchez, Maria E; Velazquez-Contreras, Enrique F; Castillo-Yañez, Francisco J; Brieba, Luis G; Sotelo-Mundo, Rogerio R

    2015-10-01

    Nucleotide phosphorylation is a key step in DNA replication and viral infections, since suitable levels of nucleotide triphosphates pool are required for this process. Deoxythymidine monophosphate (dTMP) is produced either by de novo or salvage pathways, which is further phosphorylated to deoxythymidine triphosphate (dTTP). Thymidyne monophosphate kinase (TMK) is the enzyme in the junction of both pathways, which phosphorylates dTMP to yield deoxythymidine diphosphate (dTDP) using adenosine triphosphate (ATP) as a phosphate donor. White spot syndrome virus (WSSV) genome contains an open reading frame (ORF454) that encodes a thymidine kinase and TMK domains in a single polypeptide. We overexpressed the TMK ORF454 domain (TMKwssv) and its specific activity was measured with dTMP and dTDP as phosphate acceptors. We found that TMKwssv can phosphorylate dTMP to yield dTDP and also is able to use dTDP as a substrate to produce dTTP. Kinetic parameters K M and k cat were calculated for dTMP (110 μM, 3.6 s(-1)), dTDP (251 μM, 0.9 s(-1)) and ATP (92 μM, 3.2 s(-1)) substrates, and TMKwssv showed a sequential ordered bi-bi reaction mechanism. The binding constants K d for dTMP (1.9 μM) and dTDP (10 μM) to TMKwssv were determined by Isothermal Titration Calorimetry. The affinity of the nucleotidic analog stavudine monophosphate was in the same order of magnitude (K d 3.6 μM) to the canonical substrate dTMP. These results suggest that nucleotide analogues such as stavudine could be a suitable antiviral strategy for the WSSV-associated disease.

  9. Measuring the Activity of Leucine-Rich Repeat Kinase 2: A Kinase Involved in Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Byoung Dae; Li, Xiaojie; Dawson, Ted M.; Dawson, Valina L.

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in the LRRK2 (Leucine-Rich Repeat Kinase 2) gene are the most common cause of autosomal dominant Parkinson's disease. LRRK2 has multiple functional domains including a kinase domain. The kinase activity of LRRK2 is implicated in the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease. Developing an assay to understand the mechanisms of LRRK2 kinase activity is important for the development of pharmacologic and therapeutic applications. Here, we describe how to measure in vitro LRRK2 kinase activity and its inhibition. PMID:21960214

  10. Pyridopyrimidine analogues as novel adenosine kinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Zheng, G Z; Lee, C; Pratt, J K; Perner, R J; Jiang, M Q; Gomtsyan, A; Matulenko, M A; Mao, Y; Koenig, J R; Kim, K H; Muchmore, S; Yu, H; Kohlhaas, K; Alexander, K M; McGaraughty, S; Chu, K L; Wismer, C T; Mikusa, J; Jarvis, M F; Marsh, K; Kowaluk, E A; Bhagwat, S S; Stewart, A O

    2001-08-20

    A novel series of pyridopyrimidine analogues 9 was identified as potent adenosine kinase inhibitors based on the SAR and computational studies. Substitution of the C7 position of the pyridopyrimidino core with C2' substituted pyridino moiety increased the in vivo potency and enhanced oral bioavailability of these adenosine kinase inhibitors.

  11. Multifunctional Abl kinases in health and disease.

    PubMed

    Khatri, Aaditya; Wang, Jun; Pendergast, Ann Marie

    2016-01-01

    The Abelson tyrosine kinases were initially identified as drivers of leukemia in mice and humans. The Abl family kinases Abl1 and Abl2 regulate diverse cellular processes during development and normal homeostasis, and their functions are subverted during inflammation, cancer and other pathologies. Abl kinases can be activated by multiple stimuli leading to cytoskeletal reorganization required for cell morphogenesis, motility, adhesion and polarity. Depending on the cellular context, Abl kinases regulate cell survival and proliferation. Emerging data support important roles for Abl kinases in pathologies linked to inflammation. Among these are neurodegenerative diseases and inflammatory pathologies. Unexpectedly, Abl kinases have also been identified as important players in mammalian host cells during microbial pathogenesis. Thus, the use of Abl kinase inhibitors might prove to be effective in the treatment of pathologies beyond leukemia and solid tumors. In this Cell Science at a Glance article and in the accompanying poster, we highlight the emerging roles of Abl kinases in the regulation of cellular processes in normal cells and diverse pathologies ranging from cancer to microbial pathogenesis.

  12. Genetics Home Reference: pyruvate kinase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... National (UK) Information Centre for Metabolic Diseases National Organization for Rare Disorders (NORD): Pyruvate Kinase Deficiency Genetic Testing Registry (1 link) Pyruvate kinase deficiency of red cells Scientific articles on PubMed (1 link) PubMed OMIM (1 link) ...

  13. Ets-1 upregulation mediates angiotensin II-related cardiac fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Hao, Guanghua; Han, Zhenhua; Meng, Zhe; Wei, Jin; Gao, Dengfeng; Zhang, Hong; Wang, Nanping

    2015-01-01

    Ets-1, the prototypical member of the family of Ets transcription factors, has been shown to participate in tissue fibrotic remodeling. However, its role in cardiac fibrosis has not been established. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of Ets-1 in profibrotic actions of angiotensin II (Ang II) in cardiac fibroblasts (CFs) and in the in vivo heart. In growth-arrested CFs, Ang II induced Ets-1 expression in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. Pretreatment with Ang II type 1 receptor blocker losartan, protein kinase C inhibitor bisindolylmaleimide I, extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) inhibitor PD98059, or c-Jun NH(2)-terminal kinase (JNK) inhibitor SP600125 partly inhibited this induction accompanied with impaired cell proliferation and production of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) and connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) protein, the two downstream targets of Ets-1. Knockdown of Ets-1 by siRNA significantly inhibited the inductive effects of Ang II on cell proliferation and expression of CTGF and PAI-1. Moreover, the levels of Ets-1, PAI-1 and CTGF protein were simultaneously upregulated in left ventricle of Ang II-infused rats in parallel with an increase in the activation of ERK and JNK. Our data suggest that Ets-1 may mediate Ang II-induced cardiac fibrotic effects.

  14. Discovery of Isonicotinamides as Highly Selective, Brain Penetrable, and Orally Active Glycogen Synthase Kinase-3 Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Luo, Guanglin; Chen, Ling; Burton, Catherine R; Xiao, Hong; Sivaprakasam, Prasanna; Krause, Carol M; Cao, Yang; Liu, Nengyin; Lippy, Jonathan; Clarke, Wendy J; Snow, Kimberly; Raybon, Joseph; Arora, Vinod; Pokross, Matt; Kish, Kevin; Lewis, Hal A; Langley, David R; Macor, John E; Dubowchik, Gene M

    2016-02-11

    GSK-3 is a serine/threonine kinase that has numerous substrates. Many of these proteins are involved in the regulation of diverse cellular functions, including metabolism, differentiation, proliferation, and apoptosis. Inhibition of GSK-3 may be useful in treating a number of diseases including Alzheimer's disease (AD), type II diabetes, mood disorders, and some cancers, but the approach poses significant challenges. Here, we present a class of isonicotinamides that are potent, highly kinase-selective GSK-3 inhibitors, the members of which demonstrated oral activity in a triple-transgenic mouse model of AD. The remarkably high kinase selectivity and straightforward synthesis of these compounds bode well for their further exploration as tool compounds and therapeutics.

  15. The Ccl1-Kin28 kinase complex regulates autophagy under nitrogen starvation.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jing; Deng, Shuangsheng; Lu, Puzhong; Bu, Wenting; Li, Tian; Yu, Li; Xie, Zhiping

    2016-01-01

    Starvation triggers global alterations in the synthesis and turnover of proteins. Under such conditions, the recycling of essential nutrients by using autophagy is indispensable for survival. By screening known kinases in the yeast genome, we newly identified a regulator of autophagy, the Ccl1-Kin28 kinase complex (the equivalent of the mammalian cyclin-H-Cdk7 complex), which is known to play key roles in RNA-polymerase-II-mediated transcription. We show that inactivation of Ccl1 caused complete block of autophagy. Interestingly, Ccl1 itself was subject to proteasomal degradation, limiting the level of autophagy during prolonged starvation. We present further evidence that the Ccl1-Kin28 complex regulates the expression of Atg29 and Atg31, which is crucial in the assembly of the Atg1 kinase complex. The identification of this previously unknown regulatory pathway sheds new light on the complex signaling network that governs autophagy activity.

  16. Discovery of Isonicotinamides as Highly Selective, Brain Penetrable, and Orally Active Glycogen Synthase Kinase-3 Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Luo, Guanglin; Chen, Ling; Burton, Catherine R; Xiao, Hong; Sivaprakasam, Prasanna; Krause, Carol M; Cao, Yang; Liu, Nengyin; Lippy, Jonathan; Clarke, Wendy J; Snow, Kimberly; Raybon, Joseph; Arora, Vinod; Pokross, Matt; Kish, Kevin; Lewis, Hal A; Langley, David R; Macor, John E; Dubowchik, Gene M

    2016-02-11

    GSK-3 is a serine/threonine kinase that has numerous substrates. Many of these proteins are involved in the regulation of diverse cellular functions, including metabolism, differentiation, proliferation, and apoptosis. Inhibition of GSK-3 may be useful in treating a number of diseases including Alzheimer's disease (AD), type II diabetes, mood disorders, and some cancers, but the approach poses significant challenges. Here, we present a class of isonicotinamides that are potent, highly kinase-selective GSK-3 inhibitors, the members of which demonstrated oral activity in a triple-transgenic mouse model of AD. The remarkably high kinase selectivity and straightforward synthesis of these compounds bode well for their further exploration as tool compounds and therapeutics. PMID:26751161

  17. Selective regulation of MAP kinase signaling by an endomembrane phosphatidylinositol 4-kinase.

    PubMed

    Cappell, Steven D; Dohlman, Henrik G

    2011-04-29

    Multiple MAP kinase pathways share components yet initiate distinct biological processes. Signaling fidelity can be maintained by scaffold proteins and restriction of signaling complexes to discreet subcellular locations. For example, the yeast MAP kinase scaffold Ste5 binds to phospholipids produced at the plasma membrane and promotes selective MAP kinase activation. Here we show that Pik1, a phosphatidylinositol 4-kinase that localizes primarily to the Golgi, also regulates MAP kinase specificity but does so independently of Ste5. Pik1 is required for full activation of the MAP kinases Fus3 and Hog1 and represses activation of Kss1. Further, we show by genetic epistasis analysis that Pik1 likely regulates Ste11 and Ste50, components shared by all three MAP kinase pathways, through their interaction with the scaffold protein Opy2. These findings reveal a new regulator of signaling specificity functioning at endomembranes rather than at the plasma membrane. PMID:21388955

  18. Ginsenoside Rg3 increases nitric oxide production via increases in phosphorylation and expression of endothelial nitric oxide synthase: Essential roles of estrogen receptor-dependent PI3-kinase and AMP-activated protein kinase

    SciTech Connect

    Hien, Tran Thi; Kim, Nak Doo; Pokharel, Yuba Raj; Oh, Seok Jeong; Lee, Moo Yeol; Kang, Keon Wook

    2010-08-01

    We previously showed that ginsenosides increase nitric oxide (NO) production in vascular endothelium and that ginsenoside Rg3 (Rg3) is the most active one among ginseng saponins. However, the mechanism for Rg3-mediated nitric oxide production is still uncertain. In this study, we determined whether Rg3 affects phosphorylation and expression of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) in ECV 304 human endothelial cells. Rg3 increased both the phosphorylation and the expression of eNOS in a concentration-dependent manner and a maximal effect was found at 10 {mu}g/ml of Rg3. The enzyme activities of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3-kinase), c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), and p38 kinase were enhanced as were estrogen receptor (ER)- and glucocorticoid receptor (GR)-dependent reporter gene transcriptions in Rg3-treated endothelial cells. Rg3-induced eNOS phosphorylation required the ER-mediated PI3-kinase/Akt pathway. Moreover, Rg3 activates AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) through up-regulation of CaM kinase II and Rg3-stimulated eNOS phosphorylation was reversed by AMPK inhibition. The present results provide a mechanism for Rg3-stimulated endothelial NO production.

  19. Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors and Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Abruzzese, Elisabetta; Trawinska, Malgorzata Monika; Perrotti, Alessio Pio; De Fabritiis, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    The management of patients with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) during pregnancy has become recently a matter of continuous debate. The introduction of the Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors (TKIs) in clinical practice has dramatically changed the prognosis of CML patients; in fact, patients diagnosed in chronic phase can reasonably expect many years of excellent disease control and good quality of life, as well as a normal life expectancy, including the necessity to address issues relating to fertility and pregnancy. Physicians are frequently being asked for advice regarding the need for, and/or the appropriateness of, stopping treatment in order to conceive. In this report, we will review the data published in terms of fertility, conception, pregnancy, pregnancy outcome and illness control for TKI treated CML patients, as well as how to manage a planned and/or unplanned pregnancy. PMID:24804001

  20. Novel adenosine 3 prime ,5 prime -cyclic monophosphate dependent protein kinases in a marine diatom

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, P.P.C.; Volcani, B.E. )

    1989-08-08

    Two novel adenosine 3{prime},5{prime}-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP) dependent protein kinases have been isolated from the diatom Cylindrotheca fusiformis. The kinases, designated I and II, are eluted from DEAE-Sephacel at 0.10 and 0.15 M NaCl. They have a high affinity for cAMP and are activated by micromolar cAMP. They exhibit maximal activity at 5 mM Mg{sup 2+} and pH 8 with the preferred phosphate donor ATP and phosphate acceptor histone H1. They phosphorylate sea urchin sperm histone H1 on a single serine site in the sequence Arg-Lys-Gly-Ser({sup 32}P)-Ser-Asn-Ala-Arg and have an apparent M{sub r} of 75,000 as determined by gel filtration and sucrose density sedimentation. In the kinase I preparation a single protein band with an apparent M{sub r} of about 78,000 is photolabeled with 8-azido({sup 32}P)cAMP and is also phosphorylated with ({gamma}-{sup 32}P)ATP in a cAMP-dependent manner, after autoradiography following sodium dodecyl sulfate gel electrophoresis. The rate of phosphorylation of the 78,000-dalton band is independent of the enzyme concentration. The results indicate that (i) these diatom cAMP-dependent protein kinases are monomeric proteins, possessing both the cAMP-binding regulatory and catalytic domains on the same polypeptide chain, (ii) the enzymes do not dissociate into smaller species upon activation by binding cAMP, and (iii) self-phosphorylation of the enzymes by an intrapeptide reaction is cAMP dependent. The two diatom cAMP kinases are refractory to the heat-stable protein kinase modulator from rabbit muscle, but they respond differently to proteolytic degradation and to inhibition by arachidonic acid and several microbial alkaloids.

  1. Optochemical Activation of Kinase Function in Live Cells

    PubMed Central

    Karginov, Andrei V.; Hahn, Klaus M.; Deiters, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Summary Manipulation of protein kinase activity is widely used to dissect signaling pathways controlling physiological and pathological processes. Common methods often cannot provide the desired spatial and temporal resolution in control of kinase activity. Regulation of kinase activity by photocaged kinase inhibitors has been successfully used to achieve tight temporal and local control, but inhibitors are limited to inactivation of kinases, and often do not provide the desired specificity. Here we report detailed methods for light-mediated activation of kinases in living cells using engineered rapamycin-regulated kinases (RapR-kinases) in conjunction with a photocaged analog of rapamycin. PMID:24718793

  2. Protein kinases as targets for antimalarial intervention: Kinomics, structure-based design, transmission-blockade, and targeting host cell enzymes.

    PubMed

    Doerig, Christian; Billker, Oliver; Pratt, David; Endicott, Jane

    2005-12-30

    The surge of interest in protein kinases as targets for chemotherapeutic intervention in a number of diseases such as cancer and neurodegenerative disorders has stimulated research aimed at determining whether enzymes of this class might also be considered as targets in the context of diseases caused by parasitic protists. Here, we present an overview of recent developments in this field, concentrating (i) on the benefits gained from the availability of genomic databases for a number of parasitic protozoa, (ii) on the emerging field of structure-aided design of inhibitors targeting protein kinases of parasitic protists, (iii) on the concept known as transmission-blockade, whereby kinases implicated in the development of the parasite in their arthropod vector might be targeted to interfere with disease transmission, and (iv) on the possibility of controlling parasitic diseases through the inhibition of host cell protein kinases that are required for the establishment of infection by the parasites.

  3. Electrochemiluminescence resonance energy transfer between graphene quantum dots and graphene oxide for sensitive protein kinase activity and inhibitor sensing.

    PubMed

    Liang, Ru-Ping; Qiu, Wei-Bin; Zhao, Hui-Fang; Xiang, Cai-Yun; Qiu, Jian-Ding

    2016-01-21

    Herein, a novel electrochemiluminescence resonance energy transfer (ECL-RET) biosensor using graphene quantum dots (GQDs) as donor and graphene oxide (GO) as acceptor for monitoring the activity of protein kinase was presented for the first time. Anti-phosphoserine antibody conjugated graphene oxide (Ab-GO) nonocomposite could be captured onto the phosphorylated peptide/GQDs modified electrode surface through antibody-antigen interaction in the presence of casein kinase II (CK2) and adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP), resulting in ECL from the GQDs quenching by closely contacting GO. This ECL quenching degree was positively correlated with CK2 activity. Therefore, on the basis of ECL-RET between GQDs and GO, the activity of protein kinase can be detected sensitively. This biosensor can also be used for quantitative analysis CK2 activity in serum samples and qualitative screening kinase inhibition, indicating the potential application of the developed method in biochemical fundamental research and clinical diagnosis. PMID:26724763

  4. Electrochemiluminescence resonance energy transfer between graphene quantum dots and graphene oxide for sensitive protein kinase activity and inhibitor sensing.

    PubMed

    Liang, Ru-Ping; Qiu, Wei-Bin; Zhao, Hui-Fang; Xiang, Cai-Yun; Qiu, Jian-Ding

    2016-01-21

    Herein, a novel electrochemiluminescence resonance energy transfer (ECL-RET) biosensor using graphene quantum dots (GQDs) as donor and graphene oxide (GO) as acceptor for monitoring the activity of protein kinase was presented for the first time. Anti-phosphoserine antibody conjugated graphene oxide (Ab-GO) nonocomposite could be captured onto the phosphorylated peptide/GQDs modified electrode surface through antibody-antigen interaction in the presence of casein kinase II (CK2) and adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP), resulting in ECL from the GQDs quenching by closely contacting GO. This ECL quenching degree was positively correlated with CK2 activity. Therefore, on the basis of ECL-RET between GQDs and GO, the activity of protein kinase can be detected sensitively. This biosensor can also be used for quantitative analysis CK2 activity in serum samples and qualitative screening kinase inhibition, indicating the potential application of the developed method in biochemical fundamental research and clinical diagnosis.

  5. Angiotensin II diminishes the effect of SGK1 on the WNK4-mediated inhibition of ROMK1 channels.

    PubMed

    Yue, Peng; Sun, Peng; Lin, Dao-Hong; Pan, Chunyang; Xing, Wenming; Wang, WenHui

    2011-02-01

    ROMK1 channels are located in the apical membrane of the connecting tubule and cortical collecting duct and mediate the potassium secretion during normal dietary intake. We used a perforated whole-cell patch clamp to explore the effect of angiotensin II on these channels in HEK293 cells transfected with green fluorescent protein (GFP)-ROMK1. Angiotensin II inhibited ROMK1 channels in a dose-dependent manner, an effect abolished by losartan or by inhibition of protein kinase C. Furthermore, angiotensin II stimulated a protein kinase C-sensitive phosphorylation of tyrosine 416 within c-Src. Inhibition of protein tyrosine kinase attenuated the effect of angiotensin II. Western blot studies suggested that angiotensin II inhibited ROMK1 channels by enhancing its tyrosine phosphorylation, a notion supported by angiotensin II's failure to inhibit potassium channels in cells transfected with the ROMK1 tyrosine mutant (R1Y337A). However, angiotensin II restored the with-no-lysine kinase-4 (WNK4)-induced inhibition of R1Y337A in the presence of serum-glucocorticoids-induced kinase 1 (SGK1), which reversed the inhibitory effect of WNK4 on ROMK1. Moreover, protein tyrosine kinase inhibition abolished the angiotensin II-induced restoration of WNK4-mediated inhibition of ROMK1. Angiotensin II inhibited ROMK channels in the cortical collecting duct of rats on a low sodium diet, an effect blocked by protein tyrosine kinase inhibition. Thus, angiotensin II inhibits ROMK channels by two mechanisms: increasing tyrosine phosphorylation of the channel and synergizing the WNK4-induced inhibition. Hence, angiotensin II may have an important role in suppressing potassium secretion during volume depletion. PMID:20927043

  6. Inhibition of Rho kinase mediates the neuroprotective effects of estrogen in the MPTP model of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Perez, Ana I; Dominguez-Meijide, Antonio; Lanciego, Jose L; Guerra, Maria J; Labandeira-Garcia, Jose L

    2013-10-01

    The mechanism by which estrogen protects dopaminergic neurons has not yet been clarified. It is not known if changes in RhoA/Rho kinase activity are involved in the enhanced vulnerability of dopaminergic neurons observed after estrogen depletion. The present study shows that the MPTP-induced loss of dopaminergic neurons is increased by estrogen depletion and inhibited by estrogen replacement, the Rho kinase inhibitor Y27632 and deletion of the angiotensin type-1 receptor. In ovariectomized mice, treatment with MPTP induced a marked increase in Rho kinase activity, and RhoA and RhocK II mRNA and protein expression, which were significantly higher than in ovariectomized mice treated with MPTP and estrogen replacement or type-1 receptor deletion. Estrogen depletion increased Rho kinase activity, via enhancement of the angiotensin type-1 receptor pathway, and Rho kinase activation increased type-1 receptor expression suggesting a vicious cycle in which Rho kinase and type-1 receptor activate each other and promote the degenerative process. The results suggest that type-1 receptor antagonists and Rho kinase inhibitors may provide a new neuroprotective strategy, which may circumvent the potential risks of estrogen replacement therapy and be particularly useful in elderly women or women affected by long-term lack of estrogen.

  7. Insulin-induced Drosophila S6 kinase activation requires phosphoinositide 3-kinase and protein kinase B.

    PubMed Central

    Lizcano, Jose M; Alrubaie, Saif; Kieloch, Agnieszka; Deak, Maria; Leevers, Sally J; Alessi, Dario R

    2003-01-01

    An important mechanism by which insulin regulates cell growth and protein synthesis is through activation of the p70 ribosomal S6 protein kinase (S6K). In mammalian cells, insulin-induced PI3K (phosphoinositide 3-kinase) activation, generates the lipid second messenger PtdIns(3,4,5) P (3), which is thought to play a key role in triggering the activation of S6K. Although the major components of the insulin-signalling pathway are conserved in Drosophila, recent studies suggested that S6K activation does not require PI3K in this system. To investigate further the role of dPI3K (Drosophila PI3K) in dS6K (Drosophila S6K) activation, we examined the effect of two structurally distinct PI3K inhibitors on insulin-induced dS6K activation in Kc167 and S2 Drosophila cell lines. We found that both inhibitors prevented insulin-stimulated phosphorylation and activation of dS6K. To investigate further the role of the dPI3K pathway in regulating dS6K activation, we also used dsRNAi (double-stranded RNA-mediated interference) to decrease expression of dPI3K and the PtdIns(3,4,5) P (3) phosphatase dPTEN ( Drosophila phosphatase and tensin homologue deleted on chromosome 10) in Kc167 and S2 cells. Knock-down of dPI3K prevented dS6K activation, whereas knock-down of dPTEN, which would be expected to increase PtdIns(3,4,5) P (3) levels, stimulated dS6K activity. Moreover, when the expression of the dPI3K target, dPKB (Drosophila protein kinase B), was decreased to undetectable levels, we found that insulin could no longer trigger dS6K activation. This observation provides the first direct demonstration that dPKB is required for insulin-stimulated dS6K activation. We also present evidence that the amino-acid-induced activation of dS6K in the absence of insulin, thought to be mediated by dTOR (Drosophila target of rapamycin), which is unaffected by the inhibition of dPI3K by wortmannin. The results of the present study support the view that, in Drosophila cells, dPI3K and dPKB, as well d

  8. PKCβII Modulation of Myocyte Contractile Performance

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Hyosook; Robinson, Dustin A; Stevenson, Tamara K; Wu, Helen C; Kampert, Sarah E; Pagani, Francis D; Dyke, D. Brad; Martin, Jody L; Sadayappan, Sakthival; Day, Sharlene M; Westfall, Margaret V

    2012-01-01

    Significant up-regulation of the protein kinaseII (PKCβII) develops during heart failure and yet divergent functional outcomes are reported in animal models. The goal here is to investigate PKCβII modulation of contractile function and gain insights into downstream targets in adult cardiac myocytes. Increased PKCβII protein expression and phosphorylation developed after gene transfer into adult myocytes while expression remained undetectable in controls. The PKCβII was distributed in a perinuclear pattern and this expression resulted in diminished rates and amplitude of shortening and re-lengthening compared to controls and myocytes expressing dominant negative PKCβII (PKCβDN). Similar decreases were observed in the Ca2+ transient and the Ca2+ decay rate slowed in response to caffeine in PKCβII-expressing myocytes. Parallel phosphorylation studies indicated PKCβII targets phosphatase activity to reduce phospholamban (PLB) phosphorylation at residue Thr17 (pThr17-PLB). The PKCβ inhibitor, LY379196 (LY) restored pThr17-PLB to control levels. In contrast, myofilament protein phosphorylation was enhanced by PKCβII expression, and individually, LY and the phosphatase inhibitor, calyculin A each failed to block this response. Further work showed PKCβII increased Ca2+- activated, calmodulin-dependent kinase IIδ (CaMKIIδ) expression and enhanced both CaMKIIδ and protein kinase D (PKD) phosphorylation. Phosphorylation of both signaling targets also was resistant to acute inhibition by LY. These later results provide evidence PKCβII modulates contractile function via intermediate downstream pathway(s) in cardiac myocytes. PMID:22587992

  9. A unifying mechanism for WNK kinase regulation of sodium-chloride cotransporter.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chou-Long; Cheng, Chih-Jen

    2015-11-01

    Mammalian with-no-lysine [K] (WNK) kinases are a family of four serine-threonine protein kinases, WNK1-4. Mutations of WNK1 and WNK4 in humans cause pseudohypoaldosteronism type II (PHA2), an autosomal-dominant disease characterized by hypertension and hyperkalemia. Increased Na(+) reabsorption through Na(+)-Cl(-) cotransporter (NCC) in the distal convoluted tubule plays an important role in the pathogenesis of hypertension in patients with PHA2. However, how WNK1 and WNK4 regulate NCC and how mutations of WNKs cause activation of NCC have been controversial. Here, we review current state of literature supporting a compelling model that WNK1 and WNK4 both contribute to stimulation of NCC. The precise combined effects of WNK1 and WNK4 on NCC remain unclear but likely are positive rather than antagonistic. The recent discovery that WNK kinases may function as an intracellular chloride sensor adds a new dimension to the physiological role of WNK kinases. Intracellular chloride-dependent regulation of WNK's may underlie the mechanism of regulation of NCC by extracellular K(+). Definite answer yet will require future investigation by tubular perfusion in mice with altered WNK kinase expression.

  10. Mechanisms for kinase-mediated dimerization of the epidermal growth factor receptor.

    PubMed

    Lu, Chafen; Mi, Li-Zhi; Schürpf, Thomas; Walz, Thomas; Springer, Timothy A

    2012-11-01

    We study a mechanism by which dimerization of the EGF receptor (EGFR) cytoplasmic domain is transmitted to the ectodomain. Therapeutic and other small molecule antagonists to the kinase domain that stabilize its active conformation, but not those that stabilize an inactive conformation, stabilize ectodomain dimerization. Inhibitor-induced dimerization requires an asymmetric kinase domain interface associated with activation. EGF and kinase inhibitors stimulate formation of identical dimer interfaces in the EGFR transmembrane domain, as shown by disulfide cross-linking. Disulfide cross-linking at an interface in domain IV in the ectodomain was also stimulated similarly; however, EGF but not inhibitors stimulated cross-linking in domain II. Inhibitors similarly induced noncovalent dimerization in nearly full-length, detergent-solubilized EGFR as shown by gel filtration. EGFR ectodomain deletion resulted in spontaneous dimerization, whereas deletion of exons 2-7, in which extracellular domains III and IV are retained, did not. In EM, kinase inhibitor-induced dimers lacked any well defined orientation between the ectodomain monomers. Fab of the therapeutic antibody cetuximab to domain III confirmed a variable position and orientation of this domain in inhibitor-induced dimers but suggested that the C termini of domain IV of the two monomers were in close proximity, consistent with dimerization in the transmembrane domains. The results provide insights into the relative energetics of intracellular and extracellular dimerization in EGFR and have significance for physiologic dimerization through the asymmetric kinase interface, bidirectional signal transmission in EGFR, and mechanism of action of therapeutics.

  11. Soybean nodule autoregulation receptor kinase phosphorylates two kinase-associated protein phosphatases in vitro.

    PubMed

    Miyahara, Akira; Hirani, Tripty A; Oakes, Marie; Kereszt, Attila; Kobe, Bostjan; Djordjevic, Michael A; Gresshoff, Peter M

    2008-09-12

    The NARK (nodule autoregulation receptor kinase) gene, a negative regulator of cell proliferation in nodule primordia in several legumes, encodes a receptor kinase that consists of an extracellular leucine-rich repeat and an intracellular serine/threonine protein kinase domain. The putative catalytic domain of NARK was expressed and purified as a maltose-binding or a glutathione S-transferase fusion protein in Escherichia coli. The recombinant NARK proteins showed autophosphorylation activity in vitro. Several regions of the NARK kinase domain were shown by mass spectrometry to possess phosphoresidues. The kinase-inactive protein K724E failed to autophosphorylate, as did three other proteins corresponding to phenotypically detected mutants defective in whole plant autoregulation of nodulation. A wild-type NARK fusion protein transphosphorylated a kinase-inactive mutant NARK fusion protein, suggesting that it is capable of intermolecular autophosphorylation in vitro. In addition, Ser-861 and Thr-963 in the NARK kinase catalytic domain were identified as phosphorylation sites through site-directed mutagenesis. The genes coding for the kinase-associated protein phosphatases KAPP1 and KAPP2, two putative interacting components of NARK, were isolated. NARK kinase domain phosphorylated recombinant KAPP proteins in vitro. Autophosphorylated NARK kinase domain was, in turn, dephosphorylated by both KAPP1 and KAPP2. Our results suggest a model for signal transduction involving NARK in the control of nodule development.

  12. SAGE II

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2016-02-16

    ... of stratospheric aerosols, ozone, nitrogen dioxide, water vapor and cloud occurrence by mapping vertical profiles and calculating ... (i.e. MLS and SAGE III versus HALOE) Fixed various bugs Details are in the  SAGE II V7.00 Release Notes .   ...

  13. Polo kinase Cdc5 is a central regulator of meiosis I.

    PubMed

    Attner, Michelle A; Miller, Matthew P; Ee, Ly-sha; Elkin, Sheryl K; Amon, Angelika

    2013-08-27

    During meiosis, two consecutive rounds of chromosome segregation yield four haploid gametes from one diploid cell. The Polo kinase Cdc5 is required for meiotic progression, but how Cdc5 coordinates multiple cell-cycle events during meiosis I is not understood. Here we show that CDC5-dependent phosphorylation of Rec8, a subunit of the cohesin complex that links sister chromatids, is required for efficient cohesin removal from chromosome arms, which is a prerequisite for meiosis I chromosome segregation. CDC5 also establishes conditions for centromeric cohesin removal during meiosis II by promoting the degradation of Spo13, a protein that protects centromeric cohesin during meiosis I. Despite CDC5's central role in meiosis I, the protein kinase is dispensable during meiosis II and does not even phosphorylate its meiosis I targets during the second meiotic division. We conclude that Cdc5 has evolved into a master regulator of the unique meiosis I chromosome segregation pattern.

  14. Neonatal hyperbilirubinemia caused by pyruvate kinase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Hammer, S G; Lewan, R B

    1988-01-01

    We report an infant with neonatal hyperbilirubinemia due to pyruvate kinase deficiency. The initial approach involved rapid evaluation, phototherapy, and close monitoring of serum bilirubin levels. Follow-up included maintenance on folic acid, monitoring blood counts, and educating the parents about the course of pyruvate kinase deficiency, especially aplastic crisis. We suggest that the informed family practitioner can manage neonatal hyperbilirubinemia and pyruvate kinase deficiency with referrals at critical times to pediatric or surgical specialists. The practitioner must be able to recognize quickly the need for exchange transfusion for severe jaundice and for blood transfusions or splenectomy when significant anemia or aplastic crisis occurs.

  15. Functional analysis of anomeric sugar kinases.

    PubMed

    Conway, Louis P; Voglmeir, Josef

    2016-09-01

    Anomeric sugar kinases perform fundamental roles in the metabolism of carbohydrates. Under- or overexpression of these enzymes, or mutations causing functional impairments can give rise to diseases such as galactosaemia and so the study of this class of kinase is of critical importance. In addition, anomeric sugar kinases which are naturally promiscuous, or have been artificially made so, may find application in the synthesis of libraries of drug candidates (for example, antibiotics), and natural or unnatural oligosaccharides and glycoconjugates. In this review, we provide an overview of the biological functions of these enzymes, the tools which have been developed to investigate them, and the current frontiers in their study. PMID:27351442

  16. Tyrosine phosphorylation is a mandatory proximal step in radiation-induced activation of the protein kinase C signaling pathway in human B-lymphocyte precursors.

    PubMed Central

    Uckun, F M; Schieven, G L; Tuel-Ahlgren, L M; Dibirdik, I; Myers, D E; Ledbetter, J A; Song, C W

    1993-01-01

    Ionizing radiation triggers a signal in human B-lymphocyte precursors that is intimately linked to an active protein-tyrosine kinase regulatory pathway. We show that in B-lymphocyte precursors, irradiation with gamma-rays leads to (i) stimulation of phosphatidylinositol turnover; (ii) downstream activation by covalent modification of multiple serine-specific protein kinases, including protein kinase C; and (iii) activation of nuclear factor kappa B. All of the radiation-induced signals were effectively prevented by the protein-tyrosine kinase inhibitors genistein and herbimycin A. Thus, tyrosine phosphorylation is an important and perhaps mandatory proximal step in the activation of the protein kinase C signaling cascade in human B-lymphocyte precursors. Our report expands current knowledge of the radiation-induced signaling cascade by clarifying the chronological sequence of biochemical events that follow irradiation. Images PMID:8419931

  17. Rac-1 and Raf-1 kinases, components of distinct signaling pathways, activate myotonic dystrophy protein kinase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shimizu, M.; Wang, W.; Walch, E. T.; Dunne, P. W.; Epstein, H. F.

    2000-01-01

    Myotonic dystrophy protein kinase (DMPK) is a serine-threonine protein kinase encoded by the myotonic dystrophy (DM) locus on human chromosome 19q13.3. It is a close relative of other kinases that interact with members of the Rho family of small GTPases. We show here that the actin cytoskeleton-linked GTPase Rac-1 binds to DMPK, and coexpression of Rac-1 and DMPK activates its transphosphorylation activity in a GTP-sensitive manner. DMPK can also bind Raf-1 kinase, the Ras-activated molecule of the MAP kinase pathway. Purified Raf-1 kinase phosphorylates and activates DMPK. The interaction of DMPK with these distinct signals suggests that it may play a role as a nexus for cross-talk between their respective pathways and may partially explain the remarkable pleiotropy of DM.

  18. Investigating combinatorial approaches in virtual screening on human inducible 6-phosphofructo-2-kinase/fructose-2,6-bisphosphatase (PFKFB3): a case study for small molecule kinases.

    PubMed

    Crochet, Robert B; Cavalier, Michael C; Seo, Minsuh; Kim, Jeong Do; Yim, Young-Sun; Park, Seung-Jong; Lee, Yong-Hwan

    2011-11-01

    Efforts toward improving the predictiveness in tier-based approaches to virtual screening (VS) have mainly focused on protein kinases. Despite their significance as drug targets, small molecule kinases have been rarely tested with these approaches. In this paper, we investigate the efficacy of a pharmacophore screening-combined structure-based docking approach on the human inducible 6-phosphofructo-2-kinase/fructose-2,6-bisphosphatase, an emerging target for cancer chemotherapy. Six out of a total 1364 compounds from NCI's Diversity Set II were selected as true actives via throughput screening. Using a database constructed from these compounds, five programs were tested for structure-based docking (SBD) performance, the MOE of which showed the highest enrichments and second highest screening rates. Separately, using the same database, pharmacophore screening was performed, reducing 1364 compounds to 287 with no loss in true actives, yielding an enrichment of 4.75. When SBD was retested with the pharmacophore filtered database, 4 of the 5 SBD programs showed significant improvements to enrichment rates at only 2.5% of the database, with a 7-fold decrease in an average VS time. Our results altogether suggest that combinatorial approaches of VS technologies are easily applicable to small molecule kinases and, moreover, that such methods can decrease the variability associated with single-method SBD approaches.

  19. Protein kinase CK2 regulates metal toxicity in neuronal cells.

    PubMed

    Zaman, Mohammad S; Johnson, Adam J; Bobek, Gabriele; Kueh, Sindy; Kersaitis, Cindy; Bailey, Trevor D; Buskila, Yossi; Wu, Ming J

    2016-01-01

    Protein kinase CK2 is a pleiotropic tetrameric enzyme, regulating numerous biological processes from cell proliferation to stress response. This study demonstrates for the first time that CK2 is involved in the regulation of metal uptake and toxicity in neuronal cells. After the determination of inhibitory concentrations (IC50) for a range of metal salts (ZnSO4, Al(mal)3, CoCl2, CrO3, NaAsO2 and CaCl2) in Neuro-2a mouse neuroblastoma cells, the effect of CK2 on metal toxicity was investigated by three lines of experiments using CK2 inhibitors, metal ion specific fluorophores and siRNA-mediated knockdown of CK2 expression. The results showed that both CK2 inhibitors, 4,5,6,7-tetrabromobenzotriazole (TBB) and quinalizarin, markedly reduced the toxicity of Zn(ii), Al(iii), Co(ii), Cr(vi) and As(iii). Confocal microscopy imaging revealed that Zn(ii) uptake was accompanied by the increase of intracellular Ca(ii) in Neuro-2a cells treated with IC50 of ZnSO4 (240 μM), and such concurrent elevation of intracellular Zn(ii) and Ca(ii) was blocked by TBB and quinalizarin. The role of CK2 in metal uptake was further characterised using specific siRNA against each of the three subunits (CK2α, α' and β) and the data demonstrate that CK2α' is the prominent subunit regulating the metal toxicity. Finally, the role of CK2 in metal toxicity was found to be conserved in the distant species-Saccharomyces cerevisiae by employing the complete deletion mutants of CK2 (cka1Δ, cka2Δ, ckb1Δ and ckb2Δ). Taken together, these findings shed light on a new facet of CK2 functionality and provide a basis for further research on the regulation of Zn(ii) and Ca(ii) homeostasis by CK2.

  20. Angiotensin II induces monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 gene expression in rat vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, X L; Tummala, P E; Olbrych, M T; Alexander, R W; Medford, R M

    1998-11-01

    Monocyte infiltration into the vessel wall, a key initial step in the process of atherosclerosis, is mediated in part by monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1). Hypertension, particularly in the presence of an activated renin-angiotensin system, is a major risk factor for the development of atherosclerosis. To investigate a potential molecular basis for a link between hypertension and atherosclerosis, we studied the effects of angiotensin II (Ang II) on MCP-1 gene expression in rat aortic smooth muscle cells. Rat smooth muscle cells treated with Ang II exhibited a dose-dependent increase in MCP-1 mRNA accumulation that was prevented by the AT1 receptor antagonist losartan. Ang II also activated MCP-1 gene transcription. Inhibition of NADH/NADPH oxidase, which generates superoxide and H2O2, with diphenylene iodonium or apocynin decreased Ang II-induced MCP-1 mRNA accumulation. Induction of MCP-1 gene expression by Ang II was inhibited by catalase, suggesting a second messenger role for H2O2. The tyrosine kinase inhibitor genistein and the mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase inhibitor PD098059 inhibited Ang II-induced MCP-1 gene expression, consistent with a mitogen-activated protein kinase-dependent signaling mechanism. Ang II may thus promote atherogenesis by direct activation of MCP-1 gene expression in vascular smooth muscle cells.

  1. p21-activated kinase 1 participates in vascular remodeling in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Hinoki, Akinari; Kimura, Keita; Higuchi, Sadaharu; Eguchi, Kunie; Takaguri, Akira; Ishimaru, Kazuhiro; Frank, Gerald D; Gerthoffer, William T; Sommerville, Laura J; Autieri, Michael V; Eguchi, Satoru

    2010-01-01

    Vascular smooth muscle cell hypertrophy, proliferation, or migration occurs in hypertension, atherosclerosis, and restenosis after angioplasty, leading to pathophysiological vascular remodeling. Angiotensin II and platelet-derived growth factor are well-known participants of vascular remodeling and activate a myriad of downstream protein kinases, including p21-activated protein kinase (PAK1). PAK1, an effector kinase of small GTPases, phosphorylates several substrates to regulate cytoskeletal reorganization. However, the exact role of PAK1 activation in vascular remodeling remains to be elucidated. Here, we have hypothesized that PAK1 is a critical target of intervention for the prevention of vascular remodeling. Adenoviral expression of dominant-negative PAK1 inhibited angiotensin II-stimulated vascular smooth muscle cell migration. It also inhibited vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation induced by platelet-derived growth factor. PAK1 was activated in neointima of the carotid artery after balloon injury in the rat. Moreover, marked inhibition of the neointima hyperplasia was observed in a dominant-negative PAK1 adenovirus-treated carotid artery after the balloon injury. Taken together, these results suggest that PAK1 is involved in both angiotensin II and platelet-derived growth factor-mediated vascular smooth muscle cell remodeling, and inactivation of PAK1 in vivo could be effective in preventing pathophysiological vascular remodeling.

  2. Corticosteroids block autophagy protein recruitment in Aspergillus fumigatus phagosomes via targeting Dectin-1/syk kinase signaling

    PubMed Central

    Kyrmizi, Irene; Gresnigt, Mark S.; Akoumianaki, Tonia; Samonis, George; Sidiropoulos, Prodromos; Boumpas, Dimitrios; Netea, Mihai G; van de Veerdonk, Frank L; Kontoyiannis, Dimitrios P; Chamilos, Georgios

    2013-01-01

    Aspergillus fumigatus is the predominant airborne fungal pathogen in immunocompromised patients. Genetic defects in NADPH oxidase (chronic granulomatous disease; CGD) and corticosteroid-induced immunosupression lead to impaired killing of A. fumigatus and unique susceptibility to invasive aspergillosis via incompletely characterized mechanisms. Recent studies link Toll-like receptor activation with phagosome maturation via the engagement of autophagy proteins. Herein, we found that infection of human monocytes with A. fumigatus spores triggered selective recruitment of the autophagy protein LC3 II in phagosomes upon fungal cell wall swelling. This response was induced by surface exposure of immunostimulatory β-glucans and was mediated by activation of the Dectin-1 receptor. LC3 II recruitment in A. fumigatus-phagosomes required syk kinase-dependent production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and was nearly absent in monocytes of patients with CGD. This pathway was important for control of intracellular fungal growth, as silencing of Atg5 resulted in impaired phagosome maturation and killing of A. fumigatus. In-vivo and ex-vivo administration of corticosteroids blocked LC3 II recruitment in A. fumigatus phagosomes via rapid inhibition of syk kinase phosphorylation and downstream production of ROS. Our studies link Dectin-1/syk kinase signaling with maturation of A. fumigatus phagosomes and uncover a mechanism for development of invasive fungal disease. PMID:23817424

  3. Transcriptional coactivator CIITA, a functional homolog of TAF1, has kinase activity.

    PubMed

    Soe, Katherine C; Devaiah, Ballachanda N; Singer, Dinah S

    2013-11-01

    The Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) class II transactivator (CIITA) mediates activated immune responses and its deficiency results in the Type II Bare Lymphocyte Syndrome. CIITA is a transcriptional co-activator that regulates γ-interferon-activated transcription of MHC class I and class II genes. It is also a functional homolog of TAF1, a component of the general transcription factor complex TFIID. TAF1 and CIITA both possess intrinsic acetyltransferase (AT) activity that is required for transcription initiation. In response to induction by γ-interferon, CIITA and it's AT activity bypass the requirement for TAF1 AT activity. TAF1 also has kinase activity that is essential for its function. However, no similar activity has been identified for CIITA thus far. Here we report that CIITA, like TAF1, is a serine-threonine kinase. Its substrate specificity parallels, but does not duplicate, that of TAF1 in phosphorylating the TFIID component TAF7, the RAP74 subunit of the general transcription factor TFIIF and histone H2B. Like TAF1, CIITA autophosphorylates, affecting its interaction with TAF7. Additionally, CIITA phosphorylates histone H2B at Ser36, a target of TAF1 that is required for transcription during cell cycle progression and stress response. However, unlike TAF1, CIITA also phosphorylates all the other histones. The identification of this novel kinase activity of CIITA further clarifies its role as a functional homolog of TAF1 which may operate during stress and γ-IFN activated MHC gene transcription.

  4. Post-transcriptional regulation of the chicken thymidine kinase gene.

    PubMed

    Groudine, M; Casimir, C

    1984-02-10

    In attempting to understand the molecular basis of the control of chicken thymidine kinase (cTK) gene expression, we have examined the steady state cTK RNA content, and the patterns of DNA methylation, chromatin structure and endogenous nuclear runoff transcription of this gene in dividing and non-dividing cells. Our results reveal that the steady state level of cTK poly A+ RNA is correlated with the divisional activity of normal avian cells and tissues. However, no differences in the pattern of Hpa II site methylation or chromatin structure are found among cells containing high or undetectable levels of steady state cTK RNA. In addition, no differences in cTK transcription as assayed by nuclear runoff experiments are detectable in isolated nuclei derived from dividing or non-dividing cells containing high or low levels of steady state cTK RNA. These results suggest that the principal control of chicken thymidine kinase gene expression is post-transcriptional in nature.

  5. The Crystal Structure of Cancer Osaka Thyroid Kinase Reveals an Unexpected Kinase Domain Fold*

    PubMed Central

    Gutmann, Sascha; Hinniger, Alexandra; Fendrich, Gabriele; Drückes, Peter; Antz, Sylvie; Mattes, Henri; Möbitz, Henrik; Ofner, Silvio; Schmiedeberg, Niko; Stojanovic, Aleksandar; Rieffel, Sebastien; Strauss, André; Troxler, Thomas; Glatthar, Ralf; Sparrer, Helmut

    2015-01-01

    Macrophages are important cellular effectors in innate immune responses and play a major role in autoimmune diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis. Cancer Osaka thyroid (COT) kinase, also known as mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinase 8 (MAP3K8) and tumor progression locus 2 (Tpl-2), is a serine-threonine (ST) kinase and is a key regulator in the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines in macrophages. Due to its pivotal role in immune biology, COT kinase has been identified as an attractive target for pharmaceutical research that is directed at the discovery of orally available, selective, and potent inhibitors for the treatment of autoimmune disorders and cancer. The production of monomeric, recombinant COT kinase has proven to be very difficult, and issues with solubility and stability of the enzyme have hampered the discovery and optimization of potent and selective inhibitors. We developed a protocol for the production of recombinant human COT kinase that yields pure and highly active enzyme in sufficient yields for biochemical and structural studies. The quality of the enzyme allowed us to establish a robust in vitro phosphorylation assay for the efficient biochemical characterization of COT kinase inhibitors and to determine the x-ray co-crystal structures of the COT kinase domain in complex with two ATP-binding site inhibitors. The structures presented in this study reveal two distinct ligand binding modes and a unique kinase domain architecture that has not been observed previously. The structurally versatile active site significantly impacts the design of potent, low molecular weight COT kinase inhibitors. PMID:25918157

  6. The Crystal Structure of Cancer Osaka Thyroid Kinase Reveals an Unexpected Kinase Domain Fold.

    PubMed

    Gutmann, Sascha; Hinniger, Alexandra; Fendrich, Gabriele; Drückes, Peter; Antz, Sylvie; Mattes, Henri; Möbitz, Henrik; Ofner, Silvio; Schmiedeberg, Niko; Stojanovic, Aleksandar; Rieffel, Sebastien; Strauss, André; Troxler, Thomas; Glatthar, Ralf; Sparrer, Helmut

    2015-06-12

    Macrophages are important cellular effectors in innate immune responses and play a major role in autoimmune diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis. Cancer Osaka thyroid (COT) kinase, also known as mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinase 8 (MAP3K8) and tumor progression locus 2 (Tpl-2), is a serine-threonine (ST) kinase and is a key regulator in the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines in macrophages. Due to its pivotal role in immune biology, COT kinase has been identified as an attractive target for pharmaceutical research that is directed at the discovery of orally available, selective, and potent inhibitors for the treatment of autoimmune disorders and cancer. The production of monomeric, recombinant COT kinase has proven to be very difficult, and issues with solubility and stability of the enzyme have hampered the discovery and optimization of potent and selective inhibitors. We developed a protocol for the production of recombinant human COT kinase that yields pure and highly active enzyme in sufficient yields for biochemical and structural studies. The quality of the enzyme allowed us to establish a robust in vitro phosphorylation assay for the efficient biochemical characterization of COT kinase inhibitors and to determine the x-ray co-crystal structures of the COT kinase domain in complex with two ATP-binding site inhibitors. The structures presented in this study reveal two distinct ligand binding modes and a unique kinase domain architecture that has not been observed previously. The structurally versatile active site significantly impacts the design of potent, low molecular weight COT kinase inhibitors.

  7. Crystal structures of two aminoglycoside kinases bound with a eukaryotic protein kinase inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Fong, Desiree H; Xiong, Bing; Hwang, Jiyoung; Berghuis, Albert M

    2011-05-09

    Antibiotic resistance is recognized as a growing healthcare problem. To address this issue, one strategy is to thwart the causal mechanism using an adjuvant in partner with the antibiotic. Aminoglycosides are a class of clinically important antibiotics used for the treatment of serious infections. Their usefulness has been compromised predominantly due to drug inactivation by aminoglycoside-modifying enzymes, such as aminoglycoside phosphotransferases or kinases. These kinases are structurally homologous to eukaryotic Ser/Thr and Tyr protein kinases and it has been shown that some can be inhibited by select protein kinase inhibitors. The aminoglycoside kinase, APH(3')-IIIa, can be inhibited by CKI-7, an ATP-competitive inhibitor for the casein kinase 1. We have determined that CKI-7 is also a moderate inhibitor for the atypical APH(9)-Ia. Here we present the crystal structures of CKI-7-bound APH(3')-IIIa and APH(9)-Ia, the first structures of a eukaryotic protein kinase inhibitor in complex with bacterial kinases. CKI-7 binds to the nucleotide-binding pocket of the enzymes and its binding alters the conformation of the nucleotide-binding loop, the segment homologous to the glycine-rich loop in eukaryotic protein kinases. Comparison of these structures with the CKI-7-bound casein kinase 1 reveals features in the binding pockets that are distinct in the bacterial kinases and could be exploited for the design of a bacterial kinase specific inhibitor. Our results provide evidence that an inhibitor for a subset of APHs can be developed in order to curtail resistance to aminoglycosides.

  8. Nonnucleoside inhibitors of adenosine kinase.

    PubMed

    Gomtsyan, Arthur; Lee, Chih-Hung

    2004-01-01

    Adenosine (ADO) is an endogenous inhibitory neuromodulator that increases nociceptive thresholds in response to tissue trauma and inflammation. Adenosine kinase (AK) is a key intracellular enzyme regulating intra- and extracellular concentrations of ADO. AK inhibition selectively amplifies extracellular ADO levels at cell and tissue sites where accelerated release of ADO occurs. AK inhibitors have been shown to provide effective antinociceptive, antiinflammatory and anticonvulsant activity in animal models, thus suggesting their potential therapeutic utility for pain, inflammation, epilepsy and possibly other central and peripheral nervous system diseases associated with cellular trauma and inflammation. This beneficial outcome may potentially lack nonspecific effects associated with the systemic administration of ADO receptor agonists. Until recently all of the reported AK inhibitors contained adenosine-like structural motif. The present review will discuss design, synthesis and analgesic and antiinflammatory properties of the novel nonnucleoside AK inhibitors that do not have close structural resemblance with the natural substrate ADO. Two classes of the nonnucleoside AK inhibitors are built on pyridopyrimidine and alkynylpyrimidine cores.

  9. Ocular Toxicity of Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Mary Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives To review common tyrosine kinase inhibitors, as well as their ocular side effects and management. Data Sources A comprehensive literature search was conducted using cINahl®, Pubmed, and cochrane databases for articles published since 2004 with the following search terms: ocular toxicities, tyrosine kinase inhibitors, ophthalmology, adverse events, eye, and vision. Data Synthesis Tyrosine kinase inhibitors can cause significant eye toxicity. Conclusions Given the prevalence of new tyrosine kinase inhibitor therapies and the complexity of possible pathogenesis of ocular pathology, oncology nurses can appreciate the occurrence of ocular toxicities and the role of nursing in the management of these problems. Implications for Nursing Knowledge of the risk factors and etiology of ocular toxicity of targeted cancer therapies can guide nursing assessment, enhance patient education, and improve care management. Including a review of eye symptoms and vision issues in nursing assessment can enhance early detection and treatment of ocular toxicity. PMID:26906134

  10. Genetics Home Reference: mevalonate kinase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... cytoskeleton), gene activity (expression), and protein production and modification. Most MVK gene mutations that cause mevalonate kinase ... What are the different ways in which a genetic condition can be inherited? More about Inheriting Genetic ...

  11. PORT II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muniz, Beau

    2009-01-01

    One unique project that the Prototype lab worked on was PORT I (Post-landing Orion Recovery Test). PORT is designed to test and develop the system and components needed to recover the Orion capsule once it splashes down in the ocean. PORT II is designated as a follow up to PORT I that will utilize a mock up pressure vessel that is spatially compar able to the final Orion capsule.

  12. A Molecular Brake in the Kinase Hinge Region Regulates the Activity of Receptor Tyrosine Kinases

    SciTech Connect

    Chen,H.; Ma, J.; Li, W.; Eliseenkova, A.; Xu, C.; Neubert, T.; Miller, W.; Mohammadi, M.

    2007-01-01

    Activating mutations in the tyrosine kinase domain of receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) cause cancer and skeletal disorders. Comparison of the crystal structures of unphosphorylated and phosphorylated wild-type FGFR2 kinase domains with those of seven unphosphorylated pathogenic mutants reveals an autoinhibitory 'molecular brake' mediated by a triad of residues in the kinase hinge region of all FGFRs. Structural analysis shows that many other RTKs, including PDGFRs, VEGFRs, KIT, CSF1R, FLT3, TEK, and TIE, are also subject to regulation by this brake. Pathogenic mutations activate FGFRs and other RTKs by disengaging the brake either directly or indirectly.

  13. Identifying Kinase Substrates via a Heavy ATP Kinase Assay and Quantitative Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Müller, André C.; Giambruno, Roberto; Weißer, Juliane; Májek, Peter; Hofer, Alexandre; Bigenzahn, Johannes W.; Superti-Furga, Giulio; Jessen, Henning J.; Bennett, Keiryn L.

    2016-01-01

    Mass spectrometry-based in vitro kinase screens play an essential role in the discovery of kinase substrates, however, many suffer from biological and technical noise or necessitate genetically-altered enzyme-cofactor systems. We describe a method that combines stable γ-[18O2]-ATP with classical in vitro kinase assays within a contemporary quantitative proteomic workflow. Our approach improved detection of known substrates of the non-receptor tyrosine kinase ABL1; and identified potential, new in vitro substrates. PMID:27346722

  14. Kinase inhibitor profiling reveals unexpected opportunities to inhibit disease-associated mutant kinases

    PubMed Central

    Duong-Ly, Krisna C.; Devarajan, Karthik; Liang, Shuguang; Horiuchi, Kurumi Y.; Wang, Yuren; Ma, Haiching; Peterson, Jeffrey R.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Small-molecule kinase inhibitors have typically been designed to inhibit wild-type kinases rather than the mutant forms that frequently arise in diseases such as cancer. Mutations can have serious clinical implications by increasing kinase catalytic activity or conferring therapeutic resistance. To identify opportunities to repurpose inhibitors against disease-associated mutant kinases, we conducted a large-scale functional screen of 183 known kinase inhibitors against 76 recombinant, mutant kinases. The results revealed lead compounds with activity against clinically important mutant kinases including ALK, LRRK2, RET, and EGFR as well as unexpected opportunities for repurposing FDA-approved kinase inhibitors as leads for additional indications. Furthermore, using T674I PDGFRα as an example, we show how single-dose screening data can provide predictive structure-activity data to guide subsequent inhibitor optimization. This study provides a resource for the development of inhibitors against numerous disease-associated mutant kinases and illustrates the potential of unbiased profiling as an approach to compound-centric inhibitor development. PMID:26776524

  15. Twitchin kinase interacts with MAPKAP kinase 2 in Caenorhabditis elegans striated muscle

    PubMed Central

    Matsunaga, Yohei; Qadota, Hiroshi; Furukawa, Miho; Choe, Heejoo (Helen); Benian, Guy M.

    2015-01-01

    In Caenorhabditis elegans, twitchin is a giant polypeptide located in muscle A-bands. The protein kinase of twitchin is autoinhibited by 45 residues upstream (NL) and 60 residues downstream (CRD) of the kinase catalytic core. Molecular dynamics simulation on a twitchin fragment revealed that the NL is released by pulling force. However, it is unclear how the CRD is removed. To identify proteins that may remove the CRD, we performed a yeast two-hybrid screen using twitchin kinase as bait. One interactor is MAK-1, C. elegans orthologue of MAPKAP kinase 2. MAPKAP kinase 2 is phosphorylated and activated by p38 MAP kinase. We demonstrate that the CRD of twitchin is important for binding to MAK-1. mak-1 is expressed in nematode body wall muscle, and antibodies to MAK-1 localize between and around Z-disk analogues and to the edge of A-bands. Whereas unc-22 mutants are completely resistant, mak-1 mutants are partially resistant to nicotine. MAK-1 can phosphorylate twitchin NL-Kin-CRD in vitro. Genetic data suggest the involvement of two other mak-1 paralogues and two orthologues of p38 MAP kinase. These results suggest that MAK-1 is an activator of twitchin kinase and that the p38 MAP kinase pathway may be involved in the regulation of twitchin. PMID:25851606

  16. Redundant kinase activation and resistance of EGFR-tyrosine kinase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Min; Fu, Li-Wu

    2014-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) have shown dramatic effects against that tumors harboring EGFR activating mutations in the EGFR intracytoplasmic tyrosine kinase domain and resulted in cell apoptosis. Unfortunately, a number of patients ultimately developed resistance by multiple mechanisms. Thus, elucidation of the mechanism of resistance to EGFR-TKIs can provide strategies for blocking or reversing the situation. Recent studies suggested that redundant kinase activation plays pivotal roles in escaping from the effects of EGFR-TKIs. Herein, we aimed to characterize several molecular events involved in the resistance to EGFR-TKIs mediated by redundant kinase activation. PMID:25520855

  17. BORE II

    2015-08-01

    Bore II, co-developed by Berkeley Lab researchers Frank Hale, Chin-Fu Tsang, and Christine Doughty, provides vital information for solving water quality and supply problems and for improving remediation of contaminated sites. Termed "hydrophysical logging," this technology is based on the concept of measuring repeated depth profiles of fluid electric conductivity in a borehole that is pumping. As fluid enters the wellbore, its distinct electric conductivity causes peaks in the conductivity log that grow and migratemore » upward with time. Analysis of the evolution of the peaks enables characterization of groundwater flow distribution more quickly, more cost effectively, and with higher resolution than ever before. Combining the unique interpretation software Bore II with advanced downhole instrumentation (the hydrophysical logging tool), the method quantifies inflow and outflow locations, their associated flow rates, and the basic water quality parameters of the associated formation waters (e.g., pH, oxidation-reduction potential, temperature). In addition, when applied in conjunction with downhole fluid sampling, Bore II makes possible a complete assessment of contaminant concentration within groundwater.« less

  18. BORE II

    SciTech Connect

    2015-08-01

    Bore II, co-developed by Berkeley Lab researchers Frank Hale, Chin-Fu Tsang, and Christine Doughty, provides vital information for solving water quality and supply problems and for improving remediation of contaminated sites. Termed "hydrophysical logging," this technology is based on the concept of measuring repeated depth profiles of fluid electric conductivity in a borehole that is pumping. As fluid enters the wellbore, its distinct electric conductivity causes peaks in the conductivity log that grow and migrate upward with time. Analysis of the evolution of the peaks enables characterization of groundwater flow distribution more quickly, more cost effectively, and with higher resolution than ever before. Combining the unique interpretation software Bore II with advanced downhole instrumentation (the hydrophysical logging tool), the method quantifies inflow and outflow locations, their associated flow rates, and the basic water quality parameters of the associated formation waters (e.g., pH, oxidation-reduction potential, temperature). In addition, when applied in conjunction with downhole fluid sampling, Bore II makes possible a complete assessment of contaminant concentration within groundwater.

  19. Protein kinase B and extracellular signal-regulated kinase contribute to the chondroprotective effect of morroniside on osteoarthritis chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Liang; Zeng, Guoqing; Liu, Zejun; Zhang, Bing; Cui, Xu; Zhao, Honghai; Zheng, Xinpeng; Song, Gang; Kang, Jian; Xia, Chun

    2015-01-01

    Despite extensive studies on the multifaceted roles of morroniside, the main active constituent of iridoid glycoside from Corni Fructus, the effect of morroniside on osteoarthritis (OA) chondrocytes remains poorly understood. Here, we investigated the influence of morroniside on cultured human OA chondrocytes and a rat experimental model of OA. The results showed that morroniside enhanced the cell viability and the levels of proliferating cell nuclear antigen expression (PCNA), type II collagen and aggrecan in human OA chondrocytes, indicating that morroniside promoted chondrocyte survival and matrix synthesis. Furthermore, different doses of morroniside activated protein kinase B (AKT) and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) in human OA chondrocytes, and in turn, triggered AKT/S6 and ERK/P70S6K/S6 pathway, respectively. The PI3K/AKT inhibitor LY294002 or the MEK/ERK inhibitor U0126 attenuated the effect of morroniside on human OA chondrocytes, indicating that the activation of AKT and ERK contributed to the regulation of morroniside in human OA chondrocytes. In addition, the intra-articular injection of morroniside elevated the level of proteoglycans in cartilage matrix and the thickness of articular cartilage in a rat experimental model of OA, with the increase of AKT and ERK activation. As a consequence, morroniside has chondroprotective effect on OA chondrocytes, and may have the therapeutic potential for OA treatment. PMID:25754021

  20. Proteomic and functional genomic landscape of receptor tyrosine kinase and ras to extracellular signal-regulated kinase signaling.

    PubMed

    Friedman, Adam A; Tucker, George; Singh, Rohit; Yan, Dong; Vinayagam, Arunachalam; Hu, Yanhui; Binari, Richard; Hong, Pengyu; Sun, Xiaoyun; Porto, Maura; Pacifico, Svetlana; Murali, Thilakam; Finley, Russell L; Asara, John M; Berger, Bonnie; Perrimon, Norbert

    2011-10-25

    Characterizing the extent and logic of signaling networks is essential to understanding specificity in such physiological and pathophysiological contexts as cell fate decisions and mechanisms of oncogenesis and resistance to chemotherapy. Cell-based RNA interference (RNAi) screens enable the inference of large numbers of genes that regulate signaling pathways, but these screens cannot provide network structure directly. We describe an integrated network around the canonical receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK)-Ras-extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) signaling pathway, generated by combining parallel genome-wide RNAi screens with protein-protein interaction (PPI) mapping by tandem affinity purification-mass spectrometry. We found that only a small fraction of the total number of PPI or RNAi screen hits was isolated under all conditions tested and that most of these represented the known canonical pathway components, suggesting that much of the core canonical ERK pathway is known. Because most of the newly identified regulators are likely cell type- and RTK-specific, our analysis provides a resource for understanding how output through this clinically relevant pathway is regulated in different contexts. We report in vivo roles for several of the previously unknown regulators, including CG10289 and PpV, the Drosophila orthologs of two components of the serine/threonine-protein phosphatase 6 complex; the Drosophila ortholog of TepIV, a glycophosphatidylinositol-linked protein mutated in human cancers; CG6453, a noncatalytic subunit of glucosidase II; and Rtf1, a histone methyltransferase.

  1. Methods to Purify and Assay Secretory Pathway Kinases.

    PubMed

    Tagliabracci, Vincent S; Wen, Jianzhong; Xiao, Junyu

    2016-01-01

    Members of the four-jointed and VLK families of secretory pathway kinases appear to be responsible for the phosphorylation of secreted proteins and proteoglycans. These enzymes have been implicated in many biological processes and mutations in several of these kinases cause human diseases. Here, we describe methods to purify and assay two members of the four-jointed family of secretory kinases: the Fam20C protein kinase and the Fam20B proteoglycan kinase. PMID:27632012

  2. Novel EGFR inhibitors attenuate cardiac hypertrophy induced by angiotensin II.

    PubMed

    Peng, Kesong; Tian, Xinqiao; Qian, Yuanyuan; Skibba, Melissa; Zou, Chunpeng; Liu, Zhiguo; Wang, Jingying; Xu, Zheng; Li, Xiaokun; Liang, Guang

    2016-03-01

    Cardiac hypertrophy is an important risk factor for heart failure. Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) has been found to play a role in the pathogenesis of various cardiovascular diseases. The aim of this current study was to examine the role of EGFR in angiotensin II (Ang II)-induced cardiac hypertrophy and identify the underlying molecular mechanisms. In this study, we observed that both Ang II and EGF could increase the phospohorylation of EGFR and protein kinase B (AKT)/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), and then induce cell hypertrophy in H9c2 cells. Both pharmacological inhibitors and genetic silencing significantly reduced Ang II-induced EGFR signalling pathway activation, hypertrophic marker overexpression, and cell hypertrophy. In addition, our results showed that Ang II-induced EGFR activation is mediated by c-Src phosphorylation. In vivo, Ang II treatment significantly led to cardiac remodelling including cardiac hypertrophy, disorganization and fibrosis, accompanied by the activation of EGFR signalling pathway in the heart tissues, while all these molecular and pathological alterations were attenuated by the oral administration with EGFR inhibitors. In conclusion, the c-Src-dependent EGFR activation may play an important role in Ang II-induced cardiac hypertrophy, and inhibition of EGFR by specific molecules may be an effective strategy for the treatment of Ang II-associated cardiac diseases. PMID:26762600

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